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Full text of "One line of the Burritt family"





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1765850 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
QENEALQ3Y COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01208 4007 



8S8S?S82S2S2SSg§82S2S2S2S8S2S2S2SSS2S2S2SSS2SSg2S2 

ONE LINE OF 

THE 



BUBRITT FAMIL Y, 



3*C«O«O«0*O«O«0«0«O»O 



"Let all unite, for the benefit of all, 
in placing upon record and preserving a 
recollection of our remote beginnings. 
Posterity will thank us for the labor, and 
the older the record grows the more value 
will they place upon it." — Welch. 



1765850 



ONE LINE 

OF THE 

BURRITT FAMILY. 



i. William from Wales. 

2. John, b. • 

3. Joseph, b., 12 Mar. 1685, 

4. Samuel, b., 1729. 

5. Joseph.. 9 Aug., 1758. 

6. Joseph, b. 21 Aug., 1795. 

7. Charles D. Burritt, b. 29 May, 

1823. 

8. Mary Lord Burritt Foster, b., 1848. 

9. Jesse W. Foster, b. 1880. 



Compiled By Mary L. Foster, 



WEST HILL PRESS, 

ITHACA, NEW YORK. 

1898. 



00— 





JOSEPH BURRITT. 



ONE LINE 

OF THE 

BUREITT FAMILY. 



i. William from Wales. 

2. John, b. • 

3. Joseph, b., 12 Mar. 1685, 

4. Samuel, b., 1729. 

5. Joseph.. 9 Aug., 1758. 

6. Joseph, b. 21 Aug., 1795. 

7. Charles D. Burritt, b. 29 May, 

1823. 

8. Mary Lord Burritt Foster, b., 1848, 

9. Jesse W. Foster, b. 1880. 



Compiled By Mary L. Foster. 



WEST HILL PRESS, 

ITHACA, NEW YORK. 

1898. 



"Let all unite, for the benefit of all, 
in placing upon record and preserving a 
recollection of our remote beginnings. 
Posterity will thank us for the labor, and 
the older the record grows the more value 
will they place upon it."— Welch. 



ONE LINE OF 



THE 



BURKITT FAMILY. 

S2SSSSS2S2S2S2S2SSS2SSS2SSS2S2SSS2S2g2gSS2S2SSS2S8 



THE 

BUKRITT FAMILY. 

He who has traveled in Wales delights 
to have memory linger, not only on the 
beautiful hills and charming vales, but 
among those old ruins which make fair 
Wales so famous. Those remains of 
Roman encampments, hill fortresses, 
casties, castellated mansions and speci- 
mens of antique military architecture. 
And still memory loves to linger on the 
charming valley of Glamorganshire, so 
famed for its picturesqueness, and owing 
to its great fertility, often called "the gar- 
den of Wales." It is a section of country 
having to do with most ancient history 
way back in the days of the Romans. 



2 THE BURR1TT FAMILY. 

Glamorganshire was inhabited by the 
Silures, which in succeeding ages was an 
independent principality, but was in io83 
overrun and divided by some of William's 
Norman nobles. About the time of the 
Conquest, and not long after the period 
of the revocation of the edict of Nantes ; 
there was a great importation of new 
names into England and Wales. It was 
at this time that Barrat was first found in 
their nomenclature, a name that since be- 
came modified, some families retaining 
the old form, but others making changes, 
until the Barrat of centuries ago has be- 
come the Burritt of today. The surname 
Barrat was one of characteristic, and it 
meant the "cunning." Not in the sense 
of craftiness, but having reference to their 
skill in doing things. In looking over 
the history of the old time Barrats, so 



THE BURRITT EAMILY. 3 

many have been found to be watch- 
makers, jewelers and skilled workers, 
that it would seem that the}' still retain 
the ancient cunning that gave them their 
surname, way back in the early days fol- 
lowing the Conquest. 

As early as 1550, a scholar at Cam- 
bridge spelled his name both Barret and 
Baret, being known later as a distinguish- 
ed traveller, and author of a tripple dic- 
tionary in English, Latin and French, 
which he entitled an "Alvearie," as 
the materials were collected of his 
pupils in their daily exercise, like so 
many diligent bees, gathering honey to 
their hive. This book appeared in 1573. 
The author died in 1580. 

In 1801, in Nottinghamshire, we find 
one Zachariah spelling his surname Bar- 
ratt ; — still the canning, as he that year 



4 THE BURR1TI FAMILY. 

invented a wonderful machine for grind- 
ing grain, either by water, wind, horse, 
hand or otherwise. Seventeen years af- 
ter (1818), this same Zachariah had 
changed his name to Barrat. 

In 1776, we find stiii another spelling, 
Geo. Barret. He was one of the Vice 
Presidents of the Society of Artists in 
Great Britain, as incorporated entitled as 
follows: — i4 The Society of Artists of 
Great Britain/' Arms; upon a field azure 
a brush, a chisel, and a pair of compas- 
ses composed fretty, or : over them in 
chief a regal crown, proper : supporters, 
on the Dexter side, Britannia ; on the sin- 
ister, Concord ; crest on a wreath, an oak 
branch and a palm branch in saltire, in 
the center of which a chaplet of laurel. 
That same George received a prize of 50 
guineas for his landscape painting. 



i HE BURRITT FAMILY. -, 

In another line we find Thomas Barret 
a principal officer to his highness Omduc 
ul Omrah, nabob of Arcot and its depen- 
dencies, who died at his palace of Che- 
pauV . 

We find also a James in Saffron Wal- 
den, who spelled his name Barrett, an 
iron monger who had received pate 
and so it seems that whether Barat, 
Barrett. Barrat, Barret, Baret, Burritt pr 
Burrett, there has ran through all branch- 
es the cunning handiwork which oiigi- 
nally gave to the family their name. 

This change in the orthography of a 
name was nothing unusual. Today? fre- 
quently, we find different branches of the 
same family spelling their names diffe- 
rently ; [Farley has had eleven different 
spellings] as instance in Ayoub we re- 
cognize the name Job, Abraham in Ibra- 



6 THE BURRiTT FAMILY. 

hirn, Solomon in Souleimon. When 
learned men in Germany wrote Rheabe- 
am andZitkias, and in France, Roboam 
and Sedecios [Rehoboam and Zedekiah] 
they both mean to designate the same two 
individuals, viz., the son of Solomon and 
the last king of Judah. The common an- 
cestor of the Burritt family in America 
was William Burritt of Glamorganshire, 
Wales, who settled, with his wife Eliza- 
beth, in Stratford, Connecticut where he 
was one of the earliest settlers, and where 
he died in the year 165 1. John W. 
Thompson, the historian of Stratford, 
states that the inventory of his estate, 
May 28th, 165 1, amounted to £140. His 
relict Elizabeth died in 1681, and the 
history makes mention of three children 
as follows :— 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. 7 

i. Stephen, Lieutenant, m, Jan 28, 
1673-4, Sarah, daughter of 
Isaac Nichols : d. 1697-8 ; had 
eight children. 
2. ii. John. 

iii. Mary, m. —Smith. 



JOHN[a]. 

John > son of Wm. and Elizabeth Bur- 
ritt, m. 1st, Deborah Barlow, May 1, 
1684. He married, 2nd, Hannah Beach, 
widow of Zechariah Fairchild, May 5, 
1708. He d. Feb. 1. 1726-7. He had — 
3. Joseph, b. March 12, 1685 



(8) 



TRIBE OF JOSEPH BURRITT (3) 
AND MARY WAKELEY. 

Joseph, son of John (2) and Deborah 
(Barlow) Burritt, m. Nov. 25, 1708, 
Mary Wakeley. Her grandfather, Henry 
Wakeley, was among Stratford's first 
settlers. He had six: children. James, 
Deliverance, Jacob, Abigail, who mar- 
ried John Beardsley, Patience, who mar- 
ried Timothy Titterton, Mary and Merc v. 
Either Mary or Mercy married Samuel 
Gregory. 

Deliverance, Dec, 3, 1678, m. Han- 
nah Nash, and their sixth child, Mary, b. 
3 March, 1688-9, became the wife of 
Joseph, 3. Hannah Nash was the daugh- 
ter of Edward Nash of Stratford. She 
was born Jan. 18, 1651. 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. 9 

The children of Joseph Burritt and 
Mary Wakeley are as follows : — 
i. John,b. Sept. 7, 1709. 
ii. Hannah, b. Dec. 3, 1711 ; m. Is- 
rael Beach, 
iii. Joseph, b. June 23, 1719. 
iv. Deborah, b. Sept. 21, 1714; d. 

Jan. 4, 1716-17. 
v. Deborah, b. Feb. 3, 1716-17. 
vi. Mary, b. Sept. 22, 1721. 
vii. Nathan, bapt. May 13, 1721. 

viii. William 

Dec. 2P, 1726. 



h 



ix. Ebenezer 
4. x. Samuel, bapt. Nov., 1729. 



(10) 



TRIBE OF SAMUEL BURRITT [4] 
AND MERCY BURTON. 

Samuel, son of Joseph and Mary 
(Wakeley) Burritt, m. Mercy Burton, 
in 1757. 

Solomon Burton married Mercy, dau. 
of Jeremiah Judson, Aug. 1, 1687. She 
was born in 1665, and her 3d child was 
Judson, who married Eunice Lewis, 9 
January, 1721. Among the 11 children 
mentioned was Mercy, who married Sam- 
uel Burritt. Eunice Lewis, wife of Jud- 
son Burton, was the nth child of Benja- 
min Lewis, the first of the name in Strat- 
ford. He married there Hannah, daugh- 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. II 

ter of Sergeant John Curtiss, and settled 
at Wallingford, and returned to Stratford 
about 1675. She died in 1728, aged 74. 
The children of Samuel Burritt and 
Mercy Burton were as follows : — 
5. i. Jcceph, b. Aug. 9, 1758. 
ii. Eunice, b. Dec. 21, 1760. 
iii. Nathan, b. June 6, 1763; m. 

Sarah — , 1791. 
iv. Ann Mary, b. July, 1770, 



(12) 



TRIBE OF JOSEPH BURRITT [5] 
AND SALLY UFFORD. 

Joseph (5), was born at Stratford, Ct. , 
and served as a private in the War of the 
Revolution. His full term of service, ac- 
cording to the pension application entered 
by his widow, was 17 months and 15 
days. A portion of this service was under 
Captain George Benjamin, in Col. Sam- 
uel Whiting's Brigade. He died Oct. 3, 
1830. His widow made application for 
pension on Oct. 14, 1836, at which time 
she was 74 years of age and residing at 
Stratford. 

Thomas UfFord came from England in 
1632 with his wife Isabel and three child- 



-S 




>SEPH BURRITT. 

EDWIN J. BURRITT. 



JOSEPH C. BURRITT 
EDWIN C. IU'RRITT. 



(i6) 



TRIBE OF JOSEPH BURRITT [6] 
AND ASENATH CURTISS. 

Joseph (6), b. Aug. 21, 1795, served a 
long apprenticeship to a watch repairer 
and silversmith at East Haven, Ct., who 
was a master of his calling. Here was 
constructed the tower clock which still 
marks the flight of time at Yale College. 
Here was also built and repaired the 
mathematical, optical and nautical instru- 
ments for all that country round about. 
Mr. Burritt thus became a proficient 
workman. June 17, 18 16, he was mar- 
ried to Asenath Curtiss of East Haven, 
and in October of the same year, they left 
Stratford, Ct., in a one horse wagon, for 
Ithaca, N. Y., where they arrived after a 
journey often days. Here he entered 



(*5) 



CHILDREN OF JOSEPH BUR- 
RITT [5] AND SARAH UFFORD. 

i. Samuel, b. Dec. 18, 1778. 
ii. Ann Mercy, b. July 18, 1781 ; 

m. William Peet. 
Hi. Sally, b. March 4, 1783; m . 
Isaac Brooks, Aug 17, 1800. 
iv. David, b. Jan. 7, 1785 ; m . Anna 

Wells, Oct.28, 1807. 
v. James, b. Jan. u, 1787; m . 

Betsey—, April 8, 1812. 
vi. Isaac, b. June 1, 1789; had three 

wives; m. istjuly 29, 181 1. 
vii. Joseph, b. Feb. 9, 1791. 
viii. Julia, b. Nov. 16, 1792; died 
young. 
6. ix. Joseph, b. Aug. 21, 1795, 



14 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

Martha Nettleton of Branford, and had 
eight children. Samuel, b. 21 January, 
1670, afterwards Lieutenant, married 
Elizabeth Curtiss, Dec. 4, 1694. He died 
in 1746, aged 77 years. Lieut. Samuel 
and Elizabeth Curtiss his wife had 13 
children. The youngest, Ebenezer, b. 
1719, m. Nov. 17, 1743, Jane Moss, dau. 
of John and Jane Moss. They had Me- 
hitabel, Samuel and Sarah; and Sarah, 
b. Feb. 19, 1760, m. Joseph Burritt 1778. 



THE BURRITi' FAMILY. 1 3 

dren in the ship Lion, and landed at 
Boston, where he was made a freeman 
that same year. He was in Milford as 
early as January, 1645, where he and his 
wife Isabel joined the church in that 
place. He died in Stratford in 1660, 
leaving an estate of £ L89, 12s, 7p. Had 
three children ; Thomas, John and a 
daughter, who married Roger Terrell. 
the children being born in England. 
Thomas owned land in Wethersfield in 
1641, and he married there Frances, 
daughter of the first Thomas Kilborne, 
who outlived him, and her estate was 
divided in January, 1684. ^ s estate 
amounted to £1834.. 

John, son of Thomas and Isabella Uf- 
ford, married 1st, Hannah Hawley, sister 
of Joseph Hawley, who came from Par- 
wick, Derbyshire, England, and landed 
near Boston, Mass., in 1629; and 2nd 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. 1 7 

into partnership with Wm. P. Burdick 
with whom he was associated in business 
for nearly a quarter of a century. He was 
a member of the Aurora street M. E. 
church for over fifty years, and most of 
that time an official ; for long the oldest 
living member of No. 2 fire company ; a 
Free Mason ; an overseer of the poor ; a 
trustee of the village and academy, and 
director of the Tompkins county National 
Bank ; fcr some thirty years treasurer of 
the Ithaca Mechanics' Society. He was 
twice married, his 2nd wife beino* Lucin- 
da, widow ot Mr. Vandyke of Covert, N. 
Y. The organ of the jeweler's trade, the 
Jeweler's Record, in 1883, claimed for 
Mr. Rurritt that he was the oldest living 
jeweler in tie United States. He died 
March 9, 1889, His 2nd wife died Feb. 
2, 1867. 



(i8) 



CHILDREN OF JOSEPH BURRITT 

[6] 
By ist wife Asenath Curtiss : — 

i. Joseph Curtiss, b. Jan. 26, 1817. 
ii. Mary Ann, b. Dec. 15, 1819; 

d. March 20, 1821. 
iii. Susan Jane, b. Sept. 20, 1821. 
7. iv. Charles David, h. May 29, '23. 
v. William Henry, b. Nov. 27, 

1824; d. March 12, 1825. 
vi. Mary Ann, b. June 29, 1826. 
vii. Benjamin, b. Aug. 27, 1828 ; d. 
Sept. 9, 1828. 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. 1 9 

viii. Caroline Amanda, b. Sept. 12, 

1829. 
ix. Sarah Cornelia, b. June 19,1833. 
x. Frances Maria, b. May 7, 1838. 
By wife Lucinda : — 

ix. Amelia Eliza, b. Jan. 24, 1848. 



(20) 



JOSEPH CURTISS BURRITT [7]. 

Joseph (7) entered into partnership 
with his father in the jewelry business 
May 1, 1838. He was one of the five 
trustees appointed to incorporate the sec- 
ond Methodist church of Ithaca in 1851, 
and remained a useful member to the day 
of his death. He was twice married ; 1st 
to Hetty Maria Lord, daughter of Harley 
Lord, Jan. 30, 1839; 2nd > J uli a Atwater, 
daughter of Leonard Atwater of Ithaca, 
Jan. 7, 1875. He died May 22, i, 



(21) 



DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH [7]. 

By first wife : — 
i. Ellen Maria, b. Jan, 1, 1841, m. 
William Henry Willson, July 11, 
i860, and had — 

1. Fred William, b. Nov. 20, 

1862. 

2. Herbert George, b. May 16. 

1865 ; m. Oct. 2, 1889, 
Donna Louise, daughter of 
Wm. Freer of Ithaca. 

3. Carrie Bell, b. Nov. 21, 1870, 

d. Oct. 24, 1872. 



2 2 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

ii. Edwin Joseph (8), b. Sept. 17, 

1843, by trade a jeweller, m. 

Sep. 29, 1864, Louisa Minerva, 

daughter of John D. Weed. 

They had — 

1. Edwin Charles (9). b. April 

5; 1866, a jeweler by trade, 

m. April 22, 1896, Lilla 

dau. of Samuel Kennen. 

They had— 

a. Frances Louise, b. Sept. 

5» l8 97- 

iii. Hetty Eliza, b. Ma} r 14, 1847; m. 

1st, Jan. 1, 1864, Ogden Hoffman 

Hall. He was born April 10, 

1845, and died Jan. 10, 1871. 

She m. 2nd, Henry Townley, 

Oct. 30, 1873, She died Jan. 8, 

1888. Children by first husband : 

1. Lizzie Sinclair Hall b. Jan. 

28, 1865 ; d. May 28, 1868. 




ELLEN Bl'RRITT WILLSON. 



THE BURRI1T FAMILY. 23 

2. William Burritt Hall, b. Feb. 

19, 1866. He was educated 
in Boston as a musician, af- 
terward completing his stud- 
ies in Paris ; m. Feb. 26, '91, 
Alice West ^ielder, of Dans- 
ville,N.Y ,b. July 11, 1866. 
They had:— 

a. Edward Fielder, b. June 

18 1892. 

b. Harold Glenn, b. May 

16, 1894. 
By second husband : — 

3. Hcttie Bell Townley, b. Sept. 

3, 1874. 
iv. Caroline Augusta, b. June 30, r85i, 
m. Jan. 28, 1873, Edgar Avery 
Atwater, of Ithaca. They later 
moved to Manchester, Iowa. They 
had:— 



24 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

i. Horace Burritt, b. Feb. 17, 

1874. 

2. Laura Ellen b. 2 March, 

1876.. m. June 9, 1897, 
Jesse Floyd Jackson, of 
Manchester, Iowa. 

3. Florence Bell, b. Apr. 27, 

1879. 
Joseph C. Burritt (7) had, by second 
wife, Julia Atwater: — 

v. Joseph Atwater (8), b. June 6, 
1876, by trade a jeweler. 




SUSAN BURRITT GAUNTLETT. 



(25) 



DESCENDANTS OF SUSAN JANE 

BURRITT (7) AND JOHN P. 

GAUNTLETT. 

Susan Jane, daughter of Joseph Burritt 
(6) and Asenath Curtiss, m. March 7, 
1839, John P. Gauntlett, who came from 
Portsmouth, England. She d. March 30, 
1853. They had : — 

i Jane Asenath, b May 12,1840; d. 
Nov. 13, 1858. 
ii. John Charles b. July 22, 1842, m. Oct. 
16, 1879, Mary Celestia, daughter 
oi Joseph McGraw of Ithaca, 
b. July 24, 1848. They had :— 



26 THE BURsUTT FAMILY. 

r. Anna Jane, b. Oct. 20, 1880. 

2. John McGraw, b. Oct. 22. 

1882. 

3. Minna Celestia, b. Nov. 23, 

1884. 
iii. Mary Olivia, b. Sept. 1, 1845; m. 
Arthur Benjamin Brooks, of Ith- 
aca, a descendant of Sally Burritt 
(6) and Isaac Brooks of Stratford, 
Ct. They were married Sept. 22, 
1870, and had : — 

a. Alfred Charles, b. July 2S, 

1871. 

b. John Gauntlett, b. Aug. 26, 

1874. 
Feb. 14, 1854, J oan P« Gauntlett m, 2nd 
Mary Jane, daughter of George Burritt 
of Stratford, Ct. He was a son of David 
Burritt (6). John Gauntlett d. May 8. 
1879. They had :— 




JOHN C. GAUNTLETT. 



I#HI ^^ 




MARY BURRITT GAUNTLETT. 



THE BURIUTT FAMILY. 27 

1. Katherine, b. Feb. 28, 1865, 
who m. Ira Place, Jan. 10, 
1893, and had : — 

a. Katherine, b. Oct. 3, 

1893. 

b. Herman Gauntlett, b. 

Nov. 16, 1894. 

c. Willard Fiske, b. June 

5, 1896. 



(28) 



CHARLES D. BURRITT [7]. 

Charles David Burritt (7), b. May 29, 
1823, united with the First Methodist 
Church of Ithaca, N. Y., under the labors 
of Rev. Schuyler Hoes, in January, 1841. 
Soon after he went to college at Middle- 
town, Ct., and in i iq U^> he graduated as 
Bachelor of Science. During the follow- 
ing winter he returned to Middletown as 
tutor, and remained until August, 1845, 
and having completed his course of studv 
in the languages, was admitted to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. He ranked high 
in Mathematics. He had calls to teach in 
five different institutions of learning, but 




REV. CHARLES D. ni'KKiTT 



THE BURR ITT FAMILY. 29 

felt that he was called to preach the gos- 
pel, and accordingly, in 1S44, he joined 
the Oneida Conference. His first pasto- 
rate was at McGrawville, and succeeding 
ones at Skaneateles, Norwich, Ithaca, 
Cazenovia, and again at Ithaca, remain- 
ing the full term two years, at each, ex- 
cept at Norwich, and Ithaca the second 
time. He was eminently a successful 
preacher, and wherever he labored, re- 
vivals were witnessed . In the spring of 
1850, he, with others, resolved that the 
time had arrived for the formation of a 
new society in Ithaca. A Sunday school 
was accordingly started, in the part of 
town where the church was to be located, 
followed by a class, of which the leader 
was Mr. George Young. Finally, on the 
evening of the third of February, 1851, 
the Second Methodist Church of Ithaca 



30 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

was incorporated In 1855, on account 
of failing health, he was obliged to leave 
the ministry, and in August of that year 
he moved to Delaware, Ohio, to become 
President of the Wesleyan Female Sem- 
inary. The following February he was 
compelled to resign, and returned to Ith- 
aca, where he died, at his father's, Mr. 
Joseph Burritt's, on Wednesday, May 7, 
1856, at a quarter past eleven in the 
morning, aged 32 years, n months, 8 
days. The funeral was Friday, at 2 
o'clock. He was twice married; first, 
August 27, 1844, t0 Jerusha Webster 
Lord, daughter of Harley Lord, who d. 
Feb 17, 1854, atCazenovia. He m. sec- 
end, Orpha Iantha Randall, daughter of 
Joshua Randall of Camden, N. Y., Nov. 
19, 1854. 
Children by wile Jerusha W. Lord : 




MARY LORD BURRITT FOSTER 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. 3 1 

i. Mary Eliza, b. at Middletown, Ct., 
May 31, 1845, d. Aug. 9, 1845. 

ii. Charles Paddock, b. July, 1847, at 
Havana, N. Y., d. Aug., 1847. 

iii. Mary Lord (8), b. Sept. 7, 1848, 
at Skaneateles, N. Y. On the 
death ot her father, she went to 
live with her grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lord, and her aunt Mrs. 
Herrick, with whom she remained 
most of the time until her mar- 
riage, living successively in Dans- 
ville N. Y., Lyons Iowa, Maquo- 
keta Iowa and Ithaca N Y. July 
14, 1874, sne m - George E. Foster 
of Milford, N. H., and had :— 
1. Jesse Webster Foster, b. 11 
Feb., 1880. 

iv. Emma Eliza, b. Oct.. 1850, d Aug. 
1851. 



32 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

Charles D. Burritt had, by 2nd wife, 
Orpha I. Randall :— 

v. Charles Randall (8), b. Oct. 8, 
1855, at Delaware, Ohio. He be- 
came a jeweler, and m. Sept. rg, 
1883, Emma Presher, of Ithaca, 
and is residing at Canestota, N. 
Y. They had:— 

1. Nina May, b. May 2, 1885, 
at Ithaca, N. Y. 

2. Edna, b. July 26, 1888, at 
Say re. Pa 



(33) 



MARY ANN BURRITT. [7] 

Mary Ann Burritt (7), b. June 29, 
1826, m. 1st, May 1, 1851, Ellsworth 
S. VanHoesen, who d. Dec. 29, 1853. 
She m. 2nd, Charles W. Smith, March 
17, 1859; he d. Dec. 10, 1887. She d. 
Dec. 12, 1892. No issue. 



(34) 



DESCENDANTS OF CAROLINE A. 
BURRITT [7]. 

Caroline Amanda Burritt (7), m. Hor- 
ace Augustus Merriam, Sept. 20, 1853. 
He d. August. 3, 1879. She d. Jan. 4, 
1893. They had:— 

i. Charles Burritt (8), b. June 4, 1854 

d. Sep. 3, 1854. 
ii. Franklin Asbury (8), b. June 7, 
1857, m. Feb. 6. 1891, Eva 
Belle, daughter of William H. 
Sickles, of Newark, N.J. Mr. 



THE BURR ITT FAMILY, 35 

Merriam was an employee in 
the office of the Ithaca, N. Y. 
''Journal," and afterwards took 
an editorial position on the 
"Argus", Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
becoming, in 1897, one of the 
proprietors, 
iii. Ella Bell (8), b. Dec. 8, 1859. m. 
Dec. 16, 1879. Theodorus Van- 
Wy ck . of Mont Vernon . They 
had :— 

1. Harold Van Wyck. (9), b. 
July 14, 1882. 
iv. Frederic Lincoln (8), b. July 9, 
1865, m. 10 June, 1897, Lillian 
Eugenia, daughter of Lorin 
Clark of Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
Mr. Merriam is a clerk in the 
New York Central Depot. 



(3*) 



SARAH CORNELIA BURRITT. [7] 

Sarah Cornelia (7) m. Jan. 11, 1854, 

Charles F. Williams. She d. Oct. 4, 1868. 

They had : — 

1. Cornelia F. (8), b Oct. 4, 1868, 

unmarried, and a teacher in the 

public schools of Ithaca, N. Y. 



(33) 



MARY ANN BURRITT. [7] 
Mary Ann Burritt (7), b. June 29, 
1826, m. ist, May 1, 1851, Ellsworth 
S. VanHoesen, who d. Dec. 29, 1853. 
She m. 2nd, Charles W. Smith, March 
17, 1859; he d. Dec. 10, 1887. She d. 
Dec. 12, 1892. No issue. 



(34) 



DESCENDANTS OF CAROLINE A. 
BURRITT [7]. 

Caroline Amanda Burritt (7), m. Hor- 
ace Augustus Merriam, Sept. 20, 1853. 
He d. August. 3, 1879. She d. Jan. 4, 
1893. They had:— 

i. Charles Burritt (8), b. June 4, 1854 

d. Sep. 3, 1854. 
ii. Franklin Asbury (8), b. June 7, 
1857, m. Feb. 6, 1891, Eva 
Belle, daughter of William H. 
Sickles, of Newark, N.J. Mr. 



1765850 



THE BURR ITT FAMILY, 35 

Merriam was an employee in 
the office of the Ithaca, N. Y. 
"journal," and afterwards took 
an editorial position on the 
"Argus", Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
becoming, in 1897, one of the 
proprietors, 
iii. Ella Bell (8). b. Dec. 8, 1859, m 
Dec. 16, 1879, Theodorus Van- 
Wyck , of Mont Vernon. They 
had:— 

1. Harold Van Wyck, (9),b. 
July 14. 1882. 
iv. Frederic Lincoln (8), b. July 9. 
1865,111. 10 June, 1897, Lillian 
Eugenia, daughter of Lorin 
Clark oi Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
Mr. Merriam is a clerk in the 
New York Central Depot. 



(3*) 



SARAH CORNELIA BURRITT. [7] 

Sarah Cornelia (7) m. Jan. n, 1854, 

Charles F. Williams. She d. Oct. 4, 1868. 

They had : — 

1. Cornelia F. (8), b Oct. 4, 1868, 

unmarried, and a teacher in the 

public schools of Ithaca, N. Y. 




FRANCES BURRITT KENNEDY 



(37) 



FRANCES MARIA BURRITT [7]. 

Frances Maria (7) m. April 14, 1859, 
Laurence P. Kennedy. She d. 
April 2, 1894, aged 55. They 
had :— 

1. Alvah Burritt Kennedy (8), b. 17 
March, 1864, a jeweller by 
trade, m. May 30, 1895, Nellie 
Grace, daughter of Pi of. Works 
of the Wesleyan Seminary at 
Lima, N. Y. They reside in Ith- 
aca, N. Y. They had ;— 

a. David Works, b. Feb. 19, 
1897, d. March 27, 1897. 






DESCENDANTS OF AMELIA 

ELIZA BURRITT [7] AND GEORGE 

E. PRIEST. 

Amelia Eliza (7) m. Oct. 22, 1865, 
George E. Priest, who has for many years 
been connected with the Ithaca "Journal." 
He has shown unexceptional talent as its 
editor, aid has conducted the political 
columns oi his paper with ability and 
shrewdness. He has had the satisfaction 
of seeing his paper take high place in in- 
terior city journalism. They had : — 
1. Louise V. (8), b. at Ithaca, Sept. 1, 

1867, m. Edward E. Ingalls, of 

Ithaca, March 22, 1887. 



GEO. E. PRIEST, EDITOR OF ITHACA JOURNAL. 




AMELIA BURRITT PRIEST. 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. 39 

Jesse E. (8), b. at Ithaca, Jan 2, 
1870, m. April 8, 1890, Wm. T. 
Armstrong of Mount Vernon, N. 
Y., who for some years has been 
lccal editor of the Ithaca "Journal" 
and correspondent for the New 
York "Sun" and other metropolitan 
papers. 

Maud Winifred (8), b. at Ithaca, 
Sept. 1, 1877. 



A REFLECTION 

In concluding the record of this single 
branch of the descendants of William, 
who came to this country from Glamor- 
ganshire, it is of interest to note the irre- 
proachable standing of the family through 
the various generations. Their record has 
been one of industry. They have been re- 
ligiously inclined, and often active in 
church work. The family do not forget 
that the immortal Eiihu was of the same 
ancestral blood. Indeed, the same indom- 
itable pluck that he displayed in gaining 
his education has manifested itself in 
many members of the several branches of 
the family in this country. Indeed, in our 
own branch it was well illustrated by the 
early struggles of that pioneer jeweller and 
watchmaker in Ithaca, Joseph Burritt ; 



42 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

and was further evidenced in the zealous 
labors of his son, Rev. Chas. D., whose 
zeai for the cause of religion no doubt 
brought too soon the close of what would 
have been a most brilliant career. In this 
country the family numerically is on the 
decrease. Over in Wales, where once 
dwelt the pioneer William, the ancestral 
fields, once fertile and green, are today 
covered by many homes. Strange names 
are borne by the people who tread the 
soil that the pioneer William bade fare- 
well to more than two hundred and fifty 
years ago. Country hamlets have given 
way to bustling villages. In the shire 
town of Glamorganshire the great Cardiff 
library is the pride of Wales. Not long 
since the gifted librarian of this famous 
institution, at the request of the writer, 
made search there for the name of some 



THE RURRITT FAMILY. 43 

living descendant of the ancestral race. 
Books of present pedigree, dwellings of 
all leading places in thatpopulous county 
of Glamorganshire were carefully exam- 
ined, people were inquired of, but not a 
single person could be found bearing the 
name of Burritt, a name that in England 
still exists in modified form, — it now only 
lives as an American name of what has 
become purely an American family. 



(44) 



FAMILY OF ASENATH 
CURTIS. 

Asenath Curtiss became the wife of 
Joseph Burritt 6, (see page 16) . 

Phineas Curtiss (i) is the first member 
of the Curtiss tamily whose name is re- 
corded in the town records of East Haven 
Ct. It is recorded that he married Han- 
nah Russell, May 28, 1759. Their chil- 
dren were :— 

i. Benjamin (2). 

ii. Abigail (2). 



THE BURRITT FAMILY. 45 

iii. Phineas (2), who m. MaryChedsey, 
July 4, 1787, and d. 1806. They 
had:— 

1. Polly (3), b. June 12. 1788. 

2 . H annah ( 3 ) , b . M a 1 ch 1 7 

1790. 

3. Russell 3, b. March 16, 1792. 

4. Loly 3, b. Feb, 1:, 1794. 

5. Asenath, b. Feb. 28. 1796; 

she m. Joseph Burritt. June 
17, 1816, and moved to Ith- 
aca, N. Y. She was the 
mother of Rev. Chas. D. 
Burritt, who married Jeru- 
sha Lord, and had Mary 
Lord Burritt. She m. Geo. 
E . Foster, and had Jesse 
Webster Foster. Asenath 
d. Feb. 7, 1844, aged 47 
years, 11 months. 



46 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

6. Benjamin 3, b. March 19, 

1798. 

7. Major 3, b. Dec. 20, 1800 

who m. Ellen , and 

moved to Ithaca. 

8. John 3, b. April 26, 1802. 

9. Susan 3, b. Feb. 11, 1804; 

she became Mrs. Mix, and 
moved to Ithaca. 
10. Street3,b. 1806, d. 1808. 



(47) 



PEDIGREE OF ELIHU BURRITT. 

THE LEARNED BLACKSMITH. 

i . WiHiam and wife Elizabeth had : — \ 
Stephen in the line of Elihu. 
John in line of Ithaca Burritts. 
Mary, the progenitor of many 
Smiths. 
2. Stephen m., 1673, Sarah, daughter 
of Isaac Nichols, eon of Francis 
Nichols, who was son of Sergt. 
Francis Nichols from England. 
He was a near relative of Col- 
onel Richard Nicolle, the first 
English Governor of New York, 
who belonged to the famous 
Horse Guards of London. 
Stephen was confirmed Ensign of the 
Traine Band, 1672 ; made recorder of 
Stratford, 1673 ; made Lieutenant, 1675 ; 
also Commissary of Army ; chosen Town 
Treasurer, 1689 ; Chairman of Committee 
on Wolf-killing ; Town Auditor, 1690. 



|8 THE BURRITT FAMILY. 

Children of Stephen and wife Sarah ; — 
3. Elizabeth, b. July, 1675. 
William, b. 29 May, 1677. 
Peleg, b. 5. Oct., 1679, in direct 
line of Rev. Blackleach Burritt 
Josiah, b. t68i 
Israel, b. 1687. 

Charles, 1689. In line ot Elihu. 
Ephriam, b. 1693 : 
Charles (3) had — 

Daniel, 
Charles, 
Elihu. 
4. Elihu (4) had Elihu, 
Elihu (5) had Elijah, Elizabeth, Emily, 
George and ELIHU, the learned Black- 
smith. 



PEN-ADDENDA. 



THE BURRITT NAME. 

In a previous chapter we have spoken 
at length concerning the probable con- 
nection of the Barrett and Bnrritt name. 
A subsequent investigation proves con- 
clusively that the proposition that the 
name was of French origin is correct. 
We have shown how the French names 
were introduced into Wales at the time 
of the revocation of the edict of Nantes. 
Barrett is recorded as one of these 
names. In the *ra of French surname 
giving, there was unusual excitement 
in the religious world. At the close of 
the tenth century and the commence- 
ment of the eleventh, the number of 
persons bore a great disproportion to the 
number of personal names, and it was 
found necessary to add in all public 
acts a distinct appellation for the sake 



2 THE BURRITT-NAME. 

of identifying individuals. Such names 
figure in great numbers in the records 
of all kingdoms of Christendom up to 
the fourteenth century. By degrees 
this means of remedying the confusion 
became insufficient. Those sobriquets 
which described physical and moral 
qualities, habits, professions, and the 
place of birth were imposed on many, 
who bore the same name by baptism, 
and it was about that time that heredi- 
tary surnames became indispensable. 
It is said to be an unquestionable fact, 
that the higher order of purpled pre- 
lates, commonly called cardinates, had 
its rise in the 11th century, yet it did 
not acquire its stable and undisputed 
authority of a legal council before the 
following age and the pontiiiciate of 
Alexander III. The cap and bonnet be- 
came a symbol of religious devoteeism 
early in the eleventh century. In 1245, 
Innocent IV. granted the Cardinals the 
privilege of wearing the red cap as an 
emblem of their readiness to shed their 



THE BURRITT NAME. 3 

blood for the Catholic faith. But th« 
red cap was not permitted to be worn 
by £iny except the cardinalate.— The 
secular clergy were distinguished by 
black leathern caps, the regulars by 
knit and worsted ones. A very early 
Frenchman, Patroillet, was the inventor 
of the square hat so long worn by stu- 
dents of the French universities, it was 
to denote that they had acquired full 
liberty, and were no longer subject to 
the rod of their superiors, in imitation 
of the ancient Romans, who gave a 
"pileus" to their slaves in the ceremony 
of making them free, vocare servos ad 
pileiirn. It will be seen that of neces- 
sity cap making must have been a most 
important industry in the very era of 
surname making. Camden informs us 
that after local names the most in num- 
ber have derived from occupations or 
professions. There was no profession, 
no employment that did not give its 
designation to one or to many families. 
Lower says the practice of borrowing 
names from various occupations of life 



4 THE BURRITT NAME. 

is of high antiquity. "Thus the 
Romans had among them many per- 
sons, and tho*e too of highest 
rank that bore names answering to 
■'potters, painters, etc." These name^ 
became, as we have said, hereditary in 
the eleventh or twelfth centuries. At 
this time the manufacture of caps be- 
came a leading occupation. The work 
on the Cardinals' caps, the caps of clergy 
of lesser degrees, for physicians and stu- 
dents required the skilled workmen; it 
was a distinctive trade. Those who 
made them in France were called Bar 
rette. The Barrette was pictured on the 
sign, and the cap makers were people 
much honored by the people. To be tin 
capmaker for the Cardinals was some- 
thing highly desirable. A picture of a 
barrette (cap) on the sign board, soon 
gave the name Barrette to him who 
made the caps. Hal our William of 
Stratford been the capmaker during the 
11th century, his surname would have 
become Barrette, or the skilled cap- 
maker. After the names had become 



THE BURRITT NAME. 5 

hereditary in France, these capmakers 
(Barrette) scattered into other countries, 
our ancestors went to Wales, as is told 
elsewhere in this volume, others went to 
England and Germany, where their 
names took various spellings still closely 
resembling the word Barrette, the orig- 
inal French. Mordaque in his famous 
book on nomenclature says that the 
etymology of hereditary names in En- 
gland and Germany is generally the 
same as in France and Italy. The cap 
(Barrette) was still a leading business 
sign during the twelfth, thirteenth and 
fourteenth century, frequent mention of 
it can be found in England, but it no 
longer gave the name Barrette to those 
who did business beneath it. The cap 
was appropriated by people of other 
surnames, as indicative of their business, 
but the name Barrette still lived with 
numerous spellings. The family of 
Barrette, Barret, or kindred spellings 
still continued to be noted for their 
skill as cunning artificers and instead of 



6 THE BURR ITT NAME. 

being makers of caps, weavers of hoods 
rs they were in the eleventh and twelfth 
century, they now were inventors, they 
were famous for their knowledge of 
mechanism, just as the Ithaca families 
are to-day — who are jewelers. Just 
when our branch of the Barretts or Bar- 
ratt family changed their family name to 
Burritt is not exactly known, but it was 
not done without a reason. The lineal 
name has been always an honorable one. 
a synonym of honesty and integrity. 
It is very doubtful if the name Burritt 
would have been in existence to-day if 
it had not been for the arising of a class 
of knaves that were given a sobriquet 
that closely resembled the ancient name 
of Barrett©. In the sixteenth and 
seventeenth century the term barratry 
became a by-word and synonym of 
knavery throughout the world, they 
who practiced barratry were often 
for short called barrets. In Eng- 
land barratry was the offence of 
stirring up frequant suits and quarrels 



THE BURRITT NAME. 7 

among his majesty's subjects ; in Italy 
it was applied to the traffic of ecclesias- 
tical beneficiaries and later it was ap- 
plied to all corrupt baying and selling of 
justice ; in Scotland it signified the cor- 
rupt purchasing of beneficies or offices 
of corruption from the see of Rome —it 
was an act to prevent the free elections 
of the monks in the monasteries. In 
France, any fraud practiced by the mas- 
ters of vessels was accounted barratry 
and severely punished. It was a term 
in England, and every commercial state 
in En rope that had the meaning of 
piracy, and was recognized by an act of 
Congress of the United States as late as 
1804. It is nothing strange that the 
term barratry and they who were called 
barrett because they practiced it should 
have been distasteful to the descendants 
of the Barret te of France who felt a 
pride in all that pertained to a long 
established and honorable name, and 
some families, our own included, desir- 



8 THE BURRITT NAME. 

ing to have in their name no semblance 
of dishonor began calling themselves 
Burritt, which was the name borne by 
William who came to Stratford from 
Glamorganshire at a time when barratry 
was a term hated by all good citizens. 








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