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Full text of "Old English songs and ballads. Pt 10."

Part X. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



In Ten Parts. 



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#lfr dhglisjj Songs antr §allab 



SELECTED FROM 



W. OHAPPELL'S 



POPULAR MUSIC OF THE OLDEN TIME. 



THE SYMPHONIES AND ACCOMPANIMENTS BY 



G. A. MACFARREN. 



& 




Jonhn : 

CRAMER, BEALE, AND WOOD, 201 REGENT STREET; 

AND 

WOOD AND CO. EDINBURGH, GLASGOW, AND ABERDEEN. 




HENDERSON, BAIT, AND CO. PRINTERS, WINSl.EY STREET, OXFORD STREET, W. 



A COLLECTION OF THE 

ANCIENT SONGS, BALLADS, AND DANCE TUNES, 

WHICH CONSTITUTE THE 

NATIONAL MUSIC OF ENGLAND; 

ARRANGED CHRONOLOGICALLY, WITH REMARKS AND ANECDOTE, 

AND rBECEDED BY 

SKETCHES OP THE EARLY STATE OP MUSIC, AND OF THE AMUSEMENTS ASSOCIATED 

■WITH IT IN ENGLAND, DURING THE VARIOUS BEIGNS, 

Br 

W. CHAPPELL, F.S.A. 

THE AIRS HARMONISED BY G. A. MACFARREN. 




In Two Volumes, Eoyal Octavo, £2 2s. ; or in Seventeen Parts, each 2s. 



From the Quarterly Review, July, 1859. 
" The main body of the book consists of a mass of erudition, no less copious than well digested. Late as it comes, Mr. 
ChappelTs work is the only one of its kind." 

From the Saturday Review, June 9, 1860. 
"Mr. ChappelTs book is a valuable contribution to our scanty stock of musical literature. It is well and earefully executed, 
and displays a patience in research, and an accuracy of detail, which must make it a reliable authority on points connected with the 
archaeology of English National Music." 

From the Athenmum (second notice), August 20, 1859. 
" Not two, but twenty notices could be written of tins excellent and carefully- wrought book." 

From Notes and Queries, July 9, 1859. 
" This book is indeed one which the ladies will delight in for its music, and graver readers for its curious learning." 

From the Gentleman's Magazine, August, 1857. 
" The student of history, the antiquary, the reader for amusement, and the cultivated lover of sweet sounds, will come alike to 
Mr. ChappelTs volumes in search of gratification for their several tastes, and will assuredly not come in vain." 

From the Spectator, March 5, 1859. 
" Popular Music of the Olden Time, one of the greatest and most valuable works which has ever issued from the English 
music press." 

From the Times, March 31, 1859. 
" Antique specimens furnished By Mr. W. ChappelTs invaluable work on Popular Music of the Olden Time." 

From the Morning Post, Sept. 22. 
" There is an enormous amount of research in Mr. ChappelTs book, yet no sign of labour ; no heaviness whatever ; but, on the 
contrary, the author gives the results of his studies briefly, smoothly, pleasantly as possible." 

From the Daily News, Dec. 7, 1858. 
"Mr. William ChappelTs great collection of our national songs and ballads, is, in truth, an English classic, a standard work — 
distinguished not only as a vast storehouse of the treasures of genuine English music and song, but as a literaiy work of great 
learning and research, and so full of curious and interesting information relative to the music as well as the manners and customs of 
our ancestors, that it may be regarded as a contribution not only to the history of music, but to the history of England." 

From the Morning Herald, Sept. 1, 1856. 
" An invaluable history of the early music of this country — the fruit of study, at once patient and unwearying, and of 
investigation adequately learned and intelligent." 

From the Daily News, Oct. 11, 1859. 
"We heartily recommend this important and admirable work to the attention, not of musical readers only, but of the wholo 
public. It is full of interesting information, the result of great learning and deep research ; while it is attractive from its pictures 
of society and manners among our ancestors, and from the exceedingly pleasant and animated style in which it is written." 

From Chambers' Journal, Oct. 23, 1858. 
" Mr. ChappelTs collection is in all respects a remarkable work, one of those which an honest enthusiasm may, but a money-fee 
never can, produce. 

London : Published by Cramer, Beale, and Wood, 209 Regent Street ; 

AND 

Wood and Co. Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Aberdeen. 



X 



THE 



OLD ENGLISH SONGS AND BALLADS 



SELECTED FROM 



W. CHAPPELL'S 



fflpitlar SPtasir ai fbc <§Jton Cim*. 



THE SYMPHONIES AND ACCOMPANIMENTS BY 



G-. j^. IMI ^ O IF^IR/IR, IE IST. 



LONDON: 
CRAMER, BEALE, AND WOOD, 201 REGENT STREET: 

AND 

WOOD AND Co. EDINBURGH, GLASGOW, AND ABERDEEN. 



fo (feglisjj gJittks; 



W. CHAPPELL'S popular music of the olden time. 



PART I. 

1. Summer is a coming in 

2. My little pretty one 

3. Now, Robin, lend to me thy bow 

4. The hunt is up 

5. Ah ! the sighs that come fro' my heart 

6. Oh, willow ! willow ! 

7. It was a lover and his lass 

8. Oh, mistress mine 

9. Phillida flouts me 

10. A legend of the Avon 

11. There were three ravens 

12. Then to the maypole haste away 

PART II. 

13. The bailiff's daughter of Islington 

14. Drive the cold winter away 

15. Since first I saw your face 

16. Christmas comes but once a year 

17. The blind beggar's daughter of Bethnal Green 

18. Sequel to ditto (another tune) 

19. You gentlemen of England 

20. Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright 

21. Joan, to the maypole away let us on 

22. Once I lov'd a maiden fair 

23. Will you hear a Spanish lady 

24. Though to care we are born (Hope, the hermit) 

PART III. 

25. To carry the milking pail 

26. In sad and ashy weeds 

27. Cold's the wind and wet's the rain 

28. Phillis on the new made hay 

29. Autumn's goljru leaf 

30. The British Grenadiers 

31. I live not where I love 

32. The jovial man of Kent 

33. The spring is coming 

34. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

35. Fair Hebe I left 

36. The roast beef of Old England 

PART IV. 

37. The Queen of May 

38. Sing a sweet (Dulce domum) 

39. come you from Newcastle 

40. King John and the Abbot of Canterbury 

41. Dear Kitty 

42. Why so wayward (Light of love) 

43. Cauld and raw's the wind without 

44. Rouse thee, young knight 

45. The beggar boy (Ladies who shine like) 

46. Early one morning, just as the sun 

47. Drink to me only with thine eyes 

48. Come, lasses and lads, get leave of your dads 

PART V. 

49. I'm call'd the jovial miller 

50. My dearest love, why wilt thou ask 
61. The name of my true love 

52. A soldier should be jolly 

53. Northern Nancy 

64. There was a simple maiden 

55. Oh ! the oak and the ash and the bonny ivy tree 

56. When the king enjoys his own again 

67 . Love will find out the way 

68. Barbara Allen 

69. Black-eyed Susan 

60. Under the greenwood tree 



PAET VI. 

61. Fairies, haste, the summer moon *s bright 

62. Love me little, love me long . 

63. Nought I prize beyond her 

64. There was an old fellow at Waltham Cross 

65. Near Woodstock town 

66. I sit upon the mountain side 

67. Oh, list to me, my only love 

68. The parting (the dreaded hour) 

69. Beneath the willow tree 

70. My dearest, look on me again 

71. In the spring-time of the year 

72. The dusky night rides down the sky 

PAET VII. 

73. Let me list to the billows 

74. My lodging is on the cold ground 

75. Oh ! weel may the keel row 

76. Cease, rude Boreas, blust'ring railer 

77. There w r as a jolly miller 

78. Golden slumbers kiss your eyes 

79. What if a day, or a month, or a year 

80. Sally in our alley 

81. The Vicar of Bray 

82. May he who wears a sulky face 

83. Till Marj' won my heart 

84. Amid the new mown hay 

PART VIII. 

85. Heart of oak 

86. The girl I left behind me 

87. Dorothy's a buxom lass 

88. Past three o'clock (The London Waits) 

89. Old King Cole 

90. At her cottage, dear Maiy 

91. Down among the dead men 

92. Yes, to-morrow, my love 

93. Send me a lover, St. Valentine 

94. As down in the meadows 

95. My secret I will safely keep 

96. The leather bottel 

PART IX. 

97. Prince Charles Stuart's farewell to Manchester in 1745 

98. Oh ! for a husband 

99. Row, gallant comrades, row 

100. There was a maid the other day 

101. Oh, dear ! what can the matter be? 

102. Saw you my father 

103. The mermaid (an old sea song) 

104. From Oberon in Fairyland 

105. The carman's whistle 

106. The "Blue Bell " of Scotland 

107. Lovely Nancy 

108. The well of St. Keyne 

PART X. 

109. In his barque merrily 

110. Here's a truce to idle sorrow 

111. Take me to the North Country 

112. Under the Rose 

113. The Moon shall be in darkness 

114. Why, brother soldiers, why? 

115. To-night let's jovial be 

116. Farewell and adieu to you all, Spanish ladies 

117. I wandered through the garden 

118. Great Orpheus was a fiddler bold 

119. Sad, weary hearted 

120. Begone, dull care ! 



London : Published by Cramer, Beale, and Wood, 201, Regent Street; 

AND 

Wood and Co. Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Aberdeen. 



CONTENTS. 



PART X. 



In his barque merrily 

Here's a truce to idle sorrow 

Take me to the North Country 

Under the Rose . . . 

The Moon shall be in darkness 

Why, brother soldiers, why? 

to-night let's jovial be 

Farewell, and adieu to you all, Spanish ladies 

i wandered through the garden 

Great Orpheus was a fiddler bold 

Sad, weary hearted .... 

Begone, dull care ! 



218 
220 
222 
224 
226 
228 
230 
232 
234 
236 
238 
240 



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IN HIS BARQUE MERRILY. 

TUNE, "THE BOATMAN," — POPULAR IN AND AFTER 1650. 



P • - 76. 

Moderately slow, and very smooth. 



Nciv Words upon the old subject by J. Oxcnford. 






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TUNE, "THE GLORY OF THE NORTH," — TIME OF CHARLES X. 



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TAKE ME TO THE NORTH COUNTRY. 

TUNE, "THE NORTUEltN LASS," — TIME OF CHARLES I. 



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116. 
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UNDER THE ROSE. 

TUNE, "UNDER, THE ROSE," TRADITIONAL. 



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TUNE, "THE MOON SHALL BE IN DAKKNESS," — TRADITIONAL, 



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WHY, BROTHER SOLDIERS, WHY? 

TUNE, "WHY, SOLDIERS, 'WHY?" — POPUXAB BEFOBE 1729. 

P - 88. 

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TO-NIGHT LET'S JOVIAL BE. 

TUNE, "HEY, BOYS, UP GO WE," — 1641. 



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feel, with-out one oath, we're bound To have a mer - ry night ; The trou - bles of the 
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day are o'er, Our hearts are glad and free, 

soon, for all Are un - der fate's de - cree, 



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FAREWELL AND ADIEU TO YOU ALL, SPANISH LADIES! 



OLD SEA SONG, "FAREWELL, SPANISH LADIES," TRADITIONAL. 

j» = 132. 

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assai marcato. 



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Gracefully. 



I WANDERED THROUGH THE GARDEN. 

TUNE, "CUPID'S GARDEN," TRADITIONAL. 



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GREAT ORPHEUS WAS A FIDDLER BOLD. 

TUNE, " STINGO J OR, OIL OF BARLEY," — POPULAR BEFORE lCuO. 



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fid - dler bold, But when a tune I plaj', Sir, They 



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man and brute he led, I'm told, And like - wise all the trees, Sir; From stones he'd con -jure 
do not fol - low,- as of old, Oh no, they run a - way, Sir; A mul - ti-tude I 

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tears and smiles, The mountains shake with laugh - ter, And if he walk'd some hundred miles, They 
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leave be-hind a pen - ny. 



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SAD, WEARY HEARTED! 

TUNE, -'LOVE LIES BLEEDING," — TIME OP CHAKLES I. 



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BEGONE, DULL CARE! 

TUNE, "THE QUEEN'S JIG," ABOUT 1700. 



= 92. 

Clieerfully. 



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wife shall dance and I will sing, So mer-ri-ly pass the day, 



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END OF VOL. I. 



HENDERSON, RAIT, AND CO., 

GENERAL TRINTERS, 

WINSLEY STREET, OXFORD STREET, W. 



THE NATIONAL MUSIC OF SCOTLAND. 

WOOD'S NEW AND COMPLETE EDITION OF THE SONGS. Arranged with Pianoforte Accompaniments by Fdjlay Dim, 
T. M. Mudie, J. T. Surrene, and H. E. Dibdin. In three volumes, cloth, 21s., or the three in one, half-bound, gilt edges, 21s., 
and 25s. ; elegant bindings, full bound morocco, 31s. 6d., 35s. 

The Introduction, Critical Dissertation, and History of the Songs, has been written by George Farquhar Grahame, Author of 
the article " Music " in the seventh edition of the " Enclopsedia Brittanica." 

THE SONGS WITHOUT THE WORDS. One volume, 7s. Introduction by George Farquhar Grahame. 

THE DANCE MUSIC. One volume, 7s. Being the Complete Collection of Keels and Strathspeys so arranged as to admit of their 
being played in the regular sequences of Keel, Strathspey, and Reel. 




WITH NEW SYMPHONIES AND ACCOMPANIMENTS, AND EDITED BY 

G. A. MAC FAKE EN. 

In One Volume, full Music Size, 21s. ; in parts, each containing Twelve Songs, 4s. ; or each Song separately, Is. 



CONTENT! 
After the battle (Night closed around) 
As a beam o'er the face of the waters 
As slow our ship 
At the mid hour of night 
Avenging and bright fall the swift sword 
Before the battle (By the hope within lib) 
Believe me, if all those endearing 
By that lake whose gloomy shore 
Come, send round the wine 
Come o'er the sea, maiden, with me 
Come, rest in this bosom 
Dear harp of my country 
Drink to her who long 
Erin, the tear and the smile 
Erin, Erin (Like the bright lamp) 
Eveleen's bower 

Farewell ! but whenever you welcome the hour 
Fill the bumper fair 
Fly not yet 
Forget not the field 
Go where glory waits thee 
Has sorrow thy young days shaded 
How dear to me the hour 
How oft has the Banshee cried 
I'd mourn the hopes that leave me 
If thou'lt be mine 
111 omens (When daylight) 
I saw from the beach 
I saw thy form in youthful prime 
In the morning of life 
It is not the tear at this moment shed 
Let Erin remember the days of old 
Love's young dream (Oh ! the days are gono) 
Love and the novice (Here we dwell) 
My gentle harp 
Nay, tell me not, dear 
Nora Creina (Lesbia hath a beaming eye) 
No, not more welcome the fairy numbers 
Oh ! breathe not his name 
Oh ! blame not the bard 
Oh ! had we some bright little isl 
Oh ! doubt me not 



Oh ! where's the slave so lowly 

Oh ! for the swords of former time 

Oh ! 'tis sweet to think 

Oh ! the shamrock (Thro' Erin's Isle) 

One bumper at parting 

O think not my spirits are always as light 

Remember the glories of Brian the Brave 

Rich and rare were the gems she wore 

Remember thee ! yes, while there's life 

She is far from the land 

Silent, Movie, be the roar of thy water 

St. Senanus and the Lady (Oh ! haste and leave) 

Sublime was the warning 

Take back the virgin page 

The harp that once through 'Para's halls 

Though the last glimpse of Erin 

The meeting of the waters 

The legacy (When in death) 

Through grief and through danger 

This life is all chequered 

The young May Moon 

The Minstrel Boy to the war is gone 

The valley lay smiling before me 

The time I've lost in wooing 

They may rail at this life 

'Tis believed that this harp 

'Tis the last Rose of Summer 

'Tis gone and for ever 

Though dark are our sorrows 

To ladies' eyes around 

Weep on 

We may roam through this world 

What the bee is to the flow'ret 

When he who adores thee 

When through life unblest we rove 

When first I met thee 

When cold in the earth 

Whene'er I see those smiling eyes 

While gazing on the moon's light 

While history's muse 

Wreathe the bowl with flowers 

You remember Ellen, our hamlet's pride 



CRAMER, BEALE, and WOOD, 309, Regent Street. 



DEBAIIT'S IHIJ^^IMIOILTITTIIVLS. 



CRAMER, BEALE, AND WOOD, SOLE AGENTS. 







LIST OF PRIC ES. 











One row of "Vibrators. 
One Stop. 

Four Octaves. 


© 

a 

m 

00 

B 


Polished 
Oak, 
£6 6 


Solid 

Mahogany, 

£7 7 


"Walnut, 


1 


One row of Vibrators. 
Three Stops. 

Five Octaves. 


•*] o P3 2 Ti 
o o X "■ o 3 

£ g. * | .a 


Polished 

Oak, 

£12 12 


Eosewood, 
£13 13 


"Walnut, 
£14 14 


2 


One row of Vibrators. 
Five Stops. 


• •(£)•• 

E" i^ ►> * p» F S 

? D ST S 


Polished 
Oak, 
£14 


Bosewood, 
£15 


"Walnut, 
£16 


3 


One row and a half of 
Vibrators. 

Seven Stops. 


• • • © • • • 

in ? • J* 


Polished 

Oak, 

£19 15 


Rosewood, 
£21 


"Walnut, 
£21 15 


4 


Two rows of Vibrators. 
Nine Stops. 


• • • • ©• • • • 

S p cm a » 
"*' ' & P 3- 

F 


Polished 

Oak, 

£22 15 


Rosewood, 
£24 15 


"Walnut, 
£25 10 


5 


Two rows and a half of 
Vibrators. 

Eleven Stops. 


?siooo„o«io»ih 
| s a > g. ^ - s -. s; | 
p P <E. g sr S 


Polished 
Oak, 
£28 5 


Rosewood, 
£30 15 


"Walnut, 
£31 10 


6 


Four rows of Vibrators. 
Thirteen Stops. 


1 . a | 3 I L P ? I' •" & P= 1- 

e 

Knee Pedals. ©— @ Grand jen. 


Polished 

Oak, 

£36 15 


Rosewood, 
£42 


Walnut, 
£43 10 


7 


Four rows and a half of 
Vibrators. 

Fifteen Stops. 


f 1 5 S E ° ? ^ S 8 5 ? s ; 
S - B ? § 5 »• • a g- | 

Knee Pedals. ©~~ © Grand jeu, treble, A bass. 


Polished 
Oak, 
£43 


Rosewood, 
£47 


Walnut, 
£48 10 


8 


Five Rows and a half of 
Vibrators. 

Nineteen Stops. 




Polished 
Oak, 
£59 


Rosewood, 
£63 




11 P P p g g ■ S ? | 1- ? f 

Knee Pedals. ©— © Grandjea, treble, & bass. 


Walnut, 
£64 10 



CRAMER, BEALE, & WOOD, 209 Regent Street. 



HARMONIUMS WITH PERCUSSION. 



9 


g 2* Cr^5 £ a $ C^? 5 1 2 Bosewood, 
Vibrators. iff."s?*338tl 

i ^ 1 1 : i ? 1 i : jt * 1 £29 10 

Nine Stops. ? fa's- s- " ff e 


■Walnut, 
£31 


10 


Two rows and a half ot „ „ _ . on s, m n w >j 

g'2 , l l ?5'?«S3 , 32S 1 ^ Bosewood, 1 -Walnut, 
Vibrators. ^S-^l§S¥gf=-i:l 

Thirteen Stops. S P <& §■ a ' §" § g 


11 


Pour rows and a half of S?»5'2Saaog2:!?5»^?;°3 

™ . £?S3 3.>SS.3^S3?2. »|S3 Bosewood, Walnut, 

Vibrators. ffP§SPSg-<»S 8 a. & 

g • p « |- ft |. | s g £60 £6 3 

Seventeen Stops. a - S ' ■"* 

Knee Pedals. @~ © Grand jeu, treble, & bass. 


12 






Five rows and a half of pLS£S'gS3 -o5o~3 55r 5§°£3 

f» fol'j^S Jj!«i;|;j."5S53 Bosewood, 
Vibrators. f 8 P , g g | ' & ■ g. » I | s. ff S 

Twenty-one Stops. » " e s= 

Knee Pedals. © — © Grand jeu, treble, & bass. 


Walnut, 
£75 




HARMOUICORDES, 

COMBINING THE PIANO AND HARMONIUM ON THE SAME ROW OF KEYS. 


13 


Three rows and a half of ISS^Ix^SsSS, 

? | ■§-£■£■ y ff • g ^5-8 Bosewood, 
Vibrators. S P « g S g 

■" P ? S- £60 
Thirteen Stops. 

Forte - for Strings. ®— (§) Grand jeu. 
Knee Pedals. 


Walnut, 
£65 


14 




Walnut, 
£85 


Six rows and a half of likllliiiS>S9f?SSii§lE 

J* B' » P s o ■ g • 5ff g ? S E .« Bosewood, 
Vibrators. § ? • P * £ ' S ff " £ 

S - S • . a £80 
Twenty-one Stops. ■ 

Forte' for Strings. (F)— © Grand jeu. 
Knee Pedals. 


15 


GRAND HARMONIOHORD AND PIANO HARMONIUM. 

Two keyboards, extra stops, percussion, prolongement t general sourdine, wind regulator, richly finished, from 100 to 200 Guineas. 


16 


THE HARMONINO. 

A small Harmonium of two rows of vibrators and four stops, intended to be placed in the space under the keys of an 
ordinary pianoforte, so as to be used with it. 12 Guineas Rosewood, 13 Guineas Walnut. 




THE ANTIPHONEL; 
Or mechanical substitute for an Organist in the performance of Sacred Music upon the Organ or Harmonium. 12 Guineas. 



CRAMER, BEALE, & WOOD, 209 Regent Street, 



Lately Published, New Editions of the following Works on the Art of Singing : — 

Varna's Ifcfo €xmiUi w t\t %xt ni Singing. 

WITH EXAMPLES AND EXERCISES FOR THE CULTIVATION OF THE VOICE. 

Price Twelve Shillings. 



The production of this work is the result of experience 
gathered from a life* devoted to the observation and culture of 
the voice under "its numerous phases and varieties. It should 
be distinguished from an earlier production, by the same author, 
as offering a course of study mote methodical, more progressive, 
and complete.' The success, and the still constant demand for 
copies of the earlier work, give assurance that the public will 
speedily recognise the greater usefulness of the present publi- 
cation. 

There is no branch of education in which an expenditure of 
time, talent, and capital may be relatively so unproductive of 
improvement as in the art of singing. The failures are more 
frequentlyrto be charged to the indifference or insufficiency of 
teachers, than to the incapacity of learners. In many caees,. 
before the voice is educated,' its 'register known, or any portion 
of it properly developed, in order to gratify the impatience of 
parents, the pupil is allowed to sing ballads and popular songs, 
or required to practise some modern operatic cavatina or aria, 
which, after many attempts, she is supposed to have accom- 
plished, although, in truth, she sings no better at the last lesson 
than at the first. Instead of real improvement, bad habits 
have been engendered, which it becomes henceforth the more 
difficult to eradicate ; and yet the lessons may have been many, 
long, and expensive. 

On the contrary, many artistes, whose voices, in a normal 
condition, were most unpromising, weak, limited, and unpleasing, 
by appropriate method and study have achieved unanticipated 



excellence and great popularity. Although capabilities be 
various, and some very limited, yet all who diligently pursue a 
right course of study and exercise will attain to a certain de- 
gree of excellence ; while they whom nature has most liberally 
endowed, but who pursue an empirical method, can never rise 
to real eminence in the art. The best voice does not make the 
best singer, any more than the best Straduarius violin makes 
the best player. Even facility of execution, however remark- 
able, is worthless, if unaccompanied by any manifestation of 
those higher excellences, — colour, expression, and style. 

The inability of the public to arrive at a proper estimate of 
the excellences or deficiences of the various works on the Art 
of Singing, which are now being issued with unparalleled 
fertility, induces ! the publishers strongly to recommend the 
following pages to the notice of students. Besides copious direc- 
tions for the discriminative treatment of voices, they contain 
important suggestions on vocalisation, instructive examples of 
the various modes of expression, and those valuable exercises 
for the attainment of command over the voice, by the aid of 
which many of the Author's professional pupils have earned 
European reputation ; among whom may be numbered the most 
attractive vocalist of the age. f 

* As several eminent artistes bear the name of Garcia, it may be proper to 
state that the author of this work is the son of the renowned vocalist, who was 
also Madame Malibran and Madame Viardot's father. 

t Madame Jenny Goldschmidt Lind. 



CRIVELLI'S ART OF SINGING. 

The Sixth Edition of this celebrated work contains the Author's latest observations and amendations. Price 20s. 

WALTER MAYNARD'S INSTRUCTION IN THE ART OF SINGING. 

After the method of the best Italian Masters. Third Edition. Price 7s. 

THE VOCALIST'S GUIDE. 

Instruction and Solfeggio,- with Illustrative Examples. Revised from the MSS. of the late A Bennett, M.B.O. by T. Cooke. 

Price 10s. 6d. 



ROSSINI'S EXERCISES AND SOLFEGGI. 

Revised, with an Accompaniment for the Pianoforte, by F. SCHTRA. Price 6s. 

THE CHILD'S OWN SINGING BOOK. 

Songs and Rounds for little Singers. By Maria and W. H. Callcott. Price 2s. 



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