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Full text of "Old Ironsides and Old Adams: Stray Leaves from the Log Book of a Man-of-war's Man"

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NUMBER III. 



STRAY LEAYES PROM THE LOG BOOK 



MAN-OF-WAR'S MAN. 



EDITED BT 
RBV. CHARUSS IV. DBNISOlf, S«amen'i Cl&aplalii. 



BOSTON: 

PUBLISHED BY W. W. PAGE, 115 Court Street. 

H. LONG & BROTHER, 32 Ann St., New York. 

G. B. ZIEBER & CO., Philadelphia. 

1846. 






■■:• COLi.EiiE LidHABY 
.■:t^V OF 
^M-rif. n. TAYLOB 

^r 2/1931 



Biit4refl| adeMiAg tt> Aiet of Congi^M, ifl tke yeaf 1846, 

Bt w. w. page, 

In th« Clerk's Office of the District of Massachasetts. 



CH»AFTER I. 

MY FIRST CmriSE IN THE CONBTlTUTiON. 

1 SHIPPED on board the noble " Old Ironsides," in the year 
ISll. Captaiti Isaac Hull was then in command of the 
frigate. H^ was not then made a Commodore. That was 
done after he took the Guerriere. ^ 

I went on the decks of the Constitution in Boston. There 
were 350 men of us when we dropped d6wn the Bay. Our 
business was to bear despatches to Prance. We had a short 
passage. On entering the French harbor we were fired oii, by 
mistake. One shot struck our stem boat^ and Entered the ham- 
toock nettings. The Frenchmen soon came to apologize, how- 
ever, and said they thought we were English. The affkir was 
Boon {settled. 

We then sailed for Coweis, and Captain Hull proceeded di- 
rectly to Portsmouth. War was not then declared between 
England and the United States, but the feeling between the 
two countries was none of the pleasantest. At Portsmouth 
two men belonging to our gig ran away. We concluded they 
were not American born. But it stirred up bad blood among 
Ufd ; and when the Captain came oflF he found seven or eight of 
the crew in irons. They had been druilk, and threatened to 
desert. It was evident that Captain Hull was excited, for sev- 
eral efforts had been made to induce men on board to leave. I 
shall long remember the appearance and woirdsof Captain HuH 
on that occasion. As soon as he touched the deck, he turhed 
to the first Lftutenant, and said, so that all who pleased might 
bear t 

" The insults of the English are mot6 than flesh and blood 
can bear." — Turning to the men, he cried out : 

" Boys ! are you willing to fight ? I do liH know but tJie 
BrititSh will send a frigate out to meet us. Are you ready ? " 

Thisshort speech waii atoswered' byasrhej^ty a cheef as'e^er 
rang over the waters. 



The Captain went immediately to the men in charge of the 
sentry. He soon settled matters with them, and found they 
were ready to defend the ship and her flag. The cabin was 
soon torn away, and the ship prepared for action. But no 
frigate came. Pretty soon a man of w£ir brig hov^e in sight, 
and fired on us. We were called to quarters instantly, and ran 
down for her. The Capta.in hailed ; , 

"What brig is that?'' ' • • 

No answer. 

" How dare you fire on tit^ ? " shouted Hull. 

" O ! we beg pardon," replied a voice from the brig. " We 
thought you were French !: " 

*^ French ! " retorted Hull. " I've seen you all night-^^md 
yet ypu jcan't tell who I am ! I have a good mind to sink yet " 

This characteristic Yankee reply produced some sensation 
aboatd the brig. She soon squared her yards, and set all sail 
from us. '■ Wb let, h^ go.; 

In ^ few; days we passed from the French coast to Holland. 
In Texel iT:e had to pay $28,000, for powder and guns furnished 
our pountry by .the( Dutch during the Revolution. This money 
the, English tried hajnl to get .hold of. They meant to prevent 
us from carrying.it ashore — thinking, probably^ that as w^Jf 
was about being declared with us, they could easily take the 
Constitution, pioney and all. But we had the start of them, 
and >ve:kiept'it^.> 

., 3^he way we landed' the money was this. We lashed our 
IsfT^t^r boats alongside, the boats that carried the dollars, and 
sent them ashore /together. This prevented any collision, be- 
cause the laws of nations allow an enemy; to obtain water and 
pro:visions, without molestation. As they didn't fire on our 
water boats, of; cpurse they didn't touch our -money. It was 
landed safely. 

We left Texel isoon after ; but before we got under way,^aa 
English braggart charged us with misrepresenting our draft of 
watei: ! . His object was, if possible, to make a difficulty be- 
tween us and the Dutch. But he didn't succedl. We came 
off with receipts in full for our cash, and the unabated Qonfi- 
dence of the Hollander^. 

On our passage to America we met the Royal Oak — an 
English 74. She had come across a French privateer, and sunk 
her. The captain felt quite big on the occasion. He said he 
meant to serve all the Frenchmen in the same way. He had 
run down the privateer, and sent her, with all on board, to the 
bottom of the ocean ! 



We had a visit from this brave Englishman. He fbund 6\it 
guns double-shotted, and every man at his quarters. His 
looks, as he turned from side to side, were " very peculiar ; ". 
but he said not a word on that subject. Perhaps it wa^'ds 
well for him to keep quiet. After a few mutual salutations, he 
returned to his ship, and we parted company. 

When I shipped in Boston, there was a man booked by the ' 
name of Brown. He was from the country, and decidedly 
green. He had shipped as the "Captain's gardeiier ! " He 
was, unfortunately, very intemperate. As he came aboard^ his' ' 
first question was : 

" Where is the captain's garden? " 

This was followed by a general shout. Some one whispered 
to him to wait a. little while, and when the captain can^e off 
he would show him his garden. The captain soon arrived, ' 
and learning the state of the. case, ordered the Boatswain V 
mate to give the man half a dozen lashes to sober him before, 
he commenced his gardening operations. Brown grumbled at 
this; whereupon, the captfiiin gave hiiii another dose of the 
same sort. He was never flogged again during the cruise* 
He went into the carpenter's gang, and proved to be a good 
hand. 

Tom McOumber, our quarter-master, made us some difficulty. 
He had shipped eighteen months ; and as he thought his time 
was out, and wanted to be discharged, he took the liberty to 
write to Washington^ For this specimen of sailor freedom 
Tom was put in irons. He wa& in the limbo when I went on 
board the frigate. The first thing I noticed was the ease with 
which he took off his hand-cufls — his hands being small, and 
the cuffs large at the wrist; He kept off these ruffle ornaments, 
as much as possible. Whenever he saw an officer coming, he 
would slip them on, and turn quietly into his hammock. 

Tom waft aftarwardj brokei and put on the forecastle. Here 
he was always skylarking with the men. He used to fix a noose 
in a bowline, and throw it over the necks of some of the crew, as 
if he were cal^hing wild horses. This sport came near bringing 
him into trouble, several times. 

A gunner, by the name of Anderson, felt put with Tom, and 
reported him to One of the Lieutenants. He was seized up to 
the rigging, and stripped for a flogging. Tom was very much 
excited, and broke out with a speech, 

" I thought this was a free country ! But I see I was mistaken. 
My father and mother were American born, — I;am an American 
myself!" 



6' THK LOG B00& Ot A MAR-OF-WAr's IfAK. 

The only reply of the Lieutenant was — 

**Take him down, and put him in irons. If it laid in my- 
power, I wcpuld have him shot." 

The officers court-martialed Tom* Every day^ for three days, 
we could tell by the .sound of the gixn when the court assembled. 
But he was discharged instead of teing e^iecuted, and went on to 
Washingtoa. This was the last we ever heard of poor Tom. 

We learnt while in port of a singular instance of patriotism, 
as tm offset to this. A colored sailor, who had been pressed into 
the English servipa, endeavored to.get on board the John Adams. 
Finding this effort to be in vain, and determined to be of as little 
use as possible to the enemies of his cquntry, this gallant fellow 
cut the iSngers of his right hand off! 

"Now/' said he, as he held up the bloody boarding axe with 
his left hand, " now let the English take me, if they want me." 
This little incident shows the feeling that pervaded all classes of 
society among those who were willing to defend the American 

During our passage to Prance, with the ambassador, Mr. Bar-^ 
low, we experienced very severe weather ; and in the midst of it, 
the plague oroke out among the crew. It was an appalling sceri^ 
Death was busy among the four hundred occupants of that great 
ship — away on the ocean as she was, almost solitary and alone. 
Some of. the men did not live twenty-four hours. They were 
often taken down without a mometit's warning. Up on the heights 
of the masts, on the points of the yards, dbwn in the recesses of 
the holds, .the messenger of the grave sought them out, and hur- 
ried them to his caverns in the deep blue se^. . The stoutest hearts 
were nqore or less appalled by the ravages of the destroyer. The 
thought that a deadly plague was among us — that every day ti^A 
of its onward march into our ranks — that, perhaps, the ship might 
be depopulated before we reached port, and the dead lie unbui^ 
ied in heaps on board, was enough to appal any one for a tirtie. 
But tbe tmrge()ns di4 thew duly nobly ; and althctigh deaths kept 
oc^tirring frequently for three weeks, yet we went on our way, 
growing braver and braver as we looked at Death closer and 
closer in the face. • 

A family incident of a peculiar character took place off Dover. 
An old woman and her daughter came along side, claiming to be 
the mother and sister of one of our men,' a promisSi^g young sailor 
we were loath to part with. To our surprise, he denied the Tela- 
tionship. The girl said she had a scar on her hand where he 
wounded her accidentally with a knife when thej^ were both 
children. But the tar knew nothing about it. He denied to the 



la3t t^^t they were any rdfttiou toi hu»-^H^XQ©pt t^pugb pW 
father A4am— and they left th^ frigate Tj'h^.of^^, feow^ij^r* 
were against him, to a man. They felt that the ^if^^OPiiea k^ \9\i 
thetruSi. How far the oieJawjhoJy ^esuUjtt bifl 01^0 |Mrj(We4 tti*, 
the. r^dei ipurt judgfu The wloi was npt long aft^x fiak^o wpliu 
Hi# ^it «ailk wJlEjn Wm. Thq blo^m fswiod from b)ft ^h^-r^ * 
the tight weftt .mi from! hw.^ye, . Hie ^ppiewinw was w)f|. 
pitifiiJL! Heisopmdied Ami^9^(le«tb« 

While we w^re lyingin the INwfM pi>e cff oiw u^b wft oflT*: 
and went on board lan Eoglisk YielweL OSe Vl^9i^: ^D Ifisbrnw^^^ 
We Kent fiboj^ryi lk»Mm,b^t ib9:6^itts4 vKmfa} M|;gi¥e<hAn»Jip- 
Tba9 elicited C^pi^AD Sull< £te loomed ^be]Ei4i|^4sl|i^^ ; 

the mao hft4 iiiUipp^d e«^ a^ Amei^ fuid^ a^ s^^biiiF^ bM a 
right to. ^laim hm- But it wi^ of Ha ay«jJL Tbe de99rtiQ9» 
howler, wa9 aoon follow^ 1i>y oAe ^rom Ibe BHti^b. He «n««w 
to us, ^nder tb^ gufts af tiisi frigate. Wetep^rted bii» to tbfi 
English at once, and they demanded him. 

" No/' said Hull. " If you will give up our man, we will give 
up yours. Not without." 

The deserter to us had his papers with him as he swam from 
the English. On drying them, it appeared he was from New 
York. His character was good. He loved his country; and 
we were resolved to retain him. 

To show the generous feeling of Hiill, I will relate an occur- 
ence that took place at Annapolis, while the frigate was lying 
there. The Captain called all hands aft, and said that he was 
satisfied that two men on board were English. One of them was 
sick. He was willing that both of them should leave the service ; 
as, in case of a war with Great Britan, he did not wish to compel 
men to fight against the flag of their native land. This sentiment 
was received with cheers by the crew, who immediately made up 
a purse of $140, and divided it between the two men. They 
went with it to Baltimore, and soon spent it, man-o'-war &shion. 
The last I heard of them they had shipped as Americans in the 
Congress — ready as they said, to defend the stars and stripes. 

A flogging scene came off on our first cruise. A reckless, 
daring fellow by the name of Dan Blish refused to do his part, 
from some cause or other, in taking in sail. The Lieutenant of 
the deck was disposed to punish him, but, on account of the 
obstinacy of some of his messmates, he could not be fully iden- . 
tified. To avoid this dilemma, and to make sure of punishing 
the offender, the Lieutenant resolved to flbg the whole watch ! 
There were about thirty of us, in all. Our grog had been stop- 
ped for a week. 

The day of the flogging I shall never forget. Dan was aloft at 



TUC LOG BOOK OF ▲ KAN-OF-WAR's KAK. 



CHAPTER II. 

ESCAPE OF THE CONSTITUTION. 

While the Constitution was lying in Washington, undergoing 
repairs, the Declaration of War arrived. It was a stirring time 
with us that day. We thought of what the over-bearing English 
had done to American sailors— of what insults we had experienced 
in **Qld Ironsides!' on the English coast — and we determined to 
do oiir best for the motto of the nation : 

" Free Trade ana Saiiars^ JRights.^^ 

Orders came immediately from Washington that a rendezvous 
should be opened, and asmanynfien shipped as the frigate would 
want. The work commenced at once. Not a man ran away 
after that ! Captain Hull came down frequently among us. He 
said he wanted all his own men: — they knew him, and he knew 
them. Hull had great confidence in his countrymen. He regard- 
ed them as his equals in birthright, if not in station. It was 
this feeling of mutual confidence between the ofBcers and men 
which gave such success to our naval arms during the last war. 
The men went into the struggle as brethren^hot as serfs. They 
stood, and fought, and fell by their guns as citizens of the Repub- 
lic they defended, not as the hired minions of a tyrant throne. 
Every true American felt that his own honor was identified with 
the honor of his country \ atid as such he was resolved to pre- 
serve it untarnished, Or die in the attempt. 

In a few duys after war was declared we dropped down to Annap- 
olis. We^laid there three weeks, exercising every day to attain 
perfect discipline. Among other plans, we placed a hogshead on 
a pole in the water, a mile off, and fired at it as a target. The 
hogshead looked less than a barrel at that distance. After we 
had practised sufficiently, Hull gave one of his shrewd looks at us 
one day — 

" rU risk ye now, my boys ! " said he. '^ If that were a boat, 
you'd cut it all to pieces." 



Our preparations for war were much hastened by the return 
of the John Adams with despatches from our English and French 
ministers. We immediately sailed from Annapolis to join the 
squadron at New York. The President, United States, and 
other vessels of war were lying there. We spoke but a few 
vessels on our passage. One day, at about 4 P. M., a large sail 
hove in sight. We immediately gave chase, and gained on her 
handsomely. At eight o'clock in the evening, Captain Hull came 
forward on the forecastlei. Some of the officers and crew clus- 
tered respectfully around him. Old Adams, the boatswain, was 
standing by ; . 

"Adams," said Hull, "what do you think of that vessel? " 
"Doa't know, ^r,'' rseplied the veteran i^r^ with his deep 
V4pic0. "I can't ooa^e her out; sir. But I think st^e'9 aq !lp!ngl^^ 

mw.'' 2- ■ ■■' 

'' So do i;' added Hull. '^ |Iow long will it t^ii^ to flog bpr, 
A^ams?" ...['■■■• 

" Don't know, sir! " replied ^^^ Bo?itffi|?i^. ^^ Wo c^p 4p itj 
but they're hard fellows on salt water." 

"I know that," continued the Captain; ''they are father a 
hard set of fellow?, sure einough. But don't, you think w^ can 
flqff then) in two hours and a half, Adams?" . 

" Yes, sir ! " said the Boats waip, with all the coolness imiagi- 
nid)Ie. "Yes, sir! we can do it in that.tiri^e, if we c^Ui do it at 
all." ••;. . r: y: 

The Captain turned away, with a ^n[iile, and kjmost instantly 
had all sail set, ^^d the ship drawing towards ihe^itrdnger; ivitn 
a smacking br<3eze tp jog her ^long. . '. '/' 

Hull came forward again, and took a close surVfjy of the oceap, 
and the distant sail. • . • 

• "Dog her by and large 'till momiria," ^id Jiie to the lyienf 
tenant, *^and then we sihall see what sh^V made of." ' , : 

^h^.t nkhl; every, in w on board l^ Gonsfitution wajp Wi(fe. 
awak^. There was no speajiipji ffpm duty iu aoy part of tli$ 
brave old ship. I laidin niy qqaft^ris jtJJi thQ b^Q dbck, py the 
side of my gvm. The ^poqgC; finfi rai;iarod were , all tlie time 
lying by me, ready fof use at ainou^eiit'? notioQ^ Sreyeral pip- 
toU belonging to ^widshipmfin, Mr. Geri^aan, Wier^ giyw pu;^ pay| 
cbaj^e for bim. Otlaer watches were i? f^WiilAr yitjujat^;^s,' 
The oncers weyra ^l ^ their po^^. JtuU ]£6pt walking ahcMuit,, 
watching the mmut;fist thing worthy oi ^)4;^^tion, and givj^gj 
his orders in a quiet, calm, determined tone. It was a stirring 
houjr. We felt that we were about to strike th» firsf ]Aovf for 
our country and her flag. There had never been » timPj fiiwe 



THai Loe BOOK OF \4 man-ov-^w^b's man. 11 

our nation teisted, when a foir trial of American naval prowess 
had occurred ; our ships, our commanders, our men, during the 
war of *he Ilevolution, had always fought to great disadvantage 
on the ocean ; the honors won fta us by the Chevalier Paul 
Jones wer eclaitoed as legitimately belonging to a British sub- 
ject*-Ta native of Scotland ; our priveteers, fitted out and 
manned in g?eat haste, could not be expected to give fair speci- 
mens of American valor : here, theti, on board the wettknpwii 
and. [ Hoaored frigate Constitution was , the theatre for a tialval 
action that should cover the Republic either ^ith living dis? 
grace or glory. i ; 

There was not an American: sailor in that ship but felt some- 
thing of this. However he tnight express it^ in the rough 
words of the deep, or the bold look of his eye, this was the 
sentiment of his patriotic bosom. 

At four o'clock in the morning, we heard the cry :-— *' Up, 
nqreai upi here's the whole American sqaadion npoa us ! 'V 

^^ Pretty American sqtiadron ! ;" said some of the old ialt», as 
they lookiad out thepox^'holes. ^ American squadron ! Don't 
yow see that English selv^aty-four.? '^ . 

All hands were called to quarters. If ew arm^igements were 
made for meeiing.the enemy ; port-holes W;^re ei^t in the stern, 
on the spar deck, and. guns run out. immedialtely. # ..The Eng»- 
lish were now within three miles of us. There wei» ^ven 
men of wm:, in all: Ihi^ OLi$, Africati, Shannon^ Gueirriete, Bel^ 
videre. Nautilus, andoDeotfaer. : it wetS: a spiritrdturring sight^- 
to see them steering towards u^, with all sail set.. ^ ^ 

Our guns were now: all up, land the breechings rove. Cap-, 
tain Hull came forward, cobUy surveyed the -scene, took a? 
match in his hand, and iordered the quart-er master: to' hoist the 
American flag. Xstood withiaa a few feet of HuU at the time. 
He clapped the fire to the poi^der, and such f^ barkii^ as souod-* 
ed over the 'sea:! It was worth hearing. No sooner had our 
iron dog opehed his mouth in this manner, than the enemy 
opened the whole- of theirs. Every om of the ships fired dir 
reetly towards us. Those nearest kept up their firing for some 
timJBf ; but of course not a shot reached us then, at the distance 
we were off. . 

Captain Hull gave up the match to the captain of the gun, 
and we kept blaaing away with our stern chasers. The shotft 
we fireQ helped to send us ahead, out of the reach of the enemsr> 
There was little or no wind ; but we resolved to save ourselves 
fifom capture, or sink in the conflict We soon found, how^vep^ 



12 THE LOO BOOK OF ▲ MAN-OT-WAR's MAN'. 

that ^e made but slow work in getting ahead. Hull called 
Lieutenant Morris to him, and said, calmly, — 

"Let's lay broadside to them, Mr. Morris, and fight the 
whole ! If we sink her, we'll go down like men ! " 

We were oflf Little Egg Harbor, on the New Jersey shore, at 
the time, stretching in toward the Delaware Bay. The enemy 
heul drawn in between us and the land, so that the prospect was 
they might cut us off from the Capes. 

Mr. Morris now spoke to Captain Hull : " There is one thing, 
sir, I think we'd better try." 

" What's that ? " replied Hull. 

" Try: to kedge her off,'^ said the lieutenant. 

"Well, try it," responded the captain. "But I imagine- 
you'll fail. The water's too deep here; we've at leasit forty 
fathoms." 

The kedges were soon under way. Every man worked as 
an American always should. We gained a little on the enemy 
by this manoBiivre. We brought all the spare rigging out of 
the boatswain's store room, and bent 6u so, much line that when 
one short peak came out of the ground, we let; go the other 
kedge ; this kept the frigate surging ahead all the while, at the 
rate of about three knots an hour, with the help of the boats. 
It was almost a dead calm, and the enemy soon saw that we 
were gaining on them. There was considerable of a stir on 
board the nearest ships. They had an Aiinerican coast captain 
ill one of them, who told us iifterwards that he saw and under- 
stood our " Yankee tridc.'^ The British imitated us, bat they 
couldn't do miich; They set the boats from three ships at 
work towing tl;ie one nearest us ; but slie made very little head** 
way ; we gained on them constantly, although slowly. 

At that time not an American vessel, of any kind, was in 
sight ; we were pursued alone, by ,the shores of our nativb 
country, and a more resolute set of men never smelt salt water. 
There hung oh the mast, drooping silently in the calm sky, 
the ensign that we all loved so ^^ell ; and as we looked toward 
it from the boats and tops, we were determined to a man that 
it should never go down but with the ship. Captain Hull 
saw and felt this patriotic feeling, and cherished it to the ut- 
most. He was found in every part of the frigate, surveying 
the state of affairs with the strictest scrutiny. Our stern 
chasers were fired at the ship closest aboard us ; but the shot 
went over her. They fired their bow guns in return ; but noth- 
ing hit us. We were anxious to cut away the rigging or 
masts, and bring down their sails by the run. 



THE LOG BOOK CO* A MAN-<»yWA&'s MiLl7. 13 

The boats were all armed. I remember a remark made by 
Midshipman Bourie at the time. As he looked toward the 
enemy, and thought of the possibility of an engagement, he ex- 
claimed, ** O, that I had my pistols here, that I might defend my 
boat to the last." Such was the spirit that animated every bos- 
om. Is it any wonder that such seamen, when self-possessed, are 
almost always victorious on the ocean ? 

Towards dark a breeze sprang up, which helped us along very 
well. Next morning it Aad mcreased tia 'pretty fresh blow, and 
we cracked on all the sail we could carry. One of the enemy's 
ships kept middling c|ose to us j but we were ready for her. 
She ran down towards us, and then bore away for a short time. 
Again she hauled her wind,, and put on after us. But it was no 
use. We walked away frprii' hbr as if ghe had been lying at an- 
chor. We then had no land hi sigh t!^ and the wiijd kept fresh- 
ening every hour. A squdl broke on us ; but we were ready for 
it, and had in the studding-sails in le?s than no time. Everything 
was set again, aloW and aloft^ as *so6n as the squall passed over ; 
and we showed the enemy our h^lsiii a way that will long be 
remembered. We beat the fastest ship they had so badly, that '.:^ 

w© chased her huU down in a fefw hoiirs. ^ ' '^ 

<^]!j|lgfeL'- said the Captain, ks the last strijp of sail disappear^ 
ob^iiehorizon, '^'^now we'll tdke'aci^ise by ourselves; tmtin 
come^^ross oiie of thes^ chapi' alone; depe:nd oil it he shall pay 
for this.'' ■ • • ■• '» ' • ''••'• 
: We continued our cruise, as usual, meeting with merchant 
vessels occasidnally. One of them was bound to New York: V> 

and we saved him by giving notice of the blockade there. The 
Captain presented us with a puncheon of rum for our information ; 
and we presented him our pray^rsi for his safe arrival in return. 
SLum was more thought of >oqi board piir tti^n of War then thati it 
is now. :• .; • ; vr;.-.:-'.. 

In a few days we arriyed in Boston, where we met the new5 
that we had-been captured by ]the €»ienQiy !; It was said we had 
not ammunition enough. ' But if those who thought so had re- 
mained at our quarters until our amnpuiiitiQn was all gone,, they 
would probably have altered their opinion. < We had enough, at' 
leait, to tire then^L "some*"f, .;; ,, 

At Boston we obti^^ more men, wood and water ^ and wepB 
soon under way on another cruise* We . met a number of mer- 
chant-men. Those x)f them fhai bejoaged to the enemy we set 
on fy,e\ taking. the crews with. us as prisonevs of war. 

In this cruise we captured the Cuerrier^,;. But! rq^erve jny 
account of that for the next chapter. 

,"■■*'' y.iii. t»/. 



*.,» 



14 THE LOe BOOir or a 'JClLIf^Mr-WlAA's UlOf. 



0HiPi:iR ill. ; 

On the seventh day out Irom Boston, ott oux second crui$e, 
we met with some of the enem.y.il It was- iu; the month of uj^u- 
gust, towards night. The oc^^an was soon shrouded ip dsurk* 
uess. As the night came on, I ihink I never saw it darker. 

4<t a late hour a vessel hove in sight, close aboard of us. We 
thooight we saw a light in 'her cabin,*, butit proved to b^ a 
floating beacon which she had thrown overboard for the pur-, 
pose of putting us on therW/TQng tack« But we passed this 
d^nci^iiig tant^n in heir wake, land steered diarectly ^^^^bi^^ 
We icept her in view aU night; and the next mflffiut^Hifte 
forovied to be a filo^^ of war. Two other vessels now bj^ftn 
sight. We steered for the one at the windward of us — ^Seating 
«s the near the wind's: eye as the. noble fntgatb wodbd make it. 
It. was not long before. we weie ia her wake, and steering 
irtmight into her stern. On the way^ we passed a large Dutch 
baiqas, thai; i put new mettle i»tOt our' speed She had been 
taken undter English ooloi«(by i^n' Amehridim privateer, and re* 
tadoen by thevBritish,b6ingthenUi¥ 'change of the Ranget sloop 
of war. The American officers and nien had not then been 
^laken out — so cflose W«re w^ -bprnii th^m. The Ranger ■ had 
•wiicfluded to l^Jgo this pAt^, and-mjlke gobfi httr own escape ; 
but another Ictrge vessel, loaded with hemjy and rosin, was s6t 
fiflte to before we could come up,' aijtd burnt to the water'i^ e^dgf. 

W« soon boardfed arwl tbbkposfisefssion of thi^ barque, f^tom 
%et we learned that the Ranger had taken antrthefr rich' jkfis^y 
^BSati ifn the way to fialifkx. We rah ffoVn toward the Rareer^ 
iSWfering the baftiiie to follow; hiit she tpfused to do it, , * Y^e 
^mediately left her to bet fate, atnd stretched awav^o keWard ^ 
for another priief. it took but Kttle time to bverhaui hW'-^lh ■ 
ttiln Sull was on dedt at the titkljB. , 

"Load the long Tom," said he, "and give them some.^ 

No answer. 



« Okfii* r " ertod m*. ^ Fire ck)i» ! »* 

The next shot did thd tvt)tk. H^ colorii tatile^td^li, «ia9 
ttie tdtitidcsa ta It wafc virtefi »l^ did,;ftwt tl feir»bi?6 iiMtn fiuch 
'«» tlVe Ikftft would hftvi^ toiskde it aA iSay iritii htlr. 

We i6xslt p(^s^^i^kftt m Ihe Mme of tbei jsttof and sit^H, atid 
flCfon had the pHsbi:ieiris'a^ oiit df her, mid on board th«#rigat^. 
^^6 Vaiif Ihett/^inii^a; i^ ftiiha iftl Mii^hlpittan Maflisoh was 
put on board '^ Priie Bltasiter, "^itn cM^r^ to take ^i^r'to the 
nearesft Americaa port. But she was afterwards Xd!keh Ixy the 
AcastA iWgate, dmti&Hii fihgJahA, anjd 'the feaptured thrown 
^nf p that hoiWblfe plaxseV iDteirtmdofr pri*6tt. ;J, ], / 

ilVe Continued our cniiize, taking an odcasional v^fti^el ftom 
the enemy, and |iiettin^ her on fire.. Ma,ny a fine, l^tg^ ship 
was thus destroyeil by the Constitution. But we felt that we 
J were doii^g pght, fyr we were .acting ux selfrdefenqe. . .We 
always saved the crews,' and living animajfs. 1 do not remem- 
ber that a goaf* dog, fowl or cat was- thus butut lypj.^ . 

At 11 o'clock w th.e;»aght of the 18th of Augiist, 1612, a 
brig hov.e iu sight, , Itr was very foggy, and we wjere unable to 
aiiake out wba|t she was« As we :came up, Captain HuU hailied 
her himseiif : 

., ^:*iWh»t brig's that?" . \' K 

. r ^«:Thei J4DhnL,,cf St JohnV ♦ . ' -Jw. 

. ?< Where are you bound J '^ . / ; 

: : ■ " Goide utidw 6uff leia. We^ll send a boataboarf.'^ ; ; 

liiealenaikit Morris; boailded her. Aboy Who liad seea iii^on 
ldie;coasfcof Frahoewtu^; (beard to cty oii<t: ..!::>.; 

"Th^idldGonbtitutioikl'' ' • ) V 

; <<' Awdy wdth yoav nonsl^tite^ lad,'^ «siid oilier 6f the. ixM^ ki 
reply. ■'' ^ : -^^ ■■' ■':;:■ >: .;:•:::•'••'•. : ;.% '.• 

« Yorfll find mvii \»f^ ieudkled ^ -bbj. ^^Dwi-tyoa «ed the 
'tei|te'JbiiiiAiis.f.^''! y^ ■ • V 

lUmt^mni^Ubfms bad now ^eacfced tibe deck »f the *« Jrihn." 
Her captain had ordered his jEitate room, shut, and thrown jbis 
guns and cutlasses ott^'boaraJ Bdi^ \he roftm was soon opened 
again, emd^.pjar.tpep.lmcjti^l^t.they pleasecU ;Tbis vessel laid by 
1^ all QigM,. and, {^^^y;^,to Wa ^^^e^ had 

■\men th^f^i^^fiiif ti^^t^^ CkierrijeareV ajad wasiafi^^^ 

ii's|bn;a£5qb^ j-' :''••; "/ 

.,1 , jjTjhe vireatflij^ had fio)^, qleare4 ^Pi and a? we hatdljisarped by 
' this adventure some'tbing of the wher<^9J^tt^Vp£.i^l^ ^^^ 
.^^awere anxious to bft^ff- ^Bj^t our B^ltifn'ore^Halifax rieigbbo 
Ibad sprung his maintdpmast'in trying to get a!way from lis^— we 



16 THE LOG BOOI^ OF Jl MAN-OFtWAr's MA^. 

supplied him with a new one, idnd a quantity of muskets, cut- 
lasses, and ruffles for the enemy's wrists^ 

.Having learned which. w^y the Querriere was steering when 
last seen, we crowded all sail in that direction* W^'Steerpda 
nprth-^ast cpurse for severs^l hours, until the morning of the 1 9th 
of Ai^ust, '181^. ..,Tfais was the. day pf:tbjB,baJtl(^. ;. i | , ,,. ^ 

We now c^ngedoqr course, aiid steeri^d sQu!;h.east, wit||:a 
good breeze* .At lO A*.Mtj'the naaat hea^.^ri^:' , • 

.,;^*^irhop^ ■; .-;': ..!'/."!."/■• ^'...:.; ,;;.;': ..... ;: 

"Where iaway ?^^ inquired the Lieutenant in commjand/ 

"Two points off th^ larboard bow, sir! ;' was, the reply. 

Hull had now come on deck. His first drder was to a OUTid- 
sbipman: 

"Mr. German! take the glass and go alpft. Sefe if yoti can 
make out what, she is." . 

German W9S , soon above us, Icfoking intently, in the direction 
named. , 

" What do you think ?" ^sked Hull, with anijna,tioh.. . 

"She's a ^eat vessel, sirf Tremendous sails." ' 

" Neyer.mind," coolly added Hull. " You cian come down; sir. 
3Mtr. Adams," addressing another officer, "call all hands. - Make 
»sail for her! " • ' 

But before all hands could be called, there was a genei^ rush 
on deck. The word had passed like lightning frotn man i!d man ; 
and all who could be spared, came flocking tip like pigeons from 
a net bed. From the spar deck to the gun deck, fk'om that to 
the berth deckj every man was roused, and on his feet. All 
^yes were turned' in the direction of the strange sail. Many had 
sprung into the rigging; without Waiting for orders, ieind as quids 
as thought studding-sails were out, fore and afl.* The boble 
frigate fairly bounded over the billows, as we gave her a rap 
full, and spread her broad and tall wings to the gale. 

The stranger hauled his wind, «md laid to for us. 'It was evi- 
dent that he was an English man of war, of a large Alasfty^i<4>all 
ready for action. In otie of her topsails we read these word9 : 

, *| iWe^. understood this to m^i^ that the ship we were now ap- 
•;pt9aching was not the f* Littje Belt '\ we had previously captured. 

But we knWw tfiat very 'well; aiid subsequent events proved that 

they might have saved themselves the trouble of telling us of it. 

We saw it w'as the vessel we wanted to meet, not the "Little 

Belt,'* but ty bfg Gueitiere. : '; 

As we cdoib up she began to fire. She wtis evidently trying 



1«» liOO BOOK OP Ai >CiN-OV-WAB;'ti: WAffi tfT 

to ridce us. But ^e continued dh our course, tacking aind half 
tacking, taking good care to avoid being raked. We came so 
near on one tack, that a 141b. shot came through us under the 
larb(lard< knight-^headv striking just abaft the breech of the gun 
to which I belonged. The splinters flew in all direction^ ; but 
fio one was hurt. We immediately dragged a spare gun to the 
opening that was made by the sHot, and converted it into an 
extra porthole ! The shot'itself was picked tip, and put on the 
spar deck, ready to be lised, as oceasionf required. We afterwards 
put it in the mouth of long Tom, a large gun loose on deck — and 
sent it home again, with oUr n^speets. 

Another stray shot hit our foremast, cutting one of the hoops 
in two. But-tfae mast was not otherwise injured, and the slight 
damage was soon repaired. 

Hull was now all animation^ H« saw tlmt the decisive mo- 
Hient had t^ome^ With great energy, yet calmness of nianner, 
he passed around among the officers and men, addressing to 
them words of confidence arid encouragement. 

" Men ! ^ said he, " now do your duty. Your offici^rs ciannot 
have entire command over you now. Each man must^do all in 
his power for his country.'* 

At this moment a man was killed on our spar deck. : He had 
run away from us, and was only returned about a fortnight. He 
fell by the side of long Tom, and neier rose again. 

Hull now determined on closing with the enemy. 

♦' Never mind, rtiy boys ! " said he to the men. ^^ You : shall 
have her as close as you please. Sailrhg. master ! fay her along 
side!" 

' We came up iiito the wind in gallant style. As we fell off a 
little i\\e Guerriere ranged by us her whole Ibrigtb. 

The stars and stripes never floated more proudly than they did 
at that moment. All was silent beneath them, i^ve the occasion* 
lU order from an dflScer, or the low sound of the niovement of 
our implements of war. Every man stood firm at his postl * . 

HiiH's ordie^s ^re that we should not fire a gun until he him- 
self gave the word of command. 

'^ No firing at random ! " cried be in a subdued tone of Voic6. 
" Let every rtian look well to his aim." 

Thisivas the pride of Aitierican seamen. Correctness in ta- 
king aiafi did' mfore than anything else in securinfg the naval ric- 
tories of tbe'lastWar. 

The question was now repeatedl jr asked of HuR : 

'* Why not fire?" 

« WmI !^' was hfe caimrtolv. 



rS VBB' I.OG- BOOK- /OF A' MAN-OF«-WAr'b IHkKr 

' .:flBiit! tbeyare cutting u&all to pieces, and w& can't £et:onr 
guns to bear at thi& distance.'^ ; - v .' 

** Wait !". again responded the Captain. \ 

. <' Shall we lay her along^dC) sir ? " inquired li Lieutenaat< ; . 

. "Wait! " Hull replied, once more. 

.:A shot froDi; the enemy now struck the spar, deck, and wocd 
was passed that a man was. killed. <> . i : • 

-" Now qlose. with them J "cried Hull, raiding his :Voioe to its 
sternest tnote of command, so that it could .be heard on theene^ 
my's decks. .. nf ^ ; 

"Along side with her. Sailing Master!'' . ; ». . 

; A whole broadside from our guns followed this command. .The 
Con^titufioh shook from stem to stern. Every spar and yard, ia 
her was on a tremble. But no one was hurt by the recoil of the 
guns, i We instantly followed the thunder of our cannon with 
three )oud cheers, which rang along the ship like thie roar of 
waters, and floated away rapidly to the ears of the enemy. . 

This was a Yankee style which the British had not adopted. 
The. English officers often spoke of it to. ours, after the war was 
oven. They said they were astonished at the spirit of our mea 
in the toil and heat of the battle. Amid the dying and the dead, 
the crieJsh of timbers, the flying of splinters and falling of spars, 
the Artibrican heart poured out its patriotism with long and loud 
cheers. The efiect was always electrical, throughout all the 
struggle for our rights. 

When \he smoke cleared away after the first broadside, we 
saw that we had cut ofl'the mizzen mast of the Gu^rriere not fiir 
from the deck, and that her main-yard had been shot from the 
slifigs.'' Her mast and rigging wer« hanging in great confusion 
over her sides, and dashing against her on the waves. \ ^ . 

This 'discovery was followed by three mpre cheers froth the 
Constitution, and the cry: 

' **Huzza, boys! 'We've mad^ a brig of her ! Next time we'll 
make her a sloop ! *' .'.', ^ ■ ->; 

The •Giierriere returned our fire with spirit^-4>ut it 4)a8sed loo 
high, and spent its force among our light spars, rigging and sails. 
Our fore-royal truck was shot! away, with two pair of halyards ; 
the flag was hanging down tangled on the shitered mast in the 
presence of the enemy. This sight inspired one of our men, 
familiarly called Dan Hogan, to the daring feat of nailing the 
standard to the mast. He was a little Irish <^hap, but brim-full 
of courage. Without a word' from any one, he sprang into the 
rigging and was aloft in a moment. He had hastily snatohed a 
hammer and nails from the carpenter, and leaped upi in the air 
with them in his teeth. We soon saw him, «nder the fire of the 



TflE L6d^ BObiL *6l^ X ^MAN-dF-WiR'^S "man^ ^ W 

cfbem;^^ Wl)o siw^Wm tpOj'^t the topmast height^ clihging on/Wii^ 
oijie hand/^nd witH the 6ther driving home ttie riaife.'so tn^t'jte 
flag cobid neye^,6oihejAowii'tii^iiiss the mast came with it. '. Toe 
smoke ctirled afoUiid hlilii as h^ s^ung his hanfi;ner on high| but 
we could see him, atiil' Wept cheeririghim through the kutphury 
clouds. He was.soon.dow;n ag^aih,.^nd at his station .in the^ghl. 
Several ^hot rioW entfeVed oiir hull. One of the largest t^ 
enemy could conrimanrf struck 'us, but the. plank w^; so hard it 
fell out. and sank in the waters. /I'hi^ w^s\ notici^d bj tl^e men, 
and the cry arosp: '/ / \ ,, " ** . - 

/'.HuzzftJ Herlliid^ isire made of iron! See, the shot fatJ 

From that moment the name of the Constitution, was garnished 
wfth the faoiiliar title : J . . : .j 

^^OI.» IRO]VSIDJES.'4 ' j'^ 

. J^y this tjille 3be is known' aroufid the world. . 

The (braces of both sh^ps were- now ftbot off. :The Ghlerriefe 
s,wung. round into our miz^^n riggipg, so that a parti Of her la^ 
right over our taffrail rail. We could see the wiiites^efihe eyei^y 
and count the teetb of the enemy. Ourstern guns were, pouring 
iauppp th^fp,sojthat we; raked the .ship fore^ae^ -^Iv /Every thot 
tol'd-^^Ur* r^^n^^ f^^ "^<^™^i^^ the'.foremast.wai^ gone, and our 
prediction was fulfilled. The great Guerriere had become a sltfop* 
Soojji-^fti^rithe mainmast followed,- renderings jier-a; ^poipi^te 
vv^cL Vlnit^^^f^Upft^beim^ts^spme of opr boats; were sweplj^fl)) 
but the Constitution herself was hardly touched, except in «oiiM^ 
of^tjie y^ds^,apd sailsf*: ^Beth ships kept iSring f^natantlyrrKHir 
guns continuing to do the most fearful executioBH' .! '.;^ 

Qoe of tb^ UeutenaqtS: aoW:a^ed the Captain if he slnAlld 
call the boarders. : M • ." v .« 

*' No ! " replied HhJLh.*- No! t We can take h^r without »lo»iiig 
so.mapy.liv^t"' .-./IrJ?, » •;.'■•..•.•. .- ji.f ,: c., j.Mi-v 

Th|^;(&n^n[^K>£i^i^editOi hai^ ibeeoiteKp6«ting usJiO;iboandthi»«l 
He;^ad.placejd,'twa carronj^flfss on th^.i^owspvit^ ia'SUctifa.mQti- 
ner as to sweep off our men as they should oiten^p^ to ii^daif^^i 
The^^ werQ loaded tqfthe<m^z2l^ with joauak^t^balld m^'cal^vass 
bs(g^ Bfxd . wpxkld have cut u^, dQ¥^P Uko a; flock xif sheep. • t ; 

We were preparing for an attack;io.;ai^>tbfir qut^rter^ti^hen tto/ 
Guerriere suddeQ][y.drQpped |x» the leeward, and .firtsd a gun for 
as^istahcef They tri^d to ^ul theiif colors down J but; every man 
who coiild be seen attempting it, was shot dead from the topt? 
of t^e Const4tu^i(;M{ir We lijere d^t^i^iui(^.tp giye^th^ni an^iop- 
portunity t6 be convinced that we would defend our country's 



THE LQfi SpOK pF^A M4Jf;'Of^W^B,^. Mi^lf., 

itits to the last ; and, beside, we t bought th^ae irepeated att^fppt? 

Tifturdown. the flag were intended to deceive .ue—rFpr wq saw 
ti^^/mep as busy as ever in continuing tiiQ actjoiv I h^JfX.d tb<^ 
pbwder boy nearest me on board the Guerrjere qall Qut to pother: 
* " Work i^way, there ! She II soon b« Qi]irs ! " 
^ .T^ ^omen they had with them were engaged in. passingipQW- 
d^r? &nd other munitions of war. Amid such activity on the 
ifepks ^f the enemy, courage and prudei^ce d^mandi^d ^^^ ^^ 
Bfaouid be aatjve on our own. 

As ati intended insult, th.e English had hois.tj^ a piuicfteon of 
moIa£s^s on. their maJn stay, and si^n^ out nyprd.:; ' . : i 

**D(i give the Yankee^ some switchel. They wiH need.Ut 
when they are our, prisoners/? 

But we made a very different use of this molasses fromwbat 
they intended. Our shooting at hogsheads in the Chesapeake 
Bay, was now tur6^ to good accounts . .We soon tapped their 
sweet stuff for them, in a wray which they little thought of. The 
Yankee shot tasted the Ehgfeih' molasses, and not the Yanj^ee 
lips. W^ made the deeks of the Guetriere so slippery, that her 
men 'could hardly stand ! They had more switchel prepared for 
them thttti' they knew what to d6 with. ~ 

On boafd the Guerriere was an American, by the name of Bien 
Hodged. SA.S ihe b^nle commenieed ine appealed to the Caplai^. 
^ '♦•That is art American fiigate,^^ said he;/<aqd F bannot ^fct 
against my couniry*" 

' '1^^ (Affi^r^n« this fr6m the tbmne of irtiin;f,ari En^hfnfito 
dbriBg the Wat*! ' It wits a feeling which the Comifmndei' of the 
Guerriere nespected/ 

^*Gt> fellow, Thy frian, •* ; said be. ** Go intp the cockpit. Yob 
may be of assista*eethere.^^ 

Hodges obeyed* the order. As he stood by one t>f the surgeons, 
a voice said: 

"I don't ^ee that we^ve much to do, aftei-all.^' ; 

"Hold on a bit sir," responded Hodges. "The Yankee* 
h«i^ti?t'be|^n<$t. '' Vtn Ibitikin^, srr, yoti'li h^e f^ntt to do.'/ 

This was ios^W the aetioii'was' cdiiimencing. In a mbment a 
rod'ghjre foltowe** :! . 

'^^ThereV^ cried Bern "Th^Ve begun. Now, look out/' 
He had hardly spoken before fiW^n or twenty wounded m^o 
were tumbled into the cockpit. '''-/' 

'* Your words were true enoughs, Beiir,''. sf^idone of the surgeons 
a»iie took upH knife. "Here'a work foro^^-and plepty of it, 

The action waittbw^rty at its^/dpse. /Rieftfn^ hi^d be-^ 



^J 



s 



lf^ t06 Aocik Ibir'' A * MAN-6'F-WAR*i5 MAN. ^I 

<orhe less freqaent on both sides. All Jfdt the necessity of pro- 
ceeding at once to repair damages. But we dare not trust, the 
^hieili^. Nptwidistahding his disabled condition^ it was'evideQ^ 
he Wbttlci attack us again, thi? first opportunity. His, men were 
still numerous-r— his ammunition, ^as but pamyspeht, ^p4 his 
Miins \iki been bfeared away trbm the Jowc^tdec^kisy so as to W^rk 
n> the best ^dvantefge. . . , , ?* 

MT^ sent abbai 6q board, bat could get.no. satisfaction. Uik 
i^dtorli were,downrr-b(it still theriel wa& dingier x>f his aUacking 
^^ unaWjareS. This inspired a determined spirit qn board th|^ 
Jjbnstitutiiida. , . :. 

" ^\ l^*s sink thefn t"^ was the cry that ran aloiig our dect'fiH-^for 
w^ telt^that we, W4^e deceived. 

At thi;s momeht.Captain Dacre^ appeared in one of our boatsi 
ilncL immediately surrei)d:^red himself as a prisoner of war. .We 
^id not have any switchel prepared for him as hp came on board, 
^ecause we thought hc.had had e^iough already.., ^ .. r 

'.The delivery of his 6word to Hull by Dacres was a speniQ 
90v^r to \ik forgotten by those ^ho witnessed it. . . , \ , 

K$ he placed t^e hilt. in the hand of Hull, his'^rst remark was: 
" Captain Hiill ! ,what haVe vou got for men.? " 
" O, replied Still, with a 'i^y smife^ " onljr a p^rpel (>f green 
bush-whackers. Captain Dacfe^ ! " . /i V. ., . , .. i 
; '^*' 3us?h- whiacfe'^r^ f Thef ^re, more like tigers . , thaji . jaieii , ^ , I 
dever siwiheniiiiht so. THey fairfy drbve li^ ?tof]gi our^q^a^- 
Very sodti itter th'^ battle' commenced^ Lifeuteliant Bush felt, 
mortally wounded. Lieiitenaol Morris received a wound in his 
chest; but lie T)6re himself bravely through iintil we won the day. 
Lieutenant Waifdsworihcame nobly forward ^, and fiSled the place 
ftikde vacant by death with great honor to himself and adyan^tagi^ 
t6 the ship, :"" ■• ^:. - ,., ..^ , ^ ,1 ^ ;^ ■' . , 

We re mafned b'y' the Gtier'riere all tTia t n IghL t'he prisoners 
were taken out, and humanetjf disposed of> We immediately set 
itar^fel ve* at' Wot* , repairing d^i^iages. Two anchor si ock s weld- 
^ij 6h'1!he ^Jl'fejW&^t; Iha^^^^ injured by the slray sbotj 

liiade thsli ^3 go6d a^ fliew. tti ohe hour's time, we had the 
gallant frigate ^s tHrn dsf she wa$ ^Uen (he fight began. But li 
was not so with the Giierrlbre. .Thfe Yankee wounds made in hef 
sides werp incurable.. She ,*vas t^t)! afloat near us bul wilh six 
feet 9f Water iiji hei- hold. LlefO tenant Reed had command. The 
prisoners w^r6 s^t at the, pumps, but they eould noi all keep hec 
free. ' ^he was soon reported to be in a sinking condition, and 
we hastened to get All the men otft of her. 

Some of the captives came on board of us very badly wounded. 




Their sufferings wQre. greater th?^n c^ jbe^d^gcrib^, oj e.yen 
rm^giiied. One poor fellow bs^d^.^his under jaw. shot off}.)aLn4 
^i^ile we were watching hin>j he jbied to deatn^ Otjier^, depn.^i^d 
of arms and legs, lingered in the -gr^ateititortureVu^^ • 

an. en<J to their pains. ' ■''][ . ■; . 'r..,r.' n;» 

Inere was one man — Dick Dui>p— svpobor.^ th^ amDUfat^Q^ 
6i*liis Teg with a fortitude I shall always be^i-jniP^i^^^ ^*f Jqv^ar^ 
a hard set of butchers^" wa^ ^A)?^ ^?\*4 ./^ -^f^P surgeon, as his 
fifra and'bleeding liiiib was peveired frppi tjj^. bo(j[y. Others, whom 
f "ibutii name,^ Ibbre their 'anQpu^tipn^ equally well. Some ojf 
ttlfee brave defenders of the nation are among my frignds ;^nd I 
sometimes meet them stumping it through .life. In t(ie midst ot 
ill* this suffering', Captain Hull wj^s,.fr^(ji^nt^y found tendering 
thjB consolations needed in such an hour, aiid! showing his hu- 
manity to the best advantage. He.ea^en Ipbked more truly noble, 
behding over the hammock of a wounded iar, tliaa when invading 
and conquering the enemy. * . *. . : ... ; . . •, . 

In spite of all the efforts to keep her afloat^ wq nw'saw;^at 
the' Guerriere was rapidly sinking. A cpuncil of war jwas* held 
on board the Constitution, and the decision was that sneshpuld 
be blown up. It was a moment of th^ cJeepest;ai%t(Bri^. . After 
removing every thing thougbt necessary^tp;)^ sp^d,!we,put a 
slow "match to the magazine, and left her. , . , ' V . . , i ^ , • ; 
. There was something melanctiQiy aed grand \^ i)^/ eigfit 
Alth|6ugh theftigi^te \yas.a wreck,' iflqating; abpv^ a mastless.liulk 
at ttie sport of tne waves, she bore marks of her' fornier greajt.r 
ness. Much of her ornamental work had been untouched; and 
her long, high^ black sides rps^ in solitary niajeky, b^fore'ius) as 
we bade her farewelL Fpr y^ars she had beep the Jhpuse of.thbur 
sands of ^ human beings; fpr y^^rs she had withstood the shoc|{S 
bf thb winds, the billows and t)ie battfo ; for years she had borpe 
the insfghia of English valor to different and distant climes. .Bi^t 
her years were n(^w ended,;, lier coujrse ^wjasruQ y sbQ. ivas about 
|9 sioVin^o'the doep ocean forevef.; . . f , 

.Captain Dacr^s ^toocjl by our tsflTKail as we squared, away frpw, 
the Guerriere^: I fhpught Isaw ihirii brush away' a t^ar ^ojm His 
asictfeye, as.he fopKtfhe. last look of the vessel he ha^.jSo'latety 
Qp^manded. .But .whatever, piay have been h^s (jbeliiigsV it n>uH 
be admitted that he had done bis own, duty wellrr-and his" ,m)pip 
had defendec!' their v^3sel to the Ij^s^ ^i> '.,.:. / r * ; 

At the^dtstarice of about three miles we hpve .tpi anfj. aw^it^d 
thp result- * )^'ui\dreds of eyes wej-e stretched in that .one di^'^C- 
tion, where the ill-fated Guprriere moved heavily on the deep.. J% 
was like waiting for 'the'uhcappip§. of a, vk)1c« the bqrsting 

.; ' ••i\ ;. ':...' v.M riff:) ]>•:::. ■: lio ■■•:.'"■ •- v-' • . : ^1»"'.. "ir.- •. 




l>firr LOO BOOK Or*A^lf«lV-01MWAR'8 MAirr "kki^' 

up of a crater. Scarcely a word was spoken on board the Con- 
stitution, so breathless was the interest felt in the scene. 

The first intimation we had that the fire was at work 'was the 
discharge of the guns. Slowly at first, one after another, as 
the flame advanced, and then more rapidly, they came booming 
towards us. Now on one side, now on the other, roar followed 
roar, flash followed flash, until,^or a time, the whole mass was 
enveloped in clouds of simoke. , We could see but little of the 
direct progress of the w6i4c, and therefore We looked the more 
earnestly for the explosion — not knowing how soon it might 
occur. Presently ^here was a dead silence, as if every gun had 
been discharged ; then followed a vibratory, shuddering motion, 
and streams, of. ligbl, like streaks of lightning riinning along the 
sides; and the grand . crash came 1 The quarter d^^j-^W*''^ 
was immediately ov^ the magazine, Jifted in a mass,, broke lintOi 
fragments, and flew in every direction. The hullj parted in the 
centre by tb^ shock, and loaded with, such masses of iroii ^and 
spars, reeled, staggered, plung^ Jb):ward a few feet/ And sank 
out of sight. y'i 

It was a grand and awful iScene^ Nearly every floating iMsig 
around her went d6Wn with the Guerriere, Scarcely a<viQstig6 > 
remained wh^n we passed the spot t6 tdl the world that «uc'fe' a 
frigate had even swept the seas. We ^immediately squared away^; 
and were again under a crowcl of sail for our liative land. : .: i! 
i.ThuftQnded the captured* the- puerriQte,.. ' : :: « * ; 



b5' 






; .:■'■ . I. 







CHAPTBB IV. 

BETV&N QF THE CONSTITUTION. 

On odr passage borne wi met with but kiw vessels. Soott 
after the capture of ,the Guerriere we fell in with two sail. We 
run down to within a short distance. Oor Ei^glish friends were 
soibewtiat elated. 
' " They are British men of war ! " cried oni. *^ Now we shall 
bil set at liberty, and yoii will be the prisoners.*^ 

"No, no! '' said the Boatswain. ''Not exactly. You've for- 
aoftteil the escape off the Delaware Bay, haven't you ? The Old 
Uonlttitatioii will show them the way, by and by." 

We tacked ship, cra<iked oh all sail, and walked aWay (Vom 
th^ enemy with all ease. The English were astonished at our 
sailing; dud well they might haVeJ^en. ' 

On the following night the prisbiiiers undertook to rise, and 
gain possession of the ship. Lieutenant Morris discovered the 
plot. He saw the first Lieutenant of the Guerriere in the cabin 
hunting after his surrendered sword. Intelligence of that and 
other proceedings was instantly communicated to Captain Hull, 
who passed at once to the berth deck. There he found nearly thir- 
ty of the English prisoners had managed to remove the iron felter- 
locks from their hands, and to substitute leather ones for them. 
One man who claimed to belong to New York, made a confession 
of the affair. All of them we're in a state of intoxication. They 
made their boasts to Captain Hull, that they should have taken 
the ship before morning. But they would have found that thing 
much easier said than done. The man who confessed was liber- 
ated. The remainder were placed in irons again, and continued 
so during the remainder of the cruise. 

We proceeded without interruption, and arrived below Boston 
light in fine order. While we laid there, the **Old Waggon " — 
the United States — came in sight. We immediately cut our 
cables, and pushed in before her. We thought, at first, she was 
an English vessel — not understanding each other's signals, on 
account of our having been out cruising so long. 




TUB LOCh BOOK-Or' ▲ MM^-^fMVAft^ Wtmi 2t 

On, arriving in Boston hartior^ we anchored' off Long whai^ 
The people crowded in thousands on the docks, and sent an et^**' 
nest invitation for Caplain Hull to come ashore* But he fell it 
to be his duty to remain a board for two days. Wh^n he }ande<t; 
the piers were crowded with people — so that he had barely room 
to plant his feet on the stone, as he left his boat. At that mo- 
ment the roar of cannon from the shore and the frigate saluted 
him, mingled with the cheers of the thousands congregated to do 
homage to his valor. In all the adjacent buildings ladies were 
clustered, waving their handkerchiefs, and casting wreaths of 
flowers on the gallant Captainashe passed along. Boston was 
one scene of intense excitement. The thunder of the artillery, 
the shouting of the people, and the strains of music woke up the 
patriotism of the town to rejoice over one of the most brilliant 
naval victories ever achieved. 

After recovering our anchors, we proceeded to land our pris- 
oners. There were one hundred and fifty in all. They confess-^ 
ed freely that they had been treated with the greatest immanity. 
Very different indeed, was their treatment from that experienced 
by American prisoners ;On board English prison ships and in 
English jails. 

Commodore Rogers was then in Boston. He proposed to keep^^ 
twelve picked men as hostages (or that number of Ameritani^ 
taken in the Nautilus. Several English vessels appeared below 
the light, while we were in the harbor ; whereupon Americans 
volunteered to go out and attack them; but there was then a' 
cessation of arms, which prevented us. 

The boisib-boats of that day used to cOme ^iklongside of lis .with 
liqnor in bladders. They were a hard set ©f customers.-*** 
They were manned by the worst kind of landshiirks ever ^n-' 
ccHintered by 9 sailor. Wa were then more' iinposcKl upon th^a 
w^ can be now* The officers tried every wpy to prevent us frofti 
getting, th^ liquor; but U w,as generally in v^in* Sometimes 
they watched the boats, ^s they came along side, with their spyr 
glasses, tp discovei> how 9|Hd whjere the men. secieled their gro^« 
Many a time have I seen,#n officer glass, in i^and, waitching us 
from .the mizzen chains. 6nt tiemperance had not then taught- 
sailors, as it is teaching them now, to take care lof ihemselve's by 
letting rum alone.. We didn't iinderstend theq^ as. we can n^w, 
that a Yankee tar? can work better, fare better^ defend his countrj^ 
better, without the poisonops draft than with it. . 

Sq strong was the appetitq of the great mass of seamen for rum 
in those days^ ,that we resorted tQ all expedients to obtain it 
These bladders were hidden away in our boats, on rCvery possible 
occasion. Sometimes we secreted them in our clothing, at the 



-*,.s 



t& Tgm* LOO BOOK or a MAtf-QfffWABJB MAM.! 

bottom of the boat,; and the offioera would search for ibexn. with 

out .findii>g. ^^ •:./... . ..,, 

[ Thusilqgging9/ri3ks,aad disgraicea followed on board our ^hip-r 
Uaced dirfictly:tQ rum.; i : . . - 



1^y 



CHAt'1:ER t: 



I . OLD IRONSIDES IN A GALE, 

: . , ;. . . . . t , 

_,We, b?iql,beei> out from Bp^tQii about a week. We were 
bound to thef coast of France, having on board Mr^ Barlow, 
tb^Amexicatt .minister, ^d his family. They went out with 
i|3. in greaJt state, and made ;us plenty of . jnusic from the band. 
The. frigatP! W4S i«fine trim,; and Gapte^in. Hull was in /fine 
spirits, fie was then a single gentleman, and his galfemtry :t6f 
tbe ladies of the company was equal to.hi^ bravery in defend- 
ing bis,$hip4 iTbe Captain was a favorite with the: ladies, as 
he weltdeserw^ed to be-r-rfor he h^ protected themin battle j and 
saired'iheir naiiiresoil fcom'didioaor.: I So.it always^ is Vith a* 
tifuly. brave man. He is iiever faap!^r than when shielding 
the weak, and ministering to the welfare: of the virtuous. ? 

:> iOn board a -ship like the Constitution a wide field for i^tional 
enjoyment was opened* An intelligent female will soon fiod 
herself at home tin sucha^place. Reposing confidence in^lv^i^ 
guardians, she will look abroad on the ocean scene around her, 
with a pleasure never obtained oii the land. It is surprising to 
ilOti(ie how soon woman will become^ accustomed to the sea. 
The rbaip of the winds, the rock of the billows,- the pluttgihg 
and rearing of the ship, will be malfters of course to her in it 
little while, ahd, if she had been intteriding tb do it, there arfe 
rfiariy^ cases in which she could* navigate the largest class of 
vessels with skiH and safety. ' ' 

The crew Wer^f hiiich honored by the refined conversation of 
Mr. Baflow*s family. They exerted themsel yes to make ui^ 
bappy, seeing how hdrfl we toil6d'to Speed them on their watery 
way. Every nian on board v^ak more or less interested in 
them, so that \ife Were ready to do all we could to make the 
voyage agreeable. ^j'' ; ;' ! . .. ,, . 



-, II; was under, these cimumstanees that a teirrific gale of wind 
arose. ..Captain. Hull wa^ soon among us on deck, determined 
tp £^aw his ^Uant craft to the best : advantage. The Wind 
had chopped around ye|ry suddenly, at near midnight. It Was 
o|i€| of the darl^esi nights ever seen. The huge^ black clouds 
fltvv'ept ejdse over .<;au:>i heads, throwing: fn dense shadow all 
arouiid 0^ the watprjk . iWe could hardly s^ o|lr hands before 
oiirfiEkCe^,';i^d every > upper mast and piece of rigging wa^ 
eQtii;ely>ou^.p£ sight.! Notwithstanding it was in the month of 
February, the thunder broke on us in tremendous crashes, and 
tik^ hghtning blazed as if . tlie sky was turned into one grand 
fiiflpnaGi^ioffire.r :; ' :■ .•,■.•., ^i- 

. We weie then QOt far'off from'the Western Islands, where 
a<P^ljS .^e, very abun4§ia!;-:.{ Puff after puff came the wind, 
hck^yieifiai^d he$iyier,^the^aight elouds shutting down closer and 
cl^)(6er) and the. light^iug dancing around among our spars and 
y^^ .a«i if at were in sport The tempest had fairly lifted up 
ill^ waves, wijtji it^might^ and tossed them at us in all manner 
<rfj (shapes.. It; » was not like the de^p, heavy, regular roll of the 
ocean, when the ship seems to know eiKactly; .how to take it, 
and rises iaftd;fjall^.<lik€^ a plough: going .oyer; /ai furrough,^ but a 
sbpirttJsna^iQhiPQlid.ma^s of waves, tuml^d upon us without 
ord«r apd without »mercy. Old Neptww appeared to show us 
vbfitihe.eouid (Joi :by blowing in alino&t every directioti at 
once, ami racing! hi^ chijdrenj iqtOjall tb^ contrary motions: 
imaginable. .IJIever, shall we forfet his obstreperous conduct 
on th«Ae!cca8ion(! 

' The.Qpn^Utulipn, prepared and brave^as she was, laid down 
before Jbis.iaudden Wast. . She rolled harder, and with a more 
jerking, trembling motion than I. ever knew her to before, or 
hayf kncjWja her Cq sin^. Bveryn^ffprt was instantly required 
t]9trk^f)p ^b^,gu,Bs from breaking, loose.. : Had any done so, and 
d€>fiJp(Qd,do)y|a: that, steep, planky hill which her decks presented, 
tJbieyjnn^t ;b*yeifweU nigh gone strftight through ber— riron- 
si4^d({^ iwei jl^e\V'ber to be.,j: The ofllcers and men were tossed 
akiputj .liJcOrSp. m^y playthings of the winds:. and waves. 
g^iHn^ ^f;. the. officers. fonn4 ftheir arins filled, with roughr old 
ss^s,;in.a way they ^ didn't mucb.joelish. But, at such a tim^ 
^ har^esl^imnst fond off the. best way. they cani 

A gale of wind, on board a man, of War^, with the rfiipon her 
bosm ^nds, is no place for passing cards of compliments. At 
«LVoh a. timo, he who ha^ the best sea-legs on him is the best 
fellow, A few who had , greased their shoes to keep their feet 



dry, found themselves v^ry^fteti on the ^et -de^k, ftrt thfeir 
<Jomfort, iasflat as a pan fish. It was a biisy wdrfc, for' a white, ^ 
to help pick them up. But, in the midst of aM this exciteiiifeilt 
mid ddnget, the most perfect subordinatioh prevailed. Noitll' 
WJord was spoken, except by somfe dfiic'eir in eotrimand. I MV 
the necessity of strict disoiptine, as I Ick^d around me> MI&- 
was proud <rf the American Navy, as 1 saw how otderly ^V€^- 
thing was. The momentary cotifusion of the sqtoU showed' 
oflf Old Ironsides to the best advantage. Lbtig may she ftoafl' 
to wear her well-earned honors f ''.; V 

Lieutenant (now Commodore) Reed took con^^hd of tfcf^' 
deck. The darkness was at its deepest pitch, and tb^gtfe* 
piping its loudest tune. Mr. Reed was completely sfeJf^poSs^s- 
ed. It was a treat to see hirii pads^ai^Oiind, and toheai^'Mtti' 
issue his orders. A ludicroTW scene o^curl-ed between 1hi» gtA^ 
iant officer and a sailor, while I was standing elosebe^idis llyiM? 

Mr. Reed hdd order^ this man to haul on a rope rtearOyz 
when 1^ seized the Lieutenant hard aild ftist by thi^ nosf^ 4' 9¥ 
pulled away lustily for a moment, and then discoverittg'iito 
mistake, stammered out : ^i i ><. 

<* I — ^I — ask y dur pardon, sir. It's so Akrk, I ea*(^t deei^' • ^ f^- 

*' Granted, my ' b^^,**' ^ i-ejrfied the Lieukfia^t Witfc MaMbr 
" Here's the rope," halsding him the j^iece €tf rigginrg feimsdfi ' 

"Here ! here! " cried he, as the sailor pluiigedtbWi^d'hite 
agiaitt. "Hete is tHfe r^ipe! I've feot hbld of ft; Kow pttll 
away!" Arid right lustily^ they pulWA together. 

There were at least a hundred men under R<^8^6iOTA*ri4rid» 
at that moment. TSaeh one bad been directed (0 Hfe pldc^/ and 
stood waiting the most tninute order. Now <!iamle the^ tty t '^ '\ 

" House top-gallant-masts ! ^' '■['■ ' ' ! 

" Dark as it waSj the men ispwmg into iM riggtog. ' lw4 
iioment they were aloft in the^dom j ind when' an^i^iElsk>htf 
flash of lightning flashed a«iro8ri the waives, you liiight'jfe^'fhteftt 
np there, bending over tb^ir work with iall 'the- libnipdttore ^ 
mett ih a harvest field. The rigging was soon sWayed H^,' tkief: 
fids taken out, the tnasts lowereddowU, and stowed albngfeiidfe 
the long boat on the spar deck. Tfee ^hip felt relieved ^y-th^ 
operation, and rolled less heavily. It was quick Worktoite^ 
lieve her. Not ten minutes passed, before the whole^ tfain^ W^ 
done, and the masts made snug. ~ . 

The gate kepit increasing every moment. W=^ had only -Mii 
fliail up— a storm stay sail. Bnt thsii did ita duty noilily. • W^ 
€lxpedled to see it slit into ribbona^ «ti«eiry squkU that i^truck'U^ 



.29 

hM itikield oh^ like buckmih io a coat, so^ that we ky to under 
iA seveilal hoiura. ' 

' : As the momihg btxxhe the gale grew worse, instead of sub^ 
tfdiog. We werd obl^ed to. take in the stovm stay sail, and 
icui linder bare poies. The fine old ship rode off on the bit 
lows, like a swan in a lafoe; shaking the spray from her sides a» 
she dashed along. The decks w«re well wcw^hed by the flying 
foam, so that we l*aid no occasion to use bucketfe for that pur- 
posed Bttt i« was rich to notice how steady she waSj and how 
little ndid^S the ship made. Her kuW was like her commander— 
:^, hat Swre. There wtts no creaking of the mai^ts and' tim- 
ieifs,'sne'h as Js tbo often heatd of at these times, on board of 
^frttt at^ cadled bur first class ships. We were satisfied then,, 
if we had not been before, thp^t a vessel tb^t could walk over 
the water so quiet in sucli weather was well named the 
Ironsides. . We. all. felt, that i^hfi was pqt together to stay put. 

You could li^ar nothing but the loud roaring of the winds, and 
the wild dash of the waves. It was only occasionally, however, 
that the htiter could be neard, so violent was the rush of the gale 
through the ri^giqg. , Just at this moment, as the daylight stream- 
ed across ibe ragjqg waters,, Captain Hull came among ug. He 
Was as tahri as a mtdsummer day, and looked around as if noth- 
ing had happened. Mr. Wa^di^worth was. now in command of 
th^ deck*. 
-'^^ Sliel«*OTs hard, Mr. Wftdsifi^rth ; 1^^ 

-**¥e«j'sfr; but she rhakes good wea|her pf it.V 

^^ iky,ky, that shis cfoieir. She'll give us a good reli^ for 6\xt 
dinners at this rate.'/ 

^'She has come up lik^.a top,,sir,«nd keeps jtrst as steady." 

*<^EjlactIy.' What vessel is that to lee wj^rd, Mr. Wai;dfewo|-thf^'^^ 

" A square rigger/ hying td, Wr.*' ' 

" Has she anything on her? '' 

'< Not a stitch, sir. Nothing but her masts would stand in such 
a blow as this." 

" Keep the frigate so, Mr. Wardsworth. This is going to stay 
by us some time, I'm thinking." 

And it was just as the Captain thought. The gale continued, 
with fury, for two days. The only change in it was that as we drove 
further out to sea, the waves became longer, deeper and heavier, 
so that we did not pitch so violently as we had done. Every 
thing was in the snuggest possible trim, and a sharp look-out 
was kept on all hands. Nothing, scarcely, hove in sight ; and 
when a vessel did appear, it was only for a few moments at a 
time that we could see her. 



90 THE LOG BOOK OT A XAN*-OF«Wi^B'8 KAV. 

Toward the close of the second day we were driven^ i^td iM 
currents of the gulf, where the extreme violence >ctf the gaki 
somewhat abated. We began to carry ssul again, a9 sh^ would 
bear it. Lieutenant Morris was the officer of the deck. Hull 
ciiine up once morOb And now occtii^ed a scene:.whidl) showed 
the indispensable necessity* of implicit ob^dience^ 

Art order came from Mr. Morris: . 'r :» ^] ,. ,/. 

<<Lay aloft there, men! T^e ia two rscefs.." - i !. , ,uu/ii 

Another squall was comings and with it jcamet another bua^ 

time. But we were aloft instantly 9 and the work as. qi^iQJklyidonci. 

I was a fore-top*man,at the tim^, and close by the>,aiep,on tbj» 

larboard fore yard arm. One awkward , fellov^ oia^^ fiqct^ a jbod 

piece of w:prk of it, as to leav^ hU pa^t of tl^e. sa^l jop^^^i^ 

attracted the attention of Mr., J^eed. ^ 

** Who is that lubber?" he called put from belpw;/ . ; 
No answer, . j ., ., . .;, ^ . /• ..J. ; . ' 

" Larboard fore yard there ! What fellpw lis Xh^il\\,],,^ "..^^j 
All silent. I , V ,,}j , .,. ,,;; 

The man next to him was then ordered to pajss hi^.pi^m^ t .;, 
Still there was no answer. , . ^i ij/ tl^'ii., ii 

*'Down here, everj one of you! •' iariedtheXie^utl^napii'^.j^r 
^' Who was next to ycHU^ on the larppardjsjcje?'] ^^^e^.fe^^ 
one of the men* . " ;"^' . ' ^ '^ 

** Don't know, sir!" mutterred the man. ' • ^ S^'-l- iii 
This would not do. Here, was a direct ^flfprt to jBhield tlie 
guilty. Such an act of insubordination, niqst no^go unpupished. 
ThQ safety of. all on, board depended pq^j^yery m^u's .^bipg his 
duty. ■ ' ' •'_ . "/.'.;.■.; ..... 

A flogging was ordered, and each one/of,, that watch bo^ to 
receive half a dozen of the cat- i The eflfeit yv^ good. ^ { |i^j^ ,i|uch 
case of stubborn disobedience eviar occurreid again; , •, / 



i/ 



. • »• - ,.. ' ., '. :» ... 



tRfi LOO BOOK or JL man-of-war's maw. ft! 



CHAPTER VI. 

CRUISE OF THE ADAMS. 

Boston, 1812. Not long after Captain Hull took the Guer- 
riere he was removed to New York. Captain Bainbridge came 
^board at Boston, to take command of Old Ironsides. Many of 
our crew were, not at all pleased with this arrangement. We 
had become personally attached to Captain Hull, and hated to 
have him leave us. Such was the state of feeling, that it almost 
amqunted to a mutiny- , 

There were many of us who felt badly for Captain iSain- 
bridge. We knew he bad been called a gallant officer, and it 
was hard to judge him before the time. He qame forward on« 
day and said : . 

" My men, what do you know aboiit me ? " '- ' ' 

This question called out several of the crewi One after an- 
other said, in reply : ' 

"We were with you, sit, at the taking of the Philadelphia,' 
at Tripoli." 

" Well," continued the Captain, "go with me now, j^nd I 
will do by you all that the service allows." 

Whz^t more could the men;ask ? But, although they be<iamt 
more quiet, there were several cases of lurking discontent:' 
Eighteen sentrieis w:ere placed that, night all over the ship. In 
the course of the night, twb then stole the second cutter, and 
resolved to run off. But, after they were in her, they found it 
was impossible to row without making so muchli6isd as to be 
discovered. They waited in the dark, under thq shadow of 
the ship, as long as they dared, when they floated quietly along- 
side one of the gun-boats, in hopes of being able to push unob- 
served from her to the shore. But they were discovered. 
One of the gun-boat sehtries put out his gun, an^ drew the 
bolat close under her quairiter, Ivheie^ the desetters weri^ both easily 
captured^ ' They were very soon reported to Captain Bain-' 
bridge, who called all hands aft in the morning. 



38 

" Now," said he, '' I will not punish these men as they de- 
serve, if you will consent to go in the ship." 

This was appealing to our best feelings. It was an argument 
in favor of our new commander at the very cemmencement of 
our acquaintance on the decks of the Constitution. The result 
was that nearly every man consented, to save his brother sailors 
from punishment. 

But, after all, there were some of us who could not feel satis- 
fied. We loved Captain Hull td well that we knew we must 
leave the frigate and we did. 

** Never," burst from my lips, almost before I was aware of it, 
" Never will I fire one of these guns again." As I said this, I 
laid my hands on a gun which had been with me in battle. 
My words have proved true. I left the Constitution then, and 
I have never shipped in the fine old frigate since. 

As soon as my time was out, and my wages were paid, I 
went to the Navy Yard at Charlestovvn. I was honorably dis- 
charged, and immediately determined to continue in the service 
of my country. One of our men had pursued a course that 
di^usted every patriotic bosom. He had gone ashore on liber- 
ty, and ran away to enlist in the army. No one could justify 
h^im. When discovered, and returned to the ship, be was 
severely punished in the presence of all the crew. 

There was a circumstance connected with my discharge 
which may interest some. 1 was discharged on the day that 
Furley was hung as a pirate. He, and a man named EUqr, 
has scuttled a vessel, killed one of the crew, and run away 
with the money they found on board. It was a dreadful mur- 
der, and will be. remembered by those who read the account at 
that day. 

, Impiediatejyr on leceiving my discharge, I went to witness 
t\\\» execution, with a shipnxate* Whatever may be said to the 
coptraf y^ by peoplci now, I am- satisfied that what I saw that 
d^^y did me good, and will [be the means of meJ^ing me think 
more correctly as long as I live. 

In my company, was Daniel Sanders, who was cast away on 
th^ Arabian coast, and suffered so much in the deserts of that 
country. -We -met the procession on the way to the scaffolds 
The t^o prisoners were seated on their coflSns, with their caps 
on their heads. Their appearance struck awe to my heart — 
and. I doubt not, to the hearts of multitudes who beheld them. 
" The mufderer ! " was stampjed on the brow of each of the 
crifninals; andxloudly and solem^Ijrclid that cavideade sjpeai^. 



THE LOG BOO& 07 A MAN-Or*WAR's MAN. 33 • 

to the people. Only one of them was hung. The other was 
cleared by turning state's evidence, having been reprieved by 
the Governor. ^ 

I was then a young man. A horror of crime seized on me/ 
which I hope is not eflfaced, at this day. But I could not 
remain idle. In a short time I shipped to go in the Adams.' 
She was then lying at Washington, under the command of 
Lieutenant Morris. The Adams was pierced for twenty-eight 
guns, having been made a razee. Her appearance was some- 
what singular. I remember a remark made by a countryman 
who came on board : 

u w^hy," said he, with a wonderful stare, "she would do very 
well, if she was twenty feet wider ! '* But the Adams did good- 
service in her day. 

A week's liberty was granted me. I am sorry to say that 
such was ^ery liable to be abused in those times. The first 
night of my shipping, before going to report myself on board, 
I was persuaded, sailor fashion, into a sailor row. We soon 
had no less than twelve watchmen upon us. It was then the 
law for each " Charlie " to carry a long pole. One of these 
I seized, and laid about me with so much man^'-war spirit, as 
to keep the remaining eleven at bay ! It was a difficult operation, 
however. 

\^ Let him alone ! " was the language of my landlord to the 
standers-by. "Better let him alone, if you know when your 
leg^vand arms are well off." 

We were then seduced away with the story that a French 
crown was waiting me at the boarding house. The ruse took; 
the hope of a spree surmounted every other, in the bosom of 
thoughtless sailors. 

Instead, however, of taking me to his home, my very worthy 
and truly amiable host led me to a grog shop, and called for 
half a gallon of liquor ! This the company drinked up, and a 
few hours found them sleeping off its dreadful effects on the 
floor. 

The next morning, such was the thirst that followed, acascf 
bottle full of spirits was in deniand. From this we drank our 
fill and passed toward the ship. On our way, a half peck of 
apples attracted my attention, and have them we would. So; 
out I sprang from our carriage, and bought the whole lot of 
the apple woman — taking her entire stock at once. But the 
officer having us in charge was not so well pleased with thi« 
operation as we were. He followed me to the stand, and think- 
ing k best to iptimidate me, drew his dirk. / i 
3 



34 

My breast was mstantly bared, as I turned respectfully 
tonyard him : • 

" There, sir," said I, " is a breast that never knew fear.-**-: 
You can put your dirk i« it, if you like I " 

That officer always showed me respect, after that, to lu» 
dying day. 

/* My man," he added, " I will give you the apples, if yott 
will take (hem. Bui suppose I had/been in a passion, and ruA 
yeu through ? " . 

The look with which this speech was answered was^ enough. 
Ever after that, the officer and I were friends. 

We wertt to. Washington all the way by land, in the stages. 
It was a curiosity to travel that route, in those days. From 
Boston to New- York, by land, would be a novel affair now — 
especially in a stage^ coach. 

In Philadelphia we had the misfortune — for it was really 
ojje — to be presented with a barrel of beer. This encouraged 
us to all manner of sailor pranks. But the country was thca 
rallying to carry on the war, and every man felt hound, accord-- 
ing to the fashion of those times, to contribute something. 
Beyond Philadelphia, we had no money among our officers ta* 
pay our ferriage. One of us lent the gentleman in command 
the sum of three dollars, which carried us over the river. ^ 

When we arrived in Baltimore tve learned the Adams was 
waiting for us, and orders came toi hurry us forward. Here ft 
landlord tried hard to enlist us in what he called a Patriot 
vessel But we werie shy of hen He offlered us high wages, 
axi/i plenty of prize money. 

"What flag does she sail under ? " inquired I. 

" O, sometimes one — sometimes another," was tlie response. 

« Does she every carry a black flag, sir ? " 

'^ Why— yes — perhaps' she does-^— once in a while ! " he 
added. 

" ladeed! " was our quick rejoinder. " Then, sir, you can't 
have us. We go for nothing darker, sir, than the red, the 
white and the blue." 

"We never desert our colors!" shouted one old tar, and 
with three cheers foe the starsi and stripesy we ended ouc 
Baltimore privateering; 

In as short a time as our lumbering wheels, would take U9^ 
we arrived in Washington. We were immediately set ai 
work in the> rigging loft, fitting the Adaais^^fbr seat. Here wiet 
soon found, that we were likely to be short of proviigiona 
Three stewards had been biraken^iin^oonseqaencqofnegMcidaBi 



T^t L0<? fioot 6¥^ ▲ teAJ^-Oi^WAB's *Ai!^l 3^ 

the men. On? goitig to thfe i$t6re-T»ootti, vr^ tdiihd dftfbiigh 5f' * 
every thing wfe needed; and it Was riot long before all 6itf 
vr^t^-ixr^re i&upplied. The temptaeioh wa^ to6 mucll for usi 
We wei^ stU sdbn intoii^ted — a^ wa^s allowetf to us then — ajf 
if then epuld defend theii' country as well drunk as they ^oultf 
when 6oi3chr f I rejoice, as a man-of-war's rwah who has been Hi 
the' setVrce' niany years, th^lt we are getting 6iir eyes^ 6peh i6 
the truth of this mattef. fiiit out drunkenness, even then, v^dii 
discovered, and when it interfered with our duty, was jiistly 
c6ttl?idexed at di^rice to the stetvice. 

Mir. Stlckiiey, the officer of the deek, liot longStjFtei: overhaulecf 
me. He took the with hilil eh board the old York, and push- 
ed me violently with his foot down to the gun deck. 1 brougtt 
up all standing ; but the shock well high sobered me. 

"Why, my, boy!" said the officer, "what made you get 
drunk 7 "\ 

My reply was a respectful apology for being caught in the . 
company of the old, hard drinkers, and this excuse followed. 

" It s well, my boy, that yoor'e the Captain's favorite. If ft 
were not for that, you would be flogged till you oould hardly 
stand.'' 

The next day I was reported to the Captain. 

**Ah!" said he, "it's bad, bad. But, then, it's not worth 
while to mind it now." 

Thus, unfortunately, is the habit of intemperance schooled inte 
tie lads of the Navy. 

In a few days the Adams dropped down the Potomac, near t9 . 
Alexandria. Here we 'came among the gun boats — the small; 
vessels buih by order of M^r. Jefferson, to protect tfae Southerly 
harbors and rivers. •! had no great fancy for them, and I nerer 
knew a saitpr who had. 

Lieutenant lleed, who was in the Constitution when I was^ 
had command of one of these naval beauties. He very soon 
paid. bis kinc} regards to me, with the question : 

" Will you go with me, my lad 1'^ 

Now i didn't want to go in such a craft as that — and Mr, 
Reed knew it. But the young sailors of the Constitution stood 
well, and he wanted me with him. 

" I had rather be excused, sir : not that I've the least objections 
to you, Mr. Reed; but, then," and my lurking glance at the gua 
boat, by which we were standing, told the rest of the story, 

" Come, my boy, come alongj" lie rejoined. "To-morrow We 
sliall lie ready for sea. You shall have good wages, and act acr 
quarter-masteru" 

r yielded ; but I didn't like it at all. There was so much 



36 

clearing away, and dressing up, and walking about, and making 
siffnals, that I sighed for the unrestrained station I had just left^ 
All was done, however that could be, to make my situation 
as pleasant as could be expected in such a lubberly craft as a 
gun-boat. Our gunner, who was a Turk taken in the Algerine 
war, tried his best to render me contented. But it was of no use. 
I loved one inch of the broad sweep of the decks, or tops, or 
yards of a frigate, more than all the hull of these lumbering, black 
crafts. 

The Lieutenant was mortified at my dislike to promotion, and 
even went so far as to threaten to stop my grog, and then to flog 
me if I asked for it ! In revenge for this, my plan was to intox- 
icate myself that I might be broken, on purpose. But they over- 
looked this folly in me, and I returned to my duty again. 

It was not long before we dropped down the Potomac to the 
mouth of the Weeomico. Here lay the two gun-boats, the Scor- 
pion and Asp. We saw two large ships off the nearest point, and 
made instant preparations for a chase. The Asp could not ge 
out the harbor, on account of the wind, and Lieutenant Reed 
nrade signals foi* her to go further qp; But it was loo late. The 
enemy sent their boats to her, four barges, filled with men, who 
captured her, after a gallant defence. Lieutenant Stickney was 
wounded, and laid helpless on the quarter deck. He hqd just 
strength enough to cry out : 

*' Men ! don t let them come aboard ! Never give up to them ! '' 
This order was heard by the English, who blew his brains out as 
soon as they reached the decks. Six of the crew immediately 
swam ashore. They were fired on repeatedly, but not a shot hit 
them. The British officers stood in their boats cheering their 
crews as they fired. 

On possessing themselves of the vessel, the English resolved 
to burn her. For this purpose they thrust a match into a bucket 
of tar. But it was a very foolish way to do it. ff they had 
emptied the tar on the deck, and set fire to it there, the work would 
have been quickly and surely done. As it was, the bucket was a 
long time burning before the fire reached the vessel, and then it 
only blazed up against the foremast and one of the sails. The 
inhabitants saw the fire, and as the enemy had gone, they came 
on board and extinguished it. 

That night, a part of the crew of the Adams went down the 
Potomac to return the A^p. We found both the Scorpion and 
Asp stem and stern, out of harm'^s way. Our spirits rose with 
the discovery; and having rpwed and toiled all night to reacti 
the spot, we gave up to the temptation to recreate a little. For 
this, one of the sailors was lashed to the rigging, which incensed 



THE LOO BOOK OF A HAN-OF-WAit's kkv. Iff 

him very much. He said he had rather take a thousand flog- 
gings, than be tied up so, like a slave. So thoroughly was 
the spirit of this tar roused within him, that he actually gnawed 
off the ropes that bound him ! An attempt to re-bind his limbs^ 
was followed by a threat that he would drown himself in the riv- 
er, rather than submit! Seizing an eighteen pound shot in both 
hands, he sprang over the sides of the vessel, and was rapidly sink- 
ing, when an expert swimmer dived for him, and brought him up 
by the hair of his head. 

But an interview with the Captain soon settled the matter. 
The sailor was a favorite; and a^ the Commander saw him enter 
the cabin, wet and dripping, his generous nature returned the 
offender with a short rebuke. This, however, might not have 
been the ericj. Such are the Naval rules — so dearly does the 
national law prize the life of our humblest sailor — that if that nian 
'had drowned, the officers concerned must. have been tried for 
their lives. 

Our gun-boats kept cruising up and down the Potomac, in 
quest of the vessels of the enemy. But we met with nothihfg 
worthy our attention. A couple of privateers from Baltimore 
met near us, and each supposing th^ other t6 be an enemy, both 
commenced firing. Three broadsides were given, and severikl 
men wounded, before the mistake was discovered. 



dry, found themselves T^ry^ften oil the ^et^ d«ek, fot thfeir 
<Jomfoft, iasflat as a pan fish. It was a huky wdrk, for a whiter* 
to help pick them up. But, in the midst of all this exciteiiifent; 
mid ddnget, the most perfect subordinatioh previEiiled., NoitM' 
word was spoken, except by somfe Mic^ftir iri eonimand. I MV 
the necessity of strict dii^iptine, as I Ickrfced around me, Mf& 
was proud of the American Navy, as 1 saw how otderly^ve^- 
Ifaing was. The momentary confusion of the sqiiiaU showi^ 
<>ff Old Ironsides to the best adviniage. Lbng may she *Aoi^ 
to wear her well-earned herons f • / ' V 

Lieutenant (now Commodore) Reed took eomlAAhd &f tfcf^' 
deck. The darkness was at its deepest pitch, and th^gttle* 
piping its loudest tune. Mr. Reed was completely sel-f^poSsefes- 
ed. It was a treat to see him pass aground, and to heai^h^ii^ 
issue his orders. A ludicrons soene o^curl-ed between 1bi» gtA^ 
iant officer and a sailor, while I was standing close bei^idis (Mtti? 

Mr. Reed hdd order^ this man to haul on arope rtearOyz 
when 1^ seized the Lieutenant hard aild ftist by thi^ no^&y' 9¥ 
pulled away lustily for a moment, and then discovering^ liW 
mistake, stammered out : i > s ,» »<. 

<* I — ^I — ask ydut pardon, sir. It's isO'dkrkvI c&tft H&^A* ' ^^^ 

^< Granted, my < bt^y,'*' l-ejrfied the Lieukfia^t Witfc ttiattgfe.^ 
" Here's the rope," halsding him the piece €tf rigging feims^ft ' 

"Here ! here! " cried he, as the sailor plttiigfedt6W»d'hifal 
agiaitt. "Here is tHfe r^pe! Tve feot hbld rf«tti if^w pttir 
away! '' And right lustily^ they pulWfi together. 

There were at least a hundred men under BM(SffW^6mhttikti&' 
at that moment. Each one had been directi^did Mid ptdc^, and 
stood waiting the most tninute ord^r. No W <9amie thie ^ry t ' > ^ 

" House top-gallant-masts ! ^' * • • i 

" Dark as it was^ the men. sprung into tlie^ i^iggit^g. ' lW4i 
moment they were aloft in the^oomj ind when an ddciElSrtofatf 
flash of lightning flashed ai^rbsd the weives, yon niight'de^'flkfii^ 
op there, bending over th^ir work with iall'/the libnipdtfere ^ 
merti ih a harvest field. The rigging was soon sWayed ^tlp^,' tklef: 
fitds taken out, the tnas^s lowered' do wU; Bind stowed albngsiKl^ 
tbe long boat on the spar deck. 'Tfee ^hip felt relieved *y-th^ 
operation, and rolled less heavily. It was quick work' to i^ 
lieve her. Not ten minutes passed, before the whdlo thin^ W^ 
done, and the masts made snug. ^ . 

'The gale kep* increasing every nioment. W-^ had only -Mil 
fliail up— a storm stay sail. Bnt thsii Ai4 ita duty noilily. ' W^ 
dxpected to see it slit into ribbona^ idti^ry squkU that struck'U^ 



.29 

tol itiield oh^ like bdckiam io a coat, so. that we ky to under 
H seveilal homra. 

r: As the mommg bbohe. the gale grew worsel, instead of sub^ 
ttdiog. We werd obl^ed to. take in the stovm stay sail, and 
kuri lindierbare poles.- The fine old ship rode off on the bil;^ 
lows, like a swan in ai lake; shaking the spray from her sides i^ 
she dashed along. The decks were well wcw^hed by the flying 
foam, so that we had no occasion to nse bucketfe for that pur- 
p^fipei Bat i« was rich to notice bow steady she was^ and how 
littte'fioi«<S the ship mside. Her kullf was like her commander — 
1^1^, bat 'Swre.' Ther^ wtts no creaking of the madts and' tim- 
bers,' stfeh a^ is too often heatd of at these times, on board of 
^frttt sat^ cadled bur first class ships. We were satisfied then,, 
if we had not been before, thp^t* a vessel tb^t could walk over 
the water so quiet in sucK weather was well named the 
Ironsides. , We. all. felt that j^hfi was pqt together to Stay put. 

You could ^^r nothing but the loud roaring of the winds^ ^nd 
the wild dash of the waves. It was only occasionally, however, 
that the latter could be neard, so violent was the rush of the gale 
through the riggiqg. , Just at this moment, as the daylight stream- 
ed ac,rc^i ibe ragjqg waters,, Captain Hull came among U3« He 
Was as bahd'as a mKlsummer day, and looked around as if noth- 
ing had happened. Mr. Wa^-di^worth was.now in commai^d of 
th^ deck*. 
-•^^ Slie'labcrrs hard, Mr. Wftdswxjrth ; labors htilrd, w.^ \ 

■ *• If es- ■ sfr ; but she ftiakes good weafher pf it.V' 

^'^ A% ay, that shis cfoieir. - She'll give us a good reli^ for oSit 
dinners at this rate.'/ 
^^'•She has come up lik^.a top,;sir,«nd keeps just as steady." 

*<>EjlactlyJ WJiatTessel is that toleeiwd, Mr. Wai;dfeworth f *' 

" A square rigger/ laying ti^, Wr.-' '^ 

" Has she anything on her 7 '' 

'< Not a stitch, sir. Nothing but her masts would stand in such 
a blow as this." 

*' Keep the frigate so, Mr. Wardsworth. This is going to stay 
by us some time, I'm thinking." 

And it was just as the Captain thought. The gale continued, 
with fury, for two days. The only change in it was that as we drove 
further out to sea, the waves became longer, deeper and heavier, 
so that we did not pitch so violently as we had done. Every 
thing was in the snuggest possible trim, and a sharp look-out 
was kept on all hands. Nothing, scarcely, hove in sight ; and 
when a vessel did appear, it was only for a few moments at a 
time that we could see her. 



40 

*' Avveel ! aweel ! " muttered he, as he came over our sides ; 
" but this is muckle bad I " 

** Why, skipper ?*' asked Captain Morris, with a queer look. 

" O ! an' 'tis bad for mysel, dear mon — muckle bad !" 

** Pray tell me why, my friend ? ' again inquired our commander. 

" An' maun I spik it oot, mon? '' 

" Out? — Yes, to be sure. What's the ma^tter ?" 

The Scotchman, by this time, had actually tnegun to cry. and 
stood before 'Captain Morris with a wo-begone visage that was 
absolutely ludicrous. *' Oh ! oh ! '* (blubbering but loud ) '* all 
my siller is in her — every pound I've kepit in this worl." . .. 

Here was a dilemma, and as the Scotchman cried the Uaptain 
laughed. But he yielded to him, and made his vessel 8^ ^cartel, sa 
that she might go unmolested into port. 

The man of the thistle fairly jumped for joy at this news, and 
wiped his eyes before us. 

We learned from him that the Plover, a heavy English sloop of 
war, had just left. She had been razeed from a frigate, and 
mounted thirty-two guns. We carried but twenty-eight- But 
we were not afraid of her, especially as she had on board a quan- 
tity of gold dust. 

Our cruise was immediately resumed. We took a large East 
Indiaman, when we had been out only a, few days. We expect- 
ed to have a brush with her — and we did, a short one. She was 
Well provided with guns and ammunition. It was in the afternoon 
when we saw her. She ran down toward us, as though she 
wanted to speak. We understood the ruse, and slipped away, 
^ntil we knew more of the strength of her metal. The next day 
we bad to hunt her up on the great ocean park, arid at last found 
her just as she was going up one of the watery hills. For three 
or four days we kept her in sight. She loomed upbefore us oc- 
casionally, like a light-house seen through a thin mist. 

** A great vessel,' said one of the midshipmen to me. " And 
what white sails she has." 

** Yes, sir," I replied, " she's an East Indiaman, and well pre- 
pared for us, I reckon." 

An old tar now broke in upon us : 

* Do you think that's an old merchantman, you lubber? — 
A man-o'-war, I tell ye ! Whos afeard ? " 

The last remark was overheard by Captain Morris. 

**If any of you are dissatisfied,' said he, ^' I'll put ye alongside 
in a hurry. We'll sink her, or defend ourselves like men ? " 

Three cheers followed from the crew, and we spread more can- 
vass to the breeze. We were very soon up with her. She fired 
first, and then attempted to run. We overhauled her immediate*. 
ly, and gave her a broadside. * This brought down her colors. 



THE LOQ b60K OF A HAN-OF^WAR's MAN. 41 

As the Captain came on board' the Adams, he looked chop- 
fallen enough. 

" You have all made your fortunes," he pettishly exclaimed, 
" if you can only keep us : but you can't." 

" We'll try," briefly responded Captain Morris. 

**If you do it, sir, you 11 never need to wet your hands again. 
You and your men are made for life. My cargo is one of the 
richest that ever floated in salt water.'' 

We held this noble prize about ten minutes. We had hardly 
begun to call her ours, when at least twenty-five sail of the enemy 
hove in sight! Never shall I forget how they appeared, as they 
came sweeping on toward us. There were seven large class men- 
of-war among them. The Huzzar frigate took the lead. She 
came on us as furious as a tiger, firing from both sides at once. 

The shrill whistle was now heard through the Adams. We 
were soon called aft, and a general consultation held as to the 
best way of escaping. Our boats were immediately out. Consti- 
tution fashion, and begun a hearty tow. Night soon came on; 
and as the dense darkness of that climate shut in around us, we 
escaped. The next morning we were six miles dead to windward 
of all our pursuers. They kept up the chase all day ; but it was 
of no use. We ran them down every moment, so that at sunset 
there was nothing of them to be seen ! 

We met with several English vessels on the cruise. These we 
generally took, and burnt. Many of them were valuable, and 
must have caused no small loss to the enemy of our country. 

From this cruise on the African coast we returned to America, 
and entered the port of Savannah. On our way seventy prizes 
were added to our list. Some of them were worth the hand- 
ling. Some were loaded with smoRed salmon, for the enemy's 
troops, some with raisins for their ports, some with munitions of 
war. 

The Peacock came in while we were at Savannah, and landed 
her prisoners. She had, like us, made a successful cruise. At 
this port we laid in a large stock of provisions and water. Captain 
Morris had been obliged to put us on short allowance — and it 
went against the grain of a man of his noble nature. He was 
determined, now, to be prepared. A wild boar that undertook 
to swim the river, where we were procuring water, up the wild 
country north of Savannah, was killed by a boat's crew. He 
was a furious creature, with long tushes, and at least three years 
old. But the Yankee man-o'-war's men were too much for him* 
We carried too many guns. We soon despatched him, and 
made a feast of his remains. Money brought us the Southern 
^'fixins ;" ahd what with ham, cheese, and other eatables, wo 
were ready to'put to Qea in good spirits, 



4s THS LOa BOOK or a HAN^tOr^WAB 8 MAV. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

LAST CRUISE OF THE OLD ADAMS. 

Our next cruise in the Adams was toward the English coast. 
We calculated to pick up something along there worth having. 
Our route lay close by a part of the British shore. Sometimes 
we came near enough to distinguish the inhabitants, as thef 
stood looking at u^. An Enghsh razee gave us chase from 
this quarter. But we showed her our heels very quick, and 
were clear of her in a 3hort time. But.it cost us something to 
do it. We parted company, on the occasion, with some of out 
old friends, the guns and anchors. One of the former, I re- 
niember, was so large that I could put my head in the muzzle, 
3.nd move it quite easily around. The water was let off pretty 
freely,, also, in the chase, until we were fairly out of sight. 

We steered due North for several days, spreading all the §all 
we could carry, until the atmogphere at night was almost as 
light as it was by day. The wind blew §0 fresh, that we 
carried away our main top gallant yard. But we spliced it 
immediately, and pushed on. The ship sailed remarkably well j 
but she trembled very much when we carried sail heavy. One 
peculiarity qf the Adams was that she seldom rose much with 
the waves, she generally ploughed directly through them, cutting 
her watery path in a lather of foam. 1 pever saw the like be^ 
fore nor since>. ,' 

We now tfKJked, ^bcI stoodj towards Quebec. Here we fell 
in wilb sevelifal irietchantmen, some of which became our 
prizes. We destroyed them— probably as many as fifty in all, 
Ckie we met was deeply loaded with fur and lumber, bound t^ 
London for the merchants there. We changed her destination 
very materially. It was singular that the first mate of thia 
vessel was the second mate of the Bast Indiaman we took aa 
the coast of Africa. 

We were all the time hearing j as w<e heard from this 
Londoner, that our vessels "were escaping frb*i \h^ on«my, by 



7^E Ldis POQK Of A HAN-OF-WAR'^ MAN. 43 

B^e^s of their superior s?dlir|g. This is what gave us such 
j^vantage during ihe last war j and it is th^^t gives America 
merchantmeii, aad especially American packet ships, the ad- 
vantage in commerce now. As a general thing, say what you 
will, the Yankee vessels are the swiftest sailers in the worli. 

While pursuing an English ^hopnpr on this coast, we came 
very n^ar getting on th^ Isle of Holt, a dangerous place, in any 
climate, bvit especially so on the Canada shore, and in the dead 
pf wiqtef. We ran so close to th^ rocks that we could ^ee 
them wjthiu a few feet of us, and quite too $oon for ovur 
pleasure hear4 the noise of the Roaring Bull — a tremendous 
pijfi of ledges, where the tide and waves make a deep, sullen, 
roaring noise, like that of an angry bull. We thought it 
vas just the place for Englishmen. We could here jump off 
Qur bowsprit on the shore, but concluded not to try it. Jn 
t^pking ship, to go around the island, we struck hard, and the 
(y:y arose, ** We're all lost! " But we soon backed her off; 
%nd, a piece of tarred canvass, drawn tight under the bottom, 
repaired all damages. 

Our next place of destination was Portland, Maine ; but, in 
consequence of some mistake, we arrived at Castine, in that 
fitate. We soon found the enemy were in hot pursuit of us, 
^nd took a pilot up the Penobscot river. We were resolved to 
place ourselves as far out of the reach of a superior force as 
possible, and then fight our way through to the last moment. 

In passing up the river, several of us vwere left in ambusfe 
op an island toward the mouth. Here we had it in pur power 
to watch, unobserved, the motions of the British, while we could 
i^a^sily communicate with our own forces. The ship's cook was 
left with us, and we had plenty of provisions; but after all, it 
was a dreary place. One of our men was suddenly taken sick, 
fuid died. He met his end with great fortitude; but it was 
melancholy to see him die there in that desolate spot. We 
sat in silence around him, as he lay pillowed in the arms of 
one of his shipmates. The only sound that mingled with his 
dying groans was the dull wash of the waves as they rolled in 
at our feet. No sheltering roof was over the head of the 
departing sailor. No mother, no father, no friend of all his 
kindred, was nigh to wipe his clammy temples, or listen to or 
bear back to his home the last words that fell from his quiver- 
ing lips. But we did all we could for him ; and when he was 
dead, falling back stiffly and heavily on the ground, we took 
him gently up, and laid him in the boat for his bier. There 
he was, a noble, manly fellowj a pale corpse, on a thaught in 



44 THE LOG BOOK OF A HAN-OF-WAR's MAN. 

the little bark he had helped to row through -the waves for 
many a day. His face was turned toward the sky that he had 
watched so often from the bosom of the mighty deep, and his 
stalwart limbs were stretched out cold and stiff by the oars he 
had gallantly handled. 

There was not earth enough, on that rocky little island, to 
bury our shipmate, and, besides, we thought it would be more 
becoming to lay him down in the sea. We sewed him up in a 
piece of canvass, with a large bowlder at his feet, and rowed 
out. with him into the open ocean. Here was our burial scene. 
We had no hearse, no funeral ^procession, no tolling bell, no 
mitred priest. The sky was the dome of our sanctuary, and 
the surrounding waves sent up through their watery aisles a 
solemn chant to the memory of our comrade. We had but one 
officer with us on the island — a surgeon's mate. He accom- 
panied us in the boat to the burial ; and when we placed the 
wet thaught over the stern, with the body of the sailor laid out 
upon it, a word from him gave us the only service that con- 
signed his remains to the deep. It was a gentle plunge that he 
made ; and each shipmate bent over the boat to watch him as 
he sank down to his appropriate grave. 

By command of Captain Morris, we held intercourse with 
the mainland, and ascertained the best location for the ship. It 
was the opinion of the inhabitants that the safest spot would 
be opposite Camden, several miles up the river. Castine was 
then very much exposed to the enemy, and it was more dif- 
ficult to obtain provisions there than at Camden. As soon as 
possible, the Adams was moored at the latter place, and armed 
for the best defence that could be made. This was on Wednes- 
day night. On Thursday morning the English sent us this in- 
sulting message : 

** We will come and help you heave your ship out. for we 
are going to Bangor to breakfast." 



45 



CHAPTER IX. 



BURNING OF THE ADAMS. 

On the morning of the Saturday previous to the burning of 
the Adams, several companies of troops came in from the sur- 
rounding country. They wanted guns, and ammunition, to 
aid us in defending the vessel ; but it was the opinion of the 
officers that the English were afraid to come up. Thursday 
had passed, and they had not yet taken their breakfast in Ban- 
gor. 

But we were mistaken. Scarcely had Captain Morris spoken 
on the subject than a large fleet of the enemy's boats hove in 
sight. The spy glass of Captam Morris was instantly at his 
eye. They came rounding the point nearest us, firing with all 
their force. We returned the compliment as soon as we could 
reach them with our guns, dashing two of their boats to pieces. 

The people now gathered in great numbers on the banks ; 
but it was in vain to attempt to save the ship, unless we could 
get off the boats before they reached her. They were bent on 
reachifig Bangor ; and our only hope was in repelling them by brave single 
combat, before they could crowd all ,their forces on the decks of the Adams. 

An officer inquired : 

« Who will go into an ambush near the enemy ? *' 

A lar^e number of us volunteered immediately. As soon as we reached a 
spot near them on the shore, we opened a brisk fire on the boats, that took 
effect. The adjoining hills were now crowded with spectators. All was in- 
tense excitement. An old man who had been in the Revolution, shouldered 
his rusty musket, and crept beside me to the bank of the river, where we helped 
to keep the British nearest us at bay for a while. The old man prided himself 
on having been ** a Continentaller," and handled his weapon with the skill and 
efficiency of a man in the prime of life. His name was Benjamin Runnels. 

Soon after we reached the. ground I missed him, and discovered he had 
taken a position by a fence. He was lying in wait. 

" Uncle Ben,'' said I, ** what are you doing t " 

'* Doing? " he answered : "Just come here. See what they're about ! " 
His ambush commanded a full view of both forces — American and English. 



36 THE LOG BOOK OF A MANtOF-WAR's MAJEI^ 

clearing away, and dressing up, and walking about, and making 
siffnals, that I sighed for the unrestrained station I had just left# 
All was done, however, that could be, to make my situation 
as pleasant as could be expected in such a lul^berly craft as a 
gun-boat. Our gunner, who was a Turk taken in the Algerine 
war, tried his best to render me contented. But it was of no use. 
I loved one inch of the broad sweep of the decks, or tops, or- 
yards of a frigate, more than all the hull of these lumbering, black 
crafts. 

The Lieutenant was mortified at my dislike to promotion, and 
even went so far as to threaten to stop my grog, and then to flog 
me if I asked for it ! In revenge for this, my plan was to intox- 
icate myself that I might be broken, on purpose. But they over- 
looked this folly in me, and I returned to my duty again. 

It was not long before we dropped down the Potomac to the 
mouth of the Wecomico. Here lay the two gun-boats, the Scor- 
pion and Asp. We saw two large ships off the nearest point, and 
made instant preparations for a chase. The Asp could not ge 
out the harbor, on account of the wind, and Lieutenant Reed 
n>ade signals foir her to go further ap. But it was too late. The 
enemy sent their boats to her, four barges, filled with men, who 
captured her, after a gallant defence. Lieutenant Stickney was 
wounded, and laid heJpless on the quarter deck. He had jttst 
strength enough to cry out : 

'' Men ! don t let them come aboard ! Never give up to them ! '' 
This order was heard by the English, who blew his brains out as 
soon as they reached the decks. Six of the crew immediately 
swam ashore. They were fired on repeatedly, but not a shot hit 
them. The British oflScers stood in their boats cheering their 
crews as they fired. 

On possessing themselves of the vessel, the Engfish resolved 
to burn her. For this purpose they thrust a match into a bucket 
of tar. But it was a very foolish way to do it. If they had 
emptied the tar on the deck, and set fire to it there, the work would 
have been quickly and surely done.. As it was, the bucket was a 
long time burning before the fire reached the vessel, and then it 
only blazed up against the foremast and one of the sails. The 
inhabitants saw the fire, and as the enemy had gone, they came 
on board and extinguished it. 

That night, a part of the crew of the Adams went down the 
Potomac to return the A^p. We found both the Scorpion and 
Asp stem and stern, out of harni^s way. Our spirits rose with 
the discovery; and having rowed and toiled all night to reach 
the spot, we gave up to the temptation to recreate a little. For 
this, one of the sailors was lashed to the rigging, which incensed 



THE too BOOK OP A MAW-OF-WAft's if AN. 37 

him very much. He said he had rather take a thousand flog- 
gings, than be tied up so, like a slave. So thoroughly was 
the spirit of this tar roused within him, that he actually gnawed 
off* the ropes that bound him ! An attempt to re-bind his hmbs, 
was followed by a threat that he would drown himself in the riv- 
er, rather than submit! Seizing an eighteen pound shot in both 
hands, he sprang over the sides of the vessel, and was rapidly sink- 
ing, when an expert swimmer dived for him, and brought him up 
by the hair of his head. 

But an interview with the Captain soon settled the matter. 
The sailor was a favorite; and a^ the Commander saw him enter 
the cabin, wet and dripping, his generous nature returned the 
ofi^ender with a short rebuke. This, however, might not have 
been the eric). Such are the Naval rules — so dearly does the 
national law prize the life of our humblest sailor-— that if that man 
'had drowned, the officers concerned must. have been tried for 
their lives. . 

Our gun-boats kept cruising up and down the Potomac, in 
quest of the! vessels of the enemy. But we met with nothing 
worthy our ieittention. A coupFe of privateers from Baltimore 
met near us, and each supposing th4 other to be an enemy, both 
commenced firing. Three broadsides were given, and several 
men wounded, before the mistake was discovered. 



4d 

q)ened his eyes with the hroadest astonishment, having just come in from the 
woods. 

** How far is it to the main road ? " I inquired. 

" A mile and a quarter," said he, ** to where they ford the stream." 

Here was where I supposed the crew of the Adams to be, and I wa« 
anxious to join them. 

«* What will you give for ray musket, my man ? " said I. My arms were 
weary with carrying it, and I knew I should need all it would bring. But I 
eould not trade with the gentleman, tie was evidently not much acquainted 
with the article, nor much interested in the demand f6r it then in the market. 

On the banks, I could now see the enemy passing up the river, and hear 
them firing on the inhabitants. We heard that there were five hundred ' 
English troops then on the way to Belfast. Could we have obtained the 
recruits we expected from Portsmouth, we would have been able to keep the 
enemy at a much more respectful distance. 

All that day another sailor and myself travelled together. We did not reach 
the remainder of the crew until afterwards. Our rest was but little at the best. 
Occasionally a farmer invited us in, and gave us milk ; but I found the eight 
dollars for which I sold my gun, were very convenient Those of the men we 
overtook were in distress, some from being wounded in defence of the country, 
others from fatigue. Had it not been for my desire to aid these brave ship- ' 
mates, I should have carried my trusty friend, the musket, home with me, 
and left it as a memorial of the war with my old father. Others had thrown 
theirs away, sailor-like ; and even some of the officers had been so thoughtleae 
as thus to expose themselves and their men to the necessities of hunger. 

The gentlest caution was necessary. The enemy had landed at different 
points, and surrounded us on all sides. Hence the necessity of findings a 
spot where we could concentrate, arm ourselves anew, and prepare to expel * 
the invaders. 

I saw several instances of jthe chances of war. When the British were . 
nearest to the bank of the Penobscot, several people clustered around me for 
defence. They saw I was armed. Although the English fired freely into 
oar ranks, yet we stood our ground, and not one of us was wounded. But a 
countryman who was frightened, and run and hid beside an adjoining house, 
was instantly killed ! 

But 1 must close up these " Stray Leaves," with the promise of giving more 
to the public before long. I have a great variety of authentic facts stowed 
away in my locker, and they shall be forthcoming in due time and order.. 






44 

the little bark he had helped to row through -the waves for 
many a day. His face was turned toward the sky that he had 
watched so often from the bosom of the mighty deep, atnd his 
stalwart limbs were stretched out cold and stiff by the oars he 
had gallantly handled. 

There was not earth enough, on that rocky little island, to 
bury our shipmate, and, besides, we thought it would be more 
becoming to lay him down in the sea. We sewed him up in a 
piece of canvass, with a large bowlder at his feet, and rowed 
out. with him into the open ocean. Here was our burial scene. 
We had no hearse, no funeral -procession, no tolling bell, no 
mitred priest. The sky was the dome of our sanctuary, and 
the surrounding waves sent up through their watery aisles a 
solemn chant to the memory of our comrade. We had but one 
officer with us on the island — a surgeon's mate. He accom- 
panied us in the boat to the burial ; and when we placed the 
wet thaught over the stern, with the body of the sailor laid out 
upon it, a word from him gave us the only service that con- 
signed his remains to the deep. It was a gentle plunge that he 
made ; and each shipmate bent over the boat to watch him as 
he sank down to his appropriate grave. 

By command of Captain Morris, we held intercourse with 
the mainland, and ascertained the best location for the ship. It 
was the opinion of the inhabitants that the safest spot would 
be opposite Camden, several miles up the river. Castine was 
then very much exposed to the enemy, and it was more dif- 
ficult to obtain provisions there than at Camden. As soon as 
possible, the Adams was moored at the latter place, and armed 
for the best defence that could be made. This was on Wednes- 
day night. On Thursday morning the English sent us this in- 
sulting message : 

" We will come and help you heave your ship out. for we 
are going to Bangor to breakfast."