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DOCUMENTS 
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VOLUME VI 



Ohio General Statirstics 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Commencing July 1, 1919, and Ending 

June 30, 1920. 



Prepared and Published 

BT 

HARVEY C. SMITH 

Secretary of State 



Springfield, Ohio: 

Tlie Kelly-Springfield Printing Company. 

State Printers. 

1920. 

Bound at the State Bindery. 

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FOREWORD 

These statistics are published pursuant to an act passed by the 
Eighty-first General Assembly of Ohio, on the twenty-seventh day of 
May, 1915, and is as follows : 

• '::•::•. : :**.:-' 

* ' Sec. 260-1. For all state officers, departments, jconfidifillncms, boards 
and institutions of the state tJie fiscal year shall 'be -and is4«»byd^«i/- 
to begin on the first day of July of each year and.4^>'«J5nd.6ii'tlMr Iksfliuy' 
of June of the succeeding year. 

*'Sec. 2264-1. Each elective state officer, • • • and every 
private or quasi-public institution, association, board or corporation i:^ 
ceiving state money for its use and purpose, shall make annually, at the 
end of each fiscal year, in triplicate a report of the transactions and pro- 
ceedings of his office or department for such fiscal year excepting, how- 
ever, receipts and disbursements unless otherwise specifically required 
by law. Such report shall contain a summary of tiie official acts of such 
offieer, board or commission, institution, association or corporation, and 
such suggestions and recommendations as may be proper. On the first 
day of August of each year, one of said reports shall be filed with the 
Governor of the state, one with the Secretary of State, and one diall be 
kept on file in the ofiice of such officer, board, commission, institution, as- 
sociation or corporation. 

'*Sec. 2264-2. Wherever in the statutes of this state annual reports 
are required to be made to the Governor, or annual reports to the Gov- 
ernor are referred to, the words *to the Governor' shall be held to mean 
annual reports in triplicate as provided in section 2264-1 and the special 
information required by any such statutes to be included in such annual 
report to the Governor shall be included in such triplicate reports. 

''Sec. 173. The Secretary of State shall prepare from the reports 
filed with him or with the Governor of state, accurate statistical tables 
and practical and analytical information regarding the activities and 
proceedings of the several offices and departments of the state to be 
known as 'Ohio General Statistics.' 

"Sec. 173-1. The Secretary of State shall annually publish the 
'Ohio General Statistics,' the number of copies thereof to be determined 
by the commissioners of public printing. The first issue of 'The Ohio 
General Statistics' shall be for the period from November 15, 1914, to 
and including June 30, 1915." 

The act providing for the "Ohio General Statistics" is an economic 
measure. The purpose of having a complete and comprehensive star 
tistical history of the state in condensed form, covering every activity 
and industry of the state is apparent. Prior to 1915, each department, 
board, commission, institution, etc., issued a voluminous annual report 
in large quantities and at great expense. For many of these reports in 
the form in which they were compiled there was little demand, resulting 
in thousands of such being left on hand and worthless. To correct this 
condition the General Assembly charged me under this law, with the 
duty of compiling and publishing from reports filed with me or with the 

(3) Digitized by ^OOQ IC 

664306 



4 OHIO GENEBAIi STATISTICS. 

Governor, accurate statistical tables and practical analytical information 
regarding the activities and proceedings of the several offices and depart- 
ments of the state Many of the reports contain no summary as required 
'35y the Iftw.- SoiKe reports omit important and valuable information in 
fh6 field (Si aetivtt}^ they cover, which, if incorporated, would be of great 
vdlue.to tli^ J>eOpJe, l^oth inside and outside the state. Attention is called 
to these facts so thaf the same may be corrected in future reports and 
that succeeding publications of these statistics may be more comprehen- 
sive, accurate and complete, and thus more completely fulfill the intent 
and purpose of the law. 

I, therefore, earnestly urge that all officers, departments, boards and 
commissions, whose duty it is to prepare and file reports for the purpose 
herein provided, completely cover the field of their official acts and the 
industrial activities in summary form so that accurate statistical tables 
and complete analytical information may be obtained for the **Ohio 
General Statistics.'' To this end the hearty co-operation of every state 
officer, board, commission and association falling within the purview of 
this law is solicited. 

Harvey C. Smith, 

Secretary of State, 



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Report of the 
SECRETARY OF STATE 



The Department of State, for the year endings June 30,..198(>,-.l^ 
filed and recorded 5,582 articles of incorporation of domestic CcKlrpbria- 
tions, and 10,478 miscellaneous certificates relating to domestic corpora- 
tions. 

In classification and number they are as follows : 

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION. 

Banks — Commercial and Savings and Trust Companies 40 

Building and Loan Associations 39 

Cemetery Associations 8 

Churches and Church Societies 110 

Co-operative Companies 4 

Electric Light and Power Companies 33 

Gas and Oil Companies 222 

Insurance Companies and Associations 6 

Manufacturing Companies 1,654 

Mining. Companies 84 

Printing and Publishing Companies i 11 

Railroad Companies 2 

Societies — Benevolent, Social and Mutual 435 

Street and Electric Railroads 3 

Telephone and Telegraph Companies 7 

Real Estate Companies 836 

Companies — ^Various Purposes 2,022 

Total 5,582 

Total 1919- 3,374 

MISCELLANEOUS CERTIFICATES. 

Increase of Capital Stock 2,034 

Reductions of Capital Stock 185 

Certificates of Subscription 4,165 

Railway Equpiment Contracts 193 

Municipal Corporations 19 

Amendments, etc 830 

Certificates of Change of Name 464 

Certificates of Change of Location 51 

Dissolution of Domestic Corporations 1,042 

Cancellations on Order Tax Commission 1,400 

Reinstatements 95 

Total 10,478 

Total 1919 6,882 



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6 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

DOMESTIC CORPORATIONS— CAPITAL STOCK. 

The authorized capital stock of domestic corporations incorporated 

.-^uring i)ifyfiST ending June 30, 1920, was as follows; 

••• . V :;.••: J 

^£^k%-^Cpmmercial and Savings and Trust Companies $3^1,000 

••i^Juig^Sijid JhPjVi] i^ssociations 15,900,000 

Co-operative* T2om^aflies 90,000 

Electric Light and Power Companies 1,116,500 

Gas and Oil Companies 24,271,500 

Insurance Companies and Associations 451,000 

Manufacturing Companies 340,595,595 

Mining Companies 9,732,500 

Printing and Publishing Companies 3,495,750 

Railroad Companies 535,000 

Real Estate Companies _ 53,298^75 

Street and Electric Railroads 410,100 

Telephone and Telegraph Companies 330,000 

Miscellaneous Companies (not included above) 127,430,793 

Total $580,928,513 

Total 1919 - _.„- 219,273,600 

DOMESTIC CORPORATIONS— INCREASE OF CAPITAL 

STOCK. 

The authorized increase of capital stock of domestic corporations 
during the year ending June 30, 1920, was as follows: 

Banks — Commercial and Savings and Trust Companies $4,985,000 

Building and Loan Associations 99,661,000 

Electric Light and Power Companies 7,338,000 

Gas and Oil Companies 131,709,000 

Manufacturing Companies ; 719^39,560 

Mining Companies 9,785,000 

Printing and Publishing Companies 2,490,000 

Insurance Companies 240,000 

Telephone and Telegraph Companies 950,000 

Miscellaneous Companies (not included above) 36,565,450 

Merchandise Companies 100,000 

Real Estate Companies 142,221,325 

Total $1,155784,335 

Total 1919 254,039,200 

DOMESTIC CORPORATIONS— REDUCTION OP CAPITAL 

STOCK. 

The authorized reduction of capital stock of domestic corporations 
during the year ending June 30, 1920, was as follows : 

Building and Loan Associations $400,000 

Gas and Oil Companies 864,100 

Manufacturing Companies rT,g!rrze^ly^^&&^^ 



SECBBTART OF STATE. 7 

Mining Companies 75,750 

Printing and Publishing Companies 387,800 

Real Estate Companies 4,499,427 

Miscellaneous Companies (not included above) 9,786^50 

Total $45,902,537 

Total 1919- 28,147,195 

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS. 

The Department of State, during the year ending June 30, 1920, has 
filed the statements of, and has issued the certificates to do business in the 
state to 419 foreign corporations, and has filed 726 miscellaneous certifi- 
cates relating to foreign corporations. In detail they are as follows : 

Statements under Section 178, General Code 419 

Statements under Section 183, General Code 367 

Statements under Section 185, General Code 34 

Amendments of Articles of Incorporation 18 

Certificates of Appointment of Agents upon whom process may be served 115 

Reduction of Capital Stock 5 

Certificates of Retirement from Business in Ohio 74 

Reinstatements , 95 

Miscellaneous 18 

Total 1,145 

Total 1919- - 643 

THE RECEIPTS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

The receipts of the Department of State for the year ending June 30, 
1919, amounted to the sum of $3,078,254.97, and were derived from cor- 
poration initial fees, automohile license fees, and various miscellaneous 
sources: 

The receipts are shown more in detail hy the following : 

Domestic Corporations $2,326,645 21 

Foreign Corporations 150,859 62 

Official Commissions 4,316 00 

Transcripts 4,685 92 

Miscellaneous 12,656 73 

Sale of Opinions of Attorney-General 978 00 

Total main office 2,500,141 48 

Division of Automobiles 5,056,037 18 

Bureau of Vital Statistics 479 50 

Grand total $7,556,658 16 

Grand total 1919 - $3,078,251 97 

EXPENSES OP THE DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of the Department of State for the year ending June 
30, 1920, were as follows : Digitized by ^OOglc 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

MAIN OFFICE. 

Personal Service $30,758 54 

Maintenance 6^1 98 

Total $36,980 52 

BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

Personal Service $23,745 64 

Maintenance , 4,778 07 

. Total $28,523 71 

AUTOMOBILE DEPARTMENT. 

Personal Service 37,813 13 

Maintenance, including license tags 129,350 89 

Total .. $167,164 02 

STATE PURCHASING DEPARTMENT. 

Personal Service . $8,642 68 

Maintenance 3,815 87 

Total $12,458 55 

PRINTING AND DISTRIBUTION. 

Publishing and distributing publicity pamphlet authorized by Section 

10, Article II of the Constitution of Ohio _- $19,661 90 

Advertising constitutional amendment, newspapers, 1919 $3,849 82 

STATISTICAL REPORT. 

The statistics following are reported upon blank forms prepared and 
furnished to the Department of State, by the county officers of the vari- 
ous counties, as required by law. These returns, with few exceptions, 
are complete in detail, carefully compiled by these oflScers from the 
official records of the county and then arranged and tabulated in a com- 
prehensive manner in this department. Coming as they do from officers 
charged with a duty imposed by law, and in many instances the officer 
compiling the same being allowed a liberal compensation for the labor 
performed, this department believes them to be accurate and entitled to 
full credit. Only the summaries of these returns as arranged and tabu- 
lated, are given. The statistics in detail will be found in the Annual 
Report of the Secretary of State for the year 1920. 

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SECRETARY OP STATE. 9 

CONVEYANCE STATISTICS. 
{For year ending June 30, 1920.) 

The. conveyance statistics are compiled and reported by the county 
recorders of the several counties of the state and include deeds, leases 
and mortgages. 

DEEDS. 

Deeds numbering 23,433 were recorded iu the several counties of 
the state during the year, conveying 1,221,153 acres of agricultural land, 
outside of the corporate limits of municipalities, with a total considera- 
tion of $107^17,358, and an average price of $95.00 per acre. 

Deeds numbering 770 were recorded, conveying 2,376 acres of land 
within the corporate limits of municipalities, with a total consideration 
of $1,792,745. 

Deeds numbering 55,082 were recorded, conveying city and village 
lots, with a total consideration of $109,918,347. 

Deeds numbering 1,864 were recorded, conveying mineral, oil or 
other lands with a total consideration of $1,427,829. 

Deeds with a consideration of $1.00 each were recorded, numbering 
229,427, conveying 931,201 acres. 

The total number of deeds recorded during the year was 319,315, 
conveying 2,231,014 acres, with a total consideration of $221,285,706. 

LEASES. 

Leases of agricultural lands outside of municipal corporate limits 
were recorded during the year, numbering 2,266, with the total con- 
sideration of $1,121,246 ; on lands within the corporate limits, 108, with 
the total consideration of $2,908,405 ; on city and village lots, 7,197, with 
total consideration of $108,808,990; on mineral, oil and other lands, 
$7,725, with a total consideration of $252,553. 

Total number of leases recorded, 17,296, conveying 636,024 acres, 
with a total amount of consideration of $113,091,194. 

MORTGAGES. 

{Other tJum railroad.) 

Mortgages on agricultural lands were recorded, numbering 30,758, 
with a total amount secured of $155,667,466 ; on lands within the corpo- 
rate limits of municipalities, 1,125, with a total amount secured of 
$2,600,534; on city and village lots, 177,632, with total amount secured t 

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10 OHIO GENEBAL STATISTICS. 

of $570,584,442 ; on mineral, oil and other lands, 882, with a total amount 
secured of $27,147,815. 

Total number of mortgages recorded, 210,397, conveying 1,888,012 
acres, securing the total sum of $756,000,257. 

CANCELLATION OP MORTGAGES. 

(Other th(m railroad.) 

Mortgages -on agricultural lands were cancelled during the year, 
numbering 28,001, securing $68,969,077 ; on lands within corporate limits 
of municipalities, 535, securing $1,055,158; on city and village lots, 
138,233, securing $274,264,849; on mineral, oil and other lands, 1,068, 
securing $8,176,150. 

Total number of mortgages cancelled, 167,837, conveying 1,480,972 
acres, securing the total sum of $352,465,234. 

SOCIAL STATISTICS. 
{For the year ending March 31, 1920.) 

The social statistics are compiled and reported by the probate judges 
of the several counties of the state. 

For details of these statistics reference is made to the annual report 
of the Secretary of State. 

MABEIAQES. 

Marriage licenses were issued to white persons during the year, num- 
bering 57,084 ; to colored persons, 2,773. Marriage contracts were entered 
into during the year by the publication of bans, numbering 2,969. 

Total number of marriages for the year, white and colored, by license 
and by bans, 62,826. 

LETTERS OF GUARDIANSHIP. 

Letters of guardianship, numbering 6,248, were issued during the 
year, including 8,327 children, 13 drunkards, 693 insane and 702 idiots 
and imbeciles. 

LETTERS OP ADMINISTRATION. 

Wills probated during the year numbered 9,920, letters testamentary 
issued, 7,777, letters of administration issued, 15,310, and estates admin- 
istered upon, 24,311. 

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SECRETARY OP STATE. 11 

STATE HOSPITALS. 

Persons sent to the various hospitals of the state for insane and for 
epileptics from the several counties, during the year, )vere as follows: 
White, 3,424; colored, 138; total, 3,562. 

boys' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

From the several counties of the state 523 boys were sent to the In- 
dustrial School at Lancaster. 

girls' industrial home. 

From the several counties 233 girls were sent to the Industrial Home 
at Delaware. 

JUDICIAL STATISTICS. 

{For year endinig June 30, 1920.) 

These statistics are reported by clerks of courts of common pleas of 
the various counties of the state and by probate judges in counties where 
by law jurisdiction in divorce and crimes and offenses is conferred upon 
probate courts. 

divorce statistics. 

The statistics relative to divorce, as reported by clerks of courts and 
probate judges, are as follows : 

A total of 1,839 suits were pending and brought for tlie year, alleg- 
ing adultery as the statutory ground for divorce ; 963 were brought by 
the husband and 875 were brought by the wife; 310 were granted to the 
husband and 354 to the wife ; 235 were refused to the husband and 166 
to the wife. 

A total of 16,901 suits were pending and brought for the year, alleg- 
ing absence and neglect as the statutory ground ; 6,702 were brought by 
the husband and 10,190 were brought by the wife ; 2,868 were granted to 
the husband and 5,625 to the wife ; 997 were refused to the husband and 
1,138 to the wife. 

A total of 8,059 suits were pending and brought, alleging cruelty 
as the statutory ground; 1,932 were brought by the husband and 6,127 
by the wife ; 502 were granted to the husband and 2,314 to the wife ; 397 
were refused to the husband and 1,698 to the wife. 

A total of 185 suits were pending and brought, alleging fraud as the 
statutory ground ; 84 brought by the husband, and 101 by the wife ; 26 
were granted to the husband and 49 to the wife ; 16 were refused to the 
husband and 12 to the wife, t 

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12 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

A total of 707 suits were pending and brought, alleging drunken- 
ness as the statutory ground ; 57 wete brought by the husband and 650 
by the wife ; 17 were granted to the husband and 314 to the wife ; 30 were 
refused to the husband and 142 to the wife. 

A total of 867 suits were pending and brought, alleging miscellaneous 
causes as the ground ; 322 were brought by the husband and 545 by the 
wife ; 92 were granted to the husband and 211 to the wife ; 82 were re- 
fused to the husband and 82 to the wife. 

The total number of suits pending and brought for all causes for 
the year was 28,558, of which number 12,881 were granted, 4,985 were 
refused and 10,692 are still pending. 

PROSECUTIONS FOR CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON. 

For crimes against the person the grand juries of the state returned 
4,788 indictments, including 6,249 persons, and of which number 1,181 
were convicted and sentenced. In this report details of various crimes 
of this character cannot be given, hence only the summaries of convictions 
are included. Convictions for murder in first degree, 176 ; murder in sec- 
ond degree, 149 ; manslaughter, 120 ; assault with intent to kill, 1,117 ; as- 
sault with w ith intent to commit robbery, 126 ; assault and battery, 408 ; 
blackmail, 19 ; pointing firearms, 33 ; rape, 393 ; robbery, 793 ; all other 
crimes against the person, 1,441. 

PROSECUTIONS FOR CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY. 

For crimes against property there was returned a total of 6,885 in- 
dictments, including 8,051 persons, and of which number 2,059 were con- 
victed and sentenced. Convicted for arson, 55; burglary, 1,440; embez- 
zlement, 445 ; forgery, 736 ; forging brand, stamp, etc., 30 ; grand larceny, 
1,712 ; petit larceny, 310 ; horse stealing, 62 ; making fraudulent transfers, 
13; malicious destruction of property, 67; obtaining property by false 
pretense, 292 ; receiving stolen property, 369 ; obstructing railroad tracks, 
7 ; all other crimes against property, 1,370. 

PROSECUTIONS FOR OFFENSES AG^UNST PUBLIC PEACE, ETC. 

For offenses against public peace, public health, public justice, public 
policy, public chastity and morality and all other offenses of whatsoever 
nature, 3,680 indictments were returned, including 3,970 persons, of 
which number 953 were convicted and sentenced. Convicted for offenses 
against public peace, 1,377 ; public health, 18 ; public justice, 339 ; public 
policy, 1,081 ; public chastity and morality, 313 ; all other offenses, ^S^ojp 

igi ize y g 



SECRETABY OF STATE. 13 

PINES, COSTS AND FORFEITED RECOGNIZANCES IN COMMON PLEAS COURTS. 

Fines assessed in common pleas courts for the year were $97,937. 
Amount collected, 47,252. Amount probably collectible, $1,693. 

Costs taxed in common pleas courts for the year were $145,543. 
Amount taxed against defendants, $91,526. Amount collected from de- 
fendants, $32,742. 

Forfeited recognizances for the year were $132,125; $19,492 were 
collected ; $2,195 probably collectible. 

GRAND AND PETIT JURY FEES. 

The total amount of fees paid grand jurors in the state for the year 
was $48,945. 

Amount paid petit jurors in civil cases, $292,185 j in criminal cases. 
$53,923. Total amount of fees pai'd all jurors for the year, $395,053. 

CIVIL JUDGMENTS. 

A total of 32,842 civil judgments were rendered. For money only 
11,519, and 6,073 in which money was included. Total amount adjudged 
due, $14,719,667. Average amount of each judgment for money only and 
in which money is included, 1,181. Total number of final decrees ren- 
dered, $23,731. 

NATURALIZATION. 

The number and nativity of persons naturalized in this state during 
the year was as follows: Austria, 884; British American and Canada, 
184; Denmark, 16; England, 356; France, 19; (Jermany, 174; Holland 
and Belgium, 32; Ireland, 108; Italy, 641; Kussia, 406; Scotland, 98; 
Sweden and Norway, 90 ; Switzerland, 39 ; Turkey, 67 ; Wales, 30 ; other 
countries, 218. Total number of all persons naturalized, 3,282. 

CONVICTIONS FOR LOWER GRADE OF CRIME THAN CHARGED IN INDICTMENT. 

In the trial of persons in the courts of common pleas of the state 
upon indictments returned by grand juries charging crimes and offenses, 
512 persons were convicted of a lower grade of crime or oflfense than 
charged in the indictments so returned. 

INQUEST BY COROJTERS AND JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

The number of inquests in the state for the year held by coroners 
and justices of the peace was 3,449 ; native bom, 2,046 : foreim IwiilM? • 



14 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

nativity unknown, 492. Further classification as follows: Homicide, 
240; suicides, 353; accident, 1,288; cause of death unknown or natural, 
1,568; white, 3,171; colored, 249; males, 2,517; females, 903. 

CASES BEFORE COMMON PLEAS COURTS. 

The common pleas courts of the state had a total number of 87,019 
cases, pending and brought within the year, before them. Of this number 
48,142 cases were finally disposed of by these courts, 1,390 were taken to 
the courts of appeals and 37,487 are still pending in said courts, 

CASES BEFORE COURTS OF APPEALS. 

The courts of appeals of the state had a total number of 2,859 cases, 
pending and brought within the year, before them. Of this number 
1,658 were finally disposed of, 114 were taken to the supreme court and 
1,087 cases are still pending in said courts. 

ELECTION STATISTICS. 

The 88 counties of the state, comprising 1,373 townships, 80 cities 
and 765 villages, are divided in 5,882 voting precincts by the deputy 
state supervisors and deputy state supervisors and inspectors of elections. 
The Constitution and General Code of Ohio provide for the election of 
all state, district and county officers, at elections held in the even-num- 
bered years, and all township and municipal officers in the odd-numbered 
years. 

The tables following will show the vote for candidates for President, 
Governor, Secretary of State, Auditor of State and comparative vote 
for candidates for President November 7, 1916, and Governor, at the 
general elections held November 5, 1918. For further detail of the vote 
cast for other candidates at said election and for the votes cast for all 
candidates at the primary elections in said year, reference is hereby 
made to the Annual Report of the Secretary of State for the year 1920. 



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SECRETARY OF STATE. 



15 



VOTES CAST BY COUNTIES FOR ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE-PRESIDENT AT THE ELECTION HELD NOVEMBER 7, 1916 
(FIRST ELECTOR). 





Candidates for President. 


Pluralities. 




Bep. 


Dem. 


Soc. 


Pro. 


Bep. 


Dem. 


Counties. 


n 

1 
1 


^ 


5 


1 


1 

s 


1 
1 

1 


Adams 


2,819 
5.713 
2,534 
6,608 
5,554 
2,763 
7,526 
2,227 
5,850 
2,086 
3,695 
8,715 
3,549 
3,520 
8,118 
2,831 
2,673 

51,287 
4,322 
2,565 
3,461 
4,170 
3,380 
2,772 

24,107 
2,933 
2,860 
1.806 
4,458 
4,228 

64,030 
4,268 
4,119 
2,517 
2,482 
3,727 
2,357 
955 
4,048 
3,116 
6,658 
3,646 
2,887 
4,363 
5.935 
4,345 
6,868 

16,711 
2.809 

11,256 
4,264 
2.754 
3,184 
2,065 
5,772 
1,504 

19.683 
2,136 
2,062 
7,597 
2,290 


2,887 
7,905 
4,000 
5,306 
4,101 
4.124 
7,911 
3,959 

10,806 
1,672 
3,338 
8,848 
4,247 
2,602 
7,788 
4,269 
6,014 

71.533 
6.186 
3.359 
3,754 
5,152 
6,172 
2,616 

34.103 
2.507 
2,277 
1,345 
2,913 
4,312 

51,990 
5,416 
4.304 
1,911 
3,252 
3,964 
2,907 
2.846 
4,136 
2,922 
5,250 
4,578 
2.696 
2,821 
8,183 
3,483 
7,658 

30,779 
2,667 

13.013 
5.273 
2.984 
2,628 
3,803 
5,582 
3,322 

24,339 
1.833 
2.345 
6,328 
2,175 


107 
411 

97 

569 

338 

246 

1,387 

45 
1,625 

61 

70 
538 
106 

52 
999 
284 
215 
5.662 
115 

97 

49 
317 
111 

67 
1,172 

69 

67 

43 
209 
776 
3,739 
211 
113 

50 

91 

60 
134 

43 
189 
127 
500 

96 
106 
165 
268 

45 

464 

3,000 

16 
741 
264 
111 
189 

55 
433 

51 

2,618 

105 

39 
376 

32 


34 

111 
48 

143 
73 
42 

222 
11 

111 
66 
30 

192 
27 
47 

421 

159 
68 

418 

242 
34 

104 
32 
81 
31 

345 
28 
24 
24 

115 

130 

310 
81 
31 
36 
38 
45 
27 
21 
57 
38 

109 
63 
29 
33 

114 
56 
52 

136 
24 

215 
49 
36 
30 

184 
86 
36 

235 
67 

.95 

201 
53 




68 


Allen 




2,192 


Ashland 




1,466 


Ashtabula 


1.302 
1,453 




Athens 




Auglaize 


1,361 


Belmont 




385 


Brown 




1,732 


Butler 


' 414' 

357 


4,956 


Carroll 




Champaign 




Clark 


133 


Clermont 




698 


Clinton 


918 
330 




Columbiana »»-,..... 




Coshocton 


1,438 


Crawford 




3,341 


CuyahOffa 




20,246 


Darke 




1,864 


Defiance 




794 


Delaware 




293 


Brie 




982 


Fairfield 




2.792 


Fayette 


156 


Franklin 


9.996 


Fulton 


426 

583 

461 

1.545 


Gallia 




CTeauga 




Greene 




Guernsey ¥ 


84 


Hamilton 


12,040 




Hancock 


1,148 
185 


Hardin 




Harrison 


606 


Henry 


770 


Highland 




237 


Hocking 




550 


Holmes 




1,891 
88 


Huron 




Jacltson 


194 
1.408 




Jefferson 




Knox 


932 


Lake 


291 
1,542 




Lawrence 




Licking 


2,248 


Logan 


862 


Lorain 


790 


Lucas 


* * 


14,063 


Madison 


142 


Mahoning 


1,757 

1,009 

230 


Marion 




Medina 




Meigs 


556 




Mercer 


1.738 


Miami 


190 


Monroe 


1,818 
4.656 


Montgomery 




Morgan 


303 


Morrow 


283 


Mnxklng^m 1 1 ^ 


1,269 
115 


Noble 





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16 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



VOTES CAST BY COUNTIES FOR ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE-PRESIDENT AT THE ELECTION HELD NOVEMBER 7, 1916 
(FIRST ELECTOR)— Concluded. 





Candidates for President. 


Pluralities. 




Rep. 


Dem. 


Soc. 


Pro. 


Bep. 


Dem. 


Counties. 


8 


1 


d 

Hi 

1 

< 


1 


1 

S 


1 


Ottawa 


1,793 
2,647 
3,953 
2,629 
1,616 
3.142 
2.881 
2,243 
4,886 
4,857 
3.557 
6,356 
4.301 
2,352 
14,159 
11,598 
6,167 
5,404 
3.182 
3,802 
1.420 
3,610 
4,745 
3,676 
3.132 
5,034 
2,078 


3,347 
2,313 
3.860 
3,820 
2,091 
4,269 
8,387 
4,294 
6.985 
5,154 
5.264 
4,808 
6.451 
3,801 
15.316 
19,343 
6,091 
7,608 
2,747 
3,753 
1,433 
2.937 
5.267 
5,930 
3.552 
5,796 
3,250 


46 

85 

381 

21 

29 

215 

59 

53 

343 

109 

132 

521 

320 

110 

1,506 

1.260 

684 

806 

47 

131 

53 

60 

335 

135 

131 

202 

33 


8 

23 

67 

42 

17 

57 

53 

38 

69 

50 

84 

124 

89 

38 

322 

343 

138 

54 

31 

43 

7 

35 

97 

106 

58 

76 

11 




1,554 


Pauldlne 


334 
93 




Perry •• 




Pickaway 


1,191 


Pike 




475 


Portage .. ». 




1,127 


Preble 




506 


Putnam . . 




2,051 


Richland 




2,099 


Hoss 




297 


R»nHii«lrv 




1,707 


Scioto 


1,548 




Seneca 


2,150 


Shelby 




1,449 


Stark 




1,157 


Summit 




7,750 


Trumbull 


76 




Tuscarawas 


2,204 


Union 


435 
49 




Van Wert 




Vinton 


13 


Warren 


673 




Washlntrton 


522 


Wayne 




2.254 
420 


Williams 




Wood 




762 


Wyandot 




1,172 






Total 


514.753 


604,161 
89,408 


38,092 


8,080 


30,671 


120,079 


I'lurality 







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SECRETARY OP STATE. 



17 



VOTES CAST BY COUNTIES FOR CANDIDATES FOR GOVERNOR, 
TOTAL VOTE CAST FOR GOVERNOR AND TOTAL VOTE CAST IN 
THE STATE, AT THE ELECTION HELD NOVEMBER 5, 1918. 





Governor. 


Total 
Cast for 
Governor. 


Pluralities. 






Dem. 


Rep. 


Dem. 


Rep. 




Counties.^ 




1 


t-4 


.2? 

i 


Total 
Cast in 
State. 


Adams.- 


2.309 
5.613 
3.160 
3,765 
3,525 
2,902 
7,134 
3,067 
9,045 
1.153 
2.513 
6.707 
3.522 
2.053 
6.146 
3.273 
4.289 

62.036 
4.414 
2.601 
2.611 
4.253 
4.420 
1.949 

25.664 
1.562 
1,514 
939 
2,133 
3.761 

56.618 
3.826 
3.165 
1.187 
2.356 
3.044 
2.403 
2.015 
2.871 
2.344 
4.647 
3.458 
1.722 
1.903 
6.236 
2.560 
5.806 

24,360 
2.091 
9,621 
3.596 
2.149 
2.073 
2,813 
4,120 
2.247 

20.782 
1.432 
1.574 
5.641 
1.614 
2.231 
1.712 


2.760 
5.058 
2.557 
6.611 
4.896 
2,734 
6.980 
1.868 
5.606 
2.150 
3.309 
7.813 
3.082 
3.074 
7.393 
3.118 
3.552 

45.705 
4.812 
2.779 
3.666 
3.839 
3.715 
2.666 

21.361 
2.993 
2.587 
1.584 
3.988 
3.970 

40.048 
4.604 
4.084 
2.624 
2.712 
3,480 
2,140 
1,149 
4.389 
2.687 
5,679 
3.657 
2,761 
3,247 
6.312 
4,128 
6,882 

16.538 
2.635 

10.754 
4.264 
3.212 
2.883 
2.377 
6.846 
1.417 

18.261 
2,078 
2.347 
6.276 
2.160 
1,90 
2,498 


5,069 
10,671 
5,707 
10.376 
8,421 
5,636 

14,114 
4,935 

14,770 
3.303 
5,822 

14,520 
6,604 
5.127 

18,539 
6.391 
7.841 
107.741 
9.228 
5.380 
6.277 
8.092 
8,135 
4.615 

47,025 
4,555 
4.101 
2,523 
6.121 
7.731 

96,666 
8.430 
7,249 
3.811 
5,068 
6,524 
4.543 
3,164 
7,260 
5,031 

10,326 
7.115 
4.483 
5.150 

11.548 
6.688 

12.688 

40.998 
4.726 

20.375 
7.860 
5.361 
4,956 
5.190 
9,966 
3.664 

39.043 
3.510 
3.921 

11,917 
3,774 
4.131 
4.210 


655 
693 


.f[ 

2"846 
1,371 

997 

796 

1.106 

1.021 
1,247 


5,140 


AllMl 


11,053 


AshlAn<1.._ 


5.863 


Ashtabula. 


10,861 


Athens . _,. ,. 


168 

154 

1,199 

3,439 


8.656 


Auglaize ' 


5.908 


Belmont. ... ._ 


14,712 


Brown. . . ._ .. 


5,141 


Butler. 


15,777 


CarmlL . __ 


3.406 


Champaiim _.. 


440 

155 

737 

16,331 


6,912 


CUrv'^^^ 


15,173 


Clermont 


6.806 


Clinton.... ... 


5.262 


Columbiana 


14.194 


Coshocton.- .. ... 


6.553 


Crawford 


398 

178 

1.055 

717 

1.431 
1,043 

645 
1.856 

209 

778 
919 
1,437 
356 
436 

1,618 
343 

1.032 
199 

1,039 

1.344 

1,568 
1,076 

644 
1.133 

668 
1.063 

810 


7.841 


Cuyahc^a. . 


114.306 


Darke ».. 


9.552 


Defiance 


in 

705 
4;303 


6.555 


Delaware . " 

Erie.. 


6,376 
8,329 


Fairfield .. 


8.331 


'R^y(^J^t 


4.723 


PmnWiT^ 


48,287 


Fulton_— . . _ 


4.662 


Gallia ^ .. _ ,.. _ 


4.228 


Geauga. 


2.596 


Greene . . 


16,570 


6.088 


Guernsey™.. .. . 

Hamilton.. .... ... 


8.097 
100.099 


Hancock. ..—„. ...._ ^, 


8.585 


Hardin 




7.349 


Harrison 


263 
866 


3.942 


Henrv. .. 


5.213 


Highland. ... .. 


6.678 


Hocking ... . 


4,662 


HolmesT . 


3.309 


Huron. .., ,...,. ,.,,,.., 


7.407 


Jackson..^- 


6J43 


Jefferson.^ ,„ 


924 


10,681 


ICnox 


7.265 


Lake...... ^ "" 


4,638 


Lawrence-. «. 


6.485 




11,852 


LoganZ _ .. ... 


6.838 


Lorain ., , 


13.068 


Lucas_.- . . . 


7,722 


43.309 


Madison 


4.793 


Mahoning- ... .. ^ 


21.481 


Marion , -,,.^ 


8.043 


Medina _ 


5,607 


Meigs.. 


436 

830 
2.521 


4.9£6 


Mercer.. ._ , - . 


5.190 


Miami 


1,726 

646 
773 
635 
546 

786 


10,467 


Monroe.— ^ 


3.886 


Montgomery. .. 


41,906 


Morgan ........._ . 


3.617 


Mf»rrnw,, _ , 


331 


4.028 


Muskingum^.. _^ . 


12,313 


Noble 


3.847 


Ottawa 


4.311 


Paulding. ... 


4,264 



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18 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



VOTES CAST BY COUNTIES FOR CANDIDATES FOR GOVERNOR, 
TOTAL VOTE CAST FOR GOVERNOR AND TOTAL VOTE CAST IN 
THE STATE. AT THE ELECTION HELD NOVEMBERS. 1918-^Concluded. 





Governor. 


Total 
Cast for 
Governor. 


Pluralities. 






Dem. 


Rep. 


Dem. 


Rep. 




Counties. 




1 




•3 

n 

1 


Total 
Cast in 
SUte. 


Perry 

Pickaway^ 

Portage .>... .~ .— ~ ~ ^ 


3.416 
2.861 
1.659 
3.369 
2.523 
2.932 
5.154 
3.820 
3.733 
4.850 
4.807 
3,129 
11.519 
15.195 
4.473 
5.736 
1.962 
2.856 
1.143 
2.425 
3.753 
4.174 
2.531 
2.699 
2.624 
- 


3.879 
2.644 
1.350 
3.442 
3.141 
2.613 
5.441 
4.432 
4.039 
6,156 
4.297 
2.705 
13.883 
12.604 
6.468 
5.737 
3,118 
8,640 
1.291 
3.084 
4.949 
4.331 
3.440 
5.385 
2.132 


7.296 
6.506 
3.009 
6.811 
5.664 
5.545 
10,598 
8.252 
7.772 
10.006 
9.104 
5.834 
25.402 
27.799 
10.941 
11.473 
5.080 
6.496 
2,434 
5.609 
8.522 
8.505 
5.971 
9.084 
4.756 


217 
309 


463 

73 
618 

290 
612 
306 
306 


2.364 

1 

1,166 

784 

148 

659 

1.376 

157 

909 

1.686 


7.493 
5.629 
3.079 
7,007 


Preble 


5,854 


Putnam. 

Richland. - 

R06g .- .. 


319 


6,555 
10.954 
8.426 


Sandusky ^ ~ ~.... ~.. 




7,992 


Scioto . 


610 
424 

2.591 


10.363 


Spnivn 


9.440 


Shelby. 

Stark „.^ .. ... _ 

Summit „.. ... 


5.836 
26.550 
29.097 


TrumbtilL . .. - 


11.263 


TtiMarawas . 




11.984 


Union - „ 

V^n Wert 


I.,--..- 


5.166 
6.02ft 


Vinton.-,.. .~ 


2.611 


Warren 




6.682 


Washington....... ~.. ~ 




8.787 


Wi^ynA .._ , 




8,781 


Williams... . 


5,976 


Wood. 

Wyandot. 


492 


9.361 
4.899 








Total .'. _ 

Plurality 


486.403 
11.944 


474.459 


960.862 


64.518 


62,674 


997,930 



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SECRETARY OF STATE. 



19 



VOTES CAST BY COUNTIES FOR CANDIDATES FOR SECRETARY 
STATE. AT THE ELECTION HELD NOVEMBER 5, 1918. 



OF 





Secretary of State. 


Pluralities. 




Dem. 


Rep. 


Dem. 


Rep. 


Counties, 


i 
1 

a 

1 


1 


1 


O 

6 

1 


Aflftmx , , , ., 


2.292 
5.242 
3.106 
3.270 
2.844 
2.716 
6.231 
2.906 
8.391 
1.077 
2.306 
5.937 
8.292 
1.720 
6,070 
3.145 
4.348 

52.663 
4.596 
2.561 
2:576 
3.576 
4.385 
1.734 

23.301 
1.483 
1.344 
764 
1.846 
3.042 

42.434 
3.911 
3.167 
1.280 
2.239 
2.991 
2.195 
2.015 
2.721 
1.992 
3.566 
3.366 
1.521 
1.399 
6.000 
2.319 
5.082 

21.020 
1.921 
7.792 
3.593 
1.992 
1.682 
2.715 
3.926 
2.191 

18.777 
1.323 
1.678 
4.310 
1.552 
2.119 

\^ 


2.634 
4.713 
2.292 
6.288 
4,892 




842 


All#«i 


529 
814 








A&htabula. 


3.018 
2.048 


AthMMl._.,.. ._ , ,, 


Auglftici^ . ... _ 


2.476 1 240 






6.756 
1.680 
5.292 
2.087 
3.251 
7.609 
3.070 
3.156 
7.200 
2.914 
2.851 

45.253 
4.220 
2.455 
3.455 
3.941 
3.320 
2.597 

21.685 
2.808 
2.464 
1.529 
3.817 
4.180 

51.938 
4.259 
3.883 
2.272 
2.499 
3.316 
2.082 
911 
4.167 
2.717 
5.708 
8.484 
2.680 
3,042 
5.079 
3.994 
6.673 

17.224 
2.628 

10.374 
3.938 
3.054 
2.725 
1.952 
6.387 
1.234 

18.404 
2.007 
2.092 
7.327 
2.088 
1.715 
2.407 
3.790 


1,226 
3.099 


525 


Brown,. 




BtitW 




CWTOII »_ 


960 


Ch*Tniv»*PTi .,,>.,! 


945 


riarlr^*" --"•• 


2ia 

.. .^ 

231 

1.497 

7.410 

376 

106 


1.672 


Clennoat _ 

Clinton ^ 


1.436 
2.130 




Crawford >- „ 








'Dn^^r.^ , , 




Defiance ... 




n«lAWf|m..... _. 


879 


Rri« 


365 


Pairficl<L.» _ ^ 


1.066 
1.616 




Payette 

PrAnlrlin , ,. 


863 


Fulton . ,..,., ..^.,, 


1 325 


Oajli* ,. . 


1.120 
765 




Gtfene .>,... > 




1.971 


Guernsey. _.. 

HAmilt^rn „ 


1.138 
9.504 


TTATMyw^lr ...,..,. . ,, 


. 


348 


Hardin^- _ 





716 
992 


Hf*nry.... ........ .... .™ ... ., 





260 


TlighfanH 


325 


HocVinff,.. .. 


113 
1.104 




Holmes^. 




'H^t'T*" -- 


1 436 


JiKolnwvn .. __ . 




725 




2.142 







118 


TjlW 


1,159 


!*• wren Oft....... , 


921 
3.796 


1.643 


yJoVmg 






1.675 


T^oram — .,.-« ^ 

X>n'^f ....... , , 


1.591 


U^Aimr^n , 


707 


ftfntinnmgr ... 




763 


2,582 


lA^Ann " 


345 


\MmAWt^ 


1.062 


Vtrtft^ir „ ... 


1.043 




1.461 


Mnnrn* ^,. , „, ,^, n -.«_.. 


957 
373 










684 


MnrjVkw 




414 


Miitlrinm^'n 




3.017 


M«K1. ^ 


404 


536 


Ottawa ,,, 




PattMing 


728 






TO 



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20 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



VOTES CAST BY COUNTIES FOR CANDIDATES FOR SECRETARY OF 
STATE, AT THE ELECTION HELD NOVEMBER 5, 1918— Concluded. 





Secretary of State. 


Pluralities. 




Dem. 


Rep. 


Dem. 


Rep. 


Counties. 


I 

6 


1 


1 

Q 

1 


6 


PickftWftv 


2.808 
1.630 
3.063 
2.541 
3.091 
5.357 
3.666 
3.680 
3.947 
4.776 
3.132 
10.207 
13.712 
3.805 
5.488 
1.866 
2.763 
1.073 
2.060 
3,542 
4.280 
2.523 
3.628 
2.529 


2.431 
1.287 
3.252 
2.932 
2.174 
4.733 
4.382 
3.581 
5.268 
3.852 
2.343 
13.755 
12.438 
6.176 
6.282 
2.989 
3.520 
1.254 
3.081 
4.547 
3.853 
3.268 
6.029 
1.926 


377 
343 




Pilfft. 




Portage -. . . 


189 


Preble..^ .. 


891 


Pt,itn»^m.... . « ,,.... 


917 
624 

99 

924 

789 

1.274 

206 




Richland _ 




Ross. 


716 


Sandusky. ~ ................ .... ... . 




Scioto 

Seneca — 


1.321 


Shplhy . ,. , 




Stark ... 

Summit ,, .^. 

Trumbull ., 

Tuscarawas 

Unicn 

Van Wert „ 

Warren" 1~!!!"!!!.!Z!.!!7.!.!.!.!.!".!".!]!.!!!.! 


3.548 
2.37i 

1.123 
757 
181 

1.021 


Washington -. 

Wayne 


427 
603 


1.005 


Williams _. 

Wood .. 

Wyandot. 


745 
1.401 






Total- _ 

Plurality ...... ,,.. , .... 


432.442 


471.228 
38,786 


33.445 


72.231 







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SECRETARY OP STATE. 



21 



TABLE GIVING VOTE BY COUNTIES FOR PRESIDENT, 1916; PRESI- 
DENT 1912, AND 1908, WITH TOTAL VOTE CAST IN THE STATE FOR 
THE AFORESAID YEARS. 





President. 1916. 


i 

.fi 


President. 1912. 


C4 

1 

03 


President. 1908. 


00 




Rep. 


Dero. 


Dem. 


Rep. 


Prog. 


Rep. 


Dem. 


.s 


Counties. 


8 










. 




CO 

.a 




•a 


1 


1 
o 


i 


i 


> 

1 


i 

u 


i 


i 






H 




"8 




ii 




1 


w 


•-^ 






1 


t^ 


> 

1 


1 




1 


> 


P 


1 


> 


Adams. 


2.819 


2.887 


5.866 


2.279 


1.863 


GC.3 4.939 


3.432 


3.048 


6.635 


All«i 


5.713 
2.534 


7.905 
4.000 


14.592 
6.802 


5.696 
3.364 


2.638 
1.017 


2.3.17 12.125 
J„-ir>j» 6.431 


5.841 
2.804 


7.195 
3.627 


13.718 


Ashland 


6.625 


Ashtabula., — 


6.608 


5.306 


13.161 


3.181 


2.214 


f,JH{t\ 12.594 


8.213 


3.572 


13.153 


Athens 


5.554 


4.101 


10.182 


2.393 


3.090 


2,811, 9.733 


6.449 


3.654 


10.637 


Auglaize. 

Belmont.. — 


2.763 


4.124 


7.367 


3.726 


1.401 


t nsr.' 6.836 


3.001 


4.622 


7.867 


7.526 


7.911 


17.392 


5.412 


5.267 


1 /,s [ 15.960 


8.193 


7.750 


17.323 


Brown.... 


2.227 


3.959 


6.347 


3.451 


1.650 


6.101 


2.638 


4.242 


6.661 


Butler 


2.850 


10.806 


18.821 


7.763 


3.431 


iT T 17.119 


7..320 


9.678 


18.185 


Carroll.... , , 


2.086 


1.672 


4.049 


1.293 


1.096 


Ml , 3.8.32 


2.517 


1.590 


4,292 


Champaign. — 


3,695 


3.338 


7.950 


2.763 


2.392 


! 1-: 6.941 


4.1.53 


3.160 


7.516 


Clark.!! 


8.715 
3.549 


8.848 
4.247 


18.646 
7.939 


5.217 
3.610 


6.036 
2.543 


^l:- 17.173 
1,113 7.641 


8.917 
4.137 


6.529 
4.1.50 


17.001 


Clermont.. 


8.571 


Clinton .. 


3.520 


2.602 


6.360 


2.010 


2.916 


Stl 6.056 


4.107 


2.464 


6.770 


Columbiana.... 


8.118 


7,788 


17.791 


4.816 


4.601 


^Ml 16.416 


9.626 


6.736 


18.312 


Coshocton 


2.831 


4.269 


7.756 


3,465 


1.984 


m^ 


7.409 


3.606 


4.106 


8.203 


Crawford 


2.673 


6.014 


9.146 


4.733 


1.4.32 


t,i7n 


8.231 


3.061 


6.006 


9.402 


Cuyahoga 


51.287 


71.533 


133.483 


43.610 


14.176 


•:^.l.y-:'2] 


104.451 


56.344 


39.954 


104.425 


Darke!:. 


4.322 


6.186 


11.212 


5.027 


3.107 


1.17. 


10.403 


4.951 


6..391 


11.709 


Defiance. 


2.565 


3.359 


6.580 


2.784 


872 


1 ■'.■' 


.5.71 1 


2.531 


3,7.54 


6..550 


Delaware 


3.461 


3.754 


7.547 


2.934 


2,.584 


1 Ml. 


7.2S2 


4.007 


3.330 


7.671 


Erie- 


4.170 


5.152 


10.008 


3.504 


2.695 


m; 9.167 


5.366 


4.983 


10,876 


Fairfield 


3.380 


6.172 


9.901 


5.101 


1.672 


] 77 ii 9.032 


4.023 


5.821 


10.085 


Fayette. . ... 


2.772 


2.616 


5.597 


2.261 


2.186 


M 1 


5.6.30 


3.343 


2.451 


5,493 


Franklin 


24.107 


34.103 


60.562 


20.697 


12.791 


11,737 


51.816 


28.913 


23.314 


54.583 


PiiUnn . 


2.933 
2.860 


2.507 
2.277 


.5.818 
6.364 


1.805 
1.765 


929 
1.355 




5.371 
.5.504 


3.608 
3.914 


2.131 
2.171 


5.976 


Gallia..-.. 


6.258 


Geauga 


1.806 


1.345 


3.380 


873 


579 


« I, f- 


3.292 


2.596 


982 


3.710 


Greene 


4.458 


2.913 


7.938 


2.107 


3.242 


■ !■ . 


7.304 


4.902 


2.882 


8.274 


Guernsey 


4.228 


4.312 


9.7.39 


2.726 


3.426 


; :7 • 


9.232 


5.210 


3.449 


9.780 


Hamilton 


64.030 


51.990 


121.927 


42.909 


42.119 


:•', -_'■. 


111.249 


63.803 


45.429 


114.398 


Hancock. 


4.268 


5.416 


10.234 


4.309 


2.241 


1 7. "'7 


9.245 


4.899 


5.420 


10.890 


Hardin 


4.119 


4.304 


8..307 


3.912 


2.775 


IJH, 8..50'4 


4.444 


4.164 


8.903 


Harrison. 


2.517 


1.911 


4.626 


1.714 


1.9.50 


7..:, 4.711 


3.060 


1.961 


5.221 


Henry 


2.482 


3.2.52 


6.082 


2.994 


804 


1 hi 5.441 


2.425 


3.817 


6.516 


Highland 


3.727 


3.964 


7.905 


3.314 


2.757 


i 1,..; 7..5.54 


4.149 


3.823 


8.200 


Hocking 


2.357 


2.907 


5.513 


2.295 


1.3.54 


:. 6.151 


2.749 


2.864 


5.830 


Holmes 


955 


2.846 


3.956 


2.429 


465 


-1! 3.701 


1.252 


3.043 


4.413 


Huron „. 


4.048 


4.136 


8..587 


3.317 


1.707 


-. -.!'!, 8.514 


4.930 


4.262 


9.474 


. Jackson 


3.116 


2.922 


6.321 


2.049 


1.860 


f --I 6.230 


4.489 


3.235 


8.125 


, fefFerson 

Cnox. 


6.658 


5.250 


12.970 


3.171 


4.777 


J.M. 8.658 


7.310 


4.882 


12.938 


3.646 


4.578 


8.5.55 


3.632 


2.530 


l.--b 8.191 


4.318 


4.233 


8.891 


Lake ... 


2.887 


2.596 


5.779 


1.429 


1.155 


2Ain 


5.237 


3.635 


1.605 


5.638 


Lawrence 


4.363 


2.821 


7.633 


2.042 


2.650 


I.f)3? 


7.274 


5.708 


2.654 


8.665 


Licking- — 


5.935 


8.183 


14.925 


6.120 


4.487 


1 AS:^ 


13.614 


6.7.56 


7.685 


15.309 


Logan 


4.345 


3.483 


8.086 


2.727 


1.977 


a27s 


7.633 


4.756 


3.186 


8.060 


Lorain. 


6.868 


7.658 


15.473 


4.591 


2.226 


-■.A?A\ 


13.941 


8.699 


5.460 


1.5.462 


Lucas 


16.711 


30.779 


52.299 


13.999 


5.622 


]?.!l?l 38.894 


18.715 


16.208 


39..523 


Madison 


2.809 


2.667 


5.487 


2.172 


2.271 


■ ! 5.335 


3.051 


2.430 


5.598 


Mahoning....... 


11.256 


13.013 


25.968 


6.838 


5.830 


- 21.031 


10.760 


9.312 


21.384 


Marion 


4.284 


5.273 


10.046 


4.024 


3.218 


9.0.56 


4.17.5 


4.6.57 


9.151 


Medina. 


2.754 


2.984 


6.130 


2.108 


685 


J ■ ■ 1 5.767 


3.427 


2.378 


6.104 


Meigs 


3.184 


2.628 


6.427 


1.738 


2.129 


1 6.093 


4.108 


2.225 


6.717 


Mercer.. — 


2.066 


3.803 


6.517 


3.591 


1.324 


■■?■■ 5.913 


2.148 


4.4.56 


6.802 


Miami 


5.772 


6.582 


12.166 


4.310 


3.615 


. ' 11.336 


6.5,58 


5 369 


12.327 


Monroe. 


1.504 


3.322 


5.041 


3.199 


1.0.55 


4.948 


1.974 


3.961 


6.075 


M ontgomery.. 


19.683 


24.339 


47.623 


15.544 


10.341 


40.407 


20.069 


20..566 


43.236 


Morgan 


2.136 


1.833 


4.242 


1.633 


1.448 


4.131 


2.445 


1.932 


4.571 


Morrow 


2.062 


2.345 


4.6.52 


1.880 


1.240 


r ! ' 4..545 


2. .500 


2.230 


4.955 


Muskingum 


7.597 


6.328 


14.735 


5.376 


4.134 


14.213 


8.080 


6..576 


15.606 


Noble 


2.290 


2.175 


4.621 


1.842 


1.804 


4.566 


2.707 


2.154 


5.021 


Ottawa 


1.793 


3.347 


5.348 


2.728 


791 


-..; 


4.876 


2.202 


3.329 


5.666 



Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



22 



OHIO GBNEBAL STATISTICS. 



TABLE GIVING VOTE BY COUNTIES FOR PRESIDENT, 1916— PRESI- 
DENT 1912, AND 1908, WITH TOTAL VOTE CAST IN THE STATE FOR 
THE AFORESAID YEARS— Concluded. 





President. 1016. 


2 
3 


President. 1912. 


.3 


President. 1908. 


i 




Ren. 


Denu 


Dcm. 


ReTK 


P*o«. 


Rep. 


Dem. 


fH 








1 








1 






• 












jj 






1 


Counties. 


^ 


• 


.a 








.S 






.s 






1 


1 


S 




i 


1 


i 


i 

n 


1 




1 


1 


> 

1 


1 


1 


> 
1 


1 


a 


> 
1 




^ 


H 


^ 


? 


H 


s 


s 


H 


Paulding 


2.747 


2.313 


5.166 


2.296 


1.542 


1.223 


5.340 


3.049 


2.767 


5.964 


Perry 


3.953 


3.860 


8.446 


3.H7 


urn 


2.220 


8.273 


4.304 


3.885 


8.843 


Pickaway 


2.629 


3.820 


6.539 


3.311 


2.232 


569 


6.425 


3.119 


4.007 


7.286 


Pike 


1.6H> 


2.091 


8.801 


l.flOl 


1,184 


443 


3.482 


1.798 


2.085 


8.989 


Portage 


2,liJ: 


4.269 


7.988 


2.85a 


1.162 


2.583 


7.537 


4.129 


3.625 


8.204 


Preble 


2.?^^l 


3.387 


6.609 


S,S5ft 


2.135 


910 


6.302 


3.519 


3.247 


6.985 


Putnam 


2,24a 


4.294 


6.914 


4.000 


1,000 


1.182 


6.362 


2.483 


4.836 


7.577 


Richland 


4.aH6 


6.985 


12.541 


5,201 


2.3S9 


2.058 


11.119 


5.301 


6,702 


12.450 


Ross 


4.fi57 


5.154 


10.277 


4AiH 


3.600 


1.096 


9.938 


5.432 


5.325 


11.062 


Sandusky 


3,B/>7 


5.264 


9.317 


4.333 


1.576 


2.103 


8.763 


4.079 


6.242 


9.611 


Scioto^ 


6.3o6 


4.808 


12.030 


3.60S 


3.600 


2.012 


10.753 


6.790 


4.310 


10.960 


Seneca 


4.301 


6,451 


11.492 


5.0S3 


2,362 


2.062 


10.566 


4.959 


6.138 


11.658 


Shelby. 


2.S.-L? 


3.801 


6.505 


3.S».S 


1.613 


678 


5.930 


2.646 


3.879 


6.644 


Stark .„. 


I4j:iu 


15.316 


-32.116 


9.908 


6,033 


6.802 


27.147 


14.112 


12.286 


28.263 


Summit — 


IIMH 


19.343 


34.432 


7.7S6 


3.502l 


7.473 


23,714 


10.365 


9.930 


22.167 


Trumbull _ 


6,167 


6.091 


13.577 


3.347 


2.630 


3,556 


11,552 


0.978 


4.476 


12.203 


Tuscarawas.... 


5.404 


7.608 


14.158 


4,978 


3.417 


1.749 


12.805 


6.717 


6.775 


14.392 


Union 


3.182 
3.802 


2.747 
3.753 


6.204 
7.822 


2,362 
3,^7 


2.0.71 
2.490 


1.209 
1.050 


6.024 
7.264 


3.567 
3.809 


2.568 
3.783 


6.301 


Van "Wert 


7.800 


Vinton. 


1.420 


1.433 


2.985 


I.22S 


952 


581 


3.051 


1.916 


1.496 


3.480 


Warren 


3.610 


2.937 


6.773 


2J01 


2J88 


1.100 


6.304 


4.233 


2.656 


7.091 


Washington.... 


4.745 


5.287 


10.658 


4,B37 


3.326 


1.222 


10.136 


6.648 


6,771 


11.733 


Wayne 

Williams 


3.676 


5.930 


10.101 


4J37 


1.674 


2.351 


9.398 


4.388 


5.368 


10.194 


3.132 


3.552 


7.018 


2,B7o 


1,145 


2.081 


6.521 


3.625 


3.329 


7.186 


Wood. 


5.034 


5.796 


11.439 


1.35*i 


2,020 


3.021 


10.269 


5.904 


5.625 


11.976 


Wyandot 


2,078 


3.250 


5.523 


2,ME 


1,409 


854 


5.392 


2,408 


3.353 


5.986 


Toals. 


614,753 


604.161 


1.195.907 


424.834 


278.168 


229,807 


1.056.067 


572.312 


502.721 


1.136.525 


Plurtality.. 




89.408 




146.666 








69.591 







I 



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Google 



SECRETARY OF STATE. 



23 



APPORTIONMENT OF SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES FOR 
191 14921 .^SENATORS. 

Population of State. 4,767,121. Sen atonal ratio, 130.203; thret-fourths ratio* 102,153; one and tbrep 
fourths rati 0, 238,356; two ratios. 272.406; three TJitios, 40S.*i09; four ratios, 544,812. 





Conn ties. 


J 


1 
f 


1 


6 

1 
1 
1 

H 

1 


1 


5' 


Sessions Oe^entufn 
Penod* 


1 
1 






CO 


i 


i 


I 


Hl^mift^. , 


460.732 
70.271 1 
34,497 


4fi0,732 

149.151 
1S7.597 

r 13,1*37 
r mM2 

17S.00!ii 

2-17, 7 2H 


52,123 

12,94R 
5l.3fi4 

7,734 


260,615 

04.940 
2S0.D7O 

38,071) 
212.^25 


3 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

2 


I 

I 

,-■ 

1 

1 ■• 
1 

1 


3 

1, 

1 

1 


3 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2 


a' 

i 
r 

1 

ii 
i 

i 

2 

)0 

1 


3 

2 


4 


2 


Wartcji ,-....,„.. 

Total 2d diatxict.^^ 
Clermont,. „ ,,„ ,„ — ,, — „„„, 


ft 


e4J6S 




29.551 
24,832 




4 


Totiil 4tk district^,,.. 

Preble ._.... 

Total 3d district 

Faytttt. ................. , .„. 

Greene — ^„^,. .....^ 




54.383 


1 


3 


163.763 
1 23,834 

1S7,,^7 


2 


f 5 


21,744 
2&,733 
23.6S0 






Total Sth district,..,.. 

Highland. ^_ .,,.. 

Ross. ^ , 

Total OIK district 

fAdama...-^,...... *,... 




& 


75,157 




G 


2S,T11 
■10,000 


1 




^.75,=! 
I5.72:{ 
4S.4*(3 
:^Q,71ll 






Pike*^ „,-,....,, . 




7 


( Scioto. .^.... „_ ... 

L Total nil dhinct, 

i LawTCTvce ^,....„^,.^ 

Gflllifl„„ ..,..........,_ 

Meiffs„_^,. , ^. „ „ 






119,732 


1 


S 


3!J,48M 
25.74.> 
25,5W4 
KUmu 






VmtoiL, „. . 

Total 8th (Il5tritt.._ 

Athens . „..„ , 

Hocking 

Fairfield,.,.,,,. ,.... 

Total 9th diStOL-t 

1 Waihingl(jii_ ,*.... „ 






ia^023 


I 


a 


47J0S 
39.201 




At 


110,049 




4ri,422 
«,0()0 

mi 




U 


Kable. part of ,>...„..„ , 

Monroe, pBft cf..,^... 

Total Htkajrtrfct_ 

fFrantliti ^ 

Pickaway.—.™ ^™, 

TotallOtb dlstrEct . 

f Clark., ._ ._ 






mMn 


2 


IQ 


221,6^7 
2njnS 

1 247,72.*^ 

1 fl 0,435 
2G,:i5l 

lyjoi; 

112.6SS 


2 


11 


Ma«JiBoiu-. .^^^.. 

Tot*l 11th dtitrlct™. 


Diai izec 


^. 



m 



OHIO GEN'EEAL STATLSTICS. 
APPORTIONMENT OF SENATORS— Contmued, 



C&UTtllC6, 





i 




X 








/I 








Q 








.-3 




'C 




o 








.^ 













m 




% 1 








'i-' 




<A 






g 


'i. 


rt 


S. 


"3 


fl 








ci 


c^ 


H 



E 



Seaysiotis DeceuiiLal 
Period. 



Darke . - 
Shelby.-. 



'Tolal 12th district^.. 



13 

3i 



IT 
2S 



UnJmi 

IlEirdiTi,»f:H 



24. rm 



112.043 



ii2,r.c» 



30,40?! 



Totat 13tJi di I riiit.- 



Seneca., _.*.„.,,.-.., ..-. 

fVawford. .^..^.^.. ,. 



iio,;t;t;^ 



I. Total TiUt disthrt . . 

MuiJ^ii^fftjiJi., ,, , -- 

Pftrry— « -' ,-...>^. . 

Total irjth di£irici_. 



Lit^king 



42,421 
20Jf.f> 
Ur.2l7 
.^17.4^^, 



ll^XuA'i 



tJ2.SS4 



TuUl inthdisint-t... 



2r,lS2,l 



S2,r7 



IT.^Ji.Vi 



•:jtw,7.'ir> 



■ti>.4r.a 



22 



Knnx.^,. , , ^--T-, 






Tot^il iTtli diatnct ... I 40.liUf}' 



IJf4n,«j>, 



-I 



17.1 KH^ 



T'ai£ai2MitaHtt«.t..i rMVNi7 

r.o«luM li>ri _,^ u- - ( HO, 12] 



lO^.lWlH 



Turiil iMh rlisUirt 

rttitTrKi.-y 

I M'i117Mf< pi*Fi (if 

I XuLilr, van ^t- 

I 'inf.. I V}\\ ai.rriL'l.,, 

(.Utltrmnt.... .,_.„„.,, , 

ilam"**!*..,. ...„..., 

j *Xi>U\\ t^n\, ni\tfiit... 
.Tr'dr'i'M.n „ . , 



L^■r.7lt| 



^\xm\ iwu'i 






:;r».oi 






T«/tnliJi-Vl.|»f,\rH't. . 



HJ7,3itj 



M2,o^:?| i];.7/i74 Mj'i.Th' niNWsr,' i 



SLurk . 



Tutul2l!.-t dJar;a 






IH.S.T'IH^ UiSjiSI 



U,-»:i, 






1,^,(1, iiTi;' ll 



I J 



V 



I 



Digitized by 



'Google 



SECRETARY OP STATE. 
APPORTIONMENT OF SENATORS— Concluded. 



25 





Counties. 


1 


■I 

§ 

I 


1 

g 
•;3 


d 

1 
1 


1 


< 


Sessions Decennial 
Period. 


1 

a 
•s 

1 


5 


to 

00 






us 


?«3 


fTrumbull^. 

1 Mahoning _ -,- 


52.766 
116.151 


168.917 

97.144 

235.704 
637.425 

170.277 
130.064 

216.907 

163.195 
192,728 

ession 


32.714 

99.501 
92.613 

34.074 

80.704 

26.992 
56.525 


163.570 

497.505 
463.065 

170,370 


1 

1 
4 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

30 


1 

3 
3 

1 

2 

2 
22 


1 

2 
5 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

33 


1 

2 
5 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

33 


1 

2 
5 

1 

1 

2 

1 
2 

36 


1 

1 

4 

1 
1 

2 

1 
2 

"33 






I Total 23d district...... 

Ashtabula 

Lake 






168.917 


2 


24 


59,547 
22.927 
14.670 






Geauga 

Total 24th district.... 
Portagj^ , 




& 


97,144 






30,307 
108.253 




26 


Summit. 

Total 26th district..^ 
Cuyahoga.. - «... 












138.560 


1 


25 


637.425 


4 




Medina 

Lorain — 

Total 27th district... 

Ashland 

pirMand 




27 


23.598 
76.037 




& 
29 


I 99,635 




22.975 
47.667 






Total 29th district..- 






70,642 


2 




34.206 
38.327 
35,171 
22,380 






Erie.. 




30 


Sandusky 

Ottawa. ~- 

Total 3Dth district... 

fMercer ,^ -. 






130.034 


1 




403.520 

134.960 
282.625 






27.536 
31.246 
66.5S0 
29.119 
22.73:) 
24.498 
25.198 






Auglaize 

Allen 






Van "Wert.. -. , .. 




32 


Paulding — - 

[Defiance 

mUliams 

Total 32d district 

(Hancock. 

Wood 






216.907 


1 




37,S60 
46,330 
23,914 
25.119 
29,972 




33 


Pulton.- 

Henry 

Putnam .» 

Total 33d district. 

Lucas. _..-.^.. -.. 






163.195 


1 


34 


192.728 


1 




Total number Senato 






rs each s 


~37 



Digitized by 



Google 



26 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTIGS. 



APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
One ratio, 47,671; tbree-fourths niUo, 35,754; two ratios, 95,342. 



Qoiniticaf 



I 



S 






Sessions. 



Adams. . 

Alien 

Ashland 

Ashtabula^ 
Athens.. 



Auglaize 

Belmont 

Brown 

Butler 

CarrolL 

Chamx>aigiL. 



Clark.-^ 

Clermont.. 

Clinton.™ 

Coltmibiana.... 

Coshocton 

Crawford 

Cujrahoga 

Darke.. 



Defiance.... 
Delaware... 

Erie. 

Fairfield.... 



Fayettc- 



Franklin. 

Pulton. 

GaUia...^ 

Geauga 

Greene.—. 



Guernsey 

Hamilton.... 
Hanfcock.„... 

Hardin-.; 

Harrison 



Henry.. 
Highland... 
Hocking 



Holmes„ 
Huron.. 



Jackson 

TeflFerson.- 

Knox. 

Lake.. 



Lawrence.. 
Licking 



Logan.. 
Lorain.. 



Lucas. .» 

Madison 

Mahoning. 

Marion , 

Medina... 

Meigs.. 



Mercer..- 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery- 

Morgan 

Morrow. 

Muskingum.... 
Noble 



24.76/» 
66.680 
22.975 
69.647 
47.798 
31.246 
76.866 
24.832 
70.271 
16.761 
26.361 
66.436 
29,661 
23.680 
76.619 
30.121 
34.036 

637.426 
42.933 
24.498 
27.182 
38.327 
39.201 
21.744 

221.667 
23.914 
26.746 
14.670 
29.733 
42.716 

460.732 
37.8^ 
30.407 
19.076 
25.119 
28.711 
23.660 
17.909 
34.206 
30.791 
66.423 
30.181 
22.927 
39.4$8 
66.690 
30.084 
76.037 

192.728 
19.902 

116.161 
33.971 
23.598 
26.594 
27.636 
45.047 
24.244 

163.763 
16.097 
16.815 
57.488 
18,601 



sSw 


'44,645 


11.876 
127 


60.380 
636 


ijo.'iss 


145.925 


22.600 


113.660 


18.764 


93.820 







28.948 


144.740 


if;JQ2i 


88.5i6 



30.883 



164,416 



31.693 



168.466 



17,762 



88.760 



7,919 


39,595 


28.366 
2.044 

26;869 


141.830 
10.220 

164T646 


26;756 


103,760 





„ 



9.817 



49.086 



13 



13 



10 



1 

"*Digi*zi 



13 



13 



13 



10 



10 



edyy^c^ogie 



SEGBETABT OP STATE. 
APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES— Concluded. 



27 



Counties. 



Sessions. 



3 



Ottawa 

Paulding.. 



Peny 

Piddiway 

Pike. 

Portage.^ 
Preble„ 



Putnam — 
Richland^ 



Ros&_ 



Sandusky.. 

Scioto... 

Seneca.. 



Shdby.. 
Stark.. 



Van Wert. 

Vinton 

Warren- 



Washington.. 
Wa; 



ayne., 
iUiami 



WiUianM. 



Wood.- 



Wyandot.. 



Total Representatives each ses 



22.360 
22,730 
35.396 
26,158 
15,723 
30,307 
23.834 
29.972 
47,667 
40.069 
35,171 
48.463 
42,421 
24.663 
122,987 
108.253 
52.766 
67.035 
21,871 
29.119 
13.096 
24,497 
45.422 
38,058 
25,198 
46,330 
20.760 



792 



27.645 

12.911 

5.095 

9.364 



3.960 



138.225 
64,555 
25,476 
46.820 



1191 28 



123 



123 



128 



124 



125 



91^^^^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
One ratio, 47,671; tbree-fourtbs ratio, 35,754; two ratios, 95,342. 



Ctmntuo. 



E 

s 






Sessions. 



Adams.. 



Allen.. 

Ashland 

Ashtabula^- 



Athens..^ 



Auglaize^ 

Belmont.. 

Brown.......... 

Butler 

Carroll 

Champaign. 

Clark. 

Clermont.. 

Clinton — 

Columbiana 



Coshocton.. 

Crawford 

Cuyahoga. 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware 

Erie.> 



Fairfield- 

Fayette.-.. 

Franklin.. 



Fulton.—.. 
Gallia . 



Geauga.. 



Greene.—. 



Guernsey 

Hamilton 

Hanbock. 

Hardin.. 



Harrison.. 



Heniv 

Highland 

Hocking 

Holmes. 

Huron.. 



ft 



ackson.. 



efferson 

;nox 

Lake 

Lawrence... 

Licking 

Logan 

Lorain.^... 

Lucas .. 

Madison 

Mahoning.- 



Marion 

Medina... 

Meigs 

Mercer..-. 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery.- 

Morgan 

Morrow. 

Muskingum 

Noble 



24.755 
56.580 
22.975 
50.547 
47.798 
31.246 
76.856 
24.832 
70.271 
15.761 
26.351 
66.435 
29.551 
23.680 
76,619 
30.121 
34.036 

637.425 f 
42.933 
24.498 
27.182 
38,327 
39.201 
21.744 

221.567 
23.914 
25.745 
14.670 
29,733 
42.716 

460.732 
37.860 
30.407 
19,076 
25.119 
28.711 
23.650 
17.909 
34.206 
3a791 
65.423 
30.181 
22.927 
39.4g$ 
55.590 
30.084 
76.037 

192,728 
19.902 

116.151 
33.971 
23.598 
25.594 
27.636 
45,047 
24.244 

163.763 
16.097 
16.815 
57.488 
18,601 



8.909 



11,876 
127 

"29.185 

22.660 



28;948 


144.740 


17.702 ( 


88.510 




"ZZ.'"Z"Z 








ioMz 


154.415 






_ 



31.693 



17,752 



44.545 



59.380 
635 



145.925 
113.000 



93.820 



13 



158.465 



88.760 



7,919 


39.595 


28.366 
2.044 

20.809 


141.830 
10.220 

104;045 


- 







""20;750 


i03.'750 


9.817 


49.085 



13 



ttigil 



13 



13 



13 



10 



10 



10 



:ized 



i^lLdo^ie 



SECRETARY OP STATE. 



29 



NUMBER OF BIRTHS WITH RATES PER 1,000 POPULATION FOR 
YEARS 1918 AND 1919 IN THE STATE BY COUNTIES. 



Counties. 


Number 
of Births 
for 1918. 


Number 
of Births 
for 1919. 


Rate 
1918. 


Rate 
1919. 


Adams 


419 

1,605 
502 

1,380 

1.236 
629 

2.319 
414 

1.937 
284 
439 

1.653 
501 
393 

1.929 
590 
705 
22.658 
965 
488 
433 
733 
850 
438 

5.316 
527 
426 
269 
562 
940 

9,495 
743 
586 
319 
570 
496 
553 
390 
653 
680 

1.589 
577 
487 
902 

1.005 
553 

2,040 

6,230 

5.652 
882 
806 
501 
552 
670 

1,019 
470 

4,228 
265 
294 

1.167 
327 
457 
406 
901 
562 
293 
696 
456 
707 

1,081 
954 
756 

1,468 
952 
591 

3,930 

6.258 

1,670 


377 

1.408 
405 

1,371 

1.035 
580 

1.997 
394 

1.784 
260 
368 

1,448 
418 
357 

1.639 
601 
565 
20,066 
850 
454 
425 
641 
736 
387 

5.056 
458 
369 
196 
518 
901 

8.354 
654 
511 
310 
507 
428 
443 
379 
634 
583 

1,453 
532 
470 
820 
911 
510 

2,035 

5,350 

5,226 
303 
718 
453 
481 
567 
994 
370 

4.002 
264 
271 

1.104 
284 
405 
386 
781 
519 
256 
628 
414 
591 
972 
924 
699 

1.463 
793 
522 

3.714 

5,807 

1.646 


16.9 
25.1 
20.5 
20.8 
22.3 
20.1 
25.7 
16.7 
23.8 
18.0 
16.8 
22.7 
17.0 
16.6 
23.2 
19.2 
20.7 
28.2 
22.3 
19.9 
15.6 
18.8 
19.6 
20.1 
19.8 
21.2 
16.5 
18.3 
18.9 
18,9 
18.9 
19.6 
19.3 
16.7 
22.7 
17.3 
23.4 
21.8 
18.3 
22.1 
19.1 
17.9 
20.3 
22.8 
16.0 
18.4 
21.8 
27.7 
36.6 
19.2 
21.0 
20.1 
21.6 
24.3 
21.8 
19.4 
22.1 
16.5 
17.5 
19.1 
17.6 
20.3 
17.9 
23.5 
21.5 
18.6 
22.3 
19.1 
23.6 
21.4 
23.8 
21.1 
26.8 
21.9 
23.9 
26.8 
45.1 
28.8 


16.7 


Allen 1 . . . 


20.7 


Ashland 


16.5 


Ashtabula 


21.0 


Athens • 


20.6 


Auglaize 


19.6 


BeUnont 


21.6 


Brown . . . .* .* 


17.3 


Butler 


20.7 


Carroll 


16.3 


ChamDalen 


14.6 


cSu* . :::::::;:::;::::;::;:::::;:;: ::.. 


18.1 


Clermont 


14.7 


Clinton 


15.5 


Columbiana 


19.2 


Coshocton 


20.3 


Crawford 


15.7 


Cuyahoga 


21.6 


Parke 


19.8 


Defiance 


18.5 


Delaware 


16.3 


Brie 


16.1 


Fairfield 


18.2 


Fayette 


18.0 


Franltlin 


18.1 


Fulton 


19.5 


Gallia 


15.2 


Geauga 


13.1 


Greene 


16.6 


Guernsey 


20.0 


Hamilton 


17.0 


Hancock 


17.0 


Hardin 


17.2 


Harrison 


15.8 


Henry 


21.6 


Hiidiland 


15.5 


Hocking 


19.0 


Holmes 


22.2 


Huron 


19.4 


Jackson 


21.2 


JefTerson 


18,8 


Knox 


17.6 


Lake 


16.5 


Lawrence 


20.7 


Licking 


16.2 


Logan 


16.9 


Lorain 


22,7 


Lucas 


19.7 


Mahoning 


28.5 


Madison 


15 4 


Marion 


17.2 


Medina 


17.4 


Meigs 


18.3 


Mercer 


21 1 


Miami 


20.5 


Monroe 


17 7 


Montgomery 


19.3 


Morgan 


18.1 


Morrow 


17 3 


Muskingum 


19.0 


Noble 


15 8 


Ottawa 


18 2 


Pftllldlng - 


20.3 


Perry 


21 6 


Pickaway .... 


20.1 
17 9 


Pike 


Portage 


17 4 


Preble 


17 7 


Putnam 


21 2 


Richland 


17 7 


Ross 


22 2 


Sandusky 


18 8 


Scioto 


23 5 


Seneca 


18 3 


Shelby 


20 1 


Stark 


21.2 
20 9 


Summit 


Trumbull 


19.9 



Digitized by ^OOQ IC 



•'"tjr^^.. 



30 



OHIO GENEBAIi STATISTICS. 



NUMBER OF BIRTHS WITH RATES PER 1,000 POPULATION FOR 
YEARS 1918 AND 1919 IN THE STATE BY COUNTIES— Concluded. 



Counties. 


Number 
of Births 
for 1918. 


Number 
of Births 
for 1919. 


Bate 
1918. 


Rate 
1919. 


Tuscarawas 


1,458 
353 
537 
308 
480 
912 
813 
527 
978 
393 


1,277 
353 
440 
263 
472 
822 
747 
462 
978 
400 


24.4 
16.1 
18.4 
23.5 
19.6 
20.1 
21.3 
20.7 
21.1 
18.9 


20.1 


Union 


16.8 


Van Wert 


15 5 


Vinton 


21.6 


Warren 


18 4 


Washington 


19 8 


Wayne 


18.1 


Williams 


18 6 


Wood 


21 7 


Wyandot 


20 4 






Total • 


124.629 


107,663 


23.6 


18 8 







Digitized by 



,y Google 



SECRETARY OP STATE. 
CITIES. 



31 



NUxMBER OF DEATHS WITH THE DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULA- 
TION FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919. 



cities. 


Number 

of Deaths 

1918. 


Number 

of Deaths 

1919. 


Hate 
1918. 


Rate 
1919. 


Akron 


2,426 
389 
143 
309 
113 
330 
329 
110 
100 
83 
127 
243 

1,266 
322 

8,754 

169 

13,086 


2,188 
326 
120 
256 

60 
226 
204 
124 

69 

101 

154 

185 

1,036 

226 

6,365 

122 

9.900 

98 

3,309 

124 

131 

96 

1,758 

123 

151 

79 
116 

68 
228 
289 
274 
229 
149 
129 
124 
170 
112 
103 
510 
237 

98 

91 

91 
126 
370 
204 
520 

67 
454 
316 

43 
356 
196 
200 
253 
149 

78 
116 
354 
147 
131 
214 
121 1 
227 
418 
125 

56 

70 
165 
313 

55 
102 


25.1 
19.3 
15.8 
13.7 
15.2 
21.8 
22.2 
11.5 
16.3 
15.5 
13.5 
17.2 
19.7 
20.4 
20.9 
25.1 
16.1 


10.9 


Alliance 


15 3 


Ashland 


13 2 


Ashtabula 


11 7 


Athens 


9 4 


Barberton 


12 3 


Bellalre 


13.5 


Bellefontaine 


13 3 


Bellevue '.'. . . 


12 


Bowling Green 


17 6 


Bncyms 


14.9 


Cambridge 


14.2 


Canton ." 


12.2 


Chllllcothe 


14.3 


Cincinnati 


15 9 


Circlevllle 


17.3 


Cleveland 


12.6 


Cleveland Heights 


6 5 


Columbus 


4,261 
178 
211 


18.9 
19.1 
17.3 


14 1 


Conneaut ■ 


13.3 


Coshocton 


12 1 


Cuyahoga Falls 




Dayton 


2,557 

128 

179 

86 

124 


io.e* 

17.5 
17.9 
15.7 
16.3 


11 6 


Defiance 


14 


Delaware 


17.2 


Delphos 


13 8 


Dover 


14 5 


Dennlson 


12.5 
8.6 


East Cleveland 


259 
451 
332 
285 
166 
205 
137 
387 


17.8 
19.4 
16.3 
19.2 
14.9 
18.3 
19.0 
68.3 


East Liverpool 


13.5 


Elyria 


13.6 


FIndlay 


13.5 


Fostoria 


14.9 


Fremont 


10 5 


Gallon 


16 8 


Gallipolla 


28 1 


Girard 


17 5 


Greenville 


134 
710 
340 
127 


19.6 
16.8 
23.9 
20.7 


14.6 


Hamilton 


12.9 


Ironton 


17 


Jackson 


16 8 


Kenmoro 


7 6 


Kent 






13 1 


Kenton 


147 
405 
199 
673 


19.7 
24.7 
12.1 
17.5 


16.4 


T4ikewood 


9.2 


Lancaster 


13 9 


Lima 


12 8 


TiOgan 


12 3 


I*oraln 


678 
416 
231 
394 
268 
264 
405 
191 
101 
152 
528 
201 
140 
229 
145 
272 
658 
137 
102 
67 
212 
364 


17.1 
17.8 
15.6 
15.9 
26.1 
16.8 
23.6 
17.2 
15.2 
14.7 
17.0 
23.8 
16.4 
9.4 
24.6 
18.9 
22.0 
21.4 
16 1 


12.3 
11.5 
16 2 


Mansfield 


Marietta 


Marion 


12.7 
17 


Martins Ferry 


Massillon 


11.6 
11.0 
16.1 
12.1 


Middletown ', . 


Mt. Vernon \ 


Nelsonvllle 


New Philadelphia 

Newark 

Nlles 


10.9 
13.3 
11.4 

17 7 


Norwalk 


Norwood 


8 7 


Palnesville 

Piqua 


16.8 
15.2 
12 9 


Portsmouth , 


Ravenna 


17 6 


St. Bernard 


9.9 
12.3 
16 1 


St. Marys 

Salem 


11.1 
21 


Sandusky 


18.0 


13 8 


Shelby 


9 9 


Sidney 


135 


Digitized by 


L.dtfi 



32 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



CITIES— Concluded. 



NUMBER OF DEATHS WITH THE DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULA- 
TION FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919— Concluded. 



cities. 


Number 

of Deaths 

1918. 


Number 

of Deathar 

1919. 


Rate 
1918. 


Rate 
1919. 


Springfield 


1,013 
652 


771 
432 

49 

199 

3,204 

96 

67 
103 
110 

65 
314 
107 

87 
117 

65 

76 

137 

155 

1,884 

471 


19.1 
22.4 


12.8 


Steubenville 


15.3 


Struthers 


8.6 


Tiffin 


258 

4.045 

110 


17.3 
15.4 
17.4 


14.0 


Toledo 


13 1 


Troy 


13.3 


Uhdchsvllle 


10.6 


Urbana 




131 
131 
48 
445 
157 
113 
169 


is. 4 

16.9 
7.3 
32.8 
18.4 
16.4 
18.5 


13 5 


Van Wert 


13.7 


Wapakoneta 


12.3 


Warren 


12 


Washington C. H 


13.5 


Wellston 


13 


Wellsvllle 


13 3 


West Park 


7 9 


Wllmlngfton 






15 


Wooster 


174 

195 

2.825 

612 


28.1 
22.4 
24.3 
19.3 


16 9 


Xenia 


17 1 


Youngstown 


14 5 


ZanesviUe 


16 






Totals • 


45,004 


58.348 


13.1 


18 5 







Digitized by 



Google 



SECRETARY OP STATE. 

COUNTIES. 



33 



NUMBER OF DEATHS WITH THE RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION FOR 
THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919. 



Counties. 



Number 

of Deaths 

1918. 


Number 

of Deaths 

1919. 


Rate 
1918. 


Rate 
1919. 


307 


352 


12.4 


15.6 


1,061 


888 


16.6 


13.1 


337 


300 


13.8 


12.21 


1,001 


862 


15.1 


13.19 


883 


669 


16.0 


13.3 


313 


331 


10.0 


11.8 


1,527 


1,143 


16.9 


12.34 


298 


283 


12.0 


12.4 


1,467 


1,035 


18.0 


12.0 


216 


151 


13.7 


9.36 


390 


309 


14.9 


12.3 


1,358 


1,079 


18.7 


13.5 


482 


377 


16.3 


13.3 


389 


260 


16.4 


12.7 


1,439 


1,057 


17.3 


12.78 


417 


363 


13.6 


12.23 


510 


■ 484 


14.9 


13.55 


14,743 


11,446 


18.4 


13.3 


586 


544 


13.5 


12.67 


309 


316 


12.6 


13.3 


376 


332 


13.5 


12.7 


721 


621 


18.5 


15.6 


517 


500 


11.9 


12.4 


339 


243 


15.6 


11.3 


4.936 


3,920 


18.3 


14.11 


3,003 


3.002 


12.2 


12.9 


604 


362 


23.7 


15.4 


221 


178 


15.1 


11.8 


573 


426 


19.3 


13.6 


712 


494 


14.4 


10.9 


9,932 


7,267 


19.7 


14.8 


512 


393 


13.5 


10.2 


438 


365 


14.4 


12.5 


295 


235 


15.5 


11.98 


262 


249 


10.4 


10.6 


375 


345 


13.1 


12.5 


415 


250 


17.5 


10.7 


208 


208 


11.6 


12.21 


575 


480 


16.1 


14.8 


462 


370 


15.0 


13.4 


1,487 


885 


17.9 


11.5 


467 


371 


14.5 


12.5 


427 


343 


17.8 


12.07 


803 


593 


20.3 


15.0 


932 


689 


14.9 


12.2 


375 


368 


12.5 


12.14 


1.457 


1,118 


15.6 


12.52 


4,433 


3,539 


19.7 


14.2 


301 


222 


15.1 


11.27 


3,729 


2,501 


24.2 


13.7 


607 


528 


15.8 


12.7 


371 


310 


14.9 


11.93 


415 


268 


16.2 


10.23 


326 


272 


11.8 


10.1 


737 


611 


15.8 


12.7 


249 


215 


10.3 


10.32 


3,765 


2,804 


19.6 


13.5 


222 


170 


13.8 


11.7 


173 


193 


10.3 


12.3 


1,041 


775 


17.0 


13.33 


244 


184 


13.1 


10.3 


317 


238 


14.1 


10.7 


228 


214 


10.0 


11.3 


487 


365 


12.7 


10.1 


422 


336 


16.1 


13.0 


225 


191 


14.3 


13.4 


523 


486 


16.8 


13.46 


342 


255 


14.3 


11.0 


381 


307 


12.7 


10.99 


779 


598 


15.4 


10.88 


1,985 


602 


27.7 


14.5 


524 


390 


bigitizM-l^ 


L3OO5; 



Adams 

Allen 

Ashland . . . . 
Ashtabula . . 

Athens 

AuRlaize . . . 
Belmont .... 

Brown 

Butler 

Carroll 

Champaign . 

Clark 

Clermont . . 

Clinton 

Columbiana 
Coshocton . . 
Crawford . . 
Cuyahoga . . 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware . . . 

Erie 

Fairfield .... 

Fayette 

Franklin ... 

Fulton 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey . . 
Hamilton . . . 
Hancock . . . 

Hardin 

Harrison . . . 

Henry 

Highland . . . 

Hocking 

Holmes .... 

Huron 

Jackson .... 
Jefferson . . . 

Knox 

Lake 

Lawrence . . 
Licking .... 

liOgan 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison . . . . 
Mahoning . . 

Marion 

Medina 

Meigs 

Mercer 

Miami 

Monroe .... 
Montgomery 

Morgan 

Morrow .... 
Muskingum . 

Noble 

Ottawa 

Paulding . . . 

Perry 

Pickaway . . 

Pike 

Portage . . . . 

Preble 

Putnam 

Richland ... 

RO80 

SanduslQ^ . . 



!ie 



»— O. G. S. 



34 



OHIO GENERAIi STATISTICS. 

COUNTIES— Concluded. 



NUMBER OF DEATHS WITH THE RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION FOR 
THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919.— Concluded. 



CounUes. 


Number 

of Deaths 

1918. 


Number 

of Deaths 

1919. 


Rate 
1918. 


Rate 

1919. 


Scioto 


1,246 
704 
350 
2,873 
3.482 
1,288 
935 
275 
326 
207 
394 
573 
600 
317 
598 
213 


769 
571 
291 
2.318 
8,030 
961 
772 
228 
289 
159 
312 
578 
484 
320 
544 
241 


22.8 
16.2 
14.2 
19.6 
25.1 
22.2 
15.6 
12.6 
11.2 
15.8 
16.1 
12.6 
15. T 
12.5 
12.9 
10.3 


12.4 


Senoca 


13.19 


Shelby 


11.23 


Stark 


18.8 


Summit 


10.9 


Tmmbuli 


11.62 


Tuscarawas 


12.4 


Union 


10.9 


Van Wert 


10.2 


Vinton 


13.1 


Warren 


12.18 


Washinfton 


13.3 


Wayne 


11.8 


Williams 


18.0 


Wood 


12.1 


Wyandot 


12.3 






Total 


93,965 


72,592 


17.8 


12.7 

















Digitized by 



Google 



SECRETARY OF STATE. 

CITIES. 



35 



NUMBER OF BIRTHS WITH THE BIRTH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION 
FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919. 



cities. 


Number 

of Births 

1918. 


Number 

of Births 

1919. 


Rate 
1918. 


Rate 
1919. 


Akron 


4,664 
507 
187 
553 
140 
469 
388 
160 
102 
117 
247 
312 

2,006 
385 

7,930 

143 

20,650 


4,309 
474 
159 
601 

97 

454 

357 

163 

120 

107 

191 

301 

1.910 

359 

6,943 

118 

18,304 

72 
4,259 
207 
228 
232 
3,117 
142 
162 
115 
146 
172 
204 
431 
459 
290 
154 
236 

81 

65 
137 

95 
762 
287 
112 
300 
124 
138 
683 

86 
288 
864 
1,051 
545 
276 
506 
282 
360 
681 
178 
152 
222 
486 
234 
118 
293 

97 
330 
713 
133 
140 
115 
219 
423 

80 
156 


48.3 
25.1 
20.7 
24.6 
18.8 
80.9 
26.2 
16.8 
16.6 
21.0 
26.2 
22.1 
31.2 
24.4 
19.0 
21.2 
25.5 


20.4 


Alliance 


22.8 


Ashland 


17.4 


Ashtabula 


27.5 


Athens 


15.2 


Barberton 


24.8 


Bellaire 


23.9 


Bellefontaine 


17.6 


Bellevue 


20.9 


Bowling Green 


18.6 


Bucyrus 


18.5 


Cambridge • 


23 1 


Canton 


22.4 


Chillicolhe 


22.7 


Cincinnati 


17.3 


Circleville 


16.7 


Cleveland 


23.3 


Clereland Heights 


4.7 


Columbus 


*4.467 
214 

202 


19.8 
23.0 
16.6 


18.1 


Conneaut 


22.2 


Coshocton 


21 1 


Cuyahoga FaUs 


23.4 


Dayton 


3.289 
117 
146 
114 


25.2 
24.2 
14.6 
20.8 


20.5 


Defiance 


16.1 


Delaware 


18.4 


Delphos 


• 20.1 


Dennison 


26 8 


Dorer 


204 
254 
483 
505 
316 
213 
273 
109 
65 


26.8 
17.5 
20.7 
24.8 
21.3 
19.1 
24.4 
15.1 
11.5 


21.4 


East Cleveland 


7.7 


East LiTerpool 


20,1 


Elyria 


22.7 


Findlay 


17.1 


Fostoria 


15.4 


Fremont 


19.1 


Gallon 


10.9 


Gallipolis 


10.7 


Glrard 


21.4 


Greenrille 


119 
857 
331 
109 


17.4 
20.3 
23.3 
17.8 


13.4 


HainUton . w ... 


19.3 


fronton 


20.5 


Jackson 


19.2 


Kenmore x .... . , . . ..... ..ax * . 


24.7 


Kent 






17.8 
18 


Kenton 


149 
779 


20.0 
47.5 


Lakewood 


16 9 


Logan 


15 7 


Ti«ncaster .......... 


321 
1,016 
974 
588 
296 
568 
288 
400 
687 
193 
179 
219 
512 
203 
112 
310 
94 
332 
771 
163 
149 
123 
255 
482 


19.5 
26.5 
24.6 
25.2 
20.0 
22.9 
28.0 
25.5 
40.1 
17.3 
27.0 
21.2 
16.5 
24.0 
13.2 
12.8 
15.9 
23.1 
25.7 
25.5 
23.5 
20.4 
25.3 
23.8 


19 6 


l.\mtL 


21.2 


Iioraln 


28.5 
19 8 


Mansfield 


v^rletu 


18 4 


Marion 


18.0 
24.5 
20.8 
29.5 
19.2 
23.6 
20.9 
18.2 
18.2- 
15 9 


Martins Ferry 


MMKfillon 


Middletown 


Ml. Vernon 


NelsouTllle 


New Philadelphia 


Newark 


Niles 


Norwalk 


Norwood 


11.9 
13 5 


PainesTille 


Piqua 


22.1 
21.9 
18.6 
22.4 
20.2 
21.4 
18.1 
14.6 


PniTtamiouth 


R^re'niiJL 


St* Bernard 


St. Miirya 


Sftlem 


SAQduAky 


@l»?Iby 


Sidney , .* .* 




177 


jigitizedby 





36 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

CITIES— Concluded. 



NUMBER OF BIRTHS WITH THE BIRTH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION 
FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919-Concluded. 



cities. 


Number 

of Births 

1918. 


Number 

of Births 

1919. 


Bate 
1918. 


Bate 
1919. 


SDrlnsfleld 


1.280 
656 


1,078 
633 
215 
231 

4,770 
136 
124 
107 
106 
106 
633 
135 
173 
215 
97 
77 
144 
151 

3,896 
602 


24.1 
22.6 


17.9 


St6ubenyllle 


22.4 


Struthers 


35.8 


Tlffln 


277 
5,524 
' 147 


18.5 
21.1 
23.3 


16.2 


Toledo 


19.6 


Troy ...• ... 


18.7 


rhrlchsTiUe 


19.5 


Urbana 


i29 
148 
102 
685 
129 
175 
268 


15.2 
19.1 
15.6 
50.5 
15.1 
25.5 
29.4 


14.0 


Van Wert 


13.2 


WapakOQOta 


20.0 


Warren • 


24.2 


Waahinirton C. H 


17.2 


Wellston 


25.8 


WellsTille 


24.4 


West Park 


12.2 


Wilmington 






15.3 


Wooster 


145 

163 

4,155 

642 


23.4 
18.7 
35.8 
20.2 


17.8 


Xenia • • • 


16.6 


Youngstown 


30.0 


Zanesvillfi 


20.4 






Grand toal .' 


76,372 


71.034 


24.2 


20 8 







Digitized by 



Google 



SECBETABY OF STATE. 



87 



NUMBER OF DEATHS IN THE STATE OF OHIO, FROM ALL CAUSES 
AND THE VARIOUS DISEASES FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919, 
WITH RATES PER 100,000, EXCEPTION OF STILLBIRTHS. 



Gauge of Death. 


Number 
1918. 


Number 
1919. 


Rate 
1918. 


Rate 
1919. 




AT.Ty rATJSES 


93,965 

33,216 

771 


72,592 

22,063 

460 


17.82 

629.83 

14.62 


12.7 




T HBNERAL DISEASES 


383.89 


1 


TTnhold fever 


8.00 


2. 
3 






BelansinflT fever ?..... 










4 


Malaria 


20 
22 
270 
170 
687 
497 
14,986 


10 
10 
197 
135 
244 
647 
5,767 


.38 

.42 

5.12 

3.22 

13.03 

9.42 

284.16 


.17 


5 


SmallDoz 


.17 


S 


Measles 


3.43 


7 


Scarlet fever 


2.35 


8. 


Whooping cough 


4.25 


9 


DiDhtheria and crouo .. 


11.26 


10 


Influenza 


100.33 


11 


Military fever 




12 


Asiatic cholera 










13. 


Cholera nostras 


i2 
153 


5 
148 


.23 
2.90 


1.09 


14. 


Dysentery 


2.58 


15. 


Plague 




16 


Yellow fever 










17 












18 


Erysipelas • 


160 

23 

147 


153 

14 

135 


3.03 

.44 

2.79 


2.66 


19. 


Other epidemic diseases 


.24 


20. 


Purulent infection and sentichacuiia 


2.35 


21. 


Glanderff 




22. 


Anthrax 


1 

10 

42 

2 

7 


2 

9 

54 


.02 
.19 
.80 
.04 
.13 


.03 


23. 


Rabies 


.16 


24. 


Tetanus 


.94 


25 


Mycoses 




26. 


Pellagra *. . 


6 


.10 


27. 


Beriberi 






TUBERCULOSIS (Total) 


7,649 

6,445 

142 

393 

309 

88 

53 

141 

78 

31 

593 

62 

4,804 

178 
1,885 
591 
775 
424 
206 

733 

12 

189 

75 


6,542 

5,621 

109 

317 

247 

56 

24 

101 

67 

29 

582 

56 

4,891 

169 
1,842 
596 
783 
461 
215 

820 

13 
139 

78 

4 

926 

198 

25 

96 
269 

49 
152 

10 


145.04 

122.21 
2.69 
7.45 
5.86 
1.67 
1.00 
2.67 
1.48 
.59 
11.24 
1.18 

91.09 

3.38 

35.74 

11.21 

14.70 

8.04 

3.91 

13.90 

.23 
3.58 
1.42 


114.60 


?8 


Tuberculosis of lungs 


97.81 


29. 


Acute miliary tuberculosis 


1.90 


30. 


Tuberculosis meningitis 


5.52 


31. 


Abdominal tuberculosis 


4.30 


32. 


Pott* 8 disease 


.97 


33. 


White swellings 


.42 


34. 


Tuberculosis of other organs 


1.76 


35 


Disseminated tuberculosis 


1.17 


36. 


Ricketa 


.50 


37 


Syphilis 


10.13 


38. 


Gonococcus infection 


.97 




CANCER AND OTHER MALIGNANT 

TUMORS 


48.10 


39 


Cancer of buccal cavity 


2.94 


40. 


Cancer of stomach and liver 


32.05 


41. 

42. 


Cancer of peritonaeum, intestines, rectum 

Cancer of female genital organs 


10.37 
13.71 


43. 


Cancer of breast , . . . . 


8.02 


44. 


Cancer of skin 


3.74 


45. 


Cancer of other organs, or of organs not 
specified 


14.27 


46. 


Other tumors (tumors of the female genital 


.23 


47 


AcuIa aricular rheumatism 


2.42 


48 




1.36 


49 


Scurvy • • • 


.07 


50 


Diabetes 


893 
188 

26 

90 
333 

45 

238 

6 

2 

12 


16.93 

3.56 

.49 

1.71 

6.31 

.85 

4.51 

.11 

.04 

.23 


16.11 


51 




3.45 


52 


Addifionn disease 


.44 


53. 


lieuchaemla 


1.67 


54 




4.68 


55 




.85 


56 


Alcoholism (acute or chronic) 


2.64 


57 




.17 


58. 
59. 






Other chronic poisonings 


8 


.ii 



Digitized by 



Google 



38 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



NUMBER OF DEATHS IN THE STATE OF OHIO, FROM ALL CAUSES 
AND THE VARIOUS DISEASES FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919. 
WITH RATES PER 100,000, EXCEPTION OF STILLBIRTHS— Continued. 



Cause of Death. 



Number 
1918. 



Number 
1919. 



Rate 
1918. 



Rate 
1919. 



60. 

61a. 

61b. 

61c. 

62. 

60a. 

63a. 

63b. 

64. 

65. 

66. 

67. 

68. 

69. 

70. 

71. 

72. 

73. 

74 

75. 

76. 



77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 

82. 
83. 

84. 

85. 



86. 

87. 

88. 

89. 

90. 

91. 

92a. 

92b. 

93. 

94. 

95. 

96. 

97. 

98. 



100. 
101. 
102. 
103. 

104. 

105. 

106. 

107. 

108. 

109.a 

109b. 

110. 

111. 



n. DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 



Encephalitis 

Simple Meningitis 

Cerebro spinal meningitis (undefined) . 

Cerebrospinal feyer 

Locomotor ataxia 

Sleeping sickness 

Acute anterior poliomyelitis 

Other diseases of spinal cord 

Cerebral hemorrhage, apoplexy 

Softening of the brain 

Paralysis without specified cause 

General paralysis of the insane 

Other forms of mental alienation 

Epilepsy 

Convulsions (nonpuerperal) 

Convulsions of infants 

Chorea 

Neuralgia and neuritis 

Other diseases of the nervous system. . 
Diseases of the eyes and their annexa. 
Diseases of the ears 



in. DISEASES OF CIRCULATORY SYSTEM. 

Pericarditis 

Acute endocarditis 

Organic diseases of the heart 

Angina pectoris 

Diseases of the arteries, atheroma, 

eneurysm, etc 

Embolism and thrombosis 

Diseases of the veins, (varices, 

haemorrhoids, phlebitis, etc.) 

Diseases of the lymphatic system 

(lymphangitis, etc.) 

Hemorrhage, other diseases of the circu- 
latory system 



IV. DISEASES OP THE RESPIRATORY 
SYSTEM 



Diseases of the nasal fossae 

Diseases of the larnyx .' 

Diseases of the thyreoid body 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Broncho pneumonia 

Lobar pneumonia 

Pneumonia (undefined) 

Pleurisy 

Pulmonary congestion, pulmonary apoplexy. 

Gangrene of the lung 

Asthma 

Pulmonary emphysema 

Other diseases of the respiratory system... 

V. DISEASES OP THE DIGESTIVE 

SYSTEM 



Diseases of the mouth and annexa 

Diseases of the pharynx 

Diseases of the oesophagus 

Ulcer of the stomach 

Other diseases of the stomach (cancer 

excepted) 

Diarrhoea and enteritis (under 2 years) 

Diarrhoea and enteritis (2 years and over).. 

Ankylostomiasis 

Intestinal parasites 

Appendicitis and tyhlltls 

Hernia 

Intestinal obstruction 

Other diseases of Intestines 

Acute yellow atrophy of the liver 



8,431 

39 
190 

40 
161 
182 



55 
285 
5,836 
108 
201 
426 
224 
232 

12 
139 

15 

45 

121 

3 

117 

11.283 

67 

400 

8.581 

485 

1.519 
165 

27 

23 

16 



14.246 

3 

45 

34 

448 

273 

3.223 

9.605 

214 

124 

60 

11 

136 

11 

59 



7.015 

28 
111 

1 
262 

534 

2,733 

664 

1 

7 

641 

244 

430 

97 

15 



7.977 

67 

162 

40 

63 

140 

28 

36 

280 

5.797 

106 

196 

338 

142 

195 

9 

113 

9 

38 

113 

2 

103 

10,469 

60 

381 

7,659 

506 

1.579 
232 

17 

18 

17 



8,168 

10 

47 

28 

445 

255 

2.891 

4,007 

143 

88 

66 

8 

128 

12 

40 



6.292 

34 

101 

9 

207 

573 

2,213 

576 



3 

639 

239 

445 

85 

22 



159.87 

.74 

3.60 

.76 

3.05 

3.45 



1.04 
5.40 
110.66 
2.05 
3.81 
8.08 
4.25 
4.40 

.28 
2.64 

.28 

.85 
2.29 

.06 
2.22 

213.94 

1.27 

7.58 

162.71 

9.20 

28.80 
3.13 

.51 

.44 

.30 



270.13 

.06 

.85 

.64 

8.49 

5.18 

61.11 

182.13 

4.06 

2.35 

1.14 

.21 

2.58 

.21 

1.12 



133.02 

.53 
2.10 

.02 
4.97 

10.13 

51.82 

12.59 

.02 

.13 

12.15 

4.63 

8.15 

1.84 



138.80 

1.17 
2.82 

.70 
1.10 
2.44 

.49 

.63 
4.87 
100.87 
1.84 
3.41 
5.88 
2.47 
3.39 

.16 
1.97 

.16 

.66 
1.97 

.03 
1.79 

182.16 

1.04 

6.63 

133.27 

8.80 

27.47 
4.04 

.30 

.31 

.30 

142.12 

.17 

.82 

.49 

7.74 

4.44 

50.30 

69.72 

2.49 

1.53 

1.15 

.14 

2.23 

.21 

.70 

109.48 

.59 
1.76 

.16 
3.60 

9.97 
38.50 
10.02 



.05 

11.12 

4.16 

7.74 

1.48 



Digitized by 



o'bogi^ 



SECRETARY OP STATE. 



39 



NUMBER OF DEATHS IN THE STATE OF OHIO, FROM ALL CAUSES 
AND THE VARIOUS DISEASES FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919, 
WITH RATES PER 100,000, EXCEPTION OF STILLBIRTHS— Continued. 



Cause of Death. 



112. 
113. 
114. 
116. 
116. 
117. 
118. 



119. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 
124. 
125. 
126. 
127. 

128. 
129. 
130. 
131. 
132. 

133. 



134. 
135. 
136. 
137. 
138. 
139. 

140. 
141. 



142. 
143. 
144. 
145. 



146. 
147. 



148. 
149. 



150a. 
150b. 
150c. 



15U. 
151b. 
152a. 
152b. 
153. 



154. 



Hydatid tumor of the liver 

Cirrhosis of the liver 

Biliary calculi 

Other diseases of the Uver 

Diseases of the spleen 

Simple peritonitis (non-puerperal) 

Other diseases of the digestive system 

TI. DISEASES OF THE GENITOURINARY 
SYSTEM 



Acute nephritis 

Brlght's disease 

Chylurla 

Other diseases of kidneys and anneza 

Calculi of the urinary passage 

Diseases of the bladder 

Diseases of the urethra, urinary abscess, etc. 

Diseases of the prostate 

Nonrenereal diseases of the male organs — 

genital •• 

Uterine hemorrhage (non-puerperal) 

Uterine tumor (non-cancerous) 

Other diseases of the uterus 

Cysts and other tumors of the ovary 

Salpingitis and other diseases of the 

female genital organs 

Nonpuerperal diseases of the breast, 

(cancer excepted) 



Vn. THE PUERPERAL STATE. 



Accidents of pregnancy 

Puerperal hemorrhage 

Other accidents of labor 

Puerperal septichaemia 

Puerperal albuminuria and convulsions 

Puerperal phlegmasia alba dolens embolus, 

sudden death 

Following childbirth (not otherwise defined). 
Puerperal diseases of the breast 



vn.. DISEASES OF THE SKIN.. 



Gangrene 

Furuncle 

Acute abscess 

Other diseases of the skin and annexa. 



rX. DISEASES OP THE BOXES 

Diseases of the bones (tuberculosis excepted) . 
Diseases of the bones, joints, (Tul>ercuiosis 

and rheumatism excepted) 

Amputation 

Other diseases of organs of locomotion 



X. MALFORMATIONS 



Hydrocephalus 

Congenital malformation of heart. 
Other congenital malformations. . . 



XI. EARLY INFANCY. 



Premature birth 

Congenital debility (atrophy, marasmus), etc. 

Injuries at birth 

Other causes peculiar to early Infancy 

Lack of care 

Xn. OLD AGE 

Senility 



Number 
1918. 



674 

223 

247 

13 

65 

25 



5,375 

290 

4,289 

1 

117 

34 

78 

15 

261 



1 

113 
46 

47 



65 



1,171 

299 
93 
185 
386 
180 

24 

4 



219 

112 
29 
22 

56 

125 

107 

16 



2 

1.051 

71 
685 
295 

4,034 

2,484 

739 

420 

377 

14 

769 

769 



Number 
1919. 



4 

574 

249 

222 

15 

65 

17 



5,125 

322 
4,025 



80 
32 

108 
18 

215 

14 

1 

129 

44 

37 



4 

822 

155 

77 

80 

302 

178 

23 
5 
2 

209 

98 
41 
35 
35 

104 

96 

5 

"'3' 

884 



71 
566 
247 

3,721 

2,267 
669 
432 
346 

7 

775 
775 



Rate 
1918. 



12.78 
4.23 
4.68 

.25 
1.23 

.47 



101.92 

5.67 
81.33 

.02 
2.22 

.64 
1.48 

.28 
4.95 

.17 
.02 
2.14 
.87 
.89 

1.23 



* 22.20 

5.67 
1.76 
3.51 
7.32 
3.41 

.45 

.08 



4.15 

2.12 
.55 

.42 
1.06 

2.37 

2.03 

.30 

*"*.04 

19.93 

1.35 

12.99 

5.59 

76.49 

47.10 

14.01 

7.96 

7.15 

.27 

14.58 

14.58 



Rate 
1919. 



.07 
9.99 
4.83 
3.86 

.26 
1.13 

.29 



89.18 



5.60 
70.03 



1.39 
.56 

1.88 
.31 

3.74 

.24 
.02 
2.24 
.77 
.64 

1.67 

.07 

14.30 

2.70 
1.34 
1.39 
5.25 
3.10 

.40 
.09 
.03 

3.64 

1.70 
.71 
.61 
.61 

1.81 

1.67 

.09 

'***.05 

15.38L 

1.24 
9.85 
4.30 

64.74 

39.44 

11.64 

7.52 

6.02 

.12 

13.49 

13.49 



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dO 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



NUMBER OF DEATHS IN THE STATE OF OHIO, FROM ALL CAUSES 
AND THE VARIOUS DISEASES FOR THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919, 
WITH RATES PER 100,000, EXCEPTION OF STILLBIRTHS— Concluded. 



Cause of Death. 



Number 
1918. 



Number 
1919. 



Rate 
1918. 



Rate 
1919. 



Xni. EXTERNAL CAUSES. 



155. 
156. 
157. 
158. 
159. 
160. 
161. 
162. 
163. 



164. 
165. 
166. 
167. 
168. 
169. 
170. 
171. 

172. 

173a. 

173b. 

174. 

175a. 

175b. 

175c. 

175d. 

175e. 

176. 

177. 

178. 

179. 

180. 

181. 



182. 
183. 
184. 
185. 
186. 



187. 
188. 
189a. 
189b. 



SlUCIDK TOTAT; 

Suicide bj? [If H ^1 Ti 

SuJeMe by n^^t-hyxla 

Sulclide fiy bnn. iip or strangulation 

Sulc'jdo by drnn rilng 

Sulfide by fin ,. r lis 

Suicide by nairnr or piercing instruments. 

Suldde hy jums^ ig from high places 

Suicide b^' cnUiing 

Other sulcldi :^ .. . 



ACCIDENTAL OR UNDEriNED (Total) . 



Poisoning by food 

Other acute poisonings 

Conflagration 

Bums (conflagration excepted) . . . . 

Adsorption of deleterious gases 

Accidental drowning 

Traumatism by firearms 

Traumatism by cutting or piercing 

instruments 

Traumatism by fall 

Traumatism in mines 

Traumatism in quarries 

Traumatism by machines 

Railroad accidents 

Street car a^ident^ 

Automobile accidents 

Injuries by other vehicles 

Landslide, other crushing 

Injuries by animals 

Starvation 

Excessive cold 

Effects of heat 

Lightning 

Electricity (lightning excepted) 



HOMICIDE TOTAL. 



Homicide by firearms 

Homicide by cutting or piercing instruments. 

Homicide by other means 

Fractures (cause not specified) 

Other external violence 



XIV. ILLDEFINED DISEASES.. 



Illdeflned organic diseases. 

Sudden death 

Illdefined 

Not specified, or unknown. 



XV. 

000. SUllblrths 



6,458 

722 

142 

6 

128 

59 

316 

55 

5 

10 

1 

5,259 

56 
111 

91 
456 
155 
361 
119 

13 

944 

155 

5 

219 

903 

204 

668 

154 

29 

51 

2 

35 

159 

23 

78 

477 

289 
86 

102 
40 

228 

572 

10 

61 

102 

399 



5,341 



5,543 

723 
150 

10 
156 

70 
269 

46 

12 
6 
4 

4,403 

52 
105 

83 
427 
113 
344 
101 

14 

823 

135 

5 

202 

550 

185 

641 

132 

30 

53 

2 

11 

59 

11 

82 

417 

258 
52 

107 
36 

207 

439 

14 

38 

140 

247 



4,440 



122.45 

13.69 

2.69 

.11 

2.43 

1.12 

5.99 

1.04 

.09 

.19 

.02 

99.72 

1.06 
2.10 
1.73 
8.65 
2.94 
6.85 
2.26 

.25 
17.90 

2.94 
.09 

4.15 
17.12 

3.87 
12.67 

2.92 
.55 
.98 
.04 
.66 

3.01 
.44 

1.48 

9.04 

5.48 
1.63 
1.93 
.76 
4.32 

10.85 

.19 
1.16 
1.93 
7.57 



101.27 



96.45 

12.50 

2.61 

.17 

2.71 

1.22 

4.68 

.80 

.21 

.10 

.07 

77.10 

.90 
1.83 
1.44 
7.43 
1.97 
5.99 
1.76 

.24 
14.32 

2.35 
.09 

3.51 

9.57 

3.22 
11.15 

2.30 
.52 
.92 
.03 
.19 

1.03 
.19 

1.43 

7.40 

4.49 
.90 

1.86 
.63 

3.60 

7.64 

.24 

.66 

2.44 

4.30 



77.26 



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SECRBTABT OP STATE. 41 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 



DIVISION OF AUTOMOBILES. 

Probably the most important branch of the Secretary of State's 
office is the automobile department, the detail and volume of which has 
become one of the most important units of state administration and 
state revenues. It had its inception in 1908. Its remarkable growth is 
emphasized in the following statement which covers a period of thirteen 
years; 

Vehicles Operating 

Year. Registered. Revenues. Percentage. 

1908 11,026 $55,130 00 27.1 

1909 23,003 115,015 00 26.3 

1910 32,941 164,205 00 25.4 

1911 45,788 228,940 00 22.4 

1912 63,118 315,590 00 18.2 

1913 86,156 430,780 00 13.6 

1914 122,504 612,520 00 12.9 

1915 181,332 906,660 00 9.2 

1916 254,121 1,270,605 00 7.8 ' 

1917 350,618 1,753,090 00 7.4 

1918 413,578 2,242,800 00 6.3 

1919 - 511,031 4.7 

1920 620,000 approx. 3.8 

In December, 1919, the legislature amended the law and enacted a 
measure regulating registrations under a graduated horse power rating 
for passenger cars and trucks and an additional weight fee for all truck 
and commercial vehicles. This was done for the purpose of raising funds 
for road and street maintenance and repairs. The measure has proved 
successful and very satisfactory. Though increasing the expense of 
operating the department it has added additional revenues to the amount 
of probably $4,000,000. Each county and each municipal incorporation 
receives 50 per cent of the tax on all vehicles owned and registered there- 
from. 

The issuing of 600,000 sets of license plates under the new law with 
its attendant record and detail is a matter of much concern to the Secre- 
tary of State and requires the closest attention and application by the 
entire automobile department. Lack of office room and space for ship- 
ping and mailing has been partly taken care of by the appointment of 
automobile clubs as deputy registrars. By this means only have the car 
owners of Ohio been supplied with license plates without delay and 
without embarrassment from traffiic officers; and to the numerous auto- 
mobile clubs who have assisted in the distribution of **tags," the Secre- 
tary of State is under lasting obligation. 

An entire volume might easily be written on the progress of auto- 
mobile industry and highway improvement. In thirteen years Ohio's 

Digitized by ^OOQ 16 



d2 OHIO GENBBAL STATISTICS. 

revenues for vehicle registration have grown from fifty-five thousand to 
nearly seven million dollars, annually. From the noisy ''rattletrap," 
chugging along at fifteen miles an hour, we have a marvel of engineering 
skill gliding over the asphalt streets and roads without a sound and so 
easily controlled that a child may operate. Eailroad express train rec- 
ords of speed between Columbus and Indianapolis have been equalled 
and in some instances surpassed by the automobile. Such feats of speed 
have been made possible by an equal progress in highway building. 
State roads that were practically impassable thirteen years ago, have 
been turned into boulevards. Such work seems only to have commenced. 
More than one billion dollars is now available for road building and 
maintenance in the United States, five hundred and fifty million of which 
will be expended in 1921. 

The constitution of Kansas prohibits that state from engaging in 
internal improvement but that diflBculty Was removed by a referendum 
at the recent election. The people out there recognize the necessity of 
automobiles and consequently of good roads. 

New Jersey has bonded its state for twenty-nine million dollars for 
the purpose of the state's share of the cost of a vehicular tunnel under 
the Hudson river, connecting with New York City, automobile traffic 
having become so great that ferry boats are inadequate. 

The automobile and rubber industry has become the second lai^est 
industry in the United States which means the second largest in the 
world. In this particular Ohio ranks first. No state in the Union ex- 
ceeds Ohio's vehicle registration. Ohio is also first in rubber and third 
in automobile production. 



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SBCRETARY OP STATE. 43 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 



DIVISION OF STATE PURCHASING AGENT. 

The Eighty-second General Assembly of Ohio by an act provided 
for a department of purchase to be attached to the department of Secre- 
tary of State, and effective July 1, 1917. 

Under its provisions the Secretary of State appoints jbhe purchasing 
agent and all necessary clerks and assistants. 

The act provides that it shall be unlawful for any elective or ap- 
pointing state officer, board or commissioner ''other than those excepted 
under section 4" to procure or purchase any supplies or equipment other 
than from the state purchasing department. 

The Auditor of State and the Secretary of State may decide that at 
times it is impractical for such officers to obtain any such supplies or 
equipment from the purchasing department and may issue a release or 
permit to purchase other than from the purchasing department. 

An appropriation of $40,000 was made by the state emergency board, 
placed to the credit of the purchasing department, and is known as the 
Rotary fund. 

All purchases made are paid for out of this fund, supplies are dis- 
posed of at cost to the various departments of state, and the fund is 
reimbursed at the end of each month after statements have been compiled 
by the Auditor of State. 

AU supplies and equipment authorized to be purchased and fur- 
nished by the state purchasing department shall be purchased by the 
state purchasing agent through competitive bidding, except where such 
supplies or equipment are purchased pursuant to section 1847 of the 
General Code. 

The law provides that the purchasing agent shall establish a state 
exchange department. Supplies and equipment abandoned by state de- 
partments and (whenever any department of state is abolished) all sup- 
plies and equipment in the possession of such department are required 
to be taken over by the exchange department. 

Articles taken over by this department must be appraised by the 
purchasing agent, and when necessary repaired or renovated and again 
disposed of to other departments of state at the appraised price plus 
cost of repair, freight and drayage. 

The Secretary of State and Auditor of State may determine from 
time to time to dispose of certain supplies and equipment on the open 
market ; the proceeds of such sales to be credited to the general revenue 
fund. 

The total amount of commodities purchased and consigned to the 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



44 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

various departments of state during the year, or from July 1, 1919, to 
July 1, 1920, was $328,852.62. 

The following is a statement showing the condition of the Rotary 
fund at the close of business June 30, 1919 : 

ASSETS. 

Bills receivable $6,481 27 

Bills receivable, June 1920 32,530 79 

Inventory— Stock July 1, 1920 6,814 55 

Total $45,826 61 

Treasury balance - 4,987 12 

$50,813 73 

LIABILITIES. 

Appropriation— Rotary fund $40,000 00 

Bais payable 6,644 02 

Supplies on hand July 1, 1919 3,905 46 

Cash discounts to July 1, 1920 254 92 

$50,804 40 
Less unaccounted for 9 33 

$50,813 73 

The following is statement of cash receipts from sale of grand stand, 
iron and waste paper from July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920, deposited with 
Treasurer of State credit general revenue fund : 

Grand stand $200 00 

Old iron .- 69 98 

Waste paper 383 21 

Total $653 19 



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REPORT OF THE AUDIT OR OF STATE 

STATEMENT No, 1 

SHOWING THE STATE FINANCES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 
JUNE 30. 1920. 

(a) CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF THE CASH OF ALL FUNDS. 

Balance in treasury subject to draft at beginning of year July 1, 1919. $6,898,385 50 
Receipts 31,592,058 27 

Total to be accounted for $38,490,443 77 

Disbursements 29,479,260 84 

Balance in treasurv subject to draft at close of year June 30, 1920 $9,011,182 93 

Add to above balance total amount of warrants unpaid and outstand- 
ing at close of business June 30, 1920 596,703 11 

Automobile registration District fund for counties: 9,607,891 01 

Receipts $2,340,558 50 

Disbursements 241,892 42 

Balance in treasury June 30, 1920, Due counties 2,098,666 0^ 

Cash balance to be accounted for by treasurer of state at close of year 

June 30, 1920_ $11,703,557 12 

(b) CONDENSED STATEMENT OF THE SEVERAL STATE FUNDS. 



Fond 



Balanoe* 

subject to draft 

July 1, 1919. 



General Revenne^ 
Snkinf , ^ ■ ,, 



Conunon SchooL 

TJnivenity. 

Highmor 

Liquor 



School and Ministerial Trust. 



Sehoo 'and Miniaterial Land Rental . 
Totala^^ 



Transfers- 



I2 09U74 84 
2^33 



434.442 12 

4,240893 51 

117.116 91 

1U90 72 

744 57 



$6,898,385 50 



Receipts 

and 
Transfen. 



•11.412.663 16 

24,448.949 78 

*303319 15 

86.613 45 

•2J287,017 81 

512.715 19 

861.104 13 
*3.656.992 94 
5.632.609 92 



*61 85 
82.996 53 

17.069 27' 



131 592.058 27 
•7,660.554 91 



Totals. 



$27,953,187 28 

342,655 93 

2.799 783 00 

1.295,546 25 

13,530.496 37 

117,116 91 

94.449 10 

17.813 84 



$46,150,908 68 



Disbursements 

and 

Transfers. 



*$64!47.708 33 

$20,774 415 17 

•34 94 

822482 84 

2.799.093 00 
•1,295,546 25 



5.555.467 65 

•117.116 91 

tl6 70 

11.533 51 

•148 48 

15.985 37 



$29,479,260 84 
•7.660.554 91 



Balances 

subject to draft 

June 30. 1920. 



$931,063 78 

20.438 15 

40 00 



7.975.028 72 

16 70 

82.915 59 

1.679 99 



$9,011,182 93 



•IVansfers. 

tVTsrrants returned and cancelled thereby reducing the total disborsements for the year by this amount. 

(c) COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE CASH BALANCES IN THE 
SEVERAL FUNDS AND THE TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS STANDING 
AGAINST EACH AT CLOSE OF YEAR JUNE 30, 1920. 



Funds. 



I Cash balances [Total approfm- 1 Excess of appro-] Excess of cash 
I subject to draft] ations in force | priations over I balances over 
I June 30. 1919. | June 30, 1919. | cash balances. | appropriationB. 



-I- 

$931,063 78| $6,845,330 85 1 $5,914,267 07U 
20.438 151 211.677 661 191.230 51 U 
40 00[ 2.711.265 00| 2.711.225 00| . 



General Rerenue... 
Sinkings 



Ccnnmon SdiooL 
Unirerflty-. 



Hj^way 

Uqnor License. 



Sebool and Mmisterial TVust 

Behool and Ministerial Land RentaL 



Totals.. 



7,975.028 72 

16 70 

82.915 59 

1.679 99 



I $9.0 



13.186.519 97 



1.011.182 93] $23,039,389 06 $14,028,222 83 



5.211.491 25 



$16 70 



$16 70 



UigitizedbyV-iOOQ lC 



45) 



4i 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS, 

STATEMENT No. 2 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES FOH FISCAL YEAR 
JULY 1, 1919 TO JUNE 30, 1920, INCLUSIVE. 

Arranged by departmentB. Those dDpartmenta arc furlJier arranged, m far as 
practicable, alphabetic all 3% by the subject of their respective activities, so that if 
it is desired to find the receipts collected under a department, think of the subject 
with which it deals, and look for that subject in the alphabetical arraDgement. 



Departmental 


Sources of Revenue, 


Items. 


Total Receipts 
Departments. 


Adjutant GeneraL ____.__._ 


Kenta— Wyandotte Buildmg. . . _ 
Armory rents ,.*.__..,^.,__ 

Wast© paper eold,—*^*^-^^,^*^ 


1825 00 

3,392 92 

51 34 

I 25 

47 50 

206 00 

188 00 

3,159 75 

90 






Rosters sold . .___ 






Jiifik - ^ ^^ 






Gas engine— Wyandotte build- 
ing ._ ,-„ 

TJ, S. Government— Damage 
Camp Perry 






Refun(6— Balancefl 0. N, G._. 
RefundB-C. U, TeL Co,,.....: 

Central warehouse— sales of gro- 
ceries and supplies to state 
institutions .. ^ - . ,^ . » 

Stock breeding feea^ .-^. 


$7,872 m 


Administration, Ohio Board of _. 


598,916 95 
105 00 
140 00 

5 22 

300 00 
13 25 

730,576 46 




Stock sales __, 






Books^Greatest Problem of 
Race, ,,,,.^,_*_.*^^,.^,^,-»^ 


■ 




Sale of Ford car .^^---...^ 






Refund— dupl ica te p a>'mcnt 

Products of met i tut ions' farms 
sold to various institutions^^* 

Calves sold 

Hides sold.. ......... . ^. ... 


$1,330,056 88 


Feeble Minded— Tngtilution for- 


S421 00 

4S4 35 

278 70 

13 60 

67 75 

280 00 

41 64 

185 00 

17 91 

17 41 




Empty barrels and sacks sold.. 

Labon making clothing .... 

Junk and paper.^ _., .. 






Livestock ......---.^ ..,*. 






Refund— freight,.....— ._..-,.. 

Refund— salaries. ...,. 

Refund— on lamps. ..^ , 






Refund— coaL , - . , _., . . * ..• 






Clothing for inmates paid by 
counties. .*,..-..,^-., . 


$1,807 26 


Ath^iB State HofipitaL..^-..-^- 


|17,0Q5 71 

68 25 

124 11 

1,726 15 

20 00 

26 80 

70 00 

115 30 

735 63 






. 


House rent-.. -. .... 

Hides sold..... ...^-. 






Live stock sold 






Ammonia cvlinder ...-.- 






Bnipty barrels, ..,»...-..._. 






Priae for Holsteins..,.,*.,,**^. 






Fire piimp._ ___ ,. 

Refunds.* ^..__. 








119,980 85 



AUDITOR OP STATE. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



47 



Departments. 


Sources of Revenue. 


Items. 


Total Receipts 
Departments. 


Cleveland State Hospital 


Clothing and supplies for in- 
mates 


$19,937 60 

122 60 

2100 

8 12 

238 

38 63 






Jimk, rags, bones 






Empty barrels 






Hices sold 






Overpayment — sugar 






Refund freight, express and 
water 






Clothing and supplies for in- 
mates 


$20,130 23 


Columbus State Hospital 


$23,660 50 
2,412 80 




Scrap iron, copper, paper and 
bags 






Clothing and supplies for in- 
mates. 


$25,973 30 


Dayton State Hospital 


$9,237 64 

620 00 

346 37 

186 66 

41 75 

160 

1 60 




Calves sold___ 






Hides 






Junk and waste 






Prizes 






Kindling ^ 

Bale straw .;. 






Clothing and supplies fbr in- 
mates _. 


$10,334 32 


Ohio Hospital for Epileptics 


$18,094 14 
740 60 
199 48 
698 00 

89 27 
2,064 77 

16 25 
449 38 

10 00 

38 57 




Burial of inmates by counties— 
Hides sold : 






Calves sold 






Junk, waste and ipaterial sold.. 
Live stock 






Lard, tallow and cracklings 

Water sold 






Old carriages 






Refunds _ ._ 






Clothing and supplies for in- 
mates 


$22,400 36 


Lima State Hosoital ^ 


$11,434 59 
286 61 

10 20 

11 20 
505 00 

60 








Hides sold 






Rags sold 






Wool sold 






Calves sold 






Refund— freight 






Refund — discount 


$12,248 10 


lionirview Hosoital 


$6 60 
37 70 




Refund— stock lost in transit .. 

Clothing and supplies— counties 
Clothing and supplies— individ- 
uals 


$44 30 


Massillon State Hospital 


$29,940 84 

24 39 

705 00 

671 09 

2,044 76 

303 25 

63 00 

24 00 

36 32 




Calves sold 






.Tunic soM 






Wheat 






Hides sold 






Pump and pipe 






Meals and lodging 






Refunds 








bom'''' 




Digitized by V3 



48 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



Departments. 


Sources of Revenue. 


Items. 


Total Receqjts 
Departm^its. 


Toledo State Hospital 


Clothing and supplies for in- 
mates 


$26,596 41 

270 38 

727 25 

783 00 

1,869 45 

53 97 










Hides sold 






JiinV flold , 






Live stock 






Wheat 






Refunds 






Room rent 


$30,300 46 


Juvenile Research, Bureau of 


$12 00 

111 50 

6 75 




Meals 












Meals and lodsrinir , 


$130 25 


Madison Home 


$35 50 

800 

24 40 

115 00 

23 42 

500 

660 




Calves sold 






Jimk sold 






Cow sold 






Farm products 






Surrey 




, 


Refund 






Admissions from visitors to pen- 
itentiary 


$217 92 


Ohio Penitentiary 


$5,368 00 
45 00 

66 85 

719 47 

802 50 

26 30 

47 31 

577,634 27 
261 99 
319 09 








House rent 






Subscriptions to penitentiary 
news 






Junk and waste sold 






Meal tickets 






Plants 






Refunds 






Sale of manufactured products 
to state and other taxing dis- 
tricts 






Enmings refunded 






Refuncb— freight and express. . . 
Sale of brick _ 


$585,290 78 


Brick Plant 


$53,681 30 

177 21 

240 




Coal, meals, ice 






Telephone 






Live stock sold . - ..i 


$53,860 91 


New Prison Farm 


$1,239 40 
162 11 

79 11 
246 50 

32 40 
590 00 




Hides sold 






Farm products sold 






Onions spoiled in transit 

Iron sold > __ 






Catalogue 






Admission from visitors to re- 
formatory 


$2,349 52 


Ohio Reformatory, Mansfield— . 


$125 00 

1,266 50 

387 89 

31 50 

156 00 

1,750 00 

58 43 

371,799 02 




Live stock sold 






Hides soldw 






Junk sold 






RenV 






Meals 






RfifiTnHs 






Sale of manufactured products to 
state and other taxing districts 

Board of Federal Prisoners 


$375,574 34 


Reformatory, Women 


$297 00 




$297 00 



Digitized by ^OOQ IC 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 



m 



STATEMENT No, 2— Coatmued. 



Depart menta. 


Sonrcea oi Reveoue. 


I Items. 


Total Reeeiptfl 
Departments. 


Oliio Sanatorium „._^ ^ _,_.___ 


Support of inmates paid by_- 

coimtiefl and indivicluala ... 

Li vc etOL'k sold ^^ _, 


$38,304 22 

450 10 

2S2 05 

110 88 

63 16 

40 00 

2 60 

46 74 


1 




Milk sold.... ....„„ 






Sat kg gold _.,_..,_.. *.-,— 

Hides and tallow. .„._.. 






Board .. . .. 






Junk sold..... , _^,^^ 






Refunds ... *„,- ^^^ -. 






Clothing and supplies for inmates 

Individual accounts.., .^,*. 

Tuition fees— .,^ ^._..-,., — . 

Centenary fund .,— .. 


$39,300 m 


State School for Blmd„___._,., 


$170 58 

71 89 

600 00 

440 25 

351 00 

50 70 








ih A. R. fund...... _. 






Miscellaneous.. ..... -,- 

Dairy products sold . . 


$1,693 42 


Boys' Industrial School ........ 


$158 75 
3S4 95 

13 00 
626 21' 
867 24 

46 00 
153 30 

17 94 


Live stock sold. . .. ._, 






Journal subseriptions. _. . „_ . - — - 
Meals sold ^_,**^....,— ..__ 






Junk sold ......-.- ._.__ 






Ice gold , .: , ...^- 






H ides sold -,. ^^^ 






Refunds- _ _ .^... . 






Clothing and supplies paid by 
counties. ,,,^.. ^ ^~. 


$2,267 39 


State School for Denf _ ....._... 


$2,229 25 

1,238 63 

233 21 

182 90 

67 33 

2,127 32 

3^17 52 

38 19! 

52 00 

OS 03 




Cloth in IE and supplies paid by 
imlividuats ._ .^^^^ 






Jimk sold,,,,,,.,^ , , ...... 






Borird __......._.. 

Tuition.................... 






H ooni rents. , -^ ^. 






Swinimmg privilei^ea. ... ... 

CoiiTerente of superintendents ,, 
Nurse hire . ^,^ 






Kefunds,,_,...^,.,__, .. 

Two mules sold ...„,., 

Meals sold.,..^ ..,,...^... 

Ammonia cylinder , .... 

Hefuuda. ._^_.. ...._.. 


16,584 3^ 


Gi rla" Indiistrial Home , . 


$175 00 

70 
20 00 
60 36 




Grease and bones contract,,.... 
Swill sold _. ..... 


$256 m 


Ohio Soldiers* & Sailors' Home* 


$250 00 

330 00 

715 92 

25 00 

41 35 




Old clothing, barrels and junk.. 
Ammonia ty liuder ^ 






Hefunda.^ _.,... ^.„_..,..**,... 

Fertihsser licenses sold. 

Feed stnfTa licenacs sold ,_^.. 

Seed licenses sold ^,,, .... 


$1,362 27 


Agrieulture, Ohio Stute Board of . . . 


|1S,3TO 00 

20,5"W 00 

10,540 00 

1,175 00 

87 00 

381 00 

MO 00 

160,387 p 

Digitized by v^ 




A gri culture lime licenses sold... 

iSpec i al f e r t i 1 izer anal y si s 

8]jecial feed stuffs analysis,. ... 
Nursery and orchard inspection 

fees ....... 

State fair receipts _-—«-- 


lOOQle 



fiO 



OHIO geneeaij statistics. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



Departments . 



Sources of Revenue. 



Items. 



Agriculture, Ohio State Board of-- 
Concluded. 



pEiTy ind Food. 



Fish and Game Department 



Stall rent — Fair grounds 

Rental of Horticulture Building, 

Fair grounds 

Tuberculin test fees 

Veterinary examination fees 

Inspection of sheep 

Weighing hay 

Fine account violation of seed 

law 

Sale of hog cholera serum 

Sale of pigs 

Sale of scrap lumber ^. 

Sale of wool 

Sale of wheat I_ 

Sale of guinea pig 

Sale of onions.- 

Sale of coal — IIIIII 

Sale of tile " 

Refur d on tuberculin cattle...!* 

Refund gas bill 

Refund wages 

Refund cement sacks returned. . 



Fines. .. 

Analyses fees. - 
Inspection fees. 

Licenses 

Witness fees.- - 



Fines— violation Offish and game 

laws 

License fees paid by fishing boats 

on Lake Erie... 

Hunters' licenses 

Bird licenses 

Confiscated pelts J. J J 

Pheasant tags... VS.ViV. 

Pheasant licence fees 

Confiscated guns „~Ji 

Non-resident fishing licenses 

Rent of state scow 

Sale oi fodder and eggs-_ II 

Refunds on pheasants llll 

Claim — American Express Co.II 

Agrictiltural Experiment Star| 

tion, Wooster, Ohio J Agronomy— sale of seeds 

Animal husbandry, sales of "live 
stock, eggs, wool, etc 



Dairy husbandry, live stock, 

milk and cream 

Horticulture IIIIII 

Soils receipts from testfarmlll 
Administration, sales of waste 

paper, old iron, etc 

Nutrition, experiments with live 

stock. 



$34 00 

50 00 

2,086 00 

200 00 

20 00 

15 

50 00 

61,065 43 

33,095 89 

29 46 

660 

199 23 

75 

3 55 

22 40 

60 

13 33 

16 32 

42 86 

146 25 



$10,535 50 

65 00 

6 95 

15,168 55 

6 70 



$32,937 96 

15,335 00 

245,470 00 

40 00 

881 50 

16 01 

236 00 

38 00 

64 00 
175 00 
211 80 
164 25 

65 00 



$3,911 53 

24,548 75 

9,773 77 

10,166 01 

15 92 



1,826 08 

Digitized by 



Total Receipts 

by 
Departments* 



$309,229 80 



$25,782 70 



$295,634 52 



1,418 27 

5 981 T 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 
STATEMENT No. 2~Continued. 



51 



Departments, 



Sources of Revenue. 




Total Receipts 
Departments. 



Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Wooster Ohio — Concluded 



Attorney General — 

Delinquent accounts collected 
by the Attorney General and 
distributed to other depart- 
ments 



Auditor of State. 



Delinquent accounts collected 
by the Auditor of State and 
distributed to other depart- 
ments 



Forestry, sale of seeding trees, 

Chemistry, empty bottles 

Botany — tobacco — testing 

seeds, etc 

Farm managements 

U. S. Government 



Domestic corporation fees 

Foreign corporation fees 

Excise taxQB 

State Board of Charities ac- 
counts 

Superintendent of Public Works 
accounts 

Bureau of Accounting accounts. 

Insurance department accounts . 

Maintenance Public Utilities 
Commission accounts-. 

Board of Administration ac- 
counts 

Dairy and food accounts 

School land rentals 

Refund court costs 

Total distributed 

Steamship agent's fees 

Land department fees 

Oil production on school lands. _ 
Gas production on school lands 
Oil production on Ministerial 

lands 

Coal production on school lands 
Coal production on ministerial 

lands 

School land rents 

Ministerial land rents 

School land sales 

Ministerial 1 and sales 

School and ministerial trust 

fund interest 

Refund — court costs 

Refund — examiners _ 

Refund — ^freight 

Refund — private use of state 

auto 

Refund — binding 



Embalming Board 

Highway department refunds . 
General Assembly 



$649 81 
40 00 

11 25 

3,413 04 

30,950 00 



$167,084 47 
36,663 73 
20,303 61 


48,140 97 


8,456 32 
1,005 92 
2,715 35 


8,024 90 


7,620 92 

250 00 

12 00 

47 00 


$290,225 19 


$866 00 

180 70 

20,701 22 

198 28 


969 63 
6 54 


102 30 
16,439 17 

630 10 

45,854 04 

2,152 75 


8,507 82 

554 36 

609 98 

49 45 


45 00 
1 00 


$40 00 
225 97 
270 00 



$86,725 33 



$97,868 34 



$535,97 

Digitized by 



'Google 



52 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



Departments. 



Sources of Revenue. 




Total Receipts 

by 
Departments. 



Bureau of Inspection and Su- 
pervision of Public Offices 



Banks and Banking Department.. 



Blind, Ohio Commission for. 



Building and 
Bureau of. 



Charities. State Board of. 



Civil Service Cpwwissjon- 



Pul)lic audit expense collected 
from counties and cities on ac- 
count of examinations made 
by state examiners 

Photo work 

Refund— discount 

Findings 



$123,789 511 

40 00! 

1 00 

32 13 



Preliminnry inspection fees paid 
b}^ hanks _ 

Inspection fees paid by state 
ban ks 

Inspection fees paid by private 
banks 

Foreign trust companies— exam- 
inations 

Steam ship companies— exami- 
nations 

Refunds _ 



.1 



-I $123,SC2 G-1 



Loan Association, | 



Brooms and home work. 



Fees on reports, paid bjf Build- 
ing and Loan Companies 

Assets— 1-80 of \% paid by 
Building and Loan Companies 

Error 1918 



$2,805 00 ; 

180,818 89 

13,603 70 

1,500 00 



500 00 
192 26 




Support of patients in State In- 1 
stitutions paid by relatives! 
and friends: 

Athens State Hospital 

Cleveland State lIosj)ital _ 

Columbus State IIosi)ital 

Longview State Hospital 

Dayton State Hospital 

Massillon State Hospital 

Toledo State Hospital 

Ohio Hospital for f^pileptics 

Lima State Hospital 

Institution for Feeble Minded.. 

Ohio State Sanatorium 

Support of patients in State In- 
stitutions paid by counties: 

Institution for Feeble Minded. . 

Ohio State Sanatorium 

Child Placing fund, paid from 
County Treasuries _ 

Miscellaneous collections: 

Court fees _ 



Exammation fees. 



$S,540 000 

62,312 92 
2 00 



$23,224 73 
34,633 69 
4(»,684 18 
26,293 26 
35,785 77 
45,257 76 
55,148 70 
20,262 20 
4,401 07 
20,775 84 
20 00 



284,295 56 
9,331 46 

26,585 78 

10 50 



$1,004 00 



$199,422 85 



$115,032 73 



$70,854 92 



$632,710 50 



Digitized by V^jOOQ 



ife' 



,004 00 



AUDITOR OP STATE. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



53 



Departments. 


Sources of Revenue* 


Itemi. 


Total Receipts 

by 
Department. 


Dental Board, Ohio State 


Applicants' examination fees 

Endorsement fees 


$4,010 00 

25 00 

100 00 

15 00 










Fines _ _ 






Duplicate licenses 






Examination fees 


$4,150 00 


Embahning Examiners, State Board 
of » 


$1,420 00 

2,910 00 

137 00 

13 00 

25 00 

40 00 

200 

300 




Members* renewal fees 






Registration fees 






Certified copies of grades 

Reciprocal fees 






Fine 






New certificates 






Incidental 






Restaurant licenses 


$4,550 00 


Fire Marshall— State 


$18,746 00 

11,010 00 

4,960 00 

126 24 




Hotel licenses 






Dry cleaning licenses 






Condemned buildings— 






Clerk of house refund expenses- 
Refund on general codes by 
Auditor of State 


$34,842 24 


General Assembly 


$1 98 
270 00 








Sale of bulletins, maps and other 
publications 


$271 98 


Geological Survey, Ohio 


$615 33 








Notarial commissions 


$615 33 


Governor. . . .. 


$7,360 00 
2,259 00 

91,600 22 
24 00 
69 00 




Requisitions and extraditions.— 

United States Government aid 

to Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' 

Home 






Commissioners of deeds fees 

Miscellaneous certificates. 

Plumbing inspections paid by 
individuals 


$101,312 22 


Health, State Department of 


$3,342 50 
127 39 
145 82 

12,919 84 
151 01 




Plumbing code 






Fines . 






United States Government Soo- 

in.1 Hvirifinfi fiind 






Refunds 






U. S. Government, aid in road 
construction 


$16,686 56 


Highway Department, State 


$976,109 96 
74,304 79 




Refunds, reimbursements and 
sales 






Boiler inspection: 

Boiler mspection fees paid by 
boiler owners 


$1,050,414 75 


Industrial Commission , - , - ^ - - 


$18,839 00 
19,100 00 

470 00 

Digitizecrft/^ 








Annual certificates 






Examinations of boiler inspec- 
tors — fees 




. 


Interest of deposits , , . , 


Loogle 



54 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



Bepartmonts* 



Sourcea of Revenue, 



ItemB. 



Total Receipts 
Departments, 



Industrial Coiu mission— Concluded. 



Instruction, Public Superintendent of 



State Board of Education. 



Insurance, Superintendent of. 



Judiciary— 

Siq)reme Court Clerk 

Supreme Court Reporter. 
Liquor License Commission.. 



Eixaminations for license fees 

Renewal license fees 

Examination for boiler operar 

tors— fees. 

Renewal license fees 

Censors, Board of: 

Licenses issued 

Duplicate leaders 

Investigation and Statistics 
Private employment agency 

licenses 

Mine Inspection: 

Fines for violation of min- 
ing laws 

Workshops and Factories: 

High explosive certificate 

fees 

Refunds 

Witness fees 

Waste paper sold 

Provisional teacher's certificates 

Renewal certificates .-. 

Dental board applicants' certifi- 
cates 

Fees — State Board of Examiners 
life certificates 

U. S. Government promotion of 
vocational education 

Rrfund— Meigs County 

Miscellaneous fees from Insur- 
ance companies, section 661 
and657G.C 

Fees from insurance companies, 
2.5% on net premiums, sec- 
tion 5433 

Assessments from fire insurance 
companies for maintenance of 
State Fire Marshal's Dept., 
section 841 

5% on §ross premiiuns on un- 
authorized insurance, section 
664 - 

Fees trial docket 

Fees motion docket 

Certificates 

Copies of opinions 

Galley proofs 

Sale of furniture 

Refund — telephone 



$4,059 00 
27,014 00 

4,475 00 
10,794 00 

29,873 00 
48 30 



6,175 00 
119 01 



7,670 50 
35 11 
26 00 
70 60 



11,409 00 
376 50 

250 00 

11,165 00 

115,249 13 
650 00 



216,275 65 
2,134,386 05 

115,502 40 
5,001 50 



$905 00 
688 00 
176 50 



$476 00 
242 50 



$1,436 95 
264 



$128,808 93 



$129,099 63 



Digitized by V^jOOQ 



$2,471,165 60 



$1,769 50 
$718 50 



AUDITOR OP STATB. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



55 



Departments. 



Sources of Revenue. 



Items. 



Total Receq>t8 

by ^ 

Departments. 



Medical Board, State. 



Nurse Registration. 
Miscellaneous J 



Normal College, Bowling Green 



Kent Normal School 

Oil Inc^iector, State 

Optometry, State Board of, 
Pharmacy, State Board of. 



Printing, Supervisor of Public . 



Examination fees paid by physi- 
cians and surgeons 

Examination fees paid by osteo- 
paths 

Examination fees paid by mid- 
wives 

Reciprocity fees physicians and 
surgeons 

Fines 

Entrance fees 

Registration fees paid by Ign- 
ited practitioners — 



Registration fees paid by nurses 

Reciprocity fees 

Entrance fees .. 



Violation Valentine Anti-Trust 
Law Paid in by Hugo Schle- 
singer, Proe.Atty. Franklin Co 

Farm products 

Home economics.... 

Industrial arts.. ... 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Music 

Building 

Sale of cinders, paper, wood and 
boxes 



Bus fares... 
Chemistry.. 

Sales 

Electricity. 



Inspection fees. 



Examination fees. 



Pharmacist renewal fees 

Asst. Pharmacist renewal fees 
.Pharmacist examination fees .. 
Asst. Pharmacist examination 

fees 

Entrance certificates fees 

Apprentice certificate fees 

Lapsed certificate fees 

Reciprocal certificate fees .. 

Fines 

Duplicate certificate fees | 

Certifying examination grades.. 

Paper, printing, binding supplies 
and equipment for special de- 
partments 

Bindery waste and junk 



$4,775 00 

925 00 

110 00 

7,250 00 

950 00 

1,554 00 

825 00 



$4,740 00 

150 00 

2,340 00 



16,200 00 



1311 91 

332 75 

90 25 

9 76 

26 00 

18 00 

10 00 

11 44 



$382 43 

57 05 

108 12 

10 00 



$175,441 18 



$19,485 00 



$3,176 00 

166 00 

2,250 00 

440 00 

804 00 

226 50 

200 00 

850 00 

1,830 00 

200 

75 25 



$13,021 44 
1,239 78 



Digitized by VjC 



$16,389 00 

$7,230 00 
$6,200 00 



$810 10 



$557 60 

$175,441 18 

$19,485 00 



$10,019 75 



O 



8' 



» 



,261 22 



56 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



Departments^ 



Sources of Revenue. 



Items. 



T 



Total ReceipU 
Department £. 



Public Works, Superintendent of 



Secretary of State. 



Purchasing Agent. 



Automobile Department- 



Canal land and public park 
rentals 

Pipe permits for water supplied 
from reservoirs and canals 

Canal water power rentals 

Licenses — motor, row, detach- 
able and sail boats 

Sale of canal lands 

Tolls 

Ice sold from reservoirs 

Transfer fees land leases 

Stone sold___ 

Bridge crossing 

Sale of old boat 

Sale of old buildings 

Survey.- - 

Refund discount— - | 



Initial fees 

Sale of Opinions Attorney Gen- 
eral 

Sale of railway and highway 
maps 

Excess printing on constitutional 
amendments 

Declarations of candidacy 

Sale of old boxes 

Refund — telephone 

Refund — postage 



1106,111 97 

67,929 84 
22,434 11 

5,960 00 

26,533 00 

1,351 83 

465 96 

245 00 

99 10 

85 00 

40 00 

57 00 

e7 16 

10 701 



Requistions of departments- 
Waste paper 

Sale of metal and lumber 

Refunds 



Motor, vehicle licences secured 
from — passenger, truck, electric, 
motorcycle, and trailer owners: 
and from manufacturers and 

dealers 

Disbursed by State to Counties 

Balance — State's portion | 



12,479,649 27 

1,119 00 

1,767 27 

804 00 

1,187 59 

55 20 

3 10 

1,370 44 



$313,801 84 
516 29 
286 86 
950 49 



$5,044,510 50 
2,340,558 50 



$231,390 66 



$2,485,945 78 



$$315,555 48 



$2,703,952 00 



Digitized by 



Google 



AUDITOB OF STATE. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



67 



Departments, 



Sources o( Revenue. 



Items. 



Total Eeceipts 
Departments. 



Vital StatiBtice, Bureau of_. 



Securities Department. 



Birth and death certiiicates... 



Fees paid by dealers and agents 
for licenses to sell stocks, 
bonds, etc__ 

Licenses and renewal fees — 
Chattel Loan Companies 



Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' | 

Home __| Live stock sold.. 

I Hides sold... 

Subscriptions to Home Weekly- 
Tallow and grease sold 

Junk and waste sold 

Refund salary 



Tax Commission. 



Tax Settlements with Counties . 



Copies of reports- 



Levied by state to pay interest 
on irreducible debt, and paid 
by counties 

County depository interest on 
same 

Levied by state for support of 
state universities 

County depository interest on 
same 

Levied by state for support of 
common school and paid by 
coimties 

County depository interest on 
same 

Levied by state for road con- 
stmction and maintenance 
and paid by counties 

County depository interest on 
same 

Received from counties, state's 
portion of inheritance tax 

Received from counties, state's 
portion of collateral inher- 
itance tax -. 

Received from counties for sup- 
port of Bureau of Inspection 
and Supervision of Public 
Offices. 

Received from Counties: 

State portion of cigarette tax.. 

State portion auction duties 

State portion show licenses 

State portion peddler's licenses. 

In teres t on collections for state 

general revenue purposes and 

paid by county depositories. . 



$576 50 



$111,245 00 
16,600 00 



$763 40 
108 17 
118 00 
363 91 
180 54 
10 00 



$29 00 



$23,166 84 

106 50 

857,172 91 

3,931 22 

509,670 42 
2,338 77 

3,780,422 79 
16,797 88 
77,012 50 



379,355 93 



19,140 00 

117,148 66 

174 93 

1,110 00 

666 00 



$576 50 



$127,845 DO 



$1,H4 (12 
S2S) 00 



4,155 60 

Digitized by ^6(5gP^^ 



,370 0,1 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

STATEMENT No. 2— Ckjntmtied. 



Departmenta. 



Sources of HeYODue. 



Items. 



Total Beceipta 

iJepartmoota. 



Treasurer of State. 



Aecounta collected by treasurer of 
etate and distributed to other de- 
partments^ ^,,^. ___..,_,, ^ 



Domestic corporation fees 3.20 
of 1% on outstanding oapitaL 

Fees foreign corporation 3-20 of 
1% OB proportion of capital 
employed in Ohio ^ -,__ 

Steam railroads— excise taxes 
4% on intrastate gross earn- 
inp. __...-.* ..,„ 

Street, suburban and interurbaD 
railways — excise taxes 1.2% on 
in trastatc gross earnings 

Telegraph — excise taxes 2% on 
intrastate lerross receipts,^ 

pipe line excise taxes 4% on in- 
trastate jBcross receipts ^, 

Electric light, cxcrse taxes 1.2% 
on intrastate gross receipts 

Artificial gas, excise taxes 1.2% 
on intrastate gross receipts--. 

Natural gas — excise tax 1 .2% on 
intrastate gross receipts. 

Water works — excise taxes 1^% 
on intrastato |?toss receipts.. - 

Telephone — excise tax I.^% on 
intrastate gross receipts 

Messenger and signal excise 
taxes 1>2% on intrastate gross 
receiptB........ _....-. 

Union Depot — excise taxes 1.2% 
on intrastate gross reeeipts... 

Heating and cooling — excise 
taxes 1,2% on intrastate gross 
receipts^ __, , _* ^ ^ . _ ,^ ^_ _ ^ _ . , 

Water transportation — excise 
taxes 1-2% on intrastate gross 
receiptiS, ...,-..__.. ^. 

Express excise taxes 2% on in- 
trastate gross receipts^ ^_._ 

Sleepirig car, freight line and 
equipment excise taxes 1.2% 
on proportion of capital in Ohio 

Unclassified excise taxes col- 
lected by Attorney General . . 

Interest on state funds in de- 
po!?itorics-. 

II ,000.00 annual liquor traffic tax 
3-10 of which is paid by eoun- 
ti OS to the state .^-,. ... 

Eefunds .__.. .. 



Board of adminiatratibn.. -._.., 
Superintendent of public works. 

Board of charities.-^ .^_._. 

Superintendent of insurance. ^_^, 

Bu reau of ac coim t in g , 

State board of ediJcation_____.- 
Public (itiiities commission. 



13,294,052 80 

745,74S 52 

3,314,889 84 

775,408 16 
ia,858 14 
64,978 72 

336,263 34 
5,615 24 

593,321 34 
13,278 21 

297,950 34 

4,542 06 
5,894 29 

932 82 

2p360 25 
76,514 82 

90,778 56 

20,303 61 

355,720 71 



67,232 56 
202 14 



1150,790 05 
215,356 49 
584,559 03 

2,247,532 38 

122,815 72 

28,905 *55| 

100,819 64 



110,079,847 07 



Digitized by V^OOQl'C 



,778 m 



AUDITOB OF STATB. 
STATEMENT No. 2— Continued. 



59 



Departments. 


Soiirc^B of Revenue. 


Items. 


Total Receipts 

Departments. 


UtiiTersity, Miami..-,....,.--...-- 


Piano and organ f e^^ - ^ - - _ 

Rents from Ian da oripnally 
granted by Federal GoveTti' 
menfc for support of Miami' 
University-. - ...^ .- 


1385 53 

7,476 m 

79 00 

2,5,110 55 

220 25 

70 80 

747 00 

383 45 

450 00 
1,492 m 
6,217 40 

47Ji m 

mo 00 

2,{KK) 00 

10,000 00 

53 10 






Special examinations , ^_., 






Student fees 




* 


ReKistratian^^ ^ ^, ,, 






Librarv fines—.. ...,-.,—._ 






Diploma fees 






Miscellaneous sales .,,**_ 




, 


Interest on endowments paid by 

Btate- -.-... — -- .^^ -' 

Student health fees.^ -,..... 

Medicolf ees ., 






Study claas fees __,*^^ ,- 






Corwm Smith prize fund_------- 

Woman*s loan fund ...- 






Whalmg Aid Fund ,._ 






Kefund3.-_ *..' 

Interest on endowments paid by 
state _ 


$,55,662 22 


University, Ohio.. 


$3,122 23 

7,652 50 

4,753 36 

260 00 

968 97 

1,694 75 

96 00 

104 00 

140 00 

240 00 

30 00 

3,710 60 

333 74 

9,477 02 








Registration fees 






Tax from county treasury 

Penalties ... . 






Rents from lands originally 

granted by Federal Government 

for support of Ohio University 

Music 






Harmony 






Stenoeranhv 






Typewriting 






Oratory 






Painting.. 






Sales of lease hold land 






Miscellaneous sales ... . . 






U* S. Government Housing S. A. 
T. C 






Produce and dairy sales 

Morrill fund— U. S. Government 
aid to agricultural and mechan- 
ical work 


$32,383 17 


Universitv. Ohio State 


$11,513 24 

50,000 00 

330 00 

5,141 00 

208,424 50 
5,028 75 

184,536 95 
94,374 05 

16,450 00^ 

Digitized by VJ^ 








Rents from buildings & grounds 
Locker rents paid by students — 
Tuition, incidental and laborer 

tory fees paid by students 

Special fees 






if. S. Government Smith Lever 
and Federal Extension funds.. 

County agents' funds from coun- 
ties for agricultural and me- 
chanical work 






Farmers' institute funds paid by 
coimties for agricultural ex- 
tension work . 


30gle 







60 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 
STATEMENT No. 2-Concluded. 



Departments. 



Sources of Revenue. 



Items. 



Total Receipts 
Departments. 



University, Ohio State — Concluded. 



Wilberforce, University. 



Warehouse — Sales of materials 
and supplies to students and 
various departments of the 
university 

Shop deposits paid by students. 

Virginia Military lands — Appli- 
cations to quiet title 

Interest on endowments paid by 
state 

Veterinary clinic fees 

Dental clmicfees 

Homeopathic clinic fees 

Journalism — Printing 

Architecture photo receipts 

J. McLain Smith fund— Student 
and loans paid 

Scott fund— Return of loan 

Boy's and girl's club work 

Refunds overpayments 

Laundry 

State board of education (Smith 
Hughes) 

Gifts for current e3q)enses 

Farm bureau funds 

Miscellaneous sales.. 



Department sales. . 

Laundry work , 

Tuitions 

Room rents 

Phone calls 

Coal sold 

Bed linen 

Jimk sold 

2 autos sold , 

Miscellaneous sales. 

Invitations 

Auto repairs 

Hospital service 

Refunds 



Utilities Commission, Public. 



Grand total receipts for fiscal year. 



For maintenance of public utili- 
ties commission paid by utility 
companies doing business in 
Ohio 

Copies of records 



I 



$146,554 99 
5,128 80 

200 

62,355 51 

7,182 52 

9,075 91 

29,874 91 

26,383 70 

127 65 

232 00 
608 11 
5,942 29 
327 76 
439 70 

30,895 67 
2,065 00 
2,034 88 
1,568 55 



$2,770 40 

131 08 

4,822 40 

1,911 70 

423 

73 00 

168 90 

81 75 

657 00 

146 31 

14 45 

149 56 

75 

26 36 



$108,844 54 
152 28 



$906,598 44 



$10,957 89 



$108,996 82 



$31,592,058 27 



Digitized by 



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AUDITOR OP STATE, 



61 



STATEMENT No. 3 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

The following consolidated table gives the total of all funds available to each 
department and institution, and the total disbursements from the same for the fiscal 
vear ending June 30, 1920. The specific sums appropriated by the General Assem- 
bly, together with all balances against which there were outstanding obligations 
and certain appropriated receipts, are included in the colimm of fimds available. 



Total 
Available. 



I 



Total 
Disbursements. 



Accoimtancy, State Board of 

Adjutant General _ _. 

Armory Board _ 

Ohio National Guard 

State House and Grounds 

Wjrandotte Building 

Administration, Board of _ 

Agriculture, Board of _ 

Dairy and Food Division 

Fish and Game Division.^ 

Archaeological and Historical Society 

Attorney General 

Auditor of State _ 

Bureau of Inspection and Supervision of Public 
Offices-.. 

Support of Schools for Deaf, Blind and Crippled 
Children 

State Aid to Weak School Districts 

Bcmks and Banking 

Blind Conunission 

Building and Loan Bureau 

Charties, Board of 

Civil Service Conmiission 

Clemency, Board of 

Common Schools 

Controlling Board 

Dental Board 

Education, State Board of 

Embalming Examiners, Board of 

Emergency Board 

Executive Department 

Budget Conmiission 

Experimental Station, Agricultural 

Fire Marshal 

General Assembly 

Geological Survey 

Health, Board of 

Highway Department 

Inaustrial Conmiission _ 

Instruction, Public, Department of 

Insurance Department .__ 

Judiciary 

Supreme Court and Law Library 

Clerk of Supreme Court 

Reporter of Supreme Court 

Legislative Reference Department 

Library, State i 

Liquor Licensing Board 

Medical Board. 

Normal College, Bowling Green 

Normal College, Kent 



$630 00 

44,163 87 

221,750 66 

358,407 47 

62,727 35 

26,780 87 

11,990,220 61 

564,122 92 

73,788 93 

1,162,498 08 

39,924 49 

140,723 81 

92,233 16 

151,617 87 

145,643 92 

696,837 12 

126,534 79 

178,805 34 

48,356 04 

141,218 45 

57,000 02 

9,298 75 

5,510,958 00 

1,193,309 31 

6,404 78 

414,702 94 

4,843 01 

1,076,635 65 

48,296 91 

14,558 37 

486,119 72 

122,266 61 

400,921 45 

11,207 49 

277,805 71 

19,290,094 79 

871,176 92 

392,814 55 

83,479 79 

628,221 48 

31,834 31 

11,364 71 

9,563 30 

16,212 56 

52,985 74 

54,411 63 

30,006 86 

348,456 62 

208,134 98 



$31,994 66 
31,284 06 

200,278 53 

58,990 87 

26,379 16 

9,179,386 27 

526,343 29 
66,967 90 

359,848 42 
21,501 71 
75,724 25 
73,175 81 

147,237 89 

122,980 33 

611,227 32 

82,248 73 

173,805 01 

44,871 71 

126,835 03 

45,269 07 

9,090 51 

2,799,693 00 

*'327,177 10 

4,166 66 

236,937 73 

3,433 16 

•524,063 90 

31,204 65 

8,899 39 

305,584 09 

111,895 84 

269,974 68 

9,466 18 

234,262 33 

5,555,467 65 

791,701 15 

345,820 22 

• 64,001 73 

609,491 50 

28,420 93 

11,100 26 

8,583 77 

5,903 39 

31,001 85 

2,315 70 

23,133 36 

148,943 00 

160,720 27 



Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



OHIO GENERAL. STATISTICS. 
STATEMENT No. 3—Concluded. 



Total 
Available. 



Total 
Diflbursements. 



Oil Inspector _^- 

Optometry, Board of 

Pharmacy, Board of 

Prbtmg Commission,. _ 

Prin tin g , Publ ic , Supervisor of 

Prosecution and Transportation of Convicts. 

Public Works, Department of 

Secretory* of State 

Automobile Department 

Bureau of Vital Statistics 

Pijrcli-iaing Agent 

Securities Department 

Sinking Fund— Interest on Irreducible Debt- 

S oldiera * and So i lors ' Orphans' Home 

Soldiers' Cl.nim^, Commissioner of 

Tax Cooimij^dion 

Topoprnphii;al iSnrvey 

Treasurt^r of 8taio_^^_ 

UnJvcmity, Miami,.., 

University, Ohit>__,,, 

Universityi Obio State 

UniversitVi Wilbi rforce 

Utilities Commi;ssion, Public __. 



Ml^CBLT AN150DS APPROPRIATIONS. 

Americanization Camraittee. 

American I-tegion— furnishing state headquarters. _ 
Badges of H or for Ohio Soldiers who served on 

Mexican Border _ 

Board of Public Building (Commission to house 

State Officcg). 

Board of Uniform State Laws 

City of Columbua— Paving contiguous to State 

Property _ 

Commission to Codify Ditch Laws of Ohio 

Executive Marjeion Board 

E^enses Maintaining G. A. R. Headquarters 

Memorialfl-— 

Andrews Raid. _ 

Colonel Jennings 

Fort Meigs _ 

Ohio Institution for Treatment and Education of 

Crippled and Deformed Children 

Ohio Penitentiary Couunission 

Preparation and Publication of Roster of Ohio Sol- 
diers in the World War 

Roads, Improvement of, along State Farm at Orient 

Spanish War Vetorans^ Headquarters for 

Sundry Claima^^ 

State Teachers' Retirement Board 



TRust Funds. 

School and Ministerial Fund 

School and Mmisterial Rental Fund. 



176,640 65 

7,083 10 

12,730 07 

133,884 67 

204.199 99 
201,694 69 

162.200 36 
94,347 91 

195,606 79 

34,821 39 

334,304 82 

69,162 31 

633,896 44 

328,002 14 

4,876 88 

65,323 66 

17,689 35 

135,727 05 

339,636 78 

317,121 86 

3,267,331 66 

124,153 41 

176,092 26 



25,000 00 
2,500 00 

2,937 68 

960,642 73 
1,123 14 

21,500 00 

53 44 

31,503 34 

2,860 00 

600 00 

600 00 

10,000 00 

89,985 10 
334,206 11 

50,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 

319,160 44 

10,000 00 



94,449 10 
17,813 84 



$56,724,824 65 



Emergency and Controlling Board Transfers. 



$69,236 87 

5,489 61 

7,124 39 

99,772 16 

191,637 87 

191,980 28 

102,619 43 

63,899 32 

165,726 68 

30,404 10 

329,244 99 

61,704 52 

322,182 84 

291,616 65 

4,452 73 

52,702 68 

2,783 62 

38,416 06 

300,063 19 

269,624 60 

2,368,464 12 

114,293 44 

141,763 02 



6,177 60 
2,356 67 



250 00 



27,704 37 
2,650 00 

600 00 

"""i47'66 



173,081 36 

610 00 

2,600 00 

1,600 00 

195,183 14 

4,809 70 



11,633 51 
16,986 37 



$29,479,260 84 
♦$848,532 31 



Digitized by V^OO^ IC 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 63 

STATEMENT No. 5. 

Showing the total irreducible state debt on July 1, 1920, with amount in each 
fund, and the interest disbursed by the state during the fiscal year ended June 
30,1920: 

Interest disbursed 
Funds. Amount of by state during 

principal on fiscal year ended 

July 1,1920. June 30, 1920, 

Section 16 ...._.$3,535,2S4 S3 $212,117 04 

Virginia Military -„ 197,144 07 11,985 IS 

United States Military - 120,272 12 7,216 33 

Western Reserve - -^- 257.499 21 15,449 95 

Section 29 150,275 97 9,016 55 

Ohio State University 1,043,349 01 62,355 51 

Ohio University 52,348 33 3,122 23 

Miami University 7,500 00 450 00 

Special School -. 7^4 59 470 08 

Total _$S,376,307 83 $322,182 84 

Note: — ^The funds shown in the foregoing are what are known as the irre- 
ducible debt of Ohio, on which the state pays annually 6 per cent. The U. S. gov* 
emment reserved in that part of the Northwest Territory now comprised within 
the limits of Ohio 704,488 acres of the public domain for the support of common 
schools. Most of this land has been sold and the proceeds turned into the state 
treasury. In the Ohio Company's and Symnes' purchases and in all congress lands 
section 16 was set apart in each township. In tlie Western Reserve a, i U. 5* mil- 
itary district the school allotments were two and one-half miles square, and in the 
Virginia military district three miles square. For this reason the receipts from the 
sales of school lands are carried in four separate funds. In the Ohio Compaiiy's 
and Symnes' purchases section 29 was set apart for the support of the ministry. 
The $9,016.55 disbursed during the past fiscal year went to the support of all the 
churches in certain townships in the eleven counties within or partly within the two 
designated purchases. Of the over one million dollars held in trust for the benefit 
of the Ohio State University, $340,906.80 was derived from the sale of 630,000 
acres of the public domain given by the national government for the establishment 
of this institution of learning. The remainder is largely endowments and donations 
by private individuals for the benefit of the university. The small credit to Miami 
is all from private donations to the college. No part of the proceeds of the sales 
of the township given by the U. S. government to assist in the establishme-nt of 
Miami University is held by the state. Practically all of the Ohio University fund 
came from the sale of the two townships donated by the U. S. government for the 
purpose of establishing the university. 

In addition to the funds shown in the table, the state holds in trust $25,121.09 
known as the Swamp Land fund. This came from the sale of 25,640 acres of 
swamp land in northwestern Ohio given to the state by the national government. 
The state also holds in trust $41,024.05 received from the sale of salt lands in Jack- 
son, Muskingum and Delaware counties. The Salt Land Fund was carried in the 
Auditor of State's report from 1849, when the last payment was received by the 
state, until 1870, when it disappeared from the records. The schools of Ohio have 
never received any interest on these two funds. _^ 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



64 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

Covering the period from 1884 to 1920, inclusive, and showing total collections each year of state direct 
and indirect taxes, total annual disbursements and cash balances in the treasur>'. 



Fiscal 
year. 



1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 

1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 



1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 

1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 

1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 

1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 

1914 
*1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 

1919 
1920 



Governor. 



State Tax collected ) Revenues col- 
tax direct from I lectcd indirect- 
rate f the people by lly by the State 

mills. 1 State levy. 1 from all other 
I sources. 



Total amount 

disbursed each 

year for all 

purposes. 



Hoadley 

Hoadley 

Poraker. 

Foralcer 

Poraker. 



Poraker. 

Campbell 

Campbell 

McKinley. 

McKinley 

McKinley 

McKinley. 

Bushnell 

Bushnell 

Bushnell 

BushnelL 

Nash. 

Nash. 

Nash. , 

Na,sh. 

Herrick. 

Herrick.^.. 

Pattison-Harrik 

Harris 

Harria» 

Harmon 

Harmon 

Harmon 

Harmon 

Cox 

Cox. 

Willis.... 

Willis 

Cox 

Cox 



Cox.„.... 
Cox 



2.90 
2.80 
2.90 
2.90 
2,90 

2.90 
2.70 
2.70 
2.45 
2.75 

2.75 
2.75 
2.75 
2.84 
2.84 

2.84 
2.84 
2.90 
2.89 
1.35 

1.35 

1.35 

1.35 

1.345 

1.346 

1,345 

1.345 

1.345 

.451 

.451 

,961 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 

.45 
.65 



I 



$4,670,612 03 
4.595.119 31 
4,811.307 55 
4.847.001 14 
5.120.267 23 

4,987.725 66 
4,731.294 75 
4,796.272 47 
4.216.166 07 
4,720,348 08 

4.796.137 47 
4,782.343 96 
4.735.873 74 
4.955.653 20 
5,001.944 19 

5,029.548 04 
5.118.863 11 
5.316.944 86 
5.698.020 93 
2,803.202 26 

2.8.33.311 06 
2.883.697 94 
2.669.583 44 
3.008.092 5.5 
3.061.241 32 

3.201.949 37 
3.171.636 37 
3,323.891 18 
2,758,520 02 
2,878.366 46 

6.272,192 42 
1,689.8.58 75 
3.238.691 28 
3,351,07.5 52 
3,633,079 13 

3.898.665 23 
5.170,432 96 



$621,280 83 
472.411 16 
964.596 19 

1.209.025 40 
778.964 19 

960.179 44 
1.122.383 07 
2.273,022 39 
1.328.325 00 
1.331,808 46 

1,763.417 31 
1.252.812 08 
1.756.662 63 
2.250.498 37 
2,721.383 78 

2.628.547 56 
2,912.954 61 
2.719,483 73 
4,157.503 72 
4,912.377 04 

5.594.567 09 
6,414.578 72 
7,116,962 88 
7.8S3.347 05 
8,575,631 58 

8.080.863 42 
8,.395.586 40 
9.713,401 83 
11,278.382 17 
12.700.105 14 

14.272,346 73 
9,851,730 44 
15.937.409 16 
17,559.901 31 
20.061.994 21 

21.578,017 00 
26,421.625 31 



$5,450,649 88 
5,.530.209 43 
6.573,721 29 

6.289.969 05 
6.001.784 75 

5.685.970 73 
5.832,751 25 
6.101.289 50 
6,158.671 24 
6.190.229 40 

6.375.628 64 
6.203.571 87 
6.601.260 36 
6.966.777 70 
7.658.852 98 

7.290.092 47 
7.707,88-1 07 
7,873.015 78 
7.967.003 37 
8,323.267 15 

8,836.236 67 
8.866.497 55 
9.328.390 84 
9.555.621 69 
11.515.588 88 

12.315.067 76 
12.074,835 44 
12,932.343 97 
13.122,180 63 
14.697.184 67 

17.942,183 69 
12,042.301 54 
19.7,36.237 02 
21.203.020 88 
22,827.295 61 

25,9.34.104 33 
29,479,260 84 



Cash balance 
in treasury 
at clo«e of 
fiscal year. 



Interest 
collected on 
State funds 
each year. 



$716,717 75 
254,038 79 
456,221 24 
222,278 73 
119,725 50 

381.659 87 
402.586 44 
1.370.591 80 
7.56.411 63 
618,338 77 

802.264 91 
633.849 08 
525.125 09 
764.496 96] 
828,973 951 

1.196.977 08 
1.520.910 73 
1.683,723 54 
3.572.244 82 
2,964..556 97 

2,556.198 45 
2.987.877 56 
3.746.033 04 
5.081,850 95 
5,203,134 97 

4,170,880 00 
3,663.167 33 
3.768,116 37 
4.682.837 93 
5.564 124 86 

8.166.480 32 
7.665.767 97 
7.105,631 39 
6.791.829 33 
7,787,756 19 

7.375.352 44 
11.706,557 12 



$32,669 34 

53.568 17 

112,407 94 

137.176 88 

157.315 65 
178.871 30 
159,777 38 
199.443 95 
241,227 17 

450,971 05 
273.547 56 
457,007 63 
562,078 39 
710,081 91 

1,071,462 43 
1,499,044 99 



NOTE — The column of indirect revenues (column .5) includes all state receipts except the direct taxes as 
shown in the preceding column. The cash balance in the treasury is the actual cash on hand without deducting 
outstanding warrants. The column of interest includes all interest received by the state from county treasuries, 
interest on all state deposits, interest on workmen's compensation insurance funds and interest collected by the 
attorney-general on illegal deposits of state funds by former administrations. 

♦In 1915 the fiscal year was changed to end June 30th instead of November 15th. The figures for 1915 cover 
seven and one-half months from November 15, 1814. to June 30. 1915. The fiscal years preceding 1915 ended 
November 15. The fiscal years subsequent to 1915 ended June 30th. 



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AUDITOR OP STATE. 



65 



STATE TAXATION PREVIOUS TO 1826. 

Table Showing Rates of Taxation on Land in Ohio from 1803 to 1825 
and Total Taxes Collected. 

Many years before Henry George was born, Ohio employed a modi- 
fied form of single tax in raising all state revenues. All privately 
owned land was classified as to its natural value into three classes, and 
all the land in the state in any particular class was taxed at a fixed rate 
per one hundred acres. The following table gives the total number 
of acres of each class for each year, the rate per one hundred acres on 
each class and the total annual collections by the state. Of the annual 
receipts from land taxation the state distributed a portion to the count- 
ies. The proportion granted by the state to the counties was never 
in excess of one-half of the total collections and in 1820 was. reduced 
to one-fifth. Counties were permitted to tax lots in towns but not farm 
land. • They could also tax horses and cattle and dwellings valued 
at $100.00 or more. No effort was made to tax moneys or credits. 
Fraudulent classification of lands throughout the state caused the 
change in 1825 from single tax on land to general taxation of all real 
estate and certain kinds of personal property. 





First 
Quality 

of 
Land. 


Second 
Quality 

of 
Land. 


Third 
Quality 

of 
Land. 


Total 
Number 

of 
Acres. 


Rate of Taxation 
per 100 Acres. 




Years. 


If 


'Si* 
II 




Total 
Taxes. 




Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


1803 

1804 


101,709 


3,326,226 


3,641,694 


7,069,629 


10 60 
70 
90 
90 
90 

1 00 
1 00 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 

1 25 

2 00 

3 60 
3 75 
3 00 

2 00 
1 50 
1 50 
1 00 
1 50 

1 50 
1 25 
1 50 


$0 40 
50 
65 
65 
65 

75 

75 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

1 00 

1 50 

2 OSM 

3 00 
2 25 

1 50 
1 00 
1 00 
75 
1 12K 

1 12^ 

mi 

1 WA 


$0 20 
26 
40 
40 
40 

50 
50 
65 
65 
65 

65 
1 00 

1 78 

2 00 
1 50 

1 00 
50 
50 
50 
75 

75 

56 

75 

Jigitized 


$22,331 06 
22,331 04 


1805 








7,252,850 
7,917,590 
7,886,840 

10,479,029 

9,924,033 

9,933,099 

12,034,777 

11,370,032 

10,934,323 
11,095,878 
11,090,214 
10,639,104 
11,331,620 

11,714,468 
12,039,040 
13,319,043 
14,380,224 
13,082,4,54 

14,110,381 
14,720,648 
13,025,073 


43,512 95 


1806 








48,260 48 


1807 








43,632 79 


1808 

1809 

1810-*—- 

1811 

1812 

1813 

1814 

1815 

1816 

1817 

1818 

1819 

1820 

1821 

1822 

1823 

1824 

1825 


147,093 
141,805 
129,741 
234,335 
185,775 

179,666 
180,370 
174,819 
173,741 
165.49J 

205,344 
126,138 
255,082 
241,914 
226,084 

234,000 
222,852 
178,998 


5,080,131 
3,971,82.5 
4,177,950 
6,456,113 
5,585,367 

4,858,750 
4,919,968 
4,856,997 
4,360,8't6 
5,027,390 

5,174,726 
5,251,270 
7,304,633 
7,734,974 
6,870,921 

f,859,439 
6,822,230 
5.672,277 


5,251,803 
5,810,403 
5,625,408 
5,444,329 
6.598,890 

5,895,907 
5,9i^5,540 
6,0.58,398 
0,098,517 
6,138,738 

6,a34,39S 
7,261,032 
5.759.323 
0,402,336 
6,585,449 

7.016,312 
7,675,560 
7,173,798 


67,501 60 
63,991 87 
85,964 39 
170,546 74 
155,137 07 

108,761 24 
165,196 48 
259,488 19 
2?9,897 98 
231,811 68 

109, ia5 43 
179,475 62 
205,346 95 
171,648 68 
188,047 53 

194,289 95 
170,761 20 



le 



3^-0. G. S. 



■^wr 



66 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

GRAND DUPLICATE OP OHIO— 1826 TO 1919. 

Table Showing the Valuations of Real Estate and Personal Property, 

Total Taxes Levied for the State, and Aggregate Levies for all 

Purposes Each Year Since 1825. 

Single tax on land by the state as its only source of revenue was 
abolished by the law of 1825 which took effect March 1, 1826. The 
act of 1825 made buildings and live stock subject to state taxation as 
well as land. Complete uniformity in taxation by which all personal 
property and real estate were taxed at the same rate en their market 
value was not required by law until 1846. This legal requirement 
was largely ignored in the valuation of property for taxation in Ohio 
until the enactment of the Smith one per cent tax law of 1911. Since 
1911 an effort has been made to assess all property in Ohio at its true 
market value, and Ohio is the only state in the Union that even at- 
tempts to secure a market value tax duplicate. The value of all prop- 
erty has rapidly increased in recent years, partly as an effect of the 
currency inflation which has occurred since our declaration of war 
with Genuany in 1917. As a result, the real estate of Ohio today, 
urban and rural, is listed for taxation at an average of not to exceed 
two-thirds of its market value. In many counties with level, fertile 
farm land and in many large cities, real estate is selling for double its 
appraised valup. Three-fourths of all personal property in the state 
escapes taxation. Of the four billion dollars of personal property on the 
tax duplicate, over one billion represents valuations of railroads, tel- 
egraphs, telephones and other utilities. The total deposits in Ohio 
banks are over two billions of dollars of which not ten per cent, is on 
the tax duplicate. There are billions of dollars in Ohio invested in 
bonds, stocks, notes, securities and other invisible property not listed 
for taxation at all. If Ohio with at least twenty billion dollars of tax- 
able property in the state has succeeded in getting only ten billion 
dollars on the tax duplicate, what must be the condition in other states? 

It is an interesting study to observe the changes in valuations re- 
sulting from the laws of 1846 and 1911 and the changes in the value of 
real estate caused by the revaluation of real property in 1826, 1835, 
1841, 1847, 1854, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911. There has 
been no general re-appraisement of land since 1911. The law now 
permits annual reappraisements. A few counties have reappraised 
but there has been no uniformity. Reappraisements should be made 
in every county the same year and should occur at least twice each 
decade. 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



\ 



\ 



AUDITOR OP STATE. 



67 



GRAND DUPLICATE OF OHIO— 1826-1919— Continued. 



Years. 



Value of 
Realty. 



Value of 
1 Personalty. 



Total Value 

of Taxable 

Property. 



State Tax. | Total Tax. 



1826 

1827 

1828 

1829 

1830- 

1831 

1832 

1833 

1834. 

1835 

1836 

1837 

1838 

1839 

1840 

1841 

1842 
1843".:.:. 

1844. 

1845 

1846 

1847 

1&48. 

1849 

1850.. 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1856.. 

1857.. 

1858.. .. 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

187? 

1873 

1874 

1875 



$15,946,8401 
47,206,3861 
50,116,513 
49,511,733 
50,086,250 

50,627,110 
55,013,412 
57,280,851 
57,399,577 
75,760,797 

72,223,906 
75,782,176 
80,923.608 
83,080,406 
85,287,2911 

100,851,837 
104,322,013 
105,496,382 
107,142,152 
108,185,744 

109,940,636 
306,798,730 
330 995 273 
335,839,311 
341,389,838 

346,341,233 
354,937,147 
363,490,901 
569,868,410 
677,858,538 

580,634,487 
585,620,682 
590,285,947 
584,114,004 
639,894,311 

634,883,552 
645,670,080 
649,500,022 
655,498,100 
660,557,979 

663,647,^42 
673,993,757 
683,452,487 
697,018,203 
807,846,636 

1,025,619,034 
1,030,163,528 
1,041,763,931 
1,052.257,736 
1,052,915,044 



I 



$11,035,8201 
12,375,3361 
12,168,841 
16,788,170 
14,589,335 

15,793,666 
19,229,620 
19,738,675 
23,500,073 
21,188,048 

27,029,444 
25.890 566 
26,553,182 
28,143,791 
27,038,89o| 

27,501.820 
28,021,822 
28,167,312 
29,000,514 
35,974,725 

40,352,496 
83,964,430 
90,072,818 
95,000,074 
98,487,502 

115,807,387 
152,644,763 
229,905,947 
297,061,572 
283,018,815 

240,026,550 
263,793,897 
240,514,084 
251,795,937 
248,4a3,290 

248,966,532 
243,615,312 
286,871,222 
351,198,016 
409,047,876 

446,501,379 
464,762,022 
460,008,899 
450,762,252 
459,684,861 

476,510,937 
494,159,590 
525,510,708 
528,111,588 
535,600,818 



$57,982,640 
69,591,722 [ 
62,285,054 
66,299,903 
64,675,578 

66,420,776 
74,243,032 
78,019,526 
81,100,660 
96,949,205 

99,253,356 
101,672,742 
107,476,790 
111,224,197 
112,326,156 

128,353,057 
132,343,835 
133,663,794 
136,141,666 
164,160,469 

159,293,132 
410,763,100 
421,057,991 
430,839,385 
439,876,340 

462,148,620 
508,851,911 
593,396,848 
866,929,982 
860,877,354 

820,661,037 
849,414,579 
840,800,031 
845,909,051 
888,302,601 

892.850,084 
889,285,292 
936,271,244 
1,006,690,16 
1,069,505,855 

1,106,208,921 1 

l,138,7i>4,779| 

1,143,461,3861 

1,157,180,455 

1,107,731,697 



I 



1,502,129,P71 

1,521,323,1181 

1,507,274,039) 

1,5S0,379,324| 

1,598,575,8621 



$105,816 
188,830 
187,906 
174,412 
232,472 

240,991 
264,954 
247,079 
172,434 
147,854 

211 932 
337,264 
434,061 
553,475 
564,435 

642,1531 
660,759 
934,899 
948,996 
1,006,001 

1,214,897 
1,331,398 
1,265,769 
1,296,547 
1,413,830 

1,687,392 
1,776,537 
3,026,234 
3,027,601 
2,754,807 

2,626,132 
2,609,395 
2,978,122 
2,997,918 
3,503,713 



4,056,379! 
4,129,4731 
4,722,0081 
5,329,9631 
5,663,3671 

3,867,1671 
3,981,0991 
3,997,4721 
4,045,4761 
4,666,2^12 

4,350,728 
4,414,557 

5,477,8501 
5,030,367) 
4,948,9951 

Digitized by 



$392,783 
472,094 
498,481 
441,191 
598,695 

615,651 
685,909 
730,010 
703,104 
805,050 

1,007,216 
1,205,362 
1,605,210 
1,770,161 
1,755,539 

1,890,405 
2,026,857 
2,361,842 
2,340,663 
2,409,171 

2,589,073 
2,847,673 
3,241,955 
3,631,878 
4,227,708 

4,957,013 
5,J^4,335 
8,823,805 
9,092,239 
8,954,512 

8,009,514 

8,673,298 

9,756,6.50 

10,083,608 

10,817,676 

11,656,814 
10,135,284 
11,759,574 
16,595,039 
20,870,828 

18.868,437 
20.253,615 
20,489,148 
22,232,877 
23,403,631 

22,955,388 
23,24S,979 
26,131,353 
26,837,196 



le 



68 OniO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

GRAND DUPLICATE OF OHIO— 1826-1919— Concluded. 





Years. 


Value of 
Realty. 


Value of 
Personalty. 


1 Total Value 
of Taxable 
Property. 


State Tax. 


Total Tax. 

1 


r 


1876 


$1,076,788,367 
1,084,455,378 
1,091,116,952 
1,093,768,904 
1,002,(V49,931 

1,101,457,383 
1,116,684,665 
1,131,058,750 
1,145,475,21c 
1,160,165,882 

1,173,106,705 
1,185,010,625 
1,200,064,195 
1,216,645,052 
1,232,305,312 

1,151,038,931 
1,167,305,647 
1,184,423,675 
1,200,364,474 
1,214,928,085 

1,226,988,666 
1,230,911,871 
1,244,817,473 
1,250,524,809 
1,274,203,721 

1,377,253,183 
1,396,180,471 
1,422,939,254 
1,451,007,020 
1,482,795,705 

1,520,998,^6 
1,558,354,660 
1,590,299,746 
1,619,462,263 
1,656,944.631 

4,273,439,712 
4,335,005,521 
4,418,953.299 
4,570,902 ,,540 
4,720,3^44,108 

4,850,122,293 
£.277,179,(101 
5,424.872,785 
5,009,004,209 


1 
$520.681 .599 1 *1 -597.469.Q6fi 


$4,626,629 
4,560,379 
4,496,376 
4,450,341 
4,513,240 

4.598,057 
4,735,748 
4,847,639 
4,681,339 
4,840,727 

4,894,593 
4,142,447 
6,020,384 
4,734,010 
4,798,635 

4,181,143 
4,759,127 
4.818,926 
4,790,470 
4,790,054 

4.942,533 
4,902,337 
4,997,107 
5,071,800 
5,316,623 

5,686,248 
2,687,252 
2,794,366 
2,853,252 
2,920,455 

3,012,115 
3,103,785 
3,163,925 
3,214,085 
3,^,945 

2,796,408 
2,922,577 
6,457,025 
3,251,507 
3,313,369 

3,462,320 
3,842,625 
4,023,128 
6,238,640 


1 $28,521,256 

1 27,514,650 

1 26,324,445 

25.756,665 

29,092,048 

27.606,380 
30,618,785 
31,387,041 
1 32, 87,417 
33,737,415 

33,378.558 
34,565,285 
35,481,758 
35,974,234 
37,636,940 

35.861.610 
37,896,987 
39,966,490 
40.774,542 
40,715,350 

40,638,200 
^0.721,769 
41,645,204 
42,936,645 
45,008,126 

47,980,500 
47,658,208 
51,570,457 
53,670,052 
56,317,763 

50,974,046 
64,182,241 
67,708,460 
71,706,370 
75,819,794 

''2,248.974 
76.974,096 
86.825,695 
91,575,655 
99,819,773 

112,509,015 
125,085.610 
133,019,701 
159,926,361 


ft 


1877 


490,190,387 
401,460,^52 
442,^79,885 
456,166,134 

485,750,196 
518,229,079 
512,207,121 
528,298,871 
509,913,980 

515,569,^463 
520,172,091 
531,994,601 
M0,552,292 
543,833,165 

556,164,445 
563,950,820 
508,5e7,255 
542,297,641 
527,589,429 

514,039,771 
511,096,768 
515,439,970 
5:30,034,260 
559,849,507 

591,026,817 
594,704,917 
647,289,735 
662,739,148 

680,805,888' 

718,788,257 
749,579711 
702,381,078 
770,510,080 
827,370,943 

1,927,803,870 
2,145,393,037 
2,300,115,070 
2,055,314,103 
2,041,159,387 

2,847,507,939 
3,20-),5.>4,559 
3,043,290,2551 
3,933,089,455' 

1 


1,574,545,705 
1,552,577,504 

1,536,748,7891 
1,558,215,905 

1,587,207,579 
1,63^,910,734 
1,073,265,871' 
1,673,774,081 1 
1,670.079,868 

1,688,676,1681 
1,705,182,719 
1,732,058,799 
1,754,197,344 
1,778,138,477 

1,707,203,376 
1,731,256,467 
1,752,990,930 
1,742,602,115 
1,742,517,5141 

1,741,028,4371 
1,748,008,0391 
1,700,257,4431 
1,780,559,0091 
1,834,053,228 

1,908,280,0001 
1,990 ,885,3iS| 
2,070,22S,9891 
2,113,800,1081 
2,103,001,5931 

2,239,780,903 
2,307,934,371 
2,352,080,824 
2,389,978,349 
2, 4SJ4 ,315,574 

0,201,303,588 
0,481,059,1581 
0,719,0(>8.909 
7.220,270,044 
7,300,503,5551 

7,097,030,232 
8,>I2,73!,100 
9,00S, 103,040 
9,002,153,00-11 


^ 


1878 


k 


1879 


k 


1880 


1 


1881 

1882 


% 


1883 




1884 




1885 

1886 

1887 




1888 

1S89 




1890 




1891 

1892 

1893.." 

1894.." 




1895 




1896 




1897 




1898 

1899 




1900.. ...:.._ 

1901 




1902 . 




1903 




1904 




1905.. 

1906 

1907 




1908 




1909 




19)0 




1911 




1912 




1913 1 

1914 

1915 

1910..... .. 

1917 

1918. 

1919 



Digitized by 



Google 



AUDITOR OP STATE. 



69 



COMPARATIVE TAX TABLE. 

Total tax duplicate and total direct taxes collected in each county in 1900, 1910, 1915, 1919 

and 1920. 



Counties, 



Total 

duplicates 

subject to 

taxation 

in 1900. 



Total 

duplicate 

subject to 

taxation 

in 1910. 



Tottil 

dupl icatf 

aubjcet to 

taxation 

In 1915. 



I 



Total 
dnplicale 
suBJQCt to 
taxation 

ill am. 



1 



Total 

duplicate 

SI object to 

ttixation 

in J 920. 



Adams 

Allen 

Ashland — 
Ash tabula - 
Athens 



Auglaize. 
Belmont. 
Brown. -» 
Butler... 
Carroll.. 



Champaign. 

Clark 

Clermont 

Clinton 

Columbiana. 



Coshoc ton- 
Crawford- - 
Cuyahoga.. 

Darke 

Defiance-.- 



Delaware- 
Erie 

Fuirfie.d - 
Fayette,. 
Franklin.- 



Fulton-— 

Gallia 

Geauga.. - 
Greene — 
Guernsey - 

HamiUon- 
Hancock— 

Hardin 

Han ison. . 
Henry 



Highland. 
Hocking-. 
Holmes.. - 

Huron 

Jackson.. 



Jefferson.. 

Knox 

Lake 

Lawrence- 
Licking... 



$-1,743,475 
20,522,017 
11,681,900 
18,377,570 
8,257,830 

10,762,356 
21,429,139 

8,030,972 
30,525,656 

8,035,940 

16.974,401 

30,957,9411 

10,454,S80 

12,477,5011 

23,761 ;2 10 1 

I 

11,697,300 

17,286,3801 

167,144,4151 

21,202,2501 

7,735,9651 

13,683,330 
1 ,920,5901 
16,823,9201 
13,199,/85 
85,547,330 

7,218,500 
6,522,418 
6,957,964 

17,700,863 
8,897,960 

239,329,220 

21,353,796 

11,777,000 

11,252,520 

6,815,560 

11 ,343,232 
5,250,924 
7,684,284 

15,853,835 
6,327,074 

18,033,880 
14,187,718 
13,297,480 
7,494,796 
23,136,4111 



$5,267,577 
28,114,961 
13,588,630 
27,112,250 
10,949,055 

13,626,747 
30,229,630 

9,383,956 
38,924,466 

8,667,400 

19,031,374 
38,107,3^0 
11,491,610 
14,137,565 
32,820,370 

14,858,790 
21,632,910 
298,635,455 
29,427,320 
10,099,022 

15,744,900 
18,095,090 
21.X52,e70 
1^,173,865 
122,100,250 

10,119,220 

6,537,130 

7.607,127 

19,093,483 

12,271,562 



298,7ro,3CO| 
24,653,700 
14,387,200 
13,071,010 
10,434,080 

12,063,35^1 
6,610,917 
8,180,059 

18,843,500 
7,860,712 

20,506,670 
17,867,510 
15,069,420 
11,016,069 
29,807,808 



I 



$13,566,900 
93,428,350 
43,316,810 
87,414,780 
38,326,225 

46,551,960 
82,623,880 
21,417,072 
118,797,820 
18,005,085 

46,461,940 
99,039,660 
26,241,500 
35,879,530 
95,531,9701 

37,098,700 
58,164,970 
1,375,006,405 
72,348,130 
39,031,860 

^3,845,260 
65,646,210 
03,378,360 
^0,27i),893 
353,770,220 

39,035,190 
14,847,015 
17,604,8;'0 
4.^,372,19? 
39,419,990 

707,359,340 
99,208,180 
50,458,620 
29,124,600 
39,016,390 

32,109,0701 
22,734,0501 
25,629,8801 
62,993,31,51 
17,963,3781 
I 
83,205,600 1 
48,344,0301 
5,3,213,3301 
30,455,0011 
89,517,7501 



$16,731,200 
106 912,290 

50,921,690 
107,896,480 

42,813,015 

51,612,2801 
99,495,0401 
23,335,9451 
133,795,7701 
22,233,3001 

I 
61,165,6901 

120,518,9601 
27,706,9301 
40,190,610 

103,361,790 

41,585,230 
65,211,810 
1,609,619,910 
80,387,000 
45,211,5301 

47,4^^2 1401 
7^,764,6701 
71,812,4301 
45,443,93i>l 
412,501,7401 

43,732,605 
16,487,9651 
21,006,3401 
51,331,3701 
43,637,7851 

8^2,223,3co| 
107,781,3101 

55,801,3001 
34,4;i3,500] 
42,700,460 1 

I 
36,r>07,4001 
28,223,4101 
28,012,8201 
65,859 245 1 
20,516,7201 

99,044,7£0 
52,538.925 
70,310,5:^0 
34,398,210 
95,748,550 



$17,143,620 
109,638,880 

52,730,890 
112,563,290 

44,048,860 

53,291,690 
102,900,540 

23,950,920 
143,479,880 

22,876,050 

52,227,330 

124,757,730 

28.486,000 

41,379,900 

105,041,770 

42,399,040 
67,621,360 
1,743.068,085 
83,003,590 
45,547,720 

^8.269,180 
75,733.890 
73,435,530 
46,3^6.100 
466,723,730 

45,307,800 
16,900,205 
21,533,325 
52,650,710 
^4,366,985 

8.9,010,800 

105,850,140 

56,775.900 

34,932,300 

43,088,790 

37,277,010 
28,400,730 
20,210,890 
66,078,120 
20,023,230 

101,582,350 
5;3,720,l(iO 
79,313,010 
35,953,880 

105,4G3/)70 



Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



70 



I. 



h"'<'^ 



OHIO GBNEKAL STATISTICS. 

COMPARATIVE TAX TABLE— Continued. 



Counties. 



Logan 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahoning 

Marion 

Medina 

Meigs 

Mercer 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery... 

Morgan 

Morrow 

Muskingmn 

Noble 

Ottawa 

l^auldiug 

Perry 

Pickaway 

Pike 

Portage 

Preble. 

Putnam 

Richland 

Ross 

Sandusky 

Scioto 

Seneca 

Shelby - 

Stark. 

Summit 

Trumbull 

Tuscarawas 

Union 

Van Wert 

Vinton 

Warren. 

Washington 

Wayne 

Williams,.. ... 

Wood 

Wyandot 

Total 



Total 

duplicate 

subject to 

taxation 

in 1900. 



Totiil 

duplicate 

subject to 

taxation 

in 1910. 



$13,825,590 
19,5t)2;i59 
59,419,2t56 
13,131,700 
20,660,530 

14,794,385 

12,025,448 

6,346,838 

8,924,060 

22,268,209 

0,483,629 

64,763,860 

6,863,188 

9,7/7,822 

22,256,009 

5,345,491 
7,361,933 
4,950.183 
8,6i2,300( 
16,193,7731 

3,706,1361 
16,711,7891 
15,414,1081 
10,308,611 1 

22,05S,88H 

18.283,1171 
15,122,915 
10,525,1691 
20,513,5501 
11,690,6301 

40,737,7701 

32,960.090! 

19,300,313 

17,935,960 

10,501,535 

9,342,320 

3,30^,/05 

15,1S3,32H 

14,375,694 

21,029,550 

8,937,370 
20.SG1 2 ^0 
11,407,480 



Total 

duplicate 

subject to 

taxation 

in 1915. 



$17,017,970 
33,326,964 
92,063,530 
15,355,750 
49,073,140 

19,154,940 
15,542,961 
7,073,740 
12,125,555 
27,753,345 

8,722,675 
84,834,530 

7,816,115 
11,564,455 
26,866,273 

6,201:5861 

9,7 16,293 1 

7,507,516 

11,664,123 

18,832,489 

4,837,829 
19,339,747 
19,164.295 
12,342,60n 
26,401,3S0 

19,431,580 
18,972,660 
15,499,710 
23,451,460 
14,198,950 

51,599,5501 
47.508,0701 
26,232,1811 
22.484,3301 
12,805,9701 

1 3,702, 5r>o' 
1,001,057 
10.219,2S:? 
20,144,380 
24,852,160 

10,740,^00 
27,314,5:^ 
14.722,100 



Total 

duplicate 

subject to 

taxation 

hi 1919. 



$44,369,790 
130.622,372 
289,881,410 
43,379,400 
230,717,850 

61,555,590 
42,929,850 
18,388,515 
42,795,690 
72,686,8501 

21,445,7551 
227,388,2001 
15,489,^471 
26,272,7901 
66,493,680 

15,596,5101 
38,506,500 
36,335,840 
30,662,296 
50,032,7151 

11,801,3101 
55, 5 J5, 3(55 
n, 354,5(50 1 
44.123,8551 
OS ,855,6201 

50,658,3601 
64,413,4801 
55,324,3901 
72 ,5d 1,920! 
11,067,270 

176,921,590 

193,021,010 

97,579,280 

74,512,2.50 

2/, 705,900 

i 

50,78^,3401 
9.928,100 1 
35,S?^0,lf8| 
45,212,5801 
68,875,5011 

42,151,6101 
88,32:^,9501 
40,636.4701 



$48,940,830 
154,936,275 
399,816,000 
47,932,770 
304,237,050 

72.621,490 
52,244,840 
20,377,730 
48,299,760 
82,098,210 

23,334,680 
278,246,290 
18,748,040 
29,610,120 
76,778,300 

17,277,500 
41,459,100 
38,792,520 
36,036,265 
66,859,360 

14.345,820 
59,523,195 
47,719,810 
40,830,000 
81,629,980 

58.627,040 
72,865,950 
77,107,260 
80,171,490 
45,725,890 

273,714,010 

358,539,200 

153,476,850 

85,474,230 

42,115,990 

M,970,000 
11,872,380 
^^0,575,850 
56,071,880 
81,759,115 

46,136,480 
94,143,980 
46,276,600 



$1,786,559,0091 $2,380,978,340 .$7,537,480.981 119,068,163,040 



Total 

duplicate 

subject to 

taxation 

ml920. 



$51,190,820 
165,620,305 
495,109,360 
48,649,850 
320,136,270 

75,117,180 
55,396,980 
20,735,580 
50,768,120 
84,127,370 

24,064,855 
294,314,570 
18,737,150 
29,765,045 
77,568,340 

17,612,080 
46,014,170 
39,481,670 
36,835,704 
57,864,945 

14,568,000 
61,362,900 
49,063,760 
48,281,620 
85,404,730 

59,645,035 
74,113,420 
80,085,350 
81,478.590 
48.145,000 

284,568,320 

388.820,180 

170,368,890 

90,188,640 

42,697,010 

56.558,970 
12,857,330 
42,170,730 
56,873,390 
8^,877,485 

46,391,070 
94,916,960 
46,527,190 



$9,602,153,064 



NOTK—All duplicates given above are va'uations made the year previous. The 1900 

duplicates are valuations made in 1899. The succeeding table gives the total taxes collected 

on the above duplicates. _ i /-ir^nii^ 

^ Digitized by VjOOv Ic 






AUDITOR OF STATE. 

COMPARATIVE TAX TABLE— Continued. 



71 



Counties. 


Total taxes 

collected 

ISOO. 


Total taxes 

collected 

1910. 


Total taxes 

collected 

1915. 


Total taxes 
collected 
1919. 


Total taxes 
•collected 
1920. 


Adams 

Allen 

Ashland 

Ashtabula 

Athens 


$122,520 38 
481,815 74 
224,562 99 
243,223 53 
415,544 26 


tl68,r55 13 
808,V24 94 
348,510 07 
781,560 33 
4C8,054 88 


1158,442 93 
967,683 26 
480,109 24 

1,028,371 02 
473,348 98 


§220,539 12 
1,393,487 59 

687,612 10 
1,495,113 63 

622,173 98 


$224,448 93 

1,443,308 20 

771,325 30 

1 1,721,103 68 

801,272 20 


Auglaize 

Belmont 

Brown 

Butler.. 

Carroll 


273,279 62 
433,246 81 
197,060 57 
697,^86 11 
136,975 60 


403,801 04 
813,706 72 
235,201 99 
1,082,990 52 
172,590 34 


529,849 43 
926,768 44 
215,513 28 
1,353,845 57 
200,608 90 


670,271 15 
1,344,626 49 

294,805 10 
2,086,845 72 

291,394 30 


811,677 33 
1,500,821 76 

312,982 76 
2,207,281 16 

321,103 95 


Champaign.. 

Clark 

Clermont 

Clinton 

Coliunbiana . 


324,086 43 
631,113 63 
245,833 46 
280,046 48 
529,420 15 


447,624 52 
1,018,527 91 
294,131 14 
354,567 20 
920,267 72 


480,013 93 

1,220,810 21 

291,235 18 

287,257 26 

1,081,899 29 


750,565 35 

1,691,412 63 

368,968 03 

515,2^5 26 

1,504,641 73 


878,787 04 

1,983,520 44 

382,067 46 

579.180 57 

1,7&5,921 76 


Coshocton- -- 

Crawford 

Cuyahoga. . . 

Darke 

Defiance 


253,145 72 
363,220 81 
5,721,337 87 
386, 1?2 28 
254,027 C8 


406,883 97 
512,491 76 
12,244,077 61 
7r8,f89 15 
324,528 58 


439,799 16 

608,919 69 

16,724,702 40 

1 734.829 19 

1 261,418 66 


562,776 68 
870,986 48 
26,607,055 21 
981,935 92 
671,243 29 


665,792 99 

1,011,732 64 

31,863,187 53 

1,154,466 47 

915,683 94 


Delaware 

Erie 


277,621 35 
261,810 15 
280,151 09 
250,755 95 
2,141,166 93 


535,480 24 
489,849 69 
484,223 66 
270.374 46 
3,580,026 95 


681,151 16 
652,416 02 1 
626,281 21 
262,765 92 
4,418,657 14 


827,621 78 

1,C04,CC4 70 

819,4a5 61 

561,764 52 

5,956,312 10 


939,460 88 

i,rro4r5 12 


Fairfield 

Fayette 

Franklin 


9r6,6iV7 22 

606,423 72 

8,633,368 45 


Fulton 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey 


208,113 37 
167,078 89 
125,366 52 
361,260 65 
208,599 64 


365,892 06 
228,993 93 
200,532 99 
517,956 6-1 
374,606 84 


448,278 53 
185,447 16 
219,282 89 
536,299 57 
441,228 74 


587,006 52 
259,813 68 
299,256 83 
680,222 04 
617,822 98 


721,506 34 
288,168 67 
352,243 16 
723,344 73 
696,297 92 


Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry 


6,254,571 94 
513,505 90 
288,768 77 
182,921 59 
236,037 73 


9,173,054 83 
698,823 41 
389,780 75 
280,149 45 
392,0r8 93 


10,650,576 82 
757,761 89 
456,126 16 
290,780 74 
504,902 93 


12,873,366 16 

1,209,962 76 

757,388 62" 

404,657 45 

574,289 53 


13,433,149 11 

1,322,298 41 

861,849 81 

494,617 95 

618,138 31 


Highland 

Hocking 

Holmes 

Huron 

Jackson 


247,589 88 
120,253 88 
136,180 45 
331,586 05 
177,450 57 


a35,002 23 
209,553 47 
198,616 59 
501,639 26 
317,253 48 


337,631 21 
221,327 25 
223.401 20 
726,2r)3 43 
223,787 81 


477,432 69 
350,494 60 
267,972 90 
960,377 15 
302,375 22 


537,270 26 
397,940 43 
402,937 47 
1,031,420 99 
367,690 08 


Jefferson 

Knox 

Lake 

Lawrence 

Licking 


392,346 42 
267,909 56 
250,326 61 
240,055 82 
478,422 68 


822,814 .53 
371,665 80 
394,965 96 
350,229 31 
741,763 44 


999,700 26 
449,.^55 40 
515,60,5 64 
378,129 73 
889,445 09 


1,319,524 97 
r)52.4()0 76 
827,570 61' 
472,9.57 81 

1,290,754 15 


1,608,719 76 
748,499 16 
98,3,441 19 
505,075 71 

1,451,978 47 


Logan. 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahoning 


288,997 26 
489,330 06 
2,156,728 14 
260,199 89 
725,593 10 


414,867 20 
1,132,678 841 
3,448,121 94 

374,550 70 
1,612,667 73 1 


481,425 36 
l,760,2cS3 15 
4,435,2i)9 10 

415,012 34 
2,797,026 41 1 


667,803 94 
2.201 ,6(>7 13 f 
6,967,935 30 

625,139 00 

4,766,144 44 

Digitized 


739,477 03 
2,619,918 04 
9,304,:^^7 00 

703,755 00 



72 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

COMPARATIVE TAX TABLE— Concluded. 



Counties. • 


Total taxes 

collected 

1900. 


Total taxes 

collected 

1910. 


Total taxes 

collected 

1915. 


Total taxes 

collected 

1919. 


Total taxes 

collected 

1920. 


Marion 

Medina 

Meigs 

Mercer 

Miami 


$389,022 15 
203,149 73 
177,768 85 
224,345 64 
496,197 67 


1631,697 06 
342,194 74 
250,a57 13 
404,085 13 
666,453 23 


$766,283 93 
477,560 28 
254,449 45 
562,258 58 
7a5,078 77 


$985,876 31 
705,514 32 
338,068 58 
617,414 64 

1,017,963 19 


$1,106,099 78 

835,321 00 

410,765 46 

697,257 99 

1,120,808 83 


Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Morgan 

Morrow 

Muskingum.. 


151,528 27 
1,773,892 09 
158,132 37 
166,234 10 
510,316 50 


236,264 74 
2,433.401 80 
204,^:94 62 
244,519 87 
698,651 19 


228,743 23 
3,051,504 67 
182,666 70 
285,925 27 
814,399 61 


299.563 61 
4,863,849 95 

291,59$ 55 

401.564 39 
1,079,034 15 


323,042 37 

5,801,072 74 

314,064 96 

447,543 95 

1,225,432 09 


Noble 

Ottawa 

Paulding 

Perry 

Pickaway 


120,120 13 
]89,4€0 26 
218,261 54 
196,487 17 
320,683 62 


167,768 49 
265,716 85 
319,633 49 
3.54,298 25 
400,109 07 


173,832 14 
366,975 01 
381,602 50 
365,229 36 
422,611 23 


248,754 31 
538,457 55 
515,544 42 
544,164 67 
653,318 51 


271,274 77 
626,339 62 
553,806 00 
660,166 66 
689,546 78 


Pike 


96,870 24 
275,239 46 
259,183 20 

281,982 18 
484,569 68 


120,686 99 
442,235 45 
386,140 19 
359,967 38 
709,776 65 


110,150 84 
668,917 66 
386,178 69 
415,387 91 
768,696 38 


185,418 73 
875,405 43 
572,248 93 
584,966 30 
1,117,730 40 


217,088 40 


Portage 

Preble 

Putnam 

Richland 


1,013,692 58 
607,282 31 
708,454 26 

1,286,414 73 


Ross 

Sandusky 

Scioto 

Seneca 

Shelby 


388,056 88 
328,585 48 
270,164 69 
461,880 95 
256,300 76 


477,283 77 
519,721 80 
499,29^ 08 
610,688 40 
341,847 82 


499,600 89 
653,293 10 
733,997 33 
&36,996 19 
420,982 69 


763,551 67 

894,218 53 

1,105,682 87 

1,152,274 67 

503,521 99 


762,805 54 
1,033,314 06 
1,267,460 20 
1,325,850 10 

631,260 11 


Stark 

Summit 

Trumbull 

Tuscarawas.. 
Union 


900,450 02 
710,470 02 
406,963 48 

407,847 181 
198,770 50 


1,439,767 65 

1,426,239 13 

719,328 57 

651,367 26 

381,132 57 


2,166,400 84 

2,934,912 87 

1,244,954 28 

821,047 57 

504,934 72 


3,620,440 44 
5,814,224 26 
2,187,114 73 
1,026.452 06 
562,043 52 


4,264,166 34 
7,255,363 03 
2,748,794 93 
1,407,523 09 
711,156 04 


Van Wert.... 

Vinton. 

Warren 

Washington.. 
Wayne 


265,949 46 
73,352 35 
294,940 21 
319,407 00 
352,895 29 


384,873 09 
102,351 06 
390,534 36 
470.934 56 
493,598 47 


499,806 16 
127,463 64 
380,349 35 
507,961 37 
682,343 32 


748,482 30 
164,499 44 
552,898 10 
743,678 40 
965,377 60 


845,654 91 
181,553 24 
736,953 94 
801,452 45 
1,102,021 41 


Williams 

Wood 

Wyandot 


208,132 69 
405,285 54 
218,883 80 


358,843 33 
919,014 88 
341,335 79 

$71,921,650 74 


402,795 34 

1,111,712 12 

396.585 67 


679,809 32 

1,285,973 91 

495,075 48 


763,444 52 

1,438,447 60 

610,893 67 


Total 


143,797,692 51 


$91,185,992 94 


$133,019,701 06 


$156,813,231 86 



Digitized by 



Google 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 



73 



GRAND DUPLICATE, OF OHIO FOR 1919. 

The following table gives the assessed value of all property listed for taxation in each county 
in 1919 on which taxes were paid at the Pecember, 1919, and June, 1920 collections. 



I 



Count k^s. 



Value of 
Lfindp Out- 
side Cities 
and Incor- 
porated 
Villages. 



Value of Itesil | 

Estate in I 

Cities and 

Ineorp^tnited 

V ill ages. 



Value of 

Personal 

Property 

Oiitsidn 

Cities and 

incorpornle< 

ViHn^t'3. 



Vahie of 

Personal 
Property m f 

Cities and 
In4»orporatod 

Villages, 



Total 

Tax 

rXiplicate. 



Adams 

Allen 

Ashland 

Ashtabula.. 
Athens 

Auglaize 

Belmont 

Brown 

Butler 

Carroll 

Champaign. 

Clark.. 

Clermont... 

Clinton 

Columbiana 

Cosbonton.. 
Crawford... 
Cuyahoga.. 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware... 

Erie 

Fairfield 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gallia. 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey... 

Hamilton... 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry 

Highland... 

Hocking 

Holmes 

Huron 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Knox 

Lake 

Lawrence... 
Licking 



I8,€60,130 
23,903,450 
17,138,230 
26,859,780 
11,182,940 

22,574,^tO 
32,051,330 
13,011,220 
31,954,300 
8,720,340 

23,666,480 
25,538,560 
13,953,210 
19,378,670 
20,762,010 

14,236,280 
21,402,880 
28,885,500 
38,674,220 
21,507,210 

20,852,430 
16,903,030 
Z5,950,280 
23.366,000 
48,999,220 

21,029,720 
6,686,330 
12,322,810 
22,154,540 
14,344,525 

24,772,030 
31,6P8,210 
24,948,2.50 
12,998,340 
25,501,240 

16,5&5,9P0 

9,122,540 

15,2M.260 

22,340,910 

5,271,090 

19,1.'^8,600 
20,667,710 
21,492,040 
8,523,000 
35,330,890 



$2,296,930 
34,326,010 
10,816,880 
27,727,700 
11,076,240 

10,446,4601 

25,185,2001 

2 693,9S0 

54,175,820 

2,812,730 

7,540,330 

44,860,230 

4,299,850 

6,692,540 

37,424,120 

9,313,670 

16,631,000 

999,262,210 

11,534,580 

8,789,720 

7,423,610 
27,7(^8,680 
15,024,300 

6,423 ,.560 
245,661,600 

6,012,2701 
2,6.54,410 
1,985,730 
7,910,4.^0 
12,.372,020 

527,1.5.5,630 

13, .529,080 

8,7.57,100! 

3,3.'>t,660 

5,501, 100 1 



I 

7,0.32,i>20l 

4,299,6.-0 1 

2,016,1101 

14, .376, 460* 

6,043,190' 

I 

37,8^1, .360 1 

9,8.30,5701 

16,672,8.')0 

13,069,4^10 

27,354,800] 



14,14.5,750 
29,983,640 
16,.349,280 
23,703,3r0 
13,752,470 

11,698,140 
23 133,930 

5.635.600 
22,769,310 

9,178,500 

13,309,140 

16,807,190 

7,030,890 

9,957,110 

22,264,OiO 

12,101,870 
16,348,690 
18,741,780 
22.146,960 
9;485,290 

14.608,160 
12,944,800 
22,245,120 
10,466,080 
37,194,140 

12,003,690 

5,243,775 

5,693,745 

13,667,200 

10,360,675 

10,9^8,7.30 
16,321,000 
15,747,790 

i4.ri85.aso 

8,828,630 

8,.nS5,110' 
12,501,5001 
10,183.640! 
19,423,810 

4,5,''y2,400 

17,667,280 
16,635,440 
28,828,120 
5,.3.50.060 
25,631,840 



$1,740,810 
21,425,780 

8,426,500 
34,272,420 

8,037,210 

8,572,250 
22,5.30,0801 
2,563 120 
34,580,4.50 
2,1^,480 

7,711,380 

37,5,51,7.50 

3,202,0.50 

5,351,580 

24,591,600 

6,744,220 

13,238,790 

696,178,.595 

10,707,830 

5,765,500 

5,.384,980 

18,117,-380 

10,215,770 

6,1.30,460 

134,808,770 

6,.322,120 
2,321.690 
1,. 531 .040 
8,918,.520 
7,089,7a5 

206,081,410 

44,.301, 2.^50 

7,322.820 

3,593,r.20 

3,8.57,760 

5,273.990' 
2,477,0401 
l,7.T),S,K0l 
10,53().m0| 
4,7.56,550! 

26,875,110 
6,5!)2.440 

12,,320,000 
9,002.380 

17,146,040 



$17,143,620 
109,638,880 

52,730,890 
112,563,290 

44,048,860 

53,291,690 
102,900 540 

23,950,920 
143,479,880 

22,876,050 

.52,227,,330 

12-1,7.57,730 

28,486,000 

41,379,900 

105,011,770 

42,.399,040 
67,621,360 
1,743,068,0^5 
83,063,590 
45,547,720 

48,269,180 
75,733,890 
73,4.35,530 
46,-386,100 
466,723,730 

45,367,800 
16,906,205 
21,53:3,325 
52,6.50,710 
44,366,985 

859.010,800 

105,850,140 

56,775,960 

.34,9.32,.300 

43,688,790 

.37,277,610 
28,400.7.30 
29,210.890 
(»6. 678, 120 
20,()23,230 

101,."S2,.350 
.53,72().160 
79,313,010 
.35.9.53,880 

105,463,670 



ai 1*1 



74 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

GRAND DUPLICATE OF OHIO FOR 1919— Ck)n eluded. 



Counties. 



Value of 
Lands Out^ 
side Cities 
and Incor- 
porated 
Villages. 



Value of Real 
Estate in 
Cities and 

Incorporated 
Villages. 



Value of 
Personal 
Property 
Outside 
Cities and 
Incorporated 
Villages. 



Value of 

Personal 

Property in 

Cities and 

Incorporated 

Villages. 



Total 

Tax 

Duplicate. 



Logan 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison... 
Mahoning- 



Marion. 
Medina. 
Meigs._ 
Mercer - 
Miami. _ 



Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Morgan 

Morrow 

Muskingum.- 



NoblT.... 

Ottawa 

Paulding-- 

Perry 

Pickaway. 



PikG 

Portage.. 
Preble._.. 
Putnam.. 
Richland. 



Ross 

S m dusky. 

Scioto 

Seneca 

Shelby ... 



Stark 

Summit 

Trumbull- _- 
Tuscarawas. 
Union. 



VanW.^L.. 

Vinton 

Warrori 

Washington. 
Wayne 



Williams.. 

Wood 

W van dot. 



Totals. 



23,681,150 
30,847,060 
39,129,690 
26,556,410 
26,102,910 

21,791,660 
18,229,640 
7,656,340 
27,174,260 
27,996,320 

13,277,375 
44,861,330 
9,067,820 
14.583,740 
19,^7,250 

9,411,500 
22,111,651) 
25,811,530 
11.971.640 
28,632,325 

6,011,310 
17,61)1,035 
22.104,380 
27.804,160 
19,315,120 

19,110,350 
25,518,300 
10.942.050 
30,100.630 
23,561750 

50,321,040 
26,279,6)0 
45,852,470' 
22,081 0701 
21.625,3901 
I 
25,300.490 
3,910,520; 
16.8:U,970l 
17,752.400 
27,228,255 

2l.17O.0S0 
43,043.090 
20,040,000 



Sl,924,042,06;5 



8,-139,570 

67,108,240 

296,589,720 

4,875,050 

169,897,960 

22,773,560 
7,531,300 
3,843,200 
6,335,200 

22,789,930 

2,101,985 

133,602,200 

1,970,905 

2,618,650 

26,086,880 

1,215,650 
6,859,510 
3,218,130 
6,139,124 
6,814,090 

1,008,310 

10,112,015 

6,071,030 

4,973,965 

25,376,610 

13.518,310 
17,825,420 
36,798,200 
17,300..510 
7,085,910 

114.837,010 

185.925,2)0 

40.;>]4,700 

25,137,950 

4,917,510 

7,332,430 

1,026,170 

6.205850 

11,538,310 

14,8 i7 ,900 

7,9S8 4S0 

10.760720 

5,835,530 



$3,745,022,144 



12,753,490 
22,839,375 
16,516,600 
12,181,840 
22,233,400 

16,127,290 
18,273,110 
6,467,620 
11,318,940 
14,414,670 

6.462.210 

21,488,120 

5,470,075 

9.146,605 

18,473,440 

5,520,070 
12.688,290 

7,618,360 
13,134,915 
16,010,580 

6,343,720 
22,576,490 
14,157,910 
10935,195 
22,312,000 

15.990 530 
17,592.710 
11,395,630 
22.059 980 
11,171,610 

36 051,100 
25,703.720 
45,9 U 400 
22.607.270 
12,679,620 

15,653,030 
7,051.810 
13,821,130 
14,170,590 
30,442,705 

11,659.970 
31,085,650 
14,697,250 



6,616,610 

44,825,630 

143,873,350 

5,036,550 
107,902,000 

14.424,670 

11,362,930 

2,768,420 

5,939,720 

18,926,450 

2,220,285 

94,:562,830 

2,228,350 

3,412,960 

13,120,770 

1,422.850 
4,351,600 
2.833,650 
5,500,025 
6,377,950 

1,111,630 

10,985,300 

6,730,440 

4,538,300 

18,340,910 

10,935,845 
13,148.990 
20.951,350 
12.037,470 
6,323,390 

83,322,570 

152,908,520 

30.917,140 

19,459,'380 

3,474,460 

8,239.990 
838.800 

5,185,780 
13,'381,930 
12,368.625 

5.572,670 

10,022,590 

5,924,320 



51,190320 
165,620,305 
496,109,360 

48,549,850 
326,136,270 

75,117,180 
55,396,980 
20,735,580 
50,768,120 
84,127.370 

24,064,855 
294,314,570 
18,737,150 
29,765,045 
77,568,340 

17,612,080 
46,014.170 
30,481»67O 
36,835,704 
57,834,945 

14,563.000 
61,332,900 
40,033,760 
48,281,620 
85,404,730 

50,645,035 
74,113,420 
80,085.350 
81.478,590 
48,145,690 

2^4,568,320 

388.820,180 

170,338,890 

90 188,643 

42;607,O10 

53,558;970 
12,857,330 
42.170.730 
56,873.290 

84,877,485 

46,391,070 
94,916,950 
46,527,190 



$1,370,400,305 $2,562,689,150 



$9,602,153,664 



Ji i yiiLedby^^Q^Ogre 



AUDITOR OP STATE. 



75 



TAX COLLECTIONS BY COUNTIES FOR 1920— FEBRUARY 

AND AUGUST. 




Cayahoga 

Hamilton 

Franklin 

Lucas. _ 

Montgomery 

Stark 

Mahoning 

Summit 

Belmont 

Columbiana. 

Lorain 

Butler , 

Clark 

Jefferson 

Ashtabula... 

Muskingum.. 
Tuscarawas.. 

Allen 

Licking 

Trumbull.... 

Scioto 

Athens 

Richland 

Wood 

Washington.. 

Miami 

Darke 

Guernsey 

Seneca 

Ross 

Lawrence 

Fairfield 

Erie 

Wayne 

Hancock 

Perry 

Sandusky 

Huron 

Crawford 

Marion 

Auglaize 

Jackson 

Hardin 

Portage 

Knox.. 

Coshocton... 

Logan 

Putnam 

Greene 

Clermont 



637,425 
460,732 
221,567 
192,728 
163,763 

122,987 

116,151 

108,253 

76,8.56 

76,619 

76,037 
70,271 
66,435 
65,423 
59,547 

57,488 
57,035 
56,580 
55,5r0 
52,766 

48,463 
47,795 
47,667 
46,330 
45,422 

45,047 
42,933 
42,716 
42,603 
40,000 

39,488 
39,201 
38.327 
38,0"8 
37,800 

35.3P6 
35,1711 
;^,200l 
34,0:T)I 
33,971 ! 

31,420 
30,791 
30,407 
30,307 
30,181 

30.121 

30,08^1 

29,972 

29.7731 

29,r)51| 



$1,105,692 02 
559,235 63 
299,841 02 
313,573 BS 
187,2e8 83 

193,522 95 

206,531 99 

248,056 70 

65,554 99 

66,643 05 

106,647 02 
88,703 79 
79,646 33 
64,118 44 
72,220 04 

49,661 00 
57,283 03 
69,198 62 
67,628 82 
108,499 45 

51,000 01 
22,533 30 
54,823 45 
61,215 32 
36,765 53 

.53,873 82 i 
53,575 86 
28,194 4G 
52,324 14 
38,288 01 

22,584 30 
47,084 82 
48,474 51 

54.251 24 
67,826 05 

23,4r0 94 

47.252 10 
42,520 36 
43,152 97 
47,572 55 

34,138 21 
13,080 27 
35,()74 02 
38,928 91 
34,213 17 

27,165 50 
32,541 34 
30.937 42 
33,925 71 
17,498 00 



$4,048,374 94 
3,000,816 36 
2,605,400 79 
1,384,074 91 
1,279,218 68 

865.723 78 
981,24(^94 

1,247,217 18 
303,837 05 
609,220 01 1 

378,164 01 
491,736 82 

434.724 86 
499,544 66 
416,908 68 

366,504 83 
439,156 83 
328,420 10 
338,.543 30 
596,437 37 

394,088 50 
268,303 13 
316,685 64 
282,346 20 
246,392 13 

277,479 00 
234.820 70 
130,730 53 
245,557 04 
200,003 01 

176.382 99 
315,159 21 
224,2t)5 52 
297,474 24 
207,247 74 

250,411 831 
214,310 82 
235,t>()2 02 
199,410 17 
221,637 05 

228,601 95 
95,506 64 
384, on 40' 
212,490 09! 
2:]9,;U2 371 
I 
207.436 621 
1(>0,023 81 ! 
12-1,205 75 1 
212,2:30 17 
124,419 52] 



$135,251 01 

90,666 69 

180,281 58 

209,251 99 

166.125 17 

264,365 17 
393,445 22 
174,819 41 
234,596 22 
228,422 36 

298,330 80 
115,574 35 
70,304 50 
104 ,.554 68 
237,776 04 

97,128 04 
144,122 50 
125,.544 60 
170,601 36 

347.126 98 

.59,196 19 

98,215 62 

191,646 95 

315,005 00 

86,428 93 

70,415 19 
209,256 46 
108,.342 02 
359,202 62 

74,569 61 

39,972 36 
120,728 44 
141,-5,57 53 
145,780 63 
261,948 81 

105,281 06 
177,30() 20 
252,040 2S 
205,875 41 
30,204 95 

92,037 ,34 

19,998 13 

43,551 03 

141,019 77 

111,050 81 

69,380 18 
a3,r>00 49 
147,193 72> 
92.709 01- 
48,696 04 



76 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



TAX COLLECTIONS BY COUNTIES FOR 1920— FEBRUARY 
AND AUGUST— Continued. 



School. 



City 

and 

Village. 



County 
Special. 



Township 
Special. 



Municipal 
Special. 



Total. 



$13,585,511 19 
3,898,427 39 
2,590,633 84 
3,316,815 79 
1,770,900 03 

1,506,620 14 

2,193.964 18 

2,859,653 71 

633,971 60 

466,126 21 

953,658 97 
628,257 03 
731,544 11 
550,845 10 
642,321 66 

436.115 17 
519,935 57 
510.726 18 
506,449 60 

1,039,983 97 

410,529 08 
297,106 36 
380,541 12 
511,440 00 
291,103 65 

459,100 65 
408,133 45 
277,861 22 
331,484 28 

308.116 90 

170,506 85 
347,484 89 
322,600 30 
363,645 0; 
390,563 70 

217,188 11 
335,615 49 
338,4W 54 
321,476 04 
414,421 73 

226,264 17 
125,023 39 
221,751 06 
429,224 20 
267,372 46 

242,P83 26 1 
"08,709 041 
233,797 24 ( 
264,054 37 
158,665 461 



$10,040,204 58 
5,715,811 92 
2,957,211 22 
2,913,868 05 
2,125,846 61 

1,062,209 51 

V301,369 45 

1,982,662 44 

209.917 95 

346; 156 71 

696.697 00 
721,263 42 
532,020 88 
313,249 99 
281,907 90 

25,5,682 63 
190,166 46 
314.889 23 
275.835 37 
389;686 46 

292,762 36 
94,400 92 

251,054 52 
80,968 27 

113,270 10 

259,940 17 
111,363 02 
123,521 13 
236,760 39 
123,308 34 

95,569 21 
102,994 93 
293,755 85 
1,^8,558 99 
203,580 93 

4l,a37 38 
169,199 96 
122,089 82 
151,379 94 
179,191 61 

113,004 97 
44,751 23 
74,751 16 

122.698 11 
60,239 45 

76,659 75 
a3,209 26 
47,955 47 
85,743 28 
30,409 74 



$162,116 02 



328,022 87 
53,966 63 

48,474 06 



20,496 99 
16,610 47 

8,233 29 

1,071 76 

18,900 24 

35,847 50 

62,233 58 



9,282 41 
9,501 29 
19,939 68 
13,614 04 



5,606 82 

23,034 65 

125.116 39 



106 55 

5,026 30 

55,249 68 



3,938 28 

2,619 37 

30,360 16 

64,540 43 

3,317 09 
41,128 33 
10,194 2.3 
29.630 98 
97,622 02 

56,242 70 

19,987 35 

101,481 14 

27.173 01 

1,941 99 

12,884 95 

54,346 50 

120,728 88 

11,719 50 

2,163 15 



$245 40 



$2,785,792 37 
168,191 12 



13,088 45 



3,852 28 
16,277 28 
68,968 64 

5,124 05 
774 26 



304 68 

16 90 

1,232 24 

47 63 

10,811 90 

113 56 

42 00 

372 81 

14,556 91 



2,074 38 
795 92 



118,393 82 

1,296 54 

1,007 22 

327 48 



479 70 
4,734 23 
1,476 72 
6,705 89 

&44 98 

333 70 

05 09 

19,637 69 

121 93 

28,970 26 
9,362 38 



2,470 44 
456 83 

4,034 86 

"1^264 '66 

"""88'22 



825,641 06 
217,716 79 

319,398 45 

440,674 75 

673,984 95 

27,322 91 

52,968 69 

178,186 95 

160,369 31 

115,372 62 

39,327 15 

7,688 15 

9,529 12 

47,462 73 

85,046 27 

66,607 53 

238,889 75 

59,884 06 
15,106 05 
68,628 40 
60,222 04 
26,636 19 



18,816 61 
21,325 72 
44,264 73 
12,192 19 



18,786 95 
52,392 21 
50,474 38 
59,934 86 

18,195 27 
48,107 46 
30,497 65 
41,169 44 
109,327 94 

31,817 73 
39,974 69 



39,658 05 
33,882 08 

25,247 87 

31,146 59 

2,371 78 

22,962 09 

126 73 



$31,863,187 53 

13,433,149 11 

8,633,368 45 

9,304,337 00 

5,801,072 74 

4,264,166 34 
5,533,503 81 
7,255,363 03 
1,500,821 76 
1,785,921- 76 

2,619,918 04 
2,207,281 16 
1,983,530 44 
1,608,719 76 
1,721,103 68 

1,225,432 69 
1,407,523 09 
1,443,368 29 
1,451,978 47 
2,748,794 93 

1,267,460 20 

801,272 20 

1,286,414 73 

1,438,447 60 

801,452 45 

1,120,808 83 
1,154,466 47 

696,297 92 
1,325,850 10 

762,805 64 

505,075 71 

956,657 22 

1,090,405 52 

1.102,021 41 

1,322,298 41 

660,166 66 
1,033,314 06 
1,031,420 99 
1,011,732 64 
1,106,099 78 

811,677 33 
367,690 08 
861,849 81 
1,013.692 58 
748,499 16 

665,792 99 
739,477 03 
708,454 26 
723,344 73 
382,067 45 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 



77 



TAX COLLECTIONS BY COUNTIES FOR 1920— FEBRUARY 
AND AUGUST.— Continued. 



Counties. 



1910. 
Popula- 
tion. 



State. 



County. 



Township. 



Van Wert.. 
Highland _- 

Mercer 

Delaware.. 
Champaign 

Pickaway.. 

Gallia 

Mei^s 

Williams... 
Henry 

Brown 

Adams 

Shelby 

Defiance... 
Warren 

Monroe 

Fulton..... 

Preble 

Clinton 

Hocking... 

Medina 

Ashland 

Lake 

Paulding... 
Ottawa 

Union 

Fayette... 
Wyandot.. 
Madison... 
Harrison... 

Noble 

Holmes 

Morrow 

Morgan 

Carroll 

Pike 

Geauga 

Vinton 

Totals. 



$29,119 
28,711 
27,536 
27,182 
26,351 

26,158 
25,745 
25,594 
2.5,198 
25,119 

24,832 
24,755 
24,663 
24,498 
24,497 

24,224 
23,914 
23,834 
23,680 
23,650 

23,598 
22,975 
22,927 
22.730 
22,360 

21,871 
21,744 
20,760 
19,902 
19,076 

18,601 
17,909 
16,815 
16,097 
15,761 

15,723 
14,670 
13,096 



$36,121 34 
23,526 64 
32,421 73 
30,794 43 
33,244 53 

36,989 33 
10,662 99 
13,158 27 
29,570 07 
27,953 99 

15,114 96 
10,657 81 
30,749 27 
28,556 17 
27,400 74 

15,272 65 
29,099 66 

31.210 10 
26,532 91 
17,866 25 

35,332 21 
33,556 24 
50,083 42 
25,141 07 

29.211 94 

27,176 78 
29,628 42 
29,783 72 
30,927 17 
22,116 79 

11,132 42 
18,577 39 
18,933 54 
11,977 69 
14,328 44 

9,128 19 

13,575 73 

8,110 39 



$194,771 91 
180,859 20 
162,409 74 
253,725 53 
270,882 64 

198,273 72 1 
118,008 14 
126,789 71 
184,682 24 
115,815 20 

110,124 43 
82,077 41 
141,820 40 
206,425 19 
176,841 46 

93,890 85 
143,384 42 
137,111 14 
128,586 06 
121,505 63 

173,848 14 
248,814 11 
242,620 22 
182,118 33 
137,156 97 

233,872 05 
209,609 42 
132,853 50 
178,346 19 
176,916 01 

75,783 04 
148,547 11 
101,440 93 
112,653 87 

83,702 78 

112,283 09 
73,478 97 
62,340 78 



4,767,121 



$6,130,095 28 



$33,451 ,8i2 42 



$157,354 68 

54,484 37 

135,004 19 

151,325 08 

107,201 35 

98,750 07 
42,162 51 

53.758 65 
170,362 95 
152,572 50 

46.759 73 
33,435 15 
98,443 03 

113,842 76 
130,108 52 

75,521 49 
88,130 91 
81,450 52 
81,074 69 
62,391 29 

161,868 69 
123,054 82 
121,611 68 
67,738 79 
152,965 99 

62,567 13 

90,703 67 

146,578 89 

109,844 05 

94,992 29 

69,167 28 
81,785 20 
108,823 78 
72,432 73 
74,543 71 

21,417 70 
72,952 95 
42,033 14 



$11,292,367 58 



Digitized by 



Google 



78 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



TAX COLLECTIONS BY COUNTIES FOR 1920— FEBRUARY 
AND AUGUST— Concluded. 



School. 



City 

and 

Village. 



County 
Special. 



Township 
Special. 



Municipal 
Special. 



Total. 



$240,448 26 
219,689 41 
191,683 10 
268,701 80 
310,811 19 

285.214 46 
93,247 68 

134,832 49 
220,604 78 
198,276 71 

119,421 70 
84,704 m 

186.215 42 
233,282 64 
245,535 46 

125,844 13 
217,017 06 
291,103 46 
259.688 92 
147,801 74 

334,414 71 
257,516 50 
329,599 32 
171,998 05 
185,045 97 

250,372 47 
214,821 68 
190,151 69 

258,598 99 
159,343 77 

90,766 77 
131,194 75 
147,664 54 

94,044 50 
117,122 65 

63,955 68 

131,910 44 

63,223 95 



$55,983,634 01 



$70,367 04 
56,327 62 
65,563 54 
79,837 78 
94,184 28 

59,327 07 
19,559 96 
28,523 64 
44,756 44 
50,841 72 

20,935 45 
12,238 30 
72,626 05 
94,377 83 
62,017 75 

9,933 58 
71,416 88 
65,607 54 
64,527 77 
31,832 06 

77,278 67 
86,7a3 69 
133,070 94 
23,576 76 
63,896 61 

48,719 09 
61,670 53 
59,124 95 
53,272 06 
35,212 32 

10,441 04 
14,169 65 
27,662 68 
19,811 35 
20,848 47 

8,7&5 42 

24,321 77 

5,679 01 



$116,917 47 
23,111 87 

2,966 62 



40,490 55 
76,704 10 
53,596 98 



75,005 11 
82,309 09 
82,045 18 

1,505 46 

140,138 52 

180 40 



1,519 46 

10,873 23 
4,009 81 
29,615 91 
62,347 50 
32,157 49 

65,786 15 



43,474 53 
40,634 34 



9,637 09 

657 39 

36,900 89 



17,020 17 



$38,420,445 35 



$2,763,076 59 



$125,471 28 

80 50 

95,629 20 

26 92 

2,450 55 

2,455 66 

1,795 83 

3 19 

35 69 

86 19 

273 42 

1,255 14 

5,097 34 

132,759 72 

4,968 46 



702 63 

17 84 

5,976 62 



23,558 10 

599 09 

2,412 75 

1,205 23 

3,903 23 

606 67 



3.999 92 
2,491 70 

211 86 
3,500 38 
3,8,^)8 34 
1,475 59 
1,458 76 



8,687 49 



$21,120 40 

2,302 52 

14,546 49 

38,131 87 

36,900 63 

5,569 85 

2,731 56 

13,208 96 

36,728 25 

18,995 02 

353 07 

80 45 

21,303 49 

24,130 54 

8,036 37 

1,074 21 

31,616 26 

601 31 

12,793 60 

12,024 00 

18,147 25 
17,011 04 
74,426 95 
19,680 27 
22,001 42 

22,055 70 



8,926 39 

28,132 28 

3,545 07 

4,135 27 
4,505 60 
2,259 25 
1,669 23 
9,099 14 

1,518 32 

10,295 64 

165 97 



$845,654 91 
537,270 26 
697,257 99 
939,460 88 
878,787 04 

680,546 78 
288,168 67 
410,765 46 
763,444 52 
618,138 31 

312,982 76 
224,448 93 
631,260 11 
915,683 94 
736,953 94 

323,042 37 
721,506 34 
607,282 31 
579,180 57 
397,940 43 

835,321 00 
771,325 30 
983,441 19 
553,806 00 
626,339 62 

711,156 04 
606,433 72 
610,893 67 
703,755 00 
494,617 95 

271,274 77 
402,937 47 
447,543 95 
314,064 96 
321,103 95 

217,088 40 
352,243 16 
181,553 24 



$777,626 56 



$7,994,144 07 



$156,813,231 86 



Digitized by 



Google 



AUDITOR OP STATE. 

CONSOLIDATED LOCAL DEBT STATEMENT. 



79 



A Consolidated Statement of the Aggregate Amount of Funded and Unfunded Debts of all the Coun- 
ties, Townships, Cities, Incorporated Villages and School Districts in the State as reported 
in Pursuance of Sections 253 and 2604 General Code, on July 1, 1920, Compared with the Aggre- 
gate Debts on July 1, 1919. The cents are omitted in all items, but included in the additions 
to secure total of each column. 



Counties. 



Adams 

Allen 

Ashland 

Ashtabula.. 
Athens 

Auglaize 

Belmont 

Brown. 

Butler 

Carroll 

Champaign 

Clark 

Clermont- -- 

Clinton 

Columbiana 

Coshocton.. 
Crawford--. 
Cuyahoga .. 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware.-. 

Erie 

Fairfield.... 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey,. _ 

Hamilton... 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry 



Debts of 

counties 

1920. 



Debts of 
uities 
1020. 



Debts of 

villaKes 

1920. 



Debts of 

to^-ufihips 

1920. 



Debta of 

school 

districts 

1920. 



Highland. 
Hocking.. 
Holmes—. 

Huron 

Jackson... 



Jefferson . 

Knox 

Lake 

Lawrence- 
Licking... 



$453,397 
121,189 
435,000 

1,323,500 
202,000 

761,550 

435,500 

45,348 

1,052,000 

7,500 

149,974 
679,473 
560,460 
312,700 
956,531 

387,300 
442,812 
12,789,112 
544,732 
932,510 

905,537 

409,585 

30,000 

157,300 

5,028,700 

747,386 
380,900 
195,a37 
340,?63 
355,000 

7,963,243 

653,280 

525,987 

34,200 

588,030 

243,182 

46,569 

69,840 

976,105 

297,300 

499,000 
244,450 
1,301,400 
956,000 
495,800 



$2,996,274 
400,300 
841,995 
289,979 

584,732 
681,601 



3,771,981 



532,165 
2,493,417 



2,345,908 

307,110 
459,357 
81,774,171 
256,372 
773,133 

209,500 

1,211,975 

221,287 

339,060 

26,031,416 



261,644 



911,600 
774,235 

82,712,567 
503,074 
231,165 



575,275 
232,191 

730,612 

308,359 

649,2.50 

1,078,500 

1,142,307 



$42,550 

80,294 

103,559 

339,672 

69,667 

169,323 
372,350 
134,200 
112,300 
49,161 

34,600 

59,300 

108,107 

165,401 

534,761 

10,275 

153,713 

8,498,308 

175,207 

02,800 

41,262 

185,400 

50,789 



927,980 
469,679 



267,134 
59,0?0 
43,523 

1,348,910 

65,326 

473,065 

150,20:] 

345,410 

303 553 
75.150! 
31.003 ■ 

303,052 

18,8-SO 

134,r)<SS 
139,310 
84X,052 
31,200 
278,605 



$1,285 



181,950 
23,489 
10,500 

215,140 

294,441 

11,445 



2,150 
4,463 



564,425 

5,075 
452,987 
380,688 

1,166 
416,390 

3,160 
115,700 



3,500 

4,000 

300 

124,243 

994 

69,400 

17,500 
154,100 

8,377 
3,842 



000 

33,0:)0 

000,5sS 

• 1,300 

31,000 
10,L>('.2 

2oo,r)r)2| 

15,7851 



I 



Total I Total 

ifidcbted- | indebtcd- 

neaa | neas 

irr20 1 1919, 



$72,759 
1,121,728 

308, 13S 
1,313,608 

321,815 

189,560 

947,198 

112,520 

1,373,235 

58,791 

591,120 

1,048,450 

229,436 

371,732 

1,528,479 

252,387 

1,381,781 

25,555,489 

508,913 

3-18,900 

376,686 
308,771 
663,325 
312,100 
2,007,800 

130,964 
158,073 
34,515 
320,8:]4 
285,721 

8,818,974 
588,550 
119,702 
104,775 
3.53,000 

102,564 
142 .22S 
1.57,200 
4:J0.(KX) 
03,.550 

80.5,.S75 
17r),s,S2 
007 .()()() 
l.T2,2SS 
700,183 



$569,992 
4,319,486 
1,428,947 
3,842,265 
893,962 

1,920,306 
2,731,092 

303,513 
6,309,516 

117,602 

1,312,323 

4,280,^0 

898,004 

849,833 

5,930,106 

962,147 

2,890,651 

128,997,770 

1,486,391 

2,533,733 

1,536,146 

2,231,431 

965,402 

808,460 

33,999,396 

1,352,020 

800,91' 

620,929 

1,6.32,782 

1,527,881 

100,801,230 

2,02^1,431 

1,3<SS,0S7 

203, OSO 

1,287,000 

7O0,.3OO 
204,817 
202,203 
2,%3,021 
613,225 

2,2!)7,07G 

870,2r>-t 

3,1H>0..S.5-1 

2.108,342 



Digitized by ^ 



$511,810 
4,063,447 
1,215,653 
a,246,607 
894,049 

1,588,010 
2,436,213 

308,848 
5,766,721 

132,378 

1,036,323 

4,040,168 

561,531 

829,686 

5,396,223 

856,348 

1,833,904 

115,973,620 

768,262 
2,042,279 

1,605,570 

2,125,129 

892,744 

627,645 

31,407,730 

1,119,.305 

745,451 

565,960 

1,069,830 

1,629,300 

96,063,210 

2,017,262 

1,455,970 

278,749 

1,010,490 

630,473 
261 ,024 
183,807 
2,014.0<)7 
600,8-12 

2,1S0,614 

005.102 

2,871,0(kS 

2,072.SSS 



2,032,; 



^8 



80 



OHIO GENERAL. STATISTICS. 



CONSOLIDATED LOCAL DEBT STATEMExNT— Concluded. 



Counties. 



Debts of 

counties 

1920. 



Debts of 
cities 
1920. 



Debts of 

villages 

1920. 



Debts of 

townships 

1920. 



Debts of 
school 
districts 
1920. . 



Total 
indebted- 
ness 
1920. 



Total 
indebted- 
ness 
1919. 



Logan 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison,.. 
Mahoning . 



Marion. 
Medina- 
Meigs. . 
Mercer. 
Miami.. 



Monroe... 
Montgomery 

Morgan 

Morrow 

Muskingum. 

Noble 

Ottawa 

Paulding 

Perry 

Pickaway..- 

Pike 

Portage 

Preble. 

Putnam 

Richland 

Ross 

Sandusky... 

Scioto _-_ 

Seneca 

Shelby 



Stark. 

Summit 

TrumbulL.. 
Tuscarawas. 
Union 



Van Wert... 

Vinton 

Warn^n 

Washington. 
Wavne 



William.^ 

Wood 

Wyandot 

TotaL.. 



$398,590 
307,000 

2,494,539 
305,880 

2,016,985 

653,300 
417,873 
15,000 
742,440 
628,550 

41,383 

2,146,500 

392,800 

594,041 

1,296,000 

128,500 

420,150 

1,083,260 

470,080 

488,885 

91,500 
727,770 
278,000 
395,600 
673,435 

405,492 
961,906 
751,704 
210,050 
322,750 

1,531,000 

3,350,492 

1,644,668 

116,575 

589,160 

223,704 
7,000 
377,410 
145,000 
593,685 

1,207,000 
904,123 
511,623 



J 



$476,0691 

4,542,171 

16,181,2251 



7,151,426 
1,496,664 



1,357,182 



8,506,745 



1,122,884 



150,236 



413,565 



1,175,642 

443,574 
356,991 
1,950,600 
985,589 
494,152 

7,968,172 

12,771,078 

2,472,383 

733,996 



216,822 



538,641 
563,176 



201,841 



$130,217 
470,674 
405,266 
405,050 

1,023,089 

103,820 
356,258 
214,948 
508,790 
155,948 

30,425 
367,596 
91,031 
84,262 
136,719 

68,604 
266,704 
274,015 
321,918 

16,975 

83,968 
513,149 
266,784 
173,495 
273,692 

58,807 
144,628 
243,000 
113,830 

18,575 

462,130 
2,517,432 
420,635 
622,158 
422,996 

38,186 
30,900 

366,219 
54,294 

454,890 

791,366 
346,782 
136,020 



$11,437 
872,500 

1,662,600 
1,400 

1,642,125 



464,500 

20,970 

4,700 

209,419 

19,900 

26,.500 

2,790 

38,950 



41,800 
227,961 



18,553 



75 

3,122 

2,000 

1,200 

110,226 

1,825 

101,500 

14,363 

805,500 

4,800 

72,229 
269,315 
979,100 

27,400 



385,804 



6,650 
18,055 
13,035 

17,000 
15,845 
41.503 



$192,522 
2,250,820 
5,443,850 
317,540 
3,936,100 

1,105,230 

274,701 

105,900 

78,380 

1,138,049 

91,596 

2,010,521 

55,808 

52,314 

509,761 

19,050 
164.630 
2(H,(>16 
376,226 
347,192 

27,497 
656.379 
470,759 
181,963 

583,718 

349,838 
452,500 
1,295,705 
520,425 
143,510 

5,766,080 

7,728,830 

2,782,754 

767,814 

250,377 

253,300 
56,655 
403,589 
139,892 
459,776 

706,761 

• 589,629 

352,385 



$77,098,116! $288,969,519 $31,855,7781 $12,190,764 1 $100, 152,287 



I 



! 



$1,508,836 
8,443,168 

25,187,481 
1,029,870 

15,769,725 

3,359,015 
1,513,3321 
356,814 
1,334,3101 
3,489,149 

183,3041 
13,057,8631 

542,4301 

769,568' 

3,065,366 1 

I 

257,955 
1,079,446 
1,621,921 
1,186,777 
1,003,288 

203,040 
2,313,986 
1,017,544 

752,259 
2,816,715 

1,259,537 
2,017,527 
4,255,373 
2,635,394 
983,787 

15,799,613 

26,637,149 

8,299,M1 

2,267,^44 

1,262,533 

1,117,818 

94,555 

1,153,869 

895,883 

2,084,562 

2,722,127 
2,058,220 
1,041,531 



$1,103,019 

6,554,805 

23,237,482 

990,790 

13,395,612 

2,699,552 
1,572,774 
393,431 
1,316,287 
3,369,787 

183,344 

12,162,886 

542,536 

547,373 

3,251,915 

167,965 
1,155,038 
1,484,893 
1,1^,400 

970,769 

212,203 
1,800,160 
1,007,901 

866,960 
1,822,3^ 

1,247,781 
1,570,392 
3,936,491 
2,337.847 
797,912 

12,173,420 

21.398,109 

5^25,704 

2,148,920 

947,833 

1,168.139 

99.955 

955,732 

961,140 

1,741,700 

2,795,310 

1,788,546 

844,648 



$510,266,465l$456,487,442 



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REPORT OF TREASURER OF STATE 



In compliance with the Ohio laws, I have the pleasure and honor to 
submit herewith for your consideration, the annual report of the De- 
partment of Treasurer of State for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920. 

The last General Assembly appropriated $95,500 for installation of 
new vault, and other necci^sary improvements in the State Treasury. 

The law created a special committee, composed of Auditor of State, 
Attorney General and Treasurer of State, duly authorized to carry out 
the pro visions of the act. The committee employed Mr. Frank L. Pack- 
ard, architect, on account of his experience in building such improve- 
ments as was contemplated. 

Specifications and designs were submitted by the architect, and con- 
tracts let to Harring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co., Hamilton, 0., for vault con- 
struction, and E. 11. Latham Co., of Columbus, for office improvement, 
and the insrtallaticns should be completed during the calendar year. The 
new vault will take care of the future needs of the state, provided the 
Legislature enacts legislation with reference to bonds to be purchased 
by the Industrial Commission and tlie Teacher's Retirement System. 

The Workmen's Compensation Fund, June 30, follows: 

Bonds $23,474,509 98 

Inactive depositories 3,096,500 00 

Active depositories 1,042,617 22 

Total ^ $27,613,627 20 

The law passed by the Legislature with reference to the Teacher's 
Retirement System, which makes the Treasurer of State custodian of 
their funds, becomes operative September 1. This law, in my judgment, 
will in a few years cause the system to purchase more bonds than the 
Industrial Commission. Therefore, the state should pass a law providing 
for the things necessary to handle these two enormous accounts to the 
best interests of all concerned. 

The law provides all bonds purchased by the Commission be made 
payable at the office of the State Treasurer ; all bonds maturing under 
one date te printed in one bond-. This law should be amended to in- 
clude the Teacher's Retirement System. 

An amendment should be passed to have the state funiish the stock 
for all the bonds purchased and deduct the cost of the stock furnished 
when bonds are presented for payment; this in my judgment will be 
necessary if the state dees not want to spend incney for more vault room 
in a few: years; the present vault will be sufficient if this suggestion is 
carried out. By the state furnishing the bend stock the taxing district 
could have them printed where they choose. 

(81) ^ T 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

The recapitulation shows $84,721,640.62 securities and cash. T*hese 
figures are a E^ilent and forceful reminder that the state is not making the 
neeeasary improvements in the office before needed. 

SECURITIES TO SECURE CIRCULATION. 
Independent Banks. 

Franklin Bank Zanesville, Ohio $10,100 00 

Sandusky City Bank Sandusky. Ohio 10,000 00 

Mahoning County Bank Youngstown, Ohio — 6,527 00 

Western Reserve Bank Warren. Ohio 17,000 00 

Dayton Bank Dayton, Ohio 14.000 00 

Commercial Bank Cincinnati, Ohio 1,550 00 



Total Independent Banks $59,177 00 

Free Banks. 

Pickaway County Bank Circleville. Ohio $2,000 00 

Forest City Bank Mansfield, Ohio 3,000 00 

Batik of Commerce Cleveland, Ohio 5,000 00 

Bank of Ddawsire Delaware, Ohio 3,000 00 

(.'hanipaigri County Bank Urbana, Ohio 5,000 00 

Sfirini^field Bank Springfield, Ohio 4,600 00 

Bank of Ohio Valley Cincinnati, Ohio 598 00 

Hank of Marion Marion, Ohio 3,000 00 

Franklin Bank of Portage County Kent, Ohio 2,100 00 

Stark County Bank Canton. Ohio 3,500 00 



Total Free Banks $31,798 00 

Grand Total $90,975 00 

These seeurities are in my opinion worthless and mean nothing to 
any cne only space in the Treasurer's office. I suggest the Legislature 
authorize their destruction in accodrance with law, thereby saving the 
year!y examination of them, conserve the space they consume. Some of 
the^e indivichial bonds date back to 1866; perhaps all signers have passed 
to their reward and the institutions have changed their names or have 
(*oased to exist years ago. 

BOND EMPLOYES. 

The Treasurer of State is bonded for $600,000 to the state and $100,- 
000 to the Industrial Commission, a total of $700,000, and is responsible 
for $84,721,1)^0.62. On account of the diversity of income, all employes 
hamlle monies in shape of cash, checks or securities. The state should 
provide that all employes in the Treasury be bonded to the State Treas- 
urer ami the state pay the bond; over fifty per cent of the employes in 
the department are in the classified service, the balance are at the pleasure 
of the Treasurer; the department is too big and too much at gftake to 
allow this condition to continue. Every bank bonds its employes under 
blanket bond; the state policy in this respect is unwise, unbusinesslike 
and foolish to the extreme. The state could suffer a great loss, the 
Treasurer of State ruined by the act of an unfaithful employe. 

The state should lock the door before the horse is gone. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TKEASXJBEB OF STATE. 



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84 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



STATEMENT NO. 3. 

GENERAL REVENUE FUND, RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND BAL- 
ANCES FOR THE LAST FORTY-ONE YEARS. 



Fiscal Year 

Ending 

November 15. 



I 



Cash on Hand 

at Beginning 

of Year. 



New Receipts 

for 

the Year 



I. 



Disbursements 

for I 

the Year. I 



Cash on Hand 

at Close of 

Year. 



1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886.. 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891... 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895_ 

1896 

1897.... 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1901. 

1905 

1906 

1907 

190S 

1900. _._ 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915... 

1916 (vear ending | 

June 20) i 

1917 I 

1918... _..l 

1919.... ....| 

1920 ._ I 



I 



J 199.577 83 

301,432 74 

254,513 33 

413,3,56 29 

618.876 00 

587,654 58 

98,138 47 

272,794 73 

65,364 00 

26,752 71 

22,3aS 8S 

71,998 52 

281,544 84 

211,656 52 

138,015 16 

354,727 86 

233,673 38 

196,547 77 

451.600 00 

594,026 87 

1,033,632 35 

1,151.217 48 

1,220.664 46 

2.869.122 2\ 

2,4.'^4,654 77 

2.002.2'29 99! 

2,289.826 27 1 

2,899,901 24 

4,124,3:^0 01 

4,488,748 49 

3.428,704 701 

3,015,051 821 

3,141.709 121 

4,150,115 801 

6,156,537 051 

4,922.530 731 

i 

3,080.812 82' 

3.800,527 301 

1,681.300 45 

2.3.37,850 90' 

2.398,031 231 



I 



$3,210,852 25 
3,083,987 54 1 
3,157,626 371 
2,943,750 981 
2,888,563 58 
2,5.56.312 86 
3,256,620 87 
2,8.53,379 57 
3.310,716 75 
3,.3.55,094 Ot 
3..534,4I0 91 
3, 751, J 02 43 
3,707,675 88 
3.731,496 80 
4,199,607 80 
3.074,r.06 75 
4,154,008 96 
4,6S7,006 71 
5.173,146 87 
5,102.375 10 
5.222,.355 0^» 
5.272,177 97 
6.900,995 OS 
4,091,4.56 92 
5,610.577 70 
6,307.271 31 
7,050,780 68 
7,767.027 51 
8.558,912 30 
8.013,256 80 
8,308,373 15 
9.078,656 20 
11,254,804 23 
12.508,,508 03 
13.042,-383 48 
9,719,263 92 

15,120.827 57 
16,740,710 61 
18,934,788 50 
21,100,000 39 
24,453,712 05 



$3,108,997 24 1 
3,130,906 951 
2.998,783 41 
2,738,231 27 
2,919,786 00 
3,054,827 97 
3,081,964 61 
3,0'-.0,810 21 
3,349,328 13 
3,359,482 87 
3,48.1,80) 27 
3,.541,8.56 111 
3,777,564 20 
3,80^138 16 
3,982,895 11 
3,795,721 22 
4,191,215 57 
4,-132,014 48 
5.030.720 00 
4,602,7« 9 02 
5,101,760 96 
5.196,730 99 
5,20^1,537 30 
5,425,924 39 
6,043,002 -18 
6,019,675 03 
6,4^0,705 71 
6,542.508 74 
8,104,4f>3 91 
9,103,:-00 05 
8,781,420 0'{ 
9 552,r)38 89 
10 210,547 .50 
11,0.52,087 38 
13,780.762 17 
9,218,075 65 

14,180 545 30 
15,107,286 95 
15,974,045 12 
17,470 177 78 
20.573,599 31 



$201,432 74 

' 254,513 33 

413,356 29 

618.876 00 

587,654 58 

98.138 47 

272,794 73 

65,36-1 09 

26,752 71 

2/\368 88 

71,998 52 

281.544 84 

211,656 52 

138.015 IC 

3.5-1,727 85 

233,673 38 

196,647 77 

451,000 00 

504,026 87 

I,a33,li32 35 

1.151,217 48 

1,226.064 46 

2,869,1-22 24 

2,43-1,654 77 

2,002,229 99 

2,280,826 27 

2,890,901 -^4 

4,124 330 01 

4/6^,748 49 

3 't2S,701 70 

3.015,051 82 

3,141.709 13 

4.150,115 .^0 

5,156.537 05 

4,922,530 73 

3,980,812 82 

3,866,527 40 
1,681,300 45 
2.337.850 90 
2,398,631 23 
1.381,464 85 



NOTti.— The year 1915 is for fiscal period November 16, 1914, to June 30, 1915, 
inclusive. 



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TREASURER OF STATE. 



85 



STATEMENT No. 4. 

INTEREST RECEIVED FROM THE FOLLOWING BANKS ON DEPOSITS 
OF STATE FUNDS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 
1920. 



Inactive Banks. 



Location. 



Amount. 



Total. 



Central Savings & Trust Co 

Commercial Savings & Trust Co 

Depositors Savings & Trust Co 

Dime Savings Bank Co 

Ohio Savings & Trust Co 

State Bank 

Summit County Bank Co 

Alliance Bank Co 

City Savings Bank ^i Trust Co 

Amherst Savinra Bank Co 

First Nat ional Bank 

Arcadia Bank & Savings Co 

First National Bank. 

Peoples State Bank Co. _ 

Peoples Savings & Banking Co 

Dollar Savings Bank 

First National Bank _ 

National Bank of Bamesville 

Bank of Beaver 

Dollar Savings Bank & Trust Co 

Farmers & Merchants National Bank. 

Farmers Bank Co 

Bank of Berea Co _ 

Bergholz State Bank 

Conunercial & Savmgs Bank 

First National Bank 

Citizens Bank Co 

Conmiercial Bank & Savings Co 

Commercial Bank & Savings Co 

First National Bank 

Dollar Savings Bank Co 

Citizens State & Savings Bank 

First National Bank 

Bank of Buffalo Co 

First National Bank 

Byesville State Bank 

Citizens National Bank 

Farmers & Merchants Bank 

Noble County National Bank... 

Cambridge Savings Bank 

Exchange Bank 

Cummings Trust Co _ 

Citizens Banking Co 

Commercial Bank Co _ 

First National Bank 

Center burg Savings Bank Co _ . 

First National Bank 

Farmers & Merchants State Bank 

Farmers & Merchants Bank 

Clarke Ave. Savings Bank 

Cleveland National Bank 

Detroit Ave. Savings & Trust Co 

Guardian Savings & Trust Co 

Nottingham Savings & Banking Co.. 

Clinton Savings Bank 

Citizens Bankmg & Trust Co 



Akron 

Akron 

Akron..: 

Akron 

Akron 

Akron 

Akron 

Alliance 

Alliance 

Amherst 

Ansonia. 

Arcadia 

Arcanum........ 

Archbold 

Barberton 

Bamesville 

Bamesville 

Bamesville 

Beaver 

Bellaire 

Bellaire 

Bellville 

Berea 

Bergholz 

Bethesda 

Bethesda 

Beverly. 

Bluffton 

Bowling Green. 

Bradford 

Bridgeport 

Brookville 

Bryan 

Buffalo 

Burton 

Byesville 

Caldwell 

Caldwell 

Caldwell 

Cambridge 

Canal Fulton.. 

Carrollton 

Celina 

Celina 

Celina 

Center burg 

Chagrin Falls. 
Chattanooga. - 
Christ iansburg 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Clinton 

Conneaut 



$11,180 00 

3,678 69' 

6,843 69 

1,066 57 

1,833 89 

5,063 85 

9,315 40 

2,132 87 

1,553 44 

2,331 38 

210 71 

501 38 

1,186 95 

218 90 

1,667 05 

566 63 

2,447 44 

2,440 43 

149 97 

503 03 

1,705 17 

399 38 

903 57 

40 75 

384 25 

508 27 

470 64 

2,162 47 

707 67 

933 70 

1,140 61 

1,614 39 

1,206 08 

1,165 71 

889 01 

1,165 71 

183 96 

1,204 92 

2,266 17 

1,398 03 

1,051 78 

4,156 94 

2,079 66 

1,066 57 

486 65 

533 28 

829 97 

63 46 

403 76 

4,278 06 

4,512 05 

818 15 

6,507 13 

387 74 

389 95 



By 



Google 



83 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 
STATEMENT No. 4— Continued. 



Inactive Banks. 



Location. 



Amount. 



Total. 



Centml Bjmk of Coshocton. _. 

ritizens Bj-Tik _. 

CuyiihoRji Falls Savings Bank 

First National Bank _ 

Winters National Bank 

Bolinvfirr National Bank 

ExchfiKii^r Nfitional Bank 

Htjitf.^ Snvinp^s Bank 

FfiriinTH Sirite Bank.. _ 

Elyria S:u'ings <fe Banking Co 

Lom^in County Savings & Trust Co._- 
Savings Drposit Bank & Trust Co.- . 

American National Bank. 

Buckeye Nrt t ional Bank 

Commrrri.'il Bank Savings & Trust Co 

First Nriticihal Bank _ 

Ohio Bank & Savings Co _. 

Ft. Recovery Banking Co _ _ _ 

First National Bank 

Colonial Savings Bank & Trust Co 

Chrognn Bnnk & Savings Co 

Com n a^rc in I Savings Bank. _ 

CitizcnB National Bank 

Peoplea Xa ( fonal Bank _. 

Commercial Bank Co 

Peoples 8 :iv ings Bank 

Hebron Bmik Co._ 

First Nat ional Bank _ 

Howard Savings Bank Co 

Iron City Snvings Bank 

JcfTcrsan Ilinking Co __. 

Farmers Bank Co __ __. 

Kin buck Ravings Bank 

First Nat ional Bank 

KiuBman Brvnking Co 

Kinsman National Bank 

Lodi State Bank 

Peopl es Nat ional Bank 

Pcoplep Cnmrnercial & Savings Bank 

First A: S:ivings Bank. 

First National Bank 

Mn gnet ic Springs Banking Co_ . _ 

Bank of Ms^gnolia Co __ . 

Marble ITead Bank Co 

Central National Bf>nk _._ 

Peoples Banking & Trust Co 

Commer<?ia| Savings Bank__ __ 

Union Bfinking Co 

Merchant H National Bank 

Ohio Banking & Trust Co 

State Bank of Massillon 

TTnion Natifmal Bank.. _.. 

Medina CtK National Bank 

Savings Deposit Bank Co 

Firs! National Bank 

FarmerR tk Merchants Bank Co 

Milford Center Bank 

Farmers & Merchants Bank Co 



Coshocton 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Dalton... 

Dayton 

Delaware. 

Dover 

Dover. -- 

Eldorado.. 

Elyria 

Elvria.. 

Elyria 

Findlay 

Findlay 

Findlay 

Findlay 

Findlay 

Ft. Recovery 

Frederickst own 

Fremont 

Fremont 

Galion 

Gettysburg 

Greenfield 

Green Spring 

Greenville 

Hebron 

Ilicksville 

Howard... 

Tronton. 

Jefferson 

.Jenera 

Killbuck 

Kingston 

Kinsman 

Kinsman 

liodi 

Lodi 

London 

Loudonville 

Lowell. 

Magnetic Springs __ 

Magnolia 

Marblehcad 

Marietta 

Marietta 

Marysville.. _. 

Marysville 

Massillon.. _ 

Massillon 

Massillon 

Massillon 

Medina 

Medina 

Mendon 

Metamora 

Milford Center 

Millersburg 



f 1,368 75 

1,948 38 

1,545 61 

712 05 

4,498 37 

6,534 211 

1.140 61 

2,068 75 

1,398 83 

9,826 88 

9.526 04 

1,005 87 

4,108 67 

4,562 45 

4.562 45 

3,431 17 

3,440 00 

1,051 76 

901 81 

3,421 82 

75 11 

246 27 

1,051 15 

1,824 98 

1,140 61 

2,011 00 

214 83 

2,456 73 

385 53 

2,108 34 

539 11 

682 69 

211 05 

457 39 

806 30 

1,433 22 

1,708 77 

1,578 07 

2,C0l 12 

17 06 

901 81 

270 14 

75 11 

152 53 

2,406 57 

10,804 81 

1.466 35 

896 00 

5,686 87 

62 68 

2,256 15 

791 78 

2,431 64 

904 46 

1,190 77 

142 05 

404 38 

1,082 65 



Digitized by 



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TREASURER OF STATE. 
STATEMENT No. 4— Continued. 



87 



Inactive Banks. 



Location. 



I Amount. Total. 



Mineral City Bank Co 

Farmers & Merchants State & Sav- 
ings Baak._ 

Morral Banking Co 

Peoples National Bank _ 

Citizens National Bank 

First National Bank __ _.. 

Mt. Victory Savings Bank 

Merchants State Bank 

Marshfield Bank_ 

Commercial Savings Bank. 

Oak Harbor State Bank _ 

Oak Hill Savings Bank Co 

State Saving Bank Co 

Orrvillc National Bank 

Orrville Savings Bank _ 

Ostrander Banking Co.. 

Farmers & Citizens Bank Co 

Pleasant City Bank... 

First National Bank 

Ohio Valley Bank 

Portsmouth Banking Co.. 

Security Bank 

Bank of Pt. Washington _ 

Farmers Banking Go 

Quaker City National Bank 

First Nat ional Bank 

Richwood Banking Co. 

First National Bank 

Citizens Savings Bank & Trust Co _ i _ . 

American Banking & Trust Co.. 

Scio Bank Co 

Sh iron Center Banking Co 

First National Bank 

Citizens State Bank 

Farmers National Bank 

Springfield National Bank 

Dollar Savings Bank Co 

Somerset Bank ..._ 

Steubenville Bank& Trust Co 

Citizens Bank 

Farmers t Merchants Bank 

Peoples Bank of Thomville 

Thornville Banking Co 

Citizens Safe Deposit & Trust Co 

Peoples State Savings Bank. _ . . 

Tontogany Banking Co 

First National Bank_ 

First National Bank 

Wads worth Savings & Trust Co 

Western Reserve National Bank 

Union Savings & Trust Co 

Waynesburg Bank 

Farmers Bank. 

W. Lafayette Bank Co _ 

Citizens State Bank _ 

W. Unity Banking Co 

Citizens National Bank 



Mineral City. 



Montpelier 

Morral 

Mt. Pleasant 

Mt. Sterling-___._ 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Victory 

New Philadelphia. 
New Marshfield... 

Norwood 

Oak Harbor 

Oak Hill 

Obcrlin. 

Orrville 

Orrville 

Ostrander. _ 

Payne _. 

Pleasant City 

Portsmouth- 

Portsmouth 

Portsmouth __ 

Portsmouth 

Pt. Washington... 

Prairie Depot 

Quaker City 

Richwood 

Richwood- 

Sabina 

Salem 

Sandusky 

Scio 

Sharon Center 

Smithfield- 

Somerset 

Springfield 

Springfield 

St. Clairsville..... 

Somerset 

Steubenville 

Strasburg 

Svlvania 

Thornville _ 

Thomville 

Toledo 

Toledo 

Tontogany 

Versailles 

Wads worth _ 

Wads worth 

Warren _.. 

Warren 

Waynesburg 

West Jefferson 

W. Lafayette 

W.Milton 

W. Unity 

W^ilmington 



I 
?178 59 

1,443 95 

1,786 46 

2,113 78 

2,617 15 

2,693 09 

167 19 

164 17 

152 53 

28 56 

765 61 

1,225 46 

686 23 

1,913 42 

966 45 

235 64 

664 86 

706 78 

7,835 53 

1,051 16 

2,286 23 

2,341 74 

130 68 

8*^0 55 

1,575 61 

1,865 09 

1,190 95 

963 50 

684 66 

2,393 09 

912 91 

403 15 

4.263 81 

533 29 

2,681 90 

4,108 65 

828 50 

147 87 

62 53 

409 28 

1,041 42 

526 60 

428 66 

?81 34 

728 89 

172 00 

694 81 

536 20 

6,858 69 

8,217 37 

6,200 33 

144 38 

821 74 

1,153 14 

152 53 

901 81 

4,278 05 

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88 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTIOB. 
STATEMENT No. 4— Concluded. 



loEctiTc Banks, 


Location. 


AmouDL 


Total. 


Worth ingt on Savinp Bank... 

Union Savings Ban c Co 


Worthington 

Yorkville 


$152 53 

855 01 

1,796 58 

3,607 30 




Guardian Trust & Safe Deposit Co 

Peoples Savings Bank Co _ 


Zanesville 

Zanes ville 








Total Inactive Interest | 




$320,296 99 


Active Banks. 
Central National Bank 


Columbus 


11,580 69 

8,073 44 

10,073 30 

10,103 15 

4,070 63 

762 20 

760 31 




City National Bank 


Columbus . _ - 




Commercial National Bank _ 


Columbus 




Hayden-Clinton National Bank 


Columbus 




Huntington Nat ional Bank 


Columbus .- 

Columbus 




Fifth Avenue Savings Bank.. _ 




Produce Exchange Bank... _ 


Columbus 








Total Active Interest 




35,423 72 










Total Interest 


$355,720 71 











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TREASURER OP STATE. 



89 



STATEMENT NO. 5. 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS ARISING FROM EXAMINATIONS OF COUNTY, 
TOWNSHIP AND MUNICIPAL OFFICES, AND PAID BY THE COUNTIES 
OF OHIO, EXCEPT THE LAST ITEM, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1920. 



County. 



Amount. 



County. 



Amount. 



Adams 

Allen 

Ashland 

Ashtabula. - 

Athens 

Auglaize 

Belmont 

Brown 

Butler. 

Carroll 

Champaign - 

Clark 

Clermont-.. 

Clinton 

Columbiana 
Coshocton. _ 
Crawford- _. 
Cuyahoga.. 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware... 

Erie. 

Fairfield 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey... 
Hamilton... 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry...... 

Highland. -. 

Hocking 

Holmes 

Huron 

Jackson 

Jeflferson 

Knox 

Lake 

Lawrence.., 

Licking 

Logan 



$854 06 
1,590 69 
1,556 60 
1,111 89 
687 18 
1,364 78 
1,343 06 

"l",669"23 

434 27 

51 28 

1,174 12 

6 00 

17 62 

827 11 

289 55 

2,349 35 

8,722 19 

1,164 45 

"Y,366'99 

646 48 

69 75 

987 31 

4,961 25 

960 21 

88 73 

"1,596 18 
321 05 

16,854 91 
1,836 45 
462 10 
361 96 
699 80 
326 77 

""3ii'59 

188 40 

423 66 

1,776 46 

796 36 

1,146 29 

1,368 52 

4.54 17 

725 40 



Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahoning 

Marion 

Medina 

Meigs 

Mercer 

Miami. 

Monroe 

Montgomery.. 

Morgan 

Morrow 

Muskingum... 

Noble 

Ottawa 

Paulding 

Perry 

Pickaway 

Pike 

Portage 

Preble 

Put nam .-J 

Richland 

Ross 

Sandusky 

Scioto 

Seneca 

Shelby 

Starke. 

Summit. 

Trumbull 

Tuscarawas... 

Union 

Van Wert 

Vinton 

Warren 

Washington... 

Wayne. 

Williams 

Wood 

Wyandotte... 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



12,121 30 

8,140 24 

73 30 

8,549 23 

1,822 30 



377 18 

56 29 

1,303 24 


2,134 18 
481 13 
660 88 

1,282 03 



1,518 33 
811 34 

1,040 03 
167 67 
646 68 

2,793 31 



752 29 
53 54 



211 96 

3,812 90 

536 80 

82 10 

6,392 02 

2,264 60 

588 39 

2,640 67 

1,003 47 

270 13 

172 65 

449 11 

684 83 

1,809 72 

980 81 

2,136 25 

214 25 

203 60 



$122,856 72 



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9© OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

STATEMENT NO. 6. 

STATEMENT SHOWING TOTAL AMOINT EECEIVED FROM THE COUN- 
TIES, TO THE CEEDIT OF TEE VARIOVS Fl NES, AND THE AMOUNT 
PAID TO THE COUNTIES IN THE SETTLEMENT OF TA^'ES FOR THE 
Fl&CAL Yl AR ENDING JUNE cO, 1910. 

Receipts. 

To General Ri?venue Fund _ _ $598,097 62 

Sinking Fund _.._ 23,273 24 

' Common School Fund 512,675 19 

rniversilv Fund 861,104 13 

Highway Fund 3,797,220 67 

$5,792,370 95 

DifiBURSEMENTS. 

From Common School Fund 12,799,693 00 

Sittkmg Fund _ 256,255 10 

$3,055,948 10 



STATEMENT NO. 7. 

PUBLIC DEBT OF OHIO AT THE CLOSE OF THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 20, 1920. 

Canal loan, not bearing interest... $1,665 00 

The State Levy for Duplicate of 1920— 

For Stale Common School Fund 1.8 mills. 

For Highway Fund _ _ . 5 mil Is. 

Total___ 2.3 mills. 



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102 OmO QBNEIfeAL STATISTICS. 

STATEMENT NO. 9. 

STATE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION. INSURANCE FUND. 

Under the provisions of an Act of the 79th General Assembly, passed May 31st, 
1911, and approved June 5th, 1911, the Treasurer of State was made custodian of 
State Insurance Fund of the State Liability Board of Awards. By an act of the 80th 
General Assembly, passed February 26th, 1913, and approved March 4th, 1913, the 
Treasurer of State is authorized to deposit any portion of the State Insurance Fund 
not needed for immediate use in the same manner and subject to all provisions of 
law with respect to the deposit of other State Funds. 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements of the State Insurance Fund 
FOR THE Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1920. 

Balance on hand July 1st, 1919. $19,056,230 76 

Interest— Active accounts , $33,573 33 

Interest — Inactive accounts 108,751 47 

Interest on Bonds (Coupons) 973,669 51 

Receipts from Premiums 14,140,449 25 

Warrants claimed to have been forged 2,335 75 

15,258779 31 

Total $34,315,010 07 

Warrants paid during fiscal year $6,597,371 49 

Paid for accrued interest on bonds 104,011 38 

6701,382 87 

Balance on hand June 30th, 1920 $27,613,627 20 

Recapitulation. 

Deposits— Active Banks $1,042,617 22 

Deposits— Inactive Banks 3,096,500 00 

Invested in Bonds 23,474,509 98 

Balance on hand June 30th, 1920 . $27,613,627 20 



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TREASUHER OF STATE, 



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STATEMENT No. 25, 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF CASH AND SECUEITIES ON HAND AT THE 
CLOSE OF FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 



Aeeount. 



Cflflh 
held in 
trast. 



Cash and 

Bonds owned 

by State. 



Securities held 
for faithful 
performance, 



Gbnchai. Ftrwnfl— 
Active depositories. -- 
Inactive deposit ories- 
Cashiar'flsafe,,-^-.-- 



StATE iNBtJRANCB FUND^ 

Act ive depositoricB., _, . _ _ 

Inactive aepositories. , ^,..^^^^_^.. 

Bond account (Purchased by Indus* 

trial Commiflsion), . _ _ 

Self Inau ranee Companies, _„^,,.,, 



MiSCELLANEOTTB AcCOTrrNTa— 

By order of Court__-_,_,_-- _ 

Ohio Soldier's Fund_,____.„_,,„. 
M iam i Conservancy D ist rict _ . ^ * ^ . _^ , 
Upper Scioto Drainage and Consei^ 

vancy District. ^_ 

Bank ing Department 

Torrens Law.. .._ 



$921 25 
4e,a^9 37 
59,991 25 

21T60 

19.665 62 

7»921 94 



Savings and Truit Companies.,^... 

Superintendent of Insurance ....... 

Foreign Exchange Banks .___,._... 

Commissioners of Sinking Fund__ - . _ 

Held to secure circulation— Free 
Banka_-- ,_-......- 

Held to secure circulation— Indepen- 
dent Banks ,.._^._.,*,._^_.. 



TotaL 



$135,557 03 



|2,64S,710 61 

9,0H000 00 

4S,84e 51 



1,042,617 23 
3,006,500 DO 

24,474,509 9S 



12,962,202 06 
9,S45,a50 72 



1,732,557 00 
4,016,300 00 



600,100 00 



$40,320,184 32 



64,000 00 
658,000 00 



10,835,342 17 
13,572.872 32 

im,dm 00 

177,700 00 
31,798 00 
59,177 00 



$44,365,899 27 



RecAPITTIIATI013'. 

Cash held in trust,. _,,___ ,,_,__.___ ^._.., 1135,557 03 

Cash and Bonds Owned by State_____ ...,_......___.......... 40,320,184 32 

Securities hold for faithful performance __....-._._... _.^.. ...._ 44>26i>,S99 27 

TotftL™.^,. , ,,,,„__„„„ ^ $84,721,640 02 



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REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL 

OF OHIO 

For the Year Ending June 30, 1920 



Sec. 260-1 G. C. (106 0. L. 508) provides that the fiscal year for 
all state officers and departments shall begin on the first day of July in 
eafih year and end on the last day of June of the succeeding year. Sec. 
2264-1 G, C. {106 0. L., 508) requires each elective state officer to make 
annually, at the end of said fiscal year, **a report of the transactions and 
proceedings of his office or department for such fiscal year, excepting, 
however, receipts and disbursements, unless otherwise specifically re- 
quired by law. Such report shall contain a summary of the official acts 
of Huch officer, board or commission, institution, association or corpora- 
tion, and sueh suggestions and recommendations as may be proper.*' 

In aeeortlance with said statutes, the following report is submitted 
by the Attorney General. For convenience in discussion subdivisions of 
the subject matter of this report will be made as follows : 

Pages. 

L Personnel of the department 

II. Work of the department 

III. Important cases conducted by the department 

IV. Summary of actions and prosecutions disposed of and pend- 

ing, together with a list of the cases as the same appear 

on the dockets of the various courts . 

V. Recommendations 

I. 

PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

During the period covered by this report, the personnel of this de- 
portinent was as follows : 

John G. Price Attorney General 

Joseph I. Eagleson First Assistant 

Marshall G Fenton Second Assistant 

Clifford R. Bell Special Counsel 

(June 30, 1919, to Dec. 1, 1919) 

Bert B. Buckley Special Counsel 

Robert B. Barcus Special Counsel 

Bert W. Gearheart Special Counsel 

Clarence D. Laylin Special Counsel 

Ray Martin- ^ Special Counsel 

Donald F, Melhorn Special Counsel 

William J. Meyer .-Special Counsel 



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ATTOENEY GENERAI., 109 

Robert J. Orfell — :^> — .~~ ^— ™-_^ Special Counsel 

Arthur IL Wicks .—. .- .-. ^ Special Counsel 

(May 3, 1920, to date) 

Charles G, Williams-^— .^Special Counsel 

(December 1, 1919, to date) 

RoUin R. Zarniehly____-._^^_^_____^, _„____ Special Counsel 

Edward E. Corn__ Assigned to the work of the Public Utilities Commission 

Pierre A. White Special Counsel, Cleveland, Ohio 

George T. Poor— ^ Special Counsel, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Fred H, Kirtley —^^-. Special Counsel, Toledo, Ohio 

Joseph R. Frillman,^ , ^*— —Superintendent of Claims 

The other members of the department during said period were : 

Stella Drayer^^ ^—^—Stenographer 

Marie Damron ^-_.^__^ .—,^. — Stenographer 

Kathryn Haughran -Stenographer 

Laura E. Kelly- Stenographer 

Hazel Kridler ^, Stenographer 

(July 1, 1919, to June 1, 1920) 

Catherine McDermott ■ Stenographer 

Estella St. Clair_ ^_^^_,,—, -Stenographer 

Bird White ^—Stenographer 

Kenneth Bergin.^ — ^Messenger 

n. 

WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

As year succeeds year, the work of the office of the Attorney General 
increases in volume and importance. To attempt a detailed desL^ription 
of this work would trespass unduly upon the time of both the writer and 
reader of this report. The main activities of the departmect are, how- 
ever, included in the following headingSj concerning each of w^liieh some- 
thing of detail will be said hereinafter; 

(A) Official opinions. 

(B) Consultations, 

(C) Trial of cases. 

(D) Claims department, 

« (E) Industrial Commission tuatters, 

(P) State Highway Depart men t matters^ 

(a) official opinions. 

The statutes make the Attorney General the chief law ofiBcer for the 
statfi and all its departmentSj and require him to give, upon refjueat, legal 
advice to state ofliaer% boards or commiasiona, aa well as prosecutii 



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110 OmO GENEHAL STATISTIOS. 

attorneys of the several connties^ in all matters relating to their official 
duties. In recent years many new laws have been enacted by the legis- 
lature and requests for the Attorney General's construction of these 
laws have been very numerous During the period covered by this report, 
the Attorney General rendered nine hundred and twenty-three opinions. 
The opinions themselves show, without the necessity of comment here, 
the time and energy that have been required of this department in their 
preparation. 

(b) consultations. 

In the course of any day's work, the Attorney General and the mem- 
bers of his force are ccmtinuaUy called into consultations with various 
state officers, boards, county prosecuting attorneys and others seeking 
advice and information respecting legal problems The sessions of the 
legislature are naturally the occasion for much additional work of this 
nature, as it is the desire of the Attorney General to co-operate in every 
proper way with the members of the General Assembly in the perform- 
ance of their official duties. 



(C) TRIAL OP CASES. 

I 

A very important part of the work of the Attorney General is the 
trial of litigated cases in which the state, or some of its departments or 
officers, is a party. Under Sec. 1465-100 G. C, the Attorney General is 
charged with the duty of prosecuting the necessary actions to enforce 
the provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Act, and much of the 
litigation conducted by this office has to do with the operation of this law. 

Under subdivision III of this report, styled ** Important Cases Con- 
ducted by This Department," are set forth details of various cases of 
general interest tried by this department. 

(d) claims DEPARTMENT. 

Special attention has been given by the department to the collection 
of claims aud accounts certified to it The accounts include not only the 
Willis law taxes and penalties, but also the accounts certified from the 
Industrial Commission and based upon unpaid premiums owing to the 
state insurance fund; also various miscellaneous accounts certified by the 
Auditor of State, under Section 268 G. C. (107 0. L. 547). 

The collections made by the claims department of the Attorney 

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PPB^-^" 



ATTORNEY GENERAL. Ill 

General's office, from July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920, are shown in detail 
as follows : 

1,514 Domestic corporations paid franchise fees and pen- 
alties $157,084 47 

78 Foreign corporations paid franchise fees and pen- 
alties 36,663 73 

142 Public utilities paid excise tax and penalties 20,303 61 

$214,051 81 

113 Public utilities paid fees for maintenance of Public 

Utilities Commission of Ohio 8,024 90 

9 Corporations paid reinstatement fees 900 00 

1 Corporation qualify to do business 630 00 

1,530 00 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

44 Board of Administration accounts $7,520 92 

23 Board of State Charities accounts, rotary 2,635 08 

713 Board of State Charities accounts 45,505 89 

104 Department of Public Works accounts 8,456 32 

4 Bureau of Inspection and Supervision of Public Of- 

fices accounts 1,005 92 

107 Industrial Commission liability insurance 44,241 15 

5 Insurance Department accounts 2,715 35 

7 Refund of court costs 47 00 

6 Ministerial land rent accounts 12 00 

4 Board of Agriculture account 250 00 

$112,389 63 

13 Foreign corporations, qualified to do business, paid 

direct to Secretary of State, but collected 

through the efforts of this office 4,527 22 

Compensation claims paid through the work of this 

office 12,395 91 

Total $352,919 47 



(e) industrial commission matters. 

It is the duty of the Attorney General to pass upon the legality of 
all bonds purchased by the Industrial Commission as investments for the 
state insurance fund and whenever an issue of bonds is purchased the 
bond transcript is submitted to this department for approval. 

Since December 31, 1919, this department has had under considera- 
tion bonds submitted to the Industrial Commission, for purchase by that 
body, in the aggregate amount of $12,479,828.87. 

Further facts in this connection are shown by the following table, 
compiled for convenience, as of August 1, 1920 : 

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112 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Total amounut examined , $10755^25 17 

Total amount approved 8,602,054 02 

Total amount disapproved 842,478 S3 

Total amount pending 2,523,309 32 

Total amount withdrawn (without examination) - 386^27 00 

Total amount withdrawn (after examination) 35,160 00 

Explanatory of the above table, the following is submitted: 

Said table includes not only bonds purchased by the Industrial 
Commission since December 31, 1919, but also a number of issues which 
were purchased prior to that date, but for which transcripts had not 
been submitted and examined until after that date. It will also be noted 
that the amount purchased is considerably in excess of the amount ap- 
proved or disapproved. In explanation, it may be said that it has fre- 
quently occurred that transcripts which have been examined and found 
defective have been withdrawn before a final opinion, either of approval 
or disapproval, was rendered. This has usually been accomplished by 
the officers of the political subdivision requesting the Indui^rial Com- 
mission to rescind its previous action purchasing the bonds and pass a 
resolution declining to accept them, thus giving said officers an oppor- 
tunity to sell the bonds at public sale. There have also been a number of 
instances in which the Industrial Commission has rescinded its action in 
purchasing bonds before transcripts have been submitted. 

During tJie year herein reported upon, 109 cases, in which appeals 
had been taken against the Industrial Commission, have been finally 
disposed of in the courts of this state. At this time there are pending 
in the various courts 85 cases, 14 of which have been disposed of in one 
of the lower courts and are now pending either in the Court of Appeals 
or Supreme Court. In many of the cases pending in the Common Pleas 
Court preliminary motions or demurrers have been disposed of. 

In addition to this, more than $12,395.91 has been collected on 
awards made by the Industrial Commission of Ohio against employers 
who do not carry their own risk. In some instances it was necessary to 
institute legal proceedings to collect the awards. A detailed statement 
of such claims follows: 

Qaim No. Amount. 

1027 Ray Birch $193 04 

1000 Jacob Norris 81 94 

1001 Thomas Sinnot 88 94 

1086 Ross Mussick . 180 00 

940 Nick Warrick 111 46 

1057 Wm. Chamberlain 208 40 

961 Geo. Elder 341 43 

999 Emmet Morey ^ 35 86 

903 J. T. Horrocks 1 329 71 

1099 Sam Arnold 30 00 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL. 118 

1073 Vander Smissen-- ,_.__ 134 43 

1091 Ida Sommcrs . 47 96 

1059 Roy Ricards .__.____ 192 32 

1006 Fred Collins ^__________ 260 07 

783 Edward McLaughlin 257 21 

1082 Fred Moore ., 72 14 

987 Bland _« 14 04 

923 Clara Corwan 3,233 85 

912 Chas. Canan 150 00 

924 Sam Bonham ._ ^ . 3,011 04 

926 John Reid ...__ ,. 264 50 

925 Guy Sellars ._._ 55 00 

State ex rel. Icy Thompson vs. Ohio Traction and Light 

Company 3,102 57 

Total _ — $12,395 91 

Among the most important cases disposed of are : * 

BMient vs. Industrial Commission, instituted in the Common Pleas 
Court of Belmont County, Ohio, and involving the construction of a re- 
cent amendment of Section 1465-90 of the General Code^ relative to the 
jurisdiction of the Common Pleas Court on appeal 

Aluminum Casting Co, vs. Patton, in which the term '* lawful re- 
quirement" was again defined and further extended the case of "Wooden- 
ware Manufacturing Co. vs. Schorling, 96 0. S., 305, 

Davidson vs. Industrial Com/mission^ deciding that a second appeal 
from the decision of the Industrial Commission can not be maintained. 

(f) state highway department matters. 

While industrial conditions have greatly hampered the Highway 
Department in its efforts to proceed with highway improvement on 
original construction contracts, yet the legal work arising through the 
department continues to be large in volume and important in nature. 
Suits are now being brought against surety companies on defaulted con- 
tracts; frequent calls are made for legal advice as to current department 
activities; and many routine matters are referred to the Attorney Gen- 
eral for attention. 

In addition to the legal work of the department itself, frequent calls 
are made by prosecuting attorneys for formal opinions in connection with 
highway construction, as well as personal calls at the office of the Attor- 
ney General by prosecuting attorneys and other county officers. 

DRAFTING OF PROPOSED LEGISLATION. 

Ordinarily it is no part of the duty of the Attorney General to draf t^ 

Digitized by CjOOQIC 



114 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

bills and present same to the legislature for adoption, it being presumed 
that that body is the best judge of the necessity for changes in statute 
law. In my last report, however, I made, under the head of ** Recom- 
mendations,*' the following statement in reference to a desired amend- 
ment of the Workmen's Compensation Law : 

''From experience and observation it is quite apparent to 
me that if the Workmen's Compensation Law is to afford the 
relief possible under the constitutional amendment, it is neces- 
sary and expedient that some change should be made in the law 
which will make the system compulsory and afford protection to 
all of the workmen of Ohio employed by corporations, firms or 
individuals employing five or more persons. Instances of work- 
men injured in the course of their employment, who are made to 
suffer by reason of the fact that the employer had failed to con- 
tribute to the workmen's compensation fund or carry self- 
insurance, are present and serve as glaring examples of the 
weakness of the law. 

*'A law will be drafted in this department and presented 
to the General Assembly with the request that the same be con- 
sidered and, if deemed proper, enacted into law." 

Pursuant to the intention just stated, this department prepared and 
presented to the General Assembly for adoption, a bill known as Amend- 
ed Senate Bill No. 208. Said bill was enacted into law on January 22, 
1920, and appears in Volume 108 of the Laws of Ohio, Part II, page 1145. 

No further comment upon this law need be made, except to say that 
in the short interval between its passage and the submission of this re- 
port, the wisdom of the measure has been frequently demonstrated. 

IIL 

IMPORTANT CASES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 

It is customary for the Attorney General to call particular attention 
in his annual report to those cases tried by his department which concern 
matters of general interest. A short statement of each of the important 
cases in which this department appeared, follows : 

SUPREME COURT OP THE UNITED STATES. 

Frank C. Thornton et al vs. Thomas J. Duffy et al. 

This case involves the constitutionality of an act of the legislature, 
passed May 20, 1917, amending section 1465-69 of the General Code of 
Ohio seeking to take from employers who carry their own insurance the 
right to make contracts of indemnity against liability for payment of in- 
Digitized by ^OOQlC 



ATTOBNBY GENEBAIi. 115 

jured employes or dependents of those killed or for medical, nursing and 
hospital services and medicine. The constitutionality of the act was 
sustained in all the Ohio courts. The case was taken on error to the 
Supreme Court of the United States where it is still pending, not having 
been reached by that before its adjournment in May. 

The State of Ohda vs. the State of West Virgima. 

This is an action brought in the Supreme Court of the United States 
to enjoin the State of West Virginia from enforcing what is known as 
the '*Steptoe Law" requiring producers and owners of natural gas to 
supply customers in West Virginia before permitting any of their 
product to be sent outside the borders of their state. 

A temporary restraining order has been obtained and arrangements 
made for taking testimony. 

Oeorge S. Hawke vs. Harvey C. Smith, Secretary of State. 

This was an action to restrain the Secretary of State from placing 
on the ballots for the election in November, 1919, the referendum on the 
joint resolution of the General Assembly of Ohio ratifying the Federal 
prohibition amendment. The state courts held that under the provisions 
of the Ohio Constitution providing for a referendum on such joint reso- 
lution the suit could not be maintained. The case was taken to the 
Supreme Court of the United States where the judgment was reversed, 
that court holding that the provision of the Ohio Constitution (Art. II, 
Sec. 1) for the referendum on a joint resolution of the Gteneral Assembly 
ratifying a Federal amendment is in conflict with the Federal Constitu- 
tion, and that the word ** legislature" in Article V of the latter must be 
held to mean the General Assembly or legislative body chosen by the 
people of the state. 

Oeorge S. Hawke v$. Harvey C. Smith, Secretary of State. 

This case involved the right to maintain under the provisions of the 
Ohio Constitution a referendum on the joint resolution of the General 
Assembly ratifying the Woman's Suffrage Amendment. It was taken 
to the Supreme Court of the United States, where it was held that such 
referendum could not be had in view of the language of Article V of the 
Federal Constitution. 

DISTRICT COURT OP THE UNITED STATES. 

The German National Bank of Cincinnati vs. Peter W. Durr, Auditor. 
The Fifth-Third National Bank of Cincinnati vs. Peter W. Durr, Auditor. 
The First National Bank of Cincinnati vs. Peter W. Durr, Auditor. 
The Fourth National Bank of Cincinnati vs. Peter W. l^ftyr^j Aj^y^^OOQlc 



116 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

The Citbcns Nattonal Bank of Cincinnati vs, Peter W, Durr, Auditor. 
The Atlas National Bank of Cincinnati vs. Peter W. Durr, Auditor, 

These actions were brought in the Diatriet Court of the United States 
for the Southern Distriet of Ohio to eojoin the coll€^2tion of taxes upon 
the property of these banks. A number of questions arose as to the 
method of arriving at the valuation of their property. The valuations 
fixed by the Tax Commission were auEtained. 

IN THE SUPEEME OOUWT OF OHIO, 

State of OJUo ex rel Samuel Doerfler, Prosecnivn^ AHormy, vs. John G. 

Price, Attorney General of the^ State of Ohio. 

The purpose of this action, which was brought in the Supreme Court 
of Ohio, was to have declared uneonstitutionai the provisions of Section 
13560 G. C, passed April 17, 1919, providing for the impaneling of a 
special grand jury and giving to the Attorney General, whose duty it 
was to act on the direction of the Governor or General Afisemhly, ex- 
elusive control over its proceedings* It was maintained that the statute 
was unconstitutional because it conferred the functions of a county 
officer upon the Attorney General, provided for a grand jury not recog- 
nized by the comumon law and conferred upon the Attorney General 
judicial power. The holding was in favor of the constitutionality of the 
statute. 

The State of Ohio ex rel. Intcr-Imurance Agenctj Compamy vs, William 
E, TamUmQn'f Snpermtendent of Insumnce of the State of Ohio. 
This action was brought to compel the Superintendent of Insurance 
to issue a license to the relator, a reciprocal company, to do fire and pub- 
lic liability insurance. 

The courtj upon hearing, directed the superintendent to issue a 
license to do pubUc liability and fire insuranee on automobiles. An 
application was made by the defendant for rehearing which has been 
granted. The question involved is whether the relator has the right to 
do any fire insuranee business if it writes public liability policies on 
automobiles, 

Emil Pohl vs. The State of Ohio. 
E, E. Bohnin^j r,s\ Th^ State of Ohio. 

These cases involve the constitutionality of the so-called '^ Ake Law" 
(18 0. L., 614) forbidding the teacldng of subjects and branches in the 
schools of the state below the eighth grade in other than the English 
language; forbidding the teaching of German below the eighth grade in 
such elementary schools ; forbidding the teaching in other than the Eng- 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ATTORNEY GENERAL. 117 

lish language in private and parochial schools m grades equivalent to 
the first seven of the elementary schools of the state, and forbidding the 
teaching of the German language below the eighth grade in such private 
and parochial schools. 

The constitutionality of this legislation hm been sustained by com- 
mon pleas court and court of appeals. 

The State of Ohio ex rel. The European Accident Insurance Co, vs. Wil- 
liam H. Tomlinson, Superintendent of Insur(^d€e of th-e State of 
Ohio, 

The question involved in this case is whether the relator, a BritiKh 
insurance company, may legally malie a contract to reinsure or take 
over, in whole or in part, risks written in Ohio indemnifying employers 
and others without making a deposit of fifty thousand ($50,000.00) dol- 
lars in bonds, required by Clause 2 of Section 9ijl0, when it makes such 
contracts of re-insurance or assumption of risks outside the state. 

The State of Ohio ex rel. John G, Price, Attorney Generuly vs. Th-e Clev(^- 

land-Columbus Realty Campany and the Depositors Realty Cmn- 

pamy. 

This is an action in quo warranto complaining that the defendants 
have illegally confederated and combined to establish an arbitrary rental 
for the rooms in the Columbus Savings and Trust Building in the City 
of Columbus, in connection with the furnishing of service to the tenants 
therein, and complaining further that the constitution and by-laws of 
the Columbus Real Estato Board are unlawful in that they tend to fix an 
arbitrary standard of commissions. 

Motions have been filed to the petition and the case is awaiting their 
disposition. 

The State of Ohio ex rel, John G, Price, Attorney Gmeral, vs, Louis J- 
Huwe, as Treasurer of Hamilton County, Ohh^ et ah 
This is an action in mandamus brought against the Treasurer, Audi- 
tor and County Commissioners, of Hamilton County, Ohio, to require 
the payment of the state's claim against the county for the care of feeble- 
minded who are not financially responsible and to eomi^el a levy for such 
purpose, the issuing of a voucher by the auditor and the payment tliereof 
by the treasurer. 

Theodore Leonard, Jr,, vs. The State of Ohio, 

This case was an important one for the reason that it established the 
constitutionality of the Smith Cold Storage LaWj found in 107 Ohio Law^ 
p. 594; particularly the thirteenth section thereof. It was also impiirtant ^ 

Digitized by V^OOQlC 



"^^^^"v^Tvninp 



118 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

from the standpoint of the law of evidence in criminal cases, the Supreme 
Court holding that records kept by a cold storage warehouse in the ordi- 
nary course of business are admissible in evidence to show how long food 
is held in cold storage. 

The successful termination of this case made it possible for the State 
to obtain convictions in some forty other cases of similar nature in vari- 
ous parts of the state. 

Paulus Weisheimer et al vs. Board of Agriculture et cU. 

This was an action to test the constitutionality of sections 1141 et 
seq. (106 0. L., 156.) These sections provide for the inspection and 
license of stock and poultry foods. 

The action was begun by the plaintiff in behalf of the millers of Ohio 
in 1915. The Supfeme Courts affirming the lower courts, sustained the 
law. 

The State ex rel, Andrews vs, Zangerle, Auditor. 

This case was an original action in mandamus, involving the effect 
to be given amendments made in House Bill No. 699, passed February 4, 
1920, amending Sections 1223, 3298-15e, 3298-45 and 6929 of the high- 
way laws so as to permit a maximum rate of six per cent interest on road 
bonds in lieu of the previously existing maximum rate of five per cent. 
The Attorney General filed a brief and argued the case orally, amicus 
curiae, taking the position that as to road proceedings which had become 
pending proceedings prior to the going into effect of the amendments in . 
question, the new maximum interest rate was available. The Supreme 
Court, however, in its opinion of May 11, 1920, held that proceedings 
pending when the amendments became effective, were not affected by 
such amendments. 

Clinton Cowen, State Highway Comnvissioner, et al, vs. State ex rd. 
Donovam, a tax payer. 

This case is in the Supreme Court on error. It involves the construc- 
tion of certain of the highway improvement statutes, particularly Section 
301 of the so-called Cass Highway Law, now Section 12078-1 G. C. 

State ex rel. Lucias Hart vs. Civil Service Commission, etc. 

Relator claiming that he had been wrongfully discharged as super- 
intendent of the county infirmary by the commissioners of Hocking 
County, sought to take an appeal to the State Civil Service Commission, 
and upon the refusal of that body to hear such appeal, brought this action 
in mandamus to compel it to do so. The defense was that a rule of the 
board of county commissioners of Hocking County required the nmtnon 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ATTORNEY GENERAL. 119 

of the infirmary to be the wife of the superintendent, and that a rule of 
the Civil Service Commission, adopted under statutory authority, pro- 
vided that when husband and wife were submitted to an examination for 
positions requiring their appointment as such, both must pass the exam- 
ination. Relator and his wife took a number of examinations for the 
positioi]is of superintendent and matron. Relator passed but his wife 
failed. Subsequently the statute was amended authorizing the superin- 
tendent to appoint the matron. No further examinations were taken by 
the relator nor was his name ever certified to the commissioners. It was 
held that the latter could only appoint from a certified list and that their 
action in selecting the relator after the change in the statute was without 
force or effect ; that he was a provisional appointee, not under the protec- 
tion of civil service and had no right to appeal. 



C30URT^0P APPEALS. 

(Franklin County) 

State of Ohio ex rel. WilUam H, Tomlinson, Superintendent of Insunmce 
of State of Ohio, vs. The Mutual Aid Society of Lutherans of Ohio 
amd other states. 

This was an action brought to liquidate the society. Trustees have 
collected all its assets and prepared a report which is ready for filing. If 
approved by the court distribution will be at once made to policy holders. 

State of Ohio ex rel. Joseph McOhee, Attorney General, vs. The Casualty 
Company of America. 

This is an action to distribute the fund of $50,000.00, deposited with 
the commissioner of insurance by the casualty company upon its begin- 
ning business in Ohio. There are about thirty-five claims against the 
fund, which are being put in the forms of agreed statements of facts and 
the case will be submitted to a master who has been appointed. 

State of Ohio ex rel. Charles C. Marshall vs. A. V. Donakey, Auditor of 
the State of Ohio. 

This is an action in mandamus to compel the auditor to pay the in- 
crease in salary provided by the legislature during the incumbency of 
relator as a member of the Public Utilities Commission. The defendant 
declined to pay it on the ground that the legislature was forbidden under 
the constitution to increase the relator's salary by any law passed after 
the beginning of his term. The decision was in favor of the relator, the 
holding being that he was paid from funds collected from the Utilities 

Digitized by ^OOQ IC 



120 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Commission and that the constitutional inhibition referred to did not 
apply. Instructions have been given by the auditor to prosecute error 
to the supreme court. 

COURT OP APPEALS. 

(Hamilton County) 

State ex ret Fortini vs. Hoffman, Judge. 

The point involved in this case was of vital iuiportacee to the ad- 
ministration of the juvenile act. It was contended that a proceeding 
against a juvenile delinquent or dependent person was essentially a pro- 
ceeding in chancery and that therefore there was a right of appeal from 
the finding and order of the Juvenile Court to the Court of Appeals, 
The court held, however, that the proceedings had under the juvenile 
act are purely statutory and that no right of appeal being given by the 
legislature, none exists. 

COURT OP APPEALS. 

(Cuyahoga County) 

BkJiard En^lis vs. Phillip C. Berg et al. 

This action was brought in the court of common pleas for the pur- 
pose of obtaining construction of the language appearing in sections 
710-2 and 710-3 G. C, being part of the Graham Banking Act, effective 
July 11, 1919. 

These statutes forbid the use of the term ''bank/' *' banker," *' bank- 
ing" or ^ 'trust" as a designation or name, or part of a designation or 
name, under which business may be conducted by any person or institu- 
tion not defined as a bank in section 710-2. 

Otis & Company, a partnership, uses the term '^Otis & Company, 
Investment Bankers." It was held by the Court of Appeals that such 
use was within the language above referred to and forbidden. The case 
will probably go on error to the Supreme Court. 

COURT OF APPEALS. 

(Licking County, Ohio) 

Licking Aerie No. 387 of Fraternal Order of Eagles vs. Fred B. Wilson, 

Couniif Auditor. 

This ease was brought in the court of common pleas for the purpose 
of enjoining the collection of taxes on real estate belonging to a lodge of 

Digitized by V^00QIC_ 



ATTORNEY CffiNBBAL. 121 

Eagles. The court held that the propei^y was not exempt from taxation 
and the case was taken by the lodge to the court of appeals, where it is 
now pending. 

COURT OF COMMON PUBAS. 

(Franklin County) 

C. D. Saviers and Ohio State Automobile Association vs. Harvey C. 

Smith, Secretary of State. 

This action began in the Court of Common Pleas of Franklin County, 
Ohio, where it was claimed by the plaintiffs that the act of the legislature 
providing for the collection of a license tax on the operation of motor 
vehicles on the public highwjp^s of the state was unconstitutional. The 
main objection urged against the law was that it amounted to double 
taxation on automobiles. The constitutionality of the act was sustained 
in all the courts on the ground that it was a charge upon the right to 
operate motor vehicles and not upon the vehicles themselves. 

State of Ohio ex rel. Latanner vs. Ferris. 
State of Ohio ex rel. Latam^ner vs. Hills. 

These actions grew out of the failure of the Gambler Bank and were 
suits against parties whose notes were found among the bank's assets. 
The Common Pleas Court found that there had been an agreement that 
the disposition of these two cases should be governed by the verdict and 
judgment in an earlier case against the maker of another note which 
action tl^e state had lost. Error proceedings were perfected in these 
•actions in the Court of Appeals, where the judgment of the Common 
Pleas Court was aflfirmed. Motions to certify were overruled by the 
Supreme Court and the cases were dismissed. 

State of Ohdo ex rel. Charles II. Bryson vs. Harvey C. Smith, Secretary 

of State. 

This was an action in mandamus to require the Secretary of State 
to appoint the cashier of the Automobile Department from a list certified 
by the Civil Service Commission. The writ was denied, the court holding 
that the position was not within the civil service because it was not prac- 
ticable to determine the fitness or qualifications of the appointee by ex- 
amination. 

Staie ex rel. vs. The ChilUcothe & Camp Slierman Electric Bmliaay Co. 
State ex rel. vs. Th>e ChilUcothe Electric Raihmy and Light Co. 
State ex rel. vs. The Ohio Utilities Co. 

These cases involved the title to property along the Ohio and Erie 
eanal and were brought to require the defendants to remove certain 
properly therefrom. The judgment was in favor of the state. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF 
STATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

SUMMAEY. 

PERSONAL SERVICES AND OFFICE MAINTENANCE. 



Code. 


Balance 

H.B. 

No. 684 

Jan. 1. 1919. 


No. 636. 


Transfers. 


Expend!- 
tures. 


Transfers. 


Lapsed 
No. 684. 


Balance 
Jan. 1, l©2a 


A- 1 

A- 2 

A- a 


$53,822 32 

904 02 

6.882 60 


$103,470 00 
3.600 00 
6.000 00 
2.100 00 
3.000 00 

2;276*00 
600 00 
800 00 

7.000 00 


$8,478 00 
1.200 00 


$89,763 97 
6.394 35 


$4,678 00 


$10,764 92 

171 68 

4.882 60 


$60^1 43 

37 99 

1.822 00 


C- 3 


1.100 00 
1.244 14 
8.240 02 


r.37#46 

3.404 49 

1,070 63 

11.772 15 

663 07 

615 26 

210 07 

86 00 

5 45 

6.398 63 

804 45 

706 37 

17,692 21 

•2.476 54 

4.798 08 

4.995 19 

320 00 


720 54 


C 4 

C-10. 


1,713 96 
1.309 47 
2.642 94 
6.306 62 

429 64 
7,096 68 

264 40 
3,281 69 

4.349 61 

8.971 66 

886 98 

14.794 02 

4.001 19 
625 00 


278 44 

1.250 00 

244 14 

4.000 00 

3,900 00 


444 29 
233 08 
790 58 
948 32 
358 12 

6.485 61 
178 40 

3.259 49 

3.645 06 

153 64 

255 42 

7.401 24 

1.784 82 

600 00 


1.686 73 


Cll 

D- 3^« 


251 09 
195 23 


E- 1 

E- 6 

E- 8 


400 00 


756 27 
3.600 00 


E- 


600 00 
3.500 00 




496 75 


F- 1.... 

P- 2L. . 


3,500 00 
.... 


1.601 37 


P- a 


1.000 00 
16.000 00 
2.000 00 
6.000 00 
6.049 00 
400 00 


351 12 

1,200 00 

300 00 


644 75 


P- « 
F- 7 

F- 9 

H- fl 
H- 7 


341 29 

9 83 

6.311 68 


7.984 62 

445 19 

2.283 12 

3.220 18 

206 00 










Totals.. 


$116,160 69 


$162,994 00 


$21,013 28 


$161,456 26 


$21,013 28 


$42,107 17 


$85,592 16 



Road Accounts.. 



SUMMARY. 

RECEIPTS. 



..Balances.. 



Certifications.. 



$3,510,609 98 
6.944.386 34 



Personal Services- 



..Balances.. 



Certifications. 



Office Maintenance.. 



60.608 84 
111.970 00 



66.561 76 
61.021 00 



$9,454,996 32 
172,678 84 
106.676 75 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Expenditures. Road Accounts- 



Personal Services. 

Office Maintenance ....„ 



Lapsed ... 

Balances Unexpended 



Personal Serv ces.. 



Office Maintenance.. 



...Road Accounts. 

Personal Services.- 



Office Maintenance 



(122) 



$9,734,150 91 



$5,147,237 82 
95.158 32 
66.296 94 



15.829 10 
26.278 07 



$4,307,758 50 

61.601 42 

23.990 74 



$5,298,693 08 
42.107 17 

4.393.350 66 



Digitized by 



$9,734,160 91 



Google 



STATB HIGHWAY. 



123 



ROAD ACCOUNT. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balances Jan. 1, 1919.. 



Certifications^ 



-I. C. H.. 



Main Markets 



Maintenance and Repair.^ 

Rotaxy_«. 



S2,709.158 58 

549.737 66 

204.490 77 

47.222 97 



$3,510,000 as 



^Inter-County Highway. 

Main Mazket ..... 

Maintenance and Repair^, 

Rotary.., 

Federal. 



1.901.146 00 
673,719 28 

1.838.015 44 
706.000 00 
825.506 62 



Expenditures. 



Unexpended Balances.. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

...Contracts Construction. $3,252,100 60 

Contracts M. & R 306.671 07 

Force Acct. M. & R 1,480,112 07 

Surveys 64.555 46 

Salaries, County Surveyors 60,047 25 

Hearings, Chazige of Roads 751 37 

Putnam County. 1203 G. C-. 4,000 00 



..Inter-County Highway—^ 

Main Mailtet . 

Maintenance and Rc^xair.... 

Rotary... 

Federal.. 



SUMMARY. 



ROAD ACCOUNTS— BY FUNDS. 



5,944.3^ 34 



$9*4^.990 32 



3.333.249 78 

553.320 81 

18.312 15 

272.290 60 

130.585 26 



5.147.237 gS 



4.307 J68 60 



$0,454,996 32 



Funds. 


Balances. 


Certifications. 


Expenditures. 


Balancxs. 


Inter-County. 


$2,709,168 58 

649,737 66 

204.490 77 

47.222 97 


$1,901,145 00 

673,719 28 

1.838.015 44 

706,000 00 

825.606 62 


$1,277,053 SO 

670.133 13 

2.024,iM 09 

48f/.032 47 

694.921 36 


$3 333 340 78 


Main Market . 


653,330 SI 

18.312 15 

372,290 50 


Maintenance and Repair .. ... 
Rotary 


Pedeml 


130,58^ 20 








Tntalfl .. . 


$3,510,609 98 


$5,944,386 34 


$6,147,237 S2 


^1.307.758 50 





SUMMARY. 

EXPENDITURES 1M»— BY COUNTY AND STATE. 







Construc- 
tion. 


Miscellan. 
eous. 


County. 


5t&t% 


Contracts — Conatniction. 


$164,962 80 

2,968 26 

108,914 72 


$8,347,356 03 
320.623 76 




$6,200.2 IS 23 
17.8J0 94 
54.369 26 
£2,246 S5 


$3,252,100 60 


M.&R 

SiiTveyor».-._- 


$1,562,358 92 

4.000 00 

761 37 

50.047 25 

95.158 32 

56.296 94 


ao&,e7i 07 


Force' Acct. M. ft IL ..» .. 




tiS(f,il2 07 


To Counties, 1203 G. C. 




4,CM)0 00 


Hn^ripgYP , ^ 







Ihl 37 


Salary ."Coun^ Surveyors. « 







£0.047 25 


Personal Services^ 


9a. 158 32 


OffiM KTAtntenA^'^ 






m,2m 94 








T^«lfl 


$276,845 77 


$8,667,879 79 


$1,768,612 80 


$6,414,645 28 


$5,298*693 08 







Engineering. 



Construction. 



Misoellaneoua.. 



$276,845 77 
8.667.879 79 
1.768.612 80 



County.. 
State.... 



$5,414,645 28 
5,298,693 06 



TotaL 



. $10,718,888 36 



TotaL 



. $10jl3.3a8 96 



Digitized by 



^^oogle 



124 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

BUREAU OF TESTS. 



As indicated in previous reports the work of the Bareau of Testa 
consists chiefly in making physical and chemical tests on samples of road 
and bridge materials submitted by the resident engineers und inspectors 
of the Highway Department These materials include paving brick, 
Portland cement, stone, slag, gravel, sand, asphalts, tars, oils, culvert 
pipe, reinforcing steel, paints, etc. In addition to the testing of strictly 
routine samples of materials submitted from State Highway work, this 
bureau has been conducting, when time permits, investigation and re- 
search work with reference to materials used in highway construction. 
One of the recent investigations along this line, consisted of a series of 
tests on concrete specimens using various grades of local materials as 
aggregates. The results of our experimental and research work have 
been covered in separate reports. 

Other work of this bureau includes the supervision of the inspection 
work on bituminous concrete pavements, also the supervision of plant 
inspectors, whose duties include the testing and inspection of highway 
materials prior to shipment on state highway work. During the past 
year we have had inspectors located at paving brick plants and at re- 
fineries producing bituminous materials. 

The tests to which the various materials are submitted in order to 
determine compliance with specifications include the following: 

Paving Brick — Abrasion or rattler test, and absorption. 

Stone and Slag — Abrasion, hardness, toughness, soundness, cement- 
ing value, slaking, specific gravity, and absorption. 

OroAjel — Mechanical analysis, or grading, abrasion, or resistance to 
wear test, per cent of silt, voids, etc. 

Sand — Mechanical analysis, or grading, per cent, of silt, tensile 
strength of cement-sand briquettes, colorimetric test for organic im- 
purities, voids, etc. 

Portland Cement — Specific gravity, normal consistency, fineness, 
setting time, soundness, and tensile strength of cement-sand mortar. 

Oils — Specific gravity, viscosity, flash point, burning point, loss on 
heating five hours at 163 °C., character and viscosity of residue from 
above evaporation, solubility in carbon bisulphide, percentage of organic 
and inorganic matter insoluble, fixed carbon, solubility in carbon tetra- 
chloride and solubility in 86°B. paraflBn naphtha. 

Tar5— Specific gravity, viscosity, free carbon, ash, melting point, 
distillation. 

Digitized by CjOOQIC 



STATE HIGHWAY, 125 

Asphalts — Specific gravity, penetration, melting point, ductility, 
loss on heating five hours at 163 ^'C, character and penetration of residue 
from above evaporation, solubility in carbon bisulphide, percentage of 
organic and inorganic matter insoluble, fixed carbon, percentage of 
bitumen insoluble in carbon tetra-chloride, and percentage of bitumen 
insoluble in SQ^'B. paraffin naphtha. 

The number of samples of each class of material received and tested 
in the State Highway Testing Laboratory during the year 1919 is as 
follows: 

Paving brick 156 samples 

Stone, slag, etc 129 samples 

Portland cement 1,126 samples 

Gravel, sand, etc 367 samples 

Bituminous materials 374 samples 

Miscellaneous materials 171 samples 

Total 2,323 samples 

Recommendations — The work of this bureau is greatly handicapped, 
due to lack of laboratory space The laboratory is occupying the same 
floor space which it had seven or eight years ago, during which time the 
work of this bureau has increased about 500 per cent. With the present 
available space it has been found impossible to install equipment which 
would materially increase the efficiency of this department With the 
present available facilities it has been impossible to take care of the 
testing work for counties, townships, etc., for other than work on the 
state system of inter-county highways. At the present rate of increase 
in the construction work of the State Highway Department it is only a 
question of a comparatively short time lintil it will be impossible to 
handle the state work alone, properly and eflSciently, unless some relief 
is obtained in the way of increased space and facilities. It is, therefore, 
earnestly recommended that eflPorts be made to secure an appropriation 
sufficient to take care of the increased work of this bureau. 



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OHIO QENEBAIi STATISTICS. 



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REPORT OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF BANKS AND BANKING 



GENEEtAL SITUATION. 



The period that has just passed has been one of the most eventful 
in the history of banking in the State of Ohio. During this time the 
new banking code has been in effect — with the exception of the first ten 
days — ^with the result that its application has been wholesome in many 
respects^. It may be stated without reservation that the Ohio banking 
laws compare favorably with the laws of other states — ^a fact of which 
we may justly feel proud. 

The year has been one of expansion despite minor disturbances inci- 
dent to the concerted effort of continuing the readjustment of aflfairs 
and restoring conditions to a practical basis. The manufactured and 
agricultural output has been increased in an endeavor to meet the de- 
mand. General business has been at its best and crops have been heavy. 
Industries have been active and labor has been fully employed. Even 
though we have had slight disturbances, there has been no noticeable 
depression caused by the attempted readjustment. 

The outlook for the coming year appears to be favorable and is 
viewed with optimism by the most conservative, in anticipation of the 
greatest activity ever known. 

BANKING POWER. 

The banking power of Ohio is steadily increasing. Particular atten- 
tion is called to the various reports which evidence the prosperity and 
wealth of the people of our state. Savings deposits alone amount to 
more than fifty per cent, of the total deposits, which indicates the thrift 
of our people throughout the state. 

The capital of many banks has been increased in order that they 
keep pace with the increase of deposits. 

On the date of this report the combined resources of all banks under 
supervision of this department exceeded one billion, three hundred and 
forty-three million dollars ($1,343,000,000), while the combined resources 
of the National banks in Ohio reached one billion, seventy-eight million 
dollars ($1,078,000,000), making the astounding total of two billion, four 
hundred and twenty-one million dollars ($2,421,000,000). 

It is an interesting fact that the State banks of Ohio rank sixth as 
to resources and fifth as to capital and surplus in comparison with the 
other forty-seven states of the union. 

(128) 

Digitized by V3OOQIC 



™«»««pcrj 



BANKS AND BANKING. 129 

PRIVATE BANES. 

During the period covered by this report twenty-six unincorporated 
or private banks have either discontinued or have incorporated, and at 
the close of the year only one hundred and forty-four unincorporated 
institutions remain. 

Many private bankers have become impressed with the advantages 
that attend in conducting their business in corporate form, and have 
ffled with this department their ** notice of intention to incorporate." 
In this the tendency on their part is particularly noticeable. At the 
present time there are a number of applications pending before the de- 
partment for conversion of private institutions into State banks. 

NEW BANKS. 

Authority for thirty-eight (38) new banks was granted during the 
year, while six applications were rejected. In passing upon applications 
for new banking ventures the great responsibilities imposed by law are 
ever present in a marked degree. When it is noted that the Superin- 
tendent of Banks is charged with the duty of supervising the conduct of 
banking institutions, it is obvious that every precaution should be exer^ 
cised before granting certificates for a new banking business. Investiga- 
tions and examinations are conducted relative to the standing of the 
incorporators and the territory to be served. The project must be meri- 
torious from every standpoint and the circumstances surrounding it must 
be conclusive of the imperative need of a financial institution in the 
particular locality to be served. The' popular local demand and the 
ultimate success of the. proposed financial institution are also taken into 
consideration. 

TRUST COMPANIES. 

At the close of the fiscal year fifty-eight (58) duly incorporated 
State banks were engaged in a trust business, and of this number eight 
(8) qualified during the year. In addition to the fifty-eight (58) banks 
above mentioned, twenty-two National banks, located in Ohio, and fifteen 
(15) banks located in other states, were also qualified to take on fiduciary 
powers under the Ohio banking laws. 

It may be interesting to know that at the close of business on June 
30, 1920, the fifty-eight (58) Ohio State banks doing a trust business had 
a capital of thirty-three million, one hundred and thirty-seven thousand, 
two hundred and fifty dollars ($33,137,250) ; surplus, twenty-eight mil- 
lion, nine hundred and thirty thousand, nine hundred and ninety dollars 
($28,930,990), while deposits amounted to six hundred and thirty-three 

6-0. G. S. Digitized by ^OOglC 



130 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

million, seven hundred and eighty-three thousand, eight hundred and 
forty-two dollars ($633,783,842), and total resources of seven hundred 
and forty-seven million, two hundred and sixty-three thousand, eight 
hundred and eighty dollars ($747,263,880). 

PROSECUTIONS. 

Indictments were returned by the grand jury of Lorain county 
against William Treble, assistant cashier, and Walter Davies, cashier, 
of The City Bank Company of Lorain. Just prior to the examination 
of this bank a crash in the stock market came and it was discovered that 
approximately one hundred and ten thousand dollars ($110,000) of the 
funds of the bank had been appropriated to their own use in the pur- 
chase of stocks. As soon as the discovery was made Treble absconded, 
but later was brought back and pleaded guilty to a charge of embezzle- 
ment. He is now serving an indeterminate sentence of from one to 
twenty years in the Ohio penitentiary. 

Davies stood trial to the charge of embezzlement and, in December, 
1919, was found guilty and given an indeterminate sentence of from one 
to twenty years. Davies carried his case to the Court of Appeals, but 
up to this time a decision from this court has not been rendered. 

The Farmers' State Bank of Hicksville closed its doors, upon request 
of its board of directors, on January 17, 1920, when shortages were dis- 
covered by the examiners from this department. Through the efforts 
of the examiners the shortages were made good, and the president, cashier 
and one of the directors were requested by the department to hand in 
their resignations, which were duly accepted by the remaining members 
of the board of directors. A reorganization was eflfected, and the bank 
was reopened for business on January 21, 1920. Up to this time no 
prosecutions have been made in this connection. 

The action taken by the department against Bruce R. Campbell, 
secretary and treasurer of the State Savings Bank of Struthers, Ohio, 
who wrecked this institution, will be found in this report under the head 

of LIQUIDATION BUHBAU. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations made during the fiscal year totaled 934, and are classi- 
fied as follows V 

First examinations 791 

Second examinations 50 

Branch examinations 55 

Preliminary examinations 38 

Total 934 

Digitized by V^OOQIC 



BANKS AND BANKING. 131 

The number of examinaticms made as compared with the previous 
year decreased slightly. One of the reasons for such decrease is the 
steady growth of the banks in resources and the limited number of exam* 
iners to conduct examinations. Another reason is that, daring the latter 
part of the year, the attention of the Superintendent of Banks, together 
with the greater part of the force of the examiners, was attracted to cer- 
tain sections of the state where conditions were critical, caused by the 
juggling and the manipulation of accounts. For more than three months 
it was necessary to keep in close touch with the situation in those sections 
in order that justice should not miscarry. 



GENERAL SUMMARY OP INCORPORATED AND UNINCORPORATED BANKS AS 
DISCLOSED BY REPORTS OP CONDITION FILED JUNE 30, 1920. 

Resources of the state banking institutions, as reported as of call 
of June 30, 1920, surpass all previous records and now amount to 
$1,343,976,586. The total assets reported at the call of June 30, 1910, 
amounted to $510,174,580. A comparison of these amounts show the 
unprecedented growth of nearly 834* million dollars during that period 
or an average of more than 83 million dollars a year. Their aggregate. 
resources passed the billion dollar level at the call of December 31, 1918, 
Their resources today are more than three times as great as when placed 
under state supervision. 

Deposits now amount to $1,150,313,376, the greatest ever recorded. 
Analysis of the statement discloses a marked increase in savings deposits* 
Such deposits show an increase of nearly 80 uiillion dollars for the year. 
This extraordinary increase in savings deposits may be attributed largely 
to the high wages now paid and the natioo-wide thrift propaganda. 
Wage earners have been educated as never before, to systematically save 
their earnings, the greater part of which finds its way into the savings 
banks. 

Transition from a war to a peace basis discloses a decided readjust- 
ment of banking resources. The urgent demand for funds to finance 
necessary business and industrial activities for the past year has been 
apparent. During this period, government securities have been liqui- 
dated to the amount of over 52 million dollars, real estate loans increased 
approximately 64 million, and unsecured loans and acceptances increased 
nearly 92 million. 

Despite the unusual demand for money, bank reserves have not only 
maintained their high level but show an increase as compared with the 
amount reported June 30, 1919. The excess reserve, over and above the 
amount required to offset their increase in deposit liabilities^ amounts to 
approximately 45 million dollars as compared with 33 million a year ago. i 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



132 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Siate Member Banks — Federal Reserve System: 

Since the call of June 30, a year ago, 23 banks have entered as mem- 
ber banks of the Federal Reserve System, bringing the total to 81, with 
aggregate resources of $582,560,028, or approximately 45 per cent, of the 
entire resources of all incorporated State banks. 

As disclosed by the reports of the 631 incorporated and 144 un- 
incorporated banks, the resources amount to $1,343,976,586, an increase 
of $21,125,738 since May 4, and an increase of $182,860,761 since the call 
of June 30, 1919. 

Total Deposits I 

The aggregate of deposits at the call of June 30 last, was $1,150,313,- 
376, an increase of $17,050,685 as compared with May 4, and an increase 
of $141,720,921 over the amount reported June 30, a year ago. Savings 
deposits were reported at $545,593,583, an increase of $16,578,781, as 
compared with May 4. Savings deposits have increased approximately 
80 million dollars during the past year. United States deposits, ex- 
clusive of Postal Savings, amounted to $3,126,206. 

Loans and Discounts : 

The total loans and discounts was $817,694,762, an increase of $16,- 
749^82 since May 4, and an increase of $205,061,255 as compared with 
the call of June 30, 1919. Loans on real estate amounted to $268,023,249, 
or an increase of $5,949,145 over the amount reported May 4. Unsecured 
loans amounted to $297,831,832, or an increase of approximately 92 mil- 
lion dollars since June 30, a year ago. The proportion of unsecured 
loans was 24.83 per cent, as compared with 25.33 per cent. May 4, and 
19.43 per cent. June 30, a year ago. The proportion of loans on real 
estate to capital, surplus and total deposits June 30, was 21.27 per cent., 
as compared with 21.73 per cent, on May 4, and 18.58 per cent, as com- 
pared with June 30, 1919. The proportion of loans and discounts to 
total deposits in incorporated banks June 30, was 70.79 per cent., as 
compared with 72.54 per cent. May 4, and 60.86 per cent. June 30, 1919. 

United States Bonds : 

United States bonds and war savings stamps owned amounted to 
$64,507,353, a decrease of $52,861,147, as compared with June 30, a year 
ag:o. 

Total Bonds and Securities : 

Total bonds and securities held on June 30, amounted to $287,425,- 
691. Ratio of total bonds and securities held to total deposits on June 30 
was 24.9 per cent, as compared with 25.2 per cent, on May 4, and 32.6 
per cent, as compared with June 30, a year ago. ^ t 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BANKS AND BANKING. 133 

Amount Due From Reserve and Other Banks : 

Amount due from reserve and other banks June 30, was $126,446,- 
542, a decrease of $7,508,906 as compared with May 4, but an increase 
of $1,885,892 as compared with June 30, 1919. 

Cash on Ha/nd: 

Gold and gold certificates amounted to $2,506,185, or a decrease of 
$151,635 as compared with June 30, a year ago. Silver, currency and 
subsidiary coin amounted to $32,076,602 June 30, an increase of $695,508 
since May 4, and an increase of $4,837,367 as compared with June 30, 
1919. 

Total Reserve : 

Total reserve held June 30, amounted to $151,853,005, a decrease of 
$1,555,397 since May 4, but an increase of $21,190,959 as compared with 
June 30, 1919. Their surplus reserve over and above the amount re- 
quired on June 30, was $45,098,483, a decrease of $2,173,359 as compared 
with May 4, but an increase of $11,460,184 as compared with June 30, a 
year ago. 

BiUs Payable and Rediscounts : 

Bills payable and rediscounts on June 30, amounted to $30,676,176, 
or a decrease of $672,896, as compared with May 4, but an increase of 
$18,004,105, as compared with June 30, 1919* Bills payable and redis- 
counts with the Federal Reserve Bank, June 30, amounted to $17,399,319. 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits : 

Capital, surplus and undivided profits in incorporated banks were 
reported at $135,570,385 June 30, or an increase of over 17 million dollars 
since June 30, 1919. 



Digitized by 



Google 



134 



OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



ABSTRACT OF REPORTS. OF CONDITION OF STATE AND PRIVATE 
BANKS AT THE DATE OF EACH CALL DURING THE REPORT YEAR. 



EEEOUHCEg. 



Lusim m Rimi] F^iAif _,__,_ ,-, ^_,_.. 

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f tnU', CDiiiityatid MiirilrepiiJ BqubIi.,. 
Olhpr Bottcii tnti l?cf niritj*-*,..^^^^ .... 
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Caah Ttt^tiML . ._ ._,, ,. ^_ 

Fptli'nii Hi-acrv'ri Buiik Stc»di„. ._._„. 



Oold Coin ajjd Gold Ctfti£4:atcA^._ 
&ilv*T Cpiii,. „., ._ 



Due from Qf bor t hau liciervc Bioki 

Itfitka im Tmjqsit , ,. , .„^ ,„ 

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ttfitsfl J6tiuranteed,..„. .„...._„._. 

Cauli aJjort . ^^,,^„._^^^._ „_^ \ 



779 B»nb [ 

ft-pf . 12. I 



224,70.1 JWJS 

2,000.05*1 
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r7jai,m« 

633 J4 2 
23.fl5JJ81 

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sa,722jy:wt' 

2.027,63.1 

4i>e,Ta7 

2.1.4:^2,739 
m.224 



e,BS5J»0 

3,027J3ti 
22;^fi7 



TuUib „__....._._._, _,.J I1.213.97&,^7 



UABlUTim 

rapiialStisek i'liM ir | 

Furplu* Fuuti . , .,__ _ „ . 

Niit i: iicjiyidiTNl Profits . .. .. 

ntt!*?rvi'd for TuXM atid JntiynaC , 

V. ?. aptHtt* other ttan I'unuJ 

PaTiriKs ... 
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Demand Ciitifiratf'B t^f Ik-ponL ...... 

t jwliiiTu Clirrks f mLiiJirjiJirig ^. 

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Dtit' Ut tiankf Qiiil Baiiker!! ^, .. 

Dividt'iidfl liififljd^ _.-. _-,..._ 

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Trust l3oTsfK?itjt ....„ , .^..^^^..i.^^^, 

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Piirttitl IVmruts on Uhitly Bund 

FvubftcipTiofi^ - .-..— , ., -...„,-. 

f'tht'T J,iiihiJitu>7» „ ^„_ 

Not Atiicfunt "AefvpWdPva" ixt^euM 

lUP CMaiuiuvri. .., ,...,,.^.. .„- 

AcTi'pdicirea ^wrttut*«»ti by (jtitiwNp-J 

mid , , „ _ ■ 

CjuiIl over _^„.,„..^„^,^^,^..^ 



71^2 Bftflks 

l)rc. 31, 

1VI0. 



1238.291,417 
254^15,107 
244 .3M ,2 28 

3,iao,»0r 

7n,»73.3r? 

H2J&6.2OT 

a437J.7?U 

5.05 7,2W 

i,iw,An 

1,^36, ItW 

lS,<>t7.61Ml 

2.433,723 

2,974,730 

440,014 

J:i7^g| 
3 75 B7 ,1^56 1 
3.8f?J,eSO 
4,d72,317 

fl,l7JM2l 
15.41S 



IUS7^D3J/5fl 



Touls.., 



t&L7r,4;]53 

4,^,7S2,HW 
I7,ir^4,ti07 

©.iw.nTii 

^3,012.612) 
3f^y.D71J,t'SS| 

354.ro7,t>y2| 
4 ,T40..^'i;i ' 

i:>.209,(i5Vi] 

477^4a;>(»/ 
•iX'fH.l'Jl 

»!S3..^32 

3,570,(JWl 

7.4fl5,500i 

4,-:h)S.4W| 
5,227,a^^: 

3/)27.1U0 
27,527 

II iiia,97W7 



Feb, 2«, 
1020. 



|2i}Oj45,im 

267,6^0^ 
2J(MjfJ6 

7l>^*MJ§.Se2 
7l>.3.1h24ft 

030.281 
24,7^.701 
3J59J02 

MQtt.«10 
1,437^0 
^,71Dp4«S 

J4,1^.8S2 



4.165,72© 



0,«09J60 

1,924.524 



11^97.091,431 



|ti2,S85,0Jfl 
47,447;i7l 

17r5^ttJU5 

fl^.^S,477 

74,S49,0.'Jl> 
3UM55,074 

]1,1^1.[30|! 

3,28:U32 
14,412.25»| 

Sii,070,6(ig 
504,4f<0.;.*WV 

2;2f.l^.05S 

a.252.mJif 

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12,12 11,00^1 j 

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Fi;i.:^,42» 

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335,130 
90473,470 
^IUM7M7 

5.180^35 

25.130.720 

&0.S4S 

OU12,703 

fil4.»MJS7 

2^7 51fi 

32.020XJ82 

2,047,340 

S^>tS,244 

2M7^m 

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4^(W.12<i 

0,OO9,7Sa 

1.024,524 
25,077 



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7761 
May4» 

1920, 



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lean. 



1262.074.104 

217,909,343 

a,3 73471 

1^!M • '"■ 

2,'^ors,3ii I 

4.101^51 

1.442,400 
14,552,4^ 

J 3,200,900 

175,735 
26.550,435 
SA^7S3^ 

7,583.429 

1^77,428 
25j33t 



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Sl,72fi^03 

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Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



BANKS AND BAKKIN0. 



135 



COMFARATrV^ STATEMENT OF AGGEEGATE RESODKCES OF 

INCOKPORATED STATE BA^KS, 



RESOURCES. 



Loans on Heal Estate _ ,^_, 

Loans on Collateral ^_,,^*^^^, 

Other Loans and Discoujits -.^.-_ 

Acceptances Rirchased or Discounted. 

Overdrafts.^ _...._^-^-_^.-.__,___^ 

U. 8. Bonds and LT. S. Secunties„ 

State, County and Municipal Bonds__.. 
Ot her Bonds and Securi ties. _ ._._.. ^ ^^. 
PreTnium on all Bonds and Securities.. 

Banking House and Lot _._, .__. 

Furniture and Fixtvires ^..^^ 

Other Real Estate -.._....__., 

Cash Items ......^ 

Federal Reserve Bank St oek , 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank^ 

Due from Reserve Banks ._ .^_*^, 

Exchanges for Clearinjt .-_^. 

Gold Coin and Gold Certtfieates 

'Silver Coin 

Nickels and Pennies__^ ,^_._, 

Paper Ciirrcne>^ .*_„____ , ^- _ . 

Bonds held as La^^til Reserve., ___._.. 
Due from other than Reserve Banks... 
Other Assets .^.. .*._,*,, 



460 Banks 

Report of 

Aug. 18, 19aS. 



SS2,fi58,411 
91,210,a35 
56,937,876 



1,108,393 



69,014,263 

294.890 

11,2,^,745 

1,684 ,980 

2,691,154 

iS89,976 



Totals. 



49,899,081 
1.17L071 
2,130,886 



961,618 
9,472.502 
2,641,863 



aiO,173 



$413,984,036 



612 Banks 

Report of 

Jime 30, 1919. 



$196,373,644 

199,248,257 

182,603,910 

2,98-1991 

683„'?83 

1I3.26U318 

73,OS3,90-i 

128,851,606 

536.327 

21,393,777 

3,0%.416 

4,441,078 

846.596 

1.214.050 

]7,781,92S 

74 J 09.357 

12,842,190 

2,4.76,279 

1,931,265 

2SS,614 

23.7f2,09I 

4,119,512 

25,247,312 

18,521 ,eos 



631 Banks 

Report of 

Jiine 30, 1920. 



$260,590,357 

24S.91 5,1^6 

272.6tv;.n22 

2j:ii,200 

^19,9.5-4 

62.1,"i0,213 

79 .3:^9. oh:^ 

138;m^,239 

846,218 

24.775,193 

4,n2t).4:ri 

1,397.911 

Lr>i3„^ino 
7n.riso.o7i 

2,37 1.SM 

2,til6,083 

340.166 

27,S56,2Z5 



24,358,785 
22,005,5^*8 



11,109,622,618 11,295.203,333 



LIABILITIES. 



Capital Stonk Paid in ......^^ 

Surplus Fund , , ^___ 

Net Undivided Profits_^ _^_^_,_ 

ReBerved for Taxes and Interest 

U. S. Deposits other than Postal Savings 

Public Funds .,_.__ 

Individual Deposits subiect to Cheek, _ . 
Demand Certificates of Deposit.. ^._,^__ 

Cashi er^s Chec k s Ou t s t an d i ng . . ^ 

Certified Checks Outstanding.,. _._ 

Due to Banks and Bankers ,*,__ 

Dividends Fnpaid ...___...,...,_ 

Time Certifieates of Deposit__, . 

Savings Deposits *^ ^_______. 

U, B. Postal Savings. ...^_—.,,_.-.^__., 

Trust Deposits , .__.__._..._. 

Notes ana Bills Rediscounted„ __^_ 

Bills Payable. ___,_„____, ___________ 

Other Liabilities.-— .....,_... .__, 



Totals. 



$37,726,020 

20,693.983 

4,807,948 



493,649 
81.766,241 
17,727,070 



5,265.639 f 

29,876 1 

28,269,138! 

207,015,574! 



7,174,6471 

265,2231 

1,849,0281 



$58,417,0081 

43.597.7661 

15,224,6741 

1,124,9001 

12,657,9301 

69,179,5791 

261,445.8031 

31,a5.8,013i 

5,747.5381 

1.925,975' 

12,074, 950 f 

703.406 

72,229,562 

460,a3'l,949 

3. .Wfi. 430 

23.78.5,771 

1,977,066 

8,968.550 

25,362,748 



$413,984,036 $1,109,622,618 



?64,395.942 

51,547,387 

18,071.516 

1,555.540 

3.126,206 

81,105,9.>1 

311.^01,247 

32.375,336 

6,677,019 

2,21 4. .^5 

14,641.511 

847,372 

80,890 J 72 

541.^58,437 

l.R^7,826 

32,2.54,778 

11,788,645 

16,804,098 

22,309.772 



I! .295,203,333 



♦Silver Coin and Nickels and Pennies in 1908 were (jlaesifiDd under Fractional Coin. 



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T^^'t^^mm 



136 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



(X>MPARATIVE STATEMENT OF AGGREGATE RESOURCES OF 
PRIVATE BANKS. 



RESOURCES. 



216 Banks 

Report of 

Sept. 4, 1913. 



169 Banks 

Report of 

June 30, 1919. 



144 Banks 

Report <rf 

June 30, 1920. 



Loans on Real Estate 

Loans on Collateral 

Other Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts 

U. S. Bonds and U. S. Securities 

State, County and Municipal Bonds.. 

Other Bonds and Securities 

Premium on all Bonds and Securities 

Banking House and Lot 

Furniture and fixtures , 

Other Real Estate 

Cash Items , 

Due from Reserve Banks 

Exchanges for Clearing 

Gold Coin and Gold Certificates 

Silver Coin 

Nickels and Pennies 

Paper Currency 

Bonds held as Lawful Reserve 

Due from other than Reserve Banks. 
Other Assets 

Totals 



$8,851,444 

3,373,155 

18,968,674 

717,454 

46,107 

1,434,067 

1,931,462 

18,820 

667,844 

318,903 

1,051,900 

202,126 

6,536,999 

96,976 

242,589 

131,194 

139,617 

1,270,886 

69,940 

874,847 

103,262 



$47,048,266 



$7,357,140 

3,393,894 

20,671,661 

190,006 

4,107,182 

926,359 

2,752,279 

11,353 

1,028,124 

278,a51 

665,280 

53,290 

6,942,476 

159,213 

201,541 

216,003 

28,233 

1,063,029 

620,754 

479,582 

347,757 



$51,493,207 



$7,432,892 

2,923,535 

22,432,010 

153,467 

2,357,140 

1,009,724 

2,747,792 

3,265 

815,623 

268,439 

531,507 

69,754 

5,884,687 

153,018 

134,301 

139,694 

27,417 

1,097,017 



300,653 
291,628 



$48,773,253 



LIABILITIES. 



Capital Stock- 

Surplus Fund 

Net Undivided Profits 

Reserved for Taxes and Interest 

Public Funds 

Individual Deposits subject to Check. 

Demand Certificates of Deposit 

Cashier's Checks outstandmg 

Certified Checks outstanding 

Due to Banks and Bankers 

Dividends Unpaid 

Time Certificates of Deposit-.A 

Savings Deposits 

Notes and Bills Rediscounted 

Money Borrowed 

Bonds Borrowed 

Other Liabilities. 



Totals- 



$2,669,607 

1,629,086 

833,471 

11,533 

2,349,166 

16,010,111 

7,007,332 

19,444 

5,697 

326,268 

2,964 

10,461,251 

4,603,354 

134,038 

278,180 



706,864 



$2,657,096 

989,508 

1,086,900 

16,396 

1,879,406 

20,030,470 

7,627,625 

61,214 

26,606 

401,872 

2,811 

8,889,021 

5,146,228 

71,382 

1,655,073 

303,050 

651,649 



$2,833,920 

1,102,281 

867,612 

16,534 

2,174,450 

19,209,605 

6,330,638 

93,779 

27,801 

213,916 

2,363 

10,295,355 

4,236,146 

492,632 

1,369,856 

366,745 

143,010 



$47,048,266 



$51,493,207 



$48,773,253 



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BANKS AND BANKING. 



137 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND 
LIABILITIES OF .THE NATIONAL BANKS OF OHIO. 



RESOURCES. 



369 Banks 

Report of 

June 30, 1919 



370 Banks 

Report of 

June 30, 1920. 



Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts 

U. S. Bonds and U. S. Securities 

Other Bonds and Securities 

Stocks other than Federal Reserve Bank Stock 

Stock of Federal Reserve Bank 

Banking House 

Furniture and Fixtures 

Other Real Estate 

Lawful Reserve with Federal Reserve Bank 

Net Amount Due from Banks and Bankers 

Exchanges for Clearing House 

Checks and other Cash Items 

Gold Coin and Gold Certificates 

Silver Coin, Silver Certificates and Fractional Coin _. 

Paper Currency 

Redemption Fund and Due from U. S. Treasurer 

Other Assets. 

Totals 



$529,947,000 

473,000 

142,476,000 

105,874,000 

3,140,000 

3,195,000 

16,325,000 

1,399,000 

1,260,000 

47,484,000 

103,875,000 

11,030,000 

4,567,000 

1,719,000 

4,639,000 

17,083,000 

2,605,000 

1,987,000 



$634,180,000 

402,000 

103,676,000 

108,294,000 

2,202,000 

3,471,000 

17,655,000 

1,837,000 

3,390,000 

53,525,000 

102,138,000 

12,438,000 

4,401,000 

1,358,000 

2,003,000 

21,777,000 

2,656,000 

2,862,000 



$999,077,000 



$1,078,265,000 



LIABILITIES. 

Capital Stock paid in_._^ _______ 

Surplus fund 

Net Undivided Profits ___* 

Circulation outstanding. __^. 

Net Amount Due to Banks and BankGrs._ 

Demand Deposita,,,. __ ___ 

Time Deposits.. _...,_,*,. , _ 

Bilb Payable ....___._ 

Bills Payable with Federal Reserve Bank 

Rediscounts , _,._____ ____ 

Bonds Borrowed. _^_,_* ^,^ 

Acceptances, ^_,____ ._, __^ 

Other LiabiLitiefl__ , _ _ , ^, 

TotatB_.__. ,...._. .,...„,_..,„..„ 



$64,384,000 

41,874,000 

25/278,000 

44,921',000 

113,597,000 

48.S.603,000 

l+S.726,000 

1,8,54,000 

26,126,000 

14,241 .000 

lfiJOf),000 

10,7f>0,000 

2,e»oo,ooo 



$67,372,000 

48,729.000 

25/t34.000 

45,070,000 

I06,%7,000 

52O,7M.00O 

174,322,000 

4,714,000 

14,133,000 

37,289.000 

lfi,546,000 

13,1327.000 

3,258,tXK) 



$999,077,000 



$1,078,265,000 



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138 



OmO GENllRAli STATISTICS, 



COMPARATIVE STATE^IENT OF HEBOtmCES OF INCORPORATED 

STATE BANKS, 



Date of Report. 



Auguat IS, 
Noveinber 27 



February 
June 

September 
Novcoiber 
January 
June 

September 
November 10 
January 7 
March 7 

June 7 

TSeptember 25 
December 5 
I'ebruarv 20 
Apnl ' IS 
September 4 
November 26 
February 4 
June 

September 
October 
January 
April 
June 



September 12^ 
October 
December 
March 
May 
Jime 
September 25 
Deremher 31 
Mar^h 7 

May I 

Jime 30 

September 30 
Dee ember 27 
March B 

June 20 

September 11 
December 31 
March 
Juno 
Auf^uflt 
Dec ember 
March 
June 
September 12 
Dee ember 31 
February 28 
May 4 

June 30 



mm.. 

1008_. 
1909,, 
1909,, 
1009__ 
1909., 
1910.. 
11110.. 
19I0._ 
1910.. 
imL. 
191 1„ 
1911,. 
1911., 
1911. _ 
1912,. 
I9I2,. 
1912.. 
1912__ 

ima.. 

J913,_ 
1913., 

1913., 
1914.- 

mi4,, 
1914.. 
1914., 
1914.. 
1014.. 
1915.. 
1915.. 
1915.- 
1915.. 
1915._ 
1916_. 
191fl.. 
1916_. 
1916.. 
1916.. 
1917_. 
1917.. 
1017.. 
1917., 
10tS._ 
19IS.. 
1918,. 
191S._ 
1919.. 
1919.. 
1919„ 
1919.. 
1920,. 
1920., 
1920„ 



No. ai BftukB, 

472 

472 
468 
476 
478 
480 
477 
4M 
4S4 
488 
492 
492 
493 
4ef4 
492 
494 
494 
503 
502 
504 
509 
512 
512 
519 
526 
530 
538 
540 
543 
549 
549 
55S 
554 
557 
561 
566 
568 
673 
577 
586 
594 
598 
601 
fi02 
604 
606 
607 
609 
512 
615 
623 
632 
624 
631 



Aggreagt^ Resourcea. 

$413,984,636 
407.860.oa3 
425.961,971 
441,9^5,323 
4.50,173.331 
448,554.833 
456,579.236 
474.062.210 
476.056,603 
476,658.ft50 
4^.910,163 
495,399,900 
503.3.S,5,aH9 
515.265,024 
514.848,623 
524,722,355 
521,228,444 
540.f^l,5fJ6 
544.352,930 
556JS7,S92 
^3,167,361 
SS5;i81.373 
&S7 ,846.858 
601.492,041 
607.497,603 
630,946.aS9 
62O,89S,502 
6n.93^S,292 
61(1.707,675 
627,660.111 
63.8,971.307 
a50.1^W,705 
*i66.290,9OT 
692,067.516 
711,529.290 
722.480.454 
7,56.267. laS 
795,004.440 
843,007.750 
8fi7,0O4,Of>2 
8,S9.S34,765 
914,130,214 
93'4,*535,757 
936,937,322 
924.281,115 
941.274,4S1 
1.00^,263.04.5 
1.047,426,331 
1.109.622,618 
1.158.830,216 
1.234,444,104 
1,243.362,402 
1,271,550,594 
1,295,203,333 



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BAKKS AND BANKINa, 



139 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF OHIO BANKS— NATIONAL, STATE 
AND PRIVATE^JUNE 30, 19211 



Un thouaand ftf doIUri.) 


lis 


l4 
II" 


1 ^ 
■pi 


in 




4i 
Hi 

^1 


1 


1 


fV^tt 


t5l©.227 
10,730 


|d0(},54S 

am? 


f 

$fi20,57ft| 

turn 
i03.e7n 

10,492 

53.5S5 

25,1 3Sj 
3.650 

2,sa2 


2.731 
1^73 

fi4,W7 
22^.768 

2&.8a5 
0^7Q 

2.'i,223 
78.^166 
il.BlO 

"^"22^97 
311,343,071 


11 ,12075 1 

13.705 
1,347 

25S.S44 
321,324 

y,5io 

fl,3fl0 

«5^Pfi 

81,052 

i5fl,l00 

53.337J 

2,605 

aojflj 


f 1,435^6 

lfl,33& 
1,375 

10^.183 
337,735 

49^77 
10;?60 

7B,74! 
76^65 
16Q^S7 
SB ,72 1 
2J&U 
25.159 


I3Q0.001 

'■It 

'" 13.411 

5.867 
3,891 

];3.4SSi 

i;4€7 

0,3S4f 

SI 

4^98 




Ubotjr Lma Boodq and U. 3. 


473 RI4 
142,475 117J99 

11^,200 2i2.ns 

17,714 25Jgfi 
1J80 5.106 

47.484 17 782 

Etjm 
iio.4?i ae.ea» 

23.441 2*W 


mMt 


All olhor bonda, lecuHtles, eteu.. 
BvtktDK bottie, fundttUB And 

flittirei 

GthcT real latate ., 

B»Tv« with fcdfit^l Risatrf B 

BauJc.. ._ ...„....-. 

lUwiTC ^ it h Reiervi! B&oka 

£3t(^h4ii»F(<3 iiTid duo fixiia Bookg. 
CMb in faul^ . -,^,.._..„.. ^.1 


44S7 




OlCSS^^ 


m7 


18.874 




T<it>1. 




imm 


11,161.1 la 


11.078,265 


113 I0O.ItJ 


113.4223 








UABILmES. 
(tfitbrnnndofdalluB.) 

CapitAl — -. 


mm 

41, £74 

113,597 
46^,429 
24SJ3a 
23,174 

43551 
lfl.106 

10,«Jfl 
2,547 


I8J.074 
44,5*7 
17.1^1 

400^fl5 

£iJ0405 

12,668 

12.073 
3.705 

5,455 
7^39 


1*7.372 
48,720 

10fl,fiS7 
512,341 
174.^22 

Itl,54fl 

I3.09fi 
3.889 


^67.230 
52.050 
201510 

143-95 
401,4Py 
03S,«17 
3426 
32,a'i5 
30.07 fl 
4a54 

7.019 
10,9^4 


1125,4,78 
854^1 
42.7;^ 
41.922 
120.074 
S74 flflfi 

m,m 

3.'i.833 
23.786 
54,»93 
19.S11 

19,254 
HUifi 


101JI7P 
J5,B44 
45j07W 
Ul.§42 
973,801 
81i?.E]39 
11^0 
32.2W 
80,812 

2vm 

21,015 
13. §13 

J2,422J41 


19,144 

14.918 

3Jr5 

148 

90J0S 
lia.S08 

31 .91 SI 

3.667 
*I252,049 




Surplil'^ 




Undiviii*^ ?VJi*« , 




Due to Banki lOid Bnnkiin.,,,.^ 

TJ 5 J}^V^*M - - - 


^14^2 
^ "24.303 


BcRidi borpfiinKL 
MnlHAiHMS ami Lcttiiirfi of 
Credit.. _ .....,.,..,. ■ 


— --- 


Totab .^ . -..,■■..■■. 




tmp77\ 


li.im.tir> 


II.078J265 


II,;jl3,y7G 


«2,m,ltf2 


— 



i 



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140 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



CLASSrFICATION OF INCX)RPORATED BANKS AS TO CAPITAL. 

Lesa than $25,000 51 

25,000 and not exceeding % 60,000 273 

50,000 and not exceeding 100,000 146 

100,000 and not exceeding? 200,000 85 

200,000 and not exceeding 500,000 50 

500,000 and not exceeding 1,000,000 10 

l.OOOjOOO and over,, ,_,_____ 13 

Savings Societies (no capital) 3 

Total Banks.— ..—.. 631 

CLASSIFICATION OF BANKS AS TO AGGREGATE RESOURCES. 

Less than S200,000 _ 68 

$ 200,000 not exceeding $ 500,000 224 

r»00,000 not exceeding 1,000,000 158 

1,000,000 not exceeding 5,000,000 138 

5,000,000 not exceeding 10,000,000 23 

10,0m,000 not exceeding 20,000,000 9 

20,niH),000 not exceeding 50,000,000 7 

60,000,000 mid over. 4 

Total Ban]£B_._.._... 631 

The following Comparative Statement shows the aggregate amount of DEMAND, 
TIME and TRUST DEPOSITS (state banks), and the increase since the organiza- 
tion of the banking department in 1908: 

Aug. 18, 1908. June 30, 1920. Increase. 

Demand Deposits $104,758,951 $452,389,220 $347,630,269 

Time Depoait8___ _., 236,184,712 624,086,435 387,901,723 

Trust Deposits.... ...-_„ 7,174,648 32,254,778 25,080,130 

$348,118,311 $1,108,730,433 $760,612,122 

INCREASE IN NUMBER OF STATE BANKS, ETC. 

Aug. 18, 1908. June 30, 1920. Increase. 

Number of Banks... _.. — 460 631 171 

Capital Stock_, „.._.__._.. $37,726,020 $64,395,942 $26,669,922 

Surphis. ._.-_„. 20,693,983 51,547,387 30,853,404 

Total Resoureeg._„_,_ $413,984,036 1,295,203,333 881,219,297 



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BANKS AND BANKING. 141 

NET EABNINGS AND DIVIDENDS, 

Incorporated State Bcmks. 

The following table ahows the amount of capital, net earnmga, divi- 
dends paid and per cent, of dividends to capital in incorporated State 
banks from January 1, 1913. 



Year. 


No. Banks, 


Capital. 


Net 
Earnings. 


Dividendfi. 


Per Ceot. 


1913...-™,.™-. 


526 
643 

557 
577 
601 
607 
623 


$44,795,401 
45,941,630 
47,391,000 
50,174,751 
53,964,237 
56,9S4,078 
60,134,511 


$8,514,692 
9,016,426 
9,'i01,43S 
11,616,198 
11,892,281 
12,692,751 
15,177,170 


^,501,551 
3,730.336 
3,976,883 
4,480,499 
4,a'?7,757 
5,660,193 
6,126,026 


7.82 


1914_ -.„.„. 


8.12 


1915 _.-_. 


8.39 


1916 ,.-*-.- 


8.93 


1917-„, -„_,,.„. 


8.96 


1918_.__„. — „.- 


9.91 


1919 


lO.Ift 







During the seven-year period from 1913 to 1919 inclusivej the aver- 
age rate of dividends to capital was 9 per cent. The maximum rate of 
10.19 per cent was paid in 1919. Based upon capital and surplus, the 
rate of dividends for the past seven years was 5.24 per cent. For the 
year 1919 a rate of 5.7 per cent, was reported. Net earnings carried to 
surplus during the period show an average rate of 4.62 per cent, of the 
capital. The rate reported for the past year was 5.7 per cent. The 
average rate of net earnings to capital from 1913 to 1919 inclusive was 
21.79 per cent. Based upon capital and surplus the rate was 12.7 per 
cent. Net earnings to capital for the past year were reported at 25.2 per 
cent; to capital and surplus 14.2 per cent. Total net earnings carried to 
surplus since 1913 amounted to $16,594,966 or 37.04 per cent, of the 
capital as reported December 31, 1913. 

ANALYSIS OF EARNINGS AND EXPENSES FOE THE CURRENT 

YEAR. 

An analysis of the reports of earnings and expenses of the 623 in- 
corporated State banks for the year ended December 31, 1919, discloses 
earnings much in excess of any former year. Their gross earnings for 
the past year were reported at $59,402,408 or 98.8 per cent on the capital. 
This is an increase of approidmately ten million dollars over the amount 
reported for 1918. Net earnings amounted to $15,177,170 or 25,2 per 
cent, on the capital. This is the highest percentage of net earnings thus 
far reported. 



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142 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

XJmng the 1918 report as a basis for comparison, it is of interest to 
note the substantial increases both in grosa and net earnings. Gross and 
net earnings for 1918 were reported at $49,485,295 and $12,692,751, re- 
spectively, as compared with $59,402,408 and $15,177,170 for 1919, A 
comparison of these figures shows an im^rease of 20 per cent, in gross, 
19.5 per cent, in net earnings over the amount reported in 1918. While 
gross earnings of the bants show an inerease for the year of 20 per cent,, 
salaries have increased 31.5 per cent., taxes 37.5 per cent, and miseel- 
laneouB expenses 30,6 per cent, over the previous year, 

The percentage of net earnings to capital continues to be greater in 
banks located in the larger cities. In 511 banks outside the larger cities, 
the percentage of net earnings to capital is 21.5 per cent,, while those of 
Akron show 35.4 per cent; Youngstown^ 30.4 per cent.; CFeveland, 29.2 
per cent» Toledo, 27,5 per cent. ; Cincinnati, 25.3 per cent. ; Dayton, 25,2 
per cent.; Canton, 24.5 per cent, and Columbus, 12.5 per cent. The 
greatest increase for the year was reported by the banks of Akron, 

Salaries of officers and employees of the banks paid during the year 
amounted to $9,371,074 as compared with $7,126,515, the amount paid 
in 1918; Taxes paid by the 623 banks amounted to $3,199,677 as com- 
pared with the preceding year of $2,327,105, being the heaviest percent^ 
age of increase in the expense items of tbe banks. Interest paid deposi- 
tors for the same period increased over two million seven hundred thou- 
sand dollars^ or 12.3 per cent. 

Dividends paid stockholders during the year amounted to $6,126,026, 
an increase of $475,833 or 8,4 per cent, as compared with the preceding 
year. Net earnings carried to surplus amounted to $3,4^4,855, or 5,8 per 
cent of the total earnings. 

Total capital and surplus invested at the close of business December 
31^ 1919, as reported, was $106,913,350, Capital invested amounted to 
$60,134,511. The increai^e in capital and surplus was $7,308,640, or 7,2 
per cent, aa compared with December 31, 1918, 



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BANKS AND BANKING. 



143 



ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF EARNINGS AND EXPENSES OF INCORPO- 
RATED STATE BANKS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1919. 

Eight Cities Shown Separately, 



Capital 



Sunilm^ 



Qroas Earnings.. 



Interest on Depodta^. 
TaxesL. 



Sakriea.. 



Miscellaneoufl Ikpenaes.... 
Net^ Kamtnga 



Dividends^ 



Carried to Surphis.. 



Batioa: 

Grom anungB to Capital 

Net Earnings to Capital 

Net Earnings to Capital and 
Surplus- 



Intereet Piaid to Gross Earnings 
Taxes I^id to Gross Eamin^„ 
Salaries Pkid to Gross Eamings 
Expenses I^edd to Grass Earnings 
Net Earnings to Gross Earnings 

Dividends Paid to Capital 

Dividends B&id to Capital and 
Surplus 



Cleveland 
27 Banks. 



$17^2^1 

19,548,568 

25,110328 

11,918,322 

1,276,317 

3,951.472 

2,838.851 

5,125,366 

2,180,008 

316,420 

Percent. 
143.1 



13.8 
47.5 
5.1 
15.7 
11.3 
20.4 
12.4 



5.9 



Cincinnati 



16,410,500 

6.192.625 

5,166.834 

1,828470 

325,844 

732,823 

654,742 

1,625,255 

816,380 

203,163 

Percent. 
80.6 
25.3 

12.9 
35.4 
6.3 
14.2 
12.7 
31.4 
12.7 

6.5 



15 BaakL 7 Banifi. 



t3 ,600.000 

»^'il6.000 

3,766.704 

I4B3.W7 

16S,filB 

S2S.43& 

«SMI7 
307.000 

mm 

Per Cflnt. 
IW.6 
274 

ma 

42.0 
4.& 

14.0 
13,2 
38^ 

iL5 

&0 



t2,2.5O,0OO 

2,039.542 
756.mi 
124307 

684,DS7 
194.000 
534,500 

Pbrccnt. 

30.4 

19.0 
37.1 

6.1 
14.9 

8.3 
33,6 

8.1 

0^ 



Abon 
9 Banks. 



12,100 .OOQ 
1^7.500 
2,677441 
1J75.735 
103.574 
4S{t.SS7 
3.'i7J!2g 
744.017 
241,502 
206,772 

Pur Bent. 
127.5 
35.4 

21.6 
36.4 
3.0 
1S.(J 
13,3 
27.8 
11 .5 

7.0 



10 r 



tl,59?.a75 
557,, iOO 
»i:i.904 
270.1544 

M:m 

163,034 
128:229 
199,617 
99JCNJ0 
10.500 

ftroemt 
51.0 
12.5 

9.2 
33.1 

20.0 

15.7 

24.5 

6.2 

4.6 



CapitaL. 



Surphia 



Gross EandngSL. 



Interest on Deposits.. 
Taxesi^ 



Salaries... 



Mifloellaneoua Expenses.. 
Net Earnings 



Dividends-. 



Carried to Surplus.. 



Ratios: 
Gross Earnings to CapitaL. 
Net Earnings to Capital.. 



Net Earning to Capital and Surplus^ 

Interest PSaid to Grosi Earnings 

Taxes Phid to Gross Earning 

Salaries Paid to Gross Earnings. 

Expenses Paid to Gross Earnings-.^ 

Net Earnings to Gross Earnings . 

Dividends Bud to CapitaL. 



Dividends Plaid to Capital and Surplus.. 



Canton 
8 Banks. 



11,525.000 
879.565 
1,277,134 
474.268 
111.694 
188,679 
127,999 
374,494 
132.500 
140.833 

Percent. 
83.7 
24.5 
15.5 
37.1 

8.7 
14.8 
10.0 
29.3 

8.7 

5.5 



Dsjrtoo 



Total 

SOitiBS 

112 Beuifl. 



|S65,0OO 
622.2,iO 

1.075,7-U 
461,221 
J3JJ90 
I7S.0O5 
Jfla,504 

03,250 

32;250 

Ppr ixnU 
124-4 
25.3 
14.7 
42.9 
4.S 
1(U 

20,3 

7.rj 
4.3 



1^,891,976 

a 2, SOI ,4 M 

41, 029.507 

1S.209,43M 

2.216.000 

6.,^a.St!2 

4.941,370 

9,960,84 F! 

4^23.540 

l,5^1t93B 

Per cent. 
116.§ 
27,7 
14.5 
43.6 
5.3 
15.5 
U.JS 
23.7 
112 



Total 

Kxclwriva 

orCilks 

51lHanU. 



t24.242.535 

17,472,901 

6,630,417 

983,^ 

2.B2S.252 

5^16322 
2.m.^S6 
1.0O2.9I7 

l^ocnt* 
72.1 
21.5 
13.7 
3S.1 

16.2 
10.2 
2^1.8 

8.7 

5.5 



Total all 

State Baoka 

623. 



160434,511 

46,778.83» 

59,402,408 

24.92S.S75 

3499.677 

9.371^74 

8,725.613 

1 5,1 77,1 7tK 

6,126,026 

3,434355 

Ptefcent. 
98.8 Ml 
S5.S 
14;! 
42Ji 
5.4: 
15.8' 
U.3 
25.S 
lOj 
5J 



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144 



OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT. 
INCORPORATED STATE BANKS IN EIGHT CITIES. 

June 29, 1918. June 30, 1919. June 30, 1920. 

CLEVELAND— 28 Banks. 28 Banks. 28 Banks. 

Loans $196,619,676 $239,810,094 $329,314,250 

Deposits 340,902,703 408,079,763 473,055,368 

Reserve 40,403,812 49,261,886 63,046,926 

Resources 389,894,414 468,226,898 650,016,968 

CINCINNATI— 32 Banks 33 Banks 30 Banks 

Loans $38,437,920 $37,646,364 $56,615,686 

Deposits 74,190,688 82,634,080 100,034,340 

Reserve 10,163,043 9,932,276 11,703,230 

Resources 91,149,178 99,794,161 120,423,864 

TOLEDO— 16 Banks 16 Banks 15 Banks 

Loans $30,678,466 $36,265,996 $50,739,320 

Deposits 46,002,669 60,107,700 69,462,922 

Reserve 6,974,437- 8,386,648 8,969,704 

Resources 64,156,648 68,086,146 80,446,344 

AKRON— 10 Banks 9 Banks 9 Banks 

Loans $21,134,708 $27,713,859 $42,058,481 

Deposits 24,870,860 39,810,679 60,931,965 

Reserve 3,046,648 4,347,076 6,899,172 

Resources 29,746,595 44,399,145 66,836,432 

YOUNGSTOWN— 7 Banks 7 Banks 7 Banks 

Loans $17,928,930 $22,398,230 $23,936,860 

Deposits 23,976,828 29,892,231 26,319,611 

Reserve 6,132,988 3.166,020 3,423,141 

Resources 27,943,866 34,191,467 31,937,649 

CANTON— 7 Banks 7 Banks 8 Banks 

Loans $9,606,476 $12,011,324 $17,217,639 

Deposits 15,296,903 21,019,876 25,637,118 

Reserve 3,812,144 4,037,765 4,493,987 

Resources 17,657,493 23,986,925 29,256,396 

DAYTON— 8 Banks 7 Banks 6 Banks 

Loans $9,272,036 $12,229,714 $13,993,371 

Deposits 14,402,920 21,469,354 21,928,067 

Reserve 2,226,998 2,593,447 2,144,633 

Resources 15,900,974 23,319,194 24,270,741 

COLDMBCJS— 9 Banks 9 Banks 9 Banks 

Loans $8,433,687 $9,663,644 $11,435,878 

Deposits 12,347,151 16,234,649 16,429,866 

Reserve 2,352,227 2,900,350 3,326,676 

Resources 16,190,298 17,629,487 19,995,643 



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BXn^ AKD BANEIKQ- 



145 



HEW INCOEFORATIONS, 

Thirty-eight certificates of authority were granted to new incorpo- 
rated State banks during the year — nineteen of which were conversions 
of private banks — with a combined capital of two million six hundred 
fifty^one thousand ($2,651,000) dollars. 

There ha^ been no eertifleate of authority granted to a private bank 
sinee December 28, 1916. 

The number of incorporated State banks now doing business is 631, 
operating 98 branches, and the number of private banks is 144, making a 
total of 873 banks and branches under the supervision of this depart- 
ment. 

STATE BANKS AUTHORIZED TO BEGIN BUSINESS SINCE JUNE 30, 1919. 



Name 



The Brecksville Bank Co , 

The Farmers & Merchants State Bank 

The Vanlue Banking Co._ .._. 

The Farmers State Bank. _______ 

The Bank of Mount Eaton , ,__ 

The Communi ty Bank.. . . 

The Clevelandltalian Savingis Bank Co 
The Liberty Banking Co.. _^. _-..-.-. 

The American Exebaiige Bank ___ 

The Commonwealth Savmga Bank.^_, 
The Peoples & Drovers Bank & Trust 

Co _-.._______„ _._._.-_.___ 

The Bartlett Fanners Baiik______ 

The WalbridKe State Bank,_.. . 

The Curtice State Bank__^. ._...__ 

The Farmers Bank of El ida. ..^^ ,. 

The Citizens Banking Co,._ ,,,_, 

The Farmers Commercial & Savings 

Bank__.„_.._.-__ „..__.. 

The Firet Trust & Savings Bank 

The Spira Bank & Trust Co, .,.„ 

The Roseville State Bank. _,..__.,_ 

The Ixon Bank __« 

The Ney State Bank._. 

The Farmers State Bank ,„,._^,..,_,l 

The Farmers Bank__^_. --.__.- .^ 

The North American Banking & Sav- 
ings Co___ _ ,,...,-, 

The Farmers & Citizens State Bank _. 
The Citizens Banking Co..._.__ _.___. 
The Adena Commercial & Savings B'k 
The KloDowski Savings Bank, ;__._,,_ 
The Elyria Savings & Trust Co__._- 

The Zanesville Bank & Trust Co 

The L, Witt State Bank Co„._ ___._,, 

The Xcnia Avenue Savings Baiik_^_ 

The Peoples Bank^___.___ ___. 

The Commercial Bank of Morris Sharp 

&Oo-__.____. ._._ — . 

The Lewis Bank & Trust Co_.,._,. 

The Zitiello Banking Co._ ._____, 

The Farmers & Merchants Bank 



Location 



B recks vi 1 le _ . 

Archbold______-_ 

Vaiilue,.,__^ 

New Madison 

Mount Eaton- ___ 
East Liverpool___ 

Cleveland, ^ . - 

Fremont ^._,., 

Canton_,^^.»,_^_ 
Columhu8.,,^,,,_ 

Washington C.H. 
Bartlett__.„_. 
VValbridge-___^_. 
Curtice.. ________ 

^ida..___.__,... 
Kenmore , ^ ^ ^ ^ , . _ 

West Unity. _,,„ 
Zanesville _._..__ 

Cleveland. ... 

Roseville.. __^^ 

JackBOn,. ^»,. 

Ney^_.^. .__...-. 
Port Washington. 
Savannah 

Cleveland .... 

Crestline __*_ 

Prospect... _,__^_ 
Adena..,.. _^--._ 

Cleveland-.. 

Elyria_.._.^ 

Zanesville.. ^,. 

Bellaije,^..._._. 

Dayton... _ _ 

Gambier _ 

Washington C.H. 
Upper Sandusky . 

Cleveland 

Malinta ^ 



Date of 

Authorizatioti. 



July 

Aug, 
Aug, 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept- 

Oct, 

Oct, 
Oct. 

Oct. 
Oct. 



10, 1910 
h 1919 

1, 1919 

2, 1919 
15, 1919 
20, 1919 
11,1919 
22, 1919 
22, 1919 
30, 1919 

22, 1919 

23, 1919 

24, 1919 
24, 1919 
29, 1919 



Nov. 11, 1919 



Nov, 

Nov. 

Dec, 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar, 

Mar. 

April 
April 
May 
May 
May 
Mav 
May 
May 
June 



IS, 1919 

19, 1919 

8, 1919 

11, 1919 

2, 1920 

3, 1920 

4, i^m 
10, 1920 

25, 1920 

1, 1920 

5,1920 

7,1920 

21, 1920 

la, 1920 

2.5, 1920 

25, 1920 

26. 1920 
1, 1920 



Jime 5, 1920 

June 5p 1920 

Jime 12, 1920 

June 28, 1920 



Dig i l i zujd b\ 



Capital 



$25,000 
60,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
50,000 

100,000 
50,000 
50,000 

100,000 

125,000 
25,000 
25,000 
40,000 
25,000 
25,000 

30,000 
150,000 
150,000 
^,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 

125,000 

50,000 

30,000 

60,000 

100,000 

500,000 

150,000 

65,000 

50,000 

25,000 



51,000 

150,000 

50,000 

^,000 

Coogl e 



146 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF STATE MEMBER BANKS-FEDERAL RE- 
SERVE SYSTEM— AT THE DATE OF EACH CALL DURING THE 
CURRENT YEAR. 



RESOURCES. 



! ST Batiia I 71 Buiki | 71 BiinkB I 7§ Bmaks 
I Ri?^iort(jf I Heportof 1 Report of ] Hcpoetcrf 
J Sopt^ 1^, l»ltJ j a-e. 31, m9\ m. 28. }^20\ May 4, IflM 






Oih&c LoiLDa Kod DiapmuitL ,._ ..__ 



StitCp County imd Munidpul Hoiuii.,„.^ 

Oihcr Bondii Hud aptturtira.. _„...,.. . . 

rr<>3itiuai on all Bcmik vai Sftcuritica^.^ 

Bftukiiig Uiitisa tkod Lt3l__ 

FttmHune injj Pkturefl _^^. 



R»J Estate otJicT thmi Bimkii^ ilniu 

Ofldi Itpjna^-.^ ^ _„._.^^.^, 

La wf id Hcwrvi.^ with Fcdcml Ii«if.Ti% Buiik^ 
Foderai Ikwrve BahJc Stocky 



I terns wilh F. R. !J. nn proecM «oiL)_^ __.,__ 

l^tchaiig^ f<(r Cleuritiit . , , , ._, .......,_ 

Gold Cob and Gold CCTtificftt** 
Silver Coio. 



Vwp^ CurrciMy ._^ 

FareigQ Moiury ^ .— -. . - . . _.. 

Nel HiuckUJtil dwrrriB Bulks asrdHttEiJcGrL^. 

Itranm Trftiiait_____ _.,.., „„_._ 

Otbar uKla„„ .-^_^_^._...^,_,.._^^^__,... 

^'AowpUniccfl" esecnled by bti^nkt uid outatomi- 



gXUUHn l4H'd.. ^ — „,_ ____^ 

Caah ihprt — „, , . „ 



1604 m.m 

7fi. 1 23^3^1 

20239? 

177, U7 
135.440 

2n,r2f5."57 
J^14JJ04 
a,432,9fiS 

a,na7j36 



Tot»IflL-. 



J 



uMimiEs. 



Cftjitft] Hotk iifliM iJL. 

Suri)lu0 Fijjid..„ _,^^ 

Ntt Lli]Jivid<NJ IVoata. 



Eeerirvtid for Tawn acid Interwt ..._.,-.^_,.,___ 
L . S, l>rp(MiU (Jlhtr Limn PoftalSovkj^i^..^ ,_ 

Public Fiiadj ..._,.,_. , ,.._^._^^.,. 

Lcuiividual UT'oeiia Hubjiwt io >!lieek , j.,/^ 

Di'Giarul Citrtihcjitt-s of iKpfWU . ,_,.^ ,__ , _ 

C«4hior'# Chi^ct.^ oatataiuiin« ^^^^^!^^^ 

Ccrlificd Chcclks ^ut Htiindini!; ►.„.,•,•, , 

Ntst oraiounl dui? to BaciU and HunkiTa.^. . 7^.. 

Dlvidcriria I npfdiL.... _,,... ._„„^.. ^_^,^„„ 



?k\inkTi lifiKKita , „ 

IL "5. t\ietik] gavipga „ ._._ ____ ^_ 

Trujt Dcpr^dia ... ..._ ^_^.„.,__^«^..„^ 

Notts [ind BilJj Itt-diacoutitiai^. „.^ _^_ 

Bjiifl iwab]4.-,. ; _ . ;.. , 

l-ioQiL^ Bumiwt-d ... .._ 

Bill* [\viibl»- wirJi B^dcral I^^mtt^' Bttiik 1™ .. 
licdiacouiiu iriil, Fcdrml Rpufrvc Bjink .. ,-, _ 
Part bl f*i:iy JiiL-nts ?>n Liberty Bottrl E^ubsi^rJiitiOtu 

OlLtr )iubl!it]>p , .^ .__ ^,...... 

Ni't .\jMoijiit "Ai-ctptanccs" cxctitit^ fur viis^ 

Uftat-jn ._,^, ^_ _ 

A(X!r<r»l:aiicra ^[uuratiti^ed by eiido(t«cjiicni .._,.,.,,.„, 
C4itl ov»T^ .^,.^.^^^. _ _ ^. 



m^^riMi 



|22,21J»,S75| 
67fl,4n) 

l,7l«,5J*|l 

WViJili] 
1^11)2,474/ 

2:i,sn7..5:ii! 

l',W,JMM,JU7| 
[J7iA'22^ 

iQ,}H7,mi\ 

4LM,-J14 
72f^Jf*H}\ 

7,4U1/i<H»; 
4.fili;s.41Hl 

J,457,J^d 

5,4;i^'jtn» 

ilj027j;iii 



Tiiiab . 



|4H2A'rj.047 



IS73M323 
l*4,S70JO9 

20,6(S»,406 
?0,742.fl59 

37UM 
13,167,043 

afl7j28 

53^40,293 

3,4M^3 

lO,D«£.!)7tl 

1&[.523 

i(?.7i>'t,7US 

33,373,^" 
J^0.4SI 

5^56,481 
»30,425 



$Hr,u%m^ m52soju 



iaj42i,fiis 

M^».l44 

30,001 .m 

nM9M3 

mm 

3p2S07aS 

*70.»U 

23, 7 10,4 OK 

J,4S7,0IW 

7mMQ 

JH.712 
I.tl5745» 

1.924^24 



2I.7a*J/>l5 

7:iu.s^ 

74S^'»S*t 

fi.74i,MiN 

3DJlt3.mi2 

i:?4,lli.or7 

lX>-li37\ 

a.mT:jm f 

22M,>7.ai3/ 

ni.fitiQ.r7y' 
I7;i,4«li 

j /!Ki*.:afj 
i?,t*a».i,5j(ii 

425,7r*7| 
J,W>2J83 

A^y.Vi,4«i 



|u47^l(S,U^U 



125*2413.- 
22.86iaj2? 

fl75,y.'i3 

2«1J7S 

33,070,210 

2,763,410 
7*l,»13 

2Sj^ia,974 

2L'fl,KW,3l5 

1 ,4S<5,OSC 

isjjijrirWi 
iia,42fl 

l,70f),flOO 
1(>,1,1^,}197 

J8i,9as 
i,m,m 

], 024,524 
3,70§ 



^i^;^,ii3 



EBtJOrtqf 

^nae 30, 19J9 



m.m7M%\ 

1.768^77, 

3^,360 

2ft,4«fl.730 

d8,4M401 

4,M3^fll 
^«S6a^4«S 



r,ftJ2»77!J 
J4»a77 
JMIS.447 

10.7114WM; 

72,m 

21451 J»3 

74il3,4ia 
1,S774M 

t2an 



|S(il^73j007 



g,4»fl,727 
U0«,S<I4 

32^>ae,6ii 

2A9^M7 
3,^76^08 

24,OSIJ07 

233,0ti«,49l 

J3il2.S4^ 

1 184 73 

3^85.000 
S^g7,7flO 
10,443^48 

7.fi37 



1561, 973 jU07 



fl01jOS9J09 
lllJft44^ 
tUMAMt 

3o:m.iao 

22^41:963 

0^1,448 
11^t»*4t7 

4,481,701 
100441 

],e«04i7 

3,777.7lt 

7429,73a 

S4fli474 

a^a4 



t&ez^^ 



ia«.7ll,ft3B 
244«O,M0 
§44«,fi&3 

$3^74J)M 
142,i>®a,Tl» 

2jm.m 

UA949S 
10,.17«,70I 

&4341347i 

3.4ShflO0 
6.901,790 

tmm 

7426.73ft 

3,504474 

3,Md 



$583,£00i»28 



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BANKS AND BANKING. 



147 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF STATE MEMBER BANKS— FEDERAL 
RESERVE SYSTEM— FOR JUNE 1917, 1918, 1919 AND 1920. 



RESOITRCES. 



Lauu on BeftI EvUtc , 

LoiLfis OB CoUitenf ^^^ 

Otbfr LcHUM acd DbcouDta . 



Ae<>cpt&ncra Pun:liAfed or DucoujitedL 

Owrdrafts „ . ^ .„., 

U. S. Borde and U. 8. SceurUirt ..._. 
^Ukte, County uid Municipal Botwia^... 

Other B<»cidi acd ScruritiML..... ,, 

TVf MJUiii 00 aJJ Bcsnda and Swuritiefl.^ 

Batik ing Housrr and Lot ^ „.^ 

Fwnitupe and Fklurc«... ^_ 

Kfial EstMn o[hcr than Baakiii« Hoiuk,-. 



Lawful Reserve with Federal Reoervc Bank,.- 

Fedcrml E*»HTe Bank Btoifk, .^ .. ...„___.^^„ 

TtcBM wttli Fpd«^l Eeiierw Bank (b pnacen eolkctioiO^ 
£ichaJi{^« fee Clearing-, _,_ 



Gold Ccin and Gold Certiecat««._«^^._, 



NieUitaiid ^ 



Net UDOunt du« IkciBi Bankj uid Banke 



Olbera 



'^Aceeptanjoei" eucuied by faftnkoitid QtitataadinR ... 

Liability of Btakenae«o<t)iitaoceptanct!iiffU]inateed_._^..-^^ 
Cadi ahort. . „ , .^^.^.^^^^^ .^ ^^ 



Totak- 



LIABILIITES. 



Capttal 5toct pakt ia 

^uf plui Fund- 



Net Uodividcd Profitt- 



HcflCTTed for Taxra and Interert.-.^ . 

O. S. D^Dsfta Erthcr tfaan Pbeta! Saving^^ 
Publk Fund»_, 



fndiridual DepomUt niblect to check.^^.- 
Demand OcrUBcatefl of l>poait_ . 

Caihkr'i Cl)«clct outatanding ^ 

Certified Cftedca oatstanding 



Kf t amount due to Eanka and BankeriL—^ 

Divid(*flda Unpaiti ^.^^ 

Time Certificatea of I>i?poaat 

Savuko Depodta . . 

U. S, PoftiJ Saringv.^ __, 



Tratit Dwoaita.™^ ^„ 

Notet aad BiUa RcdiiBootuited. 

BiQft Rtyable. 

kBonnai* 



Bilb Pkyable witb FedfjTil Rmcitp Bank.. 
EedbeocmU mih Fodcrnl Reaarvo B«nk^ 



Btftial F^mcoiii on Liberty Banrd Subtcriptiona ._ 

Other BabiBtita ...„__„.. -.^.„„ „ 

Net Amount "A«ioepianc«i" eiccuted im customcra.- 



ADceptaooea guiraiiteed by endointcmeni^ 
Ouh«y«r„ 



Report of I Heixirt of 
Junc20, 19l7[June29J9l8 






163,566,531 



Report of 



65.625 jOU 

2S.43O.620 

1,205,(66 

H.74^.87* 

ft7Ji!i,4SH 

1,1^ AW 

2,14J>.2S4 

100.126 

10.517.190 

865,400 

304.135 

2,644.107 

162,477 

1011.067 

SKJ.102 

3.966,253 

I1.4S9 

12,671 ,52fl 

52&.4S4 

."ij)77286 

l.fl0&387 



6S5 



1275,028,082 



|2J0r>,0flO 

2,700,01X11 

H4.^S5 

'""l.^3¥jr7H 

15,022,104 

202, l*j 

2>W,I14 

7§J05 

848,234 

1,42^ 

2.582 .S87 

32.075,466 

418,74« 

3»8344?36 



672466 
143.479 



2,2S6 



Jl4,235,nO0 

14,617,500 

3, .tC 1,4 15 

250.167 

13,370.Df>0 

18,246,073 

47,74 5,W76 

l,4m).S40 

1,071,604 

237,432 

4,021.412 

71.73.^ 

8, H 3,524 

123.5S,S,630 

1,080.497 

11.43fi,734 

ifn.eoi 

2;iix;,oixi 

1.412.fifXf 

2.onfl,0(JO 

2,520,123 

5fl6,497 

IXM 7,326 

1,600.387 



Totafe.- 



. t I63.'5«e.538; 1275.023,0 S2 



$62,010,907 

111. 7^0,202 

65.2110 ,.'i53 

2,5H,BOa 

220.767 

50J70.(»0S 

20.565.922 

61.5r>.fll3 

291 .S02 

11,307.218 

858,780 

2.363.63» 

257.001 

17,781,923 

1JH.0.W 

2,532,171 

6.744.325 

162.376 

542,117 

57,466 

8.3M,I50 

23.194 

21,284,950 

1 .2M1 ,8f>tl 

:,74L9O0 

4.1I4.N77 

1,752.433 

2.176 



Report of 
Jtuie 30, 1^ 



«4GO,28d,236 



121,632.100 

18,843.750 

6,332,190 

415.289 

9,IH«,000 

25,374,896 

106,676,082 

1.842,117 

3,087,7K3 

792,590 

6,996 ,6R5 

300.470 

23.875.023 

158,508,676 

14>55,135 

18,2ft'i,7K3 

278,406 

192.50(1 

2,050 ,4(X> 

5.5HI,O0(» 

1MU\7 

5.49I,S37 

1.106,8]: 2 

4.1M,S77 

4,752,433 

1,:1551 



IIOI .059,60* 

133.304.130 

114,84.'5,607 

828.003 

276,4(^ 

30,297.120 

22.744.963 

70,206.459 

651 .44« 

13.8t9.4l7 

924,520 

4.485,70* 

459,892 

254122,540 

1,513,500 

4^^23.961 

0,905.499 

I89,W1 

1,163,682 

100.549 

11 X>1 6,911 

135J065 

18J19.836 

1.666,147 

3,777.712 

7,126,738 

3,504,174 

3.395 



»5S2,5flO,028 



t20,7813a0 

24, ISO ,940 

8,M6hS52 

IU9J0S2 

2,831,58.1 

32.974j&5fl 

1424328,785 

2,942,702 

3,034,489 

1,359.135 

10.W6,703 

363,685 

24^13,558 

243,413,178 

1,283,100 

19.634,652 

19337 

681,139 

3481,600 

6,801.750 

10,597,569 

7,126,738 

3,504,174 

3^43 



146036,23^1 $582,500,028 



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148 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



STATE BANKS EXERCISING TRUST POWERS, AND QUALIFIED TO DO 
TRUST BUSINESS JUNE 30, 1920. 



Name 


Location 


Capital 


The Central Savines & Trust Co 


Akron 


$500,000 


The Depositors Savings & Trust Co 


Akron 


300,000 


The Firestone Park Trust & Savings Bank 


Akron 


200,000 


The Ohio Savines & Trust Co T 


Akron 


300,000 


The Peonies Savinira & Trust Co 


Akron 


200,000 


The State Savings & Trust Co 


Akron 


450,000 


The City Savings Bank & Trust Co 


Alliance 


100,000 


The Central Savinirs Bai^ Co 


Cftnton . ^ * ^ ^ 


175,000 


The First Trust & Savines Bank 


Canton 


250,000 


The Cummings Trust Co 


Carroll ton 


100,000 


The Valley Savings Bank & Trust Co 


Chillicothe 

Cincinnati 


100,000 


The Central Trust Co 


1,000,000 


The Cosmopolitan Bank & Trust Co 


Cinninnati . . . ^ 


250,000 


The Provident Savings Bank & Trust Co.. 


Cincinnati 


1,400,000 


The Union Savings Bank & Trust Co 


Cincinnati 


1,000,000 
1,000,000 


The Western Bank & Trust Co _ 


ninc-innftti . ^ 


The Broadwav Savinss & Trust Co 


Cleveland 


300,000 


The Citizens Savings & Trust Co 


Cleveland 


4,000,000 


The Cleveland Trust Co 


Cleveland 


4,000,000 


The First Trust & Savings Co 


Cleveland '. .. . 


1,250,000 
500,000 


The Garfield Savings Bank Co 


Cleveland 


The Guardian Savings & Trust Co 


Cleveland 


3,000,000 


The Llake Shore Bailing & Trust Co 


Cleveland 


1,000,000 


The Lorain Street Savines & Trust Co.. 


Cleveland 


200,000 


The Pearl Street Savines & Trust Co 


Cleveland 


600,000 


The State Banking & Trust Co 


niftVftland 


350,000 


The Superior Savings & Trust Co 


Cleveland. 


500,000 


Thft TTnif^H 'RfLnlcino' Ar. RAvinira Co _ 


Clftvftland , , 


1,000,000 
350,000 


The Woodland Avenue Savings & Trust Co 


Cleveland , 


The Citizens Trust & Savings Bank 


Columbus 


700,000 


The State Savines Bank & Trust Co 


Columbus ^ 


400,000 


The Citv Trust & Savines Bank 


Dayton 


200,000 


The Davton Savines & Trust Co - 


Day1;on 


587,600 


The Lor&in Coimtv Savines & Trust Co _- 


Elyria 


250,000 


The Savines Deposit Bank & Trust Co 


Elyria 


224,650 


The Citizens Savines Bank & Trust Co 


Hamilton 


200,000 


The Lima Trust Co 


Lima 


200,000 


The Farmers Savines A Trust Co 


Mftnsfield . ^.^ 


200,000 


The Peonies Bankine& Trust Co 


Marietta 


250,000 


The Ohio Bankine& Trust Co 


Massillon 


150,000 


The American Trust & Savings Bank a... 

The Newark Trust Co 


Middletown 

Newark 


100,000 
200,000 


The American Bankine & Trust Co 


flAndnnlcy ^ ^ 


100,000 


The American Trust & Savings Bank 


Springfield 


200,000 


The Steubenville Bank & Tnwt Co 


Steubenville 

Toledo 


350,000 


The Commercial Savines Bank & Trust Co 


200,000 


The Guardian Trust & Savines Bank.... .. 


Toledo 


200,000 


The Ohio Savings Bank & Trust Co 


Toledo 


1,000,000 
250.000 


The Security Savings & Trust Co 


Toledo 


The Soitzer-Rorick Trust & Savines Bank 


Toledo 


300,000 


Thft Siimmit Tniflt Cn . , . , - 


Toledo 

Upper Sandusky — 

Wadsworth 

Warren 


100,000 


The Lewis Bank & Trust Co 


150,000 


The Wadsworth Savines & Trust Co 


* 150,000 


The Union Savings & Trust Co - 


300,000 


The Dollar Savings & Trust Co 


Youngstown 

Youngstown 

Zanesville . 


1,500,000 


The Mahonine Savines & Trust Co 


100,000 


The First Trust & Savines Bank. 


150,000 


The Guardian Trust & Safe Deposit Co 


Zanesville 


50,000 



NOTE— All banks doing a trust business whose capital does not meet the require 
ments of Section 710-37 of the Ohio Banking Law, must comply with such section 
by April 11, 1922, in accordance with Section 710-38. 

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sat^v^Bfiwip "i,uii''i«*»j:^ 



BANES AND BANKING. 



149 



NATIONAL BANKS AUTHORIZED AND QUALIFIED UNDER STATE LAW 
TO DO A TRUSf BUSINESS JUNE 30, 1920. 



Name 


Loeation 


Date of 

authon nation 

of fiduciary 

poweri. 


The FirsUSecond National Bank »*. 


Akron 


Oct. 22,1919 
Aug. 4, 1919 
Oct. 1, 1910 


The National C^ty Bank *^ ^.^ 




The First National Bank .-. 


Bellaire^^^^ .^^^,^ 


The Atlae National Bank 


Cincinnati 


June 14* 1920 


The Citizens National Bank **,«. . ^^^ 


Cincinnati 


Oct. 2S, 1910 


The Fifth- Third National Bank. ^ 


Cincinnati ^^^^^^^ 


Aug, 4,1910 
Nov. 25j 1919 


The First National Bank ... I 


Cincinnati ^- 


The Second National Bank,_^._*^_^_*...^__^_ 


Cin^inrifiti 


Nov. 29, 1919 


The National City Bank -* ,._---..^ 


Cleveland 


Oct. IR. 1919 


The Winters National Bank.. 


Dayton ^_---.*, 


July 2S. 1919 
July 21, 1919 


The Merchants National Bank , „ 


Defiance 


The XTnion National Bank ^ . ^ 


Fog tori a 


Nov. 15. 1919 


The Merchants National Bank.,-^^ ,, 


Hillsboro . _ 


Nov. 2*J, 1919 


The Lebanon National Bank ^ 


Lebanon ..^^ _^ ., 


July 22, 1919 
June 21, 1920 


The Central National Bank,,,, 


Marietta ^. __... 


Thft Frm*, N«itionRl BanV ...^ __„^^^ 


Marietta 


Sept, 27, 1919 
July 30, 19J9 


The Merchants National Bank __^.^ .,.. 


Masai 11 on 


The National Bank of Commerce , , 


Lorain -^^.^-.^ ^^- 


June 24, 1920 


The Piqua National Bank,,, ,__ 


Piqua ._ 


May 10, 1920 
AuK. 4, 19ni 


The Second National Bank ^..^^. *.*,.. 


Ravejina_ .____,, , 
Steubenvi lie _.-_,. 
Troy,, ......._..., 


The National Exchange Bank ..^ _,_.„ 

The First National Bajik____^ ^-_ 


Sept. 8, 1919 
Nov. 5, 1919 









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150 



OHIO GENZBAL STATISTICS. 



AGGREGATE EESOUHCES OF ALL BANKING INSTITtmOKS UNDER 

eTATE CONTROL. 



State 



I 



No. of 

loatitu- 

tioHB 



Capital 

Siupliis 

and 

Undivided 

Profits. 



B^OBlt^ 



Total 
Raeourcee 



1 New York_ _......_ 

2 Mass achuBet te . . . . . _ 

3 Pf^rmslyvmrui ... 

4 Illinois. .,, .,_,____- 

5 California,, _,.,,__ 

6 Ohir>___. ___„,. 

7 MichiKftn...... — ,-, 

S Missouri.. 

9 Iowa _-^__ 

10 N*nv Jersey _.,.,^*^* 

11 Connectictit 

12 Minni?BOta...-____._ 

13 Wisfonsm.--- ^-_ 

14 Indiana,,,,. ^_.,^.*. 

15 TexaR ,..._ 

16 Maryland... 

17 Georgia^.., _ 

IS Kansas...,, __--—-_ 

19 Louisiana- __,-, 

20 Nebraska,. 

21 Oregon. ..._.,, __^ 

22 Rhode Island., ^ 

23 North Carolina. ..._. 

34 Tennessee 

25 Washingtoji.,*^ , 

2ft Kentucky.,.^ , 

27 Maine__j^ 

28 South Dakota 

2fJ Miefiissippi , 

30 Oklahoma . . 

31 South Carolina. -^ 

32 Virginia 

33 West Virginia,,. 

34 Arkansas. ...,^ .^. 

36 North Dakota.. 

36 New Hampshire . 

37 Alabama....,.,.,,, 
3.S Vermont _._.__. 

39 Montana , 

40 Colorado^. _,,,.*.^, 

41 Utah, _..,.,„ 

42 Florida _, 

43 Delaware , 

44 Idaho 

45 Arizona, ^_._. 

46 Wyoming.. ^ 

47 New Mexico 

4S Nevada,.,.-..--— «-, 

Totals....... 



561 
496 
580 
9SS 
425 
776 
535 
1,484 

276 

250 

1,177 

814 

792 

m^ 

187 

662 

1,008 

224 

1,008 

274 

47 
513 
440 
304 
450 

97 
552 
312 
610 
389 
316 
217 
404 
71S 

70 
248 

50 
2S6 
258 
Ifrl 
204 

27 
139 

66 
110 

71 

23 



21,961 



1668.848,800 

213,4R5,377 

3ftM39.133 

20S.4a'>.424 

134,296.122 

135,369.5251 

101.992,572 

111,871.762 

88.062,^1 

76.078.835 

45,698.360 

51,570.790 

46,522,323 

57,519,092 

67,128,446 

51,821,794 

56.784,916 

44.793,973 

34,609,582 

3-%147,8,'S8 

32,778,904 

33.341.081 

31.188.512 

30.368.146 

24,878,6521 

a4,4I7,170 

20,094,617 

18,540,2^0 

21,027.40?) 

20,123,156 

29,326,(587 

36,837,172 

30,390,705 

24,a52,164 

17,3^14,474 

13,328,110 

19,983,50.^ 

10,994,007 

17,302,926 

13,744,765 

12,163,806 

11,658,113 

11,280,0!7 

6,949.012 

7,029,278 

4,6,58,^38 

3,995,941 

2,588,872 



$3,156,023,402 



16,063.307,817 

2.a^'5, 459,247 

l,t;i4,428.973 

1,462,700.803 

1,181,073,066 

1,133,172,111 

878,670,113 

679,154.63,^1 

7a5.487,S19 

693,037.5331 

562.65 1 ;991 

465.318.091 1 

4'>3.548,102| 

398,520. no J 

323,2,50.283 

322,960,913 

26I,6ij3,393 

303.086,453 

284.509,270 

298,465,167 

278,526,124 

284,034.9«l2f 

237,f)97,4.50| 

199,141,987) 

212,8.38,107 

l.S4.S28,727 

2m.234,719 

195,951,450 

77,616,322 

180,834,958 

157,643,590 

143,710.445 

154,OKO,oa^ 

143,r*98,220 

127,515,642 

133,662,617 

115,529.fi29 

119,9-14,370 

100,692.903 

104,681.190 

75,302,033 

86,a33„567 

6,5,576,409 

52,034,714 

58,737,571 

29.120,478 

20,9.31,108 

20,547,SJ"" 



$24,189,608,378 



17,208,129.490 
2,480,789,517 

2,096,703,466 

1,819,215.743 

1,347,296,633 

1,32^,850.8^18 

I,a57.153,a37 

S56,5l5.99r* 

839.413.141 

796.934.374 

621,902.598 

,528.495,860 

500.711,213 

5as.-soo.as2 

412.273.846 
,397.236,931 
a80,218,5,53 
364,529,992 
364.224,279 
347,434. 7W 
a3.5J07.694 
321,619,171 
283.974,783 
259.675,761 
245.510,067 
234.315.847 
232,003,212 
220.209,822 
217,02O,9a^ 
2l3.S59.aS2 
202.58S;ft52 
201 ,.559,929 
192,679,40? 
189,064.079 
152,460,618 
148,471,034 
iaS.375,2M 
1^4,020,932 
125.513,395 
120,700,025 
103,571,167 
100,258,943 
81.827,163 
68,672,503 
67,631,929 
34,495,099 
25,aS6,708 
23,662,246 



129,024,095,813 



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•^■* '» 



BANEB AND BANKDr0. |S1 

LIQUIDATION BUREAU. 

At the time of filing the last aurnial report of this department there 
were six banks in process of liquidation. One has been completed and 
two additional onea taken over. The affairs fo the Osboni Bank, Osborn, 
Ohio, were closed and a final dividend of ten and three-tenths per cent, 
paid. Progress has also been made, though slowly, in the litigation now 
pending to enforce the individual liability of the stockholders in The 
Putnam County Banking Company and The German-American Commer- 
cial and Savings Bank. 

Through the defalcation of Bruce R, Campbell, seeretary-treaanrer 
of The Struthers Savings and Banking Company, StrutherSj Ohio, this 
bank was closed for liquidation April 3, 1920. An etxamination of the 
bank's affairs beginning March 20, 1920, disclosed a faitini,^ comlihou as 
a result of the misapplication of its funds by the secretary-treasurer. 
Its doors were temporarily closed and a more extensive audit made, which 
disclosed the bank to be Impel essly insolvent. A meeting of the directors 
was called and the apparent condition of the bank placed before them, 
whereupon they passed a resolution requesting the Superintendent of 
Banks to take cliarge and liquidate its affairs. 

By a system of manipulation and falsifying the bank's records the 
shortage in the accounts of Bruce R. Campbell reached nearly $300^000. 
It appears the greater part of this was loaned to parties and eoncerna 
in which Mr. Campbell was personally interested. He resorted to almost 
every illegal device to misappropriate funds of the bank. On a part of 
these illegal transactions fourteen indictments against him were returned 
by the grand jury of Mahoniug County, to one of which he pleaded 
guilty, and received the maximum sentence of one to thirty years in the 
penitentiary, together with a fine of $10,000, 

At the time this bank was closed, it had a capital, surplus and un- 
divided profits of approximately $109,000 and deposits amounting to 
$1,500,000. 

Before the liquidation of the Struthers bank was well under way, 
to protect the depositors, the Farmers Bank of Glenmont, Holmes 
County, had to be taken over for liquidation. This was a small unin- 
corporated bank, owned by the firm of Gray Brothers, with capital, sur- 
plus and undivided profits of $25,763.47 and deposits of about one hun- 
dred and twenty thousand dollars. At the time the bank was closed, the 
obligations to the bank of the Gray Brothers were approximately forty- 
five thousand dollars^ almost one half of the deposits. Excessive loans 
to themselves brought about a condition in the bank which made it im- 
perative to close its doors temporarily until sufficient money could be 
raised by the owners to restore the reserve and pay off certain urgent de- 
mands. A partial audit of the books, however, disclosed a condition 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



1S2 OHIO GENBRAIi STATISTICS. 

which made it necessary to take over its affairs for liquidation. This 
being done, the property of the owners, both real and personal, was 
placed in the hands of a trustee to meet any loss to the depositors. It 
appears they have ample property to meet all their obligations and unless 
some unforseea contingency should arise, the depositors will be paid in 
fuU. 

A great effort was made by the department to save these banks from 
liquidation^ but conditions were such, it made their closing imperative. 



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REPORT OF 

INSPECTOR OF BUILDING AND LOAN 

ASSOCIATIONS 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OP THE DEPARTMENT 
OF BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS FOR YEAR 
ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 

RECEIPTS. 
Fees received during the year (68,249 77 

Totals $68,249 77 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Amount turned over to State Treasurer $67,907 16 

Amount on hand 342 61 

Total $68,249 77 

FUNDS APPROPRIATED BY THE LEGISLATURE TO PAY 
SALARIES OF OFFICERS, EXAMINERS AND CLERKS 
AND FOR GENERAL EXPENSES. 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriated for year (including salary bonuses granted for year by 
Legislature) $46,335 80 

Total $46,333 80 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Salaries and compensation of officers, clerks and examiners for the year.. $34,395 74 

Expenses 10,679 24 

Unexpended balances June 30, 1920 1,260 82 

Total $46,335 $0 

(163) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



154 



OHIO GENESMi STATISTICS, 



G0MPARI80N BY CITIES FOR FISCAL YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, ni% 

AND JITNE 30, lom 



City. 



ClevelaiuL 



Columbui_ . 

CincinnatL 

Yoangftown.. 

Toledo.. 



prmiiield,. 



Lima.. 



Mii*eillon^^_ 
Afihtabula™ 



Bellaire.....^^ 

Hamilton 

East LivetpooL. 

Mansfi,eld,._„.„ 
Pqrtsraoiith^^^ 
Sidney.^, *-„, 






Mic3 ditto wTL^ 
B€ll*rfontaine,, 

Xei!iiA._ 






C«mbd4ge^,> 
Mt. Vernon., 

AJliance.-, 

Cornitry—*^. 

Totals, 



Kumber of AssociAtunuL 



Jtme 3a B20. June 30. 191^. 



61 
25 

18 
225 

6 
11 

5 

3 

5 

3 

3 

3 

i 

3 

8 

4 

8 

3 

5 

3 

2 

a - 

3 

4 
3 

3 

JO 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2G6 



718 



48 

23 

18 

225 

H 
4 
3 
G 
3 
3 
3 
4 
2 
S 
4 
B 
3 
6 
2 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 



3 

3 

2SS 



Ajisrts 



151 .sfiR.n:^! 2? 

■r- i's 

du ' jr. 

2iA»07.11& OS 

12.S^.597 40 

12.706.Sm 71 

12,04!. 711 m 

I0.fi»3.724 m 

10ja3JV>« 67 

8,133.852 29 

7.27^.386 *i5 

0,036,028 m 

0,374.660 le 

6.349,32S 43 

fi.26t.2ia 03 

5.P03.8&7 &2 

SjOl^Oe 10 

5.768.811 96 

5.4 00.030 n5 

5.1fi0,e7^ 09 

4,R58,7O0 62 

4.2SE.2S8 77 

4.00».0B5 30 

3.098.71»1 03 

3.970.462 SI 

3,946 J3S 9fl 

3,854^93 S3 

3,396.093 23 

2.702.8OO 60 

2.t97,5BB 74 

2.6fl3.961 OT 

2.453,3(10 07 

2,304.238 32 

2.0§0.66O 21 

72.060,219 07 



Aszets 
Juae m, 10 Id. 



f37.72SJ57 20 
41.072.331 87 
42.251,711 fSl 
37.340.^*1 02 
1^,812,624 ^7 
10.303.221 81 

jo.&*7.io9 m 

9.521.2^ tff 
a,9l4,7»& lA 
9.D5d.dd6 74 
7.1J^,«05 45 
5,828,500 &* 
f,..|fi^.621 41* 
6,749,250 m 
6,130,415 4t> 
5.553.014 m 
4, 623, 70S 31 
4.966,450 37 
4. 71 0.0 03 m 
4.473.061 17 
3.711,04! b% 
3.(»25.&7S 20 
3.727.842 PO 
3,526.178 65 
3,2M.353 14 
3,203,327 64 
3.:«0»2t)7 86 
3,4ft3aS2 74 
2.247,191 43 
2,396,018 19 
2.SDG.ST7 29 
2.081.2S(* 45 
2,063.747 42 
1, go 1,768 M 
1.847*lCift 48 
ei.lOT.BOl 00 



1462,700,287 78 1381,478,702 TJ 



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BUTLDING Am* LOAK ASSOCIATIONS. 



155 



INCREASE AND DECREABE IN ASSETS BY CITIEB FOR FISCAL YEARS 
ENDING JUNE 30^ 1920, AND JUNE 30, 1919. 



i 


Citlei. 


if 

li 
ill 


5: 


1 
I 

II 


ln(^^e&». 


Aggrciatc 
Decrease. 


Net 
Increrasfl. 


Ket 
DecTuase, 


1 
2 

3 
4 


Columbua^^ 
Daylcm.., 

Clndtmati _. 
Tokdo „, 

Liraa^..^ , 

A3htatnilft.__| 

Aktoti .^.^.. 

HftmiltcsTL.„„ 

Caotcm 


di 

25 
IS 

a 

225 

11 
3 
5 
& 
4 
2 

3 ! 

S 
S 
3 

a 

5 

3 

3 

2 

3 1 

3 

3 1 

4 
2 
2 

2 

4 

S 
2 

3 

10 

2 

260 


24 
17 

6 
ISI 
U 
B 
5 
5 
4 
2 
•A 
7 

3 

3 

5 ' 
3 

2 
3 
3 

4 
2 
2 
2 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
10 

t 

228 


1* 

1 

1 

44** 
1* 

38 


tl4.2S6,7S.i 13 
9.ti56j03 00 
7.43^533 45 
5,184.793 21 
4.0M.&32 11 
2.55e.375 &B 
2.520,4«5 m 

3.ose.6©4 m 

1,67S.W3 90 
1.471,407 40 
1,458,B37 Bl 
L4.'iO*S77 11 
I,3ri6.l2* 41 
1.21&.i:Ji2 B4 
1,149.501 m 
1,00732B m 

i,mE.2os 00 

^^.m6 S4 
&41.823 32 
93B.5flfl ^ 
71J4,755 73 
775.135 27 
714.437 89 

TOS.201 09 
625,300 17 
605 J32 10 
5S2,671 02 
5tl0,44.'i 8*1 
479,000 Si 
442.450 4tt 
300,013 25 
301,010 43 
307,812 41 
300.711 45 

$12,010,293 40 


tlie.OlI 05 

507 40 

3.705 m 

ft6,Q41 50 


I14J69.S74 08 

9,859,255 60 

7.427*767 77 

5,IS4.703 21 

3,533<33S 24 

2.5S6,375 59 

%.b2f}M5 0& 

2,05^.694 m 

1,078,043 00 

1.47 L407 40 

1,468,637 Bl 

1,450.877 11 

1.280;lS2 01 

1,218,912 94 

I.14S,501 80 

1.067.830 83 

1,018.208 00 

90S,0*ft 84 

041,828 B2 

93R.a69 08 

704 J55 73 

775435 27 

714,437 80 

709,201 09 
625,30B 17 
605 J3 2 10 
582,671 Oa 
fid0,44a SS 
470.006 81 
442,400 40 
309,613 25 
391,010 40 
367,812 41 
300.711 45 
342,483 73 
111.592,015 84 




b 




6 

7 
g 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 


" — -^^- 


15 

in 




17 
Ifi 
It 


Fortsmouth* 

Dftfiatict. , 

S^dfiey.^. — >' 

Mittisfkid 

Urbaiia . _, 
Bclkfontaine 
Enst 

Xenift ..^„.! 

Mt Vernon „ 
Cambridge,.^ 
SteubeniTiIIe.. 

Irontoa ._.. 

Atliance. ^ 

Country „..^. 

Toffil __ 




20 
21 


-— ~ 




'22 

2a 

24 




2h 
27 




2« 

30 
31 




-------- 


^12 






:i3 
34 
35 


»473;966^^ 


S50.2S8 67 




71S 


632 


m 


JS2.520.281 la 


11^14.076 13 


»81.361,873 73 


S50.2S8 67 



*Cavera final report, 
•*Ijitludea tlirce fioai report*. 



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166 



OmO GENERAL STATtSTlCb. 



BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS INCOHPORATED DtJKING FISCAL 

YBAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920, 



3 
4 

e 
7 
s 

II 

12 
13 

14 
15 

m 

17 

IS 

10 
20 

31 

22 
23 
24 
25 

2n 

27 



29 

31 
32 

34 
35 

37 



N*me of Assoeialion. 



tdwreace Savings & Loan Compftny.™™! 

Empire Savings & Loan Compaiiy.^..„,_..„„..^,. 

Rc^L*fVe Savings & I^^BLn Cdmpany. .„„..„ 

Heights Sa^'iiiBS & Lnan Conip^my^..^^... ... . .. 

Karpat Build it) e & Loan Assoc iatawi ..... . 

Cofjimunity Savings & Loan Company „,.„„.._,„ 
Southwestern Savmsrs & Losn CompaQy„«_..^_. 

Mechanita* BijildniK & L'ian AssocijitiotL^ 

Metrojwhs Savings & b»n Com pany_^ .„.,„.,... 

American Saviiws & Loan Company .._..,^.-... 

Harvest Home Build itiR & Loan AsBOctatioiL-^, 
West Park ButklJng& Loan Company .^,,..^_^.. 
FarmcTB Savings <& Loan Compflny,^=^„,„„.,„^„ 

Thrift Savm^E & Loan Compttfiiy , .■. 

Windsor Savmgs & L>an Company , , , 

Lincoln Buildings Loan & Savings Compaiiy„„„ 
I mlust rial Savings &; Loan Compaaiy.......^....^^.^ 

Newton Fa lb Savings & Loan A^ociation COTn- 

pany .. _ .„.„,„ . . , „. ..„ ......„^. . .. ., 

Collinwood Savings & Loan Compftny„„„. „.- 

Cleveland Heights Savings Bl Loivi Ownpany.,,. 

Seaman Buildtog, Loan & Savings Asaociatiom.., 
Lyons Savings & Loan Company...,..^^..^^.^...^^ 

Hub Buildtn^-Ivoan Company. ..,.,_ 

Engkwood Building & Loan Association.,.,.,...^,, 

Harvey Buildmg & Loan Company . ^.. 

Park View Savingg d Loan Asfiociatioii_„„,„ 

Union Savings Aisotiation..,,...,. .................... ......... 

CrifipuA Attucks Building & Loan A^^iaticm 

Company, „.™ . ..^____.^,.__.. 

Kent Savings & Loan Company, „ ...„_.... 

Sfluthem Buitdin^: & Loan Company ..„ —. .^„. 

Slnvflk Savings & Loan Company ___„_., 

Northtm Saving & Loan Company.™................... 

C* Edflrin Smith Shoe Company Employes 

Savings St Loan Association., ..... ...................... 

Coal ana Iron Savings & Loan Company.-, 

Detroit Avenue Savings & Loan Company _.. 

Five Points Savings & Luan Company... ...., 

Madison Buildingt Loan ^ Savings Company, _ 
New Philadelphia Building & Loan Company.^ 



Locatton- 



Ironton. ^. — , 

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C«nficli_._,..„. 

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Capital 



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July 
July 
Augnfit 
September 
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Sfpttmber 22 

September 30 

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October 34 

October 27 

October SlO 

November 7 

Kdvember 25 

November 2S 

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February 

February 

February 

February 

FebTuary 

March 

March 



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May 

May 

May 
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BUHiDINO AMD LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



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BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



159 



BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS TBAT CEASED DOING BUSINESS 
AND FILED FINAL REPORTS DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 1920. 



Name of Association. 


Location. 


County. 


St. Clair Avenue Savings & Loan Company 

Advance Building & Loan ComiMiny. » ^ 


Cleveland; 

Cincinnati..^ ......... ...... 


Cuyahoga. 
Hamilton. 


Mercer Loan & Building Company 

Nineteenth Ward Building Association Company — 
Portage Savings & Loan Company 


Cincinnati 

Cincinnati *. 

Akron>. - 


Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 
Summit. 



BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS IN LIQUIDATION DURING FISCAL 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 



Name of Association . 


Location. 


County. 


Franz Josef Loan & Building Company 


Cincinbatl 

Wellston. 


Hamilton. 


Jack^n County Building, Ix)an & Savings Company 


Jackson. 



BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS THAT FILED FIRST REPORTS 
DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 



Name of Association. 


Location. 


County, 


Assets. 


Guaranty Savings & Loan Company 

Bedford Saving^ & Loan Company._ 

Broadview Savings & Loan Company. 

Capital Savings, Building & Loan Association 

Commonwealth Savings & Loan Company 

Custodian Savings & Loan Company 

Franklin Savings & Loan Company 

Karpat Building and Loan Association. 


Galion 

Bedford- 
Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

CleveUnd.... 

Cleveland 

Cleveland _... 

Cleveland-. 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland..^ 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Maple Heights_.. 

Columbus.. 

Columbus 

Ironton 

Elyria 


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CT.y:iho|7.a., 

CviyahoMa_..„.. 
Cuyahoga — ._ 
Cij\'flhoga^__. 
CiiyahoRft^...... 

CiiyahogB-._„„ 
CnyahciRii— ..., 

Cuyahctga.., 

CijyHbogii„.._ 
Cviyaboga.^...... 

Ciivahoga^.-^. 
Ciivahopii,.,...... 

Ci .', 

Franklin 

Franklin 


$61,043 18 

66.139 34 

421.654 74 

114.070 58 

228.704 02 

88.091 09 

102,267 05 

9 358 50 


Keystone Building & Loan Association.... 


56.593 35 
12.786 67 
31 260 42 


Orleans Building & Loan Association 


Prudential Savings Company 


Ouincy Savings « Loan Company. - 


51 047 75 


Reliance Savings & Loan Company 

Reserve Savings & Loan Company 

United Savings & Loan Company. 


128.752 89 
11.724 75 
3 873 20 


Maple Building and Loan Company.- 


40,808 04 

122.463 00 

27.221 07 

3 837 37 


H. C. Godman Company Employees Savings & Loan 

Association 

National Savings & Loan Company 

Lawrence Savings & Loan Company 


Home Building & Loan Association.. ....^ 


Lorain..- 

Shelby 

Summit 

Trumbull 


13 609 74 


Fifrt BnildhiQ ft I'^n C-ornpAny 


Jackson Center .. 

Kenmore 

Girard 


75 214 08 


Kenmore Savings & Loan dbmpany 


68 680 14 


Ginrd Home Savings & Loan Company 


101,850 81 



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^ ^.- MWJUH 



16D OHIO GENERAL STATISnOB. 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 

Total ftuthomed capital $1,112,737,100 00 

Total capital subacribed and in force 638,073,568 00 

Total capital stock paid in 248,033,661 07 

Number of asHociationa filing reports during the year 718 

One Liquidating company at Cincinnati failed to make report.! 1 

Number of asiociatlons filing final reports 5 

724 

Plan of association: 

Permanent——-- 702 

Serial- _-_- 8 

Terminating, __ 5 

715 

Liquidating ....___. 2 

Final reports ^ ^--- 5 

Companies fUing two reports within fiscal year 2 

724 

Number of asaoejations in existence July 1, 1919 742 

Number of aasociations incorporated during the year 38 

780 

Less final reports _._. 5 

Total number of associations in existence June 30, 1920 775 

N umber of associations signed subscriptions for stock 597 

Number of associations not having signed subscriptions for stock... 119 
Number of associations whose directors have one or more shares, 

fully paid up and not assigned 470 

Number of shares of running stock in force at close of fiscal year. . . 2,286,819 

Number of shares of paid-up stock in force at close of fiscal year ... 485,004 

Number of shares loaned upon 1,324,859 

Total number of shares of stock in force 4,096,682 

Total number of stockholders 556,916 

Total number of depositors 416,252 

Total ixumber of borrowers 214,481 

Amount of losses charged to the Reserve Fund $50,755 30 

Niunber of farm loans . 12,583 

Amount of aame_. _..,_.__, - $39,505,478 23 

Average rate of mterest charged,- 6.32% 

Average rate of dividend declared 5.46% 

Average rate of interest paid on deposits. 4.63% 



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BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 161 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET SHOWING IN DETAIL 
THE VARIOUS ITEMS OP ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OP 
ALL ASSOCIAIONS. 

ASSETS. 

Caahonhand- _ $20,137,993 63 

Loans on mortgage security 408,484,368 30 

Loans on stock, certificates or pass book security 5,468,401 99 

Loans on all other security... ._ 2,899,434 13 

Furniture and fixtures.. ..^ 374,271 13 

Real estate _ 1,530,422 48 

Real estate sold on contract 518,275 69 

Real estate— office building __ _ 6,333,254 79 

Due from borrowers for insurance and taxes 66,895 86 

Bonds (including Liberty Loan Bonds) 10,606,813 75 

War Savings Stamps 117,883 05 

Deposits in other building and loan associat ons 4.493,325 OiO 

Deposits in other financial institutions 1,388,279 05 

Other assets ^ 280,668 93 

Total $462,790,287 78 

Interest due and uncollected __- -$394,954 27 

LIABILITIES. 

Running stock and dividends. __. $193,589,807 52 

Credits on mortgage loans .-_ _. 17,564,014 64 

Credits on other loans _ _ ... 155,371 14 

Credits on real estate sold on contract _ -.. 51,145 50 

Paid-up stock and dividends 52,501,686 98 

Permanent (non-withdrawable) stock ._- _., _ 1 ,840,166 63 

Deposits and accrued interest _. 159,472,430 34 

Deposits secured by collateral 61,458 85 

Reserve fund - --- _. 14,165,945 81 

Undivided profit fund .- 4,819,709 07 

Borrowed money and accrued interest, 5,780,692 61 

Contingent profit on real estate sold on contract 42,126 61 

Due borrowers onimfinished buildings. 6,312,561 06 

Deposits from other building and loan associations 4, 108,477 50 

Deposits from other financial institutions 1,333, 102 94 

Other liabilities (including payments on Liberty Bonds) 880,590 61 

Total $462,790,287 78 

Interest due and uncollected _.. $394,954 27 

6—0.0.8. Digitized by V^nOOQlC 



162 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OP THE RECEIPTS AND DIS- 
BURSEMENTS, EARNINGS AND THE DISTRIBUTION 
THEREOF, OP ALL ASSOCIATIONS DURING PISCAL 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 

RECEIPTS. 

Dues on running stock $97,906,110 69 

Paid-up stock 13,126,067 77 

Deposits 149,998,061 93 

Credits on mortgage loans 25,086,244 15 

Loans on mortgage security repaid 104,455,882 41 

Loans on stock, certificates or pass-book security repaid 8,034,703 30 

Loans on all other security repaid _ 2,231,753 31 

Unfinished building account 41,133,592 79 

Borrowed money 15.740,454 96 

Deposits from other building and loan a^ssociations 2,735,145 ^ 

Deposits from other financial institutions 794,685 31 

Real estate sold _ 097,257 46 

Real estate sold on contract 220,667 15 

Insurance and taxes refunded by borrowers _ 160,640 45 

Interest _ - --. 24,472,124 43 

Premium J 381,279 68 

Fines _ 25,960 21 

Transfer fees _ - 4,610 81 

Pass-books and initiation fees 120,994 94 

Rents from company's real estate __ 360,651 23 

D^osits in other building and loan associations withdrawn 1,989,534 01 

Deposits in other financial institutions withdrawn 3,000,212 39 

Other receipts (including sales of bonds).. .-. , 20,458,735 73 

Total _ - 1513,216,360 60 

Cash on hand at close of last fiscal year _ 19,585,342 53 

Total $532,801,703 13 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Loans on mortgage security _ _ 1194,954,459 82 

Loans on stock, certifi?ate8 or pass-book security 10,043,826 31 

Loans on all other security _ 2,999,390 01 

Unfinished building account _ 38,253,208 71 

Withdrawals of running stock and dividends 79,474,371 22 

Withdrawals of paid-up stock 8,730,131 22 

Withdrawals of deposits 118,030,626 60 

Borrowed money 12,813,200 31 

Deposits in other building and loan associations 3,257,583 05 

Deposits in other financial institutions. 2,918,776 94 

Insurance and taxes paid for borrowers 154,415 12 

Real estate (purchase price) __ _ 2,6i5,47il 03 

Real estate on contract 133,015 63 

Dividends on paid-up stock _ _ 2,915,422 76 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 163 

Interest on deposits ._. 5,578,562 95 

Interest on borrowed money 297,133 91 

Repairs on compan3r's real estate 43,836 55 

Taxes _ _ _ 86,068 59 

Salaries of oflBcers and directors. _ _ _ 1,740,615 73 

Office help, rent and legal services •_ _ _._ 897,385 06 

All other expenses (including purchases of bonds) _-. 24,222,907 81 

Deposits by other building and loan associations withdrawn 1,846,263 59 

Deposits by other financial institutions withdrawn 615,809 42 

Total $512,652,382 34 

Cash on hand 20,149,320 79 

Total - $532,801,703 13 



PROFIT AND LOSS. 

EARNINGS. 

Interest $24,466,845 23 

Premium 384,553 07 

Fines 24,378 67 

Transfer fees 6,776 70 

Pass-books and initiation fees _ 119,266 21 

Rents from company's real estate 341,112 99 

Transferred from imdivided profit fund _ 304,701 12 

Miscellaneous .- 420,061 18 

Total -•. $26,067,695 17 



DISTRIBUTION OF EARNINGS 

Dividends on running stock $8,743,098 75 

Dividends on mortgage loan credits 357,325 55 

Dividends on paid-up stock 3,015,905 44 

Reserve fund credit 1,440,854 78 

Undivided profit credit 1,392,698 03 

Interest on deposits 6,687,479 45 

Interest on borrowed money 300,804 78 

Salaries of officers and directors 1,741,592 56 

Office help, rent and legal services 893,870 01 

All other expenses - 1,368,2^ 77 

Taxes 85,499 72 

Repairs on company's real estate 40,273 33 

Total $26,067,695 17 



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164 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



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REPORT OF 
STATE INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

SUMMARY OF PART I. 

Pursuant to the law, I herewith submit Part I of the Fifty-third 
Annual Report of the Superintendent of Insurance (jovcring the calendar 
year ending December 31, 1919, and a statement of the fees received hy 
this Department during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920 : 

1919— 

July.... ... I 5,514 80 

August _._..-_- 5/728 70 

September _..„...- 6,509 10 

October „.__-, 11,341 SO 

November __.._,.. 3,632 20 

December 5,394 55 

1920— 

Jaauary ,_._ 3,126 75 

February ._.. 4,214 20 

M^rch 54,464 36 

April ..-...- 46,846 96 

May .._ 46,042 14 

June _._...... 23,013 39 

Total 1215,918 95 

Fees collected by the Attomey-Genen^l and paid into the 
State Treasury for account of this Department ....... 356 70 

Total fees ...........1216,275 65 

In addition to the above amount of $216,275.65 received for fees, 
there were levied by this department and collected on aceount of tases 
the following amounts : 

Paid to the Treasurer , .. ^2,247,532 38 

Paid to the Attorney-General .... 2,358 65 

Paid to this Department ,,.-...., 4,998 92 

Total .._-... 12,254,889 95 

Fees paid to this Department 216,275 66 

Total receipts , , 12,471,165 60 

Gain in fees over last year .__.___,, $29,459 62 

Gain in taxes over last year . 239,214 68 

Gains over last year ___.. 1268,674 30 

(166) 



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STATB mSUBANGE. 167 

DEPOSITS. • 

The following is a statement of the amount of securities deposited 
by insurance companies, other than life, with the Superintendent of 
Insurance, in accordance with law, and held by him at the close of 
business June 30, 1920, for the benefit and security of policy holders 
in said companies : 

Aachen & Munich Fire Insurance Co., Aix la Chapelle 1100,000 00 

Abeille Fire Insurance Co., Paris, France 100,000 00 

Aetna Casualty & Surety Co., Hartford, Conn 50,000 00 

American Automobile Insurance Co., St. Louis, Mo. — 50,000 00 

American Casualty Co., Reading, Pa 50,000 00 

American Fidelity Co., Montpelier, Vt 52,500 00 

AmericiMi Guaranty Co., Columbus, Ohio 200,685 00 

American Indemnity Co., Galveston, Texas 50,000 06 

American Surety Co., New York, N. Y 30,000 00 

Atlas Assurance Co., England 100,000 00 

Balkan National Insurance Co . , Sofia, Bulgaria 100,000 00 

Baltica Insurance Co., Ltd., Copenhagen, Denmark 110,000 00 

Bankers Surety Co., Cleveland, Ohio 200,000 00 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto, Canada. 100,000 00 

British & Foreign Marine Insurance Co . , Ltd . , Liverpool 100,000 00 

Caledonian Insurance Co . , Edinburg, Scotland ._. 100,000 00 

Central Manufacturers Mutual Insurance Co., Van Wert, Ohio 200,000 00 

Chicago Bonding & Insurance Co., Chicago, 111 50,000 00 

Christiania General Insurance Co., Christiania, Norway _ 100,000 00 

City Equitable Fire Ins. Co., Ltd., London, England 100,000 00 

Cologne Heinsurance Co., Cologne, Germany 100,000 00 

Columbia Casualty Co., New York, N. Y 60,000 00 

Commercial Union Assurance Co . , London, England 100,000 00 

Commonwealth Casualty Co., Philadelphia, Pa 50,000 00 

Consolidated Assurance Co . , Ltd . , London, England 100,000 00 

Continental Casualty Co., Hammond, Ind .-_ 50,000 00 

Eagle, Star & British Dominions Insurance Co., Ltd., London 100,000 00 

Employers Liability Assurance Corp., Ltd., London, England 150,000 00 

European Accident Insurance Co . , London, England 100,000 00 

Fidelity & Casualty Co., New York, N. Y 90,000 00 

Fidelity & Depost Co., Baltimore, Md _ 80,000 00 

Fire Reassurance Co., Paris, France ___ _ 105,000 00 

First Bulgarian Insurance Co . , Rustchuck, Bulgaria 100,000 00 

First Russian Insurance Co., Petrograd, Russia 100,000 00 

Frankona Reinsurance Co., Frankfort, Germany 100,000 00 

General Accident Fire & Life Assurance Corp., Perth, Scotland 152,400 00 

General Fire Assurance Co., Paris, Fraface _ 105,000 00 

Georgia Casualty Co., Macon, Ga _ 50,000 00 

Globe Indemnity Co., New York, N. Y 50,000 00 

Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co. , Hartford, Conn _. 50,000 00 

Hamburg-Bremen Fire Insurance Co., Hamburg, Germany 105,000 00 

Indemnity Co., of America, St. Louis, Mo _ _._ 50,000 00 

Indemnity Mutual Marine, London, England _ 104,400 00 

international Reassurance Co., Vienna, Austria 161,000 00 

jakor Insurance Co., Moscow, Russia DryttT^ed by ^#&??ie 



168 OmO GENEBAL STATISTICS. 

Law, Union and Rock Insurance Co., Ltd., London, England 102,000 00 

Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co., Liverpool, England 100,000 00 

London Guarantee & Accident Co . , London, England 150,000 00 

London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., Liverpool, England 100,000 OO 

London & Lancashire Indemnity Co., New York, N. Y 50,000 00 

London & Scottish Assurance Corp., Ltd., London, England 110,000 00 

London Assurance Corp., London, England 105,000 OO 

Lumbermen's Mutual Casualty Co., Chicago, III 50,000 00 

Lumbermen's Mutual Insurance Co ., Mansfield, Ohio 200,000 00 

Mannheim Insurance Co., Mannheim, Germany 100,000 00 

Marine Insurance Co. , Ltd. , London, England 100,000 00 

Maryland Casualty Co., Baltimore, Md 50,000 OO 

Massachusetts Bonding & Insurance Co . , Boston, Mass 50,000 OO 

Medical Protective Co., Ft. Wayne, Ind 50,000 00 

Mercury Reinsurance Co., Cologne, Germany 105,000 OO 

Michigan Automobile Insurance Exchange, Grand Rapids, Mich 50,000 OO 

Michigan Employers Casualty Co., Lansing, Mich .--.: 0,250 00 

Minerva Retrocession & Reinsurance Co . , Cologne, Germany 100,000 00 

Munich Reinsurance Co., Munich, Bavaria 100,000 OO 

Moscow Fire Insurance Co., Moscow, Russia _ 100,000 OO 

Nationale Fire Insurance Co. , Paris, France _ 100,000 OO 

National Insurance Co., Copenhagen, Denmark 100,000 OO 

National Surety Co., New York, N. Y _. 30,000 OO 

Netherlands Fire & Life Insurance Co., The Hague, Holland.'. 100,000 OO 

New Amsterdam Casualty Co., New York, N. Y 50,000 OO 

New Zealand Insurance Co., Ltd., Auckland, New Zealand 100,000 OO 

Nippon Fire Insurance Co., Tokio, Japan— 100,000 OO 

Nord-Deutsche Insurance Co . , Hamburg, Germany __ 100,000 OO 

Nordisk Reinsurance Co. , Ltd . , Copenhagen, Denmark 100,000 OO 

Norske Lloyd Insurance Co., Christiana, Norway 100,000 OO 

North British & Mercantile Insurance Co., London, England.. _ 100,000 OO 

Northern Assurance Co., London, England. ._ - 100,000 OO 

Northern Insurance Co., Moscow, Russia -- 100,000 00 

Norwegian Assurance Union, Ltd., Christ iania, Norway 100,000 00 

Norwegian Atlas Insurance Co., Ltd., Christiania, Norway 100,000 00 

Norwich Union Fire Insurance Co., Norwich, England. . _ 100,000 OO 

Norwich Union Indenmity Co., New York, N. Y 60,000 OO 

Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corp. , London, England 155,000 00 

Palatine Insurance Co., London, England 100,000 OO 

Patemelle Fire Insurance Co., Paris, France 100,000 OO 

Phenix Fire Insurance Co., Paris, France _ 100,000 OO 

Phoenix Assurance Co., London, England -. 100,000 OO 

Preferred Accident Insurance Co., New York, N. Y _ 50,000 OO 

Prudential Re and Coinsurance Co., Ltd., Zurich, Switzerland 110,000 OO 

Prussian National Insurance Co., Stettin, Germany 100,000 00 

Reinsurance Company Salamandra, Copenhagen, Denmark 1 10,000 00 

Republic Casualty Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 100,100 00 

Rossia Insurance Co., Petrograd, Russia 100,000 00 

Royal Exchange Assurance, London, England 100,000 00 

Rpyal Indemnity Co., New York, N. Y 50,000 00 

Royal Insurance Co., Liverpool, England _ 110,000 00 

Russian Reinsurance Co., Petrograd, Russia 100,000 00 

Salamandra Insurance Co., Petrograd, Russia. 100,000 00 

Scandinavian American Assurance Corp., Ltd., Christiania IQQiPPP ^ 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



STATE INSURANCE. 169 

Scottish Union & National Insurance Co., Edinburgh, Scotland 100,000 00 

Sea Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool, England 110,000 00 

Second Russian Insurance Co., Petrograd, Russia 100,000 00 

Skandia Insurance Co., Stockholm, Sweden 100,000 00 

Skandinavia Reinsurance Co., Copenhagen, Denmark 100,000 00 

South German Reinsurance Co., Munich, Bavaria 100,000 00 

Southern Surety Co., Des Moines, Iowa _ 50,000 00 

Southern Surety Co., Denison, Okla 50,000 00 

Spanish American Union Insurance Co . , Havana, Cuba 100,000 00 

Standard Accident Insurance Co., Detroit, Mich 50,000 00 

Sun Insurance Office, London, England 100,000 00 

S vea Fire & Life Insurance Co . , Gothenburg, Sweden _ _ 100,000 00 

Swiss National Insurance Co., Basle, Switzerland - 100,000 00 

Swiss Reinsurance Co., Zurich, Switzerland _ 100,000 00 

Tokio Marine & Fire Insurance Co . , Tokio, Japan _ 100,000 00 

Union Assurance Society, Ltd. , London, England 100,000 00 

Union Fire Insurance Co., Paris, France 100,000 00 

Union Insurance Society of Canton, Ltd., Hong Kong, China 100,000 00 

Union Marine Insurance Co., Liverpool, England _ 100,000 00 

Union & Phoenix Insurance Co., Madrid, Spain 100,000 00 

United British Insurance Co., Ltd., London, England 100,000 00 

United States Fidelity & Guaranty Co., Baltimore, Md 80,000 00 

United States Casualty Co., New York, N. Y... 50,000 00 

Urbaine Fire Insurance Co., Paris, France 100,000 00 

Warsaw Fire Insurance Co., Warsaw, Russia 100,000 00 

Western Assiurance Co., Toronto, Canada 100,000 00 

World Auxiliary Insurance Corp., Ltd., London, England 100,000 00 

Yorkshire Insurance Co., Yorkshire, England 100,000 00 

Zurich General Accident & Liability Insurance Co., Zurich 150,000 00 

Total $12,043,335 00 



COMPANIES ADMITTED— JANUARY 1-DECEMBER 31, 1919. 

STOCK FIRE AND MARINE. 
COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 

American Fire Insurance Corporation, New York, N. Y., Nov. 25. 

Bankers and Shippers, New York, N. Y., Aug. 19. 

Fidelity Fire, Sumter, S. C, Oct. 16. 

Hudson Fire, New York, N. Y., May 29. 

Importers and Exporters, New York, N. Y., Aug. 27. 

Jeflferson, Philadelphia, Pa., April 14. 

Liberty, St. Louis, Mo., Dee. 14. 

Liberty Marine, New York, N. Y., April 14. 

Merchants Fire, Indianapolis, Ind,. Nov. 21. 

National Keserve, East Dubuque, 111., Dec. 14. 

North Atlantic, New York, N. Y., April 14. ^ t 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ITO- OHIO GENERAL. STATISTICS, 

Old Bay State, Concord, Mass., Dec. 10. 

Palmetto, Sumter, S. C, Oct. 16. 

Eofisia; Hartford, Conn., Dec. 16. 

South Carolina, Columbia, S. C, April 23. 

Washington Marine, New York, N. Y., Oct. 15. 

Western Alliance, Chicago, 111., Sept. 5. 

U. S. BRANCHES OP FOREIGN COMPANIES. 

BalticHj Copenhagen, Denmark, April 14. 

London and Scottish, London, England, Dec. 23- 

NippoD, Tokio, Japan, Nov. 26. . 

Nordisk Reinsurance, Copenhagen, Denmark, Dec. 30. 

Norwegian Atlas, Christiana, Norway, March 31. 

Beinsurance Company, Salamandra, Copenhageji, Denmark, Dec. 5. 

Union Hispano Americana, Havana, Cuba, May 1, 

Union Insurance Society, Hongkong, China, May 5. 

MUTUAL COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 

Baltimore, Baltimore, Md., Feb. 14. 

Merchants and Farmers, Worcester, Mass., Dec. 11. 

Retail Hardware, Minneapolis, Minn., March 22. 

RECIPROCAL OB INTER-INSURANCE EXCHANGES OP OTHEB STATES, 

Manufacturing Lumbermens Underwriters, Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 11* 
National Underwriters, Chicago, 111., Nov. 15. 
Sprinklered Risk Underwriters, Chicago, 111., Nov. 25. 

OHIO ASSESSMENT FIRE AND MISCELLANEOUS A^OCIATIONS, 

Home Insurance Association, Fremont, July 4. 

OHIO MUTUAL MISCELLANEOUS COMPANY. 

Drivers Mutual Indemnity, Marion, June 11. 

MUTUAL MISCELLANEOUS COMPANY OF OTHER gTATB. 

Lumbermens Mutual Casualty, Chicago, 111., July 15. 

MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES, 

Commercial Casualty, Newark, N. J., May 15. 
Indemnity Company of America, St. Louis, Mo,, Feb. 13, 
Michigan Employers' Casualty, Lansing, Mich., May 27. 

Digitized by 



Google 



STATE mSURANCB. 171 

U. S. BRANCH OF FOREIGN MISCELLANEOUS COMPANY, 

Zurich General Accident and Liability, Zurich, Switzerland, Nov. 25. 
COMPANIES CEASED BUSINESS IN OHIO. 

STOCK FIRE AND MARINE. 
COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 

Knickerbocker, New York, N. Y. 
Merchants National, Chicago, 111. 
Vulcan, New York, N. Y. 

^ MUTUAL COMPANY OP OHIO. 

"Wayne, Eaton. 

MISCELLANEOUS COMPANY OP OTHER STATE. 

Western Live Stock, Peoria, 111. 

CHANGE OF NAME. 

STOCK FIRE AND MARINE. 
COMPANY OP OTHER STATE. 

Associated Industries, Chicago, 111., to Manufacturers Insurance Com- 
pany of America, Chicago, HI. 

OHIO ASSESSMENT FIRE AND MISCELLANEOUS ASSOCUTION. 

German Baptist Mutual Insurance Association of Miami county, Cov- 
ington, changed to Buckeye State Mutual Insurance Association, 
Covington. 

University Gegenseitigen Fruer Versicherung Unterstuetzung, Verein, 
Cleveland, changed to University Mutual Fire Insurance Aid So- 
ciety, Cleveland. 

COMPANIES ES:AMINED. 

OHIO STOCK FIRE AND MARINE. 

Buckeye National Fire Insurance Co Toledo, Ohio 

Cleveland National Fire Insurance Co Cleveland, Ohio 

Industrial Fire Insurance Company Digiri?etJ^^^^6)@¥?e 



172 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

OmO MUTUAL PIBE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Columbiana County Mutual Insurance Co Lisbon, Ohio 

Knox County Mutual Fire Insurance Co Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Lumberman's Mutual Insurance Co Mansfield, Ohio 

Mansfield Mutual Fire Insurance Co Mansfield, Ohio 

Merchants and Manufacturers Mutual Insurance Co Mansfield, Ohio 

National Mutual Insurance Co Celina, Ohio 

Ohio Hardware Mutual Insurance Co Coshocton, Ohio 

Ohio Millers Mutual Insurance Co Canton, Ohio 

Ohio Mutual Insurance Co Salem, Ohio 

Richland County Mutual Insurance Co Mansfield, Ohio 

OHIO MUTUAL MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 

Great American Mutual Indemnity Co Mansfield, Ohio 

Security Automobile Mutual Insurance Co Youngstown, Ohio 

NUMBER OF COMPANIES. 

Including U. S. branches of foreign companies, there were 317 stock 
fire and marine, mutual and reciprocal companies reporting to this de- 
partment December 31, 1919, compared with 289 in 1918, classified as 
follows : 

1918 1919 

Stock Ohio companies 9 9 

Stock companies of other states _-_ 133 145 

XJ. S. branches of foreign companies 57 65 

Ohio Mutual companies 25 24 

Mutual companies of other states 47 50 

Ohio Mutual miscellaneous 5 7 

Mutual miscellaneous companies of other states 1 

Reciprocal or Inter-insurers 13 16 

Totals 289 317 

The number of miscellaneous companies and assessment associations 
was 226, compared with 224 in 1918, classified as follows : 

1918 1919 

Miscellaneous companies 79 82 

Assessment associations. _. 145 144 

Totals _ - 224 226 



BUSINESS OF 1919 AS SHOWN BY THE FOLLOWING NAMlJD 
STATISTICAL TABLES. 

Stock Fire and Marine, Mutual Fire and Reciprocal Companiefi:^ j 

igi ize y g 



* STATE INSURANCE. 173 

INCOME. 

Tables III, X and XVI show the character and source of income for 
companies for the year 1919, the aggregate being $823,313,682.11, as 
against $726,780,085.92 for 284 companies in 1918, showing an increase 
of $96,533,596.19. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Tables IV, XI and XVII show the disbursements itemized, the ag- 
gregate being $673,107,318.65 as compared with $598,804,321.75 for 
1918, being an increase of $74,302,996.90. 

The net excess of income over disbursements is $150,206,363.46 as 
compared with $127,975,764.17 for 1918. 

ASSETS. 

Tables V, XII and XVIII show the amount and character of the 
assets, the aggregate being $1,216,407,993.85 compared with $1,041,- 
765,323.55 for 1918, showing an increase of $174,642,670.30. 

LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS. 

Tables VI, XIII and XIX show the liabilities and surplus. The 
aggregate liabilities for 1919 being $724,003,717.42 compared with 
$ 627,917,198.11 for 1918, showing an increase of $96,086,519.31. The 
surplus as regards policy holders for 1919 is $492,404,276.43 compared 
with $413,848,125.44 for 1918, showing an increase of $78,556,150.99. 

The surplus as regards policy holders includes the capital stock of 
the stock companies. 

PREMIUMS AND LOSSES. 

Tables III, X and XVI show the aggregate premiums received to be 
$743,118,971.11 for 1919, compared with $656,738,183.86 for 1918, being 
an increase of $86,380,787.25. 

Tables IV, XI and XVII show the aggregate losses to be $301,022,- 
520.49 for 1919, as against $302,051,818.19 for 1918, a decrease of 
$1,029,297.70. 

RISKS. 

Tables VII, XIV and XX show the amount of fire risks written in 
1919 to be $102,068,659,105.93, compared with $87,739,610,592.94 for 
1918, being an increase of $14,329,048,512.99. ^.^.^.^^^ ^^ GoOglc 



174 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Table YIII shows the amount of marine and inland risks written in 
1919 to be $71,255,528,372.00, as against $76,450,616,878.00 for 1918, 
being a decrease of $5,195,088,506.00. 

Fire and tornado risks in force December 31, 1919, $97,864,186,878.- 
73; December 31, 1918, $86,775,397,409.64, an increase of $11,088,789,- 
469.09. 

Table VIII shows marine and inland risks in force December 31, 
1919, $5,448,687,806.00; December 31, 1918, $4,259,336,281.00, an in- 
crease of $1,189,351,525.00. 

(Table VII shows perpetual risks in force December 31, 1919, $290,- 
914,080.00; December 31, 1918, $312,581,407.90.) 



BUSINESS IN OHIO. 

Tables Villa, XlVa and XXa are exhibits of the business done in 
Ohio by joint stock fire and marine companies of this and other states 
and countries, mutual fire companies of this and other states and re- 
ciprocal fire exchanges. 

The fire and tornado premiums received were $28,254,029.22, as 
against $24,543,463.03 for 1918, an increase of $3,710,566.19. Fire losses 
paid for 1919 were $9,004,320.17, compared with $11,082,985.70, a de- 
crease of $2,078,665.53. Fire losses incurred were $10,482,581.17 for 
1919, compared with $10,857,907.31, a decrease of $375,326.14. 

The increase in premiums received in 1919 over 1918 is made up as 
loliows : stock companies, Ohio, $129,901.11 ; companies of other staties, 
$2,363,736.56; U. S. branches, $399,607.53; mutuals, Ohio, $491,936.48; 
oth^r states, $275,078.77; reciprocals, $50,305.74. 

Amount of risks written in 1919 was $3,219,373,990.88, compared 
with $2,636,844,653.62, an increase of $582,529,337.26. 

Amount of risks in force December 31, 1919, was $5,155,318,949.88 
compared with $4,371,614,370.50, an increase of $783,704,579.38. 

Table Vlllb shows the amount of marine and inland risks written in 
1919 to be $1,677,080,754.18, as against $1,110,899,855.00, an increase 
of $566,180,899.18. 

The amount of risks in force December 31, 1919, was $313,528,184.76, 
as against $165,137,613.00, an increase of $148,390,571.76. 

The marine and inland premiums received were $4,470,320.25 for 
1919, as against $3,175,588.40, an increase of $1,294,731.85. 

Losses incurred in 1919 were $2,439,850.61; in 1918, $2,196,900.77, 
an increase of $242,949.84. 

Losses paid in 1919 were $2,306,286.83, compared with $1,929,554.41, 
^ increase of $376,732.42. 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



STATE INSURANCE. 176 

MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 

There were 82 miscellaneous companies reporting to the depart- 
ment December 31, 1919, compared with 79 in 1918. When any of these 
companies include income, disbursements, assets and liabilities of life 
departments, a foot note at the bottom of table will designate the fact. 

INCOME. 

Table XXII shows the aggregate income of the miscellaneuos com- 
panies during 1919 was $322,770,946.29, compared with $299,426,967.65, 
an increase of $23,343,978.64. 

Table XXIIa shows the premium income for 1919 classified as fol- 
lows: •accident, $48,744,020.12; health, $13,581,370.40; liability, $70,- 
666,698.26; workmen's compensation, $96,073,638.52; fidelity, $13,726,- 
895.07; surety, $25,445,540.90; plate glass, $9,176,699.16; steam boiler, 
$4,501,526.36. burglary and theft, $12,595,406.53 ; auto and teams prop- 
erty damage $22,242,065.17; live stock, $1,497,835.11, and all other, 
$4,519,250.69. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Table XXIII shows the disbursement for 1919 was $302,110,318.86, 
as against $232,577,346.56 for 1918, an increase of $69,532,972.30. i • 

Table XXIIIa shows the amount paid for losses during 1919, classi- 
fied as follows : •accident, $16,828,082.83 ; health, $8,481,172.08 ; liability, 
$26,486,818.78; workmen's compensation, $37,282,533.52; fidelity, $4,- 
030,662.09; surety, $3,642,784.25; plate glass, $4,161,766.57; steam boiler, 
$527,297.90; burglary and theft, $4,998,011.06; auto and teams property 
damage, $10,399,135.78; live stock, $670,397.29, and all other, $1,045,- 
070.21. 



♦Includes accident and health. 

ASSETS. 

Table XXIV shows the total admitted assets for 1919, $2,246,489,- 
975.64, an increase over 1918 of $800,599,472.29. 

LIABILITIES. 

TableXXV shows liabilities, except capital, $2,066,450,620.70, an 
increase of $766,840,698.94. 

The aggregate capital stock for 1919 was $63,960,065.80, as against 
$57,984,090.00 for 1918, an increase of $5,975,975.80. . 

Digitized by V^OOQlC 



176 Ohio GfiOTittAL statistics. 

Surplus over all liabilities for 1919 was $116,079,289.14, an increase 
of $27,782,797.55. 

Surplus as regards policy holders for 1919 was $180,039,354.94, an 
increase of $33,758,773.35. 

MUTUAL MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 

Table XXVIII shows the premium income for 1919 to be $1,467,- 
928.85, compared with $159,282.66 for 1918, an increase of $1,308,646.19. 

The total income for 1919 was $1,506,293.96, compared with $191,- 
558.85 for 1918, an increase of $1,314,735.11. 

Table XXIX shows losses paid in 1919 to be $372,415.81, compared 
with $33,079.30 in 1918, an increase of $339,336.51. 

The total disbursements for 1919 were $958,448.67, compared with 
$131,236.14 for 1918, an increase of $827,212.53. 

Table XXX shows admitted assets for 1919 of $1,106,123.71, com- 
pared with $121,856.15 for 1918, an increase of $984,267.56. 

Table XXXI shows total liabilities for 1919 of $834,040.18, com- 
pared with $86,643.96 for 1918, an increase of $747,396.22. 

The surplus over liabilities for 1919 was $272,083.53, compared with 
$35,212.19, an increase of $236,871.34. 

Table XXXII shows premiums written in 1919 to be $1,732,879.62, 
compared with $174,716.91, an increase of $1,558,162.71. 

The risks in force in 1919 were $75,845,123.23, compared with 
$19,632,322.50, an increase of $56,212,800.73. 



Digitized by 



Google 



STATE INSURANCE. 



177 



BUSINESS OP 1918 AND 1919 COMPiVRBD. 
STOCK FIRE AND MAEINE. 

OHIO COMPANIES. 





1913. 


1019- 


IiijCTcasc. 


Decrease, 


I^utnber of «mipsiiies,=- 




I2.51V5.876 72 

2.1.%^,993 48 

1.0S7.055 81 

07.000 00 

0.918,001 49 

1,8^7,755 OOi 
2,43@,S8f> 00 
2,0n,2f.0 40 
2.105.241 53 
2S8.G03»298 29 

522,482 70 
li5.M7,3tH 13 




|3.a32,624 31 

2,246.329 98 

950.40B 5:1 

113.500 00 

7,810,817 08 

2.27l,Cyl8 00 
2.5MI.5S0 00 
2.9.50.189 S9 
2.53d.70g 78 
302.208.852 00 

050,504 23 
148,102,832 23 


- $460;747'^ 
' 02.330 50 

^rti;50O 00 
808.210 19 

403x293 00 
150,000 00 
344,023 19 
431.557 25 
73.065,553 71 

128,081 53 
32,555,408 10 


« 


Tolal income,. „, ,.., 

Total disbursements. . 




Nd losses. 

Oividc-nda paid^- 

Admitted fls^ta„_ .... 


137.1fi7 28 


capital stock... .„„, _. 
Caiiital MOcIl.. ,..^., 




Siurpltift over lijibilitiet, 
FrenliuiTk3 received.^ 




Premiums received m 

Ohio_..__^ .. .,„ 

Risks, in forte in Oiiio„ 









COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 





1918. 


1910. 


Increase, 




Kijmbtt of companies- 
Total income,. 


133 

1479.095.384 S4 

306.258,877 30 

204.72:1,92:1 90 

lO.S,'i9,797 39 

734.013,352 00 

432,065,097 9& 
112.857,*408 70 
188,190,755 32 
434.1SIJ.150 44 
00,537,301,808 00 

17,071,233 00 
2.073,833,629 48 


145 

*.=;42.48S.C08 m 

4-12,922,023 30 

2a'i,82',>,28:^ 14 

19,463,03S 71 

SO 1.000 ,980 08 

506,440,040 78 
123,328,125 45 
232,132,213 85 
493,713,382 04 
60.345.820.011 S3 

20 207,201 02 
3.30,'5,443,214 74 


12 
«03.393,313 82 
40,003.146 06 

2.603,241 32 
127,890.034 08 

73,4M^54S ao 
10,47Cr,026 75 
43.041.458 53 
59.524,231 OOi 
5,808.404.202 03 

3.135,908 02 
031,(509,585 20 


.....»..^»^*„^« 


Total disbureefnents.^.. 

Netkssea.^., ,.„. 

OiTidTOdspaid. ._ 


894,040 iff 


Admitted asaeti...-^.^.... 




Total ti abilities except 
captt*l Ktcx;k„ 

Capital rtcck....^... 

Surplus QVfT liabilities^ 
Premiums fcceived.. ...... 


_„...._.„„_ 


Risks in {orr<?„^,.._, .,.., 




Pteroiusni received m 
Olito„„„„ 




Risks in force m Ohio .. 









UNITED STATES BRANCHES OF FOREIGK COMPANIES. 



Number of cotnpanies 
Total income (1918 in- 

rludi^ remitted from 

H. O.).... 

Total disbursemcnta_„ 

Het losses.^ ,_ ,. 

Remitted to home oiSce 

Admitted asfetfL .„... 

Total liabil ities wtcept 

capital stocks .......... 

S^irplm cverliabilitica. 

Premiums received „. 

HisJfs in force.. ^..... ....... 

Ptemiuma recti v^ ii 

Ohio. 



EulcB In force in Ohio ^ 



1918. 



67 



»192,028.710 11 

157.300,014 22 

83,732,030 52 

9,,500.f391 461 

223,525,308 83 

154,842,838 45 

7O.0S2.530 38 

l70.994,OT^fl 11 

22.540,474,447 00 

6,307.869 32 
932.800.241 75 



1910. 



05 



|i2n, 744.093 79 

177.240,578 47 

B4.010.725 90 

19,970.742 20 

354,400.544 12 

ir0,0n0,370 02 

M,449,173 50 

la^ ,758,073 30 

24,102.750.280 00 

7.201.S41 BO 
tOOC^.173,053 00 



Increase^ 



§19,715.383 OS 

9,870,904 25 

277,789 HS 

10,380.0,-0 83 

28,884.175 29 

15.117,532 17 

13.760.043 12 

14J04,€07 25 

1.022.275,830 00 

803,072 48 
133.283,411 25 



DecTicaj«. 



Uigitized by V-jOOQlC 



178 OHIO QENEBAL STATISTICS. 

MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

OHIO COMPANIES. 



.^ 





1918. 


1919. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Number of coms>anies .. 
Total income — 

Net loMe«_^ ^.... 


25 

$7,736,839 67 
6.396,833 14 
3,447.633 87 

525,177 48 

12.157,487 10 

6,480,440 23 

5.677,046 87 

7,155,766 21 

1,024.121,589 62 

2.718,541 93 
549.800.641 42 


24 

$8,951,946 13 
7.019.594 00 
3.333.440 40 

646.712 67 

13,873.366 89 

7.353.291 26 

6.520,076 63 

8.307,636 20 

1,146.471,200 62 

2.924.061 67 
617.630.385 38 


622.760 86 

120.535 19 

1.716.879 79 

872.851 03 

843.028 76 

1.161.770 08 

121.349.611 00 

205.519 74 
67,729.743 96 


1 
$114719347 


Dividends paid to pol- 
icy hoMer* 


Admitted assets- 
Total liabilities 




Surplus over liabilities- 
Premiums received 

Risks in forcc_ 

Premiums and assess- 
ments received in 
Ohio 


:mi:::::::::::::::::z 


Risks in force in Ohio^ 









MUTUAL COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 





1918. 


1919. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Number of companies .. 


47 
$40,623,388 28 
32,662,270 07 
7,666.791 08 

19.861,161 60 
55.062.062 23 
28.630.612 14 
26.421,470 00 
38.182.062 66 
5.976,962.676 72 

1.307,084 20 
223.131.560 40 


50 
$49,499,158 71 
38.790,563 02 
7,664,618 95 

24,228.053 80 
66,364.358 10 
33.336.085 42 
33.028.272 68 
46.421.437 22 
7.018.261,223 42 

1.601.426 41 
271.423.167 42 


3 
$8,875,770 43 
6.128.282 95 

4,366.892 29 
11.312.276 87 
4,705.473 28 
6.606.802 69 
8.239,374 66 
1.041.306.646 70 

194.341 21 
48.291.697 02 




Total income^ 




Total disbursements — 
Net losses.- 


$1,172 13 


Dividends paid to pol- 
icy holders 

Admitted assets 

Total liabilities^ «. 


Surplus over liabilities.. 




Premiums received...^..— 


- 


Premiums and assess- 

Ohio 

Risks in force in Ohio „ 









RECIPROCAI/ FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES, 

COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 





1918. 


1919. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Number of companies „ 


13 
$4,730,886 30 
3.962.733 64 
1.393,877 01 
1.364.035 06 
8.098.431 90 
3.130.464 22 
4.967.977 68 
4.111.897 01 
667,219,870 11 

175.684 73 
41.573.0S6 32 


16 

$7,697,160 51 

4.882.239 82 

1.232.953 27 

1.698.942 72 

12.033.920 98 

4.633.275 25 

7.400.645 73 

6,577.410 01 

913.964.772 8)6 

225.990 47 
58,794,236 91 


3 

$2,866,274 21 
919,506 28 

234.907 66 
3.935.489 08 
1.502.821 03 
2.432.668 05 
2.466.613 00 
346.744,002 76^ 

50.306 74 
17.221,210 60 




Total income — 




Total disbursements- 
Net losses. ^. 

Returned to subscribers 


$160,923 74 


Admitted assets 

Total liabilities.... 




Surplus over liabilities.. 
Premiums received........ 

Risks in force.. , 


.„... ^ 


Premiums received in 

Ohio ...„ 

Risks in force in Ohio . 









Digitized by 



^^oogle 



STATE msURAKCB. 

OHIO ASSESSMENT ASSOCIATIONS. 



179 



1018. 



1919. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Number of companies^ 
Total income and last 

balance 

Total disbursements 

I paid. 



I unpaid .^ 

Borrowed money re- 
ceived- - ~. 

Borrowed money re- 1 

paid , 

Cash assets 

AjEgregate assets 

Total liabilities 

Surplus.^ 



written.. 



Risks in f orcein. 



IBS 

$2,102,928 38 

1.835.193 15 

1.019.824 03 

31.472 82 

637.005 72 

589.889 20 
231.051 51 
377,728 05 
190.996 04 
186.732 01 
1)37.899.066 20 
573.653.424 38 



137 

$2,225,152 05 

1.928.823 21 

1.079.560 44 

136.688 80 

667.174 47 

619.240 49 

276.804 17 

423.723 78 

342.266 93 

82.166 85 

162.483.644 25 

644.301.629 37 




30.168 75 

29.351 29 
45.752 66 
45.995 73 
151.270 80 



24.584.578 05 
70.648,204 99 



$104,575 16 



OHIO MISCELLANEOUS ASSESSMENT ASSOCIATIONS. 





1018. 


1919* 


IiwrcaEe 


D«aieai«* 


Number oE ccimpaniea,^ 

Total incoma and last 

baliLTici^ .„^.. . 


7 

174,302 02 

71J13 31 

31,160 09 

7,223 m 

21,883 7S 

25,555 00 
3. 188 71 
11.803 17 
28,907 87 
17.014 70 
1,140,547 00 
1.326,358 00 


7 

iOP,741 70 
03.026 09 
44,045 38 

m2m 

29^75 32 

30.074 38 

2.815 61 

ie,053 65 

25.4S4 97 

0.431 32 

l,3.'iR,241 00 

1.425.429 00 


122.439 68 
22.SJ2 78 
12,885 29 




Total disbiitseinenta,^.^ 

Losses paid., ,.^ . 

Lo*scB unpaid.,-. , 


$6,231 16 


Borrowed money re- 
ceivod..^... ^ 


7.401 54 
4,519 28 




Borrowed money nc- 




Cagh ssseti^.. .^..„. 


373 10 


Apgrf'pfjitF ^iu±i^l,9| ^ 


4,160 48 
99.071 00 




Tolftlliabilitics..^, ^ 

Li ei bill ties over assets.- 
Rii^kfi writtfTi 


3.422 90 

7,583 38 


R.iskE ifi fonet.. ^ ^„,., 









MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES TRANSACTING CASUALTY, 

ETC., BUSINESS. 

(N. B. — Several companies include life business.) 



1918. 



1919. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Number of companies.. 

Total income 

Claims paid 

Dividends to stockhold- 
ers 

Total disbursements, 

Total admitted assets ..] 
Total liabilities except) 

capital stock J 

Capital stock ( 

Sun>ltl* over liabilities..! 

Surplus as regards pol- 1 

icy holders | 



79 

$299,426,967 65 
96.880.295 69 



82. 

$373,430,542 69 
118.553.732 36 



6.340.099 18 j 6.322.040 30 

232.577.346 56| 302.110.318 86 

1.445.890.503 35 | 2.246.489.975 64 



1.299.609.921 76 
57,984.090 00 
88.296.491 59 



146.280.581 



591 



2.066.450.620 70 
63:960.065 80 
116.079.289 00 

180.039.354 94 



$74,003,575 04 
21.673.436 67 



69.532.972 30 
8p0.599.472 29 

766.840.698 94 

5.975,975 80 

27,782.797 41 

33.758.773 35 



$18,058 88 



bigitizedby^OOgie 



180 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



SUMMARY OF THE BUSINESS IN OHIO OF ALL INSURANCE COMPANIES 
AUTHORIZED TO TRANSACT BUSINESS IN THE STATE, DURING 

THE YEAR 1919. 



Paid by policyholders 

Received by policyholders 

Risks written 

Risks in force -. 



{Companies 

Other Than 

Life. 



$50,612,146 77 

17,908,763 26 

5,148,151,364 54 

5,887,443,790 48 



tLife. 



f75,975,790 34 

30,512,010 12 

534,735,467 78 

2,568,088,177 65 



Total. 



$126,587,937 H 

48,420,773 12 

5,682,886,832 32 

8,455,531,968 13 



tStock Fire and Marine, Mutual, Reciprocal, Mutual Miscellaneous Assessnaent 
Fire and Miscellaneous. 

tOrdinary, Industrial, Assessment, Assessment Life and Accident, Assessment 
Accident, Assessment Accident and Sick Benefit, Fraternal. 



MUTUAL MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 




1918. 


1919. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Number of companies.. 

Total income 

Total disbursements. 


5 

$191,558 85 

131.236 14 

33,079 30 

121356 15 

86,643 96 

35.212 19 

159.274 26 

17,126,612 17 

159.274 26 
17,126,612 17 


8 

$1,506,293 96 

958.448 67 

372,415 81 

1.108.123 71 

834.040 18 

272,083 53 

1.467,928 85 

87.823.211 23 

700.664 00 
87.823,211 23 


3 

$1,314,735 11 
827,212 53 
339,336 51 
984.267 56 
747.396 22 
236.871 34 
1.308.654 59 

70.690,599 06 

541.389 74 
70.695.599 05 




Net losses. 

Admitted assets. 

Total liabilities..- - 

Surplus over liabilities- 
Premiums received. 

Risks in force.- 

Premiums and assess- 
ctived in 

Riiks in force in Ohio .. 





ASSESSMENT FIRE AND MISCELLANEOUS ASSOCIATIONS 
The following table shows the average annual assessment, the amount of losses 
paid, and the amount of other expenses in Ohio for the past ten years. 

















Percent 














Rate per $1,000. 


of assess- 
ments 








Asse^- 


Losses paid. 


All other 




paid for. 


Year. 


Amount written. 


Risks in force 


ments. 
















Dec. 31. 


etc. 




exi>enses. 


I' 


i 


i 


9 


i 














I 


1 


I 


1 


1919 


$163,841,885 25 


$645,727,058 37 


$1,355,946 16 


$1,123,965 82 


$249,468 71 


$2.10 


$1.74 


$0.38 


77.6 


18.4 


1918 


139.039.613 20 


574.979.782 38 


1.261.019 90 


1.050.984 12 


.239.878 14 


2.19 


1.83 


.42 


83.3 


19.0 


1917- 


114,222.742 75 


529.152.526 92 


1.073.617 73 


825.283 29 


206.568 24 


2.02 


1.56 


.39 


76.9 


19.2 


1916 


96.163,201 08 


497.247.542 66 


953,434 29 


802.925 18 


181,816 32 


1.91 


1.61 


.36 


84.2 


19.0 


1915 


89,744.710 94 


477.840.244 18 


882.269 56 


662.772 20 


201.432 47 


1.84 


1.38 


.42 


74.6 


22.8 


1914 


88.038.385 94 


442.418.736 41 


858.182 99 


681.906 48 


171,799 29 


1.94 


1.54 


.38 


79.0 


21.0 


1913 


91.139.285 04 


415.949.120 97 


958.899 22 


815,787 97 


169.440 55 


2.30 


1.86 


.40 


85.0 


15.0 


1912 


78.917.754 30 


389,290,238 02 


760.644 11 


614.286 46 


162.362 59 


1.96 


1.67 


.41 


80.0 


20.0 


1911 


69.908.508 19 


363.665,366 68 


705.905 79 


554.547 44 


147.956 27 


1.94 


1.52 


.40 


78.3 


21.7 


1910 


68.605.956 00 


345.100.867 00 


643,875 32 


504.812 97 


135,770 16 


1.86 


1.46 


.39 


78.5 


21.5 


Totals 


$999,622,042 69 


$4,681,371,483 59 


$9,453,795 07 $7,637,271 93 


$1,886,492 74 


$2.02 


$1.63 


$0.40 


80.7 


19.1 



EespectfuUy submitted, 

W. H. TOMLINSON, 

Superintendent of InsuranedQlC 



STATE mSUBANCE. 



181 



LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 
BUSINESS OF 1918 AND 1919 COMPARED. 

OHIO COMPANIES— ORDINARY BUSINESS. 
(Business of 1919 is on paid for basis instead of on written basis as heretofore.) 



Number of companies 

Premiums received 

All other receipts 

Total income^ 

Claims paid 

Supplementary contracts. 

Expenses. 

Dividends to stockholders.-.,... 

Total disbursements. 

Assets 

Reserve — ~ 

Other liabilities 

Total liabilities — , 

Suri>lus _ 

Capital stock. 

Total policies in force. 

Total msurance in force 



1918. 



11 

$28,164,737 4,1 

11.499.164 38 

39.663,901 79 

19,090.351 69 

138.363 34 

9,180.650 46 

463,963 39 

28,873,228 78 

157.286.309 46 

130.112.120 00 

17.945.692 92 

148.657,812 92 

4.620.626 53 

4.607.970 00 

350.776 

716.045,937 42 



1919. 



11 

$34,294,778 65 

11.630.446 38 

45.925.225 03 

19,274.101 19 

188.506 42 

12.482.054 82 

885.486 29 

32.830.148 72 

170,901.163 82 

144.069,276 00 

26.831,888 82 

170.901.163 82 

4.782.113 41 

6,170.310 00 

405.660 

860.963,309 00 



Increase. 



$6,140,041 24 

131.282 00 

6,271,323 24 

183,749 60 

50.143 08 

3,3011504 36 

421.622 90 

3.966.919 94 

13.614.854 37 

13.967.156 00 

8,886.196 90 

22.843.360 90 

161.686 88 

662,340 00 

54.786 

136,907,371 68 



Decrease. 





INDUSTRIAL BUSINESS. 








1918. 


1919. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Number of companies 


4 
902.495 
$122,192,811 00 


4 

1,037.908 

$163,806,966 00 


136.413 
$31,614,166 00 




Total insurance in force. 









COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES— ORDINARY BUSINESS. 





1918. 


1919. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Number of companies 

Premiums received..........^,.^. 

All other receipts «. 

Total income _. ^...... .~ 


65 

$907,290,696 24 

466.714.614 16 

1.374.005.209 39 

659.436.697 79 

7.620.669 97 

254.632,349 11 

1.975.534 08 

923,605.250 96 

6.149,624.193 44 

6,059.099.989 41 

932.144.256 17 

6.991.244.245 58 

130.179.iair «6 

28.200.810 00 

11.108.859 

21.795.427.868 09 


67 

$1,067,430,863 23 

394.963.322 66 

1.462.394.185 89 

690.440.772 14 

9.788.679 64 

530.400,476 62 

1.510.857 05 

1,232.140.785 45 

6.370.757.630 46 

5.415.468,630 06 

955.289.100 40 

6.370.757.630 46 

160.929.678 60 

29.454.720 00 

12.643.037 

24.605.894.750 44 


2 
$160,140,267 99 

■""M.388;976"60 

31.004.074 36 

2.168.009 67 

275,768,127 51 

3d8.475;53*4 60 

221.133.437 02 

356.368.540 65 

23,144.844 23 

379.513.384 88 

30.750.440 74 

1,253.910 00 

1.434.178 

2.810.466.882 36 


'"$7i;76i;29r49 


Claims paid _ 




Supplementary contracts. — 




Expenses. 




DividendjB to stockholders.... 
Total disbursement^,.. 


464.677 03 


Assets 




ResfX'^ 


*" 


Other liabilities 

Total liabdities^.. . 

Surplus.. .- _ 





Capital stock 

Total policies in force 





Total insurance in force. 








INDUSTRIAL BUSINESS. 








1918. 


1919. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Nimiber of companies.— 


9 
37.972.001 
$6,211,445,198 00 


9 
41.098.728 
$5,758,370,633 00 


3ri26.727 
$646,926,435 00 




Total insurance in force. 


zizoogK 



182 OmO GENERAL STATISTICb. 



INCOME. 

Table I.— The total income for 1919 was $1,508,319,410.92; for 1918, 
$1,413,659,111.18, an increase of $94,660,299.74. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Table II. — The total disbursements during the year were $1,264,- 
970,934.17, compared with $952,538,479.73, showing an increase of $312,- 
432,454.44. 

The excess of income over disbursements for the year was $243,- 
348,476.75. 

ASSETS. 

Table III.— The total admitted assets for 1919 were $6,541,658,- 
794.28 as against $6,306,910,502.89, showing an increase of $234,748,- 
291.39. 

LIABILITIES. 

Table IV. — The total liabilities for the year, not including capital 
or unassigned funds, were $6,341,322,072.27, compared with $6,139,302,- 
058.50 for 1918, showing an increase of $202,020,013.77. 

The capital for 1919 was $34,625,030.00; for 1918, $32,808,780.00, 
an increase of $1,816,250.00. 

The total unassigned funds for 1919 were $165,711,692.01) for 
1918, $134,799,664.39, an increase of $30,912,027.62. 

1919 BUSINESS (ORDINARY) ON PAID FOR BASIS INSTEAD 
OP ON WRITTEN BASIS AS HERETOFORE. 

Table V.— There was in force December 31, 1919, 12,948,597 policies, 
carrying $25,456,848,059.44 of insurance, compared with 11,290,517 
policies in 1918 carrying $21,536,176,618.20, an increase of 1,658,080 in 
the number of policies and $3,920,671,441.24 of insurance. 

BUSINESS (INDUSTRIAL), 

Table V.— There was in force December 31, 1919, 42,136,636 policies 
carrying $5,912,177,629.00 of insurance, compared with 38,899,083 poll* 
cies in 1918, carrying $5,349,888,507.00, an increase of 3,237,553 in ik% 
number of policies and $562,289,122.00 of insurance. r^^^^T^ 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE INSURANCE. 

GROUP INSURANCE. 



183 



Table Va. — There was in force December 31, 1919, 4,122 policies 
carrying $1,092,146,349.00 of insurance, compared with 2,302 policies 
carrying $597,889,398.92 for 1918, an increase of 1,820 in number of 
policies and $494,256,950.08 in amount of insurance. 

BUSINESS IN OHIO. 

1919 BUSINESS (ORDINARY) ON PAID FOR BASIS INSTEAD 
OP ON WRITTEN BASIS AS HERETOFORE. 

There was in force December 31, 1919, 866,267 policies carrying 
$1,588,410,498.42 of insurance. 
. The premium income for 1919 was $53,286,580.89. 
The losses paid in 1919 were $20,291,637.92. 

BUSINESS (INDUSTRIAL). 

There was in force December 31, 1919, 3,241,361 policies carrying 
$439,677,954.00, of insurance. 

The premium income for 1919 was $16,147,861.13. 
The losses paid in 1919 were $4,298,978.28. 



GROUP INSURANCE. 

BUSINESS IN OHIO. 

Table Vc. — There was in force December 31, 1919, 285 policies 
carrying $125,574,185.00 of insurance, compared with 171 policies 
carrying $87,629,205.00 for 1918, an increase of 114 policies and $38,- 
281,980.00 in amount of insurance. 

1919 BUSINESS IN OHIO. 

OHIO COMPANIES— ORDINARY BUSINESS. 
(Business of 1919 is on paid for basis instead of on written basis as heretofore.) 



Number of companies... 
Premiums received. 



Number of losses paid^ 
Amount of losses paid 

XT.....!.. r i_ I 



Number of losses mcurT^_ 
Amount of losses incurred.- 

Total policies in force.— 

Total insurance in force.-.-. 



1918. 



11 

$5,751,282 41 

929 

$1,475,214 81 

1.033 

$1,579,640 02 

112.758 

$159,647,087 35 



1919. 



n 

iA.Sli3.4G7 78 
1,467 

12, 3 07. 2 WJ 01 
1,391 

$2,280,4011 A'A 

Vi^yA 10 

$210.2iM,!!h:l5 01 



Googk 



Digitized by 



184 



OHIO GENEEMi STATISTIGS, 
INDUSTRIAL BUSINESS. 




Number of roinpamcs„ 
Premiums feceivetj.. 



Number of losses paid^, -_ 

Amount ol losaes paid„....... 

l^umber of los£e;S mcurrecL, 
Amouat ol losses incurretL^ 
Total policies in fonceL™—,.^ 
To^l msurance in force.^ 



$3,055.l&4 OS 

il.0O5.058 4S 

fl.0l8.4Sl ^ 

f7a,731.704 00 



1«10. 



13,714.193 3fi 
7*13 U 

7.850 

GT0.<V13 
t&2,437.&S8 00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES— ORDINARY BUSINESS. 



Number of companiei^ 
PremiiiiiiB reCEived - _. 
Number of Ioufs paid,*,^... 
Amount of losses paid.. 



Number of los^s inctiTTcd , 

Amount of lu^s^s incttrred,.^-^^- 
Total policies in forco^ 
Total insurance in forcc„ 



19ia 



el 

f39,077,S&a 30 

9,265 
I17J02.OO6 SO 

&,&S3 
118,071.303 07 
(Vf>fi-373 
tL26S.25a,600 35 



10 to. 



63 
W0.423J13 11 

tl7.t)S4,MS «1 

9 444 
117.471.713 TO 
731,157 
SL37S.i45.G&2 St 



INDUSTRIAL BUSINESS. 




NuTuber of crojnpaniea^.. „...,. 

Premium:?. receiverj,„„„ ^. 

Number of losses paid*.*-,.**... 
Amount of looses pBtd„....„„. 
Number of IdSiSeg mcurred.^ 
Amount of Icnsses incurfed-^.^ 

Total policies in f r/rcp ^ 

Total inatirance in f orcei 



1 10,395.902 m 

:i2,4eo 

J4,142.H44 47 
32.994 
$4,227,2G» 60) 

2.546,742 
1313.0^.491 00 



lOlfl. 



10 

»12.433,007 77 

29 2iS3 

i3.502.fl0e 4a 

^,fl27 

f3.40&,S72 24 

t347,^0,0€6 00 



FEATERNMi BENEFICIARY ASSOCIATION^ 
BUSINESS OP 1918 AND 1919 COJVIPAEED, 

OHIO ASSOCIATIONS. 



P 



♦J^umber of assot.iations..^ 
Received from merabcjs.,... 

Total in come., ,.,„ ^.^ „,.„„. 

Paid to members . -_^ 

Total disbufBqmenta. ^„...„,.. 
Total admitted asset5,__^., 
Total Uii bill ti^ig.„_ 



Ck?rti (Tcates in force Dec* 31..... , ^„„, 

Amount of insurance^ „.,..... ..„„,.. ,.«^.,„„..,, 

Certificates in force iii Ohio Dec. 3L.^.....^^ 

Amount of insurance in Ohio. ....... ...„„„. 

Los$(^ paid in Ohio...,..^*.„„, .,..*,„.*.,.„*... 



lOlS. 



•IB 

114.019.602 4S 

15,064.635 SI 

13,23 U ^01 23 

ir>.05S,374 f»3 

15,010,328 00 

4,07&.4Mi M 

728.55G 

S1.D0S,700.457 10 

121.160 

S15fl.179.0fi6 25 

$l,S8fi,5S0 05 



1019. 



♦13 

f7.50e, 

S,51«, 

5,9S0, 

7.7ai. 

9 JOT. 

1,217, 

3!52, 

»00S,O44 

87, 

1123,647, 

11,562, 



,495 44 
,599 90 

am 23 
.367 41 
.121 51 
,16^ to 
,794 
,2Srj (52 
,175 
,IS5 3S 
,364 38 



Digitized by 



Goo^l( 



^ 



STATE INSURANCE. 
ASSOCIATIONS OP OTHER STATES 



185 





I 101S. 


1919. 


Number of associatifm* . ,. , ^ 

R«!!*'i\i''*>rl ffr^m memh*«i .,.., ^, .. ....... . .. . .. ., 


Sfl8.495.0fH 74 
llI.54S,6Sfl 00 
S2,fi93s3RS m 
O0,3rifiJS7 S4 
331.470jfiR 22 

S0.9Ot:l.57.'5i,fi52 DO 

1317,010.003 W 
13.919,978 40 


53 
i97.42S,ee5 11 




110,504.821 OS 


Paid to membf.™, .. .., ^.,,..,,..... ,.,,., 


6S,110J7^ 15 
108,354.052 23 


Tot.il admitted assetfL .... .... . . . . ... 


235,381,215 25 


T*^t^lliflhl?ltl«* , , , L . , , ,L,, ,n-., , ,, , 


71.73<V,G6S (57 


Certificftt^s in fnTfft n#Ci 31.. ..^ ,^.. „ . ., .. ... ,. .. 


M0S.137 


Amoynt o£ JfvsttTancc ..,.,..... , ,.,„. . .^ ,.™„*,,^ „*...., 


$0,429,541,809 92 


Certificates in force in Ohio. Dec. 31^.,. „ , r 

AmtniTit r»F ii:isiiTiines in Ohio . . .,,.. .... , , .. 


273.010 
1268.116.454 85 


Losaea paid in Ohio „.,„„.. „,., „..,.. 


»3,8BG.504 OS 



♦Six associations reporting in 1918, but not now under the sui>ervi8ion of the department arc omitted 
from this, the 1919 report, wmch partly accounts for the decreases shown above. 

•INCOME. 

Table XX.— There were 66 fraternal beneficiary associations re- 
porting to the department December 31, 1919, of which 13 were Ohio 
associations. 

The total income of all associations during the year was $119,021,- 
421.58, of which $104,935,190.55 was paid by members; $10,438,488.71 
for interest and rent, and $3,647,742.32 from all other sources ; a decrease 
of $8,191,903.23. 

The Ohio associations received a total of $8,516,599.90, of which 
$7,506,495.44 was from members; $319,291.67 for interest and rents; 
$690,812.79 from all other sources; a decrease of $7,148,035.91. 

•DISBURSEMENTS. 



Table XXI. — The disbursements during the year, all associations 
aggregate $116,115,419.64, of which $94,101,030.38 was paid for death 
claims and other benefits. $5,873,999.22 for commissions and salaries of 
deputies, organizers and agents; $960,522.62 for salaries of officers, 
trustees and committees ; $1,980,995.27 for salaries and compensation of 
employes ; $356,215.48 for salaries and fees of supreme and subordinate 
medical examiners, and $12,842,656,67 for all other disbursements, an 
increase of $1,700,887.17. 

Ohio associations disbursed for death claims and other benefits 
$5,990,256.23; commissions and salaries of deputies, organizers and 
agents, $700,993.07; salaries and other compensations of officers, trus- 
tees and committees, $109,610.31; salaries and other compensation of 
office employes, $146,319.59 ; salaries and fees of supreme and subor- 
dinate medical examiners, $44,878.95, and all other disbursements, $769,- 
309.26. Total disbursements $7,761,367.41, a decrease of $7,297,007.22. 

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186 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

•ASSETS. 

Table XXII.— All associations have gross assets of $257,582,275.07 
invested as follows : Book value of real estate, $6,682,534,71 ; mortgage 
loans, $23,046,570.78 ; collateral loans, $5,425,675.19 ; book value of bonds 
and stocks, $150,659,943.29; cash in oflSce and banks, $517,715.09; cash 
deposited on interest, $16,025,403.94; interest and rent due and accrued, 
$2,796,330.11 ; all other assets, $52,428,101.96. Of the total gross assets, 
$22,493,938.31 is not admitted, leaving admitted assets of $235,088,- 
336.76, a decrease of $11,992,157.46. 

Ohio associations have admitted assets in the sum of $9,707,121.51, 
which is $5,903,206.49 less than the amount held by the associations in 
1918. 

•LIABILITIES. 

Table XXIII. — The liabilities of all associations aggregate $72,- 
953,830.77, of which $11,220,284.13 is for unpaid death claims; $1,660,- 
567.13 for unpaid permanent disability claims; $182,413,60 for unpaid 
sick and accident claims; $903,383.44 for old age benefits; $1,195,061,22 
for borrowed money, and $57,792,121.25 for all other items, a decrease 
of liabiUties, 1919 from 1918, of $23,226,757.66. 

Ohio associations have liabilities as follows: $820,347.09 unpaid 
death claims; $96.15 unpaid permanent disability claims; $69,101.55 un- 
paid sick and accident claims; all other claims, $327,617.31. 

Total liabilities, $1,217,162.10, a decrease from 1918 of $2,861,327,74. 

BUSINESS. 

Associations not supervised by the department are eliminated- 
Table XXIV. — These associations had in force December 31, 1916, 
5,514,137 certificates carrrying $6,916,195,147.50 of insurance; issued 
during 1919, 865,753 certificates and $1,041,911,991.95 of insurance, 
terminated 618,959 certificates and $829,620,961.91 of insurance, leaving 
in force December 31, 1919, 5,760,931 certificates and $7,128,486,177.54 
of insurance; net increase of insurance in force, $212,291,030,04, 

The Ohio associations had in force December 31, 1918, 325,489 cer- 
tificates, carrying $638,441,659.60 of insurance; issued during 1919, 
67,691 certificates and $134,032,877.50 of insurance; terminated 40,386 
certificates and $73,530,250.48 of insurance, leaving in force December 
31, 1919, 352,794 certificates and $698,944,286.62 of insurance; net m- 
crease of insurance in force, $60,502,627.02. 

BUSINESS IN OHIO. 
Associations not supervised by the department are eliniinated. j 

Digitized by V^OOQlC 



STATE INSURANCE. 187 

Table XXV,— There were in force in Ohio, December 31, 1918, 
350,276 eertifieates and $385,187,574.46 of insurance; issued during 
1919, 51j458 certificates and $52,830,454,00 of insurance; terminated 
41,549 certificates and $46,254,388.23 of insurancCj leaving in force, 
December 31, 1919, 360,185 certificates and $391,763,640.23 of insurance; 
net increase of insurance in force, $6,576,065.77. 

Losses and claims paid during the year in Ohio, $5,528,869,00, Ohio 
associations had in force Deeemher 31, 1918, 86,344 certificates and 
$122^021,431.26 of insurance; issued during the year, 8,890 certificates 
and $13,350,430.00 of insurance; terminated during the year, 8,059 cer- 
tificates and $11,724,675.88 of in.surance, leaving in force, December 31^ 
1919j 87jl75 certificates and $123,647,185,38 of insurance, an increase 
over 1918 of $1,625,754,12, Losses and claims paid in Ohio, $1,662,- 
364,32. 



*SLx «3SE>cIiiiloiia reporting In 1&18, but not now under the superrlfiloa of the dcpurtment, ara 
QfiiUtoa tram Uila, the I in 3 rcpurt, iffUkh partly i^ccuunU for th^ deerea^ea flhown uhovu. 



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188 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

REPORT OF 
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

I have the honor to submit herewith the report of the department 
for the year ending June 30, 1920; appended is an abstract showing 
the receipts and expenditures fully analyzed : 

The total receipts amounted to $231,390.66. The sum was derived 
from land rentals, water rentals, boat licenses, ice permits and the sales 
of a few small pieces of abandoned canal lands. 

The total expenditures for the year amounted to $98,215.55 which 
leaves a balance for the general revenue funds of the state amounting 
to $155,175.11. Out of the sum expended by this department $21,281.02 
was put into improvements and repairs and $76,934.53 for maintenance. 

This department has adhered to the policy of spending no money 
on any parts or sections of the canals that produce income. The sec- 
tions of the canal system that bring increasing dividends for water and 
land, for industrial purposes and the various state parks are the places 
that improvements and maintenance expenses are incurred. 

The year just closed has been the greatest in point of attendance 
of the people at the various state parks. Cottage owners have increased 
in number at all the lakes and it is a significant fact that our lakes are 
visited by many persons from outside the state who come here to enjoy 
a vacation and to fish and bathe in the beautiful lakes of Ohio. 

This department has established allotments on the full length of 
the west bank of Lake St. Marys and (m the greater part of the east 
embankment which are open to application by prospective cottage build- 
ers. In order to avoid speculation, but a single lot will be leased to any 
one party. This policy is for the purpose of encouraging as many dif- 
ferent persons as possible to avail themselves of cottage sites. 

Before another year rolls around each of the lakes will be provided 
with fish screens at all the waste- ways, thus preventing the escape of the 
fish from the lakes. The past season has been noted for the excellent 
fishing to be enjoyed and it is hoped that the gentle art of angling will 
become more popular in the coming years than it has ever been before. 
For a place to rest and to enjoy the usual recreation incident to boating 
and to bathing the lakes of Ohio are growing in popularity. This sit- 
uation is fast meeting the ideal purpose that the legislature of this state 
had in mind when the law dedicating the lakes and reservoirs to the 
use of the public as places of recreation was enacted and fully justifies 
the wisdom of the act. 

An important step was taken last November when there was organ- 
ized the Ohio State Public Parks Association, with headquarters in Co- 
imbus. Mr. W. L. Whitaker was made president and Mr. B. F. Qay- 

Digitized by V^OOQ 16 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC W0RK8. 1S9 

man was elected secretary and treasurer. There will be branch organ- 
izations in each county where a state park is located composed of peo- 
ple who are interested in the improvement and betterment of those 
places and the purpose is to cultivate a strong public opinion which 
will exert an influence for better sanitary, moral and physical condi- 
tions surrounding the state parks. The assoeiation is voluntary and a 
vigorous organization has been formed at Buckeye Lake, the Portage 
Lakes and at Lake Loramie. 

A movement has been inaugurated in eoimoction with the State 
Board of Health to improve sanitary conditions about the state parks, 

A request will be made to the next General Assembly to provide 
funds so that the state may join with other interests in establishing a 
sanitary sewage disposal plant at Buckeye Lake. The congested con- 
ditions which are fast growing at tbis popular resort make it necessary 
that the state provides for such a necessary improvement. 

Protection of the west bank of Lake Loramie should be provided 
for as a matter of safety and protection. 

It is very necessary that sufficient funds be appropriated by the 
General Assembly to complete the protection wall at Indian Lake. The 
amount granted last term was insufficient and owing to the extreme 
difficulty of securing cement and its high cost, no wall was constructed. 
The bank was strengthened by dredging and tilling and can be held until 
another season. "When this wall is completed Indian Lake will be per- 
fectly safeguarded. 

It is also important that the wall be completed as soon as practicable 
because there is being built along the whole length of this bank a con- 
crete pavement. This places Indian Lake on the direct route of the 
inter-county highway improvement running from Springfield where it 
intersects the famous old ''National Pike/^ to Toledo through Urbanaj 
Belief on taine and Lima and the various thriving towns between. The 
completion of this highway will mark a new era in the development of 
Indian Lake. It will afford a convenient avenue of ingresa and egress 
and will doubtless bring many more to this lake as visitors and patrons* 

This department has just constructed a new landing dock at Bus- 
sels Point, which will be a great convenience to boatmen and the gen- 
eral public at that place. 

At Buckeye Lake an improved highway connecting the National 
Pike near Hebron and passing along the north shore of the lake to 
connect with the road from Lancaster and the south is beiug considered. 
Eventually proper communications will be cstablislied by the state mak- 
ing all the state parks more accessible to the people. 

The policy of the General Assemlilies may be criticised in not pro- 
viding larger sums for the improvement of the various state parks. The 
Department of Public Works has been contributing on an average of 

Digitized by V^OOQIC 



190 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

$100j00.00 per year to the general revenue of the state for the past six 
years above the amount appropriated by legislatures for the park and 
canal improvement, so that while it is not necessary, nor good judgment 
to make any particular canal appropriations, it would be only natural 
justice for the state to deal more generously with the state parks. 

The abandoned canals are being gradually leased and made to pro- 
duce some revenue, and some parts are from time disposed of by sale 
particularly where the legislature has passed an act authorizing the same. 
But there are many miles of the old canal bed that constitutes a liability 
against the state due to the agency of floods. Such canals are dry as far 
as navigable water is concerned, but in time of heavy rainfall the high 
water passes from adjacent streams into the canal bed and flows along 
until a break in the banks is reached when the flood passes out and 
spreads over the adjacent lands owned by private parties and destroying 
crops and rendering the lands untillable. Several damage claims due 
to the above stated conditions are now on file in this oflSce. Such sec- 
tions should be surrendered by the state and ceded to the adjacent land 
owners rather than that they should be held any longer because it has 
been impossible to dispose of such lands by lease, or by sale. 

A great deal of public interest has been aroused in various sections 
of the state as to which route will be recommended by the federal gov- 
ernment in the proposed new barge canal connecting the Ohio river with 
Lake Erie. 

The report and recommendations will be made by the war depart- 
ment to the next session of congress when it convenes in December. 
There are four routes being considered by the engineers of the war de- 
partment, viz., the Pittsburg- Youngstown and Ashtabula route; the 
Marietta-Zanesville- Akron-Cleveland route; the Portsmouth-Columbus- 
Sandusky route and the Cincinnati-Defiance-Toledo route in the wesftem 
part. 

The enterprise will be of great public importance and possesses a 
particular interest to our people at this time because of the project un- 
der {ionaideration by the United States and Canada of enlarging the 
Welland canal around Niagara Falls to a capacity that will permit ocean 
vessels to enter the ports of cities located on the Great lakes. It will be 
possible for large, ocean-going vessels to load at Toledo, Sandusky, De- 
troit or Cleveland, and at the harbors on the Canadian side and cross 
the seas to foreign ports with their cargoes. This was demonstrated 
during the world war by smaller ocean-going vessels which took cargoes 
of food and ammunition from Ohio lake ports to France and England 
directly. It will be one of the greatest advance steps in the history of 
American development when the large sea vessels are enabled to visit 
the cities of the Great lakes and to carry hence the vast tonnage of freight 
from the middle west without shipping the same to the Atlantic seaboard 

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SUPEEINTENDENT OF PUBUO WORKS. 



191 



by trains. Then the importance of connecting the Mississippi-Ohio river 
system with the Great lakes will be appreciated. The impetus that this 
great improvement will give to improved waterways, both natural and 
artificial will be incalculable. The assistance thus rendered to the crip- 
pled transportation service of the United States cannot be estimated, 
when our lake cities become sea ports and the direct inland water route 
from Panama, the Gulf ports and the cities of the Misissippi valley is 
connected with Lake Erie. The feature of this great project that ap- 
peals to us, is that the state of Ohio is destined to become one of the chief 
maritime states of the Union, 

I wish to renew the recommendation contained in the department 
report of last year that the General Asssembly make adequate appropria- 
tion to reclaim the swamp lands bordering on Lake St. Marys, Loramie 
and Indian Lake, There are several thousand acres in all that by a 
system of diking may be reclaimed for agricultural purposes. At the 
present time these tracts arc vast swamps, that are worthless for any 
practical purpose, but with a moderate expense may be converted into 
valuable arable land. The state owdb a good dredge on each of the 
lakes and all the expense required is an allowance to maintain the opera- 
tion of the dredges steadily for a couple of years. 

ADDITIONS AND BETTERMENTS. 

July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920. 



G-IB. 

G-3B. 
G-3C. 

G-3E. 
G-3P. 

G-32. 
G-2. 

G-32C 



Tract S, Shorft Loramie Reservoir., 
Tracts north shore Buckeye Lakc._ 

PufchaM two lots Celitifl, Ohio_^^ 

Boat house nnd ofFict Buckeye Lake 
piling Rufolph LdK'. St. Marys, — .„ 
Culvert M . ff E. CsLnal, Spcnecrville 

Repair walls Buckeye Lake,.^ , 

Culvert, SpejicervilJe.-,- 



CulvcTt Lock 14p near St, Marya„..„ I 
Widening and deepening channel 
Buckeye Lflkc.^, 



Wall at W5an Lake ^ 

LandlnR dock Russells Point , 

Repair Levee State Dam, Coshocton | 



Appropria- 
tion. 



Totals.-,. — 



S5Q0 DO 
500 00 

3.000 00 
500 OO 
500 00 

1*500 00 

1,OCO.OO 
025 OC 
705 00 

4.000 00 

20.000 00 

6.000 00 

1,800 001 



Additionial 

Credits 
Appropria- 
tion. 



$1,000 00 
1.000 00 



69 33 
credit 



tmMO DO 



S2.060 33 



Revised 
Appropria- 
tion. 



S500 00 

500 00 

3.000 00 

500 00 

fiOO 00 

1.500 00 

2.000 00 

1.925 00 

765 00 

I 4.069 33 

20.000 00 

5.000 00 

I 1.800 00 



$42,059 33 



Expendi- 
tures; 



$760 53 

1.625 30 

1.650 39 

488 50 

2.072 30 

12 89 



$6,609 91 



Balance 

Jttne 30, 

1920. 



$500 00 
500 00 

3.000 00 
500 00 
500 00 
739 47 
874 70 
274 61 
276 50 

1.997 03 

20.000 00 

4.987 11 

1.800 00 



$35,449 42 



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192 



OHIO QENBRAL STATISTICS. 



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J 



REPORT OF 
THE STATE FIRE MARSHAL 



Herewith I beg leave to submit the twentieth annual report of this 
department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, as required by law. 

While the fire loss for the fiscal year of 1920 is $4,566,100 more than 
for 1919, this was to have been expected owing to highly increased prop- 
erty values. 

The l^oss for 1919 was $7,310,908 while that for the fiscal year 1920 
was $11,877,008. 

The number of fires in 1919 (5314) was but 75 less than for the 
year following, notwithstanding the increase in building and population. 

As usual, eighty per cent or more of all Ohio fires are due to care- 
lessness or to careless conditions. 

This department is waging a relentless warfare against needless fires, 
and is pleased to report that, through the hearty co-operation of the 
lecturers and officials of the Ohio State Grange, immense strides have 
been taken in rural communities toward safe-guarding lives and prop- 
erty. Fire prevention literature prepared by us has been placed in the 
grange of every county in the state, with most gratifying results. 

We are also pleased to report that there is a splendid awakening 
along lines of fire protection in rural districts and that much equipment 
of the motor type is now either in service or contracted for. 

The community idea of protection to homes and other property is 
rapidly gaining ground throughout Ohio, and we have many calls for 
advice as to the best equipment to purchase. 

Standardization of all fire fighting apparatus has been advised, so 
that one village or one community may successfully co-operate with 
another. 

During the year the paid departments and the brigades of our huge 
industrial interests have become closer allied so that, in the event of 
plant fires, there is no delay or conflict of authority in fighting the com- 
mon enemy. 

We have taken up the vital question of the protection of railroad 
property and that adjacent to terminals and rights of way, and caused 
to be published and spread broadcast, not only throughout Ohio, but also 
over the entire United States, a pamphlet that has received much fav- 
orable comment. This booklet has been endorsed by the Fire Chiefs' 
Club of Ohio, the railway fire prevention experts and by high officials of 
the big steam and interurban systems; in fact, this office has been de- 

(194) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE FIRE MARSHAL. 195 

luged with requests for the publication, which has also been reproduced 
in insurance and railway publications. 

We also issued a bulletin aimed to set the fathers and mothers of 
Ohio thinking what they would do in case of fire in the home. Our 
supply was quickly exhausted, and we are still having inquiries from 
many states for copies. This publication was also copied broadcast, 
and we hope that the lessons intended to be conveyed have accomplished 
their object. 

It has been our pleasure upon request to furnish valuable data for 
the historical department of the University of California upon Ohio's 
conservation work during the world's war, and also to furnish the Uni- 
versity of Iowa with other data for record. 

Starting from suggestions from this oflSee, the idea of specially 
decorated fire prevention windows for us^ in clean-up and fire prevention 
campaigns has gone all over the country, and we have furnished pho- 
tographs and descriptive matter to states from New York to California. 

The fire chiefs and firemen of Ohio have proved splendid allies of 
this department during the fiscal year. Through talks by uniformed 
firemen to school teachers and pupils, we have been able to get right into 
the homes, where the danger to life and property has heretofore been 
acute. 

Many homes are now being equipped with fire extinguishers, and the 
women and older children know how to use them. 

Fire equipment of schools and public institutions has been thor- 
oughly inspected and placed in first-lcass condition for instant service. 
, . Fire drills in schools have been carried out with such success that 
in several instances buildings actually on fire have been cleared without 
the loss of a second and in a most orderly manner. Particular attention 
has been paid to the janitors and their ability to act calmly and intelli- 
gently in emergencies. 

In the spring clean-up campaign, a questionnaire was sent to the 
mayor of every city, town and village in Ohio, and the following is a 
svmmary of the work done. Fire hazards reduced (exclusive of big 
cfties) 3,023 ; money realized from sale of junk heretofore gone to the 
j^ublic dump $10,475.30 ; health hazards reduced by clean-up, 4,779. 

Agencies assisting in clean-up, Tuesday Club (ladies), Parent- 
Teachers Association, Community Betterment Council, Civic League, 
Street Commission, Fire Department, State Fire Marshal's Department, 
churches, Lone Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, Red Cross, Boy Scouts, Ameri- 
can Club, Civic Pride Society, civic bodies of various kinds, Property 
Owners Clubs, Ladies' Civic Improvement Society, Flower Culture Clul), 
health oflScers, Mothers' Club, Business Club, Chamber of Commerce, 
Rotarians, etc. 

In 104 towns the campaigns had reduced the number of fire hazards 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



196 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

and hen<^e the nnniber of fires. In 115 towns, the health of the people is 
reported improved, while in 129 towns the doctrine of fire prevention 
was getting into the hmnes i^iiere such education had never gone before. 
In lie towns, the results of the spring campaign were reported as per- 
nmueni. 

In spite of fire prevention education, we are losing too many people 
in Ohio throiif^b deaths by fire. This year, owing to climate conditions 
and the se\Tre long continued cold, the toll is heavier than usual 

In the desire to keep warm people took chances with stoves, chim- 
neys and heating devices that ran the total number of deaths in Ohio 
above the average. The u^e of oils to hurry the home fire along, un- 
screened fires in grates, the use of antiquated and, in cases, discarded oil 
stoves and oit lamps, made the public pay the price. 

The record for the fiscal year, by months, follows: 

1919. Dead. 
My _—-,__„,._._. 22 

August ^ ^^-^. .^^^ 14 

September .__,_— .— 19 

October . . 22 

November «^*,_ „_ ^^_ 20 

Dectmber ^^^_^___,™^^^— ^„*,_ 31 

1920, Dead. 

January , ^_- 53 

February* .~-^. — — 24 

March ^_^__, .___^-_-^. 46 

April „-__-„„„_ __. 24 

May _. ,-,,-^ . — 21 

June -_._ __^____„_-__^ 24 

Total— ^_—^ 320 

The Hotel and Restaurant Law is now in full opertaion under ^® 
jurisdiction of this department. There has been 1,261 hotel inspectiolj 
made and licenses granted. Five thousand, four hundred and thirty* 
nine restaurants have been inspected and licensed. 

Under the new dry eleaning law, probably the most stringent ano^ 
air-tight in the United States, 348 inspections have been made and li-* 
censes issued. 

The number of arrests in arson cases during fiscal year was 47, dis- . 
posed of as follows : j; 




Confessions ,-^-^_„„^ — __^ 26 

Bound over__^^__^___, 20 

Failed to bind over__-__^__. 

Indicted ^-^^-—— .^^ . 44 

Failed to indict™.,^^.. 7 

Digitized by ^OOQL 



1 



STATE PIHE MAR3HAI/» 197 

Acquittals ^- . . ^_^- ._- , ^-» 3 

Disagreement by jury .-^^ — ~ 1 

Pleaded guilty — ^,^ ^ ^-_^„_„„ _^^ — 1 7 

Convictions , __„^ .^-, -^ ^-— 46 

There has been no let down on inspection work by this department 
as we realize that now, as never before, every ounce of foodstuff and every 
pound of commodity must be guarded and conserved. 

In closing, it is aot out of plaee to say that this departmeot feels 
under great obligations to the state oflfieialSj fire insurance men, the 
conservation and fire prevention associations of Ohio^ fire chiefs and 
municipal officers, business and social organisations^ educators in gen- 
eral, and, last but not Icagt, the press of state and the splendid corps of 
writers^ for the splendid and loyal aid they have rendered the dual 
causes of Fire Prevention and Fire Protection. 



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REPORT OF 
THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



During the year ending June 30, 1920, the commission held 249 com- 
petitive examinations, and examined 1,728 applicants. Of this number, 
1,326 passed and 640 were appointed to positions in the classified service. 
Special institutional examining boards examined 3,420 applicants. The 
eommisaion considered and allowed 160 promotions. The total fees col- 
lected during the year araouiited to $949.00. 

REPORT OF EXAMINATIONS CONDUCTED DURING THE FISCAL 

YEAR 1919-1920. 



B&tc 



July 11, 1019 



Jttly 11. 
July 11, 

July 11. 



Aug. 



iei9 

1019 



IS IS 



19 ID 
1919 



Aiiff. 5, 1919 



Aug. 
Au^. 

Aug. 
Aug, 



1919 
1919 



1919 
1919 



Aug. Qp 1919 



Aug. 

Au£. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug- 

Aug. 

Aug. 



July 28, 

Aug. S, 

July 31. 

July 31, 

Aug, 14. 

Aug. 14, 

Aug* 14, 

Aug. 14. 

Aug. 20» 

Sept. 19 H 
Sept. 19, 

Sept, 19p 
Sept, 16, 



1919 
1919 
1919 

1919 
1919 
1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 
1919 
1919 

1919 
1919 

1919 
1919 

1919 
1919 

1920 
1920 
1920 
1910 



No. 



134^ 

1344 
1345 

1^47 

134S 
1349 

13^0 

nbi 

13S2 

1353 
1354 

1365 

lase 

1357 
13SS 

1359 
1360 
1361 

1362 

1363 

1304 

1365 
1366 
1367 

1368 
1369 

1370 
1371 

1372 
1373 

1374 
1375 
137a 
1377 



Position and Department. 



Superintendent, Clinton County Children's 
Honns_. 



Matron. Clinton County Children's Home.. 
Superintendent, Logan County Children's 

Matfoa, Loijan County Children's Home. 

Stetiogmplier, Grade III. all State Depart- 
jmenU,„. — — 

Asst. ChctJiisti State Department of Health 

District Health Supervisor, State Depart- 
ment of Health.,.— » -.....„., 

Printtr, Ohio Soldiers' & Sailors' Orphans' 
HDme. 



Chefs, State Institutions.. 
Secretin' to Superintendent, Ohio State 
'Reionvi&tOTy 



Plumbiiit; In^ipector, Depaitment of Health 
NtjTM, Receiving Home. Bureau Juvenile 

Reseai^. 



Assistant Bpidemologist, State Department 
of Health 



Grade Te&chcrs, State InstitutionsL.. 



Guard. Board of Administration... 

Assistant Cabinet Maker, Ohio State Re- 
formatory 



Nurses, Institutions and Universities. 

AssifiiflTit Exanmiers, Auditor of State. 

Teacher, Domestic Science, State Institu- 

Director of Women's Work, Industrial 
ConuniRsiQSi .. 

Job Pres^znaTi, Institutions and Universi- 
ties^.... 

Bookkeeper (Machine) Or. 4 State Depart- 
ments. 



City Exiammers, Auditor of State 

Superintendent, Athens State Hospital.-.— 
Superintendent, Logan Coimty Children's 

Home.^ „ 

Matron, Logan County Children's Home — 
Superintendent, Erie County Children's 

Home. 



I 



12 



Matron, Erie County Children's Home.- — 
Superintendent, Hancock County Child- 
ren's Home 



Matron* Hancock County Children's Home 
Asst. VHX-atsr.Tial^ Supervisor, Dei>artment 
Public Instruction.. 



Superintradtnt Morgan County Infirmary .. 

Matron. Morgan County Infirmly 

County Examiner, Auditor of State. 



I Rat«Clerk«DcpartmeAQt of Insurance 

(108) 



19 



12 



10 



12 



24 



11 



10 



17 



10 



12 



Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



STATE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



199 



REPORT OF EXAMINATIONS CONDUCTED DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR 1919-192Q-Continued. 



Date. 


No. 


Sept. 


16, 


1919 


1378 


Sept. 


17, 


1919 


1379 


Sei»t. 


17, 


1619 


1380 


Sept. 


17. 


1919 


1381 


Sept. 


16. 


1919 


1382 


Sept. 16, 


1919 


1383 


Sept. 


17. 


1919 


1384 


Sept. 


17, 


1919 


1385 


Sept. 


17, 


1919 


1386 


Sept. 


17, 


1919 


/ 1387 \ 
( 1388 / 


Sept. 


17, 


1919 


1389 


Sept. 


17. 


1919 


1390 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1391 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1392 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1393 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1394 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1395 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1396 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1397 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1398 


Sept. 


18. 


1919 


1399 


Sept. 


19; 


1919 


1400 


Sept. 


19, 


1919 


1401 


Sept. 


19. 


1919 


1402 


Ort. 


2. 


1919 


1403 


Oct. 


2. 


1919 


1404 


Oqt. 


2, 


1919 


1406 


Oct. 


2, 


1919 


1406 


Oct. 


2, 


1919 


1407 


Oct. 


2< 


1919 


1408 


Oct. 


2. 


1919 


1409 


Oct. 


2. 


1919 


1410 


Oct. 


9. 


1919 


1411 B 


Oct. 


9, 


1919 


1412 B 


Oct. 


18, 


1919 


1411 A 


Oct. 


18. 


1919 


1412 A 


Nov. 


3, 


1919 


1413 


Nov. 


3, 


1919 


1414 


Nov. 


3, 


1919 


1415 


Nov. 


4, 


1919 


1416 


Nov. 


4. 


1919 


1417 


Nov. 


4. 


1919 


1418 


Nov. 


4. 


1919 


1419 


Nov. 


4. 


1919 


1420 


Nov. 


5. 


1919 


1421 


Nov. 


6, 


1919 


1422 


Nov. 


5. 


1919 


1423 


Nov. 


5, 


1919 


1424 


Nov. 


5, 


1919 


1425 


Nov. 


5. 


1919 


1426 


Nov. 


6. 


1919 


^ 


Nov. 


6. 


1919 


Nov. 


6. 


1919 


1429 


Nov. 


6. 


1919 


1430 


Nov. 


6. 


1919 


1431 


Nov. 


7, 


1919 


1432 


Nov. 


7, 


1919 


1433 



Position and Department. 



Bm^ldyment Office Clerks, Indtistrial Cotn- 
misfiion 



Inspector, Automobile Department, Secre- 
tary of State ;. 1 

Stenographer Grade III. State Departments 
Junior Messenger, Clerk Grade IV, State 
Departments.. 



Inspector-Nurse 



Labor-Foreman. 

Typist Grade II — State Departments. 

Acturial Clerk, Insurance Department. 

Examiner. , Steam Engineers. Industrial 
Commission : 

Stenographers, University and Institu- 
tional -J .; .,— ~. 

Placement Clerk, Industrial Commission 

Custodian. Wilberforce University 

Director, Div. Industrial Hygiene 

Social Investigator, Board State Charities 

Guard 

Seed Analyst, Dept. of Agriculture 

Typist Grade II, All State Departments 

Assistant Actuary, State Insurance Dept..... 
Grade Teachers, State Institutions. 



Telephone Operator, Hamilton Cotmty 

Janitor, Hamilton County 

Elevator Operator, Hamilton Cotmty 

Night Watchman, Hamilton County 

Janitress, Hamilton Coimty. 

Superintendent. Vinton County Children's 

Home „ 

Matron. Vinton County Children's Home. 
Superintendent, Guernsey County Child- 
ren's Home ..„........— — ^... 

Matron, Guernsey County Children's 
Home. 



Superintendent, Brown County Infirmary 

Matron, Brown County Infirmary 

Superintendent. Montgomery County 

Children's Home 

Matron. Montgomery Coimty Children's 

Home ~~ 

Sui>erintendent, Richland Cotmty Infirmary 

Matron, Richland County Infirmary.„.w 

Superintendent, Shalby County Infirmary.— 

Matron, Shelby County Infirmary 

Supervisor, District Health. 

Chief of Nurses, Bureau of Venereal 

Diseases.— 

Investigator of Securities, Public Utilities 

Commission. 

Electrician, State Departments. 

Associate Psycho-Clinician 

Power Piping Inspector, Industrial Com- 
mission „ 

Guard-Board of Administration 

Inspector — Nureery and Orchards 

Appraisal Engineer, Telephone Division. 

Fub. Utilities Com ^ 

Assistant Physician — State Hospitals 

Game Warden.. 

Assistant Bank Examiner. 

Stenographers, Grade III, State Dei>art- 

ments.. 



Clerk, Grade IV — State Departments 

Nurse — Bureau Juvenile Research 

Typist, Grade I, State Departments.. 

Appraisal Clerk, Public Utilities Com- 
mission 

Clerk, Grade III, State Departments; „.. 

Labor Foreman 

Assistant Seed Analyst, Dept. Agriculture 

Visitor, Child Welfare Dept., Board State 
Charities ■.■■,..... 



r 



3 
11 

3 

1 
10 
20 

1 
17 



1 


2 




3 




1 




1 


2 


2 




13 




1 


2 


10 




.^^.^.. 



1 

10 



16 
1 



1 
9 
5 

To 

1 
1 

1 

1 

""i 
1 
1 



11 
1 

2 
2 

1 
1 

11 
2 

1 



Digitized by 



^^oogle 



200 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



REPORT OF EXAMINATIONS CONDUCTED DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR 1919-1920— Continued. 



Date. 


No. 


Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 


?: 

7. 


1919 
1919 
1919 


1434 
1436 
1436 







1919 


tl437 
tl488 
tl489 

1440 
+1441 
tl442 
*1443 
♦1444 
♦1446 
♦1446 

1447 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov.' 


T37 


1919 


Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 


13. 
18. 
4. 


1919 
1919 
1919 


1448 
1449 
1460 


Dec. 
Dec. 


4, 
12. 


1919 
1919 


1461 
1462 


Dec. 
Dec 
Dec. 
Dec. 


12. 
15. 
16. 
16. 


1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 


1453 
1464 
1465 
1466 


Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 


16. 
16. 
16. 
16. 
16, 
16. 


1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 


1457 
1468 
1459 
1460 
1461 
1462 


Dec. 


16. 


1919 


1463 
1464 


Dec. 


16. 


1919 


Dec. 
Dec. 


17. 
17. 


1919 
1919 


1466 
1466 


Dec. 


17. 


1919 


1467 


Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 


17. 
17. 
16. 
18. 
18. 


1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 


1468 
1469 
1470 
1471 
1472 


Dec. 


18. 


1919 


1473 


Dec. 


18, 


1919 


1474 


Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 


18. 
12. 
19. 
19. 


1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 


1476 
1476 
1477 
1478 


Dec. 


19, 


1919 


1479 


Dec. 


19. 


1919 


1480 


Dec. 
Dec. 


19. 
4. 


1919 
1919 


1481 
1482 


Dec. 
Dec. 

>ec. 
. an. 
^ an. 

'an. 
Feb. 


4. 
30. 
30. 
27. 
27. 
28, 

9, 


1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 


1483 
1484 
1485 
1486 
1487 
1488 
1490 


Feb. 


9, 


1920 


1491 



Position and Department. 



PriTiicf. O. S* & S, p. Home^. . „, 

Aircinantftrit. Becuritici Dep&TtTO«it_ — *. 
Stap rintefideTit of Installaticm, Board 

.\i 1 n 1 ini?t rat i on,^-— -— — -^ — ^™.- 

Qiief Engineer. - 



AijsL <. hie rating Engbeer, Grade III...„.., 

Piri^t CJjiss Pineraan-^ ..„„_^^-— »* — -*,.—.. 

Secnd Cliiss Fireman.^,.-,, — .-^™.*^,. 

Bi * ! 1 e r Cleaner. „_ ,„ -„.,*.... ..^.^ 

Dih^trict Health Commisdonfcr Gr* II 

Di trit^t H«iUh Commissioner Gr* Ill.„, 
D ■- -t ^ipatth CommiBsioneT Gr. IV ...... 

D ' i^^ltli ComrtiiBsiontr Gr, V. 

St dent Ashliind Coiinty Children's 



Matron. Aahbiid County Cbtldren's Home 
Siip€rmt>*ftdcnt Fmnklin County Infirmarsr 
Si , - - - d cut, M ontgomefy Co^inty la- 



W t ■ intemnery Connty InStioaTy—^. 

DLii.'-Li^r Mji Liibonitories, State Depatt- 
nient of Health. 



Architect . Adjutant GcnemL. 



LinotyMi Operator, Ohio State University., 

Grade Teachers..- .--... ;-. 

Junior Comptometer Operator, Industrial 
Commission. 



Bindery Workers, State Bindery 

Tumor Messenger, State Departments 

Gtiatd, Board of Administration ^ 

Examiner, Securities Department. 

Placement Clerk. Industrial Commission ... 
Assistant Statistician, Industrial Com- 
mission.. 



Director, Women's Work, Industrial Com- 
mission 

Teacher, Domestic Science, State Institu- 
tions *• 

Plumber.- 



Stenographer, Grade III, State Depart- 

menfjt ,< — "«"** 

Superintendent, State City Free Lab. Ex- 
change, Ind. Com .-— .- — 

Employment Clerk, Industrial Commission 

Cottage Matrtm, State Institutions 

Inspector, State Medical Board.. 



Clerk, Grade III, State Departments 

Assistant Superintendent, State City Free 

Lab. Exc, Ind. Com.:: -• 

Public Health Nurse, (Trachoma) Dept. of 

Health.. 



Supervisor (Assistant) Boarding Homes, 
Board State Charities.- 

Penal Matron, Board of Administration 

Laboratory Assistant, State Dept. of Health 

Clerk, Institutional - -. 

Public Health Nurse <Prevention of Blind- 
ness), State Department of Health — 

Assistant Sanitary Engineer, State Depart- 
ment of Health 

Governess, Receiving Home, Board State 
Charities ~ 

Assistant Superintendent State Hatchery.... 

Superintendent, Ashtabula County Infirm- 
ary 

Matron, Ashtabula County Infirmary 

Superintendent, Hocking County Infirmary 

Matron, Hocking County Infirmary 

Superintendent State Highway Department 

Foreman, State Highway Department 

Inspector, State Highway Department 

Director, Bureau Trachoma Clinics, De- 
partment of Health.- — 

Actuary, State Insurance Department.. 



i 

I 



4 
17 

11 

4 
4 

1 

1 

19 

3 

""3 

2 

28 

4 

3 

2 
3 
3 
3 

1 

2 

1 



1 

1 

1 

1 

96 

209 

215 

1 



1 

1 

1 

1 

89 

188 

180 

1 



1 
1 

1 
1 

47 
100 

77 



40 

28 

103 



Digitized 



2 2l 1 

by^^oogie 



19 
45 
29 

1 

1 



STATE CIVIL SEEVICE COMMISSION. 



201 



REPORT OF EXAMINATIONS CONDUCTED DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR 1919-192a-Continued. 



Date. 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 


1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 


1492 
1493 
1494 
1496 


Feb. 


10. 


1920 


1496 


Feb. 
Feb. 


10. 
10, 


1920 
1920 


1497 
1498 


Feb. 


10, 


1920 


1499 


Feb. 


10. 


1920 


1500 


Feb. 


10, 


1920 


1501 


Feb. 


10. 


1920 


1502 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


11. 
11. 
11. 


1920 
1920 
1920 


1503 
1504 
1605 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


11. 
11. 
11, 


1920 
1920 
1920 


1506 
1507 
1508 


Feb. 
Feb. 


12. 
12. 


1920 
1920 


1509 
1510 


Feb. 


12. 


1920 


1511 


Feb. 


12. 


1920 


1512 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


12. 

li: 

12. 


1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 


1513 
1514 
1516 
1516 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


13, 


1920 
1920 
1920 


1517 
1518 
1619 


Feb. 
Feb. 


13. 
19. 


1920 
1920 


1520 
1521 


Feb. 
Feb. 


19. 
17. 


1920 
1920 


1522 
1523 


Feb. 
Feb. 


17. 
20. 


1920 
1920 


1524 
1525 


Feb. 
Jan. 


20. 
31. 


1920 
1920 

1^20 
1920 
1920 


1526 
1527 


Feb. 
Feb. 
liar. 


17. 
17, 
16. 


1628 
1529 
1530 


Mar. 


15. 


1920 


1531 


Mar. 
Mar. 


15. 
15. 


1920 
1920 


1532 
1533 


Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 


15, 
16. 
16. 


1920 
1920 
1920 


1534 
1535 
1536 


Mar. 
Ular. 
lilar. 


16. 
16. 
16. 


1920 
1920 
1920 


1537 
1538 
1639 

1540 
1541 
1542 
1543 


Mar. 
Mar. 


16. 

}?; 

17. 


1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 



No. 



Position and Department. 



Director o f Safety. Industrial Commission 

Assistant to Registrar. State Universities. 

Supervisor c^ Music. Girls IndustrialSchool 
A^istant Forester. Ohio Agricultural Ex- 

peximent Sftation 

A^istant Examiner (Male), Auditor of 

Statc^ - ^.™ .- 

Guard. Ohio Board of Administration. 

Madiine Shop Porenian. Ohio State Re- 
formatory „ 

Lumber Yard Foreman. Ohio State Reform- 
atory 

Instructor in Shoe Shop. Ohio State Re- 
formatory^, 



Millwright. Furniture Shop. Ohio State 

Reformatory.— 

Foreman, Composing Room, Ohio State 

Reformatory „ 

Clerk. Grade Iv , All State Departments. 

Actuarial Clerk, Insurance Department — 
Superintendent of Ntirses, Institutional 

Service— 

Assistant Physician, State Hospitals. 



Special Examiner. Tax Commission 

StnDervisor, Home "Work. Commission for 

Junior Messenger. State Departments 

Superintendent. Motor Equipment. State 
Hif^way Department 

Map Draftsman. State Highway Depart^ 
ment .- 

Assistant Actuary. State Insurance De- 
partment. „ 

Examiner. Banks and Banking. 

Stenographer. Grade III. DepartmentaL..^ 

Florist. State Institutiona 

Division Engineer, State Highway Depart- 
ment..^ 

Examiner, Building & Loan Department 

Clerk. Grade HI (Male). DepartmentaL. 



Assistant. Department Farm Management, 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Laborers. State Departments. 

Superintendent, Monroe County Children's 

Home 

Matron, Monroe County CHiildren's Home 
Superintendent. Montgomery County In- 
firmary 

Matron, Montgomery (bounty Infirmary 

Superintendent, Brown County Children's 

Home. 

Matron. Brown County Children's Home... 
Siipervisor. Advanced Registry, Ohio State 

University.-^ | 

Superintendent. Auglaize County Infirmary 

Matron. Auglaice Coun^ty Infirmary 

District Health Supervisor. Departmen t of 

Health „ 

Director. Bureau Child Hygiene, Depart- 
ment of Health - 

Public Health Nurse. Dent, of Health. 

Labor Foreman. Dept.. Inst, and Universx- 

Grade Teacher. InstitutionaL. 

Teachers, High School, InstitutionaL 

Superintendent, State City Free Labor Ex- 
change, Ind. Com ^ 

Public Health Nurse, Dept. of Health 

Typist, Grade I, Departmental ^ 

Teachers. Art and Penmanship, Institu- 
tional — — 

Clerks. Grade III, Institutional 

Guard. Board of Administration 

Stenojnraphers, Grade III, Institutional 

Field Veterinarian. Dept. of Agrictilture. 



8 

12 

1 

22 
4 

10 

3 
9 



C^nc 
Cane 



58r 



Cane 
Cane 



eUed. 
elkd. 

1 

1 

55 
elled. 
eUed. 



I 
I 



1 

4 
2 

2 

4 

• 4 
2 

**"8 
8 

1 

18 
2 
5 

3 
7 



42 



13. 



4 
11 



1 1 1 1 1 , 

Digitized by V^OOQlC 



202 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



REPORT OF EXAMINATIONS CONDUCTED DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR 1919-1920-Continued. 



Date. 



Mar. 


17. 


1020 


154S 


Mar. 


17, 


1820 


1546 


Mar, 


17. 


I&20 


1547 


Mar. 


17, 


1920 


1543 


Mar. 


la. 


1020 


1540 


Mar, 


IS. 


lfl20 


ISSO 


Mar. 


IH, 


1020 


1551 


Mar- 


IS, 


1020 


1552 


Mar. 


m. 


1020 


1&53 


Mar. 


18, 


1920 


1554 


Mar. 


10, 


1020 


1555 


Mar, 


1»» 


1020 


1556 


Mar. 


19. 


1020 


1557 


Mar. 


10, 


102O 


155S 


Mar, 


10. 


1920 


1550 


Mar. 


20. 


1020 


1560 


Mar. 


20. 


1B20 


1.^1 


Mar. 


20, 


1020 


1562 




* 




1.563 




« 




1564 




• 




1565 


Feb. 


34, 


1020 


15fl6 


Feb. 


24. 


1020 


1$67 


Mar. 


n. 


1920 


im^ 


Mar. 


18. 


1920 


1560 


Mar. 


35, 


1020 


1.^70 


Mar. 


3. 


1020 


1571 


Mar. 


11. 


1020 


1572 


Mar. 


as, 


1920 


1573 


Mar. 


25, 


1020 


1574 


Mar. 


25. 


1920 


l.'i75 


April 


I. 


1920 


1570 


Mar, 


VA, 


1020 


1577 


Mar. 


12. 


1920 


157R 


April 


12, 


1920 


1579 


April 


12, 


1020 


L^O 


April 


12, 


1930 


Ui8l 


A|ml 


12, 


1920 


15^3 


Aptil 


!2, 


1930 


15S3 


April 


rs, 


1930 


I5ft4 


April 


13, 


1020 


15R5 


April 


13. 


1020 


lasn 


April 


13, 


1020 


I5ft7 


April 


13. 


1020 


15S8 


April 


13. 


1020 


1580 



April 14. 1020 
April 14. 1020 
April U. 1920 



April 14, 


1020 


laoa 


April 14. 


1020 


1504 


April U. 


1920 


1505 


Apnl 15, 


1920 


!&9fl 


April 15. 


1020 


l.=W7 


April 15, 


1920 


isog 


Apnl 15. 


1020 


1509 


April 15, 


1020 


IflOO 


April 15, 


1020 


1601 


April m. 


1020 


1902 


April 16, 


1020 


1603 



1500 
1501 



iri02 



Placement Clerks. Industrial Commission.^ 
Printer, Ohio Soldiers' & Sailors' Orphans' 

Home.- „ ^ 

Nurw, Universities and Institutions 

Employment Office Clerks, Industrial Com- 

niissjfiQ ^ 

StcnciRTapher, Grade III, Departmental 

Penal Matron. Board of Administration 

Storekeeper, Institutional 

Aaaistant Supt. Fish Hatcheries, Dept. of 

Agriculture 

Landscape Gardener, Adjutant General.. 

Inspettor, Bureau Child Hygiene. Dept. of 

Health ' 

Teacher, Hiysicial Culture, Institutional.... 
Electrician. Departments and Institutions. 
A^LitaTit Cabinet Maker* Ohio State Re 

fonnatofty.- 

Gan^c Ktieper, Dept. of A^culture 

Plumbers, State Institutions 

Chief Engineer. Institutional, N. A. _ 

Opera t i tig Enfifineer, Inst. N on- Assembled 
Asat. (Jpcratmg Engineer Inst., Non- 
Assembled 

First Class Fireman Inst 

Seo^ind Qass Fireman Inst. 

Boiler Cleaner Inst 

Supermtendent, Morrow County- In&rmary 

Matron 1 Morrow County Infirmary 

Superintendent, Wyandotte County Home.. 

Probation Officer, County Service 

Superintendent. Auglaize County Home 

Superintendent, Montgomery County 

Home..^ 

Superintendent, Morrow County Home...... 

Supcrintendent, Ashland County Children's 

Home,. 

Matron, Ashland County Children's Home. 

Stt^erintendent, Paulding County Home 

A.HfiJ slant Probation Officer, Clark County.... 
Super^^aor, Advanced Registry, Ohio State 

Univiersity 

Inheritance Tax Expert, Tax Commission.... 

Attorney, Examienr, Banks and Banking. 

Assistant Efficiency Examiner, Civil Ser- 
vice Commission 

Assistant Actuary, State Insurance Dept 

A-ssistant Psycho, Clinician, Bureau 

Juvenile Research 

Director of Publicity. Dept. of Health 

Assistant Examiner. Insurance Dept 

Assiijtant Physician, State Hospitals 

Bookkeeper, Grade IV 

Plumbing Inspector, Dept. of Health 

MillviTiKht, Ohio State Reformatory 

Instructor in Shoe Shop. Ohio State Re- 
formatory 

Director Woman's Work, State City Free 

Lnb. Exc, Ind. Com._ 

Assistant Supt. State. City Free Labor Exc., 

Ind. Com._„ 

Fami Superintendent, Board Administra- 
tion. 

Bindery Workers, Dept. Public Printing 

Typist, Grade II, Departmental 

Clerk. Grade IV, Departmental 

Stunner ^pher. Grade II. Departmental 

Clerk, Grade II, DeiJartmental 

Cleric. Utiiversity Service 

Inspet t'lr. Nursery and Orchard, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture 

GaTr>e ^^'arden, Dept. of Agriculture 

Dredge Fireman. Dept. Public Works. 

Sten^i^nipher, Grade III, Departmental 

Stenographer, Grade III, InstitutionaL...^ 



1 

1 


1 


1 


1 


12 


9 


6 


3 


1 
2 


1 
2 


1 
2 





6 
18 


6 
17 


4 

12 


2 
6 


2 


2 


„ 
























2 


2 


2 




j 


-j 


j 





"~'2 

2 
1 
2 


2 

1 
1 
2 


" 2 

1 

1 
2 





:=: 


1 


1 


1 











„ 


Cane 
Cane 

4 
20 

6 


ellcd. 
elled. 

3 
19 

S 


3 
9 


10 
5 


11 

1 


11 
1 


6 
1 


6 


1 
1 
3 
3 

40 
9 
10 


1 
1 
3 
3 

44 
8 



1 
1 
3 
3 

?| 

2 




5 
1 

4 


g 
1 


9 
1 


3 
1 


6 


3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 


3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 


3 

1 
2 


1 


2 
2 
2 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 





3 


3 


1 


2 


5 
3 

12 
9 


10 
2 


6 
3 

12 
9 
7 

10 
2 


5 

1 

8 
3 

4 
2 


1 
4 
6 


1 
31 


1 
30 


1 
29 


-J 


11 

1 


11 

1 


8 

1 


3 



— 1 



1 

17 



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STATE CIVIL SEBVICB COMMISSION, 



203 



REPORT OF EXAMINATIONS CX)NDUCTED DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR 1919-192(V-Concluded. 



Date. 



April 16. 1920 

April 16. 1920 

April 16. 1920 

April 16, 1920 

Mar. 30. 1920 



April 9, 1920 

May 13. 1920 

May 20. 1920 

May 20. 1920 

May 24. 1920 

May 24. 1920 

May 24. 1920 



May 24. 
May 24. 



1920 
1920 



May 24. 1920 



May 25, 

May 25. 

May 25. 

May 25. 

May 25, 

May 25. 

May 26. 

May 26. 

May 26. 

May 26. 

May 26. 

May 26. 

May 27. 

May 27. 

May 27. 

May 27. 

May 27. 



1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 

1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
2920 
1920 
19201 



May 27. 1920 

May 27. 1920 

May 28, 1920 

May 28, 1920 

May 28. 1920 

May 28. 1920 

May 28. 1920 

June 24. 1920 

Jtme 24. 1920 



No. 



1604 
1605 
1606 

1607 
1608 

1609 
1610 

1611 

1612 
1613 
1614 
1615 

161» 
1617 

1618 
1619 
1620 

1621 

1622 
1623 

1624 

1625 
1626 
1627 
1628 
1629 
1630 

1631 
1632 
1633 
1634 
1635 
1636 
1637 
1638 
1639 
1640 
1641 

1642 

1643 
1644 
1645 
1646 

1647 
1648 
1649 

1650 



Position and Department. 



University Stenographer. 

Junior ComDtometer Operator _,._ 

Superintendent Cotton Mill — Ohio Peni- 
tentiary ..-.- -^ „ 

Inspector of Nurses. Commission for Blind- 
Certification Clerk. Civil Service Corn- 



Assistant in Soils, Ohio Agr. Exp. Station... 
Assistant in Agronomy, Ohio Agr. Exp. 

Station — —. 

Assistant in Nutrition, Ohio Agr. Exp. 

Station 

Assistant in Botany, Ohio Agr. Exp. Station 
Assistant Chemist, Ohio Agr. Exo. Station.. 

Field Assistants, Ohio Agr. Exp. station 

Orthopedia Nurse, Bureau Juvenile Re- 
Superintendent, Auglaize County Home. 

Superintendent, Hancock County Child- 

dren's Home 

Matron, Hancock County Children's Home 

Exajp:iiners, Building and Loan Dept 

Assistant Supt. Pi^ Hatcheries, Dept. of 

of Agriculture.-: _ 

Architectural Assistant. Board of Ad- 
ministration- 



Special Examiner. Tax Commission- 

Msistant Corporation Accountant. Tax 

Commission 

Supervisor and Field "Worker, Ohio Com. 

for Blind 

Clerk, Grade II, Departmental. ». 

Assistant to Registrar.State Universities. 

Guard, Board of Administration— 

Pay-roll Auditor. Industrial Commission 

Storekeeper, State Institutions 

Superintendent of Nurses, Institutional, 

Board of Administration 

Assistant Examiner, Auditor of State 

Clerk, Grade III (Male), Departmental 

Laboratory Assistant, Dcjpt. of Health 

Linotype Operator, Ohio State University 

Nurse, Board of Administration.. 

Telephone Operator, Departments 

Electrician, Departments and Institutions.^ 

Janitors, State Departments 

Junicr Messenger (Male), Departmental 

Penal Malsron, Board of Admjnistralion. 

Publip Health Nurse (Trachoma). Dei)art- 

ment of Health 

Assistant Supt. of Construction. New 

Prison Farm 

Typist Grade II, State Departments.. 

Stenographers.Gradc III, Departmental.. 
Stenographers. Grade III, Institutional.... 
University Stenographer. Univ. and Normal 

Schools 

Dairyman^ Institutional. 

Plumbers (Male), Institutional... 

Superintendent. Summit County Child- 
ren's Home 

Asst. Sui>erintendent. Summit County 

Children's Home 



Total.. 



2 

Csnc 

Cane 

Cane 

Cane 



elkd. 
cllcd. 



died. 



Cancelled 
Cane tUtd. 



1.91S 



1,728 



1,326 



402 



< 



640 



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Google 



REPORT OF 
THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 



In compliance with the requirements of Section 2264*1 of the Gen- 
eral Code of OhiOj I herewith submit the report of the State Department 
of Health for the year July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 

PUBLIC HEALTH COUNCIL. 

The membership of the Public Health Council continued without 
change during the fiscal year. Together with the Commissioner of 
Health, the following were members of the Council ; 

W. I. Jones, D. D. S., Cdumbus^. - ,^. -...until July, 1919 

R. M. Calfee, Cleveland ^ . - until July, 1920 

G. D. Lummis, M. D., Middletown ._^,-until July, 1921 

C 0. Probst, M. D., Columbus ^, — . until July, 1922 

Dr. Lu minis continued as chairman of the Council and James E, 
Bauman, Deputy Coinxnissioner of Health, continued as secretary. 

The Public Health Council held four quarterly meetings and six 
special meetings. Besides taking routine action on matters which by law 
come before it^ the Council formally approved a plan for organization 
of the department into divisions and bureaus^ adopted the Ohio Sanitary 
Code (comprising all regulations of the department), and ratified an 
agreement with tlie Ameriean Red Cross in regard to co-operative super- 
vision of public health nursing activities in the state. Several regula- 
tions were adopted prior to the adoption of the Ohio Sanitary Code, but 
were superceded hy that code. The Council also gave attention to legis- 
lation amending the Hughes Act and to inquiries addressed to the de- 
partment by the legislative Joint committee on administrative reorgani- 
zation. 

The Ohio Sanitary Code is being published in the Ohio Public Health 
Manual and a certified copy of it is on file in the office of the Secretary of 
State. Because of its excessive length it is not included in this report. 
The Code comprises sections dealing with Morbidity reports, Communi- 
cable Diseases, Venereal Diseases, Infiammation of the Eyes of the New- 
born, Physical Examination of School Children^ Teachers and Janitors, 
Transportation of the Deadj Tuberculosis Hospitals, Maternity or Lying- 
in Hospitals or HomeSj Ice Cream Sodas, Soda Fountain Sundries and 
Other Beverages, Submission and Approval of Plans, Sanitary Control 
of State Park Sanitary Districts, Spitting and Unguarded Coughing or 
Sneezing in Public Places, Common Towels, Drinking Cups, etc., Barbers 
and Barber Shops, Manicures and Chiropodists. 



(20i) 

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STATE DEPARTMBNT OF HEALTH. 205 

WORK OP THE DEPARTMENT. 

Change in PersoTmel. 

The year was marked by the return of most of the staff members ' 
who had been on leave of absence for war service. Resignations caused 
many of the changes. Appropriations for salaries of district super- 
visors and child hygiene inspectors, and for venereal disease and tra- 
choma control work brought about enlargement of the staff. A complete 
table of personnel for the year is appended. 

Division of Admimstration, 

Action of the Public Health Council, as explained previously in this 
report, brought about an administrative reorganization of the depart- 
ment The new plan of organization is followed in reporting the activi- 
ties of the department for the fiscal year. 

Routine activities of the Division of Administration were carried on 
as usual. The Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner gave much time 
to consideration of legislation amending the Hughes Act in the earlier 
part of the year, and later to administrative matters growing out of the 
reorganization of local health districts, dating from January first. 

Publicity and educational activities were carried on as usual, 
through the press, the Ohio Public Health Journal, educational litera- 
ture, and films, slides and exhibits. Preparation for the Ohio Public 
Health Manual, including health laws and regulations of the state, was 
an important feature of the publication work. 

Division of Scmitary Engineering, 

During the fiscal year the division has conducted examinations of 
existing water supplies and sewerage systems and investigations of pro- 
posed improvements. The following are the principal projects which 
have been granted approval during this period : 

\ New and additional public water supplies at Ashland, Bucyrus, 

[ Jewett, East Palestine, Loveland Farms-Mahoning County, Fairlawn 

\ Heights-Summit County, Canton, Grafton, Silver Lake, Nelsonville, 

I East Columbus and Xenia; 

I Treatment by disinfection of the public water supply of Norwalk; 

! New water filtration plants for Ashland, Batavia, Defiance, Newark, 

Wauseon and Xenia ; 

|, Improvements and enlargements of water purification plants for 

■ Lorain, Bucyrus, Toledo and Youngstown ; 

t New and additional sewerage systems for Hamilton, Franklin 

t County Sewer District No. 2, Toledo, Zanesville, Lucas County Se\^er 

,| ^ Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



206 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



District No. 2, Rocky River, Buckeye Land Company-Malioning County, 
Struthers, Oakwood, Silver Lake, Forest Hills Allotment-Butler County, 
Bexley, and Lancaster ; 

Relief sewers for Lima ; 

Intercepting sewers for Toledo and Newark ; 

New sewerage systems and sewage treatment plants for Franklin 
County Detention Home, the Toledo Welfare Farm, Grafton, Fairlawn 
Heights Allotment-Summit County, and Hiram ; and. 

Sewage treatment plants for Cleveland and the Union County In- 
firmary. 

The division was called upon to investigate typhoid fever outbreaks 
at Warren, Girard, and Rossford. 

Investigations were conducted which resulted in the issuance of 
orders requiring improved sewerage and sewage disposal at Van Wert, 
and Ruggles Beach and Mitiwanga, Erie County; and a water purifica- 
tion plant at Newark. 

Division of Laboratories. 

A comparison of the figures in the following table for the total num- 
ber of specimens received and outfits distributed by the laboratories 
readily shows the remarkable growth in the work during the past year : 



TABLE. 



Year— 1915-16 

Specimens examined 14,596 

Outfits distributed 27,966 



1916-17 


1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


18,193 


16,833 


23,522 


53,488 


55,194 


53,055 


76,388 


148,828 



As compared with the growth of previous years it will be seen that 
the work during the past year was more than double that of the pre- 
ceding year. The demand for laboratory service indicated by the num- 
ber of outfits and prophylactics requested is an index of the enormous 
increase in the activities of this division. Another encouraging feature 
is the fact that the large increase in demand for this service has come 
from individual physicians and health officials. 

Even with several additions to the staff it has required a constant 
effort and spirit of co-operation to keep apace with the work and main- 
tain a prompt and efficient service. There has been little opportunity 
for research work, which is vitally important to any laboratory in main- 
taining its standard and prestige. It is earnestly hoped, therefore, that 
sufficient help may be provided to keep our routine at a maximum of 
efficiency and to give the technical staff an opportunity to keep apace of 
their particular field both in the literature and in original work. 

Digitized by.V^OOQlC 



STATE DEPABTMENT OP HEALTH. 207 

Division of Communicable Diseases. 

The work of this division is grouped under the following : A, Com- 
municable Diseases ; B, Morbidity Statistics ; C, Trachoma, and D, Local 
Health Organization. 

A. — ^During the period under consideration the largest number of 
investigations for communicable diseases were made on account of small- 
pox. This disease continues to be unduly prevalent due mainly to lack 
of vaccination. The people of Ohio will be taught a severe lesson some 
day because of their neglect to profit by the lessons taught their ancestors 
as to the treachery of smallpox and the efficiency of vaccination. 

Diphtheria continued to exact a heavy toll, and will not release its 
hold upon its victims until parents, physicians and health commissioners 
unite against it. The new law which provides for free antitoxin for every 
patient should prove a useful weapon. 

The decrease in typhoid fever is very gratifying and reflects mainly 
the value of pure public water supplies. 

B. — ^No comment is necessary concerning the appended tables of 
morbidity. Under the new system of health organization morbidity 
statistics should be of greater value than in the past. The change in 
the system of local health organization, however, caused a serious inter- 
ruption to the collection of morbidity statistics during the fiscal year. 

C. — No amount of money appropriated for health purposes was ever 
utilized to better advantage than the $20,000.00 appropriation for tra- 
choma. During the fiscal year seventy-one surveys were made to locate 
cases of trachoma in the schools at various points in the state, and four- 
teen clinics for the treatment of the disease were held. At these clinics 
hundreds of cases of trachoma were operated and the majority perma- 
nently cured. In this way blindness was prevented, defective vision was 
corrected, and the cure of each case represented the stamping out of one 
focus of disease. Only a small portion of the appropriation was utilized, 
the large amount of work being made possible by the co-operation of the 
United States Public Health Service, the local Bed Cross chapters, and 
other voluntary health agencies. Trachoma appropriations in future 
should include sums for traveling expenses, as during the year just 
passed it was necessary to keep field workers in the office because of the 
lack of money for traveling expenses. 

D. — ^During the fiscal year a complete change took plcae in the sys- 
tem of local health organization. Village and township boards of health 
and health officers were displaced by boards of health of general (county) 
health districts. In spite of the Griswold amendment to the Hughes law, 
full time health commissioners were secured in thirty-one districts, and 
the demand for public health nurses exceeded the supply. The work of 
organizing and instructing the new boards and their employes was heavy 
and occupied the full time of eight district medical supervisors, each 

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50S Ohio GENEfeAL STATISTICS, 

supervisor having eleven counties. A total of 540 trips for orgamzation 
purposes was made. Once the districts were organized the supervisors 
were detailed to assist and advise the health commissioners, and in the 
course of this work they made nineteen school and seventy-four miscel- 
laneous investigations. 

Ohio now has the foundation of a real health organization, upon 
which a fine superstructure of health service and disease prevention may 
be raised in the near future. 

Divisiooi of Industrial Hygiene. 

Probably the most far reaching event of the year affecting the health 
of industrial workers of Ohio was the passage by the legislature in Feb- 
ruary, 1920, of an amendment to the occupational disease reporting law 
whereby physicians could be penalized for failure to make reports. The 
two months immediately following the taking effect of this law saw an 
increase of several hundred per cent in reported cases- While the total 
number of reports of occupational disease for the year is far in excess 
of All previous records it is still to be regretted that physieians generally 
fall so far short in the matter of reporting these diseases. Besides the 
special efforts that were made through addresses and published articles 
to acquaint physicians with the importance of reporting occupational dis- 
eases, an educational campaign was carried on among undertakers auid 
local registrars of vital statistics, to acquaint them with the importance 
of accurate occupational data on death certifiuates, to the end that we 
may be able to develop mortality statistics showing the effects on health 
and life expectancy of the various trades. A special investigation was 
made of the mortality from influenza-pneumonia among bituniinous coaJ 
miners. A special investigation was also made of the rubber tire manu- 
facturing industry to determine the poisonous properties of a variety of 
organic accelerators. A careful study was made of the character of 
medical supervision and protective devices in plants operating under the 
lead law. At the request of the Ohio Federation of Lai>or a list of indus- 
trial poisons was prepared for inclusion in the proposed occupational 
disease compensation law. Co-operated with the Industrial Commission 
in public hearings relative to and in re-drafting the proposed Ventilation 
and Sanitation Code and the Industrial Camp Sanitation Code. Three 
hundred and thirty-one occupational diseases were reported by physi- 
cians; 5,120 report forms were distributed to physicians; 3,345 medical 
record forms were furnished to plants operating under the lead lawj 
218 complaints and requests for advice received attention; 42 special 
investigations were conducted; 12,583 pieces of literature were dis- 
tributed; 4 scientific papers were read and 5 scientific papers were pub- 
lished; 9 popular addresses were given; 200 lectures were given to stu- 
dents at the Ohio State University on the subject of Hygiene and Sani- 

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_J 



^W»T^^''^r''^W^W!»F«»^?Y^3?'f'^^ 



STATE DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH. 209 

tation; 99 abstracts of the literature were made for publication in the 
American Journal of Public Health. 

Divisic^i of Hygiene. 

During the fiscal year, 1919-1920, the Public Health Council auth- 
orized the reorganization of the Division of Public Health Education and 
Tuberculosis as outlined in detail elsewhere in this report. The re- 
organizatoin plan provided that the tuberculosis program of the State 
Department of Health be under the direct supervision of the Director 
of the Division of Hygiene and that the remaining work of this division 
be in charge of the bureau chiefs. 

Applications were received by this division for the inspection and 
recommendations for approval of the sites and plans for two additional 
units of 30 beds each and one 50-bed children's pavilion for the Spring- 
field Tuberculosis Hospital and one additional pavilion of 100 beds for 
the Franklin County Tuberculosis Hospital. 

During the year the Springfield Lake District Tuberculosis Hospital 
was purchased from the other members of the district by Summit county. 

The Mahoning County Commissioners, soon after selling their share 
in the Springfield Lake District Hospital, made application for the ap- 
proval of site and plans for a County Tuberculosis Hospital. The pro- 
posed site was approved but the plans have not been submitted. 

Plans were approved for a 30-bed addition to Stillwater Sanatorium, 
Dayton. 

The work of the Bureau of Child Hygiene was taken up with re- 
newed vigor upon the return of chief from service with the American 
Red Cross during the war. The outline of the teaching of hygiene in the 
public schools was prepared by this bureau and was approved by the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

The part played by the State Department of Health in the adoption 
of the American Red Cross co-operative agreement was one of the 
achievements bearing directly upon the Bureau of Public Health Nurs- 
ing and indirectly upon the nursing throughout the state. 

The Bureau of Venereal Diseases, which had been operated from 
oflSces in Clfeveland, was moved to the general offices of the department, 
thus centralizing these activities with the other bureaus of the division. 

The ** Keeping Fit" campaign carried on in the high schools and 
factories of the state by representatives of the Young Men's Christian 
Association was one of the far-reaching educational features of this 
bureau. 

By the passage of Senate Bill No. 15, otherwise known as the Kryder 
bill, the Bureau of Hospitals was made necessary. The registration of 
hospitals and dispensaries by sending blanks to 349 hospitals and 30 
dispensaries was carried out. The inspection of maternity boarding 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



210 



OHIO obnerUj statistics. 



bomes, which was formerly done by the Bureau of Child Hygiene, was 
transferred to the Bureau of Hospitals, 

During April and May, 1920, a large amount of the time of the 
director and the bureau chiefs was devoted to the Columhus survey. 



TABLE NO, 1--1NVESTIGATI0NS OF THE DIVISION OF SANITARY 

ENGINEERING. 





Under Sec. 


Under Secticm 


-y 


^ 


^ 












1240 G. C. 


134«-1261 G. C. 


S 


d 


i 


















i 


^ 


1 






















■3 


■^ 












1 


1 




1 




"1 


|3 

3 


a 

E 








^ 


MrtDtti 


*l 


■■§ 






1^' 


1 


'H 








1 


10 10-1930. 


a 


r. 




b£ 


c 


'^5 


iri 


^ 










*S 


a 






E 




^ 










■s 




g 


1 
1 


^ 
1 
1 




1 


ifj 


1* 
SI 


1 


# 


^1 


^ 


o 

St 

1 

1 




$ 


1 




^ 

cu 


r^. 


s^ 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


Jtity , ,. ^ .,-_„,. 


6 


s 






2 


3 


10 
IR 


3 


7 


1 
1 


40 


10 


Au^st..„^ ..„. 


e 


13 








12 


5 


September,. „„,,.*„-„„..,, 


7 


s 






2 


R 


H 


fi 


10 




50 


1) 


Oi:tciber.„ . ' .. _., 


3 


3 






1 


7 


IS 


i\ 


fl 


2 


47 


11 


N n veiti ber„ „ „ _,. „„.„... 


7 


4 






:< 


7 


31 


1 


5 




m 


la 


December ,.„...„ „»^^,„.. 


10 


3 








9 


20 


g 


4 




Iti) 


s 


fanuaiv. ...... ^ . ... .. 


10 


5 




' 


' "' 


7 


10 


(\ 


I 




43 
32 


11 


Frbmary . ,.. „, 


1 


4 


2 






3 


12 


3 


5 


2 


March™ .„„,..... 


17 

4 


1 


4 

2 







8 


23 
17 


J 


5 
3 




7ft 
3fl 


16 


May..„„„.. ^ .,. 


' 


3 


n 


7 








14 


8 


fi 


3 




42 


5 


Jtme......^, . ,^,„ „, 


5 


10 







i 


14 


11 


2 


4 


— """■ 


47 


& 




Totfll_........„,,„.„.. 


S5 


7S 


Ifl 




9 


101 


134 


62 


57 


6 


bm 


130 









•Mis^ellatieoqs investitratirms iurlude the foUgwing: AtieTidflTict at mectinra and ccmffirences 
outside of ColumbuE; ^ddrc^ses al public imcetings, mvcstigntion of sanitary coinditic^K^ Atib&nces, dm- 
posel of mdiistfinl vra^tes, dratnage eonditions, and olbtr mutlers not clasiificd in tabid. 



Digitized- b^ 



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L«Ji-"»«-< •' 



STATE DEPABTMENT OF HEALTH. 



211 



TABLE No. II.— ACTIONS OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
ON REPORTS OF THE DIVISION OF SANITARY ENGINEERING. 



Month 
1919-1920 



Under Section 
1240 G. C. 






II 






I 



Under Sections 1249-1261 G. C. 



I 
■& 



31 



§ 
•31 



Railroad 
Water supplies 



^ 



I 



July 

Au£n>M.. 



September 

October. 



November 

December—^ 

January 

February 

March.J 

ApriL. 



May 

June 



t2 



131 
2 
2 

1 
5 
6 



134 
2 



30 



26 



14 

1 
2 



2 

"si 



♦Order rescinded. 

tOne under Section 6602-8d. 



TABLE No. III.— BUREAU OF PLUMBING INSPECTION. 



Months 
1919-1920 



I 



July. 

August 

Sept 

October « 

Nov 

Dec 



January - 
February 

March 

ApriL 

May.; 

June 

Total— 



$20 
10 
60 



1 
079 
623 



$244 75 
270 60 
256 50 
287 50 
176 26 
173 76 
352 00 
203 75 
340 76 
376 60 
308 60 
361 60 



468 



267 



726 



11 



13 



96 



106 



10 



$90 00 



199 



209 



87 



$3,340 26 



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STATE 0EPAETMBNT OF HEAItTH. 



213 



TABLE NO. 5— CHEMICAL LABORATORY— DIVISION OF LABORA- 
TORIES. 

SAMI*LES REPORTEI?. 



Month* 


























idig-ioso 








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1 


, 






1 










1 


1 


1 


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1 


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4 

6 


151 
91 


33 


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9 


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.,„™,„„ 


322 


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201 


Sept__-.^ 


h2 


30 

131 


S5 
45! 


97 
133 




6 
5 


21 
13 


4 


14 

15 


S 

g| 




2@S 


October „ 




^8 


Nov„_..J 


34 


10 


12 


114 




2 


6 




15 


16 




218 


Doc^ 


04 


13 


32 


123 


7 


3 


14 




IDS 


30 


130 


534 


Jan^^ 


142 
93 


30 
19 


20! 
1 


175 
125 


20 


li 


15 
4 


2 


11 
4 


8 
g 




433 


ts 


270 


Mar__ 


ita 


47 




leii 


2 




3o; 




17 


3 


13 


385 


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May ..„„.. 


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24 


49 


lU 




& 


5 




9 


3 


S7 


S5a 


m 


39 


7S 


BO 






29 




10 


15 


20 


341 


June..,™,, 


45 


29 


38 


115 


.......... 


29 


32 


,, . 


10 


5 


s 


3U 


Totals 


910 


37B 


300 


IA%^ 


62 


©7 


170 


6 


251 

z_ 


119 


234 


3.800 



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214 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 







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STATE DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH. 



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210 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



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STATE DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH. 217 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
DIVISION OF HYGIENE. 

TABLE NO. Xrv— BUREAU OF HOSPITALS. 



HOSPITALS. 



Registration: 



Total number recorded June 30, 1920 ^ 360 

Number removed from list 85 

Total number remaining on active list 284 

Total number registered 258 

Remaining on active list not registered 31 

Estimated number beds on active list June 30th 32,750 

Beds registered June 30th 31,800 

Per cent registered 97.0 



DISPENSARIES. 

Total number recorded June 30th 60 

Total number registered 60 

Remaining on active list not registered 10 

Per cent registered 83.0 

Annual Reports: 

Number uniform annual reports received 202 



TABLE NO. XV— GENERAL SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS OF THE VENE- 
REAL DISEASE CLINICS OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
OF OHIO FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 

New cases of Syphilis admitted to clinic 5,093 

New cases of Gonorrhea admitted to clinic _. 4,954 

New cases of Chancroid admitted to clinic 463 

Nmnber of patients with no disease found.-- _ __ 644 

Total number new patients admitted to clinic 1 1 ,154 

Total treatments given .__ ___ 130,027 

I Total administration of arsphenamine _ 21,021 

Total number of Wassermanns taken^ 19,853 

Number of quarantine orders issued 918 j 

Digitized by V^OOQlC 



218 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTIC6. 



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STATE DEPARTMENT OP HEAIiTH, 
TABLE NO. XX— DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE. 



219 



SUMMARY OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES REPORTED FISCAL YEAR 

JULY, 1919— JUNE, 1920. 







Spec i Eg. 


Hon-Specific. 


Month. ' 


'! 


1 


1 


Q 


1 


i 


(2 

ii 


i 


A 

i 

'■i 


1 

1 


1' 

1- 

1 

1 


i 


Total , 


331 
6 

17 

G 
11 
14 

3 

10 

30 

41 

1S4 


40 ' 

5 
1 


2 




3 

1 


2 
1 


61 

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3 
6 

10 

8 
1 
7 
4 


15 

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1 

1 


a 

I 


1 
1 


3 
2 


196 
8 

1j 


2 


July .„._...,.„.,„.._„..„ 
Atigiust . -. 




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KmrerYih** ^ 




December.. ^,, 


'"""•* 


January ^_ ,.„..„^.^ , 


1 
1 

13 


1 




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MaTcli. _ . , 




April , _^ __ _ „ _ 


-J. JIB. 


May. : .,.,_.. ... 




Tiine.,„.,, ..-, r T , 


2 








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J 



REPORT OF 
BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES 



On June 30, 1920, the Board of State Charities consisted of the 
following members ; Governor James M. Cox, president ex-officio ; R. C. 
Burton, chairman, Zanesville; H. H. McFadden, Steubenville ; Rev. 
William A. Hale, D. D., Dayton ; Miss Lucy B. Buell, Painesville ; Mrs. 
Pauline Steinem, Toledo; J. 0. White, Cincinnati; W. H. Stoutt, 
UhrichsviUe, and Prof. James E. Hagerty, Ph. D., Columbus. 

The executive employes of the board are : H. H. Shirer, secretary, 
appointed in 1902 ; J. D. Holmes, agent, appointed in 1910 ; Harry H. 
Howett, director of the Child Placing Division of the Children's Welfare 
Department; and Miss Mary Irene Atkinson, chief of the Institutional 
Inspection Division of the same department. Upon resignation of C. V. 
Williams, appointed director of the Children's Welfare Department in 
1913, the board determined, on account of the increase of work in that 
department, to divide it into two divisions and appointed Mr. Howett 
and Miss Atkinson to head the respective divisions from May 1, 1920. 
Both had been formerly connected with the Children's Welfare Depart- 
ment for several years and were selected on the promotional basis of the 
civil service law. 

The public institutions of the state and counties have been subjected 
to considerable stress on account of conditions incident to the World 
War. It was difficult, in many instances, to secure competent employes, 
especially in the professional departments. Because of heavy demands 
upon the expenditures for food and fuel and other items of maintenance, 
due to increased prices, first attention had to be given to meeting these 
needs, with the result that improvements, betterments and ordinary 
repairs have in many instances been omitted. Even appropriations for 
new buildings have not been utilized because it was felt by the authori- 
ties that the high cost of construction did not warrant the expenditures 
of these special funds. 

The board has continued to diligently prosecute the duties imposed 
upon it by the act of 1910, known as the *'Pay Patient Law." The 
financial results of this act are shown in the following table. The total 
expense involved has been about 2 per cent of the income derived by the 
state. The table shows that there has been a gradual increase in each 
year's receipts, both collectively and for the inmates in the respective 
institutions. 



(220) Digitized by Google 



^-x^-', 



BOARD OP STATE CHARITIES. 



221 



RECEIPTS BY THE STATE OF OHIO FOR THE SUPPORT OF INMATES 
IN STATE INSTITUTIONS FROM AUGUST 15, 1910, TO JUNE 30, 1920. 



Hospital. 



Athcfii... 
Cleveland^ 



Daytoiw H««. 

LimA, 

Longyiew^^ 
M&villoiL... 
Toledo.. 



Gallipulk^ ^«, ,„. 

Tota|s.._„- . 

Feeble- Minded^, 
M t. Vern,an„„,_„„ 



Totals., 



Aug. 15. 1910 
June 30. 1017 



Year fndiTiflr 



fnr.554 m 

] 40.206 30 

194.556 57 

14S.704 20 

5,106 5S 

205,175 55 
217 JBl :iO 
00.620 04 



I3.2SSJ06 26 

704,596 13 

ie,S42 fltJ 



S1H,1?4 10 
25,571 51 
:i7.13S 70 
27,864 7e 
2.S2tl 70 
20,763 4.S 
3JS,^in3 50 
33.065 66 
13.f^76 01 



12 ID ,537 46 

2ia.0a6 71 

11.217 56 



Year raidJiaj? 
June SO. 1919 



f ^,44S SO 
28.708 S3 
44.515 40 
29,310 33 

22.770 82 
4^MH fl7 
44,BS0 35 
10,024 54 



$257.^77 02 

273.977 01 

0,55^ 65 



it3.O40.M5 07 t402.741 73 1540,014 1& ' ifiOfl.114 22 |3,6fi«*415 20 





Year ending 
June 30. 1920 



t:K3.2^ 73 

S4,ft33 no 

46,684 IB 
35,7^5 77 
4.401 07 
2tl29S 26 
45,257 76 
55,148 70 
20,262 20 



jsoi.noi m 

^1305. 071 40 
9,351 45 



Grand 
Total 



f 182,352 fil 
229420 33 
322.896 00 
241,755 00 
16,140 44 
18S,23I 06 
320.875 5S . 
355.1^05 10 
140.4SS 79 



12.006,763 00 

1. 605.581 §fi 

47,070 35 



*Paid by individuals, 120.775.84; balance by counties. 

The Children's "Welfare Department, which was created in 1913, as 
a result of the passage of the act commonly known as the "Juvenile 
Code," has become a very important division of the board's work. An 
act passed at the last session of the General Assembly added a new 
feature which requires that all persons desiring to board children for 
hire, gain or reward would be required to procure a license from the 
Board of State Charities. This new feature has been undertaken to the 
best of the board's ability with only one person of the staff assigned to 
this particular function which should require several additional workers. 

The Division of Institutional Inspection is concerned with the en- 
forcement of the law requiring the Board of State Charities to issue a 
certificate to such child-caring institutions as, in its best judgment, are 
proper to receive dependent or delinquent children. It has been the 
purpose of the board to make a study of these institutions, more than a 
superficial inspection. It has encouraged the adoption of modern meth- 
ods and installation of complete records and many other features for the 
purpose of producing a group of institutions in the state that will render 
the best service possible. This has often required prolonged and patient 
negotiation with responsible authorities and much time on the part of 
the persons assigned to this work. Occasionally it is necessary to apply 
the disciplinary method of refusing certification until certain prescribe^ 
standards were approached. 

In the Division of Child-Placing the board has found an increasing 
demand for the reception of children from juvenile courts and child- 
caring institutions. It has been the policy of the board to receive only 
such number as could be properly supervised. Incident to this policy 
the number of children under the guardianship and sole control of the 
board has steadily increased, as will be noticed by the following table 
which also gives certain data relative to the children received. 

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222 



OHIO QENiatAL STATISTICS. 



STATISTICS OF CHILD-PLACING DIVISION. 






Year 

ending 

June 30, 

1920. 


From 
April 30, 

1914 to 

June 30, 

1920. 


Wards received: Boys . « « ... . .. 


162 
147 

10 
21 

10 

1 

15 
22 

362 

2,170 

478 
464 

19 

11 

5 

6 

30 

18 

51 

33 

53 

79 

4 

149 

131 

18 

16 

33 

37 

31 

7 

30 
27 
10 

124 
119 

36 
28 

2 


557 


Girls 


542 


Adoptions! Boys . 


30 


Girls 






46 


Deaths Boys 


16 


Girls 


8 


Other losses: Boys 


63 


Girls 


70 


Placed in free foster homes . . 


957 


Visits made by agents to foster homes 


4,466 


Number under control of Board at close of year: 


Boys... 




478 




Oirlfl 




464 


Special Statistics of Children Received. 
Ages: Under 6 months — Boys 


38 


Girls 


40 


6 months to 1 year — Boys 


15 


Girls 


20 


1 to 5 years — Boys 


100 


Gifla.:::::::.::::::::::::::::;::::::.:... 


80 


6 to 10 years — Boys 


155 


Girls 


146 


Over 10 years — Boys . 


242 


^ Giria:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::.;. 


254 


TTnlmown , . . . . ^ . , 


9 


Color: White— Boys 


478 


Girls 


455 


Colored— Boys 


79 


Girls 


87 


Parents: Both dead 


80 


Father dead 


171 


Mother dead .. 


202 


Both deserted children — 


21 


Father deserted children . 


69 


Mother deserted children . . 


48 


Separated 


78 


Legitimate: Boys 


455 


Girls 


438 


Illegitimate: Boys . 


99 


Girls 


100 


Foundlings: Boys -- 


3 


Girls 


4 


Committed by Juvenile Courts - 


233 
76 


653 


Transferred from Children's Home _ 


442 


Transferred from Board of Administration 




...nigili 


30Qk 



BOABD OF STATE CHARITIES. 



223 



Following this report will be found a statistical table relating to 
public benevolent and correctional institutions and agencies, arranged 
hy counties. The aggregate expense and number of persons cared for 
during the last year are as follows : 



Agenci^ 



County and city infirm aries 

Public children's homes.. ______^ 

Blind relief. __ ..,,. _..,.._ 

Mothers* peneions ,^^^^^^^-,, 

Outside relief by counties.^ ^. 

Outside relief by townshipB and cities 
County jaiifl ...^ 

Ttotal_, ...............^ 

First preceding year .^.__.^,^*.„_ 

Second preceding year_^^^-^^ .^,^*- 

Third preceding year..... .. 

Fourth preceding year. 

Fifth preceding year _,,_,,, ,, ^, 

Average for six years.. . ... 



Total Cost 



922,413 62 
412,677 13 
696,142 45 
216,632 33 
298,S01 02 
317,77S 03 



$4,783,306 23 

|4,5a4,623 57 
4,218,211 99 
3,748,165 m 
3,562,264 6& 
2,944,866 60 



$3,965,239 49 



Persons 



12,507 
6,264 
4,16^i 
5,64VI 
3,427 
24,192 
37,934 



94,152 

94,113 

97,201 

8.S,48S 

106,324 

87,S71 



04,691 



Willie tlie total cost shows an increase over the preceding year, it is 
to be noted that there is a decrease in the numher of persons eared for 
in the county and city infirmari^ and county jails, 

Without submitting any detailed arguments for the recommenda- 
tionSy the ^x>ard suggests the following for consideration by the General 
Assembly^ either by the enactment of suitable bills or the granting of 
proper appropriation ; 

1, The development of a special scheme by the Board of Adminis- 
tration so that surgical service can be rendered in tlie various hospitals 
under its control, either by providing funds for the employment of a 
surgeon at each institution or for the engagement of part time of persons 
who can l)e assigned to any institution for the special work for which 
they are trained and experienced. 

2, The development of mental hygiene clinics in connection with 
the various state hospitals for the insane by enlarging the medical staff 
so that it will be possible for one or more of the staff to conduct these 
clinics at the hospital and at other populous centers in the district of the 
respective hospitals. 

3, Service for patients who have been released from hospitals 
under the method commonly known as *' trial visit/' so that a represen- 
tative of the hospital staff or a trained social worker^ preferably a nurse, 
will keep in touch with these temporarily released persons so as to ren- 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



224 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

der every possible assistance so that the mental eonditioQ will remain 
so improved that it will not be necessary for many of these persons to 
return to the hospital because the families in which they reside do not 
thoroughly understand their needs and conditions, 

4. The purchase or lease of coal lands to be operated by convict 
labor, similar to the brick plant, to provide fuel for the state institutions. 

5. Believing that the indeterminate sentence law is logical and 
defensible, it is recomm mended that the General Assembly do not give 
heed to the growing demands from certain sources for its repeal or 
radical modification. 

6. That the appropriations made by the past General Asserabli^ 
for increasing the facilities for tlie care of feeble-minded be used at an 
early date, both for the establishment of a new institution and for the 
enlargement of the institution at Columbus and its branch at Orient. 

7. That funds be provided for additional parole officers for the 
penal and correctional inatitutious, so that the supervision of these of* 
ficers will be more frequent and effective. 

8. That the literary and vocational training at the various state 
institutions be subjected to the supenision of the State Superintendent 
of Public Schools. 

9. That the Heformatory for Women at Marysville be enlarged 
so as to take care of the persons which tlac act creating that institution 
intended to be coininitted thereto. The last General Assembly passed 
an act relative to prostitution^ known as the Gorrell Act, prescribing 
sentences for a period not to exceed three years for offenders. If this- 
act h enforced, which many agencies are proposing shall be done, addi- 
tional facilities at the Reformatory for Women are necessary. The 
population the last two years has been in excess of the normal capacity. 

10. The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home, at Xenia^ 
should be placed under the control of the Ohio Board of Administratiou, 
as is the ease of other state institutions which are largely educational in 
character. 

11. The various workhouses of the state should be placed under 
the supendsion of a proper state hoard. Or efforts should be undertaken 
to establish a state workhouse system with suitable and hierative employ- 
ment for the inmates who are mm largely occupied iu ''killing time,'* 

12. Passnge of an adoption law which will require certain definite 
methods to he pursued hy the court in which the adoption is had, in 
order to protect uatiiriil and adopting parents and the children to be 
adopt e(.K 

• 13*^That all applieations for incorporations not for profit^ or 

especially those that seek to undertake s^omc form of welfare activities, 
should be submitted to some authority for investigation before incorpora- 

Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES. 



225 



tion is granted, as is now the case in incorporations of agencies seeking 
to care for children. 

14. Any welfare agency or institution which makes a practice of 
soliciting funds outside of its immediate neighborhood should be required 
to procure a license from a state department, so as to protect citizens of 
the state from fake solicitors. Law to this end has been passed in a 
number of states. 

15. That the salary limitation for the agents in the Support De- 
partment be removed. 



STATISTICS OF PUBLIC BENEVOLENT AlSID CORRECTIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CHARITIES. 



Counties. 



Adams. 

Alkn. «_. 

Ashland 

Ashtabula^ 

Athena. 

Auglaize 



Belmont. 

Brown_^ 

Butler 

CarrolL 

Champaign. „ 

Clark. 

Clermont 

Clinton— 

Columbiana. 

Coshocton ».^ > 

Crawford 

Cuyahoga . (7) 

Darke » 

Defiance 

Delaware. -, 

Erie.. _ 

Fairfield 

Fayette. 

Franklin „. 

Fulton. 

Gallia 

Geauga .., 

Greene _ 

Guernsey 

Hamilton. (8) 

Hancock. 

Hardin.... 

Harrison. „ 

Henry „ 

Highland 

Hocking 

Holmes ,*. 

Huron... „ 

Jackson.— 



Infirmaries. 



Current 
. exi>enses. 



16.016 92 
19.821 81 
12.913 81 
24.876 83 

9.002 04 
10.575 07 
32.372 92 

4.960 26 
35,539 53 

9.076 61 
19.142 19 
24.154 21 

7,468 57 
10.791 19 
23.903 33 
14.184 31 
11.933 51 



(1) 



18.318 
11,453 
17.412 
16.761 
10.681 
22,426 
83.987 

9,913 

4.940 

8.215 
14.578 

8.384 
47.267 
18.340 
12.653 

9.828 
11.089 
12.885 

7.422 
10.331 
12.649 

6,665 



Repairs 

and 

improve 

ments. 



(1) 



$642 21 

3.101 46 

2,160 14 

3.148 97 

1,320 27 

274 30 

615 42 

303 36 

471 49 

309 08 

626 78 

419 84 



617 46 
1.540 39 
1,169 24 



3,760 

373 

54 

4.851 
298 
230 

1,690 

1.399 

82 

407 

905 

986 

2.067 
366 
411 
583 
615 

1.516 

49 

509 



314 45 







Gross 


Total 


Daily 


annual 


persons. 


average 


per 




for year. 


capita. 


36 


30 


$200 50 


159 


78 


254 14 


68 


51 


253 17 


160 


97 


267 34 


73 


56 


160 74 


55 


36 


309 98 


191 


132 


245 25 


57 


46 


107 83 


256 


124 


287 49 


43 


33 


275 02 


196 


77 


248 62 


183 


147 


164 34 


73 


49 


152 42 


49 


34 


317 41 


154 


95 


251 61 


67 


44 


322 38 


81 


65 


177 91 


123 


77 


*244"46 


64 


53 


218 94 


65 


66 


310 89 


150 


83 


202 08 


64 


44 


243 61 


58 


32 


700 82 


492 


246 


349 71 


40 


31 


319 78 


48 


35 


141 15 


55 


34 


241 62 


145 


76 


191 82 


44 


30 


279 47 


266 


203 


232 85 


113 


61 


300 66 


82 


55 


230 60 


(1) 53 


(1) 38 


(1) 258 65 


41 


25 


443 64 


80 


61 


210 92 


44 


29 


255 97 


53 


38 


285 29 


80 


61 


207 35 


61 


35 


190 43 



Net 
annual 

per 
capita. 



$189 82 
206 23 

180 40 
234 84 
141 10 
162 66 

181 01 
6 82 

268 15 
96 67 
166 42 
119 34 
109 60 
100 89 
229 97 
300 05 
62 16 

"ijbe'ijo 

162 84 
190 04 
169 41 

99 36 
278 69 
320 15 

58 08 
103 22 

84 65 
136 95 
247 26 
223 66 
208 97 
138 81 
165 06 
218 26 
176 09 
226 43 

86 83 
136 33 
175 07 



(1) 



(1). Report for current year not received; report for previous year substituted. 
(7). Cleveland City Infirmary included in Cuyahoga County total. 
(8). Cincinnati City Infirmary included in Hamilton Cotmty total. 



8—0. G. S. 



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226 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



STATISTICS OF PUBLIC BENEVOLENT AND CORRECTIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CHARITIES—Continued. 



Jffferson.. _^..-..„ .*., 

KnoK. .„-„.,-^ ► 

Iiflke..., ..».-..«*.». 

Lawrence^. ^--..^w-^ 

Litkinff., ..".^^.-.-rr 

Logan.. .— „,.,-,.„^„« 

LomiiL.^.. ^ 

Lucas ,,,^^.^,^^.. 

Madison .,.--, ,..- 

Mpihnning; ^.«— .. 

Marion.. 

M«diim.^. , . . -.„ .,- 

Mcig9 — „^..*- 

Mcreer....^ ....... 

MiamL.,,. - ^,^ 

Monroe. .... *,^„. 

MofitRomcry .,„„►„ 

Morgan . 

Marrciw . „ .,. 

M n ski nguiJi ^..„ „ 

Noble ,.,.. 

Ottawa . ^,^—.,. 

Paulding — ,,H^.. „. 

Pi?nT . . . ... 

Pickttway ^^.. 

Pik)e.__ . _,, 

Portia ge.^..^, — ...... 

Pmtale 

Piitnam,—, .-.-„^- 

Ri c h land ,^, , ,._„. 

Rosi„.4..,., „ 

Sandusl^'^.H • . 

Scirjto „, ,„. ,_ ,,_, 
Stneca,,.^-,*.,,.^.. .... 

Shelby, ., ^. 

Stark ,_., -..,, 

SummU .„ 

Trumbull , . 

Ti] sr li ra w as .^,... 

Uniun 

Van Wert., ,.. ,.,. 

Vintfin, . ,... 

Wjirn?n 

WasJtinKton. - 

Wi»vnp,.,, ,., . .,. 

Will iims-. 

Wond .... 

Cincinnati City ... 
Fa inn r Mini Humc^. 



7) 
. .<8) 
, llO) 



Total previous year., 



Infirmaries. 



Current 
expenses. 



12,474 08 

(10) - 

10 232 00 

5.072 77 
26.511 50 
12.603 46 
ai.852 20 
165.828 01 
11.384 77 
46.028 66 
(1) 16,842 55 
10.040 30 

5.072 13 
14.756 88 
18.167 40 

4.605 48 
63.413 53 

6.058 32 

7.513 04 
10.008 01 

3,356 80 

5.403 72 

6.523 10 
16.308 21 
11,780 46 

5.221 55 
16.011 61 
10,566 61 
! 0,146 30 

15,431 76 
15.350 57 
10,877 75 
11.800 81 
15.850 36 
12.320 14 
48,513 44 
50.054 76 
31.005 81 
18.405 77 

7,746 16 
15.445 06 

2.372 34 
11,025 03 
13.642 25 
18.013 04 

7.421 70 
16.251 13 

8.205 73 
182.370 03 
78.833 64 



$1,812,061 16 



I 



$1,812,607 42 



Repairs 

and 

improve 

ments. 



(10).. 



1,501 74 


001 00 


626 52 


301 6€ 


1,606 00 


1,473 47 


282 50 


6.320 80 


(1) 100 16 


38 65 


545 72 


1.105 00 


432 58 


4.437 58 


475 73 


330 83 


1,086 00 


204 80 


44 00 


161 53 


738 28 


140 15 


3,641 60 


640 63 


2.182 01 


04 44 


1.661 67 


1,834 10 


013 00 


1.050 24 


130 05 


6.600 64 


366 01 


3.370 46 


2.075 37 


205 8j6 


1,247 65 


117 26 


374 61 


122 02 


426 65 


237 28 


031 48 


450 06 


12.103 43 


4,565 78 



$106,800 40 



Total 
persons. 



(10).. 



127 



(1) 



47 
53 
06 
88 

117 

1.405 

60 

311 

160 
84 
65 
77 

115 
25 

501 
42 
43 

132 
38 
60 
36 
77 
83 
37 
70 
82 
66 

100 
74 
75 
78 

126 
58 

464 

433 

107 

177 
38 
37 
26 
75 
04 

108 
47 
05 
52 
1.060 

770 



12.507 



$03,302 261 

I 



14,024 



Daily 
average 
for year. 



(10) 



(1) 



58 

35 
65 
64 
86 

432 
35 

211 
7t) 
61 
26 
40 
60 
18 

332 
20 
20 
08 
33 
36 
26 
56 
66 
26 
55 
40 
30 
76 
47 
57 
33 
82 
38 

271 

170 
02 
06 
31 
28 
24 
47 
50 
50 
31 
71 
35 

671 

601 



7.383 



7,047 



Gross 
annual 

per 
capita. 



(10).. 



(1) 



ai5 08 

144 04 

407 87 
108 08 
254 10 

387 27 

325 20 
222 41 
240 61 
164 74 
238 88 
301 20 
263 30 
260 87 
101 02 
208 01 
250 07 
203 14 
101 72 
154 37 
250 00 

202 83 

214 26 

200 83 

201 12 

215 65 
234 48 

203 05 

326 70 
100 83 

388 01 
206 22 
324 45 
170 02 
284 66 
346 80 
180 01 
240 88 
651 64 

08 84 
234 57 
231 22 
320 58 

236 10 
228 81 

237 01 
271 78 
131 11 



$246 70 



f 



$230 70 



Net 
aimual 

per 
capita. 



(1) 



102 46 

(10) .- 

128 03 
134 81 
326 05 
131 67 

171 30 
260 39 
206 70 
208 84 
178 58 
113 75 

172 04 

112 68 
232 50 
235 26 
171 61 

113 89 

00 52 
183 35 

01 21 
82 31 

157 46 
280 29 
101 77 
51 48 
183 14 

120 70 
100 03 

173 80 
201 46 
125 89 
211 39 

121 67 
267 02 
151 10 
241 85 
300 35 
138 08 

114 34 
222 21 

38 80 
170 88 
2C7 63 
360 30 

33 11 
180 04 

70 50 
164 30 
131 11 



$183 35 



$188 61 



fl), Repait for current year not leceived; report for previous year substituted. 
0). Annual profit per capita — receipts exceeded maintenance expenses. 
(10), No report for two years. 



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BOARD OP STATE CHARITIES. 



227 



STATISTICS OF PUBLIC BENEVOLENT AND CORRECTIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CHARITIES— Continued. 





Children's Homes. 


Counties. 


Current 
expenses. 


Repairs 

and 
improve- 
ments. 


Total 
children. 


Daily 
average 
for year. 


Gross 
aimual 

per 
capita. 


Net 
annual 

per 
capita. 


Adams._ . „ 


$9,923 50 
24.404 75 
5.902 32 
13.262 40 
13.394 78 

17,'ni 09 

4.404 9^ 
18.8(36 61 


$385 81 
431 40 


51 
170 

33 
111 

92 

162 
39 
178 


30 
100 
22 
61 
49 

74 

26 
82 


$330 78 
244 04 
268 29 
217 41 
273 36 

231 23 

169 42 
229 71 


$265 38 
195 31 


Allen 


Ashland „ 


125 87 


Ashtabula. 

Athens _ 


168 06 
1.399 36 

658 92 


193 33 
197 36 


Auglaize „ 

Belmont „ 

Brown™ „ 


193 57 

165 41 


Butler — _ 

CarrolU 


1,460 96 


206 11 


Champaign. 


i7.884 91 
28.085 09 

€^716 13 


286 08 


77 
184 

-* '66 

(5) 20 

77 
53 

160 
81 
82 
60 

217 

69 

71 

100 

"* 66 

47 

66 

69 
30 
84 


4)6 
114 

" 29 

(5) "13 

46 

36 
71 
37 
54 
39 
108 

"35 

32 

63 

44 

33 

^'48 

32 
17 
50 


388 80 
246 37 

23; 59 

(5)"434"56 

■40299 
278 02 
144 82 
278 86 
256 51 
384 79 
268 49 

259 68 

39860 

242 82 

291 99 

231 26 

145 60 

110 34 
272 95 
228 00 


298 72 


Clark 


23i 32 


Clermont 

Clintart...- 

Columbisbia 




"i606« 


Coshocton^.- 

Crawford - 

Cuyahoga 


(5)"5."649'22 


(5)" 'i867'32 

""1.76640 

184 42 

i,'i46'67 


(5) 422'86 


Darke _ _..„ 

Defiance 


18,134 59 
10.008 89 
10.282 39 
10.299 54 
13.851 54 
15.0O«74 
28.006 91 

9.688'67 

12;756 33 

15.297 62 

i2;847 78 

7.629 61 

'eiss 87 

3.530 89 
4.64rf0 10 
11.400 11 


39^ 56 
268 00 


Delaware 


(9) 10 11 
237 85 
219 56 


Erie. „ 

Fairfield » :.... 


Fayette... _ 

Franklin „ 


372 00 


194 23 
254 34 


Fulton. 

Gallia 


; 


181 17 


Geauga _ 


87895 



564 98 

i,635 56 

ioo 90 

270 00 
135 50 


382 28 


Guernsey 


224 43 


Hamilton.^ 

Hancock. 


236 85 


Hardin 

Harrison.^ : 

Henry 

Highland. „ 

Hocking ^ 

Holmes..„ 


183 66 

i2'2"95 

98 89 
162 63 
177 24 


Jackson. 


... . 




Jefterson. 

Knox „ ,,. ... .. 


16.788 79 
7,874 52 

4"9i9 02 

9.802 72 

9.389 68 

16.666 33 

94,450 70 

8.736 25 

29.661 19 

9.243 21 


1,835 98 
844 57 


170 
41 

36 
100 

77 
137 
627 

47 
185 

50 


62 
25 

16 

48 
39 
68 
286 
36 
89 
26 


270 79 
314 98 

327 93 
204 22 
240 76 
246 09 
330 24 
249 61 
333 27 
355 61 


209 24 
267 92 


Lake „.. 

Lawrence 


327 93 


Licking ...« 




159 97 


Logan. ~ 




208 10 


Lorain.. „. 




180 30 


Lucas. 


1,721 07 

1.178 65 

580 28 

964 78 


262 83 


Madison 


240 30 


Mahoning.- 


305 02 


Marion....—™ 


255 32 


Medina. „ 




Meigs _.._ 

Mercer- 


4,916 61 




43 


15 


327 77 


313 96 


J 




Miami.. 


16.091 87 
3,992 12 

51.034 80 
4,748 36 

ieiew 10 




67 

24 

448 

29 

" "i"l2 


33 

19 

236 

19 

""■* 67 

63 
39 


487 63 
210 11 
216 24 
249 91 

248 05 

253 72 

261 78 


210 08 


Monroe._ 




106 02 


Montgomery^ „ 

Morgan... 


1,128 21 
490 42 


193 63 
221 80 


Morrow 

Muskingum 


208 96 


Noble 






Ottaw;a 

Paulding.- 

Perry.— 


i,3!394"l3 

10.209 54 





86 

57 


231 12 


Pickaway 


92 56 


229 02 











(.5). Home opened January 1, 1919. 

(9). Annual profit per capita — receipts exceeded maintenance expenses. 



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228 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS, 



STATISTICS OF PUBLTC BENEVOLENT AND CORRECTIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CII A RITI ES— Continued. 





ChJldroi'i Homes. 


Counties. 


Current 
cJtpejifies. 


Repeira 

and i 
improvo- 


Total 
persona. 


Daily 
average 
lor year. 


GTQ6S 

annual 

per 
capita. 


Net 
annual 


Pilff._ , ......„„. .,„..,,....., 


2,654 60 

fi,3Q2 03 

22.IHa 10 




12 


9 
17 

44 


204 S9 
§70 71 
272 15 

207 83 

264 52 

233 00 
354 OS 
ia7 36 
160 72 

24g 30 
460 OS 
210 07 
019 00 


204 20 








p^Sr ^s.. ': .„..: 




28 
^'^^"""157 

79' 


350 7a 


Putnam..^ ^^^.,_., ..*«.. 






Sm 40 


170 as 


ivrndtifllty^ „„^^ 






Sdoto.^.,,.. ,. 


ii jsi 41 


„_.. ^. 


255 70 


Sf^nBGm ^^,,..,,^.^..^... .„-.-,— 




&hclby. ....... „„ 


13,490 62 

e.©12 S3 
18,173 19 
4p582 36 

""" 3r()S0'74 

; 10, soil 55 

15,766 32 

10,237 06 


m 00 


79 

271 
73 

177 
61 

""""""" "35 
4S 
114 

m 


Bl 


141 IT 


Stark. ,.-..,...„..„„ ,^„^ , 




Summit ..... .. . .,^ ^, „. 

TmtTibuIL*^ 


^ISO OS 

349 23 
''"3fi2 i2 


m 
m 

97 
27 


106 Bfi 
SOI 42 


Tu^cftrawaB..,».*,.*,«, .„*.„ 


78 05 


LfniuTi ,^ 


51 98 


Vjir, Wftrt _, 




^^'a^^en_ ,,.. 


12 
23 

75 
32 


229 23 

431 m 


Washin^f^ „ , 


1.058 &5 


100 67 


WnVTie,— .. «„ .^ .^. . 


207 43 


WTilJiaina. . 




Wood . , ,, . 






Wyandot...^ .„„„ ..„_. 


M.077 03 






Cleveland City„ 






Cfucinnati City ^ ., „ 


*^"io.'3Sb76 


""" 348 


185 


195 01 




Fflirniount Hoiiie„„., ..„; 


187 33 


TotaL ,_ , ,, 


«SS1^2t}S 30 


$41445 23 


e,2Ci4 


3,380 


$272 61 


S200 37 






Totftl previoai year^ 


1777,175 06 


t44,Gga S3 


6.146 


3.372 


V243 73 


t2D2 93 



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BOARD OP STATE CHARITIES. 



229 



STATISTICS OF PUBLIC BENEVOLENT AND CORRECTIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CHARITIES— Continued. 





Mothers' Pensions. 


Blind Relief. 


Outside Relief. 




Counties. 


Amount. 


Per- 
sons. 


Amount. 


Per- 
sons. 


By Counties. 


By Townships 
apd Cities. 




Amount. 


Per- 
sons. 


Amount. 


Per- 
sons. 


Adams. , .. .. ,i... 


$607 25 
9,483 00 
2,771 78 
7,354 00 
2.189 00 
4.654 00 
6,791 50 
1.926 00 
9.634 50 
2.035 00 
1.801 00 
8.601 00 
661 00 
3.611 20 
7,222 00 
(2)— . . 


3^ 
67 
32 
60 
18 
60 

107 
21 
79 
23 
21 
72 
38 
56 

175 

379 
96 
26 
66 
49 
76 
80 

284 
18 
27 
14 
36 
80 

656 
48 
41 
25 
32 
31 
36 
12 
25 
44 

24 
36 
75 
45 
22 
91 
178 
32 
83 
92 
24 

53 
25 
250 
20 
22 
74 
22 
31 
24 
33 
1 


$453 00 
6.762 81 
2.140 10 
3.277 60 
2.225 00 
2.225 95 
5.532 02 
1.622 00 
8.276 50 

780 00 
2.713 66 
5.701 00 

855 42 

2.920 34 

13.115 00 

2.688 33 

1.740 00 

38.843 75 

4,725 97 

1,279 00 

3,447 60 

5,846 40 

3,915 00 

3,676 15 

3C.133 00 

1,215 00 

494 76 

920 00 
5.412 00 
2.376 00 
41.550 00 
3.700 00 
2.163 82 

990 00 
2.618 00 
2,018 00 
1,032 50 
1,200 00 
2.290 00 

974 00 
4.417 00 
2.996 00 
1.426 00 
1.981 26 
5.206 16 
1.446 40 
2.349 63 
14.198 47 
3.190 00 
9.170 00 
3.091 00 
1.875 00 
(1) 1.702 00 
1.829 00 
3.394 00 

734 00 

20,013 50 

1.076 50 

2.045 98 

3,245 55 

913 00 
2.503 75 
1.168 50 
3.420 00 


17 
82 
31 
27 
36 
23 
66 
20 
65 
8 
34 
72 
26 
42 
78 
30 
14 

284 
63 
14 
44 
50 
38 
50 

273 
12 
27 
9 
87 
30 

306 
35 
36 
14 
27 
67 
10 
13 
27 
33 
65 
26 
11 
58 
66 
32 
23 

105 
32 
66 
39 
17 

56 
20 
175 
27 
17 
53 
16 
22 
13 
29 


$2,166 58 
5,403 25 

320 00 
5,723 81 

776 90 

952 25 
6,102 67 

596 94 
3,650 62 

602 26 

266 85 
1.309 00 

886 20 

1.804 46 

5.029 67 

13.369 12 

1,713 41 

36 00 

1.175 97 

1,239 51 

8.353 85 

970 07 

36 73 

1.851 38 

1.966 73 

215 26 

349 80 

2,024 73 

1.464 45 

689 21 

96 00 

(1) 572 11 

2,091 26 

210 60 

189 00 

99 92 

2,291 00 

1,956 87 

7,449 80 

(10) 

2.434 96 

118 00 

4.392 21 

43 25 

5.229 63 

18.403 37 

768 69 

30.049 76 

(1) 1362 25 

99 12 

801 85 

892 56 

1,166 91 

69 33 

6,239 98 

4^ 00 

258 40 

2,101 45 

1,162 98 

1.412 86 

844 05 

3,027 23 


56 

72 

10 

220 

(3)...^ 

(3)_.5 

8 

48 

4 

4 

(3) .- .. 

101 

70 

1 
34 
36 
130 

5 

11 

60 
30 

(3)„. 

3 

22 

83 

181 

(10) „„ 

^'-^ 

1 

60 

6 

13 

507 

(1) 34 

:^4 

21) 

(»,.„ 

300 

46 

20 

6 

61 


11 n2i 11 
1JH2 86 
l,4is8 40 
l,;^s.7 33 
;^,0s2 17 

1 H^moi 

r.TL'fl 83 
1 OTFi 35 
u.:^s^ 14 

2^Q 69 
'^/A^-Ki. 55 
l.ii.U 98 
( :i4l 66 
L:.474 56 
41*13 22 
H.LJt^o 26 
:iAm 87 
r>2.U^S 21 
I .',>77 45 
I .-^jT6 41 
:s>.06 67 

443 28 
'2,:m 42 
:il2ll 69 
loJ76 70 

40 L 65 
1.4&4 25 

■AKi 20 
^.«;71 69 
\K'^l 82 
11,01s 26 

rm 66 
L170 71 

im 60 
^:ili7 23 
2,n2:l 31 

^7A 00 

:.75 28 
2:m\S 23 

too 47 
VA.y'Ot\ 96 

7.^ 51 
1 MLt 68 

2^n 33 

- mm 99 
t.4g8 61 
1-3:1 61 
lAfyfS 24 

7rJ 86 
4K5 38 
: j<^7 88 
l,.^.tfj 62 
l.MU 14 
■J, ] m 18. 

- ^ ti7 86 
SOI 96 

6,523 26 

704 70 

683 18 

1,938 45 

416 47 

1.481 60 

1,597 18 

1,326 39 


114 


AUen. 


80 
97 


Ashtabiilau. 

Athens 

Attjfl^i«e-.„__ 


150 
201 
168 


Belmontw 

Brown .. 

Butler. 

CarrolL.^ -.. 


149 
84 

496 
82 


Champaiirn 

Clarlcl!^. 

Clermont.-, 

Clinton _ - 

Columbiana — 

Coshocton_ -. .V 


231 
71 
106 
111 
301 
63 


Crawford . ~ — 

Cuvahosa 


6,657 00 
137,519 68 
9,013 00 
2.614 00 
4.877 00 
3,090 76 
6.545 00 
2.172 50 

39,004 20 
3,055 60 
494 76 
1.280 00 
3.382 ?0 
2.003 00 

88.753 00 
8,551 50 
2.4.38 80 
2,288 00 
3.294 00 
1.744 00 
2,747 00 
540 00 
2.660 00 
1.012 35 
(2) - 


287 
6,080 


Darke .. .. — 


261 


Defiance _— .» ^j,...— 


142 


Delaware 


81 


Erie 

Fairfield. — 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Pulton^ _ ^ 


40 
111 
131 
1.885 
42 


Gallia — 

Geauga 

Greene^ 

Guernsey 

TT«Tniltfm. , «- 

HancfxJc 

Harrison 

Henry ^ „-......- -. 


50 
9 

84 
255 
684 

41 
408 

57 
145 


Highktnd 


173 


locking. ~ -. 


76 


7n1tn«^ ., -- - 


73 


Huron- - 

. ackson 


183 

65 

653 


Cnojc ......V .... ..~ — 


4.121 00 
5.831 00 
3.222 00 
1.848 00 
2.507 50 
8.916 00 

36.044 00 
4.990 00 

23.439 46 
8.389 30 
2.528 00 
(1) 1.054 25 
3^4.79 60 
4,074 00 
1.520 00 

31.953 50 
1,017 50 
2.331 OK) 
4.985 00 
1.561 60 
6.221 00 
2.540 00 
a<766 00 1 


51 


Uke -- 


151 


Lawrence. ~~ —- 


627 




699 


Lognn -.-^— - 


50 


Lorain 

T/ucaflL - — 


436 
153 


Mahoning 


58 

11 

136 


Medina ^. ........_ r- - 


88 


Mmmi , ,.,^., 


73 


^trvTT 


224 


Miami 


669 
72 


Montgomery 1 


1,128 
31 




61 


Muskingum 

Mftbll* 


93 
45 


OttfiWft ,, 


43 


Paulding-^ 

Perry- - 


90 
78 



(l\. Report for current vear not received; report for previous year substitut ed- 

(2). No fund provided for mothers' pensions. 

(3). Not reported. 

UO). No xtsport (or two years. 



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230 



onto GINEBAL STATJS'nCS. 



STATISTICS OF PUBLIC BENEVOLENT AND CORRECTIOXAL INSTI* 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CHARITIES^Conlinyed. 





Mothers' Penfiioiia. 


Blind Relief. 


Outside Relief. 


Couatie*. 


Anioitnt. 


Per- 1 
sons* 


Amount. 


Per- 
sons. 


By Countie*. 


By ToffTishtps 
afad Cities. 




Amount. 


Per- 


Amoxxni. 


Per- 

soa&. 


PickfiWay. ..... . .. 


4314 00 
65S 281 
3,6R2 00 
3.784 50 ' 
a.33l 00 
5.211 50 
4il301 00 

4,iHi4 m 

2,2iM 17 
5,1*0» 00 

1.751 m 
IB, mi 00 

37,000 00 
4,600 04 

1 4,202 24 

1.068 34 

3,376 00 

283 mi 

2.740 00 

(2), . .. 

«.250 00 
3J51 BO 
0,510 00 
7,282 00 


00 
12 
38 
20 
44 
76 
40| 
35 
31 

103 
32 

213 

im 

42 

721 

30 

1 36 



30 
(2) 

08 

32 
61 


4,27ft 16 
280 15 
a.032 00 
3^21* 00 
t.716 00 
2,366 rt7 
3,S2S 00 
1,372 .^.0 
2.265 00 
4,SiB0 00 
1,022 (XI 
20,7(VI m 
8MI 50 
5.212 50 
3,970 50 
1.820 00 
1,020 00 
800 OO 
2,435 ,-itJ 
4.288 00 

i 5.501 25 
3,082 50 
4,27ft 16 

1 2t303 00 


53 
20 
31 
27 
18 
28 
76 i 

30 

2.5 
1 144 
04 
50 
38 
21 
10 
7 
»4 
46 
4! 
30 
46 


2JS5 10 
1,175 70 
4,216 48 

135 00 
1.334 11 
3.481 64 
3.080 34 
2,764 04 
1„583 00 
1,207 42 

321 05 
h.^m 20 
7.288 07 
7.803 22 
1,722 12 

132 50 
1,65B 54 

108 81' 
1.049 42 
3,36ft 21 

795 3fl 
1,023 41 
1,495 53 

612 47 


ca) .,.. 

125 

2; 

n 

51 
45 

H 

7 

228 

m ^^^ 

52 

* 4 

3 
12 
15 

11 
15 


4.212 73 
432 M 
1.610 21 
1.381 40 
1,025 17 
US04 2» 
1.870 91 

313 60 
3,710 46 
3.102 66 

2.42tp wa 

13^53 35 
24,210 la 
fi.710 13 
3.013 97 
1,411 n 
1J85 61 

314 40 
2.S48 33 
1,845 m 

1.420 m 

1,US 73 
4,652 m 


iB4 


Pike., ,-._..... _„.. 

Portaae ,._.. ^. 

Preble. __ __...,.. 

Putnam ^.^ 

Ricbknd.-_ . 

Ro«i.. . „ _. 

Sftnduaky. 

Scioto. ,,, ,,^. 

Senecn„ .._,., „ 


w 
n 
m 

M 
121 


Shelby... .... „ .. ^. 

SUrk ^..„ ..r.. 

Summit,. _, ,. 


111 

m 

1.9IS 


Van Wert ^„.-.^. 

Vinton,.-.., . ,, , , 
Wjirr^rt . 


m 

m 
m 


Washington, ^ _. 

Wflvne ,. ... 
WilJisms.. ,.^_^ ,. 

WooeU , . ,,_ 

Wyandot „._, 

ClevekTid City.. m 


n 

11 
m 
m 
m 


Cindnnati City fSj 

Paimnount Home, .tl6) 


~ 




-'- ^^ 


— ^ 


Total . 


ieflrt,i42 45 


5.fM14 


t4 12.677 13 


4.164 


S210,632 33 


3,427 


^smmi 02 


%Lm 


TotRl previous year 


my^AM 44 


5.500 


|4l2J58f* 41 


AMI 


1190,750 6J5 


4.2fi6 


1250,950 35 ^-^ 



(2). No fund provided lor mothers* pciisiciiis. 
(3K Not reported. 



Digitized by 




BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES. 



231 



STATISTICS OF PUBLIC BENEVOLENT AND CORRECTIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CHARITIES— Continued. 



Counties. 



Adams 

Allen „ 

Ashland 

Ashtabula - 

AthenSu - 

Au^aize „ 

Belmont 

Brown „ 

Butler ^ 

Carroll 

Champaign 

ClaTk.__ 

Clermont ~ _ 

Clinton.. _ 

Columbiana ^ 

Coshocton. , 

Crawford „ , 

Cuyahoga.- 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware 

Erie -... 

FairPeld. 

Payette.- 

Franklin 

Fulton- 

Gallia -.... 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey 

Hamilton.-- _ (8) 

Hancock. 

Hardin 

Harrison. 

Henr^' 

Highland 

Hocking. 

Holmes 

Huron 

Jackson 

Jefferson. 

Knox. 

Lake 

Lawrence 

Licking 

Logan 

Lorain— 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahoning.— 

Marion., 

Medina... 

Meigs „ 

Mercer 

Miami.- 

Monroe.- 

Montgomery 

Morgan 





County Jails. 1 

1 


Total 




Fees for 








Maintenance 


Prisoners. 


Expenditures. 


Persons. 


of Prisoners. 








(3) 




(11> 29 


$21,206 38 


3:>6 




2.891 05 


205 


73,492 3/9 


835 




533 25 


30 


28.149 80 


301 




3.247 68 


175 


62.445 47 


911 




2.500 00 


264 


35.889 52 


674 




3.106 11 


110 


23,624 59 


424 




13.304 80 


1.226 


88,219 17 


1.901 




234 75 


33 


15,122 60 


270 




5,976 80 


803 


90,4:15 05 


1,877 




646 20 


61 


13.629 00 


179 




470 26 


49 


46,686 27 


616 


(10) 




(10) 


69.206 12 


630 




698 66 


' 66 


11,913 85 


313 




1.792 80 


313 


30.110 68 


641 




4,570 00 


341 


(6) 69.402 58 


(6) 1.049 




1.704 75 


471 


36,747 16 


722 




2,608 75 


148 


37.968 32 


664 




29.215 12 


7,351 


(7) 462,250 22 


(7) 16.172 




2.263 78 


106 


60.493 72 


726 




664 36 


56 


29,230 51 


389 


(10) 




(10^ 


41.009 27 


441 




2.(M5 25 


122 


47,838 61 


622 




1.217 20 


110 


39.982 42 


486 


(11) 


380 00 


(11) 182 

(12) 2,060 


47.512 62 


511 


(12) 


21.419 20 


222,859 62 


6,306 




396 40 


65 


18.436 93 


188 




642 00 


152 


17,443 14 


373 




81 00 


17 


11.636 98 


104 


(1) 


248 00 


(1) 69 


44.257 03 


538 




1,332 60 


150 


35.376 25 


709 




33.225 00 


2.728 


(8) 305.280 22 


(8) 5,418 




361 75 


71 


46.905 21 


404 




1,642 00 


149 


23.476 94 


716 




666 25 


95 


24,996 57 


291 




768 00 


49 


21.773 41 


351 




340 56 


44 


28.428 98 


451 




401 50 


55 


16.516 57 


283 




80 50 


18 


18.111 95 


202 




1.541 26 


75 


35.199 69 


496 




1.094 80 


83 


12.688 65 


369 




12.509 40 


1.409 


69.282 90 


2.595 




952 20 


268 


17.542 80 


400 


(12) 


1,840 90 


(12) 206 


24.809 37 


488 




2.094 00 


201 


20,446 37 


950 




3,807 30 


655 


54.256 49 


1,630 


(3) 




267 


27,870 56 


637 




6.476 00 


375 


69.409 38 


1.238 




25.414 50 


2.386 


357.990 73 


4.850 




285 75 


38 


31.584 56 


280 




38.238 90 


2.848 


184.883 62 


4.011 




2,397 00 


422 


46.268 12 


942 




473 05 


73 


16.320 18 


293 




1.275 00 


242 


16.921 63 


639 




869 95 


52 


24.482 79 


443 




6.624 75 


530 


63,702 87 


1.490 




2M 00 


48 


12.449 47 


217 




14.248 40 


1.408 


198.992 76 


3.910 




66 60 


29 


14,680 03 


178 



(1). Peport for current year not received: report for previous year substituted. 

(3). Not reported. . . ... 

(4). In a number of counties township rei>orts are missing: other reports are incomplete in certam 
details. 

(6). Proportionate share of cost of Fairmount Home not included in total for Columbiana and 
Stark Counties. 

(7). Cleveland City Infirmary included in Cuyahoga Cx)unty total. 

(8). Cincinnati City Infirmary included in Hamilton County total. 

il 0). No report for two years. 

1 1.). For SIX months preceding June 30. 1919. 

12). For year ending January 31, 1919. 



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232 



OHIO OENiniAL STATISTICS, 



STATISTICS OF PUBLIC BENEVOLENT AND CORRECTIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND AGENCIES COMPILED BY BOARD OF STATE 
CHARITIES— Concluded, 





CQimty Jaite. 


Tatal. 


Onmtla, 


Pecafcjf 
Maint*amncB 
of Prisoner 


Priaonets. 


Expendituret, 


Pers(?iii. 


fJiM,u\[irt^m , .,. , ,,.., . -., . . 


74 10 
(10) 

3)^. 

1.125 55 
36S 50 
S.510 00 
47S 00 
253 TO 
1,515 ^ 
297 OO 

ate 40 

2,179 50 
3,974 12 

(lOO 

8,059 40 

OSfl SI 
l,:i07 50 
0.271 44 
2,709 Oi 
6J65 7» 
4.4^ 00 

102 fifi 

1,215 4fl 

93 ft5 

2,991 59 

l.&3fi 30 

pm 7S 

CD 8S9 S3 

1,600 00 

752 50 


(10). 
(lOX 


34 

*^""29 

146 
931 
f.3 

202' 
41' 
22 
931 

256 

""1j51 

7» 

176 

1.305' 

2,082 

LOOSI 

ISO' 

01 

133 

19a 

123 
100 

imj 

134 


1S49€ 43 
40,883 56 
7.615 55 
18,202 4« 
13,303 9fi 
44,fi70 24 
3M0a 71 
10.5M 40 
33.715 15 
2fi.47fi 17 
2imi OS 
B2,il22 20 
32,9S1 01 
22,124 09 
43.331 21 
33.004 19 
33 J60 44 
119,664 73 
15i,Qe4 90 
75.680 7» 
50,000 Ifl 
liS,19& 17 
26^50 22: 

7.512 sa 

34.334 03 

41,033 m 

44,24S 03 

17.401 «5 
35.719 37 
20,336 31 


175 
704 


Noble^.,^. , .. -^ - 


190 


mtftWB„ 

PiLiiIHirtg . ,-..^,. . ...^ -,...». ..^,-.,.„*.. , 


357 

m 


PonV._ . ..™,_ 


409 


Pit* . ,_ . , ,.__. ___.._ ._ 


«19 

19S 




551 


Prelila ...... . ^^ _„. „« „^„ ^. 


377 




314 
572 


l^nsA . .„ ....,...„..,,^,..,^,,,.„„,...„,.^_^.^ . . . ._ .- 


745 




199 
1.4S7 




525 


Shelby, .„ „„„....^„^„_., ^......„.. 


49S 

2.3K& 




5.080 


Tii»raTA warn.., ...,., . .. .... . . ... .^_ . .„ „. 


l,rtl9 
926 




394 


VaaWert.^^ ^ ^^ ., ,., „ 


440 




137 


WftfTfTrt , ..... .. .... . 


mz 


'Wa.ahiTvgtem.,,^..,. ,^.„^,^,,„, ^.^^ ^, -,, n rr- -rr— 


4M 


WmVTVlX ,.,...^^.^^.^ ^.^_..^.,^_„._ 


465 
27(1 




639 




340 


Clevelami Citirv. . . .. .„ . 


m. 


riivHTiTfut-i r,ity . , , 


"— 




(6)" 46^457 7.r 


&L - 


Painnoutit Home „,....,u.*...„^„ „*...,♦.....„. „> -.^- 


K%\ U% 










TotaT. , 


1317.778 03 




37.934 


I U,l^%Zm 33 


94452 


Total pre\iciui year.,,.,..^ ,^.,......„......... 


i333,33S 35 


39.0B1 


t4,534,e23 57 


04.113 



(1). T?epoft i€iT enmsiit year ndt recciYfid; report for previous year iubstitutdt, 

i%\. Kot reported. , . ^^ » * /- 1 ui a 

rO>. PtopoTtion&tc share of eoss of Fairmount Homo not mdudea in tofal for loiuroDtaaa ina 
Stark Cpudtiei. 

(7). Cleveland Citf Infirmary indltided m Cuyahoga County totjil. 

rei Cincinnati City I ofiirnan' inchidftl in Hjimilton Ciaunf y total. 

(10), No report for t wo years. 



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f 



ippy^^ppp^afVpawnF^"*"- -# " I r* ""-▼^fr^^r ?^':<>,;^7¥iw -™ -^^^i^ptotw «s?5(^^i!«^-i^9fBT"'"-^w.*t^y^Tii^ -^v^ 



REPORT OF 
DEPARTMENT OF SECURITIES 



In accordance with law and precedent I have the honor to transmit 
herewith the Third Annual Eeport of the Department of Securities 
covernig the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920. 

The Department of Securities became a separate state department 
July 1, 1917, and so well has it functioned since that time that the wis- 
dom of the legislation creating the same, and the value of the law licens- 
ing brokers and regulating the disposal of securities within this state 
has become generally recognized. The law has in a large measure pre- 
vented the sale, within this state, of millions of dollars worth of securi- 
ties fraudulently conceived or founded on nothing but speculative 
schemes which had no more substantial basis than the cupidity of 
crooked promoters. On the other hand legitiniate business has not been 
hampered but rather conserved and stabilized. 

During the fiscal year just closed the department has administered 
a greater volume of business and had under consideration a larger num- 
ber of applications for licenses and certificates than in the two preceding 
years combined. This becomes apparent upon a comparison of the re- 
ceipts of the office and of the number of applications filed and licenses 
and certificates issued as hereinafter set forth, with those of the former 
years during the existence of this department. 

FUNCTIONS OP THE ''BLUE SKY" LAW. 

The ''Blue Sky" Law has two important functions: 
First — The licensing of all individuals, co-partnerships or corpora- 
tions dealing in securities (the law defining securities as stock, stock 
certificates, bonds, debentures, collateral trust certificates or other similar 
instruments evidencing title to, or interest in, property) or real estate 
located outside of Ohio. To secure a license, the applicant must be of 
good business repute, and submit references and other information to 
the Commissioner to establish this fact. The department has authority 
at any time to examine the books and records of any licensee to determine 
whether or not the business is being properly conducted. 

Second — Securities, (excepting those specifically exempted under 
the statute), and real estate located outside of the state, offered for sale 
must be approved by the Commissioner before being sold or even offered 
for sale within the state. Upon approval of the proposition together 
with the proposed methods of operating, a Certificate of Corporate Com- 

(233; Digitized by google 



234 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

pliance is issued. To obtain this certificate, very complete information 
must be filed with the department by the applicant, including copy of 
the articles of incorporation, certified to by the officer or officers of the 
particular state or province granting same; rules, regulations and by- 
laws, method of operation, financial condition, complete description of 
all property, both tangible and intangible, salaries to be paid officers, 
amount of stock given for promotion, organization, patents, formulas, 
trade mark, etc., and the terms upon which the stock is to be sold, as 
well as certified copies of all contracts relative to carrying on the busi- 
ness. 

INVESTIGATION IS MADE. 

An inspection and investigation is then made by an examiner as to 
the personnel of the corporation and condition of the property wherever 
located, upon which the securities are predicated. In all cases a written 
report is then made by the examiner and this information is compared 
with that placed on file, and, if a going concern is under investigation, 
the books are also audited with particular reference to the profit and loss 
account, assets and liabilities. With this information at hand, the Com- 
missioner is in a position to decide intelligently as to whether authority 
to seU the securities or real estate for which application has been made, 
should be granted or refused. 

WORTHY INVESTMENTS NOT HINDERED. 

Concerning the intent, essence and results of the law, one thought 
has always been uppermost and that is to administer it uniformly and 
equitably, and to this end the department has had the co-operation of 
all fair-minded and honest business men, as they have been quick to 
realize that to stabilize all business strengthens greatly each particular 
enterprise. Applicants having a fair plan of organization, with compe- 
tent and reputable men in charge and with a feasible system for opera- 
tion, have no trouble in getting their propositions promptly acted upon. 

The law, though restrictive, gives the Commissioner much latitude, 
and, as long as a business is placed on a high plane and is to be con- 
ducted primarily for the benefit of the investors, no legal hindrance is 
in the way. All applications relative to business undertakings of this 
nature can be acted upon without delay, and no onerous conditions are 
exacted to cover future activities of such undertakings. When, in the 
opinion of the Commissioner, such conditions are necessary,. they must be 
accepted in writing before the certificate becomes efifective 

SAFEGUARDS TO INVESTMENTS. 
A business may be hazardous and exceedingly speculative, and while 

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DEPARTMENT OF SECURITIES. 235 

it is not the intention of the law to remove such features, yet the Com- 
missioner primarily acts as the mediator for the purpose of making sure 
that the investor's money goes to develop the enterprise, less a reasonable 
amount paid for the sale of the stock, services rendered, etc. With these 
conditions prevailing, and with competent management, there is nothing 
either morally or legally wrong in allowing each individual who is men- 
tally well balanced to determine as to the propriety of investing. 

It has been necessary, however, in a great number of cases for the 
Commissioner to substantially reduce the amount of stock to be issued 
for promotion, services, patents, contracts, etc., and in some cases elim- 
inate such stock allotments altogether as well as refuse certifications 
until all leases are legally executed and recorded, all patents duly granted 
and assigned to the corporation, all contracts executed, and to absolutely 
refuse certifications in other cases, but in this the Commissioner has 
always been prompted by the motive of protecting the investor and plac- 
ing the proposed issue of securities upon a fair basis. 

SECURITIES HELD IN ESCROW. 

It is very often the case in the organization and promotion of a 
company that the persons interested therein or promoting the same are 
to have issued to them a portion of the stock in exchange for patent 
rights, or other intangible assets, or for services rendered in organizing 
and promoting the company. In such cases the Commissioner determines 
as to the fairness of the amount of stock so alloted and invariably re- 
quires said stock when issued to be escrowed either with the department 
or with an individual or trust company designated by the Commissioner, 
until such time as the company has earned a certain amount of dividends 
or until other conditions, which the Commissioner at the time judged to 
be wise and necessary for the protection of the company and future 
investors, had been fully complied with. The purpose of escrowing stock 
under such conditions is to prevent the promoter from disposing of his 
stock while the company is still in its promotion stage and until the 
worth of the property has been proven by actual earnings, and also to 
prevent an abandonment of the project by the promoters to the prejudice 
of the other stockholders, as well as to induce the promoters to stimulate 
their efforts in behalf of the company. 

Because of this policy, the department is holding in escrow at the 
close of the fiscal year $42,486,000 worth of securities at par value and 
588,728 shares of no par value stock. 

EXEMPTIONS. 

Not all of the securities, within the meaning of the Securities Act, 
disposed of within this state, are required to be certificat^^U^C^is de- 



236 - OHIO GENEEil. STATISTICS. " 

partment or sold through a licensed dealer. Section 6373-2 (f ) exempts 
from license and eertification the disposal in good faith of the seeuritiefi 
of a corporation organized under the laws of this state where the securi- 
ties are sold by the issuer without any commissionj at a total expense of 
not more than two per eent plus $500.00, and where none of the stock is 
issued directlyj or indirectly, in payment for patentSj serviceSj good will 
or property not located in this state. 

Under the provisions of said section 6373-2 (f) there was reported 
to this department for exemption thereunder, for the past year^ the foU 
lowing securities : 

Common stock aggrcgatmir -~— — $228,903^000 00 

Preferred stock aggregating——.-,,.-^ . * — $109,102,000 00 

Number of shares of no par common stock ^^, 6,016,000 

Seetion 6373-14 also provides that certain securities may be dis- 
posed of within this state without certification by this department wh^n 
the securities have been underwritten and paid for, in cash or its equiva- 
lent, by the underwriter before attempting to sell the same and pur- 
chased at not less than ninety per cent of the price at which the same 
are thereafter sold by him or where the securities are those of a comtnon 
carrier or of a company organized under the laws of this state and 
engaged principally in the business of manufaeturing, transportation, 
coal mining or quarrying, and tlie whole or part of the property upon 
which such securities are predicated is located within this state^ or of a 
real estate or building company all of whose property upon which sueh 
securities are predicated is located in this state. While this section 
exempts tire securities from certification they must nevertheless be dis- 
posed of through a duly licensed dealer. 

There was reported to this department during tlie past year for 
exemption under said section the following amount of securities : 

Common stock aggregating^ -*,_^„_^___-^_^- ^_^-$l5|332,000 00 

rreferred stock aggregating——— _.- — ...$171,832,000 00 

Bonds and notes aggregating.— _^^^-.,.^ .^—^, ,$154,213,000 00 

Number of shares of no par common stock. 2,710,000 

By virtue of the two above cited sections of the Securities Act there 

was reported to this department, for disposal within this state during the 
past year, securities aggregating the sum of $679,382,000.00 and 8 ,726,000 
shares of no i>ftr stoek over which this department had no supervision. 

LICENSES ISSUED. 

The statute provides that tlie Commissioner shall, upon beings sat- 
isfied as to the business repute of the applicant, grant a dealer's liBense^Tp 



DEPARTMENT OP SECURITIES. 237 

to any person or company applying for the same after giving legal notice 
of such application for a period of one week, and during the past year 
1,018 dealer's licenses were allowed and 650 dealer's licenses renewed 
for the year 1920. A dealer is permitted to name agents under his license 
and during the year 7,430 agents were named and added to the various 
licenses held by the numerous dealers. During the year 1,557 licenses 
and agents' authority were revoked. Eight applications for dealer's 
licenses were refused and eleven applications were abandoned during 
the year. 

SECURITIES CERTIFICATED. 

All securities, for disposal within this state within the meaning of 
the Securities Act, that are not entitled to exemption under the two 
sections heretofore cited, are required to be certificated by the Commis- 
sioner before the same can be issued and sold in the state of Ohio. After 
a full and complete examination of the proposition and of the properties 
upon which the proposed securities are predicated if it then appears to 
the Commissioner that the law has been complied with and that the 
business of the applicant is not fraudulently conducted and that the 
proposed disposal of such securities or other proprety is not upon grossly 
unfair terms and that the issuer or vendor is solvent, a certificate to that 
effect is then issued. During the past year there were filed with this 
department 1,176 applications for such certificates and the same were 
favorably or unfavorably acted upon by this department with the result 
that 944 were allowed and certificates issued. The remainder were either 
refused by the Commissioner or abandoned by the applicant. 

"While a total of 944 applications were allowed and certificates 
issued it might be said that in practically ninety-eight per cent of these 
applications the Commissioner required a modification of the plan under 
which the company was organized and proposed to issue its securities, or 
materially reduced the amount of stock to be issued for property, patents, 
promotion, services, etc., so as to better safeguard the investor and place 
the disposal of the proposed issue upon a fair basis for all concerned. 

The securities so certificated by this department during the fiscal 
year are as follows : 

Common stock aggregating $151,522,000 00 

Preferred stock aggregating $195,587,000 00 

Total number of shares of no par common stock 7,128,000 

We here direct your attention to the fact that during the past year 
securities aggregating $678,382,000.00 together with a total of 8,726,000 
shares of no par stock were reported for disposal within this state under 
the exemption sections of the Securities Act and nc^ j^^^^^^^Jt^^W^^ 



238 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

vision by this department ; while on the other hand securities certificated 
by this department during tiie same period for disposal within this state 
aggregate $347,109,000.00 and 7,128,000 shares of no par common stock, 
and of which a large part is held in escrow as hereinbefore mentioned. 
The amount of securities certificated being practically one-half of the 
amount of exempted securities disposed of within this state. It is thus 
apparent that a far greater amount of securities are placed upon the 
market in the state of Ohio free from supervision by this department 
than the amount permitted by this department after thorough examina- 
tion and consideration, and in my opinion it suggests the importance and . 
necessity of amending the Securities Act so as to prohibit many exemp- 
tions which are now permitted under the present law. Some of the 
present exemptions permit the disposal of securities by companies that 
may be insolvent or wherein an excessive commission may be paid to 
dealers for selling the stock, all to the prejudice of the new investor. 

PROSECUTION OF VIOLATORS. 

Willful violations of the law have been detected in various parts of 
the state during the year and a number of arrests and prosecutions have 
been instituted by the department. Evidence procured by examiners of 
the department in such cases being turned over to the prosecuting attor- 
neys of the counties in which such offenses occurred. Indictments have 
been secured and convictions in most cases have followed. This phase 
of the department's activity has done much to discourage unscrupulous 
persons from misrepresenting and attempting to dispose of unauthorized 
securities within the state. 

The burden of these prosecutions has fallen upon the Commissioner, 
the Deputy Commissioner and the examiners, all of w^hom find their time 
urgently needed in the consideration of applications for the sale of se- 
curities, and it has been a matter of difficulty to adequately prosecute 
such violations of the law. 

The full measure of protection to Ohio investors against these un- 
licensed as well as unscrupulous dealers will not be reached until such 
time as the department has been placed in position through adequate 
employes to prosecute all violations of the law. 

This law has demonstrated that fraud and deception in the sale of 
the securities can be practically eliminated. Legitimate corporations 
and dealers have become its most ardent supporters, and the investing 
public will greet with hearty approval any amendment that will 
strengthen it and make it more efficient. 

IN GENERAL. 
It should always be borne in mind that Blue Sky Laws, howeyer_T _ 

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DEPARTMENT OP SECUBITIES. 239 

vigorously and intelligently' administered (unless indeed they are oper- 
ated so as to utterly extinguish enterprise) , cannot oflPer entire assurance 
of safety in investment. Nothing under the law can be done to guarantee 
the future stability of an enterprise, as a company, though organized 
and promoted with the best of motive arid most commendable purpose, 
and after certification by this department may, through mismanagement 
or lack of business experience or for reason of general financial condi- 
tions, fail and cause a loss to the investor. Where losses are due to the 
negligent or fraudulent acts on the part of the promoters or oflScers of 
the company, through embezzlement of corporate funds, or failure to 
expend the amounts received for the purposes for which the money was 
obtained, or by the payment of fictitious dividends, or in deliberate 
swindling and cheating, provision should be made by proper legislation 
to punish the guilty individuals. A company in its organization may 
comply with the law and have its project and plans approved by this 
department and receive a license to dispose of its stock, but later its 
promoters or oflScers may perpetrate a fraud upon the public through 
false representations and promises or misappropriation of funds. To 
remedy such conditions penal statutes should be enacted. 

It is not merely suflScient to provide a penalty for selling securities 
without first securing a license from this department. Punishment 
should be provided for swindling operations after a license has been 
secured instead of merely providing punishment for failure to obtain a 
state's consent to sell stock. A system of punishing dishonest and un- 
fair dealing after certification will tend to eliminate many frauds, and 
the best protection that can be given to the public is sure punishment 
of cheats and swindlers who operate under the guise of an honest pro- 
moter and who go forth representing that their proposition has been 
certified and licensed by a state department. An adequate force should 
be provided this department to permit investigation and audit of the 
affairs and books of the companies at reasonable periods after securing 
authority to sell its securities to prevent wasteful expenditure or embez- 
zlement of corporate funds and to see that orders issued to govern the 
sale of such securities are conformed to. 

The Blue Sky Law, however, has accomplished much good. It has 
reduced promotion cost and expense to a minimum and has kept out of 
the state many ** fly-by-night, ' ' impractical, and fraudulent promotions, 
and by these means saved millions of dollars to the Ohio investor. Every 
dollar so saved to the public through elimination of fraudulent promo- 
tions and impossible enterprise is a dollar available for decent business 
that aids in the upbuilding of the state. 

In a steadily increasing measure organizers of new enterprises are 
adopting the department's suggestions for organization along lines that 
have been found fair and practical in business experience, and as a 

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240 OHIO GEINTERAL STATISTICS, 

direct result of the efforts of the department, careless and unfair prac- 
tices of corporate organizations are giving way to sounder methods to the 
adv^antage alike of business itself, which is thus made easier of financing, 
and of the investing public. 

That the law has been fairly administered and that no substantial 
injury has been done to business is fairly evidenced by the fact that in 
no case has an appeal been taken from any decision of the Commissioner 
although the act provides a ready method of appeal to the courts, and it 
is exceedingly gratifying to the department that its efforts to protect 
the public from fraud and unsound promotions and to encourage and 
assist conservative business has met with general commendation and 
Iwarty co-operation on the part of legitimate dealers and business men 
as well as from the people generally. The department will endeavor to 
deserve their support, and wherever possible to extend its field of useful- 
ness. 

t 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

Below is reported the total receipts and disbursements of this de- 
partment, since becoming a separate state department: 

For the year ending June 30, 1918. 
Recdpts ._..—„..— — — $59,224 00 

lilj^biirsemenis — ___^_— ^— ^-^ 42,558 87 

Balance -. .-..—_. $16,665 13 

For the year ending June 30, 1919. 

Recdpts . -- — - — ^- $67,077 27 

Disbursements — ^ *- 49,667 80 

Balance— -—..—»,-.— ~— $17,409 47 

* 
For the ycur ending June 30, 1920. 
(Covered by this report) • 

Receipts -..— ,-^-^— ^-^— $137,497 00 

Disbursements __ ^^^^ ^~-. 59,839 27 

Balance^^-^-.— — ™-,-^— — — — $77,657 73 

This depurtiuent has at all times been more than self-sustaining and 
bad been of great service to tlie public without expense to the general 
tax payer, 

CHATTEL LOAN DIVISION. 

It it somewhat unfortunate that the fiscal year and the license year 
of the bureau are not identical. This disagreement may lead to a little 

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DEPARTMENT OP SECURITIES. 241 

confusion in considering this report. The fiscal year ends on June 30, 
whereas the license year ends on March 1. The subject matter following 
relates of course to the occurrences between June 30, 1919, and June 30, 
1920. 

The fifth year of the operation of the Lloyd Act ended June 30, 
1920, the date of this report. During the year our operations have been 
very interesting, far-reaching and important. When it is considered 
that there are always on the books as borrowers from our licensees over 
eighty thousand borrowers and in dollars more than four million con- 
stantly employed and further that during the year (while no exact 
figures are available) probably two hundred thousand different borrow- 
ers are accommodated and that each borrower represents a family of 
some size, it will be seen that the importance of this work is more than 
considerable. The class of our population affected by this law too is 
most important, being probably almost entirely constituted of those who 
are the industrial producers and who, for one reason or another, are in 
urgent temporary need of relatively small sums of money which ordi- 
narily cannot be obtained through other channels and to whom it is 
important that their peace of mind and independence be preserved. 
The energies of the bureau have been devoted first to see to it that no 
borrower is overcharged, no matter in how small an amount, and second, 
to search out, stop and punish all illegal lending in the state so far as we 
possibly can. "We have also interested ourselves actively in perfecting 
and making as uniform as possible all systems of accounting. The 
writer of this report has no claim of originality in the theory that to 
get a man out of debt is often much more of a favor than to lend him 
money in case of urgent need, but acting on this theory we have con- 
sistently urged and even preached that payments on account be made as 
large as is consistent with borrowers' incomes and that such payments 
should be insisted on with as great regularity as consistent with indi- 
vidual conditions, to the end that thrift and saving be impressed on and 
inculcated in the borrowers. 

The regular examinations^ of the licensees have been made by our 
eflScient examiners with great thoroughness and the results shown by such 
examinations have been in the main most satisfactory, particularly so 
in the fact that it is clearly apparent that almost without exception the 
licenses have been found manifesting their complete and whole-hearted 
desire to co-operate with the department in every way and the value of 
co-operation to all concerned has again been clearly demonstrated. It 
is proper in this report to commend most highly the officers and mem- 
bers of The Ohio Loan Association and the other licensees for their real 
enthusiasm in maintaining and furthering the objects aimed at in the 
law. It is of course true that the examinations often disclose inaccura- 
cies in computations of interest, which inaccuracies are almost as often 

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242 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

less than could be charged as they are over the amount permitted. These ' 
overcharges are to be expected when the vast number of computations 
made in a year and tJie hurry under which thpy are often made is con- 
sidered, but in no case have they been serious in amount nor have they 
been made with any intent to over-reach or violate the provisions of the 
law. When found the small amounts have invariably been refunded to 
the borrower. It has not been necessary to bring to the attention of any 
prosecuting officer any licensee in the state. The examinations made 
are probably the most valuable part of our work. They stimulate the 
lenders to care and attention to their charges which formerly were made 
w4th considerable carelessness, and keep from engaging in the business 
such persons who, without the curb of examination, would work greedily 
at the expense of the necessitous. They also are notice to the borrowers 
throughout the state that their interests are being looked after and safe- 
guarded under the law. Every borrower should know, if he does not 
now, that the slightest complaint of any overcharge or any unjust treat- 
ment of any kind will receive the instant attention of the department 
and will be corrected or punished to the best of our abilities and powers. 

We have investigated quite a large number of reported and suspected 
violations of law and have taken into court, with resulting convictions in 
every case, thirteen violations in the following cities: Lima (2), Ironton 
(4), Mansfield, Lockland, Cincinnati, Toledo, Postoria, Akron and Tiffin. 
Fines were assessed of from $50.00 to $200.00 in each case and in addi- 
tion considerable sums were ordered refunded to borrowers and other 
amounts were not permitted to be collected. We have also, in several 
instances, prevented violations from occurring by warning those who 
were about to commit same. 

Quite secondary to our main duties have been our efforts to improve 
and make as uniform as possible the system of accounting and computing 
and we believe we have accomplished much. Our efforts in this direction 
have been first to make sure that the statements rendered to borrowers 
show clearly, at all times, the amounts due from them to the lenders, and 
second, that the system of computing charges should be as simple as 
possible and such as to render errors difficult to make and easy to dis- 
cover and correct if made. The law does not directly give the depart- 
ment authority over such matters and therefore we can only accomplish 
results by suggestions and co-operation by licensees but, with one or two 
exceptions, the licensees have cheerfully co-operated especially when they 
see that the suggestions have been made progressive It is natural for 
one to prefer his own system but when our suggestions are right they 
w411 eventually govern. 

The number of licenses issued in the license year ending March 1, 
1920, was one hundred and fifty-six (151)) as against one hundred and 
forty-four (144) for the preceding license year. On March 1, sixteen 

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DEPARTMENT OF SECURITIES. 243 

(16) of the licensees did not renew their licenses but new applications 
were received and at the date of this report, June 30, there have been 
issued one hundred and fifty-five (155) licenses and it is quite certain 
that this number will be increased to at least one hundred and sixty-five 
(165) before March 1, 1921. 

The amount of business done by the licensees, exclusive of those do- 
ing only a pawnbroking business and The Industrial Discount Company 
and The Union Finance Company, both of Cleveland, and who lend only 
on invoices, is not exactly ascertainable, but we estimate it at over four 
million dollars constantly employed and approximately ninety thousand 
separate borrowers at any given time. 

There are quite a number of companies in the state engaged in the 
business of buying ** automobile paper.*' It would seem that these com- 
panies should be under the jurisdiction of this department, but on con- 
sultation it has been determined that w^hen their transactions are clearly 
and fairly purchases of paper and not lending of money, that we will not 
claim jurisdiction. 

The pawnbroking business in the state is in a most unsatisfactory 
condition. In three cities, Cleveland, Akron and Barberton, some of the 
pawnbrokers have taken out state licenses and are accommodating their 
business and charges to the provisions of our act and affairs are working 
smoothly though not with entire satisfaction to the department or to the 
pawnbrokers. Unquestionably there should be passed a law which would 
take into account the full equities of this peculiar and necessary business 
and regular and careful supervision provided for. We regard this as 
most important and hope it will be brought to the attention of the legis- 
lature at the coming session. 



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REPORT OF 
STATE MEDICAL BOARD 



Regular meetings of State Medical Board were held on July 1, 1919 ; 
October 7, 1919; Januar>^ 6, 1920; April 6, 1920. Called meetiDgs were 
held on October 6, 1919; December 3, 1919; January 5, 1920; April 5, 
1920, and Juiie 10, 1920, 

Regular examinations were held on December 2, 3 and i, 1919, and 
June 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, 1920. 

On July 1, 1919, 128 physicians aud surgeons and 11 osteopaths 
were registered as a result of examinations held on June 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, 
1919; 29 physicians and surgeons and 5 osteopaths were registered as a 
rcaiilt of examinations held December 2, 3 and 4, 1919. Three ost^eo- 
paths, already licensed, were granted certitieatea to practice surgery, as 
a result of the examinations held on Decembebr 2, 3 and 4, 1919, 

Reciprocity certificates were issued to 143 physicians and surgeons 
and one osteopath during the year. 

Six limited practitioners were iasued certificates under the five-year 
waiver, four chiropodists were issued certificates under the five year 
waiver, and three were certificated by examination under the higher 
educational requirements. Nine mid wives were granted certificates dur- 
ing the year as a result of examinations held on June 2, 3, 4^ 5 and 6, 
1919, and December 2, 3 and 4, 1919. 

Four hundred and ninety4hrec preliminary educational certificates 
were issued to those desiring admission to medical schools; twenty-five 
to tliosc desiring admission to schools of limited practice. 

Nine applicatiouB for revocation {physicians and surgeons) were 
considered ; two certificates were revoked during the year, and one 
certificate restored. Two physicians and surgeons surrendered their 
certificates. Two limited practitioners' certificates were revoked. Six- 
teen physicians and surgeons, mid wives and limited practitioners were 
called before the board to explain their practices. 

STATISTICS. 

CERTIFICATES I8SUKD AKD APPLICATIONS REJECTED FROM JULY 1, 

1919 TO JUNE 30, W20. 

I. To graduates in medicine and BurKory on examination — 

July 1, 1019 .„. . ...__..._. .. laS 

January 6, 1020---- .-„,-, __.-.-.__, — 20 



TotaL— -„..., ...--._-. — -.-_ - -.-_—,„ 157 

^244) Digitized by VjOOQ1( 



e 



STATE MEDICAL BOARD. 245 

2. To gr&duates in medicine and surgery imder reciprocity provisions — 

July 1, 1919 - 40 

October?, 1919 ..._ 37 

Decembers, 1919 ^- 14 

January 6, 1920 - 20 

April 6, 1920 _ 30 

June 10, 1920 .._.- _. 2 

Total _ 143 

3 To Osteopaths on examination — 

July 1, 1919 - 11 

January 6, 1920 ._. _ -. 5 

Total _ 16 

4. To Osteopaths under reciprocity provisions — 

October?, 1919 1 

5. To Osteopaths previously licensed— Surgery certificates — 

January 6, 1920 3 

6. To limited practitioners on examination under waiver — 

7. To limited practitioners, five year practice, under waiver — 

October?, 1919. _._ _ _. 2 

April 6, 1920 _ - 4 

Total - 6 

8. To limited practitioners, under higher requirements — 

9. To Chiropodists, five years practice, under waiver — 

July 1, 1919 _ 1 

April 6, 1920 ._. 3 

Total ■ 4 

10. To<;jhiropodists, on examination, higher requirements- 

July 1, 1919 - 3 

11. To Midwives on examination — 

July 1, 1919 6 

January 6, 1920 3 

Total 9 

APPLICATIONS REJECTED. 

1. To graduates in medicine and surgery on examination- 
July 1, 1919 2 

January 6, 1920 : 4 



Total. 



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2^ OHIO GENER.\L STATISTICS. 

2. To graduatpa under reciprocity provisions — 

July 1, ims . 2 

Decemlx^rS, 1910 ,...._ ._ -.- 2 

January fV, 1020., ._ - .- 2 

Jujie lOp 1020-..,,. -.- 1 



Total- 



To OstPopathH on examination — 

pJuly 1, 1919 ..„.....--. - .-- ---- 5 

January G, 1920..,,,...,....,, 21 



Total.... „ ,---- -- 2G 

4. To Oflteopaths under reciprocity provisions — 

5. To Midwive^ on exiimination— 

6 . To U m i t etl pra c t it i onere — 

July 1, 1010--,. . -.-- 4 

7. To ChiropodLBtB— " 

CERTIFICATES REVOKED. 

rhysiciana and Surgeons— 

July 1, IDIO- ,- ,-. Herbert E. Twitchell Hamilton 

Octobor?, 1919,_,.,,,,_.,._-G. E, Brown. Cleveland 

Limited Practitioners^- 

Octobc»r 7, 1910.,.,- Harry Ben Bolt Bellefontaine 

April 0, 1020, ......... Peter James Visser Cleveland 

CERTIFICATES SURRENDERED 

(After being cited for revocation, voluntarily surrendered their license, and left 

ihi' State.) 

Physicians and Surgeons— 

• April 6, 1920 - .Win throp Randall- _ Cleveland 

April U, 19^^-. ,,-, Edwin Hartley Pratt Cleveland 

CERTIFICATES RESTORED. 

Physicians and Surgeons^ 

Decembers, I919-,,...,.,.,,Merton A. Probert - Bloomdale 

SimiMARY. 

Total number of cjertificates issued since passage of law. 

Physicians and Surgeons— 

To graduates without examination 10,324 

To graduates without cxiiinination on reciprocity.. TT"l"a'K"^ti00^1Pffe 



STATE MEDICAL BOARD. 247 

To legal practitioners.. _ _ _. 713 

To one year certificates on examination _ _ 15 

To graduates on examination. 3,15'J 

To graduates on reciprocity, after examination 810 

Total _ — _ _. 15,127 

Osteopaths— 

To graduates without examination. _. u _ 122 

To graduates on examination _ ,.._ 232 

To graduates with examination on reciprocity --. 3C 

Total -.- 390 

Limited Practitioners— 

To applicants under waiver on examination _ _ 224 

To applicants under waver without exjimination -. 342 

To applicants on examination under higher requirements 1 

Total _- 567 

Chiropodist— 

To under waiver on examination. _ ._ 13 

To under waiver without examination _ 161 

To on examination, higher requirements _ ^ 17 

Total - :..-- 191 

Midwives — 

By probate judges - 290 

By examination .._ 341 

Total - 631 

REJECTIONS. 

Physicians and Surgeons- 
Graduates — without examinations ._ 227 

Legal practitioners 227 

On examination- _ 214 

On reciprocity 74 

Total - 742 

Osteopaths — 

On examination ..- 81 

Reciprocity 9 

Total - --- 90 

Limited Practitioners- 
Five years practice under waiver - 64 

On examination under waiver _ — 50 

On examination — Higher requirements. 2 

Total 116 

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248 OHIO GENEEAL STATISTICS. 

Chiropodista— 

Five years practice under waiver. .^ .__-_-__,*.____.., ._--.^* 6 

On examinat ion under waiver. .^, ^.......^ , _,__,^^,,^_. 3 

Oti examination, higher requirements. __.___*-,,,_,_^,. ^_,.^*. ... 1 

Total -..„,-..__.-.„.„ _.-_........ .,_- 10 

Mid wives — 

On examination. _, ... ^ *.......,,,.,........ 11& 

On re-examinatiou, , .^^_- ^^^__^._.....^.... 31 

TotaI.........„.„..___„.,.____„._._, .,._.,.. ..-_...-.....- 88 

Certifientes revoked^^ 

Physicians and aurgeons., _._.____-_ ^.,_,.,.„^,,,._ 68 

Mtdwives ^_. _. _,,,._, _,_,^_^,.^._.^_^..._ 3 

Chiropodi&ts . ... ...__..*_ ^. _,,.,_ _.,._....._ ^ 1 

Limited practitioners^..-* *.,^,_..^,__..^.^.,.^.^ . 3 

^ TotaL-..,.. ._._.,._._........-„.-_....„ ,_. 75 

Certificates suspended— 

Physieiwnii and siirgeons_..-..^,v----^-----,^,.^.-.^.- _ 1 

Certi5catei anrrende red- 
Physicians and surgeons...,. ..._..,.._. ,,_____,, ..^ 2 

Certificates restored^ 

Physicians and surgeons.. ,.__-_*, .. ^- ,-....^*._-_.__*- 16 

Midwiv€s..__-_...^^._,.,^, ^,.___,_ _.._.. ._.,_-,,. 2 

Total .._..-.....- _„.„..... IS 



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REPORT OF 
NURSE REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT 

JULY 1, 1919, TO JUNE 30, 1920. 



Regular meetings of Nurses' Examining Committee were held July 
8, 1919, and January 13, 1920. 

Called meetings were held November 3, 1919, and December 30, 1910. 

Examinations for nurse registration were held on December 9 and 
10, 1919, and June 1, 2 and 3, 1920. 



Number of certificates issued under waiver of examination _ 

Number of certificates issued through reciprocity. _— 15 

Number of certificates issued after examination 425 ' 

Total - _ 449 

Certificates of preliminary eduication issued to applicants for entrance 

to schools of nursing _ 784 

Educational qualifications of the above, having 

College degree _ 6 

High school and part college course- _ 37 

High school diploma __ _ 294 

More than one year high school, 5 to 14 units 161 

One year high school, or four units 130 

Entrance examination - _ -_. 34 

Reciprocity in nurse licensure was established with the following 
states : Idaho, Iowa and Delaware. 

Visits to and conferences with hospitals 88 

The following improvements are noted in conduct of schools : 

New class rooms and added teaching equipment _. 5 

Adding teaching equipment _ - _ 23 

Improved living conditions for students 12 

Schools giving public health courses 26 

Schools using eight hour system _ 12 

The use of the modified course of the National Curriculum for 
Schools of Nursing, which was presented to the schools of the state last 
year, has resulted in a fairly uniform curriculum being carried out in 
all the recognized schools of the state. ^ 

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250 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



The voluntary placing of full time instructors for the class room 
work in 41 of the 64 registered schools has produced excellent results 
in obtaining a state wide uniformity of training. This result is shown 
in schools which lack clinical material and from which students are ac- 
cepted by larger schools to make up the deficiencies. 

A nation wide campaign to interest young women, about to be 
graduated from the high schools, in the study of nursing was promul- 
g;ated by the Red Cross during the months of April and May of this 
year. In Ohio, speakers from schools of nursing visited the high schools 
and told them of the work and elaborated upan the advantages of an 
education in nursing. 

The second epidemic of influenza threw a very heavy burden upon 
the student nurses. As always, the student nurse is the one who meets 
th actual emergencies. 

From the report of the Survey Committee of the Rockefeller Board, 
we learned that Ohio has two out of the four highest schools of nursing, 
from the educational viewpoint. The School of Nursing and Health in 
Cincinnati is first and Lakeside Hospital of Cleveland ranking fourth. 

Survey of hospitals and schools of nursing from annual report 
shows as follows: Daily average, 5,982; beds, 7,872; students, 1,968; 
graduate nurses, 496 ; dietitians, 55. 

Forty of Ohio schools of nursing are giving students the benefit of 
a broader experience by aflSliation for medical, children's, contagious and 
public health nursing. This shows an increase of 14 schools who are 
securing education in services which they do not provide for the student. 

LIST OF RECOGNIZED SCHOOLS OF NURSING IN OHIO. 



Akron City Hospital, Akron. 
Alliance City Hospital, Alliance. 
Ashtabula General Hospital, Ashtabula. 
Aultman Memorial Hospital, Canton. 

Ball Memorial Hospital, Piqua. 
Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati. 
Bethesda Hospital, Zanesville. 

Christ Hospital, Cincinnati. 
Cleveland City Hospital, Cleveland. 

Deaconess Hospital, Cincinnati. 
Delaware Springs Sanitarium, Delaware. 

East Liverpool Hospital, East Liverpool. 
Elyria Memorial Hospital, Elyria. 
Evangelical Lutheran Hospital, Cleve- 
land. 



Fairview Park Hospital, Cleveland. 
Flower Hospital, Toledo. 

Glenville Hospital, Cleveland. 
Good Samaritan Hospital, Cincinnati. 
Good Samaritan Hospital, Zanesville. 
Good Samaritan Hospital, Sandusky. 
Grant Hospital, Columbus. 

Home and Hospital, Findlay. 
Homeopathic Hospital, Columbus. 
Hawkes Hospital of Mt. Carmel, 

Columbus. 
Huron Road Hospital, Cleveland. 



Jane Case Hospital, Delaware. 
Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati. 



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STATE MEDICAL BOARD. 



251 



Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland. 
Lakewood Hospital, Lakewood. 
Lancaster Hospital, Lancaster. 
Lima Hospital, Lima. 
Lucas County Hospital, Toledo. 

Marietta Hospital, Marietta. 
Massillon City Hospital, Massillon. 
Memorial Hospital of Sandusky County, 

Fremont. 
Mercy Hospital, Canton. 
Mercy Hospital, Columbus. 
Mercy Hospital, Hamilton. 
Mercy Hospital, Toledo. 
Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton. 
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Cleveland. 

Ohio Valley Hospital, Steubenville. 

Painesville Ho^ital, Painesville. 
Peoples Hospital, Akron. 
Protestant Hospital, Columbus. 
Providence Hospital, Sandusky. 

Robinwood Hospital, Toledo. 



Salem Hospital, Salem. 

School of Nursing and Health— ^Univers- 
ity of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. 

Springfield City Hospital, Springfield. 

St. Alexis Hospital, Cleveland. 

St. Clair Hospital, Columbus. 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Youngstown. 

St. John's Hospital, Cleveland. 

St. Joseph's Hospital, Lorain. 

St. Luke's Hospital, Cleveland. 

St. Rita's Hospital, Lima. 

St. Vincent's Hospital, Toledo. 

St. Vincent's Charity Hospitj;!, Clove- 
land. 

Seton Hospital, Cincinnati. 

Toledo Hospital, Toledo. 
Van Wert County Hospital, Van Wert. 
Warren City Hospital, Warren. 
Youngstown Hospital, Youngstown. 



SUMMARY. 

Total number of certific ites issued since passage of the law_ 6,120 

To graduates without examination under the waiver 5,380 

To graduates without examination on reciprocity. 26 

To graduates after examination : 677 

To graduates on reciprocity after examination 37 



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REPORT OF 
THE STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXAMINATIONS. 





Number of 
appli- 
cants. 


Satis- 
factory. 


Rejected. 


Granted 
assistant 
certiJic'ee 
on Phar. 
examina- 
tion. 


Absent, 


June 1919 — PhartnaciBt^ 

Asat. Phar^^ ._ 


50 
23 

50 

40 

48 
18 

Sd 

59 


22 
12 

10 

1 

22 
2 

15 
13 


30 
11 

33 

8 

17 

22 
4 


7 


1 


Oct. 1919— Pharm aetata 

Asst, Phar _. 


4 


3 


Jan, 1920— Plmrmaciflts 

Asfit, Phar... 

April 1920— Pharmacists-,-. 


1 
10 


1 
1 


June 1920— Pharm aetata- -- 






Asst. Phar __.--. 




















Total pharmacists 

Total Aast, Phar-_,.— . 


227 
88 


m 

28 


92 
23 


22 


6 








Total both grades. 


305 


97 


115 


22 


6 



Percentage of phirmncists sueceasfuL,,.-^ ... ,___ 36 plus 

Percentage of assiataiits successful .--.,___,,_. _, 53 plus 

Increase m number of pharmacist applicants _,_,,,,..,,,,__ 61 plus 

Increase in number of assistant applicants 100% 

Pharmacists registered by reciprocity. _. .. -__ 5fl 

Apprentices registered diiring the year.,,, ^_, ^-... , 453 

Preliminary education certificates issued,- ^ ___.,,_^. _,,,,__, _^ 20^ 



NUMBER OF CERTIFICATES IN FORCE JUNE 30, 1^0. 

Pharmacists by examination,., __,___,, ^.-,^..,*^_,._,,,.^.^, 3;923 

Pharmacists by law. . -.__..__,,,_._-_ ^ ...^^ -*^^^, 501 

Pharmacists by reciprocity.-- ,^^. ----.-__. _.^ - ._ 197 



Totalnumber of pharmacists-,— ., . .., ,. 4,621 

(252) 

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STATE BOARD OP PHARMACY. 253 

Assistant pharmacists by examination _._ 472 

Assistant pharmacists by law _._ __,,,,,.,,,, 52 

Assistant pharmacists by reciprocity __,,,,_,.^_, 12 

Total number of assistants ^^..^.^.^ = ^- 535 

Total number registered both grades _ __ ^. .^. - .- 5,157 



RECEIPTS. 

Pharmacist renewal fees . 1311 | 3.176 00 

Assistant pharmacist renewal fees _ _ _,.. 1*^11 1*16 00 

Pharmacist examination fees _ „.]311 2,250 00 

Assists^it pharmacist examination fees. 1311 440 00 

Entrance certificate fees.. _ _ ___ .._.i;i03-l 804 00 

Apprentice certificate fees ,.. ia03-3 220 50 

Lapsed certificate fees .._ .13aS-<J 200 00 

Reciprocal certificate fees 1311 8^) 00 

Fines _-. LHU 1,8^0 00 

Duplicate certificate fees-- 1200 2 00 

Certifying examination grades 1_ _. 1 2ftlJ 75 25 

Total - -- - I10»019 75 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Personal Service — 

A-1. Salaries — 

Secretary -.- -- ,_--.. S'2J20 00 

Inspector . S^ 00 

Entrance examiner -_-- . ,, 200 00 

Stenographer.-- --_ ,._ _- 1.020 00 

A-2. Wages— 

Per diem members of the board - _-,^_-^ f 1,500 00 

Janitorial service ___- , ^ 15 IKJ 

Maintenance — 

C-4. Supplies — 

C-4. Office- -- KMi5 53 

E. Equipment — 

E-1. Office - - __._..__. 182 50 

F. Corftract and Open Order Service — 

F-6. Transportation- - — . -^l T71 12 

F-7. Communication - ^U\\\ m 

H-8. Contributions - _-. -. 25 00 

Total - $NM*j to 

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REPORT OF 
OHIO STATE DENTAL BOARD 



The following meetings were held by the board : July 28, 1919, Co- 
lumbus; Oetoher 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 and November 1, 1919, Columbus j 
December 1, 1919, Columbus; June 28, 29, 30, July 1, 2 and 3, 1920, Co- 
lumbus. 

At the October, 1919, meeting, one hundred and one applicants were 
examined, of which number forty-one were repeaters. . Of the one hun- 
dred and one applicants, twenty-three failed. 

At the June, ]!)20, meeting, one hundred and three applicants were 
examined, of whicli tuimber twenty were repeaters. Of the one hundred 
and three applicants, forty-two failed. (Meeting July 26, 1920,) 

During the year the records were transferred from Columbus to 947 
Nicholas Buihling, Toledo. 

A license was issued to Dr. Garret P. Kenney of Newport, Ky., (on 
the advice of the Attorney General). In 1911 Dr. Kenney filed an appli- 
cation and paid the fee, but he did not take the examination until June, 
1913, Or, Kenney was a reciprocity candidate from Illinois. He was 
never notified of the outcome of his examination nor was a license issued 
to him, although he had passed the examination. 

On ManOi 24, 1920, Dr. R. E. East, of Cleveland, was arrested for 
praetieing without a license. He was convicted and fined $50.00. 

The board's definition of a reputable dental college, compiled in 
1915, hardly fits present conditions, so until a new definition can be 
compiled i^ni\ approved, the board has decided to accept only graduates 
of CUlsk A and U schools, as defined by the Dental Educational Council 
of America, and graduates of the State University schools belonging to 
the Dental Facultiej^ Association. 

At tfic -lune meeting, the board was unanimous against the licensing 
of dentfil hygienists in this state until they have completed a regular 
dental course, 

We wish to call your attention once more to the fact that we believe 
it necessary to chan*^^e the dental law so that every practicing dentist 
will lie rcfiuired to register in his county every year, and also to change 
tlir law so that the hoard may employ an executive secretary who will 
be able to take earc of prosecutions and who will have an office in Co- 
in mbiis. 



(254) 

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STATE DENTAL BOARD. 255 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Fees for examinations $4,435 00 

Fees for endorsements ^ 10 00 

Fees for duplicate licenses 30 00 

Fines 100 00 

Total . $4,575 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

A-1 Salary of secretary . - $1,240 00 

A-1 Salary of stenographer 248 00 

A-2 Members per diems ■. . 1,790 00 

C-4 Office supplies 234 86 

F-5 Express 27 81 

F-6 Transportation _.. 383 94 

F-7 Communication 8 14 

H-7 Insurance - - 5 00 

Total __._ -. - $3,937 75 



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REPORT OF 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF OHIO 



PUBLICATIONS DURING THE YEAR, 

The only publication that was eompleted and distributed within 
the year was the Geologiti I^Iap of Ohio, This is a great improvement 
over previous editions. It shows more subdivisions and more details. 
Tn every respect it is more aeeurate than previous editions of the Geo- 
logic Map, 

It may be worth while %o mention at this place that with the Topo- 
graphic map, the Railroad map, and the Geologic map, Ohio is better 
equipped than any other state west of the Appalachians and is equaled 

by few elsewhere, 

I 

PUBLICATION IN PA^S8, 

Tlie Survey has one volume in press. It it entitled The Dunkard 
Series of Ohio^ and treats of the formations on the hilltops of southern 
Ohio. The field work for this was done before our entrance into the 
world war and publication was withheld because of paper seareity. 

WOftK COMPLEl^ED BUT UNPUBIJSHED. 

Tlie bulletin ou the Camp Sherman area has been completeil and its 
pid)lit'Htiou authorized. This will differ from the usual type of geologic 
publications in that it treats many topics from a miltary standpoint- 
At file saTiie time it should prove excellent for anyone who desires 
geologic information of the area. 

The bulletin on the clays of Ohio is now practically eompleted and 
f^hould be ready for the printer in a few months. In this work Ohio has 
joined forces with the United States Bureau of Mines, aud the volume 
should be of more than usual excellence. It will fill a long felt want, 

FIELD WORK IN PROGRESS, 

Some years ago a bulletin on the Silurian rocks of Ohio wa.s begun 
but the work was interrupted by the war. Work has been started again 
but a number of summers will be required to complete the task, 

A bulletin on the Geology of Columbiana County has joat been 



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GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OP OHIO. 257 

started and is being- pushed with vigor. This county has large geologic 
resources and the publication will be welcomed by many. However, it 
will not be ready before 1922. 

Field work on the formations of the Ordovician of southwest Ohio 
will probably be completed this summer. The area is one about which 
much diflference of opinion exists, and it is hoped that the forthcoming 
publication will settle many disputed points. 

CALLS ON THE SURVEY FOR INFORMATION. 

During the past year the sales of publications by the Survey 
amounted to $615 against $342 for the preceding year, and these figures 
indicate very well the increasing calls on the Survey for information. 
The correspondence has been correspondingly heavy. Because of the 
meagemess of appropriations, the progress of the Survey falls far short 
of keeping pace with the demands. 

EMPLOYEES DURING THE YEAR. 

Following are the names of employees within the year. J. A. Bow- 
nocker, Wilber Stout and Ethel S. Dean are employed by the year. 
Others are engaged for shorter periods, usually the three summer months. 

J. A. Bownocker, Columbus. 
Wilber Stout, Columbus. 
J. E. Hyde, Cleveland. 
A. F. Foerste, Dayton. 
W. H. Shideler, Oxford. 
R. E. Lamborn, Sebring. 
Helen Morningstar, Columbus. 
W. D. Tumbull, Columbus. 
D. J. Demorest, Columbus. 
Ethel S. Dean, Columbus. 



9—0.0.8. 

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REPORT OF 
COMMISSIONER OF SOLDIERS' CLAIMS 



I have the honor to submit for your inspection and use a detailed 
report of the operations of this department for the year ending June 30, 
1920. 

CLAIMS GRANTED FROM JULY 1, 1919 TO JUNE 30, 1920. 
SOLDIERS. 



No. 


Rate 


Amount per month 


Amount per year 


2 


$ 800 


$16 00 


$192 00 


1 


12 00 


12 00 


144 00 


1 


15 50 


15 50 


186 00 


2 


17 00 


34 00 


408 00 


1 


19 00 


19 00 


228 00 


1 


20 00 


20 00 


240 00 


3 


30 00 


90 00 


1,080 00 


2 


32 00 


64 00 


768 00 


2 


38 00 


76 00 


912 00 


1 


40 00 


40 00 


480 00 


100 


50 00 


500 00 


6,000 00 



116 $886 50 $10,638 00 







WIDOWS. 




2 


$8 00 


$16 00 


$192 00 


30 


12 00 


360 00 


4,320 00 


5 


20 00 


100 00 


1,200 00 


123 


25 00 


3,075 00 


36,900 00 


16 


30 00 


480 00 


5,760 00 


176 




$4,031 00 
MINORS. 


$48,372 00 


2 


$8 00 


$16 00 


$192 00 


4 


12 00 


48 00 


576 00 


22 


2 00 


44 00 


528 00 



28 S108 00 $1,296 00 

(258) 



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$10,638 00 


48,372 00 


1,296 00 


288 00 


5,648 18 




€66,242 18 



COMMISSIONER OP SOLDIER 's CLAIMS. 259 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Rate Amount per month. Amount per year. 

2 Dependent mother _ _ _ _$12 00 $24 00 $288 00 

50 Reimbursement _. 1,200 00 

16 Accrued 4,448 18 

19 Certificate of honorable service. 
Rejections 26 

TOTAL CLAIMS GRANTED. 

Soldiers 116 

Widows 1 176 

Minors 28 

Dependent mothers 2 

Miscellaneous 66 

Half of husbands^ pension 2 

390 
Claims filed July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920: 

SOLDIERS. 

Act of May 11, 1920 12 

ActofMay 1, 1920 .. 67 

General law (Increase) 20 

General law (Original) 6 

Act of June 5. 1920 123 

Total . 228 

WIDOWS. 

Act of September 8, 1916. _<. 118 

Act of September 8, 1916 (Remarried) 9 

Act of July 16, 1918 _ 14 

General law 2 

Total 143 

MINORS. 
Minors _.-. 17 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

New pension certificate 10 

Certificate of honorable service 19 

Act of March 3, 1899 r--r^-^??.^ 

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260 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS* 

Dependent mother , ^.._. _-.____.__ 4 

Reimbursement ___ ^ . ^ __._- S4 

Helpless child __.._,. ^...___._^ ^__-^ 1 

Accrued _ ......._........._ . .,^_,,,-- 12 

Arrears of pay _ _ ....... ^.._..__._.,.-^.. S 

Indian war _. .^.-._. 5 

Appeal to the secretary of the interior ,_^ ^__._ _„,__^_^._.-._ 1 

Markers to soldiers' graves ___ ,_.,_, __,,._ ._......, 31 

Restoration ,-,..,._, .„,^.,_^.^..^.__-_- 1 

Xenia home applications .___.^ ^_. .,_.._. ,._ B 

Soldiers' home applications _.. ^ _^ .__._.____.- 56 

Compensation (Bureau of war risk insurance) .._ ____.. -..._.___.____^ 4B 

Insurance (Bureau of war risk insurance ... .._........... ,...,, 25 

. Total _,_-. 265 



TOTAL CLAIMS FILED, 

Soldiers ._.._._. _.. _. 228 

Widows .._..._._...... ...._,, .. 143 

Minors _^ ___,_.,, _,,^__^. 17 

Miscellaneous ... ,,^,__.^..._ 195 

Compensation _._____^^.,,* ... 45 

Insurance __ . ..__„_^__.,-^ . 25 

Total ._......... .— 653 

Claims called up _ .^_ ..__._.,_ 150 

. Total -_- ...._...-.....„... 803 



It is impossible for me to make a complete report of the work done 
in this oflSce, as no records are kept of tlie letters written, blanks furn- 
ished or information given out. We have been of great assistiiBee to the 
soldiers of the late war in filling out blanks for vocational training, com* 
pensation, and collecting back pay. 

Therefore this report by no means covers the work done in this 
department and since the law has rec^ently passed pensioning veterans 
of the Spanish- American war our work has greatly increased, as I have 
filed several hundred claims so far, and a certain amount of evidence is 
required in each claim. Since we are familiar with all pension laws the 
information given and assistance rendered by us is a great benefit to all 
soldiers, as w^ell as their families. 



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REPORT OF 
OHIO COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND 

JULY 1, 1919, to JUNE 30, 1920. 



The activities of the Comoiission have been condUGted, during the 
period covered in this report, along the lines pursued by the Commission 
since its appointment "We have endeavored to reach and be of service 
to ao ever increasing number of those who are blind and also to those 
who may be saved from blmduess. 

The aims of the Commission are: 

1 . To prevent unnec essa ry bl i u dn eas . 

2. To furnish instruction and employment for the adult blind in 
workshops for the blind or in factories and shops with the sighted or in 
their own homes. 

3. To ameliorate the condition of the aged and infirm blind. 

CONSERVATION OF VISION DEPABTMENT- 

The staff of the Conservation of Vision Department is composed of 
six nurses. The state is districted, each nurse having abont fourteen 
eoimties under her eare. These women do not give a great deal of actual 
nursing service, but are what might properly be termed social welfare 
workers; they are acquainted with all the medical resources that are 
available for their patients and see that those requiring espert care, but 
not financially able to provide it, receive the same. The Commission has 
an advisory board made up of many of the best oculists over the state 
who will give gratuitous treatment to patients referred to them by the 
Commission^ Several hundred cases are refracted, operated and treated 
in this way every year, and, while we do not attempt to place a monetary 
value on eyesight, it is an actual fact that the number of eyes saved and 
those benefited because found and cared for by these nurses make this 
department a paying investment for the state. 

While provision has been made by the state for a staff of six nurse 
inspectors in this department, tlie Commission was not successful in 
filling two vacancies on the staff, caused by nurses having resigned to 
take up war work, until March of this year. This report, therefore, 
represents the work of four nurses for the first eight months of the year. 

The Commission is particularly fortunuate in having on its board 
two ophthalmologists, Dr. W. H. Snyder, of Toledo, and Dr. C. L. Minor, 
of Springfield. These gentlemen meet with the nurses once a month. 



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262 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

giving instructive talks on this phase of the work and affording an op- 
portunity for the nurses to present any problems confronting them. 

The folio^dng is a summary of the reports of the nurse inspectors 
for the year ; 

Nmnber of open caaes on record July 1, 1919 1,992 

Number of oases reported during the year _ 664 

Total cases recorded.- -- 2,656 

Number of cases closed during the year _-. 590 

Number of cases carried over July 1, 1920 _ 2,066 

Number of caaes on register of the blind visited and diagnosis secured 886 

HOME TEACHING DEPARTMENT. 

A staff of seven teachers has been employed during the year. These 
women, who are hlintl or partially blind, received their education at the 
State School for the ELLnd. 

The following is a summary of the reports of work accomplished by 
these teacliers covering a period of approximately ten months. 

Number of visits niade^ ___ 4,089 

Investigating caUs 965 

Social CBils..^ 107 

Leaaona given ._ _ _ 2,648 

INSTRUCTION WAS CLASSIFIED AS FOLLOWS: 

Hand aewiiiK' --- 1,037 

Machine aewiiig__,_, , 364 

Crocheting- _, _._ 106 

Knitting .,...^-. 38 

Chair caniixg,._^,__.. _ 77 

Brush raoking.- — „^ _ 125 

READING AND WRITING: 

New York Point (reading and writing) 371 

Revised Braille (reading and writing) 66 

Moon Print Reading 457 

Pencil Writing.- __, 27 

Two hutidred and twenty- three new pupils w^ere registered during the 
year. One hundred and one completed their course and are recemng 
work direct from headquarters. One hundred and twelve deaths of blind 
workers were reported during the year. 

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- OmO COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND. 263 

The state is districted, each teacher having about ten counties to 
look after. Blind men and women are visited in their homes by these 
teachers who give instruction in reading and writing and in industrial 
work, and, by their own example, inspire their pupils to realize that 
blindness need not mean idleness or uselessness. In the majority of cases 
the blind desire to learn to sew, knit, crochet, etc. as well as to read and 
write. Those who do machine work were gvien an opportunity to pur- 
chase a machine on easy terms and many women have been busy making 
aprons, dress bags, gowns, etc., on their machines. During the year five 
thousand aprons were made on the machine by these women and one 
hundred and eighty thousand tea towels were hemmed by hand. The 
workers in this department made over one hundred different articles. 
Material is purchased at wholesale by the .Commission, cut out at head- 
quarters in Columbus, and mailed to the worker ; the finished product is 
returned to the Commission, inspected, and placed in stock. A check in 
payment for the work together with another consignment of work is 
mailed to the worker as soon as the work is received. The Highest stand- 
ard of workmanship is maintained and the articles are sold on their own 
merit. 

The most diflBcult problem is that of disposing of the finished article. 
During the past year the sales in this department amounted to sixty 
thousand dollars. This was made possible by the generous contributions 
made by department stores where space is donated for a department, the 
only expense incurred by the Commission is the salary of a saleswoman 
who is in charge. 

Departments are operated in the following cities: 

Cincinnati, The McAlpin Company. 
Cleveland, The Higbee Company. 
Dayton, The Rike-Kumler Company. 
Youngstown, The Strouss-Hirshberg Company. 

Two salesrooms are maintained in Columbus in connection with the 
ofiices and Trade Training Department at 335 South High Street and 
685 North High Street. 

Special sales are held in cities where there is not a department, 
under the auspices of the Ohio Federation of Women's Clubs, churches 
and other organizations. The club women have taken an active part in 
advertising and assisting with the sales at the departments in stores. In 
several cities, every club woman has pledged to buy at least one dollar's 
worth at the department for the blind during the year; these pledges 
are checked up and the sales have more than doubled as a result. In 
other cities the ladies of the various clubs are assigned a week during the 
year when they have members of their clubs at the department to assist 
in making sales. These women also render a great seryig^ tpUhe blinds 



264 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

in many cities in a social way, reading for the blind, writing their letters 
and in giving real personal service in many ways. 

The plainer articles such as aprons, tea towels, dress bags, etc., are, 
in addition to being offered at the various departments, sold direct to 
the trade through our wholesale department; in this way it is possible 
to sell in large quantities and enables the Commission to keep the women 
regularly employed. These articles are handled by many of the best 
known firms in the country ; the sales are not confined to Ohio, but are 
made in seven other states. 

Since the working capital is made up from the receipts from sales 
it is most important that the stock be kept moving; the purchase of 
material to be made up and the payment of blind labor depends entirely 
upon the receipts from sales. All salaries, transportation and overhead 
expenses are paid directly by the state from funds appropriated for these 
purposes. The blind worker receives all the profit, or the difference 
between the cost of material and the selling price. 

TRADE TRAINING DEPARTMENT. 

The Commission operates a Trade Training Department in Colum- 
bus where blind men are taught to make brooms. When it is not possible 
for the pupil to defray expense of board and room rent the state provides 
this for a limited number. It requires from six to eight months for a 
blind man to complete the course so that he will be able to manage a 
business of his own successfully. When he has finished the course he 
returns to his home and establishes a shop of his own. The Commission 
assists him, if it is necessary, in the nature of a loan for the purchase of 
machinery and his first order of jnaterial ; also in disposing of his output 
until he finds a market in the community in which he lives. 

In addition to broom making, men are employed at making floor 
brushes, mops, baskets, cane seating chairs, wea\dng carpets and rugs, 
and are assisted in disposing of their output. Orders for piano tuning 
are solicited. Blind men are employed as salesmen, on a commission 
basis, for brooms and other articles made by the blind. 

A forward step in the work for the blind has been made in the 
securing of employment for the physically fit blind men with industrial 
concerns where he works side by side with the sighted afid is employed 
on the same terms. About 200 blind men are engaged at some sort of 
factory work throughout the state. 

The Commission is just introducing this part of the work and has 
secured the services of a placement agent, whose entire time will be de- 
voted to securing positions for the blind. 

Six men completed the course in broom making at the Trade Train- 
ing School in Columbus during the year, returning to [^ht^ir^^o^a^u^epf^ 



OHIO COMMISSION FOR THE BLEND. 265 

they are operating shops of their own under the supervision of tlie Com- 
mission. 

Eighteen shops over which the Commission has supervision and is 
assisting in the purchase of material and disposal of output, are in 
operation throughout the state. 

Twenty-five thousand brooms have been purchased from tJie men 
operating shops during the year and forty-eight thousand brooms were 
manufactured at the shop in Columbus. Orders were received for sixty 
thousand brooms, the total receipts amounting to about thirty -eight 
thousand dollars. 

One of the problems confronting the Commission has been to secure 
suitable remunerative employment for the older blind men pli^sieully 
unable to leave their homes and yet who needed occupation. During the 
past year thirty of these men were taught to make floor bruslies from 
horse hair. The Commission provides the material and disposi ^i of the 
finished product through blind salesmen working on a commissitm basis. 

During the year the Commission has provided employment for men 
in the following trades: 

Piano Tuning. 
Chair Caning. 
Basketry. 
Mop Making. 
Weaving. 
Brush Making. 
Broom Making. 
Salesmen. 

Assisted in purchase of stock for news stands and store. 
Blind and partially blind people employed by the Commis^itm have 
been paid in wages during the year, $55,299.42. This does not im^latlc 
wages earned by those employed in positions secured by the Cojmnissioii 
for them. Total amount of appropriation for the year was $62,^^^^U.(J^J. 

REGISTER OP THE BLIND OP OHIO. 

The law creating the Commission, requires that a complete ref?ister 
of the blind in the state be prepared and maintained, descril*inf? the 
condition, cause of blindness, capacity for educational and industrial 
training of each. A census is being taken of the entire state^ throu^'h 
the members of the stafif of the Conservation of Vision and the TTome 
Teaching Departments, and at the present time there are abfiut 5,800 
eases of blind men, women and children registered with the Cormnission. 



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REPORT OF THE STATE 
BOARD OF EMBALMING EXAMINERS 



In compliance with the General Code of this state, it is my pleasure 
to submit to you the annual report of the State Board of Embalming 
Examiners of Ohio ending as of June the thirtieth, 192(i 

The oflBcers and membership of this board are as follows: W- P- 
Cary, of Millersburg, President; B. G. Jones, of Columbus, Secretary- 
Treasurer, and J. L. Arnold, of Canton, Ohio. 

The need of a permanent oflBce of this board located in Columbus 
and the appropriation of suflBcient funds to employ an assistant to the 
Secretary-Treasurer, is to be desired if efficiency is to be secured. 

During the year a great many investigations of reported violations 
were made and erne prosecution at Lorain, Ohio, which resulted in a 
verdict for the state. 

After considerable correspondence and several meeting with the 
members of the Embalming Boards of bordering states and a careful 
consideration of their respective laws, this board on September 11, 1919, 
agreed that reciprocal relations should be established between the state 
of Ohio and Indiana. Reciprocal arrangements were also agreed upon 
with the state of Kenutcky under certain conditions if ugreeable witli 
Kentucky. To date Kentucky has not signified a^ to what action she 
may take. 

There are twenty-eight hundred licensed embalmera holding Ohio 
licenses to date. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1920, 
are as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

Renewals at one dollar $2,637 00 

Renewals at ten dollars __ _ 200 00 

Soldiers reinstatement fees 16 00 

Registration fees -^ 137 00 

Examination fees 1,420 00 

Reciprocal fees 25 00 

Incidental fees S5 00 



(266) 

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$4,470 00 

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OHIO BOABD OF EMBALMING EXAMINERS. 267 

EXPENDITURES. 

A- 1 Personal service $1,240 00 

A- 2 Wages 793 00 

C- 4 Office supplies _ _ 257 43 

F- 6 Transportation 622 43 

F- 9 General plant- 1 61 08 

C-11 Cadavers _ 75 00 

3,048 94 



Credit balance to Emb. fund deposited with the treasurer of state $1,421 06 

Failure to renew and loss by death has been considerable, but after 
making the above deduction there has been a net gain of eighty-two. 

Thanking you and your official family for courtesies extended dur- 
ing the past year, we respectfully submit this report. 



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SS~?*.':!'Jf 



i 

I:- 



REPORT OF 
STATE INSPECTOR OF OILS 



The following is an exhibit of the number of barrels of oil, gasoline, 
naphtha and other petroleum products inspected during the period com- 
mencing July 1, 1919, and ending June 30, 1920, together with the 
amount of fees charged for such work and the fees paid to the various 
deputies therefore. 



i'i - 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 

32 
33 
34 
36 
36 
37 
38 



Name of Deputy. 



SylvanuB Walter 

E. W. CostcUo 

M. C. Crossley 

C. D. Cremean. „ 

Th - s. R . Ketchatn , . , . 
Ssitnuc-l StutE .. .,.,. 

M. W. HftfTner. .^ 

J. C. Do wUrig„ „,.„*„ 

E iw^ird Marts. 

Duvanncy ^ Harlow. 
JO;*eph Miller.__„„„„. 
A. A, Graebfflr^^,.^... 

J. M. Fletcher^. 

T O. AfiamB.-.w..„..„ 
G^rrey & LaPiimte^. 
Diintel Mbchlcr.^^^^. 

R. S. Btowik„«, ^ 

Chaa. McDermot" 

Gc^o. L, Sherwood. ...,._..^ 

S. M, Nelson. .^ „.„„«.^ 

W. R. Griffin ^ 

Geii, A, ScWuseiL, .^ 

CUas. T. HcAi 

J. Orlett ~. 

W. Ucker. 

^W. Holdcn 

M. Baxmin&.> 

Jacob Leopold. 

Ott, Amidon & Williams. 

Alfred Humphrey 

M. F. Gearon. 

W. T. PerraU. 

W. H. Neufang 

R. A. Fitzgerald 

L. G. Krantz 

E. O. Zimmerman 

M. W. Gribble. 

Chas. PlucheL 

W. E. Lce._ 

W. L. Bolin., 

Clyde Latchaw» 

Totals 



Oil. 



17.114 
21.646 
18.322 
24.617 
25.946 
30.660 
32.602 

3.695 
22.390 
68.282 
29,394 
28.826 
22.568 
32.590 
78.373 
20.970 
21.032 
26.600 
27.461 
26,669 
43.562 
24.037 
13.243 
18.004 

9.790 
11.474 
17.762 
37.761 
133,112 
20.3a4 
23.195 
21.496 
11.928 

8.389 
24.290 
11.095 
12.359 
16.925 
15.701 
14.732 
11.256 



1.083.969 



Gasoline. 



44.674 
46,616 
94.612 

126.483 
67.263 
90.796 

172,490 
22.763 
95.020 

379,227 
51.229 

119.782 
68,225 
97,134 

407.176 
80,942 
85,399 
95,500 
84,398 
63.657 

290.798 
68.247 
26,232 
61,488 
98.889 
44.820 
86.871 

296,739 

1,041.906 

71,178 

163.666 

110.344 
36.442 
26.199 
90.022 
50.162 
42.493 
68.688 
60.185 
49.778 
41.132 



5.027.264 



TotaL 



61.788 

68.062 

112.834 

161.100 

93.208 

121.466 

206.092 

26.358 

117.410 

447.509 

80.623 

148.608 

90.793 

129.724 

485^549 

101.912 

106.431 

121.100 

111.869 

90.226 

334.360 

92.284 

39.476 

69.492 

48.679 

66,294 

103.633 

334.500 

1,175.018 

97,482 

186360 

131.839 

48.370 

33.588 

114.312 

61.267 

64,852 

74,613 

66.886 

64.510 

52.387 



6.111.233 



Pees 
Chained. 



$1,863 64 
2.041 86 
3.436 57 
4.600 49 
2.796 24 
3.643 68 
6.170 05 
790 74 
3.622 30 

13.427 16 
2.418 69 
4.468 24 
2 722 79 
'.S91 72 

14,-66 47 
^^,057 38 
;i.-87 98 
^'33 00 
:ia55 77 
2,706 78 

I i'} r)60 92 
L,773 32 
1 ,L09 52 
^.i>90 64 
1. .77 16 
1,'.97 78 
^^.122 06 

Ui o35 00 

^o.;63 21 
i> 38 73 
^.< 07 90 
^ •t65 17 
1.151 82 
1 ,1-107 64 
K,431 78 
1.S74 62 
Ij 54 60 
£,Li36 39 
1,*j80 07 
1.936 30 
1.689 77 



$183,873 84 



Fees Paid 
Deputy. 



$1,200 00 
1.200 00 
460 OO 
760 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.100 00 
100 00 
1.200 00 
2.400 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
2,400 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1,200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1,200 00 
1,184 25 
1,200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1,200 00 
1.200 00 
3.600 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
700 00 
600 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 
1.200 00 



$50.38425 



(268) 



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i 



t 

STATE INSPECTOR OP OILS. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Total fees collected and paid into state treasury July 1, 1919, to 

JuneSO, 1920 $174,911 53 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Salary of Chas. L. Resch, State Inspector $3,500 00 

Salary of chief clerk 1,620 00 

Dq[)utie8' fees, July 1, 1919 to June 30, 1920 60,384 25 

Qflfice supplies 327 64 

Office equipment _ 147 03 

General plant equiiHnent _ 17 32 

Tranc^rtation (Traveling expenses of .deputy in- 
spectors) _ 13,632 81 

Communication (Telephone and telegraph) 208 93 

General plant service 233 32 

Insurance (Bonds) 150 00 

70,221 30 

Unexpended balance June 30, 1920.— - $104,690 23 

Outstanding accounts-. $24,850 89 



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REPORT OF THE OHIO 
STATE BOARD OF OPTOMETRY 



We herewith submit the following report of the proceedings of the 
Ohio State Board of Optometry for the year ending June 30, 1920. 

House Bill No. 240, known as the Ohio Optometry Law, was filed 
with the Secretary of State on April 11, 1919. The present board re- 
ceived their commissions and took the oath of office on October 3, 1919. 

Examinations were held on the following dates : 



November 11, 1919 ..Columbus, Ohio. 

November 12, 1919 .--Columbus, Ohio. 

November 17, 1919 Toledo, Ohio. 

November 19, 1919 - Cleveland, Ohio. 

November 20, 1919 -.- Dayton, Ohio. 

November 21, 1919 _ ^ Cincinnati, Ohio. 

November 28, 1919 Columbus, Ohio. 

Dec(Bmber31, 1919 _-. .-. Dayton, Ohio. 

May 3, 1920 Columbus, Ohio. 

June 8, 1920 .Columbus, Ohio. 

During the year the board has carried out its separate duties as 
outlined by law. 

One thousand four hundred and twenty-seven applications have been 
accepted. 

One thousand four hundred and twelve licenses have been issued, 
of which 428 are standard, and 999 limited. 

Thirteen applicants have been accepted, who have not appeared for 
examination, and two members died after their applications had been 
accepted. 

Amount received from examination fees, $19,485.00. 

On account of insufficient funds having been appropriated by the 
legislature, as the bill creating the board was passed late in the session, 
after the report of the Budget Commissioner had been filed and before 
the board was created, the secretary was compelled to seek additional 
funds from the State Emergency Board, in order to take care of the 
work of this department. 

(270) ^ . 

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STATE BOARD OF OPTOMETRY. 271 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Personal Service: 
A-1. Salaries — 

Secretary _ _ $500 00 

Clerk 840 00 

Additional appropriation S. B. 254. 93 10 

$1,433 10 

A-2. Wages — 

Per diem 5 members of board $2,000 00 

Extra help— - " 500 00 

2,500 00 

Total personal service _ $3,933 10 

Maintenance: 

C. Supplies — 

C 4 Office - --. $250 00 

Emergency allowance ,..- 1 ,000 00 

Cll General plant.. 25 00 

$1,275 00 

E. Equipment — 

E 1 Office. $300 00 

Emergency allowance 200 00 

500 00 

F. Contract and Open Order Service — 

F 6 Traveling Expense $500 00 

Emergency allowance 400 00 

F7 Communication 100 00 

F 9 General plant 75 00 

1,075 00 

H. Fixed Charges and Contributions — 

H6Rent _.. $300 00 * 

- Total maintenance. 2,850 00 

Total $6,783 10 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Personal Service: 
A 1. Salaries — 

Secretary $499 50 

Clerk _ _-._ 483 10 

$982 60 

A 2. Wages — 

Per diem 6 members of board 1,310 00 

Extra help 489 70 

$1,799 70 

• Digitized by VjOOQIC 



-:«4^ 



Syt Ohio general statistics. 

M&mtcnance^ 

C, SuppleeB— 

G 4 Office _ $1,027 64 

C 11 General Plant 16 82 

1,044 46 

E, Equipment— 

E 1 Office,. _ 428 6J 

F, Contract mid Open Order Service — 

P 6 Traveling expense $1,194 98 

F 7 Commniiication 72 75 

F9 General Plant 10 00 

1,277 73 

H. Fixed Charges and Contributions — 

HSRent 178 00 

Total., $6,710 62 



CONDITIONS OP OPTOMETRY IN OHIO. 

The present law has eliminated a great many undesirable men from 
tlie profession, and has necessitated regular practice. Daily our atten- 
tion is called to local prosecutions because of violations, and the entire 
stiincljird has been rai.sed throughout the state. Then there is the psyco- 
logieal and moral effect that is gained by the passage of the present law, 
\^bich is not to be uuderestimated, as it gives those in the profession a 
sense of security luid confidence, with added pride and a desire to meet 
with the highest qii allocations. Several hundred of our limited practi- 
tioners, licensed under the limited examination, have taken up courses 
of study, and later returned and taken the standard examination so that 
they might receive the standard certificate. Without the law, they would 
undoubtedly never have taken up this additional work. 



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REPORT OF 
BOARD OF AGRICULTURE OF OHIO 

BUREAU OP LIVE STOCK INDUSTRY. 
Report of field investigations for the year ending June 30, 1920. 

Number Number 

Horses. Examined. Affected. 

Tested for glanders 225 ^ 21 

Destroyed , 14 

Tested for interstate shipment 296 

Examined for forage poison 50 21 

Examined for purpura hemorrhagica 1 1 

Examined for mange 18 3 

Totals 604 46 

Number Number 

Cattle. Examined. Affected. 

Tested for tuberculosis 48,886 2,381 

Slaughtered 1,355 

Quarantined 1,633 

Examined for contagious abortion 447 63 

Examined for rabies 66 6 

Examined for forage poison 112 14 

Examined for infectious keratitis 43 6 

Examined for blackleg 175 16 

Examined for actinomycosis 1 1 

Totals 52,718 2,487 

Number Number 

Swine. Examined. Affected. 

Treated for hog cholera 27,843 6,540 

Examined for hog cholera 24,449 

Examined for verminous pneumonia 1,606 718 

Examined for ascaris suilla 2,069 1,859 

Examined for interstate shipment 2,563 

Totals - 58,530 9,117 

Number Number 

Sheep. Examined. Affected. 

Examined for nodular disease 722 432 

Examined for scab 938 110 

Exammed for footrot 275 110 

Examined for lip and leg ulceration 757 18 

Examined for interstate shipment 2,422 

Totals 5,114 670 

(273) 

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274 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

In addition to the above, all live stock exhibited at the Ohio State 
Fair was examined before the same was admitted to the grounds, and 
several times daily thereafter. 

During the year 8,080,360 cubic centimeters of hog cholera serum 
and 277,850 cubic centimeters of tuberculin were produced at the State 
Serum Institute. In the production of serum 2,696 hogs were used. 
Seventy-nine examinations of material submitted by farmers and veteri- 
narians were made. 

BUREAU OP DAIRY AND FOODS. 

During the fiscal year from July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920, sanitary 
and stock investigations were made of 6,069 groceries, 874 meat markets, 
734 restaurants, 637 confectioneries, 498 milk plants, 629 dairies, 169 
creameries, 785 cream receiving stations, 204 ice cream factories, 240 
canneries, 138 bakeries, 238 bottling plants, 36 produce dealers, 13 cheese 
factories, 13 condenseries, and 5 fruit dealers, 4 hotels. 

Four hundred and sixty-two samples of milk were examined, 231 drugs, 
84 narcotics, 211 cream, 82 vinegar, 21 extracts, 72 soft drinks, 23 oleo- 
margarine and butter, 229 food, 32 ripe olives, five olive oil, 2 candy, 
6 maple syrup, 7 egg substitutes, 48 cosmetics, 14 milk and bottles, 13 
condiments, 2 roof paint, 11 gr. test bottles, 108 sanitary notices served. 

One hundred and eighty-three samples of milk were adulterated, 80 
samples of food, 75 samples of drugs, 48 cosmetics, 63 vinegar, 46 soft 
drinks, 12 narcotics, 6 butter and oleomargarine, 3 olive oil, 5 extracts, 
3 maple syrup, 8 egg substitutes, 2 condiments. 

One hundred and ninety-four affidavits filed charging illegal sales 
of milk. 

Thirty-five affidavits filed charging illegal sales of unclassified food- 
stuffs. 

Fifty-eight affidavits filed charging illegal sales of narcotics. 

Twenty-two affidavits filed charging illegal sales of vinegar. 

Eleven affidavits charging illegal sales of soft drinks. 

Fourteen affidavits filed charging illegal sales of butter and oleo- 
margarine. 

One affidavit filed charging illegal sale of olive oil. 

Three affidavits filed charging illegal sales of drugs. » 

One affida\it filed charging illegal sale of maple syrup. 

Two affidavits filed charging illegal sales of cosmetics. 

Total number of — 



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BOARD OP AGRICULTURE. 275 

Sealed. Adjusted. Condemned. 

Computing scales 22,659 1,644 1,841 

Counter scales 1,660 831 707 

Spring balances— 14,862 209 8,304 

Beam scales - 4,496 212 176 

Wagon scales 7,451 492 804 

Hopper scales 438 49 42 

Slot machine scales 760 38 91 

Platform scales 12,580 431 886 

Dormant scales 1,487 40 118 

Suspension scales 710 19 122 

Weights-scale 82,319 2,118 6,220 

Dry measures 61,809 1,421 

Berry boxes 48,380 7,260 

Liquid measures 26,592 2,281 

Automatic pumps 8,765 814 2,830 

Milk cans 685 48 

Wagon measure buckets 3,640 192 

Milk bottles 58,860 42,000 

The grand total of all weighing and measuring devices tested and 
sealed, 307,545. 

The grand total of all weighing and measuring devices adjusted, 
6,897. 

The grand total of all weighing and measuring devices condemned, 
75,343. 

During the year from June 30, 1919, to July 1, 1920, the working 
standards of sixteen county and city sealers were adjusted and sealed 
by the state. There were 67 prosecutions for short weight or measure 
among the county and city sealers of the state and 41 prosecutions were 
brought by the state department, making a total of 108 prosecutions in 
the state during the year for violations of weight and measure laws. 



BUREAU OF FAIR ADMINISTRATION. 

RECEIPTS STATE FAIR. 

Privileges $13,207 46 

Space 6,714 00 

Race entries 4,769 00 

Poultry entry fees 598 25 

Stall and Pen Fees — 

Horses $1,306 00 

Cattle 1,334 00 

Swine 470 00 

Sheep 355 00 

3,465 00 ^ I 

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m 



OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Admission Fees — 

Adults --- .. $74,975 50 

Children ,... 3,296 25 

Night 4,508 75 

Automobile 6,415 36 

89,195 86 

Grand stand 17,606 10 

Colbeiim 7,621 15 

Exhibitor's tickets 1,539 00 

Helpers' tickets 2,738 00 

Patrons' tickets 46 00 

Wagon tickets 1— 180 00 

Care of exhibits 15 00 

Miscellaneous 117 41 

Season auto tickets 13 50 

The following specials are not included in above, viz: 

Anierican Shorthorn Record Association $7,303 50 

American Hampshire Swine Record Association 439 00 

American Poland China Record Association 641 25 

Percheron Society of America Association 200 00 

National Spotted Poland China Association 115 00 

Circle W. Farm Contest Special—- 475 00 

Refunded speed purses 304 00 

Refunded account pageant 93 00 



$147,825 73 



This added to above figures gives a Grand Total of 
"which corresponds to records in the office. 



9,570 75 
$157,396 48 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Premiums $63,102 94 

Advertising 11,055 43 

At traction St (including pageant fireworks, etc.) 11,624 00 

Music __.. 6,234 50 

Judges 2,254 30 

Superintendents 1,526 50 

Assistants ^, 958 30 

Police ,1,475 50 

Treasurer's department 807 50 

Gate and ticket men 2,609 25 

Entry clerks and office force 1,258 00 

Decorating 1,184 00 

Tent rentals— _ 1,598 71 

Light, gas and water bills 1,030 86 

Feed and Straw 1,010 75 

Labor pay roll 2,587 17 

Premium ribbons 992 90 

Ryan electric bill 1,476 20 

Lumber, temporary stalls 3,148 00 

400 poultry coops 501 40 



$121,S80 02 

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■JJW«| ' ^*^j7— -— ^ — r '^^'- — ~ . ^ " ■ " ' I I ■■ . | ^" 'i 



BOAED OP AGRICULTURE. 277 

To correspond with records the following amounts should be 
added, viz: 
Specials offered by Record Associations 9,173 75 

Amounts refunded 397 00 

A total expenditure of $131,150 77 

Balance - 26,245 71 

Per capita certificates issued to county and independent fairs, 103. 

BUREAU OP PISH AND GAME. 
July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920. 

Hunters and Trappers licenses sold, 235,587. 

State Game Parm, Wellington, Ohio, disftributed 8,000 Ringneek 
pheasants. 

Commercial fishermen: Pish caught in Ohio waters of Lake Erie, 
all kinds, 20,142,459 pounds. 

Pishing licenses sold to commercial fishermen, revenue $18,000. 

Pish placed in Ohio waters of Lake Erie by state hatchery (Put-in- 
Bay), 600,000,000. 

Pish distributed by inland fish hatcheries, 1,370,000. 

Number of trips of fish car, 50. 

Matured fish distributed by fish car, 60,000. 

Pheasant eggs distributed, 70,000. 

Game refuges established, 40. 

Pish and game moving pictures exhibited in all counties of the state. 

BUREAU OP PEEDS AND PERTILIZERS. 

RECEIPTS. 

License fees on feed stuffs $20,540 00 

License fees on fertilizers 18,390 00 

License fees on lime and limestone 1,175 00 

License fees on seed 10,540 00 

Special fees on feed stuffs analysis 381 00 

Special fees on fertilizer analysis 87 00 

Fines — - - :. 50 00 

Total - .— $51,163 00 

Number feeds licensed 1,027 

Number feeds registered (not paid for) 1 320 

Number fertilizers licensed 613 

Number limes licensed 47 

Number insecticides registered 229 

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278 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

NUMBER OF SAMPLES COLLECTED. 

Feed 2,054 

Fertilizer 720 

Lime 75 

Insecticides ' 104 

Seed 340 

Total _. _- 3,293 

BUREAU OF MARKETS. 

STATISTICAL REPORT JULY 1, 1919 TO JULY 1, 1920. 

Number of general meetings attended 85 

Number of marketing investigations 17 

Number of grading demonstrations 8 

Number of city marketing meetings 

Number of co-operative livestock shippings associations formed 

Number of co-operative creameries formed , 

Number of co-operative elevators formed 

Number of co-operative stores formed 

Number of co-operative grape growers' associations 

Number of exposition exhibits 3 

Market News and Exchange Bulletin — 

Number copies printed 541,200 

Average number mailed per week 10,300 

Advertising in exchange column — 

Live stock advertisements 1,700 

Poultry advertisements 1.130 

Produce advertisements 300 

Farms advertisements 372 

Miscellaneous advertisements 290 

Wanted advertisements 545 

Note: — ^The Bureau assisted in the formation of the State Federation Co- 
operative Shippers and interested the Farm Bureau Federation in taking up and de- 
veloping this work. 



THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

During the year ending June 30, 1920, inspectors from this Bureau 
examined 378 nurseries containing 2,875 acres of growing stock and 
which produced during, this period 33,978,737 trees, shrubs, plants and 
vines. A considerable portion of this stock was reinspected once and 
sometimes twice at or before digging time. In addition the inspectors 
supervised the fumigation of 950,000 stocks either because of the pres- 

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BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 279 

ence of scale insetts or other pests in the nursery blocks or in dangerous 
proximity thereto, and also for shipment to states requiring certificates 
of fumigation. 

A total of 1,510,158 pieces of foreign nursery stock was delivered to 
Ohio nurserymen during the fiscal year, all of which was inspected at 
destination. Because of the danger of the introduction pf European 
and Asiatic pests this work must be very carefully done. 

The apiary inspectors examined a total of 8,385 colonies of bees lo- 
cated in thirty-five counties of the state, about 15 per cent of which 
were found to be infected with foul brood. 

The certification of seed potatoes was continued, but the expected 
growth of this work did not materialize because of unfavorable weather 
conditions at the time of planting and during the development of the 
crop. However, a total of a little over 2,000 bushels were certified, which 
under the circumstances is very satisfactory indeed. 

The entire office and inspection force was employed for a period of 
about ten days at the time of the State Fair, this Bureau having charge 
of the Horticultural building during that event. 

On April 15, 1920, the administration of the Agricultural Seed law 
was transferred from the Bureau of Feeds and Fertilizers to this Bureau. 
The seeding season being at that time practically ended it was not 
thought advisable to divert our regular inspectors to this work, two of 
the seed inspectors taken over with the work were continued, one for one 
month and the other for nearly two montlis. A total of 540 official in- 
spectors' samples were collected during the fiscal year which together 
with 1,489 samples sent in by farmers, seed merchants and others, were 
analyzed by the analysts at the State Seed Laboratory. During the year 
a total of 1,226 agricultural seed licenses were issued by this department 
to parties doing business in the state. 



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280 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS, 1919-1920. 
ACREAGE AND PRODUCTION OF CROPS. 



1919. 



Acreage. 

Corn 3,563,352 

Wheat 2,922,592 

Oats 1,452,052 

Barley 114,217 

Rye 116,464 

Buckwheat 30,413 

All Tame Hay 3,026,527 

Ensilage 224,469 

Potatoes 124,917 

Tobacco 75,789 

Sugar Beets 33,561 

Maple Sugar 

Maple Sirup 

Trees. 

Apples 5,970,410 

Peaches 2,924,177 

Pears 



1920. 



Production. 




Production. 


Bushels. 


Acreage. 


Bushels. 


149,844,626 


3,735,000 


162,099,000 


58,124,351 


2,259,000 


28,698,000 


46,818,330 


1,614,000 


71,339,000 


2,412,196 


102,000 


2,825,000 


1,666,449 


80,000 


1,152,000 


640,662 


26,000 


543,000 


Tons. 




Tons, 


3,716,036 


3,150,000 


4,252,000 


1,906,206 


198,135 


1,543,000 


Bushels. 




Bushels. 


7,513,960 


115,000 


11,500,000 


Pounds. 




Pounds. 


64,420,472 


63,000 


60,480,000 


Tons. 




Tons. 


365,415 


57,800 


557,000 


Gallons. 




Gallons. 


694,175 


. « 


427.426 


Pounds. 




Pounds. 


62,001 




41,622 


Bushels. 


Trees. 


Bushels. 


2,976,436 


5,970,410 


13,193,000 


617,537 


2,924,177 


2,241,000 


218,000 





662,000 



LIVE STOCK STATISTICS. 

January 1, 1920. January 1, 1921. 

Horses - 810,692 794,478 

Cattle 1,926,823 1,869,018 

Sheep 2,102,550 1,976,477 

Hogs 3,083,846 2,929,653 



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REPORT OF 
THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION DEPARTMENT. 

DIVISION OP CLAIMS. 

The increased number of claims filed for the fiscal year just closed 
over the preceding year was 14,614, which is due to two conditions. 
First, to the increased industrial activities throughout the state; and, 
second, to the fact that employers are reporting all injuries, in compli- 
ance with Section 1465-99 of the Act, which is evidenced by the increased 
number of *' medical only" claims filed on pur new blank form C-3. At- 
tention is called to the fact that at no time during this period did the 
pending files contain a greater number of claims than 8,858 which was 
on July 31, 1919, or during the vacation period. 

This indicates a very favorable condition, in view of the fact that 
the Claims Department has lost by resignation some of its most valued 
and experienced employes to accept more remunerative positions with 
private firms or corporations. 

From the tables contained in this report it will be noted that 166,885 
claims on account of industrial accidents were filed with this Commission 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, as compared with 152,271 
during the preceding year. Of the number filed, 880 covered fatal ac- 
cidents — an increase of 10 over the preceding year. It is interesting to 
note that only 109 claims were filed under Section 27 of the Act, a de- 
crease of 21 as shown in the last annual report. 

This decrease in the number of claims filed by employes whose em- 
ployers have either failed or neglected to pay premium into the state 
fund indicates a very general compliance with the' provisions of the 
compensation act by all classes of employers of the state who employ 
five or more persons by promptly paying their premiums to the state 
fund or complying with the provisions of Section 22 by paying compen- 
sation direct to their injured employes and the dependents of those that 
were killed during the course of their employment. 

The records further show that the Commission disposed of 167,007 
claims during the last fiscal year as compared with^l62,169 for the year 
Vnding June 30, 1919. There were 198,805 claims heard in the '* regu- 
lar*' manner during the year (this includes re-hearing cases) and 8,831 
heard specially. Of the number heard specially 1,221 were disallowed; 
1,024 were for payment of medical expenses in excess of $200.00 and the 
amount so paid averaged approximately $116.00 per claim; and 863 were 
claims on account of death. 

(281) 

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282 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

At the close of business on June 30, 1920, the pending files con- 
tained but 5,340 claims, the lowest number in the past two years. 

SPECIAL REPORT ON NEW FORM 
BLANK C-I. 

For the purpose of determining the eflSciency of the new Form C-I 
recently adopted by the department, in connection with the handling of 
regular state and public employe claims, accurate check has been kept 
upon such claims, date of their receipt and the date of hearing, and the 
Commission is now able to report intelligently upon the operation of this 
blank. 

It is explained at the outset that the new blank form is a combina- 
tion of the former First Notice of Injury and Preliminary Application, 
and the Preliminary Eeport of the attending physician, and Supple- 
mental Application (C-4) and by its use it is demonstrating that it is 
possible to hear claims involving serious injuries and loss of time within a 
few days or a week after the receipt of the new blank and thus grant im- 
mediate financial relief to the injured persons. 

Check w as kept on a total of 3,340 claims beginning with the in- 
auguration of the new blank form about May 15th and extending to 
July 31, 1920. By computation of tJiese 3,340 claims it is foimd that 
the average time for each claim is being passed by the Commission con- 
sumed 15.33 days, counting the date of receipt and the date of hearing. 

This result is gratifying to the Commission, and is subject to im- 
provement, when it is taken into consideration that the blank form is 
still practically new to many of the subscribers to the fund, and included 
in this computation are a large number of claims where it was found 
necessary to return the application for either claimant's signature, cer- 
tificate of employer, average weekly wage, or other defects or discrepan- 
cies preventing immediate hearing. 

Based upon the result so far shown, it is the opinion of the Com- 
mission that the new blank is proving very successful for the immediate 
purposes intended at the time of its adoption, namely, the furnishing of 
immediate relief to injured persons where conditions justify and to keep 
the number of pending claims in the files to the lowest possible minimum. 

It is the further belief that time will improve the use of this blank 
and reduce to a still lower figure the average as shown above. Em- 
ployers who are becoming more familiar wdth the use of this form of ap- 
plication recognize the improvement over the previous method of hand- 
ling claims involving disability of more than 7 days, and it is hoped that 
by a correspondence campaign of education and the co-operation of the 
employer, to reduce even further the time elapsing before a claim is 
heard. 

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INBUSTRIAL COMMISSION OW OHIO. 



283 



MONTHLY STATEMENT OF CLAIMS FILED, 

AU Classes, 

From July 1. 1919, to July L 1920. 



Month* 



State Fund. 






Public Em- 
ploye* 






Section 22. 



'5- 



Section 27 



^ 

rt 



Total 



1919 
July _„-.. 
August --. 
September 
October _. 
November 
December 

1920 
Jamjar>- _. 
I**ebniary . 
March — 
April _.__ 
Maiy ^^^.. 
June „__^ 



10,844 
3237 
13,393 
13,250 
10767 
11,813 



13.29S 
9,901 
15,772 
12.872 
12.319 



149,706 



50 
49 
46 

5S 
47 
14 



34 
51 
63 

57 
45 
49 



590 



59 
90 
45 
77 
78 
74 



02 
45 
66 
58 

58 



772 



4 
1 

1(1 
4 
3 
2 



43 



1,309 
1,222 
1472 
L234 
1,019 
L216 



1.519 
L26LH 

L49t>l 
L373 
1.1351 
1;175| 



15,430 



21 


S 


16 


8 


19 


8 


Z2 


11 


3Sl 


8 


12 


12 


331 


6 


14 


7 


16 


12 


IS 


6 


14 


5 


18 


9 

1 


23S 


1 



12^3 
13.686 
14,996 
14,655 
11,957 
13,173 



14.9S4 
1L28CJ 
17,428 
14,391 
13,581 
14,491 



12 166.885 



NUMBER OF CLAIMS DISPOSED OF MONTHLY. 

All Classes. 

From July L 1919, to July L 1920. 



Month. 



State Fund. 



State. 



Ptib. Emp. 



Section 22. 



Section 27, 



Total. 



1919 

July - .— - 

Angust ^ ^- 

September _^— . 

October 

November _,*_ 
December ^— 

1920 

Januar>' --^ 

Fcbniary -^^^^ 

March ,^^^ 

April ^„^ — 

May 

Jtinc _ 

Toral - — 



7.612 
12,Sl^ 
13.Q2l> 
13J17 
11,407 
13,030 



12.747 

0.8f,2 

15J55 

13.730 

12.9(.M) 
13,40*3 



62 
66 
92 
65 

78 i 

67 



66 
61 
78 

m 

SB 
91 



1.252 
1,120 
LSKS 
1,410 
1.167 
L118 



1,5m 
L510 
1,325 
1 ,450 

1.182 



150,374 



B49 ^ 15,669 
I 



-I- 



11 
8 

10 
H 

18 
6 



19 
8 
6 
S 
8 
8 

115 



8,937 
14,082 
15,54<} 
15,200 
12,670 
14,221 



14,336 
11,450 
16,564 
15.253 

14,067 
14,687 

167.007 



Google 



Digitized by 



284 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



NUMBER OF CLAIMS PENDING AT END OF EACH MONTH. 

All Classes. 
From July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920. 



Month. 



State Fund. 



State. 



Pub. Emp. 



Section 22. 



Section 27. 



Total 



1919 

July 

August — 
September 
October — 
November 
December . 



1920 
January « 
February 
March — . 

April 

May 

June 



Total 



7,903 
7,361 
6,880 
6,468 
5,875 
4,702 



5,287 
5,377 
6,057 
5,256 
4,720 
4,501 



70,387 



1(> 
101 
64 
80 
83 
92 



90 

67 
65 
72 
43 



909 



863 
981 
954 
800 
687 
797 



845 
600 
787 
725 
770 
781 



9,590 



16 
19 
20 
25 
15 
1 



8 
7 
13 
16 
14 
15 



169 



8358 
8»462 
7,918 
7,373 
6,660 
5,592 



6,230 
6,060 
6,924 
6,062 
5,576 
5,340 



81,055 



NUMBER OF CLAIMS REGULARLY HEARD IN STATE AND PUBLIC 

EMPLOYE CLASSES. 

From July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920. 



Month. 



State. 



Public 
Employe. 



Rules 
9 and 12. 



Total 



1919 

July 

August »— 
September 
October — 
November 
December 

1920 
January — 
February - 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total - 



12,571 
15,195 
16.636 
17,342 
14,382 
17,292 



16.067 
12,669 
12,517 
17.666 
16.257 
18,021 



186,615 



94 
130 
123 
125 
104 
136 



131 
100 
136 
No record 
126 
153 



1,358 



638 
865 
772 
760 
696 
862 



1,167 
1,188 
1,177 

987 
1,126 

594 



10,832 



13,303 
16,190 
17,531 
18,227 
15,182 
18,290 



17,365 
13,957 
13,830 
18,653 
17,509 
18,768 



198305 



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5^"^w?V!t«J ■ "^ ' 



T*W^*'r 9P 



■w^fflF^^ 



IRH^npii 



INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO. 



285 



MONTHLY STATEMENT OF CLAIMS HEARD SPECIALLY BY THE 

COMMISSION. 

From July 1. 1919, to July 1, 1920. 



Month. 



State Fund. 



Total hd. 



Death C. 
presented. 



Awards 
granted 
Death C. 



Sec. 22. 



Sec 27. 



1919 

July 

August — 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 



1920 

January - 
February 
March — 

April 

May 

June 



Total 



505 
696 
557 
697 
588 
603 



632 
504 
645 
766 
641 
742 



7,576 



48 
98 
63 
90 
62 
54 



70 
52 
62 
116 
78 
70 



863 



28 
55 
28 
34 
39 
30 



34 
31 
37 
57 
45 
26 



444 



108 
96 
91 

146 
73 

114 



53 
64 

118 
88 
93 

102 



1,146 



11 

8 
10 

8 
18, 



19 
8 
6 
5 
8 
8 



109 



CLAIMS HEARD SPECIALLY FOR PAYMENT OF MEDICAL EXPENSES 
IN EXCESS OF $200.00 AND AMOUNTS SO PAID. 

From July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920 



Month. 



Number 
Heard. 



Amount 
Paid. 



1919 

July 

August 

September — 

October 

November - 
December — 

1920 

January 

February _— 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total — . 



36 


$5,691 38 


48 


5.783 81 


82 


10,291 54 


97 


11.115 49 


71 


10,104 28 


66 


7,226 48 


132 


11,910 01 


53 


5,636 n 


114 


16.485 05 


94 


7,860 26 


92 


11,320 68 


139 


15.264 74 


1,024 


$118,690 49 



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286 



OmO GENERAX. STATISTICS. 



MONTHLY STATEMENT OF CLAIMS DISALLOWED. 

All Classes. 

From July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920. 



Month. 



State Fund. 



Injury. 



Death. 



Section 22. 



Injury. 



Section 27. 



Death. 



Injury. 



Death. 



Total. 



1919 

July 

August - - 
September 
October __ 
November 
December 

1920 

January — 
P'ebruary . 
March -— 

April 

May 

June 

Total . 



106 
103 
93 
89 
58 
54 



57 
66 
81 
109 
89 
96 



1,001 



2 
8 
10 
10 
3 
4 



6 
3 
3 
11 
11 
5 



76 



7 
6 
6 
10 
6 
7 



13 
5 
8 

13 
6 
9 



96 



20 



3 
2 
1 
• 1 
3 
1 



28 



119 
122 
114 
HI 
73 
66 



79 

78 

98 

136 

110 

115 



1,221 



MONTHLY STATEMENT OF CLAIMS DISMISSED UNDER 
RULES 9 AND 12. 

From July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920. 



Month. 



Rule 9. 



Rule 12. 



Total. 



1919 

July 

August - - 
September 
October — 
November 
December 

1920 

January - 
February . 
March ___ 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



485 


153 


638 


601 


264 


865 


479 


293 


772 


182 


109 


291 


299 


213 


512 


464 


398 


862 


879 


288 


1,167 


708 


480 


1,188 


789 


388 


1,177 


648 


339 


987 


725 


401 


1.126 


407 


187 


594 



6,666 



3,513 



10,179 



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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO. 
NUMBER OP AWARDS MADE. 



287 



Under the provisions of Sec. 1465-103, there is to be included in the 
annual report a statement as to the number of awards made. The fol- 
lowing table will show this data for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, 
inclusive : 





State 
Fund. 


Pub. Emp. 


Sec. 22. 


Sec. 27. 


Total. 


Claims disposed of 

Claims disallowed 


150,374 
1,087 


849 


15,669 
116 


115 
28 


167,007 
1,231 








Total 


149,287 


849 


15,553 


87 


165,776 







There was a total of 167,007 claims of all classes disposed of during 
the fiscal year. Of these 1,231 were disallowed. Subtracting the number 
of disallowed claims from the total number disposed of, we get a total 
of 165,776, which approximately represents tlie number of awards made 
in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920. 



iMOXTHLY STATEMENT OF APPEALS TAKEN FROM THE DECISIONS 
OF THE COMMISSION AND STATUS OF PENDING CASES. 



Month. 



Appeals. 



Cases Pending. 



Common 
Pleas 
Court. 



Court 
of ^ 
Appeals. 



Court 
Supreme. 



tm9 

July — .. 
August ^ - 
September 

October 

November 
December 

im 

January ^. 
Febniar)' ^ 

March . 

April -^^^ 

May , .- 

June _____ 



3 

14 

7 

2 

T 

4 



10 

No record 
Ko rt'Cun! 
Nn record 
No rtcnrd 
No record 



176 
226 
214 
215 
211 
210 



1% 

v.e 

188 
186 
184 



4 
3 
4 
5 
5 
5 



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28$ OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

MEDICAL DIVISION. 

The work of the past year in the Medical Division has been a memor- 
able one, with respect to the amount of routine work handled and also 
with respeet to tlie improvements made in the methods employed. 

In prolongGtl disability claims the Division has perfected a system of 
keeping in close touch with claimants by periodical examinations made 
either at the claimant's home or at a point within easy traveling distance 
from his home. Two examiners devote their entire time to this work 
and ill case of necessity one or even two more are temporarily placed on 
such duties. Examinations are made from time to time as the character 
of the disability requires. This not only gives the Commission reliable 
and accurate in formation regarding the claimant's condition but also 
creates a feeling of trust on the part of the claimant, his employer and 
his attendingr j^iiysician. The Commission do^ not attempt to dictate 
the treatment in any case but is alw^ays glad to consult with the attend- 
ing physician when requested to do so. 

About twelve thousand special examinations were made in the past 
year as agaiast ten thousand in the preceding year. This work is of the 
greatest practical importance and the personnel of the examining force 
siioulrl be sufficiently augmented to permit them to cover the state at 
least every four weeks. This Division needs the services of a full time 
medical investigiitor. At the present time, due to pressure of work, 
they are able to devote only part time of one medical examiner for such 
duties. 

The work of the Medical Division is gradually increasing and broad- 
ening. Not only must they keep pace with the new claims filed daily, 
but there h always a large number of continued claims up for attention, 
many uf tlieni dating back five or six years. Most of these claims re- 
quire as mutih time for review and report as many new claims. 

Another class of cases w'hich is becoming an important factor in 
the work m Ihni In which bills for medical, hosptial and nursing services 
exceed two lumdred dollars. While the actual number of such cases is 
small in comparison with the total number filed (over one thousand in 
the past year) tl^ey are constantly increasing. All of these cases require 
special reports and are now of such frequency that the time of one 
examiner js largely devoted to this work. 

There has been a revision of the fee schedules covering medical, 
dental imtl hospital services. The Commission adopted a system of flat 
fees for all injuries where such a plan is practicable. This covers all 
fractiireis, aiiapiUations, dislocations and a number of special operations 
such as tliat of Jiernia, enucleation of eye, cataract operations, etc. In 
Kuch eases a fixed fee is paid for full treatment of the case. This plan 
has the endorsement of the Ohio State Medical Association and was 

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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 289 

adopted only after such endorsement had been received. This new 
schedule became effective June 1, 1920, and has not been in operation 
long enough to demonstrate its value. 

The question of hospital rates was taken up with a committee from 
the Ohio Hospital Association and after considering the matter from all 
angles, it was decided that the fairest plan would be to base charges for 
hospital attention on the actual patient-per-day cost of each hospital as 
shown by its report to the State Board of Health. The fixed rate form- 
erly in effect was found to be woefully inadequate — in fact, most hos- 
pitals were actually taking care of industrial cases at a loss. This con- 
dition was most unfair to the hospitals and could not be allowed to 
continue. This plan was adopted by the Commission and is effective on 
and after July 1, 1920. 

The duties of the medical examiners include the preparation of many 
reports and opinions. It is of the utmost importance, therefore, that a 
reliable and up-to-date reference library be available. It is impossible 
for any physician, no matter how able, to keep abreast of the trend of 
medical progress unless such literature is available. 

AUDITING DIVISION. 

(A) RECEIPTS. 

Balance in treasury July 1, 1919 $19,056,230 76 

Premium 14,140,449 25 

Interest- 
Bond account $973,657 01 

Inactive account 108,751 47 

Active account 33,573 33 

1,115,981 81 

Collected warrants 2,335 75 



$34,314,997 57 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Warrants and refund vouchers $6,597,358 98 

Paid as accrued interest on bonds 104,011 39 



$6,701,370 37 



Balance in treasury June 30, 1920 $27,613,627 20 

RECAPITULATION. 

Invested in bonds $23,474,509 98 

Deposits — inactive accounts 3,096,500 00 

Deposits — active accounts 1,042,617 22 



$27,613,627^20^ 
10 — O. G. S. Digitized by ' ^ ^ ^ 



il3,627 20 T 

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OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



(B) SUBSCRIBERS TO FUND. 

Number of new risks (State Insurance) 3,776 

Number of new risks (Self-Insurance) 32 

(C) COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS SHOWING GROWTH OF STATE INSURANCE FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 



Fiscal year ending Premium. 

June 30, 1912 $37,842 75 

June 30, 1913 460,503 05 

June 30, 1914 2,096,267 14 

June 30, 1915 2,844,022 15 

June 30, 1916 3,715,298 20 

June 30, 1917 6,492,101 03 

June 30, 1918 10,410,013 45 

June 30, 1919 12,480,483 11 

June 30, 1920 14,140,449 25 



Interest. 

$2,818 81 

32,230 28 

89,756 15 

130,188 20 

237,014 87 

386,615 25 

725,772 52 

1,115,981 81 



Collected 
Warrants. 



$25 71 

367 87 

563 06 

690 29 

1,049 32 

1,700 28 

2,335 75 



$52,676,980 13 $2,720,377 89 $6,732 28 



$55,404,090 30 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Warrants and 
Refund Vouchers. 

June 30, 1912 - $1,192 54 

June 30, 1913 76,543 78 

June 30, 1914 693,015 32 

June 30, 1915 2,152,088 95 

June 30, 1916 2,673,229 99 

June 30, 1917 4,327,318 75 

June 30, 1918 5,185,144 66 

June 30, 1919 5,834,392 18 

June 30, 1920 6,597,358 98 



Accrued Interest 
Paid on Bonds. 



$5,378 52 
15,270 55 
21,550 66 
25,091 36 
78,875 47 
104,011 39 



$27,540,285 15 $250,177 95 



$27,790,463 10 



Balance in Treasury June 30, 1920 $27,613,627 20 

During the fiscal year the investments in bonds was increased by 
$7,732,940.84. The balance in the tresaury was increased by $8,557,- 
396.42. 

The interest collected from bonds and banks was almost $400,000.00 
more than the preceding year. We are at present receiving a minimum 
of 5 per cent on money deposited in banks and in some cases as much as 
6 per cent. 

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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 291 

STATEMENT OF CONDITION OF THE OHIO STATE INSURANCE FUND (EMPLOYERS 
FUND only) as of DECEMBER 31, 1919. 

Income — 

Premium receipts $41,703,768 54 

Self-insurers — 1,157,297 88 

$42,861,066 42 

Interest earnings 2,032,518 28 

Collected warrants 6,079 97 



$44,899,664 67 



Disbursements — 

Warrants issued $23,266,409 72 

Refund vouchers 418,067 80 

Accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased 186,515 53 

$23,870,993 05 

$21,028,671 62 

Assets — 

Bond investment account $18,953,280 05 

Inactive account (bank loans)— 1,927,000 00 

Active account 354,692 41 

Accrued interest due fund 334,000 35 

Premium in course of collection. 2,028,687 00 

$24,097,659 81 
Less premiums of state and 

county fund $326,777 40 

Less premiums due over 90 days- 85,372 96 



$412,150 36 

$23,685,509 45 



Liabilities— 

Claims reserves $17,834,664 57 

Unearned premium 2,001,929 00 



Surplus Funds — 

Catastrophe surplus $1,135,158 11 

General surplus 2,713,757 77 



$19,836,593 57 



$3,848,915 88 

$23,685,509 45 
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292 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

TWELVE (12) PER CENT DIVIDEND DECLARATION, — EQUALLING APPROXI- 
MATELY ONE AND ONE-THIRD MILLION DOLLARS. 

The above financial statement of December 31, 1919, shows the 
Ohio State Insurance Fund with a greater surplus than it has ever here- 
tofore possessed, the catastrophe surplus being $1,135,158.11, the general 
surplus being $2,713,757.77. In view of the fact that it is a basic in- 
tent of the Ohio State Insurance Plan to provide the Ohio employers 
their workmen's compensation insurance at absolute cost, with the main- 
tenance only of a reasonable contingent reserve to safeguard the fund 
against fluctuations, the Commission has declared a twelve (129^) per 
cent dividend on the past year's business. Predicated upon the volume 
of earned premium income for the past year, this dividend declaration 
will return to the subscribers to the Fund approximately one and one- 
third million dollars. 

INCREASES MADE IN HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL FEE SCHEDULE. 

Since the compilation of the July 1, 1919, rates, there has been but 
one upward revision of the past schedule that has necessitated a special 
additional loading upon the July 1, 1920, rates, viz, the upward revision 
of the hospital fee and medical fee schedules. The revision of the hos- 
pital fee schedule will result in an increased cost of about 33 1/3 over the 
previous schedule, and the increase in the medical fee schedule is com- 
puted at a little over 20 per cent. 

Practically every subscriber to the Fund is keenly aware of the 
absolute necessity for the above action. Substantial increases in work- 
men's compensation hospital and medical fee schedules, similar to the 
above, have become necessary throughout the United States. 

EXTENSION OF THE LIMITS OF THE MERIT-RATING SYSTEM. 

In keeping with the established plan of the Commission to stimulate 
accident prevention through the process of debits and credits based upon 
the individual experience produced by the employer, and to reward the 
employer financially for the production of a good accident experience, 
the Commission has increased the maximum penalization from 30 per 
cent to 33 per cent and the maximum reward credit premium from 10 
per cent to 15 per cent, effective July 1, 1920. 

ACCIDENT CAUSES YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 

Following is a distribution of the industrial accidents, by causes, 
as reported for the year ending June 30, 1920, which includes those self- 
insurance claims wherein the period of disability has not exceeded one 
week. This general cause classification is in accordance with that adopted 

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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 



293 



by the Committee on Statistics and Compensation Insurance Cost of the 
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commis- 
sions:— 



General Cause of Accidents. 



Number of 


Percent 


Accidents. 


of Total. 


79,043 


43.2 


366 


.2 


4,391 


2.4 


12,442 


6.8 


183 


.1 


8,417 


4.6 


5,306 


2.9 


6,404 


3.5 


45,194 


24.7 


13,357 


7.3 


549 


.3 


7,318 


4.0 



Machinery 

Boilers and Steam Pressure Apparatus 

Vehicles ; 

Explosives, electricity, fires and hot and corrosive sub- 
stances 

Poisonous substances 

Falls of persons 

Stepping on or striking against objects 

Falling objects 

Objects being handled 

Hand Tools 

Animals 

Miscellaneous causes - 

Total number of accidents reported for year ending 
June 30, 1920 



182,970 



100.0 



Four months' exposure of the above cause distribution has been determined by 
pro-rating. 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION DEPARTMENT. 

FIELD FORCE. 

The activities of the six branch offices and the various claim in- 
vestigators and pay roll auditors located over the state are covered by 
this report. 

The work assigned to this division has shown steady increase 
throughout the year, especially is this true with reference to claim work, 
which is given preference over other classes of work assigned. During 
the year just closed there has been an increase in the monthly average of 
work performed over the year previous of 10 per cent in death claims 
investigated, 50 per cent in special claims investigated, and 60 per cent 
in lump sum investigations and disbursements. With this increased 
claim work, the division has succeeded in keeping our auditing work well 
in hand and in preventing any material increase in the unfinished work 
on hand. 

The following tables show the volume of work performed and the 
unfinished work on hand by months for the fiscal year : 



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294 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



SUMMARY OF WORK PERFORMED BY FIELD MEN. 
July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 



:3 



< 



O 



^ 



12: 



O 

u 



C4 



Qaims 
Investigated. 






E 

1/2 



1919 

July __ 

August — ^^ 

September 

October —^ ._. 

November -^*. * 

December 



1920 

January __ 
February - 
March _ ^- 

April 

May 

June 



Totals 

Monthly Aver- 
age ^- 



3,133 
2.468 
3.093 
3.754 
2.972 
3712 



3.536 
2,873 
2.696 
3,039 
3,317 
3,690 



3S,283 



3,190 



$903,968 15 
1,144,219 90 
1,055,165 81 
1,217,812 39 
3,981,338 35 
1,118,684 78 



1,353,044 35 
1,303,060 59 
1,426,616 39 
838,562 85 
1,110,856 73 
1,330,154 93 



$16,783,485 22 



$1,398,623 77 



13(^ 
57 
66 
56 
76 
82 



111 
68 
84 
128 
124 
102 

1,090 



91 



166 
98 

128 

136 
96 

125 



133 
107 
178 
165 
173 
141 



1,646 



137 



198 
89 

122 

111 
90 

150 



144 
108 
197 
185 
191 
149 



1,734 



144 



35 
36 
24 
42 
34 
48 



46 
24 
29 
47 
67 
49 



481 



40 



57 
58 
59 
75 
50 
58 



55 
51 
88 
69 
71 
7Z 



7(A 



63 



120 
102 
118 
115 
159 
129 



171 
145 
190 
160 
203 
227 



1.839 



153 



85 

94 

105 

91 

112 

126 



101 
97 
148 
144 
121 
130 



1,354 



113 



SUMMARY OF WORK ON HAND BY FIELD MEN. 
July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 



Unaudited 
Payrolls. 



Claims for Investigation. 



Death. 



Special. 



Lump 
Sum. 



July 1, 19t9.-_._^ — 

August 1^-^ «. 

September 1 _^^ __- 

October 1-^ 

November 1 

December 1— ,-. 

January 1, 192E).__.._ 

February I ,-_^,^ „ 

March l^ 

April 1_^ *_____- 

May 1 -_.. 

June 1 — ^,^— ..^ 

Monthly Average 



17,700 
16,931 
16,913 
19,030 
17,806 
17,061 
15,651 
15,863 
16,005 
17,267 
16,813 
17,436 



17,260 



28 
35 
35 
41 
27 
38 
24 
41 
42 
39 
35 
26 



33 



50 
44 
42 
42 
50 
44 
53 
43 
56 
56 
60 
60 



55 



39 
31 
36 
47 
35 
51 
26 
33 
51 
44 
30 
33 



38 



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\ 



i 



INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 295 

DEPAETMENT OF INVESTIGATION AND STATISTICS. 

DIVISION OF STATISTICS. 

This Division collects all data relating to industrial and social con- 
ditions in the state and prepares this information for publication. Bulle- 
tins have been issued from time to time dealing with the subjects men- 
tioned. 

*' Statistics of Mines and Quarries in Ohio, — 1919.'' This bulletin 
shows for the mines and quarries in each county the number of employes, 
production, days in operation and the total wage and salary payments, 
etc., in 1919. 

** Union Scale of "Wages and Hours of Labor in Ohio on May 15, 
1919." This bulletin shows the wages for the regular time, the over-time 
rate and the hours of labor in each of the 14 largest cities in the State 
of Ohio according to the Union agreements in eflfect on May 15, 1919. 

** Rates of Wages, Hours of Labor and Fluctuation of Employment 
in Ohio for the year ending December 31, 1918." This bulletin includes 
returns from approximately 22,709 employers, and the classified wages 
in 1918 of about 1,245,025 employes, total wage and salary payments and 
the fluctuation in the number employed. 

The Printing Commission has refused to authorize the publication of 
these bulletins, with the exception of the one covering the Union Scale of 
Wages. They have also refused to authorize the publication containing 
a directory of Ohio Manufacturers, which has been insistently demanded 
by hundreds of people in and out of this state, comprising manufactur- 
ing associations, chambers of commerce, and social and insurance organ- 
izations. 

DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Under the supervision of the Department of Investigation and Sta- 
tistics, Free Employment Service OflBces are operated in Akron, Cincin- 
nati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown. In each of 
the cities the municipal authorities co-operate with the state in bearing 
the expense of the offices, and they are known as State-City Free Em- 
ployment Service OflSces. During the war these offices were operated by 
the United States Government as part of their employment service. 
Since the first of July, 1919, they have been under the direct super- 
vision of this Division. The following is a table showing the amount of 
work done during the past year : 




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296 



OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

YEARLY REPORT EMPl^MENT OFFICES. 
July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1920. 





New 
Regis- 
trations. 


Re- 
newals. 


Total 
Appli- 
cations. 


Help 
Wanted. 


Re- 
ferred. 


Reported 
Placed. 


Male . 


120,787 
19,668 


180,915 
103,975 


301.702 
123,643 


295,294 


9?ft19C 


192,735 
90,106 


Female 


129,201 103,101 




Grand Total 


140,455 


284,890 


'425,345 


424,495 


331,226 


282,841 



PRIVATE AGENCIES. 

A new law now in effect gives to the Industrial Commission the 
power to regulate the fees to be charged by private agencies, but up to 
date no regulation has been attempted. The number of licenses issued, 
renewed, lapsed and revoked is. as follows : 

New licenses issued - 22 

Renewals 38 

Lapsed \ 10 

Revoked 1 

Denied . 2 

Total number of private labor exchanges in operation 60 



DIVISION OF MEDIATION AND ARBITRATIONS. 

Labor disputes or differences that are liable to lead to serious out- 
come and interference with work are noted by this Division, and it 
renders its service to bring them to an agreeable conclusion. During the 
year covered by this report the Chief Mediator or his deputies partici- 
pated in the settlement of twelve controversies, also made local investi- 
gation during the steel strike, although no attempt was made at settle- 
ment on account of the trouble being of a national character. 

A number of agreements entered into between employers and em- 
ployes stipulate that in the event that their grievances go to arbitrators 
and the arbitrators appointed by the different parties involved fail to 
agree upon a third man, the Industrial Commission of Ohio shall, in 
that case, make the nomination. We have had five requests for this 
service, which were granted. 



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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 297 

DEPABTMENT OF INSPECTION. 

DIVISION OP WORKSHOPS, FACTORIES AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

By close application to duty on the part of every member of the 
Department, the total number of inspections made this year was in- 
creased over the number made last year by approximately 700. This 
result has been obtained notwithstanding the fact that due to a number 
of our inspectors resigning to take up more remunerative employment 
with industrial concerns, it was necessary to employ new and inexperi- 
enced help. 

FACTORY INSPECTION. 

As has been customary, by far the greater part of the time of the 
Department during the year has been devoted to factory inspection and 
the enforcement of the laws relating to safeguarding of machinery and 
other dangerous conditions. "While some difficulty was experienced in 
getting prompt compliance with orders, due to the scarcity and high cost 
of labor and material, in the main, the co-operation and and assistance of 
manufacturers generally has been had in our efforts to make the work- 
shops as safe as possible through the installation of safety devices, and 
the results accomplished in this direction have been very gratifying in- 
deed. 

During the year the force of field deputies made a total of 30,033 
factory inspections in consequence of which there was issued a total of 
10,790 orders for changes and improvements relating to safety and sani- 
tation in these establishments. The number of re- visits and re-inspec- 
tions required to establish compliance with these orders was approxi- 
mately 10,000. 

SUMMARY OF INSPECTIONS MADE. 

Factories 23,694 

Mercantiles 3,985 

Schools 802 

Theatres 327 

HaUs 292 

Churches 153 

Hotels 107 

Tenements 113 

Miscellaneous 467 

Home Workshops 34 

Bakeshops 2,320 

Explosive Magazines and Factories 235 

Total 32,829 

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298 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



DIVISJON OF WORKSHOPS, FACTORIES AND PUBUC BUILDINGS. 

SUMMARY OF ORDERS ISSUED. 

Factories 8,215 

Mercantiles 1,573 

Schools 1 684 

Theaters , 236 

Halls 249 

Churches 97 

Hotels - 104 

Tenements - 89 

Miscellaneous - 282 

Home Workshops -^ 12 

Bakeshops 990 

Explosive Magazines and Factories 216 

Total 12747 

Total number of re-visits made for the purpose of ascertaining whether 

orders placed had been complied with 12,911 

EXPLOSIVE CERTIFICATES ISSUED. 

First Qass 983 

Second Qass .p 120 

Total 1,103 

Total amount of license fees collected $7713 50 

CODES. 

During the past year public hearings on the Lighting Codes were 
completed and same has recently been adopted by the Commission as a 
standard for inspection for this Division. 

This code will serve as an excellent guide for our inspectors and 
employers as well in correcting improper and inadequate lighting condi- 
tions in their plants, conditions which have been responsible for many 
of the accidents occurring in industrial establishments in the past. 

The code on Ventilation and Sanitation is practically completed and 
will, no doubt, be submitted to the Commission for adoption in the near 
future. 

A construction code, covering the erection, repair and demolition of 
buildings, is in course of preparation and will be completed within the 
next few months. This code is very badly needed and when adopted will 
enable this department to provide much better conditions for the safety 
of persons employed in building construction work. 

The General Standards Code Committee, which has been assigned 
the work of compiling codes on Grinding and Emery Wheels and Chains 
and Cranes, has been reorganized and will be set to work in the very near 

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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO. 299 

future, compiling codes on the above mentioned subjects, which work 
ought to be finished by the end of this year. 

The Department has just recently compiled a code of regulations 
covering construction and arrangement of garages. Copies of the code 
have been mailed to all mayors throughout Ohio, together with a circular 
letter requesting their co-operation in the enforcement of its provisions. 

In this connection, attention is called to the fact that the code on 
Passenger and Freight Elevators, which was adopted by the Commission 
in 1916 as a standard for inspection, has provai very satisfactory in every 
respect. 

FIRE DRILLS. 

Pursuant to the provisions of House Bill No. 235, passed by the last 
General Assembly, establishing fire drills in factory and loft buildings 
of this state, there has been, with the assistance of the Fire Prevention 
Code Committee, prepared and distributed amongst the manufacturers 
for their guidance, a complete code of regulations outlining the method 
of conducting these drills ; said rules became effective June 1, 1920. 

Quite a few of the smaller plants have already installed their fire 
alarm systems and are practicing the fire drills, and others are organizing 
and equipping their plants as rapidly as possible preparatory to estab- 
lishing their drills. 

This is an excellent law and will, if observed in letter and in spirit 
by the manufacturers, go a long way toward insuring safety to life and 
limb of the occupaoits of factory buildings in case of fire or other disaster. 

HIGH POWER PIPING. 

On August 1, 1919, there was added to the force two field deputies 
whose duties are to inspect high power piping of all kinds, including 
high and low pressure steam, hydraulic and refrigeration. We were 
fortunate in securing for these positions two very capable men who have 
had -years of practical experience in this line of work. Both have been 
very vigorous in the performance of their duties and as a result very 
satisfactory results have been ^attained. 

Before starting these men on this work, there was prepared, as a 
guide for them, a tentative draft of essential safety requirements per- 
taining to the installation of high power piping. This code is to be used 
only temporarily, however, and it is the intention later on, acting through 
the General Advisory Committee, to organize a committee of experts to 
drdft a permanent code covering all phases of this subject, which is a 
rather complicated and technical one. 

BAKESHOPS. 

The three rae^ engaged in this work have been very active and dili- t 

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300 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

gent in the perfonntoce of their duties and as a result very satisfacrtory 
results have been accomplished atong this line. During the year a total 
of 2,320 inspections of this kind were made and a total of 990 orders 
issued. Legal proceedings were instituted against the owners of nine of 
these establishments to enforce compliance with orders. Conviction was 
secured in all cases and substantial penalties imposed by the court. 

EXPLOSIVES. 

The new explosives laws passed by the General Assembly in 1919 
became effective August 15, 1919. In actual operation they have proven 
very satisfactory and hearty co-operation in their enforcement has been 
secured throughout the state. 

Good progress has been made in this branch of the work. As shown 
in the accompanying table, 535 inspections were made during the year, 
resulting in the issuance of 216 orders for the erection of new magazines, 
alterations and improvements to old magazines and the installation of 
safeguards in connection with explosive manufacturing plants, 1,103 cer- 
tificates of compliance were issued, 983 for first-class and 120 for second- 
class magazines, and a total of $7,713.50 was collected in license fees. 
We have but one explosive inspector for the state, whose salary is 
$2,040.00 per year with necessary traveling expenses, and it will, there- 
fore, be observed that this work is not only self-sustaining, but a sub- 
stantial surplus has been created which has been turned into the State 
Treasury. 

The enforcement of the new explosives laws has caused a great deal 
of additional clerical work in the office in collecting the fees, issuing of 
certificates and correspondence incident thereto, and this has been ae- 
complished without any addition to the offiice force. 

CHILD LABOR. 

A special effort was made to strictly enforce all laws relating' to 
the employment of children. However, there are still many violations of 
the various provisions of these laws, especially those prohibiting employ- 
ment of boys under sixteen years of age and those relating to age and 
schooling certificates and the hours of labor. This will, no doubt, con- 
tinue until the force of inspectors is sufficiently increased to enable regu- 
lar and more frequent inspection of all establishments employing minors. 

In this connection, attention is called to the lack of co-operation on 
the part of the school authorities in the enforcement of the child labor 
and compulsory educational laws. A great deal of the trouble in this 
direction could be obviated and many of the child labor law violations 
prevented, particularly those pertaining to the employment of minors 
under age, if the school officials, through their truancy department, would 

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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO. 301 

properly enforce the compulsory educational laws and see to it that chil- 
dren of school age are compelled to remain in school. For some reason, 
however, there seems to be a tendency on their part to shift the responsi- 
bility to this Department, whenever possible ; not infrequently complaints 
being received from the school authorities themselves to the effect that 
boys and girls thirteen to fifteen years of age are employed in certain 
establishments in violation of the law, and requesting that the matter . 
be looked into. They seem to completely overlook the fact that under 
the law it is as much their responsibility as it is of this Department to 
see that these children are kept out of illegal employment and compelled 
to return to school. 

During the past year it has been found necessary to bring prosecu- 
tion for violation of these laws in a total of 196 cases as follows: Em- 
ploying minors under age, 81 ; employing minors without certificates, 65 ; 
employing boys and girls in excess of the hours allowed by law, 15 ; em- 
ploying minors before and after hours, 19, and miscellaneous, 16. Con- 
viction was secured in all of these prosecutions, although in a number of 
cases the fines imposed were either suspended or remitted by the court. 
This was done in most instances without the consent or approval of this 
Department. 

FEMALE LABOB. 

The new law prohibiting the employment of females in certain oc- 
cupations went into effect on September 5, 1919. The report of the in- 
spectors would indicate that this law is being fairly well observed by 
employers, very few violations having been reported to the Department. 

As much cannot be said in regard to complying with some of the 
other provisions of these laws, however, especially those relating to hours 
of labor, etc. It was found necessary during the past twelve months to 
institute legal proceedings to enforce compliance with these requirements 
of the law in 53 cases, 22 for employing females more than 9 hours per 
day and 50 hours per week, and 31 for employing females more than 6 
days per week. In 75 per cent of these cases a plea of guilty was entered 
by the defendant and in the balance a verdict of guilty was returned 
when cases were heard. 

During the past year repeated complaints have been made regarding 
the long hours required of females in business offices. There are no re- 
strictions in the present laws as to the hours of labor for females over 
21 years of age employed in strictly office work, and as a result the 
women engaged in these occupations are quite frequently compelled to 
work excessive hours, in some instances as high as 70 hours per week. 
As the working conditions of the office girl are no better in many cases 
than that of the factory girl, there is no reason why the law regulating 
the hours of labor for females should not apply to offices, and it is recom- 

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302 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

mended that Section 1008 of the General Code be amended so as to in- 
clude offices and office work, in the enumeration of establishments and 
occupations to which its provisions are applicable. 

PUBLIC BUILDING INSPECTION. 

The total number of public buildings inspected during the year, in- 
cluding theaters, churches, halls and schools and tenements, was 2,261, 
and the total number of orders issued was 1,741. As might be expected, 
much difficulty has been experienced in securing prompt compliance with 
many of these orders, due to the enormous increase in the prices of labor 
and materials of all kinds, which has made the cost of building repairs 
almost prohibitive. 

Much better results could be secured along this line if the proper co- 
operation from the different mayors and prosecuting attorneys of the 
cities and counties throughout the state could be had in the enforcement 
of these orders. Under the provisions of Section 1033, the responsibility 
for enforcing public building orders rests upon the mayors of the mu- 
nicipalities in which the buildings are located, and if not within the con- 
fines of the municipality, then the responsibility rests upon the prosecut- 
ing attorney of the county, whose duty it is to close these buildings until 
the orders of the Department are complied with, but in a great many 
instances these officials are totally indifferent in regard to the enforce- 
ment of these orders, and in some cases positively refuse or neglect to 
take any action whatever until forced to do so by the Department. 

k 

EXAMINATION OP PLANS. 

During the fiscal year the two men engaged on the work of examin- 
ing plans and specifications have examined a total of 566 plans. This 
is an increase of 268 over the number examined the preceding twelve 
months. Some idea of the vast amount of work entailed in the examinar 
tion of that number of plans and specifications may be gained when you 
consider that many of the plans, the majority perhaps, have to be re- 
turned to the Department two or three times before being finally ap- 
proved. 

NUMBER OF PLANS EXAMINED AND APPROVED. 

Factories 34 

Schools 172 

Theaters 69 

Churches 1 68 

Garages 42 

Lodge and Assembly Halls 42 

Miscellaneous 56 

Heating and Ventilating g3 

Total- - , 566 

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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 303 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

A proportionate share of our time and attention has been given to 
the enforcement of the Mattress Begulation, Eight Hour Public Work 
Law, Labeling of Prison Made Goods and Semi-Monthly Payment of 
Wage Law, and the results obtained have been quite satisfactory. 

PROSECUTIONS. 

Below is a summary of prosecutions brought by the Department 
during the fiscal year for violations of the various laws coming under 
our jurisdiction. 

SUMMARY OF PROSECUTIONS. 

Number of 
Prosecutions. 

Employment of girls under 16 years of age 49 

Emplo)rment of girls under 18 years of age more than 8 hours per day 12 

Employment of girls under 18 years of age after 6 p. m 8 

Employment of females under 18 years of age before 7 a. m 2 

Employment of girls under 18 years of age without certificates 58 

Employment of females over 18 years of age more than 9 hours per day 10 

Employment of females over 18 years of age more than 50 hours per week- 12 

Employment of females over 6 days per week 31 

Employment of females under 21 years of age after 10 p. m 1 

Employment of females under 18 years of age in place of amusement 1. 

Employment of boys under IS years of age 32 

Employment of boys under 16 years of age after 6 p. m 9 

Employment of boys under 16 years of age over 8 hours per day 3 

Employment of boys under 16 years of age in bowling alleys 8 

Employment of boys under 16 years of age in the tobacco industry 2 

Employment of boys under 16 years of age in place of amusement 3 

Employment of boys under 16 years of age without certificate 7 

Employment of boys under 16 years of age operating automobile 3 

Selling and having in possession mattresses not properly labeled 5 

Failure to comply with bakeshop order 9 

Failure to comply with factory order 5 

Failure of employe to wear safety device furnished by employer 1 

Refusing to permit an inspection of factory 1 

Violation of Eight-Hour Public Work Law 2 

Operating moving picture theater in violation of the Ohio State Build- 
ing Code 1 

Total 275 

Total amount of fines assessed $5,018 00 

Total amount of fines paid 2,979 50 

Total amount of fines suspended, remitted or not paid owing to appeal— 2,038 50 

Total amount of costs 1,176 68 

Total amount of costs paid 1,164 83 

Total amount of costs suspended, remitted or not paid owing to adverse 

verdict or appeal 11 85 

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304 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

DIVISION OF SAFETY. 

During the past six months the following was accomplished: The 
various code committees, some of which have not functioned since 1917, 
were reorganized and code work commenced; the Lighting Code waa 
discussed at two meetings of the General Advisory Committee and then 
was transmitted to the Industrial Commission with recommendations 
that it be used as a guide for inspection; three hearings were held on 
the Ventilation and Sanitation Codes, which were supposed to have been 
completed by the sub-committee in 1917; the hearings showed the need 
for more work on these important codes. This work has since progressed 
and will be completed in the next few months. The Construction, Chains, 
Cranes and Emery Wheel Codes have been worked on. The ground 
work has been laid for the Fire Prevention Code. The work of the 
Electrical Code and Intra Plant Railroad Code Committees has been 
prepared for them and will receive their early consideration. It may be 
well to point out that the plan of formulating codes has been submitted 
to a thorough analysis and as a result first efforts are being given to the 
development of the six basic codes which will cover conditions common to 
all industries. These six basic codes are: the General Standard Code, 
(covering the hazards common to all industries), the Fire Prevention 
Code, the Lighting Code, the Construction Code, the Ventilation and 
the Sanitation Code. By including in these codes all material of a gen- 
eral nature the codes with particular industries will only deal with the 
particular hazards thereof. This will avoid a great deal of confusing 
and conflicting repetition found in the codes developed to date. 

The Department has also co-operated with various national agencies 
in the development of national codes, particularly the Head and Eye 
Protection Code, the A])rasive Wheel Code and the Wood- Working Code. 
Eventually these codes will be adopted with minor modifications by all of 
the states and tlius the greatly-to-be-desired uniformity of state stand- 
ards will be accomplished. 

Realizing that personal carefulness is probably the most important 
single factor in the reduction of accidents and that our present educa- 
tional system does not teach the children habits of carefulness, a study 
was made of the problem and it was decided to encourage the introduc- 
tion in Ohio grade schools of the St. Louis plan of teaching safety to 
grade school children. This plan had met with marked success in St. 
Louis. Pursuant to this thought a letter was sent to every school super- 
intendent of this state outlining the accident situation and showing the 
need for safety education in the schools. The St. Louis plan was de- 
scribed and an offer made to send to all school superintendents, who 
would pledge themselves to support the Industrial Commission in its cam- 
paign for safety, a copy of a book outlining in detail the St. Louis plan. 

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1N1>USTRIAL COMMISSION Of OHIO. 305 

In reply to this letter it is most gratifying to note that 92 per cent of the 
city and county superintendents and 200 out of 245 of the district super- 
intendents pledged their support. While this step was taken shortly 
prior to the summer vacation, several schools nevertheless incorporated 
safety education into their curriculum at that time. We can look for- 
ward with confidence to the use of this method by the large majority of 
the schools in the coming school year. It is difficult to overestimate the 
eflfect such education will have on our accident problem in the future, as 
these children will have had inculcated in them habits of carefulness 
which will be their surest guarantee of immunity from accidents, not 
only in industry, but also on our streets, which, truth to tell, are today 
as dangerous to life and limb as our most hazardous industrial establish- 
ments. 

Another important development* has been the fostering of local 
councils of the National Safety Council in the larger communities of the 
state. Cleveland and Akron now have such a local council, with a paid 
secretary who devotes his entire time thereto. Canton and Cincinnati 
have safety clubs. This work is being carried on and it is hoped within 
the next year there will be local councils with paid secretaries in all 
of the larger cities of this state. If an experiment devised to meet the 
needs of smaller communities and now being tried is successful, there will 
also be local councils in many of the smaller communities actively carry- 
ing on accident prevention as a community problem of the first degree. 
To point out the value of this it may be well to note that following the 
first year of operation of the local council in St. Louis, industrial deaths 
were reduced from 110 to 57, and in Cleveland, deaths on the streets 
from automobiles were reduced from 143 to 73. Other accidents were 
decreased in proportion. 

A bi-monthly bulletin has been instituted and already evidence is at 
hand that it is serving a very useful purpose, not only in keeping em- 
ployers informed of the code work and other work of the Commission, 
but in pointing out to them their duty in connection with the prevention 
of accidents, and showing them how to organize and carry on accident 
prevention work. 

The accident problem of the state considered from one angle is: 

1. A problem of preventing as many accidents as possible. 

2. Of preventing the aggravation of an injury by improper hand- 
ling, or, differently stated, a problem of proper first-aid treat- 
ment. 

3. The proper care of those who, notwithstanding all other efforts, 
are disabled. 

In accordance with this analysis : 
1. A start has been made toward training foremen on construction 

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306 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

f. work in the principles of first aid. This work is being carried 

on in connection with the American Red Cross. 
2. The necessary data for a thorough comprehension of the cripple 

i problem of the state has been collected and presented to the 

Industrial Commission. 

Both the teaching of first aid and the care of the cripple will be 
greatly developed during the coming year. 

Some European countries notable for their accident reduction have 
achieved their deduction by handling each industrial group separately as 
for instance the iron and steel group, rubber group, etc. They have in- 
spectors for each particular group, who as the result of working in a 
particular group, become thoroughly familiar with the hazards thereof. 
Then in going from one plant to another the improvements made by one 
plant are carried on to the next, and thus become the common property 
of all. Meetings are held for the interchange of ideas and this method 
of carrying on accident prevention work of necessity results in a high 
degree of perfection. 

In this state, where each group is classified separately, it is quite 
evident that this method is particularly applicable, as by proper co- 
operation of the group members a reduction of accidents with a conse- 
quent reduction of rates can be accomplished, thus serving as an incen- 
tive to each member. In accordance with this thought a meeting was 
called of the Steam Forge Manufacturers, classification 3100. Several 
meetings were held and marked enthusiasm was evident. No attempt 
has been made to hold summer meetings, but the work will again be re- 
sumed in the fall. 

The Department has co-operated with the Ohio Ice Manufacturers' 
Association in the preparation of various bulletins and in a program for 
safety work within this group. Likewise an effort has been made to 
have the Cleveland Builders' Exchange employ a safety inspector to 
work among their members exclusively. Similar to this plan is an 
effort to reduce accidents from a given source, such as punch presses, 
elevators and other hazards which cause a large number of accidents. 

Quite a number of safety meetings have been held during the past 
six months and advice and assistance rendered many establishments rela- 
tive to their accident problems. 

A guide for safety inspectors and committeemen has been completed 
and a limited number of copies distributed. A handbook for foremen is 
practically completed. 



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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO. 307 

DEPARTMENT OF INSPECTION. 

DIVISION OP MINES. 

In common with all industrial activities, the coal industry for the 
fiscal year just passed was badly handicapped by labor conditions and 
car shortage. 

The coal production for the Calendar year 1919 reached about 34 
million tons, which was perhaps a fair record for normal times, as the 
greatest tonnage produced for any one year in Ohio prior to the war 
period was 36,285,468 tons for the year 1913. 

The unprecedented record for last October in anticipation of the 
miners* strike which began November 1st, oflfsets to some degree the great 
decrease in production for the first half of the fiscal year, but during 
the latter half the production w^as extremely low — the mines operating 
probably not over three days per week on an average. 

FATAL ACCIDENTS. 

There were 147 fatal accidents during the year, of which number 
76, or 51.7 per cent, were caused by falls of roof. This was an improve- 
ment over the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919, when 65.9 per cent of 
the entire number were caused by falls of roof. 

The number of fatal accidents in proportion to the tonnage pro- 
duced was considerably higher than for the preceding year. JefiPerson 
County alone had 41 fatal accidents — 20 of which were the result of 
the greatest mine disaster Ohio has ever experienced. This was in the 
nature of a fire which occurred on October 29, 1919, at the Amster- 
dam mine, located at Amsterdam, Jefferson County, and owned by the 
Youghiogheny and Ohio Coal Company at Cleveland. The fire is sup- 
posed to have been caused by an overheated bearing on an electric fan 
located inside the mine — 800 feet from the bottom of the shaft, and 20 
men trapped back of the fire were overcome by carbon monoxide and 
fumes generated by the fire before they could be rescued. 

A factor contributing to the high rate of fatalities was the unusual 
number of accidents — six in all, which resulted in the death of two or 
more men. 

In addition to the 76 men who were killed by falls of roof and the 
20 by mine fire, there were 18 killed by mine cars, 13 by explosives, 3 
by motors, 4 by electricity, 2 by mining machines, 1 by gas explosion, 2 on 
surface by railroad cars and 8 by miscellaneous causes. 

INSPECTIONS. 

The deputy mine inspectors spent 2,029 days making 2,342 inspec- 
tions of mines, in addition to investigating each of the 147 fatal acci- 

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308 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

dents; 129 days spent in the oil and gas fields, 218 days in training in 
use of mine rescue apparatus and attending general meetings called by 
the chief deputy, 252 days investigating and fighting mine fires and 24 
days spent with a representative of the United States Bureau of Stand- 
ards testing scales at 38 mines. 

MINE FIRES. 

There was an unusually large number of mine fires with which to 
contend during the past year — 7 in all, the Amsterdam, fire being the 
only one, however, to cost any loss of life. 

Another of these fires w^hich gravely endangered the lives of the 
employes was that which occurred January 6, 1920, at the Laughlin mine 
located at Martins Ferry, Ohio, and owned by the American Sheet and 
Tin Plate Company of Pittsburgh, Pa. This fire originated from some 
unknown cause, and only through the prompt action of the men who 
discovered the fire and the mine officials was another such disaster as 
that of Amsterdam averted. 

On February 7, 1920, a fire started in the Pittsburgh No. 2 mine of 
the Ohio and Pennsylvania Coal Company, located at Amsterdam, caused 
by cutting into an oil well and the oil in some way becoming lighted from 
a miner's lamp. 

On April 20, 1920, a gob fire broke out in the old workings of the 
Warwick No. 4 mine, located at Coshocton, and owned by the Warwick 
Coal Company of Cleveland. 

The fire which occurred at No. 253 mine, located at RendviUe, Perry 
County, and owned by the Cor-Ren Coal Company, was caused by break- 
ing the fire walls in the abandoned workings of the mine and in Mine 
268, which was done for the purpose of removing the pillar coal. This 
disturbance caused the fire which had been sealed oflf some years ago to 
rekindle. 

The remaining two of the 7 mine fires occurred in small mines, and, 
fortunately, did not jeopardize the lives of the miners. 

PROSECUTIONS. 

There were four cases of prosecutions for violation of those sections 
of the General Code coming under the jurisdiction of this Division. 
One was for failure to comply with an inspector's orders — Section 
871-43, and one for violation of Section 963 G. C. In the first case a 
fine of $100.00 and costs was assessed and the latter $50.00 and costs — 
the $50.00 fine being suspended. The other two were for violations of 
Section 959 — in each case fined $25.00 and costs, but fines suspended. 

NEW LEGISLATION. 

On December 18, 1919, the General Assembly passed a bill to amend 
Section 948 of the General Code relative to the use of alternating current 

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1 



INDUSTBIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 309 

in mines. At the end of the session, Section 915 was supplemented to 
provide for the establishment of five rescue stations wtihin the coal pro- 
ducing counties, such stations to be fully equipped with mine rescue 
apparatus and first aid supplies. This law is still inoperative, however, 
as no appropriation was made to meet the necessary expense. 

OIL AND GAS WELLS. 

During the year there were permits granted by this Division for the 
drilling of 830 new wells for oil or gas. Maps were filed showing the 
location of 1,274 additional wells and 376 wells were plugged and aban- 
doned. 

It being an impossibility for the one inspector now engaged in this 
work to be present when all weUs located in any coal bearing or coal 
producing township of any of the 30 coal producing counties of Ohio, 
such inspector witnesses the plugging of only the wells penetrating a 
workable seam of coal, a certified report being required of the operators 
in other cases. 

DEPARTMENT OF INSPECTION. 

DIVISION OF STEAM ENGINEERS. 

Number of applicants examined for Stationary Engineer's license 1,925 

Number of applicants examined for Boiler Operator's license 2,143 

Total number of applicants examined for license 4,068 

Number of applicants failing to qualify for Stationary Engineer's license. 1,178 

Number of applicants failing to qualify for Boiler Operator's license 972 

Total number of applicants failing to qualify 2,150 

Number of applicants qualifying for Stationary Engineer's licepse 747 

Number of applicants qualifying for Boiler Operator's license 1,171 

Total number of applicants qualifying for license 1,918 

Number of Stationary Engineer's licenses renewed 13,451 

Number of Boiler Operator's licenses renewed 5,391 

Total number of licenses renewed 18,842 

Number of Stationary Engineer's licenses expired 553 

Number of Boiler Operator's licenses expired 557 

Total number of licenses expired 1,110 

Number of Stationary Engineer's licenses revoked 1 

Number of Boiler Operator's licenses revoked 7 

Total number of licenses revoked 8 

Number of prosecutions for violations of license law 14 

Total receipts of fees for examinations and for renewals of licenses $46,681 00 

Inspections made since January 1, 1920 , 1,873 

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310 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

DIVISION OF BOILER INSPECTION. 
Reports received: 

Manufacturers* data on Ohio Standard inspections 5,126 

Internal inspections, Insurance Companies 15,069 

External inspections, State Inspectors 767 

Internal inspections, State Inspectors — . 3,461 

Special inspections. State Inspectors 1,114 

Three-Horse Power, State Inspectors 142 

Total . 25,679 

Receipts : 

Certificate fees $19,100 00 

State Inspectors' internal inspections 17,305 00 

State Inspectors' external inspections 1,534 00 

Examination fees, Boiler Inspectors 470 00 

Interest on bank deposit ^ 40 41 

Total $38,449 41 

Expenditures : 

Salaries $28,615 33 

Traveling expenses 7,474 19 

* Rent 1,800 00 

Equipment 341 90 

Repairs 2 50 

Supplies 99 78 

Advertising 29 77 

Miscellaneous . 14 61 

Total -— $38,378 08 

Total receipts 1 $38,449 41 

Total expenditures -. 38,378 08 

Net gain $71 33 

Due to age, deterioration, and general constructional requirements, 
110 boilers were condemned and no certificates of inspection issued per- 
mitting their operation in the State of Ohio. 

It is interesting to note that out of 19,439 boilers inspected during 
the past year, repair orders have been issued and compliances received on 
2,958, showing that owners and users of steam boilers in this state are 
co-operating with this Division in giving good care and attention to their 
equipment and are complying with the requirements of the Ohio boiler 
inspection law and rules. 

With approximately 20,000 boilers in use in this state and regularly 
inspected by this Division, there were but two boiler failures. One at 
the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company, Youngstown, Ohio, a Rust 
water tube boiler, tlie lower drum of which ruptured the entire length 
of the longitudinal seam frpm head to head, due to a constructional 

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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO. 311 

condition caused by punching and drifting the rivet holes., thereby 
throwing unequal strains upon the boiler plate at this pointj which 
construction was permitted at the time this boiler was construe ted, but 
since has been corrected by the Ohio Board of Boiler Rules, and no 
longer permitted. There was considerable property damage done by 
this explosion, but no person injured. 

The other was a small boiler owned by the Jones Meat Market, 
Chillicothe, Ohio, of the vertical flue type, which caused a proifcrty los4 
of about $1,000, but no person injured. This boiler was coiistnieted 
prior to the passage of the Ohio boiler inspection law, and is of such 
design that if not properly constructed unequal strains are plm-ed upon 
the vital parts which cause them to rupture. The Ohio Board of Boiler 
Rules, realizing this fact, has reduced the safe w^orking pressure from 
one hundred pounds to sixty pounds on all boilers of this design and 
construction, and is intending to still further reduce this pressure ^vith a 
view of entirely eliminating their use. 

A cast iron section boiler owned and operated by The Reliable 
Outfitting Company, Toledo, Ohio, for heating their building, exjiloded, 
causing a property loss of $10,000, but no personal injury This littler 
was not inspected and was operated in violation of the Ohio boiler in- 
spection law, and was not properly equipped with the requii-ed safety 
devices. If this boiler had been properly equipped with safety deviees, 
this explosion would not have occurred. 

It is estimated that there are approximately 5,000 steam bnib rs being 
operated in the State of Ohio in violation of the law, thereby emlans^'er- 
ing life and property of those coming in contact with them, l:or wliieh 
this department can not be held responsible, as they are located in i-ural 
districts and the present force of eight boiler inspectors can not pro|teily 
cover the entire State of Ohio. It has been shown that the lioiler in- 
spectors are self-sustaining and pay their salaries and other expf^nses Uy 
fees collected, and it is earnestly recommended that appro] ►riatioji lie 
made for two additional boiler inspectors so as to comply with Soetion 
1058-17 of the General Code, which provides that ten general itispectovs 
of steam boilers may be appointed. 



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312 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

DEPARTMENT OP FILM CENSORSHIP. 

Reels of Films: 

28,746 Passed Upon. 
Divided as Follows : 

24,395 Approved without elimination. 
4,176 Approved with elimination. 
175 Rejected. 

The receipts of this Department for the year were $29,087.00 for 
censorship fees and $47.60 for substitute leaders issues. The difference 
between the total reels passed upon and the total receipts for censorship 
fees is accounted for by balances standing to the credit of the various 
film companies at the close of the fiscal year. 



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INDUSTBIAL COMMISSION OF OHIO. 



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INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 315 

THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OP OHIO. 

DIVISION OF COLLECTIONS. 

July 1, 1919-June 30, 1920. 

Receipts, 
FILM CENSORSHIP— 

License Fees $29,873 00 

Duplicate Leaders 48 30 

INVESTIGATION AND STATISTICS— 

Private Employment Agency License Fees 6,175 00 

EXAMINERS. STEAM ENGINEERS— 

Examination and License Fees 46,681 00 

BOILER INSPECTION— 

Inspection and License Fees 39,219 50 

Interest on Bank Deposits 38 12 

WORKSHOPS AND FACTORIES— 

High Explosives License Fees 7,670 50 

MINING DEPARTMENT— 

Fines, Violations, etc 105 00 

MISCELLANEOUS— 

Refunds, etc. 36 11 

Witness Fees and Mileage (Employes) 39 01 

Sale of Old Waste Paper 70 60 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $129,956 14 

Capital City Bank (Balance June 30, 1919) 931 79 

Grand Total $130,887 93 

Disbursements. 

TREASURER OF STATE OF OHIO $126,807 93 

Refunded Fees 6 00 

Capital City Bank (Balance June 30, 1920) 4,074 00 

Grand Total $130,887 93 



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REPORT OF 
STATE BOARD OF SCHOOL EXAMINERS 

Meetings of the examiners were held in Columbus on August 14 and 
15, Ot^tober 8], November 1, December 12 and 13, December 29, 30 and 
31, Pebniary 6, April 2, May 7 and 8, June 16, 17 and 18. 

Certifii'atcs were issued at all of these meetings with the exception 
of December 12 and 13. The meetings of December 12 and 13 were 
called for tJie special purpose of passing judgment upon charges of 
iiieffieient-y against a holder of a life certificate. 

Under tiie law requiring the full examination, only five applicants 
were examined. Under the 100 montlis provision of Section 7807-8, 85 
applicants were examined by the board in Columbus, in prescribed pro- 
fessional books. 

A number of persons filed application with the State Board of 
School EsaiTiiners, but were not considered sufficiently successful as 
teaehers to be granted a life certificate. 

Certificates were granted in the following number : 



El. H. S 

Certificates grairted July to December 1919__ 1,189 312 

Certificates granttrd January to June 1920___ 509 358 



El. H. S. Spec. 

226 
127+10-Kindg. 



(338) 

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REPORT OF 
THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 

I beg leave to herewith submit report of the Adjutant Generars 
Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920 : 

OHIO NATIONAL GUARD. 

Not only favorable but more than satisfactory progress has been 
made during the past year in the reorganization of the new Ohio National 
Guard. Considering the difficulties and obstacles to be overcome, tiie 
apathy of the people and the indifference of the ex-service men, thn 
progress made is indeed gratifying to this Department, when it is also 
taken into consideration that little more than a year ago there was not a 
single member of the National Guard in Ohio, except the Adjutant 
General and a few assistants. The war being over, the people in gi^nrira! 
were tired of anything pertaining to military life and the retnrniii|T 
veterans were **fed up'* on war. At fin^t it was hard sledding liut we 
passed the peak the first of this year and from now on it will be easeir 
sailing. There is already a change in sentiment noticeable amon^ tlitj 
young men and in particular the ex-service men, relative to enlisting in 
the Guard. 

All this has been done under financial difficulties not experictiecd 
by other leading states of the Nation, who are spending or exi>«'i't \n 
spend several times as much as Ohio to reorganize their Guard. Lack of 
funds has been a serious handicap and special credit should bo ■rrvin 
to the National Guard officers, past and present, for their patriot ir and 
unselfish efforts in helping to rebuild and maintain the Guard without 
receiving any adequate compensation. It is now only a question of 
money and organization and if there were sufficient funds available, so 
that we could place enough men on active duty in different parts ul" the 
State, we could double the Guard in six months. 

Two complete regiments of infantry, comprising the Second <>\\'ni 
Brigade, have been organzed and equipped, also five troops of cavalry, 
one separate machine gun company and one tank corps company. At tliis 
date the National Guard consists of 152 active officers, 53 reserve ot'li^erK, 
and approximately 2,435 enlisted men, making a total of 2,640 utlit ers 
and men mustered in and recognized by the War Department. In adili- 
tion at least 1,500 men have been enlisted in the Guard in various liMali- 
ties throughout the State where companies are being organized, iiuLliitJU 
in all over 4,000 officers and men actually in the National Guard U» dau\ 
Hence Ohio is maintaining its quota as required by law. Two more iNtgi- 



(339) 

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340 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

ments of infantry, the First and Second, will be completed perhaps by 
the end of the year. The First Regiment of Cavalry will soon be ready 
and one regiment of artillery is now in process of organization. A 
regiment of engineers in Cleveland is also well under way. In addition 
a signal corps battalion, hospital and ambulance companies and separate 
machine gun companies have been started. 

At the present rate of progress, an average of from one to two units 
(companies, troops, batteries, etc.) will be mustered in each week during 
the coming fiscal year. The Guard is increasing at the rate of 250 men 
per month, so that by the end of the year 1920, the total number in the 
Guard, recognized by the War Department, should be in the neighbor- 
hood of 4,500. This does not include the Ohio Naval Militia, which is 
now being organized, reference to which is made in another part of this 
report. 

To bring the National Guard from nothing to 14,000 or more men 
will take time, labor and money. It will talke several years, of course, to 
complete a division, and the War Department is figuring on the entire 
allotment by July 1, 1924, under the National Defense Act, which re- 
quires an increase of 50 per cent each year, the maximum amount being 
700 National Guardsmen for each senator and representative from the 
state. 

The percentage of ex-service men enlisting in the Guard is gradually 
increasing, the percentage at this time being about 20 per cent. Prac- 
tically all the officers are veterans of the World War, most of them having 
seen overseas service. Preference in the selection of officers has always 
been given thus far by this Department to World War veterans. The 
same applies to non-commissioned officers. By reason of this fact and 
the eagerness of the new recruits to learn, the efficiency of the Guard 
for duty right now is at least 90 per cent. 

PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN. 

A general and state-wide publicity and advertising campaign to 
obtain recruits for the National Guard was undertaken by this Depart- 
ment, under the supervision of the Arthur M. Crumrine Advertising 
Agency and other experts, during the months of March and April, 1919. 
Large display advertisements '* writing up'* the Guard in an attractive 
manner, telling of its benefits, advantages and traditions, running in a 
series and illustrated with high-class drawings, were published three 
times a week in the leading dailies in the larger cities of the fitate. 
Artistic, four-color posters, of two different designs, over ten thousand 
in all, were distributed in all the cities and towns where units of the 
Guard formerly existed or where recruiting officers of the Guard were 
on duty. Many thousand colored folders of three different kinds, includ- 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL OP OHIO. 341 

ing a booklet of information, were sent out by mail with appealing form 
letters, to former service men, college men and high school students. 
Advertisements were placed on banners, signs and street cars. Numerous 
patriotic and instructive articles relative to the history and advautages 
of the National Guard were published in many newspapers and m?iga- 
zines. 

The total cost of the campaign was less than $15,000 and the results 
justified the earnest efforts made. From both a standpoint of general 
advertising and direct results obtained, the campaign was a sueeess. An 
excellent foundation was laid for future efforts to rebuild the Guard . The 
entire prograixi not only attracted the attention of printers and adver- 
tisers in general throughout the nation but the details of the oainjiaign 
were published and sent out by the Militia Bureau of the "War Depart- 
ment to the Adjutants General for the benefit of the National Guard of 
all the states. It should be stated that in this recruiting cauipaigu m 
well as at all times since then, we have had the active assistance ^md 
co-operation of the Regular Army recruiting officers and men on duty 
throughout the state, who are also conducting* an active drive for re(?ruits 
for the Regular Army. 

THE THIRTY-SEVENTH DIVISION. 

The state has been allotted by the War Department, one complete 
division in addition to one regiment of Cavalry and other auxiliary units. 
This division will be knowTi as the Thirty-seventh Division, tlius per- 
petuating the history and traditions of that National Guard Division 
from Ohio in the World War. It is also confidently expected that in the 
end the various regiments and brigades will be given the same niuuerical 
designations that they had in the World War. 

ROSTER TO DATE. 

The following organizations have been effected and accord*xl Fedta*al 
recognition to date : 

STATE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF. 

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

Brigadier General Roy E. Layton, the Adjutant General, State House. Columbus. 
Lieutenant Colonel John M. Bingham, Assistant Adjutant General, State llfmse, 

Columbus. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Major Charles C McClelland, Asst. to Chief Surgeon, 237 Whittier St 

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342 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Lieut. Col. John S. Shetler, Asst. Q. M. General, State House, Columbus. 
Major Arthur W. Reynolds, Asst. Q. M., 920 Franklin Ave., Columbus. 
Major Joseph H. Nicholas, U. S. P. and D. Officer, State House, Columbus. 
Captain John Edwards, Asst. Q. !M., 10519 Clare Doan Ave., Cleveland. 

ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

Lieut. Col. George P. Zwerncr, Ordnance Officer, State Arsenal, Columbus. 
Captain Max Zwerner, Asst. to Ordnance Officer, State Arsenal, Columbus. 

THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 

Headquarters Company — Akron, Ohio. 
Machine Gun Company, Akron, Ohio. 
Supply Company, Akron, Ohio. 
Company "A" — Cleveland, Ohio. 
Company "B" — Akron. 
Company **C" — Lima. 
Company "D" — Cleveland. 
Company "E" — Ashland. 
Company "F" — Cleveland 
Company "G" — Ada. 
Company "H" — Shreve. 
Company "I" — Cleveland. 
Compa*ny "K" — St. Marys. 
Company "L" — Canton. 

SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 

I leadquarters Company — Cleveland. 

FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY. 

Headquarters Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

Machine Gun Company — Zanesville, Ohio. 

Supply Company — Columbus. 

Company "A" — Cincinnati. 

Company "B" — Columbus. 

Company "C— London. 

Company "D" — Marion. 

Company "E" — Zanesville. 

Company *'F" — Cincinnati. 

Company "G" — Greenfield. 

Company "H" — New Lexington. 

Company "I" — Blanchester. 

Company "K" — Cincinnati. 

Company "L" — Athens. 

Company "M" — Marysville. 

Sanitary Detachment — Delaware. 

Machine Gun Co., Springfield (attached to Fourth Infantry). ^ ^ 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL OF OHIO. 343 

FIRST OHIO CAVALRY. 

Troop "B" — Columbus, Ohio. 
Troop "C" — Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Troop "E" — Lima. 
Troop "F" — Sandusky. 
Troop "G"— Ashtabula. 

TANK CORPS. 

Company "H" — Port Clinton, Ohio. 

A roster of the officers of the Ohio National Guard corrected to June 
30, 1920, as recognized by the War Department, is attached to this report, 
marked Appendix *'A." 

A list of the General Orders and Bulletins issued by this Depart- 
ment during the past fiscal year, is here])y attached, marked Appendix 

ANNUAL CAMP AND RIFLE MATCHES. 

Arrangements have been made to hold the Annual Field Training 
Camp for the entire National Guard, at Camp Perry, the first fifteen 
days in September of this year. The state rifle matches will be held at 
Camp Perry, July 5th to 10th, and the school of instruction for officers 
and specially selected enlisted men, will be held at the same place, July 
12th to 15th inclusive. The state matches will be in command of Briga- 
dier General Benson W. Hough and the camp of instruction in command 
of Brigadier General Roy E. Layton. 

Permission has been granted to the War Department to hold the 
national matches at Camp Perry during the month of August. Nearly 
4,000 officers and men will attend these matches and it is expected that 
they will be not only the best ever held but will result in a great revival 
in the shooting game by reason of the experience gained during the recent 
war. The State of Ohio will be represented by a National Guard team, a 
civilian rifle team and other officers. The present Adjutant General 
has been appointed one of the assistant executive officers of the matches. 

OHIO NAVAL MILITIA. 

The Ohio Naval Militia must not be overlooked, as this state will soon 
nave a first-class Naval Militia, not only in the lake cities of Toledo and 
Cleveland, but in the inland cities of Columbus and Cincinnati. The 
Navy Department is making a special effort to expand the Naval Militia 
of the states and include all the recruits in both the Militia and Naval 
Reserve. Special appropriations for the use and upkeep of the State 
Naval Militia have been made and the allowances for the local units will 
be much more liberal than heretofore. 

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344 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Captain Anthony F. Nicklett, of Toledo, being an experienced naval 
oflRcer and member of the Ohio Naval Militia for many years, has been 
placed in charge of this work in Ohio, by this Department, and the Navy 
Department as well. A ship company or battalion has already been 
organized at Toledo and another battalion is under way at Cleveland. 
A U. S. S. gunboat, the Gopher, has been assigned to Ohio for use of the 
Naval Militia, turned over to the state and is now docked at Toledo. 
This gunboat will be used this summer for crusies of the various com- 
panies already organized. 

GUARD '^ CALLED OUT'' FOR DUTY. 

Notwithstanding many strikes and labor troubles in the State of 
Ohio during the fall and winter of 1919, both the National Guard and 
the State were fortunuate in that the National Guard was called upon by 
the Governor, in aid of the civil authorities but twice, and then they were 
not actually used. On both of these occasions the Guard was merely 
mobilized and held subject to further orders, while the pending difficul- 
ties or threatened riots were settled by arbitration or in some other way 
directly by Governor Cox or his representatives. Providence otherwise 
was also kind to the State in that there were no calamities of such a 
nature requiring the use of the Guard. 

On September 28, 1919, as per Special Orders No. 63 of that date, in 
view of a probable emergency arising in eastern Ohio, in connection with 
the strike situation among the miners, in part because of a threatened 
invasion of West Virginia by miners of Ohio, all the companies in the 
Second and Fourth Infantry which were equipped, were, by command 
of the Governor, ordered to mobilize in their respective armories and 
await further orders. Colonel Benson W. Hough of the Fourth Infantry, 
was temporarily placed in command of the state troops and various field, 
staff, state and medical officers were placed on active duty and ordered 
to report to Colonel Hough. On the evening of the following day, Sep- 
tember 29, all of said troops and officers were dismissed or relieved from 
duty except Company **B' and the Supply Company of the Second 
Infantry at Akron, which remained imder arms and ready for duty at 
their armory until dismissed from further duty on October 5, 1919. 

In the meanwhile, owing to pending labor troubles and strikes in 
northeastern Ohio, in Canton, Youngstown, Cleveland and elsewhere, 
but in particular in Canton, threatening destruction of life and property, 
in anticipation of the developing of a rioting condition, the Governor of 
Ohio deemed it necessary to assemble a sufficient number of state troops 
at the armory at Akron, to be held in readiness to render aid to the 
civil authorities (there was no serious trouble at Akron at this time). 
By command of the Governor, Companies B, E, G, H, K, and Supply 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL OF OHIO. 345 

Company of the Second Infantry; Companies C and D of the Fourth 
Infantry, by Special Orders No. 82, dated October 25, 1919, were ordered 
to proceed to Akron and there remain mobilized at the state armory 
until further orders. Colonel Benson W. Hough was again pla^^ed in 
command and various field, staff, state and medical oflScers were placed 
on active duty to be ready during the emergency. 

There the troops remained quartered in the Akron armory for one 
week, the mere fact that they were ready for duty being in itself a potent 
factor in maintaining law and order in that part of the state. It is 
gratifying to the State ofBcials that in those strenuous times it was not 
necessary to use the Guard or fire a gun. On November 1, 1910, iis per 
Special Orders No. 88 of that date, all the troops at Akron were dismissed 
and sent to their homes and all oflBcers relieved from actvie duty. While 
many requests were made upon the Governor of Ohio for trooii-? during 
the progress of various strikes in different parts of the state, no further 
calls were made for the use of tlie Guard, as both the present Governor 
and the undersigned believe that the National Guard should not )>e used 
for what is ordinarily called ** strike duty,'' unless in case of extreme 
emergency. 

NEW ARMY ACT. 

The new Army Reorganization Act, approved June 4, 1920, or niore 
properly an amendment of the National Defense Act of June 5, lt*lG, m 
one of the most comprehensive and satisfactory acts for the orgitnization 
and maintenance of the Regular Army and National Guard ever juifvser]. 
Most National Guard officers are very well pleased with the successful 
outcome of this legislation after special efforts were made to pass another 
bill which would have practically destroyed the National Guard Many 
provisions of the new Army Act are very favorable to the Guard and 
give it a much better standing, both in the state and nation. 

The chief of the Militia Bureau will be a National Guard offi^ er jifter 
January 1, 1921. Better pay is granted both officers and men of tlie 
Guard than heretofore and the method and periods of pay are made 
easier. The authority granted to muster in units with a miniinuiti of 
50 men will help materially in the organization of the state forces. The 
Act further provides for the appointment of special committees to ninke 
new allotments of the Guard to the states and to adopt new rei^nilations 
and new tables of organization. The results of the labor of tin se lOin- 
mittees are anxiously awaited, as nothing will be definitely sett lid iinlil 
their reports are approved and published by the War Department. 

ARMORIES. 

Arrangements have been made for the erection of only hvu new 
armories out of the appropriations available for the two fiscal yr;»r.s etid- 

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346 OHIO GENEBAL STATISTICS. 

ing July 1, 1921, one at New Lexington and one at St. Marys. The 
Eighty-third General Assembly appropriated at its first session, the sum 
of $30,000 for an armory at New Lexington. This was not sufficient, 
owing to the high cost of labor and material, and at a later s^sion the 
legislature appropriated $10,000 additional, making $40,000 in all, with 
the understanding that this Department would add a suflfcient amount 
from its funds to build a satisfactory, one-company armory. Accord- 
ingly, plans have been prepared by Mr. Fred Elliott, the armory archi- 
tect, and the cost estimated at $46,000. Bids will be received in August. 
This armory will be finishetl by early spring of 1921. It was also decided 
by this Department to erect a one-company armory at St. Marys, which 
organized one of the first companies in the new Guard. This Depart- 
ment will appropriate $40,000 for this armory, the amount allowed by 
law, and the citizens of St. Marys have agreed to donate a valuable site 
and raise the balance necessary to complete the building. The plans are 
now being prepared and it is estimated that this armory will cost about 
$55,000. 

This Department has been busy and will continue to be busy making 
leases for halls, buildings and temporary quarters to be used for armory 
purposes for the new companies and units as fast as they are organized. 
As stated in my last annual report, one of the most serious handicaps we 
have to meet is the lack of suitable facilities for armories, practically all 
halls and buildings that could be used, for armories having been leased 
for garage purposes or the storage of automobiles. This only emphasizes 
the importance of a special appropriation of a large amount by the legis- 
lature to enable the state to build suitable armories in the different towns 
for this purpose. I again recommend in particular that a large regi- 
mental armory be erected in Columbus, the capital of the state, not only 
to take care of the troops of this city but to be used by the Guard as a 
whole in mobilizing troops whenever called out for duty. Such a build- 
ing of course could be used by the citizens in general for any other 
purposes. 

In this connection I might state that the State of Ohio really has 
(in addition to the list given in my last annual report) seven armories in 
the four largest cities, built by counties or private individuals, which 
are now leased by the State for the use of the National Guard. These 
armories are as follows : 

County Armory, Toledo. 

Gray 's Armory, Cleveland. 

Central Armory, Cleveland. 

Freeman Avenue Armory, Cincinnati. 

High-Seventh Armory, Columbus. 

East Ooodale Street Armory, Columbus. 

Hankins Riding Aeadeiiiy, Columbus. 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL OP OHIO. 347 

The last three named are small armories, insufficient to take care of 
the National Guard allotted to Columbus. The East Goodale Street 
Armory will be used for the Naval Militia. Gray's Armory in Cleveland 
has been repaired and is in good shape. The remaining three armories 
in Cleveland, Toledo and Cincinnati, are large, out-of-date structures, in 
a bad state of repair and rather expensive to heat, light and maintain. 

WORLD W^AR FLAGS ON DEPOSIT. 

Bulletin No. 65 of the War Department, dated December 31, 1918, 
Par. 1, provides that upon the disbanding of organizations which were 
originally National Guard or National Army organizations, their colors 
will be delivered into the custody of the states from which the majority 
of the men originally came at the time the organizations were formed, 
but that the United States, however, will retain title to these colors. In 
accordance with this order up to date some seventy-one (71) flags and 
colors of the World War organizations have been turned over to the 
State of Ohio for preservation and safe-keeping, including the colors of 
all the well-known regiments that saw service at the battle-front. Special 
attention is called to the fact that one of these flags came from a foreign 
nation, the flag presented by the people of Genoa, Italy, to the 332nd 
Infantry,83rd Division, which saw service in that country. 

A complete list of all the World War colors on deposit with this 
Department is hereto attached, marked Appendix **C." 

These flags and colors, to be properly preserved for posterity and 
also that they may be. seen at any time by the citizens of the state when 
visiting the capital, should be carefully and neatly marked and placed 
in sealed cases with glass fronts, the same as the flags of former wars 
now located in the rotunda of the State House. A suitable place perhaps 
for the cases containing these flags of our latest and greatest war would 
be along the walls of the north and south corridors of the State House. 
An appropriation of $8,000 was requested from the last legislature for 
this purpose, but this amount was cut down to $2,000. As this sum is 
entirely inadequate for the purpose, nothing has been done and it is again 
recommended to the incoming legislature that a larger amount be granted 
without further delay. 

A list of all the flags of our former wars will be found on page — 
of the Adjutant General's report for 1914. 

^'Ohio's Jewels" Re-marked, — A joint resolution was adopted by 
the legislature authorizing and directing the Adjutant General to desig- 
nate by a suitable tablet or letters, the figures on the monument known 
as ** Ohio's Jewels" monument, located in the State House yard. This 
was promptly taken care of by the placing on the stone base of the monu- 
ment, beneath each figure, permanent brass plates of the best material. 

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348 OHIO GENER^VIi STATISTICS. 

with raised letters, giving the full name of each of the famous Sons of 
Ohio, whose statues adorn this monument. 

Recruiting Funds. — ^Another joint resolution was adopted by the 
legislature on July 18, 1919, authorizing the transfer of $50,000 from 
appropriations heretofore made for the use and benefit of the Ohio 
National Guard, to a new fund to be used for recruiting purposes, on 
account of the necessity of rebuilding and reorganizing the National 
Guard anew. The State Auditor has held that other funds could not 
be used for this purpose and hence the passage of this resolution at the 
request of this Department 

All the statutes above referred to can be found in Part II, Vol. 108 
of the Laws of Ohio for 1919. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

The work of the Adjutant General hass increased so much during the 
reorganization of the Guard and will continue to increase to such an 
extent that the salary provided by law in time of peace is wholly inade- 
quate for the responsibilities and labor of the position. He is responsible 
for the expenditure of several millions of dollars and under him are 
nearly one hundred employees outside of the Guard itself. The present 
salary has remained the same for many years. I recommend that the 
salary of the Adjutant General and Chief-of-Staflf be increased to $4,500 
per annum. 

I also again recommend that the two positions of Adjutant General 
and superintendent of hte State House grounds and state office buildings, 
be divided and the former be relieved of the latter duties of a nature 
entirely foreign to the character and dignity of this position. In view 
of the great increase in the number and importance of the various ofl&ces, 
bureaus and commissions, and the size of the departments the superin- 
tendent would have more than enough work alone to keep him busy on 
full time. On the other hand as the head of the military department 
of the State and Federal Militia and as adviser to the Governor, the 
position of the Adjutant General is quite diflferent from what it was 
twenty years ago. 

NEW LAWS AND LEGISLATION. 

Several new laws and resolutions, of interest to the Ohio National 
Guard and war veterans, in addition to those already outlined in my 
last annual report, were passed at the adjourned session of the Eighty- 
third General Assembly, which convened again in December, 1919, and 
adjourned sine die on February 11, 1920. 

Maximum Amount for Armory and Maintenance, — The most im- 



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ADJUTANT GENERAL OP OHIO. 349 

portant of these statutes was an act passed at the special request of this 
Department, to amend Section 5242 of the General Code, pertaining to 
the maximum allowance for the erection, equipment and maintenance of 
state-owned and leased armories. At the first session of the legislature, 
the amount for the erection of a single, one-company armory, was in- 
creased to $25,000, but owing to the high cost of labor and material this 
was found to be entirely inadequate. The amended statute fixed the 
maximum amount to be expended by the state for the building or pur- 
chase of an armory for a single organization at $40,000 and $15,000 
additional for each organization or headquarters provided for. The 
maximum sum that the Adjutant General may allow for furnishing and 
equipping of each armory is raised to $2,000. A sum of not to exceed 
$1,200 per annum in villages, and $2,000 per annum in cities, shall be 
allowed each organization to cover armory rent, heat, light, water and 
janitor service This statute further provides that all sums expended 
for said purposes shall be approved and paid by the Adjutant General 
upon vouchers properly certified. 

Dual Oath Authorized, — The same act also provides that all officers 
appointed and commissioned in the Ohio National Guard, according to 
law, whether extended Federal recognition or n^t, are authorized to ad- 
minister the dual oath of office and of enlistment to officers and men, as 
required by the law. This was passed to give recruiting officers, not yet 
recognized by the War Department, authority to complete the enlistment 
of men in new organizations. This section is known as Section 5186-1 of 
the General Code. 

Armory at Shreve, — ^A special act which was passed providing for 
the erection of an armory and a Soldiers' Monumental Building, at 
Shreve, Ohio, appropriated the sum of $30,000 from the General Revenue 
Fund for this purpose, providing that the citizens of Shreve shall deed 
a suitable site and furnish all equipment not needed for military pur- 
poses. The citizens of Shreve have deeded a suitable site to the state. 
As the amount appropriated is not sufficient to build an armory at 
present prices, no immediate steps have been taken to erect same. 

Annory at New Lexington, — In the Supplementary Appropriation 
Act for the fiscal year, the sum of $10,000 additional was appropriated 
to complete the armory at New Lexington. This makes $40,000 in all 
appropriated by the legislature. This Department has agreed to allow 
an additional amount to complete this armory. 

Erection of Tablets, — ^A special act was passed authorizing and di- 
recting the Adjutant General to secure and have located at a suitable 
place or places in the State House, one or more tablets on which will be 
inscribed the names of all officers and enlisted men, composing the special 
State Roll of Honor, as establsihed by a previous act of legislature, and 
appropriating the sum of $1,100 for each such tablet 



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?i:^^ 



350 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

CivU Service Exemptions.— On June 27, 1920, Section 486-10 of the 
General Code, relative to the eligibility of honorably discharged soldiers 
for positions in the classified service, was amended, providing that any 
soldier, sailor, marine or Red Cross nurse who served in the army, navy 
or hospital service in the World War, and who has been honorably dis- 
charged therefrom and is a resident of Ohio, may be exempt from ex- 
amination under the civil service laws, under certain conditions. 

Caretakers of Memorial Buildings. — The legislature passed another 
act on June 29, 1920, providing that it shall be the duty of all Boards of 
County Commissioners and Township Trustees having Memorial Build- 
ings under their charge and control, to employ or appoint only honorably 
discharged soldiers, sailors and marines of the United States, if available, 
as caretakers, janitors or employees in the care of said buildings. No 
present employees are to be discharged. This act is now known as Sec- 
tion 3069-1 of the General Code. 

LIST OF WORLD WAR FLAGS ON DEPOSIT. 

37TH DIVISION. 
Organization. Division. 

I45th Infantry 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribbons). 
5 Battle Silver Bands. 

146th Infantry 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribbons). 
5 Battle Silver Bands. 

147th Infantry 1 Colors National Silk, presented to First In- 
fantry, by Knights Templars, Cincinnati, O. 
1 Colors, Regimental Silk. 
5 Battle Silver Bands. 

148th Infantry 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribbons). 
5 Battle Silver Bands. 

112th Engineers 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribbons). 
5 Battle Silver Bands. 

112th Field Signal Battalion 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribbons). 
5 Battle Silver Bands. 



l3Sth Machine Gun Battalion 1 Colors National Silk (2 Battle Ribbons). 

16TH DIVISION. 

67th Infantry 1 Colors National Service. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk. 

68th Infantry — 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk. 



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ADJUTANT GENERAL OP OHIO. 
42ND DIVISION. 



351 



166th Infantry 



.1 Colors National Silk (Presented by Mrs. B. 
M. Cheseldine, London, Ohio)— 2 Battle 
Ribbons. « 

1 Colors Regimental Silk. 



83RD DIVISION. 



329th Infantry 
330th Infantry 
331st Infantr>' 
332nd Infantry 



308th Engineers 

308th Field Signal Battalion_- 

308th Ammunition Train 

308th Supply Train 

308th Trench Mortar Battery. 

308th Motor Supply Train 

83rd Division Headquarters _ 

166th Infantry Brigade 

165th Infantry Brigade 

322nd Machine Gun Battalion 
323rd Machine Gun Battalion 
324th Machine Gun Battalion 
322nd Field Artillery 

323rd Field Artillery 

324th Field Artillery 



Colors National Silk. 
Colors Regimental Silk. 

Colors National Silk. 
Colors Regimental Silk. 

Colors National Silk. 
Colors Regimental Silk. 

Colors National Silk. 

Colors Regimental Silk. 

Battle Silver Band. 

Colors National Silk — Presented by Ladies 

of Alliance, Ohio. 
Colors Regimental Silk — Presented by Young 

Italy, Inc., New York. 
Flag presented by people of Genoa, Italy. 

Colors National Silk. 

Colors Regimental Silk (3 Battle Ribbons)* 

Colors National Silk. 

Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribbong). 

Colors National Service. 

Flag Distinguishing (red). 

Guidon Silk (Croix de Guerre attached). 

Flag Distinguishing (red). 

Flag Distinguishing (red). 

Flag Distinguishing (blue). 

Flags Distinguishing Service (blue). 

Flag Distinguishing Service (red). 
Flag Distinguishing Service (blue). 

Colors National Service. 

Colors National Service. 

Colors National Service. 

Colors National Silk. 

Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribbons). 

Battle Silver Bands. 

Colors National Silk. 

Colors Regimental Silk (2 Battle Ribtons) 

Colors National Silk (2 Battle Ribbons) » 
Colors Regimental Silk. ^_^ ^ 

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352 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

95TH DIVISION. 

379th Infantry 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk. 

380th Infantry 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk. 

320th Engineers 1 Colors Regimental Silk. 

620th Field Signal Battalion 1 Standard National Service. 

95th Division Headquarters 1 Flag Distinguishing (red and white). 

1 Flag Distinguishing (blue). 

9Sth Headquarters Troop 1 Guidon 95th Division. 

UNATTACHED FLAGS. 

372nd Infantry 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors Regimental Silk (Croix de Guerre 
attached). 

802nd Pioneer Infantry 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Battle Silver Band. 

34th Engineers 1 Colors National Silk. 

1 Colors National Service. 
1 Regimental Silk. 

1st Anti-Aircraft Machine Gun Bat-1 Colors National Service (Croix de Guerre 

attached). 
9 Battle Silver Bands (Not official). 
1 Croix de Guerre, 1st Anti-Aircraft Battalion. 

158th Depot Brigade 1 Flag Distinguishing Service (red). 

1 Flag Distinguishing (blue). 

I60th Infantry Brigade 1 Flag Distinguishing. 



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REPORT OF 
OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION 

AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION. 

The average daily population of the Ohio State Institutions for the 
year ended June 30, 1920, was 23,284, the following table showing the 
average daily population by institutions : 

The Athens State Hospital 1,282 

The Qeveland State Hospital 1,714 

The Columbus State Hospital 1,882 

The Dayton State Hospital 1,210 

The Lima State Hospital 850 

Longview Hospital 1,486 

The Massillon State Hospital 1,808 

The Toledo State Hospital 1,855 

The Ohio Hospital for Epileptics 1,522 

The Institution for Feeble-Minded 2,447 

The State School for the Blind 204 

The State School for the Deaf 495 

The Ohio State Sanatorium 180 

The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home 861 

The Madison Home 35 

The Boys' Industrial School 1,195 

The Girls* Industrial School 464 

The Ohio Penitentiary 1,694 

The New Prison Farm 215 

The Ohio State Reformatory 1,634 

The Ohio Reformatory for Women 155 

The Ohio State Brick Plant 76 

The Bureau of Juvenile Research 20 

Total 23,284 

The entire operating expense to house, feed and clothe these wards 
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, was $6,380,376.63, a per capita 
cost of $274.02 ; the largest items of expense being — 

Food $1,935,976 02 

Fuel 608,246 53 

Wearing apparel 309,827 91 

The expenditures for the purchase of land and additions and bet- 
terments for the year amounted to $401,618.61. 

FARM, GARDEN AND DAIRY PRODUCTION. 

Acreage tillable, 8,132.14. For year ended June 30, 1920, the pro- 
duction amounted to $1,115,167.46, divided as follows: 

Fruits $23,675 79 

Vegetables 293,715 79 

Forage 229,232 19 

Poultry and Eggs 17,219 18 

Slaughtered products 184,852 82 

MUk and Butter 334,197 28 

Live Stock, natural increase, etc 32,274 41 

(363) , 

^2- O.G.S. Digitized by google 



r.7?T' 



354 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



TABLE 1— EXPENDITURES BY APPROPRIATIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS FROM 
JULY 1, 1919, TO JUNE 30, 1920. 



Institutions. 



Ohio 
Board of 
Adminis- 
tration. 



Athens 

State 

Hospital. 



Cleveland 

State 
Hospital 



Columbus 

State 
Hospital. 



Dayton 

State 

Hospital 



Appropriation Expenditures 



Personal service.. 



1 

Maintenance I 2 



Total operating expenditures... 
Additions and Betterments 



Total for all purposes ^ 

Classification Expenditures 



A- 
A- 
A- 



1 Salaries „ 

2 Wages 

3 Prisoners' compensation. 

Total personal service. 



1 Food supplies ^ 

2 Forage and veterinary supplies... 

3 Fuel supplies. 

4 Office supplies.- 



C- 
C- 

c- 
c- 
c- 
c- 
c- 

C- 9 Botanical and agricultural suppfies. 
C- 11 General plant supplies. 



5 Medical and surgical supplies. 

6 Laundry, cleaning and disinfecting supplies 
8 Educational and recreational supplies. 
" '^ lie 



Total supplies.- 



D- 
D- 



E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 



F- 
F- 
P- 
F- 
F- 
F- 
F- 



H- 
H- 
H- 



2 Building materials. 

3 Generalplant materials.. 

Total materials. 



1 Office equipment „ 

2 Household equipment ^ 

3 Medical and surgical equipment 

4 Live stock.- ^ ^ 

6 Motorless vehicles and equipment 

6 Motor vehicles and equipment 

7 Wearing apparel 

8 Educational and recreational equipment.. 

9 General plant equipment- 



Total equipment.. 



1 General repairs 

3 Water. ^ 

4 Light, heat and power 

5 Freight, express and drayage. 

6 Transportation— 

7 Communication 

9 General plant service 



|f64.884 10, 
15.183 13 



f97.965 03 
235.405 34 



S106.344 30 
294.304 14 



$132,692 78 
335.674 09 



S10232I 32 
214.612 47 



Total contract and open order service.... 



Total additions and betterments 51 



6 Rent— 

7 Insurance 

8 Contributions... 



Total fixed charges.. 
Total maintenance... 



G- 1 Lands— 

G- 2 Buildings.- 

G- 3 Non-structural improvements.. 

G-3-1 Capital equipment 

G-3-2 Other capital outlay 



$80,067 23 
$2,000 00 



$333,370 37 
$18,690 71 



$400,648 44 
$68 37 



$472,366 87 
$4,637 94 



$317,433 79 
$6.320 56 



$82,067 231 $352,061 08 f $400,716 81 



$64,884 10 



$64,884 10 



$100 80 
4.185 42 



29 25 
166 80 



1.139 81 



$5,635 33 



$203 36 
24 50 



$227 86 



$976 87 
54 26 



106 96 



36 69 
34 67 



32 $1,209 45 



$66 80 

91 80 

728 85 

11 02 

3.528 07 

1.381 18 

2.003 97 



$7,811 



$312 05 



$97,928 23 $106,288 80 



36 80 



$97,965 03 

$91,136 69 

26.358 11 

38.399 66 

1.0.59 83 

1.100 30 

5.531 52 

175 98 

2.066 67 

7.849 84 



$173,678 60 



$1,647 74 
21.892 70 



$23,540 44 

$11 40 
4.065 93 

442 28 
1.357 83 

45093 

21.678 87 

162 26 

7,264 25 



435,333 75 
$990 31 



6 32 

452 00 

244 13 

1.027 50 



$2,720 26 

$100 00 
32-29 



$312 05 $132 29 

$15,183 13! $235,405 341 



$2,000 00 



$10,000 00 

5,359 51 

12 25 

2.283 51 

1.035 44 



Total-. 



Average daily population 

Per capita — TotaJ expenditures 

Per capita — Operatbg expenditures^ 



51 


$2,000 00 


52 


$82,067 23 


.'W 




54 
55 


$3 52 
3 52 



$18,690 71 

$352,061 08 

1,282 
$274 69 
260 04 



55 50 



$477,004 81 



$136,606 98 
85 80 



$323,754 35 



$102,821 32 



$106,344 301 

$142,849 25 

8.126 66 

41.458 12 

456 57 

1.217 50 

4.011 30 

96 53 

430 60 

4.737 92 



$136,692 78 

$168,691 94 

6.539 60 

47.120 30 

890 51 

1.847 64 

5,853 85 

139 93 

2 J76 67 

8.257 45 



$203,384 45 

$6,301 05 
30.007 29 



$36308 34 

$261 15 

5.238 25 

193 69 

155 66 

3 50 

56 16 

26.497 15 

122 77 

8.767 47 



$41,285 79 

$5,311 09 
4,503 20 

4 85 

642 31 

695 34 

1.643 77 



$12,800 56 

$500 00 
25 00 



$525 00 
1294.304 14 



$68 37 



$68 37 

$400,716 81 

1.714 
$233 79 
233 17 



$242,117 89 

$8,520 27 
28.970 46 



$37,490 73 

$23 19 

7.189 35 

362 97 

364 50 

i99'78 

26.792 91 

96 73 

5.061 42 



$39,089 85 

$12,796 26 

1.764 80 

89 20 

710 23 
1.302 74 



$16,950 62 
$25*00 



$25 00 
$335,674 09 



$3,209 26 

428 68 

1.000 00 



$4,637 94 

$477,004 81 

1.882 

$352 92 

250 99 



$102321 32 

$89,218 58 

14.122 41 

35.296 42 

738 65 

1.822 42 

5.076 50 

177 71 

3.132 89 

6.992 64 



$156,578 22 

$5.712 87 
18.210 64 



$23,923 51 

$114 00 

6.485 19 

1,051 71 

516 61 

^348"45 

16.566 60 

128 49 

4.758 99 



$29,970 11 

$1,271 11 
264 33 
43146 

67T46 
584 05 
892 22 



$4,115 63 



$25 00 



$25 00 
$214,612 47 



$2,748 IS 

980 67 

2,215 00 

376 71 



$6320 56 

$323,754 35 

1^10 
$267 56 
262 34 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 



355 



TABLE 1— EXPENDITURES BY APPROPRIATIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS FROM 
JULY 1, 1919, TO JUNE 30, 1920. 



Lima 

State 

Hospital. 


Longview 
Hospital. 


Massillon Toledo 
State State 
Hospital. Hospitel. 


Ohio 
Hospital 

Epileptics. 


Instutition 

for Peeble- 

Miaded. 


State 
School 
for the 

Blind. 


State 

School 

for the 

Deaf. 




191.966 g6 
145,857 4e 


$91,224 65 
25U.291 05 


$100,120 25 $124,049 M\ 
303.48U 85 370, laS 00 


S14fl.690 51 
a-tfl.OSS 45 1 


$17«,900 03 


160,482 69 
60,870 09 


$93,364 34 
89,734 S8 


1 
2 


»237.S44 32 
12.430 m 


$350,515 70 


$409,610 10 
tl7,GG3 93 


♦t94,S0a 7411492.745 96 1 

$15,230 02 $87,054 23 

, . . . . ' 


$508,005 93 
$88,859 15 


$123,352 78 
S3W 39 


$183,099 22 
$2,804 m 


3 
4 


$240,275 18 
$91,986 86 


$353,265 70 

$91,145 65 
79 00 


$427. £74 03 

$106,023 52 
96 73 


$510,039 66 
$124,649 84 


$599,800 19 
$146,690 51 


$596,865 08 
$176,900 93 


$127,717 17 

$64,526 64 
1.966 06 


1 $185,903 91 

$92,649 51 
714 83 


5 
6 

I 


$91,986 86 

$70,465 95 

4.023 96 

27.100 62 

658 52 

412 12 

3.829 93 

88 82 

1.078 19 

4.886 30 


$91,224 65 

$138,855 00 

9.954 68 

37,428 86 

623 16' 

1,665 15 

9.008 05 

276 71 

1.031 80 

6.091 32 


$106,120 25 

$120,529 25 

18.508 80 

45,868 44 

1.042 73 

2.075 55 

6.303 57 

99 99 

5.454 99 

6.776 05 


$124,649 84 

$176,182 82 

18.127 28 

69.643 78 

1.028 44 

1.603 45 

7.772 22 

84 31 

1,449 29 

6,886 50 


$146,690 51 

$178,120 25 

16,324 26 

43.173 13 

750 30 

2.279 02 

7,801 56 

264 38 

2.698 20 

9.920 90 


$176,900 93 

$121,116 97 

14,705 29 

67.104 32 

769 58 

1.169 99 

10,170 74 

343 00 

5,558 96 

6,804 39 


$66,482 69 

$22,837 48 

1,050 39 

9,501 40 

356 88 

276 51 

2.305 39 

177 20 

36 86 

747 41 


$93,364 34 
$51,311 11 

jJiiioTi 

350 81 
276 18 
1,189 96 
694 99 
107 07 
675 73 


9 
10 

13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 


$112,544 41 

$558 77 
6.384 97 


$203,934 72 

$3,595 14 
17,818 85 


$206,659 37 

$7,169 39 
33.321 68 


$281,778 09 

$8,981 11 
26.764 51 


1 $261,332 00 

$5,978 83 
26.191 47 


$227,743 24 

$6,608 14 
52,176 20 


$37,289 62 

$1,577 56 
5.042 51 


$56,646 16 

$1,948 63 
5,490 56 


19 

20 
21 


$5,943 74 

$12 96 
2.706 35 

106 36 
8.372 57 


$21,413 99 

$8 12 

6.282 02 

373 45 

8.784 81 

12 00 

801 98 

10.328 92 

119 62 

3.154 62 


$40,491 07 

$146 07 

10.558 38 

521 57 

4.847 80 

458 93 

86 24 

24.214 26 

45 77 

3,490 00 


$35,745 62 

$114 76 

9.546 58 

540 75 

97 99 

129 01 

222 56 

28.229 61 

20 00 

5.102 90 


$32,170 30 

$54 12 

11.239 51 

294 52 

1,964 59 


$58,784 34 

$154 13 

8.875 31 

274 56 

3.829 52 

1,325 03 

445 72 

8,021 21 

1.003 73 

10.295 11 


$6,620 07 

$26 04 

3.060 46 

127 22 

3500 

44 60 

223 33 

1.331 62 

2.149 80 


$7,439 19 

$247 48 

3.040 84 

22 50 

■*^'" ' 91" 80 
1.243 93 
1.556 89 
1.078 32 


22 

23 
24 
25 
26 
27 


327 50 

10.855 46 

39 82 

2.950 11 


231 80 

19.315 73 

385 45 

7.997 50 


28 
29 
30 
31 


$25,371 18 
$354 68 

103 15 

341 17 

1,174 13 


$29,866 54 

$2,508 08 
20 40 

99 
542 66 
401 79 
577 88 


$44,369 02 
$6,839 27 

11 89 

740 53 

685 23 

1,197 97 


$44,094 15 

$4,917 73 
6 40 

sis'ss 

340 69 
834 39 


$41,483 22 

$4,703 48 
2.170 99 

26913 

605 99 
3.295 34 


$34,224 32 

$4,914 92 

60 00 

3,082 00 

"465T7 

562 93 
1.302 68 


6.998 07 

$4,870 57 

1,276 10 

1,738 00 

6 60 

155 15 

302 91 

1.589 20 

$9,937 43 

"" ""'lis'oo 


17,281 76 

$2,890 85 

1,571 31 

11,744 26 

3 77 

61 21 

261 61 

1,809 77 


32 

33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 


$1,973 13 
$25 00 


$4,051 80 
$25 00 


$9,474 89 

$2,470 50 
25 00 


$6,918 09 

$1,600 00 
22 95 


$11,044 93 
$2500 


$10,328 10 
$2500 


$18,342 77 
'$25"00 


40 

41 
42 
43 








$25 00 
$145,857 46 


$25 00 
$259,291 05 

$2,750 00 


$2,495 50 
$303,489 85 

*"$2;665'78 

■""iis'ii) 6'3 

2.779 12 


$1,622 95 
I $370,158 9C 

$465 31 

i4'765 61 


$25 00 
1 $346,055 45 

'$84.'522"42 

98 50 

2.433 31 


$25 00 
1 $331, 105 00 

■"$59"i48 "56 

7.802 95 

18.991 01 

2,916 63 


$25 00 
$60,870 09 


$25 00 
$89,734 88 


44 

45 

46 
47 


$2,430 86 


$i44'68 
219 71 


'"~'$2.8d4"6"9 


48 
49 
50 








$2,430 86 

$240,275 18 

850 
$282 68 
379 82 


$2,760 00 

$353,266 7G 

1.486 
$237 73 
235 88 


$17,663 93 

I $427,274 03 

1.808 
$263 32 
226 55 


$15,230 92 

I $510,039 66 

1.8.55 
$274 95 
266 74 


$87,054 23 

$579,800 19 

1.522 
$380 95 
323 75 


$88,859 15 

$596,865 08 

2.447 
$243 91 
207 60 


$364 39 

$127,717 17 

204 
$626 07 
624 27 


$2,804 69 

$185,903 91 

495 
$375 57 
369 90 


51 

52 

53 
54 
65 



Digitized by V^OOQ IC 



nm 



OUIQ GENERAL STATISTICS. 
TABLE 1 — Concluded. 



InstitulioiiE, 



ApFaOPRlATlON Exi-EWPITUREfi. 

FfnKifial scrvice..„..^„,.._. .„,._„,.... .™, — .. 

Total opemting expmditur«^_ .. 
AtldUbtis and bettntBCBtHL ^^^ „ 



Tdtal for all ptjTposea,...++ .^.....^^.^ 

CtJkSSWttATtOfi EaU^HNDITfaffSt 



Talal pcTsc»nsi1 service.- 



c* 
c 
c- 



c- 



1 Food 8uppli(»..„,.*.„.**„„.„,-.«-„.w,^**.„„.-. 

2 Poraiit and veierin&ry imppltm ^^^ 

3 Fuel cuppli^ ..._..^...._.,......„...^.^^. 

4 Oflfi*^ pupplie*-,,,.-....^-, *..,-..«„*«-..«*««, 

© Medkml &tad surgieal iiuppl»«..-._^-^„. 

It Laundry* cleanirnE and diimfvcting ^.p^ties 

IS Educational »nd recrcstional suppUeJ— 

@ BotftTiirni] and aeriajLttura] stippfics. ., 



C' 11 fJcncf^l jjLiiit RuppUes 

Total sitpplist- 



D- 2 Build mg materia^t ..-.*.^.. 
D- 3 GeqcthI plant niatcrmia^ 

Total materialt—^^..... 



E- 
E- 
S- 
E- 
E* 
E- 
K. 
E- 
E- 



F- 
F- 
F- 
F- 

F- 



1 Office f-q^ipment . „.„^*j , ^^^..^ 

2 Hou^ohqld eclyipnient.. „™^„,.^... ,„, 

3 Klcdical and! surgical etiuipBient. ..++,„,♦,„.„„ 

4 Li vt stock. ^ - ...... .^ . .^. ........ ^. ...__ .^ 

5 MotorlesK vchidca sud eqtiipniemt...^ „_. 

fi Motor vehjck'S and eauipn>cnt„,.„.^„..,*„,,,, 



S EducaLiQnal and rtcreatiotial equipnient„ 
Sf Gt-Tieral plant equipmcnl., *.,.,.., „^„ 

TaXiil cquipTrtent.., ...... _^^, ^ 

1 GL^neml ^t^pa.i^a.^^_^=,««_^.„,.^*.,™i,^.^ 



«^I31 



32 



S WaU-T -- ..- :., .,.^..^-1^ ._ 

4 Light, htat land power. ...,.^^.„.. 

5 Frt.'irtht, cxprp*s and drayage,„^„„.^, 
TnLnapr^rtatirsn.— ..,-„, ™„^..^.„,* ^^ 

7 Corn rnunicat ion _ 



9 General plant 6crviceu,„„„„..„„_«.»„^.^.,,„« 
Total ccmtract and opeii order servke^. 



H' 8 Rent—.............. 

II- 7 Insurance... 

H* a Contributioiw-^ 



Total fijwd cliarses.....^... ....... ..,.„„ 

Total main Icnanc c ^.^,......^..„....„...... 

O' I Lnnd.q .-^...-.-....^.....^...^...^...^.^ . 

(>' 2 BuirriinBB^. _..... ,..,,._,. ,.., ...^..... 

G» 3 Non structural improvenaenta.,... *.„,*...,„« 

£j*3*l Tspital prill iptTienl.^...... ^ .. 

G-3'1! Other eapital outliy...,.,... ^,.^,.„„...„,.... 

Total additioiis and bcttCTmeBts.,.^ 

Total. , .........._.....,. ..... ....,„...,..... 



Aycrage daih' ptipuTatiotL... ^...^.......^..^... 53 

P#f tiipita — 'Total eTtpi3iniditurtf&, ,..^ ,.,..^ .,,,„.. 1 54 

PfcT f^pitA — Gpririting cxp<.nditurtr-«^.,^. _ !55] 



Ohio 

SUte 

Sanatorium. 



S36.883 04 
110.099 40 



1146.982 44 
S6.985 68 



$153,968 12 



$36,783 53 
99 51 



$36,883 04 

946.593 64 

4.438 54 

14,736 51 

580 28 

2.844 94 

1.164 84 

216 36 

766 47 

2.211 57 



$73,553 15 



$1,484 14 
3.733 36 



Ohio 

Soldiers* 

and Sailors' 

Home. 



$72,980 65 
285.451 49 



$358,432 14 



1358.432 14 



$72,980 65 



$72,980 65 

$151,824 73 

1.099 94 

43,135 17 

778 96 

1.845 33 

2.063 13 

3 75 

100 00 

2.485 93 



MadidOQ 
Home. 



$8,234 96 
8.721 88 



$16,956 84 



$16,956 84 



$8,187 16 
47 80 



$8,234 96 

$3,631 69 

600 40 

1.194 76 

68 35 

34 26 

128 68 



47 76 
61 90 



$203,336 941 $5,767 80 



$5,217 50 

$105 15 

4.749 54 
425 14 

1.499 14 

354 58 

250 95 

311 41 

28 31 

1.492 25 



-I- 



$2,125 45 
14.320 50 



$9,225 47 
$602 37 



143 
470 30 
419 09 
366 95 



$1,851 14 

$cOO 00 

25 00 

19.727 14 



$20,252 14 
$110,099 40 



151 14 

"5.949 66 
884 98 



$6,985 68 

$152,968 12 

180 

&855 38 

816 56 



$16,445 95 



25 
_ 44 
476 98 



6 



;.l77 



6 70 

174 89 

37.867 08 

24 25 

2.593 28 



$47,320 87 

$2,671 76 
6.723 40 



2 46 
1.088 48 
1.058 35 
6.778 28 



$18,322 73 



$25 00 



$25 00 
$285,451 49 



$358,432 14 



861 

$416 30 
416 50 



$18 33 
436 02 



$454 35 

$0 48 

103 27 

15 

22 50 

40 66 
16 

r.27r79 



$1,438 90 
$79 06 

4'23"64 

53 

42 96 

35 65 

453 97 



tl.035 83 



$25 00 



$25 00 
$8,721 88 



$16,956 84 

35 
$484 48 
484 48 



Boys' 

Indtistrial 

School. 



$91,566 25 
206,415 26 



$297,981 61 
$3,772 05 



$301,763 56 



$91,566 26 



$91,566 26 

$63,305 38 

28.464 78 

26.598 78 

788 76 

1.915 17 

2.709 79 

459 06 

3,992 60 

3.918 69 



GirV 

Industrial 
School. 



$132,162 91 



$8,073 381 
38.489 45 



$46,562 83 

$13 18 

3.223 18 

710 43 

657 14 



360 87 
8377 63 
1.274 19 
4.833 18 


$19,949 70 
$1,307 07 


1.319 65 

384 59 

1.063 46 

3.650 05 



$7,724 82 



$26 00 



$25 00 
$206,415 26 



$221 91 
3.650 14 



$3,772 06 

$301,763 56 

1.195 
$262 51 
249 36 



$53,403 12 
95349 05 



$149,252 17 
$2,911 84 



$152,164 01 



$53,403 12 



$53,403 12 

$42,695 25 

2JOS3 72 

13.935 23 

1.032 72 

449 76 

2.702 22 

235 64 

1.110 72 

2.813 61 



$67X)08S7 

$2,814 71 
10.711 71 



$13.526 42 

$186 00 

2.357 66 

355 99 

385 00 

isroi 

333133 

632 39 

235182 



$11,747 80 
$553 13 



44 98 

122 46 

2320 39 



$3.540 96 



$25 00 



$25 00 
$05.849 03 



$2,911 84 



$2,911 

$152.16 

464 

$327 94 
321 66 



•Per cffpjta fiifurtMl on IflTOn lOO men at 'honor camps." 
tPrf capita fifiured on lalH. 121 mtfri at "honor camps." 
VMi friaintained. per capita ii^iiryd on 2277 examinations. 



Digitized by ^OOQ IC 



OHIO BOAED OP ADMINISTEATION. 
TABLE 1— ConcludecL 



357 



Ohio 

Peniten- 

tary. 


Ohio 

SUte 

Refoima- 

tory. 


Ohio 
Reforma- 
tory for 
Women. 


New 
Prison 
Farm. 


Btireau of 

Juvenile 

Research. 


Total. 


Expendi- 
tures per 
Capita 
Annual. 


Expendi- 
tures per 




$190,361 22 
240.672 58 


$152,686 18 
239.360 09 


$19,754 72 
46.909 68 


$6,589 19 
72.570 20 


$23,891 22 
11,107 00 


$2,062,478 15 
4.317.898 48 


$88 58 
185 44 


$0 24 
50 


1 
2 


$431,033 80 


$392,046 27 
$62,764 77 


$65,664 40 
$3,403 64 


$79,159 39 
$32,595 85 


$34,998 22 
$40,309 03 


$6,380,376 63 
$401,618 61 


$274 02 
$17 25 


$0 74 
$0 05 


3 

4 






$431,033 80 

$143,182 94 
70 50 


$454,811 04 

$111,787 96 
40,898 22 


$69,068 04 

$17,928 54 
1.826 18 


$111,755 24 
$6,589 19 


$75,307 25 
$23,891 22 


$6,781,995 24 

$1,969,403 45 

3.251 52 

89.823 18 


$291 27 

$84 58 

14 

8 86 


$0 79 
$0 23 


6 

6 
7 


47.098 78 


01 


8 








$190,361 22 

$128,016 94 
2.000 65 


$152,686 18 

$97,149 89 

11.404 86 

33.910 93 

2.542 64 

1.530 80 

3.608 16 

99 97 

2.672 84 

4.299 80 


$19,754 72 

$15,813 49 

281 35 

3.815 05 

391 33 

685 85 

1.033^ 

79 48 

772 72 

2.869 33 


$6,589 19 

$14,217 94 

14.831 73 

4.339 34 

310 60 

125 00 

1.009 18 

3.543 63 
7.093 61 


$23,891 22 
$2,411 78 


12,062,478 15 

$1,935,976 02 

202,997 41 

608.246 53 

22.873 05 

28.138 22 

86.344 47 

3.995 43 

38.839 64 

108.165 33 


$88 58 

$83 15 

8 72 

26 12 

98 

1 21 

3 71 
17 

1 67 

4 64 


$0 24 

$0 23 
02 
07 


9 

10 
11 


2.040 61 
2.765 49 
2,755 97 


204 do 
702 62 

205 31 
120 60 

36 72 


12 
13 
14 


2,920 80 
178 10 


01 


15 
16 


10 81 


02 


17 


11.517 72 


126 91 


18 


$152,207 09 

$1,367 67 
35.634 30 


$157,219 89 

$4,930 88 
7.382 24 


$25,741 83 

$1,192 17 
4.234 78 


$45,470 93 

$801 70 
3.609 73 


$3,807 94 

$1,964 41 
299 32 


$3,035,589 35 

$83,575 70 
390.047 75 


$130 37 

$3 60 
$16 75 


$0 35 

$0 01 
$0 05 


19 

20 
21 


$37,001 97 
$408 41 


$12,313 12 

$183 60 

13.872 61 

818 68 

237 50 

9 77 

130 57 

42.437 51 

157 29 

8.981 97 


$5,426 95 
$45 09 

5.104 79 
23 25 

1.408 43 

1.352 29 
77 43 

2.610 31 


$4,311 43 

$1 50 

1.301 97 

31 00 

3,387 18 

79 43 

494 52 

10.449 53 


$2,263 73 

$11 15 

283 17 

38 20 


$473,623 45 

$3,106 10 

114.184 88 

7.032 34 

41.585 13 

2.449 90 

8.207 38 

309.827 91 

7.479 29 

85.549 39 


$20 35 

$0 13 

4 90 

30 

1 79 

11 

35 

13 31 

32 

3 84 


$0 06 


22 
23 


2,538 88 
237 70 


$02 


24 
25 






26 


12 70 






27 


275 49 

10.457 71 

161 31 


1.375 30 
75 28 

268 00 


04 


28 
29 
30 


8.142 83 


4,818 80 


01 


31 


$17,235 03 
$1,076 55 


$61,329 50 
$1,388 74 


$11,982 81 
$593 32 


$20,563 93 
$603 96 


$2,039 10 

$117 21 
33 03 


$583,409 32 

$61,428 34 
24,865 39 
34.747 32 
1.389 69 
12.908 24 
11.630 41 
42.073 33 


$25 06 

$2 64 

1 07 

1 49 

06 

65 

50 

1 81 


$0 07 


32 
33 


6.379 63 




34 


16.509 92 






1 50 

80 00 

76 03 

1.427 42 


35 




16 02 

483 48 

654 50 

2.277 48 


2 69 

56 69 

192 87 

1.888 62 


1 07 

1.208 98 

277 06 

271 88 


36 


370 27 




37 


622 69 




38 


8.486 83 




39 








$28,445 89 


$4,720 22 

$2,224 48 

62 50 

1,490 38 


$2,733 09 


$2,188 91 

$10 00 
25 00 


$1,909 23 

$1,050 00 
26 00 


$188,942 72 

$8,454 98 

1.004 79 

26.875 12 


$8 12 

$0 36 

04 

1 15 


$0 02 


40 
41 


$125 00 
5 657 60 


$25 00 




42 
43 




" " "~~ 






$6,782 60 
$240,672 68 


$3,777 86 

$239.360 09 

$34,662 90 
27.232 09 


$25 00 
$45,909 68 


$35 00 

$72,570 20 

$28,600 00 

3.531 69 

464 16 


$1,075 00 
$11,107 00 


$36,334 89 

$4,317,898 48 

$76,262 90 

221.344 67 

18.620 68 

78.397 48 

7.992 88 


$1 55 

$185 44 

$3 23 

9 51 

80 

8 37 

34 


$0 50 

$0 01 
03 


44 

45 
46 




$57 55 
3.346 09 


$32,631 27 


47 




48 




869 78 


7,677 76 


01 


40 




50 














$62,764 77 
$454,811 04 

$300 60 
259 12 


$3,403 64 

$69,068 04 

155 
$445 60 
423 64 


$32,595 85 

$111,755 24 

215 
$519 79 
368 18 


$40,309 03 

$75,307 25 

$2,277 
$33 07 
15 87 


$401,618 61 
$6,781,995 24 

274 02 


117 25 
$291 27 


$0 05 
$0 79 


51 


$481.038801 
•1770 00 


52 

53 


$268 10 
368 10 






54 






55 



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362 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



TABLE V— INVENTORY OP THE PROPERTY OP THE STATE IN THE OPPICE OP THE OfflO BOARD OF 
ADMINISTRATION, COLUMBUS. OfflO, AND THE STATE INSTITUTIONS OVER WHICH SAID BOARD 
HAS SUPERVISION, AS OF JUNE 30, 1920. 



Cleveland 
State 
Hospital. 




ColombaB 

SUte 
Hospital. 



IHytoa 

State 
Hospital. 



C— SUPPLIES 

C- 1 Pood Supplies „ 

C- 2 Porage and veterinary suppies 

C- 3 Puel supplies^.. 

C- 4 Office supplies „ 

C- 6 Medical and surgical supplies... 

C- 6 Laundiy, clean 'g and dis'f'g supplies 

C- 8 Educational and recreation! supplies 

C- 9 Botanical and agricultural supplies 

C- 11 General plant supplies _, 

D— MATERIALS 

D- 1 Highway materials (10 

D- 2 Building materials jll 

D- 3 General plant materials „ 1 12 



$21,830 64 

1.667 35 

1.733 90 

268 21 

241 29 

1.238 69 

12 47 

2.502 90 

696 95 



3.123 45 
14.189 61 



E. 
E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 
E- 



E—EQUIPMENT 

1 Office equipment 

2 Household equipment.„ „. 

3 Medical and surgical equipment. 

4 Live stock. 

5 Motor less vehicles and equipment... 

6 Motor vehicles and equipment 



7 Wearing apparel ^_ 

8 Educational and recreational equip 't 

9 General plant equipment ., 

ADDITIONS AND BETTERMENTS 
G- 1 Lands. 



G- 2 Structures and i>arts. 

Manufacturing departments 

Central warehouse 



2.427 18 

105.229 84 

915 44 

9.701 50 

403 75 

985 12 

8,436 17 

4.265 91 

49.855 42 



250.607 40 
1.188,735 00 



$15,855 75 

380 89 

1,315 80 

370 22 

2,942 29 

1.457 60 

1 02 

2.801 60 

1.381 11 



5,543 15 
17.180 78 



2.960 90 

113.337 06 

5,383 14 

4.592 52 

877 50 

2.250 00 

18.421 34 

5,619 85 

136,758 97 



456,225 00 
1.924.213 25 



TotaL 



$13,823 01 [$1,666,067 94[$1,664.068 19 



$2,719,878 74 



$20,008 90 
2,962 66 
1911 08 
507 00 
2.631 05 
1.216 22 



6.966 35 
1.548 00 



2,903 07 

63,636 70 

6.098 51 

53.309 35 

1357 00 

3.350 00 

7.162 38 

6.380 42 

100.548 37 



248,363 88 
047.063 08 



$1,522,786 71 



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OHIO BOARD OP ADMINISTRATION. 



363 



TABIjB T— INVBNTORY op the PROPBRTY op the state in the OPFICE op the OHIO BOARD OP 
ADMINISTRATION, COLUMBUS, OHIO, AND THE STATE INSTITUTIONS OVER WHICH SAID BOARD 
HAS SUPERVISION, AS OP JUNE 30, 1920. 



Lima 

State 

HospHal. 


Longview 
HospitoL 


Stote 
HospitoL 


Toledo 

Stote 

Hospitol. 


Ohio Hos- 
pitol for 
Epileptics. 


Institution 

for Feeble- 

Minded. 


Stote 

School for 

Blind. 


Stote 

School for 

Deaf. 




$».315 20 
796 20 


$12^22 28 

766 62 

3.476 67 

53 08 

1,070 62 

1.010 48 


$14,249 13 

8.405 20 

1.900 00 

60 65 

902 41 

735 46 

23 90 

6.079 62 

854 69 

858 28 
16.649 97 

1.169 90 

112.848 39 

4.694 63 

60.847 60 

4.613 81 

750 00 

6.006 M 

4.376 26 

60.090 42 

170,000 00 
1,150.774 49 

y 


$8,937 51 

6.361 36 

17 10 

55 68 

1.570 73 

534 »4 

• 34 83 

9,306 00 

1,625 61 

"5,i07"di 
14.860 68 

1.394 50 
92.094 85 

1.249 18 

33.693 00 

905 00 

4.30C 00 
14.902 75 

3.049 35 
90.876 71 

452/.098 00 
1.071,455 07 

f 


$15,332 9f 

4.143 25 

3.000 00 

47 34 

4.362 58 

540 04 


$12,430 4fl 
7.570 60 
1.133 95 
99 29 
1.214 01 
2.627 12 
502 99 
1.469 20 
1.514 57 

653 65 
20.553 98 

2.928 00 

131.224 17 

4.041 94 

45.163 10 

3.189 00 

6.35C 00 

6.705 34 

9,522 96 

21.568 90 

301,749 80 
1,717.539 22 


$1,891 04 
201 80 
790 00 
230 32 
175 61 
586 85 
351 44 
618 14 
295 83 

6.174 39 

2.230 35 

35.485 68 

556 61 

540 00 

537 25 


$2,486 00 


1 
? 


1.131 00 
46 55 


- 


3 
4 


407 12 

352 46 

11 09 


222 V.9 
117 71 
184 66 

450 74 

1.440 15 
2.008 10 

1 1.980 71 

65.928 86 

99 20 

385 00 

250 00 


5 
6 
7 


i7l07 24 

2.890 24 

1.142 01 
43.836 16 

1,709 10 

20.658 42 

225 00 

3,200 00 


2.796 66 
1,057 81 

1,149 28 
7,696 92 

686 00 

39.706 46 

1.061 21 

10.077 30 

444 50 

3,600 00 

16.564 64 

1.806 00 

25.183 69 

T3,'6aod6 


6.509 25 
2.977 42 

"6.i35'"l9 

14.918 72 

2.611 05 

103.920 61 

4.303 20 

19,388 00 

1.122 73 

6.287 00 

8.928 14 

5.934 70 

188.055 86 

78 425 00 
1.103.368 35 


8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 


163 71 

673 00 

3,586 48 

8r.500 00 
2.03S.141 35 


679 50 
22.925 02 
28.526 55 

125.000 00 
669.775 00 


1.686 08 
10.221 09 
23.192 47 

260.000 00 
675.600 00 


19 
20 
21 

22 
23 

24 






26 










$2,215,981 33 


$142,448 81 


$1,615,791 25 


$1,815,030 16 


$1,581,311 41 


$2,298,751 98 


$797,760 10 


$1,026,242 75126 



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384 



OmO GEKEBAL STATISTICS. 
TABLE y— CoQcluded, 



State 
SaT^tofium- 



Ohio 

Eiiid Sailofi' 
Home. 



Madisoa 



Iitdustml 
SdiooL 



IndufEnal 
Scluaal. 



C-^UPPLIES 



c- 
c- 

c- 

c- 



1 pood suppIiM.. 



, I 

2 Pfsrage an4 vfltcrbary supplies,,, 

3 Fuel supplier, ^^ . ., ., . .t a 

4 Office supTiliea.-... . — ^._ „.j 4 

fi Medical and sujTfical fiuppUea^.. f 5 

~ ^ - T>^.^ g 

7 
8 

g 



Laittidiy, cl«?An'g and dviTig ■lupplks 

8 EdueatnTLdl and rcctBat't supplies.™ 

Botanical and affrictiltum] Btipplies.,. 

C- H Geheral plant sBUpplie3.,„***,-,^„ ... 

D--MATERIALS 

D- I Hl^liwajr matcnals . ^.^ 

D- 2 Biiiliitifj materials. 



D- 3 General plASt materia ls„„„..-^_„ 

E— EOUTPMENT 

E- 1 Office equipm£nt„,„..,.^^.H.*^^.-— ^-., 13 

E- 2 Hoti&Er!iold e<iuipmernt „--,„,_.„.._.„ 14 

E- 3 Medicai ftud suTijical cquipmetit__ 16, 

E- 4 Live atJ3ck..... ..^^„.,..^.„..„......„„.,^. I ft 

E- i5 Motorlesa vehicjea and equipiiieiit,.^ — IT ; 

E- Motor vehicles and etitiipmetit. —^t 1^ 

E- 7 Wearirxf; oppart?l_ .„„ — _ , [19 

E' 8 Educaticmal aJid recrcfit'^ equipm^t^jSil 

E- Q General pknt cqutpment [21 

ADDITIONS AND BETTERMENTS 

G- 1 LM^di. ..^ 

G<- § Structures and pirts.^ 

Manufacturmg departments.. 
Central warehTjusc.^....^.. ........ 

Totals . 



/23| 

.'24 
25 

20 



12,309 45 

3,357 25 

202 17 

25 GCi 

fiSKJ 70 

212 22 

228 7lj 



127 M 
WM 2S 



3.001 32 

3*1,502 92 

3.1S4 SI 

11J2J 75 

1.05;3 7^ 

5,378 f*5 

83 16 i 

1,073 37 

110, 1 as 41 



33,5iW 0^3 
512,(i5(i 07' 



1757.447 



«( 



111.061 fi3| 

'"^ITai* as 

71 ^ 

327 06 



785 21 



9,053 45 



3.940 25 

64,027 m 

923 16 

6()0 00 

1.240 40 

2.465 00 

2t>,734 B&^ 

i.sao 70l 
SI. OSS m 



4t>,2S0 00 
647.291 15 [ 



1673 54^ 
107 73 
26 3S 
3d 34 
fifi 74, 
30 98 

34 ^ 



4 £1 
131 35 



37S 30 

146 31 
693 50 

923 00 

771 70^ 
2, Tie 41 



3,7aO 00 
40,591 44 



*aM.797 561 ta5*531 



«I196» 77 

5.743 m 

57 47 

276 16, 

1,2*4 60, 

6m 29 

370 OO 

5.233 IS 

1.4(15 95 



3,5u ai 

2a, 5^ M 



3,027 70 
61,847 42 

l.OLT 90 

2S,5*t 61 

624 92 

6.450 00 
3^.030 19 

7.080 11 

m,mo 32 



58,474 00 
1,375,945 00 



i«t.l63 U 

234 CIO 

4 m 

7I> W 

LlTl « 

£.223 41 

7M 11 

IB SI 



£ J?& IT 



1,054 05 

310 60 
1^,546 n 
3.004 ^ 

43i>ao8 
^HS.Sii Si 



is.9oa DO 
S74.MS as 



SOltl 



,603.005 58 



fssa,4Q2 m 



Digitized by 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 
TABLE V— Concluded. 



365 



Penitentiary. 


Ohio 

State 

Reformatory. 


Ohio 
Reforma- 
tory for 
Women. 


New 
Prison 
Farm 


Bureau of 
Juvenile 
Research. 


Ohio State 
Brick P^|int. 


Central 
Warehouse. 


Totals. 




$22,712 95 


$4,854 94 

3.210 92 

14 80 

81 2» 

2.060 43 

630 75 

24 27 

452 24 

i'ssoeis 

20.136 41 

3.678 66 

39.099 34 

819 85 

46.034 96 

1.108 37 

2.486 00 
20.319 80 

2.641 39 
46.695 19 

• 

123.775 00 
1.763.656 09 

366.534 16 


$6,703 14 


$1,799 87 

7.544 15 

119 10 

34 85 

12 48 

155 32 

'*" ijroo 

841 55 

1.015 28 

211 65 
6.270 19 


$638 68 






$219.52,3 68 
61.590 22 
20,477 67 

3.922 57 
31.918 23 
16.630 62 

2.394 GO 
47.212 37 
25,505 43 

222.316 33 

63.462 04 
1.315.463 92 


1 


351 91 






2 


30 82 


843 00 
125 42 
269 39 

1.353 48 

47 75 

633 83 

1.084 43 

S'isW 05 

1.535 2^3 
15,456 18 

213 39 
7,094 77 

477 25 
2.271 75 
1.460 70 
1.244 62 
8,540 27 

30.000 00 
295.712 72 








» 


1.188 45 


225 00 

101 67 

24 92 

39 61 






4 


1,700 72 






5 


326 16 

64 25 

1 00 

2.684 60 




..^ _,. 


7 
8 
9 










10 


136 87 
18.980 91 


11 

1t7 


5.082 Dd 
31.286 d6 


3.172 33 

5.856 01 

514 39 






113 
14 


776 26 







42.995 74 \ .'. 


96a 50 
686 80 


5d,'6oi 50 

953 00 

2.125 00 

1.259 12 


446.004 02 

23.909 06 

69.496 17 

179.482 02 

105.118 62 

1.247,514 45 

3.481,'282 25 
20,082.506 59 

1.129.932 50 
120.612 40 




3.733 00 








IS 


6.642 02 


220 32 
310 50 
685 79 






r« 


5.701 14 


- 




■'fi 


24.768 23 
312.398 67 


13.874 88 

331.525 00 
222.843 10 




21 
27, 


787,720 30 


103.384 09 






?^ 


582.907 71 


$180,490 63 




''4 











$120.61*2 40 


^^ri 






$1,809,623 18 


$2,461,084 48 


$377,431 37 


$649,013 01 


$115,173 31 


$180,490 63 


$120,612 40 


$28,998.058 84 


2fi 



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366 



OHIO GENEBilL STATISTICS. 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 



367 



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OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



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370 



OHIO GENEJtAIi STATISTICS. 



TABLE VIII— COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OP EXPENDITURES OF THE OHIO BOARD OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND THE STATE INSTITUTIONS UNDER ITS SUPERVISION BY AP- 
PROPRIATIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1915. JUNE 
30. 1916. JUNE 30. 1917 JUNE 30. 1918. JUNE 30. 1919, AND JUNE 30. 1920, AND PER CAP- 
ITA COSTS FOR SAME PERIODS. 



ClasiJBcfltioas. 



1915- 



turcs 
1916. 



tuttm 
lfll7. 



BEpcndi- 
191S. 



OfSRATTNG EXPKKDlTURffS. 



A-1 Salaries „ 

A-2 Wages 

A-3 Uncla.ssified -Prisoner' Compensation 

C-l 
C.2 
C-3 
C-4 
C-5 
C-6 
C-8 



tl 



Food Supplies ^ 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies 

Fuel Supplies „ „ 

OfR " "ifts^-.,.-- .- 

M' ■': ■ '^uTj^iial Supplies « _... 

La u I . 1 r y . t ' 1 1- ^ n hiw a ti cl D i - infecting Supplies .. 

Eel h u I ]L inal aud R »% rt at i .inal Supplies 

C-9 Bct.LT.). ji and AHricu^tur-d Supplies. „.. 

C-11 Gcn-.Tidl Fkrit SuppUt&_ ^ 



I 1 



D-1 Highway Materials 

D-2 Building Materials 

D-3 General Plant Materials. 



E-1 
E.2 
E-3 
E.4 
E-5 
E-6 
E-7 
E-8 
E-9 

F-1 
F-3 
F-4 
F.6 
F-6 
F-T 
F-9 






Office Equipmfnt.^^ .._.. .,,^. 

Hiuuehold Equipment..-,......,.. .^^..^^ 

Mcdica] and Surgical Equipment..^ ,_, 

LivB Stock...,,, „, ,., . _„, _.. 

MaturlMs Vehicles and Equipment.... ..,.^-. 

A^citor Vehicles and EQuipmrnt„„„..,„^...„ 

Weiring x\piparel ._..^.... ._^. .._. 

EiiucLitmnafa nd Heft npalions I Eijuipnaeat 
Gl-ru^^..l I '1-1 -t EqiMpnuerit.. ,^„..*..„,.....,.. 

General Repairs 

Water. _.: 

Light. Heat aJod Power „ 

Freight, Express, Drayage 

Transportation.. - 

Communication 

General Plant Service... 



.401.743 

8.836 

73.941 

.013.532 
90.029 

282.482 
18.931 
26.950 
34.088 
4.339 
19.188 
56.234 



07 tl .405.322 28 
.007 93 
.295 97 



4,( 
73.J 



1,011 
73, 
273 
17. 
15, 
40, 
3 
26 
46 



,739 32 
.572 19 
.089 50 
,532 63 
,171 43 
,887 54 
,406 87 
,073 00 
7&'4 17 



H-6 Rent ^ 

H-7 Insurance 

H-8 Contributions .. 



84.235 36 
183.381 88 

3.133 92 1 

62.817 46 

4,443 61 

94.647 85 

981 44 

20.098 41 

160.660 951 

5.078 481 

82.143 88 

24.423 40 
18.960 48 
38.388 08 



19.960 90 

8.382 57 

48.289 07 

2.909 90 
1.085 13 



Total Operating Expenditures. 

Additions and Betterments. 



G-l Lands...,- _.. 

G-2 Structures and Parts 

G-3 Non -Structural Improvements.... 

G-3-1 Capital Equipment 

G-3-2 Other Capital Outlay „ 



Total Additions and Betterments... 
Total for All Purposes.. 



111.025 00 

136.217 10 

2,996 72 



53,337 20 
166.S48 49 

2.465 94 

70,570 64 

4.308 87 

117.661 67 

1.721 38 

8.584 16 

163.113 19 

5.420 88 

66.784 36 

16.105 70 
14,759 73 
36.986 20 



15.919 59 

7.749 71 

41.051 95 

4.339 74 
915 35 



$3,894,118 521^3.789,407 48 



$3,464 30 

200,676 66 

79.141 87 



I- 



U0,238 82 1 283,281 73] 036.001 76 



I $4,044,357 34 1 $4,072,689 21 



$1.. 529.382 33 

6.785 69 

78.767 46 

1,332.983 19 

118.267 68 
476.072 41 

19.667 89 
24.607 85 
47.889 67 
3.917 17 
35.488 63 
66.613 62 

176 77 

72,277 84 

209.409 64 

3.271 CO 

100.268 04 
3.691 60 

64.590 86 

2.489 69 

6^183 90 

173.974 33 

7.654 42 

80,229 18 

23.819 68 
14.604 90 
36.592 94 



$1,640,068 96 
4.167 55 
83.066 64 

1.624.239 90 

131.365 76 

603.081 21 

18.917 38 

26.204 02 

6r.765 36 

4340 62 

26.136 08 

77.608 49 



13.783 01 

8.998 96 

43.848 00 

6.006 60 
971 66 



%4.61 2,326 00 



627.168 61 
107.833 24 



$6,427,327 76 
I 



62.947 29 
267.679 02 . 

2.660 38 
79.981 62 

4.363 69 
38.240 69 

1.588 24 

7.443 48 
186.666 36 

4.904 37 
73,609 34 

21.266 02 
20.016 40 
37.040 93 



10.446 77 

9.150 42 

26.936 83 

6.676 45 

941 70 

12.448 42 



$6,078,806 88 



$14,900 00 
477.005 30 
146.477 14 



637.382 44 



$6,716,188 32 



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OHIO BOARD OP ADMINISTRATION. 



371 



TABLE VIII— COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OP EXPENDITURES OP THE OHIO BOARD OP 
ADMINISTRATION AND THE STATE INSTITUTIONS UNDER ITS SUPERVISION BY AP- 
PROPRIATIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1915. JUNE 
30. 1916, JUNE 30, 1917, TUNE 30, 1918. JUNE 30, 1919, AND JUNE 30, 1920. AND PER CAPITA 
COSTS ^OR SAME PERIODS. 



Expendi- 
tures 
1919. 


Expendi. 
tures 
1920. 


Increase 
Over 
1919. 


Decrease 
Over 
1919. 


Per 
Capita 
1915. 


Per 
CapiU 
1916. 


Per 

Capita 
1917. 


Per 
Capita 
1918. 


Per 
Capita 
1919. 


Per 
Capita 
1920. 


$1,731,793 54 


$1,969,403 45 

3,251 52 

89,823 18 

J,935.976 02 

202.997 41 

608.246 53 

22.873 05 

28.138 22 

86.344 47 

3.995 43 

38.839 64 

108.165 33 

83.575 70 
390.047 76 

3.105 10 

114,184 88 

7.032 34 

41.585 13 

2,449 90 

8.207 38 

309,827 91 

7.479 29 

89.549 39 

61,428 34 
24,865 39 
34.747 32 
1,389 69 
12.908 24 
11,530 41 
42,073 33 

8,454 98 

1,004 79 

28,875 12 


$237,609 91 




$65 31 
41 

3 46 

47 23 

4 20 
13 16 

88 
1 25 

1 59 
20 
88 

2 62 

3 93 
8 55 

15 

2 92 
21 

4 41 
05 
94 

7 48 
24 

3 82 

114 

88 

1 78 

93 
39 

2 2o 

14 
05 


$64 89 

19 

3 38 

46 72 

3 40 

12 61 

81 

70 

1 88 

16 

1 20 

2 16 

•24*6 
7 70 

11 

3 29 
20 

5 43 
03 
40 

7 53 
25 

3 08 

74 

68 

1 71 

""'74 

36 
1 90 

20 
04 


$67 60 
30 

3 48 

58 94 

5 23 

21 04 

86 

1 09 

2 12 
18 

1 57 

2 92 

320 
9 26 

14 

4 43 
16 

2 85 
12 
27 

7 69 
34 

3 65 

1 05 

65 

1 62 

61 

40 
1 93 

26 
04 


$70 69 

18 

3 58 

65 60 

5 65 

26 96 

81 

1 08 

2 92 
19 

1 08 

3 34 

2 71 
11 62 

11 

3 44 
19 

1 65 
07 
32 

8 03 
21 

3 16 

92 

86 

1 60 

45 

39 
1 16 

24 
03 
54 


t<76 45 

21 

4 09 

71 73 
8 29 

29 10 

97 

1 45 

3 38 
17 

1 29 

4 46 

2 m 

13 75 

14 

4 33 

24 

2 10 
06 
47 

12 72 
20 

3 50 

2 26 
1 00 
1 74 

59 

43 

1 69 

34 
04 
37 


$84 58 


4,765 71 
92,572 76 


i."5i'4 19 
2,749 58 


14 
3 86 


1,624,755 00 
187,739 47 


311,221 02 
15.257 94 

952 17 


83 15 
8 72 


659,221 57 
21.920 88 
32,898 35 


60,975 04 
4;760"i3 

79 29 

5,902 17 
2,340 44 

4,658 27 
■■49b"77 


26 12 

98 

1 21 


76.535 99 

3.990 05 

29,210 46 

100,961 60 

'64".059'64 
311,445 48 

3.184 39 
98.117 39 

5.393 01 
47.487 30 


9,808 48 

5 38 

9.629 18 

7.203 83 

"~'*"l9T516 66 
78.602 27 

16,067 49 
1.639 33 


3 71 
17 

1 67 

4 64 

3 60 
16 75 

13 

4 90 
30 

1 79 


1.399 63 

10.547 82 

288.186 68 

4,700 75 

79.250 69 

51.189 40 
22,711 70 
39.405 59 

T3;399 01 
9.687 40 


1,050 27 

21.641 23 

2.778 54 

10.298 70 

10,238 94 
2.163 69 

1,389 69 

1.843 01 
3.855 52 

843 03 

164 07 

18,479 08 


11 

36 

13 31 

32 

3 84 

• 2 64 

1 07 

1 49 

06 

65 

60 


38,217 81 

7,611 95 

840 72 

8,395 14 





1 81 

36 

04 

1 16 


$6,671,506 18 


$6,380,376 63 

$75,262 90 

221,344 67 

18,620 68 

78,357 48 

7,992 88 

401.618 61 


$708,780 45 

$75,262 90 

78.397 48 
7.992 88 

46.281 41 




$181 47 

$0 50 

6 35 

14 

6 99 


$174 98 

$0 16 
9 27 
3 65 

13 08 


$203 90 

'$23"3i 

4 77 

28 08 


$218 58 

$0 64 

20 64 

6 26 

27 44 


$^50 39 

13 61 
2 08 

16 69 


$274 02 
$3 23 


$308,194 07 
47.143 13 


$867849 40' 
28,522 45 


9 51 
80 

3 37 
34 

17 25 


$6,0204^ 88 


$6,781,995 24 


$755,061 86 




$188 46 


$188 06 


$231 98 


$1246 02 


$266 08 


$291 27 









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372 



OHIO GENEBAL STATISTICS. 



TABLE VIII— Concluded. 

In the following table is set up first the per capita cost of conducting the twenty 
institutions for the year 1911, the year previous to the time the Board of Admin- 
istration took over the public institutions of the state. Against this is shown per 
capita for 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919. 1920. and the difference in 
the per capita cost each year of the Board's Administration as compared with the 
per capita cost under boards of trustees. 

The difference each year multiplied by the average daily population during the 
year shows the saving to the state, the saving in the nine years under the adminis- 
traiion of this Board being $893,392.63. This saving is shown against a constantly 
rising market since 1911 for all classes of supplies, materials, etc. 



SAVING 



10 11 Per capita — 
1013 Per oapita. — 

1^12 Pop Illation-.. 
Saving. 

IftU Per capita.-.. 
19i;i Per capita.— 



. $217 26 
. 180 76 

$27 50 
. 20.112 



1913 Population. 



Saving- 
1011 Per capita. 



. $217 26 
. 193 29 

$33 97 
20.302 



19 14 Pet capita 

19 14 Popij] ation 

Saving 

19 1 1 Per capita 

1915 Per ciipita — 



■ $217 26 
. 197 58 

$19 68 
. 21.026 



1916 Popialation — 
Saving.— 

1911 Per capita 



$217 26 
188 46 

$28 80 
21.460 



19 la Per capita .. 

1916 Population 



Sa,ving.- 

1911 per capita.- 
1917 Per capita^. 



. $217 26 
. 188 06 

$29 20 
. 21.656 



19 17 Population 



Saving.- 



$217 26 
20390 

$13 36 
. 22.618 



Total saving. 6 years- 

19 IS Per capita 

1911 Per capita 



1918 Population — 
Increase- 



$218 58 
217 26 

$1^2 
. 23.235 



Total saving, 7 years- 



10 19 Per capita 

1911 Per capita. 



19 19 Population- 



$250 39 
. 217 26 

$33 13 
. 22.651 



Increase- 



Total saving, 8 years- 



1920 Per capita 

1911 Per capita — 



1920 Population- 



$56 76 
23.284 



Increase- 



Total saving, 9 years- 



$553,080 00 



$486,638 94 



$413,791 68 



$618,048 00 



$632,355 20 



$302,176 48 



...- $274 02 
..- 217 26 



$3,006,090 30 



$30,670 20 
$2,975,420 10 



$750,427 63 
$2,214,992 47 



$1,321,599 84 



^ $893.392 63 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 



373 



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OmO QEI^TERAL STATISTICS. 



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OHIO BOARD OP ADMINISTRATION. 875 

TABLE IX— Continued. MANUFACTtJRING AND SALES— PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNTS. 





Debits. 


Credits. 




Loss. 


Net profit 

Credit to 

Capital 

Stock. 


Total 


Profit. 


Net loss 
Charged to 
Capital 
Stock. 


Total. 


Ohio Statb Reformatory— 
Clothing department _ 





''$78.949"46 




$31,893 50 
15.975 57 
16.024 26 
12.636 78 
10.204 10 






Pumituie department. .... „ 


/ 




Printing department 

Shoe department 

Institut'on labnr . 


::::::::::::::::::. 








Clothing equipment .. 


$569 69 

890 63 

6.239 52 

84 97 




Furniture equipment 

Printing equxpment„ ^ 

Shoe equipment ^ „ 


- -" 












Net profit credited capital stock..- 








Total... 

Ohio Penitentiary— 

Soap department 

Tin department — ^... 

Machine department „ — 

Knitting mill department. „. 

PovTcr plant department ~.- ~ .. 


$7,784 81 

uii'H 

- - 

sl^eo 

9-34 24 

903 68 

4.053 23 


$78,949 40 


$86,734 21 


$86,734 21 

$25,715 15 

465 33 

2.666 35 

12.231 36 

6.950 34 

6.338 22 

12.894 72 

6,738 89 

34.960 75 

27.108 70 

19.342 70 

195 88 

3.542 09 

7f2"96 
30 55 

149 88 

3.295 05 

54 07 


- " 


$86,734 21 


Stone quarry departrriant. 

State shop department ^ 

Planing mill department 















Woolen mill department 

Printing department ^ 

Cotton mill department - 





i:::::::z:i:::: 


Auto tag department - 

Road sign department 

Xn^titutton labor 






Soap equipment 

Machine shop equipment 

Knitting mill equipment. 

Power plant equipment 

Stone ouany equipment. .„ 

State snop equipment. .. 








— 






237 15 

jjiiss'io 

74 04 
2.217 17 
6.393 12 

77 10 
4.239 09 


t 


:::::::::::::::::::. 




Planing mill equipment 

Woolen mill equipment... 


$i40;358'30 




Printing department equipment.. 

Cotton mill equipment 

Auto tag equipment 

Road sign equipment- 

General office department 

Bentz Aoct. (had been closed off 

P. and L.)~. . 

Discount 

Freight.- - „ - 




Net profit credit capital stock.- 










Total - 


$22,942 69 

. - 

■'$'l6"223''66 
21.997 09 


$140,358 30 


$163,300 99 


$163,300 99 

$26,515 50 
104 11 
230 63 




$163,300 99 


Ohio State Brick Plant— 
nricir 






Discount.. .-. ....... . 


:;;:::::::::::::::: 






Brick equipment .- - 






Salaries And wages .*...... ..n. 


"$ii"37o"n 




Supplies (Maintenance account) 

Net loss chatged to capital stock 


--• 












Total .- — ~ 


$38,220 35 
2.413 93 




$38.22^35 


2.413 93 


$26,850 24 


$11,370 11 
2.413 93 


$38,220 "35 


Ohio Board op Administration 
(Mfg. office) 


2.413 93 






Grand totaU- .- 


$71,361 78 


$219,307 70 


$290,669 48 


$276,885 44 


$13,784 04 


$290,669 48 



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376 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 



377 



TABLE IX— Coatmued* MANOPACTtTRING AND SALES, 
COMPARATIVE STATEMEKT OF SALES. 



Depaitments. 



Year funded 
June 3 Op 1917. 



Yc&T ended 
June Sa IB 18. 



YcAr enrJed 
JuTie m liHO. 



Yeaf ended 
June 30, 1920, 



Ohio Statu Rkfokmatohy-^ 
Fumituns, . 

OhTO PsNtTKNTJlAaV— 

Sfflip^^^.^ ^.. 

, _ M achinfe shop..„.. — ^.,^ 
Knitting milL-^..^^-..-^ 
Power plant,^ 

J State s&iop.^^_ 

Planing mill 

Wocilen mill.^^. 

Printing., .^._. 

Cotton raQl.. ^.. 

Auto Ug_„„^^^^..^,„^, 
Road EipdL^^^.., 

1 TotftL,,,..,.-.-. ,,.„.- 

Dmo SrATB Brick Plant.. 

Grand totaL^.. ....... 

Increase 10 20 over 1917, 
Increase 1920 over 191Sl 
IdCrea^ 1030 over 1913. 



176.837 49 
41.357 20 
%\^im 57 
4S.530 13 

1103.628 30 



»42.SeO 75 

1.121 61 

5,910 72 

35.081 SO 

35,370 n3 

13.12S 2S 

S4,2;il 70 

13,550 33 

A^Am 79 

2,391 30 



f 230.0 24 31 
3$,S55 H2 



*452,662 52 
eT0,2S9 08 



*l. 122,8^1 60 



»91,47§ 27 
49,62if5 13 
2G.1^S 04 
S6.5t;3 09 



1144.620 47 
71,102 32 
24,30S 21 
77,022 m 



i223,80ti 53 



171,830 2S 
f^537 53 
7,870 5f> 

52,^5 m 
39,724 3&1 
15,()SJi 57 
41.235 &1 
i:i.JS54 86 
101.693 15 
1,{H57 68 



50., ^7 34 



S537.3S^ 69 



485,401 91 



tan. 735 06 



«7S.07O 66 
5,400 93 
14,854 m 
,'>3,345 M 
45,411 17 
16.581 30 
52,33t3 52 
23,280 79 

142,349 65 

2.577 U 

43,240 91 

78.661 37 



S556,02S 63 

115,615 69 

t08tl.38O 2S 



133,471 32 



S1,122,S51 ftO 81,122,851 CO 



S154.577 35 
62.0.^3 m 
37,008 76 
92,277 72 



S345Jt7 44 



133,550 m 

7,3&9 87 

12.994 93 

*V9,G95 44 

48,418 53 

12,14+3 B3 

74.783 50 

27.110 77 

173.001 59 

2,353 37 

117,808 40 

80,71S 24 

831 44 



1716,444 63 
60.489 53 



11.122,851 00 



11,122,851 CO 



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378 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 
TABLE IX— Continued. MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT 



• 


Schedule Effective. 


Departments. 


Sales 
year ended 
June 30. 1920 


Number of 
Employes 


Total 
Salaries. 


Percentage 
Based on 

Sales 

year efnded 

June 30. 1920 


Ohio State Reformatory— 

Clothing „ ^.. 

Furniture 


$154,577 35 
62,053 61 
37.008 76 
92.277 72 


4 
11 
5 
3 
2 


$7,140 00 
18.780 00 
9.060 00 
5.700 00 
3.120 00 


5 
30 


Printing _. „ 

Shoes. 

Office ^ ^ 


24 
6 
1 








TotaL ...^ „ 

Ohio PEMrrBNtiARY— 

Tin.."Z!!I!"!!!!]!!"!"I!!!"!ZI!ZZ!!I!m 

Machine shop 


$345,917 44 

$88.550 66 

7.359 87 

12.994 93 

69.695 44 

48.418 53 

12.146 83 

74.788 6C 

27.116 77 

173.601 50 

2.353 37 

117.868 46 

80.718 24 

831 44 


25 

1 
1 
1 

1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 

2 


$43.800 00 

$2.100 00 
750 00 
2.100 00 
1.800 00 
6.760 00 
1.200 00 
2.100 00 
3.600 00 
8.100 00 
1.020 00 
2.100 00 
2.100 00 

lisOO 00 


13 

2 
10 
16 


Knitting mill. „ 

Power plant 

Stone quarry 


3 
12 
10 


State shop 


3 


Planing milL_. _ 


13 


Woolen mill 


.«» 


Printing shop « „ 

Cotton mill 


43 
2 


Auto tag. 

Road sign.- 


3 


Office.- _ 


_ 


TotaL - 

Ohio State Brick Plant 


$716,444 63 
$60,489 53 


22 

4 
2 


$34,530 00 

$7,140 00 
2.229 03 


5 
12 


Ohio Board of Administration (Mfg. office) 




Grand total 


$1,122,851 60 


53 


i $87,699 031 8 



TABLE IX— Continued. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT— MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT 
RESOURCES. 





August 15. 
1911. 


June 30, 
1920. 


Ohio State Reformatory- 

• Equipment.- . 


$78,845 14 

2.227 60 

188.091 94 


$123,281 08 


Appropriations and balances. - . — - . - 


243.253 08 


Materials and finished products.-^ 

Accounts receivable 




101.587 41 
40,097 01 




> 




Total resources 

Ohio Penitentiary— 

Equipment.- „ 


$111,697 27 

$75,845 85 

2.227 50 

188.091 94 


$508,218 68 
$249,867 82 


Materials and finished products 




333.039 89 


Appropriations and balances 


80.138 06 


Accounts receivable -- - 


21.723 64 








Total resources .... 


$266,165 29 


$684,769 31 


Ohio State Brick Plant — 

Equipment— . „ 


$136,650 13 


Lano^ 


5.626 50 


Brick.... 




34.306 86 


Supplies . . 




3.907 14 


Balance state treasury 




80 46 


Accoimts receivable..„ 






28.826 35 


Total resources 




$209,397 43 


Ohio Bo.\rd of Administration (Mfg. office) 




$826 07 


Total resources (Reformatory. Penitentiary, 
Less accounts payable . 


Brick plant and Board).... 


377,862 56 


1.403.211 39 
61.216 64 










Net resources 


$377,862 66 
974.132 29 


$1,361,994 86 


Increased resources (9 years equals 27 per ce 


tit per year) 




TotaL 


$1,351,994 86 


$1,351,994 85 



Digitized by ^OOQ IC 



OHIO BOARD OP ADMINISTRATION. 379 

TABLE IX— Concluded. CENTRAL WAREHOUSE. 

SuppUBS— Dr. Cr.' 

June 30, 1919 — Inventory^ $62,376 63 

June 30, 1920— Purchases, July 1, 1919. to June 30, 1920..^ „ 666,478 17 

Sales July 1. 1919, to June 30, 1920 _ $535,363 82 

Inventory June 30, 1920 „.... 100.862 11 

Profit „ 17,371 13 



COFFEB— 



Gbkbral PtAKT Equipment— 



$636,225 93 $636,225 93 



June 30. 1919— Inventory.__ $16,731 61 

June 30, 1920— Purchases. July 1, 1919. to June 30. 1920 75,297 13 

Sales. July 1. 1919. to June 30, 1920 $87,809 22 

Inventory June 30. 1920- 18,774 79 

Profit. _ _ „. 14,555 37 



$106,684 01 $106,684 01 



June 30. 1919— Inventory.. $1,161 88 

Purchases, July 1, 1919. to June 30. 1920 .... 27 30 

Inventory June 30. 1920 $891 80 

Loss. — „ _ „ 297 29 



^ „ $1,189 18 $1,189 18 

Office Equipment — 

June 30, 1919— Inventory..^ ^_. . $11148 

Inventory, June 30, 1920. $83 61 

Loss. ^ 27 87 

$111 48 $111 48 

PROFIT AND LOSS, 
e ,. Dr. Cr. 

Supplies „ $17,371 13 

Coffee..... 14,555 37 

Salary and wages $3,739 98 

Discount — „ ^ • j^....;.;.;;... .;;;. 6,o88 oo 

Exijense ^ 1,481 55 

Freight..... ^ 139 92 

Umce equipment- _ _ 27 87 

General plant equipment.__ "."*] 297 29 

Net profit credit capital stock ' *" . 32.327 79 



$38,014 60 $38,014 60 

TRIAL BALANCE. 
After closing books. June 30, 1920 

Capital stock.^ $162,300 33 

Accounts payable 74 24 

SuppHcs '^Z^ZZZZZZZZZ^ZZZZ $100,862 11 

Coffee . _ 18.774 79 

General plant equipment .... 891 89 

Office equipment 83 61 

Accounts receivable ' . . 25,882 63 

Balance in state treasury. „ 15,879 64 



$162,374 57 $162,374 57 



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380 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTIOS. 



TABLE X— ACREAGE OP STATE INSTITUTIONS 
Year Ended June 30. 1920 



las titut ions 


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Ibtal 


1SK£' 


Ghin Bnarrl of Arlniinistratian 


1.002.46 
I01J7 
30445 




1.002.46 
136.87 
304.15 
76fl.e8 
574.21 

isa.oo 

l.a44.00 
792.05 
664.15 

l,SS6,|ia 

nm 

10.00 

35iiJ00 

9850 

15.00 

14230.00 

180.00 

54.28 

1428.20 

257.80 

1.773.24 




Athcn* State Hpspital _. ._ „ .,, 

Cleveland Stale Htjspitai^ _ *.,„ ^ ^„ * 


35.50 


691.54 
46.50 


CotiHT3bi.is State lio^pital ... ,_- «, 


100.00 


Dayton States HnRpitftl . .... .., , . ... , .^ . . .,. 




549.00 




574^1 

850.00 

530.42 

664 J C 

1380 86 

ILOO 

10 00 

355.00 

B8.50 

15.00, 

1,230.00 

imm 

MM 

810.86 

267.80 

L773.24 

35.51 


•188.00 
484.00 
262.53 


4Mm 
62JDO 


MassiliLin Stj5ite HftspitaL ,........, 


1430.00 


Tnlcrln StMt*- Hril5Xiit»l , _ __ 


596.^ 


Ohio Urispital for Ei-iltptics-.^ .. .... 


288^ 
1*255410 


State Schirfil mr the filmH. , ' 






Sblte SthopI Tot l>ii. Opaf., . ,. 






Ohio StatQ Saafttoriunj....,,.,...-^..,..^^^ „,„.. 




IGOJOO 


Madison Hfjme ..,-.. . ^ ^.., 




lom 


Bcjvi' Industrial: SthooL.. ., ..., , 1 




worn 


Girk' TndiistTiAl Schnr*l, , , ,, ^,,_., ,, ^ , ,. i 




mm 


Ohio Penitentmr^'. , , ........ 




Ohio State Refnrmfitnfy . 


317.40 


1,027.73 


Ohio RcfDrmatrirv f^r tFriTnc-n., . r,,i,..j,. r-,- ^-^ -x - ni .it-t- 


217jO0 


New Prj^cni Furm.^..., ,„„„,.„.„ „ _*. 




885 J&O 


Bureau dE Juvenile Research .,. ...... 






Ohio StBte Br ck Pl&ut „ . „ „.. . ,. ^ .. 




35u61 










TcjtflL^^......„.„._. ,_„„ ... . .„ „ .. 


11.,'iSO.Tfi 


1^S7.43 


12.808 JE2! 


S43244 







♦Owned by Hamilton county. 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 



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382 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 



o83 



TABLE XI— Concluded RECAPITULATION AND COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FARM AND 
GARDEN PRODUCTION EXPENSE. PROFIT AND LOSS. YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1919 
AND 1920. 



1910 



1U20 



Increase , 



Decnasc 



Production-^ 

Fruit... ... 



Pora^. 

Poultry and *gg5..._ 

STaughlered products,, „,„..^ 
Milk and butter^ 



Natural incnmae. live «todc* etc.-. . 



»18.762 72 
2^*5.208 OS 
J 67.000 50 

20,118 08 
160J20 61 
337.454 Sa 

m.!^2 78 



17, I'll! IS 

3;iJJl>7 2S 
M:27i 41 



Totnt. 



Expenijea^- 

La t«>r.. „„„,,_ 



Rent of )aiid.„.*,„^._„, 
Tissting hti6&, etc.^....,„ 
Poiaee 



Af ricuhural and botanical ^uppli&g^,^ J. 

Live stock ..„...._„,^, 

Five per cmt on in v^tment. ._...„..„„„ 

Butter fat „.....„.....„...^......._..^„..^^.| 

Boa^rd of Administration. Agricutttiral 
Department saUirJeiw.. .„„.....,..,.._ ... I 



*1,C 16,706 74 



874.034 27 
e.561 t»S 
3,667 87 

38.229 6g 
2S.075 27 
26,066 80 
2:£Mo 27 

5.900 00 



Total,...- 



*I.S1I3 07 

8.'i07 71 

61,3^2 GO 



tl,ilj.l67 46 



a4,132 21 



$2Jim 00 

""3;257"60 
i|,2^ 37 



$9S.460 72 



$m,:i^7 44 

n7tn 98 

3.2/jri H7 

■loi.mia is^ 

Jf).7,'j^J la^ 

:t;i249 2vS 

l.*l,:-f2'* till.. 

6,770 00 



114,42:$ 17 
23a 03; 

53;287"6I 
2.52lt 45 
5.174 01 



407 80 



1-740 m» 
1.G27 m 



870 00 



Net profit......^.,...*. 



|*>50,016 48 $fi,Hj Jf^7 42] $T:iAm !M 



... .._( 1457.600 26 



$ ihli.rw U 1 1 «2G.(M)U 7a 



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386 OHIO QENEEAL STATISTICS. 

TABLE III— MOVEMENT OF POPULATION POR YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1©50. 







The Ohio Hospital 
for Epileptics 


The Institwtion fisr 
FeebJe-Mitidsd 




Men Women Tatal 


M» 


Women 1 


TetAl 


HfmrtAinina J^nft 3f>, IQIO 


1 
2 

a 

# 

G 


7 
S 
9 

10 
11 
13 
13 
H 

IS 

Id 

!7 

in 

19 
20 

21 ; 

22 

2a 

24 
2& 
2A 
2T 
2S 
20 
30 
' 31 
32 
33 

35 

36 
37 
38 

30 

40 
41 
43 

4S 

44 

45 

46 
47 


77fll 723 


72 


MS2 
34S 


ijei 

214 


2.373 


Dii tetnpofjify leave. . ....^„„^„. .^„^„.. .^„„^™.,.. 

Oa parole ,„*...„,,, „^i_^,„„.,*..™4. *.„,*. , 


43 


20 


5fi2 


On prtibiitioh ...,_.. , 


„„,«__ 












Total on Tolh JuTie 30. Ifl 19 ,.„__.„„,„, ......... 

AdmiAsions during yeai^ 


S10 

lea 


752 
103 


1,571 
268 


1.53Q 

lai 
u 


I.4D5 

123 
1 


2.039 
25i 


Kf^ftrlmiiULltlTt . ..,,.'! 4. 


12 


Tra.tisf*<r«t 




TllT^l'i' vinlatdins rptilTTi^ , ,. , , , 








r.^f tii^i-ft rtrt pml-nitif>ni 




— 


. 


Probation violfttfjrt 




Rcfitorpd to piarole or probati<m while at l&ii^ *.... 










R!a*^p*>s i*pti.i Fnj=fi ^ 


— — 






Returned from A^ W. L 






















Tot»il AtlTniRiiimiB , . ., . ,,, 


165 
@S4 

40 


loa 

S55 

1 
20 


268 
1.530 

I 

5a 


; 142 

1.672 


1.529 


266 


Entire numbef under car?.,.. ,. ^„„„,«„..,,. 

Removed — 


3.201 


Im^rovtd.... ., , ,,„,. 

Unimproved.. .„...„.^.„„^„^...,.„.„„.,^.^.,.„...„„„ ,^. 








!-— 






Not ^ EpiJgptic...-..^..^ , . ,, . .^^^. 










^^ ,_ 

37 
9 




Arre^tefl . ....... ......... . 




,..„-.., — 




Appa ren t ly ftrrcsted_ .™ ^.^ ^..., ,,„., — ^ .^^.^^ 

iBwd .„„„...„,.„... .» 






Bl 


"™"Si 


'"""Tis 


m 

8 




07 


Discharged, drtjpped, etc^„..„,..J. .».„,„.„.,...I^..«..^^ 
Pinal reli^a^se-.... *^.. ...^ .*j ..*. *,, 





IT 






rrniditimn^l rp.lHB,fin,. , „,.....-,. -,. ,- 




_, 


Parokd 






Restored to probation. ,. .^ .... .._ .. ... .... .. . 


;= 






fiisti.tii+if'knfif p^irriilfl vini^;{itftf* 






Pardont'd 


— 




Escaped ...._,..„.. ,.., „ ^„., 

1-LtT-iipAi; Crjrpiiis ^ 










Absent with leAVie«„„.,„...,»..^.. ....:,..„, ..^,„.,.,.„»....»,. .,» ... 








Legn] e-Xecuti on „«.„, .*,,. ►*.„ ,*.,..., „.„„.„.,.i.„. .„.„ . 


.**„,^„-.*, 


^*,,-,.*..-., 


— 




Tqtal removed ,,„,.^..„^.„^.-.,, ...„....., ., 

On records Junr 30, J920.... .^....^.. .-^....^. .^, . 

On temporja.r>' leave.,_.^ .„ -,—,,.„,. „..„ .,..„......,. 

On parok .. .... ......... -..,...„^...„„,».._«„,... .«,..^. .«^_««.«*.., 

On probation,*,* _....*.—**.. .^...... l.. ...*.... . ^ 


703 
23 


73 

782 
15 


Sft4 

1,675 
41 


ss 

429 


4G 
273 


S4 

i flJl7 
7te 










Averngc daily resident _^ .-..,^..^ -,,,^..^-^..... 

Per cent recoveries bn&ptl on mlmisiiona ..,..*. »♦.- _^-. 

Per cetit dcsthi bast-d on eTitim nqtnbcr 


7*^7 
771 

12% 


767 

7fil 

37% 
3.9% 


L534 
1,G22 


1,205 
1.217 


1.210 
1.236 

2.9% 


2.4 Ifl 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 387 

TABLE ni— MOVEMENT OP POPULATION FOR YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1020. 



The State School 
for the Deaf 


The State School 
for the Blind • 


The Ohio State 
Sanatorium 


The 

Madison 

Home 


The Ohio 

Soldiers' 

and Sailors* 

Home 




Boya 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Men 


Women 


Totol 


Women 


Men 






106 


436 


103 


92 


195 


87 
3 


70 166 


27 
6 


85 
240 


1 


240 


4 


7 


2 
8 






4 














2*0 
30 


106 
28 


436 
67 


103 

33 
22 


92 

33 
8 


195 

66 
30 


00 
207 


83 
258 


173 
555 


83 
11 


1.003 

141 
143 


5 

6 

7 







8 

















10 













11 




• 







12 








13 














14 












30 
270 


28 
224 


67 
503 


55 
158 


41 
133 

"i" 

14 


96 
291 


207 
387 

00 
05 

7 

1 

48 

51 


258 
341 

75 
00 

2 

4 
25 
44 

1 


555 
728 


11 
4i 


284 
1.377 


15 
16 

17 










165 
104 



5 

73 

05 

1 




18 






10 




4 
25 


20 








21 







3 
23 


4 

■"* 37 




22 




167 


23 


4 


8 


2 

1 
2 


24 
25 
26 

27 


17 


236 


28 
20 








30 







31 




"ZZ'.Zl 


32 






33 






34 




— 


= 


::=: 






35 
36 









37 







— ~- 


38 






21 

258 
• 258 


8 

216 
216 


29 

474 
474 


28 

132 
♦ 131 


15 

118 
118 


41 

250 
240 


292 

06 
5 


250 

01 

1 


542 

186 
6 


5 

30 
5 


403 

074 
244 


30 

40 
41 
42 









43 




210 




1 
107 




1 
204 

"*T3% 


00 
01 


00 
80 


180 
180 

t.31% 

.14% 


34 
35 

•4:5% 


730 

861 


44 


269 


495 


97 


45 
46 


1.3% 




.8% 


12% 


47 











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r 



388 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

TABLE ni— MOVEMENT OP POPULATION FOR YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1920. 







The Boys' 

Industrial 

School 


The Girls- 
Industrial 
School 


The Ohio 
Penitenti- 
ary 


The Ohio 
State 

R^orma- 
tory 




Boys 


G:rb 


Women 


Men 


Eemain'nfi; June 30^ 1919 „. 


1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
1 13 
14 1 

15 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20 
.21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
2S 
21 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 

39 

40 
41 
42 
43 

44 

45 

40 
47 


1.248 

lOi 

1.237 


472 

630 


2.039 

672 

261 


1.546 


On tempnrary'fleave,,-^, „ 




Oil par!:]]e .♦ - , .. 


2,011 


On probation .... .. ......... ..,„^ 


&50 








Total on rolU Jutie 30, 1919 


2.588 

834 
119 

226 


1,102 
315 


2.972 

785 


4.407 


Admisfiion^ duririB yfcar — 

Fir^ admi5sio».».^,^»,..,.,^,.. 


1.049 


Transfers ,. .._„..^ 

Pamlff vioUtors Ttttifritd „ 

Ccrlifietl on [ifobatioiL^ 

Prribfttion viulattiTS ^ . . .■ 


167 


27 

58 

155 

10 

2 

2 


19 

78 

357 

S3 


RejstOTed to parole or probation while at large .. 

Escapes returned , „ 

Returned from A- W. L-. I 




76 
3,1 




15 


1 








Tot»ladmissions^-, ....,-. -■ 


(i) 1.236 
(r) 953 

(r) 3.541 


(i) 4S2 
(r) 315 

(r) 1.417 


(i) 882 
(r) 988 

(r) 3.960 


(i) 1,183 
(r) 1.425 


Ent re number under care 


(r) 5.832 


Remcjved — 




|cn|jrOv*d ,.,.".•—." ^^ 

Utiimproved , ..^ 

f In *^iiu. „,„.,„, ... _..,-•". 




:":::::::::::::::::::: 









Kot iBiuV-ptk... ... . 

1 TubetrtiloiiS . .. . 




Arr^^t-d .. 

Appart'iUly aTrirsled 





Oi'i -Scent.. .,.,. -,.,,„, ,,- 








Dijd . ... ,., _., 


8 

1 

83 
1.027 


'' 


43 

46 

243 

437 

84 

663 

11 

48 
38 

4 
7 

6 


24 


Tranj^f^rroil .... 


34 


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OinfUttfjrial r..! 'ase 






398 


1.464 


Pan-l d 

R^atonsito prjbati'ii* 

f n' ; L i t '4.t 1" 1 nal pa ti jIc vi'5 1 1 t<3ts. 


1.208 


474 


980 

8 


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143 

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4 
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58 


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Total removed 

On records June 30, 1&2(^.....,._., 

On tempoimry leaiTip^ ,, . . 


(i) 1.403 
(r) 1,119 

2.422 

148 

1.143 


(i) 490 
(r) 414 

1.003 

--5S 


(i) 985 
(r) 860 

3.100 

875 
289 


<i) 1.138 
<r) 1.539 

4.293 


On parole .^,...„ ,. „„..„..... 


1.845 


0*1 pTtahfitiori .-mv. n 


847 










Remaidne June 30, 1920 ,..„ 

Average daily resident....^ 

Per d*int recovcHes based on admissions 


1.131 
1.195 


464 
464 


1.936 
1.694 


1.601 
1.634 


Per cctil deaths based on entire number 


.2% 


.8% 


.1% 


A% 







(t) Rolls, 

(i) InititutFon. 



♦At hemes for summer vacation. 

fArrestcd, apparently arrested and quiescent based on discbarges. 



Digitized by 



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OHIO BOAHD of ADMINISTRATION. 389 

TABLE III— MOVEMENT OP POPULATION FOR YEAH ENDED JUNE m, 1020- 



The Ohio 

ReformatoTy 

for 

Women, 


The BurcBU of 
Juvenile Research 


Tlie New 
Prifioa 
Farm 


The Ohio 

State 

Brick Plant 


RecapkuktsoQ 

Twenty- three State 

Institutions 




Women 


Boys 


Girl* Total 


ilen 


Men 


Men 


Women 


, Totnl 




17S 


13 


3 


10 






14,200 

3,020 
1.111 


B,437 

722 

792 

44 


22,607 
2.071 
4.712 

. 1.155 


1 


7 




2 


162 




3 


44 




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13 

101 
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57 



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20.040 

5,274 

G47 

S4 

371 

512 

32 

2 

05 

31 


0.9»5 

2.261 

321 

20 

lfi« 

23 

3 


30,635 

7.535 

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Ift4 

630 

535 

35 

2 

102 

31 


5 
6 




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11 




2 




12 


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13 




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14 












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120 
133 


04 
67 


200 


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355 
740 
270 

1 

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1 

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51 

1,173 

184 

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84 

2.877 

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45 


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212 

1 

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34 

507 

643 


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3.435 

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(i) 6,570 
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1.575 

1 3.303 

1,135 


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7B2 
41 


0.155 
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2,450 
4,645 
1,177 




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177 
23 




30 


440 






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20 






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44 


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21S 


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390 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



TABLE IV— NATIVITY OF FIRST ADMISSIONS TO ALL STATE HOSPITALS 
• FOR THE INSANE FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1920. 

Male Female ToUl 

United States.. 1,248 962 2,210 

Africa 

'"''Asia 

Australia'III^IIIII"II"I'I"IIII'I"I"III'IIIIIIIIIIIIII "41 28 69 

Austria 33 10 43 

Belgium 4 4 

Bohemia 10 8 18 

tCanada 17 7 24 

Central America _ 

Uiuii.*.. 2 —. 2 

Cuba.. 1 .... 1 

Denmark 112 

England 13 14 27 

•Europe. 10 1 U 

Finland. 6 3 8 

France 7 2 9 

Germany 64 31 95 

Greece 13 13 

Hawaii 

Holland 

Hungary 57 27 84 

India 

Ireland 23 27 50 

Italy 34 16 50 

Japan 

Mexico 1 1 

Norway 

Philippine Islands 

Poland 23 17 40 

Porto Rico 1 1 

Portugal - 

Roumania 13 3 16 

Russia 40 19 59 

Scotland 5 1 6 

South America 

Spain 1 1 

Sweden 6 2 8 

Switzerland 5 3 8 

Turkey in Asia 

Turkey in Europe 3 14 

Wales... 2 .... 2 

JWest Indies 

Other countries 4 4 

Unascertained * 14 11 25 

Total 1 1,699 ' 1,196 2,895 

*Not otherwise specified, 
fin eludes Newfoundland. 
JExcept Cuba and Porto Rico. 



Digitized by 



Google 



OHIO BOABD OP ADMINISTRATION. 



391 



TABLE V-CITIZENSHIP OF FIRST ADMISSIONS TO ALL STATE 
HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 
30, 1920. 

Male Female Total 

Citkene by birth.., , .- ,.„„, — 1,245 9B2 2,207 

Citizens by naturalization ^^_. ,.*,_. .__ 104 40 144 

Aliena_..:... „ ,. —....,.... 24p 135 m^ 

Citiienship unascertained- , .,^***, _. l(fe 59 161 

Totals-,,.,,- — . — ..--— -__,__._-„.- I,e99 1,196 2.895 



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392 



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INSTITUTION REPORTS 



Athens State Hospital. 

Cleveland State Hospital. 

Columbus State Hospital. 

Dayton State Hospital. 

Lima State Hospital. 

Longview Hospital. 

Massillon State Hospital. 

Toledo State Hospital. 

Ohio Hospital for Epileptics. 

Institution for Feeble-Minded. 

State School for the Blind. 

State School for the Deaf. 

Ohio State Sanatorium. 

Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home. 

Madison Home. 

Boys' Industrial School. 

Girl's Industrial School. 

Ohio Penitentiary. 

Ohio State Reformatory. 

Ohio Reformatory for Women. 



(399) 



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The Athens State Hospital 

TABLE 1. GENERAL INFORMATION. 
Year Ended June 30. 1920. 



Date of opening as an tnst;itution'for the^insane 



Type of institution, 
Hospital 



>spital plant: 
value of hospital property: 

Real est ite including buildings- 
Personal property 

Total 



1874. 

State. 



. $1,346,373 10 
319.604 84 



Total acreage of hospital property (Includes grounds, farm and garden sites 

occux>ied by building^) , 

Acreage under cultivation during previous year. 



$1,666,067 94 



1.002.46 
400 



Medical service: 

Superintendents. 



Assistant physicians ... 

Medical internes 

Clinical assistants 

Total physicians.- 



I Men. 

1 
3 



Women. 



Total. 



Bmplo yes on pay roll (No^ including physicians) : 
Graduate nurses.. 



Other nurses and attendstfxts... 
All other employes 

Total employes. 



Men. \ Women. 



15 
31 
40 



Total. 

15 
60 

84 



Patients employed in industrial classes or in general hospital work on | 

date of report.. „ ' 

Patients in institution on date of report (excluding paroles) 



73 



2261 
640] 



86 



206 
640 



159 



432 
1.280 



TABLE 3. MOVEMENT OF INSANE PATIENT POPULATION 

For Year Ended June 30, 1920. 

Includes all patients admitted as insane who are on books of institution regardless of the method d ad- 
mission, whether volimtary, committed, emergency, temporary care, for observation or otherwise; 
but does not include those who are only dispensary or out-patient cases. 





Males. 


Females. 


TotaU 


1. Insane patients on books of institution at beg'nning of institution year 


674 


656 


1,330 


Admissions during year: 

a — First admissions ^.. 

b — Readmissions „ 


117 
14 


94 

27 


211 
41 


Total admissions , .,... 

c — Transfers from othtr/.nstitutions for the insane. 


131 


121 
1 


252 

1 


2. Total rfc^ived during y**nr. . .,, .^ , ......,, 


131 


122 


253 


3. Total under treatment during year 


£05 


778 


1.683 


Discharged from books during vear: 

a — As recovered-- - - 


45 

36 

3 

3 

75 


34 
27 
4 

71 


79 


b — As improved „ 

c — As unimproved ... 


62 
7 


d — As not insane „. 

e — Transferred to other institutions for the insane „ 


3 


f — Died during year 


146 






4. Total discharged and died during vear . — .„ „. 


161 


136 


297 


5. Insane patients remaining on books of institution at end of institution 
year 


644 


642 


1.286 



(400) 



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OHIO BOARD OP ADMINISTRATION. 

SUPPLEMENTARY DATA, 



401 



ft. 

10. 

11. 

12. 

14. 

15. 
16. 



Avetage daily number oi maaae paticnU actu&Uy in institution dunng 

Avtragic daily number iof otiicT msane paticntis on booVs. but away 
iiQm institution on parole, on visit, bctarded out, e£ca.ped, or oji 

temporary leave. .., _ . ,.., ^^^..^ ._ 

InBanc voluntary patients admitted during year....... , . — .„ 

Patients or inmates iix institution at end oi mstitution )(ear, tiot i 
eluded m the number of infane patienta given in item S^ 

Dfug caee^ . „„,...... .„.„.. ... „„ .„ -« 

Inebriates.,..,.. ...„..,^ „._„„.,„„„.... .,..,...,.,., , , „....*^„... 

Neurological cases. .....^.........._.^: ,., ...^.. .,.,....^., . 

Epileptics (not feeble^ininded)., „...,.. .,, ..,, , ^„t- 

Feeble- minded Cii^es (not cpUeptie9)v*«««,-i.«,«^*-*,.„*««*^»««-~*,^ ^ 

Feeble-minded epileptics .■^...^. ■■„......- — ^ ...^...,. *., 



All oih er cases ,._ „„™.„„„ _, „„ ... . ,„.„__., , „, , ., . 

Per&ons given ad vies or treatment in out-patient department during 



Male«- 
GJ7 



FemakSp 



Total. 

1.282 



81 

8 



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The Cleveland State Hospital 



TABLE 1. GENERAL INFORMATION. 
Year Ended June 30, 1920. 



Date of 9pening as an institution for the insane^ 
Type of institution -«„...^« 



ospital plant 



.March 5. 1855 
State 



ipitL r 

value of hospital property 

Real estate including buildings.. 
Personal property . 



$1,439,342 40 
' 224,726 79 



TotaU 



Total acreage of hospital property 
Owned 



Leased.. 



, $1.6«4.068 19 

101^ 
22.50 



(Includes grounds farm and garden and sites occupied by buildings.) 
Acreage under cultivation during previous year. 


40 


4. Medical service ] 
Sup<«rinteFdentf ..x. r .„-„..„r. 


Men. 

1 
2 

1 


Women. 

1 


Total' 
1 


At«ifit4.Tit ph]r8ici»n9..„ _ , ^.... ., , 


3 


Medical inteTt)e«-„.„...„ ._,... .^ ^ ............ 


1 












Total physicians »_u...... - ... , 


4 


1 


5 






5 Employes on pay roll (Not including physicians) 

Cwn^nhU^ «iuTS«i . „ T--.. - -....,--. ^ -„.... ..-xtt 


Men. 

-J 

80 


Women. 

"J 

23 


TotaL 
31 




60 




59 






Total employ^f ,.,... _ , .., 


80 
438 


79 

860 
828 


159 


6. Patients employed" in 'industrial classes or in general hospital work on 
date of report^ ,.„ ^ ,_ , .... 


788 


7. Patients in institution on date of report (excluding paroles) 


909 


1.735 



TABLE 3. MOVEMENT OP INSANE PATIENT POPULATION 
For Year Ended June 30, 1920. 

Includes all patients admitted as insane who are on books of institution regardless of the method of 
admissioQ. whether voluntary, committed, emergency, temporary care, for observation or other- 
wise but does not include those who are only dispensary or out-patient cases. 



Males. 
1. Insane patients on books of institution at beginning of institution year) 1,013 



Admissions during year 
a — First admissions... 



b— Readmissions^ 



294 
84 



Total admissions.. 



c— Transfers from other institutions for the insane.. 

2. Total received during year. 

3. Total under treatment during year 



Discharged from books during year 
a — As recovered. „. 



b— As improved 

c — ^As unimproved— .............. 

d — As not insane ._ 

e — ^Transferred to other institutions for the insane^ 
f— Died during year — -- 



378 



378 
1.391 



54 
147 

29 
1 

10 
158 



Females. 



189 
79 



Total. 



208 



1.151 



97 

27 

1 

6 

97 



4. Total discharged and died during year | 406] 200 

5. Insane patients remaining on books of institution at end of institution I I 

year ( 980 1 885 



103 



040 



046 
2.542 



92 
244 

50 
2 

22 
255 



071 



1371 



(402) 



Digitized by 



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k-. 



OHIO BOABD OF ADMINISTRATION. 
SUPPLEMENTARY DATA. 



407 



7. 



9, 
10. 
11. 
13. 
13. 
14. 
15, 
16. 



AveragQ daily number of insaiui patienta actuaHy in instittiticm during 

ye»r„„„, _ „.._,„_.„.. „, , „_,_„_,„„„„„ — . 

Avermge daily number of other insane patients on books, but away 
irvm insthution on parole, on visit, boanicd out, escaped, or on 

te mporary leave ,*,..„.„ .„„,„.. „„™, ,„.„ , ^,_.__„ 

Insane voluntary patients admitted durinji yeftr^„^........^,..,„....«...,^ 

Patients or mnnates in institution at end of institutioii year, not in- 
cluded m the numbm- ofixwane patients givea in item 5: 

D rug cases .^^ ^^.^..„^...^ ^..... ,............„..^, ....^..^..^ 

I nebriatcs., „ .,,., ^ „„, _ „. .„_ .„.„ „„.„,.„„_,* . 

Neurol«)e^<^l cases., ,.._„,_._^.„„„„^^„« . ...^.,^„^,„..^,>^^ „. 

Epilep t i es f not ^ceblfr-m inded) .... ^ „„..^..„.™.,_^ ^.-^-^ - ..™— 

Feebfe-m Ended leases (not epileptics) . ._.„_.__™.**..^„,..„..„ 

Feiible-mtmled epileptics^, ^- -^^^^ „ „ ^.,_h,.^«.,«,,**,*.^.,^ 

AIJ other c 



Persona given advice or treatment in out-patient d^saitment during 

year , . ■ , . . ^.^.-^..-^^^„^. ,^.„„..^.„. — ■..^^.^-^.,., 



Male*, 


FemAlea, 


Tot*L 


620 


580 


1.210 


4: 


77 

1 


163 


^^^ 


— — — 


_ 



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The Massillon State Hospital 

TABLE 1. GENERAL INFORMATION. 
Year Ended June 30. 1920. 



Date of opening as an inst'tution for the insane.. 

Type of inst'tution 

Hospital plant: 

Value of hosp'tal property: 

Real estate in^'luding buildings 

Personal property^ 



Total.. 



Total acreage of hospital pToperiy: 

Owned. 

Leased.. 



(Includes grounds, farm and garden and sites occupied by build'ngs.) 
Acreage under ctUtivation during previous year: 

Leased _ ~ 



Sept. 6. 1898 
SUte 



♦1.320.774 40 
295.016 76 

$1,615,791 25 



850 
484 



560 
315 



4. Medical service: 

Superintendents... „ 


Men. 

1 
3 


Women. 
1 


Total 


Assistant physicians^ „ 

Medical internes.. „ „ — 

Clinical assistants — 


4 


Total physicians. — 


4 


1 


5 


5. Employes on pay roll (Not including- physicians) : 

Graduate nurses .. . 


Men. 

6 
35 
36 


Women. 

20 
48 
15 


Total. 
26 


Other nurses and attendants 

All other employes „ — 


83 
61 


Total employes ....„ „ 

9. Patients employed in industrial classes or in general hospital work on 
date of report. . ... ... 


77 

634 
1.027 


83 

494 
835 


160 
1.128 


7. Patients in institution on date of report (excluding paroles).- 


1.862 



(412) 



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The Toledo State Hospital 

TABLE 1, GENERAL INFORMATION. 
Year End*d June 30. 1920. 



1. D^tc of o:J mitig aa iti Ij^atttutum f(yr the kiaane . 

a. Type of iTiitUiution ..^... ........ 

3. Hu^pitDl plant:; 

Value of hctspitcil property: 

Real cstitsi induding brntdtogs.. 
P^rso lal p roperty „ ,„„ 



Toul.. 



Ttital acTCAgi: of hQ3pital^pTqtpcrty„.^„„._._..-._., — ^_. ..^„„„^^^,.^„.„.^„„ 

LcAsed .„ ._ ^...-^ 

( Includes groufida. fami and g^ardcn and tites occupied by buUdinji^) 

Acreage under cultivation during previous year,. „„.,.,., ,- — .„„,„„.„..,„., 

(Including lesned limd), ■„„^^..,^....^^„.^..„ __..^,.^^...._^^^^ 



Jan. 12. IS88 
State 



, 11,524, ir>3 07 

. 11.815,030 in 
£30.42 

412,67 
537.50 



Medical service:: 

SujiCTintcTiden ta .. 



Men. 



I 



Women, j Total 



Arista nt physicians.. 
Mcdicnl iriftemes..,.,,,. 
Clinic{L| as^istanta.^^^ 



Total ph3rsiciBfiSL^*. 



1|.... 



e. 



B, Hmployvs on pay toU (Not mclndine pHysiciaiu) : 

Gnkdu al* nurses. _^ .........^„,. 

Other numes and attendants.. ..._..... .... ,. 

AH other ranployet. ,.,„„„„._„_..^__„„ 



Men* j WomcTi. 



Total employes ..,-...,., _..„.._, ., _.....„„...„... J 

Patients tmpluyed in industrial classes Of in eenefa) hos|iiial work on J 

date of report ... [ 

7. Patietita in institution on date of report (excluding paroles)..,,,...,....*.™,,) 



4^1 
61 



10i[ 



5^1 

©25 



U 

105 

421 
0«7 



Total. 



II 
103 
07 



211 



0^7 
iJ12 



TABLE 3. MOVEMENT OF INSANE ^PATIENT POPULATION 

For Year Ended June 30. 1&20. 

Include all patients admitted aa insane who ate on books of institution reganjlesfi of tbe method of ad- 
misaion. whether voluntary, tommitted, etnwgoney, temporary care, for observation or otherwise; 
but does niot include those who are only dispenury or oat-patient cas«. 



1. Insane p&tienta on hooka of institution at begmimig of Isutitution yeof 
Admissions durm^ year: 

a^Pirat ndmi5sionS.,»„„„..,..,.™,.„„.„.,..,^...„ ,.,. „_„™.,..„ . — ,.„. 


Maks. 
Dfi5 
3.2 


Ftniale^. I 

1,000 

200 
55 


Total. 

1,005 

46S 
120 






Total admissions ,..„,.,., ,„,., ,...„„ „„. ,„,.*. „ 


A2^ 


261 


594 
1 






3. To t pi rnri^ivcff during y^jif ^ , , , 


l,2ft9 


2fll 
1,261 

80 

15' 

''" 05 


5^5 


3, T"tjil ntiflifr tnefttment dii ring year , , ., .„ . 


2,560 


Disch&Tged from books during year; 


13D 


b — AfS improvecL. ., . ^ .^, ....,^. ,,... . ,,^ ^, TT-rr, -,- -t-t t- 


173 




60 


d—Aa not insane. _„ ..... ,. , , - , .. 








f*— Died during year „„,„„.„,,.„.„..„„.„ „„..„„....**_,„...., ... 


1234 


4* Total discharged and died duffng ycar„„.,. .,_„ 

5. Insane patients remaining on books of institution at end of institution 
TC*.f . ^ _„, , , ,, 


I 


eofl 

1.954 






(413) 


Digitizec 


jbyVjC 


)OQle 



414 



OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 
SUPPLEMENTARY DATA. 



6, Avga*agc daily number of insane patients uttqatly in institution during 
y cfi r_ . _ 

7» Average daily imimbsr ot other insane paticTAi on book?, but away 
from institutiDn cm parolfl,)oii visit, boarded out, escaped, or on 
tcmpon e f lea ve._^ „. ,.._„,.. , ,, ..^^,^.... 

8. Insane voluntary ^pflti^its admitted duiing year...^.....^.......^..-^....^.., 

Pa^tiertts or inmates in iiLStkution at end of institution year, not in- 
cluded in the number of insane patients giveia, in item fi; 

9* Hrug cases , , ,.^ ^ - .^.^ , ...^^ 

10. Inebri»tea„„. — „^„^,.^„,....^„.„^.„,„. ,„. ^~^.. 

1 1. Neurologic^ cai«...„,... ....=. ...„..«™. ,.*,„„,^„„«.^»«**^„^^_,^. 

12. Epileptics [not feeble-minded) „..„^ _._„., ..,„.__^, 

13. Feeble-minded cases (not epileptLcfl)„„„,, ._.„^_,^ 

14. Feeble-minded «ptleptic£ .......^.^..^^.^.s^,^,^^.^ 

15. All other cases„_,..„.....,.,-, „.,.„.. ^ „„ 

16. Persona given advice &t tfeatment in out-patient department during 

year.., .^.. m....... .....—,....,.. ...^ „..,,„ 



Males, 
001 



12^ 
7 



Pcmaiia 
106 



Totat 
1,855 



232 
I'd 



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The Ohio Hospital for Epileptics 

Established in 1893 and was the first institution of this character in the UnH^ 
States. . 

Who adwissibJe as imnafes : Id sane persons who are also epileptjc, and whose 
disease has developed during their residence in this state, and epiJeptics who have 
been residents of the state for one year next preceding application for admission, 
shall be admissible as inmates of this institution. 

Bnilt on the cottage plan— 46 buildings, 31 of which are for patients. 

Inventory June 30. 1920. $1.5S1,31L41, 

Acreage: 66415, of which 288 are tillable. 

Production, year ended June 30, 1920. Farm, Garden and Dairy, $79,639.37. 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920; 1522. 

Operating expenditures, year ended June 30, 1920: $492,745.96; per capita, 
$32375. 

Additions and Betterments, year ended June 30, 1930: $87,0R23; per capita, 
$57.20. 

Officers and employees, June 30, 1930 : 139 men, 127 women ; total 265. 

Ratio of inmates to officers and employees : 6. 

TABLE 1. SHOWING MOVEMENT OP POPULATION. 
During the Year Ended June 30 ] 1020. 



nemaining June 30, lfll9^««^*-„..^.*.*....*^-.-...*...-... 
On 1r<!'mi&*^^flf j?^ If'^^vp' ,,.., , 


Men. 
776 


W^omen. 
723 


Total. 

1,499 
72 


Mm. 
S19 

IflS 


Women, 
752 

103 


TotaL 






Totfil on recDfii ^^^^^ .„.*„..rf*-..*4.^.,.. ,,-......-- 


165 


103 


208 


1,571 


Admissions dnriiae the year onded Juno 30. 1920 1 
CotnQiltted nstlents - - — 




Voluntary pn tieiiti.^.......„.. ..... ... .,... «„,. 




T^tal ■d"i^"'^^"n* , - . - - 




|— ' 


1 
1 89 

115 
3 


268 






Efiliffi niini'bcr un-dcr care * *.*^*-.^+ ^ 


191 


855 
73 


1,839 


Removed: 


40 

81 

1 


1 

in 

34 
2 




iTiior^^'?*! -- • --I -- 




Ummprioved,^^— .,—»-..*— , — . — -, , 

Died ^ ^-^ . ..... ....^ 




Ncm-Epncptic.^... ^.^.... — ^^^.^.. 




Tot.B.1 removGid. . ^*.. ^* ». .._ 




"""^ 




2G4 






Total cwi recofd Tune 30. 1920.. ^...,... ...^......,. 


793 
20 


783 
15 


1.575 


Oo temporary Jeave.....™..^ .., ,,.„.„..„„„.„.*..,„ 


41 


Eemainirii? June 30, 1Q20..^ ......„,, 


767 
771 


767 
751 

.97 
34J 


],5a2 
1,524 


Per cent recoveries based on admission*. ..„, .^- 

Per cent deaths based f on entire number under care 




.36 
6.2 







TABLE 2. GENERAL RESULTS. 
Showing GeTicT&l Results Sinc^ OptniBg of Hysphal, Novenkbcr 30, 180:5. 





Men. 

1.1 8:i 
71>B 

1.540 


Women. 

120 
548 

13 

7m 


Mexi. 
297 

i,7:n 

977 

42 

2.3:«i 


Total- 
4,421 

3.02S 


Women. 
2.M0 

1,75S 


TuhL 
6.&01 


Remo%'ed: 








Ummprovid;__,..„„,-»-„«.^^*,^..— 


- — -' — 




I>ifld - .r, r, r - - r ^r - 








30. 1920..,..._ 






.„ 


— ' 




6,380 


ReiniikiiiiB on hospital register June 


793 


7S2 


1.575 







C416) 



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The Institution for Feeble-Minded 

Established in 1857. Opened for reception of patients in August of that year 
in rented property on East Main street. Moved to present location on West 
Broad street in 1868. The Custodial Farm at Orient was purchased in 1898. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920, $2,298,751.98. 

Acreage: 1886.96, of which 1255 acres are tillable. 

Production, year ended June 30, 1920: Farm, Garden and Dairy, $153,096.94. 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920; 2,447. 

Operating expenditures, year ended June 30, 1920: $508,005.93; per capita, $207.60. 

Additions and betterments, year ended June 30, 1920: $88,859.15 ; per capita, $36.31. 
Officers and employes, June 30, 1920: )12 men, 190 women; total 302. 

Ratio of inmates to officers and employes : 8. 

TABLE 1. SHOWING MOVEMENT OP POPULATION. 
During the Year Ended June 30, 1920. 



Remaining June 30, 1919 „ 

On tcmiwrary leave _ 


Men. 

1,182 
348 


Women. 

1.191 
214 


Total. 

2.373 
562 


Men. 
1.530 

142 


Women. 
1.405 

124 


TotaL 


Total on records 


- 131 
11 


123 

1 


254 

12 


2.935 


Admissions during period: 

First admissions 

Re-admissions 








Total admissions..... 




1 




266 


Entire number under care.- ., 

Removed: 

Discharged... „ 


1.672 
38 


1,529 

j 46 


3.201 


Retvfmed to parents or guardian 


8 
30 


9 
37 


17 
67 




Died 




Total removed 





::::: 


:::: 


84 






Total on record June 30, 1920 

On temporary leave 


1.634 
429 


1.483 
273 


3.117 
702 














Remaining June 30, 1920. 

Average daily resident „ 

Per cent of deaths based on entire number under 
care . ... 


1.205 
1.218 

2.4 


1.210 
1.229 

2.9 


2.415 

2.447 

2.7 












TABLE 2. SHOWING AGES OF ADMITTED AND DIED. 
During the Year Ended June 30, 1920. 





Admitted. 


Died. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men.. 


Women. 


Total. 


Under 15 years „ 

Prom 15 to 20 


83 
37 
10 

1 
3 
3 
3 


53 

37 

12 

^ 4 

7 

5 

2 

2 

2 


136 

74 

22 

5 

10 
8 
5 
2 
4 


8 
6 

4 
6 

1 

1 
3 


1 

6 
1 
5 
1 
2 

2 
2 
1 
1 


16 
14 


Prom 20 to 25 


10 


Prom 25 to 30 „ 

Prom 30 to 35 


7 
5 


From 35 to 40 


2 


Prom 40 to 45 


3 


From 45 to 50 


3 


Prom 50 to 60 . . 


2 


2 


From 60 to 70 


i 


2 


From 70 to SO 

Unknown 










1 
2 








. 




Total 


142 


124 


266 


30 


37 


67 







(416) 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMIKISTRATION. 417 

TABLE 3, SHOWING SOCIAL CONDITIO >r OP PATIENTS ADMITTED ANp DFED- 
Dtir.ng the Year Enfipd June 30, lfl20. 





Admitted. 


Died. 




Uea. 


Women. 


ToUL 


Men. 

■ ■ 


Women. 


TotaL 


M»med ..-. _„, , ..^ - 

Widowed. ........^.„...„...,^.^„.....^...-...,.. .„.,.e,..*.,..,.*,^^ 


lit 




257 
B 


30 


1 


- 2 


TqtaL„ „_. , 


H2 


124 


3H3 


30 


37 


. ©T 



1 



14 O. O, B. 



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The State School for the Blind 

Opened in 1837. 

Ohio established the frst School for the Blind in America entirely at state ex- 
pense. 

Pupils are admitted at is early an age as possible. 

The term of instructic. is deter mined chiefly by the needs and aptUude of each 
pupil. 

The purpose of the institution is to assist all pupils to become, so far as pos- 
sible, useful, self supporting men and women* 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $797,?6OJ0. 

Acreage: IL 

Average daily population, year ended June 3(1 1920: 204. 

Operatinif expenditures, year ended June 30, 1920: $127,35278; per capita, 
$624.27. 

Additions and lietterments, year ended June 30, 1920: $364.39: per capita, $1.80. 

Officers and employes : 22 men* 70 women ; total 92. 

Ratio of inmates to officers and employes ; 2^ 



TABLE 1. MOVEMENT OF POPULATION. 
During the Year Bnded Jutie ^. 1&30. 



Number ':]tipil5 rcmaming June 3a .1019 .-.,.,.,-,.,. „,^ . .......... .^..^.„ 

On temporary leave (an rolls, but not b iitttitutioii>*,^-^,«,=.„....... „.„... 


Boy* 
103 


Girls 

e? 


Total 


Total on roUiv ,„ , ,, „„™,. ... „, . ,..,.,„...^....... 


103 

S3 
22 


92 

33 
8 


105 


Admitted during year — 

First admiSfsionB — .,. ,,. ., „ ,.. .,„...,...,....,.„...... ....^...„ 

Re-admission*,, ,.„-» +.*,..- *-.**.., .,*. r-.-^ .,^*^ . .*.„ .-^t..,^^. .»-»,..-..«„^*,,,„,,.,.- ..,. ., ' 


30 






Total admitted...... ,........,.„, ..^.,_ 

Total number under cart^^„... ...^„...._..^., ,.^.,..„..,.„,...„^„^ 

WithdTnWTl , , , , , „ ^ ..,.., , , .. 


55 
IfiS 

Id 
7 
3 


41 
133 

13 
1 

1 


mi 

20 


DTOoncd . ... -,„.,.„.„..._. .,„„.„.. ..„™„ .„_ .......,^_ 


E 


pLI^ ;::.:;ij:;r:i:;: ::::;:iz::::;::::i::z:z::::iz:::",„i^ 


4 






Total losatt.. „ _...... . ,-..,..„„..,.„.„,. ,.....,.. ^...., 

Onrcford Jtine30. 1Q10..„ , ...... .. ....... ...._... _.., 

On temporary leave Caummef vuc^atlonK .,,..„.. „,.™. „„ ..^....^ 


26 
131 


15 

Its 

US 


41 

240 


RemaininR in institution... ...„...^.....,.... . „^ ^ .^.., 

Average da»ly refident (for ]2montbi).„.^,„*.„..,...,...,....,. ,,..,.,,..,,.....,.,.„. 


I 

81 
107 


73 
»7 


154 


Avera«fi datly ret i dent £for fl monthi)......^.. ..........,*.. ......„.^„.......^ 


201^ 



TABLE 2. CAUSES OF BLlKDNBSS OP PUPILS ENROLLED. 
During tho Year Ended June 30, 1U20. 



Ophthalmia neonatorum.™ 

Trachom3.„„ ,. ._^...+^.i^ 

Accident ...,..„ .. 

Progre«aivc myo]fi»,.,^* 

Interstitial ke^titii.^^..... 



.7fi 
„ 2 
.IS 
. 3 



L Optic nciT.'e atrophy.™,.,*..,... 

g. Congenitat cataract ...^ 

h. Other ctingeiiital defects, , 

i. O ther.Jcausei ., .. „..„«.^.. . 

Total nnnabef examined,.,. 



42 
-.42 



Number ptipils in Ohio State School for Blind who weit admitted in 191f»-lB20 for the first time to a 

school for thf hiind....... .., _.... .,....-, 66 

Number pupils admitttid for th« lirst timts who are blind M a result of Ophthalmia neOTiialomiti.^-,..... 23 



(418) 



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The State School for the Deaf 

Opened in 1829. This was the first t)enevolent institution in Qhip. 

Admission of Pupils, Age and Time: The State School for the Deaf shall be 
open to receive such persons too deaf to be educated in the public schools, residents 
of the state, as the trustees and superintendent deem, from reliable information 
and examination, to be suitable persons to receive instruction, according to the 
methods therein employed. . No person shall be received under seven years of age 
or remain longer than thirteen years. No person addicted to immoral habits or who 
has a contagious or offensive disease shall be received. 

A broad course of instruction including instruction and practice of industrial 
pursuits is pursued in order that the pupils may become useful and self-supporting. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $1,026,242.75. 

Acreage: 10. 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920: 495. 

Operating expenditures, year ended June 30, 1920: $183,09922; per capita, 
$369.90. 

Additions and betterments, year ended June 30, 1920: $2,804.69; per capita, 
*5.67. 

Ratio of inmates to officers and employes: 4. 

Officers and employes: 34 men, 75 women; total 109. 

TABLE 1. MOVEMENT OF -POPULATION. . 
For .the Year Ended June 30. 1920. 



NumbfiT of ^pupils present June SO. IfiSO, _....,..,, ...,,.„..^....... ......... 

(Ail pup-Is home for aummer vacation.) 
Nuitiber of fonner pupils enrolled September 17* 1919„..k,,*^.,,*^..^. 
Number of new pupib admitted „,. ., 



Number 
Number 

Number 
Average 
Averagb 
Number 

Avemfie 
Average 



Total enroUmmt for the year,^..„^ ,^.„„ 

d?ed (mcludiriB one at hwne). .,..*...„ 

withdrawn, dropped, etc, .„ ,_„,*...^. 

absent with leave, ,, , 

attendance for year fg-lfl school dayi).,„.. 
attendance for year (305 days in ye»r)^.- 

o! pup U present Juno SO, lU^ 

(All pup \^ horne foe fiutnmer vacation.) 

number of pervon,^ eRiptoyed.„_. _..^.. 

number of pupils employed.... .■..■.■..■■,„^ 



Boyi 



^0 

39 



4 

17 

1»7 



n 



Gtrla 



2S 



224 



8 

2 in 

150 



Total 



436 
67 



503 

4 
25 

474 
495 
361 



82 
19 



TABLE 2. NUMBER OF PUPILS PROM EACH COUNTY ENROLLED AT STATE SCHOOL 

FOR THE DEAF. 
For the Term Beginning September 17. 1919, and Ended June 9. 1920. 



Counties. 


No. ri 
PupiU 


Counties. 


No. of 
Pupils 


Adams... 


1 
5 
2 
1 
7 
3 

10 
4 
8 
3 

12 
2 
6 
2 
4 

27 

13 
2 
6 
3 

62 
3 
3 
1 
1 
8 

28 
2 
3 
9 
2 

13 
1 


Lake .- 

Lawrence ~ 

Licking ~ 

Lorain....................... 

Logan.- ~ 


3 


Allcn^.... 

Ashland....- 


2 

4 


Ashtabula. ... 


7 


Athens 


6 


Auglaize „ 


Lucas_. — 

Mahoning.. ~ ».. ~...... 


23 
20 


Bronm 


Marion. 


1 


Butler. 


Medina — 

Mercer - - 


3 


ChamDaicm 


1 


c2St?!z!::j::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::i 

Clinton - 

Columbiana 


Meigs.- ~ - 

Miami.... 

Monroe .. 


2 

11 

2 


Coshocton... .- „ 

Crawford 

Cuyahoga........... 


Montgomery 

Morrow „ „... 

Muskingum... r , , 


12 
11 
5 


Darke „.... 

Defiance 


Noble.- - 

Ottawa. 

Pickaway. — 

Pike 

Portage- 

Putnam 

Richland 

Sanduaiv.— '• '............ 

Scioto ., 

Seneca - — 

Stark 

Summit 

TrumbulL 

Tuscarawas - ~ 


1 
2 


Delaware 


4 


Erie 

Franklin 

Payette.. 

Gallia 


1 
2 
5 
5 


Geauga 


6 


Greene...... 

Guernsey „ 

Hamilton 

Hancock.. „ 

Hardin 

Highland 

Hobnes 

Jefferson 


2 

7 
10 

4 

9 
32 

4 
13 


Union , ^j^^p^n-f-nv-.^..^.^ 


dOQIf^ 




t A 


1A\ 





V. .-TTSr-^ 



The Ohio State Sanatorium 

For the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Opened for reception of patients in 1909. 

Who may he admitted: Any citizen of this state of more than seven years of 
age, suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis in the incipient stage, as determined by 
the superintendent, may be admitted to the Sanatorium upon paytnent in advance 
of a sum to be fixed by the superintendent, said sum to be not less than five dol- 
lars nor more than twenty-five dollars each week, according to the financial condi- 
tion and ability to pay of the person applying for admittance or any other person 
legally liable for the care and support of said applicant. Said sum, so fixed, shall 
fully cover all expenses for medical treatment, medicine, nursing, board, lodging 
and laundry. 

r.uilt on the cottage plan: Administration building, two receiving cottages, 
eight convalescent cottages, and employes' building. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $757,447.12. 

Acreage: 355. 

Production, year ended June 30, 1920 : Farm Garden and Dairy, $23;914.02. 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920 : 180. 

Operating expenditures, year ended June 30, 1920: $146,982.44; per capita, 
$816.56. 

Additions and betterments, year ended June 30, 1920: $6,985.68; per capita, 
$38.82. 

Officers and employes : 31 men, 31 women ; total 62. , 

Ratio of patients to officers and employes : 3. 



TABLE 1. SHOWING MOVEMENT OP POPULATION 
* During the period Ended June 30. 1920. 





Males. 


Females 


Total. 


Males. 


Females 


Total. 


Remaining June 30, 1919 


87 
3 


79 
4 


166 

. 7 


90 
297 


83 
258 




On temporary leave 








Total bn, records 

Admissions during the year: 

Committed i>atients 










173 


Voluntary patients 


297 


258 


655 








Total admissions... 








556 


Entire number under care.„ 


387 
292 


341 
250 


728 


Removed: 

Non-Tuberculous„..» » 

Arrested _ 


7 
1 
48 
51 
90 
95 


2 

4 
25 
44 

75 
99 

1 


I 

73 
95 
165 
194 

1 




Apparently arrested 




Quiescent 




Improved 




Unimproved.™ 




Died 










Total removed.— 








542 












Total on record June 30, 1920 









95 
6 


91 

1 


186 


On temporary leave 








6 












Remaining June 30. 1920 


90 
91 


90 
89 


180 


Average <&ily residents.. 








180 



Per cent — Arrested, apparently arrested, and quiescent cases, based on discharges 31 

Per cent — Deaths based on inumber under care 



W 



TABLE 2. SHOWING PHYSICAL CONDITION ON ADMISSION 
Of Patients Discharged during the Period Ended June 30, 1920. 





Men. 1 "Won-.en. 


1 Total. 


Incipient (favorable) 


-.1, 86 

11:^1 y7 

7, 2 


151 


Moaerately advanced. „ .... 


172 


Advanced 


210 


Non-Tuberculous 


9 






Total. * : 


2112 ! 250 


542 



150 remained 30 days or less. 



(420) 



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The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home 

Opened in 1888. 

Who may be admitted to the home : All honorably discharged officers, soldiers, 
sailors and marines, who served in the regular or volunteer forces of the United 
States, including the Ohio National Guard, \yho have been citizens of Ohio one 
year or more at the date of making application for admission, who are disabled 
by disease, wounds or otherwise, and by reason of such disability incapable of 
earning their living; and any soldier of the National Guard of Ohio who hereto- 
fore has- lost, or hereafter may lose an arm or leg, or his sight, or may become 
permanently disabled from any cause, while in the line and discharge of duty and 
not able to support himself may be admitted to the home under such rules and 
regulations as the board adopts. 

Built on the cottage plan. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $904,797.56. 

Acreage: 98.50. 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920: 861. 

Operating expenses, year ended June 30, 1920: $358,432.14; per capita, $416.30. 

Officers and employes, June 30, 1920 : 26 men, 28 women ; total 54. 

Ratio of inmates to officers and employes : 16. 

ADJUTANT'S ANNUAL REPORT. 

Number on rolh June 30th, 1919 _ 1,093 

Gained by admission i „ 141 

Gained by re^dmission 143 . 284 



*•• Total cared for during the year „ „ 1,377 

Loss by discharge (Own Request) ^ 173 

Loss by dropped (Violation of rules) ~. 2 

Loss by dropped (Absent without leave) 61 

Loss by deaths. ^ _ ^ _ 167 403 



Nimiber 4m rolls, present and absentHfune 30th. 1920..- ..„ ~ 974 

Number present for. duty 487 

Nmnber present on extra .duty _ 84 

Number sick in hospital j „ 159 

Number in arrest ^ - 

Total number present - 730 

Number absent with leave . „ 220 

Number absent without leave 24 244 

Aggregate, present and absent - ~ 974 

Average number present during year ^ 861 

Average number present and absent during year .,- 1,034 

Total cared for during year. - 1.377 

There have been 10,118 admissions since the Home opened November 19th, 1888. 
Of this number, 28 were Mexican War Veterans. 9,4»7 Civil War Veterans, 11 Indian War Vet- 
erans, 686 Spanish American War Veterans, 2 Mexican Border Veterans, and 4 World War Veterans. 

Tot%l loss by discharge and dropped 6,877 

Total loss by death. „ 3.802 

Buried in Ohio Soldiers' & Sailors* Home Cemetery 1,864 

Buried in other cemeteries ^ 2.035 



(421) 

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422 OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION^. 

The Ohio Soldiers* and Sailors' Home — Concluded., , 

_ COUNTY TABLE, SHOWING NUMBER IN INSTITUTION 
/ June 30. 19 m 



Adams.. .,^,*.„ 

AJlr^ ™__ 

A?ht ilitibt^-.^ 

Athf*i; „-^ 

Au<?UiM ...,-...., 
Hel ivnnt.. . . ^ 

nr<i'^"!i - .^ 

Bulla- „ 

rhrke 

Cam.lL ..^.....^ 

Clinton .,, „ 

Clermont ,._, ..^ 
ColuEtibiatu^.^ 
Cfj^hocttm ,..„_ 
Champaiffn.„„_. 
rniwford?.. ...... 

Ciiy*hoiia. . 



DefiAnee.„.. 

Eriip . , ,.„. 

Fftyt-tte,^..... 

Franklin 

FultcnL^^^,.. 

LljtitjgHi^ — 

Hamilton:,.. 
Hancock...,. 

Hardlii,,. 

HanTKJiL...^ 
Hanrr „,„... . 

Holmea . 
Huron....^.. 
ackaorL..„. 



6 



Uke. „ 

LawmK!e„ 
Ltic^inff 




19 
11 

4 

ta 



2 
2 

.1 

13 

X07 

7 

10 
4 

45 
& 
5 

75 
S 
4 
7 
2 
7 

20 
9 

10 
I 

11 

2 

4 

21 

g 

12 

s 

I 

16 




Shelby„,,.... — 

Stark. ,^.. ^ 

Summit- 



Trumbull.. 



Tu9carawfli....«« 
Union.. 
Van Wert.. 
Vintoti.^...,, 
Warren ..-^^" 
Waahington- 
Way He™ -.,,..,. 
'ftlliani*, ........ 

Wood-.... ^ 

Wyandflt. * 

TotiL^.. 



10 

14 

1 
1 
2 
fi 

32 

n 



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The Madison Home 



Established in 1890 by the National Women's Relief Corps, occupying two 
hujIfUngs erected in 1845 and 1850 by tlic Madison Seminary and transferred with 
10 acrea of land by the board of directors to the National VVomen's Relief Corps. 
The state of Ohb erected the Ohio cottage in 1892 at a cost of $JO,OOCl{X>. 

The National Women's Relief Corps having added five acres, conveyed in 1904 
the land» buildings and personal property to the state of Ohio, the state accepting 
the transfer by an act of the legislature passed Ajiril 15, 1904. 

IVho may bi^ admitted i Subject to the provision that preference be given to 
those who served in Ohio military oriaranizations. the following: persons may l:^e 
admitted to the Madison Home: All honorably discharged soldiers, sailors and 
marines, who served the United States government in the Civil War, from 1861 to 
1865, who are citizens of Ohio, and who are not able to support themselves i their 
wives, to whom such soldiers, sailors and marines were married at any time prior 
to June 1, 1905 ; their widows, to whom such soldiers, sailors and marines were 
married prior to June 1, 1905, and the dependent mothers of such soldiers, sailors 
and marines residents of Ohio; in case of death of such soldier, sailor or marine, 
his surviving wife may live in and be snpportcd by the home. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $65,834.80. 

Average daily pojjnlation, year ended June 30, 193f)r 35. 

Operating expenditures, year ended Jtme 30, 1920: $16,956.84; per capita, $484,48. 

Officers and employes: 3 men, 13 women; total IS. 

Ratio uf inmates to officers and employes : 2. 

TABLE 1. SHOWING MOVEMENT OF POPULATION 
DuTing Ye$.r Bndcd June 30. 1020. 





Men. 


Women 


ToUl 


Men. 


Women 


Total. 


Hfimaining June 30, 3 920„ „„...*,,„..... ^.^ ,..„.,„.., 


,....„..„. 


2? 


37 
1 








On tompofary lea vc>.,. ,..,-.+.*«**-... ..,.*„-..^^ «..,.,.*«. 


.1 . ... _ 






'"""■"""""" 


Total on record* ..„.. ,^,...^ . 


**""'""""* 


11 

, - 


"" U 


,^^^ — 


R3 


3,i 


AdmissioTis during reai^^ 

Committed ....^„„^. .., .„„»*„„ „.^, 

Voluatary.^ ,... , .. ..„^.,..,.^....^. 






■^ • -1 


'■" " 


T^lLfll atTmiMiir^FtV , ., -,,... 






'....„ ^ 


._.... — 


1 1 ' 11 


Bntiri! number under tBj^ ..r 




44 


„,.,f„..."- 


I 

a 

2 


1 
3 




44 


Removed— 






Dicd„... „ , ^- . ...... . - 




ToUl remo ved.^,,. ......^... „.„..„,....„„*„,.„.... . 




»..-,.......,. 


..„..,....,*. 


„„.....,„.. 


5 


5 


Total on recofd June 30, 1030.. ^,_, .,. „. „^.. *_ 




iz:::::: 


'""*" 


tm*f.^.,tr,M^t 


5 


3ft 


On tcmpomry leave. — „ — . ...«..^...„^ 


S 






Remaining June 30, 19S0,.„„.^ .^^_.... 

Avtrsge daily resident..... ..................... 


1 


^ ,,._ 


3.^ 


34 
35 



Perccnlage de&ths baaed on entire number under cans.. 



^45 



TABLE 2. SHOWING AGES OF ADMITTED, DISCH.'\RGED, DIED AND REMAINING. 
Year Ended June 30. 102O 





1 f 
Aimilted f Dischftrged 1 Died 


Remaining 




M F T 1^ M J 


p 


T M 


p 


T 


M 


F 1 


T 


From 60 to 70 years. ,„..*...,.. .„ 

Over 70 s^ea re.. ........ ., ^^.^t--,-,. 


IZ 


3 


3 

S 


::::;:; 


3 


1 
2 

3 


i:;:: 


2; 


2, 


^- 


4 
22 
11 

2 

ag 


4 
22 


Over 80 years.„,.*.,...,„^«.,,^«..„^.,..... 
Over 90 vcars,... . ...,*„.. ...m.. ...,,., 


11 


" 


It 
2 


Total.....-..™........^^^....^ ....^. 


m 



(423) 



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The Boys' Industrial School 

Located four miles south of Lancaster on traction line. Opened in 1B5S. 

Admission of Vouihs to School: Such youths convicted of a crime or offense, 
the puuishment of which in whole or part is confitn^ment in jail ur the penitentiary, 
at the discretion of the court K^ving sentence instead of being sent to tlic jail <;*r 
penitentiary may be comniitted to the Boys* Industrial Scho€>L 

Built on the cottage plan. 

Inventory June 30. 1920: $1,662^5.58, 

Acreage: 1230, 

Production, year ended June 30, 1920, Farm, Garden, and Dairy: |63^SLS^j, 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920: 1195, 

Operating expenditures, year ended June 30, 1920: $297,981.51 ; per capita 
$249.36. 

Additions and betterments, year ended June 30, 1920: $3,772,05; per capita $115. 

Officers aiid employes June 30, 1920: 86 men, 41 womien; total 127. 

Ratio of inmates to officers and employes: 9. 



TABLE I. MOVEMKNT OF POPULATION 
For Year Ended June 30. 1930, 



In ifnti- 
ttttion 



On piirok 



A.WX. 



E^aprd 



On roH 



Present Jtine 30 IflaO^^.,. ^.^ 

Gains dur.nsr ycai^— 

New comTTiiiitmpnts frnm cnunt: 
Re-tommitted after f|i5cTiaT(je_ 



Re- committed whtli? on parole ..,.^,.„,^,.^,„., 
He-copimilted while on escape „..__,. _„_^^ 

Assigned hy the O. B. A. (new) „„._ _. 

AfisjgTkcd hy the O. B A. after disehanR^,.... 
Assigned bv the O, B, A. while on parole ,-. 

Committed tern pof aril y., ^._.^. _,._„, .^ 

Returned fur violation of parole. ..-^^...„....^. 

Ret u mcd t em pora.ri 1 /.. .... ^ . .„»^.„..,-«, ,..,. 

Kelumied from eEcape„„.^„.._.„...__,_^^._^„„ 

Jiiet limed ffoni tttmparary A. W. L. ^..-,. 

A. W. L. (not to be returned) _^.,.„,....«.... 

A-W. L, {temporary) ,.„....,. ..«„.,..,...^.. 

Escaped.. .,,.... .^....^.r.^..^...^.^,^^ ^ 

Restared to p.-iro^e ^__.,._„- „ ,,„.„,^ 

Changed from tcmp^Tafy A, W^ L to pflnj'e 

Total ,^.^ ,.^....,^.....^^..^ . 



1JJ8 



804 

40 
2 

2 
1 
fi 

14 
7S 
]7 



1.237 



J03 



1.106 



as 





;s 




t 




£5 




9 




1 




& 


-*—«'— 


..^.„ — .™, 


- 


^ . 


t,^,„,„^t^^tm 


143 





To be accounted for. ...... ...*„....,.. 

Ijdsse^ duriniif vear^ 

A. W. L. (not to he returned)....,. 

A. W. L. (temporary) -- ►*— 

Escaped^,.^,.. ..._.... h— . — 

Restored to parole. . ,...,. u..^^.. 

Tranfrftrred to O. S. R ............._, 

Died Jit institution,. 



Retunied for violation of pamle.^.., .*..,„*. 

Distrhiirged fmm institution..- „., ,-....-. 

Returned temporarily^...,......^...... ,....„...,. 

Dropppd from roll because recommitted 

while on pa.rnle .., h ^ .+..., 

Dischafgfd ftorn parole,,,, — ... ^...„. ..„^.. 

Returned from trmporary A. W* L^^,.,..^„.. 

Hctunifd from esfape ..►,.<....._..,* .,,.„. 

Droppi?d from roli becauser recommitted 

while on escape , ..,, ».....,....,....., 

DiKchflrfc^^d from wf.^ape ,_., ,.„... 

Changed from ttmporar>* A W. L. to parole 



2.534 



1 im 

.181 

14.^ 

12 

1 

S 



1,223 
2.4€0 



as 



143 
£4^ 



TotuL,. ,....„ 

Present June 30. l»^..„^.. 



irr- 



226 
"■"14 



1,027 



17 



U 



75 



1,40(3 



\M7 



m 



2.5SS 



d63 



1 



imr 



1,1^1 f 



1,H3] 



301 



IJIO 



2.122 



I 424 1 



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OHIO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 



425 



TABLE 2. CAUSES OP COMMITMENT. 



Assault 

Assault to rape . .. 

Assisting prisoners to escajpe jail 

Breaking and entering railroad car. 

Buiglary. .*. ; ' 

Carrying concealed weapons. 

Cutting with intent to wound 

Destroying property. 

Embezzlement 

Forgery. 

General delinquency^ ,, 

Incorrigible 1 ,. 

Immoral conduct i 



4 

14 

4 

1 
3 

93 
4 
1 
1 
1 

10 

13 
127 

10 



Tuv.Dis. Person 115 

Manslaughter... .. 1 

Obtaining goods under false pretenses.^^ 1 

Receiving stolen property < 3 

Selling stolen property ^ 1 

Selling liquor without license ..„ 3 

Shooting with intent to wound - ', 2 

Sodomy„ 
Stealing.. 



Truancy.- 



Total.... 



117 
953 



TABLE 2. AGE AT DATE OF ARRIVAL. 



10 years 

11 years 

12 years 

13 years 



63 

86 

112 

. 122 



14 years._ 

15 years.- 

16 ycars._ 

17 years » 



TotaL. 



, 171 

, 165 

, 125 

109 

~963 



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^"■^ 



w^ 



The Girls' Industrial School 

Located on the banks of the Scioto river, ten miles south of Delaware, 

Hyatls h the railroad station, on the Hocking V^alley R. R. 

Established in 1869. 

Object of the School: The Girls' Industrial School shall be for the instruction, 
employment and reformation of evil -disposed, incorrigible, and vicious girls* 

Bnilt on the cottage plan. 

Inventory. June 30, \920: $823,40Zg9. 

Acreage; 189. 

Prixlnction, year ended June 30, 1920 : Farm and Garden, $6,647.62. 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920: 464. 

Operating expenditures! year ended June 30, 1920: $149^52,17; per capita 
$321.66. 

Additions and betterments, year ended June 30, 1920: $2»9n,84: per capita $6.38. 

Officers and employes. June 30, 1920 : 33 men, 50 women ; total 83, 

Ratio of inmates to ofilcers and employes: S. 



MOVEMENT OP POPULATION, 
For Year Ended June 30, 1920. 



1 


Jnfilitiitujn. 

f 


Rolla. 


i^Uftiber Prewnt.. ..^ .. - - -■ - -,- t- u,, ,. 


47. ' 


47 T 


t*ji Pairjifi o* rrf4*ntii***l jx , , ,i .. , ■ 


630 






Tbtal_... „.„.„.,„„......,.„.,...„..........,.. _....._„„._„. „,. 

Utkin Dunng the Ycur: 

Received from Coufta........ „ „^**^... ... . ^....„„„.,,.^. .,*i.4.... 


472 

31.1 
lfl7 


1.102 
315 


Rp turned for ViDlstion of Pattjic..„^„„„„. ,„,«,.. .^.h... _*. „. . .._ 




Ri't^irnef) rtn New Comfniimefit. . , .,....^..,.,, ., , .. . , ,, ,, , _r,-, 


*-,.+. 




"""-™ 


Total Gaint....... „..„„.„..„........,. ............ 


' 


f 4t*2 


315 


1 


*"*' 


Tn he Afvfiijntttl for ^. ^., „-x„^ ^.r-.r-., ,„,.,.,..., .^ . .. x_l 


H 
I 

1 


1*417 


Lofts During the Year. 

Panlf4 , .,., ...,.,.^......^.......^ ....*.* ,., „. ..,._. 


Finjili RpU'iue frnm t^mle. „...,...,., ,^. ^, , ^...^ , 


lia 


Released by order of Court .. ... ,„^,,^, ^.,^., — r ,- - li . » 


1 


Died... .._ ..«„^. ^„ „^.„. „ .._.„. 

Keo&ped , . - . ,.. ... - ,, .. , „, .... . . 


n 

4 






Total Loa^efl.^^.,, ♦.,.*.— *,,„.. .., .„.-, .^ ^ «-..« 




414 


NumbeT Remaining June 30, 1930 ,,_„ .^,,„, „,,....,, ,,,,,, „ 


1.003 


Daily Averugt NumW Pfestnt Duriiig VeiU^^„„ „...._..._......,...._„.. 




PAROLE DEPARTMENT REPORT, 


Ntimber of Homei investijiated.^.^..^^. — ,_ 103 


Number of court caJiesi, 
Number of funerals atte 
Number of «irk returne 
Number of rniles trave!c 
Number of (firls for 
found and plaeed„„„. 




21 


Number of Honn?i approved. „ „„,^..,*, 170 


nded . ,. 


7 


NiimbeT of ttqinei diaapp roved .,^,...,^™-., 20 


d. ..._ 


« .,. .. 144 


Official visits.... -.....„.. ....„„ l.flO^ 


d 


^ 72 03 1 


Number of eifU placed oiice„. .„„^ . „ 5199 
Numtwr of girU pbced twice.. ..,_...„,.™ 35 


whom homw 


WiC«! 

. ^.._ ISO 


N u mtwr Q f Ktria placed thit* t ime»..„. .„*, ...... 1 






HOSPITAL REPORT. 
Pitieiita odttittted to HospitaL ........ „.„ ............. ........................ .„,„ „, 




IflQ 


Medical, 




-- - . 7-^ 


CnratagLoufi. ^.^ ,„,„ . ,„, __„__. _ . , ..., , ^^ ^ 




ifl> 


Sursical...^ ^. „ „.*„.,™^,.„_. ,.,„.,^,.,.„^...^^^:.^..,„.„.,..^,. *.„«*_. . . *«, 




1$S 


Totnt-.-.^ X - . -UI-U-X.X. -t-.-^ . .. 


* 


100 


(42 


«J 


Digitized by V 


ZooqU 



OHIO BOABD OF .4B MINISTRATION. 427 

i 

DIAGNOSIS OF HOSPITAL CASES, 



Medical Oeoefal: 

Bttouc Jiitia-^ ^^.,^ 

Chorea, .,, ^.. 

Chronic Catarrh*,.^., 

Bfy sipelaa^^^ 

Gonorrhea..^ . *„,..„ 

Laryngitis-., „._. 

Rheuma t iflBfL, „ „ „ ...^ 

Svphi 1 1 is ..... -..^..™._ . 

TubeJculosit.....^ ^„ 

Tonoilitii.. ., .. ....„..,.^^ 



Mcdftal Cotitagiotis: 



SiirgicAl! 

TQn3illectcntiy^^>^*^..L ^.....,-^. ..■„ ... .^^ „„,™™„™ „.^. .,*^..^... -.^..^.^ 10 

T^taU... _„„_„...._.-_-. ^.^ ... . ™„,,_,^_„_.. „ 13 



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The Ohio Penitentiary 

Located on Spring street, Columbus. 

Opened in 1834. The first penitentiary was built in 1813. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $1,809,623.18. 

Institution occupies 24.20 acres and in addition there is a stone quarry of 30.08 
acres adjoining the Columbus State Hospital. 

Under the prisoners' compensation system, prisoners are paid at the rate cf 1 
to 5 cents per hour. Ten per cent of said earnings must be held and paid to the 
prisoner upon his discharge; the ninety per cent may be forwarded at stated 
periods to his dependents. For the year ended June 30, 1920, the prisoners* com- 
pensation amounted to $47,098.78. 

The sales from the manufacturing departments of the penitentiary for the 
year ended June 30, 1920, amounted to $716,444.63. 

Average daily population, year ended June 30, 1920: 1670. 

In addition there were 31 5 honor men at the Prison Farm, State Brick Plant, 
and other state institutions. 

Operating expenditures year ended June 30, 1920: $431,033.80; per capita $258:10. 

Officers and employes: 107 men, 1 woman; total 108. 

Ratio of inmates to officers and employes : 19. 



TABLE 1. 



MOVEMENT OP POPULATION 
Year Ended June 30. 1920. 




Rolls. 



Remaining June 30. 1910 

On Parole Tune 30, 1919, 

On Probation June 80, 1919.... 

Totel ~ 



Admissions During the Year: 

Received from Courts 

Received from other Institutions. 

Parole Violators received 

Institutional PArole Violators returned 

Certified on Probation. 



Probation Violators bought into the Institution.. 
Escapes Returned. 



Restored to Parole while at large..- 

Restored to Conditional Release while at large. — 



Total AdmisslotiBL.., 
Entire Number Uadcr Cartu 



Losses Durine the Y*ar: 

Expiration of Sentenc** ,.-^«. 

Sentence Commuted by Governur _ 
Final Release from Tnatitution™.-^ 
Final Rfsleaae from Parolfe- 



Final Rcleasi^ from ProlmtioiL. 

Paitiltd „ .^^- 

Restored to Parole. „. „„ 

Restored to ProbatJOBL««.«-,»«.. 
Difid (Tnatitutiion|.-„ 



IjCRal Execytioni;. ^_ 

Institutional Parole Violators 

Transfers to other Inititutbns,.. 
PardQn«?d by Govc4Tinr,..„._^.„ 

Died on Parole._„ ,.. .,.^ 

Died on PTObalion.. ^^.^^..^^ 

Escapes. .„.„.,.. ,.. 

Cond ttio Eial R e leases.^, 



Off Pa^ile Cc^ttnt no Pinal Relfeaie^.,,.. 

Released by Order cf Court..- .-.^.. „.^^. 

Expiration of Sentence while on Paro If *,*,...*. 
Eipimtion of Sentence while on Probatioti^^ 
Gonditi''mal Rdt^as^s to other InstitutioinB-^ 

Conditional Releasees restored.. ................ 

Conditional Releas^^-off Cc«nt„,.,_„. ^„,,. 



TotaL 



Remaiaitig June 30 1920^ 

On Par(}le._„^^ _* 

On Pniibation. ™™.^,_ 



32 



&14 
3S 
H 
S3 

e 

48 



4 

76 




2.039 
672 
261 



2.972 



785 
27 

—-,-7 
155 

1 
1 



&S8 



32 



117 



m 

s 

4a 

36 
3S 

5 
5 
« 

7 
25 

8 



800 



3.100 
875 



(428) 



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The Ohio State Reformatory 

Opened September 17, 1896. 

Who may be sentenced to reformatory: The superintendent shall rcz.ivc all 
male criminals between the ages of sixteen and thirty years sentenced to the re- 
formatory, if they are not known to have been previously sentenced tti a state 
prison. Male persons between the ages of sixteen and twenty-one years convicted 
of a felony shall be sentenced to the reformatory^ instead of the penitentiary. Such 
persons between the ages of twenty -one and thirty years may be sentenced to the 
reformatory if the court passing sentence deems them amenable to reformatory 
methods. 

No person convkted of murder m the first or second degree shall be smUnced 
or transferred to the reformaiory. 

The sales from the manufacturing departments of the reformatory for the 
year ended June 30, 1920. amounted to $345,917.44. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $2,451,084,48. 

Acreage, June 30, 1920: S10.S6. 

Productfon, year ended June 30, 1920, Farm, Garden, and Dairy ; ^,B34.S4. 

Average daily population: 1513. 

Operating expenditures year ended June 30. 1920: $392,046.27: per capita $259.12. 

Additions and betterments year ended June 30, 1920: $62,76477; per capita 

Officers and employes : 98 men, I woman \ total 99, 
Ratio of inmates to officers and employes: 17. 



MOVEMENT OF POPULATION FOR YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1020- 



Iiutttu- Parole. 






Rem ^inme July 1. lOie. — .......^.^ 

Received from Coufts-,,.. --,-— * 

Received from othei'InstitutiDtu^, 
Pafole violators retumeil-,„..JL....„^ 

Probationers returned ,™..**„*.**». 

Escapes Tetumerl— 



Paroled fgatn to paroles).™ 

Rfiatored to pBTole {gam) „...,„„ 
Restoted to pruibation_^....«,.^„ 

CcrtifieJi on probation..... 

EH::aped (carried as absent) .*^« 



Total gains -^... . 

To be accounted for...... 



l.CMfl 
19 
7S 
22 

15 



Final Telease&- 
Paroled... 



Pardoned (S conditional).. 

Kelcased to court „,™.^, 

Died„ 



Escaped. . ^ .._„.. ....„„ „ 

Transferred O. P. and Lima 
Restored to parole........ ....... 

Restored to probation 



2,72^ 



(> 

7 
2S 
17 

m 

24 
IS 



Paroled violators returned (lora to paroles)..^.., ►,- 
Probation violators rctumed floss to probation). 
•Escflpes returned (loss to parole)........... , 

Total loss.. . _... ... .. .. _._.„^. .™ .,... 



Remaining June 30, 1020.. 



1,128 



2,011 



S50 



IS 



5*1 



357 



1,040 
10 



3«T 



lp03S 
3,040 

1.112 



1.215 



1*43S 



1464 
24 



7S 
10 



23 






:S-1' 



1,530 
4.2D3 



*0£ the escapei returned (mly 10 wera being carried as **oa parole." 



(420) 



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430 



OmO BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION, 



The Ohio State Reformatory— Concluded* 

AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION BY MONTHS. 
For Year Ended Juxic 30, 1^20. 



Month ATijriin^ 
Month ending 
Month endifiR 
Mnnth ending 
Mfvnth ending 
My nth rniding 
Month ending 
M"Tnth ending 
Month ending 
Mnrith ending 
MVmtb rndtng 
Month ending 



AuRuat 3L 1910... 
September 30. 1019.. 

October 31. 1910 

November 30, 3019^ 
December 31. 1^10.. 
Jftnuan' 3L 1920 „« 
February 29, lflatJ..« 
March 31, 1©20.__ 

April 30, 1020,. ™, 

Mtiy 31, 1930^^..^ 

June 30. Ift20„^..„.,.. 



Highest number.,. 
Uiweit number..^ 
Daily BVerBgc,.,.« 



1.537 
1,472 
1,447 
K4MF 
1.561 
1,619 
l,6«7 
1,730 
1,743 
1.717 
1.679 
1,638 

1,774 
1.42€ 
1.634 



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The New Prison Farm 

Located two miles west of London, Madison County. Purchase made under 
an act of the legislature passed April 19, 1913, which carried an appropriation of 
$250,000.00. An appropriation of $25,000.00 became available February 16, 1914. 
The original purchase was 1448j^ acres for $250,340.00, with an additional expense 
of $4,036.13 for court costs, etc., in connection with the condemning of the land. 
Since the original purchase 324.74 acres have been purchased. 

The Penitentiary Commission employed architects and, in accordance with the 
law, the work of constructing the new penitentiary is under the supervision of 
the Ohio Board of Administration, it being the intent of the law, in so far as 
possible, that labor be performed by prisoners. 

The expenditures to June 30, 1920, for structures and parts amounted to $89,- 
940.65 for dormitories, bams, implement sheds, and the foundation of the Admin- 
istration Building, which is in and ready for the first story floor construction. 

The expenditures to June 30, 1920, for non-structural improvements amounted 
to $90,951.39 and were for equipment, sewers and roads. 

The expenditures to June 30, 1920, for drainage, roads and rail mad spur 
amounted to $24,985.78. 

Time of prison labor on the above construction to June 30, 1920, was 322J54 
hours or equal to 40,344 eight-hour days. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $621,013.04. 

Acreage, June 20, 1920^ 1,773.24. 

Production, year ended June 30, 1920,. Farm, Garden and Dairy : $140,252.70, 

Average daily population: 215. 

Operating expenditures for farm year, ended June 30, 1920: $79,159.39; per 
capita $368.18. 

Officers and employes, June 30, 1920: farm department 6. 

Officers and employes, June 30, 1920: construction department 4. .^ 

(431) 



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The Ohio Reformatory for Women 

Located one mile southwest of Marys ville, Union Coimty. 

Who skail he admitted. The reformatory for women shall be used ;or the 

# detention of all females over sixteen years' of age, convicted of felony, raisde* 

meanor, or delinquency, as hereinafter provided, and for the detention of sudi 

fmale prisoner 2i as shall be transferred thereto from the Ohio Penketitiary and 

the Girls' Industrial School. 

Established by an act of the legislature May IS, 191 L Opened Septepber l» 
1916. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $377,431.37- 

Acreage: 257,80. 

Production for year ended June 30, 1930, Farm and Garden ; $7,9S2M. 

Daily average population for year ended June 30, 1920: 1S5, 

Operating; expenditures for year ended June 30, 1920: $65*664.40; per capita 
$423.64. Additions and betterments expenditures for year ended June 3H 1920; 
$3,403.64; per capita $2L96. 

Officers and employes; 9 men, 11 women; total 20. 

liatio of inmates to officers and em[>loyes : 8. 



HGVEMENT 0¥ POPULATION 
For Ysaj Ended June 30* 1&20. 



{ Institution. 


Rolk. 


Rt'inaifiiTiff June 30, 1Q19 . ,,._ , ....... ....... .. ,. * . . ., 


ITS 


178 




103 
44 

7 






TotfiL^. .., \. .....^......, „...,.. ..^ ............ .. ^, »,*.„ „ „ . ^ 


ITS 
! 13T 

a 

I 

* 


3&1 


AdmissxcTLa dtiririji the year: 


ia7 


Received from fithi^r infititnttrtHs ,, ,,,.,,,,... ,^, , . ., _,.,...' 


a 


Parole violators returned to in3titutioii..„,»^,^,^.„„.,.^,.^.,,.^„ „h_,h^.,k 

Certified on pnjbation- -., ..„,-.,, .,....,,...,,,„ ............. ^,..^,.„...,, , 

pTOtaation vialaton received... .....^ .^ .,.^,.^^^^.. 

Escapes returned, _„ , „,.,^,„^„.,„„ „,.....-, „ .„„ , .^_^.., 


"^ 






Total admbsions,^ _, .„... .^..^^ . ,„.„...„.,..., ... ,.. 

To be accounted for.^.........,.........„.....................^.....+.,. .^..„ ,..^.....,...^^.......„„ 

Losses duntiR ttie yean 

Final rcl*;a$c from iTusti:tutioii_ ,^, .,...^,^.r., .r,...^,-.in-.„n,..- «t«pt-.,— ., _— 


150 


TfiT 


163 



Final release from pafok. _...»...... ..^„ ^_*„.,^,^*„^.,^.^«,^**..w„...»*.^„,^.„«-.. 

Final fcieaac from probation.- ... .^ , ... ^.. .^^. ^.^ ^^ , 

ParoletL„^, .. „_-„- _...___. .___, ^„_^ _. 

Transferred to other iristjtulioiis..... ...^ ».,.,^..„..^,...„ .^„ .«.«..,..- 

Escaped , „.... .. ♦.„* «. ...-.«,.„.. — «,...»«>.. .* ^ 


SO 

^2 


Died.. .......,............._. „,.,......._:,......_..„....„„.,....____„., 


3 


Trtt.\J loSSBE.. ... . ... - .. ,_- 


WW 


114 


Remain! ngUune 30, 10 20.. .,*.„..,. „.„,....-...^..^.,.„.,., ,.^.„^,.^.„,...,^..,„„.,. 

On Pamlsi: . .^ . .._,..,...- ^. 


440 

ii»a 


On t^-nnpornry pariilf ..,.„......-«....,/ .,...^..^. ^ *.-..' , .,",., 


ai 


Opf priltjaticm ,.,.-.., ,,- ,, , ,, ,,,, , „, ,, , , ,-- - ,-. ..- ..,r-,,--„,,,..,. .■^,.. 


41 




7 



I'lsa) 



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OHIO BO.UiD OP ADMINISTRATION. • 433. 

AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION BY MONTHS 
Pot Year Ended. June 30. 1920. 

Month ending July 31. 1919 ,.„ .'.'.„..... „ ^ ».-.^ - 171 

Month ending August 31, 1919 ^ ^ ^ 16© 

Month ending September 30 , 1919..^ 162 

Month ending October 31, 1919. '. 157 

Month ending November 30. 1919 * - 155 

Month ending December 31. 1919_ ^ _ 161 

Month ending January 31, 1920 156 

Month ending February 29, 1920 „ - 149 

Month ending March 31. 1920— - 147 

Month ending April 30, 1920 ^ : .,„ 149 

Month ending May 31. 1920 149 

Month ending June 30, 1920. 149 

Highest number presenjt in^Anstitution.. 178 

Lowest number present in institution. 141 

Daily averagei^or the year 155 



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The Ohio State Brick Plant 

Located two miles from Junction City, Perry Coimty, on tlic B. & O. By. 

This plant was purchased April 12. 1919. Purcha^ic price $59,572.50. Consists 
of 33.51 acres, more or le^vs. Brick manufacturing plant composed of kilns, sheds. 
bnildings. machinery and equipment. This purchase was made from earnings of 
the manufacturing departments, of the Ohin Board of Adminisiration. Two acres 
were purchased in Novcmher, 1919. Located on this two- acre tract is a two story 
brick store building. Price paid $2,000.00. 

Average number of prisoners at the Brick Plant during voar cniled June 30, 
1920: 76, 

The sale of brick, for t!ie year ended June 30, 1920, amounted to $60,489.53, 

The paving hlocks are sold to the State Highway neparimenti the building 
brick to the state and political subdivisions. 

Inventory. June 30, 1920: |209,397.43. 

(434) 



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The Bureau of Juvenile Research 

Located on Wheatland Avenue, at Broad street. 

Establishment and purpose. The Ohio Board of Administration shall provide 
and maintain a "bureau of juvenile research", and shall employ competent persons 
to have charge of such bureau and to conduct investigations. The Ohio Board of 
Administration may assign the children committed to its guardianship to tlie 
"bureau of juvenile research", for the purpose of mental, physical and other ex- 
amination, inquiry or treatment, for such period of time as such board may deem 
necessary. Such board may cause any minor in its custody to be removed thereto 
for observation and a complete report of every such observation shall be made in 
writing, and shall include a record of observation, treatment, medical history, and 
a recommendation for future treatment, custody and maintenance. The Ohio Board 
of Administration or its duly authorized representatives shall then assign the child 
to a suitable state institution or place it in a family. under such rules and regula- 
tions as may be adopted. 

An administration building and two cottages have been erected for the btrreau. 
They were constructed as far as possible by prison labor. 

Number of examinations made, during year ended June 30, 1920 : 2,277. 

Inventory, June 30, 1920: $115,173.31. 

Operating expenditures, year ended Jime 30, 1920 : $34,998.22. 

Additions and betterments expenditures, year ended June 30, 1920: $40,309.03. 

Officers and employes, June 30, 1920: 3 men; 18 women; toals 21. 



MOVEMENT OP POPULATION. 
Year Ended June 80. 1920. 





Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Present at the beginning of the year. ^, ^k 


13 

92 
4 
2 
6 
9 
2 
5 


3 

52 
2 

'6 

"l 
3 


16 


Gain during the year — 

Committed to the Board of Administration 

Admitted from the Ohio Board of State Charities „ 

Re-admitted irom the Ohio Board of State Charities.. „.. 

Re-admitted from State institutions. ^ „ „ 


144 

6 

2 

12 


Re-admitted from violation of parole ^ 


9 


Returned from assignments, unfit.. 

Admitted without commitment _ ..^ 


3 

8 


Total of new and re-admissions.. 


120 
133 

25 

27 

2 

10 

13 

1 
1 
1 
1 
8 

29 
**! 


64 

67 

6 

1 
7 

*'5 
8 

1 
4 

1 

24 
1 


184 


Total number of children to be accounted for.- 

Loss during the year — 

Paroled to parents. „ 

Paroled to work „ _ ... 

Returned to courts.^ „ „ _ 

Returned to County Children's Homes 

Assigned to Institution for Feeble-Mmded. 


200 

31 
1 

34 
2 

15 


Assigned to Columbus State Hospital-.. 

Assigned to Cleveland State HofepitaL 

Assigned to Massillon State Hospital „ 

Assigned to Hospital for Epilepticd „ 

Assigned to Ohio State School for the Deaf. „ _ 

Assigned or returned to Ohio Board of State Charities ^ - 

Ass gncd to Holy Cross Home for Cripples 


21 

1 
1 
1 
2 
12 
1 


Assigned to Boys' Industrial School _ 

Assigned to Girls' Industrial School 

On temporary parole 


29 

24 

1 


Discharged to p&Tent, out of State 


1 


Total disposed of .^ ^ ^ 

Total number present at beginning of new year 


119 

14 

133 


68 
9 


177 
23 


TotaU _ „ 


67 


200 







(435) 



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StATE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

Ohio State University. 

Ohio University. 

Miami University. 

State Normal School (Kent). 

(437) 



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The Ohio State University 

The Ohio State University is a part of the educational facilities 
niafntained by the State and is located in the northern part of the city 
of Columbus. 

ORGANIZATION. 

For convenieoee of administrtaion, the departments of the Univer- 
sity are grouped into organizations called colleges. The Ohio State 
University comprises a graduate school and eleven colleges, each under 
the adinioistration of a Dean and College Faculty as follows: 

Graduate School. 

(.•ollege of Agriculture. 

College of Arts, Philosophy and Science. 

College of Commerce and Journalism. 

College of Dentistry. 

College of Education. 

College of Engineering. 

College of Homeopathic Medicine. 

College of Law. 

College of Medicine. 

College of Pharmacy. 

College of Veterinary Medicine. 

SUMMER SESSION. 

In addition to the above, there is a Summer Session under the 
supervision of a Director and governing committee for the administra- 
tion of the regular uuuiversity courses offered in the summer. 

This bulletin is devoted exclusively to the work of the College of 
Arts, Philosophy and Science for the academic year, 1920-21. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS, PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCE. 

The College of Arts, Philosophy and Science comprises those cur- 
ricula tlmt are dei^igned to furnish a liberal education in the languages 
and literatures, the isciences, mathematics, pliilosophy, history, politics, 
rcouoiiiius and sociology. The first two years of work in this college are 
i-e(iuired for tidjtussion to the Colleges of Law, Medicine, and Commerce 
and JournalisuL 



(XOTt") — 'The T'nitenflty publiBlics a bnlletin deH-riptive of each college. Copies may be obtained 
hy itiVlrttMtine t}i# Sf^rrctjir)' of tlie Entrance Board, Ohio State University, Columbus. Ohio, and statins 
tMo colleflis in nbleh this writer iB interested. ) 



(438) • 

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OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 439 

DEPARTMENTS. 

The College of Arts, Philosophy and Science includes work in the 
following departments: American History, Anatomy, Astronomy, Bac- 
teriology, Botany, Chemistry, Economics and Sociology, English, Euro- 
pean History, Geology, German, Greek, Journalism, Latin, Mathematics, 
Military Science and Tactics, Mineralogy, Philosophy, Physical Educa- 
tion, Physics, Physiology, Political Science, Psychology, Romance Lan- 
guages, Zoology and Entomology. 

( 

GRADUATE COURSES. 

The graduate instruction offered by the departments represented 
in this bulletin is given in the Graduate School. A special bulletin de- 
scribing the organization, admission requirements, and work of the 
Graduate School may be obtained on application to the Secretary of the 
Entrance Board. 

THE SUMMER SESSION. 

The University maintains a summer session for eight weeks, in which 
most of the courses offered are credited by this College. Two summer 
sessions^are considered the equivalent of one semester, and four summer 
sessions the equivalent of the year. 

THE LAKE LABORATORY. 



The University maintains a Lake Laboratory at Put-in-Bay during 
the summer vacation, which is designed to provide opportunity for the 
investigation of the biology of the lake region, and for giving certain 
courses of instruction in the departments of Botany, and Zoology and 
Entomology. For further information write for a special bulletin, which 
may be obtained from the Secretary of the Entrance Board. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT. 

No undergraduate will be admitted to candidacy for a degree at any 
Commencement who has not done the last year of work required for the 
degree in residence in this college. No student will be registered in such 
candidacy later than the first day of October. 



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440 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

RESERVE officers' TRAJNING CORPS. 

Under the law of Congress establishing the land grant colleges it 
is required that instruction in Military Science and Tactics be included 
in the curricula. This instruction is given under the Defense Act of 
June 3, 1916, establishing in the University the Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps. Under normal conditions, six commissioned officers and 
eleven non-commissioned officers of the regular army are detailed by the 
War Department to take charge of this department. The Board of 
Trustees has directed that all male students, special and regular, except 
thoBe registered in the Colleges of Law, Medicine, Homeopathic iledicine^ 
and Dentistry, shall complete two years of military service unless espec- 
ially excused by the Military and Qymnasium Board. 

Foreign students are not exempt from military training, nor is self- 
support an adequate reason for excusing a student from the requirement 
in Military Science. 

The Reserve Officers* Training Corps is organized as a brigade con- 
sisting of two regiments of infantry, each composed of three battalions 
of four companies each, and one regiment of field artillery , composed of 
two battalions of three batteries each, a band of sixty pieces, and a 
trumpet corps. There are two companies of men from the students in 
tlie three-year course in agriculture. The total number of men under 
ainjis averages about three thousand. 

The course of instruction is both practical and theoretical, and 
divided into basic and advanced courses in both infantry and field artil- 
Ipry, One-half of the time is devoted to theoretical work in the cla^* 
rooTti, rnd one-half of the time to practical work in the field. The basic 
eourses are required of all freshmen and sophomores. The advanced 
<^ourses are elective for juniors and seniors. Students completing the 
advanced course when recommended by the Commandant and the Pr^si- 
dertt of the University, are granted a commission as Second Lieutenant 
in the Officers' Reserve Corps by appointment from the President of tbe 
T'nited States. No student is eligible for the advanced course until he 
has satisfactorily completed the basic course or its equivalent, 

Uniforms and equipment are furnished by the War Department 
Stuilents who are taking advanced courses in Military Science also receive 
forty cents per day as commutation of rations in addition to their uni- 
ruriiis. 

The appointment of cadet officers is made usually from those who 
]mx*2 served in the Military Department at least one year and as a reward 
fnr excellence in their work. No compensation is paid to officers who 
tiru completing their first two years of service in the Military Depart- 
m»^ut, the only exception being those who have had the equivalent of th# 

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OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, 441 

required two years in service elsewhere. The compensation awarded at 
the end of each year of satisfactory service is thirty dollars for lieuten- 
ants, forty doUars for captains, and proportional sums for ofl&cers of 
higher rank. 

Service in the band is credited as military service, the positions being 
assigned after competitive try-out. Members of the band who have com- 
pleted two years of service in the Military Department or its equivalent 
are paid at the rate of twenty dollars per year and receive instruction 
during the four winter months from a competent band master. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS. 

To encourage graduates of this University, and of other similar and 
approved institutions, especially those in Ohio, to continue their studies 
and to undertake advanced work leading to the higher degrees, the Uni- 
versity has established assistantships in several departments. These 
demand from one-quarter to one-half of the time of the student for 
laboratory and other similar assistance — as far as possible along the line 
of his major subject. The remainder of his time is given to graduate 
work. The assistantships pay from $250 to $500 for the academic year 
and in addition all fees are remitted, except the matriculation fee and a 
diploma fee for those students who receive degrees. Appointments to 
all assistantships are made annually in April or May for the following 
year. Students desiring such appointments can obtain application blanks 
by addressing the Dean of the Graduate School. Applications must be 
filed not later than March 1st. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS. 

In addition to the graduate assistantships, a limited number of 
scholarships and fellowships have also been established. The scholar- 
ships are open to students having a baccalaureate degree from an ap- 
proved institution, and have a value of $250 with exemption from all 
fixed fees, except the matriculation fee. The fellowships on the other 
hand are open only to students who have at least the Master's degree or 
its equivalent, and have a value of $500 with like exemption from all 
fixed fees, except the matriculation fee. Scholars and fellows are selected 
on a basis of merit and must devote all their time to graduate work. 
Candidates for these positions should file their applications not later 
than March 1st. Application blanks may be obtained by addressing the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

THE APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE. 

In order to serve the schools of the State, the University faculty 
has provided a committee, one of the duties of which is to assist gcadiiatc.s^,^ 

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442 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

of tlie IJcivemty to teaching positions for which they are best fitted. 
Any student of the University intending to teach is invited to enroll his 
name with the eotmnittee on a blank provided for that purpose by the 
comniittee. Graduates of the University who are already engaged in 
teaching are also cordially invited to correspond with the Appointment 
Oonnnittee with a view to bettering their positions. Correspondence is 
invited from Boiird^ of Education and from superintendents and princi- 
pftls of sehools in need of teachers. No fee is charged f'^r the services of 
the committee. 

THE BRYAN PRIZE. 

Through the generosity of lion. William J. Bryan an annual. prize 
of twenty-five dolhirs is offered for the best essay on the principles under- 
lying the form of government of the United States. Competition for this 
I>rixe is open to all students of the University. For further information, 
make inquiry of the head of the department of American History. 



FEES AND EXPENSES. 

GENERAL CHARGES. 

All University fees must be paid, at the opening of each semester 
as a condition of ailniis.Hion to classes. Registration is not complete until 
all fees have been paid. No student will have any privileges in the classes 
or laboratories until all fees and deposits are paid. 

Since all fees are due and payable as a part of the student's registra- 
tion, no person should come to the University for registration without 
money suflffleient to cover all of his fees and deposits. 

Matrkidutkm Fee — Every student upon his first admission to the 
University is rer(uired to pay a matriculation fee of $10.00. This fee is 
paid but onee, and is in addition to other University fees and entitles 
the student of the priviltjges of membership in the University. (Effective 
June 1,1920.) 

Non-Resident Fee—l^very undergraduate student who is not a legal 
resident of the State of Ohio is required to pay a non-resident fee of 
$25.00 each setneBter of his residence in the University in addition to 
other University fees. The burden of registering under proper residence 
h placed upon the student. If there is any possible question of his right 
to legal residence the matter should be brought to the attention of the 
Eegiatrar and passed upon, previous to registration or the payment of 
fees. Any student who registers improperly under this rule shall be 
required to pay not only the non-resident fee but shall be assessed a 
penalty of $10.00, (Effective June 1, 1920.) 

No person shall be considered eligible to register in the University 

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OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 443 

as a resident of the State of Ohio unless he has resided in the state twelve 
months next preceding the date of his proposed enrollment ; and no per- 
son shall be considered to have gained a residence in this State for the 
purpose of registering in the University while he is a student in the 
University. 

The residence of minors shall follow that of the legal guardian. 

The residence of wives shall follow that of husbands. 

Aliens who have taken out first citizenship papers and who have 
been residents of Ohio for twelve months next preceding the date of their 
enrollment in the University, shall be regarded as eligible for registra- 
tion as residents of Ohio. 

Incidental Fee — The fee for all students is $15.00 a semester. 

Former students who do not pay this fee until the third day of the 
first semester, and the second day of the second semester, must pay one 
dollar additional. For each day of delinquency thereafter fifty cents is 
added. 

Laboratory Deposit — Students are required to pay for all materials 
consumed in laboratory work. To meet the cost of these materials a de- 
posit ranging from two to fifteen dollars for each course requiring such 
supplies is made at the Bursar's oflSce before the student can enter the 
laboratory. All laboratory supplies are sold at the General Store Room, 
Chemistry Hall, to students at cost to the University, and charged against 
the deposit. Any unused part of the deposit is refunded at the end of 
the semester. 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Locker Fee — The gymnasium is free to all students, but those desir- 
ing to use a locker are charged a fee of two doUars a semester, which 
includes the rental of towels. 

' The Ohio Union — A fee of one dollar a semester is paid by all male 
students at registration. This entitles the student to all the privileges 
of the Union, consistent with the Constitution and House Rules govern- 
ing it. 

Oraduatioii Fee — A fee of five dollars, to cover expenses of gradua- 
tion and diploma, is required of each person receiving one of the ordinary 
degress from the University, and this fee must be paid on or before the 
last Friday preceding Commencement. A like fee of ten dollars is 
charged each person receiving one of the higher graduate degrees. 

Rooms and Board — Furnished rooms can be obtained at prices vary- 
ing from ten to fifteen dollars per month. Board at the restaurants and 
boarding clubs near the University costs from six and one-half to eight 
dollars per week. The Ohio Union Commons offers board at reasonable 
rates. Board with furnished room can be obtained in private families 
at rates varying around ten dollars per week. 

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444 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Textbooks — Students should not purchase textbooks until they are 
advised by the instructors of their respective classes. 

EXPENSES PER TEAR. 

One of the most perplexing questions that confronts a prospective 
student is what the course is going to cost him a year. 

In order to furnish information, we have listed below an estimate 
of the average payments required by the University for the Preshman 
year in the College of Arts, Philosophy and Science, and have estimated 
the cost for room and boarding at a safe price. These two items are 
sometimes reduced slightly where two students occupy the same room 
and where boarding clubs are economically managed. Fees to the Uni- 
versity are paid one-half at the beginning of each semester. 

Matriculation fee $10 00 

Incidental fee 30 00 

Ohio Union 2 00 

Gymnasium locker 4 00 

Deposits (if Chemistry is elected) 30 00 

Books 30 00 

Board— (36 weeks at $8.00 per week) 288 00 

Room rent, at $15.00 per month 135 00 

General expenses 100 00 

$629 00 

The item of general expenses is always subject to the personal 
habits of the individual, and varies according to the degree of economy 
exercised. 

Note — In order to meet all the necessary expenses of registration, 
books, and other expenditures incident to securing a room and board, a 
student should come prepared to expend from $75.00 to $100.00 during 
the first ten days of a semester. After that period his board and room 
rent will constitute the major part of his expenses. 

THE E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOimS FELLOWSHIP. 

Through the generosity of E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company of 
Wilmington, Delaware, and in recognition of the service of coUej^es and 
universities in training chemists for the emergency of the war, fellow- 
ships in chemistry have been established in a number of institutions, one 
of which is available at the Ohio State University. 

The holder of the fellowship must be prepared to engage at once 
in active research upon a problem distinctly chemical in character, there 
being no further limitations upon the fellowship. The stipend is $750 
per annum, and it is expected that at the conclusion of the year the holder 

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OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 445 

of the f eillowship will be able to present his research as a thesis for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The donors have not assumed obligation 
to continue the fellowship beyond the current year, but it is hoped that it 
will be renewed. 

THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Men who have completed their sophomore year at the Ohio State 
University are eligible to compete for the Cecil Rhodes Scholarships, 
tenable for three years at Oxford University, England, with a stipend 
of three hundred pounds each year. These scholarships are awarded on 
the combined basis of character, scholarship, athletics, and leadership in 
extra-curriculum activities. Further information may be obtained from 
any member of the Rhodes Scholarship Committee of Selection for Ohio : 
Chairman, President W. O Thompson, Ohio State University, Columbus, 
Ohio; Professor B. E. Schmitt, Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 
Ohio ; Cary R. Alburn, Esq., Attorney, Garfield Bank Building, Cleve- 
land, Ohio ; Secretary, Professor Leigh Alexander, Oberlin College, 
Oberlin, Ohio. 

WOMEN STUDENTS. 

As far as possible, women students should make arrangeiricnts for 
room and board in advance. An effort will be made to secure suitable 
accommodations in private residences for such as cannot be accomiro- 
dated in Oxley Hall. Prospective women students should address Miss 
Elizabeth Conrad, Dean of Women, Ohio State University, Columbus, 
Ohio. . . 



ADMISSION. 

The admission of students is in charge of the University Entrance 
Board, which determines the credits that shall be issued on all entrance 
examinations ai^d certificates, and furnishes all desired information to 
applicants. Correspondence relating to admission should be addressed 
to the Entrance Bo^rd, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 

ADMISSION TO CURRICULA LEADING TO A DEGREE. 

I^ compliance with the laws of the state of Ohio, the holder of a 
diploma from a first-grade high school in the state, will be admitted 
to the College, of Arts, Philosophy and Science upon presentation of 
his high school certificate. 

Other applicants may be admitted without examination on pre- 
sentation of properly indorsed certificates covering fifteen units and 
graduation from such secondary schools as have been accredited or 



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446 , OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

recognized by the University, from approved normal schools, and from 
the State Board of School Examiners. 

For admission by examination or by certificate see the Bulletin of 

General Informalion, 

DISTRIBUTION OF UNITS. 

In order to form a broad foundation for the course in Liberal Art« 
the following distribution of units in the high school is strongly recom- 
mended: three in English; one in history; one in algebra and one in 
geometry; one in physics or chemistry; one in biological science; four 
in foreign language; and three additional in these or other studies. 
If the distribution of units does not meet the above recommendation 
the student will be required to carry courses in the University to make 
up any deficiency and this may delay his graduation. . 

SPECIAL STUDENTS OP MATURE YEARS. 

A person Of mature years who is unable to meet the entrance t'c- 
quirements in all respects, under certain circumstances may be per- 
mitted to matriculate for specified courses for which he can demonstrate 
adequate qualifications. An applicant under 21 years of age will not 
be considered. Inquiry concerning such admission should be addressee! 
to the Entrance Board, and, to receive consideration must reach the 
Board not less than ten days in advance of the opening of the semester. 



COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE. 

The College of Veterinary Medicine aims to fit its students for the 
regular practice of veterinary medicine; to offer the special training 
necessary to equip its graduates for positions in Federal Civil Service 
and for positions of state and municipal inspectors; and to provide 
opportunity for graduate work for those who contemplate research 
work or teaching. 

It is an institution supported by the State iand Federal govern- 
menta and does not depend upon fees collected from students for its 
maintenance. It can therefore demand of its students a high grade 
of scholarship. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATiON. 

The location of the college in a city of over 200,000 inhabitants 
makes possible a combination of theoretical and practical training in 
the study of animiil diseases. From the city, horses, dogs, and other 
pet animals are brought to the clinic; from the adjacent agricultural 
rountr>% the meat and wool-producing animals also come for treatment. 
The8P animals are not so readily available for clinical study in larger 
cities. 

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OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 447 

Veterinary students may avail theraselves of the advantages of- 
fered by any of the other colleges of the University if time permits 
them to do so. The University Library of 207,685 volumes, the gym- 
nasium, literary and musical societies, etc., arc as available to veterinary 
students as to students of any other college of the University. 

Free clinics are held from 9 to 11 a. m. daily that the students may 
become familiar in a practical, way with the diagnosis of disease and 
with the care and treatment of diseased and injured animals. During 
the clinic hours the' students assist the instructors in surgical opera- 
tions and in dispensing and administering medicines* 

A large number of animals are left in the hospital for treatment. 
Third and fourth year students are placed in charge of thes.. cases and 
are required to keep a careful daily record of each cas*", administer 
medicimsand apply bandages, wound dressings, etc., under the super- 
visioa of the Clinical Staffflf. Tlie students thus become famiKar with 
veterinary practice and are thereby enabled to apply intelligently the 
theoretical instruction they receive in the class room. 

In connection with the Hospital an ambulance service is main- 
tained for both large and small animals. This service brings to the 
clinic: a class of clascs which furnishes the most instructive clinical 
material. The Hospital is undoubtedly one of the best in the country. 
During the academic year of 1918-1919, nearly 6,000 cases were treated 
in it. The small animal wards are especially well equipped and fur- 
nished with every modem facility for the care and treatment of small 
patients. In the arrangement the pedagogic features of clinical train- 
ing have been taken into consideration and every eflfort has been made 
to emphasize the practical phases of disease, diagnosis and treatment. 



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The Ohio University 



Herewith is presented the report of the Ohio University for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1920. 

Classes in the University and the State Normal College were in 
session throughout forty-eight (48) weeks of the year for which this 
report is made. The enrollment of students varied with the diflfcrcnt 
semesters and terms. The average enrollment of students, regular 
semesters, covering a period of thirty-six (36) weeks, was 1,011. The 
three special terms, with additional enrollment of students, and each 
six weeks in length, had an average enrollment of 1,234, Average en- 
rollment of students in the two extension semesters was 828^ Dififerent 
students in the college year numbered 4,023. 

The Report of the Treasurer shows total receipts for the fiscal year 
to be $387,244.80. Receipts exclusively for University use amounted 
to $360,580.11. Of the total receipts reported, the sum of $287,337.02 
came from the State of Ohio. 

The statements regarding student enrollment, and those relating 
to money receipts for institutional up-keep, give means for estimating 
the cost of the educational service given at Ohio Universit3^ Those 
most conversant, with such matters will conclude that such service is 
given at' very modest cost. 

The value of the service referred to depends upon, the fitness of 
those rendering it and the results of it as seen in the work of the students. 
A faculty sufficient in numbers and made up of scholarly, experienced, 
and industrious members, is the first promise of desirable outcome in 
the right ordering of the work of the student body. The record shows 
that the teaching staff at Ohio University is composed of ninety-eight 
(98) members. There are those who will say that the number of in- 
structors named is not large enough properly to give instruction to the 
number of enrolled students. I do not have such opinion. If those 
under service are qualified for their work, are rightly interested in it, 
and are not constitutionally tired, they can render effectively all needed 
teaching service for a larger body of students than that now found at 
Ohio University. With this opinion strong in mind, I am not disposed, 
under present conditions, to ask appropriations to pay the the salaries 
of additional instructors. 

There has grown up in college halls the feehng that an instructor 
who gives fifteen hours a week to class room work has reached the limit 
of his teaching power to do satisfactory work. It has been said that 
teaching is a very wearing and narrowing occupation — but normally it 
need not be either. Given proper preparation for teaching, love for the 
calling, and wilUngness to serve faithfully, and no one is going to a 

(448) 

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OHIO TTKIVEBSITT. 449 

premature grave by doing the service rendered by a teacher in the . 
public schools or by the one teaching classes in a college. As I look 
back over a Somewhat extended experience in school and college work, 
I am led to say that "indisposition to work/' to put it mildly, is more 
responsible for worthless teaching service in school and college than any 
other one cause. In saying this I do not mean to convey the thought 
that those engaged in teaching at Ohio University are not measuring 
up, with fair acceptance, to their responsibility as teachers. A general 
application of what has been said must be made. 

When I came to Ohio University nineteen years ago, each head of 
a department was receiving a salary of $1,500 per annum. Some of 
these, yet in service, will in the college-year ahead receive a salary of 
$3,000 for teaching service covering thirty-six (36) weeks. Those 
rendering additional teaching service in special terms get extra and full 
pay for time given. It is a proper question for these people to put to 
themselves, '*Am I better-fitted for my work now, and more willing to 
do it, than I was when I first became a teacher?" 

I am an earnest and a consistent advocate of better salaries for all 
who teach, whether in school or college; but I am equally insistent that 
increased salaries shall bring better qualified persons into the profession 
of teaching. The salaries now paid employes at Ohio University are 
not unreasonably low, but they are not high enough to secure and hold 
the kind of teaching talent that should be employed. Our employes, 
many of them, caught the spirit of unrest that seems to have entered 
into the make-up of the whole working world. For a part of the college- 
year, the result of that spirit was plainly evident in the lowering of 
efficient service. A discontented, imeasy, restless employe cannot 
render satisfactory service; and such is easily led to neglect the work 
for which he was employed, thus finding time to join some questionable 
combioation that gives promise of promoting his selfish interests. 

A reference to the salary roll, found on the pages of this. report, 
shows the salaries at Ohio University have been increased, on the 
average, about thirty per cent (30%) since direct effort was put forth 
to that end. In the budget now being prepared, for the biennial period 
1921-1923, request will be made for a further increase of salaries amount- 
ing to not less than twenty per cent (20%). It would seem needless to 
go into lengthy statement of reasons why an increase of salaries should 
be granted. An object lesson is given in the cost of everything that 
salaries must buy. Adequate salaries and none but competent teachers 
should be the watchword. The best instructors are none too good to 
direct the educational activities of our yoimg people. 

It is unfortimate when one advanced in years and, for that and 
other reasons, is rendered incapable of giving the amount and quality 
of service needed, feels under necessity to continue teaching for the 
salary it brings. The pension system soon to become oi>erative in Ohio 

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450 OfflO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

will prove a veritable boon to school districts and colleges wherein 
persons, while worthy and with a creditable teaching record behind 
them, are stmggUng along under the infirmities of age to their own 
physical undoing and the no less disastrous consequences to those 
under their instruction. 

One who has to do with directing the work of yoiing peopb in 
school or college needs more than good health, educational ability, and 
willingness to labor. His character must rest upon sound ideas of his 
relation to the work he has chosen. At the June meeting of our Board 
of Trustees, a full list of instructors and minor employes was chosen. 
Most persons whose names appear on the list were not required to enter 
into a formal contract with the Board of Trustees; but each and every 
one of them well knew that he was expected to decHne the position to 
which he was appointed if the conditions of his appointment were un- 
satisfactory to him. Well, what happens? Two months after the 
Board action mentioned, and within less than three weeks before the 
opening of the college-year, resignations by nearly every mail came to 
the executive office. Thus it is that the President of the University, 
who ought to be enjoying a breathing spell from executive responsi- 
bility, finds himself driven to wit's end to fill positions in the teaching 
force. Can such persons as those just referred to exert any wholesome 
influence upon the minds and conduct of those whom they teach? 
There is but one answer to the question. It is becoming more and more 
the practice of teachers, of all grades, to accept one position and with 
that as a secure resting place strive with might and main for another 
position paying a better salary. Moral obligation to those who first 
employed them and to the interests they were selected to serve rests 
as lightly on their conscience as thistle-down on the back of a pachy- 
derm. As between employer and employe there ought to be reciprocity 
at least. The employer's right "to fire" after a time limit of service 
and other conditions of employment have been agreed upon is as de- 
fensible as the right "to quit" on the part of the employe. 

Fairly successful effort, continued the last college-year, was made 
to advance the standard of scholarship among students. It is needless 
to say that united faculty action is the only certain way of bringing 
this about. Among a large number of instructors there are always 
some who are regarded as "easy marks" by students. Failures in their 
classes are few and far between. It requires some diplomacy on the 
part of other faculty members to get the easy-going ones to stiffen up 
in their class room work. Desirable results have been secured, par- 
ticularly in the College of Liberal Arts. In the State Normal College 
there has been too much consideration shown students who were not 
doing satisfactory work. Credits were assembled from questionable 
sources and made to apply on the requirements of diploma and degree 



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OHIO UNIVERSITY. 451 



courses. The lines have been tightened somewhat, but they will be 
drawn more closely hereafter. 

Students attending classes in the second semester of the college- 
year — their number being an even thousand — had among their number 
fifty-eight (58) students who failed to make passing grades in their 
studies. This per cent of failures — 5 4-5% — ^is about the average at 
Ohio University. Our strongest teachers, while reporting the failure 
of students unprepared for their work or unwilUng to do it, yet make 
personal effort to reduce the percentage of failures to a minimum. 

The year ahead gives promise of good results. Indications point 
to an increased student enrollment. Employes will enter upon the 
work of the new college-year with a better feeling regarding it than 
existed throughout the greater part of the year gone by. The pay of 
one in service does have something to do with the amount and quality 
of that service. The prospect of permanent ,'employment, the knowl- 
edge that good work will favorably aflfect those who do it, such increase 
of wages as will meet the high cost of hving — all Will give promise of 
conditions favorable to the best educational service that any institu- 
tion of learning can render. 



ORIGIN OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The treaty of Paris, Sept. 3, 1783, made effective the independence 
of the United States. Then "a more perfect union," under the Con- 
stitution, was hastened by the cession of certain lands, claimed by in- 
dividual states, to the General Government. 

Virginia, which claimed large tracts of land in the western country, 
had l4d in this movement. In response to a recommendation of Con- 
gress, under date of Sept. 6, 1780, Virginia, in 1781, jdelded to the 
Congress of the United States for the benefit of said states all right, 
tit/fe, and claim which the conunonwealth had to the territory north- 
west of the Ohio River. 

On March 1, 1786, in response to a call issued by General Rufus 
Putnam and others, a body of men mostly soldiers of the Revolution 
holding certificates of indebtedness, or army warrants, against the 
Government, met at the "Bunch of Grapes Tavern,*' in Boston, Mass., 
and organized the Ohio Company of Associates. These men were in 
financial straits and were led to look towards the lands northwest of 
the Ohio River for a permanent home, could they secure government 
lands for the army warrants held by them. General Putnam, who had 
been in close touch with General Washington during the war, was the 
acknowledged leader of the movement and was ably assisted byManasseh 
Cutler, Winthrop Sargent, and Nathan Dane, the last named, at that 
time, representing Massachusetts in Congress. I 

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452 OHIO GBNEBAIi STATISTICS. 

Through the united action of these men, the Ordinance of July 13, 
1787, was passed by Congress. This famed piece of legislation pro- 
vided for a territorial goveinment of the district in which settlement 
was to be made, prohibited slavery therein, and decreed that "schools 
and the means of education shall be forever encouraged." 

In October, 1787, Messrs. Cutler and Sargent contracted with the 
Board of Treasury for the purchase of a large tract of land in the new 
territory. By the terms of this contract. Lot 16 of each township was 
to be set apart for the support of public schools. Lot 29 was reserved 
for the purposes of religion, and two complete townships were to be a 
perpetual endowment for a university. 

Here, in brief, is set forth part of the activities that later kd to the 
estabyshment of the Ohio University, at Athens. 

Manasseh Cutler wrote the charter of the institution which was 
called in 1802, the "American Western University,*' and, in 1804, the 
"Ohio University.' Territorial legislation located the institution at 
Athens, and legislative provision, under the first State Constitution, 
confirmed and emphasized all that the territorial legislature had done 
in the matter. 

The University now owns property — lands, buildings, and equip- 
ments — conservatively valued at $1,830,248. 

When Ohio was admitted into the Union it became a trustee, into 
whose hands were given the obligations and duties connected with the 
public-school, the ministerial, and the university lands — all explicitly 
reserved, for specific purposes, in the contract entered into by the Ohio 
Company of Associates with the Board of Treasury acting in the name, 
and under the direction of Congress. 

An act of Congress passed February 1, 1826, gave to the State of 
Ohio a fee-simple title to Lot 16. The State of Ohio acquired like con- 
trol of Lot 29 by an act of Congress bearing date of February 20, 1833. 

No act of Congress has ever given Ohio a fee-simple title to the land 
in the two townships explicitly reserved as a perpetual endowment for 
a university. Today, the State of Ohio holds these lands as a trustee, 
one that has voluntarily taken upon itself all the duties and obligations, 
legal and in equity, involved in such trusteeship. Good legal authority 
has expressed the opinion that, should the State of Ohio surrender its 
trusteeship, as assumed in the legislative act of 1804 and in subsequent 
acts of legislation, the title to the lands included in Athens and Alex- 
ander township would rest in. the General Government. 

The corporation known as the ^'President and Board of Trustees'* 
was not created to own the University property but to act as the State's 
agent to carry out a well-digested and well-defined purpose. There is 
nothing strange that the State began its control of the University in 
that way. 



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OHIO UNIVEEtSITT. 453 

The early legislators in Ohio were familiar with that form of insti- 
tutional management, for it generally prevailed a hundred years ago. 

It will be seen, clearly, from the foregoing, that the Ohio Company 
never secured any title to the two townships of land and that after 
the location of these townships was fixed that company had nothing 
more to do with them. The location having been fixed, absolute con- 
trol of the land was taken by the then existing legislative body. (See 
Sections 3 and 25, Article 8, Ohio Constitution of 1802.) 

The Territorial Act of January 9, 1802, established "an University 
in the Town of Athens." This Act also named the persons who should 
constitute a body politic and corporate to take immediate control of 
the University. This 'T>ody poUtic and corporate" exercised authority 
over the institution established just as boards of trustees, in these days, 
exercise authority over the state-supported institutions of learning. 
The legislature has been the supreme power from the beginning. Nat- 
urally, as a law-making body, it could not well do the work of a board 
of trustees, as we know and recognize the work and duty of such today; 
and for that reason it delegated some of its powers to a body of its own 
creation in harmony with educational experience and practice of that 
day. The legislature, from the very nature of its make-up, must neces- 
sarily have agents to execute its purposes; and that agency may con- 
sist of a number of persons, for instance, "The President and Trustees 
of Ohio University," or a single individual. 

The Act of February 18, 1804, passed by the Ohio Legislature, 
contained many of the powers and privileges of the Act of 1802 and is 
considered as entirely superseding it, although the earUer act has never 
been expressly repealed. 

The preamble of the later act is worthy of quotation in this con- 
nection: "Whereas institutions for the liberal education of youth are 
essential to the progress of arts and sciences; important to morality, 
virtue, and religion; friendly to the peace, order, and prosperity of 
society; and honorable to the government that encourages and patron- 
izes them; therefore. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the 
State of Ohio, That there shall be an University instituted and estab- 
lished in the tovvti of Athens * * * by the name and style of the 
'Ohio University' for the instruction of youth in all the various branches 
of liberal arts and science; for the promotion of good education, virtue, 
religion, and moraUty; and for conferring all the degrees and literary 
honors granted in similar institutions." 

From the date of the appointment of the first "body poUtic" to 
the adoption of the Constitution of 1851, its membership was named 
by legislative acts; since 1851, the members of the Board of Trustees 
have been nominated by the Governor of Ohio subject to confirmation 
by the Ohio State Senate. 

The educational history of Ohio University is one of deep interest 

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454 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

to every friend of education. The past at least is both honorable and 
secure. From the date, in 1815, when its first graduates left its halls, 
to the present, the educational service it has rendered to the people 
of Ohio speaks volumes for the wisdom, foresight, and patriotism of 
its founders. 

The Civil War was in progress in the early sixties of the last cent- 
ury. At their country's call, students left the halls of Ohio University 
to enter the army. Ohio, as a state, recognized the motive and service 
of these young men. 

February 10, 1864, the legislature passed an act whose purpose 
was **to provide for admission, without charge, into the state universi- 
ties and common schools of persons who, when minors, entered the 
military service of the United States.'* Observe that the "universities" 
and the ''common schools*' are directly associated in the title of the 
act. The act made it the ''duty of the trustees of Miami University, 
at Oxford, and of Ohio University, at Athens^ * * * to admit into 
said universities * * ♦ without charge, all persons who, when 
minors, so enUsted in the mihtary service of the United States, etc." 

Acts of the legislature— January 23, 1867; April 30, 1868, January 
28, 1870 — make appropriations "to pay tuition of salaries in the state 
universities at Athens and Oxford,'' 

Originally, it was thought that the income from the endowment 
lands and from tuition fees would be sufficient to give the University 
adequate financial support. It did not take long to see that such in- 
come was wholly inadequate to support an institution of learning 
worthy of the people's confidence and patronage. Thus it is, that, since 
1875, the Ohio University has been financially supported by legisla- 
tive acts making direct appropriations of money, or providing a mill- 
tax support, or by a combination of the two. In this manner, the Ohio 
University within the last forty-two years, has received hundreds of 
thousands of dollars from the legislature of Ohio for institutional up-keep. 

By an act of the Legislature, passed March 12, 1902, a Normal 
College was established at Ohio University. Since the date named, the 
College has been supported by a mill-tax and by direct appropriations. 

Both University and Normal College are under the direction of the 
same Board of Trustees, whose members are appointed as hereinbefore 
stated. There is no separation, no division of the institution's funds 
as between the two arms of its educational service. Legislation, and 
public opinion as well, recognizes the Ohio University as an entity — 
not one part controlled by a corporation and another part by the State 
of Ohio, through its legislative acts. 

LOCATION. 

Athens, the seat of the University, is situated in the southeastern 
part of the State. It is easily accessible from the east and west by the 

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OHIO UNIVBRSITY. 



455 



Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern railroad and its branches; from the 
southern, central, and northern portions of the State by the Hocking 
Valley and the Toledo and Ohio Central railways. By these routes it 
is one hundred and sixty miles from Cincinnati and seventy-five miles 
southeast from Columbus. The sanitary arrangements of the city are 
unsurpassed. Its principal streets are paved; it is provided with water- 
works and sewerage; its Board of Health is vigorous and efficient. There 
are few cities in the country that are more desirable a^ a place of tem- 
porary or permanent residence than Athens. 

The lover of natural scenery cannot fail to hv charmed with its 
picturesque surroundings. The winding valley of the Hock-hocking 
and the wooded hills beyond present a series of striking views from the 
University, while the wide prospects, as seen at certain seasons from 
some of the neighboring summits, afford a quiet and varied beauty, 

OHIO UNIVERSITY, ATHENS, OHIO, 

Enrollment of Students, 1915-1916 and 1919-1920, inclusive. 

1915-16 1916-17 191^-18 1918-19 1919-20 



First Semester 1,106 

Second Semester 1,088 



Average.- _ 1,097 

Spring Term 796 

Summer School, 1 2,287 

Summer School, 2 _ ___ 



1,112 
1,067 

l,08fl 

801 

1,97S 

127 



829 
754 

791 

mi 

1.741 
427 



S94 



1,022 

1,000 



777 1,011 

793 817 

1,694 2,163 

386 721 



Extension Classes: 

First Semester .- 1,215 1,142 1,324 1,101 849 

Second Semester 1,030 1,008 1,186 9ii8 807 

Different Students in the College Year.. 4,317 4,479 4,051 3,957 4,023 

Total number in teaching staff _ .___.^ — ... ©8 

Administrative staff and non-teaching employes .......__ 44 

Number of acres in plant ._._.._ ,. 40 

Estimated value, grounds and buildings -,.* 11,830,248 

Senior Class, four-year graduates __._.,_, 137 

Graduating Class, two-year courses ___ ^, __.,._._..*. 143 

Estimated number of living aliunni and former students _,.___.. 10,000 

Number of students and graduates in national service during the late war 500 

Number of those who held commissions _ ........... 100 

Number of those who died in service ,......._. 16 



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456 



OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 



SOME ENROLLMENT STATISTICS, PAST AND PRESENT- 



1870 

Classical Course 28 

Scientific Course 16 

Preparatory 61 

1880 

Classical Course 13 

Scientific Course 25 

Preparatory Course 43 

Teachers' Class 22 

18d8 

College of Arts 97 

Irregulars 22 

Preparatory 293 

1919 

College of Arts 511 

Irregulars HI 

622 

State Normal College 297 

Irregulars 65 



1873 

Classical Course^,-^,,,.,,., ..,.*,. 33 

Scientific Course ,___._,,._-.- ^ 11 

Preparatory 56 

1891 

College of Art6-„. ._.-... ,, 80 

Preparatoty ..._.,. ._,..,_, 140 

1901 

College of Arts -. 109 

Irregulars *^ 11 

Preparatory _. _____^ ,_ 185 

Commercial .__.--_....,_--„- 86 

Music -.-, 71 

Names counted more than once*-,-, 72 

1920 

College of Arts - ,, 517 

Irregulars ^ 137 

654 

State Normal College 417 

Irregulars __,..__-, ,., 75 



Grand Total. 



362 
-*984 



Grand Total. 



492 

*1,146 



♦This total does not include Spring-Term, Summer School ^ or Extension- 
Class Students. The Grand Net Total for the year is 4,023, 

ENROLLMENT AND CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS. 

1896-7 1897-8 1808-9 1899-00 1900-01 

Seniors 19 13 12 11 13 

Juniors 13 21 17 19 18 

Sophomores 27 28 23 30 29 

Freshmen 36 35 49 42 49 

Specials and irregulars 24 22 26 9 11 

Preparatory 232 293 254 257 185 

Names counted twice 8 3 1 75 72 

Commercial Students 64 ^ 

Music Students ..— , 72 71 

iSTo/r— Omitting "Specials" and "Irregulars" it will be seen that the student 
enrollment in the Arts College ran from 95 to 109. Even this small number included 
students working towards the degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy— B. Ped. Examina- 
tion of the figures show that the Preparatory students outnumbered the Art stu- 
dents nearly two and one-half to one. * 



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OHIO UNIVEESITy, 



m 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT, 

1913-1914 AND 1919-1920 INCLUSIVE. 

College of Liberal Arts— 1913-4 1914-5 1915-6 lOlM I917-S IDIS-U 191&-20 

Post Graduates 6 4 7 6 3 ._- 

Graduating Class 52 40 69 50 

Seniors .___ 40 63 39 70 47 40 00 

Juniors ._ 51 44 74 74 52 43 69 

Sophomores 114 129 121 136 SO 111 150 

Freshmen 180 156 154 200 140 312 238 

Special and Irregular... 171 141 156 127 78 110 137 

612 580 619 GGO 403 622 654 

6 6 3 ..... ,,,- 

32 34 35 85 -.,- _,,- 

33 33 63 45 ei 45 38 

26 51 77 72 42 27 43 

155 193 337 396 133 99 128 

177 350 555 329 ISH 141 20S 

64 112 597 5*5 22 50 75 

172 349 275 108 74 ._.._ 



State Normal College- 
Post Graduates 

Graduating Class 

Seniors 

Juniors _ 

Sophomores ___ 

Freshmen 

Special and Irregular... 
Preparatory _ _ . 



665 1,128 1,942 1,090 



521 



362 



492 



DEGREE GRADUATES 11)09-1920. 



Male Female Total 

1909 23 10 33 

1910--_ --, 22 8 30 

1911 -...,- 34 19 53 

1912 41 32 73 

1913 - 55 20 81 

1914 -^--- 4a 33 79 

1915 ._._._ 65 38 103 

1916 ..-— 76 58 134 

1917 .-— 69 76 145 

1918 - 40 68 las 

1919 ,^- 37 54 91 

1920 , 82 55 137 

Totals - ---. 662 509 1,171 

The whole number of degree graduates from 1815 to 1930, inchmive, a period uf 
one hundred and six years, is as follows: 

Men, 1,133; Women, 567; Total, 1,700. 

Included in the last two totals are the degree graduatos from the State Normal 
College, whose number is as follows: 

Men, 217; Women, 259; Total, 476. 

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458 OmO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

In addition to the four-year courses of full college grade, there are a number 

of two-year courses leading to a diploma, but not to a degree. The names of some 
or these find the number of graduates from each, within the limit time named, are 

herewith given: 

Department— Dates Graduates 

Elementary Education 1904-1920 937 

IJonie Economics .-_ 1913-1920 211 

Piiblic-School Drawing __ 1909-1920 74 

rublic^chofil Music 1908-1920 122 

KbdcT^^iHen -. _ 1910-1920 43 

Miimml Tminmg 1912-1920 24 

Agriculture _ 1915-1920 19 

College of Music 1909-1920 28 

Bchool of Orntory 1910-1029 34 

School of Commence 1904-1920 93 

Electrical Engineering 1891-1920 187 

Civil Engineering .__ - 1907-1920 85 



TotaL ..- 1,857 

Note.^An examination of the statements made will show that over 69 per cent 
of all the degree graduates, receiving diplomas since 1814, have gone from college 
\u\Ub in the last nineteen years. 

All the 1,857 diploma gradua'tes (two-year courses), save a few students taking 
tJje .short course in Electrical Engineering, have graduated since 1903. 

Gradimtea from the School of Commerce do not include those receiving Certifi- 
cates of Proficiency in Accounting, Stenography and Typewriting. 



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OHIO UNIVBRSITY. 459. 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 



The work of the Extension Department of Ohio University has now 
passed the experimental stage. 

The possibility of bringing the advantages of a college' education 
to the doors of all has been established. The social benefits of the 
college campus cannot be supplied through the extension Department, 
but the opportunity to obtain a considerable portion of a college train- 
ing is offered to those students who do not wish to spend long periods 
away from home. 

The Ohio University, constantly alive to the needs of the i!)eople 
of the State, organized its extension department in 1910, that the ad- 
vantages which its students have enjoyed for more than a hundred 
years may be shared by those who cannot come to the college halls. 
The growth of. the department during the short period of its existence, 
and the interest manifested in it by the citizenship of Southern Ohio, 
furnish ample evidence of the appreciation accorded this feature of 
University activity. 

In 1910 nine extension centers, enrolling a total of 79 students, 
were organized. From this meager beginning the work has grown until 
the Extension Department now ranks high among the departments of 
the University in service rendered. 

Within the college-year 1918-1919 three instructors gave their 
whole time, up to the opening of the Spring Term, May 5, 1919, to 
conducting extension classes. Their united salaries amounted to $6,500. 
Houjse Bill No. 536 authorizes the employment of only two extension 
teachers or 1919-1920 and 1920-1921, and gives them a total salary of 
$4,000 for each year. This means a great reduction in the* amount of 
instruction that can be given. The reduction of salaries was both ill- 
advised and unjust. Commendation of our extension work by school 
superintendents and others interested in it has been almost without 
exception. Those giving extension class instruction were picked men, 
chosen for their special fitness for the work to be done. . That they 
should feel the lack of legislative appreciation of their work is very 
natural. They are not alone in the feeling that the present is not an 
opportune time for the lessening of educational activity and the reduc- 
tion of teachers' salaries. Those having to do with salary appropriations 
cannot be made to see the importance of the special work done in our 
extension classes and in the short terms — all organized and conducted, 
principally, for the professional improvement of teachers and prospec- 
tive teachers. For the sum expended on these agencies, the results are 
more in amount, and better also, than the educational results following 
a like expenditure in the regular semesters of the college-year. 

During the academic year, 1919-1920, 51 centers with an enroll-^ 

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1 


Barnes vi lie 


2 


Belkire 


3 


Bremen 


4 


Cambridge 


5 


Chillicothe 


6 


Circleville 


7 


Clarington 


8 


Gallipolis 


9 


Glouster 


10 


Ironton 


11 


Jackson 


12 


Lancaster 


13 


Logan 



460 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

ment of 1,656 students were organized in 26 cities and towns. These 
places are listed below; 

14 McConnelsville 

16 Martins Ferry 

16 Middleport 

17 Murray 

18 Nelsonville 

19 Newark 

20 New Straitsville 

21 Portsmouth 

22 Shawnee 

23 Steubenville 

24 Waverly 

25 Wcllston 

26 Zanesville 

As indicated in the introductory statement, it is ten years since 
extension work was first undertaken by the Ohio University. The 
appended table will indicate the growth of the department to date: 

Year Centers Students 

1910-11.-.--- - 9 79 

1911-12 9 113 

1912-13 ..-- 7 96 

1913-14 -_-. 23 307 

1914-15--. ...- 99 2,160 

1915-16. - 77 l,45t> 

1916-17-... .-.- 72 1,105 

1917-18 75 2,IS0 

1918-19 -_ 70 2,059 

1919-20 --.- 51 1,056 

Ten years 492 11,334 

Number Required for Formation of a Class — There must be 
at least twenty registrations in the same subject before the University 
will consider furnishing an ihstructor. The demands made upon the 
University for Extension Service are so great that it is necessary^ to 
place the minimum number of registrations for any class at twenty if 
the pohcy of doing good to the greatest number is to prevail. IK 

Costs of Courses — A registration fee of five dollars will be 
charged for each course for which a student is registered. This fee is 
due and payable on the day of registration. It is to be noted thai ike 
fee of $5.00 is not a tuition fee, and that no refund will he vmde after a 
student has registered. Whenever it is necessary for the instructor to 
have the railroad, or in any manner depart from the regular method 
of travel, such additional cost in transportation will also be met by 
members of the class concerned. - ^ t 

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OHIO UNlVBftSITY. 461 

Length of Coukses — A term covers a period of fifteen weeks. 
One recitation, two hours ijQ length, is held each week. Each assign- 
ment is laid out to represent a week's work on a two-hour credit course, 
or the equivalent of from four to six hours of home study per week. 
Classes are organized in September and January of each year. 

Credit for Courses — Upon evidence that the student has com- 
pleted the prescribed course in a satisfactory way, a credit of two 
semester hours will be given upon the college records. These credit 
hours may be applied on any course given in any department of the 
University on the same basis as if done in residence. But not more 
than twetity hours on any two-year course will be permitted in this way. 

Entrance Requirements — No entrance requirements are specified, 
but each application will be passed upon individually. No one will be 
admitted to a class until the Department is satisfied that he is suf- 
ficiently prepared to carry the work of the course. 

Standards — Classes will be conducted like resident classes, and ' 
regular attendance will be insisted upon. Only those students are de- 
sired who have serious intentions of doing intensive study under expert 
guidance for their betterment as individuals and citizens. Grades will 
be reckoned upon the class record, examination and attendance. 

Instructors — The instructor will, in most cases, be from the 
faculty of the Department. Occasionally the services of a member of 
the resident faculty are obtainable if the center is organized within 
reasonable distance from the University. In all cases, instruction is 
given by a bona fide member of the University faculty. While the Di- 
rector will try, so far jas lies within his power, to comply with the 
wishes of a center as to the instructor and the course given, yet he 
will reserve the right to decide both points, compatible with the best 
interest of all concerned. 

Work Limit — The State Appropriation for salaries of extension 
professors has, by legislative action, been cut from $6,500 to $4,000; 
transportation from $3,500 to $3,000; instructors from three to two. 

From this it can be seen that the Department has been greatly re- 
stricted in its work, tue think unfortunately so. Conditions will have to be 
accepted as they are, with hope for more favorable legislation hereafter. 

Effort will be made to distribute the time of the extension men as 
equitably as possible over the section of the state assigned to the Uni- 
versity. It may be necessary in some cases to limit the number of 
classes to be organized in certain counties, or perhaps the number of 
registrations permitted in any one town, in order to distribute ad- 
vantages fairly. 

It is the desire of those in control that the Extension Department 
shall render the largest possible service to the people of Southeastern 
Ohio. This service may take other forms than the organizing of classes 
for study leading to college credit. Co-operation and counsel, will ije^^ 



462 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

gladly supplied to those planning educational campaigns, school surveys, 
and other forms of educational activity. Requests for speakers foi 
teachers' conventions, club meetings, and commencement exercises will 
be gladly received. Inquiries relative to any of the service above 
mentioned will be turned over to the member or members of the Uni- 
versity faculty best qualified to handle them that accurate information 
and expert advice may be disseminated. 

Correspondence relative to the work of the Extension Department 
should be addressed to the undersigned. 

Robert L. Morton, Director, 
Extension Department, Ohio University 
Athens, Ohio. 

RECAPITULATION. 

No. 
Name of Professor — of 

Sudents 

Robert L. Morton 677 

Matthew J. Walsh- -J 719 

AlvinE. Wagner 214 

Bert M. Thompson 1 46 

Total number of students— 1919-1920 1,656 

Expense Account — Extension Teacuers. 

Total 
Instructors— Expense 

Account 

Robert L. Morton _ 19^.25 

Matthew J. Walsh 919.39 

Alvin E. Wagner 264.6il 

Bert M. Thompson _ - 

Total 12,133.33 

THE TRAINING SCHOOLS OF THE STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

The Schools directly connected with the Normal College and under 
immediate control of the University authorities are the John Hancock 
High School, the Graded Training School, the Rural Training School 
(Mcchanicsburg), and the Kindergarten Training School. 

The John Hancock High School. 

This school was named in honor of Dr. John Hancock, who, in 
his day, was one of the most prominent and best known of the school 
men of Ohio. At the time of his death he was State Commissioner of 
Common Schools and an honored member of the Board of Trustees of 
Ohio University. 

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OHIO UNIVERSITY, 463 

Those having to do with the planning and direction of the work of 
the State Normal School have always felt that the olasses of the State 
Preparatory School did not give adequate means for observation and 
practice teaching to the rapidly increasing number of students prepar- 
ing for high-school positions. Students looking forward to teaching 
service in kindergarten and elementary schools have always had good 
opportunity at Ohio University for professional training in the Kinder- 
garten, Rural and Graded Training Schools connected with the State 
Normal College. 

It has ever been the wish of the University authorities to give up 
all preparatory classes just as soon as school conditions in Southeastern 
Ohio suggested the wisdom of that course. The conditions to that end 
are becoming more favorable every year. The continuation of some 
preparatory work for the help of a few students of more mature a^e 
than the average high-school student will be a necessity for some time 
ahead. This is in continuation of the desire of the University authori- 
ties to serve educationally all who need and are worthy of educational 
help. 

This school is a high school in all that the words imply. All its 
work is well planned, successfully conducted, and in every way repre- 
sentative of the best educational experience of the times. It is not the 
wish of any one connected with it to have it interfere in any way with 
the high schools of Southeastern Ohio. Its opening is to lealize a two- 
fold purpose: (1) To give advanced students (those looking forward 
to the completion of a four-year degree course) an opportunity to ob- 
serve real professional teaching in a high school and to take part in it 
under the skilled supervision of expert teachers; (2) To afford young 
people who may not be able to secure adequate instruction at home a 
high-grade, well-taught school where, at the minimum cost, they can 
complete a high-school course fitting them for effective service in some 
chosen vocation or for entrance to college. 

THE GRADED TRAINIKG SCHOOL. 

The classes of this school are taught in a model building of its kind, 
erected and equipped at a cost of $70,000. This building contains ten 
classrooms, twelve recitation rooms, rest rooms, offices, and an audi- 
torium with seating capacity for 400 persons. This school is attended 
by about 330 pupils representing all grades below the high school. An 
experienced school supervisor directs the work of eight critic teachers 
and five special teachers. The special teachers have direct charge of 
the instruction given in Music, Drawing, Domestic Science, Manual 
Training, Nature Study and Physical Culture. All practice teaching 
is under the close supervision of the critic teacher of the grade, or a 
special teacher, and the Principal of the School. 

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464 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

THE RURAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The Rural Training School is situated on a brick-paved road, 
only a few minutes walk into the country from the University. This 
is a type of the Rural Consolidated School — the school of the future. 
It has the eight grades divided into three rooms and taught by normal 
graduates selected for this special work. In addition to the legally 
required elementary subjects, Music, Drawing, Domestic Science, 
Agriculture and Manual Training are taught by seniora in the Normal 
College in the special courstes. The Domestic Science, Manual Training 
and Agriculture are taught in separate rooms well-equipped for these 
special subjects. In connection wth the class work on Methods of 
Teaching the Common Branches, the class observes the teaching of the 
same subjects by the critic teachers in the Rural Training School. 

THE KINDERGARTEN TRAINING SCHOOL. 

This school offers training for professional work as kindergarteners 
or as an aid in other lines of work. The course ofifered is two years in 
length and leads to the diploma in Kindergarten Education. As a part 
of the regular work, a kindergarten is conducted where students may 
observe and obtain practical experience in all branches connected with 
such work. Second year students attend monthly meetings of the 
Kindergarten Mothers' Association and so gain an insight into the 
organization and conducting of such meetings. Graduation from a 
first-grade high school or equivalent scholarship and ability to play the 
piano are requirements. 

OTHER TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

In addition to the Mechanicsburg Consolidated School, there was 
maintained, under the direction of the State Normal College, a two- 
room rural school, Torch, Rome Township, Athene* County. 'Keeping 
up one-room rural training schools is of questionable value. The 
reduced appropriation fc their support has reason, in addition to 
economy, in its support. The school at Mechanicsburg will be main- 
tained under present direction. 

ENROLLMENT OF PUPILS IN THE TRAINING SCHOOLS FOR THE SCHOOL 

YEAR, 1919-1920. 

John Hancock High School. 

Boys Girls Total 

Freshman Class 24 29 63 

Sophomore Class 15 34 49 

Junior Class _.. 16 15 31 

Senior Class -.. — 16 30 45 

Total - 70 108 178 



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OHIO UNIVERSITY. 



465 



Grade 



Graded Training School. 
Teacher 



First. ^___-_ ^___---__Miss Morris 

Second-. Miss Weihr 

Third ..,Mis8 Buchanan- 
Fourth,,,, ,. , .-Miss Hesse 

P^ifth., ...., . Mrs. Price 

Sixth ,_.Miss Everett 

Seventh *__Miss Bailey 

Eighth. _..__^., ......Mrs. Tilley 



Boys Girls Total 



31 


15 


46 


16 


23 


39 


22 


19 


41 


16 


21 


37 


16 


21 


37 


23 


22 


45 


16 


24 


40 


16 


29 


45 



Total. 



156 



174 



330 



Room Teacher 
I. Nellie B. WatBon. 



Rural Training School. 

Grade 

...,-lst- -. 

2nd 



II. Clara L. Blurae. 



-3rd. 
4th- 



III. Olin E. Fri. 



-5th. 
6th- 
7th- 
8th- 



Graad totaL 



Kindergarten Training School. 



Boys 


Girls 


Total 


10 


8 


18 


13 


10 


23 


23 


18 


41 


9 


• 10 


19 


11 


10 


21 


20 


20 


40 


5 


9 


14 


8 


6 


14 


4 


5 


9 


8 


5 


13 


25 


25 


50 


68 


63 


131 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


28 


3 


58 



Teaehere 
Constatice T, McLeod, Principal _ 

Jane Evans. 

Recapitulation op Pupil Enrollment. 

•The John Hancock High School _ 178 

The Graded Training School ._. 330 

The Rural Training School. _ ._- 131 

The Kindergarten School 58 



Total. 



Summer School of 1920. 

The Graded Training School 173 

The Rural Training School .__ 121 

The Kindergarten School..., _ _ _ _ _ 39 



Total _-... _ 333 



*The John Hanijook High School was not open for Summer School PgPiJ^OOQlc 



Mian^i University 

I. Students 
ATTENDANCE. 

COLLEGE YEAR. 

Tiie enrollment for the College year, September 1919 to Jmie 1920, 
omitting the students who entered for the first term of the ummer 
sessioD May 10, was 1049.* Thid is an increase of 22, or 2.1%, over 
Ia?it year. The increase of 22.8% last year was abnormal due to the 
S> A. T. C. The average of the two years is 12.4% 

Liberal Arts Collega 659 to 603, a loss of 56 or 8.5% 

Teachers College 213 to 249, a gain of 36 or 16.9% 

B. S. in Education. 155 to 197, a gain of 42 or 27.1% 

A further analysis show£ that the distribution of men and women 
has changed as follows: 

Men Women 

1918-19 1919-20 Gain Loss 1918-19 1919-20 Gain Loss 
Libenil Arts College 531 429 ._- 102 128 174 46 

TeQchers College - 7 10 3 _.. 206 239 33 

B, S, in Education. • 17 40 23 ._. 138 157 19 

sum;mer terms. 

The enrollment for the six-weeks terms of the summer session was 
ao follows: 

Spring term 1st 6 weeks 2d 6 weeks Total 

1913,__, 551 70 621 

1914_,__, - 1,131 150 1,281 

1915, _____.. - 1,044 146 1,190 

191G .-- 747 145 892 

1917....... -- 551 158 701) 

191S 114 576 229 919 

1919 :.. 140 532 186 858 

*iS^ot counting 15 students who withdrew within two weeks. 
EXTENSION TEACHING. 

Tilt' enrollment in extension work for the past three years has been 
as follows: 

Classes Students Average 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 1st Sem. 2nd Sem. Enrollment 

1!>15-1G__.. 13 12 213 166 189 

101G-17.-_ 15 10 243 132 187 

1917-18..., 20 19 459 396 427 

1918-KK 16 16 346 288 317 

191LM920 18 19 473 402 437 

It Diay be noted that of the 473 registered the first semester, 365 
finsilicd the course. Professors Scudder and Stewart have rendered fine 
service both in their actual teaching and informally thruout their field. 

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(466) ^ ^ <3 



MIAMI UNIVBESITY. 467 

MCGUPPEY SCHOOLS. 

The enrollment in the William McGuffey Schools for the past five 
years shows a good growth. 

Kindergarten 

and Grades High 

I-VIII School Total 

1913-14 173 75 24S 

1014-16 - 190 68 258 

1916-16 - 221 63 2S4 

1916-17 224 70 204 

1917-18 -. 222 83 305 

1918-19 - 214 118 332 

1919-20 221 125 346 

AVERAGE ATTENDANCE. 

For the past five years we have recorded the actual numbtT of 
students in attendance each week of the college year, and from this 
data have calculated the actual average attendance for the college yeav. 
The accompanying chart shows the attendance for 1919-20. 

The following table shows the comparison of the attendance for 
the past five years. 



Enrollmont 
Sept. -June. 

1916-16 793 

1916-17 897 

1917-18 836 

1918-19 1,027 

1919-20 -. 1,049* 







Average 


ReUtion of 






Weekly At- 


Average At- 




Attendance 


tendance 


tendan cc to 


Withdrawals 


June. 


Sept. -June. 


Enrollment 


89 


704 


727 


91.7% 


77 


815 


836 


Q:i.O% 


100 


728 


770 


92.0% 


307 


720 


806 


78.4% 


149 


900 


960 


90.4% 



*Not counting 15 student who withdrew within two weeks. 
WITHDRAWALS 1919-1920. 

From the beginning of the college year up to April 10, 155 students 
have withdrawn from college. Of these, 15 withdrew during the first 
two weeks and were not counted in the total enrollment listed; they 
are included in the following list, however. The reasons for withdrawal 
are stated below so far as we could ascertain them. 

Low scholarship 50 

Reasbn unknown _ 14 

Poor health -- 21 

To enter another college 17 

Dissatisfied— _ _ 15 

Completed course for degrees first semester _ 10 

Needed at home _-. 9 

To enter business 9 

Finances 5 

To teach 2 

To be married _ 1 

To travel _ 1 

^**^ TJigiti-zeaB-y-GbOgle 

US 



468 OHIO GENERAL STATISTICS. 

HEALTH 

INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC 

Immediately on the opening of the second semester, February firsts 
an epidemic of influenza of a mild type caused a g'^eat deal of sickness. 
While there were very few dnagerous cases, a great man3' students 
were left in a very poor physical condition from which recover^' wnB 
slow. It was necessary to vacate the entire second floor of Bishop Hall 
and on one day thirty-eight students were confined to the hospital. 

STUDENT NURSES. 

Besides two trained nurses whom we were able to seciirp at this 
time the following students generously gave up their class work and 
served as nurses as their services were needed: Charlotte Chance, 
Arthur Clark, Harriet Dieter, Claude Henney, Gertrude JenningSj 
Frank Lee, Merle Lemon, Thelma Skeen, Frances Voorhees, Florence 
Willey. 

REPORT OP MEDICAL DIRECTOR. 

The report of the Medical Director contains h great deal of inter- 
esting information about the work of his department. This department 
has so fuly justified itself during the past two years that it is hard to 
see how any college can get along without a similar department. 

RESIDENT NURSES. 

Miss Margaret Fox and Miss Sabina Fox resigned their positions 
as resident nurses in December. Miss Margaret Fox has been at Miami 
since 1912 and has rendered us invaluable service. Miss Sabina Fox 
came to us during the influenza epidemic of last year. 

We were fortunate in securing Miss Mabel D. Hannabf*r\% R, N., 
and Miss Edna E. Steinbaugh, R. N., to fill these positions since Janu- 
ary first. 

FINANCIAL REPORT MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The financial report of the medical department on April 1, 1920, is 
given below. 

July 1, 1919 Estimated Total 

to Unpaid for remain- for 

March 31,1920 Bills • der of year 1919*20 

Income. 

Medicalfees $5,88150 I5SB1 50 

Hospital charges _ 807 47 1100 00 907 47 



Total $6,688 97 $100 00 $6,783 97 

Digitized by CjOOQIC 



MIAMI UinVERSITY. 



469 



EXFENDETURBS. 



Medical Director _ $2,260 00 



Nurses 

Professional services 

Room rent in Bishop Hall 

Board charges 

Telephone, telegraph 

Supplies (including medicine ). 

Ice --- 

Maids and tray girls 

Clerical services 

Laundry - .- 

Traveling expenses _ _ . 

Equipment _-__-. 



1,425 00 
409 73 
124 25 
101 25 

38 20 
629 16 

16 65 
268 98 

21 40 
137 00 

21 43 
423 77 



2 30 

5 72 



35 50 
33 85 



$750 00 $3,000 00 


525 00 


1,950 00 


25 00 


434 73 




124 25 


25 00 


126 25 


800 


48 50 


150 00 


784 88 


20 00 


36 56 


125 00 


393 98 


10 00 


31 40 


60 00 


232.50 


10 00 


65 28 


10 00 


433 77 



Total $5,866 73 



$77 37 $1,718 00 $7,662 10 



Summary. 



Estimated income for year- 
Estimated expense for year. 



Apparent deficit for year. 
Balance from 1918-19 



$6,788.97 
7,662 10 

$873 13 
629 72 



Apparent deficit June 30 - - S243 41 

SCHOLARSHIP 

NEED OP HOSPITAL. 

The very heavy clinical work of the past few months as well as the 
need for ampler room for hospital patients again emphasizes the urgent 
need of a college hospital. Certainly before the fall of 1921 the Miami 
Hospital should be in operation. j 

COMPARISON OF AVERAGES. . 

In the four-year courses the averages for the first semesters for the 
past five years have been as follows : (Missouri grading system, A J^-130) 
98.5, 98.7, 99.02, 88.3, 100.2. For the second semesters the averages 
have been 100.5, 102.8, 105.03, 106.9, 104.4. The last figure is for the 
third term of 1918-19. 



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470 



OHIO OENEBAL STATISTICS. 



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