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Full text of "Oracle"

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http://www.archive.org/details/oracle1910athe 




The Oracle 



i n i — inn i -mi 

DEDICA T ION 



in i i nni inr 



Iff This volume of THE ORACLE is dedica- 
ted to Miss Rosa Lea Jackson, Dean of 
Athens College, as an expression of the 
high esteem in which she is held by the 
student body as a friend, an instructor, 
and a scholar, ftfptttf* 

rn < ~> n i i nn i \m > r-n 

rr n -in i i nn i i m i rfl 




Miss Rosa Lea Jackson 
Dean 



*A JFoit6 farewell 



Tae me it seems but yestere'en 

Sin' first ye cam amang us; 
But mony months have Hed, I ween, 

And now ye're ganging fram us. 
We'll miss fu' sair our bonny Dean; 

We'll miss ye gentle laughter; 
We'll miss the sparkle of ye een; 

We'll miss ye voice that's safter. 



We ken some days o'er stony ways 

Ye tired steps hae wandered; 
Ye've had your fears, and sometimes tears, 

And ye've had briefs tae ponder. 
Sometimes, I ween, our frowns ye've seen; 

Our luve's aft been unspoken; 
And mony a glance, like pointed lance, 

Has pierced without luve's token. 




But ye've been ours, and we've been yours; 

We've eaten salt thegither; 
We've told our griefs; we've ope'd the doors- 

Our hearts — tae ane anither. 
We canna' dream how it will seem 

Nae mair tae meet at table, 
Nor in "the line," like auld lang syne; 

It seems unreal — a fable — 



Tae meet nae mair at even prayer, 

Nae mair in hall or street, 
At noontide bright or dim twilight, 

Amid our lassies sweet. 
But when we pairt, tho' sair at heart, 

We'll smile amid our tears; 
The prayer of luve we'll waft abuve 

Tae speed the pairting years; 
And aft at eventide we'll pray: 
" God grant we meet again some day." 

MARY N. MOORE. 



^fcoard of Orustees 



<4 

HON. W. T. SANDERS, President ----------------- Athens 

REV. GEORGE W. READ, D.D, Vice President ----------- Talladega 

MR. A. M. LEWIS, Secretary ------------------- Athens 

MR. R. H. RICHARDSON, Treasurer ---------------- Athens 

MR. T. M. HOBBS ----------------------- Athens 

REV. J. C. PERSINGER --------------------- Avondale 

REV. H. C. HOWARD, D.D. ------------------ Talladega 

HON. H. B. MALONE ---------------------- Athens 

REV. F. W. BRANDON ------------------- Birmingham 

REV. I. B. SARGENT ------------------ - - Goodwater 

REV. J. S. ROBERTSON -------------------- Decatur 

MR. BELTON GILREATH ----------------- Birmingham 

MR. J. D. LANIER --------------------- Birmingham 

R. N. CARTWRIGHT --------------------- Athens 

*REV. E. M. GLENN, D.D., Presiding Elder, Decatur District ------- Decatur 

*DR. JAMES A. DUNCAN, Pastor ------------------ Athens 



"Executive Committee 

W. T. SANDERS, R. H. RICHARDSON, H. B. MALONE 



* Trustees ex officio . 




Miss Mary Norman Moore 
President 



iDepartment of Orator? 

■ 




Miss Allie Hayes 
Instructor 



JDepar Intent of .Art 







Miss Frances Williams 
Instructor 





one Department Faculty. 



r 



Un Mlemoriam 




k 



When on November 5, 1909, the soul of our dear Florence Brown slipped quietly away from 
its earthly habitation, the life work of one of God's truest, bravest, and most generous children 
was terminated. 

The affection engendered of more than four years of constant daily association is too deep, 
and the sense of personal loss too great, for me to write of her beautiful young life without the 
deepest emotion; yet I wish to record some tribute to one whose memory is a sweet inspiration 
to me, even while her loss is an inconsolable sorrow. 

In the fall of 1905 Florence Brown came to us an earnest student; and, although only six- 
teen years of age, her maturity of thought, dignified deportment, and conscientious discharge 
of every duty placed upon her, so impressed us that, having learned that she wished to take up 
office work, and a vacancy occurring in our office, she was offered the position of secretary 
to this writer; and so acceptably did she fill the place, at the time of her death, although a girl 
in years, she practically had control of the financial affairs of the college, as far as the office 
routine was concerned. 

Miss Brown was born in Chicago, of English and Canadian parentage; was educated in the 
Chicago high schools, supplemented by one year as a student at Athens and a course in the 
Gregg Commercial School, Chicago. 

She was an only child, and her splendidly developed and unspoiled character, her unselfish 
regard for others, and her piety and deep reverence for all sacred and holy subjects, are an in- 
destructible testimony to the wisdom of her parents and the sincerity of their religious life. 
Early in her young life she united with the Presbyterian Church, and not so much by public 
protestation, but by that best of all tests of the Christian life —her daily walk and conversa- 
tion — she gave evidence of her confidence in the faith that was within her. 

When the sickness which so grievously afflicted Athens College came upon us, some one 
asked Miss Brown if she were going home. Her response was characteristic of the loyalty and 
devotion that burned within her heart when she laughingly said: "No, I am going to remain and 
run the school." Even at that moment the disease had her in its clutches, and just twelve 
days later the Father took her to her eternal home. 

We sorely miss her cheery, happy presence, her unusually developed sense of humor, her 
companionship and loving friendship; but by faith in Christ Jesus some day we hope to slip 
away to join our dear ones who have "crossed the bar." and there we expect to find again this 
loving, brave, unselfish, noble-hearted girl. 





faculty 



GOVERNMENT 

MARY NORMAN MOORE 
President 

ROSA LEA JACKSON 
Dean 

MARY COWPER PITTMAN 
Presiding Teacher 

FLORENCE BROWN 
Registrar 

DR. JAMES A. DUNCAN 
Pastor 

DEPARTMENT OF ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION 

MARY NORMAN MOORE 
Philosophy, Bible 

ROSA LEA JACKSON, A.B. 
Mathematics 

MARY C. PITTMAN, A.B., A.M. 
English 

MINNIE R. PERRY, A.B. 
Greek, Latin 

FRANCES LERMAN 
French, German 

ANNA EDWARD SPENCER, A.B. 
Science 

JULIA JACKSON 
History, Assistant Registrar 

MABEL R. LEWIS, A.B. 

Superintendent of School of Education, Principal of 

Subcollegiate Department 

JESSIE BRANSCOMB 
Assistant in English 

FLORENCE BROWN 
Bookkeeping, Stenography, Typewriting 



MUSIC 

DR. HANS C. WULF, Director 
Pipe Organ, Piano, Theory, Harmony 

ELIZABETH G. JONES 
Piano, Harmony, Theory 

MARIE M. DEZE 
Organ, Piano, Harmony, Theory 

BLANCHE MALLERY 
Piano, Harmony, Theory 

MARY I. MEEK 
Voice and Violin 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE AND ART 

MISS EDITH HARDING 

ART AND EXPRESSION 

M. FRANCES WILLIAMS 

Art 

ALLIE HAYES 
Expression, Physical Culture, Director of Athletics 

HOME DEPARTMENT 

MRS. L. A. VANDIVER 
Housekeeper 

LINNA H. DENNY 
Superintendent of Infirmary 

DR. WILLIAM J. HAGEN 
Physician 

VELMA PRICE 
Librarian 

LOUISE MOORE 
Superintendent of Practice 



ttoll 



ALDRIDGE, MEMORY LEE, '11 A.B. - - - Jacksonville 
K. O. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Secretary of G. E. L. S., '10; 
Class Basket Ball, '08, '09, '10; Business Manager of 
Oracle, '10; A. A. A.; Glee Club, '10; Jolly Bachelors; 
Kimono Kiub. 

ANDERSON, RUTH --------- Carbon Hill 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A.; Fair Japonica. 

AUSTIN, BELLE ------------ Kosh 

G. E. L. S. 

BARRETT, ESTHER LOUISE, '13 A.B. - - - Bessemer 
K. O. S.; J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A.; Freshman 
Basket-Bali Team; 'Varsity, '10; Jolly Bachelors; Doo 
Dollies. 

BEASLY, LOUISE -------- Aspen Hill, Tenn. 

J. C. L. S.; A. A. A.; Doo Dollies. 

BLANKENSHIP, ELIZABETH HUDYEE, '12 A.B. - Riverton 
L. B. A.; Y. W. C A.; G. E. L. S.; 'Varsity, '09. 

BRANDON, CARRIE LOUISE, '13 A.B. - - - Bessemer 

L. B. A.; Y. W. C. A.; J. C. L. S.; Athenian Board, '10; 

Doo Dollies 

BROWN, LUCY ---------- Birmingham 

BUCHANAN, ANNIE McCULLY, '12 A.B. - - - Riverton 

L. B. A.; Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S.; A. A. A.; Historian, 

'12; Business Manager of Athenian, '10. 

BUCHANAN, LIZZIE - - ------- Riverton 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; L. B. A. 



BURNS, RUTH CRAIG, '12 ------- - Gadsden 

L. B. A.; A. A. A.; Glee Club, '10; Secretary of J. C. L. S. 

CARTER, VIVIAN - --------- Langston 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

CARY, SADYE ------------ Caryton 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

CHANDLER, REBECCA, '13 ------- - Athens 

J. C. L. S.; P. C. D. 

CLARK, ANNIE ---------- New Decatur 

G. E. L. S. 

CLARK, VIOLA ---------- New Decatur 

G. E. L. S. 

CLEMENTS, MARY ----------- Athens 

COFFMAN, MAE, '13 ---------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

COTTEN, NELLE, '13 A.B. -------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

COUCH, MARIE ---------- Birmingham 

K. O. S.; J. C. L. S.; Jolly Bachelors; A. A. A.; 
'Varsity, '09. 

CRAWFORD, LOUISE ---------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

CRAWFORD, ANNA PURYEAR, '13 A.B. - - - Athens 

J. C. L. S. 



CRUTCHER, MAMIE ---------- Athens 

J. C. L. S.; P. C. D. 

CURTIS, ADA, '11 A.B. ------ McMinnville, Term. 

K. O. S.; J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

DAVENPORT, MARIA -------- Fort Payne 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S.; A. A. A. 

DAVIS, CATHERINE -------- Birmingham 

D. K. P.; G. E. L. S.; Glee Club, '10. 

DAVIS, ROBBIE ---------- Birmingham 

G. E. L. S.; A. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. 

DIAZ, ELODIA, '12 A.B. --------- Mexico 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Athenian Board, '10; 
Double Three 

DINSMORE, ANNA VIRGINIA, '12 A.B. - - - Falkville 

L. B. A.; Oracle Board, '09, 10; Y. W. C. A.; G E. L. 

S.; A. A. A.; Doo Dollies. 

DOWNEY, EVELYN --------- Birmingham 

G E. L. S.; A. A. A.; Glee Club. '10. 

DOWNEY, REGINA -------- Knoxville, Tenn. 

G E. L. S.; A. A. A. 

DUKE, IDA HUNTER, 11 B.S. ----- Birmingham 
L. B. A.; Y. W. C. A.; 'Varsity, '09, '10; Class Secre- 
tary, '11; Class Basket Ball, '08, '09, '10; A. A. A.; Jolly 
Bachelors; Kimono Klub; G E. L. S.; M. F. A.; Doo 
Dollies. 

ELLIOTT, ELNA. '13 A.B. -------- Columbiana 

K. O. S.; G E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club, '10. 

EZZELL, FLORENCE - - ------ Russellville 

J. C. L. S. 



FAUST, LOLA ------------- Jasper 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club, '10; A. A. A.; 
Sub Basket Ball. 

FLOYD, PATTIE ----------- Ashland 

J. C. L. S.; A. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. 

GARLOCH, FLORENCE ----- Garden City, Kan. 
J. C. L. S.; A. A. A. 

GARNICA, CARMELITA ------ South America 

G. E. L. S.; A. A. A.; Sub Basket Ball; Fair Japonica. 

GATLIN, MAMIE --------- Bethel, Tenn. 

J. C. L. S. 

GREENE, ELMINA --------- Conyers, Ga. 

J. C. L. S.; Glee Club, '10; A. A. A. 

GRIFFITH, MARGARET EVA, '12 A.B. - - Hoke's Bluff 
L. B. A.; Treasurer of Y. W. C. A., '10; Class Medal, 
'09; Music Medal, '09; G. E. L. S.; A. A. A.; Kimono 
Klub. 

GRIGSBY, CORINNE ---------- Athens 

GRUBBS, MABEL VIRGINIA ------- Decatur 

G E. L. S.; A. A. A. 

GRUBBS, MARIANNE - - ------- Decatur 

G. E. L. S ; A. A. A.; Glee Club, '10; Fair Japonica. 

HARRIS, FLORENCE -------- Birmingham 

J. C. L. S.; A. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club, '10. 

HARRIS, INEZ, '13 A.B. --------- Red Bay 

G E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

HATCHETT, NELLE ---------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 



HAYES, EUNICE DOROTHY ------- Helena 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A.; Fair Japonica. 

HERNDON, EINNAN ---------- Vernon 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

HERTZLER, FRANKYE, '12 A.B. ------ Madison 

J. C. L. S.; L. B. A.; A. A. A. 

HIGHTOWER, ETHEL MAE, '13 A.B. ----- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

HODO, ETHEL, '12 B.S. --------- Millport 

A. A. A.; G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

HODO, WINNIE ----------- Millport 

A. A. A.; G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

HOWARD, HELEN, '11 A.B. ------ Birmingham 

K. O. S.; President of J. C. L. S., '10; Class Basket Ball, 
'09, '10; President of Class, '11; Athenian Board, '09; 
Oracle Board, '10; Class Medal, '09; Double Three; M. 
F. A.; A. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. 

HOWARD, RUTH, '12 A.B. ------- Birmingham 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A.; Class Basket Ball, 
'10; Spectators; Fair Japonica. 

HUFFSTUTLER, ELOISE, '13 B.S. ----- Sulligent 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A.; Freshman 

Basket Ball. 

HUGHES, SCOTTIE -------- Wilmar, Ark. 

D. K. P.; J. C. L. S.; A. A. A. 

IGON, ALTA ------------- Athens 

IGON, JENNIE ------------ Athens 

G. E. L. S. 



IRVINE, EMILY ------------ Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

IRVINE, AGNES ------------ Athens 

JACKSON, MATTIE ALLEN ------ Iuka, Miss. 

L. B. A.; G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

JACKSON, NELLIE --------- Atlanta, Ga. 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

JONES, EVA ------------- Athens 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S. 

JONES, RUTH - ----------- Athens 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S. 

KELLY, AURORA, '13 B.S. ------- Huntsville 

J. C. L. S. 

KENNEDY, EMMA ----------- Illinois 

L. B. A.; A. A. A.; J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

KEY, JOSEPHINE, '11 A.B. ------- Russellville 

Y. W. C. A.; J. C. L. S.; Class Basket Ball, '09, '10; 
A. A. A.; M. F. A.; Double Three. 

KEY, MARY CLARE, '12 A.B. ------ Russellville 

Y. W. C. A.; J. C. L. S.; A. A. A.; Spectators; Class 
Basket Ball, '10; Athenian Board, '09; Oracle Board, '10. 

KING, SALLIE MAE, '13 A.B. ----- Elkton, Tenn. 
J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

KING, SUSIE BLANCHE -------- Florence 

J. C. L. S. 

KNOX, LUCILE ---------- Birmingham 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S. 



LEE, LOIS ------------- Brundidge 

G. E. L. S.; A. A. A. 

LEE, MITTIE, '11 B.S. --------- Glen Allen 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

LEETH, ALMA, '11 A.B. --------- Cullman 

D. K. P.; J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Athenian Board, 09; 
Oracle Board, '10; Class Basket Ball, '09, '10; A. A. A.; 
M. F. A.; Double Three. 

LEVIE, FLORA ELIZABETH, '13 B.S. - - - Goodwater 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A.; Class Basket Ball, 

'10; Doo Dollies. 

LEWIS, MYRTHA ----------- Sweetwater 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

LOWE, CARRYE ---------- Hazel Greene 

K. O. S.; J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club, '10; A. A. A. 

MARLOWE, LENA - --------- Oneonta 

Y. W. C. A.; G E. L. S.; Glee Club, '10; A. A. A. 

MARLOWE, PEARLE, '12 A.B. ------- Oneonta 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S.; Glee Club, '10; A. A. A. 

MASTIN, ETTA, '11 A.B. -------- Huntsville 

L. B. A.; Glee Club, '09, '10; A. A. A.; J. C. L. S.; 
Y. W. C. A. 

McCALEB, JOSEPHINE IRENE, '13 - - - - - Deposit 
A. A. A.; J. C. L. S.: Basket Ball, '10; Y. W. C. A. 

McCARY, HALLIE EDNA -------- Huntsville 

D. K. P.; J. C. L. S.; Glee Club, '09, '10; A. A. A. 



McCLURE, HAZEL --------- Wilmar, Ark. 

D. K. P.; J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A.; Sub Basket 
Ball; Glee Club, '10. 

McCOY, MARJORIE, '12 --------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

McDANIEL, MADELINE --------- Athens 

Mcdonald, eunice bethea, 11 a.b. - - - Millport 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club, '10. 

McDONALD, JESSYE ---------- Athens 

McGLAWN, ALMA ------------ Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

McGLAWN, NELLE ------------ Athens 

McLANE, ETHLEEN, '13 B.S. ------- Saginaw 

G E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

McWHORTER, ZELLA ABIGAIL, '13 A.B. - - - Riverton 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Class Basket Ball, '10; 

'Varsity, '10; A. A. A. 

MEALING, NELLE --------- Birmingham 

J. C. L. S. 

MILLER, RUTH, '13 A.B. --------- Cullman 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

MERIWETHER, OCTAVIA, '12 A.B. - - - Trenton, Ky. 
G. E. L. S.; A. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. 

MITCHELL, EDNA, '13 A.B. ----- Goodman, Miss. 
J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

MORTON, EMMETT ---------- Russellville 

J. C. L. S.; Glee Club, '10. 



MOORE, LUCY THOMASON ------ Ocala, Fla. 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

MOORE, ETTA HAMILTON ------ Ocala, Fla. 

J. C. L. S.; A. A. A. 

MOORE, MABEL ----------- Riverton 

G. E. L. S. 

MURPHY, LOUISE DOWNS, 13 ----- - Decatur 

Y. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S. 

MORRIS, EMMA SUE ---------- Trinity 

G. E. L. S. 

NELSON, ELLA WILL -------- Cartwright 

G. E. L. S. 

NICHOLS, MATTIE - -------- New Hope 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

NICHOLS, CARRIE ---------- New Hope 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

O'NEAL, FRANCES --------- Bolton, Miss. 

G. E. L. S. 

PEARSON, MATTIE MAY, '13 - - - - - Alexander City 

J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Athenian Board, '10; 

Kimono Klub. 

PECK, DIALTHA ONA, '12 ------ - Somerville 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

PERSINGER, MARY BOYD, '12 A.B. - - - Birmingham 

L. B. A.; G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Class Basket Ball, 

'09, '10; Oracle Board, '10. 

PETTUS, MARGARET ---------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 



PETTUS, GLADYS ----------- Athens 

PACE, LINDA, 13 ----------- Oxford 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

PRIDE, ELIZABETH ---------- Cherokee 

G. E. L. S. ; Y. W. C. A.; Fair Japonica. 

PRICE, VELMA, '11 A.B. -------- Bridgeport 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

PEETE, OLLIE ------------ Madison 

J. C. L. S.; Doo Dollies. 

RIVES, SARA, '13 ----------- . Athens 

J. C. L. S.; President of Class, '13. 

RIVES, JEN - - ----------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

ROCHELL, IONE - ---------- Athens 

ROCHELL, ODELL ----------- Athens 

ROGERS, ANNIE DEE ---------- Athens 

Oracle Board, '10; J. C. L. S. 

ROGERS, NELLE - - --------- Athens 

RUTHERFORD, MYRTLE ------- Birmingham 

G. E. L. S.; A. A. A. 

ROBERTS, ETHEL ---------- Albertville 

G. E. L. S.; A. A. A. 

ROBERTS, SALLIE ---------- Austinville 

G. E. L. S. 

STEPP, DEZZIE, '13 ------- - Elkmont, Tenn. 

J. C. L. S. 



SANDERSON, BERTHA, '12 B.S. ------ Athens 

G. E. L. S.; Y.-W. C. A. 

SANDERS, FRANCES B. --------- Athens 

J. C. L. S.; P. C. D. 

SCARBOROUGH, DEE, '13 ------ - White Plains 

G. E. L. S. 

SARGENT, BUBY ETHEL ------- Birmingham 

K. O. S.; J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; Librarian, '10; 
A. A. A. 

SELF, ELIZABETH, '12 A.B. ------ Laurel. Miss. 

K. O. S.; President of Class, '12; J. C. L. S.; Athenian 
Board. '09; Oracle Board, '10; Y. W. C. A.; Double 
Three. 

SHELBY, LILLIAN ---------- Riverton 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 

SIMMONS, ELIZABETH, '13 ------- - Athens 

G. E. L. S. 

SMITH, IRA ------------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

SMITH, BONNIE ------------ Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

SMITH, BESSIE ------------ Athens 

STANTON, HELEN ----------- Mobile 

J. C. L. S.; A. A. A. 

STURDIVANT, SADIE LOUISE, '12 A.B. - - Bessemer 

L. B. A.; Y. W. C. A.; J. C. L. S.; Athenian Board, '10; 

Doo Dollies; Jolly Bachelors. 



SYFRETT, IDA ----------- Birmingham 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

STOVALL, IRENE, '11 ---------- Jasper 

D. K. P.; J. C. L. S.; Secretary of Y. W. C. A., '10; 
Double Three; M. F. A. 

TONY, MARIE ------------ Madison 

J. C. L. S. ; A. A. A.; Fair Japonica. 

TUCKER, BERTHA, '13 A.B. ------- Lafayette 

J. C. L. S. 

TUTWILER, DUDLEY --------- Blossburg 

G. E. L. S.; 'Varsity. '10; Class Basket Ball, '09, '10; 
Glee Club, '10; A. A. A. 

TUTWILER, MARGARET C. ------- Blossburg 

J. C. L. S.; Sub Basket Ball; 'Varsity, '10; A. A. A.; 
Fair Japonica. 

TURRENTINE, NINA ---------- Athens 

VANDIVER, MARY RUTH ------- Birmingham 

J. C. L. S. 

VANN, LINNA, '13 ----------- Athens 

G. E. L. S. 

VANN, ELIZABETH ---------- Athens 

G E. L. S. 

VANN, ADDIE WAE --------- Pratt City 

K. O. S.; G E. L. S. 

VANN, MAE, '13 A.B. --------- Pratt City 

G. E. L. S.; K. O. S. 

WALSTON, KATHARINE LOUISE, '12 A.B. - Birmingham 
J. C. L. S.; Y. W. C. A.; A. A. A. 



WASHINGTON, LUELLA ._...-.. Wainsville WEATHERLY, MILDRED 



Huntsville 



J. C. L. S. 



G. E. L. S. 



WARTEN, LOUISE Athens W EBB, CLEO Langston 

G - R L ' S - G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

WILLIAMSON, MATTIE, '13 ------- Oxford 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

WITT, FLORENCE ----------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 

WITT, ADDIE MAY ----------- Athens 

J. C. L. S. 



WARTEN, MATSIE ----------- Athens 

WADSWORTH, ESTHER, '13 A.B. - - - - Birmingham 
D. K. P.; J. C. L. S. 

WARE, DONIE ----------- Trussville 

G. E. L. S.; Y. W. C. A. 

WEATHERLY, MARJORIE ------- Huntsville 




^Mumtide Chorus 

Come, ye band of Athens daughters, 

Lift a song of praise; 
Join in joyful adoration; 

Grateful voices raise. 

How we love thee, Alma Mater, 

We can never tell; 
But thy daughters' lives shall ever 

Sing thy praises well. 

Thy green campus, halls, and class rooms; 

Thy great columns four— 
Though we leave them, Alma Mater, 

We shall still adore. 

CHORUS: 

Sing to Athens, Alma Mater; 
Loud her praises tell! 
Hail to thee, O Athens College; 
Hail to thee— all hail, all hail! 









Bl)£ ^Atyens ©iris 



What's the line of dazzling white 
That bursts upon the people's sight? 
It is the wonderful Athens girls 
Dressed in Sunday frills and curls. 



They skip, they giggle, they laugh, they sing; 
For doesn't this mean the beginning of spring? 
And doesn't it mean in a few more months 
They'll be free from demerits — at least for once? 

H. McCARY. 



Senior (Tlass 



OFFICERS 

ELIZABETH TAYLOR --------- President 

SUSIE GLENN ------------- Vice President 

MABEL WATERS ----------------- Secretary 

PEARLE SAWYER ------------------- Treasurer 

IRENE MERKEL ------------------------- Poet 

BERNICE RODEN ------------------------- Prophet 

PEARLE SAWYER ---------------------------- Giftorian 

OZIE YORK --------------------------------- Historian 

Colors 
Red and White. 

Motto 

"A man's reach should exceed his grasp, 
Or what's a heaven for? " 






<LJ>% 



(" Sugar Glenn.") 

SUSIE HERNDON GLENN. A.B.. 
Decatur, Ala. 

" Noiseless as fear in a wide wilderness." 

" Sugar Glenn," also known as " Baby." enjoys the distinction 
of being the smallest member of her class. Always has a kind 
won! for every one, and stands up for what she thinks is right. 
Is ever loyal to old Athens College and the Class of '10. Is 
rather fond of "eats," and was never known to miss a meeting 
of the Kimono Klub. Intends to return to Athens next year and 
take a " post " course in music. 

K. O. S.; Vice President of Class, '10; Treasurer of Athens 
Athletic Association. '10; Class Basket-Ball Team, '10; Treas- 
urer of G. E. L. S„ '10; Kimono Klub; Y. W. C. A. 



(" Rene.") 

IRENE HUNTINGDON MERKEL, B.S.. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

" What the hammer, what the chain, 
Knit thy strength, and forged thy brain?" 

" Rene " loves a good time, but always uses reason and good 
judgment. Is a " shark " in Mathematics. A devoted worshiper 
at the shrine of Morpheus. Rather hard to get acquainted with; 
but once you know her, you can but be her friend. Voted the 
brightest girl in school. 

L. B. A.; Editor in Chief of Oracle; Vice President of G. E. 
L. S.: President of Athletic Association. '10: Class Medal. '07, 
'08, '09; Glee Club, '09; Class Basket Ball, '07. '08. '09. '10; Class 
Poet, '10; Y. W. C. A.; Jolly Bachelors; Kimono Klub. 






C Red.") 

i'.I RN1CE RODEN, English Certificate, 
Collinsville, Ala. 

" I never saw 
Nor shall see, here or elsewhere, till T die, 
Si i svi lit a character." 



Red" is '>ih ■■! the most popular K' r ' s in college. Wears a 
smile thai makes you feel better for having met her. Rather 
fond "i a certain member of the Sophomore Class. Plays well 
and practices most of her time, as she expects to get a diploma 
this year Voted the most polite girl in college. 

K O S.; President of G F 1 S.; Secretary of G. E. L. S., '09: 
Vice President of Y. W. C. \ ; Class Prophet; Glee Club, '09; 
Kimono Klub. 



<0><CJ 



(" Ginger.") 

PEARLE MARGARET SAWYER, A.I',.. 
Albertville, Ala. 

" Stn mg i if will and proud." 

"Ginger" is rather hot-headed, True to her friends, and will 

rln anything for them. Likes a g 1 j"l<e. and proves it 1>> a 

hearty laugh, 

K. O. S.; Editor in Chief of Athenian. '10; Oracle. '09; Class 
Secretary; (lift. .nan of Class, '10; <i. E. L. S.; Y. \Y. ('. A.; 
Class Basket Hall, '10; Tennis Club; Jolly Bachelors; Kimono 
Klub. 






<LJP% 



(" Beth.") 

JULIA ELIZABETH TAYLOR. A.B., 
Brownsville, Tenn. 

" For manners arc not idle, but the fruit 
Of loyal nature and of noble mind." 

"' Beth " hails from "Sunny Tennessee." She is one of the 
best-liked girls in school. A good student, and does good work. 
Has a genial and good-natured disposition. Rather quiet to 
those who do not know her. Well endowed with good looks 
Voted best all-round girl in college. 

L. B. A.: President of V. W. C. A., '10; Class President: Treas- 
urer of V. W. C. A., '09; Glee Club. '09. '10; Cla-s Basket Ball, 
10; Tennis Club; Kimono Klub; G. E. L. S. 



(" Fresh Waters.") 

ANNIE MABEL WATERS. English Certificate. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

" We needs must love the highest when we see it." 



"Fresh Waters" is a pleasant girl to mix with. Never has 
been known to do anything very shocking. Always extremely 
neat in her appearance. Doesn't waste much love or time on 
Mathematics. Is rather good to look at. 

K. O. S.; V. W. C. A.; G. E. L. S.; Class Basket Ball, '10; 
Tennis Club; Assistant Editor of Athenian; Jolly Bachelors; 
Kimono Klub. 




(" Duck.") 



OZIK MATILDA YORK. 
Athens, Ala. 

"Quiet, but deeper than you think." 

"l)ucl<" is somewhat reserved, and never obtrudes herself 
upon your attention. Is well endowed with gray matter, and 
make-- tine grades. Has high aspirations. Future plans to be a 
Professor of Mathematics in some college. 

J. C. L. S.; Class Historian; Graduate of E. D. A. S., '07. 




VgffiEifo 



SeroOr Yt\3iSc.cy\:S 



Class £><vz (Greeting 




)E, the Class of 1910, have at last reached one 
of those occasions to which we have looked 
forward for four long years. "Long," we 
may say, in one sense of the word; yet we confess 
that each year has had its charms, and there have 
been joys and triumphs which we shall ever cherish 
in our memory. 

So on this, our Class Day, it gives us great pleas- 
ure to greet you with a hearty welcome. 

Doubtless it is your interest in the dear old col- 
lege, which we shall ever love and honor as our Alma 
Mater, which has constrained you to lend us your 
presence; and we are to-day proud of your hearty co- 
operation, and we hope that the pleasure which you 
shall derive fro7)i these exercises may in some meas- 
ure be equal to that which the day brings to us. 

This is a day whose importance to us is second 
only to that one on which we shall receive our hard- 
earned and well-won diplomas. From this time, 
when we plant our tree as a memorial of our class, 
the tie which binds us together will be knit even 
closer, for more fully do we realize that the time is 
growing sliort in which we shall mingle together as 
"just schoolgirls." 

While in the past we have ever hovered near the 
shore of life's sea, before the lapse of a few short 



months we shall find our barges launched upon its 
bosom. 

Because we realize there will be serious problems 
for each of us to face, we are to-day glad to render 
thanks to Athens College that it has taught us the 
lessons of fortitude, perseverance, and the true 
worth of a noble character, that we might be pre- 
pared to meet those vicissitudes; and to our beloved 
President we wish to say that we have ever been 
led on to those higher things in life by the inspira- 
tion of her tenderness, sympathy, and nobility of 
character. 

We go out into the busy world to fulfill that life 
purpose which some of us have cherished perhaps 
since childhood — not that we expect to become stars 
of the first magnitude in the world of genius, but 
that, with our smaller lights and in our simple way, 
we may be worthy representatives of this institution, 
and that from our lives there may radiate beams 
which will brighten some otherwise dark and lonely 
pathway. 

You are all familiar with the fact that experience 
is a great teacher, and from our experience we are 
able to say to the Freshmen, Sophomores, and Jun- 
iors that the ladder which leads to a diploma is diffi- 
cult to climb, and that many hours' work, inter- 



spersed with tears and possibly an office lecture, are 
sometimes needed to mount just one round ; but bear 
in mind the fact that just one round is gained at a 
time, and at the summit there is a prize for which 
we may well strive. 

So our advice is: Press onward, and in the end 
you shall realize that "he who waits shall have what 
he desires." 



To the dear teachers who have ever been our ref- 
uge and our fortress we lift our hearts in gratitude, 
and may your lives ever be as golden cups filled with 
long life and happiness. 

When we have left these halls, many things which 
we have learned will be forgotten; but though time 
and tide may roll forever, they can never sever the 
links wbich bind us to our Alma Mater. 




Vive la (Hasslca '10 

(Air: "Vive L'Amour.") 
<« 

I. 

In ye days when ye maydens wore caps and ye gowns, 

Vive la Classica '10, 
And Athens girls' wisdom was ever renowned, 

Vive la Classica '10, 
A class was born of ye classical race, 
Who delighted not in ye wisdom and grace, 
But rather pitch ball and win in ye chase 

For ye jolly Classica '10. 

II. 
But now as my story must truly relate, 

Vive la Classica '10, 
The girls of this class did all dissipate, 

Vive la Classica '10, 
In privileges both and " cases " fine, 
And, sad to say, not to breakfast on time, 
Until each must say, " Demerits are mine " — 

Vive la Classica '10. 

III. 
And now as my song must come to an end, 

Vive la Classica '10, 
This class, as all others, should its name defend, 

Vive la Classica '10. 
'Twas the champion in ball, and tennis, too, 
If not in grace and wisdom forsooth; 
And now I will bid you all an adieu — 

Vive la Classica '10. 



Class Jp r0 Pb* c ? 



I'T was my first day and my first visit to New 
York City, and I was bent upon taking in all 
the sights. After fifteen years of public- 
school teaching, I had managed to save enough for 
the trip, and had promised myself an indulgence in 
everything offered. 

Grant's tomb, Central Park, Madison Square Gar- 
den, had all been visited, and I had very nearly com- 
pleted the list of sights that had been charming vis- 
itors for the last decade. What next? My mental 
and my financial condition rebelled at a return to 
Greenbrier yet. The spirit of the metropolis was in 
my veins, and I longed for something new. Then it 
was that, glancing skyward, I saw a sign on the 
top of a one-hundred-and-ninety-nine-story building 
which was a direct answer to my prayers. It read: 
"All Around the World in Twenty-four Hours in 
the Wrightless Aeroplane for $5." Aeroplanes are 
things only read of in Greenbrier; so I saw a chance 
here to eclipse all previous sight-seers. Their man- 
ager, in his roofarge on the top of this one-hundred- 
and-ninety-nine-story building, promised me a great 
trip the next day. 

"All aboard of our one-millionth-bird-power ma- 
chine!" cried the conductor in his aeroplane; and 
we promptly sailed forth. ' ' The first point of inter- 
est," he said, before I had time to catch my breath 
and adjust my veil, "is the most noted glue factory 
in the world, which is under the proprietorship of 



Miss Susie Glenn. ' ' Why, that must be our dear lit- 
tle Susie of 1910 at the old Athens College. I well 
remembered how sticky she was in those days, and 
how she numbered her crushes by the score. But to 
go into the business in such a wholesale fashion! 

Then the Atlantic ! The beauty of the view, how- 
ever, could not turn my thoughts from Susie and 
the Class of 1910. Where were they all? I was 
aroused from my reverie by the conductor shout- 
ing: "Liverpool! Below you get a glimpse of the 
city noted for its manufacturing interests. Here, 
too, they suffer from the same calamities which be- 
set our American industries. At present there is a 
strike on at the Lacy Jabot Company which prom- 
ises to threaten the neckwear of the world. The inter- 
ests of the operatives are being stanchly advocated 
by a Miss Ozie York, who is the champion jabot 
maker of the world. " Our Ozie! She always wore 
a scrap of something ornamenting the front of her 
collar, and always spoke enthusiastically of ours. 
Her love of feminine frumpperies had claimed her 
at last. 

Europe was passed over unnoticed. Then Asia! 
Just as we were in sight of Tibet, a sailor beside me 
mentioned the great work that was being done in 
this land by one of our American women — Miss Ma- 
bel Waters — in the interest of woman 's rights. Ma- 
bel! Why, I remember her intense interest in our 
Wednesday evening Tibet study; but for her life 



work! Probably some of the many advantages 
which women possess over men attracted her. Who 
knows? How I would like to have taken a drop 
down to see her! But the ticket did not permit of 
' ' dropovers. ' ' 

Already the voice called me: "We will now take 
a side sail over Africa, following the course made by 
our President Roosevelt in years gone by. This 
course has been made a race track by American lec- 
turers since then in their chase for information con- 
cerning his trip. The most famous of these seekers 
is I. H. Merkel, who is now making a second investi- 
gation in order to prepare a supplement for her book 
entitled 'The Truth About Teddy's Chase After Big 
Game.' " What next, I could not imagine. The 
mention of names unknown to me hardly reached my 
ears, so preoccupied was I in my thoughts of Irene. 
Her experience with the Oracle, no doubt, was re- 
sponsible for this work. 

We had even arrived over San Francisco before I 
recovered sufficiently to listen. "In this city the 
greatest trial of the century is being conducted. Mr. 
I. Cheatem, of the firm U. Grabem & I. Cheatem, has 
been convicted of the embezzlement of this firm. 
Rumors have reached society that the wife of Mr. 
Cheatem is really the responsible member of this 
daring scheme. Mrs. Beth Taylor Cheatem has been 
in the social ascent for years, and this affair was the 



climax of her arrival at the top of the ladder." 
Surely he didn't mean our Beth, but in his descrip- 
tion of her I could not fail to recognize a certain 
member of our class. Now I remember how she did 
not hesitate to star in her class of "History of Art," 
even if she received the honor at the expense of 
her fellow-mates. But fifteen years makes a differ- 
ence. 

"Chicago! Marshall Field's! Sears-Roebuck! 
Sawyer Bread Company!" "Did you say 'Saw- 
yer?' " "Yes, the P. Sawyer Bread Company; 
bread rises while you wait;" and other wholly un- 
known assertions to my Greenbrier ears. Pearle 
did frequent the Athens Bakeiy in those old days, 
in spite of the fact that she did not have the fever 
excuse. If she has the old taste for bakery prod- 
ucts, I doubt the amount of her profits. 

"Soon home!" our informer cried; and I almost 
gave a sigh of relief. Such a day! Why, it had 
food for thought sufficient for a century at Green- 
brier. "Here we are! The Statue of Liberty, Wall 
Street Exchange, and — tickets, please ! ' ' 

Then "bang!" went something. "Where am I? 
What is it?" 

"Get up!" said Mabel. "This is Class Day, and 
you must hustle if you get your prophecy written in 
time to plant that tree. March 4 is positively the 
last day, you know. ' ' 

PROPHET, '10. 



(Tlass ~!poem 



In the early fall of 1906, 

When all the world seemed drear, 
'Twas whispered in the college halls: 
" Hurrah! Class '10 is here! " 

" Out of the Everywhere into the Here " 
Had come this mighty class 
That in the future was to change 
The records of the past. 



Yes, " out of the Everywhere into the Here " 

They came with shouts of glee; 
And even the Seniors forgot to look wise, 

And lost their dignity. 

And Jupiter from Olympus' heights 

Smiled when he saw this class; 
For now quoth he: " Some fun there'll be 

In rivaling my lass. 

" Minerva has no show at all 
In wisdom up to date. 
Class '10 will smile and win the prize. 
Minerva, you're too late. 

"And even Juno, pure and fair, 
Will blush to vie with the few 
In beauty who will ever shine 
As Class of '10 must do. 



" The giant oaks will nod their heads, 
And sigh as ne'er before, 
When 1910 has passed away — 
The mournful sigh: 'No more.'" 

POET, '10. 



Kutor? of tbe Class of 1910 




|INCE the mind of a historian is not permitted 
to wander into the realm of imagination to 
the extent of painting our past in glowing col- 
ors, I have collected merely some facts that will re- 
veal the true importance of our illustrious class. 

Before a girl finishes the course at Athens College 
she has a rough and stony path to tread. The larger 
stones on this path are those called "demerits," 
"4's," and "examinations." But there are some 
beautiful flowers scattered here and there, and these 
brighten the way and hide the ugly stones. So many 
have been the pleasures of the past four years that 
the girls of the Class of 1910 are of the opinion that 
the flowers on their path are far more numerous than 
the stones. 

In September, 1906, when many young girls were 
admitted as Freshmen, the Class of 1910 was organ- 
ized. The college was in a very prosperous condi- 
tion. The two previous years had been successful, 
and the outlook for the future was bright. And so 
the members of the Faculty were happy; but the 
"Freshies" were far happier, because we were fax 
enough advanced to leave the subcollegiate depart- 
ment and to enter college. We felt that we could 
advance much more rapidly after this important 
step; and although examinations came in such quick 
succession, and there was a demerit ready for us 
every time we turned to the left or right of the path 



made for us to tread, and our lessons were very dif- 
ficult, yet the year passed very pleasantly and profit- 
ably; and when we left in May with certificates of 
promotion to the Sophomore Class, we felt that all 
our labor had not been in vain. 

Our work as Sophomores, while very interesting 
and pleasant, was, nevertheless, the most difficult of 
any in our school life; but we were so elated over the 
fact that we were Sophomores, and that there were 
only two more years before our graduation, that we 
felt equal to any task. We were still more jubilant 
when, at the close of 1908, having successfully passed 
those dreadful examinations, we received our cer- 
tificates of promotion. 

As the Sophomore was the most difficult, the Jun- 
ior was the easiest, the most pleasant, and perhaps 
the most successful of all the years we have spent at 
college. We were more contented, more inclined to 
take things easy, and were not quite so anxious 
about promotion as in previous years; and as the 
time when we should receive our diplomas drew 
near, we felt more and more our unworthiness. Thus 
the Junior year was marked by more earnest and 
careful study on our part. This made the work more 
pleasant. The fact that we enjoyed some privileges 
which we had not had before rendered the year's 
work more pleasant still. But with the pleasures 
came the sadness in the realization of the fact that 



so many of our members had given up the fight and 
that so few were left to continue until the end. 

Some of the most noted events of this year were 
the reception given by the Y. W. C. A. to the stu- 
dents and Faculty, the reception given by us to the 
Class of 1909, and the Seniors' Class-Day exercises. 
The year passed very quickly, and almost before we 
knew it we had our certificates of promotion to the 
Senior Class and were dreaming of the time in the 
near future when we would put on our caps and 
gowns. 

After being admitted into the Senior Class in Sep- 
tember, 1909, we found that this year, with all its 
importance, its privileges, and its many joys and 
pleasures, had also its sorrows and troubles. The 
trouble in the fall served only to cause us to redou- 
ble our energies and to make up for the lost time. 
It also served to bring us closer together. So we 



realize, as the time for commencement draws near, 
that it will not be such a happy time, after all. It 
will mean freedom from books, it will mean rest from 
work and some disagreeable tasks for a while; but 
it will also mean the leaving of this dear old Athens 
College, it will mean our separation from our Presi- 
dent and teachers and from one another. When we 
think of these things, we almost wish we were not 
Seniors, but Freshmen, and could go over our college 
life again. If we could, I am sure that our history 
would not be the same. I do not think we would 
receive quite so many "2's" and "3's," and there 
would be fewer demerits on record. There are no 
great deeds in our history to be written on the page 
of fame, but the fact that we realize the meaning 
and purpose of life will enable our future to be wor- 
thy of notice. Herein we are illustrious. 

CLASS HISTORIAN. 



Gifts 



You know and think, as all must do, 

That gifts are very dear, 
And like to see them come to you 

From friends both far and near; 
But I must choose the better part 

Of giving, not receiving, 
And bring to each one of my class 

A token of Fate's weaving. 

No doubt each one of you has read 

Of "Alice in Wonderland," 
And how she ate the magic bread 

And changed from small to grand. 
Now, by a rare good streak of luck, 

This bread I did obtain, 
And treasured it with utmost care 

That it might work the same 

For Susie. 

It is, indeed, the queerest state; 

But truth's in every word. 
A maid there is who studies late, 

And's wild o'er Math., I've heard. 
Now any one so studious 

Deserves immense rewards, 
And so I give right here and now 

This book on sines and chords 



To Ozie. 



For one who likes such curly hair 

It really seems that Fate 
Would pity take and have a care 

To whom she gives it straight; 
But this maid has a daily task 

Of putting hers in curls. 
And so I give a bunch of " kids " 

To the vainest of the girls — 



There's something that comes well to hand 

For one who has to work, 
And Seniors wish that it might stand 

For study which they shirk; 
But only favored few may have 

This wondrous bag of knowledge. 
It's handed down to Mabel now 

To help her get through college. 

A ship I'm sure will give good cheer 

To our missionary to be 
When she decides to leave us here 

And sail across the sea. 
May it resist the sounding waves 

And bear her safe to land, 
And carry our good wishes o'er 

With Beth, to a heathen band. 

And I have learned a secret deep 

Which now I shall divulge: 
There's one of us would rather sleep 

Than in other things indulge. 
So I feel it my duty clear 

To present a downy bed, 
With a soft and easy pillow, 

Where Irene may rest her head. 

May each gift fill some long-felt need; 

May each girl happy be, 
And may each always through life heed 

This truth she's learned from me: 
That happiness will always come, 

And then will sadness leave, 
If she is always giving, 

Not waiting to receive. 



Bernice. 



Cast Will anb Oestameitt of tl)e Senior Class of 1910 




;E, the members of the Senior Class of Athens 
College, being aware of approaching exam- 
inations which threaten the lives of us all, 
do here make and declare this, our last will and tes- 
tament, declaring that all former wills or testaments 
made by us at any other time are null and void and 
this the only original and true copy of the said docu- 
ment. 

First: We appoint as executors of this will those 
members of the class who for any reason may return 
next year; and if none should return, we appoint 
that member of the Class of 1909 who is still linger- 
ing about these halls this year and who may return 
next year to execute this to the letter. 

Second: We declare it to be our desire that our 
worthy Historian shall write up in fitting terms a 
record of the many great achievements which we 
have accomplished during the four years in which 
we have held the "supreme power" in college life, 
including the glories of this present day. 

Third: To the Senior Class of 1911 we give and 
bequeath all the dignity and honor which is attend- 
ant upon that high office; the right to appear learned, 
as we have done; and the pleasure of being honored 
by all teachers and of being "looked up to" by all 
students. We also give up to them the Senior row 
of desks and left-over books, with the injunction that 
they must maintain the honor and dignity of the 
class, as we have so worthily done this year. 

Fourth: To the Sophomores we willingly give all 

Witnesses: The 



the advice which we have collected during our four 
years of college experience, hoping that it will help 
them to recover from their malignant disease of con- 
ceit and self-importance, so that by the time they 
will have reached the Class of 1912 they may be wor- 
thy to be called ' ' Seniors. ' ' 

Fifth: To the Freshmen we hereby bequeath all 
the toys, trinkets, dolls, gay hair ribbons, and 
' ' cases ' ' which we may have left from the days long 
ago when we were called "Freshies." We also ex- 
tend to them our heartfelt sympathy for the long 
and hard road of learning which they will have to 
travel before reaching the dignified position which 
we hold to-day. 

Sixth: To the Faculty we give the right to make 
the tasks for the Class of 1911 as hard as, if not 
harder than, those they have set for us this year; 
and we extend to them a last formal acknowledg- 
ment of the help and indulgence which they have 
given to us, hoping that they will continue their sin- 
cere cooperation to the end of time. 

Seventh: To all — teachers, Juniors, Sophomores, 
Freshmen, and to all those who do not belong to any 
of these classes — we leave the greatest gift in our 
power to bestow — our memory — and, with it, the 
Oracle for 1910, in order that it may give them the 
satisfaction of seeing themselves as others see them. 

And now we do hereby place our signature and 
seal on this, the 4th day of March, 1910. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

two college kittens. 



& 




• 



Commencement 



The happy days are come, 

The jolliest of the year — 
Of caps and gowns and dresses fine, 

And — O! — those "sheepskins" dear. 

Where are the books, the Latin books, 
And Grammar, French, and Math.? 

Ah, they have vanished from our sight, 
With roses in their path. 



$ 



\ 




^Junior Class 



OFFICERS 
HELEN HOWARD ---------------- President 

IRENE STOVALL ----------------- Vice President 

IDA DUKE ------------------------- Secretary 

MEMORY ALDRIDGE ------------------------ Historian 

JOSEPHINE KEY _____--_-_-_.-__.-______.______ Poet 

MEMBERS 

ALDRIDGE. MEMORY LEE, A. B. - - - - Jacksonville KEY, JOSEPHINE, A.B. --------- Russellville 

("Merm.") ("Jo.") 

"A heart as true as steel." "A marvelous witty person, I assure you." 

CURTIS, ADA. A.B. ------- McMinnville, Tenn. LEETH, ALMA, A.B. . _ _ _ _ Cullman 

„...,.,„ " She bore a mind that envy could not but call fair." 

" Eyes glad with smiles. 

LEE, MITTIE, B.S. ----------- Glen Allen 

DUKE. IDA HUNTER. B.S. - - Birmingham .. Hear , an( , ,,.,„,, tha , move together 



Feet that run on willing errands." 



(" Idaho.") 

" You wear your blue so chiefly in your eyes. 
In Mich a frank, good way." MASTIN, HENRIETTA, A.B. ------- Huntsville 

(" Misetta.") 
HOWARD, HELEN. A.B. -------- Birmingham " I celebrate myself and sing myself." 



("Elen Oward.") 

" If I vow a friendship, I'll perform it to the last article. 



PRICE, VELMA, A.B. ---------- Bridgeport 

"Ala-, for those that never sing, 

But die with all their music in them! " 
HODO, ETHEL, B.S. ----------- Millport 

" Certainly a woman's thought always goes before STOVALL, IRENE, A.B. ---------- Jasper 



her action. " -p] le ne atest. the sweetest, the trimmest little maid 



en. 



Humor THistor? 




'HE Junior enjoys a peculiar place in college 
life. She has not the fear and timidity of the 
Freshman, nor the self-satisfaction of the 
Sophomore, nor the anxiety of the Senior. She en- 
joys the privileges accorded to upper classmen, with 
no uneasiness. 

We, the Class of 1911, having passed into that 
happy state, no longer burn the midnight oil nor 
"cram" for exams. We extend our deepest sympa- 
thies to the Fresh, and Sophs., and bid them "keep 
the faith," and one day they shall enter into the joys 
of the Junior. 

When we first entered these walls that have be- 
come so dear to us, we were twenty in number; but, 



sad to relate, some of the more faint-hearted of our 
band succumbed to the pestilences of homesickness, 
plagues of exams., and floods of demerits. Six of us 
only have been fortunate enough to survive these 
trials up to the Junior year. Although we are the 
smallest class in school, we know that it is not quan- 
tity, but quality, that counts. We do our work faith- 
fully; and if things get to looking "blue" some- 
times, we just put on a smile and remember that 

" It is easy enough to be pleasant 

When the world flows along like a song, 
But the girl worth while is the girl who can smile 
When everything goes dead wrong." 

HISTORIAN. 



TJuitior fiodxn 



I wouldn't be a Fresh., 

Mere babes, who have no knowledge, 
With three more years to toil 

Before they get through College. 

I'd hate to be a Soph., 
"Conceited?" Just a little. 
But why they have conceit, 
To me, is quite a riddle. 

"A Senior? " Not for me; 
They're always in a hurry; 
They care for naught, save books; 

And their brows are creased by worry. 

I like my Junior life. 

With privileges so fine; 
I'm glad I'm what I am, 

With no one's faults but mine. 

POET, '11. 



p 



s 



o 




Sophomore Class 



OFFICERS 



ELIZABETH SELF 
MARY PERSINGER - 
MAGGIE GRIFFITH -.-.'- 
ANNIE BUCHANAN - - - - 
MARY KEY --------- 



President 
Vice President 

- - - Secretary 
- - _ _ _ Historian 



Poet 



MEMBERS 



BLANKENSHIP, ELIZABETH HUDYEE, A.B. - 

(" Lizzie.") 
" Black were her eyes as the berry 
That grew on the thorn by the wayside." 

BUCHANAN, ANNIE McCULLY, A.B. - - - - 
("Little Buck.") 
" The calm brow, the parted hair, 
The gentle lips which know no guile." 

BUCHANAN, ELIZABETH, A.B. ------ 

(" Lizzie Buck.") 

" I love her for her smile, her look, her way 

speaking gently." 



Riverton 



Riverton 



Riverton 



of 



BURNS, RUTH ------------ 

"Alack! I love myself. Wherefore?" 

DINSMORE, ANNA VIRGINIA, A.B. - - - - 
"A woman's crowning glory is her hair." 



DIAZ, ELODIA, A.B. ------- 

(" Daz.") 
" Soft eyes did gaze on me — 
Burning, yet tender." 



Gadsden 



Falkville 



Mexico 



GRIFFITH, MARGARET EVA, A.B. - - - Hoke's Bluff 

(" Maggie.") 
"A waking eye, a prying mind, 
A heart that stirs, is hard to bind." 

HERTZLER, FRANKYE, A.B. ------- Madison 

(" Frank.") 
" I have found a little lassie 
With bright eyes of darkest gray." 

HOWARD, RUTH, A.B. -------- Birmingham 

" It's gude to be merry and wise; 
It's gude to be honest and true." 

KEY, MARY CLARE, A.B. ------- Russellville 

(" Key.") 
" But let me laugh a while; 
I've mickle time to grieve." 

MARLOWE, PEARLE, A.B. -------- Oneonta 

" Noble her object, glorious her aims." 

MERIWETHER, OCTAVIA, A.B. ----- Trenton, Ky. 
" I sit alone, and watch the warm, sweet day 
Lapse tenderly away; 
And, wistful, with a feeling of forecast, 
I say: 'This is the last.'" 



McCOY, MARJORIE ----- - - - - Athens 

(" Moggie.") 
" O, what a power has white simplicity! " 

PERSINGER, MARY BOYD, A.B. - - - - Birmingham 
(" Mary P.") 

" Care to our coffin adds a nail, no doubt; 
But every smile so merry draws one out." 

PECK, ONA DIALTHA - ------- Somerville 

(" Miss Peck.") 
" It is a poor heart that never rejoices." 

PENNINGTON, NELLE, B.S. ----- Ripley, Tenn. 

(" Penny.") 
"When she made pause, I knew not for delight." 

SANDERSON, BERTHA, B.S. ------- Harvest 

" Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit." 



SELF, ELIZABETH, A.B. ------- Laurel, Miss. 

" Glancing with black-beaded eyes 
Till the lightning laughters dimple the roses in her cheeks." 

SHOOK, ANNA MAE, B.S. ------- Bridgeport 

(" Shucks.") 
" Be not too bold." 

STURDIVANT, SADIE LOUISE, A.B. - - - - Bessemer 
" Tell this girl what 'tis to love." 

WALSTON, KATHARINE LOUISE, A.B. - - Birmingham 

(" Kathouise.") 
"How noble in reason! How infinite in faculty!" 

WADSWORTH, ESTHER, A.B. ----- Birmingham 

(" Es.") 

" She blushed and smiled like a looking-glass." 



Sophomore Jp° em 



Listen! Have you heard the story 

Of the Class of 1912? 
They will win all of the glory, 

For at their books they work and delve. 



It was in September, readers, 

When their work they did begin, 

When this merry band of leaders 
Began to study and to win. 



They had given for more knowledge, 
Wealth and comfort; yes, and more — 

Left their homes to enter college, 
Came this crowd of Sophomores. 



In basket ball they're hard to beat; 

In their studies they are grand. 
Such a jolly class you'll meet 

Nowhere else in all the land. 



In loyalty they never lack — 

This happy class of maids so bright. 
Their colors, Lavender and Black, 

Stand for what is good and right. 



Then here's to the class that's always right! 

Here's to the class that's full of fun! 
And we will stand firm in the fight 
"As long as the sands of time shall run." 

POET, '12. 



Sophomore (Tlass Ufistor? 




JHEN in the fall of 1908 Athens College opened 
its proud halls for the reception of new pu- 
pils, there was never seen a crowd of jollier 
girls to enter the Freshman Class. 

We had expected to have an easy time in school, 
and to spend most of our time in "having fun;" but 
at the end of the first month we found that our 
grades were not so good as we had hoped them to 
be, and, instead of "l's," there were "3's" and even 
"4's" on our reports. However, these low marks 
did not cause us to lose heart, but only served to 
make us study more; and, by constant "digging," 
at the close of school we were the happy possessors 
of promotion cards. 

After three months of vacation, we were glad 
when the time came for us to resume our work at 



Athens. When we arrived, we found that nearly all 
of our classmates had returned, and with them a few 
new members to join us in our work. And work it 
was. It seemed to us almost impossible to get over 
this rough path to learning, and more than once we 
nearly gave up in despair; but with a little encour- 
agement from our teachers and home folks, and by 
constantly keeping in our minds that well-known 
proverb, "Where there's a will, there's a way," we 
found at the close of the term that the victory was 
ours. 

Although this year has been filled with trials, it 
has also been filled with pleasures which we shall 
never forget; and when our school days have ended, 
the recollections of our "Sophomore" year will be 
cherished in our memories. 

HISTORIAN, '12. 





RESHKIAN 



Jftesljman Class 



OFFICERS 
SARA RIVES --------------------- President 

REBECCA CHANDLER ------------------- Vice President 

CARRIE LOUISE BRANDON --------------------- Historian 

SALLIE MAE KING ----------------------------- Poet 



MEMBERS 



BRANDON, CARRIE LOUISE, A.B. - - - - Bessemer 
" Roses are her cheeks, 
And a rose her mouth." 

BARRETT, ESTHER LOUISE, A.B. - - - - Bessemer 

(" Es.") 
" She sang a song, she danced a jig 

That took my heart away." 

CHANDLER, REBECCA, A.B. ------- Athens 

•' The less men think, the more they talk." 

COTTEN, NELLE, A.B. ---------- Athens 

" Fair she is, if that mine eyes be true." 

COFFMAN, MAI, A.B. ---------- Athens 

" Lips mute, hands clasped, in silences of speech." 

CRAWFORD, ANNA PURYEAR. A.B. - - - - Athens 

" The most precious articles are always done up in 

small packages." 

ELLIOTT, ELNA, A.B. --------- Columbiana 

"A blue-eyed, flaxen-haired angel." 

HIGHTOWER, ETHEL MAE, A.B. ------ Athens 

"A spirit so still and quiet that it blushed at its own motion." 



HARRIS, INEZ, A.B. ---------- Red Bay 

"A seeming child in everything, 
Save thoughtful brow." 

HUFFSTUTLER, ELOISE, B.S. ------ Sulligent 

" Curiosity killed a cat." 

HERNDON, EINNAN, A.B. -------- Vernon 

" The love of praise, howe'er concealed by art, 
Reigns more or less in this young lady's heart." 

JACKSON, NELLE LOIS. B.S. ------ Atlanta, Ga. 

(" Tempest.") 
" We wouldn't mind putting up our young friend, 
In making a noise, against any five men." 

KELLY, AURORA. B.S. ----------- Jeff 

(" Roe.") 
" With every change, her features played, 
As aspens show the light and shade." 

KING, SALLIE MAI, A.B. ------- Elkton, Tenn. 

" But being what I am. 
I'll be it nobly." 

l.EVTE, FLORA ELIZABETH. B.S. - - - - Goodwater 
(" Bess," " Levie.") 
"Who broke no promise, served no private end; 
Who gained no title and lost no friend." 



McWHORTER, ZELLA, A.B. ------- Riverton 

(" Squirter.") 
" I'll care for no one — no, not I — 
If no one cares for me." 

McCALEB, JOSEPHINE IRENE, B.S. ----- Deposit 

("Josie.") 

" With blinded eyesight, poring over miserable books." 

I 
McLANE, ETHLEEN, B.S. -------- Saginaw 

" Not a single word she uttered." 

MITCHELL, EDNA, A.B. ------ Goodman, Miss. 

" I would that my tongue could utter 
The thoughts that arise in me." 

PEARSON. MATTIE MAE, B.S. - - - - Alexander City 
" She gave to misery all she had — a tear." 

PACE. LINDA, A.B. ----------- Oxford 

"Go thy way; thou art a good, plain maid." 



RIVES, SARA, A.B. ----------- Athens 

" Full beautiful, a fairy's child." 

SCARBOROUGH, DEE, B.S. ------ Choccolocco 

" May Jove, in his next commodity of hair, send thee a curl." 

SIMMONS, ELIZABETH, B.S. ------- Athens 

" Her eyes were deeper than the depths 
Of waters stilled at eventide." 

TAYLOR, MAMIE, A.B. ------- Stanton, Tenn. 

" O, that I had stayed and said my prayers at home! " 

TUCKER, BERTHA COKE, A.B. ------ Lafayette 

" There shall ever be a place for virtue." 

VANN, LINNA, A.B. ----------- Athens 

" Her spirit is the harmony of truth." 

VANN, MAE, A.B. ---------- Pratt City 

" Fair, in sooth, is this maiden.'' 




^resljmait ~jp° em 






When from tradition we did learn 

That Freshmen always had been fools, 

We said, when we began as Fresh., 
That our bright class would break such rules. 

We started right at very first, 

And ne'er a precious moment spared; 

We always did just what was best, 
As our hard lessons we prepared. 

In basket ball we've been the head. 

I'll tell you what our class has done: 
It's met the Faculty on the field; 

The final score — thirteen to one. 



4* 



We've shown the Sophs., and Juniors, too, 

That we can be as smart as they; 
And even the great, conceited Seniors 

Don't dare to stand in our bright way. 

POET, '13. 



"3fVesl)man Hfistor? 




;E haven't much history to relate, but it is 
only because of lack of time, not from any 
fault in ourselves. When we reach the 
dizzy heights from which the Seniors smile so con- 
descendingly, we do not doubt but that we shall have 
the most interesting history ever made in Athens. 
We have made a splendid beginning, and that is half 
the battle, saith the seer. 

We have two of our members on the 'Varsity 
basket-ball team, and a large majority are on the 
first honor roll. Even those self-deceived creatures, 
the Sophs., cannot boast these honors. Although 



some might say that the Freshmen of 1909-1910 have 
a ' ' streak of luck, ' ' we feel that it is due to our own 
merits. 

We had the honor of meeting the Faculty on the 
basket-ball court, and they proved themselves wor- 
thy of any foe. We trust they entertain the same 
sentiments toward us. 

So, hoping that our good looks, good luck, and 
good nature will continue and increase, we are pa- 
tiently waiting (should I say it?), working for the 
time when we shall don the cap and gown and bid a 
long farewell to our Alma Mater. 

HISTORIAN, '13. 



Subfresfymert 



ANDERSON, RUTH --------- Carbon Hill 

BROWN, LUCY ---------- Birmingham 

CLARK. VIOLA ---------- New Decatur 

CARTER. VIVIAN ---------- Langston 

CLEMENTS. MARY ----------- Athens 

CRUTCH ER. MAMIE - - - - - - - - - - Athens 

CARY. SADYE ------------ Caryton 

DAVIS. ROBBIE C. --------- Birmingham 

DAVENPORT. MARIA -------- Valley Head 

DOWNEY, REGINA --------- Birmingham 

GARNICA, CARMELITA ------- South America 

GATLIN, MAMIE ---------- Bethel, Term. 

GRUBBS. MARIANNE ---------- Decatur 

GRUBBS. MABEL ----------- Decatur 

GRIGSBY, CORINNE ---------- Athens 

IIATCHETT. NELLE ---------- Athens 

HAYES. EUNICE ----------- Helena 

HUGHES. SCOTTIE -------- Wilmar. Ark. 

IRVINE. EMILY ------------ Athens 

IRVINE, AGNES ------------ Athen 

1GOU. ALT A -------------- Athens 

1GOU, JENNIE -------------- Athens 

KING. SUSIE BLANCH --------- Florence 

MARLOW, LENA ----------- Oneonta 

McCLURE, HAZEL --------- Wilmar, Ark. 

McGLAWN, NELLE ----------- Athens 

McDANIEL. MADELINE --------- Athens 

McDONALD. JESSYE ---------- Athens 

MEALING. NELLE --------- Birmingham 

MOORE, LUCY ----------- Ocala, Fla. 

MOORE, ETTA --_.-_____. Ocala. Fla. 

MOORE. MABEL ----------- Riverton 

MORRIS. EMMA SUE ---------- Trinity 



NICHOLS, CARRIE ---------- New Hope 

NICHOLS, MATTIE --------- New Hope 

O'NEAL, FRANCES --------- Bolton. Miss. 

PETTUS, -MAGGIE ----------- Athens 

PETTUS. GLADYS ----------- Athens 

PRIDE, ELIZABETH ---------- Cherokee 

PRICE, VERA ------------- Athens 

RIVES. JEN __-__-------- Athens 

ROCHELLE, ODELL ---------- Athens 

ROCHELLE, I ONE ----------- Athens 

ROGERS, NELLE ----------- Athens 

RUTHERFORD, iMYRTLE ------- Birmingham 

ROBERTS, SALLIE ---------- Austinville 

RORERTS. ETHEL ---------- Albertville 

SANDERS. FRANCES ---------- Athens 

SHELBY. LILLIAN ---------- Riverton 

STANTON. HELEN ----------- Mobile 

SYFRETT. IDA ---------- - Birmingham 

TONY, MARIE ------------ Madison 

TUTWILFR, DUDLEY --------- Blossburg 

TUTWILER, MARGARET -------- Blossburg 

TURRENTINE, NINA ---------- Athens 

VANDIVER. MARY RUTH ------- Birmingham 

VANN. ELIZABETH __-_---_-_ Athens 
WASHINGTON. LUEI.LA ------- Wainsville 

WEATHERLY. MILDRED _____-- Huntsville 

WEATHERLY, MARJOR1E ------- Huntsville 

WARTEN. LOUISE ----------- Athens 

W'ARTEN. MATSIE ----------- Athens 

WEBB, CLEO ------------ Langston 

WITT, ADDIE MAE ----------- Athens 

WITT, FLORENCE ---------- Athens 



^lormal 

CLARK. ANNIE ---------- New Decatur 

"Thou foster child of silence and slow time." 

COUCH, MARIE ---------- Birmingham 

"All that's best of dark and bright 
Meet in her aspect and her eyes." 

CRAWFORD. LOUISE ---------- Athens 

"Attempt the end. and never stand in doubt." 

DOWNEY, FVELYN --------- Birmingham 

"Surely, surely, slumber is more sweet than toil." 

FAUST. LOLA ------------- Jasper 

" What means this' 
< I. 11 iw 1 St e — a jest ! 

FLOYD, PATTIE ----------- Ashland 

"Loyal to truth and the sacred professions of friendship." 

HARRIS, FLORENCE -------- Birmingham 

"Just anything than what I am 
It seems to me were better." 

HODO. WINNIE ----------- Millport 

" O, true in word and tried in deed' " 

JONES, RUTH ------------- Athens 

" Modest and shy as a nun is she." 

JONES, EVA ------------- Athens 

" Locks not wide dispread. 
Madonna wise on either side her head." 

KNOX, LUCILE ---------- Birmingham 

"Sweet, my case, I live for thee." 

LEE, LOIS ------------- Brundtdge 

" I take part, 1 see and hear the whole." 



(Tlass 

LOWE, CARRYE ---------- Hazel Green 

"This girl's soul is in her clothes." 

McGLAWN, ALMA .___-_.-__-_ Athens 
" She hath her praise." 

MORTON, EMMETT --------- Russellville 

No greater talker ever was." 

MURPHEY, LOUISE ---------- Decatur 

" Like sunshine on the uneasy ocean waves." 

McCARY, HALLIF EDNA -------- Huntsville 

(" Hal") 
" Hail to thee, blithe spirit! " 

NELSON. ELLA WILL ---------- Athens 

Large was her bounty, and her soul sincere." 

SMITH. BONNIE _----_--.-_- Athens 
" I lam would make attempts to win." 

SMITH. BESSIE ------------ Athens 

"Ambitious, cautious, yet the one 

To strike down fraud with resolute hand." 

STEPP, DEZZ1E --------- Elkmont, Tenn. 

" Lay aside life-harming heaviness. 
And cultivate a cheerful disposition." 

WAR]-:. DONIE ----------- Trussville 

" Whate'er her life defeatures, 

She loved her fellow-creatures." 

WHEELER, ALMA ----------- W'infield 

" Not for a soul like thine the calm 
Of selfish ease and joys of sense." 

WILLIAMSON, MATTIE --------- Oxford 

"A maiden never bold." 




* 



% 





QSjV 



f& 



irregulars 



AUSTIN, BELL ._.____._.___ Kosh 
*' Never was [ afraid of man." 

DAVIS. CATHERINE --------- Birmingham 

C'Cat.") 
" She paints like nature." 

EZZELL, FLORENCE --------- Russellville 

" Her waist is ampler than her life, 
For life is but a span." 

GARLOCH, FLORENCE ------ Garden City. Kan. 

"Thou art so full of misery. 
Were it not better not to be?" 

GREENE, ELMINA --------- Conyers, Ga. 

"A delicate child, and slender. 
With lucks of dark-brown hair." 

JACKSON. MATTIE ALLEN ______ Iuka, Miss 

" She tasted love with all her mind." 

KENNEDY, EMMA ----------- Illinois 

"'Ah. truest soul of womankind. 
Without thee what were life?" 



Mcdonald, eunice ---------- Millport 

" Humility — that low, sweet root 
From which all heavenly virtues shoot." 

SHELL, ALVA ----------- Birmingham 

" Simple and fresh." 

SARGENT, RUBY ETHEL ------- Birmingham 

(" Rube.") 
"A pair of dainty glasses 

On her slender little nose. 
Add to her look of wisdom 
And statuesque repose." 

SMITH, IRA ------------- Athens 

\\ e are what we are made." 

RODGERS. ANNIE DEE --------- Athens 

"What a tender and impassioned voice!" 

VANN, ADDIE WAE --------- Pratt City 

" The light of heaven 
Still lingered and gleamed in her hair." 

YOUNG, ESSTE ----------- p ratt City 

" Fashioned so slenderly. 
Young and so fair." 









(T- 



4- 



Hn Mlemoriam 





i 



^ 



=j 



(cL 



MATTIE JIM REDDING 
Freshman 



LOUISE McWHORTER 
Subfreshman 



NINA WORD 

Subfreshman 



ANNIE NICHOLS 
Subfreshman 



^ 




M 



USIC 



Mtusic iDepartment 

DR. HANS C. WULF, Director 

<4 

DR. WULF 

CARRIE LOUISE BRANDON EMMA SUE MORRIS 

RUTH BURNS EMMETT MORTON 

ELIZABETH BUCHANAN ETTA MASTIN 

LILA COLEMAN RUTH MILLER 

ADA CURTIS HAZEL McCLURE 

LUCILE CRUTCHER HALLIE McCARY 

MAMIE CRUTCHER MARJORIE McCOY 

OPIE CLEMENTS ONA PECK 

EMMA DRISKELL ANNIE WRAY GRISHAM ELIZABETH PRIDE FRANCES PEEBLES 

ANNA DINSMORE EUNICE SMITH GILBERT BERNICE RODEN MARGARET PETTUS 

FLORENCE GARLOCH ETHEL ROBERTS 

SCOTTIE HUGHES ANNIE MAE SHOOK 

RUTH HOWARD DUDLEY TUTWILER 

MARY KEY MARGARET TUTWILER 

JOSEPHINE KEY MISS JONES LOUISE WARTEN 

ALMA LEETH UZZIE BLANKENSH IP MACCA MARTIN LUELLA WASHINGTON 

MRS. LERMAN ANNA CRAWFORD JOSEPHINE McCALEB ESSIE YOUNG 

CATHERINE DAVIS MADELINE McDANIEL 

ROBBIE DAVIS ELIZABETH PRIDE 

MARGARET GRIFFITH SARA RIVES 

SUSIE GLENN MISS DEZE IRENE STOVALL 

EUNICE HAYES RTJTH ANDERS0N BESSIE LEVIE ELIZABETH SELF 

SALLIE MAE KING EST HER BARRETT GLADYS PETTUS SADIE STURDIVANT 

SALLIE B. MALONE MARY CLEMENTS VERA PRICE FLORENCE WITT 

REBECCA MALONE m&s DENNy NELSON RODGERS ADDIE MAE WITT 

EVELYN DOWNEY IDA SYFRETT 

MARIA DAVENPORT LILLIAN SHELBY 

NORA FRY FRANCES SANDERS 

CARMELITA GARNICA MARGARET SANDERS 

CORINNE GRIGSBY ELIZABETH TAYLOR 

MARIANNE GRUBBS MAMIE TAYLOR 

MAMIE GATLIN LINNA VANN 

LUCILLE KNOX MILDRED WEATHERLY ELIZABETH VANN 




Km* 



dt«S 



(blaa (Llub 



MISS MARY MEEK, Director 




MEMBERS 



MEMORY ALDRIDGE 
RUTH BURNS 
EVELYN DOWNEY 
C VTHERINE DAVIS 
ELNA ELLTOTT 
LOLA FAUST 
MARIANNE GRUBBS 



FLORENCE HARRIS 

LEN \ .MARLOWE 
PEARLE MARLOWE 

EMMETT MORTON 

HA LI. IE McCARY 

HAZEL McCLURE 

EUNICE McDonald 



EUNICE HAYES 



DUDLEY TUTWILER 



BETH TAYLOR 



<bhd (Hub yio. 2. 




OFFICERS 

JOLLY KEY 
President 

HAL McCARY 
Business Manager 

MADAM MARCHAROUND DAVIS 
1 )irector 



Sopranos 

CAT DAVIS 
RENE MERKEL 
MEM. ALDRIDGE 
TOLLY KEY 



MEMBERS 



Tour 

KITCHEN 
Crow's-Nest 

ANNEX 
Tin Roof. Infirmary 



Tenors 
HAL McCARY 

CAD LOWE 
RUTH BURNS 
KUTH HOWARD 



Orator? ^iotes 




.ET us say in beginning that these are "Ora- 
tory" notes, not "Expression" notes. We 
claim that "Oratory" is a broader term, for 
it includes nor. only the expression of our own or 
another's thoughts, but also all speech arts. An- 
other reason: we are following the Emerson sys- 
tem; and as their work goes by the name of "Col- 
lege of Oratory," we should, as a matter of course, 
use their title. Hence our name. Before long we 
expect to boast of the name "Oratory School of Ath- 
ens College." Merely "Oratory Department" is too 
small for our work. Already we have a definitely 
outlined three-years' course. At the end of that time 
our pupils will receive a certificate, provided that 
they shall have finished the Sophomore year. A pu- 
pil taking a four-years' course will be given a di- 
ploma. To those who intend pursuing this work 
after their graduation here this diploma will mean 
much. It will admit them to the Senior Class of 
many oratory colleges and to the Junior Class of 
Emerson. And this is our endeavor: to so interest 
and enthuse our pupils that they may not be con- 
tented with merely learning a speech or two, but that 
they may pursue the work in all its branches until 
they shall have obtained that development which 
comes with a perfect understanding of speech arts. 

Our class now numbers thirteen — not unlucky as 
we see it, for some of us are doing double work; and 



we intend to double our roll next year. The class 
reads thus: 

Juniors 

Rebecca Chandler 

Nelle Cotten 

Elna Elliott 

Ethel May Hightower 

Mary Persinger 

Sara Rives 

Bertha Sanderson 

Freshmen 

Lucy Moore 
Bessie Smith 

Irregulars 

Lucile Crutcher 
Annie May Grisham 

Nina Turrentine 
Kathouise Walston 

What have we done this year in public work? 
Not so much as we expect to do next year. Our first 
play was in course of rehearsal last fall when school 
disbanded. It was a Hallowe'en entertainment, and 
we had planned it as a complimentary evening to 
our friends in the other departments. That play will 
hold for another year, however. 

"My Lord in Livery," a one-act play by Theyre 
Smith, was presented Friday evening, February 18, 
by the members of the Junior Class. One-half of the 
proceeds was given to the Oracle. A very apprecia- 



tive audience greeted the opening scene, which rep- 
resented a sitting room in an English country house. 
The cast of characters was as follows: 

Lord Thirlsmere (of the ship Phlegethon) - Rebecca Chandler 
Spiggott (an old family butler) -------- Mary Persinger 

Hopkins (a footman) --------------- Sara Rives 

Robert (a page) __________ Ethel May Hightower 

Sybil Ambersley (daughter of Sir George Ambersley) - - - - 

__--._-.-_______---- Nelle Cotten 

Laura ) ( ----------- Bertha Sanderson 

Rose } her fr,ends { Elna Elliott 

In the recital work the girls have acquitted them- 
selves very creditably. ' ' The French Tenor, " by H. 
C. Bunner, was given at the January recital by Mary 
Persinger. The same evening, Rebecca Chandler, as 
"A "Woman in a Shoe Shop," was enjoyable. "A 
Man Without a Country," by Edward Everett Hale, 
is a fine book, and a good cutting of it was read by 
Ethel May Hightower on March 25. Lucile Crutcher, 
"The Littlest Girl," is a wonder. Any one who has 
heard her will understand our praise of her. She 
gave "The Pickaninny" at our March recital, and 
she was as dear and attractive a little reader as you 
can find anywhere. A two-act sketch, "While 
Breakfast Waited," by Otto Senga, was played by 
Sara Rives and Nelle Cotten. Sara is our very best 
"man," and always sets the college girls' hearts 
aglow. Let us take occasion to say that she does not 
take advantage of her ability to so cleverly imper- 
sonate a man to use it for "crushing" purposes. 
She and Nelle did an attractive piece of work in this 
little play, and showed a surprising knowledge of 
how things are done where Love is in charge. 



But where we get most enjoyment is in our class 
work. The Juniors have three classes a week, and 
the Freshmen have two. These are, of course, in ad- 
dition to the two regular individual lessons. In the 
classes we study, primarily, the evolutions of ex- 
pression. These "little red books," as the girls call 
them, give the system as outlined by Dr. Emerson. 
It is a system based on the laws of nature, and shows 
the processes through which a person should pass in 
his endeavor to attain perfect power of expression. 
To assist in this work we have classes in pantomime, 
responsive gesture, and other forms of physical ex- 
pression. 

During March "The Reveries of a Bachelor" was 
given for the benefit of the Oracle. Sara Rives, as 
"The Bachelor," was visited by almost a score of 
memories, which were altogether delightful. Dud- 
ley Tutwiler, as "The Western Girl," and Emmett 
Morton, as "The Gypsy Girl," were especially at- 
tractive. 

We are accumulating a fund with which to furnish 
our room. Some handsome book shelves are on the 
way, and several other things of usefulness and 
adornment have been planned. 

Our commencement play will be "The School for 
Scandal," by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. This 
amusing series of laughable situations promises to 
give ample opportunity for our girls to show their 
histrionic ability. The picturesque costumes of this 
period will lend an attractive effect to the scenes. 
"The play's the thing," after all, with girls. 




Sonnet to America 

<• 

America, my own dear native land, 

How proudly do thy Stars and Stripes float o'er 
Each harbor, port, and bay from sand to sand! 

May cruel bloodshed stain thy soil no more; 
But may with loyal hearts each wandering band 

Forget the dreadful slaughter and the gore, 
And sing of liberty o'er all the strand, 

And prosperity at each freeman's door. 
Dear land, I'd rather be a native of 
Thy soil than of any empire of the globe 
The kindly sun has ever shone upon, 
And feel, no matter where my feet may rove, 
I still possess a glorious resting place, 
Ruled by the greatest people of our race. 

M. P., '12 




.Art dlass 



MISS FRANCES WILLIAMS, Instructor 




Werefora v D6y_ 
ceri/e Mat) there 
: nothiYKf better 
jan that/ a man 
^iii/uici rejoice in the worKs 
0/ his oyvn hands, /or this is 



MEMBERS 

ANNIE BUCHANAN MARIANNE GRUBBS 

ANNIE DEE ROGERS HELEN HOWARD 

GEORGIA MOORE EUNICE McDONALD 

LOUISE MOORE LOLA FAUST 

ETTA MOORE MARIE COUCH 

TEN RIVES FRANCES O'NEAL 

MABEL GRUBBS MAMYE SPEARS 




The " Crow's-Nest " 




A Corner of the Library 



.Alumnae .Association 



OFFICERS 
MISS M. L. HAMMERLY ------------------------- President 

MRS. ERNEST HINE ---------------------- Vice President 

MISS SALLIE MASTIN --------------- Second Vice President 

MRS. ROY OSBORNE - -- -- - -------- Third Vice President 

MISS JOSIE COLE ----------- Fourth Vice President 

MISS JESSYE BRANSCOMB ------ Fifth Vice President 

MRS. B. L. ALLEN ------- Recording Secretary 

MRS. W. P. CHANDLER ----- Treasurer 

MISS SARA M. MALONE - - Historian 



ACTIVE 

MRS. B. L. ALLEN ------------ 1890 

MISS BLANCHE BINFORD --------- 1906 

MISS LUCIA BARCLIFT ---------- 1906 

MRS. EUDORA BLACKWOOD -------- 

MRS. J. L. BRITAIN ----------- 1872 

MISS KATE BRACKEN ---------- 1908 

MISS JESSYE BRANSCOMB -------- 1909 

MISS ISOLA BARCLIFT ---------- 1908 

MRS. W. P. CHANDLER ---------- 1872 

MISS ROBBIE CHANDLER --------- 1906 

MISS SARA CARLISLE ---------- 1909 

MRS. J. W. CUNNINGHAM --------- 1892 

MISS JOSIE COLE ------------ 1897 

MISS OPIE CLEMENTS ---------- 1908 

MRS. TULA VAUGHN GILBERT ------- 

MISS JESSIE GREEN ----------- 1904 

MISS VALLIE GREEN ----------- 1907 

MRS. SARA D. GRAY ----------- 

MRS. KATE G. GAMBLE ---------- 1890 



MEMBERS 

MISS L. M. HAMMERLY ---------- 1848 

MRS. ERNEST HINE ----------- 1881 

MRS. J. R. HOFFMAN ----------- 

MISS MARY ELLA HOUSTON -------- 1872 

MRS. LAURA C. HORTON --------- 1896 

MRS. MARY W. HIGHTOWER -------- 1889 

MISS ANNIE LEE HORN --------- 1909 

MRS. T M. HOBBS ------------ 

MRS. CARRIE D. HALL ---------- 

MISS MILDRED IZZARD ---------- 1906 

MISS MAGGIE IRVINE ---------- 1898 

MISS MADGE JACKSON ---------- 1908 

MISS OLIVE KELLEY ---------- 1906 

MRS. W. G. MARTIN ----------- 1898 

MISS SARA MALONE ----------- 1883 

MISS MARY CAINE MASON -------- 1890 

MISS LIZZIE McCLELLAN --------- 

MISS LUCILE MORRIS ---------- 1896 

MISS NORA MERKEL ----------- 1908 



MISS SALLIE C. MASTIN --------- 1908 

MISS OLA MABRY ------------ 1908 

MISS EDITH NORMAN ---------- 1907 

MRS. FRANK PRICE ----------- 1897 

MISS MONA PURYEAR ---------- 1905 

MRS. ADA T. PHILLIPS ---------- 1872 

MISS LILLIE PEARCE ---------- 1908 

MISS FANNIE L. RAWLS --------- 1903 

MRS. MARIA W. RIVES ---------- 1887 

MISS ADDIE RICE ------------ 1899 

MRS. L. P. RODGERS ----------- 1890 

MRS. J. S. ROBERTSON ---------- 1890 

MISS ELIZABETH HINE RICHARDSON - - - - 1902 



MISS LOUISE ROBINSON --------- 1907 

MISS ROWE SANDERS ---------- 1883 

MISS ROSA SMITH ------------ 1906 

MISS ELIZABETH STEADHAM ------- 1906 

MISS CARRIE SYKES ----------- 1894 

MRS. FLORENCE H. SPEAK -___.-_. 1890 

MRS. OLA M. SPICKARD --------- 

MRS. ELIZA C. THATCH ---------- 

MISS MABEL VAN HOOSER -------- 1906 

MRS. FRANCES T. WHITE --------- 1903 

MISS LUCY WALKER ---------- 1908 

MRS. MATTIE E. YARB ROUGH ------- 1887 



U e v.1 c A y^ o/"S> t 



^e Oracle 3&oar& 

IRENE H. MERKEL, '10 ----- - Editor in Chief 

MEMORY ALDRIDGE, '11 - - - - - Business Manager 

ALMA LEETH, '11 ... - Assistant Business Manager 
ELIZABETH SELF, '12 - - - Assistant Business Manager 
ANNIE DEE RODGERS - - ----.... Art 

MARY PERSINGER, '12 MARY C. KEY, 12 

ANNA DINSMORE, '12 HELEN HOWARD, '11 



Ol)e ,Atl)<ntiatt Staff 



PEARLE SAWYER, '10 ------------ Editor in Chief 

MABEL WATERS. '10 ----------- - Assistant Editor 

ANNIE BUCHANAN, 12 -------- - - Business Manager 

CARRIE LOUISE BRANDON. '13 - - - Assistant Business Manager 

SARA RIVES. '13 --------- _ Assistant Business Manager 

IRENE STOVALL. '11 ----_______ _ Alumna- Editor 

SADIE STURDIVANT, '12 ---------- Exchange Editor 

MATTIE MAE PEARSON, '13 
ELODIA DIAZ, 12 




^>l)£ Recipe 




Just take a pound of fun. 

An ounce or two of sense; 
Stir in a little laughter; 

Don't have it very dense. 
Wee tears will do no harm; 

A sigh, a moan, a wail- 
Without these accessories 

The greatest aim will fail. 
And don't forget the love — 

That love of girl for girl; 
Nor yet that love of boy 

That sets our heads awhirl. 




Now stir it and boil it and send it to press. 
And — lo! — issues forth the finest, the best- 
Sir Oracle. 





ITERAfcY SOCIETIES 



<5eorge TEUot Titerary Society 

(• 

OFFICERS 

BERNICE RODEN ------------------- President 

IRENE MERKEL -------------------- Vice President 

MEMORY ALDRIDGE ----------------------- Secretary 

SUSIE GLENN ----------------------------- Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

MEMORY ALDRIDGE EUNICE McDONALD 

LIZZIE BLANKENSHIP LOUISE MURPHEY 

ANNIE BUCHANAN ELLA WILL NELSON 

MARIA DAVENPORT CARRIE NICHOLS 

CATHERINE DAVIS LINDA PACE 

ROBBIE DAVIS ONA PECK 

ANNA DINSMORE MARY PERSINGER 

EVELYN DOWNEY ELIZABETH PRIDE 

IDA DUKE BERNICE RODEN 

ELNA ELLIOTT BERTHA SANDERSON 

CARMELITA GARNICA PEARLE SAWYER 

SUSIE GLENN DEE SCARBROUGH 

MAGGIE GRIFFITH LILLIAN SHELBY 

MARIANNE GRUBBS ELIZABETH SIMMONS 

EUNICE HAYES IDA SYFRETT 

ALTA IGOU BETH TAYLOR 

LUCILE KNOX MAMIE TAYLOR 

PEARL MARLOWE DUDLEY TUTWILER 

LENA MARLOWE LINNA VANN 

NELL MEALING ELIZABETH VANN 

IRENE MERKEL MABEL WATERS 

ZELLA McWHORTER MATTIE WILLIAMSON MILDRED WEATHERLY 



liana <TI)U&s CiterarY Society 



OFFICERS 

HELEN HOWARD .__.---_------_-_-- President 

IRENE STOVALL -------------------- Vice President 

RUTH BURNS -------------------------- Secretary 

HALLIE McCARV ---------------------------- Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



RUTH ANDERSON 
CARRIE LOUISE BRANDON 
LOUISE BEASLEY 
ESTHER BARRETT 
LOUISE CRAWFORD 
ANNA CRAWFORD 
NELLE COTTEN 
MAYME CRUTCHER 
REBECCA CHANDLER 
ELODIA DIAZ 
LOLA FAUST 
MAYME GATLIN 
EINNAN HERNDON 
FLORENCE HARRIS 

ETHEL MAY HIGHTOWER 
ELOISE HUFFSTUTLER 
RUTH HOWARD 
M \RY KEY 

JOSEPHINE KEY 
SALLIE MAE KING 
ROE KELLY 
ALMA LEETH 
BESSIE LEVIE 
CAR RYE LOWE 



EMMETT MORTON 
HAZEL McCLURE 
MARJORIE McCOY 
JOSIE McCALEB 
MARGARET PETTUS 
MATTIE MAE PEARSON 

SARA RIVES 
JEN RIVES 
ANNIE DEE ROGERS 
SADIE STURDIVANT 

ELIZABETH SELF 

RUBY SARGENT 
FRANCES SANDERS 
MARGARET TUTWILER 
MARIE TONEY 
OLLIE PEETE 
MARY RUTH VANDIVER 
KATHOUISE WALSTON 
OZIE YORK 
FLORENCE WITT 
ANNA MAE WITT 
IONE ROCHELL 
ODELLE ROCHELL 
ETTA MOORE 



DEZZIE STEP 



y. w. <c. m. 

OFFICERS 

BETH TAYLOR President 

BERNICE RODEN ------.-----....-...._. Vice President 

IRENE STOVALL ------__-----____ __'___ Secretary 

MAGGIE GRIFFITH .-----..-..-._.... Treasurer 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 
MABEL WATERS ----------- Devotional 

IDA DUKE ------.---_.___ Finance 

SADIE STURDIVANT .--..-..... Social 

HELEN HOWARD --------.__ Missionary 

BERNICE RODEN .-...._.__. Membership 

MARY PERSINGER --------- Intercollegiate 

1 HE Y. W. C. A. was reorganized soon after the Our vesper services are held each evening by the 

opening of school in the fall, with a member- girls, and their interest and enthusiasm is shown 

ship of one hundred and ten students and a by their ready response when asked to take part, 

large proportion of the members of the Faculty. On Sunday evening these services are held by Miss 

This was a larger membership than we had ever Moore, who always has something new for us; and 

had before, and it gave much encouragement to the many times are we lifted to nobler resolutions and 

enthusiastic cabinet ; and we entered into the work higher aspirations by her inspiring talks. 

with the realization of the fact that it is a privilege, Realizing that our lives are incomplete with spirit- 

and not a sacrifice, to give of our time, service, and ual training alone, the Y. W. C. A. endeavors to in- 

means to this work which has always meant so much troduce as much of the social life into its work as 

to Athens College. possible; and a number of little social evenings are 

The Y. W. C. A. stands for all that is highest and given during the year that the girls may forget 

best in our college life, and it is the very nucleus books, homesickness, etc., for a while and have a 

around which centers all that which tends to develop jolly good time. 

the spiritual side of our girls that we may each be Miss Irene Stovall represented our Association at 

brought into a closer union with Christ. the Gulf States Convention at Athens, Ga., and 




brought back a most interesting and inspiring re- 
port. Miss Stovall has been elected president of the 
Association for next year, and we hope that the work 
will prosper as never before. 

Besides our regular pledges to the Gulf States, 
our Association offers a scholarship to some girl each 
year who would otherwise be deprived of a college 
education. A large portion of this money is raised 
by giving little entertainments and various other 
schemes; but the remainder is a freewill offering 
from the girls, keeping ever before us the thought: 
1 ' Freely ye have received, freely give. ' ' 



Miss Theodosia Wales, our traveling secretary, 
spent several days in our midst the first of April; 
and we received immeasurable benefit from her visit, 
and only wished she might be with us longer. She 
gave us much encouragement, and seemed to think 
our Association in a very flourishing condition. 

It is our purpose to deepen the spiritual life of our 
college, to make our lives such that they may influ- 
ence others to that which is best in life, and, as 
nearly as possible, bring each girl into the fold of 
Christ. So let each one of us feel the individual re- 
sponsibility of fulfilling this purpose. 





A-T'H-LE-T l-CS- 



^tbletic Officers 





Allie Hayes 
Director 




Irene H. Merkel 
President 



Susie Glenn 
Treasurer 



.Athens .Athletic ^Association 



MEMORY ALURIDGE 

RUTH ANDERSON 
ESTHER BARRETT 
LOUISE BEASLEY 
RUTH BURNS 



EMMETT MORTON 
LOUISE MURPHEY 
EDNA MITCHELL 
IRENE MERKEL 
OCTAVIA MERIWETHER 



ELIZABETH BUCHANAN 

ANNIE BUCHANAN 
SADIE CARY 
VIVIAN CARTER 
ADA CURTIS 
MARIE COUCH 
REGINA DOWNEY 
EVELYN DOWNEY 
ROBBIE DAVIS 
MARIA DAVENPORT 
ANNA DINSMORE 
IDA DUKE 
LOLA FAUST 
PATTIE FLOYD 
MARIANNE GRUBRS 
MABEL GRUBBS NELLE JACKSON 

SUSIE GLENN JOSEPHINE KEY 

CARMELITA GARNICA MARY KEY 

MARGARET GRIFFITH EMMA KENNEDY 
ELMINA GREEN ELIZABETH I.EVIE 

FLORENCE GARLOCH LOIS LEE 

FLORENCE HARRIS M1TT1E LEE 

INEZ HARRIS 
ELOISE HUFFSTUTLER 
SCOTTIE HUGHES 
EUNICE HAYES 
FINNAN HFRNDON 
HELEN HOWARD 
RUTH HOWARD 
ETHEL HODO 
WINNIE HODO 
FRANKIE HERTZLER ESSIE YOUNG 



HAZEL McCLURE 

JOSIE McCALEB 

HALLIE McCARY 
ZELLA McWHORTER 

Eunice Mcdonald 
frances o'neal 

ONA PECK 
MARY PERSINGER 
ELIZABETH PRIDE 
MYRTLE RUTHERFORD 
BERNICE RODEN 
ETHEL ROBERTS 
HELEN STANTON 

ELIZABETH SELF 
SADIE STURDIVANT 



MYRTHA LEWIS 
CARRYE LOWE 
ALMA LEETH 
EMMA SUE MORRIS 
LUCY MOORE 
ETTA MOORE 
RUTH MILLER 



IRENE STOVALL 
ALVA SHELL 
RUBY SARGENT 
PEARLE SAWYER 
DUDLEY TUTWILER 
MARGARET TUTWILER 
BERTHA TUCKER 
ELIZABETH TAYLOR 
MAE VANN 
ADDIE WAE VANN 
LUELLA WASHINGTON 
DONIE WARE 
CLEO WEBB 
ALMA WHEELER 
ESTHER WADSWORTH 
KATHOUISE WALSTON 
MABEL WATERS 




'Varsity ^asket-^atl Oeam 



ZELLA McWHORTER DUDLEY TUTWILER 

ESTHER BARRETT [DA DUKE MARGARET TUTWILER 




Senior ^asket-^&all Oeam 



PEARLE SAWYER 



SUSIE GLENN 



BETH TAYLOR 



MABEL WATERS 
IRENE MERKEL 



BERN1CE RODEN 




Junior !ftasket-!ftall Oeam 



HELEN HOWARD 



IDA DUKE 
MEMORY ALDRIDGE 



IRENE STOVALL 

ALMA LEETH 



JOSEPHINE KEY 




Sophomore ^asket-^all Oeam 



mary key sadie sturdivant 

eunice Mcdonald ruth Howard kathouise walston 




Second Sophomore ^asket-^all Oeam 



LIZZIE BLANKENSHIP 
HALLIE McCARY CATHERINE DAVIS 

RUTH BURNS MARY PERSINGER 




JFresl)man ^asket-^all Oeam 



ELOISE HUFFSTUTLER ESTHER BARRETT 

ZELLA McWHORTER BESSIE LEVIE 

jOSIE McCALEB 




Sub !ftask<2.t-!ftall Oeam .A 



LOLA FAUST MARGARET TUTWILER MARION GRUBBS 

DUDLEY TUTWILER CARMELITA GARNICA 




Sub !ftasket-!ftall Oeam *& 



NELLE MEALING EUNICE HAYES 

HAZEL McCLURE ELIZABETH PRIDE 

RUTH ANDERSON 



(Tollege ^ells 



Rickty ram. rickty ram! 
I'm from Athens — yes, I 
Rail. rah. rah! 
Sis, bi ii mi. bah! 
Athens. Athens! 
Wall. wall, wall! 



Rah. rah. rah! 
\\ ■ iw, wow, wow! 
Chic-a-1 acker, chic-a-lacker! 
Chiiw, chow, ch( iw ! 
Athens! 



With a vevo, with a vivo, 

With a vevo, vivo, vuml 

Johnny, get a rat trap, 

Bigger than a cat trap; 

Johnny, get a cat trap. 

Bigger than a rat trap! 

Cannibal, cannibal! Sis, boom, bah' 

Athens, Athens! Rah, rah, rah! 



Rickty rix, rickty rax! 

Girls from Athens! 
Wickty was! 

They have knowledge- 
Know it all! 

Athens. Athens! 
I I ear them sipiall ! 



Athens, Athens! 
Ts our cry; 
V-i-c-t-o-r-y ! 
Athens! 



Mtiscellaiteous 



MARY I. MEEK HALLIE McCARY 

MEMORY L. ALDRIDGE ELNA ELLIOTT 

ESTHER L. BARRETT ELIZABETH LEVIE 

IRENE H. MERKEL ELODIA DIAZ 

BERNICE RODEN OZIE YORK 

SUSIE H. GLENN MARY PERSINGER 

PEARLE M. SAWYER SALLIE MAE KING 

ELIZABETH TAYLOR CARRIE L. BRANDON 

HELEN HOWARD WYNNE BOBBITT 

MARY KEY MISS MOORE 



~3<rl 



MISS WILLIAMS HELEN HOWARD 

ESTHER L. BARRETT ANNIE DEE RODGERS 



Bo 



I hear the birds' low singing; 

Their songs are sweet and true. 
The air with their music is filling; 

It brings to me thoughts of you. 

The zephyrs are kissing the flowers, 
Tossing them in the grass so blue. 

Flowers, grass, and sunshine, 
All make me think of you. 

In darkest hours of midnight, 

And all the long day through, 
The bright, the good, the beautiful, 

Bring to my mind — just you. 

ANNA DINSMORE, '12. 



.As 3t Sometimes Ufappens 



fT may have been Fate that caused Jack Madi- 
son to be standing at the foot of the library 
steps that April morning when pretty Nelle 
Ashley came tripping down them, or it may have 
been that he had merely started into that same li- 
brary, because, suffice it to say, he was standing 
there; and as it sounds more romantic to say it was 
Fate, let it go at that. 

Nelle was as fresh and dainty as the lovely morn- 
ing itself when she came down those old steps that 
were ever afterwards so full of memories to Jack. 
She was smiling a little to herself, and it was just by 
accident that the smile was still on her face when her 
eyes chanced to meet his. They were great blue eyes 
that could look pensive or reproachful or gleam with 
mischief, as their owner willed. Just now they were 
at their merriest, and Jack, gazing into them, knew 
that for him it was all over. He stood where he was, 
like one in a trance, until she had passed down the 
street and out of sight. Then he drew a long breath 
and pulled himself together. "Jack, my boy," he 
said to himself, "you're a goner for fair this time, 
and don 't you forget it. ' ' 

That afternoon Colonel Moore, the senior partner 
in the law firm of Moore & Madison, noticed that the 
junior partner seemed strangely preoccupied and 
answered his questions in a vague, unsatisfactory 
manner, and sometimes not at all. And all night 
through Jack dreamed of deep-blue eyes, tantali- 



zing yellow curls, and a rosebud mouth smiling for 
him alone. 

The following week was a wonderful time to the 
youth. He learned her name through a mutual 
friend, and at last met her through the same kind 
medium. After that nothing else mattered. 

Miss Ashley had had many lovers in her brief ex- 
istence of twenty-two summers, but never a one so 
ardent as Jack. He surrounded her with candy and 
flowers, and besieged her with invitations to row, 
drive, walk — in short, every excuse he could think 
of for being in her society. He was hopelessly lost. 
In a month he was a regular visitor at the Ashley 
home, and it was settled, as far as the village gos- 
sip was concerned, that they were engaged. 

One night Jack and Nelle were seated on a bench 
out under the trees in Nelle 's old-fashioned garden. 
It was a beautiful June night, and the air was heavy 
with the perfume of the roses. The moonlight lay 
white over the lovely old garden, but the spot where 
Jack and Nelle sat was almost entirely darkened by 
the trees. It was the time, the place, and, as rarely 
happens, the girl. Jack felt it, gave his tongue a 
twist, and cleared his throat. 

"Nelle — Miss Nelle — er — ah — I am — er — I — that 
is — I think — er — isn't it a beautiful night?" 

"Yes, indeed," sweetly responded the girl, smil- 
ing to herself; for she knew the symptoms, "having 
been there before," as Jack would express it. He 



began again, desperately: "Do you think — er — well, 
you know — er — 0, hang it! — the fact is — will you 
marry me?" 

He settled back in his seat. "I've done it," he 
muttered to himself, and prepared for the worst. 
But, to his surprise, she blushed a little, laughed a 
little, and as by that time he had her hand in his and 
she was murmuring something in a low voice, we 
will draw the curtains over what followed — only let 
it be added that Jack was able to drag himself away 
that night without the aid of her father's boot and 
actually slept fully an half hour before daylight. 

For a month Jack abode on Olympus. He had 
given her a beautiful pigeon-blood ruby, as she had 
often expressed her fondness for that stone. Just 
inside the plain gold band in which it was set he had 
engraved the word ' ' Betrothed. ' ' Jack had not been 
able to persuade her to set the day for the wedding, 
for she always put him off with the assurance that 
it would be soon. She was so adorably and sweetly 
persuasive about it that he could not find it in his 
heart to be impatient with her. 

When matters were thus, a stranger arrived from 
the West and registered at the hotel as Bobert F. 
Smythe. Jack was attracted to him from the start 
by his dashing ways and breezy Western airs. He 
was a wealthy rancher, and his lavish generosity 
bore him out in this statement. He seemed to take 
a fancy to the bright young lawyer, and soon he and 
Jack were sworn comrades. Jack confided his love 
for Nelle to him, and Smythe displayed such a lively 
interest that Jack asked him to call with him that 
night. 



Nelle was at her best in a pale lavender gown, and 
Jack thought he had never seen her so pretty. When 
he presented Smythe to her, she gave a slight start, 
and Smythe also looked a little queer; but Jack had 
no eyes for anything but the fair young girl before 
him. For a time the conversation was almost en- 
tirely between Jack and Nelle. She, seating herself 
at the piano, asked Smythe to sing. Jack wondered 
why she knew he could sing, but said nothing. 
Smythe obediently crossed over to the piano and be- 
gan to sing. He had a clear, very expressive bari- 
tone, and Jack ground his teeth as he saw the open 
admiration in Nelle's eyes and the tender look 
Smythe gave her as he sang "I Love You Truly." 
But, then, he remembered that Smythe was a man 
of the world and accustomed to make love to every 
pretty girl he met. So, with such reasoning, he com- 
forted himself; and when they left at a late hour, he 
had forgotten the incident. 

But this peace of mind was not to be his long. 
Smythe began to be a frequent caller at the Ashley's, 
and several times his engagements clashed with 
Jack's. He had purchased a big red auto., and 
Jack's jealous eyes often saw Nelle spinning past his 
office in it. But if he mentioned the fact of their 
increasing intimacy, she grew indignant, and Jack 
dared not say any more. He felt that he was doing 
her an injustice to doubt her; but still he could not 
but feel a little uneasiness every time he saw them 
together or met Smythe coming from her home. 
Once he deliberately asked her if she thought she 
was treating him right, and he said it was about 
time they were married. "I have a steady prac- 



tice," he pleaded; "and even if I am not as rich as I 
could be, with youth and love and my strong right 
arm to protect you, I am sure I could make you 
happy. And — " 

He was going on, when she interrupted him: "You 
know Jack, darling, that I do love you, and it is mean 
of you to doubt me. I don't care for m-money if I 
c-c-can have you, and you k-k-know it. ' ' 

Her head was on his shoulder, and Jack was kiss- 
ing away her tears. He felt like a brute for having 
made her cry, and mentally kicked himself all over 
Winston and the adjacent counties. And before he 
left, she did give him a tearful half promise that she 
would marry him some time before Christmas. 

Nelle was very affectionate during the next few 
days, and Jack had nearly forgotten Smythe. The 
touring car was still in evidence, but Nelle was not 
so often its occupant; and, indeed, Jack began to 
hope that Nelle would name a definite time very 
soon. 

One morning Jack arose in a particularly happy 



* * 



frame of mind. Work had no charms for him; so 
he loitered about the corners, talking with his 
friends until considerably after his usual office hours. 
When he did muster up fortitude enough to go into 
his dusty law books, it was nearly lunch time. Col- 
onel Moore was not in, so he sat down at his desk to 
look over the mail. One little envelope and a pack- 
age, both addressed in a familiar handwriting, 
claimed his attention. "From Nelle," he whispered 
to himself. "By Jove, maybe she has decided on 
the day ! ' ' He tore open the envelope hurriedly. 

"Dear Jack," it ran, "probably I never told you 
that Mr. Smythe is really my old chum and sweet- 
heart — Bob Frank Smyer. He went West about six 
years ago when we quarreled. You know the result 
of his trip. He and I have decided that ranch and 
riches are more suited to my temperament than law 
and love. We leave on the midnight train. I am 
returning the ring. Let me say, however, for your 
benefit, that you were splendid practice. Regret- 
fully. — Nelle. ' ' 

ESTHER BARRETT, '13. 



POEM 

Little bird, don't fly away; 
I want you with me in my play. 
Let me hear your pretty lay; 
Tell me why you cannot stay. 

Do not leave your little nest, 
Among the boughs so neatly pressed, 
But forever live and sing, 
And happiness to me you'll bring. 

E. ELLIOTT. 



Der Deutchman says, " Ich liebe dich; " 

The Latin, "Amo te; " 
The Spaniard says, " Yo te amo;" 

But 'tis as clear as day 

That, let the words be what they will, 

In Latin, Spanish, " Dutch," 
Each maiden knows and smiles with joy, 

For words don't mean so much. 



But, O you sweet maiden fair, 
Which would you rather hear- 
" Ich liebe dich;" or, "Amo te;" 
Or this, " I love you, dear? " 



"passing tl)e TDoor 



Midnight and very dark, 

And by a hunger led; 
And may there be no teacher's eye to mark 

When I start to a " spread." 

But may they snore and be so sound asleep, 

Not thinking that I roam, 
When I, who should be lost in slumber deep, 

Start from my home. 

Steep stairs and then a door, 

And after that I fly; 
And may there be no squeaking of the floor 

When I pass by. 



For though from out my room and nice warm place 

My hunger leads me fast, 
I hope to see some chicken face to face 

When by that door I've passed. 



Ol)e life of a Mlexican <5irl 




i EING kindly asked to write something for the 
Oracle, I feel myself in a dilemma; but, to 
please you, I will attempt to describe how 
we Mexican girls spend our time in my dear native 
land. We do not enjoy the liberty of action that the 
American girls enjoy, but it does not trouble us very 
much except "on certain occasions;" but you know 
that "where there is a will, there is a way." 

In my country it is customary to baptize children 
as soon as possible. For this church sacrament both 
a godfather and a godmother are selected — gener- 
ally aunts and uncles or very intimate friends. The 
godparents' duties before the Catholic Church are 
that, if the child is left fatherless, they will assume 
both the responsibility and the care of the child. 
On the day appointed for the baptism the god- 
mother presents the baby with a box containing as 
handsome an outfit as possible, especially the bap- 
tismal robe. After the baby is dressed for the occa- 
sion, the godparents take the baby to church, where, 
after paying a certain amount (according to their 
financial state), a name is selected; and the priest 
proceeds to pour the baptismal waters on the child's 
head, then gives the child a taste of holy salts, blesses 
it, and, if invited, he joins the party in order to par- 
take of their feasting. On coming out of the church, 
the godfather throws pennies ("centavos") to the 
poor children, who keep crying for money until the 
baptismal party disappears. Little cards stating 



the parents' names, the godfather's and godmoth- 
er's names, and the name of the child, with date of 
birth and baptism, then are printed. A little coin is 
glued on a side of the card. These cards are distrib- 
uted among the members of the family and among 
friends. 

When the child is about six years of age or older, 
it joins the church, or is confirmed. For this sacra- 
ment another set of godparents is selected. The 
godmother furnishes a set of clothes of the best she 
is able. The child is taken to the cathedral, where 
the archbishop performs the ceremony, which, briefly 
described, is as follows: the people stand outside 
of the railing which incloses the passage where the 
archbishop and his attendants walk, wearing the re- 
spective gorgeous dress for the occasion. The arch- 
bishop pronounces, or rather "rattles off," some 
Latin prayers. An acolyte, ready with a closed box 
perforated on the lid, asks for the amount of money 
that people desire to put in. More than twenty-five 
cents is always expected. Then the archbishop 
gently taps the child's cheek and crosses its fore- 
head with holy oils. The party goes home, and a 
special meal is prepared. 

Children, if well off, are taken care of by nurses 
all the time. As servants' wages are not so very 
high, the majority of the children are taken care of 
by "nanas," or nurses. 

At the age of six or seven years children start to 



school. If they belong to very strong Catholic fami- 
lies, they attend a private Catholic school; if they do 
not, they go to the public schools, where religious 
subjects are prohibited and where a laic instruction 
is received. They are taught things which children 
learn in the civilized, cultured countries of Europe 
and America. 

Girls and boys between nine and fifteen, at the lat- 
est, are requested to confess and to take their first 
communion. For the communion a good drill in 
church catechism and prayer is gone through. A 
godmother is selected, rarely a godfather. After 
the confession and penitence according to its sins, 
the child is ready for the first communion. If it is a 
boy, he is dressed in black ; a white bow of ribbon is 
tied on his sleeve; a wax candle, tied with white rib- 
bon and decorated with orange blossoms, is carried 
to church. If it is a girl, she is dressed in white, 
wearing a veil to the edge of her dress. Godmoth- 
ers for this occasion present their godchildren with 
a pretty mass book, a rosary, and, if possible, with a 
medal engraved with a holy image. Persons, before 
communion, have to fast; but the children, after 
their first communion, return home and find a table 
decked with white flowers; a new cup is filled with 
chocolate; and the girl or boy enjoys his breakfast 
and tries to be very good while the impression of the 
sacrament lasts. 

Primary education is compulsory. Some girls fol- 
low different professions. Good schools of arts, 
trades, or science are freely opened to everybody. 
Our government is very much interested in the edu- 



cation of the common people. Night schools are 
opened for the factory people, and schools of music, 
sculpture, art, etc., are opened to many. A charity 
hospital or free boarding college is sustained by our 
government, and many rich persons sustain char- 
itable Catholic institutions, asylums, hospitals, etc. 
Contests both in art and music are held at the end 
of every school year, and pupils showing intelligence 
and talent are pensioned by the government to go 
to Europe to perfect their studies. 

So you find many girls with their respective di- 
plomas in art, music, voice, manual arts, or as teach- 
ers. Of course not every girl carries her studies to 
an end. Some girls do not like to study. They had 
rather stay at home, play the piano, embroider, help 
mother keep house, primp, go to church by all means, 
call on their friends, and be courted. 

' ' Things equal to the same thing are equal to each 
other." Little wicked Cupid furiously hurls his 
mortal missiles. Mexican girls do not attend so 
many parties as the American girls do; and if they 
do so, they are generally accompanied by their par- 
ents or by some elder person. On Thursday nights, 
generally, we wear our "rebozos" (pretty kind of 
silk shawls), and we go to the parks to hear our 
bands. You can imagine how alert are both maidens 
and youths to take an opportunity to convey per- 
haps some speechless message or exchange glances. 
Most of lovers' talking before people is with the 
eyes. 

None of our boys come to take us out at any time, 
and a boy does not call to see a girl unless he intends 



to marry her, and he is only permitted to come in 
the house after some frights and fears. 

Balls are very popular among us, and anything 
with music is our great delight. We let down our 
dresses sooner than you girls do, for our great dream 
is to be a young lady — to be addressed by all as 
4 ' sehorita. ' ' 

You know, Love wounds the heart of every woman 
in this world, and we are by no means free from the 
wounds inflicted by that cruel Eros. 

Here comes a little puzzle for foreigners in Mex- 
ico. A boy makes his declaration of love to a girl 
through a letter, very seldom by spoken words, as 
there are hardly any chances for those solemn occa- 
sions to take place. The girls receive letters by all 
means of communication except through the mail. 
My ! Those letters have to be well hidden, especially 
if you possess old-maid aunts. It is considered more 
ladylike not to answer the first letter, but to wait 
for a number of letters, if you have an intention to 
answer; or, if not, the letter is returned to the au- 
thor. If the girl consents to respond to the boy's 
love, they keep on writing, ask for each other's pic- 
ture, exchange locks of hair, presents, and every- 
thing that is nice and sweet. Sometimes lovers can 
talk to each other in the following way: the girl 
sits or stands in her balcony; the boy stands in the 
street. Everybody looks at them, but 

" Love is blind, and lovers cannot see 
The petty follies they themselves commit." 

So Mexican lovers forget that they are the center 
of attraction of everybody who walks in the street. 



They only watch carefully to avoid a meeting with 
the girl's father or anybody who has power to cause 
fright. If a boy intends to marry, he asks the girl 
if she is willing, etc. ; then he declares it to his par- 
ents and asks his father to go to ask the father of the 
girl for her hand in marriage. The financial condi- 
tions are taken into consideration; and if all seems 
favorable, the father of the boy goes to see the girl 's 
father with the purpose and object of asking for the 
girl's hand to be given to' his son. This interview 
between the fathers of the future couple is a tremen- 
dous one. Everybody at home is excited, not know- 
ing what the result will be. Sometimes it ends in 
serious anger on the part of the girl 's father. It is 
always hard to give up the girl; but if all seems fa- 
vorable, especially the financial state of the boy, the 
girl's hand is granted. 

After this the boy may come into the girl's house 
and talk to her in the parlor. Sometimes if a girl 
possess a candid old-maid aunt or other cranky rela- 
tives, they come in and sit with her. This, of course, 
is not very pleasant for them to enjoy such select 
company when they had rather stay alone. 

A date is set for the wedding. The boy looks for 
a house, furnishes it, and gives a certain amount for 
the girl 's trousseau. Of course men do their best on 
this occasion. The presentation before the civil and 
religious authorities is made fifteen days before the 
marriage takes place. Certificates of birth and hon- 
orable witnesses for both are required. Our laws of 
marriage are very strict both in church and law. 
After the fifteen days, during which time the names 



of the couple are published, great preparations are 
made. Godfathers are selected for the religious 
wedding. The bride wears the white bridal gown, 
her veilj orange blossoms, and carries a beautiful 
book of mass and a rosary of pearl. The girl is taken 
to church, accompanied by her godfather or by her 
own father; a beautiful wedding march is played 
both by orchestra and pipe organ, and they are 
united by the bonds of eternal union. On her way 
back her husband accompanies her, and generally 
they drive first to have their pictures taken, and then 



go home to her parents' residence, where a dinner is 
served in their honor and a ball is given after it. 

After all the feasting, rejoicing, and tears, the girl 
goes to her future home. A married girl retains her 
own name, and only her husband's surname is af- 
fixed to hers, preceded by the preposition "de" — of. 
Sehora Maria Garcia de Guerrerro. She is addressed 
by all as ' ' senora. ' ' 

So life is quite different in these countries, but the 
arrows of Cupid wound the same. He is kept very 
busy both in Mexico and in the United States. 

ELODIA DIAZ, '12. 



5ttoo6< 



The wind blows hot, the wind blows wild, 
Whirling o'er sandy sea; 
Its ruthless sway 
And cruel way 
Doth blast the soul of me. 

The wind moans loud, the wind moans cold, 
Shuddering through the tree; 

Its shivery tone 

And hopeless moan 
Doth chill the heart of me. 

The wind sighs soft, the wind sighs low, 
Whispering o'er the lea; 

A fragrance rare 

From flowers fair 
Is wafted back to me. 

It sings of joy, it sings of grief — 
Moods of Heaven's decree. 

A laugh, a sigh 

In passing by — ■ 
'Tis thus with thee and me. M. I. M. 



X3l)e inevitable 



|T was the dead of midnight; and as the month 
was October, it was rather cool. The Fresh- 
men of a large Southern college for boys, hav- 
ing during the day learned of a plot of the Sopho- 
mores to "teach those pusillanimous Freshmen that 
they are forever our inferiors," had fled from the 
wrath to come, and fifty of them were now safely 
sheltered in the class president's room. 

"We ain't so green, after all," giggled a small, 
red-headed, freckled-faced Freshman, who was shiv- 
ering from sheer fright. 

"Well, fellows, we're one on 'em for sure this 
time," the president said, as he admitted the last 
member of the class, shut the door, and locked and 
bolted it. 

"Yes, you'd better bet we are," agreed the secre- 
tary. 

"Gee, but won't they look blank when they find 
all our rooms empty?" another Freshman suggested. 

"We must be quiet," the president ordered, "or 
they'll hear us, and — 0! — then we'll catch it." 

"Well, I'm simply smothering!" exclaimed a 
rather fat member of the class. "I'd jes' about as 
soon be paddled as to smother to death. ' ' 

"Well, if you don't keep your mouth shut, I'll 
pitch you out at the window, ' ' one of the more slen- 
der members threatened. 

' ' The next one that opens his mouth has got to get 



out and suffer the consequences, for they'll be com- 
ing—" 

The president did not finish the sentence, for there 
was heard a buzz in the distance that soon grew into 
audible whispers. 

"I wonder where in the thunder they can be," a 
Sophomore remarked. 

How the heart of each Freshman beat with joy! 
They were not then discovered. 

"Whew-w-w! If—" 

That was all the Freshmen heard. The next was 
uttered in a low whisper. 

In a few minutes the Sophomores left the hall and 
went back to the campus. The Freshmen thought 
they had given up the search. But alas for the inno- 
cence of youth ! 

"We'll have to wait till they get to their rooms 
and are good asleep before we leave," the president 
told them. 

He had scarcely closed his mouth when the sound 
of muffled footsteps was heard ascending the stairs. 
They heard the Sophomores moving about as if at 
work on something, and fear took hold of the Fresh- 
men. What if they were going to pick the lock ! 

These unpleasant thoughts were interrupted by a 
veritable flood pouring through the transom, which 
the Freshmen in their precautions had not seen to 
be up. 



The Sophomores had dragged up two hose from 
the campus and had fastened them to the faucets in 
the hall, and for almost fifteen minutes the "rats" 
thought that "the flood" had returned in its original 
force. 

Through the windows the cool night air blowing 
in on the soaked bodies of the "Freshies" was cer- 



tainly enough to have taken the green off the grass. 
The Freshmen bore it without a murmur, although 
many of their teeth were chattering and their bod- 
ies were solid icebergs. 

They awoke the next morning a "sadder and a 
wiser" crowd, but firmly resolved to even up. 

M. L. A., '11. 




jFour TCona, Pears 



O, it's hard to stay in school 

Four long years, 
And always keep the rule 

Four long years! 
For we can't do as we please, 
And we know there's no surcease; 
So we wait for our release — 

Four long years. 



If it weren't for study hall 

Four long years; 
If they'd give us basket ball 

All these years; 
If we never did get beat, 
And had something good to eat, 
It would simply be a treat — 

Four long years. 



But the study bell we hear 

Four long years, 
And defeat at ball we fear 

Four long years; 
And we sometimes yield the palm, 
Or are stricken with a qualm, 
And we simply can't be calm — 

Four long years. 



Then it's just the same old thing 

Four long years, 
Through winter, fall, and spring — 

Four long years. 
It's calls to recitation, 
And it's bells for meditation, 
With but little recreation — 

Four long years. 



O, our task is truly hard 

Four long years! 
But we look for our reward 

Four long years. 
On exams, we sometimes " flunk," 
If we can't give up our "bunk;" 
For we've got to have the spunk — 

Four long years. 

MEMORY ALDRIDGE. 



^Vn October JDa? 




MISTY haze spread over the universe. The 
sunbeams softly penetrated it, casting a 
shadowy mantle over the day. The chatter of 
the birds, preparing for their long flight South, 
sounded distant and indistinct. The gentle breezes 
lightly caressed each plant and flower, each tiny 
blade of grass, each mighty tree. Red and yellow 
autumn leaves chased each other downward, weav- 
ing a magnificent Oriental carpet on the soft, brown 
earth. Yellow branches of golden-rod swayed peace- 
fully to and fro in the fence corners. Masses of 
white clouds, of every conceivable shape, piled up 
here and there, breaking in upon the blue expanse 
of the heavens. Fields of snow-white cotton 



stretched away to the dim horizon to unite with the 
gleaming clouds. 

The brooks and rivulets, murmuring sweetly on 
their way to the great ocean, sparkled with the soft 
luster of precious stones laid away in their dim, 
satin-lined caskets. On the moist banks grew lux- 
urious masses of dark-green ferns and patches of 
velvet moss. Occasionally an adventurous squirrel 
appeared to sun himself on the limb of the dead tree 
in which he had built his home. Far away among 
the purple shadows a care-free shepherd lad whis- 
tled an old, familiar love song. The reapers sang 
joyfully at their work in the fields. All nature 
seemed in a state of melancholy happiness. 

'11. 



Ve !fcalla&e of $>e Coste jprivtlege 



In ye olden tyme ye maidens fair 
Possessed ye privilege so rare 
Of faring forth unchaperoned, 
And felt as if ye earth they owned. 

Ye maids of Junior Class they be, 
And Seniors, too, soon to be free 
From ye carking cAre of study hall 
And answering ye bells' loud call. 



A lordly lot these maidens were; 
Where'er they went they caused a stir. 
Their wit and learning were so vast, 
Ye feared such wonders could not last. 

Alas! ye maids grew overproud; 
One damsel spake ye words out loud: 
" I fear not ye demerits grim." 
Dame Pittman gave her one of them. 

Another damsel loved a youth — 
A comely lad, I vow, forsooth. 
Quoth she: "I will a letter write." 
Her privilege quickly took its flight. 



Ye others lost them day by day; 
Ye privilege seemed loath to stay. 
Ye damsels wept and wailed full sore; 
Their clothes they rent, their hair they tore. 

Ye hearts of Fresh, and Sophomore 

Are gladdened to ye inmost core, 

For now ye upper classes proud 

Are a " sadder and a wiser " crowd. E. L. B. 



ZK "Poem 



The plaintive song of a bird at eve 
Was strangely sweet to me — 

A dreamy note 

From trembling throat, 
More than a melody. 

It sang from out the twilight gloom, 
Sad as a soul's vain plea: 
"Ah, bird of air, 
I know the prayer 
Which thrills from yonder tree." 

The starlit blue succeeds the gray; 
Silence reigns in the tree. 
"Sing on, wild bird; 
Thy song is heard; 
A heart is answering thee." M. I. M. 



Subconscious 3£rcnn ^JPork 




jCHOOL was proceeding in its usual quiet man- 
ner, when Miss Moore entered the chapel and 
announced: "Girls, the judgment will begin 
in one hour. ' ' 

She told Miss Jackson to dismiss school, and for 
the girls to go to their rooms and dress in uniform 
costume, and to come to the dining hall immediately 
upon the ringing of the hell; for the judgment was 
to be held in the dining hall, and, as usual, the bell 
was used as the signal. 

We rushed upstairs in great disorder, but the 
thought of dressing in unifonns never entered our 
confused minds. Soon from every nook and corner 
of the building could be heard the sighs and cries of 
agonizing girls. Poor old Florence's feet had for- 
gotten the spirited, fantastic steps; and she was 
kneeling in one corner of the dark room, pleading 
that her shoe bills might be blotted from the book 
of remembrance. Catherine's first act was to tear 
up all the ragtime music she could find. Etta made 
a flying trip over the second and third floors, making 
apologies. Memory was tenderly caressing Rene's 
scarred neck, saying: "Rene, hum, if you will only 
forgive me for making all of these ugly scars, I will 
not fear the judgment." There were a great num- 
ber of girls confronted by visions of walks skipped 
and midnight feasts attended. 

The hour swiftly passed, and the old college bell 
sent its last warning. The girls crept downstairs 



and into the dining hall. As I was entering the door, 
I saw some one eyeing me very keenly, whom I at 
once recognized as Miss Pittman. She caught my 
arm and demanded: "What are you doing going to 
judgment without your uniform ? Of course there is 
no use of you even appearing before the judge. I 
distinctly remember this dress; it is Miss Sargent's. 
You may as well come and go with me." 

This made me very angry. I told her that I had 
been engaged in something of a great deal more im- 
portance than dressing in uniform. I tore my arm 
from her firm grasp and rushed through the door- 
way. 

In the rear of the dining room was a beautiful 
white throne, and upon the majestic seat sat Miss 
Moore. Around it were seats for the Faculty. I 
noticed two vacant seats, and asked Beth why they 
were vacant. She said: "They were placed there 
for Miss Pittman and Miss Branscomb; but as Miss 
Pittman started to sit down, a stream of examina- 
tion questions began flowing through the seat, and 
this was followed by a river of demerits which car- 
ried her away on the strong tide, and, in the at- 
tempt to save Miss Pittman, Miss Branscomb was 
washed away." 

As I gazed upon that awe-inspiring scene, my 
whole past life seemed to glide before me. Miss 
Moore cast her eyes upon me, and my knees shook 
with fright. Impelled by some mysterious force, I 



drew slowly nearer to the judgment bar. When it 
seemed as if my knees would no longer support me, 
Miss Moore pointed her finger at me and said, in a 
loud, accusing voice that sounded like the trumpet 
of doom : ' ' What have you to say for yourself f " Be- 
fore I could answer, I began to get dizzy, everything 



swam before me, I felt a strong drowsiness coming 
over me, and — 

"Get up; second bell has rung!" cried my room- 
mate, shaking me vigorously. 

I woke, and thankfully was made aware that the 
time for reckoning had not yet arrived. 

B. LEVIE. 




'Past, "Present, and future 



We hear of the girls that used to be 

Sheltered within these walls, 
Their laughter, as ours, full of glee, 

Ringing throughout these halls. 

We hear of the pranks they used to play, 

The demerits they used to get, 
And we wonder if in present days 

They look back with sad regret 

To the moments spent in old A. C, 
When the future seemed all fair — 

A time of only laughter and glee, 
All sunshine, with never a care (?). 

And then perchance we hear a sigh — 

A sigh half joy, half pain — 
For the days that now are going by 

And can never come back again. 

We wonder what the future holds — 

Just as all girls will do — ■ 
And if when the last hard lesson's told 

Our dreams will all come true. 

WYNNE BOBBITT. 



Sonnet: Z3l)c Rising 3&*ll 

O thou who ^endest from thee all around 
Melodious tones, recurring yet, until 
Each girl is wakened from her slumbers still, 
We welcome thee with joy sincere, profound. 
Thou callest us back to work that we have found 
More pleasant than vain sleep, in which we fill 
Our minds with idle phantoms, and our will 
Doth have no part. A hundred voices drown 
Thy echoes with these songs, joyfully sung: 
" Is that the second rising bell I hear? " 
And, "Are you sure that two have really rung? " 

Then when each is assured beyond a fear, 
She rises, studies, and, her tasks among, 

Thanks thee who brought her back to labors dear. 

IRENE MERKEL, '10. 




w ^ PR /NT 

Accidents 

SCN M DAL5 
AND DfcvJ^R 

/T -f WITH 
GRF/irCWEEl 






f 




EDITED By O a 
Ota. <A ^ 



C»A 



,lu5 



tKmt. 4^ 

tK * San* 
6***4 Set 



EDDY TORIAL 



It is our opinun thet to 
mutch wurk is not healthy to 
Humanity. To pruve this we 
mearly prefer you to our 
highly cared for citisen, R. C. 
Davis. Look how wurk hes 
worn her to the bone. Now 
nobudy cares to be in such a 
condition; therefore, worthy 
readers, we declare to you 
thet to mutch wurk is not 
healthy to Humanity. On the 
other hand of this most im- 
portant question, you heve 
only to turn your eyes on an- 
other respectful citisen, E. 
Huffstutler, who never wurks 
and takes life easy. All my 
readers who know this sed cit- 
isen will join me in agreein 
thet no wurk w healthy to 
Humanity. 



SAVED FRUM THE 
GRAVE! 

Miss Mattie May Pearson, 
who hes been in a criticul con- 
ditun by reason uv the Ap- 
proachin exams., reports thet 
she feels like she hed been 
drew frum the grave now thet 
she hes passed on Fisix. We 
are heartily glad to here this, 
fur we would hate verry 
mutch to lose our nabor and 
subscribur, Miss Mattie Mae. 



COUNTRY CORRESPOND- 
ANCE. 

Pike. 

Every one busy these days. 
Exams, not far off. 

B. Roden wuz scene in 
West Pike Sun. evenin. Won- 
der what wuz the atractun. 

Miss Mabel Waters reports 
thet her abundant suppli ov 



Fary Sope, which formerly 
consisted ov Vt bar, hes en- 
tirelly disapeared. Our deep- 
est simpathie is with her in 
her loss. 

It hes been noticed with 
grate appreciatun by the in- 
habitants of this naborhood 
thet Miss Ona Peck hes at 
last succumbed to Faschun in 
haredressin. 

It is with grate sorrow thet 
we here thet H. Howard, a 
respectful citisen, hes hap- 
pened to a grate calamitie, 
havin been put on the " chane 
gang." 

It is rumored thet Z. Mc- 
Whorter is makin eyes at a 
certane young ladie at Annex. 
Somebody at Annex better get 
busie, or they'll get left. 

No rain lately. 

We wish the Banner a hap- 
pie and joyus yere. 

BLUE EYES. 



COUNTY FARE 

VISITORS FRUM ALL 

THE BORDERIN 

CITYS. 

Miss Sturdivant the Bell ov 
the Gatherin. 

BUTIFUL EXIBITS. 

Last Sat. the Skule House 
wuz the seen of mutch festiv- 
itys, a County Fare bein 
held. Many Fare visitors cum 
frum all over the country. 
Amung the distinguished ladie 
visitors wuz Miss Sady Sturdi- 
vant. She wuz butiful, and 
wore a scarlet red silk waist, 
with a yallow buff wool skirt 
and a straw sailor trimmed in 
pea-green feathers. There 
wuz a trane ov village swanes 
at her feet the whole day. 
(Continued orer.) 



Page 2. 



ATHENS BANNER. 



They are all hopin thet she 
will visit our citie agane in the 
Future. 

There wuz also sum won- 
derful exibits frum evry where. 
The most wonderful wuz a 
marvelus animule, a nikle- 
eatin goose, which wuz a at- 
tractun ov the day. This 
goose wuz brought frum parts 
unknown. 

Amung the exibits wuz sum 
picturs drew by the Art Sas- 
siety of this burg. The people 
wuz ov the opinun thet sum 
ov the picturs aught to be put 
in a big Art gallery. This 
County Fare wuz held for the 
Art Sassiety, and a big sum 
wuz made. 



SASSIETY NOTES. 

Miss Pearlie Sawyer hed a 
candie pullin at her butiful 
home on 3d st, South, last 
Fri. All the damsels and gal- 
lents ov our city wuz present. 
H. McCary brought Miss Elna 
Elliott, and I. Merkel wuz 
with Miss Aldridge as usual, 
but we wuz verry mutch sur- 
prised to see K. Walston with 
Miss Mamie Taylor. Wonder 
what wuz the matter with I. 
Duke and how he felt next 
day. The candie wuz good, 
and every one reported a good 
time. 

The Singin School is heard 
practicing evry evenin. We 
here thet they are goin to give 
a intertainment soon. Evry- 
body come to here them, fur 
they heve been wurkin mighty 
hard. 

The Elocutun Club give a 
drama last weak, named "A 



Bachlur's Revry." Evry one 
carryd out there parts butiful, 
and it wuz a mighty grate suc- 
cess. 

There wuz a Easter Egg 
Hunt in the skulehouse yard 
on Sat. before Easter. All the 
chillun who found eny eggs 
sed as how they wuz mighty 
good. Eggs must be gettin 
cheap, as we wuz gratifyed to 
see them so plentiful on that 
day. 



PERSONAL MENTCHUN. 

A. Leeth wuz scene out rid- 
in last Sun. evenin with Miss 
Grubbs. This is gettin com- 
mun hear lately. There must 
be sumthin to it. 

We wuz glad to see C. L. 
Brandon, frum Annex, in town 
Wed. He called by our once 
and pade his long standin sub- 
scriptun to the Banner. Call 
again, C. L. 

M. R. Vandiver, frum Sibe- 
ria, wuz in town Sat. He wuz 
a welcum visitor at our once. 

Some ov our readers are 
complainin thet we don't print 
enuf accidents, demerits, and 
scandals hear lately. It is not 
our fault. Get busie, evry- 
bodie. 



GRATE CALAMITY!!! 

On Apr. Fule the people ov 
this burg wuz mutch shocked 
to see, instid ov the usual pa- 
rade of black draped Seenurs, 
walkin in the Skule House, a 
line ov gigglin, insignificunt 



Freshmen, clothed in the high 
and mighty robes ov stait be- 
longin to the aforesed Seen- 
urs. Therefore sed inhabit- 
ants wuz grately outraged by 
sutch presumptous happenins, 
and the Seenurs hes decided 
thet there feelins is stepped 
on. 

The ultimate and inevitable 
end ov this insult is unknown 
to us, but the Banner wishes 
to remind its inteligant read- 
ers thet it hearby sets its firm- 
est disappruval on sutch on- 
dacious doins. 



QUESTUN BOX. 

Conducted for the Instructun 
of Our Subscriburs. 

ANSWERS BY THE 
EDITUR. 

"Deer Editur: Will you 
pleze tell me how I kin recov- 
er 5 cts. which hez been owin 
two me sense last Dec. I 
loaned it two a girl two get 
sum ice creme, and I heve 
never heard frum it sense. 
Pleze ans., as I nede the 5 
cts. X." 



Ans. — This problum is two 
mutch for our brane. If we 
new how to get thet 5 cts., we 
might heve new how two get 
our long standin subscriptuns 
and be in a flourishin conditun 
now. ED. 

"Deer Editur: Kin you sug- 
gest a way for me to make my 
sweathart luv me? I heve 
tryed evry way I kin thynk 
ov, and it hes not done no 
good. BROKEN HART." 

Ans. — We fele thet the best 
ans. we kin offer you to this 
is to prefer you to some ov 
our readers who hes succeed- 
ed in this matter. We would 
like to here frum sum ov our 
subscriburs on this point. 

ED. 

"Deere Ed.: I am intindin 
standin an exam, in Sichologie 
real sune. How earlie would 
you advyse me to get up and 
studie for it? ANXIOUS." 

Ans. — We do not know how 
mutch you no on sed subject; 
but if you don't no know more 
on it than we do, we would 
advise you to get up real 
early. ED. 



YOUR FORTUNE TOLD. 
I Have Visions uv the Future. 
CAN TELL YOU TO A CERTAINTY 
WHAT IS GOING TO BE- 
COME OF YOU. 
Onlie 15 cts. a head. This cost is not mutch, 
so be sure and sea the grate, celebraited 
B. LEVIE. 

52 ANNEX. 




Jokes 



Ruth Burns: "Let's go to the drug store. I want 
to get some massage cream. ' ' 

Lola Faust: "O, I've been, and they haven't a 
thing but chocolate and vanilla!" 

Ida (studying Economics): "Who is the ultimate 
consumer?" 

Mabel: "Don't you remember? The ultimate con- 
sumer is the one who eats the hash. ' ' 

"Annie Buck:" "I've been reading old Chaucer 
all day." 

"Cat" Davis: "Why, I didn't know you studied 
Greek. ' ' 

Helen: "This cream tastes like frozen hot choco- 
late." 



Miss Pittman (in Chemistry): "What elements 
could we have found in what we ate for dinner to- 
day?" 

Miss Diaz: "Phosphorus in the bones." 

From a Sub. to Her "Case" 

"My sweat angle, i luve you. Why do you note 
answer my not ? Your Case. ' ' 

In Virgil they came to the phrase: "And they 
throw the superfluous girl babies in the river." 

Elodia (whispering to Ruth): "What does 'su- 
perfluous' mean — fat?" 

I care not for your honors, 

I dare not hope for II. 's; 
I know I never " busted," 

So I haven't got the " blues." 



Mies Moore (in Economics): "What does the 
book say of the advantages of interests ? ' ' 

Jo Key: "It says it will tell more about that in 
the next chapter. ' ' 

"Leesten, Hans, und I vill you a leetle fable getell. 
Don't know vat a fable iss? Veil, leesten. A fable 
iss ein leetle story vat iss seelly, but vat wise folks 
tink iss got a moral in him. Once upon a time saw a 



cat a leetle bird resting his tiny feet on a tub. Now 
this tub did a lot of water gehelt, but die cat did not 
know dot. Up springs the cat at the bird, but the 
bird away flies, and poor puss a good bath instead 
gets. ' ' 

"Und vat iss der moral?" says Hans. "Dot he 
should look before he leaps?" 

' ' Nein, nein, you esel — dot a bath iss better than a 
good meal." 




Here's to the girl with eyes of gray! 
Ask for a kiss, and she turns away. 
Here's to the girl with eyes of black! 
Ask for a kiss, and she turns her back. 
Here's to the girl with eyes of brown! 
Ask for a kiss, and she turns around. 
Here's to the girl with eyes of blue! 
Ask for a kiss, she says: "Take two." 



(Decided by votes) 



The Prettiest Girl Catherine Davis 

Second Place Elizabeth Pride 

The Greatest Coquette Carrye Lowe 

Second Place Florence Harris 

The Tallest Girl Zella McWhorter 

Second Place Sadie Sturdivant 

The Shortest Girl Carmelita Garnica 

Second Place Mattie Mae Pearson 

The Jolliest Girl Mary Key 

Second Place Carrie Louise Brandon 

The Hungriest Girl Emniett Morton 

Second Place Nelle Mealing 

The Girl with the Talkative Eyes . Elizabeth Self 
Second Place Elodia Diaz 

The Most Original Girl .... Pearle Sawyer 
Second Place Josephine Key 

The Fastest Talker Esther Barrett 

Second Place Memory Aldridge 

The Coolest-Headed Irene Stovall 

Second Place Bess Levie 

(" Because," as the votes explained, " she has nothing on her head.") 



The Most Interesting Girl .... Elodia Diaz 
Second Place Pearle Sawyer 

The Gentlest Girl Lillian Shelby 

Second Place Beth Taylor 

The Most Mischievous Girl .... Etta Moore 
Second Place Mary Ruth Vandiver 

The Handsomest Girl .... Dudley Tutwiler 
Second Place Mabel Waters 

The Harum-Scarum Girl Lola Faust 

(No one else in the race.) 

The Cutest Girl Hal McCary 

Second Place Memory Aldridge 

The Most Athletic Girl . . . Margaret Tutwiler 
Second Place Ida Duke 

The Girl who Laughs Most .... Elna Elliott 
Second Place Carrye Lowe 

The Sweetest Girl Bernice Roden 

Second Place Lizzie Blankenship 

The Laziest Girl Evelyn Downey 

Second Place Robbie C. Davis 



The Sleepiest Girl Evelyn Downey 

Second Place Robbie C. Davis 

The Quietest Girl Mattie Williamson 

Second Place Lillian Shelby 

The Smartest Girl Irene Merkel 

Second Place Kathouise Walston 

The Most Polite Girl Maggie Griffith 

Second Place Bernice Roden 

The Best All-Round Girl 
Second Place .... 



The Wittiest Girl .,.,.. Mary Key 

Second Place Josephine Key 

The Biggest Bluffer Alma Leeth 

Second Place Anna Dinsmore 

The Neatest Girl Hazel McClure 

Second Place Eunice Hayes 

The Most Studious Girl Ozie York 

Second Place Maggie Griffith 

. . . . Beth Taylor 
. . . Irene Merkel 




"^Formation of TLove 



Experiment No. 1 




I'EST TUBE; spirit lamp; filter paper; evapo- 
rating dish; granulated attention; concen- 
trated acid of encouragement; mutual satis- 
faction. 

Place in a test tube a few pieces of granulated at- 
tention, and pour over it 5 cc. of concentrated acid 
of encouragement. Bubbles will rise, and a gas 
known as ''sincere interest" is given off in large 
quantities. This may be collected in vessels and 
preserved for future use. Now add to some of the 
sincere interest in solution some of the solution of 
mutual satisfaction. Heat this mixture over the 
spirit lamp, and it becomes a heavy, dark liquid, 



which is extreme interest mixed with an impure sub- 
stance called ' ' doubt. ' ' Then filter the solution, put 
some in an evaporating dish, and heat it on a sand 
bath. If the experiment is carried on properly, the 
doubt will pass off as a vapor, leaving a salt, which 
is pure extreme interest. This, if treated with a 
pleasing substance known as "constant companion- 
ship," is transformed into a tender, yielding sub- 
stance recognized by experienced chemists as true 
love. The reaction is sometimes accompanied by a 
by-product in the form of a colorless, unstable gas, 
called "infatuation," and is often mistaken for the 
true product. 



Hfow ^>l)e? ytlay be 3\eco9tttee& 



Ruby Sargent — Talking about "Sam." 

Bernice Roden — Always with ' ' Mary P. ' ' 

Mary Persinger — Always with Bernice. 

Evelyn Downey — Late to breakfast. 

Eloise Huffstutler — Asking questions. 

Ida Syfrett — Looking at Memory. 

"Cat" Davis— Playing "rag." 

"Yap" Gamica — Saying, "My soul!" 

Maggie Griffith — Eternally practicing. 

Mattie Williamson — Lending Miss Hayes her watch. 

Dee Scarbrough — Talking up midnight feasts. 

Nelle Mealing — Leading the Glee Club. 

Ozie York — Working Analyt. for the rest of class. 

Kathouise Walston — Studying Physics. 

Anna Dinsmore — Copying for the Oracle. 

Florence Harris — All ribbon, no hair. 

Mattie Mae Pearson — Wanting to see "the baby." 

Elizabeth Self — "Casing" with Miss Perry. 

Louise Beasley — ' ' Let 's go get something to eat. ' ' 

Marie Toney — Sending "eats" to Ruth. 



Ol)£ .Athenian .Ads 



FOR SALE — Complete set of my 
works, as follows: 

" Hints on Raising Money." 
" How to Manage Advertisers." 
" Best Methods of Collecting." 
" How to Approach a Deadhead." 
These books are all based on expe- 
rience. M. ALDRIDGE, 

39 Annex. 

EDUCATIONAL — Lessons in Jig- 
ging every afternoon. Special rates on 
Saturdays. 

F. HARRIS & E. BARRETT, 

Siberia. 

Ida Duke would like to exchange a 
portion of talent in Math, for same 
amount in English. 

LOST, STRAYED, OR STOLEN 
(most probably strayed) — My hair. Find- 
er will receive reward by returning same 
to B. LEVIE, 

52 Annex. 

WANTED — A new expression. 

E. MORTON. 

Will gladly exchange two hours of 
study hall for same amount of time be- 
ginning with second rising bell. 

E. DOWNEY. 

FOR SALE— Unlimited stock of 
Brass. Sold in 50-cent and $1 packages. 

R. BURNS. 

WANTED— To know price of "Dan- 
derine." ES. BARRETT. 



WANTED— A hair restorative. 
R. VANDIVER, 

E. MOORE, 

F. HARRIS, 

D. SCARBROUGH, 
B. TUCKER. 

LOST— A rat. E. V. RYBODY. 

Big reward offered for return of box of 
paint lost by C. L. BRANDON. 

WANTED — To know how to get good 
grades without studying. Am willing to 
pay well for the solution. 

RUTH HOWARD. 

NOTICE — Up-to-date hairdressing 
done at all hours. Reasonable terms. 
RUBY SARGENT. 

WANTED— A few more curls. 

CARRYE LOWE. 

FOUND — A solution of " churchgo- 
ing." Will exchange for a method of 
skipping walk. B. RODEN. 

WANTED — Information which will 
lead to the recovery of a long black coat. 
Last seen with Carrye Lowe. 

CATHERINE DAVIS. 

LOST — An Inspiration. Finder please 
return same and receive reward. 

I. MERKEL, 
54 Annex. 

NOTICE — Voice lessons under the 
celebrated Prof. Emmett Morton are 
available at reasonable terms. 



FOR RENT — Seat in the Senior row. 
Desirable location behind a post. Rea- 
son for renting same: am compelled to 
move since last exam. Address 

R. C, 
Care Oracle. 

WANTED— A "case." Will be very 
attentive. LUCILLE KNOX, 

Pike. 

FOR SALE — Chemistry Notebook. 
Very thorough. Will be of great use to 
any member of Chemistry Class next 
year. Call on or write to 

A. LEETH, 
Room 15, Main. 

NOTICE — Any one in the " dead- 
broke " state may find temporary relief 
at my pawnshop, 23 Over Pike. 

P. SAWYER. 

" How I Have Fooled Them — Teach- 
ers;" "Best Way to Cheat — urn;" 
" How I Became Famous Through My 
Voice." Newest things out; bargains. 
B. TAYLOR. 

WANTED— Information which will 
lead to discovery of person who left 
H,S valve open in Chemistry Lab. on 
last Thursday. CLASS. 

Old books for sale, dirt cheap; very lit- 
tle used. Address 

SENIOR CLASS, 
Senior Row, Chapel. 



"Jokes 



Dee: "I don't think Napoleon was so great, after 
all." 

Linda: "Why?" 

Dee: "Because I know I have to use as much 
strategy in passing Miss Pittman's door on the way 
to a feast as it took for him to conquer Europe. ' ' 

"Toney:" "Did you know Evelyn Downey put 
a clock under her pillow every night?" 

"Yap:" "No, but I knew she liked to sleep over- 
time. ' ' 



"The rule says: 'Uniform hats must be worn 
straight on the head.' What do you mean with 
yours on crooked, Miss Merkel ? ' ' 

"Please, Miss Moore, it's my face that's crooked." 

Beth: "Let's have a 'grip' in our club." 
Pearle: "All right. I have a little satchel up- 
stairs that will be just the thing." 

Miss Diaz (translating): "'They make hats of 
the epidermis of the beaver. ' ' ' 




(Zatt you ~3ma%iti<L 



Pearle Sawyer with black hair? 
Lillian Shelby five feet tall? 
Annie Buchanan going to a feast? 
The Seniors without anything to do? 
Memory Aldridge silent? 
Ozie York "casing ? " 
Dudley Tutwiler studying? 
The Sophomores without any conceit? 



Mary Persinger not getting a letter every mail? 

Beth Taylor without her hair curled? 

Bobbie Davis playing basket ball? 

A whole day with nothing to do? 

Mary Key solemn? 

Nelle Cotten without bows on her hair? 

Ida Duke in a hurry? 

Carrye Lowe with her hat on straight? 



Charge of tl>e feasters 



Twelve o'clock, twelve o'clock, 
Twelve o'clock midnight; 
Down in the Science room, 
House as still as any tomb, 
Slipped the gay feasters. 
"Where have the pickles gone?" 
" I have just got to yawn." 
" B'lieve I could eat till dawn." 
Such are the whispers. 

Teachers to right of them, 
Teachers to left of them, 
Teachers in front of them, 

Yet still they dared them; 
For, roused by hunger deep, 
Up from their troubled sleep, 
Down the long stairs they creep, 

Whose loud creaking scared them. 

" Hush! There's a sound out there! " 
On end stood every hair; 
They knew what fate they'd share 

If the night watchman caught them. 
Theirs not to reason why, 
Theirs not to turn and fly, 
Theirs but to eat or die; 

Experience had taught them. 



' Shucks, it's the college cat, 
Hunting for some poor old rat, 
And we were scared at that! " 
Thus spoke the leader. 
' Let's get to work again." 
' Those olives stick like sin; 
I want a long hat pin, 

'Cause why? I need her." 

Crackers and cheese were slain, 
Cake passed away in pain; 
They ate with might and main, 

While Faculty slumbered (?). 
Then when the grub gave out, 
Each one, grown strangely stout, 
Went on her homeward route; 

(Their days were numbered.) 

Next morn at breakfast hour, 
With faces drawn and sour, 
Seems by no earthly power 

Can they their tea stir. 
Hash has no charm for them, 
Grits only harm for them; 
For Miss Moore made it warm for them. 

Poor midnight feasters! 

ESTHER BARRETT. 



X. ». ~5\. 



Established, 1904 




Flower 

Rose. 



Colors 

Green and White. 



Motto 
" Ser y no parecer.' 



MEMBERS 



CARRIE LOUISE BRANDON ------- Bessemer 

LIZZIE BLANKENSHIP ------ . - Riverton 

ANNIE BUCHANAN ----------- Riverton 

RUTH BURNS - - ---------- Gadsden 

IDA DUKE - - - - --------- Birmingham 

WNA DINSMORE ----------- Falkville 



MAGGIE GRIFFITH ---------- Hoke's Bluff 

IRENE MERKEL ----------- Birmingham 

MARY PERSINGER ---------- Birmingham 

SADIE STURDIVANT ---------- Bessemer 

BETH TAYLOR --------- Brownsville, Term. 

MAMIE TAYLOR ---------- Stanton, Tenn. 



Absent Members 



ELIZABETH BUCHANAN - - - - - - Riverton 

ELMINA GREEN ----------- Conyers, Ga. 

FRANKIE HERTZLER --_-__. . . Madison 

MATTIF ALLEN JACKSON ------- Iuka, Miss. 



EMMA KENNEDY ------------ Illinois 

HENRIETTA MASTIN --------- Huntsville 

NELLE PENNINGTON -------- Ripley, Tenn. 

ANNA MAE SHOOK ---------- Bridgeport 



D. IK. 13. 



Established, 1906 



Colors 

Green and Gold. 




Flower 
Jonquil. 



Motto 
" Tell the truth, but don't make a habit of it." 

MEMBERS 
IRENE STOVALL --._.._..... Jasper HALLIE McCARY - - - 

ALMA LEETH .-_.__.. Cullman CATHERINE DAVIS - - 

HAZEL McCLURE --------- Wilmore, Ark. 



Huntsville 

Birmingham 



SCOTT1E HUGHES 



Absent Members 
Wilmore, Ark. ESTHER WADSWORTH 



Birmingham 



TK. 0. 5. 



Founded, 1907 




Colors 

Gold and Black 



Flower 

Narcissus. 



Motto 

'Aim high, if you hit the bottom.' 



MEMBERS 



MEMORY ALDRIDGE ----- Jacksonville 
ESTHER BARRETT ----_._ Bessemer 
ELNA ELLIOTT --_._.. Columbiana 
SUSIE GLENN -.___.___ Decatur 
HELEN HOWARD . . _ _ _ Birmingham 

JOSEPHINE KEY ---.-._ Russellville 
CARRYE LOWE --.._._ Hazel Green 
BERNICE RODEN -.__... Collinsville 
PEARLE SAWYER - - . _ . _ _ Albertville 
RUBY SARGENT ---____ Birmingham 




ELIZABETH SELF ...... Laurel, Miss. 

MABEL WATERS _.___.. Birmingham 

Absent Members 

MARIE COUCH ---____ Birmingham 

ADA CURTIS --___. McMinnville, Tenn. 
ALVA SHELL - - __..__ Birmingham 
ADDIE WAE VANN ------ Birmingham 

MAE VANN --------- Birmingham 



iDouble Ol)ree 




Colors 

Pink and White. 



Flower 
Double Hyacinth. 



Motto 
Double-dog dare you." 



"JO " - - 
" DAZ " - 

'•MEEK IF. 



MEMBERS 

Chief Cussers'' ------------ ELIZABETH SELF and HELEN HOWARD 

Chief Wits" -._____-----___ JOSEPHINE KEY and ELODIA DIAZ 

' Deux Forts" - -------------- IRENE STOVALL and ALMA LEETH 

Favorite Stunt 

- - - - - - _ - - "As You Like It" "RENIE" ------- -'Putting Miss Pittmart wise ' 

"VENUS" ------------- "Giggling' 

"FRENCHIE" ---------- "Going to town ' 



" Writing to my sweetheart " 
"Getting excused from practice" 




Fair Japonica " 



jFair TJapomca* 



Flower 

Chrysanthemum. 



Motto 

"Always sit on the floor. 



Nicknames 



MARIANNE GRUBBS -------- "Marianne 

MARIE TONEY --______--_ •' Toney 

CARMELITA GARNICA --------- -Yap 

MARGARET TUTWILER ------- " Little Tut 

RUTH HOWARD ___-_.______" Rufus 



"OUR VIRGIN QUEEN" - - - - " For heaven's sake! 

"LORD DUDLEY " ------ " How sympathetic! 

"YAP" - - - - _--_-----_-" I ain't 

"DOLLY" ----_____ " Miss Meek said so 

"MARIANNE" --------- " I'd be ashamed 



EUNICE HAYES ----------- "Dolly 

RUTH ANDERSON --------- "Grandma 

J OS IE McCALEB -_-------'__. "It 

ELIZABETH PRIDE ------ " Our Virgin Queen 

DUDLEY TUTWILER ------- " Lord "Dudley 



Sayings 



" LITTLE TUT 
"TONEY" - 
" RUFUS " - 
"GRANDMA" 
"IT" - - - 



- - - - " Kiss me ' 
might get a demerit ' 

- - - " Let's do ' 
- - " Keep quiet ' 

" Child, that's grand ' 



Occupations 



"RUFUS" ------------- "Smoking 

"OUR VIRGIN QUEEN" - - - " Hugging Lord Dudley 

"IT "----__-____--" Keeping quiet 

"GRANDMA" -------- _ " Being shy 

"DOLLY" --_-_-_______ "Grinning 



"LITTLE TUT" ----------- "Dignity 

"YAP" ____----______ "Flirting 

"TONEY" ----------- " Holding hands 

"MARIANNE" --------- "Admiring herself 

" LORD DUDLEY "_--*_------" Eating 



TKu IKlux Kbit 




Swastiea - - - Great High Mogul 
Cross ---._____ High Master 

X--------- __._ Grand Pilot 

Triangle - --___. Grand Chancellor 

Triangle and Dot --.--_______ Guard 

Circle and Dot --_______ Guard 

Question Mark - - - - _ Detective 



Million's ^fallen .Angels 



Rendezvous 

Pandemonium. 

Watchword 

" Dog Rite." 

Symbol 
Flaming Sword. 

Colors 

Red and Black. 

Charm 
Fire and Brimstone. 

Favorite Employment 
Reading " Paradise Lost." 

MEMBERS 

Satan ..._-__._ IRENE STOVALL 
Beelzebub ------- HELEN HOWARD 

Moloch -------- JOSEPHINE KEY 

Belial ---------- ALMA LEETH 

Mammon ---------- IDA DUKE 

Ashtoreth ------ ELIZABETH SELF 

Rimmon -------- RUBY SARGENT 

Dagon ------- EUNICE McDONALD 

Tammuz _______ MABEL WATERS 

" Devil with devil damned, lirni concord holds; 
men only disagree of creatures rational." 




Ol)e Bessemer JfVeaks 



Three Louises 

SADIE LOUISE ESTHER LOUISE 

CARRIE LOUISE 

There once were three charming Louises, 
Who were all quite as airy as breezes. 

They came to this college, 

They said, to get knowledge; 
But we fear they were very great teases. 




1. 

The oldest of these was named Sadie, 
By some considered a " Lady." 

Her shoes were eights, 

And never were mates; 
And she loved a young fellow named Grady. 



The second in line is Esther, 
And she we never dare pester. 
Her shoes, which are nines. 
She can throw in straight lines — 
We know, for we once tried to test her. 



The youngest of all is named Carrie. 

She was once very anxious to marry; 
But her number ten shoes 
Gave the young man the blues, 

And the poor wretch dared not tarry. 



Bbe Skippers 



MEMBERS 
'MEM,'' when she has no letters to write; 

" FUZZY." when she hasn't heard from "papa dad; 
'JAP," when Nelle is out of sight; 

"TWILIGHT," when her "case" is mad; 
' HAL," when she isn't in the office; 
' HAZELNUT," doesn't ever miss. 

Absent Members 
SETT A MASTIN MIX A GREEN 

SHUCKS SHOOK ES. WADSWORTII 




"3p. <r. "3D. 

Flower 
Red Rose. 

MEMBERS 

REBECCA CHANDLER ---------- Athens 

MAMIE CRUTCH ER ----------- Athens 

FRANCES SANDERS ---------- Athens 



OFFICERS 
RED RODEN --------- Reddest of the Red 

JO KEY --------------- Crimson 

P. SAWYER _ _ - _ --------- Garnet 

MEMBERS 

ANNA DINSMORE RED RODEN 

MARY KEY P. SAWYER 

MARY PERSINGER JO KEY 





»^^^ 


ILi' Vl ^1 




fit h^B w^^B 


"^.Jjf: -J-^H ' ' 






' A - ^-^ 









Ol)e Spectators 

•4 

Main Jigger -------- . - - _ MARY KEY 

Second Jigger - __...._ RUTH HOWARD 

Another Jigger - . - - - - - - - LOLA FAUST 

Main Spectator - ------ EUNICE HAYS 

Second Spectator - .-..._ RUTH ANDERSON 

Another Spectator - - - - - KATHOU1SE WALSTON 

Orchestra 
HAZEL McCLURE and ELIZABETH PRIDE 

Ordinary Mortals 

EMMETT MORTON 

ROBBIE DAVIS 

CARRIE LOUISE BRANDON 

OLLIE PEETE 

Evil Spirit 

MISS PITTMAX 



Ol)£ Skeeters 




Color 

Fiery Red 

Motto 

Trouble, trouble — forget it." 



Flower 
Chigger Weed. 

Aim 

Get through school the best way you can. 



MEMBERS 

HAZEL McCLURE FUZZY BURNS 

CAD LOWE TRIXY BRANDON 

HAL McCARY 

Absent Members 

SETTA MASTIN ES. WADS WORTH 

SHUCKS SHOOK MINA GREEN- 

MAT. ALLEN JACKSON PENNY PENNINGTON 

SCOTTIE HUGHES FRANK HERTZLER 



TKo6akers 



MEMBERS 

SUSIE GLENN [RENE MERKEL 

EUNICE HAYES JOSEPHINE KEY 

ALMA LEETH ELODIA DIAZ 

LUCILE KNOX IRENE STOVALL 

PEARLE SAWYER HAZEL McCLURE 

RUTH ANDERSON 




!6aldl)ea6s 




Motto Colors 

"Happy-go-lucky." Dark Blue and Gray. 

FLORENCE HARRIS ------ President 

MEMBERS 
FLORENCE HARRIS ---------- "Bob 

ETTA MOORE ------------ "Tom 

BERTHA TUCKER ---------- "Harry 

MARY RUTH VANDIVER --------- "Jack 

DEE SCARBOROUGH ---------- "J, ,1m 



Ol)£ ~2>oo JDollies 



Motto 

Give me a good time, or give me death. 
" Don't keer il 1 d< i." 

Guardian Angel 
Mrs Murrah. 

Favorite Candy 
Fudge, packed in shoe boxes. 

IS. B. II- C. T. S. G. 



CUTE-UN " BARRETT - 
BIG L'X " STURDIVANT 
LITTLE-UN " BRANDON 
GRUB L KVY " BEASLEY 




MEMBERS 
"Shoot, Woman!" " RED " DINSMORE -------- "By Hokey! 

- "Doo Shiggit!" "MAW" LEVIE --------- " Living Horrors! 

- - "(), Pap!'' "MULE" DUKE -------- " I Say the Word! 

- "ByShully!" " PETE " PEETE - --------- "Mascot! 



Doll? !ftacl)dors 




SONG 

Hail, hail, the gang's all here! 
What in the world do we care? 
What in the world do we care? 
Hail, hail, the gang's all here' 
What in the world do we care? 



GANG 



•• BILL" DUKE - 
"TOM " SAWYER 
" SAM " WATERS 
" BOB " BARRETT 



Lawyer 

_ _ Doctor 

_ - Drummer 

Civil Engineer 



MOSE" STURDIVANT 
' DICK" MERKEL 
■JAKE" ALDRIDGE 
' HAL" McCARY - 



_ _ Preacher 
Baseball Shark 
_ _ - Sport 
_ _ - Sport 



TKimono HKlub 




Motto 

Be an eater. 



Hours 

Any old time after midnight. 



MEMBERS 



"P." SAWYER "SUGAR" GLENN 

■' FRESH " WATERS " RENE " MERKEL 

" MERM '• ALDRIDGE '• RED " RODEN 

" IDAHO " DUKE <• BE TH " TAYLOR 

" MOGGIE " GRIFFITH « CHUNK " PEARSON 




Motto 


Colors 


Have all the fun you can, in all the ways you can, 


Olive Green and White. 


just as long as you can." 




LIZZIE BLANKENSHIP - 


- - President 


MEMBERS 




LIZZIE BLANKENSHIP 
DUDLEY TUTWILER 
FLORENCE HARRIS 
MARIANNE GRUBBS 


EINNAN HERNDON 

ELIZABETH PRIDE 

LOUISE MURPHEY 
MISS FRANCES WILLIAMS 




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MoVOS DM: liU illf tku "Pet. vor Wit" 

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~2>as TEnde 1st 



The Seniors have vanished in cap and in gown; 
Diplomas and flowers are weighing them down. 
Exams, and commencement are things of the past; 
Vacation and summer have reached us at last. 

No time now for frolic and fun-making jest; 

I must pack up my trunk and leave with the rest. 

I've put in my dresses and most of my books, 

My pictures and racket and clothes from their hooks. 

But I can't get it locked, and the train is now due; 
I'll just strap it, and hope that 'twill get through. 
Good-by, little room, sweet haven of rest, 
Dear friend of my joys and my tears if confessed. 

Alma Mater, farewell; farewell each loved spot. 
I'll never forget thee, whate'er be my lot. 
The train's distant whistle now warns me to come. 
Good-by, dear old college; glad greeting, sweet home. 




RESOLVED 

7* AT W£ W i L L 
pAflfOAlJ^S ALL 

YY/i -pAT/Yo/Vi-z £ 

77/ E Qllf/.S. 




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ESTABLISHED 1829 



CLASS PINS AND STATIONERY 



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Our Stationery Department is unexcelled in its excellency of workmanship and materials. Our artists are skilled in their line, and 
an order entrusted to us is an assurance of elegance and refinement, and that it will be correct in every detail. Your order for 
Invitations, Calling Cards, Stationery, Monogram Dies, Book Plates, Crests, and Coats of Arms will receive prompt attention, as all 
work is done on our premises under our own supervision. Samples mailed on request. 



QPFf^I \ I Box containing ioo sheets of paper and ioo envelopes of our fine *< Cft 
JrLvlAL "Modern Linen." stamped with single or two-letter monogram die <p X «Ovf 



Our 200-page catalog containing over 5,000 illustrations of Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware, Cut Glass, Leather Goods, 
Clocks, Opera Glasses, Marble and Bronze Statuary, China, etc., will be mailed to you. Write for it to-day. FREE. 



IL 



MERMOD, JACCABD &r KING 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



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Dresses for Commencement Exercises 



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A most elaborate collection of White Lingerie Dresses. Paris and New York's best designers are represented. 

We've all sizes and all styles for your selection. Coat Suits of summer weight; Woolens, Silk, or Linen. Separate Skirts of Voile, 
Panama, and Fancy Weaves. Muslin Undergarments of every kind. Shirt Waists of Silk, Linen, Lingerie, or Lawn. Belts, 
Gloves, Corsets, Neckwear, Hosiery. 

Toa'll find Jaks' the place to shop, prices reasonable, and styles thebest. If ton 
cannot com* in persen, send oj your mail ordtr. It will be given oar best attention 



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RAILROAD PARES 
REFUNDED THROUGH 
THE REBATE BUREAU 



LOUIS SAKS 

Clothier to the Whole Family 
BIHMINGHAM. ALA.BA.MA 



RAILROAD PARES 
REFUNDED THROUGH 
THE REBATE BUREAU 



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Shop in Birmingham at 



Steele -Smiths 




Birmingham's Fastest-Crowing 
Department Store 



'Never a Day Without Its Bargains " 



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Amzi Godden Seed Co. 



Cut FtoWers 



CHOICE FLOWERS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 



Phone 41 



Birmingham, Ala. 



LUNCHES 




Oyster Loaves and 

Sandwiches 

Quickly Put Up 



. CHRIS'S PLACE 

&• — = — =^||f V 



1926 FIRST AVENUE 





BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



1ST 



The very best of eatables that can be obtained, combined with 

unexcelled service and good cooking, 

demands your patronage 



□ 



ED 



BELL PHONE 860 



PEOPLES PHONE 860 




nox $ktozdio 



416 NORTH 2 1ST STREET 



NEW 

GROUND FLOOR 

BIG LIGHT 

MODERN EQUIPMENT 

EXPERT OPERATORS 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



^ 



Money in Circulation 

is as essential to business as water is to the 
growing crops; as irrigation is to the land 
requiring water, so the BANKS are the great 
irrigating channels through which money 
is furnished to the business community. 

Let us handle your money for you — to your 
interest as well as to our own. 

Our BANK is owned and controlled by active 
business men. 

We pay 3 per cent on time deposits. 

Farmers & Merchants Bank 



C. O. JOHNSTON 



G. L. SHERRILL 



Johnston-Sfierrill Hardware Go. 



HARDWARE 

BUILDERS' MATERIAL 

STOVES 




TELEPHONE 74 



ATHENS, ALA. 



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McGehee Furniture Co. 



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FINE FURNITURE 
CARPETS, RUGS 
AND DRAPERIES 

' BBB I ' 

Exclusive Patterns 



McGehee Furniture Co. 

DECATUR, ALA. 



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The Limestone Democrat 

Limestone's Leading Newspaper 



The Democrat is the leading 
newspaper in Athens in circula- 
tion and influence. An Ad. in its 
columns is read by the people 
of both town and country. We 
have a well-equipped Job Office 
in connection, and turn out neat 
work at moderate prices . • . . • . 



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R. H. Walker, Editor and Proprietor 



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Joy Floral Company 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

(TutTftowers 



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Out-of-Town Orders Solicited 



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Poems, New Novels, and Stationery $ Pictures, 
Frames, and Moulding $ Cut Glass, Mirrors, 
and China $ Wall Paper, Window Shades, 
and Curtain Rods $ Dolls, Toys, and Games 
$ $ Croquet Sets and Hammocks $ $ 



-CAN BE FOUND- 
AT 



The Athens Bookstore 

J =] I i i — i i ir=ir===ni — II - — ir==l 



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Commercial 
Savings Bank and Trust Co. 

New Decatur, Alabama 


Matchless Merita Chocolates 

Best in the World 

Try a Box Next Time 

Huston — Birmingham 


Send your orders direct to the only house in the State operating a complete 
Engraving and Embossing Plant, producing promptly highest-grade Engraved 
Visiting Cards, Wedding Invitations, Announcements, Embossed Monogram 
Personal and Business Stationery. 

ROBERTS & SON (Inc.) 

" The Big Alabama House " 

MANUFACTURING STATIONERS 

1812 THIRD AVENUE BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 


Culpepper Exum, Pres. and Treas. S. D. Crenshaw, Vice President 
S. N. Gore, Secretary 

Birmingham Fertilizer Company 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-GRADE FERTILIZERS 

Birmingham, Alabama 


The Jefferson County Building and Loan Association 

Birmingham, Alabama 
RESOURCES, 8600,000.00 

Tlw M*al laaUnttsa (or S»» l«m WrlM (or Particular! 
P. M. Jiossoi, Pusum 


Bell Phone 3239 

W. A. LESTER 

REAL ESTATE, REAL ESTATE LOANS 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

3004 Third Avenue Birmingham, Ala. 


Bell Phone 4173 Peoples Phone 384 

DR. J. G. CALDWELL 

DENTIST 

Office, 808-9 First National Bank Building BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 


COMMERCIAL HOTEL 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY 

Remodeled and Refurnished Perfection Mattresses on all Beds 

No Charges for Sunday Dinner to Traveling Men , 
The Table the Best the Market Affords Sample Room Free 
Baggage Handled Free No Charges for Baths or Fires 

W. R. PRICE, Proprietor ATHENS, ALA. 


Buy Cadet Hose 

FOR MEN, WOMEN, BOYS, AND GIRLS 
Every Pair Guaranteed 

Lerman & Yarbrough 


Bell Phone 996 Peoples Phone 2486 

EASONVILLE CAFE 

303 North Twentieth Street Birmingham, Ala. 



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S. E. Stewart 
Bros. 



Dry Goods, C/othing 

Shoes 
Groceries, Hardware 




Everything sold at lowest prices 

We invite you to call and see us before 
buying 

Hartsells, Ala. 



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Martin, Richardson 
& Malone °**isx"" 



THE BIG STORE 




Dry Goods, 
Notions, Shoes, Hats, Clothing, 
Ladies' and Gents' Furnish- 
ing Goods, Furniture, 
Carpets, Mattings, 
and General Merchandise 





Thone No. 5 



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Athens, Mia. 



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Three "Common Senses," HEARING, 
SEEING, FEELING, are all appealed to 
by a visit to our stores. 

What your ears have heard and your 
eyes have seen, your feet will feel the 
comfort to be true when you put on a 
pair of our well-known shoes. 



«!§!» 



Avoid Regrets and come to 



I. Rosenau's Sons 



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LADIES' FANCY NOVELTIES AND 

READY-TO -WEAR A 

SPECIALTY 



II 

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II 

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E. GILBERT 



DR. W. G. HAGAN 



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Gilbert Drug Co. 



Drugs and 
Drug Sundries 



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Agents for 

Nnnnally's Candies 

Venders of the Purest and Best 

of Creams, Ices, and 

Fountain Drinks 



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PHONE No. 13 



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ATHENS, ALA. 
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I Nelson, Sarver & Nelson I 

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Up-to-date Millinery 

Queen Quality Shoes 

American Beauty Corsets 

IN FACT, EVERYTHING A LADY WEARS 



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Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

ONLY SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY IN ALABAMA 



64 Professors and Instructors 20 Well-Equipped Laboratories I 

Chat. C. Thach, M.A., LL.D., President Auburn, Ala. 

Session begins Wednesday, September 7, 1910. Location high and health- 
ful, 826 feet above sea level. Attendance, 761 students, from twelve States 
and three foreign countries. 

Course of Instruction. — Nine-four year degree courses. Mines, Engi- 
neering, Chemistry; (1) Mining, (2) Civil, (3) Electrical, (4) Mechanical, 
(5) Architecture, (6) Chemistry and Metallurgy, (7) Pharmacy. Forty-one 
Professors and Instructors. New machines and equipment in all labora- 
ties. Students hold leading technical positions in Birmingham District and 
throughout the South. First course of Architecture established in the 
South. New Library Building. (8) History, Latin, and Modern Language 
Course; English (4 years); Latin (4 years); History (4 years); French (2 
years); German (2 years); Mathematics (3 years); Physics and Astronomy; 
Political Economy; and Psychology. Thirty-seven Professors and Instruc- 
tors. (9) Agriculture, Horticulture, and Forestry- Fifty-three Professors 
and Instructors. (1) Three-year course in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
Ph.C; (2) two-year course in Pharmacy, Ph.G.; (3) three-year course in 
Veterinary Medicine, D.V.M. 

New Dining Hall, also board in private families. Tuition free to residents 
of Alabama. Agricultural Hall. New Engineering Hall in course of con- 
struction. 

information, address the President 



"1 GnftL G 



|il For catalogue and further inf( 
1!=]||— IIU— im^— HE 




©VKRALIL m 



311- 



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BETTER THAN BUTTER 

because it is made in a more healthful, hygienic manner, and under 
both government and State inspection. Does not get rancid. 
BETTER THAN ALL OTHER MAKES OF BUTTERINE 

because it is churned under a wholly original and inimitable for- 
mula, producing an Absolutely UnequaJed Quality. 
MADE IN COLUMBUS, 



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First National Bank 



CAPITAL, $50,000.00 




Oldest and Biggest Bank in Limestone County 



Theo. Westmoreland S Son 



DEALERS IN 



| DRUGS AND MEDICINESjj 

IIL=i nr= 1 1=11 3EH=H 



Patent Medicines, Perfumery, 
Toilet Articles, Etc. 



ICE CREAM FROM JERSEY CREAM 



RUSSELL 
BROTHERS 

Will insure your 
house against 

FIRE 
and WINDSTORMS 



OEFICI IN OLD BXFRBSS 
BUILDING 

TELEPHONE 116 



Citizens Bank 




CAPITAL " 

B dSDRPLOsj50 000 



nd PROFITS 



Athens and Elkmont, 
Alabama 



McCONNELL 
'BROTHE'RS 
& COMPANY 

Hardware 
Groceries 
Feed Stuff 




WILLIAMS 



3 ANDC 



GILLILAND 

Keep a Complete 
Stock of 

College 

Girls' 

Furnishings 

Send at ymur mill order j 

HARTSELLS, ALA. 



This Space is (or the 

BAKERY 

Good Things to Eat 





D. O. LOONEY 

"Everything that's Good to Eat" 

We Appreciate College Trade 

TELEPHONE 42 



MARVIN 
PATTILLO 

Registered 
Pharmacist 



i 



11ARTSELLS, MLA. 



B. C. Bynum 

millinery 

Original and 
Imported Model* 




421 Bank Street 

Decatur, J41a. 



Dr. W. G. Hagan 

JUtbena, Mia. 



W.llti ■cWllllini j. I. ■cflJIIIiBt 

McWilliams 
Tiros. 

Groceries 



Keep Everything 
Good to Eat 



Thooe Us, No. 86 



SARVER& 
CRUTCHER 

Staple and Fancy 

Groceries 




CALL AND SEE US 



HIRSCH MILLINERY CO. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



College Girls are usually charming, 

but a stylish hat from Hirsch's will 

add to their dress and general style 

THINK THIS OVER 




COMMENCEMENT SOUNDS GOOD 



Wood's Jewelry looks GOOD 
Because it is GOOD 



Don't Forget 



WOOD'S JEWELRY STORE 



WM. S. PEEBLES 

NIB INSURANCE 
ATHENS. ALA. 



Compliments 

of a 
Friend 



Dr. W. T. McDaniel 

DENTIST 

SmIBMH CoiBM Of Ssl«f* 

Talcplioa* SI 
Aihoni. Alb 



THE PURE FOOD STORE 



We carry everything good to 
eat in the purest goods that 
can be bought 

Our motto: The best is none 
too good .... 



WALKER, MARTIN & GLAZE 



ATHENS, ALA. 




GOVERNED BY WOMEN 



FOR GIRLS AND WOMEN 



.Athens College, .Alabama 



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FOUNDED 184.? 



FOR TERMS. WRITE TO THE 

PRESIDENT OR DEAN 
BOX 68 - ATHENS, ALA. 



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COLLEGE o4NNUALS 
CATALOGUES 



VniSlS THE HARK 



P Rl NTINO G«? 



STEEL DIE EMBOSSING 
INVITATIONS 



Telephones, Main 357 and 358 



McQuiddy Printing Co. 



Nashville, Tennessee 



PRODUCERS OF "THE ORACLE" 



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Dime 



Dime 



ATHENS LIVERY CO. 

J. H. EUBANK. Man&cer 

' DRUMMERS' RIGS A SPECIALTY " 




PHONE 18 



Dime 



ATHENS, ALABAMA 



Dime 



Dime 



Dime 



J. N. HUGHES AGENCY CO. 



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HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Fire, Life, Accident 

AND 

Live Stock Insurance 

NEXT DOOR TO "NEW BANK" 
The Only Important Insurance Agency in Limestone County 

>TTTT< 



Dime 







Ward 
Seminar; 

3tasl)vilU. • Z3citn. 

Special (Course* in 

"Xlterature. Iflstorj. 
Tanjuages. Mtusic. 
1\rt ait&HExpressloit 

Tor Catalogue ^A&oress 

"3. ~X>. &lanton, "P r « s « 







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