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Full text of "Ontario phonic primer"

NTARIO 
HONIC RIMER 




The anada Publishing Company 

limited 



THE LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF 
WESTERN ONTARIO 




• THE J. D. BARNETT 
TEXT-BOOK COLLECTION 



University of Western Ontario 
LIBRARY 

LONDON - CANADA 

Class .V.X\.DC).\ 



PLEASE 



nn mm'w j!»j-«jM*i.i=. •r-MkMft 




LIBRARIES 
THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO 



LONDON CANADA 




c^^ 



Le>>on un page 54. 



ONTARIO 

PHONIC PRIMER 



PART I 




TORONTO 

CANADA PUBLISHING CO. 

LIMITED 



Entered accordini;; to Act of the Parliament of Canada in the office of 
the Minister of Agriculture by the Canada Publishing Company, 
Limited, in the year of our Lord one tliousand nine hundred and two. 



Copyright, 1902, by Canada Publishing Company, Limited. 



Registered at Stationers' Plall. 



4 



PREFACE. 

The powers and sounds of the letters should be taught at 
the blackboard. 

The letters are associated in the book with pictures which 
are intended to suggest the powers and sounds of the letters 
after they have been taught. 

A.11 the work in the book is intended to be done by the pupils, 
absolutely without help. This independent work, though it may 
seem at first to be slow, will be really most effective and most rapid. 

Most phonic systems are based on the idea that every 
sound of the variable letters must be represented by a special 
sign or mark. Experience has proved that this idea is wrong. 
If pupils are properly taught the common and long sounds of 
vowels, and are trained to know when to expect certain let- 
ters to be silent, the association of the words in the sentences 
will enable them to do the rest, and the mental exercise they 
get in making the necessary adjustments is one of the best 
direct intellectual results of learning to read. 

After the first few weeks it is well to have more than one 
sound of a letter or diphthong on the same page or even in 
the same sentence. 

There are two kinds of problems in learning to read: 
ear problems and eye problems. In the ear problems the 
pupil hears the sounds spoken by the teacher and translates the 
sounds of the word into letters; in the eye problems he sees 
the word and translates the letters into sounds, and combines 
the sounds into the word. 

The combining process is the very first step in teaching 
reading. The pupils should be trained to recognize short words 
by listening to them, when they are sounded with a slight pause 
between the sounds of which they are composed. 

Most of the work in class should be ear problems. The 
Primer contains eye problems for the pupil to solve at his seat. 

The use of script must begin in the first lesson in connec- 
tion with the ear problems. Children learn to write by using 
script for a definite purpose. 

For the right to reproduce tlie ilhistrations of the Parrot and Wood- 
pecker the publishers are indel)trcl to Mr. A. W. Mumford, Chicago, 
the owner of the copyright of these pictures. 




2 1^ 




MrM 






5 

6 
7 
8 






W/'?^''' 



f'v 



,- '^ 



10 






ONTARIO 

PHONIC PRIMER 




ma 
am 



s ^ 



s 



am 



PART I 





a cv 



A 



S - am 
Sam 



ma 

7 



S: 



am 






o o O 



pt^P 



ttT 



pa 


mop 


top 


map 


pop 


Tom 


sap 


sop 


tap 


mam 


pot 


sat 


pap 


sot 


tat 


mat 


spot 


spat 


tam 


pots 


tops 


stamp 


papa 


tata 



Tata, mamma ; Tata, papa 

Pupils make words by putting letters before: 

- am - am - ot 

- at - at - op 



ot 
op 




cap 


cat 


cot 


cast 


lat 


lam 


hot 


ram 


rap 


rat 


rot 


larp 


car 


crop 


cross 


cart 


stop 


larm 


star 


rasp 


cram 




Sam has a cat. 




Tom has a harp. 




Pat has a stamp. 

Pupils make words by adding letters: 

ra -, ra -, ra -, 

s , t — , st - - 

m — , P — , pa - 




c o 



c 




h L H 



r ^ 



R 



ra 
st 
po 





i V I 

in 

it 

is 

mit 

pit 

hit 

pin 



Nan 

Nat 

Tom 

Sam 

Mat 



Word making. 

- at, - at, 

— st, - - 






'*«p- 



4 

^1 




e ey E 
pet net 

set Nat 

met Nan 

mess not 

ran run 

ant hen 

pest nest 

has a net. 
has a tent, 
has a nest, 
has set a hen. 
has ten hens. 

- at, — at, at, - 
- st, — st, - nt, 



n -TL/ N 
an 
can 
man 
men 
ten 
tent 
sent 







at, - at. 
- - nt. 



jam 
bur 
burn 



jet 

bet 

bit 




J I 
crust 
must 
hurt 



J 




rust 
but 
hunt 
bib 



trust 

lump 

bitter 



tub 

just 
trumpet 

Jim can jump on a bar. 
Tom can, but Sam 

cannot. 
Sim is in bed ; a bad 

cur bit him. 



jump 
better 




Word making. 
- St, 

bu , 



- st, 



nt, 



nt. 



ju 



cru 



bo 





u-.O.Oj''* 



ItL 


f f. F 


del D 


fat 


ap 


dot 


fan 


lamp 


Dan 


farm 


lot 


muc 


art 


'P 


mac 


larp 

sand 1^ 


ac 
h lee 


anc 
sad 


clap K: 


M Icnc 
|\ hand 


lac 
fed 




^ jK5h 


roc 
soc 



Fan can dress her doll. 
Ned hid his tin top in a lot 
Tom had a fern. 
Dan did not hit Sam. 
Miss Ross hurt her arm on 



a car. 



m - n, n - n, p t, p t, p - t. 
p - n, p - n, 1 d, 1 d, n - t. 




o^iim 


gun 


got 


gad 


get 


g'g 




>A \ 



g<^ 



gun 



G 



X a- X 




grit 


gap 


grab 


grub 


pig 
bug 


pug 
beg 


fig 


dug 
ox 


dig 
box 


fix 


six 


next 


text 


fox 


kit 


vin 


rr^ 




milk 


^MmJ) 


^^w^^ 


sulk 


elk 




tick 


nick 


y wBl^M 



Ned's kitten got milk in a 

pan. k ft/ K 

Tom had a pug dog in a barn. 
Jim can fix Fan's big box. 
Mix corn and bran in a box for an ox. 
As snug as a bug in a rug. 

13 



iJM 



m 


i 


f 

/ 


f 


^^' 


W bU^ 


w 


\ 


^a> V 


y-i-Y 


was 
wet 




war 
wit 


win 
wil 


wax 
web 


yarn 
want 
vat 




yet 

went 

van 


yon 

wasp 

vest 


yonder 

warp 

vex 


Will has 


j a pet 


rabbit in 


a big box. 



Has Fan a wax doll yet? 
Not yet, but Vic has a 

doll. 
Tom's vest is on a peg. 
Will Sam get wet? Not 

wet, but damp. 
Tun runs well. Tim 

will win yet. 
Yonder is a wasp's nest on 
A dog, a man, a cat, and a 

14 




a stump, 
hat. 



mat 


mat^ 


rot 


rot^ 


dot 


dot^^ 


mit 


mit^ 


cut 


cut^ 


pie 


croz£^ 


eat 


par 



Vowels lonof before silent vowels, 
hat hat6^ 

not not^^ 

mit mit^ 

pet Pet^ 

bit bit6^ 

]oe ho6^ 

co<2t haj' 

Tom went on a lake. 
Jane and Kate ate a fine 

, cake. 
Take a cup of milk for 

Joe. 
Run for Kate and Pete. 
Did Tim's dog bite Dick? (M 
I like cake and milk for ^^ 

supper. ^«j^ 

Cake will make Jane sick. u^'-v^ 
A wave came on a lake. >^^^^ 

James has a fine cane. ^"^ 

He rave me a cane like it. 
Jane is pale. Jane cannot run a mile. 




■'^^« 




JiA* 






0'^'^ - now he 

used. 



This is Jim with his kitten and dogs. 
J mi IS kmd to the kitten and the 

dogs. 
The httle dog barks at the kitten. 
The kitten purrs. She hkes the 

dogs. 
The dogs sleep in the kennel. 
The kitten sleeps in the kennel with 

them. 
Jim likes these pets and feeds them 

well. 
The cat can run up a tree, but the 

dogs cannot. 
The dogs can drne the sheep home. 



i6 




RSOf 




> 


OB- 


'^' A 


w^,- 


^Ji. 


-4"* 


'//-' 


'ty. 
i 




-'■ -•! 



e/ equal to short e. 

See the ten ducks and their mamma. 
See the web between the toes of the 

duck on the land. 
Swim, little ducks, swmi fast. 
The little ducks cannot swim so fast 

as their mamma. 
Get up on land, little ducks, and 

pick in the sand. 
Run and o^et ten \i\si huo-s. 
Swim, little ducks, swim. 



oo, and o in to, do, &c. 

oodpecker. 
see his red head. 
) hear hmi ham- 
er on a tree. 
He makes his 
nest m a hole 
HI a tree. 
He eats grubs 
that he gets in 
the trees. 
ap, tap, tap ; 
lammer, ham- 
mer, hammer; hear him 
at his work m the woods. 
He taps the trees to find the grubs. 
He can do a lot ol work m a day. 
He will go away in the winter. 
His little woodpeckers will be safe 
fi'om the old cat, for she cannot 
get at the nest in the hole in the 
tree. 

i8 





sh. 
See that fine ship. I wish I was on 

that ship. 
She has a lot of fine fish. 
She will get home with the fish next 



week. 


■■■■■■j 






■*fe :^ -'" 


ow. 


H^SI 


h 


i 


1^ 


This is a 
fine cow. 


^^Bi^n'^^^ 


y 


1 




She gives 


lHr|H|| 


w 






us milk. 


sSIB 


m 




AX'^ 



She eats grass in summer, and hav 
in winter. 

19 



I can sec the man in 

the moon. 
The cow jumped 

o\'er the moon. 
The (hsh ran a\va\" 

with the spoon. 




8- LJ 



Do vou hke to run and jumj)^ 
I can spin a top. Can you do it? 



oy. 

This boy 
has a pole and 
hne to get fish 
for his father 
and sister. His 
sister Flov has 
a lot of toys He is a good l:>oy. 

He is kind to his sister, and she 
likes him. 




Let us get 
these polly- 
wogs and keep 
them till they 
to be 
Their 



Of row 

fro Of s. 

leofs will orrow 




and their tails 

will drop off. How funny these 

polly-wogs look! 

We must o-et them fresh water. 




a in 
water. 

V i. 



Keep still and let us look at this 
froof! He will trv to catch that flv. 
How he can jump! He can live 
on land or m the water. 




Where 
this whip? 
you buy it? 



chd you get 



Why did 




a as in 
said. 

Albert and 
Jane went 
to the barn. 
Albert took 
a pail to 
hold eggs. 

Jane was 
very glad to 
find an tgg 
m a nest. 

She ran to 
Albert and said: " See what I have." 

''Where did you find it?" said he. 

"In the barn, on the hay," said she. 




all and ey. 

These bovs like 
to play a game of ball. It is a fine 
day and they have a holiday. They 
have had a swim in the river near 
the mill, and now they will have the 
game. They are small boys, but they 
can play ball well. The little boy is 
too small to play. These girls do not 
play ball. I like to see girls play ball. 
Do you see the hill behind the mill? 
The river flows past the mill and the 
hill. I hope the ball will not fall into 
the water. 



23 




incr. 



This boy is trying to bring the cow 

home to get her milked. 
She is running fast, and he is striv- 

mo- to oet ahead of her. 
He IS breathing very hard. 
It is a fine picture. 
See the boy's boots. 
Where is his home? 
He makes the cow run too fast. 
He calls the cow: ''Co boss, co boss, 

CO boss, CO, CO, co!" 



24 




ou. 
These girls are out in a spring 

shower. 
The ram is falhng out of the clouds. 
The rain will make the orrass ijrow 

and the flowers spring up in the 

woods and by the side of the 

road. 
The girls live in a brown house by 

the mill. They are going to gather 

flowers in a crrove about a mile 

from home. 

25 



c = s, o = u. 

Fred. Jones and Charles Sims are 
playing ball. They take turns in 
throwing. They need another 
boy. John Brown will come soon. 




Fred, went home and said: 
"Mamma, is supper ready?" 
" I am makmg the cakes, " she said. 
"I think I am too hungry to wait," 
said Fred. "May I have a good 
thick slice of bread and butter?" 



26 




What a lot 
of baby hares.! How proud their 
mother looks! Count the young- 
hares. One, two, three, four, five. 
Why are their ears long? Why 
are their tails short? How happy 
they are in then' home m the woods, 
with their mother. 



27 



i^h silent. 
This bird has a nest in the tree 
She is flvniij;- to get a rest. 

She has to sit all clay 

and nioht on her 

eggs to keep them 

warm. 
Her mate brings 

her food to eat. 
How happy she 

will be when the 

little birds come 

out. 
Be kind to the 

birds. 
How man\' bn*ds 

can vou name? 
I know robins and 

blue birds and spar- 
rows and warblers 

and thrushes and 

swallows. 





aw. 

"Mamma! put on the baby's shawl 
and I will draw her to the pond 
to see the bovs and girls skating, " 
said Nellie Daw. 

"Yes, Nellie," said her mamma, "I 
am o:lad vou wish to take her for 
a ride, for I fear it mav soon thaw." 

I see our Bob with Jennie. They 

can skate well. 

It is fine lun to skate and slide. 

29 



1 liese three girls are Kate, Fannie 
and Ella. They are looking at a 
bu^d that IS sitting on a hush. 
The hu'd IS sinoino- a sonsf, for it is 

Ella says: "See his 
pretty wings ; they 



spring. 





have white 

spots on 

them.' 

Fannie 

says: " I 

hope he 

will make a 

nest in the 

garden." 

Kate says: "We shall get seed and 

put water in a cup for him and 

his mate. 



30 




Jane and Annie have a fine pet 

lamb. It has a long tail. 
The orirls ofive it milk in a dish. It 

can eat grass now. It goes out 

every day. 
Its mamma died when it was small. 
When it sees the girls it bleats/'Ma-a." 
Then they run hard to it and it skips 

to them. 
It will have a good coat of wool in 

the fall, to keep it warm, before 

the snow falls. 



31 




This is Helen 
Cutter. She 
IS seven years 
old. 

She is a very 
kind mrl. She 
helps her 
mamma to do 

her work. 

a m many. ci i 

^ bhe can make 

a dress for her doll. She can cut 

good dolls out of paper. 
She oroes to a kindergarten. 
She can make man\' prett\^ thmgs, 

and sing many songs for her 

mamma and papa. 
She has a little garden and she grows 

fine flowers m it. 
She runs to meet her papa every 

day. 
Her papa is very fond of her, and 

is glad to see her at the gate. 
32 




Jack and Jill 
Went up the 

^"^-^'J^ To get a pail of 

_^ "' water ; 

Tack fell down 
And broke his crown, 
And Jill came tumbling after. 
Up Jack got ^1^''"'' 

And back did t^'^/A '" 

trot ^^^^ 

For water for ^ ^^0^ ^^^ 

his mother; M^^-^-^ J^^ 
Jill went too, ^ ^ 

So kind and true, 
To help her little brother. 



Litde Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet. 
Eating her curds and whey; 
There came a great spider, and sat 

down beside her. 
And frightened Miss Muffet away. 




qu, ew, and ew. 

Andrew Brown lives near a park. 

There are many squirrels in the park. 

Boys and girls feed the squirrels, 
and the squirrels will take nuts 
out of then* hands to crack them. 

When a new squirrel is put m the 
park it is afraid at first, l)ut it soon 
finds that the boys are kmd, and 
then it is not afraid. 

34 




Jane and Annie are (lri\'ing their 
pet lamb to the meadow. 

Tom IS followino- them. 

The lamb sta\'s m the meadow when 
the orirls are at school. When 
they get home, they feed it and 
put it m the shed. 

It likes the girls, for thev are kind 
to it. 

It will ha\'e a oood fleece of wool 
in the spring time. 

35 



Little Bo-peep 

Has lost her sheep, 

And doesn't know where to find 

them; 
Leave them alone 



And they 
will come 
home, 




And brmg their tails behind them. 



" Pat a cake, pat a cake, baker's 

man! 
"So I do, master, fast as I can." 
" Pat it and prick it 
And mark it with T, 
And then it will do 
For Tommy and me." 

36 



Nellie's papa owns a fine collie. 
Her brother Archie takes the collie 

to watch the sheep on the hills. 
NelHe 

loves 

Archie 



an 



dth. 




pup. 
She 
treats 
the pup 
as if it 
were a 
baby. 
She calls 

it her darling puppy. 
Sometimes she ties a ribbon around 
its neck, and puts a bonnet on its 
head and takes it in her arms. 
The big dog barks, ''Bow, wow, 
wow. " 



37 




nk, think, drink, wink, &c. 

These girls and boys are playing 

Ring around a Rosy. 
How happy they seem as they go 

hopping around, singing: 
" Ring around a Rosy, 
A pot full of posy. 
Who drops first?" 
I think the big girls are good to play 

with the little girl and boys. 
Bertha has a new pink dress. 

38 




and their sister 
for a sail in 
splendid 
boat. 

she 



over 
_ water! 

They ...P^^^.., \v \\\ 

soon ^^ reach 

home. They can see the shore 

now. It looks like rain. That 

is why they are in a hurry. 
Sandy is dressed like a sailor. He 

is captain. He calls his boat the 

Shamrock. 
He IS careful and watches the sky 

for storms. 
His father can trust him to sail the 

boat on the bay. 
He likes to take his father and 

mother for a sail when it does not 

rain. 

39 



What can be the 
matter with the hen!^ 
This 




clucks 

Hke to 

Q-Q on the water. 

She thinks they are chickens and 

she is afraid they will be drowned. 

Tom is feeding the ducks with his 

cake. See how they swim to him 

to get the crumbs as they fall. 

The hen savs: "Cluck! ckickl ckick!" 

The ducks say: " Peep! peep! peep!" 

When they are older, they will say: 

"Quack! quack! quack!" 
40 






Ding dong bell! 
The cat's in 
the well. 
Who put her 
in? 
Little Johnny Green. 
Who pulled her out? 
Big Johnny Stout. 

What a cruel boy was that 
To drown poor pussy cat, 
Who never did him any harm 
And killed the mice 
In his fathers barn. 



Pussy cat, pussy cat! 
Where have you been? 
I've been to London 
To see the Oueen. 



41 




--=v 



Ol. 

Edna has 
found the cat 
and four kit- 
tens on her 
bed. The 

kittens do not 
see her, but she 
wishes to watch them, 
so she hokls up her finger 
W:o warn her mother not to 
make a noise. 
The kittens hke to sleep on the bed 
with then* mother. When they 
are hungry they make a great 
noise. "Meow! Meow! Meow! 
Meow!" they say, and Edna gets 
milk in a dish and calls: "Kitty, 
kitty, kitty," and all the kittens 
run for the milk. 
When they are fed they say, "Purr, 

purr." 

42 




^ 



What a good 

time these 

children 

have in the 

woods. 

Thev play m 

the woods 

every dav. 

Thev oret but- 

tercups and 

daisies in the woods. 

Sometimes they pretend they see 
Indians, and they shout and play 
that thev 2:0 to fiorht the Indians. 

They play that thev shoot Indians 
when they look out from behind 
the trees. 

The bovs put their little sister be- 
hind a bio- loor when thev m to 
shoot the Indians. 

They often sit and hear the little 
birds sinmno- in the trees. 

43 




ail. 

Fannie has l:)een 

naughty, and her 

mamma has told 

her to sit on 

the chair. 

Her httle 

knows 

she is in dis- 



dog 



grace. He 



is very fond 
of Fannie, and he seems to be 
very sorry for her. 

He looks as if he had been scolded 
instead of Fannie. 

When Fannie's mamma lets her get 
down from the chair, J ip will jump 
and bark to show how glad he is. 

Fannie is not often naughty, but to- 
day she did what her mamma told 
her not to do. She is sorry now. 

44 




g soft. 

George 

large 

strange 

ginger 

charge 

fringe 



Susan has a large collie. He is a 
very wise dog. He came from 
Scotland. 

Susan thinks Sandy is the wisest dog 
in the world. He likes to be kept 
clean. Susan often washes his face. 

He knows the names of all the cows, 
and he can go to the pasture and 
get any cow Susan's mamma 
wishes him to bring home. 

He can drive a large flock of sheep. 

45 




II 



'M 



Little Jack Horner 
Sat in a corner 

Eating his 
^B ^. . .i^ C h r 1 s t m a s 

^^WM^-?^ He put in his 
- '-^^ -- thumb 
And pulled out a plum, 
And said, "What a good boy am I." 




Rain, rain, go away. 
Come again some 

other day, 
Little Harry wants t(; 

play. 




In the heart of a seed, 

Down deep, so deep, 
A dear little plant 

Lies fast asleep. 

46 



George and Jessie have a garden 
of then" own. Their father mves 
them money to buy seeds. 

George digs the garden. Jessie 
rakes it to make it smooth. 

When 

it is 

ready, 

they 

plant 

their 

seeds, 

and 

water the soil to make them erow. 

They grow many kinds of flowers, 
and some corn and peas. 

They keep the weeds cleared away 
so that the plants may grow. 

rhey like to work in their garden. 

They like to take their friends to 
their garden to show them the 
flowers, and the corn and peas. 

47 




Man' and Ethel arc foncl of pets. 

Mary's brother sent her a {)retty 

white rabhit. She hkes to stroke 

its soft fur. She feeds it leaves 

of cabbage and lettuce. 

says she likes 

her old 

black cat 

better than 

a rabbit. 

She says 

the rabbit 

does no 

good, but 

the cat catches rats and mice. 

When Ethel rubs Nim rod's back he 

bends it and looks pleased and 

purrs. 

When he wishes to go out, or to get 

his supper, he says: "Meow! 

meow ! meow ! " 

The cat and ral)bit are good friends. 

48. 




Ella lives on a farm. Her father 

has a fine orchard. 
Ella and her mamma are swinging 

in the garden. 
The day is fine, and 

Ella is very happy. 
Her father put up 

the swing for her. 
Ella often singes as ^ 



she swings 


'' 




nvingin 


g' 


swin 


g 


ing, 








Here 


we 


go. 






Backward, forward. 
Fast or slow. 

Upward, downward, 

Happy, free. 
Swinging, sw^inging 
Merrily." 
When her mother wishes to stop, 
Ella often says: "Now we will 
let the old cat die." 

49 




ci - a. 
Let us count the sheep: One, two, 

three, four, five, six, seven, eight. 

How gentle they look. 
They are in the shed on the straw. 

It is the spnngtime, for I see a 

young lamb. I like to see young 

lambs skip by their mothers. 
I can see four hens. One is in the 

window, and three are on the 

straw. 
Boys and girls who live on a farm 

see many wonderful things. 
The little lamb lies beside its mother. 



50 



Spring is coming. 
The crows say so, 
"Caw, caw, caw. " 
Pussy Willow says 

so, too. She has 

come to see us. 
We can see the 

fur hoods from 

the window. 
One day robin saw 

her soft gray 

hoods, and she 

was glad to see 

them coming out 

of their winter shells. 
The rain fell and the 

sun shone on Pussy 

Willow. The fur 

hoods burst open and down 

fell some fine yellow curls. 
How proud Pussy Willow was when 

she saw her picture in the stream ! 
51 





Carrie and 
Mabel are 
takini?; their 
dolls for a 
ride. 

Thev are go- 
ing to see 
the woods. 
T h e }^ can 
see a red 



squirrel in a tree, and Mabel is 
afraid of him, but Carrie laughs 
at her. She says the pretty squir- 
rel will not hurt her. 

They saw a bird's nest, ferns, wild 
flowers, yellow butterflies, an ant 
hill, and a wild rabbit. 

When Mabel saw the rabbit jump, 
it looked so bio; she ran to Carrie 
and asked her if it was a bear. 

They tried to catch a bird, but it 
flew away. 



52 



Maude and her cat are good friends. 
They play together every day. 
Maude will not hurt her cat. 
When Maude 
was very 
youngthecat 
would let her 
take her in 
her arms, and 
squeeze her 
very tight. 
She would lie 
on the floor 
and let Maude lay her head upon 
her for a pillow. Maude is a 
happy little girl. Her papa calls 
her "little sunshine." She can 
sing: 
•*Good mornnig, merry sunshine, 
How did you wake so soon? 
You've scared awav the little stars, 
And shined away the moon." 

53 




(Sec frontispiece.) 

Helen is visiting her cousin Mabel. 
It is June and all the trees in the 
o-arden are in l^loom. 

Helen thinks she never saw any- 
thing in the city so beautiful as 
the big apple trees covered with 
pink and white blossoms. 

Mabel swings Helen high up into 
the blossoms, so that they kiss her 
cheek. How much she enjoys it! 
Fido barks as if he liked to see 
Helen in the swing. 

Helen has a large home in the city, 
but she says she likes to go to see 
Mabel on the farm in June. 

Mabel will go to visit Helen when 
she gets a holiday. Helen will 
show her many strange things in 
the city. 

She will take her to see the animals 
in the Dark. 

54 




Xunnan and 

Grace are out for a walk in the 
garden. They are looking at a 
spider spinning her web. 

She fixed the ends of her web to 
twigs. She spun her web verv fast. 
It looked like silk when it was done 
and the sun was shining on it. 

She spins her web to catch flies. 

Her small thread is made of a large 
number of smaller threads wound 
into one. 

55 




z. 

Dora has a o^rcat 
Dane that won 
the first prize at 
the doo" show. 
Her uncle 
Charles gave 
him to her. 
What a fine h'lQ- 
fellow he is! He is gentle, too. 
He lets Dora hold him by his 
collar. He does not oret cross 
when little doo^s bark at him. 
He lets Dora's kitten ride on his 
back, sometimes. Dora can ride 
on him, too. 
He sleeps near the door of Dora's 
room, and seems very glad when 
she gets up m the morning. 
He is very fond of his little mistress. 
She likes to play with him, and she 
is very kind to him. 
56 




Nellie is visiting her grandpa. He 

lives near the sea. He goes out 

every day to catch fish. 
Nellie likes to go out in the boat 

with her grandpa, when it is fine. 
She likes to try to row the boat, and 

her kind grandpa shows her how 

to pull the oar. 
Her face has got quite brown since 

she came to the seashore. 
She has found a lot of shells on the 

shore, and some pretty seaweed. 

57 



Did you ev^er see a parrot? 
Harry Jones has a fine parrot, with 
a green and red coat. His 
uncle is a sailor, and he got 
the parrot for Harry. 
The parrot can say 
many things. 

It savs: "Time 




to bed, Harry." 
len he o^ets 
savs: "Good 



out: 
make 



to oro 

A^n d 

up, it 

morn 

Sometimes it shouts 

"Harry, Harry, you 

too much noise." 

One day the parrot was 
lost and it said, "I'm Harry's par- 
rot, I 'm Harry's parrot," till it 
was taken home. 

Harry was very glad to get his 
parrot back. The parrot seemed to 



be o^lad too. 



58 



Why is Carrie Smith not at school 
to-day ? 

She is sick, and the doctorsays she 

will not be able to come to school 

V for a long time. 

Y "*^^i,«.^^ ■ ''I am so sorry," 

'^jtk-l/f ^"^^^ ^1- ^'^^ giris, 

'^ 'I "June is such a fine 

month." The o-irls said 

they would take flowers to 

Carrie e^/ery day. 

Jennie Gage took her 
a bunch of wild flow^ers, 
and Carrie said: "Thank 
you, Jennie; I love to see 
the flowers in l^loom." 
The girls were all very 
glad when Carrie came back to 
school. 

W hat W'ild flower do you like 
best? 

Pamt ten nice flowers. 

59 





See the train ! 
Hear it — 
choo ! 
choo ! 
choo ! 
It IS com- 



ing o u t 
of the tunnel. The tunnel runs 
under the big hil!. It is dark in 
the tunnel. George Brown is on 
the train. He is going to see his 
grandma m the city. George 
lives on a farm. 

When the train went into the tun- 
nel George was afraid. He will 
be o^lad when the train a"ets out 
of the tunnel. 

He will soon get to the city, now. 

I am sure he will see many 

strange things in the city. The 

train says, " Good-b\'e, choo, choo, 

choo!" 

60 




Do you like to run tor the paper lor 

papa. Laddie? 
Why have you four feet, Laddie, 

when I have only two ? 
Will you let me pat you on the 

back. Laddie ? 
Were you a little pup when my 

papa got you, Laddie ? 
Do you like to have me for your 

little boy, Laddie ? 
If I oret a cart will vou on^e me a 

ride, Laddie ? 
Don't you hear me, Laddie ? Why 

don't vou speak? Can't vou speak? 

6i 




Let us go and see the new elephant 

in the Zoo. 
What a long trunk he has ! See 

hnii pull the long grass with it. 
What big ears and what a little tail 

he has. 
Give him apiece of candy. Do not 

be afraid. He will not hurt you. 

He will take it from your open 

hand \'ery gently. 
He can carry you on his back, if 

you wish to ride. He can draw 

very heavy loads, too. 



62 



Hurrah for 

the ma- 

pleleaf ! 

It means 

more than an\ 

other leaf to Cana- 
dian girls and boys. 
VVe love the maple tree. It 

oTows so tall and so orrand. 

Its colors are so fine in the ^ 

fall. It gives us maple sugar. 

But we lo\^e it best because its 

leaf is the emblem of our own land. 

We love to sing, 
"The maple leaf, our emblem dear, 

The maple leaf forever; 
God save our King and heaven 

bless 

The maple leaf forever." 
Hurrah for the rose, the thistle, 

the shamrock, and the maple 

leaf! 

63 





"Where did you get those fine cher- 
ries, Harry ?" 

"My mamma gave them to me." 

"If you eat all the cherries I am 
afi-aid they will make you sick. 
Won't you give me some, Harry?" 

"No!" 

" ril take you fishing, if you give me 
some." 

"Will vou let me fish ?" "Yes." 

"All right, you may have one, two, 
three, four, five, six, seven, eight." 
64 



C 





authorized by 
The Minister of Educatiom