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Full text of "The Oklahoma red book"

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THE 

OKLAHOMA 

RED BOOK 



VOL. II 



Compiled by 

W. B. RICHARDS 

CORPORATION RECORD CLERK 



Under the Supervision of 

BENJAMIN F. HARRISON 

SECRETARY OF STATE 



OKLAHOMA CITY. OKLAHOMA 
1912 



V(o'i\ 



Exchanjre 
Brookings Institution Ij5brary 

MAR 1 3 1940 



Press ot Tulsa Daily Democrat 
Tulsa. Okla. 



PREFACE 



PREFACE 



The information contained in this publication is compiled from 
official sources where official records and documents could be obtained. 
In other respects the most reliable unofficial data has been used. Be- 
ing a publication by the state, it is intended that it should be impart- 
ial and unprejudiced. In formation concerning political parties and 
their organization has been obtained from the authorized party offic- 
ials. Effort has been made to avoid giving prepondating importance 
to one party over another and where such information is meager or 
incomplete, it is because no better could be obtained at the time of 
publication. 

In giving this volume to the public it has been the aim to make 
it a book which will be desired as an addition to the libraries of the 
state because of its real worth. Special attention has been given to 
obtaining and preserving facts and historical matters which were about 
to become lost to the future generations of the state of Oklahoma. 
Owing to the lack of an historical perspective on events in Oklahoma 
since it became a state, the selection of the material used has of course 
been confined to the contemporary, and consequently could be chosen 
with but doubtful regret to historical value. The purpose of the book 
is to give Oklahomans real facts concerning their commonwealth and 
to, at the same time bear a message to the residents of other states 
who may desire to know something of Oklahoma's make-up, political, 
social, economic and historical. 

BENJAMIN F. HARRISON. 

Secretary of State. 



Sis 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Proposed State Capitol ; Frontispiece. 

Page. 

United States Senators from Oklahoma S 

United States Congressmen from Oklalioma S 

Governor, Lee Cruce 16 

Lieutenant Governor, J. J. McAlester 16 

First State Governor, C. N. Haskell 16 

Secretary of State, Benjamin P. Harrison 16 

State Auditor, Leo Meyer 16 

Attorney General, Charles West 16 

State Treasurer, Robt. Dunlop 16 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, R. H. Wilson 16 

State Examiner and Inspector, Chas. A. Taylor 16 

Chief Inspector of Mines, Ed Boyle 16 

District Mine Inspector 16 

State Labor Commissioner, Chas. L. Daugherty 16 

Commissioner of Charities and Corrections, Kate Barnard 16 

Insurance Commissioner, Perry A. Ballard 16 

Justices of the Superme Court 16 

Members of the Supreme Court Commission 16 

Members of the Criminal Court of Appeals 16 

Clerk of the Supreme Court, W. H. L. Campbell 16 

Corporation Commission: Jack Love, chairman; A. P. Watson, member; 

Geo. A. Henshaw, member 16 

S^tate Printer, Giles W. Farris 16 

Board of Agriculture: G. T. Bryan, President; Benjamin Hennessy, Sec- 
retary; Kirby Frans, Statistician; Den Diehl, member; O. A. Brewer, 
member; Geo. H. Hinds, member; Ewers White, member; L. G. 
Griffin, member; Frank L. Haymes, member; A. C. Cobb, member; 

J. W. L. Corley, member; J. C. Elliott, member 16 

Members of State Board of Affairs 64 

John R. Williams, Secretary of School Land Commission 64 

Ben W. Riley, Secretary of State Election Board 64 

John B. Doolin, State Game and Fish Warden 64 

J. D. Lankford, Bank Commissioner. 64 

C. C. Hammonds, State Fire Marshal 64 

Prank M. Canton, Adjutant General 64 

Sidney Suggs, Commissioner of Highways.^ 64 

S. O. Daws, State Librarian 64 

Howard Parker, State Reporter 64 

Dr. J. C. Mahr, State Health Commissioner 64 

'Edwin DeBarr, State Chemist 64 

D. W. Ohern, Director Oklahoma Geological Survey 64 

F. S. E. Amos, Secretary to the Governor 64 

W. J. Caudill, State Enforcement Officer 64 

Assistant Attorneys General 64 



xii OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Hugh L. Harrell, Assistant Secretary of State 64 

Santord Brooks, Assistant State Treasurer 64 

Hugh Gerner, Assistant Examiner and Inspector 64 

A. Landrum, Assistant Superintendent Public Instruction 64 

'Dr. J. D. Ballard, Assistant State Auditor 64 

Arthur W. Pettit, Deputy Insurance Commissioner 64 

Don G. Lawhead, Secretary State Game and Fish Department 64 

Henry R. McGill, Assistant State Printer 64 

U. S. Russell, Assistant-in-Charge Pure Food and Drug Division State 

Healtli Department 64 

G. E. Warren, S tate Factory Inspector 64 

C. E. Connally, Deputy State Factory Inspector 64 

W. G. Ashton, Assistant State Labor Commissioner 64 

T. D. Kelley, Assistant State Mine Inspector 64 

M. F. Ikard, Superintendent Live Stock Inspection 64 

Leslie Bush, Assistant Live Stock Inspection 64 

A. P. Howe, State Dairy Commissioner 64 

R. D. McManus, Superintendent State Dairy Inspection 64 

E. P. Ansley, Superintendent Farmers' Institute 64 

Marie Woodson, Superintendent of Demonstration Farms 64 

Irma Mathews, Superintendent of Women's Auxiliary to County Farmers' 

Institute 64 

B. C. Pittuck, Dean of District Agricultural Schools 64 

L. McLennan, State Food Inspector 64 

Kirby Fitzpatrick, Chief Examiner of Titles for School Land Commis- 
sioners 64 

Wm. P. Campbell, Custodian of Oklalioma State Historical Society 64 

J. Elmer Thomas, President Pro Tempore of the Senate 72 

W. A. Durant, Speaker of the House of Representatives 72 

Convention Hall — First Home of State Government — Guthrie, Okla 128 

City Hall, Guthrie, Okla., where Constitntion was framed 128 

Members of tlie Constitution Convention 128 

Members of the First and Second State Legislatures 128 

State University, Norman, Okla 168 

Buildings at Oklahoma A. & M. College, Stillwater, Okla 168 

Lecture Room, A. & M. College 168 

Northeastern State Normal, Tahlequah, Okla 192 

Northwestern State Normal, Alva, Okla 192 

Oklahoma Industrial Institute and College for Girls, Chickasha, Okla 192 

Colored Agricultural Normal University, Langston, Okla 200 

State Rifle Range, Chandler, Okla 64 

Camp Frank Canton, Chandler, Okla 64 

Oklahoma Hospital for the Insane, and Officials, Fort Supply, Okla 216 

State Prison, McAlester, Okla 124 

Sectional Views of the State Prison, McAlester, Okla 124 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Oklahoma's Story XVII 

Description of Great Seal, State Banner, and State Emblem 1 

Elective State Officers, 1911-1915 5 

tJ. S. Senators and Congressmen of Oklaiioma 8 

Governors of tlie Five Civilized Tribes 9 

Various State Boards and Appointive State Officers 10 

STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

Governor 13 

Lieutenant Governor 15 

Secretary of State 16 

Auditor of State 17 

Attorney General 18 

Treasurer 19 

"Department of Public Instruction. 20 

"Department of Accounting- 21 

Department of Mines, Oil and Gas 22 

Department of Labor 24 

Department of Charities and Corrections 26 

Insurance Department .- 27 

Judiciary Department ." 29 

Corporation Commission 35 

Department of Agriculture 37 

Department of State Printer 40 

Choctaw and Cherokee Laws Creating Office of State Printer, a National 

Printing Press and Establishing the National Publication 40 

State Board of Public Affairs , 43 

Commissioners of the Land Office (School Land Commissioners) 44 

Department of Bank Commissioner 59 

Fish and Game Department 61 

Department of Public Health and Pure Food and Drug Inspection 64 

Department of the Adjutant General 65 

Department of CJeological Survey 68 

Department of State Highways 69 

Department of the State Fire Marshal 70 

Legislature 72 

Biographies of State Officers 118 

Members of the Constitutional Convention 129 

State Officers, 1907-1911 132 

Territorial Officers and Territorial Boards, 1890-1907 148 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

University of Oklahoma 167 

Oklahoma University Preparatory School 172 

Eastern University Preparatory School 173 

State Medical School 171 



xiv OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Oklahoma Agricullural and Mechanical College 175 

. Cameron State School of Agriculture. 179 

Connell State School of Agriculture 179 

Connors State School of Agriculture 180 

Haskell State School of Agriculture 180 

Murray State School of Agriculture 180 

Pan Handle Agriculture Institute '. . . . 181 

Normal Schools 182-192 

Central State Normal 182 

East Central State Normal 184 

Northeastern State Normal 18G 

Northwestern State Normal 188 

Southeastern State Normal 190 

Soutliwestern State Normal ' 191 

Oklahoma Industrial Institute and College for Girls 193 

Oklahoma School of Mines and Metallurgy 195 

State School for the Deaf 196 

Oklahoma School for the Blind 198 

Colored Agricultural and Normal University 200 

Industrial Institute for the Deaf, Blind and Orphans of the negro race 203 

Accredited List of Colleges and Universities 204 

School Population of the various Counties, Enrollment, Attendance and 

Teachers' Salaries, Certificates, and the Value of School Districts 207 

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS. 

Oklahoma Hospital for the Insane 215 

East Oklahoma Hospital for the Insane 218 

Oklahoma Sanitarium 219 

Oklalioma Institution for the Feeble Minded 220 

State *rphans' Home 221 

Oklahoma State Confederate Home 222 

Cornish Orphans' Home 223 



PENAL AND CORRECTIVE INSTITUTIONS. 

Oklahoma State Penitentiary 227 

Oklahoma State Reformatory 232 

State Traifiing School 235 

HISTORICAL. 

State Historical Society 241 

Oklahoma in the Spanish- American War 243 

Oklahoma Indians in the Civil War 245 

Chronological History of Oklahoma 247 

RESOURCES. 

"Oklalioma Among the Southern States" 259 

POLITICS. 

Election Statistics 269 

State Election Boards 143,269 

County Election Boards 2G9 

Territorial, State and National Elections 278 

Party National Platforms 317 

Oklahoma's Political History, Platforms, Committees, Etc 354 

STATE, FEDERAL AND FOREIGN OFFICERS. 

State Governments 395 

Federal Government 409 

Federal Officials in Oklahoma ., 427 

Foreign Consuls with Jurisdiction over Oklahoma 433 



TABLE OF CONTENTS xv 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 

Carnegie Libraries 437 

Banks Named as State Depositories 437 

Delegates Appointed by tlie Governor 444 

Railroads 449 

Commissioners of Deeds for Oklahoma 457 

'\Varehouse Managers 457 

State Fiscal Agency 457 

Oklahoma Zoologj'' and Ornithology 457 

Altitude and Streams 457 

County Officers and County History 459 

Louisiana Purchase Treaty ■ 523 

Organic Act 526 

Postof f ices ". 545 

Statistics of Population, 1910-1907-1900-1890 555 

Population of Iticorporated Places 619 

Mayors and City Clerks of Incorporated Cities * . . . 626 

Tax Valuations and Assessments by Counties. . , •. . . 632 

Assessed Valuations of Railroads and Other Public Service Corporations 

for 1910 652 

Assessed Valuations of Railroads and Other Public Service Cor- 
porations for 1911 • 64S 



INTRODUCTORY 



INTRODUCTORY 



OKLAHOMA'S STORY 



The story of the contest waged for the opening of the lands of Ok- 
lahoma to white settlement is most interesting. The long fight made 
by the "colonies" for entrance to the forbidden land showed the 
charcater of the men and women who were to become the basic ele- 
ment of the state's citizenship. As the desire for unoccupied lands 
grew, a large army of prospective settlers clamored for the unused 
lands of Indian Territory. These settlers joined forces with the rail- 
roads and together they waged war on the cattle kings of Oklahoma's 
pastoral regime. 

On April 15, 1879, T. C. Sears, an attorney for the M. K. & T., 
railroad announced that there were fourteen million acres of public 
land located here which were subject to homestead entry. This seems 
to have been the original discovery of the "unassigned lands" and 
immediately aroused much interest. Three "colonies" were or- 
ganized. Charles C. Carpenter, a leader of one of the colonies and a 
man who, three years before, had rushed the Black Hills region, cros- 
sed the border with his band May 7, 1879, but was promptly ejected 
by general Wesley Merritt in command of troops of the Fifth Cavalry. 
David L. Payne then came to the front as an organizer -and leader of 
the boomers. Again and again presidential proclamations warned the 
boomers out of the forbidden territory, but as often did Captain Payne 
and his persistent followers return only to be ejected. Much agitation 
of the question of settlement resulted. The sudden death of Captain 
Payne at Wellington, Kas., November 27, 1884, put something of a 
damper on boomer enthusiasm, although the next year Captain Wil- 
liam L. Couch, Payne's lieutenant, led another expedition into what is 
now Payne County. He was forced to withdraw and made a second 
attempt in November of the same year with no better success. 

It was in 1885 that the Santa Fe railroad was built into the Ter- 
ritory from Arkansas City, and the boomers were convinced that Ok- 
lahoma, would soon be opened to settlement by legal proclamation. 
and invasion was given up. 

In the interim from 1885 to 1889, the boomers turned their at- 
tention to "No Man's-Land". When Texas joined the United States 
in 1845, all its territory north of thirty-six degrees and thirty minutes 
had to be surrendered because, according to the Missouri compromise 
there would be no more slave territory north of that line. By the 
organization of Kansas in 1856 its southern boundary was made thirty- 
seven degrees. This left a strip of land thirty minutes in width from 
the 100th meridian, north of Texas and south of Kansas, long known 
as "No Man's Land." The Indians laid no claim to this region and 
the cattlemen had already taken possession of those limitless prairies, 
now constituting the Pan Handle of Oklahoma or Beaver, Texas and 
Cimarron counties. By the spring of 1887, it was estimated that six 



xviii OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

thousand people had entered this unorganized territory. The region 
had not been surveyed, there was no land office, and titles could not 
be obtained. The settlers, however, organized a claim board and set 
up a government of their own. A convention was held in March, 
1887, and the "'Territory of Cimarron" was organized and a delegate 
elected to Congress. A territory legislature was elected in the fall of 
1887 and it was in session most of the following winter. A full set of 
territorial officers and a new delegate to Congress were chosen in 
November 1888. Here the tnatter ended. The Territory of Cimar- 
ron was forgotten the next year when Oklahoma was opeiied by the 
provisions of a "rider" on the Indian Appropriation Bill and in 1890 
it vi'as made an Oklahoma county. 

President Benjamin F. Harrison issued the proclamation opening 
Oklahoma to settlement April 22, 1889, thus ending the long fight be- 
tween the farmer and the herdman. 

THE OPENING OF OKLAHOMA 

Never was there such a race in the history of the world. 
Since ^^^9 when ttie Fort Smith soldiers ejected the settlers 
on the Kiamitia this had been a forbidden region. 

"For three quarters of a century the tide of migration 
had'surged against this wall. Finally when it gave way, the 
eager settlers hurled themselves upcn the coveted land, as 
did the ancient Israelites upon the fields of Canaan. The 
racers had to cross the Cherokee strip, sixty miles in width, 
in their rush from the Kansas border before they arrived at 
the land open to settlement. The three days preceding the 
opening were allowed for this. Now, women and children 
on horseback and on foot, with buggies, wagons, oxcarts, 
horses and ponies, all gathered on the line as the hour of noon 
approached. The noise and .confusion ceased as the moment 
for the start drew near. With set faces these racers for homes 
closely watched the officer who, with v/atch in hand, awaited 
the appointed moment. Suddenly from the carbines of the 
cavalrymen there came a puff of smoke. The crashing report 
of the guns was drowned in the mighty shout of the waiting 
thousands as they crossed the line. On they went in breath- 
less haste. The solid front shown at the moment of the start 
was soon broken, and the forces of the invading boomers 
seemed rather the wild route of a 'defeated foe than the 
advance of an invading one." 

The majority of the settlers came into the territory from the 
north, but considerable numbers came from the Chickasaw country 
on the south and the Pottawatomie reservation, which joined the open 
district on the east. 

The "rider" which opened Oklahoma to settlement was the hurried 
expedient of an almost defeated contingent. No provision was made 
for a territorial government, and no local laws were in force, but stipu- 
lations were made that town sites could be laid out. In a day, places 
which were but railroad sidings with a water tank, a section house, 
and a name, have become bustling cities, with a population of several 
thousand. 

Provision was made that any person who should enter the new 
country previous to the moment set for the opening would forfeit his 
right to hold land, thus becoming a "sooner". Many quarrels over 
claims and town lots arose. Often there was recourse to arms to 
settle these disputes. In Oklahoma City rival land companies con- 
tended for possession of lots, and a bitter feud raged for months. 



INTRODUCTORY xix 

City governments were at once organized, and wliile tliese had 
no real authority, according to the strict letter of the law, yet they 
were obeyed ana proved as useful and efficient a means of maintain- 
ing order as were the wholly self-constituted governments of the New 
England Puritans. 

The Organic Act, legally establishing Oklahoma Territory and pro- 
viding a toim of government became a law on May 2, 189T). Power 
was given the president to appoint the governor and the secretary, and 
the judges of the supreme court. The governor was given the power 
to appoint all other executive officials. The legislature consisted of 
a council of thir{een members and a house of representatives of twenty- 
six. The supreme court judges acted also as district judges, and as the 
territory grew in size and population, the number of these judges was 
increased from three to five and then to seven. 

George W. Steele of Indiana became the first territorial governor, 
May 22, 1890. Guthrie was designated as the temporarj^; capital and 
remained so until June 11, 1911, when it was moved to, Oklahoma City 
by referendum vote of the citizens. The election was held invalid by 
the State Supreme Court on a defect in the bill, but Governor Haskell 
called a special session of the legislature, which body located the 
capital at Oklahoma City, December 29th by more than a two-thirds 
majority vote. After being in office a year and a half Governor Steele 
resigned and on October 18, 1891, Judge A. J. Seay, a supreme court 
judge of the territory was named to succeed him. "President Cleveland 
appointed Vv. C. Renfrow to succeed Seay May 7, 1893. Renfrow serv- 
ed th'^ f'']l four years and was succeeded by Cassius M. Barnes of 
Guthrie May 24,, 1897. Governor Barnes also served a full term of four 
years and William M. Jenkins, also of Guthrie, was named as his suc- 
cessor April 15, 1901. Governor Jenkins served but a little over 
seven months when he was summarily removed by President Roose- 
velt. Thompson P. Ferguson of Watonga was appointed to fill the 
vacancy on November 30, 1901. He held office for more than the full 
term of four years, remaining in office until January 5, 1906, when he 
was sucf>eeded bv Frank Frantz, a captain in Roosevelt's regiment of 
Rough Riders, during the Spanish-American War. He served as chief 
executive of the territory until November 16, 1907, when the territory 
was admitted with the Indian Territory as Oklahoma, the Firty-iSxth 
State. 

Treaties were made with the Iowa, the Sac and Fox, and the Pot- 
tawatomie and Shawnees by which those reservations were opened to 
settlement Sept. 22, 1891. The Cheyenne and Arapaho country was 
opened to settlement by like manner April 19, 1892. Finally the cattle 
kings of the Cherokee Outlet were routed and this strip of surplus 
land of the Cherokee, was ceded back to the government by the In- 
dians and then opened for settlement, Sept. 16, 1893. This was a re- 
petition of the former runs. "Sooner" and the pistol played an even 
more prominent part at this opening than at previous runs." In May, 
189.5, the Kickapoo county, a small district lying between the reserva- 
tions of the Iowa and Pottawatomies was opened to settlement. This 
was the last of the Indian lands to be opened with a "run." At the 
Kiowa-Comanche-Caddo opening August 6, 1901, the farms were dis- 
tributed by means of a lottery. Greer county, a disputed portion of 
land claimed by Texas, was awarded to the jui'isdiction of Oklahoma 
by a decision of the Supreme Court in 1895. 

David A. Harvey was the first delegate to represent Oklahoma at 
Washington. He was elected in November, 1890, under the terms of 
the Organic Act, but was allowed no vote. Dennis T. Flynn was chos- 
en in 1892 to succeed Harvey. He was re-elected in 18t94. but was de- 
feated in 1896 by James Y. Callahan. In 1898 Flynn was again elected 
and remained in office until 1903 when he was succeeded by Bird S. 



XX OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

McGuire, who held the office until the coming of statehood. 

Almost immediately after the settlers had rushed into Oklahoma, 
agitation for statehood began, for the new territory soon had more 
people than many states. Numerous statehood conventions were held 
in Oklahoma Territory and at these the question immediately pre- 
sented itself as to whether there should be one or two states carved 
out of the Twin Territories. The advocates of single statehood felt 
that the mines and vast oil interests of the eastern part of what is 
now the state and the agricultural industries of the western half 
would naturally supplement each other. The advocates of double 
statehood pointed out that the small and sparsely settled New England 
states had two senators apiece, and that since each half of Oklahoma 
already had a larger population than many of these states, simple 
justice demanded that the Southwest should have this added repres- 
entation. 

The so-called "Sequoyah Constitutional Convention" was the only 
determined effort made by Indian Territory to secure statehood, in- 
dependently of Oklahoma Territory. Delegates from the Five Nations 
met at Muskogee in July, 1905. A constitution for this portion of Ok- 
lahoma was framed, and the prospective state was named "Sequoyah," 
in honor of the inventor of the Cherokee alphabet. William H. Mur- 
ray, who came from the Chickasaw nation and Charles N. Haskell, 
who later became the first governor, were actively identified as dele- 
gates in the convention. The constitution written by this convention 
was given little recognition by Congress, but its work gave the white 
men of the Civilized Tribes an opportunity to get together, so that 
when the convention met at Guthrie during the following year to 
frame a constitution for the united territories, a group of delegates 
who had worked together in the Sequoyah Convention easily forged 
to leadership. 

Finally the Omnibus Bill was signed by President Roosevelt June 
14, 1906. The bill was so called because it united Oklahoma and In- 
dian Territories as one state and Arizona and New Mexico as an- 
other. The Enabling Act provided for a constitutional convention of 
one hundred and twelve members, fifty-five from Oklahoma, fifty-five 
from Indian Territory and two from the Osage Nation. The election 
of delegates was held and they met at Guthrie, November 20, 1906. 
Wm. H. Murray of Tishomingo was elected president. He had served 
as vice-president of the Sequoyah convention and was subsequently 
elected speaker of the first legislature. C. N. Haskell was the demo- 
cratic floor leader. 

The constitution framed was adopted by a majority of 107,274 and 
the entire democratic state ticket was elected at the election, Sept., 
17, 1907. The two territories were admitted as the state of Oklahoma, 
November 17, 1907. Chas. N. Haskell was elected governor and 
Thomas P. Gore and Robt. L. Owen were chosen the first U. S. Sen- 
ators from the new state. Bird S. McGuire. Elmer L. Fulton, James 
S. Davenport, Charles D. Carter and Scott Ferris were elected as the 
first Congressmen 

OKLAHOMA'S CITIZENSHIP. 

The Oklahoman is a proud individual. He is rich, not wealthy, 
less aristocratic. Rich in earned pride in so many things of which to 
be proud, not vain. Praiseful without boasting. However humble the 
lot cast in Oklahoma, that lot has changed and ^very Oklahoman 
stands with head erect, though not in the air. The past life of en- 
forced drudge, of toil and hardships, that surrounding void of oppor- 
tunity entailed; the venture made for a chance of life in a strange, 
untried field, each a stranger to each, necessitating self introductions. 



INTRODUCTORY xxi 

each to each forced to a sudden fraternization, which born of neces- 
sity, became an innate quality, deep and deeper burned in with the 
brand of observance until there has been developed an unconquerable 
trait of nature. 

Hence, the proverbial characteristic of the Oklahoman for sociabil- 
ity, commonality and generous impulse, the gate ajar for a stranger 
as well, with no sword of jealousy over the arch; welcome over every 
door, the latch string out. From the previous drudge to swift gather- 
ings of all that modern pleasure desires, the Oklahoman rests in 
ease and comfort, not in that luxury which breeds indolence and fosters 
pomp. From peonage to peerage, why not proud? For "it was not 
the wealth and affluence that gathered here with coffers of gold." But 
the crack of a gun on that forever memorable day when Oklahoman's 
green gates were thrown open, sounded the crack of doom to poverty 
and distress to those who waited on the margin of "The Land of the 
Fair God." The day of jubilee under proclaimed script from the in- 
finite, bidding the bondman go free; and sunset of the first day cast 
fading rays on a surging, seething tide of venture, rushing, jostling, 
struggling. The like was never seen before, never will be seen again 
in its extent, in its orderly tumult. And what system, what patience 
in that mad cavalcade of adventure; what noble citizenship stamped 
peace and fraternity and, good fellowship upon that clamorous, tumult- 
ous mass in the heterogeneous scramble for vantage! 

Beneath each foot of the sea of green that day, each throb that 
thrilled the untamed swards of Oklahoma, lay limitless the germ of 
rich harvests, of fruits, in florescent splendor, exhaustless the latent 
resources, and immeasurable by calculation the possibilities. These 
came, homeless, to seek a home; moneyless, to coin from the respons- 
ive soil. They "had tasted from the bitter cups of drudgery and dis- 
tress, but came as the children of favors delayed. They came with 
their manhood, their womanhood, with their patience, their good citi- 
zenship, with hope. They had calculated on hardships, for the time, 
and deprivations; these they met with heroic will and conquered. 
They smote the hillsides and gushing streams issued forth; they em- 
braced the virgin fields, and golden sheaves were conceived. Poverty 
and self-denials vanished as did the mists above the drenched wastes. 
Herds increased, great bins groaned wtih their care of grains, and 
the keys to golden stores were turned. Even as Midas prayed for vint- 
age god that all he touched might turn to gold, so Ceres heard the plea 
of Oklahoman husbandry, and the primitive is now a reminiscence 
engraved on aureate plaques. 

So came the merchant, the baker, the craftsman. Churches, edu- 
cational institutions sprang up as if from spontaneity at the nod of 
Allah. Industries spread like fires before the wild winds of the burn- 
ing'plain. Venture predicated upon the latent resources of Oklahoma, 
so that yesterday a seat of improvised tents and habitations less pro- 
vised — today, collossal marts and palatial homes. 

That community which can assure itself that its citizenship is on 
a plane with the best known to civilization has the greatest asset 
obtainable. 

The circumstances under which the state of Oklahoma was open- 
ed as a territory to white settlement was such as to assemble, in a 
single day, a quarter of a million hardy, aggressive, intellectual, dar- 
ing people from practically every state in the union. Among these 
were few indeed to whom might not be applied the title "an uncrown- 
ed king." Only brave hearted, strong minded folk permit themselves 
to th drawn into a vortex such as was that seething mass formed on 
the opening day of Oklahoma. Cowards and degenerates could not 
endure such a strain. Few who came here at that time ever gave the 
question of returning to their former abodes a second thought. They 



xxii OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

knew the natural advantages of the section they had chosen for a 
future home, and they bravely faced every hardship to make the ef- 
fort of their lives to make good individually. How well they suc- 
ceeded in this is manifested in the wonderful strides made in every 
county in the now popular young commonwealth in the sisterhood of 
states. 

The world has never produced an assemblage of braver, stronger, 
cleaner specimens of manhood and womanhood than those liberty lov- 
ing, patriotic, determined men and women who walked from the decks 
of the May Flower at Plymouth Rock, three hundred years ago and 
those brilliant Cavaliers who landed at Jamestown in 1607. They form- 
ed a foundation for a citizenship, which has spread westward steadily 
and conquered both foe and nature. The same strong arms that 
wielded the ax in the forests of the New England states in the years 
that followed the arrival of these patriots, to clear the fields for plant- 
ing a citizenry, which has reproduced and multiplied descendants whose 
valor has never dimmed, whose love of country, freedom of speech, 
pride of home and loyalty to our institutions, have grown stronger as 
the nation has become popular and its people independent. 

Thousands of the descendants of these hardy pioneers were to be 
found astride striped legged ponies dashing across the sun kissed 
prairies of Oklahoma on that memorable day, April 22, 1889. A large 
majority of them may be found, multiplied and advanced in keeping 
with the time, among the business men throughout the state. There 
is a larger per centage of people residing within the boundaries of 
Oklahoma today, in proportion to population, eligible to membership 
in that society known as the Daughters of the American Revolution 
than in any other state. 

Situated in the central southwest, well removed from any sea- 
shore, Oklahoma feels less the influx into the country of undesir- 
able immigrants from foreign shores than almost any other state. The 
fact that the assimulation of these immigrants aften require two or 
more generations, renders their admission in larger numbers imdesir- 
able, hence the fact that Oklahomans are largely American born citi- 
zens, keen in their conception of the higher ideals of our form of gov- 
ernment and its institutions, places the state upon a plane above many 
of its sister states. The low-class foreigners in his ignorance of 
our institutions bothers little here, hence the few who stray into our 
midst are lonesome and not impressed by the reception accorded them 
when they enter into competition with our typical class of active 
Americans. 

A territory situated as Oklahoma naturally appeals to the best 
people and those most informed of the advantages of a home in a 
temperate clime, from all over the nation. For this reason there has 
been developed in twenty years a citizenship of the most pronounced 
cosmopolitan type. There were just enough descendants from the 
Cavalier aristocracy of the Old South to blend with the Puritan that 
formed the Westerner, and then came the typical Yankee of the East, 
making concessions, e'ach to the other; which character calculated 
to develop a race unlike anything in the world, and retain a pride 
of race and respect for that hope for a higher civilization any true 
American must prize. 

In order that the full story of Oklahoma's empire builders be told, 
it would require the hand of the historian, the foresight of the statesman, 
and the knowledge of the ethnologist of racial and social conditions 
and racial and social characteristics of the various races and tribes of 
men which have become component parts of its citizenry. To clearly 
depict the life of a people and the growth of a state, which in little 
more than one score years has been changed from a prairie waste with 
a lonesome ranch house here and there in some sleepy' valley, to the 



INTRODUCTORY xxiii 

forefront of the sisterhood of states, and whose banner is seen proudly 
waving, unsullied and unstained, in the thickest of the industrial and 
political battle as the battle flag of the great humanitarian forces, 
would require the hand of no mean artist. 

Oklahoma's constitution, like her people, is a product of the entire 
union. That document has been pronounced as one of the greatest 
declaration of rights of the common people which has ever been laid 
down. It ranks with the Magna Charta. It contains the best of the 
ages. Oklahoma's great leaders and its constitution framers were 
able to glean the best from the fruits of the years and then wrote that 
into the fundamental document of our laws. 

Oklahoma's men and women have come fi'om practically every 
state in the union. It is the scene of the final stand of the 
Indian against the Anglo-Saxon's form of civilization. It is the 
fusing point o| the ideas and energy of the Southron, the Northerner 
and the Easterner. It is the one great bright spot in the southwestern 
corner of the nation's political firmament. From here will come a new 
type man of the age. The southwest has been the objective point of 
some of the best educated, best trained, best equipped men of the nation 
who have forsaken the more crowded avenues of success in the older 
states and have come hither to achieve their fame and fortune. As 
a result a new type-man of the first quarter of the Twentieth Century 
must come from the recently unsettled southwest. 




OKLAHOMA STATE SEAL 



The conception of the Oklahoma state seal is peculiarly 
happy in that it combines in a perfect symbol the Great Seal 
of the Territory of Oklahoma with those of the Five Civilized 
Tribes, the Great Seal of the Territory of Oklahoma being 
in the center of a five-pointed star, in each projection of which 
is one of the national emblems of the red men's former gov- 
ernments. 

The device of the seal was the work of Dr. A. Grant Evans, 
formerly president of the Oklahoma State University, J. J. 
Quarles of the Osage Nation, and Gabe Parker of Academy, 
Okla., members of the Constitutional Convention. 

It is described as follows : 

"In the center shall be a five-pointed star, with one ray 
pointing upward. The center of the star shall contain the 
central device of the seal of the Territory of Oklahoma, in- 
cluding the words 'Lahbr Omnia Ylncit.' the literal transla- 
tion of which is 'Labor Conquers All,' and all of which shall 
be encircled by a wreath of the floral emblem of the new state, 

''The upper left-hand ray shall contain the symbol from 
the ancient seal of the Cherokee Nation — a seven-pointed star 
surrounded by a wreath of oak leaves. 

"The ray pointing upward shall contain the symbol from 
the ancient seal of the Chickasaw Nation — an Indian warrior 
standing upright with bow in hand. 

"The lower left-hand ray shall contain the symbol from 
the ancient seal of the Creek Nation — a sheaf of wheat and 
a plow. ' 

Sig. 3. 



2 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

"The upper right-hand ray shall contain a symbol from 
the ancient seal of the Choctaw Nation — a tomahawk, bow 
and three crossed arrows. 

''The lower right-hand ray shall contain the symbol from 
the ancient seal of the Seminole Nation — ;a village with houses 
and a factory beside a lake upon which an Indian is paddling 
a canoe. 

''Surrounding the central star and grouped between its 
rays shall be forty-five small stars, divided into five clusters 
of nine stars each, representing the forty-five states of the 
union to which the 46th is now added. 

"In a circular band surrounding the whole device shall 
be inscribed, 'Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma, 1907' " 



STATE BANNER 

The Third Legislature, 1911, adopted a concurrent reso- 
lution designating a state banner. Its description follows: 

"That a banner, consisting of a red field with a five- 
pointed star, of white, edged with blue, in the center thereof, 
with the figures 46, in blue, in the center of the star, be, and 
the same is hereby adopted as the official banner of the State 
of Oklahoma." 



STATE EMBLEM 

The Territorial Legislature of 1893 adopted the mistletoe 
as the state emblem. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 



STATE OFFICERS 1911-15 



GOVERNOR. 

Lee Cruce Democrat Ardmore, 

Carter County. 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. 

i. J. McAlester Democrat McAlester, 

Pittsburg County. 

SECRETARY OF STATE. 

Benjamin F. Harrison... Democrat Calvin, 

Hughes County. 

STATE AUDITOR. 

Leo Meyer Democrat — Sayre, 

Beckham County. 

ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

Chas. West Democrat -- Enid, 

Garfield County. 

STATE TREASURER. 

Robert Dunlop Democrat __Newkirk, 

Kay County. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

R. H. Wilson Democrat Chickasha, 

Grady County. 

STATE EXAMINER AND INSPECTOR. 

Chas. A. Taylor. Democrat Pond Creek, 

Grant County. 



6 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

STATE INSPECTOR OF MINES, OIL AND GAS. 

Ed Boyle Democrat Chant, 

Haskell County. 

ASSISTANT MINE INSPECTORS. 

District No. 1. 

John O'Brien Democrat Lehigh, 

Coal County. 

District No. 2. 

Martin Clark Democrat McAlester, 

Pittsburg County. 

District No. 3, 

Frank Haley — . . Democrat Henryetta, 

Okmulgee County. 

COMMISSIONER OF LABOR. 

Chas. L. Daugherty Democrat Oklahoma City, 

Oklahoma County. 

COMMISSIONER OF CHARITIES AND CORRECTIONS. 

Kate Barnard Democrat Oklahoma City, 

Oklahoma County. 

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

P. A. Ballard Democrat Coyle, 

Logan County. 

STATE PRINTER. 

Giles W. Farris Democrat Mangum, 

Greer County. 

PRESIDENT BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

G. T. Bryan Democrat __ Perry, 

Noble County. 

CORPORATION COMMISSIONERS. 

Geo. A. Henshaw Democrat Madill, 

Marshall County. 

A. P. Watson Democrat Shawnee, 

Pottawatomie County. 

Jack Love Democrat Woodward, 

Woodward County. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 7 

MEMBERS OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

John B. Turner, Chief Justice, First District Vinita 

R. L, Williams, Second District Durant 

Matthew J. Kane, Third District Kingfisher 

S. W. Hayes, Fourth District. Chickasha 

Jesse J. Dunn, Fifth District Alva 

Clerk op Supreme Court. 
W. H. L. Campbell, Democrat Ada, Pontotoc County 

MEMBERS OF THE CRIMINAL COURT. 
OF APPEALS. 

Henry M. Furman, Presiding Judge, Southern District Ada 

Jas. R. Armstrong, Eastern District Boswell 

Thos. H. Doyle, Northern District __ Perry 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



SENATORS AND CONGRESSMEN 



UNITED STATES SENATORS FROM OKLAHOMA. 

Robt. L. Owen (D), Muskogee. Elected Sept. 17, 1907. 
Term expires March 4, 1913. 

Thomas P. Gore (D), Lawton. Elected Sept. 17, 190 T. 
Term expired March 4, 1909. (Re-elected.) 



UNITED STATES CONGRESSMEN FROM OKLAHOMA. 

First District. 

Bird S. McGuire (R), Pawnee. Term expires March 4, 1913 
(Re-elected twice). 

SecoHd District. 

Elmer L. Fulton (D), Oklahoma City, Elected Sept. 17, 
1907. Term expired March 4, 1909. 

Dick T. Morn-an (R), Woodward, Term expires March 
4, 1913 (Re-elected Nov. 7, 1910.) 

Third District. 

Jas. S. Davenport (D), Vinita. Elected Nov. 17, 1907. 
Charles S. Creager (R), Muskogee. Elected Nov. 3, 1908. 
Jas. S. Davenport (D), Vinita. Elected Nov. 7, 1910. 

Fourth District. 

Chas. D. Carter (D), Ardmore. Term expires March 4, 
1913 (Re-elected twice). 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 



Fifth District. 



Scott Ferris (D), Lawton. Term expires March 4, 1913. 
(Ke-elected twice). 



GOVERNORS OF THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES 

Victor M. Locke, Jr _ -Choctaw Nation 

W. C. Rogers Cherokee Nation 

Moty Tiger Creek Nation 

John F. Brown Seminole Nation 

Douglas H. Johnston Chickasaw Nation 



10 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



STATE BOARDS AND STATE APPOINTIVE 
OFFICERS 



Board of Public Affairs — Lon Frame, chairman, Ardmore; E. 
B. Howard, Tulsa; Eugene E. Morris, Duncan. (Mem- 
bers also constitute State Capitol Commission.) 

State Banking Board — Governor Lee Cruce, Ardmore; Jos. C. 
McClelland, Oklahoma City; Fred G, Dennis, Oklahoma 
City. 

State Election Board — C. C. Penn, chairman, Weatherford; 
Benj. W. Riley, secretary. El Reno; T. B. Ferguson, Wa- 
tonga. 

State Board of Education — State Superintendent R. H. Wil- 
son, chairman; Robert Dunlop, state treasurer, Newkirk; 
J. F, Warren, Oklahoma City; W. E. Rowsey, Muskogee; 
W. A. Brandenburg, Oklahoma City; O. F. Hayes, Chan- 
dler; Scott Glenn, Shawnee; L. T. Huffman, secretary, 
Oklahoma City. 

Scliool Land Commission — Lee Cruce, governor; Benjamin F. 
Harrison, secretary of state; R. H. Wilson, superintend- 
ent of public instruction; Leo Meyer, state auditor; G. 
T. Bryan, president of the board of agriculture; John R. 
Williams, secretary. 

State Board of Equalization — Lee Cruce, governor; Benjamin 
F. Harrison, secretary of state; Leo Meyer, state audi- 
tor; Robt. Dunlop, state treasurer; Charles West, attor- 
ney general ; Charles A. Taylor, state examiner and in- 
spector; and G. T. Bryan, president of the board of agri- 
culture. 

Board of Agriculture and Regents o\f Agricultural and Me- 
chanical Colleges — G. T. Bryan, president, Perry; J. C. 
Elliott, Pauls Valley; R. F. Wilson, Valliant; J. W. L. 
Corley, Howe; A. C. Cobb, Wagoner; George H. Hinds, 
Westville; Frank L. Haymes, Broken Arrow; Ewers 
White, McLoud; Dan Diehl, Gotebo; and O. A. Brewer, 
Helena. Ben F. Hennessey, secretary, Watonga. 



OTATE DEPARTMENTS 11 

State Mining Board — F. W. McLaughlin (mining engineer), 
Haileyville; W. F. Evans (hoisting engineer), Dow; Alex- 
ander Mount (coal miner), Henryetta; P. R. Allen (coal 
operator), McAlester; Daniel C. McAlpine (coal miner), 
Chant. 

State Board of Arbitration and Comciliation — J, G. Leeper 
(employer), Oklahoma City; Thomas Bell (employer), 
Hughes; T. C. Wyatt (farmer), Wanette; M. F. Landon 
(farmer), Lehigh; M, R. Powell (employee), Oklahoma 
City; Richard Alexander (coal miner), Chant. 

State Boiird of Medical Examiners — F. E. Fite (Regular), 
Muskogee; John W. Duke (Regular), Guthrie; Leroy 
Long (Regular), McAlester; Philip F. Herrod (Regular), 
Alva; M. Gray (Eclectic), Mt. View; R. E. Sawyer (Eclec- 
tic), Bokchito; W. L. Bonnell (Homeopathic), Chickasha; 
J. O. Whorton (Physio-medico), Duncan; F. A. Engle- 
hart (Osteopath), Oklahoma City; J. J. Schmidt (Osteo- 
pathic, alternate), Tulsa; R. T. Castleburg, (alternate), 
Ada; Sam B. Leslie (alternate), Okmulgee. 

State Board of Pharmaci/ — J. C. Burton, Stroud; W. F. 
Dodd, Caddo; F. B. Lillie, Guthrie; J. D. Humphrey, 
Bristow; L. D. Brunk, Nowata. 

State Baard of Emhalmers — George H. Bloom, Muskogee; W. 
E. Harper, Oklahoma City; and L. T. Walters, Ada. 

State Board of Dental Examiners — A. C. Hixon, Guthrie; A. 
E. Bonnell, Muskogee; E. E. Heflin, Oklahoma City; Geo. 
W. Bowling, Lindsay; W. W. Bryan, Claremore. 

State Board of Examiners in Optometry — H. D. Brandt, Cher- 
okee; W. K. Grady, Stillwater; E. E. Russell, Altus. 

State Board of Control of the OklaJwmia State Home — Ben F. 
Lafayette, Checotah; J. W. Swartz, Chelsea; A. L. Hau- 
sam, Coweta ; O. W. Killum, Grove. 

Board of Trustees of the Oldahoma Confederate Eome — ^Dr. 
John M. Threadgill, Oklahoma City; N. F. Hancock, Mus- 
kogee; Daniel M. Hailey, McAlester; Richard A. Sneed, 
Lawton; J. W. Blanton, Rocky; George H. Bruce, Ard- 
more; Mrs. Ruth Clement, Oklahoma City. 

Board of Trustees for the Oklahoma Hospital for the Insane 
at Vinita — C. L. Long, Wewoka ; Oliver Bagby, Vinita ; J. 
J. Maroney, Okmulgee. 



12 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Board of Trustees for the OklaJioma Hospital for the Insane 
at Fort tSuppli) — <J. L. Long, Wewoka; W. S. Bearing, 
Thomas; W. M. Turlington, Seminole. 

Board of Prison Control — Lee Cruce, governor; Charles West, 
attorney general ; and G. T. Bryan, president of the state 
board of agriculture. 

Board of Warehouse Commissioners — Benjamin F. Harrison, 
secretary of state; Leo Meyer, state auditor; Chas. West, 
attorney general. 

Examining Board of Nurses — Mrs. Maggie Morrison, Guth- 
rie; Lelia Hartley, Muskogee; Mabel Garrison, Oklahoma 
City; Olive Salmon, Oklahoma City; Esther Young, Okla- 
homa City. 



APPOINTIVE STATE OFFICERS 

Frank M. Canton. Adjutant General Fairfax 

Dr. J. C. Mahr. . .State Health Commissioner ShaAvnee 

Sidney Suggs .State Highway Commissioner Ardmoi*e 

C C. Hammonds State Fire Marshal Lawton 

John B. Doolin Fish and Game Warden Alva 

Howard Parker. ..State Re(porte.r .Ada 

S. O. Daws State Librarian Guthrie 

J. D. Lankford. . .Bank Commissioner Atoka 

W. J. Caudill. . . .Supt. of State Enforcement Agency. .Hobart 
R. W. Dick Warden State Penitentiary Ardmore 

( McAlester) 
Clyde W. Reed. . .Warden State Reformatory. .Mountain View 

(Granite) 

G. E. Warren. . . .State Factory Inspector Oklahoma City 

C. E. Connally. . .Assistant Lehigh 

Henry StauffacherGrain Inspector Blackwell 

M. F. Ikard Supt. of Live Stock Inspection. . ..Chickasha 

Dr. D. W. Ohern. .Director of State Geological Survey. Norman 
Edwin De Barr. . .State Chemist Norman 



SUPTS. FREE EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS. 

E. W. Vance Oklahoma City 

R. M. Johnson Chief Clerk Oklahoma City 

Thomas Wiley INIuskogee 

J. H. Pieh ..." Enid 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 13 



GOVERNOR. 

The governor of Oklahoma is elected for a term of four years 
and cannot succeed himself in office. He is commander-in-chief of the 
militia of the state, exceot when it is in the service of the United 
States, and may call out the same to execute the laws, protect the 
public health, suppress insurrection and repel invasion. The governor 
shall commission all officers not otherwise commissioned by law, may 
grant pardons, reprieves, paroles, commutations for all offenses, ex- 
cept in cases of impeachment, sign or veto bills passed by the legis- 
lature, unless they be passed by a two-thirds vote over his veto, and 
convoke the legislature in extraordinary sessions. The salary is four 
thousand five hundred dollars per annum. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Lee Cruce Governor $ 4,500.00 

F. S. E. Amos Private Secretary _ 2,000.00 

W. F. Kerr Executive Clerk 1,800.00 

Lavina Woods Executive Secretary 1,200.00 

C. F. Croninger Stenographer 1,200.00 

Prentiss Heard Pardon Clerk . . . _ 900.00 



Appropriations. 

S. B. No. 209— (Deficiency)— Extra help in office $ 2,000.00 

Special investigations, traveling expenses, etc. 1,000.00 

Supplies 500.00 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Salaries $ 9,200.00 $ 9,200.00 

Postage 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Telephone and telegraph _ 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Special service and extra help.. 8,000.00 8,000.00 

Traveling expenses 500.00 500.00 

Stationery and office supplies.. 1,500.00 1,500.00 

•Contingent fund 12,500.00 5,000.00 

Legal services and expenses of 
defendants in defending sec- 
tion 4a of article 3, of the Con- 
stitution, to be paid only on 
vouchers approved by the gov- 
ernor 15,000.00 



GOVERNOR'S MILITARY STAFF. 

*Major William Black . . Brigadier General Oklahoma City 

John B. Doolin Colonel _ Oklahoma City 

John P. Crawford'. " Ada 

John R. Williams " Oklahoma City 

*Deceased. 



14 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Walter Howard 

William I. Gilbert. . . 

E. K. Thurmond 

James L.. Wallace 

Robert Galbreath. . . . 
Thomas C. Harrell. .. 
Arthur H. Geissler. . . 
Newton B. Medlock. . 

J. W. Zevely 

Thomas H. Owen. . . . 

E. L.. Cralle 

Hunter A. Craycroft. 
Charles F. Adams. . . . 
Clarence B. Douglass. 

Alva J. Niles 

W. B. Merrill 

J. B. Gillespie 

Earle C. Bayless ... 

U. S. Joines 

H. W. Pentecost 

John L. McClelland.. 
Jack Jones 



Colonel Muskogee 

Oklahoma City 

'« Sayre 

Oklahoma City 

*. ' Tulsa 

" Wagoner 

Oklahoma City 

" Hobart 

" Muskogee 

" Muskogee 

" Norman 

" Oklahoma City 

" Oklahoma City 

Muskogee 

" Sentinel 

• Elk City 

Tulsa 

" Claremore 

" Ardmore 

" Oklahoma City 

" Oklahoma City 

Oklahoma City 

George D. Key I-it. Colonel Lawton 

W. H. L. Campbell " Ada 

J. T. Sturm " Oklahoma City 

Ed L. Dunn '[ Oklahoma City 

Tracy Brown " El Reno . 

J. Frank Laux " Oklahoma City 

C. J. Wrightsman " • Tulsa 

Boone Hite " Anadarko 

Kirby Fitzpatrick " . • Oklahoma City 

P.P.Duffy " El Reno 

J. D. Carmichael " Chickasha 

J. F. Warren " Oklahoma City 

W.B.Johnson " Ardmore 

Charles Shaw " Lawton 

Joseph Haskell " Oklahoma City 

A. N. Leecraft " Colbert 

John Davis " Chandler 

D. O. Groff " Atoka 

Robert H. Burns Major Duncan 

Edward H. Bond " Oklahoma City 

James Sain " Alva 

M. V. Van Meter " Oklahoma City 

Eugene E. Morris " Oklahoma City 

F. S. E. Amos " Vinita 

J. S. Mullen " Ardmore 

Albert C Hunt " Wagoner 

M.L.Webb " Huga 

J. A. i.dams " Homestead 

Johi Burke " Shawnee 

C.F.Dyer " Geary 

W. f. Head " Sulphur 

John R. Whayne " Oklahoma City 

William F. Kerr " Oklahoma City 

John W. Foster " Oklahoma City 

Ben Watt " Oklahoma City 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 15 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. 

The Lieutenant Governor shall possess the same qualifications 
of eligibility for office as the Governor. He presides over the sessions 
of the senate, and in case of impeachment of the Governor or his 
death, failure to qualify, resignation, removal from the state, or ina- 
bility to discharge the powers and duties of the office, he shall suc- 
ceed to the office thereof, for the residue of the term or until the disa- 
bility shall be removed. The office is elective and the tenure of office 
is four years. 

If, during a vacancy of the office of Governor, the lieutenant gov- 
ernor^ shall be impeached, resign, die or be absent from the State, or 
becorne incapable of performing the duties of the office, the president, 
pro tempore, of the Senate, shall act as Governor until the office be 
filled or the disability removed; and if the president pro tempore of 
the Senate, for any of the above enumerated causes, shall become 
incapable of performing the duties pertaining to the office of the 
Governor, the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall act as 
Governor until the vacancy be filled or the disability shall cease. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Salary. 

J. J. McAlester, Lieutenant Governor, McAlester $1,000.00 

W. T. Dugan, Temporary Secretary (To hold office only during 
session of the legislature.) 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Salary of Lieut. Governor $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contingent fund 750.00 750.00 



16 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 

The Secretary of State, under the provisions of section 17 of ar- 
ticle VI, of the State Constitution, sliall keep a register of the official 
acts of the Governor, and when necessary, shall attest the same. He 
is custodian of the Great Seal of the State and authenticates therewith 
all official acts of the Governor, except his approval of laws. 

All corporations formed within the state or foreign corporations 
seeking a legal standing within the State are required to file their ar- 
ticles of incorporation, or certified copies of their articles of incorpo- 
ration with the appointment of agent for service in the State, in the 
office of the Secretary of State, with the exception of insurance com- 
panies and banks. The secretary thereupon issues charter, granting 
them the right of legal and lawful existence within the State. All 
public service instruments, such as mortgages, deeds of trust and con- 
tracts of the public service companies, are filed in the office. 

The Secretary of State is also a member of the School Land Com- 
mission, the State Board of Equalization and chairman of the Board 
of Warehouse Commissioners. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Benjamin P. Harrison. .Secretary of State $2,500.00 

Hugh L. Harrell Assistant Secretary 2,000.00 

King L. Fitzpatrick. . . .Corporation Clerk 1,500.00 

William B. Richards. . .Corporation Record Clerk 1,500.00 

Thos. J. O'Neill, Jr Recording Clerk 1,200.00 

Marguerite Wolfe Assistant Recording Clerk 1,000.00 

Arthur Jones Clerk ■ 1,200.00 



Dooley W. Williamson.. Custodian of State House $ 900.00 

F. J. Etter Custodian of State House (Mercantile 

Building) 900.00 

Todd Warden Night Watchman 900.00 

Hans Degn Day Fireman 360.00 

Geo. W. Martin Night Fireman 600.00 

James Abernathy Janitor 600.00 

George W. McNeal Janitor 600.00 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Salaries $14,020.00 $14,020.00 

Contingent fund, etc 8,000.00 8,000.00 

Lights and Gas for State House 4,000.00 4,000.00 

S. B. No. 209— Contingent Fund $ 2,500.00 

Recording certificates of articles of in- 
corporation $1,000.00 

Expenses of caring for State offices for 

six and one-half months 2,405.00 

Lights for fuel 2,437.73 




LEE CRUCE 
Governor 




J. J. M'ALESTER 
Lieutenant Governor 




CHARLES N. HASKELL 
First State Governor 




BENJAMIN F. HARRISON 

Secretary of State 




CHARLES WEST 
Attorney General 




Ml miii^iliiilili 



p 




ROBERT DUNLOP 
State Treasurer 





R. H. WILSON 
Superintendent of Public Instruction 




CHARLES A. TAYLOR 
State Examiner and Inspector 





ED BOYLE 
Chief Inspector of Mines 




CHARLES L. DAUGHERTY 

State Labor Commissioner 




KATE BARNARD 
Commissioner of Charities and Corrections 




PERRY A. BALLARD 
State Insurance Commissioner 




Photo by Pasevitch, Oklahoma City. 




W. H. L. CAMPBELL 
Clerk of Supreme Court 




JACK LOVE 

Corporation Commissioner 

(Chairman) 




A. P. W ATS OX 
Corporation Commissioner 




GEORGE A. HENSHAW 
Corporation Commissioner 



^*3fi 




GILES W. FARRIS 
State Printer 



a '3 




STATE DEPARTMENTS 17 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUDITOR. 

The State Auditor is elected for a term of four years and cannot 
succeed himself in office. All accounts and claims against the State 
which shall be by law directed to be paid out of the state treasury, 
shall be presented to the auditor, who shall examine and adjust the 
same, and, for the amounts found to be true, shall issue warrants 
therefor. 

The auditor shall make and keep fair and accurate account of the 
debts and credits of each separate State fund or appropriation and 
make an annual report to the Governor and also a bi-ennial report 
preceding each regular session of the legislature on the dates, num- 
bers, amounts of warrants drawn, a statement of the accounts of the 
various funds and appropriations, and such remarks on finances of 
the State as he may deem proper. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Address. Salary. 

Leo Meyer Auditor Sayre, Okla $2,500 

J. D. Ballard Asst. Auditor Shattuck, Okla.. . 1,800 

E. F. Keys Chief Clerk Oklahoma, Okla.. 1,500 

R. C. Cain Chief, Accounting Division Guthrie, Okla — 1,800 

G. B. Balfour Accountant McAlester, Okla. . 1,800 

P. B. Lee Accountant Hugo, Okla 1,800 

Frank Orr R. R. and Public Service 

Tax Clerk Alva, Okla 1,50C 

C. V. Lisman Gross Revenue and 

Inheritance Tax Clerk. . Oklahoma, Okla.. 1,500 

R. T. Mitchell Bond Clerk Oklahoma, Okla.. 1,200 

E. P. Bryan Warrant Clerk Perry, Okla 900 

Carl Lumpkin Stenographer Muskogee, Okla.. . 1,200 

B. R. Simpson Stenographer Guthrie, Okla 1,500 



Appropriations. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries $14,800.00 

Contingent expenses, telephone, telegraph, 

collection of taxes, etc 11,000.00 

S. B. No. 209, Supplies 992.23 

Contingent, and gross revenue and inheritance 

taxes 1,500.00 



Sig. 4. 



18 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

Under provisions of an act by the Territorial Legislature of 
1893, the office of attorney general was created. It is set forth in 
the State Constitution that he shall appear for the state and prose- 
cute and defend all actions and proceedings, civil or criminal, in the 
Supreme Court in which' the state shall be interested as a party, 
and shall also, when requested by the governor or either branch 
of the legislature, appear for the state and defend or prosecute in 
any other court or before any officer in any cause or manner, civil 
or criminal, in which the state may be a party or interested, and shall 
attend to all civil cases remanded by the Supreme Court to any 
district court in which the state is a party or interested. The 
attorney general, when requested to do so, shall give advice to the 
various state officers and county attorneys and to either branch of 
the legislature on questions pertaining to law. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Charles West Attorney General $4,000.00 

W. C. Reeves First Assistant 2,750.00 

E. G. Spillman Assistant 2,750.00 

C. L. Moore Assistant 2,750.00 

S. C. Matson Assistant 2,750.00 

Claude Davenport. .... Law Clerk *156.00 

Andy Wood Law Clerk • *100.00 

Dora Theis Stenographer 1,200.00 

M. L. Davis Stenographer 1,200.00 

Juliet Wright Stenographer 1,200.00 

Mable Fasken Stenographer 1,200.00 

Aimee Swank Stenographer 1,200.00 

Alfaretta Jennings Stenographer 1,200.00 



♦Salary per month. 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries $22,200.00 $22,200.00 

Contingent, etc 10,000.00 10,000.00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 19 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE TREASURER. 

The state treasurer is elected for a term of four years and cannot 
succeed himself in office. The salary is $3,000 per annum. He 
shall have charge of all public moneys which shall be paid into 
the state treasury. He shall also keep an account with each organized 
county of the state, in which each county shall be charged with the 
amount of the tax levied according to the statement of assessments 
and levy transmitted to him by the state auditor and credited by the 
amounts received from the various county treasurers. 



Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Robert Dunlop State Treasurer $.3,000.00 

Sanford Brooks Chief Clerk 1,800.00 

A. C. Savage Warrant Clerk 1,500.00 

G. E. Metz Bookkeeper 1,200.00 

C. M. Howe Security Clerk 1,200.00 

H. K. Gaines Stenographer 900.00 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries $ 9,400.00 $ 9,400.00 

Contingent fund 3,000.00 2,500.00 

Interest on state bonds 58,400.00 58,400.00 

S. B. No. 209, (Deficiency) Interest on state bondis to 

Feb. 1, 1911 $29,200.00 



20 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION^ 

The educational interests of the state are under the supervision 
and uianagement of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
subject to such limitations and restrictions as or may be prescribed 
by law. He has the power of apportioning the income of the state 
school fund and the annual taxes collected by the state for the 
support of public schools. The superintendent, at th'e request of any 
county or city superintendent, gives his opinion upon a written state- 
ment of facts on all questions and controversies arising out of the 
interpretation and construction of the school laws in regard to the 
rights, powers and duties of township and city boards, school offlcers 
and county superintendents. The office is elective and the term of 
office is four years. The salary is $2,500.00 per annum. No person 
shall be eligible to the office except a male person of more than 30 
years of age, and three years a qualified elector of this state before 
his election. 



Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

R. H. Wilson Superintendent of Public Instruction. .$2,500.00 

George A. Landrum. . . .Assistant Superintendent ► . . . . 1,800.00 

W. T. Hunt Chief Clerk 1,500.00 

Henry J. Miller Agricultural and Blank Clerk 1,500.00 

E. F. Proffitt Public School Inspector 1,800.00 

Alta B. Drake Stenographer 1,200.00 

L. T. Huffman Secretary of Board of Education 2,000.00 

Grace Liegerot Stenographer to Secretary 1,200.00 



Appropriations. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries, *(2 years) $17,000.00 

Contingent, (2 years) 12,560.00 

S. B. No. 139, Salary School Inspector 3,600.00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 21 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCOUNTING. 

Under the provisions of Section No. 17, Article VI, of the State 
Constitution, the office of State Examiner and Inspector is defined. 
The examiner and inspector must have had at least three years' 
experience as an expert accountant. His duties shall be to examine 
the state and county treasurers' books, accounts and ,"ash on hand 
or in bank at least twice each year, without notice to such treasurer, 
and publish the report as to every such treasurer once each year, 
and also examine the accounts of the departments of state. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Address. Salary. 

Chas. A. Taylor State Examiner 

and Inspector Pond Creek Okla. .$3,000.00 

Hugh Gerner Asst. State Examiner 

and Inspector Shawnee, Okla.. . . 1,800.00 

C. J. Alexander Deputy State Examiner 

and Inspector Oklahoma, Okla.. . 1,800.00 

H. C. Hammonds... Deputy State Examiner 

and Inspector Lawton, Okla 1,800.00 

George J. Mechling. Deputy State Examiner 

and Inspector Woodward, Okla.. 1,800.00 

Jacob A. Mercer. . . .Deputy State Examiner 

and Inspector McAlester, Okla.. . 1,800.00 

M. E. France Deputy State Examiner 

and Inspector Alva, Okla 1,800.00 

Colin Valentine Deputy State Examiner 

and Inspector Quinton, Okla 1,800.00 

Tennis Sniggs Clerk and Stenographer Oklahoma, Okla.. . 1,200.00 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B, No. 557, Salaries $16,800.00 $16,800.00 

Contingent, etc 9,000.00 9,000.00 



22 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MINES. 

The office of Chief Inspector of Mines, Oil and Gas was created 
under the provisions of Section 25, Article VI, of the State Consti- 
tution. The term of office is four years and no person shall be 
elected to the office unless he shall have had eight years actual 
experience as a practical miner, and such other qualifications as may 
be prescribed by the legislature. The first state legislature created 
three mining districts and provided for the election of assistant 
inspectors therein after 1910, who are under the general control of 
the chief mine inspector. Assistant mine inspectors from 1907 until 
1910 were appointed by the chief mine inspector. The chief duty of 
the mine inspectors is to inspect mines, and oil and gas plants, and 
see that the mining, oil and gas laws are enforced. To enable them 
to assist in the enforcement of such statutes, they are given police 
powers to make arests for any violations of the law. 



District No. 1. 

John O'Brien, Lehigh, Inspector. 

Mining district No. 1 is composed of the following counties: 
McCurtain, LePlore, Latimer, Pushmataha, Choctaw, Coal, Atoka, 
Bryan, Pontotoc, Johnson, Marshall, Garvin, Murray, Carter, Love, 
McClain, Grady, Stephens, Jefferson, Comanche, Washita, Kiowa, Till- 
man, Jackson, Greer and Beckham. 



District No. 2. 

Martin Clark, McAlester, Inspector. 

Mining district No. 2 is composed of the following counties: Pitts- 
burg, Hughes, Seminole, Pottawatomie, Lincoln, Payne, Logan, Okla- 
homa, Cleveland, Canadian, Kingfisher, Garfield, Grant, Alfalfa, Woods, 
Major, Blaine, Custer, Dewey, Woodward, Ellis, Roger Mills, Beaver, 
I Texas, Cimarron and Harper. 



District No. 3. 

Frank Haley, Henryetta, Inspector, 

Mining district No. 3 is composed of the following counties: 
Sequoyah, Adair, Delaware, Ottawa, Craig, Mayes, Cherokee, Haskell, 
Mcintosh, Muskogee, Wagoner, Nowata, Washington, Rogers, Tulsa, 
Okmulgee, Creek, Pawnee, Noble, Kay, Osage and Okfuskee. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 23 

, Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Ed. Boyle Chief Inspector $3,000.00 

John O'Brien Assistant District No. 1 1,500.00 

Martin Clark Assistant District No. 2 1,500.00 

Frank Haley Assistant District No. 3 1,500.00 

T. D. Kelly Clerk, and Chief Deputy Inspector 

of Refined Oils 1,500.00 

George W. Taylor Stenographer 900.00 



Oil and Gas Well and Pipe Line Inspector. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

H. H. Breene Chief Deputy $2,000.00 

Salary per day. 

Ira H. Gibbens Deputy 5.00 

C. C. Harmon Deputy 5.00 

W. C. Connely Deputy 5.00 



Appropriations. 



1912. 1913. 



H. B, No. 557, Salaries, contingent expenses, and 
traveling and per diem ex- 
penses $27,200.00 $27,200.00 

S. B. No. 209, Deficiency $124.95 

H. B. No. 83, Deficiency for oil and gas inspectors' salaries — $8,000.00. 



24 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

• 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMMISSIONER OF LABOR. 

Section 20 of Article VI of tlie State Constitution creates the 
office of Commissioner of Labor, wlio stiall be elected by the people. 
The terra of office is four years and the salary $2,000. The first 
legislature created a Board of Arbitration and Conciliation in the 
department, to be appointed by the governor by and with the advice 
and consent of the state senate, two of whom must be farmers and 
one an employer, selected by the governor, and two employes and one 
employer, recommended by the labor commissioner. 

That organized labor has played an important part in shaping 
the destinies of the new state is evident from the fact that the 
state constitution, statutes, and ordinances of cities and municipali- 
ties contain laws which were advocated and enacted at its request. 

Oklahoma has an eight-hour law for all public work, and provi- 
sion is made in the same law that the current market rate of per 
diem wages in the locality where the work is performed, shall be paid. 

The State Free Employment Bureau was created at the request 
of organized labor. The law creating this institution of state gov- 
ernment affects the unorganized class of labor more than any other, 
practically 99 per cent, being of that class. 

Factory inspection, child labor legislation, and many other laws 
have proven their value during the three years of their operation. 
Provision is also made, by statute, for the labeling of convict-made 
goods; and, in the constitution, for the prohibition of contracting 
convict labor, other than that of employment by the several counties 
of the state for road building; prohibiting payment of wages in 
script; providing a semi-monthly pay day; for service letters; steam 
boiler protection; operation of at least one repair shop within the 
limits of the state by all railroads; a mechanic's lien; protection of 
employes on buildings; punishment for deception in the employment 
of labor, or the use of unlawful force; regulation of private employ- 
ment agencies; the exemption of wages, and other provisions. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Charles L. Daugherty . . Commissioner of Labor $2,000.00 

W. G. Ashton Assistant Commissioner 1,500.00 

F. B. Yarbrough Statistician 1,500.00 

H. B. McCance Stenographer 900.00 



Bureau of Factory Inspection. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

G. E. Warren Chief Factory Inspector $1,500.00 

C. E. Connally Deputy 1,500.00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 25 

Bureau of Free Employment. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

E. W. Vance Superintendent Oklahoma City Office. .$1,200.00 

Thomas Wiley Superintendent Muskogee Office 900.00 

J. H. Pieh Superintendent Enid Office 900.00 



Appropriations. 

1911. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries and contingent fund $22,500.00 $23,500.00 

S. B. No. 209, (Deficiency) Traveling expenses, extra help, 

freight, telephone, telegraph, etc $308.90 



26 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES AND CORRECTIONS. 

Section 28 of Article VI of the Olclahoma State Constitution pro- 
vides for the Commissioner of Charities and Corrections to inspect 
and examine into the condition and management of all prisons, jails, 
alms houses, reformatories, reform and industrial schools, hospitals, 
infirmaries, dispensaries, orphanages, etc. , ' , 

By the passage of House Bill No. 69 by the Third Legislature, the 
commissioner was given power to appear as "next friend" for all minor 
orphans, defectives, dependents, and delinquents who are inmates of 
any public institution maintained and operated at public expense in 
court actions affecting their estates, legacies or properties, and also to 
intervene where it appears that the estates of such minors are being 
mismanaged or dishonestly administered. 



Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Kate Barnard Commissioner $2,500.00 

H. Huson Assistant Commissioner 1,500.00 

Dr. J. H. Stolper Insp^ector 1,200.00 

Estelle Blair Stenographer 900.00 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries, expenses, legal services, 

and contingent $15,800.00 $15,800.00 

S. B. No. 209, (Deficiency) Contingent fund $300.00 

Inspector's traveling expenses 600.00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 27 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

Since the Insurance Department was established, November 16, 
1907, it has paid to the state treasurer from fees and taxes collected 
from insurance companies transacting business in this state the sum 
of $626,392.67. 

The Constitution provides that all insurance companies transact- 
ing business in this state shall pay to the Insurance Commissioner, 
annually, a tax of 2 per cent, of all premiums collected in this state, 
after all cancellations and dividends are deducted, and in addition 
to this tax, all foreign life insurance companies must pay an annual 
tax of $200; fire insurance companies a tax of $100; and surety and 
bonding companies a tax of $150. 

Last year the department issued 16,626 agents' licenses, and from 
January 9 to July 20, 1911, it issued 13,874 agents' licenses. These 
licenses were issued to both foreign and domestic insurance companies. 

The income of the office since statehood was as follows: 

Total fees and taxes collected in 1907, from November 16 to 

December 31 $ 471.50 

Total fees and taxes collected in 1908 76,821.33 

" " " " " 1909 168,418.28 

" " " " " 1910 189,239.56 

' " " to July 20, 1911 191,442.00 

Total $626,392.67 

For the four years prior to statehood the Insurance Department 
collected from insurance companies operating in this state the sum 
of $75,595.07, as follows: 

Fees and taxes collected in 1904 $14,792.00 

" 1905 16,086.50 

" 1906 21,628.32 

" to November 15, 1907 23,088.25 

Total $75,595.07 

There are now 206 insurance companies transacting business in 
Oklahoma, and of this number 51 are life insurance companies, 78 
fire insurance companies, 37 fraternal associations, and 40 miscel- 
laneous insurance companies. 

There are five domestic life insurance companies operating in 
the state, two stock fire insurance companies, and four mutual insur- 
ance companies, and one reciprocal underwriter. 

The amount of insurance written by life Insurance companies in 
the state in 1910 was $29,842,355; the amount of premiums collected 
was $3,860,855; and tie amount of claims paid was $568,400. The 
total premiums collected by fire insurance companies in the state 
in 1910 was $3,612,074.43, and the amount of losses paid was $1,940,- 
222.10. The amount of insurance written in the state in 1910 by 



28 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

fraternal associations was $39,528,803; the amount of premiums col- 
lected $1,474,231; and the amount of losses paid $883,619. 

The amount of premiums received by miscellaneous companies 
transacting business in this state, which include surety, bonding, 
fidelity, casualty, plate glass, boiler explosion, health and accident, 
title, guaranty, burglary, live stock, and credit insurance, was $763,252, 
and the amount of losses paid by such companies was $277,931. ^■■ 

The expenses of maintaining and operating the Insurance Depart- 
ment from November 16, 1907, to December 31, 1910, was $133,367.74. 

The Third Legislature of Oklahoma passed an act creating the 
office of State Fire Marshal, which became effective on June 10, 1911. 
Governor Lee Cruce appointed C. C. Hammonds, of Lawton, Oklahoma, 
as the first incumbent of this office. 



Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Perry A. Ballard Insurance Commissioner $2,500.00 

Arthur W. Pettit First Assistant 1,800.00 

O. E. Young Second Assistant 1,500.00 

J. H. McElroy Chief Clerk 1,200.00 

Lulu M. Regnier Stenographer and Record Clerk 1,200.00 

Kate J. Elliott Stenographer and License Clerk 1,200.00 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries $9,400.00 $9,400.00 

Actual expenses 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Traveling expenses 600.00 600.00 

Contingent expenses 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Telephone and telegraph,expenses 

general miscellaneous 3,000.00 3,000.00 

S. B. No. 209, Furniture $700.70 

Guthrie Steam Bot. Works 10.00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 2» 



STATE JUDICIARY DEPARTMENT. 

The judicial power of the state is vested in the Senate, sitting 
as a court of impeachment, a Supreme Court, consisting of five justices, 
a Criminal Court of Appeals, composed of three members, district 
courts, superior courts, county courts, municipal courts, and courts of 
the justices of the peace. The state is divided into five judicial 
districts for the purpose of electing justices of the supreme court, and 
into a northern, eastern and southern district for the election of 
judges of the criminal court of appeals. The nominations are made 
by districts but the election is at large. 

The term of office of the justices of the supreme court is six 
years. Provision is made in the State Constitution that the supreme 
court shall render a decision in each case filed, within six months 
after it has been filed. 

The legislature in 1911 apportioned the state into twenty-six 
districts for district court purposes, increasing the number five, as 
originally prescribed by the Constitution, with the provision that 
the number might be changed from time to time by the legislature. 

County courts have original jurisdiction in all probate matters, 
co-extensive with the county. 



Justices Supreme Court and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

John B. Turner Chief Justice (Term expires 1912) $4,000.00 

Neeley C. Orr Stenographer 1,200.00 

S. W. Hayes Justice (Term expires 1914) 4,000.00 

H. E. Oakes Stenographer 1,200.00 

R. L. Williams Justice (Term expires 1914) 4,000.00 

H. S. Burke Stenographer 1,200.00 

Matthew J. Kane Justice (Term expires 1916) 4,000.00 

Floyd Calvert Stenographer 1,200.00 

Jesse J. Dunn Justice (Term expires 1916) 4,000.00 

Alvin Richards Stenographer 1,200.00 



Judges of the Criminal Court of Appeals and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Henry M. Purman Presiding Judge (Term expires 1912) . .$4,000.00 

Dortsh Young Stenographer 1,200.00 

Jas. R. Armstrong Member (Term expires 1914) 4,000.00 

George Kelly Stenographer 1,200.00 

Thos. H. Doyle Member (Term expires 1916) 4,000.00 

Wm. Hobbs Stenographer 1,200.00 

W. H. L. Campbell Marshal Fees 

Wm. T. Fields Clerk Supreme Court 1,500.00 

Howard Parker State Reporter 2,000.00 



30 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

SUPREME COURT COMMISSION. 

Under the provisions of House Bill No. 75 passed by the Third 
State Legislature, six supreme court commissioners were appointed 
by the members of the supreme court to assist that court in dis- 
posing of causes pending or hereafter brought for a period of two 
years, at which time the positions expire. A salary of $3,600 per 
annum is paid. 



Members and Employes. 

Name. Position. Address. Salary. 

J. B. A. Robertson Chandler $3,600.00 

Vivian E. Hall Stenographer 1,100.00 

Malcolm E. Rosser Poteau 3,600.00 

Mamie E. Rooney. . . Stenographer 1,100.00 

Phil D. Brewer McAlester 3,600.00 

E. G. Thomas Stenographer 1,100.00 

J. P. Sharp Purcell 3,600.00 

C. F. Cable Stenographer 1,100.00 

John B. Harrison Sayre 3,600.00 

Beatrice Ramsey . . .Stenographer 1,100.00 

C. B. Ames Oklahoma City. . . 3,600.00 

W. H. Winn Stenographer 1,100.00 



COMMISSION ON UNIFORM LAWS. 

Name. Address. Salary. 

Robert E. Jackson Sallisaw Expenses 

Clinton O. Bunn Oklahoma City Expenses 

D. A. McDougal Sapulpa Expenses 

NOTE. — Created under provisions of Senate Bill No. 79, passed by 
the Third State Legislature. Members were appointed by Governor 
Cruce June 10, 1911. 



OKLAHOMA BAR COMMISSION. 

Ben F. Williams, Jr., acting president Norman 

W. J. Horton McAlester 

George S. Ramsey Muskogee 

E. F. Lester Wilburton 

James W. Bolen Ada 

Frank Dale Guthrie 

D. A. McDougal Sapulpa 

Louis Davis Lawton 

Nester Rummons Hobart 

Charles Parker Enid 

William B. Johnson Ardmore 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 31 

Appropriations. 



Supreme Court. 



1912. 1913. 



H. B. No. 557, Salaries for five justices, marshal, 
five stenographers, six supreme 
court commissioners, six sten- 
ographers $55,700.00 $55,700.00 

For printing nine volumes of Ter- 
ritorial Supreme Court Reports 
1,000 each (re-appropriated).. 9,000 00 

For printing 2,000 Supreme Court 

Reports, six volumes 15,000.00 

Contingent expenses, etc 1,500.00 1,500 00 

Contingent fund for six new com- 

^. sioners 400.00 400.00 

Six typewriters for commission... 486.00 '486 00 

Extra help for Supreme Court Re- 

c? R Mn onQ r-n « °'''''''" ; -A 2,000.00 2.000.00 

to. B. No. 209, (Deficiency) Supreme Court Reporter $300.00 

Guthrie miscellaneous expenses 211^44 



Criminal Court of Appeals. 

1912. 1913 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries, contingent and miscel- 

laneous expenses $17,600.00 $17,600 00 

Printing reports, four volumes of 

1,500 copies each 7 150 00 

S. B. No. 209, (Deficiency) Salary of judges, ste- 
nographers, special judges, con- 
tingent fund, etc 8,400.97 



District Judges. 

1912 191^ 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries $87,OOo!oO $87,000.00 



CLERK OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

The Clerk of the Supreme Court is elected for a term of four 
years. The salary is provided for by a system of fees on cases The 
clerk also acts as ex-officib clerk of the Criminal Court of Appeals 



Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salarv 

W. H. L. Campbell. . . . Clerk Peeg 

Thos. H. Sturgeon Deputy 



32 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



John L. Wallace Deputy 

Ruell Haskell, Jr Deputy 

Jessie Pardee Deputy 

Floyd Majors Stenographer 

Lela Catlin Stenographer 



STATE REPORTER. 

The office of State Reporter was created by Senate Bill No. 136, 
1909, by the provisions of which the reporter is appointed by the 
members of the Supreme Court and the Criminal Court of Appeals. 
The duties of the reporter are to edit and report the decisions of 
the two courts, and prepare for publication the session laws of the 
legislature. He also superintends the binding and printing of 
the reports and the session laws. The law creating the office became 
effective March 12, 1909. 



Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary 

Howard Parker State Reporter $2,000.00 

Elmer V. Jesse Assistant State Reporter 1,500.00 

W. T. J. Hartman Assistant State Reporter 1,500.00 



♦Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salary $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

Assistance and otjjer incidental ex- 
penses for two years 1,900.00 1,900.00 

♦Note. — See appropriations for supreme court. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 

The state library was established by act of the Territorial Legis- 
lature of 1893. Provision was made for the appointment of the 
State Librarian by the members of the state supreme court, who 
were constituted the board of directors of the library. The library 
shall consist of all law books, miscellaneous books, pamphlets, maps, 
charts, pictures, documents, and other literary matter acquired by 
the state. 



Officers and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

S. O. Daws Librarian $1,500.00 

Sue Barcroft Assistant 1,000.00 

Perry T. McVay Reference Librarian 720.00' 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 33 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries $3,220.00 $3,220.00 

Telephone 36.00 36.00 

Supplies, etc 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Purchase of books 5,000 00 5,000.01^ 



District Judges. 

Dist. No. Name. Post-Office. Counties Composing Dists. 

1. John H. Pitchford...Tahlequah Adair, Cherokee, Dela- 

ware, Sequoyah. 

2. T. L. Brown Claremore Nowata, Rogers. 

3. R. P. DeGraffenried. .Muskogee Muskogee, Wagoner. 

R. C. Allen Coweta Muskogee, Wagoner. 

4. Preslie B. Cole McAlester Mcintosh, Pittsburg. 

5. W. H. Brown Stigler LeFlore, Haskell, Latimer. 

6. A. H. Ferguson Durant Bryan, Choctaw, McCur- 

tain, Pushmataha, Mar- 
shall. 

Summers Hardy Madill Bryan, Choctaw, McCur- 

tain, Pushmataha, Mar- 
shall. 

7. Tom t). McKeown. . .Ada Pontotoc, Seminole. 

8. Stilwell H. Russell. . . Ardmore Carter, Love. 

9. John Caruthers Okemah Hughes, Okfuskee. 

10. Chas. B. Wilson, Jr.. .Chandler Lincoln, Pottawatomie. 

11. A. H. Huston Guthrie Logan, Payne. 

12. W. M. Bowles Perry Grant, Kay, Noble. 

13. George W. Clark. .. .Oklahoma City. . .Canadian, Oklahoma. 

John J. Carney El Reno Canadian, Oklahoma. 

W. R. Taylor Oklahoma City. . .Canadian, Oklahoma. 

14. Robinson McMillan. .Norman Cleveland, Garvin, Mc- 

Clain, Murray. 

15. Frank M. Bailey [^hickasha Caddo, Comanche, Grady, 

Jefferson, Stephens. 

J. T. Johnson Lawton Caddo, Comanche, Grady, 

Jefferson, Stephens. 

17. James R. Tolbert Hobart Custer, Kiowa, Washita. 

18. G. A. Brown Mangum Beckham, Ellis, Dewey, 

Greer, Roger Mills. 

19. R. H. Loufbourrow. . .Beaver City Cimarron, Texas, Beaver, 

Harper, Woods. 

20. James B. Cullison Enid Alfalfa, Garfield, King- 

fisher, Major, Wood- 
ward. 
J. W. Steen Enid Alfalfa, Garfield, King- 
fisher, Major, Wood- 
ward. 

21. L. M. Poe Tulsa Pawnee, Tulsa. 

22. Wade S. Stanfield. . .Capulpa Creek, Okmulgee. 

23. Preston S. Davis. . . . Vinita Craig, Mayes, Ottawa. 

24. R. H. Hudson Pawhuska Osage, Washington. 

Sig 5. 



34 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



25. Frank H. Matthews. .Altus .Harmon, Jackson, Swan- 

son (dissolved), Till- 
man. 

26. Robert M. Rainey Atoka Atoka, Coal, Johnston. 



Superior Court Judges. 



Name. Address. County. 

J. W. Lawter Weatherford Custer. 

Dan Huett Enid Garfield. 

Will Linn Chickasha Grady. 

S. S. Lawrence Guthrie Logan. 

Farrar L. McCain Muskogee Muskogee. 

E. D. Oldfield Oklahoma City Oklahoma. 

*W. C. Liedtke McAlester Pittsburg. 

G. C. Abernathy Shawnee Pottawatomie. 

M. A. Breckenridge Tulsa Tulsa. 

♦Note. — Contested by appointee of county commissioners. Leidtke 
appointed by the governor. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 35 



STATE CORPORATION COMMISSION. 

Sections 15 t"b 35, inclusive, of Article IX of the State Constitu- 
tion creates the Corporation Commission and defines and outlines 
its duties. The commission consists of three members, who shall 
be elected by the people at a general election for state officers and 
their terms of office are six years. The commissioners must be at 
least 30 years of age and have been citizens of the state for over 
two years, next preceding the election, and qualified voters under 
the constitution. In addition to the oath, required of state officers, the 
commissioners must each take a special oath, declaring that he is 
neither directly nor indirectly interested in any corporation which is 
under the supervision of the commission. 

The commission sits as a court to hear complaints of citizens 
against the public corporations, or of one corporation against another, 
takes evidence and makes rulings, as it may be limited by the con- 
stitution or statute. Members of the commission may sit as a court 
to hear evidence in complaints which is then presented to the com- 
mission sitting as a body. The commission has ruled that its inten- 
tion in all cases is to get at the facts, irrespective of legal 
technicalities. 



Members and Employes. 

Name. Position. • Salary. 

J. E. Love Chairman $4,000.00 

A. P. Watson Commissioner 4,000.00 

George A. Henshaw. . . . Commissioner 4,000.00 

E. C. Patton Law and Executive Clerk 2,500.00 

C. B. Bee Rate Expert 3,000.00 

L. Bennett Assistant Rate Clerk 2,500.00 

J. H. Hyde Secretary 2,000.00 

A. L. Funk Court Reporter 1,500.00 

Frances Kelley Opinion Clerk 1,500.00 

J. S. Gram Marshal 1,500.00 

W. L. Stout Auditor 2,500.00 

P. E. Glenn Assistant Auditor 1,500.00 

Eugenia Willmering. . .Clerk Auditing Department 1,020.00 

E. P. McKay Corporation Record Clerk 2,200.00 

George P. Player Telephone Engineer 2,400.00 

A. I. Thompson Engineer 2,200.00 

H. H. Bryant Assistant to Engineer 1,500.00 

P. H. Nolan Assistant to Engineer 1,500.00 

Ruby Turner Clerk Engineering Department 1,200.00 

Adah E. Endres Official Stenographer 1,200.00 

Mary L. Pierce Official Stenographer 1,200.00 

Constance Wright Stenographer 1,020.00 

Augusta Ellis Stenographer 1,020.00 

Anna Fightmaster Stenographer 1,020.00 

M. E. McGill Multigraph Operator 1,200.00 



36 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Appropriations. 

Sam Houston Mailing Clerk 1,020. 00> 

C. G. King Night Watchman 900.00 

H. B. No. 557 — Salary for two years $ 45,200.00 

Printing and publishing general orders.... 5,000.00 
Court expenses, appeals and expenses of 

procuring witnesses 10,000.00' 

Contingent expenses, etc 100,000. 00- 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 



37 



DEPARTMENT OF THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

The Board of Agriculture consists of eleven members, a president 
and ten members, chosen two from each judicial district of the state, 
and all members including the president shall be farmers of at least 
five years' practical experience, after reaching the age of twenty-one 
years. The term of office, following the expiration of the terms of 
those chosen under the provisions of the law of 1907-08, providing for 
selection of the first set of officers under the state form of government 
shall be five years. The members are chosen by the delegates to the 
farmers' State Institute from the various county institutes. 

The president is elected at a general election, and his tenure of 
office is co-terminus with that of the governor. 

The board under the provisions of Section 11, article 1 of session 
laws of 1907-08, constitutes the board of regents of all agricultural and 
mechanical colleges of the state and shall have control thereof. It has 
jurisdiction over all matters affecting animal industry and animal 
quarantine regulations, and of all matters affecting agriculture, horti- 
culture and arborculture. 

The Secretary of the board is chosen by the members of the board 
and he shall not be a member thereof. 



Members of the State Board of Agriculture. 



Name. Position 

J. C. Elliott Member 

R. P. Wilson Member 

J. W. L. Corlev Member 

A. C. Cobb Member 

Geo. H. Hinds Member 

Frank L. Haymcs Member 

Kweis White Member 

Dan ijiehl Member 

O. A. Brewer Member 

M. P. Ikard Member 

Estimated mileage 

members 

Appropriation 



$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
$6.00 per 
and per 



Salary 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
day and mileage) 
diem of 

$5,000.00 

$5,000.00 



Officers and Employees. 



Name Position Salary 

G. T. Bryan President $ 2,.500.00 

Benj. Hennessey Secretary 1,800.00 

M. F. Ikard Supt. Live Stock Inspection 1,500.00 

Kirby Prans Statistical Clerk 1,500.00 

J. E. Scott Chief Clerk and Stenographer 1,200.00 

W. T. Joyner Stenographer 1,000.00 



38 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

J. K. Callicotte State Veterinarian 1,500,00 

Ben Dobkins Asst. State Veterinarian 9 months. . . 900.00 

$11,900.00 

Appropriation $12,600.00 

Estimated expense 11,900.00 

Balance $ 700.00 



Department of Feed Inspection. 

Name Position Salary 

L. McLennan Feed Inspector $1,400.00 

W. H. Hudson Clerk 1,200.00 

Albert Shields (Sal) . Inspector 1,200.00 

R. T. German (Sal) . . Live Stock Inspector (9 months) 1,200.00 

Ld O'Connor (Sal.) ...Inspector (9 months) 900.00 

Expenses of three inspectors 3,000.00 

Accumulated expenses, including 

$1,500 for analysis 2,036.00 

$9,736.00 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Estimated expenses $9,736.00 



Department of County Farmers' Institutes. 

Name Position . Salary 

J. S. Murray Superintendent $1,500.00 

Hardy Dial Lecturer 1,200.00 

E. B. Fleming Stenographer 1,000.00 



$3,700.00 

Appropriation $5,500.00 

Estimated expenses $3,700.00 



Live Stock Inspectors. 

Name Position Salary 

J E. Allin Clerk $1,20a 

Leslie Bush Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

Ed Etinnett Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

J. H. Hightower Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

W. D. Shepler Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

E. H. Miles Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

John Hendley Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

Wm. Dotts Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

J. W. Dotts Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

A. E. Romoerg Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

iViarcus Fraley Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

C. N. Anderson Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 39 

Roscoe Cox Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

W. S. Spencer Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

W. H. Agee Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

A. B. Silver Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

C. L. Edmonson i^ive Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

Jas. W. Wadley Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

T. H. Parker Live Stock Inspector ($3.00 per day and Exp.) 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Amount to be expended $2,000.00 



Demonstration Farming. 

Name Position Salary 

M. M. Woodson Superintendent $ 1,500.00 

Asst Superintendent 1,200.00 

Wallace York Inspector i,200.00 

J, B. Faulkner " 1,200.00 

Inspectors' Expenses Farm Seeds, Incidentals 6,900.00 



$12,000.00 
Appropriation $12,000.00 



Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Miss Irma Matthews, Secretary $1,500.00 

Expenses, supplies. Incidentals etc., and assistants 3,500.00 



$5,000.00 
Appropriation $5,000.00 



State Dairy Commission. 

Name Position Salary 

A. F. Howe State Dairy Commissioner $ 1,200.00 

R. D. McManus Supt. Dairy Inspection 1,200.00 

Traveling expenses, supplies, incidentals, etc 1,600.00 



$ 4,000.00 
Appropriation $4,000.00 



40 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF THE STATE PRINTER. 

The office of State Printer was created by act of the First State 
Legislature. The office was made elective after 1910 and for a term 
of four years with a salary of $2,500. Clint C. Worrall of Hobart, was 
appointed first state printer by Governor Haskell, but died near the 
end of his term in the fall of 1910. 

The state printer has power, under the direction of the state 
printing board, composed of the governor, state treasurer, and state 
auditor, to superintend, supervise and contract for all public printing 
and binding required by the legislature, the governor, the state su- 
preme court and several state institutions, state officers or any state 
board or state commission created under the laws, also all bound 
books and records required by the district courts, counties, and town- 
ships of the state. 



Officers and Employes. 

Name Position , Salary 

Giles W. Farris State Printer $2,500.00 

H. R. McGill Assistant State Printer . _ 1,500.00 

Alice Dunn Clerk _ 900.00 



Appropriations. 

1912 1913 

H. B. No. 557 — Salaries _ $ 4,900.00 $ 4,900.00 

Printing Fund 60,000.00 60,000.00 

Contingent 900.00 900.00 

S. B. 209— Deficiency 225.97 



BILL PASSED BY CHEROKEE COUNCIL TO ESTABLISH A PRINT- 
ING PRESS AND TO REGULATE THE NATIONAL NEWSPA- 
PER, PASSED IN 1843. 

"AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A PRINTING PRESS AND TO REG- 
ULATE THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER. 

"Sec. 1. BE IT ENACTED BY THE NATIONAL COUNCIL, That 
there be established at Tahlequah, as soon after the passage of this act 
as may be practicable, a printing press for the publication of a week- 
ly newspaper, in the English and Cherokee languages, which shall be 
called the "Cherokee Advocate," the object of which shall be the dis- 
semination of useful knowledge among the Cherokee people, and send- 
ing abroad correct information of their condition, and of passing 
events generally among the different Indians tribes. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 41 

"Sec. 2. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That there shall be elected 
by the National Council, for the term of four years, an Editor who shall 
exercise control over the whole establishment, receive all subscrip- 
tion money, and account quarterly to the National Treasurer for the 
same, and make annually to the National Council, a full report of the 
condition of the paper and its interests. He shall support and de- 
fend the National Rights of the Cherokees, and those recognized in 
all acknowledged treaties with the United States, and such measures 
as will, in his opinion, conduce to their best interests, in a moral and 
civil point of view. The management of the press, types and all the 
apparatus connected therewith shall be subject to such rules and reg- 
ulations as the Editor may deem expedient to devise, as he in all 
matters pertaining to the establishment not herein specified, is ex- 
pressly empowered to use his discretion, in order that the Nation may 
be benefited by the institution. 

"Sec. 3. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That the Principal Chief 
be and he hereby is authorized to appoint a suitable person whose 
duty it shall be to translate into the Cherokee Language for weekly 
publication, such laws, public documents, and other articles, as the 
editor may submit to him for that purpose. The principal Chief is 
also hereby further authorized to appoint a National Printer and a 
Journeyman Printer, who shall be men of steady and industrious 
habits, and who shall publish such articles only as the Editor may 
submit to them, or as have received his approbation. 

"Sec. 4. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That there shall be receiv- 
into the office, by appointment of the Principal, as apprentices to the 
art of printing, three Cherokee youths, of moral character and indus- 
trious habits, and two of whom, at least shall be familiar with the 
Cherokee language. The term of apprenticeship of said youths shall 
be four years, during which time they shall be supported and com- 
fortably clothed by the Nation, and allowed at the expiration of their 
time, fifty dollars each out of the National Treasury. 

"Sec. 5. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That the Editor shall re- 
ceive for his services Five Hundred Dollars, the National Printer and 
Translator Four Hundred Dollars each, and the Journeyman Printer 
Three Hundred Dollars per annum. And they shall be required to 
enter into bond for double the sum of their respective salaries, with 
approved security for the faithful performance of their several duties. 

"Approved. JOHN ROSS. 

"Tahlequah, Oct. 2.5th, 1843. 



AN ACT FIXING THE TERMS OF THE CHEROKEE ADVOCATE. 

"BE IT ENACTED BY THE NATIONAL COUNCIL, That the 
terms of the Cherokee Advocate shall be Three Dollars per annum, in 
advance, excepting those subscribers who read only the Cherokee 
language, and they shall pay Two Dollars per annum in advance. 

"Approved JOHN ROSS." 



42 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



BILL PASSED BY CHOCTAW COUNCIL CREATING OFFICE OF 
NATIONAL PRINTER IN 1862. 



"AN ACT ENTITLED AN ACT TO ELECT A PRINTER. 

"Sec. 1. BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL COUNCIL OF 
THE CHOCTAW NATION ASSEMBLED, That the General Council 
in joint session, shall elect one suitable person, citizen of the Nation, 
to compile and print all the Constitution, Laws, and Resolutions, and 
all other documets proper to be printed for the benefit of the Choctaw 
people to be embodied in one book with complete index and marking 
the repealed laws so that the same can be fully understood, after which 
he shall employ some suitable and competent person to translate the 
same into the Choctaw language, of which five hundred copies shall 
be printed in each language. 

"Sec. 2. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That the sum of Twelve 
Hundred Dollars shall be and is hereby appropriated out of any 
money in the National Treasury, not otherwise appropriated, to pay 
the person so elected for the services thus rendered, provided, he 
shall not receive any part of tl e said sum until the work is completed. 

"Sec. 3. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That from and after the 
passage of this act, the person elected shall be authorized to call upon 
any of the National Officers for the original bills wanted for pub- 
lication and execute his receipt for the same. 

"Sec. 4. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That as soon as the work 
is done, the same shall be sent to the Capitol, of the Nation for the 
Principal Chief to distribute among the National and County Officers 
and the members of the General Council, etc. 

"Sec. 5. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That the Principal Chief 
shall, on reception of the books issued, issue his certificate to the 
National Auditor, who will issue to each person elected his warrant 
upon the National Treasurer for the sum above specified, which said 
warrant the National Treasurer is hereby authorized to pay. 

"Sec. 6. BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That this act take effect and 
be in force from and after its passage. 

"Approved October 18, 1862." 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 43 



STATE BOARD OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. 

The state Board of Public Affairs was created under the provis- 
ions of Senate Bill No. 223, passed by the legislature in 1909, becom- 
ing effective March 27, 1909. The board is to consist of three mem- 
bers not more than two of whom shall be of the same political party, 
each being a qualified elector of the state. The members of 
the board are appointed by the governor, by and with the davice and 
consent of the senate, for a term coterminus with that of the governor 
making the appointment. Each member shall furnish bond in the 
sum of $50,000, conditioned for the honest and faithful performance of 
his duties. The members receive a salary of $3,000 per annum. 

The board has charge of the construction, repair, maintenance, 
insurance and operation of all buildings owned, used or occupied by or 
on behalf of the state. They have authority to purchase all material 
and perform all other duties necessary in the construction, repair and 
maintenance of all such buildings and have the control and custody 
of all state property and all other property managed or used by the 
state, except military stores and such as come under the control of 
the state banking department. The board contracts for, purchases and 
acquires all furnishings, furniture and supplies of every kind or de- 
scription for the use of the state or its officers, or the support of the 
several state institutions where the law requires the state to furnish 
the same. 

The Third Legislature in 1910, transferred the powers and duties 
of the Capitol Commission, created for the purpose of having charge 
of the construction and erection of the capitol buildings, from that 
commission to the board of public affairs. 



Members and Employes. 

Name Position Salary 

Lon M. Frame Chairman $3,000.00 

E. B. Howard Secretary 3,000,00 

Eugene E. Morris .... Member - . . 3,000.00 

J. W. Quilty Chief Clerk 1,800.00 

W. W. Brown Jr Auditor _ 1,800.00 

John A. Olive Secretary 1,500.00 

Walter W. Witt Stenogxapher 1,200.00 

T. C. Beeler Clerk . _ 1,800.00 

Mary L. Wilbur Stenographer 1,800.00 

Carrie L. Milhollan . . . Secretary Capitol Commission 900.00 



Appropriations. 

1912 1913 

H. B. No. 557 — Salaries, clerical help, incidentals, 
telephone, freight, rent, traveling 

expenses, ets $20,400.00 $20,400.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency $26,096.62 



44 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



COMMISSIONERS OF THE LAND OFFICE. 



History of Department. 

The school lands of Oklahoma are a heritage to the coming gen- 
erations, the magnitude of which is difficult to comprehend from the 
present viewpoint of history. 

Under the act of Congress, approved March 4, 1889, opening Ok- 
lahoma to settlement, sections 16 and 36 in each township were re- 
served for the use and benefit of the common schools, and the reser- 
vation was confirmed by the organic act of the territory. It had been 
customary in all territories in which school land was reserved to allow 
the land to lie idle until such time as the Territory was admitted to 
statehood, when some provision would be made for the disposal of 
the lands. 

Territorial Governor George W. Steele conceived the plan of hav- 
ing the lands leased for a term of years. 'He went to Washington and 
as tbe result of his visit, authority was given the Governor of the Ter- 
ritory by an act of congress approved March 3, 1891 to lease such lands 
under such rules and regulations as might be prescribed by the Secre- 
tary of the Interior. Soon after the school land department was 
organized with one clerk, appointed by the Secretary of the Interior, 
and the leasing of land was begun. 

By the act of Congress approved May 4, 1894, a board for leasing 
school lands was created, composed of the Governor. Secretary of the 
territory, and superintendent of public instruction who were author- 
ized to lease such lands under the rules and regulations prescribed by 
the Secretary of the Interior until laws for the administration of the 
trust should be passed by the territorial legislature. 

The Third Legislature failed to pass such legislation. The Fifth 
Legislature passed a bill which was vetoed by Governor Renfrew and 
May 3, 1899, the board, as created bv the act of Congress adopted a 
new set of rules and regulations of its own accord, governing the 
leasing of land. 

It was provided in the ordinance for the government of the 
Northwest Territory in 1787, that Section 16 in every township be set 
aside for the maintenance and support of a public school system. 
Thomas Jefferson was the real author of the public school system 
prevalent throughout the various states of the Union. In 1848, Section 
36 was added to Section 16 for the support and maintenance of a com- 
mon school system in all the public lands of the United States out of 
which states might be created. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 45 

Oklahoma was opened to settlement by the act of Congress under 
this law, April 22, 1889. When the Cherokee Strip was opened, Presi- 
dent Cleveland under the direction of Congress, added section 13 for 
the support of state educational institutions and Section 33 for the 
erection of public buildings for the state, which created an endow- 
ment of 1,415,862 acres of land for the common or district schools, and 
1,712,633 for public buildings and for five higher educational institu- 
tions. 

The national government in the Enabling Act in 1907, gave $5,- 
000,000 in lieu of Sections 16 and 36, which could not be had in the 
Indian Territory section of the state. 

The Governor, Secretary of State, State Auditor, Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, and the President of the Board of Agriculture, 
under the provisions of Sections 32, 33 and 34, of Article VI of the 
State Constitution, constitute the Commissioners of the Land Office, 
who shall have charge of the sale, rental, disposal and managing of 
the school lands and other public lands of the State, and of the funds 
and proceeds derived therefrom. 

An account is kept by the officers and commissioners of the 
State of all moneys and choses in action disbursed or otherwise dis- 
posed of severally by them, from all sources and for every service 
performed; and a report thereof shall be made semi-annually and as^ 
often as may be required by law, to the Governor under oath. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

John R. Williams Secretary $3,300.00 

James H. Chambers. . .Attorney 2,700.00 

T. M. Miller Chief Clerk 2,000.00 



Leasing Division. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

F. L. Langley Assistant Secretary $2,000.00 

Frank B. Lucas Bookkeeper 1,800.00 

R. L. Lunsford General Agent (Oil and Gas) 1,800.00 

J. W. Sorrells Cashier 1,700.00 

W. C. Raymond Clerk 1,500.00 

A. C. Rippy Clerk 1,500.00 

S. P. Price Clerk 1.200.00 

W. H. Tillotson Clerk 1,200.00 

O. P. Callahan Transfer Clerk 1,200.00 

A. W. Garrett Printer 1,200.00 

P. E. Trent Clerk •. 1,020.00- 



46 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

F. S. Warner Stenographer 1,020.00 

Josephine Schott rtenographer -^'^oS'S^ 

James Langley Cierk iTrlrl 

Fred Parkinson Superintendent of Appraisers /,uuu.uo 

J. F. Frost Appraiser 1,800.00 

Sanford Feland Appraiser "^'^SS'SJ 

C. C. Fisher Appraiser 1,800.00 

Joseph Ropp Night Watchman 780.00 

Sam Pearson Janitor 600.00 



Sales Division. 
Office Force. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

L. K. Hughey Chief Clerk $1,800.00 

G. L. Bennett Bookkeeper 1,500.00 

Homer Whayne Tract Book and Record Clerk 1,200.00 

Claude Ray Assistant Bookkeeper 1,200.00 

Cora Friend Stenographer 1,020.00 

L. H. Costello Bookkeeper and Interest Clerk 1,200.00 

Seth Ledbetter Clerk 1,020.00 



Field Force. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

R. E. Wood Superintendent of Sales $2,100.00 

R. E. Trammell Assistant Superintendent of Sales.... 1,800.00 

G. W. Blackard Cashier 1,500.00 

Fred A. Speakman Auctioneer 1,500.00 

L. T. Babcock Report and Record Clerk 1,200.00 

Mrs. F. A. Speakman. . Stenographer 1,020.00 



Farm Loan Division. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Ray O. Weems Assistant Secretary $2,000.00 

Kirby Fitzpatrick Title Examiner 2,000.00 

M. F. Lake Farm Loan Appraiser 1,800.00 

G. P. Spaulding Mortgage Clerk 1,500.00 

M. P. Long Statistical Clerk 1,500.00 

G. C Stark Bookkeeper 1,500.00 

N. B. Roach Stenographer and Clerk 1,200.00 

Katherine Bremicker. . Stenographer and Clerk 1,200.00 

Essie Majors Stenographer and Clerk 1,200.00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 47 

Appropriations for Farm Loan Department. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557, Salaries, officers and employes. .$38,260.00 $38,260.00 

Expenses of farm loan appraisers 3,600.00 3,600.00 
Expenses of field force, and 

contingent expenses 21,200.00 21,200.00 

Other expenses of Commissioners 

of the Land Office 5,000.00 5,000.00 



48 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



ACREAGE BY COUNTIES AND FUNDS OF LAND 

COLLEGE AND 



COLLEGE. 



PUBLIC I 
BUILDING. |GREER 



U 



Mii 



O 



Logan 

Oklahoma 

Cleveland . . . . 

Payne 

Noble 

Kay 

Pottawatomie 

Lincoln 

Pawnee 

Garfield 

Grant 

Canadian . . . . 
Kingfisher . . . 

Stephens 

Jefferson 

Grady 

Caddo 

Comanche . . . 

Major 

Alfalfa 

Blaine 

Woods- 

Tillman 

Kiowa 

Washita 

Custer 

Dewey 

Woodward . . . 

Jackson 

Harper 

Greer 

Beckham . . . . 
Roger Mills . . 

Ellis 

Cimarron 

Texas 

Beaver 



26,2301.... 
32,887 18, 

16,7521 

26,422|.... 
14,6401... 
24,528|..., 
20,4001 6. 
49,960| 50, 
17,27l|..., 
37,7001... 
38,400|... 
31,201| 
31,6321..., 
3,8401 1. 
4,0001 1, 
5,1201 2, 
47,1601 7, 
45,320| 6, 
35,600|.... 
30,0501.... 
31,700|.... 
49,i20|.... 
15,0401 4, 
46,382 9, 

34,520i 

33,4401 5, 
34.5191 3, 

42,0801 

12,760|.... 
49,0401 20, 
26,4801 15, 
38.5601 11 
31,728| 3, 
37,326| 
57,0001.... 
63.7901 17, 
56.4801 27, 



100 



009 1 

715 



2,720 

6,614 

12,000 



640 



4,760 

18,502 

19,215 

640 



3.200 

1,920 

1,600 

15,274 

10,880 

16,900 

19,200 

480 

23,840 

8,320 

19.520 

2,560 

1,920 



21,120 



360 
040 
560| 
3601 
640 



19,200 



1,280 

9,240 

13,920 



6,360 
19,200 
19,200 

2.240 



2,400 
1,600 
2 I 
7,360 
7,360 



9,440 



1,280 

1,920 

3,360 

17,800 

14.240 

18,700 

13.790 

2,218 

23,200 

7,360 

16,160 

1,600 



1,600 
1.760 
2,400 
3,360 
11,520 



640 



12,320 
" 1,126 



21,760 

480 

11,400 



6,240 



280 
2,0791 
13,440] 
9,3331 
9,333| 
9,334 



17,600 
7,040 



12,800 



4,4801 



Total |1,199.078|214,784|273,904| 35.5201239,508| 34,7201 30,880 



•The above figures are approximately correct. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 



49 



GRANTED STATE OF OKLAHOMA FOR SCHOOL, 
OTHER PURPOSES. 



13 


GREER 33. 




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eo 

^5 


>, 

'5 
p 

-a 
c 

CO 

e<5 


>, 

£ 
> 


>> 

o 

> (-. 

p 


O 

O 
eg 

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>, 


to 

o 
o 

Xi 
o 

-3 

o 


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Eh 


















26,230.00 
50,987.00 


















16,752.00 


















30,422.00 


















30,494.00 


















50,448.00 


















26,409.00 


















100,675.00 


















28,391.00 


















75,402.00 


















76,815.00 


















34,721.00 


















31,632.00 


















13,920.00 


















12,480.00 


















18,240.00 


















98,114.00 


















95,520.00 














2,863.04 


2,716.37 


76,779.41 















63,040.00 










1 






35,038.00 








3,621.55 


1,086.02 


5,881.80 


3,669.85 


9,075.12 


119,494.34 








35,520.00 


















113,702.00 


















38,680.00 








52.50 

771.75 

2,217.95 










42,452.50 












798.85 
4,410.08 


812.79 
983.32 


40,742.39 








6,913.55 


2,449.80 


101,934.70 


320 


9,280 




29,080.00 






23,318.66 


1,641.44 


887.35 


4,060.05 


11,630.86 


141,538.36 


5,920 


14,560 
8,160 


4,000 
4,480 


83,600.00 


5,840 


• 




280.00 

720.00 

8,564.92 

163.992.16 

26 732 26 






75,920.00 




4^046.76 

10,882.48 

148,739.17 

247278.76 

33.208.75 


3,236.71 

8,448.30 

44,987.54 

55,865.39 

1 24,049.78 


"3,198.28 

66,240.57 

316.28 

17,112.08 


701.40 

4,309.87 

145 653.95 


45,871.87 








99,609.85 
fi35 946.39 








75,434.631 277.510.32 


:::::.i::::::: 




1 36.524.59 


48,154.42 


1 252.383.62 



12,080| 32,000| 8,480|251.138.33|146,228.73|246,032.88|102,669.08|299,472.73|3,126,495.75 



Sig. 6. 



50 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Report by Funds, showing the acreage, amount of rents received 
up to June 1, 1911, acreage sold, amount sold for, and acreage un- 
sold of all of the preference right lands belonging to the State of 
Oklahoma: 

Common School. 

Acreage. Rent Rec'd. Acreage Sold. Sold For. Acreage Unsold 
1,199,078.00 $4,141,712.00 , 400.00 $ 244,647.50 1,198,678.00 



Common School Indemnity. 
214,784.00 418,672.38 153,252.03 1,596.451.57 61.531.97 

S. E. I. Sections 13 and Indamnity. 

309,424.00 1,001,788.85 23,309.55 453,169.00 286,144.45 

Public Building, Sections 33 and Indemnity. 
271,636.57 919,312.89 170,005.71 3,169,540.43 101,630.86 

Greer County, Sections 33 and Indemnity. 
42,960.00 62,397.84 7,590.47 71,500.00 35,369.53 

Greer County, Sections 13 and Indemnity. 
40,480.00 58,083.93 7,970.83 79,070.00 32,509.17 



2,078,362.57 $6,601,967.89 362,528.59 $5,614,378.50 1,715,833.98 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 51 



"Original Sources of Oklahoma Titles, with Special Reference to 

Indian Titles." 

BY KIRBY FITZPATRICK 
(Chief Examiner of Titles for State Scliool Land Department). 

Delivered before the American Association of Title Men, at Little 
Rock, Ark., November 18, 1911. 



The discussion of the original source of Oklahoma titles properly 
falls into two divisions: 

First: The source from which the original individual owner ac- 
quired the fee; 

Second: The condition under which the invidvidual ownei- can 
convey a fee simple; 

Inasmuch as the entire area of Oklahoma except the three extreme 
western counties was originally included in the Indian Territory, the 
discussion necessarily involves a consideration of Indian laws and 
treaties from the foundation of the republic, and even before. 

Among the European nations which established colonies in Amer- 
ica, the doctrine became firmly established that a grant from the Crown 
carried to a colony only the exclusive right to purchase from the 
Indians, at such time as they saw fit to sell, their right of occupancy, 
which right of occupancy remained fixed in the Indian tribes. 

The supreme court of the United States has held time and time 
again that the United States in acquiring sovereignty once held by 
European nations succeeded only to such rights as the said nations 
themselves claimed; in other words, the Indian tribes owned a life 
estate in the territory which they occupied, while the United States 
held merely a vested remainder. 

Our government, in dealing with the Indian right of occupancy has 
proceeded on the theory that each sub-division of the human race has, 
according to the law of nature, a right to a reasonable portion of the 
earth's surface, and that the Indian had no right to roam, unmolested, 
through this imperial domain, while other parts of the human .family 
were huddled together in countries over-crowded to such an extent as 
to make existence extremely precarious and well night intolerable. 

The government, therefore, exercised the right of racial eminent 
c'omain, and while each cession of territory has been accompanied by 
the formality of a treaty, such treaty was invariably procured by 
fraud or under duress and for a consideration the insufficiency of which 
is well nigh appalling, and should be revolting to the national con- 
science. 

Thus, this princely and warlike race, the most virile type of 
aborigines the world has known, was, by conquest, duress and fraud, 
reduced to a state of abject hoplessness and forced to assume a form 
of civilization for which they were not prepared; herded on reserva- 
tions or allotted on meager quarter sections, which scanty pittance 
is the patrimony left from the vast domain, all of which, under the 
construction of our supreme court, should have descended as a 
heritage to the Indians, in the absence of an alienation for a valuable 
consideration. 



52 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

When we contemplate a spectacle such as the purchase of Man- 
hattan Island for twenty-four dollars (which was paid with three 
dollars worth of beads) can we wonder that these children of the 
forest stood appalled when they saw the land that they thought was 
to be merely a joint hunting ground being actually reduced to 
possession, dismantled of its timber, and hedged about with forts? 
Is it strange that their sense of justice was outraged, and their thirst 
of vengeance aroused, that they fell back step by step, contesting 
every foot of ground, leaving the bones of their warriors scattered 
from the Atlantic to the plains, and quenching with their own life 
blood every camp fire that the invader built? 

When tiring of the unequal struggle, crowded out by an encroach- 
ing civilization, the Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Creeks and 
Seminoles (now known as the Five Civilized Tribes) relinquished their 
right of occupancy to all of the country east of the Mississippi, being 
granted in exchange the fee to the greater part of the area of 
what is now Oklahoma; they were promised undisputed enjoyment 
of this hunting ground so long as the grass grew, and so long as the 
rivers ran on to the sea; but soon the tide of material civilization 
overran their borders until the intermarried whites and mixed bloods 
were able to control an election by which a treaty was adopted, 
against the wishes of ninety per cent of the full-blood Indians, re- 
linquishing the tribal right and agreeing to a partition of their lands 
to the individual members of the tribe; and thus the last flower 
of the most ideal tribal relations the world has ever known has been 
ruthlessly blotted from the earth. 

The government, from time to time, purchased from the Five 
Civilized Tribes that part of their lands lying in what was Oklahoma 
Territory, and settled thereon remnants of many scattered tribes, 
allowing them to hold only under the ordinary right of occupancy, 
with the exception of what is now the Osage Nation, which land 
was purchased by the government from the Cherokees and sold out- 
right to the Great and Little Osages and the Kaws. 

When the Territory of Oklahoma was organized, all of the Indian 
Territory, except what was then occupied by the Five Civilized Tribes, 
was cut off and, together with the public lands lying west of the 
one hundredth meridian, known as "No Man's Land," was formed 
into Oklahoma Territory. 

The government, from time to time, purchased from the scat- 
tered tribes in Oklahoma Territory their right of occupancy, in 
exchange giving to each member an individual allotment and issuing 
what is known as a "trust patent," which provides that the govern- 
ment shall hold the land for twenty-five years in trust for the allottee 
or his heirs. 

The lands, purchased from the above mentioned scattered tribes, 
together with the public-lands strip above referred to, was from time 
to time, opened to homestead settlement under the general homestead 
laws of the United States; the settlers, after proof of settlement 
and final payment, being issued a fee simple patent. 

Out of the public land aforesaid, the government, from time to 
time, has set aside an amount aggregating three million, one hundred 
and twenty-six thousand, four hundred and ninety-five and seventy- 
five one-hundredths acres (worth at this time at least fifty million 
dollars) ; the title to which land is held by the state of Oklahoma 
in trust for the benefit of the schools and public buildings of the 
state. This land is controlled by the commissioners of the land office, 
and will be treated under the general head of "School Lands." 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 53 

When it became necessary to establish towns in Indian Territory, 
the government, acting as the trustee for the respective tribes, set 
aside townsites, plotted and sold the lots, issuing to the purchasers 
thereof a fee simple patent. 

There was left over, after allotting to the Indians of the Osage 
nation, and the Five Civilized Tribes, certain lands which are at 
this time being sold by the government, as trustee, the purchaser 
receiving from the chiefs of the respective tribes a fee simple patent. 

Thus we have in Oklahoma seven distinct classes of land: 

A — Homestead entries; 

B — Town lots in Indian Territory and Osage Nation; 

C — Land purchased from Indian tribes; 

D — School lands; 

E — Land held by individual Indians of the Osage Nation; 

F — Land held under trust patent by members of scattered tribes; 

G — Land held by individual members of the Five Civilized 
Tribes. 

This brings us to the second division of the subject namely: 
"The Condition Under Which the Original Individual Owner May 
Convey a Fee Simple Title." 

The general laws of conveyancing, administration and guardian- 
ship proceedings, tax titles, sale under execution, probation of will, 
etc., as modified by our statutes, of course, govern in Oklahoma. 
I will, therefore, only discuss conditions perculiar to the respective 
classes of land; and while it is impossible to give an exhaustive 
treatise on titles in a limited space, however, the following will be 
found to cover the principal laws governing the transfer of Oklahoma 
Indian land, acting under which an unquestionable title may be ac- 
quired. 

Classes "A," "B," and "C" are alienable at will after issuance of 
patent. 

Class "D" (school lands) is from time to time being sold under 
statutory authority by the commissioners of the land office at public 
auction, the purchaser, upon payment of five per cent of the purchase 
price is issued a certificate of purchase (which is transferrable), the 
remainder of the purchase being paid in forty equal annual install- 
ments, drawing interest at five per cent with the option of the pur- 
chaser of paying up after five years, and upon full payment the 
purchaser received a fee simple patent from the commissioners of 
the land office. 

About ten thousand quarter sections of agricultural school 
land is held under lease, the lessees having, under the constitution, 
a preference right to take the land at the highest bid; while if the 
lessee elects to allow the bidder to take the land, the purchaser 
must pay the lessee, in cash, the appraised value of improvements on 
the land, as appraised by the commissioners of the land office. 

Class "E" lands in the Osage Nation are held by the Osages and 
Kaws subject to certain restrictions. 

The act of congress of June 27, 1906, provides that the adult 
members of the Osage tribe may sell their surplus land, provided 
the Secretary of the Interior, upon due investigation, will certify that 
the particular Indian is competent to attend to his own affairs. 

The act of Congress of March 3, 1909, authorized the Secretary 
of the Interior, as trustee for the Indians, to sell any surplus land 
in the Osage Nation (both the Kaws and the Osages) provided, how- 
ever, that the mineral rights to lands, belonging to the Osages, should 
remain the property of the tribe, for a period of twenty-five years. 



54 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Class "F": Trust patents to the members of the various scat- 
tered tribes in what was Oklahoma Territory were issued under the 
general allotment act of 1887, which act has the following language: 

" * * * The United States does, and will, hold the land 
thus allotted for the period of twenty-five years in trust for the sole 
use and benefits of the Indian to whom such allottment shall have 
been made, or in case of his decease, of his heirs according to the 
law of the state or territory where such land is located." 

This section was amended by the act of May 27, 1902 (32 Stat. 
275), which amendment governs in the sale of such estates in 
Oklahoma. (See rules and regulations, approved by the interior 
department, October 12, 1910, Section 10.) Said act of May 27, 1902, 
section 7, has the following language: 

"That the adult heirs of any deceased Indian to whom trust or 
other patent containing restrictions upon alienation has been or shall 
be issued for lands allotted to him, may sell and convey the lands 
inherited from such decendant, but in cases of minor heirs, their 
interest shall be sold only by guardian duly appointed by the proper 
court upon the order of such court, made upon petition filed by the 
guardian, but such conveyance shall be subject to the approval of 
the Secretary of the Interior, and when so approved shall convey 
full title to the purchaser, the same as if final patent without re- 
strictions upon alienation had been issued to the allottee." 

The Department of the Interior holds that under the last quoted 
section the trust estates of Indians (deceased) are not subject to the 
jurisdiction of state courts (probate or other) and that all that is 
necessary in order that heirs may convey under said section is to 
establish heirship by affidavit, thus securing the approval of the 
Secretary of the Interior, which the Interior Department holds con- 
veys an indefeasible title. On the other hand, I hold that the approval 
of the deed of the heirs by the Interior Department merely acts as 
relinquishment, on the part of the government, of all restrictions 
against the conveyance of said land, but that such approval does not 
preclude unknown heirs, who were not a party to the said approval, 
from setting up a claim to title in the land question and that the 
effect of said deed is merely an absolute conveyance of all the rights 
which the parties grantor hold in the said land. I hold that said 
section seven provides a procedure not for the determination of 
heirship, but merely a procedure by which the government relinquishes 
the restrictions on such land. The question as to who the adult 
heirs of the deceased Indian are must be determined "according to 
the law of the state or territory where such land is located," as is 
provided in the general allotment act above quoted. The language 
of the said section, "when so approved shall convey full title to the 
purchaser the same as if final patent without restrictions upon the 
alienation had been issued to the allottee," it seems to me, can have 
one effect only, namely, to place the heirs of the said allottee in the 
same status as the heirs of the estate of a white man, "The same a8 
if final patent without restrictions upon alienation had been issued 
to the allottee." 

Had such fee simple patent been issued to the allottee during 
his life, there is no power in the federal government other than armed 
force that could rob an unknown heir, who is a citizen of Oklahoma 
of his right to a participation in his patrimony, without due process 
of law. 

Class "G": Titles to the lands held by the Five Civilized Tribes 
are exceedingly complex, inasmuch as each tribe had its local laws 
and has been governed by separate treaties and acts of Congress 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 65 

(with the exception of Choctaws and Chickasaws, who are governed 
by the same laws) So that, in passing on these titles more than two 
hundred and fifty conditions may arise wliich do not appear in the 
ordinary title. Nevertheless, these titles are just as fixed and certain 
as any titles, provided one stays within the clear meaning of the 
acts of Congress. 

There is a class of title that all admit is alienable, and another 
class that all admit is inalienable; then there is the twilight zone of 
uncertainty in which lurks speculators known as "grafters," wno, 
either through ignorance of, or total disregard for the acts of Coi»- 
gress, have purchased thousands of acres of land, the alienability 
of which has always been questioned by the more conservative title 
experts of the state, and because of this very uncertainty, these 
lands have been acquired at a nominal purchase price. 

A bona fide purchaser, seeking legitimate investment at a fair 
consideration can acquire an absolute title to thousands of acres of 
Indian land, which has never been questioned by the courts, provided 
he will seek the counsel of any reputable title expert. 

In the Marchie Tiger case, the supreme court of Oklahoma held 
that the provisions of the act of April 26, 1906, requiring the Secretary 
of the Interior to approve the deed of full blood heirs, was retroactive 
and could not be held to apply to a class of land the restrictions on 
which had expired under the operation of a prior act. This decision, 
inasmuch as it involved the interpretation of a federal statute, was 
in no sense conclusive, but stood subject to review by the supreme 
court of the United States. 

While I have the utmost respect for the supreme court of my 
state, I could not hold with them in this interpretation and there- 
fore, for the last three years have refused to recommend loans of 
this character; the position is vindicated by the fact that on May 11, 
1911, the Marchie Tiger case was reversed by the Supreme Court 
of the United States; and the records of the commissioners of the 
land office will show that I have disapproved more than one hun- 
dred thousand dollars worth of loans on which the state would now 
hold worthless mortgages had I seen fit to follow the ruling of the 
Supreme Court of Oklahoma in the Marchie Tiger case. 

While it is estimated that the celebrated Marchie Tiger case 
made void the title under which more than one-quarter million acres 
of land was held in Oklahoma, I submit that every acre of this land 
was purchased with the full knowledge that the title was uncertain 
and the reason this land was purchased rather than land that had 
unquestionable title was that the clouded title forced down the market 
value. 

In the case of Hancock, et al., vs. the Mutual Trust Company, 
the Supreme Court of Oklahoma held that prior to the act of Congress 
approved May 26, 1906, and under the act of July 18, 1902, the heirs 
of a deceased Cherokee Indian might alienate the lands inherited from 
such a decendant. 

A similar question came before the Secretary of the Interior on 
January 29, 1907, in the case of the heirs of Robinson Watson, and 
upon an opinion from the Attorney General of the United States, 
the Secretary of the Interior made a ruling on alfours with the 
above holding of the Supreme Court of Oklahoma. On October 17, 
1908, the identical tract of land, title to which was held to be good, 
in the above case of the Watson heirs, was submitted to the state 
for a loan, and I disapproved the title in the following language: 

" • * * I do not agree with the reasoning of the honor- 
able Attorney General of the United States. I think that the deduc- 
tion is unsound and farfetched in the extreme. * • ♦ My 



66 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

opinion is that while this class of title is such that a speculator might 
afford to invest his own money thereon, it is not such as would 
justify a trustee in loaning a fund which is to be held sacred for the 
benefit of the unborn generations of the school children of the state. 
This law is retroactive in its nature, therefore, there is some question 
as to its constitutionality, but until the courts pass on this question 
the only safe position is to follow the act of Congress, of April 26, 
1906." 

While this point has not yet been decided by the Supreme Court 
of the United States, yet a ruling contrary to the above ruling of 
the Attorney General was made June 7, 1911, by the Honorable At- 
torney General of the United States, in re the heirs of Lucy Cole; 
holding squarely that such lands were inalienable. 

Of the four million dollars loaned by the commissioners of the 
land office since statehood, three-quarters of a million is on Indian 
land to which the title is unassailable. 

The Attorney General of the United States, October 17, 1909, 
construing section nine of the act of Congress of May 27, 1908, held 
that its provisions were not retroactive, and that all conveyances by 
full-blood heirs of the deceased allottees who died prior to May 27, 
1908, in order to pass a valid title to the estate of said deceased 
allottees must be approved by the Secretary of the Interior. On May 
27, 1911, the Supreme Court of Oklahoma in the case of MacHarry 
vs. Batman (not et published) held directly to the contrary, and 
the United States court for the eastern district of Oklahoma has 
also held with the Supreme Court of Oklahoma in a case parallel 
with the one above referred to. 

It is my opinion that the Attorney General in the above opinion 
has correctly interpreted the law and that this interpretation will 
oe followed by the Supreme Court of the United Stateg in due time. 
However, as the state and federal authorities are clearly at variance 
on this point, which has been adjudicated by both state and federal 
courts, the only safe method in approving titles of this class, prior 
to a final adjudication, is to require the approval of the Secretary 
ot the Interior, and also of the probate court. 

Where the original allottee has parted with his title and the 
purchase is from a party other than the allottee, the question of the 
v^alidity of the title depends upon the date of the deed from the 
original allottee. 

With the exception of the Creek Nation, there was practically no 
land in the Five Civilized Tribes alienable prior to the act of April 21, 
1904, which law is still effective and was supplemented by the act of 
April 26, 1906. 

Next in point is the purchase direct from the Indian, in which 
case the act of Congress, approved May 27, 1908, which became 
operative after sixty days, namely, July 26, 1908, governs absolutely 
irrespective of previous enactments on the subject, with the exception 
of certain conditions as to the estates of deceased Indians. 

The acts of Congress above referred to form the main basis of 
alienation of Indian lands and effect all of the Five Civilized Tribei 
alike. 

Next came a few specific acts relating to individual tribes. 

In the Choctaw and Chickasaw agreement, approved by Congress 
July 1, 1902 (33 Stat. L. 641), Section sixteen is as follows: 

"All lands allotted to members of said tribes, except such land as 
Is set aside to each for homestead as herein provided shall be alien- 
able after issuance of patent as follows : One-fourth In acreage ih one 
year, one-fourth in acreage In three years, and the balance In five 
years; in each case from the date of patent. Provided, that such land 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 57 

shall not be alienable by the allottee or his heirs at any time before 
the expiration of the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribal governments for 
less than its appraised value." 

This law remained in effect until the act of May 26, 1908, with 
regard to all Indians except full-bloods, having been repealed as to 
full-bloods by the act of April 26, 1906. The law was never effective 
as to Choctaw and Chickasaw freedmen, because such freedmen had 
no surplus allottment, the land being homestead. 

In the Creek agreement on March 9, 1900 (31 Stat. L. 861) Section 
7, we find the following language: 

"Lands allotted to citizens hereunder shall not in any manner 
whatsoever or at any time, be encumbered, taken or sold to secure or 
satisfy any debt or obligation contracted or created prior to the date 
of the deed to the allottee therefor, and such lands shall not be alien- 
able by the allottee or his heirs at any time before the expiration of 
five years from the ratification of this agreement, except with the ap- 
proval of the secretary of the interior." 

The supplemental Creek treaty of June 30, (30 Stat. L. 500), Sec- 
tion 16, reaffirms the above proposition of law in practically the same 
language, its only effect being the extension of the time to five years 
from the date of said supplemental agreement instead of five years 
from the date of the original agreement, therefore, from March 1, 1901, 
until August 8, 1907, the surplus allottment of the Creek Indians could 
be sold with the approval of the Secretary of the Interior. 

After August 8, 1907, the surplus land of said Creeks, except full- 
bloods, could be sold free ffom any restrictions and without the ap- 
proval of the Secretary of the Interior, said condition existing until 
the act of July 26, 1908, which act repealed the provision of the treaty 
above quoted. 

There were certain conditions under which the Creek citizen could 
make a valid will to his land prior to April 26, 1904, but titles arising 
under these conditions are so rare that it is not deemed sufficiently 
important to be of great interest. 

Cherokee Agreement, approved April 21, 1902 (32 Stat. L. 716) 
Section 15, is as follows: 

"All the lands allotted to members of said tribe, except such lands 
as set aside for homestead as herein provided, shall be alienable in 
five years after the issuance of patent." 

This provision was repealed as to full-bloods by the act of April 
26, 1906, and repealed as to all other Indians by act of July 27, 1908. 
There are very few deeds made under this provision of law, however, 
as there are very few patents whose date extended back five years 
before the acts repealing said law. 

Aside from this provision there was no provision either in the 
Cherokee or Seminole Nations for the alienation of lands prior to the 
act of congress of April 21, 1904, above quoted. 

The following general principles applying to each of the Five 
Civilized Tribes is conclusive proof as to age of allottee, while the 
tribal roll is conclusive proof as to the per cent of blood. 

Land of an allottee is not liable for any claim or lien contracted 
prior to the removal of restrictions, and is only taxable after the re- 
moval of restrictions. 

Oklahoma statutes removing the disability of a minor to make con- 
tracts does not affect Indian minors in the transfer of Indian lands. 



58 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Chapter 49, Mansfield's digest of the statutes of Arkansas (govern- 
ing as to descent and distribution) was made to apply to the re- 
spective tribes after the following dates: 

Choctaw and Chickasaw, September 25, 1902. 
Creek, July 1, 1902. 
Seminole, October 7, 1902. 
Cherokee, August 7, 1902. 

All patents must be approved by the Secretary of the Interior. It 
has been held, in the case of Shulthis vs. McDougal, 95 C. C. A., page 
615, that the Indians of these tribes held their lands as tenants in com- 
mon; that their right to participation came as an estate of inheritance 
from their tribal ancestors who, as above set out, received a deed to 
this land from the United States government at the time they oc- 
cupied same. 

There is, therefore, no reason in equity why the Secretary of the 
Interior should approve these deeds and the provision that he should 
so do was wholly gratuitous on the part of congress and partakes of 
the nature of "malicious mischief." 

In closing, I cannot forbear the remark that, with the exception 
of the outrage that was perpetrated on the Indians of the Five Civi- 
lized Tribes, in forcing them to share their lands with the negro 
slaves as a penalty for having espoused the cause of the once glor- 
ious and ever immortal Southern Confederacy — with this exception, 
the greatest curse that has fallen to the Indians since they were rob- 
bed of the main bulk of their estate east of the Mississippi, is the 
annoying, long distance, restrictive supervision of the federal govern- 
ment over the little that is left to them. 

The courts have held that the United States stands in loco par- 
entis to the Indians. It is a significant fact, whatever right of guard- 
ianship the government has, existed at a time when the Indian was a 
naked and untutored savage, and so greatly needed the guidance of the 
paternal hand of the "Great White Father." But that hand was then 
lifted to smite him, and, now that the restraining hand is no longer 
needed, the Indian is surfeited by unsolicited solicitude and in the 
language of Shakespeare 'he dies of much cherishing.' 

The Indians of Oklahoma are amply able to taKe care of them- 
selves, and if the restrictions were lifted from all their lands, the in- 
flux of home builders would double the price of land in the east side 
of the state. 

There are thousands of acres of Indian land clearly alienable, but 
the lack of confidence in titles that exists in the minds of non-resi- 
dent investors, through their failure to discriminate between good and 
bad Indian titles, keeps the market price down, and allows the "graft- 
ers" to secure the land at a nominal price. 

Bars make a prison though they be bars of gold; and the bonds 
that bind a man whose soul cries out for liberty become shackles of 
servitude, whether they be the hand of a marshal or the annoying 
supervision of a misguided federal government. 

The spirit of liberty was not born in the breasts of the Revolu- 
tionary patriots — it was indigenous to the soil; and the wild out-cry 
for 'Liberty or Death' was equally well expressed by the twang of 
every bow-string that answered the crack of the invader's rifle; and 
the same spirit burns today in the breast of every proud Indian citi- 
zen of Oklahoma and will smoulder there until the restrictions are re- 
moved. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 59 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BANK COMMISSIONER. 

The state bank commissioner is appointed by the governor, by 
and with the advice and consent of the senate. The office was cre- 
ated by the first state legislature and its tenure is four years. The 
salary is $4,000 per annum and traveling expenses. Eight assistants 
are appointed by the commissioner, each receiving a salary of $2,000 and 
traveling expenses. It is the duty of the bank commissioner to exam- 
ine each bank or trust company at least twice each year. The bank 
commissioner has the power at any time, when he deems it necessary, 
to call upon any bank or trust company organized under the laws of 
the state, and upon any national bank whose depositors are protected 
by the depositors' guaranty fund, for a statement of the condition of 
Its funds. 

Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

J. D. Lankford Bank Commissioner $4,000 per year 

R. C. Stuart Office Assistant 2,000 per year 

M. R. Garnett Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

Geo. S. Mead Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

W. L. Reed Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

J. G. Hill Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

Claude Tuttle Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

Henry M. Wells Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

H. M. Foster Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

I. F. Crow Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

W. C. Ernest Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

G. L. Wilson Assistant Commissioner 2,000 per year 

W. M. Malone Building and Loan Auditor 2,000 per year 

Zelma Young Stenographer 1,200 per year 

Lina Griff ing Stenographer 1,200 per year 

Filing Clerk 720 per year 



State Banking Board. 

The state banking board is composed of the governor and two 
members appointed by the governor, by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the senate. The members receive a salary of $6.00 per day 
for the time necessary to transact the businss of the department, and 
expenses. The bank commissioner is ex-officio secretary of the board, 
with a bookkeeper and clerk as an assistant. The board has super- 
vision of the depositors' guaranty fund. 



60 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Members and Employes. 

Governor Lee Cruce . Chairman No Salary 

F. G. Dennis Treasurer 96.00 per diem 

J. C. McClelland. . . . Member $6.00 p«r diem 

J. D. Lankf ord Secretary Ex-Officio No Salary 

J. L. Coffman Bookkeeper and Clerk $1,800 

(Above officers receive traveling expenses In addition to salary.) 



Appropriations for the State Banking Department. 

1912 1913 

H. B. No. 557— Salaries $32,08o'.00 $32,08o!o0 

Contingent, extra help, etc 10,000.00 10,000.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency for supplies 3,000.00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 61 



GAME AND FISH WARDEN DEPARTMENT. 



While Cassius M. Barnes was territorial governor, the legisla- 
ture established a game and fish department and provided for its 
maintenance from funds derived from fines assessed against those guilty 
of violating the game laws. This failed to provide adequate funds for 
the successful enforcement of the game law and the conduct of the 
ofiice. The 1909 legislature passed a game law, known as the Keys 
bill, providing for the issuing of hunting licenses for resident, non- 
resident and alien hunters. The money derived from the 
sale of these licenses was to be placed in the game protection 
fund for the support of the department. This law, with a few minor 
amendments passed since, is now in force. 

Since statehood three men have held the position of game and 
fish warden: J. S. Askew of Chickasha, appointed by Governor C. N. 
Haskell, who served until January 21, 1911; Lon M. Frame of Ardmore, 
who occupied the position for about sixty days and resigned to 
become chairman of the state board of public affairs; and John B, 
Doolin of Alva. 

The work done by the department in the past two years is shown 
by the following report: 

Resident hunting licenses issued from June 9, 1909, to June 1, 
1911, 125,000 at $1.00 each, $125,000; non-resident hunting licenses 
issued June 9, 1909, to June 1, 1911, 415 at $15.00 each, $6,225.00; alien 
hunting licenses issued June 9, 1909, to June 11, 1911, 4 at $25.00 each, 
$100.00; number of arrests and convictions for violating state game 
laws, 450, amount collected from fines assessed, $2,320.00; total 
amount of money collected and deposited with the State Treasurer 
from June 9, 1909, to June 1, 1911, $133,645.00; amount of money ex- 
pended for conduct of state game and fish warden's department, 
including money expended for propagating purposes from June 9, 

1909, to June 1, 1911, $30,908.00; number of live pheasants distributed 
throughout the state from June 1, 1910, to June 1, 1911, 2,500; num- 
ber of pheasant eggs distributed throughout the state from June 1, 

1910, to June 1, 1911, 60,000; number of live pheasants now in the 
state, 40,000; number of fish distributed throughout the state, black 
bass and croppie, 30,000. 

Warden John B. Doolin has reorganized and systematized the 
state game and fish warden's department since his incumbency. He 
has districted the state into twelve districts, containing from six to 
ten counties in each district. Each district deputy warden recom- 
mends the appointment of a sufficient number of assistant game and 
fish wardens to properly police the state and enforce the law in the 
territory assigned them. 



Game Law Interpretations. 

All hunters must carry their licenses while hunting. 

It is unlawful to hunt, chase, capture, shoot, or shoot at or wound 



62 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

or kill deer at any time in Comanche, Caddo, Kiowa and Delaware 
counties. 

It is unlawful to kill or capture birds of game at night, to use 
poison or snare or trap or explosive or swivel or punt gun. 

It is unlawful to kill carrier pigeons or deer without horns 
at any time. 

The unprotected birds are: English sparrows, hawk, owl, crow, 
buzzard, jay bird or black bird. 

Bag limit: one buck deer with horns in a season; three turkeys 
in a season; one swan in a season; fifteen prairie chickens in a day, 
100 in a season; ten geese or brandt in one day; twenty-five quail, 
plover, curlew, ducks, snipe or other shore birds in one day or 150 
in one season. 



Open Season for Hunting Prohibited Game. 

Deer Nov. 15 — Dec. 15 

Quail Nov. 15— Feb. 1 

Wild turkeys Nov. 15— Jan. 1 

One turkey gobbler Mar. 15— April 15 

Prairie chickens Sept. 1 — Nov, 1 

Snipe, plover, curlew, duck, geese, brandt, dove, crane, swan or 

other shore birds Aug. 15 — May 1 

Mongolian, Chinese, English, Rich-Neck or other pheasants 

Nov. 1— Dec. 1, 1914 

(and between same dates each year thereafter.) 

It is unlawful to kill any of the above game or birds on Sunday. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. Expenses. 

John B. Doolin Fish and Game Warden $1,800 $900 

Don B. Lawhead Secretary 1,800 

Sue Frame Record and License Clerk. . . . 1,200 

Dottie Hardin Stenographer 1,200 

Ray V. Campbell Bookkeeper 1,200 



Bonded District Game Wardens. 

Names. Dist.No. Counties. 

J. E. Patterson, Alva 1 Cimarron, Texas, Beaver, Harper, Ellis, 

Woods, Alfalfa, Major, Woodward, 

Grant. 
D. W. Drennan, Thomas . . 2 Roger Mills, Custer, Dewey, Blaine, 

Kingfisher, Logan, Beckham. 
N. E. Medlock. Rocky.. 3 Harmon, Greer, Comanche, Kiowa, 

Jackson, Swanson, Tillman, Washita, 

Caddo. 
Wm. Edwards, Chlckasha 4 Grady, Stephens, Jefferson, Canadian, 

Oklahoma. 
L. W. Cruce, Ardmore... 6 Love, Carter, Garvin, McClain, Cleve- 
^ land, Pottawatomie. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 63 

W. D. Ozmun, Fairfax. ... 6 Osage, Kay, Payne, Pawnee, Noble, 

Garfield. 
R. E. Seamans, McAlester 7 Hughes, Pittsburg, Latimer, Haskell, 

Seminole, Okfusiiee, Lincoln, Leflore. 
Dr. W. M. Ligon, Ada.... 8 Marshall, Pontotoc, Johnson, Atoka, 

Murray, Coal. 
Geo. F. Wyvell, Claremore I) Washington, Nowata, Rogers, Creek, 

Tulsa. 
M. M. Ballew, Cookson.. 10 Craig, Delaware, Ottawa, Cherokee, 

Adair. 
Ben "Watt, Muskogee 11 Muskogee, Sequoyah, Wagoner, Okmul- 
gee, Mcintosh, Mayes. 
Julius Ward, Hugo 12 Bryan, Choctaw, Pushmataha, McCur- 

tain. 

Bonded district deputy game wardens receive an annual salary 
of $800.00 and $600.00 for expenses. In addition to this salary and 
expense money, they receive 25 cents for each resident hunting 
license issued. 



Appropriations. 

S. B. No. 254 — Making appropriation out of the Game Protec- 
tion Fund for the use and benefit of the De- 
partment of Fish and Game (For 2 years) $62,200.00 



64 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 65 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 

The State Commissioner of Health is appointed by the governor 
for a term of four years. The commissioner has charge of all mat- 
ters relating to the public health and has the power to make and 
enforce all needful rules and regulations for the prevention and cure, 
and to prevent the spread of any contagious, infectious or malarial 
diseases and to establish quarantines. The commissioner has the 
authority of appointing county superintendents of public health. In 
the townships, the board of directors constitute the local board of 
health, and in cities of the first class, the mayor and common council 
have the power to appoint the city superintendent of public health. 

The work of the state chemist and the operation of the state lab- 
oratory, as well as pure food and drug inspection, are under the super- 
vision of the department. 



Personnel of Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Dr. J. C. Mahr State Commissioner of Health $1,800 

R. H. Riley Chief Clerk 1,200 

Dr. Edwin DeBarr State Chemist* 

Dr. Gayfree Ellison. . .Bacteriologist* 

H. W. Russell Statistical Clerk 1,200 

Food and Drug Division. 

U. S. Russell Assistant in charge 1,800 

H. O. Tener Food Inspector 1,200 

Caswell Bennett Food Inspector 1,200 

W. G. Short Drug Inspector 1,200 

Sanitary Inspection Division. 

A. J. Emery Inspector 1,200 

Luke Allen Inspector 1,200 

Stenograpiiers. 

Mayme Martin 1,200 

Kathryn Cain 1,200 

•Salaries fixed as employees of State University. 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557 — Board of Health salaries and 

contingent, etc $18,900.00 $18,900.00 

Pure Food and Drug Division 
salaries. Traveling, office and 

contingent expenses 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Sanitary inspection and expens- 
es for two years 3,000,00 3,000.00 




SraNOfiRD EUG- CO. QtiLO CfTV. Offlff. 




J^rAf\/OA,J^£t £/s/c 



W.J.Gaudill r 

STATE ENFORCEMENT OFFICER 




1 iiuLO by I'iisevitch, OKlahcma <..Uj 




KIRBY FITZPATRICK 
Chief Examiner of Titles for School Land Commissioners 




\VM. P. CAMPBELJ. 
(^"ustodian of Oklahoma State Historical "Society 



p 



4 



4i 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 65 



NATIONAL GUARD. 

The National Guard of Oklahoma consists of one regiment of 
infantry, one detachment of engineers, signal corps, and sanitary 
troops, which are attached to the first infantry. The total numerical 
strength of the organization is 1,012 commissioned and enlisted men, 
60 officers and 952 enlisted men. 

The Governor of the state is commander-in-chief of the militia, 
and as such has supreme command of the military forces of the 
state while in the service of the state, or until they are ordered and 
accepted into service of the United Stats. The adjutant general is 
in control of the military department of the state and is subordinate 
only to the governor in matters pertaining to the department. 

The militia of the state is divided into two classes, the active and 
reserve militia. The active militia consists of the organized and uni- 
formed military forces of the state, which is known as the Oklahoma 
National Guard. The reserve militia consists of all those liable to 
service in the militia, or all able bodied men between the ages of 18 
and 45 years who are or who have declared their intention of be- 
coming citizens and not serving in a National Guard of a State. 

Under provisions of the state law, there is an annual muster and' 
camp of instruction of the Oklahoma National Guard at Chandler, 
Okla., where the state rifle range is located, or such other place as 
may be ordered by the Governor or Adjutant General. 



K 



Officers and Employes of the Artjutant General's Department. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Frank M. Canton Adjutant General $1,800.00 

Earl Patterson Post Q. M. Sergt. & Chief Clerk 1,200.00 

Clara Kinzer Stenographer 900.00 

Gus Pietchner Storekeeper 600.00 



V 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Salaries $ 4,500.00 $ 4,500.00 

Payment of troops ordered on 

duty 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Freights and encampment 8,000.00 8,000.00 

Armory rent 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Contingent Expenses 2,495.00 2,495.00^ 

S. B. No. 209— Freight, armory rent, etc $2,517.35 

Sig. 7. 



66 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Roster of Officers, O. N. G. 

Following is a roster of the officers of the Oklahoma National 
Guard, the organization, station, number of officers and number of 
enlisted men, according to companies: 



Name 



Lee Cruce 

F. M. Canton. . . . 

Alva J. Niles 

Roy V. Hoffman 

E. HL Jayne 

C. F. Barrett 

Mont F. Highley. 
J. M. Grimsley. . . 

Job Ingram 

Fred W. Hunter. 

A. L. Emery 

J. P. Alley 

Ross R. Way 

S. J. Foster 

Chas. D. Keller.. 
O. J. Perren 

Mark W. Tobin., 

M. P. Riley 



Rank 



Organization Station 



Governor and Com.-ln-Chief 
Brig.-Gen'l, Adjt.-Gen'l 

and Cliief-of-Staff 

Major and Judge Advocate.. 

Colonel 

Lieut. Colonel 

Major 

Major 

Major 

Chaplain 

Regular Adjutant 

Captain and Commander.... 
Captain and A. I. S. A. P. . . 
1st Lieut, and Batt. Adjt... 
1st Lieut, and Batt. Adjt... 
1st Lieut, and Batt. Adjt... 
2nd Lieut, and Batt. Q. M. 

and Commander 

2nd Lieut, and Batt. Q. M. 

and Commander 

2nd Lieut, and Batt. Q. M. 

and Commander 



Staff 

Staff 

1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 
1st Infantry 

1st Infantry 

1st Infantry 

1st Infantry 



Oklahoma City 

Oklahoma City 

Sentinel 

Chandler 

Edmond 

Shawnee 

Oklahoma City 

Pawnee 

Kingfisher 

Oklahoma City 

Watonga 

Norman 

Walter 

Oklahoma City 

Oklahoma City 

Pond Creek 

Oklahoma City 

Mustang 



f 



M 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 



67 



Name 



Hank 



Organization 



E. R. Perry 

S. Maxwell Smith 

R. F. MacArtliur 

Harry B. Gilstrap 

Frank O. McLean.... 
Oscar Soderstrom 

E. R. Waite 

Geo. M. Ciiristner. .. . , 

Robt. L. Flynn 

A. J. Arendell 

Leigliton E. Worthley 
Rufus A. Johnston... 

Chas. H. Johnson 

W. R. Einwaecliter. . . 

L. C. Johnson 

Wm. A. Green 

A. J. D. Howe 

C. R. Gilmore 

Wm. Hutchinson 

Wm. A. Worley 

Albert B. Hayes 

Walter Veach 

Wm, J. McClure 

Lewis Paulin, Jr 

Frank S. Wyatt 

Gus Hadwiger 

C. G. Williams.. 

Winfield Scott 

W. J. Otjen 

J. B. Cullison 

Victor M. Locke , 

Parris Pipkin 

J. Nelson Locke , 

S. H. Harrelson 

EUes Stephenson 

Frank B. King 

Archie C. Ennes , 

Enos H. Hurd 

James B. Taplin 

Jesse T. Ford 

Chas. W. McKowan.. 

Floyd H. Racer 

Hugh Scott 

F. H. Clark 

Floyd J. Bolend 

Arthur L. Edgington. . 
R. P. Blewer 



Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain . . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. . 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. , 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieuc. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut, 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . , 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Captain. . . 
1st Lieut. 
1st Lieut. 

Major 

Major 

Captain. . . 
Captain. . . 
Captain. . 
Chief Mu- 
sician of 
Band 



Co. A, 1st Infantry 
Co. A, 1st Infantry 
Co. A, 1st Infantryj 
Co. B, 1st Infantry 
Co. B, 1st Infantry 
Co. B, 1st Infantry! 
Co. C, 1st Infantry 
Co. C, 1st Infantry 
Co. C, 1st Infantry 
Co. D, 1st Infantry 
Co. D, 1st Infantry 
Co. D, 1st Infantry 
Co, E, 1st Infantryj 
Co. E, 1st Infantry 
Co. E, 1st Infantry| 
Co. F, 1st Infantry 
Co. F, 1st Infantry 
Co. F, 1st Infantry 
Co. G, 1st Infantry 
Co.'G, 1st Infantry; 
Co. G, 1st Infantry 
Co. H, 1st Infantry 
Co. H, 1st Infantry 
Co. H, 1st Infantry 
Co. I, 1st Infantry 
Co. I, 1st Infantry! 
Co. I, 1st Infantry 
Co. K, 1st Infantry 
Co. K, 1st Infantry 
Co. K, 1st Infantry 
Co. L, 1st Infantry 
Co. L, 1st Infantry 
Co. L, 1st Infantry 
Co. M, 1st Infantry 
Co. M, 1st Infantry. 
Corps of Engineers 
Corps of Engineers 
Corps of Engineers 

Signal Corps 

Signal Corps 

Signal Corps 

Medical Dept 

Medical Dept 

Medical Dept 

Medical Dept 

Ordinance Dept. . . . 



Band. 



Tuisa 

Tulsa 

Tulsa 

Chandler . . 

Chandler 

Ciiandler 

Shawnee . . 

Shawnee 

Shawnee 

McAlester , 

McAlester 

McAlester 

Pawnee ... 

Pawnee 

Pawnee 

Muskogee . 

Muskogee 

Muskogee 

Ardmore .., 

Ardmore 

Ardmore 

Durant . .'. 

Durant 

Durant 

Alva 

Alva 
Alva 

Enid 

Enid 
Enid 

Antlers 

Antlers 
Antlers 
Okla. City. 
Okla. City. 
Lawton .. . 
Lawton 
Lawton 
Blackwell , 
Blackwell 
Blackwell 
Woodward 
Guthrie . ... 
El Reno... 
Okla. City. 
Okla. City. 



Shawnee 



^O 






3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

I 3 

3 

2 
3 

3 

4 



63 

58 

64 

6S 

57 

69 

66 

75 

66 

78 

71 

58 
46 

60 

21 



28 



•Machine gun platoon attached to Co. K, and stationed at Enid, Okla. 



68 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF THE STATE GEOLOGIST. 

The territorial legislature of 1899 passed an act creating the oflBce 
of State Geologist, but provided that the office should be held by the pro- 
fessor of biology and kindred sciences of the State University and that 
he should serve without pay. The department was thus established 
at Norman. The geologist was at that time directed to begin and 
continue the geological survey of the state by counties or districts. 
The state geologist is also curator of the geological cabinet, museum, 
apparatus and library. The third state legislature provided for an 
enlargement of the bureau and appropriated a considerable amount 
of funds for the benefit of the department. 



Geologist. 

1912. 1913. 

Dr. D. W. Ohern, Professor of Geology State 

University $2,500.00. $2,500.00' 

*Other appointments not made. 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B, No. 557— Office and incidental expenses $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Printing •. . 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Field work 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Co-operative work with U. S. 
survey and other federal field • 

bureaus : 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Salaries of director, assistant, 
chemist, clerk, two stenograph- 
ers, and one laborer 10,480.00 10,480.0a 



STATE DEPARTMENTS 69 



STATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



House Bill No. 318, passed by the third legislature, 1911, created 
the office of the State Highway Commissioner and established the de- 
partment of highways, prescribed the duties of the highway com- 
missioner and his compensation; and authorized a state license fee 
on automobiles to create a fund for establishing and maintaining the 
department. The commissioner is to receive a salary of $2,500.00 
per annum, is appointed by the governor, by and with the advice and 
consent of- the state senate, and shall hold office for a term of four 
years. The commissioner shall also be allowed actual traveling ex- 
penses, not to exceed $1,500.00 per annum. The license fee required 
for the support of the department is fixed at one dollar for each 
automobile, assessed annually against the owners of automobiles. 



Commissioner and Assistants. 

Sidney Suggs Commisioner of Highways $2,500.00 

Clark Hudson Assistant 

W. R. Goit Highway Engineer 

W. O. Gilbert .Secretary 



70 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE FIRE MARSHAL. 

House Bill No. 278, passed by the third legislature, 1911, created 
the office of State Fire Marshal, prescribed his duties and provided 
for the maintenance of the office and his compensation as such officer. 
The salary is $2,500 per annum and the term of office continues until 
a successor is named for the incumbent, the appointment being made 
by the governor. The office of chief assistant is also created, and this 
officer is to assume the duties of the office in case of a vacancy 
of the office of fire marshal or during the absence or disability of 
that officer. The marshal is to make an investigation of all fires 
occuring in the state in conjunction with the chiefs of the various 
city fire departments, the sheriff of the county in which the fire 
occurs, and the mayor of the village, city or town, which has no fire 
department, to ascertain the origin of such fires. The salary and ex 
penses incurred by the department shall be defrayed by the fire 
Insurance companies of the state, and a tax of one-fourth of one per 
centum is levied on the gross premium receipts of such companies 
to provide such a fund. 



Officers and Employes. 

C. C. Hammonds State Fire Marshal $2,500.00 

J. O. Crawford Chief Assistant 1,500.00 

C. W. McKeehen Bookkeeper 1,500.00 



Legislative Department 



72 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

The legislative authority of the state shall be vested in a Legis- 
lature consisting of a Senate and House of Representatives; but the 
people reserve to themselves the power to propose laws and amend- 
ments to the Constitution and to enact or reject the same at the polls 
independent of the Legislature, and also reserve power at their own 
option to approve or reject at the polls any act of the Legislature. 

The Senate shall consist of not more than forty-four members 
and shall always be composed of forty-four members, except that in 
event any county shall be entitled to three or more senators at the 
time of any appointment such additional senator or senators shall 
be given such county in addition to the forty-four senators and the 
whole number to that extent. Senators hold office for a farm of 
four years. 

Under the re-apportionment act passed by the third state legis- 
lature, the representation in the House of Representatives shall be: 
1912, 99; 1914, 98; 1916, 111; 1918, 104; and 1920, 92. The present 
number is 109. 

Representatives hold office for a term of two years. 

Sessions of the legislature are held biennially, beginning on the 
first Tuesday after the first Monday in January, at twelve o'clock 
noon on the odd numbered years, provided, however, that the gov- 
ernor may call special sessions at any time. 

Members of the legislature receive six dollars per day for their 
services during the term of the legislature and ten cents per mile for 
every mile necessarily travelled in going to and returning from the 
place of meeting of the session. 

Members of the Senate shall be at least twenty-five years of age 
and members of the House of Representatives twenty-one years of age 
at the time of their election. 

The lieutenant governor is the presiding officer of the Senate. 

The House of Representatives choses one of its own members 
Speaker, who presides at the meetings. 

The lieutenant governor and the speaker of the House name the 
committees of the two branches of the legislature. 



THIRD LEGISLATURE. 



Officers of the Senate. 

J. J. McAlester President (Lieutenant Governor) . . . .McAlester 

J. Elmer Thomas President Pro Tempore Lawton 

T. M. Miller Secretary Cheyenne 

C. S. Gilkerson Reading Clerk Elk City 

H. S. Blair Chief Enrolling and Engrossing 

Clerk Pauls Valley 





J. ELMER THOMAS 
President Pro Tempore of Senate 




W. A. DURANT 

Speaker House of Representatives 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



73 



Sergeant-at-Arms Ada 

.Reporter Hugo 

.Journal Clerk Enid 

Chaplain Talihina 

.Calendar Clerk Waurika 

.Messenger Durant 

W. T. Dungan Secretary to Lieutenant Governor. . ..McAlester 



F. J. Etter 

A. M. Works 

Herbert Cook 

Rev. H. A. Tucker. 
C, V. Easterling. . . 
W. L. Pool 



STATE SENATORS. 
(Democrats) 



Name 


Postoffice 


CO 

5 

o 
d 


Counties Comprising District 


Harry K. Allen 

*F. W. Anderson. .. 
*Geo. W. Barefoot 

♦Geo. A. Coffey 

H. J. Denton 

*R. E. Echols 

M .F. Es'gernian.. 
W. M Franklin 


Ardmore 

Waurika 

Chickasha 

Lone Wolf 

Hollis 

P:ik City 

Shawnee 

Madill 


18 
17 
15 

6 

4 

2 
13 
i!6 
27 

8 
33 
20 
29 

.5 
18 
30 
20 

2 
14 
10 
25 
23 
15 
21 
24 
17 
19 
13 
31 

6 
19 


Carter, Murray, Love 

Comanche, Jefferson, Stephens 

Grady, Caddo 

Custer, Washita, Kiowa 

Greer, Harmon 

Beckham, Roger Mills, Ellis, Dewey 

Pottawatomie, Lincoln 

Marshall. Johnston 


♦Sid Garrett 

P. J. Goulding 

*Gid Graham 

J M. Hatchett ... 
♦E C Harlin ... . 


Ft. Gibson 

Enid 

Catoosa 

Durant 

Welch 


Muskogee, Mcintosh, Haskell 

Garfield 

Rogers, Nowata 

Bryan, Atoka, Coal 

Craig, Mayes 


♦G P Horton 


Altus 


Jackson, Tillman 


*C. B. Kendrick... 
E. M. Landrum... 


Davis 

Tahiequah 


Murray, Love, Carter 
Cherokee, Delaware, Ottawa 
Atoka, Bryan. Coal 


E. L. Mitchell 

*Tom F. McMechat 

J. Q. Newell 

*W. N. Redwine. . . 
*R M Roddie 


Cheyenne 

Oklahoma Citj 

Jennings 

McAlester 

\da 


Beckham, Roger Mills, Ellis, Dewey 

Oklahoma, Canadian 

Pawnee, Noble 

Pittsburg * 

Pontotoc. Seminole 




A nadarko 

T\'"ilburton 


Caddo. Grady 


•E. T. Sorrells 

W^ P Stewart . . 


LeFlore. Latimer 

Choctaw, Pushmataha, McCurtain 


J. Elmer Thomas. 
*J. B. Thompson. . 
•Wm. Tilghmant . . 
♦A. F. Vandeventer 

J. J. Williams 

R. P. Wynne 


Lawton 

Pauls . alley. . 

Chandler 

Bartlesville 

Weatherford. . 
Lexington 


Comanche, Stephens, Jefferson 
Garvin, McClain, Cleveland 
Lincoln, Pottawatomie 
W^ashington, Tulsa 
Custer, Washita, Kiowa 
Cleveland, McClain, Garvin 



(Republicans) 



H. B. Beeler 

B. F. Berkey 

E. D. Brownlee. . . . 
♦Wm. A. Briggs.. 

E. B. Chapman... 

F. M. Colville 

J. H. Cloonan 

*W R. Dutton 



* J. J. Jones Sapulpa 



*J. H. Langston. 
♦J. W. McCully. 

R. T. Potter 

F. L. Warren. . 



Checotah. . . 
Guthrie. . . . , 
Kingfisher. 
Woodward. 
Tonkawa. . . 
Edmond. . . . 

Bunch 

Foraker. . . . 



Guvmon. . . . 

Helena 

Okmulgee . . 
Holdenville. 



♦Senators whose terms of office expire 
fResigned. 



Mcintosh, Muskogee, Haskell 
Logan 

Kingfisher, Blaine 
Woodward. Woods 
Kay, Grant, Osage 
Oklahoma, Canadian 
Adair, Sequoyah 
Grant, Kay, Osage 
Creek, Payne 

Texas, Cimarron, Beaver, Harper 
Alfalfa, Majors 
Okmulgee, Wagoner 

Hug hes. O kfu skee 

in 1914. Others expire in 1912. 



74 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



SENATE STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Rules of Procedure.— Vandeventer, Chairman; Thomas, Ex-Officio 
Chairman; Hatchett, Memminger, Wynne, Briggs. 

Legal Advisory. — Franklin, Chairman; Kendrick, Mitchell, Roddie, 
Stewart, Thomas, Warren. 

Judiciary No. 1. — Hatchett, Chairman; Echols, Landrum, Sorrells, 
Thompson, Vandeventer, Potter. 

Judiciary No. 2. — Kendrick, Chairman; Allen, Horton, Mitchell, 
Redwine, Wynne, Jones. 

Code Revision. — Stewart, Chairman; Allen, Hatchett, McMechan, 
Thomas, Thompson, Potter. 

Appropriations. — Memminger, Chairman; Anderson, Dento,n 
Echols, Garrett, Graham, Landrum, Newell, Williams, Chapman, 
McCully. 

Revenue and Taxation. — Mitchell, Chairman; Hatchett, Horton, 
Kendrick, McMechan, Smith, Jones. 

Privileges and Elections. — Allen, Chairman; Anderson, Eggerman,. 
Hatchett, Mitchell, Thompson, Vandeventer, Beeler, Briggs. 

Public Service Corporations. — Redwine, Chairman; Coffey, Gra- 
ham, McMechan, Newell, Tilghman, Brownlee. 

Private Corporations. — ^Brownlee, Chairman; Anderson, Denton^ 
Garrett, Briggs. 

Commerce and Labor. — Sorrels, Chairman; Allen, Franklin, Bare- 
foot, Goulding, Newell, Colville. 

Agriculture, Quarantine and Animal Industry. — Graham, Chairman; 
Barefoot, Eggerman, Hatchett, Harlin, Newell, Wynne, Button, McCully. 

Banks and Banking. — Roddie, Chairman; Barefoot, Goulding, Gra- 
ham, Harlin, Stewart, Beeler. 

Insurance. — Goulding, Chairman; Coffey, Denton, Landrum, Mem- 
minger, Tilghman, Cloonan. 

Public Buildings and Capitol. — Eggerman, Chairman; Barefoot, 
Echols, Franklin, Kendrick, Thompson, Vandeventer, Brownlee, Potter. 

School Lands. — Barefoot, Chairman; Anderson, Denton, Harlin, 
Roddie, Stewart, Thomas, Brownlee, Langston. 

Oil, Gas and Mineral Lands. — Vandeventer, Chairman; Allen, 
Franklin, Garrett, Graham, Memminger, Redwine, Berkey, Potter. 

Mines and Manufacturing. — Garrett, Chairman; Coffey, Redwine^. 
Sorrells, Tilghman, Wynne, Colville. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 7& 

State and Legislative Affairs. — Williams, Chairman; Allen, Gould- 
ing, Kendrick, Brownlee. 

State and County Affairs. — Denton, Chairman; Garrett, Redwluo, 
Roddie, Smith, Williams, Warren. 

Federal Relations. — Potter, Chairman; Franklin, Horton, McMe- 
chan, Tilghman, Williams, Berkey. 

Indian Affairs. — Harlin, Chairman; Franklin, Graham, Landrum, 
Cloonan. 

Hospitals and Charities. — Goulding, Chairman; Kendrick, Mem- 
minger, McMechan, Newell, Williams, Chapman. 

Penal Institutions. — Coffey, Chairman; Allen, Denton, Redwine, 
Smith, Thompson, Briggs. 

Public Printing. — Anderson, Chairman; Landrum, Memminger, 
Mitchell, Thomas, Vandeventer, Dutton. 

Public Health. — Williams, Chairman; Coffey, Horton, Newell, Rod- 
die, Smith, Warren. 

Drugs and Pure Food. — Newell, Chairman; Anderson, Goulding, 
Sorrells, Stewart, Williams, Chapman. 

Fish and Game. — Thomas, Chairman; Barefoot, Kendrick, Roddie,^ 
Smith, Sorrells, Stewart, Jones. 

Military Affairs. — Tilghman, Chairman; Coffey, Horton, McMechan, 
Berkey. 

Enrolled and Engrossed Bills. — Coffey, Chairman; Mitchell, 
Langston. 

Prohibition Enforcement. — Horton, Chairman; Eggerman, Lan- 
drum, Sorrels, McCully. 

Legislative and Judicial Apportionment. — Thompson, Chairman; 
Barefoot, Echols, Garrett, Graham, Harlin, Kendrick, Newell, Roddie, 
Tilghman, Sorrells, Williams, Vandeventer, Briggs, Potter. 

Congressional Apportionment. — Echols, Chairman; Anderson, 
Eggerman, Goulding, Franklin, Hatchett, Harlin, Newell, Redwine, 
Stewart, Thomas, Thompson, Vandeventer, Brownlee, Potter. 



Senate Employes. 

Name. Position. Address. 

A. H. Murchison Asst. Journal Clerk Tahlequah 

Mrs. Lillian M. Roberts. Asst. Enrolling and Eng. Clerk Anadarko 

Alex C. Hull Asst. Enrolling and Eng. Clerk Edmond 

Mrs. Swanie Hampton.. Asst." Enrolling and Eng. Clerk Tecumseh 

Mrs. Lelia P. Catlin Auditor and Post Master Bartlesville 

P. T. Harris Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms Grandfield 

Claud C. Biard Doorkeeper Grant 

W. M. Childers Property Man Wann 

J. J. Conway Cloak Room Attendant Tulsa 

Thomas Bridge Day Watchman Chandler 



76 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

H. H. Allen , Night Watcliman Davis 

W. M. Walde Chief Stenographer Pauls Valley 

Katherine Pierce Stenographer Oklahoma City 

Ellen Simmons Stenographer Oklahoma City 

Ethel Lawson Stenographer Ardmore 

Blanche Neill Stenographer Woodward 

Katherine Speice Stenographer Kingfisher 

Ida F. Hasley Stenographer ■. Oklahoma City 

Mrs. Madge Martin .... Stenographer McAlester 

Robert Alexander Page Alex 

Eddie Underwood Page Mill Creek 

Sam Grisswold. Page Guthrie 

Glenn Coffland Page Ardmore 

J. L. Pardue Chief Janitor Oklahoma City 

J. R. Hogan (col.) Janitor Chickasha 

W. M. Sulcer (col.) Janitor Shawnee 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



77 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



Officers of the House of Representatives. 

Name. Position. Address. 

* W. A. Durant Speaker Durant 

J. Roy Williams Speaker Pro Tempore Lawtou 

G. A. Crossett Chief Clerk Caddo 

J. S. Bell Sergeant-at-Arms Lookeba 

Rev. Snodgrass Chaplain Tulsa 

William L. Martin Official Reporter Muskogee 

Jane L. Marshall Official Reporter Oklahoma City 

N. A. Gordon Reading Clerk Oklahoma City 

Luther Harrison Assistant Reading Clerk Wetumka 

W. C. Murray Enrolling Clerk Marlow 

W. D. French Calendar Clerk Milburn 

Wm. P. Hill Journal Clerk McAlester 



Stephens 

Cleveland 

Jackson 

Pushmataha 

Bryan 

Pontotoc and Seminole 

Pottawatomie 

Oklahoma 

Sequoyah 

Love 



Members. 

Democrats: 
Name Post-Office 

W. B. Anthony Marlow 

Oliver H. Akin Norman 

S. G. Ashby Eldorado • 

H. S. P. Ashhy Antlers 

J. H. Baldwin Calera , 

J. S. Barham Wewoka , 

C. P. Barrett Shawnee 

H. L. Bolen Oklahoma City 

J. W. Breedlove Sallisaw 

W. H. Brooks Marietta 

Charles Broome Oak Lodge LeFlore 

Ross Brubaker Blackburn Pawnee 

W. S. Carson Tecumseh Pottawatomie 

Joe Chambers Claremore Rogers 

J. B. Champion Ardmore Carter 

H. N. Christian. Lookeba Caddo 

J. W. Clark Caney Atoka 

G. E. Clayton Waterloo Logan 

G. W. Cornell Weatherford Custer and Washita 

* W. L. Coughlin Frederick Tillman 

K. C. Cox Granite Greer 

Pete Coyne Estella Craig 

J. P. Crawford Ada •• Pontotoc 

W. A. Durant Durant Bryan and Atoka 

H. H. Edwards Stigler Haskell 

C. B. Emanuel Sulphur Murray 



Washington 

. Sequoyah and LeFlore 
Grady 
Caddo 
Tulsa 



Lon Fisher Bartlesville . 

S. J. Folsom Heavener. 

E. "W. Frey Amber 

G. M. Fuller Anadarko. 

J. I. Gillespie Tulsa 

R. L. Glover Rush Springs Grady 

E. I>. Green Purcell McClain 

W. A. Hammond Hartshorne Pittsburg and Hughes 

E. L. Harris Cordell Washita 

W. C. Jackson Muskogee Muskogee 

T. O. James Guymon Texas 

E. E. Jayne Wewoka Seminole 

*W. B. Anthony of Marlowe, was speaker of the special session, con- 
voked to locate the State capitol. 



78 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

"W. L. Jeffords Chelsea Craig and Rogers 

N. J, Johnson Atwood.... Hughes 

Cham Jones Ryan Jei't'erson 

Eugene M. Kerr Muskogee Muskogee and Haskell 

O. W. Killam Grove Delaware 

J, R. Knight Valliant McCurtain 

J, S. Leftwich Comanche Comanche and Stephens 

J. M. Lenox Boynton Okmulgee 

G. W. Lewis Texola..... Beckham 

r! W. Lindsey Choteau Mayes 

O. J. Logan Mountain View Kiowa 

J.' V. McClintic Snyder Swanson (Kiowa) 

H. M. McElhaney Indianola Pittsburg 

J. W. McDuffee Woodville Marshall 

C. H. Madden Hollis Harmon (.2d Dist. of Greer 

Perry Madden Roll Roger Mills 

O. Marshall Griggs Cimarron 

J. H. Maxey, Jr Shawnee Pottawatomie and Lincoln 

W. J. Milburn Miltaurn Johnston 

w! P. Miller Muskogee Muskogee 

C. ' L. Miller Delaware Nowata 

J. K. Moore Miami Ottawa 

j'. M. Moore Olney Johnston and Coal 

J. S. Moss Porter Wagoner 

W. H. New Wilburton Latimer 

B * F. Nisbett Tecumseh Pottawatomie 

o! W. Patchell Pauls Valley Garvin 

r". l Peebly Oklahoma City Oklahoma 

Dan. W. Peery Carnegie Caddo, Canadian, Cleveland 

C. B. Peters Hominy Osage 

W, V. Pryor Sapulpa Creek and Tulsa 

U. T. Rexroat Ardmore Carter 

J. J. Roland '. . . Okemah Okfuskee 

George T. Searcy Coalgate Coal 

W. P. Semple Caddo Bryan 

Geo. W. Smith Stilwell Adair 

J. W. Steen Checotah Mcintosh 

William Tabor Stratford ■ • Garvin 

fH. B. Tehee Tahlequah Cherokee 

M. L. Webb Hugo Choctaw 

S. F. Whitman McAlester Pittsburg 

J. Roy Williams Lawton Comanche 

T. O. Williams Tonkawa Kay 

D. S. Woodson Alva • • . Woods 

J. H. Wright Oklahoma City Oklahoma 



Republicans: 

O. B. Acton Lovell Logan 

C. R. Blackburn Wellston Lincoln 

U. S. Brown Piedmont Canadian 

J. B. Campbell W^aukomis Garfield 

J. B. Charles Stroud Lincoln 

W. T. Clark Manchester Grant 

W. H. Clarke Blackwell Kay 

E. M. Clark Pawnee . . ■ • Payne and Pawnee 

S. S. Davison Fairview Majors 

C. H. DeFord Harrah Oklahoma 

H. O. Devereux Lenora Dewey 

George Jamison Watonga Blaine 

G. L. King Kingfisher Kin,s:fisher 

G. N. Kneeland Helena Alfalfa 

J. M. Porter Enid Garfield 

A. J. Rentfrow Pond Creek Alfalfa and Grant 

E. P. Rose Catesby Ellis 

J. S. Shearer Guthrie Logan 

S. J. Smith Sapulpa Creek 

T, H. Stockton Perkins Pavne 

B, T. Testerman Morrison Noble 

J. M. Thrash Clinton Custer 

A. W. Tooley Floris Beaver ■ 

H. D. Vogle Charleston Harper 

E. G. Vosburg Woodward. . • • Woodward 

Eugene Watrous Enid Garfield 

•Dead. tResigned. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT^ 79 



HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Engrossment. — Akin, Chairman; Ashby (Jackson), Blackburn. 

Public Health and Sanitation. — Johnson, Chairman; Miller (No- 
wata), Jackson, Coughlin, Baldwin, Madden (Harmon;, Nisbett, Jones, 
Rose. 

Practice of Medicine. — Miller (Nowata), Chairman; Baldwin, Nis- 
bett, Johnson, Miller (Muskogee), Barrett, Emanuel, King, Anthony. 

Private Corporations. — Jayne, Chairman; Bolen, Frey, Harris, 
Pryor, Chambers, Madden (Rogers Mills), McClintic, Clark (Kay). 

Investigation of Judicial and Executive Department. — Jackson, 
Chairman; Killam, Webb, Williams (Comanche), Williams (Kay), 
Woodson, Rexroat, Rentfrow, Clark (Grant). 

Enrollment. — New, Chairman; Green, Clark (Grant). 

Levies, Drains, Ditches and Irrigation. — Barham, Chairman; Stock- 
ton, Ashby (Pushmataha), Glover, Pi,oland, Lennox, James, Blackburn, 
Christian. 

Libraries. — Moore (Ottawa), Chairman; Ashby (Pushmataha), Mar- 
shall, Lewis, Rentfrow. 

State Military. — Barrett, Chairman; Jones, Jayne, Fuller, Miller 
(Muskogee), Gillespie, Steen, Charles, De Ford. 

Pharmacy. — Hammond, Chairman; Madden (Harmon), Miller 
Nisbett, Clayton, Christian, Watrous. 

Dentistry. — Nisbett, Chairman; Baldwin, Glover, Brubaker, DeFord 

Constitutional Amendments. — Champion, Chairman; Clark (Atoka) 
Patchell, Peery, Green, Hammond, Madden (Rogers Mills), Testerman 
Porter. 

Cotton Warehouses and Grain Elevators. — Moore (Coal), Chair- 
man; Peery, Jeffords, LeftwicH, Moss, Fisher, James, Ashby (Jack 
son), Carson, Brubaker, Peters, Lennox, Jamison, Devereaux, Rose. 

Prohibition Enforcement. — Leftwich, Chairman; Williams (Com 
anche). Christian, Teehee, Patchell, Cox, Madden (Harmon), Milburn 
McDuffee, Roland, McElhaney, Lewis, Clark (Grant), Davison, Jamison 

Public Service Corporations. — Steen, Chairman; Woodson, Logan 
James, Moss, Barham, Semple, Gillespie, Searcy, Watrous, Campbell. 

Labor and Arbitration. — McDuffee, Chairman; Williams, (Com 
^nche), Coyne, Barham, Bolen, McElhaney, Carson, Ashby (Pushma^ 
taha), Moore (Coal), Marshall, Clayton, Lewis. Lindsay, Watrous 
Brown. 

Initiative and Referendum and Legislative Departments. — Clark 
(Atoka), Chairman; Cornell, Broome, Lewis, Moss, Maxey, Clayton, 
Peebly, Fisher, Campbell, Acton. 



80 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Oil and Gas. — Gillespie, Chairman; Steen, Logan, Peters, Pryor, 
Fisher, Miller (Nowata), Rexroat, Smith (Creek). 

Purchase of Coal and Asphalt Lands. — Polsom, Chairman; Searcy, 
Smith (Adair), Moore (Coal), Knight, New, Semple, Ashby (Pushma- 
taha), Rexroat, Testerman, Shearer. 

Manufacturers and Commerce. — Searcy, Chairman; Williams 
(Kay), Tabor, Rexroat, Roland, Lennox, Lewis, Jeffords, Madden 
(Harmon), Jamison, Thrash. 

Protection of Birds, Fish and Game. — Knight, Chairman; Smith 
(Adair), Peery, Peebly, Coyne, Johnson, Glover, Milburn, Miller 
(Nowata), Watrous, Stockton. 

House Expenses and Public Accounts. — Webb, Chairman; Cox, 
Moore ( Ottawa), Peters, McDuffee, Williams (Kay), Watrous. 

Canals and Navigation. — ^Lindsay, Chairman; Glover, Tabor, Mad- 
den (Harmon), Ashby (Pushmataha), Cox, Roland, Brubaker, Vos- 
burgh, Blackburn, Lennox. 

Retrenchment and Reform. — Harris, Chairman; Ashby (Jackson), 
Glover, Green, Nisbett, Baldwin, Broome, Brubaker, Whitman, King, 
Stockton. 

Geological and Economic Survey. — Peery, Chairman; Cox, Jones, 
Williams (Kay), Cornell, Christian, Madden (Harmon), Blackburn, 
Acton. 

Impeachment and Removal From Office. — Moss, Chairman; An- 
thony, Folsom, Breedlove, Killam, Fisher, Peters, Marshall, Smith 
(Creek). 

State and School Lands. — Logan, Chairman; Anthony, Jones, 
Maxey, Frey, Crawford, Devereux, Tooley, Vogle, Smith ( Adair), Knight. 

« 

Mines and Mining — McElhaney, Chairman; Moore (Coal), Ed- 
wards, Webb, Smith (Adair), Cox, Chambers, Broome, Searcy. 

Insurance — Frey, Chairman; Jayne, Edwards, Anthony, Crawford, 
McClintic, Thrash, Shearer. 

Municipal Corporations — Bolen, Chairman; Jayne, Clark (Ataka), 
Madden (Roger Mills), Hammond, Killam, Porter, Anthony, Chambers. 

Agriculture and Agricultural Education — Peebly, Chairman; Bar- 
rett, Lenox, Fuller, Searcy, Smith (Adair), Tabor, Broome, Rexroat, 
Brooks, Prey, Williams (Comanche), James, Marshall, Ashby (Jack- 
son), Brubaker, Roland, Lewis, Folsom, Clarke (Kay), Davison. 

County and Township Organization and Government — Carson, 
Chairman; McElhaney, Fuller, McDuffee, Champion, Johnson, Mc- 
Clintic, Milburn, Brown. 

Relations to the Five Civilized Oklahoma Indian Tribes — Cham- 
bers, Chairman; Teehee, Smith (Adair), Semple, Breedlove, Knight, 
Folsom, Coyne, Lindsay, Blackburn, Jeffords. 

Federal Relations — Edwards, Chairman; Chambers, Cornell, Har- 
ris, Wright, Peters, Green, Barrett, Clark (Pawnee). 

Education — Williams (Comanche), Chairman; Woodson, Prey, 
Carson, Akin, Brooks, Milburn, New, Moore (Ottawa), Vosburgh, 
Kneeland. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 81 

Bank and Banking, Loan, Trust and Guaranty Companies — KUlam 
Chairman; McClintic, Jackson, Wright, Fuller, Moore (Coal), Miller 
(Nowata), Charles, Acton, Chambers. 

General Appropriations — Crawford, Chairman; Chambers, Cough- 
lin, Steen, Woodson, Logan, Barham, McEIhaney, Miller (Muskogee), 
McClintic, Semple, Charles, Jones, Miller (Nowata), Williams (Com- 
anche). 

Judiciary and Judicial Departments No. 1— Coughlin, Chairman; 
Bolen, Logan, Jones, Pryor, Semple, Crawford, Breedlove, Clark 
(Atoka), Clark (Grant), King. 

Judiciary and Judicial Departments No. 2— Maxey, Chairman; Ed- 
wards, Cornell, Champion, Chambers, Patchell, Hammond, Emanuel 
Jackson, Clark (Pawnee), Clayton, Wright. 

Criminal Jurisprudence— Semple, Chairman; Crawford, Maxey, Cor- 
nell, Wright, Logan, Harris, Coughlin, Miller (Muskogee), Jones. Clark 
(Kay). 

Public Printing— Whitman, Chairman; Emanuel, Moore (Coal) 
Anthony, Webb, Gillespie, Knight, Barrett, Devereux. 

Code Committee— Jones, Chairman; Crawford, Maxey, Patchell, 
Coughlin, Bolen, Breedlove, Champion, Edwards, Clark (Atoka) Tee- 
hee. Chambers, Semple, Emanuel, Pryor, Cornell, Clark (Grant) 
Clark (Pawnee). 

Private Corporations— Jayne, Chairman; Bolen, Frey Harris 
Pryor, Chambers, Madden (Roger Mills), McClintic, Clarke (Kay). " 

Pure Food and Drugs— Baldwin. Chairman; Madden (Harmon) 
Carson, Semple, Johnson, Nisbett, Miller (Nowata), Watrous, King. 

Elections— Breedlove, Chairman; Jayne, Miller (Muskogee), Craw- 
ford. Pryor, Coughlin, Jones, Anthony, Teehee, Charles, Vogle. 

« ^^Y'u^^ f^'^ Corrections— Coyne, Chairman; Anthony, Lindsey 
Peery, Ashby (Pushmataha), Gillespie. Logan. Cox, Vogle. 

rv ^^^K^^^^^°^^^ ^"^ Highways— Woodson, Chairman; Steen. Barrett 
Tabor. Leftwich, Ashby (Jackson), Glover, Brooks, Carson, ChrSan 

SmUr^Cr^ek)" ^°"^^^^' ^^^'^^^^^^ Coyne, Vosburgh, King. Searc?! 

Committee on Revenue and Taxation— Milburn, Chairman- An- 
thony, Coyne, Tabor, Killam, Rose and Tooley. 

Committee on Judicial and Senatorial Redlstrictmg— McClintic 
Chairman .-^Folsom, Moss, Jackson, Champion. Jayne! McDuffee' 
Coughhn, Williams (Kay), Clark (Kay), Thrash. Mcuuiree, 

h»n ^°'"7'"«e on Congressional Redistricting as follows: 17 mem- 

bers-Anthony Chairman; Crawford, Woodson, McClintic, Jayne 

Coyne Coughlin, Edwards, Tooley, Steen. Webb Maxey, Chanson' 

Kerr. Jones. Killam, Smith (Creek). v^nampion. 

T.r,o?°T"ll"®® on Rules— Pryor. Williams (Comanche), Crawford 
Jones, Anthony and Vogle. v>ia,Yvxv^xu, 

Journal Committee— Frey, Chambers, Campbell. 
Sig. 8. 



82 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Public Buildings — Teehee, Chairman; Crawford, Akin, Harris, 
Jackson, Jayne, Logan, Steen, Wright, Whitman, Smith (Adair), 
New, Charles, Kneeland, Testerman. 

Fees and Salaries — Miller (Muskogee) Chairman; Moss, Barham, 
Brooms, Edwards, Crawford, Rexroat, Fisher, Clark (Pawnee). 

Legal Advisory — Emanuel, Chairman; Maxey, Wright, Teehee, 
Harris, Patchell, Clark (Pawnee), 



House Employees. 

Sam A. Opliger Secretary to Speaker Tishomingo 

Syd. J. Wheeler JVIinute Clerk Kingston 

Jeannette Collar Asst. Journal Clerk Oklahoma City 

Robert M. Snelson Bill Clerk 'Checotah 

W. F. Durham Law and Record Clerk Tecumseh 

Roy E. Burks House Auditor Pauls Valley 

N. A. Gordon Reading Clerk Oklahoma City 

Luther Harrison Asst. Reading Clerk Wetumka 

J. S. Bell Sergeant-at-Arms Lookeba 

F. M. Tuttle AsslstantSergeant-at-Arms Guymon 

J. A. McLaughlin. Assistamt Sergeant-at-Arins . . . Chandler 

Seth Ledbetter Postmaster Oklahoma City 

Joe Haskell Messenger Muskogee 

J. B. Martin Messenger Muskogee 

Pearl Alspaugh Assistant Enrolling Clerk Shawnee 

Edna Bowers Assistant Enrolling Clerk Claremore 

Susie King Assistant Enrolling Clerk Oklahoma City 

Grey Moore Chief Engrossing Clerk Guthrie 

Helen Smith Assistant Engrossing Clerk Muskogee 

Delia B. Mitchell Assistant Engrossing Clerk Cherokee 

Albert Shields Chief Committee Clerk Enid 

Edna Thomas Committee Clerk Ardmore 

Ruth Hazel Committee Clerk Ardmore 

Janie Gwln Committee Clerk Ardmore 

Effie D. Botts Committee Clerk Hobart 

Garland Gale Committee Clerk Oklahoma City 

Pauline Bremlcker Committee Clerk Chlckasha 

Harry Wagner Committee Clerk Hobart 

Margaret Nichols Committee Clerk Oklahoma City 

Katherine Bremlcker Committee Clerk Chlckasha 

H. B. Butts Committee Clerk Muskogee 

A. F. Robertson Committee Clerk Tulsa 

J. L. King Committee Clerk Oklahoma City 

Anna Groves Committee Clerk Woodward 

Russell Ballard Messenger to Committee Guthrie 

R. D. Elklns Property Clerk Durant 

John Jels. Rankin Mail Carrier Chlckasha 

•C. H. Pinkley Telephone Operator Mt. Park 

Duncan H. Nash Custodian Valliant 

Raqdell Cobb Page to Speaker Wewoka 

Clyde Geo. Plsher Page Berwyn 

Louis Statton Page Guthrie 

Leroy F. Caateel Pa^e Boise City 

L.awrence Dewees Page Delhi 

Pay A. Bennett Page Alva 

Stanley Landrum Page Tahlequah 

Allen Wesson Page Hugo 

Richard King, Jr Page Duncan 

L. Z. Lasley Day Watchman Alva 

J. A. King Night Watchman Calera 

I. B. Littleton Cloak Room Attendant Earlsboro 

G. W. Oldham Cloak Room Attendant Vlnlta 

J. W. Singleton Cloak Room Attendant Temple 

W. R. Ferguson Cloak Room Attendant Lexington 

W, J. Harding Doorkeeper Checotah 

Sam H. Hargis Assistant Doorkeeper Cornish 

Wm. R. Reagin Assistant Law Clerk Oklahoma City 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



83 



LEGISLATIVE APPORTIONMENT, S. B. 243. 
(Repr«"^oitatives apportioned.) 



Adair 

Alfalfa 

Atoka 

Beaver-Harper . 

Beckham 

Blaine 

Bryan 

Caddo 

Canadian 

Carter 

Cherokee 

Choctaw 

Cimarron-Texas 

Cleveland 

Coal 

Comanche 

Craig 

Creek 

Custer 

Delaware 

Dewey 

Ellis 

Garfield 

Garvin , 

Grady 

Grant 

Greer 

Harmon , 

Haskell 

Hughes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Johnston , 

Kay 

Kingfisher 

Kiowa 

Latimer 

LeFlore 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Love 

McClain ! 

McCurtain 

Mcintosh , 

Major 

Marshall 

Mayes 

Murray 

Muskogee 

Noble 

Nowata 

Okfuskee 

Oklahoma 

Okmulgee 

Osage 

Ottawa 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pittsburg 

Pontotoc 



1912 1914 1916 1918 1920 



1 




1 




2 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




3 


3 


1 




1 




2 




5 




1 




2 




1 




1 




1 




3 


3 


1 


1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

3 

2 



84 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Pottawatomie 

Pushmataha 

Roger Mills 

Rogers 

Seminole 

Sequoyah 

Stephens 

Swanson (dissolved) 

Tillman 

Tulsa 

"Wagoner 

Washington 

Washita 

Woods 

Woodward 



3 3 3 2 2 
11111 
11111 
11111 
112 11 
112 2 1 
12 111 
11111 
11111 
2 2 2 2 2 
1 1 I 2 1 1 
11111 
112 2 1 
11111 
11111 



Total 



99 



9S 



111 



104 



92 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 85 



HOUSE AND SENAT • RULES AND JOINT RULES OF 
THE TI IRD LEGISLATURE 



RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE STATE OF 

OKLAHOMA. 



The Speaker's Duty. 

RULE 1. 

Section 1. The speaker of the House shall take the chair each day at 
the hour to which the House shall have adjourned, and Immediately call 
the House to order, and, except in the absence of a quorum, shall proceed 
to business in the manner prescribed by these rules. 

Section 2. He shall preserve order and decorum, and in debate shall 
prevent personal reflection and confine members to the question under 
discussion. When two or more members rise at the same time, he sha4l 
name the one entitled to the floor, and he shall not recognize a member 
who has risen and remained standing while another member is speaking 
provided any one rises after the speaker has yielded the floor, and no mem- 
ber shall be recognized unless he address the Speaker from his own seat. 

Section 3. He shall decide all questions of order subject to appeal to 
the House. On any appeal he shall have the right to assign his reason 
for decision. In case of such appeal, no member shall speak more than 
once. 

Section 4. He shall api alnt all committees except where the House 
shall otherwise order. 

Section 5. He may subst! tute any member to perform the duties of the 
chair, but such substitution shall not extend beyond adjournment. 

Section 6. He shall have general control of the corridors and passages 
to the House and shall assign the committee rooms for the various com- 
mittees. 

Section 7. He shall preserve order and decorum, and in case of 
disturbance or disorderly conduct in the galleries or In the lobby may 
cause the same to be cleared. 

Section 8. He shall certify the passage of all bills and resolutions as 
required by the Constitution. 

Section 9. He shall assign seats to authorized reporters of the press, 
who shall have the right to pass to and from such seats on entering 
or leaving the Chamber. No reporter shall appear before any of the com- 
mittees in advocacy of, or in opposition to, anything under discussion before 
such committee. A violation of this rule will be sufficient to cause the 
removal of such reporter. Removal for this cause shall be vested in the 
Speaker. 



86 OKLAHOMA RED B0(/ K 

Section 10. In case of a ballot by the Ho ise, and on all questions 
where the ayes and nays are called, the Spea' er shall vote last, under 
the title of "Mr. Speaker." 

Section 11. He shall also be ex-officio men ber and chairman of the 
Committee on Rules. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

RULE 2. 
Section 1 — 

1. Prayer. 

2. Roll Call. 

3. Reading of Journal. 

4. Petitions and Memorials. 

5. Reports of Select Committees. 

6. Reports of Standing Committees. 

7. Motions, Resolutions and Notices. 
■ 8. Unfinished Business. 

9. Introduction of Bills. 

10. Executive Messages or other Executive Communications. 

11. Message from the Senate and Senate Amendments to House Bills. 

12. Bills and Resolutions from the Senate on their First Reading. 

13. House Bills and Joint Resolutions on Second Reading. 

14. Senate Bills and Joint Resolutions on Third Reading. 

Section 2. The order of business prescribed in the second rule shall 
be used each day, beginning with the first item and going down to and 
Including the seventh item, before completing the catalog of items begun 
on the previous day; provided not more than one hour daily shall be 
devoted to so much of said order as is embriced in the fourth to the 
seventh inclusive. 

Section 3. The Journal shall be typewritt >n and after the same is 
approved, shall be signed by the Speaker and a Itested by the Chief Clerk 
In the presence of the House. 



ORDER AND DECORUM. 

RULE 3. 

Section 1. No member rising to debate, to give notice, make a motion 
or present a paper of any kind, shall proceed until he shall have addressed 
the Speaker, and has been recognized by him as entitled to the floor. 
"While the Speaker is putting the question or count is being had, no member 
shall speak or leave his place; and while a member is speaking no member 
shall enter into any private conversation or pass between him and the 
chair. 

Section 2. When a motion to adjourn, or for a recess shall be carried, 
no m'ember or officer shall leave his place until the adjournment or recess 
shall be declared by the Speaker. 

Section 3. No person, except members of the House and the officers 
thereof, shall be permitted within the Chief Clark's desk, or the room set 
apart for the use of the Chief Clerk during the sessions of the House, and 
no member or other person shall visit or re nain by the Chief Clerk's 
table while the ayes and nayes are being call© 1. 

Section 4. No member shall speak mor« than once on the sam« 
question, until every member desiring to spe.Jc on such question shall 
have spoken; nor more than twice on any question without leave of the 
House. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



87 



Section 5. All questions relating to the transgression of the rules of 
the House, the Speaker shall, or any member may, call him to order, In 
which case the member so called to order shall immediately sit down, and 
shall not rise unless to explain or proceed in order. 

Section 6. All questions relating to the priority of one question or 
subject matter over another, under tlie same order of business or the 
suspension of any rule, shall be decided without debate. 

Section 7. No member or other person shall be permitted to smoke on 
the floor of the House or in the gallery during sessions. 



STANDING COMMITTEES AND THEIR DUTIES. 



RULE 4. 



Section 1. The Speaker of the House shall appoint the following 
standing committees to report upon the subjects named and such other 
matters as may be referred to them: 

(1 On Rules and Procedure, to consist of seven members. 
(2) On Judiciary No. 1, to consist of eleven members. 
On Judiciary No. 2, to consist of twelve members. 
On Criminal Jurisprudence, to consist of eleven members. 
On Legal Advisory, to consist of seven members. 
On General Appropriations, to consist of fifteen members. 
On Congressional Redistricting, to consist of seventeen members, 
On Judicial and Senatorial Redistricting, to consist of eleven 



(3 
(4 
(5 
(6 
(7 
( 

members 
(9 
(10 
(11 
(12 
(13 
consist 
(14 
(15 
(16 
(17 
(18 
(19 
(20 
(21 
(22 
(23 
(24 
(25 
(26 
(27 
consist 
(28 
consist 
(29 
(30 
(31 
(32 
(33 
(34 



On Public Service Corporations, to consist of eleven members. 

On Revenue and Taxation, to consist of seven members. 

On Education, to consist of eleven members. 

On General Agriculture to consist of twenty-one members. 

On Banks and Banking, Loan, Trust and Guaranty Companies, to 
of ten members. 

On State and School Lands to consist of sixteen members. 

On Public Buildings, to consist of sixteen members. 

On Charities and Corrections, to consist of nine members. 

On Public RoETds and Highways, to consist of eighteen members. 

On Prohibition Enforcement, to consist of eighteen members. 

On Elections, to consist of eleven members. 

On Labor and Arbitration, to consist of fifteen n>embers. 

On Pure Food and Drugs, to consist of nine members. 

On Practice of Medicine, to consist of nine members. 

On Oil and Gas, to consist of nine members. 

On Mines and Mining, to consist of nine members. 

On Insurance, to consist of nine members. 

On Municipal Corporations, to consist of nine members. 

On Initiative and Referendum and Legislative Departments, to 
of eleven members. 

On County and Township Organization and Government, to 
of nine members. 

On State Militia, to consist of nine members. 

On Pharmacy, to consist of seven members. 

On Dentistry, to consist of five members. 

On Code, to consist of eighteen members. 

On Constitutional Amendments, to consist of nine members. 

On Cotton Warehouses and Grain Elevators, to consist. of fifteen 



members. 

(35) On Relation to the Five Civilzied and other Indian Tribes of 
Oklahoma, to consist of eleven members. 



88 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



(36) On Protection of Birds, Fish and Game to consist of eleven 
members. 

(37) On Purcliase of Coal and Asplialt Lands, to consist of eleven 
members. 

(38) On Manufacturers and Commerce, to consist of eleven members. 

(39) On Canals and Navigation, to consist of eleven members. 

(40) On House Expense and Public Accounts, to consist of seven 
members. 

(41) On Retrenchment and Reform, to consist of eleven members. 

(42) On Public Printing, to consist of nine members. 

(43) On Impeachment and Removal from Office, to consist of nine 
members. 

(44) On Geological and Economic Survey, to consist of nine members. 
On Public Health and Sanitation, to consist of nine members. 
On Private corporations, to consist of nine members. 
On Fees and Salaries, to consist of nine members. 
On Levees, Drains, Ditches and Irrigation, to consist of nin» 



(45) 
(46) 
(47) 
(47) 
members. 

(49) On Investigation of Judiciary and Executive Departments, 
consist of nine members. 

(50) On Enrollment, to consist of three members. 

(51) On Engrossment, to consist of three members. 

(52) On Federal Relations, to consist of nine members. 

(53) On Libraries, to consist of five members. 



to 



COMMITTEE ON PRINTING. 



RULE 5. 



Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Printing to 
examine and report on all questions referred to them; to examine from 
time to time, and ascertain whether the prices charged for printing and 
the quantities and qualities furnished are in conformity with the orders 
of the House, and the conditions fixed by it; to ascertain and report 
the number of copies to be printed and how distributed; and to report 
to the House, from time to time, any measures they may deem useful 
for the economical and proper management of the House printing. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Committee on House Accounts 
and Expenses to Inquire into the expenditures of the House and whether 
proper vouchers exist for the same, and whether funds provided for the 
purpose are economically applied, and to report from time to time such 
regulations as may conduce to economy, and the proper disbursements of 
the moneys appropriated by law. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Committee on House Accounts 
and Expenses to require the Chief Clerk to produce receipts for all sup- 
plies, furniture and fixtures bought by or on behalf of the House and no 
purchase shall be made unless ordered by said committee. 



COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE. 

RULE 6. 

Section 1. All appropriation bills shall be considered by the Com- 
mittee of .the Whole. All other bills may, on motion, be referred to the 
Committee of the Whole. All bills, and resoliltions shall be referred to the 
committees either by the Speaker or on motion of the House, unless the 
rules are suspended and the same placed on the calendar. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 89 

Section 2. Any matter may be committed to the Committee of the 
TVTiole after the report or discharge of a standing committee or select 
committee or by unanimous consent without report or discharge. The same 
rules shall be observed in Committee or the Whole as in the House, so far 
as the same are applicable, except that the previous qustion shall not 
apply nor the ayes and nays be taken. 

Section 3. A motion to "rise and report progress," shall be in order 
at any time and shall be decided without debate. A motion to "rise and 
report" is not in order until each section and the title have been considered 
unless the limit of time iias expired. 

Section 4. Proposed resolutions or bills and other matters shall be 
considered in Committee of the Wliole, in the following manner, viz: They 
shall first be read through by the clerk, and then read and considered by 
section. When the limit of time has expired, the provisions which have 
been- proposed and not acted upon shall be subject to consideration by 
the committee at a subsequent sitting, and the committee shall then arise 
and report in accordance with the action which it has taken. If the com- 
mittee shall have adopted and proposed provisions, the same shall be 
reported complete, with any amendments made in committee incorporated 
In their proper places. 

Section 5. No member in Committee of the Whole shall speak longer 
than ten minutes, except by consent of the committee. 

Section 6. In forming the Committee of the Whole, the Speaker shall 
leave the chair, having first appointed a chairman to preside in the 
Committee, who shall take his seat in the Speaker's chair and the 
Speaker shall occupy the chair vacated by the member acting as Chairman 
of the Committee of the Whole. 



MOTION TO RE-COMMIT. \ 

RULE 7. 

A motion may be made during the reading or consideration of any 
proposed bill, to re-commit it, with instructions but the instructions shall 
be in writing, and such motion shall not be debatable. 



RESOLUTIONS 

RULE 8. 

Section 1. The following classes of resolutions shall lie over one day 
for consideration, after which they may be called up as of course, under 
their appropriate order of business. 

Section 2. Resolutions containing calls for information from any of 
the Executive or Judicial departments, from territorial, tribal, county 
and municipal officers, or from any corporate bodies or persons. 

Section 3. Resolutions giving rise to debate, except such as shall 
relate to the disposition of business Immediately before the House, to 
the business of the day, on which they may be offered, or to adjournments 
or recesses, shall be referred to committees. 

Section 4. All resolutions for printing an extra number of documents 
shall be referred, as of course, to the standing committees on printing for 
its report thereon before final action by the House. 

Section 5. All resolutions authorizing or contemplating expenditures 
for the purposes of the House shall be referred to th standing committee 
on House Accounts and Expenses for its report thereon, before final action 
by the House, 



90 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

ATTENDANCE OF MEMBERS. 
RULE 9. 

Section 1. No member shall absent himself from the sessions of the 
House without leave. 

Section 2. If, at any time during the daily sessions of the House 
a question shall be raised by any member as to the presence of a quorum 
the Speaker shall forthwith direct the clerk to call the roll and shall an- 
nounce the result, and these proceedings shall be without debate. 

Section 3. Wherever upon such a roll call it shall be ascertained that 
a quoruni is not present, a majority of the members present may direct 
the sergeant at arms to request, and, when necessary, to compel, the 
attendance of the absent members, which order shall be determined with- 
out debate; and pending its execution and until a quorum shall be present ' 
no debate or motion, except to adjourn, shall be in order. 

AUTHOR'S NAME. 

RULE 10. 

All bills, resolutions and memorials or other papers shall be accom- 
panied by the name of the member presenting the same, also the county 
or district he represents. 

ROLL CALL. J 

RULE 11. 

Every member shall vote when his name is called, and shall not be 
permitted to vote afterwards unless he states that he did not hear his 
name called by the clerk. No explanation of roll call shall be permitted 
during roll call or after the vote has been cast. 

QUESTIONS OF PRIVILEGE. 

RULE 12. 

Questions of privilege shall be: First, those affecting the rights of 
the House collectively, its safety, dignity and the integrity of its pro- 
ceedings; second, the rights, reputation amd conduct of members Individu- 
ally, in their representative capacity only; and shall have precedence of 
all other questions, except motions to adjourn. 

LIMIT OF LOBBYING. \ 

RULE 14. 

Section 1. It is hereby declared to be against public policy and 
against the best interests of the people for any persons employed for 
a pecuniary consideration to act as legislative counsel or legislative 
agent for any person, corporation or association to attempt personally 
and directly to influence any member of the House to vote for or against 
any measure therein pending, otherwise than by public addresses, or by 
written or printed statements, arguments or briefs, delivered to each 
member of the House; provided that before delivering such statement. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 91 

argrument or brief, twenty-five copies shall be first deposited with the 
ahlef clerk of the House, and be subject to public inspection and no officer, 
agent, appointee or employee in the service of the House, or in this 
Btate, shall attempt to influence any member of the House to vote for 
or against any measure pending therein, affecting the pecuniary interest 
of such person, except in the manner authorized therein, in the case of 
legislative counsel and legislative agents. 

Section 2. No person employed for a pecuniary consideration to act 
as legislative counsel or legislative agent for any person, corpcratiou sr 
association, shall go upon the floor of the House, reserved for the memberg 
thereof, while in session except on invitation of the House. 

Section 3. In case of violation of the provisions of sections 1 and 2 
of this rule, the offender shall be deemed in contempt of this House, 
and finally excluded from the legislative hall, and from all committee 
rooms, and his name be posted in writing on the excluded list at the main 
entrance to the legislative hall and any member of this House thereafter 
wilfully and knowingly communicating with such offender before final 
adjournment of this House shall likewise be deemed in contempt of the 
dignity of this House, and subject to reprimand at the bar of this 
House in open session by the Speaker. 



JEFFERSON'S MANUAL, 

RUI.E 15. 

Where the rules of the House do not apply, then the rule of Jefferson'g 
Manual as applied by Congress shall govern the actions of this body. 

PUT QUESTIONS. 

RULE 16. 

The Speaker shall put the question distinctly, in this form to-wlt: 
.nal those in favor (as the case may be) signify the same by saying 'Aye' 
those opposed, 'No.' " 

STATE QUESTIONS. 

RULE 17. . 

Any member may call for a statement of the question, which the 
Speaker may give sitting. 

COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE, ETC. 

RULE 18 

The Speaker of the House shall be vested with discretionary power 
to send communications to the Senate on all subjects where he may deem 
it necessary or expedient. 

REMOVAL OF EMPLOYEES. 

RULE 19. 

The Speaker may at any time change employees at another depart- 
■^snt, remove or discharge any of the employees for incompetency or 
negligence, and fill their places as the law requires, subject to the rati- 
fication by the House. 



92 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

MOTION TO ADJOURN. 

RULE 20. 

The hour at which any motion is made to adjourn shall be entered 
upon the Journal. 

DUTIES OF THE SERGEANT-AT-ARMS. 

RULE 21. 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the sergeant-at-arms to attend 
the House during its sitting, to maintain order under the direction of 
the SpeaJcer, and pending the election of a Speaker or Speaker Pro Tem- 
pore, under the clerk, execute the commands of the House and all process 
issued by authority there directed to him by the Speaker. 

Eection 2. The symbol of his office shall be the mace, which shall 
be borne by him while enforcing order on the floor. 

Section 3. He shall have charge of the hall of the House during 
the session; see that the same is kept in order and at all times ready for 
the use of the House. 

Section 4. The janitors of the House shall be under his control and 
direction for the purpose of serving the House and committees. And he 
shall remain at the hall until the janitors shall put the hall in order for 
the next day's session. 

Section 5. In addition to the duties of the sergeant-at-arms, he 
shall provide swinging gates at the entrance to the floor from the lobby, 
and shall stand at such gates and see that none enter except those who 
are entitled to the privileges of the floor, and in the event his duties 
require him to leave his post the assistant sergeant-at-arms shall perform 
his duty, and a failure to comply with this rule shall constitute a breach 
of his duties. 

Section 6. The assistant sergeant at arms shall enforce strictly the 
rules relating to the privileges of the hall, and assist the sergeant-at-arm» 
In preserving order. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF MESSAGES 

RULE 22. 

When the messenger of the Senate or assistant shall wait upon the 
House, notice thereof shall be given to the Speaker by the sehgeant-at- 
arms, or doorkeeper, who shall declare the same and a copy of the messa^ 
be laid upon the table of the clerk. 



CHAPLAIN. 

RULE 23. 
The Chaplain shall attend at the commencement of each day's sitting 
of the House and open the same with prayer. 



LESS THAN A QUORUM MAY ADJOURN, ETC. 

RULE 24. 

The Speaker, with three members, shall be a sufficient number to 
adjourn; five to move a call of the House and send for absent members. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT, 93 

ABSENTEES. 

RULE 25. 

In all cases where an absent member shall be sent for, and he fail to 
attend in obedience to the summons, the report of the messenger shall 
be entered upon the Journal. 



MESSAGES. 

RULE 26. 

Messages from the Governor and Senate shall always be received, except 
while a question is being put or while the ayes and nays are being taken. 

SITTINGS OF COMMITTEES. 

RULE 27. 

Section 1. No committee shall sit during the sessions of the House 
without special leave. 

Section 2. Any member may excuse himself from serving on any com- 
mittee at the time of his appointment if he then is a member of four other 
committees. 

COMMITTEES MAY RECOMMEND TO PRINT. 

RULE 28. 

When any committee returns a bill with the recommendation that It 
do not pass. If in their judgment the same should be printed, they shall 
report and recommend. 

PRIVILEGES OF THE HOUSE. 

RULE 29. 

No persons, except members of the Senate and other officers, tht 
Governor, ex-Governor, Secretary of State, the Auditor and Treasurer of 
State, Judge of the Supreme and Circuit Courts of the States, Governors and 
ex-Governors, members and ex-members of Congress and of the State and 
Territorial Legislaturees and Constitutional Convention, and of the Judiciary 
of the United States and Chief Executives of the Five Civilized Tribes, 
and all other State Officers, shall be admitted to the floor of the House 
of Representatives during the sitting of the same, without special leave of 
the House, or on invitation of the Speaker. 



DIVISION OF VOTE. 

RULE 30. 

When a division is called for, those in the affirmative shall arise from 
their seats and stand until they are counted aloud by the clerk, and then 
take their seats; those voting in the negative shall rise and stand until they 
are counted as before, and then the Speaker shall state the vote of the House. 



J4 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

HAWKING AND PEDDLING PROHIBITED. 

RULE 31. 

There shall be no hawking or peddling, nor advertising matter distributed 
within the halls of the House. The sergeant- at-arms shall see that this 
rule is strictly enforced. 

HOURS OF MEETING. 

RULE 32. 

Section 1. When the House adjourns it shall be to 1 p. m. of the next 
succeeding day, unless another day and hour be specially named. 

MOTION TO POSTPONE INDEFINITELY. 

Section 2. On motion to postpone indefinitely the mover thereof shall 
speak but once, unless by consent of the House, but the mover, introducer 
or proposer of the bill or resolution so sought to be postponed shall have 
the right to close the debate on said motion. 

MOTION STATED, IN POSSESSION, ETC. 

RULE 33. 

After a motion is stated by the Speaker or read by the clerk it shall 
be deemed to be in possession of the House, but may be withdrawn by 
consent. 

IN WRITING, IF REQUIRED. 

RULE 35. 

Every motion shall be In writing if the Speaker or any member may 
desire it. 

MOTION PUT, ETC. 

RULE 35. 

When a motion is made and seconded it shall be put by the Speaker, or. 
If In writing, it shall be handed to the clerk and by him read aloud 
before debate. 

DIVISION OF QUESTION. 

RULE 36. 

Any member may call for a division of the question when the same 
will admit It. 

SUSPENDED RULES. 

RULE 37. 

A majority of the members present (provided there be a quorum present) 
may suspend the rules. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 95 

NOTICE TO AMEND RULES. 

RULE 38. 

No standing rule or order shall be revised or amended without one 
day's notice being given thereof. 

CALL OF THE HOUSE. 

RULE 39. 

On call of the House the bussiness then pending shall be suspended 
one hour, and the sergeant-at-arms shall be directed by the Speaker to 
compel their attendance, at the end of which time the roll shall again be 
called, the absent members be noted, and the business suspended upon the 
call shall progress: provided, however, that if absent members shall appear 
sooner, the business then pending shall progress before the expiration 
of the hour. 



ORDER OF MOTIONS, 

RULE 40. 

Section 1. When a question under debate, motions shall have 
precedence as per fellowing order: ' 



NOT DEBATABLE. 



To adjourn. 

To take a recess. 

To lay on the table. 

For the previous question. 



DEBATABLE. 

To fix the time to which the House will adjourn. 

To postpone to a day certain. 

To refer. 

To amend. 

To postpone indefinitely. 

Which several motions shall have precedence In the foreging order 
and no motion to postpone to a day certain, to commit or postpone 
Indefinitely, being decided, shall be again allowed on the same day at the 
same stage of the question. 



MOTION TO ADJOURN. 

RULE 41. 

A motion to adjourn shall always be in order when the floor can be 
obtained for that purpose, and shall be decided without debate, provided 
the previous question has not been ordered. When a vote Is being taken a 
motion to adjourn shall not be in order. 



96 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

TO RECONSIDER. 

RULE 42. 

A motion for reconsideration shall be in order at any time, and may 
be moved by any member wlio votes in the majority; but the question 
shall not be taken the same day unless by the unanimous consent; and 
if lost, it shall not be renewed or any vote taken on reconsideration a 
second time, unless by the consent of the House. If the motion to reconsider 
is not made on the same day, one day's notice shall be required to be 
given of the intention to make it. 

FILL BLANK. 
RULE 43. 

In filling out a blank, the longest time and the largest sum shall be 
considered first. 

PREVIOUS QUESTION. 

RULE 44. 

When any debatable question is before the House, any member may 
move the previous question but before it is put it shall be seconded by at 
least five members, whether that question (called the main question) shall 
now be put. If it passes in the affirmative, then the main question is to be 
put immediately, and no member shall debate it further, eitlier add to it 
or alter; provided, that after the previous question shall have been- adopted 
the mover of the main question or the chairman of the committee shall have 
the privilege of closing the debate, and be limited to one-fourth hour. 
Provided, further, when the previous question has been ordered on a 
debatable proposition which has not been debated, fifteen minutes in the 
aggregate shall be allowed the friends and opponents of the proposition each, 
before putting the main question. 

HOW TO READ, ETC. 

RULE 45. 

Upon bills committed to a Committee of the Whole, the bill shall first 
be read in full by the clerk, and then again read and debated by section, 
leaving the preamble to be last considered. 

NOT DEFACE OR INTERLINE 

RULE 46. 

The body of the bill shall not be defaced or interlined, but all amend- 
ments, noting the page and line, shall be entered by the clerk on a 
separate paper and so reported to the House. 

AFTER REPORT, SUBJECT TO DEBATE 

RULE 47. 

After the report of a bill by the Committee of the Whole, or after it 
has been perfected by the House, the same shall not be subject to debate 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 97 

when the question to engross is taken, but on final passage thereof on 
the question, "Shall the bill pass," the whole subject shall be open to debate, 
which shall be limited to thirty minutes on each side unless extended by 
a majority vote of the House, which time shall be divided between the 
members desiring to speak thereon, by the friends and enemies of the 
bill respectively. 

COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE. 

RULE 48. 

The rules of the proceedings of the House shall be observed in Committee 
of the Whole, and in standing and select committees so far as they may be 
applicable in standing and select committee, except limiting the number 
of times speaking and the call of the previous question. 



FIRST READING. 

RULE 49. 

The first reading of a bill shall be in full and unless otherwise ordered 
by the House, it shall be placed on the calendar. 

Upon the second reading of a bill, which may be by title, the Speaker 
shall state it is ready for commitment, amendment or engrossment, and if 
committed to a Committee of the Whole House, the House shall determine 
on that day, or if the House order the bill engrossed, the House may order 
the day when it shall be read a third time, but if on the day of its second 
reading it be not ordered engrossed it shall be placed on the Journal file, 
on the clerk's table, to be taken up in order. If a bill is committed on 
second reading, any member may offer an amendment to the bill, which 
shall be referred to the committee with the bill without debate. 



PRINTING OF BILLS. 

RULE 50. 

All bills returned from the committees with favorable recommendation 
shall be printed; provided, in the judgment of the House, the same should 
be printed. 



JOINT RULES OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES 



JOINT SESSION— HOW CONVENED 

Section 1. When any business shall require a joint session of the Senate 
and House of Representatives, the Senate, preceded by its officers, shall 
be conducted into the bar of the House and there be seated, the President 
of the Senate taking a seat by the side of the Speaker of the House, 
at his right. 



98 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

OFFICERS OF JOINT SESSION. 

Section 2. The Speaker of the House of Representatives shall be the 
presiding officer of tlie joint sessions, and the Secretary of the Senate shall 
be the clerk thereof and call the roll of the Senate, to be announced by 
the President of the Senate. The Clerk of the House shall call the roll of 
the House, which shall be announced by the Speaker of the House. Both 
the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House shall keep a record 
of the proceedings, to be enterd on the Journal of their respective houses. 

MANNER OF PRESENTING BILLS, ETC. 

Section 9. All bills, resolutions, votes and amendments by either house, 
to which the concurrence of both is necessady, as well as messages, shall 
be presented to the other by the Clerk or Secretary of the house from 
which they are sent, or by the Assistant Secretary or Assistant Clerk, 
or by messengers. 

REVENUE BILLS ORIGINATE IN HOUSE 

All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Repre- 
sntatives. The Senate may propose amendments to revenue bills. No 
revenue bill shall be passed during the last five days of the session. 

CONTENTS OF BILLS 

Section 4. Every Act of the Legislature shall embrace but one subject 
which shall be clearly expressed in its title, except general appropriation 
bills, general revenue bills and bills adopting a code, digest, or revision of 
statutes, and no law shall be revived, amended, or the provisions thereof 
extended or conferred, by reference to its title only; but so much thereof 
as is revived, amended, extended, or conferred shall be re-enacted and 
published at length: Provided, that if any subject be embraced in any Act 
contrary to the provisions of this section, such act shall be void only as 
to so much of the law as may not be expressed in the title thereof. 

ENGROSSMENT OF BILLS 

Section 5. All bills, memorials or resolutions ordered to be engrossed, 
shall be engrossed by the Clerk of the House in which it originated. 

NOTICE OF REJECTION. 

Section 6. "When a bill or resolution which has passed one house shall 
bo rejected by the other, notice thereof shall be given to the house in 
which the same shall have passed. 



ENROLLMENT OF BILLS. 

Section 7. All bills must be enrolled and reported to each house by the 
Enrolling Committee within three days after their passage; Provided, that 
if the reconsideration of any bill is moved in either House, previous to 
its presentation to the Governor, the Enrolling Committee shall hold the 
same until action is had upon such motion. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 99 

MANNER OF ENROLLMENT 

Section 8. No bills, resolution, or memorial shall be sent to the 
Governor for his approval, unless the same shall have been clearly and 
fairly enrolled without obliteration or interlineation. 

EXAMINATION OF ENROLLED BILLS 

Sectino 9. When a bill is enrolled, it shall be examined by a Joint 
Committee, composed of three members of each house, appointed as a 
Standing Committee, for that purpose, and it shall be their duty to compare 
the enrolled bills, correct any errors they may discover and report the same 
forthwith to their respective houses. 

SIGNING OF BILLS. 

Section 10. The presiding officers of each house shall, in the presence 
of the house over which he presides, sign all bills and joint resolutions 
passed by the Legislature, immediately after the same shall have been 
publicly read at length, and the fact of reading and signing shall be entered 
upon the Journal, but the reading at lengtli may be dispensed with by a 
two-thirds vote of a quorum present, which vote, by yeas and nays shall 
also be entered upon the Journal. (Art. 5, Sec. 36, Constitution). 

TRANSMITTING BILLS TO THE GOVERNOR 

Section 11. When a bill has been signed by the Speaker of the House 
of Representatives and President of the Senate It shall be delivered to the 
Governor by the Joint Committee on Enrolled Bills, who, through their 
Chairman or some member of the committee, shall report to the house in 
which the bill or resolution originated, the day on which the same was 
delivered, and the report shall be entered upon the Journal of such house 

BILLS PASSED BY OTHER HOUSE 

Section 12. Tuesday and Friday in each week are hereby set apart 
in each house for the special and exclusive consideration of bills and 
resolution which may have been passed by the other house, and the 
consideration of such bills and resolutions shall take precedence over 
all other business on these days, immediately after the expiration of one 
hour after the house shall be called to order by the presiding officer; 
provided, that the reading of the Journal shall be completed in any event. 

PRINTING BILLS. 

When any report, bill, or resolution shall be ordered printed by either 
house, without stating the number, two hundred and fifty copies shall be 
printed for the use of both houses, but when any bill or resolution whlr;h 
may have passed one house is ordered printed by the other, a greater 
number of copies shall not be printed than two hundred and fifty. 

CONFERENCE COMMITTEES 

Section 13. Whenever either house shall amend a measure, an 1 the 
other house shall refuse to concur in and adopt the amendment, the house 



100 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

which has adopted such an amendment shall then insist on or recede froma 
the same. In case a motion to insist on the amendment be decided in 
the negative, such action shall be deemed a receding from the amendment, 
and so ente'red on the Journal of each house. In case the amendment is. 
insisted upon, the house so insisting shall request a committee of conference 
on the subject of disagreement and shall appoint a committee of conference 
The other house shall thereupon appoint such committee. Unless another 
number is specified in said request, such committee shall consist of three 
members from the House and three from the Senate. They shall meet 
at a convenient time, to be agreed upon by their Chairman, and, having 
conferred freely, each shall report to its respective house the result of 
this conference. In case of agreement, the report shall be first made, 
with the papers referred accompanying it, to the house which refused to 
concur, and there acted upon; and such action shall be immediately reported 
by the Secretary or Clerk to the other House, the papers referred accompany- 
ing the message. In case of disagreement of Conference Committee, the 
papers shall remain with the house which insisted on the amendment. 
The agreeing report of a Conference Committee shall be made, read, and 
signed, in duplicate, by all memlier of the committee, or by a majority of 
those of each house. Should either house disagree to the report of the 
Committee, such house shall appoint a second committee and request a 
further conference, which shall be acceded to by the other house before 
adhering. The motion for a Committee of Conference and the report of such 
Committee shall be in order at any time. Wben both houses shall have 
adherred to their disagreement, a bill or resolution is lost. 



JOINT COMMITTEE ON ENROLLED BILLS. 

Section 15. There shall be appointed a Joint Committee on Enrolled 
Bills, to be composed of three Senators and four Representatives. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF MESSAGE. 

Section 16. When the Secretary of the Senate or Clerk of the House 
or either of the Assistants, shall wait upon the other house, notice thereof 
shall be given to the President or Speaker by the Sergeant-at-Arms, or 
Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms, who shall declare the same, and a copy of the 
message be laid on the table of the Clerk or Secretary. 



DISPENSING WITH RULES. 

Section 17. No joint rule shall be dispensed with, except by a majority 
vote of the membership of each house, and if either house shall violate- 
a joint rule, the question of order may be raised in the other house, and 
decided in the same manner as in case of violation of the rules of such 
House. 

APPROPRIATION BILLS PRIVILEGED. 

Section 18. The general appropriation bill and bills for the support of 
the charitable institutions of the State shall be privileged bills advanced 
upon the calendar and take precedence over all other bills at any time 
after the reading of the Journal. It shall be in order, by the direction of 
the appropriation committee, to move that the House or Senate, as the 
case may be, resolve itself into the committee of the Whole House for 
the purpose of considering the general appropriation bill, or bills for the 
support of charitable institutions of the State, and no dilatory motion will 
be entertained by the presiding officer. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 101 

AMENDMENTS TO BILLS. 

Section 14. Bills or resolutions under consideration must not be inter- 
lined or defaced, but all amendments offered must be written upon a sep- 
arate sheet of paper showing whether House or Senate Bill; the number and 
■section; line and page, word, where the amendment begins shall be particu- 
larly noted, also the part stricken out, if any, and tlie line, section or 
parts of section shall then be written as it would appear if amended. A 
type-written copy of each amendment shall be numbered in its order by 
the Secretary and the same attached to the original bill and transmitted 
to the other house. 

Your committee recommends that the Joint Rules of the House and 
Senate be printed in one leather bound volume together witli the rules 
of the House and the rules of the Senate and a roster of the House and 
■Senate members, giving full name of each Senator and Representative, 
the county or district he represents, his age, politics, occupation and 
nativity. We further recommend that the name of each House and Senate 
employee, his position, and postoffice address be printed in this volume. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. ROY WILLIAMS. 

Chairman House Committee. 
A. F. VANDEVENTER, 

Chairman Senate Committee. 



STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES. 



THE COMMENCEMENT OF DAILY SESSIONS. 

RULE 1. 

a) The Presiding Officer having taken the chair, and a quorum being 
present, the Journal of the preceding day shall be read, and any mistakes 
in the entries correctetd. When any motion shall be made to correct the 
same, it shall be deemed a privileged question, and shall be proceeded with 
until disposed of. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sees. 6, 49. 

(b) A quorum shall consist of a majority of the members elected to 
and constituting the Senate. 

— Jefferson's Manual Sec. 6. 



JOURNAL. 

RULE 2. 

(a) The proceedings of the Senate shall be briefly and accurately 
■stated in the Journal. Messages of the Governor, Senate Resolutions, 
■Concurrent Resolutions, and Memorials of the Legislature, in full; titles 
of bills and resolutions, and such parts as shall be affected by proposed 
amendments; every vote, and a brief statement of the contents of each 
petition or paper presented to the Senate, shall be entered with the name 
of the Senator offering the same. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 49. 



102 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

(b) The Legislative, Executive, and Confidential Legislative Proceedings, 
and the Proceeding when sitting as a Court of Impeachment, shall be 
recorded in a separate book. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 49. 



PRESIDENT'S PRIVILEGE. 

RULE 3. 

The President, or President Pro Tempore, shall have the right to name 
a Senator to perform the duties of the Chair, but such substitute shall 
not extend beyond the day; Provided, that in the event no such substitu- 
tion shall have been made, the Secretary of the Senate shall call the 
Senate to order, and before roll call, the Senate shall elect a member to 
serve as acting President during the day. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 9. 



ATTENDANCE OF MEMBERS. 

RULE 4. 

(a) No Senator shall absent himself from the Senate without leave. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 6. 

(b) If, at any time during the daily sessions of the Senate, a question 
shall be raised by any Senator as to the presence of a quorum, the Pre- 
siding Officer shall forthwith direct the Secretary to call the roll and 
announce the result, and these proceedings shall be without debate. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 7. 

c) Whenever upon such roll call it shall be ascertained that a quorum 
is not present, a majority of the Senators present may direct the Sergeant- 
at-Arms to request and when necessary, to compel the attendance of 
the absent Senators, which order shall be determined without debate; and 
pending its execution, and until a quorum shall be present, no debate 
nor motion, except to adjourn shall be in order. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sees. 7, 8. 
(d) The Senate shall, by majority vote of the members present, have 
the authority to compel the attendance of absentees and require their 
presence in the Senate Chamber, and while the absentees are being notified 
to attend, the Senate shall have power to proceed with business the same 
as at other times. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

If, upon calling of the roll, there be a quorum present, business shalJ 
be proceeded with in the following order: 

(a) Prayer by Chaplain. 

(b) Reading of the Journal. 

(c) Reports of Sanding Committees. 

(d) Resolutions and Notices. 

(e) Petitions and Memorials. 

(f) Reports of Select Committees. 

(g) Introduction of bills. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 103 

(h) Bjlls on second reading. 

(i) Bills on third reading. 

(j) Bills and Resolutions from the House of Representatives. 

(k) Unfinished business. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 15. 



SPECIAL ORDERS. 

RULE 6. 

(a) Any subject may, by a two- thirds vote of the Senators present, 
be made a special order; and when the time fixed for its consideration 
arrives the Presiding Officer shall lay it before the Senate, and if it is not 
finally disposed of on that day, it shall take its place on the Calendar 
under the had of Special Orders in the order of time at which it was made 
special, unless it shall become by adjournment the unfinished business. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sees. 18, 33. 

(b) When two or more special orders have been made for the same 
time, they shall have precedence according to the order in which they 
were severally assigned, and that order shall only be changed by order 
of the Senate. All motions to change such order, or to proceed to the 
consideration of other business shall be decided without debate. 



OBJECTION TO READING A PAPER, 

RULE 7. 

When the reading of a paper is called for, and the same is objected to by 
any Senator, it shall be determined by a vote of the Senate, without debate. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 32. 

DEBATE. 

RULE 8. 

(a) When a Senator desires to speak, he shall rise in his place and 
address the Presiding Officer, and shall not proceed until he is recog- 
nized, and the Presiding Officer shall recognize the Senator who shall first 
address him. No Senator shall interrupt another Senator in debate without 
his consent, and to obtain such consent he shall first address the Presiding 
Officer; and no Senator shall speak more than once upon any one question 
in debate until every Senator desiring to speak shall be heard, nor more 
than twice upon any subject, without leave of the Senate, except a motion 
to amend or substitute be made, and then he may speak once to such 
amendment or substitute. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sees. 17, 39. 

(b) No Senator in debate shall directly or indirectly, by any form of 
words impute to another Senator or to other Senators any conduct or 
motive unworthy or unbecoming a Senator. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 17. 

(c) If any Senator, in speaking or otherwise, transgress the rules of 
the Senate, the Presiding Officer shall, or any Senator may, call him to 
order; and when a Senator shall be called to order he shall sit down^ 
and shall not proceed except in order. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec 17. 



104 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK . 

(d) If a Senator be called to order for words spoken" in debate, upon 
the demand of the Senator or of any other Senator, the exceptional 
words shall be taken down in writing, and read at the table for the 
information of the Senate. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec 17. 



VOTING. 

RULE 9. 

(a) Kvery Senator shall vote when his name is called. No explanation 
of vote shall be permitted during roll call or after the vote has been cast, 
except briefly in writing. 

(b) When the yeas and nays are ordered, the names of Senators 
shall be called alphabetically; and each Senator shall, without debate, 
declare his assent or dissent to the question, unless excused by the Senate; 
and no Senator shall be permitted to vote after the decision shall have 
been announced by the presiding officer, but may, for sufficient reasons, 
with unanimous consent, change or withdraw his vote. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 41. 

(c) When a Senator declines to vote on call of his name, he shall be 
required to assign his reasons therefor, and having assigned them, the 
Presiding Officer shall submit the question to the Senate: "Shall the 
Senator, for the reasons assigned by him, be excused from voting?" which 
shall be decided Without debate; and these proceedings shall be had after 
the roll call and before the result is announced; and any further proceed- 
ings in reference thereto shall be after such announcement. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sees. 17, 41. 



RECONSIDERATION. 

Rule 10. 

(a) A motion to reconsider any vote musa be made on the same day 
on which the vote proposed to be reconsidered was taken, or on the leg- 
islative day next succeeding, and by a Senator who voted in the majority, 
except to reconsider a vote on the final passage of a proposed bill or reso- 
lution, which shall be privileged to any Senator. Such motion may be 
naade under any order of business in which the vote proposed to be re- 
considered occurred. When a motion for reconsideration" is decided, that 
decision shall not be reconsidered; and no question shall be twice recon- 
sidered upon any of the following motions: 

(1) To adjourn, 

(2) Lay on the table, 

(3) To take from the table, or 

(4) Previous question. 

(b) Every motion to reconsider shall be decided by a majority vote, 
and may be laid on the table without affecting the question in reference 
to which the same is made, which shall be a final disposition of the mo- 
tion; Provided, that a motion to reconsider the final vote upon a Bill or 
Joint Resolution passed shall be decided by a majority of the total member- 
ship elected to and constituting the Senate. If the Senate refuse to recon- 
sider, or if upon reconsideration, shall affirm the first decision, no further 
consideration shair be in order, except by unanimous consent. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 43. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 105 

(c) When a bill, resolution, report, amendment, order, or message, 
upon which a vote has been taken, shall have gone out of the possession 
of the Senate and been communicated to the House of Representatives, 
the motion to reconsider shall be accompanied by a motion to request 
the House to return the same; which last motion shall be acted upon 
immediately, and without debate, and if determined in the negative shall 
be a final disposition of the motian to reconsider. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 43. 



SECOND READING. 

RULE 11. 

(a) After a measure has been considered in committee of the whole 
and the report thereon adopted, the next proceeding shall be by motion 
to advance said measure to engrossment and third reading; and while 
said motion is pending it shall be in order, except by unanimous consent, 
to consider only such amendments as were proposed in committee of the 
whole where notice in writing was given in committee that such amend- 
ments would be offered in the Senate. 

(b) When a bill is read a second time it shall be referred to a com- 
naittee unless otherwise offered by the Senate. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 25. 



THIRD READING. 

RULE 12. 

When a bill or resolution is read the third time, the question shall be, 
""Shall the Bill pass?" and it shall not be in order to propose amendments. 

NOTICE TO RE-COMMIT. 

RULE 13. 

A motion may be made during the reading of any proposed bill, to 
re-commit it, with instructions, but the instructions shall be in writing, 
and such motion shall not be debatable. 

BILLS REFERRED. 

RULE 14. 

AH bills referred shall go to their appropriate committees and shall be 
reported back to the Senate within ten days, and may be re-committed at 
any time before the final passage. 

TITLE OF BILL. 

RULE 15. 

After a bill has been passed, the Presiding Officer shall put the ques- 
tion, "Shall the title of 'the bill remain the title of the act?" The title, 
by amendment, may then be made to conform to the body of the bill. 

— Jefferson's Manual. Sec. 42. 



106 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

RESOLUTIONS. 

RULE 16. 

Except by unanimous consent the following classes of resolutions shall 
lie over for one day for consideration, after which they may be called up 
under the appropriate order of business: 

Resolutions containing calls for information from any of the Executive, 
or Judicial Departments, or from Tribal, or County Officers, or from any 
corporate body or persons. 

Resolutions giving rise to debate except such as relate to the dis- 
position of business immediately before the Senate, to the business of the 
day on which they may be offered, or to adjournment or recess, shall be 
referred to committees unless otherwise ordered. 

MOTIONS TO TABLE AMENDMENTS. 

RULE 17. 

When an amendment proposed to any pending measure is laid on the 
table, it shall not carry with it, or prejudice such measure. 



AMENDMENTS— DIVISION OF A QUESTION. 

RULE 18. 

If the question in debate contains several propositions, any Senator 
may have the same divided, except a motion to strike out and insert, 
which shall not be divided; but the rejection of a motion to strike out 
and insert a different proposition; nor shall it prevent a motion simply to 
strike out; nor shall the rejection of a motion to strike out and insert, 
but pending a motion to strike out and insert, the part to be stricken out 
and the part to be inserted shall each be regarded for the purpose of 
amendment as a question; and motions to 'amend the part to be stricken 
out shall have precedence. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sees. 25, 26. 

MANNER OF DIVIDING THE HOUSE. 

RULE 19. 

When a division is called for, those voting in the affirmative shall rise 
in their seats, and remain standing until counted aloud by the Secretary. 
Then those voting in the negative shall rise and stand until they are 
counted as before, when the President shall announce the result. 

PRESERVATION OF ORDAR. 

RULE 20. 

It shall be the duty of the President to preserve order, prevent per- 
sonal reflections, confine members in debate to the question; anU he shall 
have the privilege to rise and speak in explanation of any question of order. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES. 

RULE 21. 

The President shall appoint all temporary committees, except those 
otherwise fuled by the Senate. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 107 

MOTIONS. 
RULE 22. 

(a) Every motion shall be redured to writing, if desired by the 
Presiding Officer, or by any Senator, and shall be read before the same 
is debated. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 20. 

(b) Any motion may be withdrawn by the member making it, before 
amendment, postponement, or order to lie on the table, or the ordering 
of the yeas and nays. 

PRECEDENCE OF MOTIONS. 
RULE 23. 

(a) ■ To adjourn. 

(b) To adjourn to a day certain, or that when the Senate adjourns 
it shall be to a day certain. 

(c) To take recess. 

(d) To proceed to the consideration of executive business. 

(e) To lay on the table. 

(f) To postpone indefinitely. 

(g) To postpone to a day certain, 
(h) To commit. 

(i) To amend. 

Which several motions shall have precedence as they stand arranged; 
and the motions relating to adjournment, to take recess, to proceed to the 
consideration of executive business, to lay on the table, shall be decided 
without debate. 

—Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 33. 

CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEES. 

RULE 24. 

The first person named on any committee shall be chairman thereof, 
unless otherwise ordered by the committee, and the Secretary shall deliver 
all papers referred to any committee to the Chairman; Provided, that if 
the Chairman be sick, or absent, the next person named on the committes 
shall act as Chairman Pro Tempore. 

WHEN COMMITTEES SHALL MEET. 

RULE 25. 

No committee shall sit during the session of the Senate, without leave, 
except the Committee on Engrossing and Enrollment, and the Committee 
on Rules and Procedure, and they have leave to sit and report at any 
time. 

CONFERENCE REPORT. I 

RULE 26. 

The presentation of reports of Committees of Conference shall always 
be in order, except when the Journal is being read, or the roll is being 
called, and there shall accompany every such report a detailed statement. 



108 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

sufficiently explicit to inform the Senate what effect such amendments or 
propositions will have upon the measures to which they relate. 



COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE. 

RULE 27. 

In forming committees of the whole, the President shall leave the Chair 
and appoint a Senator to preside, subject to the right of the Senate to select 
its own Cnairman. 

BILLS CONSIDERED BY COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE. 

RULE 28. 

All bills shall be considered in Committee of the Whole, except on sus- 
pension of the rules; and debate shall be unlimited in the conamittee, 
-unless otherwise ordered by the Senate. 
I 

RULES IN COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE. 

RULE 29. 

The Rules of the Senate shall be observed in Committee of the Whole 
so far as they may be applicable, but the following Special Rules shall be 
observed: 

(a) The bill shall first be read at length unless otherwise ordered, 
and then read and considered by sections. 

(b) No proceedings in committee shall be entered in the Journal of the 
Senate. 

(e) The previous question and motion to lay on table cannot be put 
in committee. 

(d) The committee cannot adjourn, but if their business is finished, 
they rise on a question. 

(e) When the Senate is resuined, the Chairman of the committee re- 
ports. 

(f) Bills under consideration in Committee of the Whole must not 
be interlined or defaced, but all amendments offered shall be duly entered 
upon a separate piece of paper by the Scretary, noting the line and page 
amended and so report to the Senate. 

(g) The committee cannot change the title of a bill. 

(b) If a message is announced during a committee the President 
must take the Chair and receive it. 

Jefferson's Manual, Page 194. 

PRIVILEGES OF THE SENATE. 

RULE 30. 

No person except members of the Senate, and its Officers, the Governor, 
and ex-Governors of the State and Territory, all State Officers, members 
of the U. S. Senate and Congress, and of the State and Territorial Legis- 
lature, and Constitutional Convention, and the President and Judiciary 
of the United States, and Chief Executives of the Five Civilized Tribes, 
shall be admitted to the floor of the Senate during the sitting of the same 
without special leave of the Senate, or on invitation of a Senator. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 109^ 

DECORUM OF MEMBERS. 

RULE 36. 

No Senator shall walk out, or across the Senate Chamber when the 
President is stating a question, or addressing the Senate, nor when a 
member is speaking, pass between him and the President.. 

MANNER OF PUTTING QUESTION. 

RULE 32. ( 

The President shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 
All questions shall be put in this form, to-wit: As many as are in favor 
(as the question may be), say "aye"; as many as are opposed say "no" except 
when the yeas and nays are ordered, then the question shall be put thus: 
As many as are in favor (as the quetsion may be), will answer aye, as your 
names are called; as many as are opposed will say no. When a motion, 
or amendment to strike out a part of the pending measure, the question 
shall be directly upon the motion or amendment; and shall be put: "Shalli 
the motion (to strike out) prevail." 

PREVIOUS QUESTIONS. 
RULE 33. 

(a) There shall be a motion for the previous question, which shall 
be stated in these words, to-wit: "Shall the main question be now put?" 
which being ordered by a majority of the members voting, if a quorum, 
be present, shall have the effect to cut off all debate and bring the House 
to a direct vote upon the immediate question, or questions, on which it has 
been asked and ordered. The previous question may be asked and ordered 
upon a single motion, a series of motions allowable under the rules, or an 
amendment, or amendments, and include the bill to its passage or rejection. 
It shall be in order, pending the inotion for or, after the previous question, 
for the President to entertain and submit a motion to commit, with 
or witliout instruction*, to a standing or select committee. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 34. 

(b) If the previous question is carried, the original mover of the 
main question, or if the bill or resolution originated in the other house, then 
the Chairman of the committee reporting the same shall have the right to 
close the debate, and be limited to fifteen minutes; and should the previous 
question be ordered on a subject debatable, before the same has been de- 
bated, the friends and opponents of the measure shall have thirty minutes 
on either side in which to debate the question, if desired. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 34 

QUESTION OF ORDER. 

RULE 34. 

A question of order may be raised at any stage of the proceedings, 
except when the Senate is dividing, and, unless submitted to the Senate, 
shall be decided by the Presiding Officer without debate, subject to an ap- 
peal to the Senate. Wlien an appeal is taken, any subsequent question of 
order which may arise before the decision of such appeal shall be decided 
by the Presiding Officer without debate; and any appeal may be laid on 



no OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

the table without prejudice to the pending proposition, and thereupon shall 
be held as affirming the decision of the Presiding Officer. 

— Jefferson's Manual, Sec. 33. 



QUESTIONS OF PRIVILEGE. 

RULE 35. 

Questions of privilege shall be: First, those affecting the rights of the 
House collectively, its safety, dignity and the integrity of its proceedings; 
Second, the rights, reputation and conduct of members individually, in 
their representative capacity only; and shall have precedence of all other 
questions, except motions to adjourn. 



INTERRUPTIONS. 

RULH 36. 

A question regularly before the Senate can be interrupted only by 
call for the previous question, for amendment, postponement, commitment, 
to lay on the table, or adjournment. ■ 



FILLING OF BLANKS. 

" RULE 37. 

On filling up blanks, the question shall first be taken on the largest 
sum, greatest number and most distant day. 

DISPENSING WITH RULES. 

RULE 38. 

Any amendment to tlie rules, or any new rule before adoption, shall 
require the affirmative vote of a majority of all members elected to and 
constituting the Senate. 

JEFFERSON'S MANUAL. 

RULE 39. 

All rules laid down in Jeffersons' Manual, as construed and practiced 
by the United States, are hereby declared to be the governing Rules of the 
Senate, except wherein they conflict with the rules herein adopted. 

ADJOURNMENT. 
RULE 40. 

(a) A motion to adjourn shall always be in order, except when the 
motion shall have been the last motion voted on, and no business trans- 
acted, or on call for the previous question, the main question shall have been 
ordered to be now put, or when a member has the floor, and shall be 
decided without debate. 

(b) When the Senate adjourns, it shall be to 1:30 p. m. on the next 
succeeding day, unless another day and hour shall be specially named. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 111 

STANDING ORDERS, ETC. 

OFFICERS OF THE SENATE. 

RULE 1. 

The officers of the Senate shall be: 
The President. 

The President Pro Tempore. 
The Secretary. 
The Reading Clerk. 
The Journal Clerk. 

The Chief Enrolling- and Engrossing Clerk. 
The Messenger to the Senate. 
The Sergeant-at-Arms.- 
The Reporter. 
The Chaplain. 

All otner persons in the service of the Senate or of its officrs shall be 
designated as employees. 

ENDORSING OF PAPERS. 

RULE 2. 

Every Senator presenting a paper shall endorse the same; if a petition, 
with a concise statement of its subject and his name; if a notice or resolu- 
tion, with a brief title thereof and his name; if a Joint resolution or bill, 
with a statement of its title and his name; and if taken from the Statutes 
or Constitution of any other state, a reference thereto; if a matter of 
any other kind for the consideration of the Senate, with a statement and 
its subject, the proposer's name and the reference desired. 

CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS, ARTICLE 5. 

RULE 3. 

PERSONAL OR PRIVATE INTERESTS 

(a) A member of the Legislature who has a personal interest in any 
measure or bill proposed or pending before the Legislature shall disclose 
the fact to the House of which he is a member, and shall not vote thereon. 
(Art. V, Sec. 24.) 

ELECTION OF COMMITTEES 

(b) The Senate shall at the beginning of each regular session, and at 
such other times as may be necessary, elect one of its members President 
Pro Tempore, who shall preside over its deliberations in the absence or 
place of the Lieutenant-Governor; and the Senate shall provide for all 
its standing committees, and by a majority vote elect the members thereof. 
(Art. V, Sec. 98.) 

ELECTION RETURNS AND QUORUM 

(c) Each House shall be the judge of the elections, returns and quali- 
fications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute a 



112. OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to 
day, and may be authorized to compel the attendanee of absent members 
in such manner and under such penalty as each House may provide. (Art. 
V, Sec. 30.) 

(d) Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish 
its members for disorderly behavior, and with the concurrence of two- 
thirds, expel a member. 

Each House shall keep a Journal of its proceedings, and from time 
to time publish same. The yeas and nays of the members of either 
House on any question, at the desire of one-fifteenth of those present 
shall be entered upon its Journal. 

Neither House, during the session of the Legislature, shall, without 
the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any 
other place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting. 

In all elections made by the Legislature, except for officers and employes 
thereof, the members shall vote "yea" and "nay," and each vote shall be 
entered upon the Journal. (Art. V, Sec. 31.) 



SPECIAL OR LOCAL LAWS. 

(e) No special or local law shall be considered by the Legislature 
until notice of the intended introduction of such bill or bills shall first have 
been published for four consecutive weeks in some weekly newspaper 
published or of general circulation in the city or county affected by such 
law, stating in substance the counties thereof, and verified proof of such 
publication filed with the Secretary of State. (Art. V, Sec. 32.) 

REVENUE BILLS. 

(g) All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of 
Representatives. The Senate may propose amendments to revenue bills. 
No revenue bill shall be passed during the last five days of the session. 
(Art. V, Sec. 33.) 

READING OF BILLS. 

(g) Every bill shall be read on three different days in each House, 
and no bill shall become a law unless on its final passage it be read at 
length, and no law shall be passed unless upon a vote of a majority of all 
the members elected to each House, in favor of such law; and the question 
upon final passage shall be taken upon its last reading, and the yeas and 
nays shall be entered upon the Journal. (Art. V, Sec. 34.) 

SIGNING OF BILLS. 

(h) The Presiding Officer of each House shall, in the presence of 
the House over which he presides, sign all bills and joint resolutions 
passed by the Legislature, immediately after the same shall have been 
publicly read at length, and the fact of reading and signing shall be 
entered upon the Journal, but the reading at length may be dispensed 
with by a two- thirds vote of a quorum present, which vote, by yeas and 
nays, shall also be entered upon the Journal. (Art. V, Sec. 35) 

CONTEMPT PROCEEDINGS. 

(i) In any Legislative investigation, either House of the Legislature, 
or any committee thereof duly authorized by the House creating the same, 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 113 

shall have power to punish as for contempt, disobedience or process, or 
contumacious or disorderly conduct, and this provision shall also apply 
to joint sessions of the Legislature, and also to joint committees thereof, 
when authorized by joint resolution of both Houses. (Art. V, Sec. 42.) 

APPROPRIATION AND SALARY OF OFFICERS. 

(j) The general appropriation bill shall embrace nothing but the 
appropriations for the expenses of the Executive, Legislative and Judicial 
Departments of the State, and for interest on the public debt. The salary 
of no officer or employe of the State, or any subdivision thereof, shall be 
increased in such bill, nor shall any appropriation be made therein for any 
such officer or employe, unless his employment and the amount of his 
salary shqll have been already provided for by law. All other appro- 
priations shall be made by separate bills, each embracing but one subject. 
(Art. V, Sec. 56.) 

BILLS EMBRACING BUT ONE SUBJECT 

(k) Every Act of the Legislature shall embrace but one subject, which 
shall be clearly expressed in its title, except general appropriation bills, 
general revenue bills, and bills adopting a code, digest, or revision of 
iBtatutes; and no law shall be revived or amended, or the provisions 
thereof extended or conferred by reference to its title only; but so much 
thereof as is revived, amended, extended or conferred, shall be re-enacted 
and published at length; Provided, that if any subject be embraced In 
any Act contrary to the provisions of this Section, such Act shall be void 
only as to so much of tlie law as may not be expressed In the title thereof. 
(Art. V, Sec. 57.) 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

RULE 4. 

The following standing committees shall be elected by the Senate, and 
no additions shall be made to any committee, except when two-thirds of 
the Senate agree thereto: 

(1) A Committee on Rules and Procedure, to consist of six members. 

(2) A Legal Advisory Committee, to consist of seven members. 

(3) Two Judiciary Committees, Nos. 1 and 2, each consisting of seven 
members. 

(4) A Committee on Code Revision, consisting of seven members. 

(5) A Committee on Appropriations, consisting of eleven members. 

(6) A Committee on Revenue and Taxation, consisting of seven members. 

(7) A Committee on Privileges and Elections, consisting of nine 
members. 

(8) A Committee on Publice Service Corporations, consisting of seven 
members. 

(9) A Committee on Private Corporations, consisting of five members. 

(10) A Committee on Municipal Corporations, consisting of seven 
members. 

(11) A Committee on Roads and Highways, consisting of nine members. 

(12) A Committee on Fees and Salaries, consisting of seven members. 

(13) A Committee on Education, consisting of seven members. 

(14) A Committee on Commerce and Labor, consisting of seven members. 

(15) A Committee on Agriculture, Quarantine and Animal Industry, 
consisting of nine members. 

Sig. 10. 



114 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

(16) A Committee on Banks and Banking, consisting of seven members. 

(17) A Committee on Insurance, consisting of seven members. 

(18) A Committee on Public Buildings and Capitol, consisting of nine 
members. 

(19) A Committee on School Lands, consisting of nine members. 

(20) A Committee on Oil, Gas and Mineral Lands, consisting of seven 
members. 

(21) A Committee on Mines and Manufacturing, consisting of seven 
members. 

(22) A Committee on Senate and Legislative Affairs, consisting of 
five members. 

(23) A Committee on State and County Affairs, consisting of seven 
members. 

(24) A Committee on Federal Relations, consisting of seven members. 

(25) A Committee on Indian Affairs, consisting of five members. 

(26) A Committee on Hospitals and Charities, consisting of seven 
members. 

(27) A Committee on Penal Institutions, consisting of seven members. 

(28) A Committee on Public Printing, consisting of seven members. 

(29) A Committee on Public Health, consisting of seven members. 

(30) A Committee on Drugs and Pure Food consisting of seven members. 

(31) A Committee on Fish and Game, consisting of seven members. 

(32) A Committee on Military Affairs, consisting of five members. 

(33) A Committee on Enrolled and Engrossed Bills, consisting of three 
members. 

(34) A Committee on Prohibition Enforcement, consisting of five 
m.embers. 

(35) A Committee on Legislative and Judicial Apportionment, consist- 
ing of fifteen members. 

(36) A Committee on Congressional Apportionment, consisting of fifteen 
members. 

INTRODUCING BILLS. 

RUT.E 5. 

One original and three copies of every bill introduced shall be sent 
to the Secretary's desk. 

CXECUTIVE BUSINESS— PROCEEDINGS ON NOMINATIONS. 

RULE 6. 

When nominations shall be made by the Governor to the Senate, they 
shall be laid upon the President's table until such time as the Senate may 
go Into executive session, when the President shall lay the same before the 
Senate. The final question on every nomination shall be: "Will the Senate 
advise and consent to this nomination?" Which question shall not be put 
on the same day on which the nomination is received, unless, by unanimous 
consent, nominations may be referred to a committee. 

EXECUTIVE PROCEEDINGS FURNISHED TO THE GOVERNOR. 

RULE 7. 

Nominations approved, or definitely acted upon by the Senate, shall not 
be returned by the Secretary of the Senate to the Governor until after the 
next executive session, or while a motion to reconsider is pending, unless 
otherwise ordered by the Senate. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 115 

SECRECY OF REMARKS ON NOMINATION, 

RULE 8. 

All information, or remarks concerning the character or qualification of 
any person nominated by the Governor to office shall be kept secret by the 
Senators and Officers, but the result of the vote on confirmation, or rejection, 
of every nomination shall be published in the Journal of the Senate. 

PENALTIES FOR VIOLATING THE CONFIDENCE OF THE SENATE. 

RULE 9. 

Any Senator or Officer of the Senate, who shall disclose the secret or 
confidential business proceedings of the Senate, shall be liable, if a Senator, 
to suffer expulsion from the Senate, or punishment for contempt. 

LOBBYING. 

RULE 10. 

Lobbying under certain conditions is prohibited by law. Section 4212, Page 
993, Snyder's Statutes, 1909. 

COMMITTEE ON PRINTING. 

RULE 11. 

All Bills, Calendars, Orders, Stationery and Resolutions ordered printed 
shall be in charge and under control of the Committee on Public Printin- 
regardless of former reference, and printing under its direction Said ConT' 
mittee shall examine and ascertain whether the prices charged for printin- 
and the quantity and quality furnished are in conformity with the contract" 
or orders of the Senate, and to audit and approve all printing accounts and 
see that proper vouchers exist for the same. • 

DUTIES OF COMMITTEES ON SENATE AND LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS. 

RULE 12. 

It shall be the duty of the Committee on Senate and Legislative Affairs 
to purchase all supplies for the use of the Senate, and to have general super- 
vision of the care and sanitation of the Senate Chamber and Committee 
Rooms, and to audit, examine and pass upon the Senate accounts and 
expenses, and shall appoint from its members a sub-committee of three 
for the special purpose of auditing, passing upon, and examining Senate 
accounts and expenses. 

DUTIES OF SERGEANT. AT-ARMS. 

RULE 13. 

The Sergeant-at-Arms shall, under direction of the Committee on Senate 
and Legislative Affairs, have charge of all property of the Senate and receive 
from the printer all matters printed for the use of the Senate, and keep a 



116 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

record of the time of the reception of each document and the number of 
copies received, and cause a copy to be placed on the desk of each member 
under orders of the Senate. He shall serve all processes and shall enforce 
the rules of the Senate subject to the direction of the President. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEES. 

RULE 14. 

A report of a committee must be endorsed with the statement of such 
report, together with the name of the committee making the same, and 
shall be signed by the Chairman or ranking member participating in 
such decision or concurring in such report. A report by the minority 
of any committee shall be signed by the members submitting the same. 

PRIVILEGE OF MEMBERS. 

RULE 15. 

No person, except Senators, officers or designated employees, shall be 
permitted within the desk of the Secretary or of other custodians of public 
documents, files, or papers, or of the room set apart for such use; and no 
Senator or other person shall visit or remain by the Secretary's table while 
the yeas and nays are being taken, except officers and designated employees 
in the official discharge of their duties. 

POWERS OF THE PRESIDENT. 

RULE 16. 

The President shall have general control of the chamber and of the corri- 
dors and passages in that part of the building assigned to the use of the 
Senate. In case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct in the galleries, 
corridors or passages, he shall have the power to order the same to be 
cleared, and may cause any person guilty of such disturbance or dis- 
orderly conduct to be brought before the bar of the Senate. In all 
cases the Senate may take such measures as they shall deem neces- 
sary to prevent a repetition of such misconduct, by excluding the offend- 
ing person from admission to the Senate Cha.mber thereafter, or Imposing 
other penalties. 

DUTIES OF PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE. 

RULE 17. 

The powers and duties devolving upon the President shall vest in the 
President Pro Tempore or other person when exercising the office of 
President. 

POWER OF COMMITTEES. 

RULE 18. 

Any Senate Committee, either standing or special, shall be and is hereby 
authorized and empowered to issue process, compel attendance of witnesses, 
and to administer oaths to any person appearing before any said committee. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 117 

AUTHORS OF BILLS TO BE GIVEN HEARING. 

RULE 19. 

When a bill is pending before a standing committee, the author thereof 
shall be notified of the time and place of its consideration, and be given 
opportunity to be heard thereon. Any member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives shall be accorded the privilege of being hard upon all matters 
pending before the standing committees of the Senate. 

DUTIES OF OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE SENATE. 

RULE 20. 

All officrs and employees of the Senate whose duties do not require their 
presence in the Senate Chamber shall rport and remain at their respective 
places of duty assigned to them by the Senate, during the hours that the 
Senate is in session, and at such other times as their services may be 
required. 

AMENDMENT TO RULES, 

RULE 21. 

Any amendment to the rules of any new rule before adoption, shall re- 
quire the affirmative vote of a majority of all members elected to and con- 
stituting the Senate. 



118 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



THOMAS PRYOR GORE. 

Thomas Pryor Gore was born in Webster county, Mississippi, 
December 10th, 1870. His parents were Thomas H. Gore and Carrie 
E. (Wimgo) Gore. He attended a local school at Walthall, Miss., and 
was graduated from the law department of Cumberland University, at 
Lebanon, Tenn., in 1892. He removed to Texas in 1896 and came to 
Oklahoma in 1901. He was elected to the Territorial Council in 1902 
and 1904 and was nominated for United States Senator in state pri- 
maries, June 8, 1907, appointed by the governor November 16, 1907, 
and elected by the legislature December 11, 1907, taking his seat De- 
cember 16th. During the short term, expiring March 3, 1909, he was 
re-elected for a full term by the legisature January 20, 1909. 



ROBERT LATHAM OWEN. 

Robert Latham Owen, of Muskogee, was born February 2, 1856, 
at Lynchburg, Va., to Robert L. Owen, president of the Virginia & 
Tennessee Railroad, and Narcissa Chisholm, of the Cherokee Nation. 
He was educated in Lynchburg, Va., Baltimore, Md., and at Washing- 
ton and Lee University, Lexington, Va. He came to the Indian Terri- 
tory about 1878 and has served as teacher, editor, lawyer and banker, 
and was a member of the Democratic National Committee from 1892 
to 1896. He was nominated June 8, 1907, as the choice of the Dem- 
ocracy of Oklahoma for the United States Senate in primary election, 
and was elected by vote of the legislature December 11, 1907, taking 
his seat December 16th. His term will expire March 3, 1913. 



CONGRESSMEN 

BIRD S. McGUIRE. 

Congressman First District. 

Bird S. McGuire was born at Belleville, Illinois, in 1844, and spent 
his early life in northern Missouri. In 1881, the family went to Chau- 
tauqua county, Kansas. Shortly afterword McGuire came to the Indian 
Territory where he followed the life of a stockman three years, re- 
turning to Kansas to enter the State Normal at Emporia. After two 
years' teaching, he attended the law school of Kansas University and 
was admitted to the bar. He was elected county attorney of Chau- 
tauqua county for four years and in 1895 came to Oklahoma, locating 



BIOGRAPHICAL 119 

at Pawnee. Two years later he was appointed Assistant United States 
Attorney, and in 1902 was nominated by the Republican party and 
elected territorial delegate to Congress, being re-elected in 1904. In 
1907 he w'as elected congressman from the First District of Oklahoma 
and re-elected in 1908 and 1910. 



DICK T. MORGAN. 

Congressman Second District. 

Dick T. Morgan was born in Vigo county, Indiana. He was grad- 
uated from the Union Christian College in i876 and in 1880 
from the Central Law School of Indianapolis ana was elected 
to the legislature of that state in the fall of the same year. In 1885 
he removed to Garden City, Kans., and came to Guthrie, Okla., in 1889, 
but located at Wodward, his present home. He was elected congress- 
man from the Second District of Oklahoma in 1908 and re-elected 
in 1910. 



JAMES S. DAVENPORT. 

Congressman Third District. 

James S. Davenport was born at Gaylesville, Ala., September 21, 
1864, and removed with his parents to Conway, Faulkner county, Ark., 
in January, 1880. He was educated in the High Scliool at Greenbrier, 
Ark., and took up the study of law. February 14, 1890, he was admit- 
ted to practice law, and in October, of the same year, came to the 
Indian Territory, locating at Muskogee. He has practiced law con- 
tinuously in that part of Oklahoma since that date. He was mayor of 
Vinita two years, and four years a member of the Lower House of the 
Cherokee Legislature, two years of that time being speaker. He was 
elected from the Third Congressional District of Oklahoma to the 
Sixtieth Congress wlien Oklahoma was admitted as a state and was 
nominated without opposition- for the Sixty-first Congress, but lost the 
district in the general election of 1908. August 2, 1910, he was nomi- 
nated again by the democrats over three opponents by a large plu- 
rality, and elected. 



CHARLES D. CARTER. 

Congressman Fourth District. 

Charles D. Carter, of Ardmore, is about one-half Chickasaw-Cher- 
okee Indian. He is a decendant of Nathan Carter, Sr., who was cap- 
tured when a boy twelve years old, by the Shawnee Indians at the 
Wyoming Valley Massacre when all the other members of the family 
except a sister, were killed. Nathan Carter, Sr., was afterward traded 
to the Cherokees and married a full blood Cherokee woman. 

Congressman Carter is the son of Benjamin Wisnor Carter, a Cher- 
okee captain in the Confederate army, and his mother was Serena 
J. Guy. one-fourth ■ Chickasaw, sister of Governor William M. Guy, 



120 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

chief of the Chickasaws. He was born near Boggy Depot, in the 
Choctaw Nation, August 16, 1869, and brought up among the cow- 
boys and Indians on his father's ranch near Mill Creek, then the 
western frontier of the Chickasaw Nation. He attended the Indian 
neighborhood schools and was graduated at the Chickasaw Manual 
Labor Academy, at Tishomingo, June 18, 1887. He was secretary 
of the first Democratic Executive and Campaign Committee of the 
proposed state of Oklahoma, June to December, 1906. He was elected 
to the Sixtieth Congress and re-elected to the Sixty-first and Sixty- 
second. 



SCOTT FERRIS. 

Congressman Fifth District. 

Scott Ferris, of Lawton, was born November 7, 1877, at Neosho, 
Newton county. Mo., and was graduated from the Newton County High 
School in 1897, and from the Kansas City School of Law in 1901. He 
has practiced law since 1901 in Lawton, and was elected to the legis- 
lature of Oklahoma in 1904, representing the Twenty-second district. 
He was elected to the Sixtieth Congress and was re-elected to the 
Sixty-first and Sixty-second. 



STATE OFFICERS 

LEE CRUCE. 

Governor. 

Lee Cruce was born at Marion, Critenden county, Ky., July 
8, 1863, the son of James W. and Jane Hill Cruce. He studied at the 
country schools and attended the Marion Academy one year, later 
entering Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tenn., where he began 
to study law. He came to Ardmore, I. T., in 1891, three years after 
he had been licensed to practice law in Crittenden county. At Ard- 
more, he became a member of the law firm of Cruce, Johnston 
and Cruce with whom he practiced until September 1, 1901, 
1, 1901, when he entered the banking business, being made cashier 
of the Ardmore National Bank, which he helped to found. In 1903, he 
was elected president of the institution, which position he held until 
January 1, 1910, when he decided to make a second race for the 
Democratic nomination for governor. He was candidate in the state- 
hood primary but was defeated by C. N. Haskell, the first governor. 
In turn he defeated William H. Murray, president of the Constitutional 
Convention, for nomination by the democratic party in 1910, and then 
defeated J. W. McNeal, Republican candidate, for election. 



J. J. McALESTER, 

Lieutenant Governor. 

J. J. McAlester is typical of the Indian Territory. He was 
an old-timer in the Indian Territory when many present citizens of 
the state boast of being among the first to open up the country. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL 121 

is big physically and has been identified with every movement that 
has redounded to the benefit of the city of McAlester, and many 
of the Indian Territory and Oklahoma movements. He has been active 
in the development of the coal industry of the McAlester district 
and has been successful financially. He was elected a member of 
the state Corporation Commission in the statehood campaign, serving 
one term, when he became candidate for election as lieutenant gov- 
ernor. 



BENJAMIN F. HARRISON, 

Secretary of State. 

Benjamin F. Harrison, of Calvin, Hughes County, has been 
actively identified with much of the important legislation of the state. 
■He was a member of the Constitutional Convention, representing 
the Eighty-eighth District, and then represented Pittsburg and Hughes 
counties in the First and Second Legislatures. In the Constitutional 
Convention, he was a member of the committees on School Lands and 
Public Service Corporations, and in the Second Legislature was 
speaker pro tem of the House of Representatives. He was born in 
what was then the Choctaw Nation, fifteen miles west of the present 
town of Antlers, January 12, 1875. He attended Wapanucka Institute 
in the Chickasaw Nation and was graduated from Trinity College, 
Durham, N. C, in the class of 1897. After his graduation, he re- 
turned home and became a school teacher, subsequently entering 
.the service of the Dawes Commission as appraiser, preparatory to 
the allotment of land. He continued in this capacity for one year 
He selected an allotment three miles west of Calvin and began farm- 
ing and stock raising. He is of Indian ancestry, being one-eighth 
Chickasaw on the maternal side and of Choctaw descent through the 
paternal side. 



LEO MEYER. 

State Auditor. 

Leo Meyer was born in New York City, in 1873. At the age of 
fifteen years he left his native state, went to Texas, and settled in 
Cook county. Mr. Meyer has taken an active interest in public 
affairs, having been elected City Assessor and Collector of Bellville, 
Tex., at the age of 21 years. He also served as school trustee of the 
same town. In 1901, he moved from Texas to Sayre, Beckam county, 
Oklahoma. He served as mayor of Sayre, and was afterwards city 
treasurer. He was selected by the State Central Committee to run 
on the ticket for auditor, following the death of William Cross, the 
nominee, who died within a few hours after his nomination. 



CHARLES WEST. 

Attorney General. 

Charles West was born March 16, 1872, at Savannah, Ga., and was 
educated at a private school and at Maupiu's school, near Baltimore, 
until seventeen years of age, when he entered John Hopkins Uni- 



122 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

versity, whei'e lie took a three years' academic course. At the age of 
twenty-one years he went to Europe where he studied a year at "Leip- 
sic, and in 1894 returned to America, locating at Kingfisher, Oklaho- 
ma Territory. He edited a paper at that place, began the study of 
law, and was afterwards appointed deputy district clerk. He was ad- 
mitted to practice law and for ten years prior to statehood practiced 
at Enid, and on November 16, 1907, entered upon the duties of At- 
torney General for the new state. 



ROBERT DUNLOP. 

State Treasurer. 

Robert Dunlop was born at Garnett, Kansas, in 1869, came to 
Oklahoma in 1889, and is one of the successful farmers in the north- 
ern part of the state. He was elected treasurer of Kay county in 
1902, and re-elected in 1904. In 1907, he was defeated by only a few 
hundred votes for the nomination for State Treasurer by James 
Menefee. "Bob" Dunlop, as he is commonly called, is a Scotchman. His 
father and mother were born and reared in Scotland. His father was 
born at Dunlop, the place that bears the family name. His mother 
was born at Kelso, close to Edinburgh. 



R. H. WILSON. 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

R. H. Wilson taught twelve years in city schools at Chickasha, 
was county superintendent of Grady county for three years, and was 
first president of the Oklahoma School Officers' Association. Mr. 
Wilson is a school man. He has devoted his life to scholastic work, 
and was serving as chairman of the Executive Committee of the 
Oklahoma Educational Association when elected state superintendent. 



CHARLES A. TAYLOR. 

State Examiner and Inspector. 

Charles A. Taylor was born in 1856, at Ashburnham, Mass, later 
moving to Lynn, Mass., where he entered the office of the city engineer. 
Six years later he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas, where he served 
as city and county engineer, and later moved to Pratt county, Kansas. 
During the Lewellyn administration he was appointed Assistant Su- 
perintendent of Insurance for Kansas. He was also Assistant State 
Auditor of Kansas. He moved to Oklahoma in 1900, locating at Pond 
Creek, Grant county. He was eected state examiner and inspector in 
1907 and re-elected in 1910. Died July 19, 1912. Fred Parkinson of 
Wagoner was appointed by the governor to fill the vacancy July 29. 



ED BOYLE. 

Chief Mine Inspector. 

Ed Boyle, of Chant, Haskell county, Oklahoma, was born in Ken- 
tucky in 1867, moved to Missouri in 1897 and worked in the mines 



BIOGRAPHICAL 123 

until the memorable strike of 1898. He returned to Kentucky to take 
part in the Goebel campaign, and returned then to Texas, worked in 
the different mines of that state until the year 1901 when he removed 
to the Indian Territory. He was elected in 1907 to the legislature from 
Haskell county and re-elected in 1908 without opposition. He has 
been a miner for twenty-two years and has held many responsible 
positions. 



JOHN O'BRIEN. 

Assistant Mine Inspector First District. 

John O'Brien was born in Melbourne, Australia, and for twenty- 
two years lived in that country. Seventeen years of that time he 
spent on a farm. At the age of twenty-two he came to America. 
Previous to that time he had been employed in the mines of Australia 
five years. Coming to the new country he has worked at that voca- 
tion twenty-three years. Mr. O'Brien came to Indian Territory in 
1888, and has resided in the mineral district of the territory and state 
since. 



MARTIN CLARK. 
Assistant Mine Inspector Second District. 
Martin Clark was born forty-eight years ago in Northumberland 
county, Pennsylvania. At the age of nine years he began work as a 
slate picker in an Anthracite coal breaker. From that he went into 
the mine as a trapper, next a driver and then as a miner. He has had 
charge of mines in Illinois and Oklahoma and has been a resident of 
Oklahoma since 1899. When the State Mining Law was enacted he 
was appointed Assistant Inspector for the district from which he is 
now the elected officer. 



FRANK HALEY. 

Assistant Mine Inspector Third District. 

Frank Haley is a practical miner and has spent years both in 
silver and coal mines. He is an Irishman and was born in the old 
country forty years ago. At the age of 10, with his parents, he came 
to America and settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania, receiving his edu- 
cation in the public schools of that town. He entered the mines at 
Scranton as trapper boy. Later his family removed to Marion, Ohio, 
and at the age of twenty he felt the call of the west and was among 
those sturdy miners who faced the hardships at Leadville. There 
he worked in silver and gold mines until 1893, when He went to 
Bridgeport, Texas. Eleven years ago he came to Henryetta, Okla- 
homa. He worked as a miner in that place until appointed inspector 
of mines in district No. 3. 



CHARLES L. DAUGHERTY. 

State Labor Commissioner. 

Charles L. Daugherty was the first incumbent of the office of 
Commissioner of Labor, and was re-elected in 1910. He was born 



124 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

in Denton county, Texas, July 13, 1873, and was graduated from the 
public sctiools of that county, where he remained until he was seven- 
teen years of age. He learned the trade of a printer in Fort Worth, 
and thereafter followed his vocation in Paris, San Antonio, Victoria 
and Brownsville, Texas, and in Old Mexico and Central America. In 
1896, he located in Ardmore, Oklahoma, and the following year, to- 
gether with partners, established the Muskogee Morning Times. 
Later he became owner of the Denton County News. In 1902, he 
entered the mercantile business in Shawnee, and in the spring of 
1903 he located in Oklahoma City. Mr. Daugherty has been a member 
of the Typographical Union for twenty years, and toas held every 
office within the gift of the Union. In 1904-5 he was president and 
secretary of the Oklahoma City Trades Council. 



KATE BARNARD. 

Commissioner of Charities and Correctirons. 

Miss Kate Barnard is one of the 89'ers. She came to Oklahoma 
soon after the opening, and after a short time spent at Kingfisher, 
moved to Oklahoma City. She held down a claim in the southeastern 
portion of Oklahoma county and received her education in Oklahoma 
City. She was employed by the Seventh and Eighth Territorial Leg- 
islatures. This was her first introduction into politics. She became the 
candidate for the position of Commissioner of Ch^irities and Correc- 
tions, in the statehood campaign. Receiving the unanimous nomi- 
nation of the Democratic party, she made an active campaign and 
was elected by a large majority. 



P. A. BALLARD. 

State insurance Commissioner. 

P. A. Ballard was member of the House of Representatives during 
the creation of Oklahoma laws, and was oil inspector in Missouri un- 
der Governor Dockery's administration. He was born in Kentucky 
in 1863, and moved to Oklahoma in 1903. He received his schooling 
at Taylor Institute, Piatt City, Mo.; Ellis Academy, Pittsburg, Mo., 
and Christian Brothers College at St. Louis. 



JOHN B. TURNER. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. 

Justice John B. Turner is a native of Tennessee. He was born in 
Robertson county August 13, 18G0. He was educated in 
/ the State University at Knoxville and admitted to the bar 
in Linneus, Linn county. Mo., June 9, 1883. In 1889, he located in 
Ft. Smith, Ark. After six years' residence there he removed to 
Vinita, then Indian Territory, where he has since resided. As early 
as there opened any field for the White Man's politics in the Indian 
country. Justice Turner took an interest and with the coming of 
statehood he was elected one of the Justices of the Supreme Court. 
In the drawing for terms, the longest fell to him, so that his term 
of office extends to January, 1913. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 125 

SAMUEL W. HAYES. 

Justice Supreme Court. 

Samuel W. Hayes was born at Huntsville, Arkansas, September 
17, 1875, and was educated in the public schools of Texas and at the 
University of Virginia. He removed to the Indian Territory in 1879. 
He was a member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention; chair- 
man of the Legal Advisory Committee of that convention and of the 
Committee on Schedule; a member of the Judicial Committee and of 
the Sub-Judicial Committee that framed the provisions of the Con- 
stitution, and was elected member of the Supreme Court September 
17, 1907, and re-elected November, 1908. 



ROBERT L. WILLIAMS. 

Justice Supreme Court. 

Over a century and a half ago the great great grandfather of Jus- 
tice R. L. Williams, emigrating from Wales, settled in New England. 
Succeeding generations have borne the name southward and west- 
ward. Justice Williams was born December 20, 1868, in Pike coun- 
ty, Alabama. He was graduated at the Southern University, and in 
1891 was admitted to practice law. He moved to Texas soon' after- 
wards, and in 1896 settled in Durant, Indian Territory. In 1907, he 
was elected to the Supreme bench of Oklahoma. He has the dis- 
tinction of being the first chief justice of Oklahoma, and was the 
first attorney for the city of Durant. He was a member of the Demo- 
cratic National committee from the territory and was a delegate 
to the Constitutional Convention and a member of the committees on 
public service corporations, judiciary, revenue and taxation, legislative, 
primary elections and legal advisory. 



MATTHEW J. KANE. 

Justice Supreme Court. 

Matthew J. Kane served in the convention which framed the Okla- 
homa Constitution, being elected from the Twenty-seventh District — 
Kingfisher. He served as Justice of the First State Supreme Court, 
and on the 12th day of January, 1909, was elected Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court by his associates on the bench. At the recent demo- 
cratic primary election he was renominated for justice without oppo- 
sition. Judge Kane was born the 28th day of November, 1863, in 
Niagara county, New York. He was graduated from Georgetown Uni- 
versity Law School, Washington, D. C, in 1887. He began the practice 
of law in Wichita, Kans., in 1888, removing to Kingfisher, Oklahoma, 
the following year at the opening of the settlement of Oklahoma 
Territory. 



JESSE J. DUNN. 

Justice Supreme Court. 

Jesse J. Dunn was born in Illinois into an atmosphere reverberat- 
ing the debates of Lincoln and Douglas, and his boyhood was spent 



126 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

in Mississippi, near the home of Jefferson Davis. He was educated 
in Kansas. Shortly after his graduation from the Law Department 
of the University of Kansas, in 1893, he located in the town of Alva. 
Okla. There he shared the trials of the pioneers, and, later, the pros- 
perity of those who persisted. The public career of Justice Dunn be- 
gan as county attorney in Woods county. In 1903, he was elected 
president of the Oklahoma Bar Association. He was chosen chairman 
of the Democratic Territorial Committee in 1904. The campaign of 
1906 for the selection of delegates to the Constitutional Convention 
was made under his management. 



W. H. L. CAMPBELL. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court. 

W. H. L. Campbell was born at Snow Creek, N. C, in 18G7, educat- 
ed in the common schools of that state, and in 1890 went to Texas 
and began the practice of law in Rockwall, Rockwall county, Texas, 
in 1901. He was elected county attorney of that county in 1902, served 
one term and in May, 1905, re-moved to Ryan, Indian Territory, and 
served as city attorney of Ada, and September 17, 1907, he was nom- 
inated and elected clerk of the Supreme Court of Oklahoma. He was 
re-elected in 1910. 



HENRY M. FURMAN. 

Justice Criminal Court of Appeals. 
(Presiding Judge.) 

Born in South Carolina, in 1850, and going to Texas as a deck hand 
on a steamboat in 1871, Judge Henry M. Purman rose in his 
chosen profession, until the people of Oklahoma elected him Judge of 
the Criminal Court of Appeals. He drove an ox wagon and read law, 
passing a creditable examination, and was admitted to the bar in 1874. 
In 1895, he removed to Ardmore, Oklahoma, and later moved to Ada, 
having been elected from the Southern District to the high position he 
now holds. Judge Furman is one of the best known attorneys in the 
state. He practiced in the courts before statehood and has an under- 
standing of the laws of both the old territories and the new state. 



JAMES R. ARMSTRONG. 

Justice Criminal Court of Appeals. 

Janies R. Armstrong was born in Jackson county, Alabama, Jan- 
uary 26, 1876, and moved to Arkansas at an early age; was educated 
at the common schools and at Washita College of that state, and the 
Southwest Baptist University of Jackson, Tennessee. He was admit- 
ted to practice law in the courts in Tennessee in 1900 and later 
in Arkansas. He re-moved to Oklahoma nine years ago and located 
in what is now Choctaw county. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 127 

THOMAS H, DOYLE. 

Justice Criminal Court of Appeals. 

Thos. H. Doyle, of Perry, was born in Uxbridge, Mass., December 
21, 1863, and in 1879 moved to Kansas City. At the age of twenty years 
he joined Capt. Payne's "Oklahoma Boomers," and has been identified 
with Oklahoma from its earliest territorial days. In 1896 he was 
elected representative from Noble county to the Fourth Territorial 
Assembly. He was elected speaker pro tem, and was chairman of the 
Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence. He was re-elected to the 
Fifth Assembly, which was controlled by the republicans, and was 
nominated by the democratic minority for speaker. He was again 
chairman of the Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence. In 1900 he 
was defeated by William Cross for the democratic nomination for 
territorial delegate to Congress. 



J. E. LOVE. 

Chairman Corporation Commission. 

J. E. (Jack) Love is an 89'er, coming to Oklahoma with those 
sturay men who have since played an important part in the build- 
ing of a state. School teacher, ' attleman, sheriff, and corporation 
commissioner, Jack Love has seen many sides of life. He was born 
in San Augustin county, Texas, June 9th, 1857, subsequently removed 
to Washington county of the same state, where he received his edu- 
cation in the common schools, excepting ten months which he spent 
in the State Normal at Huntsville. For five years he taught school in 
Texas. Coming to Oklahoma in 1889, he located in Oklahoma City, 
and at the opening of the Cherokee strip went to Woodward county. 
He served as the first sheriff of that county, being appointed and after- 
wards elected to that office. 



A. P. WATSON. 

Member Corporation Commission. 

A. P. Watson, member of the Corporation Commission, has been 
a soldier, a farmer and a public officer. He was elected member of 
the corporation commission in 1907. Mr. Watson was born in Acworth, 
Georgia, June 11, 1848, and was educated in the common schools of 
that country. At the age of sixteen he enlisted in the Confederate 
army and during the last eight months of the war commanded a com- 
pany of sixteen-year-old boys. In 1867 he removed to Mississippi with 
his parents, where he resided until coming to Oklahoma. 



GEORGE A. HENSHAW. 

Member Corporation Commission. 

George A. Henshaw was reared in Illinois, taught school, was grad- 
uated from the North Indiana Law School in 1894, and has been prac- 
ticing law since. In 1897 he was retained by John Mitchell, president 



128 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

ol the Miners' Union, and a committee of miners, to represent the 
Miners' Union in the strike of that year. In 1900 he located in Madill, 
Okla., was later elected member of the Constitutional Convention, 
afterwards appointed assistant attorney general, and assigned the 
duties of counsel to the Corporation Commission. He assisted in 
preparing and presenting the two-cent fare and rate cases in the 
Federal Court and has represented the state in all cases appealed from 
the commission to the Supreme Court, and was elected to succeed 
J. J. McAlester in 1910. 



G. T. BRYAN. 

President of the Board of Agriculture. 

G. T. Bryan has been a member of the State Board of Agriculture 
since statehood, has been a farmer all his life, and was at one 
time treasurer of Noble county. He was born in Buchanan county, 
Missouri, in 1864, and was reared on a farm. He came to Oklahoma 
in 1893, made the race in the Cherokee strip and secured a claim near 
Perry, Noble county, which claim he still holds. 



GILES W. FARRIS. 

State Printer. 

Reared in the print shop, knowing the newspaper and printing 
game from "devil" to manager of a large plant, Giles W. Farris offers 
services to the state that have been highly paid for by men who 
recognize ability. Farris was born in Green county, Missouri in 1874. 
When eleven years of age he entered the Springfield (Mo.,) Express' 
office and learned the trade. He came to Oklahoma ten years ago, 
working in Oklahoma City, El Reno and Lawton. He located in Man- 
gum eight years ago and assumed the foremanship of the Mangum 
Star. He had charge of the mechanical department of that paper for 
some time and was afterwards placed in entire management. Later 
he was selected editor and manager and elected to the office of state 
printer in 1910. 




COjMVENTION HALL. GaTHR_IE. OKLA. 

F.IRST HOME OF STATE GOVERNMENT 




CITY HALL, GUTHRFE, OKLA. 
WHERE CONSTITUTION WAS FRAJMED 



0N6TITUTI0MI 
gNVBNTION 

OKIMOMA 

1906-07 





IWJ.GaTOIIXJ f JH! I "MlLfisLASfiTElL 




EDWARD 6WENGLE _.,i^_ DR.J. H.BALDWIN ^^ , , M. B. COPE j l 



HOUSBri^PRFSENWIV^ 




m 

E. D. B OVLE liMll JAS.B. STIVERS 



M|la.v.rA»tKNin| 




.11 JAS.HXOC1WOCF1|I1|WH.BOWDPE iKIi J- S,SHEAREKjt 



HOUSBSfBmiESEmTlVES 




IWvtrJMnSAY iMl H-M: BUTLER lB kvmiCHEgrH^ALI£N,' 
— ii—wi ■iiiwiii^ ■ H ||||1>BPWww«wiiww«w»MW"P.^K«i!glg^^g5W'^^B 




r^OS.C.V^lTSON DAVID SMITH „_.„ 1- M. PUTNAM _^_ 





AT. EARLEY JliU J- W. SMITH |y| q. T.BROWN 



fr«RPRESENTATIVBS 





lII W.B.ANfHOMY Pill ^0*^*^ HAWKINS ||i(| BERT tJlOT^OH |fj 



HOUSBfifR^P^SEjnATIVKS 





HOUSBfi^R^PRpSENTATIVBS 








tsf'-'-armmimtimmm'' 



r.m^i^SiMi. 




CAMPBELL RUSSELL I si I HARRY K.ALLEN |=l E-MLANDRUM 



■Mi 




LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



129 



MEMBERS OF CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 



President Hon. Wm. H. Murray, Tishomingo. 

Vice-President A. H. Ellis, Orlando. 

Vice-President Pete Hanraty, McAlester. 

Secretary John M. Young, Lawton. 

Sergeant-at-Arms Wm. A. Durant, Durant. 



Names, Post Office Address and District Numbers of Members 



Akers, L. J Distr 

Allen R. J Distr 

Alderson, J. A Distr 

Asp, H. E Distr 

Baker, J. A Distr 

Banks, W. E Distr 

Berry, G. M Distr 

Bilby, G. N Distr 

Board, C. W Distr 

Bowers, C. H Distr 

Brewer, O. H. P Distr: 

Bryant, B. E Distr 

Buchanan, J. S Distr 

Cain, W. A Distr 

Carney, J. J Distr 

Carr. J. M Distr 

Caudill, W. J Distr 

Chambers, J. H Distr 

Cloud, H. L Distr 

Cobb, J. H. N Distr 

Cochran, A. G Distr 

Copeland, Riley Distr 

Covey, H. P .Distr 

Curl, J. J... J Distr 

Dalton, W. T Distr 

Dearing, W. S Distr 

Edley, W. H Distr 

Edmondson, J. T Distr 

Ellis, A. H.. Distr 

Fisher, C. C ; Distr 

Frye, C. O Distr 

Gardner, N. B Distr 

Graham, J C Distr 

Hanraty, Pete Distr: 

Harned, D. G Distr 

Harris, J. A Distr 

Harrison, J. B Distr 

Sig 11 



ct No. 102 Woodford. 

ct No. 93 Duncan. 

ct No. 12 Pond Creek. 

ct No. 25 Guthrie. 

ct No. 81 Wewoka, 

ct No. 52 Hes3. 

ct No. 18 Pawnee. 

ct No. 6 Alva. 

ct No. 73 Okmulgee. 

ct Np. 4l Cement. 

ct No. 77 Webber Falls. 

ct No. 47 Gotebo. 

ct No. 34 Norman. 

ct No. 74 Oktaha. 

ct No. 36 El Reno. - 

ct No. 54 Frederick. 

ct No. 50 Hobart. 

ct No. 105 Atoka. 

ct No. 23 Wellston. 

ct No. 67 Sapulpa. 

ct No. 98 Hartshorne. 

ct No. 68 Fairland. 

ct No. 4 Fargo. 

ct No. 57 Bartlesville 

ct No. 69 Broken Arrow. 

ct No. 44 Thomas. 

ct No. 53 Fletcher. 

ct No. 66 Mayesville, Ark. 

ct No. 14 Orlando, 

ct No. 9 ■ Hinton. 

ct No. 84 Sallisaw. 

ct No. 91 Stigler. 

ct No. 106 Marietta. 

ct No. 90 McAlester. 

ct No. 9 Ringwood. 

ct No. 71 Wagoner. 

ct No. 45 Sayre. 



130 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Harrison, B. F District No. 

■Haskell, C. N District No. 

Hausam, A. L District No. 

Hayes, S. W District No. 

Helton, W. L District No. 

Hendricks, W. F District No. 

Henshaw, G. A District No. 

Herring, F. E District No. 

Hill, J. K District No. 

Hogg, David District No. 

Hopkins, P. B District No. 

Houston, R. E District No. 

Hudson, W. B District No. 

Hughes, W. C District No. 

Humphrey, W. D District No. 

Hunt, W. T. S District No. 

James, T. O District No. 

Jenkins, W. D District No. 

Johnston, Henry S District No. 

Jones, Cham District No. 

Kane, M. J District No. 

Kelly, Henry District No. 

King, J. F District No. 

Kornegay, W. H District No. 

Langley, J. H District No. 

Lasater, Milas District No. 

Latimer, J^ S District No. 

Leahy, T. J. District No. 

Lee, B. F District No. 

Leeper, C. S District No. 

Ledbetter, W. A District No. 

Leidtke, W. C District No. 

Littlejohn, W. N District No. 

Littleton, L B District No. 

McCance, E. O District No. 

McClain, C. M District No. 

McClnre, P. J District No. 

Majors, J. C District No. 

Mathis, J. C District No. 

Maxey, J. H District No. 

Messenger, E. F District No. 

Mitch, J. L District No. 

Moore, C. L District No. 

Murray, Wm. H (President) , 

Nelson, Flowers District No. 

Newell, E. G District No. 

Norton, J. K District No. 

Parker, Gabe E District No. 

Pittman, C. H District No. 

Quarles, J. J District No. 

Ramsey, S. N District No. 

Rice, Thad District No. 

Roberts, Luke District No. 

Rogers, C. V District No. 

Rose, D. S District No. 

Sandlin, J. M District No. 

Sater, J. E District No. 

Savage, .L J District No. 

Sorrels, E. T District No. 



88 Calvin. 

76 Muskogee. 

70 Coweta. 

85 Chickasha. 

24 Marshall. 

10 Wakita. 

107 Madill. 

46 Elk City. 

63 Catoosa. 

43 Grand. 

75 Muskogee. 

21 Agra. 

79 Henryetta. 

28 OklahoiHa City. 

58 Nowata. 

27 Oklahoma City. 

1 Guymon. 

26 Guthrie, 

17 Perry. 

101 Ryan. 

37 Kingfisher. 

40 Minco. 

16 Newkirk. 

59 Vinita. 

65 Pryor Creek. 

94 Pauls Valley. 

99 Wilburton. 

56 Pawhuska. 

110 Hugo. 

96 Sulphur. 

103 Ardmore. 

83 Eufaula. 

78 Brushy. 

32 Earlsboro. 

5 Mutual. 

86 Purcell. 

Ill Lukfata. 

7 Granton. 

100 Monroe. 

31 Shawnee. 

82 Holdenville. 

29 Oklahoma City. 

13 Enid. 

Tishomingo. 

68...! Tulsa. 

19 Yale. 

35 Piedmont. 

109 Academy. 

11 Enid. 

56 Fairfax. 

30 Tecumseh. 

38 Hitchcock. 

49 Olustee. 

64 Claremore. 

15 Blackwell. 

22 Prague. 

20 Stillwater. 

48 McKnight. 

92 Milton. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



131 



Stowe, E. J District No. 

S warts, J. W District No. 

Tosh, J. B District No. 

Tener, H. O District No. 

Tracy, F. C District No. 

Tucker, G. M District No. 

Turner, H. G District No. 

Weaver, Carlton District No. 

Williams, E. R District No. 

Williams, Boone District No. 

Williams, R. L District No. 

Wilis, D. P District No. 

Wood, Geo. W District No. 

Wood, J. I District No. 

Wyatt, T. C District No. 

Wyly, A. S District No. 



95 Wynnewood. 

61 Chelsea. 

52 Hobart. 

42 Taloga. 

2 Beaver. 

55 Comanche. 

80 Brush Hill. 

87 Ada. 

3 Stockholm. 

97 Lehigh. 

108 Durant. 

60 Miami. 

8 Cherokee. 

89 Scipio. 

33 Wanette. 

72 Tahlequah. 



132 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



FIRST STATE OFFICERS 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Governor C. N. Haskell, Muskogee. 

Lieutenant-Governor Geo. W. Bellamy, El Reno. 

♦Secretary of State Bill Cross, Oklahoma City. 

Attorney General Chas. West, Enid. 

State Auditor M. E. Trapp, Guthrie. 

State Treasurer J. A. Menefee, Carnegie. 

State Examiner and Inspector C. A. Taylor, Pond Creek. 

Insurance Commissioner T. J. McComb, Oklahoma City. 

tMine Inspector Pete Hanraty, McAlester. 

Commissioner of Charities and 

Corrections Kate Banard, Oklahoma City. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction.. E. D. Cameron, Sulphur. 

Labor Commissioner Chas. A. Daugherty, 

Oklahoma City. 

Corporation Commissioners J. E. Love, Chairman, Woodward 

A. P. Watson, Shawnee. 
J. J. McAlester, McAlester. 



STATE SUPREME COURT. 

Mathew J. Kane Chief Justice Kingfisher. 

R. L. Williams Associate Justice Durant. 

Jesse J. Dunn Associate Justice Alva. 

J. B. Turner Associate Justice Pond Creek. 

S. W. Hayes Associate Justice Chickasha. 



CRIMINAL COURT OF APPEALS 

Henry M. Furman Presiding .Tudge Ada. 

Thos. H. Doyle Perry. 

H. G. Baker Muskogee. 



* Died as the returns from the primary election, August 2, 1910, 
showed that he had been chosen as the party's candidate for State 
Auditor. Leo Meyer, of Sayre, assistant Secretary of State, was chosen 
by the Democratic State Central Committee to fill the vacancy on the 
ticket. Thomas P. Smith, of Muskogee, was appointed Secretary 
of State to fill the unexpired term. , 

tPete Hanraty resigned October 1, 1910. Robt. W. Church, of 
Krebs, was appointed to fill the unexpired term. 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 



133 



DISTRICT JUDGES. 



District 


No 


District 


No. 


♦District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


tDistrict 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


IDistrict 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


||District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No. 


District 


No 


District 


No 



1 J. H. Pitchford Tahlequah. 

2 T. H. Brown Claremore. 

3 John H. King Muskogee. 

4 Preslie B. Cole McAlester. 

5 Malcolm E. Rosser Poteau. 

6 D. A. Richardson Durant. 

7 A. T. West Lehigh. 

R. M. Rainey Atoka. 

8 Stillwell H. Russell Ardmore. 

9 J. Caruthers Okemah. 

10 W. N. Maben Shawnee. 

11 A. H. Huston Guthrie. 

12 W. M. Bowles Perry. 

13 G. W. Clark Oklahoma City. 

§John J. Carney El Reno. 

14 R. McMillan Norman. 

15 F. M. Bailey Chickasha. 

16 J. T. Johnson Lawton. 

17 T. R. Tolbert Hobart. 

18 G. A. Brown Mangum. 

19 R. H. Loofbourrow Beaver. 

20 M. C. Garber Enid. 

21 L. M. Poe Tulsa. 

22 W. L. Barnum Sapulpa. 

23 (Not appointed) 

24 John J. Shea Bartlesville. 



*John H. King was succeeded by Charles Bagg, of Jluskogee, 
August 15, 1910. 

tD. A. Richardson resigned March 30, 1910, and James R. Arm- 
strong, of Boswell, was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

|J. B. A. Robertson, of Chandler, was appointed to succeed W. 
N. Maben, temporarily, July 24, 1909, and permanently September 
24, 1909, resigning January 6, 1910. Roy V. Hoffman, of Chandler, 
was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

||John J. Carney, of El Reno, was appointed September 12, 1908, 
to succeed James G. Lowe, of El Reno, deceased, who was elected 
In 1907. 

§James W. Steen, of Enid, was appointed to succeed M. C. Garber, 
resigned, August 16, 1910. 



134 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



MEMBERS OF FIRST LEGISLATURE 



Members of the First Senate. 

GEO. W. BELLAMY 

Lieutenant Governor — President of the Senate. 

Agee, A. E Putnam Democrat. 

Billups, Richard A Cordell Democrat. 

Blair, H. S Katie Democrat. 

Brazell, Edmund Lamont Democrat. 

Brook, Eck E Muskogee Democrat. 

Brownlee, E. D Kingfisher Republican. 

Conn, P. C Ganns '. Democrat. 

Cordell, S. A Chandler Democrat. 

Curd, R. S Aline Republican. 

Cunningham, H. S Suthrie Republican. 

Davis, Clarence Bristow Democrat. 

Eggerman, M. F Shawnee Democrat. 

Echols, R. E Elk City Democrat. 

Franklin, W. M Madill Democrat. 

Graham, J. C Marietta Democrat. 

Goulding, P. J Enid Democrat. 

Hatchett, Jesse M Mead Democrat. 

Holman, H. H Wetumka Democrat. 

Johnston, Henry S Perry Democrat. 

Johnson, W. H Calumet Democrat. 

Johnson, Geo. O Ft. Cobb Democrat. 

Keys, J. M Pryor Creek Democrat. 

Landrum, B. M Tahlequah Democrat. 

Little, J. C Sulphur Democrat. 

Matthews, Frank Mangum Democrat. 

Memminger, T. F Atoka Democrat. 

Morris, J. S Hocker Democrat. 

Moore, Tom Olustee Democrat. 

Redwine, W. N McAlester Democrat. 

Roddie, Reuben M Ada Democrat. 

Russell, Campbell Warner Democrat. 

Soldani, S. J Ponca City Democrat. 

Sorrels, E. T Milton Democrat. 

Stafford, Roy E Oklahoma City Democrat. 

Strain, J. H Wann Democrat. 

Standford, H. B. P Okmulgee Republican. 

Smith, D. M Duncan Democrat. 

Stewart, W. P Antlers Democrat. 

Taylor, L. K Chickasha Democrat. 

Thomas, J. Elmer Lawton Democrat. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 135 

Updegraft", A. G Fair Valley Republican. 

Williams, J. J Weatherford Democrat. 

W^ynne, R. P Lexington . . : Democrat. 

Yeager, P. .1 Tulsa Democrat. 



Members of the First House of Representatives. 

WM. H. MURRAY, Speaker. 

Abbott, Wm. F Alva, Woods County Democrat. 

♦Allen, W. H. H Goltry, Alfalfa County Republican. 

Allen, Geo. W Sallisaw, Sequoyah County Democrat. 

Anthony, W. B Marlow, Stephens County Democrat. 

Armstrong, Wm. H Boswell, Choctaw County Democrat. 

Armstrong, Jesse T Mondamin, Kiowa County Democrat. 

Ashby, H. S. P Simpson, Marshall County Democrat. 

Baldwin, J. H Sterrelt, Bryan County Democrat. 

Ballard, P. A Coyle, Payne County Democrat. 

Banks, Wm. E Hess, Jackson County Democrat. 

Beck, Wm. B Fayn, Mcintosh County ; . .Republican. 

Bowdre, Wm. H Watonga, Blaine County Democrat. 

Boyle, Ed Chant, Haskell County Democrat. 

Briggs, Geo. W Granite, Greer County Democrat. 

Branson, Fred P MuskOigee, Muskogee County. . . .Democrat. 

Broome, Chas. W Oak Lodge, Le Flore County Democrat. 

Brown, Q. T Braman, Kay County Democrat. 

Bryan, Milton Shawnee, Pottawatomie County .Democrat. 

Butler, Henry M Pryor Creek, Mayes County Democrat. 

Carson, Wm. S Asher, Pottawatomie County. . . .Democrat. 

Casteel, Frank L Jurgensen, Cimarron County. . . .Republican. 

Chappell, Will H .Guthrie, Logan County Democrat. 

Chastain, Jesse B Little, Seminole County Democrat. 

Cope, Milton B El Reno, Canadian County Democrat. 

Crouch, J. B Porum, Muskogee County Republican. 

Day, Curtis R Edmond, Oklahoma County Democrat. 

Deyerle, John B Ramona, Osage County Democrat. 

Durant, Wm. A Durant, Bryan County Democrat. 

Durham, Wm. F Tecumseh, Pottawatomie County.Democrat. 

Durst, John W Supply, Harper County Democrat. 

Earle, E. J Guymon, Texas County Democrat. 

Earley, A. T Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Co. . .Democrat. 

Ellis, Albert H Orlando, Garfield County Democrat. 

Evans, John P Helena, Alfalfa County Republican. 

Ezzard, John T Chelsea, Craig County Democrat. 

Faulkner, J. V Manitou, Kiowa County Democrat. 

Fisher, Chas. C Hinton, Caddo County Democrat. 

Fraser, Chas. A Red Rock, Noble County Republican. 

Harris, Leo Ardmore, Carter County Democrat. 

Harrison, Benj. F Calvin, Hughes County Democrat. 

Harrison, Wm. H Bokhoma, McCurtain County. . . Democrat. 

Hart, Irving W Woodward, Woodward County. . . Democrat. 

Hawkins, Logan Tonkawa, Kay County Democrat. 

Hendrickson, J. L Quinton, Pittsburg County Democrat. 



lae OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Hobdy, E. J Bluejacket, Craig County Democrat. 

Holland, Cicero L Tulsa, Tulsa County Democrat. 

Huddleston, Frank Ada, Pontotoc County Democrat. 

Hudson, Geo. D Gushing, Payne County Democrat. 

Japp, Amil H Lawton, Comanche County Democrat. 

Jarrett, H. M Stroud, Lincoln County Democrat. 

J esse, Elmer V Gage, Ellis County Democrat. 

.Johnson, Robert M Minco, Grady County Democrat. 

Jones, C. G Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Co.. . .Republican. 

King, Henry R Frederick, Tillman County Democrat. 

Lindsey, W. M Elmore, Garvin County Democrat. 

Lockwood, James H McCloud, Lincoln County Republican. 

London, Chas. M Hastings, Jefferson County Democrat. 

Manus, Jos. L '. . . . Tahlequah, Cherokee County. . . .Democrat. 

Martin, A. G Miami, Ottawa County Democrat. 

Moore, E. L Oak Lodge, Le Flore County. . . .Democrat. 

Murdock, Wm Ralston, Pawnee County Democrat. 

*Murley, D. G Helena, Alfalfa County Democrat. 

McAdoo, Wm. C Okmulgee, Okmulgee County. . . .Republican. 

MoCalla, John R Marietta, Love County Democrat. 

McCants, J. F Newport, Carter County Democrat. 

McElhaney, Henry M Indianola, Pittsburg County Democrat. 

Norvell, W. S Tulsa, Tulsa County Democrat. 

O'Neal, Geo. W Olney, Coal County Democrat. 

Orcutt, A. D Coweta, Wagoner County Republican. 

Paschal, Jos. L Franklin, Roger Mills County. . . .Democrat. 

Pendergraft, W. C Hollis, Greer County Democrat. 

Porter, Jos. M Enid, Garfield County Republican. 

Putnam, 1. M Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Co. . .Democrat. 

Rainey, Robert M Atoka, Atoka County Democrat. 

Ratliff, Edgar S Ada, Pontotoc County . .Democrat. 

Reeves, L. L Dill, Washita County. Democrat. 

Riddle, Albert S Chickasha, Grady County Democrat. 

Rider, T. L Stillwell, Adair County Democrat. 

Ross, A. P Durant, Bryan County Democrat. 

Sands, A. J Knowles, Beaver County Republican. 

Shearer, Jno. S Guthrie, Logan County Republican. 

Sherman, J. R .Estelle, Majors County Republican. 

Skeen, C. A .Wapanucka, Johnston County. . .Democrat. 

Smith, W. G Selling, Dewey County Republican. 

Smith, Howell Thomas, Custer County Democrat. 

Smith, Lee B Grove, Delaware County Democrat. 

Smith, Jos. W .Manchester, Grant County Democrat. 

Smith, David L Cordell, Washita County Democrat. 

Snelson, A. J Oktaha, Muskogee County Democrat. 

Stagner, Geo. H Coyle, Logan County Republican. 

Stevens, Frank Apache, Caddo County Democrat. 

Stettmund, H. G Chandler, Lincoln County Democrat. 

Stivers, J. E Wilburton, Latimer County Democrat. 

Stone, W. B Keifer, Creek County Democrat. 

Swengel, Edward Wetumka, Hughes County Democrat. 

Tabor, Wm Hart, Garvin County Democrat. 

Tandy, J. F Foyil, Rogers County Democrat. 

Tillotson, J. A Nowata, Nowata County Democrat. 

Turner, M Davis, Murray County Democrat. 

Utterback, Harvey Kingfisher, Kingfisher County. . .Republican, 

Vandaveer, J Noble, Cleveland County Democrat. 

Vandeventer, A. P , .Bartlesville, Washington County. Democrat. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 137 

Wortman, Thos. B Okemah, Okfuskee County Democrat. 

Watrous, Eugene Enid, Garfield County Republican. 

Whitehurst, Geo. C Sayre, Beckham County Democrat. 

Whitson, Thomas C Purcell, McLain County Democrat. 

Williams, J. Roy Lawton, Comanche County Democrat. 

Williams, Ben T Finlay, Pushmataha County Democrat. 

Wilson, Ben F Cereal, Canadian County Democrat. 

*D. G. Murley, of Helena, Alfalfa County, contested W. H. H. 
Allen, of Goltry, Alfalfa County, for his seat in the First House of 
Representatives. Mr. Murley won the contest and on Tuesday, March 
31st, 1908, the one hundred and seventh day of the session, was sworn 
in as the duly elected and accredited representative from Alfalfa 
County. 



138 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



MEMBERS OF SECOND LEGISLATURE 



Members of the Second Senate. 

Mitchell, E. L Cheyenne, District 2 Democrat. 

Denton, Henry J Hollis, District 4 Democrat. 

Williams, J. J Weatherford, District 6 Democrat. 

Goulding, P. J Enid, District 8 Democrat. 

Newell, J. Q Jennings, District 10 Democrat. 

Eggerman, M. F Shawnee, District 13 Democrat. 

Johnson, Geo. O Ft. Cobb, District 15 Democrat. 

Thomas, J. Elmer Lawton, District 17 Democrat. 

Allen, Harry K Ardmore, District 18 Democrat. 

Wynne, R. P Lexington, District 19 Democrat. 

Hatchett, Jesse M Mead. District 20 Democrat. 

Franklin, William M Madill, District 26 Democrat. 

Landnim, E. M Tahlequah, District 30 Democrat. 

Stewart, W. P Antlers, District 24 Democrat. 

'Hurst, Homer Holdenville District 22 Democrat. 

Warren, Frank Holdenville Republican. 

Chapman, Ernest B Tonkawa, District 9 Republican. 

Cunningham, Harper S. . .Guthrie, District 12 Republican. 

Colville, Frank M Mustang, District 14 Republican. 

Brownlee, Emory D Kingfisher, District 16 Republican. 

Beeler, Harry B Checotah, District 27 Republican. 

Cloonan, J. Harry Bunch, District 28 Republican. 

Potter, R. T Okmulgee, District 32 Republican. 



♦Contested Hurst's election and was seated. 

Hold Over Senators.^ 

Billups, Richard A Cordell, District 6 Democrat. 

Blair, H. S Pauls Valley, District 19 Democrat. 

Curd, R. S Aline, District 7 Republican. 

Cordell, S. A Chandler, District 13 Democrat. 

Davis, Clarence Sapulpa, District 11 Democrat. 

Echols, R. E Elk City, District 2 Democrat. 

Graham, J. C Marietta, District 18 Democrat. 

Keys, J. M Pryor Creek, District 29 Democrat. 

Memminger, T. F Atoka, District 20 Democrat. 

Morris, J. S Hooker, District 1 Democrat. 

Moore, Tom Olustee, District 5 Democrat. 

Redwine, W. N McAlester, District 25 Democrat. 

Roddie, Reuben M Ada, District 23 Democrat. 

Russell, Campbell Warner, District 27 Democrat. 

Soldani, S. J Ponca City, District 9 Democrat. 

Sorrels, E. T Milton, District 21 Democrat. 

Stafford, Roy E Oklahoma City, District 14 Democrat. 

Strain, J. H Wann, District 33 Democrat. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 139 

Smith D. M Duncan, District 17 Democrat. 

Taylor L K Chickaslia, District 15 Democrat. 

Updegraft A. E Fair Valley, District 3 Republican. 

Yeager P J Tulsa, District 31 Democrat. 



Members of the Second House of Representatives. 

BEN F. WILSON, Speaker, 

Durant, W. A Durant, Bryan County Democrat. 

Faulkner, J. V Manitou, Kiowa County Democrat. 

Gilmer, W. F Ardmore, Carter County Democrat. 

Glover,' R. L Rush Springs, Grady County Democrat. 

Harrison, Benj. F Calvin, Hughes County Democrat. 

Haynes, F. L Broken Arrow, Tulsa County. .Democrat. 

Huddleston, Frank Ada, Pontotoc County Democrat. 

Hughes, D. C Adair, Mayes County Democrat. 

Hutchins, S. W Lexington, Cleveland County Democrat. 

Ireton, Henrv Chickasl.a, Grady County Democrat. 

Jahn, Geo. E Coalgate, Coal County Democrat. 

japp, Amil H Lawton, Comanche County Democrat. 

Johnston, N. J Newburg, Hughes County Democrat. 

.dng, H. R Frederick, Tillman County Democrat. 

Lewi's, G. W Sayre, Beckham County Democrat. 

Lovelace, Lon Red Oak, Latimer County Democrat. 

McElhaney, H. M Indianola, Pittsburg County Democrat. 

McCalla, J. R Marietta, Love County Democrat. 

McDuffee, J. W Woodville, Marshall County Democrat. 

Mathis, C. C Monroe, Le Flore County Democrat. 

Maxey, J. H., Jr Shawnee, Pottawatomie County. Democrat. 

Moore,' John M Olney, Coal County Democrat. 

Paschal, Joseph L Rankin, Roger Mills County Democrat. 

Price Prentiss Hominy, Osage County Democrat. 

Putnam, I. M Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Co. . .Democrat. 

Ratcliff, E. N Vinita, Craig County Democrat. 

Ratliff, E. S Ada, Pontotoc County Democrat. 

Ratliff, J. M Mannsville, Johnston County Democrat. 

Reeves, L. L Dill, Washita County Democrat. 

Rider, T. L Westville, Adair County Democrat. 

Rogers, Wm. S Kiowa, Pittsburg County Democrat. 

Ross, Leslie P Lawton, Comanche County Democrat. 

Rottenberry, J. J Stratford, Garvin County Democrat. 

Savage, Alex C Hastings, Jefferson County Democrat. 

Savage, James J McKnight, Greer County Democrat. 

Semple, Wm. P Caddo, Bryan County Democrat. 

Smith, Howell Thomas Custer County Democrat. 

Smith, Joe Anadarko, Caddo County Democrat. 

Smith, J. W Manchester, Grant County Democrat. 

Smith, Lee B Grove, Delaware County Democrat. 

Terral, J. B Hobart. Kiowa County Democrat. 

Tillotson, J. A Nowata, Nowata County Democrat. 

Tucker, J. F Ottawa, Ottawa County Democrat. 

Turner, M Davis, Murray County Democrat. 

Wallace, Bob Pauls Valley, Garvin County Democrat. 

Whayne, John R Ardmore, Carter County Democrat. 

White, Lyman W Hugo, Choctaw County Democrat. 



140 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Whitson, Thos. C Purcell, McClain County Democrat. 

Williams, Ben T Finley, Pushmataha County Democrat. 

Wilson, Ben F Cereal, Cleveland County Democrat. 

Wilson, G. L. Mangum, Greer County Democrat. 

Wortman, C. S Claremore, Rogers County Democrat. 

Acton, O. B , Guthrie, Logan County Republican. 

Bonar, John Pawnee, Pawnee County Republican. 

Bridges, John H Woodward, Woodward County. . . Republican. 

Brownlee, Richard C Taloga, Dewey County Republican. 

Calhoun, J. P Wagoner, Wagoner County Republican. 

Charles, John B Stroud, Lincoln County Republican. 

Clark, E. M Pawnee, Pawnee County Republican. 

Compton, Chas. M Washunga, Kay County Republican. 

Cook, Chas. A Muskogee, Muskogee County. . . .Republican. 

Covey, H. P Fargo, Ellis County Republican. 

Dixon, Robt. J Weleetka, Okfuskee County Republican. 

Edgington, A. L Watonga, Blaine County Republican. 

Hamlin, A. C Guthrie, Logan County Republican. 

Heim, Geo. O Mounds, Creek County Republican. 

Howe, R. F Wl.iterock, Noble County Republican. 

Humphreys, J. M Atoka, Atoka County Republican. 

Jacobs, Isaac Muldrow, Sequoyah County Republican, 

Jones, C. G Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Co.. . .Republican. 

Knox, James Boynton, Muskogee County Republican. 

Lincoln, J. H Henryetta, Okmulgee County. . .Republican. 

Lockwood, J. H McLoud, Lincoln County Republican. 

Maris, Lester A Ponca City, Kay County Republican. 

Merrick, Edward Muskogee, Muskogee County. . . .Republican. 

Millsap, A. J Checotah, Mcintosh County Republican. 

Moore, Clint Bartlesville, W^ashington County. Republican. 

Murphy, S. W Edmond, Oklahoma County Republican. 

Parsons, H. T Alva, Woods County Republican. 

Partridge, Geo. W Cherokee, Grant County Republican. 

Porter, Joseph M Enid, Garfield County Republican. 

Sexton, C. E Perkins, Payne County Republican. 

Shearer, John S Guthrie, Logan County Republican. 

Sherman, Joe Estelle, Major County Republican. 

Simmons, J. H Tulsa, Tulsa County Republican. 

Stull, Arthur A Lahoma, Garfield County Republican. 

Sullivan, J. J Howe, Le Flore County Republican. 

Tate, H. M Wewoka, Seminole County Republican. 

Tooley, A. W Beaver, Beaver County Republican. 

Utterback, Harvey. ; Kingfisher, Kingfisher County. . .Republican. 

Vogle, Henry L Palace, Harper County Republican. 

Ward, Henry Hulbert, Cherokee County Republican. 

Watrous, Eugene Enid, Garfield County Republican. 



STATE OFFICERS 141 



APPOINTIVE STATE OFFICERS AND STATE BOARDS 



1907-1910. 



State Bank Commissioner. 

H. M. Smock (1907-1909) vr, 1 

A. M. Young (1909-1909)... ^?"'f°^,^^- 

E. B. Cockrell (1910).. nlTl'"^' n- 

' Oklahoma City. 

State Banking Board. 

Geo. W. Bellamy, Chairman t^, t, 

C. N. Haskell ^l ^^"o. 

J. A. Menefee Muskogee. 

M. E. Trapp Carnegie. 

J. P. Conners..'.' Guthrie. 

Roy c. oakes.-.-.-.-.-;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;see;^f '^"- 



S. O. Daws. 



State Librarian. 
Rocky 



J. A. Smith. 



State Grain Inspector. 
Kingfisher 



Board of Agriculture. 
Officers — 

J. P. Connors t-, . , 

J. S. Elliott President. 

Chas. F. Barrett. . . '. Vice-President. 

Ewers White Secretary. 

Members First District- Treasurer. 

R- ,^; ^'^^^ Wagoner Wagoner County 

R. W. Lindsay Chotean tv/t^, ,-, ^"""''>- 

Members Second District ""^^"^ ^°""^^- 

J. W. L. Corley Heavener LePlore C^nnt^. 

R- F. Wilson Valliant . ' McCi?rtain Cnnnt. 

Members Third District— AicCurtain County. 

Ewers White \T T nnH t^ x^ 

G. T. Bryan Perrv 1''^^^^^'-'''^'^ ^""'^ty. 

Members Fourth ' DrstS- """"^'^ ^°"^t^- 

M. F. Ikard Chickasha Garvin Conntv 

J- ^- Elliott Pauls Valley G?aly Countv 

Members Fifth District— ^ County. 

^^", ^!fh^ Gotebo Kiowa County 

^- ^- ^'•^^^^'- Helena Alfalfa County. 



142 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Committees. 

College Commiftee— G. T. Bryan, Ewers White, J. P. Connors. 

Farmers' Institute— Dan Diehl, J. P. Connors, Ewers White. 

Live Stock Sanitary Committee— R. F. Wilson, G. T. Bryan, R. W. 

Lindsay, M. F. Ikard, J. P. Connors 
Nursery Inspection and Enforcement of Laws — J W. L. Corley, A. C. 

Cobb, J. C. Elliott. 



State Board of Examiners- 
Prof. J. S. Buchanan, Chairman Norman. 

R. C. Cain, Secretary Guthrie. 

Prof L. J. Abbott Edmond. 

J. G. Masters Tulsa. 

Ira L. Cain Muskogee. 

Lynn Glover Bartlesville. 

H. C. King Durant. 

T. H. Hubbard Cordell. 



State Board of Public Affairs. 

Roy V. Hoffman Chandler. 

R. J. Allen Duncan. 

T. A. Chandler Vinita. 



Warden of tlie State Penitentiary. 
R. W. Dick Ardmore 

Warden of tlie State Reformatory. 
Sam Flournoy Elk City 



State Game and Fish Wrrden. 
J. S. Askew . . .• Chickasha 



Adjutant General. 
Frank M. Canton Fairfax 



State Health Commissioner. 
Dr. J. C. Mahr Shawnee 



State Factory Inspector. 
G. E. Warren Tulsa 



STATE OFFICERS 143 

Senatorial Direct Election Commissioners. 

W. H. Murray Tishomingo. 

C. B. Douglass Muskogee. 

Thomas H. Doyle Perry. 

John Threadgill Oklahoma City. 

George H. Evans Chickasha. 

T. B. Ferguson '. . .Watonga. 

Jesse J. Dunn Alva. 

D. L. Sleeper Tulsa. 

J. J. Quarles Fairfax. 



Code Commissioners. 

Sam H. Harris, Chairman Oklahoma City. 

Jean P. Day, Secretary Poteau. 

W. R. Brownlee Kingfisher. 

John R. Thomas Muskogee. 

John T. Hayes Hobart. 



State Election Board. 
1909. 

Will Linn, Secretary Chickasha. 

Frank E. Gillette El Reno. 

J. W. Bolen : Ada. 

1910 

Jake Hammon Lawton. 

T. J. Leahy Pawhuska. 

Seth Cordon, Secretary Gore. 



State Board of Pardons. 

E. D. Cameron, President Sulphur. 

J. P. Connors Canadian. 

M. E. Trapp Guthrie. 

W. B. Anthony, Secretary Marlowe. 



State Board of Medical Examiners. 

Allopathic — 

Dr. W. T. Tilley Muskogee. 

Dr. A. M. Chambers Poteau. 

Dr. A. M. Butts Holdenville. 

Dr. A. E. Davenport Oklahoma-City. 

Osteopathic — 

Dr. H. C. Montague Muskogee. 

Dr. J. A. Price Alternate) Guthrie. 

Homeopathic — 

*Dr. J. Hensley Oklahoma City. 

*Dr. D. W. Miller (Alternate) Blackwell. 



144 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Eclectic — 
Dr. Frank P. Davis Enid 

Physio-Medico — 

Dr. A. R. Lewis Ryan. 

Dr. J. A. Briggs (Alternate) Atoka. 

Dr. L. E. Manuel Chickasha. 



♦Resigned. Dr. Geo. H. Truox, of Stonewall, was named to suc- 
ceed Dr. Hensley, September 22, 1910. Dr. H. L. Lott, of Oklahoma 
City was named to succeed Dr. D. W. Miller. 



State Board of Dental Examiners. 

Dr. A. C. Hixon, Secretary Guthrie. 

Dr. W. W. Bryan Claremore. 

Dr. W. H. Murray .Poteau. 

Dr. A. E. Bonnell Muskogee. 

Dr. F. C. Seids Perry. 



State Board of Embalming. 

W. Patterson, Secretary Guthrie. 

R. E. Wade Perry. 

W. E. Harper Oklahoma City. 



Board of Pharmacy. 

J. C. Burton, Secretary Stroud. 

F. B. Lillie, Treasurer Guthrie. 

W. D. Dodd Caddo. 



Trustees for Insane Asylum. 

Robert Dunlop, Chairman Newkirk. 

C. L. Long Wewoka. 

C. N. Haskell Muskogee. 

State Printing Board. 

C. N. Haskell Governor. 

James A. Menefee State Treasurer. 

M. E. Trapp State Auditor. 

Officers. 

M. E. Trapp Chairman. 

J. A. Menefee Secretary. 

C. C. Woirall State Printer. 

D. C. Lester Assistant Printer, 

School Land Commissioners. 

C. N. Haskell, Chairman Governor. 

E. D. Cameron State Superintendent. 

William Cross Secretary of State. 

M. E. Trapp State Auditor. 

J. P. Connors President Board of Agriculture. 



STATE OFFICERS 1^5 

State Board of Equalization. 

C. N. Haskell Governor 

M. E. Trapp State Auditor 

William Cross Secretary ot State. 

T A Menefee State Treasurer. 

r'harips A Tavlor State Examiner and Inspector. 

J P Connors .■;... President Board of Agriculture. 

Charles West Attorney General. 



State Board of Education. 

E D Cameron State Superintendent. 

C. N. Haskell.'.'.'.*.".". Governor. 

William Cros% Secretary of State. 

Charles West Attorney General. 

Officers. 

E D. Cameron President. 

William Cross Secretary. 



Agricultural and Industrial Commission. 

E. D. Cameron, President Guthrie. 

J. P. Connors. Secretary Guthrie. 

J. H. Connell Stillwater. 



Text Book Commission. 

Gov. C. N. Haskell, President Guthrie. 

Rev. T. F. Brewer, Secretary Norman. 

Supt. J. D. Benedict Muskogee. 

Supt. M. E. Moore Marietta. 

Prof. J. H. Barnes Enid. 

Prof. D. B. CoUums Stillwell. 

Hon. C. B. Belt Norman. 



State Board of Arbitration and Conciliation. 

T. C. Wyatt Wanette. 

M. F. Landon Lehigh. 

J. F. Holden Muskogee. 

George Brotton Coalgate. 

M. R. Powell Oklahoma City. 

Tom Bell. . . .'.'.'.'.*.*.'. .'.*. . .' Hughes. 



State Mining Board. 

T. W. McLaughlin Baileyville. 

W. T. Evans Dow. 

Alexander Mount Henryetta. 

P. R. Allen McAlester. 

Daniel C. McAlpine Chant. 

Sigr 12 



146 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Presidents of State Schools. 

State University — A. Grant Evans Norman. 

A. & M. College— J. H. Connell Stillwater. 

Ada Normal — C. W. Briles Ada. 

Northeastern Normal — A. S. Wyly Tahlequah. 

Southeastern Normal — M. E. Moore Durant. 

Central Normal — J, A. McLaughlin Edmond. 

Northwestern Normal — W. L. Ross Alva. 

Southwestern Normal — J. F. Sharp Weatherford. 

Colored A. & N. University — I. E. Page Langston. 

University Preparatory School — J. H. Kelly Tonkawa. 

Oklahoma School tor the Deaf — A. A. Stewart Sulphur. 

Oklahoma School of Mines and Metallurgy Wilburton. 

Oklahoma School for the Blind — Geo. W. Bruce Ft. Gibson. 

Whitaker Orphans' Home— W. T. Whitaker Pry or Creek. 

Murray District A. & M. School — J. A. Wilson Tishomingo. 

Connors District A. & M.. School — F. B. Liner Warner. 

Colored Orphans' Home Logan County. 

Regents of the State University. 

C. N. Haskell, Governor Guthrie. 

Lee Cruce Ardmore. 

J. D. Lydrick Shawnee. 

John P. Hickman Perkins. 

Flowers Nelson Tulsa. 

W. E. Ramsey .- Muskogee. 

J. Matt Gordon Weatherford. 

N. L. Linebaugh McAlester. 

Clifford J. Pratt Oklahoma City. 

Claude C. Hatchett Durant. 

R. C. Beatty Temple. 

J. W. Perry Norman. 

Regents of the State Normal Schools. 

E. D. Cameron Sulphur. 

J. A. Menefee Guthrie. 

J. B. Mosley Sulphur. ' 

A. S. Wyly Tahlequah. 

D. S. Rose Blackwell. 

Officers. 

E. D. Cameron President. 

J. A. Menefee Treasurer. 

John L. Mitch Secretary. 

Regents of the Oklahoma Industrial Institute and College for Girls. 

E. D. Cameron President. 

Capt. A. S. McKennon McAlester. 

Mrs. Katherine Patterson Muskogee. 

Anna D. Stewart Antlers. 

J. P. Connors Canadian. 

Regents of the Oklahoma School of Mines 
and Metallurgy. 

J. P. Connors Canadian. 

Thad Rice Hitchcock. 

J. W. L. Corley Howe. 

D. N. Robb Atoka. 



STATE OFFICERS 147 

Regents for the Oklahoma School for the Deaf. 

E. D. Cameron, President Guthrie. 

W. S. Wiley, Secretary Bacone. 

Charles Burkes Edmond. 

John E. Hilar Norman. 

Regents of the University Preparatory School. 

Gov. C. N. Haskell Guthrie. 

W. A. Brooks, Secretary Oklahoma City. 

J. J. Quarles, President Fairfax. 

Trustees Deaf and Dumb School. 

W. S. Wiley Bacone. 

Jno. Miller Norman. 

Chas. Burkes Edmond. . 

Board of Examiners, Hospital for Insane. 

Dr. M. M. Turlington Seminole. 

Dr. J. A. Overstreet Kingfisher. 

Regents Ex-Officio of the Oklahoma School for the Blind. 
(State Board of Education.) 

E. D. Cameron President. 

William Cross Secretary. 

C. N. Haskell Governor. 

Charles West Attorney General. 

Regents for the Colored A. & N. University. 

James Menefee Guthrie. 

E. T. Barbour ^=^1 Reno. 

E. D. Cameron Sulphur. 

U. C. Guss Guthrie. 

D. L. F. Banks Enid. 

Officers. 

James Menefee President. 

E. T. Barbour Secretary. 

John L. Mitch, Clerk Guthrie. 

Board of Control of State Training School. 

J. E. Gibbons, Chairman Purcell. 

Milas Lasater Pauls \alley. 

Ira Mitchell l\^"r'''°°PU^ 

T T Rrnwn Oklahoma City. 

J. T. Sighley .■.•.■.".■.■.*.•.■.•.■.■.■ ^^. Oklahoma City. 

Trustees of the Whitaker Orphans' Home. 

Ben. T. Lafayette, President Checotah. 

A. L. Hausam, Vice-President V/TTh 

Wilson O. Bruton, Treasurer Muldro\\ . 

J. W. Swartz, Secretary S,"® p ^ 

W. T. Whitaker, Superintendent Pryor «, reeK. 



148 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 



1890. 

Geo. W. Steele Governor. 

Robert Martin Secretary. 

Horace Speed Attorney. 

Edward B. Green Chief Justice. 

Abraham J. Seay Associate Justice. 

John G. Clark Associate Justice. 

Wm. Grimes U. S. Marshal. 



1893. 

A. J. Seay Governor. 

Robert Martin Secretary. 

Horace Speed Attorney. 

Edward B. Green Chief Justice. 

John H. Burford Asociate Justice. 

Wm. Grimes Associate Justice. 



1895. 

Wm. C. Rent row Governor. 

Thomas J. Lowe Secretary. 

C. A. Galbraith Attorney General. 

Frank Dale Chief Justice. 

John H. Burford Associate Justice. 

Henry W. Scott Associate Justice. 

A. G. C. Bierer Associate Justice. 

John L. McAfee Associate Justice. 

E. D. Nix U. S. Marsha.. 

E. D. Cameron Auditor. 

M. L. Turner Treasurer. 

E. D. Cameron Supt. P. Instruction. 

Caleb R. Brooks U. S. Attorney. 



1897. 

W. C. Renfrow Governor. 

Thos. J. Lowe Secretary. 

C. A. Galbreath Attorney General. 

Frank Dale Chief Justice. 

John C. Tarsney Associate Justice. 

J. R. Keaton X^ssociate Justice. 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 149 

A. G. C. Bierer Associate Justice. 

John L. McAtee Associate Justice. 

P. S. Nagle U. S. Marshal. 

O. A. Nichols Auditor. 

M. L. Turner Treasurer. 

O. A. Nichols Supt. Public Instruction. 

Caleb R. Brooks U. S. Attorney. 

Thos. J. Lowe Insurance Commissioner. 

W. H. Smithson Asst. Insurance Com. 

Edgar W. Jones Librarian. 

J. C. Jamison Adjutant General. 

Wm. Blincoe School Land Commissioner. 

J. S. Soule ■. Statistical Agent. 

Edgar W. Jones Court Clerk. 

J, Y. Callahan Delegate to Congress. 

Percy L. Smith Secretary to Governor. 

Di*. L. Haynes Buxton Supt. of Public Health. 



1898. 

Cassius M. Barnes Governo/. 

W. M. Jenkins Secretary of the Territory. 

Harper S. Cunningham Attorney General. 

Frank M. Thompson Treasurer of the Territory. 

S. N. Hopkins Supt. Public Instruction and ex-Officio 

Auditor. 
Charles H. Filson Secretary School Land Board and ex- 

Offiicio School Land Commissioner. 

Joseph H. Xorris Assistant Secretary. 

Fred L. Wenner Private Secretary to the Governor. 

James J. Houston Assistant Secretary of the Territory. 

E. P. ^IcCabe Deputy Auditor. 

Amos A. Ewing Oil Inspector. 

John M. Pugh Bank Examiner. 

George H. Dodson Librarian. 

Bert C. Orner Acting Adjutant General. 

Dr. L. Haynes Buxton Superintendent of Public Health. 

Territorial School Land Board — Governor, Territorial Secretary 
and Territorial Auditor. 

Territorial Board of Railway Assessors — (Same as above.) 

Territorial Board of Equalization — (Same as above.) 

Banking Board — Governor, Secretary, Attorney General, Treas- 
urer and Auditor. 

Territorial Board of Education — Territorial Superintendent of 
of Public Instruction Hopkins; President D. R. Boyd, of Norman; 
President E. D. Murdaugh, Edmond; Prof. B. F. Nihart, Oklahoma 
City, and Prof L. E. Cooley, Shawnee 

Presidents of the Territorial Institutions of Learning — D.R.Boyd, 
of the Territorial University at Norman; E. D. Murdaugh, of the 
Normal School of Edmond; G. E. Morrow, of the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College at Stillwater; Inman E. Page, of the Colored Uni- 
versity at Langston. 

Board of Health — Auditor Hopkins; Dr. L. Haynes Buxton, of 
Guthrie; and Dr. F. S. Hamilton, of Norman. 



150 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Supreme Court. 

J. H. Burford Guthrie Chief Justice. 

J. C. Tarsney El Reno Associate. 

B. F. Burwell Oklahoma City Associate. 

B. T. Hainer Perry Associate. 

J. L. McAtee Enid Associate. 

These Judges also served as judges of the district courts in the 
First to the Fifth Districts, respectively. 

Clerks of Courts. 

B. F. Hegler Guthrie Supreme Court. 

M. C. Hart Guthrie First District. 

J. H. Warren El Reno Second District. 

Byron D. Shear Oklahoma City Third District. 

W. F. Harn Perry Fourth District. 

J. S. McClelland Pond Creek Fifth District. 

Federal Officers. 

United States District Attorney — Samuel L. Overstreet. 

Assistant United States Attorneys— John H. Scothorn and B. S. 
McGuire. 

United States Marshal— C. H. Thompson. 

Register and Receivers of Land Offices— Guthrie, J. J. Boles and 
F. E. McKinley; Oklahoma City, S. S. Price and A. H. Classen; 
Kingfisher, E. E .Brownlee and J. V. Admire; Enid, J. B. Cullison 
and J. J. S. Hassler; Perry, A. H. Boles and J. J. Powers; Alva, R A. 
Cameron and W. J. French; Woodward, F. S. Healy and J. W^ Miller; 
Mangum, H. D. McKnight and James Kelly. 

United States Indian Agents— Osages, W. J. Pollock, Pawhuska; 
Poncas, Pawnees and Otoes, John Jensen, Whiteagle; lowas. Sacs and 
Foxes, and Pottawatomies, Lee Patrick, Sac and Fox; Cheyennes and 
Arapahoes, Major A. E. Woodson, Darlington; Kiowas, Comanches and 
Apaches, W. T. Walker, Anadarko. 



1899. , 

Few changes were made in the official roster in this year. These 

were as follows: 

Daniel R. Widmer Game Warden. 

C. E. Erwin Associate Justice Second District. 

W. S. Hunter Clerk of the Second District. 

J. E. Pickard Clerk of the Fourth District. 

J. P. Renshaw Clerk of the Fifth District. 

C. T. Prouty Grain Inspector. 

Col. A. E. Randelet Indian Agent at Anadarko for ^\:iowas, 

Comanches and Apaches. 

Prof G. D. Moss Member of Board of Education, suc- 
ceeding Prof. L. E. Cooley, Shawnee. 

A. C. Scott Member of Board of Education, suc- 
ceeding G. B. Morrow as President 
A. & M. College. 

J. E. Ament Member of Board of Education. 

(Added.) 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 151 

1900. 

Changes were made in the following departments and positions this 

year as follows: 

Horace Speed U. S. District Attorney General. 

J. C. Strang Attorney General. 

W. S. Search . .Bank Commissioner. 

C. M. Keiger Game Warden. 

Board of Education — Territorial Superintendent, President D. R. 
Boyd, Norman; President E. D. Murdaugh, Edmond; Prof. G. D. Moss, 
Kingfisher, and Prof Richard H. Ewing, Stillw'ater. 

Board of Health — Dr. L. Haynes Buxton, superintendent of public 
health, Oklahoma City; Dr. B. F. Hamilton, Shawnee, and Territorial 
Auditor Hopkins. 

E. M. Hegler succeeded W. S. Hunter as clerk of the Second 
District of the Supreme Court at El Reno. D. W. Eastman succeeded 
J. J. S. Hassler as receiver and register of the United States land 
office at Enid, with J. B. Cullison. J. R. Scott succedeed J. J. Powers 
at the Perry land office. 

Changes of Indian Agents. 

O. A. Mitscher Agent for Osages Pawhu-ska. 

Maj. Geo. W. H. Stouch. . .Agent for Cheyenne 

and Arapahoe Darlington. 

Col. J. F. Raudlett Agent for Kiowa, 

Comanche and Apache Anadarko. 



1901. 

William M. Jenkins Governor. 

Fred L. Weuner Private Secretary. 

William Grimes Territorial Secretary. 

J. M. McConnell Assistant Secretary 

J. C. Strang Attorney General. 

C. W. Rambo Territorial Treasurer. 

L. W. Baxter Supt. Pub. Ins. and Ex-Officic 

Territorial Auditor. 
J. J. Houston Sec. School Land Board and 

Ex-Officio Commissioner. 

Joseph H. Norris Assistant Secretary. 

E. E. Brown Oil Inspector. 

Fred H. Thwing Bank Commissioner. 

George H. Dodson Librarian. 

E. P. McCabe Deputy Auditor. 

E. P. Burlingame Adjutant General. 

C. T. Prouty Grain Inspector. 

C. M. Keiger Game Warden. 

E. E .Cowdrick Supt Public Health. 

Board of Education — Superintendent Baxter; President D. R. Boyd, 
of Norman; President F. H. Umholz, of Edmond; Prof. G. D. Moss, 
of Kingfisher, and Prof. Richard H. Ewing, of Stillwater. 

Presidents of the Territorial Institutions of Learning— D. R. Boyd, 
Territorial University of Norman; F. H. Umholz, of the Oklahoma 
Normal at Edmond; James E. Ament, of the Northwestern Normal 



152 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

at Alva; A. C. Scott, of the A. &. M., at Stillwater, and Inman E. Page, 
of the C. A. & N. at Langston. 

No changes were made in the Supreme Courts or district clerk- 
ships. 

Board of Health — No changes. 

Several changes were made in the federal register and receiver 
of land office service, as follows: Guthrie, J. J. Boles and F. E. Mc- 
Kinley; Oklahoma City, S. S. Price and A. H. Classen; Kingfisher, E. 
E. Brownlee and J. V. Admire; Enid, J. B. Cullison and D. W. Eastman; 
Perry, A. H. Boles and J. R. Scott; Alva, R. A. Cameron and W. J. 
French; Woodward, F. S. Healy and E. S. Wiggins; Mangum, John 
Oliphant and J. A. Trotter; El Reno, Thomas R. Reid and James A. 
Sickles; Lawton, H. D. McKnight and J. D. Maguire. 

Other appointments were unchanged. 



1902. 

Thompson B. Ferguson Governoiv 

Robert M. Carr Private Secretary. 

William Grimes Territorial Secretary. 

J. M. McConnell Assistant Secretary. 

J. C. Roberts Attorney General. 

Charles H. Woods Assistant Attorney General. 

C. W. Rambo Territorial Treasurer. 

L. W. Baxter Ter. Supt. and ex-Officio Auditor 

E. P. McCabe Deputy Auditor. 

J. J. Houston Sec. School Land Board and ex- 

OfRcio Commissioner. 

H. F. Ardery Assistant Secretary. 

John H. Dillon Oil Inspector. 

Li. O. Enochs Deputy Oil Inspector. 

Paul F. Cooper Bank Commissioner. 

H. W. Pentecost Deputy Bank Commissioner. 

J. W. Foose Librarian. 

E. P. Burlingame Adjutant General. 

C. T. Prouty Grain Inspector. 

J. A. Gould Game Warden. 

Dr. E. E. Cowdrick Superintendent of Public Health. 

C. R. VanVleet Geologist. 

Clerks of Courts. 

B. F. Hegler .Guthrie Supreme Court. 

T. A. Neal .Guthrie Pirst District. 

E. M. Hegler .El Reno Second District. 

Byron D. Shear .Oklahoma City Third District. 

J. E. Pickard Perry Fourth District. 

C. F. McElrath .Enid Fifth District. 

E. P. Kelley Aiva Sixth District. 

N. E. Sisson Anadarko Seventh District. 

Board of Education— Supt. Baxter; President D. R. Boyd, Norman; 
President F. H. Umholz, Edmond; Prof. G. D. Moss, Kingfisher; Prof. 
J. R. Campbell, Guthrie. 

Board of Health — No changes. 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 153 

Federal Officers. 

Horace Speed United States District Attorney. 

John W. Scothorn Assistant Attorney. 

Frank Hall Assistant Attorney. 

H. D. McKnight Assistant Attorney. 

William B. Fossett United States Marshal. 

Registers and Receivers United States Land Offices: Guthrie, 
J. J. Boles and F. E. McKinley; Oklahoma City, A. H. Classen and 
William Young; Kingfisher, E. E. Brownlee and J. V. Admire; Alva, 
W. H. Cofield and A. R. Museller; Woodward, F. S. Healey and E. S. 
Wiggins; Mangum, John A. Oliphant and John A. Trotter; El Reno, 
Thomas Reid and James A. Sickles; Lawton, H. D. McKnight and 
J. D. Maguire. 

In the Indian Agent Service, Ross Guffin succeeded Lee Patrick at 
the Sac and Fox Agency. 



1903. 

The following changes were made in the heads of departments: 

Fred L. Wenner Secretary of School Land Board 

and ex-Officio Commissioner. 

F. A. Ashton Oil Inspector. 

J. C. Clark Game Warden. 

Prof. Ed. S. Vaught. of Oklahoma City, was named a member of 
the Board of Education to succeed Prof. J. R. Campbell, Guthrie, 
Campbell becoming president of the Southwestern Normal at Weather- 
ford. J. F. Kelley was named as president of the University Prepara- 
tory School at Tonkawa. 

Federal Officers. 

The only change made in federal officers was in the appointment 
of Hugh M. Noble as agent for the Ponca and Otoe at Whiteagle. 
George M. Harvey was named agent for the new agency of the Pawnees 
at Pawnee. 



1904. 

This year Percy C. Simons was named attorney general with Don 
Carlos Smith as assistant. A. H. Jackman was named grain inspector 
and Dr. E. G. Sharp, of Guthrie, was added to the Board of Health. 

Supreme Court. 

J. H. Burford Guthrie Chief Justice. 

C. E. Erwin El Reno Associate Justice. 

B. F. Burwell Oklahoma City Associate Justice. 

B. T. Hainer Perry Associate Justice. 

J. L. Beauchamp Enid Associate Justice. 

J. L. ^ ancoast Alva Associate Justice. 

Frank E. Gillette , Anadarko Associate Justice. 



154 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



1905. 



Thompson B. Ferguson Governor. 

William Grimes Territorial Secretary. 

C. W. Rambo Territorial Treasurer. 

L. W. Baxter Territorial Superintendent Public 

Instruction and ex-OfRcio Auditor. 

P. C. Simons Attorney General. 

Paul Cooper Bank Commissioner. 

E. P. Burlingame Adjutant General. 

F. A. Ashton Oil Inspector. 

A. H. Jackman Grain Inspector. 

J. W. Foose Librarian. 

Eugene Watrous Game Warden. 

William Grimes Ex-OfRcio Insurance Commissioner. 

Fred L. Wenner Secretary School Land Board. 

Dr. J. W. Baker Superintendent Public Health. 

C. A. McNabb Secretary of Board of Agriculture. 

1906. 

Frank Frantz Governoi". 

Orville G. Frantz Private Secretary . 

Charles H. Filson Secretary of the Territory 

Hugh Scott Assistant Secretary. 

W. O. Cromwell Attorney General. 

Don Carlos Smith Assistant Attorney General. 

C. W. Rambo Treasurer of the Territory. 

Mrs. A. J. Rambo Assistant Treasurer. 

L. W. Baxter Superintendent rublic Instruction 

and ex-Ofhcio Auditor 

E. P. McCabe Deputy Auditor. 

Fred L. Wenner Secretary of the School Land Board 

and ex-Ofhcio Commissioner. 

Charles A. Cunningham Assistant Secretary. 

Herbert H. Smock Bank Commissioner. 

D. J. Moore Deputy Bank Commissioner 

P. A. Ashton Oil Inspector. 

J. W. Foose Librarian. 

Alva J. Niles Adjutant General. 

Frank Prouty Grain Inspector. 

Eugene Watrous Game Warden. 

Territorial School Land Board: Governor Frantz, Secretary 
Filson, and Auditor Baxter. 

Board of Equalization: Governor, Secretary and Auditor. 

Regents of Territorial University: Governor Frantz; G. W. Sut- 
ton, Cleveland: D. L. Larsh, Norman; R. E. Wood, Shawnee; H. B. 
Gilstrap, Chandler; Selwyn Douglas. Oklahoma City. 

Regents of Agricultural and Mechanical College: Governor Frantz, 
Frank J. Wikoff, Stillwater; T. J. Hartman, Deer Creek; H. C. R. 
Brodball, Ponca City; W. H. Merten, Guthrie; A. T. Kruse, Geary. 

Livestock Sanitary Commission: Peter A. Becker, Jefferson; 
Thomas Morris, secretary, Guthrie; G. T. Bryan, Perry. 

Board of Education of Normal School: Superintendent of Public 
Instruction Baxter, Treasurer Rambo; Charles M. Thacker, Mangum; 
John W. Threadgill, Oklahoma City; G. E. Nichols, Alva. 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 153 

Board of Regents Colored Agricultural and Normal University: 
Superintendent of Public Instruction Baxter; Treasurer Rambo; U. C. 
Guss, Guthrie; E. T. Barbour, El Reno; James Rouse, Cooper. 

Board of Education: Superintendent Baxter; President D. R. 
Body, Norman, Territorial University; F. H. Umholz, Edmond, Central 
Hayes, Chandler; Prof. J. M. Rule, Hobart. 

Presidents of the Territorial Institutions of Learning: D. R. 
Boyd, Norman, Territory University; F. H. Umholz, Edmond, Central 
State Normal; T. W. Conway, Alva, Northwestern Normal; J. R. 
Campbell, Weatherford, Southwestern Normal; A. C. Scott, Stillwater, 

A. and M.; J. F. Kelley, Tonkawa, University Preparatory School; 
Inman E. Page, Langston, Colored Agricultural and Normal University. 

Board of Health: Auditor Baxter; Dr. J. W. Baker, superintendent 
and ex-officio, secretary, Enid; Dr. B. F. Hamilton, Shawnee, presi- 
dent; Dr. E. G. Sharp, Guthrie, vice president. 

Board of Pharmacy: F. B. Lillie, Guthrie; A. B. Clark, Watonga; 
E. E. Howendobler, Perry. 

Board of Dental Examiners: A. C. Hixon, Guthrie; R. H. Pendle- 
ton, Norman; A. IM. Detrick, Oklahoma City; Fred C. Seids, Perry; 
D. M. Brenneman, Hobart. 

Board of Agriculture: R. Kleiner, Wheatland; D. L. Aikins, Med- 
ford; A. S. Hankins, Alva; Ewers White, McCloud; W. L. Fullerton, 
Olustee; Horace J. Newberry, Lone Wolf; C. A. McNabb. secretary, 
Guthrie. 

Board of Embalmers: A. E. Bracken, Kingfisher; W. K. Patter- 
son, Guthrie; W. E. Harper, Oklahoma City. 

Board of Osteopathic Examiners: Dr. J. A. Price, Perry; Dr. J. W. 
Slade, Guthrie; Dr. J. M. Rouse, Oklahoma City. 

Federal Officers. 

John Embry LTnited States District Attorney. 

John W. Scothorn Assistant. 

George A. Outcelt Assistant. 

L. A. McKnight Assistant. 

John Abernathy united States Marshal. 

Registers and Receivers of the United States Land Offices: Guth- 
rie, J. J. Boles and William D. Hodge; Alva, George D. Orner and A. J. 
Ross; Woodward, D. T. Morgan and E. S. Wiggins; El Reno, Thomas 
R. Reid and James A. Sickles; Lawton, A. C. Maxwell and H. D. 
McKnight. 

Indian Agents and Superintendents: Osage, Ret Miller, Pawhuska; 
Ponca and Otoe, Hugh M. Noble, Whiteagle; Iowa, Sac and Fox, W. C. 
Kohlenberg, Sac and Fox Agency; Cheyenne and Arapaho, Major 
George W. Stouch, Darlington; Kiowa, Comanche and Apache, John P. 
Blackmon, Anadarko; Pawnee, George W. Nellis, Pawnee|. 

Supreme Court. 

John H. Burford Guthrie Chief Justice. 

C. E. Erwin El Reno Associate. 

B. F. Burwell Oklahoma City Associate. 

B: T. Hainer Perry Associate. 

M. C. Garber Enid Associate. 

J. L. Pancoast Alva Associate. 

Frank E. Gillette Anadarko Associate. 



156 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Clerks. 

B. F. Hegler Guthrie Supreme Court. 

J. H. Norris " First District. 

E. M. Hegler El Reno second District. 

Charles E. Hunter Oklahoma City Third District. 

Charles Watson Perry Fourth District. 

Vernon Whiting Enid Fifth District. 

Ira A. Hill Alva Sixth District. 

N. E. Sisson Anadarko Seventh District. 

No changes were made hefore statehood. 



TERMS OF GOVERNORS OF OKLAHOMA TERRITORY 



George W. Steele 

of Marion, Ind. 
Abraham J. Seay 
William C. Renfrow 

of Kingfisher, Okla. 

of Oklahoma Ter. 
Cassius M. Barnes 

of Guthrie, O. T. 
William M. Jenkins 

of Newkirk, O. T. 

Thompson B.Ferguson 
of Watonga, O. T. 

Frank Frantz 
of Enid, O. T. 



temporary 
Commission. 



May 6, 1893 



Apl. 20, 1901 



Nov. 30, 1901 



Permanent 
Commission. 
May 15, 1890 

Jan. 18, 1892 



How Vacated. 

Resigned. 

Removed. 



Sep. 2, 1893 Resigned. 
May 12. 1897 Term Expired. 



Jan. 13. 1902 



Jan. 10. 1906 



Removed 
Nov. 30. 1901. 
Immediate effect. 
Term expired. 

Service terminat- 
ed Nov. 15, 1907, 
president having 
signed statehood 
proclamation Nov. 
16, 1907. Charles 
N. Haskell sworn 
in as the elected 
Governor of the 
State November 
16. 1907. 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 
Terms of Secretaries of Oklahoma Territory. 

How Vacated. 



157 



Robert Martin 
of El Reno, O. T. 

Thomas J. Lowe 
of Guthrie. O. T. 

William M. Jenkins 
of Newkirk, O. T. 

William Grimes 
of Kingfisher, O T. 

Charles H. Filson 
of Guthrie, O. T. 




Permanent 
Commission. 
May 15, 1890 

Sep. 2, 1893 

June 7, 1897 

Jan. 13, 1902 
Jan. 15. 1906 



Removed. 

Resigned. 

Appointed 
Governor on 
April 20. 190 L 
Term expired. 

Service terminated 
Nov. 15. 1907. The 
President signed 
the Statehood 
Proclamation 
November 16, 1907. 



TERRITORIAL DELEGATES TO CONGRESS 

David A. Harvey (R) . .Oklahoma City J^ov. 4. 1890-Mar. 4. 1893. 

Dennis T. Flynn (R) . . .Guthrie Mar. 4. 1893-97. 

Two Terms. 

James Y. Callahan (D)Enid Mar. 4, 1897-99. 

Dennis T. Flynn (R) . . .Guthrie Mar. 4, 1899-1903. 

(Re-elected) Two Terma 
Bird S. McGuire (R) . . .Pawnee Mar. 4, 1903-07. 

Two Terms. 



158 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



MEMBERS OF THE TERRITORIAL LEGISLATURES 



FIRST ASSEMBLY. 

Council. 

First District Charles Brown, John Foster, John F. 

Linn. 
Second District James L. Brown, John W. Howard, 

Leander G. Pitman. 

Third District Robert J. Nisbett. 

Fourth District Joseph Smelser. 

Fifth District Mort L. Bixler. 

Sixth District Daniel Harader, W. M. McCartney. 

Seventh District George W. Gardenhire. 

Eighth District Charles F. Grunnier. 

Representatives. 

First District Robert J. Barker, William H. Camp- 
bell, Samuel L. Lewis, William H. 
Merten, Wm. S. Robertson, James 
L. Smith. 

Second District Moses Neal, Charles G. Jones, Samuel 

D. Peck, Daniel W. Peery, Hugh G. 
Trosper. 

Third District William C. Adair, Jumes M. Stovall, 

Thomas R. Waggoner. 

Fourth District Arthur N. Daniels, D. W. Talbot, John 

H. Wimberly. 

Fifth District Green J. Currin. D. C. Farnsworth, 

Joseph C. Post, Edward C. Tritt. 

Sixth District Samuel W. Clark, James T. Matthews, 

Ira N. Terrill. 

Seventh District Elisha A. Long. 

Eighth District A. M. Colson. 



SECOND ASSEMBLY. 

Council. 

First District John M. Cannon. 

Second District C. H. Carswell. 

Third District ! J. W. Clevenger. 

Fourth District O. R. Fegan. 

Fifth District J. P. Lane. 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 159 

Sixth District j q Pringey 

Seventh District L. G. Pitman.' 

Eighth District L P Ross 

Ninth District .'.'.".'.".'.'.' ! William McCartney. 

Tenth District Hugh McCredie. 

Eleventh District p. s. Pulliam. 

Twelfth District j j shafer 

Thirteenth District V.V.V.V. C. J. Wrlghtsman. 



Representatives. 

First District Talcott Ormsbfe. 

Second District j. m. Johnson. 

Third District W. B. Stone. 

Fourth District r. C. Brennen. 

Fifth District J. H. Wimberly. 

Sixth District C. H. Allen. 

Seventh District M. U Stanley. 

Eighth District j. M. Farris. 

Ninth District John Pfaff. 

Tenth District j. W. Ozmun. 

Eleventh District john W. Beatty 

Twelfth District Dan W Peery 

Thirteenth District V.J. C. Carrington. 

Fourteenth District T. R. Waggoner. 

Fifteenth District J. M. Stovall 

Sixteenth District .......'. '.John W. Moyle. 

Seventeenth District Ben J. Clardy 

Eighteenth District .W. A. Scott. 

Nineteenth District j j Merrick. 

Twentieth District '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. O. P. Rathbun. 

Twenty-first District j. k. Allan. 

Twenty-second District pi. j. Wallace 

Twenty-third District W B Stone 

Twenty-fourth District Ih.' S.' Cunningham. 

Twenty-fifth District Prank H. Greer. 

Twenty-sixth District j. j. McDaniel. 



THIRD ASSEMBLY. 

Council. 

First District j. E. Doom. 

Second District j S. Allan 

Third District .A. C. Scott 

Fourth District .J. H. Pitzer. 

Fifth District .A. H Boles 

Sixth District '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..E. U. Spencer. 

Seventh District O. R. Fegan 

Eighth District '. . .'.'.'.V.V.V.B.' R. Tankersley. 

Ninth District C. T. Prouty 

Tenth District ■.■.■/.■/. "j." g! Gandy.' 

Eleventh District H. D. Baker. 

Twelfth District G. D. Orner. 

Thirteenth District R. J. Ray. 



160 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Representatives. 

First District N. B. DeFord. 

Second District Charles Brown. 

Third District S. A. Waite. 

Fourth District R. J. Nisbett. 

Fifth District H. C. St. John. 

Sixth District James Brown. 

Seventh District A. N. Spencer. 

Eighth District H. A. Todd. 

Ninth District G. W. Sutton. 

Tenth District William T. Little. 

Eleventh District "W. A. Hogan. 

Twelfth District Robert Lowry. 

Thirteenth District W. H. Mason. 

Fourteenth District C. M. Barnes. 

Fifteenth District J. S. Wade. 

Sixteenth District W. A. Knipe. 

Seventeenth District M. P. McCoy. 

Eighteenth District G. W. Posten. 

Nineteenth District R. H. Walling. 

Twentieth District G. W. Vickers. 

Twenty-first District C. G. Elliott. 

Twenty-second District W. M. Smith. 

Twenty-third District T. T. Boyer. 

Twenty-fourth District G. S. Stine. 

Twenty-fifth District G. W. Bradfield. 

Twentv-sixth District W. F. Hendrix. 



FOURTH ASSEMBLY. 

Council. 

First District J. W. Lynch. 

Second District H. S. Johnson. 

Third District H. S. Hanner. 

Fourth District C. N. Brown. 

Fifth District A. W. Fisher. 

Sixth District J. W. Johnson. 

Seventh District C. W. Gould. 

Eighth District F. L. Winkler. 

Ninth District J. D. DeBois. 

Tenth District E. J. Clark. 

Eleventh District William Garrison. 

Twelfth District D. S. Randolph. 

Thirteenth District D. P. Marum. 

Representatives. 

First District J. W. May. 

Second District ,D. S. Rose. 

Third District T. H. Doyle. 

Fourth District John Hogan. 

Fifth District Dale Lytton. 

Sixth District E. E. Olson. 

Seventh District M. E. Ferguson. 

Eighth District Wright Christian. 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 161 

Ninth District J. M. Stovall. 

Tenth District E. B. Allen. 

Eleventh District W. J. Gault. 

Twelfth District J. K. Graves. 

Thirteenth District B. F. Wilson. 

Fourteenth District J. C. Trously. 

Fifteenth District K. B. Shannon. 

Sixteenth District T. E. Willis. 

Seventeenth District CM. Barnes. 

Eighteenth District W. L. Sullivan. 

Nineteenth District W. R. Berry. 

Twentieth District A. H. Ellis. 

Twenty-first District T. J. Woodniausee. 

Twenty-second District : I. M. St. Clair. 

Twenty-third District G. W. Vickers. 

Twenty-fourth District J. P. D. Moriquand. 

Twenty-fifth District G. P. Cherry. 

Twenty-sixth District J. E. George. 



FIFTH ASSEMBLY. 

Council. 

First District. G. H. Brett. 

Second District A. J. Biddison. 

Third District P. A. Hutto. 

Fourth District Hugh McCredie. 

Fifth District B. P. Magness. 

Sixth District *. Sidney Clarke. 

Seventh District G. W. Beuamy. 

Eighth District F. E. Winkler. 

Ninth District A. H. Houston. 

Tenth District H. E. Havens. 

Eleventh District William Garrison. 

Twelfth District J. P. Gandy. 

Thirteenth District CM. Thacker. 

Representatives. 

First District J. H. Smith. 

Second District James Wilkin. 

Third District T. H. Doyle. - 

Fourth District H. A. Thomas. 

Fifth District E. F. Clark. 

Sixth District W. P. Malley. 

Seventh District J. W. Scott. 

Eighth District J. D. Combs. 

Ninth District B. Duffy. 

Tenth District J. C Walls. 

Eleventh District C G. Jones. 

Twelfth District .- C W. Olmstead. 

Thirteenth District J. W. Hadley. 

Fourteenth District T. R. Reid. 

Fifteenth District D. H. Van Kirk. 

Sixteenth District W. C Stevens. 

Seventeenth District W. H. Merten. 

Sig. 13. .fi 



162 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Eighteenth District J. M. Holliday. 

Nineteenth District V. A. Wood. 

Twentieth District C. F. McElrath 

Twenty-first District F. S. Shearer. 

Twenty-second District J. M. Hay. 

Twenty-third District E. E. Hartshorn. 

Twenty-fourth District ]:^hilip Koch. 

Twenty-fifth District J. D. Ballard. 

Twenty-sixth District J. C. Williamson. 



SIXTH ASSEMBLY. 

Council. 

First District H. C. Brodboll. 

Second District ■. J. p. Woolsey. 

Third District F. E. Miller. 

Fourth District J. F. Todd. 

Fifth District E. Duffy. 

Sixth District Sidney Clarke. 

Seventh District G. W. Bellamy. 

Eighth District F. L. Winkler. 

Ninth District J. C. Foster. 

Tenth District R. E. P. Messall. 

Eleventh District G. W. Coiilson. 

Twelfth District A. G. Updegraff. 

Thirteenth District G. B. Harrison. 

Represbntatives. 

First District W. M. Ferguson. 

Second District James Wilkin. 

Third District J. A. Oliphant 

Fourth District H. A. Thomas. 

Fifth District .J. L. Matthews. 

Sixth District W. H. Scott. 

Seventh District John Embry. 

Eighth District .R. E. Wood. 

Ninth District F. B. Nisbett. 

Tenth District W. L. Phelps. 

Eleventh District C. G. Jones. 

Twelfth District J. W. Comp. 

Thirteenth District J. W. Hadley. 

Fourteenth District T. R. Reid. 

Fifteenth District D. H. Van Kirk. 

Sixteenth District W. C. Stevens. 

Seventeenth District C. E. Seeley. 

Eighteenth District , M. W. Allen. 

Nineteenth District Ret Millard. 

Twentieth District F. R. Rogers. 

Twenty-first District. . .' T. H. Decker. 

Twenty-second District H. M. Brewer. 

Twenty-third District A. T. Sniggs. 

Twenty-fourth District J. H. Campbell. 

Twenty-fifth District Frank Mathews. 

Twenty-sixth District C. R. Alexander. 



TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 163 

SEVENTH ASSEMBLY. 

Council. 

First District J. P. Wolsey. 

Second District J. p. Hickman. 

Third District J. C. Foster. 

Fourtli District R. M. Campbell. 

Fifth District J. Q. Blakeney. 

Sixth District H. H. Camplain. 

Seventh District F. L. Winkler. 

Eighth District A. G. Updegraff. 

Ninth District G. T. Webster. 

Tenth District C. R. Alexander. 

Eleventh District T. P. Gore, 

Twelfth District. Sam Massingale. 

Thirteenth District Frank Mathews. 

Representatives. 

First District James Wilkin. 

Second District W. M. Boles. 

Third District H. W. Williams. 

Fourth District J. L. Mathews. 

Fifth District J. J. Merrick. 

Sixth District E. W. .Jones. 

Seventh District John Threadgill. 

Eighth District F. L. Waggoner. 

Ninth District R. F. Nisbett. 

Tenth District W. T. James. 

Eleventh District J. H. Decker. 

Twelfth District S. G. Sprout. 

Thirteenth District J. P. Cummins. 

Fourteenth District W. A. Maxwell 

Fifteenth District A. McTaggart. 

Sixteenth District ,J. C. Major. 

Seventeenth District T. J. Ballew. 

Eighteenth District ,E. J. Murphy. 

Nineteenth District F. E. Braid wood. 

Twentieth District J. H. Jones. 

Twenty-first District Dyke Ballinger. 

Twenty-second District J. K. Tuttle. 

Twenty-third District ,J. A. Jester. 

Twenty-fourth District J. W. Harrison. 

Twenty-fifth District W. P. Francis. 

Twenty-sixth District T. M. Robison. 



EIGHTH ASSEMBLY. 
Council. 

First District J. R. Scott. 

Second District J. P. Hickman. 

Third District L. G. Niblack. 

Fourth District .... John Threadgill. 

Fifth District E. L. Cralle. 

Sixth District J. H. Decker. 



164 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Seventh District F. L. Winkler. 

Eighth District A. L. Sharrock. 

Ninth District E. J. Murphy. 

Tenth District C. R. Alexander. 

Eleventh District J. A. Menefee. 

Twelfth District B. N. Woodson. 

Thirteenth District W. P. Francis. 

Representatives. 

First District J. B. Norton. 

Second District Wesley Taylor. 

Third District J. T. Craig. 

Fourth District W. N. Walker. 

Fifth District F. G. Prouty. 

Sixth District I. B. Levy. 

Seventh District Ross R. Fuller. 

Eighth District ..J. J. Gayman. 

Ninth District Milton Bryan. 

Tenth District J. D. Lydic. 

Eleventh District J. P. Becker. 

Twelfth District John Ingmire. 

Thirteenth District W. W. Noffsinger 

Fourteenth District W. A. Maxwell. 

Fifteenth District C. E. Wood. 

Sixteenth District A. J. Ross. 

Seventeenth District A. McBride. 

Eighteenth District B. B. Bone. 

Nineteenth District J. P. Gandy. 

Twentieth District W. W. Daniels. 

Twenty-first District Dyke Ballinger. 

Twenty-second District Scott Ferris. 

Twenty-third District .1. A. Jester. 

Twenty-fourth District O. J. Logan. 

Twenty-fifth District David Hogg. 

Twenty-sixth District T. M. Robinson. 



Educational Institutions 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 167 



UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 

(Norman, Okla.) 



The State University was founded by an act of the legislature of 
the Territory of Oklahoma, entitled "An Act to Locate and Establish 
the University of Oklahoma." The act provided that when Ten Thou- 
sand Dollars and forty acres of land should be given to the Territory 
of Oklahoma by the City of Norman, the school should be located at 
that place. These requirements were met and the university was 
established in 1892. The university is a part of the public educational 
system of the state and the governing board of the institution is the 
State Board of Education, consisting of the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction and six members, appointed by the governor. 

In the spring of 1893, work was begun on the first building. The 
institution was organized in the following summer, and in September 
opened its doors. Colleges and schools have developed in the follow- 
ing order: The College of Arts and Sciences, 1893, four-year plan; 
the School of Pharmacy, two-year plan, 1893, four-year plan, 1908; 
graduate work, 1899, the graduate school being organized separately 
in 1909; the School of Medicine, first two years' work, 1900, third and 
fourth years, 1910; the School of Fine Arts, 1903; the School of Applied 
Science and the School of Mines, 1904, reorganized as the College of 
Engineering, 1909; the summer session, 1908; the School of Law, 1909; 
and the School of Teaching, 1909. 

David Ross Boyd was president of the university from 1892 to 1908. 
Arthur Grant Evans was elected to the presidency in June, 1908, hold- 
ing until 1910, when J. C. Monnett was made acting president. 

Number and Cost of Buildings. 

Administration building $200,000.00 

Library building 30,000.00 

Science Hall 33,000.00 

Gymnasium 7.500.00 

Engineering building 25,000.00 

Two temporary buildings 5,000.00 

Two heating plants 6,000.00 

Three small temporary buildings 1,000.00 

Amount of Land and Estimated Value. 

Sixty-acre campus $30,000.00 

Six hundred forty acres one-half mile west of campus 40,000.00 

Source and Amount of Income. 
Land grants $20,000.00 



168 



H. 


B. 


No. 


S. 


B. 


No. 


H. 


B. 


No. 


H. 


B. 


No. 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

557— Support and maintenance $150,000.00 $150,000.00 

30— Law School 125,000.00 

9— For completion of buildings 77,289.35 

593— "Section 13 Fund" 21,731.25 



Faculty and Employees. 



^ J. C. Monnett $4,000.00 

(T- T- Roy Gittinger 2,000.00 

\jr^\cr^ Errett R. Newby. . . . 1,600.00 

)C ^ Kathryn Harris 1,200.00 

HopJtt^ ^- ^- Ferguson 1,000.00 

fjj^ir^ A.M.Houston 720.00 

-V^^KcA^^ G. L. Huey 720.00 

'■V) ' 1,500.00 

T^^^yU^ Edwin DeBarr 2,250.00 

Qxj^^p J. D. Rue 1,500.00 

'^C)^'y^ R. p. Calvert 

^ a Howard S. Brown... 

_• f / Morris Meyers 

(A , , Earle S. Porter 900.00 

*C'"*'<*>Y ^- W. Ohern 1,750.00 

//^ * Charles H. Taylor... 1,500.00 

Itr^ A. H. Van Vleet 2,000.00 

/^ _J _. Dr. A. C. Hirshfield 1,500.00 

Ve*«VTrtcX^ p A. Taylor 

CT^JTi,^ W. P. Haseman 1,750.00 

^^TtXj^ Earl Baker 

LLy,_,^....^^ Robert F. Williams.. 3,000.00 

^j^^^,^^^ A. W . Linton 1,750.00 

\0l)'. 360.00 

^;7^^^ Walter L. Capshaw.. 1,500.00 

ir5L_/-/>-«..»»-* Theodore H. Brewer 1,800.00 

Jh- n D ^°y Hadsali 1,600.00 

JKa.*JL^ Adelaide C. Loomis.. 1,100.00 

aO Dn Louise Brocks 1,100.00 

C*J^4.Ai^ P.A.Walker 400.00 

^, . J.S.Buchanan 2,250.00 

fh. ^ „ [ M. A. Floyd 1,500.00 

'TlAAjUlJtsf- Jerome Dowd 2,000.00 

Outkjkit^SiAjJ\ George Cline Smith. 360.00 

/3^5- ^ John Alley 1,500.00 

F^mSBtyVr s. W. Reeves 1,900.00 

I f^^^QJj^j^y^ F. C. Kent 1,600.00 



Acting President and Dean of Law. 

Professor of English History. 

Register and Secretary to the Presi- 
dent. 

Dean of Women. 

Supt. of Bigs, and Grounds. 

Firemen. 

'Night Watchman. 

Student Janitors. 

Vice President and Head of Chemis- 
try Department. 

Associate Professor. 

Assistant Professor. 

Laboratory Assistant Pure Pood Work 
and instructor in pharmacy. 

Laboratory Assistant in Pure Food 
Work. 

Dispensing Clerk and Instructor. 

Professor of Geology. 

Professor of Mineralogy and Director 
of School of Mining Geology. 

Professor and Head of Department of 
Botany, and Dean of Graduate 
School. 

Professor and Head of Physiology. 

Fellow in Physiology. 

Professor and Head of Physics. 

Student Fellow in Physics. 

Dean and Professor of School of Medi- 
cine. 

Professor of Pharmacy and Materia 
Medica. 

Student Assistant. 

Professor of Anatomy. 

Professor and Head of Eng. Dept. 

Professor of English. 

Instructor in English. 

Instructor in English. 

Debating Coach. 

Dean of A. & S. and Professor of His- 
tory. 

Associate Professor of History. 

Professor of Sociology and Econom- 
ics. 

Fellowship Assistant. 

Professor of Political Science. 

Professor and Head of Mathematics. 

Associate Professor. 



o 
> 

> 

d 
td 

d 
I— I 

Q 

;> 

O 

w 

>• 
o 

.^ 

o 

o 




EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 



169 



R. T. House 1,800.00 

J. H. Voss 1,350.00 

Lucile Dora 1,500.00 

J. W. Sturgis 1,750.00 

Lloyd B. Curtis 900.00 

Walter Erwin 1,500.00 



S. M. Barrett 1,500.00 

J. F. Paxton 2,000.00 

Fred. F. Holmberg. . 1,750.00 

G. S. Lenox 1,600.00 

Cora Pritchett 1,000.00 

Mrs. Dugan 1,000.00 

Bess Brewer 1,200.00 

Merle E. Newby 750.00 

Lloyd B. Curtis 600.00 

Mrs. L. R. Caldwell 



Samuel Holmberg. . . 500.00 

Patricio Gimeno 500.00 

Victor H. Kulp 

Harion R. Kirkwood 

Streator Speakman.. 180.00 

Raymon Tolbert 180.00 

J. Raider 1,200.00 

Ruth Bigford 450.00 

Charles Wantland... 1,200.00 

Bennie Owen 800.00 

James L Tucker 1,750.00 

H. B. Dwight 1,500.00 

H. V. Bozell 1,500.00 



Professor and Head of Germanic 
Languages. 

Associate Professor. 

Professor of French and Head of De- 
partment of Romance Languages. 

Professor of Latin. 

Instructor of Spanish. 

Professor and 'Head of Department of 
Psyohology, Philosophy, and Edu- 
cation and Director of Training 
School. 

Professor of Education, Psychology 
and Science of Teaching. 

Professor of Greek and Classical 
Aechaeology. 

Dean and Professor of School of Fine 
Arts. 

Professor of Voice Culture. 

Instructor of Voice Culture. 

First Piano Instructor. 

Piano Instructor. 

(plus 85^-; ) Violin Instructor. 

(part salary) Band Instructor. 

(85'') TeacI er of Expression. 

(Fixed salary as physical director for 
women.) 

(plus fees) Instructor in Art. 

(plus fees) Instructor in Art. 

Professor of Law. 

Assistant Professor of Law. 

Law Librarian. 

Law Librarian. 

Librarian. 

Assistant Librarian. 

Director of Physical Training. 

Coach and Phys. Director. 

Associate Professor in Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

Associate Professor in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Associate Professor in Mechanical 
Engineering. 



Counties and States Represented in the University During 1910-11. 



Adair 1 

Alfalfa 10 

Atoka 6 

Beaver 2 

Beckl"am 8 

Blaine 2 

Bryan 8 

Caddo 10 

Canadian 3 

Carter 6 

Cherokee 1 

Choctaw 5 

*Cleveland 238 



Cimarron 

Coal 3 

Comanche 12 

Craig 4 

Creek 3 

Custer 9 

Dewey 2 

Delaware 

Ellis 3 

Garfield 8 

Garvin 13 

Grady Id 

Grant 11 



170 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Greer 

Harper 

Harmon .... 

Haskell 

Hughes 

Jackson 

Jefferson . . . 
Johnson .... 

Kay 

Kingfisher . . 

Kiowa 

Latimer 

LeFlore 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Love 

Major 

Marshall .... 

Mayes 

McClain .... 
McCurtain . . 
Mcintosh . . . 

Murray 

Muskogee . . . 

Noble 

Nowata 

Okfuskee ... 
Oklahoma . . 
Okmulgee . . . 

Osage 

Ottawa , 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pittsburg . . . , 

Pontotoc 

Pottawatomie 
Pushmataha . 



12 Roger Mills 

1 Rogers 8 

5 Seniinole 1 

. Sequoyah 4 

9 Seminole 1 

18 Swanson 2 

3 Texas 1 

1 Tillman 10 

11 Tulsa 11 

4 Wagoner 6 

12 Washington 

Washita 9 

5 Woods 3 

23 Woodward 3 

18 

STATES— 

3 Arkansas 5 

3 Colorado 1 

4 Connecticut 1 

7 Illinois 2 

1 Indiana 3 

1 Iowa 1 

10 Kansas 11 

1.5 Michigan 2 

5 Minnesota 1 

4 Missouri 14 

2 Nebraska 1 

103 Nev,' Mexico 1 

3 New York 3 

2 North Carolina 3 

2 Ohio 6 

7 Pennsylvania 2 

4 Tennessee 1 

9 Texas 28 

9 W'est ^'irginia 1 

17 Canada 1 

1 Mexico 1 



Total 870 

♦Including other towns in the county outside Norman, R. 
students, and those who have temporarily moved to Norman. 



F. D. 



STATE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



Norman and Oklahoma City, Okla. 

The State Medical School was originally made a part of the State 
University at Norman. The last two years of the course was given 
at Oklahoma City, the division line being drawn in a general manner 
after the idea that the clinical work be given at the latter place, in 
order that patients might be obtained for demonstration. Arrange- 
ment was made that these years of the course of study should be fol- 
lowed at Epworth University, with the preliminary two at Norman. 
This arrangement continued until the fall of 1911, when provision was 
made for the last two years of study to be followed at Rolater's Hos- 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 171 

pital on p:ast Fourth Street, Oklahoma City. A full corps of instruc- 
tors and lecturers have been employed and the buildings of the hos- 
pital enlarged, in order that the work may be provided for properly. 



Faculty of State Medical School. 

Norman. 

Acting President j. s. Monett Norman. 

Robert Findlater AVilliams Dean Oklahoma City. 

Walter Leander Capshaw, M. D. Professor of Anatomy. 

Edwin De Barr, Ph. D Professor of Chemistry. 

A. C. Hirshfield, M. D Professor of Physiology and Materia 

Medica. 

Henry Higgins Lane, M. A Professor of Zoology and Embryology. 

Louis Alvin Turley, AM Professor of Pathology and Neurology 

Professor of Pharmacy and Materia 

Medica. 
Guy Yandall Williams, M. A. . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Gayfree Ellison, B. S., M. D. . Lecturer on Hygiene and Sanitation. 

Oklahoma City. 

Robert Finlater Williams, B. Ph. Dean and Professor of Clinical 
M. A., M. D Medicine. 

Edmund Shepherd Ferguson, M. D. Professor of Diseases of Eye, Ear, 

Nose and Throat. 

John A. Hatchettt, M. D. (El Reno Professor of Obstetrics. 

Robert Mayburn Howard, M. D Professor of Gynecology. 

William James Jolly, M. D Professor of Surgery. 

Archa Kelly West, M. D Professor of Medicine. 

Horace Reed, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Surgery. 

John William Riley, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Surgery. 

J. B. Rolater, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Surgery. 

Millington Smith, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Surgery. 

Curtis Richard Day, Ph. G., M. D... Lecturer on Genito-Urinary Sur- 
gery, Veneral and Skin Diseases. 

Robert S. Hull, M. D Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgery. 

Leigh F. Watson, M. D Lecturer on Operative Surgery and 

Director of Patient Obstetrical 
Department. 

Samuel Robert Cunningham, M. D. Lecturer on Gynecology. 

John Smith Hartford, M. D Lecturer on Gynecology. 

Edward Francis Davis, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Eye, Ear, Nose 

and Throat Diseases. 

Robert Elmore Looney, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Obstetrics. 

C. J. Fishman, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Microscopy 

and Director of the Clinical Lab- 
oratory. 

George A. Lamotte, B. L., M. D Lecturer on Clinical Medicine. 

Lea A. Riley, A. M., M. D Lecturer on Clinical Medicine. 

Joseph Fife Messenbaugh, M. D. . Lecturer on Medicine. 

Lewis Jefferson Moorman, B. S., M. D.. Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis. 

Antonio DeBord Young, M. D .Lecturer on Nervous and Mental 

Diseases. 

W. M. Taylor, M. D Lecturer on Diseases of Children. 

Wm. Richard Bevan, M. D Lecturer on Therapeutics. 



172 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

D. A. Myers, M. D. (Lawton) Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 

Ralph Smith, M. D. (Guthrie) Instructor in Surgery. 

E. E. Rice, M. D. (Shawnee) Instructor in Gynecology. 

J. C. Ambrister, M. n. (Chickasha) .Instructor in Genito-Urinary Sur- 
gery and Venereal Diseases. 

F. B. Sorgatz, M. D Instructor in Medicine. 



UNIVERSITY PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

The Oklahoma University Preparatory School was founded and 
located at Tonkawa by the following enactment of the Territorial 
Legislature of 1901: 

"There is hereby created and established a University Prepara- 
tory School for the Territory of Oklahoma, which shall be located 
within one mile from the corporate. limits of the town of Tonkawa, in 
Kay County, in the Territory of Oklahoma, to be known as the Univer- 
sity Preparatory School." 

Complying with the conditions of the Act creating the school, the 
town of Tonkawa donated tw^enty acres of land adjoining the town to 
the east. Upon this site the first Board of Regents constructed a sub- 
stantial four-story building, 54x96 feet, of limestone and pressed brick, 
which cost $23,000.00 

The Legislature of 1905 gave the school an appropriation of $60,- 
000.00 for additional buildings. The heating plant and south hall were 
begun in September, 1906, and were finished about one year later. 

The Enabling Act gave to the school 150,000 acres of lands in 
western Oklahoma. 

A special Act of Congress, approved June, 1911, donated the school 
section thirty-three, adjacent to the town of Tonkawa, for building pur- 
poses. The Legislature ratified this donation and loaned the school 
enough money to pay for the improvements on the land. In the fall 
of 1909 this land, with the exception of forty acres which was retained 
for additional campus, was sold at public auction, the loan returned to 
the State, and plans perfected for the erection of two new buildings 
from the proceeds. These buildings, a boys' gymnasium, costing $18,- 
00 and a class room building, costing $44,000, have been completed. 
The gymnasium has been in use during the last year and the class 
room building will be ready for occupancy this fall. 

Support. 

Legislative appropriation. 

One-eighth of the proceeds from the rental of section thirteen. 

Rental from 150,000 acres of the new college lands. 

Buildings. 

Value. 

Wilkin Hall $46,381.00 

Heating plant 10,350.00 

Central Hall .' 23,200.00 

North Hall 44,075.00 

Boys' gymnasium 18,000.00 

Lands. 

150,000 acres $573,396.00 

60-acre campus 19,000.00 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 173 

Faculty. 

Lynn Glover President $2,400 

Nina Yount Secretary to the President 900 

E. A. Rippey Head of English Department.... 1,400 

L. B. Greenfield Assistant in English Department 1,100 

Margaret Baker Assistant in English Department 900 

Mary Jane Bamford Assistant in English Department 900 

Lois Borland Assistant in English Department 900 

Lucy Green Assistant in English Department 720 

G. W. Finley Head of Mathematics Department 1,500 

J. R. Ross Assistant in Mathematics Dept. . . 1,200 

Rose Ann Howe Asisstant in Mathematics Dept.. . 900 

F. B. Iseley Head of Biological Sciences 

(To be supplied) Assistant in Biological Sciences 

James Rothenberg Head of Foreign Language Dept. 

Mary Bell Assist, in Foreign Language Dept. 

Elizabeth Hammond Head of History Department.... 

Frank Gillis Director of Music 1,100 

Piano Assistant 900 

Band Assistant 1,100 

A. L. Peer Head Department of Commerce.. 1,400 

Assist. Department of Commerce 900 

Vira E. Cass Assist. Department of Commerce 900 

Dovie Eberle Domestic Science 975 

A. W. Driggs Physical Director 1,300 

Mamie Goodman Assistant Physical Director , 720 

Mary E. Pittinger Drawing and Art 900 

W. J. Yeaton Physics and Chemistry 1,100 

J. T. Le Masters Manual Training 1,200 

Lelah Price Librarian 900 

Florence Liegerot Assistant Librarian 

G. F. Miller Head Janitor 780 

(To be supplied) Engineer 630 

Student assistant janitors fifteen cents per hour. 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557 $35,000.00 $35,000.00 

H. B. No. 593. "Section 13 Fund" 13,038.75 13,038.75 



EASTERN UNIVERSITY PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

The Eastern University Preparatory School, at Claremore, Okla- 
homa, was established by Act of the Legislature of 1909. Under the 
terms of this Act, thirty thousand dollars was appropriated for a main 
building and thirty-two thousand dollars for the years 1909-1910, and 
1910-1911 for maintenance, conditioned upon the presentation of a site 
by the City of Claremore of not less than thirty-five acres of land. 
Immediately upon the acceptance of the site by the Board of Regents, 
the city of Claremore offered its spacious and commodious 
High School building for the use of teachers and students until the 
State building was completed. The extraordinary session of the Legis- 
lature of 1910 appropriated an additional sum of thirty-eight thousand 
dollars for building and equipment. Twenty thousand dollars of this 
sum has been used in enlarging the building and the remainder di- 
vided into two portions — eleven thousand five hundred dollars for 
the heating plant and six thousand five hundred for equipment. 



174 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Inventory and Property Record. 

Grounds. 

Value. 
Campus, forty acres, valuation $ 4,000.00 

Building. 

l^Iain Hall, twoniy-two rooms. valuatiDii $50,000.00 

Equipment. 

Offices $ 925.00 

General furniture and equipment 1,136.00 

Sciences «• 1,193.95 

Departments. 

Department of music 760.00 

Department of Telegraphy 430.80 

Department of Commerce 200.00 

Domestic Science and Art 1,230.00 

Ladies' Rest Room 205.00 

Manual Training 130.45 

Janitor's Supplies 15.00 

Total No. of Students, 1910-1911 375 



States Represented — Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Min- 
nesota, Tennessee, Alabama, New Mexico, Nebraska, Colorado. 

Counties of Oklahoma Represented — Craig, Nowata, Mayes, Kay, 
Adair, Cherokee, Noble, Creek, Tulsa, Osage, Sequoyah, Tillman, Pot- 
tawatomie and Muskogee. 



Name 

J, H. Bayes 

Vincent Romig 

W. J. Pointer ..... 

J. D. Barney 

Virginia Fitzgerald 
Idross Wallace . . . 
Nettie C. Williams 
Alice E. Manney . 
Lydia M. Ostenberg 
Mattie Kirtley . . . . 

Mable Broady 

Curney M. Moss . 
Olive C. Meredith 

Hazel Reed 

M. C. Taylor 



Faculty and Employes. 

Address Position Salary. 

.Chandler President $2,400 

Stillwell Physics and Chem 1,200 

Weatherford History and Civics.... 1,200 

Henryetta Mathematics 1,200 

Durant Asst. Lat. and Eng 900 

.Keytesville, Mo Piano and Spanish..,. 900 

Claremore Domestic Science 1,200 

.Claremore Modern Languages. . . . 900 

Claremore Public School Music. 900 

Guthrie Head Dept. of Lang... 1,200 

Shawnee English Literature.... 900 

Clai-emore Eng. and Athletics 1,200 

Claremore Assistant in English.. 900 

Shawnee Secretary to President 900 

Chandler Janitor 600 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913 

H. B. 557 $35,000.00 $35,000.00 

H. B. 610 $11,450.00 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 175 



OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL 
COLLEGE 

Stillwater, Oklahoma. 



The State Agricultural and Mechanical College is a State and 
Federal institution of higher learning, offering industrial, scientific 
and liberal education to white persons fourteen years of age or over. 
It also conducts extensive investigations and carries forward research 
work to establish new scientific truths of value to the people of 
Oklahoma. 

The college was organized in 1891 and located at Stillwater, Payn© 
County, and after twenty years of sturdy effort, now consists of sixty- 
one professors and instructors, 1,848 students attending last year, 
eleven large brick and stone buildings, with equipment valued at 
$175,000, and 1,000 acres of land. 

Tuition is free in all courses and departments. The college is 
supported by the federal, government and by the state of Oklahoma 
as a part of the free school system. It owes its origin to a bill of- 
fered by Unite! States Senator Morrill, of Vermont, in 1862, which 
provided funds to' one such institution of learning in each state of 
the union, and set aside certain public lands from which endowments 
have come to each of these state and federal colleges. Therefore, 
these institutions are known as "The Land Grant Colleg?s." The Na- 
tional Grange gave the "Morrill Bill'' ccdial support and was largely 
instrumental in securing its final passage. 

This Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1862, gave to each state 
which accepted its provisions, 30,000 acres of government land for 
each representative in Congress, the proceeds to be applied to the en- 
dowment and maintenance of colleges. 

"Where the leading object shall be, without excluding the other 
scientific and classic studies, and including military tactics, to teach 
such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and mechanic 
arts * * * in order to promote the liberal and practical educa- 
tion of the industrial classes in the various pursuits and professions 
of life." 

Again, in 1887, Congress provided for an agricultural experiment 
station in connection with each of the land grant colleges. 

The first legislature of the Territory of Oklahoma adopted a res- 
olution assenting to and accepting the provisions of Congress and 
established the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, De- 
cember 25, 1890. Congress, also, provided 250.000 acres of land as a 
permanent endowment for the college in the Enabling Act, granting 
statehood to Oklahoma. 



176 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

The Oklahoma constitution provides that the State Board of Ag- 
riculture shall be the Board of Regents of the A. & M. College. 

The college carries on many lines of work not commonly known 
as school work, though truly educational in all respects. The manage- 
ment assists in the educational work in behalf of grown people who 
may lack spare time to attend college, by sending oat point ted and 
practical literature, by supplying well informed lecturers to popular 
gatherings and to meetings of farmers' and teachers' institutes or 
other conventions, under conditions favorable to profitable presenta- 
tion and discussion of the subjects. The acts of Congress and the 
state legislature make certain forms of this college extension work 
obligatory. 

Land and Buildings. 

The campus, farm, and experiment grounds embrace a tract of 
1,000 acres. The present buildings were erected by the state at a 
cost of over $341,000, and they are euipped with the latest and best 
appliances and apparatus, representing an outlay by the state and 
federal governments of approximately $175,000. All buildings are 
steam heated, electric lighted, and have sewer connections. The do- 
mestic Science Hall and girls' dormitory cost $62,000. This new build- 
ing is the most complete, modern and convenient structure on the 
college grounds. 

Twenty-five thousand dollars has been devoted to the erection of 
a dormitory hall, to be used as a home for young men. 

The college has a library of 14,120 volumes, besides some 30,000 
unbound publications. All of the desirable current publications are 
received. Two specially fitted rooms of large dimensions are de- 
voted to library use. 

Appropriations. 

H. B. No. 355, for completion of buildings $34,676.49 

S. B. No. 168, for erection of engineering building and equip- 
ment; chapel and library building and equip- 
ment; remodeling old chapel building for class 
rooms; remodeling shop and foundry build- 
ing .. . 170,950.00 

1912. 1913. 

H B. No. 557, support and maintenance $112,500.00 $127,500.00 

H. B. No. 593, "Section 13 Fund" 31,293.00 31,293.00 

Faculty. 

J. H. Connell, M. S President 

Lowrey L. Lewis, M. S., D. V. M... Professor of Zoology and Veter- 
inary Science. 

R. E. Chandler, M. M. E Professor of Engineering and Phy- 
sics, Dean of Engineering Divi- 
sion. 

Sarah Windle Landes Professor of Domestic Science. 

R. C. Potts, B. S Professor of Dairying. 

W. W. Johnston, A. M Professor of English, Dean of 

Science and Literature Division. 

B. C. Pittuck, B. S Dean of District Agricultural 

Schools and College Extension. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 177 

W. A. Linklater, B. S. A Professor of Animal Husbandry, 

Dean of Agricultural Division. 

W. A. Etherton, B. S Professor of Architectural Engi- 
neering. 

Gustav F. Broemel, A. M Professor of German and Latin. 

Thos. T. Duke First Lieutenant 23d Infantry, U. 

S. A., Commandant of Cadets. 

C. F. Watts, M. A Professor of Poltical Economy and 

Social Science. 

O. O. Churchill, B. S Principal Sub - Freshman Depart- 
ment. 

S. A. Maroney, B. S Principal Sub-Freshman Department 

Joseph Watson, A. T. S. C Director of Music. 

W. E. Schreiber, A. B Director of Physical Training for 

Men. 

A. P. Little, B. S., E. E Associate Professor of Electrical 

Engineering. 

Emma J. Ross Posse Gymnasium and Emerson 

School of Oratory, Director of 
Physical Training for Women. 

T. M. Jeffords Professor of Agriculture for 

Schools. 

Handee Chambliss, M. S., Ph. D., 

F. c. S Professor of Chemistry. 

Carl Gunderson, Ph. D Professor of Mathematics. , 

C. E. Sanborn, M. A Professor of Entomology. 

J. H. Bowers. Ph. D Professor of Pedagogy and History. 

Rebecca Acheson-Booth Professor of Domestic Arts. 

N. 0- Booth, B. S Professor of Horticulture and 

Botany. 

Alfred Boyd, C. E Professor of Civil Engineering. 

H. G. Seidomridge Graduate Curry School of Expres- 
sion, Instructor in Public Speak- 
ing and Assistant in English. 

W\ P. W^ebber, A. M Assistant Professor of Mathema- 
tics. 

L. H. Rose Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles I. Bray, M. S Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

J. L. Jones, M. E Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering. 

A. C. Hartenbower, B. S Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

Ed. McCarrel Assistant Sub-Freshman Depart- 
ment. 

A. L. Lovett, B. S Assistant in Entomology. 

Madge Books Sanders Assistant in Music. 

E. E. Brewer Foreman of Shops. 

Ada Hahn Instructor in Drawing and Art 

Work. 

Sam Gaskill, LL. B Assistant Sub-Freshman Depart- 
ment. 

J. C. Skillman Assistant in Business Department. 

L. F. Stewart Assistant in English. 

Ada Belle House, M. A Assistant Sub-Freshman Depart- 
ment. 

Ed. Gallagher. B. S Assistant in Physical Training for 

Men. 

S. C. Bedinger Assistant in Business Department. 

C. H. McElroj', B. S Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Sig. 14 



178 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

P. J. Davis, LiL.B ...Assistant in Physical Training for 

Men. 

Bertha Combs A^ssistant in Physical Training for 

Women. 

A. H. Wright, B. S Assistant Agronomist Experiment 

Station. 

Iva McBride, B. S Assistant in Domestic Science. 

H. D. Strother instructor Violin and Band Instru- 
ments. 

Ralph McBurney, B. S • Assistant in Chemistry. 

D. C. Mooring, M. S Assistant in Horticulture and 

Botany. 

Z. N. Hollar, A. B Assistant in Mathematics. 

Maude Henshaw Assistant in Music. 

F. R. Bradley Assistant in Shops. 

C. W. Skinner Assistant in Shops. 

Susie Cage Assistant in Domestic Arts. 

R. V. McBride Poultryman. 

E. B. Robbins, B. S Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

James A. Wilson, B. Agr Director Experiment Station. 

C. K. Francis, Ph. D • Chemist Experiment Station. 

Cora A. Miltimore, A. B Librarian. 

E. J. Westbrook Superintendent Printing Depart- 
ment. 

R. O. Baird, B. S Assistant Chemist Experiment Sta- 
tion. 

R. E. Anderson, B. S Registrar. 

W. W. Evans Superintendent of Farm. 

S. E. Andrews, LL. B Secretary to the President and Fac- 
ulty. 

Doctors Selph and Cleverdon College Physicians. 

J. L. McKeown Financial Secretary. 

M. McDonald Assistant Commandant of Cadets. 

Lula Tourt6llotte • Station Clerk. 

E. W. Perisho Secretary Y. M. C. A. 

S. A. Minear, B. S Assistant in Agriculture for Schools 

J. W. Wilkinson, A. M Supervisor Boys' and Girls' Agri- 
cultural Clubs. 

Irma Mathews, B. P Supervisor Boys' and Girls' Agricul- 
tural Clubs. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 



179 



STATE AGRICULTUI^AL SCHOOLS 



CAMERON SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 



Lawton, Oklahoma. 



Faculty. 



No. 



Salary 
Mos. Per Mo. 



Name. Position. 

J. A. Liner iSuperitendent .... 12 .^.50. 00 

A. H. Chapman Agriculturalist 12 100.00 

Cecil Kirkpatrick Dom. Economy ... y 100.00 

C. E. Hanson Draw, and Man. Tr. 9 116.66 

Dora Cox-Frye Math, and English 9 100.00 

Jennie Edwards Instructor 9 83.33 



Total 
Salary. 

.$1800.00 

1200.00 

900.00 

1050.00 

900.00 

750.00 



Appropriations. 



H. B. No. 557 



1912. 

,.$17,000.00 



1913. 
$19,000.00 



CONNELL STATE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 

Helena, Oklahoma. 

Faculty. 



Name. Position. No. j\ 

Chas. E. Scott Superintendent ... 12 

R. EL Ellis Agriculturalist ... 12 

Jeanette Taylor Dom. Economy ... 9 

William T. Miller Draw, and Man. Tr. 9 

W. E. Kinder Math, and English . 9 

Geo. L. Hyde Music 12 

E. Earl Vezey Instructor 9 

Almira B. Rogers Asst. Dom. Econ.. . 9 

Chas. Ent Asst. Drawing and 

Man. Tr. and 
Supt. Buildings . 12 



Appropriations. 



H. B. No. 557. 



Salary 


Total 


tos. Per Mo 


Salary. 


$150.00 


$1800.00 


100.00 


1200.00 


111.11 


1000.00 


122.22 


1100.00 


116.66 


1050.00 


83.33 


1000.00 


75.00 


675.00 


75 . 00 


675.00 


83 . 33 


1000.00 


1912. 


1913. 


$17,000.00 


$19,000.00 



180 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



CONNORS STATE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 

Warner, Oklahoma. 

Faculty. 

Salary Total 
Name. Position. No. Mos. Per Mo. Salary. 

Walter Van Allen Superintendent ... 12 $133.33 $1600.00 

F. A. Gougler Agriculturalist ... 12 83.33 1000.00 

Orplia Caton Domestic Economy 9 83 . 33 750 . 00 

T. H. Horton Draw, and Man. Tr. 9 111.11 1000.00 

W. H. Culwell Math, and English. 9 83.00 750.00 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557 $17,000.00 $19,000.00 

H. B. No. 358 $11,475.05 



HASKELL STATE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 



Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. 



Faculty. 

Name. Position. No 

J. H. Esslinger Superintendent . . . 

Clarence R. Leteer Agriculturalist . . . 

Gertrude Braden Domestic Economy 

G. W. Hanson Draw, and Man. Tr. 

R. K. Robertson Math and English . 

Clara Walker . . .' Music 

Ella Haskell Instructor 9 

Minnie Walters Asst. Dom. Econ 



Appropriations. 



H. B. No. 557. 



Salary 


Total 


. Mos. Per Mo. 


Salary. 


12 $133.33 


$1600.00 


12 100.00 


1200.00 


9 111.11 


1000.00 


9 111.11 


1000.00 


9 111.11, 


. 1000.00 


9 83.33 


750.00 


9 S3. 33 


750.00 


9 75.00 


675.00 


1912. 


1913. 


...$17,000.00 


$19,000.00 



MURRAY STATE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 



Tishimingo, Oklahoma. 

Salary Total 

Name. I'osition. No. Mos. Per Mo. Salary. 

H. L. Muldrow Superintendent ... 12 $150.00 $1800.00 

R. M. McCool Agriculturalist ... 12 100.00 1200.00 

Ema A. Chandler Dom. Economy ... 9 116.66 1050.00 

Henry D. Rinsland Draw, and Man. Tr 9 lOO.O' 900.00 

Pearl Tindall Math and English. 9 116.66 1050.00 

Mrs. P. B. H. Shearer ...Instructor 9 60.00 540.00 

J. W. Fowler Music 9 100.00 900.00 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 181 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557 $17,000.00 $19,000.00 

H B. No. 223. Reappropriated from S. B. No. 109 $14,570 44 



PANHANDLE AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE. 
Goodwell, Oklahoma. 

Faculty. 

,, Salary Total 

Name. Position. No. Mos. Per Mo. Salary. 

S. W. Black Superintendent ... 12 $141.66 $1700.00 

Otto Straub Agriculturalist ... 12 75 .00 900 00 

Maggie Walters Dom. Economy .. n 7.5.00 675 00 

Chas. T. Laughton Math and Englisli 9 83.33 750 00 

Fern Noble Asst. Eng. and Math. :• 60 . 00 540 . 00 

Appropriations. 
H. B. No. 557 $11,000.00 $19,000.00 



182 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



CENTRAL STATE NORMAL 

Edmond. Oklahoma. 



The Central Normal School was located at Edmond by the Ter- 
ritorial Legislature of 1890, providing for the instruction of both men 
and women in the art of teaching, and in all branches of learning 
which pertain to a good common school education, also to give instruc- 
tion in the theory and practice of teaching. For the purpose of lo- 
cating the school, forty acres was furnished, lying within one mile of 
the city of Edmond. Ten. acres of the land were reserved as a site 
for the buildings, the remainder being platted into lots and blocks for 
sale, from which funds were received to aid the support of the in- 
stitution, according to the provisions of the act passed. 

The property of the State at the institution now consists of thir- 
teen acres of land, two three-story buildings and a heating plant, with 
furniture and equipment. The Territory of Oklahoma appropriated 
approximately $55,000.00 for buildings, the County of Oklahoma gave 
$5,000 in bonds, and the city of Edmond gave $2,000 in bonds. Twenty- 
seven of the original forty acres were platted and sold, the money 
derived from the sales being used in the construction of the North 
building. 

Estimated Value of Property. 

Thirteen acres of land $50,000.00 

South building 37,500.00 

North building. 30,000.00 

Heating plant 10,000.00 

Furniture and equipment 23,000.00 

Total $151,000.00 

The first Normal building, constructed of brick, was completed 
in 1893; the wings, built of stone, were erected in 1894 and 1895. In 
order to raise the money for this building, the Board of Regents sold 
the platted lots and the legislature appropriated $15,000. The North 
building thus constructed, contains sixteen class rooms, a large room 
for the manual training department, antl a large gymnasium. 

To relieve the crowded condition and to increase the facilities 
for instruction, the legislature in 1903 made an appropriation of $40,000 
for the erection of an additional building. The structure is of pressed 
brick and stone. It has an assembly room with a seating capacity of 
800 persons, two laboratories, reception hall, president's office, reading 
room, and thirteen recitation rooms. 

The institution is equipped with four laboratories— chemical, phy- 
sical, agricultural and biological. 

A manual training school with a kindergarten department has 
been established. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 183 

Appropriations. 

1911. 

H. B. No. 593. "Section 13 fund" .$ 5,795.00 $ 5,795.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency 7,800.00 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Support and maintenance $45,000.00 $45,000.00 

S. B. No. 294 — Repairs and improvements 25,000.00 

Faculty and Employes. 

Name. Address. Position. Salary. 

Chas. Evans Ardmore . . . President $2,700 

Austin R. Wilbur Kansas City, Ped., Psych, and Dir. 

Training School 1,800 

F. C. Oakes Edmond English 1,400 

Mrs. Annie G. Thornton . Edmond Asst. English 1,100 

Mrs. Zaida Gaines ...Cincinnati . . . Assr. English 900 

Maude Ambrister .... Norman Appt. English 900 

M. L. Gochenour Edmond History 1,400 

Lucy J. Hampton . . . Edmond Asst. History 1,100 

B. F. Nihart Oklahoma City .Mathematics 1^400 

S. J. Payne Edmond Asst. Math 1,100 

Chas. Simmons Edmond Asst. Math 1,000 

John Davis Edmond Physics and Cheistry .... 1,400 

W. M. Winton Edmond Biology 1,400 

Otto Jeffries Edmond Foreign Languages 1,400 

Cecelia Gilmore Shawnee Asst. For. Languages .... 1,100 

P. E. Baird . Edmond Physical Culture and 

Physiology 900 

Grace Baker Edmond Drawing 1,000 

Hettie Starr Edmond Domestic Science 1,000 

Oscar Lehrer Edmond Public School Mus:c 1,200 

E. J. Lowe Tonkawa ....Geology and Agriculture. 1,400 

Vern O. Wilson Edmond Manual Training 1,400 

M. Brown Edmond Piano Teacher 900 

Clara Cook Edmond Critic Teacher (1st and 

2nd) 900 

Julia Davis Edmond Critic Teacher (3rd and 

4th) 900 

Cafrie Burks Edmond Critic Teacher (5th and 

6th) 900 

Estaline Wilson Edmond Critic Teacher (7th and 

8th) 900 

Ruby Canton Edmond Librarian 900 

Ethel M. Cardiff Oklahoma City Secretary 900 

Richard Thassier ...Sulphur Engineer 720 

Janitor 450 

Janitor 450 



184 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



EAST CENTRAL STATE NORMAL 

Ada, Oklahoma. 



On the last day of the regular session of the Second Legislature 
a bill was passed, creating the sixth State Normal School and locating 
it at Ada, the county seat of Pontatoc County. The bill carried an 
appropriation of $100,000 for the erection of a building. 

The general appropriation bill had already been passed and no 
provision was made for maintenance and equipment. The citizens of 
Ada were enxious to have the school start on an equal footing with 
other new normals, and they proposed to the Board of Regents to 
advance the money necessary for the conduct of the school until the 
legislature should meet and make an appropriation. The board then 
elected a president and faculty, and the first session of the school 
opened September 20, 1909, in the Ada High School building, which 
had just been completed. 

The first year's work was fraught with the usual difficulties 
incident to perfecting the organization and woi'king with inadequate 
equipment. But in spite of these difficulties, 5lt) pupils were enrolled 
representing twenty-one counties of Oklahoma and eight different 
states. At the close of the opening term, six pupils completed the 
course of study and were granted diplomas. 

The contract for the new building was let in October, 1909, and 
was completed in July, 1910. The campus comprises twenty acres, 
donated by the citizens of Ada. The building is a magnificent struc- 
ture of pressed brick and reinforced concrete construction, including 
thirty-nine recitation rooms, offices and other apartments, with a large 
library, and an assembly hall with a seating capacity of 2.000 persons. 

The special session of the legislature, which was convened in 
1910, made an appropriation for maintenance and equipment. The 
bill carried $15,000 for equipment and furniture. This amount 'has 
been expended in equipping the departments of domestic science, 
manual training, physics, chemistry, biology and agriculture. 

The object of the school, as instituted by law, is to prepare teach- 
ers for service in the schools of the state. 

The Third Legislature appropriated .$60,000 for the conduct of the 
school for the next two years. This is derived in part from the gen- 
eral fund and in part from revenue derived from rentals. 

The State Board of Education announced the following faculty for 
the school year beginning July 1, 1911: 

Faculty and Employes. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Chas. W. Briles President .$2,700 

Madison L. Perkins Pedagogy and Training School 1,600 

William D. Little English 1,400 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 185 

Erma Spriggs Asst. English 1,000 

Josephine Claris Foreign Language 1,400 

Asst. in Foreign Language 1,000 

Rolla G. Sears History 1,400 

W. L. Roddie Asst. in History l[oOO 

Alfred L. Fentem Mathematics 1,400 

L. O. Wilson Physics and Chemistry 1^400 

J. Frank Lilly Biology and Agriculture 1,400 

W. H. Cox Maimal Training 1,200 

Grace Baker Piano 900 

Mildred Timberlake Critic Teacher 900 

Bertha M. Ruble Domestic Science 1,000 

Helen A. Turner Drawing 900 

Lillian Kendirck Public School Music 1,000 

Director of Physical Training for girls 

Director of Physical Training for boys 

Lola M. Champlin Secretary 720 

A. N. Harrison Custodian 900 

Janitor 600 

Appropriations. 

1912 1913 

H. B. No. 557 $30,000.00 $30,000.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency 2,315.00 

H. B. No. 593— "Section 13 fund" 5,975.00 5,795.00 



186 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



NORTHEASTERN STATE NORMAL 

Tahlequah, Oklahoma. 



The Northeastern State Normal was established at Tahlequah by 
an act of the State Legislature in March, 1909. The bill establishing 
the school carried an appropriation of $45,000 for the purchase of the 
Cherokee National Female Seminary building and forty acres of land 
belonging thereto. There was also appropriated at the same time 
the sum of $70,000 for maintenance the first two years. The Board 
of Regents met at Guthrie April 7, 1909, and elected the first faculty. 

The building is a three-story brick and stone structure, steam 
heated, and supplied with pure spring water. The building is the larg- 
est single school structure in the State and was erected in 1889, by 
the Cherokee Nation, at a cost of $100,000. 

Tahlequah is located thirty-five miles east of Muskogee and the 
same distance from the eastern line of the State. It is seventy-five 
miles south of the Kansas line, is the county seat of Cherokee County, 
and the capital of the old Cherokee Nation. Its location makes it an 
ideal college town. The natural scenery is unexcelled and the eleva- 
tion insures excellent drainage and a pleasant and healthful climate. 

Number of Students, Classified as to Rank. 

Seniors 14 

Juniors 25 

Sophomores 60 

Freshmen 85 

Sub-Freshmen (b) 140 

Sub-Freshmen (a) • 211 

Training School 120 

Kindergarten 20 

Total enrollment 675 

Teachers and Employees. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Frank E. Buck President $2,700 

L M. Logan Latin 1,400 

J. N. Clark English 1,400 

W. C. Jamison Geology, Geography and Agriculture. 1,400 

Geo. Norris History ] ,600 

R. V. Temming Pedagogy and Director of Training 

School 1,700 

Wrisht A. Gardner Biology 1,600 

A. K. Gossom Chemistry and Physics 1,400 

W. T. Ford Mathematics 1,400 

Geo. Short ' History 1,000 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 187 

H. R. Williams English 1.000 

Bulah Benton Edmondsor English 1.000 

Henrietta Siegel Drawing 1.000 

M. Jessie Stone Domestic Science 1,000 

Mrs. Harriet Weeks Music 1,000 

Ethlyn Hill Piano 1-000 

Emil F. Nelson Manual Training l,z«0 

J. M. Hackler Mathematics 1,000 

Trilla Reed Modern Languages 1,000 

Janana Ballard Critic 1,000 

May Stalcup Critic 1,000 

Miss Nunn Critic 1,000 

W^ilie W'hittmore Librarian and Secretary 1,000 

William Beck Engineer '<'20 

George Sink Janitor 4o0 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 555 $30,000.00 $30,000.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency 3,376.25 

H. B. No. 593— "Section 13 fund". . • 5,795.00 5,795.00 



188 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



NORTHWESTERN STATE NORMAL 

Alva, Oklahoma. 



The Northwestern State Normal School was established by an 
act of the Territorial Legislature in 1897, and was located at Alva. 
When the school was established at Alva the town was very small, 
but it has grown repidly, until it has a population of over 6,000. 

An act of the first legislature of the State of Oklahoma has con- 
firmed the Northwestern Normal School as one of the permanent state 
educational institutions. The school has been enlarged by the ad 
dition of many important departments of instruction, and is prepared 
to offer its students enlarged opportunities for education such as 
will enable its graduates to measure up to the modern requirements 
of intensive, as well as extensive scholarship. 

The central heating plant, erected at a cost of $20,000, is designed 
to furnish heat to the buildings now in use or to such as may here- 
after be constructed. The boilers and engines are of ample capacity, 
and the design of the buildings includes room for the electric plant 
soon to be installed. 

The school plant at present consists of three buildings situated 
upon a beautiful tract of forty acres on the south side of town. 

The first normal building was erected in 1898, at a cost of more 
than $100,000 and is easily the handsomest school edifice in the south- 
west. This building is occupied by the departments of English, 
mathematics, history, geography, oratory, music, fine arts, domestic 
science and art, agriculture and commercial department, and the 
administrative offices of the president and registrar. An auditorium 
with a seating capacity of 800 is the most conspicuous feature of 
the interior of the building. 

The science hall is a commodious building devoted to the depart- 
ments of biology, physical science, manual training, pedagogy and 
training school, and the library. It is fitted with ample equipment 
in laboratories for chemistry, physics, zoology, and botany, with the 
museum of natural history, and with shops of manual training. 



Officers and Faculty. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Grant B. Grumbine, 

B. S., M. S President $2,700 

Wm. Hugh Wood, A. B., 

A. M Vice President 1.800 

Vanessa Kite Secretary and Registrar 900 

E. A. Herod Professor of Mathematics 1,400 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 189 

Archie L. Dickson Asst. Professor of Mathematics 1,200 

George Walter Stevens, 

A. B., A. M., Professor of Biology 1,700 

Lawrence Yeardley Professor of Manual Training l',400 

Augustas G. Vinson Professor of Agriculture 1,400 

Lula A. Eddy Professor of Kindergarten l[ooo 

Frank S. Wyatt Professor of History I'jOO 

Henrietta Pyle Public School Music '900 

C. D. JOi.nson Professor of Physics and Chemistry. . 1,400 

Blanche V. Bussey Critic Teacher 1,000 

Ida D. Pritchett Asst. Professor of Latin 1,200 

Jane Abbott Librarian '900 

Ada B. Woodward Professor of Piano 900 

Sarah Crumley Professor of Domestic Science 1,200 

Florence Fallon Critic Teacher 1,000 

Mamie McColloch Professor of English 1,400 

Reed Loving att Asst. Professor of English l[oOO 

Minnie Shockley Asst. Professor of English 1,000 

Wm. Eugene Sloat, A. B. . Professor of Modern Languages 1,400 

Grace Stegall Professor of Art and Drawing 1^000 

William Vetter .Janitor 1,000 

Value of buildings $150,000.00 

Value of land — 40 acres 150 000.00 

Enrollment in Normal, 1910-1911 681 

Enrollment in Model School . ." 195 



Total 



876 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Support and maintenance $40,000.00 $40,000.00 

S. B. No. 209 — Deficiency 6,970.22 

H. B. No. 593— "Section 13 fund". . • 5,795.C0 5,795.00 



190 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



SOUTHEASTERN STATE NORMAL 

Durant, Oklahoma. 



The Southeastern State Normal, located at Durant, a city of 8,000 
inhabitants, was created by the First State Legislature. Appropria- 
tions were made in the sum of $100,000 for the administration build- 
ing, and a faculty of thirty, with M. E. Moore as president, was em- 
ployed for the first year. Particular stress is placed in the school 
upon the courses in physiology, history and philosophy of education, 
and the model school. 

While the new administration building, privided for by the State, 
is in course of construction, the city of Durant has placed at the 
disposal of the normal school one of its public school buildings, to- 
gether with several private residences. 

Faculty Members. 
Name. Address. Position. Salary. 

Edmund D. Murdaugh Claremore President $2,700 

J. H. MoKean Chicago, 111. . . .Ped., Phcych., and Dir. of 

Training School 1,700 

A. S. Faulkner Durant English 1,400 

Mrs. Lou Adams Alva Asst. English 1,100 

W. T. Dodson Frederick History 1,400 

A. W. Gilliland Durant Mathematics 1,400 

Jas. R Mahoney Claremore Asst. Math, and Sec 1,400 

P. E. Laird Durant Physics and Chemistry . . 1,400 

E. R. Robbins Stillwater Biology 1,400 

Minnie Ballou Junction City, 

Kan Foreign Languages 1,400 

N. E. Winters Stillwater Agriculture and Geog. . . 1,400 

Wesley Lockwood . . University of 

Miss Manual Training 1,400 

Julia Bea Vert Durant Drawing 900 

Hallie McKinnev ..Durant Domestic Science 900 

Isabelle N. Brown . . Claremore Public School Music 900 

Nellie Brady Gainesville, Tex Critic, (1st and 2nd 

Grades) 900 

Mrs. Hattie Rainev .Durant Critic (3rd and 4th 

Grades) 900 

Josephine Fitzgerald Durant Critic (5th and 8th grades) 900 

Alice McKinney Durant Piano 4 900 

Physical Culture Treacher 900 

Janitor 720 

Asst. Janitor 450 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Support an maintenance $30,000.00 $30,000.00 

H. B. No. 593— "Section 13 fund"... 5,795.00 5,795.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency 8,618,98 

H. B. No. 584 — Unpaid teachers' salaries, etc 3,172.33 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 191 



SOUTHWESTERN STATE NORMAL 

Weatherford, Oklahoma. 



Weatherford, the home of the Southwestern Normal School, is 
well located geographically for the students of western and south- 
western Oklahoma. The school has two buildings adequate for pres- 
ent needs. In 1903 the administration hall was built at the cost of 
$37,500. It has two full stories besides a basement and chapel, with 
a steating capacity of 500. With the exception of the president's suite 
of offices, this building is used as a recitation hall. 

East of the administration building is science hall, completed in 
1910, at a cost of $100,000. The training school and the auditorium, 
seating 1,750 persons, are in this hall. 

Five thousand volumes are at the service of the student body in 
the library. English literature, German, philosophy, economics, soci- 
ology, education, psychology, history, agriculture, etc., treated by the 
best authors, are to be found. 

A quarter mile oval running track, a baseball diamond, a football 
gridiron, tennis courts, basketball space, are among the conveniences 
which help the open air work of the student. Experienced coaches 
direct and supervise the athletic work. 

As the school is liberal in education aside from that actually 
sought in books, all organizations which tend to develop the spiritual 
life are supported. A Young Men's Christian Association was organ- 
ized seven years ago, the Young Women's Christian Association one 
year later. 

Faculty. 

Name. Address Position. Salary. 

U. J. Griffith Edmond President $2,700 

W. Z. Smith Hennessey . . Ped., Psych., and Dir. of 

Training School 1,700 

Maude Owen Weatherford .Prof, of History 1,400 

Dora Stewart Weatherford Asst. in History 1,100 

L. S. Stevens Tuttle Prof, of Mathematics 1,400 

R. L. Clayton Weatherford Asst. in Mathematics .... 1,100 

J. C. Resler Lincoln Physics and Chemistry .. 1,400 

Earl Wiley Shawnee Prof, of English 1,400 

John Sanders Weatherford Asst. in English 1,100 

Myrtle Williams 5741 Drexel 

Ave., Chicago. Asst. in English 1,000 

R. E. L. Burks Weatherford Prof. Foreign Languages. . 1,400 

Nell Cro-ssan Baldwin, Kan. Asst. Foreign Languages .1,100 

Guy W. Bohannan ....Weatherford Geography and Agriculture 1,400 

Frances Lyle Caddo Drawing 900 

Jane Porter Sloss . . . .Weatherford Piano 900 

Mamie B. Davis Weatherford Domestic Science 1,000 

J. W. Bremer Weatherford Public School Music 1,2()0 



192 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Lula Elsie Vrooman . Weatherford 
Minnie M. Ostenberg . .Weatherford 

Eva Allison Weatherford 

Mrs. Margaret Quiglev Weatherford 

Miss .McQuown Caddo Secretary to President 



Critic (1st and 2nd( 
(Yitic (oth and 6th) 
Critic (7th and 9th) 
Librarian 



900 
900 
900 
900 
900 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Support and maintenance $40,000.00 $40,000.00 

H. B. No. 593— "Section 13 fund". . ■ 5,795.00 5,795.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency $4,088.13 

Gardner salary in full to June 30, 1911, 

and no more 274.92 

S. B. No. 22 — Seating and equipping new building.. 15,000.00 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS J i 193 



OKLAHOMA INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE AND COLLEGE 

FOR GIRLS 

Chickasha, Oklahoma. 



The Oklahoma Industrial Institute and College for Girls had its 
origin in Senate Bill No. 249, introduced by Senator W. P. Stewart, 
of Hugo, and approved May 16, 1908. The institution was located by 
the legislature in the city of Chickasha, which donated twenty acres 
of land for the campus on the outskirts of the city, and another tract 
of one hundred and forty acres in the country. The value of the cam- 
pus is estimated at $20,000, and the outlying land at $12,000. 

The first session of school opened in five rooms of the ChickasJia 
High School building, September 14, 1909. The second years' work, 
beginning September 20, 1910, was carried on in the First Baptist 
Church, in a near-by apartment house, and in rooms of the Chickasha 
Business College. 

The administration building, costing $100,000, was dedicated with 
appropriate exercises, May 16, 1911, and, after a two years' career 
in scattered and rented quarters, the third session of the college opened 
in its own home, September 12, 1911. 

In the spring of 1911, a landscape architect was employed to plat 
the grounds and the sites of the buildings which will necessarily fol- 
low in the development of the institution. Cement walks are to be 
laid, drives made and trees and shrubbery planted. 

A special appropriations has been made for the library and liberal 
courses are offered in all departments, both literary and technical. 

The enrollment for the session 1909-1910 was 120, and for the ses- 
sion 1910-11911, 138. 

Faculty. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

.1. Alexander Moore President $2,400 

Ed P. .Johns Treasurer 

Annie B. Stewart Secretary 900 

Ethel Alta Dunn Music 1,200 

Rose Murray Asst. Music 900 

Lora Linn Garrison ...... English 1,400 

Joy Belle Hancock Domestic Science 1,200 

Ela Hockady Biological Science 1,100 

Edna B. Maddox Commercial 1.200 

Olive Leman McClintic . . Expression and Asst .in English 1,400 

Miss Wheeler Phsical Curture 900 

Merle Marie Stephens . . Domestic Art 1,000 

Sarah B. Trent , . . . History and Economics 1,200 

Fred Walters Mathematics 1,400 

Mary Elizabeth Wilson . . Art 1,200 

Miss Maxie Woodring . . Foreign Languages 1,400 

Eliza J. Rule Librarian 900 

Sig. 15. 



194 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Support an maintenance $30,000.00 $30,000.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency 4,285.00 

H. B. No. 615 — For equiping library, improvements of grounds 

and other equipment $5,800.00 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS ^95 



OKLAHOMA SCHOOL OF MINES AND METALLURGY 

Wilburton, Oklahoma. 



.• Jof P^i^^ouia School of Mines and Metallurgy was created by thft 
^S fi??nn^^^/'^^l"'?:,. The Second Legislative Assembly appropri- 
ated $115,000 for buildings, $50,000 for equipment, and $60 000 for 
maintenance for the biennial period ending June 30, 1911 The Third 
Legislature passed a bill providing for an appropriation of $65 000 to 
be used in completing Science Hall, one of the buildings under pro- 
cess of construction, and $43,000 for establishing a water works sys- 
tem and power plant, laboratory equipment, library, heating plant 
school extension work in the raining camps of the state, furniture 
forge and shop work, but the item for $65,000 was disapproved by 
the Governor. In addition $50,000 was appropriated for the support 
and maintenance of the institution during the biennial period begin- 
ning June 30, 1911. 

The degrees offered by the school are as follows: For four year 
courses: Mining engineering, metallurgical engineering and, with one 
year of graduate work, master in mining engineering, and master in 
metallurgical engineering. 

The full four year courses are: Standard mining engineering, 
optional course in mining engineering (specializing in metal mining), 
optional course in mining engineering (specalizing in coal mining), 
and metallurgy. 

The school was opened in temporary quarters in Wilburton, Jan- 
uary 11, 1909. Three new buildings have been constructed for the 
institution. These are located on a campus of sixty acres, donated 
by the citizens of Wilburton. 

Officers and Faculty 

Name. Position. Salary. 

Geo. E. Ladd President $2.f>00 

Elizabeth Thurman Secretary 900 

Damon D. Dunkin Prof. Mining 1,750 

Robert C. Thompson Prof. Chemistry 1J50 

J. J. Brown Prof. Ore Dressing 1.750 

Van Buren Hinsch Drawing and Mathematics 1.500 

Edward P. Barrett Asst. Chemistry 1,000 

Oliver Rigby Surveying 1,100 

A. Easley Cabinet Maker 900 

J. E. Stivers Mechanic 



196 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



STATE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF 

Sulphur, Oklahoma. 



The Legislature of 1908-1909 permanently located this institution 
at Sulphur and the special session of 1910 brought an appropriation 
of $100,000 for buildings. The permanent site is immediately outside 
the eastern limits of the city of Sulphur, where the State has been 
given sixty acres of land with an option on forty acres more. The 
elevation affords a view of the country for miles, and the land adjoins 
Piatt National Park, 

The school follows what is known as the combined system. There 
are two departments — the manual and the oral. The oral department 
proposes to teach Its students to talk and to educate them by speech; 
the manual department trains its students by finger spelling and by 
signs. 

The enrollment for the school year of 1908 1909 was 200, 90 boys 
and 110 girls, and the enrollment for 1909-1910 was 232, thirty pupils 
failing to return and 65 new ones were enrolled. 



Officers, Faculty and Employees. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

A. A. Stewart Superintendent $1,400 

Nora Wheeler Matron 600 

Yetta Baggerman Manual Department 675 

Joseph Carmock Manual Department 1,000 

Enga Anderson Manual Department 495 

Mrs. E. B. Hayes Manual Department 540 

P. T. Hughes Manual Department 58.5 

H. B. Shibley Manual Department 58J> 

Ivy Myers Manual Department 495 

M. S. Hayes Manual Department 585 

lona Tade Manual Department 580 

Eula Morris Manual Department 405 

G. S. Price Manual Department 405 

Grace Myers Manual Department . . .' 360 

Miss E. B. Root Oral Department 540 

Editha Williams Oral Department 540 

T. B. Archer Oral Department 630 

Evelyn Lynes Oral Department e-iO 

Delia Orr Oral Department 630 

Francis Hockensmith Oral Department 630 

Mary Carter Oral Department 585 

Mrs. M. B. Krueger Oral Department 630 

Inis Hall Industrial Department 630 

Mrs. Sarah Temple Sewing 450 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 197 

J. A. Graham Carpentering 900 

Shoe making and Harness making 675 

W. E. Raine Printing 585 

Miss Catherine Bickler Literary teacher 540 

. 4nna Merrill Industrial teacher 549 

W. D. Harmon Clerk and store keeper 600 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No, 557— Support and maintenance $50,000.00 $50,000.00 

S. B. No. 87 — Buildings and equipment 70,000.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency $10,000.00 



198 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



OKLAHOMA SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 

Fort Gibson, Oklahoma. 



The origin of the institution, which has come to be known as the 
Oklahoma School for the Blind, is to be associated with the name of 
Miss Lura A. Rowland, now Mrs. Lura A. Lowrey. Mrs. Lowrey, a 
graduate of the Arkansas School for the Blind, undertook in 1897, the 
establishment of a school for the blind in the Indian Territory. The 
school was organized, having a board of directors, and was known as 
the International School for the Blind. 

Mrs. Lowrey traveled extensively in the Territory, and by various 
means, secured funds with which to equip a building for formal open- 
ing. The school was formally opened at Fort Gibson, in what was 
known as the Barracks building, with an enrollment of ten pupils, 
January 3. 1898. For approximately ten years the school was con- 
ducted under the direct supervision of Mrs. Lowery. There were in 
all, eleven terms, comprising each from six weeks to nine months 
duration. The school, being a private institution, was supported by 
private and puolic subscription. The Cherokee and Choctaw Nations 
appropriated for several years from thhree to six hundred dollars per 
annum for the maintenance of the school. Mrs. Lowery made repeat- 
ed etiorts to secure an appropriation from Congress — all of which were 
unsuccessful. 

Mrs. Lowery, having resigned, was succeeded by C. E. Harmon, 
July 1, 1907. He moved the school, December 14, from Fort Gibson to 
Wagoner, at which place it remained until July, 1908, when it was re- 
located at Fort Gibsun. 

The First Legislature of the State of Oklahoma appropriated 
$5,000, the act being approved May 29, 1908, for the maintenance of 
"The Lura A. Lowery School for the Blind," and provided in the same 
act, that the school should be under the control of the State Board of 
Education. In July, 1908, George W. Bruce was elected, by the board, 
president of the school. Under the new management, the school was 
opened October 15, 1908, in two residence buildings, with an enroll- 
ment of thirty-three pupils. Bruce served as president of the school 
until June 30, 1911. During his three years' presidency, the maximum 
enrollment was forty-two. The State Board of Education, on May 25, 
1911, elected as superintendent of the Oklahoma School for the Blind, 
which name was given to the institution, Oscar W. Stewart, who be- 
gan his duties July 1, 1911. 

The Legislature of 1909 and 1911 each appropriated money for 
the maintenance of the school for the blind, but declined to perma- 
nently locate it. The school is being conducted in buildings formerly 
occupied by officers when a United States fort was maintained at Fort 
Gibson. 

Superintendent Stewart is a graduate of the Texas School for the 
Blind, and has been for several years unofficially active in behalf of 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 199 

the welfare of this school. Upon taking charge, he immediately ar- 
ranged for other buildings and now there is capacity for sixty pupils. 
The State Board of Education prescribed the course of study in 
the literary department to be that of the common and high schools 
of the State, and plans are under way whereby the school will be 
technically articulated with the. State University. Thorough courses 
in music, piano tuning and repairing, weaving, sewing and typewrit- 
ing, are given in this school. The eligibility of pupils has been stated 
as follow^s: "All persons over six and under twenty-one years of age, 
who are of such mental and physical ability as to enable them to do 
systematic study, whose vision is so impaired as to make it impossible 
for them to attend the schools for the sighted, are proper persons to 
be received in the school for the blind." 



Officers and Employees. 

^ ^^°l®- Position. Salary. 

Oscar W. Stewart Superintendent $1,800.00 

Lucy A Griffin i Correspondent and Bookkeeper. . '5OO.OO 

James L. Waller Principal 720.00 

J. K. Milliken Teacher and Boys' Supervisor. . . 540.00 

Laura B. Robertson Primary Teacher 540.00 

Gordon B. Hicks .Director of Music 810.00 

Grace Pagan Assistant Music Teacher 450.00 

Mrs. Gordon Hicks Typewriting and Elocution 450.00 

Ellen Burton Matron 540.00 

Mrs. Nora Revis Supervisor of Girls 360.00 



Appropriations. 

1912 1913 

H. B. No. 557 — Support and maintenance $30,000.00 $30,000.00 



2(t(l OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



COLORED AGRICULTURAL AND NORMAL 
UNIVERSITY 

Langston, Oklahoma. 



This institution was established at Langston by an act of the 
Territorial Legislature in 1897, for the purpose of giving the negroes 
of Oklahoma, normal collegiate, industrial and agricultural training. 
Forty acres of land for building and agricultural purposes were do- 
nated by the people of Langston and its immediate vicinity. The same 
legislature which established the school, appropriated the sum of 
$5,000 for its benefit, but this amount proved inadequate for the 
erection of a suitable building, the employment of teachers and the 
purchase of necessary aquipment. At this time, the land lease money 
was so divided among the territorial institutions as to make it pos- 
sible for the school to continue its work without serious embarass- 
ment until an appropriation could be made for its support by the 
next legislature. 

The legislature which met in 1899, made an appropriation of $10,- 
000 for building purposes, provided a tax levy on one-tenth of a mill, 
set apart one-fifth of the land lease money and one-tenth of the amount 
which was given the Territory annually by the Federal Government, 
in compliance with the Morrill Act, and made an appropriation of 
$15,000 from the accrued Morrill fund for the maintenance and equip- 
ment of the university. 

Owing to the fact that this last appropriation was not approved 
by the Secretary of the Interior because he was of the opinion that 
it was made in violation of law, the regents, at the suggestion of 
Governor Barnes, adopted a resolution asking the delegate in Congress 
to introduce a bill providing for the ratification of that part of the 
act of the ligislature which contained the appropriation. The bill 
passed. 

Two new buildings were then erected — a dormitory for young 
women and a mechanic arts building, and the amount of acreage was 
increased to one hundred and sixty acres. 

The First Legislature of the State of Oklahoma appropriated a 
fraction over $40,000 for the maintenance of the university for the 
year 1908-1909, which amount, added to the income from the rental 
of section thirteen and from the Morrill fund, raised the total annual 
income to $48,000. 

To relieve the crowded condition, due to the destruction by fire 
of the main building in November, 1907, and to the increased attend- 
ance, the same legislature, also, appropriated $100,000 for the erec- 
tion of a new main building and for additional improvements. The 
enrollment totals 673 students. The Second Legislature appropriated 
$85,000 for maintenance and improvements, and the Third. $82,400. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 201 

Buildings. 

Main building $65,000 

Mechanical building 10,000 

Girls' dormitory • 4,000 

Girls' dormitory 14,000 

Boys' dormitory 7,000 

President's residence 2,000 

Nurse training building • 700 

Farm house 500 

Barn 3,000 

Laundry 400 



Faculty. 

Inman E. Page President . . • $2,500 

J. R. Johnson Vice-President 1,200 

J. A. Dingus Agriculture 1,200 

Horace F. Mitchell Mathematics 1,100 

Luther L. Henderson Psychology and Pedagogy 1,100 

Edward A. Ward Economics 1,100 

Charles F. Sneed Psysical and Natural Sciences 1,100 

Gilbert H. Jones Ancient Languages 1,100 

S. R. Youngblood English Language and Literature. . 1,100 

A. J. Jordan Nurse Training Department 1,100 

J. R. Hogan History 1,100 

Zelia N. Breaux Music 1,000 

Mary Lee McCrary Domestic Economy 1,000 

J. A. Bailey Bookkeeping, Stenography, Type- 
writing 900 

Z. R. Page Girls' Dormitory and Boarding De- 
partment 900 

Sumner George Woodworking 840 

W. W. Pearson Blacksmithing 840 

N. A. Jones Machine Work 840 

Lorenda Evans Nurse Training • 840 

Mary J. McCain Domestic Economy 720 

Daisy Toombs Geography, Drawing and Penman- 
ship 720 

Samuel Sadler English 720 

Katherine Ward Young Women's Dormitory 600 

Domestic Science 720 

Music 720 



Employees 

Alexander Morris Secretary to President $ 600 

P. T. Zeigler Superintendent of the Farm 840 

Julius Tilmon Assistant 360 

Haywood Harden Assistant 360 

J. W. Baldwin Assistant 360 

J. McMullin Asistant in Foundry 720 

R. F. Hill Engineer and Fireman 900 

Joseph Johnson Assistant Engineer and Fireman. . . 600 

William Lay Watchman 600 

Ann Donnell Cook 480 

Frederick Whitlow Chief Janitor 800 



202 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Appropriations 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557 $36,000.00 $36,000.00 

H. B. No. 593— "Section 13 Fund" $ 3,474.00 $ 3,474.00 

H. B. No. 613 $5,200.00 



Land. 

The university began with forty acres of land. It now has 320 
acres, valued at $14,000. 



Source and Amount of Income. 

The current and permanent support of the university is derived 
from : 

1. Legislative appropriation. 

2. One-third on a tenth of the proceeds from the rental of sec- 
tion thirteen, reserved by Congress for the benefit of institutions of 
higher learning. 

3. One-tenth of the Morrill fund. 

4. Rental of new college land, (100,000 acres.) 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 203 



INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF, BLIND AND 
ORPHANS OF THE NEGRO RACE 

Taft, Okla. 

The Institute for the deaf mutes, blind and orphans of the col- 
ored race, located at Taft, Oklahoma, was founded by the Second 
Legislature under the administration of Governor Charles N. Haskell. 
It is intended for the education of the negro children In the gram- 
mar grades, including a thorough high school course, and in the pri- 
mary industries which will fit them for usefulness in life and safe 
citizens. 

The buildings are located six blocks from the depot on a tract of 
one hundred acres of fine agricultural land, well timbered and watered. 
At present there are two buildings: a three-story brick building, thor- 
oughly modern, and a two and one-half story frame building. 

The Institute consists of three departments: the department for 
for the deaf mute, the department for the blind, and the department 
for orphans. All deaf mute and blind residents of the state are, en- 
titled to an education in the Institute without charge. The board of 
regents has the authority to receive into the school all negro children 
in the state under the age of sixteen years. 

Students Enrolled: 

Deaf Mute department 16 

Department for the Blind 1 

Department for the Orphans .....72 

Total gg 

Following is the list of persons employed and salaries paid per 
month, dating from July 1st, 1911: 

Name. Position. Salary. 

S. Douglafe Russell Superintendent $150.00 

?J. W. Green Principal of grammar school ... 60.00 

M A/r^^^-^'^ Assistant grammar department . 50.00 

M.. M. White Assistant grammar department . 50.00 

Monroe Ingram Teacher for deaf mutes 50.00 

viola Drake Instructor in domestic economy. . 40.00 



S. A.. Parker Matron 

H. M. Byrd Assistant matron 



50.00- 
40.00 
60.00 



Stephen H. Russell Engineer 

T ?■ 'F^^^^ Assistant engineer 40.00 

Jack Norton Gardner 

Elizabeth Pollett Cook 



25.00 
30.00 



$645.00 
Appropriations. 

H. B. 557 $29,800.00 

S. B. 209 (Deficiency) 21,680.75 



204 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



ACCREDITED LIST OF COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 



Credits from the following institutions are accepted toward a 
state certificate in Oklahoma as far as they go toward meeting re- 
quirements. Subjects required for which the applicant cannot furnish 
a credit from institutions must be taken by examination. 

Arizona — University of Arizona, Northern Arizona Normal School, 
Arizona Normal School. 

Arkansas — University of Arkansas, Hendrix College, Ouachita 
College, Arkansas College, Arkansas Conference College, Henderson 
College, Gallaway College. 

California — State Normal at Los Angeles, State Normal at San 
Diego, State Normal at San Jose, State Normal at San Francisco, 
State Normal at Chico, Leland Stanford University, University of 
California. 

Connecticut — State Normal at New Britton. State Normal at Wil- 
limantic, Yale University, New Haven. 

Colorado — State Normal School, Greeley; University of Colorado, 
State Agricultural College, Colorado School of Mines, University of 
Denver, Colorado College. 

Florida — University of Florida, Florida State College for Women, 
Stetson University, Rollins College, Southern College. 

Georgia — State Normal School, University of Georgia, Georgia 
Normal and Industrial College, Wesleyan College, Mercer University, 
Emory College, Bessie Tift College. 

Indiana — State Normal School, State University, Valparaiso Uni- 
versity. 

Idaho — University of Idaho, State Normal at Lewiston, State 
Normal at Albion. 

Iowa — Coe College, Cornell College, Drake University, Highland 
Park College, Iowa College, Iowa Weslyan University, Morningside 
College, Parsons College, Penn College, Simpson College, Upper Iowa 
University, Buena Vista College, Central University, Des Moines Col- 
lege, Ellsworth College, Lenox College, Luther College, Saint Joseph 
College, Tabor College. 

Kentucky — State University, Western Kentucky Normal School, 
Eastern Kentucky Normal School, Transylvania University, Central 
University, Georgetown University, Berea College, Kentucky Weslyan 
College. 

Kansas — Baker University, Bethany College, Campbell College, 
Cooper College, College of Emporia, Fairmont College, Friends Uni- 
versity, Midland College, McPherson College, Ottawa University, 
Southwestern College, University of Kansas, Washburn College, State 
Agricultural College, Kansas Wesleyan University. 

Louisiana — State Normal, State University, Tulane University, 
Newcomb College, Industrial Institute at Ruston, Industrial Institute 
at Lafayette. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 205 

Massachusetts — State Normal at Bridgeport, State Normal at 
Framlngham, State Normal at Fitchburg, State Normal at Dowell, 
State Normal at Salem, State Normal at Westfield, State Normal at 
Worchester, State Normal at Hyannis, State Normal at North Adams, 
University at Cambridge, Tufts College. 

Maine — State Normal at Castine, State Normal at Farmington, 
State Normal at Gorman, University of Maine, Bates College, Bowdin 
College, Colby College. 

Minnesota — State Normal at Mankota. State Normal at Moorhead, 
State Normal at St. Cloud, State Normal at Winona, State University. 

Maryland — State Normal School at Baltimore, ' State Normal 
School at Frostburg, Washington College, John Hopkins University, 
Western Maryland College, Woman's College. 

Michigan — State Normal at Ypsilanti, State Normal at Mt. Pleas- 
ant, State Normal at Marquette, University at Ann Arbor. 

Missouri — State University, Washington University, St. Louis 
University. Drury College, William Jewell College, Tarkio College, 
Park College, Westminster College, Missouri Valley College, State 
Normal at Kirksville, State Normal at Warrensburg, State Normal at 
Cape Giradeau, State Normal at Springfield, State Normal at Mary- 
ville, Lincoln Institute (negro.) 

Mississippi — University of Mississippi, Agricultural and Mechani- 
cal College, Industrial Institute & College. 

Nevada — University of Nevada. 

New Mexico — State Normal at Silver City, State Normal at Las 
Vegas, University of New Mexico. 

North Dakota — State University, Wesley College, Agricultural 
College, Fargo College, State Normal at Valley City. State Normal at 
Mayville. 

New Hampshire — Darmouth College, Agricultural and Mechanical 
College. 

North Carolina — State Normal at Greensboro, State University. 

Nebraska — University of Nebraska, Bellevue College, Catner Uni- 
versity. Creighton University, Dana College, Doane College, Grand 
Island College, Hastings College, Nebraska Wesleyan University, 
Union College, York College. 

Ohio — Antioch College, Ashland College, Buchtel College, Case 
School of Applied Science, Cedarville College, Denison University, 
Hiram College, Kenyon College, Marietta College, Mt. Union College, 
Muskingum College, Oberlin College, Ohio Northern University, Ohio 
State University, Ohio University, Ohio Wesleyan University, Otter- 
bein University, Oxford College for Women, Rio Grande College, St. 
Ignatius College, St. John's University, University of Cincinnati, Ur- 
bana University, Western College for Women, Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, Wilmington College, Wittenberg College. 

Oregon — State University, State Agricultural College, William- 
ette University, Pacific College, Alabany College, M'cMinniville Col- 
lege. 

Pennsylvania — 

State Normal Schools 

West Chester, Millersville, Kutztown, East Stroudsburg, Mans- 
field, Bloomsburg, Shippensburg, Lock Haven, Indiana, California^ 
Slippery Rock, Edinboro. Clarion. 



206 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Colleges and Universities. 

Albright College, Allegheny College, Beaver College, Brj^n Mawr 
College, Bucknell University, Dickinson College, Franklin & Marshall 
College, Geneva College, Grove City College, Haverford College, Ir- 
ving College, Juniata College, Lafayette College, Lebanon Valley Col- 
I'ege, Lehigh University, Moravian College, Muhlenberg College, Metz- 
ger College, Pennsylvania College, Pennsylvania Military College, 
Pennsylvania State College, St. Vincent College, .Susquehanna Uni- 
versity, Swarthmore College, Temple University, University of Penn- 
sylvania, Ursinus College, The College of St. Thomas, Washington & 
Jefferson College, Waynesburg College, University of Pittsburg, West- 
minister College, Wilson College. 

Rhode Island — Brown University, State College. 

South Carolina — Winthrop State School. 
• Texas — A. & M. College, University of Texas, Baylor University, 
Southwestern University, Christian University, Polytechnic College, 
Trinity College, Austin College, State Normal at Huntsville, State 
Normal at Denton, State Normal at San Marcos, State Normal at 
Canyon, Industrial Institute and College, Bishop College (negro), 
Wiley University (negro), Prairie View Normal (negro). 

Utah— Brigham Young Universit.y, Agricultural College, State Uni- 
versity. 

Vermont — State University, Middlebury College, Norwich Uni- 
versity. 

Virginia — University of Virginia, William and Mary College, Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, Washington and Lee Unversity, Randolph Ma- 
con Colleges, Roanoke College, Emory and Henry College , Richmond 
College, Hampden-Sidney College, Washington City Normal School, 
Howard University (negro). 

Washington— State Normal at Ellensberg, State Normal at Bel- 
lingham. State University. 

Wyoming — State University. 

Wisconsin — State Normal School at Superior, State Normal School 
at River Falls, State Normal School at Stevens Point, State Normal 
School at Oshkosh, State Normal School at Milwaukee, State Normal 
School at Whitewater, State Normal School at Platteville, State Normal 
School at LaCrosse, State University, Beloit College, Lawrence Col- 
lege, Milton College, Carroll College, Milwaukee-Dower College, Ri- 
pon College, Stout Institute. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 



207 



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Charitable Institutions 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 215 



OKLAHOMA HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE 

Supply, Oklahoma. 



The territorial legislature in 1905 accepted an offer made by 
Congress to grant to the territory the use of Fort Supply Military 
Reservation and the buildings thereon for the purpose of an insane 
asylum. The site of the institution is one of considerable interest 
from an historical viewpoint. It is located in Woodward County. 

Many of the expeditions of the United States regular army against 
the marauding bands of the socalled wild plains Indians used Fort 
Supply as their base of supply. General Custer, the noted Indian 
fighter, who later met death at the battle of the Little Big Horn, at 
one time was stationed for a short period on the reservation. The 
house used by him as his home is now the residence of Dr. E. G. New- 
ell, superintendent of the institution. 

The management and control of the hospital is vested in the 
Board of Trustees, composed of the governor, who shall be ex-officio 
chairman, and two other persons of different political affiliations, ap- 
pointed by the governor. 

Board of Trustees. 

Lee Cruce Governor and ex-officio chairman .... Ardmore. 

C. L. Lang Member Wewoka. 

W. S. Bearing Member Thomas. 



Officers. 

Dr. E. G. Newell Superintendent. 

Dr. P. H. Stultz Assistant Physician. 

R. L. Ewing Steward. 

Name. Position, Salary. 

C. W. Griffin Supervisor $900.00 

Amelia Todd Supervisoress 480.00 

W. M. Vanscoyk Chief Engineer 900.00 

Bessie L. Davis Druggist 720.00 

C. H. Matkin Chief Cook 720.00 

Esther B. Matkin Matron 600.00 

Martha A. Curl Private Secretary and Stenog- 
rapher to Superintendent 600.00 

Jas. H. Starr Farm Superintendent 600.00 

M. L. Davis Laundryman 600.00 

G. W. Carroll Head Carpenter 600.00 

B. A. Walker Blacksmith 600.00 

A. B. Messall Steward's Assistant 600.00 



216 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



I. I. Chase Plumber 600.00 

W. M, Clanton Butcher 540.00 

L. H. Everett Baker 480.00 

J. W. Cooper Assistant Carpenter 480.00 

Jas. L. Kelly Gardener 480.00 

J. W. Manson Outside night watch 480.00 

Ida Mader Assistant Laundryman 450.00 

H. L. Washmon Dairyman 420.00 

R. D. Buoy Landscape Gardener 420.00 

J. B. Harlan Attendant 384.00 

Anna Hill Attendant 384.00 

J. L. Welch Fireman 360.00 

Luther Wilson Fireman 360.00 

Otto Waddell Fireman 360.00 

Osie Waller Deliveryman 360.00 

Ada G. Page Seamstress 360.00 

H. B. Ashcraft Inside night watch 360.00 

Minnie Dearing Inside night watch 360.00 

F. W. Matkin Assistant Cook 360.00 

Elizabeth Darnell Assistant Cook 360.00 

Lydia Zeider Assistant Cook 360.00 

Ethel Clanton Assistant Laundryman 330.00 

Mayme Pettis Night Attendant 324.00 

W. G. Glass Night Attendant 324.00 

Icy Foster Attendant 324.00 

Mayme Connerly Attendant 324.00 

Clara Carrell Attendant 324.00 

Mary Hillin Attendant 324.00 

Louise Denton Attendant 324.00 

Chas. P. Nash Attendant 324.00 

J. L. Smith Attendant 324.00 

D. F. Roberts Attendant 324.00 

Eunice Powell Attendant 324.00 

Douglas Harris Attendant 324.00 

C. W. Ball Attendant 324.0C 

H. W. Denton Attendant 324.00 

A. N. Reeves Attendant 324.00 

Chas. Shafer Attendant 324.00 

H. C. Roark Attendant 324.00 

E. B. Arnold Attendant 324.00 

.1. M. Shelton Attendant 324.00 

Lee Lloyd Attendant 324.00 

Allie May Gates Attendant 324.00 

L. P. Myers Atl[endant 324.00 

Cleo Moody Attendant 324.00 

Mayme Patton Attendant 324.00 

Grady Clifton Attendant 324.00 

Imogene Littlejohn Attendant 524.00 

Emma Darnell Assistant Laundryman 300.00 

A. A. Clanton Assistant Baker 300.00 

W. S. Marsh Dining Room Attendant 300.00 

Alma Marsh Dining Room Attendant 300.00 

Reba Gibson Dining Room Attendant 300.00 

Eugene Pearce Farm hand 300.00 

Chas. Forest Farm hand 300.00 

W. W. Denton Farm hand 300.00 

George Van Camp Farm hand 300.00 

Loyd Janes Farm hand 300.00 



s[\m$ of 

HOSPITAI/ 
FOR INSANE 
AtSUPPLY, 
OKLA. 




CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 217 

F. L. Wigle Farm hand 300.00 

Z. N. Jessee Farm hand 300.00 

Myrtle Palmer Assistant Laundryman 240.00 

A. W. Page Special labor at $2.00 per diem. 



Inventory. 

Estimated Value. 

Officers" residences $ 8,000.00 

Dormitories for employees 8,000.00 

Ward buildings (11) 42,000.00 

Amusement hall • 4,000.00 

Power house building 2,500.00 

Commissary building 6,000.00 

Laundry building 750.00 

Barns, sow sheds, poultry houses, hog sheds, other out build- 
ings, fences, etc 6,000.00 

1,760 acres of land, 400 acres under cultivation 20,000.00 

Farm utensils 4,000.00 

Horses, cattle, mules and hogs 10,000.00 

Furnishings for wards, officers' residences, dormitories, 
amusement hall (such as furniture, bedding and car- 
pets), kitchen and dining room furniture and utensils.. 18,000.00 
Blacksmith's, carpenter's, plumber's and butcher's tools, etc. 1,200.00 

Office fixtures and furniture 1,500.00 

Heating and ice plant 40,000.00 

Light plant (acetylene gas) 2,000.00 

Waterworks plant, including water mains, etc 10,000.00 

Sewer system 5,000.00 

Bath room and toilet fixtures 2,500.00 

Laundry plant 2,000.00 



Number of Patients. 

Total number of patients, enrolled Men. Women 

October 1, 1911 304 181 

On parole 27 16 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 557— Support and maintenance $149,974.00 $148,774.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency $7,144.21 

S. B. No. 218— To reimburse contingent fund 7,000.00 

Foor rebuilding and repairing ward.... 4,000.00 



218 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



EAST OKLAHOMA HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE 

Vinita, Oklahoma. 



By an act of the 1907-08 Legislature, the East Oklahoma Hos- 
pital for the Insane was created and located at Vinita, Okla., on the 
cendition that the town of Vinita should deed to the state of Okla- 
homa one hundred and sixty acres of land in fee simple and that 
the town should furnish the institution with flowing artesian water. 
The control and management of the hospital is vested in a board of 
three trustees appointed by the governor, with the advice and con- 
sent of the senate. The buildings are, so far, incomplete and the 
officers of the institution consist of the three members of the board 
of trustees: Oliver Bagby, chairman, Vinita; C. L. Long, Wewoka; 
and J. J. Maroney, Okmulgee. Provision is made in the law creating 
the institution for the appointment of a medical superintendent and 
steward, and such other subordinate officers as are necessary. 



Appropriations 

1912. 1918. 

H. B. Nc. 557— Support and maintenance $30,000.00 $100,000.00 

H. B. No. 361— To build three additional buildings $250,000.00 



Buildings and Improvements. 

Value of lands (approximately 700 acres) $38,000.00 

Value of improvements (original) 5,000.00 

New buildings, partially completed 80,000.00 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 219 



OKLAHOMA SANITARIUM 

Norman, Oklahoma. 



The Oklahoma hospital for insane at Norman, Oklahoma, is lo- 
cated on a tract of land just east and immediately adjoining the City 
of Norman. The grounds are high and dry and command an excel- 
lent view of the -surrounding country. 

The main building is of brick and stone, three stories and a 
basement. The front of the ground floor is used for offices, recep- 
tion rooms, prescription department, and laboratory; the basement 
for store room. The upper stories are used as wards for the care of 
the patients. m 

Besides the main building there are three two-story and seven 
one-story buildings, which are" also used for wards. All of these are 
well lighted and ventilated. On the grounds there are two buildings 
for the officers and many others for commissary, work shops, stor- 
age roooms, etc., covering about thirty acres of ground. The rest of 
the vacant land is used for garden, parade grounds, etc. 

During 1910 a large two-story building was added, which accom- 
modates about eighty patients. This building is used exclusively for 
the reception of new patients. 



Appropriations. 

H. B. No. 557 — Support and maintenance $300,000.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency 23,000.00 



(Note) — This hospital is a private institution but appropriations are 
made by the legislature for the care of state patients who are con- 
fined there, it thus becoming a semi-state institution, ^he Territory 
cf Oklahoma made a contract with the company operating the institu- 
tion in May, 1901, for keeping the insane patients of the state until 
the state institution for the insane located at Fort Supply should be 
constructed. The original contract was for a term of four years but 
the legislature of 1903 extended the time of the contract until the 
state institution should be completed and a railroad built to Fort 
Supply. A gradual transfer of the patients is being made. 



220 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



OKLAHOMA INSTITUTION FOR FEEBLE MINDED 

Enid, Oklahoma. 



By an act of the 1909 legislature, section 33, township 23 north of 
range 6, west of the Indian Meridian of Garfield county was desig- 
nated as the site for the Oklahoma Institution for Feeble Minded. 
The commissioner of the land office was authorized to empower the 
tract of land to the state, and the City of Enid agreed to settle the 
claims of the school land leasees who were in possession of the 
tract. 

The institution is under the general charge and control of a 
Board of Managers, consisting of five persons, of which the governor 
is the ex-officio chairman. The four remaining members of the board 
are appointed by the governor by and with the advice and consent of 
the senate, and the tenure of office is two years. 

The purpose of the institution is to care for the feeble minded be- 
tween the ages of sixteen and forty-five years. It is divided into two 
departments, a training school and an asylum department. 

Officers and Employees. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

W. L. Kendall, M. D Superintendent $2,400.00 

E. C. Callahan fhief clerk 1,000.00 

Mary J. Pearce Matron 900.00 

Berta Renshaw Teacher 480.00 

Lula Losey Cook ^00.00 

Sadie Beavers Attendants 360.00 

Nina Manning Attendants 360.00 

Anna Clements Attendants 360.00 

John B. Regier Attendants 360.00 

Cecil Dyer ..Attendants 360.00 

R. D. Elkins Attendants 360.00 

Grace Mathias Attendants 360.00 

Florence Penfield Attendants 360.00 

Lula Stone Attendants 360.00 

Ruth Jones Attendants 360.00 

Earl Miller .Attendants 360.00 

Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. .557— Support and maintenance $23,200.00 $20,000.00 

S. B. N. 209— Deficiency $3,000.00 

*S. B. No. 47 — For construction, buildings and equip- 
ment $155,000.00 

♦Disapproved by the governor for $25,000, March 10, 1911, but sub- 
sequent proceedings in the senate would make it appear that the gov- 
ernor had failed to make his disapproval within the required five days 
and the senate went on record as holding that the full appropriation 
was effective. 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 221 



STATE ORPHAN HOME 

Pryor, Oklahoma. 



The first state legislature authorized the acquisition of the Whita- 
ker Orphan Home at Pryor, Okla., and the re-naming of the institu- 
tion as the Whitaker Orphan Home of the State of Oklahoma. The 
site of the institution contains a tract of forty acres of land. The 
Board of Trustees is authorized to accept all white children in the 
state of Oklahoma of ages under sixteen years, who are dependent, 
destitute, neglected or abandoned. All children admitted to the in- 
stitution are to be retained until they obtain their legal majority 
unless they are otherwise released or removed from said home. 

The superintendent of the institution is appointed by the govern- 
or and receives a salary of $1,800.00 per annum and necessary ex- 
penses. 

The third legislature appropriated $113,730.00 for the construc- 
tion of six cottages, a detention building, mechanical building, dairy 
barn, hog barns, poultry buildings, and the purchase of farm equip 
ment for the institution. 

Officers and Employees. 

Name. Position. Salary. 

A. L. Malone Superintendent $1,800.00 

DeWitt T. Ferguson Principal 900.00 

Sallie Gray First Assistant Teacher 720.00 

Ruth Roach Second Assistant Principal 720.00 

Cleva Stafford Third Assistant Principal 720.00 

Willie May Rowe Music Teacher 720.00 

Mildred Glasse Domestic Science 720.00 

Sallie Puckett Housekeeper and Matron Rose 

Cottage, large girls 600.00 

Miss E. A. Park Housekeeper and Matron Main 

building, small girls 600.00 

Assistant Housekeeper and Ma- 
tron over Main building 420.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth Caldwell Housekeeper and Matron Maple 

Cottage, large boys 600.00 

Mrs. Edgar Hale Matron over small boys' building 600.00 

Viola Cannon Hospital Nurse 600.00 

Harry C. Hee Bookkeeper and Stenographer. . 600.00 

J. W. Weindel Laundryroan .540.00 

Mrs. Verna L. Adair Laundress 360.00 

S. K, Rotan Night Watchman 480.00 

Martha Whitaker Seamstress 480.00 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 5.57— Support and maintenance $54,000.00 $50,000.00 

H. B. No. 357— Buildings and equipment $113,730.00 



222 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



OKLAHOMA STATE CONFEDERATE HOME 

Ardmore, Oklahoma. 



By provision of an act of the state legislature in 1910, the prop- 
erty of the Confederate Veteran Home Association at Ardmore, Ok- 
lahoma, as designated and proposed in the articles of incorporation 
of that association, was made a charitable institution of the state, 
the state agreeing to maintain the home for a period of twenty-five 
years. The purpose of the institution, as outlined in the legislative 
enactment, is to care for the indigent and disabled soldiers and sailors 
who enlisted, served or participated as a soldier or sailor in the navy 
of the Confederate States during the Civil War, and also for the aged 
wives and widows of such soldiers and sailors. 

The association conveyed to the state twenty acres of land and 
the legislature in turn provided an appropriation of twenty-thousand 
dollars for the support of the institution for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1911. The third legislature made an appropriation in 1911, 
of fifteen thousand dollars for each year of the biennial period, end- 
ing June 30, 1913, in H. B. No. 557, for the support and maintenance 
of the institution. 

The control of the institution is vested in a board of control, 
composed of seven members. The names of the members of the 
board and their addresses are: 

Dr. John M. Threadgill Oklahoma City. 

N. F. Hancock Muskogee. 

Daniel M. Hailey McAlester. 

Richard A. Sneed Lawton. 

J. W. Blanton Rocky. 

George H. Bruce Ardmore. 

Mrs. Ruth Clement . . Oklahoma City. 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 223 



CORNISH ORPHANS' HOME 

Cornish, Oklahoma. 



The Cornish Orphans' Home is a private institution founded for 
the care of orphan children. The legislature in 1911 made an appro- 
priation of $5,000.00 to aid in the support of the institution for the 
fiscal years of 1912 and 1913. 

There is a two and a-half story building provided for the chil- 
dren. Nineteen are enrolled at the present time and the institution 
has already cared for approximately 100 children. The property of 
the home is valued at .$7,500.00. Seven acres of land is owned and a 
small printing plant for the publication of the Orphans' Home Journal 
has been established. 

The officers are as follows: W. S. Wolverton, president; A. Mc 
Crory, vice president; R. O. Dulaney, treasurer; Mrs. Ross Harris, 
matron; Mrs. M. E. Harris, corresponding secretary; M. E. Harris, 
state manager; Mrs. L. A. Swisher, financial secretary of Northern 
District; and Jennie L. Meyer, soliciting agent; Directors: W. S. 
Wolverton, Ardmore; W. M. Tucker, Simon; E. E. Gore, Altus; James 
H. Wolverton, Lawton; S. W. Ryan and James Ward, Ryan; A. Mc- 
Crory, R. U. Dulaney, W. W. Woodworth, and M. E. Harris, Cornish; 
D. C. McCurtain, McAlester; M. B. Cope, El Reno; A. C. Cruce, Okla- 
homa City; Mrs. Elizabeth A. Swisher, Oklahoma City; and J. A. 
Janeway, Mangum. 



Penal and Corrective Institutions 



Sig. 17 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS 227 



STATE PENITENTIARY 

McAlester, Oklahoma. 



In January, 1909, before the penitentiary buildings were completed 
six hundred and forty-three men were brought to McAlester from the 
Kansas State penitentiary, and were 1 eld in a temporary wooden cell 
house, without cells or protection of any kind of walls except a guard 
line of armed men. The prisoners were fed and housed at a great 
hazard. Time and again mutiny started and it required men of strong 
courage to stay among them and keep down attempts of concerted 
breaks. It is now looked upon as a miracle that the desperate crimi- 
nals were held by only a few men without a single escape. It was only 
by appealing to the better senses of the men and keeping them in 
good humor that a wholesale delivery was prevented. 

As soon as arrangements could be made, a temporary wire fence 
was thrown around the buildings and charged with electricity. This 
fence was fourteen feet high, of barbed wire four inches apart. Pris- 
oners experimented with It until they found that to touch it meant 
death and after that time it became a secure wall. 

Temporary cells and plumbing followed and attention was then 
turned to building the new penitentiary. As soon as plans could 
be completed and approved, the work of construction was begun in 
June, 1909. The prison walls enclose a fraction less than ten acres 
of ground. It is of concrete piers and slab3 eighteen feet above the 
grade line on the inside of the grounds, and twenty-four feet on the 
outside, and goes eight feet below the surface. 

The State Board of Public Affairs advertised for bids in October, 
lyiU, for the administration building and the west cell wing. The admiii- 
istration building has a frontage of eighty feet, a depth of sixty-eight 
feet, and is two stories high with a basement. It is, also, built of 
concrete and ceiled throughout with tool proof grating. 

The cell wing is 240 by 58 feet, four stories high and mostly of 
steel. The outside window gratings are twenty-eight feet high and 
of tool proof steel. The windows are operated by a patent window 
opening device. Between the guards and prisoners' corridors, tool 
proof grating is used. There are four tiers of cells on each side, each 
tier containing forty cells or three hundred and twenty in all. The 
cells are of Bessemer steel three-eighths of an inch in thickness with 
tool proof grating doors operated by a Pauly automatic device. The 
cell floor carries four inches of concrete and finish above the steel 
plate. Each cell is equipped with two bunks, toilet, lavatory and is 
lighted by electricity. The contract for these two buildings was 
awarded for a contract price of $267,000.00. 

In March, 1911, the prisoners which were held at the old Federal 
jail in McAlester were moved to the new penitentiary. 

The east cell wing is now under way of construction. The state 
is doing this work independent of contract. This cell wing is to be 
an exact duplicate of the west cell wing except the dungeons and 
work cells are to be in the basement. 



228 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

The central rotunda is to be octagonal, sixty-eight feet in depth. 
All corridors lead to the central rotunda where all entrances will be 
operated by an automatic locking device from a central tower. From 
this central station all doors to the cell houses, administration build- 
ing, dining hall, chapel and school rooms as well as those leading 
to the grounds will be handled by this locking device. And all the 
prisoners passing in and out will be registered. 

A temporary dining hall has been erected which seats the 1,063 
prisoners now at the penitentiary. The laundry is in the rear of the 
temporary dining hall. A model prison hospital has also been planned 
and a power and storage plant where ice and electricity for the light 
and power service of the institution will be manufactured. It is now 
in course of construction. A woman's building, under separate wall, 
is also in course of construction. Six work shops also will be built 
inside of the north wall, each large enough to accommodate about 
one hundred men at work. 

A force of nearly one hundred convicts were put to worK on 
the construction of roads around and through the farm and nearly 
fourteen miles of first class wagon road has been built. Pittsburg 
county furnished two bridges, and the roads are the best and most 
permanent in the state. 

Tte farm is to be the chief support of the institution. Under the 
Constitution, convict labor is limited practically to farm and road work. 
In order to make the institution self sustaining, many departments 
have been planned for the farm. It is gradually being stocked with 
poultry and livestock. Several hundred head of fine hogs are raised 
each year, and all the meat for the institution in course of time will 
be produced upon this farm. 

In order to properly drain and shape up the farm, it was found 
necessary to straighten creeks, and drains, and in places to construct 
entirely new ones. About two miles of this work was done, some of 
it very heavy, creeks being walled to a depth of ten or twelve feet, 
and old channels refilled. 

In order to insure a permanent supply of water, an artificial lake 
has been constructed by building a dam between two hills. This lake 
will drain a water shed of 600 acres, and when filled will cover about 
ten acres to a maximum depth of eighteen feet. It is proposed to 
establish a water system which will serve to irrigate a portion of the 
penitentiary farm, as well as furnish water for domestic purposes. 

The first year the farm was put in cultivation proved very suc- 
cessful, although the season was a bad one, and a large amount of 
vegetables and forage was raised. A large force of prisoners are 
still engaged in improving the farm, and also in excavating and grad- 
ing around the penitentiary property. 

There have been five wagon bridges constructed along the road 
surrounding the farm, and several more are contemplated. This work 
was done entirely with prison labor. 

From the beginning of the penitentiary, a prison shoe shop has 
been operated, wherein all the shoes used by inmates of the institution 
are manufactured. 

A tailor shop is also in operation in which is manufactured all of 
the underwear, shirts, overalls, caps, and a large portion of the 
prison clothing. It is proposed to enlarge this department in order 
that all of the clothing used by the inmates may be made by them. 

A large amount of sugar cane was raised during the past year, 
and a cane mill was installed. This mill enabled the officers to make 
sufficient molasses to supply the needs of the prison. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS 229 

Eighl hundred and fifty thousand dollars has been appropriated 
for penitentiary building purposes, of which about $650,000 has been 
expended in the erection of said buildings and improvements up to 
the present time, and $20,000 which was appropriated for the pur- 
chase of. land, has also been expended. 

It is estimated that the balance in the above mentioned appropria- 
tion will complete the rotunda, east cell wing, power plant, mess hall, 
hospital, woman's building' and stables, all of which are now in course 
of construction. 

Owing to the fact that all of the common labor used in the con- 
struction of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary was done by convicts, 
the estimated value of the buildings are far in excess of their actual 
cost. 

An estimated value of the land, buildings which have been erected 
and are now in course of erection, and improvements, follow^: 

Administration building $ 250,000.00 

West cell wing 200,000.00 

Rotunda and east cell wing (to date) 150,000.00 

Wall 125,000.00 

Woman's building (to date) 5,000.00 

Estimated value of grading and excavating 50,000.00 

Residences and temporary buildings 30,000.00 

Machinery, wagons, mules, etc 50,000.00 

Cells, locks and building material on hand 50,000.00 

Sewers 38,000.00 

Value of roads and bridges around and through the peni- 
tentiary property 20,000.00 

Heating plant 10,000.00 

Saw mill and planing mill 5,000.00 

*1,566.4 acres of land at $40.00 per acre 62,656.00 

* 20 acres of land at $75.00 per acre 1,500.00 

* 100 acres of land at $75.00 per acre 7,500.00 

Steam cooking outfit 4000,00 

Total $1,058,656.00 



♦Donated by City. 



Prisoners in Confinement at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary, 
June 30, 1911. 



White males 449 

White females 5 

Black males 535 

Black females 14 

Indians 65 

Mexicans 6 



Total 1,074 



230 • OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Classification as to term of imprisonment of prisoners June 30. 
1911: 

4 months .... 2 7 years 48 

6 months 8 8 years 12 

8 months.... 1 8 years and 6 months 1 

10 months .... 3 9 years 6 

1 year 87 10 years 74 

1 year 99 12 years 5 

1 year and 2 months. ... 1 15 years 20 

1 year and 3 months. ... 1 16 years 1 

1 year and 4 months. ... 2 17 years 2 

1 year and 6 months. ... 24 20 years 14 

1 year and 9 months.... 1 21 years 2 

2 years 164 22 years 1 

2 years and 6 months. ... 16 2.5 years 11 

2 years and 8 months 1 30 years 4 

3 years Ill 40 years 5 

3 years and 6 months .... 9 45 years 1 

4 years 53 50 years 5 

4 years and 6 months. ... 3 Life 133 

5 years 125 Safe keeping 6 

6 years 11 

Total 1,074 



Classification as to crime of prisoners in confinement June 30, 
1911: 

Abduction 1 

Adultery 6 

Aiding prisoners to escape 4 

Arson 7 

Assault with dangerous weapon 3 

Attempt to pass forged instrument 1 

Attempt to rape 10 

Assault to kill 79 

Bigamy 2 

Burglary 140 

Crime against nature 1 

Disposing of mortgaged property B 

Deserting child under 6 years of age 1 

Destroying building with explosive 1 

Embezzlement 9 

Escaping jail 2 

False pretense 23 

False personation and cheating 2 

Felonious assault 2 

Forgery 82 

Grand larceny 167 

Harboring a felon 1 

Incest 8 

Enticing female under 14 years of age 1 

Larceny 56 

Larceny domestic animals 78 

Maiming domestic animals 1 

Manslaughter 105 

Murder ; 166 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS 231 

Perjury g 

Prostitution of child 1 

Receiving stolen property S 

Removing stolen property 1 

Rape 3g 

Robbery [ 4g 

Sodomy !.!..! 1 

Selling liquor to minor 7 

Uttering forged instrument 2 

Total 1 074 



Officers. 

R. W. Dick Warden $3,600.00 per annum 

E- M. Fry Deputy Warden 2,000.00 per annum 

D. C. Gates Asst. Deputy Warden 1,500.00 per annum 

Dr. J. W. Echols Prison Physician 2,000.00 per annum 

L. N. Turman Chief Clerk 1,500.00 per annum 

H. M. Shepler Record Clerk 1,200.00 per annum 

W. C. Kendall Storekeeper 1,200.00 per annum 

D. J. Clement Secretary 900.00 per annum 

Rev. Frank Naylor Chaplain 900.00 per annum 

Mrs. W. C. Kendall.... Matron 720.00 per annum 

In addition to the above there are three sergeants at $900.00 per 
annum, and seventy-three other employees, including guards, foremen 
of different departments, stewards, etc., at a salary of $720 00 per 
annum. 



Appropriations. 

u T. rr- 1^12. 1913. 

^- ^- II'- ■•-■••: $160,600.00 $180,600.00 

S. B. 209— (Deficiency) « 6,000.00 

S. B. 209— (Deficiency) 1 144 21 



S. B. 218. 



11,000.00 



232 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



OKLAHOMA STATE REFORMATORY 

Granite, Oklahoma. 



An act creating and locating the Oklahoma State Reformatory 
was passed by the Second State Legislature in 1908, and an appropria- 
tion of $50,000 made for buildings and equipment. Temporary build- 
ings were erected and the first installment of prisoners were received 
by transfer from the McAlester penitentiary in April, 1910. 

The Third Legislature made an appropriation of $325,000 for per- 
manent buildings which are now under construction. 

First term prisoners, sixteen to twenty-five years of age inclusive, 
and not to exceed five-year sentences, are eligible to admission to this 
institution either by direct commitment of the courts or by order of 
the Board of Prison Control. 

The institution is now governed by the same laws that apply to 
the State Penitentiary, but as soon as suitable buildings and facilities 
are provided the legislature will be asked to enact special measures 
that will enable the institution to be conducted as a modern reform- 
atory. 

The number of inmates (June 30, 1911) was 361. There are about 
150 more at the State Penitentiary eligible for admission who cannot 
be transferred on account of insufficient quarters. 

Sam M. Flournoy of Elk City, Okla., was appointed warden at 
the creation of the institution. He was succeeded in September, 1910, 
by Clyde A. Reed of Mountain View, the present warden. 



Officers and Salaries. 

C. A. Reed Warden $2,000.00 per annum 

John Hackett Deputy Warden 125.00 per month 

J. W. Ryder Construction Supt 125.00 per month 

J. G. Price Chief Clerk 100.00 per month 

W. L| Miller Record Clerk 75.00 per month 

Lew A. Huber Storekeeper 75.00 per month 

J. H. Brannon Sergeant 75.00 per month 

O. K. Henson Sergeant 75.00 per month 

G. W. Wiley Prison Physician 75.00 per month 

B. N. Hultsman Chaplain 75.00 per month 

W. E. Williams Blacksmith 75.00 per month 

Walter Miles Steward 60.00 per month 

H. A. Nelson Foreman 60.00 per month 

E. W. Caddell Guard 60.00 per month 

J. V. Denton Guard 60.00 per month 

B. W. Brannon .Guard 60.00 per month 

T. A. Tatum Guard 60.00 per month 

E. Hester .Guard 60.00 per month 

R. L. Waldrip .Guard 60.00 per month 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS 



233 



J. D. Counts Guard 

C. R. Lee Guard 

D. W. Christian .Guard 

Joe Hackleman Guard 

M. L. Ford Guard 

B. B. Burnett Guard 

B. B. Sewell Guard 

A. W. Akers Guard 

H. N. Fritz Guard 

N. H. Nichols Guard 

W. J. Owen Guard 

C. Rusk Guard 

J. M. McCarty Guard 

J. E. Love Guard 

L. J. Lampkin Guard 

P. A. Watson Guard 

W. P. Shipley Guard 



60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per monfh 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 
60.00 per month 



Inventory. 

Estimated 
Value. 

Farm— 120 acres $7,200.00 

Granite— 40 acres 1,000.00 

Main cell building, kitchen, bakery and dining room 5,818.00 

Office and store room (stone) 1,600.00 

Guard house 600.00 

Power house (stone) 1,080.00 

Deputy's residence 600.00 

Deputy's office "S-^o 

Blacksmith shop 154.00 

Construction superintendent's office 150.00 

Storage shed 120.00 

Laundry and bath house 238.75 

Hospital 200.00 

Four tower houses 80.00 

Dark cell (concrete) 85.00 



Inmates Classified As to Crime. 

Grand larceny 130 

Larceny 108 

Burglary 142 

Robbery 12 

Murder 3 

Manslaughter 11 

Assault to kill 27 

Felonious assault 4 

Selling liquor to minors T 

Harboring 1 

Forgery 40 

Breaking into house to steal 1 

Perjury 2 

Passing forged check ; 1 

Breaking jail '^ 

Escaping from officer 2 



234 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Attempting to wreck train 1 

Killing domestic animals 1 

False impersonation 1 

Adultery i 

Assault to rape 10 

False pretense 16 

Embezzlement 4 

Attempted burglary 2 

Second degree rape 1 

Offering to sell forged check 1 

Selling forged instrument 1 

Selling mortgaged property 1 

Incest 1 

Maiming 1 

Uttering 1 



Record. 

Received at Granite 343 

Received at Camp No. 1, Washita county 99 

Received at Camp No. 2, Caddo county 100 542 

Paroled : 31 

Discharged 88 

Pardoned 3 

Died 7 

Transferred 16 

Escaped 35 

Returned on parole 1 

County June 30, 1911 :.. 361 642 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H.B. No. 557— Support and maintenance $92,200.00 $92,200.00 

S. B. No. 209— Deficiency $ 34,791.00 

Convict Camp No. 1, Mar. 15, 1911 11,000.00 

H. B. No. 445 — To purchase lands for Reformatory 12,000.00 

S. B. No. 36 — For construction, building and equip- 
ment of Reformatory 325,000.00 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS 



236 



STATE TRAINING SCHOOL 

Pauls Valley, Oklahoma. 



The Stale Training School is located three miles southeast of 
Pauls Valley on a four-hundred-acre tract of land, donated to the 
state by the citizens of Pauls Valley. The school was opened to 
receive inmates Jun^ 17, 1910, and since that time 134 boys have been 
committed by the juvenile courts of the state: 



The record follows: 



Nativity of Boys. 



Alabama 1 

Arkansas 11 

California 1 

Canada 1 

Georgia 2 

Indiana 4 

Illinois 6 

Iowa 1 

Kansas 9 

Louisiana 1 

Missouri 17 

Michigan 1 

Total 



Minnesota 2 

Mississippi 1 

Nebraska 1 

New York 8 

Ohio 2 

Oklahoma 39 

Pennsylvania 1 

Tennessee 2 

Texas 22 

West Virginia 1 

Unknown C 



,134 



Counties Represented. 



Beckham 4 

Blaine 2 

Bryan 4 

Caddo 6 

Carter 3 

Cherokee 1 

Choctaw 3 

Cleveland 2 

Comanche 9 

Creek 3 

Garfield 1 

Garvin 10 

Grady 7 

Jefferson 1 

Kay 3 

Kingfisher 1 

Lincoln 2 

Marshall 1 



McClain 2 

McCurtain 2 

Mcintosh 1 

Murray 4 

Muskogee 2 

Nowata 1 

Oklahoma 32 

Osage 2 

Okmulgee 1 

Payne 3 

Pittsburg 4 

Pottawatomie 8 

Rogers 8 

Seminole 1 

Texas 1 

Tillman 1 

Tulsa 1 

Washington 2 



236 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Ages of Boys Received. 

17 years old 6 

16 years old 14 

15 years old 45 

14 years old 18 

13 years old 1'7 

12 ye9,rs old 12 

11 years old ^ 

10 years old 9 

9 years old 4 

8 years old 1 

7 years old i 1 



Cause of Committals. 

Burglary _. 30 

Delinquency 10 

Forgery 8 

Homeless 12 

Incorrigible 15 

Larceny 39 

Loafing 3 

Selling whiskey 4 

Threatening to kill " 1 

Truancy 7 

Vagrancy 3 

No good reason 2 



Domestic Conditions. 

Both parents living 67 

Both parents dead 15 

Father living, mother dead 16 

Mother living, father dead 42 

Unknown 4 



Grades in School. 

Number in First grade 25 

Number in Second grade 16 

Number in Third grade 25 

Number in Fourth grade 29 

Number In Fifth grade 10 

Number in Sixth grade 11 

Number in Seventh grade 9 

Number in Eighth grade 9 



Movement of Population. 

Number discharged 1 

Number pardoned 1 

Number paroled 37 

Number escaped 7 

Number died 

Number present 88 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS 



237 



Officers and Employes 

Name. Position. 

E. B. Nelson Superintendent 

Mrs. A. A. Russell General Matron 

Mrs. Ella K. Fisher Dining Room Matron 

W. T. Fisher Teacher 

T. J. Bodine Foreman of Company A... . 

C. R. Walter Foreman of Company B 

S. W. Smith Foreman of Company C. . .. 

B. D. Trosper Foreman of Company D. . .. 

E. N. Lyday Night Watch 

L. R. Butcher Night Watch . 

R. L. Courtney Cook 



Salary. 
$2,500.00 per year 
50.00 per month 
35.00 per month 
65.00 per month 
50.00 per month 
50.00 per month 
50.00 per month 
50.00 per month 
50.00 per month 
35.00 per month 
50.00 per month 



Appropriations. 



H. B. No. 557 
S. B. No. 150 



1912. 1913. 

.122,750.00 $22,750.00 

$78,000.00 



GIRLS' TRAINING SCHOOL. 

,0.-.^''°^^^^°°^ ^^^^^ ™^^® *° ^ ^''1 passed by the legislature at the 
1911 session for establishing a girls' training school at Shawnee and 
another providing for its maintenance. The first was vetoed by the 
governor, but the bill appropriating $12,500 for 1912 and a similar 
amount for 1913, was approved. 



Historical 



HISTORICAL 241 



OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



The Oklahoma Historical Society was organized at a meeting of 
the Territorial Press Association in Kingfisher, May 27, 1893, and 
was inaugurated as an adjunct to that body under the title, "Historical 
Society of the Oklahoma Press Association." 

W. P. iCampbell, at that time connected with the register of deeds 
office at Kingfisher, undertook the prosecution of the work. J. B. Camp- 
bell, a brother, now a member of the State legislature, was register. 
He offered room in the register's office for storage. Effort was 
made to collect and preserve copies of every publication in the 
commonwealth, including the Indian Territory so that a file could 
always be found for future generations and incidentally to collect 
and preserve all other matters of a historic, relic or curious interest. 

During the legislature of 1895, a similar, society was organized by 
the faculty and students of the University at Norman. Custodian 
Campbell co-operated with the new organization, an appropriation 
was secured, and the collection was taken to Norman where it 
remained until completion of the Carnegie building at Oklahoma 
City, which institution sought and obtained through a special act 
removal of headquarters to the present location in the Carnegie 
building. 

It was made the trustee of the State in caring for valuable docu- 
ments by the Territorial Legislature of 1895, which provided in the 
session laws of that year that it should be the duty of the- society 
to collect books, maps and other papers and materials illustrative 
of the history of Oklahoma in particular and the west generally; 
to procure from the early settlers narratives of events relative to 
the early settlement of Oklahoma and to the early explorations. 
Indian occupancy and overland travel in the State and the west; and 
to collect documents of a varied nature such as to facilitate the 
investigation of historical, scientific, social, educational and literary 
subjects. 

The newspaper feature has always been zealously maintained, bo 
that there are now about six thousand bound volumes of these and 
kindred publications, and practically every publication, small and 
great, daily, weekly, monthly, etc., may be found on file as issued. 
Other features, however, have not been neglected, there being about 
twenty-five thousand titles covering every range of historic interest, 
the entire collection aggregating something like fourteen tons in 
weight. 

On removal of the collection to Norman, Mr. Campbell was re- 
tired, and W. T. Little became custodian, retaining the place until 
it was brought to Oklahoma City, January 1, 1901. Sidney Clarke 
was given charge and was succeeded at the end of the year by Mrs. 
Marion Rock. June 1, 1904, Mr. Campbell was induced to again take 
charge of the work, and has remained with it since that date. Miss 
Edith Rose Kneen has been assistant for the last four years. The 
society is controlled by a board chosen at annual meetings of the 
members and is maintained by membership fees and State appro- 
priations. 
Slg. 18 



242 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Official Directory. 

Jasper Sipes President Oklahoma City. 

J. B, Thoburn Vice President Olilahoma City. 

Frank H. Greer Vice President Guthrie. 

Frank D. Northrup. .Secretary Oklahoma City. 

J. W. McNeal Treasurer Guthrie. 

W. P. Campbell Librarian and Custodian Oklahoma City. 

Edith Rose Kneen. . Assistant Oklahoma City 

J. P. Renfrew Board Member Alva. 

Sidney Suggs Board Member Ardmore. 

C. A. Allen Board Member Tulsa. 

F. S. E. Amos Board Member Vinita. 

C. O. Bunn Board Member Oklahoma City. 

Roy A. Stafford Board Member Oklahoma City. 

O. P. Sturm Board Member Oklahoma City. 

G. L. Hamrick Board Member Tuttle. 

Redmond S. Cole. . . Board Member Pawnee. 



Appropriations. 

S. B. No. 209 — Deficiency— Expenses $ 356.50 

H. B. No. 363 — Support and maintenance (two years) 5,500.00 



HISTORICAL 243 



OKLAHOMA IN THE SPANISH AMERICAN WAR 



The outbreak of the Spanish-American war in 1898 found thous- 
ands of young men in the Indian Territory and Oklahoma eager to en- 
list m the military service. Under the first call for volunteers two 
troops of cavalry were authorized, one in each territory. Under 
the second call Oklahoma was to raise a battalion of four companies 
which became a part of the First Regiment of Territorial Volunteers 
the other two battalions being raised in Arizona and New Mexico 
A number of young men in both Indian Territory and Oklahoma 
enhsted m the volunteer service from adjoining states 

The First Regiment of United State Volunteer Cavalry, since 
become famous as Roosevelt's Rough Riders' had in its consist 
several Oklahoma volunteers. A part of the regiment saw active 
service in Cuba, at Las Guasimas, El Caney and San Juan Hill. 

The Oklahoma troop was commanded by Captain Robert B. Huston 
of Guthrie. An attorney by profession, he took great interest in 
military affairs and held the rank of lieutenant colonel in the first 
mihtia regiment organized in Oklahoma. In the battle of San Juan 
Hill, he was m command of his battalion after Major Brodie was 
wounded. After the close of the war with Spain, he was re-com- 
missioned in the United States Volunteers for service in the Philio- 
pines where he died in 1900. 

Captain Allyn K. Capron, who organized and commanded the 
Indian Territory troop was born in 1870. His father was an officer 
in the regular army and he chose to follow the same profession. He 
enlisted in the regular army as a private and won his commission 
by promotion from the ranks, and was first lieutenant in the First 
Regular Cavalry, stationed at Fort Reno, at the outbreak of the war 
He was killed in the battle of San Juan Hill. Captains Huston and 
Capron were both regarded as fine officers and held the respect 
of their men. 

Oklahoma was a young commonwealth when the bugle sounded 
the call to war, but the pulses of many Oklahoma school boys were 
quickened by its notes. Among those who heard and answered the 
call was Roy Cashion of Hennessey, who had been graduated from 
the public schools of that town only the year before. Though but 
eighteen years old, he volunteered under the first call, and was 
enrolled and mustered into the service as a private in' the First 
Regiment of United States Volunteer Cavalry. With that command 
he went from the rendezvous at San Antonio, Texas, to Tampa 
Florida, and thence to the southern coast of Cuba with the army 
under General Shaffer. Beneath the tropical July sun on the charge 
up San Juan Hill, young Cashion was stricken with a Mauser bullet 
from the rifle of a Spanish sharp shooter— the first Oklahoma school 
boy to give his life for his country on a foreign soil. 

Buried by his comrades where he fell, the markings of his grave 
were lost for a time, and his father made a second trip to Cuba 
before it was found and identified. After the removal and re-interment 
of his body in the sun-kissed soil of his prairie homeland, the people 



244 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



of the community raised a subscription, which was afterwards sup- 
plemented by a legislative appropriation for the purpose of erecting 
a monument to his memory. 

The First Regiment of United States Volunteer Cavalry on the 
first call received a contingent of eighty men from Oklahoma. The 
officers commissioned for this troop and the men mustered in were 
as follows: 



Robert B. Huston, captainn. 

Schuyler A. McGinnis, first lieu- 
tenant. 

Jacob Scliweizer, second lieuten- 
ant. 

Orlando G. Palmer, first sergeant. 

Gerald A. Webb, sergeant. 

Ira A. Hill, sergeant. 

George A. Sands, sergeant. 

Joseph A. Randolph, sergeant. 

Charles B. Hunter, sergeant. 

Calvin Hill, corporal. 

David V. McClure, corporal. 

George Norris, corporal. 

John D. Rhoades, corporal. 

Starr M. Wetmore, trumpeter. 

Thomas Moran, farrier. 

William D. Amrine. 

Lyman F. Beard. 

Perry H. Brandon. 

Fred M. Beal. 

Peter F. Byrne. 

James T. Browne. 

William Bailey. 

George Burgess. 

Leslie C. Chase. 

Forest L. Cease. 

Roy V. Cashion. 

(Henry S. Crosley. 

Williams S. Crawford. 

Walter M. Cook. 

William E. Cross. 

Isom L. David. 

Alexander H. Denham. 

Mathew Douthett. 

Elzie E. Emery. 

William A. Faulk. 

Theodore Folk. 

Elisha L. Freeman. 

Edwin M. Hill. 

Robert A. Hulme. 



James V.. Honey cutt. 
Paul W. Hunter. 
Shelby P. Isler. 
Edward W. Johnston. 
Andrew M. Jordan. 
Walter Joyce. 
Arthur A. Luther. 
Henry K. Love. 
Edgar F. Loughmiller. 
Henry Lusk. 
Robert L. McMillen. 
Henry Meagher. 
Volney D. Miller. 
Rosco V. Miller. 
William McGinty. 
Lorrin D. Muxlow. 
William H. Mitchell. 
Marcellus L. Newcomb. 
Warren Norris. 
William Pollock. 
Joseph H. Proctor. 
William F. Palmer. 
John P. Page. 
Scott Reay. 
Albert P. Russell. 
Clyde H. Stewart. 
Cliff D. Scott. 
Edward W. Shipp. 
Francis M. Staley. 
Clare H. Stewart. 
James M. Shockey. 
Dick Shanafelt. 
Fred Smith. 
William L. Tauer. 
Albert M. Thomas. 
James E. Vanderslice. 
John F. Weitzel. 
Frank M. Wilson. 
William O. Wright. 
John O. Woodward. 



HISTORICAL 34S 



OKLAHOMA INDIANS IN MILITARY SERVICE DURING 
THE CIVIL WAR 



In all there were some twenty organizations effected among 
the Indian tribes of the Indian Territory for service with the Con- 
federate army. It is probable that the total number of Indians 
engaged in the war on the Confederate side was between 6,000 
and 7,000. 

The following list of such organizations has been compiled by 
the office of the Adjutant General of the United States army: 

First Cherokee Cavalry Battalion, Maj. Benj. W. Meyer; First 
Cherokee Cavalry Battalion, Maj. J. M. Bryan; First Cherokee Mounted 
Rifles (also called the Second — see Drew's Cherokee Mounted Rifles); 
First Cherokee Mounted Rifles, Col. Stand Watie; First Chickasaw 
Cavalry Battalion, Lieut. Col. Joseph D. Harris; First Chickasaw 
Cavalry Regiment, Col. Wm. L. Hunter; First Choctaw Cavalry Bat- 
talion (afterward the First Choctaw War Regiment), Lieut. Col, 
Franceway Battice; First Choctaw Battalion (afterwards Third Choc- 
taw Regiment), Lieut. Col. Jackson McCurtain; First Choctaw and 
Chickasaw Mounted Rifles, Col. Douglas H. Cooper; First Choctaw 
Cavalry War Regiment (in 1864 known as the Second Choctaw Regi- 
ment), Col. Simpson N. Folsom; First Choctaw Cavalry Regiment, 
Col. Sampson Folsom; First Seminole Cavalry Battalion (afterwards 
known as tie First Seminole Regiment), Lieut. Col. John Jumper; 
First Creek Cavalry Battalion, Lieut. Col. Chilly Mcintosh; First 
Creek Regiment, Col. Daniel N. Mcintosh; Second Cherokee Mounted 
Rifles, Col. William P. Adair; Second Creek Regiment, Col. Chilly 
Mcintosh; Third Choctaw Regiment (formerly First Choctaw Bat- 
talion), Col. Jack&on McCurtain; Cherokee Battalion, Maj. Moses C. 
Frye, MaJ. Joseph A. Scales; Chickasaw Cavalry Battalion, Lieut. 
Col. Martin Sheco; Drew's Cherokee Mounted Rifles (called First 
and Second), Col. John Drew; Osage Battalion, Maj. Arm Broke. 

Both officers and men of these organizations were members 
of the various tribes among which they were respectively recruited, 
wit'i the exception, however, of Col. Douglas H. Cooper, of the F irst 
Choctaw and Chickasaw Mounted Rifle Regiment. He was a white 
man, who had been the United States Indian Agent for the Choctaw 
and Chickasaw tribes at the outbreak of the war, and was eventually 
promoted to the rank of Brigadier General. 

The Indians who were in the service of the Union Army during 
the war were organized into three regiments, known as the First, 
Second, and Third Regiments of the Indian Home Guards. They 
were recruited principally in the Cherokee, Creek and Seminole 
Nations, though other tribes were represented, and there were a few 
Indians who enlisted with Kansas regiments. 

The First Regiment, Indian Home Guards, consisted mainly of 
members of the Creek Nation, and its aggregate strength was sixty- 
four officers and 1784 enlisted men. 



246 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

The Second Regiment was composed principally of Cherokee and 
Osage Indians, its total force being sixty-six officers and 1835 
enlisted men. 

The Third Regiment was recruited mostly among the Cherokee 
and Creek, and its complete enrollment was fifty-two officers and 
1437 enlisted men. Possibly two-thirds of the officers of these 
regiments were white men. There is no record of the tribal military 
organizations which supported the cause of the Union. The total 
number of the tribes then residing in the Indian Territory who served 
in the Union Army probably did not exceed 6,000. 

The three regiments of the Home Guards, which composed a 
brigade in the Union Army, participated in twenty-eight battles, 
besides many lesser skirmishes, and it is probable that the Indians 
in the Confederate Army took part in a greater number of battles, 
as some of them were organized and placed in the field much earlier 
in the war. The total number of Indians who gave their lives in 
the struggle, including those killed in battle and those who died from 
wounds and disease, was over 1,000. 



HISTORICAL 847 



CHRONOLOGICL HISTORY OF OKLAHOMA 



The first known inhabitants of Oklahoma were the Osage, Quapaw, 
Caddo, Wichita, Waco, Tawakony, Kiowa, Comanche, the Apache of 
the Plains and several other tribes of Indians. 

1528-1536. — Four survivors of Cabeca de Vaca's expedition, captured 
by the Indians, first saw the buffalo in the Red River 
valley and are supposed to have been taken through a 
portion of Oklahoma. 

1641. — Francisco Vasquez de Coronado made an expedition from Mexico 
northward and is believed to have penetrated as far north 
as northeastern Kansas, crossing western Oklahoma. 
They named the Great Plains the "Llano Estacado." 

1541-2. — Moscosco and a few survivors of DeSoto's exploring party are 
believed to have crossed eastern Oklahoma. 

1549. — Bonilla, Spanish explorer, explored far out on the Great Plains 
and is believed to have crossed one or more of the counties 
of western Oklahoma. 

1601. — Onate, Spanish governor of New Mexico, is believed to have 

passed through the western part of the state in search of 

Quivira, the land of supposedly fabulous wealth of gold. 

1611. — A Spanish expedition was sent to the Wichita mountains, and 
until 1629 Spanish missionaries labored among the tribes 
in that section. 

1650. — -Don Dego del Castillo with a force of Spanish spent several 
months in the Wichita mountains seeking gold. He found 
many pearls which he sent to the governor of New Mexico 
at Santa Fe. 

1655.— The Crown of Great Britain made a grant for the colony of 
Carolina, embracing all the land from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific between 30 degrees and 36 degrees, 30 minutes 
north latitude. 

1673. — Marquette, a French Jesuit missionary, and Louis Joliet, a 
Quebec trader, floated down the Mississippi river to the 
mouth of the Arkansas. 

1678-1682. — Robert de la Salle explored the Mississippi to its mouth 
and claimed all land drained by that river and its tribu- 
taries for the King of France in whose honor he named 
the great region Louisiana. 

1714. — Saint Denis from New Orleans ascended the Red river along 
the southern boundary of Oklahoma. 

1717. — The Spanish under Padilla marched from the Spanish settle- 
ments on the Rio Grande across the Great Plains to punish 
the Comanche for making warfare on them. They fought 



24« OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

a hard battle on the western border of Oklahoma and 
captured seven hundred prisoners. 

1719. — Bernard de la Harpe, under direction of Governor Bienville at 
New Orleans, set out from Natchitoches on the Red river 
to explore the valley of that stream. 'He passed over 
southern and southeastern Oklahoma. 

1723. — New Orleans was proclaimed as the seat of government for 
the territory of Louisiana. 

1723. — Etienne Venyard du Bourgmont crossed Oklahoma, visiting 
the Pawnee, Kaw, Osage, Missouri, and then the Comanche 
on the Arkansas river in what is now central Kansas. He 
loaded the Indians with presents in an effort to win their 
attachment to the French, thus beginning the rivalry with 
the Spanish for the Great Plains region. 

1739-40. — Two brothers named Mallet and four companions ascended 
the Missouri river to the Platte, following that river to 
the Rocky mountains. Skirting the mountains, the party 
went to Santa Fe, N. M., where they spent the winter, 
separating in the spring, three members of the party 
returned overland to the Missouri, while the other three 
passed down the Arkansas through Oklahoma. 

1760. — Brevel, a French Creole trader from New Orleans, visited the 
Wichita mountains in company with the Caddo Indians. 
He reported the Spaniards to be engaged in mining opera- 
tions in the mountains at that time. Spanish priests were 
also present among the Indians. 

1763. — The territory of Louisiana was secretly ceded to the Spanish 
by the French to prevent its falling into the hands of the 
British. 

1801. — Louisiana was ceded back to the French by the Spanish. 

1803. — Louisiana was purchased by President Thomas Jefferson for 
the United States for $15,000,000 cash and the assumption 
of obligations amounting to $3,750,000. 

1806. — Captain Richard Sparks, Second United States Infantry, sought 
to explore the Red river but was met on the southern 
boundary of Oklahoma by a force of Spanish and com- 
pelled to return. 

1806. — Lieutenant Wilkinson of Zebulon Pike's exploring party de- 
scended the Arkansas from a point near Great Bend, 
Kansas, to the settlements on the lower course of the river. 

1809. — ^A band of Cherokee Indians made agreement with President 
Jefferson to move beyond the Mississippi river to what 
is now the state of Arkansas. These lands were ceded 
to them by treaty in 1817. 

1811. — The Salt Plains of the Cimarron and Salt Fork were explored 
by George C. Sibley, United States Indian Agent at Fort 
Osage on the Missouri. 

1817. — Fort Smith was established as a military post, at the mouth 
of the Poteau on the Arkansas river. 

1819. — Major William Bradford, stationed at Fort Smith, marched 
through eastern Oklahoma to expell "intruders," most of 
whom were declared to be renegades and fugitives from 
the eastern states. He was accompanied by Thomas 
Nuttall, the noted botanist, who visited the valley of the 



HISTORICAL 249 

Grand, Verdigris, Cimarron and the Deep Fork of the 
Canadian during the season. 
1819. — Treaty was made with Spain whereby the Red river was to 
be the northern boundary of the Spanish possessions to 
the 100th meridian, following that meridian to the Arkan- 
sas river and the channel of that stream westward to the 
Continental Divide. 
1819-20. — Major Stephen Long's party of engineers entered western 
Oklahoma just north of the Canadian river, and following 
that river, believing it to be the Red River, landed at Fort 
Smith. His course was generally along the divide between 
the two Canadians. 
1820. — Choctaw treaty made with Generals Jackson and Thomas Hinds, 
subsequently ratified by the treaty at Washington in 1825 
and the Dancing Rabbit Creek treaty in 1830. 
1821. — Captain Nathan Prior, Hugh Glenn and Jacob Fowler left Fort 
Smith with a party of traders and trappers on an expe- 
dition to the Rocky mountains. They crossed through 
northern Oklahoma. 
1822. — The American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 
established a mission sol ool on the Grand river for the 
Osage Indians, a few miles north of the spot upon whiclk 
Cantonment Gibson was built. 
1824. — Forts Gibson and Towson were established. 
1825. — First treaty made with the Creeks for their removal from 
Georgia. This treaty was confirmed bv the treaties of 
1826 and 1832. 
1825. The Santa Fe trail, crossing what is now Texas and Cimarron 

counties, was laid out. 
1826. — Eastern boundary of Oklahoma from Red river to Arkansas 

was surveyed. 

1828. — Treaty made with the Cherokees of Georgia by which they 

were to move on a reservation of 7,000,000 acres, west of 

Arkansas, with an outlet to the region of the Great Plains. 

1830. — By act of Congress provision was made for the establishing 

of the Indian Territory. 
1832. — The Seminole treaty was signed, but was unheeded by the 
tribe. In 1836 they were provoked into hostilities and in 
1842 were forcibly removed to the Indian Territory. 
1832. — Chickasaw treaty was signed at Pontotoc Creek, Mississippi. 

and the tribe came to Indian Territory. 
1832. — A company of mounted rangers under command of Captain 
Nathan Boone from the Osage Agency, near Fort Gibson, 
marched westward to a point near Guthrie and then turn- 
ing south passed between the sites of Oklahoma City and 
El Reno, and thence southeastward across Cleveland and 
Pottawatomie counties, and to Fort Gibson. 
1833. — War broke out between the Osage and Kiowa Indians and 
General Henry Leavenworth with a body of troops marched 
westward to a point between Anadarko and the Wichita 
mountains and thence southwestward throu2;h the Wichitas. 
in an effort to pacify the warring tribes. This led to a 
general peace council at Fort Gibson. 

1835. — Second treaty made with Cherokees in Mississippi in February 
with John Ross as principal chief of the tribe. The 



250 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Cherokees became dissatisfied with the amount fixed by 
the United' States senate for their lands, which Ross sought 
to refer to a general council of his people for deliberation. 
A meeting held in October resulted in the tribe refusing to 
consider the offer. At a second council called by the 
government in December but few of the Cherokees were 
present. A treaty was perfected with the few present 
and the Senate ratified this, making the official procla- 
mation May 23, 1836. 

1835-36.— Fort Holmes was established by the American Fur Company 
of St. Louis as a trading post with the southwestern 
tribes. Fort 'Holmes was abandoned three years later when 
a trading post was established in the southern part of what 
is now Cleveland county. Choteau, a trading post on the 
west bank of Cache creek, near the present site of Lawton, 
was also established. , 

1836. — The main body of the Creek tribe moved to their new 

reservation. 
1837. — The Chickasaws and Choctaws made a treaty near Fort Towson 

by which the Chickasaws purchased a joint interest in 

the granted Choctaw reservation. 
1837. — The treaty with the Kiowa. Apache, Apache of the Plains, and 

Tawakony was signed. 
1837. — The Cherokee Outlet was surveyed by the Rev. Isaac McCoy. 
1838. — A force of two thousand troops under command of General 

Winfield Scott forcibly moved the Cherokees west. 
1839. — As a culmination of the feeling between the ''Treaty" and 

"Anti-Treaty" factions of the Cherokees, Major Ridge, Blias 

Boudinot, and John Ross were killed. Civil war in the 

tribe threatened for a time. 
1839. — 'Bill was introduced in Congress providing for the organization 
of the Indian Territory. It was submitted to the several 

tribes but was not largely approved and no action was 

taken. 
18S4-39-40. — Santa Fe traders made the trip across Oklahoma from 

Fort Smith and Van Buren in each of these years under 

military escort. 
1842 — Fort Washita was established twenty-two miles above the mouth 

of the Washita river. 
1843. — Captain Nathan Boone, son of Daniel Boone, made a second 

exploring expedition through the valleys of the Arkansas 

and Cimarron and their tributaries. 
1845. — ^Texas was annexed to the United States. 
1846. — The government succeeded in getting the factions of the 

Cherokee tribe to sign a treaty between themselves. 
1845-48. — Between these years 7,000 Choctaws moved from Alabama 

and Mississippi to the tribal reservation. 
1846. — War broke out with the Kiowas and Comanches. 

1849. — A part of California gold seekers crossed the state from Fort 
Smith and Van Buren, following the valley of the Canadian. 

1850. — Texas relinquished all claims to the land north of thirty-six 
degrees and thirty minutes. The establishment of the 
bounds of New Mexico left the so-called "No-Man's-Land" 
unattached to any state, territory or Indian reservation. 



mSTGIlICAL 251 

1850. — Lieut. J. H. Simpson laid out an overland trail across Oklahoma 
from east to west. The route followed the Canadian to a 
point in what is now the southern part of Cleveland county, 
on the north side of the river. There a crossing was 
made to the south side and the trail continued to a point 
in the northern part of Caddo county where it crossed 
over into the valley of the Washita, re-entering the 
Canadian in Roger Mills county. 

1851.— Fort Arbuckle was established near the Wichita mountains. 

1852.— ^Captain R. B. Marcy led a surveying and exploring expedition 
up the Red river. Some mistakes made in his map are 
declared to have resulted in the dispute over the Greer 
county boundary. 

1853.— First attempt was made by the Cherokee and Creek to perfect 
a treaty with the plains tribes. 

1853.— A peace council was held by the Government with the Kiowas, 
Comanches and Apaches of the Plains, and a part of the 
terms was that the government should make a yearly 
allowance of $18,000 for the ensuing ten years. 

1854. — Captain Patrick Calhoun, son of John C. Calhoun, led an expe- 
dition against the hostile Indians in the Wichita moun- 
tains and in the valley of the Red river from western 
Texas. Great hardships were experienced in the winter 
months by the command. Captain Calhoun dying four years 
later as a result of his broken health, caused by the trying 
winter of the campaign in southeastern Oklahoma. 

1855.— The Cl.ickasaws and Choctaws signed an agreement by which 
the Chickasaws obtained their political separation on pay- 
ment of $150,000. 

1856. — A part of the Creek reservation was set aside by a treaty 
with the government for the Seminoles. 

1857. — Fort Gibson was abandoned as an army post. It was after- 
wards garrisoned by Confederate and then Federal troops, 
being finally abandoned in 1890. 

1857.— The Choctaws and Chickasaws adopted new tribal constitutions. 

1858. — The north boundary line of Oklahoma was surveyed by Lieut. 
Joseph E. Johnston, afterward famous as a Confederate 
general. 

1858.— Camp Radziminski was established in the southern portion of 
Kiowa county. 

1859.— Fort Cobb was established in the Washita valley. 

1861.— The Choctaw Council on February 7 adopted resolutions de- 
claring their affiliation and sympathy with the southern 
states in the Civil War. 

1861. — Fort Smith was captured by the Confederate forces April 23; 
Fort Arbuckle, Fort Cobb, and Fort Washita were aban- 
doned by the Union forces and occupied by the 
Confederates. 

1861. — The Chickasaw legislature, by resolution, allied themselves 
with the Confederate states. 

1861. — The Indian Territory was declared to be under the military 
control of the Confederacy May 13. 

1861. — Albert Pike, special commissioner of the Confederate States, 
signed a treaty at Eufaula with the members of the Choc- 



252 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

taw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole Nations July 10-12 
and August 1. 

1861. — The Cherokees in council signed a treaty of alliance and friend- 
ship with the Confederate States October 7. 

1861. — Alliance and friendship treaties were signed by Commissioner 
Pike with representatives from parts of the Comanche, 
Wichita, Waco, Caddo, Anadarko, Tawakony, Tonkawa, 
Keechi, and Delawares August 12 at Anadarko, and with 
the Osage, Quapaws, Senecas and Shawnees October 2-4. 
The major portion of the Osages and the Shawnees re- 
mained loyal to the national government. Many Indians 
of the respective tribes, also, remained loyal to the Union 
and fought in the Union armies. 

1865. — General Edmund Kirby Smith, commanding the Trans-Missis- 
sippi department of the Confederate Army surrendered at 
Fort Smith May 26. The Indians under General Douglas 
H. Cooper refused to enter into the compact with the 
Confederates, declaring for a separte agreement of surren- 
der with the Union forces. This surrender was effected 
June 23 at Doaksville, Choctaw Nation. 

l865. — The Chisholm trail was laid out from the present site of 
Wichita, Kans., to the Wichita-Caddo Agency, where 
Anadarko is now located. 

1866. — The new Seminole treaty was signed March 21, it being the 
first with the Indians who had allied themselves with 
the Confederacy. The joint Chickasaw-Choctaw treaty 
was signed April 28; the Creek treaty, June 14; and the 
Cherokee, J.uly 19. 

1867. — Removal of the Kansas tribes to northeastern Indian territory. 

1867. — Medicine Lodge treaty was signed with Kiowas, Comanches, 
Apaches, Che'yennes and Arapahoes. 

1868. — Removal of the Shawnees from eastern Kansas to the Cherokee 
country. 

1868. — 'Congress passed an act that there should be no more treaties 
with the Indians. 

1868. — General George A. Custer waged the Washita Valley campaign. 

1870. — The Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad began laying its 
tracks into the Indian Territory. 

1872. — The Atlantic & Pacific (now ti:e Frisco), railway was built, 
effecting a junction with the Missouri, Kansas & Texas at 
Vinita. 

1869-70-71-72. — Quakers were appointed as Indian agents for the 
Wichita-Caddo and affiliated tribes. 

1871-72. — Indian raids in the southwest were renewed under Satanta. 
Satanta, Satank, and Big Tree were arrested for their 
raids in Texas, found guilty at Jacksboro, Tex., on charges 
of murder and sentenced to be hanged, but sentence was 
commuted to life imprisonment. 

1872. — The Five Civilized Tribes met with the plains tribes at Fort 
Cobb and endeavored to get them to leave the warpath, 

1874. — The last outbreak on the part of the Kiowa, Comanche, Chey- 
enne and Arapaho was made. Peace was restored the 
following year. 

1875. — First cattle ranches were established in western Indian Terri- 
tory. 



HISTORICAL 253 

1877. — The Northern Cheyennes were brought to Fort Reno from 
Dakota, Wyoming and Montana. 

1878. — A band of the Northern Cheyennes under the leadership of 
Dull Knife went on a raid and were permitted to return 
to the north. The remainder of the Cheyennes were 
escorted to the Pine Ridge Agency in 1883. 

1879. — The Carpenter colony of settlers from Kansas City, Mo., made 
the first attempt to enter the unassigned lands, known as 
Oklahoma. They were ejected by troops under command 
of General Wesley Merritt. Another was organized at 
Topeka, Kansas., under J. R. Boyd, and one was organized 
in Texas to operate from Caddo, Indian Territory. The 
Carpenter colony entered near wliat is now Coffeyville, 
Kans., May 7. 

1880.— The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe built its line to Caldwell, 
Kans., on the northern border of Indian Territory. 

1880. — Captain David L. Payne and his colony of settlers crossed into 
Oklahoma, locating in Oklahoma county, where they were 
apprehended by the troops, taken to Fort Reno, later 
escorted to the Kansas line by soldiers, and released June 
7. Within a month Captain Payne returned to Oklahoma 
and was arrested a second time and taken to Fort Reno 
and from there to Fort Smith where he was released 
without bond. 

1881. — Stockmen of the Cherokee Strip met at Caldwell, Kans., for 
the discussion of common interests. This was the begin- 
ning of the movement which culminated in the organiza- 
tion of the Cherokee Strip Live Stock Association two 
years later. 

1881— Captain Payne brought suit in the United States court at To- 
peka, Kans., for damages on account of his forcible re- 
moval from the territory. He was frustrated by repeated 
postponements and in the fall he went to Texas where he 
organized his second colony. They came to Oklahoma 
and encamped on Cache creek but were expelled by the 
troops. 

1882. — Cattlemen began fencing ranches in the Cherokee Strip. 

1882. — Payne went to Washington, D. C, to consult with the Secretary 
of the Interior in regard to the status of the Oklahoma 
land, but received no satisfaction. Returning, he organ- 
ized a third colony and was arrested again and taken to 
Fort Reno, and thence to Fort Smith, but the case was 
continued on the motion of the district attorney, and Payne 
began organizing his followers for a fourth attempt to 
affect a setlement in Oklahoma. 

1883. — Payne made another attempt to settle Oklahoma with a colony 
of several hundred persons. They made their way into 
the valley of the North Canadian where he was again 
arrested and taken to Fort Reno while his followers were 
escorted by the troops to the Kansas border. Payne sought 
to obtain an injunction against the military authorities in 
the district court at Topeka in July. A band of two hun- 
dred and fifty "boomers" from Arkansas City left in August 
fo Oklahoma, but Payne was not with them. He and three 
associates were arrested at Wichita and formally indicted 
by a federal grand Jury on a charge of conspiracy to violate 



254 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

the laws of the United States, and in the meanwhile the 
injunction proceedings were postponed from time to time. 

1884. — Oklahoma "boomers" began to settle the country singly, in- 
stead of coming in a body, but as fast as the settlers were 
removed others followed. Payne and seven other leaders 
were arrested August 9 at Rock Falls, four miles south of 
Hunnewell, Kans., in tl^e Cherokee Strip on a charge of 
conspiracy by intruding on Indian lands. Judge C. C. 
Foster, of the Un'ted States District Court, held that the 
title to the land in Oklahoma was vested in the United 
States, and therefore setlement by citizens was not a 
criminal offense. This was Payne's first and only real 
victory in the courts. 

1884. — Captain Pavne died suddenly at Wellington, Kans., November 
27, and it was but a few days later when Representative 
Sidney Clarke, James B. Weaver of Iowa, and W. M. 
Springer of Illinois, aligned themselves behind a bill pro- 
viding for the opening and settlement of Oklahoma. Rep- 
resentative Clarke introduced the bill. 

1885. — W. L. Couch, one of Payne's lieutenants moved from the Kansas 
line at the head of a large colony of "boomers," little more 
than a month after the death of Payne. The party reached 
the valley of Stillwater creek, where they encamped, laid 
out a towii, and staked claims, but were driven out at the 
point of guns to the Kansas border. 

1885. — Couch and twelve leaders were arrested on a charge of 
treason in January and were placed in j^W in Wichita. 
The Oklahoma lands were declared Indian lands bv Presi- 
dent Cleveland March 13. The cattlemen were notified by 
the military authorities to move, but no record is had that 
they heeded the notice. Couch and his companions were 
released some weeks later when General Hatch, who had 
ousted them from Stillwater creek failed to appear at the 
trial. 

1885. — President Cleveland issued a proclamation ordering the removal 
of the cattle ranch fences from the ranges of Oklahoma, 
August 7. The last effort at colonization was under the 
the leadership of Couch during the fall but t^~e colonists 
were removed by Lieut. Col. E. V. Summer, Fifth Cavalry, 
Nov. 10. 

1885. — The beginning of construction work on the new railroad from 
Arkansas City south to Fort Worth, Texas, was begun. 
This gave the "boomers" inspiration that the lands would 
soon be opened to settlement. 

1886. — The Santa Fe was completed north and south across the 
country. 

1887. — Immigration of settlers into "No-Man's Land" began. 

1889. — The Oklahoma bill was passed by the House of Representatives 
early in February, but Senator Preston B. Plumb, of Kan- 
sas made an impassioned speech when it was reported 
from the senate committee on territories and the measure 
failed to pass, but the famous "rider" on the Indian appro- 
priation bill, opening Oklahoma to settlement, was passed 
by congress and it became a law March 3, 1889. March 23, 
President Harrison issued the proclamation naming April 
22 at 12 M. as the day and hour of opening. 



HISTORICAL 255 

1890. — The organic act was passed and became a law May 2, giving 
the land an organized form of territorial government. 

1890. — The population of the Indian Territory as reported by the 
federal census was 179,321, of which number 50,616 were 
Indians. The population of Oklahoma was given at 61,834. 

1890. — The reported coming of an Indian Messiah caused much unrest 
arhong the Indians west of the Mississippi and the Indians 
in western Oklahoma began holding a series of "ghost 
dances" which caused considerable excitement among the 
settlers. Apiatan, a Kiowa leader, exploded the story by 
making a trip to a remote part of Nevada, where he is 
reported to have found the reputed Messiah and ascer- 
tained that he was an imposter. 

1890. — George W. Steele of Indiana was appointed territorial governor 
May 22. 

1890. — First election for choosing members to legislature was held 
August 5. 

1891. — A. J. Seay was appointed territorial governor October 18. 

1891. — The surplus lands of the Sac and Fox, the Iowa, and the 
Shawnee-Pottawatomie reservations were opened to settle 
ment September 22. 

.1893. — Governor A. J. Seay was removed from office by President 
Cleveland in May and W. C. Renfrew was appointed to 
fill the vacancy. 

1893.— The Cherokee Outlet and tlie surplus lands of the Pawnee and 
Tonkawa reservations were opened to settlement Septem- 
ber 16. 

1893. — President Cleveland appointed Ex-Senator Henry L. Dawes of 
Massachusetts, Meredith H. Kidd of Indiana, and Archibald 
S. McKennon of Arkansas, members of the Dawes commis- 
sion November 1. 

1893. — Dennis T. Flynn, delegate from Oklahoma Territory in Con- 
gress, introduced a bill in the Fifty-third Congress provid- 
ing for the admission of Oklahoma and Indian Territories 
as a joint state. 

1895. — In May the Kickapoo surplus lands were opened to settlement. 

1896. — Greer county was made a part of Oklahoma by act of Congress, 
approved May 4. 

1896. — A statehood convention was held in Oklahoma City, January 8. 
Two separate calls had been issued for the meeting, one 
by the supporters of the joint statehood movement and the 
other for the separate statehood idea. The meeting was 
disrupted soon after it convened. Two chairmen were 
elected by the rival factions and a wrangle resulted which 
was stopped only by the lights being turned out. 

1897.— Cassius M. Barnes was appointed in April by President McKin- 
ley to succeed Governor Renfrow, whose term of office 
had expired. 

1898. — Spanish-American war broke out and many young men from 
Oklahoma and the Indian Territories answered the calls 
for troops. 

1899. — The Curtis bill was passed in February. 



256 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

1901. — The Crazy Snake "uprising" was advertised in a sensational 
manner by newspapers, when some of the Creeks refused 
to accept allotments. A faction elected Chitto Harjo 
chief and he called a special meeting of the National 
Council. He was later arrested with several of his fol- 
lowers, when much excitement had been stirred up, and 
was confined in jail for a time. 

1901. — Gas and oil were discovered in the vicinity of Tulsa, Red Fork, 
Sapulpa and other towns of the Creek Nation early in the 
spring. 

1901. — William M. Jenkins was appointed governor April 15 to suc- 
ceed Governor Barnes. 

1901. — The reservations of the Kiowa, Comanche, Wichita, Caddo, 
Apache of the Plains and the affiliated tribes were opened 
to settlement by registration July 9. The drawing began 
August 6. 

1901. — Governor Jenkins was removed from office by President Theo- 
dore Roosevelt and Thompson B. Ferguson was named as 
his successor November 30. 

1902. — The senate committee on territories visited Oklahoma in the 
fall. A bill providing for single statehood of the two 
territories was reported out by the senate committee when 
Congress met in December, but the bill became involved 
with the New Mexico-Arizona statehood question and action 
was deferred. 

1905. — The Sequoyah Constitutional Convention met in Muskogee in 
July. William H. Murray was chosen president. It pro- 
posed the formation of a separate state of the Indian 
Territory to be named Sequoyah. 

1906. — ^Prank Frantz was appointed to succeed Governor T. B. Fergu- 
son, whose term of office had expired. 

1906. — Congress passed the single statehood bill and it became a law 
June 14. 

1906. — Under the provisions of the enabling act, the delegates to the 
Constitutional Convention met in Guthrie November 20 
and was in session almost continuously until the latter 
part of April of the following year. 

1907. — Election of first state officials was held Saturday, November 16. 
C. N. Haskell, democrat, of Muskogee, was chosen first 
governor, defeating Frank Frantz, territorial governor, and 
candidate of the republican party. 

1910. — Lee Cruce, democrat, was elected governor, defeating Joe 
McNeal of Guthrie, the candidate of the republican party. 



Resources 



Sig. 19 



RESOURCES 259 



OKLAHOMA AMONG THE SOUTHERN STATES 

(By Chas. N. Gould, former State Geologist.) 



You don't have to misrepresent Oklahoma; if you tell half the truth 
people won't believe you. 

No equal area that the sun shines upon, during recorded history, 
has made such rapid material progress as has the state of Oklahoma, 
during the last decade. Her history reads like a romance. Those 
of us who have been actively engaged in aiding this development as 
well as those from other states who have watched tl. e progress of 
Oklahoma, often stand aghast before the wonderful latent possibilities 
of the state. 

Relative Rank. 

It is not easy to attempt to condense into a single paragraph a 
statement of the wonderful resources of Oklahoma and their develop- 
ment. Some idea of conditions may be gained by reference to the 
government census reports recently issued, where it is shown that 
during the past ten years, among the sixteen states represented at 
the Southern Commercial Congress, Oklahoma ranks as follows: 

First in percentage of increase of population of the state, 110%. 

First in percentage of increase of population of two chief cities, 
Oklahoma City having 549'/r, and Muskogee 494%. 

First in percentage of increase of value of farm crops, 242%. 

First in percentage of increase of wheat raised, 56%. 

First in percentage of increase of cotton raised, 176%. 

First in percentage of increase of railroad mileage, 154%. 

First in percentage of increase in lumber cut, 9017c. 

First in percentage of increase in corn raised, 921%. 

First in percentage of increase in bank deposits, 1033%. 

First among the southern states in the amount of petroleum pro- 
duced during the past four years. 

First in the amount of natural gas in sight. 

First in the total amount of available fuel. 

First in the total amount of asphalt. 

First in the total amount of glass sand. 

First in the total amount of gypsum. 

First in the amount of salt. 

First in the total amount of mineral products. 

First in the total amount of wl eat raised. 

And first in the number of acres of fertile soil lying idle. 

If you exclude Texas, our neighbor state on the South, with an 
area nearly four times our own, and Missouri, with an area nearly 
as large, and with nearly 100 years of development, Oklahoma ranks, 

First in corn. 

First in oats. 

First in cattle. 



260 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Excluding Texas, Missouri and Georgia, the Empire state bf the 
South, Oklahoma, is, 
First in hogs. 
First in miles of railroad. 

And excluding Texas, Missouri and West Virginia, she is. 
First in assessed valuation. 

History. 

Twenty-one years ago the greater part of Oklahoma was bare 
prairie or unbroken forest. In the eastern part of the state, which 
was owned and occupied by Indians of the Five Civilized Tribes, 
there were few small villages, little more than trading posts, built up 
largely of wooden shacks. Western Oklahoma was then totally unset- 
tled. In April, 1889, the first land in the Territory of Oklahoma was 
thrown open to settlement. Cities sprang up as if by magic. An 
area half as large as that of the State of Maryland was settled in a 
day. From time to time, various Indian reservations were thrown 
open to the public and cities sprang up over night. During the past 
ten years tie land of the Five Civilized Tribes in eastern Oklahoma 
has iieen allotted and much of it made available for purchase. Farms 
have been improved, mines and quarries have been opened, factories 
erected, railroads built and cities have grown, until, today, Oklahoma 
stands at the forefront of the sisterhood of states. 



Topography. 

Oklahoma is larger than any state east of the Mississippi river; 
the total area being 70,740 square miles. Generally speaking, the 
state is a level plain, sloping from an elevation of about 5,500 feet 
above sea level in the northwest corner to less than 400 feet in the 
southeast corner. Western Oklahoma is a flat or rolling prairie. In 
southern and eastern Oklahoma, this plain is interrupted by a number 
of ranges of high hills, dignified by the term mountains. These are 
known as the Wichita, Arbuckle, Quachita, and Ozark mountains. 
The eastern half of the state contains forests of pine, oak and hickory. 
Western Oklahoma contains little timber except along the streams. 

Rainfall and Soil. 

Three-fourths of the state has an abundant rainfall, varying from 
40 inches in the southeastern corner to 25 inches near the western 
line. The extreme northwestern part of the state, old "No Man's 
Land," lies in the semi-arid region of the Plains, the rainfall varying 
from 10 to 25 inches per annum. 

Oklahoma is well watered by streams. Ten large rivers cross the 
state. All the drainage is into the Mississippi through the Arkansas 
or Red rivers. The chief tributaries to the Arkansas are the Grand, 
Verdigris, Poteau, South Canadian. North Canadian, Cimarron and 
Salt Fork. The chief tributaries of the Red are the Kiamichi, Blue, 
Boggy and Washita. The general course of these streams is from 
northwest to southeast across the state. In each stream valley there 
is a broad belt of exceedingly fertile bottom land, averaging from one 
to three miles in width. The upland soil throughout tl e greater part 
of the state is very feitile. In western Oklahoma much of the soil 
is red, which color is due to the large percentage of iron which it 
contains. Eastern Oklahoma contains several large areas of limestone 
soil. 



RESOURCES 261 

Agricultural Resources. 

The happy combination of abundant rainfall, warm climate and 
fertile soil, all conspire to render Oklahoma one of the most productive 
of the agricultural states. Practica'ly everyt'. ing that is cultivated 
between the Canadian line and the Gulf of Mexico, and between the 
Atlantic and the Rocky mountains can be raised in Oklahoma. The 
four staples are corn, wheat, cotton and oats. In 1910, Oklahoma led 
the southern states in the production of wiieat, more than 2.5,000,000 
bushels being harvested. She ranks second in the production of oats, 
with 23,000.000 bushels; fourth in the production of corn with 92,000,000 
bushels; and fifth in the production of cotton with yBii.uuu oaies. lu 
addition to these crops, Oklahoma ranks first in the production of 
bropmcorn and among the first in the production of alfalfa. Many of 
her farmers have become wealthy shipping potatoes to northern mar- 
kets, two crops a year being produced. Truck and vegetables are 
grown in all localities. The wild hay crop every year adds hundreds 
of thousands of dollars to the total wealth of the state. 

Practically all kinds of fruits grow well. The apples of eastern 
Oklahoma rival those raised in the famous Ozark country of northern 
Arkansas and southern Missouri, this section of the state being a 
part of "the land of the big red apples." Elberta peaches, the finest 
raised in the Mississippi valley, grow big as pint cups, and are often 
a drug on the market at fifty cents a bushel. Cherries, plums, pears, 
grapes and fruits of all kinds grow in the greatest profusion. Pecans, 
walnuts and other nuts are abundant. 

It must not be imagined for an instant, however, that Oklahoma 
has yet come into her own in the matter of agricultural development. 
The State Board of Agriculture is authority for the statement that 
at the present time, taking into consideration all known data, only 
about 24% of the tillable land in the state is yet in cultivation. That 
is to say, three-fourths of our acreage, which includes much of the 
finest agricultural land in the United States, is still lying idle. 

Live Stock. 

In former years, Oklahoma was the stockman's paradise. Before 
the opening of the country to settlement, great herds of long-horned, 
Texas cattle roamed at will over the broad" prairies. The nutritious 
grasses, indigenous to our soil, and the abundant water supply, made 
Oklahoma the best cattle country in the world. These conditions have 
passed. Instead of the half-wild, long-horned cattle, we have well-kept 
herds of Herefords and Jerseys; instead of the tough and wirey cow 
pony, the draft horse and the racer; and instead of the wild hog, the 
Poland China and Berkshire. In 1910, Oklahoma ranked third among 
the southern states in the number of cattle and fourth in the number 
of hogs produced. 

Mineral Wealth, 

No state in the Union possesses a greater variety or larger amount 
of undeveloped mineral wealth than does Oklahoma. During the past 
three years she has led the United States in the production of petro- 
leum, and last year produced 54,000,000 barrels of crude oil. The 
amount of natural gas in sight, including that being utilized, that 
going to waste and that shut in, will approximate 2,000,000,000 cubic 
feet per day. At a conservative estimate, not to exceed 20% of the 
productive oil and gas fields have been developed. The United States 
Geological Survey is authority for the statement that the amount of 
coal in Oklahoma is 79,000,000,000 tons. These facts being true, it is 



262 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

obvious that so far as we have available data, Oklahoma possesses a 
greater amount of fuel than any other state in the Union. Wl en it 
is remembered that approximately 90'r of all the power used in manu- 
facturing and other industrial purposes is derived from one of these 
three fuels, it will be easily understood what the future development 
of Oklahoma may be. 

But not in fuels alone is Oklahoma rich. The asphalt deposits in 
the southern part of the state are the most extensive in the Union. 
Complete data are not available, but at a conservative estimate, t' ere 
is enough asphalt in this region to pave all the streets of all the cities 
in the United States for the next hundred years, and even then one 
would scarcely know from where the material was taken. 

The lead and zinc deposits in northeastern Oklahoma are among 
the most prolific in this country. Within the last tw^o years a million 
dollars have been spent in mines and mills on a single square mile 
near Miami, and more than tiat amount has been taken from the 
ground at this place in the form of lead and zinc ore. The area in 
which we may expect to find lead and zinc in paying quantities 
includes several thousand square miles. 

Oklahoma possesses more gypsum than any other state. It is 
estimated that there are 123,000,000,000 tons of this material in sight 
in the western counties, which is enough to keep 100 mills, each manu- 
facturing 100 tons a day, busy for 34.000 years. Oklahoma 1 as enough 
salt water going to waste to make 100 carloads of salt a day. Her 
glass sand deposits are among the most extensive of those of any 
state. There is in southern Oklahoma a ledge of glass sand averaging 
fifty feet thick, and sixty miles long,' which, on analysis, is found to 
be often 99.987r pure silica. 

The granite deposits of Oklahoma are among the finest in the 
country. Twenty or more varieties of shade and texture are found. 
The Wicl'ita mountains, 1,000 feet high and sixty miles long, in south- 
western Oklal oma, are composed entirely of granite. An area of more 
than 100 square miles in the Arbuckle mountains is covered by gr^inite. 

Oolitic limestone, superior to the famous Bedford stone, occurs in 
very large quantities. Six separate areas in Oklahoma contain inex- 
haustible deposits of limestone, the greater part of which is suitable 
for the manufacture of Portland cement, for burning into lime, for 
concrete rock, and for building stone. Sandstone suitable for building 
is widely distributed. Clays and shales, suitable for the manufacture 
of brick, tile, sewer pipe and a large variety of clay products, are 
found in all parts of the state. 

Oklahoma contains considerable deposits of high grade manga- 
nese iron ore; some of the finest tripoli in the country: great beds of 
volcanic ash; extensive deposits of novaculite; and a large variety of 
other minerals of minor importance. 



Water Power. 

The water power resources of Oklahoma are extensive, but at the 
present time practically undeveloped. A number of swift-flowing 
streams, carrying constant volumes of water, cross the state. Power 
plants are now in operation at only four places, namely at Anadarko, 
Chickasha and Pauls Valley, on the Washita, and at Tishomingo on the 
Pennington. Such rivers as Poteau, Kiamitia, Blue, Boggy, Grand, 
Verdigris, Illinois, North Canadian and Little River, and creeks such 
as Rock, Honey, and Mill, contain an ample supply of water to run 
scores, not to say hundreds of power plants, capable of generating 
many thousands of horse power. 



RESOURCES 263 

Two rather ambitious projects are now being considered. One, 
located in south-central Oklahoma, contemplates the construction of 
10 or 12 plants, at various points, along the Washita river, between 
Lindsay and Berwyn. Ti:e combined power from these plants is to 
be carried to Oklahoma City, Shawnee, Ardmore and other towns in 
the central part of the state. A second project of nearly as great mag- 
nitade in the eastern part of the state contemplates the erection of 
a dam across Grand river near Muskogee. It is estimated that the 
power generated at this point, would be sufficient to supply light and 
power to a city of 200,000 people. 

Other projects have been surveyed at Keokuk Falls and Weleetka 
on the North Canadian, at Carnegie, Fort Cobb, Cloud Chief, Lindsay, 
Pauls Valley and Dougherty, on the Washita; near Belton and Milburn 
on tl:e Blue; at Tahlequah and Cookson on the Illinois. Suffice it to 
say that if the immense deposits of coal, oil and gas now lying dor- 
mant in our hills are ever exhausted, there is enough water power yet 
unutilized to supply all the plants, factories and mines that Oklahoma 
will ever need. 

Transportation. 

Oklahoma has G,106 miles of railroad. Only Texas, Missouri, and 
Gebrgia among the southern states, exceed her in mileage. :\Iost coun- 
ties have two or more competing lines of railroad. 

Five trunk lines cross the state, namely the Atchison, Topeka 
and Santa Fe; the Missouri, Kansas and Texas; the St. Louis and 
San Francisco; tie Kansas City, Mexico and Orient and the Chicago, 
Rock Island and Pacific. The Santa Fe has direct connection with 
Chicago, Kansas City, Denver, Galveston and California. The Mis- 
souri, Kansas and Texas connects with St. Louis, Kansas City and Gal- 
veston. Four lines of the St. Louis and San Francisco cross Oklahoma, 
giving direct connection with the Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago and 
Texas points. The Rock Island crosses Oklahoma from both the north 
and east, connecting Chicago, Kansas City, Memphis and El Paso. The 
Kansas City, Mexico and Orient reaches Kansas City on the north, 
and is building toward the Pacific coast. 

Besides these trunk lines, there are a number of lines of minor 
importance, including the Missouri Pacific; Missouri, Oklahoma and 
Gulf; Fort Smith and Western; Midland Valley; Oklahoma Central, 
and several shorter lines. 



Need of Factories. 

Oklahoma's greatest need today is more factories. With un- 
limited natural resources, both agricultural and mineral, with a 
larger amount of fuel than any other state, and inexhaustible water 
power, Oklahoma is, at the present time, manufacturing very few 
of the comforts and necessities of life used by her people. Nine- 
tenths of the manufactured articles used in Oklahoma are imported 
from other states. Our people are today paying the market price 
plus the freight for the greater part of the articles which they use. 
At the same time the farmers of Oklahoma are able to sell their five 
staple crops: Corn, wheat, cotton, cattle and hogs, only in outside 
markets, and for these things they receive the market price less 
tho freight. 

To quote a few specific examples: Oklahoma has enough salt 
water going to waste to make 100 carloads of salt a day, yet all the 
salt used in the state comes from Kansas, Michigan and Louisiana. 



264 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

There is enough limestone in Oklahoma to burn all the lime that the 
world will ever use, yet practically all our lime comes from Texas, 
Arkansas and Missouri. With as good shale as any state possesses, 
practically all the brick, terra cotta and other clay products used 
are imported from Kansas and Missouri. Oklahoma has as good 
granite as can be found in the world, yet in our cemeteries are 
mounments, and in our large buildings, pillars and cap stones, made 
of granite from Scotland, Vermont, and Massachusetts, but practically 
none from Oklahoma. With the largest deposits of gypsum in the 
United States, a considerable amount of our gypsum plaster comes 
from Kansas and Texas. With Portland cement rock enough to 
supply cement for all the world, and fuel in abundance for its manu- 
facture, we have but three cement plants, and much of the material 
we use comes from Kansas or Texas. With enough native asphalt 
in our hills to pave all the streets of all our cities, the greater part 
of our street paving is being done with the burned-out residue from 
the oil refineries. There is in Oklahoma but one cotton mill, but 
three glass factories, and six small oil refineries. We manufacture 
no shoes and but little clothing. Within the last year, two packing 
plants have been established in Oklahoma City. There are a few 
canning factories in various parts of the state, and most of the 
towns of any size have creameries. 

It is safe to say, however, that at the present time, not 10 per 
cent of the materials used for building, food or clothing by the 
people of Oklahoma, are manufactured in the state. There is no 
state in the Union where opportunities are better, where greater 
returns may be made on investment, or where the poeple are more 
willing and anxious to give support to legitimate manufacturing in- 
dustries. We appreciate the fact that the lack of these industries 
is a part of pioneer conditions. We accepted these conditions when 
we came to the new country, but because we were willing to accept 
them, is no reason, in itself, why we should always be willing to 
live under them. As soon as plants and factories are established, 
and mines and quarries opened, and the workmen necessary to carry 
on these industries are here, our farmers will be able to raise a still 
larger variety of crops and will receive a higher price for the products 
of the farm. 

Education. 

No southern state has a greater number of state schools than 
has Oklahoma. The head of the educational system is the State 
University at Norman. The Agricultural and Mechanical College 
is at Stillwater, and in addition there are six district agricultural 
schools. Six state normal schools are located respectively at Ed- 
mond, Alva, Weatherford, Tahlequah, Durant and Ada. There are 
university preparatory schools at Tonkawa and 'Claremore, and a 
college for girls at Chickasha. Agricultural and domestic 
science are taught in all the common schools of the state. Most 
counties now have consolidated rural schools. The work done in 
the high schools is up to the standard. The requirements for admis- 
sion to the freshman class at the State University of Oklahoma, are 
with a single exception, higher than for any other southern university. 
Graduates from the University of Oklahoma take rank along with 
those from any institution in America. 

Citizenship. 

In opening a conversation with a stranger in Oklahoma is it not 
necessary to talk about the weather. The proper thing is to ask: 



RESOURCES 265 

"Where are you from?" We're all from somewhere. The oldest 
native has been voting little more than a year. Oklahoma is a meeting 
place for the clans. The northern farmer and the southern planter live 
side by side. The southerner harvests a wheat crop each year and 
the northern man is learning to grow cotton. The descendant of 
the Puritan and Cavalier vote at the same precinct. The grandchildren 
of Sam Houston and the offspring of Daniel Boone ride to town in 
the same automobile. Different traditions, different ideas, different 
viewpoints, mingle and commingle, yet out of the turmoil and tumult 
of ideas and opinions there is arising a newer, greater and grander 
civilization. 

Oklahoma is preeminently tlie young man's country. A man will 
make more advancement, attain a greater eminence in his profession 
or achieve greater success in business in five years in Oklahoma 
than in 20 years in one of the older states. We are not hampered 
by tradition nor have we any great respect for authority, as such. 
Precedent interferes with us not at all. We ask of a man one 
thing, and only one, namely, that he produce results. 

We have no heroes; neither Clays nor Calhouns, Lincolns nor 
Lees. We are little interested in either heroes or ancestors, but we 
are interested, intensely interested, in the half million boys and girls 
growing up in our midst. We have no past, and queerly enough 
we care little for one. Oklahoma is a country with a future and 
we would rather live in a country with a future than one with a past. 

In the older states a man, applying for a position, must be 
recommended, indorsed, vouched for, certified to, and analyzed, and 
not only he, himself, but his father and mother, brother and sister, 
his rich uncle, his maiden aunt, and all. his numerous relatives, even 
unto the third and fourth generation. One of the best recommenda- 
tions a young man can have in the east is that he belongs to one 
of the best families. 

In Oklahoma conditions are entirely different. We assume that 
a man is a gentleman and a scholar, that his grandfather did not 
steal sheep, and that his maiden aunt did not elope with the coach- 
man. We are not in the least interested in the family history. We 
ask a man two questions: First, "Can you do this work?" and, 
second, "Can you do it now?" If so, well and good. If not, get out of 
the way and let a man at it who can. 

This is the spirit that is today making Oklahoma great. This 
Is the spirit that is at work among our people, developing farms, 
constructing railroads, building factories and erecting skyscrapers. 
What we need is more men, more money. We are working as best 
we can, and the work is not always easy but we are not discouraged. 
We say to the world, "Get out of the way and watch us grow, or, 
better still, come in with us and help us grow." 

Statistics. 

The following statistics based on the most recent available data 
will indicate some present conditions, and something of the develop- 
ment of Oklahoma's resources: 

Per cent. 
1900 1910 of Inc. 

Population 790,391 1,657,155 110 

Population of two chief cities — 

Oklahoma City 10,037 64,205 539 

Muskogee 4,254 25,278 494 

Cotton used, pounds 1,029,200 



266 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Cotton crop, bales 349,355 962,000 176 

Corn, bushels 11,114,052 92,355,000 921 

Wheat, bushels 18,657,373 25,363,000 56 

Oats, bushels 23,068,000 

Cattle 3,029,000 1,992,000 

Swine 1,235,000 1,302,000 6 

Mineral products, value $3,000,000 $20,000,000 566 

Coal mined, tons 1,922,298 2,700,000 42 

Petroleum, barrels 55,000,000 

Railroad mileage 2,399 6,106 154 

Bank deposits $9,000,000 $102,000,000 1033 

Property, true value (exclusive of 

minerals) $811,000,000 $1,200,000,000 48 

Lumber cut, feet 22,104,000 226,000,000 921 

Land area 70,470 square miles 

Gypsum, tons, (estimated) 125,000,000,000 

Glass sand, tons, (estimated) 100,000,000,000 

Asphalt, tons, (estimated) 50,000,000,000 

Natural gas, cu. ft. per day (estimated) . . . 2,000,000,000 
Granite, gabbro, limestone, i 

shale, building sand. C Inexhaustible and widely distributed. 

marble, sandstone, clay, ) 



Elections and Platforms 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 269 



ELECTION STATISTICS 



STATE ELECTION BOARD. 



The state election board has charge of all primary and general 
state elections. The board is composed of three members, appointed 
by the governor. The secretary receives a salary of two thousand 
one hundred dollars per annum and the remaining tw^o members a 
salary of six dollars per day during the time they are in actual 
service of the state or going to or from the place of meeting, and 
hotel and traveling expenses, provided that pay shall not be allowed 
for more than fifty days in any one year or 200 days during a term. 
Returns from the counties of the state on all state elections are 
made to the state election board, where a record of all votes cast 
even to precinct divisions is kept. Certificates of election are given 
by the state board after the returns have been canvassed. The 
county boards are composed of one person selected by the state 
board, who shall be secretary, and two persons, selected one each by 
the two political parties, receiving the highest number of votes at 
the last previous general election. 



Members of the State Election Board, 

C. C. Penn Chairman Weatherford. 

Ben W. Riley Secretary El Reno. 

T. B. Ferguson Member Watonga. 



Employes. 

Effie C. B. Smith Record Clerk and Bookkeeper $1,500.00 

Pauline Bremicker Stenographer 1,200.00 

Edith Balzer Stenographer 900.00 



Appropriations. 

1912. 1913. 

H. B. No. 524 — ^Salaries. extra help, records, furni- 
ture, telephone, telegraph, etc. .$7,850.00 $6,385.00 

S. B. No. 209 — Deficiency — Stenographfers' salaries, 
typewriters, records, furniture 
contingent, etc $1,756.00 



270 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 
COUNTY ELECTION BOARDS. 



W. T. Tipton, Secretary. 

F. C. Adair 

W. D. Bigby 



Adair County. 

Westville Democrat. 

Baron Democrat. 

Stillwell Republican. 



E. W. Allen, Secretary,. 

R. I. Mimms 

E. Jones 



Alfalfa County. 

Yewed Democrat. 

Carmen Democrat. 

Burlington Republican. 



Atoka County. 

D. O. Groff, Secretary Atoka Democrat. 

.Joseph Garsides Stringtown Democrat. 

Howard Fraudree Caney Republican. 

Seaver County. 

F. J. Birdsall, Secretary Madison Democrat. 

F. C. Tracy Beaver Democrat. 

A. C. Midkiff Balko Republican. 

Beckham County. 

R. S. Andrews, Secretary Sayre Democrat. 

Samuel N. Flournoy Elk City Democrat. 

Joe Faris Sayre Republican. 



T. W. Moseley, Secretary. 

D. P. Hogan 

W. C. Brodie 



Blaine County. 

Watonga Democrat. 

Geary Democrat. 

Okeene Republican. 



George Harrison, Secretary. 

J. A. Moore 

W. S. Hawkins 



Bryan County. 

.Durant Democrat. 

.Caddo Democrat. 

Yuba Republican. 



Caddo County. 

G. A. Reinmiller, Secretary Anadarko Democrat. 

J. L. Wileman Carnegie Democrat. 

H. C. Jones Hydro Republican. 

Canadian County. 

Sam T. Roberson, Secretary El Reno Democrat. 

Tom Ellison 

W. A. IHowell 



.El Reno Democrat. 

.El Reno Republican. 



Carter County. 

J. H. Carlock, Secretary Ardmore Democrat. 

Kelly Brown Ardmore Democrat. 

Fred V. Kinkade Ardmore Republican. 



ELECTIONS AXU PLATFORMS 271 



Cherokee County. 



Joseph L. Manus, Secretary .... Tahlequah Democrat. 

J. G. Porter Teresita Democrat. 

Jas. H. Henderson Parkhill Republican. 

Choctaw County. 

J. H. Warren, Secretary Hugo Democrat. 

R. W. Williams Soper Democrat. 

No republican appointed. 

Cimarron County. 

R. C. Thomas, Secretary Boise City, Democrat. 

E. G. Boyle Wheeless Democrat. 

John Vanatta Willow Bar Republican. 

Cleveland County. 

E. L. Cralle, Secretary Norman Democrat. 

Wm. Mouta w Lexington Democrat. 

Collins McKinney Norman Republican. 

Coal County. 

R. T. Breedlove, Secretary Tupelo Democrat. 

Leslie E. Bay Phillips Democrat. 

W. A. Austin Bromide Republican. 

Comanche County. 

Charles Shaw, Secretary Lawton Democrat. 

Byron J. Rauch i emple Democrat. 

J. A. Fowler Randlette Republican. 

Craig County. 

Davis Hill, Secretary Vinita, Democrat. 

L N. Bunch Bluejacket, Democrat. 

W. H. Klaus Vinita R. F. D Republican. . 

Creek County. 

L. M. Nichols, Secretary Bristow •. Democrat. 

J. A. Boyd Sapulpa Democrat. 

Chas. W. Lovett Bristow Republican. 

Custer County. 

Walker Moore, Secretary. ...... Weatherford Democrat. 

(Resigned. No successor named) 

W. E. Hunt Thomas Deipocrat. 

J. E. Baker Butler Republican. 

Delaware County. 

Tom Price, Secretary Jay .' Democrat. 

John R. Leach Leach Democrat. 

No republican appointed. 



272 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Dewey County. 

W. P. Hickok, Secretary Taloga Democrat. 

Stanley Shepard Selling Democrat. 

No republican appointed. 

Ellis County. 

W. K. Suthers, Secretary Arnett Democrat. 

B. A. Clark. Arnett Democrat. 

Frank Hecox Fargo Republican. 

Garfield County. 

C. V. Porter, Secretary Enid Democrat. 

W. H. King Breckenridge Democrat. 

W. E. Brown Drummond Republican. 

Garvin County. 

L. W. Wettermark, Secretary . . . Pauls Valley Democrat. 

Ira Mitchell Wynnewood Democrat. 

No republican appointed. 

Grady County. 

W. A. Griffin, Secretary Chickasha Democrat. 

F. C. Blekley Rush Springs Democrat. 

Dan Roysden ' Minco Republican. 

Grant County. 

J. B. Drennan, Secretary Medford Democrat. 

Abe Slaughter Gibbon Democrat. 

Richard Metzer Pond Creek Republican. 

Greer County. 

H. M. Thacker, Secretary Mangum Democrat. 

George W. Briggs Granite Democrat. 

No republican appointed. 

Harper County. 

E. Lee Adams. Secretary Buffalo Democrat. 

E. M. Claycomb, Willard Democrat. 

C. W. Voris ^ Buffalo Republican. 

Haskell County. 

Jack Perry, Secretary Chant Democrat. 

No other appointments. 

Harmon County. 

W. B. Groves, Secretary HoUis Democrat. 

.1. B. Sherill Vinson Democrat. 

S. S. Frazier Louis Republican. 

Hughes County. 

A. J. Edmondson, Secretary Holdenville Democrat. 

J. R. Lutsell Lamar Democrat. 

Dr. Jas. M. Vanderpool Calvin Republican. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 273 

Jackson County. 

J. H. Lawson, Secretary Altus Democrat. 

A. S. J. Shaw Altus Democrat. 

Will McCoy Blair Republicaa 

Jefferson County. 

D. F. Spradling, Secretary Cornisli Democrat. 

J. T. Barnes Ryan Democrat. 

W. T. F. Bush Waurika Republican. 

Johnston County. 

D. C. Teter, Secretary Tishomingo Democrat. 

E. J. Ball Wapanucka Democrat. 

A. Wilbourn Mannsville Republican. 

Kay County. 

T. P. McDonnell, Secretary Newkirk Democrat. 

O. M. Walling Tonkawa Democrat. 

George Wageck Ponca City Republican. 

Kingfisher County. 

T. J. Stringer, Secretary Kingfisher Democrat, 

A. E. Lane Hennessey Democrat. 

George McCoy Okarche Republican. 

Kiowa County. 

G. H. Salisbury, Secretary Hobart Democrat. 

C. L. Clay Hobart Democrat. 

W. A. Phelps . Republican. 

Latimer County. 

E. A. Swan, Secretary .Wilburton Democrat. 

Bud Cutler Red Oak Democrat. 

Wm. A. Cox Wilburton Republican. 

Le Flore County. 

B. A. Witte, Secretary Poteau Democrat. 

J. O. Terrell Spiro Democrat. 

J. H. Cruthis Talihina Republican. 

Lincoln County. 

John .J. Davis, Secretary Chandler Democrat. 

C. S. Stewart Tryon Democrat. 

James Embry Sparks Republican. 

Logan County. 

Dr. J. W. Duke, Secretary Guthrie Democrat. 

J ohn E. Hopkins Crescent Democrat. 

f red L. Wenner Guthrie Republican. 

Sig. 20 



274 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Love County. 

Jesse Jordan, Secretarj'- Marietta Democrat. 

M. M. Hanna Overbrook Democrat. 

W. H. H. Keltner Leon Republican. 



McClain County. 



P. J. Thiel, Secretary Purcell 

S. R. Fisher Byars . 

W. H. Dickerson Purcell 



.Democrat. 
.Democrat. 
.Republican. 



McCurtain County. 

J. W. Scott, Secretary Garvin Democrat. 

Wm. H. Harrison Bokoma Democrat. 

Will L. Burkhart Smithville Republican. 

Mcintosh County. 

W. T. Fears, Secretary Eufaula Democrat. 

Li. C. Grimes Checotah Democrat. 

W. E. Johnson Pierce Republican. 

Major County. 

C. B. Powell, Secretary Fairview Democrat. 

(Resigned. No successor named.) 

C. T. McDermeit Ringwood Democrat. 

S. A. Kyler Chaster Republican. 

Marshall County. 



W. J. Bell, Secretary. 

john L. Woody 

J. J. Johnson 



. Madill Democrat. 

Oakland Democrat. 

.Woodville Republican. 



Mayes County. 



W. R. Samuel, Secretary: 

Dr. E. L. Pierce 

M. C. Hadley 



, Choteau Democrat. 

Salina Democrat. 

Pryor Republican. 



Murray County. 

George C. Frier, Secretary Sulphur Democrat. 

vV. F. Parker Davis Democrat. 

Mat Meadors Drake Republican. 

Muskogee County. 



C. T. Rogers, Secretary. 
J. W. Houck 

D. B. Herrchelman. . . . 



. Muskogee Democrat. 

.Muskogea Democrat. 

.Porum Republican. 



Noble County. 



J. T. Ferryman, Secretary. 

Dug Conley 

L. G. Shoop 



. Perry Democrat. 

. Morrison Democrat. 

Perry Republican. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 275 

Nowata County. 

David Parker, Secretary AUuwee Democrat. 

D, A. Dye Nowata Democrat. 

Ben F. DeVann .Delaware Republican. 

Okfuskee County. 

A. V. Skelton, Secretary Okemah Democrat. 

W. M. Davis Paden Democrat. 

Chas. T. Meyers Weleetka Republican. 

Oklahoma County. 

E. A. Ringold, Secretary Oklahoma City Democrat. 

oave Morrow Harrah Democrat. 

A. B. Dailey Edmond Republican. 

Okmulgee County. 

J. C. Milner, Secretary Okmulgee Democrat. 

C. W. Goree Henryetta Democrat. 

Robert M. Clark Beggs Republican. 

Osage County. 

E. L. Gay, Secretary Pawbuska '. . . Democrat. 

H. G. Enoil Foraker Democrat. 

(No republican named.) 

Ottawa County. 

S. T. Lincoln, Secretary Fairland Democrat. 

S. N. Maxwell Miami Democrat. 

Grant Foust Miami, R. F. D. No. 2 Republican. 

Pawnee County. 

G. M. Berry, Secretary Pawnee Democrat. 

J. T. Roe Pawnee Democrat. 

(No republican named.) 

Payne County. 

G. D. Abercrombie, Secretary. . Stillwater '. Democrat. 

Wm. Barker Mehan Democrat. 

Charles M. Prowant Quay Republican. 

Pittsburg County. 

W. P. Hill, Secretary McAlester Democrat. 

Bob Hall Ashland Democrat. 

R. V. DeGroff Hartshorne Republican. 

Pontotoc County. 

A. R. Sugg, Secretary Ada Democrat. 

Clay Jones Roit' Democrat. 

Chas. T. Barney Ada Republican. 



276 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Pottawatomie County. 

E. J. Dickerson, Secretary Shawnee Democrat. 

E. D. Cummings Tribbey Democrat. 

Mark Goode Shawnee Republican. 

Pushmataha County. 

C. A. Filley, Secretary Antlers Democrat. 

Chas. H. Chapman Tuskahoma .Democrat. 

L. W. Bennett Finley Republican. 

Roger Mills County. 

J. J. Moore, Secretary Cheyenne Democrat. 

W. M. Brooks Roll Democrat. 

J. A. Moad Carpenter Republican. 

Rogers County. 

R. W. Canfield, Secretary Claremore Democrat. 

.1. W. Coughill Chelsea Democrat. 

(No republican appointed.) 

Seminole County. 

H. E. Kanaga, Secretary Wewoka Democrat. 

Walter Casey Sassakwa Democrat. 

H. A. Reynolds Little Republican. 

Sequoyah County. 

Riley Cleveland, Secretary Gore Democrat. 

J. W. Sasser Brent Democrat. 

Gid Patton Muldrow Republican. 

Stephens County. 

R. P. Wilson, Secretary Duncan Democrat. 

Taylor Green Marlow Democrat. 

G. E. Butler Comanche Republican. 

Swanson County. 
(Dissolved.) 

C. W. Smelser, Secretary (^ooperton Democrat. 

H. J. Countryman Manitou, R. F. D. No. 4. . .Democrat. 

John S. Carmack Snyder Republican. 

Texas County. 

W. L. Roberts, Secretary Texhoma Democrat. 

(No other democratic member appointed.) 

Ralph Colvin Tyrone Republican. 

Tillman County. 

W. C. Lukenbill, Secretary Frederick Democrat. 

C. L. Gettys Grandfield Democrat. 

W. H. Murphy Davidson Republican. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 277 

Tulsa County. 

John D. Porter, Secretary Tulsa Democrat 

J. N. Crutchfield Broken Arrow Democrat 

John A. Oliphant Tulsa Republican. 

Wagoner County. 

Dr. G. D. Carl, Secretary Wagoner Democrat 

J. M. Reed. Coweta ! iDemocrat. 

George P. Rhea Porter Republican. 

Washington County. 

Mark U. Weber, Secretary Bartlesville Democrat 

L. W. Servey Ochelata Democrat.' 

F. E. Yale Dewey Republican. 

Washita County. 

J. S. Wiley, Secretary Rocky Democrat 

R. W. Riggs Foss Democrat 

D. Weans Corn Republican. 

Woods County. 

Jesse Jackson, Secretary Alva Democrat. 

R. S. Goodno Aline '..'.' .Democrat. 

W. A. Cooksey _ Republican. 

Woodward County. 

C. W. Herod, Secretary Woodward Democrat. 

C. C. Coleman Mooreland Democrat. 

Thomas S. Green Richmond Republican. 



278 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



STATE OFFICERS 

Vote 1910. 



Governor. 

Cruce Democrat 120,218 

McNeal Republican 99,527 

Cumbie Socialist 24,707_ ^^ Q-t>-t 

Rouch Prohibitionist 3,124 



Lieutenant-Governor. 

McAlester Democrat 118,544 

Dukes Republican 94,621 

Wills Socialist 23,974 

Briggs Prohibitionist 3,136 



Harrison 
Fraser . . . 
Kolachny 
Strickler 



Secretary of State. 

Democrat 117,790 

Republican 94,180 

Socialist 23,581 

Prohibitionist 2,931 



Meyer . . 

Dulaney 

Kembel 



State Auditor. 



.Democrat 117,954 

.Republican 93,749 

.Socialist 23,706 



West . . 
Dodson 
Allee . . 



Attorney General. 

Democrat 119,586 

Republican 93,648 

Socialist 23,513 



Dunlop . 

Dill 

Boylan . 
Leonard 



State Treasurer. 

. . .Democrat. . , 118,479 

. . . Republican 93,726 

. . . Socialist 23,697 

. . ..Prohibitionist 2,827 



Wilson 
Evans 
Smith . 



Superintendent Public Instruction. 

Democrat 118,628 

Republican 93,549 

Socialist 23,642 



ELECTIONS AND PLATP'ORMS 279 

State Examiner and Inspector. 

Taylor Democrat 117,519 

Lain Republican 93,372 

Webster Socialist 23,763 



Chief IVline Inspector. 

Boyle Democrat 117,248 

Hall Republican 93,988 

Jackson Socialist 24,000 

Boyle's plurality 23,260 



Commissioner of Labor. 

Daugherty Democrat 119,605 

Funston Republican 93,455 

Hadsall Socialist 23,846 



Commissioner of Charities and Corresctions! 

Barnard Democrat 120,703 

Biggers Republican 91,907 

Branstetter Socialist 23,872 



Insurance Commissioner. 

Ballard Democrat 116,621 

Burns Republican 93,778 

Maple Socialist . 23,761 



State Printer. 

Farris Democrat 11*7,239 

Bartholomev/ Republican 93,215 

Truinett Socialist 23,717 

President Board of Agriculture. 

Bryan Democrat 117,203 

Beaver Republican 93,429 

Allen Socialist 23,649 

Corporation Commissioner. 

Henshaw Democrat 117,444 

Brownlee Republican 93,050 

McDaniel Socialist 23,835 

Clerk Supreme Court. 

Campbell Democrat 117,571 

Chapell Republican 93,645 

Sinclair Socialist 23,271 

Justice Supreme Court — Third District. 

Kane Democrat 118,020 

Biddison Republican 93,159 



280 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Justice Supreme Court — Fifth District. 

Dunn Democrat 118,548 

Keys Republican 93,076 

Judge Criminal Court of Appeals — Eastern District. 

Armstrong Democrat 117,409 

Humpfirey Republican 93,601 

Judge Criminal Court of Appeals — Southern District. 

Furman Democrat 117,704 

Brown Republican 92,293 

Judge Criminal Court of Appeals — Northern District. 

Doyle Democrat ■= 117,933 

Snoddy Republican 93,468 

Assistant Mine Inspector — District No. 1. 

O'Brien Democrat 116,253 

Harris Republican 93,115 

Brady Socialist 23,849 

Assistant Mine Inspector — District No. 2. 

Clark Democrat .115,757 

Hamilton Republican '. 93,339 

Goodman Socialist 25,523 

Assistant Mine Inspector — District No. 3. 

Haley Democrat 116,085 

O'Hara Republican 92,207 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 281 



POPULATION AND VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 1910, 
BY COUNTIES 

ADAIR COUNTY— Pop. 10,535. 

Democrat 753 Socialist 26 

Republican 693 Prohibition 9 

Total 1,481 

ALFALFA COUNTY— Pop. 18,138. 

Democrat ' 1,288 Prohibition 113 

Republican 1,883 Socialist 257 

Total ., 3.541 

ATOKA COUNTY— Pop. 13,808. 

Democrat 1,005 Socialist 198 

Republican 650 Prohibition 10 

Total 1,843 

BEAVER COUNTY— Pop. 13,631. 

Democrat 963 Socialist 213 

Republican 1,204 Prohibition 55 

Total 2,435 

BECKHAM COUNTY— Pop. 19,699. 

Democrat 1,524 Socialist 656 

Republican 626 Prohibition 67 

Total 2,873 

BLAINE COUNTY— Pop. 17,960. 

Democrat 1,286 Socialist ^^"^ 

Republican 1,484 Prohibition 73 

Total 3,126 

BRYAN COUNTY— Pop. 29,854. 

Democrat 2,234 Socialist 547 

Republican 948 Prohibition 29 

Total 3,758 

CADDO COUNTY— Pop. 35,685. 

Democrat 2,623 Socialist 564 

Republican 2,734 Prohibition 65 

Total 5.986 



282 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

CANADIAN COUNTY— Pop. 23,501. 

Democrat 1,941 Socialist 432 

ReiDublican 2,144 Prohibition 61 

Total 4,403 

CARTER COUNTY— Pop. 25,358. 

Democrat 2.1""' Socialist 432 

Republican 899 Prohibition 29 

Total 3,476 

CHEROKEE COUNTY— Pop. 16,779. 

Democrat 1,291 Socialist 72 

Republican 1,208 Prohibition 12 

Total 2,583 

CHOCTAW COUNTY— Pop. 21,862. 

Democrat 1,202 Socialist 531 

Republican 764 Prohibition 48 

Total 2,545 

CIMARRON COUNTY— Pop. 4,553. 

Democrat 487 Socialist 68 

Republican 412 Prohibition 12 

Total 949 

CLEVELAND COUNTY— Pop. 18,843. 

Democrat 1,423 Socialist 307 

Republican 945 Prohibition 43 

Total 2,718 

COAL COUNTY— Pop. 15,817. 

Democrat 1,166 Socialist 379 

Republican 610 Prohobition 25 

Total 2,180 

COMANCHE COUNTY— Pop. 41,489. 

Democrat 3,221 Socialist 623 

Republican 2,381 Prohibition 110 

Total 6,335 

CRAIG COUNTY— Pop. 17,404. 

Democrat 1,584 Socialist 61 

Republican 1,234 Prohibition 21 

Total 2,900 

CREEK COUNTY— Pop. 26,223. 

Democrat 1,619 Socialist 298 

Republican 1,910 Prohibition 46 

Total 3.873 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 283 

CUSTER COUNTY— Pop. 23,231. 

Democrat 1,817 Sociali-st 359 

Republican 1,765 Prohibition 68 

Total 4,009 

DELAWARE COUNTY— Pop. 11,469. 

Democrat 924 Socialist 67 

Republican 705 Prohibition 9 

Total 1,705 

DEWEY COUNTY— Pop. 14,132. 

Democrat 983 Socialist '570 

Republican 1,108 Prohibition 46 

Total 2,707 

ELLIS COUNTY— Pop. 15,365. 

Democrat 1,085 Socialist 341 

Republican 1,417 Prohibition 38 

Total 2,881 

GARFIELD COUNTY— Pop. 33,050. 

Democrat 2,343 Socialist 318 

Republican 3,436 Prohibition 80 

Total 6,177 

GARVIN COUNTY— Pop. 25,545. 

Democrat 2,055 Socialist 353 

Republican 959 Prohibition 32 

Total 3,399 

GRADY COUNTY— Pop. 30,309. 

Democrat 2,566 Socialist 454 

Republican 1,287 Prohibition 59 

Total 4,366 

GRANT COUNTY— Pop. 18,760. 

Democrat 1,642 Socialist 149 

Republican 1,886 Prohibition 67 

Total 3,744 

GREER COUNTY— Pop. 16,449. 

Democrat 1,409 Socialist 329 

Republican 414 Prohibition 46 

Total 2,198 

HARMON COUNTY— Pop. 11,328. 

Democrat 852 Socialist 146 

Republican 174 Prohibition 19 

Total 1,191 



284 OKLAHQMA RED BOOK 

HARPER COUNTY— Pop. 8,189. 

Democrat 701 Socialist 156 

Republican 801 Prohibition 21 

Total 1,688 

HASKELL COUNTY— Pop. 18,875. 

Democrat 1,471 Socialist 277 

Republican 1,176 Prohibition 22 

Total 2,946 

HUGHES COUNTY— Pop. 24,040. 

Democrat 1,715 Socialist 413 

Republican 1,204 Prohibition 29 

Total 3,361 

JACKSON COUNTY— Pop. 23,737. 

Democrat 2,089 Socialist 346 

Republican 613 Prohibition 60 

Total 3,108 

JEFFERSON COUNTY— Pop. 17,430. 

Democrat 1,446 Socialist 422 

Republican 563 Prohibition 36 

Total 2,467 

JOHNSTON COUNTY— Pop. 16,734. 

Democrat 1,314 Socialist 469 

Republican 641 Prohibition . . '. 21 

Totl 2,445 

KAY COUNTY— Pop. 26,999. 

Democrat 2,400 Socialist 165 

Republican 2,635 Prohibition 63 

Total 5,263 

KINGFISHER COUNTY— Pop. 18,825. 

Democrat 1,339 Socialist 208 

Republican 1,901 Prohibition 50 

Total 3,498 

KIOWA COUNTY— Pop. 27,526. 

Democrat 1,414 Socialist 266 

Republican 1,054 Prohibition 21 

Total 2,755 

LE FLORE COUNTY— Pop. 29,127. 

Democrat 1,843 Socialist 215 

Republican 1,529 Prohibition 14 

Total 3.601 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 285 

LATIMER COUNTY— Pop. 11,321. 

Democrat 690 Socialist 189 

Republican 527 Prohibition 10 

Total 1,416 

LINCOLN COUNTY— Pop. 34,779. 

Democrat 2,298 Socialist 645 

Republican 2,662 Prohibition 139 

Total 5,744 

LOGAN COUNTY— Pop. 31,740. 

Democrat 1,300 Socialist 180 

Republican 2,761 Prohibition 77 

Total 4,318 

LOVE COUNTY— Pop. 10,236. 

Democrat 815 Socialist 206 

Republican 308 Prohibition 18 

Total 1,347 

McLAIN COUNTY— Pop. 15,659. 

Democrat 1,292 Socialist 321 

Republican 671 Prohibition 23 

Total 2,307 

McCURTAIN COUNTY— Pop. 20,681. 

Democrat 1,130 Socialist 176 

Republican 650 Prohibition 7 

Total 1,963 

MclNTOSH COUNTY— Pop. 20,961. 

Democrat 1,256 SociaMst 139 

Republican 1,000 Prohibition 13 

Total 2,408 

MAJOR COUNTY— Pop. 15,248. 

Democrat - 704 Socialist 461 

Republican 1,379 Prophibition 45 

Total 2,589 

MARSHALL COUNTY— Pop. 11,619. 

Democrat 845 Socialist 501 

Republican 389 Prohibition 25 

Total 1,760 

MAYES COUNTY— Pop. 13,596. 

Democrat 1,274 Socialist 47 

Republican 1,137 Prohibition 14 

Total 2,472 



28B OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

MURRAY COUNTY— Pop. 12,744. 

Democrat 987 Socialist 478 

Republican 445 Prohibition 20 

Total 1,930 

MUSKOGEE COUNTY— Pop. 52,743. 

Democrat 3,241 Socialist 164 

Republican 2,367 Prohibition 36 

Total 5,808 

NOBLE COUNTY— Pop. 14,945. 

Democrat 1,258 Socialist 188 

Republican 1,447 Prohibition 20 

Total 2,913 

NOWATA COUNTY— Pop. 14,223. 

Democrat 1,077 Socialist 81 

Republican 1,070 Prohibition 24 

Total 2,252 

OKFUSKEE COUNTY— Pop. 19,995. 

Democrat 957 Socialist 338 

Republican 749 Prohibition 33 

Total 2,077 

OKLAHOMA COUNTY— Pop. 85,232. 

Democrat 6,140 Socialist 753 

Republican 5,051 Prohibition 160 

Total 12,104 

OKMULGEE COUNTY— Pop. 21,115. 

Deomcrat 1,183 Socialist 324 

Republican 1,246 Prohibition 34 

Total 2,787 

OSAGE COUNTY— Pop. 20,101. 

Democrat 1,872 Socialist 198 

Republican 1,651 Prohibition -. 25 

Total 3,746 

OTTAWA COUNTY— Pop. 15,713. 

Democrat 1,410 Socialist 100 

Republican 1,274 Prohibition 23 

Total , 2,807 

PAYNE COUNTY— Pop. 23,735. 

Democrat 1,699 Socialist 503 

Republican 1,834 Prohibition 87 

Total 4,123 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 287 

PAWNEE COUNTY— Pop. 17,332, 

Democrat 1,394 Socialist 313 

Republican 1,495 Prohibition 60 

Total 3,262 

PIITSBURG COUNTY— Pop. 47,650. 

Democrat 2,901 Socialist 608 

Republican 2,049 Prohibition 60 

Total 5,618 

PONTOTOC COUNTY— Pop. 24,331. 

Democrat 1,893 Socialist 548 

Republican 711 Prohibition 30 

Total 3,182 

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY— Pop. 43,595. 

Democrat 2,694 Socialist 726 

Republican 2,431 Prohibition 96 

Total J 5,947 

PUSHMATAHA COUNTY— Pop. 10,118. 

Democrat 691 Socialist 234 

Republican 535 Prohibition 5 

Total 1,465 

ROGER MILLS COUNTY— Pop. 12,861. 

Democrat 1,014 Socialist 421 

Republican 673 Prohibition 57 

Total 2,165 

ROGERS COUNTY— Pop. 17,736. 

Democrat 1,638 Socialist 174 

Republican 1,195 Prohibition 36 

Total 3,043 

SEMINOLE COUNTY— Pop. 19,964. 

Democrat 1.064 Socialist 385 

Republican 964 Prohibition 26 

Total 2,439 

SEQUOYAH COUNTY— Pop. 25,005. 

Democrat 1,596 Socialist 79 

Republican 1,238 Prohibition 12 

Total 2,925 

STEPHENS COUNTY— Pop. 22,252. 

Democrat 1,802 Socialist 686 

Republican 819 Prohibition 35 

Total 3,342 



288 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

SWANSON COUNTY— (Dissolved.) 

Democrat 525 Socialist 219 

Republican 323 Prohibition 19 

Total 1,086 

TEXAS COUNTY— Pop. 14,248. 

Democrat 1,143 Socialist 286 

Republican 1,130 Prohibition 47 

Total 2,606 

TILLMAN COUNTY— Pop. 18,650. 

Democrat 1,758 Socialist 166 

Republican 735 Prohibition 28 

Total 2,687 

TULSA COUNTY— Pop. 34,995. 

Democrat 2,594 Socialist 325 

Republican 2,193 Prohibition 35 

Total 5,147 

WAGONER COUNTY— Pop. 22,088. 

Democrat 1.182 Socialist 165 

Republican 828 Prohibition 6 

Total 2,181 

WASHINGTON COUNTY— Pop. 17,484. 

Democrat 1,517 Socialist ^ 194 

Republican 1,484 Prohibition 27 

Total 3,222 

WASHITA COUNTY— Pop. 25,034. 

Democrat 1,723 Socialist 464 

Republican 1,081 Prohibition 67 

Total 3,335 

WOODS COUNTY— Pop. 17,567. 

Democrat 1,327 Socialist 548 

Republican 1,510 Prohibition 64 

Total 3,449 

WOODWARD COUNTY— Pop. 16,592. 

Democrat 1,200 Socialist 381 

Republican 1,524 Prohibition 39 

Total 3,144 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 289 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES, SEPT. 17, 1907 



Frantz. Haskell. Ross. 

Adair 715 922 6 

Alfalfa 1,698 1,323 122 

Atoka 851 1,261 98 

Beaver 1,235 1,245 100 

Blaine ' 1,735 1,469 174 

Beckham 778 2,010 214 

Bryan 1,234 2,923 264 

Caddo 2,873 3,161 202 

Canadian 1,790 2,103 9S 

Carter 1,543 2,672 252 

Cherokee 1,161 1,248 25 

Choctaw 1,167 1,551 107 

Cimarron 397 540 23 

Cleveland 1,188 1,853 213 

Coal 705 1,377 247 

Craig 1,479 1,671 27 

Comanche 2,538 3,133 193 

Creek 1,551 1,302 88 

Custer 1,523 1,930 161 

Delaware , 589 1,003 25 

Dewey 1,137 1,179 342 

Ellis 1,328 1,326 104 

Garvin 1,239 2,772 55 

Grady 1,243 2,981 70 

Garfield 3,237 2,219 175 

Grant 1,729 1,799 87 

Greer 864 2,151 173 

Harper 735 729 91 

Haskell 1,319 1,804 91 

Hughes 1,256 1,965 89 

Jackson 604 2,143 94 

Jefferson 594 1,543 72 

Johnson 757 1,944 313 

Kay 2,562 2,651 87 

Kingfisher 2,204 1,688 94 

Kiowa 1,529 2,610 130 

Latimer 629 969 68 

Le Flore 1,715 2,162 83 

Lincoln 3,562 3,432 220 

Logan 3,831 2,179 840 

Love 491 1,199 87 

Major 1,296 968 302 

Mayes 908 1,215 8 

Murray 502 1,356 93 

Marshall 467 1,248 218 

McClain 723 1,465 111 

Muskogee 3,789 3,479 63 

Sig 21 



290 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



McCurtain 955 

Mcintosh 1,607 

Nowata 992 

Noble 1,494 

Ottawa 1,245 

Okmulgee- 1,502 

Oklahoma 5,944 

Okfuskee 878 

Osage 1,357 

Payne 2,093 

Pontotoc 855 

Pottawatomie 2,911 

Pawnee 1,599 

irittsburg 2,602 

Pushmataha 520 

Rogers ; 1,116 

Roger Mills 854 

Sequoyah 1,940 

Seminole 1,101 

Stephens 710 

Tillman 557 

Tulsa 1,951 

Texas 1,353 

Wagoner 1,723 

Washington 1,442 

Washita 1,152 

Woods 1,424 

Woodward 1,416 

Total 110,293 

Haskell's plurality, 27,286 votes. 



1,287 


61 


1,606 


43 


1,068 


23 


1,459 


61 


1,305 


43 


1,287 


140 


5,038 


337 


1,125 


181 


1,693 


50 


2,261 


189 


2,328 


244 


4,210 


232 


1,714 


167 


3,366 


233 


864 


45 


1,759 


31 


1,290 


241 


1,927 


35 


1,396 


192 


2,205 


331 


1,472 


47 


2,163 


111 


1,576 


86 


1.200 


60 


1.404 


48 


2.100 


230 


1,276 


163 


1,327 


232 



137,579 10,646 



VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICIALS. 



T. N. Robnett, 100,159; 
B. Dyche, 99,904; A. B. 
S. H. Reid, 99.543; E. T. 
M. F. Stillwell, 100,137; 



Lieutenant Governor. — George W. Bellamy, 132,568; N. G. Turk, 
100,106; M. H. Carey, 9,662— Bellamy's plurality, 32,462. 

Secretary of State.— Bill Cross, 133,504; 
J. G. Watrous, 9,601 — Cross' plurality, 33,435. 

State Aurtltor.— M. E. Trapp, 132,590; J. 
Davis, 10,454 — Trapp's plurality, 32,686. 

Attorney General. — Charles West, 131,055; 
Marsh, 9,534— West's plurality, 31,512. 

State Treasurer. — J. A. Menefee, 132.496; 
John B. Ash, 9,286 — Menefee's plurality, 32,359. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. — E. D. Cameron, 132,963; 
Ballard, 99,912; J. A. Hanna, 9,678 — Cameron's plurality, 33,050. 

State Examiner and Inspector. — Charles A. Taylor, 132,831; John 
S. Fisher, 99,600; C. H. Dove, 9,555— Taylor's plurality, 33,231. 

Chief Mine Inspector. — Pete Hanraty, 132,821; David Halstead, 
99,596; David Henderson. 9,610 — Hanraty's plurality, 33,225. 

Commissioner of Labor. — C. L.Daugherty, 132,777; A. D. Marlin, 
99,380; J. Y. Shaw. 9,766— Daugherty's plurality, 32.397. 

Commissioner of Charities. — Kate Barnard, 134,300; Hazel Tom- 
linson. 98,960; Kate Richards O'Hara, 9,615 — Barnard's plurality, 35,350. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 291 

Commissioner of Insurance. — T. J. McComh Ti9 i(\k. t»t- u , 
Burke. 99,697; T. J. Toler, 9,571-McComb's ^1^^ 32 70^^ ""^'^"^^ 

Clerk of the Supreme Court.— W. H. L. CamDbell ^2 ^97- t w 
Speake. 99,227; T. V. Kolachny, 9,049^Campbell^pruramy: 33,370 ' 
oo^ Corporation Commissioners.— J. E. Love, 132,762- John Jen^Pn qq 
386; E. C. DeBerry. 9,608-Love's plurality, 32,376 ' '" 

AT aT" '^: ^^^Ifster, 132,373; Patrick Dore, 99,547; A. T. Reeves 9 639 
McAlester's plurality, 32,826. . ^- a- -tveeves, j,bi;y— 

A. P. Watson, 132,123; D. A. Grafton, 99,199; Ray Hayes 9 423- 
Watson's plurality, 32,924. ndyes, j,^z6~ 

Justice of the Supreme Court (District No 11- Tnbn R ^,^^■n^r. 
132,821; Ralph Campbell, 99,320-Turner'smajority:"33f501 ' 

Justice of Supreme Court (District No. 2).— R L William=i Ti9 
588; W. H. Johnson, 99,728-William's majority, 32,860. ^^''^''''^'' ^^^'- 

Justice of Supreme Court (District No. 3).— M. J Kane 132 43^- 
John H. Coteral, 99,655— Kane's majority, 32,778. 1^2,433, 

Justice of Supreme Court (District No. 4).— S. W Hays 131902- 
Prank E. Gillette, 99,795; A. L. Loudermilk,' 9,078-Hts' pLr^Uy; 

W W ^SnnH°/v® QQ^s^r'^^ ^°"'\ (District No. 5).-Jesse J. Dunn, 133,050; 
vv. vv. bnoddy, 99,869— Dunq's majority, 33,181. 



292 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION ELECTION 

November 6, 1906. 



At the election held November 6, 1906, for the election of members 
to the constitutional convention, one hundred democrats and twelve 
republicans were elected. Six republicans were from the Indian Ter- 
ritory portion and six from the Oklahoma Territory portion. 

In Oklal^pma Territory the total vote was 99,781, divided as fol- 
lows: democratic, 52,510; republican, 40,715; socialist. 4,060; inde- 
pendent, 1,482; miscellaneous, 1,014. 

In Indian Territory the returns as canvassed show 97,151 votes 
cast, divided as follows: democratic, 52,066; republican, 35,167; social- 
ist, 3,079; miscellaneous, 6.829. No returns were made from 62 voting 
precincts and in four no election was held. It is estimated that 
between 6,000 and 7,000 votes were included in these precincts. 

The total number of precincts in Oklahoma Territory was 973 
and in Indian Territory, 694, a total of 1,672 in the state. -le total 
vote cast and canvassed was 196,932. 



VOTE CAST ON THE ADOPTION OF CONSTITUTION. 

County. For. Against. 

Adair - 1,008 385 

Alfalfa 1,927 1,210 

Atoka 1,485 677 

Beaver 1.881 708' 

Beckham 2.582 385 

Blaine 2,170 1,164 

Bryan 3,483 941 

Caddo 4,544 1,504 

Canadian 2,710 1,148 

Carter 3,103 1,166 

Cherokee 1.565 859 

Choctaw 1,886 851 

Cimarron 840 144 

Craig 2,003 1,113 

Creek 2.342 738 

Cleveland 2,365 867 

Coal 1,882 489 

Comanche 4,379 1,371 

Custer 2,784 693 

Delaware 1, 064 361 

Dewey 1,815 826 

Ellis 2,137 630 

Garfield 3,441 1,995 

Garvin 3,175 898 

Grady 3,554 656 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 293 

Grant 2,484 1,054 

Greer 2,501 802 

Harper 1,072 451 

Haskell 2,301 790 

Hughes 2,421 912 

Jackson 2,663 282 

Jefferson 1,873 388 

Johnston 2,263 503 

Kav 3.605 1,593 

Kingfisher 2,260 1,640 

Kiowa 3,499 787 

Latimer 1,037 418 

Le Flore 2,764 1,174 

Lincoln 4,603 2,494 

Logan 3,023 2,935 

Love 1,381 396 

Majors 1.423 1,19^ 

Marshall 1,491 434 

Maves 1,509 563 

McClain 1,765 511 

McCurtain 1,581 794 

Mcintosh 1,820 1,194 

Murray 1,579 315 

Muskogee 4,468 2,855 

Noble 2,106 904 

Nowata 1,513 664 

Okfuskee 1,354 1,020 

Okmulgee 1,827 1,075 

Oklahoma 7,085 3,994 

Osage 2,308 666 

Ottawa 1,794 748 

Pawnee 2,418 943 

Payne 3,003 1,432 

Pittsburg 4,167 1,849 

Pontotoc 2,688 684 

Pottawatomie 5,200 1,576 

Pushmataha 966 365 

Roger Mills 1,673 734 

Rogers 2,402 485 

Seminole 1,696 1,059 

Sequoyah 2.169 1,367 

Stephens 2,741 593 

Texas 2,561 531 

Tillman 1.844 241 

Tulsa 3,111 1,003 

Wagoner 1,569 1,487 

Washita ' 2.755 673 

Washington 2,371 441 

Woods 1.592 1,266 

V/oodward 1,909 1,063 



Total 180,333 73,059 



VOTE ON PROHIBITION CLAUSE OF CONSTITUTION. 

County. For. Against. 

Adair 766 534 

Alfalfa 1,923 1,023 



294 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Atoka 1,082 945 

Beaver 1,220 1,206 

Beckham 2,091 791 

Blaine 1,721 1,531 

Bryan 2,293 1,870 

Caddo 3,356 2,507 

Canadian 2,034 1,853 

Carter 2,004 2,095 

Cherokee 1,196 1,033 

Choctaw 1,337 1,261 

Cimarron 545 357 

Cleveland 1,991 1,167 

Coal 899 1,3(1 

Comanche 3,178 2,467 

Greek 1,238 1,614 

Craig 1,456 1,477 

Custer 2,128 1,242 

Delaware 782 544 

Dewey 1,518 1,048 

Ellis 1,494 1,045 

Garfield 2,688 2,639 

Garvin 2,184 1,715 

Grady 2,569 1,315 

Grant ; 1,979 1,459 

Greer 2,327 967 

Harper 728 650 

Haskell 1,548 1,410 

Hughes 1,835 1,318 

Jackson 2,186 700 

Jefferson 1,302 982 

Johnston : 1,094 1,491 

Kay 2,603 1,377 

Kingfisher 1,906 1,855 

Kiowa 2,603 2,496 

Latimer 443 960 

Le Flore 1.957 1,766 

Lincoln 3,543 3,260 

Logan 2,589 3,255 

Love 972 728 

Major 1,242 1,172 

Marshall 1,060 807 

Mayes 1,221 759 

McClain 1,259 959 

McCurtain 1,12* 1,010 

Mcintosh 1,114 1,759 

Murray 939 893 

Muskogee 3,576 3,356 

Noble : 1,529 1,342 

Nowata 855 1.175 

Okfuskee l,12i 1,046 

Oklahoma 4,143 6,899 

Okmulgee 1,388 1,374 

Osage 1,156 1.585 

Ottawa 1,181 1,147 

Pawnee 1,915 1,356 

Payne 2,355 1,939 

Pittsburg 2,679 3,216 

Pontotoc 1,938 1,301 

Pottawatomie 3,513 3,005 

Pushmataha 601 664 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 295 

Roger Mills 1,355 918 

Rogers 1,219 1,511 

Seminole 1,403 1,155 

Sequoyah 1,631 1,758 

Stephens ". . . . 2,013 1,247 

Texas 1,839 1,005 

Tillman 1,414 589 

Tulsa 2,089 1,783 

Wagoner 1,353 1,390 

Washington 1,164 1,505 

Washita 2,486 903 

Woods ' 1,534 1,158 

Woodward 1,452 1,298 

Total 130,361 112,258 



296 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



CONGRESSIONAL VOTE, 1910 



FIRST DISTRICT. 



(Dem.i 

Counties. McNeil. 

Osage 1,841 

Garfield 2,727 

Pawnee 1,448 

Kingfisher 1.340 

Kay 2.418 

Noble 1,310 

Lincoln 2,386 

Logan 1,459 

Grant 1,750 

Payne 1,736 

Total 18,415 

McGuire's plurality, 1,886. 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


McGuire. Reynolds. 


1,649 


151 


3,005 


264 


1,435 


285 


1,841 


212 


2,572 


142 


1,363 


170 


2,555 


500 


• 2,415 


168 


1,740 


141 


1,726 


489 



20,301 



2,522 



SECOND DISTRICT. 



(Dem.) 

Counties. Fulton. 

Blaine 1,258 

Custer 1,781 

De\^ey 990 

Ellis 1,166 

Woodward 1,188 

Cimarron 487 

Harper 718 

Texas 1,141 

Woods 1,363 

Alfala 1,353 

Major 772 

Caddo 2,659 

Oklahoma 5,611 

Canadian 1,975 

Beaver 1,008 

Roger Mills 369 

Grady 223 

Total 24,062 

Morgan's plurality, 1,072. 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


Morgan. 


Bryant.t 


1,429 


262 


1,688 


331 


1,143 


575 


1,323 


309 


1,478 


351 


400 


58 


780 


117 


1,110 


268 


1,426 


520 


1,769 


258 


1,273 


442 


2,550 


555 


5,135 


687 


2,022 


218 


1,120 


200 


274 


188 


214 


43 



25,134 



5,382 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 297 

THIRD DISTRICT. 

(Dem.) 
Counties. Davenport. 

Okmulgee 1,140 

Washington 1,487 

Tulsa 2,625 

Creek 1,583 

Okfuskee 870 

Seminole 994 

Nowata 1,048 

Ottawa 1,366 

Rogers 1,612 

Muskogee 2,757 

Wagoner 1,114 

Mcintosh 522 

Mayes 1,230 

Adair * 699 

Cherokee 1,253 

Delaware 910 

Craig 1,560 

Sequoyah 1,555 

Hughes 987 

Total 25,312 21,767 2,932 

Davenport's plurality, 3,545. 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


Creager. 


Snyder. 


1,176 


294 


1,458 


181 


2,026 


279 


1,839 


271 


678 


312 


895 


356 


1,033 


76 


1,270 


95 


1,173 


154 


2,219 


122 


773 


187 


362 


63 


1,146 


36 


683 


17 


1,194 


71 


677 


57 


1,198 


51 


1,210 


73 


757 


228 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 

(Dem.) 

Counties. Carter. 

Murray 555 

Johnston 1,321 

Love 752 

Hughes 579 

Carter 1,794 

Pontotoc 1,858 

Pittsburg 2,885 

Haskell 1,432 

Latimer 676 

Le Flore 1,789 

Pushmataha 675 

Coal 1,094 

Marshall 804 

Bryan 2,232 

McCurtain 1,078 

Choctaw 1,175 

Atoka 958 

Muskogee ' 289 

Okfuskee 13 

Total 21,959 11,979 5,534 

Carter's plurality, 9,980. 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


Campbell. 


Gilmore. 


193 


294 


539 


417 


282 


144 


412 


151 


736 


319 


636 


469 


1,916 


576 


1,140 


283 


475 


168 


1,445 


182 


505 


226 


528 


354 


266 


501 


831 


549 


617 


160 


713 


519 


575 


176 


150 


26 


20 


20 



298 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

FIFTH DISTRICT. 

(Dem.) 

Counties. Ferris. 

Tillman 1,750 

Kiowa 1,398 

Washita 1,586 

Beckham 1,551 

Swanson (dissolved) 521 

Harmon 840 

Greer 1,387 

Roger Mills 595 

Stephens 1,741 

Comanche 3,330 

.Jackson 2,077 

Cleveland 1,399 

Garvin 2,038 

McClain 1,269 • 

Grady 2,207 

Jefferson 1,439 

Pottawatomie 2,817 

Carter 192 

Love 50 

Murray 413 

Total 28,600 13,425 6,539 

Ferris' plurality, 15,175. 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


Franklin. 


Stallard. 


664 


160 


982 


248 


941 


408 


526 


593 


268 


255 


152 


137 


352 


315 


378 


217 


670 


676 


1,922 


587 


566 


327 


857 


280 


883 


349 


618 


315 


973 


368 


471 


377 


1,994 


655 


51 


90 


11 


13 


146 


169 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 



299 



CONGRESSIONAL VOTE, NOVEMBER 3, 1908 



First District. 



(Rep.) 

Counties. McGuire. 

Garfield 2,883 

Grant 1,765 

Kay 2,736 

Kingfisher 2,088 

Lincoln 3,443 

Logan 3,708 

Noble 1,395 

Osage 1,533 

Pawnee 1,534 

Payne 2,227 

Total 23,312 

McGuire's plurality, 2,811. 



(Dem.) 


(Soc.) 


Johnson. 




2,635 


230 


1,882 


86 


2,501 


123 


1,559 


210 


3,074 


517 


2,246 


242 


1,454 


92 


1,583 


145 


1,552 


253 


2,015 


351 



20,501 



2,249 



Second District. 

(Rep.) (Dem.) (Soc.) 

Counties. Morgan. Fulton. 

Alfalfa 1,713 1,485 166 

Beaver 1,348 1,237 184 

Blaine 1,582 1,352 327 

Caddo 2,830 2,974 411 

Canadian 1,895 2,132 145 

Cimarron 372 444 35 

Custer 1,562 "1,715 317 

Dewey 1,214 1,099 490 

Ellis 1,324 1,297 213 

Grady 215 281 24 

Harper 877 761 174 

Major 1,409 875 455 

Oklahoma 5,117 5,046 446 

Roger Mills 352 450 214 

Texas 1,318 1,467 222 

Woods 1,533 1,441 273 

Woodward 1,612 1,293 347 

Total 26,273 25,349 4,443 

Morgan's plurality, 924. 



♦Semi-official. 



300 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Third District. 



(Rep.) 

Counties. Creager. 

Adair 710 

Clierokee 942 

Craig 1,266 

Creek f ,748 

Delaware 622 

Hughes 977 

Mayes 1,031 

Mcintosh 662 

Muskogee 2,386 

Nowata • 935 

Okfuskee 1,264 

Okmulgee 1,378 

Ottawa 1,171 

Rogers 1,125 

Seminole 937 

Sequoyah 2,026 

Tulsa 2,118 

Wagoner 2,083 

Washington 1,511 

Total 24,922 

Creager's plurality, 1,041. 



(Dem.) 


(Soc.) 


Davenport. 




802 


23 


833 


41 


1,597 


51 


1,409 


322 


970 


49 


, 1,030 


210 


1,183 


39 


423 


40 


2,490 


142 


905 


52 


856 


369 


1,102 


289 


1,290 


92 


1,609 


121 


891 


357 


1,641 


128 


2,265 


219 


1,166 


164 


1,419 


• 119 



23,881 



2,827 



Fourth District. 



(Dem.) 

Counties. Carter. 

Atoka 783 

Bryan 2,207 

Carter 2,000 

Choctaw 1,023 

Coal 903 

Haskell 1,386 

Hughes 614 

Johnston 1,290 

Latimer 717 

Le Flore 1,855 

Love 786. 

Marshall 845 

McCurtain 567 

Mcintosh 750 

Muskogee 255 

Murray 711 

Okfuskee 17 

Pittsburg 2,901 

Pontotoc 1,810 

Pushmataha 627 

Total 22,047 

Carter's plurality, 6,320. 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


Hackett. 




749 


195 


1,079 


465 


1,167 


411 


832 


312 


704 


518 


1,046 


348 


472 


159 


687 


595 


607 


196 


1,754 


226 


375 


204 


394 


406 


476 


150 


921 


74 


197 


14 


323 


171 


15 


23 


2,693 


625 


813 


552 


483 


125 



15,727 



5,769 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 



301 



Fifth District. 



(Dem.) 

Counties. Ferris. 

Beckham 1,825 

Carter 113 

Cleveland 1,470 

Comanche 3,587 

Garvin 2i392 

Grady 2,538 

Jackson 1,908 

Jefferson 1,451 

Kiowa 2,377 

Love ' 46 

McClain 1,208 

Murray 447 

Pottawatomie 3,558 

Roger Mills '73O ' 

Stephens 1,705 

Tillman 1,671 

Greer 2*173 

Washita 1,827 

Total 31,026 

Ferris' plurality, 11,877. 



(Rep.) 
Thompson. 



19,149 



(Soc.) 

486 
96 
417 
386 
309 
213 
209 
273 
289 
48 
359 
112 
577 
179 
549 
104 
466 
40tt 

5,478 



302 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



* CONGRESSIONAL VOTE, 1907 



First District. 



(Rep.) 
Counties. McGuire. 

Kay 2,431 

Kingfisher 2,046 

Garfield 2,904 

Grant 1,655 

Lincoln 3,412 

Logan 3,630 

Osage 1,353 

Noble 1,422 

Pawnee 1.496 

Payne 2,013 

Total 22,362 

McGuire's plurality, 1,359. 



(Dem.) 


(Soc.) 


Eagleton. 


Renshaw. 


2,584 


84 


1,740 


91 


2,365 


132 


1,750 


84 


3,380 


190 


. 2,121 


64 


1,597 


26 


1,446 


55 


1.778 


158 


2,242 


178 



21,003 



1,062 



Second District. 



(Dem.) 
Fulton. 

Alfalfa 1,282 

Beaver 1,282 

Blaine 1,481 

Canadian 2,080 

Cimarron 585 

Custer 1,891 

Dewey 1,132 

Ellis : 1,315 

Harper 739 

Maior 877 

Oklahoma 5,365 

Texas 1,580 

Woods 1,297 

Woodward 1,374 

Caddo 2,970 

The townships of Hamburg, Preston, Fairview, 
Churchill, Rail, Lone Star, Texmo, Shirley and 
Crawford in Roger Mills county lying in the Sec- 
ond Congressional district returned the following 

vote 514 

The townships of Verdon, Washington Valley, Hills- 
borough and Kochi, in Grady county, lying in 



(Rep.) 
Ferguson. 
1,621 
1,178 
1,671 
1,678 

399 
1,492 
1,128 
1,283 

700 
1,250 
5,329 
1,383 
1,339 
1,352 
2,733 



328 



^Semi-official. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 303 

the Second Congressional district returned the 

following vote 311 164 



Total vote 26,075 25,028 

Fulton's plurality, 1,047. 



Third District. 

(Dem.) (Rep.) 

Davenport Hubbard 

Adair 890 692 

Cherokee 1,238 1,139 

Craig 1,641 1,443 

Creek 1,414 1,402 

Delaware 971 609 

'Hughes 1,188 821 

Mayes 1,269 920 

The townships of Shady Grove,, Rentiesville, Mil- 
ton, West Cheoctah, Elm, Wichita, Hoffman, Guy- 
son and East Checotah, in Mcintosh county, lying 
in the Third Congressional district returned the 

following votes 556 555 

Muskogee (six precincts made no returns; four lie 

in Fourth Congressional district) 1,053 2,798 

Nowata (no returns from Claggett township) 1,053 977 

Okfuskee (Vansant precinct no legal returns, Wat- 
son precinct a part of Fourth Congressional 

district) 1,070 792 

Okmulgee 1,306 1,419 

Ottawa 1,219 1,244 

Rogers 1,765 1,094 

Seminole 1,384 1,033 

Sequoyah 1,883 1,872 

Tulsa 2,168 1,833 

Wagoner (four precincts made no returns) 1,233 1,637 

Washington 1,424 1,353 

Mcintosh (no returns from that portion within 

Third Congressional district) .... .... 

Total vote 24,725 23,633 

Davenport's majority, 1092. 



Fourth District. 

(Dem.) 

Counties. Carter 

Latimer 972 

Marshall 1,186 

Love 1,141 

Le Flore (no returns from Old Lennox 

precinct) 2,136 

Okfuskee 23 

Muskogee 369 

McCurtain 1,297 862 24 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


Disney. 


Cumbie. 


589 


66 


307 


186 


395 


75 


1,638 


95 


19 


12 


181 





304 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Murray 856 

Pontotoc 2,306 

Atoka 1,236 

Bryan 2,890 

Coal 1,373 

Haskell 1,764 

Johnston 1,969 

Hughes 766 

Mcintosh 1,131 

Choctaw 1,566 

Carter 2,597 

Pittsburg 3,360 

Pushmataha 845 



228 


57 


770 


231 


801 


80 


1,129 


257 


562 


219 


1,213 


64 


626 


.173 


377 


43 


902 




1,083 


86 


1,211 


166 


3,363 


203 


491 


28 



Total vote 29,783 16,747 2,065 

Carter's plurality, 13,036. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 

(Dem.] 

Counties. Ferris. 

Kiowa 2,494 

Washita 1,952 

Roger Mills 694 

Beckham 1,928 

Garvin 2,721 

Comanche 3,238 

Jackson 2,069 

Greer 2,270 

Cleveland 1,691 

McClain 1,407 

Tillman 1,463 

Pottawatomie 4,034 

Carter 2,052 

Stephens 224 

Love 45 

Murray 546 

Jefferson 1,511 

Total vote 30,339 13,990 1,737 

Ferris' plurality, 16,349. 



(Rep.) 


(Soc.) 


McKnight. 


Hubbard. 


1,360 


116 


1,003 


278 


468 


106 


668 




1,228 


47 


2,242 


175 


587 


77 


537 


147 


991 


205 


638 


98 


509 


30 


2,545 




512 


314 


68 


73 


13 


2 


161 


14 


460 


55 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 305 



VOTE FOR TERRITORIAL DELEGATES 

(1890-1904.) 



1890. 



^arvey Republican 4 oqc 

Matthews. . . . ; Democrat 2 ^4, 

I^iehl Populist :;. • ■ • • f'4fi4 

Scattering ^'^JJ 

• tjy 



Total 

Harvey's plurality 1 855 

1892. 

5^'^^^° Republican q Qon 

Travers Democrat 7 302 

Ward Populist ! ! ! ! ! ." ! .' ! 4,398 

Total 21,090 

Flynn s plurality 2 O88 

1894. 

^^y"i^ Republican 20 49^» 

Wisby Democrat 12'ofis 

Beaumont Populist .'.".'.'.'.".■.' 15,988 

Total 48 54., 

Flynn's plurality '.'.'.'.".'. 4461 

1896. 

^'^f " Republican' 26,267 

<^«"ahau Populist 27;435 

Total 53 702 

Callahan's majority '" 2 16S 



1898. 

■^ . -lepub».v.v*. 

™^°.^ Democrat 19,088 

Populist 

Total 77777 

Flynn's plurality '...'.'.'.'.*.".'.'.'.'.'.'.".■.'.■.■.■ 9 368 



Son Republican 28.456 

f;®^^°.^ Democrat 

Nankins Populist .'.'.■.■ i,262 



306 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



1900. 



Flynn Jlepublican 38,253 

Neff Democrat and Populist 33,529 

Allan Independent and Populist 789 

Tucker Socialist 796 



73,367 
4.724 



1902. 

McGuire Republican '. 45,896 

Cross Democrat 45,409 

Smith Socialist 1,963 

Van Cleave '. Prohibitionist 1,035 



Total 94,30:^ 

McGuire's plurality 484 

1904. 

McGuire Republican 51,454 

Mathews Democrat 49,868 

Loudermilk Socialist 4,443 

Brown Prohibitionist 1,544 

Straughen Populist 1,83(: 



Total 109.145 

McGuire's plurality 1,586 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 307 



MEASURES SUBMITTED UNDER INITIATIVE AND 
REFERENDUM 



INITIATED MEASURES SUBMITTED NOVEMBER 3, 1908. 

Vote. Majority. 

Yes. No. Yes. No. 

Agency System 105,392 121,573 16,181 

Torrens Land System 114,394 83,888 30,506 ..!... 

Location of Capital 120,352 71,933 48,419 ...... 

New Jerusalem 117,441 75,792 41^649 ...... 

Sale of School Land 96,745 110,840 14io95 

INITIATED QUESTIONS SUBMITTED JUNE 11, 1910. 

Vote. Majority. 

Yes. No. Yes. No. 

Repeal Section 9, Article IX. .. . 53,784 108.205 54,421 

Location of Capital 96,515 64,501 32,014 ...... 



INITIATED QUESTION SUBMITTED AUGUST 2, 1910. 

Vote. Majority. 

Yes. No. Yes. No. 

"Grandfather" Clause 135,443 106,222 29 221 



INITIATED QUESTIONS SUBMITTED NOVEMBER 8, 1910. 

Vote. Majority. 

Yes. No. Yes. No. 

Tax Distribution Measure 101,636 43,133 58,503 

Amendment Art. IX, Sec. 9 83,169 55,175 27,994 

Russell's New Jerusalem Plan. . . 84,336 118,899 34,533 

Women's Suffrage 88,808 128,928 40,120 

Local Option 105,041 126,118 21.077 



REFERENDUM PETITION SUBMITTED NOVEMBER 8, 1910. 

Vote. Majority. 
Yes. No. Yes. No. 

"Bryan Election Law" 80,148 106,459 26,313 



REFERENDUM PETITION SUBMITTED APRIL 25, 1911. 

Vote. Majority. 

Yes. No. Yes. No. 

Amendment Art. IX, Sec. 9 41,768 46,623 4,854 

NOTE. — The only questions adopted by Constitutional majority 
were the suffrage amendment, the "Grandfather" Clause, which is amend- 
ment No. 1 to the Constitution, and the Capital Location, which election 
was declared null and void by the State Supreme Court. 



308 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



OKLAHOMA POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 
1892-1908 



Candidate. 



1892. 
Party. 



Grover Cleveland Democrat 

Benjamin Harrison Republican . . . . 

James B. Weaver People's 

John Bidwell Prohibitionist . 

Simon Wing Socialist Labor 

1896. 



William McKinley Republican 

William Jennings Bryan Democrat > 

William Jennings Bryan People's S 

.Joshua Levering Prohibitionist 

John M. Palmer National Democrat 

Charles H. Matchett Socialist Labor 

Charles E. Bentley Free Silver Probitionist. 



Vote. 

7,390 
9,478 
4,348 



26,267 
27,435 



1900. 

William McKinley Republican ■ 38,253 

William Jennings Bryan Democrat 33,539 

John G. Woolley Prohibitionist 

Wharton Barker Anti-Fusion People's 

Eugene V. Debs Socialist Democrat 780 

Joseph F. Malloney Socialist Labor 

J. P. R. Leonard United Christian 

Seth H. Ellis T'nion Reform 



1904. 

Theodore Roosevelt Republican .51,4.54 

Alton B. Parker Democrat 49,864 

Eugene V. Debs Socialist 4,443 

Silas C. Swallow Prohibitionist 11.580 

Thomas E. Watson People's 1 .836 

Charles H. Corrigan Socialist Labor 

1908. 



W^illiam H. Taft Republican . . 

William Jennings Bryan Democrat .... 

Eugene V. Debs Socialist 

Eugene W. Chafin Prohibitionist 

Thomas E. Watson People's 

Thomas L. Higsen Independent 

August Gilhaus Socialist Labor . 

Daniel B. Turney ' Cnited Christian 




ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 309 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT IN 1908 BY 
COUNTIES 



County. Dem. 

Adair 825 

Alfalfa 1,459 

Atoka 784 

Beaver ' 1,212 

Beckham 1,807 

Blaine 1,317 

Bryan 2,415 

Caddo 2,964 

Canadian 2,124 

Carter 2.281 

Cherokee 913 

Choctaw 1,038 

Cimarron 449 

Cleveland 1,487 

Coal '. 906 

Craig : 1,578 

Creek 1,417 

Comanche 3.481 

Custer 1,721 

Delaware 974 

Dewey 1,637 

Ellis 1,297 

Garfield 2,651 

Grant 1,882 

Garvin 2,396 

Grady .' 291 

Greer . . .' 2,183 

Harper 741 

Haskell 1.376 

Hughes 1,644 

Jackson 1,953 

Jefferson 1,420 

Johnston 1,263 

Kay 2.480 

Kingfisher 1,501 

Kiowa 2,352 

Latimer 718 

Le Flore 1,867 

Lincoln 2,999 

Logan 2.210 

Love 831 

Major 855 

Marshall 893 

Mayes 1,181 

McClain 1,292 

McCurtain 568 



Rep. 


Soc. 


782 


.25 


1,733 


179 


757 


198 


1,362 


197 


866 


498 


1,598 


341 


1,144 


462 


2,860 


493 


1.931 


157 


1,355 


587 


1.040 


47 


878 


382 


371 


38 


1,092 


414 


772 


524 


1,296 


56 


1.791 


335 


2,437 


418 


1.579 


333 


625 


52 


1,257 


441 


1,324 


213 


2,883 


230 


1,765 


86 


1.128 


309 


215 


24 


564 


466 


866 


187 


1,055 


359 


1,443 


384 


671 


215 


689 


281 


693 


512 


2,713 


116 


2,089 


215 


1,552 


298 


611 


196 


1,743 


' 225 


3,493 


520 


3.688 


194 


410 


251 


1,417 


453 


435 


407 


1.023 


41 


782 


300 


475 


149 



*Semi-official. 



310 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Mcintosh 1,233 1,594 125 

Murray l^lOg 541 290 

Muskogee 2,884 3,659 164 

Noble 1,346 1,451 ^^g 

Nowata 910 1,005 53 

Okfuskee 848 1,265 387 

Oklahoma 4,933 5,267 486 

Okmulgee 1,094 1,382 290 

Osage 1,566 1,479 150 

Ottawa 1,286 1,175 93 

Pawnee 1,493 1,471 285 

Payne 1,966 2,216 372 

Pittsburg 2,880 2,696 679 

Pontotoc 1,852 916 594 

Pottawatomie 3,560 2,576 552 

Pushmataha 619 491 124 

Roger Mills 1,168 824 389 

Rogers 1,609 1,119 126 

Seminole 933 1,154 375 

Sequoyah 1,636 2,026 124 

Stephens 1,697 771 592 

Texas 1,456 1,308 235 

Tillman 1,657 703 104 

Tulsa 2,283 2,107 215 

Wagoner 1,190 2,192 165 

Washington . . 1,403 1,519 122 

Washita 1,829 1,122 396 

Woods 1,417 ' 1,533 279 

Woodward 1,161 1,451 342 



Total 120,657 108,276 21,089 

Total Democratic '. 120,657 

Tetal Republican 108,276 

Total Socialist 21,089 



Grand total 250,022 

Plurality for Democrats , . 12.381 



ELECTIONS ANU PLATFORMS 311 



PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS 



AGGREGATE POPULAR VOTE AND ELECTORAL VOTE FOR CANDI- 
DATES FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT AT 
EACH ELECTION. 



ELECTORAL VOTES. 

1789. Previous to 1S04 each elector voted for two candidates for Presi- 
dent. The one who received the largest number of votes was declared 
President, and the one who received the next largest number of votes was 
declared Vice President. The elcetoral votes for the first President of 
the United' States were: George Washington, 69; John Adams, of Massa- 
chusetts, 34; John Jay, of New York, 9; R. H. Harrison, of Maryland, 6 
John Rutledge, of South Carolina, 6; John Hancock, of Massachusetts, 4 
George Clinton, of New York, 3; Samuel Huntingdon, of Connecticut, 2 
John Milton, of Georgia, 2; James Armstrong, of Georgia; Benjamin Lincoln, 
of Massachusetts, and Edward Telfair, of Georgia, 1 vote each. Vacancies 
(votes not cast), 4. George Washington was chosen President and John 
Adams, Vice President. 

1792. George Washington, Federalist, received 132 votes; John Adams 
Federalist, 77; George Clinton, of New York, Republican (a), 50; Thomas 
Jefferson, of Virginia, republican, 4; Aaron Burr, of New York, republican, 
1 vote. Vacancies, 3. George Washington was chosen President and John 
Adams Vice President. 

1796. John Adams, federalist, 71; Thomas Jefferson, republican, 68; 
Thomas Pinckney, of South Carolina, federalist, 59; Aaron Burr, of New 
York, republican, 30; Samuel Adams, of Massachusetts, republican ,15; 
Oliver Ellsworth, of Connecticut, independent, 11; George Clinton, of New 
York, republican, 7; John Jay, of New York, federalist 5; James Iredell, of 
of Maryland, and S. Johnson, of North Carolina, all federalists, 2 votes each; 
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, of South Carolina, federalist, 1 vote. John 
Adams was chosen President and Thomas Jefferson Vice President. 

ISOO. Thomas Jefferson, republican, 73; Aaron Burr, republican, 73; 
John Adams, federalist, 65; Charles C. Pinckney, federalist, 64; John Jay, 
federalist, 1. There being a tie vote for Jefferson and Burr, the choice 
devolved upon the House of Representativs. Jefferson received the votes 
of ten states, which being the largest vote cast for a candidate, elected 
him President. Burr received the vote of four states, which, being the 
next largest vote, elected him Vice President. There were two blank votes. 

1804. The Constitution of the United States having been amended, the 
electors at this election voted for a President and a Vice President, instead 
of for two candidates for President. The result was as follows: For 
President, Thomas Jefferson, republican, 162; Charles C. Pinckney, feder- 
alist, 14. For Vice President, George Clinton, republican, 162; Rufus Kine 
of New York, federalist, 14. Jefferson was chosen president and Clinton 
Vice President. 



312 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

1808. For President, James Madison, of Vii^ginia, republican, 122; 
Charles C. Pinckney, of South Carolina, federalist, 47; George Clinton, of 
New York, republican, 6. For Vice President, George Clinton, republican, 
113; Rufus King, of New York, federalist, 47; John Langdon, of New Hamp- 
shire, 9; James Madison, 3; James Monroe, 3. Vacancy, 1. Madison was 
chosen President and Clinton Vice President. 

1812. For President, James Madison, Republican, 128; DeWitt Clinton, 
of New York, Federalist, S9. For Vice-President, Elbridge Gerry, of Massa- 
chusetts, 131; Jared IngersuU, of Pennsylvania, Federalist, 86. Vacancy, 1. 
Madison was chosen President and Gerry Vice-President. 

1816. For President, James Monroe, of Virginia, Republican. 183; Rufus 
King, of New York, Federalist, 34. For Vice-President, Daniel D. Tompkins, 
of New York, Republican, 183; John Eager Howard, of Maryland, Federalist, 
22; James Ross, of Pennsylvania, 5; John Marshall, of Virginia, 4; Robert 
G. Harper, of Maryland, 3. Vacancies, 4. Monroe was chosen President and 
Tompkins Vice-President. 

1820. For President, James Monroe, of Virginia, Republican, 231; John 
Q. Adams, of Massachusetts, Republican, 1. For Vice-President, Daniel D. 
Tompkins, Republican. 218; Richard Stockton, of New Jersey, 8; Daniel Rod- 
ney, of Delaware, 4; Robert G. Harper, of Maryand, and Richard Rush, of 
Pennsylvania, 1 vote each. Vacancies, 3. James Monroe was chosen Presi- 
dent and Daniel D. Tompkins Vice-President. 

1824-1908. See table on pages 313-316. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 



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ELECTIONS AND PLATFOR.MS 317 



NATIONAL PLATFORMS OF 1908 



REPUBLICAN PARTY. 

XATIOKAI^ TICKET. 

For President 
WII.I.IAM H. TAFT, 
of Ohio. 

For Vice-President . 

JAMES S. SHERMAX, 
of New York 

National Convention. Chicago. June 16-19, 19U.S. 
Temporary Chairman, JULIUS C. BURROWS, of Michigan. 
Permanent Chairman— HENRY CABOT LODGE, of Massachusetts. 
Secretary— JOHN R. MAI.LOY, of Ohio. 



NATIONAL PLATFORM. 

Once njore the Republican party, in national convention assembled, sub- 
mits its cause to the people. This great historic organization, that destroyed 
slavery, preserved the Union, restored credit, expanded the national domain, 
established a sound financial system, developed the industries and resources 
Of the country, and gave to the nation her seat of honor in the councils ol 
the world, now meets the new problems of government with the same courage 
and capacity with wliich it solved the old. 

Republicanism Under Roosevelt. 

In this greatest era of American advancement the Republican party has 
reached its highest service under the leadership of Theodore Roosevelt. His 
administration is an epoch in American history. In no otiier period since na- 
tional soverignty was won under Wasliington, or preserved under Lincoln 
has there been such mighty progress in those ideals of government which 
make for justice, equality, and fair dealing among men. The highest aspir- 
ations of the American people have found a voice. Their most exalted ser- 
vant represents the best aims and worthiest purposes of all his countrymen. 
American manhood has been lifted to a nobler sense of duty and obligation. 
Conscience and courage in public station and higher standards of right and 
wrong in private life have become cardinal principles of political faith; capi- 
ital and labor have been brought into closer relations of confidence and inter- 
dependence; and the abuse of wealth, the tyranny of power, and all the evils 
of privilege and favoritism have been put to scorn by the Bimple, manly 
virtues of justice and fair play. 



318 OKLAHOJ^IA RED BOOK 

The great accomplishments of President Roosevelt hare b«en, first and 
foremost, a brave and impartial enforcement of the law; the prosecution 
of illegal trusts and monopolies; the exposure and punishmont of evil-doers 
in the public service; the more effective ref^ulution of tlie rates and service 
of the great transportation lines; the complete overthrow of preferences, 
rebates and discriminations; the arbitration of labor disputes; the ameliora- 
tion of the condition of wageworkers everywhere; the conservation of the 
natural resources of the country; the forward step in the improvement of 
the inland waterways, and always the earnest support and defense of every 
wholesome safeguard which has made more secure the guarantees of life, 
liberty and property. 

These are the achievements that will make Theodore Roosevelt his 
place in history, but more than all else the great things he has done will 
be an inspiration to those who have yet greater tilings to do. We declare 
our unfaltering adherence to the policies thus inaugurated, and pledge their 
continuance under a republican administration of the government. 

Equality of Opportunity. 

Under the guidance of republican principles the American people have 
become the richest nation in the world. Our wealth (today exceeds that of 
England and all her colonies, and that of France and Germany combined. 
"When the republican party- was born the total wealth of the country was 
$16,000,000,000. It has leaped to $111,000,000,000 in a generation, while Great 
Britain has gathered but $60,000,000,000 in five hundred years. The United 
States now owns one-fourth of the world's wealth and luakes one-third of 
all modern manufactured products. In the great necessities of civilization 
such as coal, the motive power of all activity; iron, the chief basis of all 
industry; cotton, the staple foundation of all gabrics; wheat, corn and all 
the agricultural products that feed mankind, America's supremacy is undis- 
puted. And yet her great natural wealth has heen scarcely touched. We 
have a vast domain of three million square miles, literally bursting with 
latent treasure, still waiting the magic of capital and industry to be con- 
verted to the practical uses of mankind; a country rich in soil an»- 'Umate, 
in the unharnessed energy of its rivers and in all the varied prodo. ,s of 
the field, the forest and factory. With gratitude for God's bounty, with 
pride in the splendid productiveness of the past and with confidence in 
the plenty and prosperity of the future, the republican party declares for 
the principle ithat in the development and enjoyment of wealth so great 
and blessings so benign there shall be equal opportunity for all. 

The Revival of Business. 

Nothing so clearly demonstrates the sound basis upon which our com- 
mercial, industrial and agricultural interests are founded, and the necessity 
of promoting their continued welfare through the operation of republican 
policies, as the recent safe passage of the American people through a 
financial disturbance which, if appearing in the midst of democratic rule 
or the menace of it, might have equalled the familiar democratic panics of 
the past. We congratulate the people upon this renewed evidence of Ameri- 
can supremacy and hail with confidence the signs now manifest of a 
complete restoration of business prosperity in all lines of trade, commercw 
and manufacturing. 

Recent Republican Legislation. 

Since the election of William McKinley in 1896 the people of this 
country have felt anew the wisdom of entrusting to the republican party 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 319 

through decisive majorities the control and direction of national legislatioa. 

The many wise and progressive measures adopted at recent sessions of 
Congress have demonstrated the patriotic resolve of republican leadership 
in the legislative department to keep step in the forward march toward 
better government. 

Notwithstanding the indefensible filibustering of a Democratic minority 
in the House of Representatives during the last session many wholesome 
and progressive laws were enacted, and we especially commend the passage 
of the emergency currency bill, the appointment of the National Monetary 
Commission, the Employers' and Government liability laws, the measures 
for the greater efficiency of the army and navy, the widows' pension bill, 
the child labor law for the District of Coumbia. the new statute for the 
safety of railroad engineers and firemen, and uiany other acts conserving 
the public walfare. 

Republican Pledges for the Future. 

Tariff. 

The republican party declares unequivocally for the revision of the 
tariff by a special session of Congress immediately following the inaugura- 
tion of the nexjt President, and commands the steps already taken to this 
end in the work assigned to the appropriate committees of Congress which 
are now investigating the operation and effect of existing schedules. In 
all tariff legisation the true principle of protection is best maintained by 
the imposition of such duties as will equal the difference between the cost 
of production at home and abroad, together with a reasonable profit to 
American industries. "We favor the establishment of maximum and minimum 
rates to be administered by the President under limitations fixed in the 
law, the maximum to be available to meet discriminations by foreign 
countries against American goods entering their markets, and the minimum 
to represent the normal measure of protection at home, the aim and purpose 
of the republican policy being not only to preserve, without excessive duties, 
that security against foreign competition to which the American manu- 
facturers, farmers and producers are entitled, but also to maintain the 
high standard of living of the wage-earners of this country, who are the 
most direct beneficiaries of the protective system. Between the United 
States and the Philippines we believe in a free interchange of products 
with such limitations as to sug^r and tobacco as will afford adequate 
protection to domestic interests. 

Currency. 

We approve tlie emergency measures adopted by the government during 
the recent financial disturbance, and especiallV commend the passage by 
Congress at the last session of the law designed to protect the country from 
a repetition of such stringency. The republican party is committed to fhe 
development of a permanent currency system, responding to our great 
needs; and the appointment of the National Monetary Commission by the 
present Congress, which will impartially investigate all proposed methods, 
insures the early realization of this purpose. The present currency laws 
have fully justified their adoption, but an expanding commerce, a marvelous 
growith in wealth and population, multiplying the centers of distribution, 
increasing the demand for the movement of crops in the west and south, 
and entailing periodic changes in monetary conditions, disclose the need 
of a more elastic and adaptable system. Such a system must meet the 
requirements of agriculturalists, manufacturers, merchants and business men 
generation, must be automatic in operation, minimizing the fluctuations In 



320 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

interest rates, and, above all, must be in harmony witli that republican 
doctrine wliich insists that every dollars shall be based upon and as good 
aa gold. 

Postal Savings. 

We favor the establishment of a postal savings bank system for the 
convenience of the people and the encouragement of thrift. 

Trusts. 

The republican party i)assed the Sherman Anti-Trust law over demo- 
cratic opposition, and fnl'orct'd it after democratic dereliction. It has been 
a wholesome instrument lor good in the hands of a wise and fearless 
administration. But experience has shown that its effectiveness can be 
strengthened and its real objects better attained by such amendments as 
will give to the federal government greater supervision and control over, 
and secure greater publicity in, the management of that class of corporations 
engaged in interstate commerce having power and opportunity to effect 
monopolies. 

Railroads. 

We approve the enactment of the railroad rate law and the vigorous 
enforcement by the present administration of the statutes against rebates 
and discriminations, as a result of which the advantages formerly possessed 
by the large shipper over the small siiipper have substantially disappeared; 
and in this connection we commend the appropriation by the present Congress 
to enable the Interstate Commerce Commission to thoroughly investigate 
and give publicity to the accounts of interstate railroads. We believe, 
however, that the interstate commerce law should be further amended so 
as to give railroads the right to make and publish traffic agreements subject 
to the approval of the commission, but maintaining always the principle 
of competition between naturally competing lines and avoiding the common 
control of such lines by any means whatsoever. We favor such national 
legislation and supervision as will prevent the future over issue of stocks 
and bonds by interstate carriers. 

Railroad and Government Employes. 

The enactment in constitutional form at the present session of Congress 
of the Employers' Liability law, the passage and enforcement of the safety 
appliance statutes, as well as the additional protection secured for engineers 
and firemen, the reduction in the hours of labor of trainmen and raihoad 
telegraphers, the successful exercise of the powers of mediation and arbitra- 
tion between intei-state railroads and their employes, and tlie law making 
a beginning in the policy of compensation for injured employes of the 
government, are among the most commendable accomplishments of the pres- 
ent administration. But there is further work in this direction yet to be 
done, and the republican party pledges its continued devotion to every 
cause that makes for safety and betterment of conditions among those whose 
labor contributes so niiuli to the progress and welfare of the country. 

Wage Earners Generally. 

The same wise policy Which has induced the republican party to main- 
tain protection to American labor, to establish an eight-hour day in the 

construction of all public works, to increase the list of employes who shall 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 321 

have preferred claims for wages under the bankruptcy laws, to adopt a 
child labor statute for the District of Columbia, to direct an investigation 
into the condition of working women and children, and later, of employes 
of telephone and telegraph companies engaged in interstate business; to 
appropriate $150,000 at the recent session of Congress in order to secure a 
thorough inquiry into the causes of catastrophes and loss of life in the mines 
and to amend and strengthen i the law prohibiting the importation of 
contract labor, will be pursued in every legitimate direction within federal 
authority to lighten the burdens and increase the opportunity for happiness 
and advancement of all who toil. The republican party recognizes the 
special needs of wake-workers generally, for their well being means the 
well being of all. But more important than all other considerations is 
that of good citizenship, and we especially stand for the needs of every 
American, whatever his occupation, in his capacity as a self respecting citizen. 

Court Procedure. 

The republican party will uphold at all times the authority and integrity 
of the courts, state and federal, and will ever insist that their powers to 
enforce their process and to protect life, liberty and property shall be 
preserved inviolate. We believe, however, that the rules of procedure in 
the federal courts with respect to the issuance of the writ of injunction 
should be more accurately defined by statute, and that no injunction or 
temporary restraining order should be issued without notice, except where 
irreparable injury would result from delay, in which case a speedy hearing 
thereafter should be granted. 

The American Farmer. 

Among those whose welfare is as vital to the welfare of the whole 
country as that of the wage-earner is the American farmer. The pros- 
perity of the country rests peculiarly upon the prosperity of agriculture. 
The republican party during the last twelve years has accomplished extra- 
ordinary work in bringing the resources of the national government to 
the aid of the farmer, not only in advancing agriculture itself, but in 
increasing the conveniences of rural life. Free rural mail delivery has 
been established; it now reaches millions of our citizens, and we favor its 
extension until every community in the land receives ths full benefits of 
the postal service. We recognize the social and economical advantages of 
good country roads, maintained more and more largely at public expense, 
and less and less at the expense of the abutting owner. In this work we 
commend the growing practice of the state aid, and we approve the efforts 
of the national agricultural department by experiments and otherwise to 
make clear to the public the best methods of road construction. 

Rights of the Negro. 

The republican party has been for more than fifty years the consistent 
friend of the American negro. It gave him freedom and citizenship. It 
wrote into the organic law the declarations that proclaim his civil and 
political rights, and it believes today that his noteworthy progress in Intel- 
ligence, industry and good citizenship has earned the respect and encour- 
agement of the nation. We demand equal justice for all men, withou»- 
regard to race or color; 'we declare once more, and without reservation, 
for the enforcement in letter and spirit of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth amendments to the Constitution, which were designed for the 
protection and advancement of the negro, and we condemn all devices that 
have for their real aim his disfranchisement for reasons of color alone as 
unfair, un-American and repugnant to the supreme law of the land 
Sig. 23. 



322 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Natural Resources and Waterways. 

We indorse the movement inaugurated by the administration for the 
conservation of natural resources; we approve all measures to prevent the 
waste of timber; we commend the work now going on for the reclamation 
of arid lands, and reaffirm tlie republican policy of tlie free distribution 
of the available areas of the public domain to the landless settler. No 
obligation of the future is more insistent and none will result in greater 
blessings to posterity. In line with this splendid undertaking is tlie further 
duty, equally imperative, to enter upon a systematic improvement upon a 
large and comprehensive plan, just to all portions of the country, of the 
waterwaj's, harbors, and great lakes, wliose natural adaptability to the in- 
creasing :traffic of the land is one of the greatest gifts of a benign Providence. 

The Army and Navy. 

The Sixtieth Congress passed many commendable acts increasing the 
efficiency of the army and navy, making the militia of the states an integral 
part of the national establishment, authorizing joint maneuvers of army 
and militia, fortifying new naval bases and completing the construction of 
coaling stations, instituting a female nurse corps for naval hospitals and 
ships, and adding two new battleships, ten torpedo-boat destroyers, three 
steam colliers, and eight submarines to the strength of the navy. Although 
at peace with all the world, and secure in the consciousnness that the 
American people do not desire and will not provoke a war with any other 
country, we nevertheless declare our unalterable devotion to a policy that 
will keep this Republic ready at all times to defend her traditional doctrines, 
and assure her appropriate part in promoting permanent tranquility among 
the nations. 

Protection of American Citizens Abroad. 

We commend the vigorous efforts made by the administration to protect 
American citizens in foreign lands, and pledge ourselves to insist upon the 
just and equal protection of all our citizens abroad. It is the unquestioned 
duty of the government to procure for all our citizens, without distinction, 
the rights to travel and sojourn in friendly countries, and we declare our- 
selves in favor of all proper efforts tending to that end. 

Extension of Foreign Commerce. 

Under the administration of the republican party the foreign commerce 
of the United States has experienced a remarkable growth until it has a 
present annual valuation of approximately three billions of dollars, and 
gives employment to a vast amount of labor and capital which would 
otherwise be idle. It has inaugurated through the recent visit of the 
secretary of state to South America and Mexico, a new era of Pan-American 
commerce and comity, which is bringing us into closer touch with our twenty 
sister American republics, having a common historical heritage, a republican 
form of government, and offering us a limitless field of legitimate com- 
mercial enterprise. 

Arbitration and The Hague Treaties. 

The conspicuous contributions of American statesmanship to the great 
cause of international peace so signally advanced in The Hague conference? 
are an occasion for just pride and gratification. At the last session of 
the Senate of the United States, eleven Hague conventions were ratified, 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 323 

establishing ithe rights of neutrals, laws of war on land, restriction of 
submarine mines, limiting the use of force for the collection of contractural 
debts, governing the opening of hostilities, extending the application of 
Geneva principles, and, in many ways, lessening the evils of war and 
promoting the peaceful settlement of international controversies. At the 
same session twelve arbitration conventions with great nations were con- 
firmed, and extradition, boundary and naturalization, treaties of supreme 
importance were ratified. We indorse such achievements as the highest 
duty a people can perform and proclaim the obligaton of further strength- 
ening the bonds of friendship and good will with all nations of the world. 

Merchant Marine, 

We adhere to the republican doctrine of encouragement to American 
shipping and urge such legislation as will revive the merchant marine 
prestige of the country, so essential to national defense, the enlargement of 
foreign trade and the industrial prosperity of our own people. 

Veterans of the Wars. 

Another republican policy which must ever be maintained is that of 
generous provision for those who have fought the country's battle and for 
the widows and orphans of those who have fallen. We commend the 
Increase in the widows' pensions made by the present congress, and declare 
for a liberal administration of all pension laws, to the end that the people's 
gratitude may grow deeper as the memories of heroic sacrifice grow more 
sacred with the passing years. 

Civil Service. 

We reaffirm our former declaration that the civil service laws, enacted, 
extended and enforced by the republican party, shall continue to be main- 
tained and obeyed. 

Public Health. 

We commend the efforts designed to secure greater efficiency in national 
public health agencies, and favor such legislation as will effect this purpose. 

Bureau of Mines and Mining. 

In the interest of the great mineral industries of our country, we earnestly 
favor the establishment of a Bureau of Mines and Mining. 

Cuba, Porto Rico, Philippines and Panama. 

The American government, in republican hands, has freed Cuba, given 
peace and protection to Porto Rico and the Philippines under our flag, and 
begun the construction of the Panama canal. The present conditions in 
Cuba vindicate the wisdom of maintaining between that republic and this 
Imperishable bonds of mutual interest, and the hope is now expressed that 
the Cut)an people will soon again be ready to assume complete soverignty 
over their land. 

In Porto Rico, the government of the United States Is meeting loyal 
and patriotic support; order and prosperity prevail, and the well being of 
the people is in every respect promoted and conserved. 

We believe that the native inhabitants of Porto Rico should be at once 
collectively made citizens of the United States, and that all others properly 
qualified under existing laws residing in said Island should have the 
privilege of becoming naturalized. 



324 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

In the Philippines, insurrection has been suppressed, law established 
and life and property made secure. Education and practical experience 
are there advancing the capacity of the people for government, and the 
policies of McKinley and Roosevelt are leading the inhabitants step by step 
to an ever-increasing measure of home rule. 

Time has justified the selection of the Panama route for the great 
Isthmian canal, and tlie events have shown, tlie wisdom of securing authority 
over the zone through which it is to be built. The work is now progressing 
with a rapidity far beyond expectation, and already the realization of the 
hopes of centuries has come within the vision of the near future. 

New Mexico and Arizona. 

"We favor the immediate admission of the territories of New Mexico and 
Arizona as separate states in the Union. 



Centenary of the Birth of Lincoln. 

February 12, 1909, will be the one hundredth anniversary of the birth of 
Abraham Lincoln, an immortal spirit whose fame has brightened with the 
receding years, and whose name stands among the first of thos given to 
the world by the great republic. We recommend that this centennial 
anniversary be celebrated tliroughout the confines of the nation by all the 
people thereof, and especially by the public schools, as an exercise to stir 
the patriotism of the youth of the land. 



Democratic Incapacity for Government. 

We call the attention of the American people to the fact that none of 
ithe great measures here advocated by the republican party could be 
enacted, and none of the steps forward here proposed could be taken, under 
a democratic administration or under one in which party responsibility is 
divided. The continuance in power of that party which believes in them 
and which possesses the capacity to put them into operation. 



Fundamental Differences Between Democracy and Republicanism 

Beyond all platform declarations there are fundamental differences be- 
tween the republican party and its chief opponent which makes the one 
worthy and the other unworthy of public trust. 

In history the difference between democracy and republicanism is that 
the one stood for debased currency, the other for honest currency; the one 
for free silver; the other for sound money; the one for free trade, the 
other for protection; the one for the contraction of American influence, the 
other for its expansion; the one has been forced to abandon every position 
taken on the great issues before the people, the other has held and vin- 
dicated all. 

In experience, the difference between democracy and republicanism is 
that the one means adversity, while the other means prosperity; one means 
low wages, the other means high; one means doubt and debt, the other 
means confidence and thrift. ? 

In principle the difference between democracy and republicanism is 
that one stands for vacillation and timidity in government, the other for 
strength and purpose; one promises, the other performs; one Sinds fault, 
the other finds work. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 325 

The present tendencies of the two parties are even more marked by 
inherent differences. The trend of democracy is toward socialism, while 
the republican party stands for a wise and regulated individualism. Socialism 
would destroy wealth. Republicanism would prevent its abuse. Socialism 
would give to each an equal right to take; republicanism would give to each 
an equal right to earn. Socialism would offer an equality of possession 
which would soon leave no one anything to possess; republicanism would 
give equality of opportunity which would assure to each his share of a 
constantly increasing sum of possessions. In line with this tendency, tne 
democratic party of today believes in government ownership, while the 
republican party believes in government regulation. Ultimately democracy 
would have the nation own the people, wliile republicanism would have the 
people own the nation. 

Upon this platform of principles and purposes, reaffirming our adherence 
to every republican doctrine proclaimed since the birth of the party, we go 
before the country asking the support not only of those who have acted 
with us heretofore, but of all our fellow citizens who, regardless of past 
political, difference, unite in the desire to maintain the policies, perpetuate 
the blessings and make secure the achievements of a greater America. 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 

Western Headquarters, Chicago, Illinois. 
Eastern Headquarters, New York, New York. 



Acting Chairman — John F. Hill, of Maine. 
Secretary — William Hayward, of Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Treasurers — George R. Sheldon, of New York, New York, and F. W. 
Upham, of Illinois. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — William F. Stone, of Maryland. 



Executive Committee. 



Charles F. Brooker, Connecticut. 
William E. Borah, Idaho. 
Frank O. Lowden, Illinois. 
Charles Nagel, Missouri. 
Victor Rosewater, Nebraska. 
Edward C. Duncan, North Carolina. 
Boies Penrose, Pennsylvania. 
T. Coleman Du Pont, Delaware. 



Members of Committee. 



Alabama — ^P. D. Barker, Mobile. 
Arkansas — Powell Clayton, Eureka Springs. 



326 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

California — George A. Knight. San Francisco. 

Colorado — Charles E. Cavender, Leadville. 

Connecticut — Charles F. Brooker, Ansonia. 

Delaware — T. Coleman Du Pont, Wilmington. 

Florida — James N. Coombs, Apalachicola. 

Georgia — Henry Blun, Jr., Savanah. 

Idaho — W. E. Borah, Wallace. 

Illinois — Frank O. Lowden, Oregon. 

Indiana — Harry S. Xew, IndianapcTs. 

Iowa — Ernest E. Hart, Council Bluffs. 

Kansas — David W. Mulvane, Topeka. 

Kentucky — A. R. Burnam, Richmond. 

Louisiana — Pearl Wriglit, New Orleans. 

Maine — John F. Hill, Augusta. 

Maryland— William P. Jackson, Salisbury. 

Massachusetts — W. Murray Crane, Dalton. 

Michigan — John W. Blodgett, Grand Rapids. 

Minnesota — Frank B. Kellogg, St. Paul. 

Mississippi — L. B. Moseley, Jackson. 

Missouri — Charles Nagel, St. Louis. 

Montana — Thomas C. Marshall, Missoula. 

Nebraska — Victor Rosewater, Omaha. 

Nevada — P. L. Flanigan, Reno. 

New Hampshire — F. W. Estabrook, Nashua. 

New Jersey — Franklin Murphy. Newark. 

New York — William L. Ward, Port Chester. 

North Carolina — B. C. Duncan, Raliegh. 

North Dakota — James Kennedy, Fargo. 

Ohio — A. L. Vorys, Lancaster. 

Oklahoma— C. M. Cade, Shawnee. 

Oregon — R. E. Williams, Dallas. 

Pennsylvania — Boies Penrose, Philadelphia. 

Rhode Island — Charles R. Brayton, Providence. 

South Carolina — John G. Capers, Greenville. 

South Dakota — Thomas Thorson, Canton. 

Tennessee — Nathan W. Hale. Knoxville. 

Texas — Cecil A. Lyon, Sherman. 

Utah — C. E. Loose, Provo City. 

Vermont — James W. Brock, Montpelier. 

Virginia — Alvah H. Martin, Portsmouth. 

Washington — R. L. McCormick, Tacoma. 

West Virginia— N. B. Scott, Wheeling. 

Wisconsin — Alfred T. Rogers, Madison. 

Wyoming — George E. Pexton, Evanston. 

Alaska — L. P. Shackelford, Juneau. 

Arizona — W. S. S-turgis,, Arwaca. 

District of Columbia — Sidney Bieber, Washington. 

Hawaii — A. G. M. Robertson, Honolulu. 

New Mexico — Solomon Luna, Los Lunas. 

Philippine Islands — Henry B. McCoy, Manila. 

Porto Rico — R. H. Todd, San Juan. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 327 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 



NATIONAL TICKET. 



For President, 

WILLIAM J. BRYAN. 

of Nebraska. 



For Vice-President. 

JOHN W. KERN, 

of Indiana. 



National convention, Denver, Colorado, July 7-11, 1908. 
Temporary Chairman — Theodore A. Bell, of California. 
Permanent Chairman — Henry D. Clayton, of Alabama. 
■Secretary — Urey Woodson, of Kentucky. 



NATIONAL PLATFORM. 

We, the representatives' of the democracy of the United States, in 
national convention assembled, reaffirm our belief in, and pledge our 
loyalty to the principles of the party. 

We rejoice at the increasing signs of an awakening throughout the 
country. The various investigations have traced graft and political corrup- 
tion to llie representatives of predatory wealth and laid bare the unscrupulous 
methods by wliich tliey have debauciied elections and preyed upon a defense- 
less public through the subservient officials whom they have raised to place 
and power. The conscience of the nation is now aroused and will free 
the government from the grip of those who have made it a business asset 
of the favor seeking corporations; it must become again a people's govern- 
ment, and be administered in all its departments according to the Jeffer- 
sonion maxim, "equal rights to all, special privileges to none." 

"Shall the people rule?" is the overshadowing issue wliicli manifests 
itselT in all the questions now under discussion. 

Economy in Administration. 

The republican Congress in the session just ended made appropriations 
amounting to $1,008,000,000, exceeding the total expenditures of the past fiscal 
year by $90,000,000, and leaving a deficit of more than $60,000,000 for the 
fiscal year just ended. We denounce the heedless waste of the people's 
money whicli has resulted in this appalling inci-ease as a shameful 
violation of all prudent considerations of government and as no less than 
a crime against the millions of working men and women from whose earn- 
ings the great proportion of these colossal sums must be extorted through 
ex-cessive tariff exactions and other indirect methods. It is not surprising 
that in the face of this shocking record the republican platform contains no 
reference to economical administration or promise thereof in the future. We 
demand that a stop be put to this frightful extraxagance and insist upon 
the strictest economy in every department compatible with frugal and efficient 
administration. 



328 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Increase in. Officeholders. 

Coincident with the enormous increase in expenditure is a like addition 
to the number of officeholders. During the past year 23,784 were added 
costing $16,156,000, and in the past six years of republican administration 
the total number of new offices created aside from many commissions, has 
been 99,319, entailing an additional expenditure of nearly $70,000,000, as 
against only 10,279 new offices created under the Cleveland aiul McKinley 
administrations, which involved an expenditure of only $6,000,000. We de- 
nounce this great and growing increase in the number of officeholders as 
not only unnecessary and wasteful, but also as clearly indicating a deliberate 
purpose on the part of the administration to keep the republican party in 
power at public expense by thus increasig the number of its retainers 
and dependents. Such procedure we declare to be no less dangerous anri 
corrupt than the open purchase of votes at. the polls. 

Arbitrary Power — The Speaker. 

The House of Represntatives was designed by the fathers of the consti- 
tution to be the popular branch of our government responsive to the public 
will. 

The House of Representatives, as controlled in recent years by the repub- 
lican party, has ceased to be a deliberative and legislative body, responsive 
to the will of a majority of its members, but has come under the absolute 
domination of the speaker, who has entire control of its deliberations and 
powers of legislation. 

We have observed with amazement the popular branch of our federal 
government helpless to obtain either the consideration or enactment of 
measures desired by a majority of its members. 

Legislative control becomes a failure when one member in the person of 
the speaker is more powerful than the entire body. 

We demand that the House of Representatives shall again become a 
deliberative body, controlled by a majority of the people's representatives 
and not by the speaker, and we pledge ourselves to adopt such rules and 
regulations to govern the house of representatives as will enable a majority 
of its memlDers to direct its deliberatios and control legislation. 

Misuse of Patronage. 

We condemn as a violation of the spirit of our institutions the action 
of the preset chief executive in using the patronage of his high office to 
secure the nomination for the presidency of one of his cabinet officers. A 
forced succession in the presidency is scarcely less repugnant to public 
sentiment than is life tenure in that office. No good intention on the 
part of the executive and no virtue in the one selected can justify the 
establishment of a dynasty. 

The right of the people to freely select their officials is inalienable and 
cannot be delegated. 

Publicity of Campaign Contributions. 

We demand federal legislation forever terminating the partnership which 
has existed between corporations of the country and the republican party 
under the expressed or implied agreement that in return for the contribution 
of great sums of money wherewith to purchase elections they should be 
allowed to continue substantially unmolested in their, efforts to encroachi 
upon the rights of the people. 

Any reasonable doubt as to the existence of this relation has been 
dispelled by the sworn testimony of witnesses examined in the insurance 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 329 

investigations in New York and the open admission of a single individual — 
unchallenged by the republican national committee — that he himself at the 
personal request of the then republican candidate for the presidency raised 
over a quarter of a million dollars to be used in a single state during the 
closing hours of the last campaign. In order that this practice shall be 
stopped for all time, we demand the passage of a statute punishing by 
imprisonment any officer of a corporation who shall either contribute on 
behalf of or consent to the contribution by a corporation of any money or 
thing of value to be used in furthering the election of a president or vic«- 
president of the United States or of any member of the Congress thereof. 
We denounce the republican party, having complete control of the federal 
government, for its failure to pass the bill, introduced in the last congress, 
to compel the publication of the names of contributors and the amounts 
contributed toward campaign funds and point to the evidence of the insin- 
cerity of republican leaders when they sought by an absolutely irrelevant 
and impossible amendment to defeat the passage of the bill, as a further 
evidence of their intention to conduct their campaign in the coming contest 
with vast sums of money wrested from favor-seeking corporations. We call 
attention to the fact that the recent republican national convention at 
Chicago refused, when the issue was presented to it, to declare against such 
practices. 

We pledge the democratic party to the enactment of a law prohibiting 
any corporation from contributing to a campaign fund and any individual 
from cotributing an amount above a reasonable maximum, and providins' 
for the publication before election of all such contributions above a reason- 
able minimum. 

The Rights of the States. 

Believing with Jefferson, in "the support of the state governments in 
all their rights as the most competent administrations for our domestic 
concerns, and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies," and 
in "the preservation of the general goverment in its whole constitutional 
vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad," we are 
opposed to the centralization implied in the suggestion, now frequently made, 
that the powers of the general government should be extended to judicial 
construction. There is no twilight zone between the nation and the state 
in which exploiting interests can take refuge from both; and it is as 
necessary that the federal government shall exercise the powers delegated to 
it as that the state governments shall use the authority reserved to them; 
but we insist that federal remedies for the regulation of interstate commerce 
and for the prevention of private monopoly shall be added to, not substituted 
for state remedies. 

Popular Election of Senator. 

We favor the election of United States senators by direct vote of the 
people and regard this reform as the gateway to other national reforms. 

Tariff. 

We welcome the belated promise of tariff reform now offered by tho 
republican party as a tardy recognition of the righteousness of the demo- 
cratic position on this question. But the people cannot safely entrust the 
execution of this important work to a party which is so deeply obligated 
to the highly protected interests as is the republican party. We call attention 
to tne significant fact that the promised relief is postponed until arter 
the coming election — an election to succeed in which the republican party 



330 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

must have the same support from the beneficiaries of the high protective 
tariff as it has always heretofore received from them; and to the further 
fact that during the years of uninterrupted power no action whatever has 
been taken by the republican congress to correct the admitedly existing 
tariff iniquities. 

We favor immediate revision of the tariff by the reduction of import 
duties. Articles entering into competition with trust controlled products 
should be placed upon the free list; material reductions' should be made in 
the tariff upon the necessaries of life, especially upon articles competing with 
such American manufacturers as are sold abroad more cheaply than at home, 
and gradual reductions should be made in such other schedules as may be 
necessary to restore the tariff to a revenue basis. 

Existing duties have given the manufacturers of paper a shelter behind 
which they have organized combinations to raise the ^price of pulp and 
paper, thus imposing a tax upon the spread of knowledge. We demand the 
immediate removal of the tariff on wood pulp, print paper, lumber, timber 
and logs, and that these articles be placed upon the free list. 

Income Tax. 

We favor an income tax as a part of our revenue system and we urge 
the submission of a constitutional amendment specifically authorizing con- 
gress to levy and collect a tax upon individual and corporate incomes to 
the end that wealth may bear its proportionate share of the burdens of the 
federal government. 

Trusts. 

A private moopoly is indefensible and intolerable; we therefore favor 
the vigorous enforcement of the criminal law against guilty trust magnates 
ad officials and demand the enactment of such additional legislation as may 
be ecessary to, make it impossible for a private monopoly to exist in the 
United States. Among the additional remedies, we specify three: First, a law 
preventing a duplication of directors among competing corporations; second, 
a license system which will, without abridging the right of each state to 
create corporations, or its rights to regulate as it will foreign corporations 
doing business within its limits make it necessary for a manufacturer or 
trading corporation engaged in interstate commerce to take- out a federal 
license before it shall be permitted to control as much as twenty-five per 
cent of the product in which it deals, the license to protect the public from 
watered stock and to prohibit the control by such corporation of more than 
fifty per cent of the total amount of any product consumed in the United 
States; and third, a law compelling such licensed corporation to sell to 
all purchasers in all parts of the country on the same terms, after making 
due allowance for cost of transportation. 

Railroad Legislation. 

We assert the right of congress to exercise complete control over inter- 
state commerce and the right of each state to exercise like control over 
commerce within its borders. 

We demand such enlargement of the powers of the interstate commerce 
commission as may be necessary to enable it to compel railroads to perform 
their duties as common carriers and prevent discrimination and extortion. 

We favor the efficient supervision and rate regulation .of railroads en- 
gaged in interstate commerce. To this end we recommend the valuation 
of railroads by the interstate commerce commission, such valuation to take 
into consideration the physical value of the property, the original cost, the 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 331 

cost of production, and all elements of value that will render the valuation 
fair and just. 

We favor such legislation as will prohibit the railroads from engaging- 
in business which brings them into competition with their shippers; also 
legislation which will assure such reduction in transportation rates as con- 
ditions will permit, care being taken to avoid reductions that would compel 
a reduction of wages, -prevent adequate service or do injustice to legitimate 
investments. 

We heartily approve the laws prohibiting the pass and the rebate and 
we favor any further necessary legislation to restrain, correct and prevent 
such abuses. 

We favor sucla legislation as will increase the power of the interstate 
commerce commission, giving to it the Initiative with reference to rates and 
transportation charges put into effect by tlie railroad companies, and permit- 
ting the interstate commerce commission on its own initiative to declare a 
rate illegal and as being more than should be charged for such service. The 
present law relating thereto is inadequate by reason of the fact that the 
fact that the interstate commece commission is without power to fix or inves- 
tigate a rate until complaint has been made to it by the shipper. 

We further declare in favor of a law providing that all agreements of 
traffic or other associations of railway agents affecting interstate rates, ser- 
vice or classification shall be unlawful unless filed with and approved by the 
interstate commerce commission. 

We favor the enactment of a law giving to the interstate commerce com- 
mission the power to inspect proposed railroad tariff rates or schedules be- 
fore they sholl take, effect, and if they be found to be unreasonable to initiate 
an adjustment thereof. 

Telegraph and Telephone. 

We pledge the democratic party to the enactment of a law to regulate 
under the jurisdiction of the interstate commerce commission, the sates and 
services of telegraph and telephone companies engaged in the transmission 
of messages between the states. 

Banking. 

The panic of 1907, coming without any legitimate excuse when the 
republican party had for a decade been in complete control of the federal 
government, furnishes additional proof that it is either unwilling or incom- 
petent to protect the interests of the general public. It has so linked the 
country to Wall street that the sins of the speculators are visited upon the 
whole people. While refusing to rescue the wealth producers from spoliation 
at the hands of the stock gamblers and speculators in farm products, it 
has deposited treasury funds, without interest and without competition, in 
favorite banks. It has used an emergency for which it is largely respon- 
sible to force through congress a bill changing the basis of bank currency 
and inviting market manipulation, and has failed to give to the fifteen mil- 
lion depositors of the country protection in their savings. 

We believe that insofar as the needs of commerce require an emergency 
currency, such currency should be issued and controlled by the federal gov- 
ernment and loaned on adequate security to national and state banks. We 
pledge ourselves to legislation under which the national banks shall be 
required to establish a guarantee fund for the prompt payment of the deposi- 
tors of any insolvent national bank, under an equitable system which shall 
be available to all state banking institutions wishing to use it. 

We favor a postal savings bank if the guaranteed bank cannot be se- 
cured, and believe that it should be so constituted as to keep the dejfosited 



332 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

money in the communities where the depositors live. But we condemn the 
policy of the republican party in proposing postal savings banks under a plan 
of conduct by which they will aggregate the deposits of the rural communi- 
ties and redeposit the same while under government charge in the banks of 
Wall street, thus depleting the circulating medium of tlie producing regions 
and unjustly favoring the speculative markets. 



Labor and Injunctions. 

The courts of justice are the bulwarks of our liberties and we yield to 
none in our purpose to maintain their dignity. Our party has given to the 
bench a long line of distinguished judges who have added to the respect and 
confidence in which this department mu^ be jealously maintained. We re- 
sent the attempt of the republican party to raise a false issue respecting the 
judiciary. It is an unjust reflection upon a great body of our citizens to as- 
sume that they lack respect for the courts. It is the function of the courts 
to interpret the laws which the people create, and if the laws appear to work 
economic, social or political injustice, it is our duty to change them. The 
only basis upon which the integrity of our courts can stand is that of un- 
swerving justice and protection of life, personal liberty and property. If 
judicial processes may be abused, we should guard them against abuse. 

Experience has proven the necessity of a modification of the present law 
relating to injunctions, and we reiterate the pledge of our national platforms 
of 1S96 and 1904 in favor of the measure which passed the United States 
senate in 1896, but which a republican congress has ever since refused to 
enact, relating to contempts in federal courts and providing for trial by jury 
in cases of indirect contempt. 

Questions of judicial practice have arisen especially in connection with 
industrial disputes. We believe that the parties to all judicial proceedings 
should be treated with rigid impartiality and that injunctions should not be 
issued in any cases in which injunction would not issue if no industrial dis- 
putes were involved. 

The expanding organization of industry makes it essential that there 
should be no abridgement of the right of wage earners and producers to 
organize for the protection of wages and the improvement of labor conditions, 
to the end that such labor organizations and their members should not be 
regarded as illegal combinations in restraint of trade. 

We favor the eight-hour day on all government work. 

We pledge the democratic party to the enactment of a law by congress 
as far as the federal jurisdiction extends, for a general employers' liability 
act covering injury to body or loss of life of employes. 

We pledge the democratic party to the enactment of a law creating a 
department of labor, represented separately in the president's cabinet, in 
which department shall be included the subject of mines and mining. 



The Philippines. 

We condemn the experiment in imperialism as an inexcusable blunder 
which has involved us in enormous expense, brought us weakness instead of 
strength, and laid our nation open to the charge of abandoning a fundamental 
doctrine of self government. We favor an immediate declaration of the 
nation's purpose to recognize the independence of th Philippine islands as 
soon as a stable government can be established, such independence to be 
guaranteed by us as we guaranteed, the independence of Cuba, until the 
neutralization of the islands can be secured by treaty with other powers. In 
recognizing the independence of the Philippines our government should retain 
such land as may be necessary for coaling stations and naval bases. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 333 

Waterways. 

Water furnishes the cheaper means of transportation and the national 
government having the control of navigable waters should improve them to 
their fullest capacity. We earnestly favor the immediate adoption of a lib- 
eral and comprehensive plan for improving every water course in the union 
which is justified by the needs of commerce, and to secure that end we 
favor, when practicable, the connection of the Great Lakes with the navi- 
gable rivers and with the Gulf through the Mississippi river, and the navi- 
gable rivers with each other by artificial canals, with a view to perfecting 
a system of inland waterways to be navigated by vessels of standard draught. 

We favor the co-ordination of the various services of the government 
connected with waterways in one service for the purpose of aiding in the 
completion of such a system of inland waterways; and we favor the creation 
of a fund ample for continuous work which shall be conducted under the ' 
direction of a commission of experts to be authorized by law. 

Merchant Marine. 

We believe in the upbuilding of the American merchant marine without 
new or additional burdens upon the people and witliout bounties, from the 
public treasury. 

The Navy. 

The constitutional provision that a navy shall be provided and maintained 
means an adequate navy, and we believe that the interests of tliis country 
would be best served by having a navy sufficient to defend the coasts of this 
country and protect American citizens wherever their rights may be in 
jeopardy. 

Protection of American Citizens. 

We pledge ourselves to insist upon the just and lawful protection of our 
citizens at home and abroad and to use all proper methods to secure for 
them, whether native born or naturalized, and without distinction of race 
or creed, the equal protection of tlie law and the enjoyment of all rights and 
privileges open to them under our treaties; and if, under existing treaties, 
the right of travel and sojourn is denied to American citizens or recognition 
is withlield from American passports by any countries on the ground of race 
or creed, we favor prompt negotiations with the government of sucli coun- 
tries to secure the removal of these unjust discriminations. 

We demand that all over the world a duly authenticated passpin-t issued 
by the government of the United States to an American citizen shall be 
proof of the fact that he is an American citizen and shall entitle him to 
the treatment due him as such. 

Foreign Patents. 

We believe that where an American citizen holding a patent in a foreign 
country is compelled to manufacture under his patent within a creditable 
time, similar restriction should be applied in this country, to the citizens 
or subjects of such a country. 

Civil Service. 

The law pertaining to the civil service should be honestly and rigidly en- 
forced, to the end that merit and ability shall be the standard of appoint- 
ment and promotion, rather than services rendered to a political party. 



334 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Pensions. 

We favor a generous pension policy, both as a matter of justice to the 
surviving veterans and their dependents, and because it tends to relieve the 
ment and promotion, rather than services rendered to a politiial party. 

Health Bureau. 

We advocate the organization of all existing national public health agen- 
cies into a national bureau of public health, with such power over sanitary 
conditions connected with factories, mines, tenements, child labor, and such 
other subjects as are properly within the jurisdiction of the federal govern- 
ment, and do not interfere with the power of the states controlling public 
health agencies. 

Agricultural and Mechanical Education. 

The democratic party favors the extension of agricultural, mechanical 
and industrial education. We therefore favor the establishment of district 
agricultural experiment stations and secondary agricultural and mechanical 
colleges in the several states. 

Oklahoma. 

We welcome Oklahoma to the sisterhood of states and heartily congratu- 
late her upon the auspicious beginning of a great career. 

Arizona and New Mexico. 

The national democratic party has for the last sixteen years labored for 
the admission of Arizona and New Mexico as separate states of the federal 
union, and recognizing that each possesses every qualification successfully 
to maintain separate state governments, we favor the immediate admission 
of these territories as separate states. 

Alaska and Porto Rico. 

W demand for the people of Alaska and Porto Rico the full enjoyment 
of the rights and privileges of a territorial form of government, and that the 
officials appointed to administer the government of all our territories and 
the District of Columbia should be thoroughly qualified by previous bona 
fide residence. 

Hawaii. 

We favor the application of the principles of the land laws of the United 
States to our newly acquired territory, Hawaii, to the end that the public 
lands of that territory may be held and utilized for the benefit of bona fide 
homesteaders. 

Post Roads. 

We favor federal aid to state and local authorities in the construction 
and maintenance of post roads. 

Natural Resources. 

We repeat the demand for internal development, and for the conserva- 
tion of our natural resources, contained in previous platforms, the enforce- 
ment of which Mr. Roosevelt has vainly sought from a reluctant party; and 
to that end we insist upon the preservation, protection and replacement of 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 335 

needed forests, the preservation of the public domain for homesteaders, the 
protection of the nation's natural resources, in timber, coal, iron and oil, 
against monopolistic control, the development of our waterways for naviga- 
tion and every other useful purpose, including the irrigation of arid lands, 
the reclamation of swamp lands, the clarification of streams, the develop- 
ment of water power and the preservation of electric power generated by this 
natural force from the control of monopoly, and to such end we urge the 
exercise of all powers, national, state and municipal, both separately and 
in co-operation. 

We insist upon a policy of administration of our forest reserves, which 
shall relieve it of the abuses which have arisen thereunder and which shall, 
as far as practicable, conform to the police regulations of the several states 
wherein the reserves are located, which shall enable homesteaders as of right 
to occupy and acquire title to all portions thereof which are especially adapted 
to agriculture, and which shall furnish a system of timber sales available as 
well to the private citizen as to the large manufacturer and consumer. 

Grazing Lands. 

The establishment of rules and regulations, if any such are necessary in 
relation to free grazing upon the public lands outside of forest or other 
reservations until the same shall eventually be disposed of should be left to 
the people of the states respectively in which such lands may be situated. 

Pan-American Relations. 

The democratic party recognizes the importance and advantage of devel- 
oping closer ties of Pan-American friendship and commerce between the 
United States and her sister nations of Latin America, and favors the taking 
of such steps, consistent with democratic policies, for better acquaintance, 
greater mutual confidence and larger exchange of trade as will bring lasting 
benefit not only to the United States, but to this group of American republics 
having constitutions, forms of government, ambitions and interests akin to 
our own. 

Panama Control. 

We believe that the Panama canal will prove of great value to our country 
and favor its speedy completion. 

Asiatic Immigration. 

We favor full protection by both national and state governments within 
their respective spheres, of all foreigners residing in the United States under 
treaty, but we are opposed to the admission of Asiatic immigrants who can- 
not be amalgamated with our population or whose presence among us would 
raise a race issue and involve us in diplomatic controversies with oriental 
powers. 

Conclusion. 

The democratic party stands for democracy; the republican party has 
drawn to itself all that is aristocratic and plutocratic. 

The democratic party is the champion of equal rights and opportunities 
to all; the republican party is the party of privilege and private monopoly. 
The democratic party listens to the voice of the whole people and gauges 
progress by the prosperity and advancement of the average man; the repub- 
lican party is subservant to the comparatively few who are the beneficiaries 



336 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

of governmental favoritism. We invite tlie co-operation of all, regardless of 
previous political affiliation or past differences, who desire to preserve a gov- 
ernment of the people, by the people and for the people, and who favor such 
an administration of the government as will insure, as far as human wisdom 
can, that each citizen shall draw from society a reward commensurate with 
his contribution to the welfare of society. 



DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 
Headquarters — New York and Chicago. 



Cliairman — Norman E. Macic, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Vice-Chairman — P. E. Hall, Lincoln, Neb. 
Treasurer — Herman Ridder, New York, N. Y. 
Secretary — Urey Woodson, Owensboro, Ky. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — John I. Martin, Missouri. 



AJabam — -John. W. Tomlinson, Birmingham. 
Arkansas — Guy B. Tucker, Little Rock. 
California — Nathan Cole. Jr., Los Angeles. 
Colorado — Alva Adams, Pueblo. 
Connecticut — Homer S. Cummings, Stamford. 
Delaware — Willard Saulsbury, ^almington. 
Florida — T. AJbert Jennings, Pensacola. 
Georgia — Clark Howell, Atlanta. 
Idaho — Simon P. Donnelly, Lake View. 
Illinois — Roger C. Sullivan, Chicago. 
Indiana — Thomas Taggart, French Lick 
Iowa — Martin J. Wade, Iowa City. 
Kansas — John H. Atwood, Leavenworth. 
Kentucky — Urey W,oodson, Owensboro. 
Louisiana — Robert Ewing, New Orleans. 
Maine — E. L. Jones, Waterville. 
Maryland — J. F. C. Talbott, Lutherville. 
Massachusetts — John W. Coughlin, Fall River. 
Michigan — Edwin O. Wood, Flint. 
Minnesota— F. B. Lynch, St. Paul. 
Mississippi — C. H. Williams, Yazoo City. 
Missouri — M. C. Wetmore (deceased), St. Louis. 
Montana — J. Bruce Kramer, Butte. 

Nebraska P. L. Hall, Lincoln. 

Nevada — John Sunderland, Reno. 
New Hampshire — Eugene E. Reed, Manchester. 
New Jersey — Robert S. Hudspeth, Jersey City. 
New York — Norman E. Mack, Buffalo. 
North Carolina — Josephus Daniels, Raleigh. 
North Dakota— William Collins, Battineau. 
Ohio — Harvey C. Garber, Columbus. 
Oklahoma— "W. T. Brady, Tulsa. 
Oregon — M. A. Miller, Lebanon. 
Pennsylvania — J. M. Guffey, Pittsburg. 
Rhode Island — G. W. Greene, Woonsocket. 
South Carolina— B. R. Tillman, Trenton. 
South Dakota — E. S. Johnson, Armour, 
Tennessee — R. E. L. Mountcastle, Knoxville. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 337 

Texas — R. M. Johnston, Houston. 
Utah — Frank K. Nebeker, Logan City. 
Vermont — Thomas H. Brown, Rutland. 
Virginia — J. Taylor EUyson, Richmond. 
Washington — W. H. Lunphy, Walla Walla. 

West Virginia John T. McGraw, Grafton. 

Wisconsin — Timothy E. Ryan, Waukesha. 

Wyoming — John E. Osborne, Rawlins. 

Alaska — A. J. Daly, Seattle. 

Arizona — A. J. Michelson, Phoenix. 

District of Columbia — Edwin A. Newman, Washington. 

Hawaii — Gilbert J. Waller, Honolulu. 

New Mexico — A. A. Jones, Las Vegas. 

Porto Rico — D. M. Field, Guayania. 



PROHIBITION PARTY. 



NATIONAL TICKET. 

For President, 

EUGENE W. CHAFIN, 

of Illinois. 

For Vice-President, 

A. S. WATKINS, 

of Ohio. 



National Convention, Columbus, Ohio, July 15-16, 1908. 
Temporary Chairman — Robert H. Pat ton, of Illinois. 
Permanent Chairman — Charles Scanlon, of Pennsylvania, 
Secretary — W. G. Calderwood, of Minnesota. 



PLATFORM. 

The prohibition party of the United States assembled in convention at 
Columbus, Ohio, July 15 and 16, 1908, expressing gratitude to Almighty God for 
the victories of our principles in the past, for encouragement at present and 
for the confidence of early and triumphant success in the future, makes the 
following declaration of principles and pledges their enactment into law when 
placed in power: 

1. The submission by Congress to the several states of an amendment to 
the federal constitution prohibiting the manufacture, sale, importation or 
transportation of alcoholic liquors for beverage purposes. 

2. The immediate prohibition of the liquor traffic for beverage purposes 
in the District of Columbia, in the territories and all places over which the 
nati/nal government has jurisdiction, the repeal of the internal revenue tax 
on alcoholic liquors and the prohibition of the interstate traffic therein. 

3. The election of United States senators by direct vote of the people. 

4. Equitable, graduated income and inheritance taxes. 

5. The establishment of postal savings banks and the guaranty of de- 
posits in banks. 

6. The regulation of all corporations doing an interstate commerce busi- 
ness. 

7. The creation of a permanent tariff commission. 
Sig. 24. 



338 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

8. The strict enforcement of law, instead of the official tolerance and 
practical license of the social evil which prevails in many of our cities, with 
its unspeakable traffic in girls. 

9. Uniform marriage and divorcl laws. 

10. An equitable and constitutional employers' liability act. 

11. Court review of post office department decisions. 

12. The prohibition of child labor in mines, workshops and factories. 

13. Legislation basing suffrage only upon intelligence and ability to read 
and write the English language. 

14. The preservation of the mineral and forest resources of the country 
and the improvement of the highways and waterways. 

Believing in the righteousness of our cause and in the final triumph of 
our principles, and convinced of tlie unwillingness of the republican and 
democratic parties to deal with these issues, we invite to full party fellow- 
ship all citizens who are agreed with us. 



NATIONAL. COMMITTEE 

Headquarters — Chicago, III. 

Chairman — Charles Reading Jones, of Evanston, Illinois. 
Vice-Chairman — A. G. Wolfenberger, of Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Secretary — W. G. Calderwood, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Treasurer — Felix T. McWhirter, of Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Executive Committee. 

Chairman — Charles Reading Jones, of Evanston, Illinois. 

Vice- Chairman — A. G. Wolfenbarger, of Lincoln, Nebraska, 

Secretary — W. G. Calderwood, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Treasurer — Felix T. McWhirter, of Indianapolis, Indiana. 

A. A. Stevens, of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 

Samuel Dickie, of Albion, Michigan. 

Finley C. Henderson, of lumberland, Maryland. 

O. W. Stewart, of ChVneo Tii-^ois. 

J. B. Cranfill, of Dallas, Texas. i H l~Cil 



Members of Committee. 

Alabama — 

Arkansas — H. Brady, Beebe; Henry Hatton, Beebe. 
California — T. K. Beard, Modesto; W. J. Phillips, Los Angeles. 
Colorado — H. L. Murray, Longmont; O. A. Reinhardt, Denver. 
Connecticut — F. G. Piatt, New Britain; Wm. N. Taft, W. Goshen. 
Delaware — Geo. W. Todd, Wilmington; L. W. Brosius, Wilmington. 
Florida — John P. Coffin, Jacksonville; Francis Trueblood, Bradentown. 
Georgia — Geo. Gordon, Atlanta; W. S. Witham, Atlanta. 

Idaho — 

Illinois — O. W. Stewart, Chicago; A. E. Wilson, Chicago. 

Indiana — F. T. McWhirter, Indianapolis; Chas. Eckhart, Auburn, 

lawo — O. D. Ellet, Marshalltown; K. W. Brown, Ames. 

Kansas — J. N. Wood, Ottawa. 

Kentucky — Mrs. F. E. Beauchamp, Lexington; T. B. Demaree, Wilmore. 

Louisiana — E. E. Lsrael, Baton Rouge; Walter Miller, New Orleans. 

Maine — N. F. Woodbury, Auburn; L. B. Merritt, Hcrulton. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 339 

Maryland — F. C. Hendrickson, Cumberland; Geo. R. Gorsuch, Baltimore. 

Massachusetts J. M. Fisher, Attleboro; J. B. Lewis, Boston. 

Michigan — Samuel Dickie, Albion; F. W. Corbett, Lansing. 
Minnesota — W. G. Calderwood, Minneapolis; J. B. Engle, Minneapolis. 

Mississippi — 

Missouri — H. P. Faris, Clinton; Chas. E. Stokes, Kansas City. 

Montana — Mrs. Kate M. Hamilton, Butte. 

Nebraska — A. G. TC'olfenbarger, Lincoln; D. B. Gilbert, Fremont. 

Nevada — 

New Hampshire — A. H. Morrill, Laconia; J. S. Blanchard, Concord. 
New Jersey — Geo. J. Haven, Camden; J. G. Van Cise, Summit. 
New York— C. B. Pitts, Oswego; G. E. Stockwell, Ft. Plain. 
North Carolina — J. M. Templeton, Cary; T. P. Johnston, Salisbury. 
North Dakota— M. H. Kiff, Tower City. 
Ohio — F. M. Mecartney, Columbus. 

Oklahoma — Chas. Brown, Carmen; Rev. J. M. Monroe, Oklahoma City. 
Oregon — F. McKercher, Portland; W. P. Elmore, Brownsville. 
Pennsylvania — A. A. Stevens, Tyrone; D. B. McCalm'ont, Franklin. 
Rhode Island — C. H. Tilley, Providence; B. E. Helme, Kingston. 

South Carolina — 

South Dakota — W. T. Raffety, Miller; Quincy Lee Morrow, Brookings. 

Tennessee — A. D. Reynolds, Bristol; J. B. Stinespring, Sanford. 

Texas— J. B. Cranfi-11, Dallas; W. C. Swengel, Dallas. 

Utah— Robt. J. Shields, Salt Lake City; Miss Edith Wade. Salt Lake City 

Vermont— H. S. Eldred, Sheldon; L. W. Hanson, Montpelier. 

Virginia— G. M. Smithdeal, Richmond; J. W. Bodley, Staunton. 

Washington — Guy Posson, Seattle; R. E. Dunlap, Seattle. 

West Virginia — E. W. Mills, Fairmont; U. A. Clayton, Fairmont. 

Wisconsin — W. D. Cox, Milwaukee; B. E. Van Keuren, Oshkosh. 

Wyoming — L. L. Laughlin, Laramie; C. J. Sawyer, Laramie. 

Alaska — 

Arizona — Frank J. Sibley, Tucson; Dr. J. W. Thomas, Phoenix. 

District of Columbia 

Guam — 

Hawaii — 

New Mexico — 

Philippine Islands — 

Porto Rico — 



SOCIALIST PARTY. 



NATIONAL TICKET. 

For President, 
EUGENE V. DEBS, 
of Indiana. 

For Vice-President, 

BEN HANFORD. 

of New York. 



National Convention, Chicago, May 10-17, 1908. 

Chairman — A chairman was chosen for eeich day's session. The follow- 



340 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

ing officiated: Morris Hillquit, of New York; James P. Carey, of Massachu- 
setts; J. W. Slayton, of Pennsylvania; Seymour Stedman, of Illinois; Stanley 
Clark, of Texas; Robert Brandlow, of Ohio; Frank I. Wheat, of California, 
and Carl D. Thompson, of Wisconsin. 

Secretary — Frederick Heath, of Wisconsin. 



PLATFORM. 

The socialist party, in national convention assembled, again declares it- 
self as the party of the working class, and appeals for the support of all 
workers of the United States and of all citizens who sympathize with the 
great and just cause of labor. 

We are at this moment in the midst of one of those industrial break- 
downs that periodically paralyze the life of the nation. The much-boasted 
era of our national prosperity has been followed by one of general misery. 
Factories, mills and mines are closed. Millions of men, ready, willing and 
able to provide tlie nation with all the necessities and comforts of life are 
forced into idleness and starvation. 

Within recent times the trusts and monopolies have attained an enor- 
mous and menacing development. They have acquired the power to dictate 
the terms upon which we shall be allowed to live. The trusts fix the prices 
of our bread, meat and sugar, of our coal, oil and clothing, of our raw ma- 
terial and machinery, of all the necessities of life. 

The present desperate condition of the workers has been made the oppor- 
tunity for a renewed onslaught on organized labor. The highest courts of the 
country have within the last year rendered decision after decision depriving 
the workers of rights which they had won by generations of struggle. 

The attempt to destroy the Western Federation of Miners, although de- 
feated by the solidarity of organized labor and the socialist movement, re- 
vealed the existence of a far-reaching and unscrupulous conspiracy by the 
ruling class against the organizations of labor. 

In their efforts to take the lives of the leaders of the miners the con- 
spirators violated state laws and the federal constitution in a manner seldom 
equaled even in a country so completely dominated by the profit-seeking class 
as is the United States. 

The congress of the United States has shown its contempt for the inter- 
ests of labor as plainly and unmistakably as have the other branches of gov- 
ernment. The laws for which the labor organizations have continually peti- 
tioned have failed to pass. Laws ostensibly enacted for the benefit of labor 
have been distorted against labor. 

The working class of the United States cannot expect any remedy for Its 
wrongs from the present ruling class or from the dominant parties. So long 
as a small number of individuals are permitted to control the sources of the 
nation's wealth for their private profit in competition with each other and 
for the exploitation of their fellowmen, industrial depressions are bound to 
occur at certain intervals. No currency reform or other legislative measures 
proposed by capitalist reformers can avail against these fatal results of utter 
anarchy in production. 

Individual competition leads inevitably to combinations and trusts. No 
amount of government regulation, or of publicity, or of restrictive legislation 
will arrest the natural course of modern industrial development. 

While our courts, legislatures and executive offices remain in the hands 
of the ruling classes and their agents, the government will be usd in the 
interest of these classes as against the toilers. 

Political parties are but the expression of economic class interests. The 
republican, the democratic, and the so-called "independence" parties and all 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 341 

parties other than the socialist party, are financed, directed and controlled 
by the representatives of different groups of the ruling class. 

In the maintenance of class government both the democratic and repub- 
lican parties have been equally guilty. The republican party has had control 
of the national government and has been directly and actively responsible 
for these wrongs. The democratic party, while saved from direct responsi- 
bility by its political impotence, has shown itself equally subservient to the 
aims of the capitalist class whenever and wherever it has been in power. 
The old chattel slave owning aristocracy of the south, which was the back- 
bone of the democratic party, has been supplanted by a child slave plutocracy. 
In the great cities of our country the democratic party is allied with the 
criminal element of the slums as the republican party is allied with the preda- 
tory criminals of the palace in maintaining the interest of the possessing class. 

The various "reform" movements and parties which have sprung up 
within recent years are -but the clumsy expression of widespread popular dis- 
content. They are not based on an intelligent understanding of historical 
development of civilization and of the economic and political needs of our 
time. They are bound to perish as the numerous middle class reform move- 
ments of the past have perished. 

Program. 

As measures calculated to strengthen the working class in its fight for 
the realization of this ultimate aim, ana to increase its power of resistance 
against capitalist oppression, we advocate and pledge ourselves and our 
elected officers to the following program: 

General Demands. 

1. The immediate government relief for the unemployed workers by 
building schools, by reforesting of cut-over and waste lands, by reclamation 
of arid tracts, and the building of canals, and by extending all other useful 
public works. All persons employed on such works shall be employed directly 
by the government under an eight-hour work day and at the prevailing union 
wages. The government shall also loan money to states and municipalities 
without interest for the purpose of carrying on public works. It shall con- 
tribute to the funds of labor organizations for the purpose of assisting their 
unemployed members, and shall take such other measures within its power 
as will lessen the widespread misery of the workers caused by the misrule 
of the capitalist class. 

2. The collective ownership of railroads, telegraphs, telephones, steam- 
ship lines and all other means of social transportation and communication 
and all land. 

3. The collective ownership of all industries which are organized on a 
national scale and in which competition has virtually ceased to exist. 

4. The extension of the public domain to include mines, quarries, oil wells, 
forests and water power. 

5. That occupancy and use of land be the sole title to possession. The 
scientific reforestration of timber lands, and the reclamation of swamp lands. 
The land so reforested or reclaimed to be permanently retained as a part of 
th public domain. 

6. The absolute freedom of press, speech and assemblage. 

Industrial Demands. 

7. The improvement of the industrial condition of the workers. 

(a) By shortening the work day in keeping with the Increased produo 
tlveness of machinery. 



342 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

(b) By securing to every worker a rest period of not less than a daj 
and a half in each week. 

(c) By securing a more effective inspection of workshops and factories. 

(d) By forbidding the employment of children under sixteen years of age. 

(e) By forbidding the interstate transportation of the products of child 
labor, of convict labor and all uninspected factories. 

(f) By abolishing official charity and substituting in its place compul- 
sory insurance against unemployment, illness, accidents, invalidism, old age 
and death. 

Political Demands. 

8. The extension of inheritance taxes, graduated in proportion to the 
amount of the bequests and to the nearness of kin. 

9. A graduated income tax. 

10. Unrestricted and equal suffrage for men and women, and we pledge 
ourselves to engage in an active campaign in that direction. 

11. The initiative and referendum, proportional representation and the 
right of recall. 

12. The abolition of the senate. 

13. The abolition of the power usurped by the supreme court of the 
United States to pass upon the constitutionality of legislation enacted by 
Congress. National laws to be repealed or abrogated only by act of Congress 
or by a referendum of the whole people. 

14. That the constitution be made amendable by majority vote. 

15. The enactment of further measures for general education and for the 
conservation of health. Tlie bureau of education to be made a department. 
The creation of a department of public health. 

16. The separation of the present bureau of labor from the department 
of commerce and labor, and the establishment of a department of labor. 

17. That all judges be elected by fhe people for short terms, and that the 
power to issue injunctions shall be curbed by immediate legislation. 

18. The free administration of justice. 

Such measures of relief as we may be able to force from capitalism are 
but a preparation of the workers to seize the whole powers of government, 
in order that they may thereby lay hold of the whole system of industry and 
thus come to their rightful inheritance. 



NATIONAL, COMMITTEE. 

Headquarters, Chicago, Illinois. 

Chairman — No permanent chairman. 

Secretary- Treasurer — J. Mahlon Barnes, 180 Washington St., Chicago. 



Executive Committee. 

Victor L. Berger, Milwaukee, Wis. 

A. M. Simons, Chicago, 111. 

John M. Work, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Morris Hillquit, New York. 

A. H. Floaten, Denver, Colo. 

Carl D. Thompson, Milwaukee, Wis. 

J. G. Phelps Stokes, Stanford, Conn. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 343 

Members of Committee. 

Alabama — W. S. Baldwin, Fairhope. 

Arizona— P. W. Gallentine, Globe. 

Arkansas— Dan Hogan, Huntington; Wells LeFevre, Pine Bluff. 

California— Wm. McDevitt, San Francisco; N. A. Ricliardson, San Bernar- 
dino; Josephine R. Cole, San Jose. 

Colorado— Thos. L. Buie, Denver; Guy E. Miller, Hotclikiss. 

Conneciicut — Jasper McLevy, Bridgeport. 

Florida— A. J. Pettigrew, Manatee. 

Idalio — E. L. Rigg, Rupert. 

Illinois— B. Barlyn, Cliicago; May Wood-Simons, Chicago; Seymour Sted- 
man, Chicago; John Collins, Chicago. 

Indiana — S. M. Reynolds, Terre Haute. 

Iowa— John M. Work, Des Moines; John E. Shank, Waterloo. 

Kansas— John F. Willitts, McLouth; A. S. McAllister, Herington. 

Kentucky — Chas. Dobbs, Louisville. 

Louisiana — J. Van Brook, Lake Charles. 

Maine — Robert V. Hunter, Freeport. 

Massachusetts— Charles C. Hitchcock, Ware; James F. Carey, Boston. 

Maryland — Ira Culp, Vale Summit. 

Michigan— Vernon F. King, Holland; A. M. Stirton, Hancock. 

Minnesota— J. G. Maattala, Virginia; Guy Williams, St. Paul. 

Missouri— L. H. Schenkle, Kansas City; E. T. Behrens, Sedalia. 

Montana — Jesse Selby, S. Great Falls; C. C. McHugh, Butte. 

New Hampshire — Jas. S. Murray, Concord. 

New Jersey— Henry R. Kearns, Arlington; William Walker, Elizabeth. 

New York — Joseph Wanhope, New York; Sol Friedman, New York; John 
Spargo, Yonkers; Algernon Lee, New York. 

North Dakota — J. S. Lampman, Fargo. 

Ohio — Tom Clifford, Cleveland; F. N. Prevey, Akron; Howard H. Cald- 
well, Dayton. 

Oklahoma— John Hagel, Oklahoma City; C. C. Ross, Oklahoma City; 

Frank P. O'Hare, Vinita. 
Oregon— C. W. Brazee, Portland; A. H. Axelson, Portland. 
Pennsylvania— Fi-esl L. Schwartz, Allegheny; Jas. H. Maurer, Reading; 
Ed. Moore, Philadelphia. 

Rhode Island Austin Boudreau, Pawtucket. 

South Dakota — Freeman Knowles, Deadwood. 

Texas— Laura B. Payne, Tyler; Stanley J. Clark, Grand Saline. 

Tennessee— J. E. Voss, Jackson. 

Vermont— J. H. Dunbar, North Hartland. 

Washington— D. Burgess, Spokane; Emil Herman, Tacoma. 

West Virginia— G. W. Gillespie, Huntington. 

Wisconsin— Victor L. Berger, Milwaukee; Frederick Heath, Milwaukee; 

Carl D. Thompson, Milwaukee. 
Wyoming — D. A. Hastings, Cheyenne. 
Utah— Grant Syphers, Ogden. 



344 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

PEOPLE'S party: 

NATIONAL TICKET. 

For President 

THOMAS E. WATSON, 

of Georgia. 



For Vice-President, 
SAMUEL W. WILLIAMS, 
of Indiana. 



National Convention, St. Louis, April 2-3, 1908. 
Temporary Chairman — Jacob S. Coxey, of Oliio. 
Permanent Chairman — George A. Honnecker, of New Jersey. 
Secretary — John S. Allen, of Oklahoma. 



PLATFORM. 
Preamble. 

The People's party of the United States in convention assembled at St 
Louis, Missouri, this 2nd day of April, 1908, with increased confidence in its 
contentions, reaffirms the declarations made by its national convention at 
Omaha. 

The admonition of Washington's farewell; the state papers of Jefferson 
and the words of Lincoln are the teachings of our greatest apostles of human 
rights and political liberty. There has been a departure from the teachings 
of these great patriots during recent administrations. The government haa 
been controlled so as to place the rights of property above the rights of hu- 
manity and has brought the country to a condition that is full of danger for 
our national well-being. Financial combinations have had too much power 
over Congress and too much influence with the administrative departments 
of the government. 

Prerogatives of government have been unwisely and often corruptly sur- 
rendered to corporate monopoly and aggregations of predatory wealth. The 
supreme duty of the hour is for the people to insist that these functions of 
government be exercised in their own interest. Not the giver of the "thirty 
pieces" of silver has been condemned, but the "Judas" that received them, 
execrated through the ages; the sycophants of monopoly deserve no better fate. 

Money. 

The Issuance of money is a function of government and should not be 
delegated to corporations or individuals. The constitution gives Congress 
alone the power to issue money and regulate the value therof. We therefore 
demand that all money shall be issued by the government direct to the people 
without the intervention of banks and shall be a full legal tender for all 
debts, public and private, and in quantity sufficient to supply the needs of the 
country. 

The Issue and distribution of full legal tender money from the treasury 
shall not be through private banks, preferred or otherwise, but direct to the 
people without interest for the construction and purchase of federal and In- 
ternal improvements, utilities and employment of labor. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 345 

Land. 

The public domain is tlie sacred heritage of all the people, and should 
be held for homesteads for actual settlers only. Alien ownership should be 
forbidden and lands now held by aliens or by corporations wlio have violated 
the conditions of their grants should be restored to the public domain. 

Trusts and Monopolies. 

To prevent unjust discriminatitms and monopoly the government should 
own and control the railroads and those public utilities which in their nature 
are monopolies. To perfect the postal service tlie government should own and 
operate the general telegraph and telephone systems and provide a parcels 
post. 

As to those trusts and monopolies which are not public utilities or natural 
monopolies we demand that those special privileges which they now enjoy and 
which alone enable them to exist should be immediately withdrawn. 

Corporations being the creatures of government should be subjected to 
such governmental regulation and control as will adequately protect the public. 

We demand the taxation of monopoly privileges while they remain in pri- 
vate hands to the extent of the value of the privilge granted. 

We demand that Congress shall enact a general law uniformly rgulatina 
the powers and duties of all incorporate'd companies doing interstate business. 

Initiative and Referendum. 

As a means of placing all public questions directly under the control of 
the people we demand that legal provision be made under which the people 
may exercise the initiative, referendum and proportional representation, and 
direct vote for all public officers witli the right of recall. 

We recommend a federal statute that will recognize the principle of the 
initiative and referendum, and thereby restore to the voters the right to 
instruct the national representatives. 

Labor. 

We believe in the right of those who labor to organize for their mutual 
protection and benefit, and pledge the efforts of the People's party to preserve 
this right inviolate. 

We condemn the recent attempt to destroy the power of trades unions 
through the unjust use of federal injunction, substituting government by in- 
junction for free government. 

We favor the enactment of legislation looking to the improvement of con- 
ditions for wage-earners. 

We demand the abolition of child labor in factories and mines, and the 
suppression of sweat-shops. 

We oppose the use of convict labor in competition with free labor. 

We demand the exclusion from American shores of foreign pauper labor 
imported to beat down the wages of intelligent American workingmen. 

We favor the eight-hour work day, and legislation protecting the lives 
and limbs of workmen through tlie use of safety appliances. 

We demand the enactment of an employers' liability act within consti- 
tutional bounds. 

We declare against the continuation of the criminal carelessness of the 
operation of mines through which thousands of miners have lost their lives 
to increase the dividends of stockholders and demand the immediate adoption 
of precautionary measures to prevent a repetition ot such liurrible catas- 
trophes. 



346 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

We declare that in time of depression wiien workingmen are tlirown into 
enforced idleness that works of public improvement should be at once inaug- 
urated and work provided for those who cannot otherwise secure employment. 

We especially emphasize the declaration of the Omaha platform that 
"Wealth belongs to him who creates it and every dollar taken from labor 
without a just equivalent is robbery." 

We congratulate the farmers of the'country upon the enormous growth of 
their splendid organizations and the good already accomplished through them, 
bringing higher prices for farm products and better conditions generally for 
those engaged in agricultural pursuits. We urge the importance of maintain- 
ing these organizations and extending their power and influence. 

Courts. 

We condemn all unwarranted assumption of authority by inferior federal 
courts in annulling, by injunction, the laws of the states, and demand legis- 
lative action by Congress which will inhibit such usurpation of such power in 
cases involving state legislation. 

We are opposed to gambling in futures. 

We present to all people the foregoing declaration of principles and poli- 
cies as our deep, earnest abiding convictions; and now, before the country and 
in the name of the great moral but eternal power in the universe that makes 
for right thinking and right living and determines the destiny of nations, thip 
convention pledges that the People's party will stand by these principles and 
policies in success and in defeat; that never again will the party by the 
siren songs and false promises of designing politicians be tempted to change 
its course or be again drawn upon the treaclierous rocks of fusion. 



PEOPLE'S NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 

Chairman — James H. Ferriss, of Joliet, Illinois. 
Secretary — Paul Dixon, of Chillicothe, Missouri. 



Members of Committee. 

Alabama— Zack Savage, Hico; E. C. Boswell, Hartford, John A. Byars, 

Molten. 
Arkansas — R. B. Carl Lee, England; W. S. Morgan, Hardy; A. W. Files, 

Little Rock. 
California — A. J. Jones, Parlier; D. P. Rice, Occidental; Robert Shatterly, 

Spencerville. 
Connecticut — T. L. Thomas, Foutsville; F. F. Baker, Danielson; O. E. 

Wadhams, Torrington. 
Georgia— Thomas E. Watson, Thompson; W. S. Hubbard, Carrolton; J. E. 

Bodenhammer, Atlanta. 
Illinois— J. H. Ferriss, Joliet; J. S. Felter, Springfield; Wm. Hess, Milton. 
Indiana — S. W. Williams, Vincennes; F. J. Robinson, Cloverland; F. J. 

Van Vorhis, Indianapolis. 
Iowa— J. R. Norman, Albia; S. M. Harvey, Des Moines; D. C. Cowles, 

Davis City. 
Kansas — Ed. S. Waterbury, Emporia; Horace A. Kiefer, Walula; W. W. 

Wiley, Topeka. 
Kentucky— A. H. Garden, View; J. H. McConnell, Princeton; Jo. A. Per- 

ker, Louisville. 



ELECTIONS AND FLA. FORMS 347 

Michigan — J. E. McBride, Grand RapUl.-,; Mrs. Marion Todd, Springport; 

Ed Grece, Detroit. 
Minnesota — T. J. Meiglien, Preston; O. M. Morrison, Van Cato. 
Mississippi — R. Brewer, Prairie Point; A. M. Monroe, Decatur; J. E. Gore, 

Embry. 
Missouri — U. A. Towns, Bethany; H. •!. Artz. St. Douis; P. J. Dixon, 

Chillicothe. 
Nebraska— T. H. Tibbies, Omaha; A. M. Walling, David City; C. B. 

Nonuel, St. Paul. 
New Jersey — J. B. Keim, Jersey Citv; J. A. Edgerton, Ridgeway, (N. 

Y.); George A. Honnecker, Jersey City. 
New York — J. W. Forrest, Albany: Fred C. Foster, Schenectady; E. Van 

Loon, Albany. 
Ohio — Dr. R. H. Reemelin, Cincinnati; J. S. Cixey, Mt. Vernon; Wm. Al- 

lerton. Alliance. 
Oklahoma — ^A. B. Weakley, Comanche; Jno. S. Allen, Norman; Jesse L. 

Swango, Welch. 
Tennessee — A. L. Mims, Antioch; H. J. Mullens, Franklin; Sid Bund, 

Jackson. 
Texas — J. M. Mallett, Cleburne; H. I, Bentley. Abilene; J. W. Baird, 

Paris. 
Washington — Edward Clayson, Sr., Seattle 



INDEPENDENCE P ".TY. 



NATIONAL TICKET. 

For President. 
THOMAS L. HISGEN, 
of Massachusetts. 

For Vice-President, 
JOHN TEMPLE GRAVES 
of Georgia. 



National convention, Chicago, July 27-28, 1908. 
Temporary Chairman — William R. Hearst, of New York. 
Permanent Chairman — Charles A. Walsh of Iowa. 
Secretary — William A. DeFord, of New York. 



PLATFORM. 

We, independent American citizens, representing the Independence party 
in forty-four states and two territories, have met in national convention to 
nominate, absolutely independent of all other political parties, candidates for 
President and Vice-President of the United States. 

Our action is based upon a determination to wrest the conduct of public 
affairs from the hands of selfish interests, political tricksters and corrupt 
bosses, and make the government, as the founders intended, an agency for the 
common good. 

At a period of unexampled national prosperity and promise, a staggering 
blow was dealt to legitimate business by the unmolested practice of stock 



348 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

watering and dishonest financiering. Multitudes of defenseless investors, 
thousands of honest business men and an army of idle workingmen are paying 
the penalty. Year by year, fostered by wasteful and reckless governmental 
extravagance, by the manipulation of trusts and by a privilege creating tar- 
iff, the cost of living mounts higher and higher. Day by day the control of 
the government drifts further away from the people and more firmly into 
the grip of machine politicians and party bosses. 

Relief for Voters. 

The Republican and Democrat parties are not only responsible for these 
conditions, but are committed to their indefinite continuance. Prodigal of 
promises, they are so barren of performance that to a new party of independ- 
ent voters the country must look for the establishment of a new policy and 
a return to genuine popular government. 

Our object is not to introduce violent innovations or startling new theo- 
ories. We of the Independence party look back, as Lincoln did, to the Dec- 
laration of Independence as tlie fountain head of all political inspiration. It 
is not our purpose to attempt to revolutionize the American system of govern- 
ment, but to restore the action of the government to the principles of Wash- 
ingon and Jefferson and Lincoln. It is not our purpose either to effect a 
radical change in the American system of government, but to conserve for the 
citizens of the United States their privileges and liberties won for them by 
the founders of this government and to perpetuate the principles and policies 
upon which the nation's greatness has been built. 

The Independence party is, therefore, a conservative force in American 
politics, devoted to the preservation of American liberty and independence, to 
honesty in elections, to opportunity in business and to equality before the 
law. Those who believe in the Independence party and work with it are con- 
vinced that a genuine democracy should exist; that a true republican form of 
government should continue; that the power of government should rest with 
the majority of the people, and that the government should be conducted for 
the benefit of the whole citizenship, rather than for special advantage of any 
particular class. 

Direct Nomination. 

As of first importance, in order to restore the power of government to the 
people to make their will supreme in the primaries, in the election and in the 
control of public officials after they have been elected, we declare for direct 
nominations, the initiative and referendum and the right of recall. 

It is idle to cry out against the evil of bossism while we perpetrate a sys- 
tem under which the boss is Inevitable. The destruction of an individual boss 
is of little value. The people in their politics must establish a system which 
will eliminate, not only an objectionable boss, but the system of bossism. 
Representative government is made a mockery by the system of modern party 
conventions dominated by bosses and controlled by cliques. "We demand the 
natural remedy of direct nominations by which the people not only elect, but, 
which is far more important, select their representatives. 

The Referendum. 

We believe in the principles of the initiative and referendum and we par- 
ticularly demand that no franchise grant go into operation until the terms and 
conditions have been approved by popular vote in the locality interested. 

The Recall. 

We demand for the people the right to recall public officials from public 
service. The power to make officials resides in the people, and in them also 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORM 349 

should reside the power to unmake and remove from office any official who 
demonstrates his unfitness or betrays the public trust. 

Corruption Funds. 

Of next importance in destroying the power of selfish special interests and 
the corrupt political bosses whom they control is to wrest from their hands 
their main weapon, the corruption fund. We demand severe and effective 
legislation against all forms of corrupt practices at elections and advocate 
prohibiting the use of any money at elections except for meetings, literature 
and the necessary traveling expenses of candidates. Bidding for votes, the 
Republican and Democratic candidates are making an outcry about publicity 
of contributions, although both the Republican and Democratic parties have 
for years consistently blocked every effort to pass a corrupt practices act. 
Publicity of contributions is desirable and should be required, but the main 
matter of importance is the use to which contributions are put. We believe 
that the dishonest use of money in the past, whether contributed by individ- 
uals or by corporations, has been chiefly responsible for the corruption which 
has undermined our system of popular government. 

Economic Administration. 

We demand honest conduct of public office and businesslike and economi- 
cal administration of public affairs, and we condemn the gross extravagance 
of federal administration and its appalling annual increase in appropriations. 
Unnecessary appropriations mean unnecessary taxes, and unnecessary taxes, 
whether direct or indirect, are paid by the people and add to the everincreas- 
Ing cost of living. 

Over- Capitalization. 

We condemn the evil of over-capitalization. Modern industrial conditions 
make the corporation and stock company a necessity, but over-capitalization 
in corporations is as harmful and criminal as is personal dishonesty in an 
individual. Compelling the payment of dividends upon great sums that have, 
never been invested, upon masses of watered stock not justified by the prop- 
erty, overcapitalization prevents the better wages, the better public services 
and the lower cost that sliould result from American inventive genius and 
the wide organization which is replacing costly individual competition. The 
collapse of dishonestly inflated enterprises robs investors, closes banks, de- 
stroys confidence and engenders panics. The Independenc party advocates 
as a primary necessity for sounder business conditions and improved public 
service the enactment of laws, state and national, to prevent watering of 
stocK, dishonest issues of bonds and otiier forms of corporation frauds. 

Labor. 

We denounce the so-called labor planks of the Republican and Demo- 
cratic platforms as political buncombe and contemptible clap-trap unworthy 
of national parties claiming to be serious and sincere. 

The Republican declaration that "no injunction or temporary restraining 
order should be issued without notice, except where irreparable injury would 
result from delay" is empty verbiage, for a showing of irreparable injury can 
always be made and is always made in ex parte affidavits. 

The Democratic declaration that "injunctions should not be issued in any 
case in which injunctions should not issue if no industrial dispute were in- 
volved" is meaningless and worthless. 



350 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Such insincere and meaningless declarations place a low estimate upon 
the intelligence of the average \mer:can workingman and exhibit either 
ignorance of or indifference to the real interests of labor. 

The Independence parly coiideiuiis tlie arbitrary use of the writ of in- 
junction and contempt proceedings as a violation of tlie fundamental 
American right of trial by jury. 

From the foundation of our government down to 1S72 the federal judiciary 
act prohibited the issue of any injunction without reasonable notice until 
after a hearing. We assert that in all actions growing out of a dispute be- 
tween employers and employes concerning terms or conditions of employment, 
no injunction should issue until after a trial upon the merits, that such trial 
should be had before a jury and that in no case of alleged contempt phould 
any person be deprived of liberty without a trial by jury. 

The Independence party believes that the distribution of wealth is as im- 
portant as the creation of wealth, and indorses those organizations among 
farmers and workers which tend to bring about a just discrimination of 
wealth through good wages for workers and good prices for farmers, and 
which protect the employer and the consumer through equality of price for 
labor and for product, and we favor such legislation as will remove them 
from the operation of the Sherman anti-trust law. 

Eight-Hour Day. 

We indorse the eight-hour day, favor its application to all government em- 
ployes and demand the enactment of laws requiring that all work done for 
the government, whether federal or state, and whether done dirctly or Indi- 
rctly through contractors or sub-contractors, shall be done on an eight-hour 
basis. 

We favor the enactment of a law condemning as illegal any combination 
or conspiracy to blacklist erpployes. 

We demand protection for workmen through enforced use of Btandard 
safety appliances and provisions of hygienic conditions in the operation of 
factories, railways, mills, mines and all Industrial undertakings. 

We advocate state and federal inspection of railways to secure a greater 
safety for railway employes and for the traveling public. 

We call for the enactment of stringent laws fixing Employers' liabilities 
and a rigid prohibition of child labor through co-operation between the state 
governments and the national government. 

We condemn the manufacture and sale of prison-made goods in the open 
market in competition with free labor manufactured goods. We demand that 
convicts be employed direct by different states in the manufacture of pro- 
ducts for use in state institutions and in making good roads and in no case 
sTiall convicts be hired out to contractors or sub-contractors. 

We favor the creation of a department of labor including mines and min» 
Ing, the head of which shall be a member of the president's cabinet. 

The great abuses of grain Inspection by which the producers are plun- 
dered, demand immediate and vigorous correction. To that end we favor 
federal inspection under a strict civil service law. 

Currency. 

The Independence party declares that the right to issue money is Inherent 
In the government and it favors the establishment of a central governmental 
bank through which the money so issued shall be put Into general circulation. 

The Tariff. 

We demand a revision of the tariff, not by the friends of the tariff, but 
by the friends of the people, and declare for a gradual reduction of tariff 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 351 

duties, with just consideration for tiie rights of the consuming public, and 
of established industry. There should be no protection for oppressive trusts 
which sell cheaply abroad and take advantage of tlie tariff at home to crush 
competition, raise prices, control production and limit work and wages. 

Railroads. 

The railroads must be kept open to all upon exactly equal terms. Every 
form of rebate and discrimination in railroad rates is a crime against business 
and must be stamped out. We demand adequate railroad facilities and advo- 
cate a bill empowering shippers in time of need to compel railroads to provide 
sufficient cars for freight and passenger traffic and other railroad facilities 
through summary appeal to the courts. We favor the creation of an Inter- 
state Commerce Court, whose sole function it shall be to review speedily and 
enforce summarily the orders of the Interstate Commerce Commission. The 
Interstate Commerce Commission sliould have the power to initiate investi- 
gation into the reasonableness of rates and practices, and no increase in rates 
should be put into effect until opportunity for such investigation is afforded. 
The Interstate Commerce Commission should proceed at once with a physical 
valuation of railroads engaged in interstate commerce. 

Commercial Monopolies. 

We believe that legitimate organizations in business, designed to secure 
an economy of operation and increased production, are beneficial wherever the 
public participates in the advantages which result. 

We denounce all combinations for restraint of trade and for the establish- 
ment of monopoly in all products of labor and declare that such combinations 
are not combinations for production, but for extortion, and that activity in this 
direction is. not industry, but robbery. 

In cases of infractions of the anti-trust law or of the Interstate commerce 
act, we believe in the enforcement of a prison penalty against the guilty and 
responsible individuals controlling the management of the offending corpora- 
tions, rather than a fine imposed upon stockholders. 

Public Ownership. 

We advocate the extension of the principle of public ownership of public 
utilities, including railroads, as rapidly as municipal, state or national govern- 
ments shall demonstrate ability to cond»,<;t public utilities for the public 
benefit. We favor specifically government owaership of the telegraphs, such 
as prevails in every other civilized country in the world, and demand as an 
Immediate measure that the government shall purchase and operate tha tele- 
graphs in connection with the postal service. 

Parcels Post. 

The parcels post system should be rapidly and widely extended and gov- 
ernment postal savings banks should be established where the people's de- 
posits will be secure, the money to be loaned in the locality of the several 
banks and at a rate of Interest to be fixed by the government. 

Good Roads. 

We favor the immediate development of a national system of good roads 
connecting all states and national aid to states in the construction and main- 
tenance of post roads. , 



352 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Postal Censorship. 

We favor a court of review of the censorship and arbitrary rulings of the 
postoffice department. 

Statehood. 
We favor the admission of Arizona and New Mexico to separate statehood. 

Bucket Shops. 

We advocate such legislation, both state and national, as will suppress the 
bucket shop and prohibit the fictitious selling of farm products for futura de- 
livery. 

National Health Bureau. 

We favor the creation of a national department of public health to be 
presided over by a member of the medical profession, this department to ex- 
ercise such authority over matters of public health and hygiene and sanitation 
which come properly within the jurisdiction of the national government and 
does not interfere with the right of states or municipalities. 

Asiatic Exclusion. 

We oppose Asiatic immigration, which does not amalgamate with our 
population, creates race issues and un-American conditions and which re- 
duces wages and tends to lower the high standard of living and the high 
standard of morality which American civilization has established. 

We demand the passage of an exclusion act which shall protect American 
workingmen from competition with Asiatic cheap labor and which shall pro- 
tect American civilization from the contamination of Asiatic conditions. 

' The Navy. 

The Independence party declares for peace and against aggression and 
will promote the movement for the settlement of international disputes by 
arbitration. 

We believe, however, that a small navy is poor economy, and that a strong 
navy is the best protection in time of war and the best preventative of war. 
We therefore favor the speedy building of a navy sufficiently strong to protect 
at the same time both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States. 

Inland Waterways. 

We rejoice in the adoption by both the Democratic and Republican plat- 
forms of the demand of the Independence party for improved national water- 
ways and the Mississippi Inland Deep Waterways project, to complete a ship 
canal from the gulf to the great lakes. We favor the extension of this sys- 
tem to the tributaries of the Mississippi, by means of which thirty states shall 
be served and twenty thousand miles added to the coast line of the United 
States. The reclamation of arid lands should be continued and the irrigation 
program now contemplated by the government extended and steps taken for 
the conservation of the country's natural resources, which should be guarded 
not only against devastation and waste, but against falling into the control of 
monopoly. 

'i'hp almse.s grdwins: out of the administration of our forest reserves must 
be corrected and provision should be made for free grazing from public lands 
outside of forest or other reservation. In behalf of the people residing in arid 
portions of our western states we protest vigorously against the policy of the 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 353 

federal =.overnment in selling tl,e exclusive use of water and electric power 

a'd^ulieTn' ■" "*":'"■ '" ^"'""^^ corporations, thus creating a morfopoly 
and .ubjecfng c. izens Itvng- in those sections to exorbitant charges for light 
chine rfo," T""^ enterprises originally started for public benefit into 

c fs r corporate greed and oppression, and we demand that no more ex- 

elusive conti-aets be made. 

Protection of Citizens. 

wh-n.^""''''"'" '■'''^''"' ^""■'''^''' '^■'"'^"^''" "^^"^-^^ '""•" '»■ "^Uuralized. and of 
^^^Z'ZJr' "■"''• "•"" ''" ^— ^ '" ''- -J«^--ent of all rights and 
count on the ground ot race or religious faith, steps should be taken to sel 
cm e the removal of such iniust discrimination. 

State Election — Income Tax. 

tio,,., a,™„d„,„,3 „,«=»:" v,;:tiu-/e;'a; '""" "" °°" '"■' '■"""""■ 
«;r":;;",;;:.-;r""'''''-"--'--^ 



NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 

« . 

Head(iuarters, Chicago, 111. 

Officers. 

Chairman-William R. Heaist. New York X Y 
Secretarj-_Charles A. Walsh, Ottumwa. Iowa. ' 



fiig. 25. 



354 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



FIRST POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS IN OKLAHOMA 



Republican Party. 

The first political convention in Oklahoma was held by the repub- 
lican party at Oklahoma City, January 17, 1890. More than 1.50 dele- 
gates were in attendance and tie session continued three days. 

Members of the central committee as selected by the convention 
were: J. M. Canon, Frisco, chairman; A. C. Scott, Oklahoma City, 
secretary; George H. Dodson, Orlando: F. .J. Wikoff. Stillwater; C. B. 
Freeman, Guthrie; Sam Murphy, Oklahoma City; A. H. Classen, Ed- 
mond; D. W. Marquart, Norman; B. L. Eaton, Hennessey; D. B. Gar- 
rett, Lincoln; Frank Rector, Downs; I. Outright, Frisco; E. E. Wilson, 
Reno City; Thomas Jensen, El Reno. 

Democratic Party. 

On March 11, following, the first democratic convention met in 
Oklahoma City with about 200 delegates present, and was in session 
three days. Judge Amos Green was elected temporary president, and 
E. B. Green of Guthrie, temporary secretary. 

The territorial committee selected was as follows: J. E. Jones, 
Oklahoma City, president: T. E. Berry, Norman, secretary; Charles 
Van Eaton. Dover; James Shears, Cimarron City; J. L. Mitch, Edmond; 
P. Barnard, Downs; J. D. S. CI aimers. El Reno; T. E. Perry, Norman; 
J. G. Johnson, Noble; J. J. Kirwin, Britton; W. E. Banks, Mustang; 
George E. Clayton, Seward; J. R. Booth, Matthewson; P. R. Smith. 
Lexington; J. W. Crider, Hennessey: T. G. Sutton, Frisco; C. M. 
Burke, Central City: A. J. Day, Choctaw City; Allan Carruthers and 
L. Ketchum, Guthrie; D. B. Madden and J. E. Jones, Oklahoma City: 
E. J. Simpson, Reno City; A. J. Shaw, Union City; J. M. Kuykendall, 
Orlando; Pat N?gle, Kingfisher; Hugh Wilkerson, Oklahoma City; and 
Virgil Hobbs, Kingfisher, delegate at large. 

The next democratic convention was held at Edmond, July 9, 1890; 
when E. L. Mitchell of El Reno was nominated for delegate at large 
from the Eighth representative district. In the August election he was 
defeated by M. W. Reynolds. 

The third democratic convention was held at Guthrie, August 13, 
1890, to nominate a candidate for representative to fill the vacancy 
made by the death of M. W. Reynolds. P. S. Nagle of Kingfisher was 
Tiominated but was defeated by A. M. Colson. 

The first congressional convention ever held in Oklahoma was 
that of the democratic party at Norman, October 9, 1890. J. G. McCoy 
of El Reno was nominated for the long term and J. L. Matthews of 
Payne was nominated for the unexpired term of the fifty-first congress. 

The first republican convention convened at Guthrie. October 11, 
1890, but adjourned without transacting any business until October 18. 
Judge D. A. Harvey defeated Dennis T. Flynn for the nomination. 

Alliance Party. 

The alliance party was organized early in the fall of 1899 and was 
the first political party organized in Oklahoma Territory, but had a 
brief existence. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 355 



DEMOCRATIC AND REPUBLICAN PLATFORMS IN 
STATEHOOD ELECTION, 1907 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 
(Adopted at Oklahoma City, June 18, 1907.) 

"We, the representatives of the democratic party of tlie State of 
Oklahoma, in appealing to the citizenship of our state for their sup- 
port, do respectfully submit these principles of self-government, for 
which we stand and which are of special interest in the pending 
campaign. 

"We believe that we should have the right of self-government im- 
mediately, without denial, delay or evasion. 

"We believe the people of Oklahoma should and will condemn at 
the polls the efforts of those who have been trying to defeat statehood 
for our people. 

"We submit to the people of Oklahoma the best state constitution 
that has ever been written, and in asking the suffrage of the patriotic 
citizenship of this state, we firmly stand upon this constitution in its 
entirety as our platform. 

"In tills splendid organic law we have carried out in perfect good 
faith every pledge made by us to the people of the state, and have 
drawn a constitution which not only protects the right to life, liberty 
and the pursuit of happiness of the citizens, but a constitution that 
takes the most advanced ground of any organic law in existence for 
the protection of the property rights of the people against the stealthy 
hand of ingenious modern monopoly. 

"We believe that as soon as possible and practicable the lands 
held by the state for educational purposes should be sold upon terms 
that shall be absolutely fair to tl e people of the state, preserving the 
preference rights to the lessees, guaranteed by the enabling act, to the 
end that such lands should become taxable and be made more valuable 
and productive bj^ the actual owner thereof. 

"We believe that the funds derived from the sale of such lands 
should be faithfully preserved and invested as provided by the 
constitution. 

"Wp believe that the present state sclools should be maintained, 
and that other necessary schools and state institutions should be 
established equitably throughout the state. 

"We favor the purchase of the segregated coal and asphalt lands 
at a fair price to be agreed upon between the state authorities and the 
Choctaw and Chickasaw governments, sub.iect to approval by a vote 
of the people of this state, before the contract of purchase shall become 
effective. 

"We favor the fullest development of such lands in the interest 
of the schools and charitable institutions and the production of cheap 
fuel for the people of this state. 

"We favor the immediate sale of the surface of such segregated 
coal and asphalt lands in small tracts to actual settlers. 



356 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

"We strongly oppose the passing of the timber land and other 
natural resources of this state into the hands of the great private 
monopolies. 

"We believe the people of this sovereign state should have the 
full measure of liberty enjoyed by citizens of other sovereign -states. 

"We believe that the various federal bureaus established in this 
state should be immediately terminated and that the basis of this 
bureau government, the restrictions on the sale and lease of land of 
our citizens should be removed summarily, except as to homesteads of 
full-bloods; and we favor the immediate settlement of all tribal affairs 
and the immediate distribution of all tribal funds. 

"We believe that the estates of those mentally incompetent, of 
whatsoever race, should be protected by our state probate courts. We 
will take care of our own defectives of whatever race or color, and 
will not rely upon the federal government to discharge this proper 
function of our own state. 

"We I)elieve that it is of the greatest importance to the develop- 
ment of our new state, to give perfect safety and assurance to invested 
capital, and that where complete security is afforded, capital will gladly 
seek investment at the lowest rates of interest. 

"We draw a broad line of distinction between capital invested in 
honest enterprises and predatory capital engaged in conspiracy against 
the proceeds of labor of the American lieople. We opuose those crafty 
corporations wl ich artfully contrive to destroy comnetition and thus 
fix arbitrary prices on the necessities of life and on those things which 
are produced by our own people. We do not intend to encourage 
predatory capital in this state. We do intend to protect our people in 
the proceeds of their honest labor. We favor especial care for the 
protection of the rights and interests of the laboring people, such as 
the farmers, the miners, the artisan, the small tradesman and the 
women and children of this state. 

"We favor the speedy development of all our natural resources and 
especially of our oil and gas region. 

"We favor the development of every form of manufacture, for 
which our natural resources so well qualify the state. 

"We pledge the passage of a road law that will enable the people 
in each county to provide for themselves a good system of roads. 

"We recognize the education of the people as absolutely essential 
to the development of the state, and to the continuance of supremacy 
of the democratic party. We pledge the party to vigorously promote 
in every reasonable way our public school system, so that tl e state 
shall stand in- the front rank in the educational column. 

"We pledge the people of this state an economical and faithful 
administration of its affairs, and that the state taxes shall be as low 
as possible for the conduct of a state government properly 
administered. 

"We approve the resolutions of the constitutional convention of 
March 1, 1907. jiledging the enactment of laws at the earliest possible 
date during the first session of the first legislature providing for sep- 
arate coaches or accommodations and waiting roms for t' e negro race. 
We pledge in like manner to carry into effect the provisions in the 
constitution for separate schools for the negro race. 

"The question of prohibition has been removed from partisan poll- 
tics and has been left to a vote of the people in accordance with the 
principles of the referendum. 

"In the constitution which we submit we call attention to the 
important fact that we have faithfully carried out every pledge made 
to the people in the last campaign. 



ELEC'TIONS -VXD PLATFORMS 357 

"We unreservedly endorse the action of the democratic majoritj- 
in its faithful compliance in drawing the constitution in accordance 
with our pledges to the people, and we pledge that the democratic 
party, if entrusted with power in administration cf the state govern- 
ment, will faithfully enforce, execute and carry into effect every prin- 
ciple of said constitution as adopted by the people and a strict enforce- 
ment of every law enacted by the people or legislature of this state. 

"We hereiiy express our allegiance to the great principles of gov- 
ernment, advocated by the national democratic party, upon which we 
believe, the future welfare of tl is republic must depend. 

"We reaffirm our allegiance to that greatest living exponent of 
democratic principles, William .Jennings Bryan, and endorse him for 
our presidential nominee in 1908. 

"We emphatically demand the reasonable and proper control of 
transportation and transmission companies and tiie supervision 
and control of all enterprises engaged in interstate commerce. 

"We favor the improvement of the waterways of the Mississippi 
Vallev and the establishment of water transportation wherever prac- 
ticable throughout the Union. 

"We believe that the patriotic element of the republican party are 
no longer able to control or greatly influence that great politcal organ- 
ism. We believe tVat the machinery in that party has fallen under 
the insidious influence of the great plutocratic powers and organized 
monopolies of this nation. 

"We deno'ince and condemn the national republican partv for the 
lavif h use of money belonging to the people of Oklahoma in the recla- 
mation service in other states, and pledge our members in our national 
congress to use their best efforts to require the reclamation service to 
use the money belonging to Oklahoma in Oklahoma. 

"We believe that the vast ccntributions of money by these special 
interests have .given such interests such power over the republican 
party that a remedy for national conditions under which the people 
suffer is impossible through that party. 

"We appeal, therefore, to every good citizen who places patriotism 
above commercialism, happiness and the welfare of the great body of 
our producing classes above the enrichment of the few; and who 
believes in local self government, to join us in a holy crusade for the 
restoration to the people of their rights. 

"We enjoin upon the advocates of democracy that they treat with 
special respect those of our fellow citizens who by environment, affili- 
ation or for other reasons, have heretofore affiliated with other par- 
ties, and we urge them to use only sound argument, in appealing to 
their reason and to use the force of courtesy and kindness in persuad- 
ing to join us in the great task of restoring to the American people 
their rights in the pursuit of happiness." 



3S« OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 
(Adopted at Tulsa, August 2, 1907.) 



"1. The republicans of the new state of Oklahoma in convention 
assembled, mindful of their responsibilities, but conscious of their 
strength, approach their new duties without a fear and gladly wel- 
come the work of the pending contest. Inspired by the illustrious 
history of their party for the past half century, from Fremont, the 
intrepid pathfinder, to Roosevelt, the terror of the trusts, they are 
ready to do their part in upholding the invincible principles of repub- 
licanism. The party has achieved its wonderful success because it 
has been right and in harmony with the needs, hopes and aspirations 
of humanity. Led by Lincoln, the great emancipator, by Grant, tlie 
unconquerable, and by the sainted McKinley, the foremost champion 
of protection to American labor, the party hns placed upon our mighty 
nation the peerless stamp of primacy among the nations of the eartli. 

"2. There is confided to the new state the de: tiny of two million 
intelligent, deserving people, for weal or woe. It is the duty of 
republicanism to see that the beneficent principles and policies which 
have made our nation great, shall be put into operation in the 
new state. 

"3. Proud of the history and achievements of the party of pro- 
tection and prosperity, of expansion and enliglitenment, 'of loyalty 
and of patriotism, of sound policies and of sound dollars; the party 
that upholds the principles of human rights and personal liberty, of 
local self-government and of equal rights to all persons regardless 
of race, creed, color, or locality; the party of industrial development 
and provides profitable employment for labor and remunerative in- 
vestment for capital; the party that recognizes the supremacy of the 
national government and enforces obedience to law, the party that 
has throttled the trusts and dismantled monopolies, and animated by 
its laudable deeds and inspired by its brilliant future, the republican 
party of young Oklahoma springs joyously to its opportunities and 
fearlessly takes its place in the advancing battle line for human rights 
and human progress, determined that the favored star of Oklahoma 
shall give added luster to the constellation of states. 

"4. The true test of a party's worth is its record, not its promise, 
but performances; not pledges, but deeds. With confidence in the 
sober, discriminate judgment of the people, republicans refer to the 
work of the last congress as proof of their statesmanship and a just 
and ample recognition of the public needs. The railroad rate and 
anti-pass law, of general benefit to all the people; the employers' 
liability law, for the benefit of injured laborers; the law limiting the 
hours of service for employes upon railroads; the free alcohol law, 
for industrial purposes; the law prohibiting corporations from con- 
tributing to political campaigns or for election purposes; the pure food 
and drug laws and meat inspection requirements, looking to the preser- 
vation of the health of all the people; the service pension act, by 
which the defenders of our country in army and navy are liberally 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS • 359 

provided for in old age; the laws enlarging the powers of the inter- 
state commerce commission in the interests of cheaper transportation 
rates; legislation insuring the speedy completion of the Panama canal, 
by which we will control the commerce of the Orient and enable our 
enlarged navy to command our vast coast and numerous harbors upon 
two great oceans; the law for the final disposition of the affairs 
of the Five Civilized Tribes; the appropriations for improvement of 
waterways and the reclamation of agricultural lands; the national 
quarantine law, for the prevention of epidemics and protection of life*,, 
the law limiting the classes and character of emigrants; the enabling 
act, which tenders the coveted boon of statehood to two million people, 
are in themselves ample proof of the watchful care of the people's 
interests by republican legislatures. 'By their fruits you shall know 
them.' 

••5. We hail with pride the bold and fearless leader, the match- 
less statesman, the patriotic citizen, the loyal American, our honored 
and respected president, Theodore Roosevelt. He has unflinchingly 
met every issue in the open and firmly advocated the right. He is 
tne relentless foe of greed and graft and the trusted friend' of honest 
effort. He has given to combined capital and to organized labor a 
fair hearing and a square deal. He has compelled trusts and unlawful 
combinations to recognize organized government, observe the law and 
observe the courts. He has heralded the message of peace to warring 
nations and has prepared our country for war should any foreign 
power dare to insult our flag or impose upon an American citizen. 
By his dauntless vigilance and splendid diplomacy our nation has been 
made to take a higher place among nations of the world, while by his 
purity or purpose and nobility of character, our citizenship has attained 
a higher standard of excellence. We approve and commend his public 
acts and teachings and pledge him a continuance of our loyal and 
earnest support. 

"tj. A republican president, republican congress and republican 
delegate gave to us the enabling act, under which the people of the 
twin territories are authorized to form a state government and adopt 
a constitution which will admit the progressive and prosperous com- 
monwealth of Oklahoma into the union of states upon an equal footing 
with that of every other state. And we denounce the infamous, greedy 
partisan spirit which actuated the democratic majority in the consti- 
tutional convention, dominated by the treacherous and slippery boss— 
their present nominee for governor. They conceived in secret, partisan 
eaucus and adopted under tyrannical rule a document which was so 
hostile to the federal government and its brave defenders and which 
was so disloyal to pure republican institutions, that after having in 
their state platform declared it the best constifition, that the.\- were 
forced by an outraged public sentiment to reconvene and modify its 
provisions before submitting it for the action of an intelligent, fair 
minded people. 

"After laborious effort they have now submitted an instrument 
which denies to each citizen equal rights under the law with every 
other citizen; deprives the minority of their just proportion of repre- 
sentation; unfairly discriminates in favor of one locality against an- 
other; increases the liurdens of taxation without compensating benefits 
discourages industrial and commercial development; lessens the de- 
mand for labor and decreases wages: antagonizes capital and depre- 
ciates investments; repudiates public obligations and destroys public 
credit, and has already brought a blight upon the fair name of the 
proposed state. 

"7. The democratic party of Oklahoma and Indian Territories, 
bv its lack of judgment and statesmanship, its inability to compre- 



360 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

hend the needs of the people or to deal with the problems of govern- 
ment, its disregard of the rights of persons and property, its arrogant 
assumption of virtue without wisdom, as exemplified by the conduct 
of its representatives in the constitutional convention, has proven its 
incompetency to control the governmental affairs o| a great state, 
and has forfeited all claim to the suffrage of the electors of the 
proposed state. In the adoption of the provisions of the proposed 
constitution by the exercise of arbitrary and tyrannical power, it 
trampled upon the cherished rights of local self-government. In the' 
interest of corrupt townsite promoters and county seat boosters, it 
wantonly and needlessly butchered county boundaries and obliterated 
existing municipalities in disregard of the wishes of the inhabitants 
and over their determined objections. 

"It created a state government with an army of unnecessary 
officers at such extravagant salaries that the raising of necessary 
revenues to meet the required expenses will pauperize the taxpayers 
and bankrupt the public treasury. 

"With no regard for economy, or the burdens of taxation, it pro- 
vides for a large number of small counties, many of which do not 
contain a sufficient amount of taxable property to, at any reasonable 
rate of taxation, provide sufficient revenues to meet the ordinary 
current expenses, thus impoverishing the property owners and destroy- 
ing public credit. 

"It impairs the efficiency of our public school system by provid- 
ing inadequate levies for school revenues, thus shortening the school 
terms, depriving our children of adequate educational privileges and 
compelling thousands of trained and experienced teachers to seek 
more remunerative occupations. 

"It encourages anarchy and lawlessness by depriving the courts 
of an inherent power to adequately enforce obedience to their orders 
for the protection of property and preservation of the lives of the 
citizens. 

"It will materially increase the burdens of taxation upon taxable 
real estate and correspondingly reduce farm values. 

"It authorizes private property to be taken by private individuals 
for private uses, without the consent of the owner. 

"By wasting its time in useless partisan caucuses and prolonging 
its sessions unnecessarily, it has created an unreasonably large in- 
debtedness, in excess of the amount proportioned by congress, which 
the property owners of the new states are required to assume and pay. 

"In apportioning representation in the legislature, they, for base, 
partisan purposes unjustly and grossly discriminated against repub- 
lican localities in favor of democratic localities. 

"In the creation of courts and judicial districts, they committed 
the execrable crime of attempting to make the courts partisan and 
subject to political control and created particular districts for special 
members of their own body. 

"It deprives the governor of the power, in case of insurrection or 
rebellion, to suspend the writ of habeas corpus, thus inviting hostile 
conflict between the military and civil branches of the state govern- 
ment should it become necessary to declare martial law in order to 
preserve the lives and liberties of our citizens. 

"It is unrepublican and violates the spirit of fairness and equality 
which characterizes the declaration of independence. 

"It fails to make provisions for revenue for the maintenance of 
separate schools, thus either forcing mixed schools, or de))riving a 
portion of our people of educational facilities. 

"8. The republican party, the special champion of the doctrine 
of the free ballot and fair count, concedes to every elector the right 
to cast his ballot as his enlightened judgment and conscience may 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 361 

suggest. In the event that this partisan constitution shall become 
the fundamental law of the state we pledge the republican party of 
the state to use every means at our command to secure the speedy 
elimination of its objectionable features and to make it conform to 
tlie needs and requirements of the people and the interests of the 
state. On tlie other hand, if the judgment of the voters of this state, 
expressed at the polls, shall be against this proposed constitution, 
or if it shall be disapproved by President Roosevelt, we assure the 
people that republicans of the two territories and of the nation will 
exercise their power to have the comiiig congress at its first session, 
pass a new enabling act, at the earliest date possible during said 
session, under which a constitution and state government may be 
formed free from partisan bais and fair alike to all persons, interests 
and localities. 

"9. The democratic majority in the constitutional convention, 
by reason of tiieir timidity and cowardice, have failed to submit to 
the peoi-'le a finished document and adjourn after three separate 
attempts covering a period of over eight months, when the work 
should have been completed in sixty days. And all this at an enormous 
expense. They have again taken a recess until the day previous to the 
election upon the constitution. Unwilling to risk their work to the 
discriminating judgment of an intelligent public they claim tlie r;ght 
to reconvene and make further amendments. Such trifling with the 
rights and confidence of a long-suffering public is a menace to honest 
government. The people demand that if more changes are to be made 
they reconvene at once, complete the instrument, file it and adjourn 
sine die, that the people may act intelligently upon what is before 
them with no possibility of having a constitution to vote upon differ- 
ent from the one on which the election is called. 

"10. The safety of a republican form of government depends upon 
the intelligence and patriotism of citizenship. Contentment makes 
patriots. The great laboring classes are the steel framework of the 
republic. The better they are prepared for the duties of citizenship 
the stronger and more permanent the structure. We favor the enact- 
ment of such laws as will give just recognition to organised labor, 
the fullest security to individual effort, minimize the hours of labor 
and insure the highest degree of safety in places where laborers are 
required to work. We believe in the principles of arbitration, and 
that differences between employers and employes should be adjusted 
by arbitration whenever possible. The employment of children of 
tender years in mines or factories is an evil heritage to posterity and 
would be a disgrace to the state; and we demand such laws as will 
effectually prohibit such employment. 

"11. We approve the highly intelligent and competent administra- 
tion of territorial affairs by Governor Frank Frantz. In his just 
and equitable handling of school land problems, his successful efforts 
in bringing about cheaper transportation rates for both producers 
and consumers in Oklahoma, his safe and economic management of 
the fiscal affairs of Oklahoma, his impartial and judicious enforce- 
ment of the laws, he has earned and commands the respect and entire 
confidence of the people. His official experience, his knowledge of 
the conditions and requirements of the coming state, his ability to deal 
fairly with men of all races and classes, his integrity of character 
and stubborn determination to give to every person and interest a 
square deal, peculiarly equip and qualify him for the first governor 
of the State of Oklahoma; and we confidently commend Honorable 
Frank Frantz, the gallant soldier, the popular governor, the loyal 
Oklahoman, to the electors of the new state tor its firPt governor; 
and we invite all lovers of honesty, justice and right to join with us 
in securing his election. 



362 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

"12. We are thoroughly in favor of the American and republican 
policy of adequate protection to our labor and industries. We believe 
that the unprecedented prosperity which we have enjoyed for the 
past decade is due to the splendid home market built up and main- 
tained by our protective tariffs in general and the Dingley law in 
particular, giving a full measure of employment, high wages and equi- 
table prices to all. We have confidence in our chosen national legis- 
lators ^nd insist that when revision of the tariff is made it shall be 
made by republicans and protectionists, without prejudice to any sec- 
tion, any class or any industry. 

"13. The republican party is the anti-trust party. All legislation 
in the national congress for the regulation and control of trusts and 
combines operating in restraint of trade or commerce has been enacted 
by the republican party. The work of the last congress and the de- 
termined efforts of President Roosevelt have proven to the people that 
the republican is the only party to be depended upon in destroying 
trusts and monopolies. The paper trust has been wiped out, the beef 
trust has been made to respect the rights of the people, the iron pipe 
trust, the railroad freight tratflc trust, the drug trust, tobacco trust, 
lumber trust, wire trust, match trust, the Standard Oil, have all been 
upon the rack and will be made to cease their extortions. Tie repub- 
lican party will protect the people against trusts and unlawful combi- 
nations in restraint of trade. The democratic party, by its failure to 
define and prohibit trusts and monopolies in the proposed constitu- 
tion of Oklahoma, has shown its subserviency to corporation interests 
and its incapacity to deal with great political problems. 

"14. The producers and consumers of shipped products in the 
twin territories have for years been compelled to pay exhorbitant 
transportation charges, and have been furnishing the funds for divi- 
dends to corporation stockholders, wi ile supulied with inade()uate and 
inferior facilities. With the coming of statehood, we demand a square 
deal. With no reckless hostility to corporate interests or investments, 
we favor the enactment and enforcement of such legislation as will 
compel all railway, express and transportation companies doing busi- 
ness within the state of Oklahoma to carry the freight and passenger 
traffic within the state at such reasonable rates as will be just to the 
shipper and at the same time provide a fair return \ipon the actual 
investment of capital in such company. We demand that the man 
who pays the freight in Oklahoma shall be put upon an equal footing 
with the same class of persons in other states. 

"15. A magnificent fund has been created from the sale of public 
lands, to be used to provide means for the storage of water and the 
irrigation of arid lands. A large portion of this fund arose from the 
sale of lands in Oklahoma. In the past the people of Oklahoma have 
refused to admit that any portion of their territory is within the arid 
belt, but as there is a considerable area of agricultural lands in the 
state which can be made more productive bv irrigation, and a large 
body of rich bottom lands which are too wet for cultivation, we favor 
such modification of the federal laws as will permit Oklahoma's share 
of this fund to be used within the state for either reclamation of 
arid or wet lands by drainage or irrigation, as may be found the most 
practicable. 

"16. Individual ownership of the soil and the establishment of 
permanent homes has ever been one of the strongest incentives to 
intellectual and industrial development. Tt strengthens the family 
ties, inspires love of home and loyalty to country. The republican 
party, proud of its record in adoptipg the generous provisions of the 
homestead and free home law, whereby millions of happy and pros- 
perous homes haVe been provided for the tillers of the soil, and loyal 
to its principles, declares its opposition to any system which fosters 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFOltMS 363 

a condition of tenantry and withholds a vast area of our domain from 
the burdens of taxation; and we favor the sale by the first legislature 
of the public lands donated to the state, upon long time and easy pay- 
ments, at a reasonable rate of interest upon deferred payments, with 
preference rights to the lessee, under such safeguards as will prevent 
the acquisition of these lands by speculators; and we demand that the 
proceeds realized from the sale of school and indemnity lands shall 
be held inviolate as a permanent trust fund for the benefit of our 
schools, the principle never to be diminished, and we demand the en- 
actment of such laws for the control and safe investment of the per- 
manent school fund as will prohibit the accumulation of large sums 
in the treasury. We favor the loaning of such funds upon the im- 
proved agricultural lands in the state of Oklahoma to actual residents 
upon the lands, on long time and such reasonable rates of interest as 
will insure its constant investment. 

"17. We demand tl:e removal of all restrictions upon the aliena- 
tion of lands belonging to Indians. We favor the enactment of such 
laws by congress as will give to each member of the Indian tribes in 
this state, all the rights and privileges of other American citizens, in- 
cluding the right to control, sell, lease, mortgage, or devise the lands 
allotted to him. the same as white persons under similar conditions: 
except that the homestead of full bloods shall be inalienable, as now 
provided by law, and we request our members in congress to urge 
such immediate legislation. 

"18. TVe inception of all .traffic is over the public roads. The 
farmers and land owners are entitled to assistance in improvina and 
making them good. Federal and state aid should be extended for 
their improvement. Post roads for rural mail, and the highways of 
the people should be placed and maintained in condition commensu- 
rate with the greatness of our nation and state. We favor the enact- 
ment of the most liberal laws to secure this result. 

"19. Nature has endowed the new state most bountifully. We 
have a supply of oil an dgas sufficient to supply all our needs for years 
to come. Profiting by the experience of others, we favor the enact- 
ment of sucb laws as will foster and protect the oil and gas industry, 
controlling their consumption and preventing waste. 

"20. The great natural, waterways are the people's highways, and 
their improvement and use cheapens transi)ortation and increases the 
market prices of agricultural products and other commodities. We 
favor the apniopriation by congress of such liberal s'lms for the im- 
provement of our rivers as will maintain them in navigable condition 
at all times to the highest points practicable. 

"21. The republicans of the combined territories desire to express 
to Hon. Bird S. McGuire their hearty appreciation of his able and valu- 
able work in the interests of statehood and in securing the passage of 
the enabling act. His work in congress as a delegate has been in the 
interests of the people of the entire state, without discrimination. We 
consratulate the republicans of the First congressional district in 
making him their nominee. He has .iustly earned the reward of a seat 
in congress from the new state, and as an evidence of our gratitude 
and appreciation we tender him our united and enthusiastic support. 

"22. We heartily endorse the nomination of Governor T. B. Fer- 
guson for congress in the Second district. His progressive and honest 
administration as governor of Oklahoma proves his fitness as a public 
official. He merits the election we feel the people will accord him by 
a large majority. 

"23. We pledge the people in the big pasture, who are the pur- 
chasers of the land therein from the government, that its representa- 
tives in congress will use every endeavor to procure an extension of 
one year, to make their payments mature in 1908. 



364 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

"24. We favor the immediate payment by the United States gov- 
ernment to the Choctaw-Chickasaw citizens for their improvement on 
segregated coal and asphalt lands, as provided by the treaty or agree- 
ment ratified on September 25, 1902. 

"25. We favor the passage of laws by the next session of con- 
gress, providing for the immediate sale of all segregated coal and 
asphaltum lands and the per capita pa.\raent to the members of the 
nations owning such lands, of the money received from such sales. 

"We favor the immediate settlement of all Indian claims and the 
immediate payment to the Indians of all claims and invested funds, 
by congress. 

"With full appreciation of past achievements of the rei)ublican 
party so ably performed, our present organization and leadership pre- 
eminent, we submit the above declaration of our future usefulness and 
work, and go before the people pledged to their performance and in- 
vite the co-operation of all good citizens, regardless of past political 
affiliations." 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 365 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PLATFORM 

1910. 



"On tl is the threshold of the third state campaign since entrusted 
v.'ith power, the democratic party of Oklahoma greets the citizenshi]) 
of the state and nation, exultant in the trumphant success of its ad- 
v?.nced principles of modern government, and progressive statesman- 
ship. Undismayed by the aspersions and assaults of the representa- 
tives of special interests at home and abroad, it greets the people of 
the state and nation with its constitution, its legislation and its cai- 
didates. Proud and triumpliant over every opposition and vigorous in 
its patriotic purposes it again invites the co-operation of all lovers of 
good government. 

"We endorse our democratic senators and representatives in the 
Congress of the United States, and in view of the pending invesr.iga- 
tion of Indian affairs we express our continued confidence in il'e honor 
and integrity of Senator Gore and commend his courageous sUmd in 
the interest of fair dealing for the Indians and for honesty in the 
government. 

Org.anic Law. 

"After a prolonged ])eriod of misrule, the hopeless i)eopU^ of fjie 
two territories availed themselves of the earliest opportunity to be 
relieved of the burdens under which they traveled, and the intelligence 
of the state confidently entrusted to our party the duty of formulating 
its organic law, and vitalizing it by appropriate legislation. The 
marked success achieved has been due to tie active co-operation and 
sympathy of the honest people of all parties, and in spite of and over 
the malignant slander of a venal organization and press representing 
in its purpose the destruction of the good achieved. We deplore the 
in.iury, real or seeming, this organization has done the business and 
other interests of the state, and as evidence of its hypocrisy, point to 
the fact that while condemning the constitution, it has never assaulted 
it by any proposed amendment. We congratulate the citizenship of 
the state in the fact that every pledge made has been fulfilled, every 
duty assumed met, and that though charged with the responsibility of 
four great legislative assemblies, dealing with plenary power with the 
great moneyed interests of the state and nation, no agency has yet 
had the temerity to charge any one of them or any member thereof 
with dishonesty, bribery or graft. 

Faith in Party. 

"We reaffirm our faith in and adherence to the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the democratic party as proclaimed by the founders of the 
party and adhered to by all lovers of good government. 

"We endorse the wise leadership of Gov. C. N. Haskell, the admin- 
istration of public affairs in this state by tlie democratic party, in the 
legislative, executive and judicial branches of government, as able and 
economical. 



366 • OKLAl{OMA RED BOOK 

"No party in the history of the country is capable of showins a 
record of achievement which surpasses the one made by the democracy 
of this state since statehood. Every pledge made to tlie people has 
been fully redeemed. In substantiation of this statement we point 
with pride to the fact that among the pledges made to tie people in 
our previous platform may be mentioned the separation of fhe races 
in schools and in traveling, improved revenue laws, sale of part of the 
public building lands, banking legislation, fee and salary legislation, 
good roads legislation, laws which preserve the natural gas of our 
state, and encourage the development of the oil industry and protect 
the independent producer, and likewise legislation promotive of the 
interests of the agricultural, labor and business interests. Every one or 
these demands have been enacted into law, and the democracy of the 
state stands pledged for the continuance of these policies. 

"We submit, therefore, that the democracy of this state is entitled 
to the continued confidence of its citizenship because it has fully kept 
faith with them. 

Labor. 

"The man who labors is entitled to the first and highest considera- 
tion. Without labor there is no progress and the democratic party of 
this state has demonstrated that it can be depended upon to conserve 
the rights of Oklahoma's toilers. Enumeration of its beneficient laws 
on the subject is unnecessary; in both constitution and statute they 
are recognized as the most advanced of any state in the nation; we 
pledge a continuation of the righteous policy producing them, and in 
keeping therewith approve the precedent act by Oregon and Illinois 
limiting the hours of labor for women to a maximum work day of ten 
hours in occupations other than domestic and agriculture. 

Agriculture. 

"No single interest of our state stands higher in importance than 
that of agriculture. And we pledge the democratic party to a continu- 
ance of the advanced policies which have marked its history to this 
time. 

"We favor the Oklahoma agricultural and industrial system of 
education; the continuation of all the laws now in force governing 
said system; the preservation of the present powers of the board of 
agriculture and method of electing the same, and a sufficient appropri- 
ation to enable a continuance of the wholesome work of said board. 

Banking Law. 

"We favor the representation of the state banks on the state bank- 
ing board and the publication of quarterly statements of the guaranty 
fund and the deposit of guaranty fund in the contributing banks on 
the same conditions that all other state deposits are made in the 
state banks. 

"As pledged in the state constitution, our state legislature has 
provided a banking law, the results of which in actual operation show, 
for the period of two and one-half years that it l:as been in operation, 
that no state bank failure has ever embarrassed business in the state 
or community; that no depositor has ever lost a single dollar, or even 
failed to receive his money upon demand; that the bank deposits of 
our state banks have grown from eighteen million dollars to forty-five 
million dollars; that the burden upon the banks of furnishing the fund 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 367 

for the protection to the people has been many times repaid by in- 
creased volume of business, and that the practical operation of our 
banking system has challenged I he admiration of the business world. 

Usury. 

"We favor an effective usury law, with penalties to insure a proper 
enforcement of the same. 

State and School Land .and School Funds. 

"We believe that as soon as possible and practical the lands held 
by the state for educational purposes should be sold upon termss that 
shall be absolutely fair to the people of this state, preserving the pref- 
erence right to the lessees, guaranteed by the enabling act, to the end 
that such lands should become taxable and be made more valuable 
and productive by the actual owner thereof. 

"That anything that adds to the value of said land and costs time, 
labor or money, shall be classed as an improvement. 

"Improvements on said land shall be appraised at such sum as 
they add to the value of the land for the purpose of sale. 

"In drafting the constitution of the State of Oklahoma, the demo- 
cratic party forever guaranteed protection to the school lands and 
school funds of the state, and unlike a multitude of older states, the 
principal of this fund will forever remain sacred and secure from any 
loss or depletion. 

"It provides that the principal sum shall never be diminished; and 
in the investment of the permanent school fund, we point with pride 
to the fact that the agriculural interests of our state, the principal 
industry upon which the prosperity and comfort of Oklahoma depends, 
should have the first right to use these public moneys upon good 
farm security, and at a fair rate of interest. 

"The result of this policy has been to reduce the rate of interest 
on farm mortgage loans throughout the state by reason of the state 
competition with farm mortgage companies. 

"The management of the school land leasing department assumed 
by the democratic administration from the territorial condition of 
negligence, favoritism and mismanagement, has in the brief period 
of state government, grown in ethciency to where complete records 
of the location, character, description and values of these lands are a 
matter of record, and where all lessees are upon the same basis 
without regard to political favorites, and where today the school child- 
ren of Oklahoma are receiving from these lands rents more than GO per 
cent net money annually in excess of the best year of territorial 
government. 

Public Institutions. 

"Oklahoma Territory has followed the policy of failing to provide 
any institutions for the insane, deaf, dumb, blind, orphans or the state 
convicts, except by contract with othef- states, or private institutions 
within the state conducted by political favorites of members of the 
dominating official family at an extortionate rate. 

"A notable instance is to be the keeping of the insane at a private 
instutition at Norman, at such extravagant rates that the stock owner- 
ship of that institution was considered a special privilege to the fa- 
vored few of the dominating clique. 

"The prisoners of the territory were farmed out to a neighboring 
state at an extravagant rate, producing enormous profits to that state, 



368 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

and a corresponding loss to the taxpayers of Oklahoma. Thete 
methods and unwarranted condition were in face of the fact that tlie 
public building fund had already accumulated approximately six hun- 
dred thousand dollars of funds from which these institutions should 
have long prior thereto been constructed and placed on a basis of 
efficiency and economy, but the democratic party found this fund 
unused, except by a few banks, enjoying special favors at a nominal 
rate of interest. 

Schools. 

"Lavishness in education is economy. The democratic party has 
ever been the friend of efficient public schools, realizing that an 
educated citizenship insures the perpetuity of free government. We 
take pride in the educational system in operation in this state, and 
pledge ourselves to its further development and improvement. To 
this end we favor a law that will provide a school fund raised by the 
state, sufficient, when added to the interest on our invested school 
fund and rentals on school lands, to provide not less than five months 
free school in each district in the state. 

"We also favor making provision for the establishment of graded 
consolidated schools, to the end that children living in the country 
districts may receive the benefits of a high school education in com- 
munities where they live. 

Educational Institutions. 

"The democratic party, in providing institutions of higher educa- 
tion, has has dealt justly with the eastern half of the state in securing 
for it the necessary industrial and preparatory schools necessary to 
provide for that part of the new state, and in providing district agri- 
cultural and mechanical colleges throughout the entire state. 

"The democracy is proud of the educational progress made and 
pledges its continued support to encourage all of these institutions, 
and calls upon our adversaries to point out which one of the institu- 
tions of this state, created by the democratic party, which cares for 
and guards the unfortunate or educates our youth, they would strike 
down, abandon or cripple if they were placed in control of this state 
government. 

Law Enforcement. 

"The democratic party has always stood for a strict and vigorous 
enforcement of all laws and pledges its representatives to a continua- 
tion of that policy. 

Election Laws. 

"The democratic party of Oklahoma stands for a fair primary and 
general election law, with all boards to be bi-partisan and the members 
of the same to receive endorsement of the respective parties pre- 
requisite to appointment. 

Good Roads. 

"We call attention to the laws heretofore passed providing for 
the building of good roads, and we promise to pursue the policy thus 
inaugurated. 

Constitution. 

"We are proud of the constitution which our party has given to 
the people and obligate ourselves to maintain it in its integrity. The 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 369 

enforcement of its provisions should be committed to its friends who 
have steadfastly upheld and defended it and not surrendered into the 
hands of its enemies who have done everything possible to discredit 
it and render it inoperative. 

Corporations. 

"We recognize the fact that corporations are absolutely essential 
to the proper growth and development of the state, and laws should be 
so fashioned and administered as to encourage legitimate corporations 
to do business here. We realize, however, that corporations, like 
individuals, are susceptible of division into two classes, the good and 
the bad. All corporations honestly conducting their business and 
faithfully observing our laws we welcome into our state and pledge 
to them the protection of our laws, but those who violate our statutes 
will find in the democratic party an invincible enemy and an uncon- 
querable foe. 

Anti-Trust Legislation. 

"The laws of Oklahoma on this subject speak for themselves. 
Where laws of similar title in the nation and in many states are but 
an ineffective theory, the anti-trust laws of Oklahoma have proven 
a reality. 

"We note the domestication in Oklalioma of the pipe line com- 
panies, and the successful prosecution of trusts and monopolies; and 
we point to the fact that while the rights of the people are being 
protected, and embarrassing obstacles incident to the first few years of 
law enforcement being removed, yet none of our laws have proven to 
be unjust or unreasonable from the standpoint of the great legitimate 
enterprises, and Oklahoma is rapidly approaching the realization of 
the spirit of a state constitution which says that the weak and the 
strong, the rich and the poor, the laborer and the capitalist shall each 
have equal protection under the laws. 

"The democratic policy in Oklahoma has declared the right of 
every element of our citizenship to be heard with patient consideration 
by the representatives of all classes, and as a result of this policy, 
the agricultural classes and the laboring classes in general in Okla- 
homa have had more to do with the formulating the constitution and 
the laws of our state than in any other constitution or code of laws 
ever written, and yet we challenge our adversaries to point to any 
one of the numerous provisions for the protection and benefit of the 
toiling masses that they would repeal if given the power so to do. 

Taxation. 

"As the party of strict economy the democratic party advocates 
the lowest tax rate possible consistent with good and efficient gov- 
ernment. We believe that taxation should be just, equal and .miform. 

"In this connection we point to the fact that under former repub- 
lican rule the special privilege and franchise class paid only eight 
per cent of the expenses of the territory, while the taxpayers paid 
ninety-two percent, while under present democratic rule the special 
privilege and franchise class pay practically seventy-five percent 
of all expenses of the state government and the taxpayers pay only 
twenty-five per cent. 

Indians. 

"Referring to our citizenship of Indian descent, we view with 
regret the deplorable condition resulting from misgovernnxent through 
Si.?. 26 



370 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

the interior department of the United States. It is a record of pledges 
given the Indian nations by the federal government for a valuable 
consideration and thereafter recklessly and ruthlessly ignored and 
trampled under foot. It is the administration of affairs at long range, 
in most instances through deputies, clerks and subordinates, whose 
purposes have been to enlarge and prolong their selfish opportunities 
at the expense of and to the great embarrassment of our Indian citi- 
zens, and out of this has grown a constant drain upon the property 
of the Indian and a constant embarrassment to his exercise of personal 
control of his property and his person. The policy of this character 
of government has been to magnify the necessity of its importance and 
to live upon the sustenance of our people. The varying and constantly 
changing policies and rules have involved the whole Indian citizen- 
ship and their property in a chaotic condition destructive to the In- 
dian's rights and his property. The United tSates government in its 
greatness in a spirit of justice should immediately right its wrongful 
policy, place the administration of laws in the hands of those unselfish 
enough to faithfully administer that great trust, and where the United 
States government has violated its contracts with our Indian citizen 
justice demands that full compensation be made to every such Indian 
for every dollar of loss and needless expense that has been imposed 
by the violation of such governmental pledges and obligations. There- 
fore, we favor a speedy settlement of all Oklahoma Indian matters; 
the sale of all Indian tribal property; the payment to the Indians of 
all funds belonging to them, free from any charge or cost to the 
Indians as granted them by treaty, and we are opposed to the reopen- 
ing the rolls, whether by the McGuire bill or otherwise, as the same 
would disturb the business interests throughout the state and would 
do more harm than good; and we urge our democratic senators and 
representatives in congress to exercise every honorable means to 
carry out this policy; and we favor the preservation of the property 
rights of all Indian tribes and the protection of the minor Indian 
children from any and all classes of dishonest and unscrupulous 
grafters. 

Will of People Prevail. 

"The democratic party declares that whenever any amendment 
ro the constitution or act initiated by the people is pending for the 
consideration of the people, and for their adoption or rejection, that 
it is not the privilege of any political party to seek to influence such 
election by party control or direction, and, therefore, it declares 
all such measures, to-wit: Prohibition, woman's suffrage and all meas- 
ures initiate by the people, to be free from political dictation and sub- 
jection to the uninfluenced and unprejudiced choice of every voter 
of the state. 

Progress and Prosperity. 

"Contrary to the prophecies and false representations of a sub- 
sidized press at home and abroad, and a corrupt organization mis- 
representing honorable and honest republicans within our state, Okla- 
homa people can truthfully point with pride to a progressive govern- 
ment that has placed us among the leading states of the union, to a 
financial credit without a parallel and to development that has added 
thirty per cent to our manufacturing industries, and multiplied the 
commerce of our state over fourfold within the short space of less 
than three years. 

State Credit. 

The state of Oklahoma points with pride to the fact that it is the 
only new state in half a century which has gone through the first two 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 371 

and a half years of organization uniformity preserving its state credit 
on a par basis, and this has been accomplished in the face of the fact 
that we are the only such state that passed through the first year of 
state government without t^e receipt of any direct taxes from the 
people. 

Natit lal Legislation. 

"Life tenure of public ^^f ;e being born of despotic and irrespon- 
sive power, we therefore fa\or that the term of federal office be 
limited to a reasonable term of years. Be it further resolved, that 
we favor an act of congress that will strip all inferior federal courts 
of all jurisdiction except in cases involving the constitution, laws and 
treaties of the United States and that in all cases where the state 
is a party or the laws of a state are involved no federal courts shall 
have jurisdiction except the supreme court of the United States 
agreeable to the constitution of the United tSates. 

"We favor the election of United States senators by the direct 
vote of the people. 

"We favor an income and an inheritance tax: 

"We favor a revision of the rules of the house of representatives 
so that the power to control and enact legislation shall be taken from 
the speaker and restored to the members. 

"We are opposed to the interference by federal authorities with 
the organizations of laboring men and farmers. 

"We favor a law which will prevent the federal courts from 
annulling any state law until the same has been acted upon by the 
highest tribunal of the state. 

"We oppose a ship subsidy and a central bank. 

"We favor the physical valuation of all railroads. 

"We demand that an eight-hour law be enforced upon all govern- 
ment works. 

"We favor a federal law reqiiiring a trial by jury in all cases of 
indirect contempt. 

"We favor a law prohibiting gambling on stock exchanges and the 
boards of trade in stocks, bonds, and farm products. 

"We favor an honest revision of the tariff by reducing the duties 
to revenue basis, so as to raise the greatest amount of revenue with 
the least burden of taxation upon the masses of the American people, 
and so adjusting the rates of duty as to deal fairly with both producer 
and consumer with regard to the needs of the government. 

"We favor making the tariff as high as possible upon the luxuries 
of life and as low as possible upon the necessities. 

"We favor placing lumber, leather-goods, farm machinery, house- 
hold tools and all trust-made goods upon the free list. 

"We favor the extensipn of the adoption of the fellow servant 
rule to all others engaged in hazardous and dangerous pursuits besides 
those already exempt from that rule in this state." 

"With the laudable achievements mentioned in the foregoing plat- 
form accomplished with honesty of purpose animating us, with the 
confidence of a citizenship which realizes the burdens carried and 
difficulties met, the democracy submits its cause for judgment. Gov- • 
ering a continuance of the good will, confidence and esteem of our 
fellow citizens of all parties, and firm in the determination of securing 
it, we invite and welcome their co-operation in a continuance of a 
reign of law where the rights of all citizens are protected and con- 
served with equal and exact impartiality. 



372 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



OKLAHOMA REPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM 

(Adopted at Guthrie, June 16, 1910.) 



"The republicans of Oklahoma, assembled in delegate convention 
at Guthrie on June 16, 1910, affirmed their loyal adherence to the prin- 
ciples of their party as expressed in the National platform and exem- 
plified in the administrative acts of a republican president and the 
laws enacted by a republican congress. 

"We believe that President Wm. H. Taft, in his official acts and 
recommendations, is faithfully and successfully carrying out the pledges 
and policies set forth in the declaration of principles upon which he 
was elected, and we take pleasure in endorsing his administration of 
National affairs and in giving him assurance of the continued united 
support of the republican party of Oklahoma. The rugged honesty of 
Mr. Taft, his frankness with the public, and his calm, judicial tempera- 
ment are making an administration which will stand out for great 
public good, and we believe will have the universal approval of the 
American people. 

Stand by Congress. 

"We endorse the record of the present congress and believe, with 
President Taft. that the Payne tariff is the best tariff law ever enacted 
because it reduces the tax on necessities and increases it on luxuries. 
The republican policy of a protective tariff has always brought pros- 
perity to the farmer and manufacturer and employment to the wage- 
earner. The maximum and minimum features of the present law have 
opened the markets of the entire civilized world to the products of 
American indiistry. 

Has Kept Faith. 

"As proof that the republican party has kept faith with the people 
in the fulfillment of pledges, we point to .the railroad bill, the postal 
savings bank bill, the McCall bill providing for the publicity of cam- 
paign expenses, the appropriation for the Taft tariff commission — all 
of which measures will be completed by the present session of 
congress. 

"We extend a hearty welcome home to our former President 
Colonel Theodore Roosevelt, and commend the movement to make his 
welcome a national demonstration. 

Stands for Labor. 

"The republican party has stood for the farmer and the laborer 
as well as for all clases. The present high prices of the produc^ts of 
the farm are the direct result of the beneficient policies put into effect 
by the republican party. On the soil depends the prosperity of our 
country. When the tillers of the soil are prosperous everybody pros- 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 373 

pers; then all labor receives its Just reward, and plenty and happiness 
are found among all the people. 

Enacted Anti-Trust Laws. 

"The republican party is the original anti-trust party. It has en- 
acted laws and created the Interstate Commerce Commission for the 
regulation of rates of transportation and the prevention of combina- 
tions of capital inimical to the interests of the public. By the enforce- 
ment of these provisions a number of ti.e great trusts have been put 
out of business and we have confidence that President Taft, if given 
proper support, will, through the measures adopted by a republican 
congress, mete out adequate punishment to all unlawful combinations 
and trusts. 

Improvement of Waterways. 

"We recommend the policy of improvement of the inland water- 
ways and urge that the Arkansas river be included in the plans of the 
utilization of these natural waterways. 

Irrigation, Drainage and Good Roads. 

"We endorse the national policy of reclamation of agricultural 
lands, and believe it should be so extended as to include drainage as 
well as irrigation. We approve the eiforts to secure federal aid in the 
building of good roads. 

Pensions. 

"We note with patriotic pride that our country is more liberal in 
the caring for its defenders than any nation on earth, as evidenced by 
the liberal pension policy pursued in the past, which we endorse. 

Encourage Rural Delivery. 

"We regard the republican policy of rural delivery of mail as one 
of the greatest boons to the farmer, and the rural mail carrier is his 
most valued friend. The high price of farm products, which has 
brought increased prosperity to the farmers, has increased the expense 
of maintaining the rural r-arriers' equipment. We therefore favor an 
adequate allowance in addition to the carriers' salaries, for the meet- 
ing of this expense. 

Arraigns State Administration. 

"We charge that the history of the present democratic state admin- 
istration is a history of extravagance, incompetency and malfeasance 
in office. To prove this let the following facts be submitted to the 
voters of Oklahoma: 

Debt. 

"Democracy has been in charge of the state less than three years, 
and in spite of the fact that the constitution prohibits the debt from 
ever exceeding $400,000, they have issued bonds in the sum of $1,460,- 
000, in addition to outstanding warrant indebtedness in excess of 
$2,000,000 and have mortgaged the public building lands for $2,000,000 
more, while the debt is steadily increasing. 

Taxes. 

"They have collected $3,079,968.89 in direct taxes from the people 
which, according to their own official statements, has been less than 
half of the expense of carrying on the state government. 



374 OKLxVHOMA RED BOOK 

"They have already doubled taxes and enacted laws which will 
further increase the burden of taxation; have levied so many kinds of 
taxes that no man knows when the sheriff will appear with a tax war- 
rant confiscating his property. 

Extravagance. 

"They called a special session of the legislature for the s-ole pur- 
pose of enacting laws to disfranchise citizens of the state at a cost of 
$96,948.00 to the taxpayers and the appropriations of $1,247,746.00 made 
at this session, added to those made at the two previous sessions, 
aggregate $10,237,924.00 of the taxpayers' money. 

Bank Fund Looted. 

"They have looted the bank guaranty fund and manipulated the 
same for political and private gain, refusing even their own state ac- 
countant access to the books, and have failed and refused to prosecute 
the guilty embezzlers of funds and those who have made false entries 
in bank books. 

"They have paid large sums of money illegally to democratic state 
officials in excess of their salaries. 

Funds Misappropriated. 

"They have kept the public funds of the state in banks outside of 
the state in violation of law and good public policy, and have deposited 
the same in amounts in excess of the limit of the law in banks within 
the state. 

"They have expended many thousands of dollars illegally for the 
hiring of private attorneys, detectives, statistical agents, and others. 

"They have violated the spirit and intent of the initiative and refer- 
endum by enacting and amending laws thereto so as to make them a 
farce. , 

Damaged Educational Institutions. 

"They have prostituted the educational institutions of the state 
into political machines, and inaugurated therein an administration of 
mismanagement and extravagance until the people of the state no 
longer have confidence in them, and are sending their sons and daugh- 
ters to outside institutions of learning. 

Violated Constitution. 

"They have violated the terms of the constitution repeatedly, open- 
ly and defiantly. 

Mismanaged Land Office. 

"They have inaugurated a system of mismanagement, extfava- 
gance and incompetency in the Public Land Department, using the 
sacred school funds of the state in violation of law, to hire an army of 
useless employees. They have outraged the rights of the lessees in 
every way possible, harassing them by exorbitant rentals and unfair 
appraisement of improvements, denying them hearings and refusing 
to abide by even their own rules. 

Defied the People. 

"They have continuetj the liquor dispensary system after the peo- 
ple have declared against it. and mismanaged the same so as to in- 
crease the burden of taxation and bring disgrace upon the state. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 375 

* Injured Credit. 

"They have brought reproach upon the fair name of Oklahoma at 
home and abroad, driven capital and immigration from the state, in- 
jured our credit so that private and public securities are a drug on 
the market. 

"They have manipulated the $5,000,000 school fund to further their 
personal interests; have failed and refused to make any public report 
accounting for the same, and have withheld funds from distribution 
among the school districts of the state. 

Interfered With Courts. 

"Tley have interfered with the work of the courts in order to 
thwart justice and stopped the proceedings of grand juries in order to 
save democratic officials from prosecution for crimes committed. 

"They have failed and refused to make proper public reports, or 
to allow the public to have access to their records. 

Trickeci the Farmers. 

"By ])olitical manipulation and chicanery they have taken the 
Board of Agriculture out of the hands of the farmers of the state and 
used it for political purposes. 

Would Steal Election. 

"They have enacted election laws which seek to' prevent a free 
and untrammelled ballot and a fair count, denying tie minority lepre- 
sentation upon election boards, and affording every opportunity to 
manipulate the count and defeat the will of the people. 

"They are attempting to set up a test of suffrage for the negro 
which they dare not submit to themselves. 

Harass the People. 

"They have created a multitude of new offices and sent over the 
state swarms of officers to harass our people and eat out their sub- 
stance, and are continuously and illegally paying out in addition large 
sums of money to personal and political henchmen for services ren- 
dered against the best interests of the state and the taxpayers. 

"These are but a few of the acts of incompetence, extravagance, 
mismanagement, bad faith, and violation of promise and pledge for 
which the democratic administration of Oklahoma stands indicted be: 
fore the people. 

Governor Condemned. 

"We desire to specifically condemn an executive as insincere, un- 
safe and dishonest who will squander public funds regardless of the 
purpose for which they are appropriated; condemn a legislature as 
puerile which will not resent it, and endorse the action of the repub- 
lican minority which brought attention to their profligate practices by 
forcing investigation tl'ereof, and making a record of the fact that this 
same executive has openly violated the constitution and laws of the 
state, attempted to usurp the power of the courts and the legislature, 
and abused the power of pardon until even the convicts in the prison 
have lost confidence in his integrity. 



37'6 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Will Eliminate Machine Politics. 

"The republican party pledges the people that if given power it 
will remedy the many and serious evils existing in the present state 
government, establish public credit, give to every citizen his just and 
equal right, and redeem the honor of the state at home and abroad; 
we will eliminate machine politics in governmental affairs an^ give 
the people a thorough business administration, with the strictest pub- 
lic economy and the lowest possible taxes. 

To Redeem the State. 

"To this end we invite all citizens of this state who believe la 
honest, economical government, stability of public credit, and an equal 
chance for all to join with us in redeeming this state from the abyss 
of degeneration to which the democratic party has taken us. 

Favors Pure Ballot. 

"The republican party has always stood for the purity of the bal- 
lot. The democratic party of the state is criminally attempting to 
subordinate the will of the people to the selfish desires of political 
machinists. We demand a return to the election machinery in force 
prior to statehood; that each political party having state candidates 
he allowed representation on every precinct, county and state election 
board that we may have an honest ballot and a fair count. 

W.arrants Two-Cent Rate. 

"We believe that it can be shown that the trunk line railroads 
doing business in Oklahoma are deriving suflficient revenues from their 
business in this state to warrant the enforcement of the two-cent pas- 
senger rate; and while the federal court could, under the showing 
made to it, render no other decision than it did, in our opinion the 
facts were obtainable and the showing could have been made to have 
prevented the injunction which was grantd, and we condemn the in- 
competency and lack of ability of the State Corporation Commission 
and the democratic administration in failing to properly present the 
state's case to the court, and to make the showing to defeat the claims 
of the railroads to the constitutional immunity. 

School Land Department. 

"We declare for an honest, economical business administration of 
the school land department, one that will protect the interests of the 
school fund and the school children, as well as guarantee to the lessees 
the enjoyment of all his rights and fair treatment at all times. 

"We endorse the action of the republicans in the last legislatura 
and of the Farmers' Union in proposing to loan the public, state and 
school funds by an equal apportionment to the different counties. 

Plea for School. 

"That our population may be drawn from the cities to the country 
and small towns and villages, and that our boys and girls may stay 
upon the farm; we favor legislation that will develop and maintaia 
good schools within the reach of every country boy and girl, made 
easy of access by good roads. 

"We favor placing on the official ballot the party nominess for 
United States senators as advisory to the legislature that they may 
know the will of the majority before exercising the elective function. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATP^ORMS 377 

"We are in favor of abolishing the state dispensary and all ap- 
pointees thereunder and leave the enforcement of the law to the local 
officers. 

For Law Enforcement. 

"Prohibition has been incorporated into the constitution and Is 
now a constitutional enactment. We condemn the democratic state 
administration for non-enforcement of law, and pledge the republlcam 
party to law enforcement. 

Merit, the Test. 

"We pledge the party, if successful at the polls, to eliminate par- 
tisan politics from our school system and that qualification and not 
party affiliation shall be the test for position in the various state 
schools." 



378 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



SOCIALIST PARTY STATE PLATFORM 



"The socialist party of Oklahoma reaffirms its adherence to the 
principles of international socialism as enunciated in the national plat- 
form of the socialist party. 

"The socialist party of Oklahoma declares its object to be the 
political organization of the working class and those in sympathy with 
it, for the purpose of capturing the powers of government of the state 
of Oklahoma and using this power for the betterment of the condi- 
tions of the workers. 

"The socialist party of Oklahoma demands the scate ownership 
and control of such industries and means of ti-ansportation as are 
collectively used by the people of Oklaloina;. such as the coal and 
mining industries, the oil industry, the cotton ginning and compressing 
and cotto;:, spinning industries: the stock yards, packing and cold 
storage industries, the telephone lines, the interurban electric lines, 
etc.; such industries to be under the democratic management of the 
workers in such industries, and to be operated not for the purpose of 
making profits for the state, but to give to the workers in such indus- 
tries the full social, value of their labor. 

"The socialist party of Oklahoma stands for universal suffrage, 
and advocates the extension of the franchise to women upon the same 
terms as men; and will fight every move having for its object the dis- 
franchisement of the working class, or any part of it, through so-called 
poll tax laws, grandfather clauses, educational, property and residence 
qualifications that have no object other than the gradual taking away 
from the workers the right of franchise; and thus prevent the work- 
ers from securing control of the powers of governmenr. 

"The socialist pa,rty of Oklahoma demands the enactment of laws 
that will effectively give into the hands of the people the use of the 
initiative and referendum. The socialist party charges that the demo- 
cratic administration and the interests it represents, has and is using 
every eiJort to prevent the people from using the initiative and refer- 
endum on any measure, unless such measure is advocated by the capi- 
talist class. The democratic administration has further circumvented 
and evaded the demands of the people, even after the people had voted 
and determined upon such measures by large majorities at the polls. 

"As such measures we cite: 

"The people voted against the sale of the school lands. 

"The legislature immediately after sold part of the school lands. 

"The people initiated a referendum on the Taylor Ribbon Ballot 
election law. The legislature evaded this referendum by passing an 
election law equally as obnoxious as the Taylor law, which repealed 
the Taylor law; and thus took away from the people the right to vote 
on the Taylor law. '•^ 

"The capitalist interests of the state initiated an amendment to 
the constitution to be known as article IX, section 9; and further ini- 
tiated a law to determine the location of the state capital. On these 
measures the democratic governor called a special election so as to 
make these measures easily passed, as it requires but a majority vote 
of the people voting at such election. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 379 

"On the other hand, the initiative petition signed by more than 
38,000 voters demanding the right to vote for women upon the same 
terms as men is held up in the courts on the word of one man, one 
of the henchmen of the democratic administration. No special elec- 
tion is called on this measure. It must wait for the general election, 
when it requires a majority of all the people voting at such election 
for the state officer receiving the highest number of votes, to pass this 
measure. 

"The socialist party further demands the enactment of laws pro- 
viding for the right of recall, and such election laws that recognize 
the rights of all political parties taking part in such elections, to 
representation on the election boards, and to a counter at each pre- 
cinct. Such election boards to be elective, and not appointive. 

"The sociafist party demands the repeal of senate bill No. 126, 
which has for its aim and object the taking out of the hands of the 
people the use of the initiative and referendum, by limiting the time 
for the securing of petitions to 60 days, in violation of a constitutional 
provision of 90 days: and which law further gives into the hands of 
the legislature such powers as to make any measure suggested for 
initiation by thera. Easy of passage through an unfair and nefarious 
arrangement of the ballot. 

"The socialist party demands the enactment of a law abolishing 
■professional' guardianship, for the purpose of cutting our court ex- 
penses and lawyer fees, which are now gobbling r.p practically all the 
income from small estates, especially that of Indians in the eastern 
half of the state. 

"The socialist party demands the free administration of justice, 
and the maintenance by the state of families dependent on state and 
county convicts. 

"The socialist party demands the enactment of laws providing for 
state insurance of workers against sickness, accident, and death; so 
as to give to an injured or sick worker, or those dependent upon him, 
compulsory compensation, and relieve him from the necessity of go- 
ing into the courts and sue for compensation, which delays action 
indefinitely, or to such a time as to be of little benefit to the worker. 

"The socialist party demands the establishment of sanitariums for 
the free treatment of tuberculosis and other social diseases. 

"The socialist party stands for everj^ measure that will add to the 
material, intellectual or moral welfare of tlie working class; and as 
the working class of Oklahoma is largely made up of agricultural 
workers, we stand for the following: 

"Farmers' program: 

"As measures calculated to bring into collective property the land. 
and enable every farmer to have the use and occupancy of the land 
sufficient for a home and the support of his family, we hereby advocate 
and pledge our elected officers to the following program. 

Farmers' Program. 
Article I. 

"The retention and constant enlargement of the public domain. 

"By retaining school and other public lands. 

"By purchase of arid and overflow lands and the state reclama- 
tion of all such lands now held by the state or that may be acquired 
by the state. 

"By the purchase of all lands sold for the non-payment of taxes. 

"By the purchase of segregated and unalloted Indian lands. 

"By the retention of leased lands after the expiration of leases 
and the payment of the improvements thereon at an appraised valu- 
ation. 



380 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Article II. 

"Separation of the department of agriculture from the political 
goTernment by means of — 

"Election of all members and officers of the board of agriculture 
by the direct vote of the actual farmers. 

"Introduction of the merit system among the employees. 

Article III. 
"Election by the state of grain elevators and warehouses for the 
storage of farm products; these elevators and warehouses to be man- 
aged by the board of agriculture. 

Article IV. 

"Organization by the board of agriculture of the free agricultural 
education and the establishment of model farms. 

Article V. 
"Encouragement by the board of agriculture of co-operative soci- 
eties of farmers — 

"For the buying of seed and fertilizer. 

"For the purchase and common use of implements and machinery. 

"For the preparing and sale of produce. 

"For the working of land by groups. 

Article VI. 
"Organization by the state for loans on mortgages and warehouse 
certificates, the interest charges to cover cost only. 

Article VII. 

"State insurance against diseases of animals, diseases of plants, 
insect pests, hail, flood, storm and fire. 

Article VIII. 

"Aid and encouragement to be given the actual workers on the 
farms in the formation of district co-operative associations which shall 
be given the power to issue bonds for the purchase of suitable farming 
lands — bonds to be redeemable in forty years. Individuals purchasing 
such lands shall pay the purchase price of land in share or cash an- 
nual or semi-annual rentals extending over a period of forty years, or 
may, at their option, pay in full in any given number of years. 

Article IX. 

"Exemption from taxation and execution of dwellings, tools, farm 
animals, implements and improvements to the amount of $1,000.00. 

Article X. 

"A ^graduated tax on the value of rented land and land held for 
speculation. ; 

Article XI. 

"Absentee landlords to assess their own lands, the state reserving 
the right to purchase such lands at their assessed value plus 10 per 
cent. 

Article XII. 

"Land now in the possession of the state or hereafter acquired 
through purchase, reclamation or tax sales, to be rented to landless 
farmers under the supervision of the board of agriculture at the pre- 
vailing rate of share rent or its equivalent. The payment of such 
rent to cease as soon as the total amount of rent paid is equal to the 
value of the land and the tenant thereby acquires for himself and his 
children the right of occupancy. The title to all such lands remaining 
with the commonwealth." 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 381 



DEMOCRATIC AND REPUBLICAN COMMITTEES IN 
STATEHOOD CAMPAIGN 

1907. 



Democratic National Committeemen. 

For Oklahoma— R. A. Billups, Cordell, Okla. 

For Indian Territory — R. L. Williams, Durant, I. T. 

State Democratic Executive Committee. 

J. B. Thompson, Chairman State Central Committee; W. L. Chap- 
man, Secretary State Central Committee; Ed. O. Cassidy, Chairman 
Executive Committee; W. L. Poole, Secretary Executive Committee; 
Charles F. Barrett, Secretary Press Bureau; O. D. Humbarger, Assist- 
ant Secretary Press Bureau; J. E. Wyand, Secretary Speakers' Bureau. 

Executive Committee — Robert Dunlop, E. G. Newell, John B. Doo- 
lin, J. P. Conors, Tate Brady, Join R. Williams, John M. Young, George 
A. Henshaw, O. D. Halsell, W. W. Hastings. 

Democratic State Committee. 

County. Name. Address. 

Adair R. L. Sellers Westiville. 

Alfalfa D. G. Murley Carmen. 

Atoka 

Beaver F. C. Tracey Beaver. 

Beckham J. D. Ballard Sayre. 

Blaine - F. B. Allen Okeene. 

Bryan W. E. Utterback Durant. 

Caddo R. Hester Apache. 

Canadian Wm. Redder El Reno. 

Carter Mitchell Bonner Ardmore. 

Cherokee A. B. Cunningham Tahlequah. 

Choctaw B. F. Lee ;Iugo. 

Cimarron T ; omas Richmond Jurgensen. 

Cleveland Willard Hess >Jorman. 

Coal Wright Christian Coalgate. 

Comanche Ino. M. Young Lawton. 

Craig F. S. E. Amos Vinita. 

Creek M. Jones Bristow. 

Custer VV. J. Aycock Clinton. 

Delaware 

Dewey ; . . . Robert E. Adams Taloga. 

Ellis Geo. E. Baker Gage. 

Garfield P. J. Goulding Enid. 

Garvin Alvin F. Pyeatt Pauls Valley. 

Grady G. W. Barefoot Chickasha. 

Grant Chas. A. Taylor Pond Crek. 



382 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Greer A. M. Stewart Mangum. 

Harper -. 

Haskell T. D. Smith Chant. 

Hughes M A. Edmoiulson Holdenville. 

.Jackson I. R. McMahan Altus. 

.] eff erson 

.Johnston Chas. S. Stephens Tishomingo. 

Kay Geo. Hines Blackwell. 

Kingfisher I. P. Love Kingfisher. 

Kiowa M. V. VanMeter Mountain View 

Latinaer Chas. iH. Hudson Wilburton. 

LeFlore P. C. Bolger Poteau. 

I^incoln G. A. Smith Chandler. 

Logan L. G. Niblack Guthrie. 

Love G. H. Montgomery Marietta. 

Major .John C. Major ''"lirview. 

Marshall Dav'd Russell Madill. 

Mayes W. T. Tilley Pryor Creek. 

Murray G. M. Weems Sulphur. 

Muskogee Thos H. Owen Muskogee. 

McClain I. P. Sharp Purcell. 

McCurtain 

Mcintosh 

Noble A. T. Thompson Perrj'. 

Nowata T. A. Tillotson Nowata. 

Okfuskee Tnhn L. Norman 'Okemah. 

Oklahoma W. L. Alexander Okla. City. 

Okmulgee 

Osage 

Ottawa .T. K. Moore Miami. 

Pawnee G. M. Berry Pawnee. 

Payne C. L. Burdick Stillwater. 

Pittsburg Tal Milwee McAlester. 

Pontotoc 

Pottawatomie W. L. Chapman Shawnee. 

Pushmataha Tohn Cooke Antlers. 

Roger Mills .Tohn C. Hendrix Cheyenne. 

Rogers .T. S. Day Catoosa. 

Seminole E. E. Jayne Wewoka. 

Sequoyah .T. G. McCombs SaUisaw. 

Stephens Allen Robberson Dixie. 

Texas .J. W. Harris ' Guymon. 

Tillman F. P. Alexander Frederick. 

Tulsa W. T. Brady Tulsa. 

Wagoner S. D. Lyles Wagoner. 

Washington Wm. T. Sidell Bartlesville. 

Washita J. J. Howard Foss. 

Woods .John B. Doolin Alva 

^^'bodward C. B. Young Woodward. 



Republican National Committeemen. 

For Oklahoma C. M. Cade Shawnee, O. T. 

For Indian Territory ....P. L. Soper Vinita, 1. T. 

State Republican Executive Committee. 

C. E. Hunter, chaimian; A. E. Perry, vice chairman; O. A. Wells, 
eecretary; James L. Wilkin, treasurer. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 383 



Republican State Committee. 

County. Name. Address. 

Adair J. H. Cloonan Bunch. 

Alfalfa W. T. Barrett Carmen. 

Atoka Samuel Downing Atoka. 

Beaver George H. 'Healey Beaver. 

Beckham H. A. Russell Sayre. 

Blaine T. ,T. Bellew Geary. 

Bryan W. S. Sterret Durant. 

Caddo Paul Gilbert Ft. Cobb. 

Canadian . . . C. P. Lincoln El Reno. 

Carter O. A. Wells Ardm.ore. 

Cherokee Horace Gray '. . . . Tahlequah. 

Choctaw O. A. Simmons Boswell. 

Cimarron .Teremiah Ressler Dee. 

Cleveland D. L. Larsh Norman. 

Coal '. . . A. E. Perry Coalgate. 

Comanche Fred A. Parkinson Lawton. 

Craig W. S. Stanfield , Vinita. 

Creek A. M. Brixey Mounds. 

Custer J. S. Huston Thomas. 

Delaware W. .J. .Tones Grove. 

Dewey H- G. Brownlee Taloga. 

Ellis C. H. Holmes Gage. 

Garfield Ivan G. Conkling Enid. 

Garvin E- E. Norvell Wynnewood. 

Grady 'T. M. Barkley Chickasha. 

Grant T. E. Williams Renfrow. 

Greer H. L. Crittenden Mangum. 

Harper T. A. Yelton Yelton. 

Haskell Henry Cooper .Stigler. 

Hughes Frank L. Warren Holdenville. 

Jackson ■^- E. Van Matre Altus. 

.Jefferson -T- ^^ Eckles Waurika. 

Johnston ^- H. Colbert Tishomingo. 

Kay Geo. W. Brett Ponca City. 

Kingfisher ^^f'O- W. Laing Kingfisher. 

Kiowa John M. Kirkwood Gotebo. 

Latimer W. R. Webber Wilburton. 

LeFlore G- ^- Witte Poteau. 

Lincoln Emorv A. Foster Chandler. 

Logan Joe H. Norris "^Mthrie. 

Love H. G. House Marietta. 

Major Geo. E. Autrey 

Mayes John D. Wilkins Granton. 

Marshall Jeo P. Reirdon Madill. 

McCIain J- ^V. Hocker Purcell. 

McCurtain Jno. D. Armstrong Valliant. 

Mcintosh ■ 'H. L. Marshall Eufaula. 

Murray J- B. Outler Davis. 

Muskogee J- H. Huckleberry Muskogee. 

Noble W. W. Faulds Perry. 

Nowata E. B. Lawson Nowata. 

Okfuskee M. B. Flesher Okemah. 

Oklahoma Ed. S. Vaught Oklahoma City 

Okmulgee ^^'- B. Hudson Henryetta. 

Osage P- W. Farrar Pawhuska. 

Ottawa S. G. Victor Afton. 

Pawnee J- H. Sterling Pawnee. 



384 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Payne John P. Hinkle Stillwater. 

Pittsburg Wm. Busby So. McAlester. 

Pontotoc H. G. Winn Ada. 

Potawatomie C. C. Chappell Asher. 

Pushmataha Clark Wasson Antlers. 

Rogers Alex A. Dennison Claremore. 

Roger Mills A. H. Carter Cheyenne. 

Seminole C. L. Long Wewoka. 

Sequoyah Chas. O. Fry Sallisaw. 

Stephens R. H. Brewery Marlow. 

Texas N. O. Stevenson Hooker. 

Tillman Geo. A. Ahern Frederick. 

Tulsa W. T. Brooks Broken Arrow. 

Wa2:oner las. A. Harris Wagoner 

Washington C. B. Fulton Bartlesville. 

Washita J. H. Anderson Weatherford. 

Woods W. J. French Alva. 

Woodward J. H. Hopkins Woodward. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 385 



DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES 

1908-1910 



County. Name. Address. 

Adair W. H. Davis Stilwell. 

Alfalfa L. Knadler Helena. 

Atoka J. D. Lankford Atoka. 

Beaver H. D. Meese Beaver. 

Beckham J. D. Ballard Sayre. 

Blaine F. B. Allen Okene. 

Bryan W. E. Utterback Durant. 

Caddo R. Hester .Apache. 

Canadian Earl Bebee El Reno. 

Cherokee W. W. Hastings Tahlequah. 

Carter Frank Bonner Ardmore. 

Choctaw Robt. Cozad Grant. 

Cimarron Ernest Evans Garrett. 

Cleveland George Smith Lexington. 

Coal Wright Christian Coalgate. 

Comanche John M. Young Lawton. 

Craig F. S. E. Amos Vinita. 

Creek M. Jones Bristow. 

Custer T. B. Stone Custer City. 

Delaware J. R. Hastings Needmore. 

Dewey Ben K. Frans Taloga. 

Ellis George E. Baker Gage. 

Garfield O. D. Hubble Enid. 

Garvin George P. Rollow \\ ynnewood. 

Grady Ed F. Johns Chiokasha. 

Grant A. C. Thompson Lamont. 

Greer r. l. Thompson Mangum. 

Harper E. Lee Adams Buffalo. 

Haskell George Scott Kinta. 

Hughes E. A. Edmondson Holdenville. 

Jackson E. G. Walcott Olustee. 

Jefferson j. l. Keith Addington. 

Johnston George W. Dudley Tishomingo. 

Kay Willis Scott Tonkawa. 

Kingfisher Fred Ehler Hennessey. 

Kiowa M. W. Van Meter Mountain View 

Latimer E. M. Cooper Wilburton. 

Le Flore I. H. Windsor Spiro. 

Lincoln r. v. Hoffman Chandler. 

Logan J. D. Burke Guthrie. 

Love G. H. Montgomery Marietta. 

Majors j. v. Roberts Fa irview. 

Marshall Summers Hardy Madill. 

Mayes H. M. Butler Pryor Creek. 

JVIurray L. C. Coyle lona. 

Muskogee Fred P. IBranson Muskogee. 

LZ -StS 



386 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

McClain J. F. Sharp Purcell. 

McCurtain H. L. Lightsey Idabel. 

Mcintosh M. K. McElhanon. .' Pierce. 

Noble A. I. Thompson Ferry. 

Nowata J. A. Tillotson Nowata. 

Okfuskee J. L. Norman Okemah. 

Oklahoma R. R- Fuller Dklahoma City 

Okmulgee W. A. Hiatt Okmulgee. 

Osage E. F. Scott Pawhuska. 

Ottawa J. K. Moore Miami. 

Pawnee G. M. Berry Pawnee. 

Payne Dale Lytton Stillwater. 

Pittsburg Tal Milwee Krebs. 

Pontotoc Sam T. McClure Ada. 

Pottawatomie X.. T. Sammons Maud. 

Pushmataha A. A. Lesueur Antlers. 

Roger Mills T. M. Miller Cheyenne. 

Rogers W. E. Morris Chelsea. 

Seminole E. E. Jayne Wewoka. 

Sequoyah J. G. McCombs Sallisaw. 

Stephens E. J. Leeman Duncan. 

Texas W. J. Risen Hooker. 

Tillman F. P. Alexander Frederick. 

Tulsa G. N. Wright Tulsa. 

Wagoner Tom C. Harrell Wagoner. 

Washington Howard Webber Bartlesville. 

Washita Sam Massingale Cordell. 

Woodward D. P. Marum Woodward. 

Woods J. B. Doolin Alva. 

Democratic National Committeeman. 

Tate Brady Tulsa. 

1910-1912. 

CHAIRMAN — Fred P. Branson, Muskogee. 
SECRETARY— Duke Stallings, Durant (Oklahoma City). 

Adair E. B. Arnold Stilwell. 

Alfalfa J- H. Chowning Cherokee. 

Atoka J. D. Lankford. . (Okla. City) Atoka. 

Beaver H. D. Meese Beaver City. 

Beckham E. K. Thurmond Sayr'. 

Blaine J. P. Roetzel Watonga. 

Bryan W. E. Utterback Durant. 

Caddo Fremont Boyle Vnadar.co. 

Canadian James I. Phelps El Reno. 

Carter J. R. Pennington Ardmore. 

Cherokee T. J. Adair Tahlequah. 

Choctaw R. M. Connell Hugo. 

Cimarron Ashbel Cook Boise City. 

Cleveland Hi. Downing Norman. 

Coal Boone Williams (Okla. City) Lehigh. 

Comanche John M. Young Lawton. 

Craig A. M. Voyles Vinita. 

Creek C. A. Vaughn Sapulpa. 

Custer G. W. Daugherty Arapaho. 

Delaware J. R. Hastings Needmore. 

Dewey J. M. Williams Taloga. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 387 

Ellis George E. Baker Gage. 

Garfield O. D. Hubbell Enid. 

Garvin J. T. Wheeler Wynnewood. 

Grady Ed P. Johns Chickasha. 

Grant S. A. Lively Wakita. 

Greer J. E. Taylor Mangum. 

Harmon Dr. W. T. Ray Gould. 

Harper Frank White Buit'alo. 

Haskell George W. Scott Kinta. 

Hughes , . . E. A. Edmundson Holdenville. 

Jackson Tom R. Moore Olustee. 

Jefferson Homer V. Bird Ryan. 

Johnston Dr. C. C. Shaw Mill Creek. 

Kay W. C. Scott Tonkawa. 

Kingfisher Fred Ehler Hennessey, 

Kiowa C. H. Fawks Hobart. \ 

Latimer R. A. Morris Wilburton. ; 

Le Flore L H. Windsor Panama. 

Lincoln Roy V. Hoffman Chandler. 

Logan Henry Derwin Guthrie. 

Love F. M. Culwell Marietta. ,' 

McClain W. H. Woods Purcell. 1 

McCurtain H. L. Lightsey Idabel. ^ 

Mcintosh W. J. Harding Checotah. 

Majors John V. Roberts Fairview. 

Marshall David Russell Madill. 

Mayes W. R. Samuel Choteau. 

Murray G. M. Weems Sulphur. 

Muskogee Fred P. Branson Muskogee. 

Noble Clark Seton Perry. 

Nowata J. A. Tilotson Nowata. 

Okfuskee A. A. Hatch Weleetka. 

Oklahoma E. J. Giddings Oklahoma City. 

Okmulgee W. C. Newman Okmulgee. 

Osage E. F. Scott Pawhuska. 

Ottawa H. O. Bland Af ton. 

Pawnee G. M. Berry Pawnee. 

Payne I. O. Diggs. . . . .' Stillwater. 

Pittsburg R. E. Seamans Krebs. 

Pontotoc F. R. Laird Roff . 

Pottawatomie George Stone Tecumseh. 

Pushmataha A. A. Lesueur Antlers. 

Roger Mills E. C. Winford Cheyenne. 

Rogers Archibald Bonds Claremore. 

Seminole W. L. Knight Wewoka. 

Sequoyah M. S. Blassingame Sallisaw. 

Stephens J. B. Wilkerson Comanche. 

Swanson (dissolved) J. H. Anderson Snyder. 

Texas Joe L Buckley Texhoma. 

Tillman F. P. Alexander Frederick. 

Tulsa S. R. Lewis Tulsa. 

Wagoner Tom C. Harrell Wagoner. 

Washington Howard Weber ' Bartlesville. 

Washita J. M. Armfield Cordell. 

Woods J. R. Gamble Alva. 

Woodward D. P. Marum Woodward. 



388 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



REPUBLICAN STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES 

1911. 



County. Name. Address. 

Alfalfa Tom Barrett ; Carmen. 

Adair Percy P. Howard Westville. 

Atoka W. W. Bassett Atoka. 

Beaver W. T. Quinn Beaver, 

Beckham J. A. Farris Sayre. 

Blaine T. J. Bellew Geary. 

Bryan Ed F. Potts Durant. 

Caddo W. L. Lacy Anadarko. 

Canadian W. W. Jackman Union. 

Carter L. S. Dolman Ardmore. 

Cherokee E. D. Spear Hulbert. 

Choctaw W. R. Mcintosh Ft. Towson. 

Cimarron A. E. Tupper Bertrand. 

Cleveland D. L. Larsh Norman. 

Coal W. E. Groomer Coalgate. 

Comanche B. M. Parmenter Lawton. 

Craig S. E. Wallen Vinita. 

Creek Joe Thompson Sapulpa. 

Custer John J. Houston Thomas. 

Delawa re Dr. J. C. Holland Grove. 

Dewey F. G. Delaney Taloga. 

Ellis B. J. Hobbs Fargo. 

Garfield Peter Bowers Enid. 

Garvin Marion Henderson Pauls Valley. 

Grady C. M. Fechheimer Chiokasha. 

Grant W. W. Welter Medford. 

Greer George J. McClure Granite. 

Harper Dr. Walker Doby Springs. 

Harmon H. B. Joyner Vinson. 

Haskell Henry Cooper Stigler. 

Hughes J. L. Skinner Wetumka. 

Jackson Will McCoy Blair. 

Jefferson J. R. Echols (R. F. D.) Waurika. 

Johnston B. H. Colbert Tishomingo. 

Kay W. A. Smith Nardin. 

Kingfisher J. S. Patrick Kingfisher. 

Kiowa J. H. Cline .Hobart. 

Latimer Philas S. Jones Wilburton. 

Le Flore W. H. Harrison Poteau. 

Lincoln Emory Foster Chandler. 

Logan Charles Renfro Onthrie. 

Love Dr. A. E. Martin Marietta. 

Majors J. L. Admire Fairview. 

Marshall '. . F. E. Kennamer Madill. 

Mayes O. H. Graves Pryor. 

McClain J. W. Hocker Purcell. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 389 

McCurtain Will L. Burkhart Smithville. 

Mcintosh Charles N. Wilson Melette. 

Murray Frank Meadows Sulphur. 

Mii&kogee Archie V. Jones Muskogee. 

Noble *. G. A. Masters P^rry. 

Nowata Frank B. Long Nowata. 

Okfuskee J. M. Pemberton Weleetka. 

Oklahoma W. H. Trudgeon Oklahoma City. 

Okmulgee Wm. R. Hudson Henryetta. 

Osage F. W. Farrar Pawhuska. 

Ottawa Ollie Mason Miami. 

Pawnee Charles G. Colburn Tarlton. 

Payne D. F. Janeway Stillwater. 

Pittsburg J. H. Wilkins McAlester. 

Pontotoc Will H. Hart Ada. 

Pottawatomie Charles C. Chapell Ashe^^r. 

Pushmataha Clark B. Wasson Antlers. 

Roger Mills L. W. Pate Cheyenne. 

Rogers John M. Goldsberry Collinsville. 

Seniinole Walter Ferguson Wewoka. 

Sequoyah C. O. Frye Salisaw. 

Stephens John Claypool Duncan. 

Texas R. B. Quinn Guymon. 

Tillman D. B. Munro Frederick. 

Tulsa Peter Deichman Tulsa. 

Wagoner J. A. Harris Wagoner. 

Washington George C. Priestley Bartlesville. 

AVashita W. I. Fisher Cordell. 

Woods . John H. Ruttman Woodward. 

Woodward : . . . . W. J. French Sulphur. 

Republican National Committeeman 
Cash Cade Shawnee. 

CHAIRMAN — James A. Harris, W^agoner. 
SECRETARY— George H. Dodson, Oklahoma City. 



STATE CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE. 

1910-1912. 

CHAIRMAN— Alva J. Niles, Guthrie. 

First District. 

County. Name. Address. 

Kingfisher A. J. Seay* Kingfisher. 

Noble George A. Masters Perry. 

Grant W. W. Welter Medford. 

Osage F. W. Farrar Pawhuska. 

Kingfisher J. S. Patrick Kingfisher. 

Second District. 

Blaine T. B. Ferguson* Watonga. 

Caddo W. I. Lacy Anadarko. 

Canadian W. W. Jackman El Reno. 

Oklahoma C. G. Jones Oklahoma City. 

Woodward John H. Ruttman Woodward. 



390 . OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Third District. 

Cherokee E. D. Speer Hulbert. 

Craig S E. Wallen Vinita. 

Creek Joe Thompson Sapulpa. 

Sequoyah C. O. Frye Sallisaw. 

Okfuskee Dr. J. W. Pemberton Weleetka. 

Fourth District. 

Atoka Wm. Bassett Atoka. 

Pushmataha Clark Wasson Antlers. 

Haskell Henry Cooper Stigler. 

Johnston Ben H. Colbert .Tishomingo. 

McCurtain Wm. L. Burkhart Smithville. 

Fifth District. 

Garvin Marion Henderson Pauls Valley. 

Grady C. M. Fechheimer Chickasha. 

Greer George J. McCIure Granite. 

Tillman D. B. Munro Frederick. 

Stephens J. M. Claypool Duncan. 

Pottawatomie C. M. Cade Shawnee. 



♦Formerly Territorial governor. 



COUNTY CHAIRMEN. 

1910. 

County. Name. Address. 

Alfalfa J. W. Rackley .Cherokee. 

Adair Frank Howard Baron. 

Atoka C. B. Weeks Atoka. 

Beaver John W. Savage Beaver. 

Beckham George W. Seifert Sayre. 

Blaine A. H. Keith Watonga. 

Bryan George W. Cotton Durant. 

Caddo George C. Campbell Anadarko. 

Canadian Thomas R. Reid El Reno. 

Carter Sam Butler Ardmore. 

Cherokee F. W. Palmtag Tahlequah. 

Choctaw J. W. Davis Hugo. 

Cimarron G. W. Lowery Sampsell. 

Cleveland J. B. Dudley Norman. 

Coal C. M. Threadgill Coalgate. 

Comanche Frank V. Wright Lawton. 

Craig Frank Franklin Vinita. 

Creek J. Wade Bone Sapulpa. 

Custer Cy Howenstine Arapahoe. 

Delaware Jeff D. Sexton Cleora. 

Dewey H. F. Swartz Taloga 

Ellis L. H. Clark Arnett. 

Garfield John Flanegan Enid. 

Garvin Wirt Randolph Wynnewood. 

Grady Myron E. Humphrey Chickasha. 

Grant Adrian Reynolds Pond Creek. 



ELECTIONS AND PLATFORMS 391 

Greer Zack T. Pryse Mangum. 

Harper S. M. Hubbard Buffalo. 

Haskell D. R. Branham McCurtain. 

Harmon . . . .T. P. Shrewder Gould. 

Hughes ' M. M. Smith Holdenville. 

Jackson V. L. Dunham Olustee. 

Jefferson W. T. F. Bush Waurika. 

Johnston E. F. Hoffman Mill Creek. 

Kay Dan A. Bain Uncas. 

King-fisher S. W. Hogan Cashion. 

Kiowa John D. Appleby Hobart. 

Latimer John R. Williams Wilburton. 

Le Flore M. Nelson Bokoshe. 

Lincoln M. W. Lynch Stroud. 

Logan A. C. Goodrich Guthrie. 

Love W. L. Hagan Marietta. 

Majors James E. Jarvis Isabella. 

Marshall H. F. Keller Lebanon. 

Mayes Harry Seaton Pryor. 

McClain M. Haskins Blanchard. 

McCurtain W. A. Carter Garvin. 

Mcintosh John F. Vaughn Checotah. 

Murray W. Z. Hoggard Hickory. 

Muskogee James L. Fore Muskogee. 

Noble John Jensen Perry. 

Nowata L. T. Kinkead Nowata. 

Okfuskee Dr. Hunter Montgomery Okemah. 

Oklahoma Arthur H. Geissler Oklahoma City. 

Okmulgee H. E. Baker Okmulgee. 

Osage Ret Millard Pawhuska. 

Ottawa O. A. Wright Miami. 

Pawnee Charles Byers 'Cleveland, 

Payne Chris. Holzer Stillwater. 

Pittsburg J. P. Grady Hartshorne. 

Pontotoc John W. Beard Ada. 

Pottawatomie Charles J. Bocher Shawnee. 

Pushmataha Homer Earhart Antlers. 

Roger Mills J. A. Moad Carpenter. 

Rogers W. P. Johnson Claremore. 

Seminole Dr. G. B. Van Sandt Wewoka. 

Sequoyah A. J. Kennedy Vian. 

Stephens John B. Nichols Comanche. 

Texas Samuel Ecker Guymon. 

Tillman W. G. Roe Frederick. 

Tulsa W. W. Hyams Tulsa. 

Wagoner H. M. Brown Wagoner. 

Washington A. E. Graver Bartlesville. 

Washita A. E. Hughes Cordell. 

Woods Kent Eubanks Alva. 

Woodward J. A. Dixon , ^Woodward. 



SOCIALIST PARTY NATIONAL COMMITTEEMEN. 

1911. 

Oscar Ameringer Oklahoma City. 

John G. Wills Granite. 

George E. Owen Oklahoma City. 

Carrie C. Block Okemah. 



392 ^ OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

SOCIALIST PARTY STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES. 

1908. 

First District J. H. Miller Perkins. 

Second District Walter Thatcher Dacoma. 

Third District Dr. W. H. Davis Okemah. 

Fourth District James Higdon Ardmore. 

Fifth District E. E. English Norman. 

O. F. Branstetter, secretary-treasurer, Oklahoma City. 

1909. 

First District Wilfred Rupe Coyle. 

Second District Walter Thatcher Dacoma. 

Third District Dr. W. H. Davis Castle. 

Fourth District James Higdon Ardmore. 

Fifth District J. G. Wills Granite. 

At Large George E. Ov^^en Oklahoma City. 

At Large C. B. Boylan Shawnee. 

Ida Hayman, secretary-treasurer, Oklahoma City. 

1910. 

First District George Moore Pawnee. 

Second District H. A. Boyce Augusta. 

Third District J. A. Renfro .Wagoner. 

Fourth District J. W. Adair Boswell. 

Fifth District A. Fields Lawton. 

At Large John Hagel Oklahoma City. 

At Large E. S. Hurt Madill. 

O. F. Branstetter, secretary-treasurer, Oklahoma City. 

1911. 

First District W. L. Reynolds Kingfisher. 

Second District H. A. Boyce Augusta. 

Third District G. M. Snider Okemah. 

Fourth District J. W. Adair Boswell. 

Fifth District Mrs. Irene Yoeman Lawton. 

At Large John Hagel Oklahoma City. 

At Large Mrs. Winnie Branstetter Oklahoma City. 

R. E. Dooley, secretary-treasurer, Oklahoma City. 



State, Federal and Foreign 
Officers 



STATE GOVERNMENTS 



395 



STATE GOVERNMENTS 



ALABAMA— CAPITAL, MONTGOMERY. 



Office 



Name 



Term Ends|Saia)ry|PcJil'ts 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State . . . 
Supt. of Public Inst.. 
Attorney-General . . . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners, 



State Librarian .... 
Com. Agri. and Ind. 



. I Emmet O'Neal 

. I Walter D. Seed 

.1 Cvrus B. Brwn 

.1 C. B. Smith 

1 John Purifay 

.1 H. J. Willingham. .. 

• I Robert C. Brickall.. 
.[J. R. Dowdell 

• I Chas. Henderson ... 
1 Frank N. Julian . . . 
I Leoii McCord 

. 1 J. M. Riggs 

.1 R. P. Kolb 



1 

Term | 

1 1 


1 6 


yrs. 


'4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 1 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


1 4 


yrs. 


G 


\TS. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 1 


4 


yrs. 1 



Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
May, 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
I Jan.. 



19171$ 5,000 
1915 



1915 

1915 

1915 

1915 

1915] 

19171 

19131 

19151 

19151 

1917] 

19151 



3,000 
3,000 
3,>000 
3,000 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



3,0001Dem. 
5,000IDem. 
3,000 Dem. 



3,000 
3,000 
2,400 
3,000 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



*$6.00 per day during session of Legislature. 

ALASK.\— CAPITAL. JUNEAU. 



I 
Governor. Supt. of Pub. I . . 

Inst, (ex officio) I Walter E. Clark 

Acting Governor, Sec-( .. .. | I 

retary of Alaska. .. | Wm. L. Distin | 4 yrs. | Dec, 1912 



4 yrs. I Oct., 19131 



I 
7, 000 (Ren. 

4,000|Rep. 



fARIZONA— CAPITAL, PHOENIX. 



Governor 


1 1 
Richard E. Sloan . .. 


4 yrs. May, 


19131$ 3,000|Rep. 


Secretary of Territory. 


George U. Young 


4 yrs.l Jan., 


1915 


' *l,800|Rep. 


Auditor of Territory.. 


George A. Mauk 


2 yrs.l Jan., 


1913 


2,400IRep. 


Treasurer of Territory 


E. E. Kirkland 


2 yrs. May. 


191 i 


2,400lRep. 


Supt. -of Public Inst.. . 


Kirke T. Moore 


2 yrs. May. 


1911 


2.4O0TRep. 


Attornev-General 


John B. Wright 


2 5'rs. May, 


1911 


2,500|Rep. 


Chief Justice 


Edward Kent 

W. P. McNair 


■i yrs. Nov., 
2 yra. A-pril, 


1913 
1911 


5,000 Rep. 


R. R. Commissioners.. 


2.500 Rep. 




E. S. De Pass 


2 yrs. April, 


1911 


2,500 Rep. 




G. J. Stoneman 


2 yrs. April, 


1911 


2,500'T)em. 


State Librarian 


A. G. Stark _. . . 


2 yrs. April, 


19111 


eOOIRep. 



*And fees. 

•f-Since admitted to Union. 



ARKANSAS— CAPITAL, LITTLE ROCK. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State.. 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State.. 
Supt. of Public Inst. 
Attorney-General . . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners 



State Librarian . . . . 
Tax Commissioners. 



, .\Geo. W. Donaghey.. 
. I James T. Robinson., 
, .! Earle W. Hodges ... 

, .| John R. Jobe 

, .jjohn W. Crockett.., 

. I George B. Cook 

, .jHal ij. Norwood 

, .(Edgar A. McCuUoch, 
, .1 R. P. Allen 

I G. W. Bellamy ., 

I W. F. McKnight 

..I Earle W. Hodges... 
, .1 D. A. Gates 

I J. E. Hampton 

! L. M. Burge 



2 yrs(. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs'. 
2 yrs: 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
6 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1913 
1913 



2 yrs.l Jan. 
2 yrs.l Jan. 
2 yrs.l Jan. 



4.000 Dem. 

iDem. 

2,250|Dem. 
2,250|Dem. 
2,250|Dem. 
2,500|Deim. 
2,5001Dem. 
3, 600 1 Dem, 
2,500|De:m. 
2,500|D©m. 
2,500|Dem. 



19131 
1913 
1913 



2,5001Dem. 
2,500|Dem. 
2,500|Dem. 



396 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



CALIFOBNIA— CAPITAL, SACRAMENTO. 



Office 



Name 



iTerm |Term Ends|Salary|Poa'ts. 



Governor j Hiram W. Johnson... | 4 yrs.[ Jan., 

Lieutenant-Governor .| A. J. Wallace i 4 yrs.j Jan., 

Secretary of State. .. .1 Frank C. Jordan | 4 yrs.| Jan., 

A. B. Nye I 4 yrs.| Jan., 

W. R. Williams | 4 yrs.| Jan., 

Ed. Hyatt 4 yrs.| Jan., 

U. S. Webb ...; I 4 yrs,. Jan., 



State Controller ... 
Treasurer of State.. 
Supt. of Public Inst. 
Attorney-General . . 

Chief Justice | W. H. Beatty il2 yrs.i Jan . _, _ 

State Librarian | Jas. L. Gillis* | | 3,600]Rep. 

♦Elected by Library Board. 



— 1 

1915 


$10,000 


Rep. 


1915 


4,000 


Rep. 


191o 


5,000 


Rep. 


1915 


5,000 


Rep. 


1915 


5,000 


IRep. 


1915 


5,000 


iRep. 


1915 


6,000 


Rep. 


1915 


8, '000 


Rep. 



COLORADO— CAPITAL, DENVER. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State 
Auditor of State... 
Treasurer of State. 
Supt. of Public Inst, 
Attorney- General 
Chief Justice ... 
R. R. Commissioners 



> \ I 

I John F. Shafroth | 2 yrs.] 

S. R. Fitzgerald | 2 yrs.| 

James B. Pearce .... 2 yi's.l 

Michael A. Leddy ...i 2 yrs.| 

Roady Kenehan . . . . | 2 yrs. 

Helen M. Wixson ... I 2 yrs. 

Benj. Griffith | 2 yrs. 

John Campbell 110 yrs. 

D. H. Staley \ 4 yra 

i Aaron P. Anderson..] 6 yrs. 

I Sheridan S. Kendall | 6 yrs. 



Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1913j.$ 

19131 

1913 

19131 

1913 

1913 

1913 

1913 

1913 

1914 

191(5 



5,OO0|Dem. 
l,000|Dem. 
4,000 Demi. 
4,000|Dem. 
6,000lDem. 
3,000pRep. 
3,000|Rep. 
5,000|Rep. 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Rep. 



CONNECTICUT— CAPITAL, HARTFORD. 



Governor 1 Simeon E. Baldwin. 

Lieutenant-Governor .| Dennis J. Blakeslee. 

Secretary of State 1 Matthew H. Rogers. 

Auditor of State Edward S. Roberts. 

Treasurer of State..., I Costello Lippitt ... 

Attorney-General ....iJohn H. Light 

Chief Justice | Frederick B. Hall. . 

R. R. Commissioners..! Edward J. Doolittle. 

I Wm. O. Seymour . . . 

I Richard T. Higgins. 
State Librarian 1 George S. Goda rd . . . 

**$10.00 a day and expenses. 



2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


1 4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs.l 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 



Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
July, 
Jan., 
Jan., 
July, 
July, 
July, 
I July, 



19131* 

1913 

1913 

1913 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

1911 

191»| 



4,000 

500 

1,500 

1,500 
4.000 
3,000 



Deim. 

Rep. 

Rep. 

Dem. 

Rep. 

Rep. 

Rep. 
3,000|Rep. 
3,000fDem. 

3,000} 

1,8 00 1 Rep. 



DELAWARE— CAPITAL, DOVER. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor . 
Secretary of State.... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State 

Attorney-General . . . . 

Chief Justice 

State Librarian 

Insurance Com'sioner. 

*And fees. 



Simeon S. Pennewill.'j 
John M. Mendinhall. 
Wm. T. Smithers... 
Theodore Townsend. 
David O. Moore .... 
Andrew C. Gray ... 
James Pennewill . . . 
H. R. Harrington... 
Charles H. Maull . . . 




$ 4.000lRep. 

*100TRep', 

4,000|Rep. 

2,000|Rep. 

*1.950|Rep. 

2,1500] Dem. 

4,500]Rep. 

800]Rep. 

*2,000]Rep. 



FLORIDA— CAPITAL, TALLAHASSEE. 



Governor 

Secretary of State... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State..., 
Supt. of Public Inst.. 
Attorney-General . . , 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioner. 



I Albert "W. Gilchrist. 
I H. Clay Crawford . . 

Ernest Amos 

I W. V. Knott ., 

W. M. Holloway 

I Park M. Trammell. 

IJ. B. Whitfield 

I R. Hudson Burr .... 
] Royal C. Dunn 

N. A. Blitch 



4 yrs. 
4 yrs. 



4 yrs. 
4 yrs. 
4 yrs. 
6 yrs. 
4 yrs. 
4 yrs. 
4 yrs. 



Jan. 
Jan. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1913]$ 
1913 



1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1915 



5,000|Dem. 
2,500TDem. 

2.500|Dem. 



2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



STATE GOVERNMENTS 



337 



GEORGIA— CAPITAL, ATLANTA. 



Office 



Name 



Term [Term Ends|Salajry|Pal'ts. 



Governor 

Secretary of State.. 
Comptroller GeneraL 
Treasurer of State,. 
Supt. of Public Inst. 
Attorney-General .... 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners.. 



Hoke Smith 

Philip Cook 

Wm. A. Wright 



2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 



State Librarian 



. I Wm. L. Speer 2 yrs 

.1 M. L. Brittain . .. 
.IF. F. Felder 

W. H. Fish 

George Hillyer . . . 

O. B. Stevens 

H. W. Hill 

C. M. Candler 

Jos. F. Gray 

Mrs. M. B. Cobb. 



2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 




yrs. 


1 ^ 


yrs. 




yrs. 


1 - 


yrs. 




yrs. 




yrs. 



July, 
Julv, 
July, 
Jul.y, 
July, 
July, 
July, 
July, 
July, 
July, 
July, 
July, 
July, 



19131$ 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

19131 

1913 

1913 



5,000 
2.000 
2,000 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



2,5U0|Dem. 
2,500|Dem. 
3,000IDem. 
3,000|Dem. 
2,500iDem. 
2,500|Dem. 
2,500|Dem. 
2,500|Dem. 
2,500TDem. 
l,800IDem. 



HAWAII— CAPITAL, HONOLULU. 



Governor | Walter F. Frear 

Secretary of Territory! E. A. Mott-Smith .. 

Auditor of Territory. . I J. H. Fisher 

Treasurer of Territory] David L. Conkling. . 

Supt. of Public Inst... I Willis T. Pope 

Attorney-General ....I Alex. Lindsay, Jr... 

Chief Justice ( A. G. M. Robertson. 

Public Land Com | Marston Campbell .. 



4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yra. 


4 


yrs. 



Dec, 
Dec, 

Nov. , 
June, 
Jan., 
Feb., 
Mar., 
June,^ 



19111$ 7,000|Rep. 
19111 4,000|Rep. 

3,300|Rep. 

3,300|Rep. 

3,300|Rep. 

3.600|Rep. 

6,000|Rep. 

S.OOOJRep. 



1911 

1913] 
1914] 
19141 
19151 
19131 



IDAHO— CAPITAL, BOISE. 



Governor | James H. Hawley. . 

Lieutenant-Governor .1 Lewis H. Sweetser. 

Secretary of State | Wilfred L. Gifford. 

Auditor of State IS. D. Taylor 

Treasurer of State | O. V. Allen 

Supt. of Public Inst. .. I Grace M. Shepherd. 

Attorney-General 1 D. C. McDougall 

Chief Justice I George H. Stewart.. 

State Librarian | Minnie P. Dutton .. 



2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 

2 yrs. 

2 JTS. 

2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 vrs. 
2 yrs. 

t 



Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
'1913 
1913 
1913 



I 
5,000 Dem. 
* iRep. 
S.OOOjRep. 
3,000|Rep. 
4.000 Rep. 
2.400|Rep. 
4.000IRep. 
5.000lRep. 
l,200|Rep. 



*$7.50 per day for 60 days. 
fAppointive. 



ILLINOIS— CAPITAL, SPRINGFIELD. 



Governor I Charles Deneen ... 

Lieutenant-Governor | John G. Oglesby . . 

Secretary of State | James A. Rose | 

Auditor of State | Jas. S. McCullough. .| 

Treasurer of State | Edward E. Mitchell. .| 

Supt. of Public Inst. . .1 Francis G. Blair | 

Attorney-General | Wm. H. Stead I 

Chief Justice I Alonzo K. Vickers...! 

R. R. Commissioners. . I O. F. Berry 

I B. A. Eckhart 

. I Jas. A. Willoughby 




Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1915 


Jan., 


19131 


June, 


19151 


Jan., 


191o 


Jan., 


1913] 


Jan., 


19131 



$12,000|Rep. 

2,500|Rep. 

7,500lRep. 

7.500IRep. 
lO.OOOIRep. 

7,500|Rep. 
lO.OOOIRep. 
lO.OOOIRep. 

3,'500|Rep. 

3,i500|Rep. 

3,'500[Rep. 



INDIANA— CAPITAL, INDIANAPOL$S. 



Thos. R. Marshall j 4 yrs. 

Frank J, Hall | 4 yrs. 



L. G. Ellingham 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State.. 

Auditor of State | Wm. H. O'Brien 

Treasurer of State j Wm. H. Volmer 

Supt. of Public Inst. 
Attorney-General . . 
R. R. Commissioners 



Chas. Greathouse 
I Thos. M. Honan . 

I Wm. J. Wood 

I Frank E. Pavne . 
I John F. McClure 
State Librarian | D. C. Brown 



' z vrs. 
I 2 yrs. 
I 2 yrs, 

2 yrs. 

2 yrs. 

4 yrs. 

4 yrs 



Jan., 
Jan., 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Feb., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
May, 
May, 



I 4 vrs. I May, 



19121: 

1912 

1912 

19121 

19131 

19131 

19131 

1913! 

19111 

19121 



♦Appointive. 



8,000TDem. 

l,000|Dem. 

6.500|Dem. 

7,500|Dem. 

7,500|Dem 

3,000|Dem. 

7,500|Dem. 

4,000|Dem. 

4.000IDem. 

4.000lRep. 

l,800|Rep. 



398 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



IOWA— CAPITAL, DES MOINES. 



Office 


i 

Name 


Term *rerm 

1 2 yrs. Jan., 
1 2 yrs. Jan., 


1 1 
Ends iSalan-yl Pol' ts. 

1913 J*5,000 Rep. 




. Beryl P. Carroll . . . 
. George W. Clark . . 


Lieutenant-Governor 


1913 t2,O00IRep. 


Secretary of State... 


• W'm. C. Hayward.. 


1 2 yrs. Jan., 


19131 J2,206IRep. 


Auditor of State 


.1 John L. Bleakly ... 


1 2 yrs.| Jan., 


19131 $2,200TTtep. 


Treasurer of State... 


.[ Willison W. Morrow 


1 2 yrs.l Jan., 


1913| i2,200|Rep. 


Supt. of Public Inst.. 


.[Albert M. Deyoe ... 


1 2 yrs-l Jan., 


19131 2,200|Rep. 


Attorney-General . . . 


. 1 George Cosson 


1 2 yrs. Jan., 


19131 4,000|Rep. 


Cliief Justice 


.| John C. Sherwin .. 


i 1 yr. Dec, 


1913| 6,0U0|Rep. 


R. R. Commissioners 


.(Nat S. Ketchum 


1 4 yrs. Jan., 


19131 2,200 Rep. 




1 David J. Palmer . . . 


1 4 yrs.l Jan,., 


19151 2,200 Rep. 




1 ciiiiora 1 norne .... 
• 1 Johnson Brigham . . 


1 4 yrs.l Jan., 


19151 2,200 Rep. 


State Librarian 


1 6 yrs. Jan., 


19141 2,400lRep. 



♦Receives $600 extra for house rent. 
fFor regular session of the Legislature. 
JReceives $1,200 as member of Exeicutive Council. 

KANSAS— CAPITAL, TOPEKA. 



Governor | 

Lieutenant-Governor .| 
Secretary of State.... | 

Auditor of State 1 

Treasurer of State... .| 
Supt. of Public Inst. . . I 
Attorney- General . . . . 1 

Chief Justice i 

R. R. Commissioners..! 
I 
I 

State Librarian 1 

Supt. Insurance \ 

*And per diein. 



W. R. Stubbs 1 

Richard J. Hopkins.. 1 
Chas. H. Sessions....! 

W. E. Davis 

Mark Tulley 

E. T. Fair child 

John S. Dawson 

Wm. A. Johnson ....| 

George Plumb 1 

Frank J. Ryan 1 

John T. White | 

James L. King | 

Ike S. Lewis 



2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 



1 Jan., 


19131$ 


5,000|Rep 


Jan., 


19131 


*700|Rep 


Jan., 


1913 


2,500|Rep 


Jan., 


1913 


2,5001Rep 


Jan., 


1913 


2,5001Rep 


Jan., 


1913 


2,5001Rep 


1 Jan., 


1913 


2,500|Rep. 


Jan., 


19131 


4,000|Rep 


Jan., 


19131 


2,500|Rep 


Jan., 


19131 


2,500|Rep 


Jan., 


19131 


2,500|Rep 


1 Jan., 


19131 


2,0001Rep 


1 Jan., 


19131 


2.5001Rep 



KENTUCKY— CAPITAL, FRANKFORT. 



Governor \ 

Lieutenant-Governor .| 
Secretary of State....! 

Auditor of State i 

Treasurer of State.... I 
Supt. of Public Inst... 
Attorney-General . . . . i 

Chief Justice | 

R. R. Commissioners. .1 

I 

I 

State Librarian 1 

*$10.00 per day. 



Augustus E. Willson. I 4 yra. 

Wm. H. Cox i 4 yrs 

Ben L. Bruner 4 yrs. 

F. P. James 4 yrs, 

E. Farley f 4 yrs 

Ellsworth Regenstinej 4 yrs 

Jas. Breathitt | 4 yrs. 

J. P. Hobson I 8 yrs 

L. P. Tarlton 1 4 yrs 

A. T. Syler [ 4 yrs 

Lawrence B. Finn, ... 4 yrs 

F. Kavanaugh 1 4 yrs. 




LOUISIANA— CAPITAL, BATON ROUGE. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State... 
Supt. of Public Inst.. 
Attorney-General .... 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners-. 

State Librarian 



Jared Y. Sanders... 
P. M. Lambremont.. 

John T. Michel 

Paul Capdevieille. . . 

O. B. Steele 

T. H. Harris 

Walter Guion 

Jos. A. Breaux 

Henry B. Sclirieber. 

J. J. Meredith 

Shelbv Taylor 

Mrs. A. P. Phillips. 



4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


12 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 


« 


yrs. 


ti 


yrs.l 





Mav, 1912 

Mav, 1912 

Mav, 1912 

Mav. 1912 

Mav, 1912 

Mav, 1912 

May, 1912 

Nov., 1914 



5,000 
1 500 
5.000 
5.000 
4.000 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



5.000|Dem. 
5,000 Dem. 
6.000 Dem. 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



STATE GOVERNMENTS 
MAINE— CAPITAL, AUGUSTA. 



399 



Office 



Name 



I Term |Term EndslSalcurylPol'ts. 



Governor | Fi-ed'k W. Plaisted. 

Secretary of State.... Cyrus W. Davis ... 

Auditor of State | Lament A. Stevens. 

Treasurer of State. . ..| James F. Singleton. 

Supt. of Public Inst. . . | Payson Smitli 

Attorney-General [Cyrus R. Tupper .. 

Ctiief Justice j Lucilius A. Emery.. 

R. R. Commissioners,. Elmer P. Spofford... 

I Frank Keizer 

i John A. Jones 

State Librarian (Henry C. Prince.... 



2 yrs.j 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. I 

2 yrs. 

3 yrs.j 

2 yrs.] 
7 yrs. 

3 yrs. 
3 yrs. 
3 yrs., 
3 yrs. 



Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
June, 
Jan,, 
Oct., 
May, 
Sept., 

iSOV., 

Aug., 



19131$ 

1913 

19131 

19131 

1913J 

19131 

19121 

1913( 

19131 

1912 

1913 



3,000lDem. 
2,500|Dem. 
2,i500|Dem. 
2,000|Dem. 
2,500|Rep. 
4,000IDem. 
5,000 Rep. 
2,500|Rep. 
2,000|Dem. 
2,000 Dem. 
l,500|Rep. 



MARYLAND— CAPITAL, ANNAPOLIS. 



I I 

Governor i Austin L. Crothers..| 4 yrs. 

Secretary of State....! N. W. Williams I 4 yrs. 

Auditor of State ] George R. Ash 2 yrs. 

Treasurer of State. .. .1 Murray Vandiver ...j 2 yrs. 
Supt. of Public Inst. ..iM. Bates Stephens..] 4 yrs. 

Attorney-General i Isaac L. Strass | 4 yrs. 

Chief Justice \A. Hunter Boyd |15 yrs. 

State Librarian \ Miss L. M. Shaffer., j 4 yrs. 



1912 


$ 4,500 


1912 


2,000 


1912 


1,800 


1912 


2,500 


1914 


3,000 


1911 


3,000 


1924 


5,800 


191;! 


1,500 



Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



MASSACHUSETTS— CAPITAL, BOSTON. 



Gk)vernor | 

Lieutenant-Governor .j 
Secretary of State....! 

Auditor of Stale I 

Treasurer of State.... | 
Supt. of Public Inst. ..I 

Attorney-General | 

Chief Justice i 

R. R. Commissioners..! 

i 

State Librarian 1 

Insurance Com'isionerj 
Bank Commissioner . . . ! 
Com'r of Corporations! 



Eugene N. Foss .... 
L. A. Frothingham. 

Wm. M. Olin , 

Henry E. Turner... 
Elmer A. Stevens . . 
David Snedden .... 

James M. Swift 

M. P. Knowlton 

Walter Perley Hall. 
George W. Bishop.. 

Clinton White 

Chas. F. D. Belden. 
Frank H. Hardison. 
Arthur B. Chapin.. 
"Wm. D. T. Trefry. 




*Life. 
**Pleasure of Governor. 



MICHIGAN— CAPITAL, LANSING. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State.. 

Auditor of State 

Auditor of State 

Supt. of Public Inst.. 
Attorney-General . . . . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners. 



State Librarian 



Chase S. Osborn 

John Q. Ross 

Fred C. Martindale.. 
Oramel B. Fuller . . . 
Albert E. Sleeper . . . 

Luther L. Wright 

Franz C. Kuhn 

Russell C. Ostrander. 

C. L. Glasgow 

Geo. W. Dickinson.. 
Lawton T. Hemans.. 
Mary C. Spencer . . . . 




Jan., 


1913 


$ '5,000 


Rep. 


Jan., 


1913 


*800 


Rep. 


Jan., 


1913 


2,500 


Rep. 


Jan., 


1913 


2,500 


Rep. 


Jan., 


1913 


2,500 


Rep. 


July, 


1911 


4,000 


Rep. 


Jan., 


1913 


S.OOO'Rep. 


Dec, 


1911 


7.000 


Rep. 


Dec, 


1915 


3,000 


Rep. 


Jan., 


1913 


3,000 


Rep. 


Jan., 


1917 


3,000 


Dem. 


Jan., 


1913 


1,800 


Rep. 



♦For regular session; $5.00 per day extra session. 



400 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

MINNESOTA— CAPITAL, ST. PAUL. 



Office 



Name 



Grovernor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State... 
Supt. of Public Inst,. 
Attorney-General .... 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners. 



State Librarian 



A. O. Eberhart . . 
Sam Y. Gordon . . . 
Julius A. Schmahl 

S. G. Iverson 

W. J. Smith 

C. G. Schultz 

Geo. T. Simpson . . 
Charles M. Start . 

Ira B. Mills 

Charles E. Elmquist.i 
Charles P. Staples.. 
Elias J. Lien 



Term [Term Ends] Sal airy IPoVts. 



7,000|Rep. 
* I Rep. 
3,500|Rep. 



1 

1 Term 1 


1 4 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 


1 4 


yrs. 


1 4 


yrs. 


1 4 


yrs. 


1 2 


yrs. 



Jan., 


19131 


Jan., 


19131 


Jan., 


19131 


Jan., 


1915 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


1913 


Jan., 


19131 


Jan., 


19131 



4,200 
3,500 
3.500 
4,800 
5,000 
3,600 
3,600 



2.000 



Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Reip. 
Rep. 



600'Tlep 



Rep. 



*$10.00 per day during session of Legislature. 



MISSISSIPPI— CAPITAL, JACKSON. 



Governor \ 

Lieutenant-Governor .| 

Secretary of State 1 

Auditor of State I 

Treasurer of State...,! 
Supt. of Public Inst... I 

Attorney-General \ 

Chief Justice | 

R. R. Commissioners..! 
I 

State Librarian | 

Insurance Com'r \ 



E. P. Noel 

Luther Manship 
Jos. W. Power . 

E. J. Smith 

G. R. Edwards . 
J. N. Powers .... 

S. S. Hudson 

R. B. Mayes 

Jno. A. Webb . . . 
P. M. Shepherd . 

W. R. Scott 

Miss M. Plunkett 
T. M. Henry 




Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



MISSOURI— CAPITAL, JEFFERSON CITY. 



Governor 


1 

Herbert S. Hadley 
John F. Gmelich. 


... 4 yrs. 
... 4 yrs. 


Jan., 
Jan., 


1913 
1913 


$ 5,000 
fl.OOO 


Rep. 


Lieutenant-Governor . 


Rep. 


Secretary of State.... 


Cornelius Roach 


... 4 yrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


3,000 


Dem. 


Auditor of State 


John P. Gordon . 


... 4 yrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


3,000 


Dem. 


Treasurer of State.... 


James Cowgill . . . 


... 4 vrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


3,000 


Dem. 


Supt. of Public Inst... 


Wm. P. Evans . . 


... 4 yrs. 


Jan., 


1915 


3,000 


Rep. 


Attorney-General 


Elliott W. Major 


... 4 yrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


3,000 


Dem. 


Chief Justice 


Leroy B. Valliant 
John A, Knott . . 


... 10 yrs. 
... 6 yrs. 


Jan., 
Jan,, 


1913 
1915 


4,500 
3,000 


Dem. 


R .R. Commissioners.. 


Dem. 




H. R. Oglesby .. 


... 6 yrs. 


Jan,, 


1913 


3,000 


Dem. 




F. W. Wightman 


... 6 yrs. 


Jan,, 


1917 


3,000lRep. 


State Librarian 


Thos. W. Hawkin 


3 * 







1,800 Dem. 











t$7.00 per day additional during session of Legislature. 
♦Pleasure of Supreme Court. 



MONTANA— CAPITAL, HELENA. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State... 
Supt. of Public Inst.. 
Attorney-General . . . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners. 



State Librarian 



Edwin L. Norris . . 

Wm. R. Allen 

A. N. Yoder 

H. R. Cunningham. 

E, E. Es.selstyn 

W. E. Harmon 

A. J. Galen 

Theo. Brantley 

Dan Boyle 

B, T. Stanton 

E. A. Morley 

A. K. Barbour 



4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


JTS. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


JTS. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 


4 


yi-s. 


6 


yrs. 
1 



Jan., 
Jan, 
Jan,, 
Jan,, 
Jan,, 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 



I 
19131$ 
1913] 
1913 
1S13| 
19131 
1913] 
19131 
19171 
19151 
1913 
1917 



5.000 Dem. 
* Rep . 
3,000 Rep. 
3,000 Rep. 
3,000 Rep. 
3,000|Rep. 
3,000TIlep. 
6,000|Re^. 
4,0001Rep. 
4,000|Rep. 
4,000|Rep. 
l,500|Rep. 



*$10,00 per day. 



STATE GOVERNMENTS 



401 



NEBRASKA— CAPITAL, LINCOLN 



Office [ Name ITerm |Terin 

1 . I . I 

Governor 1 Chester H. Aldrich..i 2 yrs. 

Lieutenant-Grovernor .1 M. R. Hopewell | 2 yrs. 

Secretary of State. ...i Addison Nait 1 2 yrs. 

Auditor of State [Silas R. Barton i 2 yrs. 

Treasurer of State .... i V, alter A. George | 2 yrs.j 

Supt. of Public Inst. . . I J ds. \V. Crabtree 2 yrs. 

Attorney-General ....i Grant G. Martin j 2 yrs.. 

Chief Justice j M. B. Reese | 6 yrs.] 

R. R. Commissioners..! H. J. Winnett | 6 vrs. 

1 H. S. Clark, Jr | tj yrs. 

I W. J. Furse | tl yrs. 

State Librarian | H. C. Lindsay | f | 

*$10.00 per day during Legislature. 
tAppointive. 



EndslSalarylPol'ts. 



Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 



19131$ 2,500|Rep. 



1913| 
19131 

iyi3| 

19131 
19131 
19131 

19141 
1914| 
19171 
19121 



I Rep. 
2,000|Rep. 
2,500lRl(ep. 
2,500 Rep. 
2,000lRep. 
2,500|Re(P. 
4,500|Rep. 
3,000|Rep. 
3,0001Rep. 
3,000|Dem. 
l,500|Rep. 



NEVADA— CAPITAL, CARSON CITY, 



Governor , 

♦Lieutenant-Governor, 
Secretary of State..., 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State..., 
Supt. of Public Inst.., 
♦Attorney-General . . , 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners.. 



1 Tasker L. Oddie 

I Gilbert Ross 

I George Brodigan . , . 

1 Jacob Eggrs 

1 Wm. McMillan 

J. E. Bray 

1 Cleveland Baker.... 
I James G. Sweeney. 

I H. P. Bartine 

I J. P. Shaughnessey. 
I Wm. H. Simmons.. 



4 


1 
yrs., 


4 


^rs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 


3 


yrs. 


3 


yrs. 


3 


yrs. 



Dec, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Feb., 
Feb., 
Jan.. 



19141$ 

19141 

19141 

1914] 

19141 

19141 

1914J 

19121 

19121 

19111 

1914 



4,0001Rep. 
3,000|D©m. 
2,400|Dem. 
2,400|Rep. 



2,400 
2.000 
4,500 
6,000 
5,000 
2,500 
2.500 



Rep. 
Dean. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Rep. 



*Ex-officio Adjutant-General and Commander of State Police. 
tEx-officio Mineral Land Commissioner. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— CAPITAL, CONCORD. 



Governor | 

Secretary of State....! 

Auditor of State | 

Treasurer of State....] 
Supt. of Public Inst... I 
Attorney-General ....| 

Chief Justice I 

R. R. Commissioners..! 
I 
I 

State Librarian | 

Insurance Com 'r | 

♦Not Limited. 



Robert P. Bass | 2 yrs. | Jan., 

Edward N. Pearson. | 2 yrs. I an., 
William B. Fellows..] 2 yrs. ( May, 

Solon A. Carter I 2 yrs. | Jan., 

Henry C. Morrison...] 2 yrs.| Oct., 
Edwin G. Eastman. | 2 yrs. I Jan., 

Frank N. Parsons...) ISept., 

Oscar L. Young 3 yrs. J Jan., 

A. J. Whittemore I 3 yrs. ( Jan., 

George E. Bales | 3 yrs. | Jan., 

Arthur H. Chase | * | 

George H. Adams I 3 yrs. | Oct., 



3,000|Rep. 
4,000(Rep. 
3,000 Rep. 
2.500 Rep. 
2^500|Rep. 
2,500lRep. 



4,200 
2,200 
2,500 
2,000 
2,500 



Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Dem. 
Rep. 



2.000[Reip 



NEW JERSEY— CAPITAL, TRENTON. 



Governor | Woodrow Wilson ., 

Secretary of State....] S. D. Dickinson 

Auditor of State [William E. Drake.. 

Treasurer of State. . ..1 Daniel S. Voohees... 
Supt. of Public Inst... 1 Charles J. Baxter... 

Attorney-General ....j Edmund Wilson 

Chief Justice 1 Wm. S. Gtimmere... 

R. R. Commissioners..! Robert Williams ... 

I Thomas J. Hillery . . 

I Frank H. Sommer. 
State Librarian ] Henry C. Buchanan. 



. I 3 yrs. 
• I 5 yrs. 
. I 5 yrs. 
. 1 3 yrs. 
. '5 yrs. 
. 1 5 yrs. 
. 1 7 yrs. 
. I 6 yrs. 
. I 6 yrs. 
I 6 yrs. 

. I 5 JTS. 



Jan., 

April, 

1 Jan., 

j Mch., 

I Mch., 

I Jan., 

Nov., 

1 May, 

I May, 

May, 

Feb.. 



1914|$10 
1912J 6 
19141 
1913 
1912] 
1914] 7, 
1915] 11, 
1913] 5, 
19151 5, 
1911 5, 
1914 3. 



000 1 Dem. 
,000 1 Rep. 
,500 1 Rep. 
.000 Rep. 
,000|Rep. 
,0001Rep. 

000 Rep. 

000 1 Rep. 



Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 



402 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



JNEW MEXICO— CAPITAL, SANTA FE. 



Office 


1 1 

Name Term 


1 1 
Term ii,nds|SalarylPorts. 

1 1 




William J. Mills i 4 yrs. 

Nathan Jaffa | 4 yrs. 

Wm. G. Sargent 2 yrs. 

Miguel A. Otero '2, yrs. 

James E. Clark 2 yrs. 

Frank W. Clancy ... 2 yrs. 

William H. Pope 4 yrs. 

Lola C. Arniijo | 2 yrs. 


Mch., 1914|$ 3,000IRep. 
Jan., 19121 1,800 Rep. 
1 3,000 Rep. 


Secretary of Territory. 
Auditor of Territory.. 
Treasurer of Territory 
Supt. of Public Inst... 
Attorney-General .... 
Chief Justice 


1 2,400|Rep. 


3,000 Rep. 


3,000 Rep. 


Mch., 19141 a.OOORep. 
1 1 1 


State Librarian 



iSince admitted to Union. 



NEW YORK— CAPITAL, ALBANY. 



Governor 


1 
Johu A. Dix 


1 2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912 


[$10,000 Dem. 


Lieutenant-Governor . 


Thomas F. Conway. . 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912 


5,000 Dem. 


Secretary of State 


Edward Lazansky . . . 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912 


6,000 Dem. 


Comptroller of State.. 


William Sohmer 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912 


8,000 Dem. 


Treasurer of State 


John J. Kennedy 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912 


6,000 Dem. 


Com'r of Education.. 
Attorney-General 


Andrew S. Draper 

Thomas Carmody . . . 


* 






7,500|Rep. 
lO.OOOfpem. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912 


Chief Justice 


Edgar M. CuUen 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1913 


15,000|Dem. 


Public Service Com. 










1 1 


First District 


Wm. R. Wilcox .... 


5 yrs. 


Feb., 


1913 


15,0001 




Wm. McCarroU 


5 yrs. 


Feb., 


1912 


lo,000| 




Edward M. Bassett.. 


yrs. 


Feb., 


1911 


15,000] 




Milo R. Maltbie 


■5 yrs. 


Feb., 


1915 


15,0001 




John E. Eustis 


5 yrs. 


Feb., 


1914 


15,0001 


Second District 


Frank W. Stevens... 


5 yrs. 


Feb., 


1913 


15,0001 




John B .Olmsted 


5 yrs. 


Feb., 


1912 


15,000 






John N. Carlisle 


D yrs. 


Feb., 


1911 


15,000' 






Martin S. Decker . . . 


o yrs. 


Feb., 


1915 


15,000 






James E. Sague 


5 yrs. 


Feb., 


1914 


15,000 




State Librarian ...i.. 


James I. Wyer, Jr. . . 













♦Pleasure of Regents. 



NORTH CAROLINA— CAPITAL, RALEIGH. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State... 
Supt. of Public Inst.. 
Attorney-General . . . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners. 



W. W. Kitchin .. 
W. C. Newland . . 
J. Bryan Grimes 
William P. Wood 
B. R. Lacey 



State Librarian , 
Insurance Com'r 



T. W. Bickett 

Walter Clark 

Franklin McNeill. 
Henry C. Brown . 
William T. Lee . ., 

M. O. Sherrill 

James R. Young . 



4 


1 
yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


>TS. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 


t; 


yrs. 


6 


yrs. 


4 


yrs. 


1 4 


yrs. 



Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan., 

Jan., 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 
I Jan., 

Jan. 
1 Jan. 



I 
1913" 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
19131 
19151 
19171 
19131 
19131 



I 4,000 

* 

3.500 
3,000 
3.500 
3,000 



Dem. 

Dem. 

Dem. 

Dem. 

Dem. 

Dem. 
S.OOOJDem. 
3.900 Dem. 
3,000 Dem. 
3,000|Dem. 
3,000|Dem. 
l,7501Dem. 
3,5001Dem. 



5.00 per day during session of Legislature. 

NORTH DAKOTA— CAPITAL, BISMARCK. 



Governor 1 

Lieutenant-Governor .| 
Secretary of Stace....l 

Auditor of State I 

Treasurer of State....! 
Supt. of Public Inst. ..1 

Attorney-General 1 

Chief Justice 1 

Pub. Utilities Com'rs..| 

I 

I 

State Librarian \ 

♦Appointive. 



John Burke 

Usher L. Burdick 
P. D. Norton 

D. K. Brightbill .. 
Gunder Olson .... 

E. J. Taylor 

Andrew Miller . . . . 

D. E. Morgan 

W. H. Stutsman . 
O. P. N. Anderson 
W. H. Mann 

E. P. Wing 



2 yrs. 


Dec, 


19121$ 


5,000iDem. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


19121 


l,0001Rep. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912 


3,000 


Rep. 


2 £rs. 


Dec, 


1912 


3,000" 


Rep. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


19121 


3,000 


Rep. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


19121 


S.OOOlRep. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


1912] 


3,600 Rep. 


6 yrs. 


Dec, 


19121 


5,000 Rep. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


19121 


2,000|Rep. 


2 yrs. 


>-^ec., 


19121 


2,O0OIRep. 


2 yrs. 


Dec, 


19121 


2,000Ttlep. 


* 





1 


1.000 


Rep. 



STATE GOVERNMENTS 



403 



OHIO— CAPITAL, COLUMBUS. 



Office 



I I I I I 

I Name | Term |Term EndslSalary|Pol'ts. 

■ IJudson Harmon 1 2 yrs. ( Jan., 1913|$10,000iDem. 

•I I I ti I 

.1 Cnas. H. Graves j 2 yrs.j Jan., 19131 6,5001Dem. 

,| Edw. M. Fullington | 4 yrs.j Jan., 1913| 6,500|Rep. 

.1 David S. Creamer ...[ 2 yrs. Jan., 1913| e.SOOjDem. 

.1 Frank W. Miller j 2 yrs.) July, 1913J 4,000|Dem. 

J Timothy S. Hosan...j 2 yrs.j Jan., 1913 6,500jDem. 

.1 William T. Spear 1 6 yrstj Dec, 1912| 6.000|Rep. 

.[C. H. Hughes | 6 yrs.l Feb., 19111 5,000|Dem. 

I O. P. Gothlin | 6 yrs. | Feb., 1913| 5,000|Rep. 

I J. C. Sullivan | 6 yrs.j Feb., 19151 5,000!Dem. 

■ I C. B. Galbreath 1 * 1.. 1 3,0001Rep. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State. 
Auditor of State... 
Treasurer of State. 
Supt. of Public Inst 
Attorney-General . 
Chief Justice .... 
R. R. Commissioners 



State Librarian 



♦Appointive. 



OKLAHOMA— CAPITAL, OKLAHOMA CITY. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State 
Auditor of State.. 
Treasurer of State 
Supt. of Public Inst 
Atiorney-Generc. 
Chief Justice .... 
R. R. Commissioners 



State Librarian 



Lee Cruce 

J. J. McAlester . . . 
Benj. F. Harrison. 

Leo Meyer 

Robert Dunlop . . . 

R. H. Wilson 

Chas. West 

John B. Turner .. 
Geo. A. Henshaw . 

Jack Love 

A. P. Watson 

S. O. Dawes 



I 
4 yrs.l 
4 yrs.l 
4 yrs.l 
4 yrs.l 
4 yrs. j 
4 yrs.l 
4 yrs.j 
6 yrs. 
6 yrs.] 
t> yrs. I 
6 yi-s.| 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Jan. 



191-511 
19151 
19151 
19151 
19151 
19151 
19151 
19131 
19171 
19131 
19151 
I 



4,500|Dem. 
l.OOOlDem. 
2,500|Dem. 
2,500|Dem. 
3.000jDem. 
2,5001Dem. 
4,00UlDem. 
4,000iDem. 
4,0U0|Dem. 
4,000|Dem. 
4,0001Dem. 
1.500|Dem. 



♦Appointive. 





OREGON— CAPITAL, 


SALEM. 






Governor 


1 1 

. [ Oswald West 

. 1 Frank W. Benson . . . 

. 1 Thus. B. Kay 

.| L. R. Alderman 

;i A. M. Crawford 

- 1 Robert Eakin 

.1 Thos. K. Campbell... 

1 Frank J. Miller 

1 Clyde B. Atchison.... 
.1 Miss Edna Hawley... 


4 yrs. Jan., 
4 yrs. Jan., 
4 yrs.| Jan., 
4 yrs.j Jan., 
4 yrs.j Jan., 
6 yrs. Jan., 
4 yrs. Jan., 
4 yrs.l Jan., 
4 yrs.l Jan., 
* 1 


1 
19151$ 
19151 
19151 
19151 
1915j 

■T.913J 
19131 
1915j 
19131 

1 


1 
5,000jDem. 
4,500|Rep. 

4,5UO|Rep. 
3,UUU|Rep. 
3,0UU|Kep. 
4,5001Rep. 
4,000iRep. 
4,0001Rep. 
4,000|Rep. 
1.50UI 


Secretary of State.. 
Treasurer of State.. 
Supt. of Pub. Inst.. 
Attorney-General .. 
Chief Justice 


Corporation Com'rs. 
State Librarian .... 



♦Appointive. 



PENNSYLVANIA— CAPITAL, HARRISBURG. 





1 1 
.iJohn K Tener 


4 yrs. 


Jan., 
Jan., 


1.1 ', 


1 
^O.OOOjRep. 
S.OOOjRep. 


Lieutenant-Governor 


• 1 John M. Reynolds 


4 yrs. 


191'5| 


Secretary of State., 


. 1 Robert McAfee 


4 yrs. 


Jan., 


..-»15i 


S.OOOjRep. 


Auditor of State 


• 1 A. B. Sisson 


3 yrsi. 


May, 


19131 


S.OOOjRep. 


Treasurer of State . . 


1 Charles F. Wright . . . 


3 yrs. 


May. 


19131 


S.OOOjRep. 


Supt. of Pub. Inst.. 


.1 Nathan C. Shaeffer.. 


4 yrs. 


-April 


19131 


5,000|Dem. 


Attorney-General . . 


.1 John C. Bell 


4 yrs. 


Jan., 


19151 


12.000jRep. 


Chief Justice 


.1 D Newlin Fell 


21 yrs. 
5 yrs. 




19151 


10,500|Rep. 
S.OOOIDem. 


R. R. Commissioner 


.1 Milton J. Brecht 


Jan., 


1916 




1 Charles N. Mann 


,1 yrs. 


Jan., 


191-^ 


S.OOOIRep. 




1 Nathaniel Ewlng .... 


5 yrs. 


Jan., 


19131 


S.OOOlRep. 


State Librarian .... 


.1 T. L. Montgomery .. 


* 




1 


4.500|Rep. 










♦Appointive. 



404 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



RHODE ISLAND CAPITAL, PROVIDENCE. 



Office 



Name 



II 11 

I Term ^Term EndslSalairylPol'ts. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 
Secretary of State... 

Auditor of State 

Treasurer of State . . 
Supt. of Pub. Inst... 
Attorney-General . . . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners. 
State Librarian 



A. J. Pothier | 1 yr. | Jan., 19121$ 



1 Zenas W. Bliss 

J. Fred Parker 

Cliarles C. Gray 

1 Walter A. Read 

Walter E. Ranger . . . 

Wm. B. Greenough.. 

Edward C. Dubois... 

Jos. P. Burlingame.. 

Herbert O. Brigham.j 



lyr 
1 yr. 
3 yrs 
1 yr. 

* 

1 yr. 

I 3 JTS. 



Jan., 19121 

j Jan., 1912| 

1 Jan., 19121 

I Jan., 19121 

I'jan.V i9i'2' 

1 1 

Jan., 19131 



3.000 
500 
4,500 
2,500 
4,000 
3.000|Rep. 
4,500|Rep. 
6,500|Rep. 
2,500|Rep. 
1,600 1 Rep. 



Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 



•Elected by State Board of Education. 
fLife. 

SOUTH CAROLINA— CAPITAL, COLUMBIA. 





..Cole L. Blease 

.1 C. A. Smith 


2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 


Jan., 
Jan., 


1 
1913 $ 
1913 


3,000 Dem. 


Lieutenant-Governor 


* Dem. 


Secretary of State... 


.1 R. M. McCown 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


19131 


1,900 Dem. 


Comptroller General. 


.1 A. W. Jones 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


1913] 


1,900 Dem. 


Treasurer of State . . 


.| R. H. Jennings 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


1,900 Dem. 


Supt. of Pub. Inst... 


.1 J. E. Swearingen 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


19131 
1913 


l,900iDem. 


Attorney-General . . . 


. 1 J. Eraser Lyon 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


l,900|Dem. 


Chief Justice 


.1 Ira B. Jones 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


l,900|Dem. 


R. R. Commissioners 


.1 B. L. Caughman 


6 yrs. 


Jan., 


1915 


l,900lDem. 




1 J. G. Richards 


6 yrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


1.9001 Dem. 




1 McD. Hampton 


6 yrs. 


Jan., 


1917 


l.gOOlDem. 


State Librarian 


.1 Miss L. La Borde .. 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


1912 


8001 Dem. 


Insurance Com'r .... 


.1 P. H. McMaster 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


19121 


2,500|Dem. 



$8.00 per day for 40 days. 
$10 per day. 



SOUTH DAKOTA— CAPITAL, PIERRE. 



Governor 1 

Lieutenant-Goverm- .| 

Secretary of State 

Auditor of State 1 

Treasurer of State ...I 

Supt. of Pub. Inst 1 

Attorney-General . | 

Chief Justice | 

R. R. Commissioners..! 

State Librarian 1 



R. S. Vessey 

Frank M. Byrne . . . 

Samuel C. Plley 

Henry B. Anderson. 
Geo. G. Johnson ... 

C. G. Lawrence 

Roval C. Johnson . . 

Ellison G. Smith 1 

Geo. Rice | 

F. C. Robinson 

W. G. Smith | 

James S. Sebree | 




I 
1912 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913] 
19131 
19151 
1913[ 
19151 
19171 
19131 



S.OOOIRep. 
eOOIRep. 
l,800!Rep. 
l,800|Rep. 
1.800|Rep. 
1.800|Rep. 
l,000iRep. 
3,0001Rep. 
l,500|Rep. 
l,600|Rep. 
l,500|Rep. 
l.oOOlRep. 



TENNESSEE— CAPITAL, NASHVILLE. 



Governor 

Secretary of State.... 
Comptroller of State., 
Treasurer of State . . , 
Supt. of Pub. Inst..., 

Attorney-General 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners. 



State Librarian 



I 

1 Ben W. Hooper 

I Hallum W. Goodloe. . 

I Frank Dibrell 

1 Reau E. Folk 

R. L. Jones 

( Chas. T. Gates 

1 J. K. Shields 

I B. A. Enloe 

I Frank Avent 

I Harvey H. Hannah.. 
I Miss :M. Skeffington. 



1 4 


1 
yrs.] 
yrs. 


1 2 


yrs. 


1 2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


8 

1 s 


yrs. 
yrs. 1 


1 2 
1 2 
1 2 


yrs.i 
yrs. 
vrs. 


1 4 


>TS.| 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
I Jan., 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1913i5 

19131 

19111 

1911[ 

19111 

19181 

1918! 

1913f 

19131 

19131 

1911! 



4.0001Rep. 
3.5001 Dem. 
4.000] Dem. 
3.500|Dem. 
2,000 Dem. 
3,000!Dem. 
3,500|Dem. 
2.000|Dem. 
2,000|Dem. 
2,000|Dem. 
1.200|Dem. 



STATE GOVERNMENTS 



405 



TEXAS— CAPITAL. AUSTIN'. 



Office 


1 

Name 


Governor . , 

Lieutenant-Governor . 

Secretary of State 

Comptroller 

Treasurer of State . . . 


O. B. Colquitt 

A. B. Davidson 

C. C. McDonald 

W. P. Lane 

Sam Sparks 


Supt. of Pub. Inst 

Attorney-General .... 

Ciiief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners.. 

State Librarian 


P. M. Bralley 

J. P. Lightfoot 

T. J,. Brown 

Allison Mayfield . . . . 

W. D. Williams 

Jolin L. Wartham ... 
E. W. Winkler 



I Term [Term Ends SalarylPol'ts 



2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
6 yrs. 
6 vrs. 
6 vrs. 
6 yrs. 
t2>'rs. 



I Jan. 
I Jan. 
i Jan. 
I Jan. 
I Jan. 
I Jan. 
I Jan. 



19131 
19131 
1913 
19131 
19131 
19131 
19131 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



19171 
19171 
19171 
19131 



$4,000|Dem. 
* |Dem. 

2,0001Dem. 

2,500iDem. 

2,.500|Dem. 

2,5001Dem. 
t2.000|Dem. 

4.000 pem. 
, 4,000|Dem. 

4.000iOem. 

4,000|Dem. 

l.oOOPem. 



*$5.00 per day during- session of Legislature. 

fAnd fees. 

JAppointive. 



UTAH— CAPITAL, SALT LAKE CITY. 



Gk)vernor j William Spry 1 4 vrs. 

Secretary of State | C. S. Tingey | 4 yrs. 

Auditor of State I Jesse D. Jewkes ....' 4 yrs. 

Treasurer of State ...'David Mattson | 4 vrs. 

Supt. of Pub. Inst 1 A. C. Nelson j 4 yrs. 

Attorney-General .... I Albert R. Barnes ... 1 4 yrs. 

Chief Justice j Joseph E. Frick ...| ^ vrs. 

State Librarian 1 H. W. Griffith | * 



I Jan.. 
I Jan.. 
Jan., 
1 Jan.. 
I Jan., 
I Jan., 
, Jan., 



1 I 

19131$ 4.000|Rep. 

1.9131 3,000|Rep. 

2,000|Rep. 

1,500 Rep. 

2.400|Rep. 

2,000fRep. 

5,000|Rep. 

2.100lRep. 



19131 
19131 
19131 
19131 
1913 



•Appointive. 



VERMONT— CAPITAL, MONTPELIER. 



Governor 'John V Mead 

Lieutenant-Governor .ILeiglt'ii P. Slack.. 

Auditor of State 1 Guy W. Bailey 

Auditor of State ! H. P. Graham 

Treasurer of State ...IE. H. Deavitt 

Attorney-General ....I John G. Sargent ... 
Supt. of Pub. Inst. ... Mason . S. Stone.... 

Chief Justice (John W. Rowell ... 

Pub. Service Com'rs.. 1 fJohn Redmond 

I tWm. R. Warner. . 
fS. Holister Jackson 
State Librarian [George "W. Wing.. 

*$8.00 per day during session of Legislature 
fAppointed. 



1 2 


yrs. 


1 2 


yrs. 


1 2 


yrs. 


1 2 


yrs. 


2 


yrs. 




yrs. 




yrs. 


2 


yrs. 


1 4 


yrs. 


1 b 


yrs.l 


■> 


yrs. 


I 2 


yrs. 



Oct., 
Oct., 
Oct., 
Oct., 
Oct., 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
f Oct., 
Oct., 
Oct., 



19121$ 

19121 

19121 

1912f 

1912 

1912) 

19121 

19121 

19141 

19161 

19121 

19121 



2.500 

* 

1,700 
2,500 
1.700 
3,500 
2,000 



Rep. 

Rep. 

Rep. 

Req>. 

Rep. 

Rep. 

Rep. 
4.000|Rep. 
2,200|Re(p. 
l,700|Dem. 
l,700|Rep. 
1,2001 Rep.. 



VIRGINIA— CAPITAL, RICHMOND. 



Governor . 

Lieutenant-Governor . 
Sec. of Commonw'lth. 
Auditor of State . . 
Treasurer of State 
Supt. of Pub. Inst. 
Attorney-General . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners. 



State Librarian 



1 • I I 

I Wm. Hodges Mann..', 4 yrs.| 

I J. Taylor EUyson. ..14 yrs. 

T B. O. James i 4 yrs. 

IS. R. Donohoe | 4 yrs.| 

I A. W. Harman, Jr. ..| 4 yrs. 

J. D. Eggleston, Jr. .| 4 yrs. 

Samuel W. Williams l 4 yrs.j 

I James Keith [12 yrs. | 

1 R. R. Prentis ' 6 yrs. 

I J. R. Wingfield. . . >-. j 6 yrs. 

1 Wm. F. Rhea | 6 yrs. 

i Henry R. Mcllwainel * 



Feb., 
Feb., 
Feb., 
Mch., 
Feb., 
Feb., 
Feb., 
Jan., 
Feb., 
Feb., 
Feb., 



I 
19141$ 
19141 
19141 
19121 
19141 
1914 
19141 
19171 
19161 
19121 
19141 



5,000|Dem. 
720|Demi. 
2,800iDem. 
4,000]Dem 
2.000"*'^ 
3,500 
4,000 



4,700 
4,000 



Deam. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Dem. 



4,000|Dem. 
4,000|Dem. 
2.'5001Dem. 



♦Pleasure of Board. 



406 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



WASHINGTON— CAPITAL, OLYMPIA. 



Offica 



Name 



Governor 1 M, 

Secretary of State.. 
Auditor of State.... 
Treasurer of State . 
Supt. of Pub. Inst.. 
Attorney-General . . 

Chief Justice 

R. R. Commissioners 



State Librarian 



E. Hay 

I. M. Howell 

C. W. Clausen 

John G. Lewis . . . . 
Henry B. Dewey. . 

W. P. Bell 

R. O. Dunbar 

H. A. Fairchild... 

Jesse Jones 

John C. Lawrence. 
J. M. Hitt 



Term |Term Ends[Salary[Ports. 



19131$ 6. 000 1 Rep. 



4 yrs. 
4 yrs. I 
4 yrs. 
4 yrs. I 
4 yrs. I Jan., 
4 yrs. I Jan., 
I 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



19131 
19131 
19131 
19131 
19131 
I 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Rep. 



3,000 Rep. 
6,000fRep. 
4,000|R&p. 
4,000 Rep. 
4,000|Rep. 
1 500[Rep. 



♦Appointive. 



WEST VIRGINIA— CAPITAL, CHARLESTON. 



I II 

Governor 1 Wm. E. Glasscock. .. | 4 yrs.j Mch. 

Secretary of State | Stuart F. Reed | 4 yrs. Mch. 

Auditor of State 1 John S. Darst 1 4 yrh. Mch. 

Treasurer of State. ...|E. L. Long | 4 yrs. Mch. 

Supt. of Public Inst... I M. P. Sliawkey | 4 yrs. [ Mch., 

Attorney-General 1 C. D. Elliott I 4 yi-s.j Mch. 

State Librarian | John Gilmer | * | 



19131$ 5,000|Rep. 
19io| 4,000|Re<p. 

4..'S00|Rep. 

2,500|Rep. 

3,000|Rep. 

3,600|Rep. 

1,200| 



19131 
19131 

19131 
19131 

I 



*Appointive. 



WISCONSIN— CAPITAL, MADISON. 



Governor 


1 1 
Frances B. McGovern 
Thomas Morris 


2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 


Jan., 
Jan., 


1 
19131$ 
19131 


1 
.5,000|Rep. 


Lieutenant-Governor . 


l,0001Rep. 


Secretary of State 


James A. Frear 


2 vrs. 


Jan., 


19131 


o.OOOlRep. 


Treasurer of State..,. 


A. H. Dahl 


2 vrs. 


Jan., 


19131 


5,000|Rep. 


Supt. of Pub. 'Inst..... 


Charles P. Cary 


2 vrs. 


Jan., 


19131 


5, 0001 Rep. 


Attorney-General .... 


Levi H. Bancroft . . . 


2 vrs. 


Jan., 


1913 


5,0001Rep. 


Chief Justice 


J. B. Winslow 


10 yrs. 


Jan., 


1915 


6,000|Dem. 


R. R. Commissioners.. 


*David Harlow 


6 vrs.i Feb.. 


191.5] 


5.000 Rep. 




♦Halford Brickson . . 


6 yrs. 


Feb.. 


19171 


5.000 Rep. 




*J. H. Roemer 


6 yrs. 


Feb., 


19131 


o.OOOjDem, 


Insurance Com'r 


Herman L. Eckern.. 


2 yrs. 


Jan., 


19131 


5,000IRep. 


State Librarian 


*S. G. Glasier 







1 


2,500|Rep. 



♦Appointive. 



W"YOMING— CAPITAL, CHEYENNE. 



Governor \ Joseph M. Carey 

Secretary of State. .. .1 Frank L. Houx I 4 yrs. 

Auditor of State | Robt. B. Forsyth....] 4 yrs. 

Treasurer of State....] J. L. Baird ] 4 yrs. 

Supt. of Pub. Inst.. ..] Rose A. Bird | 4 >ts.] Jan., 

Attorney-General .... D. A. Preston ] Feb., 

Chief Justice | Cyrus Beard | | Jan. 

State Librarian 1 Mrs. Clara W. Bond.] ] Feb. 



4,000IRep. 
S.OOOTDem. 
3.000]Rep. 
3,0001Rep. 
3.000]Dem. 
3,000]Dem. 
5,0001R©p. 
l.oOOIRep. 



PORTO RICO— CAPITAL, SAN JUAN 



Governor | George R. Cnlton ...] 4 yrs.] Nov., 1913]$ 8,000|Rep. 

Secretary | M. D. Carroll, act'g..| | | 4,000|Rep, 

Auditor | J. W. Bonner | 4 yrs. Jan., 1915| 4,000IRep. 

Treasurer j S. D. Gromer I 4 yrs. July, 19111 5.000 Rep. 

Com. of Education \ Edwin G. Dexter ] 4 yrs. Aug., 191l| 4,000|Rep. 

Attorney-General ....I Foster V. Brown ...| 4 yrs. May, 1914] 4,000IRep. 

Chief Justice | Jose C. Hernandez..! * | | 5,000]Reip. 

Com. of Interior | John A. Wilson | 4 yrs.] Jan., 19141 4.000!Rep. 



*No term fixed by law. 



United States Government 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 409 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 



President— WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT, Ohio. Salary, $75,000. 

Vice President— James SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN, New York, Salary 



Cabinet. 

Secretary of State— PHILANDER CHASE KNOX of Pennsylvania. 
Secretary of the Treasury— FRANKLIN MACVEAGH of Illinois. 
Secretary of War— HENRY L. STIMSON of New York. 
Attorney General— GEORGE WOODWARD WICKERSHAM of New York. 
Postmaster General— FRANK HARRIS HITCHCOCK of Massachusetts. 
Secretaory of the Navy— GEORGE von LENGERKE MEYER of Massachusetts 
Secretary of the Interior— WALTER LOWTIIE FISHER of Illinois. 
Secretary of Agriculture — JAMES WILSON of Iowa. 
Secretary of Commerce and Labor — CHARLES NAGEL of Missouri. 
Salary of Cabinet Officers, ?12,000 per annum, each. 



Supreme Court of the United States. 

Chief Justice— EDWARD D. WHITE of Louisiana; appointed 1894; became 

Chief Justice Dec. 12, 1910. 
Associate Justices — *JOHN M. HARLAN of Kentucky; appointed Nov. 29, 18TT 
JOSEPH McKENNA of California; appointed Jan. 21, 1898 
OLIVER W. HOLMES of Massachusetts; appointed Dec. 

4, 1902. 
WILLIAM R. DAY of Ohio; appointed Feb. 25. 1903. 
HORACE HARMON LURTON of Tennessee; appointed 

Dec. 20, 1910. 
CHARLES EVANS HUGHES of New York; appointed 

May 2, 1910. 
WILLIS VAN DEVANTER of Wyoming; appointed Dec. 

16, 1910. 

JOSEPH RUCKER LAMAR of Georgia; appointed Dec. 

17, 1910. 

Salary of Chief Justice, $13,000; Associate Justices, $12,500 per annum, 
each. 

•Died October 13, 1911. 



Clerk— JAMES H. McKENNEY of District of Columbia; appointed May 

10, 1880. 
Marshal— J. M. WRIGHT of Kentucky; appointed Jan. 4. ISSS. 
Reporter— CHARLES H. BUTLER of New York; appointed Dec. 4, 1902. 



410 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Court of Claims. 



Name and Office. 



Whence Appointed. 



I When Appointed. 



Stanton J. Pelle, Chief Justice..! Indiana T Jan. 1, 1906.' 

Charles B. Howry i Mississippi Jan. 28. 1897. 

Fenton W. Booth | Illinois Mar. 17, 190i5 

Geo. W. Atkinson | West Virginia j Jan. 16, 1906. 

Samuel S. Barney | Wisconsin j Jan. 1. 1906. 



♦Appointed Judge, Court of Claims, March 28, 1S92. 



Court of Customs Appeals. 
(Acts of Aug. 5. 1909, and Feb. 25, 1910.) 



Name and Office. 




1 Whence Appointed. 


1 W'hen Appointed. 


Presiding Judge. 
Robert M. Montgo 

Associate Judges 
James F. Smitli . 


mery 


1 . 
. . .Michigan . . . 

. . .1 California 




1 •• 

1 Mar. .'50, 1910. 

1 .. 

1 iv^ar. 30, 1910. 


Orion M Barber.. 




1 Mar 30, 1910. 


Marion DeVries . . 








1 iviar. 30, 1910. 


George E. Martin 


Marshal. . . 
Clerk.... 


...1 Ohio 




1 Feb. S, 1911. 


Frank H Briggs ] 






.| April 4, 1911. 


Arthur B. Shelton, 


...| District of 


Columbia 


1 April 25, 1910. 



Commerce Court. 
(Act of June IS, 1910, 36 Stats., 540.) 



Name and Office. 



I Whence Appointed. 



When appointed. 



Judges. I I . . 

Martin A. Knapp l New York | Dec. 20, 1910. (a) 

Robert W. Archbald i Pennsylvania i Jan. 31, lyx^.. (b) 

William H. Hunt i Montana I Jan. 31, 1911. (c) 

John Emmett Carland | South Dakota | Jan. 31, 1911. (Q> 

Julian W. Mack I Illinois •. Jan. 31, 1911. "(e) 

Frank Jerome Stark, Marshal. .| Ohio i 

G. F. Snyder, Clerk 1 West Virginia | 



(a) Designated to serve five years in Commerce Court (additional judge 
Second Circuit). 

(b) Designated to serve four years in Commerce Court (additional judge 
Third Circuit). 

(c) Designated to servie tliree years in Commerce Court (additional 
judge Ninth Circuit). 

(d) Designated to serve two years in Commerce Court (additional judge 
Eighth Circuit). 

(e) Designated to serve one year in Commerce Court (additional judge 
Seventh Circuit). 



United States Circuit Courts. 

First Judicial Circuit — Mr. Justice Holmes. Districts of Maine, New 
Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. 

Second Judicial Circuit — Mr. Justice Hughes. Districts of Vermont, 
Connecticut, Northern New York, Southern New York, Eastern New York, 
and Western New York. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 411 

Third Judicial Circuit. — Mr. Justice Lurton. Districts of New Jersey, 
Eastern Pennsylvania, Middle Pennsylvania, Western Pennsylvania, and 
Delaware. 

Fourth Judicial Circuit. — Mr. Cliief Justice White. Districts of Maryland, 
Northern West Virginia, Soutliern West Virginia, Eastern Virginia, Western 
Virginia, Eastern North Carolina, Western Nortli Carlina, and South 
Carolina. 

Fifth Judicial Circuit. — Mr. Justice Lamar. Districts of Northern Georgia, 
Southern Georgia, Northern Florida, Southern Florida, Northern Alabama, 
Middle Alabama, Southern Alabama, Northern Mississippi, Southern Missis- 
sippi, Eastern Louisiana, Western Louisiana, Northern Texas, Southern 
Texas, Eastern Texas, and Western Texas. 

Sixth Judicial Circuit. — Mr. Justice Harlan. Districts of Northern Oliio, 
Southern Oliio, Eastern Michigan, Western Michigan, Eastern Kentucky, 
Western Kentucky, Eastern Tennessee, Middle Tennessee and Western 
Tennessee. 

Seventh Judicial Circuit. — Mr. Justice Day. Districts of Indiana, North- 
ern Illinois, Eastern Illinois, Southern Illinois, Eastern Wisconsin, and West- 
©•■n Wisconsin. 

Eighth Judicial Circuit. — Mr. Justice Van Devanter. Districts of Minne- 
sota, Northern Iowa, Southern Iowa, Eastern Missouri, Western Missouri, 
Eastern Arkansas, Western Ai-kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Eastern Oklalioma, Western Oklahoma, Wyoming, 
Ut^h and New Mexico. 

Ninth Judicial District. — Mr. Justice McKenna. District of Northern 
California, Southern California, Oregon, Nevada, Montana, Eastern Wash- 
ington, Western Washington, Idaho, Arizona, and Territories of Alaska 
and Hawaii. 



Office of the Attorney-General. 

Attorney-General. — George Woodward Wickersham. 

Solicitor-General. — 

Assistant to the Attorney-General — William S. Kenyan. 

Assistant Attorney-Generals. — John G. Thompson, James A. Fowler, John Q. 
Thompson, Wm. R. Harr, Winfred T. Denison. 

Assistant Attorney-General for Interior Department. — Oscar Lawler. 

Assistant Attorney-General for Post Office Department. — Russell P. Goodwin. 

Chief Clerk.— Orin J. Field. 

Private Secretary to the Attorney General. — Frank Cole. 

Disbursing Clerk. — James H. Mackey. 

Appointment Clerk. — Charles B. Sornborger. 

Attorney in charge of Pardons. — Jas. A. Finch. 

Attorney in charge of Titles. — Reeves T. Strickland. 

Chief, Division of Accounts. — John J. Glover. 

Superintendent of Prisons. — Robt. V. La Dow. 

Chief Examiner.— Stanley W. Finch. 

Public Lands Division. — Ernest Kneebel, attorney in charge. 

Attorneys.- — Marsden C. Burch, Oliver E. Pagan, John "W. Trainer, F. De C. 
Faust, Wm. J. Hughes, Robt. A. Howard, F. 'W. Collins, P. M. Ash- 
ford, Chas. F. Kincheloe, Geo. M. Anderson, Malcolm A. Coles, 
Wm. F. Norris, Glenn E. Husted, Arthur J. McCabe, Matt. L. Blake, 
Loring C. Christie, Geo. T. Stormont. 

Assistant Attorneys. — Clark McKercher, William W. Scott, S. S. Ashljaugh, 
F. E. Hutchins, David D. Caldwell, Sinclair B. Sheibley, J. H. Graves, 
Wm. H. Lamar, Geo. E. Boren, Chas. W. Logan, Harry S. Ridgely, 
Percy M. Cox. 



412 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Special Assistant Attorneys. — Wiflis N. Mills, Henry C. Lewis, Henry C. 
Gauss, O. E. Harrison, Edwin P. Grosvenor. Barton Corneau. Henry 
E. Colton, Prank Hall, Wm. S. Gregg, Wrisley Brown, Chas. S. 
Easterling. 

Special Agent.— V. N. Roadstrum. 



Department Solicitors. 

State. — Solicitor, J. Reuban Clark, Jr. 
Treasury. — ^Slicitor, William T. Thompson. 

Assistant, Felix A. Reeve. 

Chief, Clerk, Charles E. Vrooman. 
Internal Revenue. — Solicitor, Fletcher Maddox. 
Commerce and Labor. — Solicitor, Charles Elarl. 

Chief and Law Clerk, EMward T. Quigley. 



Department of State. 

Secretary of State. — Philander C. Knox of Pennsylvania. 

Assistant Secretary — Huntington Wilson of Illinois. 

Second Assistant Secretary. — Alvey A. Adee of Distrtet of Columbia. 

Third Assistant Secretary.— Chandler Hale of Maine. ^ 

Chief Clerk. — Wilbur McNeir of Michigan. 

Chief Diplomatic Bureau. — Sydney Y. Smith of District of Columbia. 

Chief of Consular Bureau. — Herbert C. Hengstler of Ohio. 

Chief Bureau of Index and Archives. — John R. Buck of Missouri. 

Chief of Rolls and Library. — John A. Tonner of Ohio. 

Chief of Bureau of Trade Relations. — John Ball Osborne of Pennsylvania. 

Chief of Bureau of Appointments. — Miles M. Shand of New Jersey. 

Chief of Bureau of Citizenship. — Richard W. Flournoy, Jr., of Maryland. 



Treasury Department. 

Secretary of the Treasury. — Franklin MacVeagh of Illinois. 

Assistant Secretary in Charge Customs. — James F. Curtis of Massachusetts. 

Assistant Secretary in Charge of Fiscal Bureaus. — A. Pilatt Andrew of Mass- 
achusetts. 

Assistant Secretary in charge of Public Buildings and Miscellaneous. — Robert 
O. Bailey of District of Columbia. 

Chief Clerk. — James L. Wilmeth of Arkansas. 

Chief of Division of Appointments. — Charles Lyman of Connecticut. 

Comptroller. — Robert J. Tracewell of Indiana. 

Treasurer of the United States. — Lee McClung of Kentucky. 

Register of the Treasury. — William T. Vernon of Kansas. 

Comptroller of the Currency. — Lawrence O. Murray of Illinois. 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue. — Royal E. Cabell of Virginia. 

Director of the Mint. — George E. Roberts of Iowa. 

Chief of Secret Service Division. — John E. Wilkie of Illinois. 

Supervising Architect. — James K. Taylor of Pennsylvania. 



War D;p2''tment. 

Secretary of War. — Henry L. Stimson of New York. 
Assistant Secretary. — Robert Shaw Oliver of New York. 
Assistant and Chief Clerk. — John C. Scofield of Georgia. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 413 

Chief of Division of Appointments. — William D. Searle. 
Chief of General Staff. — Major-General Leonard Wood. 
Adjutant-General — Major-General F. C. Ainsworth. 
Inspector-General. — Brigadier-General E. A. Garlington. 
Judge Advocate-General. — Brigadier-General Enoch H. Crowder. 
Quartermaster-General. — BrigadierGeneral James B. Aleshire. 
Surgeon-General. — Brigadier-General George H. Torney. 

Commissary-General Brigadier-General Henry G. Sharpe. 

Paymaster-General — Brigadier-General Charles H. Whipple. 

Chief of Bureau of Insular Affairs. — Brigadier-General Clarence R. Edwards. 

Chief of Division of Militia Affairs. — Brigadier-General Robert K. Evans. 



Department of Justice. 

Attorney-General. — George W. Wickersham of New York. 

Solicitor-General. — Frederick W. Lehmann of Missouri. 

Assistant Attorneys. — John G. Thompson of Illinois; James A. Fowler of 
Tennessee; William R. Harr of District of Columbia; Winnifred T. 
Denison of New York. 

Assistant Attorney-General for Interior Department. — Oscar Lawler of Cali- 
fornia, 

Solicitor of State Department.— J. R. Clark, Jr., of Utah. 

Solicitor of the Treasury. — William T. Thompson of Nebraska. 

Solicitor of Internal Revenue. ^ — Fletcher Maddox of Montana. 

Solicitor of Commerce and Labor. — Charles Earl of District of Columbia. 



Post Office Department. 

Postmaster-General. — France H. Hitchcock of Massachusetts. * 

First assistant Postmaster-General. ^Charles P. Grendfield of Missouri. 
Second Assistant Postmaster-General. — Joseph Stuart of Missouri. 
Third Assistant Postmaster-General — James J. Britt of North Carolina. 
Fourth Assistant Postmaster-General. — P. V. DeGraw of Pennsylvania. 
Chief Clerk. — Theodore L. Weed of Connecticut. 

Superintendent of Money Order System. — EJdward F. Kimball of Massa- 
chusetts. 
Superintendent of Foreign Mails. — Basil Miles of Pennsylvania. 
l?uperintendent of Registry System. — C. Howard Buckler of Maryland. 
Superintendent of Dead Letter Office. — James R. Young of Pnnsylvania. 



Navy Department, 

Secretary of the Navy. — George von L. Meyer of Massachusetts. 
Assistant Secretary. — Beckman Winthrop of New York. 
Chief Clerk.— F. S. Curtis of Ohio. 
Admiral of the Navy. — George Dewey. * 

Bureau Chiefs and Department Officers: — 

Navigation. — Rear-Admiral Reginald F. Nicholson. 

Medicine and Surgery.— Surgeon-General C. F. Stokes. 

Judge Advocate-General. — Captain Robert L. Russell. 

Naval Observatory. — Commodore T. E. D. W. Veeder. 

Equipment. — Rear-Admiral William F. Cowles. 

Yards and Docks. — Chief Engineer R. C. Hollyday. 

Naval Intelligence. — Captain Templin M. Potts. 

Construction and Repair. — Chief Constructor Richard Morgan Watt. 

* Since died. 



414 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Department of the Interior. 
Secretary of the Interior. — Walter Lowrie Fisher of Illinois. 
First Assistant Secretary. — Frank Pierce of Utah. 
Assistart Secretary — Carmi A. Thompson. 
Chief Clerk.— Clement S. Ucker of Ohio.. 

Commissioner of General Land Office — Fred Dennett of North Dakota. 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs. — Robert G. Valentine of Massachusetts. 
Commissioner of Patent Office.— Edward B. Moore of Michigan. 
Commissioner of Pensions. — James L. Davenport of New Hampshire. 
Commissioner of Education. — Elmer E. Brown of California. 
Director of Geological Survey. — George Otis Smith of Maine. 
Derector of Reclamation Service. — Frederick H. Newell of Pennsylvania. 

Department of Agriculture. 

Secretary of Agriculture. ^James Wilson of Iowa. 

Assistant Secretary. — W. M. Hayes of Minnesota. 

Solicitor. — George P. McCabe of Utah. 

Chief of Weather Bureau. — Willis L. Moore of Illinois. 

Chief of Bureau of Animal Industry. — Alonzo D. Melvin of Illinois. 

Chief of Forest Service. — Henry S. Graves of Connecticut. 

Chemist. — Harvey W. Wiley of Indiana. 

Statistician. — Victor H. Olmstead of North Carolina. 

Director of Experiment Stations. — A. C. True of Connecticut. 

Director of Public Office Roads. — L. W. Page of Massachusetts. 

Department of Commerce and Labor. 

Secretary of Commerce and Labor. — Charles Nagel of Missouri. 
Assistant Secretary. — Benjamin S. Cable of Illinois. 
Chief Clerk.— Robert M. Pindell, Jr., of Maryland. 
Commissioner of Corporations. — Herbert K. Smith of Massachusetts. 
Chief of Bureau of Manufactures. — Albertus H. Baldwin of Connecticut. 
Commissioner Bureau of Labor. — Charles P. Neill of District of Columbia. 
Director of the Census. — E. Dana Durand of California. 
Commissioner of Fisheries. — George M. Bowers of West Virginia. 
Commissioner-General of Immigration and Naturalization. — Daniel J. Keefe. 

Independent Commissions and Officers. 

Interstate Commerce Commissioners.- — Judson C. Clements of Georgia, 
Chairman; Charles A. Prouty of Vermont; Franklin K. Lane of California; 
Edgar B. Clark of Iowa; James S. Harlan of Illinois; Charles C. McChord 
of Kentucky; Balthasar H. Meyer of Wisconsin. 

Civil Service Commission. — John C. Black of Illinois, President; John A. 
Mcllhenny of Louisiana; William S. Washburn of New York. 

Library of Congress. — Librarian, Herbert Putnam of Massachusetts. 

Government Printing Office. — -Public Printer, Samuel B. Donnelly of 
New Tork. 

Isthmian Canal Commission. — Commissioners on the Isthmus, Lieut. Col. 
George W. Goethals, Chairman and Chief Engineer; Lieut. Col. H. F. 
Hodges, U. S. A., Assistant Chief Engineer; Lieut. Col. D. D. Gaillard. U. S. 
A., Division Engineer, central division; Lieut. Col. William L. Slbert. U. S 
A., Division Engineer, Atlantic division; H. H. Rousseau, U. S. N., assistant 
to the chairman; Maurice H. Thacher, head of the department of civil ad- 
ministration; Col. William C. Gorgas, medical department U. S. A., head of 
Ihe department of sanitation. 

Commission of the Philippine Islands. — President and Governor-General 
of the Islands, W. Cameron Forbes; Vice-Governor, Newton W. Gilbert; 
Dean C. Worcester, Jose R. Luzuriaga, Gregorio Araneta, Rafael Palma, Juan 
Sumulong, Frank A. Branagan, Charles B. Elliott. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 415 



LIST OF SENATORS AND THEIR WASHINGTON 
ADDRESSES 



(Streets northwest unless otherwise stated.) 

Sherman, James S., New York, Vice- Presi- 

„'^^"'^- 1401 Sixteenth Street • 

Bacon, Augustus O. Georgia 1709 Oregon Avenue 

Bailey, Joseph W.. Texas Riggs House 

Bankhead, John W., Alabama 2620 Connecticut Avennp 

Borali, William E., Idaho Stoneleigh Com t ""®- 

Bourne, Jonathan Jr., Oregon Stoneleigh Court" 

Bradley, William O., Kentucky Congress Hall 

Brandegee, Frank B. Connecticut 1521 K Street 

Briggs, Frank O., New Jersey 2204 R Street' 

Bristow, Joseph L.. Kansas ...The Highlands 

Brown, Morris. Nebraska The Arlington 

Bryan, Nathan P., Florida Congress Hall 

Burnhani, Henry E., New Hampshire -The Richmond 

Burton, Thedore E., Ohio The Rochambeau. 

Chamberlam, George E., Oregon 1749 Q Street 

Chilton, William E., West Virginia The Dresden 

Clapp, Moses E., Minnesota 1310 Euclid Street 

Clark, Clarence D., Wyoming The Burlington 

Clarke, James P., Arkansas The Cochran 

Crane, W. Murray, Massachusetts 1507 K Street 

Crawford, Coe I., South Dakota The Kenesaw' 

Culberson, Charles A., Texas 1820 Nineteenth Stret 

Cullom. Shelby M Illinois 1413 Massachusetts Avenue 

Cummins, Albert B., Iowa The Highlands ^''^""«- 

Curtis, Charles, Kansas 1742 S Street 

Davis, Jeff, Arkansas The New Ebiaitt 

Dillingham. William P. Vermont The Cochran 

Dixon, Joseph M., Montana 1S18 Nineteenth Street 

du Pont, Henry A Delaware 1711 Massachusetts Avenue 

Fletcher Duncan U Florida 1455 Massachusetts Avenue 

Foster. Murphy J., Louisiana The Cochran vcuue. 

Gallinger, Jacob H., New Hampshire The Normandie 

Gamble. Robert J., South Dakota TlTe Portland 

Gore, Thomas P., Oklahoma 1863 Mintwood Place 

Gronna, Asle J. North Dakota Congress Hall 

Guggenheim. Simon. Colorado I'^Ol Sixteenth Street 

Heyburn. Weldon B., Idaho Stoneleigh Court 

Hitchcock. Gilbert M., Nebraska The Shoreham 

Johnson, Charles F. Maine Congress Hall 

Johnston, Joseph F.. Alabama The Cochran 

Jones. Wesley L., Washington 325 East Capitol Street. 

Kenyon. William S., Iowa The Woodley 

Kern. John W. , Indiana Congress Hal'l 

La Follette, Robert M., Wisconsin 1864 Wyoming Avenue 

Lea. Luke. Tennessee The Cairo 

Lippitt, Henry F., Rhode Island Stoneleigh' Court 

Lodge. Henry Cabot, Massachusetts 1765 Massacnusetts Avenue 

t^'lV"''^^ ^'ll'am, Illinois Y. M. C. A. Building. 

McMumber. Porter J., North Dakota 1534 Twenty-second Street 

McLean. George P., Connecticut 1619 Rhode Island Avenue ' 

Martin. Thomas S., Virginia The Benedick 

Martine. James E., New Jersey The Cecil 

Myers, Henry L., Montana The New'Ebbitt. 

N elson, Knute. Minnesota 649 East Capitol Street. 

Newlands, Francis G., Nevada Woodley Lane 

Nixon. George S.. Nevada Woodley Lane 

O'Gorman. James A.. New York The Shoreham'. 

Oliver. George T.. Pennsylvania 2230 Massachusetts Avenue. 



416 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Overman, Lee S., North Carolina The Cochran. 

Owen, Robert L., Oklahoma totOneleigh Court. 

Page, Carroll &., Vermont The Cocaran. 

Faynter, Thomas H., Kentucky 

Penrose, Boies, Pennsylvania The New Willard. 

Percy, LeRoy, Mississippi The Cochran. 

PerKins, George C, California Stoneleigh Court. 

Poindexter, Miles, Washington 1S45 Forty-second Place. 

Pomerene, Atlee, Ohio The Highlands. 

Rayner, Isidor, Maryland 1320 Eighteenth Street. 

Reed. James A. Missouri 1921 S Street. 

Richardson, Harry A., Delaware The New Willard. 

Root Elihu, New York 115S Sixteenth Street. 

Shively Benjamin F.. Indiana 1175 Second Street, N. E. 

Simmons F. M., North Carolina The New Ebbitt. 

Smith Ellison D., South Carolina The Normandie. 

Smith John Walter, Maryland 330 Roland Avenue, Baltimore. 

Smith' William Alden, Michigan 1100 Sixteenth Street. 

Smoot, Reed, Utah -'521 Connecticut Avenue. 

Stephenson, Isaac, Wisconsin The Shoreham. 

Stone, William J.. Missouri 1921 S Street. 

Sutherland, George, Utah The Highlands. 

Swanson, Claude A., Virginia 1414 Sixteenth Street. 

Taylor Robert L., Tennessee Stoneleigh Court. 

Terrell, Joseph M., Georgia The Cochran, 

Thornton, John R., Louisiana The Cochran. 

Tillman Benjamin R., South Carolina The Normandie. 

Townsend, Charles E., Michigan The Dewey. 

Warren, Francis E., Wyoming The New Wii ard. 

Watson, Clarence W., West Virginia The New Willard. 

Wetmore, George P., Rhode Island 1609 K Street. 

Williams,' John Sharp, Mississippi The Ricnmond. 

Works, John D., California The Kenesaw. 

Officers of the Senate. 

Charles G. Bennett, Secretary, Metropolitan Club. 

Henry M Rose. Assistant Secretary, 1745 Eighteenth Street. 

Daniel M. Ransdell, Sergeant at Arms, 139 B Street, NE. 

C A. Loeffler, Assistant Doorkeeper, 1444 Newton Street. _ ^^ ^^ . 

Thomas W Keller. Acting Assistant Doorkeeper, 3406 Thirteenth Street. 

Rev Ulysses G. B. Pierce, D. D., Chaplain, 1616 Riggs Place. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 417 



LIST OF REPRESENTATIVES, WITH THEIR.RESIDENCES 
IN WASHINGTON 



(.streets northwest unless otherwise stated.) 

Clark, Champ, Speaker, Missouri 1509 Sixteenth Street. 

Adair, Jonn A. M., Indiana Congress Hall. 

Adauison, AVilliam C, Georgia The ^-ilgiers. 120 Maryland Avenu 

Aiken, \Vyatt, South ^^arolina 

Akin, Theron, New York 

Alexander, Joshua W., Missouri 1110 Rhode Island Avenue. 

Allen, ^-ilfred G., Ohio Congress Hall 

Ames, Butler, Massachusetts 

Anderson, Carl C, Ohio 

Anderson, Sydney, Minnesota The Congressional. ' 

Andrus, John E., New York The Arlington. 

Ansberry, Timothy T., Ohio The Rochambeau. 

Anthony, Daniel K., Jr., Kansas The Shoreham. 

Ashbrook, William A., Ohio Congress Hall. 

Austin, Richard W., Tennessee The Burlington. 

Ayres, Steven B., Ney Y'ork 1620 Massachusetts Avenue. 

Barchfeld, Andrew J., Pennsylvania The New Willard. 

Barnhart, Henry A., Indiana Congress Hall. 

Bartholdt, Richard, Missouri 1603 Euclid Street. 

Bartlett, Charles L.., Georgia The Ontario. 

Bates, Arthur L., Pennsylvania The cochran. 

Bathrick, E. R., Ohio Congress Hall. 

Beall, Jack. Texas The Rochambeau. 

Bell, Thomas M., Georgia 1467 Irving Place 

Berger, Victor L,., Wisconsin ...; The Farragut. 

Bingham, Henry H., Pennsylvania Metropolitan Club: 

Blackmon, Fred L., Alabama Congress Hall. 

Bochne, John W^, Indiana Congress Hall. 

Boehne, John W., Indiana 408 A Street SE. 

Borland, William P., Missouri The Cairo. 

Bowman, Charles C, Pennsylvania Congress Hall. 

Bradley, Thomas W., New Y'ork Congress Hall. 

Brantley, William G., Georgia The Ontario. 

Broussard. Robert F., Louisiana. .. ( 

Brown, William G., West Virginia Congress Hall. 

Buchanan, Frank* Illinois 

Bulkley, Robert J., Ohio Congress Hall. 

Burgess. George F., Texas '.The Normandie. 

Burke, Charles H., South Dakota The Dewey. 

Burke, James F.. Pennsylvania The Shoreham. 

Burke, Michael E., Wisconsin 

Burleson, Albert S., Texas Cosmos Club. 

Burnett, Joan L., Alabama Congress Hall. ' 

Butler, Thomas S., Pennsylvania 

Byi'nes, James F., South Carolina Congress Hall. 

Byrns, Joseph W.. Tennessee The Burlington. 

Calder, William M., New Y'ork The New Willard. 

Callaway, Oscar. Texas .- Congress Hall. 

Campbell, Phillip P., Kansas .1726 P Street. 

Candler, Ezekiel.. Jr.. Mississippi The Cecil. 

Cannon, Joseph G., Illinois 1014 Vermont Avenue. 

Cantrill. James C, Kentuckj^ Congress Hall. 

Carlin, Charles C, Virginia Alexandria. Va. 

Carter, Charles D., Oklahoma Congress Hall. 

Car-i- William J.. Wisconsin congress Hall. 

Catlin, Theron E.. Missouri The Arlington. 

Clark. Frank F.. Florida Congress Hall. 

Claypool. Horatio Co.. Ohio Congress Hall. 

Clayton. Henry D.. Alabama The Brighton. 

Cline, Cyrus, Indiana Congress Hall. 

Rig 29 



418 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Collier, James William, Mississippi The Driscoll. 

Connell, Ricliard E., New York i lie Jjriscoll. 

Conry, Michaei F., New Yorlc Congress Hall. 

Cooper, irienry Allen, Wisconsin The Rochambeau. 

Copley, Ira C, Illinois 2131 R Street. 

Covington, J. Harry, Maryland 

Cox, James M., Ohio Stoneleigh Court. 

<^ox. William E., Indiana Tne New Varnum. 

Crago, Thomas S., Pennsylvania The New Willard. 

Cravens, Ben., Arkansas The Normandie. 

Crumpacker. Edward D.. Indiana The Dewey. 

CuUop, William A., Indiana Congress Hall. 

Cm-ely, James M., Massachusetts Congress Hall. 

Currier Prank D., New Hanpshire The jjewey. 

Dalzell John, Pennsylvania ItiO-^ New Hampshire Avenue 

Danforth, Henry G., New York The Highlands. 

Daugherty, James A., Missouri j ne Farragut.. 

Davenport, James S., Oklahoma Congress Hall. 

Daviuson, James H., Wisconsin Tne Dewey. 

jjavis Charles R., Minnesota Tlie Normandie. 

Davis, John W., West Virginia 

De Forest Henry S., New York _ongress Hall. 

Dent Stanley H., Jr., Alabama The Brighton. 

Denver, Matthew R., Ohio Congress Hall. 

Dickinson, Clement C, Missouri The Driscoll. 

Dickson, Wiuiam A., Mississippi 

Dies, Martin, Texas ; 

Difenderfer, Robert E. Pennsylvania Congress Hall. 

Dixon, Lincoln, Indiana Congress Hail. 

Dodds, Francis H., Michigan The Uewey. 

Donohoe, Michael, Pennsylvania Congress nail. . 

Doremus, Frank E., Michigan 1318 D Street. 

Doughton Robert L., Nortn Carolina The Driscoll. 

Draper, William H., New York ...The Cochran 

Driscoll Daniel A., New York Congress Hall. 

j^riscoU, Michael E., New York The Cairo 

Durpre H. Garland, Louisiana • -The Benedick. 

Dwight, John W. New York 1765 R Street 

Dye? L C, Missouri The Woodward. 

Edwards, Charles G., Georgia Congress Hal. 

Ellerbe J Edwin, South Carolina Congress Hall. 

Esch John J., Wisconsin Congress Hall. 

Estopmal, Albert, Louisiana The Cochraii. 

Evans, Lynden, Illinois The Brighton 

Fail-child. George W., New York The New Willard. 

Faison John M., North Carolina The Driscoll 

Farr John R., Pennsylvania congress Hall. 

Ferris Scott, Oklahoma The Driscoll. 

Fields W. J., Kentucky he New \ arnum. 

Finlev David E., South Carolina The National. 

Fitzgeald, John J., New York The Mendote. 

Flood, Henry D., Vi^i-ginia The Benedick. 

Floyd John C, Arkansas 11^ ;^i, ^'^'^'^f^ •'^^• 

Focht Benjamin K., Pennsylvania The Champlain. 

Fordn'ey Joseph W., Michigan ■ The Dewey. 

^ornes.'^'Charles V., New York The Wes mmster. 

Foss George Edmund. Illinois 1763 R. Street 

lol^^r, oilid J., Vermont The Brunswick. 

Foster Martin D., Illinois The Drisco 1. ^ 

Fowler, H. Robert, Illinois The Dewey 

Francis, William B., Ohio' SS"^!;*;^^ "" 

French Burton L., Idaho The Alwyn. 

Fuller, Charles E., Illinois Cnn-ress Hall 

r'Q,,ae-hpr Thomas, Illinois congress wan. 

§l;dner%ugu"tus'P., Massachusetts. . ..1.17 H Street. 

Gardner John J., New Jersey The Dewey. 

glniei-'john N.,' Texas The Burhng ton. 

Garrett, Finis J., Tennessee The Fairasut 

Georse Henry Jr., New York Congress Hall ' 

Gmeft Frederick H.. Massachusetts • • • -^ ^l-g'';'\t7"th Street. 

Glass, Carter, Virginia -•••••••••• ••^ne ^^'^'§„„ 

Godwin. J. Hannibal L., North CaroUnaCongress Hall 

Pneke T H Ohio 19()o N otreei. 

Goldfogle, Henry M.; New York Ffo^^TmSif koad 

Good, James W., Iowa 1831 Belmont Koaa. 

Goodwin W S.. Arkansas Congress Hall 

Gould Samuel W., Maine 122 Maryland Avenue NB. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 419 

Graham, James M., Illinois 230 -.-^ Street SE. 

Gray. Finley H., Indiana 

Green, William R., Iowa 

Greene, William S., Massachusetts 1107 Seventeenth Stret. 

Gregg, Alexander W., Texas The Cochran. 

Gregg, Curtis H., Pennsylvania The ijewey. 

Griest, William W., Pennsylvania The Consressional. 

Gudger, James M., Jr., North Carolina. ..The Burlington. 

Guernsey, Frank E., Maine 

Hamill, James A., New Jersey The Plaza. 

Hamilton, Edward L., Michigan The Dewey. 

l^Tamilton, John M., West Virginia The Marlborough. 

Hamlin. Courtney W., Missouri ...40S A Street SE. 

Hammond, Winfield S., Minnesota The Dewey. 

Hanna, Louis B., North Dakota The Arlington. 

Hardwick, Thomas W., Georgia Room 119 House Office Building. 

Hardy, Rufus, Texas The Cochran. 

Harris, Robert O., Massachusetts The Shoreham. 

Harrison, Byron P., Mississippi The DriscoU. 

Harrison, Francis B., New York 1612 K Street. 

Hartman, Jesse L., Pennsylvania 

Haugen, Gilbert N., Iowa Congress Hall. 

Hawley, Willis C, Oregon The Woodley. 

Hay, James, Vi.Tgina The Bancroft. 

Hayes, Everis A., California 2111 Bancroft Place. "^ 

Heald, William H., Delaware The New Willard. 

Heflin. J. Thomas, Alabama The New Varnum. 

Helgesen, H. S., North Dakota Congress Hall. 

Helm, Harvey, Kentucky The Driscoll. 

Henry, E. "Stevens, Connecticut 1421 K Street. 

Henry, Robert L., Texas ISi'^T Nineteenth Street. 

Hensley, Robert L., Missouri .Congress Hall . 

Higgins, Edwin W., Connecticut The Portland. 

Hill. Ebenezer J., Connecticut The Cochran. 

Hinds, Asher C, Haine 2504 Cliffbourne Place. 

Hobson, Richmond P., Alabama 2117 S Street. 

Holland, E. E.. Virginia The Ebbitt. 

Houston, William C, Tennessee 

Howard, William Schley, Georgia Congress Hall. 

Howell, Joseph, Utah Y. M. C. A. Building. 

Howland, Paul, Ohio The Cairo. " 

Hubbard, Elbert H., Iowa .^The Ontario. 

Hugues. Dudley ivx., Georgia Congress Hall. 

Huehes, James A. West Virginia 

Hughes, William ,New Jersey The Driscoll. 

Hull, Cordell, Tennessee The Normandie. 

Humphrey, William E. Washington The Royalton. 

Humphreys, Benjamin G., Mississippi. . The Driscoll. 

Jackson, Fred S., Kansas Congress Hall. 

Jacoway, Henderson M., Arkansas The Congressional. 

James, Ollie M., Kentucky The Donald. 

Johnson, Ben. Kentucky The Cochran. 

Johnson, Joseph T., South Carolina ig First Street NE. 

Jones, William A., Virginia 1709 Q Street. 

"Kahn, Julius. California The Normandie. 

Kendall. N. E., Iowa The Ontario. 

Kennedy, Charles A., Iowa .'214 North Capitol Street. 

Kent, William, California 

Kindred, Jolm J., New York 

Kinkaid. Moses P. Nebraska Congress Hall, 

Kinkead, Eugene F., New Jersey Congress Hall. 

Kitchin. claiide. North Carolina The Driscoll. 

Knowland, Joseph R., Calipofria The Rochambeau. 

Konig, George, Maryland 

Konop, Thomas F., Wisconsin 10 B Street NE. 

Koop. Arthur W., Wisconsin The Driscoll. 

Korbly, Charles A., Indiana 238 Maryland Aveneue NE. 

La Follette, William L,, Washington ....The Congressional. 

Lafean. Daniel F., Pennsylvania The Occidental. 

Lafferty, ^. W., Oregon The Highlands. 

Lamb, John, Virginia The National. ^ 

Langham, Jonathan N., Pennsylvania. .. .210 A Street SE. 

Langley, John W., Kentucky The Burlington. 

Latta, James J. Nebraska The Driscoll. 

Lawrence. George P., Massachusetts ....The Shoreham. 

Lee, Gordon, Georgia Tlie Cochran. 

Lee, Robert E., Pennsylvania The Cecil. 



420 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Legare, George S., South Carolina The Dewey. 

Lenroot, Irvine L., Wisconsin The Kenesaw 

Lever Asburv F., South Carolina 218 North Capitol Street. 

Levy, Jefferson M.. New York The New Willard. 

Lew-is, David J., Maryland -. 

Lindbergh, Charles A.. Minnesota 

Lindsav, George H. New York The Raleigh. 

Linthicum, J. Chas.. Maryland 

Littlepage, Adam B., West Virginia Congress Hall. 

Littleton, Martin \'v .. New York 

Llovd, James T., Missouri The Y> yommg. 

Lobeck, C. O., Nebraska 27 B Street. 

Long-^vorth, Nicholas, Ohio 17o6 M Street. 

Loud Lreorge A., Michigan The Ontario. 

Loudenslager, Henry C, New Jersey ...The Dewey 

MeCall. Samuel W., Massachusetts Cosmos Club. 

McCoy. Walter I., New Jersey . .Cosmos Club. 

McCreary George D.. Pennsylvania Stoneleigh Court. 

McDermbtt, James T., Illinois The Driscoll. 

McGillicudv. Daniel J., Maine Congress Hall. 

McGuire, Bird, Oklahoma The Grafton. 

McHenry, John G., Pennsylvania Congress Plall. 

McKenzie, John C, Illinois 

McKinlev. William B., Illinois 919 Farragut Square. 

McKinlev, James, Illinois The Portland. 

McLaughlin, Jfimes C, Michigan The Iroquois. 

McMorran, Henrv, Michigan The Portland. 

Macon. Robert B., Arkansas Congress Hall. 

Madden, Martin B., Illinois The Highlands. 

Madison, Edmond H., Kansas Congress Hall. 

Maguire, John A., Nebraska The Driscoll. 

Maher, James P., New York 

Malby George R., New York The New ^^illard. 

Manii,' James R.. Illinois The Highlands 

Martin Eben W., South Dakota The Brunswick. 

Martin' John A., Colorado The Brunswick. 

Matthews, Charles, Pennsylvania The Dewey. 

Mavs, Dannite H., Florida L.ongress Hall. 

Miller. ( Clarence B., Minnesota 1202 Eighteenth Street. 

Mondell, Frank W., "Wyoming Congress Hall. 

Moon, John A., Tennessee.... 

Moon Reuben O.. Pennsylvania The New Willard. 

Moore J Hampton, Pennsylvania The Occidental. 

Moore! John M., Texas The Shoreham. 

Morgan. Dick T., Oklahoma The Dewey. 

Morrison, Martin A.. Indiana 920 M Street. 

Morse. Elmer A., Wisconsin The Dewey. 

Mos<; Ralph W., Indiana The New \arnum. 

Mott' Luther W., New York The New T\^illard. 

Murdock. Victor, Kansas The Brighton. 

Murrav William F., Massachusetts Congress Hall. 

Needham, James Carson. California 2fi?,2 Woodley Place. 

Nelson, John M., Wisconsin 1707 P Street. 

Norris ueorge AV.. Nebraska Y. M. C. A. Building. 

Nve Frank M., Minnesota The Cairo. 

nidfield William A.. Arkansas iSfiS Mintwood Place. 

Olmstea'd, Martin E.. Pennsylvania The .Arlington. 

O'Shaunessy, George F.. Rhode Island... The Portland. 

Padgett, Lemuel P.. Tennessee The Dewey. 

Page. Robert N., North Carolina The Cairo. 

Palmer, A. Mitchell, Pennsylvania The Grafton. 

Parran, Thomas. Maryland Tlie Raleigh. 

Patten. Thomas G., New York 

Pattnn Charles E.. Pennsylvania The Ontario. 

Payne Sereno E., New York The Burlington. 

Pepper, Irvin S., Iowa Congress Hall. 

Peters Andrew J.. Massachusetts 171<? H Street. 

Pickett Charles E. Iowa Y. M. C. A. Building. 

Plumlev Frank, Vermont The Driscoll. 

Porter" Stephen G., Pennsylvania Congress Hall. 

Post. James D.. Ohio The Driscoll. 

Pou. Edward W.. North Carolina The Richmond. 

Powers. Caleb. Kentucky „ „ ,,. , , t^i 

Pray, Charles N.. Montana 1S40 Mmtwood Place. 

Prince, George W.. Illinois 

P-outv. S F.. Iowa Congress Hall. 

Pujo, "Arsene P., Louisiana The Arlington. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 421 

Rainey, Henry T., Illinois The Dri'=;colI 

Raker, Jolin E. California Congress HUl 

Randell Choice B., Texas The National." 

Ransdell, Joseph E., Louisiana The Dewey 

Rauch, George W., Indiana Congress Hall 

Redfield William O., New York The Highlands. 

Rees, Rollin R., Kansas 

Reilly, Thomas L., Connecticut Congress Hall 

Reyburn, William Suart. Pennsy!va.iia..2339 Massacnusetts Avenue 

Richardson, William, Alabama The Highlands 

Riordan, Uaniel J., New York The Ralei°h 

Roberts. Edward E., N'evada The Massatchusetts. 

Roberts, Ernest W., Massachusetts J.91S N Street 

Robinson, Joseph T., Arkansas i.JOl Nineteentn Street. 

Roddenberry, S. A., Georgia Congress Hall 

Rodenbers:. William A. Illinois The Dresden 

Rothermel. John H., Pennsylvania The New Varnum 

Rouse, Arthur B., Kentuckv The Devev 

Rubey, Thomas L., Mf.souri Congress Hall. 

Rucker, Atterson Vv^., Colorado The New Wiiiard 

Rucker, William W., Missouri ..The Driscoll 

Russell, Joseph J., Missouri Congress Hall 

Sabath, Adolph J., Illinois Congress Hall 

Saunders Edward W., Virginia The^New Varnum. 

Scully, ihomas J., New Jersey The New Willard. 

Sells, bam R., Tennessee 

Shackleford, Dorsey W., Missouri .'congress Hall 

Shai-p, William G., Ohio The Cairo 

Sheppard, Morris, Texas The Burl'n°-ton 

Sherley, Swagar, Kentucky The Woodward'. 

Sherwood, Isaac R., Ohio Con<^ress Hall 

Simmons, James S., New York ... .Congress Hall' 

1?==^' '-^'nf ^ W. Tennessee The Westminster. 

Sisson. ihomas U., Mississi^-^ The Driscoll. 

ISf ^ "^^"'^^ ^^ 7-!''''^"- 1«.31 R Street. 

I n^rf ' n{ ^,^^^°^- ^^, 'fsmia The New Ebbitt. 

Sloan, Charles H. Nebraska The Dewev 

In^m • ■^°."" 1 ^- • J^°lr^^ Carolina The Driscoll. 

Sm t ' ? M n ^^^-^^''^ "'^ '^^'^ ^'e^' Willard. 

Smith, J. M. C, Michigan The Bin-linoton 

IS' IT"^' ^n '^n-l^'^'^ ::Thl B^uckint^Tm. 

Snn th' Sylvester C, California 1^0,; Ontario Place. 

Smith. T\ illiam R., Texas The Cordova 

Sparkman, Stephen M.. Florida Cono-ress Hall 

^fnZ' ^^^^'' M.. Pennsylvania t ne Shoreham. 

Stack, Edmond J., Illinois 

tl't^^""^'- --^^-"f us O., Kentucky .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.The New Varnum, 
Stedman, Cliarles M., North Carolina ....The Driscoll 
Steenerson, Halvor, Minnep-ra .. .. -up Pru-o 

Stephens, Hubert D.. Miss:.: --ppi The Driscoll. 

Stephens, John H. .Texas The Driscoll 

Stephens. William D., Califrnla .congress Hall. 

Sterling, John A., Illinois The Dewev 

Stevens, Frederick C, Minnesota 'i^be Cairo ' 

Stone, Claude U., Illinois The Driscoll 

Sulloway. Cyrus U., New Hampshire Tne New Varnum. 

|"^ff,^' -^/¥'"- \ew York The Milburn. 308 Ea.st Capitol St. 

Sweet, Edwin P Michigan The Brighton. 

Switzer, Edwin M.. Ohio 

Talbot, Frederick C, Marvland .The Dewev 

Talcott, Cnarles A., New Y'ork . . 

Taylor, Edward L. Jr.. Ohio ■^o-'^S Hillver PKce 

Taylor, Edward T., Colorado Congress' Hall ' ' 

Taylor, George W., Alabama hq-' p Street 

Thayer, John A. Massachusetts 1S07 Nineteenth Street. 

Thistlewood, Napoleon B., Illinois Congress Hall 

Thomas. Robert Y., Jr.. Kentuckv The Driscoll 

Tilson, John Q.. Connecticut ""he Cochran 

Towner, Horace M., Iowa The Marlborough. 

Townsend, Edward W., New Jersey The New Willard 

Tribble Samuel J., Georgia Congress Hall. 

TurnDull. Robert. Virginia 

Tuttle William E.' Jr., New Jersey. Cosmos Club. 

Unaerhill. Edwin S.^New York The New Varnum. 

Underwood. Oscar W., Alabama The Benedick 

Utter George H., Rhode Island Cnnsress Hall' 

Volstead, Andrew J., Minnesota The" Dewey 



422 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Vreeland. Edwara B., New York The Dewey. 

Webb. Edwin Y., North Carolina... The Cairo. 

Wedemeyer. William W'.. Michigan Conffress Hall. 

Weeks, John W., Massachusetts l"i-26 New Hampshire Avenue. 

Warburton, Stanton, Washington Culumbia Country Club. 

Whitacre, John J., Ohio 

Watkins. John T.. Louisiana Y. M. C. A. Building-. 

White. George, Ohio The Arlington. 

Wickliffe, Robert C, Louisiana Congress Hall. 

Wilder William H. Massachusetts The Woodward. 

Willis, Prank B., Ohio 13 First Street NE. 

Wilson, Frank E., New York The Raleigh. 

Wilson, William B., Pennsylvania 413 New Jersey Avenue SE. 

Wilson, William W., Illinois The Dewey. 

Witherspoon, S. A.. Mississippi The Driscoll. 

Wood. Ira W., New Jersey The Cochran. 

W^oods, Frank P., Iowa The Driscoll. 

Younsr, H. Olin. Michigan The Portland. 

Young. I. D., Kansas The Driscoll. 

Young, James, Texas The Cochran. 

Delegates. 

Andrews, William H., New Mexico The Shoreham. 

Cameron, Ralph H., Arizona The Brighton. 

Kalanianaole, Jonah K.. Hawaii Congress Hall. 

Wickersham. James, Alaska Congress Hall. 

Resident Commissioners 

Legarda, Benito, Philippine Islands The Champlain. 

Quezon, Manuel L., Philippine Islands. .. .The Champlain. 
Rivera, Luis Mufioz Porto Rico The Benedick. 



OFFICERS OF THE HOUSE. 

South Trimble. Clerk l^'44 Columbia Road. 

J. S. South, Chief Clerk 2029 Hillver Place N. W. 

A. Stokes Jackson, Sergeant-at-.A.rms. ... Congress Hall. 

Joseph J. Sinnott, Doorkeeper 3527 Thirteenth Street, 

William M. Durbar, Postmaster 179 Maryland Ave., N. E. 

Henry N. Couden, Chaplain 2006 Columbia Road. 



IVIEETING DAYS OF CONGRESSIONAL COIVi M ITTEES. 

(Committees not given below have no regular meeting days, but meet upon 
the call of the chairman.) 

Senate. 

Agi'icultural and Forestry Tuesday. 

Claims Tuesday. 

Commerce Thursday. 

District of Columbia Friday. 

Expenditures in Interior Department Monday. 

Finance Tuesday. 

Foreign Relations Wednesday. 

Indian Affairs Thursday. 

Interstate Commerce Friday. 

Judiciary .' Monday. 

Manufactures Thursday. 

Military Affairs 'i nursday. 

Naval Affairs Wednesday. 

Patents Friday. 

Pensions Monday. 

Privileges and Elections Saturday. 

Public Buildings and Grounds Friday. 

Public Lands Wednesday. 

House. 

Accounts Tuesday. 

Agriculture Wednesday. 

Alcoholic Liquor Traffic ...-, Thursday, 



UNITED STATES GOVERNxMENT 423 

Banking and Currency Wednesdav ^ 

Coinage, Weights, and Measures ..:.:" Thursdav^ ' 

iJistrict of Columbia W ednesday. 

f '^"c-ation Tuesday. 

Immigration and Naturalization Tuesday 

Indian Affairs Friday " " 

Irrigation of Arid Lands Monday" 

SS-". ::::::::::::::::: i^jAedneshay and Friday. 

Merchant Marine and Fisheries '. Thursday. 

Mliran^^^Lg-::::;::::::::::::::: SSr"^"'^ '^'--'^=^>-- 

?vf,*.£"l'''' ^"^,^.0^^ ^°'^^^s Tuesday and Friday. 

Private Land Claims Thursday 

Public Buildings and Grounds P^iday ' ' 

Public Lands Wednesday. ' 

^^ ar Claims Saturday. 



OFFICIAL REPORTERS OF DEBATES. 
Senate. 

Fdwn'^.viV- M "^'^ -12- California Street. 

Snton W • Bh.menL,--.: --^^ Pennsylvania Avenue. 

wiJ^v," T • -Blumenberg The Arlington. 

Dane'lB T fov,^"^'" '• "^^^ Kalorama Road. 

tL'I"' , w ^r^ , Mitchellville, Md. 

James W . Murphy 17SS Lanier Place. 

Assistant. 

Eugene C. Moxley 11.30 Seventeenth Street. 

House. 

|i™i;:::::::::::::;:::;;;;::;;::;;:::::;:SJSs:^^^^^^^^ 
c|£c^S::::::;::::;:::;::::::;;:::::;2?,SSrcX'- 

^^,ul i\ ^- ^''^^' l-i<^'0 L Street. 

John D. Cremer n-. C Street SE. 

• Assistant. 
John J. Cameron 223 B Street NW. 



424 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



SPEAKERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
FROM 1789 TO 1911. 



Names. 



Served. 



F. A. Muhlenberg. . . 
Jonathan Trumbull. 
F. A. Muhlenberg-.., 
Jonathan Dayton... 
Theodore Sedgwick. 
Natl^^niel Macon... 
Joseph B. Varnum.. 

Henry Clay 

Langdon Creves 

Henry Clay 

John W. Taylor 

Philip P. Barbour... 

Henry Ciay I 

Jolin W. Taylor : 

Andrew Stephenson... 

John Bell 

James K. Polk 

Robert M. T. Hunter. 

John White 

John W. Jones 

John W. Davis 

Robert C. Winthrop.. 

Howell Cobb 

Linn Boyd 

Nathaniel P. Banks... 

James L. Orr 

William Pennington . . 

Galusha A. Grow 

Schuyler Colfax 

James G. Blaine 

Michael C. Kerr 

Samuel J. Randall.... 

Josepli W. Keifer 

John G. Carlisle 

Thomas B. Reed 

Charles F. Crisp 

Thomas B. Reed 

David B. Henderson. . 
Joseph G. Cannon.... 
Champ Clark 



Fro m State 
Pennsylvania. . . . 
Connecticutt. . .. 
Pennsylvania. . . . 

New Jersey 

Massachusetts. . 
North Carolina., 
Massachusetts. . 

Kentucky 

South Carolina 

Kentucky 

New York 

Virginia 

Kentucky^ 

New York 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Kentucky 

Virginia 

Indiana 

Massachusetts. . 

Georgia 

Kentucky 

Massachusetts. . 
South Carolina. 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. . . 

Indiana 

Maine 

Indiana 

Pennsylvania. . . 

Ohio 

Kentucky 

Maine 

Georgia 

Maine 

Iowa 

Illinois 

iviissouri 



Congress. 



Time. 



5th 



list, 22nd, 23rd 



25th 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th, 

6th 

7th, Sth, 9th... 

xUth, 11th 

12th, 13th 

13tn 

14th, 15 ch, lUth 

liJth 

17th 

ISth 

lyth 

2Uth, 
23rd 
24th. 

2(;ch 

27th 

28th 

29th 

30th 

31st 

32nd, 33rd 

24tu 

35th 

36th 

37th 

3.Sth, 
41st. 

44th 

44th, 45th, 46th.. 

47th , 

4Sth. 49th, 50th. , 
51st 

53rd 

55th 

57th 

59th. 60th, 



59th, 
42nd. 



40th. 
43rd. 



52nd, 
54th, 
56th. 
5Sth. 
62 nd 



61st 



17S9-1791 
1791-1793 
1793-1790 
1795-1799 
1799-lSOl 
lSOl-1807 
1807-1811 
1811-1814 
1S14-1815 
1815-1820 
1820-1821 
1821-1823" 
1823-1825 
1825-1827 
1S27-1834 
1834-1835 
1835-1839 
1839-1841 
1841-1S43 
1843-1845" 
1845-1847 
j.847-1849 
1849-1851 
1851-1850 
1856-1857 
1S57-1859 
1S60-1S61 
1861-1S63 
1863-1869 
1869-1875 
1875-1876 
1876-1881 
1881-1883 
1883-1889 
1889-1891 
1891-1895 
1895 1899 
1899-1903 
1903-1911 
1911- 



Federal Officers for Oklahoma 



FEDERAL OFFICIALS OF OKLAHOMA 



427 



FEDERAL JUDICIARY OFFICERS OF THE EIGHTH DISTRICT 
CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS. 

(The Eighth District is comprised of the following states: Arkan- 
sas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North 
Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico.) 



Presiding Justice for Eighth District Circuit Court of Appeals. 

Willis Van Devanter Wyoming Dec. 16, 1910 

(The Chief Justice and the Associate Justices of the Supreme 
Court assigned to each circuit, and the circuit judges within each 
circuit, and the several district judges within each circuit, shall be 
competent to sit as judges of the circuit court of appeals within their 
respective circuits. ***** Act Mar. 3, 1891, 1 Sup. R. S. 902.) 



Circuit Judges. 



n'T 



Name and Office. 



Address. 



Appoir 


ted. 


Salary. 


Mar. 17, 


1S92 


$7,000.00 


Nov. 17, 


1903 


7,000.00 


Dec. 12, 


1905 


7,000.00 


Jan. 31, 


1911 


7.000.00 


Jan. 31. 


1911 


7,000.00 



Walter H. Sanborn I St. Paul Minn 

William C. Cook | Leavenworth, Kans. 

Elmer B. Adams 1 St. Louis, Mo 

Walter I. Smith | Council Bluffs. la... 

*John Emmett Garland.. | Washington, D. C. . . 



*Designated to serve two years in Commerce Court (Additional Circuit 
Judge, Eighth Circuit.) 



Clerk of the Circuit Couft of Appeals. 



John D. Jordan |St. Louis, Mo ! June IR, 1891| . .$3.500,00 



428 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



Oklahoma — Eastern District. 



Name and Office. 

District Judge I 

Ralph E. Campbell 1 

Clerk Circuit Court 1 

L. G. Disney 

Clerk District Court \ 

Robert P. Harrison 

Deputy Cl'k Cir. Court. 
Florence Hammersley. . .. 

Deputy Clk. Dis. Court. 
David F. Dickey 

United States Atty 

William J. Gregg 

Assistant U. S. Attys. .| 

John B. Meserve 

J. C. Denton 

Frank Lee 

Clerks to U. S. Atty...; 

Myra Young 

Beatrice E. Freeman 

United States Marshal. 
Samuel G. Victor 

Office Deputies 

Ernest H. Hubbard, Chief 

A. R. Cottle 

J. C. Wilkinson 1 

Clinton N. Filkins | 

Raymond Herz ] 

M. G. Norvell 

L. W. Early 

J. W. Hubbard I 

Thomas Burke 

W. W. Hvams 

R. H. Earnest 

John H. Clapp 

Wm. B. DePue 

Charles A. Nichols... 

Otis Lorton 

Eben D. Taylor 

L. S. Fawcett 

Samuel H. Butler 

E. M. Payne 

G. E. Nicholson .... 
Burton Richards .... 

John Conrov 

Samuel C. Piatt 

Charles Verne 

E. M. Frye 

P. C. Thompson 



Muskogee Jan. 13, 190S 



Muskogee i Dec. 19, 1907 

Muskogee | Nov, 16, 1907 I 

I 1 

Muskogee | Mar. 23, 190S i 

) I 

Muskogee | Nov. 16, 1907 | 

I 1 

Muskogee 1 Jan. 13. 1908 1 

I 1 

Muskogee | Apr. 13, 1908 | 

Muskogee 1 Apr. 7, 1909 | 

Muskogee j Nov. 27, 1907 | 

I 

Muskogee I Dec. 24. 1908 

Muskogee Feb. 23, 1909 



$6,000.00 

Fees. 

Fees. 

$1,500.00 

$1,800.00 

4,000.00 

2,250.00 
2,250.00 
2,000.00 

$1,200.00 
900.00 



Muskogee | Mar. 31, 1908 | 4,000.00 



I 

Muskogee I Apr. 16, 1908 | 

Muskogee | July 1, 190S '| 

Vinita ] June 1. 1908 1 

Muskogee | Sept. 1, 1910 

Ardmore 1 Apr. 16, 1908 

Ardmore 1 Apr. 16, 1908 

McAlester j Oct. 5, 1908 

Muskogee 1 Sept. 15. 1908 

Chickasha | ^pr. 16, 1908 



2,000,00 
1,500.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1.000.00 
1.000.00 
1.000.00 
1,000.00 
900.00 



U. S. Commissioners 



I Tulsa 

I McAlester . . 
1 Okmulgee . . . 

1 Vinita 

j Muskogee . . . 
1 Muskogee . . . 

I Poteau 

1 Holdenville . 
\ Ardmore . . . . 
\ Chickasha . . 

! Sulphur 

I Hugo 

I Grove 

I Grove 

1 Pauls Valley. 

Sallisaw 

Nowata 



Aug. 

Nev. 

Nov. 

Mar. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

May 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Nov. 



1908 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1910 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908. 
1910 
1909 
1908 
1910 



Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 



Time .and places of Holding Courts. — At Muskogee, first Monday 
in January; at Vinita, first Monday in March; at Tulsa, first Monday 
in April; at McAlester, first Monday in June; at Ardmore, first Mon- 
day in October; at Chickasha, first Monday in November. 



Counties in the District. — Adair, Atoka, Bryan, Carter, Cherokee, 
Choctaw, Craig, Creek, Coal, Delaware, Garvin, Grady, Haskell, 
Hughes, Jefferson, Johnston, Latimer, LeFlore, Love, Mayes, Marshell, 
McClain, McCurtain, Muskogee, Murray, Nowata, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, 
Ottawa, Pittsburg, Pontotoc, Pushmataha, Rogers, Seminole, Sequoyah, 
tSephens,. Tulsa, Wagoner and W^ashington. 



FEDERAL OFFICIALS OF OKLAHOMA 



429 



Oklahoma-Western District. 



District Judge. 1 

John H. Cotteral \ Guthrie 

Clerk Circuit Court. 
H. L. Finley 1 Guthrie . 

Clerk Circuit Court. 1 
Charles E. Hunter \ Guthrie 

United States Attorney.] 
John Embry | Guthrie 

Assistant U. S. Attys. | 

Isaac D. Taylor | Guthrie 

Geo. P. Zimmerman | Guthrie 

Clerks to U. S. Atty. 
Albina S. Bekemeyer, Mrs Guthrie 
Josephine R. Pratt (Tem) Guthrie 
Clara Cohagan (Tem) Guthrie 

Messenger. | 

Thomas P. Hewitt 1 Guthrie 

United States Marshal. I 
W. S. Cade 1 Shawnee 

Office Deputies. ] 

Chris Madsen( Chief) i| Guthrie 

David A. Hadden [ Guthrie 

Allen G. Goff 1 Guthrie 

Jacob M. Jacobson [ Guthrie 

H. A. Thomas (Temp.)..! Lawton 

Lillian Vickers | Guthrie 

John P. Jones i Guthrie 



1 Jan. 
1 Jan. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Nov. 
Mar. 

Dec. 
June 
Oct. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



13, 

6, 
16, 
19, 

16, 

17, 

1, 

17, 

5, 

10, 

15, 

1. 

i, 

1, 

1, 

1, 
11, 
18, 



1908 [ $6,000.00 
190S I Fees. 



1907 



Fees. 



190S I $4,000.00 



1907 
1909 

1907 
1910 
1910 



$2,000.00 
1,500.00 

1,200.00 

900.00 

1,200.00 



1908 I 480.00 



1911 

1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1910 
1908 
1908 



4,000.00 

2,000.00 
1,200.00 
1,200.00 
1,200.00 
1,200.00 
1,000.00 
1,200.00 



U. S. Commissioners. 



William M. Allison 

A. T. Boys 

H. R. Blanding 

Thomas P. Braidwood. 

Tliomas Daniels 

H. O. Devereux 

Chas. A. Alexander... 

John Q. Denny 

Ed G. Gray 

G. B. Mellott 

Wm. W. Rakes 

W. G. £toe 

H. A. Russell 

Ande Swigert 

D. M. Tibbetts 



Snyder Nov. 19, 1911 

Oklahoma City Nov. 19, 1911 

Lawton Nov. 19, 1911 

Beaver Nov. 19, 1911 

Buffalo Feb. 5, 1909 

Lenora Feb. 25, 1910 

Woodward Nov. 19, 1911 

Boise City Jan. 18, 1909 

Pawnee Nov. 19, 1911 

Pawhuska Nov. 19, 1911 

Cheyenne July 20, 1910 

Frederick | Nov. 19, 1911 

Sayre | Nov. 19, 1911 | 

Enid 1 Nov. 19, 1911 

Guthrie | Nov. 19, 1911 



Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 



Times and Places of Holding Courts. — At Guthrie, first Monday 
in January; at Oklahoma City, first Monday in March; at Enid, first 
Monday in June; at Lawton, first Monday in October; at Woodward, 
first Monday in May and second Monday in November. 

Counties in the District. — Alfalfa, Beaver, Beckham, Blaine, Caddo, 
Canadian, Cimarron, Cleveland, Comanche, Custer, Uewey, Ellis, Gar- 
field, Grant, Greer, Harper, Jackson, Kay, Kingfisher, Kiowa, Lincoln, 
Noble, Logan, Major, Oklahoma, Osage, Pawnee, Payne, Pottawatomie, 
Roger Mills, Texas, Tillman, Washita, Woods and Woodward. 



Miscellaneous information. 



United States commissioners are appointed by the United States 
district court^s in each judicial district. 

Clerks and deputy clerks of the United States courts are appoint- 
ed by the judges of the respective courts. 



430 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Clerks to United States Attorneys are employed by the respective 
district attorneys. 

Office deputy marshals, whose principal duties are serving pro- 
cesses, are appointed by the respective marshals, when authorized by 
the Attorney General. Other office deputies are appointd by th^ Attor- 
ney General from certification. 

Stenographers to judges are employed by the respective judges 
when authorized by the Attorney Genral. 

Field deputy marshals are appointed by the respective United 
States marshals. Bailiffs are appointed by the marshals. Criers 
are appointed by the U. S. circuit and district courts. Referees in 
bankruptcy are appointed by the respective courts of bankruptcy. 



Points of Constitutional Law. 

Congress must meet at least once a year. 

Congress may admit as many new states as desired. 

One state cannot undo the act of another. 

By the Constitution every citizen is guaranteed a speedy trial 
by jury. 

A power which is vested in Congress alone cannot be exercised 
by a state. 

One state must respect the legal decisions and laws of another. 

Congress cannot pass a law to punish for a crime already com- 
mitted. 

A person who commits a felony in one state cannot find refuge 
in another. 

Bills for revenue can originate only in the House of Representa- 
tives, but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments. 

Treaties with foreign powers are made by the President and rati- 
fied by the Senate. 

The Territories each have a delegate in Congress, who is allowed 
the privilege of debate, but not the right to vote. 

The Vice-President, who ex-officio presides over the Senate, has 
no vote in that body except in a case of a tie ballot. 

If the President holds a bill longer than ten days, while Congress 
is in session, it becomes a law without his signature. 

An act of Congress cannot become a law over the President's 
veto except on a two-thirds vote of both houses. 

The House of Representatives may impeach the President for any 
crime, but the Senate has the sole power to try all impeachments. 

Amendments to the Constitution of the United States requires 
a two-thirds vote of each House of Congress and must be ratified by 
at least three-fourths of the States. 

The President of the United States must be 35 years of age; a 
Senator, 30; a Congressman, 2.5; the President must have been a 
resident of the United States fourteen years. 

A naturalized citizen is not eligible to the office of President of 
the United States. A male child born in a foreign land of American 
parents does not lose its American citizenship thereby. 



FEDERAL OFFICIALS OF OKLAHOMA 431 

BANKRUPTCY COURTS. 

Referees of Eastern District. 

Ezra Brainerd Muskogee. 

R. H. Matthews McAIester. 

J. W. Harreld Ardmore. 

Referees of Western District. 

H. J. Sturgis Enid. 

J. M. Van Winkle Oklahoma City. 

B. M. Parmenter Lawton. 

Frank B. Burford Guthrie. 

Chas. Swindall Woodward. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

Bureau of Animal Industry. 

Dr. Leslie J. Allen, Inspector Oklahoma City. 

(Tick Eradication and Quarantine.) 

Dr. A. O. Lundell, Inspector Stock Yards, Oklahoma City 

(Meat Inspection.) 

Note. — There are 37 departmental employes under the direction 
and supervision of Dr. Allen and 38 under Dr. Lundell. 



Weather Bureau. 

J. P. Slaughter -. Section Director Oklahoma City 

G. E. Lawton Observer Oklahoma City 

H. Wahlgren Ass't. Observer Oklahoma City 

R. L. Murdoch Messenger Oklahoma City 

Fernand Donceel Messenger Oklahoma City 



(Observers at Cotton Region Stations.) 
Place. Name. 

Ardmore H. T. Nisbett. 

Chandler , Chas. L. Kern. 

Durant Nelson Houk. 

Holdenville Miss Eula L. Rutherford. 

Mangum F. D. Dodson. 

Marlow Wm. B. Anthony. 

Shawnee Mrs. Kate Chatman. 

Stillwater A. R. Evans. 

Tulsa , *Harry M. Hutchinson. 

Weatherford M. D. Reed. 



(Observers at Corn and Wheat Region Statinos.) 
Enid Uri B. Wiorcester. 



(Observers at River and Rainfall Stations.) 

Calvin Thomas Purcell. 

Fort Gibson John T. Welch. 

*Also River and Rainfall Observer. 



432 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE. 
IN OKLAHOMA. 

Personnel of Department. 

George T. Knott Collector, 306 State National 

Bank Building Oklahoma City. 

D. C. Bennington Chief Deputy Collector Oklahoma City 

H. H. Hinkle Division Deputy Collector Guthrie. 

Division No. 1. 

J. M. Watson Division Deputy Collector El Reno. 

Division No. 2. 

F. J. Kell Division Deputy Collector Muskogee. 

Division No. 3. 



UNITED STATES LAND OFFICES IN OKLAHOMA. 

Location. Register. Receiver. 

Lawton George B. Roberts A. W. Maxwell. 

Woodward George D. Orner C. C. Hoag. 

Guthrie L. N. Huston William B. Hodges 



FEDERAL OFFICIALS OF OKLAHOMA 433 



NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF FOREIGN CONSULS WHO HAVE 
JURISDICTION OVER OKLAHOMA. 



Nation. Name of Consul. Address. 

Argentine Republic. . .Abel Pardo, Consul General New York, N. Y. 

Austria-Hungary Ferdinand Dielim St. Louis, Mo. 

Belgium L. De Waele New Orleans, La. 

Bolivia Adolfo Ballivian, C. G New York, N. Y. 

Brazil Manuel Jaeintho Ferreira da Cunha, 

O. G New York, N. Y. 

Chile :Rieardo Sanchez Cruz, C. G New York, N. Y. 

China >Li Yung Yew, C. G San Francisco, Cal. 

Colombia Francisco Escobar, C. G New York, N. Y. 

Costa Rica i.amar C. Quinto, C. G. (South Half)New Orleans, La. 

Cuba Felipe Taboada y Ponce de Leon, 

c. G New York, N. Y. 

Denmark Thyge Soegaard, acting Consul New Orleans, La. 

Dominican Republic Juan Bautista Alfonseca C, C. G..New York, N. Y. 

Ecuador Luis A. Plaze S., acting C. G New Orleans, La. 

France Henri Francastel New Orleans, La. 

German Empire Maxmilian Von Loehr St. Louis, Mo. 

Great Britain Herbert Whitehead Mackirdy, V. C.Kansas City, Mo. 

Thos. Edward Erskine St. Louis, Mo. / 

Greece D. N. Botassi, C. G New York, N. Y. 

Guatemala Dr. Ramon Bengoeehes, C. G New York, N. Y''. 

Haiti Louis Durand, C. G New York, N. Y. 

Honduras C. Morton Stewart, Jr., C. G Baltimore, Md. 

L. D. Kingsland, C. G St. Louis, Mo. 

R. Camilo Diaz. C. G New York, N. Y. 

Italy iGiovanni Battiste Tua, C. Agent. . .McAlester, Okla. 

Japan Keiichi Yamasaki. C. G Chicago. 111. 

Liberia Ernest Lyon, C. G Washington, D. C. 

Mexico Jose V. Dosal St. Louis, Mo. 

Monaco Ray P. Saffold San Francisco, Cal. 

Auffuste, Jouve New York, N. Y. 

Netherlands G. H. ten Broek St. Louis. Mo. 

Nicaragua Edwin R. Heath, C. G Kansas City. Mo. 

Norway enristopher Ravn; C. G New York, N. Y. 

Panama Rodolfo Perez, C. G New Orleans, La. 

Ramon G. de Paredes, C. G New York, N. Y. 

Paraguay Clifford Stevens Walton. C. G Washington, D. C. 

Persia Richard Crane, Jr.. C. G Chicago, 111. 

Milton Seropyan. V. C St. Louis, Mo. 

H. H. Topakyan, C. G New York, N. Y. 

Peru Eduardo Higginson. C. G New York, N. Y. 

Portugal ;Louis de Sousa Monteiro Ferreira 

de Castro. C. G New York. N. Y. 

Russia Baron Ernest de Schilling Chicago, 111. 

Pi-ank A. Rockhold, V. C Chicago, 111. 

Salvador Francisco Martinez, C. G San Francisco, Cal. 

Servia Michel Poupine, Hon. C. G New York, N. Y. 

Slam Milward Adams Chicago, 111. 

Spain Alejandro Berea y Rodrigo New Orleans, La. 

Sweden C. A. Smith Minneapolis, Minn. 

Switzerland Ulrich Muller Galveston, Tex. 

Turkey Charles Henrotin, C. G Chicago, 111. 

Uruguay Jose Richling, C. G New York, N. Y. 

Venezuela Jacinto Lopez, C. G New Y'ork, N. Y. 

Notes to abbreviations: C. G., Consul General; V. C, Vice Coit 
sul; Hon. V. C, Honorary Vice Consul- C Agent Consular Agent. 



Sig. ?.0. 



MiscelI:aneous Information 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 437 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 



CARNEGIE LIBRARIES 

Libraries have been established from the funds of the Carnegie 
Library Commission at the following places in Oklahoma: 

Ada, Oklahoma City, 

Bartlesville, Ponca City, 

Cordell, Tahlequah, 

Hobart, Tulsa, 

McAlester, Wagoner. 
Muskogee, 



STATE DEPOSITORIES. 

(State banks, 224; National banks, 101.) 

The following banks have been officially designated by State Treas- 
urer Robert Dunlop as state depositories, (October 31, 1911.) : 

Oklahoma State Bank Antler 

Oklahoma State Bank Mtus. 

Oklahoma State Bane A.da. 

Atoka State Bank Moka. 

The First State Bank Bridgeport. 

The Bridgeport State Bank Burlington. 

The Bank of Burlington Billings. 

The Citizens State Bank Boswell. 

The First National Bank Cherokee. 

The Bank of Cherokee Cherokee. 

The Citizens State Bank Coalgate. 

The Farmers State Bank Coyle. 

The Cestos State Bank Cestos. 

The Peoples State Bank Custer City. 

The Citizens State Bank Cestos. 

The First State Bank Cestos. 

The City National Bank Duncan. 

The First National Bank Durant. 

The Durant National Bank Durant. 

The Colbert State Bank Colbert. 

The First State Bank Bennington. 

The Alfalfa County National Bank Cherokee. 

The First National Bank Eufaula. 

The Eufaula National Bank Eufaula. 



438 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

The State Guaranty Bank El Reno. 

The First National Bank El Reno. 

The Oklahoma State Bank Enid. 

The Bank of Earlsboro Earlsboro. 

The First State Bank Elmore. 

The Bank of Enid Enid. 

The Stock Exchange Bank Fargc. 

The First National Bank Fairfax. 

The Fay State Bank Fay. 

The Washita Valley Bank Ft. Cobb. 

The First National Bank Frederick. 

The Bank of Grove Grove. 

The First National Bank Guymon. 

The Bank of Garvin Garvin. 

The First State Bank Hobart. 

The City State Bank Hobart. 

The Bank of Hinton Hinton. 

The Oklahoma State Bank Holdenville. 

The First State Bank HoUis. 

The Hollis State Bank HoUis. 

The Helena State Bank Helena. 

The Peoples Bank Hickory. 

The Hydro State Bank Hydro. 

The Farmers S: Merchants Bank H nnessey. 

The First National Bank Hennessey. 

The First State Bank Hallet. 

The First National Bank [dabel. 

The First National Bank Hugo. 

The Bank of Kansas Kansas. 

The First National Bank Kiowa. 

The Citizens State Bank Kingfisher. 

The Kildare State Bank Kildare. 

The Bank of Krebs Krebs. 

The First National Bank [^awton. 

The Farmers & Merchants Bank Lahoma. 

The Security State Bank Lexington. 

The First State Bank Loveii. 

The Farmers State Guaranty Bank Lexington. 

The Lindsay State Bank Lindsay. 

The First National Bank Madill. 

The Miami Trust & Savings Bank INIiami. 

The Security State Bank Mooreland. 

The Bank of Mounds Mounds. 

The Farmers & Merchants Bank Mt. View. 

The Union State Bank Muskogee. 

The McAlester Trust Co McAlester. 

The Farmers State Bank Marshall. 

The First State Bank Marietta. 

The First National Bank Mangum. 

The Citizens State Bank Ninnekah. 

The First National Bank Nowata. 

The Okemah National Bank .Okemah. 

The Okmulgee State Bank Okmulgee. 

The First National Bank Okmulgee. 

The First State Bank Orr. 

The Bank of Commerce Pawhuska. 

The First State Bank Pond Creek. 

The First National Bank Porum. 

The National Bank Poteau. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 439 

The Germania National Bank Ponca City. 

The Ponca State Bank Ponca City. 

The First State Bank Perkins. 

The State Bank of Rocky Rocky. 

The First State Bank Rush Springs. 

The Citizens State Bank Ramona. 

The Bank of Randlett Randlett. 

The Bank of Commerce Shawnee. 

The Union State Bank Shawnee. 

The Oklahoma State Bank Sapulpa. 

The Sallisaw Bank and Trust Co Sallisaw. 

The Bank of Stilwell Stillwell. 

The First State Bank Seminole. 

The Speermore State Bank Speermore. 

The First National Bank Stigler. 

The State Bank of Stratford Stratford. 

The Guaranty State Bank Texola. 

The Farmers National Bank Tecumseh. 

The First National Bank Tulsa. 

The Colonial Trust Co Tulsa. 

The Farmers & Merchants State Bank Talihina. 

The Farmers & Merchants State Bank Tupelo. 

The National Bank of Verden Verden. 

The Internationa] Bank & Trust Co Vinita. 

The Farmers State Bank Wheatland. 

The Oklahoma State Bank Walters. 

The Central Exchange Bank Woodward. 

The First National Bank Wapanucka. 

The First State Bank Wynnewood. 

The Weleetka Guaranty Bank Weleetka. 

The First State Bank Wister. 

The State Guaranty Bank .Watonga. 

The First Guaranty Bank Wewoka. 

The First State Bank Waurika. 

The Yale State Bank .Yale. 

The First National Bank Yukon. 

The Bartlesville State Bank Bartlesville. 

The Arkansas Valley State Bank Broken Arrow. 

The First National Bank Checotah. 

The First National Bank Coweta. 

The Farmers & Merchants Bank . .Coweta. 

The State Guaranty Bank Granite. 

The Oklahoma State Bank Haro.ro.on. 

The Citizens State Bank Roosevelt. 

The Woods County Union Bank Alva. 

The National Bank of Anadarko Anadarko. 

The Avard State Bank Avard. 

The Bank of Beaver City Beaver. 

The Oklahoma Guaranty Bank Blackwell. 

The Oklahoma National Bank Chickasha. 

The Farmers Bank & Trust Co Clarmore. 

The First National Bank ; Claremore. 

The Farmers & Merchants Bank Collinsville. 

The Bank of Cornish Cornish. 

The State Exchange Bank Bokoshe. 

The Davenport State Bank Davenport. 

The Commercial Bank El Reno. 

The Fletcher State Bank Fletcher. 



440 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

The Citizens State Bank Foraker. 

The State Bank of Gracemont Gracemont. 

The Oklahoma State Bank Guthrie. 

The Bank of Hardy Hardy. 

Tlie Oklahoma State Bank Hastings. 

The Farmers State Bank Helena. 

The State Guaranty Bank Newkirk. 

The Oklahoma City National Bank Oklalioma City. 

The Bank of Commerce Perry. 

The Farmers & Merchants Bank Perry. 

The Oklahoma State Bank Ponca City. 

The Prague National Bank Prague. 

The First State Bank Shattuck. 

The Bank of Snyder Snyder. 

The Citizens Bank of Wakita Wakita. 

The German National Bank .Weatherford. 

The First National Bank Weatherford. 

The Caddo National Bank Caddo. 

Apache State Bank • . Apache. 

Altus State Bank Altus. 

Alva Security Bank Alva. 

Ardmore National Bank Ardmore. 

Arkansas Valley National Bank Pawnee. 

American National Bank Holdenville. 

American National Bank Oklahoma City. 

Anadarko State Bank Anadarko. 

Bank of Commerce Alva. 

Bank of Claremore Claremore. 

Bank of Crescent ' Crescent. 

Bank of Commerce Tonakawa. 

Bank of Jones Jones. 

Bank of Taloga .Taloga. 

Bank of Supply Supply. 

Bank of Drummond Drummond. 

Bank of Tuttle Tuttle. 

Bank of Spencer Spencer. 

Bank of Dover Dover. 

Billings State Bank Billings. 

Bank of Buffalo Buffalo. 

Bank of Marlow Marlow. 

Bank of Sequoyah Muldrow. 

Bank of Braggs .Braggs. 

Bank of Aylesworth Aylesworth. 

Citizens National Bank El Reno. 

Citizens State Bank Manchester. 

Citizens National Bank Chickasha. 

Custer County State Bank Arapahoe. 

Commercial Bank Checotah. 

Cordell National Bank Cordell. 

Citizens Bank Grove. 

City State Bank Mangum. 

Citizens State Bank Wagoner. 

Cheyenne State Bank Cheyenne. 

Citizens Bank Morrison. 

Citizens State Bank Lawton. 

Commercial Bank Waynoka. 

Cement State Bank Cement. 

Citizens Bank & Trust Co ... Pryor. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 441 

Citizens National Bank Pawliuska. 

Citizens Bank ' Vian. 

City State Bank , Duke. 

Citizens State Bank Rocky. 

Durant State Bank Durant. 

Duncan National Bank Duncan. 

Excliange Bank Perry- 
Farmers National Bank Pond Creek. 

TT'armers National Bank Ponca City. 

Farmers State Bank Granite. 

Farmers «fe Merchants Bank Sapulpa. 

Farmers & Merchants Bank Nashville. 

First State Bank Bristow. 

First State Bank Waurika. 

First National Bank Sayre. 

First National Bank Elk City. 

First State Bank Tonkawa. 

First National Bank Chandler. 

First National Bank Chickasha. 

First National Bank Pryor. 

First National Bank Clinton. 

First National Bank Hominy. 

First National Bank Ryan. 

First National Bank , 'iobart. 

First National Bank Sapulpa. 

First National Bank Stratford. 

First National Bank Tahlequah. 

First National Bank Sentinel. 

First National Bank Edmond. 

First National Bank Wilburton. 

First National Bank Cleveland. 

Farmers State Bank Stillwater. 

Farmers State Bank Chickasha. 

First State Bank Anadarko. 

First National Bank Anadarko. 

Formers Bank Rof f . 

Farmers State Bank Orlando. 

Farmers State Bank Weatherford. 

First State Bank .Coweta. 

Farmers National Bank Wewoka. 

i:<'armers National Bank Ft. Gibson. 

First National Bank Blackwell. 

First National Bank Braman. 

First State Bank Pryor. 

First National Bank Apache. 

First National Bank Milburn. 

First State Bank Carmen. 

Farmers and Merchants Bank Randlett. 

First National Bank Custer City 

First Sta^te Bank Eufaula. 

First National Bank Ada. 

First State Bank .Wayne. 

First National Ba^ik Wanette. 

First National Bank Pawnee. 

First National Bank Ardmore. 

First National Bank Seminole. 

First National Bank Hydro. 

First National Bank .Waurika 



i42 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

First National Bank Jrauls Valley. 

First State Bank Mannsille. 

Farmers State Bank Ada. 

First State Bank Chandler. 

Farmers and Merchants Bank Heavener. 

Farmers Bank of Illinois Gore. 

First State Bank rauls Valley. 

First National Bank AVeleetka. 

First National Bank Kingston. 

First National Bank Bokchito. 

First State Bank Jay. 

Farmers State Bank Texhoma. 

Garfield Exchange Bank Enid. . 

Gerlach Bank Woodward. 

Guaranty State Bank Muskogee. 

Guaranty State Bank ShattucK. 

Grove National Bank Hollis. 

Guaranty State Bank Oklahoma City. 

Guaranty State Bank . Ardmore. 

Home State Bank Hobart. 

Kenefick State Bank Kenef ick. 

Merchants and Planters State Bank Ada. 

Merchants and Planters Bank Tulsa. 

Maud State Bank Maud. 

Mountain Park State Bank Mt. rark. 

Muskogee National Bank Muskogee. 

National Reserve Bank New York, N. Y. 

Nowata National Bank Nowata. 

National Bank of Commerce Guthrie. 

Norman State Bank Norm.an. 

Wilkin-Hale State Bank Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma State Bank Mulhall. 

Oklahoma State Bank Enid. 

Oklahoma State Bank Ham.mon. 

Osage Bank Fairfax. 

Oklahoma State Bank ' McAlester. 

Oklahoma State Bank Atoka. 

Oklahoma State Bank Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma State Bank Jennings. 

Purcell Bank and Trust Co Purcell. 

Prue State Bank Prue. 

Shawnee National Bank Shawnee. 

State Bank of Bessie Bessie. 

State National Bank Holdenville. 

State National Bank Shawnee. 

State Bank of Commerce Stillwater. 

Security National Bank Oklahoma City. 

State Exchange Bank Oklahoma City. 

Tonkawa National Bank Tonkawa. 

Tishomingo National Bank Tishomingo. 

Tradesmens State Bank Orvlahoma City. 

Vinita National Bank Vinita. 

Western National Bank OKlahoma City. 

Choteau Bank and Trust Co Choteau. 

Bank of Canadian Canadian. 

Bank of Lawton Lawton. 

Bank of Ripley Ripley. 

Central National Bank Tulsa. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 443 

Citizens State Bank Covington. 

Citizens State Bank Marshall. 

Citizens State Bank Kingfisher. 

Farmers State Guaranty Bank Thomas. 

Farmers and Merchants Bank Snyder. 

First National Bank Texhoma. 

Guthrie Savings Bank Guthrie. 

Grant County Bank Medford. 

Konawa National Bank Konawa. 

Mulhall State Bank Mulhall. 

Oklahoma State Bank Muskogee. 

Oklahoma Stock Yards National Bank Oklahoma City. 

State Bank of Capitol Hill Oklahoma City. 

Stock Yards State Bank .Oklahom.a City. 



444 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



DELEGATES APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR 



THIRD NATIONAL PEACE CONGRESS. 

(Baltimore, Mr., May 3-4-5, 1911.) 

United States Senators Thomas P. Gore, Lawton; Robert L. 
Owen, Muskogee; Congressmen C. D. Carter, Ardmore; James S. 
Davenport, Vinita; Scott Ferris, Lawton; Bird McGuire, Pawnee; 
Dick T. Morgan, Woodward. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 
OF TUBERCULOSIS. 

(Denver, Colo., June 19-20-21, 1911.) 

Dr. D. A. Myers, Lawton, president of the State Medical Associ- 
ation; Dr. J. M. Postelle, Oklahoma City, president of the State Anti- 
Tuberculosis Association; Omer K. Benedict, Hobart, secretary of 
the State Anti-Tuber ulosis Association; Kate Barnard, Oklahoma 
City, State Commissioner of Charities and Corrections; Mrs. D. A. 
McDougal, Sapulpa, president ofg the State Federation of- Women's 
Clubs; Mrs. E. E. McKibbons, Muskogee; Mrs. Dr. W. R. Clement. 
Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City; Dr. B. W. Frees, Nowata; Dr. Ross 
Grosshart, Tulsa; Dr. W. E. Sanderson, Altus; Dr. Charles Blickens- 
derfer, Shawnee; Dr. E. N. Allen, McAlester; Dr. J. W. Rollins, 
Atoka; Dr. H. M. Williams, Wellston; Dr. J. C. McNees, Ardmore; 
Dr. J. H. Staples, Blue Jacket; Dr. W. H. Harper, Miami; Dr. W. L. 
Kendall, Dr. J. B. Rone, H. Huson and J. T. Debenport, Oklahoma 
City. 



NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CHARITIES AND CORRECTIONS. 

(Boston, Mass., June 7-8-9, 1911.) 

Charles L. Daugherty, State Labor Commissioner, Oklahoma City; 
Kate Barnard, State Commissioner of Charities and Corrections, Okla- 
homa City; Mrs. Mayme Penn, Oklahoma City; Joseph A. Gill, Vinita; 
Mrs. S. B. Daws, Muskogee; Milliam M. Franklin, Madill; Elihu B. 
Hinshaw, Durant; Mrs. Alice A. Curtic, Shawnee; E. G. Newell, Fort 
Supply; Clear Page, Tulsa; R. H. Wilson, State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction; A. C. Scott, Oklahoma City; G. B. Collins, Daven- 
port; E. J. Newell, Elk City. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 445 

NINETEENTH NATIONAL IRRIGATION CONGRESS. 

(Chicago, III., Dec. 5-9, 1911.) 

W. R. Hughes, Kenton; Frank Sewell, Texhoma; O. G. Harper, 
Buffalo; Robert Fitzgerald, Hobart; Dallas Kirby, Altus; A. S. Mc- 
Kinney, Cheyenne; Frank Hartman, Perry; George Plummer, Broken 
Arrow; Rufus D. Ross, Tahlequah; Joe Tannihill, McAlester; W. G. 
Vandever, Blackwell; Henry Noble, Tal^ga; D. C. Roper, Bluejacket; 
P. T. Gloom, Miami; H. K. Wind, Miami*; Bart Murphy, Guthrie; J. V. 
McClintic, Snyder; G. T. Bryan, President State Board of Agriculture; 
J. S. Bryan, Oklahoma City. 



SOUTHERN COMMERCIAL CONGRESS. 

(Atlanta, Ga., March 8-9-10, 1910.) 

O. D. Halsell, Oklahoma City; C. B. Douglas, Muskogee; C. C. 
Kirkpatrick, Chickasha; S. C. Heyman, Oklahoma City; Dr. F. B. Fite, 
Muskgoee; E. B. Hinshaw, Durant; L. B. Collins, Woodward; A. F. 
McGarr, Muskogee; Edward L. Halsell, Muskogee; E. E. Blake, El 
Reno; Edgar Smith, Muskogee; John W. White, Selling; A. L. Davis, 
Hastings; William Brown, Crescent City! Charles N. Gould, Norman; 

F. E. Herring, Elk City; G. E. Martin, Elk City; F. W. Bodurtha, Elk 
City; D. C. Ooley, Fargo; Leslie Niblack, Guthrie; W. H. Erwin, 
Guthrie; B. W. Riley, El Reno; James Lobsitz, Perry; William A. 
Fulwiler, Oklahoma City; Brant Kirk, Oklahoma City; I. M. Putnam, 
Oklahoma City; D. H. Middleton, Muskogee; O. T. England, Durant; 

G. W. Dodd, Hugo; Dr. H. L. Wright, Hugo; Preslie B. Cole, Mc- 
Alester; Horace Henson, Muskogee; George F. Bucher, Muskogee; J. 
C. Smith, Calvin; A. C. Trumbo, Muskogee; W. H. Darrough, Hugo; 
C. H. Swearingen, Hugo; Thomas Hall, Poteau; T. S. Cobb, Wewoka; 
H. H. Holman, Wetumka; Prof. Jerome Dowd, Norman; D. N. Fink, 
Muskogee; Rev. A. P. Johnson, Chickasha. 



SOUTHERN CONFERENCE ON WOMAN AND CHILD LABOR. 

(Atlanta, Ga., April 25, 1911.) 

Charles L. Daugherty, State Labor Commissioner, Oklahoma City; 
E. W. Vance, Director State Free Employment Buereau, Oklahoma 
City, and C. E. Connally, Assistant State Factory Inspector, Lehigh. 



AMERICAN MINING CONGRESS. 

(Chicago, Sept. 26-29, 1911) 

G. E. Warren, Tulsa, State Factory Inspector; Charles L. 
Daugherty, State Labor Commissioner, Oklahoma City; E. W. Vance, 
Oklahoma City; Gus Evans, Buck; James Stivers, Wilburton; Edward 
Padgitt, McCurtain; Jack O'Brien, Lehigh; Frank Haley, Henryetta; 
Martin Clark, McAlester, and Edward Boyle, Oklahoma City. 



446 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

AMERICAN DAIRY CATTLE CONGRESS. 

(Chicago, Oct. 26, Nov. 4, 1911.) 

L. A. Whitten, Jennings; Marcus Fraley, Hominy; G. A. Fell, 
Cherokee; Cleve Lookabaugh, Watonga; Geo. Vincent, Foyil; Gid 
Graham, Broken Arrow; A. L. Bennett, Howe; E. G. McKinney, Mari- 
etta; J. P. Gibson, Elmore; Frank Robertson,* Paoli. 



AMERICAN PRISON ASSOCIATION. 

(Omaha, Oct. 15-19, 1911.) 

Kate Barnard, Commissioner of Charities and Corrections; H. 
Huson, Oklahoma City; R. W. Dick, Warden State Penitentiary, Mc- 
Alester; Clyde Reed, Warden State Reformatory, Granite; E. B. Nel- 
son, Superintendent of Boys' Training School. Pauls Valley; Elihu 
Hinshaw, Durant; Mrs. J. L. Templeton, Muskogee. 



FARMERS NATIONAL CONGRESS. 

(Columbus, O., Oct. 12, 1911.) 

T. J. Morehead, Ripley; Isaac Dodd, Coyle; Jack Barker, El Reno; 
Wm. Cronkwhite, Watonga; W. S. Clavert, Helena; D. W. Bushyhead, 
Baptist; W. R. Hill, Sayre; E. P. Ansley, Oklahoma City; C. C. 
Goetling. Chickasha; H. J. Kester. Enid; D. J. Kirby Altus; W. D. 
Byars, Mangum; F. M. Curtis, Gutrie; B. F. Cooper, Valliant; R. T. 
Groom, Miami: Cloid McCarthy, Antlers; Jno. W. Coker. Mnldrow; 
Frank Smith, Keefton; W. S. Fears, Broken Arrow; Connie Murphy, 
Coweta; Zack Miller, Bliss; John Enlow, Ferguson; O. J. Harper, 
Buffola; Charles F. Barrett, Shawnee. 



INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF FARM WOMEN. 

(Colorado Springs, Colo., Oct. 17, 1911.) 

Mesdames Ed. F. Johns, Chickasha; W. H. Mintermute, Tonka wa; 
B. N. Woodson, Altus: Lille M. Allen. Colony; Jo Moss, Carpenter; 
Grant McColgin, Rankin; Isabel Fields, Cheyenne; Dixon English, 
Grimes; Sut Uhl Brown, Eufaula; Zylphia Myers, Weatherford: J. 
Hullum, Berlin; Mrs. Riefwohl, Grimes; Irma Mathews. Still- 
Water; Ida Lane, Hobart; Elizabeth DeLaney, Stigler; Daisy Pratt, 
Watonga; Kate Wallace, Cheyenne. 



THIRD NATIONAL CONSERVATION CONGRESS. 

(Kansas City, Sept. 25-6-7, 1911.) 

Thos. C. Harrell, Wagoner; H. B. Spaulding, Muskogee; Robt. 
Galbraith, Tulsa; Archibald Bonds, Claremore; Louis T. Martin, Ben- 
nington; C. B. Douglas, Muskogee; W. H. Walker, Purcell, A. L. 
Mitchell, Cheyenne; W. M. Erwin, Pauls Valley; J. Robt. Williams, 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 447 

Altus; Ivan Williams, Fairview; Lucian Sneed, Guymon; J. M. 
Campbell, Cordell; H. H. Brewer, Beaver City; R. O. Renfrew, Wood- 
ward; W. R. Brown, El Reno. 



NORTHERN SETTLERS CONVENTION AND TEXAS LAND 
EXPOSITION. 

(Houston, Tex., Jen. 15-28, 1912.) 

James M. Powers, Lawton; Sylvester Mullen, Ardmore; Milton 
Bryan, Oklahoma City; B. M. Lovelace, Oklahoma City; G. W. Young, 
Berwyn; Jonas Cook, Chickasha; A. T. Tooley, Purcell; John S. 
Thomason, Vinita; Homer G. Lambert, Newkirk; Benj. W. Bird, Pond 
Creek. 



NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW. 

(Chicago, Oct. 26, Nov. 4, 1911.) 

J. L. Burckhalter, Vinita; Paul G. Liebmann, Ardmore; Ray Mc- 
Greer, Oklahoma City; J. I. Morning, Vinita; Roy C. Potts, professor, 
Stillwater; C. A. Harbaugh, Perry; A. L. Churchill, Vinita; H. B. 
Greer, Woodward; Jessie Warden, Oklahoma City. 



PAN-PACIFIC CONGRESS. 

(Honolulu, Hawaii, Feb. 19-24, 1912.) 

William W. Bierce, Oklahoma City; Jesse J. Dunn, Oklahoma 
City; Dennis T. Flynn, Oklahoma City; Otto G. Beckmeyer, Guthrie; 
J. W. Hays. Ada; Aram L. Beck, Ada; Otis B. Weaver, Ada; Clinton 
A. Galbraith, Ada; Lloyd M. Robbins, San Francisco, Cal.; W. R. 
Ferrington, Honolulu, Hawaii. 



PUBLIC LANDS CONVENTION. 

(Denver, Colo., Sept. 28-29, 1911.) 

C. H. Hyde, Alva; J. Elmer Thomas, Lawton; P. P. Duffy, El 
Reno; R. A. Billups, Cordell; Thos. B. Ferguson, Watonga, members 
of Oklahoma executive committee; delegates: J. L. Reisner, Shawnee; 
William Taylor, Oklahoma City; W. E. Brewster, Medford; Wm. 
Walker, Butler; C. E. Bigelow, Shattuck; J. H. Anthrobus, Taloga; R. 
F. Barrett, Cheyenne; Frank Gait, Geary; Luther Harrison, Wetumka; 
O. R. Nation, Anadarko; T. M. Campbell, Frederick; W. R. LeCompte, 
Mangum; J. E. Patterson, Alva; J. H. Schaeffer, Alva; Robt. Loof- 
burrow, Beaver City; Thos. M. Bixby, Lawton; David P. Marcum, 
Woodward; Oro A. Mitchell, Cheyenne; M. M. Henderson, Tecumseh; 
C. S. Gilkerson, Waurika; J. B. Simpson, Grandfield; Leslie Ellis, 
Erick; John H. Mounts, Frederick; J. L. Paschel, Sayre; R. E. Staf- 
ford, Oklahoma City; T. S. Paris, Jefferson; J. B. Tosh, Hobart. 



448 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

FIFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON STATE AND LOCAL 
TAXATION. 

(Richmond, Va., Sept. 5-8, 1911.) 

Benjamin F. Harrison, Secretary of State; W. B. Anthony, Oklaho- 
ma City; E. F. Keys, Oklahoma City; G. A. Ramsey, Colbert; Dr. F. B. 
Fite, Muskogee. 



AMERICAN APPLE CONGRESS. 

(Denver, Nov. 16-17-18, 1911.) 

W. A. Tucker, Clinton; J. T. Foote, Durant; C. Galeener, Okla- 
homa City; A. S. Baldridge, Oklahoma City; V. H. Taylor, Antlers; 
F. W. Bodurtha, Elk City; J. A. Lopeman, Enid, R. W. Wilkinson, 
Tulsa; Ben Davis, Tahlequah; John Merriweather, Checotah; B. W. 
Black, Witcher; T. A. Milstead, Edmond; A. L. Luke, Wynnewood; 
John W. Allison, Stillwater; J. W. Tetirick, Blackwell. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR JUDICIAL SETTLEMENT OF 
INTERNATIONAL DISPUTES. 

(Cincinnati, O., Nov. 7-8, 1911.) 

Chas. N. Haskell, Muskogee; W. P. Thompson, Vinita; Chas. B. 
Stewart, Oklahoma City; Geo. T. Knott, Oklahoma City; Ralph E. 
Campbell, Muskogee; W. S. Cade, Guthrie. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 449 



RAILROADS CHARTERED, PROJECTED and OPERATED 
IN THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA 



Ada Terminal Railway Company, Ada. 

Alaska Southern Railroad Company. 

Altus, Wichita Falls and Hollis Railway Company of Oklahoma, 
Altus. 

The Altus, Oswell & El Paso Railway Co., Altus. 

Alva City Southern Railway Co., Alva. 

American Midland Railway Co., Guthrie. ' , 

Arkansas, Guthrie and California Railway Go. 

The Arkansas, Oklahoma and Northwestern Railway Co., Black- 
burn. 

Arkansas Pacific Ry. Co., Mangum. 

The Arkansas Valley and Gulf Railway Co. 

The Arkansas Valley and Western Railway Co. 

The Arkansas Valley, Guthrie and Western Railway Co. 

The Anadarko and Western Railroad Co., Anadarko. 

The Arbuckle and Western Railway Co., Ardmore. 

Ardmore and Northwestern "Electric Railway Company, Ardmore. 

The Ardmore Wheeler Interurban Railway Co., Ardmore. 

The Atlantic, Guthrie and Pacific Railway Co. 

Ardmore, Duncan & Lawton Railroad Co., Ardmore. 

Bartlesville Interurban Railway Co., Bartlesville. 

Beaver Valley and Northwestern Railroad Co., Beaver. 

The Blackwell and Southern Railway Co. 

The Blackwell, Enid & Southwestern Railway Co. 

The Blackwell, Fairmount and Southern Railroad Co. 

Blackwell Northeastern Railroad Co. 

Blue Island, Riverdale and Hammond Street Railway Company. 

The Buffalo and Northern Oklahoma Railroad Co., Buffalo. 

The Burbank Re-inforced Concrete Railway Co., Enid. 

The Cache and Craterville Railway Co. 

California & Arizona Railway Co., Guthrie. 

The Canadian Coal and Railway Co. 

Canadian Midland Railroad Co., Lawton. 

Canadian River Railroad Co., Woodward. 

Canadian Southern & New York Ry. Co. 

Canadian Southern Railroad Co., Shawnee. 

Canadian Valley, Chickasaw and Western Railroad Co., Allen. 

Canadian Valley Railway Co., Mutual. 

Canadian Valley & Western Ry. Co., Norman. 

Capital €ity Traction Co., Oklahoma City. (Amended to Oklahoma 
City Traction Co.) 

Central Oklahoma Union & Terminal Railroad Co. 

Chandler & Okmulgee Ry Co., Chandler. 

Chandler & Shawnee Railroad Co., Chandler. 

The Cherokee Belt & Interurban Railway Company. 

The Cherryvale, Oklahoma & Texas Railway Company. 
Sig- 31 



450 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Cheyenne and Washita Valley Railway Company. 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company. 
Chicago & Southwestern Electric Ry. Co., Guthrie. 
Chickasaw & Northeastern Railway Company. 
Chickasaw Electric Railway Co. 

The Chickasaw, Luthrie and Northern Railway Company. 
Chickasl a Railway & Electric Co., Chickasha. 
Chickasha Street Railway Company, Chickasha. 
Chickasha Terminal Railway Company, Chickasha and Purcell. 
Chickasha Wareliouse and Terminal Association, Chickasha. 
Choctaw & Chickasaw Railroad Company. 
Choctaw Coal and Ry. Co. 

Choctaw, Newcastle & Western Railroad Co., Lawtcn. 
Choctaw Northern Railroad Company. 
The Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway Company. 
Choctaw, Oklahoma & Western Railroad Company. 
Choctaw Railway and Lighting Co., South McAlester. 
Citizens Street Railway Co., Oklahoma City. 

The Citizens Street Railway Company of Wilburton, Wilburton. 
Citizens Traction Company, Oklahoma City. 
City Railway Co., of Chickasha, Chickasha. 

The Clinton and Oklahoma Western Railway Company, Clinton. 
Clinton^ Cheyenne & Canadian Inter-Urban Railway Co., Cheyenne. 
The Clinton Street Railway Company, Clinton. 

Coalgate & Western Railroad Co.. (Formerly Great Eastern & 
Western R. R. Co.) 

Coalgate, Sulphur & Western Railway Co., Lexington and Sulphur. 
Coffeyville & Memphis Ry. Co., Oklahoma City. 
Coffeyville-Nowata Railway and Power Company, Nowata. 
College City Southern Railway Co., Alva. 
The Colorado and Canadian Valley Railway C6mpany. 
Colorado, Oklahoma and Gulf Ry. Company. 

Colorado, Oklahoma Central & New Orleans Railroad Co., Guthrie. 
Colorado, Oklahoma & New Orleans Railroad Co., Oklahoma City. 
The Colorado, Oklahoma and Southeastern Railroad Co. 
The Colorado, Oklahoma & Southeastern Railway Co. 
Colorado, Oklahoma & Southern Railway Co., Thomas. 
The Colorado, Oklahoma & Texas Railw.ay Company. 
Colorado, Texas & Mexico Railroad of Oklahoma, Mangum. 
The Davis and Turner Falls Railroad Co., Oklahoma City and 
Davis. 

The Denver and Gulf Railroad Company, Texhoma. 
The Denver & Oklahoma Central Railroad Company. 
The Denver, El Reno and New Orleans Railway Company. 
The Denver, Enid & Gulf Railroad Company. 
Denver, Kansas & Atlantic Railroad Co. 
The Denver, Kingfisher and Gulf Railway Company. 
Denver, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad Company. 
Denver, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway Company. 
The Denver, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway Comnany. 
Denver, Wichita & Memphis Railway Co., Oklahoma City and 
Catoosa. 

Denver, W^oodward and Southeastern Railway Company. 
Dominion and Gulf Railroad Company. 
The Eastern Oklahoma Railway Company. 
The Eastern Oklahoma Traction Company, Muskos-ee. 
El Paso, Mountain Park and Oklahoma Central Railroad Company, 
(Amended to The Oklahoma-Pacific Railroad Company) Hobart. 
The El Reno & Southern Railroad Company. 
El Reno Interurban Railway Company, El Reno. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 451 

El Reno, Oklahoma City and Shawnee Railway Company, Okla- 
homa City. 

El Reno Power and Street Railway Company. 

EEl Reno Railway Co., El Reno. 

El Reno, Red River & Pacific Railway Company, El Reno. 

The Enid and Anadarko Railway Company. 

The Enid and Central Oklahoma Traction Company, Enid. 

The Enid and Perry Railroad Company. 

The Enid and Tonkawa Railway Company. 

Enid, Beaver, Guymon & Western Railway Co., Guymon. 

Enid, Blackwell & Osage Interurban Traction Company, Enid. 

The Enid City Railway Company, Enid. 

The Enid, Ochiltree & Western Railroad Company, Enid. 

The Enid, San Diego and Pacific Railroad Company. 

Enid Street Railway Company of Enid, Enid. 

Enid Street Railway Company, Enid. 

The Enid, W^aukomis and Oklahoma City Interurban Railway Co. 

Farmers and Merchan',3 Railroad Compan:/, Eldorado. 

Fairview and Oklahoma City Railway Co , Fairview 

Fort Smith & Arkoma & South Western Railroad Company, Ark- 
oma. 

The Fort Smith and Western Railroad Companv in Oklahoma. 

The Fort Smxith, Blackwell, Wellington and North Western Rail- 
road Company. 

The Fort Smith, Checotah and Shawnee Interurban Railway, 
Checotah. 

The Fort Smith, Guthrie and Western Railway. 

Frisco, Oklahoma City & Texas Railroad Companv of Oklahoma 
City. 

Galveston and Great North Western Railway Company. 

Garvin & Northwestern Railroad Co., Garvin. 

The Gotebo and Southwestern Ry. Co., Gotebo. 

Great Eastern and Western Railroad Company. 

The Great Southwestern Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 

The Gulf and Northern Railroad Company. 

Gulf, Oklahoma, Kansas & Short Line Railway Company. 

Gulf Railroad Company. 

The Guthrie and Interurban Railway Company, Guthrie. 

The Guthrie & Western Railway Co. 

The Guthrie and Kingfisher Railway Company 

Guthrie Electric Railway Company. 

Guthrie, Fairview & Western Railroad Company 

Guthrie Light and Traction Co., Guthrie. 

Guthrie Railway Co., Guthrie. 

Guthrie, Shawnee and Coalgate Railway Company. 

Guthrie, Shawnee & Gulf Ry. Co. 

Guthrie, Shawnee & Shreveport Railroad Co., Guthrie. 

Guymon & Southwestern Railway Co., Guymon. 

The Hobart Motor Railway Co., Hobart. 

Hobart Railroad & Townsite Co. Hobart. 

Indian Central Railway Comj^any, Oklahoma City. 

The Indian Territory, Guthrie and Western Railroad Company. 

International and Great Southern Railway Companv. Oklahoma 
City. 

Jefferson City, Albuquerque and San Diego Valley Railroad Com- 
pany, Carthage. 

Kansas and Gulfport Short-Line Ry. Co., Oklahoma City 

The Kansas and Southeastern Railroad Cornpany. 

Kansas and Texas Railway Co., Guymon. 

Kansas Central, Oklahoma and' Gulf Railroad Company. 



452 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis Railway Company. 

Kansas City, Galveston ii Mexico Ry. Co., Guthrie and Mexico 
City, Mex, 

Kansas City, Lawton &. Pacific Railway Co. 

The Kansas City, OklaLoma and Mexico Railway Company. 

Kansas City, Oklahoma and Houston Railroad Company. 

Kansas City, Oklahoma and Southern Railway and Construction 
Company. 

Kansas City, Tulsa and Southwestern Railroad Company. 

Kansas City, lulsa_ Texas <& Gulf Ry. Co., Oklahoma City. 

Kansas, Eastern Oklahoma and Texas Railroad Company. 

The Kansas, Elk City and Texas Railway Co. 

Kansas, Lawton & Gulf Railway Co., Lawton, 

The Kansas, Oklahoma & Gulf Railway Co. 

Kansas, Oklahoma & Panama Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 

Kansas, Oklahoma & Poteau Ry. Co., Guthrie. 

Kansas, Oklahoma & Southwestern Railroad Co., Stillwater. 

The Kansas, Oklahoma Central and Texas Railway Company. 

The Kansas, Oklahoma City and Western Railway Company. 

Kansas-Oklahoma Interurban Ry Co., Newkirk. 

Kansas, Oklal:oma, Texas and Gulf Railway Company, Granite. 

Kansas, Okmulgee & Gulf Railroad Co., Oklahoma City. 

Kansas, Perry and Port Arthur Railroad Company. 

Kansas Union Traction Company of Newkirk, Okla. 

Lawton and Chickasaw Central Railway Co. 

The Lawton and Craterville Electric Railway Company. 

The Lawton and Fort Sill Electric Railway Company, Lawton. 

The Lawton and Wichita Mountain Railroad Company. 

Lawton, Denton & Dallas Electric Ry, Co. of Lawton. 

Lawton Interurban & Street Ry. Company, Lawton, 

The Lawton Street Railway Company. 

The Lawton, Texas & Northwestern Ry. Company, Lawton. 

The Lawton, Wichita and Gulf Railway Company. 

Lawton, Wichita Falls & Northwestern Ry. Company., Lawton. 

The Lawton. Wichita Mountain and Suburban Railway Company. 

The Lawton, Wichita Mountain and Western Electric Railway Cam- 
pany. 

The Lexington & Northwestern Railway Company. 

The Lexington and South Canadian Valley Railroad Company. 

Lindsay, Light, Power and Transit Company, Lindsay. 

Manufacturers Belt Line Railroad Company, Oklahoma City and 
Tulsa. 

McAlester Southwestern Railway Co., Oklahoma City and Mc- 
Alester, 

INIetropolitan Railway Company. 

The Metropolitan Railway romnanv of Enid, Enid. 

Mid-Continent Traction and Power Company Tulsa and Sapnlpa.- 

Midland Valley Railroad Company, Fort Smith, Ark. 

Mississippi Vallev & Gulf Railwav Co . Guthrie and Chicago, 

Missouri and Oklahoma Central Railroad Company. 

Missouri, Kansas & Gnlf Ralroad Company. 

Missouri. Oklahoma & Gulf Railroad Comnanv, Muskogee. 

Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf Railwav Co., Shawnee. 

Missouri, Oklahoma and Gulf Bridge and Railway Company, Mus- 
kogee. 

Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. 

The Missouri, Oklahoma and Western Railroad Company. 

The Missouri River and Gulf Railroad Company. 

Mountain Park Electric Railway Company. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 453 

The Mountain Valley and Plains Railroad Company of Oklahoma, 
Arnett. 

Muskogee and Texas Railway Co. 

The Muskogee & Western Railroad Company. 

Muskogee Belt, and Terminal Railroad Company. 

The Muskogee Coal and R,aihvay Company. 

Muskogee, Hartshorne and Southern Railroad Company, Oklahoma 
City. 

The Muskogee, Oklahoma & Western Railroad Company. 

Muskogee Railway and Navigation Company, Shawnee. 

Muskogee Southern Railway Company. 

Muskogee Street Railway and Power Company. 

Muskogee Transit Company of Muskogee, Muskogee. 

Muskogee Union Railway Company. 

Newkirk^ Tonkawa & Southern Electric Railway Company, Okla- 
homa City. 

The New Orleans and Oklahoma City Railroad Company. 

The Northern Oklahoma Railroad of Oklahoma. 

The Northern Oklahoma Railroad Company. 

The Okmulgee and Coalton Railroad Company, Okmulgee. 

Okmulgee Inter-Urban Street Railway Company. 

Omaha Kansas Central and Galveston Railroad Company. 

Orizaba Railway Company, Gutl.rie and Orizaba, Mex. 

Osage Railroad Company. 

Ozark & Cherokee Central Railway Company. 

Ozark Coal & Railway Company. 

Oklahoma and Canadian River Ry. Company, El Reno. 

Oklahoma & Cherokee Central Railroad Company. 

The Oklahoma & Golden City Railroad Company, Pawhuska. 

Oklahoma and Gulf Railway Company. 

Oklahoma & Indian Territory Electric Railway Company. 

Oklahoma & Northwestern Railroad Company, Elk City; 

Oklahoma & Panhandle Railway Company. Altus. 

The Oklahoma Southern Railway Company. 

Oklahoma and Soutl: western Railroad Companj*. 

The Oklahoma and Texas Railroad Company. 

Oklahoma & Texas i'ailroad Company, Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma & Texas Railroad Company of Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma and Western Railway Company. 

Oklahoma Central & St. Louis Railroad Company. 

Oklahoma Central and Southeastern Railway Company. 

The Oklahoma Central Interurban Railway, Telegraph, Telephone, 
Li^t and Power Company, Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma Central Railway Company, Muskogee. 

The Oklahoma Central Railroad. 

Oklahoma Central Railroad Company, Asher. 

Oklahoma Central Railway Company, Norman, (Amended: name 
changed from Canadian Valley & Western Railway Company.) 

The Oklahoma Central Railway Company . 

The Oklahoma, Colorado and Chickasaw Railroad Company. 

Oklahoma, Colorado & Pacific Ry Company, Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma Consolidated Railway Company. 

Oklahoma Eastern Railway Company. 

Oklahoma Electric Light and Railway Company. 

Oklahoma Electric Railway Company. Tecumseh. 

The Oklahoma Electric Railway and Light Company. 

Oklahoma Electric Terminal Company. Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma, EI Reno and Shawnee Rapid Transit Railway Company, 
Oklahoma City. 



454 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Oklahoma-El Reno Interurban Traction Company, Oklahoma City. 
Oklanoma Empire Railway Company, Granite, 
Oklahoma Interurban Traction Co., Oklahoma City. 
Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri luter-Urban Railway Company, 
Miami. 

Oklahoma, Mexico & Pacific Railway, Oklahoma City. 
Oklahoma Midland Railway Company. 
The Oklahoma Mineral Belt Railway Company, Roosevelt. 
Oklahoma Northern Railway Company, Oklahoma City and Taloga. 
The Oklahoma, Okmulgee and Southern Railroad Company. 
The Oklahoma-Pacific Railroad Company (name changed from El 
Paso, Mt. Park & Oklahoma Central Railroad Company, Hobart. 
Oklahoma Public Service & Interurban Lines, Stillwater. 
The Oklahoma Railroad Company. 
Oklahoma Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 
The Oklahoma Railway, Light, Power, Fuel and Gas Company. 
Oklahoma, Red River and Gulf Railway Company. (Amended from 
Red River Railway Company.) 

The Oklahoma Roswell and White Mountain Railroad Company. 
Oklahoma-Shawnee Interurban Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 
Oklahoma Short Line Electric Railway Company, Shawnee. 
Oklahoma Southern Railroad Company^ Eldorado. 
The Oklahoma Southwestern Railroad Company. 
The Oklahoma and Telephone and Railway Company. 
Oklahoma, Texas & Western Railway Company, Blair and Ard- 
more, Okla., and Fort Worth, Texas. 

Oklahoma, Texas & W^estern Railway Company, Cheyenne. 
Oklahoma-Texas and Gulf Railroad Co. 
Oklahoma-Texas Railroad Company, Sterling. 
Oklahoma Traction Company. 

Oklahoma Western Railroad Company, Alva and Chicago. 
Osage Western Railway Company, Fairfax. 
Oklahoma City and Canadian Railroad Company. 
The Oklahoma City and Northwestern Railroad Company. 
Oklahoma City & Panhandle Railroad Company, Oklahoma City. 
Oklahoma City and Port Smith Traction Company, Oklahoma City. 
The Oklahoma City and Southeastern Railroad Company. 
The Oklahoma City & Southwestern Traction Company, Frederick. 
Oklahoma City & Suburban Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 
The Oklahoma City and Western Railroad Company. 
The Oklahoma City Belt Line Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 
Oklahoma City, Denver & Gulf Railroad Company, Oklahoma City. 
Oklahoma City Electric Railway Terminal Association, Oklahoma 
City. 

The Oklahoma City, El Reno and Southwestern Electric Railway 
Company. 

Oklahoma City, ^Henryetta and St Louis Railway Company, Okla- 
homa City and New York. 

Oklahoma City Junction Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 
Oklahoma City Land and Electric Railway Company. 
Oklahoma City-Lexington and Sulphur Springs Electric Railway 
Company. 

The Oklahoma City Rapid Transit Company, Oklahoma City. 
The Oklahoma City Street Railway Company. 
Oklahoma City Terminal Association, Oklahoma City. 
The Oklahoma City Terminal Railroad Company. 
Oklahoma City Traction Company (name amended from Capital 
City Traction Co.) 

Pan-American Railway Company. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 455 

Pauls \ alley Railway, Vvaueiie and Pauis Vaiiey. (Name ameiided 
to SeaboaiQ iNOitliernj 

Pawnee 6t ArKanaas River Railroad Company, 
raw nee auu Aiivauoao v ailey itaiiway coiiipany. 
jr'topieti ii.iecuj.c Kaiiway Liompaiiy, iViusivusee- 
Jr^eruue s faan.Lariaiu and street iiauvvay company, Claremore. 
'ihe roteaa Vauey Railroad Company. 

Fueblo, UKiaiioma H, i\ew Orleans Railway Company, Oklahoma 
City. 

Purcell Electric Company. 
Quanah and Oklahoma Railway Company. 
Rapid Transit Interurban Company, Tecumseh. 
Reu River Railway Company (name amended to Oklahoma Red 
River and Gulf Railway Company.) 

Red River Valley and Texas Railroad Company, Frederick. 
Sallisaw, McAlester & Southern Railway Company, McAlester. 
Sand Springs Interurban Railway Company, Tulsa. 
Santa Fe, Oklahoma, Fort Sill & Western Railroad, Land, Town- 
site & Mining Company. 

Sapulpa & Interurban Railway Company, Sapulpa. 

The Sapulpa and Oklahoma City Railroad Company. 

Sapulpa, Jennings and Northwestern RaiU-oad Company. 

South McAlester, Red River and Gulf Railroad Company. 

South Oklahoma City Car Line Company, Oklahoma City. 

Southwestern Interurban Railway Company. Mangum. 

Southwestern Railway Company, Oklahoma City. 

The State Line, Stillwater & Southeastern Railway Company. 

The Sulphur Springs Electric Railway Company. 

The Sulphur Springs Railway Company. 

Sulphur Springs Street Railway, Light & Power Company, Sulphur. 

Tt.e Shawnee & Northeastern Railway Company. 

Shawnee Central Railroad Company. 

The Shawnee Electric Railway Company, Shawnee. 

Shawnee, Oklahoma & Indian Territory Railroad Company. 

Shawnee, Oklahoma and, Missouri Coal and Railway Company. 

The Shawnee, Red Fork Coal & Railway Company. 

The Shawnee Street, Railway and Power Company. 

Shawnee-Tecumseh Traction Company of Shawnee, Shawnee. 

The Shawnee Traction Company. 

Joplin, Oklahom.a and Western Railroad Company. 

St. Louis, El Reno and Western Railw^ay Company. 

Saint Louis, Fort Smith and Dallas Railroad Company of Okla- 
homa, Arkoma. 

St. Louis and Oklahoma Railway Company, Bromide. 

St. Louis and Oklahoma City Railroad Company. 

The St. Louis and Oklahoma Southern Railway Company, Mus- 
kogee. 

The St. Louis, Oklahoma and Albuquerque Railroad Company. 

St. Louis, Oklahoma and Gulf Ry. Company. 

St. Louis, Oklahoma & Pacific Ry. Company, Alva. 

St. Louis, Oklahoma and Southern Railway Company. 

St. Louis Oklahom^a & Texas Air Line Railway Company. 

St. Louis, Springfield & Oklahoma Western Railroad Company, 
Lawton. 

The St. Louis, Tecumseh and Lexington Railway Company. 

The Taloga & Eastern Railroad Company. 

The Tecumseh & Guthrie Railroad Company. 

Tecumseh & Norman Traction Company, Tecumseh. 

Tecumseh and Shawnee Railroad Company. 

The Tecumseh and Shawnee Railroad Company. 



456 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Tecumseh Railway Company. 

Topeka, Lawrence & Kansas City Electric Ry. Company. 

Tulsa Northern Railway Company. 

The Tulsa Street Railway Company, Tulsa. 

Tulsa, Texas & Gulf Ry.. Company, Oklahoma City. 

Trinidad and AVoodward Ry. Company, Guthrie. 

Tulsa, Turnerville & Texas Railroad Company, Guthrie, 

The Texarkana, Oklahoma & Northwestern Railway Company. 

Texas & Oklahoma Railroad Company. 

The Texas, Mountain Park and Northwestern Railroad Company. 

Texas, Oklahoma and Colorado Railroad Company, Clinton. 

Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad Company, Bismark. 

Texas, Oklahoma & Northwestern Railroad Company. Guthrie. 

Union Industrial Railway Company, Aline. 

Union Electric Railway Company. 

The Union Electric Railway Company. 

Vinita & Western Railway Company, Guthrie and Vinita. 

Verden Electric Company, Verden. 

The Washita Valley Interurban Electric Railway Company, Tishi- 
mingo. 

Washita Valley Railway Company of Oklahoma. 

Watonga & Northwestern Railroad Company. 

Weatherford Interurban Railway and Light Company, Weather- 
ford. 

The Webber Falls, Shawnee and Western Railroad Company, War- 
ner. 

The West Tulsa Belt Railway Company, Tulsa. 

The Western Oklahoma Railroad Company. 

Western Oklahoma Railroad Company. 

Wichita Falls & Northwestern Railway Company, Altus. 

Wichita and Denison Railway Company. 

Wichita, Cleveland and Gulf Railway Company, Cleveland. 

The Wichita Falls and Oklahoma City Railway Company. 

Wichita Mountain and Orient Railway Company, Lawton. 

Wichita Mountain Traction Company, Roosevelt and Hobart. 

Wichita, Oklahoma and India.n Territory Railroad Company. 

Wichita, Oklahoma, and Western Railroad Compan^^ 

Wildman Central & Wichita Mountain Railway Company, Wildman. 

The Winnepeg & Galveston Railroad Company, Guthrie. 

The Woodward and Fort Supply Railroad Company. 

Woodward and Quanah Railroad Company. 

Woodward Interurban Railway Company, Woodward. 

Yankton Southern Railroad Company. 

Zinc Belt Line Railroad Company Davis. 

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Companj\ 

Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway Company. 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company. 

Hutchinson & Southern Railroad Company. 

Inter Oceanic Railway Company of Arkansas. 

Kansas and Arkansas Valley Railway Company. 

Kansas & Southeastern Railroad Company. 

Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway Company. 

The Kansas City Southern Railway Company. 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company. 

Santa Fe, Liberal & Englewood Railroad Company. 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway Company. 

St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company. 

Arkansas Western Railway Company. 

Midland Valley Railroad Company. 

Choctaw, New Castle & Western Railroad Company. 

Poteau Valley Railroad Companj'. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 457 

COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS FOR OKLAHOMA 

The following is a complete list of the commissioners of deeds for 
the State of Oklahoma, as qualified up to November 1, 1911, together 
with their respective addresses: 

George H. Carey 56 Wall Street, New York 

Joseph B. Braman 120 Broadway, New ^ ork 

Evan A. Smith Luggett Building, St. Louis. Mo. 

Vinnie A. Thomas 701 N. Y. Life Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

John S Wurts 1019 Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Joseph' F. Harrison Fourth Natl. Bank Bldg., Cinciniati. O. 

A. E. Pipkin Main and Union Streets. Memphis, Tenn. 



WAREHOUSE MANAGERS 

Van Zant-Bruce Drug Co Oklahoma City. 

Alexander Drug Co Oklahoma City 



STATE FISCAL AGENCY 

National Reserve Bank of New York New York City, N. Y. 



OKLAHOMA ORNITHOLOGY 

The birds of Oklahoma are: Golden eagle, owl, (hoot, screech, 
and monkey face), hawk (chicken and pigeon), vulture or buzzard, 
jaybird, robin, brown thrush, catbird, quail, prairie chicken, pheasant, 
marten, bluebird, pigeon, dove, crow, blackbird, cow-blackbird, hum- 
ming bird, English sparrow, woodpecker, yeiiowhammer, yellow and 
red orioles, plover, snipe, turkey, goose and duck. 



OKLAHOMA ZOOLOGY 

Practically all wild animals now to be found in the new state of 
Oklahoma are named in the following list; Black and cinnamon 
bears, mountain lions, bison or buffalo, antelope, black and white 
tailed deer, beaver, wild cat, bob cat, raccoon, grey and white opossum, 
jack rabbit, hare (cotton tail), grey and red fox, porcupine, mink, 
weasel, civet cat, wolves (timber, lobo or mountain and prairie.) coy- 
ote, polecat, prairie dog, pocket and striped gopher, fox, ground hog, 
and squirrel (fox, grey, black and flying.) 



OKLAHOMA ALTITUDE AND STREAMS 

Tex^oma, Texas County, in the extreme northwestern portion of 
the state, has the highest altitude of any town in the state with a 
total of 3,483 feet above the sea level. Goodwell in the same section 
of the state is second with 3.286 feet. The highest point on the In- 
dian Territory side is Sugar Loaf Mountain which attains an altitude 
of 2,600 feet. Cherokee is the lowest point with 411 feet. The land 



458 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

rises in elevation from tl:e southeast where the altitude reaches he- 
low five hundred feet to the northwest where an altitude of nearly 
four thousand feet is attained in the northwestern portion of Beaver 
county. 

The major portion of the state is a rolling prairie. Portions of 
the Cherokee, Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations on the east side and 
parts of Comanche, Kiowa, and Greer counties are. broken and mount- 
ainous. The remainder of the area is prairie lands, broken only by 
occasional hills and broad river valleys. 

The Arkansas, Canadian and Red Rivers with their tributaries, the 
Cimarron^ North Canadian and Washita, extend in a general horth- 
west to southeast direction through the entire breadth of the state. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS 

January 1 New Year's Da* 

February 22 Washington's Birthday 

May 30 Decoration Day 

July 4 Independence Day 

First Mionday in September Labor Day 

October 12 Columbus Day 

December 25 Christmas 

Every day on which an election is held throughout tte state, and 
every day appointed by the President of the United States or the Gov- 
ernor of the State as a day of fasting and thanksgiving. 



MAXIMUM RATE OF INTEREST 

The legal rate of interest in Oklahoma shall not exceed six per 
centum per annum in the absence of any contract as to the rate of 
interest, and, by contract, parties may agree upon any rate not to 
exceed ten per centum per annum. 



EIGHT HOUR DAY 

Eight hours constitute a day's work in all cases of employment 
by and on behalf of the state or any county or municipality, accord- 
ing to the provision of the state constitution. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 459 



OFFICERS, POPULATION, COUNTY SEAT AND HIS- 
TORY OF OKLAHOMA COUNTIES 



ADAIR COUNTY 

County Seat, Stillwell. (Population 984.) 

County Officers 

County Judge W. A. Corley Republican 

County Clerk A. W. Sanders Democrat 

County Attorney W. A. Scofield Republican 

Register of Deeds G. O. Grant Republican 

Clerk Distric* Court I\L K, Shannon Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction J. B. * Johnson Democrat 

Sheriff J- C. Goodrich Republican 

County Treasurer R. R-. McCloud Republican 

County Assessor W. L. Sheffield Democrat 

County Surveyor A. J. Marrs Democrat 

County Commissioners J W, Brown Republican 

Frank Howard Democrat 

J. A Bateman Democrat 

County Weigher J. b! Johnson Democrat 

1907 

Westviile, County eSat 

County Officers 

County Judge B. W. Alberty. . . . .- Democrat 

County Clerk Arthur Whitney Sanders. .Democrat 

County Attorney E. B. Arnold Democrat 

Regi-ster of Deeds J. M. Lynch Democrat 

Clerk District Court W. F. Langley Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. B. Johnson Democrat 

Sheriff Frank C. Adair Democrat 

County Treasurer Ed. Clyne Democrat 

County Surveyor W. P. Kirby Democrat 

County Commissioners Percy C. Howard Democrat 

Chas. L, Morris Democrat 

Ed_ Lemaster Democrat 

Population, 1907, '9,115; 1910, 10,535 

History 

Adair county is the third county south in the eastern tier of coun- 
ties, bordering on Arkansas. One hundred square miles of its area 
is mountainous and 77.921 acres is listed as taxable farm land. The 
county was named in honor of a prominent Cherokee family, bearing 
that name and was formed from a part of the Cherokee -Nation. Its 
area is approximately 60 square miles, 150 square miles of forest lands, 
362 square miles of farm land, and 100 square miles of mountain area. 



460 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

ALFALFA COUNTY 
County Seat, Cherokee (Population 2,016) 

County Officers 

County Judge F. M. Gustin Republican 

County Clerk H. L. Kincheloe Republican 

County Attorney R. R. Cloud Democrat 

Register of Deeds J. R. Constant Republican 

Clerk District Court I. L. Magee Republican 

Sheriff Chas. Morgan. . . .' Democrat 

County Treasurer H. L. Young Republican 

County Surveyor Frank Eckes Republican 

County Assessor M_ R. Mansfield . Democrat. 

County Commissioners J.' C. McWilliams Democrat 

J. T. Andrew Republican 

A. R. Moseley Democrat 

1907 

County Judge F. M. Gustin Republican 

County Clerk H. L. Kincheloe Republican 

County Attorney Webster Wilder Republican 

Register of Deeds J. R. Constant Republican 

Clerk District Court I. L. Magee Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction Gertrude E. Hotter Republican 

Sheriff . . ^ D. A. Hughey Republican 

County Treasurer H_ L. Young Republican 

County Surveyor Frank Eckes Republican 

County Commissioners J. C. McWilliams Democrat 

M_ R. Mansfield Democrat 

John Zimmerman Republican 

Population, 1907, 16,70; 1910, 18,138. 

History 

Alfalfa county is in the northern tier of counties, about equally 
distant from the eastern and western border lines. It consists large- 
ly of prairie land, although some sand hills border on the Salt Fork 
stream. The Salt Plain embraces an area of approximately 45,000 
acres of land. The industries of the county are almost entirely agric- 
ultural. In the reorganization of Woods and Woodward counties by 
the Constitutional Convention, the northeastern portion of original 
Woods was given the name Alfalfa, because of the rapid introduction 
of the plant bearing that name. 

The county has 442,490 acres of land listed as taxable farms, and 
a total area of approximately 87.5 square miles. 



ATOKA COUNTY 

County Seat, Atoka. (Population 1,968.) 

County Officers 

County J"dge Baxter Taylor T'Jemocat 

County Clerk R. W. Harrison Democrat 

Oo'unty Attorney J. W. .Tones , Democra': 

Peei^ter of Deeds W. A. McBride, Sr Democrat 

Clerk District Court D. N. Self Democrat 

Sunt. Public Instruction T. S. Nnrwo.^d Democrat 

Sheriff Jesse W. Phillips. .... .Democrat 

County Treasurer Henry J. Bond .Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 461 

County Assessor W. E. Hilsewick Democrat 

County Surveyor W. A. Withrow . . .DeraoiUiit 

County Commissioners F. C. Johno; n Dorao'jrat 

J. N. Roach Democrat 

Ira Stephenson Democrat 

County Weigher John' W. Wright Democrat 

1907 

County .Tndge J- H. Linebaugh 

County Clerk A. J. Cline. 

Cou-nty Attorney J- W. Jones 

Register of Deeds W. A. McBride, Sr. 

Clerk District Court D N. Self. 

Supt. Public Instruction. I. L. Cook. 

Sheriff J- W. Phillips. 

County Treasurer Henry J. Bond. 

County Surveyor W. A. Withrow. 

County Commissioners J. C. Scott. 

W. A. Cleveland 

B. Rose. 
County Weigher 

Population, 1907, 12,113; 1910, 13,808 

Atoka county is located in the southeastern portion of the state, 
being the third west from the Arkansas line and the second north of 
Red river. It has 600 square miles of timber land, 28 square miles of 
mountainous nature, and 71,271 acres, listed as taxable farm lands. 
Coal and asphalt are its principal minerals. The county was named 
from the town of Atoka, which was named in honor of Captain Atoka, 
a full-blood Choctaw, once a member of the Choctaw Council. 



BEAVER COUNTY 

County Seat, Beaver, (Population 326) 

County Officers 

Countv Judge Geo H. Healy Republican 

County Clerk Geo. H. Wright Republican 

Countv Attorney John A. Spohn Republican 

Reaister of Deeds Harry M. Bulick Republican 

Clerk District Court Oliver G. Pruitt Democrat 

Sheriff John E. Swaim Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction H. D. Peckham Republican 

Comity Treasurer John Simms Democrat 

County Surveyor Oscar Gardner Republican 

County Assessor P. B. Moore Democrat 

County Commissioners A. H. Fox Republican 

A. A. Haskell Republican 

W. S. Van Derburg Democrat 

1907 

County Judge J. W. Culwell Democrat 

County Clerk John W. Savage Republican 

County Attorney Albert Wellborn Republican 

Clerk District Court Ada B. Smith Republican 



462 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Supt. Public Instruction W. T. Quinn Republican 

Sheriff G. W. Meeks Republican 

County Treasurer Clyde Maple Democrat 

County Surveyor John Simms Democra t 

County Assessor W. G. Fields Democrat 

County Commissioners C. C. Maphet Democrat 

B. C. Lewis Republican 

A. P. Hatfield Democrat 

Population 1907, 13,364; 1910, 13,631 
History 

Beaver county is located in the western portion of the state com- 
prising now approximately the eastern third of what was known for- 
m.erly as "No- Man's-land." The Kansas line forms the northern bound- 
ary and the Texas line, the southern boundary. Agriculture and 'Jtock 
raising are the principal industries. Sevei\:l irrigation plants are in 
successful operation in the county. Under the provisions of the Organ- 
ic Act of 1890, the "Unassigned Land," was divided into six districts 
and "No-Man's-Land" was known as "District Seven". Di.slrict Seven 
was called "Beaver" after the stream bearing the name, which flows 
through it. Beaver creek is the upper part of the North Canadian 
river and derived its name from the fact that beaver were plentiful 
along its banks for several years. 

The taxable farming area is listed at 586,658 acres, and the total 
area is estimated to be 1890 square miles. 



BECKHAM COUNTY 

County Seat, Sayre, (Population, 1,881) 

County Officers 

County Judge John C. Hendrix Democrat 

County Clerk John C. MacKenzie Democra.t 

County Attorney E. H. Gipson Democrat 

Register of Deeds Mrs. A. D. Jones Democrat 

Clerk District Court C. T. O'Kelly Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Martha Barrett Democrat 

Sheriff C. H. Cope Democrat 

County Treasurer W. A. Murphy Democrat 

County Surveyor W. T. Peace Democrat 

County Assessor T. J. Price Democrat 

County Commissioners N. S. Mounts Democrat 

J. W. Garrett Democrat 

J. W. Simmons Democrat 

County Weigher R. S. Young Democrat 

1907 

County Judge Fleetwood Bell Democrat 

County Clerk J. A. MacKenzie Democrat 

County Attorney O. O. Smith Democrat 

Register of Deeds A. D. Jones Democrat 

Clerk District Court C. T. O'Kelly Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction A. R. Harris .Democrat 

Sheriff Jnmes R. Richardson Democrat 

County Treasurer W. A. Murphy Democrat 

County Surveyor W. T. Peace Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 463 

County Commissioners L. H. Carmichael Democrat 

Bascom Bates Democrat 

G. W. Gitlieus Democrat 

County Weigher R. S. Young Democrat 

Population, 1907, 17,758; 1910, 19,699 

History 

Beckham was originally the southern portion of Roger Mills and a 
portion of Greer counties. These were placed together by the Con- 
stutional Convention and a new county created, the name Beckham, in 
honor of a former governor of Kentucky, being given to it. The coun- 
ty is the second north from the Red river and borders on the Texas 
Panhandle. The industries are based almost entirely upon agdeultural 
products. The total area is approximately 1,000 square miles of which 
about two per cent is hill and timber land. 



BLAINE COUNTY 

County Seat, Watonga, (Population 1,723) 

County Officers 

County Judge Geo. W. Ferguson Republican 

County Clerk J. H. Craven Democrat 

County Attorney A. L. Emery Democrat 

Register of Deeds Theo. Graalman Republican 

Clerk District Court E. J. Warner Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction Daisy Pratt Republican 

Sheriff Sam E. Southerland Democrat 

County Treasurer J. J. Morrison Democrat 

County Surveyor J. W. Bruton ; Republican 

County Assessor J. H. Ragland Democrat 

County Commissioners Jacob Wildman Republican 

S. H. Kratz Democrat 

J. K. Fretz Republican 

County Weigher Jas. McConahay Democrat 

1907 

County Judge C. E. Malcomb Republican 

County Clerk J. M. Tyler Republican 

County Attorney H. N. Boardman Republican 

Register of Deeds Theodore Graalman Republican 

Clerk District Court E. J. Warner Republican. 

Supt. Public Instruction Emma Gard Mills Republican 

Sheriff Geo. A. McArthur Republican 

County Treasurer John L. French Republican 

County Surveyor J. W. Bruton Republican 

County Commissioners J. A. Convill Democrat 

J. A. Parish Republican 

R. J. Jackson Democrat 

County Weigher Thomas Pappelbaum Democrat 

Population, 1907, 17,227; 1910, 17,9G0 

History 

Blaine county was originally county "C", so named after the pas- 
sage of the Organic Act, creating the seven original counties out of the 



464 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

unassigned lands. The name Blaine was given in honor of James G. 
Blaine \Yho died a short while previously to the naming of the county 
in 1892. Agriculture and stock raising are the principal industries. 
It has an area of 1008 square miles of which 15,000 acres are forest 
lands and about 200,000 acres are in cultivation. 



BRYAN COUNTY 

County Seat, Durant, (Population 5,330) 

County Officers 

County Judge J. L. Rappolee Democrat 

County Clerk S. E. Swinney Democrat 

County Attorney J. T. Mcintosh Democrat 

Register of Deeds J. M. Moore Democrat 

Clerk District Court W. R. Collins Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction C. L. Neely Democrat 

Sheriff A. S. Hamilton Democrat 

County Treasurer J. V. Spell Democrat 

County Surveyor L. V. Stinson Democrat 

County Assessor T. I\I. James Democrat 

County Commissioners J. M. McDarnent Democrat 

J. A. Grove Democrat 

R. -C. Freeny Democrat 

County Weigher Ned Bates Democrat 

1907 

County Judge C. A. Phillips Democrat 

Coun ty Clerk S. E. Swinny Democrat 

County Attorney J. T. Mcintosh Democrat 

Register of Deeds W. L. Poole Democrat 

Clerk District Court W. R. Collins Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction H. C. King Democrat 

Sheriff A. S. Hamilton Democrat 

County Treasurer E. P. James Democrat 

County Surveyor L. V. Stinson Democrat 

County Commissioners J. M. Abbott Democrat . 

J. A. Grove Democrat 

R.. C. Freeny Democrat 

County Weigher P. Z. Harris Democrat 

Population, 1907, 27,865; 1910, 29,854. 

History 

Bryan county was originally a part of the Choctaw Nation and 
was named in honor of William Jennings Bryan of Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Its area is approximately 950 square miles, practically all of which is 
arable land, although about one-fifth of the area is timbered. Corn 
and cotton are the chief products. 



CADDO COUNTY 

County Seat, Anadarko, (Population 3,439) 

County Officers 

County Judge C. Ross Hume Republican 

County Clerk John D. Pugh Democrat 

County Attorney I. H. Kerr Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 465 

County Officers 

Register of Deeds B. P. Cooper Democrat 

Clerk District Court Theo. G. Oelke Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Nettie Daniels Democrat 

Sheriff A. J. Blankenship Republican 

County Treasurer Ed. M. West Democrat 

County Surveyor M. E. Monsell Republican 

County Assessor Frank Carpenter Democrat 

County Commissioners A. B. G-entry .Republican 

Clyde Thompson Republican 

S. E. Thurmond Democrat 

County Weigher J. M. Leazenby Republican 

1907 

County Judge B. F. Holding Democrat 

County Clerk Tohn D. Pugh Democrat 

County Attorney Theodore Pruett Democrat 

Register of Deeds B. F. Cooper Democrat 

Clerk District Court Clyde C. Leach. Democrat. 

Supt. Public Instruction Maude A. Widaman Democrat 

Sheriff Tyre Baker Democrat 

County Treasurer Ed. M. West Democrat 

County Surveyor J. M. Carter Democrat 

County Commissioners .James Murphy Democrat 

C. C. Fisher Democrat 

S. E. Thurmond Democrat 

County Weigher J. B. Montgomery Democrat 

Population, 1907, 30,241; 1910, 35,685 

History 

By the act of Congress in 1901, opening the "New Country," that 
portion inhabited by the Kiowas, Comanches, Wichitas, Apaches of the 
Plains, Caddos and affiliated tribes, was divided into three counties and 
given the names of Kiowa, Comanche and Caddo. Caddo embraced 
most of the region once known as "District I". The tota^. area is 
approximately 1200 square miles, of which eighty i-er cent is aral.le 
land. Agriculture is the principal industry. 



CANADIAN COUNTY 

County Seat, El Reno, (Population 7,872.) 

County Officers 

County Judge W. A. Maurer Republican 

County Clerk Robert Bretz Democrat 

County Attorney Joe L. Trevathan Republican 

Register of Deeds Clyde Mathews Democrat 

Clerk District Court John Pennebaker Democrat 

Supt Public Instruction Irma South Republican 

■ Sheriff C. O. Greer Republican 

County Treasurer Lee R. Patterson Democrat 

County Surveyor J. B. Stewart Democrat 

County Assessor J. W. Fitzgerald Democrat 

County Commissioners R. J. Thompson Democrat 

C. A. Ream Democrat 

Josiah Bunch Socialist 

County Weigher John H. Louis Democrat 

Sig 32 



466 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



1907 



County Judge Harry Lee Fogg Democrat 

County Clerk B. J. Kelly Democrat 

County Attorney John W. Clark Democrat 

Register of Deeds Clyde Mathews Democrat 

Clerk District Court J. D. Pennebaker Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Kate E. Meade Democrat 

Sheriff L. A. Chambers Democrat 

County Treasurer .George D. Haworth Democrat 

County Surveyor R. N. Whittlesey Democrat 

County Commissioners Lee R. Patterson Democrat 

R. J. Thompson Democrat 

C. A. Ream Democrat 

County Weigher S. J. Wick Republican 

Population, 1907, 20,110: 1910, 23,501 
History 

Canadian county was created under the name "District Four" by 
the organic act and was named Canadian by vote of the residents, af-ter 
the Canadian river which crosses it. The area is estimated at 900 
square miles, practically all of which is arable land. Agriculture and 
stock raising are the principal industries. The county is watered bv 
both the North and South Canadian rivers. 



CARTER COUNTY 

County Seat, Ardmore. (Population 8,618.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge M. F. Winfrey Democrat 

County Clerk B. W. Duke Democrat 

County Attorney Jas. H. Mathers Democrat 

Register of Deeds J. G. Latta (died) •. .Democrat 

S. S. Tolson, appointed. .. .Democrat 

Clerk District Court S. F. Haynie Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Fred Tucker Democrat 

Sheriff Buck Garrett Democrat 

County Treasurer D. M. Rumph Democrat 

County Surveyor A. G. Edwards Democrat 

County Assessor T. J. Pollock Democrat 

County Commissioners Robt. F. Scivally Democrat 

W. H. Kirkpatrick Democrat 

O. K. Darden Democrat 

County Weigher R. M. Dillard Democrat 

1907 

County Judge I. R. Mason Democrat 

County Clerk William B. Frame Democrat 

County Attorney James H. Maters Democrat 

Register of Deeds S. S. Tolson Democrat 

Clerk District Court C. T. Vernon Democrat 

Supt. Public Insitruction Mary V. Niblack Democrat 

Sheriff J. H. Akers Democrat 

County Treasurer D. M. Rumph Democrat 

County Surveyor J. W. Ham Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS LNFORMATION 467 

County Commissioners Robt. F. Scivally Democrat 

!Allen W. Apeake Democrat 

^ ^ ,^ O. K. Darden Democraf 

County Weigher w. L Smith ..BeZlrll 

Population, 1907, 26,402; 1910, 25,358 
History 
Carter county was so named in honor of W. B. Carter, father of 

NaUor'crt.'^^"''^"'wf ''"■;:. ^"r? ""^ ^■"'•"^^^ f'-°™ the Chickasaw 
Na ion. Carter owned the old "Diamond Z" ranch of the Chickasaw 
Nation in earliest times. The county's area is estimated at 850 
square miles, of which 156,000 acres is hilly or mountainous; 50 OOG 

st'ock r.T.h,l^'''''t,^"^ ^^^•^'^'; ^'''' ^^'"™ 1^^^^- Agriculture and 
f.nh^it <^v ^- I the principal industries. Large deposits of rock 
asphalt are tound in this county and coal and lead, zinc, iron and 
silver ores are also found. . . , uu duu 



CHEROKEE COUNTY 

County Seat, Tahlequah. (Populationr, 2,891.) 

County Officers 

County Judge j. t. Parks Democrat 

County Clerk T T CarlisIP democrat 

County Attorney : l ! ! ! W. 'l.'^ Johns ] [ [ ! [ [ [ [ [y -^^tZZTt 

Register of Deeds R. w. Foster Democrat 

Clerk District Court w. H. Talley DeZcrat 

Supt. Public Instruction A. K. Ralston .' .' .'Democrat 

^h^"*^ C. W. Starr Democrat 

County Treasurer j. p. Thompson ; .DeSocra 

Conn V IT^^'""' J- B. Moore Democrat 

County Assessor Kelly K. King Democrat 

County Commissioners D. E. Ward Republican 

'R. K. McCollum Democrat 

p«„r,f,. TA7 • 1 ^^'- ^- Davidson Democrat 

County Weigher w. A. Moody .Democrat 

1907 

County Judge j. T. Parks Democrat 

County Clerk Thomas J. Carlisle Democrat 

Sp"f5. S^°n"^-. ^- I- ^°"^^^>' Democrat 

?wl n / ^n' •• R- W. Foster Democrat 

^ ,nt T? K "' ^<°"'^ • ^^'- ^^- Talley Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction A. K. Ralston Domocrat 

r^f-,lv,r r^ James S. Sanders Democrat 

Cnnn V ^^f '"''''"'^' J" P" Thompson Democrat 

County Surveyor j. p. Moore Democrat 

County Comimssioners Gus Caldwell Democrat 

aas. L. Peebles Democrat 

Thomas A. Beane Democrat 

Population, 1907, 14,274; 1910, 16,778. 

History 

Cherokee county was originiaily a portion of the Cherokee Nation 
and was named in honor of the tribe inhabiting it. It has an area 



468 



OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



of 792 square miles, with a forest area of approximately twenty-five 
per cent. About fifty per cent is in cultivation. Farming and stock 
raising are the principal industries. 



CHOCTAW COUNTY 

County Seat, Hugo. (Population 4,582.) 

County Officers 

County Judge W. T. Glenn Democrat 

County Clerk J. W. Milam Democrat 

County Attorney T. S. Hardison Democrat 

Register of Deeds J. A. Penington Democrat 

Clerk District Court T. W. Hunter Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. T. Reed Democrat 

Sheriff yv. L. Loftin Democrat 

County Treasurer A. J. Steen Democrat 

County Surveyor R. P. Draper Democrat 

County Assessor W. C. Bugg Democrat 

County Commissioners J. W. Bryan Democrat 

J. M. Morton Democrat 

John Huskey Democrat 

County Weigher J. L. Wilbanks Democrat 

1907 
County Judge W. T. Glenn Democrat 



County Clerk J. W. 

County Attorney J. M. 

Register of Deeds J. A. 

Clerk District Court T. W. 



Milam Democrat 

Willis Democrat 

Penington Democrat 

Hunter Democrat 



Supt. Public Instruction P. M. Hughes Democrat 



Sheriff J. 

County Treasurer A. 



M. Meredith Democrat 

J. Steen Democrat 



County Surveyor R. P. Draper Democrat 

County Commissioners Thomas E. Oakes Democrat 

L. W. Ratliff Democrat 

VT. D. Hibben Democrat 

County Weigher W. F. Tillman* Socialist 

*Never qualified. 

Population, 1907, 17,340; 1910, 21,862. 

History 

Choctaw county was formed from the old Choctaw Nation and was 
named from that fact. The area is 825 square miles, practically 
all of which is arable land. The forest area is about thirty per cent. 
Cotton, corn and potatoes are the principal crops. It is in the south- 
eastern portion of the state, being the second county from the eastern 
boundary of the state and bordering on the Red river. 



CIIVIARRON COUNTY 

County Seat, Boise City. (Population 257.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge :m. W. Pugh Democrat 

County Clerk Ed. McMahan Republican 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 469 

County Attorney A. W. Butts Democrat 

Register of Deeds R. A. Owens Democrat 

Clerk District Court R. A. Owens Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Walter Kennedy Republican 

Sheriff S. T. Smith Democrat 

County Treasurer J. A. Ellis Democrat 

County Assessor Lee A. Atkinson Democrat 

County Surveyor H. E. Thomson Democrat 

County Commissioners Frank Cavis Republican 

>F. A. Soutar Republican 

J. Linsy Allen Democrat 

County Weigher Leonard Denny Republican 

1907 

County Judge M. W. Pugh. 

County Clerk . . .• S. R . Reeves. 

County Attorney W. T. Ceeton. 

Register of Deeds T. R. Newkirk. 

Clerk District Court L. A. Wikoff. 

Supt. Public Instruction Hettie Britton. 

Sheriff D. C. Sloan. 

County Treasurer W. M. Eddy. 

County Surveyor H. E. Thompson. 

County Commissioners Irvin P. Campbell. 

}W. P. Strong. 
County Weigher E. G. Boyles. 

Population, 1907, 5,927; 1910, 4,553 

History 

Cimmaron is the western third of what was designated as "Dis- 
trict Seven," comprising "No-Man's-Land," under the Organic Act. 
The name Cimarron was given to the county from the river Cimar- 
ron. It is the most western county of the state and has an area of 
approximately 1,450 squar miles, most of which is high plains land. 
The average altitude is 3,000 feet. It has a taxable farm area of 
275,672 acres. Live stock raising is the principal industry. 



CLEVELAND COUNTY 
County Seat, Norman. (Population 3,724.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge F. B. Swank Democrat 

County Clerk L. L. McComb Democrat 

County Attorney Geo. G. Graham Democrat 

Register of Deeds Jason Carrier Democrat 

Clerk District Court Tom Cheatwood Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction B. R. McDonald Democrat 

Sheriff I. B. Sale Democrat 

County Treasurer R. S. Davis Democrat 

County Surveyor R. D. Alexander Democrat 

County Assessor W. D. Mortar Democrat 

County Commissioners W. R. Jennings Democrat 

S. A. Ward Democrat 

J. A. Fox Democrat 

County Weigher W. P. Shelton Democrat 



4.70 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 



1907. 



County Judge N. E. Sharp Democrat 

County Clerk L. L. McCoinb Democrat 

County Attorney Geo. G. Graham Democrat 

Register of Deeds J. R. Stogner Democrat 

Clerk District Court F. O. Miller Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction B. R. McDonald Democrat 

Sheriff I. B. Sale Democrat 

County Treasurer R. S. Davis Democrat 

County Commissioners . W. A. Taylor Democrat 

J. A. Fox Democrat 

T. E. Blair Democrat 

County Weigher W. L. Martin Democrat 

Population, 1907, 18,460; 1910, 18,843. • 

History 

Cleveland county was so named in honor of President Cleveland, 
its territory having been designated as "District Three" under the Or- 
ganic act. Its area is 576 square miles, of which 10,858 acres is 
natural forest, 371,460 acres farm lands, and about 100,000 acres in cul- 
tivation. It is one of the heavy cotton growing counties of the state. 



COAL COUNTY 

County Seat, Coalgate. (Population 3,255.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge P.. H. Wells Democrat 

County Clerk Felix Gibson Democrat 

County Attorney Jas. R. Wood Democrat 

Register of Deeds C. E. Davis Democrat 

Clerk District Court C. L. Cardwell Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction M. H. Cay wood Democrat 

Sheriff J. P. Murphy Democrat 

County Treasurer Patrick Greenan Democrat 

County Surveyor E. T. Brown Democrat 

County Assessor Thos. Roach Democrat 

County Commissioners P. R. Flatt Democrat 

W. E. Jacobs Democrat 

A. W. Cole Democrat 

County Weigher George Warren Democrat 

1907 

County Seat, Lehigh 

County Judge R. H. Wells Democrat ■ 

County Clerk Felix Gibson Democrat 

County Attorney J. R. Wood Democrat 

Register of Deeds C. E. Davis Democrat 

Clerk District Court H. A. Davis Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Ellela Allen Democrat 

Sheriff J. P. Murphy Democrat 

County Treasurer Patrick Greenan Democrat 

County Surveyor A. K. Buzbee Democrat 

County Commissioners W. S. Hall Democrat 

J. W. Boyle Democrat 

J. C. Thomas Democrat 

County Weigher F. E. Bristow Democrat 

Population, 1907, 15,585; 1910, 15,817. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 471 

History 

Coal county was formed from the Choctaw Nation, the name being 
derived from the fact that coal underlies a large part of the county 
and is one of the chief sources of industry. Its area is 522 square 
miles. The surface is rolling and mining and agriculture are the prin- 
cipal industries. ^ 



COMANCHE COUNTY 
County Seat, Lawton. (Population, 7,788.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge las. H. Wolverton Democrat 

County Clerk J. M. Haynes Democrat 

County Attorney John A. Fain Democrat 

Register of Deeds Miss Charla Critcher ....Democrat 

Clerk District Court Ove Harris Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. A. Johnson Democrat 

Sheriff Walter E. Nix Democrat 

County Treasurer . .David W. Boyer Democrat 

County Surveyor S. A. Joyner Democrat 

County -Assessor H. B. Roberts Democrat 

County Comraisidoners John A. Hutcheson Democrat 

W. J. Donald Democrat 

S. L. Cox Democrat 

County Weigher John R. Hill Democrat 

1907 

County Judge James H. Wolverton Democrat 

County Clerk . J. M. Haynes Democrat 

County Attorney J. A. Fain Democrat 

Register of Deeds R. A. Sneed Democrat 

Clerk District Court Ove Harris Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. A. Johnson Democrat 

Sheriff Ruf e Le Fors Democrat 

County Treasurer D. W. Boyer Democrat 

County Surveyor S. A. Joyner Democrat 

County Commissioners Wm. E. McGurren Democrat 

H. E. Julian Republican 

W. O. Weaver Democrat 

County Weigher James F. Woodliff Democrat 

Population, 1907, 31,738; 1910, 41,489. 

History 

Comanche county was formed from the original reservation of the 
Wichita, Caddos, Kiowas, Comanches, Apaches and affiliated tribes, 
opened for settlement in 1901. The name was derived from the tribe 
of Indians, known as Comanches, that name being given to it by Con- 
gress. Its area is 1,728 square miles, of which about 90,000 acres is 
mountainous. Live stock raising and farming constitute the chief 
industries of the county. 



472 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

CRAIG COUNTY 

County Seat, Vinita. (Population, 4,082.) 

County Officers 

County Judge b. F. Parks Democrat 

County Clerk R. F. Nix Democrat 

County Attorney C. Caldwell Democrat 

Register of Deeds E. N. Williamson Democrat 

Clerk District Court Lee R. Mitchell Democrat 

Siipt. Public Instruction H. W. C. Shelton Democrat 

Sheriff H. E. Ridenhour Democrat 

County Treasurer E. D. Ficklin Democrat 

County Surveyor George Ashby Democrat 

County Assessor C. S. Shelton Democrat 

County Commissioners George Costley Republican 

J.. M. Simms Democrat 

R. L. Chamberlin Democrat 

Population, 1907, 14,955; 1910, 17,404. 

1907 

County Judge Theo. D. B. Frear Democrat 

County Clerk R. F. Nix Democrat 

County Attorney Edward H. Brady Democrat 

Register of Deeds E. N. Williamson Democrat 

Clerk District Court D. B. Stuttsman Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction H. W. C. Shelton Democrat 

Sheriff H. E. Ridenhour Democrat 

County Treasurer E. D. Ficklin Democrat 

County Surveyor George Ashby Democrat 

County Commissioners A. A. Barker Democrat 

George Costley Republican 

J. W. Harris Democrat 

County Weigher M. C. Christian Democrat 

Coroner F. M. Adams Democrat 

History. 

Craig county was formed from the Cherokee Nation and the name 
given to it was that of a prominent family of the Indian Territory, the 
name being given in particular honor to FranK Craig, a banker of 
McAlester, one of the leaders in the statehood agitation. It lias an 
area of 81G square miles, practically all prairie land with a limestone 
soil. The forest area is estimated at 30,000 acres. The total taxable 
farming area is 228,677 acres. The principal crops are corn, oats, 
wheat, alfalfa, rye, millet, hay, flax and broom corn. 



CREEK COUNTY 

County Seat, Sapuipa. (Population, 8,283.) 

County Officers 

County Judge W. H. Brown Republican 

County Clerk Abner Bruce Democrat 

County Attorney V. S. Decker Republican 

Register of Deeds H. H. Adams Republican 

Clerk District Court J. B. Summers Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Jesse Burgess Republican 



MISCELLANEOUS L\FORMATION 473 

Sheriff J. w. Berry Republican 

County Treasurer J. L. Brady Democrat 

County Surveyor M. E. Binckley Republican 

County Assessor C. B. Aubrey Republican 

W. O. Baker Democrat 

L. O. Shannon Republican 

County Commissioners D. J. Red Democrat 

1907 

County Judge Josiah G. Davis Democrat 

County Clerk Abner Bruce Democrat 

County Attorney L. B. Jackson Democrat 

Register of Deeds Lafe Speer Democrat 

Clerk District Court J. B. Summers Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction P. T. Fry Democrat 

Sheriff Henry Clay King Deihocrat 

County Treasurer W. W. Banks Democrat 

County Surveyor J. L. Brady Democrat 

County Commissioners M. A. Childress Democrat 

W. O. Baker Democrat 

L. O. Shannon Republican 

County Weigher E. H. Don Carlos Democrat 

County Coroner O. C. Coppedge Republican 

Population, 1907, 18,365; 1910, 26,223. 
« 
History. 

Creek county was formed from the Creek Nation and was so 
named in honor of the tribe of Indians inhabiting that portion of the 
Indian Territotry. It was first named Moman, in honor of Moman 
•Pruiett, an attorney of Oklahoma City, but because of a dispute 
in the Constitutional Convention, the name was changed to Creek. 
The county has an area of 972 square miles, of which about ten per 
cent is forest land. Agriculture, stock raising, and petroleum and 
gas production are the chief industries. 



CUSTER COUNTY 

County Seat, Arapaho. (Population 713) 

County Officers 

County Judge J. C. McKnight Republican 

County Clerk Fred T. Huston Democrat 

County Attorney E. J. Lindley Republican 

Register of Deeds Roy M. Davis Democrat 

Clerk District Court Jno. H. Buchenau Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Mrs. Nell A. Snider Democrat 

Sheriff Barney Davis Republican 

County Treasurer H. A. Moore Democrat 

County Surveyor Chas. Hebard Republican 

County Assessor Walker R. Moore Democrat 

County Commissioners W. W. Brown Democrat 

Newton Alexander Republican 

Geo. Moeller Democrat 

County "\\ eigher Cyrus Shirley Democrat 

Cliff Caldwell Democrat 



474 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

1907 

Counry Judge A. H. Latimer Democrat 

County Clerk Fred T. Huston Democrat 

County Attorney Fred A. Snodgre&s Democrat 

Register of Deeds George W. Dougherty Democrat 

Clerk Di&trict Court lohn H. Buchenau Democrat 

Supl. Public Instruction L. B. Snider Democrat 

Sheriff Ed. L. Thomas Democrat 

County Treasurer James T. Duncan. Democrat 

County Surveyor J. L. O'Hearn Democrat 

County Commissioners C. H. Huff Democrat 

W. W. Brown Democrat 

Newton Alexander Democrat 

County Weigher H. Sm-ith Republican 

Population 1907, 18,478; 1910, 23,231 
History 

Custer county was originally a portion of the Cheyenne-Arapaho 
reservation, a portion of which was opened to settlement in 1891. 
The name Custer was given to the county in honor of General George 
A. Custer who waged the noted Washita Valley campiagn in 1868. It 
has {in area of 1,008 square miles of which about 20,000 acres is 
natural forest. The total taxable farm area is 449,975 acres. Agric- 
ulture and stock raising are the principal industries. Corn, wheat, 
cotton, broom corn, oats, kaffir corn, alfalfa, mile maize, and sor- 
ghum are raised. 



DELAWARE COUNTY 

County Seat, Jay. .(Population 65) 

County Officers 

County Judge W. C. Hall Democrat 

County Clerk Ed. West Democrat 

County Attorney Ad. V. Coppedge Democrat 

Register of Deeds Geo. W. Fields, Jr Democrat 

Clerk District Court Huston Ballard Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. Grove Scales Democrat 

Sheriff G. W. Hogan Democrat 

County Treasurer T. J. Williams Democrat 

County Surveyor J. B. Harlin Democrat 

County Assessor W. H. Davis Democrat 

County Commissioners W. E. Carver Democrat 

Tarleton Gray Democrat 

Tom Dial Republican 

County Weigher T. J. Remson Republican 

1907 

County Seat, Grove 

County Judge Wilson N. Smith Democrat 

County Clerk Ed. West Democrat 

County Attorney Ad. V. Coppedge Democrat 

Register of Deeds Geo. W. Fields, Jr Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction S. W. Peak Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 475 

Sheriff G. W. Hogan Democrat 

County Treasurer T. J. Williams Democrat 

County Surveyor J. B. Harlin .Democrat 

County Commissioners Tarleton Gray Democrat 

Dee Jones Democrat 

T. J. Rogers Democrat 

Population, 1907, 9,876; 1910, 11,469 

History 

Delaware county was formed from the Cherokee Nation and the 
name Delaware was given it in honor of the Indian tribe bearing 
that name. It has an area of approximately 800 square miles, practi- 
cally all of which is areable land, although much of its surface is 
still covered with timber. Lead and zinc in extensive deposits have 
been reported and all kinds of grain, fruits and forage are grown 
successfully. 



DEWEY COUNTY 

County Seat.Taloga. (Population 468.) 

County Officers 

County Judge Harry H. Smith Democrat 

County Clerk E. P. McLennan Republican 

County Attorney C. K. Cary Republican 

Register of Deeds C. W. Kouns Republican 

Clerk District Court Verne Berry Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction E. B. Reay Republican 

Sheriff J. H. Brown Republican 

County Treasurer E. L. Porter Republican 

County Surveyor Fred Langley Republican 

County Assessor M. F. Clark Democrat 

County Commissioners W. H. Sneed Democrat 

J. D. Link Republican 

H. B. McKenzie Socialist 

1907 

County Judge S. M. Byers Democrat 

County Clerk Benj. K. Frans Democrat 

County Attorney C. K. Cary Republican 

Register of Deeds G. W. Kanns Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction E. M. Frost Democrat 

Sheriff J. A. Mulkey Democrat 

County Treasurer J. M. Williams Democrat 

County Surveyor Verne Berry Republican 

County Commissioners I. A. Harper Republican 

A. J. Dasher Republican 

W. J. Williams Democrat 

Population, 1907, 13,329; 1910, 14,132 

History 

Dewey county was originally county "D" under the designation 
of the counties made by Congress in 1891, but the name was changed 
to Dewey in honor of Admiral Dewey, the naval officer who sank the 
Spanish fleet in Manilla Bay in 1898, at the regular election in Nov- 



476 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

ember, 1898. It has an area of 1,029 square miles of which 12,185 
acres is natural forest. The taxable farm land area is 426,915 acres. 
General agricultural products are raised. 



ELLIS COUNTY 

County Seat, Arnett. (Population, 511) 

County Officers. 

County Judge A. L. Squire Republican 

County Clerk Thomas W. Sumpter Republican 

County Attorney Frank E. Ransdell Democrat 

Register of Deeds O. H. Richards Republican 

Clerk District Court Omer E. Null Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction J. A. McLain Democrat 

Sheriff Ray Sutton Republican 

County Treasurer Jno. F. Rogers Democrat 

County Surveyor Wm. Christie Republican 

County Assessor T. G. Eldridge Democrat 

County Commissioners Jno. S. Latta Democrat 

J. W. Bruce Democrat 

Harry Shields Democrat 

County Weigher August M. Dale Republican 

1907 

County Seat, Grand 

County Judge A. E. Williams Republican 

County Clerk T. W. Sumpter Republican 

County Attorney C. B. Leedy Republican 

Register of Deeds R. L. Darnell Democrat 

Clerk District Court 0. E. Null Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction J. A. McLain Democrat 

Sheriff G. M. Rader Democrat 

Corinty Treasurer C. E. Bigelow Democrat 

County Surveyor F. M. Sandford Democrat 

County Commissioners J. L. Ward Republican 

C. F. Ward Republican 

Louis Zahn Republican 

Population, 1907, 13,978; 1910, 15,.375 
History 

By the reorganization of the counties in the Constitutional Con- 
vention, Ellis county was created from the northern part of old Day 
county. The county was named in honor of Albert H. Ellis, second 
vice-president of the convention. It has an area of approximately 
1,200 square miles, only about ten per cent of this being considered 
broken land. Agricultural products are the chief aims of industry. 
It has a taxable farm land area of 401,912 acres. 



GARFIELD COUNTY 

County Seat, Enid. (Population 13,799.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge Winfield Scott Republican 

County Clerk [ra A. Williams Republican 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 477 

County Attorney Chas. N. Harmon Democrat 

Register of Deeds Chas. B. Longcar Republican 

Clerk District Court J. M. Fillebrown Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction Geo. Rainey Republican 

Sheriff Elsworth Hume Republican 

County Treasurer E. B. Weatherly Republican 

County Surveyor B. F. Lewis Republican 

County Assessor ' J no. P. Steward. Democrat 

County Commissioners. Abe Mehew Democrat 

W. R. Wilson Republican 

H. C. Jayne Democrat 

County Weigher 

Clerk Superior Court Ralph Roberts Democrat 

1907 

County Judge I. B. Cullison Republican 

County Clerk Ira A. Williams Republican 

County Attorney H. G. McKeever Republican 

Register of Deeds Charles B. Longcar Republican 

Clerk District Court .J. M. Fillebrown Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction G. W. Rainey Republican 

Sheriff S. C. Campbell Democrat 

County Treasurer C. W. Smith Democrat 

County Surveyor F. B. Lewis Republican 

County Commissioners M. M. Callaway Democrat 

L. J. Johnson Democrat 

W. R. Wilson Republican 

' . Population, 1907, 28,300; 1910, 33,050. 

History 

Garfield county was originally designated as county "O", a part 
of the Cherokee Outlet, by Congress, but the name was changed to 
Garfield in honor of President James A. Garfield. It has an area of 
1,080 square miles, approximately 5,000 acres forest land and 644,549 
acres farm land. Agriculture and live stock are the principal in- 
dustries 



GARVIN COUNTY 

County Seat, Pauls Valley. (Population 2,689.) 

County Officers 

County Judge W. B. M. Mitchell Democrat 

County Clerk Albert Plaster Democrat 

County Attorney John M. Stanley Democrat 

Register of Deeds W. J. Harris Democrat 

Clerk District Court T. J. Austin Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Pearl Bradfield Democrat 

Sheriff B. R. Rayburne Democrat 

County Treasurer J. F. Trimmer Democrat 

County Surveyor R. J. Wheeler Democrat 

County Assessor J. R. Ham Democrat 

County Commissioners J. R. Ham Democrat 

H. C. Gray Democrat 

C. C. Harrison Democrat 

County Weigher J. S. P. Simpson Democrat 



478 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

1907 

County Judge W. B. M. Mitchell Democrat 

County Clerk J. W. Twiggs Democrat 

County Attorney J. D. Mitchell Democrat 

Register of Deeds W. J. Harris Democrat 

Clerk District Court T. J. Austin Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Pearl Bradford Democrat 

Sheriff C. F. Worley Democrat 

County Treasurer J. P. Trimmer Democrat 

County Surveyor J. J. Rotenberry Democrat 

County Commissioners J. R. Ham Democrat 

E. C. Park Democrat 

Jeff Gabler Democrat 

County Weigher S. E. Neill Democrat 

Population, 1907, 22,987; 1910, 26,545 
History 

Garvin county was originally a portion of the Chickasaw Nation 
It received its name from Samuel J. Garvin, a freighter and rancher 
of former days. He was a member of the Chickasaw tribal organiza- 
tion. It has an area of 846 square miles, or 541,440 acres. The 
mountainous region is about fifteen square miles, while the forest 
region is less than ten square miles. Agriculture, stock raising, lum- 
ber and cotton oil constitute the source of the principal industries. 



GRADY COUNTY 

County Seat, Chickasha. (Population 10,320) 

County Officers 

County Judge N. M. Williams Democrat 

County Clerk J. D. Lindsay Democrat 

County Attorney J. H. Venable Democrat 

Register of Deeds George W. Petty Democrat 

Clerk Disitrict Court J. R. Callahan Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction G. H. Newall Democrat 

Sheriff John Lewis Democrat 

County Treasurer W. T. Cloud Democrat 

County Surveyor J. H. Cranwell Democrat 

County Assessor V. N. Hulen .Democrat 

County Commissioners John M. Penn Democrat 

Ed. F. Johns Democrat 

W. M. Pursley Democrat 

County Weigher C. C. Goetting Democrat 

Superior Court Clerk Will Melton Democrat 

1907 

County Judge M. M. Williams Democrat 

County Clerk J. D. Lindsay Democrat 

County Attorney B. B. Barefoot Democrat 

Register of Deeds G. W. Petty Democrat 

Clerk District Court J. R. Calahan Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction R. H. Wilson Democrat 

Sheriff M. B. Louthan Democrat 

County Treasurer W. S. Kilgore Democrat 

County Surveyor E. H. Peery Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 479 

County Commissioners M. D. Beddingfield Democrat 

W. M. Pursley Democrat 

Ed. F. Johns Democrat 

County Weigher 

:!ounty Coroner 0. W. Claycomb Democrat 

Population, 1907, 23,420; 1910, 30,309 

History 

Grady county was originally a portion of the Chickasaw Nation 
and was named in honor of Henry W. Grady, the noted southern 
orator. It has an area of 936 square miles, practically all of which is 
farming land. The principal crops are corn, wheat and cotton. 



GRANT COUNTY 

County Seat, Medford. (Population 1,110.) 

County Officetrs 

County Judge J. W. Bird Republican 

County Clerk P. W. Ziegler Democrat 

Register of Deeds C. T. Coleman Democrat 

Clerk District Court C. N. Ernest Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Chas. M. Jacobson Democrat 

Sheriff J. F. Lamison Republican 

County Treasurer R. J. Russell Republican 

County Surveyor Robt. M. Wharry Republican 

County Assessor W. A. Dalzell Democrat 

County Commissioners J. H. Huntington Democrat 

W. S. Robertson Republican 

E. B. Hamilton Democrat 

1907 

County Judge H. H. Rogers Democrat 

County Clerk P. W. Ziegler Democrat 

County Attorney F. G. Walling Democrat 

Register of Deeds F. P. Privett Democrat 

Clerk District Court Charles N. Ernest Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Charles N. Jacobson Democrat 

Sheriff George D. Walker Democrat 

Coujity Treasurer L. D. Anderson Republican 

County Surveyor W. H. Raymond. . ." Democrat 

County Commissione-R J. H. Huntington Democrat 

J. D. Orendorff Republican 

E. B. Hamilton Democrat 

Population, 1907, 17,638; 1910, 18,760 

History 

Grant county was originally county "L", so designated by Congress 
in opening the Cherokee Outlet. The name was changed to Grant 
in memory of President Grant. The area of the county is 1,008 square 
miles, and practically the entire area is farm land. Agriculture and 
live stock arc the principal industries. It has 571,469 acres of tax- 
able farm lands. 



480 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

GREER COUNTY 

County Seat, Mangum. (Population 3,667) 

County Officers 

County Judge Jarrett Todd Democrat 

County Clerk Floyd McNeill Democrat 

County Attorney Harry D. Henry Democrat 

Regif'ter of Deeds Mrs. Mary Watkins Democrat 

Cle'rk District Court '. .Geo. W. Swinburne Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Geo. W. Sims Democrat 

Sheriff Jasper Nelson Democrat 

County Treasurer Frank M. Overton Democrat 

County Surveyor Wm. Mitchell. . . . t Democrat 

County Assessor A. B. Carloss Democrat 

County Commissioners A. M. McKinney Democrat 

S. C. Cabiness Democrat 

Frank H. King Democrat 

County Weigher W. O. Byars Democrat 

1907 

County Judge Jarrett Todd Democrat 

County Clerk Floyde McNeill Democrat 

County Attorney H. D. Henry emocrat 

Register of Deeds Emmett Winter Democrat 

Clerk Disitrict Court Geo. D. Winburne Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. E. Tavlor Democrat 

Sheriff S. H. Tittle Democrat 

County Treasurer F. M. Overton Democrat 

County Surveyor William Mitchell Democrat 

County Commissioners A. M. McKinney Democrat 

A. E. Abernathy Democrat 

O. C. Summers Democrat 

County Weigher Bob Park Democrat 

County Coroner G. E. Border Democrat 

Population, 1907, 23,624; 1910, 16,449 
History 

Green county has a history unique and little in common with 
other counties of the state. In the treaty of 1819 with Spain, the 
Red River was made the boundary line between the United States 
and Spanish possessions. Texas become an independent nation in 
1836. Greer was named in honor of a former state official by Texas, 
but some years later the controversy arose between the United States 
and Texas as to which branch of the Red river was the stream in- 
tended in the treaty of 1819. The dispute over the Ownership was 
carried to the United States Supreme Court, which decided in 1895, 
that Greer belonged to the United States, and as such the territory 
was re-organized by act of Congress, approved May 4, 1896, under 
the laws of Oklahoma. The original tract known as Greer included 
parts of Beckham, Harrison and Jackson counties as Avell as the 
present county of Greer, or an area of approximately 1,500,000 acres 
in all. The county now has an area of 1,115 square miles with about 
1500 acres of forest lands. The surface is chiefly prairie land, with 
outcropping bluffs of gypsum along the streams with several granite 
mountains in the eastern part. The principal industries are farming 
and stock raising. General agricultural products are raised. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 481 

HARMON COUNTY. 

County Seat, Mollis. (Population 964.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge C. W. King Democrat 

County Clerk Joseph Ready Democrat 

County Attorney J- O". Counts Democrat 

Register of Deeds John Overton Democrat 

Clerk District Court E. F. Davis Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction G. P. Morton Democrat 

Sheriff Pierce Nance Democrat 

County Treasurer Wm. Aufill Democrat 

County Surveyor 

County Assessor S. D. Barnett Democrat 

County Commissioners N. E. Abernathy Democrat 

Harry Treadway Democrat 

I. M. Gibbons Democrat 

County Weigher J. H. Scruggs Democrat 

*Harmon county was a part of Greer in 1907. 

^Population 1907, — ; 1910, 11,329. 
History. 

The history of Harmon county is linked with that of "Imperial 
Greer." After Jackson county had been severed from the original 
territory, the remaining portion of Greer was divided in 1909 and the 
western portion was called Harmon in honor of Judson Harmon, gov- 
ernor of Ohio. As United States Attorney General Harmon concluded 
the case that gave Greer county to the United States. It has an 
area of approximately 500 square miles, nearly all of which is gently 
rolling prairie land with a dark sandy loam. Gypsum and salt are the 
minei'als. Corn, wheat, oats, alfalfa and forage plants constitute the 
crops. 



HARPER COUNTY. 
County Seat, Buffalo. (Popular 282.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge B. C. Krause Republican 

County Clerk E. L. Hubbart Democrat 

County Attorney D. P. Parker Republican 

Register of Deeds Hattie E. Seeman Democrat 

Clerk District Court Hattie E. Seeman Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Alma Criswell Democrat 

Sheriff .J. E. Garnett Democrat 

County Treasurer W . A. Davis Democrat 

County Surveyor C. W. Simonds Republican 

County Assessor R. W. Smith Democrat 

County Commissioners G. B. Carpenter Democrat 

A. I. McElhiney Republican 

J. W. Carl Democrat 

1907 

County Judge J. L. Griffitts Democrat 

County Clerk E. L. Hubbard Democrat 

Sig. 33 



482 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

County Attorney E. J. Dick Democrat 

Register of Deeds W. L. Little Democrat 

Clerk District Court Frank White Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Alma Criswell Democrat 

Sheriff M. P. Terry Democrat 

County Treasurer W. A. Davis Democrat 

County Surveyor W. H. Miler Democrat 

County Commissioners G". B. Carpenter Democrat 

J. W. Carl Democrat 

J. R. Litz Democrat 

Population, 1907, 8,089; 1910, 8,189. 
History. 

Harper county Vi^as created from the northeastern part of Wood- 
ward county by the Constitutional Convention, and was so named in 
honor of Oscar G. Harper, a resident of that section and a clerk of the 
convention. It has an area of 1.03.5 square miles. The surface is large- 
ly an undulating prairie, slightly broken, however, in the immediate vi- 
cinity of the Cimarron river. Gypsum and salt are the minerals found 
and wheat, corn, cane, Kaffir corn, broom corn and alfalfa are the 
crops grown. 



HASKELL COUNTY. 
County Seat, Stigler. (Popular 1,583.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge A. L. Beckett Democrat 

County Clerk Levin C. Winn Democrat 

County Attorney J. W. Frederick Democrat 

Registf.r of Deeds Henry Smith Democrat 

Clerk District Court Wade H. Denton Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction M. L. Cotton Democrat 

•Sheriff L. D. Gilstrap Republican 

County Treasurer W. W. Eckles Democrat 

County Surveyor Rey Parks Democrat 

County Assessor Louis Le Flore Democrat 

Oounty Commissioners G. O. McWhorter Democrat 

W. J. Smith Democrat 

A. O. Wilcox Republican 

1907. 

County Judge A. L. Beckett Democrat 

County Clerk Levin C. Winn Democrat 

County Attorney Joseph W. Foster Democrat 

Register of Deeds Henry Smith Democrat 

Clerk District Court Wade H. Denton Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction M. L. Cotton Democrat 

Sheriff L- D. Allen Democrat 

County Treasurer T. E. McBrayer Democrat 

County Surveyor Fred C. Mercer Democrat 

County Commissioners G. O. McWhorter Democrat 

D. M. Lee Democrat 

W. S. Hall Democrat 

Population, 1907, 16,865; 1910, 16,875. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 483 

History. 

Haskell county was originally a portion of the Choctaw Nation 
and was so named, when the counties on the Indian Territory side 
were formed, in honor of Charles N. Haskell of Muskogee, leader of 
the democratic majority in the Constitutional Convention and later 
first governor of the new state. It has an area of 612 square miles. 
The area of agricultural lands is about 70 per cent, and forest lands 
about 26 per cent. Corn, cotton, wheat and potatoes are the chief crops. 



HUGHES COUNTY. 

County Seat, Holdenville. (Population 2,296) 

County Officers. 

County Judge P. W. Gardner Democrat 

County Clerk P. B. Adair Democrt 

County Attorney J. R. Witty Democrat 

Register of Deeds C. C. Leach Democrat 

Clerk District Court Thos. Neal Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction H. S. Mathis Democrat 

Sheriff Cal Edmonds Republican 

County Treasurer B. W. Mackey Democrat 

County Surveyor C. M. Lawrence Democrat 

County Assessor H. C. Burford Democrat 

County Commissioners 

J. J. Armstrong Democrat 

J. C. Holman Democrat 

County Weigher R. L. Willbanks Democrat 

1907. 

County Judge P. W. Gardner Democrat 

County Clerk P. B. Adair Democrat 

County Attorney W. P. Langston Democrat 

Register of Deeds C. C. Leach Democrat 

Clerk District Court E. F. Messenger Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction B. N. Hickss Democrat 

Sheriff Tames K. King Democrat 

County Treasurer M. P. Ralney Democrat 

County Surveyor C. M. Lawrence Democrat 

County Commissioners H. C. Burford Democrat 

J. J. Armstrong Democrat 

J. C. Holman Democrat 

County Weigher Robt. Willbanks Democrat 

County Coroner N. J. Johnson 

Population, 1907, 19,945; 1910, 24,040. 

History. 

Hughes county was originally a portion of the old Creek Nation 
and was so named in honor of W. C. Hughes, an attorney of Oklahoma 
City and a member of the Constitutional Convention. It has an area 
of 792 square miles, fifteen per cent of which is forest land and 8.5 per 
cent agricultural. Corn, cotton and wheat are the principal products. 
The county is well watered by both the Candian rivers and numerous 
smaller streams. 



4S4 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

County Seat, Aitus. (Population 4,821.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge B. N. Woodson Democrat 

County Clerk I. A. Ashlock Democrat 

County Attorney ^I. L. Hankins Democrat 

Register of Deeds A. E. Bilbrey Democrat 

Clerk District Court Ned McDaniel Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. M. Dale Democrat 

Sheriff John D. Bailey Democrat 

County Treasurer J. S. Moore Democrat 

County Surveyor E. E. Hudson Democrat 

County Assessor J. A. Chenoweth Democrat 

County Commissioners R. A. Shields Democrat 

S. L. Bouhvare Democrat 

W. D. Ballard Democrat 

County Weigher W. B. Shelton Democrat 

1907. 

County Judge W. T. McConnell Democrat 

County Clerk I. M. Ashlock Democrat 

County Attorney J. M. Dillard Democrat 

Register of Deeds .,W. R. Morrow Democrat 

Clerk District Court Ned McDaniel Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. M. Dale Democrat 

Sheriff Geo. C. Hensley Democrat 

County Treasurer J. S. Moore Democrat 

County Surveyor E. E. Hudson Democrat 

County Commissioners E. C. Ballow Democrat 

S. L. Boulware Democrat 

H. P. West Democrat 

County Weigher J. W. Shield Democrat 

Population, 1907, 17,087; 1910, 23,737. 
History. 

Jackson county was formed from the south part of Greer county 
and was given the name Jackson in honor of Stonewall Jackson, the 
noted Confederate leader in the Civil War. The area is 720 square 
miles, practically all of which is farming land. Sixty per cent is in 
cultivation. Cotton, corn, wheat, alfalfa and other hay are the prin- 
cipal crops. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

County Seat, Waurika. (Population 2,928.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge B. T. Price Republican 

County Clerk J. B. Steele Democrat 

County Attorney Tay G. Clift Democrat 

Register of Deeds M. C. Fisher Democrat 

Clerk District Court R. F. Brown Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction L. L. Wade Democrat 

Sheriff John Wright Democrat 

County Treasurer Jim E. Howard Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 485 

County Surveyor J. R. Day Democrat 

County Assessor 3eorge Simmons Democrat 

County Commissioners J. R. Eckles Republican 

W. C. Sappiugton Democrat 

W. T. Tyson Democrat 

County Weigher Ed Williams Democrat 

1907. 

County Seat, Ryan. 

County Judge G. M. Bond. 

County Clerk J. M. Dyer. 

County Attorney P. T. Hamilton. 

Register of Deeds M. C. Fisher. 

Clerk District Court P. F. Brown. 

Supt. Public Instruction L L. Wade. 

Sheriff S. P. Treadwell. 

County Treasurer W. J. Chapman. 

County Surveyor J. R. Day. 

County Commissioners N. P. Giles. 

W. E. McClure. 
, J.M. Bounds. 
County Weigher C. F. Richards. 

Population, 1907, 13,439;; 1910, 17,430. 

History. 

Jefferson was formed from a portion of the old Chickasaw Nation 
and was named in honor of Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. The area is 780 square miles, practically all of 
which is farming land with about fifteen per cent covered with forests. 
Cotton, corn and potatoes are the chief crops. 



JOHNSTON COUNTY, 
County Seat, Tishomingo. (Population 1,408.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge Nick Wolfe Democrat 

County Clerk G. W. Lowry Democrat 

County Attorney .G. F. Lefler Democrat 

Register of Deeds J. C. Bennett Democrat 

Clerk District Court Ed Greene Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Lulu Daniel Democrat 

Sheriff J. M. Williams Democrat 

County Treasurer V. F. Eubank Democrat 

County Surveyor H. A. Hatcher Democrat 

County Assessor J. K. Cobb Democrat 

County Commissioners W. E. Brogdon Democrat 

H. T. Blount Democrat 

G. W. Edwards Deiiiocrat 

County Weigher J. R. Green Democrat 

1907. 

County Judge Nick Wolfe Democrat 

County Clerk G. W. Lowry Democrat 

County Attorney J. S. Ratliff Democrat 



486 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

Register of Deeds J. C. Bennett Democrat 

Clerk District Court Ed Greene Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction J. Frank Lilly Democrat 

Sheriff N. H. Simmons Democrat 

County Treasurer V. F. Eubank Democrat 

County Surveyor H. A. Hatcher Democrat 

County Commissioners ^ W. J. Rogers emocrat 

H. T. Blount Democrat 

V. A. Fine Democrat 

County Weigher L N. Russell Democrat 

Population, 1907, 18,672; 1910, 16,734, 

History. 

Johnston county was originally a portion of the Chickasaw Nation. 
The name given to it was in honor of D. H. Johnston, governor of 
the Chickasaw Nation. The area totals 660 square miles, one third of 
which is forest and the remainder rolling farm land. Fruits and farm 
products of all kinds are grown. Granite and asphalt constitute the 
known mineral wealth. Several large saw mills are in operation. 



KAY COUNTY. 

County Seat, Newkirk. (Population 1,992.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge Claude Duval Democrat 

County Clerk W. E. Shinn Democrat 

County Attorney B. C. Wieck Republican 

Register of Deeds E. C. Denton , Democrat 

Clerk District Court Fred C. Groshong Republican 

Supt. Public Instruction E. A. Duke Democrat 

Sheriff Paul M. Mead Republican 

County Treasurer H. M. Ziegler Democrat 

County Surveyor A. M. Stalnaker Republican 

County Assessor A. C. Smith Democrat 

County Commissioners L. A. Cann Democrat 

H. C. Scott Republican 

L. J. Burkhalter Republican 

County Weigher A. H. Bright Republican 

1907. 

County Judge Claude Duval Democrat 

County Clerk .W. E. Shinn Democrat 

County Attorney J. E. Burns Democrat 

Register of Deeds E. C. Denton Democrat 

Clerk District Court Ed. P. Reed Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction E. A. Duke Democrat 

Sheriff Syl. G. Ford Democrat 

County Treasurer H. M. Ziegler Democrat 

County Surveyor T. P. Alford Democrat 

County Commissioners Thomas McQuirk Democrat 

G. Albert!, Jr Democrat 

Charles Mayer Democrat 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 487 

History. 

Kay county bears the name originally given to it by Congress in 
the opening of the Cherokee Outlet, with the exception that the name 
is now spelled out. It was known first as "K.." It has an area of 947 
square miles; forest lands, 5,993 acres; farm lands, 600,533 acres. 
Wheat, corn, oats and alfalfa are raised. 



KINGFISHER COUNTY. 

County Seat, Kingfisher. (Population 2,538.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge John M. Graham Republican 

County Clerk George H. Wodworth Republcan 

County Attorney F. P. Whistler Republican 

Register of Deeds F. D. Dakin Republican 

Cierk District Court Geo. Laing Republican 

Supt. Public Instructon Geo. E. Moore Republican 

Sheriff Clyde Smith Republican 

oounty Treasurer Chas. E. Moore Republican 

County Surveyor A. E. Stalnaker Republican 

County Assessor W. R. Blackburn Democrat 

County Commissioners W. O. Cunningham Republican 

J. A. Lindsey Democrat 

J. C. Myers Republican 

County Weigher Mat Stringer Democrat 

1907. 

County 'Judge J. M. Graham Republican 

County Clerk Geo. H. Woodworth Republican 

County Attorney M. W. Hinch Republican 

Register of Deeds F. D. Dakin Republican 

Clerk District Court George H. Laing Republican 

Sheriff M. M. Tate Democrat 

County Treasurer J. S. Patrick Republican 

County Surveyor A. E. Stalnaker Republican 

County Commissioner J. A. Lindsey Democrat 

H. L. Miles Republican 

Dennis Downing Republican 

Population, 1907, 18,010; 1910, 18,825. 

History. 

The county of Kingfisher derives its name from the town of 
Kingfisher, now the county seat, which in turn gets its name from 
Kingfisher creek. It was originally county "Five," as designated by 
Congress in apportioning the divisions of the "Unassigned Lands." Its 
area totals 903 square miles, of which originally about one-sixth was 
covered with oak timber, while the remaining portion of the county 
was rolling prairie. Gypsum, salt and building stone are the minerals. 
Wheat, corn, cotton, alfalfa and kaffir corn are the principal crops. 



488 OKLAHOMA RED BOOK 

KIOWA COUNTY 

County Seat, Hobart . (Population 3,845.) 

County Officers. 

County Judge J. W. Mansell Democrat 

County Clerk C. H. Fawks Democrat 

County Attorney J. E. Terral Democrat 

Register of Deeds E. L. Barnes Democrat 

Clerk District Court J. A. Harris Democrat 

Supt. Public Instruction Miss A. E. Lane Democrat 

Sheriff .G. W. Daniels Republican 

County Treasurer G. A. Bot