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Full text of "Old sporting prints"


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Old Sporting Prints 




SIR ROBERT WALPOLE WITH HOUNDS 

By John Wootloii 

From an Oi! Paiiitiitir in the possession of the Earl of Orford 



Connoisseur Extra .Number. 



OLD SPORTING 

PRINTS 



by 

Ralph Nevill 



LONDON: 
Published by 

THE CONNOISSEUR MAGAZINE 

CARMELITE HOUSE, E.G. 
19 08 






Eire Cranforti ^rcss 

GEO. FULMAN AND SONS, LTD. 
LONDON AND WEALDSTONE. 



Ni^- 



To 

Sir Walter Gilbey, Bart., 

the greatest living authority on 

Enghsh Sporting Pictures and Prints, 

this book is dedicated by 

Ralph Nevill. 



CONTENTS. 

PAGE. 

List of Illustrations ' - - - - - 10 

Old Sporting Prints - - ' - ' - 15 

List of Exceptionally Attractive Prints - - - - 67 

A Record of the Principal Sporting Prints Sold by Auction, 

1901-1908 - - ' - ' - 72 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

Sir Robert Walpole. By John ]Vootton ... ... ... ... ... Frontispiece 

Pyrrhus the First (Winner of the Derby, 1846). By Hacker, after J. F. Herring, Sen. ... ... 13 

Orlando (Winner of the Derby, 1844). By Hacker, after J. F. Herring ... ... ... 13 

Fox Hunters. By Henry Aiken ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 14 

Charging an Ox-fence. Published by Humphreys, 181 J... ... ... ... ... 14 

The Leap. By Henry Aiken ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 22 

Topping a Flight of Rails and coming well into the Next Field. Published by Humphreys, J81 J ... 22 

Mounting. By Rowlandson ... ... ... ,.. ... ... ... 21 

A Country Racecourse. By T. Jenkins, after W. .Mason ... ... ... ... 21 

Water Colour Drawing. By Cooper Henderson ... ... ... ... ... 27 

The Death of the Fox. By Howitt ... ... ... ... ... ... 27 

Mrs. Thornton's Race at York, August, 1804 ... ... ... ... ... 28 

The Stag Taking Soil. After Wootton. ... ... ... ... ... ... 28 

Carriage Match against Time, Run at Newmarket ... ... ... ... ... 33 

The Chase. By N eagle, after J. N . Sartorius and Peltro ... ... ... ... 33 

Attila. Winner of the Derby, 1842. By Engleheart, after Laporte... ... ... ... 34 

Cotherstone. Winner of the Derby, 1843. By Hacker, after H. Aiken ... ... ... 34 

Little Wonder. Winner of the Derby, 1840. By Beckwith, after F. C. Turner ... ... 39 

Coronation. Winner of the Derby, 1841. By Beckwith, after F. C.Turner ... ... ... 39 

Merry Monarch. Winner of the Derby, 1845. By Hacker, after J. F. Herring ... ... 40 

Cossack. Winner of the Derby, 1847. By Hacker, after Harry Hall ... ... ... 40 

Fencing Match between Mademoiselle La Chevaliere d'Eon de Beaumont and Monsieur de Saint 

George, 1787. By J. M. Picot, after Robincau ... ... ... ... ... 45 

Oil Painting. By Francis Sartorius ... ... ... ... ... ... 46 

The Grosvenor Hunt. By Stubhs ... .. ... ... ... ... 46 

The Check ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 51 

The Brothers Fermor hunting in Aynho Park. By F. Sartorius ... ... ... ... 51 

The Cheshire Hunt. By T. Ferneley ... ... ... ... ... ... 52 

"The Death." By N eagle, after J . N. Sartorius and Peltro ... ... ... ... 52 

The Raby Pack. By W. Ward, after H. B. Chalon ... ... ... ... ... 61 

Cockfighting. By Zoffany ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 61 

The "Eagle " Paris and Dover Coach. By Aiken, after G. Tregeen ... ... ... 62 

Bloomsbury. Winner of Derby, 1839. By Beckwith, after F. C. Turner ... ... ... 62 

Newmarket Races. By James Pollard ... ... ... ... ... Colourplate 

Ascot Heath Races. By James Pollard ... ... ... ... ... „ 

Goodwood Grand Stand. Preparing to Start. By R. G. Reeve, after J. Pollard ... „ 

Epsom Grand Stand. The Winner of the Derby Race. By R. G. Reeve, after J. Pollard „ 

Race for the Great St. Lcger Stakes, 1836. Approbation — Off in good Style. By J. Harris, 

after J. Pollard ... ... ... ... ... ... ...Colourplate 

Race for the Great St. Leger Stakes, 1836. Anticipation — Who is the Winner ? By J. Harris, 

after J. Pollard ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Colourplate 

Epsom Races. By Smart and Hunt, after J. Pollard ... ... ... ... „ 

Racing. /. Clark after, H. Aiken ... ... ... ... ... „ 

Training. By G. Hunt, after J. Pollard ... ... ... ... ... „ 

Weighing. By Rowlandion ... ... ... ... ,,. ... „ 

10 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS— ro«/i';n/<!rf. 



The Brighton Mail. After H. Alhen 

The Birmingham Mail near Aylesbury. Dy R. Huvell, after U. Aiken 

The Bruce Passing tlie Pcveril Coach and Manchester Mail. By R. Ilavell, after H. Alhen 

The Devonport Mail near Amesbury. By R. Havel!, after H. Aiken 

The Holyhead and Chester Mails. By R. Havell, after H. Aiken ... 

The Liverpool Mail near St. Albans. By R. Havell, after H. Aiken 

Coach and Six. After T. Rowlandson 

Approach to Christmas. By George Hunt, after fames Pollard 

Stage Coach. By Dubourg, after J. Pollard ... 

Mail Coach in a Flood. By F. Rosenberg, after fames Pollard 

The Oxford and Opposition Coaches. IF. Havell 

Royal Mail Coach. By R. Havell, after fas. Pollard 

The Last Hour of a Contested Election for M.P. By R. Havell, aflcr fas. Pollard 

Four in Hand. By f. Gleadah, after fames Pollard 

Eclipse. After George Stubbs, R. A. 

Gladiator. By f. R. Mackrell, after J. F. Herring, Sen. 

Hermit. Winner of the Derby Stakes at Epsom, 1867. By W. Summers, after Harry Hull 

Hunting Scene. After Ben Marshall 

Fox Hunting ;" Taking the Lead." After Henry Aiken 

Fox Hunting :" Leaping the Brook." After Henry Aiken 

Fox Hunting: " The First Over." After Henry Aiken ... 

A First Rate Workman of Melton. After Henry Aiken... 

Duke of Wellington and Hodge. After Henry Aiken ... 

Game Keepers. By Henry Birclic, after George Stubbs, R.A., and Amos Green... 

To the Society of Goffers at Blackhcath. By V. Green, after L. F. Abbott ... 



Colourplale 





PYRRHUS THE FIRST. WINNER OF THE DERBY, 1^46 
Bv Hacker, after J. F. Herring, Sen. 




ORLANDO. WINNER OF THE DERBY, ltS44 
By Hacker, after y . F. Herring 



13 




FOX HUNTERS 
Bv Henry Aiken 




CHARGINC; AN OX-FENCE 
Published by Hnmphreys, 1SI1 



14 



OLD SPORTING PRINTS. 

YEAR by year old sporting prints are being accorded a larger 
measure of public appreciation. Considered in the past as 
little more than appanage of the passage and smoking-room 
they have for some time past been rising in general estima- 
tion and price, collectors paying comparatively large sums for good 
examples of this pleasant and animated form of pictorial art. 
To-day, many not sportsmen themselves or addicted to hunting, 
shooting, or racing, are included amongst the admirers of these 
old-world scenes, a number of which so vividly recall the full- 
blooded and robust life of a former generation, which in its 
amusements and habits differed so greatly from our own. 

As a rule, attracting a glance even from those most indifferent to 
prints, these representations of the sportsman of the past in the 
hunting-field and by the covert side, possess a great deal of old- 
world charm. Here also may be seen the bucks of astounding 
costume, eager with excitement, amidst the rough and tumble of 
some country race-course or equipped in more workmanlike fashion 
piloting some good chaser over the fences of an impromptu 
steeplechase. 

England at the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the 
nineteenth centuries was a sporting country in a different sense 
from to-day. The majority of hunting men, for instance, were 
squires who lived on their estates, a number of whom were well 
known as characters throughout the countryside. Hunting, with 
them, amounted occasionally to a sort of religion, and was not 
merely a pastime indulged in for purposes of relaxation and health. 
At the Gargantuan feasts, in which they delighted, songs in praise 
of the chase were much in vogue, whilst sporting toasts were drunk 
in bumpers amidst somewhat Bacchanalian shouts of enjoyment. 
A full-blooded jolly lot, not a few of them hardly visited London at 
all, being well content to live and die amidst the rural surroundings 
which they loved so well. The artistic tastes of this class were 
naturally limited, but they admired and liked striking representa- 
tions of famous horses and hounds, whilst pictures of the incidents 
of a fox-chase, ending with an extremely spirited representation of 
the death of the fox, seldom failed to command their approbation. 

A curious feature in eighteenth century hunting pictures is that 
instead of the short horn used in England at the present time a 
curly French horn, such as is still used in France, is often depicted 
as being carried. A print by Howitt, reproduced in these pages, 
is a case in point, whilst a proof of the French hunting horn having 
been used by the Royal Buckhounds is afforded by the frontispiece 
of the first number of the Old Sporting Magazine which was 

15 



published in October, 1792. This shows the turning out of the 
deer for the Royal Hunt, a picture in which His Majesty, George 
III., is a conspicuous figure. With the dawn of the nineteenth 
century, the Fi-ench hunting horn appears to have fallen into 
disuse, and at the present day a great many sportsmen are unaware 
that the instrument in question was ever a part of the equipment 
of the chase in this island. 

Whilst sport in various forms is still an almost dominant factor 
in English life, it has assumed a somewhat different shape to that 
most popular in this country at the end of the eighteenth and 
beginning of the nineteenth centuries ; the rough brutal pastimes 
in which our forefathers indulged having ceased to exist. Bear 
and Bull baiting, Cock- and Dog- fighting are things of the past, 
whilst the so-called glories of the prize ring do not ever seem likely 
to be revived. 

Racing and hunting still flourish, though both are now sports 
appealing far more to the very rich than was the case in days 
gone by, when a spirit of unrestrained and somewhat rough merry- 
making held sway. 

The happy-go-lucky spirit of careless jollity so conspicuous in the 
scenes pictured by Rowlandson has now long departed, and 
humorous incidents are rare amongst the crowds who flock to 
witness great cricket matches or contests between professional 
football teams. The picturesque is out of place in modern life, 
where everything, more or less, is affected by rule or regulation. 

It is therefore but natural that old sporting prints, many of which 
are imbued with a spirit of vivacity and life, constitute a source of 
real attraction to those interested in a more individualistic past. 

In a number of these engravings it is possible to discern many 
of the quaint and original characters who were well known to a 
by-gone generation, whilst in others the somewhat robust humours 
of the old English racecourse are prominent, together with many 
quaint sidelights on the life of a vanished age. 

From these prints also can be reconstituted the travelling of 
past days, when the sound of the coach-horn enlivened many a 
country road, and the handling of the ribbons was an accomplish- 
ment at which many well-known sportsmen loved to shine. 

In certain of these old prints we may witness great fights, the 
result of which was eagerly awaited throughout the country, whilst, 
if in a more serious mood, the burial of Tom Moody is there to 
claim our attention, the dying request of the old huntsman that six 
earth stoppers should give three rattling view-halloos in farewell, 
having been duly carried out, and the scene pictured by Dean 
Wolstenholme. 

The school of artists which devoted its energies to the 
delineation of subjects of sport and the portrayal of animal life 
was essentially British in character, being in a very great measure 
dominated by the influence of George Stubbs, who was the first 
English animal painter to seek inspiration direct from nature. 
Previous to his day, nearly all pictures of the horse were painted 

16 



from the eye alone, the anatomy and muscular system of the horse 
being more or less ignored. 

As early as the eighteenth century there was in England a 
great demand for pictures of horses and dogs. An old-time writer 
in 1755 describes the sporting art of his day thus : "As soon as 
a racehorse has acquired some fame, they have him immediately 
drawn to the life. This, for the most part, is a dry profile, but 
in other respects bearing a good resemblance. They generally 
clap the figure of some jockey or other upon his back, which is 
but poorly done." 

It was at this time that John Wootton, the great English animal 
painter, furnished the aristocracy of his day with pictures of their 
favourite horses and hounds. Amongst his patrons was Sir 
Robert Walpole for whom the portrait (now for the first time 
reproduced, as the frontispiece to this volume) was executed. A 
large number of hunting pieces, some of which were engraved, 
were produced by Wootton, whose reputation being great, was 
wont to obtain comparatively large prices for his works. 

The portrait of Sir Robert was given by him to Dr. Ranby, one 
of the Court Physicians, with the words, " Here, Ranby, is my 
likeness." The costume is that of Master of the King's Stag- 
hounds, the scenery Windsor Forest. Sir Robert's favourite 
terrier lies at his feet. 

It may be mentioned that at Orford House, two miles from 
Elsenham, a picture by Wootton, in a panel frame, is over one of the 
mantelpieces. The work of this painter was very popular with 
the sporting squires and nobility of his time, and whilst much of 
it was admirable, he painted for those who were not too critical 
in artistic matters. 

The patrons of Wootton were not as a rule people who had 
any knowledge of art or were possessed of much natural taste. 
For the most part the hard riding, drinking and swearing top- 
booted gentry of the day required a coloured chart of a horse, 
with all his good points displayed as in a diagram, rather than a 
picture, which at the same time should be a work of art. 

An especially curious picture by Wootton met with destruction 
at the burning of the Pantechnicon many years ago. This repre- 
sented Sir Robert Walpole out hunting, a feature being the tame 
magpie which used to go out with his hounds. This may be 
verified from a sketch in the possession of the present Earl of 
Orford, to whom the beautiful full-length portrait of Sir Robert also 
belongs. As will be observed, this possesses considerable artistic 
merit, being a specimen of the work of this artist at his best. 

Sir Walter Gilbey, it may be added, possesses a picture of Sir 
Robert standing by his hunter, painted by Wootton, together with 
other works from his brush. 

George Stubbs, A.R.A., the successor of Wootton as a painter 
of animals, was born, the son of a surgeon, in 1724. His Anatomy 
of the Horse, which was published in 1776, attracting some atten- 
tion, Stubbs very soon became the fashionable horse painter of 

17 



his day, but his natural talent was too great to allow him to be 
satisfied with merely depicting horses in the mechanical lay figure 
style which so fully answered the requirements of the sportsmen 
of that time. Possessing a sound knowledge of anatomy, Stubbs 
never ceased to study, and went in a great deal for dissection ; 
once, it is said, even carrying a dead horse on his back up a 
narrow staircase to his dissecting room. Though a man of great 
muscular strength this feat is difficult to credit. The animal was 
in all probability merely a small pony. Stubbs's works were 
engraved by Woollett, Earlom and Green. 

A peculiarly attractive engraving, it may be added, executed by 
Woollett after Stubbs, is that of the Spanish Pointer, which shows 
a typical English landscape undulating in the background. The 
print in question, which is uncoloured, is by no means common, 
especially in the proof state, though ordinary impressions can be 
obtained for something between six and eight pounds. 

With regard to the A natomy of the Horse, by Stubbs, it should 
always be remembered that the plates in the original edition, 
published in 1766, alone are worthy of attention, those appearing in 
subsequent issues being very inferior. The failure of Stubbs to 
secure the services of an engraver caused him to undertake the 
task himself and during a period of from six to seven years all his 
spare time was given to this work. 

A man of quite unusual bodily vigour, this artist retained his 
activity to the end of his life. He was a pedestrian of no mean 
powers, and walked eight or nine miles the day before his death, at 
the age of seventy nine, in 1806. 

In 1790, George Stubbs was offered £9,000 for a series of 
portraits of famous English racehorses, but the outbreak of war 
with France brought the series to a premature conclusion 
when only sixteen portraits had been executed. These were, 

(I) The Godolphin Arabian; (2) Marske, the sire of Eclipse; 
(3) Eclipse; (4) Dungannon ; (5) Volunteer; (6) Gimcrack ; (7) 
Mambrino ; (8) Sweetbriar ; (9) Sweet William; (10) Protector; 

(II) Shark (12) Baronet; (13) Pumpkin; (14) Bandy; (15) 
Gnawpost ; and (16) Anvil. The portrait of the Godolphin 
Arabian had been intended to form the frontispiece of the work. 
These sixteen pictures were exhibited at the Turf Gallery 
in Conduit Street in 1794. Afterwards they were engraved by 
George Townley Stubbs, the plates being of practically uniform 
size, and published in accord with the original design. Eleven 
plates of racehorses in colour after Stubbs by G. T. Stubbs were 
sold at auction some years ago for eleven guineas. 

A painter of racehorses and sporting scenes who had a 
considerable reputation in his day was James Seymour, a con- 
temporary of Wootton. 

Seymour, who had originally been endowed with an ample 
fortune, dissipated it upon the Turf, and became a professional 
painter of equine portraits from necessity, receiving commissions 
from most of the prominent sportsmen of his day. His principal 

18 



patron was Sir William Jolliffe, for whom, amongst other pictures, 
he painted two portraits of Flying Childers, another of the same 
famous horse being executed to the order of the Duke of Devon- 
shire, an engraving of which by John Scott appeared in the Sporting 
Magazine of 1813. In Sir Walter Gilbey's collection is an 
interesting work of Seymour's, Race at Newmarket {4th April, 
1731), whilst a smaller picture by this artist. The Old Weighing 
House at Newmarket, is also at Elsenham. For the Duke of 
Queensberry, "Old Q," known late in life as "the Star of Piccadilly," 
James Seymour painted a representation of his famous carriage 
match. The picture in question, which bears the names of the 
horses and riders, only passed out of the Queensberry collection 
in 1897, when it was sold at Christie's. It is now said to be in the 
possession of Lord Rosebery. 

"Old Q" late in life became a sort of tolerated West End 
scandal, his eccentricities originating a number of tales and 
witticisms, many of which wei'e fantastic in the extreme. A 
curious work was published about him in 1808, which was called 
"The Piccadilly Ambulator, or Old Q [ueensberry] , containing 
Memoirs of the Private Life of that Ever-green Votary of Venus, 
by T. P. Hurstone" (2 vols.). As a younger man the Duke (then 
Earl of March) had been a great frequenter of Newmarket and a 
rather successful patron of the Turf, displaying considerable 
shrewdness in the wagers on which he embarked. 

In 1750 he made a wager of 1,000 guineas with Count O'Taafe 
(an Irish gentleman also notorious for his bets and oddities) that a 
carriage with four wheels could be devised capable of being drawn 
at the rate of not less than 19 miles within an hour. The machine 
for this match was built by Wright, of Long Acre, who exhausted 
all the resources of his craft to diminish the weight and friction as 
much as possible. In order to ensure lightness combined with 
strength, the harness was of quite a novel kind, silk being 
employed, artfully combined with leather. Four blood-horses of 
approved speed were next selected, with two grooms of small weight 
and tried skill to manage them. A course one mile in length was 
marked out at Newmarket, and after some trials, in which several 
horses are said to have been killed, the match was fixed to be run 
on August 29th, 1750. Bets amounting to several thousands of 
pounds depended on the result, but those who had wagered that 
the feat could not be performed lost their money, for the carriage 
was drawn over the appointed distance well within the hour. 
Three of the four horses which drew the machine had won plates. 
The two leading ones carried, including jockey, saddle and harness, 
about eight stone each, the wheel horses about seven, and the 
chaise with the boy that rode in it weighed about twenty-four stone. 

The picture of this match, to which reference has been made, is 
said to have given a very fair idea of a sporting incident which 
attracted a great deal of attention. It was engraved many years 
later by J. Bodger, who inserted the following notice in the Racing 
Calendar of 1788:— 

19 



" On or before the 1st March will be published A Print (in 
colours, from nature), executed in Bartolozzi's style of engraving. 
Honoured with the patronage of His Royal Highness the Prince of 
Wales, Noblemen and Gentlemen, members of the Jockey Club, 
etc., y. Bodger (land surveyor, Stilton, Hunts., and at 53 High 
Holborn) presents his dutiful respects to the nobility and gentry, 
and acquaints them that, at the request of many of his friends, he 
promises to publish by subscription a Print, as a companion to that 
of Twenty-four Courses, &c., on Newmarket Heath, representing 
His Grace the Duke of Queensberry's Carriage Match, with which 
will be given a particular account of the match, and the names of 
the horses and riders. 

"The circumstances of the horses running away with their 
riders and carriages will be expressed in the Print, in passing by 
the King's Gap, from which place a new and picturesque landscape 
of the Heath, Beacon Hills, Upper and Lower Hare Parks, Four- 
mile Stables, and Choke Jade will be given ; and a perspective 
view of horsemen and carriages coming over the B.C. Embellished 
with a section of the carriage ; and, by particular desire, a repre- 
sentation of two horses going to run a trial. Also a Morning 
scene and an Auction Sale of Horses at the Coffee-house Gates, 
Newmarket. 

" Conditions. 

" (1) The size of the Plate will be 27 inches by 18 inches. 

" (2) Price to subscribers for Prints of the horses, etc., in 
colours from Nature, one guinea; in black, 10s. 6d. Subscribers 
to have the first impressions. 

(The print was also sold printed on silk, £1 5s.) 

" The size of the horses, riders, and carriages is taken from the 
original painting by Mr. Seymour, now in the possession of the 
Duke of Queensberry, to whom the Print, by His Grace's 
permission, will be dedicated. 

"An impression showing the present state of the Plate may be 
seen at Mr. Weatherby's, No. 7, Oxendon Street; also, by Mr. 
Bray, at Messrs. Tattersall's, London ; at the Coffee-house, 
Newmarket; Mr. Monk, Chester; Mr. Harrop, Manchester; 
Mr. S. Hodgson, Newmarket; Mr. Tesseyman, York, and Mr. 
Smith, Oxford, of whom may be had prints, in colours, of twenty- 
four Courses, etc., and an emblem of a Sweepstakes coming in on 
Newmarket Heath, on which are given chronological memorandums 
of many extraordinary riding performances, as well as an Historical 
Account of the Races and the Devil's Ditch." 

Bodger also executed an engraving of another picture by 
Seymour which was entitled. Map of Newmarket Heath. This 
was published in 1791, and shows a plan of all the different courses 
and exercising grounds upon the Heath, the situation of starting 
and winning post as well as the stands. At the bottom is an oval 
medallion containing a representation of the finish of a race, whilst 
historical accounts of the chief matches, dates and details of the 

20 




MOUNTING. By Rinolandsoii . 




A COUNTRY RACECOURSE 
By T. Jenkins, after W. Mason 



21 




THE LEAP 
Br Henrv A Ike 




TOPPING A FLIGHT OF RAILS AND COMING WELL INTO THE NEXT FIELD 
Published bv Humphreys, ISII 



22 



annual meetings and the Royal Plates are also to be seen. This 
print, which, like the Carriage Match was printed upon silk as 
well as paper, was published at the same price. 

Yet another print published in the same year by Bodger, after 
Seymour, is entitled View of the Noblemen's and gentlemen's 
trains of running horses with the grooms and horses in their full 
liveries taking up their exercise up the Warren Hill, East of the 
Town of Newmarket. This was dedicated to the Prince of 
Wales, whose arms are inscribed upon the engraving. It is a 
print of great interest, abounding in character. A conspicuous 
feature is the high four-wheeled gig drawn by six grey horses, the 
four first driven from the box seat, the leaders ridden by a post 
boy. The Prince is in a carriage on the left with the Princess 
by his side, her high hat being trimmed with feathers. In the 
background is seen a view of the town and Ely Cathedral, whilst in 
the distance a number of horses and jockeys complete the scene. 

Like the two prints previously described a number of impres- 
sions were taken upon silk. 

Amongst other hunting scenes Seymour painted a set of four 
pictures called Fox Hunting, which were engraved by J. Roberts. 
The huntsman on the grey horse going into cover, in the second of 
this series, is said to be a portrait of an old-world divine, the 
Reverend Mr. Penning, a clergyman, who was devoted to 
hunting. 

Of very independent spirit, this painter once administered a 
severe snub to the haughty Duke of Somerset with whom he had 
been staying for the purpose of painting portraits of his stud. 
The Duke, who had drunk Seymour's health, calling him Cousin 
Seymour, was very much offended at the latter claiming to be 
related to his family, and directed that the painter should be sent 
about his business, with the result that the equine portraits were 
left unfinished. Finding this exceedingly inconvenient, as no 
painter could be discovered equal to finishing the paintings in 
question, the Duke sent to Seymour asking him to return, receiving 
as answer the following disconcerting reply : 

" My Lord, I will now, by declining to come, prove to you that 
I belong to your Grace's family." 

Seymour drew exceedingly well, especially with the pen, and 
his delineations of horses are marked by much spirit and character. 
Unfortunately he was extremely lazy, and when he attempted to 
give more finish to his work his defects were very quickly apparent. 
From an artistic point of view the works of this painter are 
perhaps not worthy of any great esteem, but, as contributions to 
Turf history, they possess an undoubted value, owing to the light 
which they throw upon the manners and dress of a long-past age. 
By the art patrons of his own day Seymour was generally ranked 
as an artist far inferior to Wootton, who, however, it must be 
remembered, had been regularly trained for a painter's career. 

It is curious to recall that in 1825 John Scott etched the portrait 
of a racehorse, Old Partner, which had been painted by Seymour 

2S 



some hundred years before. A number of plates of racehorses, 
after Seymour, were also engraved by R. Houston. 

About the time of James Seymour's death in 1752 was born 
Thomas Gooch, who designed and engraved the agreeable set of 
coloured sporting prints which are known as The Life and Death 
of a Racehorse. The same artist appears to have painted more 
than one series of pictures dealing with the subject of an equine 
career. Gooch, whose particular specialities were portraits of 
horses and dogs, exhibited one set at the Royal Academy in 1783, 
whilst, in 1792, Jeffrey, of Pall Mall, published a folio volume con- 
taining, as the title page quaintly sets forth, "The Life and Death 
of a Racehorse, exemplified in his various stages of existence till 
his dissolution. The whole drawn and engraved in Aquatinta by 
Thomas Gooch, Esq." The titles of this set which Gooch himself 
engraved, differ considerably from those affixed to the pictures 
shown in the Academy. Another set of six engravings represent- 
ing the same subject was, it must be mentioned, published in 1790, 
but some doubt appears to prevail as to the originals from which 
these were taken. 

The Life and Death of a Racehorse should be in the posses- 
sion of every collector, the size and general appearance of 
the six prints rendering them especially suitable for decorative 
purposes. A good set it may be mentioned should be procurable 
for from £10 to £15. 

Not many of Gooch's pictures were engraved, whilst his career 
is enveloped in some obscurity, the exact date of his death 
being unknown. 

Amongst sporting painters of the eighteenth century the four 
artists who bore the name of Sartorius occupy a conspicuous place. 
John Sartorius, who was born at Nuremberg in 1700, is the first. 
His chief works were a portrait of the celebrated mare, Molly, 
and of the racehorses Looby, Old Traveller, and Careless. Besides 
these he painted many other pictures of horses, sending no 
fewer than sixty-two works to the exhibitions of the Free Society 
of Artists, which were held from 1761 to 1783. He died in 1780. 
Francis Sartorius, the son of John, was born in 1734 and learnt 
the art of painting from his father, with the result that he 
eventually became the most celebrated member of his family. 
Acknowledged as the fashionable horse painter of his day, he 
executed more portraits of famous racehorses during the latter 
part of the eighteenth century than any contemporary artist. 
Eclipse was one of his most favourite subjects. John June engraved 
some of his works between 1760 and 1770. 

In English country houses equestrian familj' portraits by Francis 
Sartorius are not infrequently to be found. At Aynho Park, 
Banbury, the beautiful seat of Mr. W. C. Cartwright, is a hunting 
piece representing three gentlemen, two of them the brothers 
Fermor, hunting in Aynho Park, whilst at Eridge Castle, Sussex, is 
a portrait of the grandfather of the present writer, painted when he 

24 



was a boy of thirteen, mounted upon a big horse, with a little 
dog gambolling in the foreground. This was executed in 1773. 

John N. Sartorius, son of Francis Sartorius, was born in 1755, 
and owing to the time in which he lived enjoyed advantages denied 
to his father and grandfather, whose opportunities for study had 
been somewhat limited. His pictures dealing with hunting, racing, 
shooting and other kindred sports, exhibit great animation and 
spirit, besides displaying signs of knowledge of the subjects dealt 
with. A frequent contributor to the Royal Academy from 1781 
to 1821, he exhibited there about seventy-four pictures. One of 
his best works is a portrait of Sir William Rowley, with hunt 
servants and some of his favourite hounds. He was a frequent 
contributor to the Sporting Magazine, and there are many engrav- 
ings from his works in the volumes published between 1795 
and 1827. A fine hunting scene, painted by John N. Sartorius, 
is The Death of the Fox, a picture which formerly hung in Carshalton 
Park, Surrey. John Scott engraved a good many of his composi- 
tions, but perhaps his most successful efforts were the six 
engravings in The Chase, to which is added Field Sports by William 
Somerville, Esq., published in 1817 by Sherwood, Neely and Jones. 
The eldest son of John N. Sartorius, John F. Sartorius also devoted 
his talents to the delineation of sporting subjects. He was not a 
very prolific artist, and during his life-time had to compete with his 
father, whose work was very much superior. It is probable that in 
many cases the latter assisted his son, and consequently several 
sporting pictures exist which cannot for certain be assigned to any 
particular one of the two. John Scott also engraved the works of 
John F. Sartorious, and it is impossible to say whether the plates 
in the Sporting Magazine, signed simply " Sartorius," are by father 
or son. 

An occasional exhibitor at the Royal Academy, where his pictures 
were sometimes refused by the Hanging Committee, one of his 
best works, shown in 1806, was Coursing in Hatfield Park, in which 
the famous Marchioness of Salisbury is a prominent figure. This 
lady, who was a very Diana of her day, established the Hatfield 
Hunt. A splendid and fearless rider, she continued to preside over 
its affairs up to the age of seventy, and even after this age rode 
in the park till she was eighty-six. In November, 1835, she met 
with a tragic end at Hatfield, being burnt to death through her 
cap catching alight from some candles on her writing-table. 

Though not essentially a sporting artist, Thomas Rowlandson 
executed a number of designs connected with sport, many of the 
watercolour sketches, which he dashed off with such facility, 
representing incidents connected with either the turf or the chase. 

It would however appear, from the numerous coloured prints after 
this artist, that the humourous and vivacious aspects of a 
sportsman's career appealed to him quite as much as sport itself. 
He executed quite a number of coloured prints of the same nature 
as those entitled The Huntsman Rising and The Gamester Going 
to Bed. 

25 



Born in 1756, when the world was not yet bitten with that love 
of uniformity, and the desire to reduce everyone and everything to 
a standard of dull and mediocre respectability, Thomas Rowlandson 
had little sympathy for the new conditions of life, which, during 
his old age, were beginning to make themselves felt. The change of 
dress and habits seem to have impaired his talents, for his later 
works can in no way compare with the brilliant sketches which, in 
his early period, he would dash off with such ease and facility. 
Towards the end of his life he became almost forgotten, and his 
death, in 1827, hardly aroused a languid comment. 

When at his best, no artist, perhaps, ever conveyed a better idea 
of the hot-headed young Englishman and the buxom laughing 
English lass of the late eighteenth century. Severity has no place 
in his work except to be a butt for the sallies of red-coated ensigns 
and roguish damsels. The England he loved was a very different 
country to that existing to-day, when it has become rather like a 
huge factory, with set hours of play for the operatives. The sight 
of some of Rowlandson's drawings, replete with full-blooded 
life and unrestrained gaiety, cannot fail to make a few of us 
sigh for times which, if perhaps not so orderly, were more 
natural and entertaining than the entirely commercial trend of the 
present age. 

Though many of the scenes pictured by Rowlandson are of a 
somewhat Bacchanalian character, the artist himself appears to 
have been a temperate man, the gaming table having appealed to 
him far more than the bottle. In this he differed from Gillray, who 
was a drunkard of a terrible description. In another respect also 
these artists were entirely different. Rowlandson, unlike Gillray, 
was never very severe towards the French. True is it that he 
executed several caricatures dealing with Napoleon, but none 
of them breathe that spirit of fierce hate which is so 
conspicuous in the work of his contemporary. For France, 
where he had received his education, he seems to have 
always kept a soft place in his heart, and no doubt the amusement 
and pleasure in which he had freely indulged whilst at Paris still 
lingered in his memorj^, and made him unwilling to make too 
fierce an attack upon a people with whom he had much in 
common. A hard, though not by any means a steady worker, the 
gaming-table absorbed most of the money which his reed pen 
brought to him, and the remainder was spent in entertaining that 
beauty of which he was such an ardent admirer. 

Original sketches by Rowlandson are very often to be picked up 
in out-of-the-way country towns, and occasionally very good ones 
may be met with, for whenever this artist went upon a journey it 
was his practice to make drawings along the way, and as his was 
an extremely roving disposition, he produced a good deal of work 
of this sort. 

Coloured drawings by this artist always command a good price, 
that is to say, if they have been done during his best period, which 
was, roughly speaking, between 1780 and 1810, though it must be 

26 




WATER COLCHR DRAWiNG 
By Conpt'y Ht-iitiirson 




THE DEATH OF THE FOX 
By Howilt 



27 




MRS. THORNTONS RACE AT YORK, Al^GLST, IS04 




THE STAG TAKING SOIL 
After Wootton 



28 



understood that his very best work was executed between a 
shorter time— 1780 and 1790. 

Many of his sketches of country towns, executed upon the spot, 
are quite delightful, and are still fairly easy to obtain. Nevertheless 
the very best are year by year becoming more rare. Characteristic 
scenes, showing well-known localities, should not be missed by any 
purchaser lucky enough to come across them. His book of coloured 
plates of London Volunteers, in a perfect condition, is worth a good 
deal of money, and there is little doubt but that, in a few years, it 
will increase in value, for examples of it are eagerly sought for by 
collectors. 

Should any of our readers come across a copy of Rowlandson's 
Imitations of Modern Drawings at a moderate price, let them secure 
it, and they may then see what extraordinary versatility the artist 
possessed. It is a folio volume of imitations of various masters, in 
which the imitator's own individuality is completely sunk in that of 
the artist whose style and mannerisms are travestied. 

Notwithstanding the undoubted talents of Rowlandson, it is not, 
however, everyone who appreciates his art. Of a free, careless, 
and somewhat extravagant disposition, he occasionally allowed 
himself to indulge in a license which is not to the taste of the 
present generation. Still there are many of his productions which 
must interest all who have any pretension to the possession of 
taste. His racing prints, for instance, are full of life and vigour, 
and will convey the idea of that robust vitality which was such a 
characteristic of English eighteenth-century life. A good example 
of his work in this style is the set of racing prints which made 
its appearance in 1789. Spirited and interesting, this set should 
not be overlooked when met with in a good condition. 

The six prints are Betting, Weighing, Mounting, Racing, Between 
Heats, and Running out of the Course. This series, which is to be ac- 
quired with comparative ease, affords a capital representation of the 
incidents of racing as they existed some hundred years ago. Row- 
landson, who was by nature more addicted to the pleasures of a town 
life than to rural sports, executed a good many sporting prints, but the 
greater number are practically caricatures, and are not very suitable 
for decorative purposes. Like Rowlandson, Morland dealt a good 
deal with sport, though somewhat indirectly. He was never, how- 
ever, an accurate animal portrait painter. But ill-grounded in 
anatomy, he was most successful in portraying those animals whose 
forms were most dissimulated by their covering, such as pigs, sheep, 
rabbits, etc. It was his practice, whenever he painted a horse, to 
choose an aged one, not so much, probably, on account of thinking it 
picturesque, but by reason of the salient points of its form, which 
lent itself well to his peculiar genius. Morland's boon companions 
were his models — in The Sportsman's Return, " Dirty Brooks," the 
cobbler, one of the artist's drinking cronies and agents, is depicted 
leaning out of his stall. 

Four fine sporting prints by Morland are a series of rare 
plates entitled Fox Hunting, which were engraved in colours by 

29 



E. Bell. The Lucky Sportsman, also in colours, engraved by F. D. 
Soiron, after the same artist, is another scarce print which in good 
condition realises somewhere about fifty pounds. The First of 
September — Morning and Evening — are an attractive pair of shooting 
prints by William Ward, after Morland, of which there are both 
coloured and uncoloured states. Other prints after Morland are : 
Partridge Shooting and Duck Shooting, by Charles Catton. Morning, 
Partridge Shooting, Pheasant Shooting, Snipe Shooting, Duck Shooting, 
and Evening ; a set of large oblong folio plates, chiefly etched by 
Rowlandson, aquatinta by S. Aiken, 1792. A set of these in colours 
commands something hke thirty pounds, whilst uncoloured impres- 
sions should be obtained for two or three guineas. 

A painter of sporting scenes whose style has some affinity to that 
of Rowlandson, was Samuel Howitt who married the sister of the 
latter, by whom he appears to have been very much influenced. 
Belonging to a family of Nottinghamshire Quakers, Howitt, who 
was originally possessed of independent means, took up his 
residence near Epping Forest, where the pursuit of field sports was 
his favourite occupation. His fortune however seems soon to 
have melted away, and finding himself in extremely straitened 
circumstances he became a drawing master at a school near Ealing, 
a post for which his artistic attainments, which had hitherto been 
only utilised for the purposes of amusement, fully qualified him. 

About 1783 he appears to have obtained recognition as a talented 
artist, for in that year he exhibited a hunting picture in the Royal 
Academy. Much of Howitt's best work was executed in water 
colours, while he excelled also both as an engraver and etcher. In 
1798 he contributed a certain number of engravings to Beckford's 
Thoughts on Hunting, whilst sixtj' illustrations in Oriental Field 
Sports, after Captain Williamson's designs, were his work. During 
his connection with the Sporting Magazine, Howitt engraved no fewer 
than 157 plates, whilst his productions in other quarters were also 
very large. As has before been said, this artist's style frequently 
shows a great resemblance to that of his brother-in-law 
Rowlandson, who, though a man of somewhat free life, appears to 
have been on terms of the closest intimacy with this artist of 
Quaker extraction. 

Amongst sporting artists of the eighteenth century, Sawrey 
Gilpin, R.A. must not be forgotten. Gilpin painted both in oil and 
water colours, but though his pictures display great spirit his 
colouring is poor, whilst their execution is deficient in the higher 
technical qualities. 

The famous Colonel Thornton, of Thornville Royal, was a friend 
and patron of this painter, who in 1793 painted for him The Death 
of the Fox, which was twice engraved eighteen years later by John 
Scott. One of the engravings it may be added was executed to 
serve as a companion print to The Fox breaking Cover, which Scott 
had engraved after Philip Reinagle. The pair of prints in question 
are amongst the best of the engraver's works. Ordinary impressions 
should be worth about £5, and proofs about double. 

90 



Amongst engraved portraits of racehorses after Sawrey Gilpin, 
Highflyer by F. Jukes, Jupiter and Sir Peter Teazle by W. Ward, 
are of some interest. An engraving of the last-named horse by 
John Scott, appeared in the Sporting Magazine for 1819. The 
portrait of Colonel Thornton's Jupiter, from which the print was 
taken, was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1792. Three 
pictures illustrative of incidents in Colonel Thornton's Sporting 
Tour through the Highlands are in the Elsenham Collection and are 
of great interest, being the work of three different artists. Sawrey 
Gilpin painted the animals, George Barrett the landscapes, whilst 
the portraits were by Philip Reinagle one of the most celebrated 
sporting artists of that day. 

A pupil of the Court Painter Allan Ramsay, Reinagle's work 
showed such a high degree of promise that Ramsay eventually 
appointed him as his assistant. On one occasion, it may be added, 
Reinagle was deputed by his principal (who had to go abroad for 
some time) to paint portraits of fifty pairs of Kings and Queens, the 
remuneration being ten guineas for each picture. On leaving the 
studio of Ramsay, the young painter seems to have entirely devoted 
his energies to portraiture, varied by the delineation of sporting 
subjects and landscape painting. Especially remarkable for his 
pictures of dogs, Reinagle made a particular study of what are now 
known as Clumber spaniels, which in his day were called " cock 
springers." Exhibiting two portraits of men in the Royal Academy 
of 1774, his first sporting contribution to this institution, of which 
he became an associate in 1787, was Dead Game. His Diploma 
picture on his election as an Academician in 1812, was An Eagle 
and Vulture disputing with a Hyena. Reinagle who continued to exhibit 
till 1832, showed altogether some hundred and thirty-eight pictures. 

In 1796 he painted, in collaboration with Sawrey Gilpin, a 
portrait of Colonel Thornton, in which that redoubtable sports- 
man is shown roebuck shooting in the Forest of Glencoe, with 
the only twelve-barrelled rifle ever made ; in the background is a 
keeper crouching with a dog. This was engraved by M. W. Bate, 
and published by H. Mutlow, of Russell Court, in 1810. Colonel 
Thornton was a great patron of Reinagle, who, in 1803, exhibited, at 
the Royal Academy, a portrait of a great tench caught by the 
Colonel, a view of Thornville Royal being included as a setting for 
the same. In the first volume of Colonel Thornton's " Travels in 
France," is a frontispiece engraved by Mackenzie after a portrait 
which Reinagle specially designed. This is prettily embellished 
with attributes of the chase, whilst an oval beneath shows the 
famous match between Mrs. Thornton and her brother-in-law, Mr. 
Flint. The race in question was run on the last day of the York 
August Meeting, 1804, and resulted in the defeat of the lady, who 
took her beating with rather a bad grace. To Mrs. Thornton, it may 
be added, is attached the distinction of having been the only lady 
jockey ever mentioned in the " Racing Calendar." 

Her feat is chronicled thus : — " Saturday, August 25th, 1804, 
Mr. Flint's Brown Thornville, by Volunteer out of Abigail, aged. 



31 



rode by the owner, beat Col. Thornton's ch. h. VinagriUio, aged, 
rode by Mrs. Thornton, four miles, 500 gns." 

The weights for this race were what is known as catch-weights, 
that is to say that Mrs. Thornton was to ride her own weight 
against Mr. Fhnt's. An enormous crowd assembled at York to 
witness this very uncommon race, and at the appointed time Mrs. 
Thornton appeared di'essed in a leopard-coloured body with blue 
sleeves, the rest buff, and a blue cap, in which dress she is 
represented in the print here reproduced. Mr. Flint's colours were 
white. Before the race, odds of 5 and 6 to 4 were laid upon the 
lady, and in running the first three miles as much as 7 to 4 and 2 to 
1 were wagered in her favour. During the last mile, however, it 
became evident that she would not win, and the odds veered round 
and were laid upon Mr. Flint. Notwithstanding that Mrs. Thornton 
displayed much excellent horsemanship, her opponent eventually 
won with much ease, to the great regret of the spectators, who 
were fascinated by her beauty and enterprise in taking part in such 
a sporting match. Over £200,000 is said to have changed hands 
over this race, which appears to have excited the liveliest interest 
in all parts of the country. 

The Fox Breaking Cover was another picture by Reinagle painted ■ 
for Colonel Thornton. This was engraved by John Scott, and, as 
has before been said, forms a pendant to The Death of the Fox, by 
Sawrey Gilpin. 

Colonel Thomas Thornton, who has before been mentioned in 
connection with Sawrey Gilpin, was a celebrated figure in the 
sporting world of his day, and a liberal patron of art in its relation 
to sport. At times a daring gambler, ThornviUe Royal, his seat in 
Yorkshire (now the property of Lord Ripon), is said to have been 
purchased by him with money won at play. The estate in question 
was formerly known as Allerton Maulevrer, and was the property 
of the Duke of York, from whom Colonel Thornton bought it for 
£110,000 in 1789. Sixteen years later it was resold to Lord 
Stourton when the sporting owner took up his residence at Sype 
Park, Wiltshire, which he took on lease, the increase of cultivation 
having rendered hawking, which was the Colonel's favourite pastime, 
impracticable. Several portraits of Colonel Thornton, it may be 
mentioned, show him engaged in this sport. On leaving ThornviUe 
Royal the owner created a considerable sensation by the large 
retinue of huntsmen, grooms, keepers and falconers that followed 
in his train. In addition to a pack of hounds and numerous 
hunters, a regular menagerie of animals was included. Amongst a 
heterogeneous collection of roebuck, fallow deer, terriers, grey- 
hounds and rare specimens of beasts connected with the chase were 
some French and Russian wild boar, received from the Emperor 
Napoleon in exchange for seventy couple of finely-bred English 
foxhounds. 

Ten years later the Colonel determined to retire to France, 
where he bought the Chateau of Pon le Roi, which he resold in 
1821. By this time his fame as a sportsman had become rather a 

32 




CARRIAGE MATCH AGAINST TIME, RUN AT NEWMARKET, AlGl'ST 2gTH, I75O 




THE CHASE 

By y. N. Sartni'h{S. Landscape by Piltro. Figurts Ei!gravi\i by NfagU 



33 




ATTILA. WINMiR Ol THK DI.RBY, 1842 
By Englelieart, after Laportc 




COTHERSTONE. WINNER OF THE DERBY, 1 843 
By Hacker, after H. Aiken 



34 



thing of the past and a report even stated that he was dead. Mrs. 
Thornton in consequence received a number of letters of condolence 
to one of which the Colonel sent the following quaint reply : — 

" Paris, Rue de la Paix, 

" December 25th, 1821. 
" My honest Brother Sportsman, 

" This is Christmas-Day, dedicated by me, from my youth, to gaiety and 
reasonable hospitality, endeavouring to make all happy, according to the situa- 
tion in which Providence has placed me. 

" In health no man can be more hearty, but not quite stout in my knees 
and feet ; stomach invincible ; always in appetite ; eat three times a day — tea, 
muffins, and grated hung beef at nine— at two, roasted game or cockscombs, 
and about a pint of the finest white burgundy — dinner at five and then a bottle 
of wine — about three or four glasses of spirits and water, rather weak — then 
to bed ; sleep better than I ever did in my life. Pretty well, you will say, for a 
dead man. Rise at eight, breakfast at nine, so we go on — every night the 
flnest dreams. I expect some wild boar ; if it comes our friend B. may be sure 
of a part." 

" P.S. Dec. 26, — I find by the Papers that I died, after a short illness, much 
lamented, &c., &c., at Paris. However that may be, I gave a dinner 
yesterday to a dozen sportsmen : we had roast beef, plum pudding, 
Yorkshire goose pie, and sat up singing most gaily till two this morning. 
At twelve we had two broiled fowls, gizzards, &c. ; and finished a bottle of 
old rum, in punch. No intoxication ; for I went to bed well and never 
rose better." 

(Signed) "THORNTON, MARQUIS DE PONT." 

His actual death, it may be mentioned, occurred in the spring of 
1823. He was at the time seventy-four years old. 

Philip Reinagle, like his patron, also lived to a green old age, 
dying aged eighty-four, at Chelsea, in 1833. As a sporting artist 
the accuracy of his draughtmanship is very remarkable, minute 
and careful attention being devoted to anatomical truth. In 
addition to this he was a landscape painter of considerable talent, 
his sporting pictures being rendered doubly attractive by the real 
artistic feeling which is almost invariably displayed in their scenic 
accessories, certain of the landscape settings being of high merit. 
Richard Ramsay Reinagle, the painter's son, inherited his father's 
artistic gifts, and achieving success as a landscape painter, in due 
course became an Academician. He was, however, eventually 
obliged to resign, having, contrary to rule, submitted for exhibition 
a picture at which another artist besides himself had worked. 

Another sporting artist who painted a large number of horses, 
dogs, and sporting scenes was James Barenger, whose animals are 
drawn with a fidelity which would seem to be the result of personal 
observation. As a young man he was fond of landscapes which 
allowed the introduction of deer, but he modified his style when he 
began to exhibit at the Royal Academy. 

Amongst prints after Barenger which call for special notice are 
the following : Pheasant and British Feathered Game, a pair engraved 
by Charles Turner and published by Ackermann in 1810. The Earl 
of Derby's Staghounds, engraved by R. Woodman, a print containing 

35 



equestrian portraits of Lord Stanley, the Hon. C. Stanley, and 
Jonathan Griffin, the huntsman, who is the central figure. This 
was published in 1823 by T. Griffin, of Carshalton. The best of 
twenty-six pictures reproduced in the Sporting Magazine was Doll, a 
pointer, which was admirably engraved by John Scott. Barenger's 
pictures were highly appreciated in his own day, the best engravers 
being employed to reproduce them for the various publishers of 
sporting literature and prints, with whom this artist's productions 
were in considerable demand. 

British Field Sports, Vol. III., by William Henry Scott, published 
in 1818, contains the following plates from works by Barenger, 
twelve of which were engraved by John Scott and the remaining 
five by J. Webb : — 

(1) Pointers going out with Sportsmen. 

(2) Woodcock Shooting. 

(3) Sportsmen with Spaniels. 

(4) Greyhounds with Dead Hare. 

(5) Greyhounds with Sportsmen Jinding a Hare. 

(6) Duck Shooting. 

(7) Sportsmen with Spaniels. 

(8) Earth Stopping. 

(9) Pony and Dogs. 

(10) Hunting, going into Cover. 

(11) Hunting, the Chase. 

(12) Hunting, the Death. 

(13) Racing, the Finish. 

(14) Sligo, a Racehorse. 

(15) Cock-fighting. 

(16) Game Fowls, and 

(17) Fly Fishing. 

The Sporting Repository, Vol. Vlll., published in 1822, by Thomas 
McLean, contained five plates engraved by T. Hunt from 
Barenger's pictures. These were : — 

(1) Claret, a Hunter. 

(2) A Hawk. 

(3) A Herefordshire Ox. 

(4) Rubens, a Hunter, and 

(5) Merino Sheep. 

The portrait of Rubens was engraved 
by C. Turner. The Annals of Sporting for 

two plates of special interest, these being the only examples of the 
artist's work which were engraved by his uncle, S. Barenger. 
" Topthorn " is depicted in the act of taking a leap of twenty-one 
feet over the Whissendine Brook. 

A beautiful engraving after Barenger is the one by John Scott, 
representing " Doll," a pointer bred by the artist from a bitch 
belonging to W. Whitbread, Esq., of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, 
a gentleman well known for his famous strain of pointers. Many 
of Barenger's works were engraved in large size. 



for separate publication 
the year 1824 contained 



36 



A certain number of old coloured prints depict the rather brutal 
sports which were popular as late as the early days of the nine- 
teenth century. A series of seven oblong coloured plates repre- 
senting bull-baiting, cock-fighting, and the like, were published about 
the year 1823 ; another old coloured engraving not undeserving of 
attention shows a dog-fight in the Westminster pit, whilst the 
feats of " Billie " the rat-killing dog have also been commemorated 
by the engraver. A coloured plate represents the canine celebrity 
in question, as the legend sets forth, " killing 100 rats in five-and- 
a-half minutes." 

"Billie" attracted some attention in his day as the following 
extract from the Morning Herald of October 22nd, 1822, will 
demonstrate : 

" The owner of the famous dog, Billie, of rat-killing notoriety, 
has again undertaken that he shall perform the almost incredible 
task of killing 100 rats in twelve minutes. This task he performed 
before in eight-and-a-half minutes for a bet of 20 sovereigns. The 
bet is 50, besides considerable other sums, which are pending upon 
the issue. The match will take place on Thursday evening next, at 
the Westminster Pit, when the rats are all to be turned loose in a 
12 foot squai'e. The floor of the pit is to be whitened, so that the 
whole of the rats are to be visible to the dog, and to the amateurs 
for whose accommodation galleries are already erected. Some 
diff^erence having arisen on the last match, as it was said that one 
rat escaped, there are to be now an extra number provided to 
prevent any disappointment. An eminent artist is now employed 
taking the likeness of the dog and his master. They have each lost 
an eye through their valorous exploits, in endeavouring to clear this 
country of rats. We may also add that their esteem stands so high 
that a most respectable picture frame maker has actually received 
and executed an order for 114 of the most costly frames that can be 
manufactured for so stylish an ornament, and that scarcely any of 
the fancy or the sporting world, that will not have it exhibited in 
their parlours. Billie is to be drawn with his silver collar on, and 
his master with a brilliant star, presented to him by the amateurs 
of rat-killing note." 

Amongst prints which are connected with cock-fighting, the most 
celebrated is of course Colonel Mordaunt's Cock Match, engraved 
by Earlom, after Zoffany, the oriental setting of which imparts a 
charm rather lacking in most pictures of this sort of combat. A 
fine pair of portraits of fighting cocks, is The Cock in Feather and 
The Trimmed Cock, by C. Turner, after B. Marshall ; companion 
prints to these by the same artist and engraver, are a Black-breasted 
Dark Red and a Streaky -breasted Red Dunn. The title of the first 
pair, it may be mentioned, is occasionally given as Peace and War. 
Fine impressions of the four being worth some twenty guineas. 

Benjamin Marshall, the painter of these pictures, was a 
Leicestershire man, born in 1767, originally a portrait painter. The 
Death of the Fox, by Sawrey Gilpin, which was exhibited in the 
Royal Academy of 1793, made such an impression upon him that he 

87 



determined to devote his talents entirely to the painting of subjects 
connected with sport. 

This form of art, it must be remembered, was at the time in 
question highly remunerative, there being a positive rage for 
pictures of race-horses, hunting scenes, and the like ; Stubbs easily 
obtained a hundred for a likeness of some famous horse. 

Introduced to Mr. Wheble by John Scott, Marshall's name begins 
to figure in the Sporting Magazine about 1796, as the painter of 
pictures which Scott engraved. 

For Sir Henry Smith, Marshall painted the portraits of the 
famous pugilist, John Jackson, a portrait of almost the same size, 
representing Thomas Belcher, being executed for John Harrison, 
Esq. Both of these tributes to the champions of the ring, it may 
be added, were engraved in mezzotint by Charles Turner, proofs 
being now worth about five guineas apiece. 

In 1812, Marshall took up his residence at Newmarket, where, 
in high favour with a large number of aristocratic patrons, he 
painted pictures of racehorses ; amongst these may be mentioned 
Filho da Piita, and Sir Joshua, (together) engraved by W. Ward, 
who also executed Hunters at Grass after this artist. The latter is 
a fine print, and proofs of it are worth at least ten pounds. The 
engraver in question also executed Two Dogs Fighting for a Stick, 
after Marshall, a print worthy of attention ; whilst R. Woodman 
produced an excellent engraving of Francis Dukinfield Astley, Esq. 
and his Harriers, of which a few impressions were struck in colour. 

In 1825, Marshall once more returned to London, where he 
remained till his death, ten years later. 

Two pictures by Marshall are particularly worthy of attention, 
these are The Sportsman and A First-rate Shot. The first of these is 
a portrait of Thomas Gosden, a celebrated sporting bookbinder, of 
St. Martin's Lane, which has been twice engraved, in small size by 
Maile, and in a larger form by Giller. The smaller engraving, a few 
impressions of which were executed in colour, was published by 
Gosden in 1824. It is a peculiarly attractive print. 

A First-rate Shot, an engraving of which appeared in the Sporting 
Magazine for October, 1831, represents the famous sporting 
character George Osbaldeston. 

Amongst sporting engravings now in great request, none are 
more highly valued than the best of those after James Pollard, who 
lived till the early sixties, his coaching scenes being especially 
attractive. The road, indeed, was Pollard's speciality, though it by 
no means monopolised his brush, which dealt besides with racing, 
hunting and fishing. A keen angler himself, and well acquainted 
with all the best angling round London, he painted a large number 
of fishing pictures. A set of four coloured prints after Pollard, 
Fly Fishing, Bottom Fishing, Trolling for Pike, and Anglers packing up, 
were published by T. Helme, in 1831. 

James Pollard's father, Robert Pollard, was a Newcastle man 
who established himself in London as an engraver ; his business 
was in HoUoway, the title of the firm being R. Pollard & Son. 

38 




LITTLE WONDER. WINNER OF THE DERBY, 184O By Bcikwitli . after F . C. Ttirne 




CORONATION. WINNER OF THE DERBV, 184I 
By Bcckwith, after F. C. Turner 

39 




MERRY MONARCH. WINNER OF THE UERBV, ib^^ 
By Ilackcr, after J. F. Hen in:; 




COSSACK. WINNER OF THE DERBY, 1 847 
By Hacker, after Harry Hall 



40 



Pollard's talents essentially lay in the vivacious delineation of 
sporting incidents. Though better known by engravings after his 
pictures, than by the pictures themselves, he was by no means 
devoid of cleverness in his own particular line. In 1821, he sent to 
the Academy, North Country Mails at the Peacock, Islington, a. subject 
which he had found quite close to his own home, whilst in 1824, 
he was again represented by two coaching pictures, depicting 
incidents on the road. 

One of the most attractive series of coloured prints after Pollard 
is that depicting the great steeplechase, which took place in the 
Vale of Aylesbury in 1836. 

Plate 1 shows The Start ; No. 2, The Brook, Mr. Galloway's The 
Amazon clearing it, and Jerry fairly in. Yellow Dwarf down on the 
landing side, and Cannon Ball scrambling out ; No. 3, the horses 
coming over a big bank though underwood : Yellow Dwarf and 
Sailor are down and The Pony leads. No. 4 shows The Finish : 
Captain Lamb's Vivian, ridden by Captain Becker, wins ; Mr. 
Elmore's Grimaldi, ridden by Mr. Seffert comes in second under the 
whip ; and Mr. D. Baring's The Pony, Mr. Cooper up, is a good 
third. They were engraved by J. Harris, and published in 1836 by 
Ackermann & Co., 96 Strand. A good set, it may be added, fetches 
about £20. 

The Royal Mail Leaving the G.P.O., St. Martin' s-le-Grand, after 
Pollard, engraved by R. G. Reeve, printed in colours and pubhshed 
in 1836 by W. Soffe, 288 Strand, is also a valuable print which is 
worth some twelve pounds. 

The London Fire Engines : the Noble Protectors of Life and 
Property, is a good example of Pollard's most spirited work. This 
picture was engraved, and printed in colours. It bears the inscrip- 
tion : " Dedicated to the Insurance Offices by their obedient servant, 
Thomas McLean, 26 Haymarket." 

A Prospective View of Epsom Races is the title of a series of six 
plates, printed in colours and published by R. Ackermann. These 
represent: (1) Saddling in the Warren: Jem Bland occupies a 
prominent place in the foreground of this picture ; (2) The Betting 
Post; (3) Preparing to Start; (4) The Grand Stand, the Race ; (5) The 
Race Over ; and (6) Settling at TattersaWs. The last plate is admir- 
able ; not only is it highly characteristic but it has all the interest of 
a page of Turf history, containing many sketches of well-known 
racing men taken from life. 

Wings is the portrait of a race horse, bred in 1822 by Lord 
Grosvenor ; Sam Chiffney, in yellow jacket and black cap, is in the 
saddle. On the right of the picture is the weighing room with 
jockeys going to scale. Engraved, printed in colours, and published 
by R. Pollard and Son, in June, 1825. 

Other prints after Pollard are His Majesty George I V. Travelling ; 
coloured print, engraved by W. Dubourg. 

Fox Chase : View Halloa ; engraved by R. Pollard. 

The Merry Monarch; published and lithographed by Dean & Co. 

Hyde Park Corner, by Rosenberg, in colours, which never fails to 

41 



command a good price at sales, £30 being by no means an unusual 
figure. 

On the Highgate Road, ''The Woodman ;'' a fine colour print, by 
Charles Hunt. "The Woodman" on the Great North Road, 
between Highgate and Finchley was the house at which Flower and 
Milsom called just before the Muswell Hill murder for which they 
were hanged in 1896. 

Highgate Tunnel, the companion print to the above ; a coach, with 
passengers, coming under the tunnel, the horses and coach well 
foreshortened. 

West Country M ail-Coach at the Gloucestershire Coffee House, Picca- 
dilly. This engraving is by Rosenberg. 

The Royal Mail ; a coach passing a sportsman who carries a gun, 
and is accompanied by a setter and a pointer. E. Roviskere 
engraved this plate, which was published March 30th, 1829, by J. 
Wilson, of 7 Vere Street, Cavendish Square. 

Stage Coach Passengers Seated at Breakfast and The CoachUn the Snow ; 
cottagers showing the delayed passengers hospitality.^^ (Interiors). 
Both these engravings were published by R. Pollard and Son. 

The St. A Ibans Tally-ho Stakes ; two companion pictures of a great 
hurdle race run at Albans on May 22nd, 1834. A sweepstakes of 
five sovereigns each, with twenty added from the fund ; each horse 
to carry eleven stone ; gentlemen riders only. Run in two heats, 
each heat once round the course and a distance ; two leaps to be 
taken in each heat over hurdles. Won by Mr. Coleman's Latitat. 
Plate No. 1 shows the first leap of first heat. Mr. R. Oldaker with 
extended crop is galloping forward to cheer on Latitat, ridden by 
Mr. John Palmer, who is well into his stride again after taking a 
hurdle. Norman (Mr. F. P. Delme Ratcliffe up), Pompey (Mr. 
Mason), Splinter Bar (Mr. Richard Bevan), and Deceiver (Mr. T. 
Nestley) are taking the hurdle in a cluster. Thesis (Mr. Simmons) 
and Figurante (Captain Beecher) are coming up. Plate 2 shows the 
second leap in the second heat, which was a very close race. Mr. 
Bevan was thrown, and Splinter Bar running up came in third with- 
out his rider. Latitat is again leading, Norman and Splinter Bar 
are over the hurdle. Deceiver and Figurante are clearing it, and 
Pompey and Thesis are coming up. These plates were engraved 
by G. and C. Hunt ; size of plates, 17 inches by 12 inches ; published 
by J. Moore, " at the Corner of West Street, Upper St. Martin's 
Lane." 

Scenes on the Road, or A Trip to Epsom and Back, is the title of 
four plates. Engraved by J. Harris, printed in colours, and 
published May 30th, 1836, by R. Ackermann. 

Plate 1 is Hyde Park Corner ; No. 2, The Lord Nelson Inn, Cheam ; 
No. 3, The Cock, at Sutton; and No. 4, Kennington Gate. Each picture 
bears a verse from a song in the musical farce, " Hit or Miss." 

Easter Monday : Turning Out the Stag at Buckitt's Hill, Epping 
Forest. This plate is printed in colours. 

Easter Monday : A View of Fairmead Bottom, Epping Forest. Also 
printed in colours, a companion to that last mentioned. 

42 



Stage Coach, with Opposition Coach in Sight; published in colours. 

The Cambridge Telegraph starting from the White Horse, Fetter Lane. 
Engraved by G. Hunt, and published by J. Moore, of London. 

Mail Coach in a Flood ; — in a Drift of Snoiv ; and — in a Thunder- 
storm, by Thomas Reeve, after Pollard. Three good coloured 
coaching prints, the most attractive of the three being the Coach 
in a Flood, which is reproduced. 

Stage Coach Arrivitig, Changing Horses, and Setting Off . Another 
fine series engraved by Howell. 

Stage Coaches with Neii's of Peace and— News of Reform, in colours, 
also by Howell, are a pair which are in considerable request, often 
when in good condition fetching £20. 

Besides these, there exist a number of other coloured coaching 
prints after this artist who made the Road his speciality. Within 
recent years coaching prints have been gradually rising in price, 
their attractive colouring and the spirited execution of a number of 
them, causing them to be in considerable request. 

Stage coach journeys were naturally more prone to give rise to 
incident, and even sometimes to adventure, than the prosaic railway 
travelling which has now become part of civilised life. A coloured 
print after Pollard, of some value, portrays a disconcerting 
occurrence which much startled the passengers by the Exeter Mail. 
This is entitled Lioness attacking the Exeter Coach. 

The Exeter Mail Coach on its way to London, was, one Sunday 
night attacked at Winterslow Hut, seven miles from Salisbury, in a 
most extraordinai'y manner. At the moment when the coac'mian 
pulled up to deliver his bags, one of the leaders was suddenly seized 
by a ferocious animal. This produced a great confusion and alarm ; 
two passengers who were inside the mail got out, ran into the 
house and locked themselves up in a room above stairs ; the horses 
kicked and plunged violently, and it was with difficulty the 
coachman could prevent the carriage from being overturned. 
With considerable consternation, the coachman and guard 
eventually perceived by the light of the lamps, that the animal 
which had seized the horse, was a huge lioness. As luck would 
have it, however, it was just at that moment a large mastiff dog 
came up and attacked her fiercely, on which she quitted the horse 
and turned upon him. The dog fled, but was pursued and killed by 
the lioness within about forty yards of the place. The beast, it was 
afterwards discovered, had escaped from a caravan that was 
standing on the roadside, belonging to a menagerie on its way 
to Salisbury fair. An alarm being given, the keepers pursued and 
hunted the lioness into a hovel under a granary, which served for 
keeping agricultural implements, and by half-past eight they had 
secured her so effectually, by barricading the place, as to prevent 
her escape. The lioness attacked the horse in front, and springing 
at his throat, fastened the talons of her fore feet on each side of 
his neck, close to the head, while the talons of her hind feet were 
forced into his chest. In this situation she hung, while the blood 
was seen gushing forth as if a vein had been opened by a lancet. 

43 



The ferocious animal missed the throat and the jugular vein, but the 
horse was terribly torn. Notwithstanding the agitation and 
excitement produced by this incident, a fresh horse was procured, 
and the mail drove on, after having been detained only three 
quarters of an hour. 

Occasionally also, unpleasant passengers caused delay on the 
road. In 1812 a passenger in a stage-coach, which ran daily from 
Chichester to Brighton, was seized near Shoreham, with a violent 
fit of insanity, and bit a lady who was in the coach with him, in a 
most shocking manner about the face and arms. The coachman 
and outside passengers, hearing her screams, got down, and with 
much difficulty rescued her from the jaws of the maniac. Two 
gentlemen then got inside, and pinioning his arms, prevented him 
from doing further mischief. 

A more amusing instance of an undesirable fare, was the case 
of a passenger of enormous bulk. 

On one occasion a gentleman of elephantine proportions made 
his appearance in Huddersfield, and went to a proprietor of one 
of the coaches to take a passage for Manchester, but, owing to 
his enormous size, he was refused, unless he would consent 
to be taken as lumber, at 9d. per stone, hinting at the same 
time the advantage of being split in two. The gentleman was not 
to be disheartened by this disappointment, but adopted the plan 
of sending the ostler of one of the inns to take a place for him, 
which he did, and in the morning wisely took the precaution of 
fixing himself in the coach, with the assistance of the bystanders, 
from whence he was not to be removed easily. Thus placed, he 
was taken to his destination. The consequence was, that on his 
return, he was compelled to adopt a similar process, to the no 
small disappointment of the proprietors, who had to convey 
three gentlemen who had previously taken their places, in a chaise, 
as there was no room beside this gentleman, who weighed about 
thirty-six stone. . 

It can easily be realised that the huge individual, who so annoyed 
the coach proprietor, was very much out of place at a time when 
the proprietors of coaches were in the habit of filling these con- 
veyances with a larger number of passengers than was allowed by 
Act of Parliament. The constant evasions of the regulations 
relating to Stage Coaches, in carrying more persons than they 
were allowed to do, and the many accidents which happened in 
consequence, aroused great irritation on the part of the public. 
The section of the Act relating to this ran as follows : — 

" By the 50 G. 3. C. 48 it is enacted, that any coach or other 
carriage of four or more wheels employed as a Stage Coach in 
Great Britain, and drawn by four or more horses, shall be allowed 
to carry ten outside passengers, and no more, exclusive of the 
coachman, but including the guard ; that one passenger only may 
sit with the coachman, three on the front of the roof, and the other 
six behind, but none on the luggage, or place allotted for it ; and 
all such carriages drawn by two or three horses, shall be allowed 

44 




o 

o 
i- 



D 



z 

o 



< 






z -5 



45 




oil, PAINTING 
By Francis Hartoriiis 




THE GROSVENOK HUNT 
By Stiibbs 



46 



five outside passengers, exclusive of the coacliman ; and that all 
Stages called long or double-bodied coaches, shall be allowed eight 
outside passengers only, exclusive of the coachman, but including 
the guard ; no child under seven years to be counted one of the 
number ; two such to be counted as one grown person, and so in 
proportion. No person paying as an outside passenger to sit as 
an inside, unless by consent of one inside passenger at least, and 
next to whom such outside passenger shall be placed. But where 
the carriage is sufficiently commodious, and is licensed for that 
purpose, four may ride on the front, provided the whole shall not 
exceed ten. 

" No luggage to be carried on the roof of any carriage drawn 
by four or more horses shall exceed two feet, or if drawn by two 
or three horses eighteen inches above the roof. Penalty on the 
driver so offending, or, if the driver cannot be found, on the owner, 
£5 for every inch above the height allowed; or £10 if the driver 
is the owner ; and, in default of payment, commitment for two 
months or till paid. 

" Driver leaving his horses without having some one to hold the 
reins, or otherwise neglecting his duty, penalty 10s. to £5. 

" Passengers may require the toll-collectors to count the number 
of passengers. Driver refusing to stop, penalty £5 and forfeit 
beside double the penalty already laid on extra passengers. Award 
half to the passenger and half to the toll collector. Toll collector 
refusing to count, penalty £5. Passenger evading examination 
by descending before he comes to a turnpike and reascending 
afterwards, penalty £10. 

" Coachman permitting other persons to drive, penalty from 
£5 to £10. 

" Guard wantonly firing his arms, penalty £5. 

"The Magistrate may mitigate penalties, but not less than one 
half, with reasonable costs. Award, when not otherwise specified, 
half to the informer, half to the trustees of the road. 

" Persons receiving money to connive at offences against this 
Act, penalty £50, or in default, commitment from one to three 
months. Prosecutions to be commenced within fourteen days 
of the offence." 

The spirit of opposition in stage-coach proprietors was frequently 
carried to a great pitch. Instances occurred of proprietors 
reducing their prices till they actually carried passengers for 
nothing, and on some occasions they even treated people with a 
dinner and a bottle of wine, while in one case there was actually a 
fight for a coach. The " Royal Leeds Union," in 1812, used to put 
up at the White Horse Inn, in Fetter Lane ; but inconsequence of a 
dispute between the proprietors of that inn and those in the country, 
the latter determined to discontinue to let it run to the White 
Horse, and ordered it to be driven to the Angel Inn, in Angel 
Street, St. Martin's-le-grand. This so enraged the proprietors of 
the White Horse Inn, that they determined to bring the coach 
to their Inn by force, and for that purpose employed some prize- 

47 



fighters, coachmen, guards, etc., who were sent in December, in 
post chaises from London to Barnet, being the last stage previous 
to the coach's arrival in town. The coach arrived at Barnet 
between one and two o'clock and found the change of horses to take 
it to the Angel Inn were in readiness, as well as a set of horses to 
take it to the White Horse Inn whereupon a general fight took place 
between the partizans of the two Inns, as to which horses should be 
put to. It lasted for a considerable time, during which several black 
eyes and bloody noses were given, and teeth were knocked out. Jay, 
a vv^ell-known prize-fighter, had a black eye given him, and a tooth 
knocked out. It being discovered who Jay was, and that Powers, 
another of his fraternity, was engaged in the affray on the part of 
the White Horse Inn, the coachman and guard belonging to the 
Angel Inn declared it in vain to continue the contest, and in 
consequence hostilities ceased, and the White Horse Inn party 
carried off the coach, but not without experiencing many difficulties, 
some of the passengers refusing to proceed with it. The coach was 
driven to the White Horse Inn. A few days later it left London 
from the same Inn, but when it got to Hatfield such was the spirit 
of opposition there that it could not procure a change of horses, 
and it was actually obliged to return to London. By the activity of 
Adkins and Pearkes, the Bow-street Officers, Jay and Powers, the 
prize-fighters, George Elliot and John Merchant, coachmen, 
Charles Turner and Robert Cook, guards, James Buckingham and 
Stephen Goodwin, horsekeepers of the White Horse Inn party, 
were taken into custody, and held to bail, for a violent assault on 
James Williams and John Boyle, the coachman and guard belonging 
to the Angel Inn. 

So keen did the competition between coaches become, that in 
December, 1821, a paragraph appeared in the Dock Paper 
informing the public that " in consequence of opposition 
among the coach-proprietors, the fares from thence to this 
city and London had been reduced to a few shillings ; " and as 
a further inducement to travellers, stated that on Sunday the 
Safety Coach would leave Weakly's Hotel, at any or no fare, just as 
the passengers chose ?• — that breakfast would be provided at 
Weakly's in the morning ; lunch at Goss's, Seven Stars, Totnes, in 
the forenoon ; and dinner and wine at Congdon's Hotel, Exeter, on 
the arrival of the coach, witliottt any charge ! In compliance with 
this notice, Mr. Congdon, provided a very handsome dinner, over 
which was exhibited a placard to the following effect : — " J.C. will 
feel obliged by the parties partaking of this. N.B. — All free— shall 
be glad to see our friends again to-morrow." 

At times robberies of a serious nature took place in connection 
with coaches. In February, 1821, the Bath Mail-coach drew up to 
the Gloucester Coffee-house, in Piccadilly, as was customary, when 
the man employed at the coach office, known by the name of the 
" runner," set about packing the parcels, belonging to the 
passengers and others, when finding that he could not pack a large 
band box, there not being room for it, he took it into the office, but 

48 



on his way was intercepted by a stranger, and asked some questions, 
no doubt asked for tlie purpose of delay. When he returned to the 
coach, and opened the door, he found the other door had been 
opened and left so, and immediately missed a parcel, which proved 
to be of very considerable value, as it contained Bank notes to the 
amount of £14,000, belonging to the Devizes Bank, and strange to 
tell, one of the Proprietors was going with it to take care of it. 
The robber escaped undiscovered, no doubt with the man in league 
with him who stopped the porter or " runner " to ask him a trifling 
question to delay time. 

Pei'haps the most curious circumstance connected with the annals 
of coaching is the true story of a man's life being saved owing to a 
coach passing over him. A labouring man returning home near 
Berkhamstead from a frolic during the severest night's frost of the 
winter, in 1830, fell on the turnpike road and remained insensible, 
without power to move, till half-past eleven at night, when he was 
effectually roused by a " friendly hint " from the hind wheel of the 
Birmingham mail, which grazed his head, and passed obliquely over 
his body. The man was severely injured, and was taken inside the 
mail to Berkhamstead, but no bones were broken, and he was soon 
as well as ever, having escaped from inevitable death by frost, in 
consequence of being run over by the mail. 

Another singular circumstance in connection with the road 
occurred in July, 1804, when a certain driver of one of the northern 
mail coaches, who used, as he rode along, to exert his athletic 
strength by breaking large branches off trees, noticed a huge oak, 
a branch of which, of an uncommon thickness, projected over part 
of the road. Proud of his former achievements, and thinking himself 
possessed of more than Herculean strength, he laid hold of the 
branch with his brawny hands; when lo ! the sturdy oak, not 
yielding as he expected, the coach drove on, and left the astonished 
guard dangling in the air ! who, quitting his hold, fell to the ground, 
and unfortunately broke his arm. 

Some of the old coachmen must have travelled enormous 
distances during their lives. Such a one was old Dan Sellers, who 
drove the Oxford and Bath mail for 35 years from Oxford to 
Cirencester every morning, and returned to Oxford every evening, 
a daily journey of 74 miles. He altogether travelled more than 
942,760 miles, the yearly journey exceeding the circumference of 
the globe. 

Though the competition between coach proprietors was, as has 
been said, very great, misfortune not infrequently overtook this 
sort of business. An advertisement appeared in a Bath paper of 
1826, put in by some of the unlucky shareholders in an unlucky 
concern known as " The Stage Coach Company." At the head of 
the advertisement in question was a print of a coach and four 
reversed, or, in the language of the road, overturned. 

With the coming of the railroad several prints made their 
appearance, contrasting the dangers of traveUing by rail behind 
an engine with the pleasures of a journey behind a spanking team. 

49 



Of this sort is the print, by Cooper Henderson, which shows the 
passengers on a coach very unconcernedly viewing an accident to 
a train which has fallen over an embankment. 

In 1828 some enterprising English coach-masters endeavoured 
to establish a coach between Calais and Paris, to perform the 
journey in 24 hours, which would be at the rate of seven miles an 
hour ; but the absurd restrictions imposed by the French Govern- 
ment as to the breadth of wheels, weight of carriage, etc., pre- 
vented the prosecution of the undertaking. With a view to ensure 
safety, the French Government required that public carriages 
should be of a weight, and have their wheels of a breadth, such as 
to put rapidity of travelling quite out of the question. The desired 
safety, however, was not always attained by these regulations, for 
the overturn of French diligences was frequently reported, for the 
most part attended with destruction of life or serious injury. 

The first experiment of stage coaches travelling upon railways 
was made with great success between Darlington and Stockton. 
The railway from Witton to Stockton, a distance of 25 miles, was 
formed for the conveyance of coals ; and so great was the advantage 
of this kind of road in lowering the expense of carriage, that coals 
which formerly sold at 18s. per ton in Stockton, were sold there 
for 8s. 6d. The railway passed through Darlington, which is at a 
distance of twelve miles from Stockton, and two coaches travelled the 
road daily, conveying a very great number of passengers at the 
rate of a penny per mile each. These vehicles were the bodies of 
old six-inside coaches, placed upon new and lower wheels fitted 
for the railway ; they were drawn by a single horse, which often 
drew from 20 to 30 passengers at the rate of ten miles an hour, 
with quite as much ease as a horse moving in a gig, the traces 
being generally loose the animal's principal effort being to maintain 
his speed. 

A great engraver of sporting scenes was John Scott, who was 
born in 1774. Like James Pollard's father, John Scott was born 
at Newcastle-on-Tyne from which city he came to London, entering 
the business of Robert Pollard, afterwards attracting the attention 
of Mr. John Wheble who secured his services for the Sporting 
Magazine. 

John Scott is of course best known by his engravings, having 
indeed been the founder of a school which made a particular 
feature of reproductions of sporting incidents and animal life. In 
addition to this, however, it must not be forgotten that, possessing 
artistic qualities of the highest possible character, he was the 
designer of many charming compositions ; so great indeed was his 
talent that certain of the engravings executed by him are improve- 
ments upon the pictures from which they were taken. An 
adept in conveying the peculiar texture to be found in the 
coats of animals and the animation seen in the eyes of dogs, his 
plates are invariably distinguished by a boldness which clearly 
displays the sure confidence of the hand which wielded the graver. 
So much attention and care did he devote to his work that the 

50 




THE CHECK 

By permission of A. Morelon Mandcville, Esq. 




THE BROTHERS FERMOR HUNTING IN AYNHO PARK 

By F. Sartoritis (J 754 J 

In the possession of \V . C. Carfturiglit, Esq. 



51 




THE CHESHIRE HUNT 
Br T. F.rneley 




' THE DEATH 
By y. N. Sartorins. Landscape- by Pfltrn. Figures Engraved by Neagle 



52 



large prints of The Death of the Fox, after Savvrey Gilpin, and 
The Fox breaking Cover, after Reinagle, were no less than six years 
in his hands. These were published in May, 1811, when the Society 
of Arts presented Scott with their large Gold Medal " for having 
completed two such works which do so much honour to his country 
and himself." 

Many not interested in sporting subjects cannot fail to have 
from time to time seen a set of curious little designs representing 
different field sports. These were originally patterns for silver 
buttons, and were published by J. H. Burn in 1821. The original 
drawings by Abraham Cooper, R.A., were engraved by Scott on a 
silver plate, from which the buttons were then cut and sold for 
shooting coats. A complete set is, needless to say, almost 
unobtainable at the present day, though Sir Walter Gilbey 
(that high authority on all matters connected with sporting pictures 
and prints) possesses the whole fourteen. 

Amongst the best known engravings of John Scott are the plates 
which he executed for Daniels' Rural Sports, many of which are 
beautiful works of art. The Sportsman's Repository, published 
in 1820, also contained a series of prints by this engraver, who 
contributed some fine work to two Editions of the " Complete 
Angler." 

Nine engravings in Tegg's Edition of The Chase, by Somerville, 
were executed by Scott after designs by J. N. Sartorius, whilst the 
beautiful frontispiece which embellished the Essay on Hunting, 
published by Jeffrey, was both drawn and engraved by him. 

Scott died in 1827, aged 53, his illness, it is said, being the result 
of intense application and study, notwithstanding which, his last 
years were embittered by pecuniary worry of a harassing kind. 

An animal painter, who produced a number of works, many of 
which have been engraved, was Henry Bernard Chalon, who came 
of old French Huguenot stock. Born in 1770, he became an 
exhibitor at the Royal Academy when twenty-two years old, being 
appointed animal painter to the Duchess of York, in 1795, an 
honorary distinction which in after years was also conferred upon 
him by King William the Fourth. Amongst this artist's works, The 
Passions of the Horse, seven large pictures engraved and published 
by Jackson, must not be forgotten. 

In the Sporting Magazine is an engraving after a picture by 
Chalon of a famous fighting dog, owned by Lord Camelford, which 
dog is said to have killed three celebrated dogs in his time, and was 
never beaten. Other plates after Chalon in the same publication, 
are Flora, a famous hunter, belonging to Lord Darlington whose great 
achievement was a leap of 23 feet 3 inches ; Streamer, a red grey- 
hound bred by Mr. George Lane Fox, of Bramham Park, and owned 
by the Rev. F. Best, which won the cup at the Malton Coursing 
meeting in 1821 ; Vanity, a blue and white greyhound bitch, 
also the property of Mr. Best, which won the cup at Malton 
in the following year. The Dwarf Beagles, whose portraits 
appeared in the Magazine in 1831, were from the pack of Colonel 

53 



Thornton, who bred them. These beagles were of the smallest breed 
and were noted for their beauty. Bracer, whose picture appeared 
in the New St>orfing Magazine in 1836, was a famous hound in the 
Linlithgow and Stirlingshire pack. The plate was taken from a part 
of a large picture of Mr. W. R. Ramsay, of Barnton, the Master, 
and his hounds. 

Amongst a great number of engravings after Chalon, the following 
must not be forgotten : — Eight engravings in mezzotint, by W. 
Ward, A.R.A. — (1) Pavilion, a racehorse with Chiffney in the saddle, 
published by Boydell & Co., 90, Cheapside, London, 1st March, 
1803 ; (2) Coursing, a portrait of the greyhound Snowball, published 
by Random & Sneath, 1807 ; (3) Violante, a racehorse with Buckle 
in the saddle, published by Boydell & Co., 1st March, 1808; (4) 
Quiz, a race-horse, jockey, saddle on arm, entering the weighing- 
room, published by R. Ackermann & Co., 1st September, 1808; (5) 
Costive, one of the best foxhounds in Lord Darlington's Raby pack. 
An etching from this work by H. R. Cook, was also published in the 
Sporting Magazine, of 1810 ; (6) A Setter, belonging to the Marquis 
of Ely ; (7) The Raby Pack, portraits of the hounds on the flags with 
huntsman and feeder ; and (8) Bulldogs, namely, Wasp, Child and 
Billy, three famous dogs belonging to Mr. Henry Baynton, published 
by Random & Sneath, 1809. This picture was also engraved by 
Duncan for the New Sporting Magazine, in 1835. Billy was 
originally purchased by Lord Camelford, and from whose 
possession it passed into that of Mr. Boynton, member of a 
Yorkshire family. 

Chalon's portrait of Brainworm, a race-horse, was engraved by 
J. C. Easling and published by R. Ackermann. His portraits 
of the racehorses Morelli and Vandyke, were engraved by 
William Say as companion pictures. The portraits of the Prince 
of Wales' horses, Orville and Sir David, exhibited in the Royal 
Academy of 1808, were engraved by William Ward, and published 
by Colnaghi & Co., of 23, Cockspur Street, the former on 25th 
March, 1809, the latter on the 12th August in the same year. The 
portrait of Barbarossa, also shown at the Royal Academy of 1808, 
was engraved by William Ward, and published by C. Random, at 
the Sporting Gallery, 5, Hart Street, Bloomsbury Square, on 2nd 
December, 1809. His portrait of Selim was also engraved by W. 
Ward, and published by Random & Sneath, The Sporting Gallery, 
5, Hart Street, Bloomsbury Square, on 25th March, 1809. 

Chalon died in 1849, from the effects of a severe accident which 
had befallen him three years before. 

Seventeen years after Chalon, in 1787, was born Abraham 
Cooper, who, though showing signs of artistic gifts when quite a 
child, did not take up painting as a profession till his twenty-second 
year. Obtaining an introduction to Benjamin Marshall, R.A., he 
received much guidance and useful advice, which he turned to 
excellent account. Cooper, it may be added, was a most prolific 
painter. Between the years 1812 and 1869 he sent no fewer than 
332 pictures to the Royal Academy, a number of which were scenes 

54 



connected with the civil wars, and battle pieces in which an old 
white charger ahnost invariably figured. 

A good example of sporting portraiture executed by Abraham 
Cooper is the picture of Thomas Waring of Chelsfield, engraved 
by W. B. Scott. Mr. Waring is shown on his favourite hunter, 
Peter, with five couples of hounds close by. Of this portrait 
Nimrod wrote : — 

" Mr. Waring, as Master of Harriers, hunts the country between Farningham 
and Sevenoaks, in Kent. The horse upon which he is mounted may be called 
a pattern-card for the purpose for which he is wanted. From that great 
obliquity of shoulder he must be a good and safe fencer, and from the setting- 
on of his head and his apparently placid disposition, it is no wonder he is a 
favourite. His hounds, as Mr. Cooper has represented them, are thoroughbred 
harriers, without a cross of foxhound, not rounded in the ear and conveying 
to us the idea of being well calculated to hunt." 

Of racehorses and hunters Cooper painted a great number of 
portraits. Many hunting groups were also executed by him. 

An all-round sportsman himself, who rode well to hounds, this 
artist possessed a practical knowledge of field sports, the result of 
which is clearly to be discovered in his pictures. 

An excellent appreciation of Mr. Cooper's talents and work 
appeared in volume cxxxiv. of the Sporting Magazine. 

" Whether racing, hunting, shooting or fishing, you have only to 
look at them to see that they are done by a thorough sportsman, 
and are sure to bring back some pleasant recollection of the past — 
either when you were at Newmarket and had a pony on something 
of Lord George's — you remember John Day sitting with his hands 
on both thighs, the horse with his nostrils extended, and remarked 
the dilated eye on his going back to weigh just as Mr. Cooper had 
depicted him ; how Todd, when Mr. Coombe hunted the Berkeley 
country, capped on the hounds in the Woodlands when the meet 
was at Halton, and the fox broke away in a line for Mendover. 
You had a glorious five-and-thirty minutes— only two up and your- 
self, the others on the wrong side of the wood. You felt half 
inclined to write to the editor for the addresses of the owners of 
the hunters and hacks, and have them at any price." 

Amongst English sporting artists no name is more familiar than 
that of Henry Aiken, whose work is justly held in very high esteem. 

The family of Aiken, of Danish origin, only came to this country 
about the year 1772, having been obliged to fly from Denmark on 
account of political disturbances, in which some of its members 
were involved. The refugees at first settled in Suffolk, but after- 
wards took up their residence in London. 

The original name of the Aiken family would appear to have 
been " Seffrien," a patronymic which was exchanged for that of 
Aiken (a little village in North Jutland), at the time of the migration 
into England. 

Henry Aiken is said to have at one time been huntsman, stud 
groom, or trainer to the Duke of Beaufort of the day, but there is 
no proof that this was the case, and the story must be dismissed 

55 



as a mere legend. When seventeen years of age the young man 
sent a miniature portrait of " Miss Gubbins " to the Royal Academy 
Exhibition. This was in 1801, and the miniature in question was 
his sole exhibit at the Academy. It is probable that his dislike of 
criticism was the cause of his not again sending any of his work. 
Beginning as a portrait painter — a line unsuited to his natural 
talents — Henry Aiken abandoned miniature painting, and took to 
depicting sporting subjects under the name of " Ben Tally O." 

At the beginning of his career, Henry Aiken was undoubtedly 
influenced by his uncle, Samuel Aiken the delineator of a number of 
hunting scenes, many of which are well drawn and interesting. 
This artist also painted a series of shooting pictures which were 
engraved by J. Pollard. His dogs, it may be remarked, are generally 
exceedingly good. At one time an engraver in aquatint, Samuel 
Aiken seems subsequently to have entirely devoted himself to 
sporting subjects, painting in oil and water colours, attaining 
considerable proficiency in both methods. A careful comparison of 
the work of Henry Aiken with that of his uncle, will demonstrate 
the influence which the latter exercised upon his relative's style, the 
delicacy of touch which the one seems to have acquired from the 
other, being especially striking. 

Henry Aiken was a man of considerable artistic attainments, his 
small pencil drawings in particular betraying much delicacy of 
execution. Essentially an artist of the country, he was admirably 
equipped to delineate hunting scenes, the engravings of which are 
in considerable request at the present day. The leading firms 
which published his work, were Rudolph Ackermann, Thomas 
Maclean and S. & J. Fuller. 

At the age of thirty-two, Aiken, who had previously signed his 
productions " Ben Tally O," executed the Beauties and Defects of 
the Figure of the Horse comparatively delineated, to which he 
affixed his own name. These eighteen plates with an illustrated 
title page were published by S. and J. Fuller in 1816. It may be 
added that his anatomical studies for this series greatly facilitated 
his renderings of the various coaching and hunting scenes which 
have rendered his name famous. 

In 1819, Hoiv to Qualify for a Meltonian, a set of six plates 
accompanied by some humorous directions to hunting men, was 
once again signed " Ben Tally O." 

Eight oil paintings were executed by Henry Aiken for Mr. Magniac, 
of Colworth. This fine series was entitled The Leicestershire Steeple- 
chase, and in it appear most of the best-known Leicestershire hunting 
men and horses of 1829, in which year, on March 12th, the steeple- 
chase was run. In 1833, Aiken painted The Quorn Htint — eight 
scenes, engraved by Lewis, and printed in colours. These served to 
illustrate Fox-huntings published by Ackermann. This set also 
contains many portraits. Another series of pictures was Aiken's 
Sporting Anecdotes, of which perhaps the best-known is The 
Hunting Sweep, which was engraved by the painter himself. This 
sweep was a celebrated and popular character, who hunted with the 

56 



Duke of Beaufort's hounds. Another of this series was The 
Spoi-ttng Bishop, menixonQiS. by Nimrod in one of his Hunting Tours. 

A certain Bishop had, on his elevation to the Bench, made over 
a pack of foxhounds, which had been his dehght, to his brother. 
Some time later the Bishop, out riding, chanced to come upon the 
fox and the hounds at fault. Carried away by excitement, the high 
dignitary of the Church, at once gave one of the view-halloos for 
which he had been famous. The huntsman, listening for a moment, 
soon recognised his old master's voice. "That's Gospel, by G — !" 
said he. 

Whether there was any truth or not in the report that Aiken had 
originally been a huntsman or stud-groom, it is certain that he 
knew a great deal about horses, and was intimately acquainted with 
hunting in all its phases. The accuracy of his compositions is a 
sufficient demonstration of this. It may safely be averred, that 
hardly any artist ever displayed such an aptitude for depicting 
the various phases and incidents of a run, in which it was often his 
practice to include the portrait of some follower of hounds, well- 
known as a sporting character. As a rule, individual portraiture 
was not made the sole aim of his works, an exception to this must 
be mentioned in the case of the equestrian likeness of the Marquis 
of Anglesea, which was engraved by H. Meyer. 

A most prolific artist, it is hardly possible to make any adequate 
mention of even a small portion of Henry Aiken's work. He was 
perhaps the most popular of any English sporting painter, and 
prints from his paintings are to be found all over the country. 
Who is there who does not know The Night Riders of Nacton, The 
Chase and the Road, and many other similar compositions ? 

An especially attractive series of four engravings after Henry 
Aiken, engraved by Harris, were published by Rudolph Ackermann 
in 1844. These were — 

(1) The Med. 

Delightful scene 
When all around is gay — men, horses, hounds, 
And in each smiling countenance appears 
Fresh blooming health, and universal joy. 

The meet is at the Cross Roads, where the finger-post, pointing 
to " Melton Mowbray " tells the locality. There, surrounded 
by the hounds, stand the huntsman and his two whips. The rough- 
rider of the county lays down the law for the benefit of the rural 
Boniface. The country squire — my lord in chariot and four — and 
the sporting parson are coming down the hill, the chawbacons are 
tucking up their skirts for a run, and all is expectation and 
exciting hope. 

(2) A Change, and We're Away ! 

Hark I What loud shouts 
Re-echo through the groves! — he breaks away : 
Shrill horns proclaim his flight. Each straggling hound 
Strains o'er the lawn to reach the distant pack ; 
'Tis triumph all — and joy. 

57 



The hounds have gone away, somewhat straggHng perhaps, but 
the huntsman on his grey is well up with them. The parson has 
got a capital lead, and is taking the rails in style. The thistle- 
whipper in green too, is well handicapped — the squire is going at 
the rails in a quiet workmanlike manner, and the crowd are 
emerging from the cover here, there, and everywhere. The 
game's alive. 

(3) A Shift of the Scene. 

The brook stares us in the face. The huntsman's grey is 
landed — not very well — but on the right side. The squire is 
pulling himself out as he best may, having been left, like Moses, 
in the bulrushes. The parson goes like a man, clear over his 
head, the thistle-whipper has lost start, and the rest of the field, 
in various positions, but only thirteen in sight, look very determined 
to make the best of a bad thing. 

(4) Whohoop! 

In bolder notes 
Each sounding horn proclaims the felon dead. 

The hounds are clamouring for their due, the parson is evidently 
entitled to the brush, and we may add, that the thistle-whipper is 
nowhere to be seen. 

Occasionally Aiken would himself engrave his own designs. 
" British Proverbs," published by Maclean in 1824, contains six plates, 
which are his work. Some of the plates which he contributed to 
" Nimrod's Life of a Sportsman " — there were thirty-six coloured 
illustrations in all — were also etched by the artist, who executed a 
number of illustrations for sporting books of his day. The " Life 
of John Mytton," his " Life and Death," and the " Jorrock's Jaunts 
and Jollities," all owed a good deal of their success to the talents 
of Aiken, who was, besides, a frequent contributor to the Sporting 
Magazine, New Sporting Magazine, and Sporting Review. 

Some of the artist's finest work it should be mentioned was 
contained in the " National Sports of Great Britain," a volume in 
royal folio, published by Maclean, in 1821. In this are fifty large 
plates engraved by T. Clarke, after Aiken, printed in colours, 
the accompanying descriptions of the various held sports being in 
English and French. 

"The National Sports of Great Britain " was originally published 
at £10, but of late years it has greatly increased in value, not 
infrequently fetching seven or eight times that sum. A great many 
of Aiken's productions were soft ground etchings coloured by hand, 
and a number of plates are more often to be met with in their 
uncoloured state. His " Sporting Notions," a set always extremely 
popular, has been reproduced in a number of different forms, and 
collectors wishing to obtain genuine examples above all suspicion 
should take care to exercise a very large degree of caution. 

In character, Henry Aiken was somewhat eccentric and fond of 
leading a secluded life. Exceedingly independent in manner, his 
usual method of introducing himself to anyone with whom he might 

58 



have business to do, was a curt " I am Henry Aiken." His appear- 
ance, if somewhat shabby, was picturesque in the extreme. A coat 
of vernal green, embellished with large brass buttons, breeches of 
brown cloth with gaiters to match, together with a broad-brimmed, 
low-crowned hat, formed his usual equipment — his portrait, bearing 
no date, the work of M. Gauci, was published by G. S. Tregear. 

Henry Aiken died in April, 1851, in the sixty-eighth year of his 
age, and was buried in Highgate cemetery. Though fairly affluent 
during most of his life, his circumstances at the time of his death 
wei^e anything but prosperous, indeed he was buried at his 
daughter's expense. 

Henry Aiken's son, Henry Gordon Aiken, possessed something of 
his father's talents, which, however, he used for a somewhat 
unedifying purpose, executing pictures in imitation of the elder 
Aiken's style, which he was in the habit of passing off upon those 
who could be induced to purchase them. From an artistic point of 
view these are, for the most part, inferior, though not altogether 
devoid of cleverness. The imitations in question were executed in 
water colour, oil, and pencil, being signed Henry Aiken, or simply 
H. A. Had this artist chosen to devote himself to a more legitimate 
sphere of art, there is reason to believe that he would have made a 
name for himself. Content to earn a somewhat precarious liveli- 
hood as a mere copyist the designs which he produced are but 
feeble counterfeits which careful examination cannot fail to detect. 
Henry Gordon Aiken died some sixteen years ago, aged 82, being in 
receipt of parochial relief at the time of his death. 

Samuel Aiken (uncle of Henry Aiken) was born in 1750, and as 
has before been said, largely influenced his nephew in his manner 
of painting. He did not at first devote himself to painting sporting 
subjects, but when he took to that particular line, he executed an 
enormous amount of hunting scenes. One of the best of these is 
Hunters at Covert-side, engraved by J. Pollard, and published in 
1820 by T. Knight. The horses in this composition belonged to 
Colonel Thornton. A pleasing series of pictures, also engraved by 
J. Pollard, is a set of four : Partridge Shooting, Pheasant Shooting, 
Woodcock Shooting, and Grouse Shooting. Another series is Fox 
Hunting, Hare Hunting, Stag Hunting, and Coursing. These 
were engraved by T. Sutherland, and published sixteen years after 
Samuel Aiken's death, by Laird, of Leadenhall Street. 

Samuel Aiken possessed a decided talent for depicting hunting 
scenes, and his work is as a rule an accurate representation of the 
horse and hound of his day. He especially excelled in painting 
dogs. This artist, it may be added, died about the year 1825. 

A sporting artist, whose work was only second in popularity to 
that of Henry Aiken, was Dean Wolstenholme, senior. Born in 
Yorkshire in 1757, this artist was originally a man of independent 
means, whose time was largely devoted to sport. Originally he 
painted only for amusement, occasionally presenting his friends with 
portraits of favourite horses or hounds. Ruined by lawsuits, 
however, he determined to make painting his profession, thereby 

59 



verifying the prediction of Sir Joshua Reynolds, who had early 
observed the great talent of Wolstenholme, and predicted that he 
would in time develop into a serious painter. Though more than forty 
years of age, Dean Wolstenholme came up to London in 1800, and took 
up his abode in East Street, Red Lion Square, where he commenced 
to paint for a livelihood. His first contribution to the Academy in 
1803 was Coursing, and he continued to execute many works during 
the next twenty-five years. 

Dean Wolstenholme painted a good many sets of hunting, 
coursing, and shooting pictures. Fox-hunting, four scenes, printed 
in colours, and published by Ackermann, form an excellent set; and a 
shooting series, engraved by Himeley, is also very good. A large 
number of Wolstenholme's pictures, it may be added, were inspired 
by hunting songs. Several sets or series of hunting, coursing, and 
shooting scenes, being engraved by Sutherland and Bromley. One 
such set represents Foxhunting, in four scenes ; these were engraved 
by Sutherland, printed in colours and published by Ackermann. 
Shooting, was the title of another series of four clever pictures, 
which represented respectively (1), Going Out ; (2), Game Found; 
(3), Dogs Bringing the Game ; and (4), Refreshing. These were 
engraved by Himeley. Others worthy of special mention are The 
High-mettled Racer Sold to the Hoiinds and The Joys of Coursing. 
The Death of Tom Moody and Reynard seeking Refuge in the 
Church, were companion works. These two pictures were engraved 
by his son. Dean Wolstenholme, junr., and were published by R. 
Ackermann. 

After the year 1826, pictures signed Dean Wolstenholme, may be 
ascribed to his son, " Dean Wolstenholme, junior." There are 
certain differences in the work of father and son, which should be 
carefully noted as a means of identification. The elder artist loved 
to paint a gloomy sky, whereas the younger almost invariably 
depicted a bright and sunny one. The son's backgrounds were very 
carefully executed from nature, whereas the father was not in the 
habit of devoting particular attention to them. Leafless oaks 
constantly occur in Wolstenholme junior's landscapes, and his 
sketch-books were filled with studies of trees, afterwards to be 
utihsed in pictures. If the points mentioned above are noted, there 
is less chance of confusing the earlier pictures of the younger 
Wolstenholme with the later ones of his father. 

Dean Wolstenholme, junior, who was born in 1798 ; as a young 
man, studied engraving, and was in consequence able to engrave 
both his own and his father's pictures. In after years he lamented 
that he had not devoted himself entirely to painting, and declared 
that his labours at engraving had prevented him from fully 
developing his powers as a painter. Amongst his best works are 
his Brewery pictures, which represented the horses of certain 
celebrated firms. 

The first of these " Brewery Pictures " was Messrs. Truman, 
Hanbury and Buxton's Black Eagle Brervery ; this was exhibited in 
the Royal Academy of 1822. A View of the Hour Glass Brewery, 



60 




IHIi RAUY I'ACK. By \V. Wind aft, I H . B. Clialon 
By peniiissioii of A. Moreton Mandcvillf, Esq. 




COCKFIGHTING. By Zoffany 



61 




THE "eagle" PARIS AND DOVER COACH 
Designed by G. Trcgceii. Engraved by Aiken 
Bv permission of A, Mnreton Mandeville, Esq. 




BLOOMSBLKY. WINNER OE THE DERBY, 1839 
Bv Beckwitli, after F. C. Turner 



62 



in Thames Street, belonging to Messrs. Calvert & Co., was one of 
his contributions to the gallery of the British Institution in the 
following year. The last of the series was Messrs. Barclay, 
Perkins & Go's. Brewery, in Park Street, Southwark, painted in 
1840. All of these pictures he subsequently engraved. 

Two well-known and popular pictures by the younger Wolsten- 
holme were The Burial of Tom Moody, and The Shade of Tom Moody. 
The old huntsman in question made a dying request that at his 
grave side six earth stoppers should " give three rattling view 
halloas" in farewell, and his wish was respected. The copper 
plates of these works, which were engraved by the artist himself, 
are still in existence. A series of four pictures of the Essex Hunt 
afford striking evidence of this artist's skill in grouping numerous 
figures in appropriate landscape. These pictures are entitled (1) 
The Meet at Matching Green ; (2) Drawing the Covert of Man Wood ; 
(3) Fox Crossing from Leading Roothing ; and (4) The Death. The 
figures in these pictures — men, horses and hounds — are all 
portraits ; they were painted in the time of Mr. Henry J. Conyers, 
who succeeded his father in the Mastership, in 1818. This set was 
engraved by the artist. 

Dean Wolstenholme the younger, it should be added, did not 
entirely confine himself to the delineation of sporting subjects. 
Love in a Tub, and The Widow Beivitched were two of his works 
which achieved considerable popularity, and were engraved. A 
great pigeon fancier he brought the variety known as the " Almond 
Tumbler'' to a high state of perfection. A number of prize birds 
were painted by him, some of the portraits being engraved in life 
size. Fourteen of these, printed in colours, which are in the print 
room at the British Museum, show Wolstenholme's skill in 
rendering the peculiar metallic sheen of the pigeon's plumage. He 
was the inventor of a process of colour printing, afterwards 
patented by Leighton Brothers. This artist, it may be added, lived 
to the great age of eighty-four, the last twenty years of his life 
having been passed at Hampstead, the country surrounding which 
formed the background for much of his later work. 

John F. Herring, the well-known animal painter, who was born 
in 1795, for two years drove the Wakefield and Lincoln coach 
Nelson, afterwards acting for a short time as coachman of the 
Doncaster and Halifax Mail. In his spare hours he appears to have 
painted sign boards, coach panels, and portraits of horses, his 
talents gaining for him the name of the artist-coachman. In 1818 
he seems to have definitely given up the reins, for in that year he 
exhibited the Portrait of a Dog at the Academy. This was really 
the beginning of Herring's artistic career, and for thirty-three 
years afterwards he painted a number of portraits of racehorses, 
a complete collection of which would practically constitute a 
pictorial history of the Turf during the period in question. 

The following are some of the numerous portraits of celebrated 
racehorses executed by this artist : Touchstone, who started twenty- 
one times, won nine races, including the St. Leger, 1834; walked 

63 



over for seven, and lost five; Queen of Trumps, winner of the Oaks 
and St. Leger, 1835; Elis, winner of numerous races, ending with 
the St. Leger, 1836 ; Bay Middleton, winner of the Two Thousand 
and Derby, 1836 ; Cyprian, winner of the Oaks, 1836 ; Phosphorus, 
winner of the Derby, 1837 ; Miss Letty, winner of the Oaks, 1837; 
Doji John, winner oi the St. Leger, 1838; Crucifix, winner of the 
One Thousand, Two Thousand, and Oaks, 1840; Coronation, w'xnnzv 
of the Derby, 1841 ; Ghuznee, winner of the Oaks, 1841 ; Nutwith, 
winner of the St. Leger, 1843; Orlando, winner of the Derby, 
1844 ; Faugh-a-Ballagh, winner of the Two Thousand and Cesare- 
witch, 1844 ; Merry Monarch, winner of the Derby, 1845 ; The Baron, 
winner of the St. Leger and Cesarewitch, 1845 ; Pyrrhus ist, 
winner of the Derby, 1846 ; Mendicant winner of the One Thousand 
and Oaks, 1846; Sir Tatton Sykes, winner of the St. Leger and 
Cesarewitch, 1846. Camarine, whose portrait Herring painted, 
was a remarkable mare. Foaled in 1828, she ran in neither the 
Derby nor the Oaks of her year, but had a highly successful turf 
career, beating among others, in 1831, Spaniel, winner of that year's 
Derby ; Oxygen, winner of the Oaks of that year; and in 1832 she 
beat Rowton, winner of the St. Leger of 1829. 

In his later years Herring devoted his energies largely to the 
painting of rural scenes, the execution of which betrays great 
delicacy and finish, his farmyard pictures being especially remark- 
able. For Queen Victoria, who paid this artist great attention, he 
painted the portraits of three Arabs — Bagdad, a charger of the 
Prince Consort's, Korsaid, and Said, a horse on which the royal 
children had received their first lessons in horsemanship. He died 
near Tunbridge Wells, in 1865. 

Another artist who shared with Herring the distinction of being 
a fashionable and celebrated painter of racehorses was Charles 
Hancock, born in the same year, 1795. Between 1835 and 1843 
he painted : — 

Queen of Tru7nps, winner of the Oaks and St. Leger, 1835, and 
one of the celebrated winning mares. This picture was engraved 
and published in colours by Rudolph Ackermann : the plate is a 
large size, the same as that from the portrait of Mundig. 

Mzmdig, winner of the Derby, 1835, for John Bowes, Esq. 
Scott is the jockey in the saddle. This portrait was engraved in 
large size, printed in colours, and published by Rudolph Ackermann, 
of Regent Street, in September, 1835. Richard Parr also engraved 
a small plate from this portrait. 

Glcncoc, bred by the Earl of Jersey in 1831 : winner of the 
Royal Cup at Ascot in 1835. Painted in 1836, and engraved by E. 
Duncan ; it was published in colours, by Rudolph Ackermann, in 1836. 

Don John, bred in 1835 by Lord Chesterfield; winner of the 
St. Leger, 1838. This portrait was engraved by E. Duncan, and 
published in colours, by Rudolph Ackermann, in 1838. 

Bay Middleton, winner of the Two Thousand and Derby, 1836. 
Engraved by E. Duncan ; published in colours by Rudolph 
Ackermann in 1836. 

64 



Coronation, bred by Mr. Ravvlinson ; winner of the Derby, 1841. 
This picture was engraved in small size by E. Paterson. 

Satirist, bred by Lord Westminster ; winner of the St. 
Leger, 1841. 

Attila, bred by Colonel Hancox; winner of the Derby, 1842. 

Our Nell, bred by IVlr. Dawson ; winner of the Oaks, 1842. 

Blue Bonnet, winner of the St. Leger, 1842. 

Cotherstone, bred by John Bowes, Esq. ; winner of the Two 
Thousand and Derby, 1843. 

Nutwith, bred by Captain Wrather ; winner of the St. Leger, 1843. 

Faugh-a-Ballagh, bred in Ireland, and purchased in 1842 by 
E. J. Irwin, Esq. ; winner of the St. Leger and Cesarewitch, 1844. 

In 1835, Hancock painted Tally-ho I the picture of a fox break- 
ing covert. This was engraved by Beckwith and Duncan, and 
was published by Rudolph Ackermann. 

In 1836 he painted a portrait of " George Baker, Esq., on his 
Favourite old Mare." This was engraved by W. Giller, and 
published by Ackermann. "Mr. Baker, of Elenore Hall, in the 
County of Durham," said the New Sporting Magazine, " has been 
a gentleman jockey, an owner of racehorses, a master of fox- 
hounds, a Member of Parliament, an amateur in the fine arts — in 
short, he is a thoroughbred British sportsman." 

Hancock's services were also in request as an illustrator of 
books. The Sportsman's Annual (royal folio), published in 1836, 
by A. H. Baily and Co., of Cornhill, and R. B. King, of Monument 
Yard, London, contains plates from pictures by Sir Edwin Landseer, 
Abraham Cooper, R.A., and Charles Hancock. Hancock is repre- 
sented in this book by his pictures of a Foxhound and a Bloodhound, 
drawn on stone and engraved by Thomas Fairland. 

Sporting, illustrative of British field sports, edited by Nimrod, 
also a royal folio, and published by A. H. Baily and Co., contains 
plates from pictures by T. Gainsborough, R.A., Sir Edwin Landseer, 
R.A., Abraham Cooper, R.A., J. F. Lewis, and William Barraud. 
Hancock's five pictures in this work are The Warreners, engraved 
by R. Parr ; The Gamekeeper, engraved by W. A. Scott ; Rat 
Hunting, engraved by T. S. Engleheart ; Thorngrove and Sir 
Hercules, two racehorses, engraved by H. Beckwith ; and Deer- 
stalking, engra\'ed by W. Greatbach. 

Hancock's career as a painter was from 1819 to 1847. The date 
of his death is unknown, but it would appear to have been 
about 1855. 

Five years before this died William Barraud, who, though not an 
artist of very striking abilities, produced some very good pictures of 
sport and sportsmen, together with a number of portraits of famous 
horses and dogs. His younger brother, Henry Barraud, who died 
as late as 1874, is perhaps best known by the engravings of We 
praise Thee, O God, which in their day achieved a widespread 
popularity. The three youths in the picture were the artist's own 
son, his nephew, and a friend. Other well-known pictures by 
this artist were Lord's Cricket Ground, and The London Season. 

65 



We now come to almost the last of the sporting artists who 
flourished well within living memory. This was Charles Cooper 
Henderson, who, born in 1803, died only thirty-one years ago, having 
linked the days of the mail-coach with those of the railway train. 

In consequence of his marriage, in 1829, to a Miss By, Cooper 
Henderson's father disinherited him, though there seems to have 
been no reason, except caprice, for taking such a course. Thrown 
upon his own resources, the young man adopted painting sporting 
pictures as a means of livelihood, living on the money earned by his 
own talents till 1850, when the death of his mother rendered him 
independent. Coaching scenes and incidents of the road were the 
subjects which most attracted Henderson, many of whose pictures 
have been rendered familiar through their engravings. Besides 
this, he occasionally painted in a different style, an example of this 
being the Berkeley Hunt. A number of his compositions represent 
travelling scenes in France, he having obtained a thorough 
knowledge of the horses, trappings, and vehicles employed across 
the channel, during a prolonged tour, taken as a young man, with 
his father. Cooper Henderson's elder brother, John Henderson, 
was a great collector and, as will be remembered, he bequeathed the 
most valuable portion of his treasures to the nation. 

With the death of Cooper Henderson, terminated the old school 
of sporting artists, the engravings of whose works form such 
attractive ornaments to the smoking room and country house. The 
school in question finally ended just about the time that the various 
processes of reproduction now in vogue caused the decay of the 
old-fashioned engraver, who, in his time, had reproduced so many 
sporting scenes as well as pictures of horses and hounds. Though 
mechanical reproduction has been brought to great perfection, it 
can never convey the same impressions as were produced by many of 
the sporting prints so ably executed in the past by men who 
imparted a real spirit of actuality and life into the work upon 
which they were engaged. 

Those desirous of obtaining full details of the lives of British 
Sporting Artists will find a wealth of interesting information in 
"Animal Painters of England," by Sir Walter Gilbey, Bart., a 
work which has been of great assistance to the present writer in 
the completion of his task. 




66 



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To THE sociiiEinr OF coffeirs at blackmeath 



List of a few Exceptionally Attractive Prints. 



Racing.—" The Walk," " Starting,'^ 
" Weighing and Rubbing Down,'' 
and " The Race" 



A Hurdle Race 

Racing Subjects 

Life and Death of a Racehorse 

The Aylesbury Grand Steeplechase, 
February, 1866 

Derby Stakes, 1820 

Racing 

The Derby of 1820 

Epsom Races 

The High-Mettled Racer 

Race and the Road, The 



The First Steeplechase on Record... 



Ascot ... 

Aylesbury Grand Steeplechase 

The Derby Stakes of 1828 and 1829, 
and the Ascot Gold Cup, 1829 

The Derby of 1839 

Doncaster Races 

The St. Leger of 1836 

Epsom 

Epsom, Goodwood, and Ascot Races 

Epsom Grand Stand, and Goodwood 
Grand Stand 

Scenes on the Road, or a Trip to 
Epsom and Back 

Match Between Flying Dutchman 
and Voltigeur for £1,000 



RACING. 



A set of four, by T. Sutherland, after H. Aiken ; in 
colours. 

Four prints, in colour, by C. Hunt, after H, Aiken. 

Eight plates, each about 18 inches by 12 ; in colours, by 
S. Aiken. Very rare. 

Si.\ plates, in aquatint, by and after Gooch. 



By C. Bentley, after Aiken ; in colours. 

After H. Aiken. 

By the same. 

After Aiken ; in colours. 

By Sutherland, after Aiken ; a pair, in colours. 

By Thomas Sutherland, after Aiken ; a series of six 
plates, in colours. 

Epsom 1851 ; a folding coloured print, by Henry Aiken ; 
opening to about 8 feet, describing scenes on the road 
to Epsom and the race for the Derby Stakes ; published 
by Ackermann, n.d. 

A series of four coloured plates, by John Harris, after 
Henry Aiken. This is also known as the Night Riders 
of Nacton, the jockeys being cavalry officers wearing 
nightgowns over their regimentals. It was published 
by Rudolph Ackermann. 

His Majesty's Gold Plate, after J. Pollard ; in colours. 

A set of four plates, in colours, by Harris, after Pollard. 

After J. Pollard. A set of three, in colours. 

After Pollard ; in colours. 

By Harris, after Pollard ; a series of four plates in 
colours. 

After Pollard, by Harris. 

After J. Pollard, by C. Hunt ; a set of six, in colours. 

After Pollard, by Pyall ; a set of three, in colours. 

After Pollard, by Reeve ; both in colours. 



By John Harris, after James Pollard ; a series of four 
plates in colours. 

Run at York, on May 13th, 1851, by Charles Hunt, after 
Harry Hall ; in colours. 



67 



HUNTING. 



The Lucky Sportsman 



Fox Hunting ... 

Going to Cover, The Chase, At Fault, 
The Death 

Fox Hunting 

George III. returning from Hunting. 
A Royal Hunt in Windsor Park ... 

The Quom Hunt 



The Meet, Breaking Cover, Full Cry, 
The Death 



A very valuable print in colours, executed by F. D. 
Soiron, after Morland. 

Four rare coloured prints, by E. Bell, after Morland. 



Hunting Subjects 
Fox Hunting 

Sporting Anecdotes 



Hunting Notions.. 



Hunters at Grass 

Sir M. M. Sykes' Hounds Breaking 
Cover 



Leicestershire 



Hunting Scenes 

Fox Hunters Meeting, Breaking 
Cover, Fox Chase, The Death 

The Essex Hunt 



Fox Hunting 

Fox Hunting 

The Burial of Tom Moody. The 
Shade of Tom Moody 



By T. Burford, after J. Seymour ; in colours. 
Four fine aquatints, after Rowlandson. 

By L. F. Dubourg, after Pollard ; in colours. 

A fine and valuable set of eight coloured plates, by 
Lewis, after Henry Aiken. 

Four oblong prints, by Sutherland, after Henry Aiken. 

A set of four, by J. Gleadah, after Henry Aiken. 

Four prints, by Harris, after Henry Aiken, published by 
Ackermann in 1844. 

A series of some fourteen prints, after Aiken, the best 
known of which is perhaps the Hunting Sweep 
(No. 14). This was engraved by the artist himself and 
published by Ackermann in 1837. 

Six coloured plates, by Henry Aiken. A reprint of 
slight value exists. 

By W. Ward, after B. Marshall. A fine print. 



By Wolstenholnie, after H. B. Chalon, the master is in 
the background mounted upon a white horse ; the 
huntsman, William Carter, being the central figure. 

Four fine coloured plates, representing hunting scenes, 
by J. Dean Paul. 

Four prints, by T. Reeve, after Wolstenholme. 



A set of four, by C. Hunt, after Pollard. 

Four plates, by and after Dean Wolstenholme, junior, 
the men, horses and hounds represented being 
portraits. 

By J. Havell, after Pollard. A set of four. 

Four fine coloured prints, after Herring. 

By and after Wolstenholme. 



COACHING. 

An Airing in Hyde Park, this shows 

the " Ring" in 1793 By Gaugain after Dayes. A valuable print especially 

in the proof state. 



Hyde Park Corner 



By Rosenberg after Pollard. A fine coloured print. 



The General Post Office with mails 

departing By Reeves after Pollard in colours. This and other 

views of the same building are valuable. 



68 



COACHING— continued. 

North Country Mails By Sutherland I -^ i~, „ . 

West Country Mails By Rosenberg r"^*" P°""''^- 

Very fine prints. 

Stage Coach Arriving, Changing 
Horses and Setting Off ... ... A valuable set by Havell after Pollard. 

Stage Coaches, with News of Peace 
and News of Reform ... ... ... A very fine pair by Havell after Pollard. 

Stage Coach Travelling, Opposition 

Coaches at Speed After Pollard. 

Mail Coach in a Flood, In a Drift of 
Snow, and In a Thunderstorm ... Three good prints after Pollard, the finest of which is 

the first (see reproduction). 

Lioness attacking the Exeter Coach... The incident illustrated by Pollard is described in the 

text. 

Mails changing Horses and preparing 
to start A fine pair after Pollard. 

Highgate Tunnel and View on the 

Highgate Road By Hunt after Pollard. 

The " Cambridge Telegraph " starting 
from Fetter Lane ... ... ... By Hunt after Pollard. 

West Country Mail-Coach at the 
Gloucestershire Coffee House, 
Piccadilly By Rosenberg after Pollard. 

The London Fire Engines, the noble 

Protectors of Life and Property ... After Pollard. 

Coaching Incidents Three valuable prints after Cooper Henderson. 

The Taglioni Coach and the Original 

Bath Mail After Henderson. 

The Reading Telegraph 

The Windsor Coach 

The Southampton Coach 

The Brighton Age 

The Edinburgh Express 

The Red Rover V Fine and valuable coloured plates of coaches. 

The London and Birmingham 

Tally-Ho 

The Paris and Dover Coach 

The Eagle 

The Blenheim Coach / 

Royal Mail Coach By and after Pollard. A valuable coloured print. 

Two of His Majesty's State Horses ] 

The Earl of Chesterfield's State- By W. Ward after H. B. Chalon. 
Carriage ... ... ... ...J 



SHOOTING. 

The First of September. — Morning 

and Evening By William Ward after Morland. Coloured impressions 

are of considerable value. 

Hare Shooting, Pheasant Shooting... A pair of coloured prints by J. Ward after Morland. 

Morning, Partridge Shooting, Pheas- 
ant Shooting, Snipe Shooting, Duck 
Shooting, Evening Six valuable large oblong prints in aquatint by S. Aiken 

after Morland. The majority of these were etched by 

Rowlandson. 

69 



SHOOTING-contlnued. 

Duck Shooting, Partridge Shooting, 
Snipe Shooting In colours, by Charles Catton after Morland. 

The Sportsman's Return By William Ward after Morland. A fine coloured print. 

Pheasant and Woodcock Shooting ... By Thomas Sutherland after Wolstenholme. Four 

plates. 

Coursing Scenes A set of four by Reeve after Wolstenholme. 

Shooting, Coursing By Robert Pollard. 

Cover Shooting ... A pair of coloured prints by Thomas Reeve after 

Wolstenholme. 

The Spanish Pointer By W. WooUett after G. Stubbs. A fine and valuable 

print. 

Dash A good coloured print of a Pointer in the possession of 

Colonel Thornton by Robert Pollard. 

Setters By R. Laurie after F. Sartorius. 

Wasp, Child and Billy ... Three famous Bulldogs belonging to Mr. Henry Baynton 

By W. Ward after H. B. Chalon. 



BOXING. 

The Fight between J. Broughton and 

G.Stevenson in 1742 ... ... By John Young, after Mortimer ; a very rare print. 

The Fight between Humphreys and 

Daniel Mendoza ... By Joseph Grozer, after S. Einsle. 

The Fight between Humphreys and 

Daniel Mendoza .. ... ... Three engravings, published by Fores, one with letter- 

press description underneath. This great battle 
took place at Odiham, on January 9, 1788. 

The Fights between Mendoza and 
Ward ; between Randall and 
Martin ; and between Dutch Sam 
and Medley Three prints. 

The Fight between Spring and 

Langan ... ... ... By Clements and Pitman, in colours. 

The Fight between Ward and Cannon With descriptive letterpress. 

The Fives Court After Collins. 

Going to the Fight. The Return ... Two long strips about 4 feet long by 2 inches wide. 

Coloured. Very rare 

The Interior of The Fives Court ... Randall and Turner are Sparring. After Blake, by 

C. Turner. The first state, in colours, is the most 
desirable. 
The Fight between Broome and 

Hannan ... ... ... ... ... After Heath, in colours, with key. 

The Fight between Crib and 

Molineux ... ... ... ••■ After Rowiandson, coloured. 

The Fight between Pearce and Gully By Woolnoth and Lopez. 

The Fight between Sayers and 

Heenan, i860 In colours, after Walton, with key. 

70 



The Fight between 
Heenan ... 

Thomas Belcher... 

Thomas Belcher... 

James Belcher ... 

John Broughton ... 

Buckhorse 

John Gully 
Daniel Mendoza... 

Daniel Mendoza... 
Dutch Sam 

Tom Sayers. Heenan 
Johnny Walker ... 

James Ward 
Deaf Burke 

Thomas Cribb ... 

Molineux 

Molineux 

John Gully 

John Gully 



BOXING-continued. 

Sayers and 



By Jem Ward, coloured. 

The Prizefighter, after D. Guest, C. Turner. 

By Charles Turner, after B. Marshall, mezzotnit. 

The Prizefighter of Bristol, after AUingham, by E. 
Clint, printed in colours. 

A Prizefighter. Mezzotint, published by W. Richardson. 
A lithograph of the same, full length, after Hogarth, 
also exists. 

A Prizefighter, mezzotint. 

By Lopez. 

In Fighting attitude, by H. Kingsbury, after T. 
Robineau, very rare. 

A Prizefighter, by Gillray. 

A Prizefighter, by and after P. Roberts, in colours. 

Both in colours. 

The Prizefighter, after A. S. Henning, by G. Hunt, 
printed in colours. 

The Prizefighter, after Finnic, by T. Woolnoth. 

After Meyer, by C. Hunt ; and Young Dutch Sam, after 
East ; two Portraits of Prizefighters. 

The Prizefighter, after D. Guest, by J. Young. 

A Prizefighter, by J. Young, after D. Guest. 

A Prizefighter, by Dighton. 

The Prizefighter, full length in private dress, a 
mezzotint. 

The Prizefighter, full length, a mezzotint. 



71 



A Record of the Principal Sporting Prints Sold by 

Auction, 1901-1908. By W. G. Menzies. 



Title. 



Anglers, The 

Anglers' Repast 

»» • •■ ■•• 

Bottom Fishing and Anglers 

Packing up 

Bottom Fishing and Fly 

Fishing 

Bottom Fishing ; Trolling for 

Pike ; and Anglers Packing 

up 

Fisherman's Departure and 

Fisherman's Return 

Humorous Fishing Scenes 
Party Angling 



ANGLING. 



Artist. 



Anglers' Repast and Party 
Angling 



Morland, G. 



Westall, R. 
Morland, G. 



Pollard, J. 



Pollard, J. 
Corbould 
Morland, G. 



Trolling for Pike and Fly 

Fishing Pollard J, 

Young Waltonians Constable, J. 



Engraver. 

Ward, W., 
Keating 



Knight, C. 
Ward, W. 



Hunt 



Hunt 

Ward, W. 
Turner, C. 
Keating, G. 



Hunt 
Lucas, D. 



Method. 



and 



c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 



Remarks 



c.p. pair 



pair 



c.p. 
m. 
m. 
m. 



I St state 
p.b.l. ... 



of Sale 


P 


rice 






£ 


s. 


d. 


igo3 


215 


5 





1903 


183 


15 





1902 


173 


15 





igoi 


149 








1901 


126 








1906 


105 








1904 


99 


15 





1907 


81 


18 





1901 


63 








1903 


42 








1906 


13 


'3 





1905 


14 


14 





1907 


7 


7 






1908 



c.p. mounted on canvas... 1908 



c.p. pair 

c.p. series of four. 

m. 0.1. p 

m. — 

m. — 

m. — 



14 15 



19 



ig02 


16 


16 





1 90S 


8 


15 





igo2 


55 


13 





1907 


31 


10 





1906 


24 


13 





1902 


12 


I 


6 


1908 


6 


6 





1903 


50 


8 





1906 


33 








igo6 


2 


2 






COACHING, DRIVING. AND RIDING. 



Airing in Hyde Park, and Pro- 
menade in St. James' Park ... Dayes 



Airing in Hyde Park Dayes 



Approach to Christmas ; Mail 

in Deep Snow Pollard, J. 

Arrival of the Stage Coach ; 

Royal Mail Coach 

Bedford Times Mail Coach ... — 

Birmingham Tally-Ho Coach 

passing the "Crown" at 

Holloway Pollard ... 

Brighton Coach at the " Bull 

and Mouth," Regent Circus.. Lambert 
Carlton House Gardens ... Bunbury... 



Gaugain 


and 












Soiron, 


F. D. 


c.p. 


pair 


... igo3 
... igo3 


346 
280 






,, 




s. 


, 


.. igoS 


50 8 





,, 




s. 




.. 1902 


44 2 





,, 




c.p. 


second in brown 


... 1908 


42 





,, 




E. 


in bistre, pair 


.. 1905 


33 5 





Gaugain 




C.p. 


— 


1905 


131 15 





,, 




c.p. 


— 


1902 


92 8 





,, 




s. 


— 


1906 


12 10 





>» 




s. 


— 


1907 


3 10 





Hunt, G. 




c.p. 


pair 


.. 1908 


14 10 





Havell, R. 




c.a. 


pair 


.. 1908 


20 





Rudge, B. 




— 


lithograph ... 


.. 1908 


3 









c.p. 


— 


igo4 


12 12 





Hunt, G. : 


md C. 


c.p. 





1902 


17 6 


6 


Dickinson 




s. 


p.b.l. 


. . 1 906 


42 





»» 




s. 


in brown o.l.p. 


.. 1907 


30 









s. 


in bistre p.b.l. 


•■ 1904 


26 5 





,, 




s. 


in brown 


.. 1903 


24 





,, 




s. 


o.l.p. 


.. 1906 


14 3 


6 



72 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING 



Title. 



Changing Horses 

Coaching Scenes 

Car Travelling in the South 

of Ireland in the year 1836 — 

Bianconi's Establishment ... 

Coaching Accidents 

Coaching Incidents 

Coach Horses and Chaise 

Horses 
Driving Tandem 

Driving a pair 

" Eagle " — Paris and Dover 

Coach 

Edinburgh and London Mail 

Coach, passing a ToUgate at 

night 

Elephant and Castle on the 

Brighton Road 

Elephant and Castle 

Elephant and Castle with Mail 
Coach preparing to start ... 

Excursion to Brightelmstone, 
17S9 

English Travelling, or the First 
Stage from Dover ; French 
Travelling, or the First 
Stage from Calais 

Four in-l;and 

George III., His Majesty in his 
Chariot returning to Town 
from Windsor 

Hyde Park Corner 

London Fire Engines ... 

London Fire Engines... 

Mail at Temple Bar 

Mail Coach by Moonlight 

Mail Coach-Guard dropping a 
bag at Post-office 

Mail Coach in a Flood 

Mail Coach in a Storm 

Mail Coach in a Thunderstorm 
on Newmarket Heath 

Mail Coach with the Horses 
bolting from the changing 
place 

Manchester Coach 

Mail Coach— In a Flood 

In a Thunderstorm 
,, In a Drift of Snow 

,, In a Snow Storm 

Mail Coach ... 

Mail Coach behind Time ; and 
Stage Waggon 

Mail Coach by Moonlight ; 
and Mail Coach in a Fog ... 

Mail Coach in a Flood, and 
Mail Coach in a Thunder- 
storm, on Newmarket Heath 

North Country Mails at the 
"Peacock," Islington; and 
"Elephant and Castle," on 
the Brighton Road 

North Country Mails at the 
" Peacock " Islington 



Artist. 

Henderson 
Pollard, J. 



PRINTS SOLD BY AVCTION— continued. 

Engraver. Method. Remarks. Ye 

. Hullmandel 



No time to spare for Refresh- 
ment 

Ports taken August 12th 1813— 
a gentleman driving Tandem 
in a curious Sporting Cart ... 

Post Boys watering their 
Horses; and Hunters on their 
way to the Hunting Stables.. 



Hayes, M. A. ... 
Newhouse, C. B. 
Aiken, H. 

Garrard, G. 
Pollard, J, 
Aiken, H. 

Tregear, C. 



Pollard, J. 



Jones, S. E. 

Pollard, J. 
Wigstead and 
Rowlandson ... 



Rowlandson 
Pollard, J. 

Davis, R. B. 
Pollard, J. 



Newhouse, C. B. 
Pollard, J. 



Pollard, J. 
Morland, G. 



Pollaid, J. 

Pollard, J. 

Pollard, J. 

Walter, H. 
Pollard, J. 



c.p. 

c.a. set of six 



Pollard 

Pollard, J. 

Newhouse, C. B. 
Clarke, R. 
Pollard 



Harris, J. 
Young, J. 
Aiken 



c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 

m. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.a. 



set of four 
set of four 
set of four 

pair 



Hunt, G. 
Fielding, T. 
Hunt 

Fielding, T. ... a. 

Tinted by Aiken c.a. eight plates .. 



c.p. 

c.p. 

a. 

c.p. 



Jukes, F. 
Gleadah ... 



Turner, C. 
Rosenberg 
Reeve 
Reeves ... 
Baily, J.... 
Hunt, G. 



Rosenberg 
Reynolds, S. W. 

Reeves, G. 



c.p. 
cp. 



c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

a. 

c.a. 

c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 

c.p. 



pair 



c p. in the manner of J. 

Pollard 

c.a. — 



c.p. set of four 



Reeves ... 
Reeves & Rosenberg c.a. set of four 

Pyall, H. ... c.a. pair 

Hunt, G. ... c.a. pair 

and 



Rosenberg 
Reeves 



Fielding, T. 
Sutherland, J. 

Harris, J. 
Cooke, H. R. 
Pyall, H. 



pair 



c.p. pair 

c.p. 

a. 

c.p. 

c.p. 



c.a. pair 



r of Sale. 


Price 






£ 


s. 


d. 


1908 


2 


10 





igo8 


22 


I 





1908 


12 








1908 


2 


15 





1904 


15 


15 





1907 


24 








1908 


9 








1908 


5 


10 






1906 



1908 



1908 



1908 

1905 



1904 
1907 

1907 

1907 

1907 
1907 



5 10 o 



1902 
1908 

igo2 


37 16 

18 18 







1908 


13 5 





1908 


9 15 





1908 
igo8 


5 10 

8 -5 






1907 
1908 


8 10 
31 10 






1902 
1908 
1906 
1906 


17 17 
5 
7 

17 








1908 
1908 


10 10 
9 






1904 


14 10 






6 6 



700 
7 15 o 



28 7 o 

6 15 o 

9 10 
950 

850 



1907 

1908 
1907 


26 5 

16 16 

4 15 







1907 


5 10 





1908 


6 5 






1907 



13 5 o 



73 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING PRINTS SOLD 



Artist. 
Smith, J. R. 

Promenade at St. James's Park Dayes, E. 



Title. 
Promenade at Carlisle House 



Quicksilver — Royal Mail ... Pollard, J. 

Rather Varment ... ... Aiken, H. 

Royal Mail Coach descending 

a Hill Pollard, J 

Royal Mail Coach ,, 

Rubbing down the Post Horses ; 

and Watering the Cart 

Horses Morland 

Royal Mail starting from the 

General Post Office Pollard ... 



Royal Mails starting from the 

Post Office, Lombard Street Jones, S. J. E. 

Rubbing down the Post Horses Morland. 

Specimens of Horsemanship Pollard ... 



Stage Coach; London Royal 

Mail ; and a Four in Hand 
Sporting Anecdotes — The 

Blind'uns and a Bolter 
Stage Coach, A 
Stage Coach Anecdotes — 

Let'em go, and Take Care 

of Yourselves 
Stage Coach Ascending a Steep 

Hill 

Stage Coach driving through 

Rural Scenery 

Stage Coach with opposition 

Coach in sight 

Stage Coach with News of 
Peace 

Turnpike Gates 

Trip to Brighton 

Trip to Melton Mowbray 

Trip to Gretna Green, pursu- 
ing Chaise meeting with an 
Accident ... 

Trotting Horse 

Vauxhall 



Engraver. 
Smith, J. R. 

Soiron, F. D. 
Hunt', C. 



Pollard, J. 
Havell, R. 



Smith, J. R. 
Reeves, R. G. 



Hunt, C. 
Smith, J. R. 



Pollard, J. 

Aiken, H. 
Jones, S. J. E. 



Aiken, H. 
Pollard, J. 
Jones, S. J. E. 
Pollard, J. 



Rowlandson and 

Dagoty 
Paul, J. Dean 
Paul, J no Dean 



Aiken, H. 
Rowlandson 



"Very Spicy" — A gentleman 

driving a Trotting Horse ... Aiken, H. 
View on the Highgate Road ... Pollard, J. 

West Country Mails at the 
Gloster Coffee House, Picca- 
dilly 



Dubourg 



Hunt, G. E. 



Hunt, C. 
Havell, R. 



Pollard, R. 



Hunt, C. 



... Rosenberg 



p.b.l. 



BY AUCTION— continued. 

Method. Remarks. Yei 

. m. — 

m. — 

. c.p. — 

, c.p. 
. s. 
. c.a. 

. c.p. 

. c.p. 
. c.p. 



c.p. pair 

c.p. 

c.a. - 

c.p. 

c.a. - 

c.p. 

c.p. series of lo 



c.p. 
c.a. 



c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 



c.p. 
c.a. 

c.a. set of six 
c.a. set of four 
c.p. set of i8 



c.p. 
c.p. 

a. 

c.a. 

c.a. 

c.p. 
c.a. 



■ of Sale. 


Price 






£ s. . 


d. 


1905 


75 12 





1903 


29 8 





1908 


198 





1906 


54 12 





1907 


20 





1908 


4 10 





1908 


10 





igo8 


24 





1908 


8 10 






1908 36 15 



1908 

1907 

1908 


9 
5 
2 


15 

5 

2 







1907 

1902 


8 
10 



15 






1908 
1907 


14 
13 


10 







1907 


5 


15 





1908 
1902 


2 
25 


2 
10 






1908 


II 


5 





1908 


10 








1908 


3 








1907 

1908 


19 
7 










1907 

1906 


19 

14 


10 








1908 
1908 
1908 


23 

16 

31 


10 

16 









1908 
1908 


7 
6 


15 







1903 
1906 
1908 


27 

21 

9 


6 



19 




6 


1908 
1908 


13 
19 


5 
8 



6 



c.p. 



1908 



COURSING. 



Coursing Wolstenholme ... Reeve 

Coursing and Duck Shooting ... Morland, G. ... Thompson, J. ... 

Going Out Wolstenholme ... Sutherland 

Hounds Finding and The 

Chase ... Aiken, H. ... — 

Return from Coursing, with Wheatley and Bartolozzi and 

companion ... ... ... Hamilton ... Cardon 



Return from Coursing... 



Hamilton 



Cardon, A. 



m. 
c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 



set of four 

pair 
pair 



1908 


26 


10 





1907 


8 


8 





1908 


3 


5 





1908 


5 


15 





1907 


84 








1902 


50 








1905 


23 


2 






74 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING PRINTS SOLD BY AUCTION— co«*(n«e<i. 



DOGS. 



Title. 

Bulldogs — "Wasp," "Child," 
and "Billy" 

Famous Setter ... 

Fisherman's Dog 
Sportsman's Dog 

Fox Hounds, Stag Hounds, 
Harriers, and Beagles 

Hounds of the Berkeley Hunt 

Kennel. The, and Bear Hunt.. 

Last Litter ; and Hard Bargain 

Last Litter 

Modish — A Foxhound ; and 
Dash — A Pointer 

Pointers and Setters 

Pointers 
Setters 
Raby Pack 



Setters 
Setters 
Setters 

Pointer Bitch 
Setters 
Setters 
Spanish Pointer.. 



Spanish Pointer 

Thunder — An old English 

Setter Chalon, H. B 



Artist. 


Engraver. 




Method 


Remarks. 


Year of Sa 


e. Price. 














£ s. 


d. 


Chalon, H. B. .. 


. Ward, W. 




m. 





1908 


6 5 





Chalon, H. B. . 


. , , 




. C.p. 





1906 


I I 





Morland, and 
















Northcote, J. .. 


. Reynolds, S 


W. 


C.p. 


pair 


... 1902 


14 10 





»» 


• 




m. 


pair 


... 1907 


8 





Wolstenholme . 


. Reeve .. 




C.p. 


set of four 


... 1908 


19 10 





Turner, F. 


. Dunkarton, W... 


m. 


o.l.p 


... 1904 


13 15 





Morland 


. Reynolds, S 


W, 


c.p. 


— 


1907 


3 3 





Morland 


. Ward, W. 




m. 


pair p.b.l. 


... igo6 


162 15 





Morland, G. .. 


. 




c.p. 


— 


1902 


10 10 





Gilpin, S. 


. Pollard, R. 




a. 


pair 


... 1907 


5 


e 


Morland 


. Ward, W. 




m. 


pair p.b.l. 


... 1906 


38 17 





• > 


,, 




cm. 


pair o.l.p. 


... 1906 


31 10 





Sartorius 
















Morland, G. 


,, 




m. 


pair o.l.p. 


... 1908 


23 10 





Chalon, H. B. .. 


,1 




cm. 


— 


1902 


40 





M 


»> 




m. 


p.b.l 


... 1903 


31 10 





,, 


,, 




c. 


— 


1903 


21 





Morland 


. 




m. 










,, 


Reynolds, S. 


■w'.' 


m. 


two 


... 1907 


6 6 





Morland 
















Ward 


Reynolds, S. 


w. 


c.p. 


two 


... 1902 


6 16 


6 


Sartorius, F. 


. Laurie, R. 




c.p. 


o.l.p 


... 1906 


5 10 





Turner, C. 


. Syer, R. 




c.p. 


— 


1906 


4 12 





Stubbs, G. 


WooUett, W 




m. 


early finish proof- 


-set 














of four 


... 1902 


10 10 





Stubbs, G. 


Woollett 


... 


m. 


— 


1907 


5 






Ward, W. 



c.p. 



1907 



13 10 o 



HUNTING. 



Ad Montem, The 



Bear Hunt, and The Kennels 
Best Run of the Season 

Bilsden Coplow Day 

Challenge, The 

Challenge, The 

Sanctuary, The 



Chevy 

Death of Tom Moody 

Death of Tom Moody 

Burial of Tom Moody 
Death of Tom Moody 

Shade of Tom Moody 
Deer Family 
Deer Pass 
Drawing a Cover, and Gone 

away ... 
Drive of Deer, and Hunters at 

Grass ... 
Drive of Deer 

Earl of Derby's Stag Hounds 
Easter Monday at Windsor, 
and Easter Monday at Epping 



Pollard ... 



Pollard 



Campion, G. B. Hunt, C 

Morland. ... Reynolds, S. W. 

Landseer, Sir E. Landseer, T. 

Loraine Smith, C. Jukes 

Landseer, Sir E. Walker, H. 

Lewis, C. G. ... 

Landseer, Sir E. Burnet, J. 



Landseer, Sir E. Landseer, T. 

Wolstenholme, D. Wolstenholme 

Pollard Duncan 

Pollard Rosenberg 



Pollard 

Landseer, Sir E 
Landseer, Sir E 

Aiken, H. 

Landseer, Sir E 
Landseer, Sir E 

Barenger 

Pollard ... 



Wolstenholme, 
Landseer, T. 



Sutherland 
Landseer, T. 
Lewis, C. G. 
Landseer, T. 

Woodman 

Pollard ... 



c.p. 

c.p. 

c.a. 

cp. 

ra. 

ra. 

c.a. 

m, 

m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 
c.a. 



D. 



m. 
m. 
c.p. 

c.a. 



Fox Breaking Cover ... ... Reinagle 

Fox chase. Dogs having lost 

the right scent Vernet, C. 

Fox Chase — with verses of song 

underneath Wolstenholme ... 



Fox Hunting 



Pollard 



Meadows & Lewis c.p. 

Debucourt ... — 

Reeve, R. ... c.p. 

Sutherland ... c.a. 



two 

artist's proof... 



ist published state .. 

pair, first state 

,, artist's proof .. 

,, signed ... 
artist's proof ... 
o.l.p 



c.p. pair 



pair 

artist's proof, signed 



pair 

artist's proofs 



1902 
1903 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1906 
1906 

1901 

1903 
1904 
1908 
1906 

1908 

1908 
1907 



1907 

1907 
1901 
igo6 
igo8 



pair (a pair uncoloured 
realised £3 15 o at 
this sale) 



pair 

Plates one, three, and 

four 

1824, set of four, long 



1902 
1908 

1907 



1908 
1902 



31 
21 

14 
3 

2 
I 



7 5 



28 10 o 
I I o 

37 10 ° 
30 o o 
25 10 o 

550 
850 

17 10 o 

6 10 o 

5 15 6 
14 3 6 



440 
440 
3 13 6 
9 19 6 



20 o 
5 IS 



13 15 
65 o 



75 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING PRINTS SOLD BY AUCTION— co»«jMJ<ei. 



Title 
Fox Hunting 



Fox Hunting 

Fox Hunting, and Hawking 
Fox Hunting — Going Out 
Fox Hunting 



Fox Hunting — 
Meeting at Cover 
Breaking Cover 
Full Cry 
The Death ... 



Drawing Cover 

Getting Away 

Full On 

The Death 

Fox Hunting 

Fox Hunters Regaling — "The 

Toast" 

Fox Hunt 

George III., His Majesty re- 
turning from Hunting 

Going to Cover ... 

Going to Cover, and The Death 

Going to Cover, The Leap, Full 
Cry, and The Death 

Going out in the Morning, The 
Chase, The Death of the 
Fox, and The Dinner 

Going out in the morning. The 

Chase, The Death of The Fox 

tt II ... 

Going Out, The Chase, Draw- 
ing Covert, and The Death ... 

Hare Hunting 

His Majesty's Harriers 

Hunters at Cover Side 
Hunters at Grass 



Engraver. 



Method. 



Re 



Hunters on their way to the 
Hunting Stables and Post 
Boys Watering their Horses 

Hunters at Cover side. Breaking 
Cover, Full Cry, and The 
Death 

Hunted Stag and Laying down 
the Law 

Hunting Subjects 



Hunting Subjects 

Hunting Scenes 

How to Qualify for a Meltonian 

Humorous Hunting Scenes — 
Thrown out, Craning, Head- 
ing the Fox, and Taking the 
Lead 

Litter of Foxes 



Morland, G. ... 


Bell, E. ... 


Wolstenholme, 


Sutherland 


Gilpin 


Scott 


Morland 


Bell, E. 


Leech, Jno. 


— 


Wolstenholme .. 


Sutherland 


Reinagle, P. .. 


Barney 


Smith, Loraine.. 


— 


Aiken 


Sutherland 



Aiken 

Wolstenholme 

Aiken, H. 
Pollard 



Pollard, J. 
Aiken, R. 
Aiken. H. 

Aiken, H. 



Rowlandson 

Rowlandson 
Rowlandson 

Hassell ... 
Hodges ... 
Davies, R. B. ... 

Aiken, S. 
Landseer, Sir E. 



Reeve 



Wolstenholme 

Hunt, G. 
Pollard ... 
Howell ... 

Dubourg, M. 
Sutherland 
Bentley ... 

Bentley, C. 



Reeve, R. 



Reeves ... 
Woodman, R. 

Pollard, J. 
Lewis, C. G. 



c.p. 


set of four 


c.p. 

c.p. 
c.p. 


set of four 


c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
m. 


pair ... 


c.p. 




c.a. 


set of four 


c.a. 




c.a. 


,, 


c.a. 


,, 



c.p. 

c.p. 
c.p. 
c.a. 

c.p. 
c.p. 
c.a. 

c.p. 



c.a. 
c.a. 

c.a. 

c.a. 

m. 

m. 

a. 

m. 

m. 

m. 
m. 

m. 
m. 



Year of Sale. 


Price 






£ s. 


d. 


... 1902 


39 8 





.. 1905 


35 14 





... 1902 


23 2 





... 1903 


37 16 





... 1907 


9 10 





1902 


19 15 





1907 


8 8 





1908 


5 10 





1907 


4 





1908 


3 






1908 56 o o 



four 



set of four, long 
set of four 



pair 

set of four 



c.a. set of four 



three 

set of three 

set of four 
pair 

0.1. p 

proof 

artist's proof, signed 

by the artist 
signed by the painter 

artist's proof 

presentation proof, 

signed 

proof, 2nd state 
signed by the painter 



190a 


53 


1903 


44 


1902 


39 



1904 



1908 



1908 



20 o o 



1908 


2 


2 





1902 


38 








1906 


33 


12 





1907 


15 


5 





1908 


9 


15 





1907 


8 








1908 


29 








1908 


7 









12 I 6 



1908 


27 


10 





igoS 


16 


15 





1908 


4 


10 





1907 


5 


12 


6 


1904 


II 








1906 


3 


10 





1908 


8 








1902 


127 








1901 


97 


13 





1904 


68 


5 





1905 


42 








1904 


25 








1901 


18 


18 






Pollard 


Pyall, H. 


c.a. 


pair 


1907 


13 


5 





Aiken, S., Sar- 
















torius, Pollard, 
















and Cell 


Pollard,]. 


c.p. 


set of four 


1908 


28 


10 





Landseer, Sir E. 


Landseer, T. ... 


ra. 


ist state 


1907 


3 


3 





Sartorius 


Peltro and Neagle 


c.p. 


set of four 


1905 


54 


12 





Pollard 


— 


c.p. 


set of three & one other 


1906 


19 


8 


6 


Seymour 


Burford 




set of four 


1907 


8 


8 





,, 


,, 




It 


1907 


7 


7 





Hodges, W. P.... 


Aiken, H. 


c.p. 


set of eight 


1905 


38 


17 





,1 


,, 


c.a. 


set of eight 


1907 


16 


5 


6 


Ansell 


Sutherland 


c.p. 


set of 10 


1908 


2 


17 


6 


Aiken 


Aiken, H. 


c.p. 


set of six 


1902 


38 










R. F 


c.p. 




1908 


12 


10 





Morland & Smith 
















C. Loraine ... 


Grozier, J. 


m. 


coloured 


1907 


3 


10 






76 



Title. 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING PRINTS SOLD 
Artist. Engraver. 



BY AUCTION— con^"n«££i. 

Method. Remarks. Year of Sate. 



Leicestershire Hunt — 
The Meet, Getting Away, 
Full Cry, and The Death 



Meltonians 

Old Druid — with portraits of 
R. K. Sampson and John 
Presse 

Otter Hunt 

1 ) *•* •'* •*• 

Only one in at the Death, The 
and The Right Sort 

Pleasures and advantages of a 
capital run — Young Gentle- 
men amusing themselves ... 

Quorn Hunt 



Reynard seeking Refuge in a 
Church and Death of Tom 
Moody 

Royal Hunt at Windsor Park 
and George III. returning 
from Hunting 

t, ti n ••• 

Royal Hunt in Windsor Park.. 
Royal Hunt, The 

Sporting Anecdotes 

Sportsmen Refreshing and 

Horse Feeder... 

Stag at Bay and Return of the 

Hunt to the Castle 

Sanctuary, The ... 

Sir Mark Masterman Sykes' 

Fox Hounds breaking Cover 



Price. 
£, ». d. 



Sporting Discoveries, or 

Miseries of Hunting... 
Stag at Bay 



the 



The Start, Going to Cover, 
Full Cry, and Hounds at 
Fault 

Village Scenery- -Full Cry ... 



Aiken, H. 

It 




Fielding, T. 


... c.p. 
... c.p. 


Aiken, H. 


... 


Aiken, H. 


... c.p. 
... c.p. 


Hen wood. 


T. ... 






Landseer, 


SirE.. 


Lewis 


... m. 



Aiken, H. 

Wolstenholrae .. 
Aiken, H. 



set of four ... ... igo8 

The Death, p.b.l. un- 

coloured ... 
set of four 
set of five (should be 6) 1902 



coloured litho. 
m. artist's proof ... 
c.p. — 



R.F, 
Lewis, F. C. 



c.p. 
c.a. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 



Pollard, J. 

Pollard, J. 

Aiken, "h. 

Morland, G. 

Byron, H. 
Landseer, Sir E. 



Dubourg 

Dubourg, M. .. 

Aiken 

Smith, J. R. 

Rowlandson, T. 
Burnet, J. 



Chalon, H. B. ... Wolstenholrae 



Landseer, Sir E.. Landseer, T. 



Wolstenholrae 



Howitt, G. 
Wolstenholme.jr. 



c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
c.a. 
c.a. 

c.p, 

c.a. 
m. 

c.p. 
m. 

c.p. 

ra. 

m. 

m. 
m. 



c.p. 
c.p. 



set of eight 
set of eight 
set of eight 
set of eight 



Wolstenholme ... Wolstenholrae ... c.a. pair 



pair 
pair 



set of five 



pair ... 
1st state 



0.1. p. 



signed by the artist... 
artist's proof, signed 

by the painter 
artist's proof 



four.. 



1908 



1908 



1902 
1907 
1907 
1906 
1907 

1907 

1907 
1901 

1904 
■905 

1907 
1902 

igo2 
1904 
igoi 



1908 
1908 



45 3 



1908 


14 








1908 


5 


5 





1902 


17 








1908 


4 


4 





1904 


9 


10 





1906 


5 


5 






1908 


4 


10 





1907 


97 








1908 


52 


10 





1903 


27 


6 





1902 


16 


5 






S o 



37 16 o 

23 o o 

15 5 o 

450 

9 10 o 

5 15 6 

4100 

14 14 o 

39 o o 

23 o o 

20 o o 

84 o o 

48 6 o 

44 2 o 

35 14 o 



1300 
4 14 o 



PORTRAITS. 



Astley, Francis Dukinfield and 
his Harriers 

Blackheath Golfers 

,, , , ... ... 

Callender, Henry, to the Society 

of Golfers at Blackheath ... 
Darlington, Earl of, and his 

Fo.Nhounds 

Forfeit, Robert, huntsraan to 

John Warde, Esq. ... 
Frarapton, Tregonwell, " The 

Father of the Turf " 

Innes, William to the Society 
of Golfers at Blackheath ... 



Marshall, B. . 
Abbott',' L. F. .' 


.. Woodman, R. . 
.. Green,"v. 


,. m. 

.. m. 


proof ... 

0.1. p 


,. 


.. Ward. W. 


. m. 


proof ... 


Marshall, B. ., 


.. Dean, T. 


. c.p. 


lettered proof 


Biederman 


.. Harding, E. 


— 


o.l.p.... 


Wootton 


.. Jones, J. 


. m. 
,. ra. 


— 


Abbott, L. V. . 


.. Green, 'V. 


m. 
. m. 
. ra. 
,. m. 


'^~ 



1908 


8 


15 





1907 


5 


5 





1902 


26 








1907 


15 








1907 


17 


17 





190S 


II 








1908 


I 


14 





1907 


6 


10 





1907 


4 


15 





1908 


28 


7 





1905 


21 








1903 


15 


15 





igo8 


8 


15 






77 



PRINCIPAL 



Lambton, 
Hounds 



Title. 
Ralph, 



and bis 



Ligonier, Viscount, on Horse- 
back 

Masson, Monsieur, "The 
Tennis Player " 



Oldacre, Tom 

Payne, Philip, huntsman to the 
Duke of Beaufort, on Horse- 
back with Hounds ... 

Tattersall, Mr 

Thornton. Col. ... 

Ward, Jno., on Blue Ruin ... 



SPORTING 

Artist. 

Ward, J 

Reynolds, Sir J. 
Mortimer 

n 

Marshall, Ben . 



PRINTS SOLD 

Eng^raver. 

.. Turner, C. 

.* ,, . . 

Fisher, E. 
Brookshaw, R... 

Ward.'w. '.'. 



BY AUCTION— conftnwerf. 



Davis, T. R. ... 
Beach, Thomas.. 
Reinagle 
Barraud 



Turner, C. 

Jones, J 

Mackenzie 
Collyer ... 



Method. 

m. 

C.p. 



m. 
m. 
m. 
ra. 



m. 
m. 
c.p. 



Remarks. 



proof 



p.b.l. ... 
p.b.l. ... 
inscriptio: 
coloured 



Year of Sale. 


Price 
£ s. 


d. 


... 1903 


19 8 


6 


1902 


IS 4 


6 


1906 


2 15 





... 1902 
... 1908 
off igoy 


31 10 

16 

2 12 







... 1902 


50 





1908 
1908 
1906 
1908 


6 10 

6 15 
4 17 

7 5 




6 




RACEHORSES. 



Anvil 

Anvil, Baronet and Dungannon 

Baronet 

Dan O'Connell 

Derby, Winners of — \ 

Caaland, 1828 

Priam, 1830 

Spaniel, 1831 

Dangerous, 1833 ... 

Plenipotentiary, 1834 

Dr. Syntax 

Eclipse ... ... 

Eclipse 

Eleanor, Penelope, Bobtail, 

Parasol and Metcora 
Grey Diomed and Escaye 
Gustavius 

Hafed 

Harabletonian and Diamond ... 

Highflyer ... 

Inkle and Jarico 

Mabrino, Pumpkin and Sharke 
Marske and Sweetwilliam 

Orville 

Oscar, Lop and two others 
Protector, Baronet, Mambrino 

and another ... 

Riddlesworth, winner of the 
Two Thousand Guineas, 1831 

Selim 

Sir Peter Teazle 

Slyboots 

Soldier 

St. Leger Stakes, Winners of 

the — from 1815-42 and 1845 

St. Leger Stakes, Winners of 

the 

Filho-da-Puta, 1815 

The Duchess, 1816 

St. Patrick, 1820 

Jack Spigot, 1821 

Barefoot, 1823 

Jerry, 1824 

Memnon, 1825 

Tarrare, 1826 

Matilda, 1827 

The Colonel, 1828 

Rowton, 1829 

Birmingham, 1830 

Chorister, 1831 

Margrave, 1832 

Touchstone, 1833 



Stubbs, G. 
Stubbs ... 



Stubbs, G. T. 
Stubbs. G. T. 



c.p. 



c.p. 



After Herring J. F. and Fernley ... c.a. 



Marshall, Ben ... 
Stubbs, G. 
Stubbs, G. I. .. 

Whessell, J. ... 
Sartorius 
Pollard, J. 
Landseer, Sir E. 
Sartorius 
Gilpin 

Singleton, H. .. 
Stubbs ... 
Stubbs, G. T. ... 
Tomson, C. 
Marshall, B. .. 



Stubbs ... 
Herring and 

Ferneley 
Chalon, H. B. 
Gilpin, S. 
Rowlandson 
Gerrard, C. 
Herring, J. 

and Hall 



Burke, Thos. 
Stubbs, G. 



Whessell 
Dodd, R. 
Pollard, J. 
Cousins, S. 
Whessell 
Jukes, F. 
Pollard, R. 
Stubbs, G. 
Stubbs, G. 
Scott, J. 
Whessell 



F., 
H. 



Stubbs, G. T. 



Ward, W. 
Ward, W. 
Rowlandson 
Aiken, S. 

Reeves, Hunt, etc. 



m. 
m. 
c.p. 



c.p. 

m. 

c.p. 

c.p, 

c.p. 



c.a. 

m. 

m. 



c.p. 



After Herring, J. F. and Ferneley, J. c.a. 



— 


1908 


I 


15 





0.1. p 


. 1908 


4 








— 


1908 


2 


7 


6 


in the manner of Herr 


ing 1 90S 


4 


15 








1908 


6 


5 





— 


— 


6 


15 





— 


— 


6 


15 





— 


— 


7 








— 


— 


6 


15 





— 


1907 


4 








— 


1902 


15 








— 


1908 


4 








— 


1907 


7 


15 





0.1. p., two 


• 1907 


12 


5 





— 


igo8 


10 


15 





artist's proof ... 


. 1902 


27 


6 





pair 


• 1907 


9 


10 





— 


1908 


I 


10 





pair 


. 1908 


2 


5 





o.l.p 


.. igo8 


4 








pair 


• 1907 


5 


10 





— 


1908 


3 


15 





o.l.p 


• 1907 


2 








— 


1907 


5 











1908 


6 


15 





— 


igo8 


9 








— 


1908 


8 


5 





— 


igo8 


I 


10 





in brown 


.. 1908 


2 


10 





29 


.. 1903 


69 


6 








1908 








— 


— 


3 


J5 





— 


— 


4 


12 





— 


— 


4 


13 





— 


— 


4 


4 





— 


— 


4 


12 





— 


— 


4 


12 





— 


— 


4 


13 





— 


— 


4 


16 





— 


— 


5 


5 





— 


— 


4 


10 





— 


— 


4 


18 





— 


— 


6 








— 


— 


5 


10 





— 


— 


4 


10 





— 


— 


4 


12 






78 



PRINCIPAL 



Title. 



SPORTING 

Artist. 



PRINTS SOLD 

Engraver. 



BY AUCTION— co«<jn««rf. 



Method. 



Rsmarke. 



Year of Sale. 



St. Leger Stakes, Winners of 
the, at Doncaster from the 
year 1S15 to the year 1824 
inclusive 

Sweetbriar, Sweetwilliam and 
Volunteer 

Tiresias 

Velociped, winner of the St. 
Leger at the York Spring 
Meeting, 182S 

Violante, Trumpeter and Dick 
Andrews, from the Set. — 
Portraits of celebrated 
Running Horses 

Wellesley Arabian, The 



p.b.l. 



1907 



Price. 

i. s. d. 



Herring 


Sutherland 


. c.a. 


Set of 10 


... — 


56 





Stubbs 

Pollard, J. 


Stubbs, G. T. . 
Pollard,]. 


. c.p. 


0.1. p 


... 1908 
1908 


3 18 
10 5 






Herring and 
Ferneley 


— 


c.a. 


— 


1908 


6 





Whessell, J. 


Whessell 


.. a. 




1907 


18 10 






13 o o 



RACING AND STEEPLECHASING. 



Adventures of Knutsford Race- 
course ... Hazlehurst, 

Aylesbury Grand Steeplechase Pollard, J. 



Brighton Hurdle Race, 1833 ... Earp, E. 

Chances of the Steeplechases Pollard, J. 

Country Race Course Mason, W. 

Derby Stakes at Epsom, 1828 Pollard, ]. 



Derby Day ; and The Railway 

Derby Stakes at Epsom ; and 
Gold Cup at Ascot, 1829 ... 

Doncaster Races — The Horses 
Starting ; and the Horses 
passing the Judge's Stand 
(Great St. Leger Stakes) 

Doncaster Races 



Doncaster and Epsom Races 



Epsom Races ... 

Epsom 
Epsom Races 
Epsom Races, with 

preparing to Start 

Race for the Derby, 
Epsom Races 
Epsom Races ... 
Epsom — Settling 

Tattersall's 

Epsom — Saddling in theWarren 

,, Preparing to Start ... 

,, The Grand Stand ... 

,, The Race 

Epsom Race Course, with Mr. 

Thornhill's "Sam" winning 

the Derby Stakes, 1818 
Epsom Race Course, with the 

Horses preparing to start for 

the Two Mile Heat 

Extraordinary Steeplechase ... 

Fairlop Fair 

First Steeplechase on Record 



Horses 
and The 
1818 ... 



Day at 



Frith 
Pollard 



Pollard, J. 



Pollard, J. 



Aiken, H. 
Pollard, J. 
Aiken 

Pollard, J, 



Aiken, H. 



Grand Leicestershire Steeple- 
chase 

Grand Stand, Doncaster 

High Mettled Racer 

High Mettled Racer 



Reeve, R. 
Harris, J. 


a. 

c.a. 
c.a. 


set of four 


Hunt, C. 

Various 

Jenkins, I. 
Reeves, R. G. ... 


a. 
c.a. 

c.p. 


pair 

set of eight ... 
pair 


Gleadah, J. 
Edge, J. 


c.a. 
a. 

c.a. 


proofs, pair ... 
pair 


Smart and Hunt. 
Harris, J. 


c.p. 
c.p. 


pair 

set of four 


Smart, J. & Hunt 


c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 


,, 


Hunt, C. " "... 


c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 


set of six 


Sutherland T. ... 
Hunt, C. 
Sutherland, T. ... 


c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 


pair 

proof 



Hunt, C. 



Sutherland, T. . 



c.p. 



c.p. 



Aiken 


.. Aiken and Duncan 


c.a. 


— 


Pollard ... 


.. Dubourg 


p.c. 


— 


Aiken ... 


.. Harris, ]. 


c.p. 
c.a. 


set of four 


Aiken, H. 


.. Bentley 


c.a. 


set of eigh 


Aiken ... 


.. Aiken, H. 


c.p. 


series of e 


Pollard, J. 


.. Ryall. J 


c.p. 




Aiken, H. 


... T. Sutherland 


c.a. 


set of six 


Rowlandson, T. — 


c.p. 


set of four 



igo8 


16 








igo6 


36 








1905 


22 








1907 


18 


18 





igo6 


6 


5 





1908 


16 


10 





1907 


12 


10 





1 90 1 


10 








1907 


6 


15 





1907 


7 


17 


6 



1907 



1908 


30 


10 





1902 


26 


15 





1907 


20 


I 


6 


1905 


12 


I 


6 


1903 


42 








1905 


39 


18 





1902 


31 


to 





igo8 


42 








1905 


38 


17 





1902 


37 








1907 


24 








1907 


13 


10 





1902 


II 





6 


igo8 


10 


10 





1908 


7 


10 





1908 


6 


5 





1908 


6 








1908 


6 








1908 


17 


10 





1908 


15 


10 





1902 


25 








1907 


14 








igo2 


10 


5 





1907 


8 


8 





igo8 


56 


14 





1902 


49 








igo8 


5 


17 


6 


1907 


53 








1907 


5 


15 


6 



79 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING PRINTS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Title. 


Artist. 


Engraver. 


Method. 


Remarks. 


Year of Sale. 


Price 
£ s. 
48 6 


d. 



Horse Racing Subjects 


Aiken 


. Sutherland, T. ... 


c.p. 


set of four 


... 1903 


Hurdle Race, A 


, , ... 


. Hunt, C. 


c.p. 


,, 


... 1902 


48 





High Mettled Racer 


Rowlandson 


— 


c.a. 


— 


1908 


3 3 





Leicestershire 


Paul, J. D. 


. Paul, ]. D. 


c.p. 




... igo2 


30 





Life of a Racehorse 


Ansell 


. Jukes 


a. 


■ • 


... 1908 


3 5 





Liverpool Grand National 
















Steeplechase, 1853 


Laporte, G. H... 


. Reeve, R. G. and 
















A, W. 


c.p. 


,, 


... 1908 


13 10 





Life of a Race-horse— TheFoal; 
















Breaking-in ; and the Death 


Aiken, H. 


— 


c.p. 


three 


... 1908 


9 





Leap, The, The Sporting 
















Sweep, etc 


Aiken, H. 


— 


— 


— 


1907 


7 15 





Match between Hambletonian 
















and Diamond 


Sartorius 


. Whessell 


c.p. 


proofs, pair ... 


... 1906 


22 I 





' " t, »i ' 


,, 


,, 


a. 


pair 


... 1907 


5 3 





Newmarket, Ascot, Epsom, 
















and Ipswich 


Aiken 


. Sutherland 


c.p. 


set of four 


... 1903 


32 II 





Newmarket, Racing at 


,, 


,, 


c.p. 


,, 


... 1907 


7 10 





Northampton Grand National 
















Steeplechase, 1840 — 
















The Start, The Brook, 
















The Fence, and Coming In 


Hunt, C. 


. Hunt, C. 


p.c. 


set of four — long 


... 1908 


27 





Newmarket Races 


Aiken, H. 


. Aiken 


c.a. 


pair 


igo5 


14 15 





Newton Races, 1831 


Towne, C. 


. Hunt, C. 


c.a. 


— 


igo2 


59 





., ,, 


,, 


, , 


c.a. 


— 


1904 


21 10 





(Fylde beating Halston and 
















Recovery) 


,, 


,, 


c.p. 


— 


1908 


39 





Newtown Races 


Towne, C. 


Hunt 


c.a. 


full margin ... 


... 1904 


22 





Newmarket Racecourse 


Aiken 


. Aiken, H. 


c.a. 


— 


1902 


18 10 





Newmarket Races 


Pollard, J. 


. Pollard, J. 


c.p. 


— 


1902 


10 






Noblemen's and Gentlemen's 
Trains of Running Horses 
taking their exercise up the 
Warren Hill, Newmarket ... 



Preparing to Start, Doncaster 
Race Course ... 

Qualified Horses aud Unquali- 
fied Riders 

Racing 

Racing Subjects 

Race Horses Exercising, 
Preparing to Start, The Race, 
and after the Race ... 

Rubbing Down the Racehorse 



Steeplechase, A 

Steeplechase, A 

St. Albans " Tally Ho " Stakes 

1834 

St. Albans Steeplechase, 1832 

Sir Joshua beating Filho-da- 
Putaat Newmarket, April 15, 
i8i6 

Starting and Training 

Subscription Rooms at New- 
market... 

Tradesmen's Plate, Chester, 

1839 

Training at Newmarket 
Trip to Epsora and back 
Warren Hill, Newmarket, with 
Portrait of the Prince of 

Wales 

Welter Stakes, June i6th, 1801 

Welter Stakes, Bib'ury Club, 

1801 

Wolverhampton Stakes 



Walker, G. 



Aiken, H. 



Havell, H. 



c.p. with letterpress key... igo8 36 o o 

uncoloured, without 

c.p. the key 1908 20 o o 

c.p. — igo8 2 10 o 



c.p. 



1907 



1300 



Aiken ... 
Aiken, H. 




.. Sutherland, T, ... 
.. Sutherland 


c.a. 
c.p. 


set of four ... 


... 1902 
... 1908 


70 
29 



8 


c 



Vernet, C. 




.. Debucourt 


c.p. 


p.b.l!' ... '.'.'. 


... igo8 
... 1908 


20 
20 











•> 




.. 


c.p. 


— 


igo8 


20 








Aiken, H. 




.. Bentley, C. 


c.a. 


series of three 


... 1907 


II 








Aiken ... 
Aiken, H. 




'.'. Aiken, H. 

.. Bentley 


c.p. 
c.a. 


set of six 


... 1907 
... 1902 
... igo6 


7 
23 
19 


5 

10 








Pollard, J. 
Pollard, J. 




.. Hunt, G. and C. 
.. Reeves and Hunt 


p.c. 
c.p. 


pair 

plate II. 


... igo8 
1906 


14 
3 


■5 

5 



6 


Pollard, J. 
Pollard, J. 




. Havell, R. 
.. Hunt, C. 


c.p. 
c.p. 





1907 
1908 


18 
6 










— 




Pollard, R. 


c.p. 


— 


1908 


13 








Turner, F. 
Aiken, H. 
Pollard, J. 


C. .. 


,. Harris, J, 

.. Sutherland 

.. Harris 


c.p. 
c.a. 


set of four ... 


1908 

igo7 

... 1906 


S 
9 

55 


10 









Burney ... 
Chalon, H. 


B. .' 


.. Collyer 

.. Turner, C. 


c.p. 


— 


1908 
1908 


7 
43 


5 
10 






" 




■ 


m. 


— 


1905 


21 








Turner, F. 


C. '.'. 


,. Turner, G. A. ... 


c.p. 





1904 
1908 


12 
5 


I 
15 







80 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING PRINTS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



SHOOTING. 



Title. 

Amorous Sportsman 

Benevolent Sportsman, and 
Sportsman's heturn . 

Duck Shooting, Pheasant Shoot- 
ing, Snipe Shooting, and 
Partridge Shooting 

Duck. Hare, Woodcock and 
Snipe Shooting 

Duck Shooting 

Duck Shooting and Coursing 

Duck Shjoting 

Evening, or the Sportsman's 
Return 

First of September 

First of September — 
Morning, and Evening 



Artist. 

Wheatley, F. 
Morland... 

Morland, G. 

Morland... 
Morland, G. 

Aiken, H." 

Morland, G. 

Sadler, Dendy 

Morland... 



Engraver. 
Hodges ... 
Ward, W. 

Aiken, S. 



Method. 
,. C.p. 
. C.p. 

c.a. 



RemarkE. 



Year of Sale. Price. 
£. 8. d. 

1903 29 o o 



pair 



four ... 



Simpson, & Calton 
Simpson... 
Thompson 
Simpson 



in bistre, four 
Plates I. and II. 



Grozer, J. 
Lowenstein 
Ward, W. 



c.p. 
c.p. 

c.p. 
m. 



— early artist's proof 



Fowler, The ... ••• ... Graham. P. 

Gamekeepers Stubbs ... 

Gamekeepers, and Labourers... Stubbs ... 



Gamekeepers' Midday Meal, 

and Return from the Shoot... 
Going to the Moors, and going 

to Cover 

Grouse, Wild Duck, Pheasant 

and Partridge Shooting 
Grouse Shooters in The Forest 

of Bowland, 

(Mr. Ashton and Mr. Haste) 



Hare Shooting, and Woodcock 
and Pheasant Shooting 

Leicestershire Covers 

Moor Shooting 

Morning, or the Benevolent 
Sportsman 

Morning, or the Benevolent 
Sportsman, and Evening, or 
the Sportsman's Return 

Morning, or the Benevolent 
Sportsman, and Evening, or 
the Sportsman's Return 

Morning, or the Benevolent 
Sportsman, and Evening, or 
the Sportsman's Return 

Newcastle, Duke of, 
Return from Shooting 



Newcastle, Duke of. 

Return from Shooting, (and 
Companion after Hamilton) 



Partridge Shooting 

Pheasant shooting, and Wood- 
cock shooting 

Pheasant shooting, and Part- 
ridge shooting 

Pigeon Shooting 

Poachers... 

Random Shot ... 

Retriever and Woodcock, and 
Spaniel and Pheasant 



Aiken, H. 
Henderson, C. C. 



Aiken 



Northcote, J. 



Morland, G. 
Aiken 
Reinagle, P. 

Morland... 



Birch, H. 
Birch, H. 



Sutherland, T. 
Harris, J. 
Hunt, G. 

Dawe, G. 



m. 

c.p. 

m. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

m. 

c.p. 

m. 

m. 

m. 

m. 

p.c. 

c.a. 

a. 



c.p. 
m. 



Simpson, T. ... s. 
Sutherland, T. ... c.a. 
Lewis & Nichols — 



0.1. p. pair 
pair ... 



artist's proof ... 
pair 0.1. p. 

pair 

set of four 

0.1. p 

proof in colours 



pair 

set of four 



Grozer, J. 



c.p. 



1907 



1907 



1907 



29 8 



37 6 



1907 


18 


7 


6 


1907 


II 








1907 


8 


8 





1908 


II 


15 





1908 


6 


10 





1907 


12 


I 


6 


1907 


10 


10 





1907 


6 


6 





1906 


"3 


8 





1906 


52 


10 





1907 


36 


15 





1903 


22 


I 





1902 


17 


5 





1903 


15 








1907 


6 


6 





1906 


5 


15 


6 


1906 


2 


10 





1903 


37 


16 





1905 


26 


5 





1907 


4 


10 





1907 


5 


5 





1902 


23 


10 





1908 


12 


15 





1908 


6 


15 





1907 


6 


10 





1907 


10 








1902 


26 








1908 


3 


15 






37 16 



Morland 


Grozer, J. 


.. c.p. 


pair 0.1. p 


1902 


112 


15 








.. 


.. m. 


pair framed 


1907 


86 








,, ... 


,, 


.. c.p. 


pair 


1906 


18 


18 





Wheatley, F. ... 


Bartolozzi 


.. c.p. 
.. c.p. 
.. c.p. 
.. c.p. 


— 


1907 
1904 
1902 
1904 


44 
26 

17 
16 


2 
5 

17 
16 








Wheatley 
Aiken, h7 


Bartolozzi 
Hunt, G. 


.. c.p. 
.. c.p. 
.. c.p. 
.. c.p. 


pair 


1907 
1902 
1905 

1908 


84 
50 
39 

I 





5 

I 








Ibbotsen, J. 


Dodd, R. 


.. c.a. 


., 


1907 


6 


15 





Aiken, H. 

Aiken 

Turner, J. L. ... 
Landseer, Sir E. 


Aiken, H. 
Turner, C. 
Lewis, C. G. 


c.p. 
.. c.a. 
.. a. 
.. m. 


1828, with key plate 

set of eight 

artist's proof 


1908 
1902 
1904 
1907 


6 
18 
30 

3 


5 





13 





6 





Landseer, T. 


.. m. 


pair — artist's proofs... 


1904 


19 


19 






81 



PRINCIPAL SPORTING PRINTS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Title. 



Shooting Pieces... 
Shooting Subjects 

Shooting Pieces 



Shooting 



Artist. 
... Aiken 

... Stubbs, G. 



Engraver. 

Aiken, S. 
Catton ... 

Woo'l'lett, W. 



Shooting — Illustrations to a 

Song Wolstenholme 

Snipe Shooting, and Partridge 

Shooting Morland, G. 

Snipe Shooting, and Partridge 

Shooting ,, 

ti I, ... II . 

Snipe Shooting, and a Pigeon 

Shooting Match Aiken, H. 

Sportsmen Refreshing, and 

The Rabbit Warren Morland, G. 

Sportsman's Return Morland... 



Weary Sportsman 



Wild Fowl Shooting from a 
Punt 



Morland 



Aiken, S. 
Ward, W. 



Bond, W. 



Jlethod. 

. c.a. 

. c.p. 



m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 

c.p. 



Remarks. 



Year of Sale. 



Catton, C. Junr. s. 



c.p. 
m. 



set of four 

set of four 

set of four proofs 

set of four, early 

finished proofs 
set of four 



colour print — pair 
pair 



c.p. 

— pair 0.1. p. 
m. p.b.l. ... 
m. p.b.l. ... 
c.p. 
c.p. 

m. p.b.l. ... 
c.p. 



c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 

c.p. 



igo8 
1906 
1907 

1902 
1907 

1903 

1907 
1 90S 

1908 

1907 

1908 
1907 

1908 

1907 
1906 
igo2 
1907 
1902 
1904 

1905 
1907 
1908 
1906 
1907 
1906 
igo6 

igo8 



Price. 
£ s. ( 
31 10 

3 5 
9 9 

40 o 
39 o 

37 16 

18 7 

5 10 

II o 



5 15 
46 4 

44 2 
37 16 
3i 12 
24 o 

15 15 
II II 

5 15 
4 14 

16 10 

6 16 
I I 

3 i8 



81 o o 

20 o o 

770 

4 10 o 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Archery ... 

Boxing — The Great Contest 
between "Spring" and 
" Langan " upon Worcester 
Racecourse. January 7, 1824 

Boxing Match between Richard 
Humphrey and Daniel 
Mendoza, at Odiham 

Cock Fighting — Col. Mor- 
daunt's Cock Match... 

Falconer, The 

Fores Sporting Scraps 

Game Larder 

Game Market ... 

Interior of the Fives Courts, 
with " Randall" and Turner 
Sparring 

Sporting Table, wherein all 
the Laws touching Game 
are shown at one view, a 
printed broadside with en- 
graved border of Hunting 
Incidents, etc. 

Wrestling 

Wrestling — A Match at a 
Country Fair 



Rowlandson 



Clement ... 



Einsle, S. 



drawn and etched 
colours — pair 



Zoffany .. 

Northcote, 

Henderson 
Snyders ... 
II 

Blake, T. 



Aiken, H. 



J. ... 
, C. C. 



Gleadah, J. 



R. 



Grozer, J. 

Earlom, 

Reynolds, S. W. 

Harris, J. 

Earlom 

II ••* 

Turner, C. 



Paton, F. 



m. 

m. 

ra. 

ra. 

c.a. 

ra. 

m. 



Turner, C. 



c.p. 
c.p. 



with the key .. 

0.1. p. 

p.b.l. 

p.b.l. 

pair 

p.b.l. 

p.b.l. 



1 90S 



1908 



1907 

1901 

1907 
1908 
1902 
1907 
1906 
1906 



igo8 



igo8 
igo8 

1908 



3 10 



23 2 
5 15 

20 O 

9 5 
3 o 

1 10 

2 10 



10 15 



300 

440 



c.p — colourprint. s. ^stipple, a. 

letters, e.l.p. — etched letter poof. 



ABBREVIATIONS, 
aquatint, c.a. — coloured aquatint, m. — mezzotint, p.b.l. — proof before 



p.b.t. — proof before the title, o.l.p. — open letter proof. 



82 



\Atob6ter Family l ■■^(y Medione 

©Mromdnss Sch - y Medicine at 

200 WestDoro Road 



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