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I>EPAliTME>"T OF THE INTEIllOll 



BULLETIN 



UNITED STATES 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



1^ 



No. 19 7 



SERIES F, GEOGRAPHY, 32 



THE ORIGIN OF CERTAIN PLACE NAMES IN THE 
UNITED STATES.— Gannett 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
1902 



DETARTMENT OF THE INT Eli I OK 



BULLETIN 



UNITED STATES 



GEOLOGICAL SUKVET 



T 



No. 197 



8EKIE»^ 1\ €iEO<;KAPIl\, 32 




WASHINGTON 

() () V E K N M K N T PRINTING O J' F 1 C E 
1902 



UNITP:D states (JEOLCXilCAL SURVEY 



CHARLKS 1). WALCOT'I', DIRECTOR 



4^ 



THE 



OEIGIN OF CERTAIN PLACE NAMES 



IN 



THE UNITED STATES 



BY 



HENRY C^AISnSTETT 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1902 



MAR J?. J§8§ 






/ t(^ 



CONTENTS 



Letter of transmittal 7 

Introduction 9 

Acknowledgments 9 

Authorities 12 

The names and their origin 17 

5 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Department of the Interior, 
ITnitet> States Geological Survey, 

WasJungton, D. C., May 23, 1902 . 
Sir: I transmit herewith, for pul)lication as a bulletin, a compila- 
tion giving- the origin of some ten thousand place names in the United 
States. These have been compiled from various sources, printed and 
manuscript, as set forth in the introduction. The pu})lieation is recom- 
mended, not only for purposes of information, but to induce criticism 
and additions, with a view to olitaining in the future all possible 
information on this subject. I think this work will be of great inter- 
est as embodying much local and general liistory. 
Very respectfully, yours, 

Henry Gannett, 

Qeograpliev. 
Hon. Charles D. Walcott, 

Director United States Geological Sw'vey. 

7 



THE ORIGIN OF CERTAIN PLACE NAMES IN THE 
UNITED STATES. 



B}" Henry Gannett. 



IIVTRODTTCTION. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

During- the compilation of this work, a hirg-e correspondence was 
carried on witli State and h)cal historical societies. State, county, and 
township officers, and individuals in all parts of the country for the 
purposes of obtaining information concerning the subject in hand. 
The greatest interest was shown and much work done I)}' correspond- 
ents, who have thus contributed very largely to the work. Much val- 
uabk> material was collected in this way which otherwise would have 
1)een unavailal^le. 

Among my correspondents, special thanks are due to the following- 
persons and organizations: 

Thomas M. Owen, De]iartment of iVrchives and History, Montgom- 
ery, Alabama, for valual)le I'eferences. 

C. M. Drake, of Eureka, California, for information concerning" 
names in Monterey and Humlioldt counties. 

The Bureau of American Ethnology, to which I am especially 
indebted, not only for much information concerning Indian names, but 
for g-uidance, advice, and suggestions in ol)taining sources of informa- 
tion. Indeed, most of the information concerning the meaning of 
Indian names is derived, either directl}' or indirectly, from this source. 

William N. Byers. of Denvei , Colorado, for additions and correc- 
tions to count}' names. 

Otis Ashmore, Georgia Historical Society. Savannah, Georg-ia, for 
revising list of counties. 

C. J. Bassett, Secretary of State, Boise, Idaho, for revising and 
adding to list of counties. 

J. P. Dunn, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis. Indiana, for 
additions and corrections to list of counties. 

George W. Martin, Kansas State Historical Society, for much val- 
uable material concerning the place names of his State. In addition 

9 



10 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

to the list of counties he also sent a great deal of material concerning 
town names, in which was included information furnished by Mrs. 
N. R. Calver, of Hagerstown, Mar3dand. 

Charles Evans, Chicago Historical Society, who sent a compre- 
hensive list end)racing most of the important names in his State. 

M. W. Davis, State Historical Society, Iowa City, Iowa, for much 
valualde information about his State. All of the information concern- 
ing tow.n names in this State was received from him. 

Mrs. Jennie i). Morton, Kentuck}' Historical Society, Frankfort, 
Kentucky, for additions to and revisions of names of counties. 

William Beer, Howard Memorial Lilu-ary, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
for helpful references and suggestions. 

Grace King, Louisiana Historical Society, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
for additions and corrections to parish names. 

Francis E. Sparks, Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, for valuable information regarding names of counties. 

Samuel A. Green, Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, for references which proved of great assistance in compiling 
information concerning the State. 

C. M. Burton, Michigan Historical Society, Detroit, Michigan, for 
assistance in collecting information. Mr. Burton went to much trouble 
to get information concerning the names of towns in his State, which 
resulted in adding much matei'ial to that branch of the work. 

Franklin L. Riley, Mississippi Historical Society, University, Mis- 
sissippi, for information concerning town names in his State. 

Marjor}' Dawson, Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, Missouri, 
for nearly all of the information here presented concerning her State. 

Mrs. Laura E. Howey, Montana Historical Library, Helena, Mon- 
tana, for data concerning county and town names in the State . 

Eugene Howell, l)y A. W. Morris, Deputy, Department of State, 
Carson City, Nevada, for correcting list of names of counties. 

William Nelson, New Jersey Historical Society, Paterson, New eler- 
se}^, for references, for revision of names of counties and a valuable 
list of town names. 

E. Tuttle, Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, New York, for 
list of town names. 

Julius Schoonmaker, Kingston, New York, great assistance cdnccrn- 
ing town names. 

F. J. H. Merrill, Historical and Art Society, Albany, New York, 
for names of towns in the State. 

Robert H. Kelly, New York Historical Society, for additions and 
corrections to list of counties. 

J. AV. Raynolds, Secretary of New Mexico, for corrections and addi- 
tions to list of counties. 



GANNETT] ACKIiTOWLEDGMENTS. . 11 

N. F. Carter, New Hampshire Historical Societ3% for valuable 
references, 

Kemp P. Battle, Department of History', Chapel Hill, North Caro- 
lina, for complete list of town names. 

E. F. Porter, Secretary of State, Bismarck, North Dakota, for man 3^ 
additions to list of counties. Nearly all the information concerning 
county names in this State was furnished b}" him. 

John W. Jordan, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, for much valuable aid. Names of counties, town, and 
natural features were sent by him. 

Clarence S. Brigham, Rhode Island Historical Society, for numerous 
refej-ences concerning- names in his State. 

A. S. Salley, South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, South 
Carolina, for much material of value in connection with the State 
names. Complete lists of county and town names were sent by him, 
and information not otherwise availal>le was added to that concerning 
his State. 

Doane Robinson, Department of History, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 
for names of counties and man}" town names. 

Charles P. Garrison, Texas Historical Societ3% Austin, Texas, for 
list of town names. 

Joseph A. De Boer, Vermont Historical Society, Montpelier, Ver- 
mont, for list of county and town names. 

John M. Comstock, Chelsea, Vermont, list of town names in Orange 
County. 

Virginia Historical Society, corrected list of names of counties. 

Edward N. Fuller, Washington Historical Society, Tacoma, Wasn- 
ington, for references and other assistance. 

J. P. Hale, Historical and Anticpiarian Society, Charleston, West 
Virginia, for material in the shape of count}^ and town lists. 

R. G. Thwaites, State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, 
Wisconsin, for much material, valuable suggestions, and references, 
especially in the way of putting me into communication with other 
sources of information. 

Mrs. E. W. Parker, for county names in Texas. Through her cour- 
tesy and kindness were olitained the origins of nearly all the county 
names of that State. 

In addition to the above, man}^ courteous and useful letters have 
been received from county clerks, treasurers, and other State and 
count}^ officials, all of whom have shown interest and have furnished 
all the material in their power. 

A large amount of material has been drawn from manuscript books 
compiled by Mr. Watkins, of Beaver, Pennsylvania. 



12 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 



AUTHORITIES. 

Information was obtained from the following books, two and three 
authorities l)eing' quoted in cases where differing* opinions exist con- 
cerning origins: 

INDIAN NAMES. 

The Aboriginal Races of North America, by Samuel G. Drake; fifteenth edition, 
revised by Prof. H. L. Williams. 

Tilie American Indian, by Elijah M. Haines, 1888. 

Eeague of the Iroquois, by L. II. Morgan, 1857. 

Indian Local Names, with their Interpretations, by S. G. Boyd, 1885. 

Algonquin Series, by W. W. Tooker. 

The Story of the Indian, by George Bird Grinnell. 

The Siouan Tribes of the East, by James Mooney: Bureau of American Ethnology, 
Bulletin 22. 

Indian Linguistic Families of America North of Mexico, by J. W. Powell: Seventh 
Annual Report Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 1-142. 

The Ghost-dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890, by James Mooney: 
Foiu'teenth Annual Report Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 641-1110. 

Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians, by James Mooney: Seventeenth Annual 
Rejiort Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 129-445. 

Tribes of the Extreme Northwest, by W. H. Dall: Contributions to North Ameri- 
can Ethnology, Vol. I. 

Vocabularies of Tribes of the Extreme Northwest, by W. H. Dall: Contributions 
to North American Ethnology, Vol. I, pp. 121-153. 

Cherokee Nation of Indians, by Charles C. Royce: Fifth Annual Report of the 
Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 121-378. 

The Menomini Indians, by W. J. Hoffman: Fourteenth Annual Report Bureau of 
American Ethnology, pp. 3-328. 

Klamath Indians of Southwestern Oregon, by All)ert Samuel Gatschet: Contribu- 
tions to North American Ethnology, Vol. II, 1890. 

The Seminole Indians of Florida, 1)y Clay MacCauley: Fifth Annual Report Bureau 
of Ethnology, pp. 469-531. 

Tribes of California, by Stephen Powers: Contriliutions to American Ethnology, 
Vol. III. 

Dakota-English Dictionary, by Stephen R. Riggs: Contriltution.s to American Eth- 
nology, Vol. VII. 

Pamunkey Indians of Virginia, by John Garland Pollard: Bureau of American 
Ethnology, Bulletin 17. 

Tribes of Western Washington, by (Tcorge Gibbs: Contributions to North Ameri- 
can Ethnology, Vol. I, pp.*157-241. ^ 

INDIVIDUAL STATES. 

ALABAMA. 

History of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, by Albert James Pickett. 

ARKANSAS. 

A Journal of Travels into the Arkansas Territory, by Thomas Nuttall, 1821. 
Some Old French Place Names in the State of Arkansas, by John C. Brauner. 



f^(X//^^f^Juru 



GANNETT.] AUTHOEITIES. 13 



CALIFORNIA. 



History of the State of California, by John Frost. 
History of the State of California, l)y Miguel Venegas. 

Report of Exploring Expedition to Oregon and California, 1843-44, ))y John Charles 
Fremont: Senate Doc., Twenty-eighth Congress, second session. 
History of Oregon and California, by Robert Greenhow, 1845. 



CONNECTKTT. 



Gazetteer of Connecticut and Rhode Island, ])y J. C. Pease and J. M. Niles, 1819. 
Indian Names of Places in Connecticut, by J. H. Truml)ull. 
Connecticut Historical Collections, by J. W. Barber, 1849. 



Gazetteer of Florida, by Adiel Sherwood. 

Handbook of Florida, by Charles Ledyard Norton, 1890. 



Gazetteer of Georgia, liy Adiel Sh(u-\vo(xl, 1829. 
History of Georgia, by William Bacon Stevens. 
History of Alabama, Georgia, and INIississijiiii, by Albert James Pickett. 



Indiana Gazetteer or Topographical Dictionary, published l)y K. Cliamberlain, 1849. 
History of Indiana to 1856, l)y John B. Dillon, 1859. 
Indiana, by J. P. Dunn. 

KENTUCKY. 

Historical Sketches of Kentucky, by Lewis Collins, 1848. 

LOUISIANA. 

A description of Louisiana, by Father Louis Hennepin, translated from the edition 
of 1683, and compiled with Nouvelle Decijuverte, the La Salle Docvmients, and other 
contemj)oraneous papers, by John Gilmary Shea, 1880. 



History of Maine to 1842, ])y George J. Varney, 1873. 

Gazetteer of jNIaine, by N. P]. Hayward. 

History of Maine, 1602-1820, by \V. D. Williamson, 1832. 

Collections of the Elaine Historical Society, 1847-1859. (In seven volumes.) 

MASS.VCllUSETTS. 

Gazetteer of the State of Massachusetts, by Rev. Elias Nason, 1874. 

Historical Collections relating to every town in Massachusetts, l)y John \Varner 
Barber, 1846. 

Gazetteer of Massachusetts, l)y J. Hayward, L847. 

Tlie Indian Names of Boston and Their Meaning, by P>ben Norton Hosford: New 
England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XL, 1886, pp. 94-103. 

Massachusetts Historical Society Proceedings, Vol. XII, 1873. 

.MICHIGAN. 

Gazetteer of Michigan, by John T. Blois, 1840. 

Memorials of a Half Century in Michigan and the Lake Region, by Bela Hubbard. 



14 PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 



MISSISSIPPI. 

A history of Mississipj)! from the Discovery of the Great River by Hernando de 
Soto, inchiding the Earliest Settlements made by the French under Iberville to the 
Death of Jefferson, by Robert Lowry and William H. McCardle. 

Mississippi River, by Henry R. Schoolcraft. 

History of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, by Albert James Pickett. 

NEW JEKSEY. 

Gazetteer of New Jersey, by Thomas F. Gordon, 1834. 
Historical Collections of New Jersey, by J. W. Barber and H. Howe. 
Indian Names in New Jersey, by T. Gordon: Historical Collections of the State of 
New Jersey, 1844, p. 512. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Gazetteer of New Hampshire, by Alonzo J. Fogg. 

New Hampshire State Papers. 

New Hami)shire Town Papers. 

Manual of the Court of New Hampshire. 

Gazetteer of New Hampshire, by J. Hayward, 1849. 

Gazetteer of New Hampshire, by J. Farmer and J. B. Moore, 1823. 

NEW MEXICO. 

Historical Sketches\)f New Mexico, by Le Baron Bradford Prince, 1883. 
Doniphan's Exijedition, by John T. Hughes, 1849. 

NEW YORK. 

History of the State of New York, 1609-1664, by John Romeyn Brodhead. 

Gazetteer of New York, by Thomas F. Gordon, 1836. 

Gazetteer of New York, by Horatio Gates Spafford, 1813. 

New York State Register, by Orville Luther Holley, 1843. 

History of Lewis County, 1860. 

History of St. Lawrence and Franklin counties, ))y Franklin B. Hough. 

New York State Register, ])y John Disturnell, 1858. 

Historical Collections of New York, 1524-1845, by J. W. Barljer and H. Howe, 1845. 

History of the Late Province of New York to 1732, by W. Smith, 1757. 



Gazetteer of Ohio, by John Kilbourn, 1821. 
Pioneer History of Ohio, by S. P. Hildreth. 

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of the Early Pioneer Settlers of Oliio, by 
. P. Hildreth. 

Historical Collections of Ohio, by Henry Howe. 3 volumes in 2. 1889, 1891. 
Ohio Gazetteer, by Warren Jenkins, 1837. 



History of Oregon, by Hubert Howe Bancroft, 1886. 

Report of the P^xploring Expedition to Oregon and North California, 1843-44, l)y 
John Charles Fremont: Senate Doc, Twenty-eighth Congress, second session. 

History of Oregon and California, by Robert Greenhow, 1845. 

Oregon; the Struggle for Possession, by William Barrows, 1884. 

Mountains of Oregon, by W. G. Steel. 

Tril)es of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon, by George Gibbs: Con- 
tributions to American Ethnology, Vol. 1, 1877, pp. 157-241. 



AUTHORITIES. ' 15 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



Historical Collections of Pennsylvania ( lOSO-1778), ])y S. Day, 1843. 
History of Pennsylvania to 1770, l)y Thomas F. Gordon, 1829. 



KHODE ISLAND. 



Gazetteer of Rhode Island, by Pease and Niles. 

Rhode Island Historical Society Proceedings, 1886-87, pp. 42-ol. 

Indian Names of Places in Rhode Island, Iw U. Parsons, 18(;i. 

Gazetteer of Connecticut and Rliode Island, by .J. C. Pease and J. ]M. Niles, 1819. 

Son'II CAROLINA. 

Historical Collections of South Carolina, by I^ R. CarixiU, 18o(). 

Documents Connected with the History of South Carolina, liy P. C. J. Weston. 

Collections of the South Carolina Historical Society, Vols. 1-V, 1857-1897. 

VEKMONT. 

Vermont Historical Gazetteer, by A. B. Hemenway, 18(>7-1871. 

VlKtilNlA. 

Hi.storical Collections of Virginia ( Virginia Historical Society jjublications). 
History of Virginia to 1754, liy W. II. Prockenljrougli. (In History of Virginia, 
by Joseph Martin, 1835.) 

TENNESSEE. 

History of Tennessee; the Rlaking of a State, by James Phelan. 



Exploration and Survey of the Valley of the Great Salt Lake of Utah, by Howard 
Stansbury: Senate Ex. Doc. No. 3, sjiecial session, March, 1851. 

WASHINfiTON. 

Tril)es of Western Washington and Xorthwestern Oregon, ])y George Gibbs: Con- 
tribution to American Ethnology, Vol. I, 1877, pp. 157-241. 
History of Washington, by Elwood Evans. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Canoe Voyage up the Minnay Sotor, Ijy George William Featlicrstonehaugh. 

Astoria, by Washington Irving. 

Henry-Thompson Journals, by Elliot C-ones. 

The Exiieditions ot Zebulon Montgomery Pike, by Elliot Cones. 3 volumes. 
1895. 

History of the Expedition under Lewis and Clarke, by Elliot Coues (Philadeipiiia 
American Philosophical Society, pp. 17-33), 1893. 

Account of an Expedition from Pittsburg to the Rocky Mountains under the Com- 
mand of Maj. Stephen H. Long. Compiled by Edwin James, 3 volumes, 1823. 

Narrative of an Expedition to the Source of St. Peters River, Lake Winnepcek, 
Lake of the Woods, etc., under the Command of Stephen H. Long, l)y William IL 
Keating, 2 volumes, 1825. 

The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, or Scenes beyond the Rocky Mountains 
and the Far West, by Washington Irving, 1850. 



16 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Yellowstoiu' Park, by H. M. Chittenden. 

Geographic Names as Monuments of History: Tran.saetionsdf the Oneida His- 
torical Society, No. 5, 1889-1892. 

Report of Reconnaissance of Northwestern Wyoming, including the Yellowstone 
Park, in 187.S, by William A. Jones, 1875. 

Exploration of the Colorado River of the West, by J. W. Powell, 1875. 

Report upon the Colorado River of the West, by Joseph C. Ives: Thirty-sixth 
Congress, Senate document. 

Excursion to the Grand Canon of the Colorado, l)y W. M. Davis. 

Colorado Exploring Expedition, by Joseph C^. Ives: War Department, Office 
Explorations and Surveys, pp. 31-42, 1859. 



THE I^AMES AJ^D THEIE OEIGIIT. 



Aaronsburg; town in Center County, Pennsylvania, named for Aaron Levy, who 

laid it out in 1786. 
Abahtacook; creek in Maine, branch of the ^latamiscontis River. An Indian word, 

meaning " a stream that runs parallel with a big river." 
Abajo; mountains in Utah. A Spanish word, meaning "low." 
Abanaka; village in Van Wert County, Ohio, named from an Indian tribe. The 

word means "the east land." 
Abaquage; pond near the source of Little River, Connecticut. An Indian word, 

meaning "flaggy meadow." 
Abbeville; county and town in same county. South Carolina, settled and named by 

immigrants from France, for the French town of that name. 
Abbot; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for Prof. John Abbot, treasurer 

of Bowdoin College. 
Abbotsford; village in St. Clair County, Michigan, named from the home of Sir 

Walter Scott. 
Abbott; village in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Albert F. Abbott, who 

platted it. 
Abbottstown; town in Adams County, Pennsylvania, named for John Abbott, who 

laid it out in 1753. 
Aberdeen; town in Moore County, North Carolina, city in Monroe County, Mis- 
sissippi, and numerous other places, named from the city in Scotland. 
Abert; lake in Oregon, named for Col. J. J. Abert, of the topographical enj^ineers, 

LTnited States Army. 
Abiatbar; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for Charles Abiathar White, of the 

United States Geological Survey. 
Abilene; city in Dickinson County, Kansas, and village in Charlotte County, Vir- 
ginia, named from the province of ancient Syria. The word means "a grassy 

plain." 
Abilene; city in Taylor County, Texas, named from the city in Kansas. 
Abingdon; city in Knox County, Illinois, town in Washington County, Virginia, 

and several other places, named from a borough in Berkshire, England. 
Abington; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, and several other places, 

named from a parish of Caml)ridgeshire, England. 
Ableman; village in Sauk County, Wisconsin, named for Col. S. V. R. Ableman, 

who settled there in 1851. 
Abocadneticook; creek in Maine, branch of the Penobscot River. An Indian 

word, meaning "a stream narrowed by the mountains." 
Aboljackarmegas; creek in Maine, branch of the Penobscot River, at the foot of 

Mount Katahdin. An Indian word, meaning "bare or bold." 
Abrigada; hill in Waterbury, Connecticut, having on its side a deep cavern-like 

cliff called the "Indian House," whence the name, which is an Indian word, 

meaning "shelter or hiding place." 

Bull. 197—02 2 17 



18 PLAGE "NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Absaroka; range of inountain.s in Wyoming, named from the native name of the 
Crow Indian.s. Grinnell says the word refers to some kind of a bird, possibly 
crows. 

Absecon; 1)ay and town in Atlantic County, New Jersey. The name is derived 
from the Indian words wabis.se, "swan," and ong, "a place," and was given 
because of the numbers of swans which resorted there. 

Acabonack; harbor in Long Island. An Indian word, meaning "root place," 
applied to the harbor from the meadows near, where the Indians found roots 
wliich they prized. 

Acadia; parish in Louisiana, and villages in Aroostook County, Maine, and Lee 
County, Virginia, named from the original name of Nova Scotia. Acadians 
emigrated to Louisiana and gave the name to the parish. The word is the 
French form of the Indian word kadi, meaning "the region," "the land." 

Acampo; village in San Joaquin County, California. A Spanish word, meaning "a 
portion of common given to herds for pasture." 

Accomac; county and village in same county, in Virginia. An Indian word, the 
meaning of which is given by some authorities as "on the other side," by others, 
"the limit of the woodland." 

Acequia; village in Douglas County, Colorado. A Spanish word, meaning "canal 
or channel." 

Aceyedan; creek in Iowa. An Indian word, meaning "the place of weeping." 
The name was given by the Indians upon the occasion of the death of some 
relatives. 

Achor; village in Columbiana County, Ohio, named from the valley of the Scrip- 
tures. 

Ackerman; town in Choctaw County, Mississippi, named for a landowner. 

Ackley; town in Hardin County, Iowa, laid out in 1857 '^.V J- W. Ackley. 

Acme; village in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. A Greek word, meaning "a 
point." 

Acquackanonk; township in Passaic County, New Jersey. An Indian word, mean- 
ing " where gum l;)locks were made, or procured, for pounding corn." 

Acquehadongonock; point in Maine. Indian word, said to mean "Smoked Fish 
Toint." 

Acton; town in York County, ]\Iaine, named from Acton, Massachusetts, in honor 
of the citizens of that town, originally a part of Concord, who took part in the 
battle of Concord. 

Acton; town in Middlesex County, jNIassachusetts, named from the town in Middle- 
sex County, England. 

Acton; town in Meeker County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "more 
tiian." 

Acush.net; town and river in Bristol County, Massachusetts. The name of the 
Indian village which stood upon the spot where New Bedford now stands. 

Acworth; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, namedv in honor of Lord 
Acworth. 

Ada; county in Idaho, named for the eldest daughter of H. C. Riggs. 

Ada; town in Kent County, Michigan, named for the daughter of Sidney Smith. 

r Adair; counties in Iowa, Kentucky, and Missouri; 

< Adairville; town in Logan County, Kentucky. Named for Gen. John Adair, gov- 

I ernor of Kentucky. 

Adams; counties in Iowa, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, and Washington, peak 
of the White ^lountains in New Hampshire, mountain in Washington, and jioint 
at the mouth of the Columbia River in Oregon, village in Herkimer County and 
town in Jefferson County, New York, named for President John Adams. 

Adams; counties in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, named for President John 
Quincy Adams. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 19 

Adams; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Samuel Adams. 
Adams; village in Gage County, Nebraska, named for an early settler, J. O. Adams. 
Adams; town in Robertson County, Tennessee, named for the owner of the town 

site, Reulien Adams. 
Adams, J. Q,. ; peak in New Hampshire, named for President John Quincy Adams. 
Adamsboro; village in Cass County, Indiana, named for George E. Adams, its 

founder. 

IAdamsburg; Ijorough in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; 
Adamstown; borough in Lancaster County, T'ennsylvania. Said to have been 
named for President John Adams. 

Addison; town in Steuben County, New York, county and town in Vermont, town 
in Washington County, Maine, and township in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, 
named for the celebrated English writer, Joseph Addison. 

Addison; town in Webster County, West Virginia, named for Addison McLaugh- 
lin, a prominent lawyer. 

Adel; town in Dallas County, Iowa. So named froni its situation on a dell of North 
Raccoon River; formerly written Adell. 

Adena; town in Jefferson County, Ohio, named for the home or country seat of the 
late Governor Worthington, of Oliio, which was in Ross County. The word 
means ' ' paradise. ' ' 

Adirondack; mountains in New York and village in Warren County, of the same 
State. Indian word compounded from doran, " a people who eat bark," and 
dak, "trees," with the French particle la prefixed. 

Admiralty; inlet in Washington named by Vancouver, the English explorer, for 
incumbent in the Admiralty. 

Adrian; city in Lenawee County, INIichigan, named for the Roman Emperor 
lla<lrian or Adrian. 

Advance; village in Boone C'ounty, Indiana, so named because located in anticipa- 
tion of the Midland Railroad. 

Afton; town in Union County, Iowa, laid out in 185-1: and named by Mrs. Baker, 
wife of one of the proprietors, from the little river in Scotland immortalized by 
Burns. ]\Iany other places bear the same name. 

Ag-amenticus; mountain in York County, Maine. An Indian word meaning "on 
the other side of the river." 

Agassiz; mountains in New Hampshire and Arizona, named for Prof. Louis Agassiz. 

Agate; bay in Lake Superior, Michigan, and creek in Yellowstone Park, so named 
from the agates found in them. 

Agawam; river and town of Hampden County, Massachusetts. An Indian word 
meaning "lowland, marsh, or meadow." 

Agency; town in Wapello County, Iowa, and village in Buchanan County, Mis- 
souri, named so because formerly Indian agencies. 

Agua Caliente; villages in ]\Iaricopa County, Arizona, and Sonoma County, Cali- 
fornia, so named from warm springs in the vicinity. A Spanish name meaning 
" hot water." 

Agua Dulce; creek in Texas. A Spanish name meaning "sweet water." 

Agua Fria; valley in Yavapai County, Arizona. A Spanish name, meaning "cold 
water. ' ' 

Agua Fria; peak and village in New Mexico. A Spanish name meaning "cold water." 

Ah.iki; eastern tributary of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. An Indian word, 
ahi-iki, meaning "sweet potato mother." 

Aiken; county and town in South Carolina, named for William Aiken, governor of 
the State in 1844-1846. 

Aikin; landing and swamp in Chesterfield County, N'irginia, named for the late 
owner, Albert Aikin. 



20 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Ainsworth; town in Washington County, Iowa, named for D. H. Ainsworth, civil 
engineer. 

Ainsworth; station on the Union Pacific Railroad in Franklin County, Washing- 
ton, named for J. C. Ainsworth, a prominent western railroad man. 

Aitkin; county and village in Minnesota, named for Samuel Aiken or Aitken, an 
old trapper and fur dealer. 

Akron; village in Erie County, New York, named from the city in Ohio. 

Akron; city in Summit County, Ohio, which occupies the highest ground in the 
northern part of the State, and several other places named for the same reason. 
A Greek word meaning "the summit or peak." 

Alabama; State of the Union and a river of that State, named from an Indian tribe. 
There are several explanations of the meaning of the word. Gatchet gives 
" burnt clearing. " Others say it means "here we rest." Haines, in his Amer- 
ican Indian, gives "thicket clearers." 

Alabaster; mount in Arkansas which has an eminence composed of alabaster. 

Alabaster; post-office in Iosco County, Michigan, so named from its quarry of gyp- 
sum and manufactory of calcined j^laster. 

Alachua; county and town in Florida. An Indian word, the meaning of which is 
variously interpreted as Alachua savanna, "grassy, marshy plain," referring to 
a feature of this description in the county north of Lake Orange; or "jilace 
where water goes down," the "big jug." 

Alamance; county and creek in North Carolina. The word is said to have been 
given by Germans, from Allamanca, who settled in the valley of the creek, which 
received the name first. Some authorities say it is of Indian origin. 

Alameda; county and city in California, town in Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 
and post-office in Clarke County, Alabama, named from the cottonwood trees 
growing in the vicinity. A Spanish word meaning "grove of poplar trees." 

Alamo; post-office in Contra Costa County, California, and many other places named 
from the old fort in Texas, which was so called from a grove of cottonwood 
trees. A Spanish word meaning "poplar or cottonwood." 

Alamog-ordo; city in Otero County, New Mexico. A Spanish word meaning "large 
poplar or cottonwood." 

Alamoosook; pond in Hancock County, Maine, near Orland. An Indian word 
meaning "great dog place." 

Alamosa; town of Conejos County and stream in Colorado. The stream was named 
by the early Spanish exjilorers, the town taking its name from the stream. A 
Spanish word meaning "shaded with elms," though cottonwood is the actual 
growth. 

Alaqua; river and town of Walton County, Florida. An Indian word meaning 
"sweet gum." 

Alaska; Territory of the United States. An Indian word meaning "great country," 
"continent," or "great land." 

Albany; county and city in New York, named for the Duke of "York, whose Scotch 
title was "Duke of Albany," afterwards James II of England. Many places 
named from the city. 

Albemarle; county in Virginia, sound in North Carolina, and town in Stanly County, 
North Carohna, named for Gen. George Monk, Earl of Albemarle, one of the 
original proprietors. 

Alberhill; railroad station and coal mine in Riverside County, California, named 
for the two owners of the mine, Messrs. Albers and lldl. 

Albert Lea; city in Freeborn County, Minnesota, between two lakes, from one of 
which it derives its name. The lake was named for Lieut. Albert M. Lea, who 
explored the " Blackhawk purchase" and published an account of his explora- 
tions in 1836. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 21 

Albertville; town in Marshall County, Alabama, named for the first settler. 
Albina; village, now a part of Portland, Oregon, named for the wife of Judge Page, 

of Portland. 
Albion; town in Kennebec County, Maine, and many other places named from the 

ancient name of England. 
Albuquerque; city in Bernalillo County, New Mexico, named for the Spanish Duke 

of Albuquerque, who visited this sjiot in 1703-1710. 
Alburg; town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, named for Gen. Ira Allen, one of 

the original grantees. 
Alcatraz; island and post-office in San Francisco County, California. A Spanish 

word, meaning "pelican." 
Alcona; county and post-office in Michigan. Indian word, meaning "unknown." 
Alcorn; county in Mississippi, named for James L. Alcorn, governor of the State in 

1870-71. 
Alden; town in Hardin County, Iowa, named for Henry Alden, who settled there 

in 1854. 
Alden; town in Erie County, New York, named by one of its citizens for his wife's 

mother. 
Alderson; town in Monroe County, West Virginia, named for Rev. John Alderson, 

pioneer settler. 
Aleutian; islands in the Pacific Ccean. A derivation of the Russian word aleaut, 

meaning "bald rock." 
Alexander; county in Illinois, named for Dr. William M. Alexander, a pioneer. 
Alexander; village in Genesee County, New York, named for Alexander Rea, 

first settler and State senator. 
Alexander; county in North Carolina, named for several prominent citizens: Wil- 
liam J. Alexander, State solicitor; Gov. Nathaniel Alexander, and J. McNitt 

Alexander, secretary of the Mecklenburg Congress. 
Alexander Lake; lake in Connecticut, named for Nell Alexander, who was owner 

of a large tract in the town of Killingly, Connecticut. 
Alexandria; village in Thayer County, Nebraska, named for S. J. Alexander, sec- 
retary of state. 
Alexandria; town in Jefferson County, New York; named for Alexander Le Ray, 

son of J. I). Le Ray, who fell in a duel in 183(5. 
Alexandria; county and city in Virginia, named for a prominent family of early 

settlers, of which Dr. Archibald Alexander was a distinguished member. 
Alexandria Bay; bay and village in Jefferson County, New York; named for Alex- 
ander Le Ray. 
Alford; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Hon. John Alford, of 

Charlestowu. 
Alfordsville ; village in Daviess County, Indiana, named for James Alford, who 

built the first house. 
Alfred; town in York County, Maine, named for King Alfred of England. 
Alg-ansee; townshij) and post-office in Branch County, Michigan; Indian word, 

meaning "the lake prairie, or the prairie resembling a lake." 
Alger; county in Michigan and village in Hardin County, Ohio, named for Hon. 

Russell A. Alger, Secretary of War during McKinley's administration. 
Algoma; city in Kewaunee County, Wisconsin, and places in several other States. 

Indian word formed from Algonquin and "maig," meaning "Algonquin 

waters." 
Algona; city in Kossuth County, Iowa, and post-office in Jefferson County, New 

York. Indian word, meauing probably the same as " Algoma," "Algonquin 

waters." It is said to be the Indian name for Lake Superior. 



22 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buix. 197. 

Algonac; village in 8t. Clair County, Michigan. Indian word, by some said to mean 

"pertaining to the Algonquin language;" by others it is thought to be com- 
pounded for "Algonquin " and " auke," meaning " land of the Algous." 
Algonquin; village in McHenry County, Illinois, post-offices in Franklin County, 

New York, and Can-oil County, Ohio, named from the Indian tribe. The word 

means " people living on the other side of the stream." 
Alhambra; village in Madison County, Illinois, jjost-office in Los Angeles County, 

California, and many other places named for the palace in Spain. 
Aliquippa; ])orough in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, named for an Indian chief. 
Alkali; creek in Montana, so named from the alkaline quality of the water. 
Allagash; principal branch of St. Johns River, Maine, plantation and post-office in 

Aroostook County, Maine. An Indian word meaning " bark cabin lake." The 

Indians had a hunting camp near the headwaters of the river, hence the name. 
Allamakee; county in Iowa. The Iowa Historical Society says it was named for 

Allen Makee, an Indian trader. Haines's " American Indian " gives allamakee, 

Algonquin Indian, meaning "thunder." 
Allegan; county and village in Michigan, named from an Indian tribe. Haines 

says that this was the oldest tribe in the United States, and gives the derivation 

from sagiegan, " a lake." 
Allegany; counties in Maryland and New York, and town in Cattaraugus County, 

of the latter State; post-office in Coos County, Oregon; 
Alleghany; counties in North Carolina and Virginia; 

Allegheny; county, city, and river in Pennsylvania, and mountains in eastern United 

States. An Indian word variously spelled, the origin of which is in dispute. 

The most generally accepted derivation is from "welhikhanna," "the best, or 

the fairest river." 

Allemands; town in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, situated on Bayou des AUe- 

mands, " bayou of the Germans." 
Allen; county in Indiana, named for Col. William Allen, of Kentucky. 
Allen; county in Kansas, named for William Allen, United States Senator from 

Ohio, 1837-1849. 
Allen; counties in Kentucky and Ohio, named for Col. John Allen, who fell at the 

battle of Raisin River, in the war of 1812. 
Allendale; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for the Allen family, 

prominent in that district. 
Allenhill; post-office in Ontario County, New York, named for Nathaniel Allen, 

one of the first settlers. 
Allenstown; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for Samuel Allen, 

to whose children the grant was made in 1722. He died while engaged in a 

lawsuit over the governorship. 
AUentown; city in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, and borough in Monmouth 

County, New Jersey, named for Williaui Allen, of Pennsylvania, at one time 

chief justice of the province. >. 

Alliance; town in Stark County, Ohio, because it was thought that two systems of 

railroads would form an alliance. 
Alligator; river and swamp in North Carolina, so called from the number of alli- 
gators found there. 
Alloway; township and creek in New Jersey, named for an Indian chief who 

resided upon it. 
Allum; pond in Connecticut, named for a Quinebaug captain, called by the Pequot 

Indians "the fox." The Indian word allum meaus " fox, or foxpond." 
Alma; town in Park County, Colorado, named by Mr. James, a merchant, for his 

wife. 
Alma; city in 'Wabaunsee Couuty, Kansas, uamed by Germans who settled it, from 

the city and battle of Alma, Germany. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 23 

Alma; city in Harlan County, Nebraska, named for the daughter of one of the first 
settlers. 

Almaden; township in Santa Clara County, California, containing mines of mercury. 
These mines are named after the quicksilver mines in Spain. 

Almont; village in Laj)eer County, Michigan, named for the Mexican general, 
Almonte. 

Alpena; county and city in Michigan, and village in Jerauld County, South Dakota. 
An Indian word, derived from penaise, "a bird." 

Alpine; county in California, so named because of its mountainous surface, lieing 
traversed by the Sierra Nevada. Many places in the United States l)ear this 
name in reference to their elevation. 

Alta; town in Buena Yista County, Iowa, situated upon the highest point between 
the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. A Latin word, meaning "high." Many 
other places bear this name in reference to their elevation. 

[Altamaha; river and post-office in Tattnall County, Georgia; 

] Altamahaw; post-office in Alamance County, North Carolina. An Indian word, 

*■ meaning "place of the village." 

Altamont; town in Effingham County, Illinois, situated on the highest point l)etween 
St. Louis and Terre Haute. 

Altamont; post-office in Garrett County, ^Maryland, on the extreme summit of tlie 
AUeghenies. A Spanish word meaning " high mountains." Many cither places 
bear the same name. 

Alta Vista; village in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, so named by Rock Island Rail- 
road officials because that road crosses the watershed between the Kansas and 
Neosho rivers at this point. 

Alton; village in Humboldt County, California, named from the city in Illinois. 
Many other places are named from the same. 

Alton; city in Madison County, Illinois, named by Rufus Easton, the founder, for 
his son. 

Alton; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named from a place in England. 

Altoona; city in Wilson County, Kansas, named from the city in Pennsylvania. 

Altoona; city in Blair County, Pennsylvania, so named because of its high situation 
in the Allegheny Mountains, and town in Polk County, Iowa, situated on the 
highest point between the Des Moines and .Mississippi rivers. A derivative of 
the Latin word altus, "high." 

Alturas; town in Modoc County, California, so named from its mountains. A Span- 
ish word, meaning "summits of mountains." 

Alum; creek in Yellowstone Park. Characteristic, as the water is a strong solution 
of alum. 

Alvarado; town in Alameda County, California, named for Juan B. Alvarado, 
]\Iexican governor of California. 

Alvord; lake in Oregon, named for Gen. Benjamin Franklin Alvord, who was sta- 
tioned there at one time. 

Amador; county, town, and valley in California, named for Jose M. Amador, for- 
merly manager of the property of the mission of San Jose. 

Amakalli, tributary of Flint River, Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning "tum- 
bling water." 

Amalthea; village in Franklin County, Ohio, named for the nurse of Jupiter. 

Amargosa; river in California. A Spanish word, meaning " bitter water." 

Ambajeejus; lake, and falls in the Penobscot River, Maine.' An Indian word, 
referring to the two large, round rocks in the lake, one on top of the other. 

Ambajemackomas; fall in the Penobscot River, Maine. An Indian word, meaning 

"little cross pond." 
Ambler; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for the Ambler 
family, of which Joseph Amlilcr, w ho !-ettled there in 172P), was a member. 



24 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull- 197- 

Amboy; towns in Lee County, Illinois, and Miami County, Indiana, and many 
other places. Indian word, meaning " hollow inside, like a bowl." 

Amelia; county and town in Virginia, named for the Princess Amelia, youngest 
daughter of George II of England. 

Amenia; town in Dutchess County, New York, named by an early scholar of the 
State, who also named the State of Vermont. A Latin word, meaning ' ' pleasant, 
delightful, lovely." 

America; the Western Hemisphere, named for Amerigo Vespucci, sometimes spelled ' 
Americus Vespucius, who touched the South American coast somewhere near 
Surinam in 1499. The name was first used in 1509, and first appeared on a map 
made in Frankfort, Germany, in 1520. 

American; river in California, so called by the Spanish, Rio de los Americanos, 
because most of the Americans entering California at the time the Spaniards 
ruled there, came down that river. 

Ames; city in Story County, Iowa, named for Oakes Ames. 

Ames; post-ofRce in Montgomery County, New York, named for Fisher Ames. 

Amesbury; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named from an English town. 

Amethyst; mountain in Yellowstone Park, so named by United States Geological 
Survey, from the crystalline amethysts formerly abundant on its broad summit. 

Amethyst; creek in Yellowstone Park, so named by the United States Geological 
Survey because it flows from Amethyst Mountain. 

Amherst; town in Hancock County, Maine, named from the town in New Hamp- 
shire. 

Amherst; county in Virginia, and towns in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, and 
Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Lord Jeffrey Amherst. 

Amicalola; town in Dawson County, Georgia. An Indian word, meaning "tum- 
bling or rolling water." 

Amite; town in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, named from a neighboring stream. 

Amite; county and river in Mississippi. The French named the river in commem- 
oration of the friendly manner in which they were received by the Indians. 

Amity; town in Yamhill County, Oregon, so named as a result of the settlement of 
a neighborhood contention regarding the location of a schoolhouse in 1849. The 
schoolhouse was named first and the town took its name from the former. 

Ammonoosuc; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word, interpreted by some to 
mean "stony iish jjlace;" by others, "fish story river." 

Amo; towns in Hendricks County, Indiana, El Paso County, Colorado, and Cotton- 
wood County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "bee." 

Amphitheater; creek in Yellowstone Park, named by the United States Geological 
Survey, from the form of a valley near its mouth. 

Amsterdam; city in Montgomery County, New York, named by Emanuel E. 
De Graff, a Hollander and early settler, from the city in Holland. Several places 
in the United States are named from the city in New York. 

Anacostia; village in the District of Columbia, named from an Indian tribe called 
Nacostines. « 

Anam.osa; city in Jones County, Iowa. Some authorities say it was named for the 
daughter of Nasinus, an Indian chief. Haines gives the meaning "you walk 
fromme." Another theory derives it from anamoosh, "dog," or "species of fox." 

Anastasia; island off the coast of Florida, named by the early Spanish explorers, 
St. Anastasia, for one of the numerous saints in the Catholic Church. 

Ancona; town in Livingston County, Illinois, named from the city in Italy. 

Andalusia; town in Covington County, Alabama; village in Rock Island County, 
Illinois, and post-offices in Bucks C-ounty, Pennsylvania, and Randolph County, 
Georgia, named from the ancient name of a province in Spain. 

Anderson; city in Madison County, Indiana, named for the English name of a 
Delaware chief. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 25 

Anderson; county in Kansas, named for Joseph C. Anderson, member of the first 

Territorial legislature of Kansas. 
Anderson; county in Kentucky, named for Richard C Anderson, a former member 

of Congress. 
Anderson; county and city in South Carolina, named for Col. Robert Anderson, 

Revohitionary soldier. 
Anderson; county in Texas, named for Kenneth L. iinderson, vice-president of the 

Republic of Texas. 
Anderson; island in Puget Sound, Washington, named for the surgeon of the ship 

Ri'soli(tio)i, who died just before its discovery. 
Andersonburg-; village in Perry County, Pennsylvania, named for the original owner. 
Andersonville ; village in Sumter County, Georgia, named for the original proprietor. 
Andes; town in Delaw^are County, New York, named from the mountains of South 

America, because of its mountainous character. 
Andover; towns in Essex County, Massachusetts, and Windsor C'Ounty, A'^ermont, 

named from the town in England. 
Andrew; county in Missouri, named for Andrew S. Hughes, of Clay County, who 

first ]>ublicly proposed the " Platte purchase." 
Andrews; county in Texas, named for the only man killed in a two days' skirmish 

with the Mexicans near San Antonio, in 1835. 
Androscoggin; river in Maine and New Hampshire, and county in Maine. An 

Indian word first given to the river, from the tribe Amasaguiiticook, that for- 
merly lived on its banks. The authorities give the meaning "a fishing place for 

alewives," or "fish spearing." 
Angel; island in San Francisco Bay, California, named for a j^iioneer miner. 
Angelica; town in Allegany County, New York, named for Mrs. Angelica C^hurch, 

daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler. 
Angel Island; post-office in Marin County, California, named from the island on 

which it is situated. 
Angels; town in Calaveras County, California, named for Henry Angel, who dis- 
covered gold in that vicinity in 1848. 
Anglesea; borough in Cape May County, New Jersey, named from the town in Wales. 
Aniwa; village in Shawano County, Wisconsin. Coiruption of an Indian word, 

aniwi, meaning "those," a Chippewa prefix signifying superiority. 
Ann; cape, eastern extremity of Essex County, Massachusetts, named for Queen 

Anne, wife of James I of England. 
Anna; city in Union County, Illinois, named for Mrs. Anna Davis, wife of the owner 

of the land. 
Annapolis; city in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, named in honor of (^ueen 

Anne, wife of James 1 of England. 
Ann Arbor; city in Washtenaw County, Michigan. The first part of the name was 

given in honor of the wives of the two early settlers, Allen and Rumsey; the 

latter part refers to the grovelike ajipearance of the site. 
Annawan; town in Henry County, Illinois, named from the Indian; probably 

from a wan, "fog." 
Anne Arundel; county in Maryland, named in honor of Lady Anne Arundel, wife 

of Cecilius Calvert, second Lord Baltimore. 
Annisquam; lake, bay, and river in New Hampshire, and village in Essex County, 

Massachusetts. Indian word, meaning "rock summit," or "j)oint of rock." 
Annsville; town in Oneida County, New York, named for the wife of J. W. Bloom- 
field, first settler. 
Anoka; county and city in Minnesota, and villages in Cass County, Indiana, and 

Broome County, New York. An Indian word, meaning "on both sides." 
Anson; county in North Carolina, named for Admiral Anson, British navy, who 

purchased land in the State. 



26 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Anson; town in Jones Connty, Texas, named for Anson Jones, first president of the 
Texas Reiniblic. 

Ansonia; city in New Haven County, Connecticut, named for Anson G. Phelps, 
senior partner of the firm of Phelps, Dodge & Co., which established the place. 

Ansonville; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for Admiral Anson of 
the British navy, who built the town. 

Ansted; town in Fayette County, West Virginia, named for Professor Ansted, the Eng- 
lish geologist, who rei^orted on a tract of coal land there and had an interest in it. 

Antelope; county in Nebraska, named at the suggestion of Mr. Leander Gerrard, in 
commemoration of the killing and eating of an antelope during the pursuit of 
some Indians. There are many places in various parts of the country which 
bear this name, generally in reference to the former presence of that animal. 

Antero; mount in the Sawatch Range, Colorado, named for a prominent Ute Indian. 

Anthony; city in Harper County, Kansas, named for Governor George T. Anthony. 

Anthony's Nose; promontory on the Hudson River, New York, said by Irving to 
have been named so in reference to Anthony Van Corl ear's nose; Lossing says, 
"Anthony de Hooges, secretary of Rensselaerwick, had an enormous nose, and 
the promontory was named in honor of that feature. ' ' 

Antioch; town in Contra Costa County, California, village in Lake County, Illinois, 
as well as many other places, named from the city in Syria. 

Antrim; county in Michigan, and town in Guernsey County, Ohio, named by early 
Irish settlers from the town in Ireland. Many other places are named from the 
same. 

Antwerp; town in Jefferson County, New York, built by a company which was 
formed in Holland, who named the new place from the city in Belgium. Vil- 
lage in Paulding Covmty, Ohio, named from the same. 

Apache; county and pass in Arizona, town in Caddo County, Oklahoma, and village 
in Huerfano Covmty, Colorado, named for a tribe of Indians. Some authorities 
give the meaning, "the men, the people." Grinnell interprets it as meaning 
' ' enemies. ' ' 

Apalachee; river, and post-oftice in Morgan County, Georgia. Indian word, sup- 
posed to be derived from apalatchiokli, ' ' those on the other side, " or " the people 
on the other side." 

Apalachicola; river, and city in Franklin County, Florida. An Indian word, 
variously interpreted. Gatchet translates it, "people on the other side." Brin- 
ton supposed the name to be derived from Apalache, "those by the sea," and 
the Choctaw suffix, okla, or uklah, "nation, or town." De Vera gives the 
meaning, "town of low cottages on the river." 

Apex; village in AVake County, North Carolina, so named because it is the highest 
point between Raleigh and Deep rivers. 

Apollo; borough in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, named for the classical god. 

Apopka; town in Orange County, Florida. Name derived from the Indian word 
tsalopopkohatchee, meaning " catfish editing creek." 

Apostles; group of islands in Lake Superior, so called by the early Jesuits, under 
the impression that they numbered twelve. 

Appalachia; village in Wise County, Virginia. Name derived from Appalachian. 

Appalachian; general appellation of the mountain system in the southeastern part 
of North America, extending under various names from Maine southwestward 
to the northern part of Alabama. The name was given by the Spaniards under 
De Soto, who derived it irom the neighboring Indians. Heckewelder supposed 
this name to be derived from the Carib word, apaliche, " man." Brinton holds 
its radical to be the Muscogee apala, " the great sea, or the great ocean," and 
that apalache is a compound of this word with the Muscogee personal participle 
"chi," and means "those by the sea." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IlSr THE UNITED STATES. 27 

Appanoose; county in Iowa, and a villaore of Douglas County, Kansas. An Indian 

word, meaning " a chief when a child." The name of a chief of the Sacs and 

Fi)xes. 
Applebachville; village in Bucks County, Peinisylvania, named for Gen. Paul 

Applebach and his brother Henry. 
Appleg-ate; town in Jackson County, Oregon, named for an early settler. 
Appleton; town in Knox County, Maine, named for Nathaniel Appleton, one of 

the original proprietors. 
Appleton; village in Cape Girardeau County, ^lipsouri, situated on Apple Creek; 

lu'uce the name. 
Appleton; city in Outagamie County, Wisc(insin, named for Sanniel Appleton, one 

of the founders of Lawrence University, located at that place. 
Appling; county, and town in Colund:)ia County, Georgia, named for Col. Dan 

Appling. 
Appomattox; river, and county in Virginia. An Indian word, meaning "a tobacco 

plant country." 
Aptakisic; village in Lake County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "half 

day," or "sun at meridian." 
Apukwa; lake in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "rice." 
Apulia; village in Onondaga County, New York, named from the ancient province 

of southern Italy. 
Aquaschicola; creek, and village in Carbon County, Pennsylvania. An Indian 

word, meaning " where we fish with the bush net." 
Aquebog-ue; village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian word, meaning "at 

the end of a small pond." 
Aransas; county in Texas, named from the river which flows into Aransas Harbor, 

through the county. 
Arapahoe; county in Colorado, towns in Furnas County, Nebraska, and Custer 

County, Oklahoma, and post-office in Pandieo County, North Carohna. Named 

from an Indian tribe. The word means "pricked," or "tattooed." 
Arbuckle; town in Colusa County, California. Named for the founder of the town. 
Arbuckle; mountains in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. Named from Fort 

Arbuckle, which was named for Brevet Brig. Gen. Matthew Arbuckle, who 

fouglit in the Mexican war. 
Areata; town in Humboldt County, California. An Indian woj-d, meaning "sunny 

spot." 
Archdale; town in Randolph C-ounty, North Carolina, named for John Archdale, a 

lord proprietor and governor of Carolina. 

I Archer; county in Texas; 
Archer City; village in above county. Named for Dr. Branch T. Archer, promi- 
nent in the early days of the State. 

Archuleta; county in Colorado, named for J. M. Archuleta, head of one of the old 
Sj)anish families of New Mexico. 

Arden; town in Bimcombe County, North Carolina, name<l from the Forest of 
Arden, in Shakespeare's play "As You Like It." 

Arenac; county and village in INIichigan. An Indian word, auke, "earth, or land," 
compoimded with the Latin word, arena. The name was coined l)y School- 
craft and a party of early explorers. 

Arenzville; village in Cass County, Illinois, named for Francis A. Arenz, pioneer 
and founder. 

Arequa; gulch in Colorado, named for a man named Requa. 

Arg-enta; villages in Beaverhead County, Montana, and Salt Lake County, Utah, so 
named becauaeof near-by silver mines. A Latin word, meaning "silver." 



28 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [boll. 197. 

Argentine; city in Wyandotte County, Kansas, so named from "argenta," "silver," 
a smelter being the first industry there. 

Argonia; city in Sumner County, Kansas, named from the shij) Argo, in which 
Jason sailed to Colchis in quest of the "golden fleece." 

Argos; town in Marshall County, Indiana, named from the town in Greece. 

Argusville; village in Schoharie County, New York, named for its principal paper, 
the Albany Argus. 

Argyle; towns in Walton County, Florida, and Winnebago County, Illinois, settled 
by Scotch, and named by them for the city in Scotland. 

Argyle; town in Washington County, New York, named for the Duke of Argyle in 
17S6. 

Arietta; town in Hamilton County, New York, named for the wife of Rensselaer 
Van Rennselaer. 

Arikaree; river and village in Arapahoe County, Colorado. An Indian word, 
meaning "horn people." 

Arizona; Territory of the United States. The word means arid zone, or desert, but 
Mowry claims that the name is Aztec, from Arizuma, signifying "silver bearing." 

Arkadelphia; town in Clark County, Arkansas. The word is compounded of the 
ab])reviation of Arkansas and the Greek word, adeli^hus, "brother." 

Arkansas; river. State, county and town in said State, and city in Cowley County, 
Kansas. Marquette and other French explorers wrote the word Alkansas and 
Akamsca, from the Indian tribe. The usual etymology derives the name from 
the French arc, ".a bow," and Kansas, "smoky water," while another theory 
makes the prefix a Dakota word meaning "people;" hence, "people of the 
smoky water." Schoolcraft says there is a species of acacia found in Arkansas 
from which the Indians made bows. This is thought to have been the origin of 
the name of the Arc or Bow Indians. A writer in the Atlantic Monthly sug- 
gests the French arc-en-sang, "bloody bow," and supposes the likeness to 
Kansas to have been accidental. 

Armagh.; borough and town in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, named from the 
Irish town. 

Armonk; village in Westchester County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 
' ' fishing place. ' ' 

Armourdale; formerly a village, now a station in Kansas City, Kansas, named for 
the Armour ])rothers, bankers and pork packers. 

Armstrong; county in Pennsylvania, named for Gen. John Armstrong, of Pennsyl- 
vania, who commanded the exjjedition against the Indians at Kittanning in 1756. 

Armstrong; county in South Dakota, named for Moses K. Armstrong, Congressman 
and legislator, 1870. 

Armstrong; county in Texas, named for a pioneer of the State. 

Arnolds; creek in Ohio County, Indiana, named for Colonel Arnold, of the Revo- 
lutionary war. 

Aroostook; river and county in Maine. An Indian word, meaning "good river," 
or "clear of obstruction." 

Arrow; lake in Minnesota, so called from the name given by the early French 
explorers, Lac aux Fleches, " lake of the arrows." 

Arrowhead; hot springs in southern California, named from a huge discoloration 
on the slopes of a mountain north of San Bernardino, which takes the form of 
an Indian arrowhead. 

Arrow Rock; village in Saline Covmty, Missouri, built upon a spot where the 
Indians formerly resorted for arrowheads, because of the suitability of the rock 
found there. 

Arroyo; villages in Elk County, Pennsylvania, and Cameron County, Texas. A 
Spanish word, meaning "creek, brook, or rivulet." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 29 

Arroyo Grande; town in San Luis Obinpo County, California. A Spanish name, 

meaning "great brook, or creek." 
Arroyo Hondo; village in Taos County, New Mexico, which takes its name from 

' a near-by creek. A Spanish name, meaning "deep creek." 
Artesia; town in Lowndes County, Mississippi, so named from an artesian well 

near. 
Asbury Park; borough and a city, a summer resort in ]Monmouth County, New 

Jersey, named for Francis Asbury, the pioneer bishoji of Methodism in America. 

Several towns in the Southern States bear his name. 
Ascension; parish in Louisiana, named by the early French from the festival of 

the Ascension. 
Ascutney; mountain in Vermont. An Indian word, meaning "fire mountain," 

from its having been trurned over. It is also said to signify ' ' the three l)rothers/ ' 

and is supposed to refer to three singular valleys which run down the western 

slope of the mountain. 
Ascutneyville; village in Windsor County, Vermont, named from the mountain of 

the same name. 
Ashbee; harbor in Virginia, named for Solomon Ashbee. 
Ashburnham; town in Worcester County, ^Massachusetts, named for John Ashburn- 

hum, second Earl of Ashburnham. 
Ashbyburg; village in Hopkins County, Kentucky, named for Gen. Stephen 

Ashby. 
I Ashe; county in North Carolina; 

jAsheboro; town in above county. Named for Samuel Ashe, governor of the State 
I in 1795-1798. 

Ashersville; village in Clay County, Indiana, named for John Asher, its founder. 
Asheville; city in Buncombe County, North Carolina. 
Ashflat; village in Sharp CV)unty, Arkansas, named from a prairie upon which the 

town is situated, in early days surrounded by ash timber. 
Ashford; village in Henry County, Alabama, named for Thomas Ashford, or his 

son, Frederick A. Ashford. 
Ashkum; village in Iroquois County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "more 

and more." 
Ashland; city in Boyd County, Kentucky, so named, according to Henry Clay, from 

the ash timber which a1>ounded in the vicinity. His home there was called 

"Ashland." 
Ashland; counties in Ohio and Wisconsin; cities in Clark County, Kansas, and 

Jackson County, Oregon; towns in jMiddlesex County, Massachusetts, Benton 

County, Mississippi, and Greene County, New York; borough in Schuylkill 

County, Pennsylvania, and villages in Saunders County, Nebraska, and Ashland 

County, Ohio; named for the home of Henry Clay. There are many other 

places named from the same, generally by the founders, who thus expressed 

their admiration for Henry Clay. 
Ashley; county in Arkansas, named for Senator Chester Ashley. 
Ashley; city in Washington County, Illinois, named for Colonel Ashley, of the 

Illinois Central Railroad. 
Ashley; village in Gratiot County, ^lichigan, named for II. W. Ashley, general 

manager of the Ann Arbor Railroad, which passes through the village. 
Ashley; town in Pike County, Missouri, named for General Ashley, of Arkansas. 
Ashley; river in South Carolina which unites with the Cooper, both named for the 

Earl of Shaftesbury, Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, one of the original proprietors. 
Ashley; lake in Utah, named for its discoverer, W. H. Ashley, a St. Louis fur 

trader. 



30 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Asho'wngh; iwland off the coast of Connecticut, near New London. An Indian 
word, meaning "halfway place," or "the place between." 

Ashtabula; county, river, and city in Ohio, and village in Barnes County, North 
Dakota, An Indian word, meaning "fish river." 

Ashuelot; river and village in Cheshire County, New Hauii)shire. An Indian 
word, meaning "collection of many waters." 

Aspen; town in Pitkin County, Colorado, which takes its name from a near-by 
mountain. Quaking Asp. 

Aspetuc; river and hill of New Milford, Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning 
"a height." 

Asproom; mountain in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "high, lofty." 

Assaria; city in Saline County, Kansas, named from a church which was built by 
Swedish Lutherans previous to the incorporation of the place. The word means 
"In God is our help." 

Assawa; lake near the sources of the Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning "perch 
lake." 

Assawampset; pond in Middleboro, Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning 
"a white stone." 

Assawog-; river in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "place between," or 
" the halfway place." 

Assinniboine; fort and military reservation in Choteau County, Montana, named 
from a tribe of Indians. The name was given to them either on account of the 
stony nature of their country, or because of the singular manner they have of 
boiling their meat by dropping heated stones into the water in which the meat 
is placed until it is cooked. This custom is said to have given them the name, 
which means "stone roasters." In Lewis and Clarke's journal of their expedi- 
tion it is said that the name was borrowed from the Chippewas, who called them 
Assinniboan, "stone Sioux," hence the name "stone Indian," which is some- 
times applied to them. 

Assiscunk; creek in Burlington County, New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning 
"nuiddy," or "dirty." 

Assumption; parish in Louisiana, named in honor of the festival of the assumption 
of the Virgin Mary. 

Astoria; town in Fulton County, Illinois; villages in Wright County, Missouri, 
Queens County, New York, and Deuel County, South Dakota, named for the 
Astor family, of New York. 

Astoria; city in Clatsop County, Oregon, named for the founder, John Jacob Astor, 
who estal>lished a fur-trading station there in early days. 

Aswaguscawadic ; branch of the Mattawamkeag River, Maine. An Indian word, 
meaning "a place where one is compelled to drag his canoe through a stream." 

Atacosa; county and village in Bexar County, Texas. Spanish word, meaning 
"boggy" or "miry." 

Atalla; town in Etowah County, Alabama; named for Atala, the heroine of an 
Indian romance, by Chateaubriand. 

Atchafalaya; bayou of Eed River, Louisiana. An Indian word, meaning "long 
river." 

Atchison; county and city in Kansas, and county in Missouri, named for David R. 
Atchison, United States Senator from Missouri. 

Aten; village in Cedar County, Nebraska, named for John Aten, a State senator. 

Athens; county in Ohio, cities in Clarke County, Georgia, and Menard County, 
Illinois; villages in Claiborne County, Louisiana, Greene County, New York, 
and many other places, named for the celebrated city in Greece. 

Athol; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, said to have been named for 
James Murray, second Duke of Athol. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 31 

Atisowil; cn-ek in \Vai<hin<jtoii, eiiii)tyiiiji: into Willapa Harbor. An Indian word, 
meaning " bear river." 

Atkins; bay at tlie mouth uf Kennebec Kiver, Maine, named for an early land- 
owner. 

Atkins; peak in Yellowstone Park, named by the United States Geological Survey, 
for John D. C. Atkins, Indian commissioner. 

Atkinson; town in Piscatatpus County, INIaine, named for Judge Atkinson, a prom- 
inent resident. 

Atkinson; town in Rockingham County, New Hami^shire, named for Theodore 
Atkinson, a large landholder. 

Atkinsonville; village in Owen County, Indiana, name<l for Stephen Atkinson. 

Atlanta; city in Georgia, so named to designate its relationship to the Atlantic 
Ocean, by means of a railway running to the coast. 

Atlantic; ocean named from the Greek word, meaning "the sea beyond Mount 
Atlas." 

Atlantic; county and city in New Jersey, named from the ocean. 

Atlantic; creek in Yellowstone Park, named because it flows from Two-Ocean Pass 
down the slopt' toward the Atlantic Ocean. 

Atlantic Highlands; Ijorough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, so named from 
its situation, which overlooks the ocean. 

Atoka; town in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. An Indian word, meaning "in 
another place, " or "to another place." 

I Attala; county in Mississippi. 
Attalaville; village in above county. Named for Atala, the heroine of an Indian 
romance l)y Chateaubriand. 

Attapulgus; village in Decatur County, Georgia. An Indian word, meaning 
"l)oring holes into wood to make a tire." 

Attica; city in Foimtain C'ounty, Indiana; village in Wyoming County, New York, 
and many other places, named for the ancient division in Greece. 

Attitah; peak of the White Mountains in New Hampshire. An Indian word, mean- 
ing ' ' blueberries. ' ' 

Attleboro; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named from a town in England. 

Atwater; village in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, probably named for Isaac 
Atwater, early settler of St. Paul. 

Atwater; town in Portage County, Ohio, named for Amzi Atwater, an early sur- 
veyor in the Western Reserve. 

Atwood; city in Rawdins County, Kansas, named for Attwood Matheny, son of the 
founder, J. M. Matheny. 

Aubrey; valley in Arizona, named for an army officer. 

Auburn; this name occurs many times in the United States, given in reference to 
the village in Goldsmith's poem of The Deserted Village. 

Audrain; county in Missouri, named for its first settler, Samuel Audrain. 

Audubon; mount in Colorado, county in Iowa, and village in Becker County, Min- 
nesota, named for the celebrated ornithologist, John James Audubon. Many 
other j)laces bear his name. 

Aughwick; tributary of the Juniata River, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "overgrown with brush." 

Auglaize; river and county in Ohio, and river in Missouri. A French word, mean- 
ing "at the clay or loam," used descriptively. 

Augusta; city in Richmond County, Georgia, named for one of the royal princesses. 

Augusta; city in Butler County, Kansas, named for the wife of C. N. James, a 
trader. 

Augusta; county in Virginia, and city in Kennebec County, Maine, named for 
Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, wife of Frederick, Prince of Wales. 



32 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Auraria; town in Lumpkin County, Georgia, surrounded by a hilly country con- 
taining valuable gold mines. A Latin word, meaning "gold town." 

Aurelius; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the Roman emperor. 

Aurora; city in Dearborn County, Indiana, named for the association which laid it 
out. 

Aurora; county in South Dakota, and many other places named from the Latin 
word, meaning "morning, dawn, east." 

Ausable; river and town in Clinton County, New York. A French word, meaning 
"sandy," or "at the sand." 

Austin; city in Mower county, Minnesota, named for Horace Austin, governor in 
1870-1874. 

Austin; town in Tunica County, Mississippi, named for Colonel Austin, on whose 
lilantation the town was built. 

Austin; county and city in Travis County, Texas, and town in Lonoke County, 
Arkansas, named for Stephen Fuller Austin, the first man to establish a perma- 
nent American colony in Texas. 

Austinburg; town in Ashtabula County, Ohio, named for Judge Austin, early settler. 

Autauga; county in Alabama. 

Autaugaville; town in Autauga County, Alabama. From an Indian word said to 
mean "land of plenty." 

Autryville; town in Sampson County, North Carolina, named for a member of the 
State legislature. 

Auxvasse; village in Callaway County, Missouri, named from the French word 
vasseux, meaning "muddy." 

Ava; town in Oneida County, New York, named from the city in Burma. 

Avalon; town in Livingston County, Missouri, named from the town in France. 
Several other places bear this name. 

Avery; gores in Essex and Franklin counties, Vermont, named for the original 
grantee, Samuel Avery. 

Avoca; town in Steuben County, New York, named by Sophia White, a resident, 
in allusion to Thomas Moore's poem, "Sweet Vale of Avoca." 

Avon; village in Livingston County, New York, also many other places, named 
from the river in England, upon which Shakespeare's home was situated. 

Avoyelles; parish in Louisiana, named from an Indian tribe. The name was 
doubtless given to the tribe by the early French. 

Axtell; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for Dr. Jesse Axtell, an officer of 
the St. Joseph and Grand Island Railway. 

Ayden; town in Pitt County, North Carolina, named from the place mentioned in 
Poe's " Raven," " In the distant Aideen." 

Ayer; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for James C. Ayer, a manu- 
facturer of Lowell. 

Ayish; bayou in Texas, named from an Indian tribe. 

Ayr; village in Adams County, Nebraska, named for Dr. Ayr, of Iowa, a railroad 
director. 

Ayrshire; town in Palo Alto County7Iowa, named for the town in Scotland. 

Azalia; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for the flower. 

Aztec; village in San Juan County, New Mexico, named for one of the native tribes of 
Mexico. The word is said to mean "place of the heron." Other interpretations 
give "white," or "shallow land where vapors arise." Humboldt gives "land 
of flamingoes." The word azcatl means "ant," but Buschmann says that this 
word has no connection with the name of the tribe. 

Babruly; creek in Missouri. The word is a corruption of the French Bois Brule, 
"])urning wood." 

Babylon; village in Suffolk County, New York, named from the ancient city in 
Syria. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 33 

Baca; county in Coloiudu, ikuuccI lot- a inoiniiicnt ilexicaii family ni Tiinidad, 

Colorado. 
Bache; mount, in California, named fur A. D. Baclic, Siii^'rinti'iidcnt <if the Coast 

and Geodetic Survey. 
Baconhill; village in Saratoga County, Ni-w York, nanic<l for Kbene/.er Jiacon, 

ta\i'ru keeper in early daj's. 
Bad; river in Michigan, named by the Dakota Indians W'akpashicha, "had river." 
Badaxe; river in Wisconsin and village in Ihudn County, ISIichigan. Said to be a 

translation of the Indian name of the river, Trompeleau or Tremi)eleau. 
Baden; borough in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, and several other ])laces in the 

United States, named from the German l)aths. 
Badger; creeks in Iowa, Yellowstone Park, and many other i)laces, so name<l from 

the presence of that animal. 
Bad Lands; term applied to a region in South Dakota. It is said that the old 

French voyageurs described the region as "mauvaise terres pour traverser," 

meaning that it was a difficult country to travel through; from this the term has 

been carelessly shortened and translated into the present ndsnomer. 
Baggers; point on Indian River, Florida, name<l for the owner, John Baggers. 
Bailey; county in Texas, named for one of the men who fell at the Alamo, March 

6, I806. His first name is worn away on the stone monument, which is the 

only record of him. 
Baird; town in Sunflower County, ^Iississii)pi, named for the miui who owned the 

land upon which it was built. 
Baker; county in Georgia, nanuMl for Col. John Baker, an officer in the war of the 

Revolution. 
Baker; county and city in Oregon, nanu'd for Fdward Di(;kinson Baker, officer in 

the Union Army and Senator from Oregon. 
Baker; mount in "Washington, named by the exjJorer Vancouvei' for a lieutenant 

in his i)arty. 
Bakers; river in Grafton County, xNew llamiishire, named for Cai)tain Uaker, a 

soldier of the Indian wars. 
Bakersfield; town in Franklin County, W'rmont, named for Joseph llaker, who 

owned the land in 1789. 
Bakers Mills; village in AVarreu County, Xew York, named for the owner. 
Bakersville; town in Mitchell County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Bakersville; town in Coshocton County, Ohio, nanie<l for John Baker, who laid it 

out in 1848. 
Bald Eagle; valley, creek, and village in York County, I'ennsylvania, named for 

the noted Seneca chief. Bald Eagle. 
Baldwin; county in Alabama, and county and town in (Georgia, named for Abra- 

liani Baldwin, TTnited States Senator from Georgia. 
Baldwin; town in Jackson County, Iowa, named for Judge Baldwin. 
Baldwin; city in Douglas County, Kansas, named for John Baldwin, of lU-rea, Ohio. 
Baldwin; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for L(jannni Baldwin, one 

of the i)roprietors. 
Baldwin; village in Lake County, ^Michigan, named for Governor Baldwin, of Mich- 
igan. 
Baldwin; town in Chemung County, Xew York, named from Baldwin Creek, which 

was named for Isaac, Walter, and Thomas Baldwin, early settlers at the mouth 

of the creek. 
Baldw^in; village in St. Croix Comity, Wisconsin, name<l for D. A. P>aldwin, early 

settler. 
Baldwinsville; village in Onondaga County, New York, named for Dr. Jonas C. 

Baldwin, its founder. 

Bull. 197—02 3 



34 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 107. 

Baldwyn; town iu Lee County, Mississip])i, named f()r a landowner. 

Balize; pilot town at the northeast pass at the mouth of the ^lississippi in Pla(|ue- 
mines Parish, Louisiana, the name of which comes from the French word balize, 
" a stake," " a beacon," the most of the houses being built on piles. 

Ballard; county in Kentucky, named for Capt. Bland Ballard, an officer in the war 
of 1812. 

Ballena; town in SanL>iego County, California. A Spanish word, meaning " wliale." 

fBallston; town in Saratoga County, New York; 

|Ballston Spa; village in Saratoga County, New York. Named for Rev. Elijilialet 

1 Ball, an early settler, the "spa" being added in reference to the medicinal 

I sj)rings, from the celebrated watering place in Belgium. 

Baltimore; county and city in ^Maryland, and town in Windsor County, Vermont, 
named for the proprietor of a large tract of land in Maryland, Cecilius Calvert, 
Lord Baltimore, who settled the province in 1635. 

Bamberg; county and town in South Carolina, named for a family i)rominent in 
recent history of the State. 

Bandera; county in Texas, named from a 2)ass in the State. Tlie word is Spanish, 
meaning " flag." 

Bangor; city iu Pen(>l)scot County, Elaine, named ))y the Rev. Seth Noble, its rep- 
resentative in legislature, from an old i)salm tune. 

Bangor; boi'ough in Northanijiton County, Pennsylvania, and village in La Crosse 
County, AVisconsin, named from the town in Wales because of the Welsh set- 
tlers in these places. 

Bangs; mount in Arizona, name<l for James E. Bangs, clerk ujjon the King Survey. 

[Banks; county in Georgia; 

[Banksville; village in Banks (.-ounty. Named for Dr. Richard Banks. 

Banner; village in Wells County, Indiana, named f(jr a newspaper, the Bluffton 
Banner. 

Banner; county in Nebraska, so named because it was considered the Itanner county 
(jf the State when named. 

Bannock; county and peak in Idaho, peak in Yellowstone Park, and town in Beaver- 
head County, Montana, named for a tribe of Indians. This tribe inhabited the 
country southwest of Yellowstone Park, finally settling on a reservation in south- 
ern Idaho." Some authorities give the derivation from bannai' hti, "southern 
people." Haines and others say the word signifies " root diggers," because the 
Indians sul)sisted upon roots. 

Bantam; river, and village in Litchfield County, Connecticut. Name derived from 
the Indian word peantum, "he prays, or is praying." 

Baptist Hill; village in Ontario County, New York, named from a Baptist church 
erected there at an early date. 

Baraboo; city in Sauk County, Wisconsin, named for Jean Baribault, a French 
settler. 

Baraga; county and village in INIichigan, named for Bishop Friedrich Baraga, a 
missionary among the Indians of the Lake Superior region. 

Baranof; island in Alaska, named >for the man who for a long time managed the 
affairs of the Russian-American Comi)any. 

Barataria; bay, and post-office in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. The name is derived 
from an old French word, meaning "deceit." 

Barber; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 

Barber; county in Kansas, named for Thomas W. Barber, Free State martyr. 

Barbour; county in Alabama, named for James Barbour, governor of Virginia, and 
Secretary of War under John Quincy Adams. 

[Barbour; county in West Virginia; 

Barboursville ; ttjwn in Cabell County, West Virginia, and several other towns in 
the Southern States. Named for Philii) P. Barbour, early governor of Virginia. 



(iANNETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 35 

Bardstown; city in Nelson Oouiity, Kentucky, named fur l);ivi<l IJainl, one of the 

( >ri,<,''inal projirietoiv. 
Bardwell; village in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, nanie(l lor the I'.ardwell 

fauiily, early and prominent resideuts. 
Bargersville; village in Johnsou County, Indiana, named for Jefferson Barger. 
Bar Harbor; village in Hancock County, Mount Desert Island, Maine, so named 

from a sandy bar, visible oidy at low tide. 
Baring; town in Washington County, Maine, said to be named for the I)aring 

family, celebrated bankers of London, England. 
Barker; town in Broome County, New York, named for .Tohn i'.arker, tlu' first 

settler. 
Barlow; town in Clackamas County, Ort'gou, uain('<l for .lolin h. I'.arlow, early 

settler. 
Barlow; [)eak in Yellowstone Park, named l)y the Unitetl States (Geological Survey 

for Cai)t. J. ^y. Barlow, Engineer Corjis, United States Army. 
Barnard; town in Windsor County, Vermont, named for Francis Barnard, a grantee. 
Barnegat; inlet, and village in Ocean County, New Jersey. A Dutch name, given 

by Henry Hudson, meaning "breaker's inlet." 
Barnes; city in Washington County, Kansas, named for A. S. I'.anies, publisher of 

the United States history. 
Barnes; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. A. H. I'.arnes, early Tta-ritorial 

judge. 
Barnesville; village in Belmont County, Ohio, named from a family of early settlers. 
Barnet; town in Caledonia County, Vermont, said to be named from tlie place in 

iMigland from which the ancestors of P]nos Stevens, an early settler, emigrated. 
Barnstable; c<iunty and town in Massachusetts, nameil from a sea[iort in England. 
Barnum; town in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for P. T. Barnum, who 

owned a large tract of land there. 
Barnum; town in Carlton County, Minnesota, named for a paymaster on the St. Paul 

an<l Duluth Kailroad. 
Barnwell; county and town in South Carolina, named for a distinguished family of 

the State. 
Baronette; peak in Yellowstone I'ark, named for "Yellowstone Jack," C. D. Bar- 

onette, a famous scout. 
[' Barraque; township in Jefferson County, Arkansas, named for a Frenchman, ^lon- 

sieur Barraque, who lived on the Arkansas River. 
Barre; town in Worcester County, INIassachusetts, named for Col. Isaac I>arre, the 

friend of America in the British Parliament. 
Barre; towns in Orleans County, New York, and Washington County, \"ermont, 

named for the town in Massachusetts. 
Barren; islan<l in the Hudson River. The name is derived from the Dutch word 

beeren, "bears," which was applied to the island by the early Dutch settlers. 
Barren; county in Kentucky, in the Carboniferous limestone region. The name is 

supposed to have been given in reference to this formation, though the soil is in 

reality fertile. 
Barrington; town in Bristol County, Rhode Island, prol)ably named for Sir John 

Barrington, dissenter, who died in 1734, though by some it is thought to have 

received its name from some of the early settlers who came from the parish of 

Barrington in Somersetshire, England. 
Barron; county and city in Wis^'onsin, named for Judge HenryD. P)arron, of that 

State. 
Barry; county in Michigan, nameil for William T. Barry, Postmaster-General under 

President Jackson. 
Barry; county in Missouri, named for Commodore John Barry. 



36 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Bartholomew; county in Indiana, nanieil for Gen. Jo.seph Bartholomew, United 
States Senator from tliat State. 

Bartlett; town in Carroll County, New llanipshire, named for Governor Josiali 
Bartlett, 1792-1794. 

Barton; county in Kansas, named for Clara Barton, founder of the Red Cross Soci- 
ety in America. 

Barton; county in Missouri, named for David Jkirton, mendjer of Congress from 
^Missouri. 

Barton; town in Orleans County, Vermont, name«l for William Uarton, a Kevolu- 
tionar}' general and jirincipal proprietor. 

Bartow; county and town in Jefferson County, (ieorgia, named for (tcu. F. S. Bar- 
tow, killed at the battle of Manassas. 

Basalt; peak w'hich gives name to a town in l"]agle County, Colorado, named from 
the summit rock. 

Bashes Kil; creek in Orange County, New York, named for Bashe, an Indian 
woman. 

Baskahegan; river and lake in Maine. An Indian word meaning "a ])ranch stream 
whicli turns down." 

Basking-ridg-e; village in Somerset County, New Jersey, where it is said animals 
resorted in chilly weather to bask in the milder air. 

Basswood; island in Lake Superior, one of the Ai")ostles, a translation of wigobi- 
miniss, the Indian name for the island. 

Bastrop; county and town in Texas, and town in ^lorehouse County, Louisiana, 
named for Baron de Bastrop, a Mexican, who was conmiissioner of Texas to 
extend land titles in 1823. 

Batavia; town in Genesee County, New Yo)-k, and man\- other places, named from 
the Dutch name for Holland. 

Batchelders; grant in Oxford County, Maine, named for the original grantee, Josiah 
Batchelder. 

Bates; county in Missouri, named for Edward Bates, meml)er of Congress from 
that State. 

Batesburg; town in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for a family of that 
State. 

Batesville; city in Independence County, Arkansas, named for James Woodson 
Bates. 

Batesville; village in Noble County, Ohio, named for Rev. Timothy Bates, Meth- 
odist jireacher. 

Bath; counties in Kentucky and Virginia, and village in Rensselaer County, New 
York, named so because of the medical si)rings present. 

Bath; city of Maine, named from the city in England, l)y seafaring men on account 
of their association with that city. 

Bath; town in Steuben County, New York, named f(jr Lady Henrietta, Countess of 
Bath, daughter of Sir AVilliam Pultney. 

Bath Alum Spring; toMU in \'irginia, so called fi'om the medicinal spi'ings situated 
there. 

Bath Springs; town in Decatur County, Tennessee, so named ))ecauseof the medic- 
inal si)rings within their limits. 

Baton Rouge; city in I"]ast Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. It is a French name, 
neaning "red staff or stick," given because of a tall cypress tree wliich stood 
upon the spot where it was first settled. Some authorities say that the name is 
derived from the name of an Indian chief, whose name translated into French 
was Baton Rouge. Still another theory ascribes the name to the fact that a 
massacre by the Indians took place u^son the spot upoii the arrival of tlie first 
settlers. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 37 

Battenkill; creek, tril)utary to tlie llndsuii River, called originally Ikirtholoniew's 
Kill, for an early settler, Bartholomew \'an Hogeljooni, who was nsnally called 
Bart or Bat. 

Battleboro; town in Nash County, North Carolina, named lor James S. and Joseph 
Battle, railroad contractors. 

Battle Creek; city and creek in Calhoun County, Michigan, so called ln-canse a 
battle was fought upon the hanks of the creek. 

Battle Creek; village in Madison County, Nehraska, situated on Battle Creek. 

Battle Ground; creek in Illinois, so called from a battle fouglit on its l)anks between 
the Cahokia and Kaskaskia Indians in 1782. 

Battle Ground; town in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, named in idumiemoration 
of the battle of Tippecanoe. 

Battlement; mesa in western Colorado, named liy Ilayden lu'cause of its sha])e. 

Bavaria; village in Saline County, Kansas, named for one of the divisions of 
(iermany. 

Baxter; county in Arkansas, named for Elisha Baxter, twice governor of the State. 

Baxter Springs; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, named for A. Baxter, the tirst 
settler. There are also springs in the vicinity. 

Bay; county in IVIichigan, named from its situation on Saginaw Bay. 

Bayard; town in (irant County, West Virginia, named for Senator Bayard. 

Bayboro; town in Pandico County, North Carolina, so named from its situation on 
Pandico Sound. 

Bay City; city in Bay County, 31ichigan, so named from its situation on Saginaw- 
Bay. 

Bayfield; county and village in Wisconsin, named for Rear-Adnural II. D. Bayfield, 
who surveyed the Great Lakes. 

Bayhead; borough in Ocean County, New Jersey. Name descriptive of its geo- 
graphical position at the head of Barnegat Bay. 

Baylor; county in Texas, named for Henry W. Baylor, who fell at Dawson's mas- 
sacre in 1S42. 

BayofNoquet; bay in Michigan, named from an Indian tribe. Their name was 
Noukek, the early French giving it the present orthography. 

Bayou; village in Livingston County, Kentucky. The word is used frequently in 
the Southern States, being a French term to denote "a stream derived from 
some other stream." 

Bayou Boeuf; creek in Louisiana. A French name meaning " Buffalo Creek." See 
"Bay(iU." 

BayouChetimach.es; creek in Louisiana, named for an Indian who dwelt in the 
vicinity. 

Bayou des Buttes; creek of Louisiana, named l)y the French "Bayou of the 
INlounds," from the mounds found along its course. 

Bayou Huffpower; creek in Louisiana, named for an old settler. 

Bayou Sale; creek emptying into Cote Blanche Bay. A French name meaning 
" Salt bayou or creek." 

Bay St. Louis; city in Hancock County, Mississippi, named for Loins XI of France, 
and situated on a bay, hence the prefix. 

Bay Spring; town in Tishonnngo County, Mississippi, named for the home of Rob- 
ert Lowery in the same county. 

Beacon; town in Mahaska County, Iowa, named for Lijrd Beaconstield. 

Beadle; county in South Dakota, named for W. H. H. Beadle, superintendent of 
public instruction in 1884. 

Bear; creek in Missouri, sometimes called Loose Creek, pro]»ably fi-om a careless 
corruption of the French, L'ourse, bear. 



38 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [nvu.. 197. 

Bear; ci'eek in Yellowstoiu^ I'aik, named from a hairlesH c-ul) found there l)y a party 
of explorers. Tliis name is applied to numerous places in tl;e I'nited States, 
from the presence of the animal at the time of naming. 

Beardstown; city in Cass County, Illinois, named for Thomas Beard, the founder. 

Bear Lake; county in Idaho, named from a lake. 

Bear Lake; village in Manistee County, ^Michigan, so named l)ecause some surveyors 
thought the outline looked like a sleeping Ijear. 

Beatrice; town in Humboldt County, California, named for a woman living there. 

Beattie; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for A. Beattie, mayor of St. 
Joseph, Missouri, in 1870. 

Beattyville ; town in Lee County, Kentucky, named for Sanuiel I>eatty, cme of the 
first settlers. 

Beaufort; county and town in Carteret County, North Carolina, named for the 
Duke of Beaufort, a lord proprietor. 

Beaufort; county and town in South Carolina, said l)y some authorities to be named 
for the Duke of Beaufort, but other authorities claim that the name was given 
by the French Protestants, who took refuge there from Lord Berkeley, giving 
the name of the town in Anjou, France. 

Beauregard; town in Copiah County, Mississippi, named for (icn. Pieire (nistave 
Toutant Beauregard, Confederate army. 

Beaver; counties in Oklahoma and Utah, county and liorougli in Pennsylvania, 
twenty post-offices, and numerous creeks, lakes, and other natural features in 
the United States. It was adopted l>y the Indians as a personal as well as tribal 
name, because of the widespread presence of the animal. 

Beaver; lake in Indiana, called l)y the Indians, Sagayiganuhnickyug, "the lake of 
beavers." 

Beaverdam; city in Dodge County, Wisconsin, creek in Yellowstone Park, and 
numerous post-offices, so called from an obstacle placed in streams ])y beavers. 

Beaverhead; county in Montana, named from a rock in the coimty shaped like a 
beaver's head. 

Bechler; creek in Yellowstone Park, named by the United Stat(\s Geological Sur- 
vey for (justavus R. P>echler, topographer, with th(> Hayden survey. 

Bechtelsville; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, named for the family of 
which Judge O. P. Bechtel is a prominent member. 

Becker; county and town in Minnesota, named lor (jeorge L. Becker, who was one 
of the leading men of the State at the time. 

Beckley; village in Raleigh County, West Virginia, named for (ien. Alfred Beckley, 
early settler. 

Beckwith; butte and town in Plumas County, California, and mountain in Colo- 
rado, named for Lieutenant Beckwith, of the Pacific Railroad Exploring Expedi- 
tion. 

Bedford; town in INIiddlesex County, jMassachusetts, named for Wriothesley Russell, 
Duke of Bedford. 

Bedford; town in Westcriester County, New York, named for Bedfordshire, England. 

Bedford; county and ])orough in Pennsylvania, said l)y some to be named for the 
county in England; by others it is thought that Uie name was given in honor of 
the Dukes of Bedford. 

Bedford; county in Tennessee, and village in county, named for Thomas Bedford. 

Bedford; county and town in Virginia, named for Edward, Duke of Bedford. 

Bedloe; island in New York Harbor, named for Isaac Bedlow, its first proprietor. 

Bee; county in Texas, named for Bernard E. Bee, minister to Mexico in l.SoO. 

Beebe; town in White County, Arkansas, said to have been named for Roswell Beebe, 
an early settler. 



OANNETT] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 89 

Beech; this word, with various siillixes, forms the uaiue of numerous f(!atures. There 

are six post-otiices named ]>eech in the country and thirty-six with various 

suffixes, tlie name bein^ appHed because of the occurrence of this tree in the 

vicinity. 

Beech Creek; creek and borougli of Clinton County, Pennsylvania. A translation 

of the Indian name Schauvveminsch-kanna. 
Beecher City; village in Effingham County, Illinois, named for (Charles A. P>eeeher, 

railway solicitor. 
Beechy; cape in Alaska, named for Capt. F. W. Beechy, the navigator. 
Beekman; village in Dutchess County, New York, named for Henry ]>(H'kman, who 

owned a grant there in 1701!. 
Beekmanton; town in Clinton County, New York, named for William Beekman, 

one of the original grantees. 
Bekuennesee ; rapids in the Menominee River, AVisconsin. An Indian word, mean- 
ing " smoky falls." 
Belair ; town in Harford County, Maryland, and post-offices in Richmond County, 
Georgia, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and Lancaster C-ounty, South Carolina. 
A French name meaning " fine air, good climate." 
Belchertown ; town in Hampshire County, INIassachusetts, named for Jonathan 

Belcher, one of the original grantees and one time governor of IVIassachnsetts. 
Belen; town in Quitman County, Mississipiii, named from the l)attle ground upon 

which Col. John A. Quitman fought during the Mexican war. 
Belew; town in Jefferson County, Missouri, named for Silas Px'lcw, who owned 

property in the vicinity. 
Belfast; city in Waldo County, Maine, named by James Miller, early settler, for his 

native city in Ireland. Numerous other places in the country bear this name. 
Belknap ; county in New Hampshire. The origin of this name is in doubt, but by 
some the county is thought to have been named for Jeremy Belknaii, who wrote 
a history of the State. 
Belknap; mount in Utah, named for the Secretary of AVar under Tresident Crant, 

William AVorth Belknap. 
Bell; county in Kentucky, named for Josh Bell. 

Bell; county in Texas, named for P. H. Bell, governor of the State in 1849-1857. 
Belle; a French word meaning "beautiful," of frequent occurrence in the country 
with various suffixes, there being seventy-eight post-offices which liave this 
name in combination with descriptive suffixes. 
Belleville; city in Republic County, Kansas, named for Arabelle, wife of A. B. 

Tutton, president of the town-site company. 
Belleville; village in Dane C'ounty, Wisconsin, named by the lirst settler, John 
Frederick, for his native village in Canada; a village in Jefferson County, New 
York, named for the same. 
Belling-ham; town in Norfolk County, ^lassachusetts, named for (iovcrnor Richard 

F»eliinghani. 
Belling-ham; bay in Washington, named by Vancouver, the explorer, probably for 

Sir Henry Bellingham, who was knighted in 1796. 
Bellmont; village in Franklin County, New York, named for William Bell, an early 

proi)rietor. 
Bellows Falls; village in AVindham County, A^ermont, named for (Vd. Benjamin 

Bellows, an early settler and founder of AA^alpole. 
Bell Spring; mountain in Humboldt County, California, so named l)y an early 

explorer, who found a cow bell in a sj)ring on the mountain. 
Bellwood; village in Butler County, Nebraska, named for D. J. I'.ell, its j.roprietor 
and patron. 



40 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. |bulu 197. 

Belmont; town in Mississipin County, Mi.ssouri, and town in Beikn:i[( County, New 
Hanii^shire, named for August Belmont, of New York. 

Belmont; county and village in Ohio, named for an early settler. Howe says it is 
named in reference to its hilly surface; French, " fine mountain." 

Belmont; village in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, named for three mounds within 
its limits which the early French travelers called " Belles Montes." 

Beloit; city in Rock County, Wisconsin. A coined name, selected liy a connnittee, 
to whom it was suggested l)y the name Detroit. 

Beloit; city in IMitchcll County, Kansas, named for the above. 

Belpre; town in Washington County, Ohio, named from the French, meaning 
"beautiful prairie," from its situation on a prairie. 

Belton; town in Anderson County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 

Belton; city in Bell County, Texas, named for Governor P. H. Bell. 

Beltrami; county and village in same county, Minnesota, named for Count C. C. 
Beltrami, an Italian, with Major Long's exploring expedition into the Northwest 
country. 

Belvidere; town in Boone County, Illinois, and villagt^ in Allegany County, New 
York, as well us many other places, named for the Italian word, meaning 
"beautiful sight." 

Belzoni; town in Washington County, Mississipi>i, named for an Italian, (iianibattuta 
Belzoni, a celebrated archaeologist. 

Bemis Heights; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for .lonathan Bemis, 
innkeeper there during the Revolution. 

Benedicta; town in Aroostook County, ]\Iaine, named for Bishoi> P>enedicta Fen- 
wick, who was an early projjrietor. 

Benicia; city in Solano County, California, named ))y General Vallejo for his wife. 

Ben Lomond; post-ofhces in Sevier County, Arkansas; Santa Cruz County, Cali- 
fornia; Issaquena County, Mississip])i, and Mason County, West Virginia; named 
for the beautiful lake in Scotland. 

Bennett; town in Cedar County, Iowa, named for diet Bennett, a railroad man. 

Bennett; point in Maryland, named for Richard Bennett. 

Bennett; town in Lancaster County, Nebraska, named for a resident. 

Bennett Creek; village in Nansemond County, A^irginia, named for Richard Bennett, 
governor in 1652-1656. 

Bennettsville ; town in Marlboro County, South Carolina, named for a family 
prominent in the State. 

Bennetts Wells; two shallow dug wells in Death Valley, Inyo County, California, 
named for the survivor of an emigrant party which entered the valley in 1850. 

Bennington; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, and county, township, and 
town in Vermont, named for Governor Benning Wentworth, of New Hampshire. 

Benson; town in Johnston County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 

Benson; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. B. W. Benson, member of the 
State legislature and l)anker, of Valley City, North Dakota. 

Benson; town in Rutland'County, Vermont, said by some to have ])een named for 
Judge Egbert Benson, one of the original i)roprLetors. The Vermont Historical 
Society says that it was named by James Meacham, a i)roprietf>r, for a Revolu- 
tionary officer. 

Bent; county in Colorado, named for Williaui lient, first United States governor of 
New Mexico. 

Benton; counties in Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, 
Oregon, Tennessee; village in Marshall County, Kentucky; town in Bossier 
Parish, Louisiana; village in Minnesota; town in Grafton County, New Hamp- 
shire; named for Senator Thomas H. Benton, of Missouri. Thirty-one other 
places in the country l)ear this name; ahnost all of tiicm wer<' named for the 
same man. 



GANNETT.] PLACK NAMES IN THK UNITED STATES. 41 

Benton; tow ii in VatcH Gouiity, New York, nauR^d fur Levi Benton, the tirwt settler. 

Bentonia; town in Yazoo County, Mississippi, nanaed for the Ciiristian name of 
]Mrs. Hal Green, a resident. 

Ben"wood; city in Marshall ('onnty, West A'irginia, nanu'd for iU'njamin l.atrohc, 
ertfrineer on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

Benzie; county in Michitran. Prol)ably named fi'oni the town of l>enzonia, which 
was founded and nanuMl before the county. There art' some, however, w iiotinnk 
the name a corruption from Betsie Kiver and I'oint, whicii were orii^'inally called 
Aux Bees 8cies, meaning "at the snout of the sawlish." 

Benzonia; village in Benzie Comity, Michigan, named from the llebi'ew, meaning 
"sons of light," by the Rev. J. B. Walker, member of a company formed to 
found a college where poor students could be educaU'd, wliich was built u])on the 
spot where the village now stands. 

Beowawe; i)ost-ofiice in Eureka County, Nevada, so named from the peculiar shape 
of the hills at this point, which gives the effect of an open gateway up the valley 
to the canyon be^yond. An Indian word meaning "gate." 

Berea; towns in Adair County, Iowa; Madison County, Kentucky, and Cuyahoga 
Ccjunty, (^hio, named from the ancient city in Macedonia. 

Berenda; town in Madera County, California. A Spanish word meaning "ante- 
lope," given in this case because the country in the vicinity of the town was cov- 
ered with antelope in early days. 

Beresford; lake in Florida, named for an early English proprietor. 

Berg-en; county in New Jersey, which received its name from Bergen Point, which 
in turn was named by colonists from Bergen, Norway. 

Berg-holtz; village in Niagara County, New York, named for the town in Prussia. 

Bering; several geograjjhical ])oints between Asia and America, named for the cele- 
brated Dutch navigator, Vitus Bering. 

Berkeley; county in South Carolina, named for .lohn, Lord Berkeley, one of the 
original proprietors. 

I Berkeley; county in West Virginia; 

j Berkeley Springs; town in Morgan County, West Mrginia. Named for William 

I Berkeley, governor of Virginia in 1642. 

Berkley; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, probably named for Dean JU>rk- 
ley, Bishop of Cloyne, though some authorities say for James and William 
Berkley, members of the Privy Council. 

Berkley; town in Norfolk County, Virginia, named for Norborne Berkeley, Lord 
Botetourt. 

Berks; county in Pennsylvania, nameil for the county of Berks in England. 

Berkshire; county in Massachusetts, named for Berkshire, England. Several towns 
in the country are named from the same. 

Berlin; thirty-seven post otiices in the United States bear the name of the city in 
Germany. 

Bermuda; villages in C'onecuh County, Alabama; Gwinnett County, Georgia; 
Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana; Marion County, South Carolina, and Knox 
County, Tennessee; named from the group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean, 
which were named for the Spanish discoverer, Juan Bermudez. 

I Bern; towns in Adams County, Indiana, and Albany County, New York; 
Bernville; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Named for tlu' town of Bern 
in Switzerland. 
Bernardstown; town in Franklin County, ^Massachusetts, named for the British 

governor. Sir Francis Bernard. 
Berrien; county and town in (Georgia and county and town in Michigan, named 

for John McPherson Berrien, Attorney-General of the United States in 1829. 
Berry; creek in Idaho, named by Captain Clarke, the explorer, because he subsisted 
entirely on berries at that place. 



42 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Berry; village in llarriaon County, Kentucky, named for a nian who had a station 

there called Berry's station. 
Berryville; town in Carroll County, Arkansas, named for James H. Berry, governor 

of the State. 
Berthoud; village in Larimer County, Colorado, named for ¥j. L. Berthoud, cliief 

engineer of the Union Pacific Railroad. 
Bertie; county in North Carolina, named for James and Henry Bertie, in whom 

the jiroprietary rights of the Earl of Clarendon rested. 
Berwick; town in York County, Maine, named from the city in England, Berwick- 
upon-Tweed. 
Bessemer; town in Jefferson County, Alabama; city in Gogebic County, Michigan; 

town in Gaston County, North Carolina, and several other places; named for 

Sir Henry Bessemer, who invented the process of reducing iron ore. 
Bethany; seventeen post-offices in the country, named from the village in Palestine. 
Bethel; thirty-two post-offices in the United States, named for the town in Palestine. 
Bethesda; several places in the country, named for the pool of Jerusalem. 
Bethlehem; thirteen post-offices bear the name of the town in Palestine. 
Betsie; river, point, and town in Michigan, named for the corruption of a French 

name given to the river in early days, Aux Bees Scies, meaning "at the snout of 

the sawfish." 
Beulah; twenty-two post-offices in the United States bear this Scriptural name. 
Beverly; the name of nineteen places in the United States, probably derived from 

the Yorkshire Beverley. 
Beverly; town in Randolph County, West Virginia, doubtless named for William 

}>everly, the original grantee of Beverly Manor. 
Bevier; village in Muhlenberg C'ounty, Kentucky, and city in INIacon County, Mis- 
souri, named for Col. Robert Bevier, of Kentucky. 
Bexar; county and village in Texas, and villages in Marion County, Alabama; Ful- 
ton County, Arkansas, and Ijauderdale C'ounty, Tennessee; named for the Duke 

of Bexar, a Spanish nobleman. 
Bibb; counties in Alabama and Georgia, named for Dr. William Wyatt Bibb, mem- 

l>er of Congress from Georgia. 
Bicknell; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for John Bicknell. 
Biddeford; city in York County, ]\Iaine, named from the place in England whence 

some of the^^^arly settlers emigrated. 
Bienville; parish and town in Louisiana, named for Governor Jean Baptiste Lemoine 

Bienville, son of the French explorer who accompanied La Salle on his expedition. 
Big Blackfoot; river in the Rocky Mountains, Montana, the name of which is 

ilerived from the Blackfeet Indian tribe. 
Big Blue; creek in Missouri, which was formerly called Bluewater Creek, the name 

being derived from its French name. Riviere de I'P'au Bleue. 
Bigbone; village in Boone County, Kentucky, so named from the numbers of bones 

of mastodons discovered in the vicinity. 
Big Dry; creek in Montana, so named by Lewis and Clarke, because it was dry 

when they reached it. 
Big Gravois; creek in Missouri, a French name, meaning "rubbish." 
Bighorn; river in INIontana, tributary to the Yellowstone River, so named from the 

Rocky Mountain sheep, frequently called "big horn." Its Indian (Dakota) 

name was Papatunkau, meaning "big head." 
Bighorn; county in Wyoming, named from the range of mountains, which took 

their name from the sheep which were found in them. The Indian (Absaroka) 

name of the mountains was Ahsahta, meaning "big head." 
Bigler; lake in California, named for John Bigler, governor of the State. 
Big Muddy; creek in Missouri, the name derived from that given it by the early 

French, Grande Riviere Vaseuse, "great muddy river." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IlSr THE UNITED STATES. 4o 

Big Rapids; cilv in Mecosta ('oimty, Michigan, so naiiicd l'n>in rai)iils in tlH> Miis- 
kfi^oii Rivei'. 

Big" Sioux; river in MiiiiU'f^uta ami South Dakota, named Irom the lii(Uan tril)e. 

Big Spring; town in Meade County, Kentucky, .so named from a sprint;; which rises 
near the middle of the town. There are fifteen other places in tlie coimtiy tiiat 
hear this name l)ecause of the ]>resence of sprintrs. 

Bigstone; county in Minnesota, wliich takes its name fi-ou: a river, wliicli was 
doubtless named descriptively. 

Bigtooth; creek in Center County, Pennsylvania, named from the Indian name of 
the creek, ^Vlan^ipisink, " the place where hi^ teeth are found." 

Big Tree; village in Erie County, New York, so called from tiie Indian \illage 
which formerly occui)ied the site, Deonundaga, "a big tree." 

Big Trees; village in Calaveras County, California, so named from a grove of about 
ninety enormous trees of the genus Se(jnovi. 

Bigwood; river in Idaho, the name of which is derived from the name given l)y the 
early French traders, Boise or Boisee, "woody;" so called because of its wootletl 
banks. 

Bijou; hills in South Dakota, named for an early French hunter. 

Bijou Hills; village in Brule County, South Dakota, named from the hills. 

Billerica; town in ^liddlesex County, Massachusetts, named from a town in Essex, 
England. 

Billings; c<iunty in North Dakota, and city in Yellowstone County, Montana, named 
foi- Frederick Billings, at one time president of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

Billingsport; town in (Tloucester County, New Jersey, named for an Fniglish mer- 
chant, Fxlward Bylling. 

Billington Sea; pond in Plymouth, ^Ias.sachusetts, named for the discoverer. Billing- 
ton, one of the Mtiyfiower passengers, who rei)orted it is ai: inland sea. 

Bill Williams; mountain in Arizona, named for a guide and trapper. 

Biloxi; bay, and city in Harrison County, Mississippi. An Indian tribe of this 
name inhabited this part of the country. Mooney says tlie word B'lnksi signi- 
fies "trifling or worthless," while other authorities give the meaning, "turtle," 
the B referring to the catch of turtles. 

Biltmore; town in Buncombe County, North Carolina, named ])y (ieorge Vander- 
bilt from the last part of his name. 

Bingham; county in Idaho, named by Governor Bunn for his friend. Perry Bing- 
ham, Congressman from Peimsylvania. 

Bingham; town in Somerset County, Maine, named for William Bingham, a large 
landowner in early days. 

Binghamton; city in Broome County, New York, named loi' William I'ingham, of 
Philadelphia, a benefactor of the town. 

Birch; nineteen i^ost-offices, besides man)' natural featm-es, bear this name, either 
alone or with suflixes, generally indicating the presence of the tree. 

Bird; city in Cheyenne County, Kansas, named for its founder, Benjamin Bird. 

Birdsall; town in Allegany County, New York, named for Judge John I>i7-dsall. 

Birdsboro; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, named for William Bird, who 
in 1740 l)onglit the tract on which the town now stands. 

Birmingham; twelve places in the country, named from the mannfactiu-ing to\\ n in 
England. 

Bismarck; city in St. Francois County, Missouri, city in Burleigh County, North 
Dakota (capital of State), and many other places, named for Prince Otto von 
Bismarck of Germany. 

Bison; peaks in (Colorado, and Yellowstone Park, named for their shaj^e. 

Bitterwater; branch of Grand Kiver, Utah, so named from the character of the 
water. 



44 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [Bn.L. 197. 

Blackbird; town in Holt C'ounty, Nebraska, named for tlie sreat warrior and chief 
of the Omaha Indians, Washingasahba, "Blackbird." 

Black Creek; town in Wilson Count}', North (!arolina, named from a creek of dark 
water. 

Black Diamond; town in Contra Costa County, California, so named from its coal 
mines. 

-Blackfeet; Indian agency in Montana, named from an Indian tribe. According to 
tradition, the name originated in this way: A nameless chief was unsuccessful 
in the chas(Mmtil Ids fathei- blackened his feet with diarcoal and named him 
Satsiaqua, "black feet." 

Blackfoot; peak, and village in Bingham CVmnty, Idaho, named fr<jm the Black- 
feet Indian trilie. 

Blackford; county and village in Jasper County, Indiana, named for Isaac Black- 
ford, judgi' of the supreme court of Indiana. 

Blackhawk; town in Gilpin County, Colorado, named from one of the earliest min- 
■ ing companies. 

Blackhawk; county and village in Davis County, Iowa, named for a noted chief of 
the Sac and Fox Indians. 

Blackhawk; town in Carroll County, Mississijipi, named for a Choctaw Indian chief. 

Black Hills; mountain range in South Dakota, called by the early French traders 
CoteNoire, "black hills," from the character of the timber which grows on them, 
giving a dark appearance. 

Blackiston; village iii Kent County, Delaware, named for one of the original i)ro- 
prietors of large tracts of land in the county. 

Blacklick; creek in Pennsylvania, called by the Indians Naeskahoni, "a lick of 
blackish color." 

Black Mingo; river in South Carolina, named from an Indian tribe. 

Blackmore; mount in Montana, named for the English etlmologist, AVilliam Black- 
more, of London. 

Black Mountain; range in North Carolina, so named from the dark green foliage of 
the balsam tir which covers its tops and sides. 

Black Mountain; town in Buncombe County, North Carolina, named from the 
mountain towering above it. 

Black River; village in Jefferson County, New York, named from a river the 
waters of which are the color of sherry. 

Black River Falls; city in Jackson County, Wisconsin, named from the falls of 
Black River, near which it is situated. 

Blacksburg; town in Cherokee County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 
faudly in the neighborhood. 

Blackstone; river, and town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for 
William Blackstone, the first settler in Boston. 

Black Warrior; river in Alabama, translation of the Indian word Tuscaloosa. 

Blackwells; island in Fast Kiver, New York, named for the Blackwell family, who 
owned it for one hundred years. 

I Bladen; county in North Carolina; 
Bladenboro; town in above connty. Named for Martin Bladen, one of the lord 
commissioners of trades and plantations. 
Blain; borough in Perry County, Pennsylvania, named for James Blain, the war- 
rantee of the land upon which it was built. 
Blaine; counties in Idaho, Oklahoma, and Nebraska, mountain in Colorado, and 
town in Aroostook County, Maine, and many post-otlices in the country, named 
for James G. Blaine. 
Blair; county, Pennsylvania, namt'd for John Blair. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 45 

(Blair; rity in Washington County, Ne1)raska; 

|Blairstown; town in Benton County, Iowa; 

IBlairstown; town in Warren County, New Jensey. Nanieil fnr .lolin I. IMair, of 

I New Jer^'y. 

Blairsville; borough ami town in Indiana County, renuHvlvania, naineil for.Inhn 

lUair, a j)roniinent resident of Blairs (Jap. 
Blakely; town in Early Coiuity, <Teorgia, named f(.)r Captain Blakely, naval otheer. 
Blakiston; Island in Potomac River, named for Nehemiah IMakiston, collector of 

customs. 
Blalock; village in (Tilliam County, Oregon, named for Dr. Blalock, an early 

settler. 
Blanca; peak in the Sierra Blanca, Colorado, so named from the white rocks on its 

suinnnt. 
Blanchard; town in riscatacjuis County, ]\Iaine, named for one of the early proprie- 
tors, Charles Blanchard. 
Blanco; cape on the coast of Oregon, discovered })y Martin de Aguilar, the Spanish 

explorer, who named it. Spanish word, meaning "white." 
Blanco; county in Texas, named from the Rio Blanco, " white river." 
Bland; county in Virginia, said to have been named for John Bland, a J.ondon 

merchant. 
Blandford; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named for the Duke of INIarl- 

l)orough, whose second title was Marquis of Blandford. 
Blandville; town in Ballard County, Kentucky, named for Capt. Bland Ballard. 
Bledsoe; county in Tennessee, named for Jesse Bledsoe, United States Senator. 
Bleecker; village in Fulton County, New York, named for Rutger Bleeckei', an 

eai'ly patentee. 
Blennerliassett; island in the Ohio River, named for Herman Blennerhassett, who 

was accused of complicity with Aaron Burr. 
Blissfield; village in Lenawee County, Michigan, named for Henry Bliss, an early 

settler, upon whose homestead the village is Iniilt. 
Block; island off the coast of Rhode Island, named for Adrien Block, tiie Dutch 

discoverer. 
Blocksburg-; town in Hundioldt County, California, named for Ben Blockburger, 

the founder. 
Bloods; village in Steuben County, New York, named for Calvin Blood. 
Bloomer; village in Chii)pewa County, Wisconsin, named probal)ly for a Galena 

merchant. 
Bloomfield; city in Stoddard County, Missouri, named from the field of liowers 

which grew there when the place was founded. 
Bloomfield; town in Essex County, New Jersey, named for (Tovernor Joseph 

Bloomfield of that State. 
Blossburg; borough in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, named for Aaron Bloss, who 

settled there in 1S06. 
Blount; county in Alabama, named for Willie Bhjunt, g(n-ernor of Tennessee in 

1S0*)-1,S15. 
Blount; county in Tennessee, named for William Blount, governor in 17iiO-17i)6. 
Blountsville ; village in Henry County, Indiana, named for Andrew Blount, its 

founder. 
Blowing Rock; town in Watauga County, North Carolina, named from a cliff 

when' the wind blows upward. 
Blue Earth; county, city, and river in Minnesota, so named because of the bluish 

color of the earth, due to the presence of copper. 
Bluefield; city in Mercer County, West Virginia, named from the bluegrass valley 

in which it is situated. 



46 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Blue Grass; villagt'S in Fulton C-ounty, Indiana; Scott County, Iowa; Knox County, 

Tennesssee; and Russell County, Virginia, named from a variety of grass which 

grows in Kentucky. 
Blue Hill; town in Hancock County, Maine, named from a mountain. 
Blue Hills; i-ange of hills in Massachusetts, which are said to have given name to 

the State, the Indian name liaving been Massashusetts, "great hills." 
Blue Mounds; village in Dane County, Wisconsin, named from mounds appearing 

blue in the distance. 
Blue Mountain; town in Tippah County, Mississipi)i, named from a large bluish 

hill near the site. 
Blue Ridg-e; the most eastern of the principal ridges of the Ai)palachian chain of 

mountains, so called from the hue which fre(]uently envelopes its distant summits. 
Blue Springs; town in Union County, Mississippi, named from sjjrings with water 

of bluish hue. 
Bluffton; city in Wells County, Indiana, so named on account of the high Ijluffs 

which once surrounded the town. 
Blunts; reef on the coast of California, named for C'aptain Blunt, of tlie Hudson 

Bay Company. 
Blyville; village in Knox County, Nebraska, named for George W. Bly, early 

settler. 
Boardman; mountain in Franklin County, Maine, named for Herbert Boardman, 

who settled at its base in 1795. 
Boardman; town in Columbus County, North Carolina, named for a pioneer Bap- 
tist i>reacher. 
Boardman; township and village in Mahoning County, Ohio, named for the origi- 
nal proprietor, Frederick Boardman. 
Boca; ixist-office in Nevada County, California, at the mouth of the Truckee River. 

A Spanish word, meaning "mouth." 
Bodie; island in North Carolina, named for Hon. N. W. Boddie, of Nashville, North 

Carolina. 
Bodock; creek in .\rkansas, corrupted from the French, l)ois d'arc, a sjjecies of wood. 
Boerne; village in Kendall County, Texas, named f(jr the (ierman writer, Louis 

Boerne. 
Bogota; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named for the South American 

Bogue Chitto; town and creek in Lincoln County, ]\Iississii)pi. An Indian name, 

meaning "big creek." 
Bohemia; villages in Escambia County, Florida; Suffolk County, New York; and 

Douglas County, Oregon, named from the province in Austria-Hungary. 
Bois Brule; township in Perry County, Missouri. A French name, meaning "Imrnt 

wood." 
Bois d'Arc; village in Greene County, Missouri, named from a tree from which the 

Indians procured wood for their bows. A French name, meaning "bow wood." 
Bois des Sioux; tributary' of the Red River, North Dakota. A French name, mean- 
ing "the wood of the Sioux." 
Boise; county and city in Idaho, situated on Boise River. A French word, meaning 

"woody," given by the early French traders because of the trees upon the l)anks 

of the river. 
Bolinas; l)ay, and town in Marin County, California. A Spanish word, meaning 

" whale." 
Bolivar; county and village in Mississippi; city in Polk County, Missouri; town in 

iVllegany County, New York; town in Hardeman County, Tennessee; and live 

other places, named for G(m. Simon Bolivar. 
Bollinger; county in Missouri, named for Mag. George F. Bollinger, an early settler. 



GANNKTT.] PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 47 

Bolton; town iii Worcester County, Ahi.syachusettH, iiuuumI lor ("liarles I'owiet, third 
Duke of Bolton. 

Bolton; town in Hinds County, Mississippi, named for a man interested in building 
a railroad from Vicksburg to Jackson. 

Bombay; town in Franklin County, New York, named by Mr. Ilogaii, an eaily 
settler, whose wife had lived in Bombay, India. 

Bonair; towns in Howard County, Iowa, White County, Tennessee, and village in 
Chesterlield County, Virginia. A French word, meaning "good air." 

Bonanza; village in Klamath County, Oregon, and seven other places in the country. 
.V Spanish word meaning "prosperity." 

Bonaparte; town in Van Buren County, Iowa, and village in l^ewis County, New 
York, named for Napoleon Bonaparte. 

Bonaqua; town in Hickman County, Tennessee, so called lu-causeit is situated near 
nuneral springs. Latin name, meaning "good water." 

Bond; county in Illinois, named for Shadrack Bond, tirst governor of tiie State, 
1 SI 8-1822. 

Bondurant; town in Polk County, Iowa, named for A. C. Bonduraut. 

Bonham; town in Fannin County, Texas, named for Col. J. B. Bonham, who died 
in the Alamo in 1838. 

Bonhomme; coimty in South Dakota, named for Jacques Bon Honune, the French- 
man's "LTncle Sam." Tliis name was given by the early Frencii traders to an 
island in the Missouri River, in the above State, and afterwards the name was 
transferred to the county. 

Bonita; point in California, and a village in Ottertail County, Minnesota. A Span- 
ish word, meaning "pretty, graceful." 

Bonner Springs; city in Wyandotte County, Kansas, named foi- Robert I'xmner, 
horseman, and editor of the New York Ledger. 

Bonneterre; town in St. Francois county, Missouri. A Freni'h word, meaning 
"good earth," having been given l»y early French settlers to a mine which con- 
tained lead. 

Bonneville; mounts in Nevada and Wyoming, and a village in Multnomah County, 
( )regon, named for Capt. B. L. E. Bonneville, early explorer in the Northwest. 

Bonpas; creek and town in Rii-hland County, Illinois, named from the prairie which 
is now called Bom]>are, Ijut which was named by the early French, Bon Pas, 
meaning "good walk." 

Bonpland; mount in Nevada an<l lake in California, named for Aime Bonpland, 
tile French botanist. 

Bon Secours; triangular i)rojection on the east side of IMobile Bay, an<l ])ost-office 
in Baldwin County, Alabama. A French name, meaning "good succor." 

Book; plateau in Colorado; so named from its shape. 
Boon; town in Wexford County, Michigan; 

Boone; counties in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebi'aska, and 
West Virginia, and town in Wautauga County, North Carolina. Named for 
Daniel Boone. His name appears in combination with different suffixes, such 
as "boro," "lake," etc., in many parts of the United States. 

Boone; county, city, and creek in Iowa, named for Captain Boone, Ihiited States 
dragoons, who captured Des INIoines \'^alley above C<:»on Forks. 

Boone; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for Robert Withrow, who called himself 
" Daniel Boone tiie second." 

Boone Station; village in Fayette County. Kentucky, named foi' Daniel Boone. 

Booneville; town in Prentiss County, Mississippi, named for an early settler, Colonel 
Boone. 

Boonton; town in ]Morris County, New Jersey, named for Thomas Boone, its colo- 
nial governor in 1700. 



48 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. . [biix. 197. 

Boonville; ti>\\ n in Warrick (.'ouuty, Indiana. Sonit' authorities say tluit it received 
its name in lionor of Daniel Boone, while Conklin says it was named for Ratliffe 
Boone, second governor of tlie State, who laid it out. 

Boonville; villatre in Oneida County, New York, named for (ierrit J'xxjn, ai,'ent of 
the Holland Land Company, who made the first settlement. 

Boonville; town in Yadkin County, North Carolina, named for Daniel Boone. 

Boothbay; town in Lincoln County, Maine, named for the town in England. 

Borax; lake in California, the waters of which are a solution of borax. 

Bordeaux; town in Abbeville County, South Carolina, named from the city in 
France. 

Borden; county an<l village in Colorado County, Texas, named for (/iail l:iorden, 
member of the consultation, of 1838, collector of customs at Galveston in 1837, 
editor and financier. 

Bordentown; city in Burlington County, New Jersey, named for Joseph Borden, its 
foundec. 

Borgne; lake iu Louisiana. A French word, meaning "one-eyed," hence some- 
tliing "defective," given to the lake by the Franch because they did not con- 
sider it a lake, but rather a bay, as it liad the appearance of being separated from 
the main body of the sea by numerous islands. 

Borodino; village in Onondaga County, New York, named from thetown in Russia. 

Boscawen; town in Merrimac County, New Hamjishire, named for Admiral Edward 
l>oscawen. 

Boscobel; city in (irant County, Wisconsin, named for a place in Slirop.shire, Eng- 
land. 

Bosque; county and river in Texas. A French and rortuguese word, meaning "a 
wood, a forest," a]>plied to the country because of the forests of live oak, <iak, 
and cellar. 

Bosqueville; village in IMcLennan County, Texas; so named because near Bos<iue 
River. 

Bossier; jiarish and village in Louisiana, named for General Bossier, a celebrated 
duelist. 

Bostic; town iu Rutherford County, North Carolina, named for George T. Bostic. 

Boston; city in Massachusetts. By some authorities the name is said to have l)een 
given in honor of John Cotton, vicar of St. Bodolph's church in Boston, Lincoln- 
shire, England, and one of tlu' first clergymen in the American Boston. Others 
say it was named before the arrival of John C'otton, f(jr three prominent colo- 
nists from Boston, England. Sixteen })laces in the country have taken their 
names from the Massachusetts city. 

Botetourt; county in Virginia, named for Norborne Berkeley, Lord de Botetourt, 
royal governor of Virginia in 1768. 

Bottineau; county and town in North Dakota, named for Lierre liottineau, one of 
the early settlers of the Red River Valley. 

Bouckville; village in Madison County, New Yoik, named for (iovenior William C. 
Bouck. 

Bouff; creek in Chicot County, Ai-kansas. Corrujjtion of the French Bayou aux 
Boeufs, " Ijayou of cattle." 

Boulder; county and city in Colorado, named from tlie huge ))oulders found in the 
county. 

Boundbrook; borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, named from a creek empty- 
ing into the Raritan River, which was the northern boundary of the grant made 
to Governor Carteret. It is now part of the boundary l)etween Middlesex and 
Somerset counties. 

Bouquet; river in Essex County, New York; said to be named from the flowers 
upon its banks. Some authorities think it is deiived from the French baquet, 
" a trough." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATED. 49 

Bourbeiise; river in .Missouri. .V Frrncli iiaiiu' iqiplicil to the river liy the early 

Frencii triuk'rs, ineaiiiiiij: "iiinddy." 
Bourbon; coiiiities in KansiLsaiul Kentucky, and town in Marsiiail County, Indiana, 

besides several small places, named for the royal family of France. 
Bovina; town in Delaware County, New York; from the Latin, because of its fitness 

for grazing. 
Bow; creek in Nebraska, named by the early Frencli, Petit Arc, "little Iwnv." 
Bow; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, so named from a bend in the 

river within tlie town Hmits. 
Bo wdoinhani ; town in Sagaciahoc County, Maine. Some authorities say it was 

named for James Bowdoin, governor of Massachusetts in 1785-80, wliile N'arney 

claims that it was named for William Bowdoin, of Boston. 
Bowen; town in Jones County, Iowa, named for Hugh 15owen. 
Bowerbank; plantation in Piscataquis County, Maine, a London merchant, first 

owner. 
Bowie; town in Prince George County, Maryland, named for Governor Oden Bowie. 
Bowie; county and village in Montague County, Texas, uanu'd foi- James Bowie, 

Indian and jNIexican fighter, the inventor of the l)owie knife, who was killed at 

the Alamo. 
Bowling Green; the nami' of seven places in the country. The word is said to be 

derived from a term denotiiig ornamental gardening, a plat of turf for l)owling. 

This game was played at a point at the lower end of Broadway, still called Bowl- 
ing (ireen. The name is f(mnd in Yorkshire, England. 
Bowman; village in Fleming County, Kentucky, named for Col. Aliraui J)Owman, 

first settler. 
Bowman; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for the Fleming 

family, of Orangeburg. 
Boxbutte; county and town in Nebraska, named frcjui a butte in the county. 
Boxelder; county in Utah and creek in ]Montana, also six other places in the coun- 
try, named from tlie tree. 
Boxford; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, inol)al)Iy named from a town in 

Suffolk, England. 
Boyd; county and village in Harrison County, Kentucky, named for Linn Boyd, 

statesman of Tennessee, one time lieutenant-governor of Kentucky. 
Boyd; county in Nebraska, named for James E. Boytl, governor of the State in 

1891-93. 
Boyd Tavern; village in Albemarle County, Virginia, named for a family who kept 

a tavern there many years ago. 
Boyerton; borough in Berks Countv, Pennsylvania, nanu^d for tlie Boyer family, 

early settlers. 
Boyle; county in Kentucky, named for John Boyle, chief justice of the State. 
Boylston; town in Wo'rcester County, Massacliusetts, named for a family, residents 

of Boston. 
Boylstoji; town in Oswego County, New York, named for'Thomas Boylston. 
Bozenian; city in Gallatin County, Jlontana, named for J. INI. Bozenian, an early 

colored trapper. 
Bozrahville ; town in New London County, Comiecticut, named from the ancient 

town in Syria. 
Bracken; county in Kentucky, named for two creeks, Big and Little Bracken, which 

were named for William I^racken, a ])ioneer hunter. 
Bracks; l)utte in California, named for an old settler. 
Braddock; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for the liattletield 

wliere General Braddock was defeat e<l by the French and Indians. 
Braddys; pond in Portage County, Ohio, named for Capt. Samuel Brady. 

Bull. 197—02 ± 



50 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATER. [bull. 197. 

Bradford; (.'ounty in Florida, nanifd lor' Captain Bradford, who was killt-d in liattle 
on an island in western Florida. 

Bradford; village, now a part of Haverhill, Essex County, ^Massachusetts, named 
from a town in Yorkshire, England. 

Bradford; town in Merrimat-k County, New Hampshire, and village in Orange 
County, Vermont, named for the above. 

Bradford; town in Steuben County, New York, named ior General Bradford. 

Bradford; county and city in McKean County, Pennsylvania, named for William 
Bradford, Attorney-General of the United States. 

Bradfordsville ; town in Marion County, Kentucky, named for Peter Bradford, the 
first settler. 

Bradley; county in Arkansas, named for Capt. Hugh Bradley. 

Bradley; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, named for a family of the 
State. 

Bradley; county in Tennessee. The origin of the name is in doubt. Judge P. B. 
Mayfield, of Cleveland, Tennessee, says it was probably named for a school- 
teacher. 

Bradley Beach; borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named for tlie origi- 
nal owner, James A. Bradley. 

Bradys Bend; town in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, named for Capt. Samuel 
Brady, the noted Indian lighter. 

Brainerd; city in Butler County, Kansas, named for E. B. Brainerd, who owned 
the farm upon which part of the city was Ijuilt. 

Brainerd ; city in Crow Wing County, Minnesota, named for David Brainerd, cele- 
brated missionary to the Indians. 

Braintree ; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for a town in Essex, 
England. 

Braintree ; town in Orange County, Vermont, named for the above, where many 
of the early grantees resided. 

Bramwell ; town in Mercer County, AVest Virginia, named for an English engineer 
and coal operator there. 

Branch; county and towiashipin Mason County, Michigan, named for John Branch, 
Secretary of the Nav}' under Jackson. 

Branchport; town in Yates County, New York, which derives its name from its 
position on one of the branches of Crooked Lake. 

Branchville ; borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, named for the branch or river 
known as Long Branch. 

Branchville; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named from the forks of 
the two branches of the South Carolina Railroad. 

Brandenburg-; town in Meade County, Kentucky, named for a province in Prussia. 

Brandon; town in Rankin County, Mississippi, named for Gerard C. Brandon, 
governor in 1828-32. 

Brandt; lake and town in Erie County, New York, named for Col. Joseph Brandt, 
Moliawk chief. 

Brandywine; creek in Pennsylvania. According to a tradition, the name is derived 
from the occasion of a vessel laden with brantewein (brandy), which was lost in 
its waters. Other authorities derive it from Andrew Braindwine, who owned 
lands near its mouth in early days. A third theory is that the slough near 
Downington discharged its muddy waters into the creek, tinging it the color of 
brandy. A celebrated battle was fought there, which accounts for the name 
being given to eiglit places in the country. 

Branford; town in New Haven County, Connecticut, named from the town of 
Brentford, England. 

Brasher; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Philij) Brasher, part 
owner. 



GANSKTT.l PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 51 

Brassua; laki^ of Mouf^e Kiver, ^NlaiiK', said to ])v. nanird fiom an Indian I'iiiet". 

Tiic word is said to signify "frank." 
Brattleboro; town in Windliani County, Vermont, nanicd for Col. Williaui Brattle, 

a citizen of IJoston. 
Braxton; eounty in West \'irij:inia, nauieil for Carter Braxton, one of the si<j;ners of 

the Declaration of lndei)endence. 
Braysville; villaire in ( )wt'n County, Indiana, named for its foumler. 
Brazil; city in Clay County, Indiana, named for tin; country in South America. 
Brazoria; county and town in Texas. The old municii)ality of Brazoria, foundt'd 

under the ^Mexican rule, was named from the Brazos Kiver. 
Brazos; river and county in Texas. A Franciscan monk nanu'd the neii:hl)orin.i:: 

stream — now tlu' Colorado — Brazos del I>io, "arms of (iod." The Mexicans 

confused the two rivers and called the Colorado the Brazos, and vice versa, and 

so the names stand to-day. 
Breakabeen; village in Schoharie County, New Yovk, named from the German 

word for the ruslies which grew upon the hanks of the creek at tliis point. 
Breathitt; county in Kentucky, named for John Breatl)itt, former governor of the 

State. 
Breckenridg-e ; town in Sununit County, Colorado, and city in Caldwell County, 

Missouri, named lor John C. Breckenridge, Vice-President of the United Stat(>s. 
Breckenridg-e; county in Kentucky, named for John Breckenridge, a Kentucky 

statesman. 
Breedsville; village in Van Buren County, ^lichigan, named for Silas Breed, an 

early settler. 
Breese; village in Clinton County, Illinois, named for Lieutenant-(;overnor Sidney 

Breese. 
Bremer; county in Iowa, named f(jr Fredrika Bremer, the Swedish autlioress, who 

spent some time in this region in 1850. 
Brentwood; town in Rockingham County, Xew Hampsliire, incorporated as Brint- 

wood; proltably named from a place in F^ngland. 
Brevard; county in Florida, named for Dr. Brevard, autlior of the Mecklenl)urg 

Declaration of Independence. 
Brevard; town in Transylvania County, North Carolina, named for Ephraim J. 

Brevard, a Revolutionary patriot. 
Brewer; mount in California, named for Pi'of. AV. H. Brewer. 

Brewer; city in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Col. John Brewer, first settler. 
Brewer; strait of Staten Island, New York, discovered by Brewer in 1643. 
Brewster; a town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for Elder William 

P)rewster, one of the first settlers in Plymouth colony. 
Brewster; village in Putnam County, New York, probably named after James and 

Walter F. Brewster, who at one time owned the tract of land comprising the 

village. 
Brewster; county in Texas, named for 11. I*. Brewster, i)rivate secretary to Samuel 

Houston. 
Briceland; village in Humboldt County, California, named for a resident. 
Bridal Veil; falls in Yosemite Valley, California, and falls on a branch of the 

Columbia River, Oregon. A descriptive name. 
Bridal Veil; village in ^lultnomah County, Cregon, named for falls. 
Bridge; creek in Yellowstone Park, named from a natural l)ridgeof trachyte over it. 
Bridgeport; city in Connecticut, also of munerous other places, usually so called 

from al)ridge in or near the j)lace. The sutiixes "ton," "town," "water," 

and " ville" are also used frequently. 
Bridg^er; peak, village in Carbon County, and river in Montana, lake in Yellow- 
stone Park, and pass in the Rocky Mountains, named for Maj. James Bridger, 

a noted guide. 



52 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Bridgewater; town in riynioutli Coaiity, ^NlassachuHettH, named for tlie Duke of 
Bridgewater. Nasoii .says the name wan derived from a town in Somerset- 
shire, England. 

Bridgton; town in (hunherlaiid (lounty, Maine, named for an early settler, Moody 
Bridges. 

Briensburg-; village in iMarsliall County, Kentucky, named for James Brien, niem- 
1»er of the legislature. 

Brigham; city in Boxelder C<junty, Utah, named for I'.righam Young. 

Bright Angel; creek in Arizona, so named because of the clearness of its waters. 

Brighton; twenty-five j)laces in the country named either, directly or indirectly, 
from the English town. 

Briscoe; county in Texas, named for Andrew Briscoe, San Jacinto veteran. 

Bristol; town in Lincoln County , Maine, named from the Enghsh town, whence two 
of the original proprietors came. Counties of Massachusetts and Rhode Islantl, 
town in Rhode Island, village in Bucks County, Peiuisylvania, city in Virginia, 
and town in Ontario County, New York, all derive their name from the English 
town. 

Bristol; town in Kenoslia County, Wisconsin, named for Rev. Ira Bristol, an early 
settler. 

Broad; descrij)tive word used with various suthxes. A mountain ridge in Pennsyl- 
vania wliich has a broad tableland almost destitute of trees. 

Broadalbin; town in Fulton County, New York, named for a place in Scotland. 

Broadhead; town in Rockcastle County, Kentucky, named for a resident. 

Broadtop; mountain in Bedford and Huntingdon counties, Pennsylvania; descrip- 
tive name. 

Broadwater; county in INIontana, named for Col. Charles Broadwater. 

Brock; village in Nemaha County, Nebraska, named for a resident. 

Brockport; village in Monroe County, New York, named for Hiel Brockway, early 
settler. 

Brokenstraw; village in Chautauqua County, New York, and creek in AVarren 
County, Pennsylvania. A translation of the Indian name degasysnohdyahgah. 

Bronson; village in Bourbon County, Kansas, named for Ira D. Bronson, of Fort 

Scott. 
Bronx; river in Westchester County, New York; 
Bronxdale; village in Westchester County, New York; 

Bronxville; village in Westchester County, New York. Named for Jonas or Jacob 
Bronck, an early settler. 

Brooke; county in West Virginia, named for Robert Brooke, governor of the State 
of Virginia in 1794-1796. 

Brookfield; town in Orange County, Vermont, so called, according to tradition, 
because of the number of brooks there in early days. 

Brookings; (;ounty in South Dakota, named for Wilmot W. Brookings, legislator. 

Brookland; town in South Carolina, crossed by several small streams. 

Brookline; i)art of Boston, Massachusetts. The name is said to be a modification 
of Brooklyn. Some authorities say, however, that the name was given because 
of a small creek running through the place. 

Brooklyn; city in New York, corruption of the Dutcli name Breuckelen, from a 
village in the province of Utrecht, Holland. The name signifies broken up land, 
or mai'shy land. 

Brooklyn; villages in Jackson County, Michigan, and Perry County, Mississippi, 
named for the above. 

Brooks; county in (ieorgia, named for Preston L. Brooks. 

Brooks; town in Waldo County, Maine, named for Governor Brooks, of Massa- 
chusetts. 



OAKNF.TT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE TTNITED STATES. 53 

Brooksville; tnwii in Noxubee County, Mississipiii, naiiicil l<ir:i resident I'aniilv. 
Brookville; town in Franklin County, Indiana, named fur.lessc Urooic Tlumuis, tlie 

original j)r<i|)rietor. 
Brookville; town in IJrailsen County, Kentut'ky, named I'or David llrooki^. 
Brookville; many places in the country bear this name, mostly given descriptive of 
the situation upon some stream. The wurd is used witli various sutiixes, such 
as "vale," "view," and "wood.'' 
(Broome; county in New York; 

JBroome Center; village in Schoharie Cdunty, New Y(iri<. Named for Lieutenant- 
l (Tovernor John Broome. 
Brown; counties in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin, named for .Maj. (ien. 

Jacob Brown. 
Brown; county in Kansas, named for (). II. Browne, nieudx^r of the first Territorial 

legislature. 
Brown; county in JNIinnesota, named for J. R. Brown, mend)er of the council in 1855. 
Brown; county in Nebraska, named for two members of the committee Avho rei)orted 

the bill for tiie organization of the county. 
Brown; county in South Dakota, named for Alfred Brown, legislator in l.S7!t. 
Brown; county in Texas, named for Henry S. Brown, an old settk'r. 
Brownfield; town in Oxford County, IMaine, named for Ca])t. Henry Young ISnnvn, 

to whom the site was granted. 
Browning-ton; town in Orleans County, Yermont, named for Timothy and Daniel 

Brown, to wiiom i)art of it was originally granted. 
IBrownstown; town in Jackson County, Indiana; 

I Brownsville; town in ImIuiousou County, Kentucky. Named for Gen. Jacob Brown. 
Brownsville; borough in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, named for the Brown 

brothers, Thomas and Basil, early settlers. 
Brownsville; city in Cameron County, Texas, named for Major Brown, Avho was 

killed there at the beginning of the war with Mexico. 
Browntown; village in Green County, Wisconsin, named for A\'illiam <i. I'mwn, an 

early settler. 
Brownville; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named fur i)eacon Francis I'.rown, 

early resident. 
Brownville; city in Nemaha County, Nebraska, named for the first settler, Richard 

Brown, who came there from Holt County, INIissouri. 
Brownville; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for John P.rown, an early 

settler, father of (ieneral Brown. 
Brownwood; city in Texas, named for Henry S. Brown, an old settler. 
Bruceton Mills: town in Preston County, Wt'st Virginia, nanu'(l for an early itroni- 

inent settler. 
Bruceville; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for William Bruce, its former 

owner. 
Brule; county in Soutii Dakota, towns in Keith County, Nebraska, and Douglas 
County, Wisconsin, and several other places, named for a tribe of Indians. The 
word "brule" means "burnt," and the tril)e, the Brule Sioux, were said to have 
acquired the name from being caught in a prairie tire and being badly burned 
about the thighs. 
Brunson; town in Hampton County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 
Brunswick; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for the house of Bruns- 
wick, to which the reigning King of Great Britain, William III, belonged. 
Brunswick; city in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Brunswick Terrace in 

England, the former home of the founder, James Keyte. 
Brunswick; counties in Noith Carolina and Virginia, named for the duchy in 
Germany. 



54 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bui.l. 197. 

Brush; fivek in I'riinyylvuiiia. From the Imlian iianu', Acliwcck, " ))ii8hy oi' over- 
grown with bru8li." 

Brushland; village in Delaware County, New York, named for Alexander Brush, 
first settler and proprietor. 

Brushton; village in Franklin County, New York, named for Henry N. Krush, 
extensive property owner. 

Brutus; town in Cayuga County, New York, named by the State land board of New 
York, which gave names of celebrated Romans to townships in the military tract 
in central New York. Town in Emmett County, Michigan, villages in Clay 
County, Kentucky, and Pittsylvania County, Virginia, also bear this name. 

Bryan; county in Georgia, named for Jonathan Bryan, one of the founders of the 
State. 

Bryan; village in Williams County, Ohio, named for John A. Bryan, a former audi- 
tor of the State. 

Bryn Mawr; village in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for a town in 
Wales. 

Bryson; town in Swain County, North Carolina, named for T. I). Bryson, member 
of the legislature, and owner of the town site. 

Buchanan; counties in Iowa, Missouri, and \"irginia, and several places in the 
country, named for President James Buchanan. 

Buchanan; town in Botetourt County, Viiginia, named for C'ol. John Jhichanan, 
pioneer and Indian fighter of Augusta County. 

Buck Creek; village in (ireene County, Indiana, so named because a buck ap]ieared 
each returning season on the banks of a near-by creek. 

Buckeye; fourteen places in the country bear this name. The word is applied to a 
species of horse chestnut which grows on river banks in western Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, and Michigan, the fruit resembling the eye of a l)uck. 

Buckfield; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for AV)ijah Bucks, one of tlie first 
settlers. 

Buckhannon; river and town in Upshur County, West Virginia. An Indian name, 
said to mean "brick river." 

/Bucking-ham; county in Virginia; 

iBucks; county in Pennsylvania. Named from Buckinghamshire, England. 

Bucks Bridge; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Isaac Buck, 
early settler. 

Buckskin; village in Park County, Colorado, named for Josei)h Iligginbottoni, 
"Buckskin Joe." 

Bucksport; town in Humboldt County, California, named for David Buck, w'holaid 
it out in 1851. 

Bucksport; town in Hancock County, INIaine, named for Col. Jonathan Bucks, of 
Haverhill, who settled it. 

Bucoda; villq-ge in Thurston County, W^ashington, named by taking the first part 
of the names of three men, Buckley, Collier, and Davis. 

Bucyrus; city in Crawford County, Ohio, named by Col. James Kilbourne. The 
daughters of Samuel Norton, who live there, say that Colonel Kilbourne's favor- 
ite character was Cyrus, to which "bu" was prefixed, referring to the beautiful 
country. An old citizen, F. Adams, says that it was named by Colonel Kil- 
bourne from Busiris in ancient Egypt. 

Buel; village in Montgomery County, New York, named for Jesse Buel, of Albany. 

Buena Vista; county in Iowa, city in Rockbridge County, Vii-ginia, and twenty 
other places in the country. The name of the field upon which General Taylor 
won his victory, and doubtless given in some cases for i)atriotic reasons, but the 
majority of places named descriptively, it being a S])anish word meaning " beau- 
tiful view." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMKS TN THE FNITED STATF:S. 55 

Buffalo; counties in Xobraska, Suutli Dakota, and Winconsin, city in Xcw York, 

numerous creeks, rivers, towns, and villages, uanicd liecausc <>f tlie Inrnier pres- 
ence ■•£ that animal. 
BuUards Bar; town in Ynl)a (^mnty, Calitnrnia, namcil \nv an old settler. 
I Bullitt; county in Kentucky; 

Bullittsville; town in Booiu' County. Kentucky. Named for Alexander Scott 
I I'.ullitt. 

|Bullocli; comity in (reor<ria; 

|Bullochville; villa.ire in INIeriwether County, (ieoriria, naineil for Archibald Rnl- 
l loch, one of the most eminent men of his time. 

Bullock; county and villaue in Crenshaw County, Alabama. Named lor E. C. Bul- 
lock, of that State. 
Bunceton; city in Cooper County, Missouri, named for Harvey I^>unce, of the county. 
Buncombe; county in North Carolina and several places in the Southern States, 

named for Col. Edward Buni-ombe, of the Continental Army. 
Bunker Hill; city in Macoupin County, Illinois, and eleven other places, named for 

the famous battle of the Revoluti(^n. 
Bunsen; peak in Yellowstone Park, named by the United States (Teoloijical Survey 

for the eminent chemist and physicist, Robert Wilhelin Bunsen. 
Burden; city in Cowley County, Kansas, named for Robert E. F>urden, leading 

member of the town company. 
Bureau; county and town in Illinois, named for a French trader, i'ierre de Beuro, 

who established a trading post upon a creek which first bore his name. 
Burgaw; village in Pender County, North C'arolina, named for a resident family. 
Burke; county in Georgia, town in Franklin County, New York, and town in 

Caledonia County, Yermont, named for Edmund Burke, the English statesman. 
Burke; county in North Carolina, named for Thomas Burke, governor of North 

Carolina in 1781-82. ■ 
Burleigh; county and creek in North Dakota, named for Walter A. Burleigh, early 

settler, and Delegate to Congress. 
Burleson; county and village in Johnson County, Texas, named for Edward 

Burleson, Indian fighter, and vice-j>resident under Houston in 1S41. 
Burling-ame; city in Osage County, Kansas, named for Anson Burlingame, minister 

to China. 
Burlington; town in Coffey County, Kansas, city in Des Moines County, Iowa, and 

village in Calhoun County, iSlicliigan, named from the city in Yermont. 
Burlington; county and city in New Jersey, named from Brilington, conunonly 

pronounced Burlington, p]ngland. 
Burlington; city in Chittenden County, Yermont, namecl for the Burling family, 

of New York. 
Burnet; county and town in Texas, named for David (I. Burnet, twice governor of 

the State. 
Burnett; town in Anteloi)e County, Nebraska, named for the (irst sni)erinten(lentof 

the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad. 
Burnett; county in ^Yi.sconsin, named for Thomas P. Burnett, an early legislator of 

the State. 
Burnside; river and island in Georgia, named for an early settler. 
Burnsville; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Price Burns, its 

founder. 
Burnsville; town in Yancey County, North Carolina, nanu»d for Otway Burns, ca])- 

tain of the privateer Snapdracion . 
Burr; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for early settlers. 
Burrillville; town in Provi<lenc(» County, Rhode Island, named for Hon. James 

Burj'ill, jr., attorney-geni'ral of the State. 



56 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Burr Oak; village in St. Joseph County, Michigan, an<l city in Jewel County, Kan- 
sas, on a creek of the same name, so named from the species of trees growing 

there. 
Burrs Mills; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for John Burr and 

sons, mill owners. 
Burrton; city in Har\ey County, Kansas, named for I. T. P>urr, vice-president of 

the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Burt; town in Kossuth County, Iowa, nameil for the jiresideut of the I^'nion Pacilic 

Kailroad. 
Burt; county in >('el)raska, named for Francis Burt, governor of the Territory in 1854. 
Bushkill; two creeks, and a village in Pike County, Peinisylvania. A Dutch word, 

meaning "bushy stream." 
Bushy; creek in western Pennsylvania. A translation of the Indian name Achemek. 
Buskirk Bridge; \illage in Washington County, New York, named for oMartin 

Van lUiskirk. 
Busti; town in Chautauqua County, New York, named for Paul Busti, of the Hol- 
land Land Comimny. 
Butler; county in Alabama, named for Capt. William Butlei-, of that State. 
Butler; county in Iowa, and city in Bates County, INIissouri, named for \Mlliani O. 

P>utler, of Kentucky, general in the Mexican war. 
Butler; county in Kansas, named for Andrew P. Butler, United States Senator from 

South Carolina in 1846-1857. 
Butler; counties in Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, named for Gen. Richard 

Butler, who fell at St. Clair's defeat. 
Butler; county in Nebraska, named for David Butler. 
Butte; county in California, named from Marysville Buttes. French, meaning "a 

small knoll or hill." 
Butte; city in Silverl)ow Coimty, Montana, named from a bare l)utte overlooking 

the place. 
Butte; county in South Dakota, so named from Imttes, i)rominent features in the 

c<iunty. 
Butte des Morts; town in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. A French name, mean- 
ing "hill of the dead," so called l)y the early explorers from the native graves 

found there. 
Butter Hill; an eminence on the Hudson River, so called fi'om its resemblance to a 

huge lump of batter. 
Butts; county in (Georgia, named in honor of Capt. Samuel Butts, an officer in the 

war of 1812. 
Buttzville; town in Ransom County, North Dakota, nameil for a resident. 
Buxton; town in York County,- Maine, named foi' the native place of Rev. Paul 

Coffin, the first minister. 
Buxton; village in Washington County, Oregon, nami'd for Henry Buxton, early 

settler. 
Buzzards Bay; \illage in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for a small 

hawk which was ver}' abundant on the coast. 
Byers; town in Arapahoe C-ounty and mount in Colorado, named for W. N. Byers, 

of Denver. 
Byhalia; town in Marshall County, Mississippi. Indian word, meaning "standing 

white oaks." 



«ANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 57 

Bynumville; town in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Dr. .loscitli I'.yiinin, an 

early 8ettler. 
Byron; town in Houston County, Ceorgia, and Genesee County, New York, named 

I'or Ivord Byron. Eighteen other plaees bear this name, all of which were prob- 
ably named for the English poet. 
Cabarrus; county in North Carolina, named for Stephen Cal)arrus, siieaker of the 

house of conunons in that State. 
Cabell; county in West Virginia, named fm- William Cabell, govi'rnor of N'irginia in 

180a-1808. 
Cable'; village in MerciT County, Illinois, named for Ransom li. ('able, railway 

manager. 
Cabot; town in Washington County, Vermont, nanu>d for Miss C'abot, a descendant 

of Sebastian Cabot. 
Cache; many streams, county, village, and valley in iiortheastern Utah. A French 

word, meaning "hiding place," probably applied because of certain things hav- 
ing l)een hidden there by early explorers and travelers. 
Cache la Poudre; creek in Colorado, named from the French, meaning "powder 

hiding place." 
Caddo; town in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory; jjarish and lake in Louisiana; 

village in Stephens County, Texas, and several small i)lact>s named from the 

Indian tri])e who called themselves Ascena, "timl)er Indians," probably because 

of their residence in a wooded country. The name is derived from ka-ede, 

"chief." 
Cadillac; city in Wexford County, ^Michigan, named for La Motte (or La Mothe) 

Cadillac, who established a fort on the Detroit River in 1701. 
Cadiz; town in Harrison County, Ohio, named from the city in Spain. Six other 

small jilaces in the country are so called. 
Cadott; village in Chippewa County, Wisconsin, named for an half-hreed Indian, 

r>aptiste Cadotte, who lived near the falls which first boi'e his name. 
Caernarvon; townships in Pennsylvania, named from the town in Wales. 
Cahokia; creek and town in Illin(jis, named from an extinct Indian tribe. The 

name was spelled Kahokia or Kohokia, meaning "he is extremely lean." 
Cahto; creek, and village in ^Mendocino County, California. Indian word, meaning 

"fish." 
Cahuilla; valley, and village in Riverside County, California, named from an Indian 

tribe. The word means "master." 
Caillou; lake and bayou in Louisiana. A French word, meaning "pebbU'or Hint." 
Ca Ira; town in Cund)erland County, N'irginia. A French expression used in a 

famous revolutionary song, meaning "it shall go on." 
Cairo; fourteen places in the country bear the name of the caiiital of Egyjit. 
Calais; city in Washington County, Maine, and town in Washington Comity, Ver- 
mont, named for the French city. 
Calamine; town in Sharp County, Arkansas, named from the zinc mines, calamina 

meaning the native siliceous oxide of zinc. 
Calapooya; mountains in Oregon, named from an Indian tribe. 
Calaveras; river and county in California, so called from the numbers of skulls 

found there, supposed to be the remains of a bloody battle among the Indians. 

The word is Spanish, meaning "skull." 
Calcasieu; jiarish and village in Louisiana, named from an Indi'i.; tribe Kal- 

kousiouk. 



58 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ibull. 197. 

Calcutta; villasjes in Columbiiuui County, Ohio, and I'k'asuntt< CVmnty, West Vir- 
ginia, named from the city in India. 

Caldwell; city in Sumner County, Kansas, nanuMl for Alexander Caldwell, of 
Leavenworth, United States Senator. 

Caldwell; comities in Kentucky and Missouri, named for (Jen. John Caldwell, 
formerly lieutenant-governor of Kentucky. 

Caldwell; parish in Louisiana, named for Matthew ('aid well, of North Carolina, a 
noted frontiersman. 

Caldwell; borough in Essex County, New Jersey, named for Rev. James Caldwell, 
a patriotic clergyman of the Revolution. 

Caldwell; town in Warren County, New York, named for (len. James Caldwell, 
patentee. 

Caldwell; county in North Carolina, named for Dr. Josc]>h Caldwell, lirst president 
of the State University. 

Caldw^ell; village in Noble County, Ohio, named foi' Joseph and Samuel Caldwell, 
to whom the land belonged. 

Caldwell; county and town in Burleson County, Texas, named for JNIatthew Cald- 
well, old settler and colonel of Texas regiment in 1841. 

Caledonia; county in Vermont, village in Livingston County, New York, and 16 
other places in the country, named from the ancient name of Scotland. 

Calfee; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for II. B. Calfee, a photographer of 

note. 

Calhoun; counties in Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, (Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Michi- 
gan, Mississippi, Texas, and West Virginia, also many small places, named for 
John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina, Vice-President in 1825-1833. 

Calhoun; town in McLean County, Kentucky, named for Judge John Calhoun. 

Calhoun; village in Washington County, Nebraska, so named because situated on 
the site of Fort Calhoun. 

Calhoun Falls ; town in Abbeville County, South Carolina, named from a promi- 
nent family. 

California; one of the States of the Union. This name was applied by Cortez to the 
bay and country, which he supposed to be an island. The name is that of an 
island in an old Spanish romance, where a great abundance of jirecious stones 
were found. Eight post-ottices liear this name. 

Callahan; county in Texas; named for James M. Callahan, survivor of the massacre 
of lSo(i. 

Callaway; county and village in Missouri, and several other jilaces; named for 
Cai)t. James Callaway, grandson of Daniel Boone. 

Callensburg; borough in Clarion County, Pennsylvania; named for Hugh Callen, 
its fonnd(>r. 

Callicoon; town in Sullivan County, New York. The word is said to signify 
" turkey " in both Dutch and Indian languages. The Dutch word for " turkey," 
however, is-spelleil kalkoen. 

Calloway; comity in Kentui-ky; name<l for Col. Richard Calloway. 

Caloosa; river, and village in Lee County, Florida; named for an Indian tribe. The 
word means " village cruel." 

Calumet; river in Illinois and Indiana, county and village in Wisconsin, and seven 
other places in the country. A Canadian corruption of the French, chalemel, 
which literally means "little reed," but which, in its corrupted form, refers to 
the "jiipe of peace," used by the Indians to ratify treaties. Haines derives the 
word from calamo, "honey wood." 

Calvary; town in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, and seven other places in the 
country, named from the hill near Jerusalem. 



GAxxETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 59 

Calvert ; county, and pos^t village in Cecil County, Maryland, named for Cecil Calvert, 

Loi'd l^altiniore. luglit other places are so named, doubtless, "directly or indi- 
rectly from the same. 
Camano ; island in I*uget Sound, W'ashingtnn, which fakes its name from a canal 

named for Don Jacinto Camano. 
Camas; villages in Fremont County, Idaho, ]\Iissoula County, Montana, and Clarke 

( '( lunty, AVashington ; 
Camas Valley ; village in Douglas County, Oregon. The Indian name of a small 
onion which grows in those States. 
Cambria; county in Pennsylvania, named for the ancient name of Wales. 
Cambria; village in Columbia County, Wiscon.sin, probably so named because of the 

AVt'lsh settlers. 
Cambridge; city in Middlesex County, ^Massachusetts, so named for the English 

university town, after the general court decided to estal)lish a college there. 

Twenty-two other places bear the name of the Flnglish town, two having the 

sullix "j)ort" and one "springs." 
Camden; ctiunty in (ieorgia, county and city in New Jersey, county and village in 

North Carolina, town in Knox County, Maine, and village in Oneida County, 

New York, named for Chief Justice Pratt, Elarl of Camden, a friend of the colo- 
nies during the Revolution. 
Camden; county in INIissouri, named from Camden County, North Carolina. 
Camels Hump; peak in the Green Mountains, Vermont, .so named from its resem- 
blance to the humj) of a camel. 
Cameron; county and town in Louisiana, county and village in Pennsylvania, and 

town in ^larshall County, West Virginia, named for Simon Cameron. 
Cameron; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Dugald Cameron, agent 

for the Pultney estate. 
Cameron; town in Monroe County, North Carolina, named for a jirominent family 

in the county. 
Cameron; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for J. Don Cameron, 

United States Senator from Pennsylvania. 
Cameron; county, and city in IVIilam County, Texas, named for Krvin or Krving 

Cameron, who fell in the expedition against ^leir. 
Camillus; village in Onondaga County, New York, built within tlie State Land 

Board limits, and named Ijy members of the board for the Roman magistrate. 
Camp; county in Texas, named for J. L. Camp, prominent lawyer. 
Campbell; county in Georgia, named for Col. Duncan G. Campbell, of the State 

legislature. 
Campbell; county in Kentucky, named for John Campbell of the State senate. 
Campbell; town in Steuben County, New York, named for the Campl)ell family, 

early settlers. 
Campbell; county and village in South Dakota, name<l for Gen. i'. T. Campbell, 

jdoneer. 
Campbell; county in Tennessee, named for Col. Arthur Campbell. 
Campbell; county in Virginia, named for Gen. William Cam])l)ell, an ofhcer of the 

A 1 1 lerican Revolution . 
Campbellsville; city in Taylor County, Kentucky, named for Adam Campbell, first 

settler. 
Camp Hill; borough in Cuml)erland County, Pennsylvania, so named because the 

seat of a soldiers' orphan school. 
Camp Knox; village in Green County, Kentucky, named from acamitof Col. James 

Knox and 22 men, in 1770. 
Campo Seco; town in Calaveras County, California, so named from the genera! 

cliaracter of its surroundings. A Si)anish name, meaning "dry plain." 



60 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Campton; town in (irafton County, New Hampshire, so called bet-uise the tirst sur- 
veyors of the site l^uilt a camp on the present town site. 

Canaan; tifteen i)laees in the country l)ear the name of the i)r()nuse(l land of the 
Israelites. 

Canada; villages in Marion County, Kansas; Pike County, Kentucky, and Muskegon 
County, Michigan, named from the Dominion of Canada. Authorities differ as 
to the derivation of this name. Father Hennepin says the Spaniards were the 
original discoverers of the country, but upon landing they were disappointed in 
the general appearance and expressed their feelings by saying, "II capa di 
nada, ' ' ' 'Cape nothing. ' ' Sir John Barlow says the Portuguese, who first ascended 
the St. Lawrence, believing it to be a passage to the Indian sea, expressed their 
disappointment when they discovered their mistake by saying "Canada," 
" Nothing here." This the natives are said to have remembered and repeated 
to the Europeans who arrived later, who thought it must be the name of the 
country. Dr. Shea says the Spanish derivation is fictitious. Some think it was 
named for the first man to plant a colony of French in the country. Monsieur 
Cana. Charlevoix says the word originated with the Iroquois Indians, Kanata, 
or Kanada, "a collection of huts, a village, a town," which the early explorers 
mistook for the name of the country. Other etymologies propose the two 
Indian words, Kan, "a mouth," and ada, "a country," hence "the mouth of 
the country," originally applied to the moutli of the St. Lawrence. There is a 
respectable authority that the name was first applied to the ri^■er. Lescarbot 
tells us that the Gasperians and Indians who dwelt on the borders of the bay of 
Chaleur called themselves Canadaquea; that the word meant " province or coun- 
try." Sweetser says that the word came from the Indian Caughnawaugh, "the 
village of the rapids." Brant, the Indian chieftain, who translated the gospel 
into his own language, used the word canada for "village." 

Canadawa; creek in Chautauqua County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 
"running through the hemlocks." 

Canadian; river in Indian Territory and Oklahoma, county in Oklahoma, town in 
Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, and village in Hemphill County, Texas. A 
Spanish word, diminutive of canyon, "a steep-sided gorge." 

Canajoharie; town in Montgomery County, New^ York. This name w'as originally 
given to a deep hole of foaming water at the foot of one of the falls in Canajo- 
harie Creek. Indian, meaning "the pot or kettle that washes itself," or " a ket- 
tle-shaped hole in a rock." Morgan says the meaning is " washing the basin." 

Canal; town in Venango County, Pennsylvania, so named because traversed by the 
Franklin canal. 

Canal de Hare; canal in Washington, named for the Spanish explorer, Lopez de 
Haro. 

Canal Lewisville; town in Coshocton County, Oliio, named for T. B. Lewis, wdio 
founded it. - 

Canandaigua; lake, town in Ontario County, New York, and village in Lenawee 
County, Michigan. An Indian word, the derivation of which is in dispute. 
Morgan gives canandargua, "a place selected for settlement, a chosen spot;" 
Haines, "a town set off." Others have thought the word to be derived from 
Cahnandahgwah, "sleeping beauty," while another theory is that it is cor- 
rupted from the Seneca Indian, Genundewahguah, "great hill people," so called 
from a large hill near the lake. 

Canaseraga; village in Allegany County, New York. From an Indian word, kana- 
sawaga, "several strings of beads with a string lying ac;ross." 



nvNNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. fil 

Canastota; villaj^u's in Madison County, New York, and .McCook Coiuity, South 
Dakota. An imliau wonl, Kniste, or Kanetota, "pine tree stauiliuii- alone." 
Tlie New York villau^e took ila name from a elu.ster of ))ineH tlial united tiicir 
l)ranches over tlie creek w liicii j>asHes througli the town. 

Canavaral; eai)e, and viiiatie in IJrevard County, Florida. A Si)anish wonl, mean- 
in^'' "a eane plantation." 

Canby; eity in Claekanias County, Oreijon, named for (Ten. Kdwaro Caidiy, who 
was killed by the JNIodoe Indian.s in northern California. 

Candelaria; iwst-ofiices in Ksnieralda County, Nevada, and Presidio County, Texas. 
A Spanish woi'd, meaninir "tallow and wax chandler's shop." 

Candia; town in R(iekinghaiii County, New Hampshire, named froin tho island in 
the INIediterranean where (iovernor Wentworth was onee a prisont-r. 

Caneadea; town in Allegany County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 
"where the heavens rest upon the earth." 

Caney; city in Montgomery County, Kansas, villages in ]\Iorgan County, Kentucky, 
Vernon Parish, T^ouisiana, and Matagorda County, Texas, bi'sides several other 
small places. This word is frequently used alone and with thesuttixes "branch," 
"sjmng," and "ville," in the Southern States, and refers to the cane which 
covers vast tracts of country in the alluvial bottoms. 

Canfield; village in IMahoning County, Ohio, named for one of the original propri- 
etors, Jonathan (^anfield. 

Canisteo; river, and town in Sti'uben County, New York. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "lioard on, or in, the water." 

Cankapoja; lake at the head of Vermilion Kiver, South Dakota. An Indian word, 
meaning "light wood." 

Cannelburg-; town in Daviess County, Indiana, named for the iiuckeye Cannel Coal 
Company. 

Cannelton; city in Perry County, Indiana, village in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, 
and town in Kanawha County, West Virginia, named from the beds of cannel 
coal in the vicinity. 

Cannon; I'iver in Minnesota. The name is a corruption of the name given by the 
early French, Riviere aux Canots, river of the "canoes." 

Cannon; county in Tennessee, named for Newton Cannon, governor of the State in 
1835-39. 

Cannonball; river in North Dakota, translation of the French name, Le Poulet. 

Cannon Falls; village in Goodhue County, Minnesota, named from the river. 

Cannonsburg; town in Kent County, ^lichigan, named for Le Grand Cannon, of 
Troy, New Y'ork. 

Cannonsville ; village in Delaware County, New York, named for Benjamin Can- 
non, early owner. 

Canoeridge; village in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, so named because it is situ- 
ated on the highest point on the west branch of the Susquehanna to which a 
canoe could be pushed. 

Canoga; village in vSeneca County, New Y^ork, named from a large spring which 
affords permanent motive power for two mills. An Indian word meaning "oil 
floating on the water." 

Canon; a name given In' the Spaniards to narrow mountain gorges or deep ravines. 
Sometimes spelled canon, others canyon, from their proximity to gorges; such as 
Canyonville, Oregon, and Cancan City, Colorado. A Sjiianish word meaning "a 
tube, a funnel." 

Canon de Ugalde; ]iass in Texas named for a Mexican general. 

Canonicut; island in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, named for Canonicus, an 
Indian cliief of the Narragansett tribe, a friend of Roger Williams. 



62 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Canonsburg'; town in Washington County, Pennsylvania, laid out l)y and named 

for Col. John Cannon. 
Canooch.ee; river, and village in Emanuel County, Cxeorgia. An Indian word, said 

to be derived from Ikanodshi, "the graves are there." 
Canterbury; town in ^Vindham County, Connectieut, and villages in Kent county, 

Delaware, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and Mingo County, West Vir- 
ginia, named from the p]nglish town. 
Canton; numerous places in the country, which deri\e their name, either directly 

(jr indirectly, from the city in China. 
Capac; town in St. Clair County, Michigan, nanieil for ]Manco Capac, the first 

emperor or chief of the Peruvian empire. The word, manco, is said to mean 

"chief." 
Cape Elizabeth; town in Cuml)erland C(junty, Maine, named from the cape, wliicli 

was named for Queen Elizal)eth of England. 
Cape Girardeau; county and city in Missouri, named for Sieur Girardot, of Kas- 

kaskia. 
Capell; mountain and fort in California, named for an officer. 
Cape May; county and city in New Jersey, named from the cape named for Cor- 

nclis .Jacohse ^lay, a navigator in the employ of the Dutch West Indian Company. 
Cape Vincent; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Vincent, son of 

Le Kay de Chaumont. 
Capitol; peak in Colorado, so nameil from its form. 

Carancahua; village in Jackson County, Texas, named for an Indian tribe. 
Carbon; a name of frequent occurrence in the country, given to indicate tlie pres- 
ence of coal deposits. Counties in ]Montana, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Wyoming 

are so called. Various sutiixes, such as "dale," "hill," etc., are also used. 
Cardiff; villages in Jefferson County, Alaljama; Garfield County, Colorado, and 

Onondaga County, New York, named from the city in AVales. 
Cardwell; village in Dunklin County, Missouri, named for Frank Cardwell, of Para- 

gould, Arkansas. 
Carencro; town in Lafayette Pai'ish, Louisiana, so named because large flocks of 

buzzards roosted in the cypress trees common in that neighborhood. A Creole 

word, meaning "buzzard." 
Carlinville; city in Macou})in County, Illinois, named for Thomas Carlin, governor 

of the State in 1834-42. 
Carlisle; county in Kentucky, named for John C Carlisle, Secretary of the Treasury 

under President Cleveland. 
Carlisle; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named, according to W^hitmore, 

for Charles Lloward, Earl of Carlisle. Other authorities say for the town in 

Scotland. 
Carlisle; borough in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, named for the town in 

England. 
Carlisle; town in Union County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 
Carlstadt; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named by early German settlers 

for the town in Croatia. 
Carlton; county and village in Minnesota, named for one of tlie first representatives 

in the legislature of the district, which was afterwards formed into Carlton 

County. 
Carmel; town in Penobscot County, ]Maine, and several other small i)laces, named 

from the mountain in Palestine. 
Carnegie; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Andrew 

Carnegie. 
Carnesville; town in Franklin County, (Georgia, named for Col. T. P. Carnes, sr. 



GANNKTT] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 03 

Caro; villa<r(' in Tns^fohi County, ^Michigan, a I'anciful nanu' uivi'U by its founder. 
W. K. SliLTinan. 

Carolina; name given to two States, Nortli and Soutli Caroiiiia. Near the middle 
of the sixteenth century, Jean Kiljault visited the i-egion and named it CaroUna, 
in honor of his king, C'iiarles IX of France, but the name never came into gen- 
era! use and soon disajipeared. Aliout 1628, this name was appHed definitely to 
that part of the country lying between Virginia and Florida, having been given 
in honor of Charles I of England. In an old manuscript, now in London, the 
following maybe found: "1629-30, Feb. 10. The Attorney-* ieneral is prayed to 
grant by Patent 2 Degrees in Carolina," etc. In 1663 the name was definitely 
ai)plied to the province granted to proprietors by Charles II of England. This 
province was named in honor of the reigning king, and thus the old name given 
in lionor of Charles I was retained. 

Caroline; county in INIaryland, named in honor of Caroline Calvert, daughter of 
Charles, Fifth Lord Baltimore. 

Caroline; county in Virginia, named for the wife of George 11. 

Carondelet; village in St. Louis County, Missouri, named for Laron Carondelet, 
Spanish commander in chief and governor of Louisiana in 17!*!. 

Carp; river and railroad station in Marciuette County, Michigan. A translation of 
the Indian name literally meaning "big carp river." 

Carrington; island in Great Salt Lake, Utah, named for a member of an exploring 
party. 

Carrington; island in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone Park, named for Campbell 
Carrington. 

Carrituck; plantation in Somerset County, Maine. An Indian word, meaning "the 
place where the water forms a semicircle around the land." 

Carroll; counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, In< liana, Iowa, Kentuc-ky, INIary- 
land, ]\Iississii)pi, Missouri, New Hamiishire, Ohio, and Virginia, and several 
small places, named for Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, Maryland. 

Carroll; county in Tennessee, named for William Carroll, governor in 1821-27. 

Carrollton; township in Carroll County, Arkansas; cities in Carroll County, Iowa, 
Carroll County, Kentucky, Carroll County, Missouri; towns in Carroll County, 
Mississippi, and Carroll County, Georgia, and villages in Carroll County, Mary- 
land, and Carroll County, Ohio, named for the home of Charles Carroll. 

Carrollton; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, named for G. Carroll, an 
original projirietor. 

Carrying Place; plantation in Somerset County, Maine, so named because the 
Indians had to carry their canoes from one waterway to another on the route to 
Canada. 

Carson; city, pass, lake, river, and v'alley in Nevada, and peak in Utah, named for 
the celebrated Rocky Mountain guide, Christopher, or Kit, Carson. 

Carson; county in Texas, named for S. P. Carson, secretary of State under David G. 
Burnet. 

Carter; county and village in Kentucky, named for William (i. Carter, a member 
of the State senate. 

Carter; county in Missouri, named for Zimri Carter, an early settler. 

Carter; county and village in Tennessee, named for Gen. Landon Carter. 

Carteret; county in North Carolina, named for Sir George Carteret, one of the pro- 
prietors. 

Cartersville; city in Bartow County, Georgia, named for Col. F. Carter, of Mill- 
edgeville. 

Carthage; city in Jasper county, Missouri, village in Jefferson County, New York, 
and many other places, named for the ancient city in Egypt. 



64 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Caruthersville; rity in reiuiscot (Vmnty, ^lissonri, named for Hon. Samuel Caruth- 

ers, of Madison County. 
Carver; town in Plymouth County, ^lassaeluisettH, named lor Jolni Carver, first 

governor of Plymouth colony. 
Carver; county and village in Minnesota, named for Capt. Jonathan Carver, early 

explorer. 
Cary; village in Wake County, North Carolina, nanieil for tlie temperance lecturer 

of Ohio. 
Caryville; town in (ienesee County, New York, named for Col. Alfred Cary, early 

settler. 
Cascade; county in Montana, so named because it contains the great falls of theMis- 

souri lliver. 
Cascade; chain of mountains in ( )regon and Washington, so called from the cascades 

in the Columbia Kiver, Ijreaking through the range. 
Cascade Locks; town in Wasco County, Oregon, situated at the locks built at the 

cascades in the Columbia River. 
Casco; bay and town in Cuml)erland County, Maine. From an Indian word, mean- 
ing, according to some authorities, " resting place," or " crane bay." 
[Casey; county in Kentucky; 

Jcaseyville; town in Union County, Kentucky. Named for Col. William Casey, a 
I pioneer of the State. 

Cash. City; town in Clark County, Kansas, named for its founder. Cash Henderson. 
Cashie; river in North Carolina, named for an Indian chief. 
Cashion; town in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, named for Roy Cashion, a Rough 

Rider in the Spanish- American war, and the only one of the Oklahoma contm- 

gent killed in the charge up San Juan hill. 
Cass; counties in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, IMichigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, 

and Texas; river in Michigan; lake in Minnesota, and village in Cass County, 

Texas, named' for Gen. Lewis Cass, governor of Michigan in 1820. 
Cass; county in North Dakota, named for Gen. George W. Cass, director of the 

Northern Pacific Railroad. 
Cassadaga; lake, creek, and village in Chautauipia County, New York. Indian 

word, meaning "under the rocks." 
Casselton; town in Cass County, North Dakota, named for Gen. (ieorge W. Cass, 

director of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 
Cass Lake; village in Cass County, Minnesota. 

Cassville; village in Grant County, AVisconsin, named for Gen. Lewis Cass. 
Castalia; town in- Erie County, Ohio, named for the ancient fountain at the foot of 

Tilount Parnassus in Phocis. 
Castile; town in Wyoming County, New York, named from the ancient kingdom 

of Spain. 
Castine; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for Baron de St. Castine, a French 

noblemaia, by whom it was settled. 
Castle; peak in the Sierra Ne\ada, California, so named from its conical shape. 
Castle; peak in Elk Mountains, Colorado, named from its castellated sununit. 
Castle; island in the Hudson River, New York, so called from a stockade built by 

the Dutch as a protection from the Indians. 
Castle Rock; town in Sununit County, Utah, so called from a vast rock which is 

thought to resemble a ruined castle. Towns in Douglas County, Colorado, and 

Grant County, Wisconsin, named from rocks near. 
Castleton; village in Rensselaer County, New Yoi-k, named from an ancient Indian 

oastle on the adjacent hills. , 

Castleton; town in Rutland County, Vermont, named for one of the original pro- 
prietors. 



GANNETT.! PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATJ^S. 65 

Castor; liayoii in IjOiiisiana, and river in Missouri, so named hecauHe ot the preva- 
lence of heavers, a French word, meaning "castor." 
I Castro; county in Texas; 
Castroville; town in Medina County, Texas. Named for Henri Castro, who settled 
tiOO immigrants in Texas under Government contract hetween 1842 and 1845. 

Caswell; county in North Carolina, named for Richard Caswell, governor of the 
State in 1777-1779. 

Catahoula; lake and parish in Louisiana, named for an extinct Indian tribe. 

Cataract; village in Owen County, Indiana, so named on account of the falls in the 
river near. 

Cataraque; river in New York. Indian word, meaning "fort in the water," the 
early name of Lake Ontario. 

Catasauqua; creek and borough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. Indian word, 
corruption of Gottoshacki, "the earth thirsts for rain," or "parched land." 

Catawba; river in North and South Carolina, county in North Carolina, town in 
said county, town in ]\Iarion County, West Virginia; creek in Botetourt County, 
and town in Roanoke County, Virginia; island in Lake Erie, and village in 
Clark County, Ohio, besides several other small places, named from the Indian 
tribe. 

Catawissa; Itrancii of the Susquehanna River, and borough in Columbia, Pennsyl- 
vania. Corruption of the Indian word Gattawisi, "growing fat," though some 
authorities say the name signifies "clear water;" a different derivation is from 
Ganawese, designating the region to which the tribe of Conoys retired. 

Cathaneu; river of Maine. Indian word meaning "bent," or "crooked." 

Catharine; town in Schuyler County, New York, named for Catharine Montour, 
wife of an Indian sachem. 

Cathedral; peaks in California and Colorado, so named from their resemblance to 
cathedrals. 

Catheys; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an old settler. 

Cathlamet; point and town in Wahkiakum County, Washington, named from the 
Indian trilie Cathlamah. 

Cathlapootle ; river in Washington, named for the Quathlapohtle Indian tribe. 

Cato; town in Cayuga County, New York, named by the State land board in honor 
of the distinguished Roman. 

Catoctin; stream in Virginia tributary to the Potomac. An Indian word, meaning 
"great village." 

Catskill; creek, mountains, and town in Greene County, New York. The moun- 
tains were calle<l Katsbergs by the Dutch, from the num))er of wild-cats found 
in them, and the creek, which flows from the mountains, Katerskill, "tomcats' 
creek." 

Cattaraugus; county, village, and creek in New York. Indian word, meaning 
"bad smelling shore or beach." 

Caucomgomoc ; lake in Maine. (V)rru|)tion of an Indian word, meaning "big gull 
lake." 

Caugwaga; creek in Erie County, New York. A corruption of the Indian Gag- 
waga, "creek of the Cat nation." 

Causton; 1)1 uff in ( Jeorgia, named for Tliomas Causton. 

Cavalier; county an<l town in Peml>ina t'ounty, North Dakota, named for Charles 
Cavalier, one of the old settlers in tiie Lower Red River Valley. 

Caw^anesque; branch of the Chemung River, New York. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "at the long island." 

Caw^anshanock; creek in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Indian, derived from 
Gawunschhanne, "green briar stream." 

Cawker; city in Mitchell County, Kansas, named for E. H. Cawker. 

Bull. 197—02 5 



66 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Cayuga; county, village, and lake in New York. Indian word, the derivation of 
which is in dispute. The generally accepted theory is that it means ' ' long lake, ' ' 
having been originally applied to the lake, which is 38 miles long and from 1 to 
Similes wide. Morgan derives it from Gweugweh, "the mucky land," while 
others say that it signifies "canoes pulled out of the water. " One of the six 
nations of Indians was so called. Six small places in the country Ijear this name. 

Cayuse; village in ITmatilla County, Oregon, named from the Indian ponies, which 
are numerous in the country. 

Cazenovia; lake and town in Madison County, New York, named by its founder, 
Col. John Linklaen, for Theophilus Cazenove, general agent of the Holland 
Land Company. 

Cazenovia; township in Woodford County, Illinois, and villages in Pipestone 
County, Minnesota, and Richland County, "Wisconsin, are named for the above. 

1 Cecil; county in Maryland; 
Cecilton; town in Cecil County, Maryland. Named for Cecil Calvert, second Lord 
Baltimore. 
Cedar; this word, with various suffixes, forms the name of numerous features 

throughout the country. Counties in Iowa, Missouri, and Nebraska, 153 post- 
offices, with or without suffixes, and numberless rivers, creeks, etc., bear the 

name, referring to the presence of the tree in the vicinity. 
Cedar Keys; town in Levy County, Florida, named from a group of islands in the 

harbor. 
Celeron; island near Detroit, Michigan, named for Sieur Celeron, commandant at 

Detroit in early days. 
Center; town in Sharp County, Arkansas, and county in Pennsylvania, so named 

because of their geographical situation in county or State. One hundred and fifty 

places in the country bear this name, alone or with various prefixes. 
Center Harbor; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for one of the 

first settlers. Col. Joseph Senter. 
Central; town in Pickens County, South Carolina, so named because of its geograph- 
ical situation in county or State. Twenty-eight other places, with and without 

suffixes, are so called. 
Central City; town in Huntington County, West Virginia, so named l^ecause it is 

nearly halfway between Guyandotte and Catlettsburg. 
Central Lake; village in Antrim County, Michigan, situated on a lake which is in 

the center of a chain of lakes and rivers in the county. 
Ceredo; village in Wayne County, West Virginia, named by its founder because of 

the bountiful harvest of corn upon its site. The name is derived from Ceres, the 

goddess of corn and harvests. 
Cerrillos; town in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. A Spanish woi'd meaning "little 

eminences, or hills." 
Cerro Colorado; a conical hill of reddish color in Colorado. The name was given 

l)y the Mexicans, and means "red hill." 
Cerro Gordo; village in Piatt County, Illinois; county in Iowa; and village in 

Columbus County, North Carolina, named from the Mexican Imttlefield. The 

words mean "large (around) hill." 
Ceylon; village in Erie County, Ohio, and five other jilaces, named from the island 

off the coast of India. 
Chadbourn; town in Columbus County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

business man of Wilmington, North Carolina. 
Chadds Ford; village in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named for the ])ro])rietor, 

Francis Chadsej'. 
Chadron; city in Dawes County, Nebraska, named for an old French squawman. 
Chaffee; county in Colorado, named for Jerome I>, C^haffee. United States Senator. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 67 

Chaffin; bluff in Virginia, named for tlie family who owned it. 

Chagrin; river in Ohio. Two different theories obtain in regard to tliis name, one 
being that a party of surveyorw under Harvey Rice, f<o named it ])ecause of tlieir 
disappointment at tinding that they were not following the course of the Cuya- 
hoga River. Howe says that it is named from the Indian wor<l shagrin, which 
is said to mean "clear." 

Chagrin Falls; village in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named from tlie river. 

Chamberlain; lake in Maine, named for an old settler. 

Chambers; county in Alabama, named for Senator Henry (-. Cliambers of that 
State. 

Chambers; county in Texas, named for Thomas. I. ('liaml)ers, major-general in the 
Texas revolution. 

Chambersburg'; town in Krankhn County, Pennsylvania, named for a Scotchman 
who foundeil it, J>enjamiii Chand)ers. 

Champaig-n; counties in Illinois and Ohio, and city in tlie former State, so called 
from the general character of the country. A French word, meaning " a flat, 
open country." 

Champion; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for (ien. Henry Cham- 
pion, an early proprietor. 

Champlain; lake and town in Clinton County, New York, named for the discov- 
erer of the lake, Samuel de Champlain, a French naval othcer, who explored 
that country in 1609. 

Chancellorsville; village in Spottsylvania County, Virginia, nameil for a family in 
the neighborhood. 

Chandeleur; bay and islands on the coast of Louisiana, so named })ecause they were 
discovered on Candlemas or Chandeleur day. 

Chandlerville; village in Cass County, Illinois, named for Dr. Charles C -handler, 
founder. 

Chaney; creek in Mississippi, named for Robert Chaney, an early settler in Perry 
County. 

Chanhassan; river in Minnesota and North Dakota. Indian name, "pale bark 
wood, sugar tree." 

Chanhassen; village in Carver County, INlinnesota. Indian word, meaning "tire- 
stone." 

Chankie; creek in South Dakota. Cones says it is clii)ped from Tschehkana- 
kasahtapah, "breech clout." Haines gives chanka, " tirestone,"^ so named from 
a very hard rock of vitritied sandstone found near its moutli. 

Chanlers; purchase in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Jeremiah Chanler, 
early owner. 

Chanopa; lake in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "two wood." 

Chanshayapi; river in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "red wood, or a post 
painted red." 

Chanute; city in Neosho County, Kansas, named for O. Cliamite, civil engineer 
with the Leavenworth, Lawrence and (ialveston Railroad. 

Chapa; river in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "beaver." 

Chapel Hill; town in Orange County, North Carolina, named from a colonial chapel 
of the Church of England, built on a hill. 

Chapin; town in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for a family of that name. 

Chapman; borough in Snyder County, Pennsylvania, named f<pr William C-hapman, 
who owned slate quarries there. 

Chappaqua; town in Westchester County, New York. lii<liaii word, meaning "an 
edible root of some kind." 

Chappaquiddick; island in Dukes County, ]Massachusetts. From an Indian word 
Cheppiaquidne, "separated island." So called because sei)arated from Marthas 
Vineyaid by a narrow strait. 



68 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Chardon; village in Geaujia County, Ohio, named for a proprietor, Peter Chardon 

Brooks. 
Chariton; county, river, and town in Putnam County, Missouri. The origin of the 

name is in doubt. The most generally accepted theory is that it was given by 

the early French, but that the original form of the word has been lost, hence 

the translation is impossible. Some persons say that there was a French trader 

who liad liis agency near the mouth of the river, whose name was similar. 
Charlemont; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for the Earl of 

Charlemont. 
Charles; county in Maryland, named in honor of Charles Calvert, son of Cecilius 

(All vert, second Lord Baltimore. 
(Charles; river in Massachusetts, and point in Northampton County, Virginia; 
[Charles City; county in Virginia. Named for Charles I of England. 
Charles Mix; county in South Dakota, named for a pioneer citizen. 
Charleston; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for an early settler, Charles 

N'aughan. 
Charleston; town in Tallahatchie County, Mississipi)i, named from C'harleston, 

South Carolina. 
Charleston; county and city in South Carolina. The city was named first and was 

originally called Charles Town, in honor of Charles II of England. 
Charleston; city in Kanawha County, West Virginia, named for Charles Clendman, 

father of George Clendman, the founder. 
Charlestown; part of Boston, Massachusetts, named for Charles I of England. 
Charlestown; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, named for Sir Charles 

Knowles. 
Charlestown; town in Washington County, Rhode Island, named either for King 

Charles II of England, or for Charles Edward, the pretender. 
Charlestown; town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, named for the brother of 

George Washington, Charles Washington, who owned the land upon which the 

town was l)uilt. 
Charlevoix; county and village in Michigan, named for Pere Francis X.Charlevoix, 

a missionary and historian. 
Charley Apopka; creek in Florida. Corruption of an Indian word, tsalopopko- 

hatchee, " cattish eating creek." 
Charloe; village in Paulding County, Ohio, named for an Ottawa Indian chief. 
Charlotte; C(junty in Virginia and village in Monroe County, New York, named for 

Cliarlottc Augusta, Princess of Wales. 
Charlotte; city in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, named for the wife of 

George III of England. 
Charlottesville; city in Virginia, named for Charlotte Augusta, Princess of Wales. 
Charlton; county and village in Georgia, named for Robert M. Charlton, poet, and 

United States Senator in 1852. 
Charlton; town in AVorcester County, Massachusetts, named for Sir Francis Charl- 
ton, gentleman of the privy chamber in 1755. 
Chartiers; two creeks, township in Allegheny County, and two villages in western 

Pennsylvania, named for Peter Chartiers, a noted half-breed spy and Indian 

hunter. 
Chase; counties in Kansas and Nebraska, named for Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of 

the Treasury under Lincoln. 
Chaska; I'ity in Carver County, Minnesota. An Indian name given to the firstborn, 

if a son. 
Chateaugay; river, lake, and village in Franklin County, New York, the origin of 

the nanu' of which is in dispute. Some authorities say it is from the French 

word, meaning "castle ford." Haines derives it from the Indian word Cha- 

tauqua, "place where one was lost " 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 69 

Chatham; counties in (icorjiia and North Carolina, towns in Barnstable County, 
Massachusetts, and Carroll Cornity, New Haniiishire; horoujrh in Morris County, 
New Jersey; village in Columbia County, New York, and many other places, 
named for William Pitt, earl of Chatham. 

Chattahoochee; river, county, and village in Fulton (-omity, Ceorgia, and town in 
Gadsden County, Florida; fi'om an Indian word meaning "painted stone." 

Chattanooga; city in Hamilton County, Tennessee, and creek in Georgia. Indian 
word, meaning "crow's nest" or " eagle's nest." 

Chattooga; county and river in Georgia. It is said to be from tlie same Indian 
word as Chattahooche, "painted stone." 

Chaumont; village in Jefferson County, New York, 7iamed for Le Ray de Caliumont, 
early proprietor. 

Chautauqua; county in Kansas; county, lake, and town in New York. An Indian 
word which has been the subject of much controversy. Webster says it is a cor- 
ruption of a word which means "foggy place." Another derivation gives the 
meaning as "bag tied in the middle," referring to the shape of the lake. It is 
also said to mean "place where a child was washed away." Dr. Peter Wilson, 
an educated Seneca, says it is literally "where the fish was taken out." Other 
meanings given are "place of easy death," "place where one was lost." 

Chaves; county in New Mexico, named for Mariano Chaves, governor in 183(5. 

Cheanill; chain of hills in Oregon. Indian word meaning "bald hills." 

Cheat; river in West Virginia, so called because of the yariableness of the volume 
of water. 

Cheatham; county in Tennessee, named for Benjamin Cheatham, Confederate 
general. 

Chebanse; town in Iroquois County, Illinois, named for an Indian chief. The word 
means "little duck." 

Chebeague Island; village in Cumberland County, Maine. The name is probably 
derived from (Jhebeeg, "great waters," or "wide expanse of water." 

Cheboygan; river, county, and city in Michigan. An Indian word, variously 
interpreted. Haines says it is composed of two words, che, "great," and poygan, 
" pipe." Another derivation gives the meaning, "the river that comes out of the 
ground." The Michigan Historical Society gives Chabwegan, "a place of ore." 

Checaque; river in Iowa. An Indian word, meaning "skunk." 

Chectemunda; creek in Montgomery County, New York. An Indian woi-d mean- 
ing " twin sister." 

Cheektowaga; town in Erie County, New York. Derived from the Indian word, 
Juk do waah geh, "the jjlace of the crabapple tree." 

Cheesechankamuck; eastern branch of Farmington River, C^junecticut. Indian 
word, meaning "the great fishing place at the weir." 

Cheetiery Sopochnie; chain of volcanic- mountains in the Aleutian Islands. An 
In<lian word, meaning "four mountains." 

Chefuncte; river in Louisiana. Indian word, meaning "chinkapin." 

Chehalis; river, county, and city in Lewis County, Washington, named from an 
Indian tribe, Tsihalis. The word means "sand, or sandy land." 

Chehtanbeh; rivor in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "sparrow hawk's nest." 

Chelmsford; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for the English 
town. 

Chelsea; city of Massachusetts, named from the I^nglish town. 

Chelsea; town in Washtenaw County, Michigan, and town in Orange County, Ver- 
mont; indirectly named for the town in England. 

Chemawa; village in Marion County, Oregon. Indian word, meaning "our old 
home." 

Chemehuevis; valley in Arizona named from a tribe of Indians. 



70 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Chemung; river, county, and town in New York. An Indian word, meaning "big 
Ijorn in the water," or "big horn." The river was so called according to tradi- 
tion from a fossil tooth found in it. 

Chenango; river, county, and a town in Broome County, New York. An Indian 
word, meaning "bull thistles." 

Chene; bayou in Louisiana. French word, meaning "oak." 

Cheney; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an old settler. 

Cheney; city in Sedgwick County, Kansas, named for P. B. Cheney, stockholder of 
the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 

Cheney; town in Spokane County, Washington, named for Benjamin P. Clieney, 
of Boston, one of the originators of the Northern Pat'itic Railroad. 

Chepachet; river and village in Providence County, RhocU- Island, and village in 
Herkimer County, New York. An Indian word meaning "where the stream 
divides," or "the place of separation." 

Chepultepec; town in Blount County, Alabama. An Indian word meaning " grass- 
hopper hill." 

Cheputnaticook; lake in Maine. Indian word meaning "great hill lake." 

Cheraw; town in Chestertield County, South Carolina, named from an Indian tribe 
which is also known as the Sara. The meaning is "tall grass or weeds." 

Cherokee; county and town in Alabama; township in Benton County, Arkansas; 
village in Butte County, California; county and village in Georgia; county and 
city in Iowa; nation in Indian Territory; county and city in Kansas; villages in 
Lawrence County, Kentucky, and Lowndes County, Mississippi; county and 
village in Swain County, North Carolina; post-office in Woods County, Okla- 
homa; county and post-office in Spartanburg County, South Carolina; village in 
Lauderdale County, Tennessee; county and village in San Saba County, Texas, 
and village in Marathon County, Wisconsin, named for an Indian tribe. The 
word is derived from cheere, "fire," and is said to be the name of their "lower 
heaven." 

Cherry; county in Nebraska, named for Lieutenant Cherry, United States Army. 

Cherry Creek; town and creek in Chautauqua County, New York, named by Joshua 
Bentley, jr., a surveyor who found the center of the town to be on a small island 
in a stream where there was a small cherry tree. 

Cherryvale; city in Montgomery County, Kansas, in the valley of Cherry Creek. 

Cherry Valley; village in Otsego County, New York. 

The name "Cherry" occurs frequently with and without suffixes, generally 
referring to the presence of the tree. 

Chesaning; village in Saginaw County, Michigan. An Indian word meaning "big 
rock," the name having been given because of a large rock near the place. 

Chesapeake; bay in Maryland which gives name to several places in the country. 
An Indian name variously explained. Heckewelder says it is corrupted from 
Tschischwtipeki, which is compounded of kitshi, "highly salted," and peek, "a 
body of standing water, a pond, a bay." Others give che, "great," and sepi, 
"waters." Bosnian interprets it as " mother of waters." W. AV. Tooker says that 
the early form was Chesepiooc, from k'che-sepi-ack, "country on a great river." 

Cheshire; county in New Hampshire, town in BerKshire County, Massachusetts, 
and four small places named for the county in England. 

Chester; county in Pennsylvania, named by George Pearson, a friend of William 
Penn, in honor of the native place of Penn. 

Chester; county and town in South Carolina, named from Chester County, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Chester; county in Tennessee, named for Robert I. Chester, an old settler. 

Chesterfield; county in South Carolina and town in Hampden County, Massachu- 
setts, named for Philip Dormer Stanhope, Fourth Earl of Chesterfield. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 71 

Chesterfield; countieH in Xortli Carolina and Virginia, naniud from the town in 
I )('r))ysliin^, England. 

Chesterville ; village in All)any County, New York, nameil for Rev. Jonn Chester, 
of Albany. 

Chestnut; twenty-sseven post-oflices and many natural features bear this name, indi- 
cating the presence of the tree. 

Chesuncook; lake and town in Piscataquis County, Maine. An Indian word which, 
according to Judge Potter, means "the goose place." Thoreau gives, "the place 
where many streams empty in." Haines says that it signifies ' ' great goose place. ' ' 

Chetimaches; lake in Louisiana which is also known as Grand Lake, the name of 
an Indian tribe, the word meaning "red crabs." 

Chetopa; city in Labette County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning " four houses," 
the town having l>een built on the site of four houses occupieil by the wives of 
an Osage chief. 

Chewaukan; marsh in Oregon. Indian word, meaning " water potato." 

Cheyenne; counties in Colorado, Kansas, and Nebraska, mountain in Colorado, rivers 
in Nebraska and South Dakota, city in Laramie County, Wyoming, and several 
small places, named for the Indian tribe. The word is probably a corruption of 
the French, chien, " dog," applied by some neighboring tribes to those at present 
known as Cheyennes. It was the custom for Indians to call themselves by the 
name which signified "men," and to call neighboring tribes by some opprobrious 
epithet. The word was doubtless introduced by the early French traders. 

Chicacomico ; creek on the eastern shore of Maryland. An Indian word, meaning 
"the place where turkeys are plenty." 

Chicago; city and river in Illinois. The origin of the word is from the Indian, being 
a derivation by elision and French annotation from the word Chi-kaug-ong. 
Col. Samuel A. Starrow used the name in a letter to Gen. Jacob Brown, in 1816, 
asfollows: "The river Chicago (orin the English, "Wild Onion River)." School- 
craft in 1820 said: " Its banks * * * stated to produce abundantly * * * 
the wild sjjecies of cepa or leek." Bishop Baraga gives: "From Chicag, or Sikag, 
"skunk," a kind of wild cat." John Turner defines skunk as she-gahg; onion, 
she-gau-ga-winzhe, "skunk weed." When the word first appeared the country 
was inhabited by a tribe of Miamis, in whose dialect the word for skunk was 
"se-kaw-kwaw." It is said that the wild cat, or skunk, was named from the 
plant. 

Chicamauga; creek and town in Walker County, Georgia, named from an Indian 
tribe. The word by some is said to mean "sluggish or dead water," or "ttie 
river of death; " by others it is thought to signify " boiling pot," so called from 
a whirlpool in the river. 

Chichester; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and village in Ulster 
County, New York, named from the city in England. 

Chickahominy; river in Virginia, \vhich according to De Vere is named from the 
Indian word, Checahaminend, " land of much grain," so called because it flows 
through fertile lowlands. Heckewelder, however, says that it is corrupted from 
Tschikene-mahoni, "a lick frequented by turkeys." 

Chickasaw; county and township in Iowa, county in Mississippi, and nation in 
Indian Territory, named from the Indian tribe. According to Edward Fon- 
taine, the tribe divided on account of a feud, and one part took the name of one 
brother, Chickasaw, and the other took the name of the other brother, Choctaw. 
The word is said to mean "rebels," or "renegades." 

Chickasha; town in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. The name is derived 
from the word Chickasaw. 

Chickies; creek and village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Name derived 
from the Indian Chikiswalungo, " Place of crabs." Heckewelder says the mean- 
ing is " the place of crawfish." 



72 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buix. 197. 

Chickisalung'a; creek in Pennsylvania. Indian word, derived from Chickiswalunga, 

"the place of crawfish," or "the place of cra})s or crab fish." 
Chickomuxen; creek in Maryland. An Indian word, meaning " fishing place at a 

weir." 
Chickwolnepy; creek in New Hampshire. Indian word, meaning "near great 

pond." 
Chico; city in Butte County, C'alifornia, situated on Chicfi Creek. A Spanisli word, 

meaning " little." 
Chicoriiico; creek in Connecticut. An Indian derivation from she, orche, "great," 

and komuk, or comaco, "house," or "inclosed place." 
Chicopee; river, city, and falls in Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning "cedar 

tree," or "birch-l)ark place." 
Chicora; town in Berkeley County, South Carolina. From an Indian word, Ynchi- 

kere, meaning " Yuchi are there," or " Yuchi over there." 
Chicot; county in Arkansas; creek in New York. French word, meaning "wood;" 

a term also applied to a stub or broken piece of wood. 
Childress; county and town in Texas, named for George C. Childress, author of the 

Texas declaration of independence. 
Chilhowee; mountain ridge in Tennessee and village in Johnson County, Missouri. 

Indian word, meaning "deer mountain," or by some thought to mean "tire 

deer," an allusion to the custom of the Indians hunting by fire, by which the 

deer were blinded and easily killed. 
Chillicothe; cities in Ohio and Illinois, and towns in Wapello County, Iowa, and 

Livingston County, Missouri, named from an Indian tribe. The word is said to 

mean "town," or "city." 
Chillisquaque ; creek and village in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. An 

Indian word, meaning "the place of snowbirds." 
Chilmark; town in Dukes Ceunty, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
Chilson; lake and village in Essex County, New York, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Chilton; county and village in Clarke County, Alabama, named for William P. 

Chilton, of that. State. 
Chilton; city in Calumet County, Wisconsin, named Chillington, the home of an 

early settler, for Chillington Hall, England, but the county clerk in recording 

the name, omitted the second syllable, hence Chilton. 
Chimney Rock; town in Rutherford County, North Carolina, named from nearby 

cliffs, which bear a likeness to coUossal chimneys. 
Chinook; village in Pacific County, Washington, named from a tribe of Indians. 
Chinquapin; town in Duplin County, North Carolina. The name is the Indian 

name for "nut," or "small chestnut." 
Chippewa; river in Michigan and counties in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, 

named from~an Indian tribe. The word, according to some authorities, means 

"puckered moccasins." Other explanations are "he overcomes," or "he sur- 
mounts obstacles." 
Chisag-o; county in Minnesota. An Indian word, po.ssibly from the same source as 

Chicago. 
Chissesessick; rivers in Virginia and Georgia. An Indian word, meaning "the 

place of blue birds." 
Chittenango; creek and village in Madison County, New York. Morgan says it is 

an Indian word, meaning "where the sun shines out;" other autiiorities trans- 
late it "waters divide and run into." 
Chittenden; county in Vermont, named for Thomas Chittenden, governor of the 

State in 1790-97. 
Chittenden; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for George B. Chittenden. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 73 

Chivington ; villaijo in Kiowa County, Colorado, near the l)attle ^jronnd wliere 
General Chivington defeated the Cheyenne Indians. 

Chocoma; peak in the White M()untain8, New Hampshire, said to be named for a 
prophet-chief of the Sosokis Indians, who, being pursued to this lofty peak l)y a 
white hunter, leaped over the precipice and was dashed to pieces. 

Choctaw; counties in Alabama and Mississippi, and nation in Indian Territory, also 
several small places, named for an Indian ti-ibe. (latsi'liet says the word means 
"Hat head." Dromenech gives "charming voice," because of the aj)titude of the 
tribe for singing and music. 

ChoctaAvhatchee ; l)ay and river in Floi-ida. Indian word, meaning "river of the 
Choctaws." 

Chohwajica; lake in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "willow." 

Chokin; lake in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "place of roasting," the lake 
probably having been so named because the Dakota Indians roasted the teep- 
winna root, which they used for food, on the shore of the lake. 

Chokio; village in Stevens County, Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "the middle." 

Chokoloskee; town in Lee County, Florida. The named is derived from the Indian 
word, chokoliska, meaning "the red houses." 

Choteau; county and township in Teton County, Montana, and county in South 
Dakota, named for the Chouteau family, two brothers of which, Auguste and 
Pierre, founded St. Louis. 

Chouptyatanka; lake in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "big dry wood." 

Chowan; river and county in North Carolina, named from the Chowanoke Indian 
tribe. The word is thought to be equivalent to Shawnee, " southern people." 
One authority derives the word from sowan-ohke, "south country." 

Christian; county in Kentucky, named for Col. "William Christian, an officer of the 
Revolution. 

Christian; counties in Illinois and Missouri, named from the county in Kentucky. 

Christiana; creek and village in Delaware, and borough in Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, named for the King and Queen of Sweden, Christian and Christiana. 

Chuctanunda; stream in Montg<jmery County, New York. An Indian word mean- 
ing "twin .sisters." 
Chula; village in Livingston County, Missouri; 
Chulafinnee; town in Cleburne County, Alabama; 

Chulahoma; town in Marshall County, Mississippi. From an Indian word mean- 
ing "red fox." 

Chuluota; town in Orange County, Florida. Indian word, meaning "beautiful 
view." 

Churchill; county in Nevada, which takes its name from Fort Churchill, named for 
an officer of the United States Army. 

Churchville; village in Monroe County, New York, named for Samuel C'hurch, 
pioneer settler. 

Cibolo; river and village in Guadalupe County, Texas. A Spanish word, mean- 
ing "Mexican bull." 

Cicero; town in Onondaga County, New York, named by the State land board for 
the celebrated Roman. 

Cimarron; river in Oklahoma and Indian Territory and village in Colfax County, 
New Mexico. A Spanish word, meaning "wild, unruly." 

Cincinnati; city in Ohio, laid out and named by Col. Israel Ludlow, in honor of an 
organization of officers formed after the Revolutionary war and named in honor 
of Cinciimatus, the Roman patriot. 

Cincinnatus; town in Cortland County, New York, named by the State land board, 
for the celebrated Roman patriot. 

Cinnabar; mountain just north of Yellowstone Park, named from its rocks, which 
are colored red by iron, which was nii?-taken for cinnabar. 



74 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Cinnaminson ; town in Burlintrtfui County, New Jersey. The name is derived from 

the Indian, cinna, or sinne, "a stone," and niona, or minna, "island," henee 

" stone island place." 
Circleville; city in Jackson Connty, Kansas, so named because of a sugu;estion that 

it had been circling around the jirairie in search of a location. 
Circleville; village in Pickaway County, Ohio, so named from the circular Indian 

mounds in the neighl)orhood. 
Cisco; many places in the United States bear this name. An Indian word, meaning 

a kind of trout of an oily nature. 
Citra; town in Marion County, Florida, noted for its orange groves. 
Citrus; county in Florida, named from its orange groves. 

Clackamas; county, village, and river in Oregon, named from an Indian tribe. 
Claiborne; |)arish in Louisiana and counties in Tennessee and Mississippi, named 

for William C. C. Claiborne, governor of Mississippi Territory and of Louisiana 

as a Territory and State. 
Clallam; county in Washington, named for an Indian tribe. The word means 

' ' strong people. ' ' 
Clanton; town in Chilton County, Alabama, named for General Clanton, Confederate 

general. 
Clapper; town in Monroe County, Missouri, named for Henry Clapper, who was 

instrumental in bringing a railroad into llio place. 
Clare; county in Michigan. The origin of the name is in doubt, but the Michigan 

Historical Society says that it is probably named from county Clare in Ireland. 
Claremont; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, named from the country 

seat of Lord Clive, an English general. 
Clarence; city in Shelby County, Missouri, named for a son of John Duff, an early 

settler. 
Clarendon; county and town in South Carolina, named for Edward, Earl of Clar- 
endon. 
Clarion; river, county, and borough in Pennsylvania. A French word, meaning 

"clear, bright," applied first to the river. 
Clark; county in Arkansas, named for Governor William Clark. 
Clark; peak in California, named for Fred Clark, a topographer. 
Clark; counties in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, and Ohio, named for Gen. George 

Rogers Clark, who captured Vincennes. 
Clark; county in Kansas, natned for Capt. Charles F. Clarke, United States Volun- 
teers, who died at Memphis, December 10, 1862. 
Clark; county in IMissouri, named for Capt. William Clarke of the Lewis and Clarke 

Expedition. 
Clark; creek in Nebraska, named for Dr. M. II. Clark, first member of the Terri- 
torial council from Dodge County. 
Clark; county in South Dakota, named for Newton Clark, legislator in 1873. 
Clark; county in Wisconsin, named for A. W. Clark, early settler. 
Clarke; county in Alabama, named for Governor John Clarke of Georgia. 
Clarke; county in Georgia, named for Gen. Elijah Clarke, officer of the Revolution. 
Clarke; county in Iowa, named for James Clarke, governor of the State in 1846. 
Clarke; county in Mississippi, named for Joshua G. Clarke, first chancellor of the 

State. 
Clarke; county in Virginia, named for Gen. George Rogers Clarke. 
Clarke; county in Washington, and river in Montana, named for Capt. William 

Clarke, of the Lewis and Clarke expedition. 
Clarkfork; town in Kootenai County, Idaho, named from the river, which was 

named for Capt. William Clarke, of the Lewis and Clarke expedition. 
Clarkia; village in Kootenai County, Idaho, named for Capt. William Clarke, of 

the Lewis and Clarke expedition. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES, 75 

Clarks; village in Merrick ('ounty, Nebraska, named for S. II. 11. Clark, superin- 
tendent of the Union racilie Kailroad. 

Clarksburg-; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Judge Clarke, 
first chancellor of the State. 

Clarksburg'; town in Harrison (-ounty, West Virginia. Some authorities (;laim 
that it was named for Capt. William Clarke, of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, 
while others maintain that it was named for a pioneer. 

Clarksdale; town in Coahoma County, Mississippi, named for Captain Clark, 
hrother-in-Iaw of Governor Alcorn. 

Clarkson; town in Monroe County, New York, nameil for (Jeni'ral C'larkson, large 
landowner. 

IClarkston; village in Asotin County, Washington; 
Clarksville; city in Pike County, Missouri. Named for Capt. William C'larke, of 
the Lewis and Clarke exi)edition. 

Clarksville; town in Habersham County, Georgia, named for Gen. John Clarke, 
governor of Georgia. 

Clarksville; town in Hamilton County, Indiana, named for Gen. George Rogers 
Clark, who captured Vincennes. 

Clarksville; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Benjamin Clark. 

Clarkton; town in Dunklin County, Missouri, named for Henry E. Clark, an early 
contractor. 

Clatskanie; town in C-olumbia County, Oregon, named from the Indian tribe, Klat- 
skanai. 

Clatsop; county in Oregon, named for an Indian tribe. 

Claverack; town in Columbia County, New York, from the Dutch, klaver-akker, 
"clover field," said by some to have been so called from the immense fields of 
clover which abounded there at the time of its settlement. Another opinion is 
that it is of Dutch origin, the first part of the word meaning "an opening or side 
gorge;" the latter part being a division of the river which the Dutch skippers 
referred to; the Hudson was divided into 13 "racks" or "reaches." 

Clay; county in Arkansas, named for John M. Clayton, State senator. 

Clay; counties in Alabama, Florida, Georgia; county, and village in Illinois; county, 
and town in Indiana; county in Kansas; town in Webster County, Kentucky; 
counties in Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, 
Texas, and West Virginia; mount in New Hampshire, and many small places, 
named for Henry Clay. 

The counties of Minnesota and Nebraska doubtless were named for him also, 
though no record can be found to that effect. 

Clay; county in Iowa, named for Henry Clay, jr., who fell at the battle of Buena 
Vista. 

Clay; county in Kentucky, named for Gen. Green Clay. 

Claymont; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named from the character of the 
soil. 

Clayton; town in Kent County, Delaware, named for Thomas Clayton, or his son. 
Col. Joshua Clayton. 

Clayton; county, and town in Rabun County, Georgia, named for Augustin Smith 
Clayton. 

Clayton; village in St. Louis County, Missouri, named for Ralph Clayton. 

Clayton; county in Iowa, town in Jefferson County, New York, and town in John- 
ston County, North Carolina, named for John M. Clayton,. Senator from Dela- 
ware. 

Claytonville ; town in Brown County, Kansas, named for Powell ( -layton. United 
States Senator from Arkansas. 

Clear Creek; county in Colorado, so called because it is drained by Clear Creek, an 
affluent of the South Platte. 



76 PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Clearfield; creek, county, and borough in Pennsylvania. The creek received its 

name from the clearings along its banks. 
Clear Lake; village in Polk County, Wisconsin, situated on a lake of that name. 
Clearwater; descriptive name given to a river in Idaho and many smaller streams 

in the country, which have given names to twelve post-offices. 
Cleburne; counties in Alabama and Arkansas, and town in Johnson County, Texas, 

named for Gen. Patrick Cleburne. 
Clermont; county in Ohio, name probably derived from Clermont, France. 
Clermont; village in Columljia C'ounty, New York, named by Chancellor Living- 
ston, a friend of Fulton, for the first American steamboat. 
Cleveland; counties in Arkansas and Oklahoma, name<l for President Grover 

Cleveland. 
Cleveland; village in Oswego County, New York, named for James Cleveland, 

early settler. 
Cleveland; county and village in Rowan County, North Carolina, named for Col. 

Benjamin Cleveland. 
Cleveland; city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named for Gen. Moses Cleveland, of 

the Connecticut Land Company, who surveyed it. 
Cleveland; town in Bradley County, Tennessee, named for John Cleveland, who 

came there from North Carolina. 
Clifford; village in Lapeer County, Michigan, named for Clifford Lyman, the first 

child born in the village. 
Clifton; village in Greene County, Ohio, named from the cliffs which bound the 

river at this point. 
Climax; village in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, so called because when Daniel B. 

Eldred first visited the township he said, "This caps the climax." 
Clincli; county in Georgia, and river in Virginia and Tennessee, named for Gen. 

Duncan L. Clinch. 
Clingmans Dome; peak in Great Smoky Mountains, North Carolina, named for 

United States Senator Thomas L. Clingman, who determined its altitude. 
Clinton; county, and city in Dewitt County, Illinois; counties in Indiana, Iowa, and 

Kentucky; town in Jones County, Georgia; county in Michigan, and town in 

Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for De Witt Clinton, governor of New 

York and projector of the Erie Canal. 
Clinton; counties in Missouri, Ohio, and New York, town in Dutchess County, 

New York, and village in Oneida County, New York, named for George Clinton, 

governor of New York, and vice-president of the United States. 
Clinton; county in Pennsylvania, supposed to have been named for Gen. Henry 

Clinton. 
Clockville; village in Madison County, New York, named for John Klock, original 

grantee. •>. 
Cloquet; town in Carlton County, Minnesota, so named from the mills there. A 

French word, meaning "sound of the mill." 
Cloud; county in Kansas, named for William F. Cloud, colonel Second Regiment 

of Kansas. 
Clymer; village in Cass County, Indiana, named for George Clymer, its founder. 
Clymer; town in Chautauqua County, New York, named lor George Clymer, one 

of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
Coahoma; county and town m Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning "red pan- 
ther." 
Coast; range of mountains in Oregon, so named because lying parallel with the 

Pacific coast. 
Coatesville; borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named for Moses Coates, 

one of the early settlers. 



GANNETT.! PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 77 

Cobalt; villajro in ^liddlesex County, Coimecticut, so nanu>(l from mines of cobalt 
there. 

Cobb; county in Georjjia, named for Thomas W. Cobb, United States Senator from 
that State. 

Cobbosseecontee; river and lake in Maine. An Indian word, meaning " i)la('e 
where sturjreim are taken." 

Cobden; village in Union County, Illinois, named for Richard Colulen. 

Cobleskill; creek and town in Schoharie County, New York, named for C'obel, an 
early mill owner. 

Cobscook; arm of Passamaquoddy Bay, Maine. Hubbard derives it from the name 
of the Indian tribe, Passamaquoddy, which he says signifies "falls or rough 
water." Other derivations are Kabassak-hige, "sturgeon-catching place," and 
"a small, muddy stream." 

Cocalico; creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Corrupted from Achgookwalico, 
"where snakes gather together in holes." 

Cochecalechee; tributary of the Chattahooi-hee, in Georgia. An Indian word 
meaning "broken arrow." 

Cocheco; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning "rapid or violent." 

Cochecton; town in Sullivan County, New York. An Indian word meaning, 
according to Haines, "low ground;" others say "finished small harbor." 

Cochituate; village in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning 
"land on, or near, rapid streams or falls." 

Cochran; county in Texas, named for a man who fell at the Alamo. 

Cocke ; county in Tennessee, named for Gen. William Cocke, United States Senator 
from that State in 1796-97 and 1799-1805. 

Cock Robin; island in California, settled by a man named Robin, who, because of 
his bragging of his fighting qualities, was nicknamed "C'ock Robin." 

Coconino; county in Arizona, named fronx a band of A pache Indiaii s. 

Cocoosing-; creeks in Connecticut an^ Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 
"where owls are." 

Cod; cape in Massachusetts, which received its name from Bartholomew Gosnold, 
who caught many codfish there. 

Codington; county in South Dakota, named for Rev. R. B. Codington, legislator in 
1875. 

Codornices; creek in California. Derived from the Spanish, codorniz, "quail." 

Codorus; creek in York County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, said to mean 
' ' rapid water. ' ' 

Coeur d'Alene; lake and town in Kootenai County, Idaho; named from a tribe of 
Indians. French name, meaning "needle hearts" or "awl hearts." Some 
authorities say that this name was given to these Indians because the expres- 
sion was used by a chief of the tribe to denote his opinion of the Canadian trap- 
pers' meanness. Rev. M. Eells says that the name was given to the tribe by 
members of the Hudson Bay Company, because of their sharpness in trade. 

Coeyman; town in Albany County, New York, named for the patenteee, Barent 
Peterse Coeymans. 

(Coffee; counties in Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee; 
Coffeeville; town in Yalobusha County, Mississippi. Named for Gen. John Coffee, 

I noted Indian tighter. 

CoflFee; creek in Humboldt County, California, so named from tlie occasion of a sack 
of coffee having been spilled into it. 

ICoflFey; county in Kansas; 
Coffeyville; city in Montgomery County, Kansas. Named for A. M. Coffey, mem- 
ber of the first Kansas territorial legislature. 
Cohasset; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. An Indian word, said l)y some 
to mean " a fishing promontory," "a place of pines," or " young pine trees." 



78 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Cohocton; town in Steuben County, New York. From an Indian word, cohocta, 
"uteani rising in a black alder swamp with overhanging trees," or "trees in 
water." 

echoes; city in Albany County, New York, named from Cohoes falls. An Indian 
word, meaning "shipwrecked canoe;" also said to signify "great bendings." 

Cokato; village in Wright County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "at the 
middle." 

Coke; county and village in Wood County, Texas, named for Richard t'oke, gov- 
ernor and United States Senator from Texas. 

Cokesbury; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina. The name is formed by 
the combination of the names of two bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Thomas Coke and Francis AsVjury. 

Colbert; county in Alabama, named for George and Levi Colbert. 

Colby; city in Thomas County, Kansas, named for J. R. Colby, one of the old 
settlers. 

Colby; city in C'lark and Marathon counties, Wisconsin, named for Charles Colby, 
president of the Wisconsin Central Railroa<l. 

Colchester; borough in New London County, Connecticut, and other places in the 
country; named from a town in England. 

Colchester; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Colchester, Connecticut. 

Colden; town in Erie County, New York, named for Cadwalader D. Colden, of the 
State senate. 

Cold Spring; town in Cape May County, New Jersey, and many small jilacesinthe 
country; named from springs near. 

Cold Spring; village in Putnam County, New York, named from spring formerly 
there. 

Cold-water; city in Michigan, named from a stream of the same name. The name 
is applied descriptively to many places, the city in Kansas, however, having 
been named from the city in Michigan. 

Coldwater; town in Tate County, Mississippi, named from a near-by creek, which 
was named descriptively. 

Cole; county in Missouri, named for Capt. Stephen Cole, an Indian fighter. 

Colebrook; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Sir George Cole- 
brook, original grantee. 

Coleman; t-ounty and town in Texas, named for R. M. Coleman, cajitain of the first 
company of Texas rangers. 

Colerain; town in Bertie County, North Carolina, named from the town in Ireland. 

Coleraine; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts. Origin of the name is in 
doubt, but Gabriel Hanger was created Baron Coleraine in 1761, the date of the 
naming of the town. 

Coles; county ii^ Illinois, named for Edward Cole, governor of the State in 1823-1826. 

Colesville; town in Broome County, New York, named for Nathaniel Cole, one of 
the first settlers. 

Colfax; counties in Nebraska and New Mexico, and towns in Clinton County, 
Indiana, and Grant Parish, Louisiana, and Bay County, Michigan, named for 
Schuyler Colfax, Vice-President of the United States under President Grant. 

Collegeville; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, seat of Ursinus Col- 
lege. 

Colleton; county in South Carolina, named for Sir John Colleton, one of the eight 
original piojirietors of Carolina. 

Collettsville; town in Caldwell C'ounty, North Carolina, named for a family resi- 
dent there. 

Collin; county in Texas, named for Collin Mt'Kinney, early settler. 

Collingsworth; county in Texas, named for Judge James Collingsworth, secretary 
of state of the republic in 1836. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 79 

Collinsville : city in Madison C'ounty, Illinois, nettled l)y four l^rotlicrn from Litch- 
field, Connecticut, named Collins. 

Collinsville; t()\vn in Dvnidy County, Nebraska, named for Moses Collins, early 
settler. 

Collinsville; village in Lewis County, New York, named for Homer (bllins. 

Coloma; town in Eldorado County, California, named from an Indian tribe. 

Colony; city in Anderson County, Kansas, named for a colony from Ohio and 
Indiana, which settled in the neighborhood. 

Colorado; the name of a State, two rivers, and several towns. A Spanish word, 
meaning "ruddy, blood red;" in a secondary sense, "coloreil." 

Colquitt; county and town in Ceorgia, named for Walter T. Colquitt, I 'uited State.s 
Senator. 

Colter; peak in Yellowstone I'ark, named for John Colter, a guide with the Lewis 
and Clarke exjiedition. 

Colton; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named iov Jesse C-olton Higley, 
early settler. 

Coltsneck; town in Monmouth County, New Jersey. The name is prol)ably derived 
from an innkeeper's sign upon which was printed the old seal of New Jersey — a 
horse's neck with a wreath around it. 

Columbia; counties in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, New York, Oregon, Pennsyl- 
vania, Washington, and Wisconsin, and river in Oregon and Washington. The 
river was named by Captain Gray for the vessel in which he entered its mouth. 

I Columbiana; county in Ohio; 

(Columbus; county in North Carolina, and 26 places in the country. Named for 
Christopher Columl)us. 

Colusa; county and town in California, named from an Indian tribe. 

Colville; town in Stevens County, Washington, named from the old Hudson Bay 
Company's fort near the Columbia River. 

Colwich; city in Sedgwick County, Kansas. The name is a compound of Colorado 
and Wichita, with reference to the Colorado and Wichita Railroad. 

Comal; county in Texas which takes its name from the river. A Spanish word, 
meaning "flat earthen pan." 

Comanche; counties in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas, nameil from the Indian tril)e. 

Commack village in Suffolk County, New York. From an Indian word Winne- 
comac, "the beautiful place." 

Commencement; bay in Washington, named l)y Vancouver, because he thdught it 
the beginning of the arm of an irdet. 

Commerce; village in Scott County, Missouri, so named l)ecause it was a trading 
post as early as 1803. 

Como; town in Park County, Colorado, so named by the early miners bei-ause there 
was a lake in the neighborhood, referring to Lake C'omo, Italy. 

Como; town in Panola County, Mississippi, named from a highland pond upon the 
plat'e ()f Dr. G. G. Tate, who settled it. 

Communipaw; village in Bergen County, New Jersey, named for the original grantee, 
Michael Pauw, director of the Dutch West India Company. The word is a com- 
pound of "the commune of Pauw." 

Comstock; famous silver and lead bearing lode in Nevada, named foi' Henry Page 
Comstock. 

Conant; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for Al Conant, who nearly lost his life 
in it. 

Concho; county and river in Texas. A Spanish word, meaning a "shell." 

Concord; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, so called either from the Chris- 
tian concord among the first company, or "from the peaceful manner fif its 
acijuisition," having been purchased from the Indians. 

Concord; city in Cabarrus ('ounty. North Carolina, named from the battle of Concord. 



80 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Concord; town in Esf^ex County, Vermont, named for the town in Massachusetts. 
Concordia; city in Cloud County, Kansas, named so because there was a contro- 
versy for years over a permanent seat of county government, which was finally 

settled with unanimity. 
Cone; peak in Siskiyou County, California, so named Vjecause of its regular conical 

shape. 
Conedogwinit; stream in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning "for a long way 

nothing but bends." 
Conejos; county and town in Colorado, named from the Rio de los Conejos, which 

was so called beciiuse there were great numbers of jack rabbits found by the 

Mexican pioneers. 
Conemaugh; river and town in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, 

meaning "otter creek." 
Conequonessing; creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning "for a long 

time straight." 
Conestoga; creek and village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, named for an 

Indian tribe. The word is said to mean, "the great maize land." 
Conesus; lake and town in Livingston Count}', New York. Name derived from the 

Indian word, ganeasos, "place of many berries," or according to Morgan, "place 

of nanny berries." 
Conewago; creek and village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, 

meaning "a long reach," or "a long strip." 
Conewango; river in New York. The name is derived from the Indian word, gan- 

owungo, "the rapids," or, according to some other authorities, "they have been 

gone a long time. ' ' 
Coney; island at the extremity of Long Island, New York, which is said by some to 

have been so named because of the numbers of rabbits there. Another theory 

ascribes it to the winds having driven the sand into truncated cones. It appears, 

however, to have been originally called Congu, Avhich may suggest another 

derivation. 
Confluence; borough in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, so named because situated 

near the confluence of three streams. 
Congaree; river, and town in Richland County, South Carolina, named from a tribe 

of Indians. 
Conklin; town in Broome County, New York, named for Judge John Conklin. 
Conly; creek in Humljoldt County, California, named for an old settler. 
Conneaut; lake and bort)ugh in Pennsylvania, and village and creek in Ashtabula 
County, Ohio. Heckewelder says it is a corruption of the Indian, Gunniate, 
" it is a long time since he or they are gone." According to others it is a Sen- 
eca Indian word, signifying "many fish." A third theory gives "snow place." 
Conneautville; borough in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, named from the same. 
Connecticut; river and State. An Indian name, derived from Quonoktacut, mean- 
ing, acc^ording to some authorities, "a river whose water is driven in waves by 

tides or winds." Haines says, "land on the long tidal river." Other interpre- 

tationsare, " on long river," "long river," and " the long, or without end river." 
Connellsville; l)orough in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, named for Zachariah 

Connell, who laid it out. 
Connersville; city in Fayette County, Indiana, named for John Conner, who laid 

out the place in 1817. 
Connersville; village in Harrison County, Kentucky, named for Lewis Conner. 
Conness; mount in California, named for John Conness, Senator from California 

in 1 863-1 8ti9. 
Cononodaw; creek in Pennsylvania. Name corrupted from the Indian word gun- 

niada, "he tarries long." 



cANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 81 

Conoquenessing; borough in Butler County, Pennsylvania. Name corrupted from 

the Indian word Gunachquene'sink, "for a long way straight." 
Coney; ereek and village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Corrui)tion of the 

Indian word guneu, "long." 
Conquest; town in C-ayuga County, New York, so named to commemorate the con- 

(luest achieved by those who favored a division of the old town of Cato. 
Conshohocken; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named from the 

Indian name which the jiiace first bore. 
Constable; village in Franklin County, New York, named for William Constable, 

agent and part proprietor. 
Constableville; village in Lewis County, New York, named for William Consta- 

l)le, son of the original proprietor. 
Constitution; island in the Hudson River, New York, named from the fort. 
Contoocook; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word, meaning "crow river." 
Contra Costa; county in California. A Spanish word, meaning "a coast opposite 

to another." 
Converse; county in Wyoming, probably named for A. R. Converse, territorial 

treasurer. 
Conway; county and town in Faulkner County, Arkansas, named for Henry W. 

Conway, Territorial Delegate in Congress. 
Conway; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Henry Seymour 

Conway, secretary of state of England. Some authorities claim that the name 

was derived from the town in Wales. 
Conway; town in Horry County, South Carolina, named for Gen. Robert Conway, 

earh' resident. 
Cook; inlet of the Pacific Ocean on the coast of Alaska, named for Captain Cook, the 

navigator. 
Cook; county in Illinois, nameil for Daniel P. Cook, member of Congress. 
Cooke; county in Texas, named for William G. Cooke, captain of New Orleans Grays 

at the storming of Bexar. 
Cooksburg; village in Albany County, New York, named for Thomas B. Cook, early 

landholder. 
Coolidge; city in Hamilton County, Kansas, named for Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, 

former president of the Atchison,^ Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Cooper; township ni Washington County, Maine, named for Gen. John Cooper, an 

early and esteemed settler. 
Cooper; county in Missouri, named for Capt. Sanshell Cooper, early settler. 
Cooper; river in South Carolina, named for the Earl of Shaftsbury, Lord Ashley 

Cooper, one of the proprietors. 
Cooper; point in Washington, named for a man who took up a claim there, which 

he afterwards deserted. 
Cooperstown; village in Otsego County, New York, named for the father of James 

Fenimore Cooper. 
Cooperstown; borougli in Venango County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, 

William Cooper. 
Cooperstown; town in Robertson County, Tennessee, so named because a great 

many barrels were made there for the Red River mills. 
Coopersville; village in Clinton County, New York, named for Ebenezer Cooper, 

mill owner. 
I Coos; county in New Hampshire; 
I Coos; bay, river, and county in Oregon. An Indian word, meaning either " lake," 

"lagoon," or "inland bay," or " place of pines." 
Coosa; river and county in Alabama, named from a tribe of Indians. 

Bull. 197—02 



82 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Coosawhatchie; river and town in Beaufort County, South Carolina. An Indian 

word, meaning " the river of the Coosas." 
Cope; town in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Jonathan Cope, who laid 

it out. 
Cope; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for J. Martin Cope, 

founder. 
Copemish; village in Manistee County, Michigan. An Indian word, meaning 

" beei'h tree." 
Copenhagen; village in Lewis County, New York, named from the city in Denmark. 
ICopiali; county in Mississippi; 

Copiah Creek; village in Copiah County, Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning 
I "calling panther." 

Coplay; creek and l)orough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, 

meaning "that which runs evenly" or "a fine-running stream." 
Copper; harbor in Michigan, so called from the copper mines near. 
Copperopolis; town in Calaveras County, California, named from its extensive cop- 
per mines. 
Coquille ; river and town in Coos County, Oregon. A French word, meaning ' ' shell. ' ' 
Coral ville; town in Johnson County, Iowa, so named from the coral formation 

under the town. 
Coram; village in Suffolk County, New York, named for an Indian chief. 
Coraopolis; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Cora Watson, 

wife of one of the proprietors. 
Corapechen; creek inMaryland. An Indian word, meaning "fierce-running stream." 
Corbett; post-office in Multnomah County, Oregon, named for H. W. Corbett, 

United States Senator from the State. 
Corcoran; mount in California, named for W. W. Corcoran, of Washington, D. C. 
Cordova; thirteen places in the country named from the city in Spain. 
Corfu; village in Genesee County, New York, named for the ancient city of the 

Ionian Islands. 
Corinna; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for the Greek poetess of Boeotia. 
Corinth; city in Alcorn County, Mississippi, named from the ancient city in Greece. 
Cork; villages in Butts County, Georgia, Fulton County, New York, Ashtabula 

County, Ohio, and Tyler County, West Virginia, named from the city in Ireland. 
Cornelius; town in Washington County, Oregon, named for Col. T. R. Cornelius, 

volunteer in Cayuse war. 
Cornell; mount in New York, named for Stephen B. Cornell, founder of Cornell 

University. 
Cornettsville ; village in Davies County, Indiana, named for Myer and Samuel 

Cornett, who laid it out. 
Corning; city in Steuben County, New York, and city in Nemaha County, Kansas, 

named for Erastus Corning. 
Cornplanter; township in Venango County, and Indian reservation in AVarren 

County, Pennsylvania, named for a Seneca Indian chief. 
Cornville; town in Somerset County, Maine, so named from an unusually good 

yield of corn. 
Coronaca; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, which derived its name from 

the plantation of Joseph Salvador, a wealthy Jewish landowner of Charleston. 
Coronado; cities in San Diego County, California, and Wichita County, Kansas, 

named for the Spanish explorer, Francisco Vas(]uez de Coronado. 
Corpus Christi; bay and city in Texas, named with reference to a festival in the 

Roman Catholic Cliurch. 
Correctionville; town in Woodbury County, Iowa, situated on a correction line. 
Corunna; city in Shiawassee County, Michigan, named from the city in Spam. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 83 

Corry; city in Erie County, I'ennHylvania, named for a former owner, Hiram Corry. 

Corsica; borough in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, named from tiie island in the 
^lediterranean Sea. 

Corsicana; city in Navarro County, Texas, named for the wife of Navarro, a Mexi- 
can, who owned a large tract of land in the county at one time. 

Corson; inlet in New Jersey, named for a family who lived north of the iidet, 

Cortland; city in Republic County, Kansas, named from the city in New York. 

Cortland; county and city in New York, named for Lieutenant-lTovernor Pierre 
Van Cortlandt. 

Cortlandt; town in Westchester County, New York, named for Pierre Van Cort- 
landt. 

Corvallis; city in Benton County, Orej^on. Name formed of two Spanish words, 
meaniiif^ "heart of valley," so named from its situation in Willamette ^"alley. 

Corvette; ledge in Maryland, so nanieil becausi' a French corvette went ashore on 
the ledge. 

Corwin; village in Warren County, Ohio, named for Thomas Corwin, governor of 
the State. 

Cory; village in Clay County, Indiana, named for a resident of Terre Haute. 

Coryell; county and village in Texas, named for James Coryell, large land owner. 

Coshocton; county and village in Ohio, named from the Indian town of Goshocking. 
The word means, according to some authorities, " iiabitation of owls." Hecke- 
welder gives " forks of the Muskingum, or union of waters." Others say " fin- 
ished small harbor." 

Cossatot; river in Arkansas, supposed to be a corruption of the French word casse- 
tete, "tomahawk." 

Cossayuna; lake and village in Washington County, New York. An Indian word, 
said to signify "the lake at our points." 

Costilla; county in Colora<lo, named from the Costilla estate, which exten<ls into 
Taos County, New Mexico. 

Cosumne; river and town in Sacramento County, California, named from a tribe of 
Indians. The word means "salmon." 

Cote Blanche; bay in Louisiana. A French name, meaning " white coast." 

Cottle; county in Texas, named for G. W. Cottle, who fell at the Alamo. 

Cottleville; town in St. Charles County, Missouri, named for Lorenzo Cottle, early 
settler. 

Cotton Plant; town in Dunklin County, Missouri, distinguished by fields of grow- 
ing cotton. 

Cotton-wood; county in Minnesota and many natural featui'e;i and post-offices, 
named from a species of poplar found in many parts of the country. A creek 
in Kansas was so named because it was there that the first trees of this species 
were seen by Zebulon M. Pike on his exploring expedition. 

Cottrell; key in Florida, named for Jeremiah Cottrell, first keeper of the light-house 
there. 

Coulter; village in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Eli Coulter, early 
settler. 

Coulter; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for John M. Coulter, botanist with 
Hayden expedition. 

Council Bluffs; city in Pottawattamie County, Iowa, so called from a council held 
near there by Lewis and Clarke with the Indians. 

Council Grove; city in Morris County, Kansas, so named from 3, council held by 
the United States Commission with the Indians in a fine grove on the Neosho 
River. 

Coupeville; village in Island County, Washington, named for a navigator. Captain 
Coupe. 



84 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Coventry; towns in several States, named from the town in England. 
Covington; counties in Alabama and Mississippi, cities in Georgia and Kentucky, 

and town in Wyoming County, New York, named for Gen. Leonard Covington. 
Cow; island in the Missouri River in Kansas, from the old name given by the French, 

Isle <le Vache, " isle of the cow," from the buffalo found there. 
Cowanesque; creek in Potter Comity, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

"overgrown with briars." 
Cowanshannock ; creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, gawiensch-hanne, 

"green briar stream." 
Cowautacuck; creek in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "pine woodland." 
Cowen; mount in Montana, named for the Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 
Cowen; town in Webster County, West Virginia, named for the president of the 

l>altimore and Ohio Railroad. 
Coweta; county in Georgia, named for Gen. William Mcintosh, head chief of the 

Coweta towns, a half-breed Indian. 
Cowhocton; river in New York. Indian word meaning "login the water." 
Cowles; town in Webster County, Nebraska, named for W. D. Cowles, railroad man. 
Cowley; county in Kansas, named for Matthew Cowley, first lieutenant Company I, 

Ninth Kansas. 
Cowlitz; county and river in Washington, named from the Indian tribe Coweliske. 
Cowpens; village in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, made famous by a battle 

fought there during the Revolution. It received its name from a herd of cattle 

kept there in early days. 
Cox; bar in California, named for an old settler. 
Cox; creek in Florida, named for a man who lived on its banks. 
Coxsackie; town in Greene County, New York. The name is derived from the 

Indian kuk, "to cut," and auke, "earth," descriptive of the ridge cut and 

tumbled in by the waters of the Hudson pressing hard on the shore. Another 

theory derives the name from an Indian word meaning " liooting of owls." 
Coyote; village in Santa Clara County, California, and town in Rio Arriba County, 

New Mexico. The word, in the dialect of the Cushina and other tribes inhabit- 
ing the upper portions of Sacramento Valley, means a species of dog. It is also 

derived from the Mexican coyotl, "prairie wolf." 
Cozad; town in Dawson County, Nebraska, named for the original owner of the site, 

John J. Cozad. 
Crab Grass; creek in Florida, so called from a species of grass jilentiful along its 

l)ariks. 
Crabtree; town yi Linn County, Oregon, named for John J. Crabtree, early settler. 
Craftsbury; town in Orleans County, Vermont, named for Ebenezer Crafts, one of 

the original grantees. 
Craig; village in Routt County, Colorado, named for Rev. Bayard Craig, of Denver. 
Craig; county and creek in Virginia, which took their name from a prominent 

family of Augusta C(junty. 
Craig; pass in Yellowstone Park, named for Mrs. Ida Craig Wilcox, the first tourist 

to cross the pass. 
Craighead; county in Arkansas, named for Thomas B. Craighead, of the State 

senate. 
Cranberry; islands in Hancock County, Maine, named so from a marsh of cran- 
berries on the largest island. 
Cranberry Isles; town in Hancock County, Maine, named from the islands. 
Crane; county in Texas, named for William Carey Crane, Baptist minister. 
Cranesville; xiliage in Erie County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder. Fowler 

C'rane. 
Cranston; town in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for Samuel Cranston, 

governor of the State for nearly thirty years. 



OANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE TTNITED STATES. 85 

Crater; buttes in Llalio, so iiaiiu'd from tlieir volcanic origin. 

Crater; iais:e in Oregon, so named lu'canse it, occupies tliecrater of a former volcano. 

Craven; county in North C-arolina, named for William, Earl of Craven, a lord 
proprietor. 

Crawford; county in Kansas, named for Sanuiel J. Crawford, colonel Second Kansas 
Regiment, and governor in 1865-69. 

Crawford; counties in Indiana, Mi<!higan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, named for Col. 
William Crawford, who was cai)tured by Indians and burned at the stake at 
Sandusky, Ohio, in 1782. 

Crawford; counties in Arkansas, (ieorgia, Iowa, Illinois, INIissouri, and Wisconsin, 
and town in Oglethorpe County, (leoi-gia, named for William II. Crawford, Sec- 
retary of the Treasury under President Monroe. 

Crawford; town in Lowntles County, Mississippi, named for R(n'. Crawford, a Bap- 
tist jireacher. 

Crawford; purchase in Coos County, New Hampshire, nameil foi'the original owner, 
Ethan A. Crawford. 

Crawford House; village in Coos County, New Hampshire, named from the 
purchase. 

Crawford Notch.; gap in White Mountains, New Hampshire, named from the 
purchase. 

Crawfordsville ; city in Indiana, name<l for William II. (-rawford. Secretary of the 
Treasury under President ]\Ionroe. 

Crav/f ordsville ; town in Limi County, < )regon, named for George E. Crawford, 
early settler. 

Crawfordville; town in Taliaferro County, Georgia, named from William li. Craw- 
ford, Secretary of the Treasury under President Monroe. 

Creede; city in Mineral County, Colorado, named for the miner who made rich dis- 
coveries of gold there. 

Creek; nation in Indian Territory, named from the tribe of Indians. The early 
English gave the name to the tribe because the country inhabited by them was 
full of creeks. 

Crenshaw; county in Alabama, named for Anderson Crenshaw, of that State. 

Cresskill; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named from a creek abounding 
in water cress. The word " kil" is Dutch for stream. 

[Cresson; village in Cambria County, Pennsylvania; 

iCressona; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. Named for Elliott Cres- 

I son, a Philadelphia merchant. 

Crested Butte; town in Gunnison County, Colorado, named for a conical, gray peak 
which tlominates the valley. The mountain derives its name from its shape. 

Crestline; village in Crawford County, Ohio, so called because it occupies the crest 
line of the middle elevation of the State. 

Creston; city in Union County, Iowa, so named because it was the highest point 
on the (Chicago, Burlington and (^uincy Railroad. 

Crestone; mountain in Colorado, named from its shape. 

Creswell; t<jwn in Washington County, North Carolina, named for Postiriaster-Gen- 
eral Creswell. 

Creve Coeur; village in St. Louis County, Missouri, named for an early Erenchfort. 
The name means " heart break," or "heart breaker." 

Crittenden; county in Arkansas, named for Robert Crittenden. 

Crittenden; county and town in Grant County, Kentucky, namecl for John J. Crit- 
tenden, United States Senator from that State. 

Crockett; counties in Tennessee and Texas and town in Houston County, Texas, 
named for Col. David Crockett, celebrated frontier Indian fighter, who fell at the 
Alamo. 

Croghan; town in Lewis County, New York, named for Col. George Croghan. 



86 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [Binx.m. 

Cronly; town in Colunibus C'onnty, North C-arolina, named for the former owner of 

the Kite. 
Crook; counties in Oregon and Wyoming and town in Logan County, Colorado, 

named for Gen. George H. Crook. 
Crooked; creek in Pennsylvania, named from the old Indian name, Woak-hanne, 

"crooked stream." 
Crosby; county in Texas, named for Stephen Crosby, prominent citizen. 
Crosman; valley in Nevada, named for Col. G. H. Crosman. 
Cross; county in Arkansas, named for Judge Edward Cross, a pioneer. 
Cross'wicks; town in Burlington C'Ounty, New Jersey. A corruption of the Indian 

Crossweeksmig, "house of sepai'ation." 
Croswell; village in Sanilac County, Michigan, named for Governor Croswell. 
Crothersville ; town in Jackson County, Indiana, named for Dr. Crothers. 
Croton; village in Newaygo County, Michigan, named for the town in New York. 
Croton; river in New York, named for an Indian chief whose name w'as Kenoten, 

Knoten, or Noton, meaning "the wind." 
Croton Falls; town in Westchester County, New York, named from Croton River. 
Crew; river in Minnesota. Translation of the Indian name Andaig. 
Crowley; village in Polk County, Oregon, named for Solomon K. Crowley, early 

settler. 
Crown Point; town in Essex County, New York. From the original French name, 

Point an Chevalure, "point of the hair or scalp," because it is said the French 

and Indians sent out "scaljiing parties" from this ])lace. 
Crow "Wing; county and village in Minnesota, named from a stream which was 

called by the Indians Kayaugeweguan, "crow's feather or wing." 
Croydon; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, named from the town in Sur- 
rey, England. 
Crugers; village in Westchester County, New York, named for Col. John P. Cruger. 
Crum Elbow; village in Dutchess County, New York, the name of which was given, 

it is said, from a sudden liend in the Hudson River at that place. 
Cucharas; river and village in Huerfano County, Colorado. A Spanish word, 

meaning "spoon brook." 
Cudahy; village in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, nanieil for the Cudahy l)rothers, 

who own a pork-packing establishment there. 
Cuddeback; town in Humboldt, County, California, named for an old settler. 
Cuerno Verde; mountain in Colorado, named for its shape and color. A Spanish 

name, meaning "green horn." 
Cuero; town in Dewitt County, Texas. A Spanish word, meaning "hide, skin, 

leather." 
Cuivre; river and village in Lincoln C^ounty, Missouri. A French word, meaning 

"coppei'." 
Cullman; county and city in Alabama, named for General John G. Cullman of that 

State. 
Culloden; village in Monroe County, Georgia, named for William Culloden, one of 

the first settlers in the county. 
Cullom; village in Livingston County, Illinois, named for Shelby M. Cullom, L^nited 

States Senator from that State. 
Culpeper; county and town in Virginia, named for Lord Thomas Culpeper, gov- 
ernor in 1679-80. 
Cumberland; county" in Illinois, named from Cumberland road, which was pro- 
jected to pass through it. 
Cumberland; river and county in Kentucky. Dr. Thomas Walker, of Virginia, 

named the river in 1758, but whether for the Duke of Cumberland or for the 

English county it is not satisfactorily decided. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMP^S IN THE UNITED STATES. 87 

Cumberland; i-oiiiity in Nortli Carolina, i.slandH off the coast of Georj^ia, mountains 
and city in Maryland, and town in Providence County, Rhode Island, named 
for tlie Didve of (-umberland, victor of Culloden. 

Cumberland; counties in Pennsylvania and Yiro:inia, named for the county in 
England. 

Cuming; county and town in Nebraska, named for T. B. Cmning, governor of the 
Territory in 1854-55. 

Cumming; town in Forsyth County, (ieorgia, name«l for Col. William Cumming, 
of Augusta, Georgia. 

Cumniington; town in IIamj)shire County, ]\hissachusetts, named for Col. ,Tohn 
Cununings, former owner. 

Cumminsville ; village in WlieeU-r County, Nebraska, named for J. F. Cummings, 
county clerk. 

Cumminsville; village in Hamilton ("ounty, Ohio, named for David Cummins, 
early settler. 

Cundy; harbor and ledge in Maine, named for a family who settled there at an 
early date. 

Cunningham; town in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Dr. John F. Cunning- 
ham, of Brunswick, Missouri. 

Cupsuptic; lake in Maine. Indian word, meaning "the act of drawing a seine 
while fishing." 

Currie; village in ^Murray County, Minne.sota, named for a parish in Scotland. 

Currituck; county in North Carolina, named from a tribe of Indians who once pos- 
sessed the land. 

Curry; county in Oregon, named for (Jeorge L. Curry, governor of the Territory in 
1855-1859. 

Currytovrn; village in Montgomery County, New York, nanu'd for William Curry, 
patentee. 

CurryviHe; town in Pike County, Missouri, named for Perry Curry, who laid out 
the town. 

Curtin; village in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named for the Cnrtin family, of 
which ( iovernor A. (t. Curtin was a member. 

Curwensville ; borough in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, named for John Cur- 
wen, of Montgomery County. 

Cushing; town in Knox County, Maine, named for Thomas Cushing, lieutenant- 
governor of Massachusetts. 

Cusseta; town in Chambers County, Alabama, and village in Chattahoochee County, 
Georgia. An Indian word, meaning "coming from the sun," originally 
Ilashita. 

Custer; county and town in Colorado; county and town in Idaho; cf)unty, town, 
and creek in Montana; county and town in Nebraska; county and village in 
Beaver County, Oklahoma; county and city in South Dakota, and several other 
places, named for Gen. George A. Custer, who was killed by the Indians on the 
banks of Rosebud River in 187G. 

Cuthbert; town in Randolph County, Cieorgia, named for Col. J. A. Cnthbert, 
member of Congress. 

Cutler; town in Washington County, Maine, named for an early proprietor, Joseph 
Cutler, of Newburyport. 

Cuttawa; town in Lyon County, Kentucky, named from the old Indian name of the 
Kentucky River, Kuttawa. 

Cuttings ville; village in Rutland County, Vermont, named for one of the first 
settlers. 

Cuttyhunk; island in ^Massachusetts. A contraction of the Indian word Poocutoh- 
hunkunnok, '•tlnng that lies out in the water." 



>0 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Cuyahoga; river and county in Ohio; 

Cuyahoga Falls; village in Summit County, Ohio, situated at falls on al)ove river. 
The name is derived by some from Cayahaga, "crooked," but Atwater derives 
it from Cuyahogan-uk, " lake river." 

Cynthiana; city in Harrison County, Kentucky, named for the two daughters of 
the original projirietors, Cynthia and Anna Harris. 

Cypress; island in Washington; so named by Vancouver's party, from the alxin- 
dance of that species of tree found there. 

Cyr; plantation in Aroostook County, Maine, named for a family numerous in that 

section. 
Dade; county and city in Pasco County, Florida, and counties in Georgia and 
Missouri; 

] Dadeville; town in Tallapoosa County, Alabama. Named for Maj. Francis L. Dade, 

[ of the Seminole war. 

Dagget; pond in Maine, named for an early settler. 

Daggett; village in Owen County, Indiana, named for Charles Daggett, a prominent 
resident. 

Dagsboro; town in Sussex County, Delaware, named for Sir John Dagworthy. 

Dahlonega; towns in Lumpkin County, Georgia, and Wapello County, Iowa. An 
Indian name, meaning "yellow dollar," or "place of gold." 

Dakota; two States — North and South Dakota — counties in Nebraska and Minne- 
sota, and several small jilaces, named for the Indian tribe. The name was origi- 
nallj' spelled Lahkota or Dacorta, which means "friend," "ally," " leagued or 
united people," or "allied nation," the common name of the confederate Sioux 
tribes. 

Dale; county in Alabama, named for Gen. Samuel Dale of that State. 

Dallam; county in Texas, named for James W. Dallam, lawyer who made the first 
<ligest of Texas laws. 

Dallas; county in Alabama, named for A. J. Dallas, Secretary of the Treasury under 
President Madison. 
Dallas; counties in Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri, and Texas, and towns in Gaston 

Comity, North Carolina, and Dallas County, Texas; 
Dallas Center; town in Dallas County, Iowa. Named for George M. Dallas, Vice- 
President under James K. Polk. 

Dalles; the name given by the Hudson Bay Company to deep chasms in rocks 
forming a narrow passage for rivers. A French word, meaning "flagstone, slab; 
also a spout for water or a trough." The most famous dalles are on the Colum- 
bia River, Oregon. A city in Wasco County, Oregon, takes its name from the 
above. 

Dalmatia; towi\in Northumljerland County, Pennsylvania, named from the titular 
kingdom of Austria. 

Dalton; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Gen. Tristram Dalton, 
s{)eaker of the house of representatives of Massachusetts. 

Dalton; village in Chariton County, Missouri, named tVir William Dalton. 

Dalton; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Hon. Tristram Dalton, 
a grantee. 

Daly; mountain in Colorado, named for Judge Charles P. Dalj', formerly president 
of the American (lieographical Society. 

Daly; county in Montana, name<l for Marcus Daly. 

Damariscotta; river and town in Lincoln C'ounty, Maine. An Indian name, mean- 
ing "the alewife place," or "river of little fishes." 

Damascus; fourteen places in the country bear the name of the famous city in Syria. 

Dana; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the distinguished 
family of which Chief Justice Francis Dana was a member. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 89 

Danbury; city in Fairliel<l County, Cniinecliciit, ;ni<l scvciai otiicr places, named 

I'nim the town in l-lsst'x, Enj^land. 
Danby; town in Rntland Comity, Vermont, named from Danhy, England. 
Dandridge; town in Jefferson County, Tennessee, named for the maiden name of 

the wife of George Washington, ]\Irs. ^Martha Custis, nee Dandridge. 
Dane; eounty and village in Wisconsin, named for Nathan Dane, an Amerii^an' 

jurist, and mendier of Congress. 
Danielsville; town in Madison County, Georgia, named for (iien. Allen Daniel. 
Dannebrog; village in Howard (bunty, Nebraska, wiiich was settU'd l)y l>anes 

fn)ni ^Milwaukee, AVisconsin. 
Dannemora; town in Clinton County, New York, named from the celebrated iron 

region in Sweden. 
Dansville; village in Ingham County, Michigan, named for Daniel L. Grossman, a 

resident. 
Dansville; town in Steuben County, and village in Livingston County, New York, 

named for Daniel P. Faulkner, who laid the village out. 
Danube; town in Herkimer County, New York, named from the river in Austria. 
Danvers; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, said to have received its name 

from the Eai-1 D'Anvers, but Nasou says it is said to have received its name in 

honor of Sir Danvers Osborn, governor of New York in 1753. 
Danville; town in Hendricks County, Indiana, named for Daniel Bales, proprietor. 
Danville; city in Boyle County, Kentucky, named for its founder. Walker Daniel. 
Danville; village in Montgomery County, Mis.«ouri, built on land whicli formerly 

belonged to Daniel M. Boone, son of Daniel Boone. 
Danville; borough in Montour County, Pennsylvania, name<l for (ien. Daniel 

Montgomery. 
Danville; town in Caledonia County, Vermont, named for the distinguished French 

admiral, D'Anville. 
Danville; city in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, so named because situated on the 

the river Dan. 
Darby; borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named from Derby, England, 

whence many of the early settlers came. 
Darbyville; village in Pickaway County, Ohio, named for a Wyandotte Indian 

chief. 
Dare; county in Virginia named for Virginia Dare, the first white child Ixn-n in the 

New World, 1587. 
(Darke; county in Ohio; 

JDarkesville; town in Berkeley County, West Virginia. Named for Gen. William 
^ Darke, an officer of the Revolution. 
Darlington; borough in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, named for S. P. Darlington, 

a merchant of Pittslnirg. 
Darlington; county and village in South Carolina. Tlie origin of tlie name is not 

known, but may have been given in honor of Colonel Darlington, Kevolutionary 

leader. 
Dartford; village in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, named for the first settler. 
Dartmouth; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, according to Whitmore, named 

from the seaport in Devonshire, England; other authorities give W^illiam, Earl 

of Dartmouth, founder of Dartmouth College at Hanover, New Hampshire. 
Darwin; village in Clark County, Illinois, named for Charles Darwin, the English 

naturalist. 
Darysaw; village ami township in Grant County, Arkansas, so called from tl-o 

French Dea Ruisseaux, " streamlets." 
Dauphin; county in Pennsylvania, named for the Daupiiin of France, son of 

Louis XVI. 



90 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bi i.i.. 197. 

Davenport; city in Iowa, named for Colonel Davenport, early settler. 
Davenport; village in Thayer Connty, Nel)raska, named from Davenport, Iowa. 
Davenport; town in Delaware C-ounty, New York, named for John Davenport, 

early settler. 
Davidson; town in Boulder County, Colorado, named for Col. William A. David- 
son, president of the Davidson Coal and Iron Mining Company, which platted 

the town. 
Davidson; village in Josepldne Connty, Oregon, named for Elijah B. Davidson, 

early settler. 
(Davidson; counties in North Carolina and Tennessee; 

j Davidson College; town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Named for Gen. 
' William Davidson, an officer of the Revolution. 
Davie; county in North Carolina, named for (4en. William R. Davie, governor in 

1798-99. 
Daviess; counties in Indiana, Kentucky, and Missouri, named for Col. Joseph 

Daviess, who fell at the battle of Tippecanoe. 
Davis; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an old settler. 
Davis; county and town in Decatur County, Iowa, named for Garrett Davis, mem- 
ber of Congress. 
Davis; town in Tucker County, West Virginia, named for Senator H. G. Davis. 
Davison; county in South Dakf)ta, named for Henry C. Davison, the first settler 

in the county. 
Davitte; village in Polk County, Georgia, named for the original proprietor, J. S. 

Davitte. 
Dawes; county in Nel)raska, named for James W. Dawes, former governor of the 

State. 
Dawson; connty in (ieorgia, naiued for William C. Dawson, United States Senator 

from that State. 
Dawson; county in Montana, named for Andrew Dawson, of the American Fur 

Company. 
Dawson; village in Richardson County, Nebraska, named for Josluia Dawson, early 

settler. 
Dawson; county in Texas, named for Nicholas Dawson, who led the forces at the 

l)attle of Salado, in 1836. 
Dawsonville; town in Dawson County, Georgia, named for William C. Dawson. 
Day; a county in Oklahoma. The counties in Oklahoma were originally named 

from the letters of the alphabet; later, names were given which Ijegan with the 

letter corresponding to the one l)y which the connty had been known. 
Day; county in South Dakota, named for Merritt H. Day, legislator. 
Dayansville; vfllage in Lewis Connty, New York, named for Charles Dayan, who 

founded it in 1826. 
Dayton; town in York County, Maine, named for a prominent politician. 
Dayton; city in Ohio, named for Jonathan Dayton, one of the original proprietors. 
Daytona; town in Volusia County, Florida, named for W. T. Day, of Ohio. 
Dead; mountain in Nevada, so called because it was supposed by the Mohave Indians 

to be the abode of departed spirits. 
Deadwood; city in South Dakota, named from a forest of dead tiiuber found near. 
Deaf Smith; county in Texas, named for Erastns Smith, Indian and Mexican 

tighter, and scout, so called because his hearing was imperfect. 
Deal; island in Maryland. Name corrupted from the old name, Devils Island. 
(Deal; l)orough in Monmouth County, New Jersey; 

JDeal Beach; post office in Monmouth Connty, New Jersey. Named from Deal, 
I England. 
Deal Island; village in Somerset County, Maryland, named from the island. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 91 

Deansville; village in ()iiei<la County, New York, naiiie<l for ThonuiH Dean, agent 
of the lirothertovvn Indianf^. 

Dearborn; county in Indiana; town in Wayne County; Michigan, river in Montana; 
and mount in South Carolina, named for Gen. Henry Dearborn, Secretary of 
War under President Thomas Jefferson. 

Death; valley in California, so called because a party of immigrants perished there 
from thirst and starvation. 

Deblois; town in Washington C'ounty, Maine, named for Thomas Amory Deblois, 
bank ])resident. 

Decatur; counties in Florida, Ceorgia, Indiana, b)wa, Kansas, and Tennessee, t()wns 
in Newton County, JNIississippi, and Otsego County, New York, also many other 
places, named for Commodore Stephen Decatur. 

Deckertown; borough in Sussex C'ounty, New Jersey, named for a family numer- 
ous in the neighborhood. 

Decorah; city in Winneshiek County, Iowa, named for an Indian chief, Decorie. 

Dedham; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for the Massachusetts town. 

Dedham; town in Norfolk County, ]\Iassachusetts, named from the parish in Eng- 
land. 

Deep; river in North Carolina. A translation of the Indian name Sapponah, "deep 
river." 

Deep River; town in Poweshiek County, Iowa, named from a creek near. 

Deerfield; descriptive name given to many places. The town in Rockingham 
County, New Hampshire, was so named because when the petition for a town 
was pending Mr. Batchelder killed a deer, and upon presenting it to Governor 
Wentworth obtained the act and name. 

Deering-; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named by Governor Penning 
Wentworth for the maiden name of his wifi'. 

Deer Isle; town in Hancock County, Maine, named from three islands upon which 
deer were very abundant. 

Deerlodge; county and town in Powell County, Montana, named from a salt lick 
where deer came in droves. 

Defiance; t-ounty and city in Ohio, named from a fort erected by Gen. Anthony 
W^ayne in detianc-e of the British and Indians. 

De Funiak Springs; celebrated resort in Walton County, Florida, named for a res- 
ident of Nashville. 

Dekalb; counties in Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Tennessee, 
and numerous places in the country, named for Baron De Kalb, who fell at the 
battle of Camden. 

De Lacy; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for W^illiam W. De Lacy, the first 
white man known to have passed along the valley. 

Delancey; village in Delaware County, New York, named for James De liancey, 
an early patentee. 

De Land; town in Volusia County, Florida, named for II. A. De Land, a manu- 
facturer of Fairport, New York, who founded it. 

Delano; mountains in Montana and Utah, named for Columbus Delano, Secretary 
of the Interior under President Grant. 

Delavan; city in Walworth County, Wisconsin, named for E. C. Delavan, a temper- 
ance advocate of Albany, New Y''ork. 

Delaware; river. State, counties in Indiana, Iowa, New York, Ohio, and Pennsyl- 
sylvania, named for Lord de la Warr, governor and first captain-general of Vir- 
ginia. Many small places also bear this name. A tril)e of Indians were known 
by this name, and in the case of the county in Indiana, the name was given 
because this tribe had villages within the boundaries of the county. 

JDeleon; town in Comanche County, Texas; 

iDeleon Springs; town in Vohisia County, Florida. Named for Ponce de Leon. 



92 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Delgada; point in California, named for an old Spanish explorer. 

Delhi; village in Delaware (!onnty, New York, named for the city in India. Several 

other places bear this name. 
Dellenbaugh; mount in Arizona, named for F. S. Dellenbaugh, the artist, by the 

Powell survey. 
Delmar; town on the border between Delaware and Maryland, named from the first 

syllables of the names of each State. 
Del Norte; county in California, situated in the northwest corner of the State. 

Spanish name, meaning "of the north." 
Del Norte; town in Rio (irande County, Colorado, named from the river Rio Grande 

del Norte, "grand river of the north." 
Delphi; town in Carroll County, Indiana, and village in Onondaga County, New 

York, named for the ancient town in Phocis. 
Delphos; city in Allen County, Ohio, and several other places named from the 

classical Delphos of Greece. 
Del Rio; town in Valverde County, Texas, named from its situation on Rio Grande, 

Spanish name, meaning "of the river." 
Delta; county in Colorado, named from a delta of arable land at the mouth of the 

Uncoinpahgre River where it flows into Gunnison River. 
Delta; counties in Michigan and Texas, so named because triangular in shape. 
Demopolis; city in Marengo County, Alabama. Greek word, meaning "city of the 

people." 
Denbigh; town in AVarwick County, Virginia, named from a county in Wales. 
Denison; city in Crawford County, Iowa, named for J. W. Denison; who laid it 

out. 
Denison; city in Grayson County, Texas, settled by persons from the north, and 

prol)ably named for Rev. C. W. Denison, of early antislavery fame. 
Denmark; town in Lewis C'ounty, New York, named for the kingdom in Europe. 
Denmark; town in Band)erg County, South Carolina, named for B. A. Denmark, a 

railroad director. 
Denning; town in ITlster County, New York, named for William H. Denning, for- 
mer proprietor. 
Dennis; village in Barnstal)le County, Massachusetts, named for its first minister, 

Rev. Josiah Dennis. 
Dennison; village in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, named, probably, for (tov. William 

Dennison. 
Dennys; river in Maine, named for an Indian who used to hunt in the vicinity. 
Dennysville; town in Washington County, Maine, named from Dennys River. 
Dent; county in IVJissouri, named for Lewis Dent, early resident. 
Denton; town in Caroline County, Maryland, named for Sir Robert Eden, gov- 
ernor of the province in 1769-1776. It was first called FAen Town, from which 

it was shortened to the present form. 
Denton; river, county, and city in Texas, named for Capt. John B. Denton, who 

was killed in battle with the Indians. 
Denver; city in Colorado, named for James W^. Denver, former governor of Kansas. 

Many small places take their name Irom this city. 
Depauville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Francis Depau, a 

large proprietor. 
Depere; city in Brown County, Wisconsin, so named hecau.se situated on Rapides 

des Peres. 
Depew; village in Erie County, New York, named for Chauncey M. Depew, United 

States Senator. 
Depeyster; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Frederick Depey- 

ster, member of a celebrated New York family. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 93 

Deposit; village in Delaware and Broome counties, New York, named so ))ecause it 

was formerly a place of deposit for lumber. 
Deptford; townsliip in (Gloucester County, New Jersey, named from a port in 

Kn<,dand. 
Derby; city in New Haven County, Connecticut, and town in Orleans County, Ver- 
mont, named for the town and county in England. Many other places also 

hear this name, given either directly or indirectly from the same. 
Derrick City; village in McKean County, Pennsylvania, so named from the great 

num))ers of derricks which mark the oil wells in the vicinity. 
Derry; town in Eockingham County, New Hampshire, and borough in Montour 

County, Pennsylvania; also one or two small places named for the town in Ire- 
land, now called Londonderry. 
Deruyter; village in Madison County, New York, named for Admiral I)e Euyter, 

of the Dutch navy. 
Deschutes; river and village in Sherman County, Oregon. From early Fren(;h 

name, riviere des chutes, meaning " river of falls." 
Desha; county in Arkansas, named for Capt. Ben Desha, prominent citizen of the 

State. 
Desmet; town in Kootenai County, Idaho, and village in Kingsbur)' Countv, South 

Dakota, named for Peter John De Smet, a Jesuit missionary. 
Des Moines; river, county, and city in Iowa. This name is thought to have been 

derived from the Indian word, mikonang, meaning "the road." This name 

was applied by the Indians to a place in the form of Moingona, which the 

French shortened into Moin, calling the river "riviere des moins." Finally the 

name became associated with the Trappist monks, and the river l)y a spurious 

etymology was called "la riviere des moines," "the river of the monks." 
De Soto; counties in Florida, and Mississippi, and parish in Louisiana, village in 

Sumter County, (jleorgia, and twelve other places, named for the discoverer of 

the IMississijipi River, Hernando de Soto. 
Des Plaines; river and village in Cook County, Illinois. Derived from the presence 

of a species of maple called by the French, "plaine." 
Destruction; island on the northwest coast of North America, so named because of 

the massacre of a boat crew upon this coast. 
Detour; village in Chippewa County, Michigan, so named from its position, it being 

necessary to make a detour in order to reach it. 
Detroit; river and city in Michigan. A French word, meaning "a strait, or narrow 

passage," given to the river by the early French explorers because it is a short, 

narrow river connecting Lake St. Clair with Lake Erie. 
Deuel; county in Nebraska, named for Harry P. Deuel, superintendent of the Union 

Pacific Railroad. 
Deuel; county in South Dakota, named for Jacob Deuel, a legislator in 1862. 
Devils; lake in Sauk County, Wisconsin, so named because it is situated in a deep 

chasm with no visible inlet or outlet. 
Devils Lake; village, Sauk County, Wisconsin, named from the lake. 
Devine; town in Medina County, Texas, named for Hon. Thomas J. Devine, an old 

resident of San Antonio. 
Devoe, iTeek in Arkansas, so called from the name given by the early French, 

De Veau, "the calf." 
Dewey; county in Oklahoma, named for Admiral George Dewey. A number of 

towns also bear his name. 
Dewey; county in South Dakota, named for William P. Dewey, surveyor-general 

in 1S73. 
Dewitt; county and village in Illinois, and town in Carroll County, Missouri, named 

for Dewitt Clinton, one time governor of New York. 



94 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Dewitt; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for Moses De Witt, early 

settler. 
Dewitt; county in Texas, named for Green De Witt, colonizer, who settled families 

at Gonzales in 1827. 
Dexter; city in Cowley County, Kansas, named for a trotting horse of Robert Bon- 
ner, of New York. 
Dexter; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Judge Samuel Dexter, candi- 
date for governor of Massachusetts in 1816. 
Dexter; village in Washtenaw County, Michigan, named for Samuel W. Dexter, who 

.settled there in 1829. 
Dexter; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for S. Newton Dexter, a 

prominent business man of Whitesboro. 
D'Hanis; town in Medina County, Texas, named for Count von D'Hanis, who 

founded the town about 1845. 
Diana; town in Lewis County, New York, named for the Greek goddess. 
Dickens; county in Texas, named for J. Dickens, who fell at the Alamo. 
Dickey; county and village in Lamoure County, North Dakota, named for Hon. 

George Dickey, member of the legislature. 
Dickey; river in Washington. The name is derived from the Indian name, Dickoh- 

dockteader. 
Dickinson; counties in Iowa and Kansas, named for Daniel S. Dickinson, United 

States Senator from New York in 1844. 
Dickinson; county in Michigan, named for Don M. Dickinson, Postmaster-General 

under President Cleveland. 
Dickinson; town in Stark County, North Dakota, named for W. S. Dickinson of 

Malone, New York, who founded it. 
Dickinson; county in Virginia, named for a prominent member of the legislature. 
Dicksburg; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for Thomas Dick, former 

owner of the ground. 
Dickson; county and town in Tennessee, named for William Dickson. 
Die All; island in California, so named because all the Indians on the island died. 
DigMon; city in Lane County, Kansas, named for Dick Deighton, a surveyor. 
Dighton; village in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named for Frances Dighton, 

wife of Richard Williams, one of the first settlers. 
Diller; village in Jefferson County, Nebraska, named for H. H. Diller, early settler. 
Dillon; city in Beaverhead County, Montana, named for Sydney Dillon, railroad 

president. 
Dillon; town in Marion County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 
Dillsboro; town in Dearborn County, Indiana, named for Gen. James Dill, early 

settler. 
Dillsboro; town in Jackson County, North Carolina, named for George W. Dill, 

early settler. 
Dimmit; county in Texas, named for Philip Dimmit, one of the earliest settlers in 

the State. 
Dinwiddle; county and town in Virginia, named f(M- Robert Dinwiddle, lieutenant- 
governor of the State in 1752-1758. 
Dirty Devil; creek in Arizona, so named by Pow-ell din-ing his first trip down the 

canyon oi the Colorado, because of the muddiness of its waters. 
Disappointment; cape at the mouth of the Columbia River, Washington, so named 
by John Meares, the I^nglish navigator, who thought no river existed in the 
region. 
Dismal; swamp in Virginia and North Carolina, so named because of its dismal 

appearance, due to the dense forest of junii)er, cypress, etc., which cover it. 
Dismaugh; lake in Laporte County, Indiana. From an Indian word, meaning 
" lake of the monks." 



GANNETT.] PLACE N A.MES IN THE UNITED STATES. 95 

District of Columbia. See Columbia. 

Dix; mount and town in Schuyler County, New York, named for Gen. John A. 
Dix, United States Senator. 

Dixfield; town in Oxford County, Maine. 

Dixmont; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Dr. Elijah Dix, of Boston. 

Dixmont; village in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Miss Dorothea 
Dix, American philantliropi.st. 

Dixon; city in Lee County, Illinois, named for Jolin Dixon, the founder. 

Dixon; town in Webster County, Kentucky, name<l for Hon. Archibald Dixon. 

Dixville; town in Coos County, New llani})shire, named for Col. Timothy Dix, 
first settler. 

Doane; luount in Yellowstone Park, named for Lieut, (iustavus C. Doane, L^. S. 
Army, who commanded the military escort of an expedition in 1870. 

Dobbins; town in Yuba County, California, named for a settler. 

Dobbs Ferry; village in Westchester County, New York, named for a Swede who 
owned a ferry there. 

Dobson; town in Surry County, North Carolina, named for W. P. Dobson, State 
senator. 

Doctortown; town in Wayne County, (Jeorgia, built upon the site of an old Indian 
settlement, which was the abode of a great "medicine man." 

Doddridge; county in West Virginia, named for Philip Doddridge, a distinguished 
statesman of western Virginia. 

Dodge; county in Georgia, named for W. E. Dodge, of New York, who, with W. P. 
Eastman, presented a court-house to the county. See Easlmmi. 

Dodge; counties in Minnesota and Wisconsin, and city in Ford County, Kansas, on 
the site of old Fort Dodge, named for Gen. Henry Dodge, governor of Wiscon- 
sin Territory. 

Dodge; county in Nebraska, named for Augustus Ca'sar Dodge, United States Sen- 
ator from Iowa. 
i Dodge Center; village in Dodge County, Minnesota; 
Dodgeville; city in Iowa County, Wisconsin. Named for Gen. Henry Dodge, gov. 
ernor of Wisconsin territory. 

Dolores; county in Colorado, named from the Rio Dolores. A Spanish word, mean- 
ing "grief," which has a special significance among the Spaniards, being one of 
the titles of the Virgin Mary. 

Dolph; village in Tillamook County, Oregon, named for J. N. Dolph, United States 
Senator. 

Dominguez; creek in Colorado, named for a Spanish priest, who was one of the 
early explorers in this region. 

Donaldson ville; town in Ascension parish, Louisiana, named for William Donaldson. 

Donderberg; mountain in New York, on the Hudson. A Dutch word, meaning 
"thunder mountain," so called by the early Dutch settlers because of the fre- 
quent thunder storms which gather around its summit. 

Donegal; borough and township in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, named 
from the Irish city. 

Doniphan; county and city in Kansas, city in Ripley County, Missouri, and village 
in Hall County, Nebraska, named for Col. Alexander William Doniphan, a dis- 
tinguished Western soldier. 

Donley; county in Texas named for Stockton P. Donley, justice of the supreme 
court of the State. 

Donner; lake in California, named for a leader of a party of immigrants, nearly all 
of whom perished from starvation. 

Dooly; county in Georgia named for Col. John Dooly, an officer in the Revolution. 

Doon; town in Lyon County, Iowa, named from a river in Scotland. 



96 ' PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Door; county in Wisconsin, so named because of its proximity to "Death's Door," 

entrance to Green Bay. 
Dorchester; county in Maryland, named for the Earl of Dorchester, whom Scharf 

says was a family friend of the Calverts. 
Dorchester; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Dorchester, Eng- 
land; county in South Carolina, named for the town in Massachusetts. 
Dorinansville ; villau:e in All)any County, New York, named for Daniel Dorman, 

former inn and store keeper. 
Dorrance; borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Dosoris; village in Queens County, New York. The name is a contraction of "dos 

uxoris, " " dowry of a wife, "the property having come to the first settler through 

his wife. 
Dossett; village in Anderson County, Tennessee, named for the owner of the prop- 
erty, Jacob Dossett. 
Dougherty; county in Georgia, named for Charles Dougherty. 
Doug-herty; township in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, named for Daniel Dougherty, 

one of the prominent residents. 
Doug-las; counties in Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, 

Nevada, South Dakota, and Wisconsin, and probably the counties in Nebraska, 

Oreg(in, and Washington, named for Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois. 
Doug-las; creek in Colorado, named for Chief Douglas, of the White Eiver Utes. 
Douglas; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Dr. William 

Douglas, author of a history of New England. 
Douglas; mount in Montana, named for E. M. Douglas, of the United States 

Geological Survey. 
Douglass; city in Butler County, Kansas, named for Josejih Douglass, by whom it 

was laid out. 
Dover; city in Delaware; town in Morris County, New Jersey; and city in Strafford 

County, New Hampshire, named from the town in England. 
Dowagiac; river and city in Cass County, Michigan. An Indian word, meaning 

"fishing river." 
Downie ville ; town in Sierra County, California, named for a pioneer. 
Downingtown; borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named for Thomas 

Downing. 
Downs; city in Osborne County, Kansas, named for William F. Downs, of Atchison. 
Downsville; village in Delaware County, New York, situated on Downs Creek. 

Both are named for Abel Downs, who had a tannery there. 
Dows; town in Wright County, Iowa, named for a railroad contractor. 
Doylestown; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, named for William Doyle, 

an early settler. 
Dracut; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named from the home of the 

Varnnm family, in Wales. 
Drakes; bay in California, named for Sir Francis Drake, the navigator. 
Drakesville; town in Davis County, Iowa, named for John A. Drake, who laid 

it out. 
Drayton; town in Dooly C'ounty, Georgia, named for Colonel Drayton, of South 

Carolina. 
Dresden; fifteen places in the country bear the name of the city in Germany. 
Drew; county in Arkansas, named for Thomas S. Drew, governor in 1844-1848. 
Drew; village in Sunflower County, Mississippi, named for a railroad man. 

IDrewry; bluff on James River, Virginia; 
Drewry Bluff; post-office in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Named for Maj. Augus- 
tus Drewry. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 97 

Drummond ; hike in the center of Dismal Swamp in Virginia, named fur William 

Druiinnond, former governor of North Carolina. Another authority says that it 

wan named for a hunter who discovered it. 

Dryden; town in Tompkins County, New York, named for tiu^ pcjet, John Dryden. 

DryTortugas; ten small islands off the coast of Florida. Tlu- name was given 

from the lack of springs and abundance of sea turtles. T(jrtugas is a Spanish 

word, meaning "tortoises." 
Duane; town in Franklin County, New York, named for .Jamt>s Duane, proprietor 

and lirst settler. 
Duanesburg; town in Schenectady County, New York. French says that it was 

named for James Duane, principal proprietor. Cordon says it was named for 

Judge Duane. 
Dublin; city in Laurens County, Georgia, named from the city in Ireland. Several 

other places are named from the same. 
Dubois; county in Indiana, named for Toussaint Du)j(jis, who had charge of the 

guides and spies in the Tippecanoe campaign. 
Dubois; borough in Pennsylvania, named for its founder, John Dubois. 
Dubuque; county and city in Iowa, named for a French trader, Julien Dubucjue. 
Duck Hill; town in Montgomery County, Mississippi, named from a hill near the 

town where ducks were plentiful in early days. 
Dudley; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named f(jr two Ijrothers, Paul 

and William Dudley, who were among the first proprietors. 
Dufur; village in Wasco County, Oregon, named for an old settler. 
Dukes; county in Massachusetts, so named because it was under the govermuent of 

the Duke of York, afterwards James II. 
Duluth; city in Minnesota, named for Sieur Daniel Grays<jlon I^uluth, a French 

traveler. 
Dumfries; town in Prince William County, Virginia, named for the town in 

Scotland. 
Dummer; town in Coos County, New Hampshire; 

Dummerston; town in Windham County, Vermont. Named for William Dummer, 
lieutenant-governor of Vermont and acting governor of Massachusetts in 
1723-1728, 1728-1730 
Dumont; village in Clear Creek County, Colorado, named for John M. Duniont, a 

mine operator. 
Dunbar; village in Otoe County, Nebraska, named for John Dunbar, large land- 
owner. 
Dunbar; Ijorough in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, named for the town in Scotland. 
Dunbar; village in Marlboro County, South Carolina, named for a family in the 

neighborhood. 
Dunbarton; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named by Archibald 

Stark, one of the first proprietors, who emigrated from Dunbarton, Scotland. 
Duncan; town in Bolivar County, Mississippi, named for a leading citizen. 
Duncan Falls; town in Muskingum County, Ohio, named for a trader. Major 

Duncan. 
Duncannon; borough in Perry County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in 

Wexford, Ireland. 
Duncombe; town in Webster County, Iowa, named for Hon. J. F. Duncombe. 
DundafF; borough in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in 

Wales. 
Dundee; village in Yates County, New York, named from the town in Scotland. 

A number of other places also bear this name. 
Dundy; county in Nebraska, named for Judge Elmer S, Dundy. 

Bull. rJ7— 02 T 



98 PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 1-J7. 

Dungeness; town in Clallam Cuunty, Washington. This name was given to a low 
point of land in the county, by Vancouver, because of its resemblance to Dun- 
geness in the British channel, and subsequently ai>plied to the town. 

Dunkirk; city in Chautauqua County, New York, named indirectly from the town 
in France. 

Dunklin; county in Missouri, named for Daniel Dunklin, governor of Missouri in 
1832-1836. 

Dunlap; town in Harrison County, Iowa, named for llie superintendent of the Chi- 
cago and Northwestern Railway. 

Dunlap; city in Morris County, Kansas, named for Joseph Dunlap, a trader among 
the Indians and founder of the town. 

Dunlapsville ; town in Union County, Indiana, laid out ))y John Duidap, one of the 
first settlers. 

Dunmore; lake in Vermont, named by the Karl of DuuniDre. who waded into it and 
formally christened it for himself. 

Dunmore; town in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, named for John (Lord) Dun- 
more, governor of Virginia, 1772-1776. 

Dunn; town in Harnett County, North Carolina, named for a resident. 

Dunn; county in Wisconsin, named for Charles Duiui, first chief justice of the 
Territory. 

Dunnsville; town in Albany County, New York, named for Christopher Dunn, 
original owner. 

Dunraven; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for the lilarl of Dunraven. 

Dunstable; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The history of the town 
states that it was named for the mother of one of the i)etitioners, Mary Tyng, 
but there is no record of her maiden name or birthplace. There is, however, 
record of a large family by the name of Long, who came fnjm Dunstable, Eng- 
land, in 1635. This fact gives a direct connection, and it is probable that the 
town took its name from the English town. 

Dupag-e; county in Illinois, named for a river which tiows through the county. 
The origin of the name of the river is unknown. 

Duplin; county in North Carolina, named for Lord l)ui)lin, or I)ui)plin, of the board 
of trade. 

Duquesne; l)orough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named from old Fort 
Du(juesne, which was named for a distinguished French officer. 

Duquoin; city in Perry County, Illinois, said to have been named for an Indian 
chief of the Kaskaskia tri])e. 

Durand; village in Shiawassee County, INIichigan, named for George H. Durand, of 
Flint, Michigan, member of Congress. 

Durand; city in Pepin County, Wisconsin, named ior Miles Durand Prindle, an 
early settler. 

Durant; town in C'edar County, Iowa, named for Thomas Durant. 

Durants; neck of land in Peniuimans County, North Carolina, granted to George 
Durant in 1662. 

Durham; town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, named from the town in England. 

Durham; town in Androscoggin County, Maine, named from the former residence 
of the royal family, early settlers. 

Durham; county and town in North Carolina, named for Dr. Durham, owner of the 
town site of Durham. 

Dushore; borough in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, the 
name l)eing a corruption of Dupetit-Thouars. 

Duston; island in New Haini)shire, named for an early settler. 

Dutchess; county in New York, named for Mary of Modena, Duchess of York. 
Previous to the appearance of Johnson's Dictionary the title of the wife of a, 
duke Avas spelled with a "t;" hence the name of the county is so spelled, 



GANNETT.] TLACE NAMES IN" THE UNITED STATES. 99 

Dutton; mount, in Utali, named ])y Powell for Maj. (■. Vj. l)uttiiii. 

Duval; (.■omity in Florida, named for William P. Duval, Tcnitniial i^nvcrnor in 

1822-1 8;?4." 
Duval; county in Texas, named fi>r the Duval family, prominent in the State. One 

member, Burr 11. Duval, fell in Faimin's mas,sacr(>. 
Duwamish; river in Washington, named from an Indian trilie. 
Duxbury; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, settled l»y ^Nliles Standish. It 

is said to have received its name from the seat of the Standish family in England, 

Duxlmry Hall. 
Dvright; village in Hampshire County. Massachusetts, named for the Dwight fannly, 

prominent early settlers. 
Dycusburg; village in Crittenden C-ounty, Kentucky, named for William K. Dycus, 

its founder. 

I Dyer; county in Tennessee; 
Dyersburg; city in Tennessee. Named for Col. Henry Dyer, who fell at tlie battle 
of New Orleans. 
Dyersville; town in Dubuqiie County, Iowa, named for a former owner, James Dyer. 
Dyerville; town in Humboldt County, C-alifornia, named for a settler. 
Dysart; town in Tama County, Iowa, named for a t<nvn in Scotland. 
Eagle; this word, either alone or with suffixes, forms the name of 81 post-offices in 

the United States — in many cases so called because of the former present-e of the 

bird. 
Eagle; county in Colorado. Hall's History gives the origin as from the river of 

that name flowing through this county. 
Eagle River; village in Keweenaw County, Michigan, named from the Indian, 

^Nligisiwisibi, meaning "eagle." 
Earl Park; t( iwn in Benton County, Indiana, laid out by Adams Earl and A. D. Raub. 
Earlville; town in Delaware County, Iowa, named for its first settler, C. M. Karl. 
Earlville; \illage in Madison County, New York, named for Jonas Ivirl, canal 

commissioner. 
Early; county in Georgia, named in honor of Peter Early, governor of the State in 

1813. 
Easley; town in Pickens County, South C-ar'ilina, named for General Easley, a prom- 
inent Sontli Carolinian. 
East Baton Rouge; parish in Louisiana. See Baton RoiKje. 
East Bend; town in Yadkin County, North Carolina, named from the bend in the 

Yadkin River at that ])oint. 
East Brady; borough in Clarion County, Pennsylvania, on the Allegheny River, 

east of Bradys Bend. 
East Bridge-water; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named from the 

original name of Brockhju, Massachusetts, which first received the name of 

Bridgewater in honor of a celebrated English duke. 
East Carroll; jmrish in Louisiana, named in honor of Charles Carroll of Carrolhon. 
East Fallowfield; townships in C'rawford and Washington counties, Pennsylvania, 

said to be named for Lancelot Fallowfield, one of the first purchasers of land 

from William Penn. 
East Feliciana; parish in Louisiana. A Spanish word, meaning "dome." 
East Greenbush; town in Rensselaer County, New York, named by tiie Dutch 

Het Groen Bosch, meaning "green bush," because of the pine woods near, 

which were continually green. 
East Greenwich; town in Kent County, Rhode Island, nametl for the district of 

London in Kent County, England. 
Eastham; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named from its extreme 

eastern situation in the county. 



100 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Eastland; county and town in Texas, named for M. W. Eastland. 

Eastman; town in Dodge County, Georgia, named for W. P. Eastman, who, with 

W. E. Dodge, presented the county with a court-house. 
Easton; city in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named from the estate of an 

English nobleman. 
Easton Center; village in Bristol County, Massachusetts, perhaps named in honor 

of Hon. John Easton, governor of Rhode Island. 
Eastport; city in Washington County, Maine, which was originally called Moose 

Island, but was later incorporated under its present name in honor of being the 

most eastern city in the United States. 
East River; a body of water at New York, properly a strait connecting Long Island 

Sound with New York J5ay; called a river no doubt from the river-like action of 

its tides; the name is used to distinguish it from North River, that is, the Hudson. 
Eastwood; village in Onondaga County, New York, a suburb of Syracuse, and named 

from its eastward position from that place. 
Eaton; town in Weld County, Colorado, named for Benjamin H. Eaton and Aaron 

J. Eaton of the Eaton Milling and Elevator Company. 
Eaton; county in Michigan, named for John H. Eaton, Secretary of War under 

President Jackson. 
Eaton; town in Madison County, New York, and village in Preble County, Ohio, 

named for Gen. Wm. Eaton, of Massachusetts, Revolutionary officer and com- 
mander of the United States military forces in Tripoli. 
Eaton Rapids; town in Eaton County, Michigan, so named on account of the rapids 

in Grand River. 
Eatonton; city in Putnam County, Georgia, named for Gen. Wm. Eaton. 
Eatontown; township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named for an old settler. 
Eau Claire; river in Michigan. The name is French and signities "clear water." 
Eau Claire; county and city in Wisconsin, named from the river in Michigan. 
Eau Galle; river in Wisconsin, from which township and village in Wisconsin are 

named. French word, signifying "bitter water." 
Eau Pleine; river and town in Portage County, Wisconsin. French name, meaning 

"full water," or "stocked river." 
Ebeeme; mountain and gorge in Piscataquis County, Maine. An Indian word, 

meaning "where they get high-bush cranberries." 
Ebenecook; village in Lincoln County, Maine. A corruption of the Indian 

Abanauk, meaning "bread place," or according to another authority, "high- 
bush (cranberry place." 
Ebenezer; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, named by the early settlers for 

the old Jewish city. 
Ebensburg; borough of Cambria County, Pennsylvania, laid out by the Rev. Rees 

Lloyd, and named by him for his eldest son, Eben. 
Echaconnee; town in Bibb County, Georgia, named from the creek on which it is 

situated, and which in turn is derived from the Indian, meaning " beaver creek." 
Echo; canyon in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah. 

Echo; peak in Yellowstone Park, so named because of its remarkable echo. 
Echo Canyon; town in Summit County, LTtah, named from the canyon. 
Echols; county in Georgia, named for Robert M. Echols. 
Eckley; town in Yuma County, Colorado, said to be so named for Amos Eckles, 

cattle foreman for J. W. Bowles. 
Ecola; creek and summer resort in Clatsop County, Oregon, so named by Captain 

Clark because a whale was washed up there — ecola, an Indian word meaning 

" whale." 
Economy; townslii]) in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, established in 1825 by a 

Harmonist society, and named to indicate the principles of their government and 

their habits of living. 



oANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 101 

Ecore Fabre; ptream in Arkansas. The name is derived from llie French word 
"ecore," m(>anin<j; a shore, bank, or bluff, and Fabre, a proper name. 

Ecorse; town in Wayne County, Miclngan, named from the river, which was so 
called by the Indians on account of the birch and other kinds of ))ark found on 
its banks. The word is French, meaning "bark of a tree." 

Ector; county in Texas, named for Matthew Ector, Confederate commander and 
judge. 

Eddington; town in Penobscot ( 'ounty, Maine, named for Colonel F'ddy, a ])romi- 
nent settler. 

Eddy; county in New Mexico, named in honor of C. B. Eddy, a prominent citizen. 

Eddy; t-ounty in Nortli Dakota, named for one of the early ])ank('rs of Fargo. 

Eddyville; town in Wapello County, Iowa, nam(>d for J. P. Kddy, who established 
a po8t there at an early ilay. 

Eddyville; city in Lyon County, Kentucky, so named for (lie large eddies in the 
Cumberland River at this point. 

Eden; town in Hancock County, Maine, named pro])ably for llicliard Eden, an 
early English author. 

Eden; town in Concho County, Texas, named for Fred Ede, who owne(l the land. 

Edenton; town in Chowan County, North Carolina, named for Charles Eden, gov- 
ernor of the State in 1714-1722. 

Edg-ar; county in Illinois, named for (len. John Edgar, an early and distinguished 
]noneer of the State. 

Edgecomb; town in Lincoln County, Maine, named for Lord Ivlgecombe, a friend 
of the American colonies. 

Edgecombe; county in North Carolina, named for Richard, I'.aron of Mount Edge- 
combe, of the board of trade. 

Edgefield; town and county in South Carolina, named, as Sinuns supposes, because 
of the geographical situation at the edge of the State. There is also a supposi- 
tion that the county derives its name from the fact that it l)orders on an older 
county. 

Edgerton; city in Johnson County, Kansas, named for Edgerton, the chief engineer 
of tlie Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 

Edgerton; village in Williams County, Ohio, named for Alfred P. Edgerton. 

Edgerton; city in Rock County, Wisconsin, probal)ly named for E. W. Edgerton, 
an early settler. 

Edina; city in Knox County, Missouri. A poetical name given to Pxlinburgh. 

Edinburg; nine post-offices in the United States are named for the Scottish town. 

Edison; village in INIorrow County, Ohio, named for Thomas A. Edison. 

Edisto; river and island in South Carolina, named from an Indian tribe; the tribe 
was also known as "Crista." 

Edmeston; town in Otsego County, New York, named for Robert Edmeston, an 
early pioneer. 

Edmonson; county of Kentucky, named for Capt. Jack Edmonson, who fell at the 
l)attle of Raisin River. 

Edmunds; county in South Dakota, named in honor of Newton Edmunds, gov- 
ernor in 1863. 

Edna; city in Labette County, Kansas, named for a child, EdnaGragery, in 187C. 

Edwards; county in Illinois, named for Ninian Edwards, governor of Illinois Ter- 
ritory in 1809. 

Edwards; county in Kansas, named for W. C. Edwards, of Ilutcliinson, first set- 
tler, who took active part in its organization. 

Edwards; town in Hinds County, Mississippi, named for Dick Edwards, owner and 
proprietor of the Edwards House, Jackson, Mississippi. 

Edwards; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Edward McCor- 
mack, brother of the founder. 



102 PLACE NAMES IN THK UNITED STATES. lbui.l. 197. 

Edwards; town in Beaufort County, North Carolina, named for a jiroininent family 

of the neighhorhood. 
Edwards; Cdunty in Texas, named for Harden Edwards, who estaVjlished, under 

grant from the Mexican Government, a colony at Nacogdoches in 1825. 
Edwardsport; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for Edwards AVilkins. 
Edwardsville; city in Madison County, Illinois, named for Ninian Edwards, Terri- 
torial governor in 1809. 
Edwardsville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Jonathan S. 

Edwards, the first postmaster. 
Eel; river iia California, named fi'om the Indian word Wisliosk, "eel river," so 

called ])ecause of its crookedness. 
Eel; river in Indiana, called l)y the Indians Shoamaque, "slippery fish." The 

Indiana State Historical Geology, 1882, gives the Indian name as Ke-wa-be- 

gwinn-maig, and the meaning "snake-fish-river." 
Effingham; county in Georgia, named for Lord Effingham. 
Effing-ham; county and city in Illinois. The city was named for the county which, 

in tui'n, was named for Gen. Edward Effingham. 
Effingham; city in Atchison County, Kansas, named for Effingham Nichols, of 

Boston, a promoter of the Central Branch, Union Pacific Railroad. 
Egbertsville; village in Richmond County, New York, named for James Egberts- 

ville, a former resident. 
Egg Harbor; township anil city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, bordering on the 

ocean and Great Egg Harboi- Bay. It was so called because of the number of 

gull's eggs found near the bay. 
Egremont; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, supposed to have received its 

name from Charles AVyndham, Earl of Egremont, ^vlio was secretarj- of state in 

1671. 
Egypt; fourteen places of the Ignited States are named for the ancient country in 

Africa. 
Ehrenberg; town in Yuma County, Arizona, founded in 1856 by Herman Ehren- 

1 )erg. 
Ehrhardt; town in Bamberg County, South Carolina, named for a ]>rominent 

family. 
Elba; there are 16 places of this name in the United States, most of which were 

named for the island in the ]\Iediterranean. 
Elbert; county and peak in Colorado, named for Samuel W. Elbert, governor of the 

Territory in 1873-74. 
f Elbert; county in Cieorgia; 

I Elberton; city in the above county. Named for Samuel ElViert, formerly a governor 
[ of the State. 

Elbow; lake in Maine, so called l)ecause of its sliape. 
Elbridge; town in Onondaga County, New York, prol)ably named after Elbridge 

Gerry, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
El Capitan; cliff in the Yosemite Yalley, California. The name is Spanish, meaning 

"the captain." 
(Eldora; city in Hardin County, Iowa. A corruption of the Sjtanish word El Dorado, 
I meaning " the golden or gilded land." 

I Eldorado; city in Butler County, Kansas, and the first county in California in which 
I gold was discovered. See Eldora. 
Electric; peak in Yellowstone Park, named by Mr. Henry Gannett, United States 

geographer, on account of a severe electrical storm encountered there. 
Eleven Mile; creek in Genesee County, New York, so called because it crosses the 

Buffalo roa.d 11 miles from Buffalo. 
Elgin; city in Kane County, Illinois, named for the Earl of Elgin. 



fiANNETT.l PLACE NAMKS IN THK UNITED STATES. 108 

Elizabeth; caite iu ■Maine, and u'i'"iii> of inlandi^ in ^Mafisachusetts, nanitnl in honor of 

(^lu'cn I]li/,al)t'tli of Enjiland. Tiiis word, either alon<M)r with suHixe.s, forms 

tile names of 25 places in tiie United States, most of whieli were so named. 
Elizabeth; city in Union C'onnty, New Jersey, named for tlie wife of liord Carteret. 
Elizabeth; borougli in Alletiiieny Comity, Pennsylvania, named by the founder, 

Stephen liayard, for his wife. 
Elizabeth; town in Wirt County, West N'irt^inia, named for ]<"li/.alieth, the wifi' of 

David Beauchami). 
Elizabeth City; county in Vir<,Mnia, and town in I'as(iuo1ank ('ounty, North Carolina, 

named for Queen i<]ii/,al>eth of I'Ingland. 
Elizabethtown; town in Dartholomew County, Indiana, named for Elizabeth 

Dranham, the wife of the founder. 
Elizabethtown; town in lUaden C-ounty, North Carolina, named for the wife of 

Lord Carteret, Elizabeth. 
Elk; this word, either alone or as a prefix, forms the name of (v! places in the United 

States, niostof them doulitless j^nven on account of the nmneT'onselk which made 

their home there. 
Elk Falls; town in Elk County, Kansas, receives its name from a waterfall in Elk 

Iviver, near the site of the town. 
Elk Garden; town in Mineral County, West Virg'inia, so named by Senator Davis, 

Ijecause of the former abundance of elk. 
Elkhart; county ami city in Indiana, which take their name from tiie river. 
Elkhart; village in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, nametl from the lake, which at 

this point reseml)les an elk's heart. 
Elkhorn; village in Douglas County, Nebraska, named for the river. 
Elkhorn; city in Walworth County, Wisconsin. This city is named fi-om the 

prairie, Elkhorn, which was name<l thus by Samuel E. Phoenix in .Inly, 1836, 

when he found an elk's horn upon a tree there. 
Elkins; town in Randolph County, West Virginia, named for Senator S. V>. Elkins. 
Elko; county in Nevada. The origin of this name is not certain, for according to 

some it is an Indian word, and according to others was so named on account of 

the abundance of elk found there. 
Elk Park; village in ]\Iitchell County, North Carolina, so named because of the 

number of elk killed there. 
Elkton; village in Huron County, Michigan, named by an early settler, Martin 

Baker, who saw two large elk there when the iirst building was erected. 
Ellen; mountain in Utah, named by J. W. Powell, United States Geological Survey, 

f<jr the wife of Mr. A. H. Thompson, also of the Geological Survey. 
Ellenburg; town in Clinton County, New York, named for the daughter of John R. 

^lurray, of New York, the jarincipal owner of township 5 of the military tract. 
Ellendale; village in Sussex County, Delaware, named for the wife of Dr. J. S. 

Prettyman, who laid it out. 
Ellery; town in Chautauqua County, New York, name<l for William Ellery, one of 

the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
Ellicott; city in Howard and Baltimore counties, Maryland, tirst settled and named 

by the brothers Andrew and John Ellicott. 
f Ellicott; town in Chautauqua County, New York; 

<Ellicottville; village in Cattaraugus County, New York. Named for Joseph EUi- 
i cott, of the Holland Land Company. 
Ellijay; town iu Gilmer County, Georgia. The wonl is Indian, meaning "narrow 

valley." 
EUinwood; city in Barton County, Kansas, named for Col. John R. P^llinwood, 

engineer, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Elliott; county in Kentucky, named for Judge John M. i'llliott. 



104 PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. tBiTii.. ]<J7. 

Elliottsville ; villat^c in llichinoiKl County, Now York, named for Dr. Sainnol M. 

Elliott. 
Ellis; oounty and city in Kansas, named in honor of George Ellis, first iientenant, 

Twelfth Kansas Infantry. 
Ellis; county in Texas, named for Richard Ellis, presi<lent pro tempore of the first 

senate of the rei^ublic. 
Ellisburg; town in Jefferson County, New York, which derives its name from 

Lyman Ellis, of Troy, New York, who settled there as a proprietor in 1797. 
Ellisville; town in Jones County, Mississippi, named for Powhatan Ellis, member 

of the Sni)reme Court and United States Senator. - 
Ellsworth; town in Hamilton County, Iowa, named for a banker at Iowa Ealls. 
Ellsworth; comity and city in Kansas, named from the fort, Ellsworth, which in 

turn ^\as named for Lieut. Allen Ellsworth. 
Ellsworth; city in Hancock County, Maine, named for Oliver P^Usworth, one of the 

delegates to the National Constitutional Convention. 
Elm; this word, with the suffixes "hurst," "wood," "dale," "hall," "grove," 

"creek," "city," "luiry," "branch," forms the name of 29 places in the 

United States, in most cases given on account of the presence of this species of 

tree in the vicinity. 
Elma; village in Erie County, New York, named for a large elm tree which stands 

near the village. 
Elmira; city in Chemung County, New York, said tf) have been named for Elmira 

Teall, daughter of Nathan Teall, a tavern keeper. 
Elmore; county in Alabama, named for John A. Elmore, of that State. 
Elmore; county in Idaho, named for a celebrated mine in the county. 
Elmore; village and town in Lamoille County, Vermont, named for the original 

grantee, Col. Samuel Elmore. 
Elon College; town in Alamance County, North Carolina, named, probalily, for 

Judge Elon. 
El Paso; county in Colorado. The name is a Spanish one, meaning "the pass," 
"passage," or "gap," and was given this county with reference to Ute Pass, 
which is within its limits. 
El Paso; city in Woodford County, Illinois; 

El Paso; county and city in Texas. County and city take their name from the 
l)resence of a pass or gap — that of the Rio Grande. 
Elreno; city in Canadian County, Oklahoma. A Spanish word, meaning "rein- 
deer." 
Elsie; village in Clinton County, Michigan, named for ]\Iiss P^lsie Tillotson, the 

daughter of an early jMoneer. 
Elsie; town in Perkins County, Nebraska, named for the daughter of C. E. Perkins. 
Elyria; city in Lorain County, Ohio, named for Heman Ely in 1817. 
Emanuel; county in Georgia, named for David Emanuel, at one time president of 

the Georgia .senate. 
Emaus; borough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, named by the Moravians in 

memory of the little village in Palestine. 
Embarrass; river and village in Waupaca County, Wisconsin. A French word, 

meaning "obstruction." 
Emerick; village in Madison County, Nebraska, named for John Emerick, an early 

settler. 
Emery; county in Utah, named for George W. Emery, governor in 1875-1880. 
Emlenton; borough in Venango County, Pennsylvania, named for Emlen, the wife 

of Joseph M. Fox, one of the original proprietors. 
Emma; mountain in Arizona, named by J. W. Powell, of the U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey, for his wife, Emma. 



OANNKTTJ PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. l05 

I Emmet; count ies in Iowa and l\TichiG:an and villasoin SaintClairConnly, Michigan; 
Emmetsburg-; city iu I'alo Alto County, Iowa. Named for tlie Irish i)atriot, Robert 
i W. Emuiett. 
Emmitsburg ; town in Frederick County, Maryland, named for William Emmitt, 

it8 founder. 
Emmons; mountain.^ in Colorado, New York, and Utah, named for S. F. Emmons, 

the geologist. 
Emmons; comity in North Dakota, named for James A. Emmons, a pioneer steam- 

Ixiatman and mercliant at ]>ismarck. 
Emory; town in Washington County, Virginia, named from Emory and Henry 

College, which is situated there and which received i)art of its name from Bishoj) 

Emory. 
Empire; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, so named by the founder, S. L. Cheney, 

on account of the town topping a ridge. 

I Emporia; city in Lyon County, Kansas; 
Emporium; borough in Cameron County, Pennsylvania. A Latii. word, meaning 
"center of trade." 
Emuckfaw; village in Tallapoosa County, Alal)ama. An Indian word, meaning 

"horseshoe bend." 
Enfield; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named, according to Dr. J. G. 

Holland, for Robert Field. 
Enfield; towns in Grafton County, New Hampshire, and in Halifax County, North 

Carolina, named from the birthplace of John Wesley in England. 
Eng-elmann; canyon and peak in Colorado, named for the botanist. 
Englewood; city in Bergen County, New Jersey, named from the English "wood 

ingle," a woody nook or corner. 
Englund; village in Marshall County, Minnesota, named for its first postmaster. 
Enno; town in Wake County, North Carolina, named for an Indian tribe. 
Enon; village in Clark County, Ohio, named for the place in Palestine where John 

was baptized. 
Enoree; river in South Carolina, named for an Indian tribe. 
Enosburg; town in Franklin County, Vermont, named for Roger Enos, to whom 

the land was originally granted. 
Enterprise; this name is given to about 25 places in the United States to denote 

their policy. 
Enterprise; city in Dickinson County, Kansas, named by the son of one of the 

proprietors. 

IEphrata; town in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania; 
Ephratah; town in Fulton County, New York. Named for the ancient city of 
Palestine. 
Eppes; creek and island in the James River, Charles City County, Virginia, named 

for Dr. Ep23es, the owner. 
Epping; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, named from the town in 

Essex, England. 
Epsom; village in Daviess County, Indiana, so named because of a well near by 

which contains water much resembling epsom salts in taste. 
Epsom; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for the town in Surrey, 

England. 
Epworth; town in Dubuque C'ounty, Iowa, named from, the town in Lincolnshire, 

England. 
Equinunk; villages in Delaware County, New York, and Wayne County, Pennsyl- 
vania. An Indian word, meaning "place where clothing is distri))uted." 
Erath; county in Texas, named for an early settler and Indian fighter, George B. 

Erath. 



106 PLACK NAMES IN THP: UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Erie; one of the Great Lakes, drained by the St. Lawrence, is an Indian word, which, 
in the form of "Erige" or "Erilke," was tlie name of a now extinct Lidian 
tribe of the Ilurons, exterminated by the Iroquois, tlie word signifying "cat" 
or " wild-cat; " anotlier authority gives the meaning as "mad." 

Erie; city in Neosho County, Kansas, named from a small lake near l)y, of that 
name. 

JErie; counties in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York, and city in Pennsylvania; 

(Erieville; village in Madison County, New York. Named from the lake 

Erin; the name of numerous towns and villages in the United States, named from 
the ancient name of Ireland. 

Errol; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for a imrish in Scotland. 

Erskine; village in Passaic. County, New Jersey, named for a parish in Scotland. 

Erving; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for the man who owned 
"Krvings Grant," in early days. 

Erwin; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Col. Arthur Erwin of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Escambia; county and river in Alabama, and county and river in Florida, the coun- 
ties having been named from the rivers, which are suj^posed to be named from 
the Spanish word, cambiar, meaning "barter or exchange." 

Escanaba; river and city in Delta County, Michigan, the city taking its name from 
the river. According to Haines, an Indian word meaning "flat rock," l)ut 
according to other authorities, means a "young male quadruped." 

Eschsch.oltz ; inlet of Kotzebue Sound, Alaska, named for J. F. Eschscholtz, the 
naturalist. 

Escoheag; town in Kent County, Rhode Island. An Indian word, supposed to 
• mean "origin of three rivers." 

Escondido; city in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning "hid- 
<len treasure." 

Esculapia; watering place in Lewis County, Iventncky, named for the god of the 
medical art — Esculapius. 

Eskridge; city in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, named for C. V. Eskridge, the first 
purchaser of a town lot. 

Eskutassis; stream in Piscataquis County, Maine. An Indian word, meaning "small 
trout. ' ' 

Eskweskwewadjo; mountain in Maine. An Indian word, meaning "she-l)ear 
mountain." 

Esmeralda; county in Nevada, and mining camps in California and Idaho. Si)anish 
word for emerald, the places being so named on account of the presence of these 
l)recious stones. 

Esopus; stream in New York. A difference of opinion exists as to whether the 
Indian tribe of this name took the name from the river or whether the river was 
named for the tribe. Schoolcraft gives "Seepus" or "seepu" as the word near- 
est like it in the Indian languages. 

Esperance; town in Schoharie County, New York. A French word, meaning 
' ' hope. ' ' 

Essex; counties in Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, and Virginia, 
named for the English county of Essex. 

Essexville; village in Bay County, Michigan, named for an early settler, Ransom 
Essex. 

Estaboga; town in Talladega County, Alabama. An Indian word, meaning "where 
people reside." 

Estherville; city in Emmet County, Iowa, named for Esther A. Ridley, wife of one 
of the original proprietors. 



GANNETT.] TLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 107 

Estill; county in Kontneky and a town in Madison ( 'uuuly, Kentucky, naiucil fdi- 

Cajit. James Estill, an Indian (ij^liter. 
Estill; town in Howard County, Missouri, named for dil. John K. Mstill. 
Ethel; town in Attala County, Mississippi, nameil for the daugiitiM- of Capt. 8. B. 

McConnico. 
Etna; many places in tlie United States are imnied for tiie celt'))rated volcano in 

■Sicily. 
Etowah; county in Alal)ama, and river in (ieorj^ia. From an Indian word, Ktawa, 

meaning " poling a l)oat." 
Etruria; townshi]) in Halifax County, Nortli Carolina, named for the division of 

ancient Italy. 
Euclid; town in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and village in Onondaga County, New 

York, named for the celebrated geometer of Alexandria. 
Eudora; city in Douglas County, Kansas, named for the daughter of Pascel Fish. 
Eugene; city in Lane County, Oregon, named for Eugene Skinner, its first settler. 
Eulalia; township in Potter County, Pennsylvania, named for the first child born 

within its limits. 
Eureka; county in Nevada, and cities in California and Kansas. A Creek word, 

meaning "I have found it." 
Eustis; town in Franklin County, JNIaine, named for Charles L. Eustis, an early 

proprietor. 
Eutaw; town in Greene County, Alabama. According to Gatchet it is nametl from 

the Indian tribe, also known as p]tiwaw, or from "itawa," "pine tree." 
Eutawville; town in Berkeley County, South Carolina, named from the famous 

luitaw Spring. 
Evangeline; township in Charlevoix County, JNIichigan, named for the heroine of 

Longfellow's poem. 
Evans; town in Wel<l County, Colorado, named for John Evans, former governor 

of Colorado. 
Evans; town in Erie County, New York, named for David E. F^vans, agent of the 

Holland Land Company. 
Evansburg; village in Coshocton County, Ohio, named for Isaacr Evans, who 

laid it out. 
Evans Mills; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Ethni Evans, a 

resident mill owner. 
Evanston; city in Uinta County, Wyoming, and town in Cook County, Illinois, 

named for John Evans, former governor of Colorado. 
Evansville; city in Vanderburg County, Indiana, named for Gen. I\ol)ert FAans, 

who laid it out. 
Evart; village in Osceola County, Michigan, named for Frank Evart, a jnoneer. 
Evarts; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for Truman C. Evarts. 
Evening Shade; town in Sharp County, Arkansas, so named from the density of 

shade cast by the tall pine timber on an adjacent hill. 
Everett; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and a town in Bedford County, 

Pennsylvania, named for Edward Everett. 
Everetts; town in Martin County, North Carolina, named for a resident fannly. 
Ewings; creek in Missouri. F]wing is probably a contraction of " E. Wing," which 

designated this creek upon an early map. 
Excelsior Springs; city in Clay County, Missouri, named from the medicinal 

springs there. 
Exeter; many places in the United States received this name from the Exeter of 

F^ngland, the towns in AVashington County, Rhode Island, and in Rockingham 

County, New Hampshire, being among them. 



108 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ibull. 197. 

Eyota; villiigc in Olmstoad County, Minnesota. From an Indian word lyotak, 

nieaninj; "greatest," "luoHt." 
Ezel; town in Morgan County, Kentucky, named from the Bible. 
Fabius; river in Missouri and town in Onondaga County, New York, named for the 

celebrated Koman consul. The town was named by the State land board of 

New York. 
Factory; hill in Yellowstone Park, covered with geysers and hot springs, so named 

because of the noise and steam proceeding from them, resemhling in these 

respects an active factory town. 
Fair; a name used witli various suliixes, such as " ))rook," "land," "port," etc., to 

indicate an attractive api)earance. 
Fairbank; township in Sullivan County, Indiana, named for General Fairbanks. 
Fairbury; city in Jefferson County, Nebraska, named by an early settler, Mr. 

McDonell, for his home, Fairbury, Illinois. 
Fairchild; creek in Park County, Colorado, named for A. Fairchild, a prospector. 
Fairfax; county and town in Virginia, named for Lord Fairfax, grandson of Lord 

Cnlpeper. 
Fairfield; county and town in Connecticut, counties in Ohio and South Carolina, 

and town in Somerset County, Maine, so named from the beauty of their fields. 
Fairplay; town in Park County, Colorado, estal)lished by gold miners who named 

it as a living reproof to their "grab-all" neighbors. 
Faison; town in Duplin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent family. 
Fall; river in Massachusetts, so named because it is only aljout 2 miles in length 

and falls about 140 feet in a half mile. 
Fall River; city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, situated on the Fall River. 
Fallowfield ; township in Washington County, Pennsylvania, named for Lancelot 

Fallowfield, one of the first purchasej-s of the land from William Penn. 
Falls; county in Texas, named from the falls in Brazos River. 
Fallston; borough in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, named from the falls in Beaver 

River. 
Falmouth; towns in Cumberland County, Maine, and Barnstable County, Massa- 
chusetts, named from the seaport town in Cornwall. 
Fannin; counties in Georgia and Texas, and village in Goliad County, Texas, named 

for Col. James W. Fannin, of North Carolina, who fought in the Texan war. 
Farallone; group of small islands on the coast of California, named by the early 

Spanish explorers. The word farallon means "needle," or " small, pointed 

island." 
Fargo; city in Cass County, North Dakota, named for one of the meml)ers of the 

Wells, Fargo Express Company. Several other places bear his name. 
Faribault; county and city in Rice County, IVIinnesota, named for a settler from 

Canada, Jean Baptist Faribault. 
Farley; town in Dubuque County, Iowa, named for the superintendent of the Sioux 

City Railroad. 
Farmer; name applied to many small places, either with or without suflixes, intlic- 

ative of rural conditions and appearance. 
Farmington; town and river in Hartford County, Connecticut, named from a place 

in England. 
Farmington; village in Oakland County, Michigan, named from Farmington, New- 
York. 
Farmington; town in Ontario County, New York, named from Farmington, Con- 
necticut. 
Farnbam; village in Erie County, New York, named for Le Roy Farnham, the first 

merchant. 
Farnham; town in Richmond County, Virginia, named from the town in Surrey, 

England. 



GANNKTT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. lOV) 

Farrag-ut; town in Fremont ('onnty, Iowa, nameil for Admiral Farrai^nt. 
Farrandsville ; villaKii in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, laid out by and named 

foi- William P. Farrand, of Philadelphia. 
Farrar; town in North Carolina, named for a wealthy citizen. 
Farwell; village in Clare County, Michigan, named for Samuel 1>. Farwell,an ofticer 

of the old Flint and Pere Marquette Railroad. 
Faulk; county in South Dakota, named for Andrew J. Faulk, governor from ISdf) to 

1.S6!). 
Faulkner; county and village in Arkansas, named for Sandy Faulkner, the real 

" Arkansas Traveller." 
[Fauquier; county in Virginia; 
(Fauquier Springs; village in above county. Named for Francis Fauquier, governor 

of the State. 
Fausse Riviere; village in Louisiana, so called because it is situated on what was 

formerly the bed of the Mississippi River. Many years ago the river wore 

through an isthmus and left its former bed dry for a distance of atjout 30 miles. 

A French name, meaning "false river." 
Faustburg; village in South Carolina, named for the Urst settler. 
Fayette; counties in Alalxima, Georgia, Illinois, IndLina, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, 

Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia, and many places through- 
out the country, named for the Marquis de la Fayette. The name is also seen 

with suffixes, such as " ville" and "corner." 
Fear; cape and river in North Carolina. Sir Richard (irenville narrowly escaped 

being wrecked near the cape, in consequence of whicli he so named it. 
Feather; river in California. A translation of the early Spanish name, Plumas. 
February; village in Washington County, Tennessee, named for a resident of the 

place. 
Federal; name given to several places in the country, in reference to the national 

form of governinent. 
Federalsburg; village in Caroline County, Maryland, so named because settled l)y 

persons from the Northern States. 
Felix; townships in Grundy counties, Illinois and Iowa, named for Felix Grundy, 

Senator from Tennessee. 
Fells; point in Maryland named for the purchaser, a ship carpenter, William Fell. 
Felts Mills; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for 'John Felt, early 

proprietor. 
Fence; rivers in Wisconsin and Michigan. A translation of the Indian word, mitch- 

igan, a wooden fence constructed near its lianks l)y the Indians for catching deer. 
Fenner; town in Madison County, New York, named for Governor Fenner, of Rhode 

Island. 
Fennimore; village in Grant County, Wisconsin, named for a 'settler who disap- 
peared during the Black Hawk war. 
Fennville; village in Allegan County, Michigan, named for a hnnberman, Elam 

Fenner, who founded the village. 
Fenton; village in Genesee County, Michigan, named for Colonel Fenton, who 

owned a large tract of land on the present site. 
Fentonville; village in Chautaucjua County, New York, named for Reuben Eaton 

Fenton, governor of the State in 1865-1869. 
Fentress; county in Tennessee, named for James Fentress, mend)erof a conmiission 

appointed to fix upon a place for the seat of justice for Shelt)y County. 
Fergus; county in Montana, named for James Fergus, a i)iont«r of the State. 
Fergusonville; village in Delaware County, New York, named for the Ferguson 

brothers, who were largely engaged in business there. 
Fermanagh; township in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, named for a county in 

Ireland. 



110 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Fern; name nseil with various suftixes, generally given ])ecau8e of the presence of 

the i)lant. Eighteen places bear this name, some with suffixes, such as "dale," 

"bank," and "ridge." 
Fernandina; city in Nassau County, Florida, named for a Spaniard, Fernandez. 
Ferrisburg; town in Addison County, Vermont, named for Benjamin Ferris, wl?o 

applied for a charter in 1762. 
Ferry; county in Washington, named for Elisha P. Ferry, governor of the Territory. 
Fetterman; town in Taylor County, AVest Virginia, named for a resident of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, who owned the land. 
Fever; river in Illinois, named by the early French, La Riviere de Feve, " the river 

of the bean," because of the immense quantity of wild beans upon its l)anks. 

The name was corrupted to Fievre, "fever," which gave rise to the impression 

that the place was unhealthy. 
Fidalgo; island and village in Skagit County, Washington, and harbor in Alaska, 

named for the Spanish explorer. 
Fields Landing; village in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Fifty Eight; village in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named so because it is 

58 miles from Charleston. 
Fillmore; mount in California, named for a naval officer. 
Fillmore; counties in ^linnesota and Nebraska, and many places in the country 

named for Millard Fillmore, President of the United States. 
Fillmore; station in Wyoming, named for a superintendent of the Southern Pacific 

Railroad. 
Fincastle; town in P>otetourt County, Virginia, and several other places directly or 

indirectly named for (Governor Lord Dunmore and his son George, Lord Fin- 
castle. 
Findlay; city in Hancock County, Ohio, named from Fort Findlay, built by Col. 

James Findlay, of Cincinnati. 
Findley; township in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for William Pindley, 

governor of tiie State in 1817-1820. 
Fine; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for John Fine, the principal 

proprietor. 
Finney; county in Kansas, named for Uavid AV. Finney, lieutenant-governor in 

1881-1885. 
Fire; hill in Humboldt County, California, so named because in early days it was 

used as a station from which to signal with fire. 
Fire; creek in Missouri, originally called Fire-prairie Creek, l)ecause of the fires that 

swept over the prairies. 
Firehole; river in Yellowstone Park. The word "hole" was used l)y the early 

explorers to designate depressions among the mountains, while the first part of 

the name refers to the remarkable geyser region from which the river flows. 
Fisher; county and village in Texas, named for S. Rhodes Fisher, secretary of the 

navy in Houston's cabinet. 
Fishkill; town, village, creek, plains, and mountains in Dutchess County, New 

Y'ork, named by the early Dutch settlers, Vischkill, "fish creek." 
Fitchburg; city iii Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for John Fitch, one of 

the committee that procured the act of incorporation. 
Fithian; village in Vermilion County, Illinois, named for Dr. William Fithian. 
Fitzwilliam; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for the Earl of 

Fitzwilliam. 
Five Corners; village in Miami County, Indiana, so named because it is at the junc- 
tion of several roads. 
Flackville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for John P. Flack, 

first postmaster. 



fiANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ill 

Flagstaff; tnwii in Coconino County, Arizona, nanu'd from u pole set l>y a party of 

t'lnigrantn who camped near and celebrated the Fourtli of July. 
Flambeau; lakes, town, and river in Wisconsin. The lakes wcn^ so called on 

account of the torches used to catch tish at night. 
Flatbush; ])art of Brooklyn, New York, so named from wood^^ that tifcw <iii Hat 

country. 
Flathead; lake, county, and river in Montana, named from an Indian trihe. The 
name originated with the early settlers who called several different tribes of 
Indians by this name on account of their custom of flattening the heads of 

infants l)y fastening a i)iece of board or a pad of grass upon the forehead. After 

this had ])een worn several months it caused a flat apjjcarance of the head. 
Flattery; promontory in Washington so named by t-aptain (bok, "in token of an 

improvement in our prospects." 
Flavel; summer resort in Clatsop County, Oregon, named for a prominent resident 

of Astoria. 
Fleming-; town in Cayuga County, New York, nanied for (ien. George Fleunng, an 

old resident. 
[Fleming; county in Kentucky; 

JFlemingsburg; town in Fleming County. Named for Col. .lohn Fleming, an early 
I settler in the State. 
Flint; river in (ieorgia, named fi-oni the Indian name, Tlironaluska, also Lonoto, 

"flint." 
Flint; city in ^Michigan, named from a river, which was called by the Indians Pa- 

won-nuk-ening, " river of the flint." 
Flirt; lake in Florida, named for a ( Jovernment schooner. 

Flora; town in Madison County, Mississippi, named by W. 15. .Jones for his wife. 
Florence; city in Marion County, Kansas, named for Miss Fh^ience Crawford, of 

To])eka. 
Florence; village in Douglas ('ounty, Nebraska, named for Miss Florence Kilbourn. 
Florence; town in Oneida County, New York, and village in Hampshire County, 

^Massachusetts, named from the city in Italy. 
Florence; county and town in South Carolina, named for the daughter of (len. 

W. AV. Harllee. 
Florence; county in AVisconsin, named for the F^lorence Mining Company. 
Floras; creek in Idaho, named from the flowers on its banks. 
Florida; one of the States of the Union, named by Ponce de Leon "the florid or 

flowery land." He chose this name for two reasons: First, l^ecause the country 

presented a pleasant aspect; and, second, because he landed on the festival 

which the Spaniards call Pascuade Flores, or Pascua Florida, "feast of flowers," 

which corresponds fo Palm Sunday. The second reason is generally c-onsidered 

to have more weight. 
Florissant; town in El Paso County, (Colorado, named by Judge James Castello 

for his old home in Missouri. 
Florissant; city in St. Louis County, Missouri, named from the flowery valley in 

which it is situated. 
Floyd; county in Georgia, named for (ien. John Floyd, at one time mend)er of Con- 
gress from that State. 
Floyd; county in Indiana, said by some authorities to have been named for Col. 

John Floyd, while others claim that it was named for Davis Floyd. 
Floyd; county, town, and river in Iowa, named for Sergt. Charles Floyd, of the 

Lewis and Clarke exploring party. 
Floyd; county in Kentucky, named for Col. John F'loyd, an ofiicer of the Kevolution. 
Floyd; town in Oneida County, New York, named for Williani Floyd, one of the 

signers of the Declaration of Independence, 



112 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Floyd; county in Texa.s, named for Doltin Floyd, who fell at the Alamo. 

Floyd; county and town in Virginia, named for John lUichanan Floyd, governor in 
1847-1852. 

Floyds; creek in Adair County, Missouri, named for an early settler who came from 
Kentucky. 

Flushing; town in Queens County, New York, now a part of New York City, 
called by the early Dutch settlers, " Vlissengen" of which the present name is 
a corruption. Some authorities claim that the early settlers came from Flushing, 
Holland. 

Fluvanna; county in Virginia, named from a river which was named for Queen 
Anne, of England. 

Foard; county in Texas, named iov Robert L. Foard. 

Folsom; town in Sacramento County, California, named for the owner of the ranch 
on which it was laid out. 

Folsom; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for David E. Folsom, leader of an expedi- 
tion in 1869. 

Fonda; village in Montgomery County, New York, named for Douw Fonda. 

Fond du Lac; town in Minnesota and county and city in Wisconsin, so named 
because of their situation. A French word, meaning "end of lake." 

Fontaine-qui-Bouille ; creek in Colorado, so named because its head is a spring of 
water highly aerated. 

Fontana; city in Miami County, Kansas, named from a spring 1 mile west of the 
town site. 

Fontanelle; town in Adair County, Iowa, and creek in Wyoming, named for a 
trapper in the employ of the American Fur Company. 

Ford; county in Illinois, named for Thomas Ford, governor of the State in 1842-1846. 

Ford; county and city in Kansas, named for James H. Ford, colonel of Second 
Colorado Cavalry. 

Ford; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for an early settler. 

Forellen; peak in Yellowstime Park. A German name, meaning "trout." 

Forest; counties in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, so named from the forests within 
their limits. The name occurs, either alone or with suffixes, as the name of 
ninety places in the country. 

Forrest; town in St. Francis County, Arkansas, named for Gen. N. B. Forrest, who 
built the first house there. 

Forsyth; county and city in Monroe County, Georgia, named for Governor John 
Forsyth. 

Forsyth; county in North Canjlina, named for Major Foisyth, a distinguished 
officer of the State, killed in the war of 1812. 

Fort Ann; village in Washington County, New York, named from an old fortifica- 
tion l)uilt in 1756, iluring the wars with the French. 

Fort Atkinson; city in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, named for Gen. Henry Atkin- 
son, who commanded a stockade there during the Black Hawk war. 

Fort Bend; county in Texas, named for a fort on Brazos River. 

Fort Benton; town in Choteau County, Montana, on the side of an old fort which 
was named for Thomas H. Benton, of Missouri. 

Fort Coving'ton; village in Franklin County, New York, named for Gen. Leonard 
Covington. 

Fort Crook; village in Sarpy County, Nebraska, named from a fort which was 
named for Gen. George Crook. 

Fort Dade; village in Hernando County, Florida, so named because situated near 
the spot where Major Dade and companions perished while defending them- 
selves against a party of Seminoles. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 113 

Fort Dodge; city in Wol)Hter C'ounty, Iowa, natutd for Sciuitor Dodge, (>£ Wisroiisiii. 
Fort Edward; town in Washington County, New York, named frf)ni an old fort 

l)nilt in 1709, named in honor of Edward, Dnke of York. 
Fort Fairfield; town in Aroontook County, Maine, named for an old fort which 

took its name from John Fairlield, who was governor of Maine for many years. 
Fort Fetterman; village in Albany County, Wyoming, named for Lieut. Col. W. J. 

Fetterman, killed by the Indians in 1SH(). 
Fort Gaines; town in Clay County, Georgia, named forCien. E. P. (laines. 
Fort Hall; part of an Indian reservation in Bingham County, Idaho, named from a 

foi't which was built by Caj)t. N. J. Wyeth and named for one of his partners. 
Fort Hamilton; village in Kings County, now a part of New York City, named for 

Alexander Hamilton. 
Fort Kent: town in Aroostook County, ]\Iaine, named from a fort which was named 

for (Jovernor Edward Kent, of ]Maine. 
Fort Keogh.; village in Custer County, ^Montana, named from a fort which took its 

name from Captain Keogh, who fell with General Custer. 
Fort Klamath; town in Klamath County, Oregon, named from an Indian tribe. 
Fort Leavenworth; town in Leavenworth County, Kansas, named for (ien. Henry 

Leavenworth, who erected the fort. 
Fort Lupton; town in Weld County, Colorado, named for an early settler on .\dobe 

Creek in 1840. 
Fort Madison; city in Lee County, Iowa, named for James Madison, President of 

tlie United States. 
Fort Morgan; town in Morgan County, Colorado, named for Col. C. A. Morgan. 
Fort Motte; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named so because situ- 
ated upon the site of Motte's house, which was fortified l)y the British during 

the Revolution. 
Fort Myers; town in Lee County, Florida, tirst a military post, named for Capt. 

Abraham C. Myers. 
Fort Pierre; village in Stanley County, South Dakota, named for Pierre Choteau. 
Fort Plain; village in Montgomery County, New York, named from an old fortress 

erected on a plain at the junction of the Mohawk and Osquaga rivers. 
Fort Recovery; village in Mercer C'ounty, Ohio, named from an old fort built by 

(Jeneral Wayne. 
Fort Scott; city in Kansas, named for Gen. Winfield Scott. 
Fort Sheridan; village in Lake County, Illinois, named from the military post near, 

which was named for Gen. P. H. Sheridan. 
Fort Smith; town in Sebastian County, Arkansas, named for a fort built under the 

direction of General Smith, for whom it was named. 
Fort Wayne; city in Indiana, named from a fort built ])y Lieutenant-Colonel Ham- 

tramck in 1794, named for Gen. Anthony Wayne. 
Fort "Worth; city in Tarrant County, Texas, named for Genei'al Worth, prominent 

in the ^Mexican war. 
Fortyfort; thorough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, named from the old fort of 

Revolutionary days. 
Foster; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. George I. Foster, a pioneer, 

prominent in the' territorial legislature. 
Foster; town in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for Theodore Foster, 

United States Senator from that State. 
Fostoria; city in Seneca County, Ohio, named for Governor Charles Foster. 
Fountain; name given to many places, mostly because of spriixgs. 
Fountain; county in Indiana, named for Major Fountain, of Kentucky, killed at 

the battle of Maumee in 1790. , 

Bull. 197—02 8 



114 PLACE NAMES JN THE UNITED STATES. [hull. 197. 

Four Oaks; town in Johnston C'onnty, North Carolina, named from four great 
oaks near. 

Fowler; village in Clinton County, IVIichigan, named for John N. Fowler. 

Fowler; town in 8t. Lawrence County, New York, named for Theodocius Fowler, 
former proprietor. 

Fowlerville; village in Living,st(jn County, INliehigan, named for Ralph Fowler, the 
first settler. 

Fowlerville; village in Livingston ('oimty, New York, mimed for AVells Fowler, 
iirst settler. 

Foxburg; village in Clarion C(junty, Pennsylvania, named for the original pro- 
prietor, H. M. Fox. 

Foxcroft; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, jiamed for Col. Joseph E. Foxcroft, of 
New Gloucester, an early proprietor. 

Fox Lake; village in Dodge County, Wisconsin, named from the Indian name of 
the Lake, Ilosh a rac ah ta-h, "fox." 

Frackville; borougli in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for Daniel Frack, 
one of the original settlers. 

Framboise; island in the Missouri Kiver. A French word, meaning "raspberry." 

Framingham; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The name is evidently 
a corruption of Framlingham, Suffolk County, England. 

Francestown; town in llillsboro County, New Hiimpshire, named for the wife of 
(Governor Benning Wentworth, wdiose maiden name was Frances Deering. 

Franceville ; town in El Paso County, Colorado, named for Hon. Matt France, of 
Colorado Springs. 

Franceway; creek in Grant County, Arkansas. The name is a corruption of the 
name Francois, given by the early French. 

Francis; creek in lUunboldt County, California, named for a settler. 

Franconia; town in Grafton County, New Hamifthire, named from the duchy in 
Gei'many. 

Frank; island in Yellowstone Park, nametl for the l^rother of Henry W. Elliott, of 
the Hayden expedition. 

Frankfort; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for Frank Si-hmidt, of Marya- 
ville, owner of the town site. 

Frankfort; village in Herkimer County, New York, named for Lawrence Frank, an 
early settler. 

Franklin; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, county and town in Heard 
C'Ounty, Georgia, counties in Illinois and Indiana, county and town in Lee 
C!ounty, Iowa, county in Kansas, county and city in Kentucky, parish in Loui- 
siana, county and town in Hancock County, Maine, county and town in Norfolk 
County, Massachusetts, counties in Mississippi and Missouri, county and town in 
Nebraska, county and village in Delaware County, New York, county and town 
in Macon County, North Carolina, county in Ohio, county and boroughs in 
Caml)ria and Venango counties, Pennsylvania, counties in Tennessee, Vermont, 
Virginia, and Washington, and mountain in New Hampshire, named for Benja- 
min Franklin. Many other places throughout the country bear his name. 

Franklin; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Temple Franklin. 

Franklin; county in Texas, named for B. C. Franklin, first judge of the district court 
of the republic. 

Frankstown; village in Blair County, Pennsylvania, named for Stephen Franks, a 
German trader. 

Franktown; town in Douglas County, Colorado, named for Hon. J. Frank Gard- 
ner, early resident. 

Fi»aser; village in Macomb County, Michigan, nametl for a lawyer from Detroit, 
Michigan. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 115 

Frazer; crffk in Iliiiiiltoldt County, California, nanu'd for an t'arly seltk-r. 

Frazer; village in Dc'lawarc County, New York, named for lluijli Frazer, an early 
patentee. 

Frederic; town in Crawford C'ounty, ]\[iclii.ij;an, nanie<l for Frederick Barker, a 
pioneer of that place. 

Frederica; town in (ilynn County, <ieor<^ia, named for Frederick, Prince of Wales. 

Frederick; county in Maryland, nameil for Frederick, son of Charles, Fifth Lord 
Paltiraore. It may have been given al^^o in reference to Frederick, Prince of 
Wales. 

Frederick; county in Virginia, named foi Frederick, Prince of Waie.s. 

Fredericksburg-; city in Sj>ottsylvania County, Virginia, nameil f(jr Frederick, 
Prince of Wales. 

Fredericktown; city in JNIadison County, Missouri, named for (ieorge Frederick 
BoUingei-, a former member of the State legislature. 

Fredonia; city in Wilson County, Kansas, named for Fredonia, New York. 

Fredonia; village in Chautauqua County, New York. The name was devised to 
signify " land of freedom," and proposed as a name for the United States. 

Freeborn; county and township in Minnesota, named -for William Freeborn, mem- 
ber of the council in 1855. 

Freehold; town in ^Monmouth County, New Jersey, originally a freehold. 

Freelandsville; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for Dr. John F. Freeland. 

Freeman; town in Franklin County, jNIaine, named for Sanmel Freeman, of Port- 
land, Maine. 

Freemansburg; Ijorough in Nortiiamjjton Comity, I'ennsylvania, named for Jacob 
Freeman. 

Freeo; creek in Arkansas, a corruption of the S})anish word frio, " cold." 

Freeport; town in Cumberland County, Maine, so named because it was intended 
that it should be a free port. The name is found frequently in the country, gen- 
erally having been given in the spirit of liberty. 

Freetown; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, called by the original settlers 
Freeman's Land. 

Fremont; county and pass in Colorado, counties in Idaho and Iowa, town in Rock- 
ingham County, New Hampshire, town in Steuben County, New York, island in 
Utah, and county and peak in Wyoming, besides numerous small places in the 
country, named for Gen. John C. Fremont. 

French; river in Massachusetts, so named from a settlement of French Protestants 
in the town of Oxford. 

French Broad; river in North Carolina, so named because the country west of the 
Blue Ridge was held by the French, according to some authorities. Others hold 
that the river was named by a party of hunters for their captain, whose name 
was French. The latter ])art of the name is used descriptively. 

Frenchburg-; town in Menifee County, Kentucky, named for Judge Richard French, 
prominent politician. 

French Camp; town in Choctaw County, Mississiiijn, so named from an old settle- 
ment made by French. 

Frenchman; bay on the coast of Maine, so named because a settlement was made 
here by Frenchmen. 

Frenchs Mills; village in Alban; County, New York, named for A])el French, who 
owned a factory there. 

Fresno; county, river, and city in C'alifornia, no named inmi a si)ecies of ash. 

Friar Point; town in Coahoma County, ISIississippi, named for an old woodchopper, 
early settler there. 

Frio; county and town in Texas, named from the Rio Frio. A Spanish word 
meaning "cold." 



116 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Frontier; county in NebraHkii, so named because it was on the frontier at the time 

of its naming. 
Frostburg; town in Allegany County, Maryland, named for a family who owned 

the land. 
Fruita; town in Mesa County, Colorado, situated in a large fruit-growing district. 
Frustum; mount in Colorado,, named from its shape. 

Fryburg; town in North Dakota, named for General Fry, United States Army. 
Fryeburg; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for its founder. Gen. Joseph Frye, 

a veteran r)fficer of the French wars, who received a grant of land in ]\Iaine as a 

reward for his services. 
Fulford; village in Eagle County, Colorado, named for A. H. Fulford, a pioneer. 
Fullerton; city in Nance County, Nebraska, named for Randall Fuller, early 

stockman. 
Fulton; county in Arkansas, named for "William Savin Fulton, governor of the 

Territory. 
Fulton; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky; county and villages in 

^Montgomery and Oswego counties, New York, and county in Pennsylvania, 

named for Robert Fulton. His name has been given to numerous places 

tiiroughout the country. 
Fulton; city in Bourbon Cbunty, Kansas, named from Fulton, Illinois. 
Funk; town in Phelps County, Nebraska, named for P. C. Funk. 
Funkstown; town in Washington County, Maryland, named for Jacob Funk, original 

jtroprietor. 
Furnas; county in Neliraska, named for Robert W. Furnas, governor in 1873-75. 
Gabilan; mountain ridge, spur of the coast range in California. A Spanish word, 

meaning "sjiarrow hawk." 
Gadsden; county in Florida antl town in Etowah County, Alabama, named for 

James (Tadsden, American statesman. 
Gaflfhey; city in Cherokee County, South C-arolina, named for a family in the State. 
Gagetown; village in Tuscola County, Michigan, named for James Gage, the first 

settler. 
Gaines; town in Orleans County, New York, named for Gen. E. P. Gaines. 
Gaines; county in Texas, named for James Gaines, who fought in the war for Texan 

independence. 
Gainesville; town in Hall County, Georgia; city in Alachua County, Florida, and 

town in Wyoming C-ounty, New York, named for (len. E. P. Gaines. 
Galen; town in Wayne County, New York, named by the State land ])oartl for 

Claudius Galenus, an illustrious physician of antiquity. 
Galena; city in Illinois and mount in Colorado, named from the lead ore found in 

the vicinity. 
Galesbtirg; city in Knox County, Illinois, named for Rev. George W. Gale, the 

founder. 
Galesburg; village in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, named for Gen. L. Gale, early 

settler. 
Galesville; village in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, named for Hon. George 

Gale, who laid it out. 
Gallatin; counties in Illinois and Kentucky; county and river in Montana; town in 

Columbia County, New York, and town in Copiah County, Mississippi, named 

for Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under Thomas Jefferson. 
Gallaway; town in Fayette Coiuity, Tennessee, named for Governor Gallaway. 
Gallia; coimty in Ohio, settled in 1790 by a colony of Frenchmen, and named Ijy 

them from the Latin appellation of France. 
Gallinas; river in New Mexico. A Spanish word, gallina, "hen," used figuratively 

to denote a coward. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 117 

Gallipolis; city in tJallia County, Ohio, so named Vjecause settled l)y French. 
Gallitzin; borough in Cambria County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, rrinee 

Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin. 
Gallman; town in Copiah County, Mississippi, named for a leading citizen. 
Galloo; islands in Lake Ontario, Jefferson County, New York, named foi- an old 

resident. 
Galva; city in INIcPherson County, Kansas, named by ]\Irs. J. K. Doyle for lua- old 

home in Illinois. 
Galveston; county and city in Texas, named for Don Jose Galvez, Spanish viceroy 

of Texas; in 1797 proclaimed king by the people of Mexi(;o. 
Galway; village in Saratoga County, New York, named from tlie county in Ireland. 
Gambler; village in Knox County, Ohio, named for Lord James (iand)ier, a Lritish 

admiral, who was a benefactor of Kenyon College, located at this place. 
Gannett; station on the Union Pacific Railroad in Nebraska, named for J. W. ( lan- 

nett, auditor of the road. 
Gans; town in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Gansevoort; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for C'ol. Peter (ians- 

voort, who located there soon after the war. 
Garberville; town in Humboldt County, California, named for J. C. (Jarber. 
Garden; thirty places in the country bear this name, used descriptively, either with 

or without suflixes. 
Garden of the Gods; locality near Pikes Peak, Colorado. Lewis N. Tappan and 

three others went from Denver to select a site for a town. They stood upon a 

rocky prominence and exclaimed, "A fit garden for the gods," hence the name.. 
Gardiner; city in Kennebec County, Maine, named for Sylvester Gardiner, one of 

the proprietors of the old Plymouth patent. 
Gardiner; town in Ulster County, New York, named for Addison (iardiner, formerly 

lieutenant-governor. 
Gardiner; river in Yellowstone Park, probably named for an old trap])er who was 

a companion of Joseph Meek. 
Gardiners; island lying east of Long Island, named for the first settler, Lyon (iar- 
diner, a Scotchman. 
Gardner; city in Johnson County, Kansas, named for Henry J. Gardner, governor 

of Ma.ssachu.setts in 1855. 
Gardner; town in Worcester County, IVIassachusetts, named for Col. Thos. Gardner, 

who fell at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Garfield; county and mountain in Colorado; mountain in Idaho; town in Lasaile 

County, Illinois; town in Pawnee County, Kansas; plantation in Aroostook 

County, Maine; county in Nebraska; borough in New Jersey; town in Mahoning 

County, Ohio; county in Oklahoma; town in Clackamas County, Oregon, an<l 

counties in Utah and Washington, named for President Jame.s A. Garfield. His 

name is also borne by many other places in the country. 
Garfield; town in Humboldt County, California, named for the son of Gilbert Gar- 
field, a settler. 
Garland; county in Arkansas, named for A. H. Garland, governor of the State in 1874. 
Garland; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Joseph Garland, who was 

the first man to settle there. 
Garnett; city in Anderson County, Kansas, named for W. A. (larnett, of Louisville^ 

Kentucky. 
Garrard; county in Kentucky, named for Col. James Garrard, governor of the State 

in 1796. 
Garrett; city in Dekalb County, Indiana, county in Maryland, and borough in 

Pensylvania, named for John W. (iarrett, pre.sident of the Baltimore and Ohio 

Kailroad. 



118 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buix. 197. 

Garrison; village in Nacogdoches County, Texas, named for Z. B. Garrison, early 

settler, although the name was probably also given in reference to others of that 

name in the first settlement. 
Garysburg; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named for Roderick B. 

Gary. 
Garza; county in Texas, named for the family of that name of which Governor 

Garza, who founded San Antonio, was a member. 
Gasconade; river and county in Missouri. The word is from Gascon, an inhabitant 

of Gascony. The people of that province were noted for their boastfulness. 

The early French gave the name to a tribe of Indians who were very boastful, 

and from them it was transferred to the river and county. 
Gasport; village in Niagara County, New York, so named from springs which emit 

an intianmiable gas. 
Gaston; camp in California, named for a military commander. 
Gaston; county in North Carolina, named for William Gaston, a judge of the 

supreme court of the State. 
Gaston; town in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for the Gaston family. 
Gastonia; town in Gaston County, North Carolina, named for William Gaston, a 

judge of the sujjreme court of the State. 

I Gates; town in Monroe County, New York, and county in North Carolina; 
Gatesville; town in ( Jates County, North Carolina. Named for Gen. Horatio Gates, 
Revolutionary commander. 
Gay Head; headland and town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, so named from 

the brilliant colors of the cliffs. 
Gaylesville; town in Cherokee County, Alalmma, named for George W. Gayle, a 

prominent politician of the State. 
Gaylord; city in Smith County, Kansas, named for C. E. Gaylord, of Marshall 

County. 
Gaylord; village in Otsego County, Michigan, named for an attorney of the Michi- 
gan Central Railroad. 
Gayoso; village in Pemiscot County, Missouri, named for Governor Don Manuel 

Gayoso de Lemos. 
Geary; county and town in Donijahan County, Kansas, named for John W. Gearj', 

governor of the Territory in 1856-57. 
Geauga; county in Ohio. The name is thought l)y some to have been derived from 

the same source as Cuyahoga; others say it is derived from the Indian word, 

Sheauga-sipe, meaning "raccoon river," a name originally applied to Grand 

River. Haines says that it w'as the name of a chief of one of the Six Nations. 

Still another theory derives it from Cageauga, "dogs round the fire." 
Geddes; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for James Geddes, first 

settler. 
Genesee; county, river, and town in Wyoming County, New York, and county in 

Michigan, besides several other small places, named from the Indian, meaning 

"shining or beautiful valley." 
Geneseo; town in Livingston County, New York, on the Genesee River. The 

name is a modification of the name of the river, and is given to cities in Rice 

County, Kansas, and Henry County, Illinois. 
Geneva; county and town in Alabama. The name has been given to 21 places in 

the country, transferred from the city in Switzerland. 
Genoa; It) places in the country bear the name of the city in Italy. 
Gentry; coun^ty and town in Missouri, named for Col. Richard Gentry, killed at the 

battle of Okeechobee, Florida. 
Georgetown; to'vn in Clear Creek County, Colorado, named for George Griffith, 

clerk of the court. 



GANNCTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 119 

Georg-etown ; town in Sussex County, Delaware, nanu'd for Connnissioner George 

Miteliell, prominent resident. 
/ Georgetown; formerly a city, now a 2)art of the District of t'olumbia, named for 

(it'or<ie IJoone, an Englishman who purchased several tracts of land in the 

neigh l)orhood. 
Georgetown; village in r.rowii County, Indiana, named for (ieorge Grove, its 

founder. 
Georgetown; town in Scott County, Kentucky, named for President George 

Washington. 
Georgetown; town in Sagadahoc ('ounty, IVIaine, and (;ounty and city in South 

Carolina, named for George I, King of England. 
Georgetown; lake in Xtnv York, named for George II, King of England. 
Georgetown; town in Williamson County, Texas, said to have been named for 

George (ilas.><cock, early settler. 
Georgia; State of the Union, named by King George II for himself. 
Georgia: strait between Washington and Vancouver Island, named for (ieorge III, 

King of England. 
German; town in Chenango County, New York, named for (ien. < )badiah German, 

original i)roprietor. 
German Flats; town in Herkimer County, New York, nanu'd so from the German 

settlers on the INIohawk Flats. 
Germanton; village in Stokes County, North (Carolina, settled l)y Germans. 
Gerry; town in Chantauciua County, New York, named for Elbridge Gerry, a 

signer of the Declaration (rt' Independence. 
Gervais; town in ]\Iarion County, Oregon, named for Josepli Gervais, a pioneer. 
Gethsemane; town in Nelson County, Kentucky, named for the garden at the foot 

of the Mount of Olives. 
Gettysburg; borough in Ailams County, Pennsylvania, named for James Gettys, 

who laid it out. 
Geuda; city in Sunnier County, Kansas, named from the mineral springs near. 
( Gibbon; river and hill in Yellowstone Park and village in Umatilla County, Oregon ; 
. Gibbonsville; town in Lemhi County, Idaho, named for ( i(>n. John Gil)l)on, United 

States Army. 
Gibraltar; several towns in the country are named from the city in Spain. 
Gibson; county in Indiana, named for John Gibson, secretary and acting governor 

of Indiana Territory in 1S11-LS13. 
Gibson; county and town in Tennessee, named for Col. Thomas Gibson. 
Gibsonville; town in (iuilford County, North Carolina, named for a i)rominent 

resident. 
Gila; county in Arizona and river of Arizona and Nt>w Mexico. The name is said 

to be of Spanish origin, but the meaning is lost. 
Gilberton; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for John Gilbert, 

who ownetl coal mines there. 
Gilboa; town in Schoharie County, New York, ami Putnam County, Ohio, named 

from the mountain in Palestine. 
Gildehouse; village in Franklin County, ^Missouri, named for a family who ilrst 

settled there. 
Gilead; town in Oxford County, Elaine, named from the large Balm of Gilead tree 

standing in the middle of the town. 
Giles; village in Brown County, Ne1)raska, nameil for the first postmaster, Giles 

]\Iead. 
Giles; county in Virginia, named for William Branch Ciiles, governor of the State in 

1.S27-1S;!0. The county in Tennessee was probably named for the same. 
Gilford; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for S. S. Gilman, wlio 

made the first settlements there. 



120 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITJID STATER. rnui.i,. 197. 

Gill; town in Franklin C'ountv, Massai'luiHette, nanieil for AFoses (Jill, one tinu' lion- 

tenant-gt)vernor of the State. 
Gillespie; county in Texas, nametl for Robert A. Gillespie, who fell at the battle of 

INIonterey. 
Gilliam; village in Saline County, Missouri, named for a farmer residing in tlie 

neighborhood. 
Gilliam; county in Oregon, named for Col. Cornelius ( iilliam, member of the volun- 
teers of Willamette Vallej'. 
Gilman; town in Eagle County, Colorado, namt'd for IT. INI. (Jilman, a prominent 

resident. 
Gilman; town in INIarshall County, Iowa, named for a railroad C(Mitractor. 
Gilman; town in Hamilton County, New York, named for John INI. (iilman, early 

settler, from New Hampshire. 
Gilmanton; town in TU'lknap County, New IIam])shire, named for the former owners 

of the site. 
Gilmer; county in (ieorgia, named for George P. Gilmer, governor of the State in 

1830. 
Gilmer; county in West Virginia, named for Thomas W. (iilmer, member of Con- 
gress from Virginia. 
Gilpin; county and mountain in Colorado, named for William (Tilpin, first Territorial 

governor. 
Gilsum; town in Cheshiiv County, New Hampshire, named for the first proprietors, 

(iilbert and Sumner. 
Girard; city in Crawford County, Kansas, named for the borough in Pennsylvania. 
Girard; borough in Erie County, Pennsylvania; 

Girardville; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and several other towns 
and villages. Named for Stephen Girard, at one time the wealthiest man in the 
LTnited States. 
Gladstone; city in Delta County, Michigan, and town in Stark County, North 

Dakota, named for the English statesman. 
Gladwin; county and city in Michigan, named for JNIaj. Henry Gladwin, in com- 
mand at Detroit at the time of Pontiac's cons2)iracy. 
Glasco; cit}' in Cloud County, Kansas, named from the city in Scotland, and si^elled 

by the first postmaster "Glasco." 
Glascock; county in Georgia, named for Thomas Glascock, an officer of the War of 

1812. 
Glasgow; city in Barren County, Kentucky, and several other places, named from 

the city in Scotland. 
Glassboro; town in Gloucester County, New Jersey, named from its glass factories. 
Glasscock; county in Texas, named for George W. Glasscock, who took part in the 

storuung of San Antonio. 
Glastonbury; town in Hartford County, Connecticut, named from the town in 

England. 
Glazypool; mountain and creek in Arkansas. A corruption of the French name, 

Glaise a Paul, "Paul's clay pit." 
Glen; two hundred and fifty-six places in the country bear this name alone or with 

suffixes. In the majority of cases the word is used descriptively, though in a 

few cases it is a proper name. 
Glen; town in Montgomery County, New York, named for Jacob Glen, a ]irominenl 

citizen. 
Glenn; county in California, named for Hugh J. Glenn, a jirominent resident of 

the county. 
Glenn Springs; town in Spartanburg, Comity, South Carolina, named from a famous 

sjiring owned l)y the Glenn family. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 121 

Glens Falls: villa.ixe in \\'arri'ii County, New York, iiamcil hy Jolin (ilciui I'oi' liim- 

solf. 
Glenville; town in Schenectady ('ounty, New York, named from the manor of 

Sandir Leenderste Glen, which formerly occui)ied tlie site. 
Glidden; town in Carroll Connty, Iowa, named for a manufacture)- of barbed wire. 
Gloucester; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, county and cit_\- in New Jersey, 

and county in Yirginia, as well as several other places; named for Gloucester- 
shire, England. 
Glover; town in Orleans County, Vermont, named for ( Jen. .Tolui Glover, of ]Marble- 

heail, a principal jiroprietor. 
Gloversville; city in Fulton County, New York, named from its glove factories. 
Glynn; county in Georgia, named for John(ilynn, an English lawyer and warm 

friend of the American colonies. 
Gnadenhutten; town in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, settled by ]\Ioravian mission- 
aries. A German word, meaning "tents of grace." 
Goddard; city in Sedgwick County, Kansas, named for J. F. Goddard, general 

manager of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Godfrey; village in Madison County, Illinois, named for Capt. Benjamin Godfrey. 
Goff; city in Nemaha County, Kansas, named for Edward II. (xoff of the Union 

Pacific Railroad. 
Goffstown; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for Col. John Goffe. 
Gog-ebic; county and lake in Michigan. An Indian word. According to some auth- 
orities, a contraction of Agojebic, "rocky," or "rocky shore;" others say it is 

from Gogebing, "dividing lake." 
Golconda; city in Pope County, Illinois, and town in Humboldt County, Nevada, 

named from the city in India. 
Gold; a name of frequent occurrence througliout the country. It ajipears with 

numerous sutiixes and in most cases was given to denote the presence of the 

metal. 
Golden Gate; bay in California, named by Colonel Fremont, before the discovery 

of gold in the country, l)ecause of the Ijrilliant effect of the setting sun on the 

cliffs and hills. 
Gold Point; town in Martin County, North Carolina, named from tiie gold leaf 

tobacco. 
Goldsboro; city in Wayne County, North Carolina, named for M. T. Goldsboro, of 

Maryland. 
Goldthwaite ; town in Mills Connty, Texas, name<l for a man ])rominent in the 

organization of a railroad running into the town. 
Goliad; county in Texas, named by making an anagram of the name, "Hidalgo," 

the Mexican revolutionary hero. 
Gonzales; connty in Texas, named for Raphael Gonzales, at one time i)rovisiona! 

governor of the State. 
Goochland; county in Virginia, named for William Gooch, lieutenant-governor of 

Virginia in 1727-1749. 
Goodhue; county and village in Minnesota, named for James M. Goodhue, the first 

journalist of the Territory, who founded the Pioneer, of St. Paul. 
Goodman; town in Holmes County, Mississii:>pi, named for the first president of the 

Mississippi Central Railroad. 
Goose; river in Maine, named from a pond at the source, so called l)y an early settler 

fi'om a wild-goose nest which he found on a rock on the bank of the ])ond. 
Gooski; lake in Florida, named for an old settler, a Pole. 
Gordon; county in (:leorgia, named for William W. Ciordon, first president of the 

Central Railroad. 
Gore; pass in Colorado, named for a gunsmith of Denver. 



122 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Gorham; tdwn in Cumberland County, Maine. Some authorities say it was named 

for Col. Shubael Gorham, one of the original proprietors, but Whitmore says 

that it was named for Capt. John Gorham, one of the early proprietors. 
Gorham; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Captain Gorham, who 

was in the Narragansett fight. 
Gorham; town in Ontario County, New York, named for Nathaniel Gorham. 
Gorman; township in Ottertail County, Minnesota, named for Willis A. Gorman, 

former governor of the State. 
Goshen; city in Elkhart County, Indiana, and village in Orange County, New York, 

named from the "Land of Goshen." The name is found in many parts of the 

country, ai)plied as a synonym of fruitfulness and fertility. 
Gosiute; peak and lake in Nevada, named for an Indian tribe. 
Gosnold; town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, settled by Bartholomew Gosnold. 
Gosper; county in Nebraska, named for John J. Gosper, secretary of state. 
Gothic; mountains in the Adirondaeks, New York, and Elk INIountains, Colorado, 

so named because of pinnacles resembling Gothic architecture. 
Gouldsboro; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for Robert Gould, one of the 

original proprietors. 
Gouverneur; town in St. Law^rence County, New York, named for Gouverneur 

Morris, an American statesman. 
Govan; town in Bamberg County, South Carolina, named for a family prominent 

in South Carolina history. 
Gove; county and city in Kansas, named for Grenville L. Gove, captain in the 

Eleventh Kansas Regiment. 
Governors; island in Boston Harbor, Massacliusetts, named for Governor Winthroii, 

to whose descendants it still l)elongs. 
Governors; island in New York Harbor, named for Governor Van Twiller, who 

owned it at an early date. 
Gowanda; village in Cattaraugus County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 

"a town among the hills by the water side." 
Grafton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Charles Fitz-Roy, 

Duke of ( irafton. 
Grafton; county and town in New Hampshire, named for Augustus Henry Fitz-Roy, 

Duke of Grafton. 
Grafton; city in Taylor County, West Virginia, named by the Baltimore and Ohio 

Railroad, because they grafted a branch from this point to Wheeling. 
Graham; county in Kansas, named for John L. Graham, captain of the Eighth 

Kansas Regiment. 
Graham; county, and town in Alamance County, North Carolina, named for Senator 

William A. Graham, Secretary of the Navy under President Fillmore. 
Graham; city in Young County, Texas, named for one of two brothers, who owned 

salt works near where the town was built. 
Grahamsville; village in Sullivan County, New York, named for Lieutenant (ira- 

ham, who was killed by Indians near the present site of the village. 
Grahamton; town in Meade County, Kentucky, named for an early pioneer. 
Grahamville; town in Beaufort County, South Carolina, nameil for the founder. 
Grainger; county in Tennessee, named for Mary Grainger. 
Granby; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, said to have been named for 

John, Marquis of (iranby. 
Granby; town in Essex County, Vermont, named for Earl Granby in 17G1. 
Grand; county in Colorado, named from Grand Lake, the source of Grand River. 
Grand Coteau; town in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, so named because of its posi- 
tion. A French name, meaning "great hilL" 



.iANM-.TT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 128 

Grand Forks; county and city in North Dakota, wliicth take their nanic from tiie 

junction of tiie lied River of the North with Red Lake River. 
Grand Haven; city in Ottawa County, INIichigan, no named becau^ie it in situated on 

tlie best Iiar1)()r on the eastern shore of Lake Michij^an. 
Grand Island; city in Ne])raska on Rlatte River, which is divide<l into t wo cliannels 

at tiiat point l)y an island nearly 50 miles long. 
Grand Isle; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named from an island in the river 

at that point. 
Grand Isle; county and villaue in ^'ermont, named from an island in Lake Cham- 

jylain, since called South Hero. The early French called it Grand Isle. 
Grand Junction; town in Greene County, Iowa, so named from its position at the 

junction of the Keokuk and Des Moines and Chicago and Northwestern rail- 
roads. 
Grand Lake Stream; plantation in Washington County, ]\Iaine, named from a lake 

in the northern part of the State. 
Grand Rapids; citii's in IMicliigan and Wisconsin, named from rapids and falls in 

the Grand and Wisconsin rivers. 
Grand Ronde; river and valley in Oregon. Is a French nami', meaning "great 

round," and was api^lied by the early French trappers to the valley because of 

its circular shape. 
Grand Tower; city in Jackson County, Illinois, named from a high rocky island 

which resembles a tower, in the Mississipjii River. 
Grand Traverse; county in ^Michigan, named from Grand Traverse Bay. 
Granite; citunty in ^Montana, named from a mountain which contains the celebrated 

Granite ^Mountain silver mine. 
Graniteville; village in Iron County, Missouri, named for a (juarr\- near, considered 

one of the most remarkable in the world. 
Grant; niilitary post in Arizona, county in Arkansas, town in Humboldt Count}', 

California; town in Montgomery County, Iowa; county in Kansas, parish in 

Louisiana, county in Minnesota, county and village in Nebraska, counties in New 

Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, and West Virginia, and many small 

places throughout the the country, named for Gen. U. S. Grant. 
Grant; county in Indiana, named for Samuel and Moses Grant, of Kentucky, killed 

in battle with the Indians. 
Grant; county in Kentucky. Ai-cording to John McGee it was named for Col. John 

Grant, an earlj' settler, l)ut according to J. Worthing McCann, the county was 

named for Samuel Grant. 
Grant; river and county in Wisconsin, named for a trapper who had a cabin on its 

banks. 
Grantsville; town in Calhoun County, West Virginia, named for U. S. Grant. 
Granville; county in North Carolina and town in Hampden C'ounty, Massachusetts, 

named for John Carteret, F>arl of Granville. 
Grass; river in St. Lawrence County, New York, from the name given it b}' the 

early French, LaGrasse Riviere, meaning "the fertile river." 
Grass Valley; city in Nevada County, California, named from a \alley covered 

with grass. 
Gratiot; county in Michigan, named for Capt. Charles Gratiot, United States Army, 

who constructed Fort Gratiot in 1814. 
Gratiot; village in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, named for Col. Henry (iratiot, an 

Indian agent. 
Grattan; townshii) in Kent County, Michigan, named for the Irish orator. 
Gratz; borough in Daui)hin County, Pennsylvania, named from the Prussian town. 
Graves; county in Kentucky, name<l for Cajjt. Benjamin Graves, who fell at the 

battle of Raisin River. 



124 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Gravesend; village in King8 County, New York, now a part of New York City, 

nanieil l)y persons from Gravesend, England. 
Gravette; town in Benton County, Arkansas, named for E. T. (iravette. 
Gray; county in Kansas, named for Alfred Gray, secretary of the Kansas State 

board of agriculture in 1873-1880. 
Gray; town in Cumberland County, Maine, said to have been named for Thomas 

Gray, one of the jiroprietors. 
Gray; county in Texas, named for Peter W. Gray, prominent lawyer of Houston. 
Grayling; town in Crawford County, Michigan, named from the fish for which the 

Au Sable River was famous. 
Graymount; town in Colorado near the foot of Grays Peak; hence the name. 
Grays; peak in Colorado, named by Dr. Parry for Dr. Asa Gray, l)otanist. 
Grays; harbor in Washington, named for the discoverer, Capt. Robert Gray, of 

Boston. 
Grayson; county in Kentucky and county in Virginia, named foi- Col. William 

Grayson, United States Senator from Virginia. 
Grayson; town in Carter County, Kentucky, named for Col. Robert Grayson. 
Grayson; county in Texas, named for Peter W. Grayson, attorney-general of the 

Texan Republic in 1836. 
Graysville; village in Sullivan County, Indiana, named for Joe Gray, its founder. 
Graysville; village in Herkimer County, New York, named for I^atham (iray, a 

resident. 
Great Barring-ton; town in Berkshire C'ounty, INIassachusetts, named for William, 

Viscount Barrington. 
Great Basin; an area of territory in Utah whose waters do not reach the sea; hence 

it is called a "basin." 
Great Bend; city in Barton County, Kansas, which takes its name from a bend in 

the Arkansas River south of there. 
Great Bend; l)orough in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, named from a bend 

in the Susquehanna River at that point. 
Great Black; river in Maine, which takes its name from the Indian designatiorr, 

Chimkazaootook, meaning "big black stream." 
Great Butte des Morts; lake in AVisconsin, so called from mounds near, which 

are said to contain the bodies of Indians slain in battle. 
Great Falls; city in Cascade County, Montana, named from the falls in the Mis- 
souri, near the city. 
Great Q,uabbin; mountain in Massachusetts, named for a celebrated Indian sachem. 

Thenvord is supposed to mean "many waters." 
Great Salt; lake in Utah, named from the salinity of its waters. 
Great Sinabar; creek in Missouri, a corruption of the old French name Chenal au 

Barre, meaning "channel of the bar," or "through the bar." 
Greeley; city in Colorado, county and city in Kansas, and county in Nebraska, 

named for Horace Greeley. 
Greeley; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for Peter Greeley. 
Green; descriptive word found frequently with and without various suffixes. The 

river in Wyoming and Utah was so called from the green shale through which 

it flows. 
Green; river rising in the Wind River range of the Rockies, formerly known as 

Popo Agie, a word of the Crow dialect, meaning " head of river." 
Green; mountains in New England, so named from their forests of evergreen trees. 
Green; counties in Kentucky and Wisconsin, named for Gen. Nathaniel Greene. 
Green Bay; city in Brown County, AVisconsin, named from the bay which was 

called by the early French " la grande baie," " the large bay," which was cor- 
rupted into the present name. 



GANNKTT.] PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 125 

Greenbrier; fuunty in West \'ir<rinia, iiaim'd from thu river, which was sn calleil 

hy Col. John Lewis. 
Greenbush; town in Rensselaer Connty, New York, translation orijiinal Dntch 

name Groen Bosch, from the pine woods which originally covered the flats. 
Greencastle; city in Indiana, named from the town in Ireland. 
Green Cove Springs; town in Clay County, Florida, named from a large snlpluir 

spring, supposed In- some to be the " fountain of youth " of Spanish and Indian 

legends. 
Greene; counties in (Tcorgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa; town in Andro.scoggin County, 

■Maine; counties in Mississiiiju, INIissouri, and New York, and village in Che- 
nango County, New York; counties in North Carolina, Ohio, Penn.^ylvania, and 

Tennessee; nameil for Gen. Nathaniel Greene, Kevolutionary soldier. 
Greene; town in lUitler t^iunty, Iowa, named for Judge George Green, of Linn 

County, 
f Greenesville ; county in Virginia; 

JGreeneville ; town in Greene County, Tennessee. Named for Gen. Nathaniel (ireene. 
Greenfield; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, which derives its name from 

the river which intersects it. 
Green Island; town in Albany County, New York, so named l)ecause situated on 

an island of that name in Hudson Kiver. 
Green Lake; county in Wisconsin, so named from a lake which was called so from 

tlie color of its waters. 
Greenleaf; city in Washington C'ounty, Kansas, named for the treasurer of the 

Union Pacific Railroad, A. W. Greenleaf. 
Greensburg; city in Kiowa County, Kansas, named for Col. D. R. (Treen. 
Greenup; connty and town in Kentucky, named for Christopher Greenup, governor 

of the State in 1804-1S08. 
Greenville; city in Muhlenberg Comity, Kentucky, and town in IMtt County, North 

Carolina, named for Gen. Nathaniel Greene. 
Greenville; city in INIontclam County, Michigan, named for John (ireen, one of the 

iirst settlers. 
Greenville; town in Washington County, Mississipi)i, named for the tirst settler. 
Greenville; county and city in South Carolina, named from the physical appear- 
ance. The name was first given to the city and from that applied to the county. 
Greenwich; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and village in Washington 

County, New York, named from the town in England. 
Greenwood; town in Sebastian County, Arkansas, named for Moses Greenwood, 

a pi'ominent merchant of early days. 
Greenw^ood; - anty in Kansas, named for Alfred B. Greenwood, Conunissioner of 

Indian ^ '.airs in 1859-60. 
Greenwoc ; city in Leflore C(junty, Mississippi, named for Greenwood Leflore, a 

noted Choctaw Indian chief. 
Greenwood; village in Cass County, Nebraska, named for an early settler, J. S. 

Green. 
Greenwood; county in South Carolina, descriptively named. 
Greer; county in Oklahoma, named for John A. Greer, governor of Texas in 1S49- 

1853. 
Greer; town in Greenville County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Gregg; I'ounty in Texas, named for a prominent citizen, John Gregg, killed in the 

civil war. 
Gregory; county in South Dakota, named for J. Shaw (iregory, legislator. 
Greig; town in Lewis County, New York, named for the late John Greig, of Can- 

andaigua. 
Grenada; county and town in Mississippi, named from the Spanish province. 



I'iC) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Grenola; city in Elk Countj', Kanaaa, named by compounding the first part of the 

name of two rival towns in the neighborhood — Greenfield and Kanola. 
Gridley; town in McLean County, Illinois, named for Asahel Gridley. 
Griffin; city in Spalding County, Georgia, named for Gen. L. L. Griffin. 
Grifton; town in Pitt County, North Carolina, named for tlie Griffon family. 
Grifton Corners; village in Delaware County, New York, named for the (iriffin 

family. 
Griggs; county in North Dakota, named for Ibtii. Alex. Griggy, a pioneer of Grand 

Forks, member of the constitutional convention of North Dakota. 
Grimes; town in Colusa County, California, named for the man who founded it. 
Grimes; town in Polk County, Iowa, named for Senator Grimes. 
Grimes; county in Texas, named for Jesse Grimes, member of the council of i>ro- 

visional government. 
Grimesland; town in Pitt County, North (Carolina, named for Gen. Bryan Grimes.. 
Grinnell; city in Poweshiek County, Iowa, named for Hon. W. H. Grinnell, a 

citizen. 
Griswold; town in New Lontlon County, Connecticut, named for Roger Griswold, 

governor of the State in 1811. 
Grizzly; i)eak in Colorado, named by a party of scientists from an adventure with 

a grizzly bear. 
Gross; point in Maine on the Penoljscot River, named for the first settler, Zachariah 

< i ross. 
Grosse Isle; village in Wayne County, Michigan, which takes its name from an 

island in Detroit River, which was called by the early French Grosse Isle, 

"great isle." 
Grossepoint; town in Wayne County, Michigan, so named from a large i>oint which 

projects into Lake St. Clair, named by the French, Grosse Pointe, "great or 

large point." 
Grosvenor; mount in Arizona, named for H. C. (Trosvenor, who was killed there 

in l.S(U. 
Groton; town in ]\nd(llesex County, Massachusetts, named from the place in P^ng- 

land owned by the family of Deane Winthrop, whose name headed the petition 

for the grant. 
Groton; village in Tompkins County, New York, named from the above. 
Grover; village in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and town in Dorchester 

County, South Carolina, named for (Trover Cleveland. 
Grubbs; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for the early owner, John 

Grubbs. 

I Grundy; counties in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Tennessee; 
Grundy Center; town in Grundy County, Iowa. Named for Felix (jrundy, United 
States Senator from Tennessee. 
Guadalupe; county in New Mexico and river and town in Victoria County, Texas, 

named for Don Felix Victoria, first president of Mexico, known as "Guadalupe 

Victoria." 
Guernsey; county in Ohio, named Ijy enugrants from the island of Guernsey in the 

Knglish channel. 
Guero; mount in Colorado, named for a Ute Indian. 
Guilford; borough in New Haven County, Connecticut, nametl from a town in 

England. 
Guilford; county in North Carolina, named for the Earl of (Tuilford, father of Lord 

North. 
Gulfport; town in Harrison C(»unty, Mississipi)i, named ))y W. II. Hardy, because 

of its situation. 
Gulpha; creek in Hot Springs, Arkansas. The name is a corruption of Calfat, a 

proper name, probably belonging to an early settler. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 127 

Gunnison; county, town, nionnliiin, and rivi-r in Colorado, and island in (irvat 

Salt Lake, Utah, named for Capt. J. W. (iunnison, an early explorer. 
Gurnet; point at the entrance to riyniouth Harbor, Massachusetts, named from the 

gurnet, a sea fish. 
Guthrie; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Guthrie; county in Iowa, named for Capt. Edwin B. Guthrie. 
Gvithrie; town in Callaway County, Missouri, named for Cuthrie brothers, early 

settlers. 
Guthrie Center; town in ( iuthrie County, Iowa, named for Capt. Edwin B. Guthrie. 
Guttenburg; city in Clayton County, Iowa, and town in Hudson County, New 

Jersey, named for the inventor of i>rinting. 
Guyandot; town in Cabell County, West Virginia, and river in same State. The 

French form of Wyandotte, the tribe of Indians. 
Guyot; mounts in Colorado, New Hampshire, and Tennessee, named for Arnold 

Guyot, the geograiiher. 
Gwinnett; county in Georgia, nameil for Rution (iwinnett, one of the signers of the 

Declaration of Independence. 
Habana; city in Mason County, Illinois, named for the city in Cuba. The word is 

Spanish, meaning " harbor." 
Habersham; county in Georgia, named for Col. Joseph Habersham, speaker of the 

general assembly of (Georgia in 1785. 
Hackensack; town in Bergen County, New Jersey. An Indian word. Authorities 

differ as to the meaning of this word, the many different versions jjeing " hook 

mouth," "a stream that unites with another on low ground," "on low ground," 

"the land of the Vng snake." 
Hackettstown; town in Warren County, New Jersey, named for Samuel Ilackett, 

a large landowner. 
Hackneyville; town in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, named from the sul)urb in 

London. 
Haddam; city in Washington County, Kansas, named for the town in Connecticut, 
Haddonfield; borough in Camden County, New Jersey, named for Elizabeth Haddon. 
Hadley; peak in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Hadley; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named from the itarish in 

Essex, England. 
Hadlyme; town in New London County, Connecticut. The name is formed of a 

combination of the names of the two townshii)s in which it is located — Haddam 

and Lyme. 
Hag-erstown; city in Washington County, Maryland, named for a German named 

Hager, one of the original projirietors. 
Hag-ue; several towns and villages in the United States are named for the city in 

Holland. 
Hague; peak in Colorado, named for Arnold Hague of the United States CJeological 

Survey. 

(Hahn; peak in Colorado; 
Hahn Peak; village in Routt County, Colorado. Named for Joe Hahn, an early 
settler. 
Hainesville; village in Plolt (bounty, Nebraska, named for S. S. Haines, early settler. 
Halcott; town in Greene County, New York, named for (leorge W. Halcott, sheriff. 
Hale; county in Alabama, named for Stephen F. Hale, prominent in the State. 
Hale; village in Carroll County, Missouri, named for John P. Hale, of Carrollton. 
Hale, county in Texas, named for Lieut. J. C. Hale, of the Confederate army. 
Hale Eddy; village in Delaware County, New York, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Half Dome; mountain of granite in California, on the walls of the Yosemite Valley, 
so named because it has the appearance of a half dome. 



128 PLACE NAMP:S in the united states. (bull. 197. 

Halfmoon; l)ay in California, so named from its cresc'ent shape. 

Halfmoon; town in Sarato^'a County, New York, so named from a crescent-shaped 
piece of land hetvveen the Hudson and the Mohawk. 

Halibut; island off the coast of Alaska, so named on account of the large number of 
halibut found there. 

Halifax; counties in North Carolina and Virginia, and towns in Plymouth County, 
Massachusetts, and Windham County, Vermont, named f<ir George Montagu, 
Earl of Halifax. 

Hall; county in (leorgia, named for Dr. Lyman Hall, one of tlie signers of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

Hall; county in Nebraska, named for Augustus Hall, former Congressman from Iowa. 

Hall; county in Texas, named for an early settler and captain in the war of inde- 
pendence, Warren O. C. Hall. 

Halletts Cove; i^art of New York City, formerly a village in Queens County, New 
York, which received its name from the original patentee. 

Hallowell; city in Kennebec County, Maine, named for Benjamin Hallowell, a 
large proprietor in the Kennebec patent. 

Hallstead; borough in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, named for William F. 
Ilallstead, general manager of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad. 

Hallsville; village in INIontgomery County, New York, named for Capt. Robert 
Hall. 

Halseyville; village in Tompkins County, New York, named for the first settler, 
Nicholl Halsey. 

Halstead; city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for the journalist, INIurat Halstead. 

Hamblen; county in Tennessee, named for Hezekiah Hamblen. 

Hamburg; name given to several places in the United States after the city in Ger- 
many, among them being towns in Erie County, New York, and Aiken County, 
South Carolina. 

Hamersville; village in Brown County, Ohio, named for Gen. Thomas Lyon Hamer. 

Hamilton; many places in the United States are named for the statesman, Alexander 
Hamilton, among them being counties in the States of Florida, Illinois, Indiana, 
Kansas, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, 
and probably the county of that name in Nebraska. 

Hamilton; town in Harris County, Georgia, named for General Hamilton, governor 
of South C!arolina. 

Hamilton; county in Iowa, named for William W. Hamilton, president of the sen- 
ate in 1857. 

Hamilton; county in Texas, named for James Hamilton, of South Carolina, a sym- 
j^athizer and helper of Texas in its war. 

Hamlet; village in Richmond County, North Carolina, named for its founder. 

Hamlin; several places in the United States are named for Hannibal Hamlin, among 
which are a plantation in Aroostook County, Maine, a county in South Dakota, 
and city in Brown County, Kansas. 

Hammond; village in Piatt County, Illinois, named for Charles Goodrich Ham- 
mond, railway manager. 

Hammond; city in Lake County, Indiana, named for Abram Hammond, twelfth 
governor, 1860-61. 

Hammond; town in Presque County, IMichigan, named for Stephen Hammond. 

Hammond; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Abijah Hammond, 
an early proprietor. 

Hammonton; town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, named for a family of former 
residents. 

Hammonville; town in Hart County, Kentucky, named for a resident. 

Hampden; county and town in Massachusetts and a town in Penobscot County, 
Maine, named for the English patriot, John Hampden. 



(iANSKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 129 

Hampshire; coimtic- in .Ma^istK-hiisi'tts uiid West Virginia, nauinl lor (lie njimty iu 

England. 
Hampstead; many villages in Nt'w Hampshire, Maryland, and Virginia, named for 

tlie parish in England. 
Hampton; name of several places in the United States, named for the parish in 

^iiddlesex, England, a t(jwn in Rockingham Connty, New Hami)shire, being one 

of tlu'SQ. 

Hampton; t-duntN' and town in South Carolina, nami'd U>v (ien. Wade llam|>tun. 

Hamptonburg; town in ( )range County, New York, named from the hi rtli place — 
Wolverhampton — of William F)ull, first settler. 

Hancock; counties in (ieorgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Kentucky, county and 
town in ^Maine, town iu Berkshire County, Massachusetts, county in Mississippi, 
mountain iu New Hampshire, town in Delaware County, New York, and coun- 
ties in Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia, named for John Hancock, one of 
the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Many other places in the 
United States are named for the same man. 

Hancock; mount in Yellowstone Park, named for Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock. 

Hand; county in South Dakota, named for George A. Hand, Territorial secretary in 
ISSO. 

Handsboro; town in Harrison County, Mississippi, named for a Northern man who 
estal)lished a foundry there before the civil war. 

Hanging Rock; village in Lawrence County, Ohio, named from the presence of a 
t'liff at the back of the town. 

Hangmans; creek in Washington, tributary of the Spokane River, so named because 
some Indians were hanged on its bank. 

Hanna; reef and island in Texas, |)robably named fur Captain Hanna, t'aptain of the 
Lconidds, in 1837. 

Hannacrois; creek in New York, said to have been named by the Dutch, " hanne- 
ki'aai,"' meaning "cock-crowing creek," from the legend that a rooster came 
floating down this creek on a cake of ice. 
Hannibal; town in Oswego Ccjunty, New York, named by the State land board, 
Ijeing situated in the military t act given to the surviving soldiers of the 
Revolution ; 
Hannibal; city in Clarion County, Misscniri. Named for the Carthaginian general. 

Hanover; many places in the United States are named for the Duke of Hanover, 
who became George I of P^ngland, or from the Prussian city and province 
belonging to him. Among these are a town in Plymouth County, Massachu- 
setts, city in Washington County, Kansas, and a county in Virginia. 

Hansford; county in Texas, named for John M. Hansford, who was a judge and 
lawyer there during the days of the republic. 

Hanson; county in South Dakota, named fur Joseph R. Hanson, clerk of the first 
legislature. 

Haralson; county and village in Georgia, nauied for Gen. Hugh A. Haralson, 
former Congressman fr(jm that State. 

Harbeson; village in Sussex County, Delaware, named for Harheson Hickman, a 
large landowner. 

Harbine; village in Thayer County, Nebraska, named for Col. John Harbine. 

Hardeman; county in Texa.s, named for two brothers, Bailey and T. J. Hardeman, 
prominent citizens in tlu^ days of the Republic; and a county in Tennessee, 
named fur one of the brothers. Col. T. J. Hardeman. 

Hardenburg; town in Ulster County, New York, named for Johainies Ilardenburg, 
an early patentee in Delaware and Sullivan counties. 

Hardin; several places in the United States have received this name, among them 
a nundaer of counties, most of which were named for Cc^l. J(jhn Hardin. Among 
these are the counties in Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, Tennessee, and Kentucky. 

Bull. 197 -02 y 



130 PLACE JSAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Hardin; city in Kay County, Mi^isouri, nauicd t'nr (Jovernor ("liarles U. Hardin, 
1875-1877. 

Hardin; county in Texas^, named fur tlic family of ^^"illiam Hardin, of Liberty. 

Hardin Factory; town in (iaston County, North Carolina, named for the builder 
of the factory. 

Hardinsburg; town in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, named for Capt. William 
Hardin, a pioneer. 

Hardwick; town in Worcester County, ^lansachusettt^, named foi- Pliili]) Yorke, 
Lord Hardwicke, a member of the privy council. 

Hardy; town in Sharp County, Arkansas, named for a railroad dtticial. 

Hardy; county in West Virginia, named for Samuel Hardy, a member of Congress 
fi-om Virginia in 1784. 

Hardy Station; town in Grenada County, Mississippi, nameil l)y the railroad com- 
l)any for Kichard Hardy, the owner of the land ujion which the dei)ot was Ijuilt. 

Harford; county and village in Maryland, named for Henry Harford, the natural 
son of Lord Baltimore, the sixth, and proprietor at the time of tlie Revolution. 

Harlan; city in Shelby County, Iowa, named for Senator Harlan. 

Harlan; village in Smith County, Kansas, named for John C. Harlan, one of the 
first settlers. 

Harlan; county and town in Kentucky, named for Maj. Silas Harlan. 

Harlan; county in Nebraska, named for James Harlan, Secretary of the Interior 
1865-66. 

Harlem; part of New York City and the channel which extends northward from 
Hell Gate, connecting with the Hudson, named for the town in Holland. 

Harleyville; town in Dorchester County, South Carolina, named for a resident 
family. 

Harman; village in Arapaiioe County, Col(jradi), named for L. B. Harman, its 
founder. 

Harmer; townshi}) and village in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for the 
Hon. Harmer Denny. 

Harmony; borough in Butler County, Pennsylvania, nametl by a colony of Ger- 
mans to indicate the 2)rinciple of its organization. 

Harnett; county of North Carolina, named for Cornelius Harnett, an American 
statesman. 

Harney; county, city, and lake in Oregon, named tor General Harney. 

Harper; county in Kansas, named for INlarion Harper, lirst sergeant Conijiany E, 
Second Kansas Regiment. 

Harpers Ferry; town in Jeffe)'son County, West Virginia, named for Rcibert Har- 
per, who settled there in 1734 and established a ferry. 

Harpersfield; town in Delaware County, New York, named for J<weph Harper, an 
original i)atentee. 

Harperville; village in Scott County, Mississippi, named ft>r G. W. Harper, an uld 
resident. 

Harpswell; town in Cumberland County, Maine, i)robably named for the town in 
England. 

Harrellsville; town in Hertford County, North Carolina, nameil for a former resi- 
dent. 

Harriet; lake in ^Minnesota, named for the wife of Colonel Leavenworth. 

Harrietstown; town in I'ranklin County, New York, named for the wife of James 
Duane. 

Harrietta; village in Wexford County, Michigan, a combination of the names of the 
manager of the Ann Arbor Railroad, Harry, and that of his wife, Henrietta. 

Harrington; town in Kent County, Delaware, named for the Hon. Sanmel M. Har- 
rington, at one time chancellor of the State. 

Harris; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 131 

Harris; foiinty in (loori,'i;i, nanicd I'oi' CliarU'S Harris, a jiroiniiicrit lawyer and 

judge. 
Harris; county in Texas, named for .Inhn U. Harris, wiio elected tlie tirst steam 

sawmill in Texas (1S29). 
Harrisburg; town in Lewis County, New York, named for l\ichard Harrison, of 

New York. 
Harrisburg; the cajntal of Pennsylvania, named for .lolm Harris, llie oritiinal pro- 
prietor. 
Harrison; twenty places in tlie I'nited States bear this name, amonii- them l)einj^ 

the counties of Indiana, Iowa, IVIississippi, and Ohio, and a town in.( iloncestcr 

County, New Jersey, namt-d for William Henry Harrison, former President of 

the United States. 
Harrison; counties in Kentucky and West Virginia, named for C(j1. Benjamin Har- 
rison, father of William Henry Harrison. 
Harrison; town in Cumberland County, INIaine, named for Harrison (iray Otis, of 

Boston. 
Harrison; town in Tallahatchie County, Mississii>pi, named for James T. Harrison, 

jirominent lawyer. 
Harrison; county in ^Missouri, named for Albert G. Iliirri.son, of Callaway County. 
Harrison; town in Westchester County, New Y^ork, named for John Harrison. 
Harrison; county in Texas, named for an early jiioneer. 
Harrisonburg; village in Catahoula Parish, Louisiana, and town in Pockingham 

County, ^'irginia, named for the Harrisons of Virginia. 
Harrisville; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for ]Milau Harris, 

who estaljlished a mill there. 
Harrisville; town in Lewis County, New York, named after Fosket Harris, tirst 

settler. 
Harrisville; village in Meigs County, Ohio, named for Joseph Harris, a pioneer. 
Harrisville; town in Ritchie County, West Virginia, named for Thomas Harris. 
Harrodsburg; city in Mercer County, Kentucky, named for Col. James Harrod, who 

l)uilt the first cabin there. 
Hart; county in Georgia, named for Nancy Hart, the celebrated Georgia heroine of 

the He volution. 
Hart; county in Kentucky, named for Nathaniel Hart, an officer of the war of 1812. 
Hart; river and lake in Yelhnvstone Park, named for Hart Hunney, an old hunter. 

Others say it was named "Heart," from its shape. 
Hartford; name transferred from England to many places in the Unite<l States, the 

capital of Connecticut being one of these. 
Hartford; city in Lyon County, Kansas, town in Windsor County, Vermont, and 

village in Mason County, West Virginia, named for the city in Connecticut. 
Hartley; county in Texas, named for O. C. and R. K. Hartley, distinguished mem- 
bers of the bar in the days of Texas's revolution. 
Hartsville; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for(iideon B. llait, a 

pioneer. 
Hartsville; town in Darlington County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Hartwick; town in Otsego County, New Y^ork, named for Christopher Hartwick, 

patentee. 
Harvard; mountain in Colorado, and city in McHenry County, Illinois, named 

from the university. 
Harvard; university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and a town in Worcester 

County, of the same State, named for the Rev. John Harvard, w ho founded the 

university. 
Harvey, county in Kansas, named for James M. Harvey, cajitain Company G, 

Tenth Kansas, governor, and United States Senator, 



132 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Harwich; town in Barnytable County, Massachusetts, named for the seaport in 
Essex County, P'ngland. 

Hasbrouck Heights; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named for Mr. Ilas- 
Ijroui'k, tlie j)rinrii)al owner of the land upon which the borough is located. 

Hasenclever; village in Herkimer County, New York, named for a German who 
received a grant (jf land there. 

Haskell; county in Kansas, named for Dudley C. Haskell, a former member of 
Congress. 

Haskell; county in Texas, named fur C'harles Haskell, of Tennessee. 

Hastingsr city in Barry County, ^Michigan, named for Eurotas P. Hastings, for- 
merly auditor-general of the Htate. 

Hatboro; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, so named because of its 
extensive hat factories. 

Hatchechubee; town in Russell County, Alabama. A combination of the Indian 
words hatchie, "a creek," and chubba, "halfway," "the middle." 

Hatchie; river in Tennessee. An Indian word, hatchie, meaning " a small river." 

Hatfield; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for a town in Eng- 
land. 

Hatteras; tuwnsliip and cape in Hare County, North Carolina, named for a tribe of 
Lennape Indians. 

Hattiesburg; town in Perry County, Mississippi, named for the wife of Capt. W. 
H. Hardy, its founder. 

Havensville ; city in Pottawatomie (.'ounty, Kansas, named for I'aul E. Havens, of 
Leavenworth. 

Haverford; township in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named for the town in 
Wales. 

Haverhill; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 

Haverhill; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named for tlie town in 
INIassachusetts. 

Haverstraw; town in Rockland County, New York, named by the early Dutcli 
Haverstroo, meaning "oats straw." 

Havilah; town in Kern County, California, named from the Bil)le, the word mean- 
ing "land of gold." 

Havilandsville ; village in Harrison County, Kentucky, named for Robert Ilavi- 
land. 

Havre de Grace; ttnvn in Harford County, Maryland. A French word meaning 
"harbor of grace, or safety." 

Haw; river and town in Alabama County, Ncjrth Carolina, named from tlie Indian 
trilie Sissipahaw. 

Hawesville; city in Hancock County, Kentucky, nametl for Richaid Havves. 

Hawkeye; town in Fayette County, Iowa, named for a noted Indian chief. 

Hawkins; county in Tennessee, named for Benjamin Hawkins, United States Sena- 
tor from North Carolina. 

Hawks Nest; town in Fayette County, West Virginia, named for a cliff on New 
River. 

Hawley; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Joseph Ilawley, of 
Northampton. 

Hawthorne; borough in Passaic County, New Jersey, named for Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne. 
Hayden; town in (irand County, Colorado; mountain in tlie Grand Teton range in 

Wyoming, and valley in Yellowstone Park; 
Hayden Hill; village in Lassen County, California. Named for Dr. Ferdinand V. 
Hayden, the geologist. 

Hay densville ; village in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Joel Hayden, 
its founder. 



GANXETTl PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED ^^TATES. 138 

Hayes; county in Ncln-nsku iiml nnnnit in Xew TIain]isliii-c, named I'm- Rutherford 

B. Hayes. 
Hayesville; town in Clay County, Norlli Carolina, named lor ( leor^e W. IlayeH, 

State senator. 
Hays; city in i''>llis County, Kansas, named forCen. William Hays, Cniteil States 

Army. 
Hays; county in Texas, named lor John C. Hays, colonel in the Texan service in 

the war hetween i\h"xico ami the Tnited States. 
Haywood; county in North Carolina, named for John Haywood, State treasurer. 
Haywood; county in TennessecN named for Jud.tie John Haywood, author of a liis- 

tory of Tennessee. 
Hazardville; village in 1 lartfonl County, Connecticut, named for Colonel Hazard, 

owner of powder works. 
Hazelton; city in I'arber County, Kansas, nameil for its founder, Rev. J. H. Haz- 

elton. 
Hazlerigg; village in Boone County, Indiana, nam<>d for 1 1 . (t. I hizlerigg, its founder. 
Hazleton; city in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, so named from the great abund- 
ance of hazel bushes. 
Healdsburg; city in Sonoma County, California, named for Col. Harmon Hi-ald, an 

eai-ly settler. 
Healing Springs; village in Bath County, Virginia, mimed for the thermal nnneral 

springs situated then'. 
Heard; county in Ceorgia, named for Stephen Heard, an ofTicer of the American 

Revolution. 
Heath; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Gen. William "SI. Heath. 
Heath Springs; town in Lan(!aster County, South Carolina, named after a firm of 

capitalists, Heath & Springs. 
Heber; city in Wasatch County, Ctah, named for Ileber C Kindiall, a leader of the 

■Mormons. 
Hebron; twenty-tive cities in tlie United States bear the name of this ancient city in 

Palestine. 
Heceta; village in Lane County, Oregon, probably named for the early ex]>loi-er, 

Capt. Bruno de Heceta. 
Hector; town in Schuyler County, New York, named for the character in the Iliad. 
Hedges; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for Cornelius Hedges. 
Hedrick; town in Keokuk County, Iowa, named for General Iledrick. 
Heidelberg; name of several places in the United States settled by colonists from 

that city in Germany. 
Helderberg; plateau in New York, so named becaust' of the line i)rospect from it. 

A Dutch word meaning " clear mountain." 
Helena; city in Lewis and Clarke County, Montana. Opinions differ as to the origin 

of the name, for by some it is supposed to be named for Helen of Troy, but 

according to the Helena Historical Directory of 1879 was named by John Som- 

erville, of Minnesota, St. Helena, from the resemblance in its location to that of 

the original St. Helena. It was then voted to drop the i)refix Saint, and that 

was done. 
Helena; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, name<l for the daugliter of 

Joseph Pitcairn, of New York. 
Helicon; village in Winston County, Alabama, named from the ancient mountain 

in Boeotia. 
Hellertown; borough in Northami)ton County, Pennsylvania', named for a family 

of early settlers. 
Hell Gate; narrow pass in the l*'ast River, New York. Dutch word Ilellegate, 

meaning "gate of hell." So named on account of the whirlpools, which made 

navigation dangerous. 



134 PLACE NAMES IN "THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Hellg-ate; river in Montana, named l)y Father de Sniet Porte de PEnfer, "gate of 

liell," because by tViis way the Bkickfeet reached his people. 
Hell Roaring; creek in Yellow8tone Park, so named l)y a prospecting party, because 

one of them described it as a "hell roarer." 
Helvetia; name of a few places in the United Wtates settled 1)}' the Swiss and by 

them given the ancient name of Switzerland. 
Hemlock; lake in New York. Translation of the Indian word Onehda. 
Hemphill; county in Texas, named for John Hem])hill, former Congressman from 

Texas. 
Hempstead; county in Arkansas, named for Kdwanl Hempstead, lirst delegate to 

Congress from Missouri Territory. 
Hempstead; town in Nassau County, New York. Derived from the Dutch word 

Ileemstede, meaning "homestead." 
Henderson; county and river in Illinois; city ami c((unty in Kentucky; county and 

village in Chester County, Tennessee, named for Col. Ricliard Henderson, of 

Kentucky. 
Henderson; town in Wexford County, Michigan, named for its first settler. 
Henderson; village in York County, Nebraska, named for Daviil Henderson, one of 

its iirst settlers. 
Henderson; town in Jefferson County. New York, named for William Henderson, 

proprietor. 
Henderson; county in North Carolina, named for Chief Justice Leonard Henderson. 
Henderson; county in Texas, named for James Pinckney Henderson, foreign min- 

istei- in the days of the republic; its first governor. 
Henderson; village in Mason County, West N'irginia, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Hendersonville; town in Henderson County, North C!arolina, named for Chief 

Justice Leonard Henderson. 
Hendricks; county in Lidiana, named for William Hendricks, one of the early gov- 
ernors of the State. 
Henlopen; cape on the coast of Delaware. Derived from the Dutch words Hin 

loop or Inlopen, meaning "to run in." 
Hennepin; county in Minnesota, and village in Putnam Coimty, Illinois, named for 

Louis IIennei)in, a Franciscan missionary. 
Hennessey; city in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, named for Pat Ilennesse)', an 

Indian lighter, who was killed ujion the ground which later became the town 

site. 
Henniker; town in ^Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for John Henni- 

ker, es(i., a merchant of London. 
Henrico; county in Virginia, named for the Prince of Wales, son of James I. 
Henrietta; town in Monroe County, New Yoi'k, named for Henrietta Laura, Count- 
ess of Bath. 
Henrietta; town in Rutherford County, North Carolina, named for the wife of S. B. 

Tanner. 
Henry; many counties in the LTnited States, among them those in the States of 

Alal)ama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, and Vir- 
ginia, and mountain in Tennessee, named for Patrick Henry. 
Henry; lake in Idaho, and fork of Snake River, named for one of the partners of 

the Northwest Fur Company. 
Henry; county in Iowa, named for Gen. Henry Dodge, governor of the Territory of 

Wisconsin. 
Henry; cape on coast of Virginia, named for the Prince of Wales, son of James I. 
Henry; lake in Yellowstone Park, named f< ir a celebrated fur trader, Andrew Henry, 

who established a trading post there. 



(iANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE ITNITED STATES. 135 

Hensou; town in Ilinsdulc ('i)nnty, Coloradi), nunicil I'min tlic cicck, wliicli was 

named for an cai-ly si'ttlt^i'. 
Hepburn; tnwn in Page Connty, Inwa, named tnr ('()nj,n't'ssman Hepltnrn. 
Hepler; city in Crawford Connty, Kansas, named for B. F. lle])ier, of Fori Scott. 
Herculanevim; village in Jeffei'son (!onnty, Missouri, named for the ancient city in 

Italy. 
Herington; citv in I>ickins(in Cnunty, Kans.-is, named for M. D. Ilerington, its 

f(inn<ler. 
Herkimer; county in New Yoric, named tor (leu. Nicholas I lei'lvimer, a<lerman, 

one of tlie patentees. 
Herman; village in Washington County, Nehraska, name<l for Samuel ll(>rman, 

conductor on th(» Omaha and Northwestern Railroad. 
Hermann; town in (iasconade County, Missouri, settled hy Cermans, ami named 

by them for their countryman, who fought so bravely at the time of the I'oman 

invasion. 
Hermitage; town in Hickory County, Missouri, name(l for the residence of .Vndrew 

Jackson. 
Harmon; village in St. Lawrence Comity, New York, named for the mountain in 

Syria. 
Hernando; county in Florida and city in De Soto County, .Mississippi, named for 

Hernando De Soto, discoverer of the Mississippi River. 
Hersey; village in Nobles County, INIinnesota, named for(ieiu'ral Hersey, of !\raini>, 

largely interested in the Territoiy. 
Hertford; county, and a town in I'eniuimans C'ounty, North Carolina, named for 

Conway, ^Nianjuis of Hertford. 
Heuvelton; villagi' in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Jacob \'an 

Heuvel. 
Hewes; point in Penobscot Bay, Maine, named for its first settler, Paola Hewes. 
Hiawatha; city in Brown County, Kansas, named for the hero of Longfellow's 

poem . 
Hibernia; .several places in the Cnited States bear this name of ancient Ireland. 
Hickman; county and city in Fulton County, Kentucky, named for ('apt. Paschal 

Hickman. 
Hickman; county in Tennessee, named for Fdnuuid Hickman. 
Hickory; this name, either alone or with suffixes, is borne l)y 4H places in the 

I'nited States. When alone, as in the cases of the county in Missouri, and the 

towns in Newton Connty, Mississippi, and Catawba County, North Carolina, 

the places were named for Andrew Jackson — "Old Hickory." 
Hickory Flats; town in Benton County, Mississijipi, named for a near-by hickory 

grove. 
Hicks; island at entrance to Napeagne Bay, Long Island, New York, named lor the 

owner. 
Hicksville; \illage in (Queens Comity, New Y'ork, named for Charles Hicks, the 

(.Quaker reformer. 
Hicksville; village in Defiance Connty, Ohio, named for Henry W. Hicks, who was 

one of the founders. 
Hidalgo; county in Texas, said to be named for Hidalgo y Costilla, a priest, and 

leader in ^Mexican war of independence. 
Higganum; village in Middlesex County, Connecticut. A coi'ruption of the Indian 

word, Tomhegan-ompakut, meaning "at the toinahaw'k rock." 
Higginsport; village in Brown County, Ohio, named for Col. Robert Higgins, who 

laiil it out. 
Highbridge; borough in Ihiuterdon County, New Jersey, named for its remarkable 

railroad liridge. 



186 PLACE NAMP:S in the united states. [Mill. 1i»7. 

Highg-ate; town in Franklin Gonnty, Vermont, named from the chapelry in Mid- 
dlesex, England. 
Highland; eonnties in Ohio and Virginia, and city in Donipluui County, Kansas, so 

named on account of the high location. 
Highlands; borough in Monmontli County, New Jersey, adjacent to the Atlantic 

Highlands, and taking its name therefrom. 
Highlands; l)roken hills on the Hudson River, New York. Derived from the name 

of Hogeland, or Hoogland, meaning "highland," originally given them hy the 

Dutcli. 
Highlands; town in Mason County, North Carolina, so named because it is the 

highest village east of the Mississippi. 
High Point; village in Guilfonl County, North C'arolina, so named because it is the 

highest point on the North Carolina Railroad. 
Hightower; village in Forsyth County, Georgia, on the Etowah River. The name 

is a corruption of the name of the river. 
Hightstown; borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, named for the Hight family. 
Hildebran; village in Burke County, North Carolina, named for Pope (Jregory VII. 
Hilgard; mountain in Utah, named for J. E. Hilgard, formerly suj)erintendent 

I'nited States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Hill; city in Graham County, Kansas, named for W. R. Hill, who located the town. 
Hill; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for Isaac Hill, governor 

i,s;!r)-i8:!9. 

Hill; county in Texas, named for George W. Hill. 

Hillburn; town in Rocklan'l C'ounty, New York, originally named Woodlnirn, 

changed in 1882 to Hilll)urn in order not to conflict with a post-office of same 

name in that State. Both names are descriptive. 
Hillers; mountain in Utah, named for John H. Hillers, photographer. 
Hillsboro; counties in Florida and New Hampshire, and town in Orange County, 

North Carolina, named for the Earl of Hillsborough. 
Hillsboro; city in Marion County, Kansas, named for a former mayor, John (i. 

Hill. 
Hillsboro; village in Vernon County, Wisconsin, nanie<l for the Hillsboro brothers, 

wlio made the first claim within the town. 
Hillsdale; county in Michigan, so named because of its rolling surface — hills and 

valleys. 
Hiltonhead; village in Beaufort County, North Carolina, said to have lieen named 

for the captain of the ship in which Colonel Sayle came over to make discoveries. 
Hinckley; lake and village in Oneida County,- New York, named for a resident 

family. 
Hinds; county in Mississip])i, named for (tcu. Thomas Hinds, former ('ongressman 

from that State. 
Hinesburg; town in Chittenden County, N^ermont, named for an original j^ro- 

prietor, Abel Hines. 
Hinesville; town in Lilierty County, (ieorgia, named for Charlton Hines, esq. 
Hingham; town in Plymouth County, INlassachusetts, named for the town in 

England. 
Hinsdale; county in Colorado, named for Lieutenant-Governor George A. Hinsdale. 
Hinsdale; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Rev. Theodore 

Hinsdale. 
Hinsdale; town in Chcvshire County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Ebenezer 

Hinsdale, one of its principal inhabitants. 
Hinton; city in Summers County, West Virginia, named for the former owner of 

the town site. 
Hippocrass; island in Maine, probably so named by seamen, the word meaning 

"spiced wine." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 187 

Hiram; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for ''Hiram, Kinjj; of Tyre." 
Hitchcock; county in Nebraska, named for Phineas W. Ilitehcock, Senator from 

Nel)raska. 
Hoback; jieak and liverin Wyoiiiin;^, named for an early trapper witli the Missouri 

l-"ui- Company. 
Hobart; town in Wexford County, Mieliigan, named for tiie lirst settler. 
Hobart; town m Delawari' Count}', New York, named for P.ishoj) Ilohart, of New 

Jersey. 
Hobg-ood; town in Halifax County, North Carolina, nameil foi- the piincipal of the 

Oxford Female Seminary. 
Hoboken; eity in Hudson County, New Jersey. Derived from the Indian word 

nojiocan, meanino; a "tobacco pi})e." 
Hockanum; river and villajjie in Hartford County, Connecliiut. .\n Indian wor<l, 

meaning "hook-shaped," "a liook;" so named because of tlu> change in the 

course of the river at this ])oint. 
Hockendaqua; stream in Nortliampton County, Pennsylvania. Inchan word, 

meaning "searching for hind." 
Hockessin; village in Newcastle County, Delaware. An Indian word, meaning 

"good bark;" applied to this locality on account of the good (|uality ( f white 

oak found there. 
Hocking; river and county in Ohio. Derived from tlie Indian word Hockhock, "a 

gourd" or "a bottle," and ing, meaning "a place;" so called because at this 

jioint the river suddenly assumes tlie shape of a bottle. 
Hodg-don; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named foi- the i)ro]>rietor, John 

Hodgdon. 
Hodgeman; county in Kansas, named for Amos Hodtreman, ca]>tain ('ompany H, 

Seventh Kansas. 
Hodgensville; town in Larue County, Kentucky, named for Kobert Hodgen. 
Hodges; ledge of rock in Massachusetts, named for Isaac Hodges. 
Hodges; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Hoffman; mount in California, named for Charles F. Hoffman, State geological 

survey. 
Hoffman; village in Richmond Comity, North Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Hoffmans Ferry; village in Schenectady County, New York, named for John Hoff- 
man, owner of a ferry there. 
Hog Creek; village in Allen County, Ohio, named for a stream with the Indian 

name Koskosepe, meaning "hog river." 
Hohenlinden; village in Chickasaw County, ^lissouri, named for the village in 

Bavaria. 
Hohokus; town in Bergen County, New Jersey, said to be derived from the Indian 

word Ho-hokes, meaning "a shout," or " some kind of a ])ark of a tree." 
Hoisington; city in Barton County, Kansas, named for A. J. Hoisington, of (ireat 

Bend. 
Hokah; village in Houston County, Minnesota, named from the river. An Indian 

word, meaning "a horn." 
Hokaman; name of several lakes in INIinnesota. An Indian word, meaning "where 

herons set." 
Holbrook; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Elisha Ilolbrook, a 

prominent citizen. 
Holden; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the Hon. Samuel 

Holden, one of the directors of the Bank of England. 
Holderness; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named after the district in 

Yorkshire, England. 
Holdridge; town in Pheljis County, Nebraska, named for G. W. ILjldridge, sui)er- 

intendent Burlington and Missouri River Railway. 



13B- PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bui.i.. 197. 

Holland; village in Duboin County, Indiana, and city in Ottawa County, ]Michigan, 

named by early j^ettlers for the country of Europe. 
Hollandale ; town in WaHhington County, Missis^sippi, named for Dr. Holland, 

whose plantation the town site now occupies. 
Holland Patent; village in Oneida County, New York, named for Henry, Lord 

Holland, i)atentee. 
Holley; village in Orleans County, New York, named for ]\[yron Ilolley, one of tiie 

first canal commissioners. 
Holliday; town in John.son County, Kansas, named for Cyrus K. Holliday, of 

Topeka. 
Holliday; village in ^Monroe County, Missouri, named for Samuel Holliday, of St. 

i.ouis. 
Hollidaysburg; borough in Blair County, Pennsylvania, named for William and 

Adam Holliday, the first settlers. 
Hollis; town in Hillsboro C'ounty, New Hampshire, named for Thomas Hoi lis, a 

Ijenefactor of Harvard College; or, according to Togg, for the Duke of Newcastle. 
HoUister; town in San Benito County, California, named for Col. W. \V. Hollister, 

an early settler. 
Hollister; town in Middlesex County, INIassachusetts, named for Thomas Hollis, of 

London, a patron of Harvard College. 
Holly Beach; borough in Cape May County, New Jersey, named for a beach within 

its i)recincts where holly is supposed to have been found abundantly. 
Holly Springs; city in Marshall County, Mississippi, and village in Wake County, 

North Carolina, so named on account of the prevalence of these two features. 
Holmes; county in Mississippi, named for David Holmes, governor of the Territory 

and State, 1809-1817. 
Holmes; county in Ohio, named for Major Holmes, an <ifficer of the war of 1812. 
Holmes; mounts in rtah and Yellowstone Park, named for the geologist, W. II. 

Holmes. 
Holmesville; village in Cage County, Nebraska, named for L. ]M. Holmes, its 

founder. 
Holmesville; village in Plolmes County, Oliio, named for Major Holmes. 
Holston; liranch of the Tennessee River, named, according to Haywood, for its 

discoverer. 
Holt; county in Missouri, named for David Ilice Holt, member of the State legis- 
lature. 
Holt; town in Clay County, Missouri, named for Jeri-y Holt, upon whose land the 

town was established. 
Holton; city in Jackson County, Kansas, named for Hon. Edward Holton. 
Holts Summit; village in Callaway County, Missouri, named for Timothy Holt. 
Holy Cross; mountain peak in Colorado, so named for a cross of snow upon its east- 
ern face. 
Holyoke; city in Hampden County, Massachu.setts, and mountain in same county, 

named for Rev. Edward Holyoke, an early president of Harvard College. 
Homer; name given to several places in the United States for the Greek poet, among 

them being a village in Cortland County, New York. 
Homosassa; town in Citrus County, Florida. An Indian word, the meaning differ- 
ing according to different authorities, two versions being "river of fishes" and 

"pe])per ridge." 
Honesdale; borough in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, named for Philiji Dale, a 

l)atron of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. 

IHoneoye; lake in Ontario County, New York; 
Honeoye Falls; village in Moiiroe County, New York. From the Indian word, 
Hayeayeh, meaning "a finger lying." 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. lJ^9 

Honolulu; iiaino transtVrnMl from tho city in Hawaii to a villa<ie in Craven County, 

North Carolina, nicaniiig "fair liavon," from liono, "a harbor," and inhi, 

"timooth, qn^i't." 
Hood; river and mountain in Orejion and a canal in Washin^don, named for Alex- 
ander Arthur Hood, afterwards Lord Brinport. 
Hood; county in Texas, named for Gen. John B. Hood, a frontiersman. 
Hookerton; town in Greene County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 
Hookstown; borouyh in Beaver County, IVnnsylvania, named for Matthias Hook, 

an early resident. 
Hookton; village in IIund)oldt County, California, named for ^Nlajor Hook. 
Hoopa; town and valley in Humboldt County, California, named for the Hoopa 

Indians, a tribe on the lower Trinity Kiver. 
Hoosic; river in Massachusetts, New York, and Vermont. Derived from the 

Mohican Indian, wudjoo, meaning "a mountain," and al)ic, "a rock." 
Hoosic; town in Renssalaer County, New York, named from the river. 
Hoover; village in Cass County, Indiana, named for Riley Hoover, its founder. 
Hopatcong; lake in New Jersey. An Indian name, meaning "stone over water," 

because of an artificial causeway of stone which connected an island f)f the lake 

with the shore. 
Hope; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, so named l)y its Moravian settlers as 

a monument to the sentiment which caused them to emigrate there. 
Hope; city in Dickinson County, Kansas, formerly called Wagram; renamed Hope 

for a post-office in the vicinity, when it bet'ame a station on the Atchison, Topeka 

and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Hopewell; borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, named according to the Puritan 

system of nomenclature, the place having l)een settled early in the eighteenth 

century l)y families from Long Island, formerly from Connecticut. 
Hopkins; county in Kentucky, named for Samuel Hopkins, a Revolutionary officer. 
Hopkins; county in Texas, named for a pioneer family. 
Hopkinsville; city in Christian County, Kentucky, named for < ien. Samuel Hojikins, 

a Revolutionary officer. 
Hopkinton; town in ^liddlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Edward Hopkins, 

early governor and ])atron of Har\ard College. 
Hopkinton; town in Mei'rimack County, New Hampshire, named for the town in 

^Massachusetts. 
Hopkinton; town in St. Lawrence ('ounty, New York, named for Roswell Hoi)kins, 

lirst settler. 
Hopkinton; town in Washington County, Rhode Island, said to have been named 

for Stephen Hopkins, governor. 
Hoppeny; creek in Pennsylvania. Indian word, meaning "where the wild potato 

grows." 
Hoppogue; village in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. A corruption of its 

original Indian name of Winganhappague, meaning "sweet water." 
Hoquiam; river and city in Chehalis County, Washington. The name from the 

Indian Ho-qui-umptse, meaning "hungry for wood;" the river being so called 

on account of the great amount of driftwood at its mouth. 
Horace; city in (ireeley County, Kansas, named for Horace Greeley. 
Horicon; lake and city in Dodge County, Wisconsin, and town in Warren County, 

New York. An Indian word meaning "clear." 
Hornby; town in Steuben County, New York, name(l for John Hornby, an early 

English landholder. 
Hornellsville; city in Steuben County, New York, named for its first settler, George 

Hornell. 



140 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill. 197. 

Hornersville; village in Dunklin Oonnty, Missouri, named for William II. Horner, 

founder. 
Horry; county in South Carolina, named for Gen. Peter Horry. 
Horse; ereek, a brandi of Green River in Wyoming which, at the time of receiving 

its name, was the grazing ground of a herd of wild horses. 
Horseheads; town in Chemung County, New York, so named because at this point, 

during an expedition against the Indians, General Sullivan caused his pack 

horses to l)e killed and the heads piled up. 
Horton; city in P>rown County, Kansas, named for Chief Justice A. H. Horton. 
Hortonville; village in Outagamie County, Wisconsin, named for its founder. 
Hosensack; creek in Pennsylvania. A German word, meaning "breeches pocket," 

and so called by a hunter who became bewildered in its valley. 
Hosensack; village in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, named for the creek. 
Hospital Creek; stream in Vermont, so nameil because of the hospital built upon 

its banks, by General Gates. 
Hot Springs; county in Arkansas, so named for the famous sj)rings formerly within 

its limits. 
Houghton; county in Michigan, named for Douglas Houghton, formerly State 

gCdlogist. 
Houlton; town in Aroostook Covmty, Maine, i>anied for an early settler, Joseph 

Houltoii. 
Hounsfield; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Ezra Hounsfield, early 

proprietor. 
Housatonic; river of Massachusetts and Connecticut. From the Indian words 

wussi, "beyond," and adene, "mountain," meaning "beyond the mountains." 

.Vccording to other authorities from the Indian words wassa, "])roud," aton, 

"stream," and ick, from azhubic, meaning "rocks," the whole meaning 

"proud river flowing through the rocks." 
Housatonic; village in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from the river. 
Houseville; village^ in Lewis County, New York, named for its founder, Eleazer 

House. 
Houston; this name is borne by many places in the United States, generally given 

in honor of Gen. Samuel Houston, among them being counties in Minnesota, 

Tennessee, and Texas; city in Chickasaw County, Mississippi, and the city in 

Texas County, Missouri; named for Gen. Samuel Houston. 
Houston; village in Kent County, Delaware, named for John W. Houston. 
Houstonia; village in Pettis County, Missouri, named for Gen. Samuel Houston. 
Houstoun; county in Georgia, named for John Houstoun, an early governor. 
Houtzdale; borough in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, named for Dr. Houtz, who 

owned the land upon which the town is built. 
Hovenweep; creek in .Mineral County, Colorado. An Indian word meaning 

"deserted valley." 
Ho'ward; c(>unty in Arkansas, named for James Howard, State senator. 
HoAvard; counties in Indiaria and Iowa, named for Gen. T. A. Howard, of Indiana. 
Howard; city in p]lk County, Kansas, named for Gen. O. O. Howard. 
Howard; county in Maryland, named for Gen. John Eager Howard, of Revolution- 
ary fame. 
Howard; county in Missouri, named for Gen. Benjamin Howard, an early governor. 
Howard; county in Texas, named for Volney Howard, United States Congressman. 
Howe; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Howell; town in Vanderburg County, Indiana, named for Capt. Lee Howell, local 

railroad man. 
Howell; county in Missouri, named for an early settler. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 141 

Howell; town in JVIoiiiuoutli (\ninty, New Jersey, probahly named U>\- IJieliard 

Howell, an early governor. 
Howell; town in ]\Iarion County, Oregon, named for an early settler. 
Hoxie; eity in Sheridan County, Kansaw, named for H. M. Hoxie, genenil manager 

of the .Missouri Pacific Railroad. 
Hoyt; mount in Wyoming, named for Hon. Joim ^V. Hoyt, foruK-rly governor of 

W VI lining. 
Hubbard; county in .Minnesota, named for Luciu.s P. Hubbard, former governur. 
Hubbard; village in Dakota County, Nebraska, named forjudge A. W. l!u)il)ard. 

IHubbardston; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts; 
Hubbardton; town in Rutland County, Vermont. Named for Thomas Hubbard 
of Roston, one of its charter citizens. 

Hudson; town in Middlesex County, Massachu.setts, nameil for the Hon. Charles 
Hudson. 

Hudson; county in New Jersey, river, and city in C'olumliia County, New York, 
named for Henry Hudson, the discoverer. 

Hudson; village in Sununit County, Ohio, named for David Hudson, an early settler. 

Huerfano; county, town, river, and canyon in Colorado, named from an isolateil 
mountain in the river valley. A Spanish word, meaning "orphan." 

Hughes; county in South Dakota, named in honor of Alexander Hughes, legislator, 
1S7:5. 

Hughesville; town in (dliiin County, Colorado, named for Patrick Hughes, ui)on 
whose ranch the town is located. 

Hugoton; city in Stevens County, Kansas, name<l for Victor Hugo, "ton" being 
ailded to prevent conrtict with Hugo, Colorado. 

Hulberton; village in Orleans County, New York, named for Hulbert, a former 
resident. 

Hull; town in Sioux County, Iowa, named for John Hull. 

Hull; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 

Humboldt; name of a number of places in the United States, named for the geogra- 
pher. Baron Alexander von Humboldt, among them being the counties in Cal- 
ifornia and Iowa, city in Allen County, Kansas, and county and river in Nevada. 

Hummelstown; borough in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named for Frederick 
Hummel, by whom it was laid out. 

Humphrey; peak of the San Francisco Mountains in Arizona, and mount in Yel- 
lowstone Park, named for G(?n. A. A. Humphreys, Chief of Engineers, United 
States Army. 

Humphrey; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, named for Charles Humphrey, 
speaker of the assembly when the town was founded. 

Humphreys; county in Tennessee, named for Parry W. Humphreys. 

Humphreysville ; village in New Haven County, Connecticut, named for the Hon. 
David Humphreys. 

Humptulips; river in Chehalis County, Washington. An Indian word, meaning 
" rhilly region." 

Hunnewell; city in Sumner County, Kansas, and city in Shelby County, Mi.ssouri, 
nameil for H. H. Hunnewell, of Boston. 

Hunniwell; point at the mouth of the Kennebec River, Maine, named for a former 
resident of the vicinity. 

Hunt; county in Texas, named for Memucan Hunt, one time minister from the 
Repuljlic of Texas 

Hunter; town in (xreene County, New Yi^rk, named for John Hunter, a i)roprietor. 

Hunterdon; county in New Jersey, named for Governor Robert Hunter, of New 
York. 



142 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [biix. liiv. 

Huntersville; town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, named for a i)romi- 
nent citizen. 

Huntersville; village in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, so called because the 
site was originally occupied by hunters' cabins. 

Hunting-don; county in Pennsylvania, named for a town in the same State, wliich, 
in turn, was named for Selena, Countess of Huntingdon. 

Hunting-don; town in Carroll County, Tennesseee, named f(jr Meinucan Hunt, 
whose heirs donated the land for its site. 

Huntington; county in Indiana, named for Sanmel Huntington, of Connecticut, 
one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 

Huntington; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Charles P. 
Huntington, of Northampton. 

Huntington; town in Baker County, Oregon, named ior J. B. Huntington, upon 
whose T'anch the town was built. 

Huntington; city in Cabell County, West Virginia, named for C. P. Huntington, 
of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. 

Huntsville; town in ^ladison County, Alabama, named for Jolni Hunt, its first 
settler. 

Huntsville; city in Randolph County, Missouri, named for David Hunt, of Kentucky, 
first settler. 

Hurley; town in Ulster County, New York, named for the Lovelace family, who 
were Barons Hurley, of Ireland. 

Huron; one of the Great Lakes of North America. Opinions differ as to the classi- 
fication of the name, whether French or Indian, and to its meaning. According 
to some authorities it is a corruption of the name "Hure," given a tribe of 
Indians by the French, the word meaning " head of a wild boar," applicable on 
account of their unkempt appearance; another authority says it is derived from 
the Indian word, Onkwe honwe, "true man;" by others to have been cor- 
rupted by the French from the Indian Irri ronon, " cat tribe." 

Huron; city in Atchison County, Kansas, and county in Michigan, named for the 
Huron Indians. 

Huron; county and village in Erie County, Ohio, named for the lake. 

Hustisford; village in Dodge County, Wisconsin, nan-ied for John Hustis, an early 
settler. 

Hutchinson; city in Reno County, Kansas, named for C. C. Hutchinson, its founder. 

Hutchinson; village in McLeod County, Minnesota, named for the Hutchinson 
brothers, its founders. 

Hutchinson; county in South Dakota, named for John Hutchinson, first Territorial 
secretary. 

Hutchinson; county in Texas, named for Anderson Ilutcliinson, prominent citizen 
in days of the Republic. 

Hyde; county in North Carolina, named for Edward Hyde, governor during colonial 
days. 

Hyde; county in South Dakota, named for James Llyde, member of the legislature 
in 187o. 

Hyde Park; town in Dutchess County, New York, named for Hyde Park, London. 

Hyde Park; town in Lamoille County, Vermont, named for Jedediah Hyde, an 
early settler. 

Hydesville; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 

Hyndman; peak in Idaho, named for an old resident of the vicinity. 

Iberia; parish in Louisiana, derives its name from the ancient name of Spain. 

Iberville; parish in Louisiana, named for Pierre le Moyne Jbervilie, a Canadian 
naval commander who built the first fort on the Mississippi. 

Icy; cape in Alaska, so named because of the ice along the coast at this point. 



nANNKTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. l-tS 

Idaho; State of the Ignited States and county in same State. An Indian wonl, mean- 
in;,' " ^em of the mountains." 

Ichoconnaugli; creek in ( n'orj^ia. An In(Uan word, meaniiiLr "deer tra])." 

Iliff; town in Logan County, Colorado, named for John W. Iliff, one of Colorado's 
cattle kings, near whose ranch the town was located. 

Ilion; village in Herkimer County, New York, named from the place mentioned in 
Homer's poem. 

Illinois; State of the United States. ( )n(> authority gives it as a coml)ination of the 
Indian word Illini, meaning " men," and tiie French sutii.x ois, meaning " trihe," 
" band of men." 

Illyria; village in Fayette County, Iowa, nameil for the ancient Kingdom of Austria. 

Imlay City; village in Lapeer County, Michigan, named for Judge Imlay, of New 
York, w ho owned a mill in the townshij). 

Independence; name borne by 27 ]ilaces in the L^nited States, given them in com- 
memoration of the Declaration of Independence, aifiong them being a county, 
and the city in Montgomery County, Kansas. 

Indiana; State of the United States, so named because a comjiany of traders bought 
this tract of land lying along the Ohio from the Indians. 

Indiana; county in Pennsylvania, named from the general ai)])ellation of the Indian 
tribes. 

Indian Cattle; village in Herkimer County, New York, named from the Indian 
fort, part of a chain of defenses which guarded the api)roach to Canada. 

Industry; town in Franklin County, Maine, so named on account of the industrious 
character of the people. 

Ingalls; town in Payne County, Oklahoma, named for the Senator from Kansas. 

Ing-ham; county in Michigan, named for Samuel D. Ingham, Secretary of the Treas- 
ury under Jackson. 

Ingold; village in Sampson County, North Carolina, named for a resident family. 

Inkpa; tributary of the Minnesota River. An Indian word. Eenk-pa, or Piali, 
meaning "end" or "point." 

Inman; city in McPherson County, Kansas, named for Maj. Heni-y Inman. 

Inman; station in Holt County, Nebraska, named for W. H. Inman, an early settler. 

Inman; town in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 

Interlaken; city in Putnam County, Florida, so named on account of the surround- 
ing lakes. From Interlachen, meaning "among the lakes." 

Inverness; township in Cheboygan County, Michigan, named for the city in 
Scotland. 

Inverury; village in Sevier County, Utah, named for the town in Scotland. 

Inyankara; town in Crook County, Wyoming. From an Indian word, Isanyati, 
meaning "rocky hills." 

Ida; city in Allen County, Kansas, named for the wife of J. F. Collwrn. 

Ionia; name transferred from Greece to many places in the United States, among 
them being the county in Michigan. 

Iosco; county in Michigan. An Indian word, meaning "water of light," or "shin- 
ing water." 

Iowa; State of the United States, county in that State, and a county in Wisconsin. 
The name is derived from an Indian word, meaning "sleepy ones," or "the 
drowsy ones." 

Iowa Falls; city in Hardin County, Iowa, named for the falls in the river. 

Ipswich; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for the capital of Suffolk, 
England. 

I Ira; town in Rutland County, Vermont; 
Irasburg-; town in Orleans County, Vermont. Probably named for Ira Allen, a 
grantee. 



144 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Iredell; roimty in North Carolina, named fur James Iredell, jnd<4e of the Supreme 

Court. 
Irion; county in Texas, named for an early settler. 
Iron; counties in Michigan, Missouri, Utah, and Wisc(in.sin, so named on account of 

the great amount of this ore found within th<^ir limits. 
Irondequoit; town in Monroe County, New York. iVn Indian word, which, accord- 
ing to some authorities, means "the i^lace where the waves gasp an<l die," and 

according to others, "a bay." 
Iroquois, county in Illinois, river in Indiana, town in Kingsbury County, South 

Dakota. An Indian word, meaning "heart people," or "people of Go<i," or 

from the Indian Hiro, " I have said," and koue, a vocable, which expressed joy 

or sorrow, according to the rapidity with which it is i)ronounced; the name of a 

tribe. 
Irviiae; town in Estill County, Kentucky, named for Col. William Irvine. 
/Irving'; city in Marshall County, Kansas; 

Irvington; town in Essex County, New Jersey, and village in Westchester County 
I New York. Named for Washington Irving. 
Irwin; village in (iunnison County, Colorado, named for Hichanl Irwin, a noted 

mining man. 
j Irwin; county in (^leorgia; 

^Irwinton; town in Wilkinson County, Georgia. Named for Gen. Jared Irwin, for- 
1 mer governor of the State. 

Isa; lake in Yellowstone Park, named for Miss Isabel Jelke, of Cincinnati. 
Isaac; branch of St. Jones Creek, Delaware, named for Isaac Webb, an early settler. 
Isabella; county in Michigan, named for the daughter of John Hurst, who was the 

tirst white child born within its limits. 
Isanti; county in Minnesota, named from the Indian tribe who were dwellers at 

Isantamde, "knife lake." Said by Haines to have been the original name of 

the Santees. 
Ishawooa; town in Bighorn County, Wyoming. An Indian word, meaning "mucli 

cascara." 
Island; county in Washington, so named because it is composed entirely of islamla. 
Island Falls; town in Aroostook County, Maine, so named on account of an island 

which is midway of the stream at the verge of the fallj. 
Island Mine; village on Isle Royale, Michigan, so named because of a copper mine 

there. 
Island Pond; village in Essex County, Vermont, so named because of an island in 

the center of a little lake between the spurs of the mountains. 
Isle au Chene; island in Lake Superior, Wisconsin; one of tlie Apostle Islands. 

French phrase, meaning "island of the oak." 
Isle au Haut; island at the entrance to Penobscot Bay, Maine, composed of high, 

steej) cliffs. A French phrase, meaning "island of the height." 
Isle au Haut; town in Hancock County, Manie, named from the island. 
Isle Lamotte; town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, named for a French officer. 

La Motte. 
Isle ofWight; county in Virginia named for the island in the English Channel. 
Islesboro; township in Waldo County, Maine, so named because it consists of a long, 

narrow island in Penobscot Bay 
Islington; village in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for the parish in 

England. 
Islip; town in Suffolk County, New York, named for a parish in England. 
Israels; stream in Coos County, New Hamjishire, named for a noted tiapjier, Israel 

G lines. 
Issaquena; county in Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "deer river." 



GANNKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 145 

Istachatta; town in 1 Icrnandd t'uunty, l-'iorida. An Indian wonl na'anint^ " man 
snake." 

Italian; nionntain peak in ("olorado, so named because at a distance it (lispiays the 
national colors of Italy — red, white, and green. 

Itasca; village in Dupage County, Illinois, named for the INIinnesota lake. 

Itasca; county and lake in Minnesota, into which flows the headwaters of the Missis- 
sii)pi, and named on this account Itasca, from the two Latin woi'ds Veritas caput, 
"the true head." 

Itawamba; county in Mississippi, said to have been named for the daughter of a 
Chickasaw Indian chief. 

Ithaca; city of Tompkins County, New York, and village in (iratiot County, .Michi- 
gan, named for one of tiie Ionian Islands, sujtposed to be the one celebrated in 
the Homeric poems as tiie Kingdom of Ulysses. 

Ivanhoe; many places in the United States have been named for Scott's novel, 
among them being a town in Lake County, Illinois. 

Izard; county in Arkansas, named for George Izard, former governor. 

Izuza; tributary of the .Minnesota River. An Indian word, meaning " white stone." 

Jacinto; village in Alcorn County, Mississippi. A Spanish word, meaning "hya- 
cinth." 

Jack; county and town in Texas, named for William Houston and Patrick Jack, 
Ijrothers, who were early settlers and prominent citizens in the days of the 
Kepu1)lic. 

Jackson; many places in the United States bear the name of Andrew Jackson, 
among them being counties in Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kan- 
sas, Kentucky; parisli in Louisiana; counties in Michigan, Mississippi, and IMis- 
souri; town in Carroll County, New Hampshire; city in Jackson County, Ohio; 
counties in Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin; named for Gen. 
Andrt'w Jackson. 

Jackson; mountain in the Sawatch Range in Colorado, named for the photographer, 
W. II. Jackson. 

Jackson; county in Georgia, named for (ien. James Jackson, United States Senator 
from that State. 

Jackson; town in Waldo County, IVIaine, named for Henry Jackson, a contemporary 
of Colonel Knox in the Revolution. 

Jackson; village in Jack.son County, Minnesota, said to have been named for Henry 
Ja(;kson, a proprietijr. 

Jackson; lake in Wyoming, named for David Jackson, a noted mountaineer. 

Jacksonville; city in Morgan County, Illinois; town in Randolph County, IMissouri, 
and village in Onslow County, North Carolina, nanjed for Gen. Andrew Jackson. 

Jacoby; creek in Hundjoldt County, California, named for an early settler. 

Jatfray; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, and southern point of entrance 
to Portsmouth Harbor, named for George Jaffray, one of the original proprietors, 
and later a chief justice of the State. 

Jamaica; town in Queens County, New York. An Indian word, meaning, accord- 
ing to some authorities, "a country abounding in sjirings;" according to others, 
"land of water and wood." 

James; jieak in Colorado, named for the botanist. 

James; river in Virginia, named for James I of England. 

Jamesburg-; borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, named for a resident family. 

James City; county in Virginia, named for the first English settlement, James- 
town. 

Jamestown; town in Boone County, Indiana, named for James Mattock, its founder. 

Jamestown; city in Cloud County, Kansas, named for James P. I'omeroy, of th(^ 
Central Branch Union Pacific Railn^d. 

Bull. 11>T— 02 10 



146 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 1'J7. 

Jamestuwu; city in CliautaiKjua County, New York, named for James Penderjiast, 
an early settler. 

Jamestown; town in Newport County, Rhode Island, named for the Duke of York 
and All)any, later James II of P^ngland. 

Jamestown; town in James City County, Virginia, named for King James I, and 
the first English settlement in America. 

Jamesville; village in Onondaga County, New York, named for James De Witt. 

Jamesville; town in Martin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 

Janesville; town in Lassen Colmty, California, and city in Rock County, Wiscon- 
sin, named for Henry F. Janes. 

Janesville; town in Bremer County, Iowa, named for tlie wife of John T. Barrick, 
its founder. 

Jara; creek in Colorado. A Spanish word, literally "rock rose," Imt in connection 
with the creek meaning "willow brush." 

Jarrolds; vilhige in West Virginia, named for a resident family. 

Jasonville; village in (Greene County, Indiana, named for Jason Rogers, one of its 
founders. 

Jasper; many counties, towns, and villages in the United States bear the name of 
Sergeant Jasper, of Fort Moultrie (S. C. ) fame, who was killed in the siege of 
Savannah, among these being counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Mis- 
sissippi, Missouri, Texas, and towns in Pickens County, Georgia, and Steuben 
County, New Y''ork. 

Java; town in Wyoming County, New Yoik, named for the island in the Malav 
Archipelago. 

Jay; county in Indiana; towns in Franklin County, Maine; Essex County, New 
York, and Orleans County, Vermont, named for Hon. John Jay, an eminent 
statesman, proprietor, and early governor of New Y''ork. 

Jeddo; village in Orleans County, New York, and borough in Luzerne County, 
Pennsylvania, named for the capital of Japan, the old name of Tokyo. 

Jeff Davis; county in Texas, named for Jefferson Davis. 

Jefferson; many places in the United States have been named for Thomas Jeffer- 
son, third President, among them being counties in Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, 
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New 
Y'ork, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin, a 
parish in Louisiana, town in Coos County, New Hampshire, mount in Oregon, 
and a peak in the White Mountains of New Ilampsliire. 

Jefferson; town in Ashe County, North Carolina, named for a i)rominent citizen. 

Jefferson; county in Texas, named for Jefferson Beaumont, an early settler and 
prominent citizen. 

Jekyl; island in Georgia, named for Sir Joseph Jekyl. 

Jenkintown; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for William 
Jenkins, early settler. 

Jennings; county in Indiana, named for Jonathan Jennings, tirst governor of the 
State. 

Jenny; lake in YelloWvStone Park, named for the Shoshone wife of Richard Leigh. 

Jenny Lind; town in Calaveras County, California, named for the Swedish 
songstress. 

Jerauld; county in South Dakota, named for H. J. Jerauld, legislator. 

Jericho; town in Chittenden ('ounty, Vermont, named for the ancient city in 
Palestine. 

Jerome; town in Bladen County, North Carolina, named for a ]irominent citizen. 

Jeromeville; village in Ashland County, Ohio, named for John Baptiste Jerome, a 
French trader. 

Jersey; county in Illinois, named from the State of New Jersey. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 147 

Jersey City; city in Hudson County, New Jcryoy, originally called the "city of 

JiTsey," named lr<ini une of the channel islands of Kii,tj:land. 
Jerseyville; city in Jersey County, Illinois, named from the State ui New Jersey. 
Jerusalem; town in Vates County, New York, named Iruui llie city of Palestine. 
Jessamine; county and creek in Kentucky, named foi- Jessamim^ Douglass, the 

daughter of an early settler. 
Jessup; village in Antelo|ie County, \el)raska, named fur e.\-< iovernur Jessup, of 

Iowa. 
Jesup; town in Ikichanan County, Iowa, named for ]Morris K. .lesup, of New York. 
Jetmore; city in Ilodgi'man County, Kansas, named for Col. A. 11. Jetmore, of 

Tojieka. 
Jewell; county and city in Kansas, named for Lieut. Col. Lewis li. Jewell, Sixth 

Kansas Cavalry. 
Jewett; town in (ireene County, New York, named for Freel)orn (i. .lewett, justice 

of the supreme court. 
Je'wett; village in Harrison County, ()hi(j, named for T. ^L Jewett, foiinei- president 

of the Piftsbui'g, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad. 
Jo Daviess; county in Illinois, named for Col. Joseph ihimiltiin I'aviess, (^f 

Kentucky. 
Joe Gee; hill in Orange County, New York, named for the last Indian who had his 

caljin on the hill. 
Joes; ]>rook near Walden, Vermont, named for Captain Joe, a friendly I ndian of the 

St. Francis tribe. 
John Day; river in Oregon, and town in Crant County of the same State, named 

for a mendx'r of Hunt's Astoria overland expedition. 
Johns; creek in Huml)oldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Johnsburg; town in Warren County, New York, named for John Thnrman, an 

early settler. 
Johnson; county in Arkansas, named forjudge Benjamin Johnson. 
Johnson; county in (ieorgia, named f(jr Covernor H. V. Johnson. 
Johnson; county in Indiana, nameil for John J((hnson, judge of the supreme court 

(t( the State. 
Johnson; counties in Illinois, Kentucky, ^Missouri, and Nebraska, named for Richard 

Johnson, Vice-President of the United States. 
Johnson; county in Iowa, named for Andrew" Johnson. 
Johnson; county in Kansas, named for Rev. Thomas Johnson, nnssionary to the 

Shawnees. 
Johnson; city in Stanton County, Kansas, named for Col. Alexander S. Johnson, of 

Topeka. 
Johnson; village in Nemaha County, Nebraska, named for Julius A. Johnson, large 

landowner. 
Johnson; county in Tennessee, named for Samuel Jolinson. 

Johnson; county in Texas, named for M. C. Johnson, memljer of Texas congress. 
Johnson; town in Lamoille County, Vermont, named for the ])roprietor, William S. 

Johnson. 
Johnsons; creek in New York, named for Sir William Johnson, who eiu'amped on 

its banks when on his way to Fort Niagara. 
Johnsonville; town in Humphreys County, Tennessee, nameil for .\ndn'w Johnson. 
Johnston; town in Rhode Islaml, named for Augustus J. .Tohnston, attorney-general 

of the colony. 
Johnston; j)ass in ITtah, named for Oen. A. S. .lohnston. 

Johnstons; county in North Carolina, named for Gabriel Johnston, governor. 
Johnsto^wn; city in Fulton County, New York, named for its founder, Sir W^illiani 

J<jhnson. 



148 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Johnstown; city and borough iu C'aiii))ria Comity, Pennsylvania, named for an 

early settler, Joseph Jahns or Yahns. 
Joliet; city in \yill County, Illinois, named for Louis Joliet, a French trader. 
Jones; county in Georgia, named for James Jones, member of Congress from that 

State. 
Jones; county in Iowa, named for George W. Jones, United States Senator from 

that State. 
Jones; county in Mississippi, named for Conunodore John Paul Jones. 
Jones; county in North Carolina, nanied for ^Villiam Jones, a North Carolina 

statesman. 
Jones; county in Texas, named for Anson Jones, one of the first Senators in the 

United States Congress from Texas. 
Jones; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for Col. W. A. Jones, United States 

Army, its first explorer. 
Jonesboro; town in Washington County, Maine, named for John C. Jones, one of 

the original proi>rietors. 
Jonesboro; town in Washington County, Tennessee, named for William Jones, a 

North Carolinian statesman. 
Jonesport; town in Washington County, Maine, named f(.)r John C. Jones, one of 

the original proprietors. 
Jonesville; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Benjamin Jones, its 

founder. 
Jonesville; town in Union County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Joplin; city in Jasper County, Missouri, named from Joplin Creek, whicli was 

named for Rev. II. G. Joplin, who lived on its banks. 
Joppa; name which is l)orne by 11 places in the United States, and which was 

transferred from the ancient city in Palestine. 
Jordan; this name, either alone or with suffixes, is borne by 27 places in the United 
. States, and was transferred from the river of Palestine. Among these places are 

villages in New London County, Connecticut, Onondaga County, New York, and 

a stream in Utah. 
Joseph; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for the famous Nez Perce, Chief Joseph. 
Josephine; county in Oregon, named for Josephine Rollins, the daughter of the 

discoverer of the first g(;)ld found in that county. 
Juab; county in Utah, named for a friendly Indian of the region. 
Juan de Fuca; strait separating Washington from A'ancouver Island, named for a 

Greek navigator in the Spanish service, who explored it. 
Judith; river in Montana, named for Miss Hancock, of Fincastle, Virginia. 
Judsonia; town in White County, Arkansas, named for Rev. Adoniram Judson, a 

Baptist missionary. 
Juhelville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Madame Juhel, rela- 
tive of the Le Ray family. 
Julesburg; town in Sedgwick County, Colorado, said to be named for Jules Benard, 

a frontiersman. 
Julien; township in Dubuque County, Iowa, named for Julien Dubuque, the French 

trader for whom the county was named. 
Jump-ofif-Joe; stream in southern Oregon, so named because a trai)per, Joe 

McLoughlin, fell from the bluff of the stream and was badly injured. 
Junction; city in Geary County, Kansas, so named because it is near the junction 

of the Republican and Smoky Hill rivers. 
Junction; borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, so named l)ecause it is situ- 
ated at the junction of two railroads. 
Junction; butte in Yellowstone Park, so named because it is at the junction of the 

Yellowstone and Lamar rivers. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 14V) 

Juneau; county and city in Dodjic Covnity. Wisconsin, named for the founder of 

^Milwaukee. 
Juniata; county, river, Imroufili, and a to\vnslii]> in Terry County, IVnnsylvania; 
Juniataville; village in Fayt'tte County, rennsylvania. Fi-om Indian word whicli 

means "they stay long," or, according to another derivation, "lieyond the great 

l)end." 
Junius; town in Seneca County, New York, named l)y the State land hoard for 

Junius, of the classics. 
Kahoka; city in Clark County, ^lissouri. See CahoJcid. 

Kaibab; ])lateau in Arizona. An Indian word meaning "mountain lyingth)wn." 
Kalama; town in Cowlitz County, Washington, i)rol)al)ly named from the Indian, 

Okala kalama. meaning "a goose." 
Kalamazoo; city, river, and county in ^lichigan. According to one authority 

derived from tlie Indian word Negikaiiamazo, meaning "otter tail;" '^beautiful 

watt'r" and "boiling water" are other versions. 
Kalispel; city in Flatheatl County, IMontana, named for an Indian tribe. 
Kamas; town in Sunnnit County, Utah. The Indian name for root, which is used 

as food by the Indians of the Pacific coast. 
Kamrar; town in Hamilton County, Iowa, named for Senator Kamrar. 
Kanab; town, creek, and jilateau in Kane County, Ftah. Indian word, meaning 

" willow." 
Kanabec: county in Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "snake." 
Kanawha; river in North Carolina, river and county in West Virginia. DtM-ived 

from an Indian word, meaning " river of the Avoods." 
Kandiyohi; town and county in Minnesota. From the Indian kandi, "buffalo 

fiesh," and lyohl, "to reach me." 
Kane; county in Illinois, named for Elias Kent Kane. 
(Kane; county in Utah; 

<Kaneville; town in Kane County, Illinois. Named for Gen. Thomas L. Kane, of 
I Philadelphia. 

Kankakee; county, city, and river in Illinois. An Indian word, meaning, accord- 
ing to different authorities, "wolf land river," "raven," or "among the 

meadows." 
Kanopolis; city in Elsworth County, Kansas. The name is a combination of Kansa.s 

and Centrojiolis, Ellsworth Ijeing the central (county of the State. 
Kansas; State, city, and river in the same State, and city in Missouii, named for an 

Indian tribe of the Sioux family, or from kanosas, "willow." 
Kaolin; village in Chester County, Pennsylvania, so named because of the large 

deposits of kaolin. 
Karnes; county in Texas, nameil for Henry Karnes, an early settler and Indian 

tighter. 
Karsaootuk; stream in northern Maine. An Indian word, meaning "black river," 

or "pine stream." 
Kaska; village in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

"wonderful land river." 
Kaskaskia; town in Randolijh County, Illinois, and river in the same State. An 

Indiiui word, meaning "bad hearts," the name of a tril)e of Illinois Indians. 
Kasota; village in Lesueur County, INIimiesota. An Indian word, meaning "cleared," 

"cleared off," or " the sky clear from clouds." 
Kasson; village in Dodge County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "to use 

all up." 
Katahdin; mountain in 'Maine. An Indian word, meaning, according to different 

authorities, "highest laud." " big mountain," "greatest or chief mountain." 
Katchenaha; lake in Floiida. An Indian word, meaning "turkey lake." 



150 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Katonah; village in Westches^ter Oounty, New York, named for an Indian chief. 

Kaufman; city and county in Texas, named for David S. Kaufman, former Con- 
gressman. 

Kaukauna; city in Outagamie County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, which, accord- 
ing to different authorities, means "a portage," "a long portage," "the place 
where pickerel are caught," " place of pike." 

Kay; county in Oklahoma, formerly written "K," a letter of the alphabet. 

Kearney; county in Nebraska, city in Buffalo County, same State, and town in 
Hudson County, New Jersey, named for (ien. Philip Kearny. 

Kearney; city in Clay Count}', Missouri, named for Gen. Stephen W. Kearny. 

Kearny; county in Kansas, named for Gen. Philip Kearny. 

Kearsarge; mountain in New Hampshire. Indian word, meaning "pine or peaked 
mountain," or koowas, "pointed mountain," "the highest place;" another 
authority gives, "proud or selfish." 

Keene; city in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for Sir Benjamin Keene. 

Keeseville; village in Essex County. New York, named for its founder, Richard 
Keese. 

Keith; county in Nebraska, named for John Keith, of North Platte, Nebraska. 

Kelleys Island; township and village in Erie County, Oliio, named from an island 
in Lake Erie, which was owned by Datus and Irad Kelly. 

Kellogg; town in Jasper County, Iowa, named for an early settler. 

Kemper; county in Mississippi, named for Col. Reuben Kemper, an American sol- 
dier in the Florida and Mexican wars. 

Kemper City; town in Victoria Count}', Texas, named for Captain Kemper. 

Kenansville; town in Duj)lin County, North Carolina, named for Hon. James 
Kenan, member of Congress. 

Kendall; county in Illinois and town in Orleans County, New York, named for 
Hon. Amos Kendall, Postmaster-General United States. 

Kendall; county in Texas, named for (jeorge W. Kentlall, iirominent citizen. 

Kenduskeag; town and river in Penobscot County, Maine. An Indian word mean- 
ing "little eel river," or "place for taking salmon." 

Kenesa"w; town in Co])b County, Georgia, named for an Indian chief. 

Kenesaw; village in x\.dams County, Nebraska, named for Kenesaw Mountain. 

Kenly; town in Johnston County, North Carolina, named for a prominent railroad 
oliicial. 

Kennard; town in Washington County, Nebraska, named for Hon. Thomas P. 
Kennard, secretary of state, 1867. 

Kennebec; county and river in Maine, named for powerful Indian chief of the tribe 
of Canabas. 

IKennebunk; town in York County, Maine; 
Kennebunk Port; town in York County, Maine. Named for the Indian, meaning 
"long water place," or, " where he thanked him." 

Kenner; city in Jefferson County, Louisiana, named for Duncan F. Kenner, an 
eminent lawyer of that State. 

Kennett Square; borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named from the vU- 
lage of Kennett, Wiltshire, England. 

Kenosha; city and county in W^isconsin. An Indian word, meaning "lish," "pick- 
erel," "pike." 

Kenoza; lake in Haverhill, Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning "pickerel." 

Kensington; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, named from the 
parish in England. 

Kent; counties in Delaware, INIaryland, and Rhode Island, named from the county 
of Kent in England. 

Kent; county in Michigan, named for Chancellor Kent of New York. 



liANNiTT.] I'LACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. If)! 

Kent; town in Putnam County, New York, namtHl for a family of early settlers. 

Kent; county in Texas, named for K. Kent, an early settler. 

Kenton; county in Kentucky and city in Hardin Ccnmty, ()liio, named for ( ien. 

Simon Kenton, a di.stin,ij:uished jiioneer of Kentucky. 
Kentucky; state of tiie Tnion. An Indian word, meanintr "dark and bloody 

ground," or "the jjrairies." 
Kentwood; town in Tani^ipahoa rarisii, Louisiana, iiamed for a local merchant, 

Amaeker Kent. 
Keokuk; city and county in h>wa, named for an Indian chief, the word meaning 

"running, or watchful fox."" 
Keosauqua; town in Van I'uren county, Iowa. An Indian word, meaning "the 

great hend," so named for a hend in the Des Moines River. 
Keota; town in Keokuk County, Iowa. .\n Indian word, meanint: eitlier "gone to 

visit" or "the fire is gone out.'" 
Kern; county, city, and river in California, named for three brothers. 
Kernersville; town in Forsyth County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

citizen. 
Kerr; county and town in Texas, named for James Kerr, prominent early settler. 
Kershaw; county and town in Lancaster County, South Cai-olina, named for the 

Kershaw family, early settlers. 
Keshena; town in Shawano County. "Wisconsin, named for an Indian chief, the 

word meaning "swift flying." 
Ketten Chow; valley in California. An Indian word meaning "canunas valley." 
Kewaskuni; village in Washington, named for an old Indian chief, the word mean- 
ing "returning track." 
Kewaunee; county, city, and river in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning 

"prairie hen or wild duck," or according to another authority, "to go round." 
Keweenaw; county in ^Michigan; the vicinity so named l)y the Indians because of 

the point of land which projects into Lake Superior; the word meaning* "canoe 

carried back," "carrying place," hence a portage. 
Keyapaha; county an<l river in Nebraska. An Indian word, meaning "turtle hills." 
Keyser; town in ]Moore, County, North Carolina, named for a i)romiuent citizen. 
Keyser; town in Mineral County, West Virginia, named for a prominent man who 

was an officer of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at one time. 
Keystone; town.s in Wells County, Indiana, and Dickey County, North Dakota, 

named by its Pennsylvania settlers for their State, the Keystone State. 
Keytesville; city in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Rev. Keyte, an early 

settler. 
Key "West; city in ^Monroe County, Florida. A corruption of Cayo Ilueso, a Span- 
ish word, meaning "a bone reef or island;" the jdace so named because of the 

number of bones found upon the reef. 
Kezar; village in Gunnison County, Colorado, named forCardner II. Kezar. 
Kezar; i)onds in Oxford County, Maine, named for an old hunter. 
Kickapoo; town, in Peoria County, Illinois, Anderson County, Texas, and Leaven- 
worth County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning "easily navigable," or 

according to another authority, "ghost of an otter." 
Kidder; village in Caldwell County, Misssonri, named from the Kidder Land Com- 

})any, of Boston, who laid out the town. 
Kidder; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Jefferson P. Kidder, prominent 

in the State's political affan-s. 
Kidron; towm in Coweta County, Georgia, named for the brook near Jerusalem. 
Kilbourn City; vdlage in Columbia County, Wisconsin, named for Byron Kilbourn, 

a pioneer. 



152 PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. m?. 

Kilbuck; town in Allegheny ("(miity, Pennsylvania, iianiiMl for a chief of the Dela- 
ware Indians. 

Kildare; township in Juneau County, Wisconsin, named for the Irisli tnwii. 

Kilkenny; villa^re in Lesueur County, Minnesota, named for the town in Ireland. 

Killbuck; town in Wayne County, Ohio, named for a chief of the Delaware Indians. 

Killing-wortli; town in Middlesex County, (Jonnecticut, intended by its Scotch 
settlers to be named Kenilworth, l)ut, by the mistake of the clerk of the court, 
named as above. 

Kilmarnock; town in Lancaster County, Virjiinia, named for the town in Scotland. 

Kiraball; county in Nebraska, named for John P. Kiml)all. 

Kimble; county in Texas, named for George C. Kiml)le, an early settler. 

Kimbolton; village in Guernsey County, Oliio, named from the town in England. 

Kincaid; city in Anderson County, Kansas, named for Robert Kincaid, of Mound 
City. 

Kinderhook; town in Coltmil)ia County, New York; anglicized form of Kinder 
Iloeck, the name given the place l)y Henry Hudson, meaning "children's 
point," on account of the many Indian children he saw there. 

Kineo; mountain in Elaine. An Indian word, meaning "high bluff." 

King-; county in Texas, named for William King, a prominent citizen. 

King-; county in Washington, named for William Rufus King, former vice-president 
of the United States. 

King and Q,ueen; county in Virginia, named for William and Mary, king and 
queen of England. 

Kingfisher; county in Oklahoma; so named on account of the gi'eat nund)er of 
birds of this species which live on the ))anks of Kingfisher Creek within the 
county. 

King George; county in Virginia, named for King George, of England. 

Kingman; city in Kingman County, Kansas, named for Chief Justice S. A. King- 
man. 

Kingman; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for R. S. Kingman. 

Kingman; pass in Yellowstone Park, named for Lieut. D. C. Kingman, United 
States Army. 

Kings; peak in Humboldt County, California, named for Captain King. 

Kings; county in New York, named for the Stuart dynasty. 

Kingsbury; ])lantation in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for Hon. Sanford 
Kingsbury, of (iardiner. 

Kingsbury; county in South Dakota, immed for C. W. Kingsbury, early legislator. 

Kingsley; village in Grand Traverse County, Michigan, named for .Judson Kings- 
ley, who gave the site for the railway depot. 

Kingston; town in Barton County, Georgia, named for J. P. King, of Augusta. 

Kingston; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for Evelyn Pierre- 
pout, iirst Duke of Kingston. 

Kingston; village in Tuscola County, Michigan, named for two fanuhes, King and 
Kingsbury. 

Kingston; city in Caldwell C'ounty, IMissouri, named for an early governor, .Austui 
A. King. 

Kingstree; town in Williamslmrg County, South Carolina; so named because of 
the presence of a large ])ine tree on the bank of Black River. 

Kingsville; village in Johnson County, Missouri, named for Gen. William I\I. 
King, who located it. 

King William; county in Virginia, named for William III of England. 

Kinmans; jiond in IIumt)oldt County, California, named for Setli Kiniuan, an early 
setller. 

Kinney countv in Texas, named for an earl v settler, II. L. Kinney. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 153 

Kinsale; villajre in AVostmoreland County, A'irsjinia, nanu'(1 fmin a town in Ireland. 
Kinsey; creek in Ilnniholdt County, California, nanieil l'<ir an early settler. 
Kinsley; city in Edwards County, Kansas", named for W. K. \V. Kinsley, of Huston, 

^Massachusetts. 
Kinston; town in I.enoir County. Nortli Carolina, named for Kinjj; George 111. 
Kinzua; xillage in Warren County, ri>inisylvania, named from the river, which 

doubtless received this Indian name, signifyinir "they gobble," on account of 

the wild turkeys which fre(|uent its banks. 
Kiowa; counties in Colorado and Kansas, an<l city in I'arluM- County, Kansas. An 

Indian word, meaning "great medicine." 
Kirkland; town in Oneida County, New York, named for Rev. Sanuiel Kirkland. 
Kirklin; town in Clinton County, Indiana, named for Nathan Kirk, its founder. 
Kirklin; town in Clinton County, New York, named for Martin Kiik, jiroprietor. 
Kirksville; city in Adair County, Missouri, named for Jesse Kirk. 
Kirkwood; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, and townshij) in Belmont 

County, Ohio, named for Maj. Robert Kirkwood, a Revolutionary orticer. 
KirkAwood; town in St. Louis County, Missouri, named for the first chief engineer 

of the ^Missouri I'acilic Railway, which runs through the place. 
Kirwin; city in Phillips County, Kansas, named for Col. John Kirwin, of the Regular 

Army. 
Kishacolquillas; creek and village in Mittiin C!ounty, Pennsylvania, named for an 

Indian chief, the meaning said to be "the snakes are already in their dens." 
Kishwaukee; river and town in AVinnebago County, Illinois. An Ii_dian word, 

which means "sycamore tree." 
Kiskiminitas ; townshij) in Armstrong County. Pennsylvania. An Indian woid, 

meaning "make davlight." 
Kit Carson; t(jwn in Cheyenne C(.)unty, Colorado, nametl for the celebrated Rocky 

Mountain guide. 
Kittanning; borough in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, situated on the site of 

the Inchan village of that name, meaning "greatest river." 
Kittrell; town in Vance County, North C'arolina, named for a prominent resident. 
Kittson; county in Minnesota, named for AY. V\\ Kittson, a ])rominent resident. 
jKlamath; ri\('i' in California, lake and county in Oregon; 

iKlamath Falls; town in Klamath County, Oregon. Named for the Indian tribe. 
Klej Grange; town in AVorcester County, Maryland, the name formed of a combi- 
nation of the first letters of the names of the daughters of J. AA'. Drexel, of New- 
York — Kate, Louise, P^nnna, and Jo.sephine. 
Klickitat; county in AVashington, named from-a trilie of Indians distinguished for 

their jiredatory habits, the name signifying "rob])er." 
Kline; town in Barnwell County, South C'arolina, named for a resident. 
Kneeland; prairie in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Knife; river in North Dakota, the original name being Couteini, French, meaning 

"knife." 
Knig-htsville ; town in Clay County, Indiana, named for A. W. Knight, its founder. 
Knott; county in Kentucky, named for Proctor Knott. 

Knowersville; town in Albany County, New York, named for the Knower family. 
Knox; many counties in the United States bear this name, among them counties 

in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Tennessee, 

Texas, and a town in Waldo County, Maine; 
Knoxville; village in Crawford County, Georgia, and town in Albany County, 

New York. Named for Gen. Henry Knox, Secretary of AVar during the Admin- 
istration of AVashington. 
Knoxville; town in Franklin County, INIississippi, named l)y Tennessee emigrants 

foi' the town in their (jwn State. 



154 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Knoxville; village in Madison C'onnty, New York, named for Herman Knox, an 

early resident. 
Knoxville; village in Steul)en Connty, New York, and borongh in Allegheny 

County, Pennsylvania, named for Chief Justiee John Knox, of the Supreme 

Court." 
Kokomo; city in Howard County, Indiana. An Indian word, meaning "young 

grandmother." 
Konkapot; two streams in Connecticut, named for Capt. .John Konka])ot, chief of 

the Stockbridge Indians. 
Kooskia; town in Idaho County, Idaho, named for the Clearwater River, whose 

Indian name, Kooskootske, means "small water or stream." 
Korbel; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Kortrig-ht; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Lawrence Kortright, 

a pati'iitee. 
Kosciusko; county in Indiana, and town in Attala County, ^Mississijjjii, named for 

Tadeusz Kosciusko, the Polish jmtriot. 
Koshkonong" ; lake, creek, and town in Wisconsin, and village in Oregon County, 

Missouri. An Indian word, meaning "the lake we live on," or, according to 

Haines, "frightful place," "ugly i>lace." 
Kossuth; cotinty in Iowa, plantation in Washington Comity, Maine, town in 

Alcorn County, Mississippi, and village in Auglaize C'onnty, Ohio, named for 

Louis Kossuth, the Polish patriot. 
Kotzebue; sound of Alaska, named for its discoverer, the Russian navigator. Otto 

von Kotzebue. 
Kreischerville; village in Richmond County, New York, named for B. Kreischer. 
Krenitzin; five islands in tlie Aleutian Archipelago, named for the navigator who 

first discovered them. 
Kubbakwana; lake at the sources of the Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning 

"rest in the path." 
Kutztown; borough in Rerks County, Pennsylvania, named for George Kutz, who 

laid out the town. 
K^wicMuak; an arm of the Yukon River in Alaska. An Indian word, meaning 

"crooked river." 
La Bajada; town in New ^Mexico, on the road from Santa Fe, which at this point 

makes a rapid descent. It was named by the Spanish on this account La P>aja<la, 

meaning "the descent or landing." 
Labonte; creek and town in Converse County, Wyoming, named for La Bonte, an 

early French trapper. 
Lacey villa; village in Harrison County, Ohio, named for Maj. John S. Lacey. 
liackawanna; county and river in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

"stream that forks." 
Lackawannock; mountain and township in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, named 

froin tlie Lackawanna River, and with the suflix signifying "at the river fork." 
Iiackawaxen ; townshij) in Pike County, Pennsylvania, at the confluence of the 

Lackawanna and Delaware, and on this account given the Indian name, which 

means "where the roads fork." 
Laclede; county in Missouri, and town in Linn County, ^lissouri, named for Pierre 

Laclede Ligueste, founder of St. Louis. 
Laconia; city in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for a jiortion of ( Ireece. 
La Conner; town in Skagit County, Washington, named for J. J. Connor, an eaily 

settler. 
Lac qui Parle; county, lake, and river in Minne.sota. A French name, meaning 

"the lake that talks," or "speaking lake." 



GANNKTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE ITNITED STATES. 155 

La Crosse; city and county in \Vi-c(insiii. A French namcjjiven the town because 
before its settlement thegrounl was a favorite place for ball iilayiuL' with the 
Indians, the jj:ame being calle 1 by the French "la crosse." 

Lac Traverse; lake in Minnesota. A French word, meaning "cross lake." 

Lacygne; city in Linn County, Kansas, named from the river Marais des Cygnes, a 
Flench name, meaning "swans' marsh." 

Laddonia; city in Audrain County, Missouri, named for Amos Ladd, an early 
settler. 

Ladys Creek; stream in ^Missouri, named for William Lady. 

La Fave; stream in Perry County, Arkansas, named for a French family. La Feve, 
who lived at its mouth. 

Lafayette; the name of six counties and many townships, towns, and villages in 
the United States, given them in honor of Marquis de Lafayette, who served in 
tlie American Army during the Revolution. Among these are tlie counties in 
Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, Missouri, Wisconsin, pai'ish in ]x)uisiana, town 
in Yamliill County, Oregon, and mountain in New Hami>shin>. 

Laflin; borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, probably named for Latiin, of 
the lirm of Lntlin tt Rand, powder manufacturers. 

Lafourche; parish in Louisiana, Jiamed for the Bayou La Fourche, winch intersects 
it; the name, a French one, meaning "the fork." 

L'Ag-les; stream in Bradley County, Arkansas, named from the French word I'aigle, 
"eagle." 

Lagrange; county in Indiana, and towns in Dutchess County, New York, and 
Lenoir County, North Carolina, named for the home of Lafayette, near Paris. 

Lagrue; stream in Arkansas; a French w'ord, meaning "the crane." 

Laingsburg; village in Shiawas.see County, ]Michigan, named for Dr. Laing, early 
settler and founder of the village. 

Lairdsville; village in Oneida County, New York, named for Samuel Laird, early 
settU-r. 

La Junta; town in Otero County, Colorado, at the junction of two railroads; a 
Spanish name, meaning "junction" or "meeting." 

Lake; a name given to 11 counties in the United States because of the presence of 
such ])odies of water either within or near them. These are in the States of 
California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, 
Oregon, South Dakota, and Tennessee. 

Lake; city in Columbia County, Florida, s<j named on account of the presence in 
the vicinity of 10 lakes. 

Lake; city in Calhoun County, Iowa, named for a lake near the town. 

Lake Ann; village and lake in Benzie County, Michigan, named for the wife of the 
first settler, A. P. Wheelock. 

Lake Geneva; city in Walworth County, Wisconsin, so named l)ecause of the resem- 
blance in its geographical situation to the city in New York. 

Lake Helen; village in Volusia C'ounty, Florida, named for the daughter of its 
founder, H. A. De Land. 

Lake Linden; village in Houghton County, ^Michigan, named for an early settler. 

Lake Mills; town and village in .lefferson County, Wisconsin, so named l)ecause 
situated on Rock Lake, which is the source of power for saw and grist mills. 

Lake Odessa; township and village in Ionia County, Michigan, named from the 
city in Russia. 

Lake of the Woods; lake in Minnesota. Originally named Lac des Bois by the 
French, "lake of the woods," because of the heavily wooded islands in the lake. 

Lakeville; town in Plymouth County, Massacliusetts, so named because a great por- 
tion of the township is occupied by a chain of lakes. 



156 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED f=lTATES. [bull. 197. 

Lakin; city in Koariiy County, Kansas, named for David L. T^akin, of Topeka. 

Lamar; county in Alabama, city in Barton County, Missouri, towns in Prowers 
County, Colorado, and Benton County, Mississippi, and river in Yellowstone 
Park, named for L. (^ C. Lamar, a former Secretary of the Interior. 

Xiamar; town in Darlington County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 

Iiamar; county in Texas, named for Mirabeau B. Lamar, a prominent Texas 
statesman. 

liamartine; town in Fond du Lac County, AVisconsin, named for the French 
historian. 

Lamb; county in Texas, named for Lieutenant Lamb. 

Lambertville ; city in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, named for John T^ambert, 
an early settlei'. 

Lamoille; county and river in Vermont; the name probably a mistaken rendition 
of La Mouette, the name originally given the river by C'liamjilain. 

Lamoine; town in Hanccxdv County, Maine, named for an early French resident. 

La Motte; island in J^ake Champlain, New York, named for Capt. Pierre Sieur de la 
Motte, who built a fort there. 

Lamoure; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Judson Lamoure, an early 
settler and a prominent man in Territorial politics. 

Lampasas; county, town, in same county, and creek in Texas. A Spanish word 
meaning, "a water lily." 

Lampeter; village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, named for the town in Wales. 

Lamy; village in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, named for Archl)isho2j Lamy. 

Lana; stream in Vermont, named for Ceneral Wool, United States Army; lana being 
latin for wool. 

Lanark; city in Carroll County, Illinois, named for the town in Scotland. 

Lancaster; name of many counties, towns, and villages in the United States, trans- 
ferred from the county in England; among these, counties in Nebraska, Pennsyl- 
vania, South Carolina and Virginia; town in Lancaster County, South Carolina; 
cities in Atchison County, Kansas, and Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and a 
village in Erie County, New York. 

Landaff; town in Urafton County, New Hampsliire, named for thi' town in Wales. 

Lander; county in Nevada, named for (len. F, W. Lander. 

Landisburg-; borough in Perry County, Pemisylvania, named for James I^andis, its 
founder. 

Landrum; ti:)wn in Spartanburg C'ounty, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 

Lane; county in Kansas, named for James H. Lane, Senator from that State. 

Lane; county in Oregon, named for Joseph Lane, twice governor of the Territorj-. 

Lanesboro; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for James Lane, Vis- 
count Lanesborough. 

Lanesboro; borough in Sus(juehanna County, Pennsylvania, nameil for INIartin Lane, 
an early settler. 

Langdon; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, named for Governor John 
Ijangdon. 

Langford; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named forthetirst su])erintendent of the 
])ark, Nathaniel Pitt Langford. 

ILanghorne; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania; 
Langhorne Manor; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Named for Jere- 
miah Langhorne, an early settler and prominent in State politics. 
Langlade; county in Wisconsin, named for the first white settler in the State. 
L'Anguille; stream and township in Arkansas. A French word, meaning "an eel." 
"Lanier; town in Bi\van County, Georgia, named for Clement Lanier, 
xiansingburg; town in Rensselaer County, New York, named for Aliraham Lan- 
sing, its founder. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 157 

Lapeer; roiinty and city in Mic'liifxaii. A corruption of tiic Krcnch woid, lapit-r, 

meaning " Hint." 
Lapile; stream and town in I'liion County, Arkansas. French word, meaning "a 

pier. ' ' 
La Plata; county in Colorado, wliicli contains tlie Sierra La Plata. A Spanish 

word, meaning "mountain of silver." 
La Playa; village in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish word, meaning 

"the shore or strand," and given to this village on account of its location on 

the Pacific coast. 
Lapompique; hranch of tiie Anjostook River, Maine. An Indian word, meaning 

" rope stream." 
Laporte; county in Indiana. A French word, meaning "door" or "opening" 

between two stretches of forest connecting two prairies. 
Laporte; borough in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, named for a French family 

who were large land owners. 
Lapwai; town in Xez Perces Comity, Idaho. An Indian word, meaning "place of 

division," or "a boundary." 
Laramie; village in Shelby County, Ohio, and river in the same State, named for 

Peter Laramie, a French Canadian trader. 
Laramie; county, and city in Laramie County, Wyoming, name<l for .Iac(jnes 

Laramie, a French trapper. 
Laredo; city in Webb Comity, Texas, named for the seaport town in Spain. 
Laribee; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Larimer; county in Colorado, named for Gen. William Larimer, eaily pioneer in 

Colorado and Nebraska. 
Larned; city in Pawnee County, Kansas, named for (ien. B. F. Larned. 
Larrabee; town in Cherokee County, Iowa, named for (governor William Larral>ee. 
Larue; county in Kentut'ky, named for John La Kue, an early settler. 
Lasalle; counties in Illinois and Texas; city in Lasalle County, Illinois, and village 

in Niagara Cf>unty, New York, named for Rene Robert Cavalier, Sieur de La 

Salle. 
Las Animas; county in Colorado, and town in Bent County in the same State. A 

contraction of the name originally given the river by the Spaniards, Kl Rio de 

las Animas Perditas, "tlie river of lost souls," because traditionally a Spanish 

regiment on its way to Florida was lost here. 
Lassecks; peak in Huiul)oldt County, California, named for an Indian chief. 
Lassen; county and peak in California, named for Peter Lassen, an early explorer. 
Las Vegas; city in San Miguel County, New Mexico. A Sjianish name, meaning 

"the plains," or the "meadows," and given this city on account <>( its situation 

in the midst of a fertile meadow. 
Latrobe; borougli in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, named for Benjamin II. 

Latrobe, jr. 
Latta; town in Marion County, South Carolina, named for a jirominent family. 
Lattimore; town in Cleveland County, N(jrth Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Latty; village in Paulding County, Ohio, named for the tirst settler. Judge A. S. 

Latty. 
Lauderdale; counties in Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee, and town in Lauder- 
dale County, Mississippi, named for Col. James Lauderdale. 
Laughery; river and town in Ohio County, Indiana, so named from the massacre 

of Captain Laughery's company by the Indians. 
Laughing Fish. Pond; point in Schoolcraft County, IMichigan, so named from the 

Indian name, Stikameg bapid, meaning " laughing white tisli." 



158 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Laura; village in Knott Connty, Nebraska, named for the wife of the first settler, 

whose name was Estep or p]stop. 
Laurel; county in Kentucky and town in Jones County, Mississippi, so named on 

account of the dense laurel thickets growing within their limits. 
Laurens; county in Georgia, named for Col. John Laurens, of Soutli Carolina, the 

Bayard of the American Revolution; 
Laurens; county in South Carolina and town in same county, named for Col. Henry 

Laurens and his son, John. 
Lausanne; township in Carbon County, Peinisylvania, named from the town in 

Switzerland. 
Lavaca; river, county, and l>ay in Texas. A corruption of the name, Les Vaches, 

given the river by the Spanish explorer. La Salle, on account of the number of 

buffalo found there; Les Vaches meaning " the cows." 
Lavallette; city in Ocean County, New Jersey, named for a resident family. 
Lawrence; many places in the United States bear the name of James Lawrence, 

caj)tain in the memorable battle with the British on I^ake Erie. Among these 

are counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, 

Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. 
Lawrence; creek in Hund)oldt County, California, nanied for an early settler. 
Lawrence; city in Douglas County, KaiL'^as, named f(jr Amos Lawrence, of Boston. 
Lawrence; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for Hon. Abbott Lawrence, 

of Boston. 
Lawrence; county in South Dakota, named for John Lawrence, former member of 

State legislature. 
Lawrenceburg; city in Dearborn County, Indiana, named for the wife of Captain 

Vance, whose maiden name was Lawrence. 

I Lawrenceburg; town in Lawrence County, Tennessee; 
Lawrenceville; town in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and city in Lawrence County, 
Illinois. Named for Capt. James Lawrence. 
Lawson; village in Clear Creek County, Colorado, named /or Alexander Lawson, 

keeper of a wayside inn. 
Lawton; village in Van Buren County, Michigan, named for Nathaniel Lawton, who 

donated the right of way to the Michigan Central Railroad. 
Leadbetter; point in Shoalwater Bay, Washington, named for Lieutenant Leadbetter, 
United States Army. 
Lead; city in Lawrence C'ounty, South Dakota; 
Lead Hill; town in Davidson County, North Carolina; 
Leadville; city in Lake County, Colorado. So named on a-ccount of the species of 

ore found within their limits. 
Leake; county in Mississippi; 

Leakesville; town in Greene County, Mississippi. Named for the Hon. Walter 
Leake, an early governor of the State. 
Leaksville; village in Rockingham County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Leakton; village in Newton County, (ieorgia, named for the man who kept the 

village store in early times. 
Leavenworth; town in Crawford County, Indiana, nan)ed for the proprietors, S. M. 

and Z. Leavenworth. 
Leavenworth; city and connty in Kansas, named for Gen. Henry Leavenworth, for 

whom Fort Leavenworth is named. 
Lebanon. This name, either alone or with the suliixe.s "Church," "Junction," 
"Lake," or "Spring," forms the name of 33 places in the United States, named 
either directly or indirectly from the mountain of Palestine; Lebanon County 
in Pennsylvania and city in the same county being of these. 



OANNETT.I PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 159 

Lebo; rity in Coffey County, Kansas, muned for an early settler. 

Leboeuf; townshii) in Erie Connty, I'ennsylvania, named from tlie creek wliich wa&i 

so named by the French on account of the number of Imffalo found upon its 

Ijanks. 
Le Claire; town in Scott County, Iowa, nanu>d for Antoine I.e Clair, French founder 

of Davenport. 
Lecompton; city in Douirlas County, Kansas, named for .Indite D. S. I.ecompte, 

chief justice of tlie Territory. 
Leconte; mountain in Tennessee, named for Joseph Leconte, a geologist. 
Ledyard; town in New London County, Connecticut, named for Col. William Fed- 
yard, of the State militia. 
Ledyard; town in (Cayuga County, New Yoik, named for Fenjamin Ledyard, agent 

for tlie dis])osai of tlie lands of the military tract. 
Lee; c<iunties in Alal>aina, Arkansas, Florida, Kentui-ky, INlississippi, and Texas, 

named for Robert F. Lee, commander of the armies of the Confederacy. 
Lee; counties in < ieorgia an<l Illinois, named for Cfcn. Ilichard Henry Ijcc, of the 

Revolution. 
Lee; towns in Berkshire County, ^Massachusetts, and Oneida County, New York, 

named for Gen. Charles Lee, of ^lassachusetts. 
Lee; county in Iowa, named for member of the New York land comjiany, Albany, 

New Y'ork. 
Lee; county in Virginia, named for Henry Lee, former governor of the State. 
Leechburg; borongh in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, named for Daviil Leech. 
Leech Lake; lake in Minnesota. Translati(jn of tlie Indian name, which meant 

"the i)lace of leeches." 
Leeds; many towns in the Fnited States, among them that in Hami)sliire County, 

Massachusetts, have been named for the manufacturing town in Yorkshire, 

England. 
fLeesburg-; town in Loudoun County, Virginia; 

<Leesville; town in Lexington County, South Carolina. Named f(jr the Lee family, 
I of Virginia. 

Leflore; county in ]\Iississipi)i, named for Greenwood Leflore. 
Left Hand; creek in F.oulder County, Colorado, named for a chief of the Arapahoe 

Indians. 
Lehi; city in Utah County, Utah, named for a character in the Book of Mormon. 
fLehigh; river and county in Pennsylvania; 
ILehighton; a borough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania. Named l)y the Delaware 

Indians, Lechauwekink, "where there are forks," of which the present name is 
^ a corruption. 
Leicester; town in Worcester County, ]\Iassachusetts, named for Robert Du<lley, 

luiri of Leicester. 
Leicester; town in Livingston County, New York, ]iamed for Leicester Phelps, son 

of Judge Oliver Phelps. 
Leidy ; mountains in Utah and Wyoming, named for the paleontologist, Jose])h Leidy. 
Leigh; township in Prince Edward and Amelia counties, Virginia, named for the 

Leigh family of Virginia. 
Leigh; lake in Yellowstone Park, named- for Richard Leigh, "Beaver Dii-k," hunter 

and guide in the Teton ISIountains. 
Leipsic; villages in Kent County, Delaware, and I'ntnam County, Ohio, nameil for 

tlu' city in Saxony. 
Leitchfield; town in Grayson County, Kentucky, named for Maj. David ]>eitcli. 
Leland; village in La Salle County, Illinois, named for Edwin S. Leland. 
Le Mars; city in Plymouth County, Iowa. The name is com])Osed of the initials of 

the ladies who accompanied its founder on his first visit to the spot, 



1(30 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Lienape; villages in Leaven\V(jrtli County, Kan.^as, and Chester County, Pennsylva- 
nia. The name is the original name of the Delaware Indians, and means "origi- 
nal or tirst people." 
Lenoir; comity, and town in Caldwell County, North Carolina, named for Gen. 

William Lenoir, Revolutionary ofticer. 
Lenora; eity in Norton County, Kansas, named for Mrs. Lenora Hauser. 
Lenox; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, the family name of the Duke of 

Kic'hmond, Avho was secretary of state at the time. 
Leominster; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

I lertfordshire, England. 
Leon; c(jmity in Florida, and city in Butler County, Kansas, named for Ponce de 

Leon. 
Leon; county in Texas, name<l for Alonzo de Leon, a Spanish captain and builder 

of missions in Texas. 
Leonard; village in Oakland County, ^Michigan, named for Leonard Rowland. 
Leonardville ; city in Riley County, Kansas, named for Leonard T. Smith, an otH- 

cer of the Kansas Central Railroad. 
Leopold; town in Perry County, Indiana, named for Leoi>old, King of the Belgians. 
Leoti; city in Wichita County, Kansas, named for a white girl captured hy the 

Indians, the name meaning " ])rairie flower." 
Le Ray; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Mr. J^e Ray Chaumont. 
Le Raysville; l)orough in Bradford County, Pemisylvania, named for Vincent Le 

Kay, the son of a large landowner. 
Lc Roy; town in Osceola County, Michigan, named for an Indian ciiief who lived 

near tiie tow n. 
Leroy; t(j\vn in Oenesee County, New York, name<l for Herman Le Roy, a large 

l)roprietor. 
Les Cheneaux; strait in Mackinaw County, ^Michigan. A French name, meaning 

"gutter, valley, the channel." 
Leslie; county in Kentucky, named for (iovernor Preston H. Leslie. 
Lesueur; county and borough in Minnesota, named for Le Sueui', an early explorer. 
Letcher; county in Kentucky, named for Robert P. Letcher, former governor of tlie 

State. 
Leverett; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Sir John Levcrett, 

colonial governor. 
Levy; county in Florida, named for a prominent politician. 
Lewiedale; town in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for a mend)er of a 

prominent resident family. 
Le-wis; creek in Colorado, named for a pioneer ranch owner. 
Lewis; counties in Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, and Washington; named for 

Meriwether Lewis. 
Lewis; county in New York, named for Morgan Lewis, former governor of the State. 
Lew^is; (-ounty in West Virginia, named for Col. Charles Lewis. 
Lewis and Clarke; river in Clatsop County, Oregon, and county in Montana, named 

for Capt. Meriwether Lewis and Capt. William Clarke, of the Lewis and Clarke 

expedition. 
Lewisberry; borough in York County, Pennsylvania, named for the Lewis family, 

of which Dr. Ellis Lewis was a member. 
Lew^isboro; town in Westchester County, New York, named for John Lewis, a 

prominent resident. 
Lewisburg; town in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, named for Samuel Lewis. 
JLewis Fork; southern branch of Colundjia River in Idaho; 
jLewiston; city in Nez Perce County, Idaho, Nained for Meriwether Lewis, 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. KU 

Liewiston; city in Aiulroscoggin Ci)Uiity, Maine, named f<ir tlie t'ounders, tiie Lewis 

families. 
Liewiston; village in Niagara ('(innty, New York, named ior Morgan Lewis, former 

governor of the State. 
Lewiston; town in Bertie County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resident. 
Lewistown; town in Logan County, Ohio, named for Capt. John Lewis, a noted 

Shawnee chief. 
Lexington; twenty-seven places in the United States bear this name, a majority of 

them having been given in commemoration (jf the famous Kt'volutionary battle. 

Among these is the county in South Carolina. 
Lexington; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for tlu- i)arisli of 

Lexington, iMigland. 
Leyden; towns in Franklin County, Massachusetts, and Lewis County, New York, 

named for the town in the Netherlands, the refuge of the Pilgrim Fathers jtrior 

to their arrival in America. 
Liberal; cities in Seward County, Kansas, and Barton County, Missouri, so named 

to characterize the ideas of the jK'oiile. 
Liberty; counties in Florida, (ieorgia, and Texas, and city in Montgomery County, 

Kansas, named for the sentiment which is so dear to the American people. 
Liberty Center; village in Wells C(ninty, Indiana, so named because it is located 

in the center of Liberty Township. 
Licking; county in Ohio, so named Iwcause the deer and elk found the saline 

dejiosits of the Licking River a favorite feeding ground. 
Ligonier; borough in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, name(l for Sir John 

Ligonier, Lord Viscount of Enniskillen. 
Lilesville; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for a merchant of the 

plact'. 
Lillington; tow n in Harnett County, and village in Pender C^ounty, North Carolina, 

named for Col. John A. Lillington, of tlie Revohition. 
Lily; bay and township in Piscataquis County, Maine, so name<l on account of the 

many lilies found there. 
Lime; lake in Cattaraugus county. New York, an anglicization of the Indian name 

Tecarnowundo, meaning "lime lake." 
Limerick; town in Y"(jrk County, Maine, and township in IMontgomery County, 

Pennsylvania, named for the town in Ireland. 
Limesprings; town in Howard County, Iowa, so named from the springs in the 

rcjcks. 
Limestone; counties in Alabama and Texas, and village in Cattaraugus C'ounty, New 

Y'ork, so named on account of the nature of the rock found within its limits. 
Lincklaen; town in Chenango County, New York, named for John Lincklaen, an 

early proprietor of the township. 
Lincoln; counties in Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Mississippi, 

Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, 

West Virginia, and Wisconsin; parish in Louisiana; city in Lancaster County, 

Nebraska; town in Providence County, Khode Island, and mountains in C'olorado 

and New Hampshire, named for President Abraham Lincoln. 
Lincoln; counties in Georgia, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, and Tennessee, 

named for Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, an officer of the Revolution. 
Lincoln; town in Whitmore County, ^lassachusetts, named for the ninth Earl of 

Lincoln. 
Lincoln; county in Maine, and town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named 

for Lincolnshire, P^ngland. 
Lincoln; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Governor Enoch Lincoln. 

Bull. 197—02 11 



162 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Lincolnton; towns in Lincoln ('i)unty, Georgia, and Lincoln County, North 
Carolina; 

] Iiincolnville ; ti>\vn in AValdn County, Maine. Named for Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 

I an otticerof the Kevolution. 

Lincolnville ; town in Berkeley County, South ( 'arolina, named fui- Pre.'^ident Abra- 
ham Lincoln. 

Lindley; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Col. Eleazar Lindley. 

Lindsay; creek in Humboldt C'onnty, California, named for an early settler. 

Lindsborg-; city in McPherson County, Kansas, so named because the first syllable 
of the names of many of the early settlers was "linds," the "Ixjrg" being added, 
which in Swedish means "castle." 

liine Port; town in Stewart County, Tennessee, so named because it is situated l)Oth 
upon the Cumberland River and on the lines between the States of Kentucky 
and Tennessee. 
Liinn; counties in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Oregon; village in Osage County, 

Missouri, and mountain in CaUfornia; 
Linneus; city in Linn County, Missouri. Named for Hon. J^ewis F. Linn, United 
States Senator from Missouri. 

liinton; city in ( ireene County, Indiana, named for a resi<lent of Terre Haute. 

Linwood; city in Leavenworth County, Kansas, and village in Butler County, 
Nebraska, so named on account of the presence of this kind of wood. 

liipscomb; county in Texas, named for Abner Li])scomb, a ]irominent early resi- 
dent, and associate justice of'the Supreme Court. 

Lisbon; twenty-one places in the United States bear this name, transferred from 
the town in Spain. 

Lisle; towns in Broome County, New York, and Dupage County, IlliiKiis, named 
for the city in France. 

Litclifi.eld; county in Connecticut and town in Herkimer County, New York, 
named for the city in England. 

Lititz; borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, named fnim the barony of 
Lititz in Boliemia. 

Little; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named fur L. B. Little. 

Little Beaver; stream on the boundary between Pennsylvania and Ohio. Trans- 
lation of the Indian name Tangamochke. 

Little Ferry; l)orough in Bergen County, New Jersey, so named on accomit of the 
ferry over Overptick Creek. 

Little Mountain; town in Newberry Countv, South C-arolina, so named because it 
is situated near Little Mountain. 

Little River; county in Arkansas, named from the rivei' which forms its northern 
boundary. 

Little Rock; capital of Arkansas, so named because it is built u])on a bed of rock. 

Little Sioux; river in Iowa. .\ translation of the name originally given it by the 
French, I'etite Riviere des Sioux. 

Little Tabeau; river in Missouri; the name a corruption ot the original French 
name, Tcrre Beau, "beautiful laml." 

Littleton; town in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Richard S. Little. 

Littleton; town in Middlesex County, IVIassachusetts, named for George Littleton, 
a mend^er of the British Parliament. 

Littleton; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Moses Little. 

Live Oak; county in Texas, named from the abundance of this species of oak. 

Livermore; town in Androscoggin County, Maine, named for Deacon Elijah Liver- 
more, an early settler. 

Livermore; town in (Trafton County, New Hampshire, named f(jr a prominent res- 
ident familv. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 163 

Liverpool; many i)lace8 in the Tiiited States bear this name, traiKsferred to them 

from the town in Knghind, among them bein^i a village in Onondaga County, 

Xew York. 
Livingston; counties in Illinois, .Michigan, and .Missouri, nanied I'oi- Ivl ward Living- 
ston, former Secretary of State. 
Livingston; counties in Kentucky and New York an<l parish in L<inisiana, named 

for Robert K. Livingston, a prominent politician. 
Livingston; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident family. 
Livonia; townships in Livingston County, New York, and Wayne County, Mich- 
igan, named for the division of Russia. 
Lizard; river in Iowa; the name a translation of the Indian name Wassakajximpah, 

"the river with the lizards." 
Llano; county and river in Texas. A Si)anish word meaning "plain," and so called 

Ijecause of the character of its surface. 
Llano Estacado; an elevated i)lateau in northwest Texas and New Mexico; Sj)an- 

isli words meaning "staked jjlain," api)lied to this plateau on account of the 

stake-like boles of the yucca plant, which grows there. 
Loachapoka; town in Macon County, Alabama. An Indian word meaning "here 

terrapins are killed." 
Locke; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the philosopher, John Locke. 
Lock Haven; city in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, so named because of the two 

locks and a safe harlior near it. 
Lockport; village in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, so nanu'd because it was once a 

favorite tying-up place ior the river ])oats. 
Lockport; city in Niagara County, New York, so named for the double tier of locks 

at this i^oint. 
Lodi; several places in the United States have been named for the city in Italy. 
Logan; county in Arkansas, named for James Logan, a pioneer. 
Logan; t-ounties in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and 

mountain in Arizona, named for (Ten. John A. Logan. 
Logan; county in Illinois, named for Dr. John Logan, father of Gen. John A. Logan. 
Logan; county in Kentucky, named for Gen. Benjamin Logan, a pioneer of the State. 
Logan; creek in Neljraska, named for Logan Fontanelle, a friendly Omaha chief. 
Logan; county in \Vest Virginia, named for Logan, an Indian chief of the Mingo 

tribe. 
Logansport; city in Cass County, Indiana, named for Captain Logan, Indian chief, 

nephew of Tecumseh. 
Loleta; town in Humboldt County, California. An Indian word meaning "a pleas- 
ant place." 
London; several towns and villages in the United States have l»een named for the 

city in England. 
Londonderry; towns in Rockingham County, New Hami)sliirc, and Windham 

County, Vermont, so named in compliment to Rev. JIatthew Clark, who dis- 

tinguishetl himself in the defense of Londonderry, Ireland. 
Lone Rock; village in Richland County, Wisconsin, so named on account of the 

remarkable mound of sandstone situated near the town. 
Lone Tree; town in Johnson County, Iowa, named for a single tret' which stands in 

the prairie. 
Long Brancli; celebrated watering }>lace in New Jersey, taking its name from a 

branch of South Shrewsbury River. 
Long Island; island on the Atlantic coast, part of the State of New York. An angli- 

cization of the Dutch name Lange Eylandt. 



164 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buij,. 197. 

Xiong'ineado'w; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, so named on account of 

the jiresence of a long meadow within the township. 
liOngmont; town in Boulder County, Colorado. A combination of the name of the 

discoverer of Longs Peak and the French mont, "mountain." 
liOngton; city in Elk County, Kansas, named for the town in England. 
Long-s; peak in Colorado, named for Capt. Stephen 1). Long. 
liOng Tom; stream in the Willamette Valley; the name a corrujition of the Indian 

name, Lung-tum-ler. 
lionoke; county in Arkansas. Said by one authority to have been named for the 

Indian tribe, the word meaning "the people," but according to another au- 
thority it was so named on account of the present-e of a lone oak tree which 

stood near its present site. 
Lonsdale; village in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for tiie division in 

England. 
Liookout; capes in North Carolina and Oregon, so named because of the dangers 

of navigation at these points. 
Lookout; mountain in Tennessee; so named on account of the extensive prospect 

from its summit. 
Loretto; ]>orough in Cand)ria County, Pennsylvania, named from the city in Italy. 
Los Angeles; county and city in California. A Spanisli name meaning "the 

angels." 
Los Gatos; city in Santa Clara County, California. A Spanish name meaning "the 

cats," and doubtless applied to the city because of the presence of wild-cats 

in tlie country. 
Los Pinos; river in Colcjrado. A Sjjanish name meaning "the pines." 
Lost; river in Washington County, Indiana, which for several miles is lost in a 

sul)terranean channel. 
Lost River; stream in Virginia, so called because of its abrupt disapi)earance at the 

foot of a mountain. 
Lott; town in Falls County, Texas, named for a prominent citizen. 
Loudon; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for the Earl of 

Loudon. 
Loudon; county in Tennessee, named for Fort Loudon. 
Loudoun; county in A^irginia, named for the Earl of Loudon. 
Louisa; county in Iowa, named for Louisa Massey. 
Louisa; county and town in same county, in Virginia, named for the daughter of 

George II. 
Louisburg; town in Franklin County, North Carolina, named for the fortress. 
Louisiana; State in the Union, named for Louis XIV of France. 
Louisiana; city in Pike County, Missouri, named for Louisiana Territory, of which 

it was a part when founded. 
Louisville; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, named for Louis Wilson, the son 

of the original preemptor of the town site. 
Louisville; city in Jefferson County, Kentucky, named for Louis XVI of France. 
Louisville; town in Winston County, Mississippi, named for Col. Louis Winston, a 

prominent early settler. 
Loup; county in Nebraska, named f(jr the tribe of Pawnee Loui>s. 
Love; town in De Soto County, INIississippi, named for Colonel Love. 
Loveland; village in Larimer County, Colorado, named for Hon. W. A. H. Love- 
land. 
Lovell; town in Oxford County, Maine. 
Lovevrell; mountain and pond in New Hampshire, named for Capt. John Lovewell, 

the hero of a fight with the Indians. 
Loving; county in Texas, named for Oliver Loving, an early pioneer. 
Lowell; military post in Arizona, named for (ien. C. R. Lowell. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATEt^. 165 

Lowell; town in IVnobai'ut County, Maine, named for Ivowell llayden, the first 

person born within its limits. 
Lowell, city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts; plantation in Franklin County, 

Maine; town in (Jaston County, North Carolina, and villairc in Kent County, 

Michigan, named for Francis ('aljot Lowell, of Boston. 
Low Freight; stream in Clark County, Arkansas; the name a corrujition of the 

oiiginal French name, I'eau froid, meaning "cold water." 
Lowndes; counties in Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, named for William Jones 

Lowndes, member of Congress from South C^arolina. 
Lowndesville; town in Abbeville County, South Carolina, named for tiie Lowndes 

family, prominent in that State. 
Lowville; town in Lewis County, New York, named for Nicholas Low. 
Loy alhanna ; stream and township in Pennsylvania. The name a corrnptioii of 

the Indian word Laweel-hanna, meaning "the middle stream." 
Loyalsock; branch of the Su.squehanna River and a township in Lycoming County, 

Pennsylvania. A corruption of the Indian Lawi-sacpiik, meaning "the middle 

creek." 
Loydsville; town in Belmont County, Ohio, named for a Welsh family. 
Lubbock; county in Texas, named for Tom Lubbo(;k, a colonel in the civil war. 
Lucas; county and town in same county in Iowa, and ciounty in Ohio, named for 

Robert Lucas, governor of Ohio and first governor of lovva Territory. 
Luce; county in Michigan, named for Governor Cyrus G. Luce. 
/Lucerne; town in Columbiana County, Ohio; 

1 Lucerne villa; village in Knox County, Ohio. Named for the lake in Switzerland. 
Ludington; city in ^Ia.son County, Michigan, named for James Ludington, of 

Milwaukee. 
Ludlow; town in Kentim County, Kentucky, named for Israel Ludlow, a j)r(jminent 

pioneer. 
Ludlow; town in llami)den County, Massachusetts, name<l for the town in Shrop- 
shire, England. 
Lumberton; town in Peai'l River (!omity, Mississippi, so named on account of its 

principal industry. 
Lumpkin; county and town in Stewart County, Georgia, named foi' Wilson Lump- 
kin, an early governor. 
Luna; county in New Mexico, named for a prominent resident family. 
Lunenburg; town in Worcester County, ^lassachusetts, and town in Essex County, 

Vermont, named for the Duke of Lunenburg, George II of England. 
Lunenburg; county in ^'irginia, named for the town in Prussia, from which its 

settlers came. 
Lutesville; village in Bollinger County, Missouri, named for its founder, Eli Lutes. 
Luther; village in Lake (bounty, Mi(;higan, named for William A. Luther, an early 

settler. 
Luthersburg; village in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, named for W. II. Luther, 

an old resident. 
Luzerne; county and borough in same county in Pennsylvania, named for C'heva- 

lier della Luzerne, former minister from France to the United States. 
Lycoming; Itranch of tlie Suscpiehanna, a county and a town in Pennsylvania. An 

Indian word meaning "sandy stream." 
Lyell; mountain in California, named for the English geologist, Sir Charles Lyell. 
Lykens; borough in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania; a corruption of the name of 

the man for whom it was named — Andrew Lycan. 
Lyman; town in York County, Maine, named for Theodore Lyman, of Boston. 
Lyman; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named for Daniel Lyman, one 

of the early proprietors. 
Lyman; county in South Dakota, named for W. P. Lyman, legislatcjr and soldier. 



166 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bulu 197. 

Liyme; towns in New London County, Connecticut; Jefferson County, New York, 
and Grafton County, New Hanipsliire, named either directly or indirectly from 
the l)orough of Lyme-Regis, England. 

Lynchburg; city in Campbell County, Virginia, named for a rich settler and otlicer 
in tlie Revolution. 

Lynchtown; township in Oxford County, INIaine, named for the owner of I^ynch's 
mills. 

Liyndeboro; town in Ilillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for Benjamin 
Lynde, a large landowner. 
Lyndon; tnwn in Caledonia County; 
Lyndon Center; village in ('aledonia County; 

Lyndonville; village in Caledonia County, Vermont. Named for Josiah Lyndon, 
son of an early i)roprietor. 

Lynn; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for Lynn-Regis, England. 

Lynn; county in Texas, named for G. W. Lynn, an early settler. 

Lynnville; town in Jasper County, L)wa, so named on account of the proximity of 
a 1 (asswood grove. 

Lynxville; village in Crawford County, Wisconsin, named for the steamer Li/nx, 
which brought the (Tovernment surveyors to the place. 

Lyon; counties in Iowa, Kansas, and Nevada, named for Gen. Nathaniel Lyon, 
United States Army. 

Lyon; county in Kentucky, named for Col. Crittenden Lyon. 

Lyons; city in Rice Countj', Kansas, named for Tnnnan J. Lyon, the owner of the 
town site. 

Lyons; village in Burt County, Nebraska, named for Waldo Lyon, an eai'ly resident. 

Lyonsdale; village in Lewis County, New York, named for its tirst settler, C'alen 
Lyon. 

Lysander; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for the Spartan general. 

Mabbettsville; village in Dutchess County, New York, named for James Mal)bett, 
tlie former proprietor. 

McAdenville; town in Gaston County, North Carolina, named for Hon. R. Y. 
JIcAden, speaker of the house of representatives. 

McArthur; village in Vinton County, Ohio, named for Gen. Duncan McArthur, an 
officer in the Indian wars. 

McBride; village in Montcalm County, Michigan, named for an early settler. 

McClellandville ; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for William 
McClelland, an early settler. 

McColl; town in Marll)oro County, Scmth Carolina, named for D. D. McColl, a cap- 
italist. 

McComb; town in Pike County, Mississippi, named for a foi-mer owner of the Mis- 
sissippi Central Railroad. 

McConnellsburg'; borough in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder. 

McConnellstown; village in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, named for its 
founder. 

McConnelsville; village in Morgan County, Ohio, named for Robert McConnel. 

McCook; county in South Dakota, named for Edwin S. Mi'Cook, of Ohio, distin- 
guished in the civil war. 

McCool; town in Attala County, Mississippi, named for Hon. James F. McCool. 

McCracken; city in Rush County, Kansas, named for William McCracken, of New 
York City, an official of the Missouri Pacific Railway. 

McCracken; county in Kentucky, named for Capt. Virgil McCracken. 

McCulloch; county in Texas, named for Benjamin McCuUoch, a brigadier-general 
in the Confederate army. 

McCune; city in Crawford County, Kansas, named foi- Isaac McCune, its foundei-. 



(iASNETT.J TLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 1()7 

McDonald; <'iiiinty in Missouri, iKuiicd for Ser<;i'aiit McDoiiald, ofSontli Carolina. 
McDonough; town in llcmy County, (u'orj^ia; 

MacDonoug'h.; county in Illinois, town in Clienan<io County, New York, and vil- 
latie in Newcastle County, Dclawart'. Named for the eminent naval coniinaiider, 
Commodore Thomas ]\IcI)onouj,di. 
McDowell; t'ounty in North Carolina, named for the two ocncials, .losepli and 

Charles McDowell, of Revolutionary fame. 
McDowell; county in West N'ir^inia, and town in Highland ('oimty, N'irginia, said 

to liave been named foi' .fames M(d)owell, former governor of N'iiginia. 
McDuffie; county in (ieorgia, named for < ieorge M(d)nfiie, an eai-ly governor of 

South Carolina. 
Macedon; town in Wayne County, New York, named foi- the ancient Macedonia of 

the (ireeks. 
Macedonia; name transferred from Greece to many places in the lTnite<l States. 
McFarlan; town in Anson C\)unty, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 
McGrawville; village in .\lleghany Connty, New York, named in honor of a Mr. 

McCraw, who owned considerable property there. 
McGregor; city in ('layton Connly, Iowa, named for an (»ai'ly proprietor, Alexander 

Mc< iregor. 
McHenry; county in Illinois, named fm- <ien. William M( Henry, mendiei- State 

legislature. 
McHenry; fort near lialtinioic, Maryland, named for .lames ]\r<dleiny, Sc^cietaryof 

\\'ar under Washington and Adams. 
McHenry; county in North Hakota, named lor Hon. .Tames McHenry, an early 

]iioneer. 
Machhanna; the largest of the three streams which, united, form the Lehigh 

liiver. An Indian word meaning "the largest stream." 
Machias; river and town in Washington County, Maine; 

Machiasport; town in Washington County, Maine; probal)ly a corruption of the 

French word. Magi, and given to the river on account of being discovered upon 

the festival of the Magi, or, acc(jrding to another authority, derived from the 

Indian word Machisses, "bad small falls." 

Machigamic; river in northern Wisconsin, so called beeau.se it Hows from the lake 

bearing the Indian name, ^litchigamic, meaning "large lake." 
Macinaw^; town in Tazewell County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "turtle." 
Macintire; mountain in the Adriondacks, named for an iron speculator of the 

region. 
Mcintosh; county in (Ieorgia, named for the Mcintosh family, members of which 

accompanied Oglethorpe in his first expedition into the State. 
Mcintosh; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. K. II. M(dntosh, a member of 

the Territorial legislature. 
McKean; county in Pemisylvania, named for Thomas MeKean, an vav\y governor, 

and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
McKee; town in Jackson County, Kentucky, named for .Tudge Ceorge R. MeKee. 
McKeesport; city in Allegheny Connty, Pemisylvania, named for I)avid .AIcKee, 

who once kept a ferry there. 
Mackinac; county in Michigan and town in same county. Derived from the Indian 

word "michilimackinac," meaning "island of the great turtle," or in other 

dialects, "island of the giant fairies." 
McKinley; county in New IVIexico, named for late President William McKinley. 
Macksville; city in Stafford County, Kansas, named for George Mack, the first 

postmaster in the county. 
McLaurin; village in Perry County, Mississippi, named for ( ieneral McLaurin, first 

president of the Gulf and Ship Island Railroad. 



168 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

McLiean; t-ounty in Kentucky, named for Ju(l<ie Alney McLean. 

Mcliean; county in lllinoi.s, named for John McLean, member of Conj^ress from 

that State. 
McLean; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. John R. McLean, a prominent 

State politician. 
McLennan; county in Texas, named for Neil McLennan. 
Maclenny; town in Baker County, Florida, named for IL C. MacClenny, its 

founder. 
McLeod; county in Minnesota, named for Hon. Martin McLeod, president of the 

State council. 
McLouth; city in Jefferson C'oinity, Kansas, named for tlie owner of the town site. 
McMechen; town in Marshall County, West Virginia, named for a former resident. 

iMcMinn; county in Tennessee; 
McMinnville; town in Warren County, Tennes.see. Named for Gen. Josej^h 
Mcilinn, an early governor. 
McMullen; county in Texas, named for John McMuUen, a colonizer of western 

Texas. 
McNairy; county in Tennessee, named for Judge John McNairy. 
McNeils; island in Washington, named for the captain of a steamer of the Hudson 

Bay Company. 
Macomb; county in Michigan and town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named 

for (Jen. Alexander Macomb. 
Macon; counties in Alabama, Georgia, Hlinois, Missouri, North Carolina, and 

Tennessee, and cities in Georgia and Missouri, towns in Mississipi)i and North 

Carolina, and a village in Macon County, Illinois, named for Gen. Nathaniel 

Macon, United States Senator from North Carolina. 
Macoupin; county and creek in Illinois, so named by the Indians l)ecause the white 

potato, signified l)y the name, was found abundantly along the banks of the 

creek. 
McPherson; counties in Kansas and Nebraska, and town in McPlierson C'ounty, 

Kansas, named for Maj. Gen. J. B. McPherson. 
Macungie; borough in Lehigh C-ounty, Pennsylvania. An Indian name, meaning 

"the feeding place of bears." 
Madawaska; branches of the St. John and Aroostook rivers in Maine aiid a town 

in Aroostook C(»unty. An Indian word, meaning " porcupine place," or, "where 

one river enters another." 
Madden; creek in Huml)oldt County, California, named for Captain Madden. 
Madera; county and town in California; the county, having been formed from a part 

of Fresno County after the building of the town of Madera, was named for that 

town, which was quite a lumber center. A Spanish word, meaning " lumber." 
Madison; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, 

Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New York, North 

Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, parish in Louisiana, cities in 

Georgia and Kansas, towns in Somerset County, Maine, and Carroll County, 

New Hampshire, and a peak in the White Mountains, named for James Madi- 
son, fourth President of the United States. 
Magalloway; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word, meaning "large tail." 
Magataukamde; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "swan lake." 
Mag-nolia; many towns in the United States, named directly or indirectly for Dr. 

Pierre Magnol, for whom the tree of this species was named. 
Magoffin; county in Kentucky, named for Beriah Magoffin, a former governor. 
Mag-otliy; river in Maryland. An Indian word, meaning "a small plain devoid of 

tind)er." 
Mahanoy City; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. A corruption of the 

Indian word Malioni, meaning "a lick." 



GANNKTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE ITNTTED STATES. I(i9 

Mahantang-o; hninch of the Su8(iuehanna Kiver, I'eniis^ylvaiiia. An liidiau word, 

meanino; "wliere we had ])lenty of meat to eat." 
Mahaska; county in Iowa, named for the greatest chief of tlie lowas. 
Mahomet; village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for the founder of the 

^Mohammedan reUgion. 
Mahon; village in Marshal! County, Mississippi, named for Jolm ]\laiion. 
Mahoning:; river and county in Ohio; 
Mahony; townshij) and city in S(^hnylkill County, Pennsylvania, and branch of 

the Susquehanna River, in the same State. Name derived from an Indian word, 

meaning "a lick." 
Mahtowa; town in CarUon County, Minnesota, named from tlie Indian word, mean- 
ing "grass lands." 
Maiden Rock; village in Pierce County, Wisconsin, named for the rock, famous in 

Indian legends, from whicli an Indian maiden leaped to escape marriage with a 

warrior of another tribe. 
Maidstone; town in Essex Countv, N'ermont, named for the town in Kent, England. 
Maine; a State in the Union said to be named for the private estate of Henrietta 

Maria, in Maine, a province of France; or, according to another authority, so 

called because the fishermen of the islands along the coast referred to the nmin- 

land as the "main," and in some early documents it was spelled " Mayn." 
Makage; western tril)utary of the Minnesota River. From an Indian word, Makagi, 

meaning " brown earth." 
Makiapier; pond in New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning "water of a reddish 

color. ' ' 
Malade; river and village in Oneida County, Idaho. A French word, meaning "sick 

or infirm." 
Malaga; towns in Gloucester County, New Jersey, and Monroe County, < >hio, named 

for the city of Spain. 
Malcom; town in Poweshiek County, Iowa, named for an early Scotch settler. 
Maiden; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
Malheur; river and county in Oregon. A French word, meaning "misfortune." 
Malmaison; village in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, named for a chateau in France. 
Malta; towns in Morgan County, Ohio, and Saratoga County, New York, named for 

the island in the Mediterranean Sea. 
Malvern; several towns in the United States have been named for the watering 

})lace in England. 
Mamajuda; island in the Detroit River, Michigan, named for an Indian squaw. 
Mamakating; town in Sullivan County, New York, named for an Indian chief. 
Mamaroneck; town in Westchester County, New York, named for an Indian chief. 
Mammoth; cave in Kentucky, so named on account of its great size. 
Manada; stream in Daujjhin County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning "an 

island." 
Manahan; stream in York County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

"where liquor has been drunk." 
Manahawkin; town in Ocean County, New Jersey, and a creek in the same state. 

An Indian name, meaning "good corn land," and applied to this section on 

account of the productiveness of the land. 
Manalapan; river in New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning "good bread or good 

country." 
Manan; islands on the coast of Maine. The Indian word for island. 
Manasquan; village in Monmouth County, New Jersey. An Indian word, said to 

mean "an island with an inclosure for squaws." 
Manatawny; branch of the Schuylkill River in Pennsylvania. Derived from the 

Indian word, menhaltanink, "here we drank" (liquor). 



170 fLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [kuu.. 197. 

Manatee; county, town, ami river in Florida, so nameil bceanpe the yea cow is found 

. on the coast. 
Manaticut; river in Massachusetts, named from the Indian and i)ro])a1;)ly meaning 

"a place of observation." 
Manato-Kike'we ; stream in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "stooping spirit 

river." 
Mancebona; village in Antrim County, Michigan, named for the youngest daughter 

of the first settler, Mancebona Andrews. 
Manchester; cities in Chesterfield County, Virginia, Essex County, Massachusetts, 

and Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, and village in Ontario C(junty, New York, 

named for the city in England. 
Mandan; city in Morton County, North D.ikota, named for the Indian tribe. 
Mandarin; town in Duval County, Elorida, so named because its chief orange crop 

is <if this species. 
Mandeville; town in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, named for Mandeville de 

Marigny, a descendant of the French officer of the first (lolonization. 
Manhasset; formerly a village in (Queens County, New York, and now a part of 

New York City. An Indian name, meaning "little island." 
Manhattan; an island in New York. An Indian word, said by some authorities to 

mean "little island;" others think it means "the people of the whirlpool," 

referring to Hell Gate, and another authority gives its origin as from the word 

Manna- ha-ta, "{)laceof drunkenness," since Verrazani landed ujion the lower 

extremity of ^Manhattan Island and gave the Indians liquor, on which they 

became drunk. 
Manheim; towns in llerkimei' County, New York, and Lancaster County, Pennsyl- 
vania, named for tlie town in Germany. 
Manidowish; river in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "evil spirit." 
Manistee; county, city, and river in Michigan. An Indian word, meaning "ver- 
milion river," or, ac(;ording to another authority, "lost river." 
Manistique; town in Schoolcraft County, Michigan, from the same soiirce as the 

al )i ive. 
Manitou; county in Michigan, river in Wisconsin, and town in El Paso County, 

Ci)lora(U). An Indian name given to any object of I'eligious reverence. 
Manitowoc; city in Wisconsin and county in Michigan. An Lulian word, meaning 

"s])irit land." 
Mankato; cities in Jewell County, Kansas, and Blue Earth County, Minnesota. 

An Indian word, meaning "Inile," or, more properly, "green earth." 
Mankisitah-Watpa; river in South Dakota, strongly impregnated with white slime, 

hence given this name by the Indians, it meaning " river of white water." 
Manlius; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for a Roman general. 
Manly; village in Moore County, North Carolina, named for Governor Charles 

Manly. 
Manning; town in Carroll County, Iowa, named for a merchant of the ]ilace. 
Manning; town in Clarendon County, »South Carolina, named for the Manning 

family so prominent in South Carolina history. 
Mannsville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Col. H. B. Mann. 
Mannussing; island in Long Island Sound. From an Indian word, munnohan, 

meaning "an island." 
Mansfield; town in Holland County, Connecticut, named for Moses Mansfielil, 

mayor of New Haven. 
Mansfield; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named for William Murray, Earl 

of Mansfield. 
Mansfield; city in Richland County, Ohio, name<l f<ir Col. Jared iNIansfield, at one 

time surveyor-general, United States. 



GANNETT.! . PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 171 

Mansfield; town in Tiofja County, FennHvlvania, named for Awa ^lann, original 

owner of the lan<l. 
Manson; town in Calhoini County, Iowa, named for a resident. 
Manteno; village in Kankakee County, Illinois. Prol)ably a corruption of the 

Indian word IManitou, meaning "s])irit." 
Manteo: town in Dare County, North Carolina, named for an Indian rhief, who was 

tlu' lirst Indian baptized. 
Manton; village in Michigan, named for the first wliite settler, George Manton. 
Mantua; towns in Portage County, Ohio, and (Jloucester County, New Jersey, 

named for the town in Italy. 
Manuelito; station in INIcKinley County, New Mexico, named for a former chief of 

the Navajos. .\ S])anish word, meaning "little Manuel." 
Maple Forest; town in Ciawford County, Michigan, so named because of its beau- 
tiful forests. 
Maquoketa; city in Jackson County, Iowa, and river in same State. The name is 

derived from an Indian word, variously translated as "high bank," "feather," 

' ' a bear. ' ' 
Maquon; town in Knox (bunty, Illinois. This name was given William Penn by 

the Indians because in his treaty with them on the banks of the Delaware he 

used a tiuiil pen, tliis word with them signifying "a ([uill or feather." 
Marais; town in Orange County, Missouri. French word, meaning "swamp or 

morass." 
Marais des Cyg-nes; river in "Wabaunsee County, Kansas. A French phrase, 

meaning "swans' marsh." 
Marathon; town in Cortland County, New York, and comity in Wisconsin, named 

for the l)attlefield in Greece. 
Marblehead; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, which was so named on account 

of the variegated porphyry-colored stones found there. 
Marcellus; towns in Onondaga County, New York, and Cass County, Michigan, 

named for the illustrious Roman, M. Claudius Marcellus. 
Marcus Hook; borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named for, l)ut a cor- 
ruption of the name of, an Indian chief, Maarte, who lived in that section. 
Marcy; town in Oneida County, New York, and mountain in the same State, named 

for a former governor, William L. Marcy. 
Mare; island in San Pal)lo Bay, California, said to be so named on account of a wild 

mai-e whicJi formerly inhal)ited the island. 
Marengo; comity in Alabama and cities in McHenry C'Oinity, Illinois, and Iowa 

County, Iowa, named from the ))attletield of Italy. 
Marg-aretsville ; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named for Mrs. 

Margaret Ridley. 
Margaretville ; village in Delaware County, New York, named for the owner of the 

land, Margaret Lewis, the daughter of Governor Morgan Lewis. 
Marias; river in Montana, named for Miss Maria Wood. 

Mariaville; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for the daughter of Mr. Bing- 
ham, a large landowner. 
Mariaville; town in Schenectady C-ounty, New York, named for the daughter of 

James Duaiie. 
Maricopa; county in Arizona, named for an Indian tribe. 
Marie Saline; township in Ashley Coimty, Arkansas. From the French marias 

saline, meaning "salt marsh." 
Maries; county in Missouri, named for the Big and Little Maries rivers, which name 

is of French origin. 
Marietta; city in Ohio, named for (.iueen Marie Antoinette of France. 



1^2 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Marietta; town in Lancaster County, rennsylvania, named for the wives of the two 
j)roprietors. 

Marilla; town in Erie County, New York, named for Mrs. Marilla Rogers, of Alden. 

Marin; county in CaHfornia, named for the celebrated chief of the Lecatuit, or 
Likatuit, tril)e. 

Marine; village in Madison County, Illinois, so named because settled by several 
sea captains from the east. 

Marine; village in Washington County, Minnesota, named for the Marine Lumber 
Company of Delaware and Vermont, which .settled the village. 

Marinette; county in Wisconsin, named for the daughter of an Indian chief, JNIari- 

nette Jacobs, the name being a composite of the names Marie and Antoinette. 
Marion; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, 
Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Oliio, Oregon, South Carolina, Ten- 
nessee, Texas, and West Virginia, town in Marion County, South Carolina, and 
fort in Florida; 
Marionville; city in Lawrence County, Missoui-i. Named for (Jen. Francis IVIar ion. 

Mariposa; river, county, and town in same county in California, named for a Hower 
which grows abundantly there. A Spanish word, meaning "butterfly." 

Markleville; town in Madison County, Indiana, named for John Markle, who laid 
it out. 

Marlboro; many places in the LTnited States were given this name; some of tliem 
for the Duke of Marlborough and others from the town in England. 

Marlinton; village in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, named for the first settler. 

Marlow; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for the borough in 
England. 

Marmiton; stream in Missouri. From the French wonl, marmiton, "scullion," 
from marmite, "pot or kettle." 

Maroon; peak in the Elk Mountains, Colorado, so named on account of the peculiar 
color of the sandstone. 

Marquam; village in Clackamas C-ounty, Oregon, named for P. A. Marcpiam, an old 
resident of Portland. 

Marquette; counties in Michigan and Wisconsin, city in the same county in Michi- 
gan, town in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, city in McPhenson County, Kan- 
sas, and river in Michigan, named for the Jesuit missionary, Jacques Marquette. 

Marseilles; village in Wyandot County, Ohio, named for the city in France. 

Marshall; counties in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Mis.sissippi, Kentucky, 
Tennessee, and West Virginia, named for C-hief Justice John Marshall. 

Marshall; town in Boulder County, Colorado, named for Joseph M. Marshall, who 
dist'overed coal in this section. 

Marshall; county in Kansas, named for Francis J. ^Marshall, member of the first Ter- 
ritorial legislature. 

Marshall; county and village in same county in Minnesota, named for Governor 
William R. Marshall. 

Marshall; county in South Dakota, named for Thomas F. Marshall, Congressman 
from North Dakota. 

Marshallton; village in Nevvi-astle County, Delaware, named for John Marshall, who 
first started a rolling mill there. 

Marshfield; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, so named on account of its 
situation. 

Marshfield; city in Webster Comity, Mi.ssouri, named for the home of Daniel 
Webster. 

Marshfield; town in Washington County, Vermont, named for Capt. Isaac Marsh, 
who i)urchaseil the town site from the Indians. 

Marshfield; city in Wood County, Wisconsin, so named ))ecause unusually large 
marshes cover the township. 



GANNETT.! PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 173 

Marthas Vineyard; island (■(Hiiprii^ing Dukes Coiiiity, Mass^achusetts. Martha, 

said to he a rorruption of ^Martin, the name of a friend of the discoverer of the 

island, the Vineyard l)eing added on account of the abundance of wild grapes 

found there. 
(Martin; county in Indiana; 

(Martin; county in Kentucky. Named for Col. John 1'. Martin. 
Martin; county in .Minnesota, named for Henry IMartiin, an early settU'r. 
Martin; town in Claiborne County, Mississippi, named for (ien. \V. T. ^hirtin, of 

Natchez, Mississippi. 
Martin; county in North t'arolina, named for colonial governor, Josiah INhirtin. 
Martin; county in Texas, named for Wyly JMartin, an early settler. 
Martinez; town in Contra Costa County, California, named for a })rominent SjtanisJi 

settler. 
Martins; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Martins; location in Coos County, New Hami)shire, granted to Thomas Martin, 177.'i. 
Martinsburg-; village in Dixon County, Nebraska, named for Jonathan Martin, its 

first settler. 
Martinsburg; borough in Blair County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder. 
Martinsburg-; town in Berkeley County, West Virginia, named for Col. Tom 

Martin, a nephew of Lord Fairfax, a wealthy landowner. 
Martins Ferry; city in Belmont County, Ohio, named for the family who estab- 
lished the ferry there. 
Martinsville; city in Morgan County, Indiana, named for the oldest of the locating 

commissioners, John Martin. 
Martinsville; village in Harrison County, INlissouri, named for Zadoc ^Martin, a 

miller. 
Martinsville; town in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, named for the founder. 
Marvine; mountains in Colorado and Utah, named for the geologist, A. R. Marvine. 
Mary; bay in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone Park, named for Miss Mary Force. 
Mary; lake in Yellowstone Park, named for Miss INIary Clark. 
Maryland; one of the thirteen original States, named for Henrietta Maria, wife of 

Charles I, of England. 
Marysville; city in Yuba County, California, named for Mis. Mary Covilland, one 

of the founders of the place. 
Marysville; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for the wife of Francis J. 

Alarshall, for whom the county was named. 
Marysville; village in t^nion County, Ohio, named for the daughter of the original 

proprietor. 
Mascoutah; city in St. Clair C'ounty, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "{)rairie," 

or "grassy jilain. " 
Masgeek-Hanna; stream of Pennsylvania, an Indian word, meaning "stream 

llowing through swampy ground." 
Mashamoquet; stream in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "near the great 

mountain," oraccording to another authority, " at the great fishing place." 
iMashapaug; village in Tolland County, Connecticut; 

jMashpee; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. From an Indian word, 
[ Mashapaug, meaning either "standing water," or "great pond." 
Maskeg-on; river in Michigan. An Indian word, meaning "swamp" or "bog." 
Mason; village in Effingham County, Illinois, named for Roswell B. Mason, chief 

engineer Illinois Central Railroad. 
Mason; counties in Illinois, Kentucky, and Michigan, named for Stevens T. Mason, 

the last Territorial governor and first State governor of Michigan. 
Mason; bayou in Chicot County, Kansas, named for the early proprietor, the Mar- 
quis of Maison Rouge. 



174 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Mason; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for John Mason, the 
founder of tiie colony. 

Mason; eonnty in Texas, named for Captain Mason, United States Army. 

Mason; county in Washington, named for Charles H. Mason, the first State secretary. 

Mason; county in West Virginia, named for (ieorge Mason, governor of the State. 

Mason; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for Maj. Julius AV. JNIason, United 
States Army. 

Masonville; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Rev. John M. Mason, 
of New York. 

Massabesic; village in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "a place at a great river or brook." 

Massac; county in Illinois, name<l for Fort Massac, which was the scene of an 
Indian massacre, from which circumstance it derived its name. 

Massachaug; pond in Rhode Island. An Indian word, meaning "place where 
rushes grow." 

Massachusetts; one of tlie thirteen (original States. An Indian word, meaning "at 
or near the great hills." According to other authorities, "tlie hill in the shape 
of an arrow head," "great hill mouth," "the ])lue hills." 

Massapeag; village in New London County, Connecticut. An Indian word, mea»i- 
ing "great water land." 

Massena; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Andre INIassena, a 
marshal of France. 

Massillon; city in Ohio, named for Jean Baptiste JNIassillion, a celebrated French 
divine. 

Masten; village in Kent (_'ounty, Delaware, named for William Masten, an early 
settler. 

Masthope; town in Pike County, Pennsylvania. A corruption of the Indian 
mashapi, meaning " beads of glass. ' ' 

Matagoodus ; triliutary of the Penobscot River in Maine. An Indian word mean- 
ing "meadow ground." 

Matagorda; county, and village in same county, in Texas. A Si)anisli word mean- 
ing " thick brush." 

Matamoras; village in Pike County, Pennsylvania. A Spanish word meaning 
" Moor slayer." 

Matanaucook; branch of the I'enobscot in INIaine. An Indian word meaning 
" place of bad lands." 

Matawan; town in Monmouth County, New Jersey. An Indian word to which 
various meanings are ascribed, among them " magician," " charmed skin," " it 
arrives in a lake. ' ' 

Mathews; county in Virginia, named for Gen. George Mathews, an officer of the 
Revolution and governor of (Teorgia. 

Matoaca; village in Chesterfield County, Virginia. The original name of the 
Indian princess, Pocahontas, for whom it is named. 

Mattahumkeag; lake in Maine. An Indian word meaning "sand creek jiond." 

Mattapan; station in Boston, Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning "sitting- 
down place." 

Mattapoisett; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. An Indian word given 
various meanings, "at the great rivulet," "a place of rest," "a place unfavor- 
able for the passage or shelter of canoes. ' ' 

Mattaponi; river in Virginia. The name said by one authority to be formed by 
the names of four streams which join, the Mat, Te, Po, and the Ny; another 
states that it is a corruption of the Indian word mattachpona, " no bread at all," 
and still another of the word mattapan, meaning " he sits down." 



(;,\nm:tt.1 PLAC^E NAMES IN THE UNITED STATl'^K. l75 

Mattawamkeag; river iuul :i town in l'c'nol)gcot County, Maine, An Indian wdnl 

meaning "down a istreain w liicli empties into the main river." 
Matte awan; stream and viihiiic in Dutchess County, New York, whicii in early 

days was noted for its jK'itrie, iu'iice tiie Indian name nieanini^^ " ^ood fur," or 

"eharmed, eneiianted skin." 
Matthews; town in Mecklenhurii ( Vjunty, North Carolina, named for a |)romiuent 

resident. 
Mattison; viUage in Cook County, Illinois, named forCii'orue Joel Aldridi Mattison. 
Mattituck; village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian wor<l, meaning "plaee 

without wood, or land not wooded." 
Mattoon; city in Coles County, Illinois, named for William Mattoon. 
Mauch Chunk; boiongh and river in Carbon (bounty, IVnnsylvania. An Indian 

word, meaning, according to different authorities, "on the mountain," or 

"bear's cave." 
Maumee; village in Lucas County, Ohio. From an Indian word, "omaumeeg," 

meaning "peoi)le who live on the peninsula." 
Maurepas; lake in Louisiana, Jiamed for Frederic l'hillii»eaux, Countdf Maurepas. 
Maurice; stream in New Jersey, named for the stadtholder of the United Dutch 

l^rovinces, INIaurice, Count of Nassau and Prince of Orange. 
Maury; county in Tennesst'e, named for Abram Maury. 
Maury; island in Washington, named for a naval otlicer. 
Mauston; city in Juneau County, Wisconsin, named for (ien. M. M. Maughs, former 

l)ro])rietor of the original village. 
Mauvaises Terres; tract on the White River, in North Dakota. A French name, 

meaning "bad lands." 
Maverick; county in Texas, named for Sanmel A. Maverick, a prominent early 

settlei-. 
Maxatawny; stream in U.erks County, Pennsylvania. From an Indian word, 

]\hichsit-hanna, meaning "bear's path stream." 
Maxwell; town in Colusa (/ounty, California, named for its fonnder. 
May; cape on the southern extremity of New Jersey, named for Cornelius Jacobson 

May, a Dutch navigator of the West Indian Company. 
Mayaimi; lake in Florida. An Indian word, meaning "very large watiM." 
Mayersville; town in ]ssa(piena County, Mississippi, named for David Aleyers, a 

lai'ge landowuei'. 
Mayesville; town in Sumter County, South Carolina, named for the ^hiyes family, 

prominent in the county. 
Mayodan; village in Kockingham County, North Carolina. A combination of the 

name of a prominent resident of Richmoml, Virginia, and of the river, Dan. 
Mays; creek in Micliigan, named for Judge May. 

Mays Landing; town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, named for Cornelius Jacob- 
son May, a Dutch navigator of the West Indian Comjjany. 
Maysville; city in Mason County, Kentucky, named for the original jirojirietor, 

John May. 
Maysville; village in Jones County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 
Mayville; village in Tuscola County, Michigan, named for the month of May. 
Mayville; city in Dodge County, Wisconsin, named for "Uncle" May, an early 

settler. 
Mazon; town in (Trundy County, Illinois. An Indian name, meaning "a kind of 

weed," which grew along a stream near the town. 
Meade; county in Kentucky, named for Capt. James Meade. ■ 
Meade; counties in Kansas and South Dakota, peak in Idaho, and city in same 

pounty in Kansas, named for Gen. George G. Meade. 



176 PLACE KAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Meadville; town in Franklin County, Mississippi, name<i for Cowles Meade, second 

secretary of the Territory. 
Meadville; city in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, named for Gen. David Mead, 

its founder. 
Meagher; county in Montana, named for Gen. Thomas P'rancis Meagher, a State 

official. 
Meares; cape in Washington, named for the explorer, John Meares. 
Mebane, town in Alamance County, North Carolina, named for Gen. Alexander 

Mebane. 
Mecca; town in Trund:)ull tlounty, <;)hio, named for the capital of Arabia. 
Mecklenburg; county in North Carolina, named for the Queen of George III, 

Charlotte of Mecklenburg. 
Mecklenburg; county in Virginia, named for the province in Germany. 
Medary; town in Brookings County, South Dakota, named for Samuel Medary, 

governor of Kansas Territory. 
Medfield; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. A contraction of its original 

name of Meadtield, given it on account of the l^eautiful meadows there. 
Mediapolis; town in Des Moines County, Iowa, so named because it is half way 

between Burlington and Washington. 
Medina; county and river in Texas, named for a Mexican-Spaniard, P. Medina, an 

early settler. 
Medo; village in Blue Earth C?ounty, Minnesota. The Indian name for a root which 

in appearance and taste resembles the sweet potato. 
Medora; town in Billings County, North Dakota, named for the wife of the Marquis 

de INIores. 
Meeker; town in Clear Creek County, Colorado, named for N. C. Meeker, of the 

New York Tribune. 
Meeker; county in Minnesota, named for Bradley Meeker, associate justice of the 

supreme court. 
Meherrin; river in Virginia. An Indian word, meaning "an island." 
Meigs; peak in Colorado, named for Gen. M. C. Meigs. 
Meigs; counties in Ohio and Tennessee, named for Col. Return J. Meigs. 
Melrose; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for the borough in 

Scotland. 
Melvern; city in Osage County, Kansas, named for Malvern Hills, Scotland. 
Memaloose; island in the Columbia River, near The Dalles, Oregon, so named 

because it was an Indian burial place, the word meaning "isle of the dead." 
Memphis; city in Shelljy County, Tennessee, so named because situated upon the 

river in a manner very similar to that of the t'ity in Egypt. 
Memphremagog; lake in Vermont. An Indian word, said to mean "beautiful 

water," "lake of abundance." 
Menan; island off Steuben Harbor, Maine. An Indian word, meaning "island." 
Menard; county in Illinois, named for Pierre Menard, a French pioneer. 
Menard; county in Texas, named for M. B. Menard, a prominent eai'ly settler. 
Menasha; city in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "a 

thorn." 
Mendham; town in Mason County, New Jersey, named for the town in England. 
Mendocino; county, and a cape in Humboldt County, California, named for Don 

Antonia de Mendoza, the viceroy of Mexico. 
Mendon; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named from the town of Mend- 
ham, England. 
Mendota; city in Lasalle County, Illinois, and village in Dakota County, Minne- 
sota. An Indian word, meaning "the mouth of a river." 
Mendoza; village in Caldwell County, Texas, named for Don Antonio de Mendoza, 

the viceroy of Mexico. 



GANNKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 177 

Menifee; county in Kentucky, named for Richard II. Menifee. 

Menoken; town in Shawnee County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaniui,' "itirrows 

well," "good growing place," "fortunate." 
Menominee; town in Jo Daviens County, Illinois, river, city, and county in Michi- 
gan, and city in Dunn County, Wisconsin. The Indian name for the wild rice 

which grew abundantly in these regions. 
Mentor; townshij) and village in Lake County, Ohio, named for Mento, the coun- 
selor of Telemachus. 
Mentz; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the city in Cermany. 
Mequon; river and township in Ozaukee County, AVisconsin. An Indian name, 

meaning "ladle," and given the river because a bend in the river resembles a 

paddle. 
Meramec; river in Missouri. A corruption of the Indian name which signifies 

"catfish river." 
Merced; county, and city in same county in California. A Spanish word, meaning 

"mercy." 
Mercer; counties in Illinoifi, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, 

and V\'est \'irginia, nanu'd ior General Hugh Mercer. 
Mercer; county in North Dakota, named for William Henry Harrison INIercer, an 

early ])ioneer and ranchman. 
Mercersburg-; borough in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, named for Cen. Hugh 

]\Iercer. 
Merchantville; borough in Camden County, New Jersey, named for the Merchant 

family. 
Meredith; town in Ikdknaii County, New Hampshire, named for a British nol)leman. 
Meredith; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Samuel Meredith, of 

Pennsylvania. 
Meredosia; town in Morgan County, Illinois. A corruption of the French name 

Marais d'Ogee, meaning "marsh of the pointed arch." 
Meriwether; county in (Georgia, iiame<l for David Meriwether, former mendjer of 

Congress from Georgia. 
Merom; town in Sullivan County, Indiana, named for the waters of Merom in 

Palestine. 
Merrill; "city in Lincoln County, Wisconsin, named for S. S. Merrill of the Wisconsin 

Central Railroad Company. 

IMerrimac; town in Essex County, INIassachusetts, and village in Sauk County, 
Wisconsin; 
Merrimack; river, county, and town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire. From 
the Indian, meaning "sturgeon," or " swift water." 
Mesa; comity in Colorado, so named liecause of its topographical situation; the name 

a Spanish one, meaning "elevated tal)le-land." 
Mesa Inclinado; plateau in western Colorado. The name Spanish and significant 

of its slope. 
Meshoppen; stream in Pennsylvania. An Indian name, meaning " glass l)eads," 

and given this stream because of the Iiarter of trinkets made upon its banks. 
Mesick; town in Wexford County, Michigan, named for its first settler. 
Mesilla; town in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. An Indian word, meaning 

"little table-land." 
Meskaskeeseehunk; branch of the Mattwamkeag River, Maine. An Indian word, 

meaning "little spruce brook." 
Mesongo; stream in Maryland. An Indian word, meaning "where we killed 

.l<'er." 
Mesqmte; village in Dallas County, Texas. The Spanish name for a tree of the 
locust family. 

Bull. 197— 0^ 12 



178 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Metamora; village in Woodford County, Illinois, named for the Indian chief who 
was the hero of Edwin Forrest's i)]ay. 

Metcalfe; county in Kentucky, named for Thomas Metcalfe, an early governor of 
the State. 

Metea; village in Cass County, Indiana, named for roltawattomie, an Indian chief; 
(ir possibly from meda or meta, which means "a lu'ophet or priest." 

Metuchen; l)orougli in Middlesex County, New Jersey, named for the chief of the 
Raritans. 

Metz; five villages in the United States bear the name of the town in Cermany. 

Mexia; town in Limestone County, Texas, named from Mexico. 

Mexico; city in Audrain County, Missouri. Named from the country, which is said 
to be derived from the Aztec word Mexitiii, the name of a tutelary divinity, but 
according to another authority meaning the " habitation of the god of war." 

Meyer; county in South Dakota, named for Fred Meyer, civil engineer and land 
surveyor. 

Meyersdale; borough in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, named for an early 
settler. 

Miami; counties in Indiana, Kansas, and Ohio, cities in Dade County, Floii<la, and 
Saline County, Missouri, town in Ottawa Keservatiun, Indian Territory, and 
rivers in Florida and Ohio. The French orthography of the Indian word 
"Maumee," meaning "mother;" or, according to another authority, "pigeon." 

Mianus; village and river in Fairfield County, Connecticut. A corruption of the 
name of the Indian chief Mayanno, meaning " he who gathers together." 

Micanopy; town in Alachua County, Florida, named for a chief of the Seminole 
Indians, whose name signifies "chief of chiefs." 

Michaux; town in Powhatan County, Virginia. An Indian woid, meaning "great." 

Michigamme; village in Marquette County, Michigan. An Indian word, meaning 
" large lake." 

Michigan; lake and State in the United States. An Indian word, said by some to 
mean "l)ig lake;" by others, "place for catching fish." 

Middleboro; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, so named l^ecause it was 
situated between the Pilgrim settlement at Plymouth and the village of the 
Indian sachem, INIassasoit, near Bristol, Rhode Island. 

Middleburg; town in Vance County, North Carolina, so name<l because it is the 
middlt' j)oint between two rivers. 

Middlebury; town in Addison County, Vermont, so named because it was the cen- 
tral of three towns surveyed sinuiltaneously. 

Middlegrove; town in Monroe County, Missouri, so named l)ecause it is midway 
between the Big Muddy and Mississip})i rivers. 

Middleport; village in Niagara County, New York, so named on account of its sit- 
uation on tlie canal half way between Albion and Lockj)ort. 

Middlesex; many places in the United States have been named for the county in 
Kngland, among them being counties in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, 
ami Virginia. 

Midland; county in Michigan, so named because of its situation in the east-central 
portion of the southern peninsula. 

Midlothian; town in Chesterfield County, Virginia, named for the county in 
Scotland. 

Mifflin; county in Pennsylvania, named for a former governor. 

Milam; county in Texas, named for Benjamin R. Milam, an early settler and distin- 
guished Indian fighter. 

Milan; name of many places in the United States, transferred from Italy. 

Mlburn; town in Ballard C'ounty, Kentucky, named for William Milburn. 

Miles; city in Jackson County, Iowa, named for the man who laid it out. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 179 

Miles; city in Custer (/oniity, Montana, named for Gen. Nelson A. Miles. 
Milesburg; borough in Center County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, Col. 

Samuel Miles. 
Milford; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, so naiiK'il mi account of the 

many mills erected upon Mill l\iver. 
Milford; town in llillslxjro County, New IIam])siiirc, named fur the town in England. 
Milk; liver in Montana, so named because of its whitish ai){)earaiicc. 
Millard; coimty in Utah, named for Millard Fillmore. 

Millard; village in Douglas County, Nebraska, named for Ezra Millard, its founder. 
Millbury; town in AVorcester County, Massachusetts, so named because the Black- 
stone River at this point is the site of many mills. 
Milledgeville; city in Georgia, named for John Milledge, an early governor of the 

State. 
Millelacs; lake and county in ^Minnesota. From the Fren«'h, mille lacs, meaning 

"thousand lakes." 
Miller; county in Arkansas, named for James JNIiller, former governor of the State. 
Miller; county in Georgia, named for a distinguished citizen of the State, Andrew 

J. Miller. 
Miller; county in Missouri, named for John Miller, a former governor. 
Miller; village in Knox County, Nebraska, named for the first settler, Cajjt. J. ]M. 

Miller. 
Miller; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for an early pioneer. 
Millerplace; village in Suffolk County, New York, named for Andrew Miller, the 

son of an early pioneer of Easthampton. 
Millersburg-; town in Callaway County, Missouri, named for Thomas ^liller, an 

early settler. 
Millersburg; village in Holmes County, Ohio, named for Charles Miller, its founder. 
Millersburg; bon)Ugh in l)aui)hin County, Pennsylvania, named for Daniel Miller, 

its founder. 
Millerstown; borough in Perry County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, 

David Miller. 
Millerton; town in Dutchess County, New York, named from Samuel (t. Miller, one 

of the contractors and builders of the extension of tlie New Y(jrk and Harlem 

Railroad from Dover Plains to Chatham. 
Millinocket; lake on the Penobscot River, Maine. An Indian word, meaning 

"place full of islands." 
Mills; county in Iowa, named foi- ]Major ^Mills, of the State. 
Mills; county in Texas, named for John S. Mills, jiroujinent in law and politics of 

the State. 
Millsfield; town in C'oos County, New Hampshire, named for Sir Thomas Mills. 
Millstone; borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, probably so named for the 

stone found there which is suitable for milling jiurposes. 
Milltown; borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, so named because of the 

number of mills located there. 
Mile; towns in Piscataipiis County, Maine, and Yates County, New York, named for 

the (ireek island. 
Milton; county in Georgia, named for Homer V. Milton. 
Milton; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, so named because of the number of 

mills operating on the Neponset at this point. 
Milton; towns in Ulster County, New York; Chittenden County, Vermont, and 

Cabell County, West Virginia; village in Caswell County, North Carolina; named 

for John Milton, the poet. 
Miltonvale; city in Cloud County, Kansas, named for Milton Tootle, of St. Josejili, 

the former owner of the town site. 



180 PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. [buu.. 197. 

Milwaukee; rounty and city in Wisconsin, the name said to have been derived from 

the Indian word Milioke, which means "good earth" or ''good comitry." 
Mimbres; river and mountains in New Mexico. A Spanish word, meaning "the 

willows." 
Mine; river in Missouri. A contraction of the original French name, Riviere a la 

Mine. 
Miner; county in South Dakota, named for Capt. Nelson Miner and Mr. Ephriam 

Miner, who were mendjers of the legislature which created the county. 

I Mineral; counties in Colorado and West Virginia; 
Mineral Point; city in Iowa County, Wisconsin. So named on account of tlie 
abundance of ore in the vicinity. 
Minersville; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, so named l)ecause it is 

the center of the coal fields. 
Minerva; towns in Stark County, Ohio, and Essex County, New York, named for 

the goddess of wisdom. 
Mingo; count}" in West Virginia and village in Jefferson County, Ohio, named for 

an Indian tribe, the name said to signify "spring i)eople." 
Minisink; town in Orange County, New York. An Indian name said by some to 

mean "islanders;" V)y others, " home of the Minsies." 
Minneapolis; cities in Ottawa County, Kansas, and Hennepin County, Minnesota. 

A combination of the Indian word, minni, "water," and the Greek word, polis, 

"city." 
Minnehaha; county in South Dakota, and celelirated falls in liennei)in County, 

^Nlinnesuta. An Indian word, meaning " laughing water." 
Minneiska; stream, and a village in Wabasha County, Minnes(jta. An Indian word, 

meaning "clear water." 
Minnequa; village and sunnner resort in Bradford C'ounty, Pennsylvania. An 

Indian word, meaning "to drink." 
Minnesota; State in the Union. An Indian word, meaning " nmch water" or 

"cloudy water." 
Minnetonka; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word with various meanings ascribed 

to it, such as "big water," "great water," "pond of water," or "lake." 
Minnicotta; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "warm water." 
Minniwakan; lake in North Dakota. An Indian word, meaning "spiiit water." 
Minonk; city in Woodford County, Illinois. An Indian word, given various mean- 
ings, such as "an island," "star," "place or locality." 
Minooka; village in Orundy County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "maple 

forest," or "good earth." 
Minor; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for Isaac Minor." 
Minot; town in Androscoggin County, Maine, named for Judge Minot, a member of 

the general court. 
Minto; village in Marion County, Oregon, named for John Minto, an early pioneer. 
Minturn; village in Madera County, California, named for Jonas Minturn, an old 

settler. 
Mirabile; town in Caldwell County, Missouri. A Latin word, meaning "won- 
derful." 
Mishawaka; town in St. Josei)h (_'ounty, Indiana, jir<)])ably named for the Indian 

chief, Mishiniwaka. 
Mispan; branch of the Delaware River. An Indian word, meaning "raccoon." 
Missaukee; ('(nmty in Michigan, probably named from the Indian tribe, Missis- 

sauga, which means " people of the wide mouth river." 
Missionary; ridge extending along the northeast border of Oeorgia, so called because 

Roman Catholic missions were established there at an early date. 



GANxVETT] PLACE namp:s in the united states. 181 

Missisquoi ; river in W'lnioiit. An Indian word, nie;uiin<j "tin- l)i<j; woman." 
Mississinewa; river in Indiana. An Indian word, meaning; "river of <;reat stoneH." 
Mississippi; state of tiie Union, connties in Ari<an«is and Missouri, and river, one 

of the largest in the United States. An Indian word, meaning "great water" 

or "gathering in of all the waters," and "an almost endle.ss river spread out." 
Missoula; county, river, and city in Montana. Tiie name said to mean the same 

as INIissouri, "nuiddy water." 
Missouri; state and river in the United States. The meaning as al)ove. 
Mitchell; town in Eagle County, C\)iorado, named for ( Jeorge H. Mit(-heli, a noted 

resident of (iilpin C^ounty. 
Mitchell; county in Georgia, named for David i'>radie ^Mitchell, governor of the 

Statt> in early days. 
Mitchell; county and town in Iowa, named for John Mitchell, the Irish ])atriot. 
Mitchell; county in Kansas, named for Gen. William I). Mitchi'll. 
Mitchell; county in North Carolina, named for Elisha JMitchell. 
Mitchell; town in Wheeler County, Oregon, named for Senator John II. Mitchell. 
Mitchell; county in Texas, nanie<l for the brothers A. and V,. Mitchell, prominent 

Texans of early days. 
Mitchells; peak in North Carolina, named for I'liislia Mitchell, who lost his life 

while making a survey of it. 
Mitchellville; town in Polk County, Iowa, named for Thomas Mitchell. 
Mitchigami; lake in northern Wisconsin. .\n Indian word, meaning "large lake." 
Moberly; city in Randolph County, Missouri, named for Col. William E. Moberly 

of Brunswick. 
Mobile; city, county, river, and bay in Alabama, said to have been named from 

Maubila, an Indian city in the vicinity. 
Mobjack; bay in Maryland, said to be so called Ijecause a pirate named .lack was 

mobl)ed and thrown overboard into this body of water. 
Moccasin; village in Etfingham County, Illinois. The Indian name for a shoe or 

covering for the foot. 
Mocksville; town in Davie County, North Carolina, named for the formei- ownc^rof 

the land. 
Modena; village in Ulster County, New York, named for a eity in Italy. 
Modoc; county in California, and towns in Edgefield County, South Carolina, and 

Randolph County, Indiana. An Indian word, meaning "the head of the river." 
Moffat; town in Saguache County, Colorado, named for D. H. Mc^ffat, late president 

of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad. 
Mogollon; plateau in Arizona and range of mountains in New Mexico. A Spanish 

woi'd, meaning "hanger-on, parasite." 
Mohave; county in Arizona, said to have been nametl for a tribe of Indians whose 

name was Ilanumkh-habi, "three hills." 
Mohawk; river, tovvnshij) and village in Herkimer Comity, New York, said by one 

authority to have been named for a tribe of Indians, the word meaning "eats 

what lives," indicating that they were cannibals; but another authority states 

tliat it is a corruption of Maijuaas, "nmskrat." 
Mohican; town and liver in Ashland County, Ohio, nami'd for the In<lian tribe, 

the word meaning " wolf." 
Moira; town in Eranklin County, New York, named for the Earl of Moira. 
Mokane; vdlage in Callaway County, Missouri, on the Missouri, Kan.sas and Eastern 

Railroad, the name l)eing formed of a combination of the first letters of these 

names. 
Mokelumne; river in Califowiia. A corruption of the Indian name, Wakalumni, 

meaning " river." 



182 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Mokena; village in Will County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "turtle." 
Molino; several towns and villages in the United States. A Spanish word, some- 
times written "moline," meaning "mill." 
Molunkus; river and plantation in Aroostook County, Maine. An Indian word, 

meaning "a short stretch of high land on a small stream." 
Monadnock; mountain in New Hampshire. An Indian word, meaning "spirit 

place," or, possibly, "bad," as signifying the difficulty of the ascent. Another 

authority gives the interpretation "at the silver mountain." 
Monaghan; township in York County, Pennsylvania, named for the county in 

Ireland. 
Mondamin; town in Harrison County, Iowa. An Indian w(ird, meaning "corn" 

or " cornfield." 
Monee; village in Will County, Illinois, named for the wife of an Indian trader, 

Joseph Bailes, the name being the Indian corruption of the English baptismal 

name of Mary. 
Monhegan; island in Lincoln County, Maine. An Indian word, meaning "grand 

island." 
Moniteau; county and creek in Missouri, so named bj' the Indians because of the 

painted figure of a man upon a rock in tlie vicinity, the word in their language 

meaning "spirit." 
Monks Corner; ti)wn in Berkeley County, South Carolina, named for Thomas Monk, 

a j)rominent colonial settler. 
Monmouth; town in Kenneliec County, Maine, named from the battle of Monmouth, 

New Jersey. 
Monmouth; county in New Jersey, named for Monmouthshire, England. 
Mono; county and lake in California. A Spanish word, meaning "pretty," "nice." 
Monocacy; river in Maryland, and creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian word 

meaning "stream containing many large bends." 
Monongah; town in Marion t'ounty. West Virginia. An a1)l)reviation of the names 

of Monongahela River and Monongalia County. 
Monongalia; county in West Virginia. A Latinized form of the Indian word 

Monongahela. 
Monroe; many places in the United States named for its fifth President, James 

Monroe; among them counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, 

Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, Ohio, 

Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin; city in Walton County, 

Georgia; town in Waldo County, Maine; village in Orange County, New York; 

fort at Old Point Comfort, Virginia, and mountain in New Hampshire. 
Monroe City; town in Knox County, Indiana, named for Monroe Alton, its founder. 
Monroeville; village in Salem County, New Jersey, named for S. T. Monroe, min- 
ister of an early church. 
Monrovia; village in Morgan County, Indiana, the name being a variati(jn of the 

name of the township in which it is located. 
Monsey; village in Rockland County, New York. A corrujition of the Indian, 

Minsi, meaning "wolf."' 
Monson; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named for John, the second 

Lord Monson. 
Montague; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Capt. William 

Montague. 
Montague; town in Lewis County, New York, named for the daughter of H. B. 

Pierrepont. 
Montague; county in Texas, named for Daniel Moi>tague. 
Montana; State in the Union. A Latin word, meaning "mountainous region," 

and applicable to this State on account of the nature of its topography. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMP:s IT^ the ITNITEJ) STATES. 183 

Montauk; licaillaiid at the cxlrciiic eastern |Miiiit ni l.ont;- Island, New \'()rk. A 

corniiitinn '>i tlie Indian, Minnawtawkit. iiieaiiiim "island |)lare,'" or ''in the 

island cduntiy." 
Montcalm; (•(Hinty in Mii-hifjan, luiined lor (ieneral Montcalm. 
Montclair; town in Kswx Conntv, New .Tersi'v, named from "('leai' Monntain." 
Monte Diablo; monntain in California. A S[)anisli name, nieam'nL;' "monntain of 

the <levil." 
Monterey; eonnty, an<l rity in same county, in California, named for Count de 

IMonterey, viceroy of Mexico. 
Monterey; town in Berkshire County, Massaclnisctts, named for a hattle in tlie 

jMexicun war. 
Montezuma; county, and town in Summit County, ( 'olorado, name<l for the 

Emperor of IMexico. 
Montgomery; many counties and town^inthe I'nited States, named forCen. Richard 

Montgomery, who was killed in the assault on Quehec. Aint)ng these are coun- 
ties in Arkansas, (Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, 

Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, i'ennsylvania, and 

Virginia, and village in Orange Comity, New York. 
Montgomery; county in Alal)ama, named for Lieut. lyemuel !'. Montgomery, of 

^lontgomery, Alabama. 
Montgomery; town in Daviess County, Indiana, named for N'ulentint- B. ]\Iontgom- 

ery, its founder. 
Montgomery; county in Tennessee, named for C'ol. John ^Montgomery. 
Montgomery; county in Texas, named for Gen. James Montgomery. 
Monticello; many jilaces in the United States, among them the towns in Jasper 

County, Georgia, and Lawrence County. Mississippi, and village in Sullivan 

County, New York, named for the home of Thomas .leffersou in .Mbemarle 

County, Virginia. 
Montour; county, ridge, and a bor(^ugh in Lycoming County, in Bennsylvania, named 

for ]\Iadame Montour, an early French settler fi-oni (iucbec. 
Montpelier; city, the capital of Vermont, named from the city in France. 
Montrose; county, and town in same county in Colorado, named for Sir Walter 

Scott's legend of " Montrose." 
Montrose; village in (ienesee County, New York, named from the town in ScotlancL 
Montrose; borough in Susquehamia County, IVnnsyhania, named for Dr. Robert II. 

Rose. 
Moodus; village in ^liddlesex County, Connecticut. A contraction of the Indian, 

Machemoodus, meaning "place of noises." 
Moody; county in South Dakota, named tor Gideon G. Moody, United States Senator. 
Mooers; town and village in Clinton County, New York, named for (ien. I'enjamin 

Mothers. 
Moore; county in North C'arolina, named for Alfred INbiore, an associate justice of 

the United States. 
Moore; county in Tennessee, named for Gen. William Moore, ))roinintMit nu^mlier 

of the general assembly of the State. 
Moore; county in Texas, named for Fj. W. Moore, cominodore of the Texas navy. 
Moorefield; town in Hardy County, West Virginia, named for Conrad Moore. 
Mooresville; town in Morgan County, Indiana, named for Sanmel Moore, its 

founder. 
Mooresville; town in Livingston Comity, Missouri, named for its founder, W. B. 

Moore. 
Moorhead; city in Clay County, Minnesota, named for (ien. .1. K. Moorhead of 

Pittsburg, I'ennsylvania. 



184 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull, 197. 

Moorhead; town in Custer Count y, IMontuna, named lor W. (i. Moorehead of the 
Nortliern Padlic Railroad. 

Moosabec; lij^ht-house on the coast of Maine. An Indian word, nieanin*;; "tlie 
haid pond place." 

Moose; river and plantation in Somerset County, Maine. Derivation of the Indian 
word INIoosoa, "wood eaters." 

Moose; stream in Pennsylvania. Derived from tlie Indian word Chinklacamoose, 
meaning "it almost joins," and a])plica])le to this river hccauHc lliere is a horse- 
shoe bend in it where the extremities almost meet. 

Mooselookmeguntic; lake in Maine. An Indian word, meaning "where the hunt- 
ers watch the moose at night." 

Moosup; river and village in Windham County, C'onnecticut, named for the Indian 
sachem, Mau.ssup. 

Mora; county in New Mexico. The Spanish name f(^r raspberries. 

Moran; city in Allen County, Kansas, named for Daniel Comyan ^loran, a capitalist. 

Moran; mountain in the Teton Range, Wyoming, named for Thomas Moran, tlie 
artist. 

Moravia; town in Cayuga (bounty. New York, named for the province in Austria. 

Moreau; river in Missouri. A French word, signifying "extremely well." 

Moreau; town in Saratoga County, New York, named for Marshall Moreau, of 
France. 

Morehead; town in Rowan County, Kentucky, named for Gov. James T. Morehead. 

Morehead; town in Carteret County, North Carolina, named for John M. Morehead, 
former governor of tlie State. 

Morehouse; jiai-ish in Louisiana, named for tlie man wlio o})taine(l the grant from 
Baron P)astrop, 17(U. 

Morehouse; town in Hamilton County, New York, named for the first settler. 

Moresville; village in Delaware County, New York, named for the first settler. 

Morgan; counties in Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Ten- 
nessee, and West Virginia, nameil for Gen. Daniel Morgan, an officer in the 
Revolution. 

Morgan; county in Colorado, name<l for Col. Christopher A. INIorgau. of the Colo- 
rado Volunteers. 

Morgan; town in Orleans County, Vermont, named for John IMorgan, an original 
j)roprietor. 

(Morganfield; city in Union County, Kentucky; 
Morganton; town in Burke County, North Carolina. Named for Gen. Daniel Mor- 
gan, an officer of the Revolution. 

Morgantown; town in Monongalia County, AV est Virginia, named for <Ten. Zacquell 
Morgan, the original owner of the land. 

Morganville; city in Clay County, Kansas, named for its founder. El )enezer Morgan. 

Moriah; townshij) in Essex County, New York, and peak in the White Mountains, 
New Hampshire, named for the district in Palestine. 

Morrill; city in Brown County, Kansas, named for Governor E. N. Morrill. 

Morrill; town in Waldo County, Maine, named for Anson P. Morrill, former gover- 
nor of the State. 

Morrillton; city in Conway County, Arkansas, named for the early j)ioneers, E. J. 
and George H. Morrill. 

Morris; county in Kansas, named for Thomas Morris, United States Senator from 
Ohio. 

Morris; county in New Jersey, named for Lewis Morris. 

Morris; county in Texas, named for W. W. Morris. 

Morrison; town in Jefferson County, Colorado, named from the Morrison Stone and 
Lime Comj)any. 



GANNF.TT.J PLATE NAMES IN THE TTNTTED STATES. 185 

Morrison; nmiity in .Minnesota, pmhahly nanit'd for William Morrison, the lii'st 

white man to discover the Hourees of the, Mississippi. 
[Morissania; villa(i;e and township in Westchester (bunty, New York; 
Morristown; town in Morris (Vmnty, New Jersey. Named fon Lewis ]\Iorris, an 

American statesman. 
Morristo-wn; vilhiije in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for tlie [irincipal 

pro]irietoi'. 
Morrisville; villa<2;e in INhidison ('omily, New York, nameil for a fan^ily of earl)' 

settlers. 
Morrisville; viilat,'!- in Wake County, North Carolina, name<l for the owner of the 

land. 
Morrisville; borough in Bui'ks County, Pennsylvania, named for Robert INIorris, 

the financier, who formerly resided there. 
Morrow; county in Oregon, and town in Nez Perces ('ounty, Idaho, name<l for 

(ien. Henry A. ]\Iorrow. 
Morrow; t'ounty in Ohio, and village in Warren County, same State, named for 

(xovernor Jeremiah jNIorrow. 
Morton; counties in Kansas aiul North Dakota, named for Oliver P. Mortoii, United 

States Senator from Indiana. 
Morton; village in Scott County, Missi.ssii^pi, given tlie maiden name of the wife of 

Col. 1^:. W. Taylor. 
Morven; town in Anson (Vmnty, North Carolina, named f<ir the mountain in Scot- 
land. 
Moscow; many towns and villages in the United States, named for the city in Russia, 

among them being the town in Somerset County, Maine. 
Moshannon; creek iu Pennsylvania. A corruption of an Indian word meaning 

"elk creek." 
Mosinee; village in ]\IarathoTi County, Wisconsin. Derived from the Indian word 

meaning ''moose." 
Motley; county in Texas, named for Dr. AVilliam ]Motley, one of the signers of the 

Declaration of Independence. 
Moulton; town in Appanoose County, Iowa, named for an engineer on the Chicago, 

Burlington and Quinoy Railroad. 
Moultonboro; town in Carroll County, New IIanii)shire, named for Col. Jonathan 

Moulton, one of the first settlers. 
(Moultrie; county in Illinois, and foi-tification on Sullivan Island, in Charleston 

Haibor, South Ca?'f)lina; 
Moultrieville ; town in Charleston (bounty. South Carolina. Named for (ien. Wil- 
I Ham ^Moultrie. 
Mound; city in Linn County, ridge in McPherson County, and valley in Labette 

County, Kansas, so named on account of the topography of the country. 
Mound Bayou; town in Bolivar County, Mississippi, named for the Indian mounds 

on the l)ayou. 
Moundsville; city in Marshall County, West Virginia, so named ))ecausethe largest 

mound of the mound builders is situated here. 
Mount Carmel; many towns and villages in the ITnited States are named for the 

mountain in Palestine. 
Mount Clemens; city in Macomb County, Michigan, named for Judge Clemens, its 

founder. 
Mount Gilead; town in Montgomery County, North Carolina, named from a coun- 
try church. 
Mount Morris; town in Livingston County, New York, named for Mr. Thomas 

Morris, of Philadelphia. 



186 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Mount Vernon; residence of Gen. Georsje Washington, and eity in Lawrenee 

County, Missouri, named for tlie foregoing, wliicli was originally built by Law- 
rence Washington for Admiral Vernon, for whom it was named. 
Movestar; stream in Illinois. A corruption of the French, Mauvaise Terre, "bad 

land." 
Moweaqua; village in Shelby County, Illinois, named from the Indian, which is 

given the various meanings of " weeping woman," "wolf woman," "woman of 

the wolf token." 
Mower; county in Minnesota, named for J. E. Mower, a member of the Council. 
Muhlenberg; county in Kentucky, named for (len. J. P. (i. Muhlenberg, an officer 

of the revolutionary war. 
Muir; village in Ionia County, Michigan, named for \V. K. Muir, superintendent of 

the Detroit and Mackinac Railway. 
Mullan; town in Shoshone County, Idaho, named for Lieut. Joiin Mullan. 
Mullins; town in Marion County, South Carolina, named for tlie Mullin family, 

pidiniiieiit in that country. 
Multnomah; county in Oregon. An Indian word, meaning "down river." 
Mulvane; city in Sumner County, Kansas, named for John R. Mulvane, of Tojieka, 

Kansas. 
Muncie; city in Delaware County, Indiana, and village in Vermilion County, Illi- 
nois, named from the Indian tribe, the word meaning "death," given to them 

on account of an epidemic of smallpox which nearly exterminated the tiibe. 
Mundy; township in Genesee County, Michigan, named for Edward Mundy, former 

lieutenant-go vernnr of the State. 
Munfordville; town in Hart County, Kentucky, named for Richard 1. ^Munfoid, 

former proi)rietor. 
Munising; village in Alger Comity, Michigan. A corrui)tion of the Indian word 

miniss, "island." 
Munnsville; villagt' in Madison County, New York, named for Asa Munn, the first 

storekeeper in the place. 
Murder; creek in Genesee County, New York, so named because the body of a 

man who was supposed to have been murdered was found in the stream. 
Murfreesboro; city in Rutherford County, Tennessee, and town in Hertford t'ounty, 

North Carolina, named for Col. Hardy Murfree, an officer of tlie Revolution. 
Murphy; town in Calaveras County, California, named for a pioneer miner. 
Murphy; town in Cherokee County, North Dakota, named for A. D. Murphy, a 

judge of the superior court. 
Murray; county in Georgia, named for Thomas W. INIurray, former member of the 

legislature. 
Murray; city in Callaway County, Kentucky, named for Hon. John L. Murray, 

member of Congress. 
Murray; county in Minnesota, named for Hon. W. P. Murray, jirominent State 

politician. 
Murrieta; town in Riverside County, California, named for a former proprietor of 

a large tract of land, J. Murrieta. 
Muscackituck; river in Indiana. An Indian word, meaning "pond river," and so 

named because of the niafiy stagnant ponds upon its banks. 
Muscatine; county and city in same county in Iowa, probably derived from the 

Indian and meaning "dweller in the prairie," but according to another theory 

derived from the French and Indian, Musquota, " prairie," and tine, a diminutive. 
Muscle Shoals; series of rapids in the Tennessee River in northern Alabama, so 

named because of the great number of mussels found there. 
Muscoda; village in Grand County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning "a prairie" 

or "grassy plain." 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 187 

Muscog-ee; county in Georgia and town in Creek Nation, Indian Territory, named 
for a tribe of Indians of the Creeli confederacy, whose name means "wanderer." 

Musconetcong; river in New Jersey. Indian word, meaning "rapid stream." 

Muscotah; city in Atchison County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning "beauti- 
ful prairie" or "prairie of tire." 

Music; peak in the Rocky IMountains in Arizona, so named becausi' of its resem- 
blance to a big piece of nnisic. 

Muskeego; lake, river, and township in Waukesha ("ounty, Wisconsin. An Indian 
word, meaning "place of cranberries." 

Muskegon; county, and city in same county in Michigan. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "marshy waters." 

Muskingum; river and county in Ohio. An Indian word, meaning "moose-eye 
river," so called because of the nund)er of moose and elk which inhabited the 
country. 

Musquacook; cluiin of lakes in .Maine. .\n Indian word, meaning "birch bark 
])lace." 

Mustang; stream in Texas. A S]>anish word, meaning "wild horse of the prairie," 
herds of wild hor.ses having been abundant in Texas at an early date. 

Muttonville; village in Ontario County, New York, so named l)ecause of the estab- 
lishment of a tallow chandlery there. 

Myerstown; village in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, 
Isaac Myers. 

Myrtle; village in Union County, Mississippi, so called because of the abun^dance of 
myrtle trees in the vicinity. 

Mystic; river and village in New London County, Connecticut, and river in Massa- 
chusetts. From the Indian, missi, "great," and tuk, "tidal river;" hence "the 
great river." 

Nacooche; town and valley in White County, Georgia. An Indian name, meaning 
"evening star." 

Nahant; town and watering place in Essex County, Massachusetts. According to 
different authorities an Indian word, meaning "at the point," or "two things 
united," the latter jneaning given because the town is formed of two islands con- 
nected by a beach. 

Nahma; town in Delta County, Michigan, on Sturgeon River. The Indian name for 
sturgeon. 

Naiwa; tributary of the Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning "copper snake 
river." 

Namekagon; lake in Wisconsin. Derived from the Indian, nania, "sturgeon," 
signifying "a place where sturgeons are plenty." 

Nameoki; town in Madison County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "fishing 
place," or "place of tish." 

Nance; county in Nebraska, named for All)inus Nance. 

Nansemond; river and county in Virginia. Said to l)e derived from the Indian, 
Neunschimend, "whence we fled," or " whence we were driven off." 

Nantahala; rivers in Georgia, and Macon County, North Carolina. An Indian 
word, meaning " maiden's bosom." 

Nanticoke; town in Broome County, New York, borough in Luzerne County, Penn- 
sylvania, and mountain in the same State, and river in Delaware, named for the 
Indian tribe, the w'ord meaning "tidewater people." 

Nantucket; island and county in Massachusetts. This name appeared upon the 
maps in 1630 as Natocko, and some authorities state that it is derived from an 
Indian word, meaning "far away;" others say that its present form is a direct 
derivation of the Indian, Nantnck, which means that the sandy, sterile soil 
tempted no one. 



188 PLACE NAMES IKL THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Napa; county, and city in same county, in California. Said to be an Indian word, 

meaning "city," or "liouse." 
Narka; city in Kepublican County, Kansas, named for the dauo:hter of a railroad 

otiicial; the name of Indian derivation. 
Narragansett; summer resort in Washington County, Rhode I.sland. An angliciza- 

tion of the Indian name of a tribe, which in their language means, " peoj»le of 

the point." 
Nash; county in North Carolina, named for General Francis Nash. 
Nashota; town in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. An Indian word which, in the 

Algonquin and Dakota languages, means, respectively, "the twins," or "kicks 

np smoke." 
Nashua; city in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, and town in Chickasaw County, 

Iowa. An Indian word, meaning "the land between." 
Nashville; town in Nash County, North Carolina, a number of towns and a city in 

Davidson County, Tennessee, named for Gen. Francis Nash. 
Nashville; town in Holmes County, Ohio, probably named for Judge Simon 

Nash. 
Nassau; counties in Florida and New York and several towns in different States> 

named for tlie Duchy of Nassau in Germany. 
Natchaug; rivei' in Connecticut. Derived from an Indian word, meaning "land 

between," or "in the middle." 
Natchez; city in Adams County, Mississipisi, named for the Indian tribe, the word 

meaning "hurrying men," or "one running to war." 
Natick; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning "the 

j)lace of hills." 
Natrona; county in Wyoming. Derived from the Spanish, natron, meaning "native 

carlumate of soda," and given this county because of the sin-ings within its limits. 
Naubue; town in Hartford County, Connecticut. Said to be a corruption of the 

Indian, upauk, "Hooded," or "overtiowed." 
Naugatuck; i-iver and borough in New Haven County, Connecticut. Authorities 

differ as to the meaning of its Indian origin, giving l)oth "one tree," and "fork 

of the river." 
Nauvoo; city in Hancock County, Illinois, named in obedience to a "revelation" 

made to Joseph Smith, one of its Mormon founders. 
Navajo; county, and town in Apache County, Arizona, named for the Indian tribe, 

who are said to have been so named l)y the Spaniards, the word meaning a kind 

of clasj) knife, and as applied to the tribe signifying "a knife-whetting people." 
Navarre; village in Stark County, Ohio, named for the province in Spain. 
Navarro; county in Texas, named for Jose Antonio Navarro, a Mexican by birth, 

but a ])rominent Texas citizen. 
Navesink; village in Monmouth County, New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning 

"high land between waters." 
Navidad; village in Jackson County, Texas. Spanish word, meaning "Christmas 

Day." 
Nayattpoint; village in Bristol County, Rhode Island. Probably a corruption of 

tlie Indian, nayaug, meaning a "point" or "corner." 
Nazareth; borough in Northamjiton County, Pennsylvania, named for the Ijirth- 

place of Jesus Christ. 
Nebo; several towns and villages in the United States and a mountain in the Wasatch 

Range, IT tab, named for the mount in Palestine. 
Nebo; town in Hopkins County, Kentucky. An Indian word, meaning "dead." 
Nebraska; State and river in the United States. An Indian word, meaning "shal- 
low, or broad water." 
Necedah; village in Juneau County, Wisconsin. A corru}»tion of the Chippewa 

Indian, nissida, "let there be three of us." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IlSr THE UNITED STATES. 189 

Needham; town in Norfolk Connty, Massachusetts, named for the town in Pjigland. 
Needles; peaks of the Mojave Mountains in Cahfornia, so named on account of their 

pecuHarly sliarp and slender outlines. A station on the Atchison, Topeka and 

Santa Fe Railroad in California. 
Negaunee; city in Marquette County, Michigan. An Indian word, meaning "first," 

"ahead," "he goes before;" an effort to translate the English word "pioneer." 
Neillsville; city in Clark County, Wisconsin, named for a family of early settlers. 
Nelig-h; city in Antelojie County, Nebraska, named for Hon. John D. Neligh. 
Nelson; counties in Kentucky and Virginia, named for Thomas Nelson, governor 

of Virginia in 1781. 
Nelson; village in Nuckolls County, Nebraska, named for ('. Nelson Wheeler, who 

owned the town site. 
Nelson; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. N. E. Nelson, a jirominent 

pioneer settler. 
Nelsonville; town in rutnani County, New York, named for Elislia Nelson, who 

built the lirst house in the village. 
Nennescah; river in Kansas. An Indian word, meaning "good river." 
Neodesha; city in Wilson County, Kansas, at the junction of the Fall and \'erdigris 

rivers, and for this reason given the Indian name, which means "meeting of the 

waters." 
Neoga; village in Cuml)erland County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "the 

place of the Deit}'." 

I Neosho; river and county in Kansas and city in Newton County, Mi.ssouri; 
Neosho Falls; city in Woodson County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning " clear 
cold water." 

Nepaug; small stream in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning " waters," or 
"fresh pond." 

Nephi; city in Jual) Connty, Utah, named for the youngest son of Lelii, a character 
of the Book of Mormon. 

Neponset; village in Bureau County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning " he walks 
in his sleep." 

Neptune City; borough in Monmouth Connty, New Jersey, so named because of 
its location on the seaside. 

Nesbitt; town in De Soto County, Mississippi, named for early settlers. 

Nescopeck; creek and borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. An Indian 
word, meaning "deep and still water." 

Neshaminy; stream in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 
"a stream formed by the confluence of two branches." 

(Neshannock; stream and a village in Mercer County, Pennsylvania; 

•^ Neshannock Falls; village in I^awrence County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, 

I meaning " both streams," or "the streams making one by flowing together." 

Neshoba; county in ]Missi.«sippi. An Indian word, meaning "grey wolf." 

Nesowadnehunk; stream and mountains in Maine. An Indian name, meaning 
"stream among the mountains." 

Nesquehoning; stream and village in Carbon C'ounty, Pennsylvania. An Indian 
word, meaning "black lick." 

Ness; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Corpl. Noah V. Ness, 
of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry. 

Nesselroad; village in Jackson County, West Virginia, named for the flrst post- 
master. 

Nettle Carrier; creek and village in Overton County, Tennessee, named for a Chero- 
kee Indian of local note. 

Nettleton; towns in Caldwell County, Missouri, and Lee Connty, Mississippi, 
named for a former vice-president of the Kansas City, Memphis and Birming- 
ham Railroad. 



190 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Nevada; State of the Union, counties in Arkansas and California and mountains of 
tlie western coast. A Spanish word, meaning "snow clad, snowy land," 
originally applied to the snow-capped mountains. 

New; village in Oconto County, Wisconsin, named for Hon. John C. New, of 
Indianapolis. 

New Almaden; the most productive quicksilver mine in the United States, named 
for the mine in Spain. 

Newark; cities in Essex County, New Jersey, and Licking County, Ohio, and town 
in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for the town in England. 

Newaygo; county and village in same county in Michigan, named for an Indian 
chief. The name said to mean " much water." 

New Bedford; city in Bristol County, Massachusetts. The name of the owner of 
the town site being Russell, the family name of the Duke of Bedford. 

Newbern; city in Craven County, North Carolina, named for the town in Switzer- 
land. 

Newberry; mountain in California, named for Captain Newberry. 

Newberry; village in Luce County, Michigan, named for John A. Newberry, stock- 
holder in the Detroit, Mackinac and Marquette Railroad. 

Newberry; county and town in same county in South Carolina, said to have been 
named for a i^rominent resident family, or, according to another authority, for 
a cajitain in Sumter's State troops. 

New Braunfels; city in Comal County, Texas, named for. the town in Prussia. 

New Bremen; village in Auglaize County, Ohifi, named for the Duchy in Germany. 

New Brunswick; city in Middlesex County, New Jersey, incorporated in the time 
of and named for King George the Second, of the House of Brunswick. 

Newburg; city in Orange County, New York, named for the town in Scotland. 

I Newbury; town in Essex County, Massachusetts; 
Newburyport; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, originally a part of Newbury. 
Named for the town in England. 
Newcastle; several places in the United States, among them a town in Lincoln 

County, Maine, named for the town in England or for the Duke of Newcastle. 
New Egypt; village in Ocean County, New Jersey. The place so named because a 

great deal of corn was raised and ground at tlie mill there. 
Newfane; town in Windham County, Vermont, said to have been named for 

Thomas Fane, one of the "men of Kent." 
New Florence; city in Montgomery County, Missouri, named for the daughter of 

E. A. Lewis, an early settler, and given the prefix to distinguish it from another 

town of the same name in the State. 
New Geneva; village in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, named for the principal 

city of Switzerland. 
New Hamburg; village in Scott County, Missouri, named for the city in Germany. 
New Hampshire; one of the States of the Union, named for the county in England. 
New Hanover; county in North Carolina, named for tlie Duchy of Germany. 
New Harmony; town in Posey County, Indiana, settled by the "Harmonists," 

and named for their sect. 
New Haven; county, and town in same county, in Connecticut, settled by parties 

from Boston, who called it a "new haven." 
New Haven; town in Addison County, Vermont, named for town in Connecticut. 
New Iberia; town in Iberia Parish, Louisiana, given the ancient name of Spain 
Newicargut; river in Alaska. An Indian word, meaning "frog river." 
New Jersey; one of the States of the Union; originally a grant to Sir George Car- 
teret, who named it for his home on the Isle of Jersey, off the coast of England. 
New Kent; county in Virginia, and island in Chesapeake Bay, named forthe county 

in England. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 191 

New London; city and county in Connecticut, and town in Stanly (\)unty, North 

Carolina, named for the city in England. 
New Madrid: county and city in same county in Missouri, the land originally a 

grant to ( ieii. < ieorge Morgan from Spain and named by him for its i)rincipal city. 
New Marlboro; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

I\hissachusetts, which in turn was named for tlie county in England. 
New Mexico; Territory in the Union, natned for the country of INIexico. 
(Newman; city in Coweta County, (Georgia; 

JNewmanville; village in Alachua ('ounty, Florida. Named for (ien. Daniel New- 
man, an otiicer in the Seminole war. 
New Orleans; city in Orleans Varish, Louisiana, named for the city in France. 
Newport; county in Khode Island, and towns in C'arteret C-ounty, North Carolina, 

and Herkimer County, New York, named for the city of Newport, Rhode Island. 
Newport; city in Newport County, Rhode Island, so named by a ])arty of settlers 

from rortsmouth, who called it "a new port." 
Newport News; city in Warwick County, Virginia, named for ("apt. Christopher 

Newjiort and Ca])tain (or Sir William) Newce. 
New Rochelle; city in Westchester County, New York, named for the city in 

Fratice. 
New^ry; several places in the United States, among them the town in Oxford County, 

Maine, named for the town in Ireland. 
New Smyrna; town in Orange County, Florida, named for the native ])lace of the 

wife of Dr. Andrew TurnbuU, a colonist. 
Newton; county in Arkansas, named for Isaac Newton, who s])oke in opposition to 

secession at the meeting in Little Rock, iii 1861. 
Newton; counties in Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and Texas, and town in Baker 

County, Georgia, named for Sergt. John Newton, a Revolutionary officer. 
Newton; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, originally a part of Cand)ridge, 

and when separated called "new town," afterward contracted to "Newton." 
Newton; county in INIississippi, named for Sir Isaac Newton. 
New^ York; one of the States of the Union and a county in same State, nameil for 

the Duke of York, wIkj was the original grantee. 
Nez Perce; county in Idaho, town in same county, and river in Yellowstone Bark, 

named for a tribe of Indians, who were so named l)y the French settlers, the 

phra.«e meaning "pierced nose." 
Niagara; county in New York and river between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. An 

Indian word, meaning " across the neck or strait," or " at the neck." 
Niagara Falls; city in Niagara County, New York, named for the celebrated falls 

on the Niagara River. 
Niantic; river, village, and l)ay in New London County, Connecticut. An Indian 

word, meaning "at the point of land on a tidal river." 
Nicholas; county in Kentucky, named for Col. George Nicholas, a Revoluti(jnary 

officer. 
Nicholas; county in West Virginia, named for an early governor, ^^'. C. Nicholas. 
Nicholasville; city in Jessamine County, Kentucky, named for C'ol. George Nich- 
olas, a Revolutionary officer. 
Nicholai; village in Wasco County, Oregon, named for an early settler. 
Nicholville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for E. S. Nichols, 

an agent of the proprietor. 
Nickajack; a cave in Alabama, said to have been the headquarters of the leader of 

a band of negroes, who was called " Nigger Jack," of which the ])resent name 

is a corruption. 
Nickerson; city in Nickerson County, Kansas, nauied for Thomas Nickerson, an 

officer of the Atchison, To])eka and Santa Fe Railroad. 



192 PLACE NAMES FN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Nicollet; cuuntv and village in same ruunty in Minnesota, named for. Jean Nicholas 

Nicollet, a French explorer. 
Nicomanchee; very dark stream in Washington. An Indian word, meaning 

"shadowy water." 
Nigger Baby Hill; mining camp in Dolores County, Colorado, so named because 

of the large amount of black oxide of manganese found in the outcrop. 
Nilaks; mountain in Oregon. Derived from the Indian word, nilakshi, meaning 

" daybreak." 
Ninety-six; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, S(j nameil because it was 

96 miles from the Cherokee Indian trading town of Keowee. 
Nineveh; several towns and villages in the United States, named for the ancient 

Assyrian capital. 
Niobrara; river and a village in Knox County, Nebraska. An Indian word, mean- 
ing " broad or large water," or " running water." 
Nippenose; creek and valley in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning "like 

summer," or "where cold does not penetrate." 
Nishnabotna; river in Iowa, and village in Atchison County, Missouri. An Inchan 

word, meaning "canoe making river." 
Niskayuna; town in Schenectady County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 

"extensive corn flats." 
Niwot; village in Boulder County, Colorado. The Indian name for Left Hand 

Creek. 
Noank; village in New London County, Connecticut. Derived from the Indian 

word, nayang, "point of land." 
Noble; county in Indiana, named for Noah Noble, an early governor. 
Noble; county in Ohio, named for James Noble, an early settler. 
Noble; county in Oklahoma, named for Secretary of Interior John Noble. 
Nobles; county in Minnesota, named for'a prominent politician, William H. Nobles. 
Noblesboro; town in Lincoln County, ]\Iaine, named for James Noble, an early 

settler. 
Noblesville; city in Noble County, Indiana, named for Noah Noljle, an early 

governor. 
Nockamixon; village and township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, an Indian 

word, meaning " where there are three houses." 
Nodaway; county and river in Missouri. An Indian word witli a much disputed 

meaning, the following versions being among those given: "jump over river," 

"a kind of adder," or "a very venomous reptile." 
Nogales; town in Santa Cruz County, New Mexico. Derived from the Spanish 

word, nogal, meaning "conunon walnut tree." 
Nokomis; city in Montgomery County, Illinois, named for the mother of Wenonah 

in Longfellow's " Hiawatha," the Indian word meaning "grandmother." 
Nolan; county in Texas, named for Philip Nolan, a trader and Indian tighter in the 

early days of Texas. 
NordhoflF; town in Ventura County, California, named for Charles Nordhoff. 
Norfolk; counties in Massachusetts and Virginia, and cities in Madison County, 

Nebraska, and Norfolk County, Virginia, named for the county in England. 
Normal; town in McLean County, Illinois, so named because it is the seat of the 

State Normal School. 
Normans Kill; stream in New York, named for All^ert Andriessen Bradt de Nor- 
man, an early settler. 
Norridgewock; town in Somerset County, Maine. An Indian word, meaning 

"place of deer," or, according to another authority, "smooth water between 

falls." 
Norris; town within the corporate limits of Detroit, settled by and named for Coi. 

P. W. Norris. 



GANNETT} PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 193 

Norris; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for Philetus W. Norris, the second 
superintendent of the park. 

Norristown; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for Isaac Nor- 
ris, who jiurchased the land from William Penn. 

North; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for John F. Xoi-tli, its 
founder. 

Nor fchampton; counties in Pennsylvania and Virginia, an<l town iu Hampsliire 
county, Massacluisctts, named for the county in England. 

Northampton; county in North Carolina, named for the P>arl of Northamiiton. 

North Anna; river in Virginia, named for Anne, tineen of England. 

North Bend; city in Dodge County, Nebraska, so called because it is situated in the 
north bend of the Platte River. 

North Bend; village in Ohio, named for the l>cnd in the Ohio River at this point. 

North Carolina; one of the States of the Union, named for King Charles II of 
England. 

North Dansville; town in Livingston C'ounty, New York, named for Daniel P. 
Faulkner, an early settler. 

Northeast; town in Dutchess County, New York, so name t)ecause of its geographical 
jxisition in the county. 

Northfield; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, so called because of its north- 
ern situation in the county. 

North Hero; town in (irand Isle County, Vermont, nauied lor one of the two 
islands which were called "Two Heroes" and granted to lithan Allen, the 
intention being that they should be owned by only brave men warndy disposed 
toward the Revolution. 

Northport; characteristic name given to many places in the Uniteil States. 

Northumberland; many [places in the United States named for the county iu Eng- 
land, among them being the couuties in Pennsylvania and Virginia. 

North Webster; village in Kosciusko County, Indiana, named for Daniel Wel)ster. 

Norton; county and city in same county in Kansas, nauied for Capt. Orloff Norton, 
of the Fifteenth Kansas Cavalry. 

Norton; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 

Norton Sound; an inlet of Bering Sea on the coast of Alaska, named for Sir Fletcher 
Norton. 

Nortonville; city in Jefferson County, Kansas, named for E. Norton, jr., of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Comiiany. 

Norwalk; city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, said to have been so nametl because 
when purchased from tlie Indians the northern boundary was to extend north- 
ward from the sea one day's walk, according to the Indian marking of the dis- 
tance. According to another authority it is derived from nayang, "a point of 
land." 

Norwalk; town in Warren County, Iowa, and city in Huron ('ounty, Ohio, nauied 
from the above. 

Norway; towns in Herkimer County, New York, and Orangeburg County, South 
Carolina, named for the country in Europe. 

Norwich; city in New London County, Connecticut, and village in Chenango 
County, New York, named for the city in England. 

Norwich; village in Kingman County, Kansas, and town iu Hampshire County, 
^Massachusetts, named for the aliove. 

Norwood; several places in the United States, named for the town in England. 

Nottoway; river and county in N'^irginia, named for the Indian tribe, the word 
meaning "snake" — that is, an enemy. 

Novato; village and township iu INIarin County, California. A Spanish wonl, 
meaning "new," "commencing in anything." 

Bull. I'JT— 02 ly 



194 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Novo-Arkhang'elsk; seajvu-t of Alaska, name<l for the city in Russia. 

Noxubee; rouiity in Mississippi. An Indian word, meanini; "stinking water." 

Nuckolls; county in Nebraska, named for an early settler. 

Nueces; river and county in Texas. Derived from the S])anish word nuez, mean- 
ing "walnut." 

Nunda; town in Livingston County, New York, and village in McHenry County, 
Illinois. Said by some authorities to be derived from the Indian word nundao, 
"hilly," and b_y others to mean "potato ground." 

Nyack; village in Rockland County, New York, oi-iginally written Niack. An 
Indian word, meaning "a corner or point." 

Nye; county in Nevada, named for James W. Nye, the first governor of the Territory. 

Oahe; village in Hughes County, South Dakota. An Indian word, meaning "foun- 
dation. 

Oak; a prefix nuich used in combination with lodge, mont, park, point, ridge, sum- 
mit, ton, town, vale, and valley, and generally so given on account of the pre- 
ponderance of this sjiecies of tree. 

Oakham; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 

Oakland; city in Burt County, Nebraska, named for the man who purchased the 
town site from the original settler. 

Oakley; city in Logan Count}^, Kansas, named for Mrs. Eliza Oakley Gardner. 

Oakley; village in Saginaw County, Michigan, named for an early pioneer. 

Oatmans Flat; place in Arizona, so named because it was the scene of the massacre 
of Royce ( )atman and his family by the Apaches. 

Oberlin; village in Lorain County, Ohio, named foi' Jean Frederick Oberlin, a phi- 
lanthropist. 

O'Brien; county in Iowa, named for the Irish patriot, William Smith O'Brien. 

Ocala; city in Marion County, Florida, named for the Indian village, the word 
meaning "green," or "fertile land." 

Occoquan; river and a village in Trince William County, Virginia. An Indian 
word, n)eaning "hook shaped," or "a hook." 
Ocean; county in New Jersey; 
Oceana; county in Michigan; 

Ocean City; village in Cape May County, New Jersey; 

Ocean Springs; town in Jackson (!ounty, Mississippi. So named because of their 
situation on the seashore, or some large body of water, or, as in the case of 
Ocean Springs, because of the presence of mineral springs. 

Ocheyedan; town in Osceola County, Iowa. An Indian word, meaning "jJaceof 
mourning." 

Ochiltree; county in Texas, named for W. 15. Ochiltree, a i)rominent jtolitician of 
the State. 

Ochlockonee; river in Georgia and Florida. .\n Indian word, meaning "yellow 
water." 

Ocklawaha; bianch of tiu* St. Johns River, Florida. An Indian word, meaning 
"muddy water." 

Oconee; counties in (ieorgia and South Carolina, river in Georgia, town in Wash- 
ington County, Georgia, and village in Shelby County, Illinois. An Indian 
word, meaning "great, large water," "water course, "small river," or, accord- 
ing to another authority, in the Shawnee language, a "bone." 

O'Connor; town in Greeley County, Nebraska, named for Bishop O'Connor. 

Oconomowoc; city in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning 
"home of the beaver." 

Oconto; county and city in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "red ground," 
or, in the Menominee dialect, "tiie place of tlie pickerel." 



GANMOTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 195 

Ocopson; creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian name, meaning "brawling stream." 

Ocou; river and village in Tennessee. An Indian word, meaning "a cow." 

Odanah; town in Ashland County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "a 
town " or "village." 

Odessa; town in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for the town in Russia. 

Odin; several places in the United States, among them being a village in Marion 
County, Illinois. The name is one given to the Supreme Being by the am-ient 
northern nations. 

O'Fallon; village in St. Clair County, Illinois, named for Col. Joim O'Fallon, of St. 
L(iuis. 

Offutt; village in Anderson Count}-, Tennessee, named for the owner of the land 
upon which the post-office was built. 

Ogalalla; village in Keith County, Neliraska, named for a tribe of Indians, who 
were so named l)ecause when they (]uarrele<l threw ashes in the faces of each 
other; the word meaning "scattering," "throwing at." 

Ogden; city in Riley County, Kansas, named for Maj. E. A. (Jgden, United States 
Army. 

Ogden; town in Monroe County, New York, named for William Ogden, the son-in- 
law of till' proprietor. 

Ogden; city in AVeber County, river, canyon, and valley in Utah, named for an old 
mountaineer of the Hudson Bay Company, Peter Skeen Ogden. 

Ogdensburg; city in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for its original ju-o- 
})rietor. 

fOgema; town in Price County, Wisconsin; 
Ogemaw; county in Michigan. Derive<l from the linlian word meaning "great 

I chief." 

Ogle; county in Illinois, name<l for .Joseiih Ogle. 

Oglesby; town in Lasalle County, Illinois, named for Ricliaid .1. Oglesby, former 
governor of the State. 

Oglethorpe; county and a town in Macon County, Georgia, named for (icii. .lames 
K. Oglethorpe, the founder of the colony of OJeorgia. 

Ogletown; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for Thomas Ogle, the 
former owner of the land. 

Ogontz; liver in ^Michigan. A derivation of the Indian word (>gsiasil)i, meaning 
"little i)ickerel river." 

Ogontz; towns in Montgomery C-ounty, Pennsylvania; Erie County, Ohio, and 
Delta County, Michigan, named for the Indiaji chief Ogontz, who wasa missionary 
among his own people. 

Ogreeta; village in Cherokee County, Nortli Carolina. An Indian word, meaning 
"lieautiful wild llower." 

Ohio; State in the Union, river and counties in Indiana, Kentucky, and West Vir- 
ginia. An Indian word, meaning "the beautiful river." 

Ohiopyle; falls on tlie Youghiogheny River and town in Fayftte County, Pennsyl- 
vania. An Indian word, meaning "white froth upon the water." 

Ojai; valley in California, inclosed by a rim of mountains. An Indian word, mean- 
ing " the nest." 

Ojo Caliente; village in Taos County, New Mexico. A Spanish word, meaning 
"spring and hot," and given this place on account of its numerous hot springs. 

Okabena; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "heron rookery." 

Okahumka; town in Lake County, Florida. Derived from the Indian word 
okiliumkee, meaning "bad water." 

Okauchee; town in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning 
" very long." 



196 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Okauvillee; vi'llage in WaHliiiigtoii County, Illinois. From an Indian word, kaug, 

meaning "porcupine." 
Okechobee; lake in Southern Florida. An Indian word, meaning "big river," or 

' ' large water. ' ' 
Okee; town in Columbia C'ounty, Wisconnin. An Indian word, meaning "evil 

spirit," or if from auke, "earth," or "jilace." 
Oketo; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for an Indian chief, Arkatetah, the 

same being shortened by the settlers. 
Oklahoma; a territory, county and city in same territory, in the United States. An 

Indian word, meaning "home for all Indians." 
Oklokonee; river in Georgia. An Indian word, meaning " yellow water." 
Okmulgee; river in Georgia. An Indian word, meaning "boiling water." 
Okolona; town in Chickasaw County, Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning 

"much bent." 
Okomi; river in Georgia. An Indian word, n^eaning "great, large water." 
Oktibbeha; county in Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning "ice there in creek," 

or, according to another authority, "l)loody water," because of the battles 

fought there lietween Chickasaws and Choctaws. 
Olathe; city in Johnson County, Kansas. An Indian word of the Shawnee dialect, 

meaning "beautiful." 
Oldham; county in Texas, named for Williamson S. Oldham, a prominent lawyer 

and politician after the annexation. 
Old Orchard Beach; town and Ijeach in York County, Maine, so named because of 

the extensive orchard set out by its first settler. 
Old Point Comfort; town in Elizabeth County, Virginia, so named by Capt. Chris- 
topher Newport, because he found it a safe haven after a severe storm; the 

" Old" added to distinguish it from New Point Comfort, a few miles away. 
Oldtown; city in Penobscot County, Maine, so named because it has been a town 

site from aboriginal times. 
Olean; city, town, and creek in Cattaraugus County, New York, the name given 

with reference to the oil springs in the region. 
Oleona; village in Potter County, Pennsylvania, colonized by the violinist Ole Bull 

and taking its name from the first part of his. 
Oliver; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. H. S. Oliver. 
Olmsted; county in Minnesota, named for Hon. S. B. Olmstead. 
Olokikana; lake in Florida. An Indian word, meaning "sjiotted lake," so named 

because dotted with green islands. 
Olymipia; city in Washington, named from the ancient mountain of Greece. 
Omaha; city in Douglas County, Nebraska. An Indian word, meaning "upstream;" 

also the- name of a tribe, designated as "upstream people." 
Omar; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for a character in one o{ 

Johnson's allegories. 
Onancock; town and bay in Accomac C'ounty, A'irginia. An Indian name, meaning 

"foggy place." 
O'Neals; village in Madera C-ounty, ('alifornia, named for Charles O'Neal, an early 

settler. 
Oneco; village in Windham County, Connecticut, named for the son of Uncas, the 

Mohegan sachem. 
Oneida; counties in Idaho, New York, and Wisconsin, city in Knox County, Illi- 
nois, A'illage and lake in New York; 
Oneida Castle; village in Oneida County, New York. Named for one of the tribes 
of the Six Nations, the word meaning "granite people," or "people of the beacon 
stone." 
O'Neil; city in Holt County, Nebraska, named for Gen. John O'Neil, an early settler. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 107 

Onekama; village in Manistee Comity, Micliigan. An Indian word, meaning "a 

])ortage." 
Ong; village in Burlington County, New Jersey, iianunl for an t>arly settler. 
Onida; town in Sully County, South Dakota. An Indian word, meaning "hunted, 

looked for." 
Onion; creek in North Dakota, so named on ac<'onntof tiie (|uantities of wild onions 

growing on its banks. 
Onondaga; county, and town in same county, and a lake in New York, named 

from the Indian tril)e, tlie word meaning "peojile of tlie liiils." 
Onslow; coimty in North Carolina, named for Arthur Onslow, speaker in the 

Uritish House of Conunons. 
Ontario; one of the (ireat Lakes, comity in New York, and a village in Vernon 

County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, said by one autiiority to mean " beautiful 

lake;" by another, "beautiful jirospect of rocks, hills, and water." 
Onteora; village in the Catskills in Ulster County, New York. An Indian word, 

meaning "hills of the sky." 
Ontonagon; county and river in Michigan. An Indian word, meaning "a fishing 

place," or, according to another autiiority, so named because an Indian maiden 

lost a dish in tlie stream and exclaime<l "nondonogan," which in her dialect 

meant "away goes my dish." 
Oostanaula; river in Georgia. An Indian word, meaning "place of overtaking." 
Opelika; city in Lee County, Alabama. An Indian word, meaning "great swamp." 
Opelousas; town in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, named from a tribe of Indians, 

the name signifying "black hea<l," or "black leggins or moccasins." 
Opequan; stream in Virginia. Derived from an Indian word, meaning "a froth- 
white stream," or perhaps from another, meaning "a rain-worn stream." 
Orange; counties in California, Florida, and Texas, so named on account of the 

large orange groves. 
Orange; county in Indiana, named for the county in North ('arolina, the home of 

its settlers. 
Orange; counties in New York, North Carolina, and Vermont, town in Orange 

County, Vermont, and New Haven County, Connecticut, named for William IV, 

Prince of Orange. 
Orange; county, and town in same county in Virginia, so named because of the 

color of the surrounding highlands. 
Orangeburg; county in South Carolina and town in same county, name<l for 

William IV, Prince of Orange. 
Orbisonia; liorough in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, named for William 

Orbison, an early settler. 
Orciiard; village in Morgan County, Colorado, originally calleil Fremont's ' ' Orchard, ' ' 

because he halted his outfit here in a grove of cottonwoods and spent some 

time recruiting. 
Orchard; village in Antelope County, Nebraska, so named because of the presence 

of a large orchard of api>le trees. 
Ord; city in Valley County, Nebraska, named for Gen. E. O. C. Ord. 
Ordway; town in Otero County, Colorado, named for George N. Ordway, of the 

Denver board of sujiervisors. 
Oreana; village in Humboldt County, Nevada. Latin word, meaning "town of 

gold." 
Oregon; State of the Union, and a county in Missouri. The name said to have been 

derived from Origanum, a species of wild sage found aloiig the coast in the State, 

but another authority states that it is derived from the Spanish Oregones, which 

name was given the Indian tribes inhabiting that region, by a Jesuit priest, the 

word meaning " big-eared men." 



198 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Orejas Del Oso; iiiouiitaiii in Utah. A Spanish phrase, meaning "l>ears' ears." 
Organ; monntains in New Mexico, so called because of their resemblance to the 

])ipes of an organ. 
Orion; village in Oakland County, Michigan, named for the constellation. 
(Oriskany; creek and village in Oneida County, New York; 

Oriskany ^alls; village in Oneida County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 
I " place of nettles." 
Orland; town in Hancock County, Maine, said to have been so named because of 

the finding of an oar upon the shore l)y its first settler. 
Orleans; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for the Duke of Orleans. 
Orleans; counties in New York and N^rginia, and a parish in Louisiana, named for 

the city in France. 
Ormsby; county in Nevada, named fur INhijur Ormsby. 
Orneville; town in riscataxiuis Cuunty, New York, naineil for the Hon. Henry 

( )rn(', of Boston. 
Orofino; creek in Idaho, an<l towns in Siskiyou County, California, and Shoshone 

('ounty, Idaho, so named by the Spanish ))ecause of their gold mines. 
Orphans Island; island in Penobscot County, Maine; so named because it was an 

(jri)han's share of an estate of the Waldo Patent. 
Orrick; town in Ray County, Missouri, named for John C. Orrick, of St. Louis. 
Ofrington; town in Penobscot County, Maine, the name being a misspelling of the 

original name of "Orangetown." 
Orville; town in Hamilton County, Nebraska, named for Orville Westcott, a resident. 
Orwigsburg; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for Peter Orwig, 

its founder. 
Osage; counties in Kansas and Missouri, an Indian reservation in Oklahoma, and 

many towns, cities, and rivers in the United States, name<l for the tril)e of 

Indians whose name means "the strong." 
Osakis; village in Douglas County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "yellow 

eartli." 
Osawatomie ; city in Miami County, Kansas, a comliination of the names of the two 

rivers at whose junction the town is situated — Osage and Pottawattamie. 
Osborne; county, and city in same county in Kansas, named for Vincent B. Osborne, 

of tlie Second Kansas Cavalry. 
Osceola; counties in Florida, Iowa, and Michigan, city in St. Clair County, Mis- 

soui'i, towns in Mississippi County, Arkansas, and Lewis County, New York, 

villages in Polk counties, Nebraska and Wisconsin, and a mountain in New 

Hami)shire, named for the Seminole Indian chief. 
Oscoda; county, and village in Iosco County, Michigan. An Indian word, said by 

some to mean "fire," by others, "strong prairie." 
Oshawa; village in Nicollet County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "ferry 

him over," or "across the river." 
Oskaloosa; cities in Mahaska County, Iowa, and Jefferson County, Kansas, named 

for the wife of the Indian chief Mahaska. 
Oshkosh; city in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, named for an Indian chief, the 

name said to mean " the nail, claw, or horny part of the foot of beasts." 
Oso; mountain in Colorado. A Spanish word, meaning "bear." 
Ossineke; village in Alpena County, Michigan. An Indian word, meaning "stony 

land," or "place of a stone." 
Ossining; town in Westchester County, New York, tiie name said to have been 

derived from that of the Indian tribe Scint Sinks, "stone upon stone," or from 

Osinsing, "place of stones." 
Ossipee; river in Maine. Indian word, meaning "pine river." 
Osso; town in King George County, Virginia. An Indian word, probably meaning 

"white waters." 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 199 

Oswegatchie; river in New Yurk. An Indian wunl, nieaninj; "coming or .lioiiig 
around a hill." 

Oswego; county, city, town, and river in New York, city in Labette County, Kan- 
sas!, and village in Kendall County, Illinois. Derived from the Indian On ti ah- 
an to(}ue, "where the valley wiilens," or, according to another authority, "flow- 
ing out." 

Osweya; creek in McKean County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 
"jilace of flie.'^." 

Otero; county in Colorado, named for Miguel Otero, of a prominent Mexican family. 

Otero; county in New INIi'xico, named for (Jovernor M. A. Otero. 

Otis; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for JamcH Otis, an early proprietor. 

Otis; town in Berkshire (Comity, Massachusetts, named for Harrison Cray Otis. 

Otisfield; town in Cumlierland County, Maine, named for .Tanu'S Otis, an early pro- 
prietor. 

Otisville; \illag(' in ( lenese<' County, Micliigan, namcii for I'.yron (>tis, an early 
settler. 

Otisville; village in Orange Comity, New York, named for Isaac* )tis, its first settler. 

Otoe; county in Nebraska, named for the Indian Iriln'. 

Otseg'o; counties in Michigan and New York, town and lake in New York, and vil- 
lage in INIichigan. An Indian word, meaning "welcome water," or "]>lace 
where meetings are held." 

Otselic; town in Chenango and creek in JNIadisou counties. New York. An Indian 
word, meaning "plum creek." 

Otsquago; creek in Montgomery County, New York. An Indian wurd, signifying 
"under the )>ridge." 

Ottawa; counties in Kansas, Mit'higan, and ()hio, a reservation in Indian Teriitory, 
city in Lasalle Comity, Illinois, and village in Lesueur County, INIimiesota, named 
for the Indian tribe, the name meaning "traders." 

Otter; creek in IMissouri. The jiresent name a translation of the original French 
name of " Loutre." 

Otter Lake; village in the Lapeer County, ^Michigan, so named becanse of the 
abundance of otter in adjacent lakes. 

[otter Tail; lake in Minnesota; 

lOttertail; county and town in Minnesota. Bo named because of a ]ieninsula of the 

I lake called by the Indians, Ptansinta, "otter tail." 

Otto; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, named for .facob S. Ottd, of the Hol- 
land Land Company. 

Ottumwa; city in Wapello County, Iowa. An Indian word said to mean "i)lace 
of the lone chief," but more probably meaning, " i-aj)ids," (ir "tumbling 
water. ' ' 

Ouachita; county and river in Arkansas, parish in Louisiana, named for a now 
extinct Indian tribe, the word meaning " male deer." 

Ouray; county, city, and mountain in Colorado, named for a friendly chief of the 
Ute Indians. 

Outagamie; county in Wisconsin, named for the Outagainies, or " Fox" Indians. 

Ovid; village in Clinton County, Michigan, and town in Seneca County, New York, 
named foi' the Roman poet. 

Owaneco; village in Christian County, Illinois. An Indian word, in somtMlialects 
meaning " (iod." 

Owasco; lake, town, and creek in Cayuga County, New York. An Indian word 
meaning " the bridge," or " lake of the floating bridge." 

Owassa; town in Hardin Comity, Iowa, derived from Owass(», Indian word lor 
"bear." 

Owatonna; river and city in Steele County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning 
"straight river." 



200 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

I Owen; counties in Indiana and Kentucky; 
Owensboro; city in Daviess County, Kentucky. Named for Col. Abraham Oweni 
of Kentucky, killed at Tippecanoe. 
Owensburg; village in Greene County, Indiana, named for its founder. 
Owingsville; city in Bath County, Kentucky, named for Col. T. D. O wings. 
Owobopta; tributary of the Minnesota River. An Indian word meaning " where 

they dig roots." 
Owosso; city in Shiawassee County, Michigan, named for the principal chief of the 

Chij)pewas in that country, the word meaning " he is afar off." 
Owsley; county in Kentucky, named for Judge William Owsley, a former governor. 
Oxbow; village in Jefferson County, New York, on the Oswegatchie River, so named 

because of a bend in the river at this point in the form of an ox bow. 
Oxford; county and town in same county in Maine, town in Worcester County, 

Massachusetts, and borough in Pennsylvania, named for the university in 

England. 
Oxford; city in Lafayette County, Mississippi, so named from the university city in 

England because it is the location of the State University. 
Ozan; town and stream in Hempstead County, Arkansas. A corrniition of the 

French, prairie d'ane, " ])rairie of the donkeys." 
Ozark; county and city in Christian County, Missouri, and village in Dale County, 

Ala])ama. A corruption of the French name, aux arcs, meaning " with bows," 

a term descri])tive of the Indians who inhabited the country. 
Ozaukee; county in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "yellow clay." 
Pacheco; town in Contra Costa County, California, named for an early Spanish settler. 
Pachuta; town in Clarke County, Mississippi. A Choctaw Indian word meaning 

"possum creek." 
Pacific; an ocean, the largest division of water on the globe, so named byTNIagellan, 

its discoverer, liecause of the fair weather encountered there after experiencing 

heavy gales in the straits. 
Pacific; county in Washington; city in Franklin County, Missouri; and creek in 

Yellowstone Park, named for the ocean. 
Pactolus; town in Pitt County, North Carolina, named for the ancient river in Asia 

I\Iinor. 
Paddock; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for A. S. Paddock, United States 

Senator from that State. 
Paducah; city in McCracken County, Kentucky, named for a celebrated Indian 

chief who formerly lived in the vicinity and was buried on the banks of Ten- 
nessee River, now within the city limits. 
Page; county in Iowa, named for Colo lel Page, of Palo Alto fame. 
Page; county in Virginia, named for James Page, an early governor of the State. 
Pahaquarry; township in Warren County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning 

" termination of two mountains." 
Pahcupog; pond near Westerly, Connecticut. Name derived from the Indian 

word, Pahke-paug, meaning "pure water pond." 
Painesville; village in Lake County Ohio, named for Gen. E. Paine, an early 

settler. 
Paint; creek in Ohio. From the Indian word Olomon sepung, "paint stream." 
Painted Post; village in Steuben County, New York, so named because of the erec- 
tion of a painted monument by the Indians over the grave of their chief, Cai^tain 

Montour. 
Paint Rock; town in Concho County, Texas, so named because situated near a 

ledge of rock, profusely decorated with Indian hieroglyphics. 
Pajaro; river in California, so named by the Spanish 1)ecause of the number of wild 

geese or ducks found there, the word meaning " bird." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATESJ. 201 

Palarm; town and strciuu in Faulkner County, Arkansan. A coiruptiiin of the 

Frencli, "place dess alarnies." 
Palatine; several places in the United States, named from the division of (Termany. 
Palatka; city in Putnam County, Florida. An Indian word said by Sf)nie to mean 

"spilled," and by others, "cow ford." 
Palisades Park; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, so named because of its 

location on the Palisades. 
Palmer; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named for Chief .Tustice Thomas 

Palmer. 
Palmer; village in ManjUette County, Michigan, named for Waterman Palmer, of 

Pittsburg, its founder. 
Palmer Lake; town and creek in El Paso County, C'oloi-ado, named for General 

Palmer, an oflicial of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad. 
Palmers; creek in C'hariton County, Missouri, named for Martin Palmer. 
Palmyra; town in Wayne County, New York, named from the ancient Syrian 

town. 
Palo; town in Linn County, Iowa, and village in Ionia County, Michigan. A Span- 
ish word meaning "stick." 
Palo Alto; town in Santa ('lara County, California. A Spanish |ihrase meaning 

"high stick." 
Palo Alto; county in Iowa and borough in Schuylkill ( 'ounty, Peimsylvania, named 

for the famous battlefield in Texas. 
Palo Pinto; county and river in Texas. A Sj)anish |)liiase meaning "spotted stake, 

or timber." 
Pamelia; town in Jefferson ("ounty. New York, named for the wife of (ien. .lacob 

P>rown. 
Pamlico; county, sound, and river in North Carolina, named for the ancient Indian 

village of Pomeick on the southern shores of the river. 
Pamunkey; river and town in Orange County, Virginia. Said to have been derived , 

from the Indian, Pihmunga, meaning "where lie sweat." K/Ct ^ 

Pana; city in Christian County, Illinois. Probably from the Indian word ]iena, / 

"partridge." / 

Panasoffkee; town in Sumter County, Florida. From the Indian word panasofkeo, 

"deep valley." 
Panola; counties in Mississippi and Texas. An Indian word meaning "cotton." 
Panton; town in Addison County, Vermont, named for Lord Panton, a liritish 

nobleman. 
Paola; city in Miami County, Kansas, named for Baptiste Peoria, the town name 

being the Indian pronunciation. 
Papillion; village and creek in Sarpy County, Nebraska, given the French name 

because many butterflies were seen upon the banks of the stream. 
Papinsville; village in Bates County, Mis-sonri, named for Pierre Mellecourt Papin. 
Paragould; city in Greene County, Arkansas. A compound of the names of two 

railroad men, W. J. Paramore and Jay Gould. 
Pardeeville; village in Columbia County, Wisconsin, named for John S. Pardee, 

the founder. 
Paris; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for the city in France. 
Paris; a town in Oneida County, New York, named for Isaac Paris, a merchant of 

Fort Plain. 
(Parish; town in Oswego and village in Erie County, New York; 
I Parishville ; town in St. Lawrence County, New York. Named for David Parish, an 
y extensive landowner. 

Parita; village in Bexar County, Texas. A Spanish word, meaning "grapevine." 
Park; county in Colorado, so named because it includes.a large area of South Park, 



202 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Park; county in Montana, so named because it is close to Yellowstone Park. 

Parke; county in Indiana, named for Benjamin Parke, a prominent State politician. 

Parker; city in Linn County, Kansas, named for J. W. Parker, former o.vnerof the 
town site. 

Parker; county in Texas, named for the family of Parker's Fort, who in 1836 were 
captured and killed by the Indians. 

Parkerville; city in Morris County, named for C. G. Parker, former owner of the 
tow n siti'. 

Parkersburg; town in Sampson County, North Carolina, named for a i)rominent 
citizen. 

Parkersbiirg; city in Wood (onnty, West Virsj:inia, named for Alexander Parker, 
of Pennsylvania. 

Parkers Landing; city in Armstrong C(junty, Pennsylvania, named for tlie former 
liroj)rietors. 

Parkersville; villatre in Lyon County, Kentucky, named for Thomas Parker, a 
wealthy citizen. 

Parkman; town in l*iscata(|uis C'liunty, Maine, named for its early prr)prietor, Sam- 
uel Parkman, of Boston. 

Parkman; town in Sheridan County, W^yoining, named for Francis Parkman. 

Parkville; village in Platte County, Missouri, named for (Jeorge S. Park, its founder. 

Parksville; town in Edgetield County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 
family of the county. 

Parniele; town in Martin County, North Canjlina, named for a prominent resident. 

Parmer; county in Texas, named for Martin Parmer, prominent politician in the 
early days of Texas. 

Parramore; beach and island in Accomac County, Virginia, named for the family 
who were its former owners. 

Parrott; town in La Plata County, Colorado, named for a California capitali.st. 

Parry; peak in the Front Range, ('olorado, named for the botanist. 

Parsons; city in Labette County, Kansas, named for Judge Levi Parsons, a promi- 
nent railroad ollii'ial. 

Parsons; town in Tucker County, West Virginia, named for a former resident. 

Parsonsfield; town in York County, Maine, named for Thomas Parsons, an early 
proprietor. 

Pasadena; city in Los Angeles County, California. An Indian word, meaning 
"crown of the valley." 

Pascagoula; river and town in Jackson County, Mississipi>i, named for an Indian 
tribe, the name meaning "bread nation." 

Pasco; county in Florida, named for Senator Pasco. 

Pascoag; village in Providence County, Rhode Island. An Indian word, meaning 
"the dividing place," and so named because it is situated at the forks of the 
Blackstone River. 

Paso Robles; city in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish word, mean- 
ing "pass of the oak trees." 

Pasquotank; county in North Carolina. An Indian word, meaning "divided tidal 
river," and given this county because a river forms one of its boundaries. 

Passaconaway ; mountain in New Hampshire, named for a sachem of the Merri- 
mack tribe of Indians. 

Passadumkeag; town in Penobscot County, Maine, situated at the mouth of a river 
of the same name, by reason of which it was given this Indian name, which 
means "falls running over a gravel bed." 

Passaic; county, city, and river in New Jersey; derived either from the Indian 
word Passaic or Passajeek, "avalley," or from the Indian ecjuivalent of "peace." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 203 

Passamaquoddy; bay on the coast of Maine. An Indian word, ineanin<i' "pollDck 

<,n-ound," or "pollock-plenty place." 
Passumpsic; river and village in Caledonia (Jonnty, N'erniont. An Indian word, 

meaning "much clear water." 
Pastoro; mountain in Arizona, so named because of its high mountain pastures. 
Patag-umkis; tributary of the Penol^scot River in Maine. An Indian word, meaning 

"sandy-ground cove." 
Patapsco; river in Maryland. An Indian word, meaning "backwater." 
Patchogue; village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 

"turning place." 
Paterson; city in Passaic County, New.lersey, named for William I'aterson, an early 

goxcrnor. 
Patkaskaden; triltntary of .lames River. An Indian word, meaning "the tortoise" 

or "turtle." 
Patrick; county in Viiginia, named for tlie orator, Patrick Ib'ury. 
Pattaquonk; hill near Say brook, ('onnecticut. An Indian name, meaning "round 

l)lace" or "round hill." 
Patterson; town in Putnam County, New York, named for a family of early settlers. 
Paulding; counties in ( ieorgia and Ohio, a town in Jasper County, Missis.sippi, and 

a village in Paulding CVmnty, Ohio, named for .Tohn Paulding, who helped 

capture ^lajor Andre. 
Pauquepaug; brook in New Milford, Connecticut, name derive(l fiom the Indian 

word Papke-paug, meaning "pure-water jjond." 
Pautuck; river and a village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian word, 

meaning "fall." 
Pawling; town in Dutchess County, New York. Name derived from the Paulding, 

said originally to have been Pawling. 
Pawnee; creek in Colorado, so named by the Indians because a party of 200 Paw- 
nee Indians were here surrounded by a greatly outnund)ering force of Sioux, 

wlio, when they found they could not capture the Pawnees, proceeded to 

starve them out; but the Pawnees refused to surrender to escape even this 

death, and the last man of them jieiished by starvation. The I'oot of the word 

said to mean ' ' a stone. ' ' 
Pawnee; counties in Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma, named for the Indian tribe 

mentioned al)Ove. 
Pawpaw; creek and town in Morgan County, West Virginia; villages in Lee 

County, Illinois, and Van Buren County, Michigan, so named because of the 

presence of paw-jiaw fruit. 
Pawtucket; river in New England and city in Providence County, Rhode Island. 

An Indian word, meaning "at the little falls." 
Paxton; town in Ford County, Illinois. An Indian word, meaning " standing or 

dead water." 
Paxton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Charles Paxton, of 

Boston. 
Paxton; town in Keith County, Nebraska, named for W. A. Paxton, of Omaha, 

Nebraska. 
Payette; river and a village in Canyon County, Idaho, named for a member of the 

Hudson Bay Company. 
Payne; village in Paulding County, Ohio, proljably named for Henry B. Payne, 

United States Senator from that State. 
Payne; county in Oklahoma, named for Captain Payne, "Oklahoma Boone." 
Paynesville; town in Pike ('ounty, Missouri, named for a resident of St. Louis. 
Peabody; city in Marion County, Kansas, named for F. H. Peabody, of Boston. 



204 PLAGE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Peabody; town in Essex C'ounty, Massachusetts, named for George Peabody, the 

philanthropist. 
Peace; creek in Florida, so named because it was the scene of a treaty ol peace. 
Peale; highest peak of the Sierra la Sal in Utah, named for Dr. A. C. Peale, the 

geologist. 
Pearl; river in Mississippi; 

Pearlington; town in Hancock County, Mississippi; 

I Pearl River; county in ]\lissi.«si{)pi. So named on account of the pearl fisheries 
[ whicli were early establisiu'd l)y the French upon the above-mentioned river. 
Pecan; village in Clay County, Georgia. An Indian word, meaning "nut." 
Pecatonica; village in Winnebago County, Illinois. Probably derived from the 

Indian word Pickatolica, which was the name of a species of fish. 
Peckamin; river in New Jersey. Derived from the Indian ^vord pakihm, "cran- 
berries. " 
Pecunktuk; stream in Vermont. An Indian word, meaning "crooked river." 
Pedernales; rivers in North Carolina and Texas. A Spanish word, meaning "flints, 

rocks, or stones." 
Peekskill; village in Westchester County, New York, named for Jan Peek, a Dutch 

mariner of the seventeenth century. 
Peguniock; cieek in New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning "dark stream." 
Pelham; towns in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and Hillsboro County, New 

Hampshire, named for Thomas Pelham Holies, Duke of Newcastle. 
Pelham; village in Westchester County, New York, named for the original pat- 
entee, John Pell. 
Pella; city in Marion County, Iowa, colonized by Dutch settlers, to whom the word 

meant "city of refuge." 
Pemadumcook; lake in Piscataquis County, Maine. An Indian word, meaning 

"lake of the sloping mountain." 
Pemaquid; point of land and village in Lincoln County, Maine. An Indian woi-d, 

meaning "long point," or, according to another authority, "that runs into tlie 

water." 
Pembina; county and city in same county in North Dakota, named from an Indian 

tribe, the name said to mean "high-bush cranberry." 
Pembroke; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

England. 
Pembroke; town in IVIerrimack County, New Hampshire, probal)ly named for the 

Earl of Pembroke. 
Pemigewasset; river in New Hampshire. The word of Indian derivation, said to 

mean "crooked place of pines." 
Pender; county in North Carolina, named for Gen. William D. Pender, an officer 

of the Confederate Army. 
Pendleton; town in Madison County, Indiana, named for the former jiroprietor, 

Thomas M. Pendleton. 
Pendleton; counties in Kentucky and West Virginia, named for Edmund Pendle- 
ton, a prominent politician of Virginia. 
Pendleton; town in Niagara County, New York, named for Sylvester Pendleton 

Clarke, ex-governor of Grand Island. 
Pendleton; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Pendleton; tow^n in Umatilla County, Oregon, named for George H. Pendleton. 
Pendleton; town in Anderson County, South Carolina, named for Judge Henry 

Pendleton, a Revolutionary jurist. 
Pend Oreille; lake in Idaho, named from a tribe of Indians who were given this 

name by the French because of their habit of wearing pendants in their ears, 

the word meaning "hanging ear." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 205 

Penfield; town in (^iiven County, CJeoryia, namt'tl for Joi^iah IVnlit'ld. 

Penfield; town in Monroe County, New York, named for Daniel Penlield, an early 

settler. 
Penikese; one of the Elizabeth islands in Buzzards Bay, i\lassachusetls. An Indian 

word, meaning "sloping land." 
Penn; the name of many townshijis, and the prefix to the name of many towns and 

villages in the United States, generally given them in hdiuir of William Penn. 
Penning'toii ; borough in jNIercer County, New Jersey, named for the Pennington 

family, two meml)ers of which were governors of the State. 
Penning'toii; county in South Dakota, named for John L. Pennington, a former 

governor. 
Pennsylvania; one of the States of the Union, named for William Penn, to whom 

the land coniprised within the limits of this State was granted. 
Penn Yan; village in Yates County, New York. The name is formed by a com- 

I)ound of the names of the two classes of settlers — Pennsylvanians and Yan- 
kees. 
Pennypack; creek in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "l)ody of water with no current." 
Penobscot; county, bay, river, and town in Maine. Derived from the Indian 

word Penobskeag, meaning "rocky place," "river of rocks." 
Penryn; village in Placer County, California, named for a l)orough in Cornwall, 

England. 
Pensacola; bay and city in Escambia County, Florida. Said to ]>v derived from 

the Indian word Pan-sha-okla, meaning "hair people." 
Pentwater; river and lake in IMichigan, from which a village also is named, being 

so named because of the supposition that the river had no outlet. 
Peoria; county and city in Illinois and nation in Indian Territory. An Indian 

word, meaning "])lace where there are fat beasts." 
Peosta; village in Dubuque County, Iowa. An Indian word, meaning "gorge in 

the rocks." 
Peotone; town in Will County, Illinois. Derived from the Indian word petone, 

meaning "bring," "bring here," or "bring to this place." 
Pepin; lake between Wisconsin and Minnesota, and a county in Wisconsin, named 

for Pepin le Bref. 
Pepperell; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Sir William Pep- 

perell, a member of the Massachusetts council. 
Pepperville; township in Butler County, Nebraska, named for IIubl)el Peppei-, an 

early settler. 
Pequabuclc; river in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "clear or open pond." 
Pequanac; village in INIorris County, New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning 

"cleared land." 
Pequannock; village in Hartford C-otmty, Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning 

"land naturally clear and open." 
Pequots; town in Crow Wing County, Minnesota, named for a tribe of Indians, the 

word meaning "destroyers," "enemies," or "gray foxes," according to different 

authorities. 
Perdido; rivers in Alabama and Florida, and a bay into whicli these empty, which 

was so named by the Spanish, the word meaning "lost," because a Spanish ship 

was destroyed there. 
Pare Marquette; town in INIason County, INIichigan, named for Father Marquette. 
Perham; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for Hon. Sidney Perham, a 

governor of the State. 
Perham; town in Ottertail County, Mimiesota, nameil for Josiali Perham, an ollicial 

of the Northern Pacific Kailroad, 



20r) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Perkins; i)Uuitation in Fnuiklin C'minty, IMaiiie, named for Dr. Perkins, of Farm- 

ington. 
Perkins; county in Nebraska, nameil for C. E. Perkins, an official of the Burlington 

and Missouri River Railroad. 
Perkiomen; branch of the Schuylkill River in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. 

An Indian word, meaning " where there are cranberries." 
Perinton; town in Monroe County, New York, named for Glover Perrin, the first 

permanent settler. 
Perry; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, 

Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; town in Wyoming County, New 

York, named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry. 
Perry; city in Jefferson County, Kansas, named for John D. Perry, a railroad official. 
Perrysburg; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, and village in Wood County, 

Ohio, named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry. 
Perrys Mills; village in Clinton County, New York, named ior (ieorge Perry, 

former proprietor. 
Perryville; city in Perry County, Missouri, named for Connno^lore Oliver Hazard 

Perry. 
Person; county in North Carolina, named for Oen. Thomas Person, an officer of the 

Revolution. 
Perth; town in Fulton County, New York, named for the town in Scotland. 
Perth Amboy; city in Middlesex County, New Jersey, the name a combination of 

the name of the Earl of Perth and a corruption of the original Indian name of 

the town, Ompage. 
Peru; towns in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and Clinton County, New York, 

named for the country in South America. 
Pescadero; village in San Mateo County, California. A Spanish word, meaning 

"fishmonger." 
Pescongamoc; lake in Maine near the Penobscot River. An Indian word, meaning 

"divided lake." 
Peshtigo; river in Oconto County and town in ]\Iarinette County, Wisconsin. An 

Indian word, meaning "wild goose river." 
Peterboro; town in llillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for the city in 

England. 
Peterboro; village in Madison County, New York, named for Peter Smith. 
Petersburg-; town in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Peter Magnes, its 

founder. 
Petersburg; village in Kent County, Delaware, named for the descendants of Peter 

F<iwk'r, who adopted his baptismal name as a surname. 
Petersburg; town in Pike County, Indiana, named for Peter Brenton, an early 

settler. 
Petersburg; town in Rensselaer County, New York, named for Peter Simmons, an 

early settler. 
Petersburg; borough in Huntingdon CV)unty, Pennsylvania, named for Peter Fleck, 

an early settler. 
Petersburg; city in Dinwiddle County, Virginia, founded by Col. William Byrd 

and Peter Jones, and named for the latter. 
Petersham; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for William Stan- 
hope, ICarl of Petersham. 
Petersville; village in Bartholomew C'ounty, Indiana, named for Peter T. Blessing, 

its foimder. 
Petoskey; city in Einmett County, Michigan; an Indian word meaning "the sun, 

moon, or stars," or anything relating to the heavens. 
Pettis; county in Missouri, named for Spencer Pettis, secretary of state of Missouri. 



uANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 207 

Pettit; island in Maine, named for the Pettit family. 

Pewabic; town in Ontanagon County, IVIichigan, named from the river which bears 

the Indian name, Pewabik-seede, "iron river." 
Pewakpa; tributary of the Dakota River; an Indian name meaninfr "elm river." 
Pewamo; village in Ionia County, Michigan, named for the son of Shacoe, chief of 

the ChipiH'wa Indians. 
Pewaukee; village in Waukeslia County, Wisconsin, named for the lake which 

bore the Indian name of Peewaukee-wee-ning, "lake of shells." 
Peytona; village in Boone County, West Virginia, named for William M. Peyton. 
Pheasant Branch; village in Dane County, Wisconsin, named for tlie stream which 

bears the Indian name of Peona, meaning "pheasant branch." 
Pheba; village in Clay County, Mississijipi, named for Mrs. Pheba Robinson. 
Phelps; county in Missouri, and village in Atchison County, same State, named for 

Governor John S. Phelps. 
Phelps; village in Ontario County, New York, named for Oliver Phelj)s, one of the 

original proprietors. 
Philadelphia; county, and city in same county, in Pennsylvania, so named by 

^Villiam Penn in order that the principle of the Quakers — Ijrotherly love — might 

lie identiiieil with their city, the name being that of the city in Asia. 
Philadelphia; city in Jefferson County, New York, named for the al)ove. 
Philippi; town in P)arbour County, West Virginia, l)oth town and county being 

named for Phili]) Barbour. 
Philipsburg; city in Granite County, Montana, named for the manager of the 

(Jranite mine. 
Philipsburg-; ])orough in C-enter County, Pennsylvania, named for its founders, two 

Englishmen, Henry and James Philips. 
Philipstown; town in Putnam County, New York, nameil for Adolph Philipse, tlie 

original patentee. 
Phillips; county in Arkansas, named for Sylvanus Phillips, a jirominent resident. 
Phillips; county in Colorado, named for R. (). Phillips, a i)rominent statesman. 
Phillips; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Col. William A. 

Phillips. 
Phillips; lake in I\Iaine, named for the man who has owned it for fifty years. 
Phillips; town in Franklin County, Maine, named for a prominent resident family, 

l)y whom the townsite was formerly owned. 
Phillips; city in Price County, Wisconsin, named for Elijah B. riiillii)s, a railroail 

constructor. 
Phillipsburg; town in Warren County, New Jersey, named for a resident family. 
Phillipsville; village in I lumboldt County, ('alifornia, named for a settler. 
Phippsburg-; town in Sagadahoc County, IMaine, named for Sir AVilliam Phipps, 

governor of INIassachusetts. 
Phoenix; village in Oswego County, New York, named for Alexander Phoenix. 
Phoenixville; l)orough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named for the Phoenix 

Iron works. 
Piasa; town in INIacouiiin County, Illinois. An Indian name for a huge biid which 

they chiseled in the ledge of rock on the banks of the Mississippi River, the 

word meaning " the man-devouring bird." 
Piatt; county in Illinois, named for Col. John Piatt, an early settler. 
Piccowaxen; creek in Maryland. An Indian word, meaning "torn shoes." 
Pickaway; county in Ohio. A corruption of the name of a tribe of Indians origi- 
nally known as Pickawillany. 
Pickens; counties in Alal)ama, (ieorgia, and South (Jarolina, and town in Pickens 

County, South Carolina, named for Gen. Andrew Pickens, an officer of the 

Revolution. 



208 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill. 197. 

Pickens; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, named for James Pickens, a land- 
owner. 

Pickensville ; town in Pickens County, Alabama, named for Gen. Andrew Pickens, 
an officer of the Revolution. 

Pickett; county in Tennessee, named for Col. George Edward C. A. Pickett, who 
led the famous charge at the battle of Gettysburg. 

Piedmont; city in Wayne County, Missouri, and town in Mineral County, West 
Virginia, situated at the foot of the Alleghenies. From the French pied, "foot," 
and mont, "mountain." 

Piegan; village in Chouteau County, Montana, named for a tribe of Indians, the 
word meaning "pheasant." 

Pierce; counties in Georgia, Nebraska, and Washington, and mountain in Hum- 
boldt County, California, named for Franklin Pierce. 

Pierce; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Gilbert A. Pierce, first United 
States (Senator from North Dakota. 

Pierce; village in Wharton County, Texas, named for Thomas W. Pierce, an early 
railroad man. 

Pierceton; town in Kosciusko County, Indiana, named for Franklin Pierce, a former 
President of the United States. 

Piermont; village in Rockland County, New York, so named because it is backed 
])y high hills and facing the riv.er, into which extends a long pier. 

Pierrepont; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for llezekiah B. 
Pierrepont, one of the original proprietors. 

Pierrepont Manor; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for tlie Hon. 
\\'illiam C. Pierre})ont's residence. 

Pierres Hole; valley in Idaho, named for an Iroquois chieftain in the employ of 
the Hudson Bay Company. 

Pierson; village in Montcalm C^ounty, INIichigan, named for O. A. Pierson, the first 
white settler. 

Pitfard; village in Livingston County, New York, named for David Piffard, a prom- 
inent settler. 

Pigeon; one of the Apostle Islands, in Lake Superior, Wisconsin. A translation of 
the Indian name. 

Pike; counties in Alal)ama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missis- 
sippi, Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, town in Wyoming County, New York, 
and the famous peak in C'olorado, named for Gen. Zebulon M. Pike, the explorer. 

Pikeville; town in Wayne County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resident. 

Pillsbury; village iu Todd County, Minnesota, named for an early governor. 

Pilot Grove; city in Cooper County, Missouri, so named l^ecause of the presence of 
a grove in a nearby prairie, which served as a landmark. 

Pilot Knob; town in Iron County, Missouri, named from the hill which is a prom- 
inent feature of the landscai)e. 

Pima; county, and a town in Graham County, Arizona, named for an Indian tribe. 

Pinal; county in Arizona, named for a chief of the Apaches. 

Pinckney; town in Lewis County, New York, named for Charles C. Pinckney, a 
prominent statesman of South Carolina. 

IPinckney; town in LTnion County, South Carolina; 

. Pinckney ville; towns in Clay County, Alabama, and Wilkinson County, Missis- 
sippi. Named for the celebrated Pinckney family of South Carolina. 

Pinconning; village in Bay County, Michigan. An Indian word, meaning "potato 
place. ' ' 

Pine; creek in Indiana; the present name being a translation of the Indian name 
of Puck-gwun-nash-ga-nmck, 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 20t) 

Pine; countv in ^limiesota, so named ))ecaiise of its forests of coniferous trees. 
Pine Log; town in TuoluuHie County, California, so named because the crossin<^ of 

the Stanislaus Kiver at tliis point was originally formed by a hirge log. 
Pinkham; grant in Coos County, New Hampshire, name<l for Daniel Pinkham, the 

grantee. 
Pinole; town in Contra Costa County, California. A Spanish word, meaning 

" parched corn." 
Pinon Blanco; peak and ridge in California. A Spanish phrase, meaning " moun- 
tain of white rock." 
Pinos Altos; town in Grant County, New Mexico. A Spanish word, meaning 

"high pines." 
Pintada; peak of the San Juan INIountains, California. A Spanish word, meaning 

"mottled or spotted." 
Pipestone; county, and village in same county in Minnesota, so named because of 

its celeljrated quarry of pipestone. 

IPissacassick; river in New Hampshire; 
Piscasset; stream in Maine. Derived from an Indian word, meaning " white 
stone." 
Piscataqua; river in New Hampshire, said to have been derived from the Indian 

word rishgachtigok, meaning "the confluence of two streams." 
Piscataquis; county, and a branch of the Penobscot River in Maine. An Indian 

word, meaning "divided tidal river." 
Piscataway ; village in Prince George County, INIaryland. An Indian word, meaning 

"the place of white pines." 
Pischelville ; town in Knox County, Nebraska, named for the first postmaster, 

Anton Pischel. 
Pisgah; town in Cooper County, Missouri, named indirectly for the mountain in 

Palestine. 
Pishtaka; lake in northern Illinois. An Indian word, meaning "fox." 
Pit; river in California, so named because the Indians dug pits upon its l>anks to 

catch men and animals. 
Pitcairn; island in the Patdtic, named for its discoverer. Major Pitcairn. 
Pitcairn; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Joseph Pitcairn, the 

original proprietor. 
Pitcher; creek in Hundjoldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Pitcher; town in Chenango County, New York, named for Nathaniel Pitcher, lieu- 
tenant-governor of the State. 
Pithole City; village in Venango County, Pennsylvania, named from a creek which 

had a deep hole in the rocks upon its banks. 
Pitkin; county in Colorado and village in Gunnison County, Colorado, named for 

F. AN'. Pitkin, an early governor of the State. 
Pitt; c(junty in North Carolina, and mountain in Oregon, named for Sir William 

Pitt, Earl of Chatham. 
Pittsboro; town in Calhoun (bunty, Mississippi, named for an early settler. 
[Pittsboro; town in Chatham County, North Carolina; 

J Pittsburg; city in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Named for Sir William Pitt, 
j Earl of Chatham. 

Pittsfield; town in Somerset County, Maine, named for William Pitts, of Boston. 
Pittsfield; city in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; 
Pittston; town in Kennebec County, Maine; 

Pittsylvania; t'ounty in Virginia. Named for Sir William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, 
the celebrated English statesman. 

Bull. iOT— 01^ 14 



210 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Piute; county in T'tah, named f<ir an Indian tribe, tlie word nieaninji "trueUtes." 

[Placer; county in California; 

|Placerville; city in Eldorado County, Califoi-nia. A Sl)ani^^h word, de8crii)tive of 
the sand, pebbles, etc., found in the bottom of a river, and used wlien describ- 
ing dirt with gold deposits. 

Plainfield; city in Union County, New Jersey, so named ])ecause it is situated on a 
beautiful plain. 

Plant City; town in Hillsboro County, Florida, named for II. C. Plant, who organ- 
ized a railroad system in that State. 

Plaquemines; jiarish, and a town in Iberville Parish, Louisiana, so named by 
Bienville on account of the (luantities of i)ersimmons which grew in the vicinity. 

Plata; river in Colorado. A Spanish word, meaning "silver." 

Platte; river in Nebraska, Colorado, and AVyoming. A French word, nieanin? 
"dull, flat, shallow," singularly applicable to this stream. 

Platte; counties in Nebraska and Missouri, and citv in Platte County, Missouri, 
named for the above. 

Plattekill; town in Ulster County, New York. A Dutch word, meaning "flat brook." 

Plattsburg; village in Clinton County, New York, named for Judge Zei)haniah 
Piatt, its founder. 

Plattville; village in Porter County, Indiana, named for Thomas Piatt, who laid 
it (:)ut. 

Pleasanton; city in Linn County, Kansas, named for Gen. Alfred Pleasanton. 

Pleasants; county in West Virginia, named for James Pleasants, an early governor. 

Plessis; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for the town in France. 

Plum; stream in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, the name being a translation of 
the Indian name, Sipuas-hanne. 

Plumas; county in California traversed Ijy the Feather River. A Spanish word, 
meaning "feather." 

Plymouth; counties in Iowa and Massachusetts, city in Sheboygan County, Wiscon- 
sin, and towns in Washington County, North Carolina, and Windsor County, 
Vermont, named for the above. 

Plymouth.; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, the landing place of the Pil- 
grims, which was named for the town in England where they were most hospita- 
bly entertained before sailing for America. 

Plympton; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, doubtless named for one of 
the Plymptons of England. 

Pocahontas; counties in Iowa and West Virginia, and villages in Bond County, 
Illinois, and Cape Cirardeau County, Missouri, named for the celebrated Indian 
princess. 

Pocantecs; stream running through "Sleepy Hollow," near Tarrytown, New York. 
An Indian word, meaning "a run l)etween two hills." 

Pocasset; village in Barnstaljle County, Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning 
"at which a strait widens." 

Pochaug-; stream in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "where they divide 
in two." 

Pockwocamus; lake on Penobscot River, Maine. An Indian word, meaning " nuid 
jiond." 

IPocomoke; river in Maryland; 
Pocomoke City; town in Worcester County, Maryland. An Indian word, mean- 
ing " broken or diversified by knolls or hills." 
Pocono; stream in Monroe County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

"stream between mountains." 
Poconteco; river in Westchester County, New York, said to have been densely 
shaded by trees. An Indian word, meaning "dark river." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMP:S IN THY. UNITED STATES. 211 

Pocosen; river in Virginia. Derived from tlie Indian wurd I'dnek-ansin, " place 

wliere balls, ])iillets, or lead was to l)e had." 
Poe; townshiji in Hancock County, West Vir<j;inia, named I'nr a family of i)ioneerK 

and Indian fighters. 
Poestenkill; town in Kensselaer County, New York, named from its principal 

stream. A Dutch word, meaniiii,' " pulling or foaming creek." 
Pog-e; c-ape at the north end of Cliaii|iai|uidick Island, Massachusetts. Derived from 

an ln<lian word, which means "harbor" or "place of shelter." 
Pog-ues; creek in Indiana, named for an early settler. 
Pohopoco; stream in Pennsylvania. Derived from the Indian word Pochkapockla, 

"two mountains bearing down upon each other with a stream intervening." 
Poinsett; county in Arkansas, named for Joel R. Poinsett, Secretary of War during 

the administration of Van P>uren. 
Point a la Hache; town in Pla(]ueniines Parish, Louisiana. A French word, luean- 

ing " hatchet or ax, point." 
Point Allerton; point near ]>ost<in, ^lassachusetts, named for a jiassenger on the 

Mayflower. 
Point Arena; town in IMendocino County, California, on the coast. A French 

word, meaning "sandy jxiint." 
Point Bonita; southern extremity of Marin County, California. \ French word, 

meaning "beautiful jioint." 
Point Caswell; village in Pender County, North Carolina, named for Richard Cas- 
well, a rev(ilutionai'y governor and general. 
Pointe Coupee; jtarish, and town in same parish in Louisiana, so named l»ecau.se of 

an extensive cut-off formed by the change in the course of the river. A F"rench 

word, meaning " cut-off point." 
Point Pleasant; town in Mason County, West Virginia, so named because it was 

onct' a i)lace of great natural beauty. 
Point Remove; stream in Conway County, Arkansas. A corruption of tin; Frencli 

word remous, meaning "eddy." 
Point Reyes; town in INIarin County, California, named from the point on which a 

liglit-liouse is situated, called by the Spanish Punta des Reyes, "point of the 

kings." 
Point Roberts; cape on the coast of Washington, named for its discoverer. 
Point Saint Ig-nace; village in Mackinac County, Michigan, named for Saint 

Ignacius. 
Point Shirley; point near Boston, INIassachusetts, named for William Shirley, an 

early governor. 
Pokagon; village in Cass County, Michigan, named foi' a Pottawattamie cliief, the 

name meaning "woman butcher." 
Pokomoka; ri\er in Maryland. An Indian name, meaning "place of slielllish." 
Poland; town in Andi'oscog^in County, INIaine, said to have been named for a noted 

Indian chief. 
Poland; village in Mahoning County, Ohio, named for (ii'orge Poland, its original 

propiietor. 
Polk; counties in Arkansas, Florida, (Jeorgia, Iowa, ^Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, and 

Wisconsin, and probably the counties of the same name in Minnesota, Nebraska, 

and Oregon, named for James K. Polk, a former President. 
Polk; county in North Carolina, named for Col. William Polk, of the North Carolina 

Continental Line. 
Polkton; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for Leonidas Polk. 
Pollepel; island on the Hudson River, New York. A Dutch word, meaning 

"h-dle." 
Polloksville; town in Jones Comity, North C'arolina, named for a i)rominent citizen. 



212 PLACE NAMES IN THE TTNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Polo; city in Ogle County, Illinois, named for the distingnislied traveler Marco Polo. 
Pomeroy; city in Meigs County, Ohio, named for its original proprietor, Samuel 

Wyllis Pomeroy. 
Pomfret; towns in Connecticut, New York, and Vermont, nameil for the town in 

Yorkshire, England. 
Pomme de Terra; river in Missouri. A French word, meaning "potato." 
Pomona; city in Franklin County, Kansas, named ff)r the goddess of fruit. 
Pomperaug; river in Connecticut. An Indian word, probably meaning "place of 

offering." 
Pompey; t()wn in Onondaga County, New York, named for Ponipey the Great. 
Ponchartrain; lake in Louisiana, named for a French count who was an early 

explorer of the Mississippi Valley. 
Ponkapog; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning 

" sweet water." 
Pontiac; cities in Oakland County, Michigan, and IJvingston County, Illinois, named 

for a chief of the Ottawa Indians. 
Pontoosuc; villages in Hancock County, Illinois, and Berkshire County, Massachu- 
setts, and hill in Glastonburg, Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "falls 

on the brook." 
Pontotoc; county and town in same county, in Mississippi, and town in CUiickasaw 

Nation, Indian Territory, named for a Chickasaw Indian chief, the word mean- 
ing " weed prairie." 
Pope; county in Arkansas, named for John Pope, a former governor. 
Pope; county in Illinois, named for Nathaniel Pope, a former Congressional Delegate. 
Pope; county in Minnesota, probably named for Gen. John Pope, who conducted 

the Minnesota exploring expedition. 
Popham; fort at the mouth of the Kennebec River, Maine, named for Capt. George 

Popluim, its builder, when governor of the lirst English colony in New England. 
Poplarville; town in Pearl River County, Mississippi, named for "Popular" Jim 

Smith, owner of the store in which the first railroad depot at this ]ioint was 

located. 
Poponoming; lake in Monroe County, Pennsylvania. An Indian name, meaning 

" wliere we are gazing." 
Poquessing; stream in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning "where there 

are mice." 
Poquetanuck; stream and town in New London County, Connecticut. An Indian 

word, meaning " land oi>en or broken up." 
Poquonoc; river and hill in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "cleared 

land." 
Porcupine; islands of Mount Desert, Maine, so called because at a distance they 

resemble a porcupine. 
Portage; counties in Ohio and Wisconsin and town in Livingston County, New 

York, so named because they are situated between water counses. 
Portage des Sioux; town in St. Charles C'Ounty, ]\Iissouri, so named liecause at this 

p.oint on the INIississippi the Indians carried their canoes across the peninsula to 

the Missouri. 
Port Angeles; town in Clallam County, Washington, named by Don Francisco 

Elisa, a Mexican. 
Port Austin; village in Huron County, Michigan, named for the first man to estab- 
lish a business there. 
Port Crane; village in Broome County, New York, named for one of the engineers 

of the Chenango Canal. 
Port Deposit; town in Cecil County, Maryland, so named because it is one of the 

principal depots for the pine lumber rafted down the river. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 218 

Port Dickinson; town in Broome County, New York, named in honor of Daniel S. 

Dickinson, United States Senator, lieutenant governor, and attornej^-general of 

New York. 
Port Discovery; village in Jefferson County, AVashington, named for a ship in the 

fleet of Vancouver, the explorer. 
Porter; county m Indiana, named for Commodore David l*orter. 
Porter; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for Dr. Aaron Porter, an early 

proprietor. 
Porter; town in Niagara County, New York, named for Judge Augustus Porter. 
Port Gamble; village in Kitsap County, Washington, named for a ITnited States 

naval officer. 
Port Gibson; town in Clail)orne County, Mississij^pi, named for David (Jihson, the 

former owner of the town site. 
Port Jervis; village in Orange Count}', New York, named for .hihn 1'.. Jervis, 

engineer of the Hudson and Delaware Canal. 
Portland; cities in Cund)erland County, Maine, and Multnomah County, Oregon, 

and borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named, indirectly, for the 

town in England. 
Port Leyden; town in Lewis County, New York, named after i>eydcn, Netherlands. 
Port Morris; village in Westchester County, New York, nametl for (iouverneur 

Morris. 
Port Orchard; town and harbor in Kitsap County, Washington, nauied for its dis- 
coverer. 
Port Orford; cape and town in Curry County, (Jregon, named for George, Earl of 

Orford. 
Port Penn; town in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for William Penn. 
Port Royal; river and a town in Beaufort County, South Carolina, so named 

"because of the fairness and bigness thereof." 
Portsmouth; city in Eockingham County, New Hampshire, first named Strawberry 

Banke, but later changed to its present name because situated at the river mouth 

and a good harbor. 
Portsmouth; city in Norfolk County, Virginia, named for the town in England. 
Port Tobacco; town in Charles County, Maryland, and an inlet on the Potomac in 

the same State; the name having no connection with the plant, but 1)eing a cor- 
ruption of the Indian word pautai)ang, meaning "a bulging out, a bay, or a cove.'' 
Port Townsend; harl)orand village in Jefferson County, Washington, named for 

Manpiis of Townsend. 
Portville; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, so named because it was, at an 

early date, a prominent point for the shipment of lumber, shingles, etc. 

I Posey; county in Indiana; 
Poseyville; town in Posey County, Indiana. Named for(ien. Thomas Posey, an 
early governor of the State. 
Possession; sound in Washington, so named by A^aneouver because he lan<led there 

and took possession on the King's birthday. 
Postboy; village in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, s<:) named because a i)Ostboy was 

murdered near there. 
Potaligo; village in jNIadison County, Georgia. An Indian word meaning "plenty 

of fat ducks." 
Poteau; river in Arkansas. A French word meaning "post, stake, or pillar." 
Potomac; river forming the boundary line between Maryland, Virginia, and West 

Virginia. According to different authorities, derived from the Indian word 

pethamook, "they are coming by water," or from the word potowanmeac, 

meaning "to make a fire in a place where fires are usually made;" still another 

authoritv gives its meaning as "the river of swans." 



214 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Potosi; town in Washinjjton County, Missouri, a mining town, named from the 

South American mines. 
Potsdam; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named from the town in 

Prussia. 
fPottawattomie; counties in Kansas and Oklahoma; 
\Pottawattaniie, county in Iowa, named for the Indian tribe. The word means 

"makers of fire," and was used to signify that this tribe assumed si'parate sov- 
ereignty by l)uilding a council fire for themselves. 
Potter; town in Yates County, New York, named for Arnold Potter, the original 

pn )})rietor. 
Pott^; county and township in Center County, Pennsylvania, named for Gen. 

James Potter, Revolutionary officer. 
Potter; county in South Dakota, named for a prominent physician of the State. 
Potter; county in Texas, named for Robert Pottei', teui{)orary secretary of the navy 

of Texas in 1836. 
Potter Hollow; village in Albany County, New York, named for Sanmel Potter. 
Potterville; village in Eaton C'ounty, Michigan, named for George N. Potter. 
Potts Camp; town in Marshall County, INIississippi, named for Col. E. F. Potts. 

IPottstown; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania; 
Pottsville; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. Named for .Tohn Potts, a 
large landowner, who founded the town. 
Poughkeepsie; city in Dutchess County, New York. Derived from the Delaware 

Indian word apokeepsingk, meaning "safe and pleasant harbor," or "shallow 

inlet, safe harbor for small boats." 
Powder; stream in Wyoming, so named l)ecause of the dark powder-colored sand 

on its banks. 
Powell; county in Kentucky, named for Lazerus W. Powell, a former governor. 
Powell; county in Montana, named for the mountain in Colorado which was named 

for J. W. Powell, geologist and explorer. 
Powellsville ; town in Bertie County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Powellton; town in Fayette County, West Virginia, nameil for E. Powell, interested 

in a large coal and coke company there. 
Powell Valley; village in Multnomah County, Oregon, named for an old settler. 
Powelton; village in Hancock County, Georgia, named for a former resident. 
Poweshiek; county in Iowa, named for an Indian chief. 
Powhatan; county in Virginia and city in Brown County, Kansas, named for the 

celebrated Indian chief. 
Pownal; towns in Cumberland County, Maine, and Bennington County, Vermont, 

named for Governor Thomas Pownal, of Mas.sachusetts. 
Poygan; village in Winnebago County, Wiscon.sin. An Indian word, meaning 

"pipe." 
Poynette; village in Columbia County, Wisconsin, named for Peter Paquette; the 

present name a clerical error. 
Poysippi; village in Waushara County, Wisconsin. Derived from the Indian word 

poygansip2»i, meaning "running into the lake." 
Prairie; county in Arkansas, so named on account of its treeless plains. 
Prairie; stream in Wisconsin. Derived from the Indian word musk-ko-day yaw 

se-be, "prairie river." 
Prairie du Chien; city in Crawford County, Wisconsin. A French phrase, mean- 
ing " dog i^rairie." 
Prairie du Rocher; village in Randolph County, Illinois, behind which is a rocky 

'oluff. A French i)hrase, meaning "the meadow of the rock." 
Prairie du Sac; village in Sauk County, Wisconsin, originally in the territory of the 

Sauk Indians. A French phrase, meaning "the meadow of theSauks." 



fiAXNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 215 

Prairie Home; vilhige in Cooper County, .Mij^souri, so named on account of the 

cluiraeter of the land. 
Pratt; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Calel) IMutt, .second 

lieutenant Company D, Second Kansas. 
Prattsburg-; town in Steuben County, New York, naiu(><l for Capt. Joel Pralt, one; 

of tlie lirf^t settlers. 
Pratts Hollow; village in IMadisou County, New Voriv, named for Jolin aii<l Mat- 

tlu'w I'T-att, early settlers. 
Prattsville; town in Greene County, New York, named for Zadock I'ratt. 
Preble; county in Ohio and town in Cortland County, New York, named for ( 'om- 

modore Edward Prel)le. 
Prentice; village in Price County, Wisconsin, named for Alexander I'rt'ntice, tiic 

lirst postmaster. 
Prentiss; county in 3Iissis«ippi, named for Sergt. Smith Prentiss, a gifted foi-ensic 

oi'ator. 
Prescott; town in Yavapai County, Arizona, named for W. II. Prescott, the historian. 
Prescott; city in Linn County, Kansas, named for C. H. Prescott, a railroad oflicial. 
Prescott; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Col. William I'res- 

cott, commanding the Americans at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Prescott; city in I'ierce County, Wisconsin, named for P. Prescott. 
Presidio; county in Texas. A Spanish word, meaning "a garrison of soldiers." 
Presque Isle; county in Michigan and town in Aroostook C'ounty, Maine. \ French 

phrase, meaning "nearly an island." 
Preston; township in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, nanie(l forjudge Samuel Pres- 
ton, an early settler. 
I Preston; county in West ^'irginia; 
Prestonburg; town in Floyd County, Kentucky. Named for .Tames P. Prestmi, an 
early governor of Virginia. 
Preston Hollow; village in All>any County, New York, named for the lirst family 

of settlers. 
Prestonville; town in Carroll County, Kentucky, named for James P. Preston, an 

early governor of Virginia. 
Presumpscot; village in Cumberland County, INIaine. Indian word, meaning "rongli 

place in the river." 
Preuss; mountain in Idaho, named for a topographer of the Fremont exploring 

party. 
Pribilof; islands of Alaska, named for the Kussian navigator wlio discovereil them. 
Price; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Price; county in Wisconsin, named for Congressman William T. Price. 
Primg-h.ar; town in O'Brien County, Iowa, named by combining the initials of the 

])i'rsons present at the laying of the corner stone. 
Prince Edward; county in Virginia, named for Edward of F^ngland, son of Ferdinand. 
Prince George; counties in Maryland and Virginia, named for Prince George of 

Denmark, afterwards King of England. 
Princess Anne; county in Virginia, named for Princess, afterwards (^ueen, Anne <if 

England. 
Princeton; mountain in Colorado, named foi- Princeton University. 
Princeton; city in Gibson county, Indiana, named for Hon. William Prince. 
Princeton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the Rev. Thomas 

Prince, pastor of Old South Church, Boston. 
Princeton; town in Mercer County, West Virginia, nameil for the battlefield u[)on 

which (ien. Hugh Mercer fell. 
Princetow^n; town in Schenectady (bounty, New York, named for John Prince, a 

member of Albany County's assembly. 



216 PLACE NAMp:s IK THE ITNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Prince William; county in Virginia, named for the Duke of Cumberland. 
Proctor; town in Lee County, Kentucky, named for the Rev. Joseph Proctor. 
Proctor; town in Kutland County, Vermont, named for Redtield Proctor, Senator 

from that State. 
Proctor Knott; villa,<;e in St. I^ouis County, Minnesota, named foi- I'roctor Knott, 

of Kentucky. 
Proctorsville; vilia>,H' in Windsor County, Vermont, named for the fatlier of Sen- 
ator Proctor. 
Promised Land; village in Suffolk County, New York, !<o named because the land 

for factories was promised but never given. 
Promontory; village in Boxelder County, Ctah, so name(l because it is tlie highest 

point (jf the Promontory Range. 
Prophetstown; village in AVhiteside County, Illinois, named foi the "Shawnee 

Prophet," the brother of the Indian chief Tecum.seh. 
Prospect; towns in New Haven County, Connecticut, ami Waldo County, jNFaine, 

and peak in Yellowstone Park, so named because of the elevation. 
Prosperity; town in Ne\vl)eiTy County, 8outli Carolina, named on optomistic hopes. 
Providence; county and river in Rhode Island, named from the city in the same 

State, which was so called ])y Roger Williams, "for God's merciful jirovidence 

to him in his distress." 
Provincetovra; town in Barnstal)le County, ^Massachusetts, incorporated as the 

Province Town, because the inhabitants were exem.pt from taxation. 
Provo; river and town in Utah County, Utah, a contraction oi the name — Provost — 

of the man for whom they were named. 
ProAvers; county in Colorado, named for John W. Prowers, a jirominent stockman 

and trader in early days. 
Psimmdse; several lakes in Minnesota, with wiitl rice growing on their l)anks. An 

Indian word, meaning "wild rice." 
Ptansinta; ]>eninsula on Lac Traverse and the IMiiniesota liiver. An Indian word, 

meaning " otter tail." 
Puckaway; lake in Green Lake County, Wisconsin. An In<iian word, meaning 

"cat-tail Hag." 
Puckety; stream in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

"throw it away." 
Pueblo; county and city in same county in Colorado. A Spanish w<irtl, meaning 

"a collection of j)eople, a town or village." 
Puente; village in Los Angeles County, CaHlornia. A Spanish word, meaning 

"bridge." 
Puerco; river in New Mexico. A Spanish woi'd, meaning " hog." 
Puerto de Luna; village in San Miguel County, New Mexico. A Spanish word, 

meaning "port of the moon." 
Puget; sound in Washington, named for Peter Paget, its discoverer. 
Pulaski; counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Rlissouri, and 

Virginia; towns in Giles County, Tennessee, and Pulaski County, V^irginia, and 

villages in Oswego County, New York, and Pulaski County, Illinois, named for 

the Polish patriot, Count Casimir Pulaski. 
Pulteney; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Sir William Pulteney. 
Pungoteague; stream and town in Accomac County, Virginia, supposed to be so 

named on account of the extremely sandy character of the county; the name, 

an Indian one, meaning "the place of powder." 
Punta Gorda; town in De Soto County, Florida, so named on account of the point 

near by. A Spanish word, meaning "large point." 
Punxsutawaney; borough in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, 

meaning "the habitation of the sand Hy." 



r,ANNETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 217 

Purgatory; river in Colorado, tributary of tlic Arkansas. An angiicization of the 
F-rtMH'h name "riviere Purgatoire." 

Purvis; town in .Alarion County, Mississippi, nameil lor llic former owner of the 
railroad station site. 

Put in Bay; bay in Ottawa County, Ohio, Lake Erie, and village in same county; so 
named because Commodore Perry ])ut in there with his fleet. 

Putnam; eountie.s in Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New York, Ohio, 
Tennessee, and West Virginia; eity in Windham C-ountv, Connectieut, and pond 
and ereek in New York, named for (Jen. Israel Putnam. 

Pyniatuning; tributary of the C'henango in Mereer County, Pennsylvania. An 
Indian word, meaning "the crooked mouthed man's dwelling place." 

Pyramid; canyon of the Colorado River, so named because of the monument-like 
])inna(!le of porphyritic rock which crowns the left bank near the entrance. 

Pyramid; harbor in Alaska, so named liecause of the conical sluqx' of one of its 
islands. 

Pyramid; lake in Nevada, so named on account of the shajx' of an island in the lake. 

Pyroxene; peak in the same range as the Old Bald in Montana; another name for 
the nn'neral augite. 

Pysht; river in Washington. The Clallam Indian word for fish. 

QiUakake; stream in Carbon County, Pennsylvania. \n Indian word, meaning 
"pine lands." 

Quantico; town in Wicomico County, INIaryland. An Indian word, meaning "danc- 
ing, place of frolicking." 

Qiuapaw; nation in Indian Territory, named from the Indian tribe; the word mean- 
ing "down-stream people." 

Quasqueton; town in Buchanan County, Iowa, derived from an Indian word mean- 
ing "rapid water." 

Quebec; village in Union County, {Georgia. Said by some authorities to be ilerived 
from the Indian, meaning "being shut," "Tiarrow," or, "fearful rocky cliff;" 
others say it is derived from the French word quelbei;, "what a beak!" 

Q,ueen Anne; county in Maryland, named for Queen Anne of England, reigning at 
the time of its organization. 

Queen Mahon; stream in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Derived fron the Indian 
word, Cuwei-niahoni, meaning "]>ine-tree lick." 

Queens; county in New York, named for Catherine of l^>raganza, wife of Charles II, 
of England. 

Quemahoning; stream in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. Derivation same as 
Queen Mahon. 

Quenemo; village in Osage County, Kansas, named for an Ottawa Indian, who lived 
among the Sacs and I'oxes, near Melvern. 

Queponco; creek in Maryland. An Indian word, meaning "ashes of i)ine woods." 

Quiccoane; branch of the Missouri River. An Indian w<jrd, meaning "running 
river." 

Quidnic; river and i)ond in Rhode Island and ('onnecticut. An Indian word, 
meaning "place at the end of the hill." 

Quillayute; river in Washington, named for the Indian tribe Kwiilehiut, of which 
the river's name is a corruption. 

Quincy; city in Adams County, Illinois, and village in Branch County, .Michigan, 
named for John (Quincy Adams, a former President. 

Quincy; city in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Col. John Quincy. 

Quindaro; town in Wyandotte County, Kansas, named for the Indian woman, 
former owner of the land. The Indian meaning, "a bundle of sticks." 

Quinlan; village in Hunt County, Texas, named for C A. (.^niidan, former vice- 
president of the Houston and Texas Central Railroad. 



218 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Quinnebaug; river, and a village in Windham County, Connecticut. An Indian 

word, meaning "long pond." 
Quinnesec; village in Dickinson County, Michigan. An Indian word, meaning 

" where the river forms smoke," and given this village on account of the falls in 

the Menominee River at this point. 
Quinnipiac; river in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "long water pond," 

or, according to another authority, " the surrounding country." 
Quinsigamond; lake in Worcester County, Massachusetts. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "the pickerel fishing place." 
Quintana; town in Brazoria County, Texas, named for Andre Qnintana, jirominent 

in tlie early days of Texas. 
Quitman; counties in Georgia and Mississijijii, towns in Jackson County, Georgia, 

and C'larke County, Mississippi, and village in Nodaway County, Missouri, named 

for Gen. John A. Quitman, former governor of Mississippi and officer in the 

Mexican war. 
Quitopahilla; branch of the Great Swatara in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. 

An Indian word, meaning "a spring that flows from the ground among the 

pines." 
QpUOgue; village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian word, meaning "a clam." 
Rabbit Ears; mountain of the Park Range, Colorado, so named on account of its 

resemblance to a rabl)it ear. 
Rabun; county in Georgia, named for William Rabun, an early governor of the 

State. 
Raccoon; creek in Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Corruption of the Indian arrath- 

kune, or arathcone, the procyon lotor of the naturalist. 
Racine; county and a city in same county in Wisconsin, situated at the mouth of 

Root River. A French word meaning " root." 
Radford; city in Montgomery County, Virginia, named for William Radford, a 

prominent citizen. 
Radnor; village in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named for the town in Wales. 
Ragged; moimtain in Knox County, Maine, so named on account of its ragged 

apjiearance. 
Rabway; river in New Jersey. Said to be <lerived from the Indian word nawakwa, 

meaning " in the middle of the forest." 
Rahway; city in Union County, New Jersey, named for the Indian sachem, Rahwack. 
Rainier; town in Columbia County, Oregon, and mountain in Washington, named 

for Rear-Admiral Rainier. 
Rains; county in Texas, named for Emory Rains, who was prominent in the poli- 

tit's of the Repul)lic and later in those of the State. 
Rainsville; town in Warren County, Indiana, named for the proprietor, Isaac Rains. 
Rainy; lake in Minnesota. An anglicization of the original French name, lac de la 

Pluire. 
Raisen; river in Michigan, so named on account of the abundance of grapes which 

foi-merly grew upon its banks. 
Raleigh; county in West Virginia, city in North Carolina, and town in Smith 

County, Mississippi, and Shelby County, Tennessee, named for Sir Walter Raleigh. 
Ralls; county in Missouri, named for Daniel Ralls. 

Ralston; village in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, named for Matthew C. Ralston. 
Ramseur; town in Randolph County, North Carolina, named for Gen. Stephen 

Ramseur. 
Ramsey; counties in Minnesota and in North Dakota, named for the war governor of 

Minnesota, Hon. Alexander Ramsey. 
Randall; county in Texas, named for Horace Randall, a brigadier-general of the 

Confederacy. 



(iANNKTT] TLACE NAMES TN THE TTNITED STATp:S. 219 

Randalls; island in New Yuik, nanuMl for Jonathan Randall, who owns it. 
Randleman; town in Randolph C'onnty, North Carolma, named for a i)ronun(.Mit 

citizen. 
Randolph; counties in Alabama, xVrkansas, Georgia, and Missouri, and towns in 

Coos County, New Hampshire; Orange County, Vermont, and C-attaraugus 

County, New York, named for Jolin Randolph, of Roanoke, Virginia. 
Randolph; county in Indiana, named for Thomas Randolph, killed at Tiiijiecanoe. 
Randolph; county in Illinois, named for Beverly Randolph. 
Randolph; village in Dakota C'ounty, Nebraska, named for the first mail carrier 

between Sioux City and Elkhorn Valley — Jasjier Randolph. 
Randolph; county in North Carolina and town in Norfolk County, Mas.sacliusettss, 

named for Peyton Randolph, of Virginia. 
Randolph; county in West Virginia, named for Edmund Randolph, an early 

governor. 
Rangeley; town and ])lantation in Franklin ('ounty, jNIaine, and one of tlie Andros- 
coggin lakes in the same State, named for an Englishman, an early settler and 

large landowner. 
Rankin; county in Mississippi, named for Christctpher Rankin, Congressman from 

that Statt'. 
Ransom; village in Hillsdale County, Michigan, named for Ei)ai)hroditus Ransom, 

former governor of the State. 
Ransom; county in North Dakota, named for Fort Ransom. 
Ransomville; village in Niagara County, New York, named for Clark Ransom, one 

of the first settlers. 
Raphe; township in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A corruption of an Indian 

word meaning "a fort of tents." 
Rapidan; river in Virginia, named for Anne, Queen of England, "rapid Anne." 
Rapides; parish in Louisiana. A French word meaning "rapids" and given this 

parish on account of the rapids or falls in the Red River. 
Rappahannock; river and county in Virginia. An Indian word meaning "a 

stream with an ebb and flow." 
Raquette; river in Hamilton County, New York, from French word meaning 

"snowshoe." 
Raritan; stream and a town in Somerset County, New Jersey. An Indian word 

meaning "forked river." 
Raspberry; island, one of the Apostles, Wisconsin. Tran.silation of an Indian word 

meaning "raspberries are plentiful here." 
Rathbone; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Cen. Ransom Rathbone, 

an early settler. 
Raton; village in Las Animas County, Colorado. A Spanish word meaning 

"mouse." 
Raumaug; lake in Litchfield County, Connecticut. A corruption of the Indian 

word, Wonkemaug, meaning "crooked fishing place." 
Ravalli; county in Montana, named for a Catholic priest. 
Ravenna; village in Portage County, Ohio, named f(^r the city in Italy. 
Ravenswood; town in Jai'kson County, West Virginia, named for the Ravens- 
worths, a family of England, but misspelled by the engravers in making the 

first maps and never corrected. 
Rawhide; creek in Nebraska, said to l)e so named because a w'hite man was flayed 

ujion its banks by a party of Pawnee Indians. 
Rawlins; county in Kansas and city in Carbon County, Wisconsin, named for 

John A. Rawlins, Secretary of War under President Grant. 
Ray; creek in California, named for an early settler. 



220 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Ray; county in Missonri, named for John Ray, a nienibcr of the convention wiiich 

formed the State constitution. 
Raymohd; village in Madera County, C^alifornia, named for Raymond Whitconib, 

who organized a jjarty of tourists to make the trip to the Yosemite by stages 

from this point. 
Raymond; town in C'Uml)erland County, Maine, named for Capt. William Raymond. 
Raymond; town in Roi'kingham County, New Hampshire, named for John Ray- 
mond, a grantee. 
Raymondville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Benjamin 

Raymond, first agent. 
Raynham; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named for the parish of Rain- 
ham, Essex County, England. 
Raysville; village in Henry County, Indiana, named for Governor Ray. 
Reading; town in Fairlield County, Connecticut, named for Col. John Read, an 

early settler. 
Reading; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and city in Berks County, 

Pennsylvania, named for the town in Berkshire, England. 
Readsboro; town in Bennington County, Vermont, named for John Read, one of 

the original patentees. 
Readstown; village in Vernon County, Wisconsin, named for its founder. 
Rector; town in Clay County, Arkansas, named for Wharton or Elias Rector, dis- 
tinguished in the eai-ly Indian affairs of the State. 
Red; range of mountains in Alabama, so called on account of its hematite iron ores. 
Red; river in Arkansas, so named on account of the color of the sediment with 

which it is freighted. 
Red; group of mountains in Wyoming, so named because formed of porphyry, 

which becomes dark red when exposed to the sun. 
Red Bank; towns in Marshall County, Mi.'isissippi, and Monmouth County, New 

Jersey, so named on account of the reddish appearance of the banks of the rivers 

upon wliich they are located. 
Red Bud; several places in the United States bear this name, given them on account 

of the i^resence of a small ornamental North American tree; among them being 

a city in Randolph County, Illinois. 
Red Cap; creek in California, named for a near-by mine. 
Red Cedar; river in Iowa, so named on account of the abundance of this tree once 

found upon its banks. 
Red Cloud; city in AVebster County, Nebraska, named for the celebrated Indian 

chief. 
Redden; village in Sussex County, Delaware, named for Col. William O. Redden. 
Redfield; town in Dallas County, Iowa, named for Colonel Redheld. 
Redford; village in Wayne County, Michigan, so named l)ecause it was a fording 

place on the river Rouge. 
Red Hook; town in Dutchess County, New York. A translation of the original 

Dutch name, Roode Hoeck, which they gave it on account of a near-by marsh 

covered with cranberries. 
Red Jacket; village in Erie County, New York, named for a chief of the Seneca 
Indians, who derived his name from the brilliant red jacket which he wore, 

given him l)y a British oflicer. 
Red Lake; county in Minnesota, named for a lake. 
Red Oak; city in Montgomery County, Iowa, so named on account of a near-by 

grove of trees of this species. 
Redondo Beach; city in Los Angeles County, California, named from a Spanish word 

meaning " round." 
Red River; county in Texas and parish in Louisiana, named from Red River, 
which borders Texas on the north. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 221 

Red Rock; town in Douglas County, Minnesota, so naincil on accnunt of a iieav-by 
f^ranite l)0wlder painted red by tlie Indians. 

Red Rock; village in Columbia County, New York, naiiu'(l for a red rock, sur- 
mounted ])y a wooden column 10 feet high bearing the date ISl'5. 

Redstone; branch of the Monongahela in Pennsylvania, (l('rive<l from the Indian 
word, Machkachsen, meaning "red stone creek." 

Redwillow; county in Nebraska, so named on account of the abuntlance of trees of 
this species. 

Redwing; city in (Toodhue ('ounty, iMinnesota, named for an Indian chief. 

Redwood; river in Indiana. Derived from the Indian word mus(jua me tig, mean- 
ing "redwood tree river." 

Redwood; county in IMinnesota, drained by a river of the same name, which was so 
named on account of the species of wood which grows upon its banks. 

Reed; township in Butler County, Nebraska, named for David Reed, a pioneer. 

Reedsburg; city in Sauk County, Wisconsin, named for D. C. Reed, an early settler. 

Reedy; town in Roane County, West Virginia, named for a creek where reeds grow 
abundantly. 

Reese; valley and river in Nevada, named for a guide. 

Reese; stream in Lander County, Nevada, named for an early settler. 

Reeseville; village in Dodge County, Wisconsin, named for Samuel Reese, the first 
settler. 

Reeves; county in Texas, named for (reorge H. Reeves. 

Reevesville; town in Dorchester County, South ('arolin;i, naiucd for a prominent 
family of the A'icinity. 

Refugio; county and town in Texas, name<l for a Mexican missionary establishment 
on the Mission River. A Spanish word meaning " refuge." 

Rehoboth; town in Sussex County, Delaware, given this scriptural name because it 
was first established as a place for yearly camp meetings. 

Rehoboth.; town in Bristol ('ounty, Massachusetts; a Hebrew \v(M-d meaning "ample 
room." Said to have been foundeil ])y William Blackstone and so named liy him 
as significant of his aim: "Room outside of the narrow confines of Puritan intol- 
erance." Another authority ascribes the name to Rev. Samuel Newman, who 
established a church there and gave the town this name because "the I^ord hath 
made room for us." 

Reidsville; village in Knox C^)unty, Nebraska, named for Ciiarles J. Reid, the first 
settler. 

Reidsville; town in Rockingham County, North Carolina, named for David S. Reid, 
a former governor. 

Remsen; town in Oneida C'ounty, New York, named f(n' Henry Remsen, a patentee. 

Rennert; town in Ro))eson County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resilient. 

Reno; county in Kansas, town in Washoe County, Nevada, and village in Venango 
County, Pennsylvania, named for Gen. Jesse L. Reno. 
Rensselaer; count}' in New Y<jrk; 

Rensselaerville ; town in Albany County, New Y^ork. Named for Kilian van 
Rensselaer, who j)ianted a colony on his lands to Ije known as Rensselaerwyck, 
now as above. 

Renville; county in Minnesota, named for Joseph Renville, an Indian trader and 
prominent citizen. 

Republic; county in Kansas, named for the Pawnee Rei)ublic, a principal division 
of the Pawnee Indians formerly located in this comity. 

Republican; village in Harlan County, Nebraska, named from the Repul)lican 
River. 

Revere; town in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, named for Paul Revere. 

Revillagigedo; group of islands off the coast of Alaska, named for Conde Revila 
Gigedo, viceroy of New Spain, 



222 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Reynolds; county in Missouri, named for Thomas Reynolds, a former governor. 

Reynoldsburg'; village in Franklin County, Ohio, probaljly named for Jeremiah 
N. Reynolds. 

Rhinebeck; town in Dutchess County, New York. A combination of the names of 
the man who founded the town — William Beekman — and his native town — 
Rhineland. 

Rhode Island; one of the original tliirteen States, said to have received its name 
from a small island in Narraganset Bay named Roode Eylandt, "red island;" 
according to another authority, named for the island of Rhodes. 

Rib; river in Wisconsin. A translation of an Indian word. 

Rice; county in Kansas, named for Brig. Gen. Samuel A. Rice. 

Rice; county in Minnesota, named for Senator Henry M. Rice, a pioneer. 

Rice Lake; city in Barron County, Wisconsin, so called because situated on a lake 
where wild rice is abundant. 

Riceville; town in Mitchell County, Iowa, named for three brothers. 

Rich; county in Utah, named for Apostle Charles C. Rich, one of the meml)ers of 
the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints. 

Richardson; county in Nebraska, named for William A. Richardson, former gov- 
ernor of the Territory. 

Richburg; town in Allegany County, New York, named in honor of Alvan Rich- 
ardson, the first settler, who went there from Otsego County in 1819. 

Richburg-; town in Chester County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 

Richfield; city in ]\Iorton County, Kansas, so named because it was thought it would 
prove a " rich field." 

Rich Hill; city in Bates County, Missouri, so named l)ecauseof tlie fertile hill lands 
around it. 

Richland; counties in Illinois, North Dakota, Oliio, South Carolina, and Wisconsin, 
and parish in Louisiana, so named on account of the rich character of the soil. 

Richmond; counties in Georgia, New York, and North Carolina, and town in Berk- 
shire County, Massachusetts, named for Lennox, the Duke of Richmond. 

Richmond; town in Washington County, Rhode Island, thought to have been named 
for Edward Richmond, attorney-general of the colony. 

Richmond; county in Virginia, and city in Henrico County of the same State, so 
named on account of its resemblance to Richmond, Surrey County, England. 

Richthofen; mountain in Colorado, named for the geologist. 

Richville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Salmon Rich, an 
early settler. 

Rickreal; river and village in Polk County, Oregon. A corruption of the French, 
La Creole, meaning "the Creole." 
Ridgefield; l)orough in Bergen County, New Jersey; 
Ridge Spring; town in Saluda County, South Carolina; 
Ridgeville; town in Dorchester County, South Carolina; 

Ridgeway; towns in Orleans County, New York, and Fairtielil County. South 
Carolina. Named on account of the presence of ridges of some elevation near by. 

Ridgeway; borough in Elk County, Pennsylvania, named for John Jacob Ridgeway, 
(if Philadelphia, a large landowner. 

Ridley Park; borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named for the native 
l)]ace of its settlers in Cheshire, England. 

Rienzi; town in Alcorn County, Mississippi, named for tlie Roman tribune. 

Riga; town in Lenawee County, Michigan, named for the city in Rus.sia. 

Riley; county in Kansas, named for Maj. Gen. Bennet Riley, United States Army. 

Rimersburg; borough in Clarion County, Pennsylvania, named for John Rimer, its 
first settler. 

Rincon; town in Donna Ana County, New Mexico. A Spanish word meaning 
"corner," or " inside corner." 



I 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 223 

Rindge; town in Cheshire Connty, New Hampshire, nanie(l for one of the orijiinal 

proiirietors. 
Ring-g-old; eounty in Iowa, named for Maj. Samnel Kin^i^old, an ottieer of the Mex- 

iean war. 
Ring-wood; villages in Passaic Connty, New Jersey, and Halifa.\ Comity, North Caro- 
lina, named for the town in England. 
Rio Arriba; ronnty in New Mexico intersected by the Rio (irande del Norte, "great 

river of the North." A Spanish name meaning "ui^per," or "high river." 
Rio Blanco; connty in Colorado, named from the AVhite River, of which the 

county's name is the Spanish interpretation. 
Rio de las Piedras; stream in New Mexico. A Spanisli jilirasi' nu'aning "the 

river of stones." 
Rio de los Americanos; river in California. A Spanish phrase meaning "river 

of the Americans." 
Rio de los Martires; river in California. A Spanish phrase meaning " river of the 

martyrs." 
Rio de los Mimbres; river in New Mexico. A Spanish phrase meaning " river of 

the willows." 
Riode Mercede; river in California. A Spanish phrase meaning " river of mercy." 
Rio Frio; river in Texas. A Spanish word meaning "cold river." 
Rio Grande; river rising in the Rocky Mountains and emptying into the Gulf, 

which gives name to a county in Colorado. A Spanish phrase meaning "great 

river." 
Rio Grande Pyramid; mountain of the San Juan Range, Colorado, so called be- 
cause its form is that of a perfect pyramid. 
Rio Llano; river in Texas. A Si)anish phrase, meaning "river of the i)lain." 
Rio Salinas; river in Arizona, having salty deposits upon its banks which caused 

it to be given this Spanish name, meaning "salt river." 
Rio Seco; town in Butte County, California. A Spanish phrase, meaning "dry 

ri ver. ' ' 
Rio Verde; river in Arizona. A Spanish phrase, meaning "green river." 
Rio Vista; town in Solano County, California, at the month of the Sacramento 

River. A Spanish phrase, meaning "river view." 
Ripley; counties in Indiana and Missouri, and town in Chautamiua County, New 

York, named for Gen. Eleazer W. Ripley. 
Ripley; town in Payne County, Oklahoma, named for a leading oflicial of theSante 

Fe Railroad. 
Ripley; town in Jackson County, "West Virginia, named for a lesident. 
Ripon; city in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, named for the town in England. 
Rippey; town in Greene County, Iowa, named for Capt. C. M. Rippey, an old 

settler. 
Rising City; village in Butler County, Nebraska, named for the owners of the 

town site, A. W. and S. W. Rising. 
Rising Sun; village in Dearborn County, Indiana, so named by its founder, John 

James, when viewing the sunrise from that location. 
Ritchie; county in West Virginia, named for Thomas Ritchie, editor of the Richmond 

En()uirer. 
Rivanna, river and township in Virginia, named for Queen Anne, of England. 
River Falls; city in Pierce County, Wisconsin, so named because of its situation 

near the falls of the Kinnikinnic River. 
Riverside; many places in the United States, so named on account of their situation 

near some river, among these being a county in California and town in Wash- 
ington County, Iowa. 
Rivoli; town in Mercer County, Illinois, named for the town in Italy. 



224 placp: names in the united states. [bull. 197. 

Roach; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for a man who was drowned 

in it. 
Roan; plateau in Colorado, so named on account of the color of the cliffs rising from 

the Grand River Valley. 
Roan; mountain in North Carolina, so named on account of the color of the laurel 

growing ui)on its sunnnit. 
Roane; county in Tennessee, named for (iovernor Archil)aid Roane. 
Roane; coimty in West Virginia, named for Spencer Roane, judge of the supreme 

court of the State in its early days. 
Roanoke; towns in Randolph County, Alabama, Howard County, Missouri, and 

Genesee County, New York, named for the home of John Randolph in Virginia. 
Roanoke; countj^ and city in same county in Virginia, river in Virginia and North 

Carolina, town in Huntington County, Indiana, and village in Woodford County, 

Illinois. An Indian word, designating a species of shell which they used for 

money. 
Roaring-; mountain in Yellowstone Park, so named on account of the shrill sound 

made by the steam escaping from a vent in its summit. 
Roaring Fork; branch of the Grand River in Colorado, so named from its steep 

and rai)id descent. 
Robbinston; town in Washington County, Maine, named for its original owners, 

Edward H. and Nathaniel J. Robbins. 
Roberts; county in South Dakota, named for Moses Robert (Robar) a fur trader. 
Roberts; county in Texas, named for Oran M. Roberts, former governor of the 

State. 
Robertson; county in Kentucky, named for ex-Chief Justice George Rol)ertson, a 

leading pioneer. 
Robertson; county in Tennessee, named for Gen. James Robertson, a pioneer. 
Robertson; county in Te.xas, named for Sterling C. Robertson, who received a colo- 
nization grant from Mexico. 
Robeson; county in North Carolina, named for Col. Thomas Rol)eson, of tiie North 

Carolina Revolutionary Militia. 
Robinson; tcnvn in Summit County, Colorado, named for George B. Robinson, 

former lieutenant-governor of the State. 
Robinson; city in Brown County, Kansas, named for Governor Charles Robinson. 
Rocbe a Gris; river in Adams County, Wisconsin. A French phrase, meaning 

"gray rock." 
Roche Moutonnee; branch of the Eagle River in Colorado, so named on at'count 

of the glacial rocks of its gorge. ' 
Roche Percee; river in Boone County, Missouri. A French phrase, meaning 

"pierced rock." 
Rochester; town in riymouth County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

England. 
Rochester; city in Monroe County, New York, nameil for the senior i)roj)rietor. 

Col. Nathaniel Rochester. 
Rochester; town in Ulster County, New York, named for tlie Earl of Rochester. 
Rock; counties in Minnesota, Nebraska, and Wisconsin, and river in Wisconsin, so 

named on account of the rocky character of the soil. 
Rockaway; river, and a borough in Morris County, New Jersey. Supi)osed to be 

derived from the Indian word Reckawackes, or Achewek, meaning "bushy," or 

"difficult to cross." 
Rockbridge; county in Virginia, so named on account of tiie natural bridge of rock 

over Cedar Creek. 
Rockford; city in WMnnebago County, Illinois, so named because of its situation on 

both sides of Rock River. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IlSr THE UNITED STATES, 225 

Rockford; village in Wells ('ounty, Iiidiiuui, so nanK'<l beeaui^e it is hx-ated at a 

foi'd on Uo(_'k Creek. 
Rockingham; counties in New llanipsliire, North Carolina, and Virginia, named 

for the ?dar(juis of Koekinghani, premier of England at the time of the rejieal of 

tiie stamj) art. 
Rock Island; (■ounty, and city in same county in Illinois, so name<l on account of 

the island in the Mississippi whic^h is formed of limestone. 
Rockland; city in Knox County, Maine, so nanieil because of its granite (juarries. 
Rockland; county in New York, so named on account of its extensive quarries of 

H'd sandstone. 
Rockport; town in Spencer County, Indiana, so iiametl l)ecause of the hanging 

rock, "Lady A\'ashington Rock," on the Ohio River. 
Rockport; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, so named on accountof the granite 

((uarries near the sea. 
Rockville; village in Allegany County, New York, so named on account of a (piarry 

in the vicinity. 
Rockwall; county in Texas, so named on account of an underground wall. 
Rodnian; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Daniel Roilman, of 

Hudson. 
Rodney; town in Jefferson County, Mississippi, named for Judge Rodni-y, of the 

State. 
Roger Mills; county in Oklalioina, named for Rogt'r (.1. Mills, Senator from Texas. 
Rogers; mountain in Tennessee, named for William B. Rogers, the geologist. 
Rogue; river in Oregon, named for the Tototins, an Indian tribe of nefarious habits, 

who wei'e termed Coquins by the French and Rogues by the Knglish. 
Rohnerville; town in Humboldt County, California, named for Henry Rohner, an 

early settler. 
Rolesville; town in Wake County, North Carolina, named for a pi'ominent resident. 
Rolette; county in North Dakota, named for the Hon. Joseph Rolette, an early 

settler of Red River Valley. 
Rolfe; town in Pocahontas County, Iowa, said by some authorities to be named for 

the .young Englishman who married Pocahontas, but l»y otliers for the man 

who previously owned the town site. 
Rollinsford; town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, named for a resident 

family. 
Rollinsville; town in (Tili)in County, Colorado, named for John C^. A. Rollins. 
Rome; many towns and villages in the United States, named for the city in Italy, 

among them the city in Oneida County, New York. 
Romulus; towns in Wayne County, IMichigan, and Seneca County, New York, 

named for the founder of Rome. 
Rondout; creek in Ulster County, New York, the name being a corruption of 

"redoubt," a fortitication built upon the stream by the early Dutch. 
Roodhouse; city in Creene County, Illinois, named for John Roodhouse, its founder. 
Rooks; county in Kansas, named for John C. Rooks, memljer r^f Company I, Elev- 
enth Kansas. 
Root, town in Montgomery County, New York, named foi- Erastus Root, of Dela- 
ware County. 
Roscoe; town in Coshocton County, Ohio, named for William Roscoe, the English 

historian. 
Roscommon; counts in Michigan, named for the county in Ireland. 
Rose; town in Wayne County, New York, named for Robert- L. Rose, of Geneva. 
Rosebroom; town in Otsego County, New York, named for Abraham Rosebroom, 

one of the earliest settlers. 

Bull. 1U7— 02 15 



226 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Bosedale; city in Wyandotte County, Kansas, so named because when located the 

townsite was a mass of wild rose bushes. 
Rosita; town in Custer County, Colorado, said to have been so named by the early 

miners because of the thickets of wild roses which surrounded the springs in the 

vicinity. 
Boss; town in Kent County, Michigan, named for Daniel Ross. 
Boss; county in Ohio, named for Hon. James Ross, of Pennsylvania. 
Bossie; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for a sister of David 

Parish, the proj^rietor. 
Bossville; city in Shawnee County, Kansas, named for W. W. Ross, agent of the 

Pottawatomie Indians. 
Bossville; village in Richmond County, New York, now a part of New York City, 

named for the proprietor of a large tract of land. 
Bossville; town in Fayette County, Tennessee, named for Jon Ross, a Cherokee 

chief. 
Bos\7ell; town in El Paso County, Colorado, named for Roswell P. Flower, of New 

Y^ork. 
Boswell; town in Cobb County, Georgia, named for Roswell King. 
Bothville; town in Chariton County, Missouri, named for John Roth, an early 

settler. 
Botterdam; town in Schenectadj^ County, New Y^ork, named for the city in the 

Netherlands. 
Boubedeau; river in Delta County, and pass in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, 

named for Antoine Roubedeau, a French trader. 
Bouse Point; village in Clinton County, New York, named for a resident family. 
Boutt; county in Colorado, named for John L. Routt, lafet governor of the Territory. 
Bowan; county in Kentucky, named for John Rowan, a distinguished lawyer of the 

State. 
Bowan; county in North Carolina, named for Matthew Rowan, prominent in the 

early politics of the State. 
Bowesville; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for Gen. AVilliam 

Rowe. 
Bowletts; town in Hart County, Kentucky, named for John P. Rowlett. 
Bowley; toM n in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
Boyal; village in Antelope County, Nebraska, named for Royal Thayer. 
Boyal Oak; village in Talbot County, Maryland, so named because of a nearby oak 

into which the British shot a cannon ball in the war of 1812. 
Boyalston; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Col. Isaac Royal, 

one of its proprietors. 
Bubicon; river in Wisconsin, named from the famous river in Italy. 
Buby; peak in Colorado, so named on account of its color. 
Bulo; village in Richardson County, Nebraska, named for Charles Rouleau. 
Bumford; t(.)wn in Oxford County, Maine, said to have been named for Count 

Rumford. 
Bumsey; town in McLean County, Kentucky, named for Edward Rumsey, a prom- 
inent resident of the State. 
Bunnels; county in Texas, named for Henry R. Runnels, former governor. 
Bunnelsville; town in Madison County, Mississijjpi, named for a jirominent family 

of the State. 

IBush; county in Indiana; 
Bushville; town in Rush County, Indiana, and city in Schuyler County, Illinois. 
Named for Dr. Benjamin Rush, of Philadelphia. 
Bush.; county in Kansas, named for Alexander Rush, captain Company H, Second 
Regiment Kansas Colored Volunteers. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE ITNITED STATES, 227 

Rusk; county in Texas, named for (Jen. TlioujaK J. Rank, United States Senator 

from that State. 
Russell; county in Alabama, named for C'ol. ( Jilbert Russell, of that State. 
Russell; county and city in same county in Kansas, named for Capt. Avra 1'. Kussell, 

Company K, Second Kansas. 
Russell; counties in Kentucky and Virginia, and city in Logan ('cnuity, Kentucky, 

named for Gen. William Russell. 
Russell; village in St. Lawrence County, New. York, named for Russell Atwater, its 

original proprietor. 
Russellville; village in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for the Russell 

family, prominent in the business interests of the vicinity. 
Russian River; township in Sonoma County, California, on a river of the same 

name, so named because a Russian settlement was early located here. 
I Rutherford; counties in North Carolina and Tennessee; 

■jRutherfordton; town in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Named for Gen. 
I Griffith Rutherford, a noted Indian tighter. 
Rutherford; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named for John Rutherford, 

an extensive landowner. 
Rutland; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, said to have l)een named for 

Rutland, near Leicestershire, England. 
Rutland; county in Vermont, town in Jefferson County, New York, and \ illage in 

Lasalle County, Illinois, named for the town in Vermont. 
Ryans; Creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Rye; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, named for the home of its 

English settlers. 
Sabatis; hill in Maine, named for an Indian who accompanied Arnold's expedition. 
Sabeta; peak in Colorado, named for the wife of Ouray, the chief of the Ute Indians. 
Sabetha; city in Nemaha County, Kansas, probably a corruption of the word Sab- 
bath, which was tlie name of the temporary fort, established on Sunday, for 

which the town was named. 
Sabine; county, lake, and town in Texas, and parish in Louisiana. A French word, 

meaning "cypress." 
Sable; cape, the southernmost point of the mainland iu Florida, and stream in 

Michigan. A French word, meaning "sandy." 
Sabotawan; mountain in Maine, the most easterly of the Spencer Range. An Indian 

word, meaning "the end of the pack," " where the strap is pulled together." 
Sac; C(junty in Iowa, named for the Indian tribe, the name said to mean " red bank." 
Sacandaga; tril)utary of Hudson River, so named because of a great marsh lying 

aking its l)anks. An Indian word, meaning "drowned lands." 
Sachem Head; watering place in New Haven County, Connecticut, so named 

because an Indian chief was once captured there. 
Sacketts Harbor; village in Jefferson County, New Y'ork, named for Augustus 

Sacket, its first settler. 
Saco; river, and a city in York County, Maine. Derived from an Indian word, 

sohk or sank, "pouring out;" hence the outlet oi- discharge of a river or lake. 
Sacramento; river, city, and county in California, named ])y the Spaniards, the 

word meaning "the sacrament." 
Sadlersville; town in Robertson County, Tennessee, name<l lor W. R. Sadler, an 

early settler. 
Saflfbrd; village in Pima County, Arizona, named for A. P. K. Safford, governor of 

the Territory. 
Sagadahoc; county in Maine bordering on the Atlantic Ocean. An Indian word, 

meaning "land at the mouth," or the " mouth of the river." 
Sageville; village in Hamilton County, New Y^ork, named for Hezekiah Sage. 



228 TLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Sag Harbor; villatxe in Suffolk ( 'ounty, New York. Derived from the Indian word, 
«iggai)onai'k, "place where the ground nuts grow." 

Sag-inaw; river, county, bay, and city in iSIichigan, said to derive its meaning from 
an Indian word, meaning "an outlet.' 

Sago; town in Muskingum County, Ohio. An Indian M'ord, meaning "welcome." 

Saguache; county, and town in same county, in Colorado. Au Indian word, niean- 
ing " water at tlie blue earth." 

Sahabe; peak in Cascade Mountains, Okanogan County, Washington, named by tln' 
Mazamas, a mountaineering club of Portland, Oregon, from the Chinook word 
sahabe, "high," "al)0ve." 

Saint Anthony; town in Stearns County, Minnesota, located near the falls of the 
same name, which were named by a French missionary, because "of the many 
favors received through the intercession of that saint." 

Saint Augustine; city in St. John County, Florida, so named because the first land- 
ing was made there on that day. 

Saint Bernard; parish in Louisiana, named by the French for the saint. 

Saint Charles; parish in Louisiana, named for the saint. 

Saint Charles; county, and city in the same county, in Missouri, so named because 
it was the purpose of the vicar of Pontoise to establish a seminary there in honor 
of that saint, where the Indians should be educated. 

Saint Clair; county, lake, and city in Michigan, said to have been so named because 
the lake was discovered l)y the French upon that saint's day. 
Saint Clair; counties in Alabama, Illinois, and Missouri; town in Antelope County, 

Nel)i'aska; and T)orough in Schuylkill County, Pemisylvania; 
Saint Clairsville; village in Belmont County, Ohio. Named for (tcu. Arthur St. 
Clair. 

Saint Clement; town in Pike County, INIissouri, named for the patron saint of Clem- 
ent Grote, an early settler. 

Saint Croix; river in Maine, probably so named l)ecause of its resemblance at Oak 
Bay to a cross. 

Saint Croix; river of ^Minnesota and Wisconsin, from wliich the county in Wiscon- 
sin derived its name, itself being named for IMonsieur St. Croix, wlio was drowned 
at its mouth. 

Saint Derion; ^'illage in Nemaha Coimty, Nebraska, named for Joseph Derion, an 
Indian chief of the Otoe tribe. 

Saint Elias; mountain in Alaska, named for the saint upon whose day it was dis- 
covered. 

[Saint Francis; stream in Minnesota and county in Arkansas; 

jsaint Francois; county in Missouri. Named for the founder of the Franciscan 

( ordi'r. 

Sainte Genevieve; countv, and city in same county, in Missouri, named for the 
French saint. 

Saint George; town in Knox County, Maine, named for the island wliicli is now 
called Monhegan, but was originally named l^y its discoverer, Capt. George Wey- 
moutli, for his patron saint. 

Saint George; town in Dorchester County, South Carolina, lot'ated in the defunct 
county of St. George, for which it is named. 

Saint George; town in Chittenden County, Vermont, named for George III, of 
England. 

Saint George; town in Tucker County, West Virginia, named for St. (ieorge Tucker, 
clcj-k of the house of delegates. 

Saint Helena; parish in Louisiana, named for the Fiench saint. 

Saint Helens; mountain in Washington, named for Lord St. Helens, British ambas- 
sador to Madrid. 



GANNETT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 229 

Saint Ig-nace; townsliii) in MackiiuK' County, ^[ichitian, nanu'd for a Catholic 

church erected within its Hniits. 
Saint James; parish in Louisiana, nanicil for (lie Frcncli saint. 
Saint James; city in Watonwan County, .Minnesota, named for tiu^ first settler, 

James Turriniiton. 
Saint James; town in Phelps County, Missouri, named for a larKC mine owner in 

the vicinity. 
Saint Joh.n; county in Florida, named from St. Johns River. 

Saint John; city in Stafford County, Kansas, named fi;r Covei-nor John P. St. Jolin. 
Saint Johns; river in Florida, called l)y the Si)anish discoverers San Juan Bautista, 

because upon this saint's day it was discovered. 
Saint Johns; vilhiije Iti Clinton County, Michigan, named f<n- John Swegles. 
Saint Johnsbury; town in Caledonia County, "N'ermont, named for St. John de 

Creve-coeur, French consul at New York, and a henefactor of Vermont. 
Saint Johnsville ; town in Montgomery County, New York, named for an old 

churcli estal)lished there in early days. 
Saint John the Baptist; parish in Louisiana, named for the river. 
Saint Joseph; counties in Indiana and Michigan, named for the river which flows 

through both States, it being name<l for the husi:)and of tlie Virgin Mary by its 

eai'ly French Catholic explorers. 
Saint Joseph; city in Buchanan County, Missouri, named for Joseph Kobidonx, an 

early French settler. 
Saint Lawrence; gulf, river, and county in New Yoik, the name having been 

extended from the gulf — which was so named l)ecause discovered on the feast 

day of this saint — to the river and county. 
Saint Louis; river and county in Minnesota, named for the river, said t() have been 

named for Louis XIV, of France. 
Saint Louis; county and city in Missouri, named for Louis XV, of France. 
Saint Mary; county in Maryland, so named because the tirst landing in this State 

Avas made on the day of the annuni;iation. 
Saint Marys; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, named for a Catholic mission. 
Saint Matthews; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for the 

county, now defunct, in which it was formerly located. 
Saint Paul; city in Ramsey County, Minnesota, named for a church which was 

built for ]\L (ialtier, an early Catholic missionary. 
Saint Paul; city in II<:)ward County, Nel)raska, named for J. N. and N. J. Paul, its 

first settlers. 
Saint Peter; village in Cedar County, Nebraska, named for John Peter Al)ts, the 

tirst settler. 
Saint Peters: town in Saint Charles County, Missouri, nanii'd for a Jesuit mission 

estal»lished there in eaily days. 
Saint Regis Falls; village in Franklin County, river and falls in New York, 

named for a canonized Jesuit missionary. 
Saint Stephens; town in Berkeley County, South Carolina, named for the now 

defunct parish in which it was formerly located. 
Saint Tammany; parish in Louisiana, named for the chief of the Delaware Indians, 

the name meaning "beaver leader." 
Saint Vrain; creek in Colorado, named for Ceran St. Vrain, an early explorer. 
Salado; town in Bell County, Texas. A S])anish word, meaning "salted;" salt 

being abundant in the vicinity. 
Salamanca; village in Cattaraugus County, New York, named for Sefior Salamanca, 

a Spanish financier, interested in the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad. 
Salem; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, so named by its early settlers because 
they hoped to enjoy peaceful si>curity there. An Indian word, meaning 
"peace." 



230 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Salero; liill in Arizona, said to have been so named because a saltcellar of ore, from 

the hill, was made by the padres of St. Jose^^h for the table of their bishop. A 

Spanish word, meaning "saltcellar." 
Salida; city in Cliaffee County, Colorado, at the junction of the Arkan.sas River with 

its large branch from the south. A Spanish word, meaning " point of depar- 
ture." 
Salina; town in Onondaga County, New York; 
Salinas; ilver and city in INIonterey, County, California; 
Saline, counties in Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska, and river in 

Arkansas. So named on account of salt springs or salt deposits within their limits. 
Salisbury; town in Litchlield County, Connecticut, named for a resident. 
Salisbury; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
Salisbury; city in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Lucius Salisbury, of the 

county. 
Salisbury; town in Herkimer County, New York, named for the town in Connec- 
ticut. 
Sallis; town in Attala County, INIississippi, named for Dr. James Sallis, the former 

owner of the land. 
Sallisaw; stream and town in Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory. Supposed to 

have been derived from the French name, Bayou Salaison, "meat-eating bayou." 
Sallys; town in Aiken County, South Carolina, named for the Salley family, i)romi- 

nent residents of the State. 
Salmon; river in Washington, so named on account of the shoals of salmfin that 

ascend the river in the summer. 
Salmon Falls; river and village in Strafford County, New Hampshire, named for 

the falls in the river, where the salmon stop in their upward course. 
Salt; creek in Colorado, so named on account of the character of the mineral deposits. 
Saltillo; borough in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, named for the town in 

Mexico. A Spanish word, meaning "salted river." 
Salt Liake; county, and city in same county, in Utah, named for the famous lake of 

that State. 
Saluda; river, county, and town in same county, in South Carolina, and town in 

Polk County, North Carolina. An Indian word, meaning "corn river." 
Salunga; village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, derived from the Indian word 

Chickiswalunga, meaning "the place of the crawfish." 
Salyersville ; town in Magoffin County, Kentucky, named for Samuel Salyer, a 

meml)er of the State legislature. 
Samoa; village in Humboldt County, California, named for an Indian chief. 
Sampson; county in North Carolina, named for Col. Jolin Sampson, officer of the 

Revolution. 
Samsonville; village in Ulster County, New York, named for Gen. Henry A. 

Samjison. 
Samuel Adams; mountain in New Hampshire, named for a revolutionary patriot. 
San Antonio; city in Bexar County, Texas, named for the Roman Catholic mission, 

San Antonio de Velero, otherwise the Alamo. 
San Bernardino; county, and city in same county, in California, named for an old 

Spani.sh mission. 
Sanborn; county in South Dakota and town in O'Brien County, Iowa, named for 

Oeorge W. Sanborn, division superintendent of the Chicago, Milwaukee and 

St. Paul Railroad. 
Sanbornton; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for a family of 

early settlers. 
Sanders; town in Carroll County, Kentucky, named for an old settler. 
San Diego; county, and city in same county, in California. A corruption of St. 

lago, the patron saint of Spain, for wliom they were named. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 231 

Sandisfield; town in Berkshire County, JMiih^.suchusetts, luuncd for Lord Sandys, 

lirst lord of trade and the plaiitationH. 
Sand Lake; town in Kent County, Michigan, so named because a sand bar extends 

across the center of a near-by lake. 
Sandusky; town in Illinois, county, river, and city in Oliio, whose name by some 

authorities is said to be derived from the Indian word Outsandouke, "there is i)ure 

water here;" or Sa-anduste, "large bodies or pools of water." vVnother author- 
ity states that it was named for Jonathan Sandousky, a Polisli trader of the 

vicinity. 
Sandwich; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

England. 
San Fernando; town in Los Angeles County, California, named for an iild Spanish 

Catholic mission. 
Sanford; city in Orange County, Florida, named for Gen. 11. S. Sanfoi'd, ITnited 

States minister to Belgium. 
Sanford; town and township in York County, Maine, nametl for I'elcg Sanford, an 

early in'oi>rietor. 
Sanford; town in Moore County, North Carolina, name<l for Colonel Sanford, a 

civil engineer. 
San Francisco; bay, county, and city in same county, in California, said by some to 

have been named for the old Spanish mission of San Francisco de Assisi, by 

others to have been named for the founder of the order to which Father Juni- 

pero, the discoverer of the bay, belonged. 
San Gabriel; town in Los Angeles County, California, named for an old S])anish 

mission. 
Sangamon; county and river in Illinois, named for an Indian chief. 
Sang-erfield; town and township in Oneida County, New York, named for Judge 

Jedediah Sanger. 
Sang-erville; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for t'ol. Calvin Sanger, its 

proprietor. 
jSanilac; county in Michigan; 

(Sanilac Center; town in Sanilac County, Michigan. Named for an Indian chief. 
San Jacinto; county, river, and town in Texas, and village in Glenn County, Cali- 
fornia. A Spanish word, meaning "hyacinth." 
San Joaquin; county and river in California. A Spanish i)hrase, meaning "whom 

Jeliovah has apjiointed." 
San Jose; city m Santa Clara County, California, named for the patron saint of 

Mexico. 
San Juan; river and counties in Colorado and New Mexico, named for Saint John. 
San Juan; county in Washington, named for the Greek navigator, Juan de Fuca. 
San liuis Obispo; county, and city in same county, in California, named for an old 

Si")anish mission. 
San Luis Rey; town in San Diego County, California, named for Louis IX, of 

France. 
San Mateo; county, and city in same county, in California. Sjianish form for St. 

Matthew. 
San Miguel; counties in Colorado and New Mexico, and town in San Luis Obispo 

County, California. The Spanish fornr of St. Michael. 
Sanpete; county in Utah, named for an Indian chief. 
San Qiuentin; town in Marin County, California, said to be named for a former 

resident. 
Santa Barbara; county, and city in same county, in California, named for an old 

Spanish mission. 
Santa Clara; county, and town in same county, in California, named for an old 

Spanish mission. 



232 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Santa Cruz; counties in Arizona and California, city and island in the latter State. 

A Spanish word, meaning "holy cross." 
Santa Fe; county, and city in same county, in New INIexico; and city in Haskell 

County, Kansas, and town in Monroe County, Missouri. A Spanish phrase, 

meaning "holy faith." 
Santa Ynez; town in Santa Barbara County, California, named for an old Spanish 

mission. The Spanish form of St. Agnes. 
Sapinero; town in Gunnison County, Colorado, named for a subchief of the Ute 

Indians. 
ISaranac; river and lake in New York; 

Saranac Lake; village in Franklin County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 
I "river that flows under a rock." 
Saratoga; county, town, and lake in New York; 

JSaratoga Springs; town and village in Saratoga County, New York. An Indian 
I word, said to mean "place of the miraculous water in a rock." 
Sarcoxie; city in Jasi)er County, Missouri, named for a friendly Indian chief 
Sardinia; town in Erie County, New York, named for the island in Italy. 
Sardis; town in Panola County, Mississippi, named for the ruined city of Asia 

INIinor. 
Sargent; county in North Dakota, named for a former general manager of the 

Northern I*acific Railroad. 
Sarpy; county in Nebraska, named for Peter A. Sarpy. 
Sassafras; stream in Maryland. The English form of the Indian word, Winak- 

hanne. 
Satartia; town in Yazoo County, Mississii^pi. Derived from an Indian word, 

meaning "pumpkin place." 
Saucon; townsiiip and creek in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. An Indian 

word, meaning "the outlet of a smaller stream." 
Saugatuck; river in Connecticut, and villages in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and 

Allegan County, Mii'higan. An Indian word, meaning "outlet of the tidal 

river." 
Saugerties; town in Ulster County, New York. One authority states that it is an 

Indian word, meaning "at the outlet;" another gives it as from the Dutch, 

zaeger's kill, meaning "sawyer's creek," given it because a sawmill was erected 

on the town site. 
Saugus; town in Essex County, INIassachusetts. The Indian name of Lynn. 
Sauk; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin; 
Sauk Center; city in Steams County, Minnesota; 
Sauk Rapids; village in Benton County, Minnesota. Named from an Indian tri])e, 

the word meaning "people living at a river mouth." 
Sault Sainte Marie; city in Chijjpewa County, Michigan, situated at the foot of 

the rax)ids of St. Marys River. A French phrase, meaning " falls of St. Mary." 
Saunders; tributary of the Yellowstone in Montana, named for a trapjier who 

lived in the region. 
Saunders; county in Nebraska, named for Governor Alvin Saunders. 
Sauratown; town in Stokes County, North Carolina, named for an Indian tribe. 
Sausalito; town in Marin County, California. A Spanish word, meaning "little 

willow." 
Sauvie; island in the Columbia River, Oregon, named for Jean Baptiste Sauve, a 

Frencli Canadian, who kept a dairy there. 

I Savanna; city in Carroll County, Illinois; 
Savannah; town in Wayne County, New York, and city and river in Georgia. 
Tlie name derived from the Spanish word savanne, meaning " grassy plain." 
Savoy; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for the town in Switzer- 
land. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 233 

Sawadabscook; branch of the Penol)S('()t River in Maine. An Tmlian word, niean- 

intj; " place of large, smooth rocks." 
Sa'wyer; county in Wisconsin, named for riiiletus Sawyer, Senator from that State. 
Saxapahaw; town in Alamance County, North Carolina. A corruption of the 

jiame of an Indian tril)e, Sissipahaw. 
Saybrook; town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, nam(>d for l^ords Say ami IJrook. 
Sayre; borough in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, prolial)iy named for U. S. Sayre, 

chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. 
Scammon; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, named for four l)r(ith(>rs, early settlers 

from Illinois. 
Scandia; city in Republic County, Kansas, named fur tiie Scandinavian agricultural 

society, by whom it was colonized. 
Scandinavia; village in Waupaca Ctmnty, Wisconsin, named for the peo]jle by 

whom it was settle<l. 
Scantic; river and village in Hartford County, Connecticut. Derived from the 

Indian word Peskatuk, meaning " branch of the river." 
Scarboro; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for the tnwn in England. 
Scarsdale; town in Westchester County, New York, named foi- the town in Derl)}'- 

shire, England. 
Scatacook; river in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning " the confluence of 

two streams. 
Schaghticoke; town in Rensselaer County, New York, situated at the confluence of 

the Hoosic and Hudson rivers. Derived from an Indian word, I'achgatgoch, 

" the place where a river branches or divides." 
Schellsburg-; borough in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, named for the man who 

laid it out. 
Schenectady; county and city in same county in New York. Derived from an 

Indian word, meaning "over beyond the plains." 
Schererville; village in Lake County, Indiana, nanu^l for Scherer Wright, its 

founder. 
Schleicher; county in Texas, named for <TUstav Schleicher, memluM- of Congress 

fnjm that State. 
Schleisingerville ; village in Washington County, Wisconsin, named for l'>. Schleis- 

inger Weil, its founder. 
Schley; county in (leorgia, named for William Schley, a former governor. 
Schodack; town in Rensselaer County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 

" meadow or Are plain," .so called because it was in ancient times the seat of the 

council fires of the Mohegans. 
Schoharie; creek, county, and town in same coimty in New York. An Indian 

word, meaning " flood wood or drift wood." 
Schonbrunn; town in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. A < lerman word, meaning "beau- 
tiful fountain." 
Schoodic; river and ciiain of lakes in Maine. An Indian word to whic^h many mean- 
ings are credited, am'ong tiiem, "trout place," "burnt la/^ds," "a ]>lace where 

water rushes," and "where fish live all the year." 
Schoolcraft; county and village in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, named for Henry 

R. Schoolcraft, distinguishe<l for his Indian researches. 
Schroeppel; town in Oswego County, New York, named for Henry W. Schroeppel, 

an early resident. 
Schroon; lake, river, mountain, and town in Essex County, New York. Opinions 

differ as to the derivation of this name, some saying that it is derived from the 

Indian, Shaghnetaghrowahora, meaning "the largest lake," or from the Saranac 

Indian, "daughter of the momitains;" another authority stating that it was 

named for the Duchess Schai'ou, of the court of Louis Xll 



234 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Schulenburg; town in Fayette Countr, Texas, named for a man prominent in the 

organization of a cori)oration that bnilt the town. 
Schuyler; counties in Illinois, Missouri, and New York, name<l for Gen. Pliilip 

Scluiyler, early mayor of Albany, New York. 
Schuyler; city in Colfax County, Nebraska, named for Schuyler Colfax. 
Schuylerville; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for Gen. I'hili 

Schuyler, prominent man, and early mayor of Albany. 
Schuylkill; county and river in Pennsylvania; so named because the first explorers 

passed its mouth without seeing it, which caused them to give it this Dutch name, 

meaning "hidden stream." 
Solo; town in Allegany County, New York, named for the island in the Mediter- 
ranean . 
Sciota; village in McDonough County, Illinois, river and county in Ohio. Derived 

from the Indian word Seeyotah, meaning "great legs," and applied to the river 

on account of its numerous and long branches. 
Scipio; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the Roman general. 
Scitico; village in Hartford County, Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "at 

the branch." 
Scituate; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for the stream running 

into the harbor, which derived its name from the Indian word Satuit, "cold 

brook." 
Scooba; town in Kem})er County, Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning "reed 

brake." 
Scotland; many places in the United States, among them the counties in Missouri 

and North Carolina, named for the country in Great Britain. 
Scott; county in Arkansas, named for Judge Andrew Scott. 
Scott; counties in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, named for Gov Charles Scott, 

of the latter State. 
Scott; counties in Iowa, Kansas, Tennessee, and Virginia, and city in Scott County, 

Kansas, named for Gen. Winlield Scott. 
Scott; counties in Minnesota and Mississippi, named for Gov. Abram M. Scott. 
Scott; county in Missouri, named for John Scott. 
Scottdale; borough in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, named for Thomas A. 

Scott, of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
Scotts Creek; township in Jackson County, North C'arolina, named for John Scott, 

a trader among the Cherokees. 
Scotts Bluff; county in Nebraska, named for the bluff where a man named Scott 

met his death by starvation. 
Scottsboro; town in Baldwin County, Georgia, named for Gen. John Scott. 
Scottsburg; village in Livingston County, New York, named for Matthew and 

William Scott, early settlers. 
Scottsville; town in Allen County, Kentucky, named for Gen. Charles Scott, an 

early governor of the State. 
Scottsville; village in Monroe County, New York, named for Isaac Scott, the first 

settler. 
Scranton; town in Jackson County, Mississippi, named for city in Pennsylvania. 
Scranton; city in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, named for Joseph H. Scran- 
ton, its founder. 
Screven; county in Georgia, named for Gen. James Screven, a Revolutionary officer. 
Scriba; town in Oswego County, New York, named for George Scriba, the resident 

proprietor. 
Scurry; county in Texas, named for William B. Scurry, brigadier-general in the 

Army of the Confederacy. 
Seaboard; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named from the Sea- 
board Air Line. 



GANNETT.! PLACE NAM?:S IN THE UNITED STATES. 235 

Seabright; borontrh in .Monmouth County, New Jersey, named for. tlie town in 

England. 
Sea Cliff; village in Nassau County, New York, where camp meetings were formerly 

held upon a cliff ])y the salt water, from which circumstance the village was 

named. 
Sea Isle City; l)orough in CajH' May Ccmnty, New Jersey, so iiame<l because it is 

situated near the seashore. 
Searcy; county in Arkansas, named for Judge Richard Searcy. 
ISearsniont; town in Waldo County, Maine; 

'Searsport; town in Waldo County, Maine. Name<l for David Sears, of Boston, 
[ ^Massachusetts. 
Seattle; city' in King County, Washington, named for the chief of the Duwamish 

tribe t'f Indians, See-aa-thl. 
Sebago; lake in York County, and lake, pond, and town in Cund)erland County, 

Maine. An Indian word, meaning " a stretch of water," or " i)lace or region of 

river lake." 
Sebamook; lake in Maine. An Indian word, given two different meanings, "large 

l)ay lake" and "bright water." 
Sebastian; county in Arkansas, named for Senator \Mlliam K. Sel)astian. 
Sebetbe; river in Connecticut. Supposed to be derived fnan the Indian word 

sepoese, "small river." 
Sebewa; village in Ionia County, Michigan. Derived from tlie Indian word sibiwe, 

"a rivulet, a brook." 
Sebewaing; village in Huron County, Michigan. Derived from the Indian word 

sibiweng, "at the creek." 
Seboeis; lake, stream, and plantation in Penobscot County, iMaine. Su])posed to be 

derived from an Indian word, meaning "little river." 
Secaucus; town in Hudson County, New Y'ork. Thought to be derived from the 

Indian word sekakes, used in reference to snakes. 
Seco; village in Boxelder County, Utah, and creek in Texas. A Spanish word, 

meaning "dry." 
Sedalia; city in Pettis County, Missouri. A modification of the original name, 

Sadieville, having been named for the daughter of a settler. 
Sedan; city in Chautaucpia County, Kansas, named for the town in France. 
Sedgn^ick; fort in Colorado, counties in Colora<lo and Kansas, city in the latter 

State, and mountain in Idaho, named for Gen. John Sedgwick. 
Sedgwick; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for Maj. Robert Sedgwick. 
Seekonk; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts. Said to be derived from an 

Indian word, meaning " black, or wild goose." 
Seguin; town in Guadalupe County, Texas, named for Col. Juan Seguin, a Mexican 

who joined fortunes with the Texans in 1836. 
Seiglingville; town in Barnwell County, South Cantlina, named for (Jen. Randolph 

Seigling, prominent capitalist <(f Charleston. 
Selinsgrove; borough in Snyder County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Sellersville; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The anglicised form of the 

original name, Zoellers, a family of early residents for whom it was named. 
Sellwood; town in Multnomah County, Oregon, named for Governor Sellwood. 
Selma; city in Dallas County, Alabama, named for the "Songs of Sehna," in Ossian. 
Seminole; town in Hillsboro County, Florida, and nation in Indian Territory, 

named for the Indian tribe, the word said to mean " wild men." 
Sempronius; town in Cayuga County, New Y^ork; named for the celebrated Roman 

tribune, father of the Graccii. 
Senath.; village in Dunklin County, ■Missouri, named for the wife of A. W. Doug- 
lass, an early settler. 



236 PLACE JNAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Senatobia; creek and town in Tate County, Mississippi. A C!hoctaw Indian word, 
meaning "white sycamore." 

Seneca; counties in New York and Ohio and nation in Indian Territory, cities in 
Nemaha County, Kansas, and Newton County, Missouri, and town in Ocowee 
County, South Carolina; 
Seneca Falls; village in Seneca County, New York. Named iov an Indian triV)e, 
said to be a corruj^tion of Sinnekaas, a name given them by the Dutch. 

Senegar; creek in Maryland. Derived from the Indian word, J^innc-lianne, "a 
strong stream." 

Sequatchie; county and river in Tennessee. An Indian word, meaning " hog river." 

Sequoia; town in Tuolunme County, California, named for a famous Cherokee 
Indian who invented an alphabet for his tribe. 

Severance; city in Doniphan County, Kansas, named for one of tlie tliree proprietors. 

Severy; city in Greenwood County, Kansas, named for L. Severy, of Emjjoria, a 
director of the Santa Fe. 

Sevier; county in Arkansas, named for Ambrose H. Sevier, a Congressional Delegate. 

Sevier; county in Tennessee, named for John Sevier, first governor of the State. 

Seward; counties in Kansas and Nebraska, city in county of same name in latter 
State, town in Schoharie County, and mountain in New York, named for Wil- 
liam H. Seward, the American statesman. 

Sewickley; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, mean- 
ing "sweet water." 

Seymour; city in Jackson County, Indiana, named for a civil engineer. 

Shackelford; county in Texas, named for a surgeon, captain of a band called the 
"Red Rovers," who helped the Texans in their revolution. 

Shakopee; city in Scott County, Minnesota, named for an Indian chief who 
formeily lived there; the name meaning "six." 

Shamokin; borough in Northuml)erland County, Pennsylvania. Derived from the 
Indian word, Schahanioki, meaning "a place of eels." 

Shamong; town in Burlington County, New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning 
"place of the big horn." 

Shandaken; town in Ulster Countj', New York. An Indian word, meaning "rapid 
waters." 

Shannock; river in Connecticut. An Indian \vord, meaning "place where two 
streams meet." 

Shannon; county in Missouri, named for George F. Shannon, of Marion County. 

Shannon; county in South Dakota, name<l for Peter C. Shannon, former chief justice. 

Shapleigh; town in York Comity, Maine, named for Nicholas Shapleigh, one of the 
earliest i)r()prietors. 

Sharkey; county in Mississippi, named for William L. Sharkey, provisional gov- 
ernor during Governor Clark's absence at Fort Pulaski in 1865-6(). 

Sharon; city in Barber County, Kansas, and town in Schoharie County, New York; 
the name is of biblical derivation. 

Sharon; town in IMadison County, Mississippi, so nameil liecanse the Sharon semi- 
nary for girls was situated tliere at an early day. 

Sharon Springs; city in Wallace County, Kansas, and village in Schoharie County, 
New Y(ji'k; the name is of l)iblical derivation. 

Sharp; county in Arkansas, named for Ephraim Sliarp, representative from Law- 
rence County. 

Sharpsburg; town in Bath County, Kentucky, named for Moses Sharp. 

Sharpsburg; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for James Sharp, 
the original proprietor. 

Shasta; county in California named from the Indian tribe, Saste or Shastika. 

Shaume; river in Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning "a fountain or spring." 



k 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 287 

Shavano; peak of the Sawatrli Ranj^e in Colorado, nanu-d I'di- a I'te Indian. 

Shaw; town in Bolivar County, IMisplssip])!, naninl for the owner of the land« 
tiirouj^h which tiie railroad pas.seH. 

Shawan; town in Baltimore County, Maryhind. An Indian word, meaning "soutli." 

Shawangunk; river, town in Ulster County, and niduntain in New York. Said to 
he aji Indian word, meaning "white .'itone"' i>r " white «Ut roeks." 

Shawano; eounty and city in same cdunty in Wisconsin. Derived from the Chip- 
pewa Indian word jawanong, meaning "on tiie south." 

fShawnee; county in Kansas an<l nation in Indian Territory; 

jShawneetown; city in Gallatin County, Illinois. Named for the Indian trihe, the 
word meaning " southernei's," and given them because they emigrated north- 
ward from the Savannah River. 

Sheboygan; county and city in same county in Wisconsin. l)erivt;d frcjm the Chip- 
^)ewa Indian word jihaigan, meaning a perforated object, such as a pipe stem. 

Sheepeater; cliffs in the Yellowstone Park, named for a tri])e of Indians, the only 
known aboriginal occupants of the park. 

Sheepscot; river and bay in Maine. Derived from the Indian word sipsa-couta, 
meaning "bird-flocking river" or "little bird place," because the Indians 
resorted there for young ducks. 

Sheffield; town in Franklin County, Iowa, named for James Sheffield, a railroad 
contractor. 

Sheffield; town in Berkshire County, IMassachusetts, namt'd for the city in England. 

Shelburne; towns in Franklin County, Massachusetts, and CHiittenden County, 
Vermont, named for William Fitz Maurice, second Earl of Shelburne. 
Shelby; counties in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, 

Tennessee, and Texas, and town in Orleans County, New York. 
Shelbyville; cities in Shelby counties, Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri. Named for 
Gen. Isaac Shelbj', former governor of Kentucky. 

Sheldon; town in Fi-anklin County, Vermont, named for a resident family. 

Shell Rock; town in Butler County, Iowa, so Jiamed on account of the rocks near 
the river. 

Shelter; island off Long Island, New York. Probably the translation of the origi- 
nal Indian name of Manhanset-aha-cusha-wommuek, meaning "an island 
sheltered l)y islands." 

Shelton; tow-n in Mason County, AVashington, named for an early settler. 

Shenandoah; county and river in Virginia, city in Page County, Iowa, Ijorough in 
Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and town in Page County, Virginia. An In- 
dian word said by some to mean "the sprncy stream," by others, " a river 
flowing alongside of high hills and mountains;" and still another authority 
states that it means "daughter of the stars." 

Shepaug; river in Coimecticut. Derived from the Indian word, Mashapaug, 
meaning "large pond." 

Shepherd; village in Isabella County, Michigan, named for I. N. Shepherd, its 
founder. 

Shepherdstown; town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, named for Capt. Tliomas 
Shepherd. 

Sherborn; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for the town of Sher- 
borne, England. 

Sherburne; county in Minnesota, named for Moses Sherbnrn(>, associate justice of 
tlie Supreme Court. 

Sheridan; counties in Kansas, Nebraska, and Wyoming, town in ]\Iadison County, 
Montana, and mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for (len. Philip II. Sheri- 
dan. 

Sherlock; township in Finney Comity, Kansas, named for a cax)italist connected with 
the Santa Fe Railroad. 



238 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Sherman; counties in Kansas, Nebraska, and Oregon, village in Wexford County, 

Michigan, and mountain in Idaiio, named for Gen. W. T. Sherman. 
Sherman; county, and city in Grayson County, Texas, named for Sidney Sherman, 

general of the Texas army, and the one who raised the cry of "Remember the 

Alamo" at the battle of San Jacinto. 
Sherman; village in Chautauqua County, New York, named for Roger Sherman, a 

signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Sherwood; village in Branch County, Michigan, named for the forest in England. 
Sheshequin; village in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. An Indian Avord, meaning 

"mysterious rattle." 
Shetucket; river in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "land between the 

rivers," or, according to another authority, "confluence of rivers." 
Shiawassee; county and river in INIichigan. An Indian word, meaning "straight- 
running river." 
Shickshinny; borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, protected l)y a cordon of 

hills of five summits. An Indian word, ineaning "five mountains." 
Shields; river in Montana, named for a member of the Lewis and Clarke expedition. 
Shinnecock; village in Suffolk County, New York, named for an Indian tribe. 
Shinnston; town in Harrison County, West A'irginia, named for the owners of the 

land upon which it was built. 
Shintaka; several marshes in Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "tamarack." 
Shippensburg; borough in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, named for an early 

jiroprietor. 
Shippenville; borough in Clarion County, Pennsylvania, named for Judge Shippen, 

of INIcadville. 
Shirley; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for the town in England, 
f Shirley; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts; 

■I Shirley sburg; borough in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. Named for (ien. 
l William Shirley, an early governor of Massachusetts. 

Shivwits; plateau in Arizona. An Indian word, meaning "people of the springs." 
Shobonier; town in Fayette County, Illinois, named for an Indian chief. 
Shocco; creek in North Carolina, named for the Indian tribe Shoccoree. 
Shohokin; stream in Wayne County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

" where there is glue." 
rShohola; stream in I*ike County, Pennsylvania; 

<Shohola Falls; village in Pike County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 
I "weak, faint, distressed." 

Shope; lake in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "a shoulder." 
Shoreham; town in Addison County, Vermont, so named because located on the 

shores of Lake Champlain. 
Shoshone; county, and town in Lincoln County, Idaho, named for a tribe of Indians, 

the name meaning " inland Indians," or, according to another authority, "snake 

Indians." 
Shoup; ATllage in Lemhi County, Idaho, named for G. L. Shoup, United States 

Senator. 
Showers; creek in Huml)oldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Shreveport; city in Caddo County, Louisiana, named for Henry M. Shreve. 
Shrewsbury; many places in the United States, named for the town in England. 
Shrewsbury; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for George Talbot, 

Earl of Shrewsbury. 
Shubrick; peak in Humboldt County, California, so named because the steamer 

tSliuIirick went aground in the vicinity. 
Shullsburg; city in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, named for Jesse W. Shull, the 

first settler. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 239 

Shurz; mountain inWyoniing, named for Carl Shur/., Secretarynf Ihe Interior iukUt 

President Hayei?. 
Shushan; village in Washington C'onnty, New Yorlv, named for the ruined city in 

Peryia. 
Shutesburg; town in Franklin County, Maspachnsetts, named for Governor Sanuiel 

Sluite, a relative of Governor Ilernard. 
Sibley; eounty in Minnesota, named for Henry 11. Sibley, an early pioneer of the 

Territory. 
Sidney; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Admiral .Sir Sidney 

Smith. 
Sidney; cities in Shelby County, Ohio, and Kennebec County, Maine, named for Sir 

Philip Sidney. 
Sidon; town in Leflore County, Mississippi, named for the ancient city of Palestine. 
Sierra; counties in California and New Mexico. Derived from the Spanish, Sierra 

Madre, "Main Range," Rocky Mountains. 
Sierra La Sal; mountains in eastern Utah, so named from salt springs near their 

base. 
Sigel; village in Shelby County, Illinois, named lV)r (jen. Franz Sigel, an officer of 

the rebellion. 
Sigourney; city in Keokuk County, Iowa, named for the poetess, Mrs. Lydia H. 

Sigourney. 
Sikeston; city in Scott County, Missouri, named for John Sikes. 
Siler City; town in Chatham County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

family of the neighborhood. 
Silliman; mountains in California and Nevada, named for Benjaman Silliman, the 

chemist. 
Silverbow; county in Montana, so named l)ecause of its shape, and on account of the 

presence of this precious metal. 
Silver Cliff; town in Custer County, Colorado, so named l)ecause silver was found 

in a cliff near the present town site. 
Silver Lake; city in Shawnee County, Kansas, so named because the Kansas River 

forms a lake at this point. 
Simpson; county in Kentucky, named for Capt. John Simpson, member of Congress. 
Simpson; county in Mississippi, named for Judge Josiah Simjison. 
Simpsonville ; village in Shelby County, Kentucky, named for Capt. John Simp- 
son, member of Congress from that State. 
Simpsonville; town in Greenville County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 

family of the State. 
Sincarte; town in Mason County, Illinois, corrupted name of the passage which was 

originally named by the French, Chenal Ecarte, "a remote channel." 
Sinclairville; village in Chautauqua County, New York, named for Maj. Samuel 

Sinclair, the first settler, who located there in 1810. 
Singleys; town in Hundjoldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Sing Sing; creek in Chemung County, New York, named for John Sing Sing, a 

friendly Indian. 
Sinking; creek in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, so named because it sinks 

beneath the surface of the ground for a space of 6 miles. 
Sinnemahoning; stream in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning "stony lick." 
Sinsinawa Mound; village in Grand County, Wisconsin. A combination of the 

Indian word, Sinsiawe, meaning "rattlesnake," and mound, because situated 

near a truncated cone several hundred feet high. 
Sioux; many places in the United States bear the name of this Indian tribe, among 

them the counties in Iowa and Nebraska. The word meaning a "species of 

snake," the appellation of the tribe being "enemies." 
Sir Johns; run; small stream in Morgan County, West Virginia, named for an offi- 
cer of Braddock's army. 



240 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buu,. m. 

Siskiyou; county in California and mountains in Oregon. By some authorities said 
to be a corruption of the original name given the district in California by the 
French — Six Cailloux, meaning "six bowlders;" others state that it is an Indian 
word meaning "bob-tailed horse," the mountains between California and Oregon 
having been so named because a famous bob-tailed race horse was lost on the 
trail. 

Siskowit; lake in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "a kind of lisli resem- 
bling a trout." 

Sisladobsis; lake in eastern Maine. An Indian word, meaning "rock lake." 

Sisseton; town in Roberts County, South Dakota. An Indian word, meaidng "tish 
scale mound village." 

Sisson; village in Siskiyou County, California, named for a former hotel keeper. 

Sissowkissink ; creek on the west side of Delaware River, Pennsylvania. Derived 
from the Indian word, Shihuwen, "i)lace of black ducks." 

Sitgreaves; pass in Arizona, named for Captain Sitgreaves, ITnited States Army. 

Sitkum; vil'lage in Coos County, Oregon. An Indian word, meaning "half," or "a 
part. ' ' 

Skagit; county in Wasliington, named for an Indian tribe. 

Skanawono-Wesh.ance; tributary of Wisconsin River. An Indian word, meaning 
"the creek that runs through bluffs." 

Skaneateles; lake, town, and village in Onondaga County, New York. An Indian 
word, meaning "long lake." 

Skilesville; town in Muhlenburg County, Kentucky, name<l for James R. Skiles. 

Skippack; stream and a village in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Deri\-ed 
from the Indian word Schki-jieek, "pool of stagnant, offensive water." 

Skitticook; branch of the Mattawamkeag River, Maine. An Indian word, mean- 
ing " dead-water stream." 

Skokowish.; river in Washington, named for an Indian tribe, the word said to mean 
"a portage." 

Skookumchuck; village in Lewis County, Washington. An Indian word, meaning 
' ' strong water. ' ' 

Skowhegan; town in Somerset County, Maine. An Indian word, said to mean 
"spearing," or "place of watch." 

I Skull; valleys in Utah and Yavapai County, Arizona; 
Skull Valley; village in Yavapai County, Arizona. So named on account of the 
many skulls of Indians found there. 
Skunk; stream in Iowa. Translation of the Indian name Checau(]ua. 
Skunkscut; range of hills in Glastonbury, Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning 

"at the high place." 
Slateford; village in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, so named because it is 

the center of manufacture of school slates. 
Slatersville ; village in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for Sanuiel Slater, 

its founder. 
Slatington; borough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania; so named on account of its 

extensive slate quarries. 
Slaughtersville; town in Webster County, Kentucky, named for G. G. Slaughter, 

an old settler. 
Sleepy Eye; lake and village in Brown County, Minnesota, named for the Indian 

chief Ishanundmk, "man whose eyes have the appearance of sleep." 
Slidell; town in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, named for the celebrity of that 

name. 
Sligo; many places in the United States, named for the town in Ireland. 
Slipperyrock; stream ami liorough in P>utler County, Pennsylvania. Derived from 

the Indian word " Wesch-ach-ach-apochka, meaning "slipperyrock." 



oANNKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 241 

Sloansville; villairi' i" Sclioharic County, New Yciik, iiaiued for Jolui R. Sloan, an 

early settler. 
Slocums; island in .Michigan, nanu'd for its owner. 
Slough; ereek in Yellowstone Park, wliieli was erroneously so (le.scrihed ))y its dis- 

eoverer; it being, in faet, a swift running stream. 
Smackover; stream in Tnion County Arkansas. Derived from the Frencii clieniin 

convert, "covert'd road." 
Sniethport; Ixirough in MeKean County, Pennsylvania, named for Theodore Sniethe, 

a friend of the original i)r()])rietor. 
Smitli; county in Kansas, named for J. Nelson Smith. 
Smith; county in Mississippi, named for Maj. David Smitli. 

Smith; river in ^Montana, named for Robert Smith, former Secretary of the Navy. 
Sm.ith; river in Nevada, named for Lieut. Kirby Smith. 

Sm.ith; county in Tennessee, named for Gen. Daniel Smith, a patriot and early set- 
tler of the State. 
Smith; county in Texas, named for Jolm W. Smith, killed at tlie Alamo. 
Smith Center; city in center of Smith County, Kansas, named for J. Nelson Smith, 

of the Second Colorado Regiment. 
Smithfield; town in Dutcliess County, New York, named for I'etcr Snuth. 
Smithfield; town in Johnson County, North Carolina, named for.Iohn Smith, State 

senator. 
Smiths Ferry; village in I>eaver County, Pennsylvania, named for Jesse Smith, the 

man who established the fei-ry. 
Smithto'wn; town in Suffolk County, New York, named for Richard Smith, an 

early i:)roprietor. 
Smithville; village in Jefferson County, New Y''ork, name<l for Jesse Smith, a lum- 
ber dealer. 
Smithville; village in Ritchie (^>unty. West Virginia, named for the former owner 

of the land. 
Smithville; town in <-'lay Comity, Missouri, named for Humphrey Smith, th(^ first 

settler. 
Smokes; creek in Erie County, New Yi>rk, named for an Indian who resided near 

its mouth. 
Smyrna; many places in the United States, named for the anc-ient city of Syria, 

among them the village in Chenango County, New York. 
Smyth; county in Virginia, named for (ien. Alexander Sn'iyth, member of Congress 

from that State. 
Snake; river in Idaho and Washington and Y'ellowstone i)ark. The name is said 

to l)e a translation of the name of an Indian tril)e, the Shoshones. 
Snapeene; stream in Montana. An Indian word, meaning "crooked mouth." 
Snelling; military post in Hennepin County, Minnesota, named for Colonel Josiah 

Snelling, under whose direction it was built. 
Snohomish; river and town in Washington, named for an Indian tribe. 
Snoqualmie; river in Washington, named for an Indian tribe. 
Snowden; township in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Judge Snowden, 

of Pittsburg. 
Snowmass; mountain in Colorado, so named because of the snow tield under its 

summit. 
f Snyder; county in Pennsylvania; 

Snydertown; borough in Northumlierlaml County, Penns^ylvania. Named for 
' Governor Simon Snyder of the Stat^'. 
Socatean; stream in Maine, named for Standing Atean, a warrior of an Indian 

tribe, or from an In<lian word, meaning "half burned land, and half standing 

lumber." 

Bull. 107— o:^ 10 



242 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Socorro; nmiity in New Mexico, named for "Our Lady of Succor." 

Sodus; ))ay, and town in Wayne County, New York. Derived from the Indian 
Avord, assorodus, meaniuii;, "silvery water." 

Solano; county in California, named for a chief of the Sui«un Indians. 

Solon; towns in Somerset County, Maine, and (-ortland County, New York, named 
for one of the seven wise men of Greece. 

Solution; creek in Yellowstone Park, so named because it is the outlet to Riddle 
Lake. 

Solvay; village in Onondaga County, New York, so named hecavise the Solvay Proc- 
ess works are situated there. 

Somers; town in ToUard County, Connecticut, named for Lord Somers. 

iSomers; town in Westchester County, New York; 

< Somerville; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Named forCai)t. Richard 

I Somers, naval officer in the Tripolitan war. 

Somerset; county in Maryland, named for Lady Mary Somerset. 

Somerset; counties in Maine, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, named for the county 
in England. 

Somers Point; ))orough in Atlantic County, New Jersey, named for a family of 
residents. 

Somervell; county in Texas, named for Alexander Somei'ville, a Inigadier-general 
of the Texas militia. 

Somerville; town in Somerset County, New Jersey, probably named for an English 
no))leman. 

Somonauk; village in Dekalb County, Illinois, derived from the Indian word 
essemiauk, meaning "paw paw tree." 

Sonoma; town and county in California, said to have been named for the chief of 
the Chocuyens, the word meaning "valley of the moon." 

Sonora; city in Tuolumne County, California. The name said to 1>e the Indian pro- 
nunciation of the Spanish word "senora." 

Sopris; peak of the Elk Mountains in western Colorado, named for Capt. I>ick 
Sojjris, one of the early settlers of the State. 

Souderton; borougii in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of 
early settlers. 

Souheg-an; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning " worn-out lands." 

Souneunk; stream in Maine. An Indian word meaning "that runs between 
mountains." 

Southampton; county in Virginia, and towns in Hampshire County, Massachu-- 
setts, and Suffolk County, New York, named for the town in England. 

South Anna; river in Virginia, said to have been named for Anne, Queen of Eng- 
land. 

Southboro; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, so named because formed of 
the south part of Marlboro. 

South Carolina; one of the thirteen original States, llnst named for Charles IX of 
France, and later for Charles II of England. 

South Hero; town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, named for one of the two 
islands which were called Two Heroes, granted to Ethan Allen. It was intended 
that they should be owned by only brave men warmly disposed toward the 
Revolution. 

Southport; city in Brunswick County, North Carolina, so named because it is situ- 
ated in the southern part of the State. 

South River; borough in Middlesex County, New Jer.^ey, so named to distinguish 
it from tlie North River district. 

Southwick; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named for its first settler. 

Spafford; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for Horatio Gates Spafford, 
author of the first gazetteer of that State. 



GANNETT.! PLACE NAMES IN TH K UNITED STATP:S. 243 

Spalding; county in (icoriiia, iiaiiied for tlie IIou. Tlioinas S|ianliliiiti. 
Spartanburg; county, and town in same coiuity, in South Carolina, t<o nanird 

becuusu it was settled just after tiie Kevolutiou by hunters from Virginia. 
Spearville; town in Ford County, Kansas, named for Alden Speare, of Boston. 
Spencer; counties in Kentucky and Indiana, and city in Owen rounty of the latter 

State, named for Capt. S{)ier Spencer, killed at TipjK'canoe. 
Spencer; town in Worcester County, IMassaclmsetts, said to have ))een named for 

Spencer Phips, former governor; or for Cliarles Spencer, second Duke of Marl- 

])orough. 
Spencerport; village in Monroe County, New York, named for William Il.S|HMicer, 

a i)ioneer settler. 
Sphinx; mountain in Montana, so named on account of its resendilance in shape to 

the Sphinx of Kgypt. 
Spink; county in South Dakota, named for S. \j. Sjiink. a former Congressman. 
Spirit Lake; town in Dickinson County, Iowa, named from the lake whic.li the 

Indians called "spirit water." 
Spivey; city in Kingman County, Kansas, named for K. M. Spivey, ]>residentof the 

Arkansas Valley Town and Land CV)mpany. 
Split Rock; village in Essex County, New York, so named because situated near a 

curiously forme<l rock. 
Spokane; county, city, river, and falls in Washington, named for an Indian tribe, 

the name meaning "children of the sun." 
Spottsylvania; county in Virginia, named for Alexander Spotswood, early lieu- 
tenant-governor. 
Sprague; town in Lincoln County, Washington, named for General Sprague, inter- 
ested in the Northern Pacifur Railroad. 
Springfield; city in Hampden County, Massachusetts, name<l for the town in Essex 

County, England. 
Springfield; village in Sarjiy County, Nebraska; so named because of the abundance 

of springs. ^ 

Springfield; village in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, so named by its founder 

because he "expected to see a town spring up in the old fields." 
[Spring Valley; village in Pierce County, Wisconsin; 

Springville; village in Laporte County, Indiana. So named I)ecause of the abun- 
I dance of springs. 

Sproul; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Spuyten Duyvil- channel connecting the Hudson and Harlem rivers. S<i named 

on account of the oath sworn by a Dutch shipmaster that he would pass the 

mouth of the creek "in spite of the devil." 
Squam; lake in New Hampshire. Derived from the Indian word nesquamsauke, 

meaning "the pleasant water place." 
Squaw; mountain, and a township in Piscataquis Coiinty, Maine. Abridged version 

of the translation of its Indian name, meaning "the mountain which belongs to 

a woman." 
Stafford; county and town in Kansas, named for Lewis Stafford, captain Company 

¥., First Kansas Reguiient. 
Stafford; village in Fort Bend County, Texas, named for a prominent citizen. 
Stafford; county in \'irginia, named for a county in England. 
Stair; falls on the east branch of the Penobscot River, Maine. A translation of the 

Indian name. 
Stambaugh; village in Iron County, ^lichigan, named for the man who o]iened the 

Iron River mine. 
Stamping Ground; village in Scott County, Kentucky, sonameil because the buffalo 

herds tramped down the underl)rush in early days. 



244 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ibull. 197. 

Standish; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for Miles Standish. 

Stanford; mountain in California, named for Governor Leland Stanford. 

Stanley; town in Gaston County, North Carolina, named for El wood Stanley, mem- 

l)cr of Congress. 
Stanley; town in Soutli Dakota, named for Henry M. Stanley. 
Stanly; county in North Carolina, named for Jolin Stanly, member of Con<iress. 
Stanton; counties in Kansas and Nebraska and city in Montcalm County, Michigan, 

named for Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary f)f War under Lincoln. 
Stanton; town in Powell County, Kentucky, named for Hon. Richard H. Stanton, 

of Maysville. 
IStark; counties in Illinois, North Dakota, and Ohio, towns in Coos County, New 
■j Hampshire, and Herkimer County, New York; 
I Starke; county in Indiana. Named for Gen. John Stark. 
Starkey; town in Yates County, New York. Named for John Starkey, one of the 

lii-st settlers. 
Starks; town in Somerset C'ounty, Maine; 
Starksboro; town in Addison County, Vermont; 
Starkville; town in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi. Named for Gen. John Stark, 

of Revolutionary fame. 
Starr; county in Texas, named for James H. Starr, secretary of the ti'easury of the 

republic of Texas. 
Starr King-; lake and mountains in California and New Hampshire, named for the 

Rev. Starr King. 
State Center; town in Marshall County, Iowa, so named because it is thought to be 

a geographical center. 
State College; borough in Center County, Pennsjdvania, so named because it is the 

seat of the Pennsylvania Stfte College of Agriculture. 
State Line; town in Wayne County, Mississippi, near the boundary line between 

that State and Alabama. 
Staten; island, part of Richmond County, New York, named by the Dutch for the 

Staaten general. 
Staunton; river, and a city in Augusta County, Virginia, named for the parish in 

England. 
Steamboat Rock; town in Hardin County, Iowa, so named l)ecause there is a large 

rock in the river near Avhich resend)les a steamboat in form. 
Steamboat Spring's; town in Routt County, Colorado, so named because of the 

sound wliich issues from an opening in the rocks. 
Stearns; county in Minnesota, named for C. T. Stearns. 

Steel; mountain in Washington, named for William G. Steel, of Portland, Oregon. 
Steele; counties in Minnesota and North Dakota, named for a resident of Minne- 
apolis, a town-site i^romoter. 
Steele; village in Jefferson County, Nebraska, named for D. M. Steele, railroad man. 
Steelton; borough in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, so named on account of the 

shops and works near there. 
Steelville; city in Crawford County, Missouri, so named on account of the mines 

near by. 
Steen; mountain in Oregon, named for Col. Enoch Steen. 
Steilacoom; town in Pierce County, Washington, named for an Indian tribe, the 

name said to have been derived from stolukwhamish, "river people." 
Stephens; county in Texas, named for Alexander H. Stephens, the American 

statesman. 
Stephenson; county in Illinois, named for Col. Benjamin Stephenson. 
Stephenson; village in Menominee County, Michigan, named for Robert Stephenson. 
Stephentown; town in Rensselaer County, New York, named for Stephen van 

Rensselaer. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. '245 

Steptoe; town in Wliitniaii ("ounty. WasliiiiL^don, iiainc<1 l'(ir Colniicl Sti'ptoc, rnited 

States A I'll I y. 
Sterling; city in liny Connly, Kansas, iiaiiicd fm- Stciliiii; lidsan, I'atlici- dI' ( '. W. 

and J. 11. D. liopan, early settlers. 
Sterling; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, iiaiiie<l fur Lord Stcrliiiir, an 

American general. 
Sterling-burg; village in Jefferson County, New York, named fur .lames Sterling, 

tlie builder of an iron furnace then^ 
Stetson; town in Penoliscot County, Maine, named for the (triginu! pro])rietor, 

Amasa Stetson. 
Steuben; counties in Indiana and New York; towns in Washington County, 

Maine, and Oneida County, New York; 
Steubenville; city in Jefferson County, Ohio. Named for 15aron von Steuben, a 
Prussian soldier who fought in the American Revolution. 
Stevens; count\' in Kansas, named for Thaddeus Stevens. 

Stevens; county in Minnesota, named for Colonel Stevens, of Minneapolis, promi- 
nent pioneer. 
Stevens; stream in Caledonia County, Vermont, named foi- Cajjt. Phineas Stevens. 
Stevens; county in Washington, named for Isaac I. Stevens, first governor of 

^^'ashington. 
Stevenson; mountain, and island in Vi'llowstone Lake, named for James Stevenson, 

of the U. S. (Jeological Surve)'. 
Stevens Point; city in Portage County, Wisconsin, named for the Rev. J. D. Stevens, 

missionary to the Indians. 
Stevensville ; village in Berrien County, INIichigan, named for Thomas L. Stevens, 

who laid out the town. 
Stevensville; town in Ravalli County, ^Montana, named fur Isaac 1. Stt'vens, the 

first governor of Washington. 
Stevrart; county in Georgia, named for Gen. Daniel Stewart. 
Stewart; county in Tennessee, named for Duncan Stewart. 
Stewartstown; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for John Stewart, 

one of the original jiroprietors. 
Stewartsville ; city in Dekalli County, Missouri, named for Robert M. Stewart, a 

former governor. 
Stilesville; village in Hendricks County, Indiana, named for Jeremiah Stiles, the 

proprietor. 
Stillwater; city in Washington County, Mimiesota, named for a lumber com|>any 

which selected this site for its mill. 
Stillwater; town in Saratoga County, New York, so named because of the "still 

water" in the Hudson River near the town. 
Stockbridge; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

England. 
Stockport; town in Columliia Countj^ New York, and Wayn(^ ('ounty, Pennsyl- 
vania, nameil for tlie town in England. 
Stockton; cities in California and ^Missouri and town in Chautauqua County, New 

York, named for Commodore R. F. Stockton, who toi^k part in the conquest of 

California. 
Stockton; borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, named for a resident family. 
Stockville; village in Frontier County, Nebraska, so named because stock raising 

was an important industry. 
Stoddard; county in Missouri, named for Amos Stoddard, military officer and author. 
Stoddard; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Samson Stod- 

ilard, one of the original proprietors. 
Stokes; county in Nortii Carolina, named for Col. John Stokes, a Revolutionary 

officer. 



246 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Stone; county in Arkansas, uhuumI for (Jen. T. J. (iStonewall) Jiu-kson. 

i Stone; county in Missouri; 
Stoneham; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. So named because of the 
sterile soil. 
Stonewall; county in Texas and town in Pamlico County, North C'arolina, named 

for Gen. T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. 
Storey; county in Nevada, named for Colonel Storey, killed in ])attle with the 

Pyramid Lake Indians. 
Story; county in Iowa, named for Judwe Joseph Story, of the Supreme Court. 
Stoughton; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for William Stoughton, 

lieutenant-governor and chief justi(;e of the province. 
Stoughton; city in Dane County, Wisconsin, named for Luke Stoughton, who 

platted the village. 
Stoutsville; village in INIonroe County, Missouri, named for Robert P. Stout, of 

Kentucky. 
Stow; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
Stoystown; borougli in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, name<l for an early settler 

and Revolutionary soldier, John Stoy. 
Strafford; county in New Hampshire, named for a town in England. 
Strasburg; town in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and borough in Lancaster County, 

Pennsylvania, named for the city in Germany. 
Stratton; town in Windham County, Vermont, named for Samuel Stratton, an early 

settler of Vernon. 
Strawberry Point; town in Clayton County, Iowa, so named because of an abun- 
dance of these berries. 
Streeter; creek in Nansemond County, Virginia, named for a resident family. 
Strong; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Strong; city in Chase County, Kansas, named for W. B. Strong, president Atchison, 

Tojieka and Santa Fe Railroad Comi)any. 
Strong; town in Franklin County, Maine, named f(»r Caleb Strong, former United 

States Senator. 
Strother; town in Monroe County, Missouri, named for Prof. French Strother. 
Stroudsburg; borough in Monroe County, Pennsylvania, named for Col. Jacob 

Stroud, its first settler. 
Stuart; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for Peter Stuart, an early settler. 
Sturbridge; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Stourbridge, 

England. 
Sturgeon; town in Boone County, Missouri, named for Isaac II. Sturgeon, of St. 

Louis. 
Sturgeon Bay; city in Door County, Wisconsin, named for the bay which abounds 

with this fish. 
Sturgis; town in St. Joseph County, Michigan, named from the prairie which was 

named for Judge John Sturgis, first settler. 
Stutsman; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Enoch Stutzman, a pioneer 

settler prominent in the State's history. 
Stuyvesant; town in Columbia County, New York, named for (Governor Peter 

Stuyvesant. 
Suamico; river in Wisconsin. An Indian word, meaning "the yellow sand." 
Sublett; town in Cassia County, Idaho, named for Captain Sublette, a partner in the 

Rocky ]\Iountain Fur Company. 
Succasunna; town in Morris County, New Jersey, in a locality famous for its iron 

ore. Derived from the Indian sukeu, "black," and achsun, "stone;" hence 

"place where the black stone is found." 
Sudbury; town in INIiddlesex County, Mas.sachusetts, named for the town in England. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. 247 

Suffern; town in RorkUuHl (ouiity, New York, iiaiiie<l from tlie Sutfcru fuinily, 

which <iwin'(l considerable jjroperty in the county. 
Suffield; town in Hartford County, Connecticut, originally called Southlield, and 

situated in ^Massachusetts; so named because "being the southernmost towne 

that either at j)resent or is like to he in that county." 
Suffolk; counties in ]\hissachusetts and New York, and many places in tiie rnite<l 

States, named for the county in England. 
Svigar; creek in North and South Carolina, named for the Indian tribe Sugaree. 
Suisun; town in Solano County, California, named for an Indian tribe. 
Sullivan; county and town in Indiana, named for Daniel Sullivan, killed by the 

Indians when bearing messages from Cajjtain Clark, after the capture of Vin- 

cennes. 
Sullivan; county and town in Franklin County, Missouri, named for the county in 

Tennessee. 
Sullivan; town in Hancock County, ]Maine, named for an original j)roprietor. 
Sullivan; counties in New Hanijjshire, New York, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; 

towns in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, and ^ladison County, New York, 

named for Maj. Cen. John Sullivan, a Revolutionary officer. 
Sully; county in South Dakota, named for Alfred Sully, who conmianded a brigade 

in Dakota. 
Sulphur Springs; town in lloiikins County, Texas, so named because of its local 

features. 
Summer; lake in Oregon, so called becau.se of the warm weather which was exjieri- 

enced there by the Fremont party. 
Summerfield; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for E. Summerfield, of I.aw- 

rence, Kansas. 
Summers; I'ounty in West Virginia, named for ( ieorge W. Summers, Congressman 

fnjni Virginia. 
Summerville; town in Dorchester County, South Carolina, so named l)ecanse it is a 

sunnner resort for residents. 
Summit; counties in Colorado and Cliio; city in Union County, New Jer.sey, and 

town in Pike County, Mississippi, so named because of their elevation. 
Summit; county in Utah, so named because of its mountains. 
Summit Hill; borough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, so named because of the 

elevation. 
Sumner; county in Kansas, named for Charles Sumner, an American statesman. 
Sumner; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for Governor Increase Sumner. 
Sumner; county in Tennessee, named for Col. Jethro Sumner. 
Sumter; counties in Alabama, Florida, Georgia; county and town in South Carolina, 

and fort in Charleston Harbor, named for Gen. Thomas Sumter, of South Caro- 

hna, an officer of the Revolution. 
Sunapee; lake in New Hampshire, for which a town in Sullivan County and 

mountain in the same State are named. From an Indian word, shehunk-nippe, 

"wild goose pond." 
Sunbury; borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, named for a village 

on the Thames. 
Suncook; river in New Hampshire. From an Indian word, schunk-auke, meaning 

"goose place." 
Sunderland; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for (Uiarles Spencer, 

Earl of Sunderland. 
Sunflower; river and county in Mississippi, no doubt descriptively named. 
Sun Prairie; town in Dane County, Wisconsin, so named because a party of pioneers, 

after a nine days' tramp over the prairies in the rain, came to this spot as the 

sun came out. 



248 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Superior; lake in INIichigan. Translation of the original Frencli name Lac Supe- 

rieiir aux Outaouai-.s, "the npper lake of the Ottawas." 
Surprise; creek in Yellowstone Park, so named because recent explorations find 

its course different than was formerly supposed. 
Surry; county in North Carolina, named for Lord Surry, an advocate of Anieri 

independence. 
Surry; county in Virginia, and tow^n in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, nam^, 

for the county in England. 
Survey; peak in the Yellowstone Park, so named l)ecause a signaling point for the 

Indians. 
Suspecaugh.; stream in New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning ' ' muddy or standing 

water. ' ' 
Susquehanna; river, county, and borough in Pennsylvania. From an Indian 

word, suckahanne, "water." 
Sussex; counties in Delaware, New Jersey, and Virginia, named for the county in 

England. 
Sutro; village in Lyon County, Nevada, named for Adolph Sutro. 
Sutter; county and several small towns in California, named for C-ol. John Sutter. 
Sutton; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for town of the same 

name in Worcester County, Massachusetts, said to be named for the town in 

England. 
Sutton; county in Texas, named for Lieutenant-Colonel Sutton, of the army of the 

Confederacy. 
Suwanee; county, town, and river in Florida, creek and town in Gwinnett County, 

Georgia. Interpretations of this Indian word are various, some stating that it 

is from Shawnee, the tribe, while others give its derivation as from sawani, 

meaning "echo" or "echo river." 
Swain; county in North Carolina, named for David L. Swain, an early governor. 
Swainsboro; town in Emanuel County, Georgia, named for Col. Stephen Swain, of 

the State legislature. 
Swampscott; town in Essex (bounty, Massachusetts. Various derivations are given 

this word— from the Indian word wonnesquamsauke, "the pleasant water place;" 

from m'sqm-ompsk, "red rock," or "at the red rock;" or from another Indian 

word, meaning "broken waters." 
Swannanoa; stream and town in P>uncombe County, North Carolina. An Indian 

word, meaning "l)eautiful." 
Swansboro; town in Onslow County, North Carolina, prol)al)ly so named on account 

of the swans frequenting the neighborhood. 
Swansea; town in Bristol Comity, Massachusetts, named for the town in Wales. 
Swanville; village in Erie C-ounty, Pennsylvania, named for John L. Swan, its first 

settler. 
Swarthmore; l)orough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named for the district in 

England. 
Swedesboro; town in Gloucester County, New Jersey, so named because settled by 

Swedes. 
Sweet Grass; county in Montana, named from the sweet-grass hills. 
Sweet Springs; city in Saline County, Missouri, so named because of its neighlior- 

ing springs. 
Sweetwater; river in Wyoming, giving name to a county, the river having been so 

named l)ecause its waters have a sweet taste. 
Swepsonville; village in Alamance County, North Carolina, named for George W. 

Swepson, a capitalist. 
Swift; county in Minnesota, named for an early governor. 

Swisher; county in Texas, named for James G. Swisher, a signer of the Texas 
declaration of independence. 



GANNETT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 249 

Switzerland: county in Tmliana, named for tlio country in Europe. 

Sylva; town in .laclvsou ("duiity, North Carolina, nanuul for a jironiinent resident. 

Sylvan Grove; city in Lincoln Connty, Kansas, so named because situated near the 
Twin Groves, on the north hank of the Saline River. 

Symmes; town in Hamilton County, Ohio, named for John Cleves Synnncs, judge 
in the Northwest Territory. 

Syracuse; city in Onondasn County, Ni'w York, named for the ancient city of Sicily. 

Tabery; village in Oneida County, New York, named for the iron-mining town in 
Swctlen. 

Table Rock; village in Pawnee County, Nebraska, so named because situated near 
a large, flat-topped rock. 

Tacoma; city in Washington. From the Indian woi'd Tahoma, meaning "the 
highest," "near heaven." 

laconic; range of hills in Massachusetts and village in Fairfield County, Connect- 
icut. An Indian word, meaning "forest," or "wilderness." 

Taghkanick; creek and village in Columbia County, New York. An Indian word, 
said to mean "there is water enough." 

Tahoe; lake in California and Ne'^ada. An Indian word, meaning "big water." 

Talbot; county in Georgia, named for Matthew Talb(jt, acting governor (if tiie 
State in 1819. 

Talbot; county in Maryland, probably named for Sir Robert Talbot, of Ireland, 
who married Grace, the daughter of Sir George Cab.ert, the first Lord Balti- 
more, though some authorities state that it was named for the uncle of Lady 
Talbot. 

Talbott; village in Jefferson County, Tennessee, named for Col. John Talbott. 

Talbotton; town in Talbot County, Georgia, named for ]\Iatthew Talbot, acting 
governor of the State in 1819. 

Taliaferro; county in Georgia, named for Col. Benjamin Taliaferro. 

Talladega; city and county in Alabama. An Indian name, meaning "at the end," 
"on the border," hence a town on the frontier. 

Tallahassee; city in Florida, so named because it is supposed to have been the 
site of Indian cornfields in remote times. An Indian word, meaning "old 
town." 

Tallahatchie; county in Mississippi, named from the princi])al branch of the Yazoo 
River in the same State. An Indian word, meaning "river of the rock." 

Tallapoosa; river in Georgia and Alabama, giving name to a count}' in Alabama 
and a city in Haralson County, Georgia. An Indian word, meaning "swift cur- 
rent," or, according to some authorities, "stranger," "newcomer." 

Talleyville; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for the Talley family, 
early residents. 

(Tallula; village in Menard County, Illinois; 

Tallulah Falls; town in Rabun County, Georgia. From an Indian word, meaning 

I "leaping waters." 

Tama; county in Iowa. An Indian word, meaning "beautiful," "pleasant," 
" lovely," or the name of the wife of the Indian chief Poweshiek. Still another 
authority states that it is named for a chief whose name meant "bear w'hose 
voice makes the rocks tremble." 

Tamalpais; village in Marin C'ounty, California. A Spanish word, meaning "region 
of the Tamal Indians. " 

Tamanend; village in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for an Indian chief, 
the word meaning "beaver-like," or "amiable." 

Tamaqua; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. From an Indian word, 
meaning " beaver stream." 

Tampa; bay and city on the West coast of Florida. From the Indian word Itimpi, 
"close to it, near it." 



250 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buli,. 197. 

Taney; county in Missouri, named Tor Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the United 

States. 
Tangipahoa; river, town, and parish in Louisiana, named for an Indian tribe, the 

word meaning "those who gather maize stalks." 
Tankhanna; creels in Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning "the smaller 

stream." 
Taopi; village in Mower County, Minnesota, said to be named for an Indian chief 

who befriended the whites in the Minnesota massacre, the word meaning 

"wounded." 

ITappan; town in Harrison County, Ohio; 
Tappantown; village in Rockland County, New York. From the Indian word 
Thuphane, meaning "cold stream." 
Tar; river in North Carolina; 

Tarboro; town in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. Named from the above, 

which received its name on account of the tar made upon its banks by early 

colonial settlers. Wheeler gives the origin of the name of the river as from 

the Indian word Tau, "river of health." 

Tarrant; county in Texas, named for an early settler jn'ominent in politics after the 

annexation. 
Tarrant; creek in Virginia, named for the family who owned much land along its 

\Vestern border. 
Tarry all; peak and stream in Colorado, so named because of the rich placers found 

along the latter. 
TarrytoAvn; village in Westchester County, New York. Mortification of its former 

name of Terwen, "wheat town," given on account of its large crops of that 

cereal. 
Tatamy; borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named for a chief of the 

Delaware Indians who was i^rominent in the colonial history of the State. 
Tate; county in Mississippi, named for a prominent family of which T. S. Tate was 

a member. 
Tatonka; village in Ellsworth County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning 

"l)uffalo." 
Tattnall; county in Georgia, named for Josiah Tattnall, an early governor. 
Tatum; town in Marlboro County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Taunton; river and city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

England. 
Tawas; city in Iosco County, Michigan, a contraction of Tawawa. 
Tawawa; town in Shelby County, Ohio. Indian word meaning "trader." 
Taycheedah; village in Fond du I^ac County, AVisconsin, so named because of the 

Indian camp made upon Lake Winnebago. An Indian word, jneaning "lake 

camp." 
Taylor; jieak in Humboldt County, (California, name<l for an early settler. 
Taylor; counties in Florida, Georgia, Iowa, and Kentucky, and town in Cortland 

County, New York, named for Gen. Zachary Taylor. 
Taylor; town in Lafayette County, Mississippi, named for an early settler. 
Taylor; county in Texas, named for a family of early settlers. 
Taylor; county in West Virginia, named for John Taylor, of Caroline County, 

Virginia. 
Taylor; county in Wisconsin, named for David Taylor, justice of the suprem'e court. 
Taylor Center; village in Wayne County, Michigan, named for Gen. Zachary Taylor. 
Taylor Ridg-e; mountains in Floyd County, Georgia, named for Richard Taylor, a 

Cherokee chief, who lived near their bass. 
Taylors Falls; village in Chisago County, Minnesota, named for one of the first 

settlers, member of the Northwest Lumber Company. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMP:S IN THE UNITED STATP^S. 251 

Taylorsville; \illa,i,a' in IJurtiKiloiiicw Cnunty, liidiiuia, iiaiiicd for (icii. /acliarv 

Taylor. 
Taylorsville; town in Spencer County, Kentucky, named foi- Kicliard Taylor, the 

former proprietor of the land. 
Taylorsville; town in Alexander County, North Carolina, nanicil for.Iolm !>. 'i'ay- 

lor, former jud.u'e of the State. 
Tazewell; county in Illinois, named for (iovernor i>iltleton \V. Tazewell, of Viru:inia. 
Tazewell; town and county in Viriiinia, and villaj^e in ^hu'ion (\)unty, (Jeortria, 

named for Senator Henry Tazewell, of Virji;inia. 
Tchemanahaut; ntream in Tlot Sprin<,'s County, Arkansas. A corruption of the 

Frencli chemin en haut, " lu<ich road." 
Tecumseh; villa<i;e in Lenawee County, Michi<i;au, city in Pottawatomie Oninty, 

Oklahoma, and city in Nebraska, named for tlus Shawnee Indian ciii(^f, the <j:en- 

erally accepted meaning of the word being "a panther crouching." 
Tehachapi; town and pass in Kern County, (jaUfornia, named for the Indian triln! 

Ta hi cha pa han na. 
Tekonsha; village in Calhoun County, Michigan, named for the Indian chief of the 

tribe who formerly occupied the town site. 
Telfair; county in Georgia, named for Edward Telfair, one of the early governors of 

tlie State. 
Tell; city in Indiana, named by its Swiss colonists f(jr William Tell. 
Teller; town in Colorado, named for Senator Teller of the State. 
Temescal; town in Riverside County, California. From a Spanish word, meaning 

' ' sweat house. ' ' 
Temple; town in Hillsboro County, New Ilamjishire, named for.lohn Tem]>le, a rela- 
tive of Earl Temple, of England. 
Templeton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, said to have been named for 

Earl Temple. 
Tenafly; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey. A Dutch word, meaning "at the 

meadow." 
Tenasillihee; island in the Colnndiia River, Oregon. An Indian word, meaning 

"little land." 
Tenino; town in Thurston County, Washington, named for an Indian tribe. 
Tennessee; tributary of the Ohio River which gives name to a State of the Union. 

Three different derivations are given the name: From Tanase, the name of the 

most important village of the Cherokee Indians; from an Indian word meaning 

"a curved spoon;" or from Taensa, an Indian tribe of the Watchesan family. 
Tensas; parish in Louisiana, named for a now extinct tribe of Indians. 
Teocalli; mountain in Colorado, so named because shaped like a Mexican pyramid. 
Terrebonne; parish in Louisiana, named for a ])lace in ('anada. A French word, 

meaning "good land." 
Terre Haute; city in Indiana, built upon a bank (iO feet above the river. A P^rench 

word, meaning "high land." 
Terrell; county in Georgia, named for Dr. William Terrell, an early member of 

Congress from that State. 
Terre Noir; creek in Arkansas. A French word, meaning "black land." 
Terrill; mountain in Utah, named for the wife of J. II. Renshawe, of the United 

States (Tcological Survey. 
Terry; town in Hinds County, Mississippi, named for P>ill Terry, a resident. 
Terry; county in Texas, named for Frank Terry, conunander of the Texas Rangers 

in the civil war. 
Terryville; village in Litchtield ('ounty, Coiuiecticut, named ior a manufacturer of 

wooden clocks there. 



252 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Teton; (county, river, and mountain in Montana; range of mountains in Wyoming; 
and town in Fremont County, Idaho, named for an Indian tribe whose name • 
was variously written Teton, Titon, or Titowan. 

Teutopolis; village in Effingham County, Illinois, originally settled by a colony of 
Germans from Cincinnati. 

Tewksbury; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, probably named for the 
town in England. 

Texarkana; city in Miller County, Arkansas, near the border between Arkansas 
and Texas. The name formed of a combination of these two names. 

Texas; largest of the United States. Said by some to be a Spanish word applied to 
the republic, but the generally accepted version of the name is that it is an 
Indian word, used as a token of friendship. A county in Missouri, named for 
that republic. 

Thames; river in Connecticut, named for the one in England. 

Thatchers; island in Massachusetts, named for Anthony Thacher, who was ship- 
wrecked there in 1635. 

Thayer; city in Neosho County, Kansas, named for Nathaniel Thayer, of Boston. 

Thayer; county in Nebraska, named for Governor John jNI. Thayer. 

Theresa; county in Jefferson County, New York, named for the daughter of James 
Le Ray de Chaumont. 

Thibodaux; town in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, named for H. S. Thibodeaux. 

Thielsen; mountain in Oregon, named for Hans Thielsen, chief engineer of the 
Oregon and California Railroad. 

Thomas; county in Georgia, named for Gen. Jett Thomas. 

Thomas; county in Kansas, named for Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas. 

Thomas; mountains in Utah, named for Col. L. Thomas. 

Thomaston; town in Upson county, Georgia, named for Gen. Jett Thomas. 

Thomaston; town in Knox County, Maine, nameil for Gen. John Thomas, of Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Thomasville; town in Thomas County, Georgia, named for Gen. Jett Thomas. 

Thomasville; town in Davidson County, North Carolina, named for State Senator 
Thomas. 

Thorndike; town in Waldo County, Maine, named for Thomas Thorndike, one of 
tlie original jiroprietors. 

Thornton; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, named for Dr. C. C. Thornton, a 
large land owner. 

Thornton; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, probably named for three 
brothers, Thornton, early settlers, but by some credited to Hon. Mathew 
Thornton. 

Three Oaks; village in Berrien County, INIichigan; so named on account of three 
large oaks near the village. 

Three River; peak in Yellowstone Park; so named because the three rivers, Galla- 
tin, INIadison, and Gardiner, take their rise on its slopes. 

Three Rivers; city in Michigan; so named because situated at the junction of the 
St. Joseph, Portage, and Rocky rivers. 

Throckmorton; county in Texas, named for Dr. William E. Throckmorton, one of 
tiie hrst pioneers of northern Texas. 

Throgs Neck; cape in Westchester County, New York, named for John Throck- 
morton, an original patentee. 

Throop; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for Hon. Enos T. Throop, 
governor. 

Thurman; town in Warren County, New York, named for John Thurman. 

Thurston; county in Nebraska, named for Senator John M. Thurston. 



(5ANNETT.] PLACE NAMES TN THE UNITED STATES. 253 

Thurston; town in Stcultcn County, New York, nanicil for William I!. Tliurston, a 

landholder. 
Thurston; county in Washington, named foi- Samuel \l. Thurston, delegate to 

Congress from Oregon Territory. 
Tibbetts; creek in Westchester County, New York, named for the family who 

have owned the adjoining land for one hundred and thirty years. 
Tibee; creek in INIississipiji. For derivation see (>ldilihe}i<i. 
Ticonderog-a; town in Essex County, New Y''ork. Said to be a aioditication of the 

Indian word, Chiderogo, "sounding waters;" other meanings given are "brawl- 
ing water," or "noisy." 
Tiffin; city in Ohio, named for Edward Tittin, the tirst governor. 
Tillery; town in Halifax County, North Carolina, named for a pronunent citizen. 
Tilton; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for Charles E. Tilton, of 

New York. 
Tiltonsville; town in .Jefferson ('ounty, Ohio, named for a family of early pro- 
prietors. 
Timmonsville ; town in Florence County, South Carolina, named for the Tinunons 

family. 
Tin Cup; town in Gunnison County, (V)lorado, so named l)ecause in its early days 

when a mining camp, gold was so plentiful that it was measured in a tin cup. 
Tintah; town in Traverse County, Minnesota. From an Indian \\ord, meaning 

"prairie." 
Tinton Falls; town in ^lonmonth County, New Jersey. Corruption of Tintern, 

]\Ionmouthshire, F^ngland. 
Tioga; counties in New York and Pennsylvania, river traversing both States, and a 

borough in Pennsylvania. An Indian word given various interpretations: "at 

the forks," "swift current," or "a gate," place of entrance. 
Tioinati; tributary of the St. Lawrence in New Y^'ork. An Indian word meaning 

"beyond the point." 
Tioughnioga; river in central New Y'ork. An Indian word meaning " meeting of 

the waters." 
Tippah; county in Mississippi, named for the wife of Pontotoc, Chickasaw Indian 

chief, the word meaning " cut off." 
Tippecanoe; river and county in Indiana, and village in Harrison County, Ohio. 

An Indian word given the various meanings of "at the great clearing," "the 

long-lipped pike," and " buffalo fish." 
Tipton; county and city in Indiana, named for Gen. John Tijiton, Senator from 

that State. 
Tipton; county in Tennessee, named for C-apt. Jacol) Ti2)ton, father of Gen. Jacob 

Tipton. 
Tisbury; town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
Tishomingo; county in Mississipi)i, named for the king of the C'hickasaw Indians, 

the name meaning " warrior chief." 
Tishtang; creek in Humboldt County, California, fancifully nanieil to suggest the 

sound of the water. 
Tiskilwa; village in Bureau County, Illinois. Said to be derived from various 

Indian words with the meanings "a kind of bird," "a plover," or "an old 

boy," meaning a bachelor. 
Tissaack; mountain in Yosemite Valley, California. An Indian word meaning 

"goddess of the valley." 
Titonka; village in Kossuth County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning " big house." 
Titus; county in Texas, named for James Titus, a prominent citizen. 
Titusville; town in Brevard County, Florida, named for its founder, Colonel Titus, 

who was a leader in the Kansas crusade. 



254 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Titusville; city in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, named for Jonathan Titus, 

former owner of the town site. 
Tivoli; villaj^e in Dutchess County, New York, named for the town in Italy. 
Tobesofka; creek in Georgia, so named because an Indian lost a dish of meal while 

crossing; it. Sofskee, meaning "dish of meal," and tobe, "I have lost." 
Tobyhanna; stream in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, thickl}^ banked with alder 

bnslies. Indian, meaning "alder stream." 
Tocoino; river in Florida, named for a tribe of Indians, the name meaning "lord, 

ruler, master." 
Todd; i-ounty in Kentucky, named for Col. John Todd. 
Todd; county in Minnesota, named for Captain Todd, of the Regular Army. 
Tohickon; stream in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Indian, meaning "driftwood 

stream." 
Tolly; point at the junction of Severn River and Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, where 

Captain Tolly was wrecked. 
Tomah; city and township in Wisconsin, named for the chief t)f the Menominee 

Indians. 
Tomahawk; city in l^incoln County, Wisconsin, and town in Searcy County, 

Arkansas. An Indian word, meaning "beating thing," "a savage implement," 

or, according to another authority using a different derivation, "strike them," 

or "lie is stricken." 
Tomasaki; mountain in Utali, named for a Ute Indian. 
Tombicon; stream in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, meaning 

"place of crab apples." 
Tonibigbee; river in Mississippi. Derived from the Indian Itnmbi-bikp(>, "coffin 

makers." 
Tombstone; town in Pima County, Arizona, so named by its founder, because 

when starting out on his prosi^ecting tour he was assured he would "find his 

tombstone." 
Tom.e; village in Valencia County, New Mexico. A contraction of Santo Tonuis, 

Sjianish for St. Thomas. 
Tom Green; county in Texas, named for Gen. Tom Green, distinguished in the 

early history of the State, and later in the civil war. 
Tonioka; river in Florida, named for an Indian tribe. 

I Tompkins; county and town in Delaware County, New York; 
Tompkinsville ; village in Richmond County, New York, and Monroe County, 
Kentucky. Named for Daniel D. Tompkins, governor of New York in 1807. 
Toms; river in Ocean County, New Jersey, said to have been named for Capt. 

William Tom, an early English settler. 
Tonawanda; stream, and town in Erie CViunty, New York. An Indian word 

meaning, "swift water." 
Tonganoxie; town in Leavenworth County, Kansas, named for a Delaware Indian 

who kei)t a stopping place near the present town site. 
Tonica; village in Lasalle County, Illinois, prol)ably named from the Indian, the 

word said to mean "a place or country inhabited." 
Tooele; county in Utah, so named on account of a species of rush which grows in 

the mountains. 
Topeka; city in Kansas and village in Mason (-ounty, Illinois. Indian, meaning 

" a good place to dig potatoes." 
Topsfield; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named from the parish in England. 
Topsham; town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, named for the seaport in England. 
Toronto; many towns and cities in the United States bear this Indian name, 

meaning "oak tree rising from the lake," which has been transferred to them 

from the city in Canada. 



uANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 255 

Torowcap; valley in Arizona. Indian, meaning "a clayey locality." 

Torrey; }peak in Colorado, named for the hotanii^t. 

Torrey; town in Yates Connty, New York, named for Henry Torrey. 

Torring-ton; town in Litehtield Connty, Connecticnt, nauu'd for the town in 

England. 
Totowa; borongh in Passaic Connty, New Jersey. From the Indian word tosawei, 

meaning "to sink, dive, or go under water," as timbers do when carried over 
a waterfall. 
Totoganic; river in Wisconsin. Indian, meaning "place of floating l(|gs." 
Totoket; hill in New Bedford, Connecticnt. Prol>al»ly an Indian word, mei'ning 

"on the great tidal river." 
Tottenville; village in Richmond Connty, New York, named for the Tottens, family 

of early residents. 
Toulbah; mountain m Maine, in shape resembling a turtle. Indian, meaning 

"turtle." 
Towaliga; river in Georgia, so named because the Indians roasted the scalps of the 

wliites upon its banks. Towelaggie, "roasted scalps." 
Towauda; village in McLean County, Illinois, and l)orongh in Bradford Connty, 

Pennsylvania. Indian, meaning " where we bury the dead." 
Tower City; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and town in Cass County, 

North Dakota, named for Charlemagne Tower, father of the present United 

States ambassador to Russia. 
Towner; county in North Dakota, named for ( ). M. Towner, a nannber of the Terri- 
torial council. 
Towns; county in (Jeorgia, named for (u'orge W. 1>. Towns, former governor of the 

State. 
Townsend; town in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for Sanmel Townsend, a 

large land owner. 
[Townsend; town in INIiddlesex County, Massachusetts; 

. Townshend ; town in Windham County, Vermont. Named for Charles Townshend, 

who was a member of the ministry during Governor Wentworth's term of office. 

Towson; town in Baltimore County, Maryland, named for the family of which Gen. 

Nathan Towson was a member. 
Tracy; village in Piatt County, Missouri, named for an official of the Chicago, Rock 

Island and Pacific Railroad. 
Traill; county in North Dakota, named for W. J. S. Trail, a rei)resentative of the 

Hudson Bay Company. 
Transylvania; county in North Carolina, so named on account of its geographical 

position — " beyond the forest." 
Trappe; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, so named on account of 

the high steps which led up to one of the early taverns, designated by the Ger- 
man settlers as "treppe." 
Travellers Rest; town in Greenville C<junty, South Carolina, named for an inn 

situated there in early days. 
Traverse; county in Minnesota, situated on a lake of the same name. French word, 

meaning "crossing." 
Travis; county in Texas, named for Col. William B. Travis, one of Texas' most 

prominent men during its early days, who fell at the Alamo. 
Treadwell; bay in New York, named for Thomas Tread well, an old resident. 
Treasury; mountain in Colorado, so named on account of the mines which it 

contains. 
Trego; county in Kansas, named for Edward P. Trego, cajitain Company H, F^ighth 

Kansas, killed during the civil war. 



256 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Trempealeau; county and village in same county in Wisconsin, deriving their name 

from the island in the Mississippi, which was designated by the early French 

voyageurs Mont qui trem]>e a I'eau, " mountain which stands in the water." 
Trenton; city in New Jersey, named for Col. William Trent, speaker of the assembly. 
Trexlertown; town in Lehigh County, IVnnsylvania, named for John Trexler. 
Tribune; city in Greeley County, Kansas, named for the Tribune (New York), 

( Irceley's newspa^ier. 
Trident; mesa in Colorado, so named because of the three spurs which rise from it. 
Trigg; county in Kentucky, named for Col. Stephen Trigg, slain by the Indians at 

the battle of Blue Licks. 
Trimble; county in Kentucky, named for the Hon. Robert Trimble. 
Trinchera; creek in Colorado. iSi)anish word, meaning "cut-bank river." 
Trinity; county in California, named from the river, so named from the supposition 

of its first American exj)lorers that it emptied into the Bay of Trinidad, which 

was entered by its Spanish discoverers on Trinity Sunday. 
Trinity; town in Randolph County, North Carolina, named from Trinity College, 

formerly located there. 
Trinity; river and county in Texas, named for the river, name(l for the Triune God. 
Tripp; comity in South Dakota, named for Bartlett Tripp, United States minister to 

Austria in 1893. 
Troup; county in Georgia, named for Hon. George M. Troup, Senator from that State. 
Trousdale; county in Tennessee, named for Governor William Trousdale. 
Troy; cities in Kansas, Mississippi, and New York, named for the ancient Troy of 

Asia IVIinor. 
Troy; town in Montgomery County, North Carolina, named for Matthew Troy, a 

jirominent lawyer. 
Truckee; river in California, name<l for the old Indian guide of Genei'al Fremont. 
Truesdale; town in Warren C!ounty, Missouri, named for William Truesdale, former 

owner of the townsite. 
Trumansburg, village in Tompkins County, New^ York, named for the Tremaines, 

family of early settlers. 
Trumbull; county in Ohio, named for Johnathan Trumbull, first governor of Con- 
necticut, the land formerly being within Connecticut's Western Reserve. 
Truro; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
Truxton; town in Courtland County, New York, named for Commodore Thomas 

Truxton. 
Tryon; town in Polk County, North Carolina, named for William Tryon, colonial 

governor. 
Tuckaboe; creek in New Jersey. Indian, " where deer are shy." 
Tucker; county in West Virginia, named for St. George Tucker, an eminent Vir- 
ginia jurist. 
Tuftonboro; town in Carroll County, New Hampshire, named for J. Tufton INIason, 

to whom tlie grant was made. 
Tukuhnikavats ; peak of the Sierra la Sal in Utah, named for a LTte Indian. The 

word means "Dirt Seer." 
Tulare; county and city in California. Indian, "place of tales, or reeds." 
Tuleys; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Tully; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for Marcus Tullius Cicero, 

the Roman orator. 
Tulpehocken; stream in Pennsylvania. Indian, "land of turtles." 
Tum-water; town in Thurston County, Washington. An Indian word, meaning 

"waterfall." Another authority interprets it as "the beating of the heart." 
Tunica; county and town in Mississippi, named for the Indian tribe, the word 

meaning "the people." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 257 

Tunkhannock; borough in Wyoming County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, 

mraning ''the small stream." 
Tuppecklianna; stream in Pennsj'lvania. An Indian word, meaning "the stream 

which tlows from a large spring." 
Turbutville; borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, named for a fam- 
ily who had large land holdings in the State. 
Turin; town in Lewis County, New York, named from the city in Italy. 
Turkey; river in Iowa, so named l)ecause much frequented by wild turkeys. 
Turmans; creek in Sullivan County, Indiana, named for Benjamin Turman, first 

settler on the west side of the county. 
Turner; town in Androscoggin County, Maine, named for the Rev. Charles Turner, 

of Scituate, Massachusetts. 
Turner; county in South Dakota, named for J. W. Turner, legislator. 
Turnersville; town in Robertson County, Tennessee, named for Major Turner. 
Turnwall; creek in Clark County, Arkansas, corruption of the French, terre noir, 

"black land." 
Turret; mountiiin in Yellowstone Park, so named from its shaj)e. 
Tuscaloosa; county and city in Alabama named for an Indian chief, the name 

meaning "black warrior." 
Tuscarawas; river and county in Ohio, and several townships. An Indian word 

which authorities give the two different meanings, "old town," because the 

oldest Indian town in that part of the State was situated on the banks of the 

river; and "open mouth." 
Tuscarora; village in Livingston County, New York, and river in Pennsylvania, 

named for the Dusgaoweh Indians, a tribe of the Six Nations, whose name 

signifies "shirt-wearing people." 
Tuscola; county in Michigan and city in Douglas County, Illinois, probably named 

for an Indian chief, Tusco, who formerly lived in the vicinity. The name 

meaning ' ' warrior. ' ' 
Tuscumbia; city in Colbert County, Alabama, and village in Miller County, Mis- 
souri, named for a Chickasaw Indian chief, although another authority favors 

the derivation of the Cherokee, "grand battle ground." 
Tuskegee; town in Macon County, Alabama. Probably derived from the Indian 

word, taskialgi, "-warriors." 
Tusquitee; village in Clay County, North Carolina. Indian, "high valle}\" 
Tusten; town in Sullivan County, New York, named for Col. Benjamin Tusten. 
Tuttle; lake in Wisconsin, named for an early settler. 
Tuxedo; a few places in the United States bear this Indian name, which undoubtedly 

is derived from P'tauk-seet-tough, meaning "the place of bears." 
Twiggs; county in Georgia, named lor (}en. John Twiggs. 
Twin Rivers; two small streams, so named because entering Lake Michigan, from 

Wisconsin, at the same point. Town in Manitowoc County, named for the above. 
Two Hearted; river in Michigan. An erroneous translation of the Indian name 

Nizhodesibi, "twin river." 
Two Licks; branch of the Conemaugh in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Trans- 
lation of the Indian name, Nischahoni. 
Twowater; branch of the W^hite River in eastern Utah, so named because having 

two main sources — Bitterwater and Sweetwater forks. 
Tygart; valley and river in W^est Virginia, named for David Tygart, an early settler. 
Tyler; county in Texas, named for John Tyler, President of the United States. 
Tyler; county in West Virginia, named for John Tyler, governor of Virginia. 
Tylerville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Josiah and Frederick 

Tyler, early settlers. 

Bull. 197—02 17 



258 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Tymochtee; stream and town in Wyandot County, Ohio, the former flowing around 
a large plain. An Indian word, meaning "around the plain." 

Tyndall; mountain in California, named for the English physicist. 

Tyngsboro; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Ebenezer Tyng, 
l)ut according to Mason received its name from Mrs. Sarah Tyng Winslow. 

Tyring-ham; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for the family of 
Tyringham, of which Governor Bernard was a descendant and representative. 

Tyrone; borough in Blair County, Pennsylvania, named for the county in Ireland. 

Tyrrel; county in North Carolina, named for Sir John Tyrrel, a lord proprietor. 

Uchee; village in Russell County, Alabama. An Indian word, meaning "corn." 

TJdall; city in Cowley County, Kansas, named for Cornelius Udall. 

Tlhrichsville; city in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, named for a family of early settlers. 

TJinkaret; group of volcanic mountains in Grand Canyon, Colorado, and plateau in 
Arizona. An Indian word, meaning "pine mountain." 

Uinta; counties in Utah and Wyoming and mountain range in Utah, named for a 
branch of the Ute I'ndians, the word meaning " pine land." 

TJiukufki; stream in Indian Territory. Indian, "muddy water." 

Ukiah; city in California, name<l for the Indian tribe, of whose name, Yokaia, it is 
a corruption, the word meaning " lower vallej'." 

XJlmers; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for the Ulmer family. 

Ulster; county in New York, named for the province in Ireland. 

Ulysses; city in Grant County, Kansas, anfl village in Butler County, Nebraska, 
named for Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. 

Umatilla; river and county in Oregon, said by some to be named for a tribe of 
Indians. Others state that it is derived from U-a-tal-la, meaning "the sand 
blew bare in heaps," this part of the country having ridges of sand alternating 
with bare ground. 

Umbagog; lake lying partly in New Hampshire and partly in Maine. An Indian 
word, said to mean "doubled up." Other authorities favor "clear lake, shal- 
low," or "great waters near another." 

Umcolcus; lake and stream in Maine. An Indian word, meaning "whistling duck." 

Ummo; mountain in Mariposa County, California. An Indian word, meaning "lost 
arrow." 

Unalaska; island in the Aleutian Archipelago. Indian, meaning "the land near 
Alayeska, or Alakshak." 

Unadilla; village in Dooly County, Georgia; river, town, and village in Otsego 
County, New York. Indian, "place of meeting." 

Unaweep; canyon in Colorado, so named because of the color of its sandstone. 
Indian, "red rock." 

Uncasville; village in New London County, Connecticut, named for a war chief of 
the Mohegan Indians. 

Uncompahgre; river and mountain in Colorado. Derived from the Indian, Unca, 
"hot;" i)ah, "water;" gre, "spring;" "hot water spring." 

Underbill; town in Chittenden County, Vermont, named for two brothers, share- 
holders under the original charter. 

Union; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Caro- 
lina, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Tennessee, and parish in Louisiana, 
named to express the sentiment which now actuates the American people. 

Union; county and town in New Jersey, founded during the civil war, so named to 
express the patriotic sentiment of that section. 

Union; county in Kentucky, believed to be so named because of the unanimity of 
tlie people when the division of the county from which this was taken was made. 

Union; county in Indiana, formed by the union of parts of Wayne and Fayette 
counties. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 259 

Union; county in South Carolina, named from the Union Churcli on Brown Creek. 

Union; mountain in Nevada, so named because it appears to be made up of many 
peaks. 

Unionville; town in Orange County, New York, named to connuemorate the 
friendly adjustment of the matter of the (juestioned ownership of the locality of 
the present town site. 

Upotog; stream in Muscogee County, Alabama. Indian, meaning "covering, spread- 
ing out." 

Upshur; counties in Texas and West Virginia, named for Abel I'. T'pshnr, Secretary 
of State under President Tyler. 

Upson; county in Georgia, named for Stephen Upson, an eminent lawyer of the 
State. 

Upton; county in Texas, named for John and W. F. Upton, prominent citizens of 
the State, the former an officer of the civil war. 

Ursina; borough in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, named for Mr. Bear, one of its 
founders. The Latin form. 

Utah; State in the Union, county and lake in same State, named foi- the Ute Indians, 
the word meaning "home, or location, on the mountain top." 

Utica; city in New York, named for the ancient t-ity in Africa; towns in Livingston 
County, Missouri, and Hinds County, Mississippi, and village in Macomb County, 
Michigan, named for the al)Ove. 

Utuhu; lake in Michigan. Indian, "oak." 

Uvalde; county and town in Texas, named for Jose Uvalde. 

Uxbridge; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Henry Paget, Earl 
of Uxbridge. 

Vacaville; town in Solano t'ounty, California. Spanish word, meaning "cow," 
"beef." 

Vaiden; town in Carroll County, Mississippi, said to l)e named for Dr. Vaiden, a 
resideixt planter. 

Vailsburg-; l)orough in Essex County, New Jersey, named for the Vail family, resi- 
dents of the neighborhood. 

Valatie ; village in Columbia County, New York, situated near a small falls. Derived 
from a Dutch word, meaning "little falls." 

Valentia; county in New Mexico, named for the city in Spain. 

Vallejo; city in California, named for Cen. M. G. Vallejo. 

Valley; counties in Montana and Nebraska, S(j named on aci-ount of the topography 
of the county. 

Valley; town in Douglas County, Nebraska, so named because situated at the junc- 
tion of the Republican Valley branch of the TTnion Pacific and the main line. 

Valley Forge; village in Chester County, Pennsylvania, so named Ijecause situated 
at the mouth of Valley Creek, where a forge was erected in the days antedating 
the Revolution, by Isaac Potts. 

Valley Junction; town in Polk County, Iowa, so named because situated at the 
junction of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific and Des Moines Valley rail- 
roads. 

Valley Ridge ; town in Dunklin County, Missouri, so named because of the pecu- 
liarity of the land. 

Van Buren; counties in Arkansas, Iowa, Michigan, and Tennessee, named for 
Martin Van Buren, the eighth President of the ITnited States. 

I Vance; county in North Carolina; 
Vanceboro; town in Craven County, same State. Named for Z. B. Vance, governor 
and Senator. 
Vances; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for the Vance family, 
who formerly kept the ferry at this place. 



260 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Vancouver; town and military fort in Clarke County, Washington, named for 

Capt. George Vancouver, royal navy, who explored that part of the country in 

1791. 
Vandalia; city in Fayette County, Illinois, giving name to city in Missouri and 

village in Cass County, Michigan, the town in Illinois having been so named at 

the suggestion of a wag, who told the story of the Goths and Vandals to the 

commissioners, jokingly giving them to understand that the selected town site 

was the scene of their encounters. 
Vandemere; town in Pamlico County, North Carolina, named from a resident 

family. 
Vanderburg; county in Indiana, named for Henry Vanderburgh, judge of the first 

court formed in the State. 
Van Etten; village in Chenmng C-ounty, New York, named for James B. A"an Etten, 

member of the assembly in 1852. 
Van Leuvens Corners; village in Albany County, New York, named for Isaac Van 

Leuven. 
Van Wert; county in Ohio, named for Isaac Van Wert, one of the militiamen who 

assisted in the capture of Major Andre. 
Varinagrove; town in Henrico County, Virginia, named for the town in Spain, 

because the same kind of tobacco is raised in both places. 
Varnville; town in Hampton County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Van Zandt; county in Texas, named for Isaac Yun Zandt, member of Texas congress, 

prominent politician. 
Varysburg; village in Wyoming County, New York, named for William Vary, one 

of the first settlers. 
Vashon; island in Washington, named for a captain in the British navy. 
Vassalboro; town in Kennebec County, Maine, named for Florentins Vassall, a 

proprietor of the Plymouth patent. 
Vaughns; creek in Simpson County, Mississippi, named for an early settler. 
Veazie; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Gen. Samuel Veazie, large 

property owner. 
Venable; creek in Fluvanna County, Virginia, named for Lewis Venable. 
Venango; county and borough in Crawford County, Pennsylvania. From the 

Indian Innungah, in reference to a figure found on a tree, carved by the Fries. 
Ventura; river, county, town, and city in California. Spanish, meaning "luck, 

fortune, favoraVjle chance." 
Vera Cruz; town in Wells County, Indiana, named for the old city of Mexico. 
Verde; river in Arizona with water of a greenish cast. Spanish word, meaning 

' ' green. ' ' 
Verdery; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Vergennes; city in Addison County, Vermont, named for Chai'les Granvier, Count 

de Vergennes. 
Vermilion; counties in Indiana and Illinois, parish in Louisiana, villages in Erie 

County, Ohio, and Edgar County, Illinois, named from the river in South 

Dakota, said to have been so named because of the red earth produced by the 

burning of the shale overlying the outcrop of coal, by ignition from autumnal 

fires. 
Vermont; State of the Union, so named because of the appearance of its mountains. 

Derived from the French, Vert Mont, "green mountains." 
Vermontville ; village in Eaton County, Michigan, named for the State. 
Vernal Fall; waterfall in Yosemite Valley, California, so named l)ecause of the 

l)eautiful greenish tints which it displays. 
Vernon; many places in the United States, named for the home of Washington — 

Blount A'ernon — among them the parish in Louisiana. 



OANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 261 

Vernon; county in Missouri, named for Miles Vernon, of Laclede County. 
Vernon; county in Wisconsin, given this name to suggest the greenery of the sur- 
rounding countr\\ 
Verona; many places in the United States, named for the city in Italy, among them 

the town in Hancock County, Maine. 
Verplanck; village in Westcliester County, New York, named for Philip Verpianck. 
Versailles; many places in the United States bear the name of the palace in Paris. 
Vershire; town in Orange County, Vermont; name formed by a combination of the 

first syllable of the State name and "shire," the English sutiix designating 

county. 
Vevay; city in Switzerland County, Indiana, named for the town in Switzerland. 
Vicksburg-; city in Mississippi, named for Neivitt Vick, its founder. 
Victor; village in Ontario County, New York, so named because the French com- 
mander in a battle fought there thought he had captured the Iroquois Indians 

for the French. 
Victor; town in Montana, named for a noted Flathead chief. 
Victoria; county in Texas, indirectly named for D. Felix Victoria, lirst president 

of Mexico, known as "Guadalujie" Victoria. 
Vidalia; town in Concordia Parish, Louisiana, named for Vidal, the Spanish gov- 
ernor of the district in which the town is situated. 
Vienna; many places in the United States have been named for the city in Austria. 
Vigo; county in Indiana, named for Col. Francis Vigo. 
Vigo; town in Concho County, Texas, named for a i)lace in Spain. 
Vilas; countj' in Wisconsin, named for Senator William F. Vilas. 
Villa Rica; town in Carroll County, Georgia, having gold mines. Spanish words, 

meaning "rich city." 
Villenova; town in Chautauqua County, New York. Spanish, meaning "new 

town." 
Vinalhaven; island and town in Knox County, Maine, named for John Vinal, of 

Boston. 
Vincennes; city in Knox County, Indiana, named from the fort l)uilt by Sieur de 

Vincennes. 
Vineland; borough in Cumberland County, New Jersey, so named because it was 

the intention of its founder to raise grapes on an extensive scale, which was 

realized to a considerable extent. 
Vining; city in Clay County, Kansas, named for E. P. Vining, an officer of the 

Union Pacific Railroad. 
Vinton; county in Ohio, named for S. F. Vinton, member of Congress from that 

State. 
Viola; village in Richland County, Wisconsin, named for Viola Buck. 
Virgil; town in Cortland County, New York, named for the poet, Publius Vergilius 

Maro. 
Virgin; river in Utah. Derived from the original Spanish name, Rio Virgen, 

"river of the virgin." 
Virginia; one of the original thirteen States, named for Elizabeth, Queen of England. 
Virginia; city in Storey County, Nevada, named for the State. 
Virginia; cascade in Yellowstone Park, named for the wife of Hon. C'harles Gibson, 

president of the Yellowstone Park Association. 
Visalia; city in Tulare County, California, named for Vise, a hunter. 
Volney ; villages in Allamakee County, Iowa, and Oswego County, New York, named 

for Count Volney, the French writer. 
Voluntown; village in New London County, Connecticut, so named because the 

greater part of the town was granted to the volunteers of the Narragansett war. 



I 



262 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Volusia; county in Florida, named for a town within its limits supposed to have 
been named for Volus, an English settler. 

Voorheesville; village in All)any County, New York, named for Theodore Voor- 
hees, director of the Delaware and Lackawanna Railroad. 

Waas; mountain in Utah, named for a Ute Indian chief. 

Wabash; counties in Indiana and Illinois, river flowing through both States, and 
city in Indiana. From the Indian word Uuabache, "cloud borne by an equi- 
noctial wind," or, acconling to another authority, " white water." 

Wabasha; county, and city in same county, in Minnesota, named for an Indian chief 
of the Sioux Nation. According to another authority, it is derived from wapa- 
hasa, "a standard of battle." 

Wabaunsee; county and town in Kansas, named for a Potawatomi Indian chief, 
the name signifying "dim daylight," or "causer of paleness," given because he 
captured an enemy's camp just at the l)reak of day. 

Wabeno; town in Forest County, Wisconsin. Indian word, meaning "men of the 
dawn," or "eastern men." 

Wacasassee; river and bay in Florida, so named because of the herds of cattle fre- 
quenting it. Indian, "cow range." 

Waccamaw; town in Georgetown County, South Carolina, and river, lake, and town- 
ship in North Carolina, named for the Indian tribe. 

Wachusett; mountain in Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning " the moun- 
tain " or " near the mountain." 

Waco; town in Smith County, Mississippi, village in Cleveland County, North 
Carolina, and city in McLennan County, Texas, named for an Indian tribe, the 
name meaning " heron." 

Waconia; village in Carver C'ounty, Minnesota. Indian, meaning " living spring." 

Waconda; village in Mitchell County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning "the 
great spirit," "the creator of all things," "the god of war." 

Wacouta; village in Goodhue County, Minnesota. Indian, meaning "shooter," the 
name of an Indian chief who lived at Red Wing. 

Waddington; town in Huml)oldt County, California, named for an early settler. 

Waddington; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Joshua Wad- 
dington, proprietor. 

Wadena; county, and village in same county, in Minnesota, and town in Fayette 
County, Iowa. Probably from the Indian word odana, "town." 

Wadesboro; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for Col. Thomas Wade. 

Wading River; village in Suffolk County, New York, named for the river, which 
was so called because the Indians waded into it for the shellfish to be found 
there. 

Waga; tributary to the Minnesota River. Indian, "cottonwood." 

Wagara; stream in New Jersey. Derived from the Indian word woakeu, . 
"crooked" or "bent," and aki, "a place." 

Wagener; town in Aiken County, South Carolina, named for F. W. Wagener, cap. 
italist, of Charleston. 

Wahkiakum; county in Washington, named for a tribe of Indians. 

Wahoo; village in Lumpkin County, Georgia, and town in Saunders County, 
Ne1)raska. Indian, meaning a species of elm, but in the Miami dialect meaning 
"egg." 

Wahpeton; city in Richland County, North Dakota. Indian word, meaning "leaf 
village." 

Waitsfield; town in Washington County, Vermont, named for Gen. Benjamin Waite, 
the first settler. 

Wakarusa; town in Elkhart County, Indiana, and stream in Kansas. Indian word, 
meaning " thigh deep." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 2G3 

Wakatomika; village in Coshocton County, Ohio. Indian word, meaning ''other- 

nide town." 
Wake; county in Nortii Carolina, named for wife of (Governor Tryon, it ])eing her 

maiden name. 
Wakeeney; city in Trego County, Kansas, named for its founders, A. E. Warren 

and J. F. Keeney. 
Wakefield; city in ('lay County, Kansas, named for the Rev. Richard Wake, one 

of its founders. 
Wakefield; town in Middlesex County, Massacluisetts, named for Cyrus Wakefield. 
I Wakefield; village in Wake County; 

j Wake Forest; town in Wake County. Named for the wife of Governor Tryon, it 
I being her maiden name. 

Wakenda; town in Carroll County, Missouri. Indian word, meaning "worshiped." 
Wakulla; county in Florida, named for the famous spring, near the Gulf coast. 

Indian word, meaning "mystery." 
Walden; town in Orange County, New York, named for Jacob T. Walden, a 

pnjminent citizen. 
Walden; town in Caledonia County, Vermont, named for commanding officer of the 

military forces present during the building of a road in the vicinity. 
fWaldo; county in Maine; 

I Waldoboro; town in Lincoln County, Maine. Named for Brig. Gen. Samuel Waldo, 
I of Boston. 

Waldron; inland in Washington, named for W. T. Waldron, of the ship Porpoise. 
Wales; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named for James T^awrence 

Wales. 
Walesboro; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for John P. Wales, its 

founder. 
Walhalla; tf)wns in Pembina County, North Dakota, and Oconee County, South 

Carolina. Scandinavian name, meaning "palace of immortality." 
Walhonding ; river in Ohio. Indian word, meaning "white woman." 
Walke; point in North Landing River, Virginia, named for the family which are 

the oldest residents of Princess Anne County. 
Walker; county in Alabama, named for Senator J. W. Walker, of the State. 
Walker; county in Georgia, named for Freeman Walker. 
Walker; lake and river in Esmeralda County, Nevada, and pass in California, named 

for Joseph Reddeford Walker, guide of Fremont's Second Expedition. 
Walker; county in Texas, naiiied for Robert J. Walker, Secretary of the Treasury 

during the Polk administration. 
Walkerville; city in Silverbow County, Montana, named for the owner of the 

" Alice" mine. 
Wallace; county in Kansas, named for Gen. William 11. L. Wallace, veteran of the 

Mexican war. 
Wallace; town in Duplin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resident. 
Wallawalla; county and city in Washington. Indian word, meaning "a small, 

rapid river," or "rushing water." 
Wallenpaupack; stream in Pennsylvania. Indian word, meaning "deep and dead 

water. ' ' 
Waller; county in Texas, named for Edwin Waller, former postmaster-general under 

the republic. 
Wall Hill; town in Marshall County, Mississippi, named for William Wall. 
Wallington; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named foi- Walling Van 

Winkle, the former owner. 
Walloostook; river in Maine. Indian word, meaning "stream where you get 

boughs," or "fine, beautiful river." 



264 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Walpack; township in Sussex County, New Jersey. Indian word, meaning "a 

sudden bend of a stream around the base of a rock." 
Walpole; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Sir Robert Walpole. 
Walpole; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for the town in 

England. 
"Walsenburg; town in Huerfano County, Colorado, named for Fred Walsen, a 

banker and old settler. 
Walterboro; town in Colleton County, South Carolina, named for the Walter fam 

ily, prominent residents of the State. 
Walthall; town in Webster County, Mississippi, named for Gen. Edward Walthall. 
"Waltham; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, from which the town in Addi- 
son County, Vermont, is named, the former supposedly receiving its name from 

Waltham Abbey, England. 
"Walton; county in Georgia, named for George Walton, one of the signers of the 

Declaration of Independence. 
Walton; city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for a stockholder of the Atchison, 

Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Walton; town in Delaware County, New York, named for William Walton, a large 

land proprietor. 
Walworth; county in Wisconsin, and town in Wayne County, New York, named 

for Chancellor Reuben H. Walworth. The county in South Dakota named for 

the above. 
Wamego; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, said to be so named because 

formerly there was no water in the village. Indian word, meaning "clear of 

springs." Other authorities say that it was named for an Indian chief whose 

name meant "running waters." 
Wamesit; village in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. From the Indian word 

wame, "all," or " whole," and auke, " a place." 
Wampum; borough in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. The name of the Indian 

shell money. 
Wanaque; river and valley in New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning "sassafras 

place." 
Wanatah; town in Laporte County, Indiana, named from an Indian chief, whose 

name signified "he that charges on his enemies." 
Wangunbog; pond in Connecticut. Indian word, meaning " bent pond." 
Wapakoneta; village in Auglaize County, Ohio. Indian word, meaning "clay 

river." 
Wapanucka; town in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Derived from Wappa- 

nocca, the name given the Delawares by other Indians, it signifying "East- 
landers." 
Wapato; village in Washington County, Oregon. The Indian designation of a 

bulbous root, resembling a i)otato. 
Wapella; village in Dewitt County, Illinois, named for a chief of the Fox tribe, the 

name meaning " he who is painted white." 
Wapello; county and city in Iowa. Indian word given the two meanings, "the 

pioneer" and "the little prince." 
Wapiti; village in Summit County, Colorado. An Indian word, meaning "elk." 

IWappinger; creek and town in Dutchess County, New York; 
Wappingers Falls; village in Dutchess County, New York. Named for an Indian 
tril)e. 
Wapsipincon; river in Iowa, so named because of the root which is found in great 

abundance upon its banks. Indian word, meaning " white potatoes." 
Wapwallopen ; stream and village in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Indian name, 
said by some to mean "the place where the messengers were nuirdered;" by 
others, "where the white hemp grows." 



OANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 265 

Waquapaug; stream in Rhode Island. Indian word, meaning "at tiie end of the 

pond." 
Ward; town in Boulder County, Colorado, named for the Ward lode, discovered in 

1860. 
Ward; village in Boone County, Indiana, named for Thomas Ward, Congressman 

from that State. 
Ward; peak in ^Montana, named for Artemus Ward. 
Ward; j>oint on Staten Island, New York, named for the man who formerly owned 

that part of the island. 
Ward; county in North Dakota, named for lion. Mark Ward, of South Dakota. 
Ward; county in Texas, named for Thomas W. Ward, the commissioner of the gen- 
eral land office under the first State governor of Texas. 
Wards; island in New York, named for Jasper and Bartholomew Ward, former 

proprietors. 
Wards; town in Saluda County, South C'arolina, named for the Ward family, 

prominent residents of the State. 
Wardsboro; town in Windham County, Vermont, named for William Ward, of 

Newfane, the principal proprietor. 
Ware; county in Georgia, named for Nicholas Ware, an early Senator from 

Georgia. 
Ware; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, so named on account of the 

weirs, or weirers, formerly constructed in the river to catch salmon. 
Wareham; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for the town in 

FvUgland. 
Waresboro; town in Ware County, Georgia, named for Nicholas Ware, an early 

Senator from that State. 
Warner; town in IVIerrimack County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Jonathan 

Warner, of Portsmouth. 
Warnerville ; village in Schoharie County, New York, named for Capt. George 

Warner, the first settler. 
Warramaug; pond in Litchfield County, Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning 

"good fishing place." 
Warren; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Warren; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, New 

York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia; borough 

in Warren County, Pennsylvania; towns in Knox County, Maine; Worcester 

County, Massachusetts; and Herkimer County, New York; and a fortification in 

Boston Harbor; named for Joseph Warren, who fell in the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Warren; county in Indiana, named for Gen. Francis Warren. 
Warren; city in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for Gen. Moses Warren, of Lyme, 

Connecticut. 
Warren; towns in Grafton County, New Hampshire, and Bristol County, Rhode 

Island, named for Admiral Sir Peter Warren of the royal navy. 
Warrenton; town in Warren County, North Carolina, named for Gen. Joseph 

Warren, officer of the Revolution, who fell in the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Warrick; county in Indiana, named for Capt. JacoVj Warrick, killed in the battle 

of Tippecanoe. 
Warsaw; city in Kosciusko County, Indiana, and town in Benton County, Mis- 
souri, named for the capita! of Poland. 
Warwick; towns in Franklin County, Massachusetts, and Kent County, Rhode 

Island, named for the Earl of Warwick. 
Warwick; county in Virginia, named for the town in England. 
Wasatch; rangeof mountains and county in Utah. Indian word, meaning " lake of 

many waters." 



266 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Wasco; county in Oregon, .said to ])e named for an Indian tribe, though it may 

have been derived from wasko, " gi'ass, or grass people." It is also the name of 

an Indian dish. 
"Waseca; several small streams in Minnesota and Dakota, probably giving name to 

the town and county in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "red earth or 

paint," or, according to another authority, " a pine tree." 
Washabaugh; county in South Dakota, named for Frank Washabaugh, prominent 

State politician. 
Washburn; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for Israel Washburn, jr., 

governor of the State during the civil war. 
Washburn; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for Gen. Henry Dane Washburn. 
Washburn; county in Wisconsin, named for Cadwallader C. Washburn, former 

governor. 
Washing-ton; State of the Union, counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, 

Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Mississijjpi, Missouri, New 

York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, 

Virginia, and Wisconsin; parish in Louisiana; town in Berkshire County, Mas- 
sachusetts; highest peak of the White Mountains in New Hampshire; and 

doubtless the counties in Alabama, Colorailo, Florida, Minnesota, Nebraska, 

Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, and Utah, and many other towns; 
Washing-ton; city, capital of the United States; 
Washingtonville ; town in Orange County, New York. Named for Gen. George 

Washington. 
Washita; county in Oklalioma and village in Montgomery County, Arkansas. An 

Indian word, said to mean either "male deer" or "the country of large 

buffaloes." 
Washoe; county and city in Nevada, named for a tribe of Indians who formerly 

lived in the vicinity. 
Washta; town in Cherokee County, Iowa. Indian word, meaning "good." 
Washtenaw; county in Michigan, named for the east branch of Grand River; the 

name said to be derived from the Indian word, washtenong, " river that ia 

far off." 
Wasioja; town in Dodge County, Minnesota, so named because of the pine trees 

growing near. An Indian word meaning "pine grove." 
Wassaic; village in Dutchess County, New York. Indian word, meaning " difficult, 

or hard work." 
Wastedo; town in Goodhue County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "good." 
Watab; village in Benton County, Minnesota. Indian word meaning " root of pine, 

or fir, to sew a canoe." 
Wataga; village in Knox County, Illinois. From the Potawatomi Indian word, 

meaning, " I heard;" or, if derived from ahweataga, "he has gone to ramble." 
Watauga; river in Tennessee and county in North Carolina. Indian word, meaning 

" river of islands." 
Wateree; river and town in Richland County, South Carolina, named for the Indian 

tribe — the word meaning "to float on the water." 
Waterford; town in Marshall County, Mississippi, so named on account of the great 

volume of water contained in Spring Creek at this point. 
Waterford; village in Saratoga County, New York, so named on account of a ford 

over to Haven Island. 
Waterford; town in Caledonia County, Vermont, so named because o! its situation 

on the Connecticut River. 
Waterloo; many places in the United States named for the famous battlefield. 
Watertown; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, so called because it was "a 

well-watered place," and the first means of communication between this place 

and Boston was by water. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES TTSr THE UNITED STATES. 267 

Watertovm; town in Jefferson (_"onnty, New York, so named on aoconnt of the 

extraordinary anionnt of water power there. 
Water Valley; city in Yalol)Usha C'onnty, Mississippi, so named on acconnt of the 

perpetnal stream passing there. 
Waterville; city in Maine, so named becanse situated at Ticonic Falls (m the Ken- 
nebec Eiver, which furnishes the motive power for its factories. 
Watervliet; city on the Hudson, in Albany County, New York. From the Dut<;h, 

meaning " flowing stream." 
Wathena; city in Doniphan County, Kansas, named for a chief of the Kickapoo 

Indians. 
Watkins; village in Schuyler County, New York, named for Dr. Samuel Watkins, 

of London, one of the first proprietors. 
Watkinsville; town in Oconee County, Cieorgia, name<l for ('ol. Robert Watkins, 

of Augusta, member of the State legislature. 
Watonwan; county in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "see." 
Watrous; town in Mora County, New Mexico, named for Sanniel E. Watroii.?, an 

early settler. 
Watson; town in Lewis County, New York, named for James Watson, former 

proprietor. 
Watson; town in Hampshire County, West Virginia, named for Joseph Watson, 

the former owner of the land. 
Wattsburg; borough in F>ie County, Pennsylvania, named for David Watts, an 

early settler. 
Waubay; village in Day County, South Dakota. Indian wonl. meaning "place of 

hatching." 
Waubeek; towns in Linn County, Iowa, and Dunn County, Wisconsin. Indian 

word, meaning "metal," or "metallic substance." 
Waubesa; lake in Wisconsin. Indian word, meaning "swan." 
Wauconda; village in Lake C'ounty, Illinois. Indian word, meaning "the good 

spirit," or "master of life." 
Waukarusa; stream in Kansas. Indian word, meaning "hip deep." * 

Waukau; town in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. Indian word, meaning "haV)it- 

ually," or "often." 
Waukegan; city in Lake County, Illinois. Indian word, meaning "house or fort," 

"white man's dwelling." 
Waukesha; city and county in Wisconsin. Indian word, meaning "fox." 
Waukon; town in Allamakee County, Iowa. Indian word, meaning "moss on trees 

that is eatable." 
Waunakee; village in Dane County, Wisconsin. From the Indian word, wanaki, 

"he lies," or "he lives in peace." 
Wauneta; village in Chase County, Nebraska. Indian word, meaning "winter 

camp." 
Waupaca; county in Wisconsin, nametl for the Menominee Indians, the meaning 

being "pale water." 
Wauponsee; town in Grundy County, Illinois. For derivation see Wahaunsee. 
Waupun; town in Fond du lac County, Wisconsin. Indian word, meaning "early, 

or early day," or, according to another authority, from waba, meaning "east." 
Wauregan; village in Windham County, Connecticut. Indian word, meaning "a 

good thing." 
Wausau; city in Wisconsin. Corruption of wassa, meaning "faraway." 
Wausaukee; river in Wisconsin. Indian word, meaning "distant land." 
Wauseon; village in Fulton County, Ohio, named for an Indian chief. 
Wauwatosa; city in Wisconsin. Corruption of wewatessi, meaning "firefly." 
Wauzeka; village in Crawford (bounty, Wisconsin, named for an Indian chief, the 

name said to mean " pine." 



268 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buu. 197. 

Waverly; village in Pike County, Ohio, named for Scott's novels. 
Wawarsing; town in Ulster County, New York. Indian word, meaning "black- 
bird's nest." 
Wawayanda; town in Orange County, New York. Said to be the Indian corrup- 
tion of the English phrase "away over yonder." 
Waxhaw; creek in North and South Carolina, towns in Union County, North Caro- 
lina, and Lancaster County, South Carolina, named for an Indian tribe. 
Wayland; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, name<l for Francis Way land. 
Wayland; village in Steuben County, New York, named for Rev. Francis Wayland, 

of Rhode Island. 
Waymansville ; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Charles L. 
Wayman, its founder. 
Wayne; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Missis- 
.sippi, Missouri, New Y^ork, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, 
and West Virginia, and probably the counties of the same name in Nebraska 
and Utah; 
Waynesboro; borough in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, and towns in Wayne 
{ County, Mississippi, and Burke County, Georgia; 
Waynesburg; borough in Greene County, Pennsylvania, and town in Stark County, 

Ohio; 
Waynesfield; town in Auglaize County, Ohio; 

Waynesville; towns in Haywood County, North Carolina, and Warren County, 
( )hio. Named for Gen. Anthony Wayne, hero of the Revolution. 
Wayzata; village in Hennepin County, Minnesota. Indian word, meaning " at the 

mouth." 
Weakley; county in Tennessee, named for Robert Weakley, member of the House 

of Representatives and the reviser of the constitution of Tennessee. 
Wears; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for Meshech Weare, 

chief justice of the province of New Hampshire. 
Weatherford; city in Parker County, Texas, said to be named for Jefferson Weath- 

erford, one of its early settlers. 
Weatogue; village in Hartford C-ounty, Connecticut. Indian word, meaning "wig- 
wam place." 
Weauatucket; river in Connecticut. Indian, "land at the end of tide water." 
Weaverville; town in Trinity County, Californii, named for a pioneer. 
Weaverville; town in Buncombe County, North Carolina, named for a family 

numerous in the State. 
Webb; county in Texas, named for Judge James Webl), politician in the early days 

of the State. 
Webberville; village in Ingham County, Michigan, named for Herbert Webber, an 

early settler. 
Weber; county and river in Utah, named for a well-known trapper and guide. 
Webster; counties in Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, and West 
Virginia, parish in Louisiana, aiid jjrobably the county of the same name in 
Nebraska, towns in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and Worcester County, 
Massachusetts, and mountain in New Hampshire; 
Webster Groves; city in St. Louis County, Missouri. Named for Daniel Webster, 
the statesman. 
Wecuppemee; river in Connecticut. Indian word, meaning "the linden or 

bass wood." 
Wedge; mountain in Montana, so named on account of its shape. 
Weedsport; village in Cayuga County, New York, named for Eiisha and Edward 

Weed, first settlers. 
Weehawken; town in Hudson C^ounty, New Jersey. Indian word, meaning "maize 
land." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 269 

Weeping- Water; river in Nebraska. Translation of the Indian word "Nehaga." 
Weir: city in Cherokee County, Kansas, named for T. M. Weir, its founder. 
Weisner; mountain in Idaho, named for a topographer with the Mullan expedition. 
Weiesport; borough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, named for Col. Jacob Weiss, 

officer of the Revolution, who early settled in the Lehigh Valley. 
Weitchpec; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an Indian tribe, the 

word said to mean "the junction of rivers." 
Welaka; town in Putnam County, Florida. Indian word, meaning "river of lakes." 
Welch; town in McDowell County, West Virginia, named for Capt. J. A. Welch, of 

the county. 
Weld; county in Colorado, named for Lewis Ledyard Weld, first secretary of Colo- 
rado Territory. 
Weld; town in Franklin County, Maine, named for Benjamin Weld, one of the 

original owners. 
Weldon; town in Halifax County, North Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Wellfleet; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. The name doubtless a cor- 
ruption of "whale fleet." 
Wellington; city in 8unmer County, Kansas, named for the Duke of Wellington. 
Wells; county in Indiana, named for Capt. William Wells, killed at the Fort Dear- 
born massacre. 
Wells; town in York County, Maine, supposed to be named for the town in England. 
Wells; town in Hamilton County, New York, named for Joshua Wells, the first 

settler. 
Wells; county in North Dakota, named for the Hon. E. P. Wells, of Jamestown, an 

old settler. 
Wellsboro; borough in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, named for Mrs. Henry Wells 

Morris, an early resident. 
Wellsburg; town in Chemung County, New York, named for a family who formerly 

owned most of the town site. 
Wellsburg; city in Brooke County, West Virginia, named for Alexander Wells. 
Wells River; village in Orange County, Vermont, named for the stream which 

received its named from Captain Wells, who was drowned in it. 
Wellsville; city in Franklin County, Kansas, named for D. L. Wells, a railroad 

contractor. 
Wellsville; city in Columbiana County, Ohio, named for William Wells, who laid 

it out. 
Wendell; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Oliver Wendell, a 

Boston banker. 
Wenham; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
fWenona; city in Marshall County, Illinois; 

< Wenonah.; borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey. Derived from the Indian, 
y meaning "first-born daughter." 
Wentworth; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named for Benning Went- 

worth, former governor of the State. 
Wentzville; town in St. Charles County, Missouri, named for the man who laid 

it out. 
Wepatuck; mountain in Connecticut. Indian word, meaning "place at the narrow 

pass or strait. ' ' 
Wesaw; river in Miami County, Indiana, named for an Indian chief. 
Wesley; towns and township in Washington counties, Ohio and Maine, named for 

.Tohn Wesley, the founder of Methodism. 
Wesson; town in Copiah County, Michigan, named for Col. J. M. Wesson, its 

founder. 
West Baton B.ouge; parish in Louisiana. See Batun Rouge. 



270 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

West Bend; city in Washington County, Wisconsin, so named because of the bend 
in Milwaukee River at this point. 

Westboro; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, formerly a part of Marlboro, 
hence its name. 

Westby; village in Vernon County, Wisconsin, named for O. T. Westby, an early 
settler. 

West Carroll; parish in Louisiana, named for Charles Carroll of CarroUton. 

Westchester; county in New York, named for the town in England. 

West Creek; town in Ocean County, New Jersey. Derived from an Indian word, 
meaning "place to get meat or eatables." 

Westerlo; town in Albany County, New York, named for Rev. Eilardus Westerlo, 
of Albany. 

West Feliciana; parish in Louisiana. See East Feliciana. 

Westfield; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, so named because situated on 
the west l)oundary of an early survey. 

Westhampton; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, so named because, until 
its incorporation, it was the west parish of Northampton. 

West Haverstraw; town in Rockland County, New York, named from haver- 
straw, a Dutch word originally written haverstroo and meaning "oat straw." 
Believed to have been suggested by wild oats growing there. 

Westminster; town in Worcester County, Masssachusetts, named from the borough 
of London. 

Westmoreland; counties in Pennsylvania and Virginia, named for the county in 
England. Town in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, named for the county in 
Pennsylvania. 

Weston; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and city in Platte County, 
Missouri, so named because situated at the western edge of their respective 
counties. 

Westphalia; village in Clinton County, Michigan, named for the province in Ger- 
many. 

Westport; town in Clatsop County, Oregon, named for John West. 

West Station; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, named for A. M. West, promi- 
nent citizen and president of Mississippi Central Railroad. 

Westville; town in Simpson County, Mississippi, named for Col. Cato West. 

Westville; town in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Dr. William S. West, the 
first postmaster. 

Westville; town in Kershaw County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 

Wet; mountains in Colorado, so named because of the heavy rains upon them in the 
summer season. 

Wetmore; city in Nemaha County, Kansas, named for W. T. Wetmore, vice- 
president of the Central Branch Union Pacific. 

Wetumka; city in Elmore County, Alabama, near the falls of the Coosa River. 
Indian word, meaning "waterfall," "tumbling water." 

Wetzel; county in West Virginia, named for Lewis Wetzel, a noted pioneer and 
Indian fighter. 

Wewoka; stream and village in Seminole Nation, Indian Territory. Indian word, 
meaning "barking water." 

Wexford; county and town in Michigan, probably named for the county in Ireland. 

Weyauwega; village in Waupaca County, Wisconsin. Probably a corruption of 
the Indian word ouiawikan, "he embodies it," but according to another authority 
the name of a trusted Indian guide in the employ of Governor Doty, the name 
meaning "whirling wind." 

Weyers Cave; town and cavern in Augusta County, Virginia, named for Bernard 
Weyer. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 271 

Weymouth.; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 
Wharton; county and town in Texas, named for William H. and John A. Wharton, 

of a family prominent in the State. 
Whatcom; county and town in Washington. Indian word, meaning "noisy water." 
Whately; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Thomas Whately, 

member of the board of trade. 
Wheatland; borough in INIercer County, Pennsylvania, named for the estate of the 

Hon. James Buchanan. 
Wheeler; mountain in Nevada, named for Capt. George M. Wheeler. 
Wheeler; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Capt. Silas Wheeler, the 

first settler. 
Wheeler; county in <)regf)n, named for II. H. Wheeler, first mail carrier l^etween 

The Dalles and Canyon City. 
Wheeler; county in Texas, named for Royal T. Wheeler, former chief justice of the 

State supreme court. 
Wheeling; city in West Virginia, so named because the Indians jilaced the head of 

a white victim on a pole and gave the place the name weal-ink, "a place of a 

human head." The present name of the place is a corruption of the Indian 

name. 
Wheeling; village in Livingston County, Missouri, named for the above. 
Wheelock; town in Caledonia County, Vemiont, named for Eleazer Wheelock, 

president of an Indian charity school situated there, but another authority states 

that it was named for John Wheelock. 
Whippany; river in Morris County, New Jersey. Indian wf»rd, meaning "arrow 

stream." 
Whipple; peak in the Monument range, California, named for Lieutenant Whipple 

of the Pacific railroad explorations. 
Whiskah; river of Graj^'s harbor, Washington. Indian word, meaning "stinking 

water. ' ' 
Whitakers; town in p]dgecombe County, North Carolina, named for a family 

numerous in the State. 
White; county in Arkansas, named for the river which forms the eastern boundary. 
White; branch of the Green River in Colorado and eastern Utah, so named because 

of the white cliffs of its canyon. 
White; county in Georgia, named for the Rev. George White. 
White; county in Illinois, named for Leonard White, an early settler. 
White; county in Indiana, named for Isaac White, of Illinois. 
White; rivers in Indiana and South Dakota. Translation of the name originally 

given them by the Frencli, Riviere la Blanche. 
White; city in Morris County, Kansas, named for F. C. White, superintendent of 

the Union Pacific Southern branch. 
White; river in Minnesota, so named because of the color of the water. 
White; river in Nebraska, so named because the soil near its head is white clay. 
White; county in Tennessee, named for Hugh L. White, a pioneer settler of Knox- 

ville. 
White Bluffs; town in Dickson County, Tennessee, named for the White Bluff Iron 

Forge, which was formerly in operation near the present town site. 
White Castle; town in Iberville Parish, Louisiana, named for the large white plan- 
tation house, visible from the river. 
White Cloud; towns in Mills County, Iowa, and Doniphan County, Kansas, named 

for the Indian chief Ma-hush-kah. 
White Creek; town in Washington County, New York, named for the creek whose 

l)ed is formed oi white quartzy pebbles. 
White Deer; creek in Union County, Pennsylvania. Translation of its Indian name, 

Woaptuchanne. 



272 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Whitefield; towns in Coos County, New Hampshire, and Lincoln County, Maine, 
named for the Rev. George Whitefield. 

Whitehall; town in Bladen County, North Carolina, named for an old resident. 

White Haven; borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, named for Josiah White. 

White Pigeon; village in 8t. Joseph County, Michigan, named for an Indian chief. 

White Pine; county in Nevada, so named because of the trees of this species grow- 
ing there. 

White Plains; village in Westchester County, New York, so named V)ecause located 
near the limestone debris of the valley of the Bronx. 

Whitestooro; village in Oneida County, New York, named for Judge Hugh White, 
the pioneer settler of the county. 

Whitesburg; town in Letcher County, Kentucky, named for C. White, member of 
the State legislature at the time of the formation of the town. 

Whiteside; county in Illinois, named for Capt. Samuel Whitesides, captain in the 
war of 1812. 

Whitestown; town in Oneida County, New York, named for Judge Hugh White, 
pioneer settler of the county. 

White Sulphur Springs; town in Meagher County, Montana, named for the medic- 
inal springs located in the vicinity. 

Whitesville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Thomas White, one 
of the first settlers. 

Whiteville; town in Columbus County, North Carolina, named for James B. White, 
first member of the State assembly. 

Whitewater; river and town in Wayne County, Indiana, so named because of the 
whitish cast of the waters of the river. 

Whitfield; county in Georgia, named for George Whitfield, a missionary. 

Whiting; town in Monona County, Iowa, named for Senator Whiting. 

Whiting; town in Jackson County, Kansas, named for Mrs. Whiting, wife of 
Senator C. S. Pomeroy. 

Whiting; town in Addison County, Vermont, so named because 3 of the 48 pro- 
prietors bore that name; another authority states that it is named for John 
Whitney, of Massachusetts. 

Whitingham; town in Windham County, Vermont, named for Nathan Whiting, 
one of the grantees. 

Whitley; counties in Kentucky and Indiana, named for Col. William Whitley. 

Whitman; county, town, and college in Washington, named for Dr. Marcus Whit- 
man, an early missionary. 

Whitmires; town in Newberry County, South Carolina, named for the Whitmire 
family. 

Whitney; loftiest peak of the Sierra Nevadas, named for Prof. J. D. Whitney, State 
geologist of California. 

Whitney; peak in Colorado, named for W. D. AVhitney, the philologist. 

Whitney Point; town in Broome County, New York, named in 1824 for Thomas 
Whitney, first postmaster. 

Whitneyville; village in New Haven County, Connecticut, named for Eli Whitney, 
its founder. 

i Wichita; counties in Kansas and Kentucky; city in Sedgwick County, Kansas; 
river in Texas; 
Wichita Falls; town in Wichita County, Texas. Named for an Indian tribe, the 
name meaning " white man." 
Wickenburg; town in INIaricopa County, Arizona, named for Henry Wickenburg, 

a pioneer. 
Wickliffe; town in Ballard County, Kentucky, named for a prominent family of 
the State. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 273 

Wicomico; county an<l river in Maryland. Indian word, meaning "where houses 

are building." 
Wiconisco; stream and a village in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Indian word, 

meaning "wet and niudd}'." 
Wicopee; mountain in New York. Indian word, meaning "long hill." 
Wilbarg-er; county in Texas, named for Josiah and Mathias Wilbarger, early settlers. 
Wilber; village in Saline County, Nebraska, named for C. D. Wilber, who laid it out. 
Wilbraham; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, supposed to have been 

named for a family of that Tiame from England. 
Wilcox; county in Alabama, named for Lieut. Joseph M. Wilcox. 
Wilcox; county in Georgia, named for Capt. John Wilcox. 
Wilcox; township in Newaygo County, Michigan, named for S. N. W^ilcox. 
Wilcox; village in p]lk County, Pennsylvania, named for A. I. Wilcox. 
Wild Rice; stream in Minnesota, so named because this plant grows al)undantly 

upon its banks. 
Wilkes; counties in Georgia and North Carolina, named for John Wilkes, member 

of British Parliament. 
Wilkesbarre; city in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, named for two members of 

the British Parliament, American symyathizers, John Wilkes and Colonel Barre. 
Wilkesboro; town in Wilkes County, North Carolina, named for John Wilkes 

memljer of the British Parliament and American sympathizer. 
Wilkin; t-ounty in Minnesota, named for Alexander Wilkin, second secretary of the 

Territory. 
Wilkinsburg; town in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for William Wil- 

kins. Secretary of War under President Tyler. 
Wilkinson; counties in Georgia and Mississippi, named for Gen. James Wilkinson, 

of Maryland. 
Will; county in Illinois, named for Dr. Conrad Will, many years member of the 

State legislature. 
Willamette; river in Oregon. Indian word said to have originally l>een Wallamet, 

derived from the same root as Walla Walla and Wallula; when applied to water, 

meaning "running." Another authority gives its definition as "the long and 

beautiful river." 
Willey; peak in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, named for the Willey 

family, who were killed in an avalanche in 1826. 
Williams; river and mountain in Arizona, named for one of the guides of the Fre- 
mont expedition. 
Williams; creek in Humlioldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Williams; town in Colusa County, California, named for its founder. 
Williams; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. E. A. Williams, one of the 

Territorial pioneers and prominent in the political life of the State. 
Williams; county in Ohio, named for David Williams, one of the captors of Major 

Andre. 
Williams; river in Vermont, named for the Rev. John Williams. 
Williamsburg; town in Iowa County, Iowa, named for an early settler. 
Williamsburg-; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for William Dood, of 

Boston, an early settler. 
Williamsburg; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for a family 

resident of the neighborhood. 
Williamsburg; village in Clermont County, Ohio, named for Gen. \Villiam Lytle, 

its founder. 
Williamsburg; county in South Carolina and city in James (!ity County, Virginia, 

named for William III, of England. 
Williamson; counties in Illinois and Tennessee, named for General Williamson. 

Bull. 197—02 18 



274 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ibull. 197. 

Williamson; town in Wayne County, New York, named for Charles Williamson, 

tirA agent of the Pulteney estate. 
■Williamson; river in Oregon, named for Lient. R. S. Williamson, an early explorer 

(if that part of the country. 
"Williamson; county in Texas, named for Judge Robert Williamson, last of the 

alcaldes of Texas. 
Williamsport; city in Indiana, said to be named for James D. Williams, former 

governor. 
Williamsport; city in Pennsylvania, named for William Ilepljurn, one of the first 

associate judges of the county of Lycoming. 
Williamston; town in Martin County, North Carolina, named for a family numer- 
ous in the State. 
Williamston; town in Anderson County, South Carolina, named for the family of 

Col. James Williams, officer of the Revolution. 
Williamstown ; town in Grant County, Kentucky, named for William Arnold, 

probably the first settler. 
Williamstovrn; town in Orange County, Vermont, named for the town of the 

same name in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, which was named for Col. 

Ephraim Williams, the founder of Williams College. 
Williamsville ; city in Wayne County, Missouri, named for Asa E. Williams, who 

laid it out. 
Williamsville; village in Erie County, New York, named for Jonas Williams, 

early settler. 
Willimantic; river, and a city in Windham County, Connecticut. Indian word, 

meaning a "good lookout," or, according to another authority, "good cedar 

swamps." 
Willis; city in Brown County, Kansas, named for Martin Cleveland Willis, an early 

settler. 
Williston; town in Williams County, North Dakota, named for Associate Justice 

Lorenzo P. Williston. 
Williston; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for the Willis family, 

prominent residents of the vicinity. 
Williston; town in Chittenden County, Vermont, named for Samuel Willis, one of 

the grantees. 
Willoughby; village in Lake County, Ohio, named for Professor Willoughby of 

New York. 
Wilmette; village in Cook County, Illinois, named for Quilmette Indian half-breed. 
Wilmington; city in Delaware, the present name a corruption of the name Wil- 

lington, given it in honor of Thomas Willing. 
Wilmington; towns in Middlesex County, Massachusetts; New Hanover County, 

North ( -arolina, and Windham County, Vermont, named for Spencer Compton, 

Earl of Wilmington. 
Wilmot; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for Dr. Wilmot, an 

Englishman. 
Wilna; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for the town in Russia. 
Wilpiquin; stream in Maryland, so called because the Nanticokes carried the skulls 

and bones of the dead and buried them in the caverns. Indian word, meaning 

" the place of interring skulls." 
Wilson; mountains in Colorado and Utah, named for A. D. Wilson, topographer. 
Wilson; county and town in Ellsworth County, Kansas, named for Iliero T. Wil- 
son, merchant of Fort Scott. 
Wilson; village in Niagara County, New York, named for Reuben Wilson, an early 

settler. 
Wilson; county and town in same county in North Carolina, named for Louis D. 

Wilson, State senator and officer of Mexican war. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 275 

Wilson; county in Tennessee, named for Maj. David Wilson. 

Wilson; county in Texai^;, named for James C. Wilson. 

Wilson; point in Washington, named for Capt. (ieorge Wilson of the British navy. 

Wilton; town in llillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for the town in England. 

Winamac; town in Pulaski County, Indiana. Indian word, meaning "catfish." 

Winchendon; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the estate in 

England to which Governor Francis Bernard was heir. 
Winchester; city in Frederick County, Virginia, named for the town in England. 
Wind Gap; borough in North.ampton County, Pennsylvania, which takes "its name 

from the gap in thi' Blue Mountains, the first l)el(nv the Delaware watergap. 
Windham; town and county in Connecticut, for which the county of the same name 

in Vermont and the village in Portage County, Ohio, were named, itself being 

named for a town in England. 
Windham Center; town in (linnlierland County, Maine, named for the earls of 

Egremont. 
Windom; village in Cottonwood County, Minnesota, and town in McPherson County, 

Kansas, named for the Hon. William Windom, member of the cabinet (hiring 

the Harrison Administration. 
Windsor; many places in the United States have been named, directly or indirectly, 

for the town in England, among them being a county in Vermont, towms in 

Berkshire County, Massachusetts, Broome County, New York, and Kennebec 

County, Maine. 
Winfield; town in Cowley County, Kansas, named for the Rev. Winfield Scott, of 

Leavenworth. 
Winfield; town in Herkimer County, New York, named for (3ien. Winfield Scott. 
Wingohocking; south branch of Erankford Creek, Pennsylvania. Indian word, 

meaning "a favorite spot for planting." 
Winhall; town in Bennington County, Vermont, named for its two proprietors, 

Winn and Hall. 
Winkler; county in Texas, named for C. M.Winkler, judge of the State court of 

appeals. 
Winn; parish in Louisiana, named for Gen. Ricliard Winn, noted lawyer of the 

State. 
Winnebago; counties in Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin, and village in Faribault 

County, Minnesota, named for a tribe of Indians, the name meaning "people of 

the dirty waters." 
Winnebeegosish; lake in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "very dirty or roily 

water." 
Winneconne; village in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. From an Indian word, 

winikaning, "dirty place." 
Winnegance; village in Sagadahoc County, Maine, named from a near-by river. 

Indian word, meaning "beautiful water." 
Winnemucca; town in Humboldt County, Nevada, mountain peak, lake, and town 

in same State, named for a chief of the Shoshone Indians. 
Winnepe; lake in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning "place of dirty water." 
Winnepesaukee; lake in New Hampshire. Indian word, meaning "good water 

discharge." 
Winneshiek; county in Iowa, named for an Indian chief. 
Winnetka; village in Cook County, Illinois. Indian word, meaning "beautiful 

place. ' ' 
Winnsboro; city in Fairfield County, South Carolina, named for Gen. Richard 

Winn, its founder. 
Winona; city and county in Minnesota, and town in Montgomery County, Missis- 
sippi. Indian word, meaning "tirst-l)orn daughter." 
Winslow; town in Kennebec County, Maine, named for Gen. John Winslow. 



276 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Winston; county in Alabama, named for John A. Winston, former governor of the 
State. 

Winston; county in Mississippi, named for Col. Louis Winston. 

Winston; city in Forsyth County, North Carolina, named for Joseph Winston, sol- 
dier of the Revolution. 

Winthrop; towns in Kennebec County, Maine, and Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 
named for the Winthrop family, whose founder in America was John Winthrop, 
governor of the Massachusetts colony in 1629. 

Winton; town in Hertford County, North Carolina, named for a member of 
C( )ngress. 

Winyah; bay in Georgetown County, South Carolina. Corrupted name of the 
tribe of Winyaw Indians. 

Wirt; county in West Virginia, named for William Wirt, Attorney-General of the 
United States during the Monroe Administration. 

Wisacky; town in Sumter County, South Carolina. Corruption of the name of the 
Waxhaw Indians. 

Wiscasset; town in Lincoln County, Maine. Indian word, meaning "place of the 
yellow pine." 

Wisconk; river in New Jersey. Indian word, meaning "the elbow." 

Wisconsin; State of the Union, and important river. Indian word, meaning "wild, 
rushing river." 

Wiscoy; village in Allegany County, and stream in Wyoming County, New York. 
Indian word, meaning "under the banks," or, according to another authority, 
"many fall creek." 

Wise; counties in Virginia and Texas, named for Henry A. Wise, prominent poli- 
tician of the former State. 

Wissahickon; creek in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Indian word, mean- 
ing "catfish stream." 

Wissinoming-; north branch of Frankford Creek, Pennsylvania. Indian word, mean- 
ing "where we were frightened." 

Witakantu; lake in Minnesota. Indian word, meaning " high islands." 

Withlacoochee; river and town in Hernando County, Florida. Indian word, 
meaning "little river," or, according to another authority, "long, narrow river." 

Wiwoka; tributary of the Coosa River, Alabama. Indian word, meaning "roaring 
water. ' ' 

Woburn; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for the town in England. 

Wolcott; town in New Haven County, Connecticut, named for Frederick Wolcott. 
Wolcott; town in Wayne County, New York; 

Wolcottville; village in Litchfield County, Connecticut. Named for Oliver Wol- 
cott, Secretary of the Treasury during the administrations of Washington and 
Adams. 

Wolf; river in Kansas. Translation of the French name, riviere de Loup. 

Wolf; rapids in the Yellowstone, Montana, so named by Clarke because a wolf w^as 
seen there. 

Wolf; stream in Pennsylvania. From the Indian word, Tummeink, "where there 
is a wolf." 

Wolfe; county in Kentucky, named for Nathaniel Wolfe, member of the State 
legislature. 

Wolfeboro; town in Carroll County, New Hampshire, named for General W^olfe, 
the hero of Ciuebec. 

Wolhurst; station in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Senator Wolcott, who 
owns real estate there. 

Wolverton; creek in California, named for a settler. 

Womelsdorf ; borough in Burks County, Pennsylvania, named for John Wommels- 
dorf, its founder. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 277 

Wonakaketuk; stream in Vermont. Indian word, meaning; " river of otters." 
Wonewoc; village in Juneau County, Wisconsin, ('orruption of the Indian word, 

wonowag, "they howl," meaning the wolves. 
Wononsco; lake in Litehtield C'ounty, Connecticut. From an Indian word, mean- 
ing "bend of the pond land." 
Wood; county in Ohio, nameil for Col. Eleazer I). Wood, distinguished at the battle 

ni Niagara. 
Wood; county in Texas, name<l for George T. Wood, former governor. 
Wood; county in West Virginia, named for James Wood, an early governor of 

Virginia. 
Wood; county in Wisconsin, named for Joseph Wood, member of the legislature 

creating the county. 
Woodbridge; village in Hillsdale County, Michigan, named for William Wood- 

l)i'idge, secretary of ^lichigan Territory. 
Woodbridge; town in Bergen County, New Jersey, so named because of the wooded 

ridge rising from the Hackensack meadows. 
Woodbury; county in Iowa, named for Levi Woodbury, of New Hampshire. 
Woodbury; city in Gloucester County, New Jersey, named for an English town. 
Woodbury; town in Washington County, Vermont, named for Col. Ebenezer Wood, 

first grantee. 
Woodford; counties in Illinois and Kentucky, named for Gen. William Woodford. 
WoodhuU; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Gen. Nathaniel Wood- 
hull, Revolutionary officer. 
Wood River; village in Hall County, Nebraska, so named because situated on the 

l)anks of the river of that name. 
Woodruff; county in Arkansas, named for William E. Woodruff, sr., a pioneer. 
Woodruff; valley in Nevada, named for Capt. I. C. Woodruff. 
Woodruff; town in Sx^^i'tanburg County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 

family. 
Woods; county in Oklahoma, named for Samuel Wood, of Kansas, the "s" added 

through a mistake of the printer. 
Woodsfield; village in Monroe County, Ohio, named for Archibald W^oods, of Wheel- 
ing, ^^'est Virginia. 
Woodson; county in Kansas, named for Daniel Woodson, former secretary of the 

Territory of Kansas. 
Woodsonville; village in Hart County, Kentucky, named for Senator Thomas 

Woodson. 
Woodstock; town in Windham County, Connecticut, originally in Massachusetts, 

named for the town in England. 
Woodstown; borough in Salem County, New Jersey, named for a resident family. 
Woodville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Ebenezer, Ephraim, 

and Jacob Wood, first settlers. 
Woolwich; town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, named for the military depot in 

England. 
Woonsocket; cities in Providence County, Rhode Island, and Sanborn County, 

South Dakota. From the Indian word, meaning "at the place of mist." 
Wooster; city in Wayne County, Ohio, named for Gen. David Wooster, officer of 

the Revolution. 
Worcester; county in Maryland, named for the Earl of Worcester, who married a 

Calvert of Maryland. 
Worcester; county and city in Massachusetts, named for the county in England. 
Worth; counties in Georgia, Missouri, and Iowa, and town in Jefferson County, New 

Y(irk, named for Gen. W. J. Worth, an office in the Mexican war. 
Worthington; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Col. John 

Worthington, proprietor. 



278 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 197. 

Worthing'ton; village in Nobles Countj^, Minnesota, for which the town in Greene 

County, Indiana, was named, the former named for the Worthington family of 

Ohio. 
Worth villa; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Gen. William J. 

Worth, an oflicer of the Mexican war. 
Worth ville; town in Randoliili County, North Carolina, named for Governor 

Jonathan Worth and State Treasurer J. M. Worth. 
Wray; town in Yuma County, Colorado, named for John Wray, foreman for I. P. 

Olive. 
Wrentham; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for a town in England. 
Wright; counties in Iowa, Minnesota, and Missouri, ami town in Schoharie County, 

New York, named for the Hon. Silas Wright. 
Wright City; village in Warren County, Missouri, named for Dr. H. C. Wright, an 

early settler. 
Wrightsboro; town in McDuflfie County, Georgia, named for Judge Augustus R. 

Wright. 
Wrightson; mountain in Arizona, named for the manager of the Salero Company. 
Wrightstown; village in Brown County, Wisconsin, named for H. S. Wright, who 

early established a ferry there. 
Wrightsville ; borough in York County, Pennsylvania, named for Samuel Wright, 

an early settler. 
Wrightsville Beach; town in New Hanover County, North Carolina, named for a 

family of Wilmington. 
Wrightville; town in Dunklin County, Missouri, named for the Wright brothers, 

its founders. 
Wurtsboro; village in Sullivan County, New York, named for Maurice Wurtz. 
Wyalusing; borough and stream in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. From the 

Indian, meaning either "the place of the hoary veteran," or "the beautiful 

hunting grounds." 
fWyandot; county in Ohio; 

I Wyandotte; city in Wayne County, Michigan; county in Kansas, and nation in 
I Indian Territory. Named for the Wyandot Indian tribe. 
Wyanet; village in Bureau County, Illinois. Indian word, meaning "beautiful." 
Wyncoops; town in Chemung County, New York, -named for William Wyncoop, 

an early settler. 
Wynooche; river in Washington, so named because of the sudden changing of its 

bed; Indian word, meaning "shifting." 
Wyoming; State of the Union. Indian word, meaning "large plain." 
Wyoming; counties in New York and West Virginia, named for the valley in Penn- 
sylvania, whose name was corrupted from an Indian word, meaning "large or 

extensive plains or meadows;" another authority favors "within a habitation," 

referring to the inclosure effected by the valley. 
Wysox; tributary of the Susquehanna. Indian word, meaning "the place of grapes." 
[Wythe; county in Virginia; 
iWytheville; town in Wythe County, Virginia. Named for George Wythe, one of 

the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
Xenia; city in Green County, Ohio; Greek word, meaning "friendly hospitality." 
Yadkin; county in North Carolina, said to be named for a tribe of Indians, though 

some authorities favor the idea that it Mas named for an early settler. 
[Yager; creek in Humlwldt County, California; 

[Yagerville; town in Humboldt County, California. Named for an early settler. 
Yahara; tributary of Rock River, Wisconsin. Indian word, meaning "catfish river." 
Yakima; county, city, and river in Washington, said to have been named for a tribe 

of Indians, the name meaning "black bear," or, according to other authorities, 

"coward." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 27V) 

Yale; university in New Haven, Connecticut, named for Elislia Yale, of London, 
which gives name to man}' phices in the United States, among them the village 
in St. Clair County, Michigan, and the mountttln in Colorado. 

Yalobusha; county in Mississippi. Indian word, meaning "tadpole place." 

Yamhill; county, and river in Oregon, named for the Yamil Indians, a tribe of the 
Kalapooian family. 

Yancey; county in North Carolina, named for Bartlett Yancey, ])rominent politi- 
cian of the State. 

Yankee; this name, with various suffixes, forms the name of many places in the 
Cuited States. The name is said to be the Indian pronunciation of the word 
" English," and bestowed upon the inhabitants of New England ])y the people 
of Virginia when they refused to aid them in a war with the Cherokees, it mean- 
ing to them "cowards." After the battle of Bunker Hill, the people of New 
England haviug established a reputation for bravery, accepted the name and 
gloried in it. 

Yankton; county and city in South Dakota. Corruption of Yanktonnais, the name 
of an Indian tribe. 

Yantic; river in Connectii-ut. Indian word, meaning "extending to the tidal 
river." 

Yaquina; bay and town in Lincoln County, Oregon, probably named for Yaqnina, 
a female Indian chief. 

Yardley; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of early 
settlers. 

Yarmouth; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for a seaport town of 
England. 

Yates; county in New York, named for Joseph C. Yates, early governor of the 
State. 

Yates Center; town in Woodson County, Kansas, named for Abner Yates, former 
owner. 

Yazoo; county and river in Mississippi, named for a triVje of Indians, the name said 
to mean "to blow on an instrument." 

Yell; county in Arkansas, named for Col. Archibald Yell, formei' governor of the 
State. 

Yellow Jacket; pass in Colorado, so named because infested with these insects. 

Yellow Medicine ; county and river in Minnesota. From the Indian word, Paju- 
tazee, "yellow root," probably meaning a root used by them medicinally. 

Yellowstone; river in Montana and Wyoming. Name derived from its original 
French name, Roche jaune,. meaning "yellow rock or stone," though by some 
said to be from the Indian, mi-tsi-a-da-zi, "rock yellow river." 

Yellville; town in Marion County, Arkansas, named for Col. .Vrclii])ald Yell, 
former governor of the State. 

Yemassee; village in Hampton County, South Carolina, named for a tril)e of the 
Shawnee Indians, the word meaniug "mild, gentle, peacea})le." 

Yoakum; town in Dewitt County, Texas, named for a man who was instrumental 
in building up the town. 

Yolo; county in California. From the Indian, meaning " place abounding with 
rushes," or, according to another authority, " possession of royal blood." 

Yonkers; city in New York, named for a manor house built by the Dutch, the word 
meaning ' ' young lord, ' ' and first applied in this country to Adrien Van der Douck, 
a patentee. 

York; county and town in Elaine, named f(H' the Duke of York, James II, of Eng- 
land. 

)York; counties in Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia; 

JYorktown; town in York County, Virginia. Named for the county in England. 



280 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill. 197. 

Yosemite; valley in California, probably named for a small tribe of Indians formerly 

living in the vicinity, the name meaning "grizzly bear." 
Youg-hiog-heny; river in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Indian word, meaning 

" stream flowing in an opposite direction." 
Young-; county in Texas, named for William Cooke Young. 
Young-s; bay and river in Washington, named for Sir Charles Young, of the royal 

navy. 
Young-stown; village in Niagara County, New York, named for John Young, a 

merchant of the place. 
Youngsto'wn ; city in Ohio, named for Johir Young, an early resident. 
Youngsville; town in Franklin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

family. 
Yount; peak in the Yellowstone Park, named for Harr)' Yount, early hunter and 

guide. 
Ypsilanti; city in Michigan, named for a Greek prince. 
Yreka; town in Siskiyou County, California, named for an Indian tribe. Also said 

to ])e a corruption of Weikah, " whiteness," the Indian name for INIount Shasta. 
Yuba; river and county in California. Derived from the original Spanish name of 

the river, el Rio de las Uvas, " the river of the grapes." 
Yuma; counties in Arizona and Colorado, city in Arizona and town in Colorado, 

named for an Indian tribe, the name meaning "sons of the river." 
Zanesfield; village in Logan County, Ohio, named for Col. Isaac Zane. 
Zanesville; city in Ohio, named for Ebenezer Zane, who, with John Mclntire, 

founded the city. 
Zapata; county in Texas, named for a Mexican colonel who led a force of Mexicans 

and Texans against Mexico in 1839. 
Zavalla; county in Texas, named for Gen. Lorenzo de Zavala, a Mexican who 

espoused the cause of Texas's independence and w^as vice-president of the 

Republic. 
Zebulon; town in Pike County, Georgia, named for Col. Zebulon M. Pike. 
Zionsville; town in Boone County, Indiana, named for William Zion, a pioneer. 
Zuni; river in New Mexico, named for an Indian tribe, the name said to mean 

"they live in mud houses;" another authority favors " the people of the long 

nails. ' ' 
Zwingle; village in Jackson County, Iowa, named for Ulrich Zwingle, a Swiss 

reformer. 

o 



PUBLICATIONS OF UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

[Bulletin No. 197.] 

The publications of the United States Geological Survey consist of (1) Annnal 
Reports, (2) Monographs. ('■)) Professional Papers, (4) Btilletins. (5) Mineral 
Resources. (6) Water-Snpply and Irrigation Papers. (7) Topographic Atlas of 
United States— folios and separate sheets thereof. (S) Geologic Atlas of United 
States— folios thereof. The classes numbered 2, 7. and 8 are sold at cost of pub- 
lication; the others are distributed free. A circixlar giving complete lists may be 
had on application. 

The Bulletins (which were formerly sold, but a joint resolution approved May 
IG. 1902, directed that they should l)e distributed gratuitously) treat of a variety 
of subjects, and the total number issued is large. They have therefore been classi- 
fied into the following series: A, Economic geology; B. Descriptive geology; C, 
Systematic geology and paleontology; D, Petrography and mineralogy; E. Chem- 
istry and physics: F. Geography; G. Miscellaneous. This bulletin is the thirty- 
second in Series F, the complete list of which follows: 

BULLETINS, SERIES F, GEOGRAPHY. 

5. Dictionary of altitudes in United States, by Henry Gannett. 1884. .S;2.5 pp. 

6. Elevations in Dominicjn of Canada, by .1. "W. Spencer. 1884. 4:5 pp. 

13. Bovindaries of L'^nited States and of the several States and Territories, with historical 
sketch of territorial changes, by Henry Gannett. 188.5. 13.5 pp. (Exhausted. ) 

48. On form and position of sea level, by R. S. Woodward. 1888. 88 pp. 

49. Latitudes and longitudes of certain points in Missoxm, Kansa.s, and New Mexico, by R. S. 
Woodward. 1889. 1*3 pp. 

.50. Formulas and tables to facilitate the construction and use of maps, V)y R. S. Woodward. 
1889. 124 pp. 

70. Report on astronomical work of 1889 and 1890, by R. S. Woodward. 1890. 79 pp. 

7;?. Altitudes between Lake Superior and Rocky Mountains, by Warren Upham. 1891. 239 pp. 

7t). Dictionary of altitudes in United States (second edition ), by Henry Gannett. 1891. 393 pp. 
(Exhausted: see Bulletin KiO. ) 

115. Geographic dictionary of Rhode Island, by Henry Gannett. 1894. .31pp. 

116. Geographic dictionary of Massachusetts, by Henry Gannett. 1894. 120 pp. 

117. Geographic dictionary of Connecticut, by Henry Gannett. 1894. 67 pp. 

118. Geographic dictionary of New Jersey, by Henry Gannett. 1894. 131 pp. 
122. Results of primary triangulation, by Henry Gannett. 1894. 413 pp., 17 pis. 

( L23. Dictionary of geographic positions, by Henry Gannett. 1895. 183 pp., 1 map. 
1.54. Gazetteer of Kansas, by Henry Gannett. 1898. 24tj pp., fi pis. 

1(50. Dictionary of altitudes in United States (third edition), by Henry Gannett. 1899. 775 pp. 
166. Gazetteer of Utah, by Henry Gannett. 1900. 43 pp., 1 map. 

169. Altitudes in Alaska, by Henry Gannett. 19(M3 13 pp. 

170. Sui'vey of boundary line between Idaho and Montana from international boimdary to crest 
of Bitterroot Mountains, by R. U. Goode. 190(). 67 pp., 14 pis. 

171. Boundaries of United States and of the several States and Territories, with outline of 
history of all important changes of territory (second edition ), by Heni'y Gannett. 1900. 142 pp., 
5.3 pis.' 

174. Survey of northwestern boundary of United States, 18,57-1801. by Marcus Baker. 19(X). 78 
pp.. 1 pi. 

175. Triangulation and spirit leveling in Indian Territory, by C. H. Fitch. 1900. 141 pp., 1 pi. 
181. Results of primary triangulation and primary traverse, fiscal year 1900-'01, by H. M. Wil- 
son. J. H. Renshawe, E. M. Douglas, and R. U. Goode. 1901. 340 pp., 1 map. 

ia3. Gazetteer of Porto Rico, by Henry Gannett. 1901. .51 pp. 

185. Results of spirit leveling, fiscal year 1900-'01, by H. M. Wilson, .1. H. Renshawe. E. M. 
Douglas, and R. U. Goode. UtOl. 319 pp. 
187. Geographic dictionary of Alaska, by Marcus Baker. 1901. 446 pp. 
UKI. Gazetteer of Texas, by Henry Gannett. 1903. (In press.) 

193. Gazetteer of Cuba, by Henry Gannett. 1902. 113 pp., 8 pis. 

194. Northwest boundary of Texas, by Marcus Baker. 1903. 51 pp., 1 pi. 

KW. Topographic development of the Klamath Mountains, by Joseph S. Diller. 1902. — pp., 
13 pis. 
197. Origin of certain place names in the United States, by Henry Gannett. 1902. 280 pp. 

Correspondence should be addressed to 

The Director, 

United States Geological Survey. 

Washington, D. C. 
Bull. 107—02 10 I 



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