(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The oist"

QL6 71 
'063 











FOR THE PEOPLE 

FOR EDVCATION 

FOR SCIENCE 






LIBRARY 

OF 

THE AMERICAN MUSEUM 

OF 

NATURAL HISTORY 








THE OOLOGIST, 



FOR THE STUDENT OF 



BIRDS, THEIR NESTS AND EGGS. 



VOLUME XVIII 



ALBION. N. Y.: 

FRANK H. L ATT IN, M. D., PUBLISHEB. 

1901. 



A. M. EDDY. 
PRINTER AND BINDER. 



INDEX TO VOL. XVIII. 



Alaska Notes, -172 

Albino Eggs of Sialia sialis 121 

Albinoes, More- 43 

Bird Life of a Virginia Island, 118 

Bird Music, 8, 24 

Bird Notes from California, Winter 10 

Birds Capture Their Prey, How Some. .101, 122, 

137, 153 

Birds of Michigan and Their Protection, The 

21 

Birds of South Jersey, Notes on Two 106 

Bittern, American 103 

Bittern Observed in Pennsylvania, Least 44 

Blackbird, Red-winged. 38, 43 

Bluebird, _ 38, 181 

Bobolink, - ..9 

Bob-white, 44, 106 

Books, New 107, 141 

Bush-tit, California 11 

California, Winter Bird Notes from 10 

California, Western Red-tailed Hawk in Orange 

County, _ 69 

"Canadian Birds" By J. Macoun: A Review,- .44 

Catbird, The Food Supply of the 149 

Caustic Potash 90, 122, 151 

Concerning Data, _ 140 

Consideration, A 88 

Cowbird, 39 

Chickadee, Black-capped 39, 43 

Crane, Little Brown 139 

Crow, American 54 

Crow, Fish 106 

Creeper, Brown ■. 42, 154 

Cuckoo, Black-billed 122.153 

Cuckoo's 24 

Data, Concerning 140 

Dove, Mourning 39 

Duck, Wood 21, 39 

Eggs, Packing for Shipment 40 

Eggs, Use of Caustic Potash for Incubated 

- 90, 122, 151 

Eggs, Use of Pancreation on Incubated... 122, 151 

Finch, Purple 38 

Flicker, .123 

Flycatcher, Great Crested 138 

Food Supply, Baltimore Oriole 134 



Food Supply, Brown Thrasher i86 

Food Supply, Catbird 149 

Food Supply Mockingbird i87 

Food Supply, House Wren. 170 

Gleanings from My Notebook, 37, 59, 71 

Goldfinch, American- 42 

Grackle, Bronzed 39 

Grosbeak, Evening 106 

Grosbeak, Pine- 42 

Grouse. Oregon Ruffed 63 

Grouse, Pinnated _ 106 

Grouse, Ruffed 42 

Grouse, Sooty 63 

Gull, American Herring. 37 

Gull, Laughing ng 

Hawk, Cooper's 12, 184 

Hawk, Duck- 139 

Hawk, European Sparrow 26 

Hawk, Harlan's 71 

Hawk in Central Illinois, The Red-tailed .61 

Hawk, Krider's 27 41 

Hawk, Nesting of the Broad-winged 5 

Hawk, Red-shouldered, _ 12. 40, 59, 71 

Hawk, Red-tailed 26, 40, 59, 71, 153 

Hawk, Swainson's 42 

Hawk, Western Red-tailed 69 

Heron, Great Blue 104, 153 

How Some Birds Capture their Prey,. .101, 1S2, 

137,153 

Hummingbird, Broad-tailed Nesting Habits of 

tbe _ 133 

Hummingbird, Calliope igg 

Hummingbird, Ruby-throated 73, 138 

Illinois, The Red-tailed Hawk in Central 61 

Iowa Notes _ 73 

Incubated Eggs, Preparing for Cabinet 90,122,151 

Jottings,. 139 

Junco, Slate colored _ 39 

Junior World's Exposition, 140, 143 

Kildeer,- 33 

Kingbird 138, 139 

Kingfisher, Belted 123 

Lark, Homed 38 

Loxgilla portoricensis , _ 74 

Maine, Warblers found Breeding in Liver- 
more _i8i 



Index. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Mallard 39 

Manitoba, Field Notes from...... 26,41 

Maternal Solicitude. An Example of 18S 

Merlin, 26 

Michigan, The Aceipter Cooperii in Wayne and 

Oakland counties, 184 

Michigan, The Birds o<— and Their Protection 

21 

Mockingbird, -11 

Music, Bird 8, 24 

Nests, The Use of Old 12 

Nests, Some Twice Occupied- 120, 136 

Nesting Habits of the Broad-tailed Humming- 
bird, - 133 

Nesting of the Broad-winged Hawk, 5 

Nesting Sites of ilfe;o»pi2;a/ascia^a,unusual.l22 

Nesting, Queer 62 

New Jersey, Notes on Two Birds of South 106 

Nighthawk 138 

Notes, Iowa 73 

Notes on Two Birds of South Jersey, 106 

Nuthatch, Red-breasted _ 43 

Nuthatch, White-breasted 43 

Oologlat? Who is an 53 

Oriole, The Food Supply of The Baltimore.. 134 

Osprey, American 102, 107 

Oven-bird, 8, 73, 183 

Owl, Barred 12 

Owl, A Handsome Little 85 

Owl, Great Horned 122 

Owl, The Spotted 165 

Owl, Western Horned 27, 86, 155, 167 

Oystercatcher, American 119 

Pan-American Notes 75, 90, 125, 142 

Pancreatin on Incubated Eggs, Use of--122, 151 

Partridge, Mountain 62 

Pelican, Brown 102 

Pennsylvania, Least Bittern Observed in 44 

Pheasant, Ring 62 

Phoebe, 39 

Pigeon, Passenger 117 

Pipit, American 11 

Plover, Wilscm's 119 

Rail, Clapper 118 

Redstart, American 153, 184 

Robin, American 38, 44, 154 

Robin, Western 10 

Sapsucker. Yellow-bellied 123 

Sets, Two Odd 54 

Shrike, Great Northern 37,42, 154 

Shrike White-rumped 8 

Skimmer, Black 119 



Snowfiake, 42 

Surprises. Some 153 

Sparrow, Chipping .84 

Sparrow, English. 43 

Sparrow, Golden-crowned II 

Sparrow, Intermediate II 

Sparrow, Seaside 119 

Sparrow, Song 37, 42, 132 

Sparrow, Vesper 9 

Sparrow, White-crowned 11 

Swallow, Rough-wing 153 

Swallow Tree 39 

Swift, Chimney 138 

Tern, Common 119 

Tern, Forster's 118, 

Tern, Gull-billed 130 

Thrush, Dwarf Hermit 10 

Thrush, Varied ..10 

Timely and to the Point .40 

Trogon, Coppery-tailed .171 

Twice Occupied Nests and Other Notes, Some 

120, 136 

Unusual Nesting Sites of Melospiza fasciata 122 

Vireo, Warbling .35 

Virginia Island, Bird Life of a ..118 

Vulture, The Turkey 87 

Warbler. Audubon's 10 

Warbler, Black and White 181 

Warbler, Blackburnian 182 183 

Warbler, Black-throated Green 183 

Warbler, Cape May 139 

Warbler, Chestnut-sided 183 

Warbler, Canadian 184 

Warbler, Hoover's -10 

Warbler, Magnolia 182 

Warbler, Myrtle 182 

Warbler, Nashville 181 

Warbler, Northern Parula 181 

Warbler, Pine 183 

Warbler, Yellow 182 

Warblers Found Breeding in Livermore, 

Maine 181 

Waxwing, Cedar 11, 154 

Wisconsin Hash .105 

Whip-poor-will, 72, 138 

Woodpecker, Golden- winged (Flicker), 123 

Woodpecker, Yellow-bellied (Sapsucker) 123 

Wren, House 105 

Wren, The Food Supply of the House .170 

Yellow-legs 43 

Yellow-throat, Maryland 72, 184 



The Oologist. 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 1. 



ALBION, N. Y., JAN., 1901. 



Whole No. 172 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exchanges" "For Sales," lnsert;ed In tills departmect 
f oj 25c per 25 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted In payment at one-third list rates. 



W^hat's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 172 your subscription expires with this issue 
175 " " " " Apr., 1901 

180 " " " " Sept., '• 

184 " '• " " Dec, " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

A RARE BARGAIN!— One fine buffalo over- 
coat, price SlOO.Oa J. W. PRESTON, Baxter, 
Iowa. 

1 WILL PAY CASH for heavy marked sets 
of Red-shouldered and Red-tailPd Hawks. If 
you have such send description and state price 
wanted. H. C. HIGGINS, Cincinnatus, N. Y. 

FOR SALE.— Ginseng Seed, the coming 
money maker, also for exchange Al sets 194, 
197, 326. 339, 428, 491 and many others. Send for 
list. J B. HINE, East Onondaga, N. Y. 

WANTED.— Fisher's Hawks and Owls of N. 
A. (illustrated) for cash, also some back Nos. 
of Osprey and Nidologist. What have you'^ 
J. MERTON SWAIN, Waterville, Maine. 

FOR EXCHANGE.— Complete file Natural 
Science News, 66 copies; 2 Columbian half 
dollars; 12 back Nos. Osprey; Vols. I, II, III, 
Museum; 1 Bristol Steel Trolling Rod, never 
used but twice. Wanted birds eggs In sets 
with complete data. ERNEST L HALEY, 
Rangeley Maine. 

WANTED AT ONCE.— Osprey Vol. I, Nos. 
2, 4; Nidologist Vol. I, Nos. 2, 4. 6; Ornitholo- 
gist Vol. I, No. 6; Oregon Natvu-alist Vol. I, 
Nos S, 3, 4; Museum, all Vol. VI; Iowa Orni- 
thologist, Vol. I, Nos. 1 and 4: Vol. II, No. 1; 
Vol. IV, Nos. 1, 3 and 4; Popular Science News 
Vol. 32, Nos. 1, 2 and U; Midland Monthly, June 
and August, '97, and many others. Will give 
cash or good exchange in sets and singles or 
books such as "Tenney's Zoology," "Dana's 
Geology," etc. ALBERT F. GANIER, Bow- 
mar Ave., Vlcksburg, Miss. 



CHOICE SETS of 499, 581c, 591b and 519 to ex- 
change for common Eastern sets. Want five 
or six sets of each species. Lattin's list used. 
J. S. APPLETON, Simi, Ventura Co., Cal. 

SNAP!— High scoring, pedigreed, Belgian 
Hare, doe, to exchange for best offer of eggs, 
skins, mounted birds or curios. South Dakota 
sets for sets and singles. H. E. Lee. Bryant, 
S. D. 

MANY FINE EGGS of this locality, such as 
Hawks, Owls, Vireos, Flycatchers, Wrens and 
others to exchange for eggs not in my collec- 
tion. I will have on hand a great many eggs, 
both sets and singles, this coming season. All 
egg.s collected by my.'^elf are strictly first class 
and sets are originals accompanied with full 
datas. If you wish to make a good exchange 
here is your chance. Send list and receive 
mine. Fair dealing. In exchanging I use 
Taylor's Standard Catalogue as a basis. 
ADOLF SCHUTZE, 1611 Sabine Street, Austin, 
Travis Co., Texas. 

TO EXCHANGE.— Over 1000 different stamps 
including complete set of unused Omaha issue, 
in large album; some copies of Osprey and 
about 100 arrow points. For southern or east- 
em land shells, beetles, gciod mountable bird 
skins or Al sets. PAUL B. SMITH, Box 2, E. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

COLUMBIA, HARTFORD and Wolf-Ameri- 
can Bicycles, new and second-hand; fishing 
rods and tackle, guns, rifles, cameras, most 
any article for out door sport and nature 
study. Prices right. I want strictly first class 
sets of eggs in part or full payment. Write 
me stating wants and send list of eggs. Will 
quote low cash prices. Can save you money. 
BENJAMIN HOAG, Stephentown, N. Y. 

TO EXCHANGE.— Sets of 487. 187, 367, 36 for 
common sets. Have you my last price lists? 
If not you should drop me a postal at once. I 
have everything you need. ERNEST H. 
SHORT, Rochester, N. Y. 

EXCHANGE —Field or marine glass, cost 
$16, extension hoods, shoulder straps, leather 
case, "Leflls, Paris,'' for sets, O. & O. books or 
cash. Sets preferred. E. R. FORREST, 
Washington, Pa. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



"Would say my ad. in Oologist for un- 
mounted sea mosses has brought me specimens 
enough to cover a surface 12 ft. square. I 
think the Oologist is the best advertising 
medium for collectors in America." WM. 
CUDNEY, Gait, Ont. 

BELGIAN HARES.— Employed persons may 
make money raising them. Pleasant, profit- 
able and requires but little time, money or 
space. Let me start you. R. A. POWELL, 135 
E. 5th St , St. Paul, Minn. 

MIDWINTER BARGAINS in sets of flrst- 
class eggs:— Holboell's Grebe, 1-3, 15c; St. Do- 
mingo Grebe, 1-5, 12c; Pigeon GuUemot. 1-2, 
15c; Razor-billed Auk, 1-1. 12c; Ring-billed Gull, 
12, 8c; Caspian Tern. 1-2, 12c; Black Tern, 1-2, 
5-3, 4c; Black Skimmer, 13 2, 6c; Ashy Petrel, 
4-1, $1; Booby, 1-2, 40c; Faralone Cormorant, 
1-3, 15c; Brandt's Cormorant, 1-2, 8c; Baldpate, 
1-9, 25c; Am. Elder, 1-4, 15c; Canada Goose, 1-5, 
50c; White-faced Glossy Ibis, 3.4, 12c; American 
Bittern, 3-5, 20c; Least Bittern, 1-4, 1-5, 5c; 
Great Blue Heron, 3, 4, 5 10c; Little Blue 
Heron, 1-4, 4c; Black-crovraed Nightheron, 5-3, 
T-4, 5c; Limpkin, 1-5, 25c; King Rail, 1-7, 9c; 
Clapper Rail, 18, 4c; Fla. Gallinule, 1-9, 4c; 
European Coot, 1-7 6c; Am. Coot, 1-6, 3c; Red 
Phalarope, 1-4, 35c; Northern Phalarope, 1-4, 
25c; Am. Avocet, 1-3, 15c; Black-necked Stilt, 
3, 4, 12c; Killdeer, 2-3, &-4, 6c; Belted Piping 
Plover, 1-3, 1-4; Scaled Quail, 9, 19, 11, 12, 15c; 
Ring Pheasant, 1-11, 10c; Willow Ptarmigan, 
1-7, 25c; Rock Ptarmigan, 110, 'SSc; Prairie 
Hen, 1-11 6c; Turkey Vulture. 2-8, 2!ic; Black 
Vulture, 2 2, 35c; Cooper's Hawk, 1-3, 10c; Har- 
ris' Hawk, 2-2, lOc: Swainson's Hawk, 7-2, 12c; 
Golden Eagle, 1-1, f3..50; Am. Sparrow Hawk, 
1-3, lOc; Audubon's Caracara, 2-3 5 2, 30c; 
Western Horned Owl, 1-2, 35c; Roadrunner, 9-4, 
5c; Yellow-bill-- d Cuckoo, 1-3, 5c; Belted King- 
fisher, 1-5, 8c; Chimney Swift, 1-3, 1-5, 5c; Scis- 
sor-tail Flycatcher, 3, 4, 5, 4c; Alder Flycatch- 
er, 1-3, 3c; Least Flycatcher, 1-4, 5; White- 
necked Raven, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12c ; Am. Crow, 4-4- 3-5, 
2c; Starling, 2-4, 5c; Bobolink, 1-5, 15c; Yellow- 
headed Blackbird, 1-3. 2c; Bicolored Blackbird, 
1-3, 1-4, 3c; Orchard Oriole, 4. 5, 2c; Baltimore 
Oriole, 14, 3c; Bullock's Oriole, 1-4, 3c; Bronzed 
Grackle, 1-3, 2-5, l 6, 2c; Purple Grackle, 1-3, 
1-4, 3c; Great-tailed Grackle, 3, 4, 5, 3c. Am. 
Goldfinch, 1-4, 3c; Lark Sparrow, 3, 4, 5. 3c; 
Black-throated Sparrow, 1-4, 10c; Cassin's 
Sparrow, 1-3, 30c; Song Sparrow, 2 4, 5-5, Ic; 
Samuel's Song Sparrow, 1-4, 3c; Abert's Tow- 
hee, 2-3, 20c; Lark hunting, 1-4, 9c; Cliff Swal- 
low, 2-4, Ic; Barn Swallow, 1-4, 2c; White- 
rumped Shrike, 1-5, 1-6, 4c; White eyed Vlreo, 
1-3, 4c; Bell's Vireo, 3, 4, 5, 3c; Yellow Warbler, 
2-3,1-4, Ic; Redstart, 1-4, 4c ; Meadow Plppit, 
1-4, 5c; Catbird. 3, 4, 5, Ic; Rock Wren, 1-4, 35c; 
Long-billed Marsh Wren, 4, 5, 3c; Chickadee, 
1-3, 1-4, 5c; California Bushtit, 1-4, 5; Wood 
Thrush, 2 3, 3c; Bluebird, 2-5, 3c; Plain Tit- 
mouse. 1-6, 10c; Red-shafted Flicker, 2 5, 5c; 
Black Phoebe. 1-4, 5c; Parkman's Wren, 1-7, 4c: 
Pileated Woodpecker, 1-2, $1.50; Russet-backed 
Thrush, 1-4, 5o; Bald Eagle, 11, (cracked at 
blowhole) 76c; Kidder's Hawk, 1.3, (large 
holes) 15c; Caracara, 1-3, (large holes) 15c; 
Black Vulture, 1-2, (large holes) 10c. 

The above prices are per egg, post-paid, but 
smaller orders than $3 are not desired. 

Special! a first class set of four eggs each 
of White-faced Glossy Ibis and Black necked 
Stilt will be sent prepaid on receipt of II. J. 
M. & JAMES J. CARROLL, Waco, Texas. 

WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
.JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 



CHOICE southern sets of Royal Tern, Brown 
Pelican, Willet, Wilson's Plover, Laughing 
Gull. Clapper Rail, Black Skinner for sale very 
cheap or exchange sets or singles. DR. M. T. 
CLECKLEY, 457 Greene St., Augusta, Ga. 3t 

I send you today some ads for your excellent 
paper. I must say that ads in your paper al- 
ways pay.— CHRIS P. FORGE, Carman, Mani- 
toba. 

HEAR YE ! Hear Ye ! Hear Ye 1 This is to 
certify that my advertisements in the Oolo- 
gist have paid me better than have the com- 
bined ads. in most of the amateur and natural 
science papers. Ads. in the Oologist always 
bring returns, and it is safe to say that there is 
no paper having three times the circulation of 
this widespread periodical which can give 
equal satisfaction. MORRIS GIBBS, M. D., 
Kalamazoo, Mich 

MAKE MONEY.— By securing a county 
agency for our New Edition of the Reversible 
U. S. and World Map. This map is 66x46 in. 
in size, being the largest one-sheet map pub- 
lished; mounted on sticks ready to^hang; elev- 
en beautiful colors. One side shows a grand 
map of our great country and inset maps of its 
new possessions. The other side shows an 
equally good map of the world. On receipt of 
$1.25 we will send a sample copy by prepaid 
express, and will inform you how to obtain a 
trial agency. Our men clear from $15.00 to 
$35.00 weekly after a month's work. Maps can 
be returned if not satisfactory. Yours truly, 
RAND, McNALLY & COMPANY, 160-174 
Adams St., Chicago, Ills. 172 

PLATE HOLDER— Double, by,xb%, Blair 
Camera Co., ($1.00), prepaid 34c. FRANK H. 
LATTIN, Albion N. Y. 

CODDINGTON MAGNIFIER(Miners' glass), 
diameter ^In, cost $1.50, prepaid 95cts. FRANK 
H. LATTIN,Albion, N. Y. 

"SNAPS"fortaxidermist3.7in.Stuffers, spring 
handle (1.25), 80c ; Scissor-handle Stuffers, i2in. 
($1.75), $1.05; Scissor-handle Stuffer, 15in, ($2.50) 
$1.60; Bone Cutters, extra fine and heavy, ($2.50) 
' $1.60; Forceps for Insects ($1.25) 78c; Botanical 
Collecting Can with shoulder strap, size 12x754 
x3)i in. ($1.50) $1.10; Tenaculum or Dissecting 
Hook, folding in handle ($1) 28c. All prepaid at 
prices quoted, regular prices in ( ). FRANK 
H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

TAXIDERMIST'S OUTFIT:— Contains one 
heavy Cartilage Knife; 1 nickeled and engrav- 
ed Scalpel with tip shaped for detaching skin, 
muscles, &c; 1 pair Scissors; 1 pair Forceps; 
1 Dissecting Hook; 1 Brain Spoon; 1 pocket 
Wire Cutter. Instruments best, all packed in 
polished Hard-wood Case. A better outfit than 
the one always sold at $3. I have only two 
outfits and will close them out at only $2.20 
prepaid. FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

"I don't know whether my ad. has reached 
its time limit yet or not, but stop it any way. 
My supply of exchange material was exhaust- 
ed some time ago and replies to the ad. still 
come in. F. P. DRO WNE, 20 Benefit St.. Prov- 
idence, R. I. 

WANTED.— Buyer for case stuffed birds. 
One (each) Hoot Owl, Screech Owl, Barn Owl, 
Blue Jay, Pheasant and young. Snipe, two 
Wild Pigeons, three Wild Ducks, Quail, Blue 
Jay, Redbird, Hummingbird, Mink. Gray 
Squirrel, Red Squirrel, Alligator and several 
others, 30 in all ; elegantly mounted. Make an 
offer. F. W. GATES, Chattanooga, Tenn. 172 



THE OOLOGIST. 



COLLiECTORS will do well to send early lists 
of fresh taken eggs. Al in all respects. Will 
pay cash or give good exchange. Give lowest 
cash price. I have to exchange : Black-chinned 
Humm r n-2, Bobwhite 1-11, Claycoloied Spar- 
row 6-4. Franklin's Gull 1-2, White-neck Raven 
1-4 1-5 1-6, Caracara 1-3, Louisiana Heron 1-4, 
Black-necked Stilt 4-4. Great White Heron 1-4; 
one good egg with data of the New Zealand 
Spteryx, very rare, for cash er choice ex- 
•change; and Vol. I Auk, best offer. J. W. 
PRESTON, Baxter, la. 

WILL EXCHANGE for Mounted Birds or 
eggs in sets the following Mounted Birds: 
Evening Grosbeak. Varied Thrush. Curve- 
billed Thrasher, Am. Three-toed Woodpecker, 
Young Owl in Down, Louisiana Tanager, 
Stella's Jay. Eggs: 1-3 Chuck-wills-widow. 
Skins: Phainopepla; Nashville, Blue-winged, 
Kentucky, Magnolia, Black- throated. Blue 
Warblers: Snowflake, Pine Siskin and Am. 
Crossbill. Send in your liPts. Reply to all. 
GEO. H. SWEZEY, 66-79 Jackson St., Newark, 
N.J. 

RARE WAR RELICS for sale:— Cuban Ma- 
chete $2, American Machete, bone handle $2.85, 
Spanish Bayonet 20-inch blade $1.50, Spanish 
Cartridge Box $2. The following are Civil War 
Relics: Haversack 50c, Knapsack $1 25, Bridle 
with Bits Complete $2, Canteen $1, Navy Re- 
volver 13, Navy Revoivfr Holsters 50c, Confed- 
erate Powder Bag 75c, Enfield Sword Bayonet 
■< Confederate) $1, Spade Bayonet (1776) $2,50, 
Musket Flints 10c. Don't delay. Inclose 
stamp for particulars. TEEL & CO. Williams- 
port, Pa. 

OOLOGISTS WANTED:— Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 1888, and April 
1889, and will give an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

YOU ARE INTERESTED in Something? 
Why not get all the best things printed about 
it? We read and clip thousands of newspapers 
and magazines every week, therefors we can 
help you make up a scrap book on your favor- 
ite hobby. Will take Natural History Speci- 
mens in exchange. Send for our booklet, 
which explains the scope of the clipping indus- 
try. 20TH CENTURY PRESS CLIPPING 
BUREAU, New York Life Building, Chicago. 



■ WANTED:— Will pay casli or "swap" eggs 
of American Osprey and Hummingbirds (any 
species with nest). Two good skins of each 
the Am. Barn and Long-eared Owls, Rattle- 
snake Rattles, Eggs of Hammerhead Shark. 
Write what you have and what you want. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

NOTICE:— I have retired from the farm 
and expect to devote more time to collecting. 
Hoping to hear from old correspoddents I am 
yours DELOS HATCH, Oakfield, Wis. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE:— First class 
sets of 1 1-3, 191 1-4, 142 1-11,146 1-16,228 1-4, 
273 1-4, 308 1-11, 388 1-2. 387 1-2, 325 1-2, 501b 1-5, 
676 15, 735 1-6, 751 n-4. , several large Bahama 
Starfish; large collection of foreign stamps. 
Write what you can offer. GEORGE J. TILLS, 
Gaines, N. Y. 

EGG EXCHANGE:— I offer nicely prepared, 
authentic sets of the following in exchange for 
sets I can use: 79a. 93, 107, 116, 286.1, 288. 408. 
449, 450, 498b, 520, 549 550, 611.1, 615, 729, 708. In 
sending list of duplicates it would be well to 
mention how many of each species you have to 
exchange as I can use series of most kinds. 
JAMES P. BABBITT, Taunton, Mass. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE, price per set 
prepaid: Whimbrel 5-4. 48c: Northern Phal- 
arope 5-4, 60c; Red-throated Loon 5-2. 50c; Rich 
Ptarmigan 5-1,0 $2.00; Dunlin 5-4, 48c; White- 
faced Glossy Ibis 5-4, 80c: many others. Send 
for list. D. WILBY, 27 Front Street West, To- 
ronto, Ont. 

FOR SALE:— U. S. large cents, two -cent 
coppers, different dates, 5 cents each ; Indian 
War Clubs $1.00; Moccasin, 40cts. to $1.50 ac- 
cording to size. JNO. J. PRICE, 1382 7th St., 
res Moines, la. 

EXCHANGE:— I have a mounted Hutchins's 
Goose taken in Western New York which I 
will exchange for mounted Snowy Owl or any 
desirable showy mount. CORNELIUS F. 
POSSON, Medina, N. Y. 

WANTED FOR C ASH :— Ridgway's book, 
'•Nomenclature of Colors." State lowest cash 
price. Perfect your files, I have several copies 
of Auks, Nids,,0. &. O., Oologists and Ospreys 
to exchange. JAMES H. HILL, New London, 
Conn. 






3 
3 
3 



Naturalists Book Shop 

NEWMAN r. McGIRR 

2102 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa. ^ 

Just issued, List Number ii. zS 

(Invertebrata, including Entomology, etc.) ^ 

E BOOKS BOUGHO^. OATAIaOG KREEl. 3 



THE OOLOGIST. 



20th Century Bargains. 

CURIOS. (LAND). 

Aztec Pottery. Patzcuaro, Mex. 

Bowl, irridescent ware, slightly cracked $ 25 

Imitation Fruits, various forms colored... 20 
Monnd Builders', Pottery. 

Western New York pieces, plain 06 

decorated 10 

Lai ge piece of bowl, N. H ^ 85 

Pueblo Pottery. Arizona. 
Fine pieces showing the beautiful decora- 
tions in colors, silver and gilt 05.. 25 

Modern Relics, buckskin. 

Awl Sheath beaded all over, Sioux 35 

Money-bag; Navajo, bead and colored 

hair decoration _ 50 

Money-bag: Ute, beaded in mystical de- 
sign _ 60 

Bucks-beads, talisman, Shoshone, double 

string, extra tine 75 

Sioux Arrow-shafts, picked up by Army 
Officer on site of Rosebud massacre, S. 

D., points left in victims 17 

Gun-flints, French and Indian period, 

Penn. or Mich 08 

Tuscarora Ceremonial Clubs, 15 in., stained 

in colors 75 

Package Blackfoot Tobacco, "Killickinick" 05 

Chinese Coin. 'Cash" 03 

Porcupine Quill, S. Am 08 

" African 25 

Buffalo Horn, scriped but not polished, a 

good one 78 

'■Kriss" Malay Sword, carved ebony hilt, 
scrolled brass and laquer scabbard, fine 

condition 2 75 

Egg of Alligator, worth 25 18 

•• " Gopher, worth 50 32 

•• ■' Red-leg Turtle, worth 10 04 

■' " Snapping Turtle, worth 15 05 

Icoholic specimens as curios or for school 
purposes: 

Grape-vine Beetle, (Pelidnota) 05 

50 for 160 

Locust (Acridium) 03 

50 to 100 at, each 01!4 

Spiders, Salamanders, Snakes, etc.,prices 
on application. 

Mexican Policeman's Whistle 10 

"Tapa," native cloth worn by Samoan Isl- 
anders 07 

Po-1 of Sabre Bean, Cuba, 16 to 18 in 23 

Bunch of "Wax-berries," Sarpindus 05 

••Resurrection Plants," Mexico, can be ex- 
panded and closed indefinitely 10 

Nest of Trap-door Spider 20 

Trap-door Spider mounted in box 48 

"Tarantula" " " " 58 

"Scorpion" " " •' 25 

Chinese 'Horn-nut" 05 

Confederate States Bills. $1, $5, $10 08 

Alligator Tooth, worth 10 03 

25 07 

Betel Nut, chewed by Samoans to stain the 

teeth 12 

CURIOS, (SEA). 

Marine Algee mounted on cards $ 04 

" extra fine lO 

' in neat shell frames 38 

Acorn Barnacle, worth 15 06 

" " worth 25 08 

Fiddler Crab, worth 15 06 

Horse-foot Crab, worth 35 _ 14 

Hermit Crab in shell, worth 25 11 

Sawfish Saw, worth 45 _ 19 

Porcupine Fish, worth 25 17 

35 26 

45 33 



Sea-horse. Atlantic 2? 

splned _ 25 

" mammoth. Pacific 32: 

Pipe-fish, fine 50 

Arm of Giant Serpent Starfish 06 

■'Aristotle's Lantern," dental apparatus of 

Sea Urchin 10 

Lucky Tooth of Cod _ 02 

Egg of Sand Shark 02 

•' " Nurse ' _ 18 

" " Hammerhead Shark 12- 

Egg Cases of Perriwinkle, fine long string 12 

Shell, whorls broken out by Hermit Crab.. 10 

Eyestone, Fla 03 

Red Sea-bean. 2 for 03 

Yellow Sea-bean 02 

Black Sea-bean 02 

Brown-banded Sea-bean 0-3 

White Sea-bean _ Qib 

Smooth Sea-bean 05 

Striped Sea-bean 02 

Cassia Bean. 6 for 03- 

Black eyed Susan, 6 for 03 

Mimosa. 12 for 03 

Job's Tears, 3 for 05 

Tooth of Sperm Whale 5a 

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS. 

Polished Woods; 22 varieties, sections 
2^x2>:i; foreign and native, including 
Camphor, Mahogany. Sandal, Zebra, 

Ebony, etc.; worth $3.30. Thelotforonly.$l 80 

Biological Specimens 25 varieties repre- 
senting 7 orders, all neatly put up in 
vials, preserved in Formalin and neatly 
and correctly labeled, listing at ?6 45. 
Well worth $5.00 to any Teacher. Class 
or Student in Zoology. By express at 

purchaser's expense, carefully packed 2 50 
Sent Prepaid east of Mississippi River 
for .50c extra : west of Mississippi River 
7.5c extra. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
BIRDS ECCS. 

Specimens received since January list was 
printed: 

SETS 

Am Osprey. 3 $90 

Am. Osprey, 2 60 

Cabot's Tern, 2 35 

Long tailed Jaeger, 1 60 

Western Gull, 2 28 

Rufous Hummer, nest and 2 65 

Black-throated Green Warbler 3 60 

Pufiin, 1 (curious runt) 20 

SINGLES (rare). 

McFarlane's Screech Owl (partial data) $ 50 

Wilson's Snipe, data 40 

Gt. White Heron 75 

Scaled Partridge 30 

Gray Kingbird, data _ 20 

Olive-sided Flycatcher, fine _ 60 

Am. Raven. Rocky Mts _ 60 

Red-eyed Cowbird 15 

Black-whiskered Vireo 50 

Canadian Warbler 45 

Winter Wren 35 

Leconte's Thrasher 65 

Mountain Chickadee 15 

Mockingbird, Costa Rica 40 

Black Rail 1 00 

Aleutian Leucosticte 80 

Pacific Loon 70 

Ring-neck Duck 40 

White-tailed Hawk .35 

Am. Goshawk 70 

Unless you already have it, don't fail to send 
for the new (Jan. 1901) list of eggs. Always ad- 
dress, 

E. H. Short, Rochester, N. Y. 



The Oologist. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 1. 



ALBION. N. Y., JAN., 1901. 



Whole No. 173 



The Oologist. 

A Monthly Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to tlie 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription soc per annum 

Sample copies 5c each 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber Is given a card good for a 
Want. Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

^?"Remember that the publisher must be notl 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

5 cents per nonpareil line each insertion. 

12 lines in every inch. Seven Inches in a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing Inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per Une is "net." "rock 
bottom," "inside." "spot cash" rate from which 
there is no de\latlon and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 2.5 cents; loo lines. fs.oO; 1000 lines, 
$50.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to five times cash 
rates. Due Bills and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing wUl be honored only at regrular rates in force 
at the date of issuance of said bill or card. 

Remittances shotild be made by Draft, Express 
or PostofBce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination wUl be accepted for sums tm- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans (Do., N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O. . ALBION. N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 

Nesting of the Broad-wingfed Hawk. 

On the 16th of May, 1895, while walk- 
ing through a grove of oaks on the edge 
of a marsh and within fifty yards of a 
small stream, I frightened a hawk from 



a nest twenty feet up in the crotch of an 

oak tree. 

I thought it was a Cooper's Hawk, al- 
though the plaintive cry it made as it 
perched amrng ihe branche.s of a tree, 
one hundred feet away, was new tome. 
It sounded like ''siggee,''"siggee," some- 
thing like a Kil deer, a Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak or the alarm cy of a Red- 
wing Blackbird. 

The cry was repeated constantly and 
had a somewhat ventrilcquial effect, so 
that it was hard to tell just where the 
birds were, especially as they kept pret- 
ty well out of sight and did not fly 
around much. 

When 1 reached the nest I found it to 
be about the size of a crow's, and built 
of sticks and twigs, rather c'umsily put 
together, and lined with a few pieces of 
bark and eight green oak leaves. It 
only contained two eggs and still think- 
ing the bird to be a Cooper's Hawk, I 
left it and did not go ba?k until the 20th, 
wben the hawk was again on thf^ nest. 
As no more eggs had been laid. I took 
the two, and on blowing found that in- 
cubation was about one-third advanced. 
The eggs are of a uniform dull white, 
one blotched and spotted at the larger 
end, and the other at the smaller end, 
with faint lilac, which has a clouded 
effect as if it was under the shell. They 
are rather small, measuring 1.87 x 1 47 
and 1 93 X 1.52. After looking up the 
sut ject and getting the opinions of other 
oologists, I came to the conclusion that 
they were the eggs of Buteo latissimus. 

The following year, on May 26th, as I 
was passing through the same piece of 
woods, I thought I would take a look at 
the old nest, and as I drew near a hawk 
flew from a new one in anothertree not 



THE OOLOGIST. 



more than 30 feet from the one of the 
year before. This time I observed the 
bird closely and saw that it appeared a 
little smaller than a Cooper's Hawk and 
had a shorter tsil, and was not so noisy 
and aggressive. It flew into a poplar 
tree near by, where il was joined by its 
mate, and all the time I was near the 
nest they kept up the cry which is dis- 
tinctive of the species. The nest was 
about 30 feet up, composed of sticks and 
twigs, and lined with bark, green leaves 
and the down of poplar buds. It con- 
tained a very handsome set of three 
eggs, incubation about half done, and 
measuring 2.01 X 1.63, 2.01 x 1.63 and 
1.99x1.60. They are spotted all over 
with brick(:red spots and dots so thickly 
that the ground color can not be seen, 
but the coloring is heaviest at the larger 
end on one egg, and at the smaller on 
the others. 

I was away during the next three 
years, but on May 10th of last year, 
while after a set of Long-oared Owls, 
within about one-half mile from where 
I found the nests in '95 and '96, I heard 
the now familiar cry again. The bird 
seemed to follow me wherever I went, 
although I only saw it once, and I could 
hear its cry for a long time. Taking the 
hint from the bird's actions, I went to 
the place where I had been successful 
before, but though there were several 
old nests in the vicinity, I saw nothing 
of the hawk until I had reached the far 
side of the wood about 300 yards 'away, 
when I heard it again close at hand. I 
looked around for a nest, and at first 
saw none, but finally discovered what 
appeared to be an old squirrel's habita- 
tion about 15 feet up in the crotch of a 
large black oak, growing on a narrow 
neck between two sloughs and with 
only a few other trees around. As the 
birds were both on hand sitting among 
the branches of trees near by, though 
out of sight, I thought it best to investi- 
gate, and with some difficulty on ac- 
count of the size of the tree, I got up to 



the nest. The crotch in which it was 
placed was formed by the junction of 
five branches with the main body of the 
tree and formed a very secure position. 
It was built on the remains of an old 
squirrel's nest and was composed of 
sticks and twigs, lined with pieces of 
bark, a few feathers, and some green 
twigs with the leaves on. It measured 
14 X 18 inches in diameter on the out- 
side, was 14 inches deep outside, 7 
inches in diameter inside and the hollow 
was 4 inches deep. It contained no eggs 
so I left it for a future visit. On the 
same day as I was pushing my way 
through an extensive woodof voung oak 
and poplar, which covered the sides of 
a high hill and was so grown up with 
underbrush as to be almost impenetra 
ble, I heard "siggee,'" "siggee'^ near by, 
but could see no bird. I soon found a 
nest in a small red oak, and then another 
and another, until I found five, all with- 
in fifty yards of the first one, none of 
them more than twenty feet up, but 
they all proved on examination to be 
old ones, so I gave it up for the time 
being. 

On the evening of the 17th, while out 
far a ride back of Lake Harriet and 
within the city limits of Minneapolis, 
and on high ground, mostly under cul- 
tivation, I saw a hawk fly from a small 
grove of oaks, which is about an acre in 
size and is within 500 yards of Minne- 
haha Creek. 

When returning about dusk, I stop- 
ped at the grove and pushed my way 
through the underbrush to the center of 
the grove, where I soon found a nest 
placed about 18 feet up in the forks of a 
small oak. The outside of the nest was 
rather loose and scraggy, and spread 
out so that I could not see whether there 
was a bird on or not, but a small stick 
tossed up brought Mrs. Broad-wing off 
the nest to alight on a tree near by and 
scold as long as I was near. 

The nest was rather wide and the de- 
pression very shallow and was lined 



THE OOLOGIST. 



with pieces of bark and a few green 
poplar twigs. Thie eggs, three in num- 
ber, are perfect "Red tails" in minia- 
ture, one being heavily marked with 
blotches of red, brown and lilac, one 
dotted closely all over wtth minute red 
dots and the larger end solidly covered 
with heavy reddish blotches; and the 
other is encircled with a wreath of light 
red and lilac around the middle, though 
slightly nearer the small end. Incuba- 
tion had just started. Measurements 
1.88 X 1.49, 1.95 X 1.48, 1.90 x 1.48. 

On the 20th I went to visit the nest 
found on the 10th, and as I drew near 
the bird left the nest and being joined 
by its mate, they flew about making 
more fuss than any of the other pairs 
had done. 

This time the nest contained three 
handsome eggs, one of them is speckled 
with red all over and looks like a Tur- 
key's egg, one is marked with large 
heavy blotches of red, principally at 
the smaller end, and the other is marked 
all over with smaller marks which are 
thicker at the small end; measurements 
2.05 X 1.59, 2.10 X 1.59, 2 04 x 1 60; incu- 
bation very slight. This is a very large 
set. 

I next went to visit the locality where 
I had found the five old nests on the 
hill, and as I was approaching the spot 
I came across another nest which look- 
ed older and more dilapidated than any 
of the others, and was mostly composed 
of dead leaves, being evidently an old 
squirrel's nest, but over the top of it 
projected the tail of Mr. (or Mrs ) 
"Buteo." The hawk flew off as I start- 
ed to ascend and lighting on a tree 30 
yards away, commenced the usual sere- 
nade. The nest was not more than 14 
feet up in the forks of a very small oak 
and was composed of a few sticks placed 
on the foundation of dead leaves, lined 
with a few pieces of bark, a few feathers 
and some poplar twigs with the green 
leaves and the fuzz from the Vuds still 
on them, and measured 18 x 16 inches 



in diameter outside, 8x7 inches in dia- 
meter inside, 8 inches deep outside and 
4 inches deep inside. It contained three 
eggs, incubation begun, one covered all 
over with brick-red dots so that the 
ground color can not be seen, and with 
an almost solid mass of red all over the 
small end; one marked heavily with 
brick-red blotches forming a wreath 
ai'ound the small end, and the other 
clouded and marbled all over with sub- 
merged pale lilac; size, 1.84 x 1.47, 1.89 
X 1.54, 1.80 X 1.50. 

On May 28th while looking for a 
Marsh Hawk's nest in a large marsh 
about three miles from Minneapolis, I 
was surprised to hear the cry of a Broad- 
wing. There was only one tree near 
and that was a small poplar that grew 
on a dry piece of ground 35 yards away, 
and I finally located Mr. Hawk in the 
lower branches of this tree and on the 
opposite side He seemed to be carry- 
ing on an anima'ed conversation with a 
Red-winged Blackbird, which, alarmed 
by my proximity to its nest, was utter- 
ing cries cf distress, which were quite 
similar to the Broad wing's. Every 
time the Blackbird would cry the hawk 
would answer it, and I presume the 
latter thought he was making quite an 
impression. When I tried to get near 
he flew straight away to a large wood 
half a mile distant, and I made up my 
mind that there was a set of eggs in that 
wood, but as it was getting dark I had 
to put off searching for them till a later 
date. 

On the 30th having a few hours spare 
time, I went out to the wood, and after 
a somewhat prolonged search, as the 
wood was a large one and the trees 
small and close together, I found the 
nest and the ha,wk flew off. The nest 
was about 25 feet up in the forks of an 
oak tree, and was built on top of the 
dead leaves of an old squirrel's nest and 
composed of sticks, and thickly lined 
with green oak leaves; it measured 14 
inches in diameter outside, 6 inside, and 



THE OOLOGIST. 



12 inches deep outside and 4 inside. It 
contained two eggs, incubation about 
one-half done, and rieasuring 1.88 x 
1.57,1.87x1.58. One marked with a 
wreath of red around the smaller end, 
and the other with a mass of smaller 
red spots covering the larger end, and 
a scattering of dots over the rest of its 
surface. 

On the 4ih of June I had occasion to 
be in one of the railroad yards in the 
suburbs, when I heard a Broad-wing in 
a small grove along side of the track. 
The grove is not above an acre and a 
half in extent, and on one side is a busy 
railroad yard and large grain elevator, 
and on the other a we'l used street lead- 
ing to the suburbs and Lake Minne- 
tonka, while the street cars go by right 
on the edge of the wood. The grove is 
also a famous hunting ground for the 
small boy with the air-gun and "Flob- 
ert" rifle. 

I thought the hawk must be on a hunt- 
ing trip, for it did not seem like a place 
in which thev would build, but fifteen 
minutes' search was rewarded by see- 
ing the hawk fly from what seemed to 
be an old squirrel's nest of dead leaves 
pla<^ed against the trunk of a small oak 
tree and about 25 feet up. The nest 
was a flimsy affair of a few sticks placed 
on a foundation of dead leaves and was 
lined with a few pieces of bark, a few 
feathers, (from the bird's tail evidently) 
some green leaves and fuzz of poplars 
and a long green weed of some kind 
(I think it was a "Solomon's Seal") cov- 
ered with leaves. 

The eggs were two in number and in- 
cubation was begun. One was marked 
all over with pale lilac, with a few dis- 
tinct angular spots of light red, and the 
other with a few large blotches of red 
at the smaller end; this egg is irregular 
in shape and has a distinct crack run- 
ning clear around it, and a spot where 
it has been shattered and bulged out, 
but it has all been healed up again and 
is as strong as ever. I suppose it must 



have been broken inside of the bird and 
before the shell was entirely formed. 
Size of eggs, 1.92 x 1 50, 1 90 x 1.48. 

This completes my series, altogether, 
7 sets of 18 eggs, 4 sets of 3, and 3 sets 
of 2. 

I think I could have collected a good 
many more this year if I had h^d time, 
as I found theoa in every suitable wood 
in which I searched, and every time I 
heard their call I found their ne.st with- 
out difficulty. 1 shall not disturb them 
any more this season, but next year I 
expect to take a set from each nest vis- 
ited as here described. 

These sets were all collected within a 
radius of five miles from the center of 
the city of Minneapolis and two were 
within the city limits. 

John D. Currie, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



Bird Music. 

LContinued from last issue.] 
Another bird that sometimes sings on 
the wing, is the White-rumped Shrike. 
It is not generally known that this 
Shrike, or for that matter any other, 
has a song. I have heard the song sev- 
eral times and can testify to a series of 
very agreeable notes nicely modulated. 
We cannot call the song really melodi- 
ous, but it is still possessed of unique- 
ness, as it is essentially unlike the notes 
of any other bird of my acquaintance. 
I once heard this Shrike sing as it flew 
in the characteristic manner of flight- 
singers, on fluttering wings. 

The true love-song of the Golden- 
crowned Thrush or Oven-bird has been 
but rarely referred to by writers, in 
fact, the best musical efforts of this 
species have only been described in 
comparatively recent times. The com- 
mon loud clanking chirpings, so often 
heard, have been listened to by aU ob- 
servers, but a superior strain, only oc- 
casionly uttered, has been listened to 
by but few intelligently. I feel safe in 



THE OOLOGIST. 



9 



saying that no bird among us which is 
so well known, has eluded the observ- 
ers of bird songs as this one has done. 

I listened to the love song of the 
Oven-bird for the first time in 18S0. A 
burst of melody reached me in a dense 
piece of low woods, well filled with 
underbrush, and the delightful notes 
were surprising and doubly pleasing to 
me in this location. At first on hear- 
ing the song the idea presented itself 
that a species new to me was singing, 
and my extreme care in reaching the 
glade in hopes of secnring a note, pro- 
cured me a chance of witnessing a most 
singular porformance. Crawling 

through the brush I came to a partial 
clearing, over which a bird, evidently 
in the highest transports of joy, was 
fluttering in irregular flight. It is not 
surprising that 1 failed to recognize the 
performer in this, to me, unusual as- 
pect, for there was not a feature in its 
notes or movements in which it resem- 
bled its ordinary and understood hab- 
its. 

Observing another bird, evidently a 
Golden-crowned Thrush, and its mate, 
perched on the ground near, and which 
appeared to be the center of attraction 
to the delighted warbler overhead. I 
quietly awaited the movements of the 
pair. Never had I heard this song be- 
fore and never had I witnessed such a 
scene. This was indeed, making love 
with a spirit not often witnessed among 
our warblers. 

This song was almost continuous, 
that is, together with the interruptions 
of the more subdued call or conversa- 
tion notes, and the common chattering 
notes, so well known and described by 
Coues as a harsh crescendo, and was 
largely of the most melodious strains. 

The energetic, unconscious fellow 
was in the meantime consistently flying 
above his inamorata, describing nearly 
every form of flight except sailing. 
First dashing to the edge of the glade, 
then rising to the tops of the bushes he 



would flutter almost directly upward 
as we have oftea seen the European 
Sparrow or House Wren do, and reach- 
ing a height of twenty feet or more, 
would flutter toward his mate, or dash 
about the clearing in varying evolutions 
almost constantly singing. She, in the 
meantime sat silent, and probably in- 
terestpd in the performance. The ap- 
pearance of a third party on the scene, 
undoubtedly also a lover, caused the 
ecstatic singer to dash into a bush. 

This song ecstacy is rare, as it is also 
the much simpler one of the Grass 
Finch or Vesper Sparrow as it is called, 
which also goes into a rapturous song- 
flight occasionly. The Finch rises into 
the air fifty feet or more but not as rap- 
idly as the Bobolink, and generally set- 
tles back near to the point from which 
it took its flight. The Bobolink sings 
as well when perched as in its flight, 
though not so continued, but the Grass 
Finch's song when on the surface is 
very commonplace, while its flight-song 
like that of the Oven bird, is superior. 

A number of species of birds em- 
braced in the systematic division of, 
are known to utter their notes on the 
wing, and from the Crow to the Martin, 
which is the nearest to a musician 
among the Swallows, there are many 
which give their best efforts while fly- 
ing. Among these is the Prairie Horn- 
ed Lark, which comes very near to be- 
ing a singer, and which has a flight of 
special interest; still these efforts are 
not sufficiently musiciai to entitle the 
birds to rank in this list of musicians as 
accepted by critics. 

It will be observed that a tremulous 
motion of the wings almost invariably 
accompanies song flight. We may 
maintain, then, that the quiverings of 
the wings is an accompaniment to the 
song is a strictly seasonal feature. All 
have noticed the loss of the song syn- 
chronously with the skyward flutter in 
the case of the Bobolink, when he as- 
sumes his summer dress and leaves for 



10 



THE OOLOGIST 



the South to become the plebian rice- 
bird. I have yet to hear a bird sing on 
the wlDg in autumn. 

Morris Gibbs, M. D., 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
{To Be Continued.) 



Winter Bird Notes From California. 

One of the most abundant winter res- 
idents of SaataClara Co., Cal., is the 
Western Robin (Merula migratoria pro- 
pingua). He is rihgarded by the ranch- 
ers of Santa Clara Co. as a good weather 
prophet, although I could never confirm 
their belief. When the Robins arrive in 
force in the fall, the farmers prepare for 
heavy winter rains, and when they are 
scarce it is said to indicate a dry sea- 
son. 

Although we have a county game law 
protecting this bird, they are neverthe- 
less killed in considerable numbers by 
the small boy .Italians and other foreign- 
ers, but I think that in the last few 
years the farmers are more and more 
coming to realize the need of protecting 
this and other beneficial birds. Just 
recently I have heard of several parties 
who intend to make an example of any 
one they can find shooting Robins, and 
1 hope that before long something will 
be done to enforce the law. At any 
rate, the Cooper Ornithological Club 
will soon have a law pass, in the state 
legislature, unless something ue expect- 
ed happens, which will protect all the 
song and other birds at all seasons of 
the year, and which, if passed, we mem- 
bers intend to see enforced. 

The Robin arrives with us about the 
first of October and remains until March. 
They are more or less gregarious, a flock 
usually contaicing about fifty birds, al- 
though I have seen flocks which, no 
doubt, held several hundred. 

The Varied Thrush {Hesperocichla 
naevia) arrives about the same time that 
the Robin does, but is not nearly so 
common. They are of a retiring dispos- 



ition and favor a location for their win- 
ter home, which contains a number of 
thick cypress, pine or other thick trees 
or shrubs, usually near some house, 
where they are quite content to remain 
in the seclusion thus afforded until it is 
time for them to again journey to the 
thick spruce woods of British America 
or Alaska, to their summer home. 

Another common winter resident is 
Audubon's Warbler [Denclroica audu- 
honi). Most of their time is spent in the 
orchards vigorously searching, with 
many a shai'p "chit" for insects and 
other food. They arrive about the first 
of October, and are abundant from this 
time till the last of February. When 
they first arrive they are changing from 
the summer to winter plumage, and 
some of the specimens taken at this time 
are very interesting. 

In this locality I have made an obser- 
vation which may, perhaps, help to 
prove that the sub-species of Audubon's 
Warbler, described by Mr. Robert Mc- 
Gregor, of Palo Alto, and named 
Hoover's Warbler, {Dendroica coronata 
hooveri) shows a constant variation. Mr. 
Grinnell found Hoover's Warbler abun- 
dant and nesting in the Kotzebue Sound 
Region of Alaska, (see Pacific Coast 
Avifauna No. 1, p. 55) but found no 
Audubon's Warblers. Now, our Audu- 
bon's Warbler, which nests in Califor- 
nia, arrives here in the fall about the 
middle of October, but I have never 
noted Hoover's Warbler before late in 
December. This would help to prove 
that they are a distinct sub-species, 
whose summer home is Alaska, and the 
long distance they have to travel will 
account for their delay in arriving in 
the winter. 

A very modest, though interesting 
bird is the Dwarf Hermit Thrush, {Tur- 
dus aonalaschkce) which is fairly com- 
mon in our locality in the winter time. 
He is generally not a very sociable fel- 
low, always traveling by himself through 
our gardens and feeding upon worms 



THE OOLOGIST. 



11 



and other insects. I have often felt 
sorry for him, he seems so lonely, but I 
presume he does not mind it. 

The Cedar Waxwing [Ampelis cedro- 
rum) is an irregular winter visitor with 
us, coming in flocks of from about 
twenty to perhaps one hundred. They 
feed on the seeds of the locust and pep- 
per trees, which are quite extensively 
grown for shade trees in Santa Clara. 

Has the Mockingbird {Mimuspolyglot- 
tus) ever been recorded in Santa Clara 
Co.? I have never seen a record of it, 
although I know they occur in winter 
in Alameda Co , which is next to us on 
the north. My tirst record was on the 
23d of Jan. 1899, when I saw a male 
Mockingbird near a residence in a large 
garden near Santa Clara. I was told he 
had been around the place for several 
weeks. Since then I have recorded 
them as follows; Feb. 9, 1900, female, 
seen in a garden in Santa Clara; Feb. 
13, 1900, male, bird noted in a garden 
near a house two miles west of Santa 
Clara; Oct. 12, a pair, male and female, 
seen near the place I saw a bird Feb. 9, 
1900, male t^i ging. From these records 
I conclude that the Mockingbird is 
rather a common straggler to our 
county in the winter time. 

Oar winter Sparrows, Gambel's 
[Zonotrichia leucophrys gambeli) Inter- 
mediate, [Zonotrichia I. intermedia) and 
Golden Crowned (Zonotrichia coronaia) 
all arrive about the first of October. 
The Whited-crowned Sparrow {Zono- 
trichia leucophrys) arrives several weeks 
later. They all congregate in large 
flocks in the hedge rows and brush piles 
where they spend a very merry and soc- 
iable winter. These birds are all very 
much despised by the orchardists,for in 
February and March when the fruit 
blossoms are beginning to come out, 
they form the chief article of diet for 
these Sparrows. The destruction that 
a flock of these birds can do in one day 
is something enormous. 

In the winter time our Finches all 



congregate in flocks, it being no uncom- 
mon sight to see a flock of House Finches 
(Carpodacus mexicanus frontalis), Law- 
rence's and Arkansas Goldfinches (As- 
tragalinus lawrencei and psallria), which 
will contain several hundred birds. 

After the first of October we always 
have with us the American Pipit {An- 
thus pensilvanicus) in abundance. They 
feed in large flocks in the grain fields 
and orchards, delighting particularly to 
run after a plow and pick up the worms 
as fast as they are turned up. The ma- 
jority of them leave about the first of 
April, although I have one record for 
four birds noted on the 24th of April, 
which 1 consider a very late date for 
them. 

I think of all our resident birds in 
winter the California Bush-tit {Psaltri- 
parus minimus californicus) is, perhaps, 
the most interesting. They congregate 
in small flocks and will search a garden 
so thoroughly, investigating all the trees 
and shrubs, that it has to be a very 
smart spider who can escape with his 
life. They are such dainty little birds 
and are so fearless that they always 
draw my attention, and I consider it a 
great privilege to watch a flock of them 
"do" a peach tree in our back yard. 

This is a very incomplete account of 
some of our winter birds in their chosen 
homes, but as time is pressing I must 
desist. Would time permit, I might 
enumerate the Chickadees, the dainty 
Kinglet, both species of which are com- 
mon winter residents, the Woodpeck- 
ers, Jays and many others, not omitting 
the infernal, and ever obnoxious English 
Sparrow. 

This paper is merely intended to show 
our eastern brethren something of our 
abundant bird life in winter, as well as 
in summer, for we can study birds al- 
most a'' diligently in winter as in nest- 
ing season, and it is but a poor ornithol- 
ogist who cannot enjoy the birds unless 
he is despoiling them of their most prec- 
ious treasure — their eggs. 

William N. Atkinson, 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



12 



THE OOLOGIST 



The Use of Old Nests. 

It is a strange economy of Nature, 
which impels Hawks and Owls, to use 
old and unattractive nests, when but 
little energy need be expendert, in the 
construction of new abodes, when each 
would then build, and differentiate, 
accordirg to his specific instinct. 

April 18th 1^95, we saw an Accijnter 
cooperi nearby a nest which was just 
begun, and cor eluded that she was 
constructing same. May 5th, the nest 
was completed, and on May 19th, we 
took therefrom a set of five slightly in- 
cubated eggs. The nest was typical of 
the species, very bulky, composed of 
small sticks and lined with the outer 
baik of chestnut in chunks from two 
to five inches long, and from one-half 
to one and one-half inches wide. It 
was placed in the crotch of a tall, slen- 
der chestnut tree, fifty-five feet from 
the ground. In 1896 this nest was occu- 
pied by a Barred Owl, which hatched 
its clutch there. When we visited the 
site April 12th, the shells, strewn about 
the base of the tree, appeared as if the 
young had been hatched a day or two 
previously. The nest appeared, from 
the ground, as if some inner bark and 
leaves had been added since it was oc- 
cupied by the Cooper's, but I think 
this was probably done by squirrels, 
during the preceding Fall, as I have 
never known the Barred Owl to do 
anything toward building a nest, or 
fixing over an old one. They appear 
to be satisfied with what they can find. 
We again visited this site, in the Fall of 
'98 and saw by the numerous tracks 
about the tree, that the nest was occu- 
pied, but, by what we could not 
make out, as the tracks were strange to 
us. A charge of shot into the nest 
brought down a pair of old, and four 
young, white-footed mice. This ended 
the history of that nest, as it was blown 
down the following winter. 
April 21, 1896, and April 11th, 1897, 



we collected sets of four Red-should- 
ered Hawk's eggs from a nest in the 
crotch of an oak tree, forty-one feet 
nine inches from the ground. The nest 
was a typical Buteo's, made of large 
sticks and containing much inner bark. 
In 98 the Red shouldered Hawk did 
not appear but a pair of Cooper's added 
to the top a few small branches, and 
reared their young there. During the 
winter of 1898-1899 this nest was blown 
down Last spring the Cooper's Hawks 
built a new nest, whose history we 
spoiled by removing it entire, together 
with its complement of three incubated 
eggs, to our den. 

In 18^7, on April 20th, we located 
nests rf the Red -shouldered and Coop- 
er's Hawks, which were not more than 
two hundred foet distant from each 
other. These were both of the build of 
'&7 and were typical, each, of its spec- 
ies. The Red-shouldered's nest con- 
tained two slightly incubated eggs, 
which we tock. The nest of the Coop, 
er's was just completed. On April 
oOth, we tock a set of four fresn eggs 
from it. Visiting the locality after 
Chickadee's eggs on May 12th, the 
same year, we were surprised to start a 
Cooper's Hawk from the Buteo's nest. 
A climb to the nest showed that every 
vestige of the inner bark had been re- 
moved. A few small sticks had been 
added, and the nest relined with outer 
bark. The nest contained three eggs 
of the Cooper's. One of the eggs look- 
ed as if it might have been deposited 
many days before the other two, as it 
had lost all its bluish tint, and other- 
wise appeared to be highly incubated, 
while the remaining two had the ap- 
pearance of being perfectly fresh. We 
believed, and still do, that this faded 
egg was part of the first set, which had 
been taken before it was completed, 
so we decided to take the set to see if 
this would not be evidenced by the dif- 
ferent stages of incubation. But, on 
blowing, it proved no different from 



THE 05L0GIST. 



13 



the others, all showing incubation had 
just commenced. Neither of these 
nests have since been occupied. 

April 25th, 1891", we found a nest 
which had every appearance of being 
occupied by a Uedshouldered Hawk, 
very large sticks, inner bark showing 
prominently, and a pine branch here 
and there, about the top sides. It was 
situated in th-i fork of a large branch, 
which sloped awiy from the trunk of 
the tree, and was forty -two feet from 
the jjrnuQd. The bird left the nest 
when we were about fifty feet from the 
tree, and almost the tame instant, a full 
grown gray sq lirrel sprang from the 
under part of the nest, ran over it. and 
flattened itself against the tree, a few 
inches above the nest, and there re- 
mained uniil we began the climb. So 
astonished were we at seeing a squirrel 
jump from the very nest of a Hawk, 
that we paid littlo nttention to the bird, 
and were very much surprised upon 
reaching the nest, to find that it's occu- 
pant was an Acciperal cooper i, instead 
of a Buteo lineatus. This rest contain- 
ed both the inner and outer bark o' the 
chestnut. It was plac d in such nn un- 
fortunate position, that it was with 
great diffi julty we succeeded in colitct- 
ing the three fresh eggs which it con- 
tained. The posi'ion of the nest was 
so trying, that when the eggs were 
taken, wc^ could not wait to examiae 
the nest sufliciently to assert positively 
that it was a combined nest of the sqir- 
rel and the Cooper'd. I do not dare to 
state the manner in wnich we got the 
eggs down from this nest, for when we 
told the story at home that evening, we 
were immediately branded as worthy 
disciples of Ananias, and since then, 
whenever an impropable story is heard, 
some one is sure to suggest that we can 
tell a pretty good yarn about how we 
procured a certain set of Cooper's 
Hawk. But though the set is, we fear, 
incomplete it is on recount of it's asso- 
ciation, prized most highly. It was not 



occupied in the spring of '99, t>ut last 
fall my brother shot a gray sqirrel from 
the tree which evidently made tin nest 
his home. We hava no doubt but that 
this nest was built and first occupied by 
a Red-shouldered Hawk, then occupied 
by a Cooper's Hawk, and during the 
wiater and perhaps a pact of the 
spring, was occupied by squirrels. 
The fact that it contained much inner 
bark when it was occupied by the 
Cojper's suggests the idea that the 
Co'iper'd Hawks may h ive drivon the 
Buteo away from the nest, aft-r she 
had prepared it for occupancy in the 
spring of '97, fjr during the whole of 
that spring the Buteos were in the 
grove, but did not nest there. We 
have no knowledge as to which of these 
sptc.es is considered the stronger. 

In 1898 we took a set of Red-should- 
ered Hawk's from a pine tree. Typical 
nest, forty-six feet, six laches from the 
ground. In April, lt:99, we took from 
this nest a set of three 'g^s of the 
Barred Owl. The Owls used the nest 
just as they found it, without the ad- 
dition of a stick <r a bit of burk. 

The lust ntst which my noto books 
show w!is used by different species, 
was a nest built aud occupied by a 
Coopor'.s in '95. !"his nest was fifty 
feet from the grouud, in the crotch of 
a chestnut tree. A pair of Red-should- 
ered Hawks appropiiated this nest in 

1899. 

John H. Flanigan, 

Providence, R I. 

THINGS YOU NEED SOOH. 

Best Heavy Steel Climbers, made to 

climb, with straps, $2.50; without, $1.65. 

NIckle Plated Drills, Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4, 
set $1.25. 

A Good Pencil for eges, 10c. 

Data Blanks, 10c per 100. 

Blowpipes. 40c, 20c, 12c. Hooks, Calipers, 
Measures, Scissors, etc., etc. Bargains in 
Trays. Lists free. 

I have a DRILL that cuts smooth. CUTS 
the lining of fie egg too. Once used you will 
never use the regular oological drills 6 sizes 
at 25c each. 2 sizes at 35c each. 4 sizes at 50c 
each. Sample set, 3 sizes, 81 00. You want 
THEM. Everything Prepaid. 
BENJAMIN HOAG, STEPHENTOWN, N. Y. 



14 



THE OOLOGIST. 



BIRDS' EGGS. 

Prices per set, prepaid. 
5 per cent off on orders of $5 and over. 
$10 per cent, off on orders of $10.00 or 
over. 

Western Grebe 10-4, 35c; 2-5 $ 45 

P»ied bil'ed Grebe 1 6 25 

St. Domingo Grebe 1-4 50 

American-eared Grebe 1-7 40 

Black-throated Loon 1-2 1 25 

Red-throated Loon 1-2 75 

Tufted Puffin 1-1 40 

Cassins Auklet 3-1 50 

Ashy Petrel 2-1 1 00 

California Murre 1-1 12 

Booby 1-3 1 00 

Gannet 1 1 15 

Fulmar 1-1 25 

Canvas-back Duck 18 2 40 

American Goldeneye Duck 1-12, 82.40; 1-8 1 60 

1-7 1 40 

Violet-green Cormorant 1-4 1 25 

Xantus's Murrelet 1-1 2 .'lO 

Canada Goose 16 _.. 2 65 

Lesser Scaup Duck 1-9 2 00 

Gadwall Duck 1-10, 12.00; 1-9 1 75 

Mallard Duck 1-9 1 00 

Shoveller Duck 1 10 100 

Holbcell's Grebe 1-5 75 

Great Blue Heron 1-5, 70c; 1-4 55 

Florida Qallinule 1-8 50 

European Coot 1-8 60 

Double crested Cormorant 1-4 35 

Florida Cormorant 1-3 30 

Black Skimmer 3-4 22 

American Bittern 1-3 75 

Least Bittern 15, S5c; 2-4, 20c; 1-3 15 

Black-crowned NightHeron 16 

Killdeer 1-4 40 

Spotted Sandpiper 1-4 20 

King Rail 1-11 85 

■Willet3-4 55 

White-winged Dove 1-2 22 

Inca Dove 1-2 60 

Marsh Hawk M 10c; 1-3 30 

Cooper's Hawk 1-8 15 

Harris's Hawk 1-3 45 

European Buzzard 1-2 40 

Kestrel 50 

American Rough-legged Hawk 1-2 1 60 

Duck Hawk 11 1 50 

Florida Red-shouldered Hawk 2-2 60 

American Barn Owl 1-2, 30; 1-5 60 

Aiken's Screech Owl 1 2 2 50 

California Screech Owl 1-5 _ 65 

Florida Burrowing Owl 1-6 2 00 

Chachalaca 1 3 55 

Road Runner 1-3, 30c; 1-4 40c; Is 48 

Chestnut-bellied Scaled Partridge 1-10 1 50 

Ruffed Grouse 1-8 75 

Gambel's Partridges 1-12 1 40 

Valley Partridge 1-8 55 

Dusky Grouse 1-4 2 25 

Mangrove Cuckoo 1-4 2 60 

California Cuckoo 1-3 1 50 

Red-shafted Flicker 1-6 30 

Northwestern Flicker 1-6 60 

Gilded Flicker 1-5 1 00 

Poor-wllll-8 2 75 

California Woodpecker 1-3 50 

Florida Nlghthawkl-2 70 

Western Nightbawk 1-8 25 

Black Phoebe 2-4 20 

Phoebe n-4 38c ;n-5 50c; 1-4 07 

Florida Blue Jav 1-5 50 

American Crow 3-4 10c; 3-3 6c; 1-6 18 

Pinon Jay 1 2, 81.00; 1-3, 81.50; 1-4 2 00 

Mexican Meadow Lark 1-4 50 

Hooded Oriole 1-5 90 



Arizona Hooded Oriole 1-3. 

American Goldfinch n-3 

Texan Cardinal 1-2 

Boat-tailed Grackle 3-3 

Bi'ewer's Sparrow n-4. 



40 

20 

20 

10 

50 

Cassln's Purple Finch 1-4 1 00 

Louisiana Tanager 1-3 1 00 

Pileated Warbler 1-3 75 

Audubon's Warbler 1-2 1 50 

Chestnut-sided Warbler n-2 n-3, 35c; n-4 50 

Western Robin 2 3, 12c; 2-4 18 

Casein's Sparrow 13 1 00 

American Dipper 1-4 1 50 

White-breasted Nuthatch 1-6 75 

Lead-colored Bush Tit 1-7 3 75 

Mountain Bluebird 1-4 30 

Chestnut-backed Bluebird 1-2 _ 36 

Verdin 1-4 1 20 

Brown-headed Nuthatch 1-6 50 

Curve-billed Thrasher 1-4 _ 30 

Bendire's Thrasher 1-3, 75c; 1-4 1 00 

Palmer's Thrasher 1-3 75 

Thurber's Junco 1-3 75 

Blue-fronted Jay 2 1 35 

Woodhouse's Jay-1-1 30 

Lazuli Bunting 1-9 20 

Baird's Wren 1-6 1 30 

Lomita Wren 1-5 1 50 

Parkman's Wren 1-6 25 

California Bush Tit 1-7. 35 

Prothonotary Warbler 1-6 50 

Yellow Warbler n-4 _ 25 

Arizona G< Idflnch 1-4 38 

Mexican Goldfinch 15 75 

Lawrence's Goldfinch 1-4 35 

Rusty Song Sparrow 1-4 18 

Abert's Towhee 1-3 70 

Red-headed Merganser 11 (American col.) 35 

European Coarser 1-2 (Canary Islands) 3 00 

Lesser Black-backed Gull 1-2 (Scotland) ... 35 

Gold Crest (England) 1 7 1 50 

Long-billed Curlew 1-1 40 

Oregon Chickadee 1-4 55 

Purple (Srackle n-4 40 

Many others. Lists free. 

BENJAMIN HOAG. 

Stephentown, N. Y. 

IT IS SPREADING LIKE WILD FIRE! 

What? 

The American Society of Curio 
Collectors. 

A NATIONAL SOCIETY for collectors of 
shells, fossils, minerals, Indian relics, war rel- 
ics, historical articles of all kinds, coins, med- 
als, antiquated paper money, autographs, 
bird's eggs, mounted birds and animals, in- 
sects, flowers, marine and land curios of all 
kinds. 

Monthly Official Organ with large exchange 
department. 

Free Identification Bureau. 

Quarterly Bulletin for members only. 

Initiation fee. 10c. Yearly dues 25c. 

For Application Blank and further informa- 
tion address, 

ALLEN JESSE REYNOLDS, Sec'y, 

2015 Grand Ave., Connersville, Ind. 
Mention Oologist. 



T 



HIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



THE OOLOGIST 



15 



;^5.00 for only 50 cents. 

For 1901 Subscribers ofTHEOOLOGIST only. 

While ''taking inventory" we found many Items in very large quantities— enough to last the 
ordinary Curio Dealer a lifetime and in such quantities that we cannot job them off to dealers ex- 
cept at a sacrifice— and rather than give dealers the benefit of the same we prefer and have con- 
cluded to give this benefit to the 1901 subscriber^ or the Ool,ogist. Those who have paid their sub- 
scription to the OoLOGiST for 1901 or who remit for same when accepting this ''SS-OO fornOcts" offer 
—we will send by express at their expense (we can send prepaid for 25cts.) all of the specimens 
and books listed below for only 50cts. 



1. Chinese Horn Nut, China $ 05 

2. Egg of Skate or Sand Shark, Martha's 

Vineyard 05 

8. Clay Police Whistle, Mexico 10 

4. Black-Mouth Tree Snail, Pavillion Key, 

Fla 25 

5. Purple-spined Sea Urchin, Gulf of Mex- 

ico 25 

6. Organ pipe Coral, Singapore 25 

7. Orange Scorpion Shell, Polynesia 25 

8. Resurrection Plant, Mexico 15 

S. One-half dozen Alligator Teeth, Indian 

River, Fla 25 

10. Four Gem Stones (Red Agate, Black 
Onyx, Crocidollte and Sardonyx In- 
taglio) cut and polished 40 

ai. Compass or Sunflower Starfish, Chili... 35 

12. Fossil Scaphites j (Nautilus Family) 

Montana 25 

13. Goldmouth Shell, Philippines 25 

14. Fossil Shark Tooth, Virginia _ 10 



15. Two Tarpon Scales, Florida 05 

16. Fossil Polyp Coral I New York 15 

17. "Electric Stone." a var ofTremollte 

emitting flashes of light when 
.scratched with any hard substance, 

New York - 10 

18. Precious Coral, polished twigs, Med- 

iterranean Sea 15 

19. Banded Murex Shell, Med. Sea 15 

20. Money Cowry Shell. Hawaii iQ 

21. Cone-in-Cone, Chautauqua Co. , N. Y... I5 

22. An Exchange Notice Coupon _ 2o 

23. Lattin's"Catalogue of N. A.BirdsEggs" I5 

24. Short's "Birds of Western New York." 1 

25. Tassin's "Directions for Collecting 

Minerals" 05 

26. A copy of "Penikese" - 35 

27. Five assorted Bird, Animal and Flower 

Pictures, my selection, size 6x8 in., 

beautifully colored, true to nature ..._ 30 

$5 00 



No changes or alterations of any kind can be made in this offer- you either accept or not as 
you may elect. The offer is no fake nor catch penny scheme but is made as stated and in good 
faith in order that many may share in the beneflt which would otherwise fall to a few. and inci- 
dentally to"increase the Oologist's subscrition list. This premium offer cannot be duplicated for 
double what it costs the 1901 subscribers to the Oologist by any dealer in America— the publish- 
•er of the Oologist included— after present supply is exhausted. 

RE9I£MBE^R.. 1st. That if your subscription to the Oologist is already paid through 
1901 you get the entire lot of specimens, etc , offered above for only 50cts. But if you wish them 
sent prepaid you must send 85cts additional or 75cts. in all. 

Sr?^ 2d. If you have not subscribed for the Oologist for 1901 and wish to accept this offer you 
must send 50cts. for Oologist with coupon for 1901 and 50cts. for this offer or $1.00 and if you want 
the lot sent prepaid add 25cts. more or $1.25 in all. 

3d. This offer Is made in connection with a subscription of the Oologist only. The paper 
and premium can be sent to the same or different addresses as desired. In case you wish the pre- 
mium without the Oologist or wish to secure a second premium the price will be $1.00 or $1.25 if 
sent prepaid. 

Remit in most convenient manner. Address plainly and in full. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, ALBION. N. Y. 



Buy a Postal Card, 

Write your name and address on back 
and mail to me. 

YOU WILL RECEIVE, 

New Lists of Birds Egjjs, Minerals, In- 
dian Relics and all Naturalist's 
Supplies. Ready to mail. 

Address. ERNEST H. SHORT, 

Box 173 Rochester, N. Y. 

(Formerly Albion, N. Y.) 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 

COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENT FORTREECOLLECTING- 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (175) 

J. Rowland Noweli, Portman, S. C. 



16 



THE OOLOGISl 



"You might as well be out of the Bird \A^orld al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 



a:^HR OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Popular Ornithology. 



of 



Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration withi Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C. W. Richmond and 
Other EminentOrnithoIogists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
TsE Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 
Published by 

XHH OSPRKY COIMCPABiV, 

321-323 4Y2 St., Washington, D. C. 

THE COOPER 
ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB 

Has published three-fourths of the most inter- 
esting descriptions of the nests and eggs or 
rare species of the West, which have been 
printed during the past six years, including 
the Hermit Warbler, Western Evening Gros- 
beak. White throated Swift.California Vulture, 
etc., etc. 

It is now publishing 

"THE CONDOR" 

Formerly the BULLETIN of the 

COOPER ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB. 

A crisp and breezy 16 to 24 page bi-monthly 
bird journal, illustrated as required. The arti- 
cles are all from field workers aud have a ring 
which enthuses the live ornithologist. The 
only Bird Magaziue devoted solely to the Or- 
nithology of the Great West. 

Always out on time! 

You want it! 

Subscription $1 a year. Sample copy, 20c. 
For sample, address C. BARLOW, Editor-in- 
chief. Santa Clara, Cal. Subscriptions to DON- 
ALD A. COHEN, Business Manager, Alameda, 
Cal. 

Subscription may commence with No. 1 (Jan- 
uary, 1899.). 



BIRD BOOKS. 

Prices Prepaid. 

Chapman's Handbook $ 2 25 

Ridgway's Manual 5 60 

Baird, Brewer and Ridgway's N. A. Birds 

Land Birds, 3 vols 20 00 

Water Birds, 2 vols 20 00 

Bird Studies with a Camera 1 45 

Davie's Nests and Eggs 1 50 

Davie's Taxidermy 4 00 

Nuttall's Handbook, 2 vols 6 20 

Goss' Birds of Kansas 3 95 

Bird Homes 1 95 

Land Birds and Game Birds of New Eng- 
land 3 00 

Bendire's Life Histories, Vol. 1 8 50 

Bird Neighbors 1 70 

Birds that Hunt and are Hunted 170 

Hudson's British Birds 2 15 

Kerton's Birds, Nests, Eggs and Egg Col- 
lecting 1 50 

Kerton's British Bird Notes 3 80 

Kerton's With Nature and a Camera 3 80 

Nehrling's Native Birds, bound 19 00 

Parrotsln Captivity, 3 vols., 81 col. plates 10 00 
Do you need back volumes or odd numbers 
of Auk. Osprey, "Nid" Bird Lore, etc , etc., to 
complete flies? Let me quote, can supply 
many, also any book obtainable. Lists free. 

BENJAMIN HOAG, 
Books and Periodicals, Stephentown, N. Y. 



JUST PUBLISED. 

CANADIAN BIRDS, 

By John Macoun, M. A., F. R S.C. 

The author has brought together facts on the 
range and nesting habits of all birds known to 
reside in, migrate to or visit the northern part 
of this continent and in addition to the Domin- 
ion of Canada he has before included New- 
foundland, Greenland and Alaska. 

It is the most cump'ete work on Canadian 
Birds vet published. 218 pages, paper cover. 
Price .50 cents U. S. stamps. Order a copy be- 
fore they are all gone. 

For sale by 

W. RAINE, Kew Beach, Toronto, Can. 



FOR SALE. 

500 Eggs of Birds of Prey including. 

Per set 

Turkey Vulture sets of 2 $ 50 

Black Vulture sets of 2 50 

Marsh Hawk sets of 5 90 

Harris's Hawk sets of 2 50 

European Buzzard _set3 0f3 60 

Krider'sHawk sets of 2 1 00 

Western Redtail sets of 3 75 

Swainson's Hawk sets of 3 60 

Rough-legged Hawk sets of 3 75 

Merlin sets of 5 1 25 

Kestrel sets of 5 60 

Audubon's Caracara sets of 2 75 

Rare Owls, &c. Send for full list. 

W. RAINE, Kew Beach, TORONTO, CAN. 



The OoLOGiST. 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY. ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 2. 



ALBION, N. Y., FEB., 1901. 



Whole No. 178 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants," "Exclianges" "For Sales," Inserted In tMs department 
tor 25c per 25 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted In pajTnent at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 173 your subscription expires with this issue 
175 " " " " Apr., 1901 

180 " " " " Sept., '• 

184 •' '■ " " Dec, " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

"I am sending you payment for the enclosed 
adv. to be inserted in the next Issue of the best 
advertising medium I knowof-THE Oologist." 
W. LEE CHAMBERS, Santa Monica, Calif. 

WANTED.-Copy of March, 1893, Oologist. 
Will give 4 different back No.'s Oologist. 
JOHN D. CURRIE, 1210 Yale Place, Minnea- 
polis, Minn. 

TO EXCHANGE.— With Twin City collectors 
sets 343, my collecting JOHN D. CURRIE, 
1210 Yale Place, Minneapolis, Minn. 

WANTED FOR CASH.— Will give cash for 
desirable sets. Send your lists at once, with 
lowest cash price. Many common sets wanted. 
W. LEE CHAMBERS, Santa Monica, Gal. 

GIVEN.— A nest 20 ft. out on a limb. Prob- 
lem: To get the eggs. Solution: Nowell's 
Collectors" Tool. Drop him a card for circular. 

WANTED FOR CASH.— First-class sets of 
game birds, (particularly large sets) Ducks, 
Geese, Grouse, Partridges, etc. Send list and 
lowest cash prices : also quote fine sets of any 
North American birds. J. L. CHILDS, Floral 
Park, N. Y. 174 

FOR SALE in the flesh during Feb., March 
and April: Common Cormorats. 75c to $125; 
Gt. Am. Sheldrake, 30c to 75c; Golden Eyes, 25c 
to 40c. ALVAH G.DORR,Taxidermist and Fur 
Dealer, Bucksport, Maine. 

WANTED.— Ridgeway's Birds of Illinois, 
Vol. II. Will pay cash. ISAAC E. HESS, 
Philo, Ills. 



WANTED.— Orders for choice sets of Califor- 
nia birds' eggs. To be collected during the sea- 
son of 1901. J. S. APPLETON, Simi, Ventura 
Co., Cal. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING.- On 

and after May first I will be ready to supply 
settings of Mongolian Ring Neck Pheasants. 
Settings of 15, price $4. Orders booked now. A. 
W. PERRIOR, 1409 So. Salina St., Syracuse, 
N. Y. 174 

FOX, MOUNTED.— To exchange for Nat. 
History books, printing press, money, back 
No.'s Auk, Taxidermist, etc. Write for photo, 
describing what you have. Also have Hamil- 
ton 22-cal. rifle for Hornaday's or Rowley's 
Taxidermy. J. D. ANTHONY. Waubeek.Iowa. 

NOTICE.— Send your catalogue of Insects, 
Sea Curios, Reptiles, Birds, Minerals, etc., to 
EDWIN H. REIBER, 160 Champlain St., Roch- 
ester, N. Y. 

WANTED.-Collectors throughout the United 
States and Canada to collect for me scientifi- 
cally birds' eggs in sets, with full data, at }i 
Lattin's catalogue rates. DR. M. T. CLECK- 
LEY, 457 Greene St., Augusta, Ga. 175 

COMBINATION OFFER.— While they last I 
will sell Cal. Br wn Pelican ^j, Cassins' Auklet 
1-1. Western Gull ^j. Annas' Hummingbird n-2, 
Costas' Hummingbird n-2, for $vi.40. Remem- 
ber all extra fine sets, with complete data. If 
you wish to buy them singly write me. W. 
LEE CHAMBERS, Santa Monica, Cal. 

EXCHANGE.— I have large lot of sets and 
singles of Mounted Birds and Skins, Ornithol- 
ogist and Stamp Magazines. I want Eggs, 
Skins, Mounted B rds. etc. Send lists, all an- 
swered. W.JENNINGS WIRT, Box 137,Gaines, 
Orleans Co., N. Y. 

ARIZONA SKINS FOR EXCHANGE —I have 
just received a lot of Arizona skins, which I 
will offer in exchange for any a-1 sets not in my 
collection. Among the lot are Rivoli Hum- 
mingbirds, Grades Warblers, Elf and Pigmey 
Owl, Black-vented Shearwaters, Mt. Plover, 
ect. W. LEE CHAMBERS, Santa Monica. 
Cal. 



18 



THE OOLOGIST. 



OSPREY'S EGGS richly marked and a-1 da- 
ta; 3-4 60c per egg, 10 3 45c per egg, 4S 40c per 
egg, 3-1 30c per egg; 12 second-class singles 10c 
per egg; Sharp Shinned Hawk, 3 heavily blotch- 
ed singles $1 per egg; 14x5 Vive camera hold- 
ing 12 plates 85. All postpaid. For sale or ex- 
change. J. B. NEWTON, Unionville, Ct. 

EXCHANGE. - The season for collecting is 
now here. Are you supplied with data blanks? 
I am furnishing a number of collectors with 
these desirable books. 100 datas, with stub at- 
tached, f'ize 3x6. stub 2)4 x 3, extra quality 
paper, at 50c per 100. In exchange for desirable 
sets. Write me and send list. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. GEO. W. MORSE, Box 230, Ash- 
ley, Indiana. 

EXCHANGE.— I have a li!=t of over 200 sets 
with full data to exchange for sets not in my 
collection. These sets are from California, Ar- 
izona and Texas, and I can supply most any 
common sets from these localities along « ith a 
great many rare ones. Send lists to W. LEE 
CHAMBERS, Santa Monica, Cal. 

FOR EXCHANGE— West Indian land shells, 
also several cases and drawers suitable for 
eggs or sht'Us, desiderata shells, curios^, etc. T. 
Q PRIDDEY, 371 Carlton St., Toronto, Can- 
ada. 

EXCHANGE.— In exchange for desirable sets 
with data, some back No.'s of Sports Afield, 
Gameland Recreation, Art and Nature. Outing, 
The Taxidermy, Collectors' Monthly,OoLOGiST, 
Bird Loie, and Os rey Write me your wants 
and send list. GEO. W. MORSE, Box 230, Ash- 
ley, Indiana. 

EXCHANGE.— I will exchange Cameras, 
Kodaks, Rifles, Revolvers, Bicycles of any 
make you may want that is a standard wheel, 
or anything in the sporting goods line for rare 
sets of N. A. birds' eggs not in my collection. 
Or will sell the above for part cash and take 
the balance in eggs. W. L.EE CHAMBERS, 
Santa Monica. Cal. 

TO EXCHANGE.— Indian Relics, Marlin 
Rifle, 33 Cal. with tools. Stamps, 75 Stamp pa- 
pers, Telescope, Eggs, Books, etc. Want Ban- 
jo Music, Typewriter, Hammerless Shotgun, 
Stevens Rifle, Pistol. Mounted Birds or tobac- 
co tags. F. H. RICKER, Box 38, Lisbon. Me. 

NEW TURNEY Coaster brake and hub Cen- 
tury Gas Bicycle Lamp, used twice, Medical 
Record for 1900, Phila. Medical Journal ■ for 
1900. What offers in mounted birds, etc. DR. 
A. E. PAYNE, Riverh-ad, N. Y. 

TAXIDERMIST'S OUTFIT:— Contains one 
heavy Cartilage Knife ; 1 nickeled and engrav- 
ed Scalpel with tip shaped for detaching skin, 
muscles, &c ; 1 pair Scissors; 1 pair Forceps; 
1 Dissecting Hook; 1 Brain Spoon; 1 pocket 
Wire Cutter. Instruments best, all packed in 
polished Hard-wood Case. A better outfit than 
the one always sold at $3. I have only two 
outfits and will close them out at only $2.20 
prepaid. FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

WANTED.— Osprey, Hummers. Hawks, War- 
blers and all N. A. birds' eggs in choice sets, 
large series evtn of common species. Pay cash 
or good exchange in books, magazines, oolo- 
glst tools and supplies, bicycles, guns, fish rods 
and tackle, cameras, field glasses, in fact al- 
most any article for outdoor sport or nature 
study. Send lists, quote lowest prices if you 
want cash or state what you want in exchange. 
I can save you money if you want to pay cash 
for any of above articles. BENJAMIN HOAG, 
Stephentown, New York. 



"Would say my ad. In Oologist for un- 
mounted sea mosses has brought me specimens 
enough to cover a surface 12 ft. square. I 
think the Oologist Is the best advertising 
medium for collectors in America." WM. 
CUDNEY, Gait, Ont. 

WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. W^ARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. lul 

OOLOGiSTS WANTED:— Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 18'8, and April 
1889, and will give an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

WANTED:— Will pay cash or "swap" eggs 
of American Osprey and Hummingbirds (any 
species with nest). Two good skins of each 
the Am. Barn and Long-eared Owls, Rattle- 
snake Rattles, Eggs of Hammerhead Shark. 
Write what you have and what you want. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion. N. Y. 

1 send you today some ads for your excellent 
paper, I must say that ads in your paper al- 
ways pay.— CHRIS P. FORGE, Carman, Mani- 
toba. 

HEAR YE I Hear Ye ! Hear Ye 1 This is to 
certify that my advertisements in the Oolo- 
gist have paid me better than have the com- 
bined ads. in most of the amateur and natural 
science papers. Ads. in the Oologist always 
bring returns, and it is safe to say that there is 
no paper having three times the circulation of 
this widespread periodical which can give 
equal satisfaction. MORRIS GIBBS, M. D., 
Kalamazoo, Mich 

PLATE HOLDER-Double, 5V4x5>sr, Blair 
Camera Co., ($1.00), prepaid 34c. FRANK H. 
LATTIN, Albion N. Y. 

CODDINGTON MAGNIFIER(Miners' glass), 
diameter %in, cost $1.50, prepaid 95cts. FRANK 
H. LATTIN,Albion, N. Y. 

"SNAPS"for taxidermists.7in Stuffers, spring 
handle (1.25), 80c; Scissor handle Stuffers, i2in. 
($1.75), $1.05; Scissor-handle Stuffer, 15in, ($2.50) 
$].60; Bone Cutters, extra fine and heavy, ($2.50) 
$1.60; Forceps for Insects ($1.25) 78c: Botanical 
Collecting Can with shoulder strap, size 12x754 
x3>!J in. ($150) $1.10; Tenaculum or Dissecting . 
Hook, folding in handle ($1) 28c. All prepaid at 
prices quoted, regular prices in ( ). FRANK 
H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

"I don't know whether my ad. has reached 
its time limit yet or not, but stop it any way. 
My supply of exchange material was exhaust- 
ed some time ago and replies to the ad. still 
come in. F. P. DROWNE, 20 Benefit St.. Prov- 
idence, R. I. 

MAYNARD'S "Birds of Eastern North Amer- 
ica " This elaborate work was published about 
25 years ago at $18 00 and contained 532 pages. 
I have three parts of this valuable work, each 
containing about 300 pages (over Vi of original) 
bound in tag-board covers. The Thrushes. 
Warblers, Starlings, Water Birds and Shore- 
birds are complete, will st 11 at only $?.00 per copy 
prepaid. I also have 3 copies each containing 
about H of original work at $1.00 per copy pre- 
paid I have 10 of original hand-colored plates 
at $1.50 for lot. Samp e pages of work for 
stamp. Style of text see article of 'Black 
Duck" In Dec.OoiiOGiST. FRANK H. LATTIN 
Albion, N. Y. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



\9 



WANTED —Buyer for mounted specimens 
In pairs of Peafowls, Pigeons, Pheasants, Loons, 
Wild Ducks. Squirrels. Blue Jays, one Golden 
Eagle, (fine) Owls. Hawks. All first-class. 
Make an offer MISS LEAH BERKHEIMER. 
Imler, Bedford Co., Pa. 

COLLECTION 1,100 varieties foreign and 
American stamps. $10 cash or half exchange. 
Thousands Columbians and common Ameri- 
cans. Approval sheets 25 per cent, discount 
for cash. Several books— Travel. Story and 
Historical. Eighty Oot.oGiSTS. Stylographic 
Pen, Punch and Judy Whistles, Peachpit Mon- 
keys. Want Scientific and Biblical Books or 
cash. Let's exchange lists anyhow. ARTHUR 
L. THORNE, Sonyea, Livingston Co., New 
York. 

FOR SALE —1 complete file of each Osprey 
and Natural Sci<-nce News; 1 copy each Nov.. 
Dec. 189r, Jan^ 1898, Osprey; Nidologist, Vols. 2 
and 3 complete. Vol. 4, 9 numbers, 1 copy each 
Sept. 1894, May, Sept., Oct. 2, Dec. 1895; Museum 
Vol. 2 complete, 1 copy Apr. 1895, 2 Dec. "95. 3 
Mar. '96, 1 Nov. '96, 1 Aug. '97; Oregon Natural- 
ist Vol. 2, Nos. 6 to 12 Inclusive, Vol. 3 com- 
plete, 1 copy Feb. 1898; Oologist Vols 11, 12,13, 
14, 15, 16 and 17 complete,! copy each Mar., Sep., 
Oct , Nov., Dec. '94. Aug.. Sept., Dec. '95, Feb. 
'96 Nov., Dec. '97, Jan., Nov '98, Feb. 1900; Bul- 
letin Michigan Ornithological Club Vol 2 com- 
plete. Vol 3, Nos. 1 and 2, Vol. 1, No. 2; Bulletin 
Cooper 0. Club Vol. 1. Nos. 1 and 2; Popular 
Science Neivs Vol. 30, Nos. 6 to 12 inclusive. 1 
copy each Feb. , Mar. 1897 ; Bird Lore Aug. 1899 ; 
1 copy "Birds of Michigan." L. B. GILMORE, 
Blooming Valley, Crawford Co., Pa. 

NATURALISTS ATTENTION 1— Send postal 
for rock bottom prices on all kinds of natural- 
ists' and collectors' supplies. Can supply any 
thing in the line at right prices. Naturalists' 
Supplies, 2102 Arch St., Phila , Pa. 

WANTED.— A Nn. 1 sets Of 27, 29, 63, 133, 225 
and 226 from the original collector. I will give 
exchange in sets or cash if reasonable. W. H. 
BINGAMAN, Box 151, Algona, Iowa. 

WANTED.— Am. sets with data. Have many 
Brit, sets or will collect this season if wants 
and prices are stated early. J.GORDON, Corse- 
malzie, Whauphill, Wigtownshire, Scotland. 

FOR SALE.— The following for sale cheap; 
443 1-4, 1-3 at 5c, 506 1-4 at 4c, 316 1-2 at 2c, 552 1-3 
at 2c, 593 1-3 at 3c, 633 1-3, 1-4 at 5C, 703 1-4 at 2c. 
All eggs first-class, with datas. The above 

g rices are per egg. ADOLF SHUTZE, 1611 
abine St., Austin, Texas. 

WANTED.— Back numbers of Osprey, Nid- 
ologist, Avifauna Bird Lore Condor Vols. 1 
and 2, and many others. Send full list and ex- 
change price. I can offer in exchange eggs, 
skins mounted birds and magazines and 
stamps. W. JENNINGS WIRT, Gaines, Or- 
leans Co., N. Y. 

FOR SALE.— Whlppoorwlll 1-2 $1.20, Swain- 
sons Hawk 3-3 55c, Gannet 1-1 80c, Fulmar 1-1 
30c, Northern Phalarope 1-4 90c, Magnolia War- 
bler 1-4 75c. Prices are per set, prepaid. I will 
swap any of the above for sets of Am. Osprey 
or raw furs. J AS. O. JOHNSON, Southing- 
ton. Conn. 

WANTED.— One hundred yearly subscrip- 
tions to Recreation at 75 cents each. JAS. O. 
JOHNSON, Southington, Conn. 



FOR SALE.— The following first class singles 
for sale cheap: 6 at 10c, 47 at 50c, 49 at 20c, 51 at 
2 )c, 51a at 20c. 63 at 20c. 54 at 20c. 58 at 20c. 59 at 
3.5c. 63 at 20c. 69 at 10c, 70 at 10c, 71 at 10. 72 at 15c, 
74 at 10c, 77 at 10c, 80 at 10c 120a at 25c, 126 at 20c, 
132 at 20c, 140 at 20c 142 at 30c, 146 at 35c, 160 at 
20c, 188 at 35. 191 at 20c. 199 at 10c. 200 at 10c, 201 
at 10c, 202 at 10c, 203 at 15c. 211 at 10c, 214 at 10c. 
219 at 10c, 220 at 15c, 221 atSC, 261 at 35c, 263 at 15c. 
289b at 10c, 294 at 10c, 300 at 15c. 305 at 20c, 316 at 
3c, 325 at 50c, 326 at fiOc, 333 at 30c, 336 at 3,5c, 337 
at 50c, 337b at SOf^, 341 at 50c, 360 at 20c, 368a at 
$1, 373b at 40c, 378 at 15c, 385 at 25c, 387 at 10c, 390 
at 20c, 394a at 50c, 412 at 5c, 413 at 10c, 406 at 8c, 
443 at 10c, 444 at 3c, 447 at 5c, 4.52 at 10c, 458 at 15c. 
461 at 10c, 477 at 5c, 481 at 20c, 493 at 10c, 495 at 
3c, 495a at 10c. 497 at 3c, 498 at 3c, 506 at 6, 507 at 
6c, 511 at 5c, 511b at 5c, 512 at 5c 513 at 10c, 560 at 
30, 563 at 3c, 567b at 75c, .581 at 8c, 587 at 10c, 593 at 
5c, 594 at 35c, 601 at 10c, 604 at 5c, 610 at 85c, 611 at 
10c, 612 at 5c, 613 at 5c. 622 at 5c, 622a at 5c, 624 at 
10c, 627 at 15c, 630 at $1, 633 at 10c, 653 at 5c. 683 at 
5c, 713 at 10c, 705 at 3c, 703 at 5c, 704 at .3c, 719 at 
25c, 78Ia at 10c, 725at .5c, 731a at 75. 735aat50c.761 
at 3c, 761a at 10c. 766 at 5c, 767 at 10c. 768 at 10c. 
The above mentioned prices are per egg. Any 
party sending me $2. 50 may select to the amount 
of $1.50 from the above list. I have only a few 
eggs and of some only one of the above men- 
tioned, as I am closing out my collections of 
singles. All eggs are strictly first-class. Small 
orders also accepted. ADOLF SCHUTZE, 1611 
Sabine St., Austin, Texas. 

IT IS SPREADING LIKE WILD FIRE! 

^Vhat? 

The American Society of Curio 
Collectors, 

A NATIONAL SOCIETY for collectors of 
shells, fossils, minerals, Indian relics, war rel- 
ics, historical articles of all kinds, coins, med- 
als, antiquated paper money, autographs, 
bird's eggs, mounted birds and animals, in- 
sects, flowers, marine and land curios of all 
kinds. 

Monthly Official Organ with large exchange 
department. 

Free Identification Bureau. 

Quarterly Bulletin for members only. 

Initiation fee. 10c. Yearly dues 25c. 

For Application Blank and further informa- 
tion address, 

ALLEN JESSE REYNOLDS, Sec'y, 

8015 Grand Ave , ConnersvlUe, Ind. 
Mention Oologist. 

The Student's Shell Collection 

This Collection contains Forty Small Shells 
collected from all quarters of the Globe, all of 
which are numbered to correspond with a cat- 
alogue, which gives their proper, common and 
scientific names, with the locality where found. 
These shells when purchased individually and 
properly labelled would cost from 2 to 25 cents 
each. The following are the specimens found 
in this collection : 

Scorched Murex, Thorny-nosed Murex, Fish 
Basket, Gem Shell, Inflated Olive, Lettered 
Olive, Rice, Dove, Thunder Storm, Pelican's 
Foot, Ringed Cowry, Snake-head Cowry, Money 
Cowry, Rye, Porcelain Rump, Boat, Worm, 
Brown Snail, Yellow Pea, Beaded Tower, Tow- 
er, Bloody Tooth, White Tooth, Zebra, Wheel. 
Venetian Snail, Key-hole Limpet, Many-lined 
Bulimulus, Hunch backed Partula, Black- 
mouthed Tree Snail. Banded Tree Snail, Littlfr 
Agate, Silk Worm, Pea Nut, Banded Melam- 
pus, Indian Wampum, A ngel Wing, Sun, Scal- 
lop and Jingle- Price $1.00. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 



to 



THE OOLOGIST 



The Condor for igoi. 

This popular Califomian, illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its Issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader ! 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the ner<ting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT $1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 

"You might as well be out of the Bird World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

O^HR OSPRRY, 



An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C. W. Richmond and 
Other EminentOrnithologists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollak a Year. 

Published by 

TH£ OSPR.BV C09IPAMV, 

321-323 4^2 St., W^ashington, D. C. 



Are You Interested In 

BIRDS' EGGS? Send for my lists of fine sets 
and singles. I guarantee my prices and eggs 
to please you. 

CLIMBERS? You need them now. Do yom 
want a good pair made of best material, made 
as they should be for tree climbing? 82 50 with 
4 good straps, $1.65 without, and prepaid. 
EGG DRILLS? I want you to at least try a 
sample of the Drills I am now bringing to no- 
tice of collectors. They are a delight especi- 
ally for small eggs. Sample 25c, 4 good sizes $1. 
Your money back if they do not please you 
after using. "They Cut the Lining " I have 
the regular oological drills, too, of best make. 
Set of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 «1. 25. And don't forget 
that I carry anything you need. Blowpipes 
40c, 20c, 12c. Emb. Hooks 12c. Best Calipers 
85c. FoRCEPa, Scissors. Trays, Cotton, Data 
Blanks lOc to $1. Fish Baskets. Send for 
free lists. 

PENCILS? Do you want a good pencil that 
will plainly mark the surface of the most glossy 
eggs? lOc, 3for25c. Are you a busy man? Do 
you want a pencil with thick, soft, tough 
lead, one that it is a delight to use? Try these. 
BOOKS? Of EVERY description and especi- 
ally "Bird Books " Send for Bulletin. Give 
me a list of wants. I can save you money. 
Would like to book you for Coues' New Key. I 
guarantee my price to be right. 
PERIODICALS? I promptly enter subscrip- 
tions to any magazine or newspaper published 
in this or any other country. Lists and quota- 
tions on request. 

I want to secure at once strictly new sub- 
scriptions to The Condor You can't afford to 
miss this, the ideal Bird Magazine. Note club- 
bing offers for new subs, to Condor. Others 
may be new or renewals, except Recreation, 
which also must be a new subscription. 

Condor and Recreation $L35 

Condor and Osprey 1.65 

Condor and Oologlst 1.10 

Condor and Photo Era 1.85 

Condor and Camera 1.55 

Condor and Auk 3.40 

Condor and Birds and All Nature 1 85 

Condor and Bird Lore 1 60 

Condor and Cosmopolitan Magazine l.te 

Will quote on any combination or any others 
you may desire. 

BENJAMIN HOAG, 

Stephentown, New York. 



INDIAN BASKETS, Indian 
Beaded Buckskin Sioux Relics 
• Indian Photos, Indian Pottery 
Indian Weapons. Elk Teeth, Mex- 
ican Hand Carved Leather Goods. 
Mexican Drawn Linens, Shells, Minerals. Pos 
sils. Ancient -■tone Relics, Oregon Tiny Arrow 
heads. Fossil Fishes, Fossil Leaves, Corals 
Agate Jewelry. Curios. Wholesale and Retail 
16th year. Two-story building full. New cat. 
No. 10, 40 pages, finely illus., for 5c. L.W.STIL 
WELL. Dead wood, S. Dak. 




T 



HIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



The Oologist. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 2. 



ALBION. N. Y., FEB.. 1901. . 



Whole No. 17 J 



The Oologist. 

A Monthly Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY. ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

PRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to tlie 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription soc per annum 

Sample copies sceach 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

|y Remember that the publisher must be notl 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

5 cents per nonpareil line each insertion. 

12 imes in every inch. Seven inches in a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line is "net," "rock 
bottom," "inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wLsh to use 5 lines or less space 
it will cost you 25 cents; 100 lines, $5.00; 1000 lines, 
$50.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to five times cash 
rates. Due Bills and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing will be honored only at regular rates in force 
at the date of Issuance of said bDl or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postofflce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination will be accepted for sums un- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O. , ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 

* The Birds of Michig-an and Their 
Protection. 

Members oj the Agassiz Ass'n: — 

I am rf quested to address you on the 



subject of bird protection, and gladly 
accept your kind invitation. For the 
purposes of the present discussion, 
birds may be divided into two classes: 
First, game birds; second, birds that 
are not considered game. By game 
birds I mean edible birds, the pursuit 
and taking of which affords sport for 
the gunner. There are several species 
of birds, however, that are edible and 
that never should be killed by sports, 
men because of their beauty, or their 
quality as songsters, or their value to 
agriculture as insect eaters. The birds 
which may be properly classed as game 
birds, and which are found in your 
state are: Web- footed wild fowl, the 
Grouse family, the Sand pipers, the 
Plover family, the Snipe family, the 
Quail family, the Curlew family. 

The Wood Duck is usually classed as 
a game bird and is eagerly pursued by 
sportsmen, but as a matter of fact, it 
should never be killed. Within the 
past few years it has become exceed- 
ingly rare and is threat sued with early 
extinction. Still it is one of the most 
beautiful plumage birds on this conti- 
nent. Its economic value as an article 
of food is so small that it should never 
be hunted or shot at by any true sports- 
man. I hope to live to see the time 
when all states will have laws protect- 
ing the Wood Duck, for all time to 
come. 

In fact, all migratory water fowls are 
threatened with extermination and un- 
less all states and all Canadian prov- 
inces speedily enact and enforce pro- 



* A paper addressing Chapter 176 Detroit B., 
Agassiz Ass'n. 



^2 



THE OOLOG[ST 



tective laws, a dozen species of ducks 
will disappear from the continent with- 
in ten years. Under present conditions 
the Indians in the far North hunt the 
nests of the mother birds and destroy 
the eggs by thousands. Almost as soon 
as the young are hatched, and before 
they are able to fly, these savages pur- 
sue and kill them with clubs. A native 
will eat at a single meal, a dozen young 
wild geese, none of which are perhaps 
larger than his dst; while if they weve 
let alone any one of them would make 
a good, square meal six months later. 

As soon as the young water fowls are 
able to fly they, with their parents 
start on their southern migration. 
When they cross the border into Mich- 
igan, Minnesota, N. Dakota, Montana, 
or Washington, an army of sportsmen 
assa'l them. As the winter season ad- 
vances, the birds move south and at 
every stopping point they encounter a 
new division of this army of shooters. 
Even when they reach their winter 
feeding grounds, about the Gulf of 
Mexico, they are still pursued and 
slaughtered 

A still more savage enemy greets 
them at the International boundry. I 
refer now to the market hunters. 
These men move south with the birds, 
clear into the gulf states; camp with 
them all winter and then follow them 
north to the International boundry line 
again on the spring flight. 

A game dealer in Chicago, for in- 
stance, receives a shipment of wild 
geese and ducks from a market hunter 
in Minnesota or N. Dakota in August. 
In September he receives another 
shipment from the same man 100 
miles farther south. He keeps on re- 
ceiving daily or weekly shipments 
from this same man, clear down from 
the Mississippi Valley into Louisiana or 
Texas, all through the winter. Then 
the shipments begin to come from a 
point farther north and continue with 
unceasing irregularity through March, 



April and up into May, the last ship- 
ment coming again from N. Dakota or 
Minnesota 

Is it a wonder therefore, that be- 
tween the warfare kept up by these 
sportsmen and their goril'a allies, the 
water fowl should steadily decrease 
from year to year? The wonder is that 
they have been able to withstand these 
terrific onslaughts so long. It is only 
because they are such prolific breeders, 
and in spite of this they are doomed, 
under the existing circumstances. The 
remedy is for shorter open seasors. 
These should be limited to 30 days. 

Second: The season should open on 
the same day and close on the same 
day in all states within given parallels 
of latitude. For instance, in all states 
north of the 40th parallel the season 
should open Sept. 1st and close Sept. 
30th. In all states south « f the 40th 
degree, and north of the 35tb degree, it 
should open Oct 1st, and close Oct. 
31st. In all states on or south of the 
35th parallel it should open Nov 1st 
and close Dec. Slst. I wou'd accord 
the extra 30 days of open season to the 
Southern states because in some seasons 
the water fowl would not reach these 
states until late in November, or even 
in December. 

Third: All states should pass laws 
limiting the bag for any one shooter to 
ten ducks and three geese for any one 
day, and to fifty ducks or fifteen geese 
for any one year. , 

Fourth: The sale of game of all 
kinds should be rigidly prohibited at 
all times. The broad principle should 
be established that game is and should 
be the property of the man who can go 
afield and kill it. He should be per- 
mitted to give to his friends, to a 
reasonable extent, but not to sell to any 
one. 

Fifth: A rigid and impartial enforce- 
ment of game laws everywhere and at 
all times. 

Much that has been said as to the 



THE OOLOGIST. 



23 



protectidn of water fowls applies with 
equal force to all birds of the Grouse 
fataily, to Woodcock, Qiail, and to the 
Snipe and Plover families 

Laws should be made to open on all 
kinds of game on a given day and close 
on all kinds 30 days later, and the man 
found in the woods, in the fields, or on 
the waters wiih a gun, at nny other 
time of the year, that fact should be 
considered prima facie evidence that 
he has violated a game law or is trying 
to do so, and he shouM be liable to a 
fine of not less than $10 on conviction. 

The following speci^-s are habitually 
pursued by many sportsmen, but are 
not game birds, and (with the exception 
of two species of Hawk) should nfver 
be killed: Hawk?, Owls, Blackbirds, 
Gulls, Pelicans, Cranes, Loons, Ibises, 
Egrols, rormi)raats, Bittoins, Herons, 
Doves, Eagles, Wocdoeckers, Robins, 
and Meadow larks. 

Much that has been said as to the 
protection of game birds applies with 
equal force to song and insectivorous 
birds Many of these are killed and 
eatan — not, I am glad to say, by real 
sportsmen, but in many cases by men 
who pose as such. The greatest enem- 
ies of song, insectivorous and plumage 
birds are the Italians and other for- 
eigners who live in the great cities 
An army of these men go out of every 
great city every Sundav morning during 
at least eight months of the year with 
cheap shotguns, and kill every bird 
they can find, no matter of what kind. 
Robins, Thrushes, Orioles, Tanagers, 
Blue Jays, Pewees, Song Sparrows, 
Bluebirds— all go into the Dago's bag; 
then into the pot and from there into 
his rapacious maw. 

Many states have enacted laws pro- 
hibiting the killing of song birds at any 
time of year, but unfortunately such 
laws are not enforced as they should be 
The remedy for this lies in a greater 
number of game wardens and of more 
vigorous action on the part of all bird 



lovers. There should be at least one in 
every county of this state, and if one 
could be provided to each township, so 
much the better. The minimum fine 
for killing a song bird or an in'^ectivor- 
ous bird should be $25 Half of this 
should goto the game w arden, and in ad- 
dition he should be paid a salary which 
wouM warrant him a comfoT table living. 

Another great enemy of song birds, 
and especially those classed as plumage 
birds, is the market hunter. This man 
kills and skins the small birds for mil- 
linery purposes. He also kills thous- 
ands of plumage birds, such as Egrets 
and Ibis and plucks a few plums from 
each and leaves the biid to rot In 
many cases he kills the mother bird 
and a brood of young are, left on the 
nest to starve to death. All this in- 
fatuous traOic should be suppressed, as 
speedily as possible. 

All statf s should prohibit the wearing 
of skins or plumage of birds on hats. 
A few of the slates have already passed 
laws to prohibit the killing and selling 
of such birds for such purposes, but this 
does not cover the case. The way to 
remedy an evil is to strike at the root 
of it. Let us destroy the market for 
bird ekins, and bird feathers, then the 
vandals who are slaughtering these 
birds finding their occupation gone, 
will have to go at somethidg else. If 
they are too lazy to work, let them go 
to stealing horses and they will soon 
land in the penitentiary, where they 
should have been long ago. 

Let it be considered the duty and the 
privilege of every friend of bird pro- 
tection to condemn and decry, at every 
opportunity, the habit of certain wom- 
en of wearing bird skins or plumage on 
their hats. The only hope of saving 
from total extinction the many species 
of birds in this country, lies in the rap- 
id creation of a strong public sentiment 
against the millinery traffic in bird 
skins. 

This warning is not the result of im- 



S4 



THE OOLOGIST. 



aptination or of speculation. It is the 
result of a careful and thorough study 
of the subject extending over a period 
of 30 years. I have travelled over 
nearly every state and territory in the 
Union, and have personally seen the 
Praire Chi<^keQ and the Wild Turkey 
swept almost entirely from the great 
state of Illinois. I have seeu the Ruffed 
Grouse and the Quail almost entirely 
wiped out of the state of New York. 
I have seen the Woodcock driven to 
the verge of exterminatian throughout 
all the New England States. I have 
seen the Wild Pigeon s'vept from the 
whole United States and I have seen 
practically all species of birds reduced 
in numbers from 25 to 50 per cent, all 
over the continent. 

It was principally and primarily for 
the purpose of arresting this terrible 
slaughter that the League of American 
sportsmen was organized. Men, wom- 
en and boys are eligible to membership 
in this League and all such who are at 
all desirous of seeing the beautiful 
feathered creatures remain on earth, 
should join the League at once and aid 
us in saving ihem. 

G O. Shields, 
New York City. 



Bird Music. 

(Concluded). 

We have no regular night singers in 
the Great Liike Region, so far as lam 
able to learn, and in this respect Amer- 
ica does not equal England, which has 
several nocturnal songsters, one of 
which excels as a mu-ician. The fa- 
mous English naturalist, Gilbert White, 
records three species which sing at 
night in the British Isles. They are the 
Reed Sparrow, which sings among the 
reeds and willows, the Woodlark, sing- 
ing in mid-air, and the Nightingale, as 
Milton describes it,— 

"In shadiest covert hid." 

There are several species of owls 



which roll forth or screech out their 
notes at night, and also numerous shore 
birds and water- fowl that issue their 
varied calls, and, especially these lat- 
ter are partial to night travel, spring 
and autumn. Then too our Whippoor- 
will confines his singular but monot- 
onous jargon to the hours of darkness, 
while the scream of the Nighthawk 
more often breaks on the ear between 
the setting and rising of the sun. But 
these birds are not strictly speaking, 
songsters, although their notes un- 
doubtedly fill their requirements as to 
harmony and expression. 

The plain, domestic little Chipping 
Sparrow sometimes favors us with its 
simple chatter in the darkest night. 
The notes hardly deserve the name of 
song, but heard issuing from the sur- 
rounding gloom, the simple refrain 
commands our attention from its oddity 
at the unusual hour. The Wood Pewee 
not rarely quavers forth its plaintive 
offering, sounding in the depth of night 
like a wail from a departed spirit. 
This favorite songster is a remarkably 
early riser, as he is also late in going 
to rest, and I have sometimes thought, 
that his musical efforts at night were 
the result of an error on his part— an 
idea strengthened by the fact that the 
notes are rarely heard more than once 
or twice during the night, and more- 
over the song is only occasional, and 
only in the nesting season. 

Other species which are heard to 
burst forth in ecstatic melody, are the 
Swainson's and Hermit thrushes. If 1 
could describe the socgs of birds, so 
that other bird-lovers could understand 
them as I do, I would feel that a partial 
acknowledgement had been made to 
the divine melody issuing from these 
bird's throats. 

The Cuckoo also sings at night, or at 
Itast bubbles out its peculiar empha- 
sised jargon, and which is called a song 
out of courtesy rather than from any 
real merit. Both species, the Black- 



THE OOLOGIST 



billed and Yellow-billed cuckoos favor 
ns, but the former is more abundant. 

We often hear that the best singers 
are the ones of plainest dress, but this 
is assuredly not so in all instances. If 
one is permitted to listen to the sweet 
refrain of the Scarlet Tanager in the 
night, it will be acknowledged that the 
brilliant coat of the songster does not 
compare in point of excellence to the 
owner's divine song. 

These birds are the only ones at the 
north that I am acquainted with that 
sing during the hours of darkness, and 
not o' e of them is a regular singer 
in the night. luformation has reached 
me from no less an authority than Mr. 
Robert Ridgway of Washington, to the 
effect that the Yellow- breasted Cbat is 
a performer in darkness. 

Amoug birds, the females do not 
sing, and although many species have 
musical ca'Jnotes and agreeable tones 
in conversation, which are shared in 
by both sexes still the true song is only 
rendered by the male bird I am sin- 
cere in saying that the lady bird talks 
more than her mate about the house, 
but I will admit that when away from 
home she is very discreet in this re- 
spect, lu attending to her duties of 
incubation she is very quiet, and it is 
seldom that a note is heard from her 
while on the nest. It has been said 
that all birds are silent when incuba- 
ting, so as to avoid observation, though 
most species are quiet when setting, 
there are a few which chirp loudly 
when so engaged, and soaie even burst 
into exuberant song. 

Few observers are aware how assid- 
ous are the attentions of the two birds 
to one another during incubation, and 
the credit which is due to the father- 
bird in hi-t devotion in covering the 
eggs in his mate's absence is not allow- 
ed him. 

Of course, when a bird is heard sing- 
ing on the nest we know that the notes 
come from the male, but many young 



observers are inclined to aUribute it to 
the female. Another source of error 
in failing to identify the sex occurs 
with those species in which the male 
assumes the plumage of the female un- 
til the second or third year- 

The Chipping Sparrow sometimes 
sings his chattering refrain while upon 
the eggs. Yellow Warblers are not 
rarely heard singing from the nest, but 
one has to wait patiently in a neigh- 
boring copse, at the proper season, in 
order to see, hear and be convinced. 

I have once heard the Maryland Yel- 
low-throat's song from its concealed nest 
in the grass ;in fact I found the nest, from 
hearing the peculiar notes, almost at 
my feet. Several times the song of the 
House Wren has reached me, coming 
from the cavity where the old bird was 
setting solacing himself in his cavernous 
nesting spot. 

Once, each, I have heard the notes 
of the Black-billed Cuckoo, Scarlet Tan- 
ager, Orchard Oriole. Goldfinch, Ruse- 
breasted Grosbeak, and the Hermit 
Thrush, the latter the only thrush whose 
song has positively reached me from 
the nest. One would think that the 
Brown Thrush, Catbird, and Robin, 
as great singers, would burst forth on 
the nest, but it must be borne in mind 
that these thrushes prefer higher perch- 
es for singing, while the Hermit is a 
ground nester and often sings on the 
ground. 

But of all the species which are musi- 
cal while setting, the Warbling Vireo 
heads the list, both for persistence and 
for beauty of song, according to my 
note-book. Anyone can listen to the 
song of the Warbling Vireo on the nest 
if the trouble is taken to tind a nest 
with eggs in May or June. For when 
the mate takes his trick keeping the 
eggs warTi, he cheers himself, and en- 
livens the surroundings by pouring 
forth his rippling, inspiring melodious 
warble. I have heard him sing from 
the nest in early morning; in the hot- 



THE OOLOGISl 



test part of the day, and in the early 
twilight, and I have heard him issue 
as many as twenty bursts of soog 
during one spell on the nest, and 
have discovered the nest on more than 
one occasion by the sweetly modu- 
lated tell-tale song. 

These species are all the birds I have 
found to sing while on the nest. 

Morris Gibbs, 
Kalamazo, Mich. 



Field Notes from Manitoba. 

While reading the articles in the Jan. 
1901 OoLOGiST I noticed an article on 
the use of old nests, which suggested to 
me, adding a few notes on my experi- 
ence rt'garding the use of old nests by 
Hawks and Owls. 

Before I became a resident of this 
glorious western continent, from my 
early boyhood days, I could find no 
greater enjoyment than a ramble in the 
woods, lanes and fields of old England, 
and I found many a set of Sparrow 
Hawk, Kestrel and one each of the Mer- 
lin, Hobby and Long-eared Owl. All 
these gala days are as fresh in my mem- 
ory as if they had happened but a week 
or 80 ago, and I well remember with 
what joy I returned home with my first 
set of four beautiful Sparrow Hawk's 
eggs taken from a nest in a larch (tam- 
arac) wood. How long I watched that 
nest. Five weeks elapsed from the 
time I found it until I finally brought 
home the set of four eggs. The nest 
was built by the birds themt'elves and 
was a large flat structure of larch twigs 
in a shallow depression of which lay the 
prettiest set of Sparrow Hawk's eggs I 
ever was fortunate enough to find. 
Many a set of Sparrow Hawk's eggs I 
took after that but I never got another 
set one-half so handsome. 

Again, quite fresh in my memory is 
the chalk quarry in Lincolnshire where 
I flushed a Merlin from her nest on my 
return home from a day's collecting, 



and how on the following evening with 
my brother and an oolo2ical friend and 
a wagon rope I came back determined 
to add to my collection a new species of 
eggs. The rope made fast to a stake 
well driven in the ground I (ippcended 
and there in a slight depression on a 
ledge in the chalk clifif resting on a bed 
of a few blades of withered grass I es- 
pied a lovely set of five Merlin eggs. 

On another fine May day I visited a 
larch w^nd at a distance from home, 
and in a tall pine from »he very top I 
took from a Crow's nest I had robbed 
but two weeks previously a handsome 
set of Hobby's eggs and in descending 
unfortunately broke one of them. 

But it it about the nests of our own 
Manitoba that I intended to write so 
must forget for the present these pleas 
ant memories of boyhood days. It was 
on the 15th day of June, 1887 that my 
residence in the great West commenc- 
ed, and I at once began to investigate, 
although only in the last two yrars 
have I been able to make a specialty of 
oological rerearch. 

The first nest of the Red-tail 1 found 
was found that summer. It was the 1st 
of July and three well fledged young 
birds were its occupants. The nest 
was in a small oak 25 ft. up in a main 
fork of the tree but I could not tell if it 
was new or old as it had been occupied 
so long. The next nest of thi^ species 
I examined was in a lone thorn tree 
way out in the boundless prairie miles 
from any bush on the side of a creek 
where the birds lived royally on the 
marsh birds that abounded on the creek 
and in the neighboring swamp. This 
nest also contained three well fledged 
young, and was used year after year 
for four years to my certain knowledge. 
This was from 1890 to 1894, the last 
time I was at the place. I intend to 
visit this place the coming spring to see 
if the Hawks are still breeding there. 

In the spring of 1893 I went for a 
ramble in the woods west of Carman. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



27 



It was the Ist of May, and in an old 
Red-tail's nest on an overhanging limb 
of a large oak tree cear a shallow creek 
I found a family of Western Great 
Horned Owls. There were three of 
them and I took them all. All were 
different in size; I kept them for two 
months and got some very interesting 
notes regarding them. I then gave 
them their liberty. On the 15th of May 
the same year I took three Red-tail's 
eggs from this nest. It had been slight- 
ly repaired and a few green leaves add- 
ed. 

But I must pass on to the past season 
and describe some of the takes noted 
down during the months of April, May 
and June. 

My first find was on April 6th (this is 
very early here) in heavy oak bush at 
Salterville amongst scattered trees On 
the outside of the bush I located a nest 
of Krider's Hawk. This was an oid 
nest and has been used for three suc- 
cessive years. On April 2d I had taken 
two Western Great Horned Owl's eggs 
from this nest. The nes!; was repaired 
and a lining of bark, grass and leaves 
added. It was between 35 and 40 feet 
up in oak tree on side branch on a large 
flat fork. 

On May 4th, in light oak and poplar 
bush on side of Boyne river three and 
one-half miles east of Carman, return- 
ing from a collecting trip I found a 
Red-tail's nest in a large oak. This 
was on side branch, hard to reach, but 
I got to it after some hard work and 
took therefrom three handsome eggs 
The nest was quite new, large, of sticks 
and twigs, lined with bark, leaves and 
grass, and was placed about 30 feet up. 
On the same date I got another set of 
three Red-tail's eggs. The nest was in 
a small poplar tree in a poplar bluff 
only 18 feet high. The nest was the 
largest I have ever seen. It measured 
3 feet in height and 2^ across, was a 
mass of large and small sticks and 
twigs of poplar and willow and was 



built on top of an old Crow'd nest. The 
depression was 9 in. in diameter and 
quite shallow and srarsely lined with 
bark, leaves and stubble. I could see 
this nest from either north or south at a 
distance of over two miles. 

On May 6th I took another set of 
three. Nest in a tall oak 30 ft. up in 
main fork, medium size, built of sticks 
and twigs and lined with bark and 
grass. This nest was new and although 
there were old nests in the immediate 
vicinity of this new one the birds seem- 
ed to prefer to construct their own. 

Next date, May 7tb, west of Carman 
I got another set of three. This nest 
was in an oak, one of a clump of three 
in poplar woods. Nest was about 30 
feet up in a fork on trunk and was new, 
was built like others of sticks and twigs 
and lined with grass and bark shreds. 
The eggs were nicely marked. 

On May 12th a set of two eggs was 
taken from a poplar 25 ft. up in heavy 
poplar woods northwest of Carman. 
This nest was situated 25 ft. up, close 
to trunk, made of poplar and willow 
sticks and lined with grass and bark, 
was of medium size and new In this 
case there were several old nests handy 
but the birds seemed to prefer to make 
a new structure. 

I see I have m'ssed one nest, date 
May 9th. This Red-tail's nest was in a 
tall oak tree 40 ft. up, the tree being in 
and oak grove and situated on bank of 
ravine which seems to be a favorite lo- 
cation, placed in a fork near top of tree 
on trunk, was a large coarse structure 
of sticks and twigs, lined with bark, 
leaves and grass and contained three 
eggs. This also was a new nest. 

A second set of two eggs taken on 
May 12th was taken trom a large and 
conspicuous nest in a poplar tree 20 ft. 
from ground, the nest composed of 
sticks and twigs, was lined with poplar 
bark and a little dried grass and was 
of this season's construction like one 
previously mentioned. There were a 



28 



THE OOLOGIST. 



number of old nests in the immediate 
Ticinity of this nest which the birds 
might have used. 

A third set of Krider's, two eggs, tak- 
en May 13th was taken in the same lo- 
cality, local'y known as "the poplars-," 
a large tract of wooded country, cover- 
ed with willow scrub and poplar trees. 
This nest was in a poplar tree 25 ft. up 
in main fork, nest of medium size, of 
sticks, lined with leaves and grass with 
few strips of poplar bark and was a 
nest of the year, evidently built by the 
birds themselves. Old nests abound all 
through this district, but I found none 
of them occupied. 

On the 14th of May I again visited 
this district and took a set of two Red- 
tail's eggs. This nest was placed in a 
tall dead poplar about half burned 
through at the bottom and I was afraid 
to climb it at first. However I made 
up my mind to try it when the female 
left the nest at my near approach, as 1 
knew there was something to get, and 
succeeded in reaching the nest and re- 
turned to terra firma without mishap. 
The wind was strong and cold and from 
the north and a cold rain made this a 
very unpleasant task. This was the 
second largest nest of the season and 
was built on the top of an old one. 
The nest projected so far out around 
the fork in which it was placed that I 
had trouble in reaching over it and was 
30 ft. high. The nest was composed of 
large and small poplar sticks, many of 
them being chined by the fire that had 
passed through in the fall. The nest 
was lined with poplar bark, grass and 
a few green leaves. The nest was quite 
close to the railway track . 

On this day I took another set of two 
while going homo, from dead poplar, 
28 ft. up This nest was also large but 
not as large as the other, of sticks of 
poplar, lined with bark shreds and 
leaves. A few feathers also were used 
but I think these are accidental. This 
also was a nest of the season. 



May 16th visited Jickling's marsh 
which lies in the poplar belt. I took 
from a large nest in a poplar tree 35 ft. 
up in main fork, a set of two eggs. 
These were small, the smallest measur- 
ing 2.20x1.65 and were well marked. 
This nest was new, although situated 
quite close to nests built the previous 
year, was like the rest, of sticks, mostly 
poplar, and lined with bark shreds and 
roots, grass and leaves. 

On May 17th a set of two eggs re- 
warded my search. These were Red- 
tails, the nest in a poplar tree 25 ft. up, 
of sticks and twigs, lined with grass 
and fine roots, was of large size and 
new. A second nest found the same 
day contained a set of three eggs, was 
in a tall and spreading Balm of Gilead 
tree, 25 ft. up, in main fork, was large 
and new, composed as were all the oth- 
ers found in this bush, of poplar sticks, 
lined with bark, grass and leaves. As 
I watched the old Red-tails circling 
above I glanced around the neighbor 
ing treetops and counted five more 
nests within my view. I took my set 
to the buggy and visited each of the 
five nests in turn. They all proved to 
be old nests in different stages of dilap- 
idation, from which I should judge that 
this pair of birds had bred here for a 
few years and had used all the nests in 
turn. 

Another set of three eggs taken the 
same date from a nest in a poplar tree 
20 ft. up, was also a new nest and built 
of sticks and twigs, lined with roots, 
stubble and leaves. 

On May 19th I took two sets of Red- 
tail of three eggs each, both from pop- 
lar trees. These nests were both new 
and were within a short distance of old 
nests evidently used in previous years. 

Just two more nests I will mention 
and then I will end my paper. 
(To be continued.) 

Chris P. Foege, 
Carman, Manitoba. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



89 



Since the First ... 

ROCHESTER LAMP waa made there have been 
many "like" or "as good as" it placed upon the market. Some 
were even said to be "improvements" on it. One by one 
they fall by the wayside, for experience proves that there is 
only one lamp that is really better, and we make that, too. 

The NEW ROCHESTER 

In it we embody all that is really worth having in a lamp, 
both as to quality and style. Don't forget, every genuine 
New Rochester has the name on the lamp. 

We can fill every lamp want. No matter whether you want 
a new lamp or stove, an old one repaired or reflnished, a vase 
mounted or other make of lamp transformed into a NEW 
ROCHESTER, we can do it. Let us send you literature on 
the subject. 

THE ROCHESTER LAMP CO.. ''tfaSS'.r,.,B,.. NEW YORK. 

. w w w w w w w . 



T T 



T T 




^ X ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 







The line is most complete, 
embracing pistols. heavy 
ntics for tnrL-ft and hunting 
I.urposes, Ii,-iit n.iuket rifles 
with skeleton stocks. 



FAVORITE" 

FLES 

ai-e covered by the same guarantee. The 
hest in the world for boys. Juat as reliable 
and advisable for nifu. 

t-wl«h Plain Open 8lsht8. $6.00 

^o. IS-with Tarcet Sights «.50 

Where these rifles are not carried in stock by dealers w« 

will send, express prepaiii. on receipt of price. 

Send stamp for cataloQiie. 

J. STEVENS ABMS A: TOOL, CO.. 

^"^ 219*3 ■ • Chlcopee Falls, Mass. 



FENIKESE. 

A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 
famous Summer School. 

A g6-page book of much interest to 
students of Nature. 

Read vrbat others say: 

"Have found it extremely interesting read- 
ing,"— Henry Prime, Garden City, L. I, 

"I enjoyed the book [Penikese] very much." 
— W. W. Kinsley (Supt. of Schools) Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 

"It is both instructive and entertaining and 
deserves a place in the library of every student 
of nature."— W. D. Lynn, Canfield, O. 

"I have just finished reading 'Penikese' and 
can say that I have enjoyed it exceedingly. 
Anything looking toward keeping green the 
memory of the great Agassiz should be of in- 
terest to the teacher of biology and no period 
of his life is more interesting than the years 
spent in building up the laborato'-y on Peni- 
kese."— W. P. Hay (Prof. Biology, HighSchool) 
Washington, D. C. 

"I have read the book [Penikese] with great 
interest and think it an admirable remini- 
scence of one of the greatest naturalists of the 
nineteenth century. The name of Agassiz is 
assuredly treasured by all true lovers of na- 
ture and his methods of study have left a strik- 
ing Impress on present-day workers. "^(Rev.) 
Robert Blight, Green Lane, Pa. 

Price only 25c (reduced from 35c). 

Prepaid. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r, 
Albion, N. Y. 



30 THE OOLOGIST. 



Book List. 



A few of the Second-hand Volumes For Sale at the 

Naturalist's Book Shop, 2102 Market St, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Prices do not include the carriage. 

CouES. — Key to N. A. Birds, 1872 $4 00 

Trumbull. — Names and Portraits of Birds, 1888 i 25 

St. John. — Audubon the Naturalist of the New World, 1856 75 

Bechstein. — Cage and Chamber-Birds, 1872 i 00 

CouES. — Birds of the Northwest, 1874 2 50 

Strickland. — Ornithological Synonyms, Accipitres, 1855 65 

Montagu. — Ornithological Dictionary, 183 1 i 50 

HowiTT. — Birds and Their Nests 50 

Bailev. — Our Own Birds of U. S., 1869 50 

Apgar. — Pocket Key of Birds, 1893 25 

The Book of Birds, 16 plates, 1851 25 

Schley. — American Partridge and Pheasant Shooting, 1877 50 

Harting. — Hints on Shore Shooting, 1871 40 

Seneca. — 61 1 Hints and Points for Sportsmen, 1889 50 

Hartley. — Hunting Sports of the West, 1865 50 

Gibson. — Complete American Trapper, 1879 i 00 

Miller — Cats and Dogs, 1869 50 

VoRS. — Bibelots and Curios, 1879 15 

Tenney. — Manual of Zoology, illus 25 

Pacific R. R. Survey, 13 vols , binding not uniform . . 7 50 



Special Bargains in Shells and Fossils. 

UNIONIDiE— One hundred and thirty-four (134) species (American) 450 speci- 
mens. All fresh live specimens. Worth at regular prices fully $100. Will send 
the entire collection prepaid for only $28.40. 

RARE OLD SILVER COINS of Great Britain.— A collection of 50 pieces from 
the reign of Henry II (1154) to that of Victoria. The collection contains coins 
minted during the reigns of twenty-two (32) ot Great Britain's monarchs. The 
collection lists about $55 00, will sell as a whole for $22. 50 prepaid. 

FOSSIL COLLECTION. A specially selected collection of Fossils for school 
used to I sell at $100. One hundred (100) species and about 500 specimens ranging 
in value from 5c. to $1 00 each. A very select and very valuable collection and is 
largely composed of Fossil Corals, all carefully labeled and prepared, and well 
worth $100. My price $33.50 prepaid. 

I have another collection similar to above put up to sell at $50.00, 100 species 
and about 200 specimens which I will send prepaid for only $15.75. 

AN EGYPTIAN IDOL, carved from stone or lava 1000 or more years ago, rep- 
resents an elephant or some other animal, measures about 4x2i in. Secured by a 
missionary acquaintance from a mummy pit in Egypt and guaranteed genuine. 
Prepaid only 33.15. , .... 

SPANISH CROSS inlaid with straw from an ancient church m Jempz. New 
Mex. Curio dealers would ask $5.00 for it, but it's yours prepaid for $1.65. 
Address FRANK H. LATTIN, Publisher, Albion, N. Y. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



3L 



115.00 for only 50 cents. 

For 1901 Subscribers ofTHEOOLOGIST only. 

While "taking inventory" we found many Items in very large quantities— enough to last the 
ordinary Curio Dealer a life time and In such quantities that vee cannot job them oft to dealers ex- 
cept at a sacrifice— and rather than give dealers the benefit of the same we prefer and have con- 
cluded to give this benefit to the 1901 subscriber.^ of the Oologist. Those who have paid their sub- 
scription to the Oologist for 1901 or who remit for same whea accepting this ''SS-OO forSOcts" offer 
—we will send by express at their expense (we can send prepaid for 2.ict3.) all of the specimens 
and books listed below for only 50cts. 



Chinese Horn Nut, China $ 05 

Egg of Skate or Sand Shark, Martha's 

Vineyard 05 

Clay Police Whistle, Mexico 10 

Black-Mouth Tree Snail, Pavillion Key, 

Fla 25 

Purple-spined Sea Urchin, Gulf of Mex- 
ico 25 

Organ pipe Coral, Singapore 25 

Orange Scorpion Shell, Polynesia 25 

Resurrection Plant, Mexico 15 

One-half dozen Alligator Teeth, Indian 

River. Fla 25 

Four Gem Stones (Red Agate, Black 
Onyx. Crocidolite and Sardonyx In- 
taglio) cut and polished 40 

Compass or Sunflower Starfish, Chili... 35 
Fossil Scaphites ^(Nautilus Family) 

Montana . 25 

Goldmouth Shell, Philippines 25 

Fossil Shark Tooth, Virginia 10 



15. Two Tarpon Scales, Florida 05 

t6. Fossil Polyp Coral; New York 15 

17. "Electric Stone." a var ofTremolite 
emitting flashes of light when 
scratched with any hard substance. 
New York... _ 10 

18. Precious Coral, polished twigs, Med- 
iterranean Sea 15 

19. Banded Murex Shell, Med. Sea _ 15 

20. Money Cowry Shell. Hawaii 10 

21. Conein-Cone Chautauqua Co., N. Y. ._ 15 

22. An Exchange Notice Coupon 2o 

23. Lattin's"Catalogue of N. A.BirdsEggs" I5 

24. Short's "Birds of Western New York." 1 

25. Tassin's "Directions for Collecting 
Minerals" Ob- 

26. A copy of "Penikese" 35 

27. Five assorted Bird. Animal and Flower 
Pictures, my selection, size 6x8 in., 
beautifully colored, true to nature .... 30 

85 00 

No changes or alterations of any kinO can be made in this offer— you either accept or not as 
you may elect. The offer is no fake nor catch penny scheme but is made as stated and in good 
faith in order that many may share in the benefit which would otherwise fall to a few. and Inci- 
dentally to]increase the Oologist's subscrition list. This premium offer cannot be duplicated for 
double what it cosfs the 1901 subscribers to the Oologist by any dealer in America— the publish- 
er of the Oologist included— after present supply is exhausted. 

REMEMBER. 1st. That if your subscription to the Oologist is already paid through 
1901 you g'-t the entire lot of specimens, etc , offered above for only oOcts. But if you wish them 
sent prepaid you must send 25cts additional or 7.icts. la all. 

2d. If you have not subscribed for the Oologist for 19)1 and wish tT accept this offer you 
must send 50cts. for Oologist with coupon for 1901 and SOcts. for this offer or $1.00 and If you want 
the lot sent prepaid add 25cts. more or $1.25 in all. 

3d. This offer is made in connection with a subscription of the Oologist only. The paper 
and premium can be sent to the same or different addresses as desired. In case you wish the pre- 
mium without the Oologist or wish to secure a second premium the price will be $1.00 or $1.25 if 
sent prepaid 

Remit In most convenient manner. Address plainly and In full. 

FRANK H. LATTIN. ALBION. N. Y. 



Buy a Postal Card, 



Write your name and address on back 
and mail to me. 



YOU WILL RECEIVE. 

New Lists of Birds Ejyps, Minprals, In- 
dian RhIIcs and all Naturalist's 
Supplies. Ready to mail. 

Address. ERNEST H. SHORT, 

Box 173 Rochester, N. Y. 

(Formerly Albion, N. Y.) 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' -Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 

COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREECOLLECTING- 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (175) 

J. Rowland Nowell, Portman, S. C. 



32 



THE OOLOGIST. 







Hmcrican Ornitbology. 

THE BEST ILLUSTRATED 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 



It gives the LIFE HISTORIES and FINE 
ILLUSTRATIONS of 4 or j N. A. BIRDS 
every month. The egg of each is shown FULL 
SIZE. 

It also contains short. inte:estin<j storie-^ about 
birds. 




ONLY 50 CTS. A YEAR. 
SAMPLE COPY FREE. 



SUBSCR'iiSfe NiOW. 



CHAS. K. REED, 

Sta. A, WORCESTER, MASS. 



iiiii^jsromiNs 

SiNQLE-SHOt RIFLES : 



MEANS 

PERFECTION 



WHEN 



:dto 



E S 1,^ND Ai,t KINDS Op^ 



TIT 



T 



T 



Pronounced by Experts the Standard of the World. 

Ask your dealer for WINCHESTER make of Gun or 

Ammunition and take no other, 

FREE:— Our new Illustrated Catalogue. 

INCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., New Haven, Ct. 



The Oologist 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 3 



ALBION, N. Y., MARCH, 1901. 



Whole No. 174 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exclianges" "For Sales," Inserted In this department 
lor 25c per 2.5 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted In payment at one-third list rates. 



IMPORTANT. 

This, March, Oolocjist was not issued 
until April 1st. The April issue will be 
printed on April 15th. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by 
return mail 

Index 
to Vol. XVII (1900) of the Oologist will 
be printed in the April issue 

W^hat's Your Number? 

Examine the number rollowlng your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 174 your subscription expires with this issue 
175 " " " " Apr., 1901 

180 " " " " Sept., '• 

184 ■' '• " " Dec, " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

"My ads. in the Oologist always pay me be- 
yond my expectations." A. E. PRICE, Grant 
Park, Ill«. 

"Since my ad. appeared in February number 
of Oologist I have received letters from all 
over the country and I could sell or exchange 
100 ssts If I had them." JOHN D. CURRIE, 
Minn. 

«3 WILL BUY 137 varieties of foreign and 
native woods, or will exchange for woods not 
In my collection. LOUIS W. HAHN, Lake 
Ave., Silver Creeki Chautauqua Co., N. Y. 

1901 VEDETT BIKE (made by Pope M'f'e 
Co.) model SO, new, frame 22, gear 81. 117 cash 
and 125 m eggs at list buys It. BENJAMIN 
HOAG, Stephentown, New York. 



WANTED:— Al sets Nos. 83. 172, 192, 193. 206, 
210, 228. 258a, 261, 286, 301, 302, 310. 478, 486, 618, 
701. Can offer good sets, Belgian Hares, Abys- 
sinian and English Cavies, Fancy Pigeons and 
Pit Games. ALMON E. KIBBE, Mayville. 
N. Y. 175 

WANTED:— Sets of 58. 64, 76, 137, 139, 261, 273, 
337, 339, 373, 387, 388, 390, 393, 394. 501-611. 614 and 
Others, especially 218, 230. 334, 364. Exchange 
or cash. All answered. A. E. PRICE, Grant 
Park, Ills. 177 

WANTED:— "Bird Nesting in Northwest 
Canada" by W. Raine. Must be in good con- 
dition and complete. Name lowest cash price. 
RUSSELL T. CONGDON. Ripon, Wis. 

WANTED:— Columbian half dollars, copper 
cents and half cents. Give good exchange in 
Eggs, Coins, Curios and Minerals. ROY H. 
BULLIS, Winnebago City, Minn. 

"I think the Oologist is the finest advertis- 
ing medium in existence. " ROY H. BULLIS, 
Winnebago City, Minn. 

ARROW HEADS and almost a full line of U. 
S. cents to exchange for eggs in sets or U. S. 
stamps, also one 4x5 Vive magazine camera. 
J. B. NEWTON, Unlonville, Conn. 

TO EXCHANGE:- A 15.00 Winchester rifle 
almost new, and a 812.00 Mandolin, book of in- 
structions, extja strings, etc., for a camera of 
equal value. A. R. BEYMER, Omer, Colo. 

COLLECTORS :— My Egg Powder will re- 
move dirt and nest stains from your eggs with- 
out injury H pound 50 cents; 1 pound for 
12.50 worth of sets. Send list. ROY. H. 
BULLIS, Winnebago City, Minn. 

FOR SALE AND EXCHANGE :— Live birds 
fine large Snowy Owls, Cooper's Hawk, all in 
fine plumage. Make me an offer for them. Al- 
so black cocker pup, good pedigree, birds' eggs 
(Al) full data, A. O. U. 6, 133 and many others. 
Send list and receive mine. THOS. E. BURT, 
Port Hoi)e, Canada. 



34 



THE OOLOtrlST. 



"I take numbers of ornithological and oolo- 
glcal journals, but whenever I wish to buy or 
sell anything I turn to the want columns of 
the OoLOOisT. ' ' HARRY fl . DUNN, Fullerton, 
Calif. 

FOR EXCHANGE:— 1 set of boxing gloves, 
1 French microscope, cost $15 00: back numbers 
of OoLOGisT Eggs in sets wanted. Send list 
ROY H. BULLIS, Winnebago City, Minn. 

FOR SALE:— Combination Egg Set, consist- 
ing of an engraved handle fltied with three 
sizes drills, thrfee sizes hooks with blowpipe, in 
pocket case. Never been used, f.75. MAC H. 
BURROUGHS, 401 C St., Brunswick, Qa. 

COLUMBIA CHAINLESS BICYCLE, 1901 
model, new, 22 or 24 frame, gear 82 or 74. $50 
cash and 8.50 in eggs at list rates takes one. 
BENJAMIN HOAG. Stephentown, New York. 

"The one exchange notice I had in The Oolo- 
GiST last year was so successful that it kept 
me busy all the year with exchanges." J. 
GORDON, Wigtownshire, Scotland. 

SETS of Chestnut backed Chickadee 1-7, Ore- 
gon Vesper Sparrow 1-6, Coopers Tanager 1-4, 
Mangrove Cuckoo 1-4, Arizona Goldfinch 1-5, 
Lawrence's Goldfinch 1-4, Western Goldfinch 
1-4, Brewer's Sparrow 1-4, Audubon's Warbler 
1-4, Mexican Goldfinch 15, Florida Grackle, 1 5, 
Gild°d Flicker 1-5, Florida Blue Jay, 15, Flor- 
ida Burrowing Owl 1-6, in exchange for books 
in good condition or cheap for cash. H. S. 
WARREN, 149 Gladstone Ave., Detroit Mich. 

FOR SALE:— A fine one year old Bird Dog. 
has been trained for Quails and Grouse and a 
beauty too. Will sell for $5 00 cash. Freight 
or express must be paid bv purchaser. Address 
HANS ANDERSON, Box 13, Gushing, Howard 
Co., Neb. 

TO EXCHANGE:— Fine eggs in sets with 
data for cash. Complete fllo of "The Osprey" 
for $5.50. Will give cash or exchange for cer- 
tain fossils. HARTLEY H. T. JACKSON, Box 
87, Milton, Wis. 

SOME OF THOSE rare sets of Pigmy Owls, 
Pacific Horned Owls, Belding's Jay. P .sadena 
Thrasher and Cassin's Kingbird'to exchange 
for Coues" Key, Ridgway's Manual or other or- 
nithological books. W' ill also sell a limited 
number for cash or trade for sets of Rantores. 
HARRY H. DUNN, Fullerton, Calif. 

WANT ED:- Mounted specimens or skins of 
smaller land birds. State condition and price 
prepaid, W. P. PARKER, 8 Midland St.. Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

SPRING SNAPS!— One fine White Pelican 
skin $4.00; choice tre.sh Snowy Owl skins $2.50, 
$3.50: fresh Great Horned Owl skins, $1.75 each; 
fine Wolf skins for rugs with heads, skulls, 
legs and claws complete, $2.50 each. Mounted 
birds: Sharp-tailed Grouse, $2..50; Ruffed 
Grouse, $2.00; Prairie Hens, $2.25; Pine Gros- 
beaks, 60c. ; pair N. Hairy Woodpeckers. $1.50, 
on stump; Spruce Grouse. $2.25; A. Bittern, 
$1.50; almost white Snowy Owl, $10.00; a quan- 
tity of Elk teeth, $6.00 per dozen. All Al speci- 
mens prepared at prices quoted. Scalps and 
heads of Moose and Elk for sale. Buffalo horns 

Solished at 50c. to $1 00 a pair, matched pairs, 
rder from CHRIS. P. FORGE, Taxidermist 
and Collector, Carman, Manitoba. 

SPECIAL CLIPPER BIKE rode about 2 
months, perfect shape. Palmer tires, gear 78, 
frame 24 $15 cash and 115 in eggs takes it. 
BENJAMIN HOAG, Stephentown, New York. 



EGG TRAYS FOR SALE or exchange for 
sets with data; Trays in six sizes, any desired 
color. Prices on application, discount on large 
orders. Samples 10 cents M. S. CONWAY , 
.584 6th Ave , Lansingburg, N. Y. 

FOR SALE:— :Fancy and common Geodes, 
ranging in price from 25c. to $5.00 ; halfs from 
lOc to 50c. Special rates to colleges a cd mu- 
seums. H. K. McLELLAN, Hamilton, Han- 
cock Co., Illinois. 179 

PRBLICATIONS WANTED:— Cash or ex- 
change given for Bull. Cooper Club Vol. I com' 
plete or in part; any volume of 0. and O. ; Ool- 
OGIST Vols. VI to X inclusive; American Ex- 
change and Mart any volume complete; Avi 
fauna any number. R. C. McGREGOR, Box 
158, Palo Alto, California. 

BRISTOL STEEL KOO, No. 16RanglyFly 
Rod. 4 joints and butt, new, $3.75 cash and $3.75 
in eggs. Let me quote you cash or exchanse 
on anythirg in Ime of sp^^rting goods. BEN- 
JAMIN HOAG, Stephentown, Ne.v York. 

WANTED :— Well marked sets of Red-tailed, 
Red-shouldered and Sparrow Hawks, Great 
Horned and S.reech Owls, Tufted Puffin, Pig- 
eon Guillemot. White Pelican, Caspian and 
Sooty Terns, Bridled Tern, Audubon's Shear- 
water, Blue-winged Teal. American Bittern, 
Osprey, Kildeer, Bartram's Sandpiper Califor- 
nian Quail. Bald Eagle, Downy Woodpecker, 
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and nests. Cedar 
Wax wing. Red-eyed vireos and others. I can 
offer for these Saa Birds' eggs, Ducks, Plovers 
and Hawks from Iceland, Lapland, Greenland, 
Labrad' r and Northwest Canada. I have 
thousands of eggs for exchange. W. RAINE, 
Kew Beach, Toronto, Canada. 



OCLOG.STS WANTED: — Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 18!!8, and April 
1889, and will yive an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR' HATCHING.- On 
and after May first I will be ready to supply 
settings of Mongolian Ring Neck Pheasants. 
Settings of 15. price $4. Orders booked now. A. 
W. PERRIOR, 1409 So. Salina St., Syracuse, 
N^jy\ 174_ 

WANTED FOR CASH.— First-class sets of 
game birds, (particularly large sets) Ducks, 
Geese, Grouse, Partridges, etc. Send list and 
lowest cash prices : also quote fine sets of any 
North American birds. J. L. CHILDS, Floral 
Park, N. Y. 174 

WANTED.-Collectors throughout the United 
States and Canada to collect for me scientifi- 
cally birds' eggs in sets, with full data, at M 
Lattin's catalogue rates. DR. M. T. CLECK- 
LEY, 457 Greene St., Augusta, Ga. 175 

WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

WANTED.— Single eggs of all kinds in ab- 
normal specimens. G. E. OILMAN, 27th Ave., 
Haverhill, Mass. 

ATTENTION COLLECTORS —If you have 
not seen Mr. W. J. Conway's (Lansingburg. N. 
Y., 584 Sixth Ave.,) water blower, write him 
concerning it. I would not bft without it. 
GEO. W. MORSE, Ashley. Ind. 20 years ex- 
perience collecting. 



THE OOLOGIST 



35 



WANTED. -Series of Yellow-headed Black- 
bird % from original coUe'-tor, with complete 
data Will pay cash. RICHARD D. MILLER, 
3473 Amber St., Philadelphia, Penn. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE.— KO coDies of 
Happy Days cost $6 00, Hamilton 28 cal. rifle, 
mounted quail $1.00, squirrel $1.00, Sparrow- 
Hawk 75c.' Red-bellied Woodpecker .50c. Have 
also mounted fox for best offer. J. D. ANTH- 
ONY, Waubeek, Iowa. 

BIG PROFITS-may be made in raising Bel" 
gian Hares. It is interesting work and takes 
but little space. Pedigreed stock for sale. All 
letters answered. Also climbers for exchange. 
R. A. POWELL, 135 E. 5th St., St. Paul, Minn. 



INDIAN BASKETS, Indian 
r. . Beaded Buckskin Sioux Relics 

' ' Indian Photos, Indian Pottery 

"* Indian Weapons. Elk Teeth, Mex- 

ican Hand Carved Leather Goods 
Mexican Drawn Linens, Shells, Minerals. Fos 
sils. Ancient tone Relics, Oregon Tiny Arrow 
heads. Fossil Fishes, Fo.ssil "Leaves, Corals 
Agate Jewelry. Curios. Wholesale and Retail 
16th year. Two-story building full. New cat. 
No. 10. 40 pages, finely illus., for 5c. L.W.STIL 
WELL. Deadwood S Dak. 



PENIKESE. 

A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 
famous Summer School. 

A 96 page book of much interest to 
students of Nature. 

iread -wbat others say: 

•'Have found it extremely interesting read- 
ing,"— Henry Prime, Garden City, L. I, 

"I enjoyed the book [Penikese] very much." 
— W. W. Kinsley (Supt. of Schools) Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 

"It is both instructive and entertaining and 
deserves a place in the library of every student 
of nature."— W. D. Lynn, Canfleld, O. 

"I have just finished reading 'Penikese' and 
can say that I have enjoye^ it exceedingly. 
Anything looking toward keeping green the 
memory of the great Agassiz should be of in- 
terest to the teacher of biology and no period 
of his life is more interesting than the years 
spent in building up the laboratory on Peni- 
kese."— W. P. Hay (Prof. Biology, HighSchool) 
Washington, D. C. 

"I have read the book [Penikese] with great 
interest and think it an admirable remini- 
scence of one of the greatest naturalists of the 
nineteenth century. The name of Agassiz is 
assuredly treasured by all true lovers of na- 
ture and his methods of study have left a strik- 
ing impress on present-day workers."— (Rev.) 
Robert Blight, Green Lane, Pa. 

Price only 25c (reduced from 35c). 

Prepaid. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r, 
Albion, N. Y. 



Boes. 

fricea per set prepaid. 5 per cent, on $5, 10 
per cent, on 810 and over. On an order figur- 
ing $25 net will allow 25 per cent, discounts. 
Holds good for 30 days only after appearance 
of this ad. 

Whip-poor-will 12 $i 00 

California Woodpecker 2-4 60 

Magnolia Warbler 2 3 60c; 1-4 80 

Least Vireo 3 4 80 

Bendire's Thrasher 1-3 75 

Willow Goldfinch n-3 4& 

Cassin's Purple Finch 1-4 1 00 

Long-crested Jay 1-2 $1 00; 8-3 81.50; 2-4 2 00 

Arizona Jay 2 6 82.40; 4-5 $2.00; 4-4 1 60 

Vermillion Flycatcher n-3 n 3 n-3 1 20 

Lead-colored Bush Tit n-6 83.60; n-5 83.00; 

n-4 82.40; 1 4 81 80; 1-6 3 00 

Mexican Horned Lark 3-3 50 

Arizona Hooded Oriole 2-3 40 

Western Horned Owl 12 l 00 

White-tailed Hawk 1-2 75 

Bell's Vireo 4-3 12 

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 5-4 10 

Ru.sset-backed Thrush 4-3 15 

California Thrasher 6 3 _ 80 

Orchard Oriole 10-3 8c: 10-4 12c; 3-5 17 

Blue Jay 5-4 lOc; 3 5 13 

Sooty Tern 3-1 _ 14 

Tufted PufQn 2-1 40 

California Murre 3-1 fine 20 

Clapper Rail 3-9 .50c: S-10 60c; 2-12 75 

Green Heron 3-4 16 

Black Phoebe 3-4 SO 

Brown Thrasher 4-5 _ 10 

Lomita Wren 15 l 50 

Baird's Wren 1-6 130 

Verdin 1-4 1 20 

Plumbeous Gnatcatcher n-4 1 65 

Least Vireo n-3 75 

Cedar Waxwing n-4 in situation 7b 

Long-billed Marsh Wren n-6 in situation.-, 60 

Royal Tern 3-2 35 

Wood Ibis 1-3 65 

California Screech Owl 1-3 45 

Florida Screech Owl 1-3 45 

Bald-pate Duck 1-4 80 

American Golden-eye 1-8 $1.60; 2-7 $1.40; 

1-12 with down 2 60 

Dusky Horned Owl 1-3, 1 egg Imperfect 2 00 

Valley Partridge Ml 75 

Canada Goose 1-6 3 25 

California Cuckoo 1-4 1 50 

Oregon Chickadee 1-4 60 

Louisiana Tanager 1-3 1 00 

Thurber's Junco 1-3 75 

Cassin's Sparrow 1-3 1 00 

Duck Hawk 1-1 1 50 

Audubon's Warbler 1-2 1 50 

Pinion Jay 1 1 II. 00: 1-3 _ 1 50 

Xantus's Murrelet 1-1 2 50 

Violet-green Cormorant 1-4 1 25 

Western Grebe 10-3 25c; 10-4 35 

Ancient Murrelet 1-1 3 00 

Cassin's Auklet 2-1 50 

Ashv Petrel 2-1 1 00 

Hooded Warbler 1-4 1 00 

Rusty Song Sparrow 1-4 60 

Iceland Gull 1 00 

Redshank 1-1 60 

Golden-crowned Kinglet l-l 1 00 

European Sparrow Hawk 1-1 SO 

Great Bustard 1-1 - 90 

Turkey Vulture 1-1 30 

Sharp Seed-eater 1-1 35 

Red Phalarope 1-1 - 50 

Audubon's Caracara 2-1 - 30 

Lutescent Warbler 1-1 36 

Blue-fronted Jay 2-1 35 

Have hundreds of other sets and singles. 
Send for full list of both common and rare 
species. All eggs guaranteed. Satisfaction or 
your money back. BENJAMIN HOAQ, 

Stephentown, New York. 



■36 



THE OOLOGIST. 



NOTICE; : : 

The AMERICAN SOCIETY of CURIO COLLECTORS 
is to have a new Official Organ. 



WATCH 
FOR 



THE CURIO MONTHLY 



APRIL 

20, I9OI 



It will be devoted to Natural Science, Archaeology, Numismatics and 
Curio Collecting. Fine Illustrations and a Large ExchanCxE Depart- 
ment. 

ALLEN JESSE REYNOLDS, (Sec'y) Editor and Publisher. 

[Roy Farrell Greene, President, (Kan.) 

Associate Editors- ' Thomas L. Elder, Vice-President, (Pa. ( 
ASSOCIATE JiDiTORS. , p^^j ^ Abbott Davis, (R. I.) 

I Prof. W. O. Emery, (Ind.) 

YOU MUST HITRRV and join the "A.S.ofC.C.,"35c covers membership (subject to the ap. 
proval of the members,) Official Organ, etc. 
First issue of the Quarterly Bulletin is ready for distribution. Send stamp for a copy. 
For Application Blank, address, 

ALLEN JESSE REYNOLDS, Sec. 



(Mention Oolcgist) 



2015 Grand Ave-, Connersville, Indiana* 



SETS OR SINGLES WANTED 

Of the following eggs for cash : I will pay 35c 
for Ospreys eggs; 50c for Broad- winged Hawks 
eggs ; 50c for Sharp-shinned Hawks eggs; 75c for 
Hooded Merganser eegs ; 35c for Wood Ducks 
eggs; $2.00 for Sandhill Cranes eggs; $8 00 for 
Swallow-tailed Kites eggs; $3.00 for Golden 
Eagles. If you have any of these write to W. 
RAINE, Kew Beach, Toronto, Canada. 



©PELGIAL. - 

AMERICAN ORNITHOLOGY 
AND CONDOR : : : : 

Both full year to Ne^v Subscribers only ^jkx.xs 
Dont forget I have everything for egg collec- 
tors. The Best steel climbers with straps at 
S2.50, without at $1.65, guaranteed right, pre- 
paid. Don't forget these new Drills, 25c each, 
4 selected sizes, $1.00. Pencils lOc; 3 for 25c; 85c 
dozen, good ones. See "ad" Feb. 6. Send for 
lists. Tools and supplies. Books, Magazines, 
Back vols. , Eggs. If there is an article for 
outdoor sport or Nature study let me quote. 

BENJAMIN HOAG. 

Stephentown, N. Y. 

THIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



The Condor for 1901. 

This popular Califomian, illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader : 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the nesting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents In stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1; VOL. H CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT $1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grlnnell. 
This win be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
SanU Clara, Cal. 



The OOlogist. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 3. 



ALBION, N. Y., MARCH, 1901. 



Whole No. 174 



The Oologist. 

A Monthly Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to the 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription 50c per annum 

Sample copies sceach 

The above rates include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

^r"Remember that the publisher must be noil 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES: 

5 cents per nonpareil line each insertion. 

12 lines in every inch. Seven inches In a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line is "net," "rock 
bottom," "inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 25 cents; 100 lines, $5.00; 1000 lines, 
$50.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due Bills and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing will be honored only at regular rates in force 
at the date of issuance of said bill or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postofflce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination will be accepted for sums un- 
der one daUar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y. 



ENTERED AT P. O. 



AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



Gleanings from My Note Book. 

In looking over my note book I find 
many short notes, or as it were, many 
glimpses of bird life, which, singly. 



could not very well be expanded into 
an article, so I have decided to write 
them up collectively, and offer them 
under the above gleanings. 

As the weather has a decided influ- 
ence on bird movements, especially mi- 
gration, I have usually prefaced my 
notes with a sort of weather report 
which I may use in connection with 
these gleanings Its severity determines 
to a great extent the character and 
abundance of the winter visitors that 
we may expect from the northland, 
while its mildness leads us to look for 
solitary individuals of our summer resi- 
dents which usually leave us for the 
sunny southland, hundreds of miles 
away. 

January 1, 1900 -N. W. wind with 
zero weather. As I glanced out of my 
den window I paw for the first time this 
winter a flock of about 100 Snowflakes 
on the snow covered ice along the lake 
shore. A Herring Gull was flying 
around the sandbar, and some Ducks 
were feeding along head of lake. A 
"Lanius borealis'' flew about from one 
tree top to another and teetered up and 
down on the slender branches. Tree 
Sparrows are numerous as usual and 
make a tour of the town every day, eat- 
ing the weedseeds in gardens. 

February— Heard the first gurglings 
of Song Sparrows on the 13th, during 
an hour cf sunshine in the morcing. 
Next morning they climbed up in a brush 
pile to rehearse, but seemingly became 
disgusted -for they soon dove into the 
cattails out of sight, and were not heard 
again until the 22d when I heard one 
bubbling over a little. 

March 1. — This month came in a 



28 



THE OOLOGIST. 



"whooping." Last night the ground 
was nearly bare, but this morning 24 
inches of snow covered the ground. A 
lot of Horned Larks came into my gar- 
den to feed, but hardly a weed top was 

to be seen. 

March 2 —Just 26 inches of snow on 
the level, and great drifts have been 
formed hy the heavy winds Several 
groups of Crows flew around our town, 
anxiously scanning the snowy billows 
for a morsel of food. I scattered wheat 
on the snow for the Horned Larks and 
three of them remained all the after- 
noon. At first only one came, and 
when others came he tried to drive 
them away — seemingly afraid that there 
wouldn't be enough grain for all. 

March 6.— Snow increased to 33 in- 
ches deep and the Horned Larks have 
become abundant— increase in numbers 
every day, and are so tamed by hunger 
that they run about picking up the 
buckwheat meats within 5 or 6 feet of 

me. 

March 13 — Robins arrived on the 

9th— 4 of them— although the temperat- 
ure was 6 degrees below zero. I saw 
about 50 today in an orchard where 
they were "yipping" and eating rotton 
apples that s*ill hung on the trees. 

March 23.— Saw the first Red-winged 
Blackbird this morning at 7 o'clock. 
He sat on the "Upmost branch of the 
topmost" elm tree and poured forth his 
happy "0 glee-ee-ee e." But he soon 
flew on north and was lost to view. 
The 40 or 50 other companions who 
ought to have been with h^m are prob- 
ably stuck upon the- barbarous bonnets 
of our highly organized and civilized 
"fearfully and wonderfully made' 
maids, who seem to be trying to equal 
their sisters in darker portions of the 
earth, in the manner of personal adorn- 
ment. 

I heard the sweet warblings of B'ue- 

birds for the first time. This morning 
quite a sprinkling of Robins came into 
town and for some time their homely 
yet pleasant notes sounded the good 



tidings of nearby balmy days "when 
the Robins will nest again." Saw two 
Meadowlarks flying north high in the 
air. 

March 25 — This was a beautiful day, 
clear but an icy east wicd made it 
rather frosty. Robins filled our streets 
with music, while the valley fairly 
swarmed with Bluebirds and I never 
have seen — even years ago — such a flock 
of Bluebirds. All day long they war- 
bled, flitted and played around the old 
willow stubs that fringe along the 
swamp. During the morning hours 
Song Sparrows were in full song for the 
first time. 

March 26 —At 5;30 p. m. about 75 
Red-wings came from the fields and 
flew out in the f^wamp where they 
roosted in the cattails. 

March 27. — Although the weather 
was cold and cloudy at 6:15 a m., yet 
the Song Sparrows were bubbling over, 
as on a bright sunshiny morn. Kildeers 
were seen on the 23cl, but I saw my first 
one today over in a grassy boggy place. 

March 30. — As I stood in my garden 
this morning about 7 o'clock, I heard 
among the medley of Robins, a sweet 
warb'e, and closer listening revealed a 
Purple Finch's jubilant strain, coming 
from a lowly perch in a tree in my gar- 
den, but as I approached he mounted 
higher until the top of the tree was 
reached, when after a few bursts of 
melody, he arose high in the air flying 
first one way and another, then flying 
up the street. For the first time the 
Red-wings remained around swamp and 
sang their "Og'/ee-ee" and willow 
trees and cat- tails, while the irrepress- 
ible Song Sparrows mounted on dozens 
of high places sang with joy and sweet- 
ness — a song that is indeed of great 
variation. 

Robins are becoming enamoured of 
each other and scenes of courtship are 
an every day occurrence — males utter- 
ing subdued twitterings and "showing 
off"— flitting about the females from 



THE OOLOGIST. 



39 



branch to branch and 1 think many are 
already ma ed. The multitude of Blue- 
birds that were here on tue 25th have 
passed on north and spread out to the 
hillsides. Considerable snow in woods 
and piotected places. Lake is frozen 
over with about 12 inches of ico. 

March 31. — While strolling along the 
street before breakfast I ran onto a lit- 
tle troop of Chickedees. As I watched 
them as they hung back down, or, in 
other words, "bottom side up," one lit- 
tle fellow caught sight of a branch of 
the maple that was leaking sap, and 
with every indication of having found a 
"fountain of youth" the Chickadee flew 
to where the sap was dripping and 
drank and drank with an eagerness 
equal to an old toper taking his morn- 
ing "eye opener," then he "chick-a dee- 
deed" and from across the street came 
two more of these black-capped topers 
who drank the sweet juice, and uttered 
those low notes that aound so far away. 

April 1. — Beautiful clear day, but icy 
N. wind. I spent tie day around on 
the lowlands, enjoying the hosts of 
Song SpaTOvrs, Robins, Red-wings, 
Purple Finches and a few Meadow- 
larks. I heard a Pbcebe for first time, 
and I wonder what such a bird can live 
on now when it is so cold, with ice and 
snow and no flying insects. Although 
I've seen a Bronzed Grackle several 
time?, today is the first time that I've 
heard him tuning up the wires of his 
"^E:>lean harp " Robins are mated and 
looking for suitable nesticg places. 

April 2 — Blackbirds are here in 
abundance, especially at night, when 
large flocks of Red-wings, Cowbirds and 
Grackles come in from the fields, ali^^ht 
ing in tree top around swamp and pour 
forth their scugs and notes in rich pro- 
fusion. 

April 3.— For several days a small 
flock of Ducks has been feedinar in the 
creek and today I noted a pair of Wood 
Ducks and several Mallards. 

April 5.— The graceful Tree Swallows 



came yesterday—about a dc zen of them 
— and this morning they were skimming 
over the thin paper ice along the edge 
of swamp and lake 

April 8.— It has been bright and clear 
all day with a cold north wind, which 
drove the ice out of this end of the lake. 
A new flock of Grackles arrived from 
the south at 7 a. m. Those that have 
been here are building nests in almost 
every evergreen tree in town. I have 
never seen the town so full of them, in- 
deed, the mischievous great glossy fel- 
lows seem to really erjoy town life 
more than any other bird I know. 

A small band of Slate-colored Juncos 
are staying in the evergreen trees that 
adorn some yards. During a short 
walk in the woods I saw several Crows 
carrying nesting material. On my way 
home noted first Mourning Doves. 
Bird life hfre in the valley is abundant, 
but the woods are silent as the tomb— 
except for cawing Crows and the 
lonesome notes of the White-breasted 
Nuthatches.. About 75 Ducks passed on 
north this p. m. 

April 12.— This evening I took a walk 
along swamp, listening to the full 
chorus of peepers. They were heard 
first on the 6th. As I stood on the 
bridge 1 heard Snipe making a sort of 
short, mewing noise,, as they flew by 
me just overhead, arid I also heard the 
whistle of many wicgs as a flock of 
"Whistle-wings" went on north in the 
gathering gloom. 

This p. m. a few Tree Spar- 
rows came into the willows along the 
swamp road and one seemed to be in 
nearly full song, at least he burst forth 
in as sweet a strain as ever I heard 
from a Sparrow's Ihroat. A pair of 
Loons arrived last night, also a great 
flock of American Herring Gulls, but 
they passed on north at sunrise. A 
Great Blue Heron sailed in from the 
north and spent the day fishing around 
the swamp. Yesterday a big Osprey 



40 



THE OOLOGTST. 



spent tho day here, as ;did a Marsh 
Hawk. 

April 15 —I made my first trip after 
sets of Buteo borealis today. My route 
was north, throt.gh the valley, except 
when I turned to clioab the hillsides 
to where the net-ts were. Weather 
warm and clear u"til 5 p. m. Scarcely 
had I left the town when I heard the 
trilling of hundreds of Vesper Sparrows 
but found them scarce half a mile back 
on the hills. An occasional weak voic- 
ed old Field Sparrow trilled from some 
weed top— weak voiced but none the 
less welcome. From the distant woods 
came the drumming of a Raffed 
Grouse. As I approached my first 
Hawk woods I saw the male sitting on 
a dead limb in a tall pine and near by 
the female sat on her nest which con- 
tained 2 plain eggs so I left them. The 
nest was 65 feet up an al-^ost limbless 
tree and was lined with a bed of pine 
sprigs, corn husks, bark chips and few 
feathers 

Iq another woods about 3 miles far- 
ther north I fouad the second nest with 
the telltale sprigs of evergreen branches 
waving over edge ef nest in a basswood 
about 50 feet up, but it was never used. 
While sitting on the sunny side of a big 
tree eating lunch I heard for the first 
time the melodious "chink" of a Louis- 
iana Water Thrush. From here I 
tramped over a mile to see an old nest 
of Buteo lineatus —in a woods where I 
have taken 6 sets in years gone by. 
This pair had always laid a beautiful 
set for me by April 12, but at this time 
only one egg had been laid. The nest 
was an old one, which had not been 
fixed up at all— she had merely dug a 
hole in a mass of dead leaves that filled 
the nest, so that the egg was half buried 
but when I visited the nest on April 
22d I found that she had added a few 
pine branches, corn stalks, bark strips 
and chunks of moss, on which lay 3 
handsome egg3. The female left the 
nest as I approached and did not utter 



a single cry, which is characteristic of 

this bird. I called on two other pairs 

of Red-tails but they had not begun to 

nest yet. After supper I spent an hour 

around swamp. About dark a hundred 

"Whistle wings" went on north in small 

flocks of from 6 to 50. 

C. F. Stone. 

Branchport, N. Y. 

{To be continued.) 



Timely and to the Point. 

[Dr. N. expresses our sentiments to a 
T in the above valuable suggestions— 
with the exception of his '3d" — we boy- 
cott the wadding and thread" — prefer a 
good grade of fluffy cotton and no 
thread— tissue if anything for the outer 
wrapper. We have lost many a valu- 
able small egg by perhaps too hasty or 
careless unwinding of the "thread." — 
Ed.] 

Mr. Editor: — If you will kindly al- 
low me a small section of your valuable 
paper I will endeavor to touch upon a 
subject that has been sorely neglected 
on the part of contribufors to oological 
publications. Nothing is more aggra- 
vating than to purchase or exchange 
for fine specimens of eggs and upon te- 
ceiving them to find a part of one or 
more sets broken, thereby rendering 
the set worthless. This catastrophe 
some will say is the careless handling 
of packages on the part of postal clerks, 
etc. Very true, but to them we cannot 
look for redress. 

The fault lies in every instance with 
the shipper, with only one exception, 
and that is where packages containing 
eggs are sent over the Canadian border. 
In this case I have found that the over 
zealous custom officers in searching for 
dutiable gems, etc., put their fingers 
through many a rare and costiy egg. 
This has been my experience with a 
choice set of Accipiter velox, as they 
were carefully packed and in a rein- 
forced box. The cover had literally 
been pried oft", contents of box fatally 
sounded and sent along. In this case I 



THE OOLOGIST. 



41 



do not see that the shipper was at fault 
and so one must bear with it. 

But here in our own service, where 
the box is never opened from the time 
it leaves the shipper until it is received 
by the consigoee, a broken egg should 
rarely, if ever, be found. Collectors, 
as a rule, iire uither too anxious to save 
a few cents' postage or will not spare 
the time to tack a few reinforcements 
into their cigar box before packing the 
eggs. This is the greatest fault. 

Secondly corner the careless manner 
in which the specimens are rolled in 
cotton. As a matter of fact I have re- 
ceived eggs from collectors packed in 
cotton that had been used in the field 
and over and over again until it was 
but little better than excelsior. 

Other collfcctors have the habit of 
putting in a layer of cotton, then a lay- 
er of eggs, and so on until the box is 
filled. To such collectors my senti- 
ments are perJ^aps beat unsaid. No 
doubt others have received eggs from 
these same collectors in this condition. 

I may have spoken harshly in this ar- 
ticle, but those to whom it applies I 
trust will digest every word as meant 
for them. And now a few instructions 
on packing eggs. 

1st. Ship by express instead of mail 
whenever possible. 

2d. Reioforce all cigar boxes by 
tacking small cleats on the inside to 
prevent cover from crushing in. 

3d Wrap each egg carefully in a 
8 rip of thin while wadding, which has 
been previously separated down the 
center, allowing the soft side to come 
in contact with the egg. Wrap each 
egg around the smaller diameter first, 
then around the greater, and lastly use 
a few turns of thread to keep the cotton 
in place. 

4th. Put a thick layer i.f cotton into 
bottom and top of box. 

5th Pack each egg in very carefully 
and use great cauiion in closing lid of 
box. (Many are broken this way.) 



6th. Use heavy wrapping paper and 
ptout twine, address plainly and don't 
forget, if your conscience will allow of 
it, the glass notice, where our careful 
manipulator, thi' postal clerk, will see 
it. 

7th. Be ready to make all losses 
good. 

Yours for more care, 

J. B. Newton. 
Unionyille, Conn., Jan. 15, 1901. 



Field Notes from Manitoba. 

On May 4th I found two nests of 
Krider's Hawk, one in a partly dead 
elm 20 ft. from ground. To this nest I 
climbed and found it contained nothing 
but appeared to be ready for eggs. The 
other was also in an elm about the 
same height and was no: quite ready 
for eggs. On May 9th 1 tried these 
neslri again, but found them empty. 
On both occasions the old birds circled 
above the trees and scolded me for my 
intrusion so I decided to call again So 
on the 22d I called on my way home 
from the swamp, still no eggs A little 
further down in the woods I saw a very 
small nest in an oak, not more than 15 
ft. up and climbed to it. It contained 
two eggs of Red-tail, both were incu- 
bated. This then was the second nest 
built by this pair, the first nest having 
been deserted because I had climbed to 
it on the 4th of May. The nest was 
very small, no larger than my two 
hands and quite loosely put together. 

On May 31st while looking for Marsh 
Hawk's nests I called for the third time 
at the Krider's nest located May 4th, 
and as it was still empty I knew there 
must be another somewhere. A search 
revealed a nest in top of a tall oak, but 
the bird was absent so I did not climb 
but toward evening I called round 
again and at my approach the bird left 
the nest. I quickly iLade the ascent 



42 



THE OOLOGIST 



and took a small set of two well mark- 
ed eggs, slightly incubated. The nest 
was small and loose and I conld see 
through the bottom but not clearly 
enough to discern the eggs. This is a 
phase of character I have not before 
noticed in the Hawks, but in these two 
cases with Red-tails and in four cases 
with Swainson's Hawk this season, I 
found the birds deserted the nests I had 
climbed that contained no eggs. In 
the one case with the Swainson's Hawk 
I found a nest complctfi but did not 
climb. A few days after 1 called round 
for this set and on climbing found one 
egg. As the nest was where it could 
be seen for over a mile in the top of a 
dead willow 1 took this egg, but return- 
ing next week found the nest deserted. 
I then drove over the school section 
and examined all the bluffs and in a 
small willow bush found Mrs. Swain- 
son trying to incubate two more eggs, 
which I knew by their resemblance to 
be the other eggs of the set, I having 
already taken the first. On this oc- 
casion sh3 hail se'zed upon a partly 
built Crow's nost, flattened it out and 
depo,sited the two eggs in it. 

On the 18th of June I took my last 
set of Krider'R for the season. This 
was a second set and strongly resem- 
bled the first one. The nest was small 
in a tall oak baside a ravine about one 
mile distant from where I took the first 
set and contained two eggs nicely 
marked. This nest was newly built 
like most of the others by the birds and 
was unusually deep, the cup being 
nearly 6 inches in depth and 7 in diam- 
eter. Both male and female birds were 
quite bold and seemed to resent my 
robbing their second nest. Whether 
they built a third I don't know, but if 
they did I did not find it as my horse 
hurt his feet shortly after while away 
after Loon's eggs, and I had to leave 
the field for the season. 

Chris. P. Forge, 
Carman, Manitoba. 



Some Winter Birds of a Country 
Farm-yard. 

Ruffed Grouse, Bonasa umbellus. A 
few cf these beautiful game birds are 
seen during the winter budding in ap- 
ple trees near our yard. 

Downy Woodpecker, Bryobates pub- 
escens. Quite plenty in shade trees in 
our yard on pleasant days during the 
entire winter. 

Blue Jay, Cyanociila crisiaia. Very 
abundant. A quite large flock makes 
daily visits to our yard in search of 
food. 

Pine Grosbeak, Pinicola emicleator. 
Quite abundant but more so as spring 
approa^-hes. They come in flocks to 
the maples in our yard and feed on the 
buds. 

Amer'can Go'dfinch, Spinus iristis. 
Flocks of this species alight in the trees 
in our yard quite often during the win- 
ter. In their winter plumage they are 
very plain looking birds. 

English Sparrow, Passer domesticus. 
An occasional straggler finds his way 
to our yard. I cau;f,ht one in my hands 
that flew into our shed to get out of the 
storm. 

Snowflake, Plectrophenax nivalis. 
Very largo flocks can be seen from our 
yard skimming over the fields and pas- 
ture and a few come to our yard occss- 
ionly. 

Song Sparrow, Mclospiza fasciata. 
As spring approaches we are tilled with 
gladness by the sweet song of this spar- 
row returning to his summer home, 
although a few remain here nearly the 
whole year. 

Northern Shrike, Lanius borealis. 
One of these butchers is an cccasiooal 
visitant to trees in our yard during the 
winter. 

Brown Creeper, Certhia familiaris 
americana. These interesting little 
birds are winter visitants to our farm 
yard shade trees, searching for food 
under the rough bark of the maples 
and butternuts. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



43 



White-breasted Nuthatch, Sitta car- 
olinensis. Another interesting little 
farm-yard visitant, tiying in open doors 
and windows and making themselves 
much at home and all of the time utter- 
ing their curious quauk. 

Red-breasted Nuthatch, Sitta canad- 
eusis The above description of the 
White-breasted species well describes 
this species, although the Red-breasted 
is not so abundant. 

Chickadee, Parus atricapillius. Last 
but not least on my list comes the little 
Titmouse, the bird of .so friendly dispo- 
sition and gentle manners, who thinks 
no one his enemy. They are very 
abundant here and help to make the 
long winter pass more swiftly by their 
happy, joyful nature. In closing this 
paper I cannot refrain from writing 
what Wilson says of this species which 
I take from Davies "Nests and Eggs," 
fourth edition. It is as follows: 

They traverse the wood in regular 
procession from tree to tree, tumbling, 
chattering and hanging from the ex- 
tremities of the branches, examining 
about the roots, the leaves, buds and 
crevices of the bark for insects and 
their larva. They also frequently visit 
the orchards, particularly in the fall, 
the sides of the barn and the barn-yard 
in the same pursuit, trees in such situa- 
tions being generally much infested 
with insects. Therefore we rank this 
little bird among the farmer's friends, 
and trust our citizens will always rec- 
ognize him and as such." 

I consider the above description of 
this little bird the best I have ever read 
and would call particular attention to 
the last few lines, and trust that all our 
citizens throughout this broad land will 
give more attention to the study and 
protection of our feathered friends; 
stop the wholesale destruction of our 
native birds before it is too late; unite 
in this great work, for unity means 
strength. Guy L. Briggs, 

Livermore, Maine. 



A Red-headed Black-bird. 

I saw a Red-winged Blackbird last 
spring with a red head as well as 
shoulders. 

I was painting a fence near a swamp 
and the bird was in sight at any time I 
had a micd to look for him. My team 
came to take me home and I called my 
wife's attention to the bird. 

We are both familiar with this spec- 
ies ard have it mounted at home. 

The bird was evidently mated be- 
cause it was June and all of his actions 
pointed to his being interested in a 
family in the bnshes, near by. 

R. S. Torre Y, 
Wen ham Depot, Mass. 

More Albinos. 

In the December iss'^e of the Oologist 
I saw an article written by G. G. Welsh 
giving an account of an Albino English 
Sparrow. A day or two after I read 
this article a friend told me he had seen 
a Sparrow which was nearly all wLite 
in a large flock of the same species. I 
told him to try an(l get it for me, so the 
next day he brought it, having shot; it 
that morning. I found it to be a female 
English Sparrow vvith both wings pure 
white and a few white feathers on its 
head and neck. The rest of the feath- 
ers were of the same color as other 
English Sparrows. I now have it in 
in my collection mounted with its 
wings half spread. 

I have three other Albinos in my col- 
lections which were killed here. On 
April 23, 1899, a friend of mine was 
watching near a pond for some Ducks 
when he saw a white bird flying alone, 
coming toward the pond. He shot at 
it and killed it, and as he had never 
seen a bird like it he brought it to me. 
I found it to be a pure white "Yellow- 
legs ;" this is the only pure white albino 
"Wader" I have heard of. (if there are 
others I would like to hear of them.) 



44 



THE OOLOGIST. 



The same person on March 16, 1899 
brought me a male Robin which has 
three white feathers in its right wing 
and four in its left wing, four white 
feathers in its tail, breast white, its 
head, neck and back mottled with 
white, several coverts white. 

The other Albino which I have is a 
female Bob-white. It was killed on 
November 28, 1899. This bird is of a 
very light color all over, but not pure 
white, its bill white, feet and legs a 
pale flesh color. 

If these notes are of sufficient interest 
you may publish them. 

O. S. Biggs, 
San Jose, III. 



Review. 

CANADIA.:: BIRDS BY JOHN MACOUN, 

M. A., F. R. S. C , NATURALIST TO 

THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF 

CANADA. 

In compiling this catalogue of the 
birds of Canada the author has endeav- 
ored to bring together facts on the 
range and nesting habits of all birds 
known to reside in, migrate to or visit 
the northern part of the continent. 

In addition to the Dominion of Can- 
ada he has therefoie included New- 
foundland, Greenland and Alaska. 

Since the publication of Fauna Bor- 
eali Americana by Swainson & Rich- 
ardson in 1831 no attempt has been 
made to produce a work dealing with 
the ornithology of the region now em- 
braced in the Dominion of Canada. 

In 1857 Mr. Montagu Chamberlain 
published a catalogue of Canadan birds 
and previous to this Mr. T. Mcllwraith 
published his Birds of Ontario, which 
included the birds known to occur in 
that province only. 

The Birds of Manitoba by Mr. Ernest 
Seton Thompson was published in 1891, 
and, as the name implies covered little 
more than that province. 

In 1891 Bird Nesting in Northwest 



Canada by Walter Raine was publish- 
ed, which gave an account of the birds 
found nesting in Assiniboia, a vast ter- 
ritory that had previously been over- 
looked by ornithologists. 

Mr. C. E. Dionne of Quebec pub- 
lished a catalogue of the birds of that 
province and Mr. Ernest D. Winkle has 
published a valuable little work en- 
titled The Birds of Manitoba, while in 
1898 Mr. John Fannin's Birds of British 
Columbia appeared. 

While the above ornithologists were 
engaged gathering and publishing the 
valuable information contained in these 
works. Professor Macoun had constant- 
ly before him the necessity of the pres- 
ent work and has been collecting notes 
and observations during all his journeys 
since 1879. Consequently he has gath- 
ered together a mass of valuable and 
interesting matter and his work on 
Canadian Birds is the most complete 
and up-to-date work yet published. 

Part I includes Water Birds, Gallin- 
aceous Birds and Pigeons and Part II 
will be printed this spring. 



Least Bittern Observed in Penn- 
sylvania. 

Having noticed in the April (1900) 
Oologist the article by Mr E. R For- 
rest, Washington, Pa , in rfgard to 
Least Bittern being observed in Penn- 
sylvania, it may not be out of place for 
me to state that I have observed them 
here in the mo'-ths of April. June, 
July, August and September. It ap- 
pears strange that I never observed any 
in Mav- For two years I have observ- 
a pair at Holmesburg, this rounty along 
the Pennypaok creek, where they nest- 
ed, although I never found their nest. 
In August 1899 at this locality I flushed 
four from along the creek; two I iden 
tified as young Brids from their weak, 
uneven flight In September several 
years since, a boy offered me one for 
half a dollar, which he shot at Bride- 
burg, this county. It was a young one 
and not quite full fledgfd. 

Richard F. Miller. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



45 



;$5.00 for only 50 cents. 

For 1901 Subscribers of THE OOLOGIST only. 

While "taking inventory" we found many items in very large quantities— enough to last the 
ordinary Curio Dealer a life- time and in such quantities that we cannot job them off to dealers ex- 
cept at a sacrifice— and rather than give dealers the benefit of the same we prefer and have con- 
cluded to give this benefit to the 1901 subscribers of the Oologist. Those who have paid their sub- 
scription to the OOLOGIST for 1901 or who remit for same when accepting this '•$5.00 for 50cts" offer 
—we will send by express at their expense (we can send prepaid for 25cts.) all of the specimens 
and books listed below for only 50cts. 



Chinese Horn Nut, China $ 05 

Egg of Skate or Sand Shark, Martha's 

Vineyard 05 

Clay Police Whistle, Mexico 10 

Black-Mouth Tree Snail, Pavillion Key, 

Fla 25 

Purple-spined Sea Urchin, Gulf of Mex- 
ico 25 

Organ-pipe Coral, Singapore 25 

Orange Scorpion Shell, Polynesia 25 

Resurrection Plant, Mexico 15 

One-half dozen Alligator Teeth, Indian 

River. Fla 25 

Four Gem Stones (Red Agate, Black 
Onyx. Crocidolite and Sardonyx In- 
taglio) cut and polished 40 

Compass or Sunflower Starfish, Chili... 35 
Fossil Scaphites j (Nautilus Family) 

Montana 25 

Goldmouth Shell, Philippines 25 

Fossil Shark Tooth, Virginia _ 10 



15. Two Tarpon Scales, Florida 05 

16. Fossil Polyp Coral I New York 15 

17. "Electric Stone." a var ofTremoUte 
emitting flashes of light when 
scratched with any hard substance, 
New York... 10 

18. Precious Coral, polished twigs, Med- 
iterranean Sea 15 

19. Banded Murex Shell, Med. Sea _ 15 

20. Money Cowry Shell. Hawaii Iq 

21. Cone-in-Cone, Chautauqua Co. . N. Y.... 1 

22. An Exchange Notice Coupon _ 2 

23. Lattin's"Catalogue of N.A.BirdsEggs" IQ 

24. Short's "Birds of Western New York." I5 

25. Tassin's "Directions for Collecting 
Minerals" 05 

26. A copy of "Penikese" 35 

27. Five assorted Bird, Animal and Flower 
Pictures, my selection, size 6x8 in., 
beautifully colored, true to nature.... 30 

$5 00 

No changes or alterations of any kind can be made in this ofler— you either accept or not as 
you may elect. The offer is no fake nor catch penny scheme but is made as stated and in good 
faith in order that inany may share in the benefit which would otherwise fall to a few, and inci- 
dentally to'increase the Oologist's subscrition list. This premium offer cannot be duplicated for 
double what it costs the 1901 subscribers to the Oologist by any dealer in America— the publish- 
er of the Oologist included— after present supply is exhausted. 

R.£1IIE]^BE^R. 1st. That if your subscription to the Oologist is already paid through 
1901 you get the entire lot of specimens, etc , offered above for only oOcts. But if you wish them 
sent prepaid you must send 35cts additional or 7.5cts. in all. 

1;^ 2d. If you have not subscribed for the Oologist for 1901 and wish to accept this ofler you 
must send 50cts. for Oologist with coupon for 1901 and SOcts. for this ofler or $1.00 and if you want 
the lot sent prepaid add 25cts. more or $1.25 in all. 

3d. This offer is made in connection with a subscription of the Oologist only. The paper 
and premium can be sent to the same or different addresses as desired. In case you wish the pre- 
mium without the Oologist or wish to secure a second premium the price will be $1.00 or $1.25 if 
sent prepaid. 

Remit in most convenient manner. Address plainly and in full. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, ALBION. N. Y. 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 

COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFQRTREECOLLECTING 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (175) 

J. Rowland Nowell, Portman, S. C. 



Buy a Postal Card, 



Write your name and address on back 
and mail to me. 



YOU WILL RECEIVE, 

New Lists of Birds Ej;jrs, Minerals, In- 
dian Relics and all Naturalist's 
Supplies. Ready to mail. 

Address. ERNEST H. SHORT, 

Box 173 Rochester, N. Y. 

(Formerly Albion, N. Y.) 



46 THE OOLOGIST 



ROR ONIaY 

^l.OO 

I WILL SEND YOU THE 

OOLOGIST, 

One year, One Exchange Notice Coupon and $3.00 
worth of anything you may select from the colored 
insert in this month's Oologist. All prepaid for only 
$1.00. 

This offer will hold good till June ist only and will 
then be withdrawn, never to be repeated. Remit in 
most convenient manner and address plainly, 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D., 

Albion. Orleans Co., N. Y. 
REMEMBER that I am closing out everything 
mentioned on this colored insert at one-third rates 
prepaid or at one-fourth rates if sent by Freight or 
Express at purchasers expense. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



47- 



KRANK H IaATTIN, 

ALBION, N. Y , 

Who, some years sinoe. did the larg- 
est mail order business in the specimen 
and supply line in ihe Wurld, is now 
devoting his entire time Mud enery to 
his Profwssiun— but he still has thous- 
ands of dollars locked up in his old 
business and is closing out specimens, 
collectione, etc , at 'unheard of 
prices " New lists have been issued on 
"Books for the Ornithologist," "Scien- 
tific Shells," "Selected Corals, Shells, 
Minerals, Curios, Relic, etc." "Bar- 
rel of Shells," 'Nature Study Collec- 
tion" also a selected lii't of "specimens, 
curios and publications" which are be- 
ing closed out at one-fourth rates. Oth 
er lists are to follow as time will per- 
mit. All arejree tipon request. Write 
tod,^\'<^ 



"You might as well be out of the Bird World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

"THE. OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C- W. Richmond and 
Other Eminent Ornithologists. 

The Ospkev does uot keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poots put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
OsPKEY If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

THE OSPREY COMPXW, 

321-323 4V4 St., Washington, D. C. 









^MS-J^ 






STEVENS FAVORSTE 



G IVE 
THE BOY 

It will teach him to lf::ii an active outdoor life iu 
field and forest. It will give him :i iiractical acquaintance 
with nature. It will encourage practice in shooting, which 
tends to give steadiness of nerve, accuracy of eye. These 
will be valuable qualities in after life, and, above all, it 
^^iU give him health. 

It is an nt'curate rifle, puts every shot just where 
you hold it: is light weight, graceful in outline, a bona tide 
arm in ajjpearance and construetin!!; nnthiug cheap about 
it l.ii; ti',0 price. Made iu thn- ciilibres — 22, .25 aud ..12 



i: 



-Plain Opcr. Sijjlits .«i6.«0 

Target Si«;ht» 8.50 

Kvman Sis.'lits a.OO 



.\> 


k vour dealer for th" ' 


'Fa 


■orite." If he 


doesn't 


kee[ 


it, we will .seud i.venaii 


on 




ml of price. 






<''nd stamp /or our 
■nitaining deacriuHnm, 
'*les, target pistois 

nid pistols, and genera 




on 


'•page catalogue 
■ entire line of 
mhination rifles 




J. STEVENS AKM.«; 


& 


TOOL CO. 




Kox 


2196 ■ 


Ohic 


oppe Falls, 


Mass, 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
qulclily ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confldential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jlinerican. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest dr- 
cnlation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 ■ 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.36tBro.dw.y. New York 

Branch Office. 626 F St.. Washington, X>. C. 



48 



THE OOLOGISl 




THE BEST ILLUSTRATED 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 

It gives the LIFE HISTORIES and FINE 
ILI.USTKA riONsi of 4 or j N. A. BIRDS 
livery nionth. The egg of each is shown FULL 
SIZE. 

It also contains short, irtt "o^tin;; stories about 
birds. 




ONLY 50 CTS. A YEAR. 
SAMPLE COPY FREE. 



syBSGRBBE ^OW. 



CHAS. K. REED, 

Sta. A, WORCESTER, MASS. 



^^Sss 



I 



MEANS 

^IMPERFECTION 



\TlMf:.RlF--LES i 
SINGLE-SHOT RIFLES ] 



WHENAPriLDTO 



AND ALL KINDS Op^ 



m\\\ 



Pronounced by Experts the Standard of the World. 

Ask your dealer for WINCHESTER make of Gun or 

Ammunition and take no other. 

FREE:--Cur new Illustrated Catalogue. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., New Haven, Ct. 



The Oologist 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 4. 



ALBION, N. Y., APRIL, 1901. 



Whole No. 175 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants," "Exctianges" "For Sales," Inserted In tills department 
tor 25c per 2,5 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted In payment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 175 your subscription expires with this issue 
180 " " " •' Sept., '• 

184 •' '■ " " Dec, " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

TMDftRTSIifT Tbii^ April Oologist was Is- 
Ifflr Un 1 tt ni . sued April 15th. The May is- 
sue will be printed on May 1st. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
nfail. 



WANTED.-CoUectors throughout the United 
States and Canada to collect for me scientifl- 
cally birds' eggs in sets, with full data, at 34 
Lattin's catalogue rates. DR. M. T. CLECK- 
LEY, 457 Greene St., Augusta, Ga. 175 

WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

"The one exchange notice I had in The Oolo- 
gist last year was so successful that it kept 
me busy all the year with exchanges." J. 
GORDON, Wigtownshire, Scotland. 

"I take numbers of ornithological and oolo- 
gical journals, but whenever I wish to buy or 
sell anything I turn to the want columns of 
the OOLOOiST. ' ' HARRY h . DUNN, Fullerton, 
Calif. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING.— On 
and after May first I will be ready to supply 
settings of Mongolian Ring Neck Pheasants. 
Settings of 15, price $4. Orders booked now. A. 
W. PERRIOR, 1409 So. Salina St., Syracuse, 
N. Y. 174 

OOLOGISTS WANTED:— Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 1888, and April 
1889, and will give an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 



TO EXCHANGE.— For sets, almost complete 
volumes of Osprey, Nidologist, Museum. Also 
foreign stamps. Write what you want to com- 
plete files. HAROLD M. HOLLAND, Gen. De- 
livery, San Diego, Calif. 

AUKS '94, '95 and '96 and 3 sets, 4 eggs of 
Marsh Hawk to exchange for cash or snap-shot 
camera and outfit. No cheap trash wanted. S. 
J. ADAMS, Cornish, Maine. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE.— Minerals and 
curiosities, old books and newspapers, coin 
sale catalogues, natural science papers and 
magazines. GEO. WALTHER, RushvlUe, 
Yates Co , N. Y. 

WANTED.— A few fresh skins of Prothono- 
tary and Cerulean Warblers. Will take some 
other varieties freshly skinned. I offer eggs in 
sets for same. J. R. MANN, Arlington Heights, 

Mass. 

A FEW first class Texas birds' eggs to ex- 
change for birds' eggs or curios of other states. 
Address ROY WOODWARD Pearsall, Tex. 

EASTMAN folding pocket kodak, S'/s x 3^, 
mandolin, Elgin gold ladies' watch and maga- 
zines to exchange for fire arms of any sort, In- 
dian relics, curios, bird, mammal or snake 
skins, or anything suitable for decorative pur- 
poses. STEPHEN VAN RENSSELAER, JR., 
West Orange. N. J. 

MAGAZINES for exchange: 1 Vol. Antiquar- 
ian, 1 Vol. Archaeologist, 3 Vols. Museum, 1 
Vol. Oregon Naturalist, 2 Vols. Oologist, l Vol. 
N. F. & F. R., and a hundred other natural his- 
tory papers at your own price for coins, shells 
or Indian relics. Write at once. WM. CUD- 
NEY, Gait, Ont , Canada. 

FOR EXCHANGE.— One Bristol steel rod, $3; 
eggs in sets; one Davie's key. .5th edition, new, 
12 25 ; complete file Natural Science News, 82 ; 
twelve back Nos. Osprey, including seven Nos. 
of Vol. one, $2; Vol. three Museum, $1; twenty 
Nos. of Oologist, back of 1896, $1; B-flat cornet. 
$8 ; three-inch T-perches painted white or nat- 
ural finish, 10c each. Will give 50c per 100 in 
exchange for any of the following tobacco tags : 
Star, Good Luck, Hor.-3e Shoe, Master Work- 
man, Standard Navy, Old Honesty, Drummond 
Natural Leaf, Sickle Planet,Cross Bow,Brandy 
Wine, NoDby Spun Roll, Spear Head, Neptune, 
J. T. Win also give 40c per 100 in cash. E. L. 
HALEY, Rangeley, Me. 176 



50 



THE OOLOGIST. 



WANTED:— Al sets Nos. 83, 172, 192, 193, 206, 
210, 228. 258a. 261, S86, 301,302,310.478,486,618, 
701. Can Offer good sets, Belgian Hares, Abys- 
sinian and English Cavies, Fancy Pigeons and 
Pit Games. ALMON E. KIBBE, Mayville, 
N. Y. 175 

WANTED:— Sets of 58, 64, 76, 137, 139, 261, 273, 
337, 339, 373, 387, 388, 390, 393, 394. 501 ■ 611, 614 fand 
others, especially 218, 230. 334, 364. Exchange 
or cash. All answered. A. E. PRICE, Grant 
Park, Ills. 177 

"I think the Oologist is the finest advertis^ 
ing medium in existence." ROY H. BULiLIS, 
Winnebago City, Minn. 

"My ads. in the Oologist always pay me be- 
yond my expectations." A. E. PRICE, Grant 
Park, Ills. 

"Since my ad. appeared in February number 
of Oologist I have received letters from all 
over the country and I could sell or exchange 
100 ssts if I had them." JOHN D. CURRIE, 
Minn. 

FOR SALiE:— Fancy and common Geodes, 
ranging in price from 25c. to $5.00; halfs from 
10c to 50c. Special rates to colleges aad mu- 
seums. H. K. McLELLiAN, Hamilton, Han- 
cock Co., Illinois. 179 

WANTED.— Indian relics and Buffalo robes. 
Will pay cash or make good exchange Noth- 
ing but genuine goods wanted. CHARLES 
BARNUM, Utica, N. Y. 

Wanted.— Bird and mammal skins, eggs, 
Indian relics, minerals, shells, coins, stamps, 
insects. Correspondence solicited. EUGENE 
WOOD, Fishkill, N. Y. 

SPECIAL. NOTICE.— Will collect sets or ser- 
iesof6,77 219,221,261,337, 467, 497 and 614. Look 
over my ads. in March Oologist. Write me at 
once. ROY H. BULLIS, Winnebago City, 
Minn. 

FREE.— Wishing to get statistics regarding 
my Collectors' Tool from different localities, I 
make the following offer : 1st prize, set 428 n-2, 
for the most noteworthy instance of collecting 
with the tool; 2d prize, set 729 1-3, for securing 
eggs furthest out on limb; 3d prize, a year's 
subscription to Oologist, for securing eggs 
highest above collector. Other special instan- 
ces rewarded. Artificially placed eggs not al- 
lowed. Prizes awarded and result announced 
in August. J. R. NO WELL, Anderson, S. C. 

SPRING snaps:— One fine White Pelican 
skin, $4.00; choice fresh Snowy Owl skins, $3.60, 
83 fO; fresh Great Horned Owl skins, $1.75 each; 
fine Wolf skins for rugs, with heads, skulls, 
legs and claws complete. $2.50 each. Mounted 
birds: Sharp-tailed Grouse. $2 50; Ruffed 
Grouse. $2.00: Prairie Hens. $2.25: Pine Gros- 
beaks, 60c: pair N. Hairy Woodpeckers. $1.50, 
on stump; Spruce Grouse, $2.25; A. Bittern, 
$1.50; almost white Snowy Owl, $10 00; a quan- 
tity of Elk teeth, $'5.00 per dozen. All A-1 speci- 
mens, prepaid, at prices quoted. Scalps and 
heads of Moose and Elk for sale. Buffalo horns 
polished at 50c to $1.00 a pair, matched pairs. 
Order from CHRIS. P. FORGE, Taxidermist 
and Collector, Carman, Manitoba. 



COLLECTION of eggs for sale cheap; Ist- 
class eggs: 387 1-6, 511b 1 3, 506 1 2,498 1 3.593 1-4, 
477 1-4, 622 1-4. 736 1 4, 705 1-4; singles: 80,71,65,30, 
128,223; Redstart,end-blown eggs : 121 1-3.211 1-4; 
singles: 488, 27, 416, 201, B13, 703; entire lot for 
$4.25, post-paid. WILL D. WEST, Ocean 
Springs, Miss. 



WANTED.— At once cash or exchange, back 
numbers of any the following: The Oologist, 
published by S. L. Willard, '75 to '80. Vols. I to 
V, Ornithologist and Oologist Vol. VI, 
Canadian Sportsman and Naturalist, Vol. I, 
No. 10; Observer, Vol. I. Nos. 2 and 5; Wilson 
Bulletins, Nos. 1 to 4; The Hummer, Vol. I, No. 
4; Hoosier Naturalist, Vol. Ill, No. 1, and any 
No. after No. 6. FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, 
N. Y. 

EG as TO EXCHANGE.— For others not in 
my collection. A few sets each of following, A. 
O. U. numbers : 201,388,390,412 438,414 456,461 467, 
488 494,495,498,501,507 511,529,540,563.563 581,587,595, 
598,608 613.619.924,629,652 659,674,681 685,687,704,705, 
721, 725, 755, 761. Have also a few sets of better 
kinds, which might possibly exchange. All 
eggs self-collected and prepared, and in finest 
possible condition. Want only A-1, absolutely 
reliable sets preferably New England eggs, in 
exchange. JOHN GATH, Box 2J. Torrington, 
Conn 



FENIKESE 



A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 
famous Summer School. 

A 96 page book of much interest to 
students of Nature, 

Read ^vbat otbers say: 

"Have found it extremely interesting read- 
ing,"— Henry Pbime, Garden City, L. I, 

"I en,ioyed the book [Penikese] very much." 
— W. W. Kinsley (Supt. of Schools) Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 

"It is both instructive and entertaining and 
deserves a place in the library of every student 
of nature."— W. D. Lynn, Canfield, O. 

"I have just finished reading 'Penikese' and 
can say that I have enjoyed it exceedingly. 
Anything looking toward keeping green the 
memory of the great Agassiz should be of in- 
terest to the teacher of biology and no period 
of his life is more interesting than the years 
spent in building up the laboratory on Peni- 
kese."— W. P. Hay (Prof. Biology, HighSchool) 
Washington, D. C. 

"I have read the book [Penikese] with great 
interest and think it an admirable remini- 
scence of one of the greatest naturalists of the 
nineteenth century. The name of Agassiz is 
assuredly treasured by all true lovers of na- 
ture and his methods of study have left a strik- 
ing impress on present-day workers."— (Rev.) 
Robert Blight, Green Lane, Pa. 

Price only 25c (reduced from 35c). 

Prepaid. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r, 
Albion, N. Y. 

THIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



51 



"You might as well be out of the Bird World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

^HR OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration witii Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C. W. Riclimond and 
Other EminentOrnithoSogists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 

f ether. If you don't believe this, read 
'he Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

THE OSPRBY COMPANY, 

321-323 41^ St., Washington, D. C. 

COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREE COLLECTING 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (179) 

J. Rowland Nowell, Portman, S. C. 



50 YEARS» 
lENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jtmcrican. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. I^argest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MllNN4Co.36iBroadway.NewYork 

Branch Office. 626 F St.. Washington, D. C. 



The Condor for igoi. 

This popular Californian, illu.strated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader ! 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests In various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the nesting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1 ; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT$1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also oflers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



Buy a Postal Card, 



Write your name and address on back 
and mail to me. 



YOU WILL RECEIVE, 

New Lists of Birds Eorgs, Minerals, In- 
dian Relics and all Naturalist's 
Supplies. Ready to mail. 

Address. ERNEST H. SHORT, 

Box 173 Rochester, N. Y. 

(Formerly Albion, N. Y.) 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 



-52 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Vol. I, No. I, was issued April 20th. 
It contains 2 full page plates of shells, etc. 





■^>^ "^"'^ 




"FILLS A LONG FELT WANT." Read what the collectors, dealers and publishers have to 
say about the CURIO MONTHLY ; the " A. S. of C. C. " and the A. S. of C. C. Bulletin No. i. 



ABOUT THE CURIO MONTHLY. 

Monroe, Mich., 3-22, '01. 
"Am glad you are going to publish the Curio 
Monthly." Geo. F. Heath, 

Editor and Pub. The Numismatist. 

East Orange, N. .J., 3 30, '01. 
"I wish you all success." 

Arthur Chamberlain, 

Editor Mineral Collector. 



ABOUT THE "A. S. OF C. C. 

Sault St. Marie, Ont , Can., 3-2.5, 1901. 
"Allow me to shake you by the hand for your 
efforts, which have, and shall be, rewarded in 
securing members for the A. S. of C. C. • * You 
are on the right line so keep right at it. And 
you have some grand helpers there in your 
Society. (Rev.) Wm. A. McLaughlin. 

About the A. S. of C. C. BULLETIN, No. I. 

Providence, R. I., 3 25, 1901. 
"Your Bulletin was ALL RIGHT." 

Prof. C. Abbott Davis. 



NOTE— The Bulletin (8 pages) will be sent free to those asking for a copy. 
'T^L C^tt*^\f\ rVI rkri-i-|-»lt/ (16 pages and cover) is only 25c per year to non-mem- 
I nC V>UriO I'lUntniy bersoftheA. S. ofC. C. Membership costs 35c. Free 
use of the Identihcation Bureau, Official Organ, Bulletin, etc. The "Curio'' has the largest number 
of ''exchanges" of any scientific magazine -puhlished in the V. 8. 
SUBSCRIBE NOW—ONLY 25 cts. per year- Send an Ex- notice, 25 words, with your subscription- 
(Advertising rates made known on application.) Address, 

AL.LEN JEISSE KBYNOLvDS, Pub. 

CONNERSVILLE, INDIANA. 







THE BEST ILLUSTRATED 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 

It gives the LIFE HISTORIES and FINE 
ILLUSTRATIONS of 4 or j N. A. BIRDS 
every month. The egg of each is shown FULL 
SIZE. 

It also contains short, interesting stories about 
birds. 




ONLY 50 CTS. A YEAR. 
SAMPLE COPY FREE. 



SUBSCRIBE ^OW. 



CHAS. K. REED, 

Sta. A, WORCESTE.R. MASS. 



The OoLOGiST. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 4. 



ALBION. N. Y., APRIL. 1901. 



Whole No. 175 



Who Is An Oologist? 

That is a question often asked with- 
out being properly answered. The ue- 
ual reply is: "He is an egg collector." 
In part such an answer is correct, but 
only in part, and it is not a very just 
description, for one may be an egg col- 
lector without being an oologist, and 
one may even, at this period of camera 
perfection and enlightened methods of 
bird study, be an oologist without being 
an egg collector. 

Hence, it is evident that for the sake 
of classification, it is not untimely to ask 
the question: Who is an oologist? And 
it may be of advantage to consider the 
subject carefully, with a view of finding 
a comprehensive answer to the ques- 
tion. 

Firstly, then, let us inquire whether 
an egg collector is an oologist and if 
there is not some further requirement 
than that of being an egg collector in 
order that he may correctly be called an 
"oologist." 

Ornithology is a science and oology is 
a branch of ornithology, and a science. 
An oologist is a scientist, for his object 
in pursuing the investigation of oology 
is to increase the koowledge of the sub- 
ject; to add to science, or to add to his 
own knowledge. In ordei to do this, 
that he may have specimens for use in 
studying the various types and varia- 
tions, colors and patterns, he collects 
birds' eggs, and he is, perhaps, justified 
in collecting, for his purpose is a good 
one. 

But there are persons who collect 
birds' eggs merely for the whim of col- 
lecting, after the manner of the small 
boy who collects tobacco tags, without 
any higher aim than just to possess a 
big collection or as a paslime. Are such 



persons "oologists?" Assuredly not, 
but they are often times honored with 
the name. They really belong in the 
same category with the small boy. Then, 
why should they be called oologists? 
There is no reason why they should, for 
they have no claim to the name. 

Further, we will ask: Is an oologist 
as3ienlisl? Most assuredly so, yet he 
may not wish to add to science any fur- 
ther than the increasing of his own in- 
formation; but that does not wholly bar 
him from being a scientist. Of course, 
he would have a clearer title if he were 
liberal with the facts he gleans in his 
investigations and observations. Yet if 
he is the right kind of oologist, the kind 
that collects eggs for the purpose of 
study, he may justly be called a scient- 
ist. And if he is, shall he not have an 
exclusive name? That is just the point. 

The name "oologist" is too often mis- 
applied. It is applied to shield the in- 
discriminate collecting of the small boy, 
the wanton collecting of the mere egg 
collector, and those persons whose only 
object is to own a collection. 

So it see^ns well to separate and class- 
ify 6gg collectors into three classes for 
the convenience of reference: 

Oologists, 1st. class. Such persons as 
collect eggs for the purpose of study, 
for the increase of knowledge as to the 
contour, coloration, measurement, var- 
iation of birds' eggs; the advancement 
of information respecting the nesting 
habits of birds, their manner of nest 
building, the effect of food and special 
environment upon the color of eggs; the 
length of time between the depositing 
of each egg of a set; the resemblance of 
sets of eggs taken from same pairs of 
birds in consecutive years; length of in- 
cubation, and any other facts of value. 

Oologists, 2d class. Such persons as 



54 



THE OOLOGIST. 



investigate and observe along the lines 
mentioned, but vpho do not believe in 
flgg collecting; who, with aid of camera 
and note book, observe facts and study 
the coloration of eggs, manner of nest- 
ing, etc., without disturbing nests or 
eggs- 

Egg collectors, 3d class. (Not oolo- 
gists at all,) who collect eggs merely to 
be collectmg; amass collections, merely 
to be amassing; whose insatiate yearn- 
ing is to add and add without any just 
motive, without any beneficial end. 
This class includes the small boy who, 
ignorant of the harm he does, collects 
indiscriminately; but not the small boy 
with a real desire to study and who col- 
lects sparingly and makes good use of 
the little he collects. 

With the present wave of bird protec- 
tion sweeping the country and the war 
justly waged by the Audubon society 
being carried forcibly on, there is no 
reason why this 3d class of so called 
oologists{but who are really not oologists 
at all, but simply egg collectors) should 
not be harshly dealt with. It would 
simply help real oology and tend to 
draw the distinction which is needed 
between the collecting for scientific rea- 
sons by oologists, and the collecting for 
the sake of collecting by mere egg col- 
lectors. 

John W. Daniel, Jr., 

Washington, D. C. 



Two Odd Sets. 

The American Crow in Knox County, 
Illinois, is an abundant bird, as it is 
throughout the Illinois corn belt. Ev- 
ery available timber or grove has its 
occupants during breeding spason in 
accordance witb the favorable growth 
of the trees and the location. I do not 
think that these birds return to the 
same timber or grove year after year, 
although undoubtedly may be found in 



the same neighborhood of former nest- 
ing sites. From my observation, how- 
ever, the second laying has invariably 
been found to be close by the site of the 
first nest, unless in very exceptional 
cases. This peculiarity makes it possi- 
ble, although not probable, that two 
separate pairs of birds laid very excep- 
tionally colored eggs in the same season 
and only a few miles apart. 

There were collected on March 31, 
1894 a set of five eggs of the American 
Crow which have a distinct ground 
color of light brown, showing not a 
sign of bluish greeo, spotted quite gen- 
erally with small dots of black more 
abundant around the large end, and an 
occasional dot which might tinge on 
purple. One egg is marked thickly 
with around the small end, and all the 
eggs are uciform and of the average 
size. The bird flew off its nest on ap- 
proach but remained nearby. The 
nest was typical of the Crow and was 
placed in a triple crotch of an oak tree 
in thick timber forty feet fiom tie 
ground. 

Some two weeks later another col- 
lector found a set of four in a timber 
four miles to the south. The markings 
on these eggs were more blotched and 
decidedly more purple in color, dis- 
tinctly brown in shade but lighter than 
the former set and eggs average, a trifle 
larger. Nest construction was almost 
the same, but the second nest was situ- 
ated nearer to the ground. A visit to 
the site of the former nest indicated no 
cause for a change. I looked thorough- 
ly for a second nest but without result, 
and I concluded both sets were from 
the same birds. These two sets are the 
only ones with the peculiar ground 
color which have come to my notice in 
that locality or elsewhere. Unmarked 
eggs and eggs widely differing in size 
and coloration are, however, frequently 
found. H. M Holland, 

San Diego, Cal. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



59 



Gleanings from My Note Book. 

{Continued from last issue.) 

April 18— Barn Swallows arrived 
here today— 8 of them. Yesterday I 
noted Flickers for the first time. About 
50 Gulls arrived this morning. 

April 22. — It rained last night so I 
left my ''bike" at home and went over 
my 15 miles of Hawk route afoot. An- 
other climb to the Red-tail's nest re- 
vealed but two eggs so I put them in 
my pockets and came down jab by jab, 
to the tune' of a pair of angry Hawks' 
screams. While packing the eggs I 
was surrounded by a band of Ruby- 
crowned Kingkts, who were being en- 
tertained by a lot of Chickadees. Just 
as I left the woods I heard the llute-like 
voice of the Wilson's Thrush. The 
second Red tail was near the nest but it 
was empty and in fact she did not use 
it nor could I locate her nest anywhere 
else. From here I crossed over the 
hills to the valley of Potter Swamp, 
where bird life differs from any other 
valley because of so many Woodpeck- 
ers. Here there are hundreds of old 
stubs bordering the woods so that no 
doubt this is the reason of their abund- 
ance. Nine miles south in my valley, 
or rather, the first one east of Potter 
valley, I seldom see a Red-headed 
Woodpecker, but in Potter valley they 
are very common, as are the Red- 
bellied, Yellow-bellied, Hairy and 
Downy Woodpeckers. From here I 
turn homeward, deciding to follow the 
crest of the hills, but it was a long nine 
mile tramp through birdless fields and 
woods. In the valleys the air resounds 
with noisy Flickers, sweet carolings of 
Vesper Sparrows and other common 
birds, all in abundance but the hills are 
yet dreary and barren of bird life. As 
I neared home I struck for the valleys, 
crossing several ravines, in which I 
heard Louisiana Water Thrushes in 
nearly full song. 

April 24. — After a short supper and a 



still shorter cup of coffee, I pushed my 
wheel up hill for 2 miles to visit a nest 
of Red-shouldered Hawk. I found her 
at home but she had laid but two eggs 
so I left them. This is a late date for 
this pair to be nesting as I have always 
taken her full sets by April 12. Later 
comparison with 5 sets that I had taken 
out of these woods, which show the 
same type, prove that this is a new fe- 
male, which probably accounts for the 
latef nesting. Spotted Sandpipers ar- 
rived last night, and Towhees yester- 
day. 

April 26.— At 6:30 p. m. I rode my 
wheel 2 miles and called on a pair of 
Red-tailed Hawks and although the fe- 
male looked strong and healthy, and 
had a vociferous voice, yet she had 
only exerted herself to lay one egg — 
and that's all she did lay — so I left it, 
65 feet up in a big onk, to tho tender 
mercies of a group of Crows that were 
amusing themselves with these Hawks. 
On my way over I saw a Pied-billed 
Grebe dabbling in the creek, while 
overhead a solitary Duck was winging 
his way northward. After dark I^heard 
a Wilson's Snipe's "heavenly music" as 
he zigzagged about over the swamp, 
which was rudely interrupted by a 
startled Green Heron who emptied the 
contents of his voice upon the air. 

April 28.— Four "Bluebills" (Lesser 
Scaup Ducks) were shot on the lake 
yesterday. This morning at 5 a. m. I 
found a new pair of Red-shouldered 
Hawks, nesting in a swampy woods 
near town. The female left the nest as 
I was passing by, and put up a "holler" 
fur the male who "cackled" his delight 
at seeing me take his 3 eggs, which 
were slightly incubated. The nest was 
an old one, 50 feet up in a big beech 
tree, and was lined with the ever pres- 
ent branches of evergreen, dead leaves, 
pieces of bark, and all being beautifully 
flecked with fluttering downy feathers 
from breast of Hawk. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



This evening I visited a nest of Red- 
shouldered Hawk about 2 miles away. 
I had lost track of this pair for 3 or 4 
years, but at last they had come back 
to their old home, 50 feet up in a shag 
bark hickory tree. She left the nest 
slowly and without any fear, while I 
also climbed to the nest slowly without 
any fear, but judging by the amount of 
bark at the base of the tree, when I got 
down, there could not have been very 
much left on it. However I felt repaid 
for my lacerated trousers — and feelings 
— for I brought down a set of 4 eggs. 
About one mile away I called on an- 
other old nest, but the Hawks were not 
there so I crossed a field to another 
swampy woods, where I found her sit- 
ting on 3 eggs slightly incubated. The 
nest was just 40 feet, 5 inches up in a 
nearly dead birch tree, and was an old 
nest relined with bark strips, pieces of 
bark, and decorated with downy feath- 
ers. As I coasted homeward I heard 
many Wilson's Thrushes and I remark- 
ed that it is noticeable how they seem 
to be common on the hills but never 
heard as yet in the valley woods. 

April 29. — My trip today was over my 
main Red-shouldered Hawk route. It 
was a beautiful day— quite hot in the 
sun, but rather chilly in the shade. 
Leaving home at 6 a. m. I tramped 
nearly 6 miles, visiting two orchards 
before I found B. lineatus at home. 
This nest was just 27 feet up in birch 
tree, in woods on hillside. When the 
sitting female saw me approaching she 
put up a "boiler" and half standing 
over the eggs she kept uttering cry 
after cry, and I soon found the reason 
for her fear for nestled in the lin- 
ing of pine sprigs, bark strips, grass 
and moss were 4 large beautiful eggs. 
She only flew into near by trees— her 
"cries" soon calling the male, but he 
was very moderate. It is noticeable 
that the males' cries are more of a.cackle 
than the females'. He must have been 
far away for it took him about three 



minutes to respond to the female's cry 
for assistance. 

I next visited a small woods down in 
the valley where 1 collected a set of 4 
last year, but this time I did not get a 
smell although a male's actions led me 
to believe that he had a nest near by, 
but I found a pair of Crows nesticg in 
same tree — their nest being placed 
about 10 feet under the Hawk's old 
nest. 

Continuing on up the west slope I 
visited three old nests but found the 
woods Hawkless. Returning to the 
east slope I found that a pair of Red- 
shouldered Hawks had fitted up an old 
Crow's nest in a dry thin strip of 
woods. The nest was about 50 feet up 
in a big maple tree and was lined with 
chunks of bark, pine sprigs, moss, and 
stuccoed with white downy feathers 
that fluttered like so many tiny flags. 
The distribution of these Hawks in my 
section varies every year. Some years 
they are abundant, then other years 
are not near so common. I visited in 
all 10 nests in as many woods and only 
found two sets of four eggs. Several 
years I have taken as many as seven 
sets over this route. 

April 30. — This evening I took a walk 
in near by woods jutt for pleasure, lit- 
tle expecting to take anything. 1 was 
therefore somewhat surprised to flush 
a Red-tailed Hawk out of a piae tree 
and a nest where I took a set of Crow's 
eggs last year. She had fixed the nest 
over with pine branches, bag strings, 
bark strips, grass and hen feathers. 
On the rim lay an old nest of Red-eyed 
Vireo. I have been acquainted with 
this pair of Red-tails for five years and 
have found them very changeable in 
regard to nesting. Some years they 
take up their abode in woods border- 
ing a big ravine across the valley where 
they have two nests about one-half 
mile apart. Again they come oyer to 
the west slope where they also have 



THE OOLOGIST. 



61 



two nesis that they jijenerally fix up be- 
fore deciding which one to use. 

Red-shouldered Hawks frequently 
adorn two nests before using either, 
and one pair that I know of fixed up 
three nests and then left me to guess 
where they finally nested. 

C. F. Stone, 
Branchport. N. Y, 
( To he continued. \ 



The Red-tailed Hawk in 
Illinois. 



Central 



By far the most common all-the-year- 
round Hawk in this section of the coun- 
try. Iq the early Spring and in the 
Autumn this species may be seen by 
anyone that is in the least observant of 
nature and her doings, hovering in 
varying numbers over stubble-fields 
and meadows, and in the Winter sea- 
son sailing across cornfields in search 
of its "daily bread," which consists 
principally of mice and rabbits with an 
occasional small bird by way of a desert 
and on comparatively rare occasions 
the barnyard will be invaded and an 
unlucky chicken or duck carried away 
for a "Sunday dinner." 

Or during these same seasons if he is 
not out looking for a dinner he will be 
seen sitting quietly in a cottonwood 
tree by the roadside, where he is ever 
on the alert and "scents danger afar" 
as anyone carrying a gun who has tried 
to get in shooting range of him can 
testify. 

Sometimes, however, if you are in a 
buggy you can approach very near the 
tree before he takes flight, and occas- 
ionally he will even be so trustful (when 
you do not happen to have a "conceal- 
ed weapon") as to allow you to drive 
by, within maybe 30 feet of the tree, 
without appearing to notice vou. 
^During the nesting season and the 
time of rearing the young they con- 
fine themselves more exclusively to the 
timber. 



More of this species are killed by the 
farmers and hunters in this locality 
than of all other species of Hawks com- 
bined: because in the first place they 
are probably as numerous as all other 
resident species combined, and second- 
ly and more important they are more 
inclined to get away from the woods in 
search of food, and this "coming out of 
the woods" as it were makes them more 
conspicuous and thus a target for the 
shotgun. 

Their nesting begins early in the 
springtime, their first sets usually be- 
ing completed between the 15th and 
35th of March. Only one set is laid in 
a season unless the first is destroyed, 
when a second set will be laid and if 
that too be destroyed a third and even 
possibly a fourth may sometimes be 
laid under similar circumstances. 
However I have never taken more than 
three sets from the same pair in one 
season. When more than one set is 
laid I have found the interval between 
sets to average about 23 days. My ex- 
perience has been that sets of two and 
three are about equally numerous. 

For their nesting site they almost in- 
variably choose one of the tallest trees 
if not the tallest tree in any particular 
piece of timber, and usually the most 
inaccessible possible position on the 
upper and outer branches of the tree is 
where the nest will be found, although 
the position in the tree or rather the 
distance from the trunk of the tree will, 
vary more than the height of the nest in 
the tree or the height of the tree. The 
general height of the nests in this coun- 
ty (Champaign) is from 69 to 110 feet, 
with perhaps an average of 80 to 85 
feet. Of course an occasional nest will 
be found on either side of the above 
limi s. 

There sesms to to no preference 
shown for at)y particular species or 
variety of tree. The only question on 
this subject that seems to interest them 
is, "Is it aiaZZtree'?" And if this can 



THE OOLOGIST. 



be answered in the affirmative that tree 
is as likely to be chosen for a nesting 
site as any other tree of the same height 
whatever the species. 

Contrary to what seems to be the rule 
in some sections of the country, they, 
in this locality, rarely occupy the same 
nest more than one season, an entirely 
new one (usually not far from the old 
one) being constructed each year, or 
two, three or four in a year if that num- 
ber of sets are laid. 

After incubation has begun they are,, 
as a rule, very close sitters, refusing to 
leave the nest till you are under the tree 
and sometimes not until you have rap- 
ped repeatedly on the trunk of the tree 
or thrown several clubs among the 
limbs. I recall one instance in which 
I failed to dislodge the female from her 
nest by even these proceedings, al- 
though I rapped heavily and repeated- 
ly on the tree trunk and threw clubs 
until my arms were tired, several of 
the clubs going very close to her. She 
stuck to her nest till my climber was 
within 20 feet of her before she took 
flight. 

Almost without exception the sets 
from a pair of birds show a marked in- 
dividuality as to the number of eges in 
a set, siz9, shape and ground color of 
the individual eggs, and color or colors 
and degree and intensity of the mark- 
ings. My experience has suggested to 
me that the plain or very slightly 
marked sets are laid by young females, 
^d that as the age of the female in- 
creases the degree and intensity of the 
shell markings increase till the limit 
for that particular female is reached. 

Have any of my readers made obser 
vations upon this point? If so, did the 
degree and intensity of the markings 
increase with the age of the bird up to 
a certain limit, or did it nof} 

What is more exhilerating and enj 3y- 
able than a drive to the country and a 
tramp through the woods in the middle 
of the Red-tailed Hawk season (April 



1st to 15th) a time when all nature is 
just beginning to put forth the buds of 
a new life? What more interesting 
than to watch a Red-tailed Hawk sail- 
ing, floating back and forth across a 
field, now moving swiftly for a few 
paces as though borne by a brisk breeze 
and again hovering for moments above 
a spot as though caught in a dead calm 
and all the while with scarcely a visible 
movement of those majastic sails? 
What will more tend to draw one's 
thoughts from the things of earth and 
to direct his mihd to that great home 
above to which all mankind should as- 
pire, to impress upon him the great 
wisdom and goodness of his Creator, 
than to watch a Red-tailed Hawk when 
he takes upon himself the role of a Sky- 
lark and soars, at first in broad and 
sweeping circles, each one a little high- 
er than the preceding, and then in 
gradually narrowing zones, but ever 
"onward and ujnvard" till he is a mere 
speck outlined against the blue sky and 
then at last the eye can follow him no 
more and he disappears from view as 
though the very gates of Heaven had 
opened and allowed him to enter in? 
R. L. Jessee, M. D., 
Philo, 111. 



dueer Nesting-. 

In the December Oologist I notice 
that A. G. Prill of Scio, Oregon, men- 
tions finding "a nest of the Mountain 
Partridge containing 11 eggs of this bird 
and 9 eggs of the Riag Pheasant." 

He says that this is the first time that 
such an occurrence has come under his 
observation, and that the Partridge was 
sitting on the eggs and the Ring Pheas- 
ant was not about. 

I do not wish to make any corrections 
to Ur. Prill's notes, but simply wish to 
add a few words, as I have had some 
experience aloag the same line. 

I have found the eggs of the Ring 
Pheasant in other bird's nests at least a 



THE OOLOGIST. 



6S 



score of times and ii every case the 
Pheasant left and the other bird did 
the incubating. 

Have often found from one to eight 
(usually three or four) of their eggs in 
the nests of the Mountain Partridge, 
Oregon Ruffed Grouse and the Sooty 
Grouse and even ia the nests of domes- 
tic hens. Have found nests which con- 
tained eggs of the Ring Pheasant, 
Sooty Grouse and Mountain Partridge. 
Each time the Sooty Grouse was incu- 
bating all the eggs. I have also found 
nests containing eggs of the Ring Pheas- 
ant, Mountain Partridge and Oregon 
Ruffed Grouse, the latter doing the in- 
cubating. 

A friend of mine informs me that he 
found a nest which contained 6 eggs of 
the Ring Pheasant, 6 Sooty Grouse, 4 
Oregon Ruffad Grouse and 3 Mountain 
Partridge eggs and t ie Sooty Grouse 
was sitting on the eggs. 

As to what would become of the 
young hatched from such a "mix up" 
as this I can't say; but I know of one 
case, two or three years since, o' a 
Sooty Grouse hatchirg five young 
Grouse and three youag Ring Pheas- 
ants. She soon took them all to a 
wheat-field where I oltea saw tham. 
As soon as they were o'd enough to fly 
the Grouse mother would, when dis- 
turbed, fly up into an old dead fir tree 
and call and the young would all fol- 
low her, Grouse and Pheasants alike. 
Two of tho Pheasants were male^ and 
it was a rare sight to see them, with 
their long tails, sitting up on the iimbs 
of an old dead fir tree, with the Grouse. 
Ellis P. Hadley, 
Dayton, Oregon. 



INDIAN BASKETS, Indian 
Beaded Buckskin Sioux Relics 
j Indian Photos, Indian Pottery- 
Indian Weapons. Elk Teeth, Mex- 
ican Hand Carved Leather Goods 
Mexican Drawn Linens, Shells, Minerals, Fos 
sils. Ancient ^tone Relics, Oregon Tiny Arrow 
heads. Fossil Fishes, Fossil Leaves, Corals 
Agate Jewelry, Curios. Wholesale and Retail 
16th year. Two-story building full. New cat. 
No. 10, 40 pages, finely lllus., for 5c. L.W.STIL 
WELL. Deadwood. S. Dak. 




Books 



FOR THE 



Ornithologist 



On the four center pages of this 
month's Oologist I offer a goodly 
list of books, etc., devoted to mat- 
ters ornithologically. All are pre- 
paid at prices quoted. 

At date of going to press, (April 

15th) the following titles have been 

sold: 

BOOKS. 

Architecture of Birds. 
Beckstein, Cage Birds (95c copy.) 
Cassin. Birds, China and Japan. 
Coues, Field Ornithology (Salem.) 
Gentry, Life Hi-tories of Birds of Pa. 
Jardine, Birds of Prey. 
St. John, Life of Audubon. 
Studer's Birds of North America. 

And the titles by the following authors, viz: 
Atkinson, Barrows. Bigland, Cooper, Elliott, 
Murdock, Raine, Scott, Townseni, and White- 
head 

PAMPHLETS, EXCERPTS. ETC. 

Titles by the following authors : 

Bendire. Brewster. Cantwell, Cooke, Coues, 
Coues & Prentiss, Knight, McChesney, Ridg- 
way, Palmen, Palmer. 

REMEMBER^ 

An order for books 
amounting to $1.00 
or over entitles you to 
the OoLOGis r for i go i . 

Always address plainly 

FRANK H, LATTIN, M, D„ 

Albion, Orleans Connty, N. I. 



61 



THE OOLOGISl 



A Big Dollar Offer 

BIRDS AND NATURE Six Months, 3.90 
50 PICTURES IN COLORS, 2c l.OO 



BOTH FOR ONLY ^1.00. 



Nature 



In order to secure a good many new subscribers to Diviflf 

1 DllUf 



I offer a six months' trial subscription and 50 col- 
ored pictures for only ^i.oo. Any other pictures 
may be substituted from my list of 408. 

"Birds and Nature" is the only periodical in the world illustrated 
each month by 8 full page plates of birds, animals, plants, etc., in colors 
true to nature. The plates are 8x10 inches, suitable for framing. 

You can't afford to miss this offer: "Birds and Nature" 6 months 

and the following 50 beautiful pictures for $1.00. Order now. 



Osprey. ^ 

Sora Kail. 
Kentucky Warbler. 
Red-breasted Merganser. 
Yellow Legs. 
Skylark. 

VI ilson's Phalarope. 
Evening Grosbeak. 
Turkey Vulture. 
Gambel's Partridge 
Summer Yellow Bird. 
Hermit Thrush 
Song Sparrow 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo. 
Ruby-throated Humming Bd 
House Wren. 
Phoebe. 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet. 
Mourning Dove. 
White-breasted Nuthatch. 
Blackburniaa Warbler. 
Gold Finch. 
Chimney Swift. 
HornedLark. 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. 



96 Warbling Vireo. 

97 Wood Pewee 

98 Snow Bunting. 

99 Junco. 

100 Kingbird. 

101 Summer Tanager. 

102 White-fronted Goose. 

103 Turnstone. 

104 Belt d Piping Plover. 

105 Wild Turkey. 

106 Cerulean Warbler. 

107 Yellow-billed Tropic Bird. 

108 European Kingfisher. 

109 Vermilion Flycatcher. 

110 Lazuli Bunting. 

1 1 1 Mountain Blue Bird. 

112 English Sparrow. 

113 Allen's Humming Bird. 

114 Green-winged Teal. 
11.5 Black Grouse. 

116 Flamingo. 

117 Verdin. 

118 Bronzed Grrckle. 

119 Ring-necked Pheasant. 

120 Yellow-breasted Chat. 



"I enclose check for $5.40 for which kindly send "Birds and Nature" for 1901, in- 
cludingr back numbers '97, '98, '99, 1900." 

Greencastle, lad., March 6t,h, 1901. I. B. DeMotte. 

"Eaclosed find check for $9.60, for which you will please send me the four 
double volumes of "Birds and Nature;" also subscription for one year " 

Covington, Ky , March 8 h, 1901. Chas. G. Pieck, M. D. 

"Having been a close ohsprver of birds all my life, and being perfectly familiar 
wi'^h most of the bird* of Michijjan, I will say without hesitation that the books 
entitled " Bird^ and Nature" are wiihout exception the tioest works kuown to me 
on that feubj'ict. The plates are excellent and the descriptions accurate, and I 
would hereby recommend the work t ' any and all persons desiring to gain a 
knowledge of one of th'* most interesting of all studies, viz , ornithology. The 
price of the work places it within the reach of all who may be interested in that line." 
Ypsilanti, Mich., March Sd, 1901. Dr. John VanFossen. 

A. W. MUMFORD, PUBLISHER, 
203 MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILL. 



The Oologist 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 5. 



ALBION, N. Y., MAY, 190L 



Whole No. 176 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exchanges" "For Sales," Inserted In this department 
for 25c per 25 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted tn payment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
■win expire. 

No. 176 your subscription expires with this issue 
180 " " " " Sept., '• 

184 •' '• " " Dec, " 

190 " " " " June, 1902 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 



IMPART SIIT This May Oologist was is- 
IJUruniAni. sued May Sd. The June is- 
sue will be printed on May 25th. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
mail. 

COLUMBIAN CHAINLESS. 1901 model. If 
you waat a bargain, part cash Tand part eggs, 
write me at once. Cheaper wheels too. BEN- 
JAMIN HOAG, Stephentown, New York. 

TO EXCHANGE.— Birds Eggs, Minerals, 
Books, Magazines and Autographs for Thor- 
oughbred Poultry or Eggs, Pet Birds, Auto- 
graphs and Sea Curios. F. O. NELSON, Me- 
ridian, Ada Co. , Idado. 

FOR SALE CHEAP.— A 850.00 No 15 32 35 
Maynard target rifle with case and reloading 
tools, or exchange for desirable eggs in sets. 
E. J. DARLINGTON, Wilmington, Del. 

YOU WILL WISH for Nowell's Col- 
lectors' Tool while In the woods this spring. 
Don't reproach yourself after it Is too late- 
order one now. J. R. NOWELL, Anderson, S.C. 

TO EXCHANGE.— Al Skins of New York 
birds for those of other localities. Any person 
sending $1.00 for subscription to Recreation 
will receive four prize bird photos (from life). 
GEO. C. EMBODY, Hamilton, N. Y. 

DON'T FAIL to try my new Egg Drills. You 
want them now. Your money back if not O. 
K. 4 selected sizes $1.00. Sample small size 
25c. They cut the lining. Every mail brings 
me letters speaking in highest praise of their 
work. BENJAMIN HOAG, Stephentown, New 
York. 



FOR SALE.— Homing Pigeons, one dollar 
per pair. The birds are all from .=500 mile a day 
bird imported from New York. Parties should 
address LENS FARM, Pioneer, Iowa. 

WANTED.— Sets of Hummers with nests. 
Loon, Osprey, Broad-wing, Sharp-shinned 
Hawk, Great-crested Flycatcher and many oth- 
ers. Lots of exchange in Books, Periodicals, 
Tools. Supplies, anything I sell or cash. BEN- 
JAMIN HOAG, Stephentown. New York. 

WANTED to buy for cash.— Rare singles of 
all birds eggs from No. 1 to 380 and fine, 
perfect sets of eggs from 380 to 768, also rare 
small skins. Must be cheap for spot cash. De- 
sired only for private collection. K. B. 
MATHES. 154 Ellicott St.. Buffalo. N. Y. 

EXCHANGE.— Stevens 44 cal. "Premier" 
Rifle. 50 everlasting shells, tools for smaller 
cal. 25 or 32. Colt 41 cal. Pocket Revolver. Ban- 
jo, tags for Colt or S. & W. Revolver 32 cal. 
F. H. RICKER. Box 38. Lisbon. Me. 

BOTANICAL SPECIMENS for sale; or ex- 
change for southern, western or Canadian spe- 
cies. Also a Yellow Rail skin to exchange for 
best offer In birds eggs. THOS. A. BONSER, 
Carey. Ohio. 

COLLECTORS ATTENTION !— Have you 
seen my water blower for 1901? The finest 
thing for eggs to date. For sale or exchange 
for sets at H list price. M. J. CONWAY, 584 
6th Ave., Lanslngburg. N. Y. 

TO EXCHANGE with western collectors, one 
pair heavy climbers, to be shipped from near 
Kansas City, with or without straps Can use 
sets or singles of 29, 53. 74. 77. 125, 140. 212, 214, 
819. 221. ;61. 278. 293a. S92. 294. S97a, 305, 325, 331, 
339b, 342. 362, .S73c 397. 399. 408, 429, 430, 431, 452, 
546, 552. 554b, 561, 601, 611. 612. 616. any Shrike, 
VIreo, Warbler oj Chickadee. 758. 746. 742, 743a. 
Address ERNEST H. SHORT, Box 173, Roch- 
ester. N. Y. 

FREE.— Wishing to get statistics regarding 
my Collectors' Tool from different localities, I 
make the following offer : 1st prize, set 428 n-2, 
for the most noteworthy instance of collecting 
with the tool; 2d prize, set 729 1-3, for securing 
eggs furthest out on limb; 3d prize, a year's 
subscription to Oologist, for securing eggs 
highest above collector. Other special Instan- 
ces rewarded. Artificially placed eggs not al- 
lowed. Prizes awarded and result announced 
in August. J. R. NOWELL, Anderson, S. C. 



66 



THE OOLOGIST. 



WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocitles, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

WANTED:— Sets of 58, 64, 76, 137, 139, 261, 273, 
337, 339, 373, 387, 388, 390, 393, 394, 501- 611. 614 [and 
others, especially 218, 230. 334, 364. Exchange 
or cash. All answered. A. E. PRICE, Grant 
Park, Ills. 177 

FOR SALE:— Fancy and common Geodes, 
ranging in price from 25c. to $5.00; halfs from 
10c to 50c. Special rates to colleges and mu- 
seums. H. K. McLELLAN, Hamilton, Han- 
cock Co. , Illinois. 179 

OOLOGISTS WANTED:— Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 1888, and April 
1889, and will give an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N, Y. 

WILL, COLLECT unusually fine sets this 
spring at ^ cat. rates for cash. Datas will be 
models. Get list of possible takes. "First 
come, first serve." J. R. NOWELL, Anderson, 
S. C. 

FOR SALE.— 1 Timber Wolf skin for mount- 
ing with skull and leg bones, $10.00; 1 pure 
white Snowy Owl mounted, $10.00; 1 Almost 
White, $7.00; 1 Great Horned Owl (subarticus) 
$3.00; Saw-whet Owl, $1.00; Sharp-tailed 
Grouse, $2.00; Canada Ruffed Grouse, $2.00; 
Prairie Hen, $2 00; Spruce Grouse, $2.00; Amer- 
ican Bittern, $1.50; 3 Cow Moose heads un- 
mounted, skull and scalp, $6 00 each; Doe Elk, 
13.50. All goods prepaid by mail or express. 
Will send C. O. D. if desired. CHRIS P. 
FORGE, Taxidermist, Carman, Manitoba. 

WANTED.— Any complete volume of O. & O., 
Oologist previous to '95, Auk, and Recreation 
previous to '97, also Recreation Jan. and Feb. 
1900; Osprey Vol. I, Nos. 2, 4, 6 and 11-18; Nid- 
ologist Vol. I, Nos. 2, 4 and 6; Feather, Vol. I, 
Nos. 1 and 2; Iowa Ornithologist Vol, I, No, 1 ; 
Vol. IV, No. 4; Oregon Naturalist, Vol I, Nos. 
2, 3 and 4; Ornithologist (England) Vol. I, No. 
6; Popular Science News, Vol. XXXII, No. 12; 
American Osprey, Vol. I, Nos. 1 to 7 inclusive; 
Bittern (1900) Vol. I, No. 3; Midland Monthly 
June and August, '97; Western Ornithologist, 
Vol. I, No. 3; Oologist, July, '88; and many 
others. Send full list. 

Will give in exchange for same hundreds of 
duplicate natural history magazines (many 
complete volumes), about 60 first class sets 
with datas, 150 singles, stamps, ancient Indian 
relics, Western bird skins, a few curios and a 
number of old medical books. Write at once. 
All answered. ALBERT F. GANIER, Bow- 
mar Aye., Vicksburg, Miss. 

FOR EXCHANGE.— 1 2 5. 3 2-6. 4 3-7, 6 1-7, 
16 2-1, 63 1-3, 70 13-3, 77 1-3, 80 3-4, 106 5-1, 12a 1-4, 
130 1-9, 141 2-9, 142 1-10, 143 1-6.184 2-3,1912 4, 
194 1-4, 199 1-3. 202 2-4.211 1-8, 313 1-10, 239b 1-15, 
390 1 7. 477 1-5, 488 1-5, 2 4, 488a 1-4, 497 1-4, 511b 1-5, 
540 1-3, 560 2-4, EneliSh Sparrow 2-5, f61 3-4 
563 1-4, 1-6. 581 4-5, 593c 1-4, 595 1-4, 613 1-4, 622 1-7, 
628a 1-5, 683 1-4, 704 1-4. 705 4-5, 719b 1-6. 721b 1-6, 
725 1-4, 2-6, 735 1-7, 761 1-4, 375d 4 2, 481b 2-3. 448 
6-5, 1-4, 519 20-5, 7132-4, 3-5, 710a 4 3, and many 
others. I want to trade these sets for full sets 
of Limicolae or Raptores or for ornithologlcai 
publications. For good full sets of Raptoi-es— 
any species— I will allow 25 per cent, over cata- 
logne rates. Taylor's list must be basis of ex- 
change. H. H. DUNN, Fullerton, Calif. 



WANTED.— May number, 1888, Vol. XXII, 
American Naturalist. WILLIAM BREW- 
STER, Cambridge, Mass. 

WANTED for cash or exchange.— Eggs of 
Golden Eagle, American Flamingo, Limpkin, 
Wilson's Snipe and many others. I have on 
hand these, 59, 202. 221, 226 fine series. 258a 5-4 
very fine, 289 1-11,301,331,333, 335. 337, 337a, 366, 
487 beautiful series, 51 lb beautiful series. All 
first class and choice. J. W. PRESTON, Bax- 
ter, la. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE:— Marlin re- 
peating rifle 22 cal., nearly new, for pair good 
Field Glasses; Mandolin for Coues' Key or 
Ridgway's Manual; mounted birds, Red winged 
Blackbird 75c, Red-bellied Woodpecker 7,5c, 
Sparrow Hawk 75c, Quail $1.00, Coot $1.00, 
Bufflehead $1.50, Squirrel $1.00,, Fox for best 
offer. Send for photos, 3 years' Anthony's 
Photographic Bulletins. If interested, write, 
J. D. ANTHONY, Wauboek, la. 

WANTED:- Al sets Nos. 83, 172, 192, 193, 206, 
210, 228, 258a, 261, 286, 301, 302, 310 478, 486, 618, 
701. Can Offer good sets, Belgian Hares, Abys- 
sinian and English Cavies, Fancy Pigeons and 
Pit Games. ALMON E. KIBBE, Mayville, 
N. Y. 177 

FOR EXCHANGE.— One Bristol steel rod, $5; 
eggs in sets; one Davie's key. 5th edition, new, 
$2 35; complete file Natural Science News, $2; 
twelve back Nos. Osprey, including seven Nos. 
of Vol. one, $3; Vol. three Museum, $1; twenty 
Nos. of Oologist, back of 1896, $1; B-fiat cornet, 
$8 ; three-inch T-perches painted white or nat- 
ural finish, 10c each. Will give 50c per 100 in 
exchange for any of the following tobacco tags : 
Star, Good Luck, Horse Shoe, Master Work- 
man, Standard Navy. Old Honesty, Drummond 
Natural Leaf, Sickle Flanet,Cross Bow, Brandy 
Wine, Nobby Spun Roll. Spear Head. Neptune, 
J. T. Will also give 40c per 100 in cash. E. L. 
HALEY, Rangeley, Me. 176 

PEA FOWS.— I have two pair of young Pea 
Fowls for sale at $5.00 per pair. MATT F. Mc- 
GLEN, Gaines, Orleans Co , N. Y. 

PRINTING.— All kinds of printing for col- 
lectors. 100 envelopes, 100 note heads print- 
ed by mail 80 cents. Satisfaction guaranteed . 
Samples, two red stamps. PEARL PRINT - 
ERY, Cleveland, O. 



BOYS! 



If you collect 

note my 

SPECIAL OFFER. 



I will send you by mail postpaid one 
each of the following eg<'a; American 
Herring Gull, Gt. Blue Heron. White- 
faced Glossy Ibis, Ring-necked Pheas- 
ant, KiUdeer Plover, Burrowing Owl, 
Road-runner, Red-wing, Dwarf Cow- 
bird, Mofkingbird, Flicker, Wood 
Thrush, Indigo Bunting, American 
Robin and Mourning Dove, all listing 
at $3.00, for only 72c. New list of sets 
just issued ERNEST H. SHORT, 
Rochester, N. Y. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



67 



Bro. Lattin says, 

"Send Copy by Return Mail." 

I haven't time to write "copy" 
for a large ad. so this will have 
to do for the time being. . . 

Watch for my ad. 
In the next issue. 

But if you want to be in the 
"swim" send 25c immed- 
iately and you will get 

The Curio Monthly 

for a whole year. 
WRITE QUICK! YOURS IN HASTE. 

ALLEN JESSE REYNOLDS, Pub., 
Connersville, Ind. 

p. S.— The Curio Monthly is food for the 
bansrO'' Collectors. Have you seen it? 
20 pagres, 7x10. 

COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREECOLLECTING- 
SAVES EGGS,DANGER,TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (179) 

J. Row^land Now^ell, Portman, S. C. 

Mounted Birds and Mammals. 

The following specimens are all strictly first 
class, freshly mounted specimens-regular price 
in ( ) My closing price is by mail, express 

or freight at purchaser's expense— will ship 
cheapest way. Special rates on large orders. 

Skunk ($10.00) $ 4 05 

Red Fox (15.00) 9 10 

Gray Squirrel (.5.00) 2 40 

Gray Squirrel holding walnut 3 30 

Tufted Puffin (5 50) 3 35 

Black Guillemot (5.25) 2 70 

Murre (5.00) . 2 70 

Razor-billed Auk (mounted from a skin 

from Audubon's collection) 6 75 

American Herring Gull full plumage(4.50) 2 70 

American Merganser (5.00) 2 70 

Shoveller female (3.50) 2 10 

Redhead (5.00) _ 2 70 

Buffi e-head female (3.50) 2 10 

American Elder (7 00) 4 30 

Spotted Sandpiper (2.00) 1 10 

Mexican Jacana (3.60) 2 10 

Bob-white (2.50) 1 45 

Texan Bob- white (2.50) 1 45 

Mountain Partridge (3.50) _ 2 10 

Scaled Partridge (2.75) 1 65 

Gambel's Partridge (3.00) S 10 

Prairie Hen [3.50) 2 20 

American Barn Owl (5.00) 3 90 

American Long-eared Owl (3.C0) .... 2 10 

Short-eared Owl (3.50) 2 30 

Great Gray Owl (16.00) 9 30 

Saw-whet Owl (2.75) 2 10 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion. N-Y. 



OOLOGISTS' SUPPLIES. 

If you are particular about the preparation 
of your specimens I call particular attention 
to the EGG DRILLS I am bringing to the no- 
tice of collectors. They cut smooth atia cut the 
lining. Sizes about 4 100 to 2-38: prices 25c, 35c 
and 50c each. 4 selected sizes 8100. Also 3 
large sizes at 60c and 75c each. 16 sizes in all. 
Try them. Money refunded if not satisfactory 
after use. 

CLIMBERS. Best steel, made as they should 
be for tree climbing. Long, sharp spurs with 
4 heavy straps of best leather $3.50 prepaid. 
Without straps $1,65 prepaid. 

BLOWPIPES. Best 40c. No. 3 nickel 20c, 
Cheap 12c. DATA BLANKS, 10c per 100. EGG 
COTTON, all colors, 9c a sheet, 50c a package. 
EMBRYO HOOKS, 12c. Handle With 3 hooks 
48c. EMBRYO SCISSORS, 20c, 40c, curved 
78c, best curved 98c. SLIDING CALIPERS. 
Best nickel 85c. PENCILS. Extra good, soft, 
thick lead, lOe. 3 for 25c. REGULAL OOLO- 
GICAL DRILLS. Best quality, nickeled, 3 or 
6 inch handle. No. 1. 20c; No. 2, 28c; No. 3, 38c; 
No. 4, 46c; No. 5. 63c; No. 6, 80c. EGG TRAYS, 
all sizes and colors. FISH BASKETS, all 
sizes. I can supply your wants whatever they 
maybe. Lists free. AW goods preiiaid Send 
for egg lists. 

BENJAMIN HOAG, 
Stephentown, New York. 

FENIKESE. 

A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 
famous Summer School. 

A 96-page book of much interest to 
students of Nature. 

R^ead -wbat others say: 

■'Have found it extremely interesting read- 
ing,"— Henry Prime, Garden City, L. I, 

"I enjoyed the book [Penikese] very much." 
— W. W. Kinsley (Supt. of Schools) Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 

"It is both instructive and entertaining and 
deserves a place in the library of every student 
of nature."— W. D. Lynn, Canfleld, O. 

"I have just finished reading 'Penikese' and 
can say that I have enjoyed it exceedingly. 
Anything looking toward keeping green the 
memory of the great Agassiz should be of in- 
terest to the teacher of biology and no period 
of his life is more interesting than the years 
spent in building up the laboratory on Peni- 
kese."— W. P. Hay (Prof. Biology, HighSchool) 
Washington, D. C. 

'•I have read the book [Penikese] with great 
interest and think it an admirable remini- 
scence of one of the greatest naturalists of the 
nineteenth century. The name of Agassiz is 
assuredly treasured by all true lovers of na- 
ture and his methods of study have left a strik- 
ing impress on present-day workers,"— (Rev.) 
Robert Blight, Green Lane, Pa. 

Price only 25c (reduced from 3Sc). 

Prepaid. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r,. 
Albion, N. Y. 



68 THE OOLOGIST. 

SELECTED CORALS, SHELLS, MINERALS, CURIOS RELICS, &c. 

A Barrel of Shells and a FatDre Study Collection. 

Offered on eight page insert in this Ooloqist. I still offer for sale or will ex- 
change for desirable Eggs in Sets or for Standard Books or Ornithology, if at 
right prices. It is advisable however to make your selections or purchases at 
once, as the Pan-American and Chautauqua trade will take nearly, if not quite 
everything left next month. 

The following have already been sold: Brain Coral, Propeller Coral ($2.25 
spec), Sawfish Saws, Ostrich Eggs, Emeu Eggs, Paper Nautilus, Bisected Cham- 
bered Nautilus, Egyptian Idol, Chinese God. Chinese Cash Sword, Arrowheads 
95c. lot from Illinois, Joplin Calcite— the $4.30 specimen. In the Nature Study 
Collection it is necessary to substitute other specimens of greater value for 
the Bisected Nautilus. 

In case you can use anything left in larger lots, submit list and I may be able 
to make special quotations. 

I want cash but will "swap" some items, which I have in abundance— if necessary 
and if you have what I want at right prices. 

FRANK H. LATTIN. 



GIBB'S CELEBRATED PROCESS OF RAPID TAXIDERMY, 

In Practical Use for Over Twenty-five years. 

Used Everywhere in America. Hundreds of Testimonals. Try and be Convinced. 
Start a class. Money in It. Be Your Own Taxidermist. 

Naturalists, Collectors, Gunners, Anglers, Outers, Boys, Girls and all others interested in 
nature and anxious to preserve the specimens taken in wood and field, have all felt the need of a 
simple method of preservation, which is free from intricacies and inexpensive. 

There is a method of rapid taxidermy now in extensive use, which meets the requirements of 
all amateurs who wish a practical and inexpensive method of preserving the trophies of the out- 
ing and collecting trip. This is not the old system of so-called stuffing, so expensive, laborious 
and disappointing, but is a rapid system, which anyone can learn at once and which is guaran- 
teed to give satisfaction. 

By this process you may preserve the beautiful plumage of the grouse and woodcock, or the 
pike's or buck's head, or the showy feathers of the tanager. Boys, girls and all others can do 
good work and may make money, as mounted heads and birds find a ready sale, and besides you 
may teach your friends and decorate the school room, ofQce and dining-room with native birds 
and other attractions. If you are in doubt, then get your friends to go in with you and start a 
class, for when several work together there is an advantage, and the expense is next to nothing. 

On the receipt of $1.00, cash or stamps, I will send full printed instructions for mounting 
birds, heads, mammals, etc., and all materials for mounting and preserving specimens— includ- 
ing prepared compound, together with full directions for dressing skins with the hair on for rugs 
and robes, so that you will not be to the expense of one cent and will send full directions how to 
start a class. 

Remember I guarantee satisfaction or monty refunded. 

Mention Oologist and address 

MORRIS GIBBS, M. D., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Lattin's Standard Catalogue ol North American Birds Eggs. 

Enlarged (contains 72 pages) revised, corrected and brought up to date of going to press- 
March, 1896. Gving all of the new A. O. U. changes and additions. Also divided and sub divided 
into orders, sub-orders, families and sub-families. Single copy 10 cents; 3 for 25 cents. 



The OoLOGiST. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 5. 



ALBION, N. Y., MAY, 1901. 



Whole No. 176 



The Oologist. 

A Monthly Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to the 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription soc per annum 

Sample copies 5c each 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Bach subscriber is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
Is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

^^Remember that the publisher must be noil 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

6 cents per nonpareil line each insertion. 

12 lines In every inch. Seven inches In a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line is "net," "rock 
bottom," "Inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 25 cents; loo lines, $5.00; 1000 lines, 
$50.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments wni be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due BUls and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing will be honored only at reg^ar rates in force 
at the date of issuance of said bill or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postofflce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination wUl be accepted for sums un- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O., ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



The Western Red tailed Hawk. 

[Buteo borealis calurus.) 

To Raptorial birds, especially such 
species as partake of the nature of the 
Vultures and other carrion eaters in 



their habits, Southern California of- 
fers, next to the countries of the Torrid 
zone, most ideal conditions, both cli- 
matic and geographical, for the rearing 
of their young. The rains of the win- 
ter equinox have usually abated by the 
last week of March, so that Hawks, 
Crows, and others of the larger birds 
which occupy open nests can by that 
time or earlier have their last year's 
homes renovated or if these be destroy- 
ed or occupied by some hardier Owl, 
be well started on the construction of 




EGGS or THE WESTSBN RED-TAILED HAWK. 

(From a set in the author's collection.) 



new ones. Occasionally, as was the 
case this season (1901) heavier rains 
came on just about the time these birds 
had begun to deposit their eggs and 
their nidification was correspondingly 
retarded. 

Orange county, where my home and 
principal collecting grounds have been 



70 



THE OOLOGIST 



for the past several years, is very near- 
ly in the ^center of the seven counties 
lying south of the Tehichapi Mountains 
which are known as Southern Californ- 
ia. It has some frontage on the Pacific 
Ocean, though no ports or watering 
places of importance are located on its 
coast line. Oa its south eastern border 
hills come down to the sea and thence 
running north, north west they form a 
moderately well wooded boundary along 
its northern line. Otherwise the 
county is about equally divided between 
level cultivated lowland and the rolling 
barley fields of the mesas. 

In the heart of the hills before men- 
tioned there are numerous large ranch- 
es within whose bounds the Mexicans, 
notorious wood theives, have not been 
permitted to carry on their wood-cut- 
ting operations. Many sycamores and 
oaks dot these ranches especially 
wherever water is to be found in the 
smaller canyons, and in these the Red- 
tails find suitable nesting sites. Of 
course there are other Hawks which 
breed 'n the same localities, but the 
Red-tails are the most numerous by 
about twenty-five to one. It has been 
my good fortune, ornithologically 
speaking, to be located in this region 
for the past three and a half years, but 
it was not until last year that I thor- 
oughly "got onto the curves" of the 
nesting Red-tails, and the result was 
seventeen sets saved out of about 
twenty collected. Three of these were 
of four eggs, six of three, and the re- 
mainder, eight sets, of two eggs each. 
I think this porportion will hold good 
in almost any representative series of 
sets of Red tailed Hawks collected in 
Orange county So far this season I 
have taken three sets of four, four sets 
of three, and four sets of two which 
were preserved. One set, taken from 
an immense nest forty feet up in a 
sycamore— which, by the way, had no 
branches for the first thirty feet— and 
consisting of two eggs was too far gone 



to be saved. This set had evidently 
consisted when first laid, of three eggs, 
for about half of the shell of one egg was 
found clinging to the edge of the nest. 
Of course they were finely marked. 
Who ever saw an impossible set which 
was not beautiful? 

Again, only last Sunday, I climbed 
over sixty feet to a new nest in an im- 
mense old sycamore and found one 
heavily incubated egg. No broken 
shells were visible nor to all outward 
appearances, had anyone climbed the 
tree ahead of me. Last season, this 
pair laid a nice set of four heavily 
marked eggs in a nest in another syc- 
amore not fifty yards from this one. 
This is not an "ofl"' year, for two pairs 
of these birds which laid but three eggs 
each last year, have already presented 
me with sets of four each and tomor- 
row I am going to see what they 
have done in the way of second sets. 

Several pairs of Red-tails are nesting 
on low cliffs, buildings or ledges or else 
in crevices of the rocky wall, while I 
know of one nest, which held three 
young in May of last year, which was 
built in a depression in the top of a 
huge boulder projecting out from from 
a sloping sidehill. Now and then, 
though seldom, a nest will be built in 
a wild walnut growing on the steepest 
slope of a grassy hill. As these trees are 
seldom over twenty-five feet in height 
and correspondingly small of growth, 
such nests are the collector's delight. 
The photo presented herewith is from 
a set of four eggs taken from such a 
nest situated twenty feet up in a wal- 
nut on a sidehill. No bird was on the 
nest and neither one put in an appear- 
ance until I had climbed to the nest, 
when both commenced their usual 
screaming and kept it up until I left 
the tree. Portions of two lizards and a 
gopher snake were in the nest as well 
as remains of a ground squirrel and a 
kangaroo rat. The whole outfit smelled 
like a glue factory. One egg is in- 



THE OOLOGIST. 



1 



fertile and is the most heavily marked 
egg of the set. The other three con- 
tained small embryoes. The date was 
March 28th, and this was the first 
set of that year. This set of eggs 
measure respectively: 62x47.5; 61x47; 
61x46. These measurements are in 
millimeters and the first is the infertile 
egg. Compared with the average of 
several sets of three eggs of the Eastern 
form of the Red-tail (62x49; 62x48; 
^4x49 mm.) tbey seem to be smaller, 
yet this is a set of noticeably large 
eggs as compared with about twenty 
other sets now in my collection, and 
collected by myself in the past two 
years. Four sets of Krider's Hawk, 
collected in Iowa, Texas, and Colorado 
seem to average smaller even than 
sets of the Western Red tail, and are 
not marked so well either, though the 
Eastern Red-tail is far ahead of our 
form in matter of markings. Several 
sets of two eggs of the Western species 
which I now have are either entirely un- 
marked or else one egg has a very 
few faint dashes of rufous. 

Harlan's Hawk has been taken here 
in the winter and not more than a year 
ago a pair were mounted by a Los 
Angeles Taxidermist, so I am constant- 
ly on the look out for them. Any one 
who has collected eggs of this bird and 
will favor me with good description or 
other notes will do me a favor for 
which I will pay either cash or speci- 
mens and I am sure such an article 
would be read with interest by collec- 
tors who suscribe — as who does not?— 

to the OoLOGIST. 

If robbed, our Red-tail will almost 
immediately commence a new nest for 
the reception of a second set, but will 
usually occupy the old nest the next 
year, seeming to become strongly at- 
tached to her home. In markings the 
sets of one pair of birds, or of the fe- 
male, if the male be shot, persist in the 
same type, but not always in the same 
distinctness of coloration. One nest 



of this bird at least was "unavailable" 
to me this season, though I haven't 
given up trying for it yet. It is in a 
sycamore just beside the road and fully 
seventy feet from the ground. About 
fifteen feet below it in the same tree is 
an old nest of the Hawk now occupied 
by a Pacific Horned Owl, which I sup- 
pose, has hatched her clutch by this 
time. 

Harry H Dunn, 
April 10, 1901. Fullerton, Calif. 



Gleaning-s from My Note Book. 

(Continued.) 

May came in bright and clear, but 
cold, bringing a few King birds, and an 
Oriole whom I heard chattering but not 
singing at all. The cold wave reached 
its climax on the night of the 5th, when 
a freeze caused the drizzling rain to 
sheathe the grass and every shrub with 
fantastic icy forms which sent forth 
brilliant scintillations as "old Sol" came 
smiling up over the eastern hills the 
next morning. Even the set of Red- 
tailed H.'iwk that I collected at sunrise 
were covered with frost, for it seems 
that when I flushtd the female from her 
nest several evenings ago, she never 
came back, so I had to be satisfied with 
two plain eggs. 

I have noticed many times that neith- 
er the Red-tailed nor Red-shouldered 
Hawk will return to their nest when 
flushed from them after dark, even 
when incubation was well along as it 
was in this set. 

As I left the woods I heard the clear, 
sweet warble of a Ruby-crowned King- 
let and soon I found him making his 
toilet as he sat on the sunny side of a 
pine tree on a dead branch. 

No sooner had the cold snap passed 
away than arrived on the 6th, a great 
wave of migrants, and every moist 
woodland, whether on hill or in vale, 
resounded with melody far sweeter 
than words can describe. Yet from 



72 



THE OOLOGIST 



secluded spot, or tree-top hij?h, we hear 
those unobtrnsive "Tsips" which mean 
so little to the unpractised ear, while to 
the eager ornithologist it brings visions 
of some new or rare bird. 

Among them there were Redstarts, 
Maryland Yellowthroats, Black-throat- 
ed Blue, Black-throated Green, Yellow- 
rumped, Magnolia, Oven-birds, Chest- 
nut-sided and Black and White Warb- 
lers, White-crowned and White-throat- 
ed Sparrows, Crested and Least Fly- 
catchers, Catbirds, Bobolinks, Scarlet 
Tanager, and that little bundle of activ- 
ity, the saucy Winter Wren. 

May 9.— 1 spent this evening search- 
ing among the swampy hummocks 
where a pair of Wilson's Snipe are evi- 
dently nesting, but aside from being 
nearly flushed out of my rubber boots 
by an Amerioan Bittern who suddenly 
jumped up in front of me and uttered a 
terrified squawk, my search was un- 
eventful. 

May 13.-— The corn stubble in swamp 
has become a most interesting spot, for 
here are gathered scores of Killdeers 
and Spotted Sandpipers, either species 
being capable of furnishing amusement 
as long as one cares to watch them, be- 
sides others of this kind have begun to 
appear. This morning I saw a Solitary 
Sandpiper walking daintily around the 
muddy pools. On the 18th a small 
flock of Least Sandpipers arrived, fol- 
lowed on the 19th by 15 Semipalmated 
Plovers, while on the 23d a beautiful 
male Black-bellied Plover spent the 
day here. A Least Flycatcher has been 
tugging away at the fluffy end of our 
clothes-line, working mostly morning 
and evening. The female did all the 
work, while the male followed close at 
her heels like an arrant taskmaster, his 
emphatic -'che-beck" sounding more 
like a threatening "you-get," than an 
expression of encouragement. 

May 39. — Appearances are sometimes 
very deceptive as was an evergreen 
tree in which I found a rather remark- 



able state of affairs this morning. I 
was looking for a nest of Purple Finch 
and had walked around the tree with- 
out seeing any signs of nests, but to 
make sureil gave the tree a gentle num- 
ber 8 kick which stirred up a lively 
rumpus indeed, for out of that tree 
went 6 jibbering House Sparrows, an 
excited Bronze Grackle and a more ex- 
cited Robin. Upon climbing the tree 
I found a small bird village, consisting 
of 3 nests of English Sparrows, 1 of 
Bronze Grackle, and 1 of Robin— 5 
nests within a radius of 4 feet, and all 
containing either eggs or young. 

June 5. — While trying to get in a 
good place to photograph a Black-billed 
Cuckoo on her nest I stumbled onto a 
nest of Maryland Yellowthroat contain- 
ing 4 fresh egars. The nest was placed 
upon a triangle of vines and weeds 
about 8 inches above the ground. It 
was a large bulky affair of dead leaves 
and grasses, lined with fine round 
grasses and horse-hair. This find so 
pleased me — for I do not often find a 
nest of this warbler— that I forgot all 
about the Cuckoo, who had sneaked 
away, but I got a fine photo of tho 
Yellowthroat's nest and eggs "in situ." 

June 7. — For some time I have heard 
the song of a Black and White Warb- 
ler, over in woods on hillside, along a 
bush lot, so this evening I went over 
purposely to hunt for their nest. I 
was passing along the edge of the 
woods, when I heard a rustle of dead 
leaves, and looking to one side I saw a 
W hippoorwill fluttering along, stopping 
however, about 6 feet away, with wings 
outspread in a wounded attitude. 
Quickly glancing about me I saw Ohr 
what I had hunted for for so many 
years, two beautiful eggs of Whip-poor- 
will, reposing on a bed of dead leaves 
underneath a cluster of bushes, near a 
pile of dead brush. 

1 wanted a photo, of course, but had 
not brought my camera, so knowing the 
Whip-poor-will's tendency to slip out 



Lrist No. 4. 



March 15, igoi, 



LATTIN'S CLEARANCE SALE. 



SELECTED CORALS, SHELLS, MINERALS, CURIOS, RELICS, &c. 

A Barrel of Shells and a NatoFS Study Collection. 

Selected Specimens of Corals, Sea Shells, Minerals, Indian 

Relics, Curios, &c. 

^"The Engraving on last page of this list illustrates many of the 
specimens offered on following pages. The numbers in ( ) refer to the 
specimens in this engraving. 



BRAIN CORAT^, Meandrina cerebri/ ormis,0^o. 
1,) a very fine specimen from the West Indies, 

11 in. in diameter and weighing nearly 20 lbs. 
I will sell for only $2.50; its worth more. 

VAl^yLCO'&AlL,, Madreporapalmata, (No. 2,) 
from the Bahamas. This specimen measures 
10 X 12 in. and weighs about 6 lbs. Will sell for 
only $1,75. I have another specimen of 
about same size, but more of a hand-shaped af- 
fair (thumb and fingers, tip of small finger 
broken) at same price. I also have about a 
dozen other specimens of this Coral at 3 5 cts . , 
5 O cts . and $ 1 each. All big values for the 
money. 

PLATE (BRAIN) CORAL. Meandrina clivosa, 
(No. 3,) size 16 x 82 in. and weighs nearly 30 lbs. 
It goes at only ^'l-.SO I have another speci- 
men more regular in form, 13 in. in diameter. 
My price is $ 2 . 7 5 . Both from the Bahamas. 

PINE APPLE CORAL, Porites astrceoides 
(No. 4,) from Bahamas. 10 in. diameter, weighs 

12 lbs; my price $1. 6 O I have also a 7-in. 

specimen of this species.unbleached "Nig- 

gerhead" Coral, at $1 .20. 

PROPELLER or BUTTERFLY CORAL, 
Agaricea agaricites, (No. 6,) from Bahamas. 
This specimen measures about 12 in. and weighs 
7 lbs. ^2. .2.5 takes this specimen. In '99, se- 
cured a bbl. of this Coral and have about a 
"bushel" left. Can furnish nice "wing" speci- 
mens at lO. 1 5, 25, 35, 50 and 75 cts. 
each and have a few of the "butterfly" speci- 
mens at 35, 50 and 75 cts. 

BRANCHING, TREE or SPIKE CORAL are 
terms by which the Madrepora Corals are com- 
monly called. I have several bbls. of Madre- 
pora cervicornis . (No. 7,) andean furnish speci- 
mens at any price from 1 c. to $ 1 each and can 
furnish schools or teachers in bulk at very 
reasonable rates. Its worth loose, without 
packing, about $5 per bushel. I have also 
many of the rarer Madreporas and the follow- 
ing are of the close "spike" or "prong" form 
and not in long branches : 

Madrepora spicifera from Samoa, 8 x 13 in. , 
$1.50; 5x9 in.. 75c.; also an 18 x 15 in. 
specimen at $3.50. 

Madrepora obscura, a brown-colored species 
from Torres Straits, about 15 in. diamet«r, at 



$4,50 Could be broken up into lOO lOc 
specimens. Another 7-in Madrepora, white, 
from same locality at $ 1 .2 5. 

Madrepora plantaginea from E. I., an 8-ln 
specimen at ODlr $1.20. I also have half a 
dozen clumps of J/adre;)ora from Fiji Islands, 
ranging from 7 to U in. diameter, at S1.50. 
$2 50 and$3.50 each. 

Stylophora. a branching Coral from Red "Sea, 
5-in. clump, 75 cts; 7-in., $1.50. 

Madrepora abrotanoides , a 10-in. spray from 
Fi.ii, $1.50. 

Seriaiopora, CSo. 11,) from West Africa. This 
beautiful, delicate and almost perfect clump of 
Coral has been one of my star attractions for 
past two years. I have not cared to sell this 
specimen and haye held it at $ 1 0. and could 
have sold it a number of times had I been will- 
ing to shade the price a little: it cost me $6 in 
cash and I will now sell at this figure. 

ORG AN PIPE CORAL, Tubipora musica, (No 
13 ) from Singapore ; this a section c/^) of a 
clump, measuring about 9 s 11 in. and this sec- 
tion has been held at $4- 50 Will sell for 
$3.25; another specimen,8xlO in., at $2.50. 
I have a case of this beautiful and interesting 
species direct from Singapore and can furnish 
selected specimens at following low rates- 2 in 
lOc. Sin. 25c., 4in. 35c., 5in. 50c., 6 in! 
$1 . 

CORALS not shown in engraving. I have two 
mammoth Rose Corals, Symphyllia from Tor- 
res Straits ; an 8 in. one at $ 1 . 5 O and a 5^ in. 
one, more symmetrical and beautiful, at same 
price. 

FEATHER CORAL, a 10 in. "bum" specimen 
50c. 

MUSHROOM CORALS. Fine specimens- 5 
in. diameter of Fungia patella from Zanzibar 
at only 35 cts. each. Selected specimens of 
Fungia elegans from Gulf of Calif , ly^ in onlv 
12c. prepaid. " ■' 

CRATER or VASE CORAL, Turbinaria ciner- 
ascens, from Torres Straits, somewhat resem- 
bles the Neptune Cup Sponge, (No. 8 ) This 
specimen stands 10 in. high and measures 11 in 
across top; a 3 in. triangular piece has been, 
broken out of one side; will sell for $2.5 O 



PINK CORALS, Stylaster, from Samoa, and 
the RED and YELLOW CORALS, Distichopora, 
from Hawaii. I have hundreds of specimens 
rangiijg from a few cents to 35 cts, in value. 

PRECIOUS CORAL, Coralllum rubrum, from 
Mediterraman Sea A fine two in. clumn ia 
muddy matrix, with three specimens imbedded 
of Megerlea trancata (a Brachipod of the Lamp 
Shell or Ttfrebratali Family.) My price for 
this specimen Is $1 .90. I also have a quant 
Ity of this Precious Coral in p< 1 shed twigs, 
."■uch as are used to make into the good old- 
fash iou.d Coral Strings or "Beads," once so 
connudU'y used for necii adornment. We used 
to who e.-'ale this at $8 per pound; will close 
out what 1 have left at ii5 cts. per ounce or 
$3 per pound. Samples 5 cts. 

WORM '-CORAL," Vermetus (No. 15.) A 
clump or mass of these peculiar worm-like 
shells from the W. L, measuring 5x7 in. anl 
weighing 2 lbs. -.could be made into hundreds or 
small specimens; $3.60. 

NEPTUNE'S CUP or Vase Sponge, Paterion 
(No 8,) from Tasmania. An odd and curious 
specimen worth from $15 to $iO, and we have 
always held this specimen at 110. It, measures 
ai in. high and th'^ vase portion is 12 in indiam 
It now goes for only $6 80. Its a bargain for 
some one wanting such a specimen. 

AN EGYPTIAN IDOL, (No. 21), carved from 
stone or lava 1,000 or more years ago, repre- 
sents an elephant or some other animal,, meas- 
ures about 4 X iVi in. Secured by a missionary 
acquaintance from a mummy pit in Egypt and 
guaranteed gemiine Only $3 05. 
CHINESE CURIOS. 

CHINESE GOD (No. 5) Of white porcelain, 6H 
in. high, from the collection of an old Chinese 
traveller. My price is $1.90. I also have a Chi- 
nese cash sword at $1.60. Shuttle cock of 
feathers, snakeskin and "cash" 45 cts. prepaid. 

SNUFF BO TTLES, size about 2 x 2i4 in. No. 
1. pottery, ornamented, etc., 45c, prepaid; No. 
2 Jade, carved acd ornamented, $1.35, prepaid. 

STONE WATER VESSEL, 1 x 2'/2 in. Of 
brown mottled "Jade," 65 cts., prepaid 

OPIUM PIPES, No. 1, (No. 16) 24 in. ebony 
stem, 4 in. brass mouth piece, brought by sea 
captain from China, $1.60, prepaid ; No. 2, (No. 
81) bone mouth piece, 18 in. bamboo stem, 90 
cts., prepaid; No. 3, pipe only, (bowl) 40 cts., 
prepaid. 

SPANISH CROSS inlaid with straw from an 
ancient church in Jemez, New Mex. Curio 
dealers would ask $5 for it, but it's yours, pre- 
paid, for $1.45. 

SAWFISH SAW (No. 23 ) This specimen is 
the one next to Coral specimen No. 3, and 
measures three ft. in length. It's worth $3.25. 
The others in engraving have been sold. I also 
nave two small specimens with snout or head 
back of eyes attached, 10 in. spec. 75 cts., pre- 
paid; 13 in. spec, $1 40, prepaid; all from Gulf 
Mexico. . ■ . 

SHARK JAW from Martha's Vineyard. A 
small but fine and perfect specimen. About 4 
X 7 in., with nearly 150 teeth. Only $1.80, pre- 
paid. 

ALLIGATOR (No. 30.) This 5 ft. specimen 
was from west coast Florida and was one of 
the finest specimens I ever saw. I purchased 
it at the Atlanta Expo, in '95, and has been a 
constant companic n in my expo-peregrina- 
tions in the north since that date. I've sold 
dozens of others, but I've always "hung on" to 
this specimen. It's but little the worse for 
travel. My price has been $10. Now $6.£0. 

ALLIGATOR TEETH 15 to 20 years ago al- 
ligators were abundant. The swamps and 
streams of Florida was fairly alive with them. 
Their teeth were used by the hundreds of 
pounds for jewellery purposes and good teeth 
were staple as flour or sugar at $2 per lb. A 
pound of V2 to 1 in. teeth numbers over 1,000 
(about 1,200) teeth and represents the product 
secured from 15 or 16 alligators ranging from 5 
to 12 ft. long. The craze for the jewellery has 



waned in most sections and I have many 
pounds of teeth on my hands. To close them 
out I will sell single pounds at only .50cts; 5 lbs. 
for $'3; orlOlbs for only $3. Just think of it, 
OAVr 10,000 teeth, which represents the entire 
product from over 150 large alligators for only 
$3. 

SHELL AND MOSS WRE.^TH (No. 34) 
Made from the beautiful sea mosses and small 
shells from the Callfc^ruia coast. In box 16 x 20 
in. t hese wreaths sold at the World's Fair at 
$20 each. A few of the petals, etc., have been 
loosened through shipping. My price only 
$4 60 

EGGS OF THE EMEU (No. 28.) Nothing 
attracts greater attention in the egg line than 
the large dark green, nearly black, pebbled egg 
with a lighter ground color of this peculiar 
Australian bird. Every egg collection would 
have contained one of these egg^ and even the 
laity would have had them on their "what- 
nots" or among their "brie a-brac" had not the 
price— which has always been $2.£0 -been a lit- 
tle too high. We now have a limited supply at 
only 84 cts. each, prepaid This rate will hold 
until May 1st, only. I have a few cracked spec- 
imens and a few casts at 5'J cts. each. 

OSTRICH EGGS (No. 27.) Stock all sold. 
Can secure fair specimens at $1 each. Have a 
few good 2ds. at 60 cts.. a few badly damaged 
specimens at 30 cts. and have one large flatten- 
ed warp-sided abnormality at $1 60. 

PIPE-FISH. Sygnathus, (No. 31) from Gulf 
California. We have a few choice specimens 
of this queer and rare fish, with bony armor, 
the first lot we ever secured in sufficient quant- 
ity to place on sale. Prices, prepaid, at fjllow- 
ing ridiculously low rates : Specimens under 
10 in., 3 1 cts.; 10 in., 40 cts; 11 in., 45 cts.; 12 in., 
50 cts. ; 13 in., 60 cts.; 14 in., 75 cts.; 15in.,$l. 

THE SE \ HORSES, Hippocamnus, are also 
of same order as the pipe fish and with bony 
armor. We h we choice specimens of both the 
Atlantic and Pacific species. Pi ices of either, 
prepaid, 15 to 35 cts. each. 

PAPER NAUTILUS, Argonauta Nodosa,(No. 
32.) This beautiful $10 specimen has been sold. 
We have a few small specimens of the ordinary 
Argonauta Argo from the Mediterranean Sea, 
at 50 cts. each, prepaid. 

CHAMBERED NAUTILUS, Nautilus pom- 
pilius, from Polynesia Decoricated specimens 
(NO. 9.) This mammoth 9 in. specimen, with 
lip checked, $i.25; ordinary 6 to 8 in. specimens, 
$1 25 to $2 50 each. Specimens 5 to 6 in. in nat- 
ural condition, 50 cts. to $1 each; specimens bi- 
sected to show structure, (No. 33) both halves, 
75 cts. to $150; siphuncle, H. 50 cts. to $1; the 
half not showing siphuncle, 35 cts. to 75 cts. I 
also have a lot of broken and damaged shells, 
valuable lor teaching, etc. Will close out at 
only 25 cts. each. First orders secure best spec- 
imens. I also have one very fine bisected shell 
with animal in glass jar containing alcohol, 
(No. 17) from Western Polynesia. A rare spec- 
imen and seen only in a few of our larger mis- 
eums. It cost me $9 as a dealer. Will sell for 
$7.75. I have a beautiful 4J4 in. specimen of 
Nautilus umbilicus from Australia at $1 ; lip 
checked. 

CHRYSANTHENUM SHELL OR THORNY 
OYSTER, Spondy lus pictorum, (Nos. 12 and 
16) from Gulf of California. These beautiful 
shells usually sell at $2 to $3 each and range all 
colors from pure white to bright red. I have a 
few left and will close out at $1 each. I have a 
few foreign specimens of this family from East 
Indies, etc., at 50 cts. each; worth regular up 
to $3. First orders best specimens ; have 3 or 4 
species, as aurantia, wrightil, purpuraceus, 
etc. 

TRUMPET SHELL, Triton tritonis, (No. 25) 
from Indian Ocean. Used as a teakettle by the 
natives of theTypinsan Archipeligo. This spec- 
imen is 16 in. long and was used for this or a 
similar purpose ; $3.25. The other specimen in 
engraving also has holes through shell for or- 



namental or some other purpose ; S2.20 I also 
have a few very fine specimens of this shell at 
following low rates : 6 in. specimen, f,0 cts; 8 
in.,75cts.; 10 in., ?1 to $1.50; 12 in , fl.50 to $2; 
15 in., $?. I also have a couple baby specimens 
2-3 in. at 35 cts. each, prepaid. 

SHELL VASE (No. 14) made from lai-ge-sr ec- 
imens of Green Snail, Turbo marmnratus.from 
Philippines. These vases are made from se- 
lected 5 to 6 in. shells and are worth fl.50 each. 

1 also have from same shell vases, basket style, 
with carved handles, etc.. all In one piece, at 
only 81.50. I can also furnish thtse»hells, with 
Lord's Prayer engravtd on, or made into call 
bells at $1 50. (Regular price of all these $1.50 
articles is $2.) Shell vases of same shell simi- 
lar to (14) made from 3 to 3^ in. shells, worth 
50 cts. each; prepaid, only 35 cts. Shell napkin 
rings from sections of this shell, plain 15 to 25 
cts., prepaid; engraved, 25 to 35 cts., prepaid; 
small 3 in. shells of this species in natural con- 
dition at 15 cts. each, prepaid. 

SIOUX TENT. Child's play-tent, 15—5 ft. 
Willow tent pole.s (No. 26 ) Tent cloth or cover 
measures, unpitched, two extremes— about 3 x 
10 ft. It is spread on three top steps of engrav- 
ing. Material of common factory and decorat- 
ed in colors by some Sioux artist. This is 
guaranteed genu'ne and has been in my pos- 
session for 8 or 10 years. My pri^e is $3 80, and 
its well worth double. The Sioux Pi e (No. 20) 
has been sold. I have, however, a similar one, 
length 14V^ in., both stem and bowl of red Cat- 
linite or Pipestone, Indian make, unu ed, an- 
gular and more ornamental than No 20. My 
price J1.90. 

INDIAN BASKETS mads by the Hoopa In- 
dians of Humboldt Co. Calif., from natural 
fibres, artistically woven and arranged in col- 
ors, water tight, bowl shape. The Indians sell 
them "on the ground" at |5 each. I have the 
following sizes and will send, prepaid, at prices 
named: 3 in. deep by 7 in diam., $3 15; 3^ in. 
deep by 7/2 in. diam., $3 GOWVi in. deep by S'/j 
in. diam., 14.10. I consider the best the cheap- 

AZTEC PITCHER. Genuine aztec and pur- 
chased from Mexican Village at Atlanta in "95, 
with a guarantee that it was the ancient. I te 
lleve, hov ever, that it was made rerently by 
descendants of the ancient aztecs. Material 
black day and covered with carvings, faces, 
etc,; $2.60. 

MOUND BUILDER'S RELICS. I have hun- 
dreds of ordinary arrow and spear heads and a 
few of the more common pieces such as sink- 
ers, drills, scrapers, etc., but have very few of 
the rare and desirable ones. The following 
covers what I have left: Stone Pipe, (Horn- 
blende or hard mica schist) (No. 19) size 2x4 in., 
wgt. M lb., from Brant Co., Ont , a very choice 
specimen, S5. 10, prepaid; another from same 
locali;y of a more common and unattractive 
form, 3j^ X 2 in., 7 oz.. hatchet f-hape, $2 20, pre- 
paid; Slate Pendant from Waterloo Co., Ont.. 

2 in. diamond shape, drilled, prepaid 70 cts.; 
Hematite (Limonite) Celt fr>:m Van Buren Co., 
Ark., 2x5 in., 1 lb., prepaid, only $1 20. Ordi- 
nary Stone Axe from Cumberland Co.. N. .7., 
(Serpentine, grooved, 4 x 5!^ in., 2^ lbs .) $1.30. 
I also have the contents of a cache from Rowan 
Co . N. C, consisting of about 375 unnotched 
arrow or spearheads of uniform size and form, 
about 2V4 long, will sell as a whole for only $S8 - 
10. 

CELTS. Various sizes and material from 
near Baum Village site. Paint Creek Valley, O., 
at from 45 cts. to $1 each, prepaid. 

NET SINKERS made from Iron-stone, Llm 
onite, Concretions, Van Buren Co., Ark, weigh 
ing from % to 1 lb. and measuring 2H to 3>4 by 
354 to 4)i in , each 45 cts. 

PESTLE of quartzite from Kv-. l>; IbP., 2>^x 
41/j in., 85 cts. 

ARROWHEADS. Van Buren Co., Ark,, as- 
sorted; poor, per doz., 30 cts. ; ordinary. Poets. ; 
selected, 11. 



BIRD ARROWPOINTS. Same locality, 9c. 
to 24 cts each, prepaid. 

BIRD ARROWPOINTS. The famous little 
beauties c.f jasptr, ctalcedony, obsidian, e'c, 
from WilUmette Valley, Oregon. I have a few 
ordinary ones left at 15 to 35 cts. ( ach, or 5 a.s- 
sorted for $1.10, prepaid. 

POTTER ■ fragments with markings, 6 pes , 
Ky. and N. Y., lot 40 cts. 

FIVE good jasper and iftint arrowheads from 
Mo., lot 50 3 , prepaid. 

EIGHT damagea pes. Rowan Co, No. Car., 
lot 2,5c.. prepaid. 

FOURTEEN white flint arrowhead.s frcm 
Engiewood, Ills., fair lot; lot, prepaid, 95 cts. 

MILKY QUARTZ DRILL, So. Car, W in.' 
made from broken arrowhead, '■'b cts., prepaid- 

GLASSY QUARTZ, leaf shape arrowhead. 
So Car., fair, 3} cts , prepaid. 

SCRAPERS. Nine small ordinary on^s from 
So. Dak., chalcedony, etc., lot, prepaid, $1. 

OVAL DISC shaped, pc. from Ind., 2 x'Z'-A in.' 
23c., prepaid. 

SLATE ORNAMENT, Waterloo Co , Ont.' 
round, 2 in. diam., hole in center, 85c., prepaid' 

SANDSTONE ORNAMENT, Orleans Co., N. 
Y., very raie, unattractive and not ornament- 
al, 3^4 m. didni., about 40 tally marks, one per- 
foration, another partially through, $2.10, pre- 
paid. 

SPEARHEADS, Orleans Co., N. Y., rare in 
locality, 3 in , lot (two), prepaid, 75 cts. 

CUMBERLAND CO , N. J. One knife and 
eleven seU-cled arrowheads, lot, prepaid, $1.25. 

MONTGOMERY CO., PENNA. A selected lot 
of ten pieces of Jasper and quartzite, as follows: 
1 draw knife (?),1 scraper 2 small warclub heads, 
6 arrow or spearheads; lot, prepaid. $2.10. 

BONE NECKLACE. Thirty-two perforated 
(lengthwise) phalangeal bones from an Ind'an 
burial ground in Oxford Co., Canada, prepaid. 
$3 60 

BOTRYOIDAL GROUP OF CALCITES (No. 
10 ) This magnificent specimen measures about 
10 X Li in and weighs over 20 lbs. It was taken 
from a pool of pure water in Crystal Cave, 
Black Hills This form is not know n elsewhere 
in the world Beautiful lemon yellow botry- 
oidal groups of compound and contact thickly 
studded, small 3-comered xtals, well worth $15, 
but will sell for only ?8 90. 

JOPLIN CALCITES are the most superb rich 
yellow, with deep browmish base, calcltesinthe 
world and occur in single xtals; low, broad 
scalenohedrons. sharp angles, six sided, six- 
faceted, with modifications very pleasing, bril- 
liant, natuml polish; translucent ice-like ap- 
pearance. I have a ;■ ingle ■■ rystal, which weighs 
28 lbs., and measures 10 x 18 in. It ought to be 
worth $1 per pound, but I'll sell for $9 30. I 
have another but smaller Joplin xtal nearly 
doubly-terminated, measures 6 x 11 in. and 
weighs over 13 lbs. and goes at $4.30. 

NATIVE COPPER from Lake Superior. The 
globe. No. SS, was filled with eelectfd speci- 
mens in acid, but old zero broke the globe and 
we can furnish the ragged thread-like speci- 
mens separately at 2.i tts., 35 cts., 50 cts. and $1 
each, prepaid. 

HOT SPRING QUARTZ XTALS. Have a 
few left at 15c.. 2nc and 35c. each, prepaid; and 
one 6 lb . 5 X 9 In., clump xtal, with group-like 
base at $1 60. 

RUBELLITE. I have a splendid assort- 
ment of specimens of this beautiful bright rose 
tourmaline, needle-like xtals usually arranged 
so that dozens Wj 11 radiate from a single cen- 
ter in a gangue of lavender Lepidolite and 
f( uud in San Diego Co., Calif.: M lb. speci- 
mens. 30 cts.; 1 lb specimens, 55 cts.; IH to 21b. 
specimens, $1 ; 5 1b specimens, $2.50. I have 
one beautiful museum specimen, which meas- 
ures 8 X 10 in. and weighs 14 lbs., at $.5.40. 




THE ABOVE ENGRAVING SHOWS ONE OF LATTIN'S 

PAN-AMERICAN 

NATURE STUDY COLLECTIONS 

DISPLAYED IN A 4x4 FOOT SPACE. 



This Collection will be Appreciated by EVERY STUDENT, TEACHER, COLLECTOR AND 
AMATEUR, and is of Special Value in Nature Study Work. 



Lattin's Pan-American, 

NATURE STUDY 

COLLECTION, 



This Collection contains specimens selected with special care in order that the Collection, as 
^ whole, would not only be of value to the Specimen Collector in building or adding to a cabinet, 
but. b^ivA <»ndeavored to make it practically mdispensible In Nature Study Work, both to teacher 
and student. 

As many may not wish to purchase the entire Collection, I quote the regular price on each 
■specimen and also my prepaid Clearance Sale price. 

The entire Collection at regular retail rates would cost $11 ; at. my special prepaid rates if 
purchased separately 5.19. 

I will deliver the entire Collection f. o. b., freight or express, Albion, N. Y., carefully and se- 
curely packed and boxed for only ,32.78. 



No. 
1 



Regular 
Price.; 



Pink Mnrex, Murex bicolor, 
Gulf Calif., 4in $ 35 

2 Pearl Conch, Stromhus gran- 

ulatus, Panama, 2>giD. 15 

3 Orange Scorpion, Pte: seer a au- 

rantia, Philippines, 4in 15 

4 Goldmouth, Turbo clu!,sostom- 

us, Philippines, 2in _ 15 

5 Chambered Nautilus, Nautilus 

pompilius, E. I., V4 of bisected 
shell to show structure, etc., 
5in 75 

'6 Mushroom Coral, Fungia ele- 
g^ans, Gulf Calif., 2in 25 

7 Armor Starfish, Nidorella ar- 
mata, Panama, 5in 35 

«c Black-mouth Tree Snail, Oxy- 
styla undata var floridensis, 
Florida, 2in _ 35 

4 Tiger Cowry, Cyjircea tigris, 
Australia, 3in 15 

iO Black Murex, Murex radix,Fa,- 

ge nama, 4in 35 

11 Tarpon Scale, Florida, (2 spe) 
2in , 10 

!2a Compass or Sunflower Star- 

. fish, Heliaster Kubingii, Chili, 

4in . 35 

iS^Mammoth Sea Urchin. Stron- 
qylocentrotus franciscanus. 
Pacific, 4in 35 

14 Pink Coral, Slylaster sanguin- 
eut, Samoa, 2^in _ 25 

15a Orange tscorpion Shell. Cut 
to illustrate structure, 4>^in., 
select 35 

16 Silvermouth, Turbo tesselatus , 

Gulf Calif . 2V4'ln 25 

17 Egg of Skate or Sand Shark, 

Martha's Vineyard. 4jn lO 

18 Organpipe Coral, Tubipora 

musica, Singapore, Sin 35 

19 Fossil Polyp Coral, Heliopby- 

Hum, Genessee Co., N. Y 
- 2in, Cilb) 25 



$ 21 
06 
06 
06 

48 
11 

17 

09 
11 
16 
04 



Lattin's 20 Purple-spined Sea Urchin, 
Prepaid Strongyloce)itroius drobach- 
Price. iensis, Gulf Mexico, 3;^ln 

21 Horn Nut, China, 2j^in 

22 Sea Horse, Hippocampus hud- 
sonius, Delaware Bay, 4in 

23 Screw Sbell. TurritelJa croc a, 
Panama, 3iu 

24 Native Lodestone, Magnet 
Cove, Ark., 2in 

25 Resurrection Plant, Mexico.. 

26 Young Corcb, Strombus gigas, 
Bahamas. 5in 

27 Propellor Coral, .4^aric€'aagfar- 
icites, Bahamas, 5in 

28 Coqulna Shell Conglomerate, 
St. AugustiLe, Fla., Sin 

29a Fossil Scaphites, (Nautilus 
Family) Custer Co., Mon- 
tana, 3in 

30 Venus Clam, Chione gnidia, 
Gulf Calif., 3in 

31 Lettered Cone, Conus liter atus, 
Ceylon, Sin 

32 Golden Starfish. Asterias och- 
racea, Calif., 7in 

S3 Black Ea.r.ffaliotiscracherodii 
Japan, S><iin 

34 White Murex, Murex ramosus, 
Zanzibar, 4!4in 

35 "Electric Stone," "Hell Fire 
Rock," a variety of Tremolite 
so hijjhiy charged with;phos- 
phonc acid tbat a light 
scratch in dark emits a play 
of lights. Sin 

36 Branch CovslI, Madrepora cervi- 
cornis, Bahamas, 7in. Branch 

37 Sea Fern, Pterogorgia setosa. 
Key West, 3ft 

38 Golden Sea Fan, Panama, 151n 

39 Yellow Sea Fan, Rhipidogor- 
gia occatoria, Bahamas, 121n . 

40 Sertularla, Atlantic City, ^ J. 



25 
10 

35 

15 

25 
15 

25 

35 

25 

35 
25 
35 
35 
25 
25 



09 
06 



09 

11 
11 
19 
19 



25 


09 


25 


16 


.50 


21 


35 


21 


25 


11 


15 


06 




THE ABOVE ILLUSTRATION SHOWS ONE OF LATTIN'S 



TWENTIETH CENTURY 



....BARRELS OF SHELLS 



CROWDED INTO A 4X5 FOOT SPACE. 



TO PROPERLY DISPLAY WOULD REQUIRE A MUCH LARGER SPACE. 



Our Twentieth Century 



Barrel °^ Shells 



Iq my list offering a "Barrel of Shells" six 
years ago ('95) I quote: 

"From time memorial it has been custom 
ary for shell dealers to put up a barrel of shells 
for others to sell again. $2ior$3Jisa favorite 
price for one of these barrel collections, in fact 
a good selection of saleable material cj,nnot be 
sold at a living profit at a lower price. 'Lattin' 
has been in the shell business for the past fif- 
teen years. '95 makes his 9ih consecutive sea 
son at Chautauqua (whei'e be has exclusive 
right). His 'Fail' trade U and has been on-) of 
the heaviest In the U. S., and at the WoRLd'.s 
Fair 'Lattin' personally sold more shells than 
all other dealers combined— the-^e htatements 
may seem strong but they are facts neverthe- 
less." At that time I offered a "barrel of 
shells" to dealers only. 

The "Twentieth Century Barrel of Shells" 
has been put up from an eatirely different 
standpoint; and while I expect to sell more 
barrels to dealers than to others it will be due 
to the fact that they realize more fully the ex- 
ceptional bargain I am offering in giving a 
greater variety and mikiag a lower rate than 
they were ever able to previously secure. 

I have about 25 of these Twentieth Century 
Barrel of Shells. The engraving on preceding 
page does not do the collection justice. It was 
my original Intention to have the different 
specimens numbered in order that one coul I 
get an idea of each variety from the engraving 
but I find that the reduction in size is so great 
that the carrying out of my original intention 
is out of the question. 

This 'barrel" has be^n arranged, however, 
so as to be of value to anyone, and especially 
so for those wishing to get a nice assortment 
of shells, etc., and be able to sell enough from 
the residue to make their own cost little or 
nothing. This assortment is of value to the 
collector or teacher and of special value for 
school work. It's needless to add or say more 
as to its value to the dealer or to those who 
wish a selection to sell again. I might call at- 
tention, however to its great value, if proper- 
ly displayed, as a store window attraction and 
for ornamental purposes. An up-to-date mer- 
chant can use it as an attraction for a few 
weeks and then sell at Yz usual prices and real- 
ize a good profit. It is also of special value to 
place on sale and as an attraction at a Church 
or Lodge Fair bioth, etc., etc. 

For whatever purpose you purchase this as- 
sortment you will find it one of the biggest 
investments in the shell line that you ever 
made for the money. You will also find that 
the assortmeht contains no "dead wood." 

Each variety Is plainly labeled and a good 
sized cardboard libel Is also sent for each va- 
riety, giving common and scientific names and 
locality, making the assortment doubly valu- 
able for display purposes. 



The assortment is made up as follows: 

2 Lai'ge Pink Conchs $ 75 

2PlakConch Puiats 75 

4 Youag Conchs 50 

1 E. L Clam 50 

2E I Clams 50 

4 While Murex 60 

2 Wh te Murex 50 

3 Pink MureK 50 

2 Pink Murex 75 

2 Black Murex 50 

1 Black Murex rO 

1 Grandmother Shell 1 00 

1 Grandmother Shell .. 35 

1 Violet-mouth Scorpion 50 

1 Orange Scorpion cut to show structure 35 

1 Tent Olive 75 

2GreenSnail 50 

2 Tiger Cowry 35 

1 Marlinspike 50 

8 Mother of Pearl 50 

4 Lettered Cones 1 00 

2 White Spindle Shells 50 

2 Venus Shells 50 

5 Fighting Shells 50 

5 Pearl Conchs 50 

5 Silverllps 50 

5 Goldmouths 50 

5 Silvermouths 50 

5 Orange Scorpions 50 

5 Black Ears 50 

5 Screw Shells 50 

5 Banded Murex 50 

5 Lettered Olives : 50 

4 Boxes of assorted Small Shells 1 00 

1 Sea Horse 35 

1 Armor Starfish 35 

1 Golden Starfish 35 

3 Compass Starfish 75 

3 Mammoth Sea Urchins 50 

Lot of assorted pieces W. I. \^'hite Branch 

Coral 2 00 

Lot Organpipe Coral 1 00 

2 Purple Sea Ferns 50 

2 Purple Sea Ferns 1 50 

2 Yellow Sea Fans .* 50 

2 Yellow Sea Fans 25 

2 Golden Sei Eans 75 

This assortment of shells, etc., at low rates 
will sell for not lass" than $28.03. I will pack 
the entire lot in a barrel and deliver f. o. b. 
express or freight, Albion, NY., for only $7.80. 
It's worth nearly doubfe this figure at low 
wholesale rates, and is the biggest bargain in 
showy material in the Shell and Coral line 1 
have ever seen in my 20 years' career as a deal- 
e" and .lubber In Sea Shells, etc. 

-Address plainly and in full, 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D , 
Albion, N. Y. 




THE ABOVE ENGRAVING ILLUSTRATES 

A FEW SELECTED SPECIMENS 

OFFERED ON FIRST PAGES OF THIS LIST. 



THE OOLOGIST 



73 



with her household effects, if disturbed, 
I covered the eggs with my coat and 
hustled home after my camera and took 
them "in situ." Although I use the 
most rapid plates yet I had to make the 
exposure 8 seoiiad< on account of the 
gatheritig gloom in the woods. The 
eggs were nearly hatched, but never 
did an ocilogist use more time, patience 
and pancreatin, than did I, but with 
all my care I c )uld only save one egg. 

June 21.— How queer it is— a solemn 
fact though — that one is forever sur- 
prising himself by finding just what he 
is not looking for. Here I've found 
quite accideatal'y the nests of two spe- 
cies that I've searched for so many 
times without success. I'his fact was 
again illustrated on June 21 while pho- 
tographing an Ovenbird on nest. I 
was out in the woods at 5 a. ni., and 
when 1 arrived at the nest the Oven- 
bird was out to breakfast, so I took 
photo of nest and eggs 'in situ." I had 
just finished when she came walking 
homeward with dainty, mincing steps, 
turning a«ide here and there for little 
bunches of grass or a dead limb. With 
camera obout six feet away she camo 
peeking around the nest, her sparkling, 
beady eyes seeming to express anxiety, 
which did not pass away even when I 
requested her to "look pleasant." 

While folding my camera I heard the 
"hum" of a Hummingbird, overhead in 
the oaks and I began to realize that a 
nest was near, for judging by the 
"hum" or "buzz" it sounded like a 
Hummingbird from the nest a foot or 
so, and darting back. A glance up- 
ward revealed the tiny bird humming 
around her home, on the crotch of a 
dead limb, about 5 feet from the body 
of a slender oak, and 30 feet above the 
ground. She seemed to be nervous be- 
cause of my presence and kept turning 
her head sidewise, and peering at me 
over the rim of her little gem of lichens, 
spider's web and cottony stuff. There 



were two slightly incubated eggs and 
they now are in my collection. 

There is another solemn fact that I 
always think of as a sort of "hoodoo"^ 
and that is to have some misfortune be- 
fall a new find. Either some "var- 
mint" will destroy the nest before the 
set is complete, or else some self-in- 
flicted acc'dent will happen. 

I well remember the first set of Chest- 
nut-sided Warbler that I found. I had 
succeeded in safely packing 3 of the 
eggs and had the fourth egg between 
my "first thumb and second finger' 
when a mosquito lit on my thumb and 
aroused my feelings — even more than 
the offended Warblers— which caused 
me to raise my hand, let it fall down 
upon the mosquito, smashing him into 
"smithereens" and incidentally the egg. 
C. F. Stone, 
Branchport, N. Y. 



Iowa Notes. 

"Oh! what so rare as a day in June?" 
Sometimes we ornithologists think that 
the early spring when the birds begin 
to arrive from the sunny south, is just 
as pleasant a time of the yea^, for after 
the dreary months of our severe win- 
ters, we are glad to greet our feathered 
friends once more. 

On the 13th of March I heard the first 
Bluebird of the season. While on my 
way to work in the morning I passed a 
small creek bordered on either side by 
willows, and from some where there 
came the unmistakable notes of our 
first spring arrival. A cold northwest 
wind was blowing at the time and snow 
and rain fell incessantly. The ther- 
mometer registered 36 degrees above 
zero all day. 

About the middle of the forenoon on 
the same day I saw a small flock of 
Red-winged Blackbirds flying high in 
air toward the south. Evidently their 
northward journey was begun a little 



74 



THE OOLOGIST. 



too early, and they had discovered the 
fact in short order. 

A flock of geese was seen flying north, 
ward at noon, but they became dis- 
couraged at the snow, rain and wind 
which they encountered and 'struck off 
to the east in a driving rain. 

At one o'clock in the afternoon seven 
Bluebirds were seen near Cedar Lake. 
They were on the south side of a wil- 
low covered bluff. The wind still blew 
coldly from the northwest, and snow 
was falling at the time they were seen. 

Sunday March 17th, I heard a Robin 
singing. There seems to be a scarcity 
of Robins this spring, this being the 
only one I have heard to date, (March 
20th,) but their ranks are filled with a 
goodly number of Bluebirds. I am 
very glad to note the increase of Blue- 
birds. Last season I found a pair 
breeding in an old stump near my 
home, but this was the only nest found 
for several seasons. 

Every ornithologist should have a 
camera. A good photograph of a bird, 
nest or eggs can tell more of the beauty 
of Nature than words can express or 
tongue can tell. The amateur "bird- 
ologist" will find the camera a great 
help in his study of bird life and bird- 
architecture. 

A few days ago the writer hunted up 
his climbers, blow-pipes, egg-boxes, 
drills, etc., and after looking them over 
and cleaning them, put them away 
where they could be found at a mo- 
ments notice. The time will soon 
come when they will be needed, and it 
is best to have them ready before- 
hand. 

I heard a Meadow-lark on the 18th 
of this month (March.) These larks 
are quite common during the nesting 
season, and their presence at this time 
of the year is a sure sign that spring is 
at hand. Several Red-winged Black- 
birds were serenading the sun in the 
early morning with their "kon-ker-ree." 
Song Sparrows also sang in the shrub- 
bery along the lake shore. 



The writer has a unique way of iden- 
tifying birds for field nse. It is a small 
book with alternating blank and ruled 
leaves. The left page being blank, and 
the right ruled. When a strange bird 
is seen, a rough outline of it is made on 
the blank page and then colored with 
colored lead pencils. A description of 
the bird is written on the ruled page, 
and it is very useful in identifying the 
specimen at hand. With this book in 
your panjamas, a pair of opera glasses, 
and a good "key" with you, cr at home, 
identification is made quife easy. Of 
course the exact colors cannot always 
be used, but they can be made ne^r 
enough to serve the purpose. 

Glen M. Hathorn, 
Cedar Rapids, la. 



Loxgilla portoricensis. 

I first met this bird in the hills back 
of Catana and Bayamon across the bay 
from San Juan during the spring and 
summer of '99. In a three months' so- 
journ in the Island of Vieques I did not 
observe it and do not think it occurs. 
At Aguadilla during the summer of 
1900 I found it common and again at 
Mayaguez the succeeding autumn and 
winter. In the brush of the lower hill- 
sides near San Juan Bay it seemed to 
evince no evidence of shyness or seclu- 
sion and was readily approached and 
taken, but around Aguachilla and May- 
aguez I found the opposite to be the 
base. 

A male skin now before me measurns 
six and one half inches in length. The 
color is a uniform blue-black with pur- 
plish reflections. A patch of Venetian 
red of light shade covers the crown ex- 
tending to eyes and base of bill and 
continuing in two slight stripes three- 
eighths' inch down on neck. Another 
patch of same color and oval shape 
covers throat and upper breast, meas- 
uring one and five-eighths inches from 
base of lower mandibles. A third 



THE OOLOGIST. 



75 



patch of this same color covers under 
tail coverts. 

The bill is rather short, though far 
less so than many of the Grosbeaks. 
The culmen measures live-eighths inch. 
The female is almost uniformly of an 
olive brown color with chestnut under 
tail coverts; the wing quills and tail 
feathers are dark brown, almost black, 
but edged with the same color brown 
as the rest of the plumage. The young 
of both sexes resemble the female. 

The flight is slightly bounding with 
successive, strong, separate strokes. 
The song reminds one forcibly of an 
exaggerated edition of the Song Spar- 
row's and the alarm notes are sparrow- 
like. I have he^rd the song just before 
twilight when the resemblance to that 
of the Song Sparrow was quite strik- 
ing. Their food is largely vegetable, 
but probably insects make up some 
part of it. In a hasty review of my 
note book I find record only of seeds 
and budH, but I am quite sure I have 
examined stomachs containing insect 
remains. 

The female Grosbeak is much shyer 
than the male and I have never had a 
good opportunity of watching her ways. 
The male is often found feeding on the 
hillsides and among the bushes without 
one being able to find the least trace of 
a female near. 

The nesting habits I know only by 
one nest found on June 15, 1900, in a 
narrow bushy pass between two hills 
near Aguadilla. It was built at an ele- 
vation of about 8 feet; placed in a 
clump of twigs against the body of a 
small tree. In appearance it was much 
like an enlarged edition of the nest of 
Euthia bicolor, being bell-&haped with 
entrance in the side. It was composed 
of weed and vine stems, dead leaves, 
and skeletons of leaves, and measured 
externally 7x3 inches in depth, the lat- 
ter measurement being to lower edge 
of entrance, the former to top of dome, 
— and 6i inches in diameter. The in- 



side dimensions were: Depth, 2 inches; 
diameter, 3 inches. 

The eggs were three in number and I 
sent nest and eggs to the U. S. Nation- 
al Museum without taking measure- 
ments or description, so must describe 
from memory. They were fresh and I 
should say about the size of the Car- 
dinals', of a light blue ground, and 
quite evenly and thickly sprinkled with 
fine dots of reddish brown. 

On June 13, 1900, I secured near this 
same spot a young female in immature 
plumage. Stomach's contents were 
small round weed seeds. 

B. S. BOWDISH. 



Pan-American Notes. 

If ycu don't know just where to go 
next summer you can't make any m is- 
take in going to the Pan-American Ex- 
position. 

The superb collections made in the 
far northwest by the Alaska Geograph- 
ical Society will possibly be shown at 
the Pan American Exposition. 



The best mineral exhibit ever made 
by Canada will be seen at Ihe Pan- 
American Exposition. Mine owners 
and nrospectors are giving the Bureau 
of Mines hearty co-operation in their 
collection of specimens for this display. 



The Bird Protective Association of 
America proposes to make an exhibit 
at the Pan-American Exposition which 
will be of great interest and general 
value to all agriculturists, particularly 
those interested in the forest and shade 
trees. The exhibit will consist of in- 
fected sections of various kinds of trees 
on which will be mounted the destroy- 
ing insects in their various stages of de- 
velopment, and the birds that devour 
them. 

The bird and insect life will be repre- 
sented in a natural way, thereby illus- 
trating the great value of bird life to 
all forms of vegetation. It will be the 
first exhibit of this nature ever made at 
an exposition, and it is intended to 
make it a most useful feature of the 
Pan-American. 



76 



THE OOLOGISl 



There are 5,000.000 or more persons 
in the United States who devote more 
or less of their time to the collection of 
stamps, coins, picturps, curios, etc., 
and the majority of them are members 
of the societies of collectors. Amonp: 
these are.- The American Society of 
Curio Collectors, the Philatelic Sons of 
America, the American Philatelic As- 
sociation, the American Numismatist 
Association, the American Camera 
Club Exchange and the Illustrated or 
Souvenir Card Exchange. These and 
many other associations of collectors 
will hold their annual meetings in Buf- 
falo during the week beginning August 
19th, while the Pan-American is in 
progress. 

On account of the many attractions 
offered by the Exposition and Niagara 
Falls, and the extraordinary opportun- 
ities which the collectors will have for 
adding to their specimens, it is expect- 
ed that this will be the most largely at- 
tended meeting of the different associa- 
tions ever held. 



When the Pan-American Exposition 
opens its gates at Buffalo, May 1, 1901, 
twenty-five years will have elapsed 
since the Centennial at Philadelphia. 
During all this time there has been 
nothing noteworthy of the kind in the 
east, and the new century may never 
see anything to rival or surpass the 
Pan-American in magnitude, richness, 
beauty and universal benefit. Its loca- 
tion, too, is one to assure a record- 
breaking attendance, for tahing it as a 
center and drawing a circle with a rad- 
ius of 500 miles, over 40.000,000 people 
— more than half the population of the 
United States — would be included in 
the area thus circumscribed, which 
would, moreover, include at least sev- 
enty-five per cent, of the nation's indus- 
trial and commercial wealth. As a 
center of railroads and waterways Buf- 
falo is also at the front with the tonnage 
of the Greas Lakes pouring into its 
harbor, and twenty-six steel highways 
reaching out in every direction. In 
1876, the year of the Centennial Expo- 
sition, the entire population of the 
United States scarcely equalled that 
now within the area indicated, and the 
same circle in diameter, with Chicago 
as its center, would not include over 
half that number. The resultant ad- 
vantages, both to the Pan-American 
Exposition and its exhibitors and pat- 
rons, are self-evident. 



A new booklet, just issued for the 
Exposition, tells a very charming story 
of its history and creation and de- 
scribes the beautiful city in which the 
festival has been developed and brought 
to completion. The booklet is embel- 
lished with many illustrations, includ- 
ing twelve coJoi ed plates of Exposition 
buildings and views. These will be 
sent free to applicants by the Bureau 
of Publicity so long as the edition lasts. 
All the principal buildings of the Ex- 
position have been completed for some 
time. The installation of exhibits be- 
gan many weeks ago, and there is 
every reason to expect that the Exposi- 
tion will have a sand-paper finish on 
the first of May— a remarkable achieve- 
ment, indeed, considering the unfavor- 
able weather and the history of other 
expositions in this regard. Some of 
the afterthoughts, such as State build- 
ings, will not ba done till about May 
20th, which is to be Dedication Day. 

Everyone who has visited the grounds 
of the Pan-Amoiican Exposition during 
the last few months has been astonished 
beyond expression upon beholding the 
magnitude and the exceptional beauty 
and novelty of the enterprise. It is 
very much larger than people generally 
have supposed, and it is apparent that 
the $10,000,000 which is the approxi- 
mate cost of the Exposition as a whole, 
has been expended most wisely and 
with the happiest results. The partic- 
ular novelty that is to be noted in this 
Exposition is discovered in the fact 
that in its exterior aspect it is a radical 
departure from former expositions. 
The buildings are arranged upon a har- 
monious and well developed plan, 
producing court settings and vistas of 
very charming character. The use of 
molded staff work and decorative 
sculpture upon the buildings and at all 
salient points within the courts, the 
liberal employment of hydraulic and 
fountain features, the floral and garden 
effects, the exquisite colorings of build- 
ings and architectural ornaments, and 
the illumination of the whole with 
more than 300,000 electric lamps, com- 
bine to make a picture of unsurpassed 
loveliness. The musical features are 
also of great importance and interest. 
The exhibit divisions are very complete 
and embrace the gamut of industrial, 
scientific and artistic activities of the 
people of the Western Hemisphere. 
The Midway, claimed to be the great- 
est in the world, has more than a mile 
of frontage. The restaurant features 



THE OOLOGIST. 



77 





Z 9 



a 


•A 


J 




3 


X 


H 


< 


>- 


u 


&-^ 


a: 



'4) 



fr* 



tj I- a* 3 



78 



THE 05L0GIST. 



are perfect and the Exposition, so far 
as human ingenuity and the wise ex- 
penditure of money can accomplish 
such a work, is complete to the last 
detail. 

Bnflfalo, too, is an ideal city for an 
exposition, having a summer climate 
that is tempered by the breezes from 
Lake Erie and, therefore, the most 
comfortable in which one may erjoy 
his summer outing. The people of the 
city have prepared themselves In a 
most ample way to entertain millions 
of guests during the Exposition. The 
private dwellings throughout the city 
have been thrown open to the public 
and, in view of the ample accommoda- 
tions, very moderate rates will prevail 



so that every visitor may have such ac- 
commodations as he is willing to pay 
for. He may have the palatial quart- 
ers of the fine hotels, or the quiet rest- 
fullness of a pleasant home. The 
average rate for accommodations near 
the Exposition grounds is about $1.00 
per night for lodging, with 25c to 50c 
added for breakfast, it being expected 
that guests will take their other meals 
upon the Exposition grounds. A num- 
ber of responsible companies have 
organized to find accommodations for 
visitors at any price th?y may desire to 
pay. The officers of these companies 
are centrally located and this system of 
management promises tT bring very 
satisfactory resiilts to all concerned. 



,^m 








t- 



K ;i tiki ;rr ^-- '/ 

' 1 ^^er 3 If ffS I ! ^^ 



^' horticulture: ^'^' n 
:tbuildiiscu " 




THE OOLOGIST. 



79 



"You might as well be out of the Bird World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

TUl^ OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore GUI, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C. W. Richmond and 
Other EminentOrnithoIogists. 

The Ospeey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

X^E OSPREV COMPANY, 

321-323 4% St., W^ashington, D. C. 



The Condor for igoi. 

This popular Californian, Illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader 1 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the ne-ting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are pre.sented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLTED AT $1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 




INDIAN BASKETS, Indian 
Beaded Buckskin Sioux Relics, 
j Indian Photos, Indian Pottery, 
Indian Weapons. Elk Teeth, Mex- 
ican Hand Carved Leather Goods, 
Mexican Drawn Linens, Shells, Minerals, Fos- 
sils. Ancient Stone Relics, Oregon Tiny Arrow- 
heads, Fossil Fishes, Fossil Leaves, Corals, 
Agate Jewelry, Curios. Wholesale and Retail. 
16th year. Two-story building full. New cat. , 
No. 10, 40 pages, finely illus., for 5c. L.W.STIL- 
WELL. Deadwood, S. Dak. 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Speeialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 




I^^Pfl?^ 



G IVE 
THE BOY 



ill teach him 

rl forest. It will giv 

t will cncoiirn 

'i> 10 give steadiness of 

1 be raliiahle qiialitie.s j 

1 L-ive him hcaUh. 

It^is an accurate ritlc. r"ts ^^^^y shot just where 
.1 hold it: is licht weight, graceful in outline, a bona hde 
n in ainieaianoe aud const'ruction: .nothing cheap about 
hilt the price. Made in three calibres — .'2-, .'-'o and .32 
m-lire. 

ir-PIii!i) Opon Sights.. $6.00 

>o. 1 S - TarSTct Si-rlils. ■'^..'iO 

>o. 1!» — Lyman ^i^lits 1».00 

•. our dealer for the "Favorite." If he doesn't 

„ we will send prepaid on receipt of price. 

■ul stamp for our new, i.lS-parre catalogue 

itaininn ' descrintions of our entire line of 

cs, target pistols and comhination rifles 

d jti^tnis. anil general information. 

J. STEVENS AUMS & TOOL CO.. 

Cliicopcc FaU8, Mass. ( 



THIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



80 



THE OOLOGIST. 







Jinierican Ornitbology. 

THE BEST ILLUSTRATED 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 



It gives the LIFE HISTORIES and FINE 
ILLUSTRATIONS of 4 or 5 N. A. BIRDS 
everj' month. The egg of each is shown FULL 
SIZE. 

It also contains short, interesting stories about 
birds. 




ONLY 50 CTS. A YEAR. 
SAMPLE COPY FREE. 



SUBSCRDBE NOW. 



CHAS. K. REED. 

Sta. A, WORCESTER, MASS. 



BARGAINS. 



Bird's EggS- Hundreds tiae sets and singles, will make you special low 
prices this mujjth. Send for lists. Berkshire Hills species collected to order, 
with nests ira sitti. 

Books and Periodicals. Chapman.s New "Bird Life" ed. in colors $1.70. 
American Ornithology and Condor both full year to New Subscribers for only 
$1.15 Let me quote you on any Book or Periodical published in any 
branch of literature. Back vols, and odd numbers, state your wants. 10 New 
Sets Osprey, vol. 2 at $1.00 each; 6 numbers vol. 1 at $1.00. Bendire's Life His- 
torio Vol. 1, $8 50. Send for Bulletins and Lists. 

Fishing Rods and Tacicle. Bristol Steel Bods Nos. 1, 2, 5. 6, SS.IO each. 
Nos 4, 8, il. 13, 15, 16, $4 00 each. Split Bamboos, $1.00 to $25.00. Lancewoods, 
$1 50 to $6 50. I >?uarantee to give you big value for your money. All numbers 
and styles of Bristol Rods, extra joints tips, etc., etc. Tront Flies, prood flies 
assorted 25 cts. a dozen. Out helper flies, 70 cts. dozen Bass Flies, 80 cts. a 
dozen, upward. Single Out Hooks, 16 cts. a dozen. Double Out Hooks. 25 cts. a 
dozen. Leaders, 5 cts., up. Lines and Reeds, every description. Baskets, 70cts. 
to $1.50. I have everything for all sorts of fishing in any part of the United 
States, Canada, etc., etc. Write your wants, I will save you money. 

Bicycles and Sundries. Hartford Tires, No. 80 $6.25 a pair. No. 77, $5.75 
■a pair. No. 70, $5 00 a pair. Veedtr Cyclometers $1.40. Mossberg "Cuckoo" 
'Chimes 39 cts. 1900 Columbia Chainless $48.00. No matter what you want in 
Bicycle Sundries let us quote. I have special bargains in wheels at from $5.00 up, 
both new and second hand. It will pay you to write me before you buy. I take 
eggs in part payment on wheels 

Benjamin Hoag, 

Stephentown, N. Y. 



The Oologist. 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVm. NO. 6 



ALBION, N. Y., JUNE, 1901. 



Whole No. 177 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exchanges" "For Sales," Inserted In thla department 
tor 25c per 25 words. Notices over 2.5 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each addltloaa. 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly FLrst-class specimens will be accepted In payment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the mimber following your name 
on the wi'apper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 177 your subscription expires with this issue 
180 " " " " Sept., '• 

183 •' '• " " Dec, " 

190 " - " " " June, 1902 

195 " ' •' " " Dec. " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 



IMPORTANT. 



This June Oologist was is- 
sued June 8th. The July is- 
sue will be printed on June 25. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
mail. 

NOTICE:— I will exchange ICO Datas, size 
61/4x3^, printed on Diana Bond paper, for every 
BO cts. worth of strict ly first class sets with 
complete data sent me. Sets returned if not 
entirely satisfactory. CLARENCE H. LUTH- 
ER, Payetteville, Ark., P. O. Box 322. 

WANTED:— Hummingbirds' nests with eggs 
in exchange for specimens or supplies. J. P. 
BABBITT, Taunton, Mass. 

FOR SALE: — One set of Raven eggs with 
nest at catalogue rates. ALVAH G. DORR, 
Taxidermist and Fur Dealer, Bucksport. Me. 

FOR SALE or EXCHANGE : Sets of 378 4-8, 
5-9, postpaid, for 4c per egR. or will exchange 
for Tobacco Tags. 10 tags for each egg. Get 
special price for 25 sets of 378, 1901 collecting. 
Address F. W. COLLINS, Garden City, Kan. 

TYPE:— I have about 15 fonts of display 
type and ornaments taken from a printer in 
payment of a bill. I will exchange for eggs 
or skins. Proofs on application. JAMES P. 
BABBITT, Taunton, Mass. 

TO EXCHANGE :-50 feet of seine (new) and 
good 22 cal. rifle for "Coues' Key, ' "N. A. 
Birds" or Davie's "Nests and Eggs." Good 
novels for eggs or either of above books. 
Write for exchange list. ROY E. GASTON, 
Hiawatha, Kan. 



FOR SALE:— Large Rocky Mountain sheep 
head, measuring l^Yi inches around base of 
horn, 35 inches around outside curve, 22 inches 
spread. Finely mounted. Price $hO 00. A rare 
bargain. Male deer heads,, all elegantly 
mounted. One large 13 point $15.00; one large 
13point$l,5-.00; one 10 point $12.00: one 4 point 
$10. CO Every .one a bargain at above prices. 
Enclose stamp for reply. L. B. GILMORE, 
HloominK Valley, Crawford Co., Pa 

FOR sale:— A new No. 2 Eureka Camera 
(Eastman make) pictures 3»/4x3l2. three (3) 
double plate holders and 1 dozen plates, all 
postpaid for 85.00 Also a No. l Vive (almost 
new) holds 12 plates 4'4x4ii postpaid for $3.00. 
cost $6.00. F. W. COLLINS. Garden City, 
Kan., Box 431. 

OOLOGISTS :— 1 have a fine lot of strictly 
first class sets and .singles for sale at 80 per 
cent, discount. Don't miss this chance if you 
care to purchase eggs cheaper than cheap. 
Send for list. ED KASCH, Lockhart, Tex. 

FOR SALE:— The following first class sih- 
gles for sale very cheap: 289b, 2c; 316, 3c; 335, 
I5c; 326, 15c: 38.5, 5c; 387. 3c: 394a. 10c: 4C6. 2c: 
443. 2c; 452, 3c; 4.54. 5c: .506, 2c: 507. 2c: 511, 2c: 
511b, 2c; 513. 3c: 513. 3c: 5.52. 2c; .593, 2c: 594, 10c; 
601, 2c; 604, 2c; 611. 2c; 627, 2c ; 633. 2c : 703, 2c : 
719b, 5c; 735a, If'c; 766. 2c: Orders of less than 
50cts. not dt^sired. Send before they are all 
gone ADOLF SCHUTZE, 1611 Sabine St„ 
Austin, Travis Co., Tex. 

look: look:— The following first class 
sets with data for sale: 316 13. 3c; 443 1-5 10c; 
506 1-5, 6c: .553 1-4 5c; .593 1-4, 5c: 594 1-4, 40c; 
633 1-4, 10c; 703 1-4, 1 5, 5c. The above price.s are 
per set postpaid, but orders for less than oOcts. 
not desired. ADOLF SCHUT2E, 1611 Sabine 
St., Austin, Travis Co., Tex. 

CAMERA and EGGS for EXCHANGE:— I 
offer nicely prepared, authentic sets of the fol- 
lowing In exchange for sets I can use: 79a 1-1, 
93 1-1. 107 1-1, 116 1-1. 286.1 1-1, 288 1-4, 1-5, 408 1-8, 
449 14. 498b 1-4, 1-5, 520 n-4, 611,1 1-4 to 6, 708 1 3. 
Also a 6x8 "Waterbury" view camera, made by 
the Scoville & Adams Co., with .shutter, 3 
double plate holders, carrying case and tripod, 
all in good working order. In sending lists of 
duplicates plea e mention number of each spe- 
cies you have to offer. JAMES r, BABBITT, 
Taunton, Mass. 



82 



THE OOLOGISl 



WANTED.— Sets Of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

WANTED.— May number, 1888, Vol. XXII, 
American Naturalist WILLIAM BREW- 
STER, Cambridge. Mass. 

FOR SALE:— Fancy and common Geodes, 
rangiag in price from 25c. to $5.00; halfs from 
10c to 50e. Special rates to colleges aid mu- 
seums. H. K. McLELLAN, Hamilton, Han- 
cock Co., Illinois. 179 

OOLOGISTS WANTED:— Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 1888, and April 
1889, and will give an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

WANTED: — Al sets Nos. 83, 172. 192, 193, 206, 
210, 228, 258a, 261,286, 301, 302, 310 478. 486, 618, 
701 Canoffer good sets, Belgian Hares, Abys- 
sinian and English Cavies, Fancy Pigeons and 
Pit Games. ALMON E. KIBBE. Mayville, 
N. Y. 177 

WANTED:— Oologists and others to read 
"Frederick Young," the prettiest book of the 
year. A line story with science and natural 
history intermixed. Tinted illustrations; gold 
top. Price $1.50. Superlative as a gift. Order 
through vour book dealer. By Charles Lin- 
coln Phillips, an old contributor to this jour- 
nal. H. A. DICKERMAN & SON, Publishers, 
Boston tf 

CASH PAID for bii'd, animal, nest and egg 
photos of specimens in situ or mounted. Must 
befree from copyright or other limitations, so 
that I can use them in my journalistic work. 
Write me soon and state lowest cash or ex- 
change price. Unmounted photos preferred. 
H. H. DUNN, Fullerton, California. 

PUBLICATIONS WANTED:— Complete vol- 
umes or single copies of the Osprey, Western 
Ornithologist, Bulletin Cooper Ornithological 
Club, Auk, O. and O , American Osprey, Con- 
dor, Iowa Ornithologist. Nidologist, Feather, 
Hummer. Oologist and others. I have A No. 
1 sets with data magazines, stamps and cash 
to faciliate exchange. Everything answered. 
G .EN M. HATHORN, 1600 E. Ave., Cedar 
Rapids, la. 

FOR SALE or EXCHANGE:— Complete file 
(4 volumes) Osprey, except Sept. 1899 No , $5.00; 
1 copy Nov. '97, 'ditto Jan. '98. the two 25 cents; 
Volumes 2, 3 and 4 Nidologist, $3 00: 1 copy 
each Sept. '94, May, Sept., Oct., Dec . 1895, the 
five 30 cents: Museum Vol. 2 complete. 75c: 
Bulletin Mich. O. Club Vol. 2 complete. Vol. 3 
Nos. 1 and 2, Vol. 1 No. 2, the lot 75 cents ; Nat- 
ural Science News, complete file, 60 cents. Pre- 
paid at above prices. Will exchange any of 
the' above, value for value, for set 30-30 short 
range reloading tools ; a 3 or 4 slide tripod for 
4x5 hand camera; a Stevens Diamond Model 
pistol, 22 calibre, 10 inch barrel; or a Bristol 
steel, jointed fly fishing rod for bass or trout. 
L. B. GILMORE, Blooming Valley, Crawford 
Co.. Pa. 

NOTICE !— Mounted Fish for sale: 

Leopard Shark. 18 inches $1 00 

Bullflsh, 22 inches 1 00 

Rock Sturgeon, 16 inches _ 1 00 

Send "-tamp for photograph. EDWIN H. 
REIBER, No. 160 Champlain street, Rochester, 
N. Y. 



WANTED:— Sets of 58. 64. 76, 137, 139, 261. 273', 
337, 339, 373, 387. 388, 390, 393, 394. .501-611. 614 and 
Others, especially 218, 230, 334. 364. Exchange 
or cash. All answered. A. E. PRICE, Grant 
Park, Ills. 177 

FOR SALE: -My entire collection of eggs. 
Over three hundred varieties in 8ets and some 
singles. List includes manv rare species, 
Massena Partridge, Rivoli Hummer, Bou- 
card's Snarrow, Raptores, Thrishers, Wrens, 
etc.. etc" They all go at bottom prices. Write 
for my list. F. C. WILLARD, 704 N. Cnerry 
St., Galesburg, 111. 

Al SETS RING PHE iSANT, Mt. Quail 
Sooty Grouse— 8 to I'i oggs each— a few Al 
skins Western Evening Grosbeak iu pairs for 
original sets and skins. Many common spec- 
ies wanted. A. G. PRILL, Scio, Oregon. 

WANTED FOR CASH:— I intend to start a 
collection of birds eggs and skins and intend to 
buy quite extensively. Please send me lists of 
Al sets and strictly first-class skins. I have a 
list of about 100 different sets of this locality 
for exchange for anything not in my collection. 
I also want sample copies of all bird maga- 
zines. W. E. LEE, Ocean Park, Cal. 

WANTED:— Some nicely prepared Western 
game heads to mount. If you haven't them 
but can get them next season, write me. Cash.. 
F M, RICHARDS, Farmington, Maine. 

FOR SALE:— "Birds," monthly magazine, 8- 
vols, and 6 extra copies and over 400 different 
plates, beautifully colored, nearly all of birds. 
The finest thing of the kind ever published. A 
bargain at $4.75. In splendid condition. I also 
want many of the back numbers of magazines 
advertised for in May Oologist and March 
and April "Recreation." Write at once to AL- 
BERT F. GANIER, Bowmar Ave, Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

WANTED— Fresh skins of all humming- 
birds, also others. Can give in exchange skins 
of this and other localities, also a few eggs in 
sets. E. VAN L. SMITH, 109 Good St., Akron, 
Ohio. 

INDIAN BASKETS, Indian 
Beaded Buckskin Sioux Relics 
(Indian Photos, Indian Pottery 
Indian Weapons. Elk Teeth, Mex- 
ican Hand Carved Leather Goods 
Mexican Drawn Linens, Shells, Minerals, Fos 
sils. Ancient -tone Relics, Oregon Tiny Arrow 
heads, Fossil Fishes, Fossil Leaves, Corals 
Agate Jewelry. Curios. Wholesale and Retail 
16th year. Two-story building full. New cat. 
No. 10. 40 pages, finely illus., for 5c. L. W.STIL 
WELL. Deadwood S. Dak. 

FENIKESE. 

A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 

famous Summer School. 

A 96 page book of much interest to 

students of Nature. 
Price only 25c (reduced from 35c). 

Prepaid. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r, 

Albion, N. Y. 




THE OOLOGIST, 



83 



THE CDRIO MONTHLY. 

Read What the Collectors Have to Sav about it: 



NUNDA, III. 
The Curio Monthly Is just such a magazine 
as all collectors need, and is the best magazine 
published in the ivorld. Frank A. Uox. 

SAULT Ste Marie, Ont. 
Allow me to congratulate you upon your 
very creditable first issufl. /'' was indeed a gen- 
uine surprise, and fills a long felt want. Any- 
thing I can do for you I shall be pleased to do. 
Wm. H. Laughlin. 
Shelter Island Heights, N. Y. 
The Curio Monthly at hand. I am much 
pleased with Its appearance and general make 
up, ana think It just about ./j^/.s the bill. 

Willis W. Worthington. 
Oak Mills, Kansas. 
Have received initial number of the Curio 
Monthly and am much pleased with its gen- 
eral appearance and contents. It is just swh a 
publication as ire hare been in need of for some 
time. Geo. J. Remsburg. 



Atlantic City, N Y. 
The Curio Monthly at hand and is. ^«« as 
silk. Lid you ever see any other paoer start np 
like it? c. C Downs. 

Mt. Vernon. III. 
Vol. I, No. 1 of the Curio Monthly has been 
received. Allow me to say that it not orly 
"fills a long felt want," but is exactly ••what 
the doctor ordered.'' M. L. C jleman 

High Hill, Mo. 
Received the April number of the Curio 
Monthly. No collector should be without it. 
Wm. Warner, Jr. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
The Curio Monthly came to hand yester- 
dcty and I was much surprised at its ••get up.'' 
It was more than I expected and I h'-artiiy cnn • 
gratulate you on your success with Vol. I. No. 
1 and trust that future numbers will not lack 
the merits of the first issue. 

Prank P. Jauke. 



[The publisher of the Oologist most heartily endorses the above testimonials. F. H. Lattin.] 

Subscription price only 25 cents per annum. Use the Exchange col- 
umns. The second issue (May 20th) contains 20 pages and cover. 

ALLEN JESSE REYNOLDS, Pub., 

Connersville, Indiana. 



RIDER AGENTS WANTED 

in each town to ride and exhibit a sample 1901 model 
bicycle of our manufacture. YOU CAN MAKE $10 TO 
$50AWEEK besides having a wheel to ride for yourself. 

1901 Models sr; $10 to $18 

'""•■'«» •"-•'is :.ts $7 to $12 




500 Second Hand Wheels^o i. co 

taken in trade by our Chicago retail stores, w^ III «PO 

many good as new 

We ship any bicycle QN APPROVAL to 

anyone without a cent deposit in advance and allow 

10 DAYS FREE TRIAL rc.^^ 

910 risk in ordering from us, as you do not need to pay 
a cent if the bicycle does not suit you. 
Hfl AlflT DIIV^ wheel until you have written for our 
UW nU I DUI FACTORY PRICES and FREE TRIAL OFFER. 

This liberal oSer has never been equaled and is a guarantee of 
_ the quality of our wheels. 

NT a reliable person in each town to distribute catalogues for us in 
for a bicycle. Write today for free catalogue and our special oflfer. 

MEAD CYCLE CO., Chicago. 



,0 . 



84 



rHE OOLOGIST. 



The Condor for 1901. 

This popular Californian, illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901. and its issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader 1 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three fiiU 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the ne-ting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT $1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publicaiion on ''The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



"You might as well be out of the Bird World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

"THR OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C. W. Richmond and 
Other EminentOrnithoIogists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Ospret. If you want to buy. sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

THE OSFREY COMCPA^iV, 

321-323 41/2 St., Washington. D. C. 



Buy a Postal Card, 



Wiite your tame and address on back 
and mail to me. 



YOU WILL RECEIVE, 

New Lists of Birds Eggs, Minerals, In- 
dian Relics and. all Naturalist's 
Supplies. Ready to luail. 

Address, ERNEST H. SHORT, 

Box 173 Rochester, N Y. 

(Formerly Albion, N. Y.) 

JAMES P. BAbBITT 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 



Birbtes 



A real gem. Teachers fall in love with it and 
pupils want to read it througa as soon as they 
begin it Appropriate for School and Home. 

It is the story of the experience of Delma 
and Harold who went to tiieir grandfather's to 
spend the summer studying and observing the 
birds. Contents are : 

BrRDiES AT Their Trades: Mason— Swal- 
low, BasketmaUer— Crimsonflnch, Weaver- 
Oriole. Fuller— Goldfinch, Carpenter— Wood- 
pecker. Tailor— Tailorbird. 

Birdies and Their Songs: In the Garden 
—Robin. In the Wood— Thrush In the Field- 
Bluebird. In the Sky— Lark. In the Home- 
Canary. In the Grove— MockingMrd. 

Birdies on the Wing: Hummingbird. 

The Birdies Farewell: Jack Sparrow 
and Jennv Wren. Goodbye 

The book is very prettily illustrated by 
Bertha L. Corbett. the arf.st of Sunbonnet 
Babies. The author is Ida S. Elson. of Phila- 
delphia, formerly a prominent Kindergartner 
of Bethlehem, Pa. 

Prices 

Cloth, 101 pp., 30c: Boards, 104 pp.. 25c. Spec- 
ial prices for class use, 

A single copu to the one who mentions The 
Oologist/o?' l/ic. 

WILL1AA\ G. SMITH & COMPANY, 

A'iNNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA. 



The OoLOGiST. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 6. 



ALBION. N. Y., JUNE, 1901. 



Whole No. 177 



The Oologist. 

A MontMy Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and items ot Interest to the 
student or Birds, tlieir Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription 50c per annum 

Sample copies 5c eacti 

Ttie above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber Is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

ia'"Remember that the publisher must be noti 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

5 cents per nonpareil line each Insertion. 

12 ILoes tn every inch. Seven Inches in a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing Inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
•'special rates," 5 cents per line is -'net," "rock 
bottom," "Inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there Is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 25 cents; loo lines. $5.00; looo lines, 
$50,00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to five times cash 
rates. Due BUls and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing will be honored only at regular rates in force 
at the date of issuance of said bUl or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or PostofQce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination wUl be accepted for sums un- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O., ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



"A Handsome Little Owl." 

Along the city street I wended my 
way to the high school building, having 
my eye open as usual for things orni- 
thological and 00 logical. I was passing 



the quarter-block occupied from time 
immemorial by Martin Tighe's truck 
patch, an infallible guide to the pre- 
cocity or tardiness of the egging sea- 
son, for when I saw Martin lining off 
the patch for his rows of early potatoes, 
I knew certainly that two haadsome 
eggs were waiting my gathering in the 
nest in the big Cottonwood overhang- 
ing the creek. On this particular 
morning a most unexpected event oc- 
curred. Now I pride myself on my 
acquaintance with every spot in my 
parish that is likely t^ yield any oiilog- 
ical products; but theie right before my 
eyes, in one of the ancient fenceposts, 
not more than three feet from the 
ground, was a small opening suggestive 
of a nest cozlly ensconced in the bot- 
tom of a cav ty. Strange that I had 
never seen that hole before. Wonder- 
ing how that promising cavity had thus 
eluded, my gaze while passing the spot 
four times a day for several years, I 
rapped smartly below the opening, 
while all sorts os ccjlogical anticipa- 
tions fluttered through my mind. 

Wonder of wonders! Out popped a 
tiny specimen of the Owl kind, a hand- 
some little owl, which flattered aimless- 
ly for a moment about my head, and 
then perched upon the fence, scarcely 
beyond the length of my arm. My heart 
almost stopped beating in my excited 
bosom, for I could readily see that it 
was one of those little Elf Owls, or a 
Pygmy Owl, — ah yes, it was indeed a 
Pjgmy Spotted Owl, no larger than a 
Passer domesticus, with beaut ful white 
plumage mixed with longitudinal spots 
of grayish white. I give all these de- 
tails because some collectors are so 
critically anxious about accurate identi- 
ncation. 



m 



THE OOLOGIST. 



As I peered anxiously into the cav- 
ity, which seemed much larjjer and 
rounder than I fancied would he con- 
nected with the neat circular entrance, 
I saw that there were eggs lying in the 
bottom of the hollow. Was I indeed 
about to secure a full set of eggs of this 
rare species, about which I had read 
with covetous eagerness in the "Man- 
ual" and which the books declared was 
only a casual straggler in California 
and Arizona? One, two,— tears al- 
most blinded my eyes as I realized that 
the two, pearly white, small sub-spher- 
ical eggs were an incomplete set. Why 
had fate been so cruel to me, when 
other collectors were always getting 
sets of six and even seven? (I once 
heard of a tet of eight.) What should 
I do? It would never do to leave this 
desideratum in the exposed site, with 
hundreds of children passing several 
times daily; but to take an io complete 
set of so rax'e a species would be to de- 
preciate their value, and would leave a 
traia of regrets which would linge all 
my future days with sadness whenever 
I looked over my culogical treasures. 

Something must be done, and done 
quickly, for a group of children are 
coming, «.nd my aclions would draw 
their attention to the very thing I want- 
ed them not to know. While rapidly 
considering whether to take the incom- 
plete set and blame fortune for the re- 
sults, or to take the chances upon the 
nest's being overlooked by the children, 
even as I had overlooked it for years, 
keeping my eyes glued upon the im- 
maculate treasures in the brightening 
cavity, I was surprised by the hand- 
some little Owl's fluttering down and 
striking me plump in the small of the 
back,— why, 'tis nothing but the baby 
planting his foot abruptly against my 
spinal column, and I awake to find that 
Saturday morning has arrived, bring- 
ing a fine clear day for a tramp after 
products of Bubo virginianus sub- 
■arcticus. 



Well, though no little Spotted Owl, 
nor Elf Owl, or other desideratum so 
valuable, allure me afield, I'm off for a 
cruise to a grove five miles away. On 
the preceding Monday evening, while 
mousing around a haw thicket sur- 
rounding two large cottonwoods, I had 
detected an indistinct form aperch up- 
on a low limb near the trunk of one of 
the cottonwoods. Though I was seven- 
ty-five rods away, as I circled the thick- 
et there remained the same distance be- 
tween the two prominences surmount- 
ing the upper corners of the crouching 
form, and I became aware that I was 
being watched with the jealous eyes of 
Master B. v. subarciicus. So starting 
out about Saturday noon, I made my 
way to the thicket. No Bubo was 
about the place. However I made a 
thorough search through the grove, in- 
specting every old nest of Crow, Hawk 
and even Magpie. I had not expected 
to find the Owls nesting there, though, 
for I had frequently inspected the 
thicket and knew about what it offered. 
Continuing my way I faced a cutting 
dash of snow pellets f^r nearly two 
mile', until 1 reached a grove of cotton- 
woods where I suspected the Bubos 
were located for their second attempt 
at nidification. This was on April 13th; 
I had despoiled the same pair of three 
eggs on March 16th. 

Before I entered the grove, I was in- 
formed that the Bubos were there 
domiciled and astir by a small colony 
of Crows which inhabited the place. 
Sure enough, I had scarcely stepped 
among the bare trees when I flushed 
the male Owl, and sent him flapping 
away at the head of a dozen deriding 
Crows. It happened that he alighted 
near the female, who immediately took 
wing, drawing after her the parcel of 
Crows. The male thereafter remained 
upon this perch, giving utterance oc- 
casionally to a deep-voiced but subdued 
hooting. As the female was thus 
abroad, it was necessary for me to 



THE OOLOGIST. 



87 



climb to each suspected nest, not know- 
ing the precise site; and guided by my 
experience with Bubo in Illinois, where 
sycamores grow tall and Bubos nest 
high, I ascended to several that were 
conspicuously high. At length, having 
examined all the likely sites, I conclud- 
ed that the occupied nest must be an 
insignificant affair in the top of a slen- 
der tree. Pushing through the thicket 
to reach the tree, I discovered a large, 
lean-to nest against the trunk of a 
small tree, the distance of the structure 
from the ground being only ten feet. 
Think of that, Dr. Strode, only ten 
feet. Little thinking that B. v. sub- 
arcticus was living so far beneath his 
privilege, I scrambled up the trunk 
from sheer force of habit, and ah, there 
were two eggs, generously blotched 
with blood as though produced through 
sore affliction, lying lonesomely in a 
cavity ten inches across and two inches 
deep. Incubation advanced to blood 
and matter, as I wrote in the data. 
And thus my Owl dream partially came 
true. 

P. M. SiLLOWAY, 

Lewistown, Montana. 

The Turkey Vulture. 

Cathartes Aura. 



Throughout southern California, 
from the booming surf of the hoary 
old Pacific to the snow capped summits 
of the Sierras, the Turkey Vulture, or 
"Buzzard" as he is commonly called, 
is by far the most abundant raptorial 
bird. Hawks, mostly of the Red-tailed 
and Red-billed varieties are common 
residents of certam limited districts 
but these vultures are well nigh univer- 
sal, in fact, so plentiful are they that 
one who has lived in this Golden state 
for any length of time, notes their ab- 
sence from landscape to a greater de- 
gree than he does their presence in it. 

In spring and early summer the big 
dark colored fellows are found most 



abundantly back in the higher hills but 
as soon as the young are fully fledged, 
they begin to scatter out over the low- 
lands where the food their manner of 
life demands is more easily obtainable 
than along the sterile hillsides. This 
family exodus takes place about the 
end of August, but the huge California 
Condors, who occasionally frequent the 
same hills with their lesser relatives, 
do not join in this local migration, 
preferring to take their chances in their 
naiive hills. These huge scaven)2;ers, 
however, do not nest with us, if so my 
knowledge on the subject is at present 
quite limited, ss the Turkey Vulture do. 

In this immediate vicinity, and, I 
may say, throughout the northern part 
of this county (Orange), their eggs may 
be looked for from April 1st to May 1st. 
Before this date sets are seldom com- 
plete and afterwards my experience has 
been that most eggs are "past redemp- 
tion" even by such all powerful means 
as caustic potash. I admit, on the 
other hand, that full sets of the f ggs of 
this vulture have been found near here 
earlier than April 1st, and on the 10th 
day of March of this year while out on 
the trail of a pair of Pacific Horned 
Owls, I found two fuzzy young "buz- 
zards" under a shelving ledge of rock 
on a barren hillside, and I have read of 
fresh sets which have been taken a few 
miles southeast of this place during the 
last ten days of May. 

Notwithstanding the many floating 
rumors which have come to me of 
"buzzards" that built huge nests in 
trees. I have never yet succeeded in 
finding the Turkey Vulture nesting 
anywhere save in the ground, and then 
always in little caves, never "among 
the brush on a sidehill" as I have read 
of other collector's doing. Nor do 
they nest in hollow trees, a trait com- 
mon to them in Texas and other Gulf 
states. This is not from any lack of 
dead trees for every fool camper who 
passes through our canyons must of 



THE OOLOGIST. 



necessity build his Sre beneath the 
overhanging trunk or the spreading 
roots of some giant sycamore or oak, 
so as to leave some mark of his vanda- 
lism on a creation far beyond his in- 
finitesimal ability to replace. 

I have now in my collection several 
sets of this species taken in Texas, New 
Mexico, Arizona and other southwest- 
ern states as well as eight sets of my 
own collecting; further I have sets 
from states east of the Mississippi also, 
and it is worthy of note that all the 
western and southwestern collected 
eggs are much larger, more clearly 
shell marked and more brilliant in 
their outer markings than are those 
from the eastern states. The set rep- 
resented in photo herewith averages 
fully .25 inch longer than the average 
of four sets from east of the Father of 
waters. 

As may be seen from the illustration 
this is a well marked set, yet I have 
seen many, ana taken three or four 
which were more strongly marked even 
than these. They were taken April 
12, 1900, from a hole, two by three feet, 
in a rocky ledge on a steep sidehiil. No 
diflaculty was experienced in walking 
directly to the nest. In fact I have not 
noticed that they try to conceal their 
nests or to place them in inaccessible 
positions 

This year on April 5th I took another 
set from the same locality and only a 
few feet from the old hole, so I suppose 
it was from the same pair of birds. The 
markings persist in size and position, 
while the four eggs could not be separ- 
ated by the calipers alone. No attempt 
at nest building is ever made and the 
nest smells worse than the Red-tails' I 
mentioned in the May Oologist. 

I have never seen any egg which sur- 
passes the egg of the Turkey Vulture 
in beauty unless perhaps it be that the 
Emeu, one egg of which I obtained 
from the Publisher of the Oologist not 
long ago. „ 

Harry H. Dunn, 
FuUerton, California. 



A Consideration. 



In reading many of the articles in 
current periodicals, a question must be 
forced upon the minds of all true bird- 
lovers. By bird-lovers I do not mean 
to include those who simply see in 
birds charming objects awakening a 
coveting desire for personal possession, 
but those who recognize in these 
"feathered gems" fellow creatures 
having right to existence, and the 
power to enjoy same, entitled to re- 
spect and possessini? traits of character 
worthy of earnest and forbearing study. 
The question which is suggested to 
such students is how many persons in 
the United States, collect birds their 
nests and egsrs, one or all, of these how 
many are there whose work in this 
line actually adds to the sum total of 
human knowledge, and of those who do 
so add what percentage of their collect- 
ing work continues to a desirable end. 
In short what percentage of all such 
collecting throughout the country, ac- 
tually yields commendable results and 
what percentage contributes to untold 
evil? 

These are considerations which effect 
not alone the mere "collector," but also 
at least nine-tenths of those persons 
who are posing as sincere students, and 
perhaps conscientiously believe in the 
value of their work. 

It is not my purpose here to enter 
into that much discussed question of 
what limits in collecting, the cause of 
advancement of knowledge justifies. 
"Who shall decide when doctors dis- 
agree'" And that they do so disagree 
on this subject, the columns of the pub- 
lications on ornithology amply testify. 
It has simply occured to me as a con- 
sideration, why should not those who 
are conscientious in the matter ask 
themselves in sincere impartial hones- 
ty, what the character of their work,., 
their ability for it, and its results justi- 
fy? 



THE OOLUGI.ST 



89 



When studeats whose conscieutious- 
ness it would be unjust to lightly ques- 
tion, indulge in rt^peat^'dlycoileetingnot 
first alone, but second fnd third layings 
of birds whose economic value is now 
becoming known throug;hout thereilma 
of agriculture us well as ornithology, 
and birds and their nests and eggs are 
amassed iu large series, l>y an ever in- 
cressiagiy largo number throughout 
the country, aside fjom the question of 
consideration of the rights of these 
weaker felluw creature?, asid i from 
consideration of the marked decreas- 
ing cf numbers of o! j cts of beauty 
and iatere.-t, adding immeasurably to 
the power of 0!ij>yment of nature, and 
contributing a fertile subject for legit- 
mate, harmless, and profitable study, 
there is furnished to the great mass of 
the people as just cause for complaint 
from an ecouomie standpoint and not 
alone is the study of ornithology im- 
paired by tho lus-i of sul'jeot-i but its 
cause is injured irreptrably in the mind 
of tbou-ands of { eople Mho hold the 
pleasure of diily observation of the birds 
as tiny friet.d->, vastly above all the ac- 
cumulated scientific knowledge of the 
past. 

If a conueleat student can look at 
an amassed series of a hui dred speci- 
mens of some species of a bird, or of a 
thousand eggs, and can conscientiously 
feel that the redults to true and valu- 
able knowledge has justified this ter- 
ribly seri')us sacrifice, it is my belief 
that he is above reproach. But if he 
has otie such specimen ia his collection 
which has yielded nothing to knowl- 
edge, whoso sacrifice of life has been 
in vain, then it appeais to me that a 
careful consideration of the fact must 
give him regret, kesn and sincere in 
proportion as his motives are honest 
and co:,scieutiou8. 

When WH review the enormous num- 
ber of specimens iu the private col- 
lections of the country, if we were 
able to trace all the results they have 



yielded in the way of increase of know- 
ledge, should we find the sacrifice jasti- 
fiedv And this does not touch thii mat- 
ter of the millions of specimens gone 
to early desi ruction with never a 
to contribute to any: hincr, throuj^h the 
misguided efforts of over-zea'ous col- 
lectors whose ability to obtain, entirely 
replaced auy ability to abstract ficts. 

It seems to me then that when one is 
inclined to turn to the pursuit of this 
study he sho'.ild earnestly. thoLigh:fally 
Ri^k himself the que^jtiou what bis pris- 
s'ible ability justifies in t:\e rnatter of 
coih-cting. 

If such a student would discip i.ie 
himself, first by an apprenticeship in 
observing and accumulating facts with- 
'iut tbe destroyin^r of life and the en- 
jovmi'Kt of it, would not m-vuy fall by 
the wayside, and -^ ould not the gain be 
vastly gn-ater and the sacrifice greatly 
]e s?. If a man has '•~erved such an ap- 
prertieeship, studying birds by means 
of c«me:a, opera glasses ar^d the many 
means whereby their lives are not de- 
stroyed, there has come to him oppor- 
tunity for the acquirement of more 
facts and original knowledge than 
m^ny imagine, and is not tha': man 
b tter fiUed thereby to enter into the 
serious part which deals with those 
lives that the true bird lover will rev- 
erence second only to human life and 
will not lightly sacrifice to the passing 
desire of the moment or to a mistakea 
idea of need. 

Finally, when a man has fully deter- 
mined that he ia justified in the pursuit 
of that high branch of tne stu 1y which 
occasionally requires the sacrifice of 
life or happiness, he should u e the ut- 
most care to assure himself that his 
methods are such as to guard against 
waste. When one reads of men taking 
eggs from the nest when far advanced 
in incubation and then failing to save 
them with a weak excuse that they are 
gone beyond all hope he loses all pa- 
tience. I have taken a set of Red- 



^ 



THE OOLOGIST 



shouldered Hawk in which the young 
had already pipped the shell, and 
blown them as fairly first class speci- 
mens, by the careful use of caustic 
potash and patience. I took a set of 
Scarlet Tanager in which the youpg 
had feathers formed and injecting 
caustic potash and occasionally shak- 
ing, the contents in three days became 
transparent, and save for the feathers 
Tjlew out, thin, almost as water. I 
have also saved sets of both large and 
small eggs in first class condition by al- 
lowing them to stand a day or two with 
water in, in the absence of caustic 
potash. 

I wish I might have an expression of 
opinion on this consideration from my 
fellow students, not a hasty, biased or 
prejudiced one, but the result of care- 
ful, honest consideration from all its 
aspects. 

;. Particularly I would like to see ex- 
pressed the views of those students 
whose work extends over sufficient 
time to give them the guidance of ex- 
perience. 

B. S. BOM^DISH, 

Mayaguez, Porto Rico. 
May 18, 1901. 



Pan-American Notes. 



On and after June 1st, as time and 
"patients" will permit, ye Editor in- 
tends to take an occasional day off and 
do the Pan-American — all exhibits and 
portions of exhibits containing anything 
of special interest to the readers of tne 
OoLOGiST in the specimen and curio 
line will be carefully noted, in order 
that the many who visit the Exposition 
with a limited amount of time at their 
disposal, will surely see all pertaining 
to their favorite hobby. 



For the past five years we have spent 
the bulk of our time in Buffalo and are 
fairly well acquainted with the Pan- 
American city and its accommodations. 
We have many personal friends and 
acquaintances, who are taking roomers 
and boarders during the season and 
in case any of the Oologist readers 



intend visiting the Exposition and 
have no biding place in view, we will 
gladly turn them over to the tender 
mercies of a friend. Write exactly what 
you want and how long you intend to 
stay etc. 



The following regarding the wonder- 
ful exhibit of the Smithonian Institution 
and the National Museum at the Pan- 
American Exposition, is rehashed from 
an interview with Dr. Frederick W. 
True, chi* f curator of the Bureau of 
Biology of I he Smithsonian Institution 
and Government Commissioner of the 
Institution to the Pan-American: 

The display is the finest ever made 
by the Institution and the National 
Museum, not excepting Chicago. While 
the quantity of the exhibit at the Pan- 
American may not exceed that of Chi ■ 
cago, the qu^iity will far excel it. 

It forms one of the largest exhibits in 
the Goverflment Building. Every 
bureau of the Institution is represented, 
but, as is naturally to bo expected, the 
National Museum makes the most ex- 
tensive display. 

The Institution has several exhibit 
illustrations of its history as well as 
some showing new developments in 
the work it also shows the will of 
James Smithson, the founder of the es- 
tablishment, and copips of his scientific 
writings. Pictures of the chancellors 
and secretaries of the Institution is 
also shown, with views of the build- 
ings, offices, the Hodgkins fund medals 
and publications, and, finally, a com- 
plete set of all the publications of the 
Institution and all its bureaus from the 
year 1846 to the present, comprising 
hundreds of volumes. 

The National Zoological Park is rep- 
resented by a large relief model show- 
ing all the natural features of the park 
and the animal houses, ponds, bridges 
and other matters of interest. This 
model has been worked out with great 
care and will show every important de- 
tail with exactness. The model will be 
supplemented by many interesting pho- 
tographs of picturesque points in the 
park. 

The exhibit of the National Museum 
consists almost entirely of new objects 
not shown at any previous exposition. 
The Pan-American idea runs through 
the entire exhibit, and very little that 
is not American will be shown. The 
plan has been to select large and strik- 
ing objects and exhibit them singly, 



THE OOLOGIST. 



91 



rather than to show extensive series of 
small specimens The exhibit !<; divid- 
ed into three sections — zoology, geology 
and anthropology. 

In zoology the museum has been 
fortunate in obtaining many rare and 
striking specimens for the exhibit, 
which is confined to American verte- 
brate animals. Among mammals 
should be mentioned the Kodiak bear 
of Alaska, the largest boar in the world; 
the singular little gray Glacier bear, 
which lives among the snow fields back 
of Mt. St. Elias; the giant moose, the 
wild black sheep of British Columbia, 
and Dall's sheep, which is enfrely 
white; the rare West Indian seal, the 
musk ox, the mountain caribou, and 
others. All the larger species are 
mounted on bases with accessories in- 
dicating their natural surrounding- and 
habits 

The bird exhibit comprises about 300 
of ihe most brilliant and striking forms 
in America, including many West 
Indian and South American species, 
such as the condor, the American 
ostrich, the macaws and parrots, um- 
brella bird, bell bird, cock-of-the rock. 
The taxidermy of both birds and mam- 
mals is of a very high order. 

Among reptiles the most striking ex- 
hibit is a gigantic snapping turtle from 
Texas, known as the alligator snapper. 
The creature is about five feet long, and 
is the largest fresh water turtle ever 
found in America. This part of the ex- 
hibit also includes the poisonous and 
non-poisonous American snakes— rattle- 
snakes, moi'casins, boa constrictor, 
spreading adder", together with many 
striking lizards, frcgs, tnads, and sala- 
manders, including species from Cuba 
and Porto Rico. 

American fishes are fuUv represented. 
The museum has had agents at Key 
West, Florida, and on the Amazon 
River collecting specimens specially for 
the Buffalo exhibit. These have been 
prepared by a new method, by which 
their natural form and much of their 
brilliant color is preserved. A novelty 
in fishes is a large model of luminous 
deep sea fish, arranged by means of 
electrical attachments so that it will 
phosphoresce, as it is known to do, when 
alive in the depths of the ocean. Many 
of the fishes from the deepest waters 
are exceedingly grotesque and wonder- 
ful in structure, but on account of their 
small size and their bad condition when 
dragged from the depths of the sea, 
they are little known to the public. 



The geological exhibits are diversified 
and chiefly American. One very in- 
teresting series consists of examples of 
the various elements which occur un- 
combined in the rocks, such as gold, 
silver, copper, lead, mercury, platinum, 
carbon and iron. Strange as it may 
seem, one of the rarest of these ele- 
ments is iron. The exhibit contains 
native iron from Greenland, and a por- 
tion of an iron meteorite from New 
Mexico. Another interesting object is 
a large platinum nugget worth about 
$200 Carbon is represented by a dia- 
mond crystal, a piece of graphite, and 
specimens of the curios and valuable 
black diamond, known as carbonade, a 
piece of which the size of half a pea is 
worth about $40. 

A series of minerals includes every 
important variet'^, and no small num- 
ber of very striking forms, largely from 
America. 

Another especially interesting ex- 
hibit at this time is a series of the rocks 
of the Hawaiian islands, which, as is 
well known, are namely lavas The 
exhibit is accompanied by photographs 
of the interior of the craters of the vol- 
canoes. An exhibit of concretionary 
structures found in minei-al and rocks 
will include soma magnificent slabs of 
the concretionary granite found in New 
England. Collections of deposits from 
the geysers and hot springs of Yellow- 
stone Park are also shown. 

Still another section of the geologi- 
cal exhibits is devoted to fossil verte- 
brate animals and fossil wood. Of the 
fossil nnimals, the one which will 
doubtless attract most attention is the 
skeleton of the gigantic mammal-like 
reptile known as Triceratops. This 
creature was larger than the largest 
elephant, and had an immense bony 
shield on the back of the head, as well 
as a pair of great horns over the eyes. 
Besides the ske'eton, a large painting 
representing the animal as it must have 
appeared when alive, and a model is 
also shown. 

Another extraordinary creature ex- 
hibited is a bird with teeth, known as 
Hesperornis. This remarkable bird was 
more than three feet high. The skele- 
ton is practically complete Much at- 
ten' ion will doubtless be attracted by 
the collection of fossil woods from 
Arizona, many of which are extremely 
brilliant in color. 

Hardly less striking is the Zeuglodon, 
a whale-like carnivorous animal from 
Alabama, which reaches a length of 50 



92 



THE OOLOGIST. 




THE OOLOGIST. 



93 



or 60 feet. It is a strange combiDation 
of whale, sea-cow and sea-lion, and has 
long been a puzzle to zoologists. 

An extensive display of American 
anthropology, prepared in co-operation 
with the Bureau of American Ethnol- 
ogY) completes the exhibits from the 
museum. The most prominent fea'ure 
of this exhibit is large family Kroups, 
representing typical native American 
peoples, from the Patagonian to the 
^Arctic Eskimo. Each group will serve 
to give an idea of the costumfs, sur- 
roundings and mode of life of the people 
to which it relates. Close attention 
has been paid to every detail of the ac- 
cessories and the modeling and paint- 
ing of the human figures are of a high 
order. 

The principal peoples represented 
are the Eskimo of the farthest north, 
the Canadian Algonquins. the Thlin- 
kins of Southeastern Alaska, the bas 
ket making digger Indians of Cali- 
fornia, the Zuni Pueblo Indians of Mex- 
ico, the Mayas of Yucatan, the Napo 
Indians of the Upper Amazon, and the 
Rhea-hunting Indians of Patagonia. 

Surrounding the groups are many 
cases filled with collections representing 
the arts of the Indians, their house- 
hold utensils, dress, weapons, etc. A 
series of models of habitation, the wig- 
wam, the snow-house and pueblo is al- 
so shown. 

The public will doubtless find a great 
deal to interest them in the collection 
of native baskets, which are shown. 
This series includes every type of ab- 
original basket making in the western 
hemisphere. There is many beautiful 
pieces, such as the Aleutian fine grass 
weaving, the pomo-coiled ware of Cali- 
fornia, and the diagonal weaving of the 
caribs of Guiana, the first Indians met 
by Columbus. 



With the object in view of presenting 
a route of wholesome fun and instruc- 
tion, some of the greater enterprises 
and chief Midway attractions at the 
Pan-American Exposition, have gone 
together in an organization called the 
Red Star Route, guaranteeing absolute- 
ly their entire offerings as wholesome 
and free from all objectionable features. 

Naturally, the first visit will be made 
to the electric reproduction of the Burn- 
ing Mountain of the Sandwich Isles— 
the Volcano of Kilauea, because of its 
nearness to the main entrance to the 
Midway. The spectator stands within 
an extinct crater of this perpetual fire 
mountain of Hawaii, 



Next to the Volcano you visit the 
greater Hawaiian Village, where you 
will find the now world renowned Na- 
tive Band of Hawaii, whose music, es- 
pecially the Hawaiian national airs, 
are delightful, and the famous Hulu 
hulu dancing girls. 

From all tbis fun, npxt, for the sake 
of patriotism, visit the great electric 
cyclorama, the Battle of Mission Ridge, 
an enormous reproduction of the great 
battle. Its management earnestly begs 
that the G. A. R. will make their com- 
modious waiting rooms their general 
headquarters. 

Moving along the vast Midway you 
are sure to be attracted by the quaint 
music of the Filipino Band. The Fili- 
pino Village is a big colony and con- 
tains representatives from nearly all 
the races inhabitating the islands. They 
range from cinnibalLsm to the highest 
degree of civilization. Many of the 
women are extremely beautiful. 

Near the Administration building 
you will find a handsome brick Vene- 
tian edifice, which contains the great- 
est wonder of all the Exposition — the 
Infant Incubators, from the London 
and Berlin Institutes, which has for its 
object the saving of the lives of poor 
little unfortunate babies who happen 
to have been prematurely born. 

On the Midway, and immediately op- 
posite the great Horticultural building, 
you will tind the Herodian Palace, con- 
taining the sacred spectatorium, Jeru- 
salem and the Crucifixion of Christ. 
Softly you tread with reverential step 
the grand staircase and look over the 
great scene. It is all sublimely realistic, 
and the most holy feelings of which the 
human heart is capable are aroused. 
This great work covers an area of can- 
vas four hundred feet round by sixty 
feet high. 

The price to each of these leading 
Midway attractions has been uniform- 
ly fixed at 25 cents. 



Although ground was first broken for 
the Pan-American Exposition on the 
25th day of September, 1899, it was not 
until June 4th of last year that the first 
timber was raised aloft as the begin- 
ning of the superstructure of the first 
building. Since that day a beautiful 
city of more than one hundred build- 
ings has sprung into existence. The 
magic of 20th Century methods has 
wrought a wondrous work in the con- 
struction of this beautiful and costly 
Exposition, which on Wednesday, May 



THE OOLOGIST 



1, was formally opened for a six 
months' festival. 

The completed exposition is a dis- 
tinct triumph for every one concerned 
in the mammoth enterprise. It may be 
said to the credit of Buffalo that her 
citizens have furnished the money for 
it, receiving no Government aid. The 
entire amount appropriated by the Fed- 
eral Government for the Exposition 
nas been expended under the direction 
of the Government Board of Federal 
exhibits exclusively. The New York 
State appropriation has also been ex- 
pended under the same conditions. 
The total cost of the Exposition, includ- 
ing the Government and State appro- 
priations, the cost of the Midway and 
other buildings, is conservatively esti- 
mated at $10,000,000. The Exposition 
was first proposed by a number of citi- 
zens at the Cotton States Exposition at 
Atlanta, in 1895. Its official history, 
however, began in June, 1897, when a 
company for its development was or- 
ganized by several prominent citizens 
and received the approval of the City, 
State and National governments. It 
was at first intended to hold the Expo- 
sition in 1899, but the Spanish-Ameri- 
can War caused its postponement to 
the present year. The preliminary or- 
ganization was superseded by a larger 
one with ample capital for the Exposi- 
tion, and from the time of the reorgan- 
ization the work has moved forward 
rapidly. This organization consisted 
of 25 directors, with the Hon. John G. 
Milburn as president, Edward Fleming 
secretary, George L. Williams, treasur- 
er, and John N. Soatcherd as chairman 
of the Executive Committee. 

The Hon. William I. Buchanan, at 
that time United States Minister to the 
Argentine Republic, was unanimously 
elected director-general, November 1, 
1899. He had previously been the di- 
rector of Agriculture. Live Stock and 
Forestry at the World's Columbian Ex- 
position at Chicago. His ability as au 
organizer and director of a great enter- 
prise was at once manifest, as the work 
of the Exposition has gone forward 
without apparent friction or delay. 
The original plan called for some twen- 
ty large exhibit buildings and to these 
many more have been added The Ex- 
position plot consists of 350 acres 
in the northern part of the city, 
accessible from every direction by 
electric cars, and having as favorable a 
steam railway service as could possibly 
have been chosen. The general archi- 



tecture of the Exposition follows the 
Spanish Renaissance. The plan was 
worked out by a board of eight leading 
architects, representing several of the 
leading cities of the country. 

The most comprehensive view of the 
Exposition is, perhaps, obtained from 
tne Esplanade from a point a few rods 
north of the Triumphal Causeway. 
Here the visitor, with one sweep of the 
eye, may see nearly all of the principal 
buildings of the Exposition. The Tri- 
umphal Causeway, behind him, is a 
magnificent structure, designed by 
John M. Carrere, chairman of the 
Boatd of Architects. Four tall pylons 
are connected by swinging cables. The 
pylons are surmounted by four stand- 
ard bearers, designed by Karl Bitter, 
the director of sculpture. The bridge, 
as a whole, is intended to express the 
pride of the American people In their 
achievements. The standard bearer 
represents a muscular youth upon a 
rearing horse. Below him are the 
trophies indicative of feudalism, slav- 
ery and tyrranical power, the whole 
expressing the triumphal struggle of 
the people of the Americas to free 
themselves from the institutions of des- 
potic ages and governments. Termin- 
ating the buttresses of the piers are 
four groups of trophies typifying Peace 
and Power, modeled by Augustus Luke- 
man. In the niches on the side of the 
bridge are statues f-ymbolical of Hospi- 
tality, Love of Truth, Patriotism, etc. 
On each side of the bridge are fountains 
of rearing horses and figures flustered 
about tall poles which carry huge silk- 
en flags. The fountain on the east typ- 
ifies the Atlantic Ocean and that on 
the west the Pacific Ocean, with one 
ba^e uniting the two. The sculptor of 
these is Philip Martiny. Beneath the 
bridge are subterranean grottos mod- 
eled after the famous Buttes de Chau- 
mont. 

Turning now to the eastern wing of 
the Esplanade the observer will note 
th« group of three great government 
buildings, the open space being embel- 
lished with sunken gardens, fountains 
and statuary. At the left, marking the 
western boundary of the Esplanade, 
are the Horticulture. Mines and Graph- 
ic Arts buildings, this court being, also, 
decorated with statuary, fountains and 
flowers. Looking due north, the ma- 
jestic Electric Tower rises to a height 
of 400 feet. This tower stands at the 
north end of the Court of Fountains 
and constitutes a very beautiful center- 



THE OOLOGIST. 



m 



piece. On the eastern side of the Court 
of Fountains are the Ethnology, Manu- 
factures and Liberal Arts and Agricul- 
ture buildings. On the west side are 
the Temple of Music. Machinery and 
Transportation and Electricity build- 
ings. Beyond the tower is the Plaza 
whose northern boundary is marked by 
the Propylaea, a very beautiful archi- 
techtural screen, rich in color decora- 
tions and ornamentation of statuary. 
East of the Plaza is the great Stadium, 
a mammoth buildiue, having a seating 
capacity for about 12,000 people. West 
of the Plaza is the entrance to the Mid- 
way, where one may spend days enjoy- 
ing the multitude of novel entertain- 
ments. 

The beauty of the picture is beyond 
the power of anyone adequately to de- 
scribe, for no words can convey to the 
mind the glorious result of the combin- 
ed eti'orts of the architects, the sculp- 
tor, the landscape gardener, the color- 
ist and the electrician. They have all 
worked harmoniously to produce a set 
picture upon such a magnificent scale 
as to dazzle and delight every beholder. 

Upon the pinnacle of the tower 
stands a graceful figure in gold called 
the Goddess of Light, presiding over 
the Exposition and looking abroad 
over its many beautiful features. In 
her upraised right hand she carries a 
torch while with her left she points to 
the beautiful scene below. The face of 
the tower is covered with myriads of 
electric lights. One does not realize its 
mammoth proportions until he looks at 
it from a near point of view. The 
main body of the tower is 50 feet 
square; with two wings, eaeb 110 feet 
high extending from the east and south- 
ward and enclosing a semi-circular 
court' From its southern face gushes 
a cascade, at a height of 70 feet. At a 
height of 110 feet is a fine restaurant. 
Elevators will carry visitors to various 
heights in the tower. 

The State and Foreign buildings are 
situated in the southwest part of the 
grounds- Nearly all the governments 
of the Western Hemisphere are repre- 
sented, either in buildings of their own, 
or have creditable exhibits in the var- 
ious exhibit divisions. Several of the 
States have very fine buildings of their 
own and all of the important spates are 
represented by special exhibits in the 
Agriculture, Mines and other buildings. 
The Live Stock division occupies sev- 
neteen pavillions, covering about 10 
aci'es of land. A special building has 



been erected for a model dairy and a 
commodious building is used for dairy 
exhibits. The division of agricultural 
machinery occupies extensive exhibit 
space beneath the seats of the Stadium. 
Two special buildings have been erect- 
ed in the southeast part of the grounds 
for a commercial ordinance exhibit. 
Between the two buildings is a model 
of a Gruson turre^ 53 feet in diameter. 
This is so arranged that the visitor may 
go inside and note the construction of 
this form of sea-coast defense fortifica- 
tion. The exhibit of big guns by the 
United States Government is one of the 
very interesting features of the Exposi- 
tion. 

The arrangement of the various Ex- 
position buildings is such that one may 
save a great deal of time, as well as ef- 
fort, in seeing the exhibits. The ar- 
rangement is very compact and one 
may go from building to building and 
enjoy himself thoroughly as he goes. 

The Fine Arts building is about 1,000 
feet south of the Government buildings 
and contains a fine collection of the 
best works of American artists. The 
forestry building is a near neighbor of 
the Government Buildiug, and a few 
rods to the east is a stockade of the Six 
Nations oflndians whose ancesters dom- 
inated the territory of New York 400 
years ago. This stockade contains all 
the various forms of buildings to be 
seen in an Indian Village prior to the 
settlement of New York. One of the 
pleasure trips within the Exposition 
grounds is the circumnavigation of the 
buildings upon a broad canal by means 
of launches which stop at convenient 
points. This canal, over a mile long, 
surrounds the main group of Exposi- 
tion buildings. There are also wheeled 
chairs in abundance, having noiseless 
rubber tires and easy springs, so that 
one may be as lazy and comfortable as 
he desires. A miniature railway also 
skirts the Exposition fence and will be 
found convenient by many. 



COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREECOLLEGTING- 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circulai*. (179) 

J. Rowland Nowell, Portman, S. C. 



T 



HIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



96 



THE OOLOGIST. 




THE BEST ILLUSTRATED 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 

It gives the LIFE HISTORIES and FINE 
ILLUSTRAilONS of 4 or S N. A. BIRDS 
every month. The egg of each is shown FULL 
SIZE. 

It also contains short, interesting stories about 
birds. 



,^': 



ONLY 50 CTS. A ", EAR. 
SAfllPLE COPY FREE. 



SUB^CRIB^ 9^0W. 



CHAS. K, REED, 

S«a. A, WORCESTE.R, MASS. 



GIBB'S CELEBRATED PROCESS OF RAPID TAXIDERMY. 



In Practical Use for Over Twenty-five years. 

Used Everywhere in America. Hundreds of Testimonals. Try and be Convinced. 
Start a class. Money in It. Be Your Own Taxidermist. 

Naturalists. Collectors, Gunners, Anglers, Outers. Boys, Girls and all others interested in 
nature and anxious to preserve the ."ppciniens taken in wood and field, have all felt the need of a 
simple method of preservation, which is free fi'om intricacies and inexpensive. 

There is a methrd of rapid taxidermy now in extensive use, which meets the requirements of 
all amateurs who wish a practical and inexpensive n?ethod of preserving the trophies of the out- 
ing and collecting trip. This is not the old system of so-called stuflfing, so expensive, laborious 
an^d disappointing, but is a rapid system, which anyone can learn at once and which is guaran- 
teed to give satisfaction. 

By this process you may preserve the beautiful plumage of the grouse and woodcock, or the 
pike's or bucic's head, or ibe showy feathers of the tanager. Boys, girls and all others can do 
good work and may make money, as mounted heads and birds find a ready sale, and besides you 
may teach your iViends and decorate the school-room, office and dining-room with native birds 
and other attractions. If you are in doubt, then get your friends to go in with you and start a 
class, for when several work together there is an advantage, and the expense is next to nothing. 

On the receipt of $1.00, ca.sh or stamps, I will send full printed instructions for mounting 
birds, heads, mammals, etc.. and all materials for mounting and preserving specimens— includ- 
ing prepared compound, together with full directions for dressing skins with the hair on for rugs 
and robes, so that you will not be to the expense of one cent and will .send full directions how to 
start a class. 



Remember I guarantee saHsf action or money reftinded. 
Mention Oologist and address 

MORRIS GIBBS, M. D., 



Kalamazoo, Mich. 



The Oologist. 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 7. 



ALBION, N. Y., JULY, 1901. 



Whole No. 178 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exchanges" "For Sales," Inserted In tUla department 
lor 25c per 25 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted in payment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 178 your subscription expires with this issue 
180 " " '• " Sept., '• 

183 •' '• " " Dec, " 

190 " " " " June, 1902 

195 " " " " Dec. " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited vn:ong we 
wish to rectify. 

This Oologist was mailed July 24th. 

WANTED,— A pair of young live of each of 
the following: Bam Owl, Long-eared Owl, 
Short-eared Owl For good strong specimens, 
large prices will be given. J. E. T., Box 98, 
Lancaster, Mass. 

GOOD EXCHANGE for nice sheets of Birch 
Bark and Modern Indian bows, arrows, pipes, 
buckskin, bead and basket work, ALBERT 
B, FARNHAM,502 12th St,. N. W., Washington, 
D. C. 

EXCHANGE :— One Premo camera 4x5 with 
complete outfit to exchange for complete sets 
of eggs with full data. No others accepted. 
All letters answered, CHAS. S, MOODY, Oro 
Fino, Idaho, 

FOR EXCHANGE,— Eggs Of this state for 
sets of other states. Send list and receive 
mine, ED T, SCHENCK, Sprakers, N, Y, 

FOR SALE or EXCHANGE.— Two hundred 
fifty perfect arrow and spear points. FRANK 
RACKETT, Grand Rapids, Mich. Rural De- 
livery No. 1. 

OOLOGISTS.— Have some fine sets to ex- 
change for same. Send your lists. Sets of 
hawks, owls and water birds especially desired, 
RAY F, STEVENS, Shabbona, 111, 

WANTED,— A cabinet for bird skins and 
back numbers of magazines. Can offer sets, 
skins, mounted birds, shells etc, or part cash, 
also have a Lady's Bicycle, 28 in., for sale at 
$18.00 cash. All answered. W, JENNINGS 
WIRT, Gaines, Orleans Co,, N. Y. 



FOR EXCHANGE.— Model '99 gent's bike in 
good condition. Will take bird skins or Indian 
relics to value of 810, Write first. Address 
BOX 817, Ames, la. 

WILL EXCHANGE,— Western photos or 
plates and new books for eggs in sets. All let- 
ters answered. Address CHAS. S. MOODY, 
Oro Fino, Idaho, 

WANTED.— Good U. S. stamps. Offer in ex- 
change skins of 387. 412, 498. 76], 474, 759b, .587, 
613, 614, 619, 521, 581, 461, 624. 661, 671, 673, 467, 728, 
735, 655, THEODORE B, PARKER, 36 Beau- 
mont Ave , Newtonville, Mass, 

A FEW Sets each No, 123a, 49, 413, 588b, 
Several volumes Oologist and other bird 
journals; Gov, Pub, on Ornithology; Bar Lock 
Type Writer, cost $100 in good condition: Star 
Fish and Sea Urchins from Pacific Ocean, 
All for A 1 Skins and Original sets. A, G, 
PRILL, Scio, Oregon. 

FOR SALE,— Plumbeous Chickadee, sets of 
6, 6 and 7; 15c per egg. Send for list of choice 
southern sets. Have Flying Squirrels for sale 
at $1.50 a pair; also Fox Squirrels, Coons, etc. 
E. F. POPE, Colmesnell, Tex. 

U. S, ARMY GOODS:— For Collecting, can- 
oeing, hunting and bicycle trips. Dog Tents, 
2 pieces buttoning together, covers 5x7ft, ; 
weight about Slbs,, $1,2.5, 4 pieces button to- 
gether, covering 7x10, 12.25. Rubber Ponchos, 
45x72, slit for head, $1.50. Canvas Hammocks 
and Haversacks, each, 50c. ALBERT B, 
FARNHAM, 502 12th St., N. W Washington, 
D, C 179 

WANTED.— Sets of N. Am. Birds Eggs. 
Can use any except 498, 187, 49, 385. The more 
desirable the sets you offer are, the better the 
offer I will make you for them. I can offer 
Trays for Eggs, Large Egg Calipers (best 12 in. 
sliding) ; Glass top Egg Cases, Rare Single 
Eggs, Emue Eggs, Collection of 300 var, good 
Postage Stamps in sets; Shells, a large assort- 
ment labelled ; Minerals, single specimens or 
collections: Fossils: Indian Arrowpoints; 
Spearheads and Knives, many localities ; also 
an 8 V4 in. Rough Stone Axe and a few Drills: 
a few Bird Skins and Corals. Write, sending 
list of what you can spare and gi^nng me an 
idea of what you want and I will make the best 
offer I can. E. H. SHORT, Box 173, Rochester, 
N, Y. 179 



98 



THE OOLOGIST. 



WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

WANTED.— May number, 1888, Vol. XXII, 
American Naturalist WILLIAM BREW- 
STER, Cambridge, Mass. 

FOR SALE:— Fancy and common Geodes, 
ranging in price from 25c. to $5.00; halfs from 
10c to 50c. Special rates to colleges a ad mu- 
seums. H. K. McLELLAN, Hamilton, Han- 
cock Co., Illinois. 179 

OOLOGISTS WANTED:— Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 1888, and April 
1889, and will give an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N, Y. 

WANTED:— Oologists and others to read 
"Frederick Young," the prettiest book of the 
year. A fine story with science and natural 
history intermixed. Tinted illustrations; gold 
top. Price $1.50. Superlative as a gift. Order 
through your book dealer. By Charles Lin- 
coln Phillips, an old contributor to this jour- 
nal. H. A. DICKERMAN & SON, Publishers, 
Boston . tf 

EXCHANGE.— Choice first class sets with 
full data Royal Tern, Am. Oystercatcher, Wil- 
let. Wilson's Plover, Brown Pelican, Clapper 
Rail, Laughing Gull,Forster's Tern BlackSkim- 
mer. Green Heron, Boat tail Grackle. Painted 
Bunting.IndigoBuD ting, Yellow-breasted Chat, 
etc. for A 1 sets with data and large singles. 
Sets also for sale very cheap. DR. M. T. 
CLECKLEV, Augusta, Ga. 180 



in. o V (LIVE BARN OWLS 

A rair oi imu ] live long eared owls 

° I LIVE SHORT EARED OWLS. 

For good strong specimens, large prices will 
be given. 

J. E. T , Box g8, Lancaster. Mass. 



COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREEGOLLECTING 
SAVES EGGS, DANGER, TIME, 

Send Stamp for Circular. (179) 

J. Rowland Nowell, Portman. S. C. 



A 1 SETS Manitoba collected eggs with full 
data, direct from the collector: Arctic Horned 
Owl 1-4, $1.50; W. H. Owl 1-3, 75c; Prarie Horn- 
ed i.ark 1-4 1-3. 10c; Short-eared Owl 1-10 2-7 3-6 
3-5 3-4, 40c; Redtails 1-S 5 3, well marked, 2ae; 
Krider's Hawk 2 2 3-3, 35c; Long-eared Owl 3-5 
3-4, 10c ; Marsh Hawk 1-6 5-5 2-4 10c : Gray Ruffled 
Grouse 1-9, 40c; Am. Crow 1-6 2 5 4-1 2c; Mallard 
1-7 10c; Pintail 1-5 20c; Col. Sharp-tailed Grouse 
1-10 1-12 1-13 1-17, 30c: Prarie Short-tailed 1-10 
1-12 1-13, 30c Prarie Hen Ml 1-12 1-8. 10c; Mead- 
owlark W3-4 2-5 1-6 5c ;Killdeer 1-41-3 10c ; Sharp- 
shinned Hawk 1-5 1-6, $1.00; Purple Grackle 3-4 
2-5 1-6, 2c; Rusty Blackbird 3-6 2-53-4. 30: Mourn- 
ing Dove 3-2, 2c; Clay -colored Sparrow 3-s 4-4 
2-3, nests, 10c;. Yellow Warbler 3-4 8-3, 2c; Chest- 
nut collared Longspur 2-4 1-3. 20c; White- 
rumped Shrike 3-6 3-4, 3c; Flicker 1-5 2c; Rose- 
breasted Grosbeak 3-4 1-5, 5c; House Wren 2-6 
2-5, 2c; Bewick's Wren 16 10c; Long-billed 
Marsh Wren 3-6, 2c; Bartram's Sandpiper 3-4, 
25c; Wilson's Pharalope 1-4, 50c; Loon 1-2, $1; 
Swainson Hawk 4-3 3 4, 25c; well marked 
Broadwinged Hawk 2-3, $1; Song Sparrow 3-4 
2-5, 2c; Redwinged Blackbird 3-4, Ic; Osprey 1-3, 
75c; well marked Whooping Crane 1-2, $2.00. 
List is incomplete as I am adding sets daily, 
but all listed are on hand. Prices per egg. 
CHRIS P. FORGE, Carman, Manitoba,. 

Mounted Birds and Mamnials. 

The following specimens are all strictly first 
class, freshly mounted specimens-regular price 
in ( ) My closing priceis by mail, express 
or freight at purchaser's .expense— will ship 
cheapest way. Special rates on large orders. 

Screech Owl (2 75) 

California Screech Owl (3.50) 

Great Horned Owl (6.00) 

Arctic Horned Owl full plumage (20.00)... 

American Hawk Owl (6 00) : _ 

Road-runner (3.00) 

Californian Woodpecker (2.00) 

Horned Lark (1.75) 

American Magpie (2.50) 

Steller's Jay (3.50) 

Blue-fronted Jay (8.00) 

Bobolink (1.50) 

Meadowlark (2.00) _ 

Bullock's Oriole (1.75) 

Evening Grosbeak (2 25) 

Pine Grosbeak (2.00) 

American Crossbill (1.75) _ 

Bohemian Waxwing (2.50) 

Black and White Warbler (1.25) 

Myrtle Warbler (1.50) 

American Robin (1.50) 

Ring-necked Pheasant full plumage (8.00) 
FrtANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N 



1 75 


2 10 


4 75 


12 50 


3 90 


1 75 


1 10 


90 


1 50 


1 30 


1 30 


90 


1 15 


90 


1 25 


1 10 


90 


1 30 


80 


80 


80 


5 60 


Y. 



B 



RDSof RHODE ISLAND, 

By R. H. HOWE, JR. and E. STURTEVANT 
8«o, cloth, Illustrated, 1899. ^^ Price, $1 35, Postpaid 

NATURALISTS' BOOK SHOP, 

2102 Market Street, ^ ^ Philadelphia, Pa. 



1H£ OOLOGIST. 



RIDER AGENTS WANTED 

one in each town to ride and exhibit a sample 1901 model 
bicycle of our manufacture. YOU CAN MAKE $10 TO 
$50 A WEEK besides having a wheel to ride for yourself. 

1901 Models srr: $10 fo $18 
'00 & '98 Models £s $7 to $12 

500 Second Hand Wheelsco «. ^a 

taken in trade by our Chicago retail stores, «Pu lU «PO 

many good as new -r^ 

We ship any bicycle QN APPROVAL to 

anyone without a cent deposit in advance and allow 

10 DAYS FREE TRIAL. 2LLV^^ 

710 risk in ordering from us, as you do not need to pay 
a cent if the bicycle does not suit you. 

MUflT DIIV * ■wheel until you have written for our 
I1U I DU I FACTORY PRICES and FREE TRIAL OFFER. 

This liberal offer has never been equaled and is a guarantee of 

the quality of our wheels. 

a reliable person in each town to distribute catalogues for us in 

exchange for a bicycle. Write today for free catalogue and our special offer. 

J. L. MEAD CYCLE CO., Chicago. 




GIBB'S CELEBRATED PROCESS OF RAPID TAXIDERMY, 

In Practical Use for Over Twenty-five years. 

Used Everywhere in America. Hundreds of Testimonals. Try and be Convinced. 
Start a class. Money in It. Be Your Own Taxidermist. 

Naturalists, Collectors, f Gunners, Anglers, Outers, Boys, Girls and all others interested in 
nature and anxious to preserve the specimens taken in wood and field, have all felt the need of a 
simple method of preservation, which is free from intricacies and inexpensive. 

There is a method of rapid taxidermy now in extensive use, which meets the requirements of 
all amateurs who wish a practical and Inexpensive method of preserving the trophies of the out- 
ing and collecting trip. This is not the old system of so-called stuffing, so expensive, laborious 
and disappointing, but is a rapid system, which anyone can learn at once and which is guaran- 
teed to give satisfaction. 

By this process you may preserve the beautiful plumage of the grouse and woodcock, or the 
pike's or buck's head, or the showy feathers of the tanager. Boys, girls and all others can do 
good work and may make money, as mounted heads and birds find a ready sale, and besides you 
may teach your friends and decorate the school-room, office and dining-room with native birds 
and other attractions. If you are in doubt, then get your friends to go in with you and start a 
class, for when several work together there is an advantage, and the expense is next to nothing. 

On the receipt of $1.00, cash or stamps, I will send full printed instructions for mounting 
birds, heads, mammals, etc.. and all materials for mounting and preserving specimens— includ- 
ing prepared compound, together with full directions for dressing skins with the hair on for rugs 
and robes, so that you will not be to the expense of one cent and will send full directions how to 
start a class. 

Remember I guarantee satisfaction or money refunded. 
Mention Oologist and address 

MORRIS GIBBS, M. D., Kalamazoo, Mich. 



^ . I Al^ 



100 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Birbtes 



A real gem. Teachers fall in love with it and 
pupils want to read it through as soon as they 
begin it. Appropriate for School and Home. 

It is the story of the experience of Delma 
and Harold who went to their grandfather's to 
spend the summer studying and observing the 
birds. Contents are : 

Birdies at Their Trades: Mason— Swal- 
low, Basketmaker— Crimsonfinch, Weaver- 
Oriole, Fuller— Goldfinch, Carpenter— Wood- 
pecker, Tailor— Tailorbird. 

Birdies AND Their Songs: In the Garden 
—Robin. In the Wood— Thrush. In the Field- 
Bluebird. In the Sky— Lark. In the Home- 
Canary. In the Grove— Mockingbird. 

Birdies on the Wing : Hummingbird. 

The Birdies Farewell: Jack Sparrow 
and Jenny Wren. Goodbye. 

The book is very prettily Illustrated by 
Bertha L. Corbett, the artist of Sunbonnet 
Babies. The author is Ida S. Elson, of Phila- 
delphia, formerly a prominent Kindergartner 
of Bethlehem, Pa. 

Prices 

Cloth, 104 pp., 30c: Boards, 104 pp., 25c. Spec- 
ial prices for class use, 

A single copy to the one who mentions The 
OoLOGisT/or lac. 

WILLIAM G. SMITH & COMPANY. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA. 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer' in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Speeialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 

Buy a Postal Card, 

Write your name and address on back 
and mail to me. 

YOU WILL RECEIVE, 

New Lists of Birds Ej;gs, Minerals, In- 
dian Relics and all Naturalist's 
Supplies. Ready to mail. 

Address. ERNEST H. SHORT, 

Box 173 Rochester, N, Y. 

(Formerly Albion, N. Y.) 



"You might as well be out of the Bird World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

a:'HR OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgway. L- 
Stejneger, C. W. Richmond and 
Other EmInentOrnithoIogists. 

The Ospbey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy? sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

THH OSPREY C09IPA?(V, 

321-323 AVi St., Washington, D. C. 



The Condor for igoi. 

This popular Califomian, illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its Issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of VVest- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader ! 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the nesting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BB SUPPLIED AT $1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



The OoLOGiST. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 7. 



ALBION, N. Y., JULY, 1901. 



Whole No. 178 



The Oologist. 

A MontMy Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to tbe 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription 50c per annum 

Sample copies 5c each 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
Is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

^^Remember that the publisher must be noti 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

5 cents per nonpareil line each insertion. 

12 lines In every inch. Seven Inches In a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing Inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line Is "net," "rock 
bottom," "Inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there Is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
it will cost you 25 cents; 100 Unes, $5.00; lOOO lines, 
$50.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due BlUs and Cards payable In advertis- 
ing will be honored only at regular rates in force 
at the date of issuance of said bill or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postofflce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S. Postage Stamps of 
any denomination will be accepted for sums un- 
der one daUar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co. , N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O., ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



How Some Birds Capture Their Prey. 

The ruacner in waich the different 
species of birds capture their prey is 
very interesting to the observer. There 
are divers, snappers borers, grubbers, 
ficoopers, skimmeis, diggers and many 



others of devious ways. In swimmirg 
and flying most of the birds pive evi- 
dence of their habits of securing their 
prey, as seen in the methods of the fly- 
catchers and in the movements of the 
Ducks in the water. But the habits of 
nest construction are often quite dissim- 
ilar from the methods of food capture. 
We know that the Woodpeckers can 
bore for food and at the same time hol- 
low out their nest, but the Kingfishei^ 
uses its beak in securing iis prey in the 
water, and yet burrows in the sand 
when forming its home, while tho Wood- 
cock, which bores for its food, builds its 
nest on the surface of the ground. The 
Bank Swallow captures its prey in the 
air, but burrows in the bank like the 
Kingfisher. The Great Blue Heron 
spears or snaps up its prey in the water 
and yet it builds its nest of sticks quite 
similar to the ways of many small birds. 
There are no groups of birds which 
have not marked variations in some 
habits and it is interesting to note them 
in comparison. 

Loons, Merganser.^, Auks, Guillemots 
and many other birds secure their prey 
by diving, and many can and do remain 
a long time beneath the surface and 
make long flights, so to speak, through 
the water in pursuit of fishes. I have 
twice seen birds swimming under the 
water and they seemed to be flying. In 
capturing their prey they undoubtedly 
use their winas in a similar manner. 
There is small chance of our seeing the 
actual capture by these diving birds, 
but we may reason that they secure 
the minnows by a movement similar to 
that of the Heron in his wadiog and 
snapping. 

Let us compare the ways of a fewr 
birds in securing prey from the water, 
on the surface or near it. The Osprey 



102 



THE OOLOGISl 



poises above the selected prey and at a 
height of from fifteen to 100 yards, gen- 
erally at about thirty yards, and then 
plunges at an angle of from forty to 
eighty degrees. He drops with a mighty 
rush, and apparently, is certain of de- 
struction if he strikes the water at this 
speed. No one can positively assert 
just how the Fish Hawk strikes the 
water, for though it seems as if he 
strikes heavily, and very often goes 
completely under the surface, and in 
some cases remains under for nearly a 
half mimite, yet it is observable that the 
prey, when secured, is always brought 
forth in the talons. It is really remark- 
able how the Osprey can regulate his 
plunge and secure the fish with his 
claws after churning the water to foam. 
It would almost seem that he makes a 
grab in the dark after reaching the 
water. His method of capture differs 
from all others cf the birds which I 
have observed in America. When the 
Osprey secures the fish it quickly mounts 
from the surface and then the capture 
may be plainly seen in the talons of the 
fortunate bird. The bird nearly or 
quite always carries the fish head for- 
ward and grasps it with both feet. In 
quarters where I have observed I be- 
lieve the average catch weighed about a 
pound and a half and I judged that fish 
that weighed less than a pound were 
rarely hunted, while two pounders and 
even as large as three pounders were 
not rarely secured by the Hawk. On 
one trip in Southern Florida we repeat- 
edly observed a fishing bird that had re- 
ceived an injury to one of its legs, rend- 
ering it powerless to use the injuied 
foot. This foot hung down when the 
bird flew and was of no apparent use in 
its forays for fish. We carefully watched 
this crippled fisher in its attempts to 
catch fish, and noted that the poor bird 
made as many as eight or ten plunges 
before securing a prize, and when the 
fish was secured the prize was held in 
the claws of one foot, the other foot be- 



ing of no assistance. After the capture 
the Hawk flew to a convenient perch on 
a limb in plain sight from our boat and 
attempted to eat the fish. The attempt 
to manage the fish and as well hold to 
its perch was too much of an under- 
taking for the disabled bird and in its 
struggles it lost its hold on the fish, 
which fell to the ground. The Hawk 
made no attempt to regain the captured 
fish, but immediately began fishing 
again. 

The Pelicans are odd feeders and 
their methods of securing prey are 
various In addition to the habit of 
snapping up fish and other food as they 
swim about, they have also the habit of 
swooping down and engulfing fish on 
the surface or just below. This habit 
frequently observed in the Brown Peli- 
can in the south is most singular. The 
fishing birds may be closely watched at 
St. Petersburg on Tampa bay, where 
they are protected by law, and where 
they have become very tame and unsus- 
picious. I have repeatedly seen the 
birds dive within ten yards of the wharf 
where I was standing. The bird flies 
with flops of its huge wings and has not 
inaptly been likened to an exagerated 
Woodcock with its long beak drooping. 
At times the birds hover over a spot 
and then drop with a heavy thud into 
the water This plunge is made head 
first and it always seems a miracle to 
me that the creature is not killed out- 
right from the concussion. The bird 
seems to strike the water like a huge 
bladder and sometimes goes completely 
beneath the surface, but generallv only 
partially, and in most instances immed- 
iatelv rises after its plunge. In these 
cases where the prey is small and taken 
from near the surface, I am well satis- 
fied that the Pelican scoops up the food 
rather than snaps it up with its beak. 
If one will examine a Pelican's bill it 
will be found that the upper mandible 
is firm and very strong, while the under 
mandible is of very pliable material, 



THE OOLOGIST 



103 



and though but an inch wide when rest- 
ing, may easily be spread to four or tive 
inches. It is my idea that the bird 
when fishi g for small prey on the sur- 
face, and by plunging, merely opens its 
bill as it strikes the water ard scoops 
up the minnows in its pouch. I have 
frequently seen the Pelicans feeding so 
near me that I could distinguish the 
small fish jumping about in the pouch 
of its captor just after the bird arose 
from its plunge. Anobserver is enabled 
to do this when the bird flies between 
the wharf and the rising or setting sun, 
as the pouch is almost translucent and 
the jumping form of the little nsh may 
be easily distinguished. Of course when 
larger fishes are caught the principle of 
capture is different. I have seen two 
pound mullet taken from a Pelican's 
gullet and have been told by a reliable 
man that he had seen oo« of a weight of 
over three pounds removed from a fish- 
ing Pelican. 

The Gulls and Terns feed almost en- 
tirely from the surface and are graceful 
in all their movements, dropping to the 
water in bold plunges and skimming 
above the surface like the wind-driven 
foam. The Petrels and Skimmers course 
over the sea, tacking and veering in 
their search for food. These birds snap 
up their prey when on the wing as with 
nearly all the sea biids. The Geese 
rarely go beneath the surface while 
feeding, and I have never seen a Swan 
more than plunge its head and neck 
under water. Geese and Swans always 
feed where the water is shallow when 
on lake or stream, while the sea Ducks 
feed from deep water. I have no doubt 
that many species of Ducks feed from 
the bottom where the water is twenty or 
more feet deep, and I have found some 
feeding on fresh water that had the 
crops filled with crustaceans and aquatic 
seeds, which were only to be found at 
the bottom and in fifteen feet of water. 
The Mergansers, which come very near 
to being exclusively fish feeders, secure 



their prey as do the Loons, ly ] ursuit 
and snapping up the fish. This habit is 
followed at times bv nearly all species 
nf Ducks, and well kn^wn river Ducks 
not rarely partake of a feast of small 
minnow-i when they can be fonnd in 
shallow watf r and are not difficult to 
secure. 

The Herons feed largely upon fish, 
but they vary their diet and are even 
known to eat grasshoppers, while they 
are very destructive to the larval forms 
of the dragon fly and other aquatic in- 
sects. This is especially true of the 
Least Bittern and Green Heron, which 
are very beneficial to man in their 
choice of food, though they are also de- 
structive to the small fry, efpecially the 
Fly-up-the creek or Green Heron, a 
great poacher on the trout fry. I have 
watched the Herons and Bitterns as 
they waded ybout and have seen the 
lightning like thrusts of their beaks as 
they stabbed at their prey. Among the 
fishes that are preyed upon by the 
Heron family is the bullhead or horn- 
pout, which is known to have three 
erectile fin spines — one on the dorsal fin 
and one on each side. The wild birds 
are generally well aware of the danger 
in swallowing one of these dangerous 
fishes, whole, and they usually destroy 
the hinge that works the set-trigger 
spine before swallowing the fish whole. 
I once had the pleasure of watching a 
Greater Bittern dissecting out the dan- 
gerous dorsal and pectoral fin spines 
from a good sized bullhead, preparatory 
to making a meal of him. The scene 
occurred on thw edge of a marsh and the 
thunder-pumper was so much engaged, 
that it failed to note my presence and I 
had a good opportunity to observe the 
operation. The bird placed thecsplur- 
ed fish on the marsh grass between its 
feet and with sharp stabs destroyed the 
attachments of the spines. The work 
took some time t<s the fins of the cat- 
fishes are strongly connected with the 
bony frame-work. The bird was flushed 



104 



THE OOLOGIST. 



before completing its work and I viewed 
the result after the disappointed stake- 
driver had departed. Two of -the spines 
were found almost wholly torn loose 
and the other about in shape for the 
feast. This bird had evidently reasoned 
the matter out to its satisfaction and 
thus avoided being impaled by the 
deadly spines. But this was not the 
case with a mature Great Blue Heron, 
who had captured a pound and a half 
catfish in a lagoon. The bird had at- 
tempted to swallow the live fish without 
destroying its set-trigger spines. Re- 
sult—the Heron was found lying in the 
shallow water with several inches of 
the body and tail of its destroyer stick- 
ing from its bill ;the body of the captured 
fish being started down the captor's 
gullet, but held there by the dorsal 
spine, which had penetrated the throat 
just back of the greedy bird's bill, and 
in such a situ.ation that neither fish nor 
bird could relieve itself, and both were 
dead; truly, an unforseen tragedy of 
the wilds. The smaU bullhead some- 
times works its spine-impaling act on 
fish-eating water snakes, as well as on 
the birds. 

The Rails are interesting feeders and 
it is a pleasure to see the trim fellows 
patter through the marsh grass and 
rushes. They feed on seeds, small mol- 
luscs and crustaceans, as well as nymphs 
and even the smaller minnows Their 
movements art) active and sinuous on 
the bogs and grass while the larger 
members of the family — as the Gallinu- 
les and Coots— swim ungracQfuUv and 
gather food much after the manner of 
the river Ducks 

Of all the pleasing birds while feed- 
ing, the active shore birds are the most 
engaging. If my readers know of a 
sequestered lake where thesa sprightly 
crea'.ures congregate after the nesting 
saason, then I would sui^gest that an 
afternoon be taken in August to observe 
the Sandpipers and Plovers, as they gy- 
rate about the lake or patter about and 



feed upon the sands. There is but slight 
variation in the manner of securing the 
food. Nearly all of the smaller waders 
follow the same methods in feeding, and 
whether upon the shore, as the Sand- 
pipers and Tattlers, or among the Plov- 
ers of the fields — as the Killdeer, G 'Iden 
Plover or Upland Pluver — they all run 
about actively and pick up their food in 
the daintiest manner. Along shore the 
Sandpipers may be seen traversing the 
sands or even wading in the shallow 
water and gleaning their small shelly 
food. I have seen the Greater Telltale, 
Lesser Yellow-legs and Semi palmated 
Plover catching and eating minute min- 
nows at the edge of the lake. The Spot- 
ted Sandpiper, which I have watched 
with great interest for over thirty years, 
is a loveable little creature It feeds 
upon minute animal Jife and has a wide 
range in its diet, and searches for mol- 
luscs, worms and insects among the 
debris of the edges of the millpond and 
on the low land surrounding ponds and 
lakes. 

Among the Scratchers we find but 
slight variation in food, and while the- 
Grouse, Quail and Turkey feed mainly 
upon seeds, still they all partake of an 
insect diet in the summer months. The 
Wild Pigeon and Mourning Dove are 
among the most exclusively vegetable 
feeders. All of the Scratchers are well 
known from their counterparts of the 
yard and farm. The Wild Pigeon often 
feeds on acorns, both spring and fall, 
and unlike the Ked-head Woodpecker, 
Blue Jay and Grackle, it swallows the 
acorns whole, tilling its crop to repletion 
and giving its front a peculiar appear- 
ance. 1 have shot Pigeons in the woods 
and found them stufifed with acorns, 
and again with beechnuts. The Rutted 
Grouse is occasionally in the habit of 
eating strong-scented buds, which give 
a balsamic taint to the flesh, which is 
anything but agreeable. The Spruce or 
Canada Grous-^ is rarely good for the 
table on account of this habit, and at 



THE OOLOGIST 



105 



times others of our game birds are 
ruined for the table from the same 
cause. ThR eating of wild celery by the 
Canvft''- backed Dack is said to greatly 
add to irs excellence as a table delica- 
cey. 

Among the rapacious birds there is a 
greater variation in food and the man- 
ner of spcurins; it than would be sup- 
pospd. All excepting the Vultures seize 
their prey with the talons, but while 
the B' zzird Hawks are slow in securing 
the live creaturo, the trao Hawks, Fal- 
cons and Harriers are like lightning in 
their m/vpments. The Red-taiiec? and 
Redshoiildered Hawks are quite con- 
tent with striped snakes, toads and 
frogs; while an occasional common 
striped gopher or chipmunk is added to 
their bill of fare, and these birds are but 
seldom found to molest the chickens of 
the barnyard, it is the Cooper Hawk 
and its near relaive the Sharp-shinned 
Hawk, who claim most of the chicks 
from the coop or garden. These depre- 
dators will seize a chick or half-grown 
fowl as quick as a flash and sail away 
with it before a Buzzard Hawk could 
make up its mind to an attack. The 
Buzzard Hawks are not averse to in- 
sects at times and scarcely anything in 
the nature nf animal food is refused by 
them; but 'hen most all of the rapacious 
birds will vary their diet with a cheaper 
quality of food. I have seen t^iat bird 
of elegant appearance in the air — the 
Swallow-taiI"d Kite — sweep down and 
secure a scake and bear it aloft, trail- 
ing it through the air as it swept the 
heavens in graceful evo utions. Accord- 
ing to my apprnciation there is no bird 
in the air quite equal to the Swallow- 
tailed Kite. Su( h dashes and plunges 
and un^xpected g} I'atiuns as they make. 
While the common Hawks are silently 
soaring or plodding through the forests 
the Kites are saeti to perform all the 
evolutions known to the bird world. 

The Spjirrow Hawk catches small 
birds with great dexterity, but compen- 



sates for this lapse in decency in a 
measure by gatherincr in many of the 
pestiferous rodents that infest the wood 
and field. In the summer when the 
grasshoppers are plentiful, this little 
Hawk destroys an amazing number of 
these insects. It is interesting to watch 
a Sparrow Hawk catching hoppers. He 
will sit on a dead branch and fly about, 
first to one side and then to another, 
much after the manner of a Flycatcher; 
and he is almost as accurate in his work. 
I once observed a Sparrow Hawk catch 
a grasshopper on the wing, but the work 
is mostly dune on the ground, and the 
bird always returns to hii perch before 
eating his capture. 

The little Blue-winged hawk or Sharp- 
shin is a veritable friend among the 
small birds. There is no limit to his 
destructive inclinations and I only for- 
give hioi when he moves into the city 
in November and December and wages 
war on the imported Sparrows. 

The Owls are flesh feeders and lot 
part'cu'.ar as to choice, as they will eat 
most anything dead or alive, but will 
become very hungry before they will 
eat tainted meat, as I have proven many 
timt-s with my pet Owls. This is not 
anything like the habit of the Bald 
Eagle, the emblem of our country, which 
often feeds on putr.d flesh, and I really 
believe prefers stale fish to fresh. One 
Owl that I had as a pet for a long time 
would eat all fresh meat tQat I handed 
him, whether steak, mouse, snake or 
any small bird. His habit of eating was 
always the same, and he invariably held 
the object in his claws and tore it with 
Morris Gibbs, M. D. 

(To be Continued.) 



Wisconsin Hash. 

What has become of our House 
Wrens, or in fact any of our Wrens? I 
have not seen a Wren of any variety 
this season, in town or out of town. All 



106 



THE OOLOGIST. 



of my Wren houses are vacant, except, 
perhaps, tenanted by a few spiders, etc. 

The Evening Grosbeaks came this 
year January 29th, a warm cloudy day, 
some soft snow; at first a flock of a few 
individuals, later large flocks, some- 
times nearly a hundred. They stayed 
with us until May 2d, when I saw a fe- 
male, the last one seen; the main part 
of the flock left about the middle of 
April; two pair stayed around in the 
evergreens in our yard so close and 
acted like breeding birds so much, that 
I actually was foolish enough to climb 
an evergreen in the vain hope of tind- 
ing a nest; but then, the fools aren't all 
dead yet. 

The beautiful, or I rather say the dear 
little Bobwhite, are getting bred in 
hereabouts again quite plenty, owing to 
a protecting law of five years, and either 
two or five years longer. (Am not cer- 
tain.) I call my dog by a short, sharp, 
quick whistle; one day he flushed a pair 
of Bobs. Later one called and I answer- 
ed; we answered back and forth several 
times. The dog would look at me, tfien 
toward where the Quail was, then at 
me, etc., prick up his ears and could 
not make out who the other fellow was 
calling him. 

One day while my dog and I were out 
I found a Pinnanted Grouse's nest, bird 
on. 1 watched her some time and as 
she did not ofi'er to leave, I sat down by 
the nest and after a little manouvering 
she allowed me to stroke and pet her to 
my hearts content, and to csunt her 
eggs, a fine set of sixteen. 

Any one wishing to secure, perhaps, 
one hundred fine colored photographs, 
size lOi X 14, of Audubon's Birds of 
America, taken direct from Audubon 
plates, can do so by buying the Sunday 
Chicago Record-Herald, 5 cents. The 
pictures come to your news dealer not 
folded, or in other words, flat, and if 
you stand in with your newsdealers you 
can have him save out yours before his 
delivery boys fold them; one plate 



comes every Sunday as a supplement. 
The series began June 16th. I do not 
intend this in any way for an advertise- 
ment of the Chicago paper, but as a help 
to my brother naturalists, whom it may 
concern. 

A good way to trap English Sparrows 
is to place a large cage, with a small 
open door, on the (jrouu'i near chicken 
coops, putting some feed inside. 

Any one having a singer Canary 
should never feed it lettuce; and if in 
the habit of feeding it lettuce, should 
stop off gradually. 

How many species of birds, 1 esides 
the Rose-breasted Grosbeak, eat the po- 
tatoe beetle? I made a statement sev- 
eral years ago in the Oologist that I 
wish to correct, that the Cedar Wax- 
wing eats the potatoe beetle. It should 
have been Rose- breasted Grosbeak, a 
female. 

Geo. W. Vosburgh, 
Co.umbup, Wis. 



Notes On Two Birds of South Jersey. 

Fish Crow— This little relative to the 
American Crow can oniy be identified 
from its larger relation at a clrse range 
They inhabit the trends of the coast and 
bay, and do not go far from brackish 
water. 

As nesting sites, they prefer a more 
or less wooded island marsh to the 
dense woods that set farther I ^ack. Their 
nests are as bulky as the American 
Crow, but the depression where the 
eggs are laid is much smaller. The 
height ranges from ten to forty feet at 
times in the top of a small gum or cedar 
tree, while at others against the trunk 
of a large tree. 

Complete sets may be taken with 
three to five eggs between the first and 
latter part of May. I have never col- 
lected a full set in April yet. The young 
of the American Crow are most always 
ready to leave the nest, when the Fish 
Crow completes her set. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



107 



Of course the epjgs look like other 
Crow's epgs, but much smaller, ncd at 
times a small American Crow and .-i 
large fish Crow will look just alike, 
and measurement alone will not identify 
them. 

The last egg laid is sometimes beauti- 
fully marked. 

American Osfrey— This well known 
bird is fast decreasing in South Jersey, 
especially around the brackish waters. 
I see no accountable cause for this, ex- 
cepting every year several old dead 
limbs break off with the nests. 

Every set a collector gets of this bird 
he well earns First, he generally has 
a hard tree to climb, then a dead limb 
to go out on, and when that point is 
reached he strains every nerve to reach 
over the nests, which are sometimes five 
feet high. About that time out comes a 
farmer and cries ' ut, ' come down out' 
of that tree and leave them Hawks 
alone." 

I have never known the old birds to 
strike, but they have come very near 
my head. 

They lay from two to four eggs. 
Three is the usual number and four I 
consider very rare. I have collected 
eggs for eleven years and have only 
found three sets with four. A series of 
these eggs are the prettiest specimens 
in a collector's cabinet. I can say right 
here that I never saw the eggs in the 
same set of like appearance. One egg 
I have in my collection is nearly un- 
spotted with a cream ground. 

Wm. B. Crispen, 
Salem, N. J. 



New Books. 



Mr. Chupes and Miss Jenny. The 
Life Story of Two Robins. By Effie 
Bignell, the Baker & Taylor Co., 250p, 
12mo. cloth, illustrated, 8 full page 
photo engraving plates, $1 00. 

1 he captive history of two robins who 
became at first the involuntary com- 



panions of human kind. Later love 
and sympathy made them unwilling to 
take the freedom opened to them. The 
story is so fascinating and shows such 
keen sympathy with bird life that the 
reac'er can scaicely believe the inci- 
dents true. Yet this is a true robin his- 
tory, and in it robin character and tem- 
perament ^re clearly .''hown. 

"No sweeter, more sympathetic story 
of »nimal life has ever been written 
than that which is contained in this lit- 
tle book Rudyard Kipling .-.nd Seton- 
Thompson have opened up for us a new 
literature, in which animiils play the 
principal parts This little, story of 
Mrs. Bignell's is a worthy companion 
of the masterpieces of these famous 
authors." — Dr. David Murray. 

Taxidermy. Comprising the Skin- 
ning, Stuffing and Mountiugr of Birds, 
Mammals and Fish. Paul N. Hasluck, 
Crts-iell & Company, New York and 
London. l6mo, cloth, illustrated with 
108 tig, 40c. 

In these 160 pages is included clear 
and succinct directions in the art of pre- 
paring and preserving the .'■kins of 
birds, mammals and fish, and of stuff- 
ing and mounting them so as to impart 
to them as close a resemblance to living 
forms as possible. There are also brief 
instructions on preserving and stuffing 
insects, a chapter on polishing and 
mounting horns, and another chapter 
on preserving insects and birds' eggs. 
A large amount of valuable informa- 
tion is contained in this small volume 
and over 100 illustrations give addition- 
al clearness. It contains tho largest 
amount of taxidermal information ever 
published. 

With the Wild Flowers. From 
Pussy-willow to Thistle-down. A rural 
ch onicle of our fiower friends and foes, 
describing them under thfir familiar 
English names Netv and revised edi- 
tion By Maud Going (E M Hardinge), 
The Baker and Taylor Compuny, New 
York, 16mo, < loth, 14x271 p, 58 pages of 
illustrations, $1 00 

A delightful vo ume giving flower 
facts, rather than mere names and 
classifications. It is written by a true 



108 



THE OOLOGIST 



lover of nature, who adds to exception- 
al literary feeling the rare gift of mak- 
ing instruction thoroughly enjoyable 
by a style 8t once clear, entertaining 
and imaginative. The book carries us 
through the whole season with the flow- 
ers as they make their appearance. It 



is accurate in its illustrations and 
text to the point of scientific precision, 
and its style and method (which dis- 
criminate it widely from the ordinary 
"botany") enhance, through their in- 
trinsic attractiveness, its power to in- 
struct. 




Figure 38. — Lady's-slippek (Cypripedium acaule). 

From "With the Wild Flowers." 
(Copyright. 1901, by The Baker & Taylor Co.) 



THE OOLOGIST. 



109 



List No. 5, Superceding List No. i of March 15th. July 15, 1901. 
LATTIN'S CLEARANCE SALE. 

BOOKS FOR THE ORNITHOLOGIST 



Starred (*) titles are second-hand copies, but as a rule the inside pages are "good as new." 

The unstarred titles are for new or good as new books, in a few instances the covers are 
slightly shelf -worn. 

Many volumes and sets cannot be duplicated— hence the necessity of sending your order 
early. When ordering always state whether you have a second choice, or whether you wish 
money refunded, in case boots ordered have been sold. 

important: Lack of time and space prevents my listing more books this month. I have 
hundreds of oi:Afr publications in stock relating to NATURAL HISTORY, ZOOLOGY, ICH- 
THYOLOGY, CONGHOLOGY, ENTOMOLOGY, BOTANY, GEOLOGY, ETHNOLOGY, etc. etc. 

Lists will be issued as time will permit. Can furnish almost every thing offered in June- 
July, '99 OOLOGIST and other old lists. 

Satisfaction always guaranteed or Money refunded. 

Remit in most convenient manner, but do not send sums of $1.00 or over loose in your letter. 
All books are PREPAID at prices quoted. Address all orders plainly and in full to 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D., Publisher, Albion, N. Y. 



Adams, Cage and Singing Birds. How to 
Catch, Keep, Breed and Rear Them. 148p. ills. 
$ 35 

American Ornithologists Union Check List 
of North American Birds and Code of Nomen- 
clature 2 00 

Arnold, Bird Life in England, 336p 95 

*Baird (Cassin and Lawrence), The Birds of 
North America, (Pacific R. R. Survey) 1072pp. 
4to - 3 60 

Beckstein, Natural History of Cage Birds, 
Their Management, Habits, Food, Diseases, 
Treatment, Breeding and the Methods of Catch- 
ing Them incorporating Sweet's British War- 
blers 500p. 38pl. London '77 1 10 

Ditto, with all plates colored ..._ 1 90 

Beetons Dictionary of Natural History, a 
Compendious Cyclopedia of the Animal King- 
dom, containing 2,000 articles, -lOOengr 90 

Bendire, Life Histories of North American 
Birds, vol. 1. paper, rapidly becoming very 
arre 9 GO 

Bignell, Mr. Chupes and Miss Jenny,The Life 
Story of Two Robins, 250p, 8pl 1 00 

Blanchan, Birds that Hunt and are Hunted, 
Life Histories of One Hundred and Seventy 
Birds of Prey, Game Birds and Waterfowls, 
360p, 48 full-page col. pi, true to nature 2 00 

*Boys and Girls Bird Book, 140p. ills, Phil. 
'60 40 

Brown, Taxidermists' Manual on the Art of 
Collecting, Preparing and Preserving Objects 
of Natural History, 150p. 6pl, 48flg 60 

Baily, Our Own Birds of the United States, 
265p, SOills.' (150) 80 

Buel, The Living World. Natural History of 
Fishes, Reptiles, Insects, Birds and Mammals, 
722 p, 1200 engr. (180 pages devoted to Birds) 

2 30 

Burroughs, Riverby, 319p, (1 25) 80 

Wake Robin, 256p, ills, N. Y. '77 80 

Chapman, Bird Studies With a Camera, with 
Introductive Chapters on the Outfit and Meth- 
ods of the Bird Photographer, 218p, 110 photos 
from nature, N. Y. '00 1 75 

, Bird Life, A Guide to the Study of Our 

Common Birds, with 75 full-page plates, etc. 
1 75 



, Handbook of Birds of Eastern North 

America, with Keys to the Species, Descrip- 
tions of their Plumages. Nests, etc., and their 
Distribution and Migrations, with over 200 ills; 
this is the best "Bird Book" for amateurs in 
the east _ 3 00 

Ditto, pocket edition, flexible covers 3 50 

Cory, The Birds of the Bahama Islands, con- 
taining many birds new to the Islands and a 
number of undescribed Winter plumages of 
N. A. Birds, 4to, 8pl, ($6) 3 90 

Coues, Field and General Ornithology— A 
Manual of the Structure and Classification of 
Birds with Instructions for Collecting and 
Preserving Specimens, 344p. 112fig. London 
'90 2 ao 

Cuvier, The Animal Kingdom arranged after 
its organization, forming a Natural History 
of Animals and an Introduction to Comparative 
Anatomy, 706p. 500flg. 30 col. pi. by Landseer, 
(over 100 p. devoted to Ornithology) 2 40 

Ditto, 2d hand copy of above, with plain 
plates, text as new, binding poor. 1 10 

Davie, Methods in the Art of Taxidermy, 
($10) now out of printj and publishers supply 
exhausted, will soon be very rare, only 3 copies 
left 5 35 

2d reprint edition 2 50 

, Nest and Eggs of North American 

Birds, 5th ed. 60Op. ills, best book on eggs pub- 
lished (82.25) 1 50 

De Kay, Ornithology of New York, 393p. 141 
full-page col. plates' containing 308 birds in 
natural colors, 4to; this rare and magnificent 
work usually sells at from 815 to $20 per copy. 
12 20 



Dixon, Rural Bird Life, being essays on Orni- 
thology, with Instructions for Preserving Ob- 
jects Relating to that Science, 374p. 4pl. 45ill3. 
(82.50) 1 70 

.Curiosities of Bird Life An Account of 

the Sexual Adornments, Wonderful Displays, 
Strange Sounds, Sweet Songs, Curious Nests, 
Protective and Recognitorv Colors, and. Extra- 
ordinary Habits of Birds, 322p. ($2,50) 1 90 

, Our Rare Birds being Studies in Or- 
nithology and Oology, 374p. ills 2 20 

*Dyson, Bird-keeping. A Practical Guide 
for the management of Singing and Cage 
Birds, 264p. col. pi. ills.... 60 



no 



THE OOLOGIST 



Dugmore, Bird Homes, The Nests, Eggs and 
Breeding Habits of the Land Birds Breeding In 
the Eastern United States with Hints on the 
Rearing and Photographing of Young Birds, 
200p.; 50 photoeng. 15 full-page col. plates, 64 
eggs in natural colors 2 00 

Elson, Birdies, 105p, ills 25 

*Fisher, The Hawks and Owls of the U. S., 
210p. 26 col. pi. Wash '93; a fair copy of this 
very rare and desirable book 3 50 

Fisher, Out-door Life in England, 474p....l 90 

Fowler, Summer Studies of Birds and Books. 
288p 75 

Goss, History of the Birds of Kansas, de- 
scribes ."129 western birds, 692p. 38 full-page 
photo-engravings of groups of birds, large 8vo. 
new and last edition (7 00; 5 00 

Goode, The Published Writings of Philip 
Lutley Schalter, 136p 40 

Greene, Birds of the British Empire, British 
Birds, Birds of India, Africa, America and 
Australia, 369p. 80 ills 1 30 

, Parrots in Captivity, 3 Vols. 400p. 81 

full-page col. pi. large 8vo; a magnificent work, 
'84, (815) _ 8 25 

*Harting, Hints on Shore Shooting, with a 
Chapter on Skinning and Preserving Birds. 
88p. '71 40 

Hasluck, Taxidermy, 160p, 108flg The best 
book for the money ever published _ 40 

Headley, Structure and Life of Birds, 412p. 
78flg. 1895. An Invaluable book to the Student. 
1 60 

Henshaw, Ornithology of Portions ot Neva- 
da and California (Wheeler Survey '76), 32p. 
maps (also lOOp, of other matter) l 00 

, Ornithology of Portions of California. 

Nevada and Oregon . (Wheeler Survey of '77 
and '78) 54p. maps, (also 300 pages of other 
matter _ 2 00 

Ingersoll, Birds' Nesting, a Hand-book of In- 
struction in Gathering and Preserving the 
Nests and Eggs of Birds for the purpose of 
Study, nop. 15flg. ($1.25) 1 10 

*Jardine, Humming-birds. 2vols. 630p. 95 col. 
pi. Memoirs of Linneus and Pennant, Edin- 
burgh "33 2 19 

*Jones' Cassell's Book of Birds, Vol. I. In- 
troduction; Parrots. Passerine Birds, Ravens, 
and Birds of Prey, 312p. 10 col. pi. 100 ills l 40 

Kearton, Wild Life at Home; How to Study 
and Photograph It, 188p. many photo-engr. 
1 50 

Kingsley. Popular Natural History, A Des- 
cription of Animal Life from the Lowest Forms 
Up to Man, 2 vols. 728p. 50" ills., many pi. Bos- 
ton '90, 132p. devoted to Ornithology 6 60 

, The Naturalists' Assistant, a Hand- 
book for the Collector and Student with a 
Bibliography of 1,500 Zoological Works, 228p. 
40 ills 85 

Knobel, Field Key to the Land Birds, 55p. ills, 
9col. pi ; 75 

*Lee. Taxidermy or the Art of Collecting. 
Preparing and Mounting Objects of Natural 
History, 244p. ills. London '43, (8.75) 70 

Mcllwraith, The Birds of Ontario, being a 
concise account of every species of bird known 
to have been found in Ontario, with a descrip- 
tion of their nests and eggs and instructions 
for Collecting Birds and Preparing and Pre- 
serving Skins; also directions how to form a 
Collection of Eggs, with Glossary of technical 
terms. 426p. ills. (This is the best cheap work 
for collectors In the Gt. Lafee Region — ) 2 00 



Manton, Taxidermy without a Teacher, 56p. 
ills. (50) _ 40 

Martin, Our Song Birds and Domestic Fowls- 
384p. London '60 35 

Newman, A Dictionary of British Birds, 440p. 
London, valuable and instructive. 1 45 

Ogil vie -Grant, ("Lloyd's") A Hand-book to 
the Game Birds, 2vols. of 300 pp. ea., 43 col. 
pi., 98 2 80 

Parrot Book, How to Rear and Manage them 
in Sickness and in Health, with chapters in 
Hawking, Hawking-birds and Owls, 196p. ills. 

45 

'* Ridgway, Ornithology of Illinois, vol. I, 520p. 
3.3pl., 1889 3 25 

, Manual of North American Birds, for 

the Naturalist and Sportsmen, new and last 
edition 6 80 

St. John, Notes & Sketches from the Wild 
Coasts of Nipon, 416p. ills, maps, etc 1 30 

Schley, American Partridge and Pheasant 
Shooting, 222p. 8pl 1 15 

Silloway, Sketches of Some Common Birds, 
322p. 16pl 95 

Sharpe, ("Lloyd's"), A Hand-book to the 
Birds of Great Britian, 4 vols, of 300 pp. each 
124 col. plates, '97 5 40 

Stanley, History of Birds, 420p. 160 ills 90 

Strickland, Ornithological Synonyms, Vol. I, 
Accipitres, (Hawks, Owls and Vultures) only 
volume published, very valuable, 268p 1 45 

Studer's, Ornithology or the Science of Birds 
from the text of Dr. Brehm, with 212 illustra- 
tions by Dr. Theo. Jasper on thirty-seven mag- 
niflcent.full-page pi. 156p. (size 11x14 in) ele- 
gantly bound in Russia and Gilt binding bro- 
ken at corners and back, contents as new (815) 
5 10 

Watson, Ornithology In Relation to Agri- 
culture and Horticulture, 220p. 85 

Willcox, Pocket Guide to Common Land 
Birds of New England, 170p . 75 

♦Wood, My Feathered Friends, ills. 400p... 70 

, Ornithology oj the World, America- 
nized by Holder; this is the Ornithological 
Volume of Wood's "Animate Creation" or "Our 
Living World," 640p. (10x13 in) 10 full-page 
oleographs in colors, SO full-page engr. and 
300 ills, unb _ 4 00 

, Strange Dwellings being a Descrip- 
tion of the Habitations of (birds and) animals, 
424p. 57ills 90 

PAMPHLETS, EXCERPTS, &c. 

Allen, Description of a Fossil Pa.sserlne from 
the Insect-Bearing Shales of.Colorado, 3p. pi 15 

, The American Ornithologists Union, 

a Seven Years' ReU'ospect, 20p. N. Y. '91 20 

American Ornithologists Union, Abridged 
Check List of N. A. Birds, printed on one side 
of leaf only, 70 leaves, N. Y., '89 (50) 40 

, Supplement to the Code of Nomen- 
clature and Check List of N. A. Birds, 24p. 
'89 20 

*Baird, Review {of Americrn (North and 
Middle) Birds 312p. Wash. '64 1 40 

* . Catalogue of North American Birds, 

soiled, 56p. 4to 35 

, Birds of Utah. (Notes on 25 species, 

R. R. Survey IX.) 4to. 7col. pi 75 

Barlow and Taylor, the Story of the Fa- 
rallones. 22 photo-eng, with text, Calif, '97 (50) 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Ill 



Barrows, the English Sparrow in North 
America, Especially in its Relations to Agri- 
culture, 405p. 6flg, map, Wash, '89 55 

Beal, The Crow Blackbirds and Their Food, 
20p 30 

, Some Common Birds in Their Relation 

to Agriculture, 40p. 22fig. 35 

, The Blue Jay and its Food, 12p, 3flg. 

15 

, Food of Woodpeckers, 34p. 4flg 25 

Beeton's . British Song Birds, How to Rear 
and Manage Them, 140p. ills _ 30 

Bendire. Reports of Dept. Oology, National 
Museum '86-'92, 7 year. 14p 35 

do do for 4 years, 8p If) 

Bourn & Worcester. Birds and Mammals col- 
lected by Menange Scientific Expedition, to the 
Philippine Islands (1890) 64p. (60p. Birds) 4to 
1 35 

Brewster, Description of the First Plumage 
of Various Species of N. A. Birds, 39p. Cam- 
bridge, '79 _ 50 

Burnham, Our Caniries and Other Pet Birds- 
Hew to Mate, Keep, Feed and Breed Them 
108p. 50ills. Mas. '79, (50) 30 

Carroll, Birds|of Refugio Co., Tex. 12p 35 

Cassin. Ornithology of U. S. Astronomical 
Expedition to Southern "Hemisphere, '49-52, 
30p. 15col. pi .". 1 40 

Cherrie, Two New Costa Rican Fly-catchers, 
2p 10 

Cook, A. J., Birds of Michigan, 166p. llSflg, 
(1st ed.) 45 

, ditto. (2d ed.) same text as above, but 

in better form and better covers 70 

Cooke, Birds of Colorado, 142p. rare and out 
of print 1 00 

Cooper and Suckley. Birds of Northwest 
Amerifa (U. S.) (Pac. R. R. Survey XII) 150p, 
8col.pl. 4to ,2 40 

Cope, A Wading Bird from the Amazon 
Shales, 4p 15 

Cory, How to Know the Shore Birds of N. A. 

90p. many ills. (1.00) Boston, '97 70 

Coues, Check List of N. A. Birds. 137p .50 

, Passer domesticus, 20p 25 

Coues & Kidder, Ornithology and Natural 

History of Kerqulean Island, 172p 1 00 

*Davle, Nests and Eggs of N. A. Birds 3d ed. 

'89, 468p 13pl 1 15 

Earl, Pets of the Household, Their Care in 
Health and Disease, 160p. ills. (50) ..25 

Elliott List of Described Species of Hum- 
mingbirds, 18p 35 

, The Seal Islands of Alaska, 4to. 176p. 

29pl. 2 maps, a valuable monograph, with des- 
criptive catalogues of the Birds. (12p. 3pl.) 
Mammals and Fishes of the Group 1 25 

Evermann, Birds of Carroll County, Ind., 
80p 35 

Farr, Check List of New York Birds, 410p- 
50 

Fisher, Ornithology!of the Death Valley Ex- 
pedition of "91, Comprising Notes on Birds Ob- 
served in So. Calif.. So. Nevada and parts of 
Arizona and Utah. 152p 1 25 

. Hawks and Owls from the Standpoint 

of the Farmer, 20p. Spl _ 25 

Foster, A Consideration of Some Ornitholog- 
ical Literature, with Extracts from Cur- 
rent Criticism, 1878, '83, 54p. N. Y. '94 55 

, Biographical Sketch and Published 

Writings of Geo. N. Lawrence, 124p. pi.. 30 



Goode, The Published Writings of Spencer 
FuUerton Baird. 1843-83, 377p 60 

Hay, Breeding Habits, Eggs and Young of 
Snakes, 14p 25 

Heerman, Birds of California, (San Francisco 
to Ft. Yuma, Pac. R. R. Survey X) 50p. 7col. 
pl.':4to 1 45 

, Birds of Texas (Ft. Yuma to San An- 
tonio, Pac. R. R. X) 12p. 3col, pi. 4to 60 

Henry, Smithonian Circular Relative to Col- 
lections of Birds from Middle and South Amer- 
ica 05 

Henshaw, Ornithology of Nevada, Utah, Cali- 
fornia ColoradoNew Mexico and Arizona, 395p 
15 mag. col. pi. 4to 3 75 

Holdens Book on Birds, 128p, ills 25 

Howell. Abstract of Proceedings of Linnsean 
Society of New York for year ending March, 
'92, 8p 25 

Hurst, Taxidermists' Guide. lOOp. ills 25 

Jacobs, Eggs of Penna, Birds at World's 
Fair, lOp. Spl 35 

, Summer Birds of Greene Co., Pa., 

16p 35 

Judd, Four Common Birds of Farm and Gar- 
den, 14p. 4flg 20 

Kennerly, Birds of New Mexico, (Pac. R. R. X) 
18p. 4col. pi - 90 

Lattin, Frank H., The Oologlsts' Handbook, 
1885, (25) 86p 35 

, The Standard Catalogue of North 

American Birds' Eggs, 1896, (25) 74p 10 

Lawrence, Birds of Dominica, 22p 35 

, A Few Birds of Guadalupe, etc, 8p. 15 

, Birds of Martinique, 12p 25 

Leverkuhn, Fremde Eier im Neste, 214p. .1 00 

Louck's Life History and Distribution of the 
Prothonotary Warbler in Ills _ 20 

Lucas, Birds and Animals recently extinct or 
threatened with extermination, 42p. lOpl. 6fig . 
60 

, History and Anatomy of Gt. Auk. 

(Funk Isld expd) 40p. Spl 60 

, Tongues of Birds, 18p. 53flg 45 

, Catalogue of S. A. Bird Skeletons 

4p 10 

, Exploration in N. F. and Labrador, 

(after bones of Gt. Auk.) 20p, map 30 

, Weapons and Wings ofaBirds, 12p, pi, 

Sflg 25 

, The Tongues of Woodpeckers, lOp, 

3pl _ 25 

Maynard's "Birds of Eastern North Ameri- 
ca" This elaborate work was published about 
25 years ago at 118 and contained 532 pages. I 
have one part containing about 300 pages (over 
Vilot original) bound in tag board covers. The 
Thrushes, Warblers, Starlings, Water Birds 
and Shore-birds are complete $3.00. I also have 
a copy containing about ^ of origmal work at 
90c. Sample pages of work for stamp. Style 
of text see article of "Black Duck" in Dec. 
1900, OOLOGIST 

Merriam , Report of Ornithologist and Mam- 
maloglstof U. S. for '88imp, 60p 25 

, Birds of Idaho, with description of a 

New Owl, 20p, col, pi 50 

, Birds of Arizona (San Francisco, Mt- 

Plateau and Desert of Little Colo, and Grand 
Canon of Colo. ) Map showing distribution of 
Lecoute's Thrasher, 24p 50 

, Notes on 4 Bermuda Birds, 2p 15 



112 



THE OOLOGIST. 



P THE BEST ILLUSTRATED \*\ 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 

Itgivesthe LIFE HISTORIES 
y>/^F\U^ \\.U3STRA.T\OHSof; 
FOURogFIVE NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS , 
evepymonth . THE EG-G- of each is , 
shown FULL SIZE and tnany nests. 

It also contains short interesting 

STORIES ABOUT BIRDS. 



^^1 



^X-# 



f?4 



% 



^^^TSAYEAR^SAMPLECOP^ 



FP^^- 



CHAS.K.REED, 
Sta.A. WORCESTER, MASS^ 



BUV THE 




SEW ING MAC HINE 

Do not be deceived by those who ad- 
vertise a $60.00 Sewing Machine for 
$20.00. This liind of a machine can 
be bought from us or any of our 
dealers from $15.00 to $18.00. 

WE MAKE A VARIETY. 

THE NEW HOME IS THE BEST. 

The Feed determines the strength or 
weakness of Sewing Machines. Tlie 
Double Feed combined with other 
strong points makes tlie ]¥ew Home 
the best Sewing Machhie to buy. 

showing the dif- 
Tcnt styles of 
■(^"wing Machines 
we manufiicture and prices before purchasing 



Write for CIRCULARS I 



THE NEW BOHE SEWIM MftGHINE 1^. 

ORANGE, MASS. 

28 Union Sq. N. Y., Chicago, 111., Atlanta, Ga., 

St. Louis.Mo., Dallas,Tex.,San Francisco, Cal 

FOR SALE BY 



PENIKESE. 

A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 

famous Summer School. 

A 96-page book of much interest to 

students of Nature. 
Price only 25c (reduced from 35c). 

Prepaid. 
Read iivbat others say: 

"Have found it extremely interesting read- 
ing,"— Henry Prime, Garden City, L. I. 

'•I enjoyed the book [Penikese] very much." 
— W. W. Kinsley (Supt. of Schools) Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 

"It is both instructive and entertaining and 
deserves a place in the library of every student 
of nature."— W. D. Lynn, Canfield, O. 

"I have just finished reading 'Penikese' and 
can say that I have enjoyed it exceedingly. 
Anything looking toward keeping green the 
memory of the great Agassiz should be of in- 
terest to the teacher of biology and no period 
of his life is more interesting than the years 
spent in building up the laboratory on Peni- 
kese."— W. P. Hay (Prof. Biology, HighSchool) 
Washington, D. C, 

'•I have read the book [Penikese] with great 
Interest and think it rtU admirable remini- 
scence of one of the greatest naturalists of the 
nineteenth century. The name of Agassiz is 
assuredly treasured by all true lovers of na- 
ture and his methods of study have left a strik- 
ing impress on present-day workers."— (Rev.) 
Robert Blight, Green Lane, Pa. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r, 
Albion, N. Y. 

INDIAN BASKETS, Indian 
Beaded Buckskin Sioux Relics, 
(Indian Photos, Indian Pottery, 
Indian Weapons. Elk Teeth, Mex- 
ican Hand Carved Leather Goods, 
Mexican Drawn Linens, Shells, Minerals. Fos- 
sils. Ancient >tone Relics, Oregon Tiny Arrow- 
heads. Fossil Fishes, Fossil Leaves. Corals, 
Agate Jewelry. Curios. Wholesale and Retail. 
16th year. Two-story building full. New cat., 
No. 10, 40 pages, finely illus., for 5c. L.W.STIL- 
WELL. Deadwood, S. Dak. 

If you collect 

note my 

SPECIAL OFFER. 

I will send you by mail postpaid one 
pach of the following eg'^.s: American 
Herring Gull, Gt. Blue Heron, White- 
facerl Glossy Ibis, Ring-necked Pheas- 
ant, Killdeer Plover, Burrowing Owl, 
Road-runner, Red-wing, Dwarf Cow- 
bird. Mof'kingbird, Flicker, Wood 
Thrush, Indigo Bunting. American 
Robin and Mourning Dove, all listing 
at $3.00. for only 73c New list of sets 
just issued. ERNEST H. SHORT. 
Rochester, N. Y. 




BOYS! 



The Oologist 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY. ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 8. 



ALBION, N. Y., AUGUST, 1901. Whole No. 179 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exchanges" "For sales," Inserted In tills department 
for 25C per 25 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted in pajrment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 179 yoiir subscription expires with this issue 
180 " " " " Sept., '• 

183 •' '• " " Dec, " 

190 " " " " June, 1902 

195 " " " " Dec. " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

TMDAPT R VI This August Oologist was is- 
IJurUniAlll* sued July 20th. The Sept. is- 
sue will be printed on Aug. 20. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
mail. 

CERULEAN WARBLERS Eggs in sets with 
nest in situ for sale at list rates. Sets of 617 
for exchange. W. E. SAUNDERS, London, 
Ont. 

FOR SALE.— My collection of small birds; 
169 in all. No's 815 and 640 among them. All 
good skins. Will send list if you mean busi- 
ness. W. F. WEST, Greensburg, Ind. 

EXCHANGE.— A fine lot of bird skins to ex- 
change for a pair of live Pheasants, any varie- 
ty Correspondence solicited. C. VAN L. 
SMITH, 109 Good St., Akron. Ohio. 

COLLECTORS : Why don't you send for my 
cheap prices on Birds Eggs, singles and sets. 
I am just giving them away All letters an- 
swered promptly. A D. DOERGE, P. O. Box 
3, Navasota, Texas. 

FOR SALE CHEAP.— Fine AI sets with 
data such as Chuck-wiU's-widow, Louisiana 
Water Thrush, Titmouse, Nuthatch. Hawks, 
Owls, Vultures and many more. Write for 
lists. ROBT. D. FOXHALL, Tarboro. N. Car. 

FOR SALE.— Sets of American and Barrow's 
Golden-eye, Loon and R. B. Nuthatch, skins 
of Gray Ruffed Grouse, Cinnamon Teal and 
Picket Pin Gopher, back numbers of "Osprey," 
bird pamphlets, etc., or will exchance any of 
above for Davie's Taxidermy, good Watch or 
Telescope. WM. A. BOWMAN, ColumbiaFalls, 
Mont. 



WILL SELL for best offer in cash or eastern 
specimens of birds or eggs. One glass case con- 
taluing L thirteen squirrels mounted upon 
branches, etc. Case contains one Black, one 
Red, one Grey, one Chipminck, one Flying one 
Fox, one White Face Fox, one Florida Fox, 
one German Black, one German Red. one Mex- 
ican Red and Grey, one South American Fly- 
ing, one India Black and Yellow. All answer- 
ed. GEO. SWEZEY, 66-79 Jackson St. . New- 
ark, N. J. 

WILL t)ELL CHEAP or exchange for Al 
sets with data. Lattin's catalogue. 1000 points 
and buts of arrows and spears,3 forjlc exchange 
5 for le cash; back numbers Oologist, "Birds" 
Part I, colored olates, "Birds of New Jersey," 
"Birds About Us," Abbott; Eastman pocket 
kodak; 22 and 32 cal. Smith and wesson re- 
volvers ; a handsome tan sole leather gun case 
for carrying two guns ; a four draw brass tele- 
scope: pair of boy's climbers; sets of cigarette 
cards; trap door spider's nest; large pieces of 
petrified wood from Arizona and pottery from 
the Cliff Dwellers: old copper cents and half 
cents ; two glass topped cases, one, two draw- 
ers (walnut) 21x84; other a wall case 16x24 
(cherry); also sets of Al birds eggs. Every- 
thing is Al and must go cheap for cash or Al 
sets. B. A. CARPENTER, Salem, N. J. 

I AM COLLECTING this season in Southern 
Arizona in the Huachuca mountains. I am se- 
curing many rare and desirable sets, including 
Red-faced, Virginia, Audubon's. Black-throat- 
ed Gray, Lucy's, Olive, Grace's and Sonora 
Yellow Warblers; Coues', Vermillion, Sulphur- 
bellied, Olivaceous and Buff-breasted Fly- 
catchers; Stephen's Whip-poor-will; Rivoli, 
Broad-tailed, Cactus and Black-chinned Hum- 
mers; Arizona and Long-crested Jays: Scott's 
Oriole; Hepatic and Cooper's Tanagir; Rock 
and Canon Wrens; Canon Towhee. Painted 
Redstart, Arizona Junco, Pygmy Nuthatch, 
Chestnut-backed Bluebird, White-necked Rav- 
ens and manv other varieties too numerous to 
mention here. Everything will be prepared in 
the finest order possible— nests with all sets 
not larger than Jays. Parties wishing to 
build up their collections send for my full list 
and cash priax. Specimens sent on approval 
where parties are kno^\-n to me or where good 
reference is furnished. O. W. HOWARD, Ft. 
Huachuca, Arizona. 

WANTED.— May number. 1888, Vol. XXII, 
American Naturalist. WILLIAM BREW- 
STER, Cambridge, Maes. 



114 



THE OOLOGIST. 



WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. W^ARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

FOR SALE:— Fancy and common Geodes, 
ranging in price from 2.5c. to $5.00; halts from 
10c to 50e. Special rates to colleges and mu- 
seums. H. K. McLELLAN, Hamilton, Han- 
cock Co., Illinois. 179 

OOLOGISTS WANTED:— Will pay 50cts. 
each cash for one of each June 1888, and April 
1889, and will give an exchange notice, or cou- 
pon good for one, for copies of the January 
1895 and April 1899 issue, a notice for each copy. 
FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

WANTED:— Oologists and others to read 
"Frederick Young," the prettiest book of the 
year. A fine story with science and natural 
history intermixed. Tinted illustrations ; gold 
top. Price $1.50. Superlative as a gift. Order 
through vour book dealer. By Charies Lin- 
coln Phillips, an old contributor to this jour- 
nal. H. A. DICKERMAN & SON, Publishers, 
Boston . tf 

EXCHANGE.— Choice first class sets with 
full data Royal Tern, Am. Oystercatcher, Wil- 
let, Wilson's Plover, Brown Pelican, Clapper 
Rail, Laughing Gull,Forster's Tern BlackSkim- 
mer. Green Heron, Boat-tail Grackle, Painted 
Bunting.IndigoBun ting, Yellow-breasted Chat, 
etc. for A 1 sets with data and large singles. 
Sets also for sale very cheap. DR. M. T. 
CLECKLEY, Augusta, Ga. 180 

FOR EXCHANGE —Model '99 Kent's bike in 
good condition. Will take bird skins or Indian 
relics to value of $10. Write first. Address 
BOX 817, Ames, la 

WILL EXCHANGE.— Western photos or 
plates and new books for eggs in sets. All let- 
ters answered. Address CHAS. S. MOODY, 
Oro Fino, Idaho. 

WANTED.— Good U. S. stamps. Offer in ex- 
change skins of 387, 412, 498, 761, 474. 759b, 587, 
613, 614, 619, 521, 581, 461, 624 661, 671, 673. 467, 728, 
735, 655. THEODORE B. PARKER, 36 Beau- 
mont Ave , Newton vllle, Mass. 

A FEW Sets each No. 123a, 49, 413, 588b. 
Several volumes Oologist and other bird 
journals; Gov. Pub. on Ornithology; Bar Lock 
Type Writer, cost $100 In good condition; Star 
Fish and Sea Urchins from Pacific Ocean. 
All for A 1 Skins and Original sets. A. G. 
PRILL, Scio, Oregon. 

WANTED. — A pair of young live of each of 
the following: Barn Owl, Long-eared Owl, 
Short-eared Owl For good strong specimens, 
large prices will be given. J. E. T., Box 98, 
Lancaster. Mass. 

FOR EXCHANGE.— Eggs of this state for 
sets of other states. Send list and receive 
mine. ED T. SCHENCK, Sprakers, N. Y. 

WANTED.— A cabinet for bird skins and 
back numbers of magazines. Can offer sets, 
skins, mounted birds, shells etc. or part cash, 
also have a Lady's Bicycle, 28 in., for sale at 
$18.00 cash. All answered. W. JENNINGS 
WIRT, Gaines, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

OOLOGISTS.— Have some fine sets to ex- 
change for same. Send your lists. Sets of 
hawks owls and water birds especially desired. 
RAY F. STEVENS, Shabbona, 111. 



A 1 SETS Manitoba collected eggs with full 
data, direct from the collector : Arctic Horned 
Owl 1-4, $1.50; W. H. Owl 1-2, 75c: Prarie Horn- 
ed Lark 1-4 1-3, 10c; Short-eared Owl 1-10 2-7 3-6 
3-5 3 4, 40c; Redtails 1-S .5-3, well marked, 25c; 
Krider's Hawk 3 2 3-3, 35c ; Long-eared Owl 3-5 
3-4, 10c; Marsh Hawk 1-6 5-5 2-4 10c; Gray Rufiled 
Grouse 1-9, 40c; Am. Crow 1-6 2 5 4-1 2c; Mallard 
1-7 10c: Pintail 1-5 20c; Col. Sharp-tailed Grouse 
1-10 1-12 1-13 1-17, 30c: Prarie Short-tailed 1-10 
1-12 1-13, 30c Prarie Hen Ml 1-12 1-8, lOc; Mead- 
owlarkW3-4 2-5 1-6 5o;Killdeer 1-4 1-3, 10c; Sharp- 
shinned Hawk 1-5 1-6, $1.00; Purple Grackle 3-4 
3-5 1-6, 2e; Rusty Blackbird 3-6 2-53-4,30; Mourn- 
ing Dove 3-2. 2c: Clay -colored Sparrow 3-b 4-4 
2-3, nests, 10c; Yellow Warbler 3-4 3-3. 2c; Chest- 
nut collared Longspur 2-4 1-3, 20c; White- 
rumped Shrike 3-6 3-4, 3c; Flicker 1-5 2c; Rose- 
breasted Grosbeak 3-4 1-5, 5c; House Wren 2-6 
2-5, 2c; Bewick's Wren 16. 10c; Long-billed 
Marsh Wren 3-6, 2c; Bartram's Sandpiper 3-4, 
25c; Wilson's Pharalope 1-4, 50c; Loon 1-2, $1; 
Swainson Hawk 4-3 3 4, 25c; well marked 
Broadwinged Hawk 2-3. $1 ; Song Sparrow 3-4 
2-5, 2c; Redwinged Blackbird 3 4, Ic; Osprey 1-3, 
75c; well marked Whooping Crane 1-2, $2.00. 
List is incomplete as I am adding sets daily, 
but all listed are on hand. Prices per egg. 
CHRIS P. FORGE, Carman, Manitoba. 

FOR SALE.— Plumbeous Chickadee, sets of 
5, 6 and 7; 15c per egg. Send for list of choice 
southern sets. Have Flying Squirrels for sale 
at $1.50 a pair; also Fox Squirrels, Coons, etc. 
E. F. POPE, Colmesnell, Tex. 

U. S. ARMY GOODS:— For Collecting, can- 
oeing, hunting and bicycle trips. Dog Tents, 
3 pieces buttoning together, covers 5x7ft. ; 
weight about 51bs., $1.25. 4 pieces button to- 
gether, covering 7x10, 12.25. Rubber Ponchos, 
45x72, slit for head, $1.50. Canvas Hammocks 
and Haversacks, each, 50c. ALBERT B. 
FARNHAM, 502 12th St., N. W Washington, 
D. C 179 

WANTED.— Sets of N. Am. Birds Eggs. 
Can use any except 498, 187, 49, 385. The more 
desirable the sets you offer are, the better the 
offer I will make you for them. I can offer 
Trays for Eggs, Large Egg Calipers (best 12 in. 
sliding); Glass top Egg Cases, Rare Single 
Eggs, Emue Eggs, Collection of 300 var. good 
Postage Stamps in sets; Shells, a large assort- 
ment labelled ; Minerals, single specimens or 
collections; Fossils; Indian Arrowpoints; 
Spearheads and Knives, many localities; also 
an SVi in. Rough Stone Axe and a few Drills; 
a few Bird Skins and Corals. Write, sending 
list of what you can spare and giving me an 
idea of what you want and I will make the best 
offer I can. E. H. SHORT, Box 173, Rochester, 
N. Y. 179 

EXCHANGE:— One Premo camera 4x5 with 
complete outfit to exchange for complete sets 
of eggs with full data. No others accepted. 
All letters answered. CHAS. S. MOODY, Oro 
Fino, Idaho. 

FOR SALE or EXCHANGE.— Two hundred 
fifty perfect arrow and spear points. FRANK 
RACKETT, Grand Rapids, Mich. Rural De- 
livery No. 1. 

GOOD EXCHANGE for nice sheets of Birch 
Bark and Modern Indian bows, arrows, pipes, 
buckskin, bead and basket work. ALBERT 
B. FARNHAM, 502 12th St., N. W., Washington, 

D. a 

THIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



115 



Ornithological Pamphlets, Excerpts, 8z:c. 

FOR SALE FRANK H. LATTIN, ALBION, N. Y. 



Continued from L,ist 

Newberry, Birds of Sacramento Valley to 
Columbia River, (Pac. R. R. Survey VI) 38p, 
2col, pi, 4to 1 25 

Page, Feathered Pets, A. Treatise on the 
Food, Breeding and Care of Canaries, Parrots 
and Other Cage Birds, 141p, Ills 2.5 

Palmer, T. S., Bird Day in Schools, 4p 10 

Posson, Some (27) Birds of Unusual Occur- 
rence in Orleans Co.fN. Y. 4p 20 

Rey, Die Eier der ;Vogel Mithleuropas, Part 
I. 84p, 5col, pi. of 18 full-size eggs, eagles, etc, 
1900 75 

, Do do. Part II, 16p, 5col, pi, of 40 full- 
size eggs, Hawks and Eagles 75 

Ridgway, Catalogue of Old World Birds, 20p 
05 

, Directions for Collecting Birds, 28p 32 

, Genus Sittasomus, 4p 15 

, Nomenclature of N. A, Birds, badly 

soiled. Pencil notes by Davie, giving colors of 
iris of common species, etc 50 

, Report of Dept. Birds U. S. National 

Museum 1884-'82, 9 years, 64p 50 

, Do do '86-'92, 6 years, 40p 25 

Rotzell, Birds of Narbeth, Penna. and Vicin- 
ity, 8p _ 30 

Sharpe, British Birds, parti, 112p, llcol. pi, 
40 

Short, Birds of Western York, 14p, 1st ed, 
'93 35 

, ditto, 21p, 2d ed. '96 10 

Shufeldt, M. D., R. W., Scientific Taxidermy 
for Museums, 71 full-page plates , 57p, text.l 50 

. Observations on the Classification of 

Birds, 16p, '98 20 

. Osteology of LaniuS' ludovicianus ex- 

cubltorides, lOp, pi 20 

, Forms Assumed by the Patella of 

Birds, 8p 20 

, Osteology of the Eremophila alpes- 

trls, 30p. pi 25 

, Osteology of the N. A. Tetraonidae, 

44p, 8pl 60 

, Osteology of the Speotyto cunicularia 

var. hypogea, 32p, 2pl 40 

Smith, Birds of Warren Co. O., with notes 
and Supplementary List of Birds of Probable 
Occurrence, 30p. '01 35 

Smithonian, List of Birds of Mexico, Cen- 
tral America and West Indies, 8p, '63 15 

, Arrangement of Families of Birds, 

(66) 8p 10 

Stearns, Notes on the Natural History of La. 
brador, 74p 60 

Stegneger, Notes on Japanese Birds, 24p 35 

Streets, Natural History of the Hawaiian 
and Fanning Island and Lower California, 
172p, Wash., '72 1 00 

TurnbuU, Birds of Eastern Pannsylvania 
and New Jersey, 50p, Phila, '69, very rare...! 00 

Whitlock, The Migration of Birds, 140p, '97 
95 

Bailey & Fisher, Birds and Mammals through 
parts of Minnesota and Dakota and experi- 
ments in Poisoning Birds, 34p, (A. R. 87)...- 35 



Of July OOL,OOISX. 

Baird, Directions for Collecting, Preserving 
and Transporting specimens of Natural His- 
tory, 18p, (S. R. .56) 25 

Barnard, Birds of Chester County Pa , 5p, 
(S. R. '60) 25 

Barrows & Beal, Food of Horned Lark and 
Cedarbird, 8p (A R., '93) 15 

Beal, How Birds Affect the Orchard. 14p, 6 
flg, (A R '00) ; 15 

Beal, The Meadowlark and Baltimore Oriole, 
12p. 2fig, (A R '95> 15 

Blakiston & Bland, Birds of Nova Scotia and 
Bermuda, lOp (S R '58) 35 

Collins, Habits and Capture of Sea Birds as 
Bait, 20p, (F. R '82) 25 

Coues and Prentiss, Birds of District of Col- 
umbia, 24p, (S. R '61) 35 

Dodge, Bird and Bird Laws, 14p,(A R. '64) 15 

Elliot, The Game Birds of the United States, 
30p, 4pl, (A. R. '64) 50 

Fisher, Food of Hawks and Owls, statement 
of stomach contents of over 1000, 22p,(AR'87) 25 

Fisher, Marsh Hawk. Common and Flammu- 
lated Screech Owls, 14p, 2 col pi, (A. R. '89) 35 

Fisher, Sparrow Hawk and Short-eared Owl, 
also Barrows. Food of Crows and Rose-breast- 
ed Grosbeak and Potato bugs, 46p, (A.R.'88) 35 

Gunn, Egging Expedition lo Shoal Lake, 
Manitoba in 1867, 6 p, (S. R. '67) .. 25 

Holder, Birds of Illinois, lOp, 1860 35 

Holder, Taxidermy, Directions for Collecting 
and Preserving Specimens in Ornithology, 8p, 
5pl, 15 flg 25 

Holmes, Birds Injurious to Agriculture, 50p, 
30pl, (A. R. '56) 50 

Judd, Four Common Birds of the Farm and 
Garden (Catbird, Mockingbird, Brown Thrash- 
er, Hous'i Wren), 14p, 4flg, (A. R. '95) 20 

Judd, The Food of Nestling Birds, 26p, 5pl, 
23flg, (A. R. '00) 35 

Marsh, Birds with Teeth, 44p, 30flg, 4to, 
(G. S. Ill) 1 00 

Merriam, Introduced Pheasants, etc., 12p 
(A- R. '88) - 20 

Michener, Agricultural Ornithology— Land 
Birds of Chester Co., Pa.. 22p, (A. R. 63) 35 

Newton, Preparation and Saving Parts of 
the Skeleton of Birds, 5p, 3 flg, (S. R. '60) 20 

Ridgway et al. Biographical Memoir— Spenc- 
er F. Baird, 42p, (S. R. '88) 35 

Ryder, Embryography of Osseous Fishes, 
150p, 12pl, (F. R. '85) - 60 

Samuels, Oology of New England Birds, 45p, 
(A. R. '64) 75 

Samuels, Ornithology and Mammalogy of 
New England, 22p, (A. R. '63) 50 

Shufeldt. Osteology of Cathartidse, 80p 12pl, 
46 flg, (H. R. '78) 75 

Smithsonian Instructions for Collecting 
Nests, Eggs and Insects, 4Sp, (S. R. '58) 35 

Stevenson, Birds and Mammals of Wyoming 
6p (H. R. '79) 25 

Tristram. Field Study in Ornithology— Dis- 
tribution, Migration, Mimicry, Heredity, 22p, 
(S. R. '93) 35 

Wurdemann, Flamingoes and Other Birds 
from South Florida, 5p, (S. R. '60) 35 



116 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Mounted Birds and Mammals. 

The following specimens are all strictly first 
class, freshly mounted specimens-regular price 
in ( ) My closing price is by mail, express 
or freight at purchaser's ^expense— will ship 
cheapest way. Special rates on large orders. 

Screech Owl (2.75) 

California Screech Owl (3.50) 

Great Horned Owl (6.00) 

Arctic Horned Owl full plumage (20.00)... 

American Hawk Owl (6.00) 

Road-runner (3.00) 

Horned Lark (1.76) 

American Magpie (2.50) 

Steller's Jay (2.50) 

Blue-fronted Jay (2.00) 

Bullock's Oriole (1.75) 

Evening Grosbeak (2.25) 

Pine Grosbeak (2.00) 

American Crossbill (1.75) 

Bohemian Waxwing (2.50) 

Black and White Warbler (1.25) 

Myrtle Warbler (1.50) 

Ring-necked Pheasant full plumage (8.00) 

Skunk ($10.00) 

Red Fox (15.00) 

Gray Squirrel (5.00) _ 

Gray Squirrel holding walnut 

Tufted Puffin (.5.50) 

Black Guillemot (5.25) 

Murre (5.00) 

Razor-billed Auk (mounted from a skin 

from Audubon's collection) 

American Herring Gull full plumage(4.50) 

American Merganser (5.00) 

American Elder (7.00) 

Spotted Sandpiper (2 00) 

Mexican Jacana (3.50) 

Bob-white (8..50) 

Texan Bob-white (2.50) 

Mountain Partridge (3.50) 

Scaled Partridge (2.75) 

Gambel's Partridge (3.00) 

Prairie Hen [3.50) 

American Barn Owl (5.00) 

American Long-eared Owl (3.C0) 

Short-eared Owl (3.50) 

Great Gray Owl (16.00) 

Saw-whet Owl (2.75) 

Lesser Scaup Duck 



1 75 


2 10 


4 75 


12 50 


3 90 


1 75 


90 


1 50 


1 30 


1 30 


90 


1 25 


1 10 


90 


1 30 


80 


8n 


5 60 


i 4 05 


9 10 


2 40 


3 30 


3 35 


2 70 


2 70 


6 75 


2 70 


2 70 


4 30 


1 10 


2 10 


1 45 


1 45 


2 10 


1 65 


2 10 


2 20 


3 90 


2 10 


2 30 


9 30 


2 10 


2 70 



BIRD SKINS. 

Mexican Jacana, pair ($3) $1 50 

Prairie Hen ($1.25) 75 

Red-tailed Hawk ($1.50) 1 00 

American Crow (75c) 50 

Snowflake (35c) 20 

The above specimens are all Barsrains 
at my prices. If you can use $10 worth or more 
of the above send list of wants and let me 
make you a special quotation— you'll be sur- 
prised at my liberality. No special quotations 
after Aug 15th. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion. N-Y. 

JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 



"You might as well be out of the Bird 'World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

THE. OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration witli Robert Ridgway. L. 
Stejneger, C. W. Richmond and 
Other EminentOrnithoIogists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

THE OSPREV COMtrANY, 

321-323 414 St., Washington, D. C. 



The Condor for 1901. 

This popular Californian, Illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader l 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the nesting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1 ; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT $1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



The OoLOGiST, 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 8. ALBION. N. Y., AUGUST. 1901. 



Whole No. 179 



The Oologist. 

A Monthly Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y, 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to the 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription 50c per annum 

Sample copies 5c each 

The above rates Include paj'ment of postage. 

Each subscriber is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
18 redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Sena stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

W~Remember that the publisher must be not! 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

5 cents per nonpareil line each Insertion. 

12 lines in every inch. Seven Inches in a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing Inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line is ''net," "rock 
bottom," "inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 25 cents; lOO lines, $5.00; lOOO imes, 
$50.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due Bills and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing wiU be honored only at regular rates in force 
at the date of issuance of said bill or cai-d. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postoffice Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination wUl be accepted for sums un- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O., ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



The readers of the Oologist will be 
pleased to learn that Mr. Walton I. 
Mitchell, who has an almost insatiable 
mania for rara avis, was successful in 
the capture of the specimen of his or- 
nithological career on June 25th at 
Hagerstown, Maryland — Miss Blanche 



Crawford — "At Home 534 Summit Ave. 
St. Paul, Minn., after July fifteenth " 



The entire oological collection of Miss 
Jean Bell has been purchased by the 
Hon. John Lewis Childs, Floral Park, 
N. Y. This collection is undouttedly 
the finest in the world, composed ex- 
clusively of North American ppeeies. 
It is made up of over 30,000 eggs, some 
10,000 perfect set?, coverinjj 850 species. 

Among other species it contains 
three sets of the California Vulture, 
fifteen of the Sand-hill Crane, six of 
the Everglade Kite, ninety of the Sharp- 
shinned Hawk, three of the Cory's 
Least Bittern, one Spotted Owl, two 
Whooping Crane, five Claike's Nut- 
cracker, eta., etc. 

A feature of the collection is the 
many nests of which there are about 
400 rare and perfect specimens 

It is reported that Miss Bell spent 
over twenty-five thousand dollars in 
getting this magnificent collection to- 
gether. 



Under date of March 25th Mr. O. S. 
Biggs of San Jose, 111., writes: "A 
friend sent me a fine specimen of a 
male Passenger Pigeon which was kill- 
ed Mar. 12 near Oakford, Illinois. It 
is the first one I know of being killed 
here in 8 or 9 years. I have it mounted 
and in my collection." 



The following note from Wm. Cud- 
ney announcing the death of Mr. D. 
Priddy was omitted through error 
from the May Oologist: 

"I wish to announce to the readers of 
the Oologist the death of Mr. D. Prid- 
dy of Toronto, whose ad. has appeared 
in the Oologist from time to time. 



118 



THE OOLOGISl 



He died suddenly from heart trouble a 
few days since while at his work. Mr. 
Priddy was a collector of shells and 
took quite and interest in that branch 
of science." 



Bird Life of a Virg-inia Island. 

Cobb's Island, a narrow strip of land 
lying on the coast of Virginia in the 
Atlantic Ocean near the southeast end 
of the peninsula formed by Northamp- 
ton county, was in former years, a fav- 
orite collecting ground for ornitholo- 
gists and oologists. While of but a 
limited urea, some nine miles in length, 
and six miles wide 'at its greatest 
breath, its conditions as a breeding 
ground for seafowl were most favora- 
ble, and, each year, vast numbers of 
them nested along its stretches of s&lt 
marsh and beach. The ornithologist 
here found h bird-metropolis of a most 
interesting nature, presenting a popu- 
lation of thousands. 

During June-July, 1895, I spent three 
weeks on the island among its birds. 
The season was a favorable one, and 
all the specimens were nesting. From 
the time our boat slipped from the 
mainland shore and set sail for the 
island, birds were numerous. Com- 
mon and Forster's Terns, with their 
graceful airy flight, hovered around 
the boat, darting suddenly to the water 
sometimes, sending up splashes of 
spray and catching small fish that ven- 
tured too near the surface. 

Merry Laughing Gulls, in pairs, fly- 
ing low over the surface of the water, 
each bird of a pair keeping close to its 
mate, so that their wings nearly touch- 
ed, indicated that the species was 
breeding. Black Skimmers passed us 
now and then, and toward the horizon 
a long black line of Surf Scoters rested 
on the water, this species lingering 
even at so late a date. Gulled-billed 
and Black Terns, in small numbers, 
and a single Royal or Caspian Tern 
passed by the boat. 



We reached the island late in the af- 
ternoon, and stopped at the little hotel, 
(now washed away.) The following 
morning, equipped with hip boots, 
some old clothes and a spacious wicker 
basket (for eggs,) I started for the salt 
marshes of the western side. In order 
to reach these to advantage I hired a 
sail boat and a worthy sea-captain to 
manage it. An hour later we were 
among the great colonies of Laughing 
Gulls [Larus atricilla.) Thousands of 
these birds hovered over the marsh, 
their cries, in union, creating a terrific 
din when we neared the nests. The 
sky was nearly objcured by the vast 
number of circling birds. This was my 
first experience among sea fowl, and, 
what a revelation it was! All over the 
marsh the nests were scattered. They 
were built of marsh grass and other 
similar material, sometimes raised two 
feet above the ground, and most of 
them held sets of three eggs, while sets 
of four were found in several. Many 
of the eggs were merely laid upon the 
"wind- rows" of weed and grass. I 
could have gathered several baskotfuls 
of eggs, but took only a few of the 
handsomer sets. While looking over 
the the "wind-rows" 1 ran across a 
number of sets of Forster's Tern 
[Sterna Mr undo) laid upon the rows 
without any attempt at a nest, a mere 
depression having been made and the 
eggs laid in it. I also ran across sev- 
eral fairly well made nests of this spec- 
ies, of grasses, placed on top of the 
"wind-rows." As I went to examine a 
particularly well made Gull's nest, I 
nearly stepped on a Clapper Rail [Rall- 
us crepitans) that wa^f sitting on her 
nest of nine eggs. This was my first 
set of this species and I was naturally 
elated at my find. The Captain per- 
ceiving this, told me that I could gath- 
er a barrel of these eggs if I so desired, 
which statement proved true, and 
some twelve sets taken. The Clapper 
Rails themselves were not much in 



THE OOLOGIST. 



119 



evidence, we only getting an occas- 
sional glimpse of them as they skulked 
amor'gst the high marsh grass. The 
nests are built of marsh grass and 
placed a foot or so above the gi'ound 
in the big i grass. The grass surround- 
ing the nest is pulled down by the 
birds, so that the ends hang over nnd 
form a canopy above the nest. This 
habit facilitates locating the nests, for 
by scanning over the uiarsh and not- 
ing where the even aspect of the 
grass is interrupted by the ends being 
thus pulled, over, the collector may 
find many a nest that would otherwise 
be overlooked. In this same marsh 
we found sfveral nests of the Seaside 
Finch, and saw many birds of that 
species. The nests are difficult to find. 
They are usually placed among the 
gra«s tops, and the species has a pen- 
chant for selecting the grass bordering 
on the small sloughs. After seeing the 
wonders of this marsh, I returned to 
the hotel and worked all of the after- 
noon and most of the next day blowing 
the specimens. 

On the following day I started early 
to investigate the bird-life of the btach, 
and especially to visit the large colonies 
of Black Skimmers at the northeastern 
end. This time there was no need of 
a boat, but the Captain's services were 
again secured, and he appeared on 
time, driving the only horse on the 
island hitched to a delapidated two- 
wheeled cart. As we proceeded along 
the beach, about the first birds to at- 
tract my attention were a pair of Wil- 
son Plovers. They were acting as if their 
nest was near, and a careful search re- 
vealed a cute little juvenile, covered 
with down and faintly speckled, 
crouching among the pebbles of the 
beach. The mimicry was perfect, and 
it was by mere accident 1 noticed him. 
Several American Oystercatchers were 
noticed on the beach and I found a 
nest, or rather a depression in the 
beach, with three eggs. One egg was 



'tpipped," and so I did not disturb the 
set. Another pair evidently had a nest 
near by, but a careful search failed to 
reveal it. 

Toward the northeastern end Com- 
mon Terns [Sterna hiruiido) were very 
numerous, being in hundreds and their 
nests were scattered all over the beach, 
the eggs being laid in mere depressions 
among the pebbles, and the eggs con- 
stituted the average set. 

At the extreme northern end, on the 
eastern side, we found the Black Skim- 
mer colonies. Hundreds upon hun- 
dreds of Skimmers were congregated 
and nesting. As we neared the nests, 
the birds set up an awful uproar, their 
"harking" notes together with the 
screeching of the Terns making an odd 
combination of discord. When we 
reached the nesting ground, a great 
line of Skimmers began to fly around 
and around in single file, turning 
toward the ocean, then curving toward 
the land a/ain, and approaching us 
directly, but only to curve aside at the 
distance of some fifty or sixtty yards, 
all the time uttering their peculiar 
"Ohe hark" ' Ohe bark" 'Ohe bark." 
Their oddly shaped red-orange colored 
mandibles v'c^inted downwa'dly, and 
the pure white of their underpart plum- 
age contrasted strikingly with the 
black of their upper parts. Now and 
then a skimmer would fly at us, coming 
so close sometimes as to make us dodge 
but they always curved aside when 
within three or four feet. 

On the sand dunes and on the sandy 
beach were hundreds of their eggs, re 
markable for their beauty, their ground 
color being averagely of a bluish white, 
though sometiues a very clear white. 
The markings are profuse and of um- 
ber, lavender and black. Four eggs 
constituted the full set, though sets of 
three e^gs were common. The eggs 
were laid in rather deep depressions of 
the sand, and on a single sand dune I 
found as many as seven sets. Owing 



120 



THE OOLOGIST. 



to the exposure the incubation is large- 
ly accomplished by the sun's rays, and 
the birds do not constantly sit upon the 
eggs. In the same locality with the 
Skimmers, we found a number of Gull- 
billed Terns nesting, their eggs laid in 
depressions in the sand and averag- 
ing four to a set, though several of 
three were found. 

Formerly the Royal Tern nested in 
great colonies at this part of the island, 
but not a bird of this species was no- 
ticed. Mr. Robert Ridgway found the 
Royal Tern in great abundance on the 
beach when he visited the locality 
many years previous (See Davies' Nests 
and Eggs) and records that its eggs 
were so thick on the besch, that it was 
with difficulty that he walked without 
stepping on them. The Caspian Tern 
also formerly bred abundantly on the 
island, but wa did not notice its eggs 
on our visit. 

Thonsamls of Least Terns {Sterna 
fm<t7?arwm) used to nest on tbe island, 
but, alas! they have all been sacrificed 
to the millinery trade, thousands of 
them having been shot by mercenary 
hunters who sold the skins to dealers 
in New York. Not a single specimen 
did we see, and the Captain informed 
me that it had been a long time since 
he had observed the species on the 
island. The Willet is another species 
that has decreased on the island. I 
only saw a few pairs. 

Bat now, Cobb's Island is not what it 
used to be. The ocean has made great 
inroads upon it and it has greatly de- 
creased in area. The little hotel has 
been washed away, and the birds are 
not as numerous as formerly. But 
there is an abundance of bird life re- 
maining. The Skimmers and Gulls 
are in great numbers yet and the col- 
onies are still interesting. The col- 
lecting days for the island, however, 
are over. All sincere oologists must 
certainly appreciate that there is a 
marked decrease of bird life through- 



out the country. There is no excuse 
nowadays for bisketfuls of eggs. 
What remains of these Cobb's Island 
colonies, will be protected. The A. 
O. U. has already taken measures to 
this end, and happy is the thought, that 
for many days to come Cobb's Island's 
feathered population, a delight to the 
eye of the bird lover, unmolested and 
protected, will increase as the years 
roll by. 

John W. Daniel, Jr., 

Lynchburg, Va. 



Some Twice Occupied Nests and Other 
Notes. 

On Jnly 1, 1897, at Torresdale, this 
county, I took a set of three eggs and 
nesit of the Graat-crested Flj'catcher 
from a large knot hole 20 inches deep, 
10 feet up in an apple tree. 

On May 3, 1898, I took a set of three 
eggs of the Flicker from the hole cap- 
turing the female sitting on them which 
I gave its liberty 

May 7 took set of 5 eggs again cap- 
turing the bird which again was releas- 
ed. On May 28 the hole contained 8 
two-third in:-ubated eggs. Captured 
the Flicker brooding them and let her 

go- 

On April 18. 1899. found a Screech 

Owl roosting in the hole. It has not 
since been used. 

June 9 1898, took a set of five Fiick- 
ei's eggs from cavity excavated in a 
maple stub 15 feet up Oa April 15, 
1899, from the hole took a fresh egg 
and the female Sere ich Owl (gray). 
The owl lived only two days and dis- 
secting her I obtained another egg and 
found 5 small eggs in her ovary. 

June 27, 1898, ^it the above locality 
(Frankford) took two eggs of the Red- 
headed Woodpecker from a cavity 30 
feet up in a maple stub. This hole had 
been used since during 1899, '00, '01 by 
Passer domesticus . 

On July 20, 1900, at Riverton, N. J.. 



THE OOLOGIST 



121 



took set of 3 House Wren's eggs from 
Flicker's cavity 20 feet up in a stub. 
On tiie same day at Now Albany, N. 
J., took a set of House Wren'.s eggs 
from a D^wny Woodpecker's hole 15 
feet up in a branch of a dried tree in a 
marsh. 

'On May 22, 1901, at Holmesburg, this 
county, took a set of 5 fresh Rough- 
winged Swallow's eggs from an unfin- 
ished Kingtisher's hole excavated in the 
top of an unoccupied quarry. In 1899 
a friend found a Rnuarh-winged Swal- 
low's nest in aa old Kingfisher's hole 
but tore it nut before it was finished. 

On April ^6, 1901, at Volunteortown, 
this county, took set of 4 eggs of the 
Robin from a nest situated on a girder 
of a steel railroad bridgj. On May 7 
took another sat of 4 from same nest. 

In 1899 took 14 eggs of the Flicker, 
several sets, from a cavity excavated 
in a %villow 15 feet up. Daring 1900 I 
took several oth^r sots. In the winter 
two Screech Owls were taken from the 
hole. Mav. this year, a boy roboed a 
Passer domesticus of her fggs, the nest 
of which v.'as built in the hole. June 
8, this year, I took a set of 6 Passtr's 
eggs from the hole. 

Apri[ 14, 1898, took a set of 3 fresh 
eggs of the American Sparrow Hawk at 
Frankford from a Flicker's hole 35 feet 
up in a black oak stub. In 1897 a brood 
of Flickers were raised in the hole. 
RiCAARD F Miller, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Albino Eg-g-s of Sialia sialis- 

Of the many specimens of runts, cur- 
ious colored »nd shaped eggs that I 
have seen in my many years as a stu- 
dent of oology, it has never been my 
good luck to see a pure white set of al- 
bino eggs of the Bluebird until this 
season, and this was only accomplished 
through the kindness of my naturalist 
friend, Mr. J. E. Teagae of this town, 
who ha^f pvpr been a clo?e ob^e^'ver of 



the birds of this locality, and to him all 
credit should be given for had it not 
been for him the eggs would never 
have been found. 

On April Ist as Mr. Teague was pass- 
ing through an old orchard of apple 
trees he saw a Bluebird fly from a hol- 
low tree several ods away. He at 
once thought a nest of common eggs of 
the Bluebird was in the tree, but being 
mnch interested in oology he went to 
the tree for a look at the nest. The 
hole was in the main trunk of the tree, 
about tive feet from the ground and 
about 10 inches in depth, a vacated 
nesting place of the Flicker. On look- 
ing in Mr. Teague beheld not blue eggs 
but pure white ones, four in number. 
This was indeed a surprise. 

On May 2d he again visited the nest. 
The Bluebird was on the nest and had 
to be driven from the hole before the 
eggs could be seen This time five eggs 
rewarded his gaze and this completed 
the set as no more were laid. 

On May 8th Mr. Teague notifirid me 
of the finding of the nest and eggs and 
on May 10th I tramped six miles 
through the mud in a heavy rain storm 
and collectad the nest and eggs. They 
are vtry glossy and look lika eess of 
the Woodpecker, closely resembling 
eggs of the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 
(Sphyrapious varius), both in color and 
size. They measure .80x.62, .81x.62, 
.78X.61, .78x 61, .82x 63. 

The nest was very large and bulky 
and composed of dried grass, lined 
with the same and fine rootlets. 

The nest and eggs now repose in my 
cabinet and 1 prize tham very higely. 
Guy H. Briggs, 
Livermore, Maine. 



■'Oh, you cruel boy, to take those 
eggs out of the nest! 'Think of the poor 
mother bird when she comes — '' 

"The mother bird's dead, miss." 

"How do you know that?" 

"I see it in your hat!" — Punch. 



122 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Unusual Nesting Sites of Melospiza 
fasciata. 

The Song Sparrow in the spring 
builds her nest on the ground or near it 
in this locality (northern Philadelphia) 
but on May 2, 1898, 1 found a nest in an 
unusual situation. It was placed in a 
hole in the wall, inside wall, of an old 
ruin, rootless spring house, protected 
from wind and storms except on the 
northeast. It was over 12 feet from 
the ground and empty when found, but 
live days later (May 7) it contained four 
eggs, which were collected with the 
nest. Both nest and eggs typical, the 
nest composed entirely of grass stems, 
lined with horse hair. 

Later in the season, in late June and 
July, it is not rare to find second nests 
six and seven feet up. Why the birds 
should have chosen the above situ for a 
first nest I cannot explain. 

Richard F. Miller, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Potash. 

I note Mr. Bowdish's article in last 

OOLOGIST. 

When I published my "Directions for 
the Preparation of Eggs," I advised the 
use of caustic potash. I was promptly 
"taken down" by a prominent western 
ornithologist for being behind the times. 
He advised the use of pancreatin as a 
much more satisfactory drug. Since 
then I have thorougly tried this drug. 
I do not find it as quick nor as thorough 
as caustic potash, and it is very expen- 
sive, while caustic potash is cheap, and 
can be had anywhere. 

I heartily endorse Mr. Bowdish's pos- 
ition and still believe in the caustic, com- 
bined with a steady hand and plenty of 
patience. 

Ennest H. Short, 
Rochester, N. Y. 



How Some Birds Capture Their Prey. 

(Continued from July Number.) 

his beak. The Great-horned Owls that 
a friend of mine owned for two years 
or more, and which he reared from the 
nest, finally escaped and at once visited 
a neighboring chicken coop and killed 
several chickens before they were de- 
tected. This shows the latest ferocity 
in predacious birds. 

The Great-horned Owl is an excellent 
provider for its mate and growing fam- 
ily. One nest visited held upon its 
edges the following food supply — re- 
mains of one Ruffed Grouse, parts of 
two hares and a Woodpecker, besides 
the feathers and hair of other birds and 
small mammals. This Owl is the only 
Owl that is known to be destructive to 
game and of no benefit to mankind, and 
it stands in the list with the Cooper and 
Sharp-shinned Hawks as a marauder of 
the worst type. Still I cannot but think 
that there must be some redeeming fea- 
tures, for as with the Butcher bird I 
cannot think that he is as black as is 
painted. 

The Cuckoos are among the mcst use- 
ful birds that we have. Their food in 
season is largely of caterpillars. I once 
witnessed a Black-billed Cuckoo attack 
a nest of the tent caterpillars, tear into 
it and eat a surprising number of the 
occupants of the structure. The Cuck- 
oos also eat grasshoppers and a great 
variety of other insects and also fruit of 
several kinds, more especially berries. 
In following this diet of caterpillars the 
stomach must be well filled with hairs, 
and this is so to the extent of having the 
organ look as if lined with hair. 

Everyone who has studied birds knows 
of the oddly formed tongue of the Wood- 
pecker, and it is easy to understand its 
adaptability in di-a^irg forth the insect 
life that is hidden in the decayed wood. 
The Woodpeckers in the great lake re- 
gion have mainly the same habit in se- 
curing food from the cavities which they 



THE OOLOGIST. 



123 



dig to uncover the insect lifO; and the 
dainty Downy works and feeds in prac- 
tically the same manner that the large 
Pileated Woodpecker follows. But 
there are two exceptions to the general 
habit, or we may say that there are 
charges at times. These differences 
occur in the Yellow-bellied and Gold- 
winged Woodpecker; for the former at 
times varies his diet with liquid sweets, 
while the latter sometimes leaves the 
tree trunks and plunges his bill into the 
soft earth of the ant hill in search for 
this kind of insects. Therefore, these 
two Woodpeckers are at times known 
as the sap-sucker and grubber. 

The Golden- wing leaves its perch on 
trunk and limb, and takes up a position 
on an ant hill or even on the level 
ground, where it devours the ants with 
great satisfaction. This is the more 
astonishing change in a bird when we 
consider that there are so very few 
birds which will eat ants at any time, 
and I do not know of another species in 
my neighborhood which is largely in- 
terested in ants, excepting the variable 
Sap-sucker. Someone has claimed that 
the Yellow-bellied Sap-sucker embraces 
36 per cent, of ant food, but then this 
matter of food differs in season, and 
both the Yellow-bellied and Flicker ar- 
rive some time before the ants appear 
in any number in the spring. 

Upon its arrival in late March, or 
more likely about the tenth of April, 
the Yellow-bellied Woodpecker pro- 
ceeds to bore a number of holes in the 
bai'k of certain trees producing sweet 
sap. These usually selected are the 
sugar maple and common planted ever- 
green, though others are often bored, 
including the tulip tree. The holes are 
generally about a quarter of an inch in 
diameter and are rarely much more 
than that in depth. The holes ai'e usu- 
ally elliptical in shape, and especially 
so on the coniferous trees. Many claim 
that these holes are bored so that the 
bird may secure the insects which will 



congregate around the sweets, but I 
think this a ridiculous notion, as the 
Sap-suckers are often seen feeding from 
these holes when there is an April snow 
storm and much too cold for any in- 
sects to appear on the bark or anywhere 
in the open. The Sap-sucker is easily 
approached when feeding and I have 
stood at the distance of five or six yards 
and watched them many times, and I 
am fully satisfied that they very rarely 
catch an insect in their first week's stay 
at the north; but that they sip the sap 
from the bored holes is surely the case, 
for I have witnessed the act scores of 
times. 

In the Belted Kingfisher we have an- 
other species t^at gets its living by div- 
ing in the lake and stream, but this 
plunge is entirely unlike the plunge of 
the Pelicans or Osprey. The Kingfisher 
hovers as does the Osprey and as follow- 
ed sometimes by the Pelicans, and like 
those larger Ushers is also a surface 
fisher. The Kingfisher descends at an 
angle of sixty to eighty degrees and en- 
ters the water bill first, but so quickly 
is the stop made at the surface that in 
many cases the bird does not disappear 
beneath the water, though I have seen 
the Blue >^ngler remain ten seconds un- 
der the surface. The prize does not 
average more than three and a half la- 
ches long and many minnows of no 
greater length than two inches are 
creeled by this law breaker; however, 
a five inch shiner is occasionally brought 
to the surface. When a small minnow 
is captured it is generally swallowed 
whole, the bird perching itself and tak- 
ing the little chub head first. But when 
a minnow is too large to swallow whole 
the prize is dissected and eaten piece- 
meal, and this operation is sometimes 
performed in the presence of observers; 
but I have only once seen the dissection. 
The bones of the fish are usually regurg- 
itated after the carcass is digested, after 
the manner of the Owl's process of get- 
ting rid of the bones of small mammals 



124 



THE OOLOGIST 



it has eaten. These bones when ejected 
in the burrow arp carried away from 
the nest as the birds are very cleanly in 
their sand house. 

These anglers of the lake and stream 
are not confined to a diet of fish, though 
I believe that they prefer minnows to 
anything else and they are found about 
streams and lakes at all times. They 
not rarely pick up the larger insects and 
they often eat grasshoppers, and I once 
observed one catch and swallow a small 



frog. It is said that in Arizona and 
other arid districts, the Kingfishers live 
mainly on insects and lizards, presum- 
ably from the lack of suitable waters at 
certain seasons. It is well that a bird 
of a fish-eatiug habit can accommodate 
its ways to the means offered in a desert 
land. 

MOKRTS GiBBS, M. D. 

(To be Continued ) 




MISS JENNY. 



MK. CHUPES. 



The Dramatis Person^e. 

From "Mr. Chupes and Miss Jenny." 

(Copyright, 1901, by The Baker & Taylor Co.) 



THE OOLOGIST. 



125 



Pan-American Notes- 

A fine lot of Pueblo pottery and relics 
of different sorts is shown in the Eth- 
nology building of the Pan-American 
Exposition. The Pueblos, who were 
dwellers in the plains and in the c iffs 
as well, are one of the most interesting, 
from an archaeological point of view, 
of all prehistoric people. Their civil- 
ization was remarkable, and their in- 
genuity in pottery making, basket 
weaving, bead work and many ocher 
things, very great. 

They had many peculiar customs, 
ceremonies and symbolic rites, and 
their pottery is ornamented with fig- 
ures the significance of which puzzles 
the novice and expert alike. One of 
their peculiar symbols was a broken in- 
stead of a continuous line drawn about 
a bowl or other dish, suggesting per- 
haps the finite character of life. A 
bowl shown in the exhibit of the Pueb- 
lo pottery has the repr^^duction of two 
feet upon the bottom of it, inside, sug- 
gesting possibly the transitory and iu- 
signifigant character of terrestial exist- 
ance. 

Fine specimens of the famous "black 
and white ware," are shown, as well as 
the "red ware," most of which is black 
on the Inside. A number of specimens 
finished so as to give the outside a cor- 
rugated appearance, are shown. 

Many ingenious fine tools, finished 
stone implements, ornamental trinkets, 
presumably having religious signifi- 
gance, are on exhibition in the cases 

The basket work of Indians is very 
wonderful. Baskets made by compara- 
tively modern Indians are shown. 
Water-tight baskets in large numbers 
and in many varieties are seen in the 
exhibit. All are oranmented with fig- 
ures woven in when the basket was 
made. 

The Pima Indians are those most 
famous for basket making. They even 
used baskets for cooking utensils, cov- 
ering them with a thin layer of clay to 
keep them from being destroyed by 
contact with the fire. 



An instructive exhibit of flint im- 
plements from Mill Creek, Union Coun- 
ty 111., occupies five cases in the bal- 
cony of the Ethnology building of 
the Pan-American Exposition. Rough 
pieces of flint are shown in different 
stages of completeness, and incomplete- 
ness. On the left a number of blocks 
of flint are shown, and, as one walks 



along the line of cases, he sees the 
various implements assuming a more 
nearly finished condition, and finally 
the complete flint spade, hammer, axe, 
knife, or whatever domestic or agri- 
cultural implement the crude work 
produced. 

In working the rough tools a stone 
bearing some resemblance to the shape 
the implement is to assume is usually 
selected to save labor in chipping and 
flaking the rough block. 

Many of the implements are extreme- 
ly crude, being hardly more than flat 
stones used, probably, in excavating; 
and round hard stones used in pound- 
ing and flaking the larger pieces of 
flint. Many of the stone spades and 
axes, however, are chipped down to a 
remarkable degree of thinness and 
must have made very effective tools. 



The Florida exhibit of sponges in the 
Horticultural Building of the Pan-Amer- 
ican Exposition, interests all who en- 
ter this palace of wonders. This is an 
important industry in that state and 
should be developed. Mr. T. M. Wier 
of Tampa, the Commissioner from 
Florida, says: "The Florida sponges 
are of many varieties, differing in com- 
mercial value from $2 00 to a great 
many dollars per pound. It is one of 
the largest industries in the state, more 
than 100 vessels being engaged solely in 
this trade. The business is carried on 
almost entirely by negroes. It is not 
an uncommon sight to see a vessel's 
captain and all of the crew composed 
of colored men. The sponges are 
gathered by means of a long pole with 
a hook attached to the lower end with 
which the sponge fisherman is very ex- 
pert. He lies prone upon his stomach 
in the stern of a boat looking through 
an ordinary water bucket with a glass 
bottom, which does away with the 
glare from the water and allows him 
to survey the bottom leisurely while 
the boatman rows or sculls the boat. 
A schooner lies at anchor nearby, from 
which a half dozen or more of these 
small boats fish, which returns to port 
when it is loaded or at night, as the 
case may be. The men all share and 
share alike of the cargo, the captain 
receiving a larger portion and the own- 
er of the vessel one-quarter of the profit. 
Anclote Harbor in Hillsboro County 
and Key West are the principal sponge 
stations off the coast of Florida. 



126 



THE OOLOGIST 




THE 05LOGIST. 



127 



BIG FREE MIDWAY. 
The Buffalo Outside Attraction Increas- 
es In Popularity. 

LARGE ATTENDANCE. 

The merry Big Free Midway is the 
magnet thac is attracting thousands of 
pleasure seekers who -come again and 
again hading at each visit something 
new and interesting. This Midway 
has become a resort for people who 
seek innocent amusement and its prices 
are within the reach of the most hum- 
ble. 

It is located at the terminal station, 
north of the Exposition proper. 

The performances are presented on a 
scale of magnificence never before at- 
tempted at free street shows. The at- 
tendance has averaged 17500 daily 
since the openinsr, six weeks ago. 

Among the most notable of the one 
hundred big shows are the Streets of 
Cairo, Sing Sing Prison, Idols of Art, 
Streets of India, Trained Animal Expo- 
sition, German Village, White Top 
Palm Garden, Heaven and Hell, Gypsy 
Camp, Persian Beauty Show, Palais de 
la Danse, Arctic Cave and Athletic Au- 
ditorium. 

So much has been said and printed 
about Midways and street fairs that it 
would seem to the casual observer that 
little more remains to be said. But 
the more careful student of methods 
and modes of amusing the public rea- 
lizes that as long as Midways continue 
to be popular, so lon'g will there be a 
large variety of topics to discuss about 
them. That street fairs are beneficial 
is no longer questioned. 



W^ ANTED 

in. n V (LIVE BARN OWLS 

A rair oi lonDp! { live long eared owls 

° UlVE SHORT EARED OWLS. 

For good strong specimens, large prices will 
be given. 

J. E. T., Box g8, Lancaster, Mass. 



^^ 



Ornithological 

Books, 

Pamphlets 

and 

Excerpts 

As offered in the July and Aug- 
ust OOLOGISTS are listed at 
about a ten per cent, reduction 
over former prices. If during 
the next lo or 15 days (before 
Aug. 15th) you can use $10 
^vorth or more of the titles 
offered send on a list of "wants, 
and a special quotation will be 
made on your list of wants. 



^"The copies of Bendire's Life Histories of 
N. A. Birds and Wood's Ornithology of the 
World offered in July Oologist have been sold. 



-^^r 



128 



THE OOLOGIST. 



P THE BEST ILLUSTRATED l*|| 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 
Itg;vesthe LIFE HISTORIES 
>/^F\H^ \\.UJ5TRAT\OHSof ! 

FOUR06FIVE NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS, 

everymonlh . THE EG-G- of each is , 

[shown FULL SIZE and many nests. 

It also contains short interesting 

STORIES ABOUT BIRDS. 



^r x^ 



^^# 



5o 



^^^TSAYEAR*SAMPLECOP^ 



f^l 



CHAS.K.REED, 
Sta.A. WORCESTER, MASS^ 



BUV T\-^Ei 




SEW ING MAC HINE 

Do not be deceived by those who ad- 
vertise a $60.00 Sewing Machine for 
$20.00. This Ivind of a machine can 
be bought from us or any of our 
dealers from $15.00 to $18.00. 

WE MAKE A VARIETY. 

THE NEW HOME IS THE BEST. 

The Feed determines the strength or 
weakness of Sewing Machines. The 
Double Feed combined with other 
strong points makes tlie ]Vew Home 
the best Sewing Machine to buy. 

showing the dif- 
ferent styles of 
Hewing Machines 
we manufacture and prices before purchasing 



Write for CIRCULARS 



THE NEW HOME SEWINg MACHINE W. 

ORANGE, MASS. 

28 Union Sq. N. Y., Chicago, 111., Atlantii, 'la., 

St. Louis.Mo., Dallas,Tex.,San FrSncisco, Cal 

FOR SALE BY 



FENIKESE. 

A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 

famous Summer School. 

A 96-page book of much interest to 

students of Nature. 
Price only 2Sc (reduced from 35c). 

Prepaid. 
Read ^Bvhat others say: 

•'Have found it extremely interesting read- 
ing,"— Henry Prime, Garden City, L. I, 

'■I enjoyed the book [Penikese] very much." 
— W. W. Kinsley (Supt. of Schools) Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 

"It is both instructive and entertaining and 
deserves a place in the library of every student 
of nature."— W. D. Lynn, Canfield, O. 

"I have just finished reading 'Penikese' and 
can say that I have enjoyed it exceedingly. 
Anything looking toward keeping green the 
memory of the great Agassiz should be of in- 
terest to the teacher of biology and no period 
of his life is more interesting than the years 
spent in building up the laboratory on Peni- 
kese."— W. P. Hay (Prof. Biology, HighSchool) 
Washington, D. C. 

"I have read the book [Penikese] with great 
interest and think it an admirable remini- 
scence of one of the greatest naturalists of the 
nineteenth century. The name of Agassiz is 
assuredly treasured by all true lovers of na- 
ture and his methods of study have left a strik- 
ing impress on present-day workers."— (Rev.) 
Robert Blight, Green Lane, Pa. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r, 
Albion, N. Y. 

Buy a Postal Card, 

Write your name and address on back 
and mail to me. 

YOU WILL RECEIVE. 

New Lists of Birds Eggs, Minerals, In- 
dian Relics and all Naturalist's 
Supplies. Ready to mail. 



Address. ERNEST H. SHORT, 

Box 173 Rochester, N. Y. 

(Formerly Albion, N. Y.) 



COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENT F0RTREEC0LLECTIN6 
SAVES EGCS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (179) 

J. Rowland NoweU, Portman, S. C. 



The Oologist 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 9. ALBION, N. Y., SEPTEMBER, 1901. Whole No. 180 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants," "Exclianges" "For Sales," Inserted In tMs department 
tor 25c per 2.5 words. Notices over 25 words, charged at tne rate of one-hall cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First -class specimens will be accepted in paj-ment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 180 your subscription expires with this issue 
183 •' '• " " Dec, " 

190 " " " " June, 1902 

195 " " " " Dec. " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

TMDnRTJMT This Sept. Oologist was is- 
IJurUAliilll' sued Aug. 29th. The Oct. is- 
sue will be printed on Sept. 20. Copj- intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
mail. 

WANTED.— Parties having large and finely 
blown sets in series of the commoner species 
540, 616, 735, etc., etc.. to send lists. Can offer 
good sets. Also have fine sets 677, lot of M't'd, 
birds, fine coll pistol to exchange for rare sets. 
PHILO H. SMITH, JR., Mona House, St.Louis, 
Mo. 

DESIRABLE SINGLE EGGS or pairs, with 
data, to exchange at even rates for sets, with 
data. Send list and I will make offer. ERNEST 
H. SHORT, Rochester. N. Y. 

FOR SALE.— The following mounted birds 
are all O. K. good specimens. Prices at buyer's 
expense, cheapest way. Send for larger list. 
A. O. U., No. 3, $1.50; 153, $1.50; 194, 83: 197, $3; 
203, $2.50: 214. 75c: 289, $1; 339, $1.50; 498, 50c. J. 
D. ANTHONY. Waubeck, Iowa. 

I HAVE A LOT of flrst-class western bird 
skins and a number of flrst-class eggs In sets to 
exchange for first-class eastern skins in series. 
Many common species wanted. A. C BENT, 
Taunton, Mass. 

EXCHANGE.— Davies Nest and Eggs of N. 
A. Birds for best offer in sea shells or curios. 
T. C, METZGER, 16 Gladj's St.,Rochester,N.Y. 

WANTED.— Iowa Ornithologist, Vol. II, No. 
4, Vol. IV, No. 4, and Vol. II of Bendire's Life 
Histories. Will pay good cash price for above 
in good condition. WALTON I. MITCHELL, 
534 Summit Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 



EXCHANGE.— Choice first class sets with 
full data Royal Tern, Am. Oystercatcher. Wil- 
let. Wilson's Plover, Brown Pelican, Clapper 
Rail. Laughing GulI.Forsters Tern BlackSkim- 
mer, Green Heron. Boat-tail Grackle. Painted 
Bunting.IndigoBunting. Yellow-breasted Chat, 
etc. for A 1 sets with data and large singles. 
Sets also for sale very cheap. DR. M. T. 
CLECKLEY, Augusta, Ga. 180 

FOR SALE.— Copper Bcrtanizing box, triple 
nickel, 8x6x20, drop handle, strap attachment, 
bargain at $2, cost me $5..50. A. J. STODOLA, 
649 Blue Island Ave., Chicago, 111. 

WANTED.— To exchange Cal. eggs in sets, 
Hawaiian and Chinese curiosities, Cal. Indian 
relics, baskets, etc., for other eggs in sets and 
Indian arrow and spear heads. Send list and 
get mine. H. F. DUPREY, 323 Fourth St., 
Santa Rosa, Calif. 

MERRITT TYPEWRITER in good condition 
to exchange for A-1 mounted birds or mammals. 
skins, books on birds or good cabinet, or will 
sell cheap for cash ; also live male Nonpareil 
songster for sale. I also want books and mag- 
azines on ornithology. Sets, skins and mount- 
ed specimens in exchange for same. W. JEN- 
NINGS WIRT, Gaines, Orleans county, N. Y. 

FOR S.\LE.— A-1 sets.with full data, of Royal 
Tern, 50-3 50c; Brown Pelican, 20-3, 30c; Amer- 
ican Oyster-catcher, 5-3, $1; Willet, 10-4, 50c; 
Wil.son's Plover. 5-3, 40c; Laughing Gull, 50-3, 
30c: Clapper Rail, 5 8, 5-9, 5-10, .5-11, 5-12, .5c egg; 
Boat-tailed Grackle, 5-4, 40c; Painted Bunting, 
5-4, 40c; Yellow-breasted Chat, 5-4, 20c; Black 
Skimmer, 10-4, 20c; postage extra. DR. M. T. 
CLECKLEY, Augusta, Ga. 182 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE.— A fine lot of 
eggs and skins, collected by myself last June in 
north-west Canada; also photographs of bird's 
nests of Little Brown Crane. Marbled Godwit, 
Wilson's Snipe, Northern Phalarope, Semipal- 
mated Plover. Balrds' Sparrow, several species 
Grebes and Ducks' nests, etc. Photographs 15 
cts. each, unmounted, or 2 doz. kinds for $3. W. 
RAINE, Kew Beach, Toront-^, Canada. 

I have only room for one testimonial here: 
"July 12, 1901. 

"The photos are simply elegant. I want one 
of everv set (in situ.) 

"G. ABBOTT. 
"Chicago, 111." 



130 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Large Timber Wolf Skins for Mounting, with 
skull and l^g bones, weighed 100 lbs. and meas- 
ured 6 ft 8 in.. $10; Elk Head, small, 4 point 
antlers, prettily mounted, $1.5; Deer Head, long 
neck, $7 ; Moose, $30 ; few sets of dropped Ant- 
ler.=? of Elk and Deer, from 50c to $i each. 
CHRIS. P. FORGE, Carman, Man. 

FOR EXCHANGE.— Fine singles of Hawks, 
Gulls, etc. ; also rare United States stamps, 
books on birds, papers and novels. Desire com- 
mon sets. HARRY KOFAHL, Austin, Texas. 

WE HAVE reliable formulae to exchange for 
anything in stamps, minerals, coins, shells, 
birds' eggs, relics, curios, etc. List free. HAT- 
SU MFG. CO., Fitchburg. Mass. 

MOUNTED BIRDS, ETC —2 Loons, breeding 
plumage, $5 each; one Golden Eagle, I; Snowy 
Owl, nearly white, $5; spotted and large, 83; W. 
Great-horned Owl, $3; Sharp-shinned Hawk, 
$1.50; Ruffed Grouse, $1.50; American Bittern, 
$1 ; Sawwhet Owl. $1.25; Lined Coyote Skin rug, 
$2.50; Eagles' Claws.lOc each; quills,3c. CHRIS. 
P. FORGE. Carman, Manitoba. 

THE PRIZES for the Collector's Tool Com- 
petition have been awarded. Most gratifying 
results were obtained, showing possibilities of 
the instrument. Watch for next season's com- 
petition. J R. NOWELL, Portman, S. C. 

WANTED.— Pair of Black or Fox Squirrels. 
Will give good exchange in eggs, curios or 
cash. H. A. SHAW, Grand Forks, N. Dak. 

30 eggs of Rusty Blackbird in sets of from 4 to 
7 eggs in a set at 25(i per egg, 70 eggs of Short- 
eared Owl in sets of 4 to 10 eggs each 85c per 
egg, 100 eggs Col Sharp-tailed Grouse in sets o'f 
9 to 17 eggs each 25c per egg, for one month 
only. CHRIS P. FORGE, Collector, etc., Car- 
man, Manitoba. 

TO EXCHANGE.— A-1 Skins of Swan, Peli- 
can. Eagles, Sandhill Cranes, Wood Ibis, etc.. 
for a-1 sets of eggs. J. CLAIRE WOOD, 196 
Randolph St., Detroit, Michigan. 

ORDERS TAKEN for Game Heads, Wolf 
Skins. Fresh Skins of Birds and Birds in Meat, 
Antlers, etc., for winter delivery. CHRIS. P. 
FORGE, Taxidermist and Collector, Carman, 
Man. 

WANTED.— A-1 sets. Can offer Snapping 
Turtle 1 9, 1-20, 3-21, 1-25, value 10 cente per egg. 
Mounted Snowy Owl and Wood Duck. Fancy 
Pigeons, Revolver and Cash. JAMES O. 
JOHNSON, Southington, Conn. 

FOR SALE.— A-1 sets Of birds' eggs collected 
in Manitoba. Prices per egg, all sets genuine, 
with full data: No 2, 1-3, 2-4, 2 5, 25c; 4, 1-4-3-5, 
5c; 140, 1-10, 10c; 142. 1-8, 25c; 143. 1 ,5. 20c; 148, 1- 
9, 30c; 214, 118, 3c; 224, 3-4, .50c; 261, 2 4 25c; 300c, 
1-10, 30c; 305, 1-9, 1-10, 10c; 316, 3-2, 2c; 337, 5-2, 4- 

3, 20c; 337a, 3 2, 2 3, 35c; 342, 5-3, 20c: 347a, 1-2,75; 
348. 1-2. 60c: 364, 1-3, 60c: 375a, 1-2, 50c: 375b, 1-4, 
11.00; 388, 2 3. 1-2, 5c; 390, 1-7, 10c; 394, 1-4, 10c; 
412, 1-5, Ic; 467, l-3n, 10c; 474c, 1-3. 10c; 477,1.4.8c; 
488, 6 4, 5-5, 1-6, 2c: 494. 1-4, lOc; 495, 61. Ic; 498,3- 

4, 1-5. Ic; 501, 1-4, 3c; 507, 1-4, 1-3, 2c; 511b. 3-5,2-4, 
2c; 529, l-4n, 3c; 538, 2-4, 20c; 540, 2-4, 5c; 561, 24, 
2-3, 2-5, 10c: .581, 4-5, .■?-4n, Ic; 595, 2-3, 3c; 612, 4-5, 
Ic; 613, 2-5, 2c; 619, l-.5n, 3c; 621. 2-6, 40c; 622, 2-4, 
1-5, 1-6, 3c; 652, 3-5 2-4n, 2c; 704. 2 6, 3-5. Ic; 705,3- 
3, 1-4, Ic; 719, 2-6, 10c; 721, 3-6, 1-7. 1-5, 2c; 725, 1-3, 
1-6, 2c; 750, 2-3, 6c; 767, 1-4. Ic; nests same price 
as one egg. All orders prepaid: 25 per cent. dis- 
count on orders of $5.00 or over for l month. 
CHRIS. P. FORGE, Naturalist and Taxider- 
mist, Carman, Man. 



WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

ROUGH SKELETONS FOR SALE.— Lion, 
Tiger, Grizzly, Ostrich, Monkeys and Boacon- 
strictors. Cleaned skulls of Monkeys 50c to $1 , 
postpaid. List for stamp. WM. J. HACK- 
MEIER, Taxidermist and Collector, 14 Rondel 
Place, San Francisco, Calif. 

WANTED —Nice sets of Red-shouldered and 
Red-tailed Hawk, Screech Owl, Field Plover 
and many other kinds. I will pay fl. each, for 
well marked eggs of Broad-winged Hawk, and 
35 cts. for Osprey's eggs in sets. W. RAINE, 
Kew Beach, Toronto, Canada. 



FREE 



FOR 



THE ASKING. 



My Catalogue* of all Specimens, Sup- 
plies and Publications for the Naturalist 
or Curio Collector. 
E. H. SHORT, Box 173. Rochester N. Y. 



INDIAN 




Baskets, Indian Beaded Buck- 
skin Sioux Relics, Indian Pot- 
tery. Indian Weapons, Elk 
Teeth, Mexican Hand Carved 
Leather Goods, Mexican Drawn 
Linen, Shells, Minerals, Fossils, 
Ancient Stone Relics, Oregon 
Tiny Arrowheads, Fossil Fishes, 

Fossil Leaves, Corals, Agate Jewelry, Curios. 

Wholesale and Retail. 16th year. Two-story. 

building full. New cat.. No. 10. 40 pages finely 

illus., for 5c. L. W. STILWELL, Dead wood, 

S. Dak. 



Exchange in 

Good Sets of Eggs or 

Cash Paid 

FOR GOOD 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

OF Birds, 

Birds' Nests 
and Eggs. 

Only good work from living birds 
and nests and eggs in situation. 

Photos are for 
Reproduction, 

And MUST be FREE from COPYRIGHT 

and all Limitations. 
^Vrite at once what you have to sell or exchange 

MORRIS GIBBS, M. D., 
KALAMAZOO, MICH. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



131 



The Condor for igoi. 

This popular Californian, illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its Issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found In any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader : 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the nesting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT f 1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 

"BOOKS FOR THE 

ORNITHOLOGIST" 

The following books I offered on the in- 
sert in this OOLOGIST have been sold: 

Burroughs, Riverby. 
Burroughs, Wake Robin. 
Jardine, Hummingbirds. 
Kearton, Wild Life at Home. 
Pamphlets and Excerpts. 
Barnard, Birds of Chester Co., Pa. 
Elliott, List of Described Hummingbirds. 
Gunn, Egging Expedition to Manitoba. 
Jacobs, Summer Birds of Greene Co., Pa. 
Lawrence. Birds of Martinque. 
Merrlam, Birds of Idaho. 
Stevenson, Birds and Mammals of Wyoming. 

I CAN FURNISH the "New Books" re- 
viewed in this issue of the Oologist at Pub- 
lisher's prices prepaid. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D. 

Albion, N. Y. 



Mounted Birds and Mammals. 

The following specimens are all strictly first 
class, freshly mounted specimens-rej<ular price 
in ( ). My closing price is by mail, express 
or freight at purchaser's expense— will ship 
cheapest way. Special rates on large orders. 

Screech Owl (2 75) _ 

California Screech Owl (3.50) 

Great Horned Owl (6.00) 

Arctic Horned Owl full plumage (20.00)... 

American Hawk Owl (6.00) 

Road-runner (.3.00) 

Horned Lark (1.75) 

American Magpie (2.50) ^.... 

Steller's Jay (2.50) 

Blue-fronted Jay (3.00) 

Bullock's Oriole (1.75) _ 

Evening Grosbeak (2 25) 

Pine Grosbeak (2.00) 

American Crossbill (1.75) _ 

Bohemian Waxwing (2.50) 

Black and White Warbler (1.25) 

Myrtle Warbler (1.50) 

Ring-necked Pheasant full plumage (8.00) 

Skunk (*10.00) 

Red Fox (15.00) 

Gray Squirrel (5.00) 

Gray Squirrel holding walnut 

Tufted Puffin (.5.50) 

Black Guillemot (5.25) 

Murre (5.00) 

Razor-billed Auk (mounted from a skin 

from Audubon's collection) 

American Herring Gull full plumage(4.50) 

American Merganser (5.00) _ 

American Elder (7 00) 

Spotted Sandpiper (2 00) 

Mexican Jacana (3.50) _ 

Bob-white (3.50) 

Texan Bob-white (2.50) 

Mountain Partridge (3.50) 

Scaled Partridge (2.75) 

Gambel's Partridge (3.00) 

Prairie Hen [3.50) _ 

American Barn Owl (5.00) 

American Long-eared Owl (3.C0) _ 

Short-eared Owl (3.50) 

Great Gray Owl (16.00) 

Saw-whet Owl (2.75) 

Lesser Scaup Duck 



1 75 


2 10 


4 75 


12 50 


3 90 


1 75 


90 


1 50 


1 30 


1 30 


90 


1 25 


1 10 


90 


1 30 


80 


80 


5 60 


1 4 05 


9 10 


2 40 


3 30 


3.35 


2 70 


2 70 


6 7.T 


3 70 


2 70 


4 .SO 


1 10 


2 10 


1 45 


1 45 


2 10 


1 (55 


8 10 


3 20 


3 90 


2 10 


2 30 


9 ,30 


2 10 


2 70 



BIRD SKINS. 

Mexican Jacana, pair (13) $1 50 

Prairie Hen (fl.35) 75 

Red-tailed Hawk (11.50) 1 00 

American Crow (75c) 50 

Sno-wflake (35c) 20 

The above specimens are all Bars^alns 
at my prices. If you can use llO worth or more 
of the above send list of wants and let me 
make you a special quotation— you'll be sur- 
prised at my liberality. No special quotations 
after Aug 15th. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Albion, N-Y. 



JAMES p. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Speeialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 



COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREECOLLECTING 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (179) 



T 



HIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



132 



THE OOLOGIST. 



The Wilson Bulletin 

Is now in its Eighth Volume. 

It is the Pioneer journal in the study of birds by daily horizons 
and in the taking of local censuses. Its pages are open to 

every earnest Studcfit of Omithology and Oology. 

-^, -^, -^, 

"This unpretentious and commendable magazine appears regularly at a price 
which places it within the reach of every one, Thoroughly ornithological and 
runs no fad or clique There is more good bird matter in it than we find in some 
periodicals of greater prominence and it well deserves success."— -Dr. Coues in the 
Osprey. 



Like all all other reputable scientific periodicals, its 
back numbers increase in value as time passes. 

SUBSCRIBE NOW: : : : 

And receive the current volume of over one hundred 
pages of solid reading matter for fifty cents. 



FRANK L.BURNS, 



Berwyn. Penn. 



THE BEST ILLUSTRATED I' 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 
Itgivesthe LIFE HISTORIES 

/>/5;F\H^ \\.UJSTRAT\OHSof 

FOUR06FIVE NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS 
!every month . THE EGG- of each is 
shown FULLSIZE and many nests. 
It also contains short interesting 

STORIES ABOUT BIRDS. 



^■ 



^ii 



CHAS.K.REED, 
Sta.A. WORCESTER, MASS. 



"You might as well be out of the Bird 'World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

O^HB. OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with! Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C. W. Richimond and 
Otiier EminentOrnithoIogists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy. sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

THE OSPREY COMPAWPY, 

321-323 4% St., Washington, D. C. 



The Oologist, 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 9. ALBION, N. Y., SEPTEMBER, 1901. Whole No. 180 



The Oologist. 

A MontMy Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to the 
student of Birds, tbeir Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription .50c per annum 

Sample copies 6c eacb 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber Is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
Is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

l»~Remember that the publisher must be noli 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES: 

5 cents per nonpareil line each Insertion. 

12 lines In every Inch. Seven Inches In a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing Inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line is "net," "rock 
bottom," "Inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there Is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 25 cents; 100 lines, $5.00; 1000 lines, 
$60.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due BUls and Cards payable In advertis- 
ing will be honored only at regular rates In force 
at the date of Issuance of said bill or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postoffice Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination wUl be accepted for sums un- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O. , ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



Nesting Habits of the Broad-tailed 
Hummingbird. 

The nesting habits of the Broad-tailed 
Hummingbird, while, perhaps, not un- 
like those of the Ruby-throat, are at 



least worthy of note in its peculiarities. 

It is a common breeding bird in this 
locality, often noticing the male in its 
bright colors and sharp whistling aerial 
flights; the female humming, neet build- 
ing and feeding. 

One peculiar trait of the male bird is 
its manner of flight during the breeding 
season. As the female is occupied in 
nest building, incubating, etc., her mate 
enjoys the time in sporting, rising by 
short, sharp flights to a height at which 
it is seen with difficulty and it returns 
to earth with a plunge, terminating in 
a miniature booming sound, not unlike 
that of the Nightnawk. Rising again as 
before and repeating until the little 
thing seems exhausted and alights on a 
bush or twig to rest. 

The sharp chattering or screeching 
note uttered during its flight is a pecul- 
iarity of the male only and from close 
observation I believe it to be made by 
the wings of the bird. 

The first nest that I ever saw vpas 
built under a bridge and attached to a 
knot on a small stick, one end of which 
was held firmly betv«reen the planks. 

Numerous nests of this species have 
been observed during the past few years 
since the one above noted, and all, with 
one exception, were saddled upon dead 
branches of oak saplings close to the 
tree-trunk. 

The first nest noticed in '97 was dis- 
covered by seeing the female carrying 
material for its construction. I.s posi- 
tion was on a dead stubby branch, close 
to and under the body of a leaning oak 
seven feet from the ground and protected 
from sun and rain by the body of the 
tree. 

One egg was deposited and covered 
by the down in the bottom of the nest. 



134 



THE OOLOGISl 



As I placed my fingers in the nest, the 
egj? was crushed and the bird had aban- 
doned it. A few days later another nest 
was found nearby containing a rotten 
egg in a position no different than the 
former, but at a height of twelve feet 
above ground. As this was July the 
second nest found was, undoubtedly, 
the first of the nests built by the birds. 

On May 25, 1898, a female was observ- 
ed building her nest in the same clump 
of trees, the situation being in no wise 
different from the two nests above de- 
scribed eight feet above ground. 

On June 3d the nest and two eggs 
were collected, but by the 18th another 
nest with eggs were found only a few 
feet away from tne place where the first 
nest was found. The height, position 
and protection by the tree-trunk were 
very much the same as in former nests 
noticed. 

The female was caught from the nest 
and identity made certain in this in- 
stance, after which she was given her 
freedom. 

Two exceptions to the above have 
been noticed where the nests were 
placed on a forked branch of the oak, 
one to tTO feet out. 

One nest observed differing from all 
others seen is worthy of mention; while 
as a general thing the nests are covered 
with lichens, this one contained an 
abundant supply of moss woven into the 
exterior and no lichens. 

The female is not easily noticed by 
one not familiar with Hummingbirds, 
as she quietly hums from flower to 
flower, the bumming of her wings being 
heard but a few feet away. 

P. L. Jones, 
Beulah, Colo. 



The Food Supply of the Baltimore 
Oriole. 

To the enthusiastic working ornithol- 
ogist there is not a subject of more in- 
terest than that of food supply; for 



other things being equal, this governs 
to a large extent, the geographical dis- 
tribution of the various species. Im- 
portant as the subject is, however, it is 
one which is overlooked by a large num- 
ber of the rank and t le of bird students, 
who, while interested, do not dev te the 
time they should to this most important 
division of the study, but conteht them- 
selves with leading what others have 
written. For myself, I would rather 
toil a whole season without other result 
than to establish a hitherto unknown 
point, than to add a thousand skins to 
my collection and learn nothing. 

Let us consider as a start, six of our 
birds which we are constantly meeting 
with during the spring and summer 
months, viz: Baltimore Oriole {Icterus 
galbula), Catbird ( Oaleosco2)tes carolien- 
etisis), House Wren (Troglodytes aedon), 
Meadow Lark (Si^crnella magna), and 
the Mockingbird (Miraus poJyglottos). 

The Baltimore Oriole is so well and 
so favorably known about the land by 
his various names of Golden Robin, 
Hang Bird, etc., that i" may seem some- 
what out of place to consider him, but 
the food habits of this interesting crea- 
ture are fully as beneficial as the plum- 
age and song are pleasing, and where 
ever this "flash of ornithological flame" 
chooses to build its pendulous abode, it 
is as safe as the nest of the Stork on the 
roof of the Hollander. 

The habitat of the Oriole extends 
throughout the eastern United States 
north of Virginia, and at times some- 
what south of there. In the Mississippi 
valley, however, it reaches farther south 
than on the Coast. In New England it 
is especially abundant, and extends west 
over the wooded portions of the great 
plains, and is finally replaced by its 
brother in appearance, Bullock's Oriole 
(/. bullocki). Here in New*England we 
look for him with the bursting apple 
tree buds, about the 15th to the 30th of 
May; and westerly he is often seen as 
early as the middle of April. Climatic 



THE OOLOGIST 



135 



conditions affect him little, directly, ex- 
cept as far as his food is concerned, and 
as this consists largely of the insects 
that live in the foliage of trees, the ar- 
rival of /. galbula is postponed until 
they have become plentiful. 

It begins its southern migration about 
the second week in August, and by the 
first week in October we look in vain 
for the beautiful flash of color so fre- 
quently seen but a few short weeks 
since. 

I took one specimen at Woods Hole, 
Mass., on the 2d of November, but have 
seen none later, although the capture of 
one as late as Nov. 16th is recorded from 
Conn. By this date, however, ordinar- 
illy, nothing but the deserted nest, 
swinging from the leafless bough, as 
the bleak November blast howls among 
the trees, tells of the occurence of 1. 
galbula in that locality. The winter is 
spent in the warm southern countries 
beyond the U. S. border. 

The present paper on the food supply 
is confined to the results reached from 
the examination of eighty-six stomachs, 
from birds taken from ten states, and 
covering a range from Mass., westward, 
to North Dakota, and were taken from 
April 10th to Sept. 3d, inclusive. The 
gross contents of these stomachs may 
be stated relatively, as follows: Animal 
matter (principally caterpillars and 
beetles), 72.5; vegetable matter (princi- 
pally wild fruit), 12.; mineral matter 
(not food and can therefore be eliminat- 
ed) 16.4; the additional 9 per cent, be- 
ing water and mixed gastric juices. 

From the reports received from west- 
ern points, it appears that the largest 
amount of insect food was found in 
those stomachs examined from May 1st 
to June 20th, averaging between these 
dates about 87 per cent, of the whole 
contents. The minimum amount of in- 
sect food was found in those stomachs 
examined in April and July, when it 
was found to be only about 65 per cent. 
Caterpillars were by far the most abund- 



ant insect : in fact during the time when 
these insects were most plentiful there 
was scarcely any other insect to be 
found in the stomach. 

A general average between the cater- 
pillars and beetles in the stomachs ex- 
amined, would give as a result cater- 
pillars 30 per cent., beetles 22 percent., 
and the other stomach contents making 
up the balance. 

The caterpillars were founi to be 
more numerous in the stomachs after 
the 1st of July than btfore, owing, no 
doubt, to the increased supply of these 
insects. Beetles are the article of food 
next pleasing to the Oriole palate, and 
though only eaten during May, June 
and July, the click or srapping beetles 
{Elatericlae) constituted nearly 10 per 
cent, of the food for these months. 1 his 
seems a trifle strange from the fact that 
the hard shells of these beetles render 
them .seemingly undesirable articles of 
diet. However, let us not dispute the 
good intentions of / galbula, for these 
beetles, together with their larve, the 
'•wire worms," are among the most de- 
structive to ihe products of the farmer, 
and as there are ever 500 species of 
snapping beetles in North America, any 
aid in their destruction should be gladly 
welcomed by him. 

Among the other beetles used by this 
bird for fo d are the May beetles, [Scar- 
abaeidae) the dung beetles (Aphodius) 
and several of the leaf-eating beetles 
(Dichelonycha). Among this latter, the 
striped squash beetle, {E. vittata) which 
in the larval state bores at the roots of 
squashes and cucumbers, and in the ma- 
ture state feeds upon the leaves, may be 
mentioned. Odontola dorsalis and 
rubra, which feed on the leaves of the 
juniper and apple, respectively, and at 
times ruin these trees, are also a favor- 
ite with the Oriole. The Snout beetles 
or weevils (Rhyncophora) are also taken 
by this bird in small quantities. The 
Caribidae or cannibal beetles.which feed 
for the most part on the injurious in- 



136 



THE OOLOGIST 



sects, do not form an appreciable article 
of diet for the Oriole, and it would seem 
tiiat as both are intent upon a common 
purpose, the Oriole passes over this 
beetle without disturbing it. 

Wasps, [Eymenoptera) bugs, (Eemip 
tera) among the latter being many of 
the stink bugs, {Pentalomidae) th'^ assas- 
sin bugs, (Reduvinidae) which feed on 
other insects, the scale lice (Coccidae) 
and the common plant lice (Aphidae); 
the two latter being among the most de- 
structive insects known. Fiies {Diptera) 
are also common food, the larvae of the 
March fly (Bibio) being greatly in evi- 
dence. During the months of June, July 
and August, the grasshoppers and lo- 
custs were found in the proportions of 
3, 10 and 12 per cent., respectively. 
Spiders also constitute a favorite article 
of diet, and gradually increases to near- 
ly 10 per cent, of the animal food in 
August. 

The vegetable diet of the Oriole con- 
gists almost entirely of fruit, but seeds 
and grain are sometimes taken. The 
favorite fruits are cherries, raspberries, 
blackberries, mulberries and juneber- 
ries. 

The examination of these s'omachs 
has shown that this bird is a great in- 
sect destroyer; that it destroys immense 
numbers of caterpillars, grasshoppers, 
bugs and noxious beetles and does not 
prey upon the predacious or useful in- 
sects. Let, then, the farmer continue 
to hold his good opinion of this beauti- 
ful bird and accord it the protection it 
deserves. 

C. C. PURDUM, M. D. 



"Some Twice Occupied Nests" 

After reading the article by Mr. Rich- 
ard F. Miller, Philadelphia, Pa., in the 
August OoLOGiST, under this heading, I 
thought, perhaps, my experiences in 
that line would not come amiss 

April 16, 1897, collected a set of three 
Phoebe eggs. Nest placed on a beam 



under a large covered bridge In col- 
lecting I had to remove the nest, which 
I replaced on the beam, but there was 
another beam that crossed beam No. 1 
and it was on the other side of No 2 that 
I placed the nest. This was not in its 
original positio n. A beam separated 
the two positions. 

May 15 1897, I returned to the bridge 
and found the nest gone from where I 
had placed it, but there was a nest in the 
place where I had found the one on 
April 16. There had not been water 
high enough to carry the nest away. 
Did the birds tear the old one apart and 
rebuild it in the old position? I think, 
undoubtedly, that they did, although 
they would have to carry the mate'-ial 
past an 8inch beam. Near Arden Sta., 
W. Co., Pa. 

May 25. 1897, collected one set of 
seven eggs of the Flicker from a hole in 
the limb of an apple tree in an orchard. 

June 5, 1897, I returned to the Flick- 
er hole, from which I collected the set 
on May 25, and collected another set of 
seven eggs. Near Washington, Pa. 

June 18, 1898, col ected a set of three 
eggs of the Kingbird from a nest fifteen 
feet high in an apple tree in an orchard 
nesr Tarkio, Mo. 

June 23, 1898, I found a pair of Mourn- 
ing Doves had taken possession of the 
Kingbird nest, from which I collected 
the set on the 23d inst. They relined it 
with a few straws placed in the bottom. 
I noticed that although the Doves built 
a nest for the first set, for the second 
and third they always took a deserted 
Robin, Kingbird or Blue Jay's nest and 
placed a few sticks or straws (generally 
the latter) in the bottom and proceeded 
with incubation. 

June 15, 1900, collected one set of five 
eggs of the Barn Swallow. I also took 
the nest, situated on a beam of a small 
bridge over a run. 

July 10, 1900, I found that the Swal- 
lows, from which I took the set of five 
eggs on June 15, had built a new nest 



"Clearance Sale" of Frank H. Lattin, M. D., Albion, N. Y. 

List No. 7, Aug. 15, igoi. 

Superceding Lists No. i of March 15th and No. 5 of July 15th. 

LATTIN'S CLEARANCE SALE. 

BOOKS FOR THE ORNITHOLOGIST 

Starred (*) titles are second-hand copies, but as a rule the inside pages are "good as new." 

The unstarred titles are for new or good as new books, in a few Instances the covers are 
slightly shelf-worn. 

Many volumes and sets cannot be duplicated— hence the necessity of sending your order 
early. "When ordering always state whether you have a second choice, or whether you wish 
money refunded, in case books ordered have been sold. 

important: Lack of time and space prevents my listing more books this month. I have- 
hundreds of other publications in stock relating to NATURAL HISTORY, ZOOLOGY ICH- 
THYOLOGY, CONCHOLOGY, ENTOMOLOGY, BOTANY, GEOLOGY, ETHNOLOGY, etc. etc. 

Lists will be issued as time will permit. Can furnish almost every thing offered in June- 
July, '99 OOLOGIST and other old lists. 

Satisfaction always guaranteed or Money refunded. 

Remit in most convenient manner, but do not send sums of $1.00 or over loose in your letter. 
All books are PREPAID at prices quoted. Address all orders plainly and in full to 



FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D., Publisher, Albion, N. Y. 



Adams, Cage and Singing Birds. How to 
Catch, Keep, Breed and Rear Them. 148p. ills 
$ 35 

American Ornithologists Union Check List 
of North American Birds and Code of Nomen- 
clature 2 00 

Arnold, Bird Life in England, 336p 95 

Babcock, Bird Day. How to Prepare For It, 
with notes and full page illustrations on 16 re- 
presentative Birds, 96p 50 

*Baird (Cassin and Lawrence). The Birds of 
North America, (Pacific R. R. Survey) 1072pp. 
4to S 60 

Beckstein, Natural History of Cage Birds, 
Their Management, Habits, Food, Diseases, 
Treatment, Breeding and the Methods of Catch- 
ing Them incorporating Sweet's British War- 
blers, 500p. 38pl. London '77 1 10 

Ditto, with all plates colored ...- 1 90 

Beetons Dictionary of Natural History, a 
Compendious Cyclopedia of the Animal King- 
dom, containing 2,000 articles, 400engr 90 

Bignell. Mr Chupes and Miss Jenny,The Life 
Story of Two Robins, 250p, 8pl 1 00 

Blanchan, Birds that Hunt and are Hunted, 
Life Histories of One Hundred and Seventy 
Birds of Prey, Game Birds and Waterfowls, 
360p, 48 full-page col. pi, true to nature 2 00 

♦Boys and Girls Bird Book, 140p. ills, Phil. 
'60 40 

Brown, Taxidermists' Manual on the Art of 
Collecting, Preparing and Preserving Objects 
of Natural History, 150p. 6pl, 48fig 60 

Baily, Our Own Birds of the United States, 
265p, 50ills. (150) 80 

Buel, The Living "World. Natural History of 
Fishes, Reptiles, Insects, Birds and Mammals, 
722 p, 1200 engr. (180 pages devoted to Birds) 

2 30 

Burroughs, Riverby, 319p, (1 25) 80 

"Wake Robin, 256p, ills, N. Y. '77 80 

Chapman, Bird Studies With a Camera, with 
Introductive Chapters on the Outfit and Meth- 
ods of the Bird Photographer, 218p, 110 photos 
from nature, N. Y. '00 l 75 



, Bird Life, A Guide to the Study of Our 

Common Birds, with 75 full-page plates, etc. 
1 75. 

, Handbook of Birds of Eastern North 

America, with Keys to the Species, Descrip- 
tions of their Plumages. Nests, etc., and their 
Distribution and Migrations, with over 200 ills; 
this is the best "Bird Book" for amateurs in 
the east _ 3 00 

Ditto, pocket edition, flexible covers 3 50 

Coues, Field and General Ornithology— A 
Manual of the Structure and Classification of 
Birds with Instructions for Collecting and 
Preserving Specimens, 344p. 112flg. London 
'90 _ 2 e» 

Cuvier, The Animal Kingdom arranged after 
its organization, forming .a Natural History 
of Animals and an Introduction to Comparative 
Anatomy, 706p. SOOfig. 30 col. pi by Landseer, 
(over 100 p. devoted to Ornithology) 2 40 

Ditto, 2d hand copy of above, with plain 
plates, text as new, binding poor_ 1 10 

Davie, Methods in the Art of Taxidermy, 
($10) now out of print and publishers supply 
exhausted, will soon be very rare, only 3 copies 
left 5 35 

2d reprint edition 2 50 

, Nest and Eggs of North American 

Birds, 5th ed. 600p. ills, best book on eggs pub- 
lished ($2.25) 1 50 

De Kay, Ornithology of New York, 392p. 141 
full-page col. plates' containing 308 birds in 
natural colors, 4to ; this rare and magnificent 
work usually sells at from $15 to $20 per copy. 
12 20 



Dixon, Rural Bird Life, bping essays on Orni- 
thology, with Instructions for Preserving Ob- 
jects Relating to that Science, 374p. 4pl. 45ills. 
($2.50) 1 70 

, Curiosities of Bird Life An Account of 

the Sexual Adornments, "Wonderful Displays, 
Strange Sound.*, Sweet Songs, Curious Nests, 
Protective and Recognitorv Colors, and Extra- 
ordinary Habits of Birds, 322p. ($2.50) 1 90 

, Our Rare Birds being Studies in Or- 
nithology and Oology, 374p. ills 2 20 



'Clearance Sale" of Frank H. Lattin. M D , Albion, N. Y 



*Dyson, Bird -keeping. A Practical Guide 
for the management of Singing and Cai^'e 
Birds, 264p. col. pi. ills.... 60 

Dugmore, Bird Homes, The Ne^ts. Eggs and 
Breeding Habits of the Land Birds Breeding lu 
the Eastern United States with Hints on the 
Rearing and Photographing of Young Birds. 
200p; 50 photoeng, 15 full-page col. plates. 64 
eggs'in natural colors 2 00 

Elson, Birdies, 105p, ills 25 

Eekstorm, The Woodpeckers, 132p, 5 col. pi., 
21 illus 1 00 

Fisher, Out-door Life in England, 474p.. .1 90 

Fowler, Summer Studies of Birds and Books- 
288p 75 

Gentry, Life and Immortality; or souls in 
Plants and Animal-! (Hirds)— much on ornith- 
ology, 490p, 75 ills., (.3.50) 3 35 

Goss, History of the Birds of Kansas, de- 
scribes 529 western birds, 692p. 38 full-page 
photo-engravings of gi'oups of birds, large Svn. 
new and last edition (7 OO) 5 00 

Goode. The Published Writings of Philip 
Lutley Schalter, 136p 40 

Greene, Birds of the British Empire. British 
Birds, Birds of India, Africa, America and 
Australia, 369p. SO ills 1 30 

, Parrots in Captivity, 3 Vols. 410p. 81 

full-page col. pi. large 8vo; a maguilicent work. 
'84, ($15) 8 25 

Hasluck, Taxidermy, 160p, lOSflg The best 
book for the money ever published 40 

Headley, Structure and Lite of Birds 412p. 
78flg. 1895. An invaluable book to the Student. 
ICO 

Henshaw. Ornithology of Portions or Neva- 
da and O'lifornia (Wheeler Survey '76), 32p. 
maps (also ICOp. of other matter) 1 00 

, Ornithology of Portions of California. 

Nevada and Oregon. (Wheeler Survey of "77 
and '78) 54p. maps, (also 300 pages of othf-r 
matter _ ^ 2 00 

Herrick, The Home Life of B'irds. A new 
method of the Study and Photography of 
Birds. 4to, 148p, Hlphoto Eng 3 50 

IngersoU. Birds' Nesting, a Hand-book of In- 
struction in Gathering and Preserving the 
Nests and Eggs of Birds for the purpose of 
Study, UOp. lofig. ($1,25) I 10 

*Jardine, Humming-birds. 2vols. 630 p. 95 col, 
pi. Memoirs of Linneus and Pennant, Edin- 
burgh 33 2 19 

Kansas Academy of Science, Transactions, 
Vol. XII, '89-90, devoted to Ornithology. Zool 
ogy. Botany. Geology, &c. Orn, by Goss & 
Kellogg (Summer Birds of the Estes Park. 
Colo.), I90p 1 00 

, Vol. XIII, 176p (Ornithological notes 

by Collette) _ 50 

, Vol. XIV, 370p, contains Lautz, Birds 

found near Manhattan, Kans 1 25 

Kearton, Wild Life at Home; How to Study 
and Photograph It, 188p. many photo-engr. 
1 50 

Kingsley, Popular N'atural History, A Des- 
cription of Animal Life from the Lowt-st Forms 
Up to Man, 2 vols 728p. .^07 ills., many pi. Bos- 
ton '90, 132p. devoted to Ornithology 6 60 

', The Naturalists" Assistant, a Hand- 
book for the Collector and Student with a 
Bibliography of 1,500 Zoological Works, 228p. 
40 ills 85 

Knobel, Field Key to the Land Birds, 55p. Ills, 
9col. pi 75 

*Lee, Taxidermy or the Art of Collect/ng, 



Preparine and Mounting Objects of Natural 
History, 244p. ills. London '4.3. ($.75) 70 

Mcllwraith, The Birds of Ontario, being a 
concise account of every species of bird known 
to have been found in Ontario with a descrip- 
tion of their nests and eggs and instructions 
for Collecting Birds and Preparing and Pre- 
serving Skins: also directions how to form a 
Collection of Eggs, with Glossary of technical 
terms. 42fip. ills. (This is the best cheap work 
for collectors lu the Gt. Lake Region — ) 3 CO 

Manton, Taxidermy without a Teacher, 56p. 
ills. (.50) 40 

Martin. Our Song Birds and Domestic Fowls, 
384p. London "60 35 

Maynard. Contributions to .Scienc-» Vol. I, 
204p. 16 hand col. pi, 55tig. One-half io Ornith- 
ology, one-third to < ouehology and balance 
various. Contents : W. I. and "jamaica|Birds, 
16p: Sound Producing Organs of Birds, 22p; 
Anatomical Structure of^Gannets &c. 14p; 
Young Birds. I3p: Evolution of 'i otipalmaies: 
Cory's Gannet, 16p; Monograph of Genus 
Strophia, 60p 2 90 

Newman, A Dictionary of British Birds, 440p. 
London, valuable and instrttctive 1 45 

Ogilvie -Grant, ("Lloyd's") A Hand-book to 
the (iame Birds, 2vg13. of 300 pp ea., 43 col. 
pi., "98 3 80 

Parrot Book, How to Rear and Manage them 
in Sickness and in Health, with chapters in 
Hawking, Hawking-birds and Owl-i, I96p. ills. 
45 

Ridgway, Ornithology of Illinois, vol. I, 520p. 
33pl., 1889 3 25 

, Manual of North American Birds, for 

the Naturalist and Sportsmen, new and last 
edition 6 80 

St John. NotfS & Sketches from the Wild 
Coasts of Nipon, 416p. ills, maps, ef 1 30 

Schley, American Partridge and Pheasant 
Shooting, 222p. 8pl 1 15 

Silloway, Sketches of Some Common Birds, 
322p. 16pl 95 

Sharpe. ("Lloyd's"), A Hand-book to the 
Birds of Great Britian, 4 vols, of 3J0 pp. each 
124 col. plates. '97 5 40 

Stanley, History of Birds, 420p. 160 ills 90 

Strickland, Ornithological Synonyms, Vol. I, 
Accipitres, (Hawks, Owls and Vultures) only 
volume published, very valuable, 268p 1 45 

Sttider's, Ornithology or the Science of Birds 
frota the text of Dr. Brehm, with 212 illustra- 
tions by Dr. Theu. Jasper on thirty-seven mag- 
nihcent full-page pi. 1.56p. (size 11x14 in) ele- 
gantly bound in Russia and Gilt, bii-ding bro- 
ken at corners and back, contents as new (S15) 
5 10 



Torrey, Every Daj' Birds, 12 col. pL, repro- 
dtic^d from Atidubon 1 00 

Willcox. Pocket Guide to Common Land 

Birds of New England, 170p . _ 75 

*Wood, Birds, 248p, with 242 half -page ills... 75 

*Wood, My Feathered Friends, ills. 400p ... 70 

. Strange Dwellings being a Descrip- 
tion of the Habitations of (birds and) animals. 
434p. 57ills 90 

PAMPHLETS, EXCERPTS, &c. 

Allen, Description of a Fossil Passerine from 
the Insect-Bearing Shales of Colorado, 3p. pi 15 

, The American Ornithologists Union, 

a Seven Years' Retrospect, 20p. N. Y. '91 20 

American Ornithologists Union, Abridged 
Check List of N, A. Birds, printed on one side 
of leaf only, 70 leaves, N. Y., "89 (50) 40 



"Clearance Sale' of Fbank H. Lattin, M. D , Albion, N Y 



, Supplement to the Code of Nomen- 
clature and Check List of N. A. Birds, 24p. 
'89, 20 

American Museum of Natural History, Bulle- 
tins of. Vols. I to Hi complete. Birds, Geology. 
Mammals, &c., 1200p, pL, (1200) 6 00 

, Annual Reports for '93, '95 and "96, 

300p, pi., &c. Lot - 1 05 

Bailey & Fisher, Birds and Mammals through 
parts f)f Minnesota and r>akota and experi- 
ments in Poisoning Birds, 34p, (A. R. 87)...- 35 

Baird, Directions for Collecting. Preserving 
and Transporting specimens of Natural His- 
tory, I8p, (S. R '5f5) 25 

*Baird. Review of American (North and 
Middle) Birds 312p. Wash. '64 1 40 

* . Catalogue of North American Birds. 

soiled. 56p. 4to 35 

Barlow and Taylor, the Story of the Fa- 
rallones, 22 photo-eng, with text, Calif, '97 (50) 
35 

Barnard, Birds of Chester County, Pa , 5p, 
(S 11 "60) . 25 

Barrows, the English Sparrow in North 
America, Especially in its Relations to Agri- 
culture, 405p. 6fig, map, Wash. '&9 55 

Beal. The Meadowlark and Baltimore Oriole, 
12p. 2fig, (A R '95) 15 

Beal, The Crow Blackbirds and Their Food, 
20p ., : ao 

Some Common Birds in Their Relation 



to Agriculture, 40p. 22flg 33 

, The Blue Jay and its Food, 12p, 3flg. 

15 

Food of Woodpeckers. 34p. 4fig 



Beeton's. British Song Birds, How to Rear 
and Manage Them, 140p. ills 30 

Bendire, Directions for Collecting, Preparing 
and Preserving Birds Eggs and Nests, lOp. 25 

Bendire, Reports of Dept. Oology, National 
Museum '.S6-'92, 7 year. 14p 35 

do do for 4 years, 8p 10 

Burnham, Our Canaries and Other Pet Birds, 
Hew to Mate, Keep. Feed and Breed Them 
108p. 50ills. Mas. '79, (50j 30 

Carroll, Birds|of Refugio Co.,Tex. 12p 35 

Cherrie, Two New Costa Rican Fly-catchers, 
2p 10 

Collins, Habits and Capture of Sea Birds as 
Bait, 20p, (F. R '83) 25 

Cook, A. J., Birds of Michigan, Jl66p. llSflg. 
(1st ed.) 45 

, ditto. (2d ed ) same text as above, but 

in better form and better covers 7J 

Cooke. Birds of Colorado, 142p. rare and out 
of print 1 uo 

Cooper and Suckley, Birds of Northwest 
America (U. S.) (Pac. R, R. Survey XII) 150p, 
8col. pi. 4to 2 4U 

Cope, A Wading Bird from the Amazon 
Shales, 4p 15 

Coues, Check List of N. A. Birds. 137p 50 

Coues & Kidder. Ornithology and Natural 
History ot Kerquelen Island, 172p, M. B. 23 1 00 
Coues and Prentiss. Birds of District of Col- 
umbia. 24p, (S. R '61) 35 

*Davie, Nests and Eggs of N. A. Birds 3d ed. 
'89, 468p ]3pl 1 15 

Dodge, Bird and Bird Laws, 14p,(A R '64) 15 

Duncan, Ostrich Farming in America, I8p, 

3pl (A. R. 88) _ 25 

Earl, Pets of the Household, Their Care in 

Health and Disease, 160p. ills. (50) 25 



Elliot, The Game Birds of the United States. 
30p, 4pl, (A. R. '64) 50 

Elliott List of Described Species of Hum- 
mingbirds, 18p 35 

, The Seal Islands of Alaska, 4to. 176p. 

29pl 2 maps, a valuable monograph, with des- 
criptive catalogues of the Birds. (12p. 3pl.) 
Mammals and Fishes of the Group 1 25 

Evermann, Birds of Carroll County, Ind., 
20p 35 

Farr, Check List of New York Birds, 410p- 
50 



Farrington, Fossil Egg from South Dakota, 
8p, 2pl 35 

Fisher, Food of Hawks and Owls, statement 
of stomach contents of over 1000, 22p,(AR'87) 25 

Fihher, Ornithology'of the Death Valley Ex- 
pedition of "91. Comprising Notes on Birds Ob- 
served in So. Calif.. So. Nevada and parts of 
Arizona and Utah. 1.52p 1 25 

. Hawks and Owls from the Standpoint 

of the Farmer. 20p. 3pl 25 

Foster, A Consideration of Some Ornitholog- 
ical Literat\ire. with Extrao's from Cur- 
rent Criticism, 1878, '83, 54p N. Y. '94 55 

, Biograp'iical Sketch and Published 

Writings of Geo. N. Lawrence, 124p. pi 30 

Goode, The Published Writings of Dr. Chas. 
Girard, 142p (N. B. 41) 30 

Goode. The Published Writings of Spencer 
Fulleiton Baird. 1843 82, 377p, M. B. 20 60 

Gunn. Egginsr Expedition o Shoal Lake. 
Manitoba in 1867, 6 p, (S. R. '67) 85 

Hay, Breeding Habits, Eggs and Young of 
Snakes, 14p 25 

Heerman, Birds of California, (San Francisco 
to Ft. Yuma, Pac. R. R. Survey X) 50p. 7col. 
pi. 4to 1 45 

, Birds of Texas (Ft. Yuma to San An- 
tonio, Pac. R. R. X) 12p. 3col, pi. 4to 60 

Henry, Smithonian Circular Relative to Col- 
lections of Birds from Middle and South Amer- 
ica 05 

Henshaw, Ornithology of Nevada, Utah, Cali- 
fornia ColoradoNew Mexico and Arizona, 395p 
15 mag. col, pi. 4to 3 75 

Holden's Book on Birds, 128p, ills 25 

Holder, Birds of Illinois, lOp, 1860 35 

Holder, Taxidermy, Directirns for Collecting 
and Preserving Specimens in O.nithology. 8p, 
5pl I5flg 25 

Hough, Preservation of Specimens from In- 
sects and Dampness, lOp, (M. R. 87) 25 

Howell, Abstract of Proceedings of Linnisan 
Society of New York for year ending March, 
'92, 8p 25 

Hurst, Taxidermists' Guide. ICOp. ills 25 

Jacobs, Eggs of Penna, Birds at World's 
Fair, lOp. 3pl 35 

, Summer Birds of Greene Co., Pa., 

16p 35 

Judd, Four Common Birds of the Farm and 
Garden (Catbird, Mockingbird. Brown Thrash- 
er, HousM Wren), 14p, 4flg, (A. R. '95) 20 

Kennerly, Birds of New Mexico, (Pac. R. R. X) 
18p. 4col. pi 90 

Kumlein, Natural History ot Arctic America 
(Birds 38p; Mammals 22p, etc;) 180p, (M. B. 15) 
1 10 



Lattin, Frank H., The Oologists' Handbook, 
1885, (25) 86p 35 

, The Standard Catalogue of North 

American Birds' Eggs, 1896, (25) 74p. 10 

Lawrence. Birds of Dominica, 22p 35 



"Clearance Sale" of Frank H. Lattin, M. D., Albion, N. Y. 



, A Few Birds of Guadalupe, etc, 8p. 15 

, Birds of Martinique, 12p_ 25 

Lawrence & Sumichrast, Birds of South- 
western Mexico, 56p, (M. B. 4) _ 60 

Leverkuhn, Fremde Eier im Neste, 214p 1 00 

Linton, Avian Entozoa, 32p, 4pl 35 

Louck's Life History and Distribution of the 

Prothonotary Warbler in Ills _ 20 

Lucas, Birds and Animals recently extinct or 
threatened with extermination, 42p. lOpl. 6flg. 



, Tongues of Birds, 18p. SSflg 45 

, Catalogue of S. A. Bird Skeletons 

4p 10 

, Exploration in N. F. and Labrador, 

(after bones of Gt. Auk.) 20p, map 30 

, "Weapons and Wings ofaBirds, 12p, pi. 

8flg 25 

, The Tongues of Woodpeckers, lOp, 

3pl 25 

Maynard's "Birds of Eastern North Ameri- 
ca" This elaborate work was published about 
25 years ago at 818 and contained 532 pages. I 
have one part containing about 303 pages (over 
Yi of original) bound in tag board covers. The 
Thrushes, Warblers, Starlings, Water Birds 
and Shore-birds are complete $3.00. I also have 
a copy containing about U of origmal work at 
90c. Sample pages of work for stamp. Style 
of text see article of "Black Duck" in Dec. 
1900, OOLOGIST 



Marsh. Birds with Teeth, 44p, 30fig, 4to, 
(G. S. Ill) 1 00 

Merriam, Biological Reconnoissance of Ida- 
ho, 30p, ornithology etc 25 

, Biological Survey of San Francisco 

Mt. and Little Colo. Regions of Ariz., Birds 
44p, 3pl 5mps 40 

Merriam, Introduced Pheasants, etc., I2p 
(A- R. '88) _ ^0 

Merriam. Report of Ornithologist and Mam- 
malogist of Q. S. for '8Simp, 60p 25 

, Birds of Idaho, with description of a 

New Owl, 20p, col, pi 50 

, Birds of Arizona (San Francisco, Mt 

Plateau and Desert of Little Colo, and Grand 
Canon of Colo. ) Map showing distribution of 
Lecoute's Thrasher, 24p 50 

, Notes on 4 Bermuda Birds, 2p 15 

Michener, Agricultural Ornithology— Land 
Birds of Chester Co., Pa., 22p, (A. R. 63) .^5 

Newton, Preparation and Saving Parts of 
the Skeleton of Birds, 5p, 3 fig, (S. R. '60) .. 20 

Newberry, Birds of Sacramento Valley to 
Columbia River, (Pac. R. R. Survey VJ) 38p. 
2col, pi, 4to 1 25 

Page, Feathered Pets, A. Treatise on the 
Food, Breeding and Care of Canaries, Parrots 
and Other Cage Birds, 14] p. Ills S5 

Palmer, T. S., Bird Day in Schools. 4p 10 

Posson, Some (27) Birds of Unusual Occur- 
rence in Orleans Co.[N. Y. 4p 20 

Rey, Die Eier der ;Vogel Mithleuropas, Part 
I. 34p, 5col, pi. of 18 full-size eggs, eagles, etc. 
1900 75 

, Do do. Part II, 16p, 5col, pi, of 40 full- 
size eggs, Hawks and Eagles 75 

Ridgway, Catalogue of Old World Birds, 80p 
05 

, Directions for Collecting Birds, 28p 32 

, Genus Sittasomus, 4p 15 

Nomenclature of N. A. Birds, 94p 



M. B. 21 



50 



, Report of Dept. Birds U. S. 

Museum 1884-'83, 9 years, 64p 



National 
50 



, Do do '86-'92, 6 years, 40p 25 

Ridgway et al, Biographical Memoir— Spenc- 
- - _ -- g^ 



Fishes, 
_ 60 



er F. Baird, 42p, (S. R 

Ryder, Embryography of Osseous 
150p, 12pl, (F. R. '83) 

Samuels, Oology of New England Birds, 45p, 
(A. R. '64) 75 

Samuels, Ornithology and Mammalogy of 
New England, 2Sp, (A. R. '63) 50 

Sharpe, British Birds, part I, 112p, llcol. pi, 
40 



Short, Birds of Western York, 14p, 1st ed, 
'93 35 

, ditto, 2lp, 2d ed. '96 10 

Shufeldt, Taxidermal Methods of Leyden 
Museum. 8p, 6pl 35 

Shufeldt. Osteology of Cathartidse, 80p 12pl, 
46 fig, (H. R. '78) _ 75 

Shufeldt, M. D., R. W.. Scientific Taxidermy 
for Museums, 71 full-page plates, 57p, text...! 50 

, Observations on the Classification of 

Birds, 16p, 98 20 

. Osteology of 'LaniuS' ludovicianus ex- 

cubitorides, lOp, pi 20 

, Forms Assumed by the Patella of 

Birds, 8p 80 

, Osteology of the Eremophila. alpes- 

tris, 30p, pi 35 

, Osteology of the N. A. Tetraonidse, 

44p, 8pl 60 

- — — , Osteology of the Speotyto cunicularia 
var. hypogea, 32p, 2pl 40 

Smith, Birds of Warren Co. O. , with notes 
and Supplementary List of Birds of Probable 
Occurrence, 30p. '01 35 

Stearns, Notes on the Natural History of La_ 
brador, 74p 60 

Stegneger, Natural History Notes on Com- 
mander Islds., 30p 35 

Stegneger, Notes on Japanese Bii-ds, 24p 35 

Streets, Natural History of the Hawaiian 
and Fanning Island and Lower California, 
172p, Wash., '72, M. B. 7 1 00 

Stevenson. Birds and Mammals of Wyoming 
6p (H. R. '79) 25 

Tristram, Field Study in Ornithology— Dis- 
tribution, Migration, Mimicry, Heredity, 82p. 
(S. R. '93) 35 

TurnbuU, Birds of Eastern Pennsylvania 
and New Jersey, 50p, Phila, '69, very rare. 1 GO 

Whitlock, The Migration of Birds, 140p, '97 
95 



Ornithological and 
Natural History 
Publications. 

Can furnish back num- 
bers of almost anything 
published in America dur- 
ing the past 25 years. 

Write wants. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



137 



on the sa*re spot as the former oae, and 
had four eggs. Near Tarkio, Mo 

June 18, 1900, collected one set of five 
eggs of the Red-headed Woodpecker in 
a hole in a maple tree in a grove beside 
the house on a ranch some three miles 
from town. 

June 29, 1900, collected one set of five 
fggs (if the Ked-headed Wooapecker 
from the same hole as the set of the 18th 
inst. 

July 10, 1900, collected one set of four 
eggs of f^e Red-headeil Woodpecker 
from the same hole as sets of June 18 
and 29. 

I have found that the Red-headed 
Woodpecker will do this every time, 
and the third set generally, if not al- 
ways, consists of four eggs. Near Tar- 
kio, N. W., Mo. 

April 19, 1901, collected one set of five 
eggs of the Phieoe from a nest on a 
beam under a bridge. (This is the same 
bridge situated on the same place on 
the same beam ?8 wtre the sets of April 
16 and May 16, 1897.) I replaced this 
nest, but it was carried away two days 
la;er by high water. 

June 8, 1901, collected one set of five 
eggs and nest of the Phoebe in the same 
bridge and on the same place on the 
beam as the set of April 19, 1901. Four 
eggs out of this set (June 8) were spot- 
ted, two heavily around the large end. 
The eggs in the set of April 19 were un- 
8p:-tted. 

May 16, 1901, collected one set of four 
eggs of the Red-winged Blackbird Nest 
situated six and one-half feet high in a 
small willow in a creek bottom. 

May 30, 1901, while passing the Red- 
wing's nest, found the 16th inst., with a 
friend, was more surprised to see an 
Am. Robin sitting on the nest. On ex- 
amination we found the nest contained 
one egg and the R bin had relired it 
with grasses and built the side no about 
one-half inch with mud and grass. 
Several days later I was passing and I 
called on Mrs. Merula migratoria and 



found her at home. The nest contained 
four eggs, which I photographed and 
left. 

May 30, 1901, collected one set of five 
eggs of the Red- winged Blackbird. My 
friend, who was with me, also collected 
a set of five Red-wings. I enclose you 
a photo of same. These are the only 
sets of five eggs of the Red-wing which 
have come under my notice. The eggs 
in both sets were ra'her smaller than 
the average Red-wing eggs and rather 
sperical. Both sets are well marked 
with sploches and streaks of black. 

Before I close I wish to thank Mr. 
Geo. W. Vosburgb, Columbus, Wis , for 
the paragraph in July Oologist where 
he mentions about "The Chicago Re- 
cord-Herald," Audubon series of colored 
photographs. It has been the means of 
selling more than one "Record-Herald" 
here. 

E. R. Forrest, 
Washington, Pa. 



How Some Birds Capture Their Prey. 

(Continued from August Number.) 

Among the regularly insectivorous 
birds the Whip-poor-will swallows the 
largest insects of all; frequently engulf- 
ing large moths and beetles the siza of 
the June bug. In one bird that I dis- 
sected there were over thirty insects, 
many of which I could identify. They 
were of several species and embraced 
beetles, moths and a few dipterous in- 
sects. While the two Goat-suckers 
known in the great lake region, the 
Whip-poor-will and Night Hawk, or 
Bull Bat, as it is sometimes called, feed 
upon the larger insects, th*! Chimney 
Swift only captures the smaller species, 
relying mainly on the small two-winged 
insects, flies, 'squitoes and gnats. The 
former birds dash upon their prey in 
plunges and side-flops, while the Swift 
engulfs its food as it rapidly revolves. 
"The flight and capture are quite sim lar 



138 



THE OOLOGIST 



in the movements of the Whip-poor- 
will and Night Hawk when the two 
birds are feeding, but the sustained 
flight of the latter is quite different in 
the open from the more curtailed wing 
movements of the former in the woods. 
I have but rarely seen the Whip-poor- 
will flying and feeding in the day time, 
though they sometimes do so in the 
nesting season, and I once shot a speci- 
men which had a crop full of plunder. 
The Night Hawk is a well known feeder 
during the daylight hours while the 
young are small and I have seen the 
old birds feeding and shrieking their 
skeet as early as two o'clock p. m. But 
I have never seen this habit of feeding 
in broad daylight except when they 
had young. The Night Hawk some- 
times runs, or more properly, waddles 
about on the ground in quest of food, 
and I have seen an old bird gobble a 
black cricket in broad daylight. Once 
the observance of a rare sight was af- 
forded me in a partial clearing, where 
I beheld an old Night Hawk feeding its 
one young one. This was in the day 
time and the old bird flew close to the 
nest and then scuttled to the little one, 
which was a fluffy bit of down, with 
closed eyes. The old bird placed its 
bill within the mouth of its offspring 
and apparently regurgitated the food 
for the young. This act was repeated 
three times in the space of a half min- 
ute, after which the old bird closed its 
eyes and both remained quiet on the 
ground. I have repeatedly seen the 
same act performed by the Chimney 
Bwift on a nest in the gable of the barn 
where they have nested continuously 
for over thirty years. 

from close observation I am led to 
think that nearly all insect-feeding, as 
well as many other birds, feed their 
young in this manner. The Ruby- 
throated Hummer is another species 
which macerates its food before feed- 
ing its very young, and when offering 
them delicacies, as honey and insects, 



thrusts its long beak way down the 
throats of the nestlings, in an apparent- 
ly aimless manner, but evidently to the 
liking of the midgets in the nest. The 
rapidity of movement in the Hummer 
is remarkable and they could make 
good flycatchers were it necessary. 
They sometimes catch flies upon the 
wing and I have seen them dart at 
motes and specks in the air in sheer 
sport as the trout snaps at specks in the 
water from mere wantonness. 

The question of food of the Hummer 
has been much discussed and the idea 
generally prevails that the Ruby-throat 
visits the flowers for the insects that are 
attracted by the honey in the flowers. 
This question shall be discussed in an- 
other chapter. Suffice it to say that in 
my opinion the Hummer makes the 
same use of the honey from the flowers 
that the Sap-sucker gets from the sap of 
the perforated bark. 

The Flycatchers are exponents of the 
art of lightning dash and perform in a 
small way on the insects the same line 
of work that the Falcons follow with the 
birds as prey. Some, as the small 
Green- crested, prefer the dark woods 
where they are found catching the small 
dipterous insects, while the larger spec- 
ies are more open in their depredations 
and I have repeatedly seen the King- 
bird capture, dissect and devour the 
harvest flies. The most rangy insect 
that I have seen a Flycatcher capture 
was a dragon fly, the giant libelula. The 
insect knew its danger and sought to 
evade its destroyer by flying in a small 
circle and at a very rapid rate. The in- 
telligent insect used excellent judgment 
and foiled the persistent tryant for sev- 
eral seconds. Round and round they 
went and the bird did not gain an inch 
on the devil's darning needle, as we 
boys used to call these gavze-winged in- 
sects, and I was wondering if this rea- 
soning creature could manage to get 
away from its fierce enemy, when sud- 
denly the Flycatcher dashed across the 



THE OOLOttlST 



139 



circle nearly diametrically and caughit 
the unlucky spindle amidships. 

Kingbirds do not confine their efforts 
to air captures, but often plunge at a 
grasshopper on the ground. They also 
eat bees and are known as Bee Martins. 
I once observed a Great-crested Fly- 
catcher eating a hornet, which it had 
captured from the neighborhood of a 
paper hornet's nest in the woods. Still 
1 do not think that many bees are 
caught from the hives of the domestic 
bees. 

It is not uncommon for the Barn-yard 
Phoebe to feed from the ground, while I 
have seen one perch for a moment on 
the back of a sheep, which caused me 
to think that this bird ate the ticks after 
the manner of the Cowbird. All the Fly- 
catchers are our friends and should be 
protected. 

The Titlark and Horned Lark feed 
from the ground and though they are 
very fair fliers and indulge in many var- 
iations in flight at times, still they are 
ground feeders and do not show off in 
the capture of their prey. The Crows 
are very prosaic in the capture of their 
prey, which in the nature of insects 
mainly consists of grasshoppers, which 
are caught upon the ground. Bobolinks 
and all Blackbirds feed upon ground 
insects and seed irainly, and like most 
of the singers are not interesting nor 
dashing in the capture of their food. 
Among the Sparrows we have few ex- 
ponents of the art of capturing food on 
the wing. I have seen the Chipping 
Sparrow seize a small moth while flying 
and have observed the same proceeding 
in the case of a few others of the family, 
but all of our Sparrows are surpassed 
in insect capture by that interloper, the 
European House Sparrow, which is a 
most persistent feeder upon insects at 
certain seasons and which it catches on 
the wing at times with considerable 
skill. 

Morris Gibbs, M. D. 

(To be Continued.) 



Jotting's. 
On May 7th Mr. John Rittenberg se- 
cured a male specimen of the Cape May 
Warbler, Dendroica tigrina, and 
brought the same to our office, where it 
still remains, for identification. This 
species is a very rare migrant in Orleans 
County. 



W. Raine of Toronto spent the past 
collecting season in Assinaboia and has 
returned with photo, nest, eggs, young 
in down and skin of rarent bird of the 
Little Brown Crane {Orus canadensis) — 
valuable additions to his unique series 
of this species. 



Mr. Delos Hatch of Oakfield, Wis., an 
old-time naturalist and collector, writes 
that he has a live and pretty specimen 
of the White Gopher (Albino Striped 
Ground Squirrel). 



In a letter dated July 26, from Mr. D. 
H. Haight, who is summering in Hamil- 
ton County, N. Y., and who had an ar- 
ticle in the January, 1899, Oologist on 
"Nesting of the Duck Hawk in Hamil- 
ton County, New York." He writes: 

"Remember those Duck Hawks I 
wrote you about onceV Well, a pair 
has raised a brood in exactly the same 
place again ihi« joar. Probably the 
young of the pair we shot. This morn- 
ing I was up on the ledge and within 
twenty feet of them— the old birds and 
four young just well able to fly. I left 
them undisturbed, although I could 
have bagged the lot. They will un- 
doubtedly nest here next year again. 

"It would be a great chance for some 
museum if they wanted to get up a case 
of this rare Hawk, also noted a Cardi- 
nal Grosbeak here. Never heard of one 
so far north before. Probably followed 
the Hudson River valley up and thus 
strayed up here." 



In a letter of recent date Ernest Shil- 
labeer, secretary and director general 



140 



THE OOLOGIST. 



of the Junior World's Exposition to be 
held at Dayton, O., in September, a 
more extended notice of which we give 
in other columns, writes: 

"I enclose a slip advising you of an 
exposition to be held in this association 
Sept. 9th to 21st, inclusive. It is gotten 
up by boys under my supervision, and 
is purely educational. It will be very 
extensive. We have already received 
exhibits from Russia, Jamaica, France, 
New Zealand and many states. Nearly 
every country and state will be repre- 
sented. We expect 10,000 people in the 
two weeks. The boys would appreciate 
an exhibit from you of such things as 
you would care to send. It should reach 
us by Aug. 25th, so that we can put it 
in the catalogue, which will be a souven- 
ier and 10,000 issued. 



its value in the eyes of a Philadelphia 
entomologist. The ornithologist or en- 
tomologist who collects specimens with- 
out keeping at least locality and date of 
capture is a back number." 



Mr. Philip Laurent of Philadelphia, 
to whom we recently sent specimens of 
the Great Gray and Hawk Owls, which 
were obtained during the winter of '95- 
'96, from Red Deer River country. Al- 
berta, and for which we could furnish 
no further data, writes amply, timely 
and tersely as follows: 

'I am sorry that you can't give me a 
little more data concerning the two 
Owls. 1 have nothing to complain of as 
regards the mounting of the two speci- 
mens, although I think I could have 
done a little better work with the Great 
Gray. In my opinion, the man who col- 
lects a bird skin as rare as the Great 
Gray Owl or the Hawk Owl, and does 
not take down full data (sex by dissec- 
tion, such measurements as can not be 
well taken from a dry skin; as well as 
determining the contents of the stom- 
ach, locality and date of capture) should 
have at least three months in jail. There 
are quite a few ornithologists whom it 
would pay to visit some of the active 
"field entomologists" of Philadelphia, 
and see with what care they label their 
specimens. An insect without exact 
locality and date of capture loses half 



The booklet sent out by Mr. Silas H. 
Paine of the Silver Bay Hotel, Silver 
Bay, N. Y., mentions "three unique at- 
tractions," which ought to make Silver 
Bay headquarters for the naturalist and 
collector when in the Lake George re- 
gion. 

"The flora of Lake George:— Nature 
study is becoming very popular. No 
better place can be found for it than 
the shores of Lake George. It is won- 
derfully rich in wild flowers, ferns and 
mosses. A lady guest of the Silver Bay 
Hotel, arriving on the noon boat, found 
over fifty varieties of wild flowers that 
afternoon. 

"A large room has been devoted to a 
collection of 'The flora of Lake George' 
— not pressed in books in the old-fash- 
ioned way — but placed in frames, like 
pictures, along the walls, where they 
can be easily examined and studied. 

"The fauna of Lake George:— A whole 
building is devoted to a rare collection 
of the birds and animals to be found in 
this region, nearly 300 specimens, each 
bird with its nest and eggs and young, 
surrounded by the foliage in which it 
makes its home, and each animal in the 
same way — in its natural surroundings. 
This work has been done by a skillful 
naturalist and is of g'-eat interest, not 
only to the student, but to all lovers of 
birds and animals. 

"The history of Lake George:— There 
is no spot of equal length in America 
that has been so many times fought over 
as the shores of Lake i&eorge. The relics 
of these old wars — arrowheads, spears, 
tomahawks, cannon balls, bayonets, 
muskets and all the paraphernalia of 
the camp and battlefield— are turned 
up by the plow, or fished up from the 
bottom of the lake. Two rooms have 
been devoted to a collection of these 
historical relics and the portraits of the 
French, English. Indian and American 
soldiers who have fought here. 

With these collections are also gath- 
ered the books pertaining to them, so 
that the amateur and the student can 
find all the helps necessary for their 
use." 



THE OOLOGIST. 



141 



New Books- 

The Home Life of Wild Birds. A 
new method of the Study and Photo- 
graphy of Birds. By Francis H. Her- 
rick, G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 
4to, cloth, gilt top, 168p, with 141 illus- 
trations from original photographs from 
nature by the author, $3.50 net. 

This is unquestionably one of the 
most valuable "Bird Books" of the year, 
not only for the working bird student, 
but will be equally prized by the ama- 
teur, the "Audubonian" and the scien- 
tific and exclusive A. O. U. man. A 
most happy combination: A necessity, 
elegant for presentation purposes, un- 
surpassed for the bird lover's parlor 
table. The market has been flooded 
with "bird books" and yet the publish- 
ers of this volume claim a place for it at 
the fore-front of such publications; it 
admits of no competitor: all this be- 
cause of the fact that Mr. Herrick has 
perfected an invention that brings the 
birds beneath his eye, and beneath the 
eye of his camera, in a way hitherto un- 
heard of. At an actual distance of 
about two feet from the nest, the author 
and his camera stand. From that point 
of vantage they watch and record 
every movement of the bird family 
The domestic economy of nest life be- 
comes a practical science, to be set 
down on paper by pen and picture for 
the practical needs of the scientist and 
for the delight of the lay lover of na- 
ture. 

The Woodpeckebs. By Fannie Hardy 
Eckstorm, Houghton, Miffiin and Com- 
pany, Boston. Illustrated with five c )1- 
ored plates by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 
and 21 drawings by John L. Ridgway, 
square 12mo, 140p, $1.00. 

A comprehensive account of a single 
family of birds distributed throughout 
North America; accurate and orderly, 
yet written so as to stimulate original 
observation and intelligent study among 
young people. The author has made 
an exhaustive study of the structure and 
habits of the Woodpecker and of his 
tools— bill, foot, tongue, and tail— con- 



cluding that he is a miner instead of a 
carpenter as generally supposed. The 
book is informing in contents and ani- 
mated in style, and is certain to interest 
boys and girls in the study of bird life 
on their own account. 

EvERYDAT Birds. Elementary Stud- 
ies. By Bradford Torrey, Houghton, 
Mifflin and Company, Boston. Illus- 
trated with 12 colored plates from Au- 
dubon and 2 from photographs, square 
12mo, 112p, $1.00. 

"Everyday Birds" is a collection of 
sketches of a number of well-known 
birds, some biographical, and others 
general, in character. The volume is 
really an interesting bird-study book, 
written in a manner to interest children 
and older people in birds and bird-life. 
The illustrations include twelve colored, 
plates from Audubon — the first consid- 
erable reproduction of the colored draw- 
ings from the "Birds" of that author. 
Mr. Torrey combines entire scientific 
accuracy with much literary charm, and 
readers of all ages will find it delight- 
fully interesting. 

Bird Day, How to Prepare for It. 
By Charles A. Babcock, L. L. B., Silver, 
Burdett & Company, New York, square 
12mo, cloth, 96p, 16 page illustrations 
of common birds, 50c. * 

As the author states: "The aim of 
this book is to assist school children in 
the accurate study of a few birds. It is 
believed that if this be attained, further 
study of birds will take care of itself." 
It contains chapters on History of the 
Movement of "Bird Day," The Value of 
Birds, The Destruction of Birds, Plan 
of Study, Further Suggestions, Direct- 
ions for Written Work, Programs for 
Bird Day, The Poets and the Birds, Ob- 
jects and Results of Bird Day, and Some 
Representative Birds, (note?, descrip- 
tions and illustrations of sixteen com- 
mon species.) 

Tabby's Defense. By Harriet EU'ot, 
Abbey Press, New York, illustrated, 
cloth, 12mo, 42p, 50c. 

The autobiography of a cat told in 
simple language with a view to enlist- 
ing the sympathy of children on behalf 



142 



THE OOLOGIST 



of dumb animals, and helpinj? them to 
realize the responsibility which the 
human race incurred when they received 
the Divine commission to rule over the 
animal world by mercy, and not by ag- 
gression. The interest of the story is 
enhanced by illustrations depicting the 
various scenes of trial and prosperity 
which Tabby describes. 

Bobtail Dixie. By Abbie N. Smith, 
Abbey Press, New York, 12mo, 154p, 
cloth, profusely illustrated, $1.00. 

Lovers of dogs (and their name is leg- 
ion) have a treat in this book. The il- 
lustrations which accompany it speak 
as often and as loudly as the dog him- 
self. The pictures alone are worth 
more than the price. As the biography 
of a bow-wow, the book is of great value, 
while its different teachings with regard 
to the treatment of animals will find a 
place in every library and every school. 
The author is to be congratulated upon 
the production of a work which is so 
unique, entertaining and instructive. 

Cat Tales in Vekse. By Elliot 
Walker, Abbey Press, New York, 8vo, 
48p, daintily bound in cloth, 50c. 

The multitudious friends (young and 
old) of cats will welcome in this book 
an absokitely new thing under the sun. 
Here they will find the mioaus of their 
favorites set in rhyme. Owners of cats 
and these feline animals themselves owe 
the author, Mr. Elliot Walker, a unani- 
mous vote of thanks. The verses are 
unique and admirably done. The cover 
is designed by Mr. C. H. Rowe and is 
very characteristic. Many of these 
rhymes are of a high order of merit. 
None of them are mere jingles. There 
are both wit and wisdom in the lines. 



EXPOSITION COMPLETE 

Great Throngs Enjoy the Fan-AmericaQ . 

Ample Accommodations in Buffalo for 
All Who Visit the New World's Fair. 

The Pan-American Exposition is 
complete. Its transcendent beauties 
and comprehensive exhibits are 



viewed, enjoyed and prnised by great 
throngs daily. 

There are accommodations in Buffalo 
and its suburbs for all who may visit 
the Exposition. The rates at the ho- 
tels, boarding hoases, restaurants and 
private houses for lodging and meals 
are reasonable. 

These statements are made on the 
authority of the Exposition officials 
with a view of counteracting as far as 
possible false and misleading reports 
which have gained currency in certain 

localities. 

Hundreds of thousands of fair-mind- 
ed appreciative people have visited the 
Exposition and returned to their homes 
delighted with the show and their ac- 
commodations. Their words of com- 
mendation will go far toward correct- 
ing the evil. No other exposition has 
offered so many fine attractions Never 
before has human interest been so 
graciously catered to. The illumina- 
tion is the grandest and most inspiring 
spectacle ever produced by the genius 
of man. Bathed in incandescent radi- 
ance the Rainbow City posesses a 
beauty exceeding that of fairyland, a 
loveliness beyond expression. 

By day the scene is one never to be 
forgotten. Unequal is the most fanci- 
ful pen to an adequate description of 
the magnificent architecture and beau- 
tiful coloring of the palaces, grand 
sculpture, cooling fountains, smiling 
lakes, wealth of flora, waving foliage 
and grass covered glades, delightful 
vistas, and rising high above all else — 
its pinnacle piercing the low-lying 
clouds — a tower of graceful proportions 
and amazing splendor, upon and about 
which the newest and grandest ideas of 
genius are fittingly exploited. 

Mr. Arthur C. Pearson, the well- 
known publisher of newspapers and 
periodicals of London, Eng., who re- 
cently visited the Exposition, said: "I 
much enjoyed my day at the Exposi- 
tion, which struck me as being very 
fine. The lighting effects at night are 
simply marvelous. I never saw any- 
thing like them, which is hardly to be 
wondered at as there has never been 
anything like them to be seen." 

Here are the expressions of a number 
of distinguished Americans: 

United States Senator Thomas C. 
Piatt of New York: "It is wonderful, 
very wonderful." 



THE OOLOGIST. 



143 



Secretary of War Elihu Root: "It is 
a splendid exposition, worthy of being 
seen by the whole world." 

Governor Richard Yates of Illinois: 
"If Paradise has anything more beauti- 
ful than the Pan-American Exposition 
has when illuminated, I can't conceive 
of it." 

Passing from the enchanted courts 
into the splendid palaces one reads in 
the comprehensive exhibits the storv of 
development and progress in the New 
World during the Nineteenth Century, 
vast discovery, stupendous invention, 
marvelous advancement, which consti- 
tute an example never before furnished 
in the revolution of time. 

Buffalo is amply prepared to accom- 
modate all who come to the Exposition. 
The rates are reasonable. The report 
that the hotels are charging $5 to $10 a 
day for single rooms is uttery absurd. 
These charges are for magnificent 
suites with extraordinary conveniences 
at one or two hotels There are scores 
of hotels where the charges for rooms 
are $1 to $2 per day. At the mammoth 
hotels near the Exposition the charge 
for lodging, breakfast and evening din- 
ner is but $2 50 and $2 a day. The 
charges at downtown hotels are as 
reasonable. 

There are upwards of 200 hotels in 
Buffalo, with accommodations for 45, 
000 people. There are 650 boarding 
boarding and rooming houses, accom- 
modating 18.500. More than 10.000 
householders have opened their homes 
and will provide accommodations for 
more than 100,000. The rates are 50c 
to $2 per day. 

In a mnjority of the boarding houses 
and at many private houses lodging 
and breakfast are to be had for $1.00. 

To sum up the situation, Buffalo and 
its environs are capable of accommo- 
dating nearly a quarter of a million 
visitors in a comfortable manner and 
at rearonable rates. 

It is well when convenient for the 
intending visitor to make arrangements 
for accommodations in advance. The 
Pan-American Official Bureaa of In- 
formation. 213 Ellicott Square, Buffalo, 
will furnish all necessary information, 
including lists of places where lodgings 
may be engaged, with prices, and a list 
of reliable rooming agencies and frater- 
nal order's information bureaus. 

There are plenty of restaurants 
where good service is given at reason- 
able prices. There are places on the 
Midway where a good lunch can be 



had for 20 cents and a satisfactory din- 
ner for 35 cents. 

Admission to all the exhibits build- 
ings of the Exposition is free. In this 
group are included the great Govern- 
ment, Machinery and Liberal Arts, 
Electricity, Fine Arts, Horticultural, 
Mines, Graphic Arts, Ordinance, Agri- 
cultural and Heavy Railway Exhibits 
Building, in which the visitor might 
spend with profit to himself several 
days. The great Stadium in which 
sports are held daily, is also free. 

Nowhere before have so many mer- 
itorious attractions been offered for-the 
sum of 50 cents for adults and 25 cents 
for children as at the Pan-American 
Exposition. These include, daily con- 
certs by the best bands on the Western 
Hemisphere, organ recitals by the lead- 
ing organists of the United States, and 
drills by United States Marines, U. S. 
Heavy Artillery, U. S. Life Saving 
Corps, and U. S. Hospital Corps. 
There are grand displays of fireworks 
on special days. 

Elbeet L. Lewis. 



A NOVELTY! 

In the way of International Expositions. 
Boys Imitate Their Elders in an Inter- 
esting Enterprise. 

Dayton, Ohio to be the site of a Display 

of the Products of many States and 

Countries. 

The "Juniors" of the Dayton, Ohio, 
Young Men's Christian Association 
have inaugurated a genuine novelty in 
the way of Exposition propositions. 
The boys cf all lands, and their older 
friends, are invited to contribute speci- 
mens of the natural products of their 
respective neighborhoods for exhibition 
at Dayton during two weeks in Septem- 
ber. 

The responses have been so generous 
that this Junior World's Exposition 
scheme has outgrown the original 
thought of the youthful promoters, and 
is becoming quite an extensive affair. 

In the beginning an Exposition com- 
pany was formed, the shares selling 
solely to members of the Dayton Junior 
Department, an organizition of boys 



144 



THE OOLOGIST. 



from twelve to seventeen years of age, 
some three hundred in number. Dis- 
posing of the entire capital stock at 
par, the company organized with a full 
corps of oflBcers and committees in the 
most approved fashion. Among the 
committees for preliminary work are 
the following: Care of Exhibits- 
Frank Congdon, Ralph Niedergall, 
Carl Congdon; Signs and Posters- 
Julius Tafel, Charlie Wilson; Photo- 
graphs — Robert Pape; Decoration — 
Everson Welliver. George Ohmart; 
Correspondence— Carl Starkey, Frank 
Hale. Ihis last committee is receiving 
much assistance from one of the local 
commercial colleges, whose students 
are furnishing many typewritten letters 
for the boys. Secretary Ernest Shilla- 
beer, of the Junior Department, is 
serving as director general. 

Upon completing the organization, 
letters were immediately sent out to 
many lands, asking for grasses, leaves, 
shells and similar specimens easily ob- 
tainable by a boy. Unthreshed grains, 
crude spices, nuts and cotton balls, 
as gathered in forest and fie'd, were 
solicited, together with minera's and 
other products of the under-world. 

The earlier replies were so cordial, 
and gave promise of exhibits so far be- 
yond the original expectation of the 
lads that they ha'^e been led to seek a 
more representative and elaborate col- 
lection. All answers received are fa- 
vorable endorsements of the idea and 
assurances of hearty cooperation. 

The boys of Brussels wrote: "Be as- 
sured -that we shall do our utmost to 
let our small Belgium shine in your 
gigantic America." An ostrich egg 
mounted on an orange-wood stand has 
already been received from the famous 
California farm. 

The boys of the Dayton Manual 
Training School are preparirg a beauti- 
ful piece of parquetry, consisting^ of 
specimens of every obtainable variety 
of wood native to Ohio. Hazelton, Pa. 
will exhibit a model coal bunker, show- 
ing the manner of handling a natural 
product Marseilles will exhibit pro- 
ducts of the historic Riviera Two 
dozen countries and islands, together 
with many states of the Union, will be 
represented, according to the latest 
returns 

This first exhibition of its kind- 
managed by boys in the interest of 



boys, —it is hoped will add definitely 
to the attractiveness of geographical 
study by the bo s of Ohio, many of 
whom will be privileged to inspect the 
exhibits. Many other boys, reading of 
this Dayton eft'ort, may fee new inter- 
est in the study of places and products, 
and in distant lands will start small 
collections or exhibitions in their homes 
or schools. Practical and fascinating 
business lessons will be learned by the 
boys taking this new form of corres- 
pondence study under the tutelage of 
the Dayton managers. The first con- 
sideration of the original request and 
the weighty problems involved, the 
subsequent correspondence with head- 
quarters in America, the planning nec- 
essary to give their respective States 
and countries creditable showing, the 
preparation of the exhibit, the study of 
packing and shipping methods, and the 
dealings with customs officials, will be 
of real value to the youngsters, who 
may some day participate in Vnore am- 
bitious international shows. Then, too. 
there is a hope that the successful con- 
duct of the affair may direct attention 
to work for hoys among those who 
have the world's betterment at heart. 

A striking educaMonal feature of the 
Exposition will be a huge map of the 
world, to be worked out by the Dayton 
lads. The spices of Ceylon, the tea of 
China, and the cotton of the South will 
be mounted on this unique map, 
together with the characteristic pro- 
ducts of other States and nations. "This 
alone will be worth the price of admis- 
sion." 

The bureau of publicity is offering a 
series of prizes for posters in water- 
colors, to be submitted by pupils in the 
grammar grades of the public schools. 
These posters may be of any size, shape 
or design, and shall become the prop- 
erty of the Exposition Company, to be 
used in advertising the show. The 
posters entered in the competition will 
form an interesting preliminary ex- 
hibit, to be held during the early sum- 
mer. 

The boy managers propose loaning 
the World's Exposition intact fcr ex- 
hibition in other cities. In such cases 
the local Y. M. C. A. or other organ- 
ized body interested in boys will be 
favored with the manngement. 

Young people or others desirous of 
exhibiting specimens in September 
should address Director-General Junior 
Junior World's Exposition, Dayton, 
Ohio, for further particulars. 



The Oologist. 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 10. ALBION, N. Y., OCTOBER, 1901. Whole No. 181 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exchanges" "For Sales," Inserted In this department 
.lor 25c per 2.=j words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, ca^h u lib order. 

Strictly Flrst-claas specimens will be accepted In payment at one-third list rates. 



IMPORTANT. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 181 your subscription expires with this issue 
183 •' '• " " Dec, " 

190 " " " " June, 1902 

195 " " " " Dec. " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

This Oct. Oologist was is- 
sued Oct. 16th. The Nov. is- 
sue will be printed on Oct. 30. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
mail. 

WANTE D :— To exchange, one guitar and case 
in good order, nearly new [cash price eleven 
dollars] for bird skins or sea curios. G. A. 
DECKER, Ludington. Mich. 

FOR EXCHANGE :— A collection of Alcohol- 
ic Specimens, "Scientifically named" I want 
arrow points, minerals shells, and U. S. 
Stamps not in my collection. W. J. ENG- 
LAND, Caro, Mich. 

OLD COINS, Stamps, Stamp Papers, a few 
fine mammal skins with skull and leg bones, 
etc. to exchange for bird skins and eggs. AL- 
FRED ANDERSON, Box 59, Downs, Kan. 

FOR EXCHANGE.— One brand new copy of 
Apgar's --Birds of U. S." (cost $3.U0) for Row- 
ley's Taxidermy In good condition. Address, 
ROBT. W. GLENN, Wooster. Ohio. 

TO EXCHANGE.— Complete volumes of Bird 
Lore, Condor, Osprey and Mineral Collector, 
half-dollars of 1806, 1808, 1809, 1811 and 1814, fine 
condition. Wanted first class sets. E. A. 
DOOLITTLE Painesville, Ohio. 

FOR SALE or EXCHANGE —Capen's Oology 
of New England, new: 100 Eastern bird skins; 
35 mounted small birds; 350 back numbers Ool- 
ogist, Osprey, Museum, etc. ; 800 Philatelic 
magazines; Grav's botany; Coues Key, third 
edition. Will sell any o' above cheap or ex- 
change for stamps. GEO. D. FRENCH, Ivory- 
ton, Conn. 



WANTED.— For cash or exchange. Most any 
number of The Audubon Magazine, Birds and 
All Nature or The Taxidermist. Can offer var- 
ious stamp and curio papers; also some singles 
of cheaper eggs. HOWARD E. BISHOP, 
Sayrc, Pa. 

WANTED for cash. Sets of 335, 332 and 343 
or will trade R. P. SHARPLES, West Ches- 
ter, Pa 

FOR SALE.— For best offer in cash. One 
long Seth Thomas "Grandfather" clock with a 
revolutionary history, confederate money and 
bonds. Mrs. M. F. SKEEN. Farmer. N. C 

WILL EXCHANGE fine Mexican opals for 
seeds or botanical specimens. Send specimens 
and 25 cents to pay custom house charges and 
I will send opal by return mall. R. BURN- 
HAM, Box 83, Nogales. Arizona. 

TO EXCHANGE.— Arrowheads and coins for 
eggs in sets, many common varieties wanted. 
Send lists. J. B. NEWTON, Unionville, Ct. 

FOR SALE:— 4x5 Hawkeye Gamera, 3 plate 
holders, cost $24; 1 copy British and European 
Butterflies and Moths, new; 30 colored plates; 
165 cigarette and gum pins ; 10 campaign pins 
and buttons ;Oologists and Scientific American; 
200 or 300 ciearette pictures; 1 baseball mitt. 
All to be sold for highest cash price. FRANK 
E. STOCK WELL, L,ancaster, N. H. 



TO EXCHANGE.— A lot of fine bird skins for 
Bendire's Lite History or Capen's Oology. 
FRED FREY, 428 Decatur St., Sandusky, O. 

FOR EXCHANGE in December.— Sets, 86. 
133, 273 294a, 333, 339b 365, 373, 375d, 378, 393d, 
394a. 397, 407, 413, 4.5U. 458 7-27, 710a, 7.53. Singles, 
207,455, 224, 228, 243 339b, 373, 402a, 479, 482, 487. 
Want sets of water birds. Hawks. Grouse, only. 
CHAS. S. THOMPSON, Paso Robles, Calif. 

lOOO Arrowpoints and other Indian Relics 
also 1400 beetles and 100 butterflies in glass 
cases for sp.,le cheap or will exchange. M. 
COLDITZ, Allardt, Tenn. 

FOR SALE.— Sword Fish's Sword, 35in. 
long, $1.50; Books, Birds of New Jersey by C. 
A. Shriner. 35 111., descriptions of birds, nests 
and eggs, $1. ; Brak« up Lake Shore. .50c: Rob- 
inson Cro^oe. .50c- Porthos, 35c. WM. B. CRIS- 
PIN, Salem, N. J. 



146 



THE OOLOGIST. 



WANTED:— Knight's Birds of Maine.Davie's 
Nests and Eggs 5th edition, Skins. Nests and 
Eggs of Warblers, good exchange or cash. 
GUY H. BRIGGS, Llvermore, Maine. 

FOR SALE.— Singles and twos of 319, 320a, 
714, 504, 421. 709, 519b and 593b. Five cents and 

Eostage per egg, cash with order. R. P. 
HARPLES, West Chester, Pa. 

HELLO: I have two pairs field glasses. Na- 
tural History books mounted specimens and 
other objects of Interest to you. State what 
you want and what you have H. E. NEU- 
MANN, 204 Rock St., Watertown. Wis. 

FOR SALE —A lot of Fine Bird skins cheap, 
among them I mention Mottled Owl, Short- 
eared Owl, Rough-legged Hawk, Cedar Wax- 
wing Snowflake and others. FRED FREY, 
428 Decateur St , Sandusky, O. 

WANTED— Eggs in sets or singles. Offer 
Skins, Eggs, Indian Relics, Books, in fact any- 
thing in stock. Also want good long spear- 
heads, skins of water birds and sea curios. 
Send list of what you can spare and let me 
know what you want. E. H. SHORT, Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

TO SECURE opinion of collectors as to the 
proper cash value of eggs of the Yellow Rail, 
I offer my two personally taken sets, n8. nlO to 
highest bidder before January first. Collectors 
of bird photographs, representing newest and 
most difficult work, with long tube and anastlg- 
mat, will do well to write for list of rare and 
attractive subjects, enclosing 10c. Photos, 15c 
each ; $1 60 per doz. Lantern slides to order. 
P. B. PEABODY, Hlbbing. Minn. 

NOTICE.— I have for exchange "Nests and 
Eggs of N. A. Birds" by Oliver Davie, fifth edi- 
tion, new; one Eastman Kodak, 4x5, new, and 
the best datas on the market. For Davie's 
book I will accept $5 in complete sets with data. 
For the Kodak, $25 worth of choice sets with 
data. And I will send 100 datas to every col- 
lector who sends me 50c worth of eggs In sets. 
Send list of eggs for selection. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Address. Box 322, CLARENCE H. 
LUTHER, Fayetteville, Ark. 

FOR SA.LE.— A-1 sets.with full data, of Royal 
Tern, 50-3, 50c; Brown Pelican, 20-3, 30c; Amer- 
ican Oyster-catcher, 5-3, 81; Willet, 10-4, 50c; 
Wilson's Plover, 5-3, 40c; Laughing Gull, 50-3, 
30c; Clapper Rail, 5 8, 5-9, 5-10, 5-11, 512, 5c egg; 
Boat-tailed Grackle, 5-4, 40c; Painted Bunting, 
5-4. 40c; Yellow-breasted Chat, 5-4, 20c; Black 
Skimmer, 10-4, 80c; postage extra. DR. M. T. 
CLECKLEY, Augusta, Ga. 182 

WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 



INDIAN RELICS. 

BARGAINS FOR CASH. 

I offer for one-half usual prices Relics, 
from Cree Indians; Stone Pipes, Stone - 
head War Clubs, Charms, Bows with 
Arrows, War Sling-shots. Write fnr 
list if you mean business. 

ERNEST H. SHORT. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




TiyrkT A Vr Baskets, Indian Beaded Buck- 

J-ii UjlA. il skin Sioux Relics, Indian Pot- 
tery, Indian Weapons, Elk 
Teeth, Mexican Hand Carved 
Leather Goods, Mexican Drawn 
Linen, Shells, Minerals, Fossils,. 
Ancient Stone Relics, Oregon 
Tiny Arrowheads, Fossil Fishes, 

Fossil Leaves. Corals, Agate Jewelry, Curios. 

Wholesale and Retail. 16th year. Two-story. 

building full. New cat , No. 10. 40 pages, finely 

illus., for 5c. L. W. STILWELL, Deadwood,. 

S. Dak. 



BUV THE 




SEW ING MAC HINE 

Do not be deceived by those who ad- 
vertise a $60.00 Sewing Machine for 
$20.00. This kind of a machine can 
be bought from us or any of our 
dealers from $15.00 to $18.00. 

WE MAKE A VARIETY. 

THE NEW HOME IS THE BEST. 

The Feed determines the strength or 
weakness of Sewing Machines. The 
Double Feed combined with other 
strong points makes the Xew Home 
the best Sewing Machine to buy. 

showing the dif- 
ferent styles of 
Sewing Machines 
we manufticture and prices before purchasing; 



Write for CIRCULARS 



THE REW HOME SEWINS HMHINE W. 

ORANGE, MASS. 

28 Union Sq. N. Y., Chicago, 111., Atlanta, Ga., 

St. Louis.Mo., Dallas,Tex., San Francisco, Cai 

FOR SALE BY 



THE OOLOGIST, 



147 



Exchange in 

Good Sets of Eggs or 

Cash Paid 

FOR GOOD 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

^^ Birds, 

Birds' Nests 
and Cggs. 

Only good work from living birds 
and nests and eggs in situation. 

Photos are for 
Reproduction. 

And MUST be FREE from COPYRIGHT 

and all Limitations . 
■Write at once what you have to sell or exchange 

MORRIS GIBBS, M. D., 

KALAMAZOO, MICH. 



yEScAlWrfj 

P THE BEST ILLUSTRATED 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 
Itg;vesthe LIFE HISTORIES 

/>/^F\HE WVAJSTR/aXOHSofl 

FOURoeFIVE NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS 1 
evepymonth . THE EG-G- of each is , 
shown FULLSIZE andmany nests. 
It also contains short interesting 

STORIES ABOUT BIRDS. 



^ii 



*X# 



5o 



^^^TSAYEAR*SAMPLECOP^ 



0H '^ 



CHAS.K.REED, 
Sta.A. WORCESTER, MASS. 



^HIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



FENIKESE. 

A reminiscent sketch of Agassiz 

famous Summer School. 

A 96-page book of much interest to 

students of Nature. 

Price only 35c., Prepaid- 

Read ^wtaat otbers say: 

"It is both instructive and entertaining and 
deserves a place in the library of every student 
of nature."— W. D. Lynn, Canfleld, O. 

"I have just finished reading 'Penikese' and 
can say that I have enjoyed it exceedingly. 
Anjrthing looking toward keeping green the 
memory of the great Agassiz should be of in- 
terest to the teacher of biology and no period 
of his life is more interesting than the years 
spent in building up the laboratory on Peni- 
kese."— W. P. Hat (Prof. Biology, HlghSchool) 
Washington, D. C. 

''I have read the book [Penikese] with great 
interest and think it an admirable remini- 
scence of one of the greatest naturalists of the 
nineteenth century. The name of Agassiz is 
assuredly treasured by all true lovers of na- 
ture and his methods of study have left a strik- 
ing impress on present-day workers."— (Rev.) 
Robert Blight, Green Lane, Pa. 

"Have found it extremely interesting read- 
ing,"— Henry Prime, Garden City, L. I, 

"I enjoyed the book [Penikese] very much." 
— W. W. Kinsley (Supt. of Schools) Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Pub'r, 
Albion, N. Y. 

I It is a Curious Fact I 

1^ that a large number of our noted |^ 
A botanists were students of birds J 
earlier in life. Many of them ^ 
continue to be bird-lovers and ^ 
no doubt many ornithologists ^4 
would like to know more about ^ 
the plant world. If you are one % 
of the latter send a 2 cent stamp S. 
for a sample copy of ^ 

% 
The American Botanist, .f. 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. | 

The Only UDtechnical Botanical Journal- ^ 



FREE 



THE ASKING, 



My Catalogue of all Specimens, Sup- 
plies and Publications for the Naturalist 
or Curio Collector. 
E. H. SHORT, Box 173, Rochester N. Y. 



148 



THE OOLOGIST. 



RARE BOOKS 

and MAGAZINFS 
CHEAP. 



One Morocco Volume Birds of Penn., Au- 
dubon's drawings of Birds in colors, re- 
duced in size $8 00 

Davie's Nests and Eggs, Illustrated, 1898.. 1 00 
Davie's Nests and Eggs, illustrated, 1889.. 1 50 
Ornithology of the Territories, Henshaw, 

1871-74. 4 00 

Natural History Collections In Ala-jka, 

1877-1881, Nelson 3 00 

Natural History Collections in Alaska, 1886 

Turner 3 00 

New England Bird Life, Coues & Stearns.. 2 00 

Northern and Eastern Birds, Samuels 2 00 

Birds of Rhode Island, R. Heber Howe, Jr. 

1899 1 00 

Coues Birds of Colorado Valley 3 00 

Bird Neighbors, Blanchan, illustrated 3 00 

The Bird by Michelet, a superb volume 

rare 10 00 

Birds of California and Texas, magnifi- 
cently illustrated, 1856, by Cassin 8 00 

Cooper & Suckley's Natural History of 

Washington Territory, very rare, 1859.10 00 
The Woodpeckers, Kckstorn, illustrated.. . 50 
Camp Fires of the Everglades, fine book.. 3 00 
Land and Game Birds of New England. 
Minot, edited by Wm. Brewster, ed of 

1895 2 00 

Across the Everglades, Willoughby, U.S.A. 1 50 
Wild Animals I have known, Ernest Seton 

Thompson 1 00 

Camp Life in Florida, Hallock, very rare.. 1 00 
Rarer British Breeding Birds, Kenton, 

Photos of many rare nests and eggs.. . 1 50 
Natural History of Selbourne, Gilbert 

White, Grant Allan edition, 1900 5 00 

Song Birds of the Seasons, handsome book. 

illustrated 3 00 

Goodrich's Birds and Animals, 2 large 

vols., poor condition 4 00 

Canadian Birds, Macoun, 1900, paper 1 GO 

Cassin's Biras of China, beautifully illus.. 1 60 
Cassin's Birds of Chili, beautifully illus... 1 50 
Ornithologist and Oologist, Boston, now 
unprocurable, complete from 1884 to 

1893, both Inclusive 8 00 

BuUetlnCooperOrn. Club, complete to date 1 00 
Nidologist, complete, the finest magazine 
ever published on Birds, H. R. Taylor, 

1893 to 1897 4 00 

Rare old Government Book of Colored 

Birds 2 00 

Twenty-three numbers of The Museum 1 00 

Oologist from 1883 to date, almost complete 5 00 

Any of the above delivered by mail or express 
prepaid on receipt of price. 25 per cent, dis- 
count if ten dollars worth are taken. 

J.L. CHILDS, FLORAL PARK, N.Y. 



"You might as well be out of the Bird 'World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

"THR OSPRB.Y, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgway, L'- 
Stejneger, C. W. Richmond and 
Other EminentOrnithoIogists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
jrether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all nbout 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

XH£ OSFREY COMPANY, 

321-323 4>A St., Washington, D. C. 



The Condor for igoi. 

This popular Californian, illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
ern material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found In any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 
DOR a leader l 

The March (1901) number Is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by R. H. Beck, Illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E, H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most Interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the nesting habits of GIraud's Fly- 
catcher In its Mexican home, and other inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Aifthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $1: VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT $1. 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale Its new 80-page publicaiion on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr., 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



The OoLOGisT. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 10. ALBION, N. Y., OCTOBER, 1901. Whole No. 181 



The Oologist. 

A Monthly Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to tne 
student of Birds, tlieir Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription 50c per annum 

Sample copies 6c each 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber Is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
Is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

^?~Remember that the publisher must be notl 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES: 

6 cents per nonpareil line each Insertion. 

12 lines In every Inch. Seven Inches In a col- 
nmn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing Inserted lor less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line Is "net," "rock 
toottom," "Inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there \b no deviation and no commission to 
agents, if you wish to use 5 lln^s or less space 
it will cost you 25 cents; 100 lines, $5.00; 1000 lines, 
$60.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at ra tes from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due Bills and Cards payable In advertis- 
ing will be honored only at regular rates In force 
at the date of issuance of said bUl or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postofflce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination will be accepted lor sums im- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to PRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O. , ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



The Food Supply of the Catbird. 
By C. C. Purdum, M D. 



The Catbird (Oaleoscoptes carolinen- 
sis), breeds in the greater part of North 
America. Its range extending from 
the Atlantic Seaboard to British Colum- 



bia, and from the British Provinces, 
southward to the southern boundry of 
the United States. It is found most 
plentifully in the Transition and Upper 
Astral Zones of the eastern United 
States and generalUy rears two broods 
in a season throughout the most of its 
range. 

Although fond of the society of man, 
in many places it is not appreciated, 
and is subject to persecution, through 
the mistaken idea that it is a fruit 
stealer, as well as for its plaintive feline 
call. However, examinations of the 
contents of the stomachs of these birds, 
show that at least one-half of the fruit 
that it eats, is wild, and that fully a 
third of the entire food is composed of 
insects which are more or less detri- 
mental to the farmers' interest, and 
which yearly cause heavy losses to the 
country. The good accomplished in 
this manner fully counterbalances what 
harm it dots by appropriating a few 
cherries and strawberries. The reports 
received from observers in the central 
states, show that the damage done by 
catbirds in that locality is much great- 
er than along the seaboard, but when 
we take into consideration the fact, 
that in the central part of the United 
States, wild fruits are much more 
scarce, than along the seaboard, the 
reason is perfectly apparent. This 
would perhaps account for the differ- 
ence of opinion in regard to the use- 
fulness of this bird, between the west- 
ern and eastern observers. Experi- 
ments to establish facts in connection 
with the controversy, have been con- 
ducted by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and show conclusively 
that catbirds prefer mulberries to 
strawberries and cherries, and in those 
localities where the latter are abun- 



150 



THE OOLOGIST. 



dant, they amy easily be protected by 
planting the Russian Mulberry, which 
grows luxuriantly, in hen yards and 
runs, serving the double purpose of 
affording excellent food for the hens, 
and attracting the birds from the mar- 
ket fruit. Buckthorn, wild grape, dog- 
wood, wild cherries, and elder, are 'ilso 
much sought for by the catbird and 
will be taken in preference to the culti- 
vated fruit wherever it can be procured. 

The catbird arrives from the South, 
early in May and consequently is 
obliged to subsist on other than ripe 
fruit for its vegetable diet. Until the 
time when the fruits ripen however, 
the greater part of its diet consists of 
insects, of which ants, May beetles, 
thousand legs, prfdaceous ground 
beetles, and caterpillars, form the bulk. 
Even at this time however, the bird 
will consume large quantities of last 
years smilax, sumach, etc. which have 
been exposed throughout the winter. 
During the greater part of June, the 
same, or nearly the same, conditions 
pertain, but as the weather becomes 
warmer and the vegetation increases 
the vegetable diet increases also. At 
the beginning of the sea'on, the grass- 
hoppers and crickets do not form a 
large article of consumption, but as 
June advances, they are consumed in 
great numbers. After the last week of 
June the number cf these insects con- 
sumed is insignificant. The same is 
true of the May beetle consumption, 
which increases from the 1st to the 20th 
of June and then rapidly decreases. 

The vegetable diet is greatly in ex- 
cess after the first of J uly, and from 
the 1st to the the 25th, the ratio is 4 to 1. 
During this time the fruit is most abun- 
dant, and the catbirds erjoy the har- 
vest to the limit. During this time 
only about two per cent, of the food 
consists of caterpillars and beetles. 
In their winter homes, these birds, 
while probably preferring fruits and 
insects, are forced to make many a 



meal from fr zen berries and hiberna- 
ting insects, which in the spring fol- 
lowing wou d awaken, to lay countless 
numbers of eggs which would hatch in- 
to hungry and voracif^us larvae, cap- 
able of each day consuming more than 
their own weight of garden plants. 
The number of stomachs examined of 
this bird were one hundred and ninety- 
two, and were from specimens taken 
as far north as Maine and as far south 
as Florida, and covering a p*riod ex- 
tending from March to December. The 
examination has shown that of the ani- 
mal food of the catbird, the beetles and 
ants form the principal part. Smooth 
caterpillars, crickets and grasshoppers 
are next in importance, while centi- 
pedes, thousand legs, bugs and spiders 
are not found in such large quantities, 
but nevertheless are constantly met 
with. The constant occurence of 
thousand legs in the stomach of the 
catbird, leads one to suppose that they 
are particularly relished, but owing to 
their abode, living as they do for the 
most part under stones and other art- 
icles upon the ground, they are not so 
easily captured. 

In this and the preceeding paper, no 
mention has been made to the earth- 
worms as an article of diet. As a mat- 
ter of fact, earthworms form a far 
smaller proportion of the foods of birds 
than is generally supposed. Even the 
robin does not use as many as we are 
prone to believe from so frequently 
seeing him about ploughed ground etc. 
where worms are most likely to be 
abundant. It is a noteworthy feature, 
that out of the 193 stomachs examined 
not one contained an earthworm. 

To sum up briefly then the economic 
status of the catbird, we may say that 
two-thirds of the food for the entire 
year is vegetable, and the remaining 
one-third animal. Of the former, the 
majority is composed of fruit, wild 
fruit preferred, but where the cultivat- 
ed is more easily obtained or exists in 



THE OOLOGIST. 



151 



fjreater variety, the latter is taken to a 
large extent. Of tlie animal food, 
three per cent, consists of wild bees 
and carniverous wasps which assist 
nature by carrying pollen from one 
plant to another, but this is counter- 
balanced by the destruction of the 
thousand legs, plant feeding bugs and 
weevi's. 

The easily procured predaceous 
ground beetles, are also a favorite as 
has been mentioned, but even the de- 
struction of these beneficial beetles 
is compensated for by the number of 
the May beetles and their relatives 
which are destroyed. These added to 
the caterpillars, crickets, grasshoppers, 
leaf eating lice and click beetlo'-i, make 
our friend Oaleoscopies carolinejisis, 
clearly beneficial to the husbandman 
and as such he deserves their protection 
and care, rather than the persecution, 
to which however he is all too often 
subjected. The next paper will deal 
with the gastronomic proclivities of the 
House Wren. 



Pancreatin vs Caustic Potash. 

While I dislike entering into a con- 
troversy over this matter, I believe it is 
due the readers of this magazine that 
someone should compare the prop- 
erties and merits of these com- 
pounds, as a knowledge of them may 
be the means of saving rare and valu- 
able specimens which might otherwise 
be destroyed after having been taken 
from the birds. 

When I wrote the item "Don't Use 
Caustic Potash" (Oologist May 1899) it 
was with the purpose of adding some- 
thing to the technique of preparing 
odlogical specimens. I have usd both 
the pancreatin and potash during my 
eighteen years of oological collecting 
and after a careful comparison I am 
more in favor of using pancreatin for 
removing embryos than I ever was. 



Let us compare the two compounds- 
Caustic potash [Potassa, Potassium Hy- 
drate] is a very powerful and active 
alkah, which when brought in contact 
with other compounds, decomposes 
them, extracting their water ard upset- 
ting their chemical equilibrium When 
a drop of the potash solution touches the 
shell of a delicatelv tinted or ppot'ed 
6gg it decolorizes it wherevor the so- 
lution touches. Having a decide'^ pro- 
pensity for combining with other alka- 
lies thn pota'h decomposes the calcium 
salts of which the egg thell is rompos- 
ed, changing them from carbonates, 
etc.. to the hydrate and thereby render- 
ing the shell very brittle and so d s- 
arranging and changing the composi- 
tion of the egg shell, that it is not egg 
shell at all but merely a comj)orcnd made 
from egg shdl. Potash saponifies the 
embryonic contents cf the egg and this 
soap is so alkaline that the whole in- 
side of the egg shell is attacked by its 
corrosive and caustic properti s and the 
shell is charred and weakened even if 
none of the solution touches the outside 
of the egg. The potash solution also at. 
tacks the skin on the hands of th-i oper 
ator and for that reason is disagreeable 
to handle. 

In 1895 I took a set of eleven pggs of 
Blue-winged Teal which were advanced 
in incubation. Having no pancreatin 
I used caustic potash (which I had at 
hand) to help remove the embryos. 
The eggs are in my cabinet now but 
they are bleached on the outside and 
stained with dingy black on the inside, 
by the chemical decomposition brought 
abont by the potash and are examples 
of what is claimed against the alkali. 

Pancreatin is an organic ferment 
which digests albumenoidf, converts 
starch into sugar, emulsities fats and 
curdles milk. It is not sufficiently 
alkaline (or acid) to combine readily 
with the salts composing the egg shell 
consequently does not change or de- 
compose them. Being a ferment it di- 



152 



THE OOLOGIST 



gests the embryo and renders it soluble 
in water so that it can ba removed with 
ease. Trypsin, the main proteolytic 
principle of pancreatin is probably the 
most powerful ferment known. Stu- 
dents of physiology know how actively 
and powerfully the pancreatic juice 
digests all that is left after gastric di- 
gestion. (Pancreatin will digest 30G0 
times its weight of freshly coagulated 
egg albumen ) 

A few weeks ago a friend in this city 
removed nearly fully matured embryos 
from a fine set of ten eggs of King Rail, 
in 48 hours He used one and one-half 
drachms of pancreatin (15 cents 
worth.) He injected the solution at 
6 p. m., blew out and reinjected at 6 
p. m. the next day and blew out all 
that remained of the embryos at 6 p. 
m. the next day without damaging the 
shell in color, texture or compcsition in 
the least. The shells of these eggs 
were very brittle as is usual when incu- 
bation is almost completed and in my 
opinion, he could not have had a per- 
fect set of eggs had he used the potash 
to soften the embryos 

In comparing the cost of pancreatin 
and caustic potash, I will admit that 
the digestant costs several times as much 
as the alkali but inasmuch as we buy 
these drugs only in small quantities the 
cost is not a matter of any great mo- 
ment We use them only when we find 
something rare or desirable, and to 
prepare such specimens in a strictly 
first class manner we should and most 
of us do, look for satisfactory results 
regardless of expense, especially when 
the expense is only a matter of a few 
cents. 

The question of time is also a matter 
of but little importance to one who 
wants to prepare his specimens in a 
first class manner. The actual time 
consumed in removing the contents by 
using pancreatin is probably less than 
while using potash. Of course time 
must be given for the ferment to digest 



the egg contents but that time is not 
necessarily wasted, as the ferment will 
do its work without watching or urg- 
ing. The alkali solution has to be 
shaken about inside of the egg to obtain 
the best and speediest results and is 
slower when we reckon the actual time 
consumed in the preparation of the 
specimens. 

Summing the matter up— the only 
point in favor of the caus ic potash is 
its cheapness. The points against it 
are: it will blacken and stain the egg; 
it changes the nature of the shell; it 
renders the shell more brittle and less- 
ens the stability of the specimens, (this 
being admitted by Mr. Short, in April 
1899 Oologist, where he states in refer- 
ring to the use of caustic potash: ^'This 
is impracticable with thin shelled eggs as 
it makes them too brittle to stand anything. 
You can often save large heavy shelled 
eggs when in the most advanced stages 
of incubation, etc." Another point 
against the potash is its attacking the 
skin of the operator's hands. 

The points in favor of pancreatin as 
compared with potash are: It does not 
attack the shell; it does not bleach; it 
does not stain; it is ns uszfulfor delicate 
thin shelled eggs as it is for 'Harge 
heavy shelled" ones. I have removed 
three-fourths incubated Chickadee's 
eggs in two hours, after injecting a 1:1& 
solution of pancreatin without irjuring 
or staining the shells. Those who have 
tried to blow out incubated Chickadee's 
eggs know how difiicult it is to do so 
without injuring their thin brittle sheU. 
Pancreatin does not burn the hands of 
the operator wherever it touches. The 
only point against pancreatin is. that it 
costs more. It costs 10 cents per dram 
here in small quantities. 

I trust these particulars will explain 
the advantages to be gained by using 
pancreatin in the removal of embryos 
and should anyone desire fuller inform- 
ation 1 will be glad to give same. 

ISADOR S. TrOSTLER, 

Omaha, Neb. 
July 24, 1901. 



FHE OOLOGIST 



153 



Some Surprises. 

Eggs of our American Cuckoos have 
been found in tlie nests of other birds, 
but 1 never expected to have this fact 
verified by personal experience. Such 
was the case this spring, however. 
About eight feet from the ground in the 
main fork of a maple sapling amid the 
dense .second growth bordering a big 
woods I found, on June 2d, a nest of the 
Wood Thrush, containing four eggs of 
the Thrush and one of the Black-billed 
Cuckoo. 

Later. July 16, I met with another 
surprise in the heart of this big woods. 
It was a set of seven Redstart's eggs or 
rather two sets in one nest. One fe- 
male was on the nest and the other close 
beside it. They were equally demon- 
strative of anxiety as I ascended the 
tree. The eggs were in two layers and 
all slightly incubated. Being of two 
distinct types there was no difficulty in 
separating them into sets of three and 
four. Now comes the question, are all 
the eegs found in a nest one set when 
you know they are laid by two birds? 
I do, not consider them so. Instances 
of two Terns or Gallinules sharing the 
same nest are of almost yearly occur- 
ence here, but it rarely happens with 
the land birds. 

Up to this year I found the Rough- 
winged Swallows breeding in single 
pairs only, but on the 30th of last May 
I discpvered a small colony. Their bur- 
rows were in the perpendicular face of 
a gravel pit and about a quarter of a 
mile from water. The colony consisted 
of eight pair together, with two pair of 
Bank swallows and one of English Spar- 
rows— all within a space of thirty feet. 

Perhaps the greatest surprise of the 
season occured on May 9th at a Great 
Blue Herony, consisting of seventy-two 
nests and all occupied. I was high up 
in a large elm scooping eggs into a net 
attached to a long pole. Glancing into 
a neighboring tree I beheld a Red-tailed 



Hawk upon her nest. Climbed the tree 
later and secured her two eggs. She 
had taken possession of a Heron's nest 
and warmly lined it with corn husks, 
bark fiber, moss, dead leaves and a few 
feathers. It was situated amid the top- 
most branches of an ash tree and as our 
tape line was only 100 feet in length, I 
am uncertain of the height, but judge it 
at 113 feet. The remaining two nests 
in the tree contained Heron's eggs. 

For some unknown reason the Red- 
shouldered Hawks laid larger sets this 
season. Our take consisted of three 
sets of three, thirteen of tour and one 
of five. Most seasons three is the usual 
number per set. We secured second 
sets from most of the above, consisting 
of two eggs in every case. 

The Cooper's that laid four eggs last 
year also went one better this. 

J. Claire Wood, 
Detroit, Mich. 



How Some Birds Capture Their Prey. 

(Continued from September Number ) 

Of all the birds which capture their 
food in mid air, the Swallows are the 
most entertaining. To be sure, the cap- 
tured insect is so small that we cannot 
see it as a rule, but then we may watch 
the graceful skimmers as they sail about 
the premises, and we know that at each 
dash from the course the flyer has bene- 
fitted the agriculturist by engulfing an 
insect. Blue-backed Swallows prefer 
insects which are to be found about the 
water, and generally skim the surface 
in their search, while the Martin flies at 
a greater height and at certain times al- 
most out of sight. All of the Swallows 
engulf their prey after the manner of 
the Nighthawk and Whip-poor-will, but 
do not capture such large insects as 
these night fliers. 

The Cedar Waxwing ordinarily de- 
pends upon a diet of fruit and seeds, 
but at certain seasons feeds largely upon 
insects which it catches in the air with 



154 



THE OOLOGIST. 



much of the dash of a typical Flycatcher. 
I have seen a Waxwing perched on the 
topmost bough of a tree fly up and catch 
a score of insects inside of a very few 
minutes. In these movements it some- 
what resembles the actions of the Red- 
head Woodpecker in that it nearly al- 
ways flew almost straight up and then 
returned to almost the identical perch; 
but it is more graceful as a Flycatcher 
than the Woodpecker. 

The Great Northern Shrike and our 
common White-rumped Shrike are the 
Hawks of the hedge-row and their dash 
and pertinacity are equal to the actions 
of the larger predacious birds. A Shrike 
rarely, if ever, captures a bird upon the 
wing; at least I have never witnessed 
the act and I consider them slow upon 
the wing. But they are great at strategy 
and frighten their intended victims so 
that they fall an easy prey. I have wit- 
nessed a capture where the Shrike had 
chased a Sparrow intv^ an osage orange 
hedge and then tried to seize the tremb- 
ling creature. Each time the Shrike 
made a dash the Sparrow would slip 
through the hedge to the other side and 
escape for a time; but it did not dare to 
leave its place of comparative safety, 
though I doubt not that it could have 
escaped by straight away flight. This 
game of hare and hound had continued 
quite a time, when the Shrike's mate 
appeared upon the scene and made a 
dive at the beleaguered Vesper Sparrow 
on the opposite side of the hedge. Two 
enemies were more than the distressed 
and rattled bird could manage and it 
quickly fell a victim to the rapacious 
pair which had a nestful of young near 
at hand. 

The Vireos are graceful feeders and 
very deliberate in their movements. 
They have no dash in capturing an in- 
sect and depend more on the smaller 
larval prey, which is picked from the 
leaves and twigs with a coy movement, 
which is amusing. Often the move- 
ments of a feeding Vireo are quite simi- 



lar to those of a parrot on its perch. 

All of the Warblers are given to catch- 
ing their prey upon the wing at times, 
though most of them are mainly glean- 
ers among the twigs and leaves, while , 
the Water Thrushes often wade about in 
the shallow pools for food and the Oven- 
bird occasionally scratchas after the 
manner of the Towhee. The Redstart 
dashes about among a flock of mosqui- 
toes like a typical Flycatcher. I have 
seen the Pine Warbler dash out for an 
insect while it was singing in the top of 
a tall pine. The Hooded Warbler is an- 
other species which is expert at flycatch- 
ing. 

The Catbird occasionally captures an 
insect upon the wing as do also the 
Brown Thrasher and Robin, while the 
Swainson's, Hermit and Wilson's Thrush- 
es are quite persistant in aerial forays, 
though all these birds are generally 
found feeding on the ground. The 
Robin's habit of dragging eaath worms 
from their holes is well known and we 
have all watched the struggles of the 
captor and captive. Once I observed a 
Robin engaged in fishing. The spot 
was in the woods where a little brook 
swirled about the root-lined banks and 
made little eddies at the bends. In a 
shallow place the Robin was catching 
tiny minnows and appeared to follow 
the sport simply for the fun of it. There 
were a dozen little tish lying on the 
muddy edge and as I watched the fish- 
erman twitched another minnow not 
over an inch and a half long from the 
water. 

The House Wren sometimes catches 
an insect flying, but this species as well 
as all the others of the familv mainly 
depends on hunting its food in the 
nooks and crevices, though the Long- 
billed Mtirsh Wren feeds from the water 
among the cattails and marsh debris. 

The Brown Creeper is an interesting 
feeder and we marvel as we see the del- 
icate creation creeping about the bark 
that this mite can sustain life from these 



THE OOLOGIST. 



155 



searches in the middle of winter. The 
Creeper generally begins its search at 
the base of the tree and circles upward 
and sometimes after reaching the higher 
branches will drop to the base of the 
trunk again. It differs, markedly, from 
the movements of the Nuthatch, which 
not rarely moves head downward in its 
search for insect food or seeds. I have 
seen the Red-bellied Nuthatch clinging 
to and feeding from a cone. 

The Kinglets, Gaatcatchers and Tit- 
mice are pre-eminent as acrobats while 
searching for food, and the Black-cap- 
ped Chickadee is foremost in these od- 
dities of movement. Sometimes the 
Chickndee catches an insect on the 
wing. The Bluebird is another of our 
fa verities, who frequently makes a fly- 
ing capture, and I have seen a warbling 
male make a series of forays and catch 
an insect at every attempt 

MOERIS GiBBS, M. D. 



Field Notes From Manitoba- 

Continued. 

THE WESTERN HORNED OWL. 

Eighteen or twenty years ago I re- 
member reading in Wilson's American 
Ornithology of the Virginian Horned 
Owl; but it was not till the year 1887 
that I had the pleasure of making the 
personal acquaintance of Bubo virgin- 
ianus. 

The farmer with whom my first few 
months in this country were spent, 
came home one night from a few hours 
after the Prairie Chickens, and brought 
with him a fine Owl that he had shot on 
his way home in the dusk sitting on the 
top of a straw stack. I mounted it for 
him It was a fine specimen of the 
Western Horned Owl. 

Since then I have shot and bandied a 
large number and taken both the young 
and eggs, having had fine opportunities 
to observe their habits. In this section 
they are fairly plentiful, frequenting 
the timbered country and are very par- 



tial to heavy timber following the course 
of creeks and rivers. 

In such localities almost any evening 
in the year while walking or driving 
through the woods my attention has 
been arested by their call, "Hoo, Hoo, 
Hoo," thrice repeated, then a pause as 
though listening for an answer, and 
then repeated again till Mr. Bubo is 
tired or goes off to look for some din- 
ner. 

Until the spring of 1892 I had never 
found a nest of this species because I 
did not know just when or where to 
look for them. However, on the 1st of 
May, while looking for Red-tailed 
Hawks' nescs, I chanced to see a pair 
of feathery tufts protruding from the 
top of a Red-tailed Hawk's nest. I rap- 
ped on the tree and off flew Mrs. Bubo. 
I climbed the tree expecting a set of 
Horned Owl eggs, and peeping over the 
edge of the nest saw three baby Owls in 
different stages of growth, but all ap- 
parently equally surprised and angry at 
my intrusion. One was feathering, one 
about half grown, while the third was a 
little downy fellow just emerged from 
his prison cell. I left them still mani- 
festing their anger by a volume of hisses 
and bill snappings and descended to 
terra tirma again. Two weeks after I 
called again to find the big fellow sitting 
on a branch away from the nest and the 
other two still in the nest. I took the 
two and brought them home, making 
them a cage of a large box and made 
pets of them till near the end of July, 
when I gave them their liberty again. 

From these little captives I obtained 
some interesting notes, some of which I 
will record here. During their captivity 
they were quite friendly and except 
when fed always lived on the best of 
terms, but when fed^they would some- 
times show a disposition to quarrel over 
the possession of the food given to them. 
I fed them bodies of birds I had skin- 
ned, but they did not seem to like this 
kind of food, only eating it when forced 



156 



THE OOLOGISl 



to by hunger. Mice and gophers seem- 
ed to be their favorite food and they had 
a great liking for snakes. When I 
would throw one of these into the cage 
they would immediately seize it, one at 
each end, and holding it down with 
their feet tear it to pieces and devour it. 
Rabbits seemed to be another favorite 
"dish," but they seemed to be lazy 
about this, as if I did not open the rab- 
bit before 1 put it in it would remain 
untouched. Probably this was because 
the parent birds always tear to pieces 
the food they bring to their nestling?, 
and in captivity they failed to lea'U to 
provide for themselves. 

During the day they would climb on 
to their block perches and remain very 
quiet, but toward dusk they became 
lively and noisy, spent a good deal of 
time trying to get out of their prison, 
eat any food I gave them and called to 
each other in a peculiar whistle, later 
using the same ''Hoo, Hoo," that the 
adult Bubo uses in the weird hours of 
the night 

It was very amusing to see them fight 
for the possession of a snake. One seiz- 
ing hold of each end they would tug and 
pull, flutter and struggle till the snake 
would come in two, and they would 
each take its portion to a different cor- 
ner of the cage and devour it. 

Well to leave the young Owls and re- 
turn to the woods in the sprirg of '93 
On the 15th of April I found another 
nest of Bubo virginianus, this time in 
an old Broad-winged Hawk's nest in an 
oak tree about 30 feet from the river 
bank and 35 feet high. Mrs. Bubo was 
at home and a good rap on tbe trunk 
brought her off In this nest I found 
one just hatched, young one and two 
badly incubated eggs, all of which I left. 
I might here mention that the first nest 
recorded was in a tall oak on an over- 
hanging branch 40 feet up on the bank 
of a dry ravine and about 150 yards 
from the river Boyne. The nest was an 
old Red-tailed Hawks used the previous 



season and about the 2l8t of May, short- 
ly after taking the young birds, I took 
from this nest a set of three finely 
marked Red-tailed Hawk's eggs. 

My third find of this species was in 
the latter part of April, 94. While fol- 
lowing the Boyne river in search rf 
Ducks I came upon it in the main fork 
of a giant basswood tree 45 feet up. An 
old and very delapidated Red-tail nest 
did duty for a home. No repairs had 
been bestowed upon it, but the large 
fork in which it was situated helped to 
make it more habitable. I cou!d see 
that the nest contained young so I 
climbed up to investigate, leaving my 
coat at the foot of the tree with my gun. 
Just as I peered over the edgts of the nest 
endeavoring to raise myself above it, 
the old bird resenting my intrusion 
made a dash at me, striking me in the 
back with her talons, which I felt 
through vest and two shirts. The male 
bird joined in the attack, but was not so 
bold, contenting himself with dashing 
past or sitting on the branch of a neigh- 
boring tree and mingling his vocifera- 
tions with those of his three offspring in 
their hissing and bill snappings. 

In the nest I found the hind quarters 
of two rabbits, half a garter snake, 
about medium size, part of a weasel, the 
legs and one wing of a Sora Rail and 
an almost entire male Ruffed Grouse. 

The nest first mentioned having con- 
tained a one-third eaten Prairie Hen, 
part of a garter snake, an almost entire 
gopher and the hind quarters of a rab- 
bit. This shows how royaly these power- 
ful birds of prey supply for their young. 
C. P. Forge, 
Carman, Manitoba. 
[ To be continued ] 



COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENT FORTREE COLLECTING 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (180) 

NOWELL BROS.. 
Box 213, Anderson, So. Car. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



157 



Books for the Naturalist. 

For Sale by FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D., ALBION, N. Y. 



ZOOLOGY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

American Museum of Natural History, Bulle- 
tins of Vols. I to III, complete, Birds, Geology. 
Mammals, etc., 1200p, pl,(19.00) 86 00 

, Annual Reports for '93, '95 and '96. 300p, 

pi, etc ; lot 1 05 

Beeton's Dictionary of Natural Hi-tory, A 
Compendious Cyclopedia of the Animal King- 
dom, 2000 complete articles, S92p, 400ills 1 10 

Bert, Primer and Scientific Knowledge, 186p, 
272fig 40 

Bilby, Young Folks' Natural History, 200p, 
ills 35 

Bowditch's Hints for Teachers of Physiology, 
58p ills 15 

Buffon's Natural History For Children, cloth 
and gilt, 252p, 38 col. pi 88 

Carpenter, Animal Physiology, .580p, 287flg, 
(8.50) 1 40 

Carpenter, Zoology, A Systemic Account of 
the General Structure. Habits, Instincts and 
Uses of the PrinciBal Families of the Animal 
Kingdom, as well as of the Chief Forms of Fos- 
sil Remains, 2 vols, 1164p, 624fig, (5.00) 2 85 

Clark, Outline of Zoology and Classification, 
40p 25 

Colton, Practical Zoology, 186p, (90) 55 

Cooke, Ponds and Ditches, Natural History 
Rambles, 3a4p, ills 65 

Cope, Zoological Position of Texas, 52p, M. B. 
17 35 

Cuvier, The Animal Kingdom arranged after 
its organization, forming a Natural History 
of Animals and an Introduction to Comparative 
Anatomy, 706p, SOOflg, 30 col. pi. by Landseer, 
(over lOOp. devoted to Ornithology), 2 40 

Ditto, 2d hand copy of above, with plain 
plates, text as new, binding poor 1 10 

*Dalton, Physiology and Hygiene, 400p, (1.50) 
45 

Gill, Progress in Zoology, '85. 54p _ 15 

Gilliss, U. S Naval Astronomical Expedition 
to Southern Hemisphere, vol. I, Chile, Its Geo- 
graphy, Government, Social Condition, Miner- 
al and Agricultural Resources, Commerce. Cli- 
mate, Earthquakes, etc., etc., 4to, 556p, 7pl, 7 
mps ..1 50 

, do do, vol. V, Magnetical and Meteor- 
ological Observations, 4to _. 75 

Goode, Animal Resources of the U. S., 352p, 

M. B. 14 se 

, do do. Substances Derived from Ani- 
mal Kingdom, Useful and Injurious Animals, 
Methods of Capture and Utilization, 140p, M.B. 
6 40 

Hardwicke's "Science Gossip," an Illustrated 
Medium of Interchange and Gossip for Stu- 
dents and Lovers of Nature ; each year is bound 
and contains about SOOp and 200flg, and is of 
much value to all Students of the Natural 
Sciences. I can furnish the vols, for following 
years: -72, '73, '81, '83, '85, '86 and '9'J, pub.price 
per vol 1.50 75 

"Hayden Survey Reports," 1867 to 1878. 13 
vols, thousands of pages, etc., maps, fig, etc.. 
5 50 

Holder, Stories of Animal Life, 262p, ills.. 85 



Hurst, Hunters and Trappers' Guide, 181p, 
ills 20 

Jones- Goode, Descriptive and Introdutive to 
Natural History of the Bermudas, 24p, mp.. 20 

Jordan, Science Sketches with a list of Scien- 
tific papers of David S. Jordan, 276p, (1.50).. 90 

Kingsley, Popular Natural History, A De- 
scription of Animal Life from the Lowest 
Forms Up to Man, 2 vols, 728p, 507ills, many 
pi _6 50 

, The Naturalists' Assistant, A Hand 

Book for the Collector and Student, with a 
Bibliography of 1,500 Zoological Works, 228p, 
40ills a5 

Lucas, Preparation of Rough Skeletons, 12p, 
13flg_ 15 

Manton, W. P., Primary Methods in Zoology, 
61p, ills, (.^0) 40 

Martin, Atlas of Plans for Rock Work, Build- 
ings, Grounds, etc., for Zoological Gardens, 18pl, 
4to 25 

*Maunder & Heldsworth.The Treasury of Nat- 
ural History or Popular Dictionary of Natural 
Sciences, in which the characteristics that dis- 
tinguish the different classes, genera and spec- 
ies are combined with a variety of interesting 
information illustrative of the habits, instincts 
and general economy of the Animal Kingdom, 
over 900flgs, 810pp 1 45 

Morgan, Animal Sketches, 315p, 50fig, (1.75) 
1 15 

Morse, First Book in Zoology, 175111, 190p. 70 

"Nature," Vol. XXXI to XXXIV, unbound, 
cost $12 3 50 

New York, Introductory Volume to Natural 
History Survey, with Autograph Inscription 
on Fly Leaf by one of the State's greatest 
Statesmen: "Presented to Major General 
Townsend as a mark of affection and grateful 
esteem of William H. Seward, December 31, 
1842," 4tO, 188p 3 00 

New York, Natural History Survey; I have a 
set of 19 vols, of this rare and elaborate work 
secured from the library of one of the State's 
late millionaires; he had the set elegantly re- 
bound in heavy cloth and leather, marbled 
edges, etc., at an expense of at least $50. I re- 
served the set for my private library, but now 
offer it at the regular price of a fair set in ordi- 
nary binding. The 19 vols, are as follows: Geo- 
logy, 4; Paleaontology, 2; Mineralogy, 1; Agri- 
culture, 4; Entomology. 1; Zoology, (Mammals, 
Birds, Reptiles, Fish, MoUusca and Crustacea) 
5; Botany, 2. I ought not think of selling this 
set for less than $100. The volume on Birds in 
this binding alone is worth 120. The set goes, 
however, at 75 00 

. I have another set of 19 vols, in origi- 
nal cloth binding, good condition, at 45 00 

Orton, Comparative Zoology, Structural and 
Systematic, 424p, 350fig 90 

Pacific R. R. Surveys. Reports of Explora- 
tions and Surveys for a Railroad from Missis- 
sippi River to the Pacific, 4to, 1855; cost the 
Government nearly $200 to publish set of 13 
volumes. Complete set, half calf, fine condi- 
tion, only 15 00 

♦Packard, Brief Course in Zoology, 338p, 3.34 
fig - 65 



158 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Plateau, Rapid Preparation of Large Myolog- 
ical Specimens, 6p 25 

"Science," Vols. I to XXII, complete I-XI, 
cloth, balance loose, weekly,$3.50 per year, pub- 
lisher's price nearly 850, (cost me $30) 4to, over 
lO.OOOp, lot 15 00 

Scudder, Nomenelator Zoologicus, An Al- 
phabetical list of all Generic names employed 
by Naturalists for Recent and Fossil Animals 
^rom earliest times to 1^80, 716p, M. B 19 1 60 

"Smithsonian Reports," 38 of the 41 vols. 
from 1854 to 1895, inclusive 18 00 

*Steele, Fourteen Weeks in Zoology, 413figs, 
308p 45 

Taylor, Nature's Bye-paths, 408p 90 

U. S. Department of Agriculture, Annual 
Reports, 1845 to 1885, inclusive, good condition. 
35 of original 41vols, lot 9 00 

White's Natural History of Selbourne and 
the Naturalists' Calendar, Letters Relating to 
Birds, Mammals, etc., 488p, 88111s 85 

Do do do. Vol. II of a smaller and cheaper 
edition, not connected with Vol. 1, 192p _ 20 

Wilkes', Narrative of the U. S. Exploring 
Expedition In ths Southern Hemisphere Dur- 
ing the years 1838-42, A valuable history of the 
entire Expedition In an Interesting readable 
narrative form, 5vols. and atlas, complete set, 
4to, over 2500p, many steel eng 12 00 

, do do Vol. II, Hawaii, Samoa. New 

South Wales, Antarctic Cruise and New Zea 
land, 4to, 476p, many plates. Vignettes, wood 
cuts, etc., 3mps 2 00 

, do do, Vol. Ill, Feejee Group, 4to, 438p, 

many plates, vig, cuts, etc 2 00 

, do do. Vol. V, Hawaii, Samoa. Oregon, 

California, Manilla, Sooloo, Singapore, Cape 
of Good Hope, 4to, 558p, many plaies, vig, cuts 
and maps 2 00 

*Wood, J. G., Illustrated Natural History. 
352p, hundreds ills, (1.25). 55 

Youman's, Popular Science Monthly, Vols. I 
to X. bound in green cloth, nearly 8000 pages of 
highest grade Sclentiflc Material, Pub. price, 
135 15 00 

Do do, 70 of the first, 78 issues, lacks only 8 
Nos. of completing Vols. I to XIII, ($35) 8 75 

Do do, 28 odd copies of various dates, ($14) 
3 75 

Zoological Notes and Anecdotes, 362p. 80 

MAMMALOGY. 

Allen, Monograph of North American Pinni- 
peds, 800p, 60fig $2 10 

, History of the American Bison, 146p, 

H. S.75 85 

, N. A. Ground Squirrels, 76p 50 

, Am. Arboreal Squirrels, 12p 15 

, Geographical Distribution of Mam- 
mals, 66p 35 

, Bibliography of Cetacen and Sirenia, 

164p 50 

, On Genus Nasua and Bassarls (Coatis 

and Civet Cats), 32p 25 

, Two New Mice, 4p 10 

Geographical Variation Among N. A. Mam- 
mals in Respect to Size, etc., 36p 25 

Allen & Attwater, Mammals of Bexar Co., 
Texas, 34p 25 

Allen, H., N. A. Bats, 28p 20 

, New Bats, 16p 10 

, A Monograph of the Bats of North 

America, 198p, 38pl, M. B. 43 1 10 



Bailey.The Prairie Ground Squirrels orSper- 
mophiles of the Mississippi Valley, 70p, 3 col. 
pi, 4mps 5 

. Pocket Gophers of the U. S., 48p, ipl, 6 

fig, Imap 30 

, Notes on Spermophlles and Pocket 

Gophers of the Miss. Valley. lOp, 5 col. pi, A. R. 
'92 25 

Baird, Monograph of North American Mam- 
mals, 4tO, 805p, 44pl 2 20 

, Ruminant Animals of N. A. and Their 

Susceptibility of Domestication, 26p, 8pl, A. R. 
51 50 

, Catalogue of N. A. Animals, 4to, S2p, 

25 

, Mammals, a few from Pac. R. R. Sur- 
vey, (vol. X) 4to, 14p, 9pl 50 

, Mammals of Chili, 4to, 16p, pi 50 

Brown, The Whale Fishery and Its Appli- 
ances, 116p 50 

Church, Cabinet of Quadrupeds, with Histor- 
ic and Scientific Descriptions, London 1805, 8 
vols, as new. drawing paper, thick imp, 4tos, 
full gilt, tooled and gilt Russia, (broken) rich 

full-page copper plates 3 00 

Cope, On Owen on Python Morpha, 14p.... 10 

, New Extinct Vertebrata, 18p _ 15 

, Horizons of Extinct Vertebrata,22p 15 

, NImravlolae and Canldae of Miocene, 

etc., 80p ■". 15 

, Eocene Vertebrata of Wind River, 20p 

:.... 15 

, Miocene Rodentia, 26p 15 

, Extinct Rhinocerldae, 12p 15 

Coues, Breed of Solid Hoofed Pigs .Consolida- 
tion of Va. Deer Hoofs, 6p 10 

Coues & Allen, North American Rodentia,4to, 

1091p, 4pl, 57fig 3 50 

De Kay, Mammals of New York, with Intro- 
duction to Natural History Survey, 4to, 348p, 

33pl 3 00 

Elliot, New Mammals from Oklahoma, 8p 15 

, Mammals of Olympic Mts., Wash., 36p, 

21pl 50 

, New Rodents from Olym. Mts., 8p.. 15 

, New Mammals of Ind. Ter., 8p 15 

Elliott, H. W., Fur Seal Fisheries of Alaska, 

240p, 48pl, mps 1 00 

Forbes, ("Lloyds") Hand Book to the Prim- 
ates (Monkeys), 2vol. 300p. each, 49 col. pi, '97 
2 10 

Hog Cholera. Its History Nature and Treat- 
ment, by Bureau of Animal Industry, I6pl, 198p 
75 

Hornaday, Extermination of the American 

Bison, 180p, 22pl, large map 1 10 

, How to Collect Mammal Skins for the 

Purpose of Study and Mounting, 12p, 9fig... 25 

Jones, Mammals of Bermuda, 20p 15 

Kennlcott, The Quadrupeds of Illinois, 58p, 

lOpl, A. R. 56 35 

Lydekker, ("Lloyds") Mammals, Mammals 
of Great Britain, Marsupials, Camivora, 3 vols, 

300p. each, lOOcol. pi 3 15- 

McChesney. Dakota Mammals, 18p 25 

Meams, Mammals from Arizona, 32p 25 

Merriam, Mammals of Idaho, etc. , 54p, 3pl 50 

, Mammals of San Francisco Mt.Region, 

44p, 9pl 50 

, Revision of N. A. Pocket Mice, 30p, 4 

pl. (F. 1) 50 



THE OOLOGIST. 



159 



, Fourteen New N. A. Mammals, 38p, 8 

pi, (F.2) 50 

, Twenty-Six New N. A. Mammals, 56p. 

3pl, (F. 4) 50 

. Monograph of the Pocket Gophers, 220 

p, 19pl, 71fig, 4 mps, (F. 8) 1 10 

, American Shrews, 124p, 12pl, (F. 10) 90 

Meyrick, House Dogs and Sporting Dogs, 
Their Varieties, Points, Management. Train- 
ing, Breeding, Rearing and Diseases, 260p... 75 

Mivart, St. G.. The Cat, A Study of Back- 
boned Animals, 558p, 200ills, (3.50) 1 90 

Palmer, Jack Rabbits of the U. S., 88p, 6pl 
50 

, Localities of Death Valley Expedition. 

24p,map 15 

Riggs, Extinct of Scinromorph Rodents, 8p 
10 

Salmon, et al, Diseases of the Horse, 556p,44pl, 

many colored 1 10 

Shufeldt, A New Rat, lOp, pi _ 15 

Stejneger, Extermination of Steller's Sea 

Cow, lOp 15 

Townsend, et al. Seal Life on the Pribilof 

Islands, 534p, 24pl, 11 large maps 1 40 

Trouessart & Coues, Revision of the Genus 

Sciurus, (True Squirrels) 8p 15 

True, Abbott's Kilima-Njaro Mammals, 36p 

6pl 25 

, Mammals of Kashmer, 16p, 15 

, Aquatic Mammals, 23p _ 25 

, Nine Excerpts on Rodents, etc , 23p 25 

, Mammals from Bristol Bay, Alaska. 

8p 15 

, List of Mammals of North and Central 

America and W. I., 28p 25 

, Skeleton of Ribbon Seal, lOp, 4pl.. . 25 

, Bottlenose Porpoise, lOp 15 

, Skeletons and Skulls of Indian Ocean 

Porpoise, 6p 10 

, Spotted Dolphin, 8p, 6pl 15 

, Puma or Am. Lion, 18p, pi 15 

.Florida Muskrat, 6p, 3pl 15 

True & Lucas, West Indian Seal, 6p, 3pl..- 15 
True. A Review of the Family Delphinidae. 

192p, 47pl, M. B. 36 1 40 

, Collecting and Preserving Whales and 

Porpoises, 24p, llpl 25 

True, et al, Four Excerpts on Deer, Moose 

and Mt. Sheep, 12p 15 

Wood, Mammals of the World, Americanized 

by Holder, this is the Mammal Volume of 

Wood's "Animate Creation" or "Our Living 

World," 666p, (10x13 in.) 10 full-page oleographs 

in colors, 20 full-page eng. and 30ails, unb..3 50 

HERPETOLOGY. 

Baird, Reptiles and Batrachians of Pac. R. R. 
Survey, 4to, 36p, 34pl, X 75 

Baird & Hallowell, Reptiles and Batrachians 
of Pac. R. R. Survey, (vol. X) 4to, 42p, 31pl_l 00 

Blatchley, Mexican Batrachians and Reptiles, 
6p 15 

Boulenger, Reptiles and Batrachians of Brit- 
ish India, 243flgs. 542p : 3 20 

Cooke, British Reptiles and Batrachians, 308 
p, 11 coi. pi, (1..50) 90 

Cope, Check List of N. A. Batrachia and 
Reptilia, systemic list of the higher groups, 
Geographical Distribution, 104p, (M. B. 1). . 50 



, Fossil and Recent Reptiles and Fishes 

of Kansas and Wyoming, 58p, H. S. 70 25 

, Permian Batrachians and Reptiles, 4p 

10 

. North American Snakes, 104p 75 

. Reptiles and Batrachians of Central 

America and Mexico, 98p, (M. B. 32) 75 

Coues & Yarrow, Herpetology of Dakota and 
Montana, 34p 35 

De Kay, Reptiles and Fishes of New York, 8 
vols., 4to, 524p, 102pl 5 00 

Garman, Reptiles of Bermuda, 20p 25 

, American Rhinobatus, 8p 15 

Girard. Reptiles, Batrachians, Fish and Crus- 
tacea of Chile, etc., 4to, 64p, iSpl 75 

Hallowell, Reptiles and Batrachians of Cali- 
fornia, (Pac. R. R. X) 4tO, 30p, lOpl 75 

Meek & Elliot, Cold-Blooded Vertebrates from 
Olympic Mts , Wash., 16p 25 

Stejneger, Directions for Collecting Reptiles 
and Batrachians _. 25 

, Seven Snakes and Lizards, 30p. pi.. 25 

, African Reptiles and Batrachians, 32p 

85 

, Reptiles and Batrachians of Arizona, 

16p, 2pl 25 

, Reptiles and Batrachians of Death 

Valley, 60p, 4pl 50 

, Reptiles and Batrachians of Idaho, 6p 

15 

, et al. Ten Excerpts on Snakes, Lizards, 

Chameleons, Salamanders and Turtles, 40p, 3 
pi 35 

*Tenney, Young Folks' Fishes and Reptiles, 
(l.OG) 109flg3. 142p 45 

True, Xerobates, N. A. Land Tortoises, 16p 25 

Wood, Reptiles, Fish, Shells, Insects and In- 
vertebrates of the World. Americanized by Hol- 
der, this is the Third Volume of Wood's "Ani- 
mated Creation" or "Our Living World;" this 
volume relates to the various departments 
about as follows: Reptiles and Batrachians, 
l*^Op. Fish nop, Mollusks 84p, Insects, etc., 84p, 
other Invertebrates about 150p; 644p, (10x13 in.) 
10 full-page o)eographs in colors, 20 full-page 
eng. and SOOills, unb 3 60 

Yarrow, Check List of N. A. Reptiles and 
Batrachia, with Cat. of Specimens in U. S. Na- 
tional Museum, 250p, (M. B. 24) 1 25 

, Reptiles and Batrachians of portions 

of Nev., Utah, Calif., Colo., N. M. and Ariz.. 
(Wheeler Survey V) 4to, 124p, lOpl, (3 col.)..l 50 

Yarrow & Henshaw, Reptiles and Batrach- 
ians Collected by Wheeler Expedition In Calif, 
and Nev., '75, '76, '77, 24p; also Report on Fish, 
etc., etc., 244p. in all 1 00 

ICHTHYOLOGY. 

Bean, B. A., Fish from Chespeake Bay, 12p 

10 

Bean, T., Collection of U. S. Fishes at Gt. Int. 

Fish Ex.. 124p 25 

. Directions for Collecting and Preserv- 
ing Fiih, 4p 10 

, Notes, etc., of Fishes of Alaska and 

Adjacent Waters, 70p 35 

Bean, Notes on Mexican Fish, lOp 10 

, do of E. U. S., etc., 24p.. 15 

, Check-List N. A. Fishes, imp, 46p .. 25 

, Fish from Jamaica, 20p 10 

Bendire, Salmonidae of Upper Columbia, 12p 
25 



160 



THE OOLOGIST 



BoUman, Fishes from Escambia River, Ala.. 
Hp 10 

Brevoort, Japanese Fish, 4to, 36p, 10 col. pi 
50 

♦Bushnan, Jardlne's Librarj', Fishes, Partic- 
ularly Their Structure and Economical Uses, 
220p,'33col. pi - 75 

Cattle, Gentalia of Male Eel? ; Porter, Fish 
Poisoning by Gulf Waters, etc., 12p 15 

Clark, Fishery Products and Apparatus Used 
in Preparation, 124p 40 

Collins, Fishing Vessels and Boats and Their 
Equipment, Economic Condition of Fisherman. 
Angler's Outfits, etc., 180p 60 

Day, Fishes of British India, 2 vols, 341 figs, 
1058p 5 00 

DeKay, Fishes of New York, see Herpetology 

Dresel, Notes on Greenland Fishes, 16p . . 15 

Earn, Apparatus for the Capture of Fish, 
206p -. 65 

, Fish Culture Exhibit, 96p 35 

Eigenmann, Fresh-Water Fishes of South 
America, 80p 40 

, Fresh- Water Fishes of Central Ameri- 
ca and So. Mex., 8p 10 

, Fishes of San Diego, Calif., 58p, lOpl 

35 

Evermann & Jenkins, Fishes fromGuaymas, 
(Mex.) 46p. pi S5 

Gilbert, Fishes of Albatross' Expedition on 

Pacific Coast, 120p 50 

, Fishes of White River, Ind., lOp. ^. 10 

— , Fishes of Death Valley Exped., 12p, 2 

pi 15 

, Fishes of Gulf Calif., etc., 36p 20 

Gill. Bibliography of Fishes of Pacific Coast. 
74p, M B. 11 35 

, Catalogue of the Fishes of the East 

Coast of North America, 50p 25 

,18 New Deep Sea Fish-like Vertebrates. 

30p 25 

, Osteological Characteristics of seven 

Families of Fish, 40p _ 20 

, An assorted lot of Fish Excerpts on 25 

or 30 Fish Subjects, about 400p 50 

Girard, The Fish of Western North America, 
(Pac. R. R. Survey, vol. X) 4to, 446p. 50pl . 1 50 

Goode, Fishes of the Bermudas, 82p, MB. 5 35 

, Exhibit of U. S. Fisheries and Fish 

Culture at Berlin. 264p, M. B. 18 75 

, Descriptive Catalogue of Collections 

from U. S. to Gt. Int. Fish. Ex., London, '83, 
1334p 3 50 

,Synopsis of U.S.Collections.Gt.Int Fish 

Ex., 106p 35 

, Fishes of St. Johns River, East Coast 

and Pensacola, Fla.,48p 35 

. Deep Water Fishes off New England 

Coast, 34p 15 

, Distribution, etc., of Sword Fish Fam- 
ily, 18p 10 

, Study of the Trunk Fishes, 30p 15 

r Goode & Bean, American Fishes in the Lin- 
naean Collection and Six other Excerpts, lOOp 
35 

*Hamilton.British Fishes, (Jardine's Library) 
2 vol., 742p, 72 col pi 1 50 

Hay,Fishes from Eastern Mississippi 28p 15 

Ingersoll, Fish Mortality in Gulf Mexico, 7p 
10 

*Jardine, Fishes of the Perch Family, 178p, 
36col.pl 75 



Jordan, Review of Rafinesque's Memoirs on 
N. A. Fishes, .53p, M. B. 9 25 

, Contributions to N. A. Ichthology— 

(Etheostomatidoe, Perchidce, Siluridw, etc., etc..) 
120p, 45pl, M. B. 10 75 

, Synopsis of Family Catostomidm, 

("Suckers") 140p, M. B. 12 B 50 

, Temperature and Fish Vertebras, 14p 

10 

, Fishes of Dakota and Montana, 24p 15 

, Fishes of Havana, Cuba, and Review 

of N. A. Julidinse, 40p 15 

•, Fishes from Brazil, 21p _ 15 

, Fishes from Pacific Coast of N. A. from 

Tropic of Cancer to Panama and other excerpts. 

96p 35 

, Fishes from the Rio Grande, Tex., 16p 

10 

Jordan & Brayton, Fishes of Alleghany Reg. 

of So. Car., Ga , and Tenn., 96p, M. B. 12 A.. 49 

Jordan & Edwards, Review of Tetraodontid®. 
17p 10 

Jordan & Eigenmann, et al. Review of N. A. 
Gobiidte, Prionotus, Belonidte, etc., 76p 30 

Jordan & Gilbert, Fishes of Pensacola. Fla., 
and Galveston, Tex. 66p _ 35 

, Fishes of Key West, Fla., 48p 25 

, List of Fishes of W. I , 55p 25 

, Catalogue of Fresh Water Fishes of N. 

A., 36p 20 

, Ten New Fish from Key West, 24p. 10 

, 33 New Fish from Mazlatlan, Mex., 28p 

10 

, Fishes from San Diogo, Calif., and a 

doz. other excerpts on Pac Fish, lOOp 35 

, Fishes of Beaufort Harbor, No. Car.. 

22p , 10 

, Fishes of Ark., Texas, Utah, etc , 36p 

15 

— — , Fishes of Cape San Lucas, Panama. 

etc., 60p 20 

, Review of Am. Caranginffi20p 10 

, Fishes of Pacific Coast, 44p _ 25 

Jordan & Jouy, Check-list of Pacific Coast 

Fishes, 18p 10 

Jordan & Meek, American Flying Pishes, 30p 

25 

, Fishes of Iowa, Missouri, etc.. 24p.. 15 

Jordan & Swain, Reviews of American Marine 
MugilidSB, Genus Hoemulon, Species Lutjaninse 
and HoplopagriDffi, Spinephelus and Related 

Genera, etc., 185p 75 

Kidder, Animal Heat of Fishes, etc., 40p... 20 

Lockington, Pleuronectidae of San Francisco, 

.40p 20 

McCormick, Descriptive List of Fishes of 
Lorain Co., Ohio, 34p, 14pl, map _ 35 

McDonald, The Salmon Fisheries of Alaska, 
51p, 9pl 35 

Ryder, Devlopment of Viviparous Fishes, 36p, 
7pl 35 

, Fin-Rays in Classification of Fishes. 

12p 10 

Smith & Swain, Fishes from Johnston's Is- 
land, (700 miles S. W, Hawaii) 24p 15 

Swain, Pipe-fishes of the U. S , 8p 25 

"U. S. Fish Commission Reports. 1873 to 1887, 
(lacks '78) 12 large cloth vol., also '93, '94, '95 In 
paper, lot 15 vols 7 50 

Wood, Fish of the World, see Herpetology, 
"Wood's Animate Creation." 



^/> 



The OoLOGiST 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 11. ALBION, N. Y., NOVEMBER, 1901. Whole No. 183 



Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants," "Exchanges" "For Sales," Inserted In this department 
1 or 25C per 2.=> words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-hall cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted In payment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
will expire. 

No. 182 your subscription expires with this Issue 
183 •' '• " " Dec, " 

190 " " " " June, 1902 

195 " " " " Dec. " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

IllDARTSMT This Nov. Oologist was is- 
.imrullliilll* sued Nov. 16th. The Dec. is- 
sue will be printed on Dec 15. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
mail. 

FOR EXCHANGE:— First class sets with 
d atas in full. Send your list and receive mine. 
Will not accept sets accompanied by lead 
pencil datas. JOHN P. WARD, 522 5th Ave., 
Lansingburgh, N. Y. 

From my other adv. I received hundreds of 
replies and disposed of almost my entire lot 
of sets. etc. etc. The Oologist Is O. K. B, A. 
CARPENTER, Salem, N. J. 

Winchester repeating shot gun, live fox, 
ladies gold watch, magazines, books, to ex- 
change for bird skins, Indian relics, curios, 
antiques, fossils, fiat snake or animal skins etc. 
No postals answered. STEPHEN VAN RENS- 
SELAR, West Orange, N. J. 

100 choice Sea shells, 30 cents each, 5 all dif- 
ferent old coins, 15 cts., Indian Tomahawk, 35 
cts., 5 all different Indian Relics, 30 cts , 15 Curi- 
osities, 27 cts. , 250 mixed postage stamps 25 cts. 
My price list. U. S. Coin Catalogue and a coin 
100 years old. price 10 cts. W. P. ARNOLD, 
Peondale, R. I. 

FOR SALE.— Al sets with data of American 
Osprey 1-2, 75c; Black Vulture 1-8, 49c; Arctic 
Tern 6 3, 19c; Roseate Tern 4-3, 22c, 8-2, 14c; Am. 
Crow 1-4, 10c; Wood Pewee 3-3, 19c; Am. Red- 
start 1-3, 18c; House Wren 1-5, 15c; Towhee 1-3, 
10c; Mockingbird 1-4, 10c; Black-crowned Night 
Heron 1-4, 34c; Snapping Turtle 2-21, 90c. Prices 
are per set prepaid. One old muzzle loading 
rifle, J2.00. JAS. O. JOHNSON, Southlngton, 
iConn. 



WANTED:— Eggs In sets. Have to offer Vol. 
Ill, IV and V Osprey and many other odd cop- 
ies of different magazines ; also A No. 1 sets of 
eggs 1-3 677, 1-7.390, 1-3 1-4 80, 1-4 201. 1-7 475, 1-2 
420 and others. Send for lists. RAY DENS- 
MORE, Painesvllle, Lake Co., Ohio. 

WOOD DUCK:— I want a few good skins, 
will give cash or good exchange. FRANK H. 
LATTIN, Albion, N. Y. 

WANTED:— Son;e big game heads in condi- 
tion to mount, also some new skins suitable 
for mats. Cash. F. M. RICHARDS, Farming- 
ton, Maine. 

EXCHANGE:— Winchester take down, trap 
grade gun, pun case, 100 size shell case, clean- 
ing rod and tools for best offer in sets. A. L. 
Rlbyn, Keokuk, Iowa. 

Shells to exchange for same or other speci- 
mens. 100 Goniobasis plicifera for an equal 
number of any species. Want books and pa- 
pers on conchology. FRED H. ANDRUS, 
Elkton, Oregon. 

FOR EXCHANGE :— Cast of prehistoric 
Indians' bird shaped Idol, (painted true to 
color) In my collection, for 35 cents worth of 
spear or arrow heads. HENRY O. EARHART, 
Mulberry, Ind. 

FOR EXCHANGE:— Egg trays, size Ii4x2 
2x2, 2'/4x8H. 2x3. 3x4, for eggsin sets with full 
data. H. C. MILLS, Unionville, Conn. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE:— A large col- 
lection of Patriotic souvenirs of the Spanish 
American War, such as Dewey Pills, Uncle 
Sam going to war, etc. C. A. WHITE, Saline- 
ville, Ohio. 

EXCHANGE FOR CASH:— Game heads at 
prices lower than low. Fur Rugs, Navajo 
Blankets, etc. Prof. Stalnsky's Natural His- 
tory Establishment, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

FOR EXCHANGE:— Volume Two, except 
No. One, of The Osprey, for best offer of eggs In 
sets. FRANK BRYANT, Madison Wis. Route 
No. 4. 

To any one subscribing to •Recreation'' 
through me, 1 will give a coupon good for $1.50 
worth (Lattln's List) of choice sets from my 
1902 lists. E. F. POPE, Colmesneil, Texas. 



163 



THE OOLOGIST 



FOR SALE:— Fine mounted head of Rocky 
Mountain Goat, well mounted ($17.00 prepaid.) 
Pend for photo. WM. A. BOWMAN, Columbia 
Falls, Montana. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE:— 44 caliber, 
Marlin take down rifle. Lyman ivory head and 
combination sights, all in A-1. condition, has 
not been shot 100 times, also a handsome tan, 
sole leather grun case for carrying two guns. 
810 for either $15 for both, $40 in exchange for 
sets. B. J. CARPENTER, Salem. N. J. 

"There Is no use in saying that the Oor.OGiST 
is the best paper to advertise in the United 
State.'^ for every b"dy knows that." RAY 
DENSMORE, Painesville, Ohio. 

Have brass miniature stationary steam 
engine for eggs in sets, if interested write 
Cost $20 00. Please send lists of sets for cash 
also, all answered. VVM. K. HATLER, Cincin- 
natus, N. Y. 

TO EXCHANGE:— Many fine varieties of 
Sea shells and curios to exchange for a good 
pair of climbers, Coues Key or desirable sets. 
E. L. WARNER, Pablo Beach, Fla. 

Look old timers among your old magazines 
and see it you have Osprey" Vol. i, Numbejs 
2 and 4 also '■Nldologist" Vol. I, Numbers 2,4 6, 
for which I will give 30 cenis each, Casti. AL- 
BERT F. GANIER, Bowmar Ave., Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

FOR EXCHANGE:— Fine specimens of snow 
white Gypsum from this locality, also Indian 
relics for Indian relics from other localities. 
Write for description and outlines. WM. 
CUDNEY, Gait, Ont., Can." 

FOR EXCHANGE:— Nice sets of American 
Magpie, 7. 8, 9, for nice sets of common species 
Will exchange for Mockicg bird. Yellow 
breasted Chat, Maryland Yellow throat. Oven 
bird, Chestnut-sided Warbler. Parula Warbler 
White-eyed Vireo Purple Martin, Cardinal 
Swamp Sparrow, Song Sparrow. Slate colored 
Junco, any Grackle. Baltimore Oriole. Orchard 
Oriole. Yellow-headed Blackbird, Bobolink, 
Blue Jay. Least Flycatcher, Wood -Pewee. 
Crested Flycatcher, any Kingbird, Scissor- 
tailed Flycatcher, BuTowing Owl, American 
Sparrow Hawk, Red-shouldered, Red-tailed, 
or Cooper's Hawk, Killdeer, Bartramian Sand- 
piper Only strictly first-class sets desired. 
P. M. SILLOWAY. Lewlstown, Mont. 

Now, who ever heard of a silk-lined Egg 
spoon, for handling very delicate eggs in the 
cabinet. A valuable thing for every collector. 
Sent postpaid on receipt of Sl.uO worth of eggs 
in sets with data. Again here is an Al bargain. 
100 extra flue data, for every 50 cts. worth of 
eggs with data sent me. I also offer, 1000 well 
mixed Foreign Stamps for $1 00 worth of 
choice eggs in full sets with complete data 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Address CLARENCE 
H LUTHER, Fayetteville, Ark., P. O Box 322. 

FOR EXCHANGE:— Original sets with data, 
all North Amerijan. 12 1-1, 13 1-1, 16 1-1, 27 1-1 
1-9, 30 1-1, 30a 1-1. 40 I-l 1-2 1-3, 51 1-2 1-3, 69 1-3, 
70 1-3, T2 1-3 105 1-1, 130 1-7 1-8 1-10 1-11, 132 1-7, 
140 MS, 1.59 1-3 201 1-4. 211 1-8. 212 16, 214 1-14 1 17, 
225 1-4, 226 1-4, 263 13 14, 274 1-2, 1-3, 289 1-16, 297a 
1-8 402a 1-5, 410 1-5, 471 n 3, 474c 1-4, 476 1-5, 478a 
1-4, 486a 1-3, 492 1-3, 549 n-5, 5.50 n-5, 553 n-5, 554 1 2 
1-3 1-4, 573 1-4. 495a, 578 n-4, 593c 1-4, 594 1-4, 630 
1-3, 633 n 4 1-3 of 495a. 708 1-3, 715 n 3, 719c 1 6, 729 
1-4, 746 n-3, 751 n-4 758 1-4 a^d others. Want 
Raptores and a few sets of 452 and 461. J. D. 
SORNBORGER, 101 Hammond St,, Cambridge, 
Mass. 



FOR SALE.— A-1 sets.with full data, of Royal 
Tern, 50-3, 50c; Brown Pelican, 20-3, 30c: Amer- 
ican Oyster-catcher, .5-3. 81; Willet, 10-4, 50c; 
Wilson's Plover, 5-3. 40c: Laughing Gull, 50-3, 
30c; Clapper Rail, 5 8, 5-9, 5-10, 5-11, 5 12, 5c egg; 
Boat-tailed Grackle. 5-4, 40c; Painted Bunting, 
5-4 40c; Yellow-breasted Chat, 5-4, 20c; Black 
Skimmer, 10-4, 20c; postage extra. DR. M. T. 
CLECKLEY, Augusta, Ga. 182 

WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Win give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 



Books lor the Naturalist. 

In September Oologist we cffered 
four paves of Book^i and Pamphlets on 
Ornitliology. la the October issue 
we offered four ])Hees on Zoology, 
Mammalogy, Herpetology and 
Ichyttiology. This month we ofifer 
four more on Marine Inverte- 
brates, Conchology, Entomol- 
ogy, Botany, Geology and Min- 
eralogy. 

In our "CLEARANCE SALE LIST" 
of Nov. 15lh We offered all offered in 
the three Oologists mentioned and in 
addition three pajjes on Palaeontol-- 
ogy. Ethnology and Archaeol' 
ogy. Microscopy and Miscellan 
eous. 

I wish to sell and close all out at ear- 
liest possilde date and until Jan. 1, 1902 
I give a Special Discount of lO per 
cent, on all orders of $1 or over and 
send PREPAID 

I offer hund'-eds of Excerpts at prices 
ranging from 10 to 35 cents each in or- 
der to make quick work of these rheap- 
er ones (10 to 35c ones only). t will 
send your selection prepaid — any 
amount at the rate of $2 00 worth for 
$1,00. This VERY SPECIAL discount is- 
surject to no other discount and is- 
good until December 15th only. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M D. 

Albion, N. Y. 



JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Specialty- 
illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upoip 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 



THE OOLOGIST, 



163 



New Goods ! Right Prices ! 

This list is the fourth supplement to my 2')th Century List issued last January. Copies of that 
list and supplement No. I furnished on application; supplements 2 and 3 all gone. Prices here- 
with quoted are for first-class goods sint prepaid by mail unless otherwise stated. 



Indian Relics (Cree)- 

Stone-head War-clubs. Rawhide covered 
handle and pendant, stained, good value 

at 12 EO; only H J8 

Postage if by mail 22c extra. 

Slingshot, with loop and fully de'^orated, 

34 in. long 1 SO 

Extra long, 48 in 1 42 

Bows. 45 in.. Rawhide strung and stained, 
each with 2 triple feathered bunt arrows, 

not mailable l 32 

Stone Pipes, 10 to 12 in., covered stems — 1 24 
Medicine Man's Rattle Charms, used in 

"Ghost Dance," Fur trimmed handle 1 43 

Without Fur trimming 1 30 

Elk-tooth Necklace Charm used in cere 
monial dances; 30 in. necklace with 10 
stained Elk-teeth and 19 in. decorated 
rawhide pendant 1 92 

Miscellaneous Indian Relics. 

Obsidian Knives 22 

" Scrapers 12 

" Spearheads 12 

Ancient Beads from Indian Burial Ground, 

plain white and Colored, 5c each, 3 for.... 10 
Elk-teeth, stained and perforated for 
charms, 15c each, 2 for 25 

Birds' Eggs. 

Sets with data, first-class: 

Great Blue Heron, 4 eggs 50 

Turkey Vulture, 2 eggs 70 

Black ' 2 " 70 

Red-throated Loon, 2 eggs 75 

Phainopepla, 3 eggs 35 

Fla. Red-shouldered Hawk. 2 eggs 40 

Rufous Hummingbird, nest and 2 eggs S.i 

Costa's ■' " '• " ■■ 75 

Anna's " " " " " (hole 

in one egg, irregular) 50 

Black-throated Loon, 2 eggs 1 25 

Clapper Rail. 10 eggs 55 

Western Gull 2 eggs 22 

Royal Tern, 2 eggs 25 

Black Skimmer, 3 eggs 10 

EXTRA LARGE SETS. 

Flicker. 14 eggs 25 

Long-bill Marsh Wren 10 eggs 85 

HEAA'ILY MARKED SETS. 

Bobolink 5 eggs 55 

Merlin, 4 eggs 70 

Red-shouldered Hawk, 2 eggs 33 

Calif. Murre. 1 egg 12 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak, 3 eggs 18 

SECOND CLASS SINGLE EGGS. 

End blown or slightly cracked, but practi' 
cally as good as Ist-class: 

Rhea, (So.Am.Ostrich) regular price $3 for 1 62 
Golden Eagle, (a beautifully marked egg 
of the lavender type, but very faintlv 
cracked on end, data) 2 10 



Am. White Pelican 08 

Manx Shearwater 15 

Short eared Owl 18 

Marsh Hawk 08 

Wild Turkey 20 

Rough legged Hawk 12 

Broad-winged Hawk 20 

Ferruginous Rough-leg Hawk 24 

Am. Osprey 16 

Long bill Curlew 18 

Am. Raven 25 

Am. Woodcock 20 

Whip-poor-will 20 

Black-tailPd Godwit 15 

Sooty Grouse 12 

Willet 08 

Turkey Vulture 12 

Ruddy Duck 10 

Am. Golden-eye Duck 08 

Barred Owl 20 

Cooper's Hawk 07 

Pileated Woodpecker 16 

Ruffed Grouse 05 

Black skimmer 03 

Leconte's Sparrow (data) 25 

Short-billed Marsh Wren 10 

White breasted Nuthatch 08 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (runt) _. 10 

Rare Single Eggs, (strictly first class). 

Whooping Crane 82.6 

Loon 75 

Canada Goose 70 

Northern Raven 65 

Olive- sided Flycatcher 65 

Black Rail 1 00 

Broad-tail Hummingbird 40 

Datas furnished and sent prepaid. 

I also offer the following first class singles, 
A. O. U. Nos. 312, 320a. 348, 367, 478b. 482, 4S3, 496, 
574a. 578. .579, 593a. 591, 617, 607, 633a, 641, 643, 695a, 
711, 712 707a, 752, 758a, Any of these at Jith of 
Lattin's Standard prices. 

Miscellaneous. 

Egg of Alligator 18 

'■ " Crocodile 1(0 

" " Python 95 

" " Spreading Adder (snake) 25 

" " Red-bellied Terrapin 15 

" " Yellow Spot " 20 

" •' Land Turtle 06 

" " Peacock 35 

'■ " Guinea Fowl (small runt) 12 

" '• Egyptian Goose 40 

Confederate States $100 Bond, nine cou- 
pons intact, not torn, fully signed 20 

Confederate Fractional Currency (Shin- 
plasters) 5c each, 3 var. for 10 

Davies "Nests and Egg," 5th (last) edition, 

regular price $2.35, good as new, for 1 50 

No egg order of less than 3.5c will be sent un- 
less 5c additional be sent for postage. 

All orders of over 3.5c sent postpaid. 

Butterflies and Moths, spread and in papers, 
always in stock at reasonable prices. Full list 
for 10c in stamps. 

Address all queries and orders to 

ERNEST H. SHORT, 
Box 173, Rochester, N. Y. 



"f9I 



THE OOLOGIST. 



P THE BEST ILLUSTRATED l*|| 

BIRD MAGAZINE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 
It gives the L!FE H! STORIES 

FOURoSFIVE NORTH AMERICAN BIRDSJ 
everymonth . THE EGG- of each is , 
shown FULLSIZE andmany nests. 
It also contains sKort interesting 

STORBES ABOUT BIRDS. 



^ 



^X' 



COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREECOLLECTING- 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp for Circular. (190) 

NOWELL BROS., 
Box 213, Anderson, So. Car. 



TXTT^T A XT Baskets, Indian Beaded Buck- 

llMiiAlM skin Sioux Relics, Indian Pot- 
tery, Indian Weapons, Elk 
Teeth, Mexican Hand Carved 
Leather Goods, Mexican Drawn 
Linen, Shells, Minerals, Fossils, 
Ancient Stone Relics, Oregon 
Tiny Arrowheads, Fossil Fishes, 

Fossil Leaves, Corals, Agate Jewelry, Curios. 

Wholesale and Retail. 16th year. Two-story. 

building full. New cat.. No. 10, 40 pages finely 

illus., for 5c. L. W. STILWELL, Deadwood, 

S. Dak. 




^^^■rSAYEAR^SAMPLECOPY 



FP^^' 



CHAS.K.REED, 
Sta.A. WORCESTER, MASS. 



r 



PUBLICATIONS OF 
]\( C. R. ORCUTT, San Diego, Gal 



\S~ West American Scientist, sample, .lo"" 

\\ West American Mollusca, vol. I, $i.oo 

\^ I Review of the Cactaceae, vol. I, $3.00/ 

.y Botany of Southern California, $1.00 



i 



-i 
I 
I 
I 

-I 

I 
I 



It is a Curious Fact 

that a large number of our noted 
botanists were students of birds 
earlier in life. Many of them 
continue to be bird-lovers and 
no doubt many ornithologists 
would like to know more about 
the plant world. If you are one 
of the latter send a 2-cont stamp 
for a sample copy of 

The American Botanist, 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

The Only Ui' technical Botanical Joarnal. 






"You might as well be out of the Bird 'World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

XHR OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgrway, L. 
Stejneger, C W. Richmond and 
Other EmInentOrnlthoIogists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Ospret. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

THE OSPREY COMPANY, 

321-323 AVt St., Washington, D. C. 



THIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



The Oologist. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 11. ALBION. N. Y., NOVEMBER, 1901. Whole No. 182 



The Oologist. 

A Monthly Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to the 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, solicited 
from all. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION : 

Single subscription soc per annum 

Sample copies 6c each 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber Is given a card good for a 
Want, Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
Is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

SubscrlptlouR can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

l»~Remember that the publisher must be notl 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

5 cents per nonpareil line each Insertion. 

13 lines In every inch. Seven Inches in a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing Inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates," 5 cents per line Is "net," "rocli 
bottom," "inside," "spot cash" rate from which 
there Is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 25 cents; 100 lines, $5.00; lOOO lines, 
$50.00. "Trade" (other than cash) advertise- 
ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due Bills and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing wUl be honored only at regular rates In force 
at the date of Issuance of said bill or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postofflce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination will be accepted for sums un- 
der one dallar. Malie Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscriptions and com- 
munications to PRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co. , N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O. , ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



The Spotted Owl. 

[Syrnium occidentals.) 
By Harry H. Dunn, Fullerton, Cal. 

Of this owl, probably the rarest 
North American species of its genus, 
very little appears to be known. At 



least, when, a year or two aj?i^, I at- 
tempted to gather together a little in- 
formation on the genus Syrnium, I 
met with very mea;?er results concern- 
ing this particular bird Of its occur- 
rence in Southern California I was then 
quite well assured as I had seen 
feathers, which I supposed belonged 
to this species, on the ground under 
trees which were evidently the nightly 
"hunting boxes" of some owl. But it 
was not until this season that I became 
thoroughly acquainted with this large, 
dark colored bird in its summer home 
and as I h.:ve tak«n three sets of two, 
three and fouv eggs respectively, I feel 
warrNDted in inflicting myself upon 
suih readers as I may have with a short 
description of bird and nesting habits. 
The country round about my home, 
here on the north western border of 
Orange cour.iy, is extremely hilly and 
given over to small and precipitous 
cliffs The hills are not what would in 
the east or middle west be called "well 
wooded," but in some of the more 
protected canyons a heavy growth of 
oak and sycamore with now and then a 
cottonwocd may be found. On March 
26th of the present yesr, I was making 
my way up one of the larger of these 
canyons kweping a sharp lookout for 
Western Red tails and Pacific Horned 
Owls, whch the la ter frequently occu- 
py old Jnawk'd nests, when my atten- 
tion was drawn to an old oak stump 
some fifty yards up one of the sides of 
the canyon, by the actions of a pair of 
Desert Sparrow Hawks. I was morally 
cert=>in that the little Hawks were not 
nesting at so early a date, but I had 
just taken two sets of Western Red- 
tails, each consisting of four eggs, so I 
was ready for any old chance that hap- 
pened to come along. I clambered up 



166 



THE OOLOGIST. 



to the stump and dealt it a resounding 
blow with the small hatchet which I 
usually carry with me on such occasions. 
Much to my surprise a large owl came 
hustling out of a hole some ten feet 
from the ground, and flying across the 
canyon, settled on a dead sycamore 
limb, thus permitting a good view of 
her brown body, heavily marked with 
blotches and bars of a darker shade. 
Up to the tree I went, and peering into 
the hole saw some three feet down three 
pure white eggs on a bed of rotten 
wood. I returned to the bottom of the 
canyon and got my rifle (a 22 calibre 
collecting gun) and my box. When I 
came back the owl was still sitting 
where I had left her, and when I came 
in sight she commenced snapping her 
beak at me, much as does the Long- 
eared Owl. I noticed that her face and 
in fact most of her head was much 
lighter in color than the rest of her 
body, and though quite sure of the 
species, I shot her, and upon careful 
comparison with description and 
measurements given by various authors, 
I proved her to be the Spotted Owl. 
This bird was very near as large as the 
average of two female skins of the 
Pacific Horned Owl now in my pos- 
session, she being 20.50 inches long and 
having a wing length of 13.75 inches. 

The eggs are much like those of the 
Horned Owl, only rather more glossy 
and a trifle smaller. In fact they are 
perfectly similar in all ways to those of 
the Barred Owl of the eastern states. 
These three were fresh, but dissection 
showed her to have laid her full com- 
plement. 

At a distance this bird when in re- 
pose would pass for a Horned Owl, 
though in the three cases which have 
come to my notice, the male Spotted 
Owl did not appear at the nest as the 
male Pacific Horned usually does, nor 
did the female Spotted Owl make any 
noise whatever, save the snapping of 
beak, during my stay at the nest, a 



trait common to the female of the Pa- 
cific Horned. I have taken sets of this 
latter bird from nests with the male 
and female sitting on a boulder not 
twenty feet away and "hooting" with 
all their lungs. 

My second set, consisting of two eggs 
I found in an old hollow sycamore stub, 
which had fallen slanting across the 
creek bed, and was led to its discovery 
as I have been to several nests of the 
Pacific Horned Owl, by a tell tale 
feather which still clung to the rough 
bark of the tree. This was on the 16th 
day of April and was in the Santa Ana 
canyon about eleven miles from my 
home. I did not shoot this bird as she 
was on the nest and well seen. Incu- 
bation fresh, but as one efrg had slight 
traces of blood, I consider it a full set. 
On the 18th of April, just two days 
later, I took my third set from a hole 
in a live oak about 20 feet from the 
ground, the eggs being laid about a 
foot and a half in from the entrance. 
The bird was on as before but also left 
with a few snappings of her beak when 
I rapped on the trunk. This was a 
natural cavity and had, I think been 
occupied by Desert Sparrow Hawks the 
season before. There were four eggs 
in this set and all were more or less in- 
cubated indicating that the bird had 
made a business of sitting on the eggs 
from the time the first was laid. No 
attempt at nest building was made, 
though the hole was very near horiz on- 
tal with nothing to prevent the eggs 
rolling out should they once get started. 
The eggs were similar to the two 
previous sets and not so granulated or 
"lumpy" as type eggs of the Pacific 
Horned Owl usually are. 

On the whole, I think from my ex- 
perience this season that the Spotted 
Owi is about one-third as numerous 
during the breeding season in southern 
California as is the Pacific Horned Owl, 
of which I took nine sets this year 
against the three sets of the Spotted 



THE OOLOGIST. 



167 



just mentioned. Neither owl is nearly 
so rare as the Short-eared owl which I. 
have found breeding but once and then 
with a nest full of young. 



Field Notes From Manitoba. 

Continued. 

THE WESTERN HOENED OWL. 

I did not visit this nest again, but in 
the spring of '95 I decided to profit by 
the three accidental finds I had made, 
and on April 1st, I took the course of 
the river west and as the ice had not 
broken up and made the best walking, 
I followed the river on the ice about 
three and one-half miles west of town. 
I found in a basswood tree leaning over 
the river an old Broad-wing d Hawk's 
nest, from the top of which peeped two 
tufts of feathers, which previous exper- 
ience told me were the ear tufts of Mrs. 
Bubo. Knowing that all was right, I 
climbed the tree and as I neared the 
nest the old bird flew off and perched 
on a tree near by, while I finished my 
climb and examined her home. 

The nest was small, very little more 
than a foot in diameter and only just 
hollowed enough to keep the eggs from 
rolling out. It was lined with a few of 
Mrs. Bubo's feathers and contained but 
two eggs. These were in different stages 
of incubation. I left them in the nest 
to see if she would lay any more and re- 
turning a week after found the two eggs 
still there and Mrs. Bubo still engaged 
in the duties of incubation. So being 
sure the set was complete I took them. 

From '95 to '98 I left my Horned Owls 
to breed in peace, when on the 24th of 
March I thought by way of recreation 
and for necessary out-door exercise I 
would see how they were prospering. 
Accordingly, taking my gun and a box 
well filled with cotton in my pocket, I 
took the course of the river east from 
town and after passing various unoccu- 
pied nests found in an elm close to the 



bank of the river 25 feet up an old nest 
of the Broad-winged Hawk, from which 
1 could see the tell-tale tufts protruding. 
Climbing the tree I found the nest again 
a very small one and contained only 
two eggs, which I left to see if any more 
would be laid. Returning a week af:er 
1 found the nest as I had left it and the 
two eggs awaiting me, so I took them. 

On the 1st of April I followed the 
cour:^e of the river west and in a bass- 
wood tree leaning over the river I found 
another nest. Mrs. Bubo was at home, 
as numerous feathers cau«rht on the 
edge of the nest and in the nearby 
branches testified, and after a short 
climb I reached the nest, which contain- 
ed the usual complement of two eggs 
I left this nest for eight days, when I 
returned to find that Mrs. Bubo consid- 
ered a family of two enough to look 
after and I bv taking her complement 
of eggs put her to the trouble cf re- 
suming her household duties. This nest 
was about 25 feet up and quite near the 
place I found the nest in '95. 

In '99 I tried the same route on the 
29th of March without success to the 
east and on the 3d of April to the west 
for three miles, but found no nests. I 
however saw two Owls, one of which I 
shot, a fine male of Bubo virginianus 
subarcticus, which is the commonest re- 
presentative of the family here. 

In 1900 I again tried my luck and on 
April 2d in a grove of oak trees three 
miles east of town on the bank of a 
ravine I found a nest of the Red-tailed 
Hawk, occupied by Horned 057ls. This 
nest was occupied last year by Red-tails 
and as Owls generally are not well 
versed in the mysteries of architecture 
the nest was simply flattened and two 
eggs rested therein. As it was late in 
the season and the eggs appeared pretty 
well advanced in incubation, I took 
them and after spending the balance of 
the afternoon in fruitless search return- 
ed home. The nest was in a tall oak 40 
feet up and on a main fork plenty of 



168 



THE OOLOGIST. 



feathers in the branches and on the side 
of the nest, showing that the birds had 
often passed to and fro. All these sets 
and nests were those of the Western 
Horned Owl. 

This year on March 17th I thought I 
would enjoy a ramble in the woods. It 
was a lovely day and mild, and as the 
snow was too deep in the woods for 
comfortable walking I took the course 
of the river and walked on the ice, which 
was smooth and without snow from a 
previous t aw. About two and one- 
half miles east of the town I visited a 
Red-tail's nest in a large oak tree, from 
which I had secured a set of eggs last 
spring, and as I clambered up the river 
bank I noticed Owl feathers In the 
branches and on the edges of the nest. 
As I drew closer I could see the tell- 
tale tufts and knew 1 had located Mrs. 
Bubo's intended nursery. As it was 
Sunday I did not climb, but made up 
my mind that I would visit this nest 
again, so on the 23d as the river was 
still frozen I hitched my horse to the 
cutter and drove do^n to see how Mrs. 
Bubo was prospering. Arrived at the 
wooded point, almo t an island, well 
timbered with oak, elm and basswood, 
I left the rivdr and following my path 
of last Sunday soon reached the foot of 
the tree. Mrs. Bubo was at home and 
I began the ascent. The tree was so 
large I could not shin it, so I climbed a 
small sapling and swung over till I 
could climb into the first fork. After 
this, as there were plenty of branches, 
I soon reached the nest. The old bird 
flew off as I neared it and alighting on 
a dead tree close by watched me. 

As 1 peered over the edge of the nest 
four handjome egg3 arrested my gaze, 
and raising myself above the nest I took 
notes. The nest was large, 20 inches in 
diameter and was in better repair than 
usual. The cavity also was deeper, 9 
inches in diameter, just holding the four 
eggs nicely. Quite a lot of downy 
feathers were caught in the branches 



near the nest and on the edge of the- 
nest and a few of these also composed a 
lining. 

While taking my notes the male bird 
came flying by and made a dash at me, 
and both male and female began scold- 
ing me for my intrusion, uninvited into 
their home, snapping their bills and 
hissing at me and calling to each other 
"Hoo, Hoo." I had a fine view of them 
as they sat in the tree-top close by, 
every few minutes making a dash at me 
as though to drive me from their home. 
The smaller size and very light color 
and pure white feet told me that I had, 
without doubt, found a nest of the Arctic 
Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus arcticus) . 
After taking all notes and getting the 
height of the branch on which the nest 
rested, an overhanging one and 35 feet 
from the ground, I descended, returned 
to my cutter and followed the course of 
the river to where the bush ended, find- 
ing no mora nests. 

Oq March 29th I tried the river west 
and as the ice was getting pretty rotten 
the cutter broke through and I nearly 
got a cold bath. However, I saved my- 
self by reaching out my arm and righted 
the cutter with only an arm wet to the 
elbow. On this occasion I found in a 
basswood tree in a Red-tail's nest, old 
and dilapidated, a set of two Western 
Horned Owl's eggs. Both were incu- 
bated and as is usual the one about a 
week more than the other. This nest 
was 25 feet up and in a tree quite close 
to the river bank. The nest was very 
flat and well adorned with the yellow- 
ish downy feathers of its occupant. I 
took the eggs and as the unsafe state of 
the ice prevented further progress re- 
turned home. 

Now to sum up. These birds seen in 
this northern latitude are very early 
breeders, nesting always while the snow 
is on the ground, dates being from the 
17th of March until 1st of April. I have 
never known them to construct their 
own nest. They always seiza on the 



THE OOLOGIST. 



169 



nest of some kind of Hawk and use it 
for their nursery. They like to build 
near a ravine or river, for the reason 
that finding a tree whose branches over- 
hang the river the male takes up his 
position there and watches until some 
unwary mouse, squirrel or rabbit crosses 
the ice, when he swoops down upon it 
and carries it off to his mate. They 
hunt chiefly at night or in the dusk of 
twilight, which accounts for the pres- 
ence in their nests, which contain young, 
of such dusk-loving animals as rabbits, 
(northern hares) pocket gophers, mice 
and snakes. They take birds as they 
roost aad the birds most frequently 
caught by them are ground birds as the 
Grouse, Riils, etc. These they cat h 
while s'eeping, as you may prove for 
yourself if you will go out some fine 
night in the spring at the lime the Owls 
have their families to provide for, and 
sitting down in the shelter of the trees 
on the border of the woods frequented 
by them watch them. As twilight deep- 
ens you will hear a call 'Hoo, Ho.>, 
Hoo," then a pause and again thrice re- 
peated the "Hoo, Hoo, Hoo." Strain 
your eyes and against; the evening sky 
you see Mr. Bubo sitting motionless as 
a statute on some dead stump or limb 
of a tree or perhaps a fence post. Watch 
him. In a moment he leaves his perch 
and flaps n uselessly over the grass, 
keeping about three or four feet above 
the ground. His large wings and soft 
plumage carrv him silently through the 
air and his large, well developed eyes 
scan the ground for his prey. Ah! see 
him poise. He sees some game. Hovers 
a moment, then drops. Run to the 
place and you see him rise from his 
quarry. He carries off with him a 
mouse, a rabbit or perchance a Grouse. 
On fine evenings in the spring I have 
witnessed this performance as I sat 
down to rest on my way home after a 
day's collecting 

I don't want to impress the reader 
that they are a very destructive bird, 



for I find that it is only at the season 
when they are raising their brood that 
they destroy much game. At other 
times it does not take much to keep a 
pair of these Owls, for the two I had in 
captivity were not very large eaters, a 
full-grown rabbit lasting them for three 
days. 

If you will open these Osvls' stomachs 
at other seasons you will generally find 
that its stomach contains 95 par cent, of 
the remains of mice, moles, weasels, 
snakes, rabbits and such mammals and 
that few birds are taken. 

We have the three varieties of the 
Great Horned Owl hare, the two prev- 
iously mentioned and the Dusky. This 
variety is rarer than the other two, only 
about three specimens having come into 
my hands. I have not found their nests 
as yet, although I feel pretty sure that 
they breed here. I had one brought to 
me in July of '94, and it appeared to be 
a young bird, as all the down was not 
oft' its feathers. 

The Arctic is rather more common, but 
chiefly seen in winter. With the excep- 
tion of the nest found this March I have 
never seen a nest. This year while on 
a visit to Rock and Pelican lakes I 
boated down the Pembina river for 
about seven miles between half past 4 
and half past 10 ori the third of July> 
and after passing a heronry of the Great 
Blue Heron in a very secluded spot at a 
bend of the river where the crooked 
course of the river almost forms a large 
island, I frightened from their perches 
on overhanging branches four young of 
the Arctic Horned that wee well able to 
fly. They alighted in different places 
near the river, some on overhanging 
branches and one, the smallest of the 
four, on a stump. I passed within ten 
feet of him as he sat there staring at me 
with his big yellow eyes, and knew at 
once that I had seen a family of B. y.. 
arcticus. These were all one brood, I 
have no doubt, as they stayed close to- 
gether and had probably been hatched 



170 



THE OOLOGISl 



in one of the old Heron's nests in the 
heronry before mentioned. 
• Well, so much for Bubo virginianus 
in his different phrases. When I again 
take up my pen to treat the readers of 
the OoLOGisT to some bird lore I will 
tell them something about the Loon. 
C. P. Forge, 
Carman, Manitoba. 



The Food Supply of the House Wren. 

BY C. C PURDUM, M. D. 

One of the birds I most love is our 
quick motioned and cheerful little 
House Wren [Troglodytes aedon.) I 
meet him everywhere in the United 
States where I may pitch my tent, ex- 
cept in the mountains. In the winter, 
if I chance to be in the wooris in 
Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, or in 
fact any of the Southern states, ho is 
there to greet me. If in the summer, 
when the heat becomes oppressive, I 
invade the cool and delicious solitudes 
of the forests of Maine, I find him 
always cheerful, always chirping hap- 
pily to his mate on her eggs in the nest 
in the fence post, and always glad and 
happy to be in the society of man. 
Like our friend O. caroUnensis, the 
House Wren rears two broods each 
season, depositing six to eight reddish 
brown eggs, generally in some artific- 
ially constructed shelter. Thus we 
find them nesting in bird boxes, unused 
gutters, tin cans of all sizes, which by 
chance are elevated somewhat above 
the ground, holes in the fence posts, 
old wood-pecker holes, and in one in- 
stance in a watering pot which was 
suspended from the back porch. * 
Some years ago when the writer was 
preparing a report on "Odd and pecul- 
iar Nests and Nesting" (the completion 
of which was interrupted by a long per- 
iod of sickness,) he received an inter- 

*Report on the House "Wren, U. S. Dep't. of 
Agriculture, 1895. 
+Mr. Roy G. Fitcli, since deceased. 



esting note from an observer in the 
West f as follows: "The day before 
yesterday I took a set of seven eggs of 
the House Wren. I have taken many 
sets of these eggs before, but the pecul- 
iar situation of tho nest, etc, warranted 
I think, taking it. An old rubber boot 
had been cut down to the ankle and the 
foot used as a shoe by one of the farm- 
ers about here, and had afterwards 
been discarded in the field. In clear- 
ing up the field the next Spring prepar- 
atory to planting, tLe improvised shoe 
had been thrown carelessly into a brush 
heap at the edge of the field, and re- 
mained there. The birds took posses- 
sion of this and filled it with sticks ard 
then built a nest, thus making for 
themselves a very substantial abode. 
The nest and it's encasing of boot foot, 
make a very interesting addition to my 
collection " In most localities, this bit 
of perpetual motion is respected by the 
farmer, and his worth fully appreciat- 
ed. Hunting with the minutest care, 
but with marvelous agility, the Wrens 
skip hither and thither along the fences, 
about the brush heaps, in and out 
among the stones of the loosely con- 
structed walls of the pastures, through 
the orchards, and about the out build- 
ings, searching with their little pierce- 
ing eyes, every crevice, nook, and cran- 
ny, for food for their youngsters and 
themselves, and altogether make one 
of the most useful, and certainly the 
least expensive of the farmer's assist- 
ants. The report of the U. S. Dep't. of 
Agriculture, on this bird, gives the re- 
sults of the examination of fifty two 
stomachs, taken from a range extend- 
ing from Connecticut to California. 

Ninety-eight of the stomach contents 
was composed of insects, while the 
remaining two per cent, was composed 
of rubbish, like bits of grass, wood, and 
sand, which was in all probability taken 
by accident. No vegetable food could 
be said to have been taken intention- 
ally, was found in any one of these 



THE OOLOGIST 



171 



stomachs, and none was expected, for 
I do not know of one observer who has 
taken the trouble to closely follow the 
habits of these birds, who has been 
guilty of charging them with even an 
occasional departure from an insect 
diet. 

Nearly one-half of the insects con- 
suaied are grass-hoppers and beetles, 
and the other half is about equally 
divided among the bugs, spiders and 
caterpillars. Among the beetles, the 
ground varieties form about six per 
cent , and the weevils rank next in im- 
portance. Indeed during July they ap- 
proach eleven per cent. Only about 
half as many dung beetles are consum- 
ed, as weevils are not eaten at all after 
May, when these beetles are of most 
value from an economic standpoint. 
Among the other varieties, which were 
found in only small quantities or oc- 
casionally, may be mentioned, beetles 
of the lirefiy group, leaf beetles, click 
and rove beetles. 

'Cine bird had eaten a longicorn 
beetle." From the examination above 
spoken of it was found that during the 
month of August, the grass-hoppers 
reached a maxium of sixty per cent., to 
the exclusion of some of the heretofore 
most common kinds of insects. Of this 
sixty per cent, the common and green 
grass-hoppers and insects formed the 
bulk, and as the bird continues to eat 
insects after the fruit ripens we can not 
but make a most favorable comparison 
between it and the bird of our last 
paper, Oaleoscoptes carolinensis. 

Among the bugs consumed by the 
House Wren are many of the plant 
feeding and leaf hopping varieties. 

The stink bug [Pentatomidae) is also 
consumed in large numbers. Plant 
lice are occasionaly eaten. The large 
number of daddy-long-legs which this 
bird devours, is however, from a strict- 
ly economic standpoint, somewhat det- 
rimental, as they are known to feed 
upon aphids. Very few flies were 



found in the stomachs, owing no doubt 
to the fact that these insects are more 
difficult to capture than the others. 
But few wasps were found. 

In conclusion I can do no better than 
to quote "verbatim," from the excellent 
paper of Mr. Sylvester D. Judd, Assist 
ant Ornithologist to the Department of 
Agriculture. 

"From the foregoing detailed account 
of the Wren's food, it is obvious that 
the bird is very beneficial to agricul- 
ture. Such insectivorous birds should 
be encouraged. It is a pity that the 
quarrelsome English sparrow can not 
be exterminated, for if in the place of 
every dozen English Sparrows, Ihere 
was one House Wren, our churches 
would present a more sightly appear- 
ance, while the yield of the crops of the 
country would be greatly increased. 
At Cambridge, Mass., the sparrow has 
driven >the Wren away by occupying 
the nesting boxes. This is true to a 
certain extent wherever the two birds 
have met. To secure the services of 
the wren, the farmer must put up nest- 
ing boxes and declare war on the spar- 
row." 

TABLE SHOWING NUMBER OF STOMACHS 
AND PER CENT. OF FOOD. 

Number of stomachs examined 53 

Per cent, of animal food. 

Ants 4 

Caterpillars 16 

Beetles 22 

Grasshoppers 25 

Bugs 12 

Spiders, Thousand-legs, etc 14 

Miscellaneous 5 

Total animal food 98 

Miscellaneous vegetable food 2 

Total 100 



Nesting^ of the Coppery-tailed Trog-on. 

One of my collectors has recently sent 
me several sets of eggs of the Coppery- 
tailed Trogon, and as they are quite 
rare 1 thought your readers might be in- 
terested in his letter describing the tak- 



172 



THE OOLOGIST. 



ing of a set of them. They were taken 
on July 24 of this year. He writes: 

"We left Sinaloa, Mexico, at 5 a. m. 
on the 23d of July. The pack mules 
were started, but it had taken so long 
to get them off that we decided to take 
lunch before leaying. After lunch we 
went down to the river and were fer- 
ried across, while the mules were re- 
quired to swim. Our afternoon ride 
was a pleasant one and we enjoyed it 
hugely. It was through a rather low 
growth of all sorts of strange trees. 
There were giant cacti of various kinds, 
several varieties of prickly pear and 
many climbing vines. At frt quent in- 
tervals we came to native dwellings, as 
poor as they could be to be called shel- 
ters, the sides made of brush and the 
top thatched with palm leaves. 

"I never elsewhere saw so many tar- 
antulas. Their holes lined the sides of 
the road, and occasionally one would 
stick his front feet out as we went by. 
Before night came on our mules showed 
signs of fatigue, though we had traveled 
slowly. Toward evening we struck the 
first creek of any importance, by the 
side of which the natives were starting 
to cultivate corn. The temperature was 
about the same a*" that in a moist hot 
house. It was just as the sun was set- 
ting that we rode into a little village of 
thatched houses. We put our cots un- 
der a shod and tried to get some sleep, 
but it was rather a failure, for the bur- 
ros kept up a braying to each other 
through the entire night. I put in only 
about an hour's sleep for the night. 

"Our mozos was up at 4 a.m. and fed 
the mules, and by 6:30 we were off on 
the road. It was like a moist hot house 
all morning. The trail wa^ a pretty 
one, winding beside an arroyo with 
large trees and very dense foliage all 
around. Here and there we would pass 
patches of bananas, mangoes and sugar, 
cane, with a little thatched cottage in 
the grove generally shaded by an orange 
tree. As we were riding along a siooy 



bit of trail, always on the lookout for 
curios, my eyes caught sight of a bird 
which interested me. There are lots of 
large green and blue parrots to be seen 
along the trail, and another bird of bril- 
liant red, green, black and white plum- 
age. I saw one of the latter disappear 
behind a stump, and on riding up to it 
she flew out of a hole in the stump. I 
looked in t^e cavity and found her nest 
of eggs. I did not see how she got in 
there, for her tail was as long as the 
hole was deep. I think she must have 
left it at the entrance and put it on 
again when she went out. My old spirit 
of colle'cting birds' eggs got the better 
of me, and out the eggs had to come. 
They were fresh, and I blew them and 
put them back in the nest, covered them 
with leaves, sticki and stones and left 
them until my return trip some weeks 
later." 

The native name of this bird is Coa or 
Cola, but the A. O. U. knows it as the 
Coppery-tailed Trogon, 

The eggs are pure white, about as 
dull in color as a pigeon egg, and either 
two or four in number. 

R. P. Shakples, 
West Chester, Pa. 



Mr. Richard C. McGregor of the U. 
S. S. "Pathfinder" under date of Aug- 
ust 16th, in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, 
writes: "I have some little time for 
birds, etc., here. Have put up plenty 
of skins of Aleutian Leucosticte, Sand- 
wich Sparrow and Aleutian Song Spar- 
row besides a few other species. Have 
eggs of Nelson's Ptarmigan, Fork tailed 
Petrel, Sandwich Sparrow, Green- 
winged Teal and some common things^ 



THE OOLOGIST. 



163 



Books, Pamphlets and Excerpts 
for the Naturalist. 

Zoology, Natural History, Mammalogy, Herpetology, Ichthylogy, 

Conchology, Entomology, Botany, Geology, Paleaontology, 

Ethnology, Etc. 

For Books on Ornithology see List No. 7. 

I wish to close out at once everything in the Book line offered in this List and 
have made prices accordingly. If you cannot spare cash and have desirable sets of 
Birds Eggs or Books and Publications on Ornithology or fine Curios, Indian Relics 
or Foreign Stamps I will swap the cheaper items offered — cannot bother with small 
exchanges. 

Starred (•) titles are second-hand copies, but as a rule the inside pages are 'good as new." 

The unstarred titles are for new or good as new books, in a few instances the covers are 
sllgfhtly shelf-worn. 

Many volumes and sets cannot be duplicated— hence the necessity of sending your order 
early. When ordering always state whether you have a second choice, or whether you wish 
money refunded, incase books ordered have been sold. 

Satisfaction always guaranted or money refunded. 

Remit in most convenient manner, but do not send sums of 81 00 or over loose in your letter. 
All books are PREPAID at prices quoted. Address all orders plainly and in full to 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D., Publisher, Albion, N. Y. 



MARINE INVERTEBRATES AND 
PRODUCTS. 

Agasslz, Seaside Studies in Natural History, 
Marine Animals of Mass. Bay, Radiat«s, 156p, 
185flg 1 25 

Andrews. Annelida Polychaeta of Beaufort, 
No. Car., (.57 species) 26p, 7pl 35 

Benedict, Ten New Species and One New 
Genus Annelida, 7p,6pl; also Jordan's List of 
Fishes of the West Indies, 52p _ 20 

, Corystoid Crabs and 37 New Hermit 

Crabs, 34p, 3pl 35 

Benedict & Rathbun, Crabs of Genus Pano- 
peus, 33p, 6pl 35 

Clarke, Common Sea Weeds of the British 
Coasts and Channel Islands, 140p, 10 col. pi.. 45 

Cooke, Ponds and Ditches, 254p, ills 45 

Darwin, Coral Reefs, Volcanic Islands and 
South American Geology, 550p, 6pl (1.50).... 1 10 

Fewkes, Medusae of Albatross Exped.. 6p, pi 

15 

Harger, N. E. Isopoda, 8p 15 

Herrick, The American Lobster, A Study of 
Its Habits and Development, 852p, 52pl, (7 col.) 

1 00 

Hlbberd, The Book of the Aquarium or Prac- 
tical Instructions of the Formation, Stocking 
and Management in All Seasons of Marine and 
River Animals and Plants, 262p, fully ills.... 65 

Hyatt's Sponges, 44p, ills 20 

Ives, Echinoderms from Bahamas, 6p. pi.. 15 
McMurrich, Actinias of the Albatross Expedi- 
tion, with Classification of Anthozoa, 98p, 15pl 
60 



Macalister & Packard, Zoology of the Inver- 
tebrates, 77flgs, 144p 60 

Jfann, Deep Sea Diatoms off Dela. Bay, lOp 
15 



Packard, Tertiary Crayfish, 8p, pi 15 

Page Aquaria, A Treatise on the Food, 
Breeding and Care of Gold Fish, etc., 64p, Ills 
40 



Peck, Pteropods and Heteropods of Albatross 
Exped., 16p, 3pl 25 

Rathbun, Economic Crustaceans, Worms, 
Echinoderms and Sponges, 32p 25 

, Scientific Investigation of the Sea and 

Fresh Waters, 112p 50 

, Catalogue of Recent Echini and Echi- 
ni of Albatross Exneditlon, 64p _ 50 

, 'Crabs of Family Pericerldae, 46p, ISpl 

50 



, Parasitic Copepoda, Stalked Crmoids, 

18p 25 

, Marine Invertebrates N. E Coast, 20d 

25 



, Littoral Marine Fauna of Cape Cod, 18 

p 15 

Ryder, New Sponge, Camoraphysema obscura, 
and Potts, Mexican F. W. Sponges, 6p, pi... 15 

Streets, No. Pacific Phronlmidae, 6p, pi. .. 15 

Verrill, Marine Invertebrata of N. E. Coast 
of America, 64p - 50 

Webster, Annelida from Bermuda, 24p, 6pl 
35 



Wood, Invertebrates of the World, see Herpe- 
tology, "Wood's Animate Creation" 



174 



THE OOLOGIST 



CONCHOLOGY. 

Binney, Bibliography of N. A. Conchology by 
American Authors, 650p 1 50 

, do do do by Foreign Autliors, 298p. 75 

Brown, Atlas of Fossil Conchology of Great 
Britain and Ireland, with descriptions and il- 
lustrations of all species, 98 full-page tinted 
steel plates containing 3500 figures, royal 4to, 
Liondon, 1889, (20.00) new 7 00 

Bnsh & Dall, MoUusks and Echinoderms 
dredged on Coast Labrador, etc., 20p, 2pl 25 

Carpenter, MoUusca or "Shell Fish" and 
Their Allies (134p) ; and Morlot, General Views 
on Archeology, (70p)204p, S. R. 60 75 

*Chenu, Manuel de Conchyliologie et de Pale- 
ontoiogie Conchyliologique, vol. I— Univalves. 
3707flgs 7 00 

Dall, Index to Names Applied to Sub-divis- 
ions of Brachiopoda. 88p, M. B. 8 40 

.Marine Mollusks of the S. E. Coast of 

U. S., 222p, 74pl, con. 700flgs, M B. 37 3 50 

, Instructions for Collecting Mollusks 

and Other Useful Hints for the Conchologist. 
56p, ills 50 

, Limpets and Chitons of Alaskan and 

Arctic Regi ns, etc., 96p, 5pl 50 

, Florida Land and Fresh Water Shells, 

also Marine, etc.. with Mesozoic and Cenozoic 
types by Marcou, 64p, 3pl 50 

Dall, New W<^st Am. Shells of Albatross Ex- 
pedition, eta, 32p,3pl.. 35 

, Notes on Mollusks of Behring Sea.etc, 

also Rathbun's Parasitic Copepoda, 52p, 6pl 50 

, MoUusca of Bering Island, 12p _ 25 

De Kay, MoUnsca and Crustacea of New 
York, 4to, 355p, 53 col. pi, (411 col. fig). 5 00 

IngersoU, A Monograph on The Oyster In- 
dustry of the United States, 4to, 251p, 42pl...l 50 

Jay, Japanese Shells, 4to, 8p, 5pl, (2 col)... 35 

Mayo, Lessons on Shells, 218p, lOpl, ill. 84 
species 60 

Orcutt, Mollusks of San Diego, etc., 20p, pi 
25 

Pikbry, H. A.. The Manual of Conchology, 
each part contains 64 or more pages and 15 to 
20 plates, fine edition, both colored and India- 
tinted plates, per part $8, sample part of fine 
edition on "Tree Snails" _3 00 

Rimmer. The Land and Fresh Water Shells 
of the British Isles, 208p, lOpl, ills, of all spec- 
ies, (2.60) 1 40 

Roberts, et al. List of Shells, Insects and 
Plants from Hayden Survey of '70, 20p 15 

Ruschenberger, Elements of Conchology, 110 
P, 12'fig 60 

Scudder, Bibliography of the Publications of 
Isaac Lea with Biographical Sketch and Steel 
Eng. Portrait, 338p, (M. B. 23) 1 00 

*Shells and Their Inmates, 230p, 53ills, Lon- 
don, '41 70 

Simpson, Notes on Unionidffi of Fla. and S.E. 
States, 32p, 26pl 75 

Stearns, Frederick, Japanese MoUusca, 80p, 

Pl 25 

Stearns, R. E. C. , West American Shells, 22p. 

3pl 35 

, Shells from W. Coast of S. A. , 30p.. 25 

, do do, rare or little known species, 12 

P, pl 25 

, West African Mollusks, 24p 25 

, Mollusks of Galpagos Is., 98p, 2pl . 75 



' , Land and F. W. Shells of Death Val- 
ley Expedition, 16p 25 

, L. and F. W. Shells from Texas and 

Wyoming, 12p 25 

, do from Gulf Border of Miss., 14p_. 25 

■ , Etlmo-Conchology, A Study of Primi- 
tive Money, 38p, 9pl 35 

Verrill. Deep Water MoUusca off Martha's 
Vineyard, 28p 33 

Winslow, Economic MoUusca, etc., 86p.... 35 
Williamson, Shells of San Pedro Bay, 42p, 5 

pl 50 

Wood, Mollusks of the World, see Herpetolo- 

gy, "Wood's Animate Creation" 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Ashmead, Monograph of N. A. Proctortry- 
pidaB, 472p, 18 plates, M. B. 45 1 20 

Badenoch, Romance of the Insect World, 
298p, fSfig pl, (1.50) 90 

Ballman, The Myrlapoda of N. A., 210p, M. 
B. 46 70 

Chambers, Index to Tineina of U. S. and Can- 
ada; new Tinea ; Food Plants of Tinea, 90p.. 35 

Comstock, Cotton Insects, 512p. 77 flg, 3 pl. 
(2 col.) 75 

Cook, Myrlapoda from Africa, 8p W 

& Collins, Notes on Geophilidae, 14pv 

3pl 15 

Davis. Locust and the Horn Fly, 6p,Illus 05 
Drury. Preparation and Care of Insect Col- 
lection, 8p 15 

Eberhart, Key to Families of Insects, 24p- 
150 fig 15 

Edwards, Bibliographical Catalogue of Trans- 
formation of N. A. Lepidoptera, 148p,M.B35 40 

Lepidoptera of Montana, 6p _ 10 

Emmons, Insects of New York, 4 to 326p, 
47 col. pl 5 00 

Forbush & Fernald, The Gypsey Moth, 65pl, 
.596 pages 1 70 

French. Butterflies of the Eastern United 
States, 408p. 93Uls i 05 

Grote, Maine Moths; N. A. Agrotis: N. A. 
Moths; Lithophane; NoctuEe; Calif. Noctulds: 
N. A. Pyralidaj, 134p, ills 40 

Hampson, Moths of British India, 1892, 333 
flg, 528p 2 35 

Howard, Biology of Chalcidee; Insects with 
branched antennae, 32p, 2pl 15 

Kappel & Klrby, British and European 
Moths and Butterflies, amagniflcent work,4to, 
274p, 31 col pl, illustrating nearly 500 fig, true 

to nature, cover slightly soiled (7.50) 4 10 

KIngsley, Genus Alpheus, 12p 10' 

Kirby, ("Lloyd's Natural History." Moth 
and Butterflies, 5 vols, each containing about 
300p text, 158pl., beautifully and accurately Il- 
lustrating over 500 species true to nature, 
1897 4 90 

LeConte, Rocky Mt. Coleoptera, 56p 20 

Manton, Insects, How to Catch and How to 
Prepare them for the cabinet, 32p, ills, (.50) 40 

Maynard, The Butterflies of New England, 
4to, 76p. 10 hand col. pl showing 250 life size 
specimens, rare, valuable, out of print, new 
but cover damaged 4 20 

Meyrlck. A Handbook of British Lepidoptera. 
844p, ills (2.50).... 1 70 

Montadon, N. A. Hemiptera Heteroptera, 
8p 10 

Neal, Fla. Boot Knot Disease,32p, 21col pl 25 



THE 00 LOG I ST. 



175 



Packard, Cave Fauna of North America. &c. 
&c, 270p, Slpl, 4to - 2 15 

Rocky Mt. Locust and Other Insects in- 

iurloiis to Garden and Field Crops of W. States 
and Tex., 228p. Ml, 67 flg, H. S. '75. 80 

Inj ur ious and Beneficial Insects. 30p 15 

Patton. Certain Bees; Aculeate Hymenop- 
tera; American Stizlni, 40p 15 

Pelt, Insects Injurious to Maple Trees 4to. 
3 col pi. 11 ills 25 

Riley, Directions for Collecting and Preserv- 
ing Insects, i48p, I40ag_ 75 

Insects of Death Valley, 31p 15 

Parasites of Hessian Fly, lOp, pi 10 



West African Insects and Arachnida, 

26p, pi 15 

Riley & Monell, Aphidae, 32p, 2pl 15 

Riley, Packard and Thomas 3d Report U. S. 
Entomological Commission with special refer- 
ence to the Kocky Mountain Locust, Army 
Worm, Canker Worm, Hessian Fly and Scien- 
tific Results, 4o0p, 64cl 75 

Scudder. "Tertiary Insects of North America, 

4tO, 7i4p, 28pl 2 15 

Butterflies, &c from Colo., Ariz, and 

Utah, 16p _ 10 

Tertiary Insects, Colo, and Wyo.,26p 15 

N. A. Eaiwigs, 12p 10 

Fossil (Green River) Insects; Fossil 

Coleoptera, 42p _ 85 

Smith, Insects found in New Jersey, 486p 1 10 

Lepidopterous Family, Noctuids of 

Temperate N. A , 234p. 5pl, revision of the spec- 
ies of the Genius Agrotis, M B 38 85 

Lepidopterous Super-family,NoctuId8e, 

in Boreal America, 424 -1 05 

Contributions toward a monograph of 

the noctuidSB of N. A., revision of, Dicopinas; 
Cuculla; xylomigesandMorrisonia; Mamestra; 

Homohadena; hadena, I86p, 8pl 90 

do do, all but last two (Hadena and 

Homohadena) 134p, 6pl _ 60 

Revision of Saturnidae, 30p, 3pl lf> 

Snow, Am. Platypez!dae, lOp, pi 10 

Thomas, Bynopsis of the Acrididie of No. 

America, 4to, 262p 1 20 

New Orthoptera, 20p, H S 70 10 

Thomas & Uhlfr. Orthoptera and Hemiptera 

of Dak. and Mont. 32p 15 

Weed, Harvest Spider of Ohio, 22p, 13pl... 20 
Wellman, Study of the Prothorax of Butter- 
flies, 6p, 9tlg 10 

Williston Syn-psis of the N. A. Syrphida3, 

336p, 12pl, M. B. 31 1 15 

Wood, Insects of the World, See Herpe- 

tology, "Wood's Animate Creation." 

BOTANY. 

Apgar. Trees of the Northern United State.s, 
224p, 400fig 85 

Pocket Key of Trees of N. U. S. east of 

Rocky mountains, 40p, ills 35 

Beadle, Catalogue of the Biltimore Herbar- 
ium. 30p 10 

Beal, Forestry, etc. A Popular Account of 
Trees of Michigan and Their Uses, 24p 10 

Brandegee, Flora of S. W. Colo.,22p 10 

Burgess, J. T., English Wild Flowers, 182p. 
illus 35 



Bush Trees, Shrubs and Vines of Missouri, 
46p 10 

Carpenter, Vegetable Physiology and Sy- 
stemic Botany, .576p, 200 flg, (2.50) 1 40 

Chickering, Plants of Montana and Dakota, 
30p 15 

Cooke, British Fungi (Mushrooms, &c), with 
colored plates of 40 species, 166p, 20 col pi, 
(1.50) 1 20 

Handbook of British Hepatic^, 310p, 

7pl, 2C0fig, (1.50) 1 05 

■ — Index Fungorum Britannicorum, a 

check list of over 3000 species, 58p 40 

Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mould. An 

Introduction t « the Study of Microscopic Fun- 
gi, 262p, 269 col flg (1.50) 1 10 

Eceers. Flora of St. Croix and Virgin Isles, 
34p, M. B. 13 35 

Fernow. Timber, Characteristics and Prop- 
erties of Woods, with a key to the more impor- 
tant woods of N. A., 88p 49flg 35 

Flint, Catalogue of U. S. Materia Medica Col- 
lection, 48p 15 

*Goodale. Physiological Botany. 214flgs, 
534p, vol. II of Gray's Botanical Text Book 1 10 

Few Common Plants, 62p, (20) 15 

*Gray, Asa, School and Field Book of Botany 
consisting of ''Lessons in Botany" and 'Field, 
Forest & Garden Botany." bound in one vol. 
622p, 387flg (1 80) 95 

* Manual of Botany, rev., VOOp, 25pl 

(1 62) 1 20 

Japanese Plants, 4to, 28p 25 

Plants of Commander Islands, 12p 10 

Gray & Hooker, Rocky Mt. Flora, 78p 30 

Hall. Botany: Lessons in Botany and Analy- 
sis of Plants, 287pp, ills a 70 

Hardinge. With the Wild Flowers, Descrlp- 
tlonof &o, 272p, 55p of il's 1 00 

Havard, Flora of Western and Southern 
Texas, 84p 35 

*Heinderson, Garden an Farm Topics, 244r>, 
ills (1.50) „ 60 

* Gardening for Profit. 376p, 138fig 

(1.50) 90 

Holm, Leaves of L'riodendron, 22p, 6pl... 15 

Flowers of Anthoxanthum, 6p, pi . 10 

Kelsey, The Genus Uncinula, Drawings and 
Descriptions of all American species, 26p, 
lOBg - 10 

Knowlton, Directions for Collecting Recent 
and Fossil Plants, 40s, 9 fig 25 

Plants of Alaska, 12p 15 

Lefroy, Botany of Bermuda, llOp _ 40 

Merriam, Cactuses of Death Valley, 16p, 
9pl, mp 15 

Desert Trees and Shrubs of Death Val- 
ley, 6)p, 2mp £0 

Richardson's Model Herbarium and Plant 
Record. A bound volume for mounting and 
describing 60 botanical specimens, with a 28p 
book of instructions, etc 93 

Ridge way, Robt.. Trees of Lower Wabash and 

White River Valley, Ills, and ind, 40p 35 

, Rathrock, Lichens of Alaska, lOp 15 

f coffern, Outlines of Botany, including Moss- 
es, Lichens and Ferns, 304p, 318flg 1 10 

Smith, Ferns, The History, Organography, 
Classification and Enumeration of the Species 
ol Garden Ferns with a Treatise of Their Cul- 
tivation, etc., 4'Op, lOOills 1 40 



176 



THE OOLOGIST. 



Taylor, Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms, 
lOp, 4col. pi., A. R. 93 25 

Torrey, Flora of the State of New York. 
Full descriptions of all the indigenous and 
naturalized plants hitherto discovered in the 
state; with remarks on their economical and 
medicinal properties. Vol. II, which covers 
the Cryptogams, Endogens, Gymosperms, 
Apetalons and a portion of the Monopetalous 
plants, 4t0, 58-2p, 89pl 5 00 

Vasey, Agricultural Grasses and Forage 
Plants of the U. S., 148p, 11 ^pl 1 40 

Grasses of the Southwest (Desert re- 
gion of W, Tex., New Mex., Ariz., So. Cal , 

Vol.1, lOOp, 50pl 65 

Vol. ir, lOOp, 50 plates 65 

Grasses Of Pacific Slope (Calif. Ore., 

Wash.. New Mex., Coast and Alaska, Vol. I. 

lOOp, 50pl 65 

Vol. II, lOOp, 50pl 65 

Vasey & Rose, Pac. Coast Island Plants, 6p 10 

Lower Calif. Plants, lOp _ 10 

Ward, Flora of Washington, D. C. and vicin- 
ity, 266p. M. B. 22 90 

*Wood A., Object'Lessons in Botany, 332p. 
655flg (1.17) 70 

* Class Book of Botany, 832p, 5pl, 745flg, 

(8.92) 1 Ob 

* The American Botanist and Florist, 

630 p, 555ag 90 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

'Agassiz Geological Sketches, 31Ip, ills, (1.50) 
85 

Ballard, World of Matter, A Guide to the 
Study of Chemistry and Mineralogy, 264p, (1 25) 
80 

Beck, Mineralogy of New York 4to, 560p, 8pl, 
33 tables, 533flg _.l 50 

Becker, Stratigraphy of California, 28p ... 15 

Black Hills, Geology of the, by Newton, Jen- 
ney, Whitfield, Cassin, Gray and Tuttle, 4to, 
666p, 19p, with large atlas 3 40 

Blatchley, Goology and Natural Resources of 
Indiana, (21st Annual Report) Petroleum In- 
dustry, Caves and Their Fauna, Middle and 
Upper Silrlan Rocks, Geology and Flora of 
Vigo Co., etc., etc., 718p, 39pl 6mp l 30 

Chamberlain, Terminal Moraine, 4to, 112p, 10 
pi, G. S. 3 35 

Clarke, Meteorite Collection of National Mus- 
eum, 12p, pi 10 

*Dana, Manual of Geology, 1st ed, 800p, over 
lOOOfig, (85) _..l 50 

, do do, 2d ed _.2 00 

, Minerals and How to Studv Them, A 

Book for Beginners in Mineralogy, 388p, 300ills, 
<«1.50) ..1 80 

,Crystanographlc Study of the Thinolite 

of Lake Lahoutan, 34p, 31p 25 

, Manual of Mineralogy and Lithology. 

3d ed, poor cond, 474p, ills (8.00) ..i 6o 

Denbree, Formation of Crystalline Rocks, 78 
p, S R. 61 25 

Dewey, Economic Geology and Metallurgy. 
256p. 34pl, M. B 43 95 

Egelstou, Catalogue of Minerals and Syno- 
nyms. Alphabetically Arranged for Museum 
Use, 198p, M. B. 33 75 

Emmons. Geology of Northern New York, 
447p, 17pl, (9col.) 116ills 2 00 

Endlich, Erosion in Colo., 34p i5 



Gannett, List of Elevations and Large Con- 
tour Map of U. S., 34p 15 

Gelke, Geology, 138p, 46fig 35 

Gurney. Crystallography, 128p, 46flg 35 

Hague, Geology of the Eureka (Nev.) Dlst., 4 
to, 44p, 21dg chts, G. S. 3 _ 25 

Hall, Geology of Western New York,4to,705p, 
col. map, 54pl .4 00 

Hayden, Geology of Wyoming, etc., 264p, 20 
fig, H. S.70 50 

, Headwaters of Mo. and Yellowstone, 

Two Ocean Pass, 18p, 10 folding charts, 2pl_ 85 

,U. S. Geological and Geographical Sur- 
vey of Territories, Annual Reports, Bulletins, 
etc.. Write wants. 

♦Hitchcock's Elementary Geology, 434p, 211 
fig 50 

Hoffman, Minerals of Nevada, 16p 10 

Hyatt's About Pebbles. 20p 10 

Irving, Copper- Bearing Rocks of Lake Su- 
perior, lOOp, 15 col pi 50 

Jordan s Elementary Crystallography, with 
series of netts, for the construction of Crystals 
(1.50) 60 

Kunz, Gem Collection of National Museum, 
lOp 10 

Lewis, Corundum and the Basic Magnesian 
Rocks of W. No. Car, 108p, 6pl, mp 35 

♦Lrell. A Manual of Elementary Geology ,4th 
ed, 500flg, 512p 1 15 

, The Students' Elements of Geology, 

678p, 645flg 1 36 

Mather, Geology of Eastern New York and 
Long Island, 4to, 708p, 46 col. pi. and mps, 35111s 
2 50 

Merrill, Hand-book and Catalogue of Build- 
ing and Ornamental Stones In U. S. Nat. Muse- 
um, 372p, 9pl, 30fig 75 

, Hand-book of Dept. Geology of U. S. 

Nat. Museum, 50p 25 

,Geology, Materials of the Earth's Crust, 

90p, 12pl, 10111s 25 

, The Onyx Marbles, 48p. ISpl 25 

, Formation of Stalaclites, 6p, 4pl.... 15 

, Fulgurites, 8p, pi 15 

, Maine Building Stones, 18p 10 

. Geology and Natural History of Lower 

Calif., 36p, lOpl 85 

Nichols, The Ores of Columbia, 70p, mp 25 

Nitze, The Iron Ores of No. Car., 240p, 80pl,58 

fig, mp 75 

Owen, Report on Geological Survey of Wis- 
consin, Iowa. Minnesota and Nebraska, 1852, 
4to, 638p, 75ills 1 60 

Pacific Railroad Survey, Report of Explora- 
tions west of Mississippi River, 13vol, cost $200, 
4to, over 700p, 640pl, etc.. etc.. Birds, Mammals, 
Fishes, Reptiles Botany, Geology, Palaeontol- 
ogy, etc., odd vols. 81 to 13 each, write wants. 

Peale, Endlich, Holmes, Mudge, et al. Geolo- 
gy, Geography and Topography of Hayden 
Survey for '75, 440p, 6lpl, 2mp 90 

Pennsylvania State 2d Geological Survey, 20 
vols, cloth, many plates, maps, figs, etc., thous- 
ands of pages $25 4 20 

Philippi, Meteoric Iron of Atacama, 4to, 4p 
10 

Raymond. Mineral Resources West of Rocky 
Mts., 256p, Ills 40 

Rice, Geology of Bermuda, 33p, 6pl 20 



The Oologist. 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION DEVOTED TO 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND TAXIDERMY. 

VOL. XVIII. NO. 12. ALBION, N. Y., DECEMBER, 1901. Whole No. 183 
Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. 

Brief special announcements, "Wants,' "Exclianges" "For Sales," Inserted In this department 
ror 25C per 2.t words. Notices over 25 words, charged at the rate of one-half cent per each additional 
word. No notice Inserted for less than 25c. Terms, cash with order. 

Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted In payment at one-third list rates. 



What's Your Number? 

Examine the number following your name 
■on the wrapper of this month's Oologist. It 
denotes when your subscription expired or 
win expire. 

No. 183 your subscription expires with this issue 
190 " " " " June, 1902 

195 " " " " Dec. " 

Intermediate numbers can easily be deter- 
mined. If we have you credited wrong we 
wish to rectify. 

TliTDnRTSHT This Dec. Oologist was is- 
lIIirUAiilul> sued Dec. 10th. The Dec. is- 
sue will be printed on Jan. 5th. Copy intended 
for that issue must be forwarded by return 
mail. 

FOR SALE:— One buffalo overcoat in per- 
fect condition. Or will trade for best offer in 
authentic sets. Some back volumes of The 
Auk to exchange for sets. J. W. PRESTON, 
Baxter, Iowa. 

I WILL EXCHANGE a nearly new 5x7 
camera and desirable sets for a compound 
microscope or a Bausch and Lomb oil immer- 
sion objective. ISADOR S. TROSTLER, 4246 
Farnam St., Sta. B., Omaha, Neb. 

WANTED:— Any part, odd pages, plate, 
volume or volumes of Audubon's "Birds of 
America," or Audubon's and Bachman's 
"Quadrupeds of America." Liberal cash fig- 
ure. JOHN W. DANIEL, Jr., Lynchburg, Va. 

I HAVE Fossils, sets of hawks, owls, and 
other birds, eggs to exchange for good Indian 
relics, stamps, coins or other good setsol eggs. 
(184.) JASPER BROWN, Norway, Iowa. 

DESIRE first-class specimens of Downy 
Younerof "Shore Birds." Address GEO. H. 
SWEZEY, 66, 79 Jackson St., Newark, N. J. 

FOR EXCHANGE :— Four volumes Youths 
Companion, complete file Natural Science 
News containin'? story "Penikese." Ohio 
state agricultural reports. Also a few sets 
Northern Ohio birds eggs, and mounted birds 
Will exchange cheap for revolver. Indian 
relics or tobacco tags, certain kinds. OLIVER 
HOTCHKISS, Bedford, O. 



WANTED.— Sets of eggs containing abnor- 
mal specimens, such as runts, albinos, mon- 
strocities, abnormally colored or shaped eggs. 
Will give cash or good exchange. J. WARREN 
JACOBS, Waynesburg, Pa. 101 

WILL BUY cheap lor cash reptiles eggs, 
and :"are single birds eggs not In Collection. 
American or foreign, either first class or im- 
perfect specimens W. R. WHARTON, Ger- 
mantown Philadelphia, Pa. 

FOR EXCHANGE OR SALE:— ten pairs 
large-bill sparrows, two pairs Belding'J marsh 
sparrow. Want hawks, grouse, partridges and 
warblers, ducks, best spring plumage. W. B. 
JUDSON, 4957 Pasadena Ave., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

CHOICE specimens of Opalized Tree, by mail 
10 to 50c. If large specimens are wanted, 
write for particulars. This is the only tree of 
this kind in existence. If you want the best, 
order now. O UHRLAUB & CO., Clover, 
Lidcoln Co., Idaho. 

TO EXCHANGE:— Eggs In sets With data of 
Ihis locality, for sets from other localities. 
Papers on "O and O" for sale or exchange. 
JOSEPH S. DIXON, Escondido, Cal. 

BENTON HOLCOMB, West Granby, Conn., 
wishes correspondence with collectors having 
Indian pipes of stone or clay and pottery 
(ancient) for sale or exchange. 

WANTED :— To correspond with all persons 
interested in Southern Minnesota Ornithology. 
Exchanges desired, especially with Minnesota 
Oological collectors. Enclose your lists when 
writing. EDW. W. SPRINGER, Owatonna, 
Minnesota. 

WANTED:— Skins, Eggs, Books. Can give 
exceptir>nal values in finely prepared Marine 
invertebrates in Formalin. Write me at once, 
as the supply won't last long. Full list for 
yours. No postals. DR. C. C PURDUM, 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

TO EXCHANGE :— Nice sets and singles for 
sets, athletic, sporting or furnishing goods, 
curios, stamps, coins, cutlery, kodak supplies 
or anything useful. Also have cash. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. H. L. HEATON, OberUn 
Kansas. 



178 



THE OOLOGIST. 



FOR EXCHANGE:— Skins of Gray Fox and 
Great Horned Owl, for handbook of Birds of 
Eastern North A merica, and mounted deer or 
Elk head. MRS. MOLLIE F. SKEEN, Far- 
mer, N. C. 

NOW who ever heard of a silk-lined egg 
spoon for handling very delicate eggs In the 
cabinet. A valuable thing for every collector. 
Sent prepaid on receipt of $1.00 worth of eggs 
in sets, with data. Send list for selection. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Address, CLAR- 
ENCE H. LUTHER, 2204 Third Ave., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

MTD. BIRDS FOR SALE:— Golden Eagle 
88,00; Loons $4.00; Snowy Owls $3.00 to $5.00; 
Artie Horned Owl $.5.00; W. Great Horned Owl 
$3.00; Sawwhets$l 50; Sharp-tailed Grouse $2.00; 
Ruffed $1.50; Gray Ruffed Grouse $i.50; Black 
billed Cuckoos 75 cents; Snow birds 60 cents; 
Redpoles 50 cents; Pine Grosbeaks 75 cents; 
Evening do. 75 cents ; small specimens prepaid 
by mail at prices quoted. Wolf skins for 
mounting or rugs, from $3 50 to $2.00. Eagle 
claws and feathers. Fresh skins of Northern 
birds for sale during winter months. CHAS. 
P. GORGE, Carman, Man. 

TO EXCHANGE:— Finely prepared speci- 
mens of the Marine Invertebrates, preserved 
in Formalin, for books, eggs or skins. These 
preparations are 'ivery one beauties and an ad- 
dition to any collection. Full list for yours. 
No Postals. ■ C. C. PURDUM, M. D., 128 Min- 
eral Spring Ave., Pawtucket,; R. I. 

DESIRE SETS OF Grasshoppers and Savan- 
na Sparrows. Purple Finch, Fish Crow, 
Horned Lark, Green crested Flycatcher. Whip- 
poor-will, Hairy Woodpecker, Screech Owl. 
Am. Ospre./, Am. Sparrow Hawk, Red tailed 
Hawk. Ruffled Grouse, Bartramian Sandpiper, 
Am. Woodcock, Hermit Thrush, Tufted Tit- 
mouse, Carolina Wren. R. W. Swallow, Blue- 
Gray Gnatcatcher and Summer Tanager. Ad- 
dress, GEO. H. SWEZEY, 66-79 Jackson St., 
Newark, N. J. 

FOR SALE :— The following sets at one-third 
Lattin's catalog A. O. U. Nos. 6 1-4, 30a 6-1, 49 
2-2, .51a 1-2. 70 1-3, 77 4-3, 223 1-1, 269 1-3 430 n-3, 
481 1 3, 710 1-3 and others. Send stamp for list. 
RICHARD F. MILLER, 3473 Amber St., Phila- 
delphia, Penn. 

WANTED:— Eggs in original sets with data, 
strictly first class skins, books, or anything 
the collector can use. Can give excellent value 
in finely preserved Marine invertebrates, and 
some eggs. Write me at once as I shall close 
this stock out immediately. C. C. PURDUM, 
M. D., 128 Mineral Spring Ave., Pawtucket, 
R. I. 

FOR SALE :— I have still a few choice sets of 
eggs for sale which I will close out at follow- 
ing prices: ShortEared Owl, 1-4, 80c; 1-5, $1; 1 6, 
81 20; 1 7, $1.40 per set; Gray Ruffled Grouse 1-9, 
$2.50; Am. Crow 1-4, 8c; 1-5, 10c; 1-6, 12c; Pintail 
1-5.81.00. Sharp-tailed Grouse 117, $3.40; 1-14, 
$2.80; 1-10, $2.00; Prarie Hen 1-8. 80c; Ml $1.10; 
Killdeer, 1-3, 30c; Br< nzed Grackle, 1-7, 1-4. 1-6, 
12c; 1-5 10c; 1-4. 8c; Rusty Blackbird, 1..7, $1.75; 
1-6; $1.50; Mourning Dove. 1-2 4c; Clay colored 
Sparrow, 1-4, 40c; Yellow Warbler, 1-4, 8c; 
White Rumped Skrike, 1-6. 18c; 1-5, 15c; 1-4, 12c; 
Flicker 1-5, 10c; House Wren, 1-6. 12c; 1-5, 10c; 
Bartrams Sand Piper. 1-4, soc; Wilson's Phara- 
lope. 1-4. $2.00; Loon single Chipped hole, 30c; 
Swainson Hawk, 1-3, 50c; SongSparrow, 1-5, 5c; 
1-4. 4c: Red-winged Blackbird. 1-4, 4. All sets 
with full data and a 1. CHRIS. P. FORGE, 
Carman, Man. 



Exchange:— Colt revolver, banjo, stamps, 
eggs, old-fashioned foot stove, sp^c. conglome- 
rate and others; want old U. S coins and 
Indian relics. F. H. RICKER. Lisbon, Me. 

TO EXCHANGE: -12th, 17th, 18th. 19th Re- 
ports Geological Survey, 10 vols., '-BatsN. A ," 
Allen, and -'Half Hours With Insects," Pack- 
ard, for ornithological publications, mounted 
birds or desirable sets with data. H. E. LEE, 
Bryant, S. D. 

FREE : A collection of 25 beautiful sea 
shells with large list of bargains for 10c post- 
age only. E. BOYER, 536, W. 61, Chicago, 111. 

NOTICE:— I am putting up a building for 
my collections and as soon as I get moved I 
win be ready to exchange. DELOS HATCH, 
Oakfleld, Wis. 

FOSSILS, geodes, polished onyx, curios, 
shells, 250 varieties minerals; $8.00 worth for 
$5.00. Also Indian relics, Spinning wheel, 
grandfathers clock, etc. CURIO CO., Craw- 
fordsville. Ind. 

WANTED AT ONCE:— Any ancient Indian 
spears over 4 inches long, must be perfect. 
Send full description Will give good exchange 
in flint arrows. Absidian spear-heads, beads 
and pottery, or cash, if cheap. ROY H. 
BULLIS, (Member A. S. of C. C. No. 107) 
Winnebago City, Minn. 

EXCHANGE:— I have a large quantity of 
Gladiolus bulbs and Geodes to exchange for 
Natviral History specimens, coins, stamps, 
curios, etc., etc. DELOS HATCH, Oakfleld, 
Wis. 

WANTED;— A number of sets each, 6, 27,29, 
58, 63, 64, 77, 80, 120a. 122 137 139, 140, 144, 149, 160, 
172, 183, 190, 214, 218 238. 261, 263 264, 273, 277. 277a, 
289, 294 295. 300 309, 210, 318, 325, 326, 328. 329, 337, 
337b, 339, 343. Any Hawks, Owls, Humming^ 
birds ana Warbles and nests, nearly any spar- 
rows, 364, 373. 387, 388, 390, 393, 394, 501, .509, 5,=i8, 
601, 611, 614 619, 622a. 622b 624, 761, 751 and nests, 
at once. Collectors are requested to send full 
lists of these and other duplicates. Good ex- 
change offered. D. WILBEY, 27 Front St., 
West, Toronto. Ontario, Canada. 

LARGE second-hand Billiard Table, fine to 
use or cut down. Cheap. Stamp for particu- 
lars. Vols. V. to X. inclusive, ' Birds and All 
Nature," for cash, $4.50. G. W. HOLMES 
VOSBURG, P. O. box 307, Columbus, Wis 

i It is a Curious Fact t 



that a large number of our noted 
botanists were students of birds 
earlier in life. Many of them 
continue to be bird-lovers and 
no doubt many ornittiologists 
would like to know more about 
the plant world. If you are one 
of the latter send a 2-cent stamp 
for a sample copy of 

% The American Botanist, p 

^ BINCHAMTON, N. Y. ^ 

^ The Only Ud technical Botanical Journal. ^ 



f 
I 

s 

I 
I 
I 



THE OOLOGIST. 



17» 




THE BEST ILLUSTRATED 

BSRD MAGAZENE 

EVER PUBLISHED. 
Itgivesthe LIFE HISTORSES 

JFOURo^FIVE NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS 1 
Jevepy month . THE E&Cr of each is , 
i^shownFULLSiZE andnany nests. 
It also contains short interesting 

STORSES ABOyj BIRDS. 




r 

^^TSAYEAR*SAM?LECOP^^ ^ 

CHAS.K.REED, 
»TA.A. WORCESTER, MASS. 



COLLECTOR'S TOOL. 

A POCKET INSTRUMENTFORTREECOLLECTING- 
SAVES EGGS.DANGER.TIME. 

Send Stamp lor Circular. (190) 

NOWELL BROS., 
Box 213, Anderson, So. Car. 



T\[T^T A "Vf Baskets, Indian Beaded Buck- 
Ail X/XilDi skin Sioux Relics, Indian Pot- 
tery, Indian Weapons, Elk 
Teeth, Mexican Hand Carved 
Leather Goods, Mexican Drawn 
Linen, Shells, Minerals. Fossils, 
Ancient Stone Relics, Oregon 
Tiny Arrowheads, Fossil Fishes, 
Fossil Leaves. Corals, Agate Jewelry, Curios. 
Wholesale and Retail. 16th year. Two-story, 
building full. New cat.. No. 10. 40 pages, finely 
illus., for 5c. L. W. STILWELL, Deadwood, 
S. Dak. 





PUBLICATIONS OF 
C. R. ORCUTT, San Diego, Cal. 

c, 

West American Scientist, sample, .lo^ 
■West American Mollusca, vol. I, $i.oo 
Review of the Cactaceae, vol. I, $3.00 
Botany of Southern California, $1.00 



"You might as well be out of the Bird 'World al- 
together as go without THE OSPREY." 

THR OSPRRY, 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of 
Popular Ornithology. 

Edited by Theodore Gill, in Co-op- 
eration with Robert Ridgway, L. 
Stejneger, C W. Richmona and 
Other Eminent Ornithologists. 

The Osprey does not keep a poet, 
but it has an office cat who can catch 
more birds than all the poets put to- 
gether. If you don't believe this, read 
The Osprey. If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange specimens, advertise in 
The Osprey. If you want to keep in 
with other Bird Men, subscribe for The 
Osprey. If you want to write about 
Birds, you can do it in The Osprey, 
provided you know how to write. If 
you like a beautifully printed and pro- 
fusely illustrated magazine, all about 
Birds you must have The Osprey. 

Terms— One Dollar a Year. 

Published by 

TH£ OSFHLHY COMI"AT>JY, 

321-323 4Y2 St., Washington, D. C. 



The Condor for igoi. 

This popular Califomian, illustrated maga- 
zine of ornithology begins its third volume 
with 1901, and its issues range from 24 to 32 
pages in size. It controls the output of West- 
em material, and prints the most interesting 
and valuable articles to be found in any "bird" 
journal. New features have been introduced 
for 1901, which will serve to make THE CON- 

"DOR 3i iGSidPT ' 

The March (1901) number is one of extreme 
interest, containing among other things a 
charming article on the nesting of the Golden 
Eagle by K. H. Beck, illustrated with three full 
page plates depicting nests in various rugged 
situations Mr. E. H. Skinner contributes a 
valuable and most interesting illustrated ar- 
ticle on the nesting habits of Giraud's Fly- 
catcher in its Mexican home, and otlier inter- 
esting papers are presented by Joseph Grin- 
nell, A. W. Anthony, R. D. Lusk and other well 
known contributors. A copy of this valuable 
number will be sent for 20 cents in stamps. 

yearly SUBSCRIPTION, $1; VOL. II CAN ALSO 
BE SUPPLIED AT $1. » 

The Cooper Ornithological Club also offers 
for sale its new 80-page publication on "The 
Birds of the Kotzebue Sound Region, Alaska," 
by that well-known writer, Joseph Grinnell. 
This will be sent on approval; price 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address all orders for sample copies, sub- 
scriptions or communications to 

C. BARLOW, Editor and Business Mgr.^ 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



180 



THE OOLOGIST 



X-MAS LIST. 

Eggrs in Sets, First Class, Witli Data. 
Prices Per Set Prepaid. 



Cone's Flycatclier. 3 ^5 8 

Short-eared Owl. 4 (a 

Sooty Grouse. 3 'g. 

Blue- fronted Jay, 3 : Magnolia Warbler, 4, 
per set. 

Prairie Hen, 8 (a, - 

Marsh Hawk, 5; Bartramian Sandpiper, 4, 
per set 

Glaucous Gull. 2 (a, 

Black-necked StUt, 4: Mallard Duck. 6(g.... 

Am. Avocet. 4: Audubon. s Shearwater, 1 @ 

Belted Kingfisher. 6: Pigeon Guillemot, 'i\ 
Burrowing Owl, 7. per set 

Verdin, 3; Prairie Horned Lark, 4; Ariz. 
Hooded Oriole. 3. per set 

Chestnut-sided Warbler, \(a, _ 

Stormy Petrel, 1 (g 

Louisiana Heron, 4; White-eyed Vireo, 3, 
per set 

Lazuli Bunting, 3 !?> _ 

Calif. Towfiee, 4; Noddy Tern, 1, per set 

Arkansas Goldfinch. 4: Black-headed Gros- 
beak. 3: Sooty Tern, 1 ; Leache's Petrel, 
1, per set 

Samuel's Song Sparrow, 3: Puffin, l, per set 



3.00 
150 
.85 



Unusually Heavy Marked Sets. 

Swamp Sparrow, Z<% _ 22 

Chickadee, 6 'g 35 

Spotted Sandpiper. 4 (a, .82 

Russet-backed Thrush, 3 (g, _ .20 

Bobo-llnk, 4 ig 45c;5'5> 55 

Lar£:e Sets. 

House Wren, 7 (a, 20 

Sora, 12 ra, 55 

Pied-billed Grebe, 8 fg .30 

Sooty lein,l (unusually large egg) _ .18 

Bird Skins. 

Prepaid unless otherwise mentioned. ( m. 
male; fm. female). 

Pied-billed Grebe, m 8 .45 

Screech Owl (in downy plumage) 38 

Am. Barn Owl m.. postage 12c .90 

Short-eared Owl m.. postage 12 c 65 

Kittawake Gull m., postage. 10c 85 

Balrd's Sandpiper m _ .42 

Virginia Rail m .32 

Williamson's Sapsucker (tip of beak gone) 

m 50 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, m .22 

Calif. Woodpecker m 86 

Lapland Longspur. m .22 

Snowflake, m. or fm 12 

Redpole. m. orfm _ .12 

Prairie Horned Lark, m. or fm. 14 

Am. Crossbill, m 28 

White wing Crossbill, m _ .38 

White wing Crossbill, fm .20 

Spurred Towhee, m 18 

'White-eyed Vlreo, m _ .18 

Least Vireo. m. 24 

Oregon Junco, m _ .24 

Horned Lark, m. .28 

Chestnut-backed Chickadee, m 38 

Raby-crowned Kinglet, m _ .26 

Kuby-crowned Kinglet, fm _ .18 

Cassin's Kingbird, fm 18 

Cerulean Warbler fm 28 

Connecticut Warbler, m 70 

Bay-breasted Warbler, m. or fm 34 

Fox Sparrow, m 20 



Mounted Birds (with perches ) 
Small ones by mail prepaid. 
Snowflake, Redpoll, Indigo Bunting, Cedar 

Waxwing, each 8 .60 

Bluebird, Redwlnd Starling, each 75 

Larger ones by express, F. O. B. 

Varied Thrush, Bronzed Grackle, each ,75 

Am. Crow, Screech Owl, each 90 

Puffin 1,65 

Books. 

All in good condition and postpaid. 
Davie's "Nests and Fsgs," 5th ed., fully 

illustrated, cloth, 12 2,t _ _fl.50 

Apgar's "Birds of Eastern North America." 

an analytical key, last ed.. cloth 43 

Catalogue of all Naturalists supplies and 
specimens free. 
Full list of Butterflies and Moths for 10c. 
Scientific Shells, Stamps and Supplies to 
exchange for eggs in sets and desirable Indian 
Relics. 

I can stiU furnish the Indian relics.single eggs 
at '4. and conf. Bonds as listed in last Oolo- 
GisT ; 2nd class eggs and Shinplasters all gone. 
Address, 

ERNEST H. SHORT, 
Box 173, Rocliester. N. Y. 

Books. NOTE THEIR PRICES. Eggs.&c. 

Canadian birds, new 8 .40 

Osprey vol. 2. new _ 90 

Cooper Club Bulletin, vol. I complete 3 00 

The Condor New sub. and Pacific Coast 

Aufauna, Nos, 1 and 2 1.50 

Coue"s Birds, Colorado Valley 3.50 

Birds Rhode Island, 1.50 

Best Steel Climbers with straps 2.50 

Cut the Lining Egg Drills, sample sets 1.00 

Data Blanks, per ICO 10 

Egg Cotton, pink, coral, blue, green, 

canary, pkg 45 

Egg Cotton per sheet 08 

The Best Pencil ever used for eggs, in 

general use 10 

Egg Trays, 100 assorted sizes (exp. extra) .60 

Blow-pipes, best _ .40 

Bendire's Life Histories, Vol, 1, new _ 9.00 

Osprey. Seven number Volume one 1.00 

Broad-winged Hawk 1-2. 1-2, 1-3, per egg... 1.00 
Black-throated Green Warbler n-4, n-4 in 

situ, sets _ 2.00 

Af. Ostrich, each 1 00 

Black-headed Jay. 1-2 set 3.00 

Duck Hawk, 1-1 1.50 

Iceland Gull, 1-1 1.25 

Long-cre=*ted Jav, 1-4, set - 2.00 

Arizona Jay. 2-6, set _ 2 00 

Hundreds of eggs. Get my Bulletin, also of 
Tools, Books, Supplies etc. 

BENJAMIN HOAC. 

Stephentown, N. Y. 

JAMES P. BABBITT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Taxidermists' Supplies, Bird 
Skins, Eggs & Publications. 

Fine Imported Glass Eyes a Speeialty. 

Illustrated Catalogue and large monthly bulle- 
tin of bargains in Birds Skins and Eggs free upon 
application. 

TAUNTON, MASS. 



The Oologist. 



VOL. XVIII. NO. 12. ALBION. N. Y., DECEMBER. 1901. Whole No. 183^ 



The Oologist. 

A Montmy Publication Devoted to 

OOLOGY, ORNITHOLOGY AND 
TAXIDERMY. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, Editor and Publisher, 
ALBION, N. Y. 

Correspondence and Items of Interest to the 
student of Birds, their Nests and Eggs, so^clted 
tromalL 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 

Single subscription -tOc per annum 

Sample copies 5c each 

The above rates Include payment of postage. 

Each subscriber Is given a card good for a 
Want. Exchange or For Sale Notice. (This card 
Is redeemable at any time within one year from 
date thereon.) 

Subscriptions can begin with any number. 
Back numbers of the Oologist can be furnished 
at reasonable rates. Send stamp for descrip- 
tions and prices. 

^p~Remember that the publisher must be notl 
fled by letter when a subscriber wishes his paper 
stopped, and all arrearages must be paid. 

ADVERTISING RATES : 

5 cents per nonpareil line each Insertion. 

1-^ lines tn every Inch. Seven inches In a col- 
umn, and two columns to the page. 

Nothing inserted for less than 25 cents. No 
"special rates." 5 cents per line Is "nei." "rock 
bottom." 'inside.'" -spot cash"' rate from which 
there is no deviation and no commission to 
agents. If you wish to use 5 lines or less space 
It will cost you 25 cents: lOO lines. fo.cO: loco lines, 
$50.00. "Trade"' (Other than cash) advertlse- 
• ments will be accepted by special arrangement 
only and at rates from double to Ave times cash 
rates. Due Bins and Cards payable in advertis- 
ing wUl be honored only at regular rates in force 
at the date of issuance of said bill or card. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Express 
or Postofflce Money Order, Registered Letter or 
Postal Note. Unused U. S . Postage Stamps of 
any denomination wUl be accepted for sums un- 
der one dallar. Make Money Orders and Drafts 
payable and address all subscription s an d com- 
munications to FRANK H. LATTIN, 

Albion, Orleans Co. . N. Y. 

ENTERED AT P. O., ALBION, N. Y. AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



Warblers Found Breeding in Liver- 
more Maine. 

Black and White Warbler iMni- 
otilta varia.) Breeds, but its nests 
are very hard to find. I think it is not 



an uncommon breeder in this locality, 
and is found quite abundant during 
migration. Earliest nest found May 
25th, latest June 9th. Eggs 3 to 5 in 
number, color "white, spotted in the 
form of a "wreath around the large end 
■with hazel, lilac, che&tnut etc. Nest 
composed of leaves, bark, pine needles, 
grasses, lined "with horse hair, and hair 
like roots. 

Nashville Warbler {Eelmintho- 
phila rvjicapilla.) Fairly common 
breeder in this locality. Its nest is 
"well concealed and very hard to find 
unless the bird is flushed from it. 
Ear iest nest found May 31st, latest 
July 5th. Eggs 3 to 5 in number. 
Color "white, spotted over the entire 
surface "with lilac, chestnut etc. Nest 
composed of grasses, moss, pine needles 
and hair, and sunk deep in the ground 
so that the top of the nest is level wi:h 
the surface. 

Northern Parula Warbler [Com- 
psothJypis amerii-ana nsiiea ) Breeds, 
and no doubt quite abunaantly in this 
locality -where trees are found that 
are laden "with the long gray moss the 
usnea of the botanist, that is found in 
such abundance throughout the forests 
of Maine, but I have never found its 
nest until this season. They "were 
built in "woods near stagnant pools of 
"water at a height of from 20 to 30 feet 
from the ground. Earliest nest found 
Jidy 9th, latest July 22d. Eggs 3 to 5 
in number. Color white, speckled "with 
bro"wn, chestnut, grayish etc. Nest 
composed of the usnea moss. The 
usnea moss in which one nest of this 
species is built and which is in my col- 
lection, measured 33 inches in length. 
It was in a dead spruce, and is a beau- 
tiful nest. 



182 



THE OOLOGIST 



Yellow WABBLER(Z)enc?roica cestiva) 
Fairly common here, but not so abund- 
ant a breeder in this town as in other 
localities near by. Breeds very abund- 
antly at Dead River and Androscoggin 
Lake in the towns of Leeds and Wayne, 
Me. See The Oologist, Feb., 1900, 
pages 26, 27 and 28. 

Master Harold W. Philoon found a 
beautiful nest of this species containing 
four eggs, built in a pear tree at his 
home in Livermore this past season. 

Nests early in June in this locality. 
Eggs three to five in number; color, 
greenish or bluish white, spotted with 
black lilac and brownish, thickest at the 
large end in the form of a wreath. 

The nest is very finely made and is 
composed of plant stems, fine fibers and 
grasses, and lined with soft plant down 
and some times a few feathers. I have 
never found them built over ten feet 
from the ground, seldom more than two 
or three, although I have found a large 
number of them. 

Black-throated Blue Warbler 
{Dendroicaccerulescens.) I consider this 
species a very rare breeder in this local- 
ity and have only one record of its nest- 
ing in this town June 12, 1893. A nest 
containing four slightly incubated eggs, 
placed in a low bush about eighteen in- 
ches from the ground, and composed of 
nearly the same material as described 
for this species in Davies' Nests and 
Eggs of N. A. Birds, 4th edition. 

The color of the eggs is a greenish 
white, very heavily blotched with red- 
ish brown chestnut and hazel nearly 
covering the entire surface at the large 
end, a very beautiful set of eggs. 

Myrtle Warbler {Dendroica corona- 
ia.) This Warbler although not an 
abundant breeder in this locality is not 
rare here by any means, and I think is 
far more plentiful than one would sup- 
pose. I consider this species a common 
summer resident and is found breeding 
in coniferous growths of small pines at 
a height of from five to fifteen feet from 



the ground. Earliest nest found May 
23d, latest June 15th. 

Eggs four or five in number; color, 
white, spotted with reddish brown and 
blotched with large patches of lilac, 
mostly around the large end in the form 
of a wreath. 

The nest is composed of fine twigs of 
the hemlock and fir and fibers, and a 
few dead grasses, and lined first with 
• oft grasses and lastly with a warm bed 
of featherj from the Canadian Ruft'ed 
Grouse [Bonasa uinbellus togata.) 

Magnolia Warbler [Dendroica mac- 
ulosa ) Very common breeder in this 
locality. Have found many nests of 
this species built in confirious growths 
of pine, hemlock, fir and spruce at a 
height of from two to ten feet from the 
ground. 

Earliest nest found June 5th, latest 
July 5th. 

Eggs three to five in number; color, 
white, spotted, speckled and blotched 
with brown hazel black and chestnut in 
some nearly all at the large end, in 
others over the entire surface. 

Nest composed of fine twigs and grass- 
es and lined with fine black hair like 
roots; it is made very flat and is very 
loosely constructed. 

Chestnut-sided WARBLER(2)en(Zroica 
pennsylvanica.) Abundant throughout 
its range and a very common breeder 
in this locality. 

Its nest is commonly found built in 
low bushes seldom more than two feet 
from the ground in old bushy pastures. 

Earliest nest found June 8d, latest 
June 27th. 

Eggs three or four in number; color, 
white, spotted with brown, chestnut, 
lilac and sometimes dots of blackish. 

Nest composed of bark, dead grasses, 
weed stalks, plant down, etc.; lined 
with fine grasses and horse hair, and is 
generally loosely constructed, although 
this is not always the case, for I have 
found them finely made. 

Blackburnian Warbler [Dendroica 



THE OOLOGIST. 



183 



blackburnice.) I consider this a very 
rare breeder in this locality, but is fair, 
ly common during migration. I have 
never found its nest, but have taken 
their young just out of the nest, and 
have observed them feeding their young 
in the tree tops in a woods of pine, cedar 
and fir. 

This past season the date at which I 
took the youDg was July 29th. No 
doubt fresh eggs could be obtained in 
the latter part of June in this locality. 
Next season I hope to record a nest and 
eggs of this species from Livermore. 

Black THROATED Greek Warbler 
{Dendroica virens.) Common summer 
resident and no doubt a common breed- 
er in this locality, although I have found 
but few nests. 

Earliest nest found June 8th, latest 
June 26th. • 

Eggs three or four in number; color, 
white, with a wreath around the large 
end of rufous lilac, chestnut and brown- 
ish spots, although some are spotted 
over their entire surface. 

Nest is composed of bark strips, dead 
grasses, hair and sometimes feathers; 
lined with fine down and hair, and all 
that I have seen were built from five to 
fifteen feet from the ground. 

Pine Warbler (Dendroica vigorsii .) I 
think this species is a common summer 
resident in Livermore, although very 
few nests are found and I do not think 
it is found breeding very abundant in 
any part of the state. 

I have had the good luck to find two 
nests, each containgfour eggs, one June 
14th, the other July 6th, both built in 
small pine in thi^k coniferous woods, 
one about fifteen feet up and the other 
only six or seven feet from the ground. 

Eggs white or grayish white, spotted 
and blotched with brownish lilac and 
blackish in the form of a wreath around 
the large end, the rest of the egg spar- 
ingly marked. 

The nests are composed of fine strips 
of bark from the birch and grapevine, 



find dead grasses and a few fine twigs, 
and are deeply hollowed and lined with 
fine dead grasses, hair and hair like 
roots, and warm mosses, and are very 
thick and warmly made. 

Oven-bird (Seiurus aurocapillus.) A 
common breeder in this locality. I 
have found many nests of this species 
and I do not consider them hard to 
find. 

The most beautiful nest and eggs of 
this bird that I have ever seen was one 
that I found in the month of June, 1898, 
in the town of Leeds, Me., near the An- 
droscoggin Lake, that I have mentioned 
in The Oologist, Feb. issue, 1900, page 
26. 

Well do 1 remember that night, for it 
was after the day had past and the sun 
had gone down below the western hills, 
and night was coming on. With my 
naturalist friend, Mr. J. E. Teague, of 
Livermore, who has been my compan- 
ion on many a camping expedition, I 
was climbing a hill to view a cavern far 
up the hillside among the ledges. Every- 
thing was silent, not a breath stirred 
the leaves of the giants of the forest, 
and from the hilltop we could look out 
over the silent waters of beautiful An- 
droscoggin Lake, dotted with its many 
islands, its waters glistening like silver 
under the rays of the risins? moon. That 
one could always go through life as calm 
and peaceful as this. A scene like this 
brings one nearer to his Creator and 
fills him with more noble purposes. It 
seemed as though I was looking into 
another world as we stood looking out 
on to this grand sight. 

The silence was broken from a clump 
of bushes near by. There came to us 
the mournful notes of the Whip-poor- 
will, then from the deep dark forest the 
hoot of an Owl was heard, then silence; 
then from far out on the lake came the 
mournful screams of a pair of Loons 
that were nesting there, then silence 
again. Night had come and all nature 
was at rest. 



184 



THE OOLOGIST. 



We turned to retrace our steps back 
to camp, when, from the leaves at my 
feet, there ran a little bird with the ac- 
tions of a mouse, and looking down, we 
beheld the beautiful home of the Golden- 
crowned Thrush, built among the grand 
old hill'? of northern Maine. 

This species nests in this locality in 
June. I have never found it nesting in 
any other month of the year. 

The eggs are four or five in number, 
usually five, and are too well known to 
need any descriotion, as is also the nest. 

Maryland Yellow-throat {Geoth- 
lypis trichas ) Common breeder in this 
locality. Have found many nests built 
in bunches of grass or low bushps, and 
sometimes on the ground at the foot of 
a tussock of grass near or in swampy 
localities. 

The nest is very hard to find by 
watching the birds carrying nesting 
material, and nearly all that I have 
found was by flushing the bird from the 
nest, which is very large and bulky for 
so small a bird. 

Earliest nest found June 6th, latest 
June 28th. 

Eggs three to five in number; color, 
white, spotted and lined with brown 
and black mostly at the large end, al- 
though the rest of the egg is not un- 
spotted. 

The nest is composed of dead leaves 
and course grasses and lined with fine 
dead grasses and horse hair. 

Canadian Warbler ( Wilsonia pusil- 
la.) Rare breeder in this locality. Have 
never found its nest. July 10th found 
two pairs of these Warblers feeding 
their young. It was in a low swampy 
woods of fir, spruce and ash. The 
young were hardly able to fly and were 
easily caught and positively identified. 
Next season I intend to find a nest of 
this Warbler if careful search will re- 
veal it. 

American Redstart {Setophoga ruti- 
cilla.) Abundant breeder and a beauti- 
ful bird and with tail spread like a fan 



they flit from tree top to tree top, re- 
minding one of a huge butterfly in all 
the brilliant colors of the rainbow. The 
Redstart delights to nest in woods of 
deep green foliage near running 
streams. 

Earliest nest found June 1st, latest 
June 25th. 

Eggs three or four in number; color, 
white or greenish white, spotted with 
brown and lilac over the entire surface, 
thickest at the large end. 

Nest composed of fine fibers and bark 
strips and spider webs; lined with 
gras--e8 and horse hair. Built from five 
to fifteen feet above the ground. 

In closing this paper 1 would say that 
I consider the Warblers the most inter- 
esting family of birds for the ornitholo- 
gist to study, and in giving the descrip- 
tion of the nests and eggs i-n this paper, 
I have described specimens that are in 
my own collection, and while it may 
differ from the descriptions given by 
others, it is correct in regard to the 
specimen that I have examined. 

Hoping that more attention will be 
given to the study and less to the de- 
struction of our feathered friends, I re- 
main oologicaly and ornithologicaly, 
Guy H. Briggs. 
Livermore, Maine. 



The Accipiter Cooperini in Wayne and 
Oakland Counties, Michig-an. * 



Cooper's Hawk is a common summer 
resident in both Wayne and Oakland 
counties, being exceeded in abundance 
only by the Red-shouldered [Buteo bore- 
alls ) It is well known to the farmers 
as the "chicken-hawk," and most farm- 
er boys pride themselves upon the 
number they have killed. It is the 
most dashing and spirited of our sum- 
mer hawks becoming, however, like 
most other hawks, commonest in Aug- 
ust and September. Undoubtedly 
more than 80 per cent of the depreda- 



THE OOLOGIST. 



185 



tions committed upon domestic poultry 
may be attributed to it. Bendire says: 
"Cooper's Hawk must be considered as 
one of the few really injurious Raptors 
found within our limits, and as it is 
fairly common at all seasons through 
the United States, it does in the aggre- 
gate far more harm than all other 
hawks. It is well known to be the 
most audacious robber the farmer has 
to contend with in the protection of his 
poultry, and is equal in every way both 
in spirit and dash, as well as blool- 
thirstiness, of its larger relative, the Gos- 
hawk, lacking, however, the strength 
of the latter, owing to its much smaller 
size. It is far the worst enemy of all 
the smaller game birds, living to a 
great extent on them as well as on 
smaller birds generally. It does not 
appear to be especially fond of the 
smaller ro ients. These as well as rep- 
t'les, batrachians, and insects seem to 
enter only to a limited extent into its 
daily bill of fare, and unfortunately it 
is only too often the case that many of 
our harmless and really beneficial 
hawks have to suffer from the depreda- 
tions of these daring theives." How- 
ever, this has always been the most in- 
teresting of hawks to me, perhaps be- 
cause the first I ever shot. To relate 
the story: It was late in the afternoon 
on a September day. A friend and 
myself were returning from a collect- 
ing trip rather disappointed with our 
day's "catch," when we noticed a hawk 
sailing through the air. Suddenly he 
seemed to drop into an apple tree at 
the end of a long field. We crept to 
within gun range, when he suddenly 
sailed from the tree. I tired bringing 
him to the ground- When we got up 
to him he turned over on his back and 
showed signs of fight. Not knowing 
the strength of a wounded hawk, I 
went to pick him up. when at the same 
time he took a gentle hold on my hand, 
and would not let go until we killed 
him. 



Mr. J. Claire Wood speaks of a female 
Cooper's Hawk in his collection which 
was taken in Greenfield Tp., Wayne 
County. The bird had dashed through 
the laths of a hen coop in pursuit of 
pome small chickens, and was caught 
by the farmer before it could escape. 
It was very poor in flesh, and its stom- 
ach was empty, which probably ex- 
plains its daring ferocity. Mr. Wood 
also records the following sets of eggs 
of the Cooper's Hawk taken by him. 

"May 6, 1900. Nest situated about 45 
feet from the ground in the main fork 
of a slanting beech, in higher portion 
of a thick woods in Van Buren Tp., 
Wayne County. This nest contained 
four eggs. 

"May 5, 1901. From same pair of 
birds, nest also 45 feet from the ground 
in fork of young beech, the trunk of 
which was not more than nine inches 
in diameter. This nest was not more 
than 100 feet from tree containing old 
one. The old bird was not at home, 
but put in h°r appearance as I ascended 
the tree, and was very demonstrative, 
sweeping down within a few feet of my 
head. Was induced to climb by notic- 
ing bits of down clinging to nest and 
surrounding limbs, which is invariably 
the case, I believe, when incubation has 
commenced. This nest contained five 
eggs somewhat incubated. 

"May 11, 1900. Rather open oak 
woods bordering railroad track, Clark- 
ston, Mich. The continued persistant 
cries of this bird induced me to look for 
the nest. There was a great many old 
crow nests in the woods and I climbed 
to several before discovering the one 
containing the eggs, which were five in 
number, and very slightly incubated. 

"The most remarkable part of this 
take was the fact that while it rained 
steadily all day, the hawk had not been 
on the nest for some hours, for the nest 
was soaking wet, and the eggs cold, 
nevertheless, she was very solicitous 
over the welfare of her home." 



186 



THE OOLOGIST. 



It has been stated that a visit to the 
nest of a Cooper's Hawk would cause 
the parents to abandon it, however, I am 
inclined to differ judging from a pair I 
had an acquaintance with last spring. 
On April 21st, while out collecting birds, 
we met a farmer of whom we inquired 
if he had seen any hawk nests. He re- 
plied in the affirmative, and said that a 
pair of "duck hawk" had taken up 
their abode in a nearby woods, point- 
ing out about where he supposed it 
was. He said that but a couple of days 
before, he had passed the tree, and that 
the old ones flew around, saying some 
very inpolite words (in hawk). We 
made directly for the spot, and found 
the nest in the crotch of a beech tree 
33 feet from the ground, but the tree 
was too hard to climb. On April 25th, 
we returned with irons, and climbed to 
the nest. It contained one egg which 
was cold and dirty, and as no birds 
were around I concluded that it was 
the egg of a Red-shouldered hawk which 
had deserted the nest on account of the 
farmers interrupting it. However, I 
took the egg home and upon washing 
it, found it was the egg of a Cooper's 
hawk. I blew it and found it fresh. 
On April 28th, I again visited the nest 
on which the old female was sitting, 
but she flew in response to a tap on the 
trunk of the tree. There was one egg 
in the nest, which I took and replaced 
it with that of a chicken. May 5th, I 
returned to the neet and found two 
more fresh eggs beside that of the hen. 
I took these eggs home leaving one 
more hen's egg in the nest. On May 
19th, I returned to find one more hawk's 
egg, it was highly incubated. 

You will probably be interested to 
know what became of the chicken eggs. 
What would the poor hawk do if after 
setting three weeks, find that she had 
only raised — her breakfast, but this 
could not be, as the eggs were hard 
boiled intended for my lunch, and upon 
my last visit, I threw them from the 
nest. 

Alex. W. Blain, Jr. 

* Read before Chapter 176 Detriot B. Agassiz 
Association. Oct. 4, 1901. 



The Food Supply of the Brown Thrash- 
er and Mocking- Bird. 
By C. C. Purdum, M. D. 

The Brown Thrasher:— This bird 
IS found most plentiful in the Carolin- 
ian zone of the U. S., but is found 
breeding from New England to the 
Dakotas. Like the birds which we have 
last considered, this bird rears two 
broods in one season. Being more re- 
tiring in its habits than the catbird, one 
would naturally look to find the thrash- 
er less destructive than the latter. As 
a matter of fact it is, but there is no 
great difference in the varieties of cul- 
tivated fruit which it devours, although 
the quantity is much less. 

Perhaps the variety of food taken by 
this bird from the garden is grea'^er 
than any heretofore considered by us, 
consisting as it does of a rather diver- 
sified list of fruit, viz., peaches, plums, 
apples, pears, strawberries, black and 
red raspberries, grapes and cherries; 
all of which are marketable and a 
great source of income to tbe farmer. 
Naturally therefore the fruit grower, 
observing these birds feeding in his 
trees and shrubs, looks upon them with 
no favorable eye, and contemplates 
their destruction as a thing to be de- 
sired. He should, however, look far- 
ther than the loss of a few fine cherries 
or grapes, and observe the bird closely, 
when he would find that for each peck 
at a grape or any of the other fruit, the 
bird will eat a dozen or more noxious 
insects, taking them as the body of the 
meal and the fruit as a side dish. 

This paper on the food supply of the 
Brown Thrasher, is based upon the re- 
port of the examination of one hun- 
dred and twenty-one stomachs, collect- 
ed as far west as Kansas and covering 
a range from Florida to Maine. This 
investigation was conducted by the U. 
S. Department of Agriculture during 
the years of 1893 and 1894, and the re- 
sult may be roughly estimated as fol- 
lows: 



THE OOLOGIST. 



187 



Animal matter, 63 per cent. 

Vejjetable matter, 35 per cent. 

Mineral matter, 2 per cent. 

()f the animal food, beetles are by far 
the most relished, forming nearly one- 
half of the whole amount. Next are 
the grasshoppers and crickets (Ortho- 
ptera), forming about one-tifth of the 
animal food consumed. Then comes 
the caterpillars, forming somewhat 
less than one-fifth, and then the spiders, 
thousand legs and bugs, forming the re- 
maining one tenth. 

Only eight per cent, of the beetles 
consumed are among the beneficial 
predacious ground varieties, and by 
the consumption of a great volnme of 
crickets, caterpillars, weevils, click and 
leaf beetles, a ratio is established, de- 
cidedly in favor of the Thrasher. 

Before rendering a complete verdict 
on the Thrasher, we must follow his 
food supply through the entire season. 
In the case of the Wren we 
found this bird subsisting on an 
animal diet almost entirely through- 
out the entire season. With the 
Thrasher it is different; he changes his 
diet with the ripening of the fruit, and 
as he eats more fruit he takes a smaller 
number of insects, and vice versa. For 
Instance: Early in April when the 
Thrasher first arrives from the South, 
animal food is much more plentiful and 
the Thrasher consumes at least, three 
times as much animal food as vegetable, 
and as the insects are very plentiful 
even before the vegetable food is ripe, 
the excess of animal food continues and 
increases until about the latter part of 
May it reaches a maximum of 7 to 1. 

When the vegetable element begins 
to ripen, the proportion of animal food 
to fruit begins to lessen, and about the 
middle of August to the first of Septem- 
ber, the ratio changes gradually until it 
stands inversely 2 to 1. At no time 
however does the proportion exceed 
this two to one ratio, leaving quite a 
iieavy balance to the end of the season 
on the side of the animal food. 



Notwithstanding the fact that the 
maximum of fruit consumed, is reached 
in July, we find that a large number of 
beetles and ants are also devoured dur- 
ing this month. 

After the 20th of June the caterpil- 
lars which have been very largely con- 
sumed up to this time, begin to fall off 
in numbers, and their place to be taken 
by mulberries, buckthorn, etc., and 
while a few are found in the stomach 
constantly, still after the above date 
they fail to increase to any marked de- 
gree during the remainder of the sea- 
son. 

The above looks somewhat dark to 
the value of the Thrasher economically, 
but after all, out of the general propor- 
tions of 25 per cent, of vegetable food, 
we find that only 11 per cent, of it is 
cultivated, and of tnis, eight per cent. 
is fruit and the rest grain. 

Mr. Sylvester D. Judd of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, says of this bird, 
"The economic relation of the Brown 
Thrasher to agriculture may be summed 
up as follows: Two thirds of the birds 
food is animal, the most of the 
vegetable food is fruit, but the 
quantity taken from cultivated crops is 
offset by three times that quantity of in- 
secc pests. In destroying insects, the 
Thrasher is helping to keep in check 
organisms, the undue increase of which 
disturbs the balance of nature and 
threatens our welfare. A good example 
of the result of such irregular increase 
is to be had in the fluctuations of the 
Rocky Mountain locust. 

The Brown Thrasher in its present 
numbers is a useful bird, and should be 
strenuously protected from gunners 
and nest plundering boys." 

The Mocking Bird (Mimus polyglot- 
tos): — The amount of data regarding 
the food supply of this bird is small, 
and although its range is large, and in 
many localities, especially in Texas, the 
bird occurs in great numbers, the in- 
vestigations — what few have been made 



188 



THE OOLOGIST. 



— have not been carried out systemati- 
cally. What has been determined can 
be stated concisely as follows: 

The animal food is much less in 
quantity than the vegelable, and con- 
sists entirely of insects and spiders. 
The insects include grasshoppers, cat- 
erpillars, beetles and ants, while the 
vegetable food is composed of the pulp 
of the larger fruits, as pears, plums, 
apples, etc., together with large quanti- 
ties of the seeds of berries of the smilax, 
sumac, mulberry, bayborry, pokeberry, 
black alder, red cedar Virginia creeper 
and poison ivy. 

The writer will be pleased to receive 
either authentic notes on the contents 
of the stomachs of birds shot, or es- 
tablished facts in regard to the food 
supply of this bird, and will later em- 
body them in a report, if sufficient data 
can be procured to prepare an article 
of value. The concluding paper will 
deal with the Meadow Lark [Sturnella 
viagna.) 



An Example of Maternal Solicitude 

Many are the stories told in prose 
and sung in rhyme of maternal devo- 
tion among animals and birds. So 
strongly is the maternal instinct devel- 
oped that it leads to acts of sublime 
heroism that challenge the admiration 
of the world. Then it has its amusing 
side, as when a brooding hen will pa- 
tiently incubate a china door knob 
without one ray of suspicion of the 
hoax being played upon her. 

An example of sublime, though re- 
diculous devotion came under my ken 
last summer which may be worth re- 
counting. I made a professional visit 
to one of our distant mining camps, 
high up in the mountains. After my 
patient's wants were ministered to. the 
Superintendent, who knew of my pro- 
pensity for robbing birds nests, called 
one of the men and requested him to 



lead me to the nest of a Humming B'rd 
that had been discovered a few days 
previously. The path led us up the 
steep mountainside about one-half 
mile, through the dense white fir and 
alder thicket. The nest was saddled 
upon the body of a small fir, about four 
feet from the ground. I was delighted 
to find the bird at home and ready for 
callers. She was a Calliope (Trochilus 
Calliope) one of the rarer species with 
us, and as my guide remarked that she 
had been upon the nest three days pre- 
viously, I felt sure that a fine set of 
egg^ would shortly be added to my cab- 
inet. I gently shook the bush with the 
intention of causing her to vacate Not 
any vacate there. On the contrary, she 
settled down into the nest with a sort 
of fight-it-out-on-this-line-if it-takesall- 
summer air that was highly amusing, 
I then gently lifted her up by the beak 
despite her scoldings. She dug her feet 
into lhe lining of the nest in such a 
manner that I feared to break tbe eggs 
which I could not see, so was obliged to 
desist.. Reversing the plan of battle, I 
lifted her by the very brief condal ap- 
pendage projecting above the rim of 
the nest. This was too much of an in- 
dignity for even an outraged hummer, 
so with an angry buzz she took wing 
and perched upon a tree not many 
yards away. I looked down at my 
treasures and no treasures were there. 
Not an egg. A pretty little nest of 
black moss and tree down but nothing 
that would in the future add to the 
bird populaiion of Idaho. Maybe some 
of your readers can tell me what that 
bird had in her mind. If so, I will 
gladly furnish stamps for I very much 
desire to know. Yours ooloaically, 
Chas. S. Moody. 
Orofino, Idaho. 



THIS PAPER is printed at the Book 
and Magazine Publishing House of 
A. M. EDDY, Albion, N. Y. 



THE OOLOGIST. 



189 



Books, Pamphlets and Excerpts 
for the Naturalist. 

Zoology, Natural History, Mammalogy, Herpetology, Ichthylogy, 

Conchology, Entomology, Botany, Geology, Paleaontology, 

Ethnology, Etc. 

For Books on Ornithology see List No. 7. 

I wish to close out at once everything in the Book line offered in this List and 
have made prices accordingly. If you cannot spare cash and have desirable sets of 
Birds Eggs or Books and Publications on Ornithology or fine Curios, Indian Relics 
or Foreign Stamps I will swap the cheapsr items offered — cannot bother with small 
exchanges. 

Starred (*) titles are second-hand copies, but as a rule the Inside pages are "good as new." 

The unstarred titles are for new or good as new booljs, in a few instances the covers are 
slightly shelf-worn. 

Many volumes and sets cannot be duplicated— hence the necessity of sending your order 
early. When ordering always state whether you have a second choice, or whether you wish 
money refunded, incase books ordered have been sold. 

Satisfaction always guaranted or money refunded. 

Remit in most convenient manner, but do not send sums of $1.00 or over loose in your letter. 
All books are PREPAID at prices quoted. Address all orders plainly and in full to 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M. D., Publisher, Albion, N. Y. 



GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

(Continued.) 

Russell, Geological History of Lake Lahou- 
tan, A Quarternary Lake of N. W. Nevada, 4to, 
48p, 6pl, G. S. 3 35 

St. John, Geology of N. E. New Mex., SOp, 8pl 
20 

Shaler, The Geology of Nantucket, by Na- 
thaniel Southgate, 55p, lOpl 35 

Singley, Artesian Wells of Texan Gulf Coast 
Slope, 33p, chart _. 25 

Smith, Minerals and Mineral Waters of Chile, 
4to, 24p 15 

Tassin, Directions for Collecting Minerals, 
12p 05 

Taylor, Diamonds and 5 excerpts by others, 
36p 15 

U S. Geological Survey, Annual Reports of 
1880-1896, 29, 4to, vols, thousands of pages, etc., 
16 00 

Vanuxem, Geology of Central New York, 4 to 
306p, SOills 2 00 

Wheeler, Geological Survey west of 100th 
Meridian, Reports, write wants 

White, The Relation of Biology to Geological 
Investigation, 124p,pl 20 

Williams, Gabbros and Associated Horn- 
blende Rocks near Baltimore, Md., 78p, 4pl,. 35 

Woodward, Formulas and Tables to Facili- 
tate the Construction and Use of Maps,124p 40 

PALAEONTOLOGY. 

Billings Paleozoic Fossils of Canada, 144p, 9 
pl,85flgs 75 



Call, Quarternary and Recent MoUusca of the 

Great Basin, 66p, 6pl 35 

Clarke, Higher Devonian Fauna of Ontario 

Co., N. Y., 86p, 3pl 40 

Colvin, Dark Shale and Its Fossils, 6p 10 

Cope, "Vertebrata of Tertiary Formations," 

4to, 1043p, 134pl ..3 00 

, Paleozoic Fishes, 18p, 6pl 25 

, Miocene of Oregon, 16p 15 

, Cretaceous and Tertiary Fishes, 12p 

15 

, Owen on Pythonomorpha, 14p 10 

, New Extinct Vertebrata, 18p 25 

Dall, Calif. Tertiary Fossils, 5p ,. 10 

Fontaine, Fossil Plants from Montana, lOp. 

3pl 15 

, do do from Texss, 22p, 8pl 25 

Fontaine & Knowlton, Triassic Plants, 6p, 5 

pi 15 

Greene, Indiana Palaeontology, part I, 8p, 3 

pi . 20 

Hall, Palaeontology of New York, vol. I, Or- 
ganic Remains of Lower Division of N. Y. Sys- 
tem, (Lower Silurian) 4to 361p, 100pl,536flg_7 50 

, do do. I vol. II, Organic Remains of 

Lower Middle Division, (Middle Silurian) 4to, 

370p, 104pl, 510flg 7 50 

, do do. vol. HI, Fossils of Lower Hel- 

derberg Group and Oriskany Sandstone, 4to, 

531p, Ills 3 00 

Holmes, Fossil Forests of the Yellowstone 
Park, 8p 15 

Leidy, Fresh Water Rhlzopods of North 
America, 4to, 335p,:48Ills, 1190 col. figs 3 00 



190 



THE OOLOGISl 



Lesquereaus. "Cretaceous and Tertiary Flo- 
ras," 4to, 295p, 60pl 2 00 

, Fossil Marine Plants. Sp. pi 15 

, Miocene Flora of Alaska. 6p, 5pl..._ 15 

Marcou. Bitiliography of Publications relat- 
ing to Fossil Invertebrates, including complete 
lists of the writinsrs of Meek, White and Wal- 

COtt, 334p, M. B. 30 90 

Meek, Palaeontological Report : Hodge. Tert- 
iary Coals; Xewberry, Ancient Lakes: Leidy. 
Vertebrate Fossils :Lesquereaux.Fossil Plants ; 

all of West.,lCOp. H. S. 70 50 

, Fossils from Vancouver and N. W. 

Boundary, 34p. 6pl 35 

, New Genus Ulntacrinus, 4p, 2fig .„ 10 

Mudge, Tertiary and Cretaceous of Kansas. 
13p 10 

Newberry. Fossil Fishes and Fossil Plants of 
Triassic Rocks, New Jersey and the Connecti- 
cut Valley, I90p. sepl, 4to 2 C5 

Peale. Laramie Group and Jura-Trias of 
Wyoming, etc., 12p _ lO 

Scudder, Palaeontology of Florissant, Colo., 

22p, map 15 

. Fossil Insects, 30p 15 

Walcott. Cambrian Faunas of North Ameri- 
ca, No. 1, 74p, lOpl 50 

. do do. No. 2, 359p, 33pl. 1 15 

New Upper Cambrian Fossils, 14p, 2pl 

_ 15 

Walker, Fla. Fossil Bones. 4p 10 

Ward, Types of the Laramie Flora. 354p, 57pl 

1 15 

White. Laramie Group of Fossils. 30p 15 

, Preservation of Invertebrate Fossils, 

lOp 25 

, Jura-Trias Fossils of Idaho, 20p 15 

.Carboniferous and Cretaceous Fossils of 

Western Territories, 14p 15 

. Non-Marine FossU Mollusca of N. A., 

4tO, 148p,22pl, 500fig. G. S. 3 _1 00 

, Mesozoic and Cenozoic Paleaontoloey 

of California. 33pp _. "is 

. Fresh water Invertebrates of the N. A. 

Jurassic. No. 2, 41p, 4pl 25 

, Invertebrate Fossils from Pacific Coast, 

102p. 14pl 55 

, New Cretaceous Fossils from Califor- 
nia, 25p, 5pl 20 

White .& Nicholson, Bibliographv of North 
American Invertebrate Paleaontology, 132p 35 

White et Nicholson. Supplement to Biblio- 
graphy of N. A. Invertebrate Paleaontology, 10 
P 10 

Whlteaves. Fossils of the Cretaceous Races 
of Vancouver and Adjacent Islands, lOOp, lOpl 
55 

Williams, Fossil Fauna. Upper Devonian, 
from Tompkins Co.. N. Y., to Bradford Co., Pa.. 
36p 20 

Wyman & Conrad. Fossil Mammals and 
Shells from Chile, 4to, 12p, 4pl 25 

Wyoming's Vertebrate FossUs, 34p, 20 photo- 
eng 20 

ETHNOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY. 

Abbott, Ethnological Collection from E. Afri- 
ca, 48p, 12ag 25 

Adler, The Shofar, Its L'se and Origin, 14p. 4 

pl -. 10 

, Two Persepolitan Casts, 6p, 2pl lO 



, Collections of Religious Ceremonials, 

14p 10 

Adler & Casanowicz. Biblical Antiquities,82p, 
46pl 60 

Bessels, Ancient Human Remains from S. W. 
Colo, and N. New Mex., ISp, 7pl 25 

Boehmer, Norsk Naval Architecture, 18p, 5pl 


, Prehistoric Naval Architecture, 122p. 

16pl, 127flg 50 

BoUes. Catalogue of Eskimo Collection in 
National Museum, 32p 10 

Bourke. The Medicine Men of the Apache, 20 
figs. 8pl. 162p, (9) 75 

Burns. The Crump Burial Cave, 4p, pl 10 

Culin. Chinese Games with Dice and Domi- 
noes, oOp, 12pl, 33flg 25 

. Chess and Playing Cards, 378p. 50pl.226 

fig : -1 00 

, The National Game of Africa, 14p, 5pl, 

laflg 15 

Gushing, Outline of Ztml Creation Mythology, 
128p, (13) 60 

De Kay. The Bronze Buddha, 12p. pl 10 

Donaldson. The George Catlin Indian Gallery 
with Memoir and Statistics. 940p, 144pl and 
maps, unb 1 00 

Dorsey. Omaha Dwellings.Furniture and Im" 

plemen;s. 23flg, 26p. (13) 30 

, Omaha and Ponka Letters, 128p 45 

, A Study of Siouan Cults 6pl, 45fig, 194 

p, (11) _ 75 

Ewbank, Indian Antiquities of Chile and Peru, 
4to, 44p. 3 col. pl, ills 50 

Fletcher. Prehistoric Trephining and Cranial 
Amulets. 4to, 33p, 9pl 50 

Fowke. Stone Art. 250fig, lS2p, (13) .1 50 

Gatschet. Mythical Tale of the Isleta Indians 
of New Mexico, 12p _ 15 

Hewitt. Legend of the Fotmding of the Iro- 
quois League, Ittp 20 

Hlppisley. Ceramic Art in China. 106p 35 

Hitchcock. The Ainos of Yezo, Japan, 74p, 65 
pl, 21 fig 40 

, The Ancient Pit-Dwellers of Yezo, 

Japan, I2p, 8pl, 4fig 15 

Hoffman, The Midewiwinor "Grand Medicine 
Society" ot the Ojibwa, 22pl, 40fig, 158p, (7)._ 95 

Holmes, Textile Fabrics of Ancient Peru,18p, 
llflg 15 

. Use of Gold and Other Metals Among 

the Chirique of Isthmus of Darien, 28p,22fig 20 

, Ancient Ruins of S, W Colo., 22p, 14pl 

35 

Hough, Primitive American Armor, 28p, 22pl 
35 

, Fire-making Apparatus, 58p, 8pl, 60fig 

;.... 35 



ills. 



-, The Methods of Fire Making, 16p, pl,l3 
.. 20 



, Lamps of the Eskimo, 34p, 24pl, 4flg 

40 

, Korean Collections in National Muse- 
um. 60p, 30pl 40 

Jackson, Ancient Ariz, and Utah Ruins, 22p. 
8pl 25 

Jouv, Korean Mortuary Pottery, 8p, 7pl, map 
■ 10 

McCauley, A Manual for the Use of Students 
in Egyptology. 90p 7S 

McGulre. Primitive Methods of Drilling, 132p, 
201fig 75 



THE OOLOGIST 



191 



McRae, Across the Andes and Pampas of Ar- 
gentine, 4to, 82p, ills, mp - 50 

Mallery, Picture Writing of the American In- 
dians, 54pl, 1290figs. 822p, (10) 2 f)o 

Mason, Aboriginal Skin Dressing, 38p, 33pl 
40 

, Primitive Travel and Transportation. 

358p, 25pl, 260fig 1 50 

, N. A. Bows, Arrows and Quivers, 50p, 

58pl : -. 75 

, The Human Beast of Burden, 60p, 54flg 

25 

, Cradles of American Aborigines, 52p. 

45flg - 25 

-. The Ulu or Woman's Knife of the Eski- 



mo, 6p, 21pl 20 

. Aboriginal Basket-work, 16p, 64pl.. 60 

— — , Throwing- sticks, 12p, 17pl 30 

MindeleflfcA Study of Pueblo Architecture, 

Tusyan & Cibola, 9lpl, 114figs, 228p, (8) 1 70 

, Casa Grande Euin, lOpl, 9fig,32p (13) 30 

Mooney, The Sacred Formulae of the Chero- 

kees. nop, ills, (T) 40 

Murdock. Ethnological Results of the Pt. Bar- 
row (Alaska) expedition, 428figs. 442p, (9). ..2 45 
Niblack. Indians of the Northwest Coast, 162p, 

70pl, 300flg. 2 maps 1 00 

Pilling, Bibliography of the Algonquian Lan- 
guages, 614p .1 50 

, do do, Athapascan Languages, 126p S5 

, do do, Chinookan Languages, 82p.. 25 

, do do, Eskimo Language. Il6p _ 30 

, do do, Iroquoian Languages, 2C3p.. 40 

, do do, Muskhogean Languages, 114p 

30 

, do do, Salishan Language, 86p 25 

, do do, Siouan Languages, 80p 25 

Porter. Artificial Deformation of Children, 

24p 10 

Powell. Indian Linguistic Families North of 

Mexico, 142p, (7) 55 

, Reports of Bureau of Ethnology, 4to, 

with maps and plates (many colored). Can 
furnish odd volumes. Write wants. 

Rau, Aboriginal Inhabitants of the Calif. 
Peninsula. Agricultural Implements of the N. 
A, Stone Period, N. J. Artificial Shell Deposits, 

48p 35 

, Drilling in Stone Without Metal, lOn, 

12flg 15 

, Observations on Cui)-shaped and other 

Lapidary Sculptures in the Old World and Am- 
erica, 4to, 112p, 34pl. 61fig 1 20 

Shufeldt, et al. 5 Excerpts Navajo Belt 
Weaver Havesii-Pai Indians, Bead Ornaments, 
Nez Perces Language, Indians of SOOyeai's ago, 

44p, 3pl 35 

Stevenson, The Sia, 35pl, 20fig, 158p, (11)... 95 

, Ceremonial of Hasjelti Dailjis and 

Mythical Sand Painting of the Navajo Indians, 
32 col. pi, 60p, (8) 1 40 

Thomas, Work in Mound Exploration, 16p 
20 

, Problem of the Ohio Mounds, 54p, 18fig 

35 

. Catalogue of Prehistoric Works East 

of Rocky Mts., 17pl. 246p 1 50 

Moimd Explorations, 42pl, 342flgs, 742p. 

(12) .„ „. 2 65 

— , Study of the Manuscript Troano, 4to, 

274p, 9pl, lOOfig. 1 40 



Thompson, Ethnology of Easter Island. 106p, 
49pl, 20flg 60 

Turner, Ethnology of the Ungava District, 
Hudson Bay Ter., 8pl, 135fig. 152p, (11) 95 

Wilson, The Swastika, Migration of Indus- 
tries in Prehistoric Times, 2.y3p, 25pl, 374flg.l 00 

, Criminal Anthropology, 70p 30 

. Study of Prehistoric Anthropology. 

Hand Book for Beginners, 76p. 20pl, 287flg 1 00 

, Anthropology at the Paris Exposition 

in 1899, 4Jp, 7pl 15 

, Minute Stone Implements from India, 

7p, 2pl 10 

— . The Golden Patera of Rennes, lOp, pi, 

fig 10 

. Primitive Indu-stry, 14p 15 

. The Paleolithic Period of the Stone 

Age, 26p, 28flg 35 

MICROSCOPY. 

Hitchcock. Preparation of Microscopical 
Mounts of Vegetable Textile Fibres 10 

Manton, W. P., Beginnings with the Micro- 
scope, 73p, ills, (50) 40 

"Microscopical Bulletin," Vol. I to IX, com- 
plete 8 25 

"The American Monthly Microscopical Jour- 
nal,'' Vol. IX to XIII. complete, 2 25 

"The Observer," Out Door World. Vol. VI, 
1895, Ornithology. Entomology. Botany, Conch- 
ology. Biology. Geology and Microscopy, 384p, 
111s .■ 75 

*Wythe, The Microscoplst, A Compendium 
of Microscopic Science, (8.00) 8 80 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

•Agassiz. A Journey in Brazil. 540p, 20pL.l 40 

Baird, Plan of Organization, Administration 
and Regulations of the U. S. National Museum, 
150p _. 35 

Beach. Science "Record for 1872, A Compen- 
dium of Scientific Progress and Discoyery,400p. 
iUs 40 

Bever. Influence of Atropia and Temperature 
on the Heart, 8p, 3pl 10 

*Bridees. Fownes'^ Elementary Chemistry. 
857p, 197fig. (2.75) 60 

Carpenter, Mechanical Philosophy, Horology 
and Astronomy, .576p, 175fig, (2 .50) 75 

Chute's Physics, 388p, 274flg, (1.25) 70 

Cook, Geological Survey of New Jersey. Vol. 
I, Topography, Magnetism, Climate, 440p, mps. 
and charts*...' 80 

Didot's (French) Business Directory of the 
World, including smallest Islands, etc. All the 
Consuls. Moneys, Products, Tariffs, etc. ; Re- 
presentative Merchants, Bankers, etc., of every 
place. New imp Svo, cl. Over 2,(00 p, linen 
pacer, issued May 1. 1883, to May 1, 1S99, Inval- 
uable also to librarians, editors, statesmen and 
writers -.2 CO 

Directory, Cassino's Naturalists' Directory 
of U. S., Canada and the World. Names and 
Addresses of Naturalists, etc.. both Amateur 
and Professional, Edition of 1890, International, 
300p. 9,000 names, (8 00). 35 

, Ed. of '92, International, 450p. 12,000 

names. (2.00) 75 

, Ed. of '95, U. S. and Canada. Geograph- 
ically Arranged, 400p, 5,750 names, (2 00) 1 00 

. Ed. of "96, International, 470p, 13.000 

names, (2.50) 1 45 



193 



THE OOLOGIST. 



♦Genung, Practical Rhetoric, 1892, as new, 
<1.40) 50 

Goode, Museums of the Future, 20p 10 

*Graham, Mexican Boundary Report, 1858, 
250p -. 35 

Green, Agriculture of Maderia, Cape of Good 
Hope. Mauritius, China, etc.. Coal Regions of 
Formosa, etc., etc., 4to, 210p, pi, ills 50 

Hays, Arctic Exploration, 12p, (S. R. 61)... 10 

Hitchcock, Textile Fibres and Fabrics, 8p 10 

*Johnston, Chemistry of Common Life, Svols, 
«74p, 113flg 90 

*Joyce, Scientific Dialogues, in which the 
First Principles of Natural and Experimental 
Philosophy are fully Explained and Illustrated, 
584P, ills 60 

Kane, Magnetical Observations In the Arctic 
Seas, (Smithsonian Contributions to Knowl- 
edge, '58) 4tO, 66p, 2pl 50 

Krehler, White Line Engraving for Relief 
Printing, lOp, 4pl, Bfig 10 

Metallic Castings of Delicate Natural Objects, 
p 10 

Niblack, Instructions of Taking Paper Molds 
of Inscriptions, etc., 12p _. 25 

*Pepper, Cyclopedic Science Simplified, 686p, 
75 



Redfield, Cyclones of Western Pacific, Temp- 
erature of Gulf Stream of N. Pac, 180p, pi, large 
maps 50 

Riordan, Sunrise Stones, A Glance at the 
Literature of Japan, 296p, (1.50) 80 

"Scientific American." nearly 1,000 back num- 
bers of past 40 years ('55 to 'ni). Few, if any, 
duplicates. Many unobtainable at any price. 
Publisher's original price about $75. Lot, only 
7 50 

ScoUick, Making Gelatin Casts, 2p 15 

*Steele, Fourteen Weeks in Physics, 305p, 214 
fig - 35 

Tokuno and Koehler, Japanese Wood cutting 
and Printing, 24p, lOpl, 5fig 15 

True, An Account of the U. S. National Muse- 
um, 38p 10 

Tuttle, (of the Hudson's Bay Expedition) 
Our North Land, Full account of the Canadian 
North-west and Hudson's Bay Route of the 
Hudson's Bay Expedition of 1884, between the 
50th Parallel and Arctic Circle. Two folding 
maps, four portraits and nearly sixty illustra- 
tions, large 8vo, cloth, bevelled boards, 589p, 
(W.OO) _.l 70 

Walter, Vital Science Based upon Life's 
Great Law the Analogue of Gravitation, 320p 
70 

Watkins, Development of American Rail and 
Track, 58p, 115fig 10 

, The Log of the "Savannah," 32p, 6pl 

10 

Wheeler Survey, Appendix PP.of Annual Re- 
port, '80, 4np, map 35 

, Seven Topographical Atlas Sheets of 

Survey in Case,1876 35 

Wilson. China. Travels and Investigations in 
the Middle Kingdom, 376p 70 



WANTED:— Cocoons of Luna Moth. Will 
exchange Al sets of Caracara. Black Vulture, 
Turkey Vulture, White-necked Raven, Black- 
necked Stilt, Bald Eagle and a few others for 
fl.ne sets, can use many common ones. Have 
vols. Auk, and Ornithologist and Oologist to 
exchange for sets Will sell a few sets of 
above. J. W. PRESTON, Baxter, la. 



Books lor the Naturalist. 

In September Oologist we offered 
four pacres of Books and Pamphlets on 
Ornittiology. In the October issue 
we offered four pages on Zoology, 
Mammalogy, Herpetology and 
Ichythologyt In Jv'ovember issue we 
offered four more on Marine Inver- 
tebrates. Conchology, Entomol- 
ogy, Botany, Geology and Min- 
eralogy. 

In our "CLEARANCE SALE LIST" 
of Nov. 15th, we offered all mentioned 
above. This month we offer three 
pages on Palaeontology, Eth- 
nology and Arctiaeolo^s Mic- 
roscopy and Miscellaneous. 

I wish to sell and close all out at ear- 
liest possible date and until Jan. 1, 1902 
I give a Special Discount of lO per 
cent, on all orders of $1 or over and 
send PREPAID. 

I offer hundreds of Excerpts at prices 
ranging from 10 to 35 cents each in or- 
der to make quick work of these cheap- 
er ones (10 to 35c ones only). I will 
send your selection prepaid — any 
amount at the rate of $2 00 worth for 
$1.00. This VERY SPECIAL discount is 
subject to no other discount and is 
good until January 15th only. 

FRANK H. LATTIN, M D. 

Albion, N. Y. 



Ornilliologlcal Literature A Specialty. 

BENJAMIN HOAG, Stephentown, N- Y. 

Books of every description. Subscriptions 
to all American and foreign magazines and 
newspapers, both new and renewals. Back 
volumes, odd numbers. It will pay you to 
send me a list of wants for my quotations be- 
fore you place your orders. Lists and Bulle- 
tins free. 

In following offers. Condor and Recreation 
subscriptions must be new ; if renewals^ add 
a5c each. All others, new or renewals. 

Condor, Recreation and Oologist 81 65 

Oologist and Condor 1.10 

Recreation and Oologist 85 

Auk and Oologist 2.95 

Bird Lore and Oologist _ 1 10 

Osprey and Oologist 1.10 

American Ornithology and Oologist 65 

Recreation and Cosmopolitan Magazine.... 1.30 

Coue's Key revised, will be ready early in 
'93 so publishers advise. Let me book your 
order. I guarantee my prices and you must 
have the book. 

Ridgway's Manual 85.60 

Chapman's Handbook 2.25 

Davie's Nests and Eggs, 5th ed 1.50 

Davie's Taxidermy 2.50 

All the new books in every branch of litera- 
ture, soon as issued. School and College text 
books. Any book obtainable. Get my prices. 
You can save money.