(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A history of the origin of the place names connected with the Chicago & North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha railways .."

lONVSOl^ 



"^a3AiNn-3\\v 



su: 



J F(% 



vwLOS-ANGEL^ 




ODNVSOl^ %a3AiN(V3\W 



vKLOV 



^L'UDl 




IV3JO- 



^•LiBRARYtf/; 




V.>30 v 



m\n^' 




y omm\\-w 



<&UIBR 




%)3I" 



^LOS-ANGELfr. 






JX-LIBR 



TmNvsoi^ 



INIVER5/, v^LOSAKGE^ 






^ILIBRARY^ 



^OJIIVDJO- 



^t-UbKAKT^/ 




JI1V3JO' 



^OFCALI FO% ^OFCALI F(% 





r>~r *-»-i 



^AHvaaiH^' y wivHHiH^ 




^WEUNIVERty^ ^LOSANCElfj^ 



[= «£ 



NV-SOV^ 




dlF(% 



.\WE-UNIVER5/a 



'#13DNV-S01^ 



AM.r.Uj: 









^HiBRARYv 



^LIBRARY* 

1 \r 



A HISTORY 



OF THE 



Origin of the Place Names 



CONNECTED WITH 



THE 
CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN 



AND 



CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & OMAHA 

RAILWAYS 



"Local names — whether they belong to provinces, cities 
and villages or are the designation of rivers and 
mountains — are never mere arbitrary sounds devoid of 
meaning. They may almost always be regarded as 
records of the past, inviting and rewarding a careful 
historical interpretation." 

Isaac Taylor in " Words and Places." 



SECOND EDITION 



Compiled by 

ONE WHO FOR MORE THAN 34 YEARS HAS BEEN 
AN OFFICER IN THE EMPLOY OF THE SYSTEM. 



CHICAGO 
1908 



F 
591 

b . I 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Introduction ----- ... I 

History, in alphabetical order, of the names of the states the 

North Western traverses - - - 7~9 

History, in alphabetical order, of the names of the counties 

the North Western passes through - - n-33 

' History, in alphabetical order, of the places (cities, towns, 

villages and stations) the North Western passes through - 35-142 

^The list, in alphabetical order, of the old and abandoned 

names of the places the North Western traverses - - 143-150 



t 



History, in alphabetical order, of the names of the states 

the Omaha road traverses ------ 157-158 

History, in alphabetical order, of the names of the counties 

the Omaha road passes through ----- 159-165 

History, in alphabetical order, of the names of the places 
(cities, towns, villages and stations) the Omaha road 
passes through --------- 166-198 

The list, in alphabetical order, of the old and abandoned 

names of the places the Omaha road passes through - 199-201 



INTRODUCTION 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The primary purpose of this volume is to supply authentic information as to 
the origin and derivation of the names of the towns, cities and villages which are 
located on the Chicago and North Western and the St. Paul, Minneapolis and 
Omaha Kailways. In those instances where said names have some special meaning 
or significance, such meaning or significance is noted. 

While it was not in the plan of the work to furnish a history of the various 
places referred to, it has nevertheless often happened that the meaning or deriva- 
tion of a name could only be made clear by introducing more or less information 
of an historic character. In such instances, the historic statement has been used. 

In compiling the work, voluminous correspondence has been had with state, 
county, city and town officials, for the purpose of gaining authentic information, 
and of eliminating local, fanciful and unreliable legends. Local legends are gen- 
erally the offspring of the imagination, or of personal vanity, and where reliable 
data is the end which is sought, are worthless. As far as possible these imagi- 
native and local legends and "travelers' stories" have been eliminated and 
established facts alone have been accepted. While it is true that the investigations 
of the writer have shattered many pretty romances, it i9 not unlikely that others 
have escaped his notice and may yet be handed down as history. 

In some cases positive evidence concerning names and their origin, has already 
been lost, and in such cases, the best possible information attainable has been 
used. 

Leger, in his "Wisconsin Place Names" says: "As a rule, (which, however, 
has notable exceptions), it will be found that the streams and lakes and moun- 
tains preserve the names given them by the Bed Men, or their equivalent in 
European tongues: many of the cities and villages bear names transplanted from 
European soil. Thus may be found scattered over this continent in juxtaposition 
to names of undoubted Indian origin, a nomenclature whereby the immigrant exiles 
sought to preserve in the wilderness, the associations endeared to them in youth. ' ' 

Many of the recently adopted names were selected for their brevity, or to avoid 
the objections of the United States General Postoffice Department. Many of the 
names were manufactured expressly for the place and have neither sense nor 
fitness, but as they have been registered in county records, they necessarily 
appear here. 

To secure the true history of the origin of many of the names has cost 
immense labor. As an illustration, attention is called to the name Marinesco. 
To get the facts about that name the Compiler was obliged to write more than 
one hundred letters! 

The oldest as well as the most modern records of cities, towns and villages 
have been ransacked. The journals and other papers preserved at the state cap- 
itols and at county seats; the records of state historical societies, and local 
and state histories, have been searched and their stories freely used. Henry 
Gannett 's admirable "Origin of Certain Place Names," has given a great and 
valuable fund of reliable information. This has been freely used without ac- 
knowledgment, but which is now tendered to the fullest extent. 

Indian records, the "Jesuit Relations" and the like, have been freely 
used and relied upon, as they are generally reliable. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Link 



During the thirty-five consecutive years of the administration of Mr. Marvin 
Hughitt, now President of the Chicago and North Western Railway, the mileage 
of the road has increased nearly four-fold, and the railway stations are nearly 
three times as great as at the beginning of his service. Literally, hundreds of 
these miles of railroad were built through virgin territory and far beyond the 
picket line of the white man's settlements. Mr. Hughitt thus created the necessity 
for new stations and either suggested or approved their names. His personality 
is, therefore, in one way or another interwoven with the origin and development 
of hundreds of western towns, and to him, more than to any other one person or 
agency, is to be attributed the fact that these towns were called into existence. 

The writer of this history has been much more editor than author and much 
more collator and compiler, than either. He has not aimed to originate anything, 
but merely to record and preserve that which, after almost infinite care in the pro- 
cesses of culling, selecting and sifting of material received from countless sources, 
seemed to be worthy of permanent preservation. His effort has been to hold fast 
to the grain and to discard the chaff. 

The Compiler is especially indebted to Mr. P. E. Hall of Cedar Kapids, 
Iowa, for many facts as to the place names in Iowa and Nebraska; to Mr. 
Doane Robinson, the accomplished secretary of the State Historical Society of 
South Dakota; to G. F. West and Lewis S. Reid of Omaha, Nebraska; to General 
W. H. H. Beadle, Madison, South Dakota; to ex-Governor W. IT. Upham of Wis- 
consin; to Hon. E. W. Keyes of Madison, Wisconsin; to Mr. Peter White of 
Marquette, Michigan; to ex-United States Senator Alger of Michigan; to Sen- 
ator John Gavney of Wisconsin; to Hon. Warren Upham, secretary of the 
Minnesota State Historical Society; to Mr. R. G. Thwaites of the State Histori- 
cal Society of Wisconsin; to Mr. A. C. Johnson of Winona, Minnesota; to Gen- 
eral J. W. Bishop, to Messrs. L. A. Robinson, T. W. Teasdale, and Capt. E. E. 
Woodman of St. Paul, Minnesota, and to almost countless correspondents, for the 
facts they had to give and who gave freely. To all of these most cordial 
thanks are due and are here tendered. 

The following together with many other works were carefully examined, and 
much valuable information was secured therefrom: 

"Indian Local Names and Their Interpretations," by S. G. Boyd. "In- 
dian Linguistic Families of America," by J. W. Powell. "Aboriginal Races 
of North America," by S. G. Drake. "The Menominee Indians," by W. J. 
Hoffman. "Vocabularies of Tribes of the North West," by W. H. Dall. "Da- 
kota-English Dictionary," by S. R. Riggs. "Reports of the Bureau of Ameri- 
can Ethnology," by J. W. Powell. "Indian Dictionary," by Bishop Fredrich 
Baraga. "Reports of the Exploring Expeditions of John C. Fremont." "His- 
tory of the Expedition Under Lewis and Clark." "The Narrative of an Expe- 
dition to the Sources of the St.. Peter's River, etc., Under the Command of 
Stephen H. Long." "The Story of the Expeditions of Grosielliers and Radia- 
son," by H. C. Campbell. "Father Marquette, Joliet and Other Early Mis- 
sionaries, Travelers and Traders." "The American Indian," by E. M. Haines. 
"Barrett and Johnson's Histories of Nebraska." "The Transactions of the 
Wisconsin Academy of Science." "Leger's Wisconsin Place Names." Mrs. 
Kinzie's "Wauban. " G. W. Butterfield 's "Stephen Brule's Discoveries and 
Explorations," and the many volumes of "Early Western Travels" edited by 
R. G. Thwaites. All of these have furnished many curious and accurate facts 
that have been freely appropriated. 

THE COMPILER. 

Chicago, Illinois, December 31, 1907. 



AS TO THE 

Chicago & North Western 
Railway. 



CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN 
RAILWAY COMPANY 



DIRECTORS 



MARVIN HUGHITT 
FRANK WORK - - 
JAMES STILLMAN - 
OLIVER AMES - 
ZENAS CRANE - 
W. K. VANDERBILT 
F. W. VANDERBILT 
H. McK. TVVOMBLY 



Chicago 

- New York 

- New York 

- Boston 

Dalton, Mass. 

New York 

• New York 

- - New York 

E. E. OSBORN - 



byron l. smith 
cyrus h. Mccormick 
chauncey keep - 
chauncey m. depew 
samuel f. barger - 
james c. fargo - - 
henry c. frick - 
david p. kimball 
- New York 



Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 

- New York 

- New York 

- New York 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

- Boston 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



MARVIN HUGHITT 

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

SAMUEL F. BARGER 

HENRY C. FRICK 



H. McK. TWOMBLY 

DAVID P. KIMBALL 

W. K. VANDERBILT 

JAMES C. FARGO 



GENERAL OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President and Secretary 
Vice-President - 
Vice-President - 



MARVIN HUGHITT - 
EUGENE E. OSBORN - - - 
HIRAM R. McCULLOUGH - - 
WILLIAM A. GARDNER - - 

M.M.KIRKMAN Vice-President 

JOHN M.WHITMAN Vice-President -------- 

R.H.WILLIAMS Treasurer and Assistant Secretary - 

M. B. VAN ZANDT Assistant Treasurer and Assistant Secretary 

J. B. REDFIELD - - - - - Auditor and Assistant Secretary 

LLOYD W. BOWERS - - - - General Counsel 

W. H. STENNETT Auditor of Expenditures 

RICHARD H. AISHTON - - - General Manager 

FRANK WALTERS - - - - General Manager 

WILLIAM D. CANTILLON 

MARVIN HUGHITT, Jr. - - 

EDMUND D. BRIGHAM - - 

WARREN B. KNISKERN - - 

CHARLES A. CAIRNS - - - 

WILLIAM E. MORSE - - - 

STANLEY M. BRADEN - - - 

EDWARD C. CARTER - - - 

LESTER S. CARROLL - - - 

JOSIAH F. CLEVELAND - - 

FRANK P. CRANDON - - - 

ROBERT QUAYLE - - - - 



Assistant General Manager - - - - 
Freight Traffic Manager ... - 

General Freight Agent 

Passenger Traffic Manager - 
General Passenger and Ticket Agent 

General Superintendent 

General Superintendent 

Chief Engineer 

Purchasing Agent 

Land Commissioner - - 

Tax Commissioner 

Superintendent of Motive Power and Machinery 



Chicago 

- New York 

Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 

- . Chicago 

- New York 

- New York 

Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Omaha 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Norfolk, Neb. 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 



CHICAGO OFFICE - 
NEW YORK OFFICE 



215 JACKSON BOULEVARD 
- - in BROADWAY 



December 31, 1907 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



MILES OF RAILROAD 

The total number of miles of railroad owned June 30, 1907, was 7,407,71 miles. 
In addition to which the company operated: 
Under Lease — 

Manitowoc, Green Bay & North Western 
Railway, viz: 

Manitowoc to Eland Jet., Wis... 106.30 miles 
Pulaski to Gillett, Wis 16.90 " 



123.20 miles 
Pt. Paul, Eastern Grand Trunk Railway 

(Clintonville to Oconto, Wis., and 

branches) 60.02 ' ' 

DePue, Ladd & Eastern Railway (Ladd to 

Seatonville, 111.) 3.25 ' ' 



186.47 



Under Trackage Rights — 

Peoria & Pekin Union Railway (in the city of 

Peoria, 111.) 2.02 

Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railroad (Churchill to 
Ladd, 111.) 2.80 

Union Pacific Railroad (Broadway Station, 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, to South Omaha, Neb.) 8.73 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Rail- 
way (Blair to Omaha, Neb.) 24.70 



3S.25 ' ' 



7,632.43 
Deduct miles of railroad leased to proprietary railway.... 9.52 



< < 



* < 



Total miles of railroad operated June 30, 1907 7,622.91 " 

The above mileage is located as follows: 

In Illinois 685.02 miles 

In Wisconsin 1,969.79 

In Michigan 519.88 

In Iowa 1,577.60 « ' 

In Minnesota 650.30 ' ' 

In South Dakota 974,32 * « 

In North Dakota 14.28 ' ' 

In Nebraska 1,101.26 " 

In Wyoming 130.46 « ' 

7,622.91 " 

SUMMARY OF MILEAGE OF ALL TRACKS, JUNE 30, 1907 

Miles 

Main Tracks 7,622.91 

Second Tracks 810.72 

Third Tracks 83.94 

Fourth Tracks 77.91 

Sidings *2,763.22 



Total Miles of all Tracks 11,358.70 



•Includes 35.07 miles of spur tracks on Ashland Division that are leased to 
manufacturing companies. 



A3 TO THE 

CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY 

THE STATES 

THEIR NAMES AND ORIGIN 

Illinois. Named from the Illini tribe of Indiana who lived in the State as early 
aa 1673. Father Jacques Marquette found them resident at that time and 
said they were the dominating tribe on both sides of the Illinois Kiver. 
State Capital, Springfield. Named from Spring Creek, a small stream that 
runs into the Sangamon River. This capital city is on the Sangamon River. 
Sangamon is a corruption of an Indian word that means ''good hunting 
ground. ' ' The early name assigned to the county was Sangamo. Why the 
change in name was made is not now known. 
Iowa. The name is that of a tribe of Indians who inhabited this region when 
it was first visited by the whites. The word means "sleepy ones" or 
"drowsy ones." These Indians called themselves Pa-hu-cha, which may 
be translated "as of the dusty nose." By the Algonquin tribes they were 
called 1-o-was, by other Indian tribes they were called Mas-cou-tin, and 
by the French they were called Prairie Nadoussis. Marquette called them 
Pa-hou-tet. Father Andre, a Jesuit priest, settled amongst them in 1675. 
The Iowa River was named from the Algonquin name of the Indian tribe and 
the State was named from the river. 

State Capital, Des Moines. It is on the Des Moines River and was named 
from the river. The river name comes from the Indian word Mikonang, 
meaning ' ' road. ' ' The French spoke the word as if it was spelled Hoin- 
gona, and then shortened it to Moin, and called the river ' ' La riviere des 
Moines. ' ' 
Michigan. The name is an Indian word, said by some to mean "big lake." 
E. M. Haines, who was wise in Indian matters, said it meant "place for 
catching fish." Fathers Raymbault and Jorges, Jesuit priests, founded a 
mission for the Chippewa Indians in 1641 at what is now Sault Ste. Marie, 
but it was abandoned. Father Marquette restored the mission in 1668 
and there founded the first permament settlement in Michigan. 
State Capital, Lansing. Named for Abraham Lansing of Lansingburg, 
N. Y. 
Minnesota. Minnesota is a Sioux Indian word meaning "muddy water," 
"cloudy water" or "sky-tinted water." Hennepin and LaSalle saw the 
Minnesota River in 1680, and LaHonton, LeSueur and Carver, later. In 
1812 the United States first exercised authority in the territory. Fort 
Snelling was built in 1819 and named by the United States authorities for 
Colonel Josiah Snelling who built the fort. It was a protection for the 
early settlers, traders, etc., on the upper waters of the Mississippi and 
Minnesota (St. Peter) Rivers. 



8 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

State Capital, St. Paul. The city was named in 1841 from the church of 
"St. Paul," a log church which wag built here for Father M. Galtier, a 
Jesuit missionary. 
Nebraska. Nebraska is an Indian word meaning "shallow water" or "broad 
water." It is supposed the word was applied to the Platte River by the 

Indians. 

State Capital, Lincoln. This was named for Abraham Lincoln. 
North Dakota. Dakota was the common name for the confederated Sioux 
tribes. The word they used varied, as sometimes they called themselves 
Ldkota or Nakota, and again Dakota. The "North" was added to the 
word when the territory was divided. For a mention of the confederated 
tribes, see South Dakota in this work. 

State Capital, Bismarck. Was named for Otto Von Bismarck, the great 
Chancellor of Germany. 
South Dakota. Dakota was the common name for the confederated Sioux 
tribes. The name they used varied, as sometimes they called themselves 
Lakota or Nakota, and again Dakota. The word was formerly spelled 
Dah-ko-ta. The "South" was added when the territory was divided. The 
Dakotas were cut off from Minnesota in 1858 and had no real government 
until the territory was established by act of congress in the year 1861. 
State Capital, Pierre. This was named from Fort Pierre, which was on 
the opposite bank of the Missouri River and was named in June 1832, for 
Pierre Choteau, Jr., of St. Louis, Missouri, who visited the trading post 
there at that time. The "Fort" belonged to the American Fur Trading 
Company. For a brief history of this Fort, see "Fort Pierre" in this work. 

The Dakota confederation was made up of various Sioux tribes that are 
known as the confederated tribes. These tribes occupied or roamed over 
the country west of the Mississippi River. There were seven principal 
tribes in this so-called confederation, viz.: 

First: The Mndewakantons, or People of Spirit Lake. 

Second: The Wakpekutes, or Leaf Shooters. 

Third: The Wahpetons, or People of the Leaves. 

Fourth : The Sissetons, or People of the Swamp. 

These four bands or tribes are called Santees or Isantees, or "people who 
use knives," or who lived on Knife Lake. 

Fifth: The Yankton, or People of the East End. 

Sixth : The Yanktonaise, or People near the End. 

Seventh: The Tetons, or People of the Prairies. 

These Tetons were divided into bands or sub-tribes as follows: 

First: The Vncapapas, or People who camp by themselves. 

Second: The Sihasapas, or Blackfeet. 

Third: The Itazipehos, or People without bows and consequently called 

by the French Sans Arc. 

Fourth: The Minneconjous, or People who Plant by the Water. 

Fifth : The Oglalas. 

Sixth: The Sichanques or Burnt Thighs, or, as the French called them 
"the Brules" or "Brule Sioux." 

Seventh: The Oohononpaas or Two Kettles. They were so named be- 
cause two kettles of meat once saved the band from starvation. 
The name of the State came from the general name of this confederation. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line U 

Wisconsin. The name comes from a Sauk Indian word having reference to 
holes in the banks of a stream in which birds nest. 

State Capital, Madison. Named for James Madison, president of the 
United States. It was made the state capital in 1838 and the first meeting 
of the legislature was held there in November of that year. 

Elijah M. Haines in his North American Indians, says substantially as 
follows of the word Wisconsin: "The name was first given to the stream 
or river. The word was given by Marquette as Mesh-bousing and Mish- 
kou-sing. The letter ' m ' afterwards was changed to ' w ' and the letter 
'u' changed to 'n,' making it "TVish-lcin-sing. The word given by Mar- 
quette is supposed to mean 'strong current,' a feature that especially 
marks this stream in high water." The name of the stream was ultimately 
given to the territory and later to the State. The spelling of the word as 
Ouisconsin, was merely a refining of a misunderstood French euphonism, 
and has no basis in correct (French) orthography. The first territorial 
government was established at Mineral Point in 1836. The first legislature 
met at Belmont in Iowa County, in October, 1836. The State was admitted 
into the Union on May 29, 1848. 

Wyoming. This word is a corruption of the Delaware Indian word maughwau- 
wa-ma that means ' ' large plains " or " extensive meadows. ' ' The word 
has had many spellings, such as Wauwaumie, Wiwaume, Wiomie, until it 
reached Wyoming. The name was first used by whites as the name for a 
valley in Pennsylvania where a portion of the Delaware tribe of Indians 
lived. Calwallader Colden in his history of the "Five Nations" spelled 
it Wyomen. In 1778 this valley was thickly settled and was ravaged by 
the British Colonel Butler and his Indian allies, when more than three hun- 
dred of the inhabitants were massacred. Thomas Campbell, the poet, wrote 
his "Gertrude of Wyoming" on this massacre, and that poem has done 
more than anything else to make this a popular name for places in the 
United States. Wyoming was organized as a territory by act of congress of 
July 28, 1868, portions being taken from Dakota, Idaho and Utah respect- 
ively. The first permanent settlement within the limits of the present 
State was made in 1867. 

State Capital, Cheyenne. It was named for the Indian tribe who called 
themselves Dzitzistas. The word "Cheyenne" is a corruption of the In- 
dian word and was given to the Cheyenne Indians by the Dakota Sioux, 
who assert it means "aliens," or "foreigners." 



AS TO THE 

CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY. 

THE COUNTIES. 
THEIR NAMES AND ORIGIN. 

Adams County, State of Nebraska. Named for President John Adams. 

County seat, Hastings. Named for Col. T. D. Hastings in gratitude to 

him for inducing a railroad company to build a line of railroad through 

the county. 
Alger County, State of Michigan. Named for ex-Senator and Secretary of War 

K. A. Alger. 

County seat, Munising. This is an Indian word meaning "island," or "at 

the little island." 

Antelope County. State of Nebraska. Named by Leander Gerrard in com- 
memoration of his killing an antelope while chasing Indians in this region. 
County seat, Neligh. Named for Hon. John D. Neligh of West Point, Ne- 
braska, who platted the town. 

Ashland County, State of Wisconsin. Named from the home of Henry Clay, 
in Kentucky. 
County seat, Ashland, and was named from the county. 

Audubon County, State of Iowa. Named for J. J. Audubon, the ornithologist 
and painter of birds and animals. The county was created in 1851 and 
organized in 1855. 
County seat, Audubon. Named from the county. 

Beadle County, State of South Dakota. Named for W. H. H. Beadle, an early 
State officer. 

County seat, Huron. Named from the Indian tribe, and that name is be- 
lieved to have come from the French word hure, meaning "wild boar," 
and supposed to be applied to this tribe on account of their unkempt ap- 
pearance. Huron is on the Dakota or James river. The Indians called 
this river T-chan-san-san. The Huron was one of the Iroquoian tribes 
found by the French living between Lake Huron and Ontario. The French 
included twelve tribes in their name of Iroquois. 

Benton County, State of Iowa. Named for Thomas H. Benton of Missouri. 
The county was created by the legislature of Wisconsin, while Iowa was 
yet a part of Wisconsin in 1837, and was organized in 1846. 
County seat, Vinton. Named for Hon. Plynn Vinton, an Iowa legislator. 

Black Hawk County, State of Iowa. Named for "Black Hawk," the noted 
chief of Sac and Fox Indians. The county was created in 1847 and or- 
ganized in 1853. 
County seat, Waterloo. Named for the battlefield in Belgium. 



12 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Bine Earth County, State of Minnesota. Named for the bluish earth founo. 
in the county, the blueness is caused by the presence of copper in the soil. 
County seat, Mankato. Named from an Indian word meaning "blue" or, 
perhaps "green" earth. 

Boone County, State of Illinois. Named for Daniel Boone of Kentucky. 

County seat, Belvidere. Named by one of the founders from Belvidere, 
near Weimer in Saxe-Gotha, Germany. 

Boone County, State of Iowa. Named for Captain Nathan Boone of the 
United States Army, who fought Indians here and captured the Des Moines 
Valley from them. The county was created in 1846 and organized in 1849. 
County seat, Boone. Named from the county. The original county seat 
was named Boonesboro by S. B. McCall, and was a mile or so away from 
the present city. It was ultimately incorporated with and is now a por- 
tion of the city and municipality of Boone. 

Boone County, State of Nebraska. Named for Daniel Boone of Kentucky. 
County seat, Albion. Named from an ancient name of England. 

Boyd County, State of Nebraska. Named for James E. Boyd, once governor 
of Nebraska. 

County seat, Butte. Named from the "buttes" or small hills, near the 
townsite. 

Brown County, State of Minnesota. Named for Joseph B. Brown, a member of 
the Governor's Council of Minnesota in 1855. 

County seat, New Ulm, which was named by German emigrants from the 
city of Ulm in Germany. 

Brown County, State of Nebraska. Named for two members of the legislature 
who reported the bill for organization of the county. 

County seat, Ainsworth. Named for James E. Ainsworth, a railroad en- 
gineer who located and helped to build the railroad through the county. 

Brown County, State of South Dakota. Named for Alfred Brown, a legislator 

of 1879. 

County seat, Aberdeen. Named by Alexander Mitchell of Milwaukee, "Wis- 
consin, from the city in Scotland. 
Brown County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Major General Jacob Brown 

of the United States Army, 1821-1828. 

County seat, Green Bay. Named from the bay on which it is situated. 

This bay was by the early French called "la grande baie." For a fuller 

history, see Green Bay in alphabetical list of places. 

Buena Vista County, State of Iowa. The county was named from the battlefield 

of General Taylor in Mexico. The name means "beautiful view." The 

county was created in 1851 and organized in 1859. 

County seat, Storm Lake. It was named from a nearby small lake. The 

lake was named from the fact that small as it was and is, its waters 

seemed disturbed by storms nearly all the time. 
Buffalo County, State of Wisconsin. Named from the presence of "buffalo" 

(Bos or Bison Americanus, improperly called buffalo) here in an early day. 

County seat, Alma. Named from the battlefield in the Crimea in southern 

European Russia. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 13 



Bureau County, State of Illinois. Named for Pierre de Beuro, a French trader, 
who had in an early day trading posts in what is now Bureau County. 
County seat, Princeton. Named for Daniel Prince, an early settler. 

Butler County, State of Iowa. Named for W. O. Butler of Kentucky, a general 
in the Mexican War, and democratic candidate for vice president of the 
United States in 1848. The county was created in 1851 and organized in 
1853. 

County seat, Allison. Named for the veteran and venerable United States 
Senator W. B. Allison of Iowa. 

Butler County, State of Nebraska. Named for David Butler, first governor 
of the State. 

County seat, David City. Named for David Butler, first governor of the 
State. 

Butte County, State of South Dakota. Named from the "buttes" or low hills 
prominent in this county. 

County seat, Belle Fouche. Named from the north branch of the Cheyenne 
Eiver, which the French called Belle Fourche, or "Beautiful Fork." 

Brookings County, State of South Dakota. Named for the Hon. W. W. Brook- 
ings, a judge of the Supreme Court of the Territory of Dakota. 
County seat, Brookings. Named from the county. 

Calhoun County, State of Iowa. Named for John C. Calhoun of South Caro- 
lina. This county was first named Fox for the Fox Indians. The name 
was changed by the legislature in 1853. The county was organized in 1855. 
County seat, Rockwell City. The county seat was located in 1876 on land 
belonging to Colonel J. M. Rockwell and the site was named for him. 

Calumet County, State of Wisconsin. The word Calumet is a corruption of the 
French word Chalemet, meaning "little reed," hence "pipe of peace." 
County seat, Chilton. Named for Chillington Hall in England, but by an 
error of the county clerk in recording the name, the middle syllable was 
omitted and that left the name as it now stands. 

Carroll County, State of Iowa. Named for Charles Carroll of Carrolton, Mary- 
land. This county was created in 1851 and organized in 1855. 
County seat, Carroll, which was named from the county. 

Cedar County, State of Iowa. Was named from the river, which was named 
from the presence of cedar (Arbor vitae) trees along its banks. It was or- 
ganized in 1837. 

County seat, Tipton, which was named for General John Tipton, United 
States senator from Indiana. 

Cerro Gordo County, State of Iowa. Was organized in 1855 and named from 
the Mexican battlefield. The words mean "large (around) hill." 
County seat, Mason City. John B. Long in 1851 settled here and named 
the settlement and a grove in which he lived, Masonic Grove, in honor of 
the Free Masons. In 1853, he and others laid out a town and named it 
Shiboleth, a well known Masonic and Scriptural word. In 1854, he 
bought the town site and changed its name to Masonville, for his son, Mason 
Long. In 1855 the name was changed to Mason City to obviate some con- 
fusion that had arisen over the similarity of the early name with that of 
another postoffice in the State. 



14 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Cherry County, State of Nebraska. Named for Lieutenant Cherry of the 

United States Army. 

County seat, Valentine. Named for Hon. E. K. Valentine, once member of 

congress from Nebraska. 
Clark County, State of South Dakota. Named for Newton Clark, a legislator 

in 1873. 

County seat, Clark. Named from the county. 
Clay County, State of Iowa. Named for Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Clay, a son 

of Henry Clay of Kentucky, who was killed in the battle of Buena Vista 

in the Mexican War. The county was created in 1851. 

County seat, Spencer. In 1859 George E. Spencer laid out this town and 

named it for himself. After the close of the War of the Rebellion, this 

General G. E. Spencer became United States senator from Alabama. 
Clay County, State of Nebraska. Named for Henry Clay of Kentucky. 

County seat, Clay Center. Named from being in the center of the county. 
Clay County, State of South Dakota. Named for Henry Clay of Kentucky. 

County seat, Vermillion. Named from the red color of the soil, due to 

the presence of iron. 
Clinton County, State of Iowa. Named for DeWitt Clinton, governor of New 

York. This county was created in 1837 and organized in 1840, with the 

county seat at DeWitt (formerly called Vandenburg), where it remained 

for thirty-five years. 

County seat, Clinton. Named from the county. The county seat at one 

time was Camanche (named for the Indian tribe). It was then moved to 

DeWitt (Vandenburg) and was finally moved to Clinton in 1876. The site 

of Clinton is what in 1855 was laid out by Joseph M. Bartlett and called 

New York. This site ultimately came into the possession of the Iowa Land 

company, which resurveyed the site and named it from the county. 
Codington County, State of South Dakota. Named for Rev. R. B. Codington, 

a legislator of 1875. 

County seat, Watertown. Named by John P. Kemp, an early settler from 

Watertown, New York. 
Colfax County, State of Nebraska. Named for Vice President Schuyler Colfax. 

County seat, Schuyler. Named for the given name of Vice President 

Schuyler Colfax. 
Columbia County, State of Wisconsin. Named from the Columbia River in 

Oregon, which was named by Captain Gray from the vessel he commanded 

when he entered that river. 

County seat, Portage. Named from the Indian portage, or carrying place 

between the Fox and Wisconsin rivers. 
Converse County, State of Wyoming. Named for A. R. Converse, once terri- 
torial governor of Wyoming. 

County seat, Douglas. Named for United States Senator Stephen A. 

Douglas of Illinois. 
Cook County, State of Illinois. Named for Daniel P. Cook, member of congress 

County seat, Chicago. Named perhaps for the Ojibway Indian word she- 

Jcag-ong, meaning "the place of the wild onion," and this from a root 

word meaning "bad smell." For a more lengthy description, see Chicago 

in the alphabetical list of places. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 15 

Cottonwood County, State of Minnesota. Translation of Sioux word for the 
cottonwood tree (Populus heterophylla) abundant in the county. 
County seat, Windom. Named for United States Senator Windom of 
Minnesota. 

Crawford County, State of Iowa. The county was named for W. H. Crawford, 
secretary of the treasury in 1817-25 under President Monroe. The county 
was created in 1854 and organized in 1855. 

County seat, Denison. This was named in 1856 for Kevd. J. W. Denison, a 
Baptist preacher and agent of the land company that controlled the lands 
along the railroad through this county. 

Cuming County, State of Nebraska. Named for T. B. Cuming, governor of the 
Territory of Nebraska in 1854-1855. 

County seat, West Point. Named because when located, it was the most 
westerly point that was settled in the valley of the Elkhorn River. 

Custer County, State of South Dakota. Named for General George A. Custer, 
who was killed by the Indians in the battle of the Little Big Horn near 
the Rosebud River in "Wyoming in 1876. 
County seat, Custer. Named for General Custer. 

Dane County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Nathan Dane, a judge and mem- 
ber of congress from Massachusetts, and the author of the ordinance of 
1787 for the North West Territory. 
County seat, Madison. Named for President James Madison. 

Dawes County, State of Nebraska. Named for James W. Dawes, former gov- 
ernor of the State. 

County seat, Chadron. Named from a stream that was named for a French- 
Indian "squaw-man" who lived on its banks. 

DeKalb County, State of Illinois. Named for Baron DeKalb of the American 
Revolution, who was killed in the battle of Camden, South Carolina. 
County seat, Sycamore. Named from the abundance of "Sycamore" 
(Platanus occidentalis) trees that grew here when the town was laid out. 

Delta County, State of Michigan. Named because of its triangular shape. 

County seat, Escanaba. Named from an Indian word that means "flat 
rock." See Escanaba in alphabetical list of places in this book. 

Deuel County, State of South Dakota. Named for Jacob Deuel, a territorial 

legislator of 1862. 

County seat, Clear Lake. Named from Clear Lake and is merely a 

descriptive name. 
Dickey County, State of North Dakota. Named for George Dickey, a member 

of the North Dakota legislature. 

County seat, Ellendale. Named for the wife of S. S. Merrill, the general 

manager of a Wisconsin railroad. 

Dickinson County, State of Michigan. Named for Don M. Dickinson, post- 
master general under President Cleveland. 
County seat, Iron Mountain. Named on account of many iron mines in the 

vicinity. 

Dodge County, State of Minnesota. Named for General Henry Dodge, governor 
of and United States senator from Wisconsin. 
County seat, Mantorville. The first settlers in this county were three 



16 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

brothers, Peter, Riley and Frank Mantor. They settled on the site of this 
town in 1853. When the county seat was laid out, it was named for thesw 
brothers. 

Dodge County, State of Nebraska. Named for Augustus Caesar Dodge, United 
States senator from Iowa. 

County seat, Fremont. Named for General John C. Fremont, the explorer, 
who visited the location in an early day. See Fremont in alphabetical list 
of places in this book. 

Dodge County, State of Wisconsin. Named for General Henry Dodge, governor 
of, and United States senator from Wisconsin. 

County seat, Juneau. Named from Solomon Juneau, the French founder of 
the city of Milwaukee. 

Douglas County, State of Nebraska. Named for Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois. 

County seat, Omaha. Omaha is an Indian word and is the name of an Indian 

tribe and means ' ' up stream, " as " upstream people. ' ' 
DuPage County, State of Illinois. Named for the French Indian Du (or De) 

Page, a trader and trapper on the DuPage River before 1800. 

County seat, Wheaton. Named for Warren L. W^eaton, a nearby farmer. 
Emmet County, State of Iowa. Named for Robert Emmet the Irish patriot. 

The county was created in 1851 and organized in 1859. 

County seat, Estherville. Named for Mrs. Esther Ridley, the wife of one 

of its founders and the first treasurer of the county. 
Fall River County, State of South Dakota. Named from the river of the same 

name. It is the literal translation of its Indian name. 

County seat, Hot Springs. Named for the celebrated hot springs that 

abound at this place. 

Faribault County, State of Minnesota. Named for John Baptiste Faribault, a 

French trader amongst the Sioux Indians. 

County seat, Blue Earth City. Named from the presence of blue earth 

from copper mixed with the soil. 
F»Ulk County, State of Bouth Dakota. Named for Andrew J. Faulk, the third 

governor of Dakot* Territory. 

County seat, Faull ton. Named for Governor Andrew J. Faulk of South 

Dakota. 
Fillmore County, State of Minnesota. Named for Millard Fillmore, ex President 

of the United States. 

County seat, Preston. Was named from a stream that was named by John 

C. Fremont, "the pathfinder," for a governor of South Carolina who had 

befriended Fremont. 

Fillmore County, State of Nebraska. Named for Millard Fillmore, ex-prosi- 

dent of the United States. 

County seat, Geneva. Was named in 1871 by Miss Emma McCaully, 

daughter of Colonel J. A. McCaully, who owned the farm on which the 

county seat was established, and named it from Geneva in New York, that 

was named from Geneva in Switzerland. 
Florence County, State of Wisconsin. Named by H. D. Fisher or J. J. Hagerman 

for Mrs. Florence Hulst, wife of Dr. N. P. Hulst of Milwaukee. 

County seat, Florence. Named from the county. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line H 



Floyd County, State of Iowa. Named for William Floyd of New York, 
who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
County seat, Charles City. Named for Kelly St. Charles, a son of the 
first settler in the county. The first name of the place was St. Charles, but 
it was soon changed to its present form. 

Fond du Lac County, State of Wisconsin. Named from it3 situation (end of 

lake) on Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin. 

County seat, Fond du Lac. Named from the county. The town is situated 

on Lake Winnebago. 
Forest County, State of Wisconsin. Named because of the forest with which 

it was covered when named. 

County seat, Crandon. Named for Frank P. Crandon, an officer of the 

Chicago and North Western Kailway company. 

Fremont County, State of Wyoming. Named in honor of General John C. 
Fremont, the great explorer. 

County seat, Lander. This was named for General F. W. Lander of tha 
United States Army. 

Gogebic County, State of Michigan. Named from the Indian word a-go-je-bic, 
meaning ' ' rocky, ' ' or from go-ge-bing, meaning ' ' dividing lake. ' ' 
County seat, Bessemer. Named for the inventor of the Bessemer process 
for reducing iron ore. 

Goodhue County, State of Minnesota. Named for Thomas M. Goodhue, the 
first journalist of the Territory and who in 1849 founded "The Pioneer" 
newspaper of St. Paul. 
County seat, Red Wing. Named for the Indian chief, "Ked Wing." 

Grant County, State of Wisconsin. Named for a trapper and Indian trader 

who lived in this county before the State of Wisconsin was set aside from 

the Territory. 

County seat, Lancaster. Named from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 
Green County, State of Iowa. Named for General Nathaniel Greene, the great 

Revolutionary soldier. The county was created in 1851 aud organized in 

1854. 

County seat, Jefferson. It was laid out in 1854 and named for President 

Thomas Jefferson. 
Green Lake County, State of Wisconsin. Named from the waters of the laka, 

which have a very green cast. 

County seat, Dartford. Named by and for J. N. Dart, its first settler. 

Mr. Dart also named Montello the county seat of Marquette County. 

Gregory County, State of South Dakota. Named for J. S. Gregory, a legislator 
of the Territory. 

County seat, Fairfax. Was named for Lord Fairfax of English-Virginia 
history. He was the son of Lord Culpepper. They gave their names to 
counties in Virginia. 

Grundy County, State of Iowa. Named for Felix Grundy, United States sen- 
ator from Tennessee. The county was created in 1851 and organized in 
1854. 

County seat, Grundy Center. Named from the county and from the central 
location of the town in the county. 



18 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Hamilton County, State of Iowa. Named for W. W. Hamilton, president of 
the Iowa senate in 1857. It had been first called Risley, and then Webster. 
County seat, Webster City. Named for Daniel Webster of Massachusetts. 

Hamilton County, State of Nebraska. Named for Alexander Hamilton, the 
great American statesman. 

County seat, Aurora. Named from the Latin word, meaning "morning," 
"dawn" or "east." 

Hamlin County, State of South Dakota. The county was created January 
8, 1873 and organized in July, 1878, and named for Hannibal Hamlin of 
Maine. 

County seat, Castlewood. In an early day, J. S. Keator of Davenport, 
Iowa, had the title to some fifteen thousand acres of land in this vicinity. 
A daughter of Mr. Keator, who was a reader of Thackeray's novels, in 
"The Virginians" found the name Castlewood, as the Virginia home of 
Henry Esmond. She suggested the county seat should be given the name 
of Castlewood, and the Winona and St. Peter Railroad company, that laid 
out the town site, accepted the suggestion and Castlewood became the name 
of the town site and county seat. (See Castlewood in the alphabetical list 
for further facts as to this name). 

Hand County, State of South Dakota. Was named for George A. Hand, secre- 
tary of the Territory in 1880. 
County seat, Miller. Named for its founder, Henry Miller. 

Hardin County, State of Iowa. Named for General John J. Hardin of Illinois, 
who was killed in the Mexican War. The county was established in 1851 
and organized in 1853. 

County seat, Eldora. Named from Eldorado, California, and that was 
named from the Spanish word meaning "the gilded." The county was 
established in 1853. 

Harrison County. State of Iowa. Named for President W. H. Harrison; the 
county was created in 1851 and organized in 1853. 

County seat, Logan. Was named by E. B. Talcott, of the Galena and 
Chicago Union railroad, for General John A. Logan of Illinois. The place 
was originally called Boyer Falls, from the falls (rapids) in the nearby 
river, but the name was changed on the completion of the railroad to this 
point. 

Holt County, State of Nebraska. Named for Joseph Holt of Kentucky, of 
President Lincoln 's cabinet. 

County seat, O'Neill. Named for General John O'Neill, the Irish patriot, 
who was an early settler here and who laid out the original town site and 
made his part of the town a total abstinence place. 

Hughes County, State of South Dakota. Named for Alexander Hughes, a 
legislator of 1873. 

County seat, Pierre. Named from "Fort Pierre Choteau" (commonly 
called Fort Pierre) that lay on the opposite side of the Missouri River. 
That was named for Pierre Choteau, Jr., of St. Louis, of the American Fur 
Co., that had a trading post there. See Fort Pierre in the alphabetical 
list of places in this book. 

This county was explored by J. N. Nicollet and John C. Fremont, and 
Nicollet mapped it as early as 1839. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line iy 



Humboldt County, State of Iowa. Named for Baron Alexander von Humboldt, 
the German traveler. The county was created in 1851, but was not or- 
ganized. It was re-created in 1857 and organized in the same year. 
County seat, Dakota City. Was named for the Dakota Indians. 

Hyde County, State of South Dakota. Named for James Hyde, a member of 
the legislature in 1873. 

County seat, Highmore. Was so named from the fact that it stood on the 
highest ground between the James and Missouri Eivers. 

Ida County, State of Iowa. Named from Mount Ida in Greece. The county 
was created in 1851, and the name was suggested by Eliphalet Price. 
County seat, Ida Grove. Named from the county and grove of timber 
near the town site. This conjunction was suggested by Mrs. J. H. Moor- 
head, the wife of the first settler. The town was laid out by S. H. Hobbs 
in 1871 and officially named Ida Grove by P. E. Hall of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Iowa County, State of Wisconsin. The county was named from the river and 
this was named from the Algonquin name of an Indian tribe that lived on 
the river. The word means "sleepy" or "drowsy ones." 
County seat, Dodgeville. Named for General Henry Dodge, governor of 
Wisconsin Territory. 

Iron County, State of Michigan. So named on account of the large quantity 
of iron ore that is found here. 

County seat, Crystal Palls. This name was first applied to the falls in 
Paint River, by Richard Corman, a timber "cruiser" who saw the foliage 
that overhung the falls densely covered with ice crystals after a very 
heavy sleet storm. When the town site — near the falls — was established, 
it was named from these falls. 

Iron County, State of Wisconsin. Was so named on account of finding iron 
ore in the county. 
County seat, Hurley. Was named for M. A. Hurley of Wausau, Wisconsin. 

Jackson County, State of Iowa. Named for President Andrew Jackson. The 
county was created in 1837 and organized in 1838. 

County seat, Maquoketa. It was named from the river, on the south bank 
of the south fork on which it is located. The word comes from the Sac 
Indian and means "bear river." The original name given to the place 
was Springfield. This was given it by J. E. Goodenow in 1838, and who 
had emigrated from New York state. 

Jefferson County, State of Wisconsin. Named for President Thomas Jefferson. 
County seat, Jefferson. Named from the county. 

Jo Daviess County, State of Illinois. Named for Colonel Joseph H. Davies of 
Kentucky, who was killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe. 
County seat, Galena. It was named in 1819 by S. C. Muir, an early settler, 
from the presence of great beds of lead or Galena ore at this place. The 
early French called the place La Feve, the "bean," from the profusion 
of a sort of bean they found growing there. From this La Feve, the river, 
on which the town is located, is by "corruption" called Fever River. 

Jones County, State of Iowa. Was established in 1857, and named for General 
George W. Jones, delegate to congress for the Territory of Iowa, and after 
the admission of the State to the Union, United States senator from Iowa. 



20 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

County seat, Anamosa. This is a corruption of the name of an Indian 
woman, whose father was named Nas-inms and who was distinguished in 
the Blackhawk War. The word Anamosa refers to "puppies" or "young 
foxes before their eyes are opened." In 1841 when the town was first 
platted, it was called Lexington from the battlefield of the Revolution. 
The county seat was located in 1847. 

Juneau County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Solomon Juneau, the founder 
of the city of Milwaukee. 

County seat, Mauston. Named for General M. M. Maughs, the former 
owner of the original village. 

Kane County, State of Illinois. Named for Elias K. Kane, United States sen- 
ator from Illinois, 1824-1835. 

County seat, Geneva. Was named from the city in New York State and 
that was named from Geneva, Switzerland. 

Kenosha County, State of Wisconsin. Was named from an Indian word mean- 
ing ' ' pickerel, " " fish " or " pike. ' ' 
County seat, Kenosha. Named from the county. 

Keokuk County, State of Iowa. Named for Ke-o-TcuJc a Sac Indian chief. The 
word means " ruuning fox" or "watchful fox." The county was first 
created in 1837, and re-created in 1843 and organized in 1844. 
County seat, Sigourney. This was named in honor of Mrs. L. H. Sigourney, 
the American poetess, by the commissioners who selected the site. 

Kingsbury County, State of South Dakota. Named for G. W. Kingsbury, an 
early legislator of the Territory. 

County seat, DeSmeto. Was named to honor the memory of Father P. J. 
DeSmet, S. J., the "Apostle of the Indians." 

Knox County, State of Nebraska. Named for the Revolutionary General Knox. 
It was originally called L'Eau que Court County, but was changed by the 
legislature at the request of David Quimby, a legislative representative. 
County seat, Niobrara. Named from an Indian word meaning "running 
water." The name was first applied to the river, and then was transferred 
to the town site. 

Kossuth County, State of Iowa. Was established in 1851, organized in 1855 
and named for Louis Kossuth of Hungary. 

County seat, Algona. Named from a corrupted Indian word meaning "Al- 
gonquin waters." The word Algoma was formed by Schoolcraft, and Algona 
is a changed form of Schoolcraft's word. The original name of the settle- 
ment was Call's Grove, and was so named for the brothers Call, who came 
here in 1854. The present name was suggested by Mrs. A. C. Call. The 
town was laid out by the Calls and J. W. Moon in 1856. 

La Crosse County, State of Wisconsin. The word is from the French name for 
the game that was played by the Indians and which the French settler* 
called "la crosse. " 
County seat, La Crosse. Named from the county. 

LaFayette County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Marquis de LaFayette. 
County seat, Darlington. Was named for Joseph Darlington, an early 
settler. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



21 



Lake County, State of Illinois. Was named from the large number of lake* 

(108) in the limits of the county. 

County seat, Waukegan. Originally this place was called "Little Fort." 

The present name is the Indian translation of Little Fort. 
Lancaster County, State of Nebraska. Named from the town and county in 

Pennsylvania, which were named from the county in England. 

County seat, Lincoln. Named for President Abraham Lincoln. 
Langlade County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Charles de Langlade, a 

Frenchman and said to be the first permanent white settler in the State of 

Wisconsin. 

County seat, Antigo. The name was taken from the Indian words neequic- 

antigo-sebi. The word Antigo, means evergreen, or where there always are 

evergreens. 
La Salle County, State of Illinois. Named for Bene Robert Cavalier, Sieur de 

de la Salle, the noted French explorer. 

County seat, Ottawa. Named for an Indian tribe. 
Lawrence County. State of South Dakota. Named for John Lawrence, * 

member of the legislature. 

County seat, Deadwood. Was named from Deadwood Gulch, and that was 

so named because of the many dead trees the first prospectors found in the 

gulch. 
Lee County, State of Illinois. Named for General Richard Henry Lee of tha 

Revolution. 

County seat, Dixon. Named for Captain John Dixon, an early settler and 

owner of Dixon's Ferry on Rock River. 
Le Sueur County, State of Minnesota. Named for Pierre Charles Le Sueur, an 

explorer of and trader on the upper Mississippi River 1683-1722. 

County seat, Le Sueur Center. Named from the county. 
Lincoln County, State of Minnesota. Named for Abraham Lincoln. 

County seat, Ivanhoe. Was named from Sir Walter Scott's novel of that 

name. 
Lincoln County, State of South Dakota. Named for Abraham Lincoln. 

County seat, Canton. Named from Canton, Ohio, that was named indi- 
rectly from the Chinese city. 
Linn County, State of Iowa. Named for Hon. Lewis F. Linn, United States 

senator from Missouri. The county was created in 1837 and organized in 

1839. 

County seat, Marion. Was laid out in 1839 and named for General Francis 

Marion of the Eevolutionary War. 
Lyman County, State of South Dakota. Named for W. P. Lyman, legislator 

and soldier. 

County seat, Oacoma. This is a Sioux Indian word and means "a place be- 
tween," and is here used because the town is located between the river 

and a bluff. 
Lyon County, State of Minnesota. Named for General Nathaniel Lyon of the 

United States Army. 

County seat, Marshall. Named for Gen. W. R. Marshall, governor of tha 

state, 1866-1870. 



22 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Macoupin County, State of Illinois.. This county was named for the Indian 
word that designated a tuber, resembling the potato, that was found in 
abundance along the banks of what is now called Macoupin Eiver or creek. 
County seat, Carlinville. This city was named for Thomas Carlin, who 
was governor of Illinois from 1834 to 1842. 

Madison County, State of Nebraska. Named for President James Madison. 
County seat, Madison. Named from the county. 

Mahaska County, State of Iowa. Named for Mahaska, "White Cloud," a 
chief of the Iowa tribe of Indians. The county was created in 1843 and 
organized in 1844. 

County seat, Oskaloosa, and was named for the wife of the Indian Chief 
Mahaska. This place was first named "The Narrows;" it was then called 
Mahaska, but when chosen for the county seat, its name was changed to 
the present title. This was done at the suggestion of M. T. Williams, an 
early settler in the county. 

Manitowoc County, State of Wisconsin. Man-i-to-woc-is-an is the Indian word 
for "spirit land," and the name Manitowoc cornea from this word. 
County seat, Manitowoc. (For further particulars as to this name, see 
Manitowoc in the alphabetical list of place names.) 

Marathon County, State of Wisconsin. Named by Walter D. Mclndoe, a learned 
Scotchman for the battlefield in ancient Greece. 

County seat, Wausau. The name is a corruption of the Indian word 
was-sa, meaning ' ' far away. ' ' 

Marinette County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Marinette Jacobs, the daugh- 
ter of an Indian chief. This name was made from Maria and Antoinette. 
County seat, Marinette. Named from the county. 

Marshall County, State of Illinois. Named for Chief Justice John Marshall. 
County seat, Lacon. Named from Laconia in Greece. 

Marshall County, State of Iowa. Named for Chief Justice John Marshall. 
The county was created in 1846 and organized in 1848. 

County seat, Marshalltown. Its first name was Marshall, from a place of 
that name in Michigan, and was laid out and so named by Nels Hanson 
and John Childs in 1853, but to prevent confusion, the word "town" waa 
afterwards added to the name. 

Martin County, State of Minnesota. Named for Henry Martin, an early settler. 
County seat, Fairmont. Was named in 1857 by W. H. Budd and other com- 
missioners, who were by the Government appointed to select a site for the 
county seat. The location is on elevated ground and along a chain of 
lakes. The outlook is very fine and that induced these commissioners to 
call the site Fairmont. (Not Fairmount, as it is often incorrectly written.) 

Marquette County, State of Michigan: Was named for Father Jacques Mar- 
quette, the noted Missionary to the Indians. Father Marquette was born 
at Laon in France in 1637, where he was educated. He came to North 
America in 1666 and went to Sault St. Marie on the St. Mary's Eiver in 
Michigan in 1668, where he established a mission. He went to La Pointe 
on Madaline Island, near the present city of Ashland, Wisconsin, in 1669, 
and then determined to explore the Mississippi River, of which he had 
heard much from the Indians of the Lake Superior country. He spent the 
time between 1669 and 1673 at the island of Michilmacinac (now Macki- 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 23 

nac); at what is now known as old Macinac, and at St. Ignace on Point 
St Ignace on the main land of the northern peninsula of Michigan near 
the island of Mackinac. He taught and tried to Christianize the Indiana 
who occupied or visited the vicinity. 

On May 17, 1673, he and Louis Joliet left Mackinac in canoes and went 
up Green Bay (bale de puants of the early French traders and trappers), 
and via the Fox and the Wisconsin Rivers reached the Mississippi River 
on June 17. They floated down that stream to a point in what is now the 
state of Arkansas. They then retraced their steps to the mouth of the Illi- 
nois River, which they ascended to the Des Plaines River and thence to 
Lake Michigan, and finally reached the location of the present city of Green 
Bay in September, 1673. 

In the fall of 1674 Marquette reached Chicago, on his second trip to 
the south, and wintered there. Not long since a monument was set up and 
dedicated on the spot where this winter sojourn was made. He started 
south via the south branch of the Chicago and the Des Plaines Rivers on 
March 30, 1675, and on April 8, 1675, reached Kaskaskia, near where the 
Kaskaskia River enters the Mississippi River, a hundred miles or so 
below St. Louis, Mo. After a sojourn there he started back to Mackinac, 
but died (in 1675) at a point on the east shore of Lake Michigan. Hi? 
remains were taken to Mackinac and are believed to be buried in or near 
the ruins of the old mission church at St. Ignace. There is no doubt that 
Father Marquette visited the site of the present city of Marquette, and 
hence can be seen the propriety of naming the city and the county it is 
in for him and to honor and perpetuate his name. 

Marquette is a very old settlement. Before Father Marquette first visited 
the location in 1668, the Indians made it a place of meeting and they had 
told Radisson and Grossilliers, who preceded Father Marquette in visiting 
this spot, that it had always been a favorite meeting and fishing point for 
the Indians. 

Peter White, its oldest settler, came west from Rome, New York. The 
early French trappers and Indian traders called him Pierre Le Blanc, and 
by that name he was known, and loved and trusted by all the Indians 
in the country bordering on the shores of Lake Superior. A "poet" claims 
Peter White lived here in 1664, and welcomed and feasted Marquette when 
he visited the locality in 1668. This legend is confirmed (?) by the follow- 
ing poem. 

"PIERRE LE BLANC AND FATHER MARQUETTE. 

"You know one man call Petare Wite 
What live up by Marquette, 
Was born four hundred year ago 
An' I'm glad she hain't daid yet. 

Perhaps you tink dat one big lie, 
But if you doan ' b 'lieve true, 
She 's live for last two t 'ousand year 
I'm goin' prove to you. 

Deys got a Sunday school up dere, 
An ' one day not long ago 
Ze teachare hask em question 
To see how much dey no. 



24 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

' Who 's was the one dat run ahead, 
Say, 'Mak' road and mak' 'em strait'? 
Come, hanser me dat question now, 
Doan keep me long to wait. ' 

Jus' one in hinfant class what no, 

She was six year hole and bright. 

Now, I always s 'pose 'twas Jean Baptiste — 

But she say 'Petare Wite. ' 

An ' no I 've prove ze haige to you, 
I 'm goin ' on wid my story, 
It 's more about dat Petare Wite, 
An ' more as to his glory. 

Long time she was call Pierre Le Blanc, 
'Bout two tree hundred year 
Before 'twas change to Petare Wite, 
By dose English peepl ' roun ' here. 

One day she walk down by ze rocks, 
'Bout sixteen sixty four, 
An ' scratch hees haid and wink hees hye 
At lit' speck far out from shore. 

Ver soon dat lit ' speck was a canoe, 
Bimby it came to shore, 
A man jump out, strange French man, 
What she never saw before. 

An ' dat man say ' Bon jour, my f ren ', 
T doan know you, and yet 
J guess ycur name is Pierre Le Blanc — ■ 
Mai name ees Pere Marquette. 

'I hear 'bout you from mai grand-pere, 
Dat you could not be beat, 
An ' I tought I 'd stop and get acquaint ' 
So two good mans could meet. ' 

An ' Petare say, ' Dat 's very good, 
1 '11 tell you what I '11 do— 
I '11 build a town on dis here spot 
An ' call it after you. ' 

An' Petare tak' him to hees house, 
An' fill him to hees jaw 
Wid everything she had was nice, 
Champagne and poisson blanc. 

Dat good pries' stay for two, tree week, 
An ' den he say •' Good-bye, ' 
While great big tear run down hees check, 
Two, tree stan' on hees hye. 

An' den he jump in hees canoe 
An ' shove off from ze bank, 
An ' look up to ze sky and say, 
'God bless you, Pierre Le Blanc' 

An' Petare built dat city, 

An ' did more ' as dat, you bet, 

He also built one monument 

For hees young frcn, ' Pere Marquette. ' ' 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line -5 



PETER WHITE. 

A mention of the city or of the county of Marquette without a mention 
of Peter White would be like explaining the light of day without men- 
tioning the Bun. For many years all the weal and activities of Marquette 
and of the surrounding county seemed to revolve around and about Mr. 
White. 

He is undoubtedly the best-known citizen in the Upper Peninsula, and 
one of the most popular in all Michigan. Mr. White was born in Rome. 
Oneida County, N. Y., and went to Green Bay, Wis., with his parents in 
1839. He set out for the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. After repeated 
efforts to reach his destination, it taking some three years on account of 
many vicissitudes, one of which was spent as a clerk in a Detroit store, 
he joined an expedition to the Lake Superior iron mines that then for the 
first time were being talked about. After experiencing many hardships 
he reached the end of his journey and had the distinction of being the 
first white man to fell a tree on the site of the present city of Marquette. 
It was while employed in these pursuits that Mr. White, who at that time 
spoke several languages, learned to talk with the Chippewas in their own 
tongue, thereby gaining their friendship, which proved very valuable in 
after years. He also picked up the patois of the French-Canadian habitat. 
He was literally one of the pioneers of this part of Michigan. Although 
but a boy at that time he had the pluck and perseverance of a man of 
mature years and was respected and trusted by his employers as well as 
by all those, Indians included, with whom he came in contact. First as 
a common laborer, then as a storekeeper, then a banker, real estate dealer, 
legislator, journeying part of his way to Lansing on snowshoes, always 
with his eye on the goal he had in sight, he never swerved, and his life is 
a model for the American youth to pattern after. 

At the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion he organized a company to 
go to the front and was elected its captain, but such great pressure was 
brought to bear upon him by his fellow citizens that he remained at home. 
Dating from about this time he became the leading man in Marquette. 
He has always been a generous citizen, never sparing his time or money 
in furthering the interests of his home town. 

The history of Mr. White is the history of the Upper Peninsula. It is 
full of romance as well as of the stern realities of life. During the earlier 
days it was full of exciting experiences and adventure, at one time as a 
mail carrier over a then trackless waste with Indians as guides. At the 
present time he is a cultured gentleman and a successful business man. 

He is still in the prime of his activity, both mental and physical, and his 
advice on leading questions of the day is freely asked and always given 
merited consideration. 
County seat, Marquette; named from the county. 

Marquette County, State of Wisconsin. Named for the Jesuit Missionary 
and explorer, Father Jacques Marquette. 

County seat, Montello. This town was located in 1849 by James Daniels, 
and by him was named Seralro from a place in Mexico where Mr. Daniels 
had fought during the war with Mexico. The location was also, for some 
time known as Hill River on account of its location as to granite hills 



26 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



and Fox Kiver. In course of time objections were made to the nam© 

Seralro; when J. N. Dart, an early settler, suggested the present name, 

and the suggestion was adopted by a meeting of its principal inhabitants. 

The name is a translation of two Spanish words for "mountain" and 

"waters." Mr. Dart also named Dartford, the county seat of Green Lake 

County. 
McCook County, State of South Dakota. Named for General Edwin S. McCook 

of Ohio, who was distinguished for bravery in the War of the Eebellion. 

County seat, Salem; named from the Jewish word meaning "Peace." 
McHenry County, State of Illinois. Named for General William McHenry, 

prominent in the Blackhawk War. 

County seat, Woodstock; named from the town in Vermont and that was 

named from the town in England. 
Meade County, State of South Dakota. Named for Gen. George C. Meade 

of the War of the Eebellion. 

County seat, Sturgis; named by Col. Samuel Sturgis of the Seventh United 

States Cavalry. 
Menominee County, State of Michigan. Named from the Menominee Indian 

tribe (the rice eaters). The word refers to "wild rice." 

County seat, Menominee; named from the county. 
Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. This name came from an Indian word 

probably Milicke, meaning "good earth" or "good land." 

County seat, Milwaukee. The word has been spelled in many ways from 

Father Hennipin's MillecTce in 1679, Nileke of a French map in 1864; 

Milwarick of John Buisson de St. Cosme in 1699, down to the present. 

(For further particulars as to the word Milwaukee, see under its place in 

the alphabetical list of place names.) 
Miner County, State of South Dakota. Named for Capt. Nelson Miner and 

Ephraim Miner, members of the legislature of 1872 that created the county. 
Capt. N. Miner raised a company of cavalry during the War of the Eebellion 

and was a noted Indian fighter after that war closed. 

County seat, Howard; named for Howard Farmer, the first settler there. 

Monona County, State of Iowa. The word Monona is Indian, but its meaning 
is lost. The county was created in 1851. 

County seat, Onawa; this was laid out by the Monona Land Company 
in 1857, and was named from an Indian word meaning "wide awake." 

Monroe County, State of Iowa. Was named for President James Monroe. 

County seat, Albia. Princeton was the original name of this place. It 
was changed by Dr. Anson Flint, an early settler, and was named by him 
for his native place in New York State. 

Monroe County, State of Wisconsin. Named for President James Monroe. 

County seat, Sparta; was named in 1851 by Mrs. M. Pettitt from Sparta in 
ancient Greece. 

Natrona County, State of Wyoming. Named from the Spanish word natron 
meaning "native carbonate of soda," which is plentiful in this county. 
County seat, Casper; was named from the United States post Fort Casper, 
which is located on the Platte Eiver near this station. This post was named 
by Gen. John Pope, November 21, 1865, for Lieut. Casper Collins, who 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 27 



lost his life in a battle with Indians near this spot. Lieut. Collins had 
but a handful of men while the attacking Indians numbered three thou- 
sand. Three only of the soldiers escaped, all the rest, with the leader, 
being killed. 
Nicollet County, State of Minnesota. Named for Joseph Nicholas Nicollet, a 
French explorer and map maker. 

County seat, St. Peter; the town was named by the Winona and St. Peter 
Kailroad Company from the river on which it is located. The river was 
named for Pierre (Peter) Charles Le Sueur, the first white man to navi- 
gate this stream. He was on it as early as 1689. Nicollet explored Dakota 
and Minnesota with J. C. Fremont, then a lieutenant in the U. S. Army, 
in 1838 and 1839, and mapped the territory for U. S. Government. 
They camped for a considerable time where the city of Pierre now is. 
Nicolette also discovered, explored and mapped that part of the Mississippi 
river that lies above Lake Itaska. 

Nuckolls County, State of Nebraska. Named for S. F. Nuckolls, an early settler. 
County seat, Nelson; was named by and for Mr. C. Nelson Wheeler, who 
owned and laid out the town site. 

O'Brien County, State of Iowa. Named for the Irish patriot of 1848, William 
Smith O'Brien. The county was created in 1851 and organized in 1860. 
County seat, Primghar. The site was selected and laid out by commissioners 
in 1872. Many names were suggested as the name for the town, but none wag 
acceptable to all of the commissioners. It then was suggested that the 
initials of the names of the commissioners should be taken and arranged 
into a name. The following were the names from which the initials came: 
Messrs. Pumphrey, Roberts, Inman, McCormack, Green, Hays, Albright and 
Kenck. These initials made P-R-I-M-G-H-A-R and this made the name of 
the town site and county seat. 

Oconto County, State of Wisconsin. Oconto is a Menominee Indian word mean- 
ing "red ground" and also meaning "place of the pickerel." 
County seat, Oconto; named from the county. 

Ogle County, State of Illinois. Named for Capt. Joseph Ogle, a fighter of 
Indians in the Ohio Valley. 
County seat, Oregon; was named from the then territory of Oregon. 

Olmsted County, State of Minnesota. Named for David Olmsted, mayor of St. 
Paul, Minnesota, in 1854. 

County seat, Rochester; named from Rochester, New York; this was named 
for its senior proprietor, Col. Nathaniel Rochester. 

Oneida County, State of Wisconsin. Named for the Oneida Indians. The word 
means in the Oneida tongue "people of the stone," or, "granite people." 
County seat, Rhinelander; named for F. W. Rhinelander, who was presi- 
dent of the railroad that first reached the place. 

Ontonagon County, State of Michigan. Ontonagon is an Ojibway Indian word 
meaning "fishing place." 
County seat, Ontonagon; was named from the county. 

Outagamie County, State of Wisconsin. Named for th< Outagamies or "Fox" 
Indians or from an Indian word meaning "thosr {hat live on the other 
side." 



28 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



County seat, Appleton; which was named for Samuel Appleton of Boston, 
Mass., one of the founders of Lawrence University, located at Appleton, 
Wis. 

Ozaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for the Sauk Indian word 
meaning "yellow clay." Ozaukee is the proper name of the main Sauk 
tribe. 

County seat, Port Washington; was named for George Washington. (See 
Port Washington in the alphabetical list.) 

Palo Alto County, State of Iowa. Was named from the battle field of the 
Mexican war and is Spanish for "high timber." The county was estab- 
lished in 1851 and organized in 1856. 

County seat, Emmetsbnrg; was named for the Irish patriot, Robert 
Emmet. It was laid out by Martin Coonan in 1871. 

Pennington County, State of South Dakota. Named for John L. Pennington, 
an early governor of Dakota. 

County seat, Rapid City, which was named on February 25, 1876, on the 
suggestion of J. R. Brennan and W. P. Martin, by vote of a meeting of the 
early settlers who had determined to locate a town at this point. It was, 
from the location, expected by these town builders that the town would 
have a very rapid growth, and hence that the name proposed would be 
appropriate. The name was taken from the stream that ran through this 
location. Its name came from the many "rapids" that were in the stream. 

Peoria County, State of Illinois. A corrupted form of an Indian tribal name 
meaning "carriers" or "packers." County seat, Peoria; was named from 
the county. 

Pierce County, State of Nebraska. Named for President Franklin Pierce. 
County seat, Pierce; was named from the county. 

Platte County, State of Nebraska. Named from the Platte River; that was 
named from the French plate, meaning ' ' dull, " " shallow. ' ' 
County seat, Columbus; named for Christopher Columbus. 

Plymouth County, State of Iowa. This county was named from the Plymouth 
colony in Massachusetts. The county was created in 1851 and organized 
in 1858. 

County seat, LeMars. For a full account of the way the women named 
the town see Le Mars in the alphabetical list of the place names of the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha railroad in this book. 

Pocahontas County, State of Iowa. Named for the Indian "Princess" of that 
name. It means "stream between two hills." The county was created 
in 1851 and organized in 1858. 

County seat, Pocahontas; named for the Virginia Indian squaw, who in 
history (?) goes by this name. The word is supposed to mean "stream 
between two hills." Rolfe was the first name given this place and was 
in honor of the man who carried Pocahontas to Europe and is supposed 
to have married her there. 

Polk County, State of Iowa. Named for James K. Polk, ex-president of the 
United States. The county was established in 1846 and organized the 
same year. 

County seat, Des Moines; was named from the river. The river name 
comes from the Indian word mikonang, meaning "road." The French 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 29 



spoke the word as if it were spelled moingona, and then shortened it to 
moin and called the river la riviere des Moines. Originally the town was 
called Fort Des Moines. It was platted in 1846 by A. D. Jones and made 
the capital of the state in 1857. At this time the word "Fort" was 
dropped from its title. 

Polk County, State of Nebraska. Named for ex-President James K. Polk. 

County seat, Osceola; named for Osceola, the Seminole Indian chief. The 
name refers to a medicinal drink used by the Seminole Indians. 

Portage County, State of Wisconsin. This comes from a French word applied 
to a "carrying place." Kefers to the passage between the Fox and Wis- 
consin Rivers. 

County seat, Stevens Point; named for the Rev. J. D. Stevens, a mission- 
ary among the Indians of Wisconsin. 

Pottawatomie County, State of Iowa. Named for an Indian tribe. It means 
"makers of fire." "They had no partners in their council fires." The 
county was created in 1847 and organized in 1848. 

County seat, Council Bluffs. For the history of Council Bluffs see that 
name in the alphabetical list of places in this book. 

Potter County, State of South Dakota. Named for Dr. A. J. Potter, a popular 
physician of the state. 
County seat, Gettysburg; named from the battlefield in Pennsylvania. 

Poweshiek County, State of Iowa. Named for Poweshiek an Indian chief. The 
word means "roused bear." The county was created in 1843 and organ- 
ized in 1848. County seat, Montezuma; named for the Emperor of Mexico, 

or for his Mexican palace ' ' the halls of Montezuma. ' ' The site for the 

county seat was selected by the county commissioners, who were appointed 
for that duty and it was platted and named in 1848. 

Bacine County, State of Wisconsin. From the French word meaning "root." 
County seat, Racine; named from the county. The river on which Racine 
is located is called Root River. 

Redwood County, State of Minnesota. The Indian name (Dakota — Sioux) for 
"the cornel," (a species of cornus) a bush plentiful on Redwood River. 
County seat, Redwood Falls; named from the county name added to the 
word "falls." 

Bock County, State of Nebraska. Named on account of its rocky soil. 

County seat, Bassett; was named for J. W. Bassett, a ranchman, who in 
1871, took the first "bunch" of cattle into the county, to test the quality 
and fitness of the native grasses for cattle food, and who thu3 became 
the "father" of one of the most important industries of the state. 

Bock County, State of Wisconsin. Named on account of its rocky soil. 

County seat, Janesville; was named for Henry F. Janes, who settled here 
in 1836. 

Sac County, State of Iowa. Named for the Sac Indian tribe. The word refers 
to "yellow earth." The proper word is Ozaukee. The county was created 
in 1851 and organized in 1856. 
County seat, Sac City. The county seat was named from the county. 

Sauk County, State of Wisconsin. This came from the name of an Indian 
tribe — the Sauk (or Sac), meaning "people at mouth of river." 



30 History of the Place Names o f The North Western Line 

County aeat, Baraboo; the city was named for Jean Baribault, a French 

settler. Some have supposed that the city was named for Captain Bara- 

beary of Morgan's Expedition against the Indians, but that supposition 

must be wrong for Baribault lived here before Morgan's expedition an.l 

the location then was called " Baribault 's." 
Saunders County, State of Nebraska. Named for Gov. Alvin Saunders. 

County seat, Wahoo; named from an Indian word said to mean a species of 

the elm tree. The name was first used in Georgia as the name of a village 

there, and is doubtless a Choctow Indian word. 
Seward County, State of Nebraska. Named for W. H. Seward of New York. 

County seat, Seward; named from the county. 
Shawano County, State of Wisconsin. From the Ojibway Indian word sh-aw-a- 

nong, meaning ' ' of the south. ' ' 

County seat, Shawano, and was named from the county. 
Sheboygan County, State of Wisconsin. From the Ojibway Indian word jibai- 

gan, meaning "a perforated thing" (like a pipestem). 

County seat, Sheboygan; named from the county. (See Sheboygan in 

the alphabetical list of place names). 
Shelby County, State of Iowa. Named for Gen. Isaac Shelby of the Revolu- 

tionary War. The county was created in 1850 and organized in 1853. 

County seat, Harlan; was named for United States Senator James Harlan of 

Iowa, and was made the county seat in 1859. 
Sheridan County, State of Nebraska. Named for Gen. Philip H. Sheridan. 

County seat, Kushville; so named because of the great growth of rushes 
there. 

Sioux County, State of Iowa. Named for the Dakota or Sioux Indians. 
County seat, Orange City. (See Orange City, page 110.) 

Sioux County, State of Nebraska. Named for the Sioux Indians. 

County seat, Harrison; it was named for ex-President Benjamin Harrison. 

Spink County, State of South Dakota. Named for S. L. Spink, a congressman. 

County seat, Redfield; this county seat was named to honor Joseph B. 

Redfield, then and now one of the oldest officers of the Chicago and North 

Western Railway Company. 
Stanley County, State of South Dakota. Was named for Gen. D. S. Stanley 

of the United States Army. 

County seat, Fort Pierre; was named from an old Indian trading post or 

fort, that was owned by the Choteaus of St. Louis, Mo., and it was named 

for Pierre Choteau, Jr. (See Fort Pierre in this book for a fuller descrip- 
tion of that place). 
Stanton County, State of Nebraska. Named for Edwin M. Stanton, the great 

war secretary of the War of the Rebellion. 

County seat, Stanton; named from the county. 
Stark County, State of Illinois. Named for Gen. John Stark of the American 

Revolution. 

County seat, Toulon; named from a postoffice in Tennessee, and that was 

named from the French city. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 31 



Steel County, State of Minnesota. Named for Franklin Steel of Minneapolis, 
a "town-site boomer." 

County seat, Owatonna; this is from an Indian word meaning "straight 
river." (See Owatonna in alphabetical list in this book). 

Stephenson County, State of Illinois. Named for Col. Benjamin Stephenson of 
the War of 1812. 

County seat, Freeport: This name was first applied by his wife to the 
home of William Baker, an early settler, because of his unbounded and 
continuous hospitality. The name clung to the settlement and became the 
name of the city. 

Story County, State of Iowa. Named for Joseph Story, the great judge of the 
United States Supreme Court. The county was created in 1846 and organ- 
ized in 1853. 

County seat, Nevada; named by the county commissioners, for the state 
of Nevada. It was platted in 1853. 

Tama County, State of Iowa. The name is an elision of the Indian word 
Tai-mah-a and means "lovely," "beautiful," "pleasant." It is supposed 
that Tai-mah-a was the wife of a Fox Indian chief. Another version is 
that Tai-mah-a was the name of the chief and not of his wife, and that 
the word meant "bear whose voice makes the rocks tremble." The county 
was created in 1843 and organized in 1852. 

County seat, Toledo. The site was selected as county seat by Commission- 
ers J. M. Ferguson and B. B. Ogden. They named the site from Toledo, 
Ohio, and that was named from the city in Spain. (See Tama in alpha- 
betical list of places) _ 

Thayer County, State of Nebraska. Named for Gov. John M. Thayer of 
Nebraska. 
County seat, Hebron; named from the ancient place in Palestine, Asia. 

Trempeleau County, State of Wisconsin. Named from an island in the Mis- 
sissippi River. Its name came from the French La montagne que trempe a 
I 'eau, meaning ' ' mountain that stands in the water. ' ' 

County seat, Whitehall; this name was given it by B. F. Wing the original 
owner of the town site, from Whitehall, 111., and that was named from 
Whitehall, N. Y. 

Turner County, State of South Dakota. Named for J. W. Turner, a Dakota 
legislator. 
County seat, Parker; named for the wife of a railroad civil engineer. 

Union County, State of South Dakota. Named for the expression of the senti- 
ment that should actuate all the people of the United States. 
County seat, Elk Point. Was so named on account of the presence there 
of elk when the place was first settled. It was also the Indian name for 
the point of timber that stood at the bend of the river where the village 
now is. It was in common use in 1842, as Audubon in the account of his 
travels says: "We camped at Elk Point." 

Vilas County, State of Wisconsin. Named for United States Senator from 
Wisconsin and Postmaster General William F. Vilas. 

County seat, Eagle River; named from the river, and the river was named 
for the translation of the Indian word mi-gis-i-wis-i-ii, meaning "eagle." 



32 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Wabasha County, State of Minnesota. Named for the Dakota-Sioux Indian 
chief Wapashaw, which means "red leaf," or "red cap" or "red flag." 
County seat, Wabasha; named from the county. 
Walworth County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Chancellor E. H. Walworth 
of New York. 

County seat, Elkhorn; was named from the Elkhorn prairie and this was 
named by Samuel F. Phoenix in 1836 on finding an elk's horn upon a 
tree there. 
Weseca County, State of Minnesota. Named from the Sioux Indian word 
Wash-echa, meaning "land of plenty," "good hunting ground," "red 
earth" and "red paint." 

County seat, Waseca; named from the county. 
Washington County, State of Nebraska. Named for Gen. George Washington. 
County seat, Blair; which was named for John I. Blair of Blairstown, N. J. 
Washington County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Gen. George Washington. 
County seat, West Bend; named from the bend in the Milwaukee River 
at this point. 
Watonwan County, State of Minnesota. A Dakota (Sioux) Indian word mean- 
ing "fish bait" or "where there are plenty fish." 
County seat, St. James; named for James Purington, the first settler. 
Waukesha County, State of Wisconsin. From an Algonquin Indian word Wauk- 
tsha, meaning ' ' fox. ' ' 

County seat, Waukesha; was named from the county. 
Waupaca County, State of Wisconsin. Was named from the Menominee Indian 
word meaning ' ' pale water. ' ' 
County seat, Waupaca; named from the county. 
Waushara County, State of Wisconsin. Named from the Indian word meaning 
"good land." County seat, Wautoma. This word was made by adding 
two syllables of Indian words together, viz: Wau from Waugh and Toma 
from Tomah, and the two are supposed to mean ' ' good earth " or " good 
life. ' ' Tomah was the name of an Indian chief. 
Webster County, State of Iowa. Named for Daniel Webster of Massachusetts. 
The county was established and organized in 1853. It was once called Ham- 
ilton for Alexander Hamilton, the American statesman. 

County seat, Fort Dodge. This was named for the old United States mili- 
tary post that was here and that was named for United States Senator 
Dodge of Wisconsin. The town was laid out by Maj. W. Williams in 1854 
and was named by him. 
Whiteside County, State of Illinois. Was named for Capt. Samuel Whiteside 
of the War of 1812 and the Blackhawk War. 

County seat, Morrison; was named for Charles Morrison of New York City. 
Winnebago County, State of Illinois. Named for the Winnebago tribe of 
Indians. It means "the stinking people" or "the people of the stinking 
waters." 

County seat, Rockford. It was named because of its location at the rocky 
ford of the Rock River. 
Winnebago County, State of Iowa. Named for the tribe of Indians. It means 
"the people of the stinking waters" or "the stinking people." The 
county was established in 1851 but was not organized until 1857. 
County seat, Forest City; was named because of the forest that covered ita 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 33 

site when located. The town was laid out by Judge Robert Clark in 1856 
and was made the county seat in 1858. 

Winnebago County, State of Wisconsin. Named for the Winnebago tribe of 
Indians. It means "the people of the stinking waters." 
County seat, Oshkosh; named for Oshkosh, an Indian chief. His name waa 
said to mean "nail" or "claw." 

Winona County, State of Minnesota. A Sioux Indian word meaning "first born 
daughter." County seat, Winona; named from the county. 

Wood County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Joseph Wood, a member of the 
Wisconsin legislature. 
County seat, Grand Rapids; named from the rapids in the Wisconsin River. 

Woodbury County, State of Iowa. Named for Levi Woodbury of New Hamp- 
shire. The county was created under the name of Wan-kan in 1851. It waa 
changed to Woodbury in 1853. 

County seat, Sioux City; named for the Dakota or Sioux Indians. The 
French in 1785, called the tribe "LaSues," while Capt. George Crogan at 
the same time called them "La Suil. " (For origin of this name see Sioux 
City and Sioux Rapids in another place in this book.) The town was 
platted in 1854 and made the county seat in 1855. 

Worth County, State of Iowa. Named for Gen. W. J. Worth of Mexican war 
fame. The county was created in 1851 and organized in 1851. 
County seat, Northwood; G. O. Mellem, the first white man that settled in 
this county, built his house on the present site of Northwood. When the 
town was started on his claim, the original town was called Gulbrand. South 
of the town was a grove of timber which the people called "The South 
Woods." North of the town was another grove of timber called by the 
people "The North Woods." The first postmaster that was appointed lived 
near the North Grove and therefore the post office was called Northwood. 
This postmaster kept the post office in the house where he lived, but the 
second postmaster lived in the original town of Gulbrand, and the post 
office was moved to that place. The name of the post office was never 
changed but the town has been called Northwood since that time. 

Wright County, State of Iowa. Named for Hon. Joseph A. Wright, governor 
of Indiana, and Silas Wright a statesman of New York. The county waa 
established in 1851. 

County seat, Clarion; its first name was Grant, but in 1870, it was, by 
vote of the board of county commissioners changed for the present name. 
The reason for the change is now forgotten and lost. The original town 
was platted in 1856. 

Yankton County, State of South Dakota. A corruption of the Sioux Indian 
name Ihanktonwan, meaning ' ' the end village. ' ' 
County seat, Yankton; named from the county. 

Yellow Medicine County, State of Minnesota. A translation of the Sioux Indian 
name for the river. It referred to the menispernum canadenses ("moon 
seed") plant that abounds on the river banks. The plant was used as a 
medicine by the Indians. 

County seat, Granite Falls; named because of the presence of great masses 
of granite rock there. 

York County, State of Nebraska. Named for the family of an early settler in 
the county. County seat, York; named from the county. 



AS TO THE 

CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY. 

THE TOWNS ; 

THEIR NAMES AND THE ORIGIN THEREOF. 

Aberdeen, Brown County, South Dakota, was named from the city of Aberdeen, 
Scotland, by Alexander Mitchell of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Abie, Butler County, Nebraska, was platted by the *Pioneer Townsite company 
in 1887 and named for Mrs. Abbie Stevens, a pioneer merchant near that 
place. For a now unknown reason one of the "b's" in the name was 
dropped and the present spelling was adopted. 

Ablemans, Sauk County, Wisconsin, was named for Col. S. V. R. Ableman who 
settled here in 1851. At an early day the place was called Ableman 's Mills 
from a flour mill there owned by Col. Ableman; then the name was changed 
to Eock Springs from springs running out from rocks in the river bank, 
but finally the present name was definitely fixed to the place. 

Afton, Rock County, Wisconsin, was named in 1857-1858 by Robert Harris, the 
then Superintendent of the Beloit and Madison railroad, from the name 
in Robert Burns' song "Flow gently sweet Afton among thy green braes." 
The name of the place until changed by Mr. Harris was Middleton. 

Ainsworth, Brown County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
company in 1883, and named for J. E. Ainsworth, the Chief Engineer for 
twenty years of the Sioux City and Pacific and the Fremont, Elkhorn and 
Missouri Valley Railroads. 

Ajax, Pennington County, South Dakota, was named for a Greek hero in Ho- 
mer's Illiad. 

Akron, Peoria County, Illinois, was named from Akron, Ohio, whence many of 
the nearby settlers had emigrated. The Greek word, Akron, from which 
the Ohio city was named, means "summit" or "peak." 

Albion, Boone County, Nebraska. This town was named from Albion, Mich. 
That place was named from a place in Maine, and that from an ancient 
name for England. 

* NOTE— The Pioneer Town Site Co., the Western Town Lot Co., and the 
Wisconsin Town Lot Co., that are named in connection with the platting or 
establishing of the certain towns that are mentioned in this history were com- 
panies that were incorporated in the interest of the Chicago and North Western 
Railway company for the purpose of securing the land needed for town sites, 
and the subdividing and platting it and placing the town lots on the market at 
reasonable rates, so that the settlers should not be at the mercy of the town lot 
speculators and be obliged to pay extortionate prices as usually is the case 
where he is allowed to control. All of the proceeds secured from the sale of the 
lots belonged to and reached the treasury of the railroad company. 



36 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Alcester, Union County, South Dakota, was named for Col. Alcester of the Brit- 
ish Army, who about the time this station was established, had made 
a very heroic fight in a battle in Egypt. It was platted by the Western 
Town Lot company in 1883. 

Alden, McHenry County, Illinois, was named by Frank Wedgewood, an early 
settler, for John Alden of early Plymouth Colony (Massachusetts) history. 

Alden, Hardin County, Iowa, was named for John Alden who was a governor 
and magistrate for more than fifty years of the Plymouth Colony, the site 
of the earliest Pilgrim settlements in what now is Massachusetts. He died 
in 1687, aged 89 years. He was noted for having proposed the marriage of 
Miles Standish to a pilgrim lady who replied, "Prithee John, why do you 
not speak for yourself." Thereupon he did speak for himself and married 
the lady. Longfellow made it the subject of a poem. 

Alder, Ashland County, Wisconsin, was so named because of the growth of 
"black (hoary) alder" (Alnus incana) that abounds in this locality. 

Alecto, Delta County, Michigan. The name came from heathen mythology and 
was adopted for the name of the town as it was an easy word to speak and 
to use in telegraphing. 

Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa, was named by the wife of Judge A. C. Call. 
The original name was Call's Grove, for Judge Call, who located here in 
1854. The town was platted in 1856 by Judge Call and J. W. Moore. The 
name Algona is Algonquin Indian and meant "Algonquin waters," or the 
waters (lakes, streams, etc., etc.) that belong to the Algonquin Indians. 
Algoma has the same meaning. 

Algonquin, McHenry County, Illinois, was named by John B. Turner for the 
Indian family of that name. , There is a tradition that Samuel Edwards, 
an early settler, suggested the name to Mr. Turner and claimed that it wa3 
the name of a ship in which he had sailed. 

Allenville. Winnebago County, Wisconsin, was named by and for Timothy Allen, 
who owned the land on which the railroad depot was established. 

Allis, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named for E. P. Allis, the founder 
of the corporation that started the town; he was for many years the head 
of a large manufacturing concern in Milwaukee. 

Almond, Portage County, Wisconsin, was named by Elison Doolittle in 1850, 
from a town in New York State. 

Almont, Clinton County Iowa, was named by Isaac B. Howe, once Chief En- 
gineer of the Iowa Midland Kailroad, for Gen. Almonte of Mexico. The 
final "e" was dropped for euphony. 

Almora, Kane County, Illinois, was named from a European city. 

Altamont, Deuel County, South Dakota, was named by the surveyor who laid 
out the town site, because of the hilly country surrounding it. It waa 
platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 

Alton, Sioux County, Iowa. Originally East Orange; but in 1882 the citizens 
changed the name to Alton, after the city of that name in Illinois and Alton 
in New Hampshire, both these getting the name from Alton, a town in Eng- 
land. The "Orange" names were given for William the Silent, Count of 
Nassau and Prince of Orange, to honor the many Hollanders who are settled 
in this county. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 37 



Amasa, Iron County, Michigan. The name waa suggested by Pickands, Mather 

& Co., of Cleveland, Ohio, in honor of Amasa Stone of that city. 
Amber, Jones County, Iowa. The original name was "Blue Cut," but this was 
changed to Amber in 1878 by J. C. Bamsuy, for a prominent character hn 
found in a novel published in the New York Tribune about the time that 
the town was named. 
Ames, Story County, Iowa, was named for Oakes Ames of Massachusetts, by 
John I. Blair, on account of his aid in the building of railroads in the 
West; the town was laid out in 1865. 
Amiret, Lyon County, Minnesota, was named for the wife of M. L. Sykes, who 
for more than a generation was Vice President of the Chicago and North 
Western Bailway company. The town site was taken under contract by 
the WiDona and St. Peter Bailroad company in 1875. The original name 
of the town was Saratoga, from the city of that name in New York State. 
Anamosa, Jones County, Iowa, is a corruption of a Sauk Indian name that is 
generally applied to females. It also refers to a litter of puppies or foxes 
with eyes not yet open. A modern legend claimed that the word meant 
"White Fawn" and was the name of an Indian girl who lived at this 
place in 1842; and that her father was named Nas-i-mus, but no evidence 
has been obtained to confirm the story. E. M. Haines in his "American 
Indians" says the word means "You walk with me." The town was laid 
out in 1841 and was called Lexington. It was made the county seat in 1847. 
Anderson, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for John Anderson, who 

was located nearby, and was a dealer in firewood. 
Anderson, Steele County, Minnesota, was named for William Anderson, a nearby 

land owner and farmer. 
Anderson's Mills, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named for the owner of a mill 

that was here when the station was established. 
Andover, Clinton County, Iowa, was named by C. C. Wheeler, an officer of the 
Chicago and North Western Bailway company, from a town in Vermont; 
that was named from a town in England. 
Andrews, Sioux County, Nebraska. This town was named for J. W. Andrews, 

the engineer who located the railroad through this part of the county. 
Aniwa, Shawano County, Wisconsin. The name is a corruption of the Chippewa 

Indian word an-i-wi, meaning "those," a prefix signifying reciprocity. 
Ankeney, Polk County, Iowa, was named by and for J. F. Ankeney, the original 

owner of the town site. 
Anoka, Boyd County, Nebraska, was named from a place in Minnesota, and is 
an Indian word meaning "on both sides;" the town in Minnesota being 
on both sides of Bum Biver. The Nebraska town was laid out by the 
Pioneer Town Site company in 1902. 
Anston, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named for a family of the vicinity. 
Antigo, Langlade County, Wisconsin. The name is taken from the Indian word 
nee-quee-antigo-sebi. Antigo here meaning ' ' evergreen, " or " water run- 
ning under evergreens," or "where evergreens can always be found." 

Antoine, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named from the adjacent lake, which 
was named for Antoine Le Beau an early French-Indian hunter and trapper 
who lived on the lake shore. 



6 



A. f* Q \J 



38 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Appleby, Codington County, South Dakota. Named for the inventor of the 
Appleby twine binder in recognition of the value his machine had been and 
would be to the farmers of Dakota. This town was platted by the Wes- 
tern Town Lot company in 1884. 

Appleton, Outagamie County, Wisconsin. The station was named from the city 
of Appleton which was named for Samuel Appleton of Boston, who was in- 
strumental in endowing the Lawrence University that is located in Ap- 
pleton. 

Appleton Junction, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named from the city of 
Appleton because of its nearness to that place. 

Appleton Mine, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named from a nearby iron 
mine and that was named for a prominent Boston, Mass., family. 

Arabia, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named by Henry V. Ferguson, of Cedar 
Eapids, Iowa, from Arabia in Asia, as he fancied the soil around this 
place resembled the "desert sands of Arabia." This assumption proved 
to be wrong as the soil was found to be very rich and productive. 

Arapahoe, Fremont County, Wyoming. The station site was located by the 
railroad company and was named from a nearby Arapahoe Indian res- 
ervation. The name is that of a noted Indian tribe and signifies ' ' traders. ' ' 
The Arapahoes are a remarkable tribe of Indians. They call themselves 
Henaunauanauau, the chosen people. They worship God under the name 
Eejauneaauthau, ' ' the Stranger on High. ' ' Their religion, past his- 
tory, and traditions have been preserved, handed down orally, by a secret 
order of elders among them called Jenajehenane, who are initiated with 
fasting and prayer. Their tradition of the Creator and the Deluge is 
something similar to the Bible story. They believe in the resurrection of 
the body at the last day and life everlasting in "Our Home." Many of 
their sacrificial ceremonies and sacred rites resemble those of the Is- 
raelites. 

Arbor, Lancaster County, Nebraska, was named from "Arbor Lodge," the 
home in Nebraska City of Sterling Morton, once Secretary of Agriculture, 
and a prominent citizen of Nebraska. 

Arcadia, Carroll County, Iowa, was named from the province in ancient Greece, 
by I. N. Voris, who was interested in the town site and for a time lived 
thereon. 

Arco, Lincoln County, Minnesota. The proper name of this town is Areola, 
and was named from the ancient city in Italy. It was platted by the 
Western Town Lot company in 1900. The railroad station is known as 
Arco. 

Aredale, Butler County, Iowa. This is merely a fanciful name made for its 
use here. It has no historical significance. 

Argyle. Winnebago County, Illinois, named by John Andrew, Sen., an early 
settler from Argyleshire, Scotland. The village at one time was called 
"Kintyre" from the place in Scotland. 

Arion, Crawford County, Iowa. Was named from the celebrated poet and 
cithra player of Lesbos of ancient Greek history. This is supposed to be 
one of the myth names for the Grecian god Apollo. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 39 

Arlington, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. Named from Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. The original name of this station was "Nordland" which it waa 
given in honor of the many Scandinavians who had settled in these parts 
before the station was established. The citizens who came later induced 
the railway company to change the name. The town was platted 
by the Western Town Lot company in 1880. 

Arlington, Washington County, Nebraska. This place was originally called 
"Bell Creek" from a nearby stream. This stream was named for the 
family of an early settler on its banks. Finally L. B. Sheppard and other 
citziens of the place thought the name was not euphonious enough and in- 
duced the change to the present form. Its present name came from the 
place on the Potomac Eiver in Virginia. 

Arlington Heights, Cook County, Illinois. This station had been called Brad- 
ley, Elk Grove and Dunton at various periods of its existence. In 1872 
the citizens of the village induced the railway company to change the name 
of the station, and then the name of the village was made to conform to 
that of the station. 

Armstrong, Iron County, Michigan, was named for a prominent explorer and 
woodsman of this county, and who was a contractor in building the rail- 
road that runs through the place. 

Arpin, Wood County, Wisconsin, is an elisiou of the proper name Arpino, a 
place in Italy. The place was named for John Arpin, a lumberman. 

Arthur, Ida County, Iowa. Named by the citizens for Gen. Arthur, ex-president 
of the United States. It was platted by the Western Town Lot company 
in 1885. 

Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin. The Indian name for the place was 
Zham-a-wa-mik, "the long stretched beaver." It was platted by the Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore and Western Kailroad in 1S85, and named by Martin 
Beavor, one of the original owners, from the home of Henry Clay in Ken- 
tucky. Before this name was adopted it was called Whittlesey, for Adolph 
Whittlesey, its first postmaster, and then Bay City and St. Mark. This last 
name came from the campanile of St. Mark in Venice. 

Ashton, Lee County, Illinois. The name of this station originally was Ogle, but 
owing to confusion arising from its being taken for Ogle County, the citi- 
zens of the village caused the name to be changed to Ashton. 

Astoria, Deuel County, South Dakota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
company in 1900. Was named from the place in Oregon, and that was 
named by and for John Jacob Astor of New York City, who established a 
trading post there in an early day. 

Athol, Spink County, South Dakota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
company in 1881, and was named from Athol in Massachusetts; that was 
named for James Murray, Second Duke of Athol of Scotland. 

Atkinson. Iron County, Michigan. This place was named for H. W. Atkinson, 
who owned a mill at this point before the railroad station was estab- 
lished. It was at one time called Stackville for John Stack of Escanaba, 
Mich. 

Atkinson, Holt County, Nebraska. This town was platted in 1879. It was named 
for Col. John Atkinson of Detroit, Mich., who had large landed interests 
hereabouts. 



40 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Atwood, Keokuk County, Iowa. Named for Daniel Atwood, an officer of the 
first railroad that reached this location. 

Auburn, Sac County, Iowa, was named from Auburn, Cayuga County New 
York. It was platted by the Western Town Lot company in 1888. 

Audubon, Audubon County, Iowa. Was named for J. J. Audubon, the orni- 
thologist and traveler. 

Aurora, Brookings County, South Dakota. Was platted by the Western Town 
Lot company in 1880, and was named by Mrs. W. E. Stowe of Brookings, 
S. D., from Aurora, 111., her old home, which was named from Aurora, 
N. Y., which was named from the Latin word meaning "morning," 
"dawn," "east." 

Aurora. Kane County, Illinois, was founded by Joseph G. Stolp in 1837, and 

was named by James McCarty, one of the original owners of the town site, 

from Aurora, Cayuga County, N. Y. 
Austin, Cook County, Illinois, was named by and for Henry W. Austin, who 

was a large land owner hereabouts and who was prominent in the growth 

and nurture of the place. 
Austin Avenue, Cook County, Illinois, was named from its location on a street 

of that name, which is the dividing line between the city of Chicago and 

the village of Oak Park. 

Avenue, Cook County, Illinois. Named from the street Oak Park avenue in 
Oak Park. Its present name was adopted by the railroad company because 
of its shortness. La Vallette for a time was applied as the name of this 
station, and was so named from a place in New Jersey, which wa9 named 
for an old New Jersey family. 

Avondale, Cook County, Illinois. Named by Brian Philpot who platted the 
town site. He made the name by taking "Avon" from the river in Eng- 
land upon which Shakespear's home was situated and to it added the 
word " dale." 

Bagley, Menominee County, Michigan. Named by S. G. Baldwin, the then 
superintendent of the railroad, for ex-Gox. J. J. Bagley, of Michigan. 

Bain Junction, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a 
point that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no his- 
torical significance. The name "Bain" was taken from the name of the 
Bain Wagon Company of Kenosha. 

Baldwin, Jackson County, Iowa. The original name was "Fremont," named 
for "The Pathfinder," but was by the citizens changed to Baldwin, for 
Edward Baldwin, the original owner of the land on which the town was 
established. 

Balaton, Lyon County, Minnesota, named from a lake in Hungary, Europe. 
Platted by the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company in 1879. 

Ballous, Menominee County, Michigan. This place was named for M. H. 
Ballous, who had charge of a mill for making barrel stock located here 
when the station was founded. 

Balsam, Iron County, Michigan. This place was named from the Balsam Fir 
(Abies balsamea) trees that abounded here when the railroad was built 
through this locality. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 41 



Bay Siding, Delta County, Michigan. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical sig- 
nificance. 

Bancroft, Kossuth County, Iowa, was named by Judge A. C. Call, of Algona, 
agent of the American Emigrant Association, for George Bancroft, the 
historian. This town was platted by the Western Town Lot Company, in 
1881. 

Bancroft, Portage County, Wisconsin, was named for George Bancroft, the 
American historian. 

Bangor, LaCrosse County, Wisconsin. Named by the early settlers at the 
suggestion of John Wheldon, from Bangor in Wales, many of the early 
settlers here having come from Wales. 

Baraboo, Sauk County, Wisconsin. Named for Jean Baribault, an early 
French trapper and settler. The river of this name was by J. A. Lapham, 
a local historian, asserted to have been named for a Capt. Barabeary, who 
was alleged to have been an officer in Morgan's expedition against the 
Indians, but there does not seem to be any real evidence to sustain his 
story, and it is very certain the river was named after Jean Baribault, 
who lived on this stream before Morgan's expedition was even thought of. 

Barclay, Ontonagon County, Michigan, was named for John Barclay, an old 
settler. 

Bark River, Delta County, Michigan. Named from the river on which it is 
situated. That was named by the engineers who located the railroad along 
its course from the fact that when they first saw it, it was full of float- 
ing bark. At one time the place was called "Barkville. " 

Barneveld, Iowa County, Wisconsin. Named for John of Barneveld, one of the 
heroes of the wars between the Netherlands and Spain, and whose lifo 
and times are made the basis of a history by Motley, the American his- 
torian. His proper name was Oldenbarneveld, but it has passed into 
history in the shortened form. As advocate, president, attorney general 
and minister of foreign affairs, for forty years, it might be said he was the 
whole republic and the real founder of the commonwealth. While William 
of Orange was the founder of its independence Barneveld made it perma- 
nent and respected. 

Baxrington, Cook County, Illinois. Named from the township in which it is 
located; that was named by an early settler from Great Barrington, Mass. 

Bartel, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. Was named for John Bartel, a nearby 
farmer and early settler here. 

Barton, Washington County, Wisconsin. Named by and for Barton Salisbury, 
the original owner of the town site. At one time (1847) the place was 
called Salisbury's Mills; and at another time (1848) Newark, but in 
1853 its present name became fixed and has so since remained. 

Bassett, Rock County, Nebraska, was named for J. W. Bassett, a ranchman, 
who in 1871 took into the country the first "bunch" of cattle to test the 
quality and fitness of the native grasses for cattle food, and who thus 
became the founder of one of the most important industries of the state. 

Bassetts, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. Named by and for R. L. Bassett, tha 
original owner of the town site. He died here in 1907. 



42 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Basswood, Iron County, Michigan. The name of this station was suggested by 
the "Basswood" (Tilia Americana) or "Linden" that grew around the 
place. At one time the place was called "Hemlock" from the tree of 
that name. 

Batavia, Kane County, Illinois. Named from the city of that name in New 
York State. The earlier name was "Big Wood" and was given it by 
Christopher Payne, who in 1838, built the first cabin here. The name 
Batavia came from the Batavian republic which was applied to Holland 
by the French after its conquest in 1795. 

Battle Creek, Ida County, Iowa. Named from an adjacent stream, which 
derived its name from the fact that a battle had been fought by Indians 
on its banks near this station site. 

Battle Creek, Madison County, Nebraska, was named from a nearby stream 
on which a battle was fought by Nebraska volunteer militiamen under 
Gen. John M. Thayer with the Pawnee Indians. The town was laid out 
by the Pioneer Town Site Company in 1884. 

Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named because of its location 
on the Bay of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and because of the fine view up the 
lake that is had from this location. 

Beach, Lake County, Illinois, was originally called Benton from the township, 
and that was named for Senator Thomas H. Benton of Missouri. The 
present name was given on account of the location on the shore (beach) 
of Lake Michigan. 

Beaman, Grundy County, Iowa. Named by and for H. H. Beaman, the original 
owner of the town site. It was once called Wa-di-loupe, and this was 
supposed to mean "forks of the Wolf" River, on which it is located. 

Bear Creek, Outagamie County, Wisconsin. Was named from the nearby stream. 
The stream was named by early settlers thereon, who found many bears 
along it. 

Bear Trap, Ashland County, Wisconsin. Was named by an early settler because 
he had caught in a trap a black bear at this point some time before the 
town was located. 

Beaver. Boone County, Iowa. There is doubt as to the origin of this name, 
one story being to the effect that it was named for a citizen of Cedar 
Eapids, Iowa; and the other, that it was named for an adjacent stream 
on which beavers (Castor Canadensis) were found as late as 1856. This 
last is probably the true story of the name. 

Beaver, Delta County, Michigan. Named from the many beavers (Castor 
Canadensis) dams that were found nearby when the station was estab- 
lished. 

Beaver Crossing, Seward County, Nebraska. Was platted by the Pioneer Town 
Cite Company in 1887. The overland trail from Fort Leavenworth, 
joining the Platte River trail near here, crossed Beaver Creek at the ford 
near this place, and the town took its name from that crossing place. 

Bee, Seward County, Nebraska. The political township in which this town 
is located is "B" township. This name was adopted for the town 
by adding two "es" to the "B" so as to make a name that 
would be understood. It was laid out by the Pioneer Town Site Company 
in 1887. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 43 

Beechwood, Iron County, Michigan. The name for this place was suggested 
by many Beech trees (Fagus ferrugonia) that are found in this locality. 

Beemer, Cuming County, Nebraska. Was named by and for Albert Beemer, 
at one time sheriff of Cuming County and afterwards a state official at Lin- 
coln. He laid out and owned the town site. In early days the place was 
called "Bock Creek," because it was located on a creek of that name. 
The creek was so named because its bottom was covered with rocks, which 
was very unusual in streams in this part of the state. 

Belgium, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, was named because the early settlers 
around it had emigrated from Belgium, in Europe. 

Belle Fourche, Butte County, South Dakota. Named from the north fork of 
the Cheyenne River, which was by the early French explorers called 
"Belle Fourche" (beautiful fork). The town was platted by the 
Pioneer Town Site Company in 1890. In 1884 the original village was 
called "DeMores" from the French Marquis DeMores, who had a stock 
ranch near here. 

Belle Plaine, Benton County, Iowa, named from the French, meaning "beauti- 
ful plain," and was indicative of the beautiful and extensive plain that 
surrounded the place when the location of the town was made. 

Belle Plaine, Shawano County, Wisconsin. Was named from the French mean- 
ing "beautiful plain," and was indicative of its surroundings when it 
was so named. 

Bellevue, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named from the French word mean- 
ing "beautiful view," and was believed to be indicative of the locality. 

Beloit, Bock County, Wisconsin. Its names previous to 1837 were "Turtle 
Creek" and "New Albany." In 1837 the citizens gave it its present 
name. The name was coined from the name Detroit by a committee who 
was asked to select a name for the village. 

Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois, was named by Samuel P. Doty, the first 
white settler, who claimed that he named it at the suggestion of Mark 
Beaubien, an early French settler of Chicago, who fancied the country 
around it resembled Belvidere near Weimar in Saxe-Gotha, Germany. There 
is a Belvidere in New Jersey, New York, North Carolina and Vermont re- 
spectively and a Belvedere in Italy and it alleged that all of them were 
named directly or indirectly from the place in Germany. 

Benld. Macoupin County, Illinois. This town was established in 1903 and 
named for Benjamin L. Dorsey, the founder of the Dorsey family of this 
county. The name is made up of the sylable "Ben" from Mr. Dorsey 's 
given name, and the initials "L" and "D", which were also taken from 
Mr. Dorsey 's name. 

Bennington, Douglas County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1887, and named for Bennington in Vermont, which was 
named for Gov. BenniDg Wentworth of New Hampshire. 

Benton, La Fayette County, Wisconsin. Named for United States Senator 
Thomas H. Benton ("Old bullion"), of Missouri. 

Beresford, Union County, South Dakota. Named for Admiral (Lord) Charles 
Beresford of England. It was laid out by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1883. 



44 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Berne, Crawford County, Iowa, was named and platted by the Western Town 
Lot Company in 1899, and named from the city and canton, in Switzerland. 

Berryville, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. Around this place are many large 
fruit farms on which many strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries and 
blackberries are grown. The place was named from this fact. 

Bertram, Linn County, Iowa. Named for Capt. John Bertram of Massachusetts, 
who assisted in building the first railroad that ran through Linn County, 
Iowa. 

Bessemer, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named by Mr. F. W. Ehinelander,* 
from the nearby mine. That was named for Henry Bessemer, the English 
inventor of the process for the reduction of iron that bears his name. The 
town was platted by the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Eailroad 
Company in 1884. The first iron ore that was discovered in the Gogebic 
range was found at this place and in what is now known as the "Colby 
Mine. ' ' 

Beverly, Linn County, Iowa, was named from Beverly, Mass., which was 
derived from Beverly in Yorkshire, England. 

Big Muddy, Converse County, Wyoming, was named from a nearby stream. 
TJiat was translated from the name given it by the early French traders — 
Grande riviere vaseuse — "Great Muddy Eiver. " 

Big Suamico, Brown County, Wisconsin. Named from the French Indian name 
given to the Big Suamico Eiver. The words meant "big sand," "yellow 
beaver, " or " yellow residence place. ' ' The Indian word was o-sa-wa- 
mich-lcong. 

Birch, Ashland County, Wisconsin, was so named because the vicinity was 
covered with white birch (Betula pupuliopolia) trees. 

Birch Creek, Menominee County, Michigan. Named from the river on which 
it is located. That was named from the fact that the river was densely 
shaded by black birch (Betula lenta) trees. 

Birnamwood, Shawno County, Wisconsin, was named from Birnamwood, men- 
tioned by Shakespeare in his play "Macbeth." 

Black Hawk, Meade County, South Dakota, was named from a nearby stream, 
and that was named for the Sac and Fox Indian chief, Ma-Tca-tai-me-shep , 
Jcia-kialc, or ' ' Black Hawk, ' ' who died on the Des Moines Eiver in 
Iowa, October 1, 1838, about six years after his final defeat in the cele- 
brated "Black Hawk war." The town was platted in 1887. 

Black Tail, Lawrence County, South Dakota. The place was named because 
of the many black tailed deer (Arvus Leivisii) found in the gulch in an 
early clay. The station was once named Gayville for Mr. William (Bill) 
Gay, a noted character in the early days of the Black Hills. 

Blair, Washington County, Nebraska, was named for John I. Blair, of Blairs- 
town, N. J., who was largely instrumental in building the first railroad 
that passed through this place. 



*Note. — For many years Mr. Ehinelander was the president of the then 
Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Eailroad Company, and as such 
named many of the stations that were established while the road was 
under construction. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 45 

Blairstown, Benton County, Iowa. Named for .John I. Blair, of Blairstown, 
N. J., who was president of the Blair Town Lot and Land Company that 
platted the town site. 

Eleiners, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for Gustave Blemers, a road- 
master of the first railroad that reached this place. 

Blencoe, Monona County, Iowa, was named from a place in Canada, whence 
a former settler near this place had emigrated. 

Elodgett, Cook County, Illinois, was named for Judge Henry W. Blodgett, a 
noted judge of the United States courts, and once the general counsel of 
the Chicago and Milwaukee Railroad. 

Blue Earth City, Fairbault County, Minnesota. The town was laid out by 
H. P. Carstans and J. B. Wakefield, and was named from the Blue Earth 
River; the river was so named because of the bluish hue of the earth on 
its banks due to the presence of copper. 

Blue Mounds, Dane County, Wisconsin. Named by the early French mission- 
aries from three nearby high mounds and on account of the bluish appear 
ance of these mounds when seen from a distance. 

Bluff Siding, Buffalo County, Wisconsin, was named from the precipitous rocky 
"bluffs" at this point. 

Blunt, Hughes County, South Dakota, was named for John E. Blunt, who was 
chief engineer of the Chicago and North Western Railway when the 
station was established. Mr. Blunt was also an officer of the Galena and 
Chicago Union Railroad at a very early day. 

Bolton, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was named from Bolton in Massachusetts, 
which was named for Charles Powlet, third duke of Bolton, of England. 

Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota, was named for H. E. Bonesteel of 
the forwarding firm of Bonesteel and Turner, who freighted merchandise 
through this part of the country before any railroad had reached it. 

Boone, Boone County, Iowa. When the county was organized, Boonesboro, a 
mile or so north of the present city of Boone was named from the county 
and was made the county seat. When the railroad was built east and 
west through the county, a site on the railroad was platted and was 
called Montana, a Latin word meaning "Mountainous regions" because 
of the rolling character of the land around the site. Ultimately Boones- 
boro became a part of the city and the name Montana was dropped and the 
municipality became Boone, which was named from the county. 

Bordeaux, Dawes County, Nebraska, was named from the stream on which it 
is located. That was named for Pierre Bordeaux, a French trapper and 
trader on this stream, who took the name of and emigrated from Bor- 
deaux, in France. 

Botna, Shelby County, Iowa. Its early name was Rochdale. Its present name 
is an abbreviation of Nishnabotna, the Indian name of the stream that 
flows through the place. It meant a "canoe making river." It was 
platted as Rochdale by the Western Town Lot Company in 1884, and was 
named from a place in England. 

Bowen, Washington County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1886 and named for John S. Bowen, an early settler of Blair, 
Neb. 



46 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Boyer, Crawford County, Iowa, was laid out by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany, in 1889. The place was named from the stream that flows past 
the town. The stream was named for the Boyer family of Berks County, 
Pennsylvania, one of that family having been a hunter and trapper 
amongst the Indians in this part of Iowa. The stream is mentioned by 
Lewis and Clark and also by Maximilian, Prince of Weid, who explored 
this part of the country in an early day. 

Bradgate, Humboldt County, Iowa, was originally named "Willow Glen," 
this name was changed by the early settlers to Bradgate. It was platted 
by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. The name Bradgate was 
coined for its use here. 

Bradish, Boone County, Nebraska, was laid out by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1888, and it was named for George Bradish, an engineer in charge 
of track laying on the railroad that runs through the place. 

Brainard, Butler County, Nebraska, was named by the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company for David Brainard, a celebrated missionary to the Indians. 

Bramhall, Hyde County, South Dakota, was named by W. N. Brayton, the 
original owner of the town site. The name was made for the place. 

Brampton, Delta County, Michigan. This station was named from a city in 
England. Its first name was Day's Biver, and was named for a nearby 
river that was named for John Day, an explorer, trapper and hunter. 

Branch, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named from the nearby river. At 

one time the village was called Zalesburg for the family name of an early 

settler from Germany. 
Blackwell Junction, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named for the owner, John 

Blackwell, of a nearby sawmill, and from the fact that it is the junction 

of a mill road from said sawmill to the railroad. 
Bowler, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named for Col. J. C. Bowler, who 

owned property in this vicinity. 
Bonduel, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby long estab- 
lished postoffice. That was named for the first postmaster of the place. 
Box Elder, Pennington County, South Dakota, was named from the nearby 

stream. That was so named because along its banks the "Box Elder" 

(Acer negundo) grows in great abundance. 
Breed, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named by and for George M. Breed, 

who was the first postmaster of the village. 
Breda, Carroll County, Iowa, was named from Breda, in Holland, Europe, by 

P. E. Hall for Mrs. J. La Due, an early settler here, who had emigrated 

from Breda. 
Erennan, Pennington County, South Dakota, was named for John R. Brennan, 

an early settler and notable man in this part of South Dakota. He settled 

there before Indian titles to the lands were adjusted and suffered from 

Indian depredations. He finally became United States Indian agent for 

the same Indians who had sought his scalp. 
Bricelyn, Faribault County, Minnesota, was named by and for John Brice, 

who owned and platted the town site. 
Brillion, Calumet County, Wisconsin, is the misspelled name of Brilion, a town 

in Prussia, from which it was named. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 47 



Bristol, Kenosha County, Wisconsin, was named by Alfred Giddings from the 
township. That was named in 1836 for two brothers, George and Lester 
Bristol, early settlers. 

Bristow, Boyd County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1902, and was named for Secretary of the Treasury Benjamin H. 
Bristow, of President Grant's cabinet. 

Broadland, Beadle County, South Dakota, was named by the owner of the 
farm adjoining the station, from the broad valley in which the farm and 
station are located. It was laid out by the Western Town Lot Company 
in 1881. 

Broadmoor, Stark County, Illinois, was platted in 1901 and named from the 
appearance of the surrounding country, viz., like a broad, wide "Moor," 
or meadow. It formerly was called Bradford, from the place in Penn- 
sylvania. 

Brock, Nomaha County, Nebraska, was named for Henry Brock, an early 
settler and farmer of this vicinity. 

Bronson, Woodbury County, Iowa, was laid out by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1901, and was named for Ira D. Bronson, an emigrant from Fort 
Scott, Kan. 

Brookings, Brookings County, South Dakota. Named by W. H. Skinner, an 
early settler for the Hon. Wilmot W. Brookings, an early settler and a 
judge of the Supreme Court of the territory of Dakota. It was laid out by 
the Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 

Brooklyn, Green County, Wisconsin, was named by John E. Blunt, the engineer 
in charge who located the railroad through the place. The name of the 
station was from the township and that was named for the city in New 
York State, 

Brookside, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named from its location alongside 
of a brook. 

Brule, Florence County, Wisconsin, was named from the Brule Kiver that runs 
near the station. The river was, on the suggestion of Lyman C. Draper, 
the founder and for a long life time, the devoted secretary of the Wis 
consin Historical Society, named to honor the memory of Etienne (Stephen, 
in English) Brule, a French explorer. It is a fiction to say that the rivei 
was named from a tribe of Indians, as the Brule Sioux were never known 
in this vicinity. Their roaming grounds were and still are on the Missouri 
Kiver. They were named "Brule" in derision, from a large party of them 
having been caught in a fire that was set by their enemies and were badly 
burned about the legs. It is also fiction to say that the river or any river 
in Wisconsin, was named "Brule" because of the burnt timber on the 
banks. Stephen (Etienne in French) Brule was born in Champigny, 
France in 1592 and came to New France (Canada), with Champlain in 
1608. Champlain destined the boy for an explorer and interpreter and 
induced an Algonquin Indian chief to take the boy and teach him the 
"Huron" language and teach him the Indian ways and wiles. Brule 
never wrote an account of his explorations but reported them verbally to 
Champlain and his other superiors so that we have to take the word of 
others as to his work. It is clear that his first journey with the Algon- 
quin Indians "resulted in the first exploration ever made west of the 
great river of Canada (the St. Lawrence), and in the discovery of Lake 



48 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Huron, ten years before the landing of the Pilgrims on Plymouth Rock. " 
It was only six years after Henry Hudson first saw the Hudson River 
that Stephen Brule stood on the shores of Lake Huron. He was the first 
white man to see this great lake. In one of his earliest journeyings he 
visited a copper mine on the north shore of Lake Huron and took back 
with him to Champlain an ingot of copper that he got from the Indians at 
the mine. It is believed that when he made this trip to Lake Huron he 
discovered Lake Superior. Brule was the first white man to ascend the 
Ottawa River, to see Lake Nipissing — to descend French River, and aa i3 
stated above, to see Lake Huron. He probably was also the first white 
man to see the Falls of Niagara, as he was sent there by Champlain to 
secure Indian allies who had promised to help Champlain in one of his 
Indian wars. It is certain that while on this mission he saw the falls, 
and traversed what now is Western New York State. This was in 1615, 
and only eight years after Jamestown, Va., was settled. He visited the 
head waters of the Susquehanna River, followed it to the salt water, and 
explored the country around Chesapeake Bay. He was with the "Huron" 
Indians until 1618 and by Champlain 's orders went again to Lake Huron. 
On this trip he was accompanied by Grenoble (Crenoble of some writers). 
He visited Sault de Ste. Marie, and was the first white man to see it. 
He called the people (Indians) around the Sault, Sautuers or "people of 
the falls." They were the ancestors of the modern Otchipwas (misnamed 
Ojibways and now generally known as Chippewas). These two Frenchmen 
went up Saint Marie's River, skirted the shores of Lake Superior in their 
canoes, visited Isle Royale, on the north shore of the Lake, and went west 
at least to the mouth of the St. Louis River, near where the cities of 
Duluth and Superior are located. In 1625, Brule again was with the Huron 
Indians. He discovered and visited Lake Ontario, ten years before Cartier 
had ever heard of it, as Cartier first heard of it in 1635. Cartier, however, 
never saw the lake, nor did Champlain ever see it. Champlain visited 
Lake Huron with Brule on one of hi3 trips there, and in his report called 
it "Mer douce," "the fresh (sweet) water sea." Brule was finally killed and 
eaten by the Huron Indians. From this brief narrative it can be seen 
why Lyman C. Draper wished to perpetuate the memory of this explorer 
by attaching his name to one of the rivers of Wisconsin. 

Bruce, Brookings County, South Dakota, was named for the son of one of the 
officers of the railroad, by L. A. Robinson, of St. Paul. It was laid out by 
M. M. Kirkman, of Chicago, and by him deeded to the Western Town 
Lot Company. The village was originally called Lee, but that name was 
dropped and the town and station were called Bruce. 

Bruno, Butler County, Nebraska. The name is a corruption of Brno, the name 
of a city in Bohemia, Europe. It was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1887. Enunciation of this name being so difficult, the letter 
"u" was added and the present form made. Its first name was Skull 
Creek. 

Bryant, Clinton County, Iowa, was named by Isaac Howe, a railroad civil 
engineer, for William Cullcn Bryant, the poet, and the eriitor of The 
Evening Post of New York City. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 49 

Bryant, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named for Sherburn M. Bryant of 
Milwaukee, the owner of most of the farm land in the vicinity, and who 
was also a large owner of timber in this locality. 
Buda, Bureau County, Illinois, was named for Buda, in Austria, Europe. 
Buckbee, Waupaca County, Wisconsin, was named for Col. J. E. Buckbee, late 

of the Sixth Michigan regiment, United States volunteers. 
Buckingham, Tama County, Iowa, was named from the county in Virginia 
and that was named from Buckinghamshire, in England, which gave its 
name to the many Dukes of Buckingham of English history. 

Bucknum, Natrona County, Wyoming. Was named on December 27, 1907, for 
C. K. Bucknum, a member of the Wyoming legislature and a large ranch 
owner, near the station, by Frank Walters, manager of the railroad. 

Bull Creek, Pennington County, South Dakota, was named from the nearby 
Bull Creek, which is a branch of the south fork of the Cheyenne river. 
The creek was named by trappers who found a buffalo bull "stalled" in 
the creek where it had been driven by its fellows. 

Buffalo Gap, Custer County, South Dakota, was named from a nearby "gap" 
in the "hills" through which the Buffalo fork of the Cheyenne Eiver came 
out of the hills. It was laid out by the Pioneer Town Site Company in 
1885. In a recent day this "Buffalo fork" was frequented as "feeding 
grounds" by thousands of buffalo (Bos Americana). This fact gave it its 
Indian name, of which the present name is a transliteration. 

Buncombe, La Fayette County, Wisconsin, was named for "Buncombe" Gillett, 
the owner of an adjoining farm, who was a prominent local politician when 
the station and town were established. 

Burchard, Lyon County, Minnesota, was formerly called Bedwood and Shel- 
burn, but was finally named, in 1886, for the Hon. H. M. Burchard, an early 
land agent of the railroad company at Marshall, Minn. The town was 
laid out by the Winona and St. Peter Eailroad Company in 1886. 

Burke's Siding, Fall River County, South Dakota, was named for John L. 
Burke, then a nearby settler and stone quarry man and now (1907) 
register of the United States land office in Rapid City, South Dakota. 

Burnett Junction, Dodge County, Wisconsin, was named from the township, 
which was named for Ellsworth Burnett, a member of a United States 
surveying party, who was shot in 1836 by Indians on Rock River, near the 
present site of Horicon, Wisconsin. 

Burke, Gregory County, South Dakota, was named for Congressman C. H. 
Burke, of Pierre, Hughes County, S. D. 

Burkmere, Faulk County, South Dakota, was named for John M. Burke, a 
director of the Chicago and North Western Railway Company. It was laid 
out by the Western Town Lot Company in 1886. The name is made up 
of Burke and mere. The last part of the word is used for euphony only. 

Burnside, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named for Gen. A. E. Burnside, of 
Rhode Island, of the War of the Rebellion. 

Burr, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. The town was platted under the 
name of Stanley by the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company in 1886. 
The present name was given it for Burr Anderson, an early settler. 

Burt, Kossuth County, Iowa, was named for Horace G. Burt, once chief engineer 
of the Chicago and North Western Railway Company. It was platted by 
the Western Town Lot Company in 1881. 



50 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Butterfield, Watonwan County, Minnesota, was named by and for "William 

Butterfield, the owner of the town site and its first settler. 
Buxton, Monroe County, Iowa, was named for John E. Buxton, for many 

years manager of extensive coal mines here. 
Byron, Olmsted County, Minnesota, was named at the suggestion of G. W. 

VanDusen, an early grain buyer, for his old home, Port Byron, in New 

York State. The place was once named Bear Grove, from the fact that 

in early days many bears were found nearby. 
Cadams, Nuckolls County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 

Company in 1901. It was named for C. Adams, a banker of Superior, Neb. 

The initial " C. " of his given name was added to his family name. 
Calamus, Clinton County, Iowa, was named by S. B. Walker from a nearby 

' ' Calamus slough ' ' in which a large quantity of Acorus-calamus (sweet 

flag) grew long before and also when the station was established. 
Caledonia, Boone County, Illinois, was named by John Ralston, the original 

owner of the town site, from Caledonia one of the poetical names of 

Scotland. 
Caledonia Mine, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby iron ore 

mine, the mine was named for Caledonia, one of the poetical names of 

Scotland. 
Calhoun, Waukesha County, Wisconsin, was named for George E. Calhoun, 

the owner of the farm on which the station was established. 
Cadoma, Natrona County, Wyoming. This name is an Indian word and means 

"to hide" or "to secrete." 
California Junction, Harrison County, Iowa. The first name of this place was 

Yazoo, from the Yazoo Landing on the Missouri River a few miles distant. 

The name was changed by John I. Blair, who expected that passengers 

going to and coming from California would be forced to change cars at 

this station. 
Callon, Marathon Coounty, Wisconsin, was named for Patrick Gallon, the 

owner of large tracts of land in this vicinity. He lived at Wausau, Wis- 
consin. 
Calvary, Cook County, Illinois, was named from Calvary Cemetery, for which 

the station was established, and that now lies alongside the station grounds. 

The cemetery was named for the place where Christ was crucified. 
Calvary, Fond du lac County, Wisconsin, was named by F. M. Barrett, a rail- 
road contractor, from the Calvary Convent located near the station. The 

convent was named from the place where Christ was crucified. 
Cambria, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was platted by the Western Town 

Lot Company in 1900; the village was named from the township and that 

was named from the ancient name of Wales. 
Camache, Clinton County, Iowa, was named for the Comanche Indian tribe. 

The spelling of the name of the town was adopted because it was thought 

it would make a more euphoneus sound than the real Indian word. 
Campbell, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Robert Campbell, a contractor 

who built a part of the Peninsula Railroad of Michigan between Eseanaba 

and Negaunee. 
Campbellsport, Fond du lac County, Wisconsin, was named for Stuart Campbell, 

the first settler in the place. The earliest name was New Cassel from Cassel 

in Germany. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 51 



Camp Grove, Marshall County, Illinois, was platted by the Railway Company in 
1901, and was named from a large camp that existed in a nearby grove, 
when the town was platted. 
Camp Logan, Lake County, Illinois, was named for Gen. John A. Logan, of 

Illinois. 
Canby, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, was named for Gen. E. S. R. 
Canby, of the United States Army, who was murdered by the Modoc 
Indians. The town was laid out and named by the Winona and St. Peter 
Eailroad Company in 1886. 
Canistota, McCook County, South Dakota, was named from a place in New York 
State; this place was named from the Indian word canistoe, meaning 
"board on the water." It was laid out by the "Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1883. 
Canning, Hughes County, South Dakota, was named for George Canning, the 

British statesman and orator. 
Canova, Miner County, South Dakota, was named for Antonio Canova, the 
Italian artist (sculptor). It was platted by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1883. 
Capa, Stanley County, South Dakota, this town was platted by the Western 
Town Lot Company and named Russell to honor Mr. J. R. Russell. He 
objected to this use of his name, then the name was changed to Capa 
on the suggestion of Mr. Doane Robinson, the accomplished secretary 
of the South Dakota Historical Society. The word is Sioux Indian for 
Beaver. (Castor Canadensis.) 
Capron, .Boone County, Illinois, was named for Capt. John Capron, an early 
settler of this county. The first name given the place was Helgason, and 
it was so named in derision by S. R. Lattimer, its first postmaster. 
Carbondale, Menominee County, Michigan, was named from the location of char- 
coal kilns here. They made charcoal for use in iron furnaces in the Upper 
Peninsula of Michigan. 
Careyhurst, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for Hon. John M. Carey, 
United States senator from Wyoming, who owned large tracts of land along 
the Platte River in this vicinity. 
Carnarvon, Sac County, Iowa, was named by H. M. Hughes for the county and 
city of this name in Wales, from whence he emigrated. Before this name 
was given the place it was called Wall Lake Junction, owing to its rela- 
tion to Wall Lake, a noted body of water in this vicinity. 
Carlisle, Fillmore County, Nebraska, was platted in 1901 under the name Walters 
by the Pioneer Town Site Company, but the name was changed to honor 
John G. Carlisle, secretary of the treasury under President Grover Cleve- 
land. 
Carlton, DeKalb County, Illinois. The first name was Newtown, and was so 
named because it was a new town as compared with other places in the 
county. The present name is from Carlton, N. Y., and that place was named 
from a place in England. 
Carters Siding, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named for John Carter, who built 
the first house in what is now the village. He was a carpenter and took 
his wife and two little girls with him and settled in what was then a 
dense wilderness. 



52 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Carney, Menominee County, Michigan, was named by Isaac Stephenson of 
Marinette, Wisconsin for Frederick Carney, of Marinette, who had a 
warehouse at this point when the village was established. 

Carnforth, Poweshiek County, Iowa, was named from a place one of the 
officers of the railroad company found in a book he happened to be reading 
when he was asked to name the station. 

Carnforth Crossing, Poweshiek County, Iowa, was named from the station 
above named. 

Carpentersville, Kane County, Illinois, was named by and for D. G. Carpenter, 
an early settler in Kane County. 

Carroll, Carroll County, Iowa, was named from the county, and this was named 
for Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Md., of Revolutionary fame. 

Carrollville, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named by and for Patrick 
Carroll. The name of the postoffice is Otjen and was named for Theobald 
Otjen, once a member of congress from Wisconsin. 

Carson, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named for John B. Carson, a prominent 
railroad man of Ohio, Illinois and Indiana, and who was an inveterate 
fisherman, and who penetrated the country around this place long before 
any settlers lived here and before the railroad came. 

Cartersville, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, was named for a character — "Col. 
Carter, of Cartersville" — in a popular work of fiction. 

Carthage, Miner County, South Dakota, was named by F. B. Ward, a town site 
agent, from Carthage, N. Y. The town was platted by the Western Town 
Lot Company in 1883. 

Gary, McHenry County, Illinois, was named for W. D. Gary, the original owner 
of the site of the station grounds. 

Cascade Junction, Marquette County, Michigan, was named from the Cascade 
Iron Mining Company, that opened and operated iron mines near this 
locality. 

Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1889. This town and station takes its name from Fort Casper. 
The main overland trail going up the Platte Valley crossed to the north 
side of the river near this place. During the troubles with the Sioux 
Indians about 1S64 a detachment of the Ohio volunteer infantry was 
stationed there to protect the bridge over the Platte and also to give 
protection to the overland travelers. These troops were commanded by 
a colonel who had a son, a young man eighteen or twenty years of age, 
whose first name was Casper. One day the Indians appeared a few miles 
away on the hills on the north side of the Platte and as the Indian force 
did not seem to be large, this boy asked permission of his father to go 
out with some of the soldiers and drive the Indians off. In the fight which 
resulted the boy was killed. Afterwards some "adobe" barracks were 
erected on the south side of the river at the end of the bridge and was 
kept for a time as a regular military post, and was given the name of 
Fort Casper in memory of this young man. 

Castana, Monona County, Iowa, was named by J. P. B. Day, one of the first 
settlers here, from what he understood to be the Latin word for Chestnuts, 
as he thought the oak trees growing there resembled the chinkapin (Castana 
pumila). The village around the station was laid out by the Western 
Town Lot Company in 1886, and the name of the old settlement retained 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 53 



therefor. Another story says that the name came from Castalia, famoua 
springs near Delphi in ancient Greece on the slope of Mount Parnassus, 
and another legend is, that the name came from a place in Asia-Minor. 
Castlewood, Hamlin County, South Dakota. Much fiction has been made and 
propagated as to the origin of the name of this place. Amongst this fiction 
is a story to the effect that the name of the place was made from the 
names of two trainmen who were said to have run the first train of the 
railroad that runs through the place. The simple fact that the town was 
named Castlewood and platted and fixed as the county seat of Hamlin 
County many years before the railroad was built to or through it, is 
sufficient of itself to prove the falsity of that story. The true story of 
the name and of the naming of the place is this: In the early eighties, 
Mr. J. S. Keator, of Davenport, Iowa, bought 15,000 acres of land in 
Hamlin County, established his headquarters in a hotel in Watertown, 
S. D., and started in to open up a farm or ranch in the center of his tract, 
about eleven miles south of Watertown, to which point he drove his team 
daily, or nearly so. He located the town site, and his daughter, or a lady 
member of his family, named the same, Castlewood, from the American 
home of Henry Esmond in Thackeray 's novel, The Virginians. This novel 
opens with a description of this Castlewood and says it was named from 
Castlewood in the County of Hants, England. The Virginian Castlewood, 
was, by Thackeray, located in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in which 
George Washington was born. Mr. Keator told this story to Charles 
Williams, member of congress for Wisconsin, to C. W. Tyson, now (1907) 
of Nashua, N. H., and to the writer of these lines long before any railroad 
train ever reached this location. When the railroad was built through this 
place, the Winona and St. Peter Eailroad Company located its station here 
and in 1882 laid out the town and adopted the name the place had already 
carried for many months if not for years. Outside of all of this, the simple 
fact that the county seat was named Castlewood, before the railroad, so 
far as is known, was through, is sufficient to prove that no railway train- 
men's names had any connection whatever with the name of the place. 
Mr. Keator 's story must be accepted as a fact. 

Cato, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named by John Hickok from Cato, 
N. Y. Its former name was Harrisville, so named for N. A. and J. J. 
Harris; it was afterwards called Nettle Hill, because of the many nettles 
(Urtica) that grew in the vicinity. Cato, N. Y., was named in honor of the 
distinguished Roman. 

Cavour, Beadle County, South Dakota, was named for Carriello Benno, Count 
Cavour (an Italian statesman) to honor him as the real father of the 
railroads of Italy. The town was laid out by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1880. 

Cecil, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named for a daughter of one of the 
officers of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway, when it was 
constructed through this place. 

Cedar, Menominee County, Michigan. Named from the river. This was so 
named because of the abundant growth of Thuja occidentolis (white cedar) 
on its banks. 

Cedar, Iron County, Wisconsin. The name came from the cedar (Arbor vitae) 
that abounded around the place when the town was established. 



54 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Cedar Bluffs, Saunders County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1886. The town was named because on a nearby abrupt bluff 
along the river, on which a large quantity of "red cedar" (Juniperus 
Virginiana) was growing when the place was laid out. 

Cedar Grove, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, was named from a grove of cedar 
(Thuja occidentolis) trees that grew here when the town was located. 

Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa. Named from the rapids in Cedar Eiver 
at this place. The river was named from the fact that in an early day 
the Juniperus Virginiana (red cedar) grew on its banks. The town was 
platted in 1838 by William Stone and was named Columbus. In 1841 it 
was again laid out by N. B. Brown and others and given its present name. 

Center Junction, Jones County, Iowa, was named by the original owners of the 
town site because it was at the geographical center of the county, and 
was to be the crossing (junction) place of two railroads. 

Central City, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named because of its location 
about half way between two other villages in the gulch in which Deadwood, 
Lead and other villages are located. 

Centervllle, Turner County, South Dakota. Named by Dr. Jesse Smith in 1871 
because of its being midway between Parker and Vermillion on the old 
stage road. It is on what was known as the Vermillion and Swan Lake 
stage and United States mail route. The village was platted by the West- 
ern Town Lot Company in 1S83. 

Ceresco, Saunders County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1886. This name was built up by Professor Saunderson (who 
was a teacher in an eastern college before coming to Nebraska) from the 
Eoman Ceres, the goddess of grains and of their harvests. 

Ceylon, Martin County, Minnesota, was platted under the name of Tenhassen 
by the Western Town Lot Company in 1899. Its present name was taken 
from the island off the southeast coast of India. 

Chadron, Dawes County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1885. The town was named from a nearby stream; the stream was 
named for Pierre Chadron, a French-Indian "squaw-man," who lived and 
trapped on the stream. He was at one time a trader for the American 
Fur Company (of St. Louis, Mo.) and had his headquarters at "Winter 
Quarters" at the mouth of the Cheyenne Kiver above Fort Pierre. 

Champion, Marquette County, Michigan, was named for the Champion iron mine 
that is located nearby. 

Charleston, York County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1887 and was named for Charles A. McCloud of York, Neb., 
who was engaged in procuring the "right of way" while the railroad was 
being located and built. 

Charlotte, Clinton County, Iowa, was named for Mrs. Charlotte Gilman, the wife 

of the earliest settler in the locality. 
Chaison, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Daniel Chaison, who was for 

thirty-five years a section foreman of the railroad. 
Chatfield, Fillmore County, Minnesota, was named for Andrew G. Chatfield, 

the first United States judge for the territory of Minnesota. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 55 



Chelsea, Tama County, Iowa. The original name of this place was Otter Creek 
Station. The name was changed in 1864 to Chelsea by S. G. Breese, one 
of the original owners of land near the town site, from Chelsea, Mass. 
The town was platted by John I. Blair and associates. 
Chemung, McHenry County, Illinois, was named by A. M. Seward fwm Che- 
mung, N. Y. The name is an Indian word meaning "big horn" or "big 
horn in the water," the Indians having found the skeleton of a prehistoric 
monster in the bank of the river. 
Chittenden, Lake County, Wisconsin. It was named for Chittenden, Vt., and 

that was named for Thomas Chittenden, governor of Vermont, 1790-07. 
Cherry Valley. Winnebago County, Illinois, was named by Edward Fletcher, 
the original owner of the town site, from Cherry Valley, N. Y.; it had sev- 
eral names, viz., Grabtown, Graball and Butler, before the present name 
was given it. 
Chester, Olmsted County, Minnesota, is an elision of the word "Rochester," 

It is the first station west of Kochester. 
Chester, Dodge County, Wisconsin, was named from the township it was located 
in. The township was named from Chester in Hampden County, Mass., 
and this was named from Chester, in England. 
Chicago Highlands, Cook County, Illinois. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. It is not much more than a name. It was a "boom town," 
but financial perils succeeded and today it is hoping for future prosperity. 
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. In his "American Indian" E. M. Haines, who 
knew more about the North American Indian than any other writer of 
modern times, said "the same Indian word, or one having the same sound 
in different languages or dialects, have entirely different meanings." The 
word Chicago, or that which is essentially the same, is found in several 
(Indian) languages or dialects, with entirely different meanings. He says 
Chicago is understood to be an Indian word. What its meaning is, or, if 
it has any particular meaning, is in dispute. The word comes to ua 
through the early French explorers as an Indian word from the language 
of the Algonquin group. Those who have confined their investigation to 
the Ojibway dialect, without reference to other dialects of the Algonquin 
language, reach the conclusion that it means "onion," "garlic," "leek" 
or "skunk." No one seems, previous to the rebuilding of Fort Dearborn 
(at what is now Chicago) in 1816, to have made any special inquiry as to 
the origin or meaning of the word. Col. S. A. Starrow, who visited the 
Fort in 1817 in a letter to Gen. Jacob Brown of the United States army, 
refers to the river as "the Biver Chicago," or in English, "Wild Onion 
River." Schoolcraft in his "Narrative of an expedition to the source of 
the Mississippi River in 1820" says the "banks of the river produce 
abundantly the wild species of "cepa" or "leek" and that this circum- 
stance led the Indians to name it the place of the wild leek." He then 
says: "Such is the origin of the term Chicago, which is derivative by 
elision and French annotation for the word Chi-laug-ong." Kaug is the 
Algonquin name for the Hystrix or porcupine. It takes the prefix chi when 
applied to the Musela putorius (pole cat). . . . The penultimate ong 
denotes locality. The putorius is so named from the plant." Bishop Baraga 
in an appendix to his Ojibway dictionary, says that the word "Chicago" 



56 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

is a word in the Cree dialect, a tribe of the Algonquin group called also 
Knistenos. From Chicago or Sikag, a skunk, a kind of pole cat, a word 
which at the local term makes Chicagolc. The bishop, in his dictionary, 
defines an onion in the Ojibway dialect as Kit-chi-ji-ga-gman-ji (French 
orthography). The definition of onion by Kev. Edward F. Wilson in his 
dictionary of the Ojibway dialect, is Kech-shi-gaug-uh-wunzh. He defines 
skunk as Zhe-gang. John Tanner, for thirty years a captive among the 
Ojibways defines skunk as she-gahg. He defines onion as she-gau-ga-winzhe 
(skunk weed). The word Chicago, is first mentioned in early western his- 
tory by Hennepein, when speaking of the river. He says it was named by 
the savages Chi-cau-gou. The name Chi-ka-gou appears in a map by Fran- 
quelin in 1684, applied to a river putting into the Desplaines from the east 
at a point just above the Kankakee River; while at the head of Lake Michi- 
gan on this map is the word Che-ca-gou-mein-an. At a later date, what is 
now called the Desplaines River, was called by the early French explorers 
the Eiver Che-ka-gou. Che-ca-gua was the name of a noted Sac Indian 
chief and meant in that dialect, "he that stands by the tree." In the 
Pottawatomie dialect the word Choe-ca-go meant "destitute," or "got 
none." At the time the word first appeared in this locality, the country 
about was inhabited by the Miamis Indian tribe, in whose language the 
word for skunk was se-kaw-kwaw. The Miamis, it seems, were succeeded 
here by the Pottawatomies. In a report written in 1695 at Michillimacinac 
where he then commanded La Mothe Cadillac wrote ' ' The post of Chicagou 
comes next. This word signifies "the Eiver of Garlic," because it pro- 
duces naturally without any cultivation a very large quantity of it." See 
Margry 's Decouvertes et Etablissments, volume 5, page 123. This work 
is also quoted from by J. P. Dunn in his memoir of Father Gibault, who 
was potent in inducing the French residents of "The Illinois Country" 
to accept the rule of the Americans under George Rogers Clark. For a 
reference to Father Marquette 's visits to Chicago, see record of Marquette 
County, Michigan, in this work. In early works the spelling of the 
word Chicago has been nearly infinite. A few samples thereof are 
as follows: Cheggego, Cheegago, Tzstchago, Stktschagko, Chirgago, Shecago, 
Shikkago, Shercaggo, Schenkakko, Zheekako, Ztschaggo, Chiccago, Checago, 
Chicawgo, Chikkago, Chiggago, Shakakko, Schuerkaigo, Pscesehaggo, Stks- 
chaga. Tschakko. 

Choate, Ontonagon County, Michigan, was named for Leander Choate of Osh- 
kosh, Wis., who owned large tracts of timber land in this neighborhood. 

Claremont, Dodge County, Minnesota. The village was named from the town- 
ship and that was named from the city of Claremont, Sullivan County, 
N. H., and that was named from the country seat of Clive, an English 
general. 

Clarence, Cedar County, Iowa, was first called Onion Grove from a nearby 
natural grove. At the solicitation of the people of the town, the name 
was changed by the owners of the town site. The present name was sug- 
gested by Mr. J. Vandeventer, now (1907) of Knoxville, Tenn., from Clar- 
ence Hollow, a beautiful little village in Erie County, New York. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 57 



Clark, Clark County, South Dakota. The station was named from the county. 
The county was named for Newton Clark, a Dakota territorial legislator 
of 1873. It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. For 
a short time this place was called Clark Center. 
Clarkson, Colfax County, Nebraska, was platted by the 1'ioneer Town Site 
Company in 1886, and was named for T. S. Clarkson, who lived at Schuyler, 
Neb., and who was afterwards postmaster at Omaha, Neb. 
Claywood, Oconto County, Wisconsin. This name was supposed to be descriptive 

of the location — clay soil in a deep wood. 
Clearwater, Antelope County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1885 and was named from a nearby stream that was noted for 
the clearness of its water. 
Clearemans, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for Jerry Cleareman, a 

' ' woodsman ' ' of the place. 
Clements, Redwood County, Minnesota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1902, and was named by and for P. O. Clements, an early settler. 
Cleveland, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named for ex-President Grover 
Cleveland, by the merchants of the village. It was once called Centerville. 
Cliff House, Sauk County, Wisconsin, was named by W. H. Marsh, the builder 
of the hotel known as ' ' The Cliff House, ' ' for the reason — the station and 
the hotel were located under the high "cliffs" of Devil's Lake. 
Clinton, Clinton County, Iowa, was named in 1855 from the county, which was 
named for DeWitt Clinton, governor of New York and projector of the 
Erie canal. The original location of Clinton was called New York by 
J. M. Bartlett, who laid it out. The name was changed in 1855 by the 
Iowa Land Company, that had bought the town site and nearby land. 
Clinton, Sheridan County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 

Company in 1894, and was named from Clinton, Iowa. 
Clinton Junction, Rock County, Wisconsin, was named from the township, which 
by the legislature was named for DeWitt Clinton, governor of New York 
State. It also happened that several of the early settlers here emigrated 
from Clinton, N. Y., and they procured the naming of the place for their 
old governor and from their old home. The station was once named 
Ogden for W. B. Ogden, president of the Chicago and North Western Rail- 
road. 
Clintonville, Waupaca County, Wisconsin, was originally named Clinton, but 
ultimately was changed to the present name. The names came from 
DeWitt Clinton, ex-governor of New York. 
Clover Dale, Juneau County, Wisconsin. This is a mere fanciful descriptive 

name and has no special significance as to the place. 
Clowry, Marquette County, Michigan, was named for Col. Robert C. Clowry, 
president of the Western Union Telegraph Company, which bought many 
telegraph poles at this point. 
Clutier. Tama County, Iowa, was named for B. F. Clutier of Tama, Iowa. 
Clybourn Junction, Cook County, Illinois, was formerly called Clybourne Place, 
from one of the streets of Chicago. This was named for Peter Clybourne, 
one of the early settlers of Chicago. The word Place was dropped and the 
word Junction inserted, as it was the junction of two lines of railroad. 
Clyman, Dodge County, Wisconsin, was named for Col. Joseph Clyman, a noted 
Indian fighter, in the early days of Wisconsin. 



58 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Cobb, Iowa County, Wisconsin, was named by and for Amasa Cobb, a congress- 
man who secured the establishment of the postoffice at this place. It 
formerly was called Cross Plains, because it was at this point, the old 
territorial road, crossed the level plains or prairies. 

Cobden, Brown County, Minnesota. The original name was North Branch, but 
in 1886 it was changed to Cobden for the English statesman. 

Cody, Cherry County, Nebraska. This place was named for "Tom" Cody, 
a foreman of construction, while the railroad was being built. 

Coffee Siding, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for Charles F. Coffee, 
a banker and cattle raiser of the vu-iiity. 

College Avenue, Du Page County, Illinois. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Crawford Avenue, Cook County, Illinois. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Colo, Story County, Iowa, was named by John I. Blair from a child's pronuncia- 
tion of Carlo, the name of a favorite dog belonging to the owner of the 
land on which the station was located. 

Colon, Seward County, Nebraska. This town was platted by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company in 1886, and was named for a postoffice that had been located 
here before there was any town. It was named from Colon, Mich., and 
that was named from the city in Columbia on the Isthmus of Panama. 

Columbia. Brown County, South Dakota. The original name was Kichmond, 
from Kichmond, 111. The present name was given the village by C. B. 
Peck and William Townsend, of Lansing, Mich., who were settled here 
before the railroad reached this place. Mr. Peck took the present name 
from the title of the well known "Hail Columbia." The Dakota or James 
Biver runs by this place and is the outlet of Lake T-ch-an-chi-ka-ha, as the 
Indians called it, or Sand Lake, as Nicollett and Fremont named it in 
183S-9. Mr. Townsend built a flour mill on the river at the outlet of the 
lake before the railroad reached the place. 

Combined Locks, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named from the canal 
locks in the Fox Kiver at this point. 

Comfrey, Brown County, Minnesota. This town was platted by the Western 
Town Lot Company, in 1902 and was named from a nearby postoffice. That 
was named by A. W. Pederson, the first postmaster from the plant Com- 
frey (Symphytini officinalis) that he had met with in his reading. 

Commonwealth. Florence County, Wisconsin, was named from the Common- 
wealth Iron Mining Company's mine, which was located here. 

Conde, Spink County, South Dakota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1886, and was named for the great Conde family of French 
history and especially for Louis I and Louis II, "The great Conde," and 
for he who finally became Henry I. 

Conover, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was named for Seth H. Conover of Plymouth, 
Wis., who owned a hotel and summer resort on a lake in the vicinity. 

Conrad, Grundy County, Iowa. This station was named from Conrad's Grove, 
a large grove of trees nearby — that was named by and for John Conrad, the 
earliest settler in this grove. The town at one time was called Conrad's 
Grove. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 59 



Cordova, Seward County, Nebraska. Thi9 place was platted under the name 
of Hunkins for an old settler of that name, by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1887. The station was finally named from the Anglicized spelling 
of the city in Spain. 

Cornlea, Platte County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1886. The name is supposed to mean "corn land" and was adopted 
because of the superior quality, for the culture of corn, of the soil in the 
vicinity. 

Connor's, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named for W. D. Connor, a promi- 
nent Wisconsin politician and owner of a nearby sawmill. 

Cottonwood, Stanley County, South Dakota, was named from the nearby creek. 
The creek was so named because of the many cottonwood {Poyulus hetero- 
plylla) trees that grew on its banks when the town was established. This 
place was originally called Ingham for J. Ingham Gray. Ingham was his 
mother's name. The place was so named by a son to honor his father. 

Correctionville, Woodbury County, Iowa, was in 1856 named by the surveyors 
who platted the town, from the fact that it was on the "correction line," 
a line that was established for the verification and correction of the land 
surveys. 

Cortland, DeKalb County, Illinois, was named by S. L. Porter, from Cortland, 
N. Y., which was named for Pierre Van Cortlandt. 

Cottage Grove, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named by W. C. Wells, from a cot- 
tage he built in a grove three miles northwest of this station. 

Council Bluffs, Pottawatomie County, Iowa. The name "Council Bluffs" was 
taken from a series of high and precipitous hills or "bluffs" on the west 
bank of the Missouri Eiver, in what is now Washington County, Nebraska, 
and many miles above the present city. These Nebraska bluffs were named 
"Council Bluffs" by Lewis and Clark, while on their journey up the Mis- 
souri Eiver in 1804-5. They held a council here with the Indians, and since 
that time many councils were also held there. Maximilian, Prince of 
Weid (Germany) journeyed up the Missouri River in 1832-4 and in his 
journal said: "We passed the mouth of Boyer Creek on the east bank 
where the Missouri River makes a bend and saw [on the west bank] the 
ruins of the former cantonment or fort of Council Bluffs. This fort was 
established in 1819 for 1,000 men." Thwaits says as to the location of this 
Council Bluffs: "It was near the village now known as Fort Calhoun, in 
Washington County [Nebraska]. Lewis and Clark first named them [the 
bluffs on which the cantonment was built] and held a council here [with the 
Indians] in 1804. The fort [ first built here] was known [in the United 
States records] as Fort Atkinson from the commander of an expedition 
that started for the Yellowstone River in 1819. It got no further than this 
point and built a camp which Col. Atkinson called "Fort Missouri" and 
stayed there the winter of 1819-20. Another fort was afterwards built here, 
or the original one was repaired and was named Fort Calhoun for John C. 
Calhoun, secretary of war under President Monroe, or, for a soldier of the 
force that occupied it. The question is in dispute." The present location 
was named Council Bluffs on petition of the citizens of the town, by the 
legislature of Iowa in 1853. The original settlement here was called 
"Miller's Hill" from a Mormon family that had located here. It was 
then called Hart's Bluffs for another Mormon leader. That name was 



60 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



changed to "Trader's Point" because several stores were started there 
at which the westbound Mormons could supply themselves for their journey 
over the plains. In 1846 Col. T. L. Kane, of Philadelphia, went to the 
Missouri Eiver to enlist a regiment of Mormona for the Mexican war. 
As the Mormons were at this time congregated and congested here on 
their way to the Valley of Salt Lake, after their persecutions in Missouri 
and Illinois, there was much suffering among them. This appealed to Col. 
Kane and he aided them in every way that it was possible for him to do. 
In gratitude for this kindness, the leaders of the Mormon Church named 
the settlement 'Kaneville' in his honor. After the general hejira many 
Mormons came to this location, and in time the people became so wrought 
up on account of the stigma that had become attached to the Mormon name, 
they became dissatisfied with the name of the village and petitioned the 
legislature to change it, which was finally done in 1853. 

Council Bluffs Transfer, Pottawatomie County, Iowa, was formerly called 
Union Pacific Transfer, and was so named from the fact that at this place 
the Union Pacific railroad made connections in a Union depot with all of 
the railroads from the east that came together here. 

County Line, Eacine County, Wisconsin, was named from the fact that the 
Milwaukee and Eacine County line ran through the station grounds. The 
name of the postoffice is Lamberton. 

Courtland. Nicollet County, Minnesota, was named by J. H. Stewart from 
Courtland (Kurland), one of the Germanized Baltic provinces of Eussia. 
The misspelling of the name was accidental and not discovered until too 
late to correct it without much trouble. 

Cragin, Cook County, Illinois, was named for H. B. Cragin, an early business 
man of the locality. 

Craigsmere, Ontonagon County, Michigan. The name is one made for use here. 
It has no real meaning or significance. 

Cranberry Center, Juneau County, Wisconsin, was named from the fact that 
this was the center of the Cranberry (V actinium macrocarpon) industry 
of Wisconsin, and from which the station derives most of its business. 

Crandon, Spink County, South Dakota, was named for Frank P. Crandon, a 
trusted and valued officer of the railroad company. This place was platted 
under the name of Minden by the Western Town Lot Company in 1881. 

Crandon, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named by its first settlers for Frank P. 
Crandon, an officer of the Chicago and North Western Eailway Company. 
The town was platted by the Chicago and North Western Eailway Com- 
pany in 1901. The place was first named Ayr, the city of Scotland made 
noted by Eobert Burns. 

Crawford, Dawes County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1886 and was named to honor Capt. "Jack" Crawford of the 
United States army, who was a noted Indian fighter in the early days of 
Nebraska, and who was killed by the Apache Indians in Arizona. 

Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska, was laid out by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1885, and was named for Edward Creighton, of Omaha, by a Mr. 
Bruce who was interested in the place. 

Crescent, Pottawatomie County, Iowa, was named by Brigham Young, presi- 
dent of the Mormon Church, from the cresentic formation of the bluffs 
that nearly surround the place. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 61 



Creston, Ogle County, Illinois. The original name of this station and village 
was Dement, they having been named for Col. John Dement, an early 
settler of Northern Illinois. The present name came from the fact that 
the location is the "crest" or highest point on the railroad between Lake 
Michigan and the Mississippi Eiver. 

Creston. Platte County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1886. The place was named because it was located on top of a 
hill, whence the water on the east side ran into the Elkhorn Eiver and that 
on the west side into the Platte Eiver. 

Crocker, Polk County, Iowa, was named from the township, which was named 
for Col. Crocker, a prominent citizen of Des Moines, Iowa. It was platted 
by the Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 

Crookston, Cherry County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1894 and was named for W. T. Crook, a yard master of the 
railroad at Valentine, Neb., during the construction of the railroad through 
this part of the state. 

Crossman's, Sauk County, Wisconsin, was named for Col. Jacob Crossman, a 
nearby early settler. 

Crowell, Dodge County, Nebraska, was named for Prince S. Crowell of East 
Dennis, Mass., who at one time was president of the Fremont, Elkhorn and 
Missouri Valley Kailroad Company. 

Crown Hill, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named from a nearby hill, 
that was named from a mine, that was staked out on the hill by the Crown 
Mining Company. 

Crozier's Mill, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for W. A. Crozier who 
established a sawmill at this point. 

Crystal Falls, Iron County, Michigan, was named from the falls in Paint Eiver 
that flows by the station. This name was first applied to the falls in Paint 
Eiver by Eichard Corman, a "timber cruiser," who saw the foliage that 
overhung the falls densely covered with ice crystals after a very heavy sleet 
storm. 

Crystal Lake, McHenry County, Illinois, was named from an adjacent lake 
which was and is still noted for the crystal purity of its waters. The town 
postoffice is Nunda and was so named by W. H. Hoffman from Nunda, 
N. Y., whence he had emigrated. Nunda is derived from the Indian word 
nundao, meaning "hilly" or according to another authority "potato 
ground." 

Cuba, Lake County, Illinois, was named by the owners of the town site from 
the island of Cuba. 

Cuba City, Grant County, Wisconsin, was by Craiglow and Stephens, the owners 
of the town site named Yuba from a place in California, but the name was 
rejected by the postoffice department in Washington, when the citizens then 
gave it its present name. 

Cudahy, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named for Patrick Cudaby, the 
founder of the village and a large owner of property therein. 

Cushing, Woodbury County, Iowa, was named by the Blair Town Lot and 
Land Company, that platted it, for L. Cushing Kimball of Boston, Mass., 
who was a brother of David P. Kimball, who for many years has been and 
yet is a most influential and valued director of the Chicago and North 
Western Eailway Company. The earlier name of the place was Penrose. 



62 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Cuyler, Cook County, Illinois. This station was formerly called "Belle Plaine," 
but was changed to honor Edward J. Cuyler, a loyal and valued officer 
of the railway company. 

Daggett, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for the family name of the 
wife of Thomas Falkner, the first postmaster of the place. 

Dakota City. Humboldt County, Iowa, was named by Edward McKnight in 1855 
for the Dakota (Sioux) tribe of Indians. The name of the postoffice was, 
by a mistake made in Washington, D. C, spelled "Dakotah," but the local 
spelling was never made to conform thereto. 

Dakota Junction. Dawes County, Nebraska, was so named because at this point, 
the railroad branches, one stem running into Dakota and the other into 
Wyoming. 

Dalzell, Bureau County, Illinois, was named for S. M. Dalzell of the Spring 
Valley and other coal companies. 

Dale, Washington County, Nebraska, was named for Gen. Samuel Dale, of 
Alabama. 

Dallas, Gregory County, South Dakota, was named from Dallas, Texas, by Jack- 
son Brothers, early settlers of this place. Dallas, Texas was named for G. M. 
Dallas, once vice president of the United States. 

Danbury, Woodbury County, Iowa, was named from the first syllable of the 
given name, Daniel, of Daniel Thomas, who established the town, added 
to the word "bury," which was taken from the name of the county. 

Dane, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named in honor of Nathan Dane, an Amer- 
ican jurist and a member of congress and the originator of the ordinance 
of 1787 that applied to the northwest. 

Darfur, Watonwan County, Minnesota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1899 and was named from the country in Egypt. The word 
means the country of the "Fars" or "Fors," a name used there for the 
real natives of the country. 

Davey, Lancaster County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1886, and was named for John Davey, the farmer who owned 
the land on which the town site is located. 

Davenport. Thayer County, Nebraska, was named from Davenport, Iowa, and 
that was named by Anthony Le Claire, for Col. George Davenport, an Indian 
fur trader and an early settler on the island of Rock Island in the Missis- 
sippi River, who was murdered in his home there, in the early forties. 

David City, Butler County, Nebraska, was named for David Butler, the first 
governor of the State of Nebraska. 

Dayton, Webster County, Iowa. This station was once called West Dayton, 
but for brevity the name was shortened. It was named by E. B. Allison 
from Dayton, Ohio, which was named for Jonathan Dayton, one of the 
original proprietors. 

Deadwood, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named from " Deadwood 
Gulch," and that was named from the fact that the gulch was filled with 
dead timber when prospectors for gold first entered it. At an early day 
the location was called "Miles City," for Gen. Miles of the United States 
army, who was supposed to have chased Indians in the vicinity. 
Deckers, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, was named for the Decker family, who 
owned property and were early settlers here. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 63 

Deep River, Poweshiek County, Iowa, was named from the river and that was 
named for its great and unusual depth. The name is a transliteration of 
the Indian word sap-pom-ah, meaning "deep stream," "deep water," "deep 
place in stream." 

Deerbrook, Langlade County, Wisconsin, is a fanciful name that was made for 
the place, and is based on a legend that deer were occasionally seen here 
while they were drinking from the brook that runs by the place. 

Dimmick, LaSalle County, Illinois, was named for "Squire" J. Dimmick, an 
old settler and large land owner in the vicinity. 

Divide, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was so named because it is located on the 
divide (elevated ridge of land) between two branches of the west branch 
of the Flambeau River. 

Deerfield, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named from the township, and that was 
so named because, when the township was first opened for settlers, deer 
were very plentiful and were in the habit of feeding here. 

Deering, Ccok County, Illinois, is merely a station within the city of Chicago, 
and was named for William Deering, who established an agricultural 
implement factory here before the city of Chicago was extended to this 
station. 

DeKalb, DeKalb County, Illinois, was named in honor of Baron DeKalb, one 
of the Revolutionary heroes. 

Delaughery, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for P. Delaughery, who 
had kilns and made much charcoal here for use in the iron furnaces of the 
Upper Peninsula of Michigan. 

Delmar, Clinton County, Iowa. This name was made by using the initials of 
certain six women who accompanied an excursion train that opened the 
railroad from Clinton, Iowa, to this point. For a similar case see LeMars, 
in the alphabetical list in this book of the towns traversed by the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha road. 

Deloit, Crawford County, Iowa, was platted by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany, in 1899, and was named Beloit from the city in Wisconsin. As another 
location had adopted this name, it was changed by using the initial "D" 
in the place of "B," and thus the present name was made. 

Dempster, Hamlin County, South Dakota, was named for William Dempster, of 
Chicago, one of the original owners of the town site. It was platted by the 
Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company in 1884. 

Dempster Street, Cook County, Illinois, is merely a station within the city of 
Evanston. The station was named from the street it is on. The street was 
named for Dr. John Dempster, first president of Garrett Biblical institute. 

Denison, Crawford County, Iowa, was named by the Rev. J. W. Denison, a 
Baptist preacher who organized the Providence Western Land Company, 
and who platted this town in 1856, and named it for himself. 

Denmark, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named in honor of the European 
home of the many Danes who are settled in this vicinity. 

DePere, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named from the name of "the rapids" 
in the Fox River at this place. The river was named in memory of the 
murder of French missionaries by the Indians, viz.: Rapides des Peres — 
"The Rapids of the Fathers." The town was at first called West DePere; 
but in 1890 the present form was adopted. 



64 History of the Place Na mes of The North Western Line 

DeSmet, Kingsbury County, South Dakota, was named in honor of Father Peter 
John DeSmet, S. J., "The Apostle of the Indians." He was a Belgian and 
spent his life in civilizing, Christianizing and educating the Indians of the 
Upper Missouri Eiver valley and in the Rocky mountains. The town was 
platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 
Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, was named from a fort that was here in an 
early day and that was named from the river, which was named from the 
Indian word Mi-Jcon-ang, meaning "road." The French spoke the word as 
if it were spelled Moingona. The French also called the river Des Moins, 
of the "small river," to distinguish it from the Mississippi or " the great 
river." Finally the name became associated with the Trappist monks and 
the river by a spurious etymology was called 'la riviere des moines" — "the 
river of the monks." The town was first platted by A. D. Jones and called 
Fort Des Moines. In 1857 it was made the capital of the state and given 
its present official name. 
Des Plaines, Cook County, Illinois. This place was named from the nearby 
river. The river was named Au Plaine by the early French traders and trap- 
pers, thereby intending to show it was a river of the "plains" or 
"prairie," rather than of the mountains. The lower part of the river was 
used by Marquette, Joliet and other missionaries and explorers and is 
mentioned by them in their "Relations" and reports. In some of these 
reports it is called ' ' Des Pleine ' ' or the river from the plain or prairie. 
Ultimately the name came to be spelled as is now done, Des Plaines, and 
that has caused some writers to assert that the name came from trees 
called "plaine" by the French. No such tree ever grew along this river, 
so it is very unlikely the name of that tree was thought about when the 
river was first named by white men. The tree referred to is doubtless the 
"Plane" of Europe. The "Plane tree" we have here is the Buttonwood 
or Buttonball (Platanus occidentalis), and does not grow on the river, or 
did it ever grow there as far as can be learned. The French name of 
the "Plane tree" is spelled "plaine" or "platanus" and never "pleine," 
as they spelled the name of the river. The word ' ' Platanus ' ' is Greek and 
came down to the French and to us through the Latin. It means flat. 

Devil's Lake, Sauk County, Wisconsin, was named from the lake which was 
named by Peter Folsom, an early explorer and surveyor, in 1842, because it 
was set in a deep basis that he thought had neither inlet nor outlet, and 
that resembled the crator of a volcano. The whole surroundings being so 
wierd and unusual he determined to give it a name that would be as 
unearthly as the place appeared to be. 

DeWitt, Clinton County, Iowa, was named in honor of DeWitt Clinton, the cele- 
brated Governor of New York state — its first name was Vandenburg. 

Diffin, Alger County, Michigan. This name was selected from a postoffice 
directory, and n history of it can be found. It was adopted because there 
was none other like it in the state and because it would be easy to telegraph. 

Dike, Grundy County, Iowa, was incorporated in 1900, and named by and for 
C. T. Dyke, who had large landed interests here. 

Dillmans, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named for a nearby farmer. 

Dishno, Marquette County, Michigan, is a transliteration of the name of Pierre 
Dishman, for whom it was named. He was a pioneer Frenchman of this 
locality. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 65 



Diorite, Marquette County, Michigan, was named for the crystalline, Plutonic 
rock named Diorite (commonly known as green stone), which is very abund- 
ant here and lies next to the iron ore. 

Dixon, Lee County, .Illinois, was named from a ferry in Rock River. This was 
named by and for John Dixon, an early, honored and noted settler in the 
valley of Rock River. 

Dodge, Dodge County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 18S6, and was named for George A. Dodge, an early settler here. 

Dodge Center, Dodge County, Minnesota, was named by D. C. Fairbank ou 
account of its location being at the supposed center of Dodge County. The 
county was named for Gen. Henry Dodge, governor of Wisconsin Territory. 

Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin, was named for Gen. Henry Dodge, an 
early and much respected settler, and governor of the Territory of "Wiscon- 
sin. In a very early day this place was called " Minersville" because of the 
lead mines nearby. The name was changed to honor Gen. Dodge. 

Doland, Spink County, South Dakota, was named for F. H. Doland, of Chicago, 
111., who once owned the ground where the station is located. It was 
platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. 

Dolliver, Emmett County, Iowa, was named for Hon. J. P. Dolliver, a prominent 
lawyer and politician of Northern Iowa. The town was platted by the 
Western Town Lot Company in 1899. 

Dotson, Brown County, Minnesota, was laid out under the name of Bedford 
from the town in Middlesex County, Mass., by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1899. The railroad station is called Dotson and the postoffice 
Bedford. 

Doty, Olmsted County, Minnesota, was named by G. W. Van Dusen of Rochester, 
Minn., the owner of the farm on which the station is located, for ex-Gov. 
Doty of Wisconsin. 

Dougherty, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, was named for a nearby farmer. 

Douglas, Convery County, Wyoming, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1886 and was named for Senator Stephen A. Douglas, of 
Illinois. 

Douglass. Olmsted County, Minnesota, was named for Harrison Douglass, who 
owned the original town site. Before this name was adopted, the village 
postoffice was called Center Grove. 

Dousman, Waukesha County, Wisconsin, was named by Andrew E. Elmore for 
Col. John Dousman, an early and influential citizen of Wisconsin. 

Dover. Olmsted County, Minnesota. The first name was Dover Center, as the 
location was supposed to be at the center of Dover Township. The "Cen- 
ter" was dropped by general consent of the early settlers, and the abbre- 
viated name became its fixed name. 

Dow City, Crawford County, Iowa, was named for Judge S. E. Dow, a promi- 
nent citizen of the county, who once owned the land on which the town 
site was platted. At first the town was called "Dowville," but afterwards 
was changed to its present form. 

Drexel, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named for A. J. Drexel, the noted 
banker of Philadelphia. 

Dryads, Menominee County, Michigan. The name was selected from a work 
on ancient mythology. 



66 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Dudley, Lyon County, Minnesota, was platted by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1902, and was named from Dudley in Massachusetts, which was 
named for two brothers, Paul and William Dudley, who were among the first 
proprietors. 

Duck Creek, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby creek. That 
was named by the early trappers, because of the great numbers of ducks 
that nested on its banks every spring. 

Dundas, Calumet County, Wisconsin. The place was named by the Jones broth- 
ers, from Dundas Island, on the east coast of Africa, that had been visited 
by one of them. 

Dundee, Kane County, Illinois, was named in 1857 by a Scotchman from Dundee 
in Scotland. 

Dunham, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for the manager, John Dunham, 
of the Ashland Iron and Steel Company, that owned large tracts of land 
in this vicinity. 

Dunlap. Harrison County, Iowa, was named in honor of George L. Dunlap, then 
a prominent railroad manager of Illinois and Wisconsin. The town wa9 
platted in 1867. 

Dumont, Butler Count)', Iowa, was named for John M. Dumont, a well known 
mine owner of Colorado. 

Dwight, Butler County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1887, and was named by Henry Glover from Dwight, 111., whence he 
had emigrated. (That place was named for Henry A. Dwight, Junior, a 
benefactor of the town.) Earlier it was called "Lone Star" from Texas. 

Eagle Grove. Wright County, Iowa, was so named because of the finding in 
an early day of the nests of many eagles in the grove in which the town 
was located. It was platted as Eagle Grove Junction by the Western 
Town Lot Company in 1881. The station name was changed by the elimi- 
nation of the word "Junction." 

Eagle Lake, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was named by the railroad company 
from a nearby lake, and that was named on account of the early land 
surveyors finding the nests of many "Bald-headed" eagles around the lake. 
Its earliest name was Speir and was named for Speir in Germany by J. 
Beirlis, an emigrant therefrom. 

Eagle River, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Milwaukee, Lake 
Shore and Western Kailway in 1885, and was named from the nearby 
river; the river was named from a lake that the river ran from, and that 
was named from the many bald-headed eagles that lived around the lake. 

Earlville, LaSalle County, Illinois, was named by C. H. Sutphen, the original 
owner of the town site, from Earlville, N. Y., which was named for Jonas 
Earl, a canal commissioner of the state. At one time the Illinois place was 
called "Earl," but it is claimed that that never was its corporate or lawful 
cognomen. 

Early, Sac County, Iowa, was named for Judge D. C. Early, an early settler and 
prominent citizen of Sac City, Iowa. 

East Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, was named because of its relative situation 
as to Elgin — which see. 

East Pierre, Hughes County, South Dakota, was named by town lot speculators, 
because of its situation as to Pierre — which see. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 67 

East Rockford, Winnebago County, Illinois. Tbis is the part of the city of 
Rockford on the east side of Rock River. For derivation of name, etc., 
etc., see Rockford. 

Edgar, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Milwaukee, Lake Shore 
and Western Railway in 1891, and was named for William Edgar, who was 
interested in lands in the vicinity, and owned a sawmill near Wausau, Wis- 
consin. 

Edison Park, Cook County, Illinois, was once called Canfield and was named for 
an early settler. It was afterwards called Roseneath, a fanciful manufac- 
tured name, that was supposed to assert the place was buried in roses. The 
present name was given it in honor of Thomas A. Edison, the electrician. 

Eden. Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. A popular legend has it that it was 
named with reference to the Garden of Eden, because of the beauty and 
fertility of the country surrounding the station and village. The fact seems 
to be that it was named for Johu Eden, an early settler. 

Edmund, Iowa County, Wisconsin, was named for Edmund Baker, the original 
owner of the land on which the station and village lie. 

Eland Junction, Shawano County, Wisconsin. Was platted by the Milwaukee, 
Lake Shore and Western Railroad Company in 1888. It was named for ' ' the 
Eland," a variety of Antelope discovered by David Livingston in Central 
Africa. The place was named by E. H. Rummely, an officer of the railroad 
that platted the village. 

Elba, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named from the Island in the Mediter- 
ranean. 

Elberon, Tama County, Iowa, was named from the suburb Elberon, near Long 
Branch, N. J. 

The name of the New Jersey place is an elision on the name of L. B. Brown 
who was one of the founders of the place. The word was manufactured 
for this place and is not Indian as is generally asserted and believed. 

Elburn, Kane County, Illinois. The original name was Kane, and was named 
for Gen. Thomas L. Kane, of Pennsylvania. The name was then changed 
to Blackberry, on account of the great growth of that fruit in the vicinity, 
and held that name for many years. Elburn was finally selected by the citi- 
zens as the name of the village, and then the railroad company changed 
the name of the station to correspond with that of the village. The name 
Elburn was manufactured for the place. 

Elcho, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named by B. F. Door, the pioneer sur- 
veyor in this vicinity, from a place in Scotland that is pronounced as this 
town's name is spelled. 

Elderon, Marathon County, Wisconsin. This is a name made from "Elder" 
(Sambucus Canadensis) added to the letters "on." This name was con- 
structed and used here, because much elder grew nearby when the place 
was named. 

Eldorado, Clay County, Nebraska, was named from the county in California 
in which gold was discovered. The name is from the Spanish meaning 
"the gilded." 

Eldorado, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named by John O. Henning 
from the county in California, in which in an early day he had dug gold. 
The word is from the Spanish and means "the gilded." The town was 



68 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

platted under the name of Eldon by the Pioneer Town Site Company in 
1888, but the postoffice department in Washington objected to the name, 
and it was changed to its present form. 

Eldora, Hardin County, Iowa, was laid out and named in 1851 and was made 
the county seat in 1853. The name came from the Spanish meaning "the 
gilded." It was named by Mrs. Lois B. Edgington, who found the name 
in a book. 

Eldora Junction, Hardin County, Iowa, was named by Judge W. S. Porter 
on account of its location being near his home in Eldora, Iowa. 

Eddy, Lake County, Illinois, was named in memory of Charles G. Eddy, for 
years an officer of the railroad. 

Eleanor, Butler County, Iowa, was named by T. J. Hanlon for Mrs. Eleanor 
McDonald. The postoffice is named Oplington. 

Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, was named by James T. Gifford, the original 
owner of the town site, from the old hymn tune "Elgin." 

Elgin, Wabasha County, Minnesota, was named from the place in Scotland. 

Elgin, Antelope County, Nebraska, was laid out by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1887, and named from a nearby postoffice which was named from 
Elgin, Illinois. 

Eli, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named for Daniel Webster Hitchcock whose 
nickname was "Get there, Eli," who worked for the locating engineer of 
the road. When the town was permanently named the last part of the 
nickname alone was used. 

Elkton, Brookings County, South Dakota, was named from Elkton, Md., the 
early home of one of the officers of the Chicago and North Western Rail- 
way. It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 

Ellsworth, Hamilton County, Iowa, was named to honor the memory of Col. 
Elmer E. Ellsworth of the Chicago Zouaves, who was murdered in Virginia 
in the early days of the War of the Rebellion. The town was platted by the 
Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 

Elmhurst, DuPage County, Illinois. The original name was Cottage Hill. In 
1870 the name was, on the suggestion of Thomas B. Bryan, changed to Elm- 
hurst from the word Elm and the German hoorst, meaning a ' ' place or grove 
of Elm trees." 

Elmhurst, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named from Elmhurst, DuPage 
County, Illinois. 

Elmo, Grant County, Wisconsin. The original name was Junction. It was 
changed to Elmo by M. Y. Johnson from the novel, St. Elmo. 

Elmore, Faribault County, Minnesota. The place was named by Marvin Hughitt 
in honor of Andrew E. Elmore, "The Sage of Mucwanago, " an old settler 
of Waukesha and Brown counties, Wis. Mr. Elmore was one of "the 
makers of Wisconsin" and influential in the state conventions and legis- 
latures for many years and until his death in 1906. 

Elm Creek, Fall River County, South Dakota, was named from the nearby CTeek, 
That was named from the Elm trees that bordered it in an early day. 

Elmwood, Pierce County, Wisconsin. This name was suggested by the Elm 
(Ulnus Amcricaria) trees that abound here. 

Elrod, Clark County, South Dakota. The original name was Ida, but that became 
obsolete and Elrod was adopted. It was named by L. Kinzey for S. H. 
Elrod, a friend of the owner of the original town site. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 69 

Elroy, Juneau County, Wisconsin, was named "Ell Roy" by J. M. Britnall in 
1858, to distinguish it from "LeRoy," a village in the vicinity. When the 
railroad reached this place the present name was adopted as an elision of 
its original cognomen. It is believed Mr. Britnall adopted the name from 
some place in Scotland, as he always claimed the name was Scotch. 

Elva, DeKalb County, Illinois, was named for a daughter of Joseph P. Gliddin, 
the original owner of the land now occupied by the station and village. 

Embarrass, Waupaca County, Wisconsin. The name is French and was attached 
to a nearby stream. The word means "obstructed" and was applied to the 
river because it was found full of logs that obstructed canoe navigation. 
The name was applied to the town from the river. 

Emmett, Holt County, Nebraska. This place was named for Robert Emmet, the 
Irish patriot. 

Escanaba, Delta County, Michigan. The town was named from the river that 
runs through the place. The name comes from the Anglicization of the 
original Ojibiway Indian name So-schon-hic, which means "flat rock" and 
was given to the river by the Indians because the bed was of flat limestone 
rock. Originally the present name was spelled Ecnanawba, but for euphony, 
Perry H. Smith, while vice president of the Chicago and North Western 
Railway, on the suggestion of Peter White of Marquette, proposed the 
elision of the "w. " The suggestion was adopted by the early settlers 
there, and the improved spelling has become established. At a very early 
day the first cluster of houses that were built here, took the name of Sand 
Point, but that was never the corporate name of the place. 

Esmond, Kingsbury County, South Dakota, was named by John E. Blunt, one of 
the railroad civil engineers, from Thackeray's novel of this title. The 
town was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1883. It once 
carried the name of "Sana," a Biblical name given it by E. F. Froude, 
when the first postoffice was established here. 

Essig, Brown County, Minnesota, was named by C. C. Wheeler, then an officer 
of the Chicago and North Western Railway, to honor one of the Brothers 
Essig, who erected the first business building in the place. 

Estelline, Hamlin County, South Dakota, was named for the daughter of D. J. 
Spalding of Black River Falls, Wis., the owner of the adjoining farm. It 
was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. * 

Evan, Brown County, Minnesota, was named by the first postmaster for his wife 
Eva. Its earlier name was Harmon, which it was given for an early settler 
of the vicinity. 

Evanston, Cook County, Illinois. This town was named by and for Dr. John 
Evans. Previous to 1855 there was a postoffice here that was called Gross 
Point and Ridgeville, the last from the fact that it was located on a ridge or 
elevation of land that was nearly surrounded with what then were " swamps. " 
This city is the home of Northwestern University. The charter for the univer- 
sity was granted by the legislature of Illinois and approved by the governor on 
Jan. 28, 1851. This proceeding grew out of a meeting that was held in 
Chicago on May 31, 1850, at which meeting were present, Dr. John Evans, 
A. J. Brown, Rev. R, H. Blanchard, J. K. Botsford, Henry W. Clark, Grant 
Goodrich, Rev. Zadoc Hall, Rev. Richard Haney and Orrington Lunt. A 
committee consisting of Dr. John Evans, A. J. Brown, E. G. Meet, 
A. S. Sherman and Grant Goodrich, was appointed to draft a charter 



70 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

for a university, to be established in or near Chicago, under the pat- 
ronage of the Methodist Episcopal church. Several sites were of- 
fered for the location of the university. By a happy accident, Orringtou 
Lunt "discovered" the land on which the university is located, and he and 
Dr. Evans on Aug. 11, 1853, bought the land, 380 acres, from its then owner, 
Dr. A. F. Foster of Chicago, for $25,000, or about $71 per acre. The first 
permanent building, University Hall, was finished ready for occupancy 
in 1869. 

Evansville, Rock County, Wisconsin, was named by the citizens for Dr. Calvin 
Evans, an early and much beloved physician of the neighborhood. 

Ewing, Holt County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1882, and was named for "Uncle" Jimmy Ewing, the first man who 
settled in the upper part of the Elkhorn Valley, and whose farm was near 
this site. 

Exeter, Fillmore County, Nebraska, was named from Exeter, New Hampshire, 
and that was named from Exeter in England. 

Eyota, Olmsted County, Minnesota, was named by Milo Matteson, from the 
township, and this was named from the Sioux Indian word iyotah or iyotan, 
meaning "greatest" "most." 

Fairburn, Custer County, South Dakota. Was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1886. This is a composition name made up of the affix "fair" 
and the Scotch "burn" (a brook or creek) and was used because this was 
an attractive location on a small and unnamed creek. 

Fairfax, Linn County, Iowa, was originally called Vanderbilt for Jacob Vander- 
bilt an early settler. The present name came from Fairfax County in Vir- 
ginia, and that from Lord Fairfax, the grandson of Lord Culpeper, a great 
and early land owner in Virginia. 

Fairfax, Gregory County, South Dakota, was named by Mrs. Isabella B. Turney 
of the Turney familiy who owned much land in the vicinity, from Fairfax 
Court House, Virginia. That town was named for Lord Fairfax, the grand- 
son of Lord Culpeper, a large land owner in the early days of Virginia. 

Fairmont, Martin County, Minnesota, was named from its situation on a hill. 

Farnhamville, Calhoun County, Iowa, was originally called Farnham for E. E. 
Farnham, one of the civil engineers who built the railroad through this 
place. The postoffice department in 1881 insisted upon having the name 
changed, and the present one was selected. The town was platted under 
the name of Farnham by the Western Town Lot Company in 1881. 

Faulkton, Faulk County, South Dakota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1886, and was named for Andrew J. Faulk, the third governor 
of the Territory of Dakota. 

Faunus, Menominee County, Michigan. This name was taken from ancient my- 
thology. 

Fellows, Rock County, Wisconsin, was named for a nearby land owner. 

Fennimore, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named Fennimore Center from the 
township with "Center" added thereto. The township was named for M. 
Fennimore, an early settler. In 1881 the word "Center" was dropped from 
the name of village and station. 

Fenwood, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Milwaukee, Lake 
Shore and Western Railway in 1891, and was so named because a great num- 
ber of trees and shrubbery (a wood) grew in a nearby "fen" or "marsh." 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 71 



Fenton, Kossuth County, Iowa, was platted by the Western Town Lot Company 
in 1899 and was named for ex-Governor and U. S. Senator R. E. Fenton, 
of New York. 

Ferney, Brown County, South Dakota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1886 and was named for W. H. Ferney, one of the surveyors 
who laid out the town. 

Fisher, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for F. H. Fisher, the owner of 
the X. H. Cattle ranch that was nearby. 

Fetterman. Converse County, Wyoming, was named from Fort Fetterman, which 
was near this location. The fort was named by the United States 
for Lieut. Col. W. J. Fetterman, who was killed by the Indians in De- 
cember, 1866, at Fort Phil. Kearney in Wyoming. 

Flagg, Ogle County, Illinois, was named from the township, and that was named 
for Richard P. Flagg, one of the first settlers. 

Florence, Florence County, Wisconsin, was named by Col. H. D. Fisher, or 
the owners of the town site for Mrs. Florence Hulst, the wife of Dr. N. P. 
Hulst of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Flat Rock, Delta County, Michigan. This is a transliteration of the Indian word, 
Escanaba. 

Flickville, Clay County, Nebraska, was named for a nearby old settler. 

Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named for the landing on the 
lake, and that was named by the French trappers, traders and explorers be- 
cause it was at the "end of the lake" (Winnebago). 

Footville. Rock County, Wisconsin, was named for and by Ezra A. Foot, who 
owned the town site and who was one of the earliest settlers in the vi- 
cinity. In an early day the town was called "Bachelor's Grove" for the 
family of that name who were the first settlers in the grove. 

Ford River, Delta County, Michigan, was named from the river, and that was 
named for Thomas Ford, governor of Illinois, 1842-46, who had explored a 
portion of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and had mentioned it in his 
history of Illinois. 

Fosterville, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was named for John M. Foster, president 
and general manager of the Vilas Lumber Company located here. Mr. Foster 
resides at Granville, Mich. 

Fort Pierre, Stanley County, South Dakota. There is much confusion in the at- 
tainable records as to the exact location of the forts that were built on the 
west side of the Missouri River, and that in the end came to be known a3 
Fort Pierre. None of them were established by the United States and hence 
the United States army records do not give their full history. The follow- 
ing seems to be the facts in the case: 

"A fort was built by Joseph La Framboise, an Indian trader in 1817 
* * * at the mouth of Teton River." Another fort was built by one 
of the fur companies in 1828, some say below the mouth of Teton River. 
Maximillion the Prince of Weid, who was here in 1832, says "it was just 
about the mouth." Both these forts were abandoned and the first real 
Fort Pierre was erected higher up the river. This was built by the Ameri- 
can Fur Company in 1831-2 and is known to have been three miles above the 
mouth of the Teton River. (This stream was called Bad River and Little 
•Missouri River as well as Teton River. On some of the maps it now ap- 
pears as Walc-pa-shic-Tca (which is Sioux Indian for a bad river), and on 



72 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

others as Bad river.) This fort was christened in June 1832, for Pierre 
Choteau, Jr., of St. Louis, Mo., who was on a visit to the fort when it was 
named. Gen. Harney with a force of 1,200 men wintered at this fort in 
the winter of 1855-6. The fort was abandoned and dismantled by the fur 
company in 1857. In 1857 a fur trader built another Fort Pierre three 
miles above the old one. Another new Fort Pierre, a fur company's trading 
post was built in 1859 two miles above the original Fort Pierre. It was 
abandoned in 1863 at the time of the Sioux Indian outbreak. A Fort Co- 
lumbia was built by the Columbia Fur Company in 1822 on the west bank 
of the Missouri Eiver (not the east bank, as some writers have claimed) a 
short distance below the first Fort Pierre (this must not be confounded with 
the Forts Teton). The Fort Pierre of the American Fur Company was 
the most considerable station of that company on the Missouri River. 
When Maximillion visited it in 1832-1, it was surrounded by Sioux Indians 
mostly of the Teton band, but with them were also some of the Yankton 
band, as both bands with others, traded at this post. Maximillion gives a 
lengthy account and a picture of the fort, and made a long stay there, 
studying the Indians and tne flora and fauna of the country around the fort. 
At no point on the Missouri Eiver, saving possibly the mouth of the Yel- 
lowstone Eiver, was there clustered as much of the work of the fur trader 
and the life of his Indian allies as about Fort Pierre. We have the dim his- 
tory of many "forts" and "posts" besides those we have named that were 
established around this point: Fort Tecurnseh, Sublette's Fort, Campbell's 
Fort, the Fort of Papin and of Cerro, were all about the mouth of the 
Teton Eiver and on the west bank of the Missouri Eiver. On the east bank 
were Fort Aux Cedres or Loiselles' Post, Fort Lookout, Fort Kiawa, Fort 
Eecovery or Cedar Fort, Fort George and Fort Defiance or Fort Bois. These 
forts or trading posts depended entirely on the Indians who roamed over 
the prairies west of the river to and perhaps beyond "The Black Hills," 
where Deadwood and other mining camps and towns are now located. The 
Indians came to these trading posts in preference to going to those in the 
valley of the Platte Eiver, as those were frequented by the Indians of the 
far southwestern plains, who were under Spanish domination and who had 
no use for the Indians of the northern prairies. 

De Land's map of Fort Pierre and surroundings when read from the south 
shows Fort George on the west bank of the Missouri Eiver just below and 
opposite the mouth of Medicine Knoll Creek, which flowed into the Mis- 
souri Eiver from the east, the Indians called this creek pa-hah-wa-kan ; 
then Teton Post, Fort la Framboise, Post Sublette and Campbell, Fort 
Tecumseh, "Old" Fort Pierre (one and one-half miles north of the loca- 
tion of the present city of Pierre), New Fort Pierre (two miles north of Old 
Fort Pierre), Fort Galpin (the trading post of Mr. Galpin of the American 
Fur Co.), a second Fort La Framboise (supposed to have been at the point 
where the village of Fort Pierre is now located) and Fort Primeau. On the 
east side of the Missouri Eiver reading from the south, the following points 
are shown: Old Fort Sully, American Fur Company's Fort and American 
Fur Company's Post. From what is shown above it is clear that the name 
Fort Pierre referred quite as much to the locality as to the posts or forts 
proper, and in the loose language of the day any location within ten, fifteen, 
or even twenty miles of Fort Pierre proper, was called Fort Pierre. The 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



first Fort Pierre in North America was built between 1730 and 1740 oa 
Rainy Lake on a point of land where the present city of Rainy Lake is lu- 
cated in Northeastern Minnesota by Pierre la Verendrye, a French explorer. 
Forest Junction, Calumet County, Wisconsin, was named from the fact, that 
when established, the town and station were in a dense forest at the junc- 
tion of another railroad. 
Fort Atkinson, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, was named by Dwight Foster, to 
honor General Henry Atkinson, the Indian fighter of the early days of the 
northwest and especially in the Black Hawk War. 
Tort Robinson, Dawes County, Nebraska, was laid out by Col. W. H. Carter, 
United States Army, and was named for the nearby United States military 
post, which was named by the United States War Department for Lieut. 
Robinson of the 14th United States Infantry, who had been killed by In- 
dians just before this fort was established. 
Fort Howard, Brown County, Wisconsin. This village and station were nam<>d 
from Fort Howard, a fort that in an early day was built here for protection 
against the Indians. It was named for a United States Army Officer. This 
place is now a portion of the city of Green Bay. 
Fort Sheridan, Lake County, Illinois. Was named from the fort that is located 
here; that was named by the United States War Department in honor of 
Gen. Philip H. Sheridan. 
Foster City, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named "Burnt Bluffs" and then 
changed to Foster City for Foster Brothers, prominent lumbermen at this 
point. 
Foster, Pierce County, Nebraska, was named for George Foster, long a station 

agent on the railroad, and who owned land surrounding this town. 
Fox Lake, Martin County, Minnesota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1899, and was named from the nearby lake which the Indians 
called hosh-a-rac-ah-tah, "fox." 
Fox Point, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named from the English word 

equivalent to the Indian hosh-a-rac-ah-tah, "a fox." 
Fox River, Kenosha County, Wisconsin, was named from the river on the banks 
of which the village is situated. The river was named for the English 
word that represents the Indian word hosh-a-rac-ah-tah, "a fox." 
Fortieth Street (Chicago) Cook County, Illinois. This name merely indicates a 
point that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no his- 
torical significance. Here are located the Chicago shops of the Chicago and 
North Western Railway and that explains the location of this station. 
Frankfort, Spink County, South Dakota, was named from the place of this name 
(Frankfort-on-the-Main) in Germany. It was platted by the Western Town 
Lot Company in 1882, and named by Foster and Fisher, who owned land in 
the vicinity. 
Francis Creek. Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. This place was named from the 
nearby stream. The stream was named for the founder in A. D. 1208 of the 
Franciscan Order, St. Francis of Assisi in Italy. His father, Signor Barnar- 
cione, was traveling in France when his son was born. The mother named 
the child Giovanni, but when the father returned he was not pleased with 
the name and gave him that of Francisca, whence comes the English 
Francis. In French it is Francois. 



74 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Franklin Grove, Lee County, Illinois, was named from a nearby grove of trees, 
and this was named for James R. Franklin, an early settler in this grove. 
At one time the village is said to have been known as Chaplin, but no 
records now seem accessible to prove the story. 

Freeman, Kane County, Illinois, was named for John Freeman, the original 
owner of the town site. 

Freeport, Stephenson County, Illinois. The earliest name of this place was 
Winneshiek. It took the name because it was the home of Winneshiek, an 
Indian chief. The name means "five" or "plenty waters." The burying 
ground of the tribe this chief belonged to is now covered by the freight 
station and yard of the Chicago and North Western Railway in Freeport. 
When Winneshiek and his tribe were removed beyond the Mississippi 
River, the place name disappeared. In 1835, William Baker and William 
Kirkpatrick settled here, and in 1837 laid out a town and named it Freeport. 
Mrs. William Baker suggested this name as she said it would truthfully 
depict to posterity, the unbounded and continuous hospitality that wel- 
comed every "new comer" at the Baker home. The "welcome" was 
unstinted and was given "without money and without price" and con- 
tinued as long as Mr. Baker lived. 

Fremont, Dodge County, Nebraska. The first settlement here, was made in 
1856 when John C. Fremont the explorer, was ruuning for president of the 
United States. It was first named "Jessie Benton Fremont" for the wife 
of the explorer, who was a daughter of Thomas H. Benton, long time United 
States senator from Missouri. In time the name was changed to its pres- 
ent form. 

Friday, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Joseph Friday, an early settler. 

Frost, Faribault County Minnesota, was named for Charles S. Frost, an archi- 
tect of Chicago. 

Fulton, Whiteside County, Illinois, was named for Robert Fulton, the inventor 
of steamboats. 

Fulton Junction, Whiteside County, Illinois, was named from its relation to the 
nearby city of Fulton. 

Fumee, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named for a nearby lake. Its name 
is a corruption of Fumay, a city in France, and was given the lake by a 
French explorer from that city. 

Gagen, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was named for Daniel Gagen, a local land 
owner and the pioneer of the place. 

Galbraith, Kossuth County, Iowa, was named for Senator Galbraith, a well 
known politician of Iowa. When first established the place was called 
Morton Siding for a nearby farmer. 

Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, was named in 1819 by Samuel C. Miner, 
an early settler, from the lead ore (Galena) found in its vicinity. The 
early French explorers called the place de feve "the bean," and they called 
the river it is on la riviere de feve, because of the immense quantity of wild 
"beans" found growing upon its banks. The name of the river has been 
corrupted into fievre (fever) which gave rise to the impression that the place 
was unhealthy. 

Galesville, Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, was named for George Gale, the 
original owner of the town site. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 75 



Galloway, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named for C. A. Galloway of the 
Moore-Galloway Company of Fond du Lac, Wis., and a large owner of land 
near here. 

Gait, Whiteside County, Illinois, the original name was Como, named from 
Lake Como in Italy. The name was changed to honor John Gait, the owner 
of the town site. 

Galva, Ida County, Iowa, was named from Galva in Henry County, Illinois, 
whence many of the farmers of the village came. The name is an Angli- 
cized form of the Swedish Gelfe and was the home name of Olaf Johnson, 
one of the oldest, if not the oldest, Swedish settler in Henry County, 111. 

Garden Prairie. Boone County, Illinois. The first name applied to this village 
. was Amesville, for an old settler. Because of the fertility of the soil and 
the beauty of its natural plants, it was thought to resemble a garden, and 
hence the early settlers gave it its present name. 

Garvin, Lyon County, Minnesota, was first named Kent, for Father Kent, a mis- 
sionary of Chicago, but its name was changed to honor H. C. Garvin, the 
son of one of the oldest employes of the Chicago and North Western Bail- 
way. The town was platted under the name of Terry, for General A. H. 
Terry of the U. S. Army, in 1886 by the Winona and St. Peter Railroad 
Company. 

Garwin, Tama County, Iowa, was named for Train Despatcher Garvin. 

Gary, Deuel County, South Dakota, was named for H. B. Gary of Marshall, 
Minnesota, who was an official of the postoflfice department in the early 
days of this State. The town was platted by the Winona and St. Peter 
Railroad Company in 1877. 

Geneva, Kane County, Illinois, was named by James Herrington, the original 
owner of the town site, from the place of this name in New York state. 
This was done in honor of C. B. Dodson, who had emigrated from that 
place to Kane County, 111., when this village was established. Geneva in 
New York state was named from Geneva in Switzerland. 

Geneva, Fillmore County, Nebraska, was named in 1871 by Miss Emma Me- 
Cauley, a daughter of Col. A. C. McCauley, who owned the farm on which 
the county seat was established, and named from Geneva, New York. That 
place was named from Geneva in Switzerland. 

Genoa Junction, Walworth County, Wisconsin, was named from the fact that it 
was the junction of two lines of railroad. Before the roads were built the 
settlement was called Genoa, and was named from the town in New York 
state. That was named from the city in Italy. 

Gentian, Marquette County, Michigan, was named by W. B. Linsley for the 
flower, the fringed gentian (Gentiana corinata) that abounded there. The 
place was first named Harvey for T. W. Harvey of Chicago, a pioneer lum- 
berman. 
Georgia, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named for George A. Frost, a stuttering 
carpenter, who so spoke his own name as Georgia, and as a joke, more than 
for any other reason, the name was given to and is still held by the town. 
Gettysburg, Potter County, South Dakota, was named from the battlefield in 
Pennsylvania, because many of the early settlers near here had been sol- 
diers in the fi^ht on that field. The town was platted by the Western 



7(5 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Town Lot Company in 1884. Northwest of Gettysburg is Le Beau, in Wal- 
worth County, South Dakota. Jt was named for Antoine Le Beau, a half- 
breed Sac Indian. It is near the Missouri River, a little above the city cf 
Pierre. It has been an historic spot for forty-five years, for it was at that 
point that the Indian chief White Lodge fled with his capitves at the close 
of the Sioux Indian war. On August 20, 1862, a small settlement at Lake 
Shetak, Murray County, Minn., was attacked by Sioux Indians, when Whit« 
Lodge, a Sisseton Indian chief and one hundred of his warriors were 
the assassins when all the adult white males were killed, and the chil- 
dren and the women were taken into captivity. White Lodge, Little 
Crow, Sleeping Eyes, Pawn and Big Head, conveyed the captives to tbe 
Missouri River, to a point where Swan Creek empties into that river, about 
a mile and a half from the present site of Le Beau. A local legend says that 
shortly after their arrival on the river, Galpin, a trader of the American 
Fur Company was passing down the river, and arriving at the camp 
of White Lodge, was asked to come ashore and trade; but before he could 
land, Galpin 's wife discovered the Indians were hostile and warned ber 
husband. When the boat swung out into the river again, a white woman 
ran down the shore and called to the trappers that a party of nine were 
held captive by the Indians, and implored them to come to their relief. 
When Mr. Galpin reached Fort Pierre, where he was custodian of the pott, 
and which was the next landing below Le Beau on the river, he told tbe 
Indians who were there the story of the capture of the whites. Around 
the fort, was a party of eleven young Indians, who at once formed them- 
selves into a rescue band, and resolved to go to the relief of the women 
and children. This little band, it is said, was comprised of Martin Charger, 
Kills-and-Comes, Four Bear, Mad Bear, Pretty Bear, Sitting Bear, Swift 
Bird, One Rib, Strikes Fire, Red Dog, and Charging Dog, all of whom 
belonged to Two Kettle band of Tetons, with the exception of Charger. 

The little band departed from Fort Pierre on Nov. 15, 1862, and four 
days later reached the camp of White Lodge. They asked for a council 
with the chief. 

Charger was appointed spokesman for the party and spoke in behalf of 
the rescuers. He said: "We have come here to buy the white captives and 
give them back to their people. We will give you horses for them all; all 
the horses that we have." The reply of White Lodge disheartened the 
young Indians, as the ultimatum of the chief seemed to sound the death 
knell of the white captives. 

Cliarger renewed his offer of the horses and kept persistently at the 
ehieftain, that night and well into the next day, before the proposition was 
finally accepted, and the boys were told to bring their horses into camp. 
They did so, and the captives were turned over to them. The boys started 
back to Fort Pierre with their party on the evening of Nov. 29, 1862, and 
reached Fort Pierre six days afterward, nearly frozen and almost starved 
to death. The captives were finally turned over to their friends and tbe 
Indian rescuers were rewarded by the United States. The name "Le Beau" 
is a corruption of the French Le boeuf (the buffalo), a name first applio<) 
to a man who, from his size and sluggishment moved like a buffalo. 

How much truth or how much fiction there is in this story is very difP- 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 77 



cult to determine at this time. It is history however, that after Gen. Sib- 
ley had at Wood Lake on Sept. 25, 1862, thoroughly whipped the Indian* 
in a hard fought battle, they fled towards the Missouri River, and that oa 
Dec. 25, 1862, they were on the river above Fort Pierre with 500 to 1,000 
warriors getting ready for the destruction in the spring of 1863 of all 
the whites in western Minnesota and Dakota territory. Little Crow was 
the leader in the war and vowed an awful vengeance against the whites 
because a lot of Mb followers, who had been captured by Gen. Sibley, were 
hanged before the campaign of 1863 was inaugurated. 
Gsrltd, Kossuth County, Iowa, was named from the first syllables of the names 
of the townships on each side of it, viz.: "Ger" from Germanic, and "led" 
from Ledyard. 
Gihent, Lyon County, Minnesota, was named by a Belgian priest (who located a 
colony at this place), from his native city in Belgium. This town was 
platted under the name of Grand View by the Winona and St. Peter Bail- 
road Company in- 1878* 
Gilford, Hardin County, Iowa, was named for C. T. Gifford, an early settler wlio 

induced a railroad . company to establish a station here. 
Gilbert, Story County, Iowa, was named by and for George Gilbert, who was 

the original owner of the town site. 
Gilberts, Kane County, Illinois, was named by the Galena and Chicago Union 
Railroad for Amasa Gilbert, an early settler. Its earlier name was Rutland- 
ville, which it was given by E. P. Stark, the first supervisor, from Rutland, 
Vt., whence he had emigrated. The Vermont Rutland was named from 
Rutland in Liecestershire, England. 
Gile, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named for Gordon H. Gile, of Oshkosh, Wis., 
who was largely interested in iron ore mines and mining in the vicinity, 
and who was one of the owners of the Northern Chief Iron Company. 
Gilfillan, Redwood County, Minnesota, was named for C. D. Gilfillan of Minne- 
apolis, who owned much land in the vicinity. The postoffice is Morgan. 
Gillespie, Macoupin, County, Illinois. This place was named for Judge Joseph 
Gillespie, a notel jurist of central Illinois, and who for many years had large 
• political and other influence in this county. 
Girard Junction, Macoupin County, Illinois, was so named because of its near- 
ness to the city of Girard. That city was named for Stephen Girard of 
Philadelphia, Pa., at one time the richest man in the United States, and 
who gave his great fortune to found and support Girard College, one of th* 
most beneficent institutions in the country. 
Gillett, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named for R. Gillett, one of the first 

settlers in the county. 
Gladbrook, Tama County, Iowa. This name was made up and applied to this 
place by a prominent officer of the Chicago and North Western Railway 
Company. 
Glen, Sioux County, Nebraska, was so named because descriptive of the vicinity. 
Glenbeulah, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. This name was made by the original 
owner of the town site by combining the word "Glen," which describe** 
the location, and "Beulah" the given name of the mother of one of the 
contractors who built the railroad through the place. This Scriptural name 
is supposed to mean "beautiful land" or "land of flowers," and well de- 
scribed this place when it was established. 



.78 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Glencoe, Cook County, Illinois. Thig is a manufactured name as used here, and 
was devised by W. S.Gurnee a well known citizen of early Chicago, and 
who as a contractor built the railroad through this place. To the word 
"Glen" — which was suggested to him by the many glens that are around 
the village — he added "Coe" which was his wife's maiden name. 

Glendale, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was named by James R. Lyon, an early 
settler, because "he fancied the name when he met with it in his reading." 

Glen Ellyn, DuPage County, Illinois. Its earliest name was Danby. In 1876 it 
was changed to Prospect Park. The present name has reference to a nearby 
glen. To that was added "for euphony" the last part of the name. 

Glen Rock, Converse County, Wyoming. Was named from the fur traders' and 
trappers' name for a large rock that had been a sentinel for generations to 
travelers over this part of the country. 

Glidden, Carroll County, Iowa, was named by the original owners of the town 
site in honor of Capt. W. T. Glidden of Salem and Boston, Mass., one of the 
earliest and most steadfast friends of the project of building a railroad 
across the state of Iowa. 

Goehner, Seward County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1887, and named for John F. Goehner, a member of the Ne- 
braska legislature, and a prominent merchant of Seward, Neb., who owned 
an interest in the town site. 

Gogebic, Gogebic County, Michigan. The word is Indian — a contraction of 
agojebic, meaning "rocky" or "rocky shore," or "rocky divided lake." 
Another Indian word "goebing" is also used to denote the same things. 
Ghi-gwa-ga-bing, another Indian word meaning "the place of diving," has 
been given as the origin of Gogebic. 

Golden Reward, Lawrence County, South Dakoota, was named from the "Golden 
Reward Gold Mine" nearby. 

Goldfield, Wright County, Iowa. The name of this station is an example of 
elision and substitution. The early settlers desired to honor one of them 
by naming the village after him. His name was Brassfield. It was thought 
that this would not do for the village, and consequently they discarded the 
"Brass" and for it substituted "Gold," and Goldfield resulted. 

Goodwin, Deuel County, South Dakota, was named for Geo. P. Goodwin, the first 
land commissioner of the Chicago and North Western Railway Company; 
it was platted by the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company in 1878. 

Goose Lake, Clinton County, Iowa. The original name of this station was 
"O'Brien," but owing to the fact that there was another place of this 
name in Iowa in 1S76 the name was changed to Goose Lake. This name 
was taken from a nearby lake, that was a great resort for wild geese. 
Goose Lake, Marquette County, Michigan. This station was named from a 
nearby lake. The lake was named from its palpable resemblance to a goose 
in flight. 
Gordon. Sheridan County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1S85, and was named for John Gordon of Sioux City, who undertook 
to take a train of wagons into the Black Hills, when that country was still 
a part of the Indian reservation, and closed to white settlers. He was over- 
taken at a point four or five miles from where this station now is, by a lieu- 



History or the Place Names of The North Western Link 79 



' tenant in command of a detachment of U. S. cavalry. Gordon's oxen wera 
turned loose, and wagons and freight piled in a heap and burned — for which, 
the lieutenant was afterwards dismissed from the service. 

Gowrie, Webster County, Iowa, was named from a place in Scotland. 

Grayland, Cook County, Illinois, was named for a nearby land owner, who had 
an interest in this village. 

Grand Junction, Green County, Iowa. The early citizens of this place named it 
from the fact that here, two railroads formed a junction. 

Grant, Brookings County, South Dakota, was named on the suggestion of an em- 
ploye, of the railroad that runs through the place. The man's name was 
Grant, but it is contended the place was not named for him, but merely 
that the name was short and convenient in telegraphic work and becauso 
there was no other place so named in South Dakota. 

Grand Mound, Clinton County, Iowa. This station was intended to be named 
"Sand Mound," from a high sand mound three miles distant, but 
when the name was recorded, a mistake was made in the spelling and the 
village name became ' ' Grand Mound. ' ' 

Gregory, Gregory County, South Dakota, was named from the county, which 
was named for J. S. Gregory, a well known legislator of South Dakota. 

Grand Eapids, Wood County, Wisconsin, was named from the rapids (falls) in 
the Wisconsin River at this point. The west side of the city was formerly 
called Centralia, but in 1899 the town was consolidated under the present 
name. 

Granville, Sioux County, Iowa, was named for Sir Richard Granville or Gren- 
ville, a British navigator. This place was platted under the name of 
Grenville, by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. The station name 
is spelled Granville. This confusion arises from the fact that the way the 
navigator spelled his name is not known. He explored the eastern coast of 
North America in 1585. 

Green Valley, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named from the valley in which 
it is situated. The valley was named because of the vast growth of ever- 
green trees that filled it when it was first visited by the whites. 

Granville, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named from the township and 
that was named by C. T. Everts, an early settler who had formerly lived in 
Granville, Washington County, N. Y. Granville, N. Y., was named for John 
Carteret, Earl Granville, a British statesman. 

Gray, Audubon County, Iowa, was named for George Gray, who owned the site 
on which it was located. 

Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. The first name of the station for this 
town was Fort Howard, and was on the west bank of Fox river. It was 
named for an early United States army fort and post called Fort 
Howard, which stood on or adjacent to the station grounds. The historic 
point on the east bank of Fox River was named Green Bay from the bay (of 
Lake Michigan) on which it was founded. The bay opens at the north into 
the lake and extends southward into Wisconsin. It is about 100 miles long 
and ten to twenty miles wide. The Fox River of Wisconsin enters the bay 
at its southwest extremity. The bay was called by the early French "la 
grande bale," (the large bay) which was corrupted into the present name. 
The French trappers and traders also called the bay "laie de puants." 



80 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Marquette and Joliet visited thia point in May, 1673, when enroute from 
Mackinac to discover the Mississippi River, and which they reached on 
June 17, 1673. From that day on, the location of the city of Green Bay 
was a meeting point for Indian and missionary and trader. When the city 
waa platted, it was believed by its founders that it would be the great city 
of the west. People flocked to it from all quarters, and a veritable "boom" 
in "corner lots" followed. Even the far-seeing and wise John Jacob Astor 
was caught by the "boom" and invested much money in the place. A fort 
was built by the United States on the west bank of the river and wm 
named Fort Howard (See Fort Howard in this book). Radisson and 
Grosielliers found Winnebago Indians on or near the location of thia city, 
and say that they were called Puants, or in English Stinkards, and that 
the bay "was named Baie de puants from these Stinking Indians." Astor 
built a hotel here and called it The Astor House. The original town of 
Astor was platted by J. J. Astor but opposing plats were made and their lo- 
cations were called Navarino from the place in Greece and Elliss for one 
of the platters. All these were finally consolidated with Astor 's town. 
Green Bay Junction, Brown County, Wisconsin, was so named owing to the near- 
ness of the city of Green Bay. It is really a portion of that city. 
Green Lake, Green Lake County, Wisconsin, was named from the adjacent lake. 
The French called it Lao Verde, the whites who settled around the lake 
merely Anglicized it. The main village is a mile from the railroad station 
and is called Dartf ord. It was named by and for J. N. Dart, an early settler 
in the county. Mr. Dart also named Montello, the county seat of Marquette 
County. 
Greenville, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named by Anton Becker, from 

the township. 
Gresham, York County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1887, and was named by George W. Post for Judge W. Q. Gresham, 
once a United States cabinet officer and judge of the United States court. 
Oridley, Emmet County, Iowa, was platted under the name of Maple Hill, be- 
cause of a nearby hill that was crowned with a maple grove. It was platted 
in 1899 by the Western Town Lot Company. The station was named Grid- 
ley by the railway company for Gen. Ashel Gridley, a banker and large 
land owner of Bloomington, 111. 
Grimms, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named for a prominent settler and 

property owner nearby. 
Gross Park, Cook County, Illinois, was named by and for S. E. Gross, the 

original owner of the town site. 
Groton, Brown County, South Dakota, was named from Groton, Mass., which 
was named from a place in England owned by the family of Deane Win- 
throp, whose name headed the petition that asked for the grant of land 
from the Massachusetts government to the people who finally established 
Groton, Mass. 
Guckeen, Faribault, County, Minnesota, was laid out under the name of Derby 
by the Western Town Lot Company in 1900. The present name waa given to 
the village to honor an old settler of the vicinity. 
Guernsey, Poweshiek County, Iowa, was named by Moses F. Morton, an early 
settler from Ohio. It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 81 



1884. Guernsey County, Ohio, from which this town was named, was named 
by emigrants from the island of Guernsey that lies between England and 
France. 
H»dar, Pierce County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com 
pany in 1883. The word is a corruption of the German Hader, which means 
a "misunderstanding or wordy argument," and was given the town owing 
to the settlement of a dispute between two early settlers. The name was 
intended to keep the memories of this dispute constantly in mind. 
Hackley, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was named for C. H. Hackley of Muskegon, 
Michigan, who was interested in the Phelps, Bonnell Lumber Company's 
mill that is located here. 
Hahnemann, Whiteside County, Illinois, was named from the township it is in, 
and that was named Hahnaman for an early settler and to honor the mem- 
ory of Samuel Hahnemann, the great homeopathic physician. The spelling 
of the name of the station was changed for euphony. 
Halbur, Carroll County, Iowa, was named by ex-Gov. O. H. Manning of Iowa 
for Anton Halbur, the owner of the farm adjoining the station. It was 
laid out by the Western Town Lot Company in 1881. 
Haifa, Emmett County, Iowa, was laid out by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1889, and was named from the Wadi Haifa in Egypt. The Egyp- 
tian name is also spelled Halfai by travelers on the Nile. 
Hanford, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, was named for Hanford McNider a son 
of C. H. McNider the president of the First National Bank of Mason City, 
Iowa. 
Hanlontown, Worth County, Iowa, was named for James Hanlon of Mason City, 

Iowa, who was the original owner of the town site. 
Hanover, Kock County, Wisconsin. The original name was "Bass Creek." It 
was changed by John Higgins, the owner of the town site, to honor many 
of his neighbors who had emigrated from Hanover, in Germany. 
Harcourt, Webster County, Iowa, was named by an admirer of the British states 
man of this name. It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company 
in 1881. 
Hardwood, Dickinson County, Michigan. The name was taken from a Ion? 
established postoffice of the vicinity. That was named because it wa* 
located in a dense hardwood forest. 
Harlan, Shelby County, Iowa, was named for United States Senator Harlan of 

Iowa. It was laid out and made the county seat, in April, 1859. 
Harlem, Winnebago County, Illinois, was named from Harlem, in New York 
State, for the curious reason that that Harlem was six miles from New 
York City, and this is six miles from Bockford, 111. 
Harris, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for M. B. Harris, a merchant 
and shipper of forest products, who lived here when the town was located. 
Harrison, Sioux County, Nebraska. The town was first named Bowen for John 
S. Bowen of Blair, Neb., but by vote of the citizens, the name was changed 
to Harrison in honor of Benjamin Harrison, president of the United States. 
Harrison, Lincoln County, Wisconsin. It was originally called Mitchell for an 
old settler, but the name was changed to honor ex-President Benjamin 
Harrison. 



82 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Harrold, Hughes County, South Dakota, was named for what wrongfully was 
supposed to be the given name of (H. E. McCullough), an officer of the 
railway company. An error was made in this, but the name was allowed 
to stand. 

Hartland, McHenry County, Illinois. The original name was Kishwaukee, an 
Indian word meaning "sycamore tree." This name was dropped for the 
present one, which was supposed to be more euphonious. No record is 
attainable that gives the origin of the present name. 

Hartleys, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for Charles H. Hartley, long 
superintendent of the division of the Chicago and North Western Railway 
that runs through this place. 

Hartwick, Poweshiek County, Iowa, is a fanciful name and was applied to this 
place by the railway company when the station was established here. 

Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska, was named by the officers of the first railroad 
that reached this point from the east, from Harvard University in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. The university was named for the Eev. John Harvard, who 
founded it. 

Harvard Junction, McHenry County, Illinois, was named from Harvard uni- 
versity by "Judge" Ayer, one of the earliest settlers and noted as a hotel 
keeper there. 

Hastings, Adams County, Nebraska, was named by Col. Harbin of Fairbury 
Vt., for Col. T. D. Hastings, who was instrumental in getting the railroad 
located through this place. 

Hatley, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named by Matthew LaBarin from 
Hatley in Quebec, whence he emigrated. 

Havana, Steele County, Minnesota, was named in 1867 by John Easton, at that 
time a member of the legislature of Minnesota. He named it from the city 
of Havana in Illinois, and that was named from the city in Cuba. 

Havelock, Pocahontas County, Iowa, was named by J. E. Blunt, then chief 
engineer of the railroad, for a British soldier who won immortality in 
India. The town was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. 

Hawarden, Sioux County, Iowa, was named from the home of and to honor 
William E. Gladstone, the British statesman. The town was platted by the 
Western Town Lot Company in 1882. 

Hayes, Cook County, Illinois, was named by and for the original owner of the 
station grounds. 

Hay Springs, Sheridan County, Nebraska, was located by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1882, and was named because in an early day much hay was 
cut near here where the soil was moistened by many springs; around these 
springs was an arid territory. 

Hazel Green, Grant County, Wisconsin, was so named from the fact that when 
the town was established the location was covered with hazel (Corylus 
Americana) bushes. 

Hazel, Iron County, Michigan, was suggested from the great growth of the hazel 
(Corylus Americana) nut shrub in the vicinity. Before this name was 
adopted for this town it was called Kinson, for an early settler here. 

Hebron, McHenry County, Illinois, was named from the township, and that 
was named by H. W. Mead, the original owner of the town site, from the 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 83 



church tune "Hebron." The original name given to the station by the 
railway company was Mead for the above named H. W. Mead. The tune 
name came from a place in Palestine. 

Heckman, Lyon County, Minnesota, was named for a once well-known dining 
car superintendent. 

Hecla, Brown County, South Dakota, was named after the volcano Hecla of 
Iceland. The town was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1886. 

Helena, Marquette County, Michigan, was named for his wife by S. C. Baldwin, 
superintendent of the railroad. 

Helenville, Jefferson County, Wisconsin. The original name was Bullwinkle. 
the name of the original owner of the town site; it was changed by him to 
honor Helen, his wife. 

Helps, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for Arthur Helps, an English 
writer. 

Hematite, Florence County, Wisconsin, was named from the Hematite iron ore 
that was plentiful hereabouts. 

Henderson, York County, Nebraska, was located by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1887. It was named for Daniel Henderson, one of the first settlers 
in the county. The township in which the village lies was also named for 
Daniel Henderson. 

Hendricks, Lincoln County, Minnesota, was located by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1900, and was named for the Indiana statesman and once 
Democratic candidate for the United States vice presidency. 

Henrietta, DeKalb County. Illinois, was named for the wife of Washington 
Hesing of the "Staats Zeitung," a newspaper of Chicago, he having 
promised the citizens to give a bell for the town hall or for the first church 

when built. 
Henry, Codington County, South Dakota, was named by and for J. E. Henry, 

the first settler in the vicinity. It was located by the Western Town Lot 

Company in 1882. 
Herbert, Boone County, Illinois, was named, for his son Herbert by Daniel D. 

Bathrick. 
Hermansville, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for his son Herman 

by C. J. L. Meyer, owner of the townsite. 
Hermosa, Custer County, South Dakota, is a descriptive name from the Spanish 

word meaning "beautiful." It was located and named by the Pioneer 

Town Site Company in 1886. 
Herring, Sac County, Iowa, was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 

1899 under the name of Weed, which in 1901 was changed to the present 

name to honor an old settler of the vicinity. 
Herrick, Gregory County, South Dakota, was named for Samuel Herrick (a 

nephew of ex-Gov. Hon. Myron T. Herrick, of Cleveland, Ohio), who was 

instrumental in getting the Indian reservation opened to settlement. The 

place was named to honor him for that work. 
Hetland, Kingsbury County, South Dakota, was named for John M. Hetland 

who settled in this county in 1877. He was from Hetlandin Norway, and 

as is common, he took for his surname the name of his native village. 
Highland Park, Lake County, Illinois. Was named by the Port Clinton Land 

Company, the proprietors of the original town site, because of its high 

elevation above the lake, and because it was located in a natural park. 



84 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Highmore, Hyde County, South Dakota, was so named because it was located 
on the highest ground in South Dakota between the Mississippi and Missouri 
Rivers. 

High Eidge, Cook County, Illinois, was a descriptive name made from the situa- 
tion of the town site on a high ridge. 

Highwood, Lake County, Illinois, was named by Rev. W. W. Evarts, because of 
its elevation above the lake, and because of the great height of the trees 
about the location. 

Hiles, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named for F. P. Hiles, of Milwaukee, 
Wis., and of the Foster-Whitman Lumber Company, who had large lumber 
interests here when the place was established. 

Hillside, Washington County, Nebraska, was so named because it was descriptive 
of the locality; the site being on the top of the grade where the waters 
divide between the Papillion River and the waters going directly into the 
Missouri River. 

Hitchcock, Beadle County, South Dakota, was named for C. S. Hitchcock, the 
owner of the lands adjacent to the station. It was located by the Western 
Town Lot Company in 1881. At times the place was called Clarkville from 
an early settler named Clark, and Altoona, from the city in Pennsylvania. 

Holabird, Hyde County, South Dakota, was named by Henry C. Wicker, (who, 
when the town was established, was an officer of the Chicago and North 
Western Railway), for his wife's family name. She was Louise Holabird, 
the daughter of William S. Holabird, once a lawyer of Winnsted, Conn., and 
lieutenant governor of the state; and afterwards engaged in railroad build- 
ing in Indiana and other western states. 

Holidays, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named for Benj. Holliday, who 
owned the land through which the railroad ran at this point. 

Holstein, Ida County, Iowa, was named at the request of many settlers nearby, 
who emigrated from Holstein, in Germany. 

Honey Creek, Pottawatomie County, Iowa, was named from the creek near the 
station; this was named by the early settlers thereon, because of the many 
wild bees that in an early day were found there. 

Hooker, Turner County, South Dakota, was located by the Western Town Lot 
Company, in 1894, and was named for John Hooker, an early settler who 
lived here before the town was located. 

Hooper, Dodge County, Nebraska, was named for Hon. Samuel Hooper of Bos- 
ton, Mass., a banker and prominent member of congress during the War of 
the Rebellion. 

Hortonville, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named for Alonzo E. Horton, an 
early settler, and the founder of the present city of San Diego, California. 

Hot Springs, Fall River County, South Dakota, was named from the famous 
springs at this place. The Sioux Indians who roamed around this part of 
Dakota, used these springs for their medicinal virtues. They called th« 
springs or place minne-ka-tah, "the water that boils." The present name 
of the village is a transliteration of the Indian name. 

Hudson, Fremont County, Wyoming. This place was platted by the Pioneer 
Town Site Company and was named "Atla," which is a Sioux Indian word 
and means "swift water" or "swiftly running water." The company 



History of the Pi.ack Names of The North Western* L/np 85 



finally changed the name to Hudson in honor of .John T. Hudson, an old 
settler and once the owner of the land on which the town is now located. 
He was a member of the Wyoming legislature and a county commissioner. 
Houghton, Brown County, South Dakota, was named for C. W. Houghton, of 
Columbia, S. D., who owned the land on which this station was est&b 
lished. It was located by the Western Town Lot Company in 188G. 
Houl.es, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for A. lloules, an employe of 

the railroad that runs through this place. 
Houston, York County, Nebraska, was located by the Pioneer Town Site Com 
pany in 1887, and was named for Joseph D. Houston, one of the earliest set- 
tlers in the county, and who lived near this town site. 
Howells, Colfax County, Nebraska, was located by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1S86 , and was named by P. E. Hall of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for 
J. S. Howell, a prominent citizen of Colfax County; the letter "s" was 
added for euphony by Mr. Hall. Attempts were made to name the town 
Bagnersville and Buschville, but they failed. 
Hubbard Woods, Cook County, Illinois, was named Lakeside by David Gage, of 
Chicago fame, in 1870, because of its location on the shore of Lake Michi- 
gan. Before this name was used the place was called Taylorsport, and was 
so named for the Taylor family, who were its earliest settlers. It was 
recently renamed "Hubbard Woods" for Gurdon S. Hubbard, who once 
owned the location. 
Hubbard, Hardin County, Iowa, was named in honor of Judge N. M. Hubbard, 
the noted jurisconsult of Cedar Bapids, Iowa. It was located by the West- 
ern Town Lot Company in 18S0. 
Hull's Crossing, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, was named for J. D. Hull, the 

owner of the land on which the station was established. 
Humphreys, Platte County, Nebraska, was named for Gen. A. A. Humphrey, chief 

engineer of the United States Army. 
Hunting, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was so named because there was much 
game in the vicinity, that allowed successful "hunting" hereabouts. It 
also happened that a nearby land owner had this name, and hence the 
place had two reasons for its name. 
Huntley, McHenry County, Illinois, was named by John B. Turner for T. S. 
Huntley, an early settler who owned the land on which the station was 
established. 
Hughes, Hardin County, Iowa, was named for H. M. Hughes, superintendent of 

a part of the Chicago and North Western Railway lines in Iowa. 
Hurley, Turner County, South Dakota, was named for R. E. Hurley, an accom- 
plished civil engineer, who was employed on the construction of the railroad 
here. It was located by the Western Town Lot Company in 1883. 
Hurley, Iron County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Milwaukee, Lake Shore 
and Western Railway in 1885, and was named for Judge M. A. Hurley, a 
lawyer of Wausau, Wisconsin, and a prominent iron ore operator, who with 
Plummer, Silverthorn and Ryan organized iron ore mining companies here. 
Huron, Beadle County, South Dakota, was named for the "Huron" Indians; 
whether the word is French or Indian is not known, nor is it9 real meaning 
known. It however is believed to be a corruption of the French word hur« 
that was given to a tribe of Indians by the French, the word meaning 



BG History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

"wild boar," and was given these Indians on account of their wild and 
unkempt appearance. The town was located by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1880. 

Hylas, Menominee County, Michigan. This name was taken from a dictionary 
of mythology. Hyla is the specific name of the "tree frog" or "tree toad" 
and that also was thought of when the station was named. 

Ida Grove, Ida County, Iowa; the grove was named by Mrs. J. H. Moorehead, 
wife of the first settler. The county was named from Mount Ida in Greece 
and was suggested by Eliphalet Price, once a prominent politician of 
Iowa, The town was officially named by P. E. Hall of Cedar Rapids. 

Imogene, Martin County, Minnesota, was platted and named Cardona by the 
Western Town Lot Company in 1900. The postoffice was named Imogene 
and the station name ultimately followed that. The name Imogene was 
taken from the name of the heroine of a well known poem. 

Indian Town, Menominee County, Michigan, was named from an unnamed Indian 
settlement that existed here when the railroad was built. 

Inez, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for Inez Richards, a daughter of 
DeForest Richards, afterwards governor of Wyoming, and a prominent 
"cattle man." 

Ingalls, Menominee County, Michigan, was named by Louis Dobear, for Judge 
E. S. Ingalls of Menominee, Michigan, who owned much land in the vicinity. 

Inland, Clay County, Nebraska. The name is merely fanciful, and was used as 
it is supposed to represent the locality, as being inland and not on a coast. 

Inman, Holt County, Nebraska, was located by the Pioneer Town Site Company 
in 1881, and was named from Inman 's Grove, that was nearby. The grove 
was named by and for William Inman, an early settler. 

Interior, Ontonagon County, Michigan, was named for the Interior Lumber Com- 
pany. That was so named because it was inland, and not on the lake shore. 

Ipswich, LaFayette County, Wisconsin, was named by C. C. Wheeler and John 
Patterson, jointly, from Ipswich, Mass., and Ipswich, in England. 

Ireton, Sioux County, Iowa, was named in honor of Gen. Henry Ireton, the son- 
in-law of Oliver Cromwell and one of his great soldiers. It was located by 
the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. 

Iron Mountain, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named by Joseph Fleishiem for 
a nearby "mountain" of iron ore. 

Iron River, Iron County, Michigan, wag named from the river, and that was 
named because of the outcropping of iron ore on its banks. 

Ironwood, Gogebic County, Michigan, was platted by the Milwaukee, Lake Shore 
and Western Railway in 1885. The name was built up from "iron" and 
"wood," the only two products that were abundant here when the town 
was started. 

Iroquois, Kingsbury County, South Dakota, was named from the French name 
of the Indian Confederacy of the six Nations. The word is said to 
be from hiro, "I have said," and Jcoue a vocable that expresses joy 
or sorrow, according to the rapidity with which it is pronounced. It 
was located by the Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 

Iowa Falls, Hardin County, Iowa. This place was named from the nearby 
falls in the Iowa River. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 87 

Irvine, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for "Billy" Irvine, a prom 
inent "cattle man" of Wyoming, who owned a large cattle ranch near 
this place when the town site was named. 

Irving, Benton County, Iowa, was named by Levi Marsh in 1854, for Wash- 
ington Irving, the American author. 

Irving Park, Cook County, Illinois, was named for Washington Irving. At 
one time it was called Irvington, but later it was changed to its present 
form. 

Irvington, Kossuth County, Iowa, was named from the township by J. R. 
Armstrong, an old settler, and that was named for Washington Irving. 
The town was located by the Western Town Lot Company in 1881. 

Irvington, Douglas County, Nebraska, was named by Frank Hibbard from 
Irvington, New York, the home (Sunnyside) of Washington Irving, the 
noted American writer. 

Irwin, Shelby County, Iowa, was named for E. W. Irwin, the original owner 
of the town site. It was located by the Western Town Lot Company 
in 1S81. 

Irwin, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named for Bennett Irwin, who was 
once foreman on Newman's Cattle Ranch, and afterwards a prominent 
citizen and "cattleman" of Cordon, Nebraska. 

Ishpeming, Marquette County, Michigan, was named by Captain G. S. John- 
son, one of the original owners of the town site on the suggestion of 
Samuel P. Ely and Peter White. The word is derived from an Indian 
word meaning "a place high up" if not "of Heaven," or its equivalent. 
E. M. Haines in his American Indian says " the word is Ojibway for 
Heaven." The appropriateness of the name comes from the fact that it 
is on the highest ground between Lake Superior and Lake Michigan. From 
the town can be seen the waters of Carp river flowing into Lake Superior 
and Escanaba river flowing into Lake Michigan. 

Ivanhoe, Lincoln County, Minnesota, was named from Ivanhoe, one of Sir Wal- 
ter Scott's novels. It was located by the Western Town Lot Company in 
1900. Before it was given its present name it was called Wilno, a corruption 
of the name of Wilna, a place in Russia. 

Ives, Racine County, Wisconsin, was named for a business man of the vicinity. 

Jackson, Washington County, Wisconsin, was named for President Andrew 
Jackson. 

Janesville, Waseca County, Minnesota. The original name was Empire, but 
in an early day J. W. Hosmer platted an addition to the original plat and 
named it Jane for Mis. Jane Sprague, and then by general consent of the 
villagers, the Jane was enlarged by adding to it "ville" and Janesville 
resulted and was accepted as the name for the whole village. 

Janesville, Rock County, Wisconsin, was named for Henry F. Janes, who set- 
tled here in 1836. At various times the place was called Wisconsin City 
and Rockport, but the dispute was settled by territorial legislation in 
favor of the present name. 

Jefferson. Greene County, Towa. The original name was New Jefferson for 
Thomas Jefferson, president of the L T nited States, but to prevent con- 
fusion, the word "New" was dropped by the general postoffice department, 
and this practice was accepted and adopted by the citizens of the village. 



88 History of the Place Names of The North Western Linl 

Jefferson, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, was named by Perry H. Smith, an 
early railroad officer in Wisconsin for President Thomas Jeffaraon of Vir- 
ginia. 

Jefferson Junction, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, was named because of its 
relative location to the village of Jefferson. 

Jefferson Park, Cook County, Illinois. The earlier name of the village was 
"Plank road," and it was so named because the railroad here crossed one 
of the plank toll roads, that in an early day was common in the state. 
The name was changed to help along real estate speculation in the place. 

Jeffris, Lincoln County, Wisconsin, was named for James K. Jeffris, of Janes- 
ville, Wisconsin, by David K. Jeffris, the founder of the place. Its post- 
office is Bundy, and was named for McG. Bundy of Grand Rapids, Michi- 
gan, who had large timber interests here. 

Jewell Junction, Hamilton County, Iowa, was named by and for D. T. Jewell, 
the original owner of the town site. It was located by the Western Town 
Lot Company in 1880. The town was formerly called "Calahan*' for Jam< s 
Galahan, a prominent banker and citizen of Des Moines, Iowa And a large 
land owner in many parts of that state. 

Johnson's Creek, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby creek. 
The creek was named for Timothy Johnson, the first settler on the creek. 
The station was first called Belleville for an old settler, but in 187C it 
was found that priority of settlement should be given to Mr. Johnson, ami 
hence the name was changed to honor him. 

Johnstown, Brown County, Nebraska, was located by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1883 and was named for John Berry, a frontiersman and half 
owner of the town site. 

Joice, Worth County, Iowa, was named for R. M. Joice a prominent banker of 
the vicinity. 

Jordan, Boone County, Iowa, was originally called Midway, from its relation 
to the towns on each side of it. Its present name is from the River Jordan 
in Palestine. 

Judson, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was located by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1000, and was named for the oldest settler in the township. 

Juneau, Dodge County, Wisconsin, was named for Solomon Juneau, the French 
trader, who founded Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Juneau, the commercial capital of Alaska,, was located in 1880 by Joseph 
Juneau and Richard Harris. It was first named Pilzbury aDd then Rock- 
well for early settlers and then Harrisburg for the above named Richard 
Harris. In May, 1882, the citizens of the place changed the name to 
Juneau to honor the above named Joseph Juneau. His body lies in the 
cemetery of this city. The children of the place begged enough money to 
enclose his grave with an iron fence and to erect a tablet to his memory. 
This Joseph Juneau was a son of Solomon Juneau, the founder of Mil- 
waukee, Wis., for whom the county and village of Juneau, Wis., were 
named. Thus father and son were founders of commercial cities more 
than 4,000 miles apart! 

Kampeska, Codington County, South Dakota. Its first name was Lake Kamprs- 
ka, aud was named from an adjoining lake. That name was dropped on 
the suggestion of S. S. Parke of Bloomington, Ills., and Vera was substi- 



History ok the Place Names of The North Western Line k*J 



tuted. This name was from Vera, a town in Illinois (which was named 
for Augusto Vera the Italian philosopher). That whh ultimately dropped 
and the present name substituted. The word Kampeska is Sioux Indian, 
and means "bright and shining," "like a shell or glass"; Chinaware, for 
instance, is called ka-mpc-ska by the Sioux Indians. The town was 
platted under the name of Vera, by the Western Town Lot Company in 
1883. The Sioux River was called by the Sioux Indians Tchunkas-andata, 
and at one time by the traders and trappers it was called Calumet river. 
The Big Sioux river, as it is now called, is the outlet of Lake Kampeska. 
Kamrar, Hamilton County, Iowa ,was named for Judge J. M. Kamrar, a promi- 
nent lawyer of the vicinity. It was located by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1881. 
Kasota, Lesueur County, Minnesota, was named by A. P. Buell, wlio platted the 
town in 1853. It was named from an adjoining prairie. The name is an 
Indian word meaning "cleared," "cleared up," or "a sky clear from 
clouds." 
Kasson, Dodge County Minnesota, was named for J. H. Kasson, owner of the 

original town site. 
Kaukauna, Outgamie County, Wisconsin. Kaukana is an Indian word and 
in various dialects means, "portage," "long portage," "place where pick- 
erel are caught" and "place of pike." 
Keeline, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for George A. Keeline of 
Council Bluffs, Iowa, who was largely interested in the cattle business in 
this vicinity. 
Kelley, Story County, Iowa, was named for J. T. Kelly, the original owner of 
the town site. It was once and for a short time called Hubbell for a rail- 
road contractor, but on the establishment of the station, the town was 
given its present name. The present spelling of the name was devised by 
the general postoffice department. 
Kellner, Portage County, Wisconsin, was named from Kellnerville, Manitowoc 
County, Wisconsin, which was named for John Kellner, an early settler 
there. 
Kelly, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named for Nathaniel Kelly, prominent 

in business in Wausau, Wisconsin. 
Kempster, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named for Dr. Kempster of the 

Northern State Hospital for the Insane. 
Kendalls, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was named by W. D. Medbury, the 
original owner of the town site for L. G. Kendall, a farmer from whom the 
land for the town site was purchased. 
Kenilworth, Cook County, Illinois, was named by N. K. Fairbank, of Chicago, 

from the place in England. 
Kennard, Washington County, Nebraska, was named for Thomas P. Kennard, 

once Secretary of State for Nebraska, and a banker at Lincoln, Nebraska, 
Kenosha, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. This name is Indian and means "fish," 

"pike," "pickerel," or "the place where fish are plentiful." 
Kesley, Butler County, Iowa, was named for Kesley Green a prominent farmer 

of the vicinity. 
Kew, Menominee County, Michigan, was named by W. B. Linsley, a lover of 
flowers, from the celebrated Kew Botanical Gardens near London, England. 



*.K) History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Kewaskum, Washington County, Wisconsin, was named by Jesse Meyers for an 
Indian Chief who had his camp here in 1850. The word means "returning 
track," or "going on the back track," "retracing his footsteps." 

Kiester, Faribault County, Minnesota, was named for Judge J. A. Kiester of 
Blue Earth, Minnesota, where he located in 1857, and was a prominent man 
up to his death in 1905. He was county judge, county surveyor and state 
senator, and was otherwise prominent in that part of the state. 

Kimball, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named for ex-Congressman Kimball of 
Pine Eiver, Waushara County, Wisconsin. 

Kimberly, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named for the Kimberly Clark 
Company, paper manufacturers here. 

King, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named for Henry W. King, once, and 
for a long time a prominent and respected merchant of Chicago. 

Kingsley, Plymouth County, Iowa, was named for Henry W. Kingsley who sold 
the land for the town site to the Blair Town Lot and Land Company, that 
laid out the town site. The earliest settlement here was called "Quorn. " 

Kingston. Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named by the Kingston family who 
lived here, from Kingston in the Island of Jamaica, "because a party 
interested in this village had been much alarmed by the island city which 
he had recently visited." 

Kirkman, Shelby County, Iowa, was named for M. M. Kirkman, an officer of the 
railroad company. It was located by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1880. 

Kirkwood, Sank County, Wisconsin, was named by and for N. C. and Timothy 
Kirk, owners of the land on which the town is located. They owned a 
vineyard and made wine here. It is believed they were the first people to 
make grape wine in the state of Wisconsin. 

Kiron, Crawford County, Iowa, was located by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1899, and was named by A. Norelius, who had an interest in the 
place, from Kiron in Manchuria, in China. 

Klevenville, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named by and for Iver Kleven an 
early settler. Originally the place was named Pine Bluff. 

Kloman, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for Andrew Kloman of 
Pittsburg, Pa., the owner of charcoal kilns at this place and an iron ore 
operator. 

Koepenick, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named for E. S. Koepenick, its 
earliest settler and a sawmill owner and operator of the vicinity. 

Koshkonong, Eock County, Wisconsin. The name is an Indian word of doubt- 
ful meaning, possibly having reference of kosh-kosh "a hog." The name 
of the town came from that of the lake; the early settlers asserted it meant 
"the lake we live on." 

Kranzburg. Codington County, South Dakota, was named in honor of the 
four brothers Kranz, who were the earliest settlers here. It was platted 
by the Winona and St. Peter Kailroad Campany in 1879. 

La Crosse, La Crosse County, Wisconsin. This is a French name that was given 
to the locality because before its settlement by the French it was a 
favorite place for ball playing by Indians, the game being called by the 
French, "la crosse." An unauthenticated legend claimed the name came 
from the French La Croix, from a cross erected over the grave of a 
missionary murdered here by the Indians. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Link 91 

Lac du Flambeau, Vilas County, Michigan, was named from the lake. The lak<i 
was named by the early French traders, because the Indians around the 
lake were in the habit of carrying torches while spearing fish in the lake 
at night. The words mean "torch lake," or "lake of the torch." 

Ladd, Bureau County, Illinois, was named for Amos Ladd, an early settler. 

Ladoga, Alger County, Michigan, was named from the largest lake in Europe. 

La Fox, Kane County, Illinois, was named in 1866 from the Fox river. The 
earliest name of the town was Kane, which was named from the county. 
The county was named for Elias Kent Kane, U. S. Senator for Illinois, 
1824-1835. ' 

Lake Benton, Lincoln County, Minnesota, was named from the lake on which 
it is located. The lake was named by John C. Fremont, for his father-in- 
law, United States Senator Thomas H. Benton of Missouri. The town 
was located by the Western Town Lot Company in 1879. Fremont and 
Nicolett explored this territory and named many of its lakes and streams 
in 1838-9. 

Lake Bluff, Lake County, Illinois, was named from the Methodist Campmeeting 
ground east of the station. The camp ground was named from the high 
bluff shores of Lake Michigan at this place, and on which the meetings 
were held. The original name of the station was Rockland. 

Long Lake, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby lake. That 
was so named, because it was very long as compared with its width and 
because it is much longer than other lake in the vicinity. 

Leyden, Eock County, Wisconsin, was named from the town in the Netherlands, 
the refuge of the Pilgrim Fathers, before their emigration to America. 

Lake City, Calhoun County. Iowa, was so named from Lake Creek which flows 
from the Twin Lakes and which nearly surrounds the town site. It was 
laid out by the Western Town Lot Company in 1885. The creek was 
named from the fact that it flowed from a lake. 

Lake Forest, Lake County, Illinois, was named by W. H. Ferry, because the 
town site was established in a forest that extended to Lake Michigan. 

Lake Geneva, Walworth County, Wisconsin, was named from the lake. The 
lake was named from its alleged resemblance to Lake Geneva in Switzer- 
land. By the Indians it was called muck stick or " Big foot's lake," for 
"Bigfoot" an Indian chief. The French called it grospied, being a literal 
translation of the Indian name. The Indian "Big Foot" also gave his 
name to a large prairie near this lake. 

Lake Mills. Jefferson County, Wisconsin. In an early day, Joseph Keyes built 
mills on the outlet of the lake, and when a village grew around the mills, 
the question of a name for the place was discussed. At a public meeting 
called to name the village, Mr. Keyes suggested the present name, when he 
pointed to the lake and to the mills and said "Here is the lake and there 
are the mills" and the suggestion was adopted. Years afterwards some 
women of the place induced the people to adept as the name for the 
village the word Teyranena, and that became the name, but finally the 
Legislature by an act, restored the name to its original and present form. 
The village is on the shore of Rock Lake, which was the source of power 
for the mills. 



92 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Lake Mills, Winnebago County, Iowa, was named by S. D. Wadsworth and C. D. 
Smith, because a mill had been built here on the edge of the lake, that then 
came up to the mill site. At one time the place was called Slaunsville and 
that was supposed to describe the originally swampy surroundings. 

Lake Preston, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. The first name given to the 
Village was Preston, but it was finally given its preseut form. It was 
located by the Western Town Lot Company in 1881 and was named for 
the nearby lake. The lake was named by John C. Fremont and J. N. Nicolett, 
who discovered it, for United States Senator and Governor Preston of South 
Carolina. 

Lake Shore Junction, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was so named because it 
was the junction of two lines of railroad that diverged here, one running 
close along the lake shore, and the other more inland. 

Lake View. Sac County, Iowa, was so named becouse from its site a full view 
of Wall Lake could be had: it is at the head of this lake. The village was 
formerly called Fletcher for an old settler. 

Lamberton, Redwood County, Minnesota, was named for II. W. Lamberton, an 
early officer of the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company. He died in 
1906. 

Lakewood, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was laid out by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1897 and was so named from an unnamed lake in the nearby 
woods. 

Lakonta, Mahaska County, Iowa, was platted by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany in 1900. The name is an Iowa Indian word meaning a blacksmith. 
The name was suggested by Congressman J. F. Lacey of Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Lake Elizabeth, Kenosha County, Wisconsin, one of the celebrated Southern 
Wisconsin lakes. It was named for Elizabeth Barrett Browning, the noted 
English poetess. 

LaMoille, Marshall County, Iowa, was named by Isaac B. Howe, from the L&- 
Moille River in Vermont, in honor of his friend J. L. Stevens who lived 
on the bank of this Vermont river. 

Lancaster, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named from the city in Pennsylvania 
by G. M. Pierce an earlj r settler, who in 1836 moved here from the Pennsyl- 
vania city. 

Langley, Bureau County, Illinois, was named from a village of this name in 
South Carolina; that place was named from a place (Langley Parish) in 
England. 

Laona, Forest County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Railway Company in 1899. 
The name was intended for Leona, the given name of a daughter of Norman 
Johnson, a local business man, but in making out the legal papers needed 
under the law, it was misspelled, and the present form was used. - 

Lander, Fremont County, Wyoming. This town was platted many years ago and 
was named for General F. W. Lander of the United States Army. 

Larch, Delta County, Michigan, was named from the American Larch, Tamarack, 
(Larix laricina) that abounded here when the place was established. 

Larsen. Winnebago County, Wisconsin, was named for Philip Larsen, who built 
the first store building in the village. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 93 

La Salle Junction, Bureau County, Illinois, was named because it is at the point 

where a junction is formed with another railroad that runs to the City <»f 

LaSalle. LaSalle was named for Rene Robert Cavalier, Sieur, de La Salle. 

the French explorer, who probably was the first white man to see the 

locality, as he discovered the Illinois river in 1670. 
Lathrop, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Azel Lathrop, the original 

owner of the town site. It previously had been called Centcrville, beeaun* 

it was half way between Escanaba and Negaunee. 
Lathrop Avenue, Cook County, Illinois, was named in honor of Bryon Lathrop 

who owned property nearby. 
Laurens, Pocahontas County, Iowa, was named for the Laurens mentioned in 

Motley's History of the United Netherlands. It was laid out by tb* 

Western Town Lot Company in 1882. 
LaValle, Sauk County, Wisconsin, was named by B. S. Barney, J. F. Hamlin or 

early settlers from the French for ' ' the valley. ' ' 
Lawn Hill, Hardin County, Iowa, was formerly called New Providence. The 

present name is merely fanciful. It was platted by the Western Town 

Lot Company in 1880. 
Lawrence, McHenry County, Illinois, was named for and by Lawrence Bigsby, 

the original owner of the town site. 
Lawton, Woodbury County, Iowa, was laid out in 1901 by the Western Town 

Lot Company, and was named by J. C. Law from Lawton, Michigan, whence 

he had emigrated. That place was named for Nathaniel Lawton, an old 

settler of the vicinity. 
Layton Park, Milwaukee Wisconsin, was named for a prominent citizen of 

Milwaukee, Wis., who had done much for that city. 
Lead, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named for the ' ' leads " or " lodes ' ' 

of mineral bearing rock found in the vicinity. It formerly was called 

Lead City, but when it was incorporated, the "City" was dropped from 

the title. 
Leaper, Dickinson County, Michigan. This place was named for a pioneer 

merchant and "jobber" at this point. 
Lebanon, Potter County, South Dakota, was plated 1887 by the Pioneer 

Town Site Company, and named Webb for a prominent capitalist of New 

York City. By his request the name was changed and named from Lebanon 

in New York, that was named from the mountains in Syria. 
Ledyard, Kossuth County, Iowa, was named by Professor Knapp of the low* 

Agricultural College, who was a land owner at this place. It was platted 

by the Western Town Lot Company in 1884. 
Le Grand, Marshall County, Iowa, was named by and for Le Grande Byington 

of Iowa City, who owned and platted the town site. 
Leigh, Colfax County, Nebraska, was platted in 1886, by the Pioneer Town 

Site Company, and was named by A. M. Walling from his wife's maiden 

name. He was the first postmaster of the village. 
Lena, Goodhue County, Minnesota, was named for the wife of John Lee. a hotel 

keeper in an early day. 
Lenox, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was named from Lenox, Massachusetts. 
That town was named from the family name of the Duke of Richmond. 

who was the English Secretary of State when the town in Massachusetts 
was e°tablished. 



94 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Leslie, LaFayette County, Wisconsin. The first name was Grand View, be- 
cause of its sightly situation. The name was changed to Leslie for his 
son, by M. Y. Johnson, who purchased the town site. For many yeara 
the place was called Belmont, and was so named from three shapely 
mounds nearby that the early French travelers called belles monies. 
For some time this place was the territorial capital. 

Lewiston, Winona County, Minnesota, was named in 1873 for S. J. Lewis an 
early settler. It was in 1885 named New Boston by W. H. Dwight, who 
had emigrated from Boston, Mass. It held that name until the present 
name was adopted. Mr. Dwight was its first post master. 

Liberty, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named from the township, and that 
was named from the sentiment of the American people. 

Lime, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was so named because of the abundance 
of limestone in the vicinity. 

Lime Kilns. Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, was named because there were many 
lime kilns for burning lime here when the village was located. 

Limestone, Peoria County, Illinois, was named from the abundance of lime- 
stone in the vicinity, and from the location of a lime kiln near the town site. 

Linnberg, Webster County, Iowa, was named from a nearby eminence (berg) 
on which grew many "Linden," "Linn," "Basswood, " (Tilia Ameri- 
cana) trees, when the town was established. 

Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebraska, was named for Abraham Lincoln by the 
legislature of Nebraska. It was located and named as the site of the state 
capital. Previous to this action of the legislature a village called Lan- 
caster, had been established here. That village was named for Lancas- 
ter, Pennsylvania. 

Lindsay, Platte County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1886, and was named for the man on whose farm the town site was 
established. 

Lindwerm, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named for an early settler and 
owner of the land on which the town was platted. 

Linn Grove, Buena Vista County, Iowa, was named because of its location 
in a grove of "Linden" (Bass wood) "Linn," (Tilia Americana) trees 
that grew here when the town was located. 

Linwood, Butler County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1887 and was named from a grove of "Linn," "Linden," "Bass- 
wood," (Tilia Americana) that had been planted nearby by an early settler. 

Lisbon, Linn County, Iowa, was named from Lisbon, in Portugal, by John E. 
Kurtz, the first settler here. 

Little Chute, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named from the early French 
name for Fox River "Riviere des Chutes," "River of the Falls." Their 
name for this specific place was ' ' la petite chutes, " " The Little Falls. ' ' 

Little Lake, Marquette County, Michigan, was named from the lake nearby. 
It was once called Forsythe, for an early settler, but thirty-five years ago, 
the name was changed to Litle Lake by Isaac Johnson, who built a saw- 
mill on the lake. 

Little Rapids. Brown County, Wisconsin, was named from a post office that 
had been established here long before a railroad reached the place. The 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 95 

post office was named from the rapids in a nearby stream. The place was 

once called "Little Kaukauna, " Kaukauna means "pike," "pickerel," 

"portage." 
Little Saumico, Oconto County. Wisconsin, was named from the river. The 

name is from the Indian, O-sa-wa-mick-lcong "yellow beaver," or the 

"yellow widened place." The post office was for a time called Grosse, 

from the Grosse family of the place, but was finally made uniform with 

the town and railroad station. 
Livingston, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named by Thomas Watson, for Hugh 

Livingston, who owned the land where the village is located, and who was 

helpful in getting the railroad built through the locality. 
Lodi, Columbia County, Wisconsin, was named Lodi by .7. II. Palmer, the 

owner of the town site, from the bridge or place made celebrated by Na- 
poleon's victory. 
Logan, Harrison County, Iowa, was named by E. B. Talcott for General John 

A. Logan. The original name was Boyer Falls from a nearby rapids in 

the Boyer River. The town was laid out in 1867. 
Lohrville, Calhoun County, Iowa, was named for Jacob A. Lohr, the original 

owner of the town site. It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company 

in 1867. 
Lombard, Dupage County, Illinois,. The original name was Babcock's Grove, 

and was so named by and for a Mr. Babcock, the original owner of the 

town site. The present name came from Josiah L. Lombard, who in 1868 

purchased most of the land in this vicinity. 
London, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named by early settlers from London, 

England. 
Lone Rock, Kossuth County, Iowa, was platted in 1899 by the Western Town 

Lot Company, and was named from a single (lone) rock, found on the town 

site when it was platted. 
Long Point, Tama County, Iowa. The name is a transliteration of the Indian 

name. They so called it on account of a long point of land that projected 

into the Iowa River near this village. 
Long Pine, Brown County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1884 by the Pioneer Town 

Site Company and was named from the nearby river. The river was name! 

from the pine trees that grew along it. The main river is known as Pine 

Creek, and its two branches as Long Pine and Short Pine respectively. 

Loretto, Boone County, Nebraska, was named from the city in Italy. It was 
previously called Loran for Loran Clark, of Albion, Nebraska. 

Loretto, Dickinson County, Michigan, was laid out in 1887, and named from 
the city in Italy. 

Lost Spring, Converse County, Wyoming, was named from a spring at the 
head of Lost reek, which is near the village. The stream wag so named 
because it sank out of sight at places and was "lost" to sight. 

Loveland, Pottawatomie County, Iowa, was named by and for E. Loveland, the 

original settler, owner of the townsite. and locator of " Loveland 's Mills." 

of the early days of Western Iowa. 
Lowden, Cedar County, Iowa, is a transliteration of Louden of Loudenvillc, 

Ohio, and was given by Thomas Shearer, the owner of the town site, who 

had moved from Loudenville, Ohio. 



tt6 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Low Moor, Clinton County, Iowa, was named from the mill or place where the 
rails were made that were laid through this place when the railroad was 
first built. 

Luc Jin r Redwood County, Minnesota, was laid out in 1902 by the Western Town 
Lot Company. The name of the post office is Rock. The town derived it» 
name from Lucan near Dublin, Ireland. 

Ludden, Dickey County, North Dakota, was named by Ogden Lovell, who owned 
a farm near the place for David Ludden, an early settler, who had con- 
ferred many favors on Mr. Lovell and the pioneers of the vicinity, during 
the perils that surrounded them from Indians and the rigors of the winters. 
It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1886. 

Lu.sk, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for Frank S. Lusk, the owner 
of the land on which the town site was located by him. He was a well 
known ranchman of Wyoming and subsequently a prominent railroad con 
tractor. 

Luverne, Kossuth County, Iowa, was platted in 1881, under the name of Whit- 
man, for one of the officers of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Com- 
pany, by the Western Town Lot Company. A portion of the town was at 
one time called Vernon, but that was changed by the legislature of th^ 
state. The name Luverne came from Luverne in Rock County, Minnesota, 
and that was named for the daughter of one of the proprietors of the town 
site. 

Luzerne, Benton County, Iowa, was named by Isaac B. Howe, the owner of th«- 
town site, from the place in Switzerland. 

Lynch, Boyd County Nebraska, was named for J. A. Lynch, the oldest settler 
in the place. 

Lyndhttrst, Shawano County, Wisconsin. This name was made up for this place. 
It has no specific meaning 

Lyons, Clinton County, Iowa, was named by early French missionaries because 
to them, of its fancied resemblance to the site of Lyons, in France. It was 
added to in 1837 by Elijah Buel, who previous had a store near the town 
just below Lyons that was called New York, and that eventually became 
Clinton. It was at this point that the first projected trans-Mississippi rail- 
road bridge was to be erected. From the west end of that bridge all rail- 
road trains were to depart for all points west of the river. The present 
name of the river is a corruption of the Algonquin Indian name Meche-se- 
be. Father Laval, an early missionary on the lower part of the river, cor- 
rupted the name to Mich-is-pi; he was followed by Father Labatt, also a 
missionary, who spelled it Mis-is-pi, he was followed by Father Jacques Mar- 
quette, who spelled it Mis-sis-pi; others followed with Mis-siss-pi until the 
purchase of Louisiana by the United States in 1803-4 when the present 
spelling was adopted; it has remained unchanged from that time to this. 
Lytles, LaCrosse County, Wisconsin, was named for an early settler. 
Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named by Gov. Doty for James Madison, 

ex-president of the United States. 
Magnolia, Rock County, Wisconsin, was named from the township and that was 
named indirectly for Dr. Pierre Magnol, the noted botanist, for whom a 
species of the Magnolia tree was named. The post office is called Cainvillf" 
from the name of a resident family. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 97 



Malcolm, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named by and for Malcolm Hutch- 
inson, now (1907) living at Bryant, "Wisconsin, and who was the first 
settler in what is now the village of Malcolm. 

Malone, Clinton County, Iowa, was named from the place in New York state. 
The first station was called Eamessa, but when the buildings were burned, 
the station was moved to its present location and the name changed to 
Malone. 

Malone, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. The early name was St. Johns. The 
present name is given in honor of T. H. Malone, an officer of the first rail- 
road that was built through the place. 

Malta, DeKalb County, Illinois. The original name was Aetna, from Mount 
Aetna. The present name was taken from the Island in the Mediterra- 
nean Sea. 

Malvern, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was named from the battle field in Vir 
ginia that is known as Malvern Hill. 

Manchester, Kingsbury County, South Dakota, was named for a family of early 
settlers. It formerly was called Fairview, because of its outlook. It was 
located by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. 

Manitowish, Iron County, Wisconsin. This name is a corruption of the Chip- 
pewa Indian word Man-i-do-wish, meaning "evil spirit," and was first 
given the town site from the Manitowish River on which it is located. 

Manitowoc, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. A Wisconsin writer claims the 
word Manitowoc means Swarm of Spirits, but this undoubtedly is fic- 
tion. It is an Indian word, meaning "Spirit Land." Its basis is the Algon- 
quin word or term, we write Manitou, which is merely a term of reverence 
applied to any object, literally a "spirit." 

Manitowoc Junction, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named from its nearness 
and relation to the city of Manitowoc. 

Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was named from an Indian word, 
meaning "bule," or "blue earth," but more properly it means "green 
earth." It was named by Mrs. Hinkley, an early settler who spoke the 
Sioux language. The proper spelling of the name was Mah-ka-to, and was 
applied to the river on account of the color of its water. 

Mankato Junction, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was named from its near- 
ness and relation to the city of Mankato. 

Manilus, Bureau County, Illinois, was plated by the railway company in 1901, 
and was named from Manilus, New "York, and that was named for the 
Eoman general. 

Manning, Carroll County, Iowa, was named for O. H. Manning, once Lieuten- 
ant Governor of Iowa. It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company 
in 1881. 
Mansfield, Brown County, South Dakota, was named by and for John Mans 
field, the original owner of the town site. 

Mantorville, Dodge County, Minnesota. The first settlers in this county wero 
three brothers, Peter, Riley and Frank Mantor; they settled on this town 
site in 1853. When the town was platted it was named for them. 
Manville, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for H. S. Manville, the man 
ager of the Converse Cattle Company, and afterwards and yet (1907) 
a prominent citizen of California. 



98 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Manyaska, Martin County, Minnesota, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1899. The name is Sioux Indian, meaning "silver" or "mon- 
ey." Literally it means "white iron," manna, "iron" and ska "white." 
Some Indian scholars have claimed that the word means "many lakes." 

Maple Park, Kane County, Illinois, was named from a grove of hard or sugar 
maple trees (Acer saccharum) nearby. Its original name was Lodi and it 
was named from the Napoleonic battlefield or its bridge. 

Maple Ridge, Delta County, Michigan, was so named because of and from a 
nearby elevation that was heavily covered by sugar or hard maple (Acer 
saccharum) trees. 

Maple River Junction, Carroll County, Iowa, was named from the nearby river. 
The river was named because of the groves of soft maple (Acer saccliari- 
num) trees that lined its banks, when it was first known to the whites. 

Mapleton, Monona County, Iowa, was named by W. H. Wilsey, from a heavy 
growth of soft maple (Acer saccharinum) trees growing on the banks of the 
nearby Maple river. The river took its name from the fact that it w»b 
lined with soft maple (Acer saccharinum) trees. Its first name was East 
Mapleton. 

Maplewood, Cook County, Illinois, was named because of the great number of 
soft maple (Acer saccharinum) trees, that had been planted near here by 
the early settlers. 

Maquoketa, Jackson County, Iowa, was named from the river, on the south 
bank of the south fork on which it is located. The word comes from th© 
Iowa Indian and means "Bear River." The place was formerly called 
Springfield. This name was given it by J. E. Goodenow, who in 1838, 
moved here from New York State. The town was laid out in 1838 by J. 
E. Goodenow and named Springfield from the city in Vermont or Massachu- 
setts. The name was changed to Maquoketa in 1844. 

Maribel, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named from some nearby medicinal 
springs. The waters of these springs are believed to be of great value 
in the treatment of certain diseases and their worth seems to be known 
far beyond their location. The name has no real significance, as it was 
manufactured for the springs. 

Marathon, Buena Vista County, Iowa, was named from the battlefield in Greece. 

Marengo, McHenry County, Illinois, was named from the historic battlefield in 
Italy. Before this name was given it, the village was called Pleasant 
Grove from a nearby grove of trees. 

Marathon City, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named from the battlefield 
in Greece. 

Marenisco, Gogebic County, Michigan. This village was platted by the Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway Company. The name of this 
place was asserted by nearly every person who was asked about it, to be 
Indian, and if not fully Indian as it stands, then that it was based on In- 
dian words, and by elision, corruption, transliteration, translation, or in 
some other way, had been constructed from an Indian base. It was as- 
serted to have come from the Chippewa (Ojibway) Pottawatomie, Winne- 
bago, Oneida, Sioux and other tongues, and still no person was able to defi- 
nitely locate it. The most expert Indian scholars were applied to, and 
while all were certain the word came from the Indian, none could place ite 



History of the Place Names of The North Western- Line 99 



parentage. Not less than one hundred letters were written by the com- 
piler in his endeavor to find its origin and meaning, if it had any. At 
the end of this correspondence, which covered the entire northwest as well 
as parts of the east, and extended over a year, not a glimmer of definite 
information was procured. Every person whose attention was called to 
the case, with great good nature and courtesy, endeavored to find and sup- 
ply the facts needed, but all failed, and in the end the problem was no 
nearer solution than it was when the search began. 

By bare accident the compiler learned that Emmet H. Scott, of La 
Porte, Indiana, in an early day had owned a considerable tract of timber 
land in the vicinity where this town now stands. Mr. Scott was written to, 
and being in Italy, the letter followed him there, whence came the solution 
of the mystery! 

As the principal land owner of the vicinity, Mr. Scott was asked to 
name the post office (when one came to be established) and while thinking 
of a suitable name, he happened to see his wife's name written out in full — 
Mary Relief Niles Scott. The thought came to him to manufacture a name 
out of her name, and thus honor her, and perhaps, as well mystify the 
generations to come! He took the letters "MA" from the Mary, "RE" 
from the Relief; the "NI" from the Niles and the "SCO" from the Scott. 
and putting them together he had the word, Ma-re-ni-sco, and the name for 
the post office and town, and the subject that had caused such a length of 
search and mass of correspondence. 

It is needless to say the "mystery" connected with the origin and con- 
struction of the name, has for many years given Mr. Scott much amusement 
and satisfaction. 
Marinette, Marinette County, Wisconsin, was named for Marinette Jacobs, the 
daughter of a semi-civilized Indian chief. The name is a composite of the 
names Marie Antoinette. 
Marion, Waupaca County, Wisconsin, was named by B. P. Dorr for General 

Francis Marion of the Revolution. 
Mama, Faribault County, Minnesota. This name is a corruption of Marne, the 

name of a province and a river in France. 
Marshall, Lyon County, Minnesota, was named by Colonel James H. Howe, of 
Kenosha, Wisconsin, in honor of W. R. Marshall, governor of the state 1866- 
1870. It was platted by the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company in 
1872. 
Marshalltown, Marshall County, Iowa, was named by the Iowa Town Lot and 
Land Company, from Marshall, Michigan, whence had come H. Anson. 
John Childs and others, who in 1853 laid out the town. The name was 
changed to its present form, as there already was a Marshall in Henry 
County, Iowa. 
Marshfield, Wood County, Wisconsin. This place was named by John J. Marsh, 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts, for his uncle, Samuel Marsh. The land on 
which the town is located, was part of the lands granted by the United 
States to the Fox River Improvement Company for the purpose of estab- 
lishing a waterway between Green Bay and the Mississippi River. Horatio 
Seymour, Ezra and A. B. Cornell, Erastus Corning and William Allen But- 
ler, all of New York State and Samuel Marsh, of Massachusetts. werr> 



100 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



among the original owners of the place. The legend that this place wa* 
named from Marshfield, the home of Daniel Webster, in Massachusetts, in 
a myth, propogated in very recent years. We are indebted to the Hon. W 
H. Upham, ex-governor of Wisconsin, for the facts in this case. The Gov 
ernor has been nearly a life-long resident and one of the most prominent 
business men of the place. 

Martland, Fillmore County, Wisconsin. Was platted by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company in 1889 and named for Martland Danielson, an early settler of the 
place. 

Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. John B. Long in 1851 settled here and 
named his farm and the grove in which his home was built, "Masonic 
Grove," in honor of the Freemasons. He and others laid out a village 
and called it "Shiboleth," a word well known to Freemasons and read- 
ers of the Bible. In 1854 Mr. Long bought out his partners in the town 
site, and renamed it for his son, Mason Long. In 1855 the last part of 
the name was dropped and "City" substituted therefor. 

Mastodon, Iron County, Michigan, was named from the Mastodon iron mine 
that was opened here. It was named because bones of an extinct mas- 
todon were found when sinking the shaft for the mine. 

Maurice, Sioux County, Iowa. Was platted by the Western Town Lot Company 
in 1882 and was named for Count Maurice of Nassau and Prince of Orange, 
son of William, the Silent, count of Holland, Nassau and Orange. Maurice 
succeeded his father and was one of the leaders for many years in the war- 
fare with Spain. 

Mayfair, Cook County, Illinois, was named from a novel in which this name 
is used to represent a supposed portion of London, England, and of the 
people who live in it. The original name of the town was Montrose and 
was named for the place in Scotland. 

Maywood, Cook County, Illinois, was named by Colonel W. T. Nichols, one of 
the owners of the original town site, for his daughter "May." To this name 
he added "wood," because of the forest (woods) in this locality. The 
town was laid out by the Proviso Land Company. This was one of a very 
few corporations that ever were chartered by the State of Illinois to deal 
in lands. The company is still in existence. 

McFarlands, Marquette County, Michigan, was named for A. McFarland, a pio- 
neer farmer of the vicinity. 

Marshland, Buffalo County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby fertile field 
that once had been marshy land. 

Midland, Stanley County, South Dakota. Was named from a nearby postoffice, 
and that was so named because it was supposed to be about half way 
between the Missouri and the south fork of the Cheyenne Eiver. 

McHenry, McHenry County, Illinois, was named from the county, and that was 
named for General William McHenry, a prominent officer in the Black 
Hawk war. 

McMillan, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named for P.. F. McMillan, a 
lumber man of Wisconsin. 

McNaughton, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was named for a sawmill owner at 
this point. It was formerly called Hazelhurst from the great growth 
of hazel (Corylvs Aviericana) growing here. Hurst or hoorst is German 
for a "grove." 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 101 



Meadow Grove, Madison County, Nebraska, was named from a grove of cotton- 
wood (Populus Canadensis) that stood in a meadow near the site of the 
town. 

Mechanicsville, Cedar County, Iowa, was named by John Onstat and D. H. 
Comstock, the original owners of the town site, because the first four set- 
tlers were mechanics. 

Medary, LaCrosse County, Wisconsin. This place was originally called Winona 
Junction, from the fact that at this point a junction was formed with a rail- 
road that ran to Winona, Minnesota. Its present name was given in honor 
of Samuel Medary, once governor of Minnesota and of Kansas, and who 
emigrated to the west from Columbus, Ohio. 

Medina, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named from Medina, Ohio, and that 
was named from the city in Arabia. 

Medina Junction, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, was named from its near 
ness to and relation to the village of Medina. 

Melrose Park, Cook County, Illinois, was named from Melrose Abbey in Scot 
land. Its original name was Melrose; the addition of the word "park' 
was for the purpose of (supposed) "euphony." 

Melvin, Custer County, South Dakota, was named by Charles Perkins for his 
son, Melvin Perkins. Charles Perkins was an early settler here. 

Menasha, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, is from an Indian word, meaning 
"thorn" or "island." 

Mondota, Dane County, Wisconsin. Its first name was Westport, but when n 
state hospital was located here, the name was changed by Dr. A. McDill 
to its present name. The name is from an Indian word meaning, in one 
Indian tongue "the junction of two trails," and in another, "the mouth 
of a river." 

Menominee, Menominee County, Michigan, was named from the Indian tribe 
"the rice eaters," and refers to the wild rice that before the white man 
came to Wisconsin, formed the only vegetable diet of this tribe. 

Mequon, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, is an Indian word, meaning "ladle," or 
"feather." It was first used for a river in Wisconsin because of a bend 
in the river resembling a paddle, or as some thought, a feather. 

Mercer, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named for General Hugh Mercer of the 
Revolution, by a man of this name who lived here when the town was estab- 
lished. Thio has caused many to think the town was named for the local 
man. 

Meriden, Steel County, Minnesota, was named by F. J. Stephens, its founder, 

from Meriden, Connecticut. 
Merrimac, Sauk County, Wisconsin, was named from the river in New Hamp 
shire and Massachusetts. 

Marriman, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named for John Merriman, a train 
master in charge of the construction train, while the road was being built 
through this locality. 

Metropolitan. Dickinson County, Michigan, was named from the iron ore min* 
of that name that was opened here. The name was expressive of the hop* 
of its founders as to its magnitude and value. 
Mlchigamme, Marquette County, Michigan. Is an Indian word, meaning "large 
lake" and was adopted as the name for the town from the nearby lake. 



102 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Midway, LaCrosse County, Wisconsin. J. B. Canterbury, its founder, called 
it Halfway Creek, because it was located on a stream of that name. When 
the railway was built through the village, for brevity it was given its pres- 
ent name. At one time it was called Charleston, for Charles Nichols, who 
once owned the town. 

Middle Creek Stock Yards, Butte County, South Dakota. This name merely 
indicates a point that is shown on the time table of the road. The name 
has no historical significance. The place is merely a point for loading live 
stock. 

Milford, Brown County, Minnesota. The first sawmill in this part of the state 
was located here, and a ferry established on the Minnesota River nearby. 
The township was named Milford from these two facts, and the name of the 
town naturally followed. 

Millbrig, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, was named by George Bell, the owner 
of a saw mill built near here in an early day. 

Miller, Hand Coonty, South Dakota, was named by and for Henry Miller, the 
first settler in this place and founder of the town. 

Millerton, Butler County, Nebraska, was named for William P. Miller, one of 
the oldest setlers in this part of the state, who had a farm and fine home 
near this town site. 

Milton Junction, Bock County, Wisconsin, was named from the township, and 
that was named for John Milton, the poet. 

Milroy, Bedwood County, Minnesota, was platted in 1902 by the Western Town 
Lot Company and was named for Major General Robert H. Milroy, a gal- 
lant Union soldier during the early days of the war of the rebellion. 

Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Henry Gannett of the United States 
Geological Survey, says it was derived from the Indian word, Milioke, mean- 
ing "good earth," or "good country." It has been spelled in many ways 
from that of Bather Hennepin 'a Melleoke of 1679 ; M eleke of a French map 
of 1648 ; Milwarick of John Baisson de St. Cosme of 1699, down to the pres- 
ent. The name of the first postoffice established was spelled Melwakee, and 
that of the second Milwaukie, Solomon Juneau postmaster in both cases. The 
name Milwaukee is probably of Pottawattamie origin and was originally 
Mahnah-wauk-seepe, a gathering place or council ground near the river. Vari- 
ous other deriviations have been given. One is that it sprang from the 
name of a medicinal root called Man-wan, which grew nowhere else, and 
caused the Indians to speak of man-a-waukee, or place of the man-wau. But 
there was no valuable medicinal root growing in the vicinity of Milwaukee 
that the settlers could not find elsewhere. An interpreter for the Chippewas 
is authority for the assertion that Milwaukee was first pronounced me-ne- 
au-kee, and meant rich or beautiful land, but the land upon which the city 
is now located was not particularly fertile, although the site of the city 
was beautiful. The first mention of Milwaukee is in the journal of Father 
Zenobe Membra, in 1679, which records the existence of a tribe of Indians 
at the mouth of the Millicki River. A priest named Father John Baisson 
de St. Cosme touched at the Mclwarik with a flotilla of canoes in the fall 
of 1699 on the way from Mackinaw to what now is Chicago. Lieutenant 
James Gorrell, of the Eightieth Royal American Regiment, mentions in 
his journal under date of September 1, 1761, the arrival of a party of Indians 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 103 

from Milwacky. In the Haldimand papers, discovered in England and pub- 
lished by the Wisconsin State Historical Society, there is a report by Capt. 
Samuel Robertson, of His Majesty's sloop Felicity, concerning a voyage 
of discovery around Lake Michigan, in which he mentions Milwackey, 
under date of November 1, 1779. There are at least eleven or twelve spell- 
ings of this word known to writers of early history. E. M. Haines in his 
North American Indian says, "Milwaukee is an Algonquin word for "good 
land," "rich land." The earliest mention is by Hennepin. He refers to 
a river in what is now "Wisconsin, which he called Milicke. This was doubt- 
less the French understanding of the sounds that made up the name, but it 
was not Indian of the Indians that lived there in Hennepin's time, as 
they had no sound of "1" in their dialect, they used the sound of "n" 
instead. It is fair to believe that the word was derived from some Indian 
tribes, living along the river in Hennepin's time, and that the French used 
the sound " 1 " instead of " n. " Min-wau-kee and Min-noau-kee would mean 
1 ' good earth, " " good place, " or " good country. ' ' Min-au-kee would mean 
"country of berries." MU-tig-wau-ka-kee meant forest." 

Minfield, Fremont County, Wyoming. This town was platted by the Pioneer 
Town Site Company and was named by it. The name is from the Arapo- 
hoe Indian language and means "good." 

Minneota, Lyon County, Minnesota, was named by George P. Goodwin and the 
name is assumed to be a Dakota Indian word, meaning "much water." 
The town was platted by the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company in 
1881. Its first name was Nordland, and was given in honor of Norway. 

Minnesota City, Winona County, Minnesota, was named in 1852 from the state 
by Robert Pike. 

Minnesota Junction, Dodge County, Wisconsin, was nameil from the state. 
The town was located on a railroad that was expected to reach and cross 
the then territory of Minnesota. 

Miranda, Faulk County, South Dakota, was named from the given name of the 
mother of the President of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Com- 
pany. It was platted by the Western Town Lot Company in 1886. 

Mission Hill, Yankton County, South Dakota, was named by Rev. D. B. Nich- 
ols, from a nearby hill, on which in the early days, was maintained a small 
congregational country church. 

Missouri Valley, Harrison County. Iowa. The original name was St. Johns, 
though the original town of that name was and is four miles distant from 
the present town. When the railroad was built up the valley of the Mis- 
souri River, the name was changed to Missouri Valley Junction, as the 
place was to be the junction of two lines of railway. Its name was for 
brevity changed to the present form. The present town was laid out in 1867. 

Modale, Harrison County, Iowa. This is a name made from "Mo" the abbrevia- 
tion for Missouri (referring to the nearby river) and "dale" a small 
valley or glen, that at this point ran down to the "river's brink." 

Mokoma. Natrona County, Wyoming. This name is from the Ojibway Indian 
word mokomav, meaning "knife." 

Moingona, Boone County, Iowa, was named from the Indian Mi-ko-nang , mean- 
ing "road." The French spoke the word as if spelled Moingona,, and short- 
ened to Hoin, and used that as a part of the name for the river, which we 
now call the Des Moines River. C. E. Vail, of New Jersey, named this town. 



104 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Mondarain, Harrisou County, ]owa. This is an Indian word meaning "corn," 
or the "place where corn grows." Longfellow in his song of Hiawatha, 
makes Mondamin wrestle and be thrown and buried by Hiawatha, and from 
his body comes corn, "the friend of man." 

Monico Junction, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was named by B. F. Door. Tbt- 
name seems to have been made for this place as no trace of its origin c^n 
be found. 

Monmouth, Jackson County, Iowa, was named from the township. That was 
named from the Revolutionary battle of the war of the Revolution, Jut*- 
28th, 1778. 

Monowi, Boyd County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com 
pany in 1902. The name given it was made for the purpose and wai 
intended to be accepted as an Indian word. Some people claim it is Indian 
and means "a flower," but no adequate authority seems to be found for 
that assertion. 

Monroe, Turner County, South Dakota, was platted in 1887 under the name of 
"Warrington, by the Pioneer Town Site Company, and was finally name''. 
Monroe for ex-President Monroe of the United States. 

Montfort, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named from an old fort, or palissaoV.: 
block house that in an early day was built on a nearby mound, as a pr<. 
tection to the settlers against hostile Indians. Its postoffice was succes- 
sively called Wingville and Podunk, but now agrees with the name of the 
village. 

Montrose Siding, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. This place was named from 
Montrose which was referred to by Sir Walter Scott in his legend of Mont 
rose, and that undoubtedly came from the town of that name in Scotland. 

Montour, Tama County, Iowa. The original name was Orford. The present 
name is from a county in Pennsylvania. That was named for Andrew Mon- 
tour, son of Madam Margret Montour, and an Oneida Indian. The Madam 
had before her marriage with the Oneida been married to a Seneca Indian. 
Montour was an interpreter and guide and was faithful to the whites at a 
time when half breeds were nearly all enemies to the whites and were 
treacherous. The Madam had several daughters who were noted women in 
their locality. 

Moneta, Fremont County, Wyoming, was laid out in 1906 and named from a 
village in O'Brien County, Iowa, which was named from the ancient name 
of the Island of Anglesey. A local legend declared the word was Spanish 
and meant "little money." 

Moorhead, Monona County, Iowa, was platted in 1899 by the Western Town Lot 
Company and named for J. B. Moorhead, an early settler. 

Morgan, Redwood County, Minnesota, was platted in 1878 by the Western Town 
Lot Company and was named for Henry Lewis Morgan, the American 
soldier, author and explorer. He explored in an early day this part of Min- 
nesota and wrote a full history of the American beaver (Castor Americana) 
and its works. 

Monti, Deuel County, South Dakota, was named for Andrew Merits, an early 
nearby settler. 

Morrison, Whiteside County, Illinois, was named by Lyman Johnson, the orig 
inal owner of the townsite, for Charles Morrison, of New York City. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Ling 105 

Morse, Bureau County, Illinois, was named for W. E. Morse, a railroad olHeinl 
of Chicago. Its postoffice is called Lombardville, and was foruiorlj ealle<! 
Coda, a misspelling of Code, from an early settler here. 

Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, was platted in 1887 and named Morse 
by the Pioneer Town Site Company. To prevent confusion owing to an- 
other Morse on the line of the North Western Road, the word "Bluff," 
was added to the station name. The place was named for Chas. W. Morse 
of North Bend, Nebraska, who ouce owned the land on which the town site 
is. 

Moreland, Cook County, Illinois. When this place was platted it was under 
water most of the time; this caused H. H. Porter one of the owners to Bay 
"more land and less water is much needed here." The first words of this 
sentence were taken as the name for the town. 

Mosel, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, was named for the river (Moselle) in 
Germany and France, that is noted for the vineyards on its banks and the 
wine that is made therefrom. 

Mosling, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was originally called Linwood from the 
"Linn" or "basswood" (Tilia Americana) trees that grew nearby. When 
that name was dropped, it was named for a merchant doing business there. 

Mount Horeb, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named from Mount Horeb, in 
Arabia, Petria on the Sinai Peninsula, the supposed dwelling place of the 
ancient Israelitish "Jehovah," who appeared to Moses and gave him "The 
Law." The word is supposed to mean "Mount of God." 

Mount Prospect, Cook County, Illinois, was so named because it wa« thought 
that the name was descriptive of the place. 

Mount Vernon, Linn County, Iowa. The town was laid out by A. J. Willetts is 
1847 and was named for the Virginian home of George Washington. 

Mountain, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1896. It was named from its location in a deep valley be- 
tween very high and precipitous hills. It got this name in the early stage 
days, when the stages had to climb these hills, or, as the drivers called 
them — ' ' mountains. ' ' 

Moville, Woodbury County, Iowa, was platted by the Western Town Lot ''nm 
pany in 1887, and was named from "Mo.," the abbreviation of the word 
Missouri (referring to the nearby river) and the word "ville" — village. 

Munrfords, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for a man named Mum 
ford, who owned kilns and made charcoal here. 

Nachusa, Lee County, Illinois, was named by A. P. Dysart, the original ownpr 
of the town site. Before this name was given it, the town was called 
Taylor. The present name is supposed to be Sac or Fox Indian, but the 
meaning is unknown. 

Nadeau, Menominee County, Michigan, was named by the county authorities 
for "Tony" Nadeau, an early settler. 

Narenta, Delta County, Michigan, was originally named Deerfield. The origin 
or significance of that name is lost. The present name is from the river in 
Herzegovina in Europe. Its Slavic name is Nantva; aneient Naro, and is 
anglicized as above. Its postoffice is called Bark River. 

Nashville, Jackson County, Iowa, was named in 1854 by Dr. D. S. Teeple from 
the city in Tennessee. 



106 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Natrona, Natrona County, Wyoming, was named from the county. The county 
was named from the Spanish word Natron, meaning "Native Carbonite of 
Soda," which is plentiful here. 

Necedah, Juneau County, Wisconsin. The name is a corruption of Ojibway In- 
dian nissida, meaning "let there be three of us." The river on which 
the village is located is called "Yellow Eiver" by the whites, but by the 
Indians was called nissida. 

Nekoosa, Wood County, Wisconsin, was named from the Nekoosa Paper Com- 
pany. The word is Winnebago Indian and in that tongue means "run- 
ning water." The Indiana gave the place that name because of the rap- 
ids here in the Wisconsin Eiver. The first white settlers here, amongst 
whom was Daniel Whitney, who built a mill here in 1834, called the place 
Whitney's Eapids, for this Daniel Whitney. In 1847 it was called "Poiut 
Boss," for a lumberman named Boss. In 1893, its name was definitely 
fixed as Nekoosa. 

Neenah. W T innebago County, Wisconsin. The name is derived from an Indian 
word meaning "water." 

Negaunee, Marquette County, Michigan. The name is a Chippewa (Ojibway; 
Indian word meaning "first" "ahead" "he goes before." The word was 
selected by Peter White (Pierre Le Blanc), an early and much loved citizen 
of Marquette, Mich., at the suggestion of the owners of the Pioneer Iron 
Company as the best word he could think of that would represent the word 
' ' Pioneer. ' ' 

Nashville, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named for G. V. Nash, of Forest City, 
Arkansas. 

Neligh, Antelope County, Nebraska, was named in 1873 by William B. Lambert, 
for John D. Neligh of West Point, Nebraska, who platted the town site. 

Nelson, Lee County, Illinois, was named for Samuel Nelson, an early settler 
here. 

Nenzil, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named for George Nenzil, an early set- 
tler of this part of the county and the owner of the land on which the 
town is located. 

Neshkora, Marquette County, Wisconsin. This name was built up from Nash 
and Kora, names of two of the early settlers near this town. For 
euphony the first name is spelled Nesh instead of Nash. 

Nevada, Story County, Iowa. This is a Spanish word meaning "snow clad" 
"snowy land," and was originally applied to snow capped mountains. The 
town was named by the county commissioners in 1853, from the Sierra Ne- 
vada mountains. 

Nevada Gulch, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named from the gulch in 
which it is located. That was named from the State of Nevada, and this 
was named from the Spanish word meaning "snow clad" "snowy land," 
and was originally applied to snow capped mountains. 

Newald, Forest County, Wisconsin, was platted in 1905 by the Western Town 
Lot Company and was named Eoss for Chas. Eoss, an early settler of the 
vicinity. The name was changed in 1906 to Newald for the owner of prop- 
erty in the vicinity. 

Newbold, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was named for Fred. Newbold, a nephew 
of F. W. Ehinelander, President of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and West- 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 107 



ern Railroad, when it was built thro' this place. Mr. Nowbold owned 
and operated a saw mill at Tigerton, Wisconsin. 

New London, Waupaca County, Wisconsin, was named in 1852 by R. Smith, 
when building a plank road between Appleton and Stevens Point, from hi3 
old home in Connecticut. 

New London Junction, Outagamie County, Wisconsin. The name was given this 
site because at this point, another railroad crossed that of the Chicago 
and North Western Company, which runs thro' New London proper. 

Newman's Grove, Madison County, Nebraska, was platted in 1886 by the Pio- 
neer Town Site Company and was named from a r.earby grove. This 
grove was named for one of the first settlers in this part of the state, who 
planted the grove that was ultimately known by this name. 

Newport, Rock County, Nebraska. During the time the Government was 
building the United States Military Post at Fort Niobrara, a bridge was 
built across the Niobrara River some ten or twelve miles north of this 
place, and mule trains crossed there and followed the north side of the river 
for a good many miles west. This bridge was called the Newport Bridge. 
When the railroad was built the Chief Engineer thereof, thought it proper 
to call this place Newport, because it was the nearest point to the bridge 
aforesaid. 

Newton, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named for Sergeant John Newton 
of the Revolutionary War. The postoffice is called Timothy. 

New Ulm, Brown County, Minnesota, was named New Ulm by immigrants from 
their native city, (Ulm) in Germany. 

Nlckerson, Dodge County, Nebraska, was named for Captain Frederick Nick 
erson, a sea captain, steamboat owner and capitalist of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Nicollet, Nicollet County, Minnesota, was named for Jean Nicholas Nicollet, 
a French explorer and Cartographer. He was born in Savoy in 1781 and 
came to the United States on a scientific tour. He explored the southern 
states and then via the Red, Arkansas and Missouri Rivers he traversed the 
great central basin of the continent. In 1836 he visited the sources of the 
Mississippi river and prepared maps of his journeys for the United States 
Government. He died in Washington, D. C, in 1843. 

Nilea Center, Cook County, Illinois, was named for the township. That waa 
named for Niles a village in Cayuga County, New York. 

Niobrara, Knox County, Nebraska. This is an Indian word meaning "swift 
water" "running water," and was first applied to the river and from that 
was applied to the town site. 

Node Ranch, Converse County, Wyoming, was named from the cattle brand of 
a nearby cattle ranch, that was owned by a Denver, Colorado, corporation, 
and that was managed by Frank S. Lusk, for whom the town and station of 
Lusk, were named. The name Node was taken from a work on astronomy. 

Nora, Nuckolls County, Nebraska, was platted in 1888 under the name of South 
Nora by the Pioneer Town Site Company and was named from Nora, 
Illinois, whence its earliest settlers emigrated. Nora, Illinois, was named 
by Colonel R. B. Mason, Chief Engineer of the Illinois Central railroad at 
the request of J. M. Douglas, its President, for a woman living there when 
the village was started. He said it was a small place and should have a 
small name. 



108 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Norfolk, Madison County, Nebraska, was named by ex-Governor John M. 
Thayer from the county in England and from Norfolk, Massachusetts. A 
local though untrue legend is to the effect that it was named for the north 
fork of the Elkhorn River. 

Norfolk Junction. Madison County, Nebraska, was platted in 1881 by the Pio- 
neer Town Site Company and was named from its proximity to the City of 
Norfolk. 

Normandy, Bureau County, Illinois, was named for the Norman family from 
whom the land for the town site was bought. 

Norrie, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named for Gordon Norrie, for many 
years, Treasurer of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railroad. 

North Aurora, Kane County, Illinois, was named from its being north and near 
to the city of Aurora. 

Nowlin, Stanley County, South Dakota, was named from a nearby postoffice. 
That was named for Major Henry J. Nowlan of the United States Army. 
In naming the postoffice it was erroneously spelled and this corrupt spell- 
ing has followed into the spelling of the name of the town. 

North Avenue, Cook County, Illinois. This is merely a station located on North 
Avenue in the city of Chicago; the Avenue when so named was the north- 
ern limits of the city. 

North Chicago, Lake County, Illinois. The original name of this place was 
South Waukegau, and was so named because of its joining the limits of 
that city. Its name was ultimately changed by some real estate speculators 
who bought the place. 

North Freedom, Sauk County, Wisconsin, was named from the sentiment that 
should animate all Americans. The town was originally named Bloom 
by G. Van Meenan for G. W. Bloom, the original owner of the town site. 
The name was changed to North Freedom on petition from the citizens. 

Northfield, Cook County, Illinois, was named from Northfield, Massachusetts, 
and that was so named because of its northerly situation in the county of 
Franklin. 

Northville, Spink County, South Dakota, was named by the railroad company 
from the fact that the station then was the most northerly station on 
the railroad. The town was platted in 1881 by the Western Town Lot 
Company. 

Norwalk, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was named by S. McGarry the original 
owner of the town site, from his residence in the State of Ohio. Norwalk, 
Ohio, that was named for Norwalk in Connecticut, and that was derived 
from an Indian word meaning "A point of land." 

Norway, Benton County, Iowa, w T as named by Osman Tuttle, a Norwegian, 
from his native state. 

Norway, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named because of the abundance of 
so-called Norway pine (Pinus resinosa — "Red Pine") that grew in the 
vicinity when the town was established. 

Norwood Park, Cook County, Illinois, was named Norwood by the owner of the 
town site from a novel written by Henry Ward Beecher. The word "Park" 
was afterwards added to distinguish this place from Norwood in Mercer 
County, Illinois. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 101) 

Oak, Nuckolls County, Nebraska, was platted in 1888 by the Pioneer Town Site 
Company and was named from Oak Creek, a tributary of the Big Blue River 
that runs through the town. The creek was named because of the groves 
of oak trees that lined its banks. 

Oak Center, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. Was named by Perry H. Smith, 
an officer of the original Chicago and North Western Railway, because the 
town was established in a grove of oaks. 

Oakdale, Antelope County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1891 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company and was named by I. N. Taylor of Omaha, Nebraska, who 
was part owner in the town site. He named it Oakdale because of the oak 
trees that grew around the place. 

Oakes, Dickey County, North Dakota, was named for Thomas P. Oakes an 
officer of the Northern Pacific Railroad. The town was laid out in 1S86 
by the Western Town Lot Company. 

Oakfield, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was so named by Jacob Brewster, an 
early settler, because it was located in a grove of oak trees. 

Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. The settlement was first known as Kettle- 
strings' Grove. The second name was Oak Ridge. When in the summer 
of 1848, the railroad reached here from Chicago, the station was named 
Harlem from Harlem in Holland, and the postoffice was named Noyesville 
for an old settler. The present name followed the above and was adopted 
because of the many oak trees that grew on the village plat. 

Oconto, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named from the river. The word 
is Indian. In one language it means "red ground" and in the Menominee 
dialect, "place of the pickerel." The river was, by the early settlers, 
called the Pickerel River. The Indians also called the black bass Oconto. 

Ocla, Fremont County, Wyoming, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany and was named for an Indian (Omaha tribe, perhaps) word meaning 
"water." 

Oconto Falls, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named because it is located near 
the falls of the Oconto River. 

Octavia, Butler County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1887 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company and was named for Mrs. Octavia Speltz, wife of Allen 
Speltz, a prominent farmer of the vicinity, who desired that the town 
should be so named. 

Odanah, Ashland County, Wisconsin, is an Ojibway Indian word meaning 
"town" or "village." 

Odebolt, Sac County, Iowa, was so named from a stream that runs through the 
town. The name is a corruption of Odebeau, the name of a French trap- 
per, who in 1855 lived on the bank of the creek. The town was platted 
by the Blair Land Company in 1877. 

Odin, Watonwan County, Minnesota, was laid out in 1899 by the Western Town 
Lot Company and was named from Odin, a village in Marion County, 
Illinois; that was named for the heathen god Odin of the ancient northern 
nations. 

Oelrichs, Fall River County, South Dakota, was named for Henry Oelricha, who 
owned a cattle ranch in the immediate vicinity. 

Ogden, Boone County, Iowa, was named for William B. Ogden, an early Presi- 
dent of the Galena and Chicago Union and of the Chicago & North West- 
ern railroads. 



110 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Okee, Columbia County, Wisconsin, was named by Mrs. (Dr.) Miller Blakeley. 
It is an Indian word meaning "evil spirits." In another Indian dialect 
the word is Auke and means "earth" or "place." The early French 
maps give the name as Okee. 

Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, is an Indian word meaning "up stream." 
The name was suggested for the town by Jesse Lowe. Omaha is also the 
name of a tribe designated as the "up-stream people." In Lewis and 
Clark's day, the tribe was known as the Mah-has. 

Omaha Heights, Douglas County, Nebraska, was so named because the station 
was located on a height of land adjoining the city of Omaha. 

Onalaska, La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Onalaska is doubtless of Indian deri- 
vation or construction; its meaning is doubtful. Some claim, it means 
"bright water," and others, that it was the name of a Winnebago Indian 
woman and that it had no meaning. It is also claimed the name came 
from the Alaska Indians or from a Eussian corruption of an Indian word. 

Onawa, Monona County, Iowa, was laid out in 1857 by the Monona Land Com- 
pany, and afterwards was named from an elision of Onaway, one of the 
characters in Longfellow's poem of the story of Hiawatha. The word 
means "awake" or "wide awake." 

O'Neill, Holt County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1S99 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company. The town was named for General John O'Neill, the Irish 
patriot, who took a large colony of his countrymen, from Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania, and settled them in the vicinity. He ordered that no spiritous 
liquors should be sold in his part of the domain, and that prohibition still 
obtains. 

Onslow, Jones County, Iowa, was named by W. T. Shaw, the owner of the town 
site, for an ex-Governor of the State of Maine. 

Ontario, Story County, Iowa, was named by H. Scott, the owner of the town 
site, from Ontario, Eichland County, Ohio, where he once lived. 

Oostburg, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, was named by Peter Doane from 
Oostburg in Holland, whence Mr. Doane and many of the settlers in the 
vicinity had emigrated. 

Oralabor, Polk County, Iowa, was named by John Albrecht, the owner of the 
land where the village was established. Its significance if it ever had any 
seems to be lost. 

Oral, Fall Biver County, South Dakota, was named from a nearby postoffice, 
that was named Oral from the word that means "uttered through the 
mouth," and was selected to show that from the time the place was so 
named "it would be a place that would be mentioned or spoken about in 
place of merely being pointed at or known by sign language." The place 
was formerly known as Cheyenne Pit. 

Orange City, Sioux County, Iowa, was named for William I, the Silent, Count 
of Nassau, Prince of Orange and finally Count of Holland, by Henry Hos- 
pers who laid out the town in 1872, and who wished to honor the Holland- 
ers who early settled in this county. 

Ordway, Brown County, South Dakota, was named for N. G. Ordway, once Gov- 
ernor of Dakota Territory. The town was platted by the Western Town 
Lot Company in 1880. 

Ore Dock Junction. Ashland County, Wisconsin, is merely the railroad operat- 
ing name for a junction point, and has no significance. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 111 



Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named from the township and that was 
named from the State of Oregon. The meaning of the word is in dis- 
pute. Some authorities claim it was derived from Origanum, the botanical 
name of a plant; others claim it was derived from the Spanish Oregones, 
which was a name given the Indians inhabiting the region, by a Jesuit 
priest, and that the word means "big eared men." 
Orin Junction, Converse County, Wyoming, was named from the given name of 
Orin Hughitt of Genoa, Cayuga County, New York, an uncle of the president 
of the Chicago & North Western railway. The word "Junction" was added 
to the man 's name because the place became the junction of two railroads. 
Osier, Delta County, Michigan. This name was suggested by the abundance of 
the Osier, (Salix discolor) a variety of willow, that were found here when 
the town was located. 
Otis, Linn County, Iowa, was named for Harrison Gray Otis of Massachusetts. 
Owasa, Hardin County, Iowa. This name is a corruption of the Sac Indian word 

' ' owasse ' ' — meaning a ' ' bear. ' ' 
Owatonna, Steele County, Minnesota, was named from the river. The word 
is Sioux Indian and meant "straight." It was applied to the river in 
derision, as it is about the crookedest river in the state. The Indian 
word was spelled O-wa-ton-nia. 
Owanka, Pennington County, South Dakota. This place was originally named 
Wicota, which is a Sioux Indian word, meaning "a crowd." That name 
was dropped and the place is now named Owanka, which is a Sioux In- 
dian word meaning "a camp" or a "good camping ground— (place.) " 
Oro, Menominee County, Michigan, was named from the Spanish word mean- 
ing "gold," because it was thought that metal had been found here. 
Oronoco, Olmsted County, Minnesota. Was named from the Orinoco Eiver in 
Venezuela, but in some now unknown way, the name was misspelled when 
the plat of the village was recorded. 
Orson. Harrison County, Iowa, was laid out in 1899 by the Western Town Lot 
Company. Before the coming of the railroad, a nearby postoffice had this 
name, and it was translated to the new location. It was named for Orson 
Pratt, a prominent Mormon church official. 
Osborne, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named for A. L. Osborne, who had the 
management of extensive sawmills at Giles, Wisconsin, and was General 
Manager of the Hemlock Company and of the Montreal Paver Lumber 
Company at Giles, Wisconsin. 
Oshawa, Nickollet County, Minnesota. Oshawa is an Indian word meaning 

"ferry him over," or "across the river." 
Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, was named for a Winnebago Indian 
Chief. The word means "nail" "claw" or "horny part of the foot of 
beasts or birds." This name for the town was suggested by Eobert 
Grignon, a French trader. Other names were suggested and finally to settle 
the question, an election was held and Oshkosh was adopted by the vote 
of Grignon 's Indians. , 
Palatine, Cook County, Illinois. The name was transferred from the political 
division in Germany, by the early settlers who were Jramigrants from the 
Palatinate. The town was laid out by Darius or Joel Wood who came here 
from Smithfield, Pennsylvania in 1846. Darius Wood died at this place 
in 1907. 



112 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Panola. Iron County, Michigan. Is an Indian word meaning "cotton." For 
this locality it was borrowed from a place in Florida, and was adopted by 
"W. B. Linsley for this place. 
Parker, Turner County, South Dakota, was named for the family name of the 
wife of one of the officers of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad. 
Parkersburg, Butler County, Iowa, was named by J. P. Parker, an early hotel 
keeper here, for Nathan H. Parker, of Davenport, Iowa, a noted writer in 
the 50s and 60s of the early history of the North West and of guide books, 
etc., etc. 
Park Ridge, Cook County, Illinois. Its first name was Brickton, but for 
euphony, that name was dropped and the present one substituted. The 
present name was applied, because the site of the village is on a ridge. 
Parrish, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named for a long-time Director, of 
the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railroad, the first railroad that 
was built through this place. 
Partridge, Marquette County, Michigan, was named from a nearby stream, and 
that was named because of the great number of "drumming partridges" 
(ruffed grouse) the engineers found there when the land was first surveyed. 
Paulding, Ontonagon County, Michigan. Paulding was named for John Pauld- 
ing, who assisted in the capture of Major Andre of Revolutionary infamy. 
Paullina. O'Brien County, Iowa, was named for the Paullina Brothers, early 
settlers and large land owners here when the town was established. The 
town was laid out in 1882 by the Western Town Lot Company. 
Paxton, Redwood County, Minnesota, was platted in 1879 by the Western Town 
Lot Company, and was named for the botanist, Sir Joseph Paxton, of Eng- 
land, who was prominent in promoting emigration to the United States. 
Pecatonica, Winnebago Count}*, Illinois. The town was named from the river 
on which it is located. This was named from a corruption of the Indian 
word pickatolica, the Indian name of a species of fish. 
Peebles, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named for and by Ezra Peebles, 

the first owner of the town site. 
Pelican, Oneida County, Wisconsin. The village was named for the lake on 
which it is located. The lake was named because of the "pelicans" 
(Pelican orythrornynchus) that abounds on the lake every fall. That 
an Indian Chief who lived on the lake, carried the same name in the In- 
dian tongue that the lake did, is doubtless a legend only, as no such 
Indian name can be found. 
Pence. Iron County, Wisconsin, was platted 1890 by the Milwaukee, Lake Shore 
and Western Railway and named for Mr. Pence of Pence and Snyder of 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, who were early mine operators here. 
Pensaukee, Oconto County, Wisconsin, is a corruption of the Ojibway (Chippe- 
wa) Indian word pindjsagi, meaning "inside the mouth of a river." It 
was named by F. B. Gardner, the original owner of the town site. 
Pentoga, Iron County, Michigan, was named by parties operating a mill here. 

The name was manufactured and has no meaning. 
Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois, is a corrupted form of an Indian tribal name 
signifying "carriers" or "packers." Its earliest name of the town seems 
to have been La Ville de Maillet, and afterwards was called Fort Clark. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 113 



Fort Creve Couer of LaSalle and Tonti, was located here or near here. The 
city is on the Illinois river which was discovered by Robert Cavalier, Sieuer 
de La Salle in 1670. 

Perkins, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Josiah Perkins, the earliest 
settler here. 

Perronville, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for M. Perron, a "job- 
ber" and trader at this point. 

Peshtigo, Marinette County, Wisconsin, was named from the river. The word 
is Indian and means — ' ' wild goose river. ' ' 

Petersburg, Boone County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1887 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company, and was named for John Peters of Albion, Nebraska, who 
was United States Collector of Internal Revenue, and who owned the land 
on which the town site was located. 

Peterson, Clay County, Iowa, was named for Adlie Peterson, the original owner 
of the town site. The town was laid out in 1881 by the Western Town Lot 
Company. 

Peterson Avenue, Cook County, Illinois. The avenue on which this station was 
established, was named for P. S. Peterson, a prominent tree grower, whose 
nursery was on this street. The station was named from the street. 

Petersville, Clinton County, Iowa, was named from the family of John Peters, 
who early settled in the vicinity. The town was once called Quigley, for 
the once owner of the land on which the railroad station is located. 

Peterson's, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Atle Peterson, a farmer of 
the vicinity. 

Piedmont, Meade County, South Dakota, was laid out in 1890 by Captain C. V. 
Gardner of the Spring Valley ranch. It was named from its position at the 
foot (base) of a mountain, by Captain Gardner who owned a nearby ranch. 

Pierce, Pierce County, Nebraska, was named from the county, which was named 
for Franklin Pierce, once president of the United States. 

Pierre, Hughes County, South Dakota, was named from the old American Fur 
and Trading Company's post, Fort Pierre, which was opposite on the west 
bank of the Missouri River. That was named in honor of Pierre Choteau, 
Jr., of St. Louis, Missouri, who was for many years interested in the fur 
trade with the western Indians. The town was platted in 1880 by the 
Western Town Lot Company. See Fort Pierre in this book for a more 
lengthy mention of Fort Pierre. 

Pa::ton, Redwood County, Minnesota. Paxton was named from the translitera- 
tion of an Indian word. It means "standing" or "dead water." 

Phillip, Stanley County, South Dakota. Was named for James (Scotty) Phillip, 
a Scotchman from Morayshire, Scotland; ex-Senator for the Twenty-fifth 
Senatorial District of South Dakota; was a ranchman, stock dealer and 
raiser, and has a herd of one hundred buffalo (Bos Americana) six miles 
north of Fort Pierre. He has been on "the plains" since he was sixteen 
years old, and was a cowboy and pioneer in the Black Hills. He was in the 
service of the United States Quartermaster's Department, and has been a 
banker, merchant, county commissioner and real estate agent. 

Pierson, Woodbury County, Iowa. The town was named for Andrew Pierson, 
an early settler of the vicinity. His name was also given to a tributary 
of the Sioux River that heads near this place. 



114 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Pilgwi, Stanton County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1886 by the Pioneer Town 

Site Company and was named for Adam Pilger, the owner of the land on 

which the town was platted. 
Pine Creek, Trempeleau County, Wisconsin. The town was named from the 

stream it is located on. That was so named because of the numerous white 

pine trees that were found along its banks when the whites first settled 

there. 
Pine Island, Goodhue County, Minnesota. The village was named in 1855 by 

Moses Jewell an early settler, from the fact that when he came here he 

found a small island with a solitary large white pine tree growing on it. 
Pine Ridge, Delta County, Michigan. The place was named Pine Ridge because 

it ifi located in a pine forest that grew on a high ridge of land. 
Pisgah, Harrison County, Iowa, was laid out in 1899 by the Western Town Lot 

Company and was named from the mountain in Palestine that is mentioned 

in the Bible. It was named by the Mormons during their hejira. 
Plains, Marquette County, Michigan. The place was named from the barren 

sand plains that surround the town site. 
Plainview, Wabasha County, Minnesota. Its earliest name was Centerville. 

In 1856 the present name was substituted, because the town was located 

on a high prairie, from which the country was for many miles in "plain 

view" (sight.) 
Plainview, Pierce County, Nebraska. This village was laid out in 1880 by the 

Pioneer Town Site Company and was named from the fact that it wag in 

plain view from all sides for many miles. 
Planks, Olmsted County, Minnesota. The village was named i"rom the name of 

a "country tavern" that in an early day was kept here by John A. Planks. 
Platteville, Grant County, Wisconsin. Platteville was named by John H. Roun- 

tree, the original owner of the town site, from a nearby stream, that the 

French called plate meaning "dull," "flat," "shallow," a term they 

thought applicable to the stream. 
Platte River, Saunders County. Nebraska. This station was named from 

the river. That from the French plate, meaning ' ' dull, " " shallow, " " flat, ' ' 

a term singularly applicable to this river as it is wide and very shallow. 
Pleasant Prairie, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. The place was named from the 

township, and that was given as a descriptive name suggestive of the 

locality. 
Plum Creek, Kossuth County, Iowa. The village was named from a nearby 

stream; that was named from the fact that its banks were thickly covered 

with wild plum trees. 
Plymouth, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. This village was earned in 1845 by 

II. P. Davidson, from Plymouth, Massachusetts, whence ne had emigrated. 

At an earlier day it was called Springfield. 
Polk City, Polk County, Iowa, was named from the county. The county was 

named for ex-President James K. Polk. 
Poplar Grove, Boone County, Illinois, was named in 1845, from the fact that 

the first building here erected was in a large grove of "poplar" (Populus 

monilifera) trees. 
Port Edwards, Wood County, Wisconsin. Port Edwards was named from a 

boat landing on the nearby Wisconsin River. The landing was owned by 

Jonathan Edwards, an early settler who operated a ferry here. 



HlSTOKY OF THE PLACE NAMES OF THE NORTH WESTERN LlNE 115 



Porter, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. Its earlier name was Harsted. 
When that was dropped it was named for L. C. Porter, an early settler and 
mill owner of Minnesota. It was platted by the Winona and St. Peter 
Railroad Company in 1881. It was at one time called Lone Tree from a 
single large elm tree that grew nearby. 

Portland Junction, Lawrence County, South Dakota. This name merely indi- 
cates a point that is shown on the timetable of the road. The name has no 
historical significance, as it is nearby a railroad junction point in the 
mining country around Dead wood. It was named from the nearby Portland 
gold mine. 

Portland, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named from a nearby gold 
mine. The mine was named from the city in Maine, the old home of one 
of the principal owners of the mine. 

Port Washington, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. This place was named for 
George Washington. The original name of the place was Wisconsin City, 
and was given it in 1835 by "General" Wooster Harrison? It was then 
changed to Washington City. In 1844 this name was changed by George 
C Daniels to Port Washington, and has retained it to the present time. 

Powell, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named for Major J. W. Powell, once of 
Illinois, the geologist and explorer. 

Powder River, Natrona County, Wyoming. This village was named from Pow- 
der River. The river was named from the dark powder like sand that was 
found along its banks. 

Powers, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for Edward Powers, a civil 
engineer engaged in constructing the railroad here. He afterwards became 
notorious as a professed "rain maker." At an early date the place was 
called Menominee River Junction, because here was the junction between 
the main line, and the Menominee River Branch. 

Proviso, Du Page County, Illinois. This name was taken from the Wilmot's 
proviso celebrated in the political history of the United States. When the 
bill for the purchase of a portion of Mexico was before congress in 1846 
David Wilmot introduced an amendment to the bill to the effect that slav- 
ery should forever be prohibited in the territory in question. He proposed 
to make that a stipulated condition and that condition received the name 
of Wilmot's proviso. 

Preparation, Monona County, Iowa. A settlement was made at this place about 
1858 by a body of seceders from the Mormon church, under the lead of one 
Charles B. Thompson, who styled himself the Chief Apostolic Pastor and 
Evangelical Bishop. They called themselves Conjeprezites, and the relig- 
ious order Conjprezon. They believed that the Bible had in a measure been 
done away with, by new revelations made by the voice of Baneemy, 
through the medium of the Chief Apostolic Bishop. This place had at one 
time a population of some six or eight hundred, but they finally got 
into difficulties over the ownership of the property, and the organization 
broke up. As they believed their existence in this world was only a 
preparation for the world to come, they named their town Preparation. 
The old town was abandoned and a new town laid out by the Western 
Town Lot Company in 1899 and given the old name. 

Preston, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named for Mathcw Preston, who settled 
here in 1850. It is located between Montford Junction and Lancaster Junction 
on the railroad that runs from Madison to Woodman on the Wisconsin River. 



llt> History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Princeton, Green Lake County, Wisconsin, was named by K. C. Treat, from 
Princeton, Worcester County Massachusetts, which was named for Rev. 
Thomas Prince, pastor of the Old South Church, Boston, Mass. 

Pulaski, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named for the Polish patriot, Count 
Casimer Pulaski, who was a friend of the Americans in the Revolutionary 
War. 

Quarry, Marshall County, Iowa, was named by Isaac B. Howe, from a nearby 
quarry. 

Quinnesec, Dickinson County, Michigan. Quinnesec is an Indian word meaning 
"where the river forms smoke," and was given to this village from the 
falls in the Quinnesec River at this point. It was named by John L. Buell. 
The Indian word was pronounced as it is spelled, be-quen-se-nec. 

Quinn, Pennington County, South Dakota, was named for Michael Quinn, a 
prominent "ranch man" of the vicinity. 

Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin, was named in 1834 by Captain Gilbert 
Knapp, the founder, for Racine, the French writer, and also because the 
word is French for "root," which was the meaning of the words the Indians 
applied to the river Racine is on. In an early day this town was called Port 
Gilbert and Northport. 

Racine Junction, Racine County, Wisconsin, was named from its relation to 
the city of Racine, it being a junction of two railroads that cross each other 
near that city. 

Radcliffe, Hardin County, Iowa, was laid out in 1884 by the Western Town Lot 
Company. It was named from a part of the name of a celebrated old novel 
—"The Heir of Radcliffe." 

Radford, Ontonagon County, Michigan, was named by Stephen Radford for the 
Radford family, who were large timber owners around Oshkosh, Wis. 

Radnor, Peoria County, Illinois, was named for the township the village is 
in, and that was named from Radnor, a village in Delaware County, Penn- 
sylvania, which was named from a town in Wales. 

Ralston, Carroll County, Iowa, was named for W. C. Ralston, of California, who 
was much in the eyes of the world when this place was established. 

Ramsey, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for Honorable Alexander Ram- 
say, war governor and afterwards United States Senator for Minnesota. 

Randall, Hamilton County, Iowa, was named for Samuel J. Randall, the well 
known politician and ex-secretary of the United States Treasury. 

Rapid City, Pennington County, South Dakota. The part around the railroad 
station was laid out by the Pioneer Town Site Company in 1887. The older 
part of the town was named on February 25, 1876, by John R. Brennan. The 
name was taken from the rapid creek that ran through the location. It 
was named by the trappers and hunters from many "rapids" in the stream. 
As the town was expected to make a rapid growth, it was thought that the 
name would be appropriate for the town. 

Ravenswood, Cook County, Illinois. The name was formed by prefacing the 
name (Wood) of the original owner of the land by the word "ravens" and 
that was suggested by the thousands of crows (ravens) that formerly made 
their home near here. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 11? 



Ravinia, Lake County, Illinois. Eavinia is a transliteration of the word 
"ravine," and was sugested by the many ravines that are near this place. 

Rawhide, Washington County, Nebraska, was named from Rawhide Creek. The 
creek was named from the fact that a man was flayed upon its banks by a 
party of Pawnee Indians. 

Raymond, Clark County, South Dakota. The place was named for J. M. Ray- 
mond, one of the engineers engaged in building the railroad through the 
place. It was laid out in 1883 by the Western Town Lot Company. 

Redfield, Spink County, South Dakota, was named for J. B. Redfield, one of the 
oldest and most valued officers of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway 
Company. The town was laid out in 1880 by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany. 

Red Granite. Waushara County, Wisconsin. The town was named because of the 
presence of much red colored granite (rock) in the vicinity. 

Redwood Falls, Redwood County, Minnesota. The place was named from the 
falls in the Redwood River, the name of the river is a translation of the 
Dakota (Sioux) name referring to the abundant growth along the river of 
the "cornel" (Cornus amonum) (Kinnikinick) a bush with a red bark. 

Reeclsburg, Sauk County, Wisconsin. Reedsburg was named for D. C. Reed, one 
of the earliest settlers, and who, in 1847, built the first mill in the place. 

Reedville, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named for George Reed, a prom- 
inent citizen of Wisconsin, who was chief projector in building the railroad 
through this country. 

Ree Heights, Hand County, South Dakota. This village was named from the 
nearby Ree hills. These were named for the last syllable in the name of 
the Ari-Jcaree (Ree) Indians, who, in an early day, frequented these parts. 
The Indian word refers to "horn." The Ree Indians occupied these hills 
in spite of the Sioux. The village was once called Bramhall. These "Ree" 
Indians were allied to the Pawnees and the Wichitas, who lived west of the 
Missouri River and south of the present limits of South Dakota. The name 
was spelled Arickaree, Aricaree, Biccaree, and as above. The common 
appellation among the traders was "Ree." 

Renwick. Humboldt County, Iowa, was named by Frank and Smith, the orig 
inal owners of the land. The name is merely a fanciful one and has no 
significance. The town was laid out in 1882 by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany. 

Republic, Marquette County, Michigan. Was named by and for the Republic 
Iron Company that had large iron ore mining works here. Originally it 
was called Smith's mine, for the prospector who discovered the first iron 
ore here. 

Revere, Redwood County, Minnesota, was named by C. C. Wheeler in honor of 
Paul Revere of Revolutionary fame. It was platted by the Winona and St. 
Peter Railroad Company in 1886. 

Rewey, Iowa County, Wisconsin, was named for J. W. Rewey, the original owner 
of the town site. 

Rhinelander, Oneida County Wisconsin, was named in honor of F. W. Rhine- 
lander, of New York City, who was for many years the president of the 
company that built the road through this place. It was platted in 1S82 by 
the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway. 



118 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Rhodes, Trempeleau County, Wisconsin, was named for the owner of the land on 
which the village is located. 

Richmond, McHenry County, Illinois, was in 1844 named by C. G. Cotting from 
Richmond, Vermont, whence he emigrated. 

Ricketts, Crawford County, Iowa, was laid out by the Western Town Lot Com 
pany in 1899 and named for an early settler. 

Richards. Fremont County, Wyoming, was named for W. A. Richards, United 
States Indian Commissioner, Washington, D. C. 

Ridgefield, McHenry County, Illinois, was named by J. R. Mack on account of 
ridges nearby. 

Ridgeland, Cook County, Illinois. When laid out, the ground around the town 
site was flooded and one of the proprietors suggested that what was needed 
here more than anything else, was a ridge of land on which to put the rail- 
road buildings. This fancy was accepted as a name for the village. 

Ridgeway, Iowa County, Wisconsin, was named from the township, and that was 
named because of the many ridges that ran through it. 

Ridott, Stephenson County, Illinois. The earliest name was Cochranville. In 
3863 it was named Ridott from the township in which it was located. The 
township was named for an early settler. 

Riley's, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named by Wiliam Riley, for the Riley 
Brothers, owners of the original town site. Originally the town was called 
Sugar River from a nearby stream. 

Ringle, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named for John R. Ringle, of Wausau, 
Wisconsin, because he was a very large land owner in the vicinity when the 
town was established. He was also editor of an influential Wausau, Wiscon- 
sin, newspaper. 

Ringwood, McHenry County, Illinois. There are two traditions as to this name; 
one is, that it was named by Mrs. John E. Gray, from the fact that the town 
was established on a small prairie, entirely surrounded by a ring of 
"woods" (a forest). The other is, that it was named by the Misses Rey- 
nolds, daughters of Judge Reynolds, the first settler, from Ringwood Park, 
in England. 

Ringsted, Emmet County, Iowa. Was laid out in 1899 by the Western Town 
Lot Company, and was named by Mrs. John Larson in honor of her old 
home in Denmark. ' 

River/ton, Fremont County, Wyoming. This town was platted under the United 
States Town Site Law, and was named Wadsworth in honor of H. E. Wads- 
worth, the local Indian agent. This name was changed to Riverton, as it 
was thought to be significant of the location of the place, a town on the 
bank of a river — the Big Horn. The town site is really one mile from this 
river. 

Ripon, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named in 1850 from a town in 
England, by John S. Homer, whose ancestors emigrated from that place. 
Here in 1844, Warren Chase, of Kenosha, Wisconsin, established a Four- 
ierite "phalanx" and called it "Ceresco" from Ceres the Goddess of Agri- 
culture. The colony was disbanded in 1850 and thus passed into history. 

River Forest, Cook County, Illinois, was named Thatcher for David C. Thatcher, 
an early settler, after it had carried the name "Des Plaines River" as its 
railroad station. In 1872, it was given its present name, because it was a 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line ll'J 

village in a forest alongside of a river. "Who made this name is in dispute 
and will never be positively known. 
Eib River, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named from the nearby river. The 

name is a transliteration of the Indian name of the river. 
Russell, Lyman County, South Dakota, was named for J. C. Russell, of Midland, 

South Dakota, and who furnished the land for the town site of Midland. 
Elver Sioux, Harrison County, Iowa. This place was named from the Little 
Sioux River, on which it is located. The river was named from the Sioux 
(Dakota) tribe of Indians, that formerly ranged and hunted on this stream. 
Robbius, Ontonagon County, Michigan, was named for F. S. Robbins, of Rhine- 
lander, a prominent mill man, and who once operated a saw mill here. 
Rochelle, Ogle County, Illinois. Its first name was Lane, and it was named for 
a family by that name. In 1865 it was changed to its present form, from 
Rochelle, in France. 
Rock, Rock County, Nebraska, wa8 named from the county and that on account 

of the reeky character of the soil in parte of the county. 
Rochester, O'msted County, Minnesota, was named from Rochester, New York, 
and that was named from Colonel Nathaniel Rochester, its senior proprietor. 
Rockfield. Washington County, Wisconsin. Its earliest name was Germantown, 
and it was so named from the many Germans settled nearby. The present 
name came from the fact that there were many curiously marked rocks in 
a nearby field. 
Rockford, "Winnebago County, Illinois, was so named because it was at a very 
rocky ford on Rock River. In a very early day the place was called Mid- 
way, as it was about half way between Chicago and Galena, Illinois. 
Rockham, Faulk County, South Dakota. The town site was named from a place 
in Australia, it being an elision of the name Rockhampton. It was laid out 
in 1886 by the "Western Town Lot Company. 
Rock Island Junction, "Whiteside County, Illinois, was so named when a mere 
junction point of the Rockford, Rock Island and St. Louis Railroad and the 
North "Western Line. "When the place became a town the railroad appellation 
was not disturbed. 
Rockland, La Crosse County, "Wisconsin. The original name of the post office 
was Fish Creek. When renamed, it took its name from the rocky land 
around it. 
Rogers Park, Cook County, Illinois, was named for Phillip Rogers, the original 

owner of the town site. 
Rolfe, Pocahontas County, Iowa. The original name was Pocahontas and was 
named for the Virginian Powhatan Indian woman, who the traditions of 
early Virginia allege saved the life of Captain John Smith. When the first 
name was changed, the present name was adopted. Rolf was the name of 
the soldier who abducted the so-called Pocahontas and carried her off with 
him "across the sea." The town was laid out in 1859. 
Rollo, De Kalb County, Illinois, was named from the Rollo books, a series of 
children's books that once were very popular. The word is a corruption of 
Raleigh, one of the noted names of English and Virginian history. 
Roscoe, Winnebago County, Illinois, was named from the township, which was 

named by Ralph Abell for William Roscoe, the English "historian. 
Rose Hill, Cook County, Illinois. The earliest name of the post office was Have- 
lock; when a settlement grew around the postoffice, it was called Chitenden, 



1-0 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



for an early settler. When the village was formed, the present name was 
given it because of the many wild roses that grew on the adjacent hills. 

Rosendale, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was so named because when located 
the town site was a mass of wild rose bushes. The name is a combination of 
the German "rosen" for rose, and the English "dale." 

Eosholt, Portage County, Wisconsin, was named for John Eosholt, the pioneer of 
this district. 

Eoss, Audubon County, Iowa, was named for a nearby farmer. It was laid out 
by the Western Town Lot Company in 1882. 

Eosseau, Hughes County, South Dakota. This place was named for an early 
French trading family. The name is from the French Roseau, meaning 
a "reed" or a "rush." In the northwest it seems first to have been applied 
to a stream somewhere in Minnesota, that was nearly obscured by rushes, or 
coarse water grasses. There were three brothers Eosseau located on the 
Missouri River near this station. Another brother was the Catholic Bishop 
of Quebec. All the brothers were educated and refined gentlemen, and as 
a rule associated with the whites, but in other respects, they lived and died 
in Indian ways. 

Eoss, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was named for John D. Eoss, an early lumber mill 
operator of this county. 

Eoss, Waseca County, Minnesota, was named for Ross Redfield, who lived 
nearby. 

Eound Grove, Whiteside County, Illinois, was named for a large round grove 
that was near the site of the original town. 

Eowena, Redwood County, Minnesota, was laid out by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1902, and was named from a character in a once very noted 
novel. 

Eoxby, Cherry County, Nebraska. This name is a elision of Roxbury, and was 
taken from Roxbury Station, Littlefield County, Conn. 

Eubens, Pocahontas County, Iowa, was named for Peter Paul Rubens, the 
German painter of "Flemish pictures." 

Euby Basin, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named from a "basin" 
in the Black Hills near Deadwood, from the fact that in it many rubies 
are found. 

Eudolph, Brown County, South Dakota. This place was named by C. E. Sim- 
mons for H. Rudolph McCullough, one of the officers of the Chicago and 
Northwestern Railway Company. The town was laid out in 1881 by the 
Western Town Lot Company. 

Eummele, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was named for E. H. Eummele, for a long 
time chief engineer of the Milwaukee. Lake Shore and Western Eailroad. 

Eushville, Sheridan County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1888 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company and was named because of its location at the head of Bush 
Creek. The creek was named because of the great quantity of rushes 
(Typha latifolia) that grew upon it, when it was first seen by the early 
settlers. 

Eutland, Humboldt County, Iowa, was named by H. G. Bicknell, the originator 
of the town, from Rutland Vermont, because there were many around thig 
location who had moved from that state. The town was laid out in 1882 
by the Western Town Lot Company. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 121 



Sac City, Sac County, Iowa. Sac City was named from the county and that was 
named for the Indian tribe. The name refers to "yellow earth," the 
proper form being Osaukee. 

St. Charles, Kane County, Illinois. Was named Charleston by Ira Minard, an 
early settler, from Charleston, his birthplace, in New Hampshire. In 1S36, 
when the first postoffice was established here, the name was changed to 
prevent confusion in the mails, as there was another Charleston in Illinois. 

St. Charles, Winona County, Minnesota, was named in 1853 by L. H. Springer 
from St. Charles, Illinois, whence he had emigrated. 

St. Charles, Gregory County, South Dakota, was named Hampton by Charles A. 
Johnson, president of the First National Bank of Fairfax, South Dakota, 
who donated the land for the town site, but the general postoffice depart- 
ment objected to that name and then St. Charles was adopted. It is based 
on Mr. Johnson's first name — Charles, and "St." was added for euphony. 

St. Cloud, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named by Benert Moesch, the 
original owner of the town site, from the place in France. 

St Francis, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. The original and Indian name of 
this place was No-gos-hing from nodaway, meaning "enemies" or 
"snakes." Its present name was given by Bev. Joseph Salzman, D.D., 
president of the Seminary of St. Francis de Sales, opened in 1856 and 
which is located here. The Seminary was named in honor of St. Francis 
de Sales, Bishop of Geneva, Switzerland, who died in 1622, by the Bev. 
Father Henni, first Bishop and first Archbishop of Milwaukee. 

Stella Junction, Oneida County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a 
point that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no 
historical significance. A few miles west of the junction is a village called 
Stella which was named for Dean Jonathan Swift's "Stella," the lady 
he immortalized in his writings. 

State Line, Winnebago County, Iowa. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical signifi- 
cance. It is on the line between the states of Iowa and Minnesota and 
that fact gave it this name. 

St. Lawrence, Hand County, South Dakota. The original name of this place 
was Bex (King) for J. M. King, an early settler. Iti present name was 
given by Don H. Porter, from the county and river in New York, and these 
were named from the gulf. The gulf was so named because it was dis- 
covered upon the feastday of the saint. 

St. Lawrence, Marquette County, Michigan, was named from the river St. 
Lawrence, and that was so named from the gulf, and the gulf was so 
named because it was discovered upon the feastday of St. Lawrence. 

Shennington, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was founded by and named for and 
by Fred. H. Shennington, of Silver Lake, Kenosha County, Wisconsin, 
who started the first store in the village he had platted. 

Soperton, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named from the Soper Lumber Com- 
pany, that had interests here when the town was located. 

St. Marie. Green Lake County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby church, 
which was named for the saint. 

St. Mary's Miner County, South Dakota, was named for Mary the daughter 
of Dr. Louis Gotthelf, the original owner of the town site. For euphony. 



122 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

he prefixed the "St." It was laid out in 1886 by the Western Town Lot 
Company. 

St. Onge, Lawrence County, South Dakota. This place was named for Henry 
St. Onge, a pioneer here. It was laid out in 1891. A nearby mission church 
was also named for Mr. St. Onge. 

St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minnesota. The town was named by the Winona 
and St. Peter Company from the river on which it is located. The river 
was named for Pierre (Peter) Charles LaSuerer, a French explorer, who 
is believed to have been the first white man to navigate this stream. He 
was on it as early as 1689. Rocky Point was the first name given by th« 
white settlers to this location. 

St. Rose, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby Catholic church. 

Salem, McCook County, South Dakota, was named by J. H. Brown, on the 
suggestion of E. F. Drake, from the city in Massachusetts. The town 
around the station was laid out in 1889 by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany. Salem is a Hebrew word meaning "peace," and was applied to the 
Massachusetts city by the earliest settlers in the hope of finding there the 
peace and security they had not found in Europe whence they had 
emigrated. 

Salem, Kenosha County, Wisconsin, was nemed from the city in Massachusetts 
by John Cogswell, who had emigrated therefrom. Salem is Hebrew for 
"peace" and was applied to the Massachusetts city by the earliest settlers, 
in the hope that they would find that peace and security there which they 
had not found in England. 

Salix, Woodbury County, Iowa, was named Salix from the botanical name for 
the willow, because there were many willows growing nearby when the 
town was established. 

Sanborn, Kedwood County, Minnesota, was named for Sherburn Sanborn, now 
(1907) of Milwaukee, Wis, but for many years, an officer of the Chicago 
& North Western railway company. 

Sandhurst, Ontonagon County, Michigan. This is a fancy name built up from 
the word "sand" and the translation of the German word "hoorst," 
which means "a grove." It was adopted for this place merely because 
it was thought to be unique and euphonious. 

Sand Eock, Iron County, Wisconsin, was so named because sand stone (rock) 
was plentiful in the vicinity. 

Sands, Marquette County, Michigan, was named from the nearby sandy plain. 

Secor, Hardin County, Iowa, was laid out in 1888 by the Pioneer Town Sit* 
Company, and was named for a railroad contractor named Secor. 

Sargent's Bluffs, Woodbury County, Iowa. The station and town took its 
name from the high bluff nearby, which was named Sargents Bluff to 
honor the memory of Sergeant Charles Floyd of the Lewis and Clark 
expedition, who died while the boats were passing up the Missouri Kiver 
a few miles distant and about opposite this bluff. Floyd's body was car- 
ried up tho river and was buried at the point where the bluffs touch the 
river, just below Sioux City, and to that part of the bluff Lewis and Clark 
gave the name of Floyd's Bluff. 

Satuit, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was named for Sautuit in Barnstable County, 
Massachusetts. The name was misspelled on the plat of the town and 
was so recorded and hence so stands to this day. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 123 



Saunders, Iron County, Michigan, was named for a timber "cruiser" of the 

vicinity. 
Sawyer, Fillmore County, Nebraska. Sawyer was laid out and named Buxton, 

for a valued employe of the railroad company, by the Pioneer Town Site 

Company in 1887. The name changed to honor Simeon Sawyer, the oldest 

settler on the place. 
Saxon, Iron County, Wisconsin. Saxon was named for that branch of the 

Teutonic family who originally occupied what is now known as Holstein, 

in Europe. Originally this town was called Dogwood from the abundance 

of "dogwood" (Comus) that grew hereabouts. 

Saylor, Polk County, Iowa, was named from the township and that was named 
for Thomas Saylor, an early settler, who had many years before the loca- 
tion of this place, platted a village which he called Saylorville. The post- 
office is Marquisville. 

Schaller, Sac County, Iowa, was named for Hon. Phillip Schaller of Sac City. 

Schleswig, Crawford County, Iowa, was laid out in 1899 by the Western Town 
Lot Company, and was named for the Province of Schleswig in Europe, be- 
cause many of the nearby farmers had emigrated from that province. 
Until recently the name of the postoffice here was Hohenzollern. 

Scott, Vilas Count, Wisconsin, was named for T. B. Scott of Merrill, Wisconsin, 
who was prominent in politics and business in Wisconsin in the '70 's and 
'80 's. 

Scranton, Greene County, Iowa, was named for Joseph H. Scranton, of the city 
in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania. 

Scarville, Winnebago County, Iowa, was named for Ole Scar, who owned much 
land in the vicinity when the town was established. 

Scribner, Dodge County, Nebraska, was named for Charles Scribner, the book 
publisher of New York City. He was a son-in-law of John I. Blair of New 
Jersey who built thousands of miles of railroad in the west. 

Scribner Junction, Dodge County, Nebraska. This name merely indicates a 
point that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no his- 
torical significance. It was named from its relation to Scribner. 

Seaforth, Redwood County, Minnesota, was platted in 1894 under the name of 
Okawa by the Western Town Lot Company, but the name was changed to 
its present form from Seaforth, a well known place in Scotland. 

Seatonville, Bureau County, Illinois, was named for W. A. Seaton, an old 
settler of the vicinity. 

Seneca, Faulk County, South Dakota, was laid out in 1887 by the Pioneer 
Town Site Company, and was named for Seneca Falls, a village in Seneca 
County, New York. The name is a corruption of the Indian word sinnelcaas, 
which by the Dutch was applied to an Indian tribe of New York State. 

Seven Mile Creek, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby 

stream. 
Seminole, Natrona County, Wyoming, was named for the Indian tribe, the 

word meaning "separatist," and was applied to a portion of the tribe that 

left the parent body and established the one that was known as the 

Seminole tribe. 



124 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Seward, Seward County, Nebraska, was named from the county and that was 
named for William H. Seward, the statesman of New York State. 

Shabbona Grove, DeKalb County, Illinois, was named for Shabbona, a Pot- 
tawattamie Indian Chief, who befriended the whites during the Black Hawk 
Indian war of 1832. It was platted by the railroad company in 1885. 

Shafer, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Charles Shafer, a coal dealer 
of the vicinity. 

Sharon, Walworth County, Wisconsin, was named for Sharon Springs, New 
York, whence many of the nearby settlers had emigrated. In an early 
day it was called Walworth. The word Sharon is of bibical derivation, 
from the Hebrew, meaning "a plain." 

Shawano, Shawano County, Wisconsin. This name was derived from the 
Ojibway Indian word shawanong , meaning "in the south." 

Shawnee, Converse County, Wyoming, was named from the nearby Shawnee 
Creek and that was named from the Indian tribe. The name means 
"Southerners" and was given to the tribe because they had emigrated 
from the Savannah River in Georgia. 

Sheboygan, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. The name is from the Ojibway 
Indian. Two derivations are given; one from the word ji-ba-i-gan, meaning 
a perforated object as for instance a pipe stem, and the other from 
shawb-wa-way , expressing a tradition "that a great noise coming under- 
ground (from Lake Superior) was heard at this place." 

Sheboygan Falls, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, was named from the falls 
nearby, and those were named from the county and city. 

Sheldahl, Polk County, Iowa, was named by and for Eev. D. Kjaldahl. Owing 
to the difficulty of pronouncing this name and for euphony the name was 
Anglicized to its present form. 

Schickley, Fillmore County, Nebraska, was named for Fillmore Schickley, an 
attorney of the first railroad built through the place. 

Shoshone, Fremont County, Wyoming, was laid out in 1905 by the Pioneer 
Town Site Company. It was named from the Shoshone Indian tribe 
(Snakes), from their reservation and the Shoshone mountains. The 
Shoshone tribe had its early home in Idaho and Oregon and the great 
central basin of the continent. The original meaning and derivation of the 
name is in doubt. 

Shopiere, Rock County, Wisconsin. Waterloo was the first name given to this 
village. In 1847 a committee consisting of Dr. James Buckley, the 
earliest physician of the place, L. P. Harvey, afterwards Governor of Wis- 
consin, and John Hopkins, were appointed by the citizens to select a new 
name for the place. Dr. Buckley, a scholarly man, suggested the present 
name and it was adopted. The name is a corruption and elision of the 
French Chaux (Sho) "lime" and pierre "stone," and is descriptive of the 
geological formation about the place. A colony from Connecticut settled 
the place in 1836. 

Shepley, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named for Colonel J. S. Shepley, a 
large property owner of the vicinity. 

Siemens, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for Siemens, the celebrated 
Metallagist and inventor of an improved iron smelting process, etc., etc. 

Silica, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. The name is from the Latin word for 
sand (silex, flint) and is supposed to describe the soil around the place. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 12~> 

Siloam Siding, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, is merely a side track within 
the city of Milwaukee and was named from the celebrated spring of 
mineral water nearby. The name of the spring is of Bibical derivation. 

Silver Springs, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named by Edward J. Cuy- 
ler, an officer of the railroad because of the owner of a nearby manufactur- 
ing concern, claimed he had "silver springs" in his factory. 

Sioux City, Woodbury County, Iowa, was laid out in 1854, and by its founder, 
John K. Cooke, was named from the Dakotas (Sioux) Indians, the largest 
tribe of Indians in the United States. The word is an abbreviation of the 
name Nadowessious the Ojibway (Chippewa) Indians, applied to this 
tribe and signifies "little snakes," i. e. "enemies." The French in 1785 
called them La Sues, while George Crogan, the Indian interpreter, called 
them at this time La Suil. The word Sioux is a white man's corruption 
of the Ojibway name. The Algonquin Indians called the tribe Nadowassiway 
meaning in the Algonquin tongue "snake," "like snakes" or "enemies." 

Sioux Eapids, Buena Vista County, Iowa, was named from the rapids in the 
Big Sioux River; the river was named from the Dakota (Sioux) Indians 
of Minnesota and Dakota, the largest Indian tribe in the United States. 
The word is an abbreviation of their Ojibway name and means "little 
snakes" i. e. "enemies." The town was laid out in 1881 by the Western 
Town Lot Company. The French — when Capt. George Crogan was in- 
terpreter and deputy Indian Agent under Sir William Johnson in 1785, 
called this tribe La Sues, while Crogan spelled the name La Suil. 

Slater, Story County, Iowa. Was named for Michael Slater, the owner of the 
farm on which the town was established. 

Sleepy Eye, Brown County, Minnesota, was named from the nearby lake. The 
lake was named for the Indian Chief Is-na-num-baJc. This name signifies 
"the man whose eyes have the appearance of sleep." "Sleepy Eye" was 
supposed to be a "good Indian" and a friend of the whites, but he joined 
the "hostiles" in 1862 when the Sioux war of that year was inaugurated. 

Sloan, Woodbury County, Iowa, was named for Samuel Sloan, a noted railroad 
man of New York. He was at one time Superintendent of the Hudson 
River Railroad, and afterwards and for many years was president of the 
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railway. He died in 1907. 

Smith's Mill, Waseca County, Minnesota, was named for Peter Smith, the 
earliest settler here, who owned a mill here, before the railroad reached 
the place. 

Smithwick, Fall River County, South Dakota, was named for the engineer who 
was in charge of the construction of the railroad through this place. 

Snells, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, was named for a nearby land owner. 

Snyder, Dodge County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1886 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company and was named for Conrad Schneider who owned the land on 
which the town was established. He operated a flouring mill at this 
location. The spelling of the name was changed to conform to the English 
form at the request of the early settlers. 

Soldier, Monona County, Iowa, was laid out in 1899 by the Western Town Lot 
Company, and was named from the nearby river. The river was named 
from the unnamed grave of a United States soldier, who was buried here 
in an early day. 



126 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Soudan, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named for the Sudan or Soudan 

province of Egypt, Beled-es-Sudan, or ' ' the land of the blacks^ ' ' or 

Nigritia in the valley of the upper Nile. 
South Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. This place was named Clinton ville, by 

and for Jamei Clinton an early settler. For a long time the name of its 

postoffice had been South Elgin. In 3907 the name of the station and 

village was changed to conform to the name of the postoffice. 
South Centralia, Wood County, Wisconsin, was named from Centralia (which 

see). It is a manufacturing adjunct to Centralia. 
South Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named from the city of Madison 

(whi^h see). It is practically a portion of that city. 
South Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named from Milwaukee 

(which see). It is an outlying manufacturing district. It was formerly 

called Oak Creek from a nearby stream. 
South Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, was named from the City of Omaha 

(which see). This town is a manufacturing adjunct to that city. 

Spalding, Menominee County, Michigan, was named by Edward P. Wood, the 

original owner of the town site for Hon. Jesse Spalding, of Chicago. 
Sparta, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was named by Mrs. M. Petit, the mother 

of the founder of the village, from the ancient city in Greece. The Petit 

brothers, William and Frank located here in 1851. 
Speer, Stark County, Illinois, was named for E. K. and E. M. Speer from whom 

the land for the town site was purchased. 
Spencer, Boyd County, Nebraska, was named for George E. Spencer, United 

States Senator from Alabama. 
Split Rock, Shawano County, Wisconsin, is alleged to have been named from 

a large rock that had split into two parts when the town was located. 
Spread Eagle, Florence County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby lake, 

which was so named because of its fancied resemblance to an eagle with 

its wings widely spread. 
Springfield, Brown County, Minnesota. The original name was Burns from an 

early settler. Its present name was given to it in 1880 from Springfield 

in Massachusetts. 
Spring Lake, Waushara County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby lako, 

which was named because it was made and fed by springs within the 

lake. 
Spring Valley, Bureau County, Illinois, was named from a nearby coal mine, 

that was named by William L. Scott, the principal owner, from the springs 

which were notable features in the nearby valley. 
Stafford, Holt County, Nebraska, was named for Michael Stafford, a road master 

of the Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley Railroad, who had charge of a 

part of the railroad that passes through this place. At one time the 

place was called O'Donnel, but the name was changed at the request of 

the citizens. 
Stager, Iron County, Michigan, was named for Anson Stager of Chicago, who 

for many years, managed the interests of the Western Union Telegraph 

Company in the west, and was in charge of the military telegraph of the 

United States Arm} during the War of the Rebellion. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 127 



Stambaugh, Iron County, Michigan, was named for John Stambaugh of Todd, 

Stambaugh and Company of Youngstown, Ohio, which had large iron ore 

mines nearby. 
Stanhope, Hamilton County, Iowa, was named for Lady Hester L. Stanhope, 

the traveller and authoress. The town was laid out in 1883 by the 

Western Town Lot Company. 
Stanton, Stanton County, Nebraska, was platted in 1880 by the Pioneer Town 

Site Company. It was named from the county and that was named for the 

great War Secretary, E. M. Stanton of Ohio. 
Stanwood, Cedar County, Iowa, was by Isaac Howe named for II. P. Stanwood, 

an officer of the Chicago and North Western Eailway Company. 
Stark, Mahaska County, Iowa, was named in honor of General John Stark, the 

hero of the battle of Bennington, Vermout, of the Kevolutionary War. 
State Center, Marshall County, Iowa, was so named because it was near the 

geographical center of the State of Iowa. 
State Hospital, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, was so named because the depot 

here was established for the convenience of the Northern Wisconsin (State) 

Hospital for the insane. 
State Line, Vilas County, Wisconsin, was so named because it is located on 

the State line between Wisconsin and Michigan. 
Stephenson, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for the Stephenson 

family, i. e. Isaac, Samuel and Robert of Marinette, Wisconsin and Me- 
nominee, Michigan, who owned large tracts of land around this location. 
Sterling, Whiteside County, Illinois, was named for Colonel Samuel Sterling of 

Pennsylvania. 
Stiles Junction, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named for the Stiles family, 

who emigrated from Stilesville, Indiana; that village was named for Jere- 
miah Stiles, the owner of the town site. 
Stitzer, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named by W. W. Ford, one of the 

owners of the town site for Bernard Stitzer, owner of a nearby farm. 
Stockham, Hamilton County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1887 by the Pioneer 

Town Site Company and was named from a postoftice that had been 

established here in an early day. The postoffice was named for Joseph 

Stockham, a pioneer in this part of the State. 
Stockton, Winona County, Minnesota, was named for and by J. B. Stockton 

the owner of the town site. 
Stock Yards Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, was named from the city of 

Omaha, (which see.) 
Story City, Story County, Iowa. The original name was Fairview. It is now 

named from the county. The county was named by the legislature for 

Judge Joseph Story of the Supreme Court of the United States. The 

word "city" was added to the proper name in 1907. 
Stout, Grundy County, Iowa, was named for A. V. Stout, who owned the farm 

on which the village was established. 
Stratford, Hamilton County, Iowa, was named at the suggestion of Colonel 

John Whitaker at a meeting of the citizens, from Stratford in England. 
It was laid out in 1880 by the Western Town Lot Company. 
Stratford, Marathon County, Wisconsin, was named by F. W. Rhinelander, the 
then president of the first railroad that reached this point. It was named 



128 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

from the home of Shakespeare in England. It was platted in 1891 by the 
Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Kailway Company. 

Strawbridge, Lafayette County, Wisconsin, was named for Edward Straw- 
bridge, an early settler and the original owner of the town site. 

Strouds, Natrona County, Wyoming, was laid out in 1888 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company and was named for a "ranchman" who lived here before 
the railroad was built through the place. 

Stuart, Holt County, Nebraska, was platted by the Pioneer Town Site Com- 
pany in 1883 and was named for Robert Stuart, the father-in-law of the 
owner of the land on which the town was established. He was a Scotch 
sea captain. 

Sturgeon, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named from a nearby river. That 
was named from the English translation of an Indian word descriptive of 
the sturgeon fish. The river abounds with this fish. 

Sturgis, Meade County, South Dakota, was named by Colonel Samuel Sturgis, 
of the Seventh United States Cavalry, who at one time was in command of 
Fort Meade, for his son "Jack" Sturgis who was killed with Custer in 
Montana. Fort Meade was named for General George C. Meade of the 
War of the Rebellion. 

Sugar Bush, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, was named by Michael Ruckdas- 
hel, because of the abundance and size of the sugar maple (Acer sac- 
charum) that grew nearby when the town was laid out. 

Sullivan, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, was named for the township. That 
was named for Major General John Sullivan of the Revolutionary War. 

Sumac, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named from the "Sumac" (Rhus 
typhina) trees that grew in great abundance in the vicinity. 

Summerdale, Cook County, Illinois, is practically a part of the City of Chicago. 
It was named by Robert Greer of St. Louis, who selected the name because 
of ' ' its pleasant sound and suggestions. ' ' Mr. Greer was interested in 
a large manufactory here. 

Summit, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was so named because it was on the top 
of a ridge that had steep grades on both its sides. 

Summit Lake, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was platted in 1887 by the Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway in 1882 and named for a nearby 
lake, which was on high land in the vicinity. 

Superior, Nuckolls County, Nebraska, was so named because of the superior 
character of the land in the vicinity as compared with other lands that 
were traversed by the first railroad that passed through this place. 

Suring, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named for J. Suring, who owned much 
land in the vicinity. It was once called Three Rivers, because three 
branches of the Oconto River united nearby. 

Surprise, Butler County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1887 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company, and was so named because of the surprise that was ex- 
pressed from finding the country around it so much better than was ex- 
pected before the railroad was located. 

Sutherland, O'Brien County, Iowa, was named for the Duke of Sutherland, 
some of whose neighbors were settled near here. The town was laid out 
in 1882 by the Western Town Lot Company. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 129 

Swanzy, Marquette County, Michigan. The name is an elision of Swanzey, 
a town in New Hampshire. That name is a corruption of the name of 
Swansea in Wales. The name was given to this station in honor of Denman 
Thompson, an American actor, it having been stated to the namer of this 
Michigan village that he was raised in Swanzey, New Hampshire. 

Swedeburg, Saunders County, Nebraska, was laid out in 1886 by the Pioneer 
Town Site Company, and was so named because a large number of Swedes 
owned farms in this vicinity. 

Sycamore, DeKalb County, Illinois, was named from the English translation 
of the Indian name of the Kish-wau-kee Biver. The word signifies ' ' Syca- 
more," and wa3 adopted because of the many "American Sycamore" 
{Plantanus occidentalis) trees, that grew here. 

Syene, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby extensive prairie. 
That was named by its early settlers from some now not known associa- 
tion with the Syrine of Egypt (that is mentioned in the Bible) the 
Hebrew name of which was Sevench. 

Talbot, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for Matthew Talbot, once 
Governor of Georgia. 

Tama, Tama County, Iowa, was first called Tama City. The name is Indian, 
one authority claiming it meant "beautiful," "pleasant," "lovely," 
and that it was the Indian name of the wife of the Indian Chief Powe- 
shiek. Another equally good authority, states that it was the name 
of a Chief whose name meant "a bear whose voice makes the rocks 
tremble. ' ' Its first name was Iuka and was so named from the battlefield 
in Mississippi where many Tama County soldiers were killed. The town 
was platted in 1862. The MusquaJcie tribe of Indians has a reservation 
near the town. 

Tamarack, Gogebic County, Michigan. The name of this station was taken 
from the "Tamarack" (Larix laricina — American Larch) trees that were 
very plentiful around this site. 

Taunton, Lyon County, Minnesota, was named by C. C. Wheeler, then an 
officer of the railroad, from the city in Massachusetts, which was named 
from the town in England. It was platted in 1886 by the Winona and 
St. Peter Eailroad Company. 

Taylors, Marquette County, Michigan, was named for a man engaged in dealing 
in wood at this place, when the station was established. 

Terra Cotta, McHenry County, Illinois, was named by W. D. Gates from the 
"Terra Cotta" (hard unglazed pottery) works at this- point. The village 
was originally called Gracy's Crossing because roads crossed Gracy's farm 
at this point. 

Terry, Lawrence County, South Dakota. This place was named from the 
nearby mountain "Terry's Peak" at the base of which the town is located. 
The mountain was named for General Terry of the United States Army, 
who had explored this part of the State before it was settled by whites. 

Thatcher, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named for J. M. Thatcher, the United 
States post trader at Fort Niobrara, when the railroad reached this point. 

Thayer, York County, Nebraska, was platted in 1887 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company and was named for General John M. Thayer, a distinguished 
citizen of Nebraska, a General in the United States Army, during the War 
of the Kebellion and afterwards United State Senator from Nebraska. 



130 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Taycheedah, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, a village but not a station, and 
was named from an Indian camp upon Lake Winnebago. It is an Indian 
word meaning "lake camp." 

Turtle Junction, Gogebic County, Michigan, was so named because it is at the 
junction of a line of railroad running to Turtle Lake; the lake was ao 
named because of its supposed resemblance in shape to a turtle. 

Townsend, Forest County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby Townsend's 
Saw Mill. 

Teton, Stanley County, South Dakota. The original name was Bad River. 
This name came from the present name of the nearby river. This river 
was called by the Sioux Indians, Shiclca and sometimes Wak-pa-shi-cka, 
both of which meant Bad Biver. It was so named because of a disaster 
which the Indians met with on this stream, and which was, by them aa- 
eigned to the river. As neither the river nor the land along it were bad, 
the name was changed to Teton. That is an Indian corruption of the 
word Tinton or Tinta, the name of a division of the Sioux (Dakota) tribe 
and means ' ' prairie. " It is variously spelled Teton, Titon, Titowan and 
Tintonwan. Tintonwan really means "prairie dwellers." Prairie River 
was also called Teton by the Sioux Indians and they claimed the word 
meant "a view in the prairie," or "prairie view." Lewis and Clark 
called it the Teton but gave no reason for the name. It was at one time 
called the Little Missouri Biver. 

Thornton, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named from Thornton in New 
Hampshire; that was named for three brothers, early settlers, though some 
credit the name to Honorable Matthew Thornton alone. 

Thayer, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for J. O. Thayer of Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin, who for many years was connected with the railroad that 
passed through this place. 

Thor, Humboldt County, Iowa, was named for the Scandinavian "God of 
Agriculture." It was platted in 1882 by the Western Town Lot Company. 

Thrall, Wright County, Iowa, was named by the railroad company to honor 
W. A. Thrall, one of its earliest officers, and an officer of the original 
Galena and Chicago Union Railroad. It was platted in 1886 by the Western 
Town Lot Company. 

Three Lakes, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was so named because there were 
three lakes nearby. 

Tlgerton, Shawano County, Wisconsin. This place was named from the nearby 
Tiger River; how or why the river was so named cannot now be ascertained. 
It is, however, believed to have been named by the early French explorera, 
and that the name they gave it was corrupted into Tiger. 

Tilden, Antelope and Madison Counties, Nebraska, was laid out in 1880 under 
the name of Burnett to honor one of the officers of the railroad company, by 
the Pioneer Town Site Company. Some of the admirers of Samuel J. Tilden 
of New York, induced the United States postoffice department to change 
the name of the postoffice and ultimately the name of the town wag made 
to correspond with the name of the postoffice. The town is on each side of 
the line between the two counties that are named above. 

Tilford, Meade County, South Dakota, was named by W. F. Fitch, Manager 
of the railroad when the town was located, for Colonel Joseph G. Tilford, 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 131 



of the Seventh United States Cavalry, and once Commander of Fort Meade. 

It was platted in 1888 by the Pioneer Town Site Company. 
Tilton, Poweshiek County, Iowa, was named for George W. Tilton, an officer 

of the Eailroad Company. It was plaited in 1884 by the Western Town Lot 

Company. 
Tioga, Mahaska County, Iowa, was named from the county and borough in 

Pennsylvania. They were named from the Tioga river. The name is 

Iroquois Indian and has been given various interpretations, as "at the 

forks" "swift current" and "gate." The Iowa town was platted in 

1886 by the Western Town Lot Company. 
Tipton, Cedar County, Iowa, was named in 1840 for General John Tipton, 

Senator from Indiana, by the committee appointed by the Legislature to 

select and name the county seat of the then newly erected Cedar County. 

The name was suggested by John C. Higginson, who was a personal friend 

of General Tipton. 
Toledo, Tama County, Iowa, was named from the city in Ohio. That was 

named from the city in Spain. 
Tomahawk Lake, Oneida County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Milwaukee, 

Lake Shore and Western Railway in 1892 and was named for the nearby 

lake. The lake was named because of its resemblance to the Indian 

hatchet — tomahawk, or toma-hican. 
Town Line, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. Its former name was Decco. Its 

present name came from the fact that it is on the line that separates two 

townships. 
Tracy, Lyon County, Minnesota, was named for John F. Tracy, once president 

of the Chicago and North Western Railway. It was platted by the Winona 

and St. Peter Railway in 1875. The village was for a time called "Big 

Bend," on account of a great curve in the railroad here, and afterwards it 

was called Chetek from a nearby lake. 
Traer, Tama County, Iowa, was named for John W. Traer of Vinton and Cedar 

Rapids, Iowa. 
Traverse, Nicollet County, Minnesota, was named from the township, and 

that was named from the lake. The word is a translation from the 

Dakota (Sioux) name of the lake and refers to the transverse position of 

this long lake across the lay of the neighboring lakes — Big Stone and Lac 

qui Parle, and the Minnesota River. 
Trempeleau, Trempelenu County, Wisconsin, was named from the island in 

the Mississippi River, which was named by the French La montagne que 

trempe a I'eau, meaning "mountain which stands iu the water." Until 1856 

the village was called Montarville. 
Triumph, LaSalle County, Illinois, was named by the citizens because they had 

"triumphed" over opposition to the establishment of a postoffice here. 
Triumph, Martin County, Minnesota, was platted in 1899 by the Western Town 

Lot Company. It was named from a creamery owned by the Triumph 

Creamery Company. John Stein, one of the owners of the Creamery, gave 

the town its name. 
Trombly, Delta County, Michigan, was named for a nearby property owner. 
Troy Grove, LaSalle County, Illinois, was named from a nearby grove, and that 

was named for an early settler in the grove. 



132 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Turin, Monona County, Iowa, was platted in 1887 by the Western Town Lot 

Company and was named from the city in Italy. (Torino in Italian.) The 

town was originally called Bluff Point. 
Turton, Spink County, South Dakota, was named by an early settler from Turton 

in Lancashire, England. It was platted in 1886 by the Western Town Lot 

Company. 
Twin Lakes, Kenosha County, Wisconsin, was named from two nearby lakes, 

which were in every respect so near alike that they were called the ' ' twin 

lakes. ' ' 
Two Eivers, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, was named for the twin rivers, 

Mishicott and Neshota that here run together into the lake and form the 

harbor for the city. 
Tyler, Lincoln County, Minnesota, was named by H. G. Eising of Eedfield, 

South Dakota, for C. B. Tyler, a banker of Marshall, Minnesota. It was 

platted in 1879 by the Winona and St. Peter Eailroad Company. 
Ulao, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, was named from Port Ulao, one time a port 

on Lake Michigan near this location. This port (it was not much more than 

a wharf or pier) was named from the river Ulao (Ulloa) in Honduras. 
Underhill, Oconto County, Wisconsin, was named by John Underhill, a sawmill 

man here for Underhill in Chittenden County, Vermont, and that was 

named for two brothers, share holders under its original charter. 
Union, McHenry County, Illinois, was named from the National Union (United 

States) by William Jackson, the original owner of the town site. 
Union Center, Juneau County, Wisconsin, was named Union by C. A. Davis 

for the National Union (United States), and Center was added because it 

was near the geographical center of Wonewoc township where it is located. 
Union Grove, Whiteside County Illinois, was named from two nearby groves, 

which were so much alike that they were called "The Union Groves." 
Union Stock Yards, Cook County, Illinois. This name merely indicates a point 

that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 

significance. Is to the railroad merely a freight station within the city of 

Chicago. 
Upton, Lake County, Wisconsin, was named for E. L. and E. C. Upton, attorneys 

of Waukegan, Ills. 
Urban, Custer County, South Dakota. The name is Latin for "pertaining to a 

city" and when used here, was to denote the future destiny of the place. 
Ute, Monona County, Iowa, was named for that branch of the Shoshone tribe 

of Indians that is known as Vtes or Utahs. 
Utica, Winona County, Minnesota, was named by Austin Eaymond from the 

city of Utica in New York. 
Underwood, Pennington County, South Dakota, was named for John Under- 
wood, Manager of the Humphrey Cattle Eanch near this town. 
Vail, Crawford County, Iowa, was named by John I. Blair of Blairstown, New 

Jersey for C. E. Vail, a relative. 
Valentine, Cherry County, Nebraska, was platted in 1883 by the Pioneer Town 

Site Company, and was named for E. K. Valentine of West Point, Nebraska, 

who was successively Eegister of the United States Land Office at West 

Point, Nebraska, Judge of the District Court, and Member of Congress 

from the Northern District of Nebraska. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 13:> 

VanBuskirk, Iron County, Wisconsin, was named for the brothers VanBuskirk, 
who owned and operated saw mills here. 

Vandyne, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named for Daniel Vandyne, of 
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, who had purchased from the United States the 
land on which the town was established. 

Van Metre, Lyman County, South Dakota. This town was platted by the 
Western Town Lot Company and was named Bovine. The word comes 
from the Latin for Ox (Bos) and was thought to be appropriate because 
all of the business around the place was connected with stock growing 
and feeding. This name was changed at the request of the citizens to 
Van Metre, to honor Mr. Arthur C. Van Metre who had large interests in 
the vicinity. Mr. Van Metre came to Dakota with the Harney military 
expedition in 1855. He assisted in building a fort about four miles north 
of the location of the Fort Pierre City of the present day. He was the 
interpreter at the making of a treaty with the Sioux Indians at Cheyenne 
river agency in 1889, in which the Indians relinquished their claims to 
many millions of acres of land and thus permitted them to become the 
homes of thousands. The treaty was assailed by Sitting Bull and some other 
hostile chiefs and they threatened to murder the first Indian who should 
sign the treaty. Mr. Van Metre personally induced the chief Chasing 
Crow to sign the treaty. Chasing Crow was a full blood Sioux from 
Bad Biver. Mr. Van Metre was carrier of despatches for the Government 
and often as such risked his life while passing through the camps of the 
hostile Indians. Mr. Van Metre was the first white settler in Clay County, 
S. D., was a pioneer gold hunter in the Black Hills and part owner of 
the first mill that was erected there. He also owned a ferry across the 
Missouri Biver at what is now Vermillion, S. D. His daughter was the 
first white child born to settled parents in South Dakota. He died at Pierre 
in 1894. 

Van Ostrand, Langlade County, Wisconsin, was named for E. H. Van Ostrand of 
Antigo, Wisconsin. 

Van Petten, Lee County, Illinois, was named for A. G. Van Petten who owned 
the land on which the town was established. 

Van Tassell, Converse County, Wyoming, was named for K. S. Van Tassell 
of Cheyenne, Wyo., whose cattle ranch was nearby when the town was laid 
out. He also owned the land on which the town site was laid out. 

Verdel, Knox County, Nebraska. This name was made from the Spanish word 
verde, meaning "green" and was descriptive of the locality. 

Verdi, Lincoln County, Minnesota, was named for the Italian musical com- 
poser, Joseph Verdi, and also to perpetuate the fact of the great and 
unusual greenness (Verd) of the prairie surrounding the town when it was 
established. It was platted in 1879 by the Western Town Lot Company. 

Verdigre, Knox County, Nebraska, was platted in 1887 by the Pioneer Town 
Site Company, and was named from the nearby river. The river was named 
from the Spanish word meaning green, because of the greenish cast of 
the soil on its banks. 

Verdon, Brown County, South Dakota, was named from the river in France. It 
was platted in 1886 by the Western Town Lot Company. 



134 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Vega, Menominee County, Michigan, was named from the Spanish word vega 
meaning a "tract of level, fruitful ground." It was supposed to be 
descriptive of this location. 

Verona, Dane County, Wisconsin, was named by George Vroman from the place 
in New York State; that place was named from the province and city in 
Italy. 

Vesper, Wood County, Wisconsin, was named for Venus, when evening star. 
It was, however, applied to this place from the presence of vast numbers of 
Vesper sparrows (Poocaetcs gramincus) that frequent the vicinity. 

Vesta, Redwood County, Minnesota, was platted in 1S09 by the Western Town 
Lot Company and was named for the heathen goddess Vesta. 

Vilas, Miner County, South Dakota, was named for Colonel W. F. Vilas, Ex- 
United States Senator from Wisconsin. It was platted in 1883 by the 
Western Town Lot Company. 

Viola, Olmsted County, Minnesota, was named from the township, and that waB 
named from a village in Wisconsin, which was named for Viola Buck, the 
wife of an early settler. Its first name was Viola Center, but ultimately 
the Center was dropped. 

Volga, Brookings County, South Dakota, was named from the river Volga, 
which is Sarmatian for "great river." The town was platted by the 
Western Town Lot Company in 1880. 

Volin, Yankton County, South Dakota, was named for Henry P. Volin the 
owner of adjacent land. 

Vulcan, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named for a nearby iron ore mine. 
The mine was named for Vulcan, one of the gods of ancient Mythology. 

Voorhes, Blackhawk County, Iowa, was named for one of the civil engineers 
who laid out the railroad that passes through this region. 

Wabasso, Redwood County, Minnesota. Was platted by the Western Town 
Lot Company in 1889. This name came from the Pottawatomie Indian 
language. Father DeSmet, S. J. said it referred to "The son of a great 
Manitou." Longfellow in his "Song of Hiawatha" applies it to the 
rabbit or white rabbit and also to the place the white rabbit came from. 

Wabeno, Forest County, Wisconsin. This town was platted by the Western 
Town Lot Company in 1897. Its name is Indian and means "crafty 
magicians," "wise men" and "mystery men." Hence the modern legend 
that it meant "men from the east" or "men from the early dawn," as 
many suppose all mystery and wisdom came from the East. It clearly was 
the name of a brotherhood or order amongst the Indians, rather than of a 
person. The wabenos were "medicine men" and conjurers. They also 
called the tents or huts in which they initiated into their mysteries, 
Wabeno, and they also did the Indian who had therein been initiated. 
To show the connection of medicine with the work of these people, it may 
be said that Wabcno-wusk was the name the tribe gave to the Yarrow 
(Achillae Millefoliam) plant that they claimed were "roots of power" and 
"herbs of healing." 

Wablk, Marquette County, Michigan. This name is supposed to be the Menomi- 
nee Indian name for "rock" and is descriptive of the locality. 

Wokama, Stanley County, South Dakota. Wolama is a Sioux (Dakota) Indian 
word and means "a bargain." This name was suggested by Mr. Doane 
Robinson, Secretary of the State Historical Society of South Dakota. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 135 



Wall, Pennington County, South Dakota, was named from a natural wall or 
vertical uprise of rock near the town site. 

Wasta, Pennington County, South Dakota, was so named at the suggestion 
of Mr. Don no Robinson, Secretary of the State Historical Society of 
South Dakota. The word is Sioux (Dakota) Indian and means "good," 
and should be spelled Wastah, but the "h" has been dropped for 
euphony. 

Wicota, Pennington County, South Dakota. This name is a Sioux (Dakota) 
Indian word and means "a crowd." It was suggested as the name 
for a Dakota town by Mr. Doane Robinson, Secretary of the State 
Historical Society of South Dakota, who is anxious to see proper Indian 
words perpetuated by making them the names of places in the State. 

Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska, is an Indian word and said to be their 
name for a tree (the Ulmus elatct) that grows in Nebraska and other 
States. It is also applied as the botanical name (Euonymus atropupureus) 
to the "Strawberry" tree. In some works the Indian word is spelled 
Wha-hoo. 

Wakefield, Gogebic County, Michigan, was platted in 18SG by the Milwaukee, 
Lake Shore and Western Railway, and was named for G. M. Wakefield 
of Milwaukee, Wis., who had large land interests in the vicinity of this 
town. 

Wakonda, Clay County, South Dakota. The name was suggested by Hon. 
W. H. H. Beadle, an early Dakota Territorial officer. It is a Sioux Indian 
word from walcor or uuiuLon, "wonder," "marvel," "mystery," 
"sacred," hence "medicine." Freely rendered it means "this is won- 
derful." The town was platted in 1888 by the Western Town Lot Com- 
pany. 

Wald, Cedar County, Iowa. The place was originally named Walden for 
W. D. Walden, who for many years was a valued employe of the Chicago 
and North Western Railway. Its present name is an abbreviation of 
its original name. 

Wales, Waukesha County, Wisconsin, was named in honor of Wales, the 
original home of many of the settlers in this locality. 

Wallace, Menominee County, Michigan, was named by Mellen Smith in 1871 
for a contractor who constructed the railroad through this place. 

Wall Lake, Sac County, Iowa, was named from a nearby lake. The lake 
was named because it was surrounded by rocks piled up by Nature, so 
as to appear like a wall built by human agencies. The town was platted 
in 1877 by the Blair Land Company. 

Walnut Grove, Redwood County, Minnesota, was named from a large grove 
of black walnut (Juglans nigra) trees that stood near this location when 
the village was established. 

Wanda, Redwood County, Minnesota. This name is an elision of the Ojibway 
Indian word wanenda and means "to forget" or forgetf ulness. " 

Waseca, Waseca County, Minnesota, was named from the county by J. C. 
Trowbridge, an early settler. The word is supposed to be from the Sioux 
Indian word washccho and to mean "good hunting ground" or "land of 
plenty." The Indians also used the word to mean "red earth" and 
"red point." 



136 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Washington, Washington County, Nebraska, was platted in 1887 by the 
Pioneer Town Site Company. The town was named from the county and 
that of course was named for George Washington, "The immortal." 

Watch Factory (Elgin), Kane County, Illinois, was named from the Elgin 
National Watch Company's works which were nearby. 

Watersmeet, Gogebic County, Michigan, was platted in 1884 by the Milwaukee, 
Lake Shore and Western Railway. It was so named because it is located 
on the high lands from which the waters flow into Lake Superior, Lake 
Michigan and the Mississippi River Valley respectively. The Indian 
name for the place was the word they used for stating this fact. 

Watertown, Codington County, South Dakota, was named at the suggestion of 
John E. Kemp, the first settler, who had emigrated from Watertown, New 
York. It was platted in 1878 by the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Com- 
pany. 

Watertown, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, was formerly called Johnson's Rapids 
for Timothy Johnson, its first settler. It was then named Watertown on 
account of the extraordinary amount of water power in Rock River on 
which it is located. The party who named the place had emigrated from 
Watertown, New York, and claimed that fact as well as the water 
power, were good reasons for naming the place Watertown. 

Watkins, Benton County, Iowa, was named for J. B. Watkins, an early officer 
of the Chicago and North Western Railway Company in Iowa. 

Waucedah, Dickinson County, Michigan, was named by Judge J. Ingalls, one 
of the original owners of the town site, from a nearby stream. The word 
is Ojibway Indian and means "murmuring waters" or "little talking 
stream. ' ' 

Waukegan, Lake County, Illinois. Its first name was Little Fort, on account 
of a fort that was there in an early day. In 1849 the name was changed 
to its present form, and is said to be the Indian translation of the old 
name. 

Waukesha, Waukesha County, Wisconsin. Its earliest name was Prairieville. 
In 1856 the name was changed to its present form. It is from the 
Pottawattamie Indian word wauk-toh,a, meaning "fox," and was the 
name of a Pottawattamie Indian Chief. This name was by the Indians 
applied to the river that runs through the place. 

Waunakee, Dane County, Wisconsin, is from the Indian word wanalci, meaning 
"he lives" or "he lives in peace," and was given to the place by Louis 
Baker and George L. Fish, the original owners of the town site on the 
suggestion of Simeon Mills, who was skilled in the Indian languages. 

Wausau, Marathon County, Wisconsin, is a corruption of the Indian word 
wassa, meaning "faraway." The town was named by Walter D. Mc- 
Indoe, a Scotchman. He also named the county. At an earlier date the 
Wausau settlement was known as Big Bull Falls from the French equivalent, 
given the river and falls by French voyagers and trappers who passed this 
way. 

Wautoma, AVaushara County, Wisconsin. This name was made by adding 
parts of two different Indian words, together, viz. : wau from waugh and 
torn from Tomah, and the two thus united are supposed to mean "good 
earth" or "good life," "where to spend a good life." Tomah was the 
name of an Indian Chief. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 137 



Wayburne, Eedwood County, Minnesota, was platted in 1902 by the Western 
Town Lot Company. The name is merely fanciful and has no historical 
significance. 

Wayne, DuPage County, Illinois, was named for General Anthony Wayne of 
the Revolutionary War. 

Wayside, Dawes County, Nebraska. This name is merely fanciful and has no 
historical significance. 

Weber, Cook County, Illinois, was named by and for "Barney" Weber, who 
owned a brick yard nearby. 

Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa, was named for Daniel Webster of 
Massachusetts. In 1850 when it was first platted, it was named New 
Castle. The present name was given it in 1856. 

Weedens, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, was named for G. W. Weeden, 
County Judge of Sheboygan, Wis. 

Welcome, Martin County, Wisconsin, was so named to signify that all good 
citizens would be welcomed if they came here to live. 

Wellington, Gogebic County, Michigan, was named for C. L. Wellington, an 
officer of the railroad that was first built through this place. 

Werley, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named for the Werley family, old 
settlers. Its first name was "Climbing Bock," but that was dropped by 
general consent of the villagers, and the present name substituted. 

Wendte, Stanley County, South Dakota, was named for H. S. Wendte, a 
German who formerly lived at Ponca, Nebraska. At one time it was 
named Lance Creek, from a nearby stream, on the banks of which the 
Black or Water Ash (Fraxinus sambucifola) grew, and which the 
Indians used for spear handles, staves, battle axe handles, etc., etc. 
The whites gave it the name Lance Creek, because they thought this 
wood resembled the celebrated "Lance wood" that grows in Brazil, 
Cuba, etc. Finally the name was fixed as Wendte. 

Wahaba, Fremont County, Wyoming. This town was platted by the Pioneer 
Town Site Company and was named by it. The word is from the 
Arapahoe Indian language and means "corn" (maize). 

Wessington, Beadle County, South Dakota, was named from a nearby range of 
hills that had been a landmark for the early explorers and travellers for 
many years before the railroad reached this spot. These hills were named 
by and for a teamster of that name, who, under Colonel W. H. Nobles, in 
1857 laid out a road to the Missouri Eiver. This Mr. Wessington also dis- 
covered the medicinal springs in the hills, thirty miles south of this station. 

West Bend, Washington County, Wisconsin, was named from the west bend 
of the Milwaukee Eiver on which the village is located. 

West Chicago, DuPage County, Illinois. It was first called "the Junction" 
from the fact that it was the only junction on any railroad west of 
Chicago. To honor John B. Turner, the President of the Galena and 
Chicago Union Bailroad, it was named Turner Junction, and afterwards 
Turner. In an evil day, real estate speculators and "boomers," induced 
the people to drop the old and honored name and to adopt the present 
one. 

West Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, is in the City of Elgin (which see). 



138 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

West Gladstone, Delta County, Michigan, was so named because of its nearness 
to and connection with the City of Gladstone. That city was named for 
W. E. Gladstone, the English statesman. 

West Point, Cuming County, Nebraska, was so named because when established, 
it was the most westerly point that was settled in the valley of the 
Elkhorn River. 

West Allis, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named North Greenfield by 
S. Ml. Dixon of Milwaukee, because the town was located on the north 
line of the township of Greenfield. The township was named from its 
general appearance. The postoffice is "West Allis and the name of the 
village has been made to conform to that of the postoffice. The postoffice 
was named for E. P. Allis a prominent manufacturer of Milwaukee. 

West Rapids, Linn County, Iowa. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. Is a portion of the city of Cedar Kapids (which see). 

West Salem, LaCrosse County, Wisconsin, was named from Salem, Massa- 
chusetts. The word "West" was added to distinguish it from another 
Salem in Wisconsin. It was once called Neshonic, the local spelling of 
the name of an Indian Chief, whose band lived here in an early day. 

West Side, Crawford County, Iowa, was so named because it was the first 
town on the railroad west of the high lands that divide the waters that 
flow into the Missouri and Mississippi Valleys respectively. 

What Cheer, Keokuk County, Iowa, was named by a Scotch miner when he 
discovered coal in the vicinity. It was an exclamation of gladness and 
was attached to the town under the belief that the mines would give it 
prosperity. 

Wheatland, Clinton County, Iowa, was named by John L. Bennett, from the 
Pennsylvania home of President James Buchanan. 

Wheaton, DuPage County, Illinois, was named for Warren L. Wheaton, who 
owned much land in the vicinity. He gave the railroad company tho 
right of way through his land, but would not consent to have a station 
located on it, as he "did not believe in making money from the sale of 
land." 

Wheelerwood, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, was named for J. S. Wheeler, who 
owned much land in this vicinity when the town was laid out. 

Whitcomb, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named to honor H. P. Whitcomb 
of Milwaukee, a valued officer of the railroad company that built to 
and through this place. 

Whitefish Bay, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was named from the nearby 
Bay. This place was so named at an early day because it was the 
favorite feeding ground for whitefish, and fishing ground for fishermen. 

Whitewood, Lawrence County, South Dakota, was named from Whitewood 
Creek and Whitewood Gulch, and these were named from the white barked 
trees (Populus tremuloides, Quaking Aspen), that grows along the creek. It 
was laid out in 1888 by the Pioneer Town Site Company. 

Whiting, Monona County, Iowa, was named by John T. Blair for Judge 
Charles E. Whiting, a large farmer and prominent citizen who lived 
nearbv. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 139 

Whitney, Menominee County, Michigan, was named for one of the owners of the 
Lake Superior and Pittsburgh Iron Mines, that built and operated char- 
coal kilns nearby. 

Whitney, Dawes County, Nebraska. This station was first called Earth 
Lodge, that being the English translation of the Indian name of the 
Creek on which the station is located. The people who settled here, after 
the station was established, did not like this name and insisted on having 
it called Whitney, after Mr. Peter Whitney, an old and valued employe 
of the Chicago and North Western Eailway Company. 

Whitelaw, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. This place was originally called 
Pine Grove Siding and afterwards Pine Grove, from a nearby grove of 
Pine trees. Its name was changed in 1907 to Whitelaw, to honor a 
nearby property owner. 

Whitson Junction, Iowa County, Wisconsin, was named by Henry Baker from 
a place in England. The name of the postoffice is Edmund. 

Whitten, Ilardin County, Iowa, was named for C. C. Whitten, of Tama, Iowa, 

who was instrumental in getting a railroad built through this part of the 

State. 
Wilcox, Marinette County, Wisconsin. This place was named for an early 

settler of the vicinity. 
Wild Eose, Waushara County, Wisconsin, was so named because of the great 

abundance of wild roses that grew all around this locality when the town 

was laid out. 
Williams Bay, Walworth County, Wisconsin, was named for Captain Israel 

Williams, who bought in 1837 the land now occupied by the village. 

Willow, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the timetable of the road. It was named from the many 
willows (Salix) trees that grow in the vicinity. 

Wilmette, Cook County, Illinois, was named by Judge H. W. Blodgett, of Wau- 
kegan for Ouihnette an Indian half-breed. 

Wilson, Menominee County, Michigan. Its- earliest name was Ferry, and it 
was so named for W. H. Ferry who owned land in the vicinity. The namo 
was afterwards changed to honor the Wilson family who owned a mill 
nearby. 

Wilton, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was named from the township of Wilton 
in Vermont, by emigrants from there. 

Winchester, Iron County, Wisconsin. Until January 20, 1908, this place was 
called Divide, which see. The present name came from Winchester, a 
city in Fredrick County, Virginia, which was named from the town in Eng- 
land. 

Winde, Delta County, Michigan, was named for Herman Winde, one of the 
pioneers of this part of Michigan. Originally the place was called 
Perkins, for an early settler of the locality. 

Wlnfield, DuPage County, Illinois. Its earlier name was Warren. Its present 
name was given it to honor General Winfield Scott of the United States 
Army, by the board that was appointed to name all the townships in the 
county. 



140 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Winnebago, Winnebago County, Illinois, was named from the county and 
that was named for the Indian tribe. The name means "The people of 
the stinking waters," or "men of (or from) the bad smelling waters." 
The original word was Ouinepeg or Ouinepego. The word Winnipeg, 
comes from the same word. 

Winnetka, Cook County, Illinois, is an Indian word meaning "Beautiful 
place." One or more Indian Chiefs were named Winnetka. 

Winnetoon, Knox County, Nebraska. It was named by W. F. Fitch, then 
Manager of the railroad that runs through the place. It is from the 
name of a farm in Dane County, Wisconsin, owned by Nathan Deane, a 
prominent citizen of that county. 

Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Is a Sioux Indian word and mean* 
"the first born daughter." The Indian word was sometimes spelled 
wenona and again weenonah. 

Winthrop Harbor, Lake County, Illinois, was for many years called State 
Line and after that, Spring Bluff, (because of many fine springs that 
flowed from the foot of the lake bluff). Its present name was given it 
in 1889 by J. H. Van Vlissengen when trying to convert the place into a 
manufacturing town. The name came from Winthrop in Massachusetts. 

Wisner, Cuming County, Nebraska, was named by John I. Blair for Judge 
Samuel P. Wisner of Cedar Eapids, Iowa, who was prominent in the 
affairs of the Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley Bailroad, when it 
was built to this place. 

Wittenburg, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named from the home town of 
Martin Luther, Wittenburg, in Saxony, Germany, and for the University in 
that town. This place was named as above in honor of the many Luther- 
ans who lived in this vicinity when the town was located and named. 

Wolton, Natrona County, Wyoming was named from the fact that it was the 
center of wool shipping and sheep shearing of this part of the state. The 
place was originally called "Wooltown" but was changed to Wolton for 
euphony. 

Womac, Macoupin County, Illinois. This town was started in 1870 and was 
named in 1876 by and for John J. Womac, who had a "country store" 
here and who owned large tracts of farm land in the neighborhood. 

Wolsey, Beadle County, South Dakota, was named for Cardinal Thomas 
Wolsey, the British Prelate. 

Wonewoc, Juneau County, Wisconsin, was named by DeLand Pratt, the 
original owner of the town site. It is a corruption of the Indian word 
won-a-wag meaning ' ' they howl ' ' referring to the wolves. 

Woodbine, Harrison County, Iowa, was named from the "Woodbine" or 
"Virginia Creeper" (the Avipelopies quinquefolia) that was very plenti- 
ful here when the country was first settled. 

Woodhull, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, was named for General Nathaniel 
Woodhull, a Revolutionary officer. 

Wood Lake, Cherry County, Nebraska, was named from a nearby lake. The 
Lake was so named because around its shores was about the only wood 
(timber) that could be found in this vicinity. 

Woodman, Grant County, Wisconsin, was named to honor Captain E. E. Wood- 
man of St. Paul, Minnesota, a valued officer of the railroad company, 
who was active in securing the right of way for the railroad here. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 141 



Woodruff, Vilaa County, Wisconsin, was platted by the Milwaukee, Lake 
Shore and Western Kailway in 1888, and was named for Mr. Woodruff, 
of Sands and Woodruff (a friend of President F. W. Rhinclander), who 
was interested in the railroad. 

Woodstock, McHenry County, Illinois, was named in 1854 by Joel H. Johnson, 
a director of the railroad, from his native place, Woodstock, Vermont. 
That place was named from the town in England. Before this village in 
Illinois was named Woodstock, it was called "Centerville" on account 
of its being in the geographical center of the county. 

Woodworth, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. The original name was Bristol, and 
was named for Bev. Ira Bristol, an early settler. The next town was 
named West Bristol (now Bristol), and to prevent confusion, the present 
name was selected. This name was that of the original owner of the 
town site. 

Wyeville, Monroe County, Wisconsin, was named from its location Necedah 
Junction, as it was at the junction of the railroad that runs eastwardly 
to Necedah. The postoffice is called Wyeville, which is a corruption of 
Wythe, the name of a county in Virginia, and from which this postoffice 
was named. The original name was dropped and its present name agrees 
with that of the postoffice. 

Woolstock, Wright County, Iowa, was platted by the Western Town Lot 
Company in 1881, and the name was made by Gilbert Perry for the oc- 
casion. It had no meaning or relation to anything connected with the 
place. It is merely the name of the village and was invented out of the 
two syllables that form it. 

Wright, Mahaska County, Iowa, was named for a nearby land owner. 

Wrightstown, Brown County, Wisconsin, was named for Joel Wright, the 
original owner of the town site. At one time it was called Bridgeport. 

Yankton, Yankton County, South Dakota. The name is a corruption of the 
Sioux Indian name I (or E) hank-ton-wan, meaning "the end village," and 
refers to the time when the Yankton Indians camped at the end of Spirit 
Lake in the Minnesota woods before they were forced out by the 
Ojibways (Chippewas) and were obliged to live on the prairies. In con- 
nection with the name Yankton it may be well to mention the fact that 
at treaty was made near this point in 1858 with the Yanktonaise (Yank- 
ton Sioux) by which they relinquished their claims to the land in this 
vicinity and that this treaty resulted in a great rush of white settlers to 
the southern part of the state. Eecently a monument has been erected 
for these Yanktonaise at Greenwood, South Dakota, the present home of 
this tribe to perpetuate the memory of this treaty. The face of the 
monument bears this inscription: "To commemorate the treaty between 
the United States of America and the Yankton Tribe of Sioux or Dakota 
Indians; concluded at Washington, D. C, April 19, 1858; Ratified by the 
Senate, February 16, 1859." Around the base runs the line: "Ihanktun- 
wan — Yankton — Dakota — Sioux." The second side reads: "In mem- 
ory of the Yankton chiefs who made the treaty of 1858 — Struck-by-the- 
Ree, Black Bear, Medicine Cow, White Swan, Pretty Boy, Feather-in-the- 
Ear, Crazy Bull, Frank Deloria." The third side reads: "Delegates 
who signed the treaty of 1858— Charles Picotte, Jumping Thunder, 
Mazahetun, Numkalipa, Running Bull, Walking Elk, Standing Elk, Sad 



142 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Voice Elk, Cetanwokape, Hinnanwieasa. " The fourth face of the monu- 
ment reads: "The tribal councilors who kept the peace, and saw that the 
agreements of the fifty year treaty were all fulfilled — Fat Mandan, 
Kidowanpi, Iron Necklace, Tunkannahomni, Little Bird, Mad Walking, 
Big Voice Bear, Susnakeduta, Sunkamanomani, Little Thunder, Lean Elk, 
His Fly Pipe, John Eee, Frank Jandreau. " Major A. H. Kedfield, U. S. 
Indan agent set up his tent at the Yankton agency and remained there 
and thus may be said to be the first permanent resident of the county. 

York, York County, Nebraska, was named from the county and that was 
named for a prominent pioneer resident family. 

Zaneta, Grundy County, Iowa. This is merely a fanciful name made out 
of the first syllable of Zanesville, added to the letters "ta" for euphony. 

Zachow, Shawano County, Wisconsin, was named for W. C. Zachow, a large 
land owner of the vicinity. It was once named Netley for a nearby 
settler, but was changed to honor Mr. Zachow. 

Zell, Faulk County, South Dakota, was platted in I8S6 by the Western Town 
Lot Company and was named from one of the several "Zells" of Germany, 
Austria and Switzerland. 

Zion City, Lake County, Illinois, was named by J. A. Dowie from Mount Zion 
in Palestine. 

Zumbrota, Goodhue County, Minnesota, was named from the common name 
of the nearby river. This is a corruption of its French name Evibarrass, 
which means "obstruction," and was so named because the boats of th« 
French traders were retarded and their course obstructed by much fallen 
timber in the river and by the shoals and falls and rapids in it. The 
river is often called the Zumbro, which is the way the French word named 
above sounded to the first white settlers, who followed the French trappen 
on this stream. 



AS TO THE 



CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY. 

ABANDONED NAMES. 

The following names, in an early day, were applied to towns and villages 

along the line of this road. For various reasons these names were abandoned 
and the current ones were substituted. In cases where the name of the post 
office varies from that of the town or station the post office name will also 
be found in this list: 

Abandoned Name. Current Name. 

Altoona See Hitchcock, Beadle County, South Dakota. 

Areola " Arco, Lincoln County, Minnesota 

Ayr " Crandon, Forest County, Wisconsin 

Amesville " Garden Prairie, Boone County, Illinois. 

Ableman's Mills " Ablemans, Sauk County, Wisconsin. 

Aetna " Malta, DeKalb County, Illinois. 

Aplington " Eleanor, Butler County, Iowa. 

Atkinson " Hazel, Iron County, Michigan. 

Atla " Hudson, Fremont County, Wyoming. 

Astor " Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. 

Blue Cut " Amber, Jones County, Iowa. 

Big Woods " Batavia, Kane County, Illinois. 

Bradley " Arlington Heights, Cook County, Illinois. 

Bradford " Broadmoor, Stark County, Ilinois. 

Bluff Point " Turin, Monona County, Iowa. 

Bay City " Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin. 

Belle Plaine " Cuyler, Cook County, Illinois. 

Bell Creek " Arlington, Washington County, Nebraska. 

Belleville " Johnson's Creek, Jefferson County, Wisconsin. 

Bedford " Dotson, Brown County, Minnesota. 

Barkville " Bark River, Delta County, Michigan. 

Blackberry ; ' Elburn, Kane County, Illinois. 

Bear Grove " Byron, Olmsted County, Minnesota. 

Burnt Bluffs " Foster City, Dickinson County, Michigan. 

Bagnorsville " Howells, Colfax County, Nebraska. 

Butler " Cherry Valley, Winnebago County, Illinois. 

Buschville " Howells, Colfax County, Nebraska. 

Bass Creek " Hanover, Rock County, Wisconsin. 

Bullwinkle " Helenville, Jefferson County, Wisconsin. 

Big Bull Falls " Wausau, Marathon County, Wisconsin. 

Boyer Falls " Logan, Harrison County, Iowa. 

Bachelor's Grove " Footville, Rock County, Wisconsin. 

Babcock's Grove " Lombard, DuPage County, Illinois. 

Bowen " Harrison, Sioux County, Nebraska. 

Bloom " North Freedom, Sauk County, Wisconsin. 



144 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Abandoned Name. 

Big Bend See 

Brickton 

Bark River 

Bramhall 

Bundy 

Buxton 

Belmont 

Burns 

Benton 

Burnett 

Bovine 

Bristol 

Bridgeport 

Ceresco 

Call's Grove 

Cross Plains 

Clintonville 

Columbus 

Conrad's Grove 

Clinton 

Center Grove 

Cheyenne Pit , 

Como , 

Chetek 

Clybourn Place 

Clarksville 

Calahan 

Cottage Hill 

Cainville 

Charleston 

Chaplin 

Coda 

Cardona 

Canfield 

Centerville 

Centerville 

Centerville 

Centerville 

Cochronville 

Centralia 

Chittenden 

Clark Center 

Charleston 

Climbing Rock 

Day's River 

Dunton 

De Mores 

Dement 

Des Plaines River Sta. 



Current Name. 
Tracy, Lyoii County, Minnesota. 
Park Ridge, Cook County, Illinois. 
Narenta, Delta County, Michigan. 
Ree Heights, Hand County, South Dakota. 
Jeffris, Lincoln County, Wisconsin. 
Sawyer, Fillmore County, Nebraska. 
Leslie, LaFayette County, Wisconsin. 
Springfield, Brown County, Minnesota. 
Leach, Lake County, Illinois. 
Tilden, Madison County, Nebraska. 
Van Metre, Lyman County, South Dakota. 
Woodworth, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. 
Wrightstown, Brown County, Wisconsin. 
Ripon, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. 
Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa. 
Cobb, Iowa County, Wisconsin. 
South Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. 
Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa. 
Conrad, Grundy County, Iowa. 
Clintonville, Waupaca County, Wisconsin. 
Douglas, Olmsted County, Minnesota. 
Oral, Fall River County, South Dakota. 
Clybourn Junction, Cook County, Illinois. 
Hitchcock, Beadle County, South Dakota. 
Jewell Junction, Hamilton County, Iowa. 
Elmhurst, DuPage County, Illinois. 
Magnolia, Rock County, Wisconsin. 
Midway, La Crosse County, Wisconsin. 
Franklin Grove, Lee County, Illinois. 
Morse, Bureau County, Illinois. 
Gait, Whiteside County, Illinois. 
Tracy, Lyon County, Minnesota. 
Imogene, Martin County, Minnesota. 
Edison Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Lathrop, Delta County, Michigan. 
Cleveland, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. 
Plainview, Wabasha County, Minnesota. 
Woodstock, McHenry County, Illinois. 
Ridott, Stephenson County, Illinois. 
Grand Rapids, Wood County, Wisconsin. 
Rose Hill, Cook County, Illinois. 
Clark, Clark County, South Dakota. 
St. Charles, Kane County, Illinois. 
Werley, Grant County, Wisconsin. 
Brampton, Delta County, Michigan. 
Arlington Heights, Cook County, Illinois. 
Belle Fourche, Butte County, South Dakota. 
Creston, Ogle County, Ilinois. 
River Forest, Cook County, Illinois. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



145 



Abandoned Name. Cubkent Name. 

Dogwood See Saxon, Iron County, Wisconsin. 

Dover Center " Dover, Olmsted County, Minnesota. 

Denniss " Buckingham, Tama County, Iowa. 

Dowville " Dow City, Crawford County, Iowa. 

Dakotah " Dakota City, Humboldt County, Iowa. 

Decco " Town Line, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. 

Defeve " Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois. 

Danby " Glen Ellyn, DuPage County, Illinois. 

Derby " Guckeen, Faribault County, Minnesota. 

Deerfield " Narenta, Delta County, Michigan. 

EUig " Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. 

East Orange " Alton, Sioux County, Iowa. 

Edmund " Whitson Junction, Iowa County, Wisconsin. 

Elk Grove " Arlington Heights, Cook County, Illinois. 

Eagle Grove Junct, " Eage Grove, Wright County, Iowa. 

Earl " Earlville, La Salle County, Illinois. 

Eldon " Eldorado, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. 

Ell Eoy ' ' Elroy, Juneau County, Wisconsin. 

Empire " Janesville, Waseca County, Minnesota. 

Earth Lodge " Whitney, Dawes County, Nebraska. 

East Mapleton " Mapleton, Monona County, Iowa. 

Fort Des Moines " Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. 

Fort Clark " Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois. 

Fremont " Baldwin, Jackson County, Iowa. 

Fort Creve Coeur " Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois. 

Farnham ' ' Farnhamville, Calhoun County, Iowa. 

Forsythe " Little Lake, Marquette County, Michigan. 

Fennimore Center " Fennimore, Grant County, Wisconsin. 

Felton " Hetland, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. 

Fletcher " Lake View, Sac County, Iowa. 

Fort Howard " Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. 

Fairview " Manchester, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. 

Florida " Panola, Iron County, Michigan. 

Fish Creek " Rockland, La Crosse County, Wisconsin. 

Fairview " Story, Story County, Iowa. 

Peny " Wilson, Menominee County, Michigan. 

Floyd's Bluffs " Sargeant 's Bluffs, Woodbury County, Iowa. 

Genoa " Genoa Junction, Walworth County, Wisconsin. 

Grosse " Little Suamico, Oconto County, Wisconsin. 

Grove Siding " Whitelaw, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. 

Grandview " Ghent, Lyon County, Minnesota. 

Grabtown " Cherry Valley, Winnebago County, Illinois. 

Grenville " Granville, Sioux County, Iowa. 

Graball ' ' Cherry Valley, Winnebago County, Illinois. 

Grospied ' ' Lake Geneva, Walworth County, Wisconsin. 

Gayvills " Black Tail, Lawrence County, South Dakota, 

Grand View " Leslie, LaFayette County, Wisconsin. 

Grand Trunk Junct " Stiles Junction, Oconto County, Wisconsin. 

Germantown " Rockfield, Washington County, Wisconsin. 



116 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



AUANDONFD NAME. 

Gracy's Crossing See 

Gulbrand " 

Hunkins ' ' 

Harrisville " 

Hubbell " 

Hohenzollern " 

Halfway Creek ' ' 

Hazelhurst " 

Hanson " 

Harlem " 

Hart's Bluffs " 

Hemlock " 

Harsted " 

Helgason " 

Harmon " 

Havelock " 

Hampton " 

Harvey " 

Hill River " 

Ingham ' ' 

Ida " 

Iuka " 

Irvington " 

Junction " 

Jessie Benton Fremont . . " 

Johnson's Rapids " 

Jane " 

Junction " 

Kanesville " 

Kintyre ' ' 

Kane " 

Keaton " 

Kent " 

Kinson " 

Kishwaukee " 

Kelnerville " 

Kane " 

Kettlestring's Grove ..." 

Loran " 

Lexington " 

Lancaster " 

La Vallette " 

Lone Star " 

Lac Verde " 

Lamberton " 

Leone " 

Le Petite Chutes " 

Little Kaukauna " 

Le Ville de Maillot " 



Current Name. 
Terra Cotta, McHenry County, Illinois. 
Northwood, Worth County, Iowa. 
Cordova, Seward County, Nebraska. 
Cato, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. 
Kelley, Story County, Iowa. 
Schleswig, Crawford County, Iowa. 
Midway, La Crosse County, Wisconsin. 
McNaughton, Oneida County, Wisconsin. 
Evan, Brown County, Wisconsin. 
Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Towa. 
Basswood, Iron County, Michigan. 
Porter, Yellow Medicine. County, Minnesota. 
Capron, Boone County, Illinois. 
Evan, Brown County, Minnesota. 
Rose Hill, Cook County, Illinois. 
St. Charles, Gregory County, South Dakota. 
Gentian, Marquette County, Michigan. 
Montello, Marquette County, Wisconsin. 
Cottonwood, Stanley County, South Dakota. 
Elrod, Clark County, South Dakota. 
Tama, Tama County, Iowa. 
Irving Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Elmo, Grant County, Wisconsin. 
Fremont, Dodge County, Nebraska. 
Watertown, Jefferson County, Wisconsin. 
Janesville, Waseca County, Minnesota. 
West Chicago, DuPage County, Illinois. 
Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Towa. 
Argyle, Winnebago County, Illinois. 
Elburn, Kane County, Illinois. 
Castlewood, Hamlin Couuty, South Dakota. 
Garvin, Lyon County, Minnesota. 
Hazel, Iron County, Michigan. 
Hartland, McHenry County, Illinois. 
Kellner, Portage Couuty, Wisconsin. 
La Fox, Kane County, Illinois. 
Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Loretto, Boone County, Nebraska. 
Anamosa, Jones County, Iowa. 
Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebraska. 
Avenue, Cook County, Illinois. 
Dwight, Butler County, Nebraska. 
Green Lake, Green Lake County, Wisconsin. 
County Line, Racine County, Wisconsin. 
Leona, Forest County, Wisconsin. 
Little Chutes, Outagamie County, Wisconsin. 
Little Rapids, Brown County, Wisconsin. 
Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



147 



Abandoned Namk. 

L'Eau qu Court See 

Lead. City 

Loveland's Mills 

Lane 

Lakeside 

Lombardville 

Lake Kampeska 

Little Fort 

Lance Creek 

Lee 

Lone Tree 

Lodi 

Linwood 

Montana 

Minersville 

Morse 

Marshall 

Miles City 

Middleton 

Menominee River June . 

Miller's Hill 

Montarville 

Morgan 

Minden 

Marquisville 

Maple Hill 

Midway 

Morton Siding 

Mead 

Midway 

Masonic Grove 

Mitchell 

Missouri Valley Junct. 

Montrose 

Melrose 

Mason Long 

Navarino 

Nordland 

Nunda 

Netley 

New Albany 

Newark 

New York 

New Cassel 

North Branch 

Nettle Hill 

New Jefferson 

Nordland 

North Greenfield 



CuitiiK.vi Name. 
Niobrara, Knox County, Nebraska. 
Lead, Lawrence County, South Dakota. 
Loveland, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. 
Bochelle, Ogle County, Illinois. 
Hubbard Woods, Cook County, Illinois. 
Morse, Bureau County, Illinois. 
Kampeska, Codington County, South Dakota. 
Waukegan, Lake County, Illinois. 
Wendt, Stanley County, South Dakota. 
Bruce, Brookings County. South Dakota. 
Porter, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. 
Maple Park, Kane County, Illinois. 
Mosling, Oconto County, Wisconsin. 
Boone, Boone County, Iowa. 
Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin. 
Morso Bluffs, Saunders County, Nebraska. 
Marshalltown, Marshall County, Iowa. 
Deadwood, Lawrence County, South Dakota. 
Afton, Eock County, Wisconsin. 
Pow r ers, Menominee County. Michigan. 
Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. 
Trempeleau, Trempeleau County, Wisconsin. 
Gilfillan, Bedwood County, Minnesota. 
Crandon, Spink County, South Dakota. 
Saylor, Polk County, Iowa. 
Gridley, Emmet County, Iowa. 
Bockford, Winnebago County, Illinois. 
Galbraith, Kossuth County, Iowa. 
Hebron, McHenry County, Illinois. 
Jordan, Boone County, Iowa. 
Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. 
Harrison, Lincoln County, Wisconsin. 
Missouri Valley, Harrison County, Iowa. 
Mnyfair, Cook County, Illinois. 
Melrose Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. 
Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. 
Arlington, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. 
Crystal Lake, McHenry County, Illinois. 
Zachow, Shawano County, Wisconsin. 
Beloit, Eock County, Wisconsin. 
Barton, Washington County, Wisconsin. 
Clinton, Clinton County, Iowa. 
Campbellsport, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. 
Cobden, Brown County, Minnesota. 
Cato, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. 
Jefferson, Greene County, Iowa. 
Minneota, Lyon County, Minnesota. 
West Allis, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. 



148 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Abandoned Namu. 

New Providence See 

New Boston " 

Northwood ' ' 

New Castle " 

Noyesville " 

Neshonac " 

New Town " 

Norwood " 

Ogle " 

Ogden " 

Otter Creek ' < 

Otjen " 

Onion Grove " 

Orange City " 

Oplington << 

O'Brien «< 

O 'Donnel ' < 

Orf ord < < 

Oak Creek " 

Oak Bidge < « 

Okawa < < 

Point Boss " 

Podunk < < 

Princeton ' « 

Plank Eoad < < 

Port Clinton " 

Penrose " 

Preston " 

Pocahontas " 

Port Gilbert " 

Prospect Park " 

Prairieville " 

Perkins << 

Pine Bluff " 

Pine Grove Siding " 

Pine Grove " 

Pleasant Grove " 

Quorn " 

Quigley " 

Ramessa " 

Eock Creek " 

Rochdale " 

Bock Springs " 

Redwood " 

Rutlandville " 

Richmond " 

Ridgeville " 

Ross " 

Russell " 



Cubkent Name. 
Lawn Hill, Hardin County, Iowa. 
Lewiston, Winona County, Minnesota. 
Northwood, Worth County, Iowa. 
Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. 
Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
West Salem, La Crosse County, Wisconsin. 
Carlton, DeKalb County, Illinois. 
Norwood Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Ashton, Lee County, Illinois. 
Clinton Junction, Rock County, Wisconsin. 
Chelsea, Tama County, Iowa. 
Carrollville, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. 
Clarence, Cedar County, Iowa. 
Alton, Sioux County, Iowa. 
Eleanor, Butler County, Iowa. 
Goose Lake, Clinton County, Iowa. 
Stafford, Holt County, Nebraska. 
Montour, Tama County, Iowa. 
South Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. 
Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Seaforth, Redwood County, Minnesota. 
Nekoosa, Wood County, Wisconsin. 
Montfort, Grant County, Wisconsin. 
Albia, Monroe County, Iowa. 
Jefferson Park, Cook County. Illinois. 
Highland Park, Lake County, Illinois. 
Gushing, Woodbury County, Iowa. 
Lake Preston, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. 
Rolfe, Pocahontas County, Iowa. 
Racine Junction, Eacine County, Wisconsin. 
Glen Ellyn, DuPage County, Illinois. 
Waukesha, Waukesha County, Wisconsin. 
Winde, Delta County, Michigan. 
Klevenville, Dane County, Wisconsin. 
Whitelaw, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. 
Whitelaw, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. 
Marengo, McHenry County, Illinois. 
Kingsley, Plymouth County, Iowa. 
Petersville, Clinton County, Iowa. 
Malone, Clinton County, Iowa. 
Beemer, Cumings County, Nebraska. 
Botna, Shelby County, Iowa. 
Ablemans, Sauk County, Wisconsin. 
Burchard, Lyong County, Minnesota. 
Gilberts, Kane County, Illinois. 
Columbia, Brown County, Minnesota. 
Evanston, Cook County, Illinois. 
Newald, Forest County, Wisconsin. 
Capa, Stanley County, South Dakota. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



149 



Abandoned Name. 

Rockland See 

Rockport " 

Rex " 

Eock '« 

Rocky Point " 

Roseneath " 

St. John's " 

Sana " 

Springfield " 

South Elgin " 

Skull Creek " 

St. Mark " 

Shelburn " 

Salisbury's Mills " 

Stanley " 

Spring Bluff " 

Slaunsville " 

Speir " 

Sand Mound " 

Seneca Falls " 

Southport " 

State Line " 

Story " 

St. John's " 

Smith's Mine " 

Shiboleth " 

Sand Point " 

Stackville " 

South Nora " 

Springfield " 

Sugar River " 

Saylorville " 

Saratoga " 

Seminole " 

Turtle Creek " 

Tama City " 

Timothy ' ' 

Tenhassen " 

Three Rivers " 

Terry " 

Teyranena " 

Taylorsport " 

Taylor " 

Thatcher " 



Curkknt Name. 
Lake Bluff, Lake County, Illinois. 
Janesville, Hock County, Wisconsin. 
St. Lawrence, Hand County, South Dakota. 
Lucan, Redwood Count}', Minnesota. 
St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minnesota. 
Edison Park, Cook County, Illinois. 
Missouri Valley, Harrison Countj r , Iowa. 
Esmond, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. 
Maquoketa, Jackson County, Iowa. 
Clintonville, Kane County, Illinois. 
Bruno, Butler County, Nebraska. 
Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin. 
Burchard, Lyon County, Minnesota. 
Barton, Washington County, Wisconsin. 
Burr, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. 
Winthrop Harbor, Lake County, Illinois. 
Lake Mills, Winnebago County, Iowa. 
Eagle Lake, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. 
Grand Mound, Clinton County, Iowa. 
Senaca, Faulk County, South Dakota. 
Kenosha, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. 
Winthrop Harbor, Lake County, Illinois. 
Story City, Story County, Iowa. 
Malone, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. 
Republic, Marquette County, Michigan. 
Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. 
Escanaba, Delta County, Michigan. 
Atkinson, Iron County, Michigan. 
Nora, Nuckolls County, Nebraska. 
Plymouth, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. 
Rileys, Dane County, Wisconsin. 
Saylor, Polk County, Iowa. 
Amiret, Lyon County, Minnesota. 
Bucknum, Natrona County, Wyoming. 
Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin. 
Tama, Tama County, Iowa. 
Newton, Manitowoc County. Wisconsin. 
Ceylon, Martin County, Minnesota. 
Suring, Oconto County, Wisconsin. 
Garvin, Lyon County Minnesota. 
Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin. 
Hubbard Woods, Lake County, Illinois. 
Nachusa, Lee County, Illinois. 
River Forest, Cook County, Illinois. 



150 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Abandoned Name. Current Namb. 

Traders' Point See Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. 

The Junction " West Chicago, DuPage County, Illinois. 

Turner Junction " West Chicago, DuPage County, Illinois. 

Turner " West Chicago, DuPage County, Illinois. 

Washington City " Port Washington, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. 

Walden " Wald, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Wisconsin City " Port Washington, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. 

Wilno " Ivanhoe, Lincoln County, Minnesota. 

Willow Glen " Bradgate, Humboldt County, Iowa. 

Wadiloupe " Beaman, Grundy County, Iowa. 

Walters " Carlisle, Fillmore County, Nebraska. 

Welcome " Bear Creek, Outagamie County, Wisconsin 

West Dayton " Dayton, Webster County, Iowa. 

Whittlesey " Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin. 

Wadsworth " Riverton, Fremont County, Wyoming. 

Weed " Bering, Sac County, Iowa. 

Wall Lake Junction.... " Carnavon, Sac County, Iowa. 

Webb " Lebanon, Potter County, South Dakota. 

Whitman " Luverne, Kossuth County, Iowa. 

West Depere *' DePere, Brown County, Wisconsin. 

Winona Junction •' Medway, La Crosse County, Wisconsin. 

Westport " Mendota, Dane County, Wisconsin. 

Walworth " Sharon, Walworth County, Wisconsin. 

Wooltown " Wolton, Natrona County, Wyoming. 

Warrington ; ' Monroe, Turner County, South Dakota. 

West Allis • ' North Greenfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 

Waterloo ' ' Shopiere, Rock County, Wisconsin. 

Whitney's Rapids. " Nekoosa, Wood County, Wisconsin. 

Wilson •' Ivanhoe, Lincoln County, Minnesota. 

Winneshiek " Freeport, Stephenson County, Illinois: 

Warren " Winfield, DuPage County, Illinois. 

Wisconsin City " Janesville, Rock County, Wisconsin. 

Wicota " Owanka, Pennington County, South Dakota. 

West Bristol " Woodworth, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. 

Wingville " Montfort, Grant County, Wisconsin. 

Wyeville " Necedah Junction, Monroe County, Wisconsin. 

Vandenburg " DeWitt, Clinton County, Iowa. 

Vernon ' ' Luverne, Kossuth County, Iowa. 

Vanderbilt " Fairfax, Linn County, Iowa. 

Viola Center " Viola, Olmsted County, Minnesota. 

Vera " Kampeska, Codington County, South Dakota. 

Yazoo " California Junction, Harrison County, Iowa. 

Yuba " Cuba City, Grant County, Wisconsin. 

Zalesburg " Branch, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Link 151 

SAFETY IN RAILWAY TRAVEL. 

The expeditious movement of trains and the maximum of comfort for patrons 
who travel via the Chicago and North Western Railway, is accompanied by 
elaborate precautions for their safety. Hundreds of passenger trains furnish 
daily service via this line between various towns and cities in nine western 
states, with that minimum of delay and danger, and that maximum of comfort 
that have made the road famous. 

Skill, forethought and liberal expenditure have provided carefully-guarded 
grade crossings, elevated tracks and commodious terminals, automatic block 
signals, heavy steel rails, powerful locomotives, modern, well-built equipment, 
and high-grade discipline among employes, whose duty it is to safeguard its 
patrons. 

THE BEST OF EVERYTHING. 

The main artery of travel between Chicago and Omaha — "The Only Double 
Track Railway between Chicago and the Missouri River," the double track 
North Shore route between Chicago and Milwaukee, the double-track block 
signal line between Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth, and thousauds 
of miles of high-class railway that reach other important points in the north- 
west, stand to travelers via the Chicago & North-Western Railway as a guar- 
antee of the best of everything in travel. 

The growth of the Chicago & North-Western Railway and of the western 
and northwestern states through which it passes, have kept close pace from 
the earliest history of the two. Much of the commercial vitality and rapid 
development for which the Upper Mississippi Valley is noted, is due to the 
fact that railway coommunication between this great area and the markets 
upon which it depends, has always been of a character to develop the greatest 
amount of interchange and increase the growth of the west to the largest 
possible extent. 

TO THE PACIFIC COAST. 

The comfort of the trans-continental journey is greatly added to by having 
access to properly prepared booklets and maps beforehand. The Chicago & 
North-Western Railway issue some of the most handsome booklets on the 
subject of California, Oregon and Washington; illustrations illumine the text; 
the facts set forth are reliable and enlightening. Various booklets on this 
and other travel subjects may be secured on application. 

THREE FAST TRAINS. 

to the Pacific Coast every day. Every luxury and convenience the traveler 
could wish is embodied on these great trans-continental trains via the Chicago, 
Union Pacific & North-Western Line. 

The Overland Limited to San Francisco and the Los Angeles Limited to Los 
Angeles are electric lighted throughout leaving Chicago daily, only three days 
to the Coast, with splendid equipment, modern and luxuriously complete in 
every detail. 

The China & Japan Fast Mail, another daily trans-continental train, has 
standard Pullman sleepers, Chicago to San Francisco, Pullman Tourist sleep- 
ers to San Francisco, Portland and Los Angeles, free reclining chair cars and 
dining cars. 

The best of everything is assured if you travel via this route. 

FREIGHT TRAFFIC. 

The Chicago & North-Western system, comprising 9,329 miles of railway, 
reaching the following North-Western States; i. e., Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Wyoming and the Dakotas, with its termi- 
nal tracks in every principal city and with over 200 miles of sidetrack in the city 
of Chicago and its double track main lines between Chicago and Omaha and 
Chicago and St. Paul is equipped to furnish unexecelled Freight Transportation 
between all important points in the territory it reaches. 



152 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

STILL THE PIONEER LINE. 

The "North-Western" is still the Pioneer Line in the transportation of 
Trans-continental Freight, being the original "California Fast Freight" Line. 

IMPORTANT TO MANUFACTURERS. 

To manufacturers this Company offers exceptional facilities, reaching as it 
does thriving cities in the Fox River District of Wisconsin, the Hard and Soft 
Wood Lumber Districts of Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. It reaches the 
rich Iron Ore ranges located also in these same states, and the productive coal 
fields of Northern Illinois. 

THE DAIRY LINE. 

The North-Western is also distinctively a Dairy Line and gives especial 
attention to this great important industry. 

THROUGH THE CORN BELT. 

It runs through the great Corn Belt of Iowa and Nebraska and the famous 
wheat producing states of Minnesota and the Dakotas, and is the original 
Black Hills Line. 

THE LIVE STOCK LINE. 

No railway in the great North-West transports annually a greater number 
of cars of Live Stock and with better despatch. 

ITS AGENCIES. 

This Company is represented by its General Agencies in all the principal 
cities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, who may be consulted with reference 
to Freight Traffic. 

ITS BOOK OF RATES. 

It also publishes monthly a "Book of Freight Kates," the purpose being 
to show rates to points reached by it and connections, as per the lawful pub- 
lished tariffs, which include rates not only to points reached by its own rails, 
but to 8,350 points located on 51,000 miles of connecting lines. The shipping 
public is requested to apply for desired information to any of its Freight 
Officials, Local Agents, or General Agents. 

ITS HEADQUARTERS. 

Its general offices are at 215 Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 111., where its 
patrons are always welcome. 



AS TO THE 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha 

Railway. 



CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & OMAHA 

RAILWAY COMPANY 



DIRECTORS 



WILLIAM K. VANDERBILT - New York 

HAMILTON McK. TWOMBLY New York 
FREDERICK. W. VANDERBILT New York 

W. A. GARDNER - Chicago 

MARVIN HUGHITT - Chicago 

BYRON L.SMITH - Chicago 

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW New York 



DAVID P. KIMBALL 
ZENAS CRANE - - 
EUGENE E. OSBORN 
THOMAS WILSON - 
JOHN M.WHITMAN 
JOHN A. HUMBIRD 



Boston 

Dalton, Mass. 

New York 

St. Paul 

Chicago 

- St. Paul 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

MARVIN HUGHITT WILLIAM K. VANDERBILT 

H. McK. TWOMBLY EUGENE E. OSBORN 

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW DAVID P. KIMBALL 

FREDERICK W. VANDERBILT 



GENERAL OFFICERS 



W. A. GARDNER - - President - - - 

EUGENE E. OSBORN - - - Vice-President and Assistant Secretary 

JAMES T.CLARK- - - - Second Vice-President 

RICHARD H. WILLIAMS - Treasurer and Second Assistant Secretary - 

MILTON B. VAN ZANDT - Assistant Treasurer and Third Ass't Secretary 

T. A. POLLEYS - - - - Secretary - 

THOMAS WILSON - - - - General Counsel - - - 

WILLIAM H.STENNETT - - Auditor of Expenditures - 

ARTHUR W. TRENHOLM - General Manager - - - 

SAMUEL G. STRICKLAND - - - General Superintendent - 

LEWIS A. ROBINSON - Comptroller - - - - 

CHARLES P. NASH - Local Treasurer - 

HIRAM M. PEARCE - - - - Freight Traffic Manager - 

EDGAR B. OBER - - General Freight Agent 

THOMAS W. TEASDALE - General Passenger Agent 

CHARLES W. JOHNSON - Chief Engineer - - 

ISAAC SEDDON - - - Purchasing Agent 

GEORGE W. BELL - - - Land Commissioner - 



Chicago 

New York 

St. Paul 

New York 

New York 

Hudson, Wis. 

St. Paul 

- Chicago 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

St. Paul 

Hudson, Wis 



ST. PAUL OFFICE— CORNER FOURTH AND ROSABEL STREETS. 

CHICAGO OFFICE— 215 JACKSON BOULEVARD. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— in BROADWAY. 



December 31, 1907 



156 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



MILES OF RAILROAD JUNE 30, 1907. 

WISCONSIN DIVISION 

Elroy to Westminster Street 192.82 

Westminster Street to St. Paul (leased) 1.30 

Westminster Street to Minneapolis (leased) 10.10 

Hudson to Ellsworth 24.82 

Stillwater Junction to Stillwater 3.30 

St. Croix Drawbridge to Stillwater Switch 4.55 

Merrillan to Marshfield 38.67 

West Eau Claire to Shaw 's Mill 2.74 

Menomonie Junction to Menomonie 3.01 

Fairchild to Mondo vi 36.75 

Emerald to Weston 36.37 

Northline to Bayfield 177.57 

Ashland Junction to Ashland 4.38 

Ashland Shore Line 1.31 

Eau Claire to Spooner 81.51 

Trego to Duluth (including Nor. Pac. Ky. bridge, 1.59 miles. . 73.29 

Tuscobia to Draper 56.00 

Chippewa Falls to Yellow River 49.28 

797.77 

MINNESOTA AND IOWA DIVISION. 

St. Paul to LeMars 241.49 

Cliff to St. Paul Junction 1.02 

LeMars to Sioux City (leased) 25.20 

Minneapolis to Merriam (leased) 27.00 

Lake Crystal to Elmore 43.69 

Madelia to Fairmont 29.38 

Bingham Lake to Currie 38.63 

Heron Lake to Pipestone 55.10 

Trent to Mitchell 130.73 

Luverne to Doon 28.00 

620.24 

NEBRASKA DIVISION. 

Missouri river to Omaha 123.06 

Sioux City union depot to bridge track (leased) .50 

Sioux City Bridge Company 's track 3.90 

Coburn to Newcastle 26.95 

Emerson to Norfolk 46.50 

Wakefield to Crof ton 49.14 

Wayne to Bloomfield 43.14 

293.19 

Total 1,711.20 

The mileage operated, by States, was as follows: 

Owned. Leased. Total. 

Wisconsin 756.69 1.28 757.97 

Minnesota 434.33 38.71 473.04 

Iowa 74.54 27.50 102.04 

South Dakota 88.20 88.20 

Nebraska 287.85 2.10 289.95 

Total 1,641.61 69.59 1,711.20 

In addition to the above, the company owned and operated 66.03 miles of second 
track located as follows: 

Wisconsin 40.09 

Minnesota 24.23 

Nebraska 1.71 

Total 66.03 



AS TO THE 

CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & 
OMAHA RAILWAY. 

THE STATES. 
THEIR NAMES AND THE ORIGIN THEREOF. 

Iowa. The name comes from the name of a tribe of Indians who inhabitated 
this region when it was first visited by the "whites." The word means 
"sleepy ones" or drowsy ones." For a more full report on this word 
6ee "Iowa" in the Chicago and North Western part of this book. 
State Capital, Des Moines. It is on the Des Moines Eiver and was named 
from the river. The river name comes from the Indian word " miiconang," 
meaning "road." The French spoke the word as if it were spelled 
"Moingona, " and then shortens it to Moin, and called the river "La riviere 
des moines." 

Minnesota. A Sioux Indian word meaning "muddy water," "cloudy water" 
or "sky-tinted water." Hennipin and LaSalle saw the Minnesota Eiver 
in 1680 and LaHonton, LeSueur and Carver later. In 1812 the United 
States first exercised authority in the territory. Fort Snelling was built 
in 1819 and named by the United States authorities for Colonel Josiah 
Snelling who built the fort. It was a protection for the early settlers, 
traders, etc. on the upper waters of the Mississippi and Minnesota (St. 
Peter) Eivera. 

State Capital, St. Paul. The city was named in 1841 from the church of 
"St. Paul" a log church which was built here for Father M. Galtier, a 
Jesuit missionary. 

Nebraska. An Indian word meaning "shallow water," "broad water." 
It is supposed the word was by the Indians, applied to the Platte Eiver. 
State Capital, Lincoln. This was named for Abraham Lincoln. 

South Dakota. Dakota was the common name for the confederated Sioux 
tribes. The name they used varied, as sometimes they called themselves 
Lakota or Nakota and again Dakota. The "South" was added when 
the territory was divided. The Dakotas were cut off from Minnesota in 
1858 and from that time to March 2, 1861 was practically without any 
government. In March 1861 the Territory was organized by act of 
Congress. 

State Capital, Pierre. This was named from Fort Pierre, which was on the 
opposite bank of the Missouri Eiver and was named in June 1832 for 
Pierre Choteau, Jr., of St. Louis, Missouri, who visited the trading post 
at that time. The "Fort" belonged to the American Fur Coompany. 
For a brief history of this Fort, see "Fort Pierre" in this work." For 
a mention of the Confederated Sioux tribes, who gave their name to this 
state see South Dakota in the Chicago and North Western part of this 
work. 



158 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Wisconsin. A Sauk Indian word having reference to holes in the banks of a 
stream in which birds nest. 

Elijah M. Haines in his "North American Indian," says of the word 
"Wisconsin in substance: "The name was first given to the stream or 
river. The word was given by Marquette as Mesh-bousing and Mish- 
lcou-sing. The letter ' m ' afterwards changed to ' w ' and the letter 
'u' changed to *n' making it wish-kin-sing. The word given by 
Marquette is supposed to mean 'strong current,' a feature that es- 
pecially marks this stream in high water." The name of the stream 
was ultimately given to the territory and later to the State. The spell- 
ing of the word as Ouiconsin, was merely a refining of a misunderstood 
French euphonism, and has no basis in correct (French) orthography. 
See Chicago and North Western part of this book for further remarks on 
the name of this state. 

State Capital, Madison. Named for James Madison, President of the 
United States. 



AS TO THE 

CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & 
OMAHA RAILWAY. 

THE COUNTIES. 

THEIR NAMES AND ORIGIN. 

Ashland County, State of Wisconsin. Named from the home of Henry Clay 
in Kentucky. 

County seat, Ashland. Named from the county. (Sec Ashland in alpha- 
betical list of places in this book.) 

Barron County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Judge Henry D. Barron of 
St. Croix Falls, Wis. 

County seat, Barron. Named for Judge Henry D. Barron of St. Croix 
Falls, Wis. He was a judge in the 8th, Judicial Circuit. 

Bayfield County, State of Wisconsin. Named for H. D. Bayfield of the 
United States Navy, who surveyed the Great Lakes. 

County seat, Washburn. Named for Cadwallader C. Washburn, former 
Governor of Wisconsin. 

Blue Earth County, State of Minnesota. Named for tho bluish earth, caused 
by the presence of copper in the soil of the county. 

County seat, Mankato. Named from an Indian word meaning "blue" 
or perhaps ' ' green soil. ' ' 

Buffalo County, State of Wisconsin. Named from the presence of buffalo 
(Bos Americana) here in the early day. 
County seat, Alma. Named from the battlefield in the Crimea. 

Burt County, State of Nebraska. Was named for Francis Burt who was 
Governor of the Territory in 1854. 

County seat, Tekamah; was owned, platted and named by Col. B. R. 
Folsom of Attica, New York, who settled here and laid out the town 
in 1854. The words is Omaha Indian and means "big Cottonwood." 
Before Colonel Folsom came to this place, the Omaha Indians had been in 
the habit of camping here, so much so, that by many early traders it was 
called the headquarters of that tribe. 

Cedar County, State of Nebraska. Named in reference to the presence of 
Cedar (Thuja) trees in the vicinity. 

County seat, Hartington, was named by and for Lord Hartington of 
England, who had purchased and still owns a large tract of farm land 
that now surrounds the village. 

Chippewa County, State of Wisconsin, was named from an Indian tribe. The 
proper and Indian form is Ojibway. The word means "puckered up" or "to 
roast till puckered up." 
Count}' seat, Chippewa Falls. Named from the county. 



160 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Clark County, State of Wisconsin, was named for A. W. Clark, an early 

settler. 

County seat, Neillsville, -was named for a family of early settlers. 
Cottonwood County, State of Minnesota. Translation of the Sioux word for 

a species of Poplar, or Cottonwood (Populus tremuloides) tree, abundant 

in the county. 

County seat, Windom; was named for United States Senator and Secretary 

of the U. S. Treasury, Windom of Minnesota. 
Cuming County, State of Nebraska. Named for T. B. Cuming, governor of the 

territory in 1854-55. 

County seat, West Point; named, because when located, it was the moit 

westerly point that was settled in the Elkhorn valley. 
Dakota County, State of Nebraska, was named for the Indian tribe. 

County seat, Dakota City. This place was established in 1855 and wat 

named by Mrs. J. D. M. Crockwell, for the Indian tribe. The Indian 

(Sioux) form of the word is Lakota, Nakota or Dakota, according to 

the dialect, and signifies "allies," which is the common Indian name 

for the confederated Sioux tribes. 
Dakota County, State of Minnesota, was named for the Indian tribe. The 

Indian form is Lakota, Nakota or Dakota, according to the dialect, signi- 
fying "allies," the common name of the confederated Sioux tribes. 

County seat, Hastings; was named for Henry Hastings Sibley, one of the 

early proprietors. 
Davison County, State of South Dakota. Was named for Henry C. Davison, 

the first settler in he county. 

County seat, Mitchell; was named for Alexander Mitchell, of Milwaukee, 

Wisconsin. 
Dixon County, State of Nebraska. Was by the legislature of the state, named 

for a pioneer settler. 

County seat, Ponca; was named for the Ponca tribe of Indians. The word 

means "medicine." 
Douglas County, State of Nebraska. Named for Senator Stephen A Douglas, 

of Illinois. 

County seat, Omaha; this is an Indian word for an Indian tribe and means 

"up stream," as "up stream people." (See Omaha in the alphabetical list 

herein). 
Douglas County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Stephen A. Douglas, United 

States Senator from Ilinois. 

County seat, Superior; was named from its location on the border of and at 

the head of Lake Superior. 
Dunn County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Charles Dunn, the first Chief 

Justice of the Territory of Wisconsin. 

County seat, Menomonie; was named for the Indian tribe. The word has 

reference to the wild rice which grew abundantly in this region. 
Eau Claire County, State of Wisconsin. Was named from the river; the word 

is French and signifies "clear water." In 1767 the Eau Claire Kiver 

was discovered by Jonathan Carver and his followers. Carver's voyag- 

eura came up the Chippewa River from the Mississippi in batteaux. The 

Mississippi and Chippewa Rivers were swollen by recent rains and were 

exceedingly muddy. Arriving at the mouth of the Eau Claire River they 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 161 

were surprised to find clear water. " L'eau daire, " they cried on discov- 
ering the clear water. The Eau Claire River takes its name from that 
occurrence. Carver's voyageurs had been unable to obtain drinking water 
from the time they left the Mississippi, until they reached the Eau Claire 
River. So far as known, they were the first white men to set foot on this 
section of Wisconsin. The Eau Claire and Chippewa Rivers have their 
confluences in the heart of Eau Claire. In 1854 occurred the last battle 
between the hostile Sioux and the Chippewas, taking place within a 
few miles of what was to become the town site of Eau Claire. By act of 
legislature in October 1856, the county was organized with Eau Claire as 
the county seat. The railroad reached this place on August 10, 1870. 
County seat, Eau Claire; named from the county. 

Faribault County, State of Minnesota. Named for Jean Baptiste Faribault, 
a settler and French fur trader amongst the Sioux Indians. 
County seat, Blue Earth City; was named for the township, and that was 
named because of the bluish hue of the earth, due to the presence of 
copper. 

Hanson County, State of South Dakota. Named for Joseph R. Hanson of Yank- 
ton, South Dakota, clerk of the first legislature. 

County seat, Alexandria; "was named from Alexandria, in Virginia; that 
was named from a place in Scotland; that was named from Alexandria in 
Egypt, and that was named from Alexander, the Great. A story recently 
started as to this town is to the effect that it was named for Alexander 
Mitchell of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but the writer of these lines was 
assured by Mr. Mitchell that the place was not named for him, and that its 
name came down as stated above. There is scarcely any doubt as to the 
truth of the above. Had the place been named for Mr. Mitchell, he would 
have known it, as he was the 'final authority' in tbe naming of all of the 
new towns on his railroad." 

Hennepin County, State of Minnesota. Named for Louis Hennepin, a Fran- 
ciscan missionary, explorer and author. 

County seat, Minneapolis; this is a combination of the Indian word Min- 
ni — "water" and the Greek polis "city." 

Jackson County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for General Andrew Jack- 
son. 

County seat, Black River Falls; was named from the falls of Black River, 
near which it is situated. The river was named from the dark color of its 
water which came from the macerated bark of trees in and along its banks. 

Jackson County, State of Minnesota. Was named for General Andrew Jackson. 
County seat, Jackson; was named for ex-President General Andrew Jack- 
son. 

Juneau County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for Solomon Juneau, the 
French founder of the City of Milwaukee. 

County seat, Mauston; was named for General M. M. Maughs, once pro- 
prietor of the original village. 

Knox County, State of Nebraska. Was named for the Revolutionary General 
Knox. It was originally named L'Eau que court County, but was changed 
by the legislature at the request of David Quimby, its legislative repre- 
sentative. 



162 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



County Beat, Niobrara; named from an Indian word meaning "running 
water. ' ' 

Le Sueur County, State of Minnesota. Was named for Pierre Charles Le 
Sueur, an explorer of the upper Mississippi in 1683-1722. 
County seat, Le Sueur Center; was named from the county. (For data in 
regard to Le Sueur see alphabetical list). 

Lyon County, State of Iowa. Was named for General Nathaniel Lyon of the 
United States Army, who achieved immortality during the War of the 
Rebellion. The original name of the county was Buncombe, and was given 
it when it was created in 1851. As this name was given in derision, the 
legislature in 1862, changed the name to its present form. 
County seat, Rock Rapids. This was made the county seat in 1871 and wai 
named from its location at the Falls of Rock River. 

Madison County, State of Nebraska. Named for President James Madison. 
County seat, Madison; named from the county. 

Martin County, State of Minnesota. Named for Henry Martin, an early set- 
tler. 

County seat , Fairmont. Was named in 1857 by W. H. Budd and other com- 
missioners, who were appointed by the government, to select a site for the 
county seat. The location is on elevated ground and along a chain of lakes. 
The outlook was very fine, and that induced these commissioners to call 
the site Fairmont. (Not Fairmount, as it is often incorrectly written). 

McCook County, State of South Dakota. Named for General Edwin S. McCook 
of Ohio distinguished in the War of the Rebellion, and Secretary of the Ter- 
ritory of Dakota, at the time of his death. 
County seat, Salem; named for the Jewish word that means "peace." 

Minnehaha County, State of South Dakota. Was named from the Minnehaha 
Falls in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The word is Sioux Indian and 
means "laughing" or "tumbling water." This county was constituted by 
the legislature of Minnesota in December, 1857, while the Dakotas were still 
attached to Minnesota. 

County seat, Sioux Falls. Was named from its location on the Falls of the 
Big Sioux River. W. W. Brookings was made district attorney at the 
county seat and was active in all early actions in the county and state. 

Monroe County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for James Monroe, ex-presi- 
dent of the United States. 

County seat, Sparta; was named by Mrs. M. Pettit from the ancient city 
of Greece. 

Murray County, State of Minnesota. Was named for Hon. W. P. Murray, a 
member of the Territorial Legislature and a pioneer of St. Paul, Minne- 
sota. 

County seat, Slay ton,; was named for J. B. Slayton, the earliest settler in 
the county. 

Nobles County, State of Minnesota. Was named for Colonel William H. Nobles, 
a member of the Minnesota Territorial Legislature. 

County seat, Worthington; was named for the Worthington family of Ohio, 
who had many representatives settled in this vicinity. 

O'Brien County, State of Iowa. Was named for the Irish patriot of 1848, Wil- 
liam Smith O'Brien. The county was created in 1851 and organized in 
1860. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line P>3 

County seat, Primghar. The site of this town was selected by the county offi- 
cers and laid out in 1872. Many names were suggested as a name for the 
location, but as none were acceptable to all interested, it was suggested 
that the initials beginning the names of the county officers should be taken 
and arranged into a name. The following were the names from whieh the 
initials came: 

Messrs. Pumphrey, Roberts, Inman, McCormack, Green Hays, Albright, 
and Renok; these initials made P. R. I. M. G. H. A. R. and this made the 
name of the town and the county seat 

Osceola County, State of Iowa. Was named for the Seminole Indian chief. 
The name refers to a medicinal drink used by the tribe in certain ceremon- 
ies. The county was created in 1851, but was not organized until 1871. 
County seat, Sibley; was named for General Henry H. Sibley, (an early 
pioneer of the state, while it was yet a portion of Wisconsin Territory) 
the first governor of Minnesota; a soldier of the War of the Rebellion, anil 
also of the Sioux War of 1862. 

Pierce County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for Franklin Pierce, once 
president of the United States. 
County seat, Philips; was named for Elijah B. Phillips, a railroad builder. 

Pipestone County, State of Minnesota. Was named because of its celebrated 
quarries of the red pipestone that was highly prized and was largely used 
for pipes by the Sioux Indians. 
County seat, Pipestone; was named from the county. 

Plymouth County, State of Iowa. Was named from Plymouth, Massachusetts. 
County seat, LeMars. (For the origin of this name, see Le Mars in the 
alphabetical list in this book). 

Polk County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for James K. Polk, once presi- 
dent of the United States. 

County seat, Osceola, and was named for the Seminole Indian chief. The 
word refers to a medicinal drink used by the tribe in certain ceremonies. 

Ramsey County, State of Minnesota. Was named for the noted War Governor 
of Minnesota, Hon. Alexander Ramsey. He also was United States Sena- 
tor from Minnesota. 

County seat, St. Paul. (For further information about this place, see St. 
Paul, in alphabetical list herein). 

Sock County, State of Minnesota. Named on account of the rocky character 
of the soil in some parts of the county. 

County seat, Luverne. Was named for one of the daughters of one of the 
proprietors of the town site. 

Sawyer County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for Hon. Philetus Sawyer, 
United States Senator from this state, and one of its most noted men. 
County seat, Hayward; was named for and by Anthony J. Hayward, its 
founder. 

Scott County, State of Minnesota. W 7 as named for General Winfield Scott, of 
the United States Army. 

County seat, Shakopec, and was named for a Sioux Indian Chief, who for- 
merly lived here; the word means "six." 

Sioux County, State of Iowa. Named from Dakota or Sioux Indians. The word 
Sioux is an abbreviation of Nadowessiovr. their Ojibway name, and means 



164 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



"little snakes, or enemies." The county was created in 1851 and organ- 
ized in 1860. 

County seat, Orange City; named for William the Silent, Count of Nassau 
and Prince of Orange, in honor of the large settlement of Hollanders in the 
county. 

St. Croix County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for the river. The river was 
named for Monsieur St. Croix, a Frenchman, who was drowned at its mouth. 
County seat, Hudson. The first name of this place was Willow River, so 
named from the fact that it is located at the mouth of that stream where it 
enters the St. Croix Eiver. After the close of the Mexican War, several 
ex soldiers who had been present at the victory pf Buena Vista, induced the 
settlers to give the village the name of that battlefield. For reasons not 
now accessible, the citizens again changed the name, and named it for 
Hudson, New York. That was named for Henry Hudson, the navigator, 
who also gave his name to the river on which the city of Hudson is located. 

St. Louis County, State of Minnesota. Was named from the river. The river 
was named by the French explorer, Pierre la Verendrye, in 1740, in honor 
of the Cross of St. Louis, conferred on him shortly before his death by the 
King of France. 

County seat, Duluth; was named for Sieur Daniel Graysolon Duluth, a 
French traveler and explorer. 

Taylor County, State of Wisconsin. Was named by the legislature of Wisconsin, 
for W. E. Taylor, a governor of the state. 

County seat, Medford; this was named in 1875 by Phillips and Colby, th« 
builders of the railroad that passes through the village, from Medford, 
Massachusetts, whence one of the gentlemen came. 

Thurston County, State of Nebraska. Was named for United States Senator 
John M. Thurston, of the state of Nebraska. 

County seat, Pender; was named by W. E. Peebles, for an Englishman, 
named Pender, who owned much land in the vicinity. 

Trempeleau County, State of Wisconsin. Named from an island in the Missis- 
sippi Eiver. It is from the French, La montagne que trempe a I'eau, mean- 
ing "mountain that stands in the water." 

County seat, Whitehall; was named by B. F. Wing, the original owner of 
the town site, from Whitehall, Illinois, and that was named from White- 
hall, New York. 

Washburn County, State of Wisconsin. Was named for Cadwallader C. Wash- 
burn, a former governor of the state. 

County seat, Shell Lake. Was named by the Shell Lake Lumber Company — 
that had mills here in an early day — from the lake. The lake was known 
by its present name as long ago as 1852, as it is to be found on a map pub- 
lished in Philadelphia in that year. The lake was so named on account of 
the immense number of shells of the "fresh water clams" (Mya arenaria) 
that, when discovered, and now cover its shores and its bottom for a con 
siderable distance from the shores. 

Washington County, State of Nebraska. Named for George Washington. 
County seat, Blair; named for John I. Blair of Blairstown, New Jersey. 

Washington County, State of Minnesota. Was named for General George 
Washington. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 165 

County soat, Stillwater. This place was so named by John McKessick, 
because of the stillness of the flow of the river (St. Croix) on which it in 
located. 

Watonwan County, State of Minnesota. A Dakota (Sioux) Indian word, mean 
ing "fish bait," or "where there are plenty of fish." 
County seat, St. James; named for the first settler, James Purington. 

Wayna County, State of Nebraska. Was named for General Anthony Wayne, 
one of the heroes of the American Revolution. 
County seat, Wayne; was named from the county. 

Wood County, State of Wisconsin. Named for Joseph Wood, a member of the 
Wisconsin legislature. 

County seat, Grand Rapids. Was named from the rapids in the Wisconsin 
River. 

Woodbury County, State of Iowa. Named for Levi Woodbury, of New Hamp 
shire, and a Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States. It was 
first called wan lean, but in 1851 was given its present title by the legis- 
lature of Iowa. 

County seat, Sioux City; named for the Dakota or Sioux Indians, the largest 
tribe of Indians in the United States. The word is a abbreviation of the 
name the Ojibway (Chippewa) Indians, applied to the Sioux tribe, and 
signified "little snakes," i. e. "our enemies." The French in 1875 called 
them La Sues, while George Crogan, the Indain interpreter for the United 
States government at this time, called them La Suit. (See Sioux City in 
alphabetical list). 



AS TO THE 

CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & 
OMAHA RAILWAY. 

THE TOWNS. 

THEIR NAMES AND THE ORIGIN THEREOF. 

Adrian, Nobles County, Minnesota. This town was started in 1876 and was 
named for Adrian C. Iselin, of New York City, who was a large holder of 
the earliest issued stock and bonds of a railroad that passes through this 
vicinity. 

Allouez, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was named for Father Claude Jean Allouez, 
an early French Jesuit missionary to the Indians. His name is attached to 
many places and streams, lakes, bays, and so forth, in the northwest, 
where he lived and worked for the civilization of the Indians. In 1665 
he established a mission at "Chequamegon of Lake Superior," now sup- 
posed to be one of the Apostle Islands, in the mouth of Chequamegon 
Bay at the west end of Lake Superior. He labored with the Fox, Mascou- 
tin, Miami and Illinois Indians and finally settled at Kaskaskia in a mission 
founded by Marquette. He died in 1690. His part of the "Jesuit Rela- 
tions" is among the most valuable records of the Indians. 

Alton, Sioux County, Iowa. Was founded in 1872. The earliest name was East 
Orange. It as well as the present Orange City were given their names 
in honor of William, the Silent, Count of Nassau and Prince of Orange, 
because many Hollanders were settled in the vicinity. When it was deter- 
mined by the citizens that the name should be changed, in a meeting held 
for that purpose of those present, one suggested Alton, and it was adopted. 
The name was taken from Alton, Illinois and Alton, New Hampshire, and 
both these got their names from Alton, a town in England. 

Altoona, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. This village was started in 1881 and 
was named from Altoona, Pennsylvania, by Capt. T. P. Gere, who, when 
the town was started was superintendent of the railroad that passed through 
it. The place in Pennsylvania was named because of its high situation in 
the Alleghany Mountains. The name ia a derivative of the Latin word 
Altus, meaning "high." 

Amboy, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. The town was started in 1879 and its 
po8toffice was named by some one connected with the postoffice depart- 
ment in Washington. As the town sprang up around the postoffice, the 
village so formed took the name of the postoffice. The name is an Indian 
word and means "hollow inside," "like a bowl." 

Angus, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named for United States Senataor 
Angus Cameron, the well known citizen of the state. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 167 

Anson, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named by Arthur Clark, an old settler 
for Anson Burlingharn, a well known statesman of Maine. The township 
in which the village is situated carries the same name, and for the same 
reason as the village. 

Arnold, Chippewa County, Wisconsin. This town was formerly known as 
Stillhaven, but was changed in 1896. Its present name was given it for 
Arnold Deuel, eldest son of H. H. Deuel, postmaster here when the name 
was changed. 

Asa Creek, Rock County, Minnesota. The town was started in 1881. It was 
named from a nearby creek that was named from the many white ash 
{Fraxinus Americana) trees that grew along its banks. The town was 
named by Orville Estey, its earliest settler. 

Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, was in 1858 named by Martin Beaver, the 
original proprietor, from Henry Clay's home in Kentucky. The postoffice 
was originally called Whittlesey for Asoph Whittlesey, its first postmaster, 
but in I860 it was changed to conform to the name of the town. The town 
was once called St. Mark, from the Tower in Venice, and then Bay City, 
because it was located on a bay. The Indian name for this locality waa 
sham-a-wa-milc — ' ' the long-stretched beaver. ' ' 

Ashland Junuction, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. Was founded in 1883 and waa 
named by the railroad company on account of its nearness to and relation 
to the city of Ashland. 

Ashton, Osceola County, Iowa. Was started in 1870. Its earliest name was 
Gillman for J. G. Gillman an early land agent here. The name was changed 
to its present form in 1875. The present name came from the fact that 
the white ash {Fraxinus Americana) trees were plentiful hereabouts and 
suggested the name. 

Augusta, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. Was named by Charles or John Buck- 
man, who came here in 1856 and named it from Augusta, Maine, whence 
he had emigrated. The place in Maine was named for Augusta, of Saxe- 
Gotha, the wife of Frederick, Prince of Wales of English history. 

Avoca, Murray County, Minnesota, was named in 1S79 by Archbishop John Ire- 
land who established a colony nearby. The name is an allusion to Thomas 
Moore's poem, "Sweet Val^ of Avoca." 

Baldwin, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was named by D. R. Bailey and Jacob 
Humbird for D. A. Baldwin, a prominent early day officer of the railroad 
that passes through this place. Its earliest name was Clarkesville, and was 
named for Frank B. Clark, then of the Hudson, Wisconsin, Flouring Mill 
Company. 

Bancroft, Cuming County, Nebraska. Was named for George Bancroft, tha 
American historian. 

Barden, Scott County, Minnesota, was named for J. W. Barden, who waa 
largely interested in grain elevators and other business enterprises here 
and hereabouts. The place was first called Sibley for General Henry H. 
Sibley the early pioneer of Minnesota. It was afterwards called Long 
Lake from a nearby lake of that name. Its present name was given it 
in 1885. 

Barksdale, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named by W. G. Ramsay, April 
7th, 1904 for II. M. Barksdale, president of the Atlantic Manufacturing 
Company that has large powder mills here. 



IC8 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Barronett, Barron County, Wisconsin. The town was platted in 1880 and was 
named Foster City for Jerry Foster who owned interests here at that 
time. That name was dropped for that of Bourne for Captain W. R. 
Bourne, an early business man of the place. The next year, Captain 
Bourne changed the name to its present form. This name came from the 
name of the county, with the letters "ett" added for euphony. The 
county was named for Judge Henry D. Barron of Wisconsin. 

Bayfield, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named in 1856 by United States 
Senator H. M. Rice of Minnesota, in honor of a British officer named 
Bayfield, who, in a very early day, explored, surveyed and charted for 
the first time, the shores of Lake Superior. 

Beaver Creek, Rock County, Minnesota, was named from a nearby creek. The 
creek was so named because many beaver (Castor Canadmins) dams were 
on it when it was first discovered by the whites. 

Beebe, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was named for Dr. C. V. Beebe of Superior, 
Wisconsin. 

Beldenville, Pierce County, Wisconsin, was named in 1860 by A. Belden for 
his family name. He was a large mill and land owner at this point. 

Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota, was named in 1853 by Judge Andrew 
G. Chatfield, one of the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the 
Territory of Minnesota, from the French words meaning "beautiful field 
or plain," because this name was descriptive of the place and its sur- 
roundings. The Judge lived here from 1857 to 1871, and after the forma- 
tion of the State was on the Bench until 1875. 

Bennett, Douglas County, Wisconsin, wag named for Richard Bennett, who 
at one time had a side track here for use in his business. 

Benoit, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for Antoine Benoit, an early 
French settler. 

Bibon, Bayfield Count}-, Wisconsin. This town was started in 1879 and was 
called Mason Junction. The name was soon changed by W. F. Fitch, 
Manager of the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railroad, to its present 
form. The name is a corruption of the Chippewa Indian word — bibwine — 
or pe-boan — "winter." It was applied to this place by Mr. Fitch in 
honor of E. W. Winter, then a prominent railroad official of St. Paul, 
Minnesota, and now (1907) of New York City. 

Blgelow, Nobles County, Minnesota, was located in 1872 and named for Charles 
H. Bigelow, who in an early day lived here, and aided in having the 
railroad built through the place, and who is now (1907) president of 
the St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company at St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Bingham Lake, Cottonwood County, Minnesota, was named from a nearby 
lake. The lake was named, by the United States surveyor, for Senator 
H. S. Bingham of Michigan. 

Birchwood, Washburn County, Wisconsin, was named by W. A. Scott, th« 
General Manager of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Rail- 
road, when the town was located. He so named the place because it wa» 
established in the midst of a dense grove of White Birch (Betula 
populifolia) trees. 

Black River Falls. Jackson County, Wisconsin. This settlement was started 
in 1830. The Mormons built a mill here in an early day and her© cut 
much of the timber that was used in building their temple at Nauvoo. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 169 

The present town was platted in 1860 and was named from the river and 
falls of the river here. This named came from the dark appearance of 
the water which was caused by the decomposition of pine and hemlock 
bark and roots from the forests that lined its banks for many miles. 
Blair, Washington County, Nebraska, was named for John I. Blair of Blairs- 
town, New Jersey and who built the first railroad through the place. 

Blakeley, Scott County, Minnesota, was named by E. F. Drake and I. N. 
Dean, who in 1867 when the town was laid out, had an interest in the town 
site and in the railroad that passed through it. Tt was named for 
Captain Russell Blakely of St. Paul, Minnesota. He was prominent in 
an early day in stage and steamboat transportation. 

Bloomer, Chippewa County, Wisconsin. Its first name was Vanville and was 
given it for Sylvester Van Loon, its first settler and first postmaster. 
The origin of the present name can not be ascertained. 

Bloomfield, Knox County, Nebraska. The town was established in 1890 by the 
Northern Nebraska Land and Improvement Company, and was supposed to 
be descriptive of it and its vicinity, viz: "blooming fields," "fields full 
of blossoms." This place was once known as Wausa and was so named 
from a Swedish Church having that name and located about three miles 
from the present site of Bloomfield. 

Blue Earth, Faribault County, Minnesota, was so named from the nearby river 
because of the soil from its banks owing to its containing copper had a 
decidededly bluish cast. The town was laid out by H. P. Constance and 
J. B. Wakefield. 

Bluff, Jackson County, Minnesota, was named from a bluff or abrupt elevation 
of land nearby. 

Boardman, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was named in 1853 by and for C. A. 
Boardman, the first settler. 

Bradley, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. This place was named from the 
Bradley crossing of the Blue Earth River. The crossing was named for the 
Bradley family, who owned the farm on which the town is located anri 
who established the river crossing. 

Brandon, Minnehaha County, South Dakota, was named from the township and 
that was named from Brandon, Vermont. It is a corruption of "burnt 
town" from the fact of the burning of the Vermont settlement by Indians 
in 1777. 

Brewster, Nobles County, Minnesota, was originally called Hersey, for a 
prominent citizen of Stillwater, Minnesota, who was largely interested in 
the railroad when it reached this point, but owing to confusion with a 
similar name it was changed to its present form. The present name was 
given it in honor of Brewster, a town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, 
which was named in honor of Elder William Brewster ,one of the first 
settlers in the Plymouth colony. 

Brill, Barron County, Wisconsin, was started in 1901 and was named by W. A. 

Scott, then General Manager of the railroad for Judge Hascal R. Brill, 

District Judge of Ramsay County, Minnesota. 
Brunet, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named for Captain Jean Brunet, 

one of the pioneers and for whom a nearby cataract (Brunet Falls) was 



170 History of the Place Names of The North Western Ljne 

named. Captain Brunet was the first permanent white settler on this 
Chippewa River, having settled there in 1832 and built the first sawmill 
on that stream in 1836. 

Burkhardt, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was named for C. Burkhardt, the owner 
of a flouring mill operated here before the town was located. 

Butterfield, Watonwan County, Minnesota, was named for William Butter- 
field, the original owner of the town site and its first settler. 

Cable, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named by and for R. Cable an earlj 
settler here and who conducted the first hotel in this part of the country. 
The present town was laid out in 1878 and for three or more years was 
the northern terminus of the branch of the railroad that runs through the 
plaee. 

Cameron, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named by Colonel George W. Ginty, 
in honor of Hon. Angus Cameron, for many years, United States Senator 
from Wisconsin. 

Camp Douglas, Juneau County, Wisconsin, was named for the Douglas Log- 
ging Company that had "logging camps" here long before any railroad 
penetrated this part of the state. The present town was laid out in 1870. 
The Logging Company was named for James Douglas and the town was 
named by A. Chombielier of Kilbourn, Wis. 

Carnes, Sioux County, Iowa, was named for Edward Carnes, a long time road- 
master of the railroad that ran through this place. 

Carroll, Wayne County, Nebraska, was named by E. W. Winter, the General 
Manager of the railroad when it was opened to this point. It was named 
for Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Maryland, one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

Cedarhurst, Clark County, Wisconsin. This name was made for the occasion. 
The word "Cedar" was used because of the presence of many cedar 
(Thuja) trees nearby and "hurst" for the Dutch word hoorsi which 
means "grove." Hence the name means Cedar Grove. 

Chandler, Washburn County, Wisconsin, was named for Hon. Zachariah Chand- 
ler, United States Senator from Michigan, who owned land in this vicinity. 

Chapman, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was named for A. W. Chapman, once 
chief train despatcher of the railroad that runs through this place. 

Chetek, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named by Knapp, Stout and Company, 
lumbermen here, for a Chippewa Indian Chief, whose name by various 
writers was spelled Chetek, SheteTc, Shetaclc, Shetuc, and ChetacJc respect- 
ively. In a very early day in Connecticut the word was spelled Shetucket, 
and gave the name to a river there, the meaning being "land between two 
rivers," or, according to another authority, "confluence of rivers." 

Chili, Clark County, Wisconsin, was located in 1893 and was named by Ira 
Fick and Charles Coiedius, from Chili in South America. 

Chippewa Falls, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named by H. S. Allen in 
1847 from the falls (rapids) in the river that runs through the place. 
The river was named from the noted Chippewa (Ojibway) Indian tribe 
that inhabited this, as well as other parts of the state. The word means 
"puckered up," or "to roast till puckered up." 

Clarks, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was named for J. T. Clark, who was 
Second Vice President of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha 
Railroad, when the town was established. 



HlSTOKY OF THE PLACE NAMES OF TlIE NORTH WESTERN LlNIC 171 

Clayton, Polk County, Wisconsin, was named for Clayton Rodgers, a foreman 
of a mill owned by Humbird and Company at this point. 

Clear Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin. This town was named from a nearby 
lake. The town was organized in 1877. 

Cliff, Dakota County, Minnesota, was named from nearby cliffs or bluffs and 
was illustrative of the location. This name was adopted in 1902 as a 
suggestion from F. L. Slaker, the Superintendent of the railroad that 
passed through the place. Its earliest name was East Connection. 

Cobban, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named for S. C. F. Cobban of 
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, the owner of much land in the vicinity of this 
town. 

Cobum, Dakota County, Nebraska, was named for Warren and Zerah Colburn, 
Mathematician and Arithmetrical prodigy respectively, but was misspelled 
in making the plat of the town and was so recorded and the error allowed 
to stand. A legend claims that the place was named for "Fred" Colburn, 
a railroad ticket agent of St. Louis, Missouri, and another asserted it was 
named for a pugilist, but so far as can now be learned, both these legendt 
are untrue ,and the first named derivation is the correct one, and the one 
that should go down in history as the true one. 

Coffman, Washington County, Nebraska. This town was laid out in 1886 and 
was named for Dr. V. H. Coffman, who owned the farm on which the town 
was platted. 

Coleridge, Cedar County, Nebraska, was named by an admirer of his " philoso 
phy" for Samuel T. Coleridge, the English author-poet and "philosopher." 

Columbia, Clark County, Wisconsin, was named from the poem "Hail Colum- 
bia" by the Heckney, Boynton Lumber Company, that had property here. 

Comfort, Dunn County, Wisconsin, was named for Comfort Starr, a son of 
W. J. Starr of Eau Clair, Wisconsin. The party giving it this name, said 
that it would express the hope that, all who eame here to live would 
find comfort while dwelling here. 

Comstock, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named for Judge H. S. Comstock 
of Cumberland, Wisconsin. 

Concord, Dixon County, Nebraska, was named by Marvin Hughitt, president of 
the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad from the Concord 
(bridge) battlefield in Massachusetts. 

Cornell, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named for Ezra Cornell, the founder 
and supporter of Cornell University at Ithaca, New York. The college 
owned most of the land in this vicinity. The foresight of Mr. Cornell 
caused him to locate much of the University landscrip in this vicinity. 
The wisdom of his choice has been demonstrated beyond a question; much 
of the support of the University having come from the revenue from these 
lands. Had it not been for Mr. Cornell's perseverance in the case, the land 
grant would have been frittered away, and hence what is now his immortal 
monument, but for his sagacity would doubtless have had no existence 
today. 

Couderay, Sawyer County, Wisconsin. This place was named from a uearby 
lake. The word, however, is a corruption of the proper name of the lake 
which is Lac Courte Oreille. The name was given to the lake by early 
French traders and means "Short Ear." It is stated the name was given 
to the lake owing to a massacre having taken place on its shore, in 



172 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



which the victors saved the ears of the victims for a cannibalistic feast, 
and which is said to have been partaken of on the lake shore. It is 
notorious that the Huron Indians were cannibals as they killed and made 
a feast of Stephen (Ettaine) Brule. 

County Line, Pierce County, Wisconsin, was so named from the fact that it 
was located on the line between the counties of St. Croix and Pierce. 

Cray, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. This town was named for Lorin Cray, 
Judge of the Sixth Judicial District of Minnesota, who resided in 1906 
at Mankato, Minnesota. He was for many years the attorney of the 
railroad company. 

Crofton, Knox County, Nebraska. This place was named for Mr. J. T. M. 
Pierce from Crofton Court, a place he owned in England. He spent 
much time and money in trying to procure the construction of a railroad 
from Yankton, South Dakota to Norfolk, Nebraska. It was in honor of 
these efforts that the place was named as it is. 

Craig, Burt County, Nebraska, was named by and for W. S. Craig, who es- 
tablished the town in 1881. 

Cumberland, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named by J. A. Humbird in 1873 
from the City in Maryland. That city was named for the Duke of Cumber- 
land, the victor in the Battle of Culloden of Scotch-English history. In an 
early day, Cumberland, Wisconsin, was called Lake Land, because of the 
many lakes in the vicinity. 

Currie, Murray County, Minnesota, was named in 1872 by Neil Currie, the 
first settler, for the Currie family. It formerly was called Shetek from 
the nearby Lake Shetek, on the banks of which, mnny settlers were 
massacred by the Sioux Indians in 1862. The name of this lake comes from 
an Indian word that has many forms of spelling. (For these, and other 
facts connected with the word see Chetek, Barron County, Wisconsin, in 
this history of place names). 

Dakota City, Dakota County, Nebraska, was established on September 20th, 
1855, and was named by Mrs. D. C. Crockwell, the wife of J. D. M. Crock- 
well, for the Indian tribe. The Indian (Sioux) form of the word is 
Lakota, Nokota or Dakota, according to the dialect, and signifying 
"allies," the common Indian name of the confederated Sioux tribes. The 
word Sioux is a white man's corruption of the Ojibway Indian name, 
Nadowessious, for the tribe. It meant "snake," "snake like" or "ene- 
mies." 

Dauby, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for Gunder Dauby, formerly 
connected with the White River Lumber Company at Mason, Minnesota, 
and who in an early day owned and operated a sawmill at this place. 

Deer Park, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. The town was established in 1876 
and was named by Otto Neitge, a German who built a twelve foot high 
fence around one hundred and sixty acres of land adjoining this place, 
and within this fenced in park, placed over three hundred deer and 
protected them from Indians and "pot" hunters. 

Delft, Cottonwood County, Minnesota, was established in 1892 and was named 
for the city in Holland by John Bartsch and Henry Wieb. Previous to 
adopting this name the village was called Wilhelmine, a female given 
name common in Holland. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 173 

DeSoto, Washington County, Nebraska. This town was opened in 1880 and 
was named for Hernando de Soto, the renowned Spanish explorer and 
discoverer of the Mississippi River. 

Donald, Taylor County, Wisconsin, was started in 1903 and was named by 
W. J. Campbell for Donald Campbell, his son. The Fountain-Campbell 
Lumber Company having large interests here and hereabouts once called 
the location Fountain aud the railroad company caller it Fountain Spur, 
because of a spur or branch track that was operated for the lumber com- 
pany. W. J. Campbell was the president of this lumber company. 

Doon, Lyon County, Iowa, was established in 1868 and was named by H. D. 
Eice, its earliest settler from the "Bonnie Doon" of Robert Burns' poem. 

Dovray, Murray County, Minnesota. This village was named in 1904 from 
the township. The township was named by the early Norwegian settlers 
from Doverf jeld in Norway. 

Draper, Sawyer County, Wisconsin, was named for Lyman C. Draper, the 
projector and devoted life-long secretary of the Wisconsin Historical 
Society, by whose work a collection of early history has been pre- 
served in its library, which is not equalled by any other collection any- 
where. Dr. Draper's entire life was spent in collecting and editing manu- 
scripts, pamphlets and books of the early history of the North-West and of 
its founders. To his indefatigable efforts, we are indebted for biographies 
of a large number of our heroic Indian fighters, who were largely instru- 
mental in wresting the territory now known as the North-West from the 
grasp of the savages, and holding it open for the march of civilization. 
The Wisconsin State Historical Society, with its excellent library of rare 
and valuable volumes and its large collection of original manuscripts 
of Wisconsin pioneers, is a lasting monument to Dr. Draper; but heretofore 
there has been no town or village named for this useful, if not famous, 
benefactor, and it has fallen to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and 
Omaha Railway to perpetuate his memory in the annals of Wisconsin. 

Drummond, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. This village was started in 1882 
and was named by W. A. Rust for F. H. Drummond, the General Manager 
of the Rust, Owen Lumber Company, that owned large interests here. 

Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. The city was started in 1856 and its 
name was suggested by Rev. J. G. Wilson of Logansport, Indiana. It 
was named for Sieur Daniel Graysolon Duluth, a French traveller, and 
who was one of the first whites to set foot on the north shore of Lak« 
Superior. The name in some of the Jesuit Relations, is spelled DuLuth, 
and in others Dulud. The spelling of the name of the place has not fol- 
lowed these "Relations." "The zenith city of the unsalted sea" today 
l'etains the spelling that was first applied to its name. 

Dundee, Nobles County, Minnesota, was located in 1879 and was named from 
the city in Scotland. Its earliest name was Warren, and was named for 
the immortal Joseph Warren, who fell in the battle of Bunker 'g Hill. 

Eagle Point, Chippewa County, Wisconsin. During the war of the Rebellion, 
one of the Wisconsin regiments that became justly celebrated, carried with 
it, when it left Wisconsin, and brought it back at the end of the war, a 
Bald-headed Eagle, which the regiment named "Old Abe" the familiar 
and affectionate nickname for President Abraham Lincoln. This eagle 
was caught in the bluffs near this point, and at the end of the war, when 



174 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

the eagle was returned to Wisconsin, the point or bluff was named fur 
him. When the eagle died, its skin was stuffed, and it is preserved in the 
rooms of the Wisconsin Historical Society at Madison, Wisconsin. 

Eastlake, Le Sueur County, Minnesota, was named because of its location near 
East lake. 

Earl, Washburn County, Wisconsin. This place was formerly known as Sin 
clair Spur, but its name was changed in 1906 to conform to that of the 
postoffice. This last name was given it for Earl McDill, a relative of 
John Whitney the postmaster, who was in charge of the postoffice when 
the name was changed. 

Eagle, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for the eagle and because 
many every year were seen in the vicinity. 

Eton, Pipestone County, Minnesota. This place was at one time named 
Gray, but was changed to Eton from a celebrated school in England, at 
which the Close brothers and Benson were educated. These gentlemen 
colonized many Englishmen in this county, and the people of this place 
wished to honor their memories by naming this place for their school. 

Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. The town was started in 1842 
by Simon Randall, who built the first sawmill here. The town was named 
for one of the rivers that flows through it. In 1767, the Eau Claire Eiver 
was discovered by Johnathan Carver and his followers. Carver's Voyageurs 
came up the Chippewa River from the Mississippi in batteaux. The 
Mississippi and Chippewa Rivers were swollen by recent rains and were 
exceedingly muddy. Arriving at the mouth of the Eau Claire River, 
they were surprised to find clear water. "L'eaii clairc" Ihey cried on dis- 
covering the clear water. The Eau Claire River takes its name from 
that occurrence and means "clear water." Carver's voyageurs had been 
unable to obtain satisfactory drinking water from the time they left the 
Mississippi until they reached the Eau Claire River, the streams interven- 
ing being very muddy by reason of the heavy rains prevailing and the 
swollen condition of the streams. So far as known they are the first white 
men to set foot on this section of Wisconsin. The Eau Claire and Chippewa 
Rivers have their confluences in the heart of Eau Claire. In 1S54 oc- 
curred the last battle between the hostile Sioux and Chippewas, taking 
place within a few miles of what was to become the town site of Eau 
Claire. By act of legislature in October 1856, the county was organized 
with Eau Claire as its county seat. The railroad reached this place on 
August 10, 1S70. 

Ebbe, Wood County, Wisconsin, was named for P. R. Ebbe, who owned a saw- 
mill at this point. 

Eileen, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for Miss Eileen Thompkins of 
Ashland, Wisconsin. 

Elcva, Trempeleau County, Wisconsin. This town was started in 1880 and was 
named by R. P. Coddard of Mondovi, Wisconsin, on the suggestion of 
Mr. Gates who formerly lived here. The origin of the name is unknown 
to Mr. Goddard, but he thinks Mr. Gates found a place of that name in 
France. 

Elk Mound, Dunn County, Wisconsin. This town was started in 1871 and was 
named from a nearby large and high mound on which was found the bones 



History of the Place Names or The North Western Line 175 

of many Elk, which proved that Elk were plentiful there before the advent 
of the whites. 

Ellis, Minnehaha County, South Dakota. This town was located in 1S80 and 
was named Scoopville, because while it, was a point at which much grain 
was handled and shipped, it all had to be moved with "scoop shovels." 
When grain elevators were built, here, the name was changed at the sug- 
gestion of Peavey and Company, grain buyers, and named for A. M. 
Ellis, the grain manager here for that firm. 

Ellsworth, Pierce County, Wisconsin. The town was established in 1866 and 
its name was suggested by Mrs. Henry P. Ames, and it was named in 
honor of Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth of the Chicago Zouaves, who was 
murdered at Alexandria, Virginia in the early days of the War of the 
Rebellion. Previous to its being so named, the place was called Perry, 
in honor of Commodore O. H. Perry of the United States Navy, the hero 
of the battle of Lake Erie in the war of 1812. 

Elmore, Faribault County, Minnesota, was named by President Marvin Hughitt, 
of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway for Hon. Andrew 
E. Elmore of (Fort Howard) Green Bay, Wisconsin, who had been con- 
nected with the material interests of Wisconsin since its Territorial days. 
He was one of the makers of the Constitution of the State and was so 
wise and far-seeing that he was called the "sage of Muckwanago. " 
Muckwanago is a village in Waukesha County, Wisconsin where Mr. Elmore 
lived and traded while the Indians yet lived there. 

Elmwood, Pierce County, Wisconsin. The town was started in 1902. Seven 
teen years previously a postoffice named Elmwood was established and 
named by Nathan Utter and Thomas Kelly, nearby pioneers. When the 
town was platted it was named for this old postoffice. The name for the 
postoffice was suggested by the abundance of White Elm (Ulmus Ameri- 
cana) trees that grew around the place. 

Elroy, Juneau County, Wisconsin. In 1858 this place was named Ell Roy by 
J. M. Britnall, to distinguish it, from LeRo}', a village nearby. It is 
supposed that Mr. Britnall adopted the name from some place in Scot- 
land as he always claimed the name was Scotch. When the railroad reached 
this village the present name was adopted as an elision of the name it 
originally held. 

Emerald, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was started in 1883 and was named 
from the township. The township was named from the great and peculiar 
greenness of the foilage of the trees in it when it was first surveyed. 

Emerson, Dixon County, Nebraska. This town was platted in 1881 and was 
named by E. W. Winter, then General Manager of the Chicago, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad, in honor of Ralph W. Emerson, the 
"Sage of Concord" Massachusetts. It was first called Kennesaw from the 
battle (mountain) field in Georgia. 

Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. This place was named by William 
Reynolds, its first postmaster for Lucius Fairchild, Governor of Wisconsin 
from 1866 to 1872. 

Fairmont, Martin County, Minnesota. The original name was Fair Mount, 
and was ro named from its location on a mound or high ridge of ground. 
The spelling of the name was changed by O. P. Chubb and C. A. Louns- 
berry who were interested in the place. 



176 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Fall Creek, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, wa8 named from the nearby creek. 
This creek was named from many pretty "falls" (rapids) along its 
course. The town was formerly named Cousins for an attorney from Eau 
Claire who was interested in the village. The town was started in 1870. 

Farmer, Hanson County, South Dakota, was named by Joseph Altenhofer for 
"the Farmers" as the surrounding country promised to be a "farmers' 
paradise," and he said the town was to be supported by the farmers. 

Fordyce, Cedar County, Nebraska. This place was named in honor of William 
B. Fordyce, for more than twenty-five years a train despatcher on this line 
of railroad. 

Fleming, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Florence, Douglas County, Nebraska. In 1845-7 the Mormon legions established 
and maintained a resting place here and called it "Winter quarters," and 
as such, it was used for a long time. In the town park is a large cotton- 
wood tree that is said to have been planted by Brigham Young. In 1854 
the place was given its present name by A. J. Smith and his associates, 
from the City in Italy. At one time, this was the capital of the Terri- 
tory of Nebraska, and at least one session of the Legislature was held 
here. In 1856 it was the headquarters of The Florence Bank of Nebraska, 
owned by Davenport, Iowa, people, and was one of the worst "Wild Cat 
paper money" swindles that ever afflicted the west. Millions of dollars- of 
the "stuff" (queer) was put out and but very little of it was ever re- 
deemed. The losses to the holders amounted to millions of dollars. 

Forest City, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Fulton, Hanson County, South Dakota, was named by the Northern Nebraska 
Land and Improvement Company in 1887 in honor of Robert Fulton, the 
inventor of the steamboat. 

Fort Calhoun, Washington County, Nebraska. In an early day a United 
States Army post was established here, or near here and was called Fort 
Atkinson, and is believed to have been named for the Commander of the 
first troops that were stationed here. In 1819 it, or its successor got the 
name of Fort Calhoun and was so known up to 1827. By some authorities, 
its name came from John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, while others deny 
this and claim that it was the name of a soldier of this post. The ruins of 
an old fort were plainly visible here a short time ago. When the railroad 
reached this place, it dropped the word "Fort" and the place was there- 
after called Calhoun. There is scarcely any place on the Missouri River 
where so much doubt exists as to its early history, as this. In his history 
of Omaha by Sorensen, Father DeSmet, S. J., is given as authority for 
Fort Atkinson being the same as Fort Calhoun, and also that Fort Calhoun 
was the location of the Council Bluffs of the days of the "Lewis and 
Clark Expedition." Lately the citizens of the place had the name 
changed back to Fort Calhoun, so that now the name of the town, station 
and postoffice, is the same. (See Council Bluffs' in the alphabetical list 
of places in this book, for further information in regard to this place.) 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 177 

Garden City, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. This town was started in 1856 
and was given its present name in 1879, as the name was supposed to be 
descriptive of the place. Even to this day in the spring, the surrounding 
country is like a garden of wild flowers. 

Gordon, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was named by "Butwine" Gordon for 
Antoine Gordon, a French-Indian trader who had a post here in a very 
early day and carried on an extesive trade with the Indians who then were 
numerous hereabouts. 

Gillett's Spur, Sawyer County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Grandview, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named by John E. Glover as* 
descriptive of its situation. In an early day the place was named Pratt 
for C. H. Pratt the pioneer settler in the place. 

Glover, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. It comes from J. E. Glover, a prominent lumberman. 

Granite Lake, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby lake. That 
lake was so named because it was surrounded with the granite rock. 

Gehlen, Plymouth County, Iowa. This name merely indicates a point that is 
shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Granton, Clark County, Wisconsin. This town was started in 1891. It first 
name was Maple Works. For some now unknown reason, it was thought 
best to change the name, and the present name resulted. Grant was the 
name of the township and to the word "Grant" the citizens added the 
syllable "on" and thus formed the present name. The present name was 
suggested by Capt. E. E. Woodman, late secretary of the Chicago, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad Company. 

Grogan, Watonwan County, Minnesota. This place was named in 1890 for 
Matthew J. Grogan, an early settler. 

Hadley, Murray County, Minnesota, was named by L. L. Lucason for the family 
name of one of his relatives. 

Hallie, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, was named from the nearby Lake 
Hallie. The lake was named for Miss Hallie Sherman, a daughter of 
Captain A. Sherman. Hallie Sherman that was, is now Mrs. Arthur 
Miller of Manitowoe, Wis. 

Hammond, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was named in 1856 by and for R. B. 
Hammond of Waukesha, Wis., who with others, formed the Mann, Ham- 
mond Land Company and bought large tracts of University and school 
lands around this site. 

Hannibal, Taylor County, Wisconsin, was located and named in 1903 by J. T. 
Barber from his old home, Hannibal, Missouri. The city in Missouri was 
named for the Carthaginian General. 

Hartford, Minnehaha County, South Dakota, was named in 1880 by Edward 
Tilton from the city in Connecticut. whence he had emigrated. 

Hartington, Cedar County, Nebraska, was named by and for a "Lord" 
Hartington of England, who owns the unsold part of the town and much 
land in the vicinity. 



178 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Hatch, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named for C. P. Hatch, who for man/ 

years was a railroad officer in the North West. 
Haugen, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named by and for N. P. Haugen, 

who at one time had some land interests here. It was named in 1886 

at which time the town was started. 
Hawthorne, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was started in 1885 and was named by 

D. E. Eoberts for W. B. Hawthorne, the "operator" of the first logging 

camps in the vicinity. 
Hayward, Sawyer County, Wisconsin, was named in 1881 by and for A. J. 

Hayward, who owned a sawmill here before he platted the town. 
Hazel Park, Ramsay County, Minnesota, was so named because it was located 

in the midst of a dense Hazel (Corylus Americana) shrubbery or "Chap- 

paral" as it was called. Cliapparal is Spanish and is properly and only 

applicable to a grove of Oak trees, but custom has allowed it to be applied 

to any dense brushy shrubbery. 
Henderson, Le Sueur County, Minnesota, was laid out and named in 1854 for 

his brother Henderson Brown, by Joseph R. Brown the founder, who came 

to Minnesota in 1830 as a drummer boy in the United States Army- 
Herman, Washington County, Nebraska. This town was started in 1876, and 

was named for the railroad conductor who run the first regular passenger 

train through the village. 
Heron Lake, Jackson County, Minnesota, was named in 1870 from a nearby 

lake. The lake was named by the United States surveyors, who surveyed 

the land in the vicinity, from the large number of "Great Blue Herons" 

(Ardea Herodias), that frequented the lake while the survey was being 

made. 
Hersey, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was named in 1876 by and for Samuel 

F. Hersey of the lumber firm of Hersey and Staples of Stillwater, Minn. 
Hines, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was named in 1902 for Edward Hines of 

the Edward Hines Lumber Company, large operators in lumber in this 

vicinity. Before this name was given the place, it was called Holmes 

for a former lumber dealer here. 
Hinton, Plymouth County, Iowa, was named in 1875 from the city of Hinton 

in Summers County, West Virginia, by a Mr. Hinton who was one of the 

earliest settlers here, who had emigrated from Virginia. The Virginia 

city was also named by and for Mr. Hinton. 
Eolconibe, Chippewa County Wisconsin. This place was started in 1902 and 

was named for a friend in Milwaukee by W. A. Scott, the then General 

Manager of the railroad that passed through the place. 
Home Park, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named from the hope that it 

would become the center of homes surrounded by a park of native trees 

of the place. It is the location of a State Insane Asylum. 
Hope, Madison County, Nebraska. The town was established in 1894 and was 

named for H. C. Hope, Superintendent of Telegraph of the Chicago, St. 

Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway. 
Hoskins, Wayne County, Nebraska, was named by F. H. Peavey, in 1882 for 

his father-in law. 
Hospers, Sioux County, Iowa, was in the early seventies named to honor Henry 

Uospers of Orange City, Iowa. Mr. Hospers was and is a banker and a 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 171* 

large owner of lands in the county, and has been instrumental in attract- 
ing here many families of Hollanders, not only direct from Holland, but 
from many parts of the United States. 

Houghton, Baj'field County, Wisconsin, was named from Houghton point, a 
nearby "point" of land, running into Chequamegon Bay. The point wai 
named for Douglas Houghton, an explorer, and formerly the Geologist 
of the State of Michigan. 

Hubbard, Dakota Count}-, Nebraska, was named by and for Judge Asahel "W. 
Hubbard of the District Court, Sioux City, Iowa, and Congressman from 
the Eleventh District of Iowa. He was one of the promoters in building 
the railroad from Sioux City, Iowa to Ponca, Nebraska. 

Hudson, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. This place was called Buena Vista from 
the Mexican battlefield; earlier it was called Willow River from the 
river that runs into the St. Croix at this place. In 1852, the county board 
of Supervisors gave it its present name from the City of Hudson, New 
York; that was named for Henry Hudson, the navigator, who also gave 
his name to the river on which the City of Hudson, New York is located. 

Humbird, Clark County, Wisconsin. This town was started in 1868 and in 
1872 was named for John A. Humbird, one of the builders and a director 
of the railroad that runs through the place. 

Humboldt, Minnehaha County, South Dakota. This town was named in 1880 
from the township it is in. That was named by three German Bettlevs 
for Alexander Van Humboldt, the traveller and author. 

Hughey, Taylor County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Hustler, Juneau County, Wisconsin, was named in 1891 by the Postoffice De- 
partment at Washington, D. C. The citizens of the village could not 
agree on a name that was satisfactory to the postoffice department, and in 
a final effort sent in a list of names, any one of which would be accepted by 
the citizens. Some so called "practical joker" inserted "Hustler" at 
the end of the list, and that was selected by the Department and became 
the name of the town and of the postoffice. A "Hustler" (one full of 
energy and push) is what the citizens expect each resident to become. 

Itasca, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was named by A. W. Trenholm, an officer 
of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Eailroad, from one of 
the streets of the old city of Superior. The street was named for an 
alleged Indian word tut that was coined by Schoolcraft, and was based 
upon the Ojibway word to-to-sha, a ' ' woman 's breast. ' ' 

Jackson, Dakota County, Nebraska. The town was started in 1860 and named 
in 1861 for Andrew Jackson, ex-President of the United States. 

James, Plymouth County, Iowa, was named as a station on the Illinois Central 
Eailroad for James Blair by his brother, John I. Blair, of Blairstown, New 
Jersey. 

Jeffera, Cottonwood County, Minnesota. The town was started in 181)9 and 
was named for George Jeffers from whom the land for the town site 
was bought. 

Jim Falls, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named from the falls in th«> 
Chippewa Elver that runs through this place. The falls were named for 
"Jim" Ermatinger, the pioneer settler in this part of the country. The 



180 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Indians called the falls by a word we translate as Vermillion, from 
the red color of the water. The water was colored by the dyes coming 
out of the bark and roots of trees that encumbered it, before it was cleared 
out by lumbermen. 

Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, was named in 1852 by William Holmes from 
the Kiver Jordan in Palestine. The name was given at the end of a 
somewhat angry and prolonged discussion amongst the citizens as to what 
the name should be. 

Karota, Le Sueur County, Minnesota, was named from an adjoining prairie, 
which was named from an Indian word meaning "cleared, "cleared up," 
or "sky clear of clouds." The town was platted by A. P. Buell in 1853. 

Kempton, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, was named for a popular passenger 
train conductor, William ("Bill") Kempt. 

Knapp, Dunn County, Wisconsin, was named for John H. Knapp, senior member 
of the lumbering firm of Knapp, Stout and Company of Menominee, Wis., 
who has been lumbering in this vicinity for over thirty-six years. (1907.) 

Koll, Chippewa County, Wisconsin, was named for C. J. Koll, formerly train 
despatcher of the railroad that runs through this place. 

Kurth, Clark County, Wisconsin, was named for Eobert Kurth a grain dealer of 
the place when the village was established. 

Lake Crystal, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was named in 1869 by General 
J. W. Bishop of St. Paul, Minnesota, from a nearby lake. The lake was 
named by John C. Fremont and J. N. Nicollet, who explored the country 
around it in 1838-9 because of the unusual brilliancy and crystal purity of 
its waters. 

Lake Elmo, Washington County, Minnesota, was named by A. B. Stickney, 
now of St. Paul, Minn.,, from a nearby lake, that had been named from 
the novel "St. Elmo." The town was formerly called Oakdale from the 
many Black Oak (Quercus nigra) trees that grow hereabouts. It is not 
known where the novelist found the name for her book, but it is sup- 
posed she "evolved it out of the depth of her own consciousness." She 
did not get it from that corposant known as "St. Elmo's fire," which 
was named for St. Elmo, the patron saint of navigators. 

Lakeland Junction, Washington County Minnesota, was so named because it 
was at a junction of a branch railroad near the shores of a lake. 

Lakeside, Washburn County, Wisconsin, was named from its location near tha 
lake shore. 

Lake Wilson, Murray County, Minnesota, was located in 1883 and was named 
by and for J. E. Wilson, formerly of Chicago, Illinois, who also named the 
nearby lake for himself. He owned at one time seventeen thousand acres 
of land in this vicinity. 

Lakewood, Lyon County, Iowa, was named from a nearby small lake or pond 
that existed in a "wood" or small forest. This name was given it in 
1901. Previous to this the place was called Lunt's for W. H. Lunt, who 
built the first grain elevator at this point. 

Lampson, Washburn County, Wisconsin, was named by W. C. Winter, who, 
when he named the place, was General Superintendent of the Chicago, St 
Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad. The place was named for J. T. 
and F. L. Lampson, who established a large general store here. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 181 

Laurel, Cedar County, Nebraska. The original name of this place was Clare- 
mont, but the name was changed on the solicitation of W. M. Martin, who 
named it for his wife, Laura. 
Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota. The place was in 1860 called St. Lawrence 
for John Lawrence, an early settler. In 1901 the "St." was dropped and 
the present name adopted. 
Le Mars, Plymouth County, Iowa. The town was platted in 1869 and made the 
county seat in 1872. The first railroad that reached this point from any 
direction, was built eastward from Sioux City and was the west end of 
what was then known as the Iowa Falls and Sioux City Railroad (now 
a portion of the Illinois Central Railway lines in Iowa). It was built by 
John I. Blair of Blairstown, New Jersey, and his associates. When the 
road was completed to this point, Mr. Blair opened it with an excursion. 
Amongst his guests were several women from Cedars Rapids, Iowa. On 
arriving here, Mr. Blair was asked what was to be the name of the sta- 
tion. He replied that none had been selected. He then suggested thnt 
the Cedar Rapids women should select the name. As might have been 
expected, each one had a name that she insisted was the best. Not being 
able to agree, some one suggested that a name be made by taking an initial 
from the given (Christian) names of each of the women. This was done 
and it was found that two very good names could be made out of these 
initials, viz: "Selmar" and "Lemars. " By vote, the women adopted 
"Le Mars" and Mr. Blair so named the town. As nearly forty years have 
passed since the name was made, it is impossible to be positive as to the 
women whose names were used, but it is known to be true that the initials 
used were as follows: The "L" was taken from the L in the name of 
Laura (wife of Judge W. W.) Walker, or in that of Lucy (Mrs. Judge) 
Ford. The "E" was taken from the E in the name of Ellen (Mrs. Johnl 
Cleghorn, or in that of Elizabeth (Mrs.) Underhill. The "M" was taken 
from the M in the name of Martha (Mrs. John) Weare, or in that of Marv 
(Mrs. George) Weare. The "A" was taken from the A in the name of 
Mrs. Adeline M. Swain. The "R" was taken from the R in the name of 
Rebecca (wife of Dr. W. R.) Smith. The "S" was taken from the S in 
the name of Sarah (wife of Dr.) Reynolds. Many a local controversy has 
obtained as to the question and it still prevails and not seldom the news- 
papers publish letters intended to settle it, but it does not get settled. 
We believe the above are the facts as near as they will be established. 

Leonard, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for F. C. Leonard of Eau 
Claire, Wis., who had extensive logging and lumber interests in the vicinity 
of this town. 

I*« Sueur, Le Sueur County, Minnesota, was named in 1853 at a meeting of the 
citizens living there, in honor of Pierre Charles Le Sueur, a French ex- 
plorer, who was in this part of what is now Minnesota in 1683 to 1722. 
Le Sueur built a fort and had a trading post in 1720 at the mouth of Blue 
river where it enters the St. Peter's river. After Le Sueur's departure from 
this point French traders had posts here and called the place Prairie la 
fieclce. The words "la flecke" mean "the arrow." If that gave the 
name to the place, or if La Flecke was a person, and gave his name to the 
place is not known. Authorities are inclined to think the arrow gave the 
name, for had it come from a person, the name would probably have been 



182 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Prairie Au Fleehe. The Indian name for this place was Wa-hin-oge meaning 
"Flint quarry," where flint arrow heads were made. This helps to prove 
the derivation was from the French for arrow. 

Lewisville, Watonwan County, Minnesota, was named by the Inter-State Land 
Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, that owned the town site, for the 
Lewis family of that city, as they were large holders of the stock of the 
land company. 

Lime Creek, Murray County, Minnesota, was established in 1885 and was named 
from the nearby creek. The creek was named by the early settlers living 
along its course, from the limestone which underlaid its waters. 

Lindeman, Trempeleau County, Wisconsin, was named for James L. Liuder- 
man, a prominent German of Sparta, Wisconsin, who started the first bank 
and mills in the village. 

Luverne, Rock County, Minnesota, was started in 1872 and was named by 
Philo llawes an early settler, for his daughter Luverne Hawes. 

Lyons, Burt County, Nebraska. This town was named by Waldo Lyons for him- 
self in 1880. Waldo Lyons was a strenuous advocate of total abstinence, 
and when the town was named he insisted that no saloon or other place for 
the public sale of alcoholic liquors should ever be permitted in the place. 
All the deeds for lots in the place contain this prohibition. 

Medelia, W'atonwan County, Minnesota, was started in 1857 and was named by 
General M. Hartshorn for his daughter Medelia. This naming was the 
settlement of a dispute as to what name the place should have. The name 
is an elision and reconstruction of the name Madeleine. 

Magnet, Cedar County, Nebraska, was started in 1893 and named by B. E. 
Smith the owner of the town site, from the Magnet (lodestone) thinking 
the name would draw (attract) people there, as the magnet attracts iron. 

Magnolia, Rock County, Minnesota, was named from the township it is in. 
The township was named by Philo Hawes the first settler in the county, 
from Magnolia, his old home in Rock County, Wis. That place was named 
directly or indirectly for Dr. Pierre Magnol, for whom a species of the 
Magnolia tree was named. 

Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. This place was named by a Mrs. 
Hinkley an early settler here, who spoke the Sioux Indian language. The 
word is Sioux Indian and means "blue" or probably more properly 
"green earth." The proper spelling of the word seems to have been 
Mah-lcato and was by the Indians applied to the river beeause of the 
bluish or greenish cast of its waters. This color came from copper ore* 
that were and are in the soil along the river. 

Maskell, Dixon County, Nebraska, was named for John Maskell who "home- 
steaded" the land on which it is located during the War of the Re- 
belli.n, and it has been the home of the family ever since. The name was 
srggested by T. N. Jones of St. James, Neb., as he wished to honor the 
memory of Mr. Maskell. 

Marston, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Marshfield, Wood County, Wisconsin. This place was named by John J. Marsh 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts for his uncle, Samuel Marsh. The land on 
which the town is located, was part of the lands granted by the United 



History ok the Place Names of The North Western- Link JK:> 



States to tbe Fox River Improvement Company for the purpose of es 
tablishing a waterway between Green Ray and the Mississippi River. 
Horatio Seymour, A. B. Cornell, Eraetus Corning, Wra. Allen Butler, all 
of New York State and Samuel Marsh of Massachusetts, were among tha 
original owners of the place. The legend that this place was namod from 
Marshiield, the home of Daniel Webster in Massachusetts is a myth propa 
gated in very recent years. We are indebted to Hon. W. H. Upham, ex 
Governor of Wisconsin for the facts in this case. The Governor has been 
nearly a life long resident, and the most prominent business man of tho 
place. 

Mason, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named by John A. Hunibird, the owner 
of the town site, for the Free Masons, because a friend of his was a very 
enthusiastic Mason. 

Mendota, Dakota County, Minnesota. This is the oldest town in the State, 
having been started in 1830. The name is an Indian word meaning in one 
language "the junction of two trails,'' and in the Sioux tongue "the 
mouth of a river." As the Dakota (Sioux) Indians frequented these 
parts, it is believed that their meaning of the word should apply, as here 
the Minnesota (St. Peter) River enters the Mississippi. As early as 1835, 
General H. H. Sibley had an Indian trading post here and in 1837, erected 
a stone dwelling house that still stands and is in good preservation. Nearby 
is Fort Snelling. This United States Fort was built by Colonel Josiah 
Snelling in 1S20-3 and was named Fort Anthony from the falls of that 
name. In 1824 the name was formally changed by the United States Sec- 
retary of War, and was named for the above named Colonel Suelling. 

Menomonie, Dunn County, Wisconsin, was earned by Captain William Wilson 
in 1846 for the Indian tribe. The word having reference to wild rico 
(Zizaiiiti U(^v.atica) which formerly grew throughout the country the 
Menomouee tribe of Indians ranged over. These Indians lived a large 
part of the year on this wild rice. The French called them "The Rice 
Eaters." 

Menominee Junction, Dunn County, Wisconsin, was so named because of it3 
relation to the city of this name. It is a mere junction between the main 
line and a branch of the railroad. 

Merriam, Scott County, Minnesota, was started in 1875 and named by General 
Judson W. Bishop of St. Paul, Minnesota for Governor John L. Merriam 
of Minnesota. 

Merrill, Plymouth County, Iowa, was named in 1872 in honor of Samuel Mer 
rill, Governor of Iowa, 1868-70. 

Merrillan, Jackson County, Wisconsin, was named by and for L. G. Merrill, 
who owned property here when the town was platted aud named. 

Miloma, Jackson County, Minnesota. The original name of this place was 
Prairie Junction and was given it, because it was a junction on th» 
prairie, between the main line and a branch. The present name was 
made up by taking the first three letters "Mil" from the word Milwaukee 
of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad and the first three 
letters "oma" of the word Omaha (from the title of the Chicago, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad) and uniting them. Both railroads 
contribute to the prosperity of this place and were intended to be honored 
by making this name. 



184 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Midvale, Washington County, Minnesota, was named by E. W. Winter, then 
General Manager of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Rail- 
road, because it was about midway between Hudson, Wisconsin and St. 
Paul, Minnesota and was situated in a "vale" or "valley." 

Millston, Jackson County, Wisconsin, was started in 1870 and was named by 
and for H. B. Mills. 

Mines, Pierce County, Wisconsin, was named from nearby iron ore mines. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. This name is a combination of 
the Indian word minni water and the Greek polis, meaning city. 
The first house was built here in 1849. The town was incorporated In 
1867. St. Anthony, a very old town on the east bank of the river and 
directly at the Falls of St. Anthony, was incorporated in 1856 and merged 
with Minneapolis in 1872. St. Anthony city was named from the Falls, 
and the falls were named by the early French missionaries and explorers 
for St. Anthony of Padua. The falls were first seen by these missionaries 
on St. Anthony's day. 

Minnesota Transfer, Ramsay County, Minnesota. It is an important freight 
transfer point, but the name has no historical significance. 

Minneopa, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. The place was started in 1876 and 
was named from the falls nearby in the Minneopa River. The name is a 
contraction of the Dakota (Sioux) Indian name min-ne-hin-opa, which 
means "follows the water," or "two waters fall," or "two water falls." 
This name for euphony, was contracted to the form given to the village. 
The state of Minnesota recently purchased the land around these falls and 
has converted it into the "Minneopa Falls State Park." 

Minong, Washburn County, Wisconsin, was started in 1888 and named by 
Joshia Bond. The name minong is said to be Indian name for blue ber- 
ries, huckleberries, whortleberries, i. e. V actinium corymoosam, 

Mitchell, Davison County, South Dakota, was named by J. D. Lawler of Prairie 
du Chien, Wisconsin, for Alexander Mitchell, then president of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway. 

Mondovi, Buffalo County, Wisconsin, was started in 1855 and was named by 
Elihu B. Gifferd, from Mondovi, in Italy, one of the battlefields of Napoleon 
the First. 

Montrose, McCook County, South Dakota. This town was started in 1880 and 
named by R. F. Petigrew of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, from Sir Walter 
Scott's "Legend of Montrose." 

Mountain Lake, Cottonwood County, Minnesota, was named by A. A. Soule once 
of the state of Maine, in 1870, from his farm. When first named he called 
it "Twin Mountain Lake," and when asked why this name, he replied., 
"because there is neither mountain nor lake within a hundred miles." 
When he discovered the nearby lake, he found an elevation on a small 
island in the land, and changed the name of his farm to the present form, 
and the name of the village followed that. 

Nacora, Dakota County, Nebraska. This is a name coined from the Spanish 
word nacio, meaning "I am born." 

Narrows, Washburn County, Wisconsin, was named from a stream connecting 
Balsam and Cedar Lakes. 

Neillsville, Clark County, Wisconsin. This place was started in 1856 and was 
named by and for Judge James O'Neill, a pioneer in this place. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western* Line !^ : ' 

New Auburn, Chippewa County, Wisconsin. Originally in 1878, this place was 
called Cartwright, for D. W. Cartwright, the pioneer. He was a hunter, 
trapper, etc., etc., and wrote "Western Wild Animals," which had con- 
siderable reputation at one time. The name was then changed to Auburn 
to correspond with the name of the township that it is in. In 1904 the word 
"New" was added, but the reasons therefor, seem to have been lost. The 
"Auburn" came from Goldsmith's "Deserted Village," through Auburn, 
Cayuga County, New York. 

New Castle, Dixon County, Nebraska, was started in 1878 and was named by 
Gnstavus Smith because as is asserted in the place, he had just built a house 
which he called his "new castle." The compiler of this record believes 
this to be fiction, and has reason to believe the place was named from 
New Castle, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, as Mr. Smith emigrated from 
that place. New Castle in Pennsylvania was named from the town in 
England that gave title to the Dukes of Newcastle. 

New Richmmond, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. This place was established 
in 1850 and bore the names of Foster's Crossing, Gridley and Fremont 
respectively at various times down to 1862, when by Henry Russell and 
John McGregor the name was finally fixed in its present form. It was 
named for Richmond Day, one of the original founders of the ulace. 

Nicols, Dakota County, Minnesota. This place was named more than forty 
years ago for John Nicols, who was a prominent citizen of St. Paul, Min- 
nesota, and who owned in 1865, a farm near this town site. Mr. Nicols 
was the founder of the hardware firm of Nicols, Dean and Gregg, of St. 
Paul, Minnesota. 

Norfolk, Madison County, Nebraska, was started in 1869 and was named by 
ex-Governor General John M. Thayer from Norfolk, Mass. A local legend 
made the name come from the north fork of the Elkhorn River, but so far 
as can now be learned, this is a legend without any fact behind it. 

Norma, Chippewa County, Wisconsin. Was named for the name referred to 
in a popular opera — "Hear me, Norma, etc." 

Northrop, Martin County, Minnesota. Was started in 1899 and was named by 
the Inter-State Land Company that owned the site, for President Cyrus 
Northrop, of the Minnesota State University. 

North Line, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. Was so named because at this point 
on the main line of the railroad, a branch line (since grown into a main 
line) started into the thinly settled parts of northern Wisconsin. The 
original name was North Wisconsin Junction. The change of name was 
made in 1906 by J. T. Clark, second vice-president of the Chicago, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad. 

Oaches, Washburn County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the time-table of the road. The name has no historical sig- 
nificance. 

Oakdale, Washington County, Minnesota, was so named because when estab- 
lished, the location was adjacent to a grove of oak trees in a little valley 
or "dale." 

Oakland, Burt County, Nebraska, was started in 1865 and on the suggestion of 
James Arkwig a citizen of the village, was named for John Oak, who was 
the first permanent settler in the place. 



18(5 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska. Omaha is an Indian word, meaning "up 
stream." It is the name of an Indian tribe, who by other tribes were called 
Omaha — "up stream people." In Lewis and Clark's Journal, this tribe was 
called Utah-has. The application of this name to the city was made on the 
suggestion of Jesse Love, a man well read in the history of the Indians. 

Org, Nobles County, Minnesota. This place was originally called Iselin and was 
named for Adrian C. Iselin, a banker of New York City who owned much 
land in this vicinity. It was then named "Sioux Falls Junction," and 
was so called, because at this point a branch railroad left the main line 
for the city of Sioux Falls. In 1S90 the name was changed to Org by W. 
A. Scott, the then general manager of the railroad. No one now living 
knows why he so named the place, where he got the name, or what it means, 
if it means anything. A legend connects it with "Org" (Dorg) bad slang 
for the word, dog. 

Osseo, Trempeleau County, Wisconsin. The town was started in 1856 and was 
named by Robert C. Field, one legend says, from the Spanish word oso, 
meaning "bear," while another says it came irom an Indian word ossi, 
meaning "stone," or "stony place," or "stone on stone," or having 
relation to "river'-* and "stone." The name is used by Longfellow i.i 
his "Song of Hiawatha." He called Osseo the "son of the Evening Star," 
and has him apparently when a very old man, turned into a very handsome 
and attractive young man. Where Longfellow got the name is not now 
known. 

Ottawa, Le Sueur County Minnesota. This is one of the oldest towns in the 
state, as it was started in 1854. It was named for the Indian tribe. With- 
out definite and certain proof, the word is said to mean "far away," 
"away from any other place." E. M. Haines in his "American Indian" 
says the word means "traders." The fact seems to be, that the word 
means one thing in one Indian languge and something entirely different in 
another. It is not at all unlikely that the word has other meanings than 
the above. 

Pender, Thurston County, Nebraska. This place was started in 1885 and was 
named by W. E. Peebles, the founder, for a Lord Pender of England, who 
owned much land in the vicinity. 

Pennocks, Clark County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown ou the time-table of the road. The name has no historical sig- 
nificance. 

Perley, Barron County, Wisconsin, was named for Perley Lowe, a well known 
lumber dealer of Chicago, who had large property interests here. 

Perth, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was named in 1905 from the city in 
Scotland. Previous to this, the place was called Iceland, from the fact 
that a number of Danes had emigrated from Iceland to this vicinity. They 
settled around this place and are now prosperous and contented farmers. 

Peterson, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for B. E. Peterson, who 
owned large timber interests around this place and who shipped his product 
from this town. 

Phipps, Sawyer County, Wisconsin, was named for W. H. Phipps, for a long 
time land commissioner of the Chicago, St. Paul Minneapolis and Omaha 
Railroad. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 187 

Pike, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for Captain R. D. Pike, of Bay- 
field, Wisconsin, who had property interests here. 

Pipestone, Pipestone County, Minnesota. This place wag started and platted in 
1876 by C. II. Bennett and Daniel E. Sweet, and was named by them for the 
Indian, Great Bed Pipestone Quarries, that are mentioned by Longfellow 
in his "Hiawatha," and that are quite close to this city. These quarries 
were visited by Catlin in 1836 and by Fremont in 1838-9 and were described 
by them. Jean Nicholas Nicollet, the French explorer and map maker, also 
visited and mapped these quarries in 1838-9. The land surrounding the 
quarries is now an Indian reservation, and on it is a large United States 
Indian Training School. 

Ponca, Dixon County, Nebraska. This town was established in 1854 and was 
named from the Ponca tribe of Indians who had a reservation nearby. 
The word means "medicine." 

Prentice, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time-table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Price, Jackson County, Wisconsin. Was named for State Senator William (Bill) 
T. Price, of Black River Falls, Wisconsin, who had large property interests 
there. 

Requa, Jackson County, Wisconsin. When this town was platted, it was named 
Hanson, for the owner of a farm in the neighborhood. It was then changed 
to Garfield to honor the name of President James A. Garfield. It ultimately 
was named Requa. This name (or as it was originally spelled Re-que) is 
taken from a cluster of farms in Norway, where the parents of the Pastor 
St. S. Reque of the church of Spring Grove, Minnesota and of many 
persons who are settled around the village of Requa, lived in Norway. 
The meaning of the old Norse word (Rockvin) is "path meadow" "rok" 
"rach," "raak," means "a path," and "vin" or "wen" or "veen" 
means meadow. Hence a "meadow with a path running through" would 
be the literal meaning of the word as spoken in the old Norse tongue. 
In course of time after Denmark had forced its language upon Norway, 
the word was spoken as if spelled Requa and hence the present name. The 
residents, on one at least of these farms, is known as Siur Requa or Reque 
and his father was known as Styrk Reque, while still an older one was cal- 
led Nils Reque, so that it would seem that the present name was finally 
fixed to the soil in Norway. ' 

Radisson, Sawyer County, Wisconsin. This place was named on the suggestion 
of Captain E. E. Woodman, ex-secretary of the Chicago, St. Paul, Min- 
neapolis and Omaha Railroad, for Pierre Esprit Radisson. In this way. 
Captain Woodman has helped to save from almost oblivion, the name of 
a French traveller who preceeded Fathers Jacques Marquette, Joliet and 
others, in exploring, not only the country that now forms the state of 
Wisconsin, but a large portion of the northwestern country. Pierre Esprit 
Radisson was born in St. Malo, Brittany, France and arrived in New 
France (Canada) in 1651, a mere youth. In 1652, he was captured by the 
Iroquois Indians, but escaped from them and got back to the French 
settlements. In his "Relations," he calls this his "first voyage." Meet- 
ing another Frenchman, who was named Medard Chouart des Grosielliera, 
and who claimed to have been as far west as Lake Superior in 1645, Rad- 



188 History op the Place Names of The North Western Line 

isson arranged to have Grosielliers accompany him on his projected explor- 
ations. Grosiellers was considerably older than Eadisson. His native 
place in France is not known, but it is supposed to have been near Meaux. 
He, by missionaries and others, was called "Chouart" and "Grosielliers" 
indifferently and this fact has led to much confusion and has also led many 
to believe that Eadisson had two companions in place of only one. Grosiel- 
liers spoke the language of the "Huron" Indians and that of some, if not 
all of the Algonquin tribes, which rendered him invaluable to Eadisson, 
who at this time only spoke — and that indifferently — some of the Iroquois 
dialects. These two men were the most daring explorers who ever pene- 
trated the western wilderness in the seventeenth century. In what was the 
first real exploration, for we should not consider his adventure that ended 
with his capture by the Iroquois, as a voyage, though he called it such — 
Eadisson accompanied by Grosielliers went to the head waters of the Mis- 
sissippi Eiver and explored it for a great distance, and he asserts he went 
south so far that he reached a country where snow and frost were nearly 
or quite unknown. This was years before the journeys of Marquette and 
Joliet. The next trip took them to the south shore of Lake Superior and 
west to the territory inhabited by the Sioux Indians, and into northern 
Minnesota, and it is believed as far north as Hudson's Bay. The route 
taken by these explorers from Montreal is not certain, but it appears to 
have been up the Ottawa Eiver to Lake Nipissing and down the French 
Eiver to Lake Huron, the same route Jean Nicollet followed when he 
visited Wisconsin. (This was not Jean N. Niccolett, who explored with John 
C. Fremont, but was a Frenchman who was here in the seventeenth century.) 
They certainly visited the Pottawattomie Indians and spent a winter with 
them, probably at or near Green Bay (the Bay and not the site of the pres- 
ent city of that name). They visited the Fox Eiver country and met 
the Mascoutin or "Fire" Indians, who dwelt on this river. Father 
Allouez found these Indians when he founded in 1670 the first mission 
for Indians in Wisconsin, near what is now Berlin, Wisconsin. Eadisson 
and Grosielliers spent the next winter on the shore of Lake Superior, 
probably somewhere between Sault Ste. Marie and the "Pictured 
Eocks" and quite possibly on "White Fish Bay," as he says he saw 
and described the Grand Portal at the "Pictured Eocks" (near what now 
is the town of Munising) and named it for St. Peter. They visited the 
Huron Isles, Keweenaw Bay and the Montreal Eiver, that forms a portion 
of the boundary between Wisconsin and Michigan and Chequamegan Bay 
near the present city of Ashland. Near Whittlesey's Creek, the site of the 
present city of Ashland, Wisconsin, they built a fort, the first structure 
built by white men in Wisconsin, or on Lake Superior. They then went 
westwardly and built a fort in what is now the state of Minnesota, and this 
was the first building erected by whites in that state. They also built 
a fort on Chequamegan Bay, on one of their visits to its shores. This voy- 
age seems to have ended in 1660. Eadisson did not, as has been charged, 
claim to have discovered the Mississippi Eiver, to covet that honor from 
Marquette and Joliet, as his account of the discovery was written years 
before Marquette started towards that river. Eadisson had been told of this 
great river by Indians whom he had met during his wanderings. An Iro- 
quois Chief, for instance, had told him about it in 1657. While Eadisson 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 189 

has told much that has been proved to be fiction, still there is no doubt 
that he and Grosielliers were the first to thoroughly explore the shores of 
Lake Superior and the territory of Wisconsin and Minnesota, and they 
were the "promoters," to use a modern term — of the "Hudson Bay Com- 
pany of Traders," and hence are entitled to all the honor that is due to 
such intrepid workers. "Their names must ever inseparably remain con- 
nected with the history of Wisconsin and of the old North West, as well 
as of much more of the North American continent." An island in Lake 
Superior has been named for Grosielliers, but we believe that this attempt 
of Captain Woodman, is the first that has been made to perpetuate the name 
and fame of Eadisson. 

Ranch Spur, Burt County, Nebraska. This name came from the fact that around 
this location was a very large cattle ranch. A side track was put in here 
to accomodate the operators of the ranch and thus the name became 
attached to the place. 

Randolph, Cedar County, Nebraska, was named for Randolph Churchill of 
England, by F. H. Peavey, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, who owned the town- 
site. 

Bice Lake, Barron County, Wisconsin. This village was named in 1870 by the 
Knapp-Stout Lumber firm, from the nearby lake. The lake was named from 
the abundance of wild rice (Zizania aquatica) that grew in it v\en the land 
was surveyed by the United States. 

Richardson, Polk County, Wisconsin. This place was formerly cnlled Marsh 
Lake from a nearby marshy lake. Its present name was giv«n it in 1887 
for Eugene Richardson, an early settler. 

Bitter, O'Brien County, Iowa, was named for J. L. Ritter, who when the place 
was platted was, and for a long time had been a train dispatcher on the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad. 

River Falls, Pierce County, Wisconsin, was started in 1849 and was known as 
Greenwood, until 1853, when the present name was adopted from the falls 
in the Kinnikinnick River on which it is located. The river is named from 
an Indian word that means a mixture of tobacco and the bark of the red 
willow or other shrubs, or the bark of the shrubs without any admixture 
of tobacco. In either case, the Indians were fond of smoking in their 
pipes the substance they named by this word. 

Biverside, Hanson County, South Dakota, was named in 1899 from its situation 
on the east sided of the James River. It was once known as Whites, for J. 
R. White, a grain and stock dealer here, for many years. In 1893, it was 
by W. A. Scott, then general manager of the railroad, changed to "Kif" 
which were the first three letters in the name of a town in Asiatic Turkey 
— Kifri. The name so made was merely adopted because it was sfcort, and 
because it was certain that no other place in the United States would 
have such a name. 

Roberts, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, was started in 1873, and was n^med for 
one of the engineers employed in building the railroad that passes through 
the place. 

Bockmont, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was named from a nearby rocky mound, 
and as also was the post office that was established here before the days 
of the railroad. In an early day the village was called Amnicon from the 



190 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

river of that name that flows nearby. The name of the river is Indian for 
a species of fish. 

Rock Rapids, Lyon County, Iowa. This place was located in 1869 by D. C. 
Whitehead, Matthias Sweeny and Delos Towsley. They were exploring 
the valley of Rock River and when they arrived at its junction with tho 
Kanavanzi River, they were so attracted by the scenery that they deter- 
mined to locate a town there and they did so, and named it Rock Rapids 
from the beautiful waterfall in Rock River. 

Rosedale, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, was so named because when the place 
was laid out it was near a "dale" or small valley that was full of wild 
roses. 

Rushmore, Nobles County, Minnesota. This place was located in 1877 and 
named by and for Samuel Rushmore, who was the first person to engage in 
any kind of business in the place. 

Rusk, Dunn County, Wisconsin. Was named for ex-Governor Jeremiah M. Rusk, 
of Wisconsin, afterwards United States Secretary of Agriculture. 

St. James, Watonwan County, Minnesota. This town was named by J. F. 
Drake, of St. Paul, Minnesota, for James Parrington, its first settler. 

St. Paul, Ramsay County, Minnesota. This place was started in 1838 and named 
in 1841. It was named from a log church which was built for Father M. 
Galtier, an early Jesuit missionary. The church was named for "The 
Apostle of the Gentiles." The first house was built here in 1838. The place 
was made a village in 1849 and a city in 1854. 

St. Peter, Le Sueur County, Minnesota. The town was named from the Min- 
nesota (St. Peter) River that runs by it. The river was named the St. 
Peter for Pierre (Peter) Charles La Sueur, a French explorer who explored 
its banks for many miles and who is supposed to have been the first white 
man to navigate the stream. He was on it as early as 1689. The above 
applies to the original city of St. Peter. The little village that is on this 
line of railroad is across the Minnesota River and is merely a suburb of 
the old city. 

Salem, McCook County, South Dakota, was named by J. H. Brown, from Salem, 
Massachusetts, whence he had emigrated. Salem is a Hebrew word 
meaning "peace," and was applied to the place in Massachusetts by the 
earliest settlers in the hope that they would find the peaceful security 
there which they had not found in England. 

Salaio, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named from the technical name of the 
genus of fish which is found here, viz: the Sahno salar, or "salmon" 
of the Atlantic Ocean. The name for this place was suggested by the fish 
commissioner of Minnesota. 

Sarona, Washburn County, Wisconsin, was started in 1898 and was named by 
J. S. Hiebert, the founder. The name is of Biblical origin. The town was 
started as a religious — co-operative venture. The original idea was to have 
all the property in common, but this was finally found to be impracti- 
cable and was abandoned. The translation of the name of this place is said 
to be "valley of flowers." 

Seeleys, Sawyer County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point that 
is shown on the time-table of the road. The name has no historical sig- 
nificance. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 101 

Sauntry, Douglas County, Wisconsin, was named for C. S. Sauntry, a large 
lumber manufacturer of Stillwater, Minnesota, who owned large interests 
near here. 

Savage, Scott County, Minnesota. This town was started in 1855 and was 
named Hamilton in honor of Alexander Hamilton, one of the statesmen 
of the Revolution. In 1903 the name was changed to honor Marion YV. 
Savage, president of the International Stock Food Company, of Minneapo- 
lis, Minnesota, who had a large stock form nearby. 

Seney, Plymouth County, Iowa. This town was started in 1874 and was nameil 
for George L. Seney of Scarsdalc, New York, who from 1871 to 1881, was 
a director of the railroad that runs through the place. 

Severance, Pierce County, Wisconsin, was named for Judge Martin J. Severance 
of Mankato and Beldensville, Minnesota. 

Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota, was started in 1852 and was named by 
Thomas Holmes, an Indian trader, for Nak-pan-dan or Shalcu-pa-dan, or 
Shakopee, a Sioux Indian Chief, who formerly lived here. The name, 
meaning "six" or as some wrongly translate it, "little six." (Slialopula). 

Sheldon, O'Brien County, Iowa, was started in 1872 and was named by General 
J. W. Bishop in honor of Israel Sheldon, of Orange, New Jersey, who was 
largely interested in the railroad (Sioux City and St. Paul) that was first 
built through this place by General Bishop, Mr. Sheldon and their associ- 
ates. 

Shell Lake, Washburn County, Wisconsin. The town was named by and for 
the Shell Lake Lumber Company. That company was named from the 
nearby lake and the lake was so named because of the great mass of shells 
that were found on its shores, and because it was fancied by the dis- 
coverer of the lake that it was in shape, like the shells on its shores. It 
was so named previous to 1S52, as in an Atlas published in Philidelphin, 
Pa., in that year, it bore its present name. 

Sheppard, Jackson County, Wisconsin, was named for Andrew Sheppard, a 
nearby sawmill owner. 

Shoies, Wayne County, Nebraska, was started in 1902 and was named for Lyman 
Sho!es, an officer of the railroad company who is located in Omaha, Nebraska. 

Sibley, Osceola Count}', Iowa. This town was laid out in 1873 and was named 
for General Henry H. Sibley, an earty pioneer of the territory, the first 
state governor and its military defender in the Sioux War of 1862. 

Sioux, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. Was named for the Dakota, or Sioux 
tribe of Indians. The word Sioux is an abbreviation of the Ojibway Indian 
name (Nadowessioux) for the tribe and means "little snakes," i. e. "ene- 
mies." The Algonquin name for the Sioux Indians was Nadowessiwag, 
meaning " snake, " or "snake like ones," "enemies." The whites corrupted 
the name to Sioux. 

Sicux City, Woodbury County. Towa. This town was laid out and named in 
1854 by James K. Cooke. It was named from the Dakota, or Sioux Indians, 
the largest tribe in the United States. The word is an abbreviation of 
their Ojibway name, signifying "litle snakes" i. e. "enemies." In 17S5 
the French called them "LaSues," while George Crogan, the Indian 
interpreter at that time called them "La Suil. " 



192 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, South Dakota. This place was named by 
the Dakota Land Company for the falls in the Big Sioux Kiver that runs 
through the place and that enters the Missouri Kiver just above Sioux 
City. The falls were described in 1838-9 by Lieut. John C. Fremont and 
by Jean Nicholas Nicollet, the French explorer and map maker, who 
accompanied Fremont. Nicollet says the Indians around the Falls called 
them Tehan-lcas-an-data, and the river the same, and that this signified 
"thick wooded river." The river was also called the Calumet. An Iowa 
corporation called the Western Town Lot Company, made a location here, 
but was superseded by the Dakota Land Company that is named above. 
Fort Dakota was established here in 1865 as a protection from the Sioux 
Indians and was kept garrisoned until 1869. 

Slayton, Murray County, Minnesota, was named in 1882 for C. W. Slayton, 
who was one of the first settlers to locate here. 

Solon Springs, Douglas County, Wisconsin. This place was named Solon 
Springs by and for Thomas Solon, who discovered and owned the medicinal 
springs at this point. The place was started in 1883 and was- named 
"White Birch' from the abundance of white birch (Betula populifolia) 
trees that grew hereabouts. Its present name was adopted in 1896. It is 
asserted that two rivers, one flowing south and the other north, have their 
source in these springs. 

South Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, is named for the nearby city. It is 
the location of extensive stock yards and packing manufacturing plants. 
The name here merely indicates a point that is shown on the timetable of 
the road. The name has no historical significance. 

South St. Paul, Dakota County, Minnesota. Is really a suburb of St. Paul. The 
name merely indicates a point that is shown on the time-table of the 
road. The name has no historical significance. 

South Blair, Washington County, Nebraska. The name merely shows a point 
that is shown on the time-table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

South Sioux City, Dakota County, Nebraska. This place was formerly called 
Covington; its present post office name is Sioux. The name of the town as 
well as of the post office, comes from the name of the Dakota (Siou-O 
tribe of Indians, the largest tribe in the United States. The word really 
is an abbreviation of the name given to the tribe by the Ojibway Indians 
and means "little snakes," i. e. "enemies." 

South Range, Douglas County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a 
point that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no his- 
torical significance. 

South Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota. For the origin, etc., of this 
name, see Stillwater. It is really but a suburb of that city. 

Spencer, McCook County, South Dakota, was named by F. H. Peavey, the 
president of the land company that owned the town site and started the 
town in 1887, for H. Spencer, the then division superintendent of the 
railroad that runs through the place. 

Spooner, Washburn County, Wisconsin. This place was started in 1883 and was 
named for United States Senator John C. Spooner, of Wisconsin, by E. W. 
Winter, the then general manager of the railroad that runs through the 
place. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 193 

Spring Brook, Washburn County, Wisconsin. This town was started and named 
in 1888 by Joseph Trepania, from a little brook that originates in a spring 
nearby and that runs through the village. Its post office once bore the name 
of Namekegan from the river of that name; the river was named from the 
lake of that name, and that was named from the Indian word namna, 
meaning "sturgeon," or "the place where sturgeons are plentiful." 

Spring Valley, Pierce County, Wisconsin, was started in 1892 and was named by 
William D. Akers, its earliest settler, from numerous large springs that 
flowed through a nearby valley. 

Stanton, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. The town was started in 1880 and was 
named Ormes (origin not now known). The name was changed for the 
present one in 1900, and was so named in honor of E. M. Stanton, the 
great war secretary of the War of the Kebellion. 

Stock Yards, Woodbury County, Iowa. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time-table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota, was located in 1838 and named in 
1842 by John McKasick, because, owing to the great depth of the waters 
in the river (St. Croix), and from the fact that the fall in the water until 
it reaches the Mississippi River, is very slight, the waters ran very still. 
At an early day the town was called Dakotah from the Dakota (Sioux) 
Indian tribe. 

Stillwater Junction, Washington County, Minnesota, was so named owing to its 
nearness and relation to the eity of Stillwater. 

Stinnett, Washington County, Wisconsin, was named for W. W. Stinnett, a 
former trainmaster and division superintendent of the railroad that runs 
through this place. 

Stone, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. This place was originally called Quarry 
owing to stone quarries in the vicinity. In 1902 the name was changed to 
Stone and came from the same "stone quarries" that had given it its 
earlier name. 

Storden, Cottonwood County, Minnesota. The town was started in 1902 and 
was named from the township in which it is located. The township was 
named for its earliest settler, Nels Storden, late of Norway. 

StowelL Monroe County, Wisconsin. Was named by E. W. Winter, then 
general manager of the railroad for Mrs. (W. W. H.) Elinor Stowell, who 
was a daughter of General J. T. Averill, Colonel of the Sixth Minnesota 
Regiment during the War of the Rebellion. 

Strum, Trempeleau County, Wisconsin, was started in 1875 and was named in 
1884 by Congressman William T. Price, for his friend, Louis Strum, of 
Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Previous to 1884, the town was called Tilden, for 
Samuel J. Tilden, the statesman of New York State. 

Superior, Douglas County, Wisconsin. The first location here was made imme- 
diately after the repeal of the Missouri compromise by a company of pro- 
slavery southerners with J. C. Breekenridge of Kentucky as its leading spirit. 
The intention was to make a summer resort where the southerners could 
escape the heat of the southern summers and would be free to take their slave 
servants with them which they would not do if they went to the eastern 
watering places. This city was named by the Superior Land Company, that 
started the place in 1853-4, from the great lake on which it is located. The 



194 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

name of that lake is a translation of the original French name, lac superior, 
"upper lake." This great lake was discovered by Stephen Brule, "the 
dauntless woodsman, pioneer and interpreter," who was finally killed and 
eaten by Huron Indians. 

Summit, Chippewa County, "Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time-table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 

Sweden, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, was named for the country and to honor 
the many Swedes who lived in the vicinity when the town was established. 

Sydney, Clark County, Wisconsin, its first name was "Tay" which had no 
meaning, and "was used simply because it was a short word." The present 
name was given it by William Bennett when he was superintendent of the 
railroad that runs through this place. It has no history. He adopted 
the name because he thought it euphonious, and had not been used in 
Wisconsin, and could easily be written and telegraphed. 

Teegarden, Dunn county, Wisconsin, was named for the Teegarden family who 
had fish (brook trout) ponds and a "summer resort" at this point. Thomas 
Teegarden owned much land in this vicinity, had a saw and a grist mill 
here on Wilson Creek, and was the "Patriarch" of the family and settle- 
ment. In naming the village, it was intended especially to honor this old 
pioneer. 

Tekamah, Burt County, Nebraska, was started in 1854 and was named by its 
founder, Colonel Benjamin R. Folsom, of Attica, New York. The name of 
the town comes from the Omaha Indian word te-lca-mah and means " Cot- 
tonwood," or "big cottonwood." Colonel Folsom adopted the name for this 
town because it Avas surrounded by large cottonwood (Popidus Canaden- 
sis trees. 

Thurston, Thurston County, Nebraska, was started in 1887 and was named from 
the county, which was named for J. M. Thurston, United States Senator 
from Nebraska. Its earliest name was Flourney and was so named for an 
early officer of the railroad that runs through it. 

Tramway, Dunn County, Wisconsin, was so named because of a 'tramway" or 
log railroad, that ran into the timber from this location. 

Trego, Washburn County, Wisconsin. This place was known as Veazie, and 
as Mills, so named for Congressman Mills, and then as Superior Junc- 
tion. This last name was adopted because the place was the junction of 
two lines of railroad. The present name was manufactured by Captain 
E. E. Woodman, of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad, 
from the Latin word, "tres" for "three" and "go," meaning "ways" 
or "roads." The "s" was dropped for euphony. The word "trego" is 
also a Spanish word used to designate the "wheat," "grain." In Span- 
ish it is sometimes spelled Trigo, but pronounced Trego. The section of 
modern Rome that is called Trevi, took its name from Trivum which was 
the old Roman name for any place where two long streets or roads came 
together. Captain Woodman courteously furnished this explanation of 
the reason he had for making the name for this location. 

Trent, Nobles County, Minnesota. There is a dispute as to the origin of the 
name that was selected for this place. One faction asserts it was named for 
Trent in the Italian Tyrol of Austro-Hungary, where was held the famous 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 195 

Council of Trent in 1545-63 ami that fixed many religious tenets. Th-j 
other faction claims that the name was taken from the River Trent in 
England. 

Trow, Clark County, Wisconsin, was named for A. S. Trow, of Merrillan, Wis- 
cousin, who owned property here. 

Truas, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, w;is named for ihe Truax family, who 
lived in the vicinity and owned large quantities of land here. A prairie 
nearby was also named for this family. 

Truman, Martin County, Minnesota, was started in 1899 and was named for 
Truman Clark, a son of J. T. Clark, second vice president of the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad, when the town was laid out. 

Twin City Stock Yards, Ramsay County, Minnesota. This name merely indicates 
a point that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no his- 
torical significance. 

Tunnel, Juneau County, Wisconsin, was so named from the fact of there being 
a tunnel that pierced a hill on the railroad near this place. 

Turtle Lake, Barron County, Wisconsin, was started in 1876 and was named by 
S. F. Richardson, its earliest settler, from two nearby lakes. The name is 
a transliteration of the Indian name of the lakes. 

Tuscobia, Barron County Wisconsin. This name was manufactured out of the 
word "tuscola," which is Indian and means "a level place." A nearby 
creek also carries the same name as the town. 

Tyson, Washington County, Nebraska. The original name of this town was 
Illland, it having been named for James II. Ililand, an officer of a prominent 
western railroad. Its name was changed to honor the Tyson family that 
was prominent and pioneers in this vicinity. 

Valley Junction, Monroe County, Wisconsin. This place was started in 1875 
and named from its postoffice in 1900. It was so named because the post- 
office was in a deep valley at the junction of two highways. 

Valley Springs, Minnehaha County, South Dakota, was started in 1872 and 
was named by L. M. Wood, from the many springs that were found in the 
valley along the course of Beaver Creek that runs nearby. 

Vernon Center, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was started in 1850 and named as 
above in 1S73. Its name was taken from Mount Vernon, the home of 
Washington on the Potomac River in Virginia. The town was once called 
Edgewood, from being located at the edge or margin of a grove of trees; 
that name was dropped for the present one. 

Vista, Dakota County, Nebraska. The earliest name of this town was Brady, 
and it was named for a pioneer family of the vicinity. Owing to the fact 
that an island in the Platte River was called Brady's Island, it was thought 
best to change the name of this place, as the name of the island could 
only be changed by act of congress. The present name was selected 
because of the views from the place and the vistas formed by the hills 
and valleys picturesquely surrounding it. 

Wakefield, Dixon County, Nebraska, was started in 1881 and was named for L. 
W. Wakefield, the engineer who located the lines of the railroad from 
Sioux City through this place. 

Warner, Rock County, Minnesota. This place was named for Eling F. Warner, 
one of the original directors of the Sioux City and St. Paul Railroad Com- 
pany, who was a prominent express man in St. Paul many years ago. 



196 History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 

Warren, Monroe County, Wisconsin. This village was started in 1868, and was 
named Warren's Mills by George Warren, from mills owned by the George 
Warren Company. In 1893, the name was changed to its present form. 
George Warren was the first settler in this place. 
Wascott, Douglas County, Wisconsin. This name was made out of the name 
W. A. Scott. Mr. Scott was for many years, a managing officer of the 
railroad that runs through this place. 

Washburn, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. This town was established in 1883 
by the Bay Land and Improvement Company, and was named for W. D. 
Washburn, United States Senator from Minnesota and a large flour mill 
owner of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Wausa, Knox County, Nebraska. This town was started in 1890 and was 
named by two Lutheran ministers, named Foglelstrom and Torell respect- 
ively, for Gustavus Vasa, the first Protestant King of Sweden. The 
spelling Wausa was adopted to correspond with what was certain to be 
the pronunciation of the word Vasa. Before its present name was adopted 
the town was called Thorson. for its earliest settler. 

Wayne, Wayne County, Nebraska. This town was started in 1881 and was 
named from the county. That was named to honor the memory of General 
Anthony Wayne, one of the heroes of the Eevolution. 

Wedges Creek, Clark County, Wisconsin. This was named from a nearby 
creek. The proper name is "Wages," and it was named by and for John 
D. Wage, a Maine lumberman who was sent to Wisconsin by Governor 
Coburn and other capitalists of Maine to log and lumber a large tract 
of timber land which they owned in this vicinity. Mr. Wage claimed to 
have discovered the creek, and that gave him authority to name it. How 
the name came to be changed to its present form is not known, but it 
is supposed to have been done by simple carelessness of the surveyors and 
state map makers. 

Westbrook, Cottonwood County, Minnesota, was started in 1900 and was named 
because the west branch of a creek or brook ran through it. 

Weston, Dunn County, Wisconsin. This town was started in 1901, and was 
named from a postoffice that for many years had been operated some miles 
from this location. The old postoffice was named for its postmaster, 
who was the earliest settler in his part of the county. 

Wilder, Jackson County, Minnesota. This town was started in 1885 and was 
named by D. G. Gunn for A. H. Wilder, of St. Paul, Minnesota. 

White Eiver, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name comes from a nearby 
stream, but has no historical significance. 

Wildwood, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. This name was given the place as 
being indicative of the surroundings, when the town was laid out; it being 
in the center of a dense (wild) wood or tract of timber. 

Wilson, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. This town was established in 1870 and 
was named for Captain William Wilson, of Menomonie, Wisconsin, who 
had located a lumber manufacturing establishment here at the time the 
place was named. 

Windom, Cottonwood County, Minnesota. This town was started in 1871 and 
was named by General Judson W. Bishop, who built the railroad through 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 197 

it, for William Windom, United States Senator from Minnesota, and 
United States Secretary of the Treasury. 

Winnebago, Faribault County, Minnesota. The town was located in 1856 and 
was named Winnebago City by Andrew C. Dunn, to distinguish it from the, 
Winnebago Indian Agency near Mankato. In 1905 the present name was 
adopted. It was named for the tribe of Indians, the name meaning 
"people of the stinking water," or "men of (or from) the bad smelling 
waters." The original word was ouinepeg, or ouinepego. The name 
Winnipeg comes from the same Indian word. 

Winside, Wayne County, Nebraska. This place was platted in 1886. Three 
miles away was the village and postoffice of North Side, so named because 
it was on the north side of the "divide" or ridge of land that runs be- 
tween the Elkhorn and Logan Kivers. K. C. Crawford started Winside to 
compete with North Side, and it was so named because he said it was 
"bound to win," and in time would "kill off North Side." 

Winter, Sawyer County, Wisconsin, was started in 1904 and was named for 
W. C. Winter, the then Superintendent of the railroad that runs through 
the place. 

Wynot, Cedar County, Nebraska. The name is merely fanciful and is an 
elision of "Why not," which was the answer given by the party, who 
suggested the name, when he asked "Why not name it Wynot?" The 
name was suggested by T. N. Jones of St. James, Nebraska, and was 
adopted by the railroad company. 

Woodstock, Pipestone County, Minnesota. The first name of this place was 
Burk, and it was so named in 1880 for its first settler. The name was 
dropped by general consent and the present name adopted in 1881. It 
was named from Woodstock, McHenry County, Illinois, and that was 
named from Woodstock, Vermont, and that was named from the town in 
England. 

Woodville, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. This town was started in 1870 and 
was named Kelly's Switch, for a nearby mill owner. In 1874 that name 
was dropped and the present adopted. The present name came from 
Woodville, Jefferson County, New York and that was named for Ebenezer, 
Ephraim and Jacob Wood, the first settlers. 

Worthington, Nobles County, Minnesota. This town was started in 1871 by 
the National Colony Company, of which Miller and Hamilton were the 
managers. It was started as a prohibition colony, and for many years 
was such. It was named for the Worthington family of Ohio who were 
noted people in the early days of that State, and that furnished at least 
one governor thereof. 

Wright, Jackson County, Wisconsin, was named for W. H. S. Wright, for 
many years, the purchasing agent of the railroad that runs through this 
place. 

Wyeville, Monroe County, Wisconsin. This place was formerly known as 
Necedah Junction. The postoffice had long been known as Wyeville, and 
in 1906 the name of the town was changed to correspond to that of the 
postoffice. 

Yara, Dakota County, Minnesota, was named from a place near Santiago in 
Cuba. 



198 History ok the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Yarnell, Sawyer County, Wisconsin. This place was named for the Yarnel) 
family of Pennsylvania, that had many representatives of it living in 
this vicinity when the town was named. 

Yolo, Clark County, Wisconsin. This was named from the county in California. 
The word is Indian. One authority says- it means "a place abounding in 
rushes," while others claim it means "possession of royal blood." 

Youngs, Washburn County, Wisconsin. This name merely indicates a point 
that is shown on the time table of the road. The name has no historical 
significance. 



AS TO THE 



CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS C& 
OMAHA RAILWAY. 



ABANDONED NAMES. 



The following names, in an early day were applied to towns and villages 

along the line of this road. For various reasons, these names were abandoned 

and the current names were substituted. In cases where the name of the post- 
office varies from that of the village or station, the postoffice name is also 
given in this list. 

Abandoned Names. Current Names. 

Auburn See New Auburn, Chippewa Co., Wisconsin. 

Amnicon " Eockmont, Douglas Co., Wisconsin. 

Bay City " Ashland, Ashland Co., Wisconsin. 

Bourne " Barronett, Barron Co., Wisconsin. 

Buena Vista " Hudson, St. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 

Brady " Vista, Dakota Co., Nebraska. 

Burk " Woodstock, Pipestone Co., Minnesota. 

Claremont " Laurel, Cedar Co., Nebraska. 

Cartwright " New Auburn, Chippewa Co., Wisconsin. 

Clarkesvlli*. " Baldwin, St. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 

Chetek " Currie, Murray Co., Minnesota. 

Cousins " Fall Creek, Eau Claire Co., Wisconsin. 

Calhoun " Fort Calhoun, Washington Co., Nebraska. 

Covington " South Sioux City, Dakota Co., Nebraska. 

Drake " Magnolia, Kock County, Minnesota. 

Dakotah " Sillwater, Washington Co., Winconsin. 

Ell Roy " Elroy, Juneau Co., Wisconsin. 

East Orange " Alton, Sioux Co., Iowa. 

Edgewood " Vernon Center, Blue Earth Co., Minnesota. 

East Connection " Cliff, Dakota Co., Minnesota. 

Foster City " Barronett, Barron Co., Wisconsin. 

Fountain Spur " Donald, Taylor County, Wisconsin. 

Fainnount " Fairmont. Martin Co., Minnesota. 

Foster's Crossing " New Kichmond, St. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 

Fremont " New Kichmond, St. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 

Fountain " Donald, Taylor Co., Wisconsin. 

Flourney " Thurston, Thurston Co., Nebraska. 

Greenwood " River Falls, Pierce Co., Wisconsin. 

Gridley " New Richmond, Ct. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 

Gillman " Ashton, Osceola Co., Iowa. 

Garfield " Requa, Jackson Co., Wisconsin. 

Gray " Eaton, Pipestone Co., Minnesota. 

Hanson " Requa, Jackson Co., Wisconsin. 



200 



History ok the Place Names of The North Western Line 



Abandoned Names. Current Names. 

Hersey See Brewster, Nobles Co., Minnesota. 

Hiland ' ' Tyson, Washington Co., Nebraska. 

Holmes " Hines, Douglas Co., Wisconsin. 

Hiebert " Sarona, Washburn Co., Wisconsin. 

Hamilton " Savage, Scott Co., Minnesota. 

rceland " Perth, Blue Earth Co., Minnesota. 

Iselin " Org, Nobles Co., Minnesota. 

Sennesaw " Emerson, Dixon Co., Nebraska. 

Kelley's Switch " Woodville, St. Croix Co.. Wisconsin. 

Kif " Riverside, Hanson Co., South Dakota. 

Little Land " Cumberland, Barron Co., Wisconsin. 

Little Falls " Holcomb, Chippewa Co., Wisconsin. 

Long Lake " Barden, Scott Co., Minnesota. 

Lunt's " Lakewood, Lyon Co., Iowa. 

Mills " Trego, Washburn Co., Wisconsin. 

Mason Junction " Bibon, Bayfield Co., Wisconsin. 

Mapleworks " Granton, Clark County, Wisconsin. 

Marsh Lake " Bichardson, Polk Co., Wisconsin. 

Namekegan " Spring Brook, Washburn Co., Wisconsin. 

Northside " Winside, Wayne Co., Nebraska. 

North Wisconsin June. " North Line, St. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 

Necedah Junction " Wyeville, Monroe Co., Wisconsin. 

Oakdale " Lake Elmo, Washington Co., Minnesota. 

Ormes " Stanton, St. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 

Orange City " Alton, Sioux Co., Iowa. 

Perry " Ellsworth, Pierce Co., Wisconsin. 

Pratt " Grandview, Bayfield Co., Wisconsin. 

Prairie La Fleche " Le Sueur, Le Sueur Co., Minnesota. 

Prairie Junction " Miloma, Jackson Co., Minnesota. 

Quarry Track " Stone, Blue Earth Co., Minnesota. 

Rudolph " Henderson, Le Sueur Co., Minnesota. 

Stillhaven " Arnold, Chippewa Co., Wisconsin. 

Bcoopville " Ellis, Minnehaha Co., South Dakota. 

St. Mark " Ashland, Ashland Co., Wisconsin, 

Sibley " Barden, Scott Co., Minnesota. 

Simon " Nacora, Dakota Co., Nebraska. 

Sheteck " Currie, Murray Co., Minnesota. 

Sioux Falls Junction... " Org, Nobles Co., Minnesota. 

Superior Junction " Trego, Washburn Co., Wisconsin. 

St. Lawrence " Lawrence, Scott Co., Minnesota. 

Sioux " South Sioux City, Dakota Co., Nebraska. 

Sinclair's Spur " Earl, Washburn Co.. Wisconsin. 

Thorson " Wausa, Knox Co., Nebraska. 

Tilden " Strum, Trempeleau Co., Wisconsin. 

Tay «< Sydney, Clark Co., Wisconsin. 

Vermillion " Jim Falls, Chippewa Co., Wisconsin. 

Veazie " Trego, Washburn Co., Wisconsin. 

Vanville " Bloomer, Chippewa Co., Wisconsin. 

Warren's Mills " Warren, Monroe Co., Wisconsin. 



History of the Place Names of The North Western Line 



201 



Abandoned Nambs. 

Wahinoge See 

Westside 

White Birch 

Whittlesey 

Wilhelmine 

Warren 

Winter Quarters 

Whites 

Wausa 

Willow Biver 

Winnebago City 



Current Names. 
Le Sueur, Le Sueur Co., Minnesota. 
Magnolia, Rock Co., Minnesota. 
Solon Springs, Douglas Co., Wisconsin. 
Ashland, Ashland Co., Wisconsin. 
Delft, Cottonwood Co., Minnesota. 
Dundee, Nobles Co., Minnesota. 
Florence, Douglas Co., Nebraska. 
Riverside, Hanson Co., South Dakota. 
Bloomfield, Knox Co., Nebraska. 
Hudson, St. Croix Co., Wisconsin. 
Winnebago, Faribault Co., Minnesota. 



CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS C& 
OMAHA RAILWAY. 

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Bail way Company was 
organized in 1880 and through absorption and construction now operates 1729 
miles of road. The first portion of the road was started in Minnesota in 1865. 

The present mileage of what is known locally as the "Omaha Eoad" is in 
the following States: Wisconsin 758, Minnesota 473, Iowa 102, Nebraska 308, 
and South Dakota 88. 

The Main line of the "Omaha Eoad" radiates from Minneapolis and St. 
Paul East and North East and South and South West. It has fifteen connecting 
points with the Chicago & North Western Kailway where freight and passenger 
traffic is interchanged and because of these connections the country at the 
Head-of-the-Lakes as well as St. Paul and Minneapolis is put in direct con- 
nection with the large territory covered by the C. & N. W. By. with its nearly 
8,000 miles of road. 

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Bailway Company through its 
connection with the C. & N. W. By. gives to the cities of St. Paul, Minneapolis 
and Duluth the best passenger and freight service to Chicago, to Omaha and to 
the Black Hills Country. 

For passenger service there are 26 trains a day out of and into St. Paul 
and Minneapolis over these lines including four each way between Minneapolis, 
St. Paul and Chicago, two each way between Minneapolis, St. Paul and 
Head of Lake Superior, three each way between Minneapolis, St. Paul 
and Omaha with sleeping cars on night trains to Chicago, 111., Milwau- 
kee and Fond du Lac, Wis., and West to Watertown, Bedfield, Huron and 
Mitchell, South Dakota, to Sioux City and Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Omaha, 
Nebraska and Kansas City, Mo. There are also limited trains, electric lighted, 
between Duluth, Superior and Chicago as well as between Minneapolis, St. Paul 
and Chicago and Minneapolis, St. Paul and Omaha. 

The cities and villages along the "Omaha Eoad" are showing a steady 
growth and new business enterprises are being constantly started, especially 
in Northern Wisconsiu is the growth of the country more rapid because of the 
large acreage of the cut over timber lands being placed on the market by 
lumber companies. The "Omaha Eoad" also has several thousand acres of 
land yet unsold which are now on the market at low prices and on long time 
and owing to the close proximity of these Wisconsin lands to the large business 
centers such as St. Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth, Superior, Milwaukee and Chicago 
a ready market with good prices is assured. 

Any information desired about lands or business openings on the "Omaha 
Eoad" or information as to fares or passenger train schedules may be had by 
addressing Ceneral Passenger Agent C. St. P., M. & O. By., St. Paul, Minn. 

Any information desired about rates on freight or freight train service 
or location for manufacturing concerns should be addressed to General Freight 
Agent, C. St. P., M. & O. By., St. Paul, Minn. 




MILEAGE Mile9 

Unxl:iiisu>u>i>a'« Chicago A: North 'Western Ry 7.611.16 

=-W^K3rh wr 2 Cnicago. St. Paul. Minneapolis A Omaha Ry 1,729.58 

i os 'iWi^rV' Pierre, Rapid City & North Western Ry 167.27 

= --"'"" : o ,to.0 Wyoming & North 'Western Ry 147.63 

Total 9.655.88 



i INDICATES DOUBLE TRACK 



MAP OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN SYSTEM — 1908. 




1 



r 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 

Los Angeles 
This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 




ivaan# 



ivHaiw 




IVER% 



^LOS-ANGEL£j> 



UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY 





AA 000 525 111 





\ \| i£mm*Kam±. — r— 






,i 




























'!»!! iliiv 



f