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Full text of "Oracle"



HHBmS 



THE 




Nashville, Tenn. 
McQutddy Printing Company 



Dedication 



ALMA MATER 

Thou art of antiquity, and yet thou art 
ever young in the affections of those who 
love thee. In thy halls, where many a 
young life has lived and dreamed before us 
and gone out to give battle to the world, 
we have lived and dreamed. Thou hast 
been a foster mother to our childhood, a 
wise companion to our youth, and thou wilt 
be a soulful memory to our old age. 



Page 2 




Page 3 



Board of Trustees 

HON. W. T. SANDERS, President Athens 

REV. GEORGE W. READ, D.D., Vice President Tuscumbia 

MR. A. M. LEWIS, Secretary Athens 

MR. R. H. RICHARDSON, Treasurer Athens 

MR. T. M. HOBBS Athens 

REV. T. C. PERSINGER Avondale 

REV. T. \V. RAGAN Madison 

REV. E. M. GLENN Tuscumbia 

LION. H. B. MALONE \thens 

REV. E. W. BRANDON Birmingham 

REV. I. B. SARGENT Goodwater 

REV. J. S. ROBERTSON Decatur 

AIR. BELTON GILREATH Birmingham 

MR. J. D. LANIER Birmingham 

*REV. GEORGE E. BOYD, Presiding Elder of Decatur District . . Decatur 
*REV JOHN R. TURNER, Pastor Athens 

£ « « 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

\Y. T. SANDERS H. B. MALONE 

R. H. RICHARDSON 



'Trustees ex officio. 



Page 4 




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Page 5 




Page 6 



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Page 7 




Page 8 




Mrs . W. 3. MURRA Ji 



Mascots and Mottoes 




Hoot now, for it's your last chance " 



" Get knowledge — honestly if you can, but get 
knowledge" 



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nsbBBbhhhmi 




"A thing of beauty is a joy forever " 



We wandered and strayed away from 
home; 

We followed a tinkling bell, 
Thinking we'd come to a landjof gold ; 

Instead we'd come to — Athens ! " 




' ' Get away if you can 



Page 9 



Senior Class 



OFFICERS 

MADGE JACKSON President 

NORA R. MERKEL Vice President 

LUMMIE SINIARD Secretary and Treasurer 

SALLIE C. MASTIN Poet 

NORA R. MERKEL Historian 

LUMMIE SINIARD Prophet 



Page 10 



Senior Class 



MADGE JACKSON, A.B., New Decatur. 

Y. W. C. A.; L. B. A.; President of Class of 
'08; Editor in Chief of The Athenian; Busi- 
ness Manager of The Oracle; President of 
G. E. L. S. 

" I am Sir Oracle; 
When I ope my mouth, let no dog bark." 





NORA R. MERKEL, A.B., Birmingham. 

Vice President of Class of '08; Historian, 
'08; Treasurer of Y. W. C. A.; Associate 
Editor of The Athenian and The Oracle; 
G. E. L. S.; L. B. A. 

" I am what I am. 
What I have said, I have said." 



KATE I. BRACKEN, A.B., New Decatur. 

Business Manager of The Athenian; Assist- 
ant Business Manager of The Oracle; Y. W. 
C. A.; J. C. L. S.; L. B. A. 

" She fidgets in body 
And dreams in mind." 



Page 11 





LUMMIE SINIARD, A.B., Colliersville. 

Editor in Chief of The Oracle; Secretary and 
Treasurer of Class of '08; Prophet, "08; Y. 
W. C. A.; L. B. A.; Secretary of G. E. L. S. 

*' D-d-do yo-yo-you know what I mean? " 



SALLIE C, MASTIN, A.B., Huntsville. 

Poet, '08; President of J. C. L. S.; President 
of Athletic Association; Business Manager 
of The Athenian; Home Advertising Man- 
ager of The Oracle; Y. W. C. A.; L. B. A. 

If it were as easy for her to tell in class 
what she forgot just before class, her 
grades would have all been ' I's.' " 





ISOLA BARCLIFT, English Certificate, Red 
Hill. 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S. 

" She had but one idea, and forgot that." 



Page 12 




MYRTLE BARTEE, A.B., Decatur. 
G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 



She fain would substitute her smile for 
knowledge." 



OPIE CLEMENTS, B.S., Athens. 

" If thou be'st rated by thy estimation, 
Thou dost deserve enough." 





LUCIE WALKER, English Certificate, Bir- 
mingham. 

D. K. P.; President of Y. W. C. A.; G. E. 
L. S. 

"Her art hath faded her eyes; her study 
hath faded her cheek." 



Page 13 




LILLIE PEARCE, B.S.. Hamilton. 

Voted the brightest student; Y. W. C. A.; 
G. E. L. S. 

" She would most cheerfully have assisted 
and supplemented Milton's ' Paradise 
Lost." " 



OLA MABRY, English Certificate, Alexan- 
der City. 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S. 

*' Cheerfulness and I have long been stran- 




Page 14 



Greeting — Tree Day, 1908 



^ ' ADIES AND GENTLEMEN, you are with us to-dav to aid us 

/9«\ in the celebration of the one day in the entire year which belongs 
to the Class of Nineteen Eight exclusively. It becomes my 
pleasant duty to thank you in behalf of the class for your interest in us 
manifested by your presence. 

You will scarcely be able to realize what it means to us who have, 
doubtless, trembled on the brink of uncertainty for these many months, 
to at last don the cap and gown. And hear me, ye Junior, Sophomore, 
and Freshman : woe be unto the one, great or small, who dares infringe 
upon our dignity! To-day we lay aside our childish pleasures and 
pastimes, and demand henceforth to be recognized and treated as beings 
superior in wisdom, knowledge, and power. 

It has long* been the custom in our colleges and universities to cele- 
brate this day by disclosing the what has been and the what will be of 
the " most potent, grave, and reverend " Senior to the curious and sen- 
sation-loving public. Next, to dig a hole, plant the class tree or ivy, 
sing and yell as much as possible, and depart. As it would shock our 
unsophisticated underclassmen beyond measure, it will be impossible 
for us to follow the custom indulged in by our brother colleges ; but 
we can, and will, make a joyful noise equal in volume to their lusty yells. 

I shall not attempt to tell you anything of this talented class of ours, 
as both present and future will be revealed to you in language far more 
eloquent than I command ; but I would have you, my classmates, remem- 
ber that each one of us is to represent Athens College ; and in planting 
our tree upon her campus, let us resolve to ever be worthy of her. Let 
us seek to grow in wisdom and usefulness as the tree shall grow in 
strength and beauty. CLASS PRESIDENT. 



Pat>e 15 



History of the Class of '08 



LASS '08! O, what memories of mingled pleasure and pain cluster 
around the name — memories that have become a part of our very 
self, memories that will mold our future life! It has truly been 
said that the school days are the happiest — not the most contented, for 
a schoolgirl is never contented, always hoping, always striving for some- 
thing beyond : but happiest in the true sense of the word — happy in the 
pursuit of something better. 

And yet who can say that the schoolgirl has no troubles — no heart- 
aches? For is it not then that examinations disturb her dreams, hov- 
ering over her like some avenging fate? Is not the peal of the bell dur- 
ing "exams." like her death warrant? Truly, the bell is one of the 
college girl's worst enemies. Only once is it welcome — at meals; and 
even the breakfast bell on Saturday and Sunday morning is unkind 
to her. 

Another thorn in the flesh is demerits. True, a demerit is only a lit- 
tle thing; but, remember, 'tis the little things that count, and twenty- 
five such little things means home. 

But I am digressing somewhat from my subject. I am to write the 
history of the illustrious Class of '08. 

The year 1904 celebrates the birth of this class, which birth marks an 
important epoch in the life of Athens College. For has not the college 
trebled itself since 1904? ^dio can offer a better solution of this than 
the birth of Class '08 and the appearance of the new President? 

When quite young, we were christened " rats " by our honored god- 
mother, the Senior Class — whether on account of our very great impor- 
tance or our size, I do not know; but it took both the Sophomores and 
the Juniors to a-->ist the godmother in caring for us. 

Unlike other '"rats." we never did anything ridiculous or absurd; but. 

like other '"rats." we had to survive the usual amount of homesickness 

am! '"cases." However, we managed to get through 1904; and on May 

25, 1905, those of us to whom the fates were kind went home with a 

treasured certificate of promotion to the honored distinction of Sopho- 

im >r< s. 

Page 16 



I must dwell briefly on the Sophomore year. To those to whom the 
little line beginning, 

" The Freshman knows not, and knows that she knows not; 
The Sophomore knows not, but knows not that she knows not," 

is familiar, it will not seem strange why I fain would have passed this 
painful downfall without mention; for was it not, indeed, a downfall? 
We were no longer " rats," no longer Freshmen, and in 1908 would grad- 
uate with the highest honors ever granted by Athens College. What 
person who has ever passed from Freshman to Sophomore can say that 
he ever felt " bigger " or more important than in the first few weeks of 
the Sophomore year ? The downfall ? I have only to mention the magic 
words " Geometry," " Latin," " Chemistry," etc., and Class '08 will at 
least understand. 

In 1906 it was a happy band of girls that gathered in the chapel for 
Junior work. They had learned their lesson, and had fully realized that 
they knew nothing, and were now eager in their pursuit for knowledge. 

The Junior year passed like a dream. Nothing was too difficult, be- 
cause we worked ; and when at the annual Junior reception we ex- 
changed our modest lavender and white for the more distinguished crim- 
son and white, it was with a genuine feeling of pleasure and pride that 
we retired that night to dream of Senior caps and gowns to be worn on 
the morrow — that morrow of Senior joys and tears. " Tears " did I say? 
That was a slip of my pen ; for a Senior has her emotions far too well 
under control to ever even feel like shedding tears, unless it be at the 
thought of leaving Athens, and then it is only a " feel-like." 

But, with all its pleasures and importance, the Senior year is not 
without its thorns. There are biographies to be written, theses of all 
sizes and descriptions, and last, but not least, there are privileges to be 
lost. It would take a genius to describe the many devices we contrive 
for losing them, but in time we all manage to get them well lost. Now 
we don our cap and gown and look forward to that day when, armed 
with hope and a diploma, we will go forth into the world on the true 
commencement of our lives. HISTORIAN. 



Page 17 

2 



Class '08 



Have you heard of the wonderful Class 'OS, 
So jolly, good, beloved by Fate, 
Who never did sigh, who never did cry, 
But let all trouble pass them by? 
Have you heard? 

Have you ever seen the Class '08, 
With caps and gowns arrayed in state? 
No smile in school ('twould break the rule), 
But with Senior dignity befool. 
Have you seen? 

Have you ever talked to the Class '08, 
So cultured, polished, and up to date? 
Learned in Latin, learned in Greek; 
In German or French all do speak. 
Now, have you? 

Would you like to know this Class '08? 
Just come on now; don't be too late. 
We're wise, } - ou know, not a bit too slow; 
But listen! Miss Moore don't know. 
Would you like to? 

Now here's to the nine of Nineteen Seven! 
Here's to the eleven of Eight! 
We'll drink their health, 
And wish them wealth; 
To Fortune we leave their fate. 

SENIOR POET. 



Page 18 



Senior Prophecy 



iT last I realized that I was lost. I recognized a peculiar mark on 
a birch tree, and knew that for the last half hour I must have 
merely been going round in a circle. The trees had grown 
thicker and thicker together ; the sunshine filtered through the leaves in 
tiny patches upon the ground ; but as I wandered farther, the gloom 
cast by the shade of the trees was so great that it seemed to me the sun 
must have become suddenly clouded. 

Deep, deep in the heart of this great forest there was never a sound 
of the work and life of the world outside. The chirping of the wood 
life and the caroling music of one bird in the distance were the only 
sounds to be heard. 

I stood there with thoughts I had never thought before and a belief 
in all beyond reality. Thus I was not surprised to see before me a 
strange, gnomelike figure, staring up at me with eyes no more aston- 
ished than mine. He turned and, without a sound, moved even farther 
into the depths of the forest. I followed without considering where he 
might lead me — indeed, as if by an uncontrollable power. 

Where he stopped and lifted his weird little face to look into mine, 
it was almost dark, the shade of the immense trees was so great. At 
his feet there was an opening in the ground. With the one word, 
" Come," he disappeared ; and I followed him unhesitatingly. There 
were steps leading down into such darkness that I could not catch the 
most shadowy glimpse of my little guide. On and on until there were 
no more steps ; but we walked on some substance neither soft nor yet 
firm. 

There were no words from the little man, but I knew that my dearest 
wish was to be fulfilled. I knew that in some way through him a 
glimpse into the unknown was to be given me, and that now I was in 
that mysterious land of the " yet to be." 

We seemed to pass a threshold, and entered a room where at last there 
were the faintest glimmerings of light. Here at the tiniest desks sat 
little men like my guide, only much smaller, writing in books larger 

Page 19 



than themselves — some with the most woeful countenances, some gay 
and joyful. Then I began to find among the number little gnome men, 
with features like the people I had known up in the " world of to-day," 
only the true character of the persons was even more plainly stamped 
upon their faces here than in the other world. 

These strange little creatures were each keeping the records of his 
double, who lived and acted in reality what these little men were simply 
writing' as it happened there. 

I observed one little gnome who could scarcely write for the big tears 
which followed one another helter-skelter down its cheeks. I knew 
that what it was writing of the present day must be far from agreeable; 
and when it looked up, I saw that the brown eyes so bedewed were Ola's, 
and 1 understood. 

Thus it is that the past is so closely linked with the future, for we 
passed from this into a light so faint that at first I could distinguish 
nothing; but when my eyes became more accustomed to the light, I 
saw a strange-looking apparatus near me, and, in front of this, a large, 
white piece of canvas-looking material. Gradually the canvas seemed 
to melt into the softest light imaginable: then one by one objects became 
visible, and I was filled with the mysterious feeling of awe, because I 
knew that I was about to see that which no other living person had seen 
or ever would see. I could now clearly see a room furnished as an office. 
At the desk sat Madge, the president of the largest woman's college in 
the South. Near her sat Ola, her dean, and Opie, her secretary. As I 
looked, the office door opened, and a lady with a young girl entered. It 
was Myrtle, who was bringing her daughter to Madge's school. 

Everything faded ; and when I could see distinctly again, there was a 
prim, sedate lady of middle age — in other words, an " old maid " — be- 
fore me. She was endeavoring to instruct a small boy, who seemed to 
be confident he knew quite as much as his instructor. Before I could 
recognize his teacher, his mother came into the room. There was no 
doubt here. It was the Lillie I know now, with scarcely a change. 
The other I saw at last was Kate. The room was furnished elegantly. 
Lillie was wealthy, and had not forgotten her classmates; for before 
the picture faded, another entered the room — Lucy — who was Lillie's 
companion and social secretary. These disappeared, and there arose 
before me a large room. Near a window, carefully correcting manu- 
script, sat Isola. She was completing her fifth book in seven years — 
the Walter Scott of the twentieth century. 

Page 20 



The room gave place to an outdoor scene. Two women, dressed in 
a very peculiar fashion, holding small instruments of some kind, were 
seen. Presently I distinguished a larg - e affair in the background, which 
looked like either a balloon or an air ship ; but it was neither. These 
two were Sallie and Nora, and this was a ship of their own invention, 
in which they had successfully navigated the ether. They were just 
then leaving for a trip to Mars. 

As the canvas became dark, then slowly gleamed again with its strange 
power, I turned and fled, because I knew what was about to be shown 
was my own future, and I dared not remain. CLASS PROPHET. 




Page 21 



Poem 



Tn childhood's bright awakening, 

In young life's rosy morn, 
She neither thought nor questioned 

To what would lead this dawn. 
Her dreams were of the present. 

She had no worlds to win; 
She had no mystic fancies 

Of the life she must begin. 

In girlhood's sunny noontide, 

The glory of her youth. 
She wondered, thought, and questioned 

The path which led to truth. 
She dreamed of life's bright future; 

She thought of worlds to win; 
She trod in youthful fancy 

Paths yet untrod by men. 

In womanhood's rich sunset. 

The climax of her power. 
Hushed was wonder, thought, and question. 

The bud was now in flower; 
No dream of brilliant future. 

Her path was almost trod. 
She sought for truth, and found it 

In duty to man and God. 

I n age's lengthening twilight, 

Life's day is almost spent; 
She sits in silent retrospection, 

A form white-haired and bent. 
Xo heralds sing her praises, 

Crownless her silvered hair; 
But the angel choir awaits her 

In the bright home over there. 

MADGE JACKSON. 



Page 22 




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Page 23 



Junior Class 



OFFICERS 

MARY BUCHANAN President 

MABEL RICE Vice President 

ANNIE MAE REEDER Poet 

MARY GEORGE TIERCE .... Historian 

# * 6 

MEMBERS 

MARY BUCHANAN Riverton 

" For beauty lives with kindness." 

JF.SSYE BRANSCOMB Union Springs 

" She was a phantom of delight 
When first she gleamed upon my sight." 

MAIl CARTER Athens 

" If the world be worth thy winning. 
Think — O, think — it worth enjoying." 

SARA CARLYLE Alexander City 

" I would that my tongue could utter 
The thoughts that arise in me." 

ANNIE DAVIS Trinity 

" Prithee tell me, Dimpled Chin, 
At what age does love begin?" 

HATTIE ELLIS Birmingham 

" If nobody loves you, be sure it's your own fault." 

ANNIE LEE HORN Union Springs 

" I'll leave this rule for others when I'm dead: 
Be always sure you're right, then go ahead." 

JESSIE LOVEJOY Gadsden 

"A creature not too good or bright." 

Page 24 



JESSIE PERSINGER Birmingham 

" She was not of an age, but for all time." 

ANNIE MAE REEDER Smithsonia 

"A dancing shape, an image gay, 
To haunt, to startle, and waylay." 

MABEL RICE Selma 

"As far as the east is from the west, 
So far is she from being the best." 

MARY GEORGE TIERCE Birmingham 

"Was it for this you took such constant care: 
The bodkin, comb, and essence to prepare?" 




-^ 



Page 25 



Junior Poem 



Juniors, when all the flowers are dead. 

And when the dreary winter has gone, 
Will be getting knowledge in their head, 

So they can a cap and gown put on. 

Juniors, when the Seniors are gone, 

Still linger in the mind; 
Juniors, when all the rest go on, 

Will make the Class of '09. POET. 



Page 26 



History '09 



UNIOR history. Junior history!" has been ringing- in my head 
ever since I was elected historian last week. The rising- bell 
awakes me with its pealing "Junior history ; " the scales on the 
piano seem to be running "J-u-n-i-o-r " instead of " c-d-e-f-g," etc. If 
I take a walk on the campus, even the birds must haunt me with their 
twittering "Junior history." So from very reasons I am writing this, 
and not from any vain hopes of literary fame. 

A very original idea in the history line has been used. No one cares 
to know how we were Freshmen in 1905, and how we were called " rats " 
by every one, and did all kinds of absurdities, and then were promoted 
to the distinguished position of Sophomores. 

Ask a Junior to translate Horace or Ovid, and she's delighted ; ask 
her to explain infinity in " Trig.," and she's in her glory ; but writing 
histories is not the Junior's forte. 

However, after the usual amount of excitement accompanying one's 
departure for the first time for college, we found ourselves in Athens 
in 1905, and have been here ever since — -playing, studying, laughing, 
weeping, standing "exams.," and flunking; and now we are Juniors. 
We dare not anticipate the wearing of the cap and gown, for examina- 
tions come with every new moon, and the teachers are so fond of III.'s 
and IV.'s. 

At the first of the year we enjoyed the privilege of going to town un- 
chaperoned, but it wasn't as pleasant as we thought ; so now we are 
chaperoned as of old. 

It is our aim to make the Class of 1909 worthy of its Alma Mater, so 
that on our night — the night of nights, when we receive our diploma — 
we can ring out the old life and ring in the new. 



Page 27 



When Your Idol Turns to Clay 

4 

The dreams you have dreamt are shattered. 

And hopes are all burned away. 
Air castles all go up in smoke. 

When your idol turns out to be clay. 

The thoughts you've fondly cherished 

Of some future, happy day 
Leave you feeling sad and lonely 

When your idol turns out to be clay. 

The face you've often looked for 

And dreamt of by night and by day. 
Haunts your heart with a dull, sad aching. 

Since your idol turned out to be clay. 

The kisses that once were yours, 

And given so light and gay, 
Burn like coais in your memory. 

Since your idol turned out to be clay. 

Can you turn aside when you meet her 

Without a sigh of regret? 
And though your dream is now over. 

Can you lay it aside and forget? 

Ah, no! Though you never will show it. 

But will bury it deeply away, 
Your heart is now hopelessly broken. 

Since your idol turned out to be clay. 

WATKINS HAYES. 



Page 28 




>* eueA* 



Page 29 



Sophomore Class 



OFFICERS 

DOLL ANDERSON President 

MINNIE LEE JENKINS Vice President 

REYDON1A DANIEL Secretary 

KATE EUBANK Poet 

MYRTLE STEVENSON Historian 



* * * 

MEMBERS 

RUBY WILLIAMS Boaz 

"A rose not born to blush unseen." 

MINNIE LEE JENKINS Ripley, Tenn. 

" Small of stature, but great of mind." 

INEZ BRICE Oneonto 

'' But the world shall end when I forget." 

RUBY SARGENT Goodwater 

" Dignity envelops her like a shroud." 

REYDONIA DANIEL Lanett 

" Her voice not more distinct from harmony divine 
Than the constant creaking of a country sign." 

ALVA SHELI Birmingham 

" I know not." 

BERNICE RODEN Collinsville 

" She was well read — in fact, she was entirely red." 

DOLL ANDERSON Gadsden 

" What was, shall be." 

Page 30 



EULA JOHNSON Nauvoo 

"A beauteous, lively dame. 
With smiling lips and sharp, bright eyes, 
Which always seem the same." 

MUSIE WHITFIELD Veto 

" With a voice like the caroling of a bird." 

MARIE COUCH Birmingham 

" Fashioned so slenderly, tall, and so fair." 

GRACE WARNER New Decatur 

" Earth has not anything to show more fair." 

WILLIE KENNEY . . : Athens 

" She can vie with any stuffed bird." 

ANNIE LAURIE LINDSAY . . . . * Athens 

" It is rash to even hope for some things." 

MAE WOODALL . Birmingham 

*' Small and mild." 

IRENE MERKEL Birmingham 

" To triumph and to die are mine." 

FLORIDA HERNDON Gordo 

" Hoarsely good-natured was she." 

MAGGIE PARISH Sulligent 

"Try your luck; you can't do better." 

MYRTLE STEVENSON Moulton 

" Words learned by rote a parrot may rehearse, 
But talking is not always to converse." 

KATE EUBANKS Roland 

" Stumpy in figure, but fluent in speech." 

EMMA RANEY Athens 

"All things come to tho.se who wait." 

WTLLARD WHITTEN Birmingham 

" She was fair — aye, very fair." 
Page 31 



History '10 



yOU must write a history,"' the editor of The Oracle said to me, 
" and don't let it take but one page space." It's absurd. No 
one ever heard of writing- a Sophomore history of one page. 
It might do for a Freshman, but a Sophomore! However, the word of 
the editor is law (she's a Senior) ; so I'll proceed. 

We have trod the weary path of our forefathers for two years, and 1 
must say it's slow work. When w r e were Freshmen, it was mere play — 
no getting up before the first bell to read Latin, no staying in after school 
to keep " Lab. ; " but now it's work, work all the time. Even the Seniors 
have an easier time than a Sophomore. But I guess we ought not to 
grumble about what we have to do, for we have been well blessed by 
Chance. We have the best basket-ball team in school, the greatest num- 
ber of honor-roll girls, more accomplished girls, and the most desperate 
" cases " of any one class. 

The Sophomore has been accused of being boastful, but stating facts 
when you are asked to ought not to be called " boasting." Now, honest, 
ought it? A Senior might talk all day long about Class '08, and we 
must listen without a word ; but if a Sophomore speaks, it is called " vain 
boasting." But every dog must have his day. Ours will come some 
time ; and when it does, you will see some wonderful changes in Senior 
living. I do wish we could skip the Junior year. Although the Seniors 
make us look up to them and consider us as mere children, I cannot help 
but feel that they have a tender feeling for us, while the Junior — but the 
Soph, is just allowed one page. Wait until I'm a Senior. 

HISTORIAN CIO). 



Page 32 



Page 33 
3 



A Sophomore's Thoughts 



In my mind Chemistry notes are dancing, 

And Geometry figures are prancing, prancing; 

But all the time I can't help knowing 

That the birds are singing and the spring wind blowing. 

With my lessons I keep on a-digging, 
But Chemistry's H o S0 4 with a A 3-cis jigging; 
And I see the peach blossoms falling, falling, 
And the soft south wind is gently calling. 

I sit here just a-dreaming, dreaming; 

My studying lessons is but a-seeming; 

For rather than stud}' I'd be a-Maying, 

And rather than work I'd be a-playing. POET. 





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Page 34 



Freshman Class 



OFFICERS 

RUTH LANEY . President 

KATE BROWN Treasurer 

LOUISE CRAWFORD Historian 

HALLIEMcCARY ...... Poet 



* * 



MEMBERS 

AMANDA ANDERSON Athens 

'" Meek as a lamb was she." 

MARY WILLIE ANDERSON Athens 

" She's only a girl and — very tall." 

MEMORY ALDRIDGE Gaylesville 

'* To whom ' silence is golden ' is a myth." 

KATIE BROWN Courtland 

"She stands a queen in form and grace; her beauty none may vie." 

ANNIE BROWN \. Courtland 

" I look forward with pride and joy to the day when I shall 
wear the cap and gown." 

LOUISE CRAWFORD Athens 

"A wee small creature with beads for eyes." 

IDA DUKE Birmingham 

"Ambition has no rest." 

CARRIE DAY Lacey Springs. 

" With her there is no darkness." 

ETHEL FOWLER Cullman 

" The witchery of her charm gleams in dark, bright eyes." 



Page 35 



INEZ HARRIS Oakland 

•' Some people are- never so pleased as when they can gainsay what they hear." 

CARRI1 HODGES 

" Charm strikes the sight, but merit wins the soul." 

RUTH LANEY Eden 

" For many a day she sought in vain; at last she found her affinity." 

ALMA LEETH Cullman 

'' Some are wise and some are otherwise." 

MARJORIE M'COY Athens 

" For she was so utterly utter." 

ETTA S. MASTIN Huntsville 

" The biggest horses are not the best travelers." 

RUTH M'ALISTER Lawrenceburg, Tenn. 

" Nothing ventured, nothing have." 

HALLIE M'CARY Huntsville 

" Be nt for more than you are now doing." 

ESTHER WADSWORTH Coleanor 

" I scarce can count my gains " (cases). 

VELMA PRICE Bridgeport 

'"' Good order is the foundation of all good things." 

MABEE STEGALL Huntsville 

" Never spend your money before you get it." 

CARRIE LOWE Hazel Green 

"Why so pale and wan?" 




Page 36 




Page 37 



Freshman Class History 



UR college life may have been short, but it has been far from un- 
eventful. We have learned — -learned many things. One thing 
that the high and mighty Sophomore thinks we have learned, 
and also thinks she has taught us, is to know our true place in the world. 
We have learned our place in the world, but it was not taught us by the 
Sophomore. It was shown us by her unendurable ways. We have 
learned to be glad that we are not like unto the Sophomore Class of this 
year. Next year we intend showing the world at large that a Soph- 
omore Class can exist without the ultrasuperior ways of this present 
Sophomore Class. 



Page 38 



Class '11 



They call us " rats," and so we are, 
And we're as green as grass; 

But, like unto the Senior wise, 
We " cram " " exams." to pass. 



We're thankful that we're not a Soph., 

The one who knows it all, 
And never at her lessons looks, 

But rather pitch a ball. 

And, too, we do not want to be 
A Junior; for, you see, 

A Junior has no time to play, 
Like the ones who Freshmen be. 



But we all long for a Senior's dub, 

And for her cap and gown; 
To leave this place, the dear A. C, 

To seek and gain renown. 

POET. 



Page 39 




Page 40 



Irregulars 



MEMBERS 

CLAUDE PERDUE Pensacola, Fla. 

"A walking telephone pole is she." 

MITTIE LEE Glen Allen 

"Don't blame her; she can't help it." 

HELEN LOVEJOY - Gadsden 

" She is not so fake as her hair." 

LIZZIE NORMAN ' . . . Hamburg, Ark. 

"The little rock of Arkansas." 

ELIZABETH BAKER Trinity 

"A walking apothecary shop." 

MAUD YIELDING Birmingham 

" She is like unto a lyre." 

ISABEL CHANDLER Athens 

" Her hair is like a red, red rose." 

NELLE CRAWFORD Athens 

"A diminutive grandma in specs." 

DAISY WARTEN Athens 

" To know her is to love her." 

MAUD KINNEBREW Hamburg, Ark. 

" Talking does no work." 

MARY LOU MANKIN Chattanooga, Tenn. 

'.' Lingering labors come to naught." 

PEARL SAWYER . . Albertville 

" Thou who steaiest fire from the fountains of the past." 
Page 41 



LILLIAN ALLIN Cullman 

" I fain would f.-ll, ia love if that could be." 

ERMA ELLIOTT Columbiana 

''Lest men suspect your tale untrue, 
Keep probability in view." 

REGINA DANIEL Lanetl 

"Her eyes are stars of twilight; 
Like twilight, too, her dusky hair." 

ANNIE HUGHEY Prospect, Term. 

" Then up and seek ere youth is gone. 
Whate'er the toil, ne'er mind it." 




Page 42 









Page 43 




SUB COU.EGIATES 



Page 44 




Commercial Class 



OFFICERS 

W ATKINS HAYES President 

MARY LOU MANKIN ..... Vice President 

JESSYE BRANSCOMB Treasurer 

MAUD KINNEBREW Secret 

MEMBERS 

ELLA HOUGH 

REYDONIA DANIEL 

ADDIE BRITNELL 

LULA MAE SUMMERS 

CLAUDE PERDUE 

SUSIE GRANT 

CLASS SPECIALTIES 

JESSYE: "Adding fitve columns." 
ADDIE: "Misty." 

ELLA: " Erasing." 

REYDONIA: "Trying to understand." 
MAUD: " Multiplying fractions." 
CLAUDE: " Forgetting." 

LULA MAE: "Trial balances." 
SUSIE: "Reading shorthand." 

WATKINS: "Holding up benches." 
MARY LOU: "Helping Watkins." 
CAMILLE: "Speed in writing." 
Page 45 



Hesitation 

AVING noticed on many occasions that in giving dictation to 
I I those who have ambition, aspiration, and a disposition in oppo- 
sition to inaction, and who desire to make the acquisition of 
a business education, not only as a matter of remuneration, but to have 
an occupation, and to be able to follow a vocation for the satisfaction 
of gaining- a reputation, as well as the accumulation, congregation, and 
concentration of wealth, from a just compensation, much hesitation is 
caused on account of the sure termination. I have some conception of 
the vexation; and for the prevention of any interruption, and for my 
own satisfaction, consolation, and instruction, and their accommodation 
and information, and without solicitation, I undertake the collection, 
combination, and classification of such words. While my investigation 
may prove my incapacitation and may not lead to a successful consum- 
mation of the work in contemplation, on account of the enumeration 
falling short of their anticipation, expectation, or calculation, I feel a 
growing inclination to extend the accumulation in this composition, by 
recollection, consultation, conversation, revision, and reflection, until 
the selection for inspection may not cause disaffection nor meet with 
disapprobation, but merit some recognition and appreciation of this dem- 
onstration of my admiration and consideration of honest appreciation, 
and, for their gratification and the honor of making this donation, hope 
to obtain their approval and commendation of the production, and, with- 
out any provocation, lead them to a declaration of their intention to 
become familiar with words in this relation. M. L. M. — J. F. 15. 



Page 46 



0. 



I 




MUSK 



'&\ 



•X 



UNDER DIRECTION 
OF 

PROFESSOR 
JEAN BAPTISTE GRASSE 



HE Music Department, under the able directorship of Professor 
Jean Baptiste Grasse, a graduate of the Conservatory of Mu- 
nich, assisted by his efficient staff, has this year had the largest 
enrollment in the history of the college. This brings us to the end of 
the tenth year of Professor Grasse's connection with the college, during 
which time numerous students have had the benefit of his invaluable 
instruction. Native German that he is, he naturally possesses not only 
technic, but that true love for music which is able to create a musical 
atmosphere wherever it is found. 

Mrs. Florence Lord, a graduate of the Cincinnati College of Music, is 
First Assistant. During her course she was the fortunate winner of the 
Springer medal, which is one of the highest honors awarded a student. 

Miss Lucia Davenport Barclift, a most proficient student and gradu- 
ate of our own college, returned this year to become one of its valued 
teachers in this department. 

Miss Bennie Weaver Atkins, a graduate of Logan College, Russell- 
ville, Ivy., and a student of the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, has 
charge of the stringed instrument department. 



Pa°e 47 



"Shannon Bells 



t* 



DIRECTOR 

MISS LUCY [RWIN SHANNON 
Instructor in Voice 

* * * 

OFFICERS 

HELEN LOVETOY President 

MARY LOU MANKIN Secretary 

MADGE JACKSON Treasurer 



MEMBERS 

MARY WILLIE ANDERSON. Athens 
LILLIAN ALLIN. Cullman 
KATE BRACKEN, Decatur 
REYDONIA DANIEL, Lanett 
W ATKINS HAYES, Mooresville 
CLARA HINE, Athens 
MADGE JACKSON. Decatur 
CARRIE LOWE, Llazel Green 
HELEN LOVEJOY, Gadsden 
MARY LOU MANKIN, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
ETTA MAST IN, Huntsville 
HALLIE M'CARY, Huntsville 
ELIZABETH NORMAN, Crossett, Ark. 
ALINE PERSINGER, Birmingham 
GEORGE ETHEL REID, Prospect, Tenn. 
BERNICE RODEN, Collinsville 
LOUISE ROBINSON, Decatur 
LOIS RICKELS, Attalla 
MARY GEORGE TIERCE, Birmingham 
A1AE WOODALL, Wylam 
WILLARD WH1TTEN, Birmingham 
MUSIE WHITFIELD, Veto 
LUCIE WALKER, Birmingham 
MAUDE. YIELDING, Birmingham 

Pag'e 48 



The Glee Club was organized immediately after school opened in Sep- 
tember, 1907, under the name of " Shannon Bells," for our worthy and 
efficient teacher, Miss Lucy I. Shannon. 

We are twenty-five in number, and have had a successful year's work. 

The operetta, "A Dress Rehearsal," given in February by the Glee 
Club for the Y. W. C. A., was a perfect success, and quite a neat sum of 
money was realized. 

The work of the Glee Club has been very pleasant and helpful to the 
entire class in every way. 




Page 49 
4 




§g AN can give nothing to his fellow-man but himself." (Schle- 
gel.) " The most fundamental element of expression is the idea 
of revelation of man's psychic nature through his physical 
organism. What our fellow-being thinks, feels, or is^is shown us by 




I 



what we see of the action of his body or what is hearrf from his voice. 
We see that expression is not of the body, but through the body. We 
feel that there is something mystic and hidden, unseen and unheard by our 
fellow-men and often only vaguely felt by ourselves ; but it is made mani- 
fest by the motions and actions of the body and the tones and modula- 
tions of the voice. We feel conscious of something which is called 
' emotion," and rind this emotion tends to cause something outward, 
which is motion. Thus expression is the ' motion of emotion,' the 
presentation of a vast complexity of physical actions which are directly 
caused by psychic activities. The objective phenomena are manifestive 
of subjective experience." (Dr. Currey.) 

The Expression Department holds a strong ami popular place in our 
school. For two years the class has been in charge of Miss Anne Pur- 
year Wright, who is a graduate of the Boston School of Expression. 

The dominant idea is to establish method, to train along practical lines, 
for the harmonious development of mind, voice, and body. The result 
of this training has been shown in recitals given throughout the year 
and a1 the play given at the end of each term. 

Quite a success was made in Goldsmith's delightful comedy, "She 
Stoops to Conquer." Later "The Rivals" was equally as well pre- 



Page 50 



sented. Possibly the largest thing attempted was our last commence- 
ment play, " The Princess," from Tennyson. This was well staged, and 
the reading of the beautiful lines showed the deep insight into the true 
spirit of poetry. The acting showed careful training and good work. 

This year Miss Wright will present one graduate — -Miss Regina Leal 
Daniel, of Alabama — in a recital on May 8, 1908. 

The term of the year 1908 will close with Shakespeare's " Twelfth 
Nie-ht." 




Page 51 




VIRGINIA LORD 
MAMIE CRUTCHER 

ANNIE HUGHEY 
MAY HENDERSON 
MINNIE ARNETT 
ANNIE LAURIE LINDSAY 
MYRTLE HENDERSON 



CLASS OF 1908 

JEN RIVES 
MABEL RICE 
LUCY MOORE 
LUCY WALKER 
RUBY WILLIAMS 
LOUISE MURPHY 
LILLIAN THOMAS 
LOUISE PEPPER 
SUSIE GLENN 

LILLIAN ALLIN 
BLANCHE BINFORD 
GEORGIA HOWARD 
LUCILE ANDERSON 
ESTHER WADSWORTH 



Page 52 



Miss Katherine Gwin Leiser, of the Chase School of Art, New York, 
is at the head of this department. The Art Class has had a most suc- 
cessful year's work. 

" Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry 
it with us, or we find it not." 

It is a day in mid-January. There has been a constant falling - of 
snowflakes in the still air until everything that man has erected with 
infinite pains is covered completely with this mantle of quiet whiteness. 
The morning is still so new that no man has awakened ; no sound is 
made. The world lies before me painted with this perfect purity of 
whiteness by the master brush. 

If we carry within us the beautiful, we see the world before us, an 
astonishingly new picture. Nature is ever new. 

This is the art given us. This, with a new picture for every day in 
the year, is the art gallery of eternity. 

Man must copy from this his art. To one man may be given the 
power to paint from out this pictured, painted, beautifully colored world 
one great masterpiece ; yet this cannot be a creation, since he has only 
made an imperfect likeness to that which he sees around him. 




Page 53 



^publications 

THE ORACLE 

STAFF 

LUMMIE SINIARD Editor in Chief 

NORA R. MERKEL Assistant Editor in Chief 

MADGE JACKSON Business Manager 

KATE I. BRACKEN .... Assistant Business Manager 

SALLIE C. MASTIN Advertisements 

MABEL RTCE 

BERNICE RODEN ' • Art 

RUTH LANKY 



Pa.oe 54 




Page 55 



The Athenian 



STAFF 

MADGE JACKSON Editor in Chief 

NORA R. MERKEL Associate Editor 

KATE BRACKEN \ 

y Business Managers 

SALLIE C. MASTIN ) 

MISS LERMAN ~\ 

> Review Editors 

MISS PITTMAN ) 

* -* * 



The Athenian, our college magazine, is published bimonthly. It has 
always been the aim of the editor in chief to make this magazine of true 
literary merit. Although this paper always contains articles of literary 
value, yet it is with eagerness and rapture that the girls pass the Liter- 
ary Department quickly by and turn to that ever-faithful " Case Di- 
rectory." Next the jokelets are perused most diligently, and then per- 
chance some fully wearied brain turns and reads those veritable gems 
of nineteenth-century literature. 

The Athenian has been published since the infancy of the college; 
and although it has been discontinued at times, it has been published for 
the last three years with great success, and the prospects are that the 
journal will live and thrive as long as the walls of dear old Athens Col- 
leoe stand. 



Page 56 




GEORGE ELIOT LITERARY SOCIETY 

MADGE JACKSON President 

LUMMIE SINIARD Secretary 

DAISY WARTEN Treasurer 

A 

JANE CHILDS LITERARY SOCIETY 

SALLIE C. MASTIN President 

W ATKINS HAYES Vice President 

MABEL CLAIRE RICE Secretary 

ANNIE LEE HORN . . . Treasurer 
Page 57 



Jane Hamilton Childs 



President of Athens College, Members of the Alumnae Association, and 
Young' Ladies of the Jane Hamilton Childs Literary Society: 

If I had been asked to write a sketch of my early childhood, I would 
begin with the sweetest memories of a dear little cottage home in the 
village of Athens, with its cozy corners and playhouses, its garden gay 
with old-fashioned flowers — roses, pinks, hollyhocks, althea, and mari- 
gold — and redolent of mint, thyme, lavender, and camomile, with a 
sweet-faced Christian mother presiding over all. 

If I wished to tell you of my early girlhood, it would be that of a 
happy-hearted, hard-working pupil of the Tennessee Conference Female 
Institute, as this dear old building was then named, with the genial, 
sweet-spirited Dr. R. H. Rives. President, whom to know was to love; 
of Rev. B. H. Hubbard, professor of science and mathematics, whom to 
know was to honor and obey ; of Rev. F. G. Ferguson, principal of the 
Preparatory and Intermediate Departments, with his vocal lessons from 
the blackboard, where he taught us " do, re, mi, fa, sol, la," Scotland's 
burning, etc. 

Many of the teachers of those six happy years are still held in tender 
remembrance. The poet Hillhouse has said : 

That heart, methinks. 
Were of strange mold which kept no cherished print 
Of earlier, happier times, when life was fresh, 
And love and innocence made holyday. 

But I will not linger over these recollections, as I have been asked for 
a short sketch of some memories of more mature years. 

After leaving college and teaching for several years in adjacent towns 
and counties, the tocsin of war sounded throughout our beloved South- 
land, and 1 was admonished to return to my home in Athens. 

This building was then in charge of Madam jane Hamilton Childs. 
of precious memory. She soon offered me a position in her faculty, as 
it had been depleted by her teachers returning to their homes. For six 

Page 58 



years I was most pleasantly associated with her in her work, and thus 
learned not only to admire, but to love her. 

Madam Childs was a Virginian by birth ; received her early education 
in Georgetown, and completed it in Philadelphia. 

In the early forties she was elected to take charge of a female school 
in Huntsville, Ala. Her school flourished there for a decade, when it 
was thought best to consolidate it and one taught by Rev. Mr. Ever- 
heart. 

'This arrangement lasted but a short time, Madam Childs feeling, as 
she expressed it to me, that she could not, with her experience, consent 
to be second to any one in a school. Hence she resigned her position 
there and accepted a proposition from the trustees of this institution to 
become its President ; and she opened school here in September, 1858. 

Madam Childs found this building in an unfinished and an unfurnished 
condition, accommodating about ten boarders. While she was neither a 
Vanderbilt nor a Helen Gould, she spent freely of her own means, and 
in a few years had it beautifully and attractively furnished and made to 
accommodate forty boarders. 

Through her womanly tact and wonderful influence she protected it 
from the ravages of the Federal troops, by whom Athens was garrisoned 
for the most of three years during our Civil War. 

Pier health failing, she was admonished to retire from active service; 
and in June, 1869, she resigned her position here and returned to Hunts- 
ville, which she still claimed as home, and where, after a few years, she 
passed away to reap the reward of the faithful. 

To write a deserved eulogy upon this grand, good woman would re- 
quire a readier pen than mine. Physically, she was tall and stately in 
appearance, with the light of beauty in every patrician feature ; a per- 
fect model of grace and elegance ; a manner mild, gentle, and winning ; 
a business capacity equal to any emergency; a loyal, energetic church 
worker, whose piety was her beacon light ; a woman suitable in every 
respect for the position she occupied — that of molding the lives and 
manners of the young ladies placed under her care. 

Madam Childs' aim in life was to send from her school refined, culti- 
vated, useful young women. We often heard this remark : " You will 
recognize one of Madam's girls wherever you meet her." And it was 
true, for she left her impress on every one who came under her influence. 

Young ladies of the Jane Hamilton Childs Literary Society, your 
organization is well named. 

Page 59 



To have placed in this historic hall by Miss Mary Norman Moore this 
portrait of Madam Childs is a beautiful and graceful tribute to the mem- 
ory of a good woman 

Let it be your endeavor to emulate her many good traits, remember- 
ing' also that the grand works of the world have always been done by 
the few. 

You may never be a distinguished author, you may never be a re- 
nowned painter, you may never be a great leader or teacher, you may 
never be a Madam Childs or a Mary Norman Moore; but let all of us 
who are of a humbler mold know that there remains much really noble, 
good, useful work for us to do; and " blessed is that servant, whom his 
Lord when he cometh, shall find so doing.'' 

L. M. HAMMERLY ('48). 




Page 60 



y. W. <L. Zh. 



OFFICERS 

LUCY WALKER President 

HELEN LOVEJOY .... Vice President 

MARY BUCHANAN Secretary 

NORA R. MERKEL Treasurer 

MISS ROBINSON ...."" Chairman Missionary Committee 

KATE BRACKEN Chairman Intercollegate Committee 

NORA R. MERKEI Chairman Finance Committee 

SALLIE C. MASTIN Chairman Membership Committee 

MADGE JACKSON Chairman Social Committee 

JESSIE PERSINGER Chairman Devotional Committee 

Unless one could have known the college before we organized the 
Young Women's Christian Association and since it was organized, it 
would be hard to estimate the good that has been brought about both 
in active work and in its influence among the girls. 

It is very encouraging to feel that we are one link in a world-wide 
chain ; that even the little Japanese girl and the African girl are working 
and praying for the same end — the Christianizing of the world. 

Each year as we send delegates to the Y. W. C. A. Convention, they 
come back with an enthusiasm that only a Y. W. C. A. girl can feel. 

Aside from the spiritual benefits derived, there is a social spirit found 
among the girls which cannot be obtained in any other way. Clubs fur- 
nish amusement for a part of the girls, but the Y. W. C. A. is open to all. 
To make the student's life more pleasant is one of its main objects. 

In whatever we undertake, whether of a social, business, or spiritual 
character, we try to keep the national motto in our mind : " Not by might, 
nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the Lord of hosts." 



Page 61 



Alumnae Association 



OFFICERS 

MRS. J. R. HOFFMAN . . . President 

MRS. ERNEST HINE, Vice President 

MRS. W. P. CHANDLER Second Vice President 

MRS. L. M. GILBERT Third Vice President 

MISS M. HAMMERLY Secretary 

MRS. MARY W. HIGHTOWER .... Treasurer 
MISS SARA MALONE . . . Historian 

* * * 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

MRS. B. L. ALLAN 1890 

MRS. FRANK PRICE 1897 

MISS BLANCHE BINFORD 1906 

MISS LUCIA BARCLIFT 1906 

MRS. YV.-P. CHANDLER 1872 

MISS ROBBIE CHANDLER 1906 

MISS L M. HAMMERLY 1848 

MRS. ERNEST HINE 1881 

MISS MILDRED IZZARD 1906 

MISS MAGGIE IRVINE 1898 

MISS OLLIE KELLEY 1906 

MISS FANNIE L. RAWLS 1903 

MRS. MARIA W. RIVES 1887 

MISS ADDIE RICE 1899 

MISS ROWE SANDERS ........ 1883 

MISS ROSA SMITH 1906 

MISS ELIZABETH STEADHAM 1906 

MISS MABEL VAN HOOSER 1906 

MRS. L. P. ROGERS 1890 

MRS. J. W. CUNNINGHAM 1892 

MRS. FLORENCE S. TURRENTINE .... 1896 

Page 62 



MRS. FRANCES T. WHITE 1903 

MISS CARRIE SYKES 1894 

MRS. J. R. HOFFMAN 

MRS. W. G. MARTIN 1898 

MISS SARA M. MALONE 1883 

MISS JOSIE COLE 1897 

AIRS. EUDORA RUTLAND BLACKWOOD . 

MISS MARY ELLA HOUSTON 1872 

MRS. MARY CAINE MASON 1890 

MRS. TULA VAUGHAN GILBERT .... 

MRS. J. S. ROBERTSON ........ 1890 

MRS. J. L. BRITAIN 1872 

MRS. LAURA C. HORTON 1896 

MRS. MARY W. HIGHTOWER 1889 

MRS. MATTIE EVANS YARBROUGH . . . 1887 

MISS JESSIE GREEN 1904 

MISS VALL1E M. GREEN 1907 

MISS MONA PURYEAR 1905 

MISS ELIZABETH HINE RICHARDSON . . 1902 

MISS EDITH NORMAN 1907 

MISS LOUISE ROBINSON 1907 

MRS. R. H. RICHARDSON 

MRS. T. M. HOBBS 

MRS. ADA TOWNSEND PHILIPS . . . . . 1872 

MRS. ELIZA C. THACH 

MISS LIZZIE M'CLELLAN 

MISS LUCILE MORRIS . .- 1896 

MRS. SARA DAVIS GRAY' - 

MRS. CARRIE DAVIS HALL - 

MRS. FLORENCE HOY SPEAK 1890 

MRS. KATIE GARRETT GAMBLE .... 1890 
MRS. OLA MASON SPICKARD 




Page 63 



Art Students Alphabet 




is for Art, which we all adore; 
Labor for her is never a bore. 




is for Charcoal, our homely old 

friend, 
For with its help our work we 

begin. 



is for Each of us, an artistic, 

bright band, 
Trying to daub all the world if 

we can. 



s for Grades, that, with trem- 
bling and fear, 

We meet each month in the 
chapel to hear. 



is for Ink, which sometimes for 

days 
Fills our minds with a Gibson 

craze. 






is for Brushes, that get 
clogged with paint 

Often enough to provoke 
a saint. 



is for Drawing, such aw- 
ful hard work 

That most of us try very 
often to shirk. 



is for Frames, which we 
all have to buy 

Each year at commence- 
ment, the public to try. 



is for High-light, the eas- 
iest to solve 

Of all the dread problems 
in which we're involved. 




is for Kicking, which we never 

do; 
In the studio here we are loyal 

and true. 




s for Jolly — a jolly class 

we, 
Who are striving for art 

in the old A. C. 

Page 64 




is for Light, which from the 

north must fall 
To reach all alike, both littleaud 

tall. 




is for Millet, an artist so true 
That he glorified work for 
me and for you. 



'-^■X is for Nonsense; this never could 
"'~i be 

For the gay Art Class of the old 
A. C. 




is for Ochre, a color often 

used 
In flesh and backgrounds, 

and often abused. 




is for Painting, greatest of arts; 
Hard on our clothes, but dear ' ' 
to our hearts. 



is for Questions, with which 

we shower 
Our poor instructor from 

hour to hour. 




is for Rembrandt , an artist of old , 
Who dealt light and shade' in a 
manner quite bold. 



s for Turpentine — O, bring it 

quick ! 
For down on her palette has 

fallen poor Chick. 





is for Studio, in the college 

so high, 
Where for the ideal we 

struggle and sigh. 



is for Unrest, which seizes us 

all 
When into the ranks of the 

artists we fall. 



is for Values, we are sure to get 

wrong, 
For which the instructor calls us 

all down. 



is for Water Colors, dainty 

and sweet; 
When working in these, our 

joy is complete. 




is for 'Xcuses; we've plenty on 

hand 
To pass to the ' ' Facs ' ' from all 

the band. < 




is for Youth, the time to 

love Art, 
Live for it, work for it with 

all your heart. 




is for Zero, but not for these 

maids ; 
For I.'s and II. 's are always our 

grades. 



Page 65 

5 



The Brooklet 

(Translated from the German.) 



# 



Thou brooklet, silver bright and clear, 

Forever on thou rlowest. 
Upon thy banks T stand and think: 
"Whence came thou? Whither goest? " 

I come from laps of darkest rocks; 

My course the mosses cover; 
Upon my surface pictures of 

The gentle heavens hover. 

I have a joyous, childish mood; 
It drives, I know not where; 
But He who called will be my guide, 
And I will trust His care." 

ELIZABETH STEDHAM C06). 
(From The Athenian.) 



Page 66 




^Atfyletics 



Page 67 



The Athletic Association 



HE Athletic Association was organized on October 1, 1907, elect- 
ing- Sallie C. Mastin, President; Kate Bracken, Secretary; and 
Mabel C. Rice, Treasurer. Several tennis and basket-ball courts 
had been put in tine shape during the months of vacation. The girls 
entered into the games with interest and enthusiasm ; and even if they 
couldn't love while they were at college, there was one thing certain — 
they could play " love games." 

.Miss \\ right, the director, has manifested quite a good deal of interest 
in the match basket-ball games this season. The different teams have 
done all in their power to get her on their side, but there is to be no 
bribing with Miss Wright; she stands "pat," and in so doing has won 
the love and esteem of all the girls. 

The most interesting match game of the season was the one played 
on Class Day between the " Crescents " and " Stars." *A large crowd 
was out from the city to witness the game. Colors and flags were fly- 
ing, and the air was full of college yells, which only tended to add en- 
thusiasm to the game, for the girls played as they had never played 
before. When time was called, the " Stars " carried their colors off the 
field in triumph, the score being 22 to 13. 

For the remainder of the term the tennis courts will probably be the 
most popular place to be found. Every afternoon all the courts are in 
use, not only as recreation, but an excuse to get out of walking. 

Misses Rice and Reeder, Ellis and Persinger, are the champion tennis 
players. But there is one thought that brings joy to every heart — that 
the days of ''double quickening" and "heels lift, knees bend, knees 
stretch, heels sink," are numbered, and the command, " Stand at ease," 
will be obeyed promptly and diligently. 



Page 68 







V^f 



^- ' ; 



*mS 




Paee 69 



Tennis Club 



OFFICERS 

ANN PUR YEAR WRIGHT Director 

SALLIE C. MASTIN President 

KATE I. BRACKEN Secretary 

MABEL C. RICE Treasurer 

* « * 



MEMBERS 



M A RGA RET TUTW ILE R 

JESSIE MORRIS 

GIN A DANIEI 

1IATTIE ELLIS 

ANNIE LEE HORN 

INEZ HARRIS 

CARRIE LOWE 

JESSIE PERSINGER 

CLARA HINE 

ANNIE BROWN 

MARY BUCHANAN 

SARA CARLISLE 

LUCY MOORE 

IRENE MERKEL 

LUCILE ANDERSON 

MAUD KINNEBREW 

VELMA TRICE 

LI LI. IE PEARCE 

JESSIE LOVEJOY 

BERTHA TUCKER 

SUSIE SWOOPE 

LILLIAN ALLIN 

LUMMIE SINIARD 

CLAUDE PERDUE 

ALMA LEETH 

KATE. EUBANKS 

ISO LA BARCLIET 

NELLE BARCLIET 

ETHEL FOWLER 




MAE WOODALL 
J ESS YE BRANSCOMB 
KATIE BROWN 
MADGE JACKSON 
HALLIE M'CARY 
ETTA MASTIN 
WATKINS HAYES 



MYRTLE STEPHENSON 

ESTHER W \DSWORTH 

CAMILLE SHEPPARD 

NELLE JACKSON 

LOUISE STEELE 

ANNIE HUGHEY 

LUCY WALKER 

MUSIE WHITFIELD 

MARY GEORGE TIERCE 

PEARL SAWYER 

MAUD YIELDING 

PAULINE WOODALL 

WILLARD WH1TTEN 

EULA JOHNSON 

GEORGE ETHEL REED 

ROE KELLEY 

CARM I LITA GARNICA 

SUSIE GRANT 

MYRTLE BARTEE DUKE 

ANNIE MAE REEDER 

DUDLEY TUTWILER 

MEMORY ALDRIDGE 

REYDONIA DANIEL 

ELIZABETH BAKER 

LIZZIE NORMAN 

RUTH LANEY 

MABEL STEGALL 

ANNIE DAVIS 

OLA MABRY 

Page 70 




HATTIE EIvUS ANNIE MAE READER MABEL RICE JESSIE PERSINGER 



Page 71 



Autobiography of a Tennis Racket 



'-■-'T seems a long, long time since I opened my eyes in dear old Athens 
College: and yet. as man reckons time, it has been only one year. 
*=~~* J Some strange experiences have happened to me during the time 
] have been here. I cannot remember my life before I came, but I sup- 
pose 1 must have lived in another world before this. I think man calls 
it " transmigration." You see, I have learned a great deal from the girls. 

One thing I learned was that love rules the universe; and if that be 
true. I have helped rule, for I have played more love games than any 
tennis racket in school. Teachers and girls alike played with me. When 
I was new, they could not play enough ; but after a while I was neglected, 
and man}' a time I shed bitter tears of pure loneliness. 

Sometimes I would have my expectations raised by my owner's saying : 
"Inst wait here till T run put up my name to play tennis." My heart 
would leap for joy. Now we were to have an exciting game ; but — O i — 
how my heart would sink when she would return only to read Poe's 
" Black Cat " or some such nonsense. Girls have such bad memories! 

IVIy greatest rival in school was Basket Call. From my place on the 
wall overlooking the basket-ball court I would watch the girls play; 
and — O ! — I was green with jealousy. Since I have grown older, I know 
I had no cause; for the Casket Call was such an ungainly figure — not a 
graceful curve about her, and so stout and dumpy: and, too. I've heard 
she never played a game of love the whole year ! 

But do not think from what I've said that love and frolic is all a ten- 
nis racket ever thinks of. Far from it. Any tennis player in school 
will tell you that we are always ready to serve, for to serve is the great- 
est delight of our lives. NORA R. MERKEL (US). 



Page 72 



Poem 



Each flower, with its spirit within, 
Belongs to me and is my kin; 
The ontsicle world is life to me, 
And the world outside is fair to see. 

The wild wind calls would lead me on, 
The soft breezes whisper at night and dawn; 
And I — these voices call to me; 
Ah, the world outside is fair to see. 

The sun comes out to guide the day, 
The moonbeams come to dance and play; 
Away from all my cares I'd flee, 
For the world otitside is fair to see. 

The leaves are whispering all together, 

The birds are here of every feather; 

All these things call out to me, 

Saying: " The world outside is fair to see." 

L. SINIARD (' 



Page 73 





<&*> 



n 



Page 74 



u 



est Family ff 




CLAUDE PERDUE. 

' Some are born great, some achieve greatness, 
and some have greatness thrust upon them." 



ELIZABETH NORMAN. 

The most precious of things are done up in 
small packages." 





LILLIE PEARCE. 

And still the wonder grew 
That one small head could carry all she 
knew." 



Page 75 




BERTA GRIZZARD. 



Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be 
wise." 



.MABEL STEGALL. 

'All sins can be forgiven, but for awkwardness 
there is no pardon." 





ANNIE MAE REEDER. 
'Just the airiest, fairest slip of a thing." 



Page 76 




CHICK RICE. 
Fools rush in where angels fear to tread." 



MARY BUCHANAN. 



'Tis only noble to be good. 





LUMMIE SINIARD. 



Not beauty, but wisdom, crowns her brow. 



REGINA DANIEL. 

Her face and brow are lovelier than the 

lilies are beneath the light of 

moon and star." 




Page 77 



Junior Trials 



Ten little Juniors with privileges fine. 
One loved flirting, then there were nine. 

Nine little Juniors still left in state. 

One missed her breakfast, then there were eight. 

Eight little Juniors — a number again even. 

One to the office went, then there were '' sieben." 

Sieben " little Juniors for some fun did fix. 
One smiled aloud, then there were six. 

Six little Juniors now to their luck alive. 

One had Sunday headache, then there were five. 

Five little Juniors now afraid sore. 

One left the light on, then there were four. 

Four little Juniors, all full of glee. 

One skipped study hall, then there were three. 

Three little Juniors about to feel blue. 
One flunking practice, then there were two. 

Two little Juniors doting on their fun. 

One was caught at midnight feast, then there was one. 

One lonely Junior; the race is now run. 
Caught out of her room, then there was none. 

* * * 

Imagine, if you can, a bench, 

A moon as large (O, it's a cinch!), 
And on the bench, blithe as a lark, 

Sit two — but do your part. 

At first a little shy they be 

('Tis strangest in creation), 
Until his breath must fan the cheek — 

But use your 'magination. 

And now they edge together close; 

There is no space in middle. 
A howl, a scream, a pulling hair — 

Ah, now it is no riddle. 

Imagining has done its part; 

It is as clear as day. 
'Tis just two cats — two coal-black cats — 

About to have some play. 

Page 78 



Miscellaneous 

SEVEN WONDERS OF ATHENS COLLEGE 

1. " Wat's " kinks — When straight. 

2. " Mary Buck " — A demerit. 

3. " Patsy " — To breakfast on time. 

4. " Chick " — 100 in deportment. 

5. "' Billy "—Studied one night. 

6. " Miss Horn " — Missed a rule in Latin. 

7. u Miss Pittman " — Took a Senior's demerit off. 

* * £ 

ODDS AND ENDS 

Miss Pittman : " Who was Ulysses ? " 

Miss Elliott : " Why, he was a poet of the seventeenth century." 

Miss B. : " Miss Daniel, did I give you permission to move?" 
"Reydonia: " No, but I'm in myself s light." 

Miss L. : " Miss Clements, can you tell us by what one act in David's 
early life that he distinguished himself? " 

Opie : " O, do you mean David in the lions' den?" 

Kate : " They've sent Harry Thaw to* the asylum." 

Watkins (whose grandfather is in Tuscaloosa) : " O, good ! Grandpa 
will get to see him ! " 

Miss B. : " What were the Hanging Gardens of Babylon? " 
Helen : " That's where they hung their criminals." 

Irene : " Inez, how much is that cloth a yard ? " 

Inez : " I don't know how much it is a yard. I gave twenty-five cents 
for half a yard." 

Page 79 



Deutschman (out of breath): "Vat is die matter your Onkel Sam's 
mail service? I haf a letter twice, three times mailed, und I get no an- 
swer. I — " 

Postmaster: " .\iy dear sir, where did you mail your letter, and has it 
been time enough for an answer? I am sure — *' 

her llerr: " 1 put him in dot big box on die corner vot (ley did say 
vas on all die corners for letters to be put in — right in dot leetle hole, und 
vat do 1 see a man dump die whole box in a wagon! It iss outrageous! 
i vill— " 

Postmaster: " Why, my dear sir, that was the trash box! " 

There sat the faculty 

Round a pleasant little hlaze; 
As I entered in the door, 

They all turned round to gaze. 

At first I felt all out of place, 

And wished that I was gone; 
But I was soon made welcome 

By telling all I'd done. 

" \\ here's my shoe? " 

" In the top drawer." 

" Kate,, where's my coat ? " 

" In the top drawer." 

" \\ here's my collar? " 

" In the top drawer." 

" Where're my combs?" 

" Look in the top drawer." 

" Lands, Katie, here's some candy! " 

" Where did it come from?" 

" Out of the top drawer." 



Page SO 






WMfflFsifb 



C LIA£ X. 



**J^L^* ;W..1' F 




I 



Page 81 




Les Bonnes Amies 



Motto 

"Aim high if you fall low." 

CHIEF AIMS 
Luraie — To decide between two. 
Chick — Not to get caught up with for once. 
Madge — To be a flirt. 
Sallie C. — To grow tall. 
Gina — To play Juliet. 

Jessie P. — To furnish a meal to the savage. 
.Mary Buck — To fool a man. 
Patsy — To get a complexion. 
Jessie Wade — To be Mrs. Jerry. 
< rrandma — Twenty cats, two parrots, and a poodle. 
Nora — To hurt everybody's feelings. 
[rene — To be smart. 
Kate — To know the meaning of love. 
Billv — Ain't eot none. 



82 



D. K. P. 



Motto 
Tell the truth, but don't make a habit of it 

Flower 

Jonquil 



OFFICERS 
W ATKINS HAYES, Mooresville 
JESSYE BRANSCOMB, Union Springs 
ANNIE DAVIS, Trinity 



President 
Vice President 

Treasurer 



MEMBERS 
BEDONIA DANIELS, Lanett 

LUCY WALKER, Birmingham 

ANNIE LEE HORN, Union Springs 

MARY GEORGE TIERCE, Birmingham 

MARY LOU MANKIN, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

ABSENT MEMBERS 
CI.ARA MALLISTER. Huntsville 

SALLIE LEE M'CASKY, Birmingham 
BESSIE SPANGLER, Leighton 

LUTIE HEBSON, Sylacauga 

MATTIE MORRIS, Sylacauga 

ANNIE LAURIE BRANHAM, Birmingham 



Page 83 




LEAP YEAR CLUB 



Motto 




Horror 


" Catch a man *' 




"An old maid " 


Aim 




Pastime 


Get married during 1908 


Colors 
Blue and Pink 

Flower 

Bachelor Button 

MEMBERS 

HONEST HELEN 
DASHING JESS 
FLIRTING MARY LOU 
GRINNING CHESS 


" Writing proposals 



Page 84 



Tl N HORN! 



RS 










Page 85 



The Moral Six 

Club Colors: Black and White Flower: Pansy 

Our Aim is Nothing 

Club Parable 

" Lay not up for yourselves chicken in the washstand, where clothes 

and dust doth corrupt and cats break through and steal; 

but put your chicken in a safer place " 

JESSYE BRANSCOMB President 

MARY GEORGE TIERCE ..... Vice President 

RUTH LANEY Treasurer 

HATTIE ELLIS Secretary 

ELIZABETH NORMAN Pianist 

MAUDE KINNEBREW Poet 



CLUB HOBBIES 

CHESS: "Turning out the light." 

THE LAMB: "Bleating." 

DR. LANEY: " Having hot spells. 

PATSY: "Giggling." 

K1NNE: "Flirting with men." 

LITTLE NORMAN: "Stuffing." 



Page 86 










Big Four 



Gina Fool 

BlLI,Y 

Skeeta 
Chick 



^*&*r 



Said Chick to Billy: "If you'll Gina Fool, 
We'll make 'em Skeeta and break a rule.' 



To while away the time: 
Gina Fool laughs 

Billy butts in 

Skeeta bites 

Chick pecks 




Page 87 



Dreams 



There are dreams of love, 
Dreams long and sweet; 

There are dreams of power. 
Less often we meet. 

The dreams and the dreamers 
Are living life through; 

But the dreams that are counting 
Are those made to come true. 



Page 



We dedicate this little book 
To every sacred place and nook. 
You see, our task we've not forsook. 
We hope with you our work will took. 



Page 89 




The End 



Page 90 



Advertisements 



Page 91 



BROCK & SPIGHT CO. 

Wholesale Grocers 

DECATUR, ALA. 

Representing as wholesale distributing agents 
for this territory the leading packers and man- 
ufacturers of food products in the United States, 
we offer to the retail merchant — 

Prices always right. 

Delivered within twenty-four hours. 

Quick adjustment of claims and losses. 

Try us with a mail order. You will be pleased 
with the results. 

S. S. BROADUS. Pres. J. L. ECHOLS. Vice Pres. 

CLYDE HENDRIX, Cashier 

Ccnttessee Ualley Bank 

DECATUR, ALA. 

Capital and Surplus . $175,000 
Deposits 700,000 

STATE, COUNTY, AND CITY DEPOSITORY 
4% INTEREST ON SAVINGS DEPOSITS 



J. Julian Bartee 
4 Company 

DEALERS IN 

REAL ESTATE 



BELL PHONE 1160 

City lots sold on easy monthly 

payments, $5 to $10 

per month 

Building lots, $100 to $5,000 each 

58 St. Francis St. Mobile, Ala. 



J. W. MURPHEY 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Groceries, Provisions 
Feed Stuff, Etc. 

Both Phones 192 

Church St., near Long's Drug Store 
DECATUR, mi A. 



COLEMAN L. PECK 



flttenney at Lata 



504 1-2 BOND BLOCK 



NEW DECATUR, - ALABAMA 



4V 






4* 



Go to ROSE'S for 




Millinery 


When You Go to Decatur, Eat 


THEY SHOW THE NEWEST THINGS 

Go to ROSE'S for 


BARNETT'S GROCERIES 


Shoes, Dress Goods 


They are Fresh 


Etc. 




THEIR PRICES WILL PLEASE YOU 


BARNETT & SONS 


Go to ROSE'S for 

Ladies' Furnishings 


THREE PHONES 




GIRLS 


CITIZENS 


REMEMBER 


BANK 


You are expected to make home 
inviting 


ATHENS and ELKMONT 
ALABAMA 


SUCCESS 

Will crown your efforts if, when 
he proposes, you exact a pledge 
that you shall 


CAPITAL, SURPLUS 


BUY YOUR GROCERIES 


AND PROFITS 


from 


$47,500.00 


POINTER & AUSTELL 




DECATUR, ALA. 



MARVIN PATTILLO 



REGISTERED Hi PHARMACIST 




HARTSELLE, ALABAMA 



FRED WALL 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

MEMBER OF THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE LAWYERS' 

CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. V. 

WILL PRACTICE IN ALL STATE 

AND FEDERAL COURTS 

FRtlNT OFFICE OVER GILBERT'S DRUG STORE 

ATH ENS, ALA. 



Five Gents! Five Cents is all that I ask. 

A paper bag foil of the best— ah, the best, 
The whitest, the lightest, the " greasiest" — 

At 8. F. TURNER'S is that Popcorn blest. 



J. W.J/AGEN 

Staple and Fancy 

FAMILY GROCERIES 

Candies and Fruits 



J. E,. SCHNE.LL, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 
FIRST-CLASS 



PLEASURE VEHICLES 



KODAKS 

Cameras and Supplies. Developing and 
Printing. High-class Work Only. It Will 
Pay You to Investigate. -:- -:- -:- 

A. F. HARRIS 

NEW DECATUR, ALA. 

Needlework Materials of All Kinds. Stamp- 
ing Done to Order. New Designs Coming 
in Constantly. I Pay Special Attention to 
Mail Orders. -:- -:- -:- -:- -:- 

A. F. HARRIS 

NEW DECATUR, ALA. 



DR. W. J. HAGAN 

ATHENS, ALA. 



WiWiaiws Gilliiand 

Headquarters for 

LADIES' DRESS GOODS 
and FINE MILLINERY 



Hartselle, Ala. 



CALL NO. 8 FOR 



STAPLE AND FANCY 

GROCERIES 



FRESH 
CANDIES AND FRUITS 

oRLL THE TIME 

Yarhrough Bros. 
& Bowen 

OMEGA FLOUR 

WHETHER WANTED FOR 

Rolls, Biscuits, or Cakes 

OMEGA FLOUR WILL SATISFY THE 
MOST FASTIDIOUS HOUSEWIFE 

Mc Sonne U Bros. & Go. 

Sell it in Athens 

J. T. Fargason Go. 

DISTRIBUTERS 

MEMPHIS, - - TENNESSEE 









first national Bank 




Capital, 
Surplus, 



$25,000.00 
5,000.00 



It' 



The Owl Drug Go. 

THE UP-TO-DATE 

DRUGGISTS 

CORNER BANK AND CHURCH STREETS 

DECATUR, JILA. 



The China Hall 

in Decatur has what you want 



And when in Decatur visit 
The China Hall 

W. J. Nesbit & (?o. 

PROPRIETORS 



Dr. W. T. McDaniel 



DENTIST 



Athens, .*. .*. Alabama 



Dr. Louis A. Neill 



DENTIST 



Second Avenue, New Decatur, Ala. 



M. K. CLEMENTS 



Jlttoiniey at Latr> 



TTTTTTTTTTTTTTnTTTIfmTTfTTTTTTTTTITfT 



Athens, .". .*. Alabama 



DR. E. B. HARDIN 

EYE, EAR, NOSE 
AND THROAT 

OFFICE HOURS: 9:30 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M. 

OVER GILBERT DRUG CO. 



AMERICAN PHONE MORGAN CO. PHONE 
NO. 292-W NO. 88 


WSlm 


JL RIGKLE5, D.D.S. 




DHTIftT 




OFFICE 


ROOM 


1 MALONE-SIMPSON BUILDING 


OVER B. L. MALONE FURNITURE CO.S STORE 
FRONT CORNER ROOM 


NEW 


DECATUR, ALABAMA 



Dr. Spencer M. Adams 



DENTIST 



Second Avenue, New Decatur, Ala. 



J. WILSON NOLEN 



Jktomiey at Law 

Collections a Specialty 



ALEXANDER CITY, ALABAMA 



EDWARDS 



EXCLUSIVE 



SHOE STORE 



DECATUR, 



ALABAMA 



THE ATHENS BOOKSTORE 

IS NOW AT THE OLD STAND OF THE ROSE DRY GOODS CO. 



MUSIC, l,(i(io pieces of New .Music, 
your choice, 10 cents. 

ENAMELED WARE very low; three- 
gallon Dish Pan, 50 cents. 

Combs, Ladies' Hand Bags, Purses. 

Toilet Soap, Pictures, Picture Frames. 

Decorated Tin Waiters, 18 x 24 inches, 
for 25 cents. 

A large assortment of Oueensware from 
Haviland. 100-piece sets down to 6 un- 
handled Cups and Saucers, 20 cents; 
handled, 25 cents. 



5 1-piece Dinner Set, white porcelain, 
$4.50. 

loo-piece Dinner Set, $H. 

Toys and Games for sale every day. 

Come in and see the Ferriss Wheel sell- 
ing Post Cards. 

Toothbrushes, 5 cents to 25 cents. 

Music Rolls. 

Post Cards, Albums, and whatever you 
want we have for sale. 



OUR "REMOVAL SALE" GOES ON ALL THE TIME 



If we could only sell 
All the goods we want to — well, 
If you could only buy 
All the things for which you sigh, 
How happy we would be! 



MARTIN, RICHARDSON 8 MAL0NE 

THE BIG STORE 
ORIGINATORS OF LOW PRICES 



Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes, Hats, Clothing, 
Ladies' and Gents' Furnishing Goods 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, MATTING 
AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



TELEPHONE NO. 5 



ATHENS, ALABAMA 



GLASS PINS, RINGS, MEDALS, 
BADGES, AND TROPHIES 

Designed and made to order in our own factory. 
We make more fine Class Pins and Medals than 
any other house in cAmerica, because our prices 
are the lowest and our workmanship is the best. 

FINE STATIONREY IN BOXES, 50c TO & 10.00 

We carry a large variety" if the finest imported 
and domestic papers in all the latest shapes and 
shades. Let us send you samples and prices gf 
Correspondence Paper and Monograms. <S# 

4 * * CALLING CARDS * * * 

< 100 fine cards and engraved plate (script) . $1.50 

100 fine cards from your own plate . . . $1.00 

WE WILL MAIL YOU, FREE, OUR CATALOG 

Containing over 5,000 beautiful illustrations qf Diamonds, 
Watches, Jewelry", Silverware, Cut Glass, Clocks, Opera 
Glasses, Fine Art Wares, Etc. It will help you make satis- 
factory" selections qf articles for your own use and for gifts. 
Write for it. i# £* <£# J# £# i# 

MERMOD, JAGGARD 8 KING 

| BROADWAY, CORNER LOCUST ST. LOUIS, MO. 



GILBERT DRUG COMPANY 



DEALERS //V 



DRUGS AND MEDICINES 

A FULL LINE OF PATENT AND PROPRIETARY 



ALL 

KINDS 

OF 



STATIONERY AND TOILET ARTICLES 
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, AND PUTTY 



AGENTS FOR NVNNALLY'S CANDIES 
ATHENS, * * * * ALABAMA 

Do aWay With the old method of heating 
your Dwellings and Public 'Buildings by 
grates and stoVes. 

Install a neW system of Steam or Hot= 
Water Heatings With a saving of fuel, dirt 
and dust in rooms. 

Write for free estimate on the aboVe 
system. Also, estimates furnished on 
Sanitary Plumbing. 

Ji. V. Smith & Son 

402 West Pond Street Decatur, Alabama 



S. E. STEWART BROS. 

DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, SHOES, 
GROCERIES, HARDWARE 

EVERYTHING SOLD AT LOWEST PRICES 

WE INVITE YOU TO CALL AND SEE 
US BEFORE BUYING 

HARTSELL, 40 40 40 ALABAMA 

D. O. LOONEY 

FANCY GROCERIES, FRUITS 
AND CANDIES 



J* £» 



AGENT FOR LOWNEY'S CHOCOLATES 



TELEPHONE 42 ATHENS, ALABAMA 



WE OPERATE OUR OWN COMPLETE ENGRAVING AND EMBOSSING PLANT, 

AND MAKE A SPECIALTY OF EXECUTING 

PROMPTLY ALL ORDERS FOR 

VISITING CARDS, WEDDING INVITATIONS, COMMENCE- 
MENT INVITATIONS, ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
AND EMBOSSED STATIONERY 

FOR PERSONAL, PROFESSIONAL, OR BUSINESS USES 



COMPLETE STOCK OF FINEST GRADES OF LADIES' STATIONERY 

ROBERTS & SON, Inc. 

" THE BIG ALABAMA HOUSE" 

LITHOGRAPHERS, ENGRAVERS, PRINTERS. 

BINDERS, STATIONERS, STAMPS 

AND STENCIL MAKERS 

STORE AND PLANT 

1810-1812 THIRD AVENUE BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

In all fevers and other diseases where a tonic food is required, 

HART'S ALIMENTARY ELIXIR 

is always indicated. 

It is a delicious and appetizing preparation containing just 
the right proportion of food elements, combined with the best 
Brandy, to nourish and stimulate. 

In fatigue from too much study, overwork, or other causes, one 
or two tablespoonfuls of HART'S ALIMENTARY ELIXIR 
will brace you up and infuse renewed vigor. Ask your physician. 

For sale by" all first-class druggists in original sealed bottles 
under our guarantee. 

E. J. HART & CO., LTD. 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



T. W. CROW, President W. M. BUCHANAN, Secretary and Treasurer 



North Alabama Construction Go. 




CAPITAL STOCK, $50,000 

CANAL, RAILROAD, LEVEE, STREET, 
AND SEWER CONTRACTORS 

RIVERTON, .-. /. /. /. ALABAMA 

. . . STARR PIANO . . . 

MADE AND SOLD TO THE 
PURCHASER BY 

Jesse French Piano 8 Organ Co. 

J. H. HOLCOMBE, Manager 

2018 SECOND AVENUE, BIRMINGHAM, ALA 

^S^Zhe STEIN WAY PIANO 



NELSON SARVER NELSON 



HANDLES 



illAf 



Fancy 
Goods 



QUEEN QUALITY SHOES A SPECIALTY 



I. ROSENAU'S 
SONS 

THE STORE THAT CATERS TO ALL KINDS OF 

Ladies' 
Furnishings 

SHOES and SLIPPERS 
a Specialty 



C. O. JOHNSTON 
SCO. 



DEALERS IN HEAVY AND SHELF 

HARDWARE 

Cook Stoves and Ranges 
Queensware, Glass- 
ware, Etc. 

WE ALSO CARRY A MCE LINE OF 

SILVERWARE AND GUT GLASS 



WHEN HUNGRY, GO OR PHONE 



TO 



FLETGHER ROGERS 



FOR 



EVERYTHING IN THE GROCERY LINE 



FINE FRESH 



Candies and Confectioneries 

A SPECIALTY 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT PROMPT DELIVERY 



L. L. ROGERS 


HARDAGE BROS. 




618 SECOND AVENUE 


STAPLE AND FANCY 




GROCERIES 


Dry Goods, Clothing, 
Hats, Notions, Gents' 


wmmmm, 


Prompt attention to all orders. 


Furnishings <§? *fa 


Everything to please the 




housewife and school 




children ff jf 


BOOTS AND SHOES 


ATHENS, ALABAMA 


Payable Monthly NeW DeCatUr, Ala. 


DIAMONDS, JEWELRY 






W^% 


INTERCOLLEGIATE 


CUT GLASS 


Y^Wr^ 1 BUREAU OF 


AND OPTICAL GOODS 

4* •&• 


LU 


ACADEMIC 
COSTUMES 


COTRELL 8 LEONARD 




ALBANY, N. Y. 


Everything of standard quality, 


MAKERS OF 


and guaranteed as represented. 




You run no risk when you buy from 


CAPS and GOWNS 




^^^^P^- 


" WOOD " 


TO THE AMERICAN COLLEGES 


THE JEWELER AND OPTICIAN 


FROM THE ATLANTIC 




TO THE PACIFIC 


ATHENS, - - ALABAMA 


Bulletin and samples upon request 



PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS OF 

Dress Goods, Silks, Laces 
or Embroideries 

Will save time and money by visiting us first, for we can save 
you many steps and more dimes. We carry by far the largest 
stock of 

Ladies* Shoes 

in the city, in all lasts and sizes. Call on us or write us for 
samples. We clothe the whole family. 

HUGHES & TIDWELL 

612 Second Ave., New Decatur, Ala. 

THE LIMESTONE DEMOCRAT 

LIMESTONE'S LEADING NEWSPAPER 

R. H. WALKER, Editor and Proprietor 

The Democrat is the leading newspaper 
in Athens in circulation and influence. 
An ad. in its columns is read by the 
people of both town and county. -:- 

WE HAVE A WELL-EQUIPPED JOB OFFICE 

IN CONNECTION, AND TURN 
OUT NEAT WORK AT A MODERATE PRICE 



A. M. McConnell T. H. Kennemer R. L. Hendricks 
R. H. McConnell P. W. Hendricks 



McCONNELL 
BROTHERS & CO. 

Mandioane 
Groceries 
Feed Stuff 

MTHEMS, - - ALABAMA 



C. ED. ALBES 
Proprietor 



GEO. LA CROIX 
Clerk 



GO TO ^HEADQUARTERS 

FOR ALL 



MUSICAL SUPPLIES 

WHETHER OF A CLASSIGAL OR 
TOTULAR CHARACTER 

£# 

WE SUPPL Y EVERYTHING PUBLISHED 
MND OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 

The 

Geo. B. Jennings Co. 

Music Store 

105-107 WEST FOURTH STREET 

CINCINNATI, - - - - OHIO 



^HOTEL "BISMARCK 



&lt Union "Passenger Station, Decatur, Ala. 



THE 'BEST 

IDeals, Rooms, Senvice 
Ton $2.00 Pen Dav 

* * 

TELEPHONE IN EVERY ROOM 
SAMPLE ROOM FREE 



TRY US ONCE AND YOU WILL COME AGAIN 



THE LATEST STYLES OF 




WATCHES, 
CLOCKS, 

ANT) 

JEWELRY 



MT REASONABLE PRICES 

ALSO FIRST-CLASS REPAIR WORK 
DONE AT 

Dor rah & Ro bison's 

EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 

ATHENS, ALA. 



Birmingham College 


Walter McWilliams 




STAPLE AND FANCY 


An institution for the higher 




education of men, under posi- 


GROCER 


tive Christian influence. 




Stands for Character and 


Can satisfy in all table delicacies 


Scholarship. Owned and 




controlled by the North Ala- 


SPECIALTY 


bama Conference of the M. E. 




Church, South. Session of 
1908 09 opens September 9th, 


Fine Candies 


1908. For Catalogue and 


and Fruits 


general information, write 






PHONE 86 


Rev. J. H. McCoy, President 




Birmingham, Ala. 


ATHENS, /. /. ALA. 


Tube Rose Flour 


The Alabama Courier 




ATHENS, ALA. 


J. T. Fargason Go. 


THE OLDEST NEWSPAPER IN 




LIMESTONE COUNTY 


MEMPHIS, TENN. 




Have been selling this flour over 


Issued Weekly — All Home Print 


thirty years. It pleases those 




who want the best 


ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 




Advertising Rates Made Known on 


Walter McWiUiams 


Application 


Is their agent in Athens 


Robert M. Rawls, Editor 



B. C. BYNUM 

MILLINERY 

ORIGINAL and IMPORTED 
MODELS 

421 BANK ST., DECATUR, ALA. 


LAMPKIN 4 THOMASON 

INSURANCE 
REAL ESTATE 
and LOANS 

FIDELITY AND SECURITY BONDS 

Bell Phone 4. Morgan County Phone 60 
Office, 112 Lafayette St. DECATUR, ALA. 


C. C. HARRIS. PRESIDENT JNO. L. BROCK, VICE PRESIDENT 

W. B. SHACKELFORD. Cashier W. A. FROST. ASS'T Cashier 
NO. 3699 

THE FUST RATIONAL NARK 

DECATU R, ALA. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00 SURPLUS, $45,000.00 


Morgan County National Bank 

NEW DECATUR, ALA. 

Capital, Surplus, and Undivided Profits, $70,000.00 

OFFICERS 
G. A. HOFF, President 

WM. E. SKEGGS, Vice President 

F. A. BLOODWORTH, Cashier 


THE 

COMMERCIAL SAYINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

OF NEW DECATUR, ALA. 

Wishes to announce to its friends and patrons 
that it has, at the beginning of its fourth year, 
doubled its capital, being now $50,000 fully 
paid up. Your business is solicited. 

G. L. BOWLES, Cashier 


CAFE CONVENIENT ONE BLOCK FROM STREET CAR 

Cbe Jlmettfcan Motel 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

HEAT - BATH 
Dear Union Depot Decatur, Alabama 


HOTEL ECHOLS 

Decatur, Alabama 


ODOM DRY GOODS CO. 

Successors to E. M. ODOM COMPANY 

NRY QOODS, N0TI0H8 

CLOTHING AND SHOES 

LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 

601 SECOND AVE. NEW DECATUR, ALA. 


American Plan 
RATES, &2.50 AND &3.00 PER DAI 

All Modern Conveniences 

Steam Heat, Ele&ric Lights. Private Baths; Barber Shop, Pool 

Room and Bar in Connexion; Elertric Fans, 

Hot and Cold Water 


PHONE SERVICE FROM EVERY ROOM 



nicGebee Funnitunc Companv 

Decatur, .Rlabama 



Parlor, Library Dining Room, FURNITURE 

Bedroom, and Kjtchen iff w 

Carpets, Mattings, Rugs, Oilcloth, and Draperies 

We pack all our goods carefully and ship promptly 
We prepay freight charges on purchases amounting 
to $5 and over rtf *f rtf *T if 4f 



IDcGebee Furniture Companv 

Decatur, Alabama 



3obn D. lilyker & Son 

Decatur, Alabama 



Hardware, Mantels, Fire Brick, 
Wall Paper, Moldings, Ranges, 
Lime, Cement, Plaster, Grates 




II— — Hli^— !ltl— — HH^— 1111^— III!— — !IH— — llll— . IHI— »— •It||«— — ■{III— —llll- 

j The Wise Business Man 

I === 

s s 

! I 

If you are a business man, you use Printed 
I Matter. I 

I If you are a good business man, you use a | 

liberal quantity of it. 

| If you are a wise business man, you use the | 

most attractive kind of Printed Matter you 

= can get, and have it done in the most attract- = 

ive way. 

| That's where we come in strong — AT- | 

TRACTIVENESS— and it doesn't cost you 

= much more than the ordinary kind, if placed | 

with us. Why don't you " try us? " 

! I 

! McQUIDDY PRINTING CO. ] 

= Office Supplies, Desks, Filing Cabinets i 

Typewriters 

317-319 FIFTH AVENUE, NORTH -:- NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE | 

H— — 111!— »||II— — lilt— ^1111-^— i|||^_|H|_||||_!|||.M|||i^-_ IHI—— IIH— H 










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