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Full text of "The origin and services of the 3rd (Montreal) Field Battery of Artillery : with some notes on the artillery of by-gone days, and a brief history of the development of field artillery"


 


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THE 3 RD (MONTREAL) FIELD BATTERY 


. . ITS. . 


ORIGIN AND SERVICES. 



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LIECTEXAXT-COLONEL A. A. STEVEXSOX 



THE 


ORIGIN ANI) SER\TICES 


OF rllE 


3 rd (montr
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WITH sO:\IF. K( ITES ox 


THE ARTILLERY OF BV-GO:'JE D:\ YS, AND A BRIEF HISTORY 
OF THE DE\TELOP:\IENT OF FIELD ARTILLERY. 


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CAPT.-\IX ER:'JEST J. C HA:\IBERS 


1st PR':>OCE OF \\' H.ES REGDIFNT, Fl'SII.IliR
 


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II And down goes all ht:fore him." 


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MONTREAL 


E. L. ReDDY, [674 :'JOTRE D.\:\rF. STREET 
Plï3LISHER 


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CHAPTER P-\l;E 
I The .\rtillery of By-Gone Days ':I 
II Organization of the Montreal Field Battery 16 
III The Earliest Days of the Battery 3 0 
IV On Service During the Fenian Raith, . 4 2 
V Service in Aid of the Civil power 56 
VI The \Vork and Changes of Recent Years. 62 
VII The Battery as It is To-day 7 2 
VII [ Some Official Recognitions of Efficienq 75 
List of Officers . 81 
Roll of Honour 82 



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PREFACE ! 
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It is IIlO..t lIleet we ann us 'gainst the foe: 
For peace it<;eIf should not so dull a kingdom, 
But that rlefences. musters, preparations 
Should he maintained. assembled and collected, 
.\s \\ere a war in expectation. 
IIE"õRY Y. ACT II, SCF::\;F.-t. 


""e haye it on no less an authority than that of Colond h'or Herbert, at oue 
time Commauder-in-Chief of the Acti,-e Militia Force of Canada that the 
\rtillen' 
is the most efficient branch of the Dominion's defensive force. This fact being 
conceded, a short history of one of the oldest and most efficient corps in the most 
efficient branch of the service should be welcome to all interested in the Canadian 
l\1ilitia, as helping to sho\\' how the found-ations of that efficiency were laid, and 
how developed. 
I venture to express the hope with all modesty, and with a lively appreciation 
of the defects which must exist in any hurried historical compilation of this 
character, that this book will prove not merely interesting, but also useful, to the 
members of the 3rd Field Battery. 
Anyone who has taken an intelligent interest in military affairs knows that 
esprit de corps has as much practical effect upon the efficiency of any kind of a 
military organization as has its drill, its dicipline, its interior economy, and e,-eu 
'its equipment. 
There has always been a sturdy, honest corps spirit 111 the l\1ontreal Field 
Battery, officers and men being proud of their battery and of themselYes. 
I venture to hope that these pages \\-ill help to show them that their pride in the 
past record of their fine corps is \\'en founded, and assist in keepiug the com- 
mendable spirit alive in the Battery for all time. 



Here I would like to remark that it appears to me that by asslstmg every 
military corps ill the couutry to write up to date, and keep written up, its re.:ord of 
sen'ices from the very beginning, the Militia Department could do mnch in the 
direction of improving the efficiency of the Force. Had records of the services 
rendered by the Quebec Frontier Battalions in the defence of this conntry been 
presen-ed and published. very shame would have pre,-ented the loyal people of the 
frontier counties from allowing their historical battalions, with gallantly earned 
battle honours on their colours. to die for lack of popular support. 
\\Thile thanking all who have assisted me in the preparation of this little 
book, I ,,'ould especially like to express my gratification at being privileged to 
embody in these pages what might be described as the military memoirs of that 
splendid old Canadian soldier, Lieutenant-Colonel A. A. Stevenson, a man known 
from one end of this country to the other not less for his open-handed hospitality, 
his exceptional urbanity and his good work in municipal life as an Alderman of the 
'City of :\lontreal, than for his exceptionally ,'alllable services in the Acti,'e :\lilitia. 
:\lost of the information I have embodied in the chapters on the Earliest Days 
of the Battery, the Fenian Raids, and Service in aid of the Ci,'il Power was given 
to me, during a series of interviews, by Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson. and militia- 
men everywhere, particularly when they are aware of its source, will regard it as a 
valuable contribution toward the military history of Canada. 


ERXEST J. CHA:MBERS. 
3SA Park A,-enue, 
Montreal, Qne. 


August 31st. 1898. 


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A CARD ()F THANT<S 


DI T is but uatnral, that, as cOlUmanding o/licer 01 the Third Field Battery, I 
should ayail myself of the opportunity presented by the publication of this 
history of the corps to express in a public and enduring way the thanks of 
myself and the officers. non-commissioned officers. and men of my command. to 
those whose assistance and hard work haye accomplished such a satisfactory result. 
First I must express the gratitude of all ranks in the Battery to the kind and 
generous friends whose subscriptions haye enabled us to oyercome the great finan- 
cial difficulties attending such an undertaking as this. 
I have also great pleasure in expressing the thanks due to former members of 
the Battery who have contributed the information on which the history of our 
organintion has been framed. 
All who read these pages will. I am sure, agree with me that the Battery has 
been fortunate in securing as its historian Captain Chambers, an officer who, since 
his joining the old High School Cadet Rifles as a boy, has taken a constant. active 
and intelligent interest in 
Iilitia matters, and whose pen. as a journalist, has 
always been devoted to what he considered to be the best interests of the Force. 
I venture to say that this is one of the most interesting of the series of corps 
histories contributed to military literature by Captain Chambers, and it is safe to 
predict that the result of his researches as presented in the following pages will be 
perused with general interest. and will have for all time a stimulating effect upon 
the esprit de corps of the Battery. 
I feel that it is moreO\'er incumbent upon me to pnblicly thank the publisher. 
:\lr. E. L. Ruddy, for the conscientious way in which he has executed his part of 
the work. :\Ir. Ruddy has done all he agreed to do and more, and the splendid manner 
in which the book has been brought out is creditahle alike to his conscientious 
effort and to his good taste. 


RICH \RD COSTIGAX. :\Iajor, 
Commanding the Third Field Battery. 



THE GUERTIN PRINTING COMPANY 
MONTREAL 



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THE ARTILLERY OF BY-GONE DAYS. 


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ì' HE artillery has held a most conspicuous place in the British 
:: , r Am.I}" for years, though the present regiment of Royal 
h
' ,9 ArtIllery dates no further back than May, 17 16 . 

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 According to Richard's history of Ht.'r l\Iajesty's Army, 
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anization 
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 wInch represents the hIstory of the Ordnance pnor to the 
--,:' , :9 above date, there stands boldly out the record of what 
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' \ English gunners did in by-gone days and in the battles of the olden 

 (.? .'" '\'1 time. English guns thundered-or tried to thunder-at Yannes and 
ì ':'"J '. Crecy, Agincourt and Falaise, at the Battle of the Spurs, at Flodden 
I z !l l 
 Field, in the battlt,'S fought by \\ïlliam and Marlborough, in the 
!It >' 
 early Jacobite struggles in .Ireland and Scotla
Id.. But it. is littl
 
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ore than the bare fact. whIch appears; the 
nncIpal detaIls surn- 
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 V1Ilg are those of \\'eansome orders of an l1lcompetent Board of 
Ordnance, displaying carelessness and ignorance, and jobbery and 
all the evil propensities of red tape lÌz exælcÙ. Strange and unfamiliar names 
and offices, of persons and things, are discernible in this blurred record, continuing, 
some of them, into the period of nascent order. \Ve read of robinets and minions, 
of cuh-erins and basi1iskes; the men who worked or were responsible for these 
strang-e sounding weapons were matrosses, artificers, petardiers, master gunners, 
chief bomhadiers, fireworkers, over aU of whom was a chief firemaster. 


9 



The Royal Fusiliers were raised in 1685 for the special protection of the 
English gunners, who were at that date civilian artificers. All the Fusilier 
regiments were originally intended for the special protection of the artillery, 
and the grenade is still borne by them in memory of this ancient service. 
Though artillery had been in use in British armies for over four hnndred 
years the artillerymen ,,'ere not yet regarded as soldiers, but as mechanics 
depending upon other soldiers for protection. But, however regarded, it is a matter 
of history that they had rendered splendid aid to the state. Cannon are said to 
have been used by the English armies on the continent iu the reign of Henry III, 
1216- 12 7 2 , and were unquestionably nsed at the capture of Berwick by Ed,,'ard 
III in 1333. At Crecy, 1346, and at Calais, the following year, Edward IY used 
fonr cannon against his French enemies; and the l\Ioors are said to have used 
cannon in defending Algeciras in 1343. The Board of Ordnance was first con- 
stitnted during the reign of Elizabeth, about 1597, bnt as far back as I4I4 the 
ordnance possessed by England was superintended by a ., Master of the 
Ordnance." The word ordnance ,'"as derived from the "Ordinance" or law 
anciently made to regulate the bore, size and bulk of the artillery. (Capt. Perry's 
hook on Rank, Badges and Dates.) 
Though the first use of English artillery appears to ha,'e been in the field, 
the organi/.ation of the artillery, when such was attempted, appears to have been 
directed to\mrds the recognizing only of the garrison branch. The l\Iaster Gen- 
eral of Ordnance had the control of all the master gnnners and gunners of the 
various garrisons, but held no command in the field without being specially 
appointed. In 1755 a train of field artillery was organized in l\Iadras, and in 179 8 
the companies of the Regiment of Royal Irish Artillery, the snccessors of the 
detachment of the Royal Artillery sent to Dublin in 1755, ""ere divided into 
" Heavy" (Siege) and" Light" (Field). The Light had four six-pounders each. 
The guns and waggons were horsed and driven by the" Driver Corps." 
The corps of Royal Artillery drivers was established in I 793, gradually 
reduced after the peace of 1814 and finally abolished iu 1822. rntil 1815 the 
officers were not Royal Artillerymen, and the rank and file were never artillery- 
men. The officers of the Driver Corps were styled "Corps of Captain COl11mis- 
saries." Until 1794 the men were styled "Royal \Vaggoners." In 1RI4 
there were twelve troops of these men. It was found during the Peninsular \Var 
that the divided allegiance of the Dri,'er Corps caused frequent difficulties in the 
field batteries. Towards the end of that campaign the officers of the Driver 
Corps were only allO\\"ed full control over their men in matters of pay and 
subsistence. 
Pp to so recent a date as 1877 there were no permanent Field batteries in 
the British regular service, garrison companies being detailed for field dnty when 
required. The nnwieldiness of the field gnns used at Falkirk in 1745 forced on 
an improvement in this arm. In 1746 two artillery companies were sent to 
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HIS EXCELI.E;\/C\' THE (;(n'I!.RNOR-(;ENERAJ. OF CANAnA 
THE EAR'. OF J\I'NTO, D.C., K,C.M.G. 



Flanders, and for a short time two three-pounder guns were attached to each of 
the seven infantry battalions on active service on that campaign. During the 
next two years three more companies were sent, and there were thirty-two six- 
pounders serving with the infantry battalions. The guns were as a rule attached 
in pairs, under a subaltern and two non-commissioned officers, to the different 
infantry battalions. One waggon accompanied each pair of guns. These guns 
seriously impeded the movements of the infantry, and sometimes had to be 
abandoned altogether. Their los<; diminished the confidence of all the infantry 
,d1O had been trained to consider their assistance necessary. In 1795 the" Bat- 
talion" (Field) guns marched past at the head of the regiments to which they 
were attached. The ammunition wag-gon follo,,-ed the column. At this period 
the artillerymen of the Battalion guns in Ireland were required to instruct in each 
infantry regiment at least thirty rank and file under a subaltern and two 
sergeants. 
In I79 R there were a large quantity of field guns in the British service, but 
a marked deficiency of trained gunners and horses. The British field artillery 
steadily improved during the Peninsular \Yar, until it was acknowledged to be the 
best in Europe. Its value was much enhanced by the use of Colonel Shrapnel's 
shells. \Vhen \Vaterloo brought peace to war-sick Europe, there were no less 
than I I4 troops and companies of field artillery. 
Among the ordnance stores sent out in the early days of artillery were 
numerous sets of men-harness, and in many cases the guns were drawn by drag- 
rope instead of horses. The first pieces used by the British in America were so 
moved about. 
Artillery played no important part in the wars of the French and English 
colonists against the Indians. This is natural considering the insurmountable 
difficulties of transport. But when the war which resulted in the conquest of 
Canada began, the importance of maintaining artillery iu the field in spite of 
untrodden forests and almost impassable bogs was realized by both combatants, 
but especially, apparently, by the British. \Vhen Braddock arrived at Alexandria, 
Virginia, to conduct his fatal expedition to tllt: Ohio Yalley there were sent him 
from Ireland the 44th and 48th Regiments and the battalion guns attached to 
them, manned by a detachment of fifty men of the regiment of artillery. The 
French do not appear to have been so careful to keep their colonial forces supplied 
with ordnance. \\Thell the French were in possession of Fort Beausejour they 
had no artillery; hut they managed to dccei,'e their watchful enemies in Fort 
Lawrence, near by. They prO\'ided sections of trunks of hirch, maple and other 
hard, well-grown trees, which they shaped and bored after the fashion of cannon, 
securing them from end to end with cordage, and from one of these they regularly 
fired a morning and evening gun as is customary in garrisons. Upon the reduc- 
tion of the place by l\Ionckton, an enquiry was made for the cannon, and it was 
then discovered how the force in Fort Lawrence had been deceived. 


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:\[-\JOR-CF.XERAT, E. T. H. HrTTO;\/, C,E., A.D.C. ro TH
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C(nDI.-\NPIX.. THF 
"',ITIA OF CAXAUA 



The French authorities appear to have made no earnest effort to establish an 
artillery force in connection with their very comprehensive militia system, which 
under the law of fiefs made all the male inhabitants, with a very few exceptions, 
liable for military service. The theory of the French authorities appeared to be 
that if they could depend upon the population of the colony for participation in 
their campaigns as voyageurs or guerillas that was all that they would require. 
They were consequently not even drilled to any extent in infantry tactics. But, 
according to General Murray's report, an artillery company was organized in 
Quebec, for he reports on the militia organization of the French regime as 
follows :-" The militia were generally reviewed once or twice a year to inspect 
their arms. The militia of the City of Quebec were frequently exercised, and the 
company of artillery every Suuday were exercised at the great gUll practice, nnder 
the orders and directions of the artillery sergeant-major of the King's troops." 
The first use made of British field artillery in America, ,,-hile failing to 
prevent the disaster of Fort du Quesne, reflected great credit upon the artillery- 
men. \Ye read that on that fatal day when Braddock's force was ambushed, 
when the infantry regiments staggered and hesitated under the deadly fire suddenly 
poured upon them from the dense covert, the artillery, although without orders, 
pressed to the front, and their leading guns, the field pieces attached to the 44 th 
Regiment, plied the thickets with grape and cannister, but in a few minutes all 
the officers and most of the gunners were stretched bleeding upon the field. How, 
after the guns had been thus silenced, the panic became a rout, and how the 
artiJIery shared the fate of the wounded and all the baggage, including the luck- 
less general's private papers, is familiar to every reader of Canadian history. 
The artillery of the British forces operating during this war was used to 
more purpose in other and more suitable fields. \Vhen Baron Dieskau and his 
veteran French soldiers made their spirited attack upon the British entrench- 
ments on Lake George (1755) they were checked by Johnson's guns, and disheartened 
by finding the position armed with artillery. After several gallant attacks they 
dispersed in the forest leaving their leader mortall y wounded on the field. 
All of the British expeditions of any account appear to have had detachments 
of field artillery, though the difficulty of moving the guns through the vast tracts 
of forests, hampered them considerably in their progress. \Vhen Abercromby, 
with presumptuous haste, rashly precipitated his splendid infantry against Mont- 
calm's lines of abatis in rear of the fort at Ticonderoga, committing them thereby 
to certain and complete annihilation, his artillery was, on acconnt of bad roads, 
yet lagging in the rear. The artiJIery officers in charge of the II Battalion" field 
guns were doing their best to overcome the natural obstacles, and if the impetuous 
general had waited for a few hours until the guns came up and had used them 
properly, the British army would probably have been spared one of the most 
disastrous defeats in its history. Some authorities of the time said that one hour 
of well plied artiJIery would have swept 
lolltcalm's rude barrier away, Lord Mahon 
14 



saying in his history that Abercromby was either misinformed or presnmptuous 
to expect to force this strong position by infantry alone, and attacking without 
awaiting his artillery. 
\Vhen in 1759 Amherst undertook the task in which Abercromby had failed, 
the conquest of Canada by Lakes George and Champlain and the Richelieu, his 
large army included one hundred and eleven of the Royal Artillery, having under 
charge fifty-four pieces of ordnance of various descriptions. The French forces 
opposed to him appear to have been well supplied with artillery such as it was. 
\Vhen de Bourlemaque, after abandoning Ticonderoga and Crown Point, made a 
stand at Isle aux Noix, he still had a hundred pieces of cannon, but only a small 
proportion were suitable for field service. The French did 110t appear to place 
the same importance upon the use of field guns as did the British. The day 
when \V olfe broke the backbone of French power in Canada on the Plains of 
Abraham great exertions were used to get field guns up the cliff to support the 
immortal line of infantry. The sailors of the fleet, by almost superhuman efforts, 
succeeded in getting one small piece hoisted up to the historic plateau and it 
rendered useful service during the battle which was precipitated almost as soon 
as it was got into position. The French would have had no such difficulty in 
takiug a large number of field pieces into action with them, but as a matter of 
fact they only used two. It would be hard to credit such evident neglect did we 
not find it distinct! y stated in Townseud's official report to Pitt after the action. 
The lone British field gun which helped to make history on that memorable 
13 th of September, though hoisted up the cliffs with the assistance of the sailors 
of the fleet, was served during the battle by the artillery, and the detachment 
casualty list sho\\"s that the gunners got their share of the hard knocks. It was 
as follows :-Killed, one gunner; wounded, one" engineer", one bombadier, one 
gunner, five matrosses (assistant gunners or ammunition handlers), One of the 
two field pieces taken into action by :\Iontcalm was captured by the victors, and 
during the final stages of the action the sailors succeeded in hoisting another gun 
up the cliff. By the e,.elling of the 17th no less than sixty-one pieces of heavy 
and fifty-seven of light ordnance were mounted on British batteries on the Plains 
of Abraham and ready to open fire upon the city. On the [8th, Quebec surren- 
dered and the Louisburg Grenadiers marched in, preceded by a detachment of 
Arti11ery and one gun, with the British flag hoisted on a staff upon the carriage. 
This flag was then hoisted upon the highest point of the Citadel to demonstrate 
that the British were in occupation. 


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CHAPTER II 


ORGANIZATIO:-J OF THE 
lO
TREAL FIELD BATTERY. 


S soon as Canada had passed under Briti..,h rule, within a 
couple of "eeks of the capitulation of l\Iontreal to General 
Amherst in fact, King George's officers set seriously to 
work to secure the organization of a militia force in 
Canada. ender the French regime Canada had had 
a most comprehensive and useful militia system, a system 
which had produced a force of gal1ant and hardy men that had 
done not a litt1e to \'"ard off the day of ultimate conquest. The 
military administrators appointed immediately after the insti- 
tution of British rule set themselves assiduously to ""ork to 
organize a British Canadian militia upon the ruins and the 
:> 
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 actual lines of the old French colonial militia. It is a remark- 
_
 j -- _ able feature of the British colonial policy whether in the Far 
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 East, the Far \Vest or the Far South, that the British admin- 
,.-- istrators have ShO\\11 enough confidence in themselves and in 
2-.... the people of foreign blood made fellow subjects by conquest, to 
--, 
place anns in the hands of the latter and rely upon them doing 
their share towards the protection of the Union Jack. And this practice has 
unquestionably had much to do with the success of Britain's colonial policy. 
That the British conquerors were willing to return to the officers of the militia 
their anus and their commissions, simply upon their taking the oath of al1egiance 
to their new sovereign, must have been soothing to the pride of a proud people 
like the French Canadian noblesse, and they were none the slower to appreciate 
this mark of confidence in them when they considered the ungracious treatment 
they had received at the hands of the officers of the French regular army and the 
servants of the old civil administration. 
The first mi1itia organization under British rule in Canada was, strange as 
it may seem at first glance, instituted rather to facilitate the administration of 
justice than to provide an effective military organization for the defence of the 
newly acquired colony. Some kind of a judiciary had to be established, and 
naturally the army officers had more faith in the military element in the com- 
munity than in any other. The professional instinct is more keenly developed 
16 



in military men than in any other class perhaps, and it is but natural that snch 
should be the case. So the militia captains of the old French regime, after taking 
the oath of aIlegiance \vere authorized to sit as judges in certain cases in their 
districts, and their sergeants acted as criers, bailiffs, constables, etc. 
But it was not long before Canadian militia were enroIled for military duties. 
Amherst's army took possession of :\Iontreal after the capitulation of Canada 
September'Sth, Ii60, and in l\Iarch, Ii64, an order was issued for the enroIIment 
of two companies of militia in the "Government" of Quebec, h\"O in that of 
:\Iontreal and one in that of Three Rivers. The occasion, of course, was the 
Indian uprising in the \Vest, known in history as the Conspiracy of Pontiac. 
Disputes ha\.ing arisen as to the validity of the old French militia commis- 
sions, and civil government having been in the meantime established in Canada, 
an ordinance was proclaimed by Governor :\Iurray, in Ii6S, declaring that" the 
keeping up of a militia in this Province at this juncture is not necessary. , . . ." 
and ordaining that .. on the establishment of British Civil Government in this 
PrO\"ince, the militia before that time established in the same was thereby abolished 
and taken away to all intents and purposes whatsoever. . . ." 
Carleton organized a militia for the defence of Canada at the time of the 
American Revolution, and some of the militia corps fought valiantly, at St. Johns, 
at Quebec and at other places. Three hundred of the l\Iontrealmilitia fonned the 
greater part of the force with which l\Iajor Carden captured Ethan AIlen and his 
force of Yennonters near Longue Pointe. After the war the militia organizations 
were disbanded. Acts providing for the organization of a militia were passed in 
Ii S 4 and IiS6, but the militia provided for was purely a sedentary one, and existed 
on paper only. The legislation passed by the assemblies of both epper and 
Lo,,"er Canada prO\"iding for the organization of the militia. and the prominent parts 
taken by the militia of those days in the \\Tar of [S12 and in the suppression of 
the Rebelliun of IS37-38 are matters of general history. 
Canadian militiamen assisted to man the guns in Quebec at the time of 
Montgomery's assault, but it was not until IS12 that a regularly organized militia 
artillery corps was established in the then two provinces of Canada. This was a 
garrison artillery company at Montreal, which the 2nd Regiment of Canadian 
ArtiIIery now regard as the original of their present organintion. Probably the 
oldest artiIIery corps in the Dominion of Canada as it stands to-day is the 3 rd 

ew Brunswick Regiment of Canadian Artillery, which claims direct descent 
from the" Loyal Company of ArtiIIery" organized at St. John, l\Iay 4th, Ii93. 
According to Sir James Lemoine, whose historical researches in the Quebec 
district ha\'e been practicaIIy invaluable, an artiIIery corps of three companies 
known as the Royal Quebec Volunteer ArtiIIery, existed at the Ancient Capital 
in I83i. The uniform was identical with that of the Royal ArtiIIery. This corps 
""as composed of a fine set of men, officered like tbe infantry by young merchants 
and professional men, \\"110, having been instructed by the regulars, acquired 
Ii 



great proficiency, particularly in the art of gunnery, and handled the cannotf 
around the battlement \\'a11s in a most creditable manner, forming an important 
part of the selTice for garrison duty. 
It was not until r855 that field artiUery figured in the Canadian militia lists. 
As a matter of fact it is doubtful that such a thing as a militia field battery existed 
in any sen'ice before that date. It wiU be remembered that r854 was the date of 
the opening of the Crimean \\Tar, when Britain and France made common cause 
against Russian aggression, and a general war appeared impending. J;3ritain was 
especially unprepared for the contest. During the long peace that had fol1owed 
the tremendous victory of the Iron Duke 
at \ \' aterloo, the arm y had been al10wed 
to dwindle away, and the equipment was of 
the worst, while the administration of the 
Army \\'as extremely deficient. Every train- 
ed soldier and e\'ery field gun in Canada was 
needed in the Crimea, and this at a time 
\\'hen military protection for this country 
might be reqnired at any moment. The 
Home government at this crisis practical1y 
depended upon this country to protect itself, 
and the people were equal to the occasion. 
The organi/.ation of several corps of militia 
was authorized, among them the Montreal 
Field Battery. 
The chief credit for the organization of this 
corps belonged to Major \\'. F. Coffin. That 
gentleman was a man of large general inform- 
ation and had the advantage of a generous 
education. He was a man of many parts. 
He had held an important appointment in the 
From a Dagu.';'o;;; Court House at l\Iontreal, had been entrusted 
Inn.-wl. \\1111-"1 "'''h
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IIKST t,;'O'\-I'\I-\"IH'<<. ()J.J.[CFR OJ. THF 1\[():'IoITH.....-\L 
11111' nHfl ,,'- offices and was at the head of the railway 
running from Caughnawaga to Plattsburg, one of the oldest railways in Canada. 
He \\'as named by the government to administer and genera11y look after the 
valuable property turned over by the Imperial government to the Colonial one, 
and he finally disposed of the principal land areas. He held various other im- 
portant appointments under the old administration and the later Colonial govern- 
ment. He was a wealthy man, owning large tracts of land in the Eastern 
Townships. ì\Irs. Coffin, a fine old lady of the old stamp, is stil1 liying in 
ì\lontreal, bright and intel1igent in spite of her eighty-seyen years. 1\1r. T. C. 
Coffin, manager of the Quehec office of the Quebec Bank is a son. 


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The transactions of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec, an institu- 
tion whose publications are of the greatest interest to all students of Canadian 
history, for the session of 1872-73, contained a paper by Lieut.-Colonel Coffin on 
"Some additional incidents in connection ,,"ith the siege and blockade of Quebec, 
in IïïS-76." 
From this it appears that the grandfather, father and two uncles of the organ- 
izer of the Montreal Field Battery were aU present in Quebec during the siege; and 
the fortner took a very active part in that notable event. 
The ancestry of the founder of the Battery, it appears from the cleverly 
written paper mentioned above, was ,,"orthy of the brave and loyal corps he 
established. 
John Coffin, the grandfather of the l\Iajor, though an unobtrusive, undemon- 
strative man was a resolute loyalist. Born and brought up in Boston, in the years 
before the historical tea party in Boston Harbour, he resisted the revolution, and 
made himself so obnoxious to tbe revolutionists that he was by name proscribed, 
and his property confiscated by act of the l\Iassachusetts Legislature, September, 
I ïï8. Forewarned by friends, and taking time by the forelock, he freighted a 
schooner, of wbich he was part owner, with his family and worldly goods, and 
coasted round from Boston to Quebec, where he must have arrived in or about 
June, IïïS, for the follo,,-ing month he purchased a piece of land under Cape 
Diamond. 
According to Sir James Lemoine " In the United Empire Loyalists, the \Var of 
Independence added a most noticeable element of prosperity and refinement to the 
population of Canada. Some 10,000 staunch adherents of the British Crown came 
across the Border, or penetrated by ship to New Brunswick and No,"a Scotia. These 
brave men had sacrificed fortune and position to consistency, and their allegiance to 
King George; and King George, as a good and paternal so,-ereign, indemnified them 
by pensions, land grants, honours, and emoluments, to the best of the ability of 
the British exchequer." It must be remembered that the British exchequer was not 
in anything like so sound a position in Iïï7 as it is to-day. 
After purchasing his Quebec property, l\Ir. John Coffin went to work at once 
to establish a distillery, when his lanours were interrupted by the American 
invasion in September; and from that time to the end of the siege of Quebec, his 
infant industry was paralyzed. Nor was this the sturdy loyalist's only trouble at 
the time. A brig belonging to him had been detained by the British consul at 
Lisbon for six months, as being the property of a rebel, though at this very time he 
was carrying a bro,,"n bess for His Majesty at Quebec. 
To what effect he carried his musket in the King's service is shown by docu- 
ments which speak for themselves. His services attracted attention in quarters 
capable of appreciating them, as is shown by the following letter received by l\Ir. Coffin 
from Colonel Allan l\Iaclean, 87th Regiment, who commanded the heroic garrison 
of Quebec during the siege of I ïï 5-76 :- 
19 



"Ql1FBEC, 28 JULY, 1776. 


" Sir :- 
" As I am, in a few days, going to England with despatches from the Commander- 
in-Chief, I should be glad to know if I could be of any service to you. Power to do 
you any material service I have none; but your conduct during the siege of Quebec, 
last winter and spring, makes it a duty on my part to gi,-e you my testimony and 
approbation of every part of your conduct. Truth must always have some weight 
with His Majesty and his ministers, who, I am certain, wish to re,,'ard deserving 
men like you. To your resolution and watchfulness on the night of December 3 1st , 
1775, in keeping the guard at Pres-de-Yille under anns, ,,'aiting for the attack 
,,-hich you expected; the great coolness ,,-ith which you allowed the rebels to 
approach: the spirit which your example kept up among the men, and the very 
critical instant in which you directed Captain Bamsfare's fire against 
Iontgomery 
and his troops,-to these circumstances alone I do ascribe the repulsing of the 
rebels from that important post, where, with their leader, they lost all heart. 
" The resolutions you entered into, and the arrangements you made to maintain 
that post, when told you were to be attacked from another quarter, were worthy of 
a good subject, and would have done honor to an experienced officer. I thought it 
incumbent upon me to leave with you this honorable testimony of your services, as 
matters that were well knO\\"11 to myself in particular; and I should be happy, at 
any time, to have it in my power to be useful to you; and do assure you that I am, 
with truth and regard, sir, your most obedient and most humble sen'ant, 


"Mr. Coffin. 


(Signed,) ALI..\
 l\IAcLEAX." 


This generous testimony, on the part of Colonel Maclean, sufficiently estab- 
lishes the share which John Coffin took in the defence of the Pres-de-Ville. He was 
not in command; he was not an officer; he was simply a volunteer soldier defend- 
ing the hearthstone of his Canadian home. Other Canadian ,'olunteers, thousands 
of them, have given their life blood for the same cause. 
Lieut.-Col Henry Cald,,'ell, who commanded the "British" l'Iilitia (English 
speaking residents of Quebec) during the siege, certifies by a document given under 
his hand, ßlay, 17R7, that" John Coffin, Esq. served in the British militia under 
my command, during the siege of this town by the rebels, from November, 1775, to 
l\Iay, 177 6 ; during all of which time he conducted himself and behaved with the 
greatest spirit, zeal and activity in the King's service, which, by his example, was 
very much promoted, particularly on the attack of the 31st December, when he very 
much distinguished himself." . 
The same officer in another letter wrote that soon after the enemy was repulsed 
on the Pres-de-Ville side" some old women brought an account that the rebels had 
surprised the post at Sault-au-l\Iatelot, and had got into the lower town. Part of the 
garrison, that had lately behaved so well, were struck with a panic, and began, some 
to hide their anns, and some to throw them into the rh-er. The officer began to 
20 



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1\1AJOR RICH \RD COSTII;AX 
CO
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I{)r-. fRJo;AL Flfo;'.I> IIATTfo;RY 



feel a little frightened, when a t\Ir. Coffin, a British gentleman, who, with his wife 
and t,,'eh'e children had taken refuge there, expecting to find there peace and 
quietness, and who had served previously in our militia, drew his bayonet, and 
declared he would put the first man to death who laid down his arms or who attempted 
to abandon his post; by which means he re-established order, and with the assist- 
ance of Captain Barnsfare (a ship captain), who commanded the seamen, got two of 
the guns pointed at the opposite sides, in case Arnold's people, having got into the 
Lo,,"er-Town, should attempt to force the post on that side." 
Sir Guy Carleton, in a letter dated December 25th, I ï79, had the following to 
say about t\lr. Coffin :-" Ha,-ing observed in all his conduct, from his arrival in 
the PrO\-ince of Quebec till I left it, a constant attachment and zeal for the King's 
sen"ice, as well as the manner of a prudent, worthy man, I could not but interest 
myself for him. Yet his conduct and judicious behaviour on the morning of the 
:)[st December, 1775, gave him a still stronger claim on me; for to him, ,,'ith the 
assistance of Barnsfare, I attribute the repulse of the rebels on the side of Quebec, 
where t\I r. l\Iontgomery attacked in person; while the success on the otherside was 
very different and brought the town into no small danger. 
ow, whether we con- 
sider the strength of this post, the number allotted to its defence, or the fortner 
sen-ices of the officer who commanded, we might have expected as much, at least, 
from him,-a remarkable proof, this, that former services and greater numbers may 
be outdone by superior ,"igilance and good sense of gentlemen, though not used 
to arms." 
Colonel Coffin's grandfather must certainly be credited then with a prominent 
part in one of the most momentous military achievements in Canadian history. It 
""as a most critical time for British rule in Canada. 
As Colonel Coffin himself puts it in the paper quoted :-" Un that memorable 
win ter morning, the flame of fidelity to the British empire, paling throughout the 
.\merican continent, flickered uncertainly over the walls of Quebec. At midnight 
the desperate Arnold had forced the St. Roch suburb and the Lower Town, and 
although obstinately resisted, doggedly fough t on, hoping and looking for a junction 
with Montgomery. An hour later, and a resolute volley had decided the fate of a 
great country. The brave Montgomery was slain,-his detachment annihilated; 
Arnold \'"as wounded; the American arm)' was in full retreat. Quebec had been 
saved, and the flickering flame of fidelity to the British empire blazed up therefrom, 
thenceforth and forever, a beacon of light, inextinguishable in Canada." 
If heredity counted for anything, the government of the day could depend upon 
the gentleman entrusted with the organintion of the Montreal Field Battery doing 
his duty. 
Major Coffin organized the Battery on the authorization and order of the Hon. 
George l\Ioffat, who, at the time, was in command of the Active Force of the Mon- 
treal district. As soon as he received his order, Major Coffin invited Mr. Henry 
Hogan, then a young man, to join the corps as lieutenant. 
22 



rp to this date such fe,," yolunteer corps as existed in Canada ,,'ere not guided 
by any clearly defined la""s and rules, and many injustices occurred. l\Ir. Hogan 
had commanded a volunteer cayalry troop in l\Iontreal some time previous to the 
passage of the militia act of 1855, and had devoted considerable time and means to 
it. \Vhen the old active force, under the new act, assumed a permanent fonn, a 
gentleman named Ramsay ,,'as sent to England to learn the drill, and when he 
returned, he was promoted over l\Ir. Hogan's head. The latter, naturally, felt 
aggrieved at this and resigned, and did not feel disposed to rejoin the reorganized 
force as an officer of the new Field Battery. But Hon. :\Ir. 
Ioffat joined 
Iajor 
Coffin in his request that l\Ir. Hogan should 
join the battery, and after considerahle persua- 
sion, he agreed. 'Lieut.-Col. Hogan says he 
never regretted his decision, for :\Iajor Coffin 
was a splendid officer and a perfect gen tIeman, 
and it ""as a pleasure to serve under him. He 
showed great confidence in his subaltern, and 
for a time the battery was left pretty much in 
his hands. 
The first officers of the Battery were 
l\Iajor \V. F. Coffin, Captain Henry Hogan, 
Lieutenant A. Lamontagne and Second 
Lieutenants Hobbs and Owen. The latter was 
formerly British l\Iail Officer. Dr. Fenwick -, I
'" 
. 
was the Surgeon. The first instructor ""as an 
 
old Royal Artillery Sergeant named Logan. .. 
The senior surviving officer of the original , .' ""'.... 
battery is Lieut.-Culonel Henry Hogan, who, "','" 
still hale and hearty, is a familiar figure to all I 
citizens of l\Iontreal, and whose name is 
familiar to travellers from one end of the 
world to the other. F..om a Dague....eotype 
The senior non-commissioned officer of r rWT.'C<>L. HE'-'" HOGAN, 
the Battery at its organization was A. A. emJ\r '''DlNL >"'NTKF. \I AKTJI.r FR\, 1>'56-""" 
Stevenson, since then kno,,'n throughuut the length and breadth of Canada as 
Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson, a man who has done more for the l\Iontreal Field 
Battery in particular and the l\Iilitia force in general than any man whu ever wore 
uniform. The gallant colonel had no idea of taking any interest in military 
matters at the time he ""as induced to join the Battery, and he gave in his name to 
Major Coffin against his own best judgment almost. Colonel Stevenson related 
the circumstances connected with his joining the Battery in such an interesting 
way that I cannot do better than giye his o""n words. He said:- 
" \Vhen the militia act was passed in 1855, and they spoke about organizing a 


23 


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field battery of artillery in l\Iontreall had not the slightest idea of taking any part 
in it, in fact had no special fancy for military work. I had my own business to 
attend to. 
(lOne day I ,,'as in the Mechanics Institute, in which r took a great interest, 
\\.hen a gentleman came up to me and said he wanted to speak to me for a moment. 
He said that he was organizing, under the authority of the government, a battery 
of field artillery in 
Iontreal, and he had been advised to see me. He added that he 
wanted me to assist him to organize the corps. I replied at once that r had no idea 
of meddling in military matters at all. He, ho,,'e\'er, persisted, and sàid that it was 
the duty of every loyal man to prepare to do his duty. There was every prospect 
of trouble with the United States, and it must come sooner or later, he said. He 
pointed out that the men who were coming to the front across the lines were 
actuated by a violent antipathy to everything British, and they appeared anxious 
to pick a quarrel on the slightest pretext. 
(I He added that as trouble ,,'as coming it would be better to belong to an 
organized and disciplined corps when sent against an invader than to be one of an 
undisciplined mob. It would be better to have confidence in your comrades and to 
suffer from the men in front than from those in the rear. 
(I This was Major \V. F. Coffin, a man r had known, of course, but had had no 
previous personal communication with. He, at the time, or shortly before, held 
the office of Joint Sheriff of :\Iontreal with the late Mr. John Boston. He was a 
major before the organization of the battery. He was certainly well up in military 
matters, and some years later he wrote a " History of the \Var of r812." 
(I He urged me to consent, and on my still declining, he requested me to think 
it over for the night. r did give it some slight thought, but soon decided that I had 
no inclination for the work. But casually meutioning the matter to some of my 
friends, they asked me what there was to hinder me joining. It appeared to be a 
good chance, and if r refused to avail myself of it I might regret it. \Vell, I met 
him again, and he said he hoped I had made up my mind to help him. r told him 
I did not think soldiering would suit me at all. r was just then pretty deeply 
engrossed in business. I was a partner in a big printing establishment. \Ve had 
started the SU1l in r853, and it was still running. But the t\Jajor, at any rate, 
finally persuaded me to join, and at once began to talk over the question of the 
organintion of the battery. He entered into an exposition of all the difficulties 
ahead. \Ve wanted men of the right kind and \\'e wanted men ,,'ith horses. He had 
spoken to many, and some had agreed to jòin. Others Sàid they would if certain 
acquaintances would. vVe at once set to work to communicate with desirable men, 
and we made the best use of my printing office for sending out circulars, etc. 
Finally we obtained promises from many people, and the battery started with 
plenty of the very finest material at its disposal. 
" Before speaking to me, the major had arranged for all his officers, and told 
me that he regretted he had not know]] earlier that I would go in with him, for he 
24 



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OFFICERS OF ;{rd :\IUXTREAI. FIEI.D BATTER\ 


1 :\.IAJOR R COSTIGA" 
2 SrRGEON 
I.-\JOR C_ "'. WILSOX 
..:> CAPTAIN DO
ALD A. S'I1TH 


4 '.ETERIXARV CAPTAIN CHA
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IC'H.-\CHR.-\X 
5 I..IEUTE
.-\.'T F. A. CRATHERN 
6 I.IEI-TExAXT G. W. STI!PHE>lS. JR. 



would bave liked to have given me a commission. He, however, did the next best 
thing and made me senior staff sergeant, as he called it. His officers were Henry 
Hogan, a Mr. Owen, who lived for some time at Chambly, and a :\Ir. Lamontagne. 
The latter went to the States to live, and tbe major appointed in his place Mr. 
Henry Bulmer." 1\lr. Hobbs, who joined the Battery in the hope of receiving an 
appointment as an officer was disappointed, there being no vacancy for him. A 
meeting to recruit the battery was held at the Mechanics Institute on a notice issued 
by 1\lajor Coffin. It required seventy-five men for the battery, and the roll of 
enlistment at the first general meeting showed nearly one hundred and fifty names. 
Colonel Stevenson states that Major Coffin selected the best men for the Field 
Battery, and placed the names of the others on a supernumerary list. This enroll- 
ment of these supernumeraries finally resulted in the establishment of a company of 
foot artillery, attached to the Field Battery, the whole corps being designated "The 
Montreal Artillery". There had been an efficient garrison artillery corps in Mon- 
treal in 1837-38, and it had a nominal existence for many years later, bnt, at the 
time we are speaking of, the officers of the old garrison artillery, instead of joining 
the volunteer movement then inaugnrated, did nothing, expecting the government 
to make of their corps the basis of the new artillery force in i\Iontreal. But the gO\.- 
ernment did nothing of the kind, preferring to take the men who volunteered 
under the new act. The new l\lilitia Act came into force July 1st, 1855, but the 
Battery was not gazetted until September 27th. 
:\1r. \Villiam :\lastennan, Senior, another veteran ex-officer of the battery 
relates that among those who attended the first meeting in connection with the 
organization of the batte.y were several wen-known citizens alive to-day. Among 
them Henry Bulmer, vVilliam McGibbon, \Vm. Robb, at present City Treasurer of 
I\lontreal, T. VV. Boyd, A. A. Stevenson, Henry Hogan and himself. On the 
organization of the battery, :\Ir. :\Iasterman was made a sergeant, ranking after 
A. A. Stevenson, who was staff sergeant. 
Next to :\laj. Coffin, Mr. Masterman says, the greatest credit for the organization 
of the Battery was due to A. A. Stevenson, and more thanks are due to that gen- 
tleman for the maintenance of the corps on its fine footing than to all others put 
together. 1\1r. l\lasterman added that he left the battery after seven years service 
with the rank of First Lieutenant. He was offered the command of the Foot Com- 
pany but declined. 
The Militia Act of 1855 is officially designated" 18 Victoria, Chapter 77, An 
Act to Regulate the l\lilitia." It provided for the establishment of eighteen military 
districts, and defined the Active Militia as follows :_1' The Active Militia shall 
consist of Volunteer troops of cavalry, field batteries and foot companies of Artil- 
lery, and companies of infantry armed as riflemen, but not exceeding in the whole, 
sixteen troops of cavalry, seven field batteries of artillery, five foot companies of 
artillery, and fifty companies of riflemen, the total number not to exceed five 
thousand officers and men." 


26 



The Act also prm-ided that C( Each Field Battery shall consist of a captain, two 
first lieutenants, one second lieutenant, a sergeant major, three sergeants, three 
corporals, three bombardiers, a trumpeter, a farrier, fifty-nine gunners and drivers, 
including wheelers, collar maker and shoeing smith, fifty-six horses, exclusive of 
officers' horses, and four spare horses when the Battery is called into actual service." 
Section XXX\Trr of the Act read as follows :-" Each sergeant major of a 
volunteer battery of field arti1lery shall, on account of the great responsibility 
attached to the office, be paid by the Province at the rate of fifty pounds per annnm." 
Section CXY reads as follows :-" This Act shall come into operation upon the 
first day of July, 1855, and shall be in force for three years, and from thence until 
the end of the next ensuing session of the Parliament of this Province, and no longer; 


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TREH. FIEI.D B-\TTERY -\S IT W.-\S 'N 'S93. 
AR:\L-I.:\If;XT: FOITR 9-por"O)ER R,l\I.L. GrNs 


provided that if at the time when this Act would otherwise expire, there should 
happen to be war between Her :\Iajesty an4. the "Cnited States of America, then this 
Act shall continne in force until the end of the session of the Provincial Parliament 
next after the proclamation of peace between Her .l\Iajesty and the said enited 
States, and no longer." 
After enlisting the men, a good deal of time was consumed in making arrange- 
ments for the uniforms, etc. The officers finally selected a double breasted, blue 
frock coat, red-striped artillery trousers, somewhat similar to those worn now, and a 
black, shaggy, monkey skin head-dress, very much like the Fusilier bearskin, but 
with the front of the crown slightly projecting. It was originally intended that this 
head-dress should be devoid of omament, but Staff Sergeant Ste,-enson suggested that 
2í 



there should be something to relieve it, and the officers finally pitched upon a large 
bullion tassel which was suspended by a golden cord in front of the busby. This 
imposing head-gear was made by a man named McDowall, who had a fur establish- 
ment on l\IcGill street. The officers' uniforms were made by Gibb & Co., and the 
men's by Henry Lavender. 
At first the government gave the battery twenty days drill pay per annum, one 
dollar a day for each man and the same for each horse. In 1855, they received no 
drill pay, but received a double allowance in 1856. It was late whén they began 
drill the first year, but they did some work in foot drill, sword exercise, etc, in the 
East end of the Bonsecours l\Iarket Hall. Early in 1856, the Battery began gun 
drill, and drilled regularly under an old Royal Artillery Sergeant, named James 
Logan, whose son at present carries on business as watchmaker and jeweller, in 
Huntingdon. The Battery usually drilled on \Vednesday afternoons. This was 
the slack day for the men having business at the markets, and the Battery had a 
goodly number of them in the ranks, among whom were \Vm.l\1asterman, the three 
Baudens, Edward Charters, George l\lonaghan, Robert Nicholson, John Outhet, John 
Cooper, Christopher Breadon and others. Part of the season, the Battery drilled once 
a week, at other times twice a month, and so on, and this was the practice for several 
years. The horses were supplied to the Battery by Johnl\1cIntosh, Patrick Hughes, 
T. Lecompte, Thomas Potter, James Saunders and others. The Battery had 
foot drill every morning, at five o'clock, and had full parades. The corps 
drilled at the old Royal Artillery Quarters, at the Quebec Gate Barracks. 
It was the Spring of 1856 before the equipment of the Battery was complete, 
and the gunners could do all of their drill satisfactorily. The armament consisted 
of three six-pounder brass smoothbore guns and one twelve-pounder ho,,-itzer. The 
usual equipment of the field batteries in the regular army at that time included four 
six-pounders and two howitzers. But it was decided to organize seven batteries in 
Canada, and, as there were not enough guns in the country to give them the full 
armament of the regular batteries, the guns were divided up as far as they would go. 
It is a fact that appears to have been lost sight of, that, in 1855, the British govern- 
ment transferred to the government of Canada, then comprising only the present 
limits of the Provinces of Quebec and Ontario, ordnance lands and stores to the value 
of millions of pounds sterling, on the express understanding that Canada should keep 
up and drill annually an effective militia force of 40,000 melt. The property turned 
over was more than enough to pay the cost, and yet the agreement has been 
regularly ignored, and though half a dozen other provinces have been added to the 
country, Canada does not to-day maintain a militia force of 40,000 men even on paper. 
The Battery did its first field work at Logan's Farm, at Sisson's Farm, and at 
l\Iajor Coffin's place, "Uplands", at the back of the Little l\Iountain. It had a camp 
or two at one or the other of these places and drilled from four to eight in the 
mornings, and from seven to nine in the evenings. It had target practice during 
the winter on the ice of the St. Lawrence River, opposite St. Helen's Island. 
28 



Colonel Hogan, who commanded tbe I\Iontreal Artillery for some time, comes 
from an old military family, his father having been a captain in the Inniskilling 
Fusiliers in 1815. He, himself, almost made up his mind to join the Seventh 
Hussars in 1839, and, in 1846, he actually began his military career by joining 
Colonel Shuter's Battalion of the old Lower Canada Militia as Quartermaster. 
The militia organizations of those days were, however, merely nominal, and he 
had no duties to perform. 
Colonel Hogan says tbat when the looth Regiment was organized as a contri- 
bution by Canada towards Imperial defence, he set to work to qualify for a 
commission as major, by raising the necessary quota of 200 men. "-hen he had 
raised nearly the required number of men, he found that the commissions had been 
practically allotted, and he turned over his men to Major Dunn, who otherwise 
could not have qualified for his majority. The career of Major Dunn is, or ought 
to be, familiar to all readers of Canadian military history. This gallant Canadian 
soldier of the Queen saw his first military service in the Crimea as an officer in the 
11th Hussars, winning the Cross for Valour at that most heroic and dramatic of 
all battles, Balaklava. In the celebrated charge of the Six Hundred the 11th were 
011 the extreme left of the Light Brigade. After performing prodigies of valour, 
the lIth, overpowered by numbers, were retreating. \Vhile literally hewing their 
way back, Dunn's horse was shot from under him. He sprang upon one that was 
rushing riderless about the bloody field, and dashed to the assistance of Sergeant 
Bentley who was beset by three Russian lancers. \Vithout a moment's hesitation, 
he at once attacked them, and by the strength of his arm and the vigour of his 
charge succeeded in cutting them down. A little further on, the Russians had 
flocked together, and attacked in small bauds individual members of the 11th. 
A Russian hussar officer, with others, had fallen upon Private Levett and was 
about to cut him down, when Lieutenant Dunn, bursting through, struck the 
Russian officer to the ground with his sword. For these daring deeds, he was 
recommended with one accord by his companions in arms for the Victoria Cross 
when Her Majesty instituted that token of honour. Lieutenant D
nn was the 
third member of the Army who had the decoration attached to his breast by Her 
Majesty. He retired on the sale of his commission in [855 and returned to Canada. 
but re-entered the army as major in the looth. Being transferred from that regiment, 
he attained the command of the famous 33rd Duke of \Vellington's Regiment, and 
saw service with it in Abyssinia, where he met an untimely death. 



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29 



- 


CHAPTER III 


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THE EARLIEST DAYS OF THE BATTERY. 


I 


HE first public occasion upon which the Battery had an oppor- 
tunity to turn out, but which owing to some misunderstanding 
between the committee and the officer commanding, it did not 
avail itself of, was the great public demonstration in honour of 
the opening of the Grand Trunk Railway to the Canadian 
western terminus of the line at Sarnia, and of the inauguration 
of the new .:\Iontreal \Vater \Vorks. The completion of these 
two important works '\"as celebrated by a demonstration of 
rejoicing extending over the 13th, 14th, and 15th of November, 1856. 
The completion of the \Vater \Vorks ,\"as a most important thing for 
I\Iontreal, for the citizens had felt very unsafe since the great fire of 
July 8th, 1852. In that disaster the whole of that part of the city from 
St. Lawrence Street to Molson's Brewery was swept out of existence; 
5,000 houses were destroyed and no less than 20,000 persons rendered. 
homeless. Immediately after this terrible visitation, work was begun on the 
present fine water works system, and it was completed in 1856. There had been a 
sort of a water works of very limited capacity before that with a pumping station 
somewhere near the Bonsecours Church, and the reservoir where the present 
St. Louis Square is, on St. Denis Street. The great event in connection with the 
inaugn ration in question was the turning on of the large fountain at Victoria Square. 
The whole demonstration was a glorious affair. One day there was a great 
trades procession, followed by a magnificent banquet at the Grand Trunk Railway 
works at Point St. Charles, when 3,000 guests sat down to dinner under one roof. 
Then there was a public ball in the City Concert Hall, in the upper part of the 
Bonsecours .:\Iarket building, and on the last day there was a grand review of the 
military force, in which, as above described, the Battery did not participate, though 
the other volunteer corps were on parade. These included the Cavalry Troop and 
the Rifle Companies, which, in [860, were united into a battalion numbered the First 
or Prince of \Vales Rifles, now the Prince of \Vales Fusiliers. There was plenty of 
excitement at the review. It wac; the tim
 of p-mzzle loaders, when the ramrod 


3 Q 



played so conspicuous a part in the drill of the infantry soldier. The riflemen were 
not used to reviews, and some of them became so excited that they forgot to take 
the ramrods out of their guns. The result was that quite a number of ramrods went 
flying over the heads of the spectators. Five or six persons had ramrods passed 
through the crowns of their hats, and a number had narrow escapes, but no one was 
seriously hurt. Hundreds of people came from the l:nited States to the celebration; 
so many in fact that it was a very hard matter billeting them out. 
It was in this year, too, r856, that Lieut.-Co!. Stevenson obtained his first 
commISSIOn. 
The men were getting uniformed, and the officers had been ordered to go and 
give their orders for uniforms. Lieutenant O""en delayed doing so, and J\Iajor 
Coffin, knowing of it, went up to him oue day on 'Parade and bluntly asked him 
why he had not obeyed the orders. He replied that he was waiting until he saw 
how he liked the service. The major rejoined that his liking of the service had 
nothing to do with it. That was supposed to have been determined the day he 
joined the Battery, and he would give him just twenty-four hours to comply with 
the order. \Yhen the next drill took place Owen did not turn up, but 
Iajor Coffin 
found out that he had not ordered his uniform. He consequently asked Staff 
Sergeant Stevenson to go with a letter to Owen's office, which was on St. François 
Xavier Street, about where 
Iajor Bond's office is now, and bring back an answer. 
Owen, who was '"ery much annoyed, shO\,"ed the staff sergeant the letter. It 
demanded a satisfactory explanation or Owen's resignation. Owen at once wrote 
out his resignation, aud handed it to the sergeant, and he at once took it to the 
major's office. 
The major said that he then had the opportunity to show his appreciation of 
Sergeant Ste'"enson's sen"ices for the Battery, and offered him the commission 
resigned by Owen, which he accepted. 
In r856-57 the Battery had its target practic
 on the river during the winter, 
firing from the Island to the Longueuil Road. Six hundred yards was considered 
a good range for these guns in those days. The battery had practice twice a week 
for some time. At the first practice, out of twenty rounds of solid shot fired, fifteen 
went through the target, and six or seven through what was then the bu1ls-eye. 
\Yhen Lieut. Stevenson presented the target report to the colonel commanding the 
Royal Arti11ery here, he said it was remarkably good practice and enquired if the 
officers had the usual range party. The lieuteuant told him that they had. but the 
colonel sent his brigade major to inspect the target to verify the returns. The 
result ,,"as to put up the stock of the Battery '"ery much among the regulars. 
Early in r857 Major Coffin was appointed to the position of Ordnance Land 
Commissioner, and transferred from the Battery to the civil sen"ice of the govern- 
ment. :\Iajor Hogan was appointed to commaud both corps, and Lieut. Ste,'enson 
was appointed to be Captain of the Field Battery, Henry Bulmer being made 
Captain of the Foot Company. Major Coffin died in Otta"Ta, on January 28th, r878. 


3 r 



It was early in r857 that the Battery first turned out with the regulars. The 
force had manæuvres on the ice, the Foot Company of the Artillery defending the 
Island, and the Field Battery, the regular regiment in garrison, the 39th Foot, 
and the Rifle Companies forming the attacking force. General Eyre was in 
command, and he expressed himself delighted with the Battery's work that day, 
calling out several times" \Vell done, the Field Artillery." The Battery had to 
cross great pieces of ice, blocks fifteen or twenty feet high frequently obstructing 
the way. The gunners had several times to unhitch the horses from the guns, 
and haul the latter over the rough fields of ice by the drag ropes. 
In r85] the Battery went on an 
excursion to St. Al bans, V ermon t, 
accom panied by part of N UIn ber Oue 
Troop of Cavalry. The Officers and 
men had a very good time, and every- 
thing passed off quietly, a bit of a 
dispute with the caterer, who failed to 
carry out his contract, excepted. It 
was a great event for St. Albans, peo- 
ple flocking there from all parts of 
Vermont and Northern New York. 
\Vhile there the Battery did a little 
drill in the public square which greatly 
pleased the American spectators. This 
was the first case of a Canadian military 
organization crossing the boundary line 
since the war of r8I2. 
The year r858 was a notable one in the 
history of the Battery. The Rifles went 
to Portland that year, and the Battery 
decided to go to New York to assist in 
From a Daguerreotype, 
Inn. STt.\'E,,"SO,," AND CA"T. Hn""" the celebration of the completion of the 
]
s8. first Atlantic cable, which was considered 
as a most important step in the direction of improving the relations existing between 
Great Britain and the United States. A committee of the Battery went to New York 
as soon as this decision was arrived at, and made arrangements for the trip, the 
famous Seventh Regiment arranging to look after the visitors. The Battery \\"ent to 
)Jew York accompanied by a tremendous excursion of no less than rooo people, and 
all had a magnificent time. The excursion was such a large one that the railways 
found it difficult to provide the necessary accomlllodation, and many of the excursion- 
ists had to ride on platform cars. The party left on a Monday morning and crossed 
to St. Lambert by the" Iron Duke" and ,. Prince Albert", for there was no bridge 
then. From St. Lambert they went by rail to Rouse's Point, thence taking the 


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Lake Champlain steamer to \Vhitehall. The steamer had such a tremendous crowd 
of people on board that she had to stop at Burlington to get scantling to shore up 
the deck. She arriyed at \\Thitehall some hours late, and the Battery and excur- 
sionists transferred to the train again, but instead of arriying at Troy at seven, as 
had been intended, it was nearly midnight. The military, even at that late hour, were 
awaiting their arrival, and everybody in Troy appeared to be up, for the streets ,,-ere 
jammed with people. The Battery's military friends insisted that the :\Iontreal 
corps should have a parade through the streets, and of course Captain Steyenson 
consented. All the streets were lit up and the sidewalks cro,,-ded with cheering 
people. Flags were flying, guns firing, and altogether the Canadian artillerymen 
""ere received like conquerors. There was another magnificent demonstration at 
Saratoga as they passed, and in fact at eyery place the Battery stopped it recei\-ed 
a most enthusiastic and kindly reception. 
The Battery embarked on the Hudson Riyer steamer" Francis Skiddy" at Troy, 
and ,,"hen she left her wharf she had no less than 2,400 people on board. So headl y 
laden \\"as she that she stuck on a bar between Troy and A.lbany, and instead of 
reaching Ne,,- York at six o'clock next morning, she did not arrive until half 
past two in the afternoon. 
The Seventh had detailed Xumbers T,,-o and Fi\"e Companies, Captains Sbaler 
and Ribley, to meet the Battery, and they had been on the wharf since half past five 
in the morning, except for a short inten-al, during \\-hich they had been dismissed. 
On arriyal, and after the formal reception by the companies of the Seyenth, the 
Battery went to the Steyens Hotel at the foot of Broadway, and got rid of their 
impedimenta. The Battery did not have its guns and horses \\"ith it, officers and men 
merely haying their uniforms, accoutrements and side arms. The corps had a full 
turn out, aud the men looked remarkably well. 
Haying cleaned up, the Battery marched up Broadway and down to a ferry 
steamer at the foot of Grand Street, which took them to the islands in the Sound 
for an outing, where the gunners were \"ery handsomely entertained. The next day, 
the first of September, was the big day. The l\Iontreal corps paraded at Battery 
Park on the right of the Seyenth, and took part in the big military parade. The 
line of march was up Broadway to 44th Street, \\"here the New York Crystal Palace, 
in which they were holding a grand exhibition, was located. There the military 
forces were dispersed. The Battery received a most cordial reception everywhere. 
This event was memorable in that it was the first occasion since tbe British 
evacuation of 
e\\- York that the rnion Jack was carried up Broadway by a British 
military organization, and with one single exception the _Montreal Field Battery is 
the only British corps that has had the honour of doing that since the British 
evacuation. The exception was on the occasion of the international naval parade 
in New York at the Columbian re\'ie\\" in rR93, when Admiral Sir John Hopkins' 
brigade of Royall\Iarines and Bluejackets carried the Luion Jack through Broadway. 
The principal officers of the Seventh, at the time that regiment extended hos- 


33 



pitality to the l\Iontreal Field Battery, were Colonel Duryea, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Marshall Lefferts, and 1-fajor J. B. Pond. Colonel Winchester, of the Express 
Com pan y, was the Quartermaster. 
The intercolonial trip of 1858 having proved such a complete success the 
Battery projected another in 1859, and conceived the idea of making a trip to Boston 
and Portland, and back by the Grand Trunk. The government intervened to some 
extent, after the arrangements had been partially made. The previous year the 
men had taken their side arms to New York. Ppon this occasion the Canadian 
government refused to allow the Battery to take the arms into the rnited States. 
But where there is a will there is a way, and the officers determined to go, swords 
or no swords. So Colonel, then Captain, Stevenson quietly made arrangements to 
borrow the required number of swords from Captain 
im's Light Battery of Boston. 
The Battery crossed to St. Lambert with its own swords and belts, and before 
embarking on the train Captain Stevenson had the belts and swords packed up in 
boxes and shipped to Longueuil awaiting their return. At Lowell, Mass., there were 
two great boxes awaiting them, and in the boxes the belts and swords of Captain Nim's 
Battery. They were at once served out to the men, and when they arrived at Boston 
the Battery looked quite ship-shape. There was just one draw-back. On the brass 
buckles of the belts were the letters "US" and people began asking what they 
stood for. Captain Stevenson had instructed the men to reply to questions that the 
letters meant simply what they spelt, "Us ", and the explanation appeared to be 
quite satisfactory. Fortunately there ,,'ere no spread eagles on the accoutrements, 
or the exact state of affairs might have been given away. After leaving Boston, 
where the Boston Fusiliers were the Battery's hosts, the corps went by boat to 
Portland, where officers and men had a very pleasant time, spending one day on 
one of the islands in the harbour. On the return trip to Montreal Captain Nim's 
belts and swords were left in the enited States, and on reaching Longueuil the 
artillerymen got their own equipment again, and crossed in proper form to the city. 
All this time the Battery had been carefully keeping up its drill, and was in a 
very efficient state. 
Somewhere in the Fifties the Battery organized a series of concerts to raise 
funds to put 
elson's monument in a satisfactory state of repair. The Battery 
raised a large stun and handed it over to the City on the express understanding 
that the corporation would add what was necessary, and place and keep the 
monument in good condition, as the following letter will show: 


To Hz's Irorshzþ the Mayor, Aldermen alld 
CzizZens 0/ the Cziy 0/ iJ1olltreal. 



IOXTRE.\J., APRIL 7th, [873. 


GEXTLDIEX: 
On behalf of the l\Iontreal Field Battery of \'olunteer Artillery, I have the 
honor to transmit herewith the sum of $702.90 (seven hundred and two dollars and 
ninety cents), being proceeds (with accrued interest to date) of several concerts given 


34 



under the auspices of that corps in 1858 and 1859, with the view of raising a fund 
to defray the expense of repairing 
elson's monument in Jacques Cartier Square. 
As the corporation of :\Iontreal have recently completed that work, the members 
of the Battery have authorized the transfer, to your honorable body, of the amount 
at the credit of the Battery in the Savings Bank Department of the Bank of 
Montreal, to be applied by the corporation towards the payment of the expenditure 
incurred in restoring the monument. I have therefore, in their name, the pleasure 
of enclosing the sum of 'E-702.90, with bank book, showing original deposits, and 
accretions of interest, for which please grant city treasurer's receipt in duplicate, 
and oblige Your obedient sen'ant, 
A. _-\. STEYEXSOX, Lieut.-Colouel, 
Commanding 
Iontreal Field Battery. 


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THE 3RD l\IOXTREAI. F'EI.D BATTERY OF TO-DAY, 
AR:\IA:\n:XT: SIX I2-1'0l NDER R.B. L. GI."NS. 


The City Council, at a special meeting held Monday, April 7th, 1873, t
ndered 
a ,'ote of cordial thanks to Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson and the Montreal i?ield 
Battery for their handsome contribution. 
A fact of historical interest in connection with these concerts is that a1. one of 
them, Emma Lajeunesse, since famous throughout the world as the great Canadian 
cantatrice, Albani. made her public debut. 1Ir. Lajeunesse, her father, was leader 
of a band here, and a musician of considerable reputation in those days. The 
Battery engaged him several times, and it was at his especial solicit
'ltion that his 
daughter was engaged. Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson says he recco1lects that the 
old gentleman told him that his daughter had a "delicious voice," and that he felt 


35 



sure that if some rich man would send her to Europe she would startle the world. 
To please the old gentleman, Colonel Stevenson engaged Mr. Lajeunesse and both 
of his daughters to take part in the Battery's next concert. Emma played the piano 
and sang, her sister played the harp, and the old gentleman played the clarionet. 
Of course there were other numbers on the programme. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Ste,-enson says that, to tell the truth, they were considerably 
disappointed at Emma's singing at that time, and he says he has heard much better 
attempts by other singers making their public debut. There was not ntuch applause, 
and the batterymen rather mentally accused old 1\lr. Lajeunesse of allowing his 
parental admiration for his daughter to get the better of his judgment. 
The year 1860 was an eventful one for Canada, and especially for the militia. 
His Royal Highness the Prince of \Vales came to this country to inaugurate the 
Yictoria Bridge, and made a stay of a week in l\lontreal and a long trip through 
Canada and the United States. The social functions and public hospitalities in 
Montreal were on a most lavish scale. It was really a trying time for the Battery, 
for the corps was on duty practically the whole time the Prince was in 1\lontreal. 
It fired a great number of salutes, including one when His Royal Highness arrived 
and another when he left. Upon the latter occasion a terrific downpour of rain was 
1D progress. 
Two guns of the Battery were sent to Sherbrooke to fire the salutes upon the 
occasion of His Royal Highness' visit to that city. Captain Stevenson received the 
orders to leave only a few minutes before the time set for departure, and the Battery 
had just been dismissed for the day. He at once ordered the trumpeter to sound 
the assembly in the street, and he got the men together all right and went to 
Sherbrooke by a special train, in good time to fire the salute. The Captain was told 
in his order that horses would be supplied at Sherbrooke, and so they were, but 
they baulkedand shied, and kicked at the guns, so that he ordered them taken out, and 
the gunners ran the guns up to the point where the salute was to be fired. 
The year 1861 was a quiet one in the battery, and its members did not do much 
besides perfecting themselves in their work as far as possible. 
One thousand eight hundred and sixty-two was another memorable year both 
for Canada and the Field Battery. It was the year of the excitement over the Trent 
affair, when war between the United States and Great Britain appeared perilously 
near, as a result of the action of the 'Vnited States warship "San Jacinto" in forcibly 
taking- the Confederate Commissioners, :\lason and Sliddell, from the British mer- 
chant steamer "Trent" on the high seas, in November, 1861. 
\Iilitary organiza- 
tions we're raised in Canada from one end to the other, and a large force of regular 
troops wa
. sent over from England. 
At thi
7 critical time the Battery was in a splendid condition. containing as fine 
a set of mel" as could be found anywhere. The average height of the men was 
5 feet 10. Some were 6 feet 4, others 6 feet 3, several 6 feet 2, while men of 6 feet 
were plentifuL' It was very gratifying to all ranks in the corps to know that the 
3 6 



reputation of the Battery had spread throughout the Imperial service, and many of 
the regular officers who arrived this year went to Captain Stevenson and said that 
they had heard so much in England about his battery that they wanted to see it 011 
parade. Sergeant 
lajor Bigwood of Penn's Battery of the Royal Artillery was the 
battery's instructor at this time. 
During the year the Battery gave a concert and exhibition of drill at the 
Crystal Palace, organized in honor of Lord Monck, the newly appointed Governor 
General, who said that officers of the army in England had spoken to him about the 
Battery. His Excellency was accompanied by General Doyle, commanding the 
forces in Nova Scotia; by General Sir Fenwick \\ïlliams, commanding the forces in 
Canada; by the Honorable Thomas D'Arcey .McGee, and many other distinguished 
men. There were over two thousand people present. 
One of those who was present remarked that to see 
that corps 
arching battery front down that hall, 
stretching from one wall to the other, was a sight 
worth going a long way to see. The line was 
perfectly straight and not a button on a single 
man's coat was out of place. It was as near 
perfection as military work could possibly be. 
This gentlemen said that he never saw such a 
. 
exhibition of drill himself, and the remark applies \.. . 
equally to both the gun and the foot drill. Lord 
Monck, in congratulating the Battery said it was 
not only his own opinion but also that of distinguish- I 
ed officers who had seen many efficient corps 
(doubtless meaning the two generals who accom- 
panied him) that in all of his experience he had 
never seen any corps, regular or volunteer, march 
with such precision and perform its drill so accu- 
rately as the corps he had just had the pleasure 
of seeing on parade. This, coming from the Governor General, was much appreciated. 
During the summer of 1862 the Battery organized an excursion to Xiagara 
Falls. The previous winter it had had an exciting march out to Chambly and back. 
Colonel Thorndyke who commanded the artillery in the Province of Lo,,"er Canada 
was quartered at Chambly and he expressed himself as anxious that the Battery 
should go out to visit him. As it was impossible to make satisfactory rates with 
the ferries, it was decided to defer the trip until the winter, when the Battery could 
cross on the ice. One day the roads were reported in perfect condition, and 
lajor 
Stevenson ordered the Battery to mnster early the second morning after, and march 
to Chambly. During the previous night, a bliz7.ard, accompanied by bitterly cold 
weather, set in, but no one suggested that the Battery had better not go, and it 
started. Horses and men had an awful time getting out to Chambly, the trip of 



 


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37 



sixteen miles taking from 9.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. It was 25 degrees below zero, and the 
road was so blocked with drifts that the Battery had to pass through the fields. 
Then the Battery was handicapped by its equipment, the harness continually 
breaking. The guns "'ere marked 1807, and the harness was a good deal older 
than that. The snow drifts were unusually high. One sub-division, having halted 
to repair a broken strap, was hurrying to overtake the rest of the Battery, and ran 
with such force into a drift that it was completely hidden from view. Major 
Stevenson, from his horse, could see neither horses, men nor gUll. 'But the going 
out was nothing to the return. The Battery left Chambly at five in the afternoon, 
and it was half past two the next morning when it passed l\Iolson's Church on 
Notre Dame Street. To get their guns and waggolls through bad places the drivers 
often had to hitch up seven horses tandem. 
This was about the 9th of March. On the 
17th of the same month the Battery went to Lachine, 
and, as the thaw had come, had trouble again, but 
of a different kind, 
In the year 1862 too, the Battery did some- 
thing which entitles the corps to the everlasting 
gratitude of all the citizens of l\Iontreal. It proved 
that the ascent of 
Iouut Royal was possible for 
vehicles, and thus brought within the range of 
practical municipal politics, the scheme for acquir- 
ing the :\Iountain Park. Hitherto the project had 
met with only ridicule, the general belief being 
that horses could never be got to the summit. 
Before the Prince of \\Tales came to Canada 
in 1860, Colonel Ermatinger, then field officer for 
Lower Canada. aud Captain Stevenson had several 
conversations about doing something out of the 
ordinary as a compliment to His Royal Highness. 
Among other things it was suggested that Captain 
Stevenson should take the Battery up to the summit of :\louut Royal aud fire a 
salute as the Prince was returning from inauguratiug the Victoria Bridge. Owing 
to the rain interfering, two days ceremonies had to be thrown into one, and the 
Battery had not time to try the ascent of the ?\Iountain. In 1861 Captain Stevenson 
was elected an alderman of the city of Montreal, and the following year made a 
motion in the city council that the Mountain should be acquired as a pu bEc park. 
The :\Iountain was divided at that time among some eighteen proprietors, and the 
property was lying practically idle. Cattle were grazed on the lo\\'er slopes, and 
fire wood was cut off the higher plateaus. 

early everybody laughed at Alderman Stevenson's suggestion, and thought it 
an Ctopial1 idea. He was not to be laughed out of it, however, but thought it over 


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3 8 



and decided that he would show the doubting public, by his Battery, that it was 
feasible to get up to the top. His original undertaking met with complete snccess. 
Haying obtained the permission of Colonel Ermatinger to turn ont the Battery 
and also haying got a permit from 
Ir. John Redpath to pass through his grounds, 
the Major ordered the Battery out on .l\londay, 
ovember 10th, for special service. 
No one, but the two gentlemen mentioned and the l\Iajor himself, knew what the 
special service was, for \'arious reasons. He did not want to be hampered by a crowd, 
and he was not quite certain that the Battery could get up, and if it did not he thought 
it would be quite sufficient if they had the laugh over their failure among themselves, 
without having the whole city joining in at their expense. 
Tbe Prince of \Vales' birthday was to be celebrated that day as the actual 
anniversary had fallen on Sunday, and Major 
Stevenson's idea was to fire a royal salute from 
the top of the mountain. 
Sunday night a heavy snowstorm set in and 
when the Battery paraded on :\Ionday, there was 
a foot of snow on the ground, So before starting 
they had to take the guns from the wheels and 
remount them on sleighs. The Battery went up 
by way of 11r. Redpath's private avenue and 
grounds, and gradually zig-zagged its way to the 
plateau on the summit of the mountain behind 
Ravenscrag. All ranks had hard work to get 
there. Often the sleighs would get stuck on the 
tops of stumps, and the men had to cut the stumps 
down to get them off. The sno\\" lay so hea\'y in 
some of the ravines the Battery had to cross that 
the drivers had to take the horses out, and .l\lajor 
Stevenson sent the men ahead to tramp down a 
From a Daguerreotype 
road. Then they often had to cut a road for the LIFI T>:""'-T \\lLU"" ROim 
guns through the brush. 1855-18S--
 
The Battery got into position, and swung the guns into action for the royal 
salute exactly at noon. The bells in the city just started to ring twelve as the 
first round \\"as fired. The royal salute over, the Battery had lunch, and it was one 
of the best lunches ever eaten on the Royal :\Iount's summit. At one o'clock the 
Battery fired another salute of 100 gUlls, winding up with three salvos. It was 
amusing to see the cro\\'ds running about the city to find out what had happened. 
The gunners could see that the firing had caused the greatest commotion, and people 
crowded together to the spaces where a view of the mountain could be had, A very 
large crowd gathered on the then unoccupied portion of the lot of land on St. James 
Street, where the Post Office no\\" stands. The general opinion in the city was that 
tbe Fenians had made a lodgment on the mountain. There were man)' vague reports 


39 



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in circulation about the Fenians at this time, and they were all the more alarming 
that they were vague. The Fenians had already tried to get a footing on the 
New Bruns,,-ick coast near Campobello, and there was much talk about their 
ha,'ing designs on )'Iontreal. 
The people were not altogether satisfied until the Battery returned to the city 
in the afternoon. The effect on the Park scheme "-as satisfactory and immediate. 
Instead of laughing at Major Stevenson's proposal. people insisted on it being carried 
through, and eventually it was, though it took some time securing. the necessary 
legislation, expropriating the property, etc. 
The following extract from an editorial in the "
lontreal Transcript" of 
November 11th, 1862, refers to this incident: , 
.. The twenty-first birthday of His Royal Highnes
 the Prince of Wales 
falling this year on Sunday, the celebration of the day took place yesterday. The 
unfavorable weather prevented any other public celebration by the Troops in 
Garrison than the firing of a royal salute from the Island of St. Helen's, which 
took place at noon. 
., The celebration of the day by the l\Iontreal Field Battery, under Major 
Stevenson, however, was possessed of novel features, which are likely to make the 
day memorable, apart from the interest which every British subject attaches to it. 
The indefatigable major is sure to have some novelty in store, when he attempts 
anything with his efficient Battery. Yesterday the new feature was the firing of 
the salute in honor of the attainment of majority by our beloved Prince, from the 
summit of 1\1ount Royal, eight hundred feet above the St. Lawrence. 
., The feat was accomplished not without difficulty. The Battery was ordered to 
muster for special duty at nine o'clock in the morning, and the men were promptly 
present at the Crystal Palace. The guns were dismounted from the carriages. and 
mounted again on sleighs. and, at eleven o'clock, they took up the line of march 
with four guns drawn by six horses each. They proceeded through .l\Ir. Redpath's 
avenues, and thence by a winding path. extremely rugged, and much obstructed 
by trees and stumps, which were removed by the artillerymen, and after having 
several guns upset and righted again, to the plateau overlooking the city. 
" At twelve o'clock precisely a royal salute was fired, after which the men and 
officers partook of a lunch composed of cold roast beef, ham, etc., with bread and 
hot coffee. It is needless to say that justice was done to the viands. for the labor 
of the morning and the march were keen appetizers. At one o'clock a salute of 
one hundred guns was fired in from IS to 20 minutes, when the men again rested 
a short time, concluding the business of the day with three salvos from the four guns, 
., The horses were then attached to the pieces, and the descent of the mountain 
made at the same point, after which they proceeded through St. Catherine Street 
and St. Denis Street to 
otre Dame, and about three o'clock arrived at the Crystal 
Palace. 
"The scene presented on the plateau of the mountain, as viewed from the city, 


4 0 



was picturesque in the extreme. The dark uniform of the men, with the wbite 
background of snow, and the belching smoke from the guns, were too prominent 
not to attract hundreds to the street corners affording a view of the scene. The 
reports were borne towards the city by the wind with deafening distinctness, and 
when the salvos were fired, the reverberation was repeated several times. 
"Tbe l\Iontreal Field Battery bave linked their names to the future. if no 
opportunity is afforded them of proving their efficiency in the field, at least in 
having fired tbe first gun from the summit of the mountain." 
The next year there was a grand review on the tenth of March, in honour of 
the Prince of \Vales' marriage, and in the sham fight which followed, the Battery 
and Foot Company of Artillery again went up to the summit of the mountain as the 
defending force, and all the other :\Iontreal corps attacked. Some of the infantry 
succeeded in getting up, but they had a very trying time of it. The first man to 
get to the top was Captain \Vhitehead, brother of the present Lieutenant-Colonel 
\\Thitehead, and he almost fainted as soon as he reached the top. 
In 1864 and 1865 the Battery did nothing out of the ordinary, but of course 
kept up its drills. The corps always did that, as there were constant rumours about 
the Fenians in the air. 
In another chapter will be found some official reports of the efficiency of the 
:\Iontreal Field Battery during the period treated of in this chapter, but a few words 
dropped the other day by a veteran militia officer who occupied a very prominent 
position in the old militia will give an idea of the esteem in which the Battery was 
held at the critical time of the Trent affair. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Theodore Lyman the other day was speaking of the 
appreciation of the Canadian militia shown by the Imperial officers in the good old 
Garrison days and remarked: .. I recollect that when Colonel Shakespeare, one of 
the ablest officers of the Royal Artil1ery, came here at the time of the Trent affair, 
to take command of the artillery in this country, be inspected Stevenson's Battery 
at the Crystal Palace in company with General Lindsay and General Sir Fenwick 
\\ïlliams. I \\'as with them, being at that time Assistant Adjutant General for 
the Montreal force. Colonel Shakespeare had just come from Shoeburyness. where 
he was in command of the great artillery camp. He said, after the inspection: 
.. I left at Shoeburyness eight of the best batteries of the Royal Artillery, in fact I 
doubt whether there are any better in any service, and I come here to l\Iontreal and 
I find a militia battery as efficient in e,'ery way as any of those I left behind. I 
could not have expected it, though I had heard good reports on this battery from 
man y officers." 


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4 1 


I 



CHAPTER I\T. 


ON SERVICE DrRING THE FENIAN RAIDS. 


T ' . . HE year 1866 will ever be memorable in the annals of the Canadian 
, '. . I Militia, It was the first test of the militia as it practically exists 
.' I // to-day. For some years the Fenian Brotherhood, an organization 
r///I;
 ostensibly established to wrest Ireland from the British Crown by 

 force of anns, had been very active in 
\merica, the immediate 

 -.... object of the movement in the States being avowedly to capture 
Canada and make it the base of operations against the mother country. Many 
poor people were led by patriotic devotion to contribute funds, but there is 
not the slightest doubt whatever that many of those who joined the movement were 
actuated by more sordid motives. The peaceful homes and prosperous business 
centres of the loyal British colony would, they fondly hoped, provide rich spoil for 
the invading armies of the" Irish Republic" _ The termination of the American 
civil war gave a tremendous impetus to the movement, for it threw many men of 
various races, trained to the use of arms, on the country, without any means of 
earning a livelihood. The movement against Canada appeared to be reaching a 
climax during the winter of 1866, and it was announced with mnch swaggering 
and bravado that the invasion of Canada would take place on St. Patrick's day. 
The Canadian ,'olunteer militia corps quietly drilled away to prepare for the 
threatened trouble, but nothing occurred until the 31st of 1Iay when a force of 
about nine hundred men under" General" O'Neil crossed from Black Rock and 
landed a little below Fort Erie on the Niagara frontier. .June 2nd this force was 
met at Ridgeway by a force of militia consisting of the Queen's Own Rifles of 
Toronto and the 13th of Hamilton, and an action took place which resulted in 
the killing of a number of the volunteers, and their retirement, the Fenians 
making no attempt, however, to follow. The same night O'Neil's force recrossed 
the river into American territory. 
It was ostentatiously given out that one of the first thin,gs the Fenians 
intended to do was to capture Montreal. Camps of Fenians were established in all 
the American cities near the frontier, and drilling went regularly along, but the 
would-be invaders thought better of it, and contented themselves with demonstrating. 
4 2 



Everybody, both in the United States and Canada, knew perfectly wel1, in 
1865, that there was an organized movement among the Fenians in the enited 
States to capture Canada. The American papers openly published advertisements 
summoning the" Camps" to drill, and the enited States government let them dril1. 
If the United States had been so disposed they could have stopped the whole 
trouble in short order. But they were not so disposed, and the 1Iilitia prepared to 
do its duty. There was only a smal1 force of regulars in the country at the time. 
As far as the Montreal Field Battery was concerned, officers and men kept up 
their organization and drill to the highest possible notch, and were ready for 
anything that might tnrn up so far as they had arrangements in their o\\'n hands. 
The field equipmen t and amlU unition were kept in the magazines on St. Helen's 
Island, but though Major Stevenson could not get 
those things ready, he did the next best thing, and 
prepared his requisition so that he could hand it in 
the moment his Battery was ordered out. News of 
O'Neil's im"asion and the Battle of Ridgeway created 
intense excitement in l\Iontreal, and word came 
simultaneously that the Fenians were about to make 
their attempt on :\Iontrea1. 
The Battery was cal1ed out on .Tune the first, 
and the same evening several battalions of the 
1Iontreal infantry militia corps left for the front. 
The Battery's first orders to turn out were received 
by 1Iajor Stevenson at eleven o'clock on the first. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Osborne Smith was then 
Deputy Adjutant General, commanding the district, 
and l\Iajor Stevenson at once went to the Brigade 
office to requisition the ammunition, camp equipage, 
etc. Everybody was very lUuch excited, and it was 
hard to get business attended to. l\Iajor Stevenson's 
orders were to take half of the Battery. two guns, to Hemmingford, and to leave 
at four o'clock that afternoon. The other half of the Battery was to remain in 
the city. The Major detailed Capt. \Vm. l\IcGibbon to accompany him with the 
half battery to Hemmingford, placing Lieutenant Boyd in command of the other 
half battery ordered to remain in Montreal. Major Stevenson told Colonel Smith 
that it was very short notice, and he doubted if they could get the ammunition 
and equipage from the Island in time. The Deputy Adjutant General somewhat 
hrnsquely replied that he could get it, if the major could not, if the latter had 
the requisition. Major Stevenson told him that he had the requisition all pre- 
pared and handed it to him. He handed it to Colonel Lyman, who was then on 
the staff, and that officer proceeded to get the necessary signatures to the document. 
This was no easy task, for people were occupied with personal affairs. 


43 


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18 55- 1 "77 



It was SIX o'clock before the last signature was affixed, and then Major 
Stevenson at once sent over to the Island. But the magazine was closed for the 
night, and the officers refused to open it for anybody. The next day was Sunday, 
and Procession Sunday at that, but l\lajor Stevenson sent over to the Island again 
early in the morning, and they got everything over to the city in the evening, or 
rather thought they did. But on opening out the ammunition they found that 
there were many important deficiencies. There was not a single primer, for 
instance, for the shells) without which the shells would be useless. And other 
eqnally indispensible articles were missing, so that they had to send back again to 
the Island, and found that the magazine and stores were again closed. So the 
Battery had to stay in the Crystal Palace again all night, and send over to the 
Island once more early Monday morning. 
It should be stated that as far as the men, horses and guns were concerned, 
the Battery paraded, ready for service, within a couple of hours of the receipt of the 
order ca1ling them out. 
Finally they got e'Terything all right, and started at eleven o'clock on Monday 
for HeIiImingford via Lachine and Caughnawaga. At Lachine considerable delay 
was caused, for the ferry boat could only carry half of the half battery at once. 
Then they were delayed for a long time at Canghnawaga waiting for the train to 
take them to Hemmingford, and it was half past ten at night before the Battery 
got to Henl1ningford. 
Colonel Smith had established his headquarters at that place, and had under 
his command Number One Troop of Cavalry, Captain Smith; the 1St Prince of 
\Vales Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Devlin; and the 3rd Victoria Rifles, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Heward. 
On arrival at the Hemmingford station, a messenger stopped up to Major 
Stevenson and gave him an order to proceed to Colonel Smith's headquarters 
immediately, but not to disembark the horses and guns. So the J\Iajor trudged 
along through the mud, stumbling over all sorts of things in the darkness, up to 
:\lcPhee's Hotel, where the Brigadier and his staff were comfortably established. 
The transport facilities had been very bad and the commissariat arrangements 
were quite as defective. No provision had been made by the authorities for feeding 
the horses and men en route, and when they arrived at Henuuingford they found 
that nothing had been provided there. As is the case to-day, there was absolutely 
no provision for the mobilization of the militia, and no transport service or com- 
missariat to maintain a force in the field. 
Means were taken to extemporize transport and commissariat services, but the 
experience of armies everywhere, and in every age, has shown conclusively that 
such makeshift services, organized in the excitement and bustle of the initial 
stages of a campaign, are both wasteful and inefficient. 
In the case of the Montreal Field Battery, when it arrived at Hemmingford, 
no forage could be procured for the horses) and no rations for the men from the 


44 



authorities, though there was an abundance of food and forage in the immediate 
vicinity. This appears to have been annoying to all concerned, no less to the 
officer in command at that point than to the officers and men of the Battery them- 
sel ves. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Smith was anxious that the Battery should continue some 
distance on the way to Huntingdon, but it was decided that the corps would have 
to be detrained to enable the horses and men to be fed. The detraining was a 
very difficult operation, as there was no platform for getting the guns off the cars, 
but the men finally managed it. 
The officers of the Battery then devoted their whole attention to trying 
to get something for the horses and men to eat. 


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The horses had had a little hay in the middle of the day, but the men had not 
had a bite in their mouths since five o'clock that morning, except a fe,,- loaves of 
bread they had managed to get at Caughnawaga. 
The officers of the staff said that it was absolutely impossible to get anything 
for the men until the following morning, and as for the horses, there was not a 
bushel of oats to be had within a radius of ten miles. 
At the latter statement one of the officers of the Battery expressed astonish- 
ment, as they were in one of the finest agricultural districts of the Province. 
No satisfaction could be obtained, however, from the staff officers, and some 
other source of food supply had to be found. Feeding the men and horses of a 
hungry battery of artillery is not a small matter, but it finally was accomplished. 


45 



Fortunately l\IcPhee, the keeper of the hotel, was a Scotchman, and the 
natural sympathy of one Scot for another came to the l\Iajor's assistance, for 
besides being a Scotchman himse1f, McPhee had met one or two other Scotchmen 
in the Battery, and commented on the fact as soon as the Major spoke to him. 
l\IcPhee said to the latter that he could let him have as many sacks of oats as he 
wanted, and he gladly agreed to supply all the oats required to the quartermaster 
sergeant, at a very 10\\" price, on the l\Iajor's promise to see that he was paid, which 
promise, of course, was given. 
But l\Iajor Stevenson had more difficulty in procuring a meal for his tired and 
hungry men. He, hO\\"ever, chanced to look into the dining r00111 of the hotel and 
saw that they ,,"ere setting a table, and found it was in preparation for some 
teamsters who were coming to Hemmingford to transport the Yictoria Rifles to 
Huntingdon the fonowing day. 
In the meantime Major Stevenson's anxiety was to provide a meal for his 
men. l\IcPhee said that the meal being prepared for the teamsters had been 
ordered by Colonel Smith, and he dare not disobey orders. The l\Iajor, however, 
remarking that that might be a very good rule for the military, eXplained that he 
would take the responsibility of ordering his men to eat that meal. They had not 
had anything since early morning, while the teamsters had already had their 
three meals. 
:\lcPhee still resisted, but the Major ordered the Battery trumpeter to sound 
the assembly, and marched his men into the dining room and ordered them to 
remain there until they had had an they wanted. He then investigated the 
kitchen and found that the cooks were preparing an the bread and butter the men 
would require, as well as tea or coffee. Rummaging among the cupboards he 
found a plentiful supply of eggs, and got the women in the kitchen to boil them for 
the men. The result was that the men got a good meal, which of course the :\Iajor 
was only too glad to pay for. 
He could get no more satisfaction about quarters for his men than he got 
about their food, so he arranged with McPhee to let them sleep in the hay in his 
barn, and they enjoyed a first rate rest, which was more than the infantry did. 
Those poor fellows were simply dumped down on a swamp, and had to do the 
best they could without camp equipage or anything else. 
It was cruel, and it was not surprising that the next day many of them could 
scarcel y speak for the severe colds they had contracted. Many of them at that 
time contracted colds and rheumatism from which they never recovered. 
The Yictorias were under orders to go to Huntingdon the morning after the 
Battery's arrival. The Prince of \Vales Regiment, not having had ammunition 
served out to them, were ordered to remain until the arrival of their ammunition, 
which was coming from Montreal by a train which was to arrive during the day. 
The Battery was ordered to remain also, and go on with the Prince of \Vales 
Regiment. The regular morning train did not bring the ammunition as expected, 
4 6 



and the two corps had to remain at Hemmingford all day, much to their disgust. 
During the day all sorts of exciting rumours got about, and half a dozen stories 
were started about the Fenians having crossed the lines, attacking the other 
column, etc. Of course there was nothing in any of them. Early next morning 
the column mo,'ed off on the way to Huntingdon, being entertained to breakfast 
and dinner by the good people of Havelock and Franlyn. The Battery parted 
company with the Prince of \Vales Regiment at the Ormstowll road, the infantry 
proceeding to Ormsto,,'n. 
The Battery arri,'ed at Huntingdon at half past eight at night, its guide, 
Captain Rogers, later Lieutenant-Colonel Rogers commanding the 51st Battalion, 
ha,'ing deemed it advisable to make a considerable detour near A.thelston owing to 
some report of a Fenian force being thereabouts. 


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\\Then the Battery arriyed at Huntingdon it found that there had been allotted 
to the corps as quarters an old, unused, wheelwright's shop, utterly unsuited for the 
purpose. The boards of the floor were both rotten and loose, and it would ha,'e 
broken the horses legs to take them into it. The officers in command told .:\Iajor 
Stevenson when he protested that it was the only place to be had, but he was deter- 
mined that he '\"QuId not put the Battery up there. The place given as sleeping 
accomodation for the men was not large enough to accornodate ten persons and the 
members of the Battery would have been almost as well off out of doors. 
Mr. Boyd, a local lawyer at this point came to the Battery's assistance, and he 
told :\Iajor Stevenson that if the Battery would go up to the square he would see 


47 



that men and horses were comfortably billeted for the night. Arriving at the 
square, l\Ir. Boyd, who now lives at New York, mounted one of the gun carriages 
and made a speech to the people. He urged his fellow townsmen to do their duty 
by the Battery. The artillerymen had corne to do their duty in protecting them, 
and they should do their part and see that the men and their horses had the 
necessary accomodation. 
The speech had its effect, and l\Iajor Stevenson got billets for the horses and 
men, he himself that night going to the hotel. There were several oth
r corps at 
Huntingdon and the accommodation was pretty well taken up. The great 
difficulty, so far as the Battery was concerned, was that its horses were scattered 
through the village and neighborhood, the two animals furthest away from one 
another being three miles apart. l\1ajor Stevenson wanted to encamp, and as he 
had taken the precaution to take his camp equipage along, he could have done it 
comfortably. But Colonel Smith ,,'ould not hear of it. Finally a crisis was 
reached owing to the contractor for forage refusing to supply the horses o,,'ing to 
their being so scattered, which made the delivery of the rations a very difficult matter. 
At the Presbyterian Church were long sheds to shelter the horses of those 
of the congregation who had to drive to service, and l\Iajor Stevenson arranged 
that the Battery could have these sheds for its horses. Then he obtained permis- 
sion to camp on the church grounds, and the Battery was made very comfortable. 
l\Irs. \Vatson, the good wife of the minister, allowed the Battery to use her 
kitchen for the cooking, and even spared her servant to help in the work. The 
government rations were being brought from l\Iontreal, and when they arrived were 
simply unfit for human food. Somebody must have benefitted, but it was surely 
not the men who had to subsist on the stuff. 
All the provisions required could have been purchased better and cheaper in 
the country, and they were being brought from l\Iontreal, not by train but by 
teams, by far the most dangerous and expensive means of transport. Of course 
the whole arrangement was made to favour some city contractors. The idea of 
bringing provisions by team all the way from l\Iontreal in such weather as that 
prevailing then was simply outrageous. The meat was often tainted when it 
arrived at the front, and the bread reported to have been unfit for food. 
A General l\Iiddleton appears to have been badly needed at the front during 
the Fenian Raids. 
Major Stevenson appears to have taken took good care that the stuff should 
not be foisted on his men. He had been made to provide his own rations in the 
first place and he determined to continue to do it, as he found that everything 
needed could be supplied cheaper, and in first class condition, by the local baker, 
butcher and grocers. He was ordered to receive the government rations, but 
declined, and was allowed to have his way. As a result his men and horses were 
well fed, and when the Battery returned to l\Ion, treal there was not a man or 
horse that was not considerably heavier than when the corps marched out. 
4 8 



The corps on service were allowed, by the government, fifty cents per man a 
day for rations, and though the men of the Battery were so well fed, after paying 
for everything, and giving liberal allowances to all who assisted in any way, they 
received, after the service \Vas over, twenty-five cents a day in cash, the savings 
from their ration money, in addition to their pay of fifty cents a day. 
The batterymen were the envy of the rest of the force at Huntingdon on 
account of their good food. 
The Battery had so few men that a small infantry guard was told off each day 
to do the guard duties at the artillery camp, and Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson, 
the other day, recalled the fact that, on one occasion, the corporal of the guard, 
which was furnished by the Victoria Rifles, was f\Ir. Arthur Ross, now the we11 
known stock broker. He had had such a sickening experience with the gO\"ern- 


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ment rations, and found the Battery food so satisfactory that he requested that he 
be told off permanently ,,"ith his squad to do the Battery guard duties, but in this 
he was disappointed. 
The Battery had more or less excitement during the time it was at Hunt- 
ingdon as a result of the circulation of startling rumours, but nothing really trans- 
pired. The men could not dri11 much on account of the weather. It poured in 
torrents most of the time, and, in the intervals, it was simply unbearably hot. The 
men's faces and necks were badly blistered. 
The Battery came back to Montreal on the 18th, and glad enough officers and 
men were. The Battery came back by steamboat from Port Louis on Lake St. 
Francis. To Port Louis there was a direct road from Huntingdon, some six or 


49 



eight miles in length. It was a plank road, and in rather bad repair, but 
susceptible of being mended. l\Iajor Stevenson was ordered, hO\\'ever, to proceed to 
Port Louis with the Battery by what was called the" New Found Out Road ", 
which would necessitate a detour of nearly double the distance. He was ordered to 
march half an hour ahead of the infantry, but he knew that, even with that start, 
his Battery could not make the extra distance in time. So he determined. orders 
or no orders, that he would go by the direct road. 
First he sent on some men with a load of scantling and planks. to repair the 
worst breaks in the wooden roadway, and, sharp on time, the Battery started. 
Before coming to the point where the " 
ew Found Out Road" branched off from 
the direct road, Uajor Stevenson had tried to get the guide who had been told off 
to show the Battery the way, to consent to the change in route he contemplated. 
The guide refused, however, saying that if anything happened he \\'ould get into 
trouble. The Uajor, howe\'er, said that he would take the responsibility, and 
when, on reaching the junction of the roads, the Battery kept right along, the guide 
urged no objection. 
The Battery arrived at the wharf without mishap. The mail steamer, on 
which it was to embark, had just arrived, and the Battery embarked at once. 
The men were enjoying an impromptu concert in the saloon when the staff and 
the Yictoria Rifles arrived. The astonished looks on the faces of Colonel Smith 
and his officers when they sa\\" the Battery all comfortably established on the 
steamer, was a study in itself. 
The names on the pay-roll for the eighteen days that the Battery was in active 
service at this time are as follows: 

Iajor, A. A. Ste\Oenson ; Captain, \Vm. UcGibbon; Second Lieutenant, T. \\-. 
Boyd; Surgeon, Geo. E. Fenwick; Sergeant-Uajor, C. \Yhite; Quartermaster 
Sergeaut, .John Cooper; Sergeants, .John \\'ilson, John T. Rickaby, \Vm. Bauden; 
Farrier Sergeant, S. Culley; Corporals, J. \V. \Vooding, .Jas. K, Pollock, Hugh 
McIntosh, Thomas Lilley; Bombardiers, J. H, UcNider, \V. H. Kerfut, James Yuill, 
1\1. T. Lang; Trumpeter, A. McInnes; Gunners, Robt. Nicholson, Angus l\litchell, 
W. \Vilkinson, Thomas Robinson, Chas. l\IcGuaran, Richard i\IcKeown, \V. Cun- 
ningham, .Jas. Griffin, Alex. Campbell, Richard Teannouth, John Morrison, James 
Smith, .John Jackson, \Villiam Bennett, Robert Inglis, Henry Corrigan, Hugh 
Mackay, \Vm. Grant, John Henderson, E. Cunningham, l\loses Eadon, \Valter 
McGrath, James Henderson, Ed. Morgan, Ed. Thompson, .John :\1innish, .John 
l\larsh, .John P. Peavey, Benj. Robinson, \Vm. Hardy, P. B. Ferguson, \Villiam 
Burrell, \\'1lliam \\'111 is, Thos. Wilkinson, Samuel Russell, C. Nimms, .J. H. 
Hutchison, \Vm. Nish, \Vm. Ross; Drivers, 1. S Pierotz, T. Potter, John Outhet, 
S. Cunningham, C. Cunningham, D. Cunningham. George Bruce, Fred. Bennett, 
Jas. Cunningham, .J. \\'igmore, Jno. Clayton, P. McKillop, Daniel \Vilson, Richard 
Conway, Joseph Booth, Donald Munro, John Fraser, C. Fisher, James Saunders, 
J. Matthews. 


50 



During this service the Battery wore the ordinary artillery uniform, which it 
had adopted in 1862 or 1863, and which, with few changes, it still wears. 
Between 1866 and 1870 nothing out of the ordinary occurred in the history of 
the Battery, apart from its participation in the celebration of the first Dominion 
Day, July 1st, 1867. There ,,'as a big review on Logan's Park, in ,,'hich the Battery 
participated, and it also fired three separate salutes that day at the readings 
of the Confederation Proclamation, by the l\Iayor, the Hon. Henry Starnes, 
at Logan's Farm, at Dalhousie Square and at Victoria Square. 
During all these years the Battery was ordered out frequently to fire salutes, 
and also often turned out with the regulars for field days and reviews on Logan's 
Farm, The Battery was almost regarded by the regulars as one of their own 
corps, and the result was most beneficial to the Battery. At this time, and for 


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many years pre\-iously, the Battery had taken a leading part in almost every 
public mm'ement in the city. 
The pay list on the preceding page is interesting in more respects than one. 
It is a significant fact that at this time there was a large proportion of the original 
members still in the Battery, as the following copy of the pay-list of the Battery 
signed April, 1856, will show: 
::\Iajor, \Ym. F. Coffin; First Lieutenants, Henry Hogan, Henry Bulmer; 
Second Lieutenant, A. A. Stevenson; Staff Sergeant, \Vm. Masterman; Sergeants, 
Charles Garth, Alex. Ramsay; Corporals, Joseph Baudell, Alex. \\Tand, \\Tm. Robb; 
Bombardiers; John Buchanan, \Vm. Almour, \Villiam l\lcGibbon; Gunners, R. W. 
Isaacson, \V. H. Boyd, \Vm. Hobbs, T. \V. Boyd, Joseph Tees, David Brodie, )Jeil 


51 



Douglas, Robt. Hendey, Edward Charters, John \Vilson, John McIntosh, George 
l\Ionaghan, \Villiam Bauden, Alfred Davis, J. Bays, Edward Burke, Sinclair Stuart, 
Joseph Baker, \Villiam Inglis, Patrick Hughes, J. Kinleyside, John Cooper, 
T. Tucker, .John \Vilkinson, \V. Stevens, J. Simpson, Alex. Turbyne, James 
Ma\'or, J. A. Cockburn, George Morrison, J. Cockburn, George Nightingale, 
\Vm. Nightingale, James Pollock, C. James, G. l\Iontgomery, \Vm. Ruther- 
ford, Robert Gardner, Henry Macfarlane, John Taylor, John Bauden, Robert 
Mitchell, John Scott, Robert BeI1l1, John Anderson, Robert Nicholson, \\'m. H. 
Kerfut, \\'m. Awler, James Dingwall, John McDougal, David Fender, Hugh 
McIntosh, Angus Mitchell, \Vm. :\Iartin, \Vm. \Vilkinson, Matthew Creelman, 
Isaac Black; Sergeant Logan, R. A., acting Sergeant Major. 
(Signed) \Vm. F. Coffin, l\Iajor, 
Commanding Field Battery. 
During the winter of 1869-70 the rumours of intended Fenian invasion were 
revived and the l\[ilitia held itself in readiness. May 24th a review of the whole of 
the Montreal Brigade was ordered in honour of Her l\Iajesty's Birthday. But early 
that morning orders were received from headquarters to put the force on active 
service and prepare to repel a Fenian invasion along the New York and Vermont 
fron tiers. 
The Battery's orders \\'ere to hold itself in readiness to move at a moment's 
notice. It was read\' at the time the order was received, but remained in Montreal 
un.der arms for a day or two, until ordered to the Huntingdon frontier. 
The actual order calling out the Battery for active service upon this occasion 
is preserved among the archives of the Battery. It was written upon a half sheet 
of plain foolscap and reads as follows: 

I IUT <\R y DISTRICT No. 5 
1st Brigade Division. 
Brigade Order. 
In accordance with orders received from the Lieutenant General Commanding, 
the Montreal Field Battery is hereby ordered on Actual Service without delay, a 
% Battery to be held in readiness to proceed by Grand Trunk Railway to River 
Beaudette Station for transport to Huntingdon. 
" By order" THOMAS BACON, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
The 50th Huntingdon Borderers and the 51st Hemmingford Rangers had 
been ordered out the same day that the Battery was, and they were already on 
duty at Huntingdon, the Montreal Engineers having also preceded the Battery. 
Her Majesty's 69th Regiment, under Colonel Bagot, had also been ordered up. 
The Battery left Montreal at seven o'clock for Coteau, where it arrived late, having 
encountered a number of annoying delays. From Coteau it crossed Lake St. 
Francis by steamer to Port Louis. Lieutenant FitzGeorge, now a general in the 


1.05 P.M. 
Montreal, 25th May, 1870. 


52 



The following correspondence on this subject explains itself: 
l\Iontreal, 6th .June, 1870. 


Colonel Elphinstone, C.B., \'.C., 
:\lon treal. 


\ 


Dear Sir: 
During the march of the Uontreal Field Battery of Artillery from Hunting- 
don to Hendersonville (Trout River) on Friday, the 27th ultimo, we halted for a 
few minutes to rest the horses opposite the farm of l\lr. \Vm. Arthùr, who imme- 
diately brought and sent from his house a most bountiful supply of milk, water, 
bread, cakes, etc. After all had partaken of his good cheer he insisted upon filling 
every haversack, at the same time declining to accept of any compensation what- 
ever. The members of the Battery feel that some slight acknowledgement of that 
gentleman's generosity should be made, and the similarity of name has suggested 
the idea of presenting loyal \Villiam Arthur with a photographic portrait of Royal 
Arthur \Villiam. The value of the gift would be infinitely enhanced if the 
autograph of His Royal Highness could be appended thereto, I have therefore 
ventured to enquire whether, under the circumstances, His Royal Highness would 
be graciously pleased to append his autograph to the photograph sent herewith. 
Such an act of condescension would be accepted by the Battery as a Royal favor 
conferred upon the corps, whilst it would undoubtedly awaken li,-elier feelings of 
loyalty and patriotism in the breast of that hospitable frontier fanner, in ,,-hose 
household it would be cherished with a sort of sacred veneration. 
I have the honour to remain 
Yours most faithfully, 
A_ A_ STE\'EXSOX, 
Lt.-Col. Com. :\1. F. B. of A. 


Uon treal, 6th .June, I 
70, 


Dear Sir: 
His Royal Highness says that he has very great pleasure indeed in acceding 
to the request of yourself and the officers of your Field Battery by signing the 
accompanying photograph. 
A man who behaved so loyally and liberally deserves every possible recog- 
nition, and His Royal Highness desires that you will mention to 1\Ir. \Villiam 
Arthur that the Prince will not fail to mention his liberality when in England. 
I am like".ise desired to send herewith, for your own acceptance, a photograph 
of His Royal Highness. 


Believe me, yours faithfully, 
H. C. ELPHI
STONB. 


Lt.-Col. A. A.. STEVENSON, 
Com. l\Iontreal Field Battery, Montreal. 


54 



\Vhile the Battery was at Trout River Lieutenant-Colonel John Fletcher, 
being Deputy Adjutant General of the District. commanded the militia force there 
assembled. On the last day the Battery was out there General Lindsay arrived, 
accompanied by His Royal Highness Prince Arthur, then an officer in the Battalion 
of the Rifle Brigade commanded by Lord Alexander Russell, and held a review of 
the whole force. The Battery returned to .:\Iontreal the next day via the same 
route as it had taken at the end of the Raid of 1866. 
The pay-list for this service. 
Iay 25th to June 1st 1860, shows the following 
names: 
Lieutenant-Colonel, A. A. Stevenson; l\Iajor, \\T. 
IcGibbon; First Lieutenant, 
T. \V. Boyd; Surgeon, G. E. Fenwick; Sergeant-:\Iajor, E. Hnmm; Acting 
Sergeant-1\Iajor to half Battery, James Suttie; Quartermaster Sergeant, John 
Cooper; Hospital Sergeant, J. H. l\Iathieson; Sergeants, John \\ïlson, \\"m. 
Bauden, James Pollock; Corporals, Hugh McIntosh, Thos. Lilley, \Ym. H. Kerfut, 
James Yuill; Bombardiers, \Y. Grant, J. P. Peavey, Jas. Griffin; Trumpeter, 
A. l\IcInnes; Gunners, Angus l\Iitchell, Thos. Robinson, C. McGowan, R. 
l\IcKeown, Henry Corrigan, James Smith, John Jackson, \Ym. Bennett, Robt. 
Inglis, \\'m. Cunningham, H. McKay, .John Henderson, \\T. 
lcGrath, E. 
Iorgan. 
.John i\Iarsh, Benjamin Robinson. P. B. Ferguson. \\'m. Burrell, \Vm. \\Tillis, 
Saml. Russell, Chas. 
immo, \V. Nash, \V. Houston, \Y. Higgins. John \\Tood, 
\\Tm. Brackwell, John Oliver, Jas. Thorn. Richd. Hemsley, Alex. Downs, John 
Stephenson. Edw.. Thompson, Mortimer Hynes, James Russell, Thomas Shone, 
\\Tm. :\Iuir; Drivers. J. S. Pieroty. Saml. Cunningham, Fredk. Bennett, Jas. 
Cunningham, John Clayton, Danl. \Vilson, R. Conway, D. .Munro, \Vm. \Yright, 
.John Bloomfield, Thos. :\Iassey. \V. Calvert, Joseph Turner, John Jolliff, Thos. 
Fraser, John H. Lynn, Peter Reid, Geo. H. Burt, Jas. Shannon, Alex. Mason. 
Hugh Dunachie, Ceo. Johnston. 
Major Stevenson was present when General Lindsay, who was about leaving 
Canada, decorated Lieutenant-Colonels Fletcher, Chamberlain and McEachran with 
the. order of C,M. G. and the old general feelingly remarked to the major: "I want 
you to keep up that splendid battery of yours. It is a fine corps, and will be 
wanted some day, and when it is wanted I am sure you will all do your duty." 


---

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55 


" . 



CHAPTER V. 


SERYICE IN AID OF THE CIVIL POvVER., 



 


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OT the least important of the valuable services rendered by the 
loyal militia of Canada have been those performed when 
,"arious corps have been called out on actual service in aid of 
the civil authority. The Active l\Iilitia Force is at once a 
national police force as well as a force for national defence. 
The militia has been frequently called upon to perform its 
by no means pleasant police duties, and upon no corps have the 
calls for aid to the civil power been as frequent as those which com- 
pose the 1\Iontreal Division. 
The l\Iontreal Field Battery was called out in aid of the civil 
pO\\"er very soon after its organization, election riots being frequent 
in the fifties and sixties as a result of the open ballot and the good 
old fashioned ways of conducting elections. Brick-bats were the common missiles, 
and cracked skulls were quite the fashion at election times, but a military display 
usually restored peace easily. In 1858 and 1859 the Montreal militia corps were 
frequently on service in the streets. 
In 1860 a riot occurred during a mayoralty contest, the voting then extending 
over several days. The orders to turn out were received by the members of the 
Battery early in the morning, the parade being ordered for 9.30. So promptly did 
the men respond that at that hour to the minute the Battery was on parade, with 
guns horsed and ready for action. The Battery was under anus for four days on 
this occasion, being stationed on Victoria Square and on the present City Hall 
Square, and got through this service without any trouble, but both they and the 
Cavalry were once or twice treated to a little mild excitement, being vigorously 
pelted with snowballs by the mob. 
In November, 1875, the Battery was on service on the occasion of the burial of 
.Joseph Guibord, whose body at the time of his death, some eight years previously, 
had been refused burial in consecrated ground in the Roman Catholic Cemetery 
because he belonged to the Institut Canadien, which institution had been placed 
under the ban because its library contained books regarded as heretical by the 
Roman Catholic Church. 


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56 



Guibord was himself a devout member of the Roman Catholic Church and a 
regular attendant at its services. His wife, who had predeceased him had been 
buried in his family lot in the Notre Dame des Neiges Cemetery, and, before his 
death, he had asked that his body be laid beside that of his wife. 
The Cemetery then, as now, was under the control of the Fabrique of Notre- 
Dame, and the latter body, through its representati\"e, the Reverend Curé Rous- 
selot, refused permission for the interment to take place. The power of the law 
was invoked by the officers of the Institut Canadien to compel the ecclesiastical 
authorities to permit of the interment as desired, and in the meantime, the casket 
containing Guibord's body was deposited in the receiving vault of the l\Iounl 
Royal Protestant Cemetery. 
A series of long and complicated lawsuits followed, the Church authorities 
basing their right to refuse interment in consecrated ground on the terms of the 
Capitulation of Canada, which guaranteed to the Roman Catholic Church the full 
exercise of its accustomed usages_ The learned counsel for the Institut pleaded 
that, in spite of any special arrangement with the Roman Catholic Church, that the 
ecclesiastical authorities could not interfere with the proprietary or an yother 
\"ested rights of a British subject, and this argument carried the day. 
After Mr. Joseph Doutre, Ç2.C., the leading counsel for the Institut, had fought 
out the case through the Canadian Courts, it was taken to the very foot of the 
Throne, the Imperial Privy Council, who, on appeal, finally ordered the Fabrique 
to permit the interment to take 'place as desired by the friends of the deceased. 
\\'hile the case was being argued before the courts much ill-feeling was 
aroused in Montreal and vicinity. :\I r. Doutre and the I nstitllt Canadien had the 
sympathy of the Protestant portion of the community, while the great bulk of the 
Roman Catholic population, quite naturally, sympathised with the stand taken by 
their clergy. The case was much discussed in the public press, in the pulpit, and 
on the streets, and, by the time the final judgment of the highest tribunal in the 
realm was ohtained, the situation wore an ugly look. 
\Vhen the judgment was given, some of the more ,-iolent of the church party 
publicly advised the ecclesiastical authorities to refuse to obey the order of the 
court, hut when the order arrived in the country and a date was fixed for the 
interment of all that remained of the hodyof poor Guibord, the authorities of the 
Fahrique allowed the grave to be opened in the Guibord lot, 
On the afternoon fixed for the interment, l\Ir. Duutre and a few of the officers 
of the Institut Canadien proceeded to Mount Royal Cemetery, and the casket was 
taken from its long resting place and placed in a hearse for removal to Cote des 
Neiges Cemetery. 
All went well until the little cortege approached the gates of the Roman 
Catholic Cemetery on the Cote des Neiges Road, when the modest procession was 
greeted with hooting from a crowd of disorderly persons who had assembled on the 
road. On arriving at the Cemetery entrance it was found that a mob of cOllsider- 


57 



able dimensions had closed the gates, and was prepared to resist any attempt to 
open them. The hearse was brought to a stop outside, stones began to fly, the 
driver was struck, the glass sides of the vehicle were broken, and, for some time, it 
looked as though the mob was determined to obtain possession of the casket. The 
driyer of the hearse soon realized tbat there ,\"as to he nothing gained by remain- 
ing, and turning the horses, drove back to :\Iount Royal Cemetery, where the 
casket was returned to its old place in the receiving vault. 
The news of this open defiance of the law 
reated great excitement throughout 
Canada, but there were not wanting those wþo openly approved of the action of 
the mob. The public authorities promptly decided that the dignity of the law 
must be asserted at an}' cost, and the ,\"hole of the then existing l\Iontrealmilitia 
corps were ordered under arms for November 16th, to see that the orders of the 
Privy Council were carried out. 
The force consisted of the Montreal Troop of Cavalry, the nucleus of the 
present Duke of York's Royal Canadian Hussars, the l\Iontreal Field Battery, the 
:\Iontreal Garrison Arti11ery, the Prince of \Vales Regiment, the Yictoria Rifles, 
and the Sixth Hochelaga Light Infantry, later the 6th Fusiliers, and recently 
amalgamated with the 1St Prince of \Vales Regiment, which has been transformed 
from a rifle corps into a Fusilier Regiment. 
The Battary paraded in full strength under the command of Major Stevenson, 
and was seryed out with the usual supply of service ammunition. The l\1ilitia 
Brigade, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel John Fletcher, Deputy Adjutant 
General, first marched to the gates of l\1ount Royal Cemetery, ,\.here the remains 
of poor Guibord were once more placed in a hearse for removal to the Roman 
Catholic Cemetery. The hearse was escorted by a large detachment of the City 
Police Force, accompanied by Doctor, now Sir \Villiam Hingston, then Mayor of 
Montreal, and the open grave was reached and the remains of Guibord consigned 
to mother earth without further incident. The troops marched to Cote des Neiges 
via the Outremont road, and during the interment were drawn up ready for any 
emergency on the road near the cemetery gates. 
A considerable crowd of rowdies had gathered in the \.icinity, bnt beyond a 
little hooting and jeering made no hostile demonstration. 
This Guibord incident caused a strained feeling between the two branches of 
the population of Montreal which lasted for some time. It looked for some years 
as though the City would lose its enviable reputation as the home of a singularly 
harmonious population, in spite of the fact that it is divided both as to race and 
religion. Tolerant feeling in religious matters had, up to this time, been an 
honourable characteristic of the whole of the people of :\lontrea1. 
Just after the conquest, the Protestant population used one of the Roman 
Catholic places of worship for Devine Service, after the usual Sunday celebrations 
of the l\Iass. From 1766 to 1797, the adherents of the Church of England used the 
Church of the Recollets every Sunday afternoon for the service of their Church. 
SR 



Up to 1792, the Presbyterians also used the same sacred edifice for their regular 
sen'ices, and when their congregation moved to their first church, the old edifice 
stilI standing on St. Gabriel street, the pious and orthodox followers of John Knox 
presented the good fathers of the Recollet Church with a handsome gift of candles 
for the High Altar, and of \\.ine for the !\Jass, as a token of appreciation of the 
practical Christian courtesy which had prompted the Priests to allow those of 
another faith to occupy for so long, gratuitously, their place of worship. The 
Recollet fathers certainly sho\\'ed a marked Christian spirit in that early day. 
The ill-feeling caused by the Guibord case threatened for some time to bring 
the good and honourable understanding hitherto existing between the Protestant 


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and Roman Catholic sections of the community to an end. Fanatics arose on both 
sides, and secured followings of more or less influence. The excitement had one 
good result. It had a stimulating effect upon the l\Iilitia corps, and all of the city 
military organizations were kept up in a high state of efficiency, 
In 1877 a young Orallgeman named Hackett was attacked on \ïctoria Square, 
by a gang of roughs, while returning from the Twelfth of July religious service. 
Revolvers were drawn on both sides, and Hackett was shot dead in the doorway of a 
big warehouse, near the corner of Fortification Lane. The marks of the buIIet
 


59 



could, until recently, have been seen on the stone. That night the Montreal 
.:\lilitia Brigade ,ms on sen'ice and passed the night under arms. The whole city 
was excited, and it appeared almost impossible to prevent serious trouble. Great 
numbers of Orangemen from Ontario and the Eastern Townships arrived in 
Montreal for Hackett's funeral, which took place on the 17th. It was announced 
that strong parties of Irish Roman Catholics were being organized to attack the 
funeral cortege as it passed through the streets, and the whole Brigade was again 
called out. The Field Battery had considerable moving about to db, and took up 
various commanding positions as the funeral passed through the streets. Thanks, 
doubtless to the complete military arrangements. there was no overt act, and 
Hackett's body was quietly laid to rest in l\1ount Royal Cemetery. 
The following Twelfth of July the local Orangemen announced their detenni- 
nation to celebrate the anniversary by a grand Orange procession, and again the 
city became excited. Some people left the city, and the Banks barricaded their 
places of business. The whole of the City l\Iilitia force was placed on service, 
and in addition A and B Batteries, R. C. A., and the nth, 5 0th , 5 1st , 53 rd , 54 th 
and 64 th Battalions were sent here. The .:\layor, the late jean Louis Beaudry. had 
the Orange leaders arrested at their Hall as disturbers of the peace, no procession 
took place, and the much dreaded day passed off quietly. The Battery's orders for 
this day were to hold themselves in readiness to proceed rapidly to any point where 
its services might be required. 
\Vhen ordered out on this occasion, the Battery, as stated elsewhere, was 
under-going its annual training in camp. On July 11th the following Battery 
order was issued:- 
"Orders having been this afternoon issued by Lieut.-General Smythe. and 
comnmnicated verbally by Lieut.-Colonel Fletcher, that the Montreal Field Battery 
should immediately leave the location where they are now encamped and remO\'e to 
the Lacrosse Grounds beside the A and B Batteries, tents will be struck at once, 
and the Battery will remove to the above place without delay." 
As soon as the Battery was settled down in its new lines the following 
business-like orders were issued:- 
"The Battery will parade at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning in marching order, 
horses hooked in, and all ready to move at a moments notice, if required. 
" A camp guard consisting of two non-commissioned officers and six men will 
mount at 7 a.m. tomorrow, and all the spare men will be supplied with rifles ancl 
ammunition, and will fortn an additional guard in case the Battery should be 
required to leave camp." 
The Battery remained in its lines the whole day, horses harnessed, and 
officers and men on the alert. The officers on service on this occasion were 
Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson, Major .:\lcGibbon, Captain Oswald, Lieutenant 
Green, Surgeon Fenwick and Veterinary Surgeon D. l\IcEachran. 
The conduct of the troops during this trying and unsatisfactory service was 
60 


". 



most commendable, the general officer commanding expressing his satisfaction in 
the follo\\Oing general order: 
"Lieutenant-General Sir Edward Selby Smythe has the pleasure to express 
his thanks to the three thousand officers, llon-conllllissioned officers and men, 
composing the force in l\Iontreal assembled under his command on the 11th and 
12th instants, for their remarkable discipline and good conduct, as well as for their 
singularl y soldierlike patience and forbearance under trying circumstances." 
The last time the Battery was called out in aid of the Ciyil po\\Oer was at the 
time of the small-pox riots in the latter part of the summer of 1885. The disease 
at the time was epidemic in the city, and the municipal authorities adopted 
stringent measures to suppress it. enforcing compulsory yaccination, isolation. etc, 
This was resented by a certain section of the population, and a mob attacked and 
wrecked an East end \Oaccination depot, and marching to the City Hall, proceeded 
to break the windows. 
Threats were made to destroy the small-pox hospitals, and to attack the 
municipal authorities, and, to assist the City Police Force, the whole of the local 
militia corps were called out. The late Lieutenant-Colonel Straubenzie, then 
Deputy Adjutant General, was absent from the city, and the command of the 
Di\"ision de\"olved upon Lieutenant-Colonel Ste\"enson. commanding the Field 
Battery, who made such a good disposition of the force under his command that 
there were no further demonstrations. The next day l\Iajor General l\Iiddleton. 
commanding the l\Iilitia. came down from Ottawa and appro\"ed of Colonel 
Ste\"enson's arrangements. 
During this exciting time the non-commissioned officers of the Field Battery 
rendered useful sen-ice as mounted orderlies and patrols, the ca\'alry force being 
altogether numerically inadequate to perform the mounted duties required. 
The force was necessarily much divided, some companies being detailed for 
guards at the small-pox hospitals, at the City Hall. and the Annouries, one also 
being stationed at the residence of the then :\Iayor, l\Ir. Honoré Beaugrand, who 
had earned the enmity of the disturbers of the peace by his energetic support of 
the health measures adopted. Some regiments were sent through the streets as 
patrols, and the Brigadier would have found it impossible to keep up COlll- 
munication between the parts of his scattered force without the assistance of the 
mounted batterymen. 




@

- 


61 


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CHAPTER \T1. 


THE \VORK A
D CHA
GE
 OF RECENT YEARS 


é

I)JCE the Fenian Raid of 1870, the Battery has not been called upon 
-J' _ -

\ to perf?rm any actual service in def
nse of. the conntry, ?ut it has 
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2 0/ \ 
 I held Itself always ready to do so If reqmred. Its efficIency has 
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 never been al10wed to fal1 off, though there have been the usual 
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 --r
 number of changes. 
, . < .. '-!'tJib Through the Seventies the drills of the old days were kept 
f,V {.;... (fl{(t up and numerous salutes were fired. In 1872, the Battery fired the 
f:. :i ,0 I 
. :-- salute in honour of the unveiling of the Queen's statue on Victoria 

!I,' 
 _-..:" Sq nare. 
,< <'j \\' -;, r . l
;' The Battery assisted in the organization of the Dominion Artillery 
.'...:i JIo

 ,:' \, ri
 Association , bein g one of the first cor p s to affiliate. It has alwavs 
'(1 -';nt 7,,,, .,t'tr .
\
 J 
. .", 
t,..... stood high in the competitions of that useful organization, and Colonel 
Ste"enson has in his possession, and prizes yery highly, a fine pair of 
field-glasses bearing the following inscription :-" Dominion Artillery Association. 
Presented to Lieut.-Col. A. A. Steyenson, Commanding the l\Iontreal Field Battery, 
that Battery ha,-ing the highest total number of voluntary drills during 18 77." 
Later similar glasses given as prizes in these cQmpetitions were given to the 
batteries instead of to the commanding officers, and when Lieut.-Colonel Stevenson 
relinquished the command, he had the honour of handing over to his successor two 
pairs of glasses similar to the ones in his possession, as well as two silver cups, 
awarded as prizes for general efficiency. 
The six-pounder guns and the twelve-pounder howitzer original1y served out 
to the Battery, were called in in [867 or 1868, and to replace them there were 
issued to the Battery three smooth bore nine-pounders and one twenty-four-pounder 
howitzer. This armament was in time replaced by four nine-pounder muzzle 
loading, rifled guns, and they in turn have just been replaced by six twelve-pounder 
breech-loading, rifled guns. 
The Battery has fired salutes upon the occasions of the arrival in Montreal of 
all of the GO\'ernors-Genera1. 
\Yhile Colonel Coursol was Mayor of Montreal, the city was visited by the 
Russian Crown Prince Alexander, afterwards Czar. The mayor tried to arrange a 
62 



turn-out of all the l\1ontreal corps in honour of the distinguished visitor, but it 
could not be arranged. At the request of Colonel Coursol, Colonel Stevenson 
turned ont the Battery, and the corps went through a number of manæuvres on 
the Champ de l\Iars before the Crown Prince. This was in winter, and the fact 
that the Battery had no sleighs for the guns attracted the attention of the Prince. 
He told the :\1ayor that he was surprised and delighted at the drill of the Battery, 
but thought. it strange that in a country \\"here there was so much snow during the 
winter months, that the Battery was not provided \\"ith sleighs. Later on the 
Battery was equipped \\"ith sleighs. 
On Angust 30th, 1880, the Field Battery lost by the death of Quartermaster 
Sergeant John Cooper, a non-commissioned officer who had rendered the corps 
loyal and noteworthy service ever since 1855. His _ _ 
death \\"as the occasion of the issuance of a Battery 
order in which the Commanding Officer declared: 
.. The long connection of the deceased with the Corps 
(25 years), the interest he manifested in all its affairs, 
and his 7.eal and usefulness in the position he held, 
furnish strong claims to the gratitude of the members 
of the Battery." 
The remains were accorded a military funeral by 
the comrades of the deceased. 
The Field Battery has ahm ys maintained an em-i- 
able reputation for good target practice. 
In 1861 the officers of the Battery donated a 
handsome gold medal for competition among the men 
of the Battery, the winners being as follows: 1861, 
Gunner \Vm. Bauden; 1862, Gunner Charles Breadon ; 
lð63, Driver John Outhed; 1864, Sergeant John 
\\ïlson; 1865. Gunner Hugh 
1cKay; Final \Vinner, 
1866, Sergeant John \\Tilson. 
The conditions governing the competition for the 
medal were as follows: 
"The Officers of the :\Iontreal Field Battery of 
Artillery, having presented a Gold l\1edal, to be competed for among the non- 
commissioned officers and men of the Battery, it is hereby ordered that the 
following conditions be observed in reference thereto: 
" ISt.- The l\Iedal to be the property of the Company, and is to be fired for 
annually for five years. The person who makes the best firing. ,,-ill wear the 
Medal for one year, or nntil it is next competed for. The name of the winner will 
be engraved on the back of the 
1edal, every year, and any person who should be 
successful in winning it twice within the period of five years before alluded to, will 
be entitled to claim the 11edal as his o\\"n property. Cnless sume one shall have 


63 


. 

= 



 


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-.; 

 
t.- 



-
 


, ..;. 
_ 'ÞIoo 


'lED\( I UR T-\RGET PRACTICE 


.'J
-\L \\I
:\ER SGT. JOH:\ '\'ILSO:\. 1866 



won it twice within the period referred to, the 1\Iedal will then be competed for by 
the fiye members who shall ha\'e been successful in ,\"inning it in fonner years, 
" 2nd.-Eyery competitor will point and lay his o\\"u gun, and the result will 
be declared according to the aYerage distance from the centre of the target, of the 
whole number of rounds fired by each, and not on what may perhaps be the best 
single shot. 
,. 3rd.- The ùfficers ,\'ill each year determine what number of rounds shall be 
allowed to each competitor for that year, and also the range to be adopted." 
The men of the Battery have always given a creditable account of themseh-es 
at the annual competitions held uuder the auspices of the Dominion Artillery 
Association. In 1879, the target practice took place on the Island of Orleans, and 
the programme prO\.ided that each man of the whole detatchment of sixteen was to 
fire three round" of common and three of shrapnel shell. Corporal Alexander 
( )gihoie Hastings had the satisfaction, on this occasion, of making the highest score 
lTer made up to that time in these competitions, 48 out of a possible 52. Corporal 
Kendall was second with 40 points, and Gunner .:\IcKinnon third with 37. In 
addition to the medal and badge presented by the Dominion Artillery Association, 
Corporal Hastings was presented with a gold medal by 1\1r. \\7. T. \Valker, of 
St. Louis, ;\1 issouri, a fonner member of the Battery. 
The following year Hastings, by that time promoted to be a sergeant, again 
headed the list with the score of 46, Sergeant John Marsh being second with 42 and 
Gunner J. l\1cG. 1\1owat third with 4 I. The team score was 558, the highest on 
record up to that time. The then 1\1 inister of 1\Iilitia, the Hon. A. P. Caron, 
specially came to t-.1ontreal that year to present the Batterymen with their priæs. 
Sergeant Hastings represented the Battery on the first Canadian Artillery team to 
yisit Shoeburyness, in I
RI. 
Junc 7th, 1881, two guns of the Battery participated in the inauguration of the 
monument erected at Chambly, in honor of De Salaberry, the Canadian Leonidas, 
the heroic officer who, at the head of some 400 militiamen, in the war of 1812, 
inflicted a disastrous defeat upon an invading army of 7,000 men, in the valley of 
the Chateauguay. 
September 26th, 188 I, the l\Iontreal Field Battery performed another of those 
noteworthy acts of international courtesy which haye characteri7.ed its career. 
The great neighbouring Republic had been bereft of its President, the brave 
and good General Garfield, by the hand of a cowardly assassin. The whole world, 
shocked at the unreasoning brutality of the devilish deed, watched sympathetically 
at the bedside of the suffering President and sympathised with the American 
people when his gallant fight against the inevitable came to an end. It was one 
of those occasions when the natural unity of the Anglo-Saxon race was manifested 
to a sceptical ,\'orId, and, from the Queen-Empress to the lowliest of her subjects 
in the world-wide Empire, went out a feeling of sincere fraternal sympathy to the 
kindred people of the United States. 


64 



Nowhere ,\"as this feeling more sincere than in Canada. At the time of tht:: 
President's death a United States military organization, the Troy Citizens' Corps, 
was in :\Iontreal on an excursion, and the Field Battery was associated ,,'ith the 
other local corps in entertaining them. After the sad news was receiyed the 
yisiting corps cancelled its engagements, and marching to the station with muffled 
drums and draped colours, took the train back to Troy, N. Y. 
The funeral took place on the 26th and while it was in progress a memorial 
service was held in the American Presbyterian Church on Dorchester Street. At 
the same time the Field Battery fired minute guns from Dominion Square. The 
order calling out the Battery on this occasion read as follows: 
" As a mark of respect for the memory of a gallant soldier, and to manifest 
their sympathy with a neighbouring nation now in mourning, the l\Iontreal Field 
Battery will muster at the Drill Shed, Craig Street, this afternoon at one o'clock 
precisely, and will proceed to Dominion Square for the purpose of firing minute 
guns during the funeral obsequies of the late President Garfield at Cleveland, 
Ohio. The firing will continue during the whole time the funeral procession is in 
progress, probably occupying two hours." 
l\Iarch 10th, 18RS, the Battery participated in the :\Iontreal celebration of the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of the marriage of Their Royal Highnesses the Prince and 
and Princess of \\Tales, marching with a detachment of the Prince of \\Tales Regi- 
ment to Mount Royal, where a Royal salute was fired in honour of the occasion. 
During l\Iarch, IS89, :\Ir. Frederic Yilliers, the celebrated war correspondent 
and artist, lectured in l\Iontreal, under the auspices of the Field Battery, the 
lectures proving a rare treat for the citizens. 
The annual camp in 1882, on the exhibition grounds, was under the command 
of Lieutenant Green, Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson being on leave. Lieutenant- 
Colonel In,"in ,,'as the inspecting officer at the annual inspection at the conclusion 
of the camp, and said, in addressing the men, that the Battery could not be surpassed 
by any corps he had eyer inspected. This year the Battery participated in the 
grand military review held on Fletcher's Field, the ninth of September, in connec- 
tion with the big exhibition of that year. Special interest attached to this event 
owing to the presence of two American corps, the Troy Citizens' Corps, and the 
Barlow Grays, of St. Albans. Vt. The evening after the review the Battery gave a 
grand military entertainment in the Queen's Hall, under the auspices of His 
Honor Lieutenant-Governor Robitaille. 
In [885 the men of the Battery fondly cherished the hope that they would be 
called upon to assist in the suppression of the North \\' est Rebellion, and officers and 
men worked with redoubled efforts to keep the corps up to the very highest point 
of efficiency. The Battery was complete in t::very respect and ready to take the field 
and give a good account of itself at any moment, but the uprising ,,-as put down in 
short order by l\Iajor-General :\I1ddletoll, without requiring the assistance of any of 
the volunteer batteries from the Eastern provinces. 
65 



In 18R6 the 1Iontreal Field Battery performed one of those little acts of inter- 
national courtesy which have had so much to do towards drawing closer together 
the two great branches of the Anglo-Saxon family, which are working out in their 
own way the problem of developing the resources of the North American Con- 
tinent. :\lr. Grover Cleveland, then President of the United States, was married in 
.June, and Lieut.-Col. Stevenson conceived the idea that it would be a courteous 
thing to fire a salute in honour of the occasion. So he communicated with Head- 
quarters and obtained the necessary penl1ission on the afternoon of the day of the 
wedding. The salute was fired on Dominion Square, at seven o'clock, the hour at 
which the ceremony took place, An American, ,dlO was at l\Iontreal at the time, 
wrote to one of the local papers expressing the gratitude of his fellow countrymen 
in the following words: "\Vhen I heard the sa1\-o of cannon at the moment of 
:\1r. Cleveland's marriage, a feeling of deep pleasure, a sentiment of gratitude to 
the Montreal Field Battery for its graceful act, stirred my blood; and I am sure 
that it was the same with every American resident in :\lontreal. Honours are easy; 
for I venture to say, nay I proudly assert that the heart of Britain throbs not more 
warmly than that of eyery true American with sentiments of profound respect 
and deep admiration for the incomparable Lady who, during many years, has so 
graced the throne of Great Britain; and it would gratify us all to prove by deed, as 
we would fain express by word, our homage for Her." 
The Battery fired another salute upon the occasion of another historical event 
in 1R86. The despatching of the first through train to the Pacific over the just 
completed Canadian Pacific Railway, .June 28, was attended with considerable cere- 
mony. A guard of honour from the Yictoria Rifle:s was in attendance at the old 
station on Dalhousie Square, and the Mayor, aldermen, members of parliament, and 
representatives of varions religious, business and public bodies gathered at the 
:station. At R p. n1., the Mayor, 11r. Beaugrand, gave the order for the train to 
start, and as it slowly pulled out of the station the Battery fired a salute. 
Two distinct organizations existed for some time within the ranks of the 
Muntreal Field Battery, and had much to do during several years with the main- 
tenance of the spirit of esprit de corps and camaraderie, which has always 
distinguished the corps. The Montreal Field Battery Association was organized 
in 1885, its objects being, according to the constitution: 
"(a) The promotion and maintenance of the efficiency of the Battery, and an 
esprit de corps among its members. 
.. (h) The formation of a fund to assist the Battery in carrying on its work. 
" (c) Organizing and carrying on sports, games, athletic exercises, military 
competitions, and entertainments of any kind, and provision for a band when 
required." 
In 1888, when winter sports were booming as a result of the series of winter 
carnivals, the 1\10ntreal Field Battery Snowshoe Club was organized, and during 
that winter and for several following, the club held a prominent place amung the 


66 



winter athletic organizations of the city. The club held its regular tramps, its 
steeplechases, its ladies' nights, its drives, etc., and in the carnival procession of 
r889, the allegorical car of the club was admitted to be one of the most effective on 
parade. The car represented a full battery behind a snow fort, with a pyramid of 
men in the centre of the whole. It was drawn by six battery teams with artillery 
harness and driven in the regulation way by mounted drivers in the full winter 
uniform of the Battery. It was accompanied by a mounted escort. 
The Battery has played an important part in obtaining the present excellent 
quarters of the 
Iontreal l\Iilitia corps. \Yhen first organized the Battery had the 
use of the Artillery quarters at the old Quebec 
Gate Barracks, where the station now stands, 
for the guns and for gun drill, while the East- 
ern part of the upper story of the Bonsecours 
l\Iarket ,,-as used for the foot and sword drill, 
This \vas after the Barracks had been vacated 
by the Imperial troops, who had been ordered 
off to the Crimea. \Yhen the Royal Artillery 
returned in force, at the time of the Trent 
affair, the Battery had to leave the barracks, 
and found accommodation for some time, both 
for the guns and drills, at the Crystal Palace, 
then located on St Catherine Street, opposite 
the end of \ïctoria Street. 
Some objection having been made to the 
use of part of the Bonsecours :\Iarket for 
evening drills, in 1857 or 1858, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Stevenson and Captain A_ \\'. Ogilvie, 
then commanding the :\Iontreal Cm"alry, had 
the \ïctoria Hall, on \ïctoria Square, erected 
as a drill shed for the t,,-o corps_ This build- 
.... J; 
 
ing was vacated when the old Drill Shed 
on Craig Street, on the site of the present one, 
was erected. \\Then the Drill Shed collapsed 
the Battery re-occupied the Crystal Palace as quarters, and when compelled to 
leave that building again, returned to what was left of the old Drill Shed. After 
the :\Iontreal High School moved from the building at present occupied by the 
Fraser Institute, at the corner of University and Dorchester Streets, Colonel 
Stevenson rented the lower part of the building as quarters for the Battery. and 
considerable expense was incurred in putting the place in a proper state of repair. 
After a couple of years occupation of these quarters. the Battery had again to move, 
and this time there was no place to move satisfactorily to. So the guns were 
stored in the Crystal Palace, which had been reIllO\-ed to the exhibition grounds at 


67 


, 
. 


.,.. 


, 


'- 
... 


',. - 


L 
...... 
.....>> ...... 


:\( \.JOR JOHN S. HAl L 
,>i1'<1- 18 95 



!\lile End, the harness was stored in a warehouse on Notre Dame Street, and the 
men did what foot drill they could in the upper flat of the Bonsecours Market. 
This was the unsatisfactory state of affairs when Lientenant-Colonel Stevenson, 
who was \\"ell supported by Lieutenant-Colonels Bond, of the Prince of \Yales 
Regiment, \\Thitehead, of the Victoria Rifles, and Gardner, of the Sixth Fusi1iers, 
set to work to get the Drill Shed re-built. . 
The site on \\"hich the old shed had been bnilt had been bought by the corpo- 
ration the year after the first Fenian Raid, when the value of the. Militia Force 
was appreciated by the public. The City then built a shed, the annouries round the 
drill hall proper being only one storey high. 
The cost of the land and building was 
$125,000. The construction of the roof was 
such that the nuts of the tie rods required to 
be tightened and loosened according as the iron 
contracted and expanded with the changes in 
temperature. This duty being neglected one 
fine, cold night, part of the roof came down. 
\Vhile the drill shed was habitable the govern- 
ment had paid the City rental for it, but after 
the collapse of the roof the payments stopped. 
This was the position when Colonel Steven- 
son got the other commanding officers to make 
a strong united demand for a Drill Hall. 
Clearly the first thing to be done was to 
induce the City Council to adopt some plan 
for the rebuilding of the collapsed structure 
on an improved plan. A general municipal 
election was approaching and all of the candi- 
dates were canvassed to say whether they 
would support the demand of the Militia or 
not. One prominent alderman flatly refused 
to pledge himself to the scheme as submitted, 
and at the very last moment it was decided to 
bring out Colonel Stevenson against him. All the volunteers in the City turned 
out and worked for the Colonel and elected him. He has been a member of 
the City Council ever since. 
In the City Council he would not allow the Drill Hall project to drop out of 
notice, and, principally owing to his efforts, in 1882 arrangements were completed 
for constructing the present commodious, if not exactly handsome, structure on 
Craig Street. The building was completed in 1888, the Battery taking possession 
of its quarters in l\lay of that year. 
In 1891 Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson, beloved by his men, and admired and 


, 


, 


.. 
.. 


..... 


" 


Ml\JOR (
I.'ORGE R. nOOPER. 


IR8s-I>i9S. 


68 



respected by all having the best interests of the Militia of Canada at heart, retired 
from the Battery, after thirty-six years service in that corps, and having had the 
command with conspicuous credit to himself for no less than thirty-four years. 
\\Yhen he handed the corps over to his successor, l\Iajur Hall, he turned it over 
with all the stores and equipment complete, an achievement on which the veteran 
officer justly prides himself. 
Lieut.-Colonel Stevenson formally relinquished the command of the Battery 
and read his farewëll order at a drill parade held on the evening of April 24th. 
After the reading of this order, which was very affecting, by Lieut.-Colonel 
Stevenson, a short speech was made tu the Battery by Major J. S. Hall, to whom the 
command was turned over. In the course of his remarks l\Iajor Hall said: "I wish 
to say a few words with regard to the stores. Colonel Stevenson has turned 
them over withuut one single piece, even to the smallest iota, being missing. You 
who know what a vast amount of stores there is to 
r -- 
look after can well understand that this is something 
to be more than proud of." 
Lieut.-Colonel G. Mattice, the Brigade Major of 
the l\Iontreal District, also delivered a few remarks, 
saying :-" I can only endorse "'hat l\Iajor Hall has 
said in regard to the Battery stores. To me it is 
something marvellous to know that nothing was 
missing. In the short space of one hour and a half 
the whole stores were turned over in perfect order, 
and I may say that I du not think there is another I 
corps in Canada that could show their stores in such I ' 
a condition." 
Major J. S. Hall held the command until Fen- 
mary, 1895, when he was succeeded by Major George 
R. Hooper. Duriug Major Hall's tenure of the com- 
mand there was not much out of the ordinary in the 
Battery's work. It had its annual encampment on 
either the Exhibition gruunds or St. Helen's Island, and the usual detachments 
were sent every year to the Island of Orleans for the field firing practice. 
Foot drills were kept up as usual in the armoury during the winter. 
l\Iajor George R. Hooper, whu succeeded Major Hall, was an accomplished 
ufficer, and during the last few years he had had considerable experience in the 
work of the Battery, for Major Hall, being Provincial Treasurer, was often cum- 
pletely engrossed with his civil duties. l\Iajor Hooper was a graduate of that 
excellent institution, and the Alma Mater of so many good ufficers, the Royal 
Military College, Kingston. 
Major Hooper graduated in ISS2 in a class which included a Humber of Cadets 
who have since distinguished themselves, notably Lieutenant Stairs, whu su dis- 


./ \'\ 
./
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I' 


,"" 


.. 


I 
: 
 


Q. :\[. SFR(;J-:AXT J. ,tCI; 
IXï6-J8c}2. 


'11)\\"-\1" 


69 



tingnished himself in connection with Stanley's last great expedition across the 
Continent of Africa, He joined the Field Battery as 2nd Lieutenant under Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Stevenson in 1885, the year of the North \\Test Rebellion, when the 
Battery was \-ery anxious to be sent tu the front, and, as a matter of fact, expected 
to be ordered out any day. The officers of the Battery at that time were Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Ste\'enson, Captain Green, Lieutenant J. S. Hall, Surgeon G. E. 
Fe11\\-ick, and Yeterinary Surgeon D. l\IcEachran. Major Hooper obtained his 
captaincy April 24th, 1891. and his majority Feb. 9, 1895. 
It was largely through :\Iajor Hooper's persunal friendship that Lieutenant 
Percy Girouard, at present of the Royal Engineers, became attached to the Battery 



 


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(
RlJllP OF OFFICERS DI C..u,P 'N '1igo 


SuRGEO:-o;-:\IAjOR (
. B. FE"I;\\IC,,- LT.-LOL. A .-\. STF\"fo:'\.
O::-J LT. PERCY (-:'IRor-\RD CAPT.-US (
Fn. it. ](tH)l"I'R 
l...T.-COL. J\.fONTJ7A'\JJU:RT :\'fA)OR J. S. HAT I VFT.-CAP. CII \
. McE.-\4.:IIRAN 


in 1890, and that fine young officer's picture figures in the photograph of the group 
of the officers of the Battery taken in 1890. Lieutenant Girouard was, like .:\Iajor 
Hooper, a graduate of the Royal Military College, but before many months service 
in the .:\Iontreal Battery, he accepted a commission in the Royal Engineers. His 
work in connection with the construction of the railway built in Egypt, to keep up 
the comIllunication between the base and the force operating for the re-conquest of 
the Soudan, is a matter of military history. He has had charge of the work, and 
'.I 
.1 
. '
'. 
-v ... .. 1 
.
 . 
,... - 


7 0 



with such success that the whole military world united in praising the achieyement 
as one of the most successful and remarkable military works on record. Some of 
the highest authorities declare that, next to Lord Kitchener himself, the credit for 
the success of the present campaign in the Soudan belongs to Lieutenant Girouard. 
Lieutenant Girouard has lately been appointed to the supreme control of all the 
railways in Egypt. After graduating at Kingston, this officer was for some time 
engaged in engineering work connected with railway construction, and the experi- 
ence then obtained, combined with natural talent and the thorough education 
received at the Royall\Iilitary College, has stood him in a good stead in his impurt- 
ant \\'ork in the Soudall. He now has the rank of :\Iajor in the Egyptian Army. 
In 18n the camp was held on St. Catherine Street \\Test near the City limits, 
and the year following the Battery went into camp on .July 8th on a yacant lot on 
the South side of Dorchester Street \\T est , just beyond Atwater Ayenue. On the 
orders of Lieutenant-General Sir Selby Smythe, tents were struck on the afternoon 
of .July lIth and the Battery camp remm'ed to the old l\Iontreal Lacrosse Grounds 
on St. Catherine Street, between l\lackay and :\Iountain Streets, where A and B 
Batteries of the Regiment of Canadian Artillery were encamped in anticipation of 
rioting on the 12th of .July. The annual training was completed there, the 
Battery marching out on the 17th of the month, In 1879 the first of the Battery's 
camps in the exhibition grounds at :\lile End \\"as held, The camp at night was 
lighted \\'ith the electric light, then considered a great nO\'eIty. The annual 
camps for the six succeeding years were held un the same ground, the military 
enclosure on St. Helen's Island being then adopted as the camping gruund. 
During :\lajor Hooper's te1ll1re of the command, Lieutenant Benyon was 
transferred from the Battery to the Royal Regiment of Canadian ArtilJery. 
A noticeable change \\"as made in the uniform in IR94, the old blue shoulder 
strap on the serges and tunics being replaced by one of scarlet. This change was 
general throughout the service, the object being to create a distinction between the 
Militia Artillery and the Royal Artillery, the shoulder strap being the only 
distinguishing feature there is. 
In 1894, General Herbert, then in command of the Militia, expressed a 
wish that the Battery should put in its annual training in the District camp. 
Consequently that year the corps encamped at Laprairie, and was brigaded with 
the Shefford Field Battery. 
Up to 1895 the Battery had sent detachments to the Island of Orleans each 
year for the annual target practice, but that year a new departure was made. A 
camp of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery was established at Laprairie, 
and every battery in Canada had to send detachments there to take part in field 
firing exercises under service conditions. The introduction of this idea was largely 
due to Lieut. - 1 Drury, R. C. A., who had recently returned .from Okehamptuu. 


...
J ,,
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 ,pv
" 


" I 


\ '-'II 
" ....." 

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(c 'II' 
! 

 



CHAPTER \ìII. 


1'HE FIELD BATTERY AS IT IS TO-DAY. 


) 
 LL one has to imagine is one of the smartest of the field batteries of 
, \ IJ rJ \ the Royal Artillery to be seen at Aldershot, replace the blue 
... '\ shoulder straps on the tunics by red ones. and instead of the ugly 
I
 I helmets place smart husbies, ,.ery much resembling those of the 

r Royal Horse or "Galloping" Artillery, on the heads of officers 
4 and men, and one has a very good idea of what the 3rd 
" 'm '" .t= plontreal) Field Battery looks like on parade to-day, and as 
, " 
 'AI the citi
ens of 
Iontreal sa\\- it when it marched into quarters 
. at the conclusIOn of the annual camp last summer. 
On July 6th, 1883, the Battery discarded the leggings previuusly 
\, . ., "'/7'..'.,..... worn, and adopted the riding breeches and high boots, which distin- 
" '
",;:', 'li w" 
;
J
i.:i;:.. guish the corps from the other field batteries of the l\Iilitia sen'ice. 
- ,'


 . 
 t ,. ",'f!;r

J>>;,1?'
 The men provide the boots and hreeches at their own expense, and 
-
.:./
,,::;.:::;;j!:!i:
'" they add greatly to the smart appearance of the well proportioned 
battery men on parade. The :\Iontreal Battery has always, and quite 
justly, prided itself upon the fine physique and soldierly bearing of its men, and 
the boast \\ as never better j nstified than at the present time. 
The Battery has come to be regarded as sumewhat of a corps d'elite. :\Iauy 
of its members have served in various other city corps. not a few of them having 
given up stripes in crack infantry regiments to join the Battery as gunners. There 
is an esprit de corps and feeling of camaraderie in the Field Battery distincti,'ely 
its own. amounting practically to a species of freemasonry. This has had the effect 
of keeping men in the Battery for long terms of service, and has most advantage- 
ously affected the recruiting, for as soon as men take their discharge, friends of 
those remaining always are ready to volunteer to fill the vacancies. 
The present Sergeant l\Iajor of the Battery, .1. D. Kendall, has seen 38 years 
service in the Militia, receiving his first stripe as bombardier in the Battery in ISn, 
and obtaining his Short Course certificate at the Royal School of Gunnery in 
July, 1878. The same year he was promoted to be corporal, and .Jnly 30th, lXXI, 
to be sergeant. He succeeded Sergeant l\Iajor \Valker as tIp.:: chief nun-commis- 
sioned officer of the Battery in 1896. 


-') 
/- 



The Battery is now commanded by 
Iajor Richard Costigan. a most energetic 
and capable officer, nnder whose command the corps is keeping well up to its old 
traditions. He joined the Battery as Second Lieutenant in 1890. was promoted 
to be Lieutenant April 24th, 1891, Captain, February 9th, 1895, and succeeded 
l\lajor Hooper in the command, with the rank of l\Iajor, on February 27th, 1897. 
Before joining the Battery, l\Iajor Costigan had the advantage of a long and 
varied military training. His first soldiering \vas in that fine old nursery of the 
l\Iilitia, a corps that has supplied more good officers to the l\Ii1itia of this district 
than all the other corps put together, the High School Cadet Rifles. The present 
major was then but a boy, but the drill and the soldierly instincts he tben learned 
from the old instructor, :\Iajor Barnjum. be has not forgotten. After leaving the 
High School in 18ïï, he enlisted in the Yictoria Rifles, and served in that corps up 
to 1889. when he joined the :\Iontreal Garrison Artillery as Second Lieutenant, and 
qualified for his commission at the School of Gunnery at Quebec. \\ïthin a year 
of taking his commission Lieutenant Costigan was put in command of Number Five 
Battery of the Garrison, and a little while later was appointed adjutant. The 
following year he resigned from the Garrison Artillery and took a commission in 
the Field Battery, being one of the hardest working officers of the Battery ever since, 
gi\'Ïng much time and attention to the interests of his corps, though much of his 
time has been occupied with his private and municipal business. For three terms 
he represented St. Antoine \Yard in the City Council. 
\\Then :\Iajor Costigan took the command of the Battery. Captain A. T. Ogilvie 
transferred from the Victoria Rifles to the Battery. .-\ short time ago he was 
transferred to the Royal Canadian Artillery, l\Ir. Donald .\.. Smith. a grandson of 
Lord Strathcona and :\Ioullt Royal, joined the Battery in 1896, and was promoted 
to be Captain last spring. 
Perhaps the most important event in the history of the Battery since its organ- 
ization. the increase of strength and the re-arming, took place in the spring of 1898. 
By this change the strength was increased from 79 to 102, and the number of 
guns from four to six. 
The guns are modern, breech loading, 12-pounder rifles. and with them was 
served to the Battery a complete, new sett of harness, waggons, etc. 
Surgeon-l\Iajor \Vilson represented the Battery in the detachment selected from 
the Canadian :'.Iilitia to represent Canada at Her l\Iajesty's Diamond Jubilee, he 
having been placed in medical charge of the contingent. 
On the occasion of its organization the Battery adopted as its motto the words 
.. Always on Hand ", a motto the corps has always well lived up to. 
The original badge of the battery was a large Maltese cross, "ith three cannon 
balls within each angle. The circular centre of the cross was occupied by an 
unlimbered field gun, ,,"hile the Imperial Crown occupied the upper ann of the 
cross. The right arm of the cross bore the \vords " :\Iontreal Field Battery", the 
left, ., Yolunteer Artillery", and the lower" .-\lways on Hand ". 


73 



In 1886 a new badge was adopted. It consisted of a gun, within a garter, 
surmounted by a lion on the Imperial Crown. \Vithil1 the garter was the then 
title of the Battery, "The 
Iontreal Field Battery of Artillery," while flanking it 
were t,\"O sprays of oak leaves tied underneath, the junction of the two sprays being 
hidden by a scroll bearing the old motto, I, Always on Hand ". 
The latter badge is practically the present badge of the Battery, the new 
designation merely being added ,,"ithin the garter. 
The Field Battery has ah\"ays been a favourite corps with, the people of 
Montreal, as abnndantly proven by the applause which has greeted it at reviews 
etc", and the popularity of the corps was never greater than at present. 
Admiration for this efficient organization is not confined to the fellow citizens 
of the smart gunners. A short time ago a letter to the editor was published in the 
l\Iontreal Daily Star from a gentleman who signed himself as " J. Drew Gay, Late 
Colonel Ottoman Army". It read as follo\\"s: 
" I see that the critics have been making adverse comment upon the Canadian 
volunteers. Allow me, as one who has seen service all over the world, to say that 
ten years ago, when I visited Canada for the first time, I said in the London Daily 
Telegraph, of which journal I was for eighteen years chief war correspondent, that 
I had never seen so good a battery of volunteer artillery as that commanded by 
Lieutenant-Colonel Ste\"enson of your city, and that the opinion I then expressed 
has never changed" In my opinion the Canadians possess many volunteer 
and militia regiments which could take the field along-side of any of the line 
regiments in Europe, with credit and confidence." 
December 2nd, 1878, Colonel Gay in his description of the reception of the 
:\Iarquis of Lome and Her Royal Highness Princess Louise in 
Iontreal published 
in the London Daily Telegraph December 29th, wrote: 
I, And such militia! I know it is the fashion to decry and depreciate irregular 
forces" I am aware that to the" regular " the idea of militia is "something too 
absurd ", but I may mention that, gathered on parade that morning, were more 
than one battalion that would have done credit to any army in the world; that 
Stevenson's four gun battery is almost the equal of some of our own famous 
batteries at \V oolwich ; and that the Scotch companies of the Fifth Fusilier regiment 
showed as handsome a set of fellows as ever marched past the saluting point." 


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74 



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CHAPTEI{ \7111. 


SO
lE OFFICIAL RECOGNITIOXS OF EFFICIE:\JCY 


FACT upon \\-hich the 3rd Field Battery especia11y prides itself 
is that, throughout its entire career, it has been måintained in a 
thoroughly efficient state, up to fu11 strength and ready to turn 
out at any time in response to any ca11 of duty. That the 
worthy boast is wen founded can easily be proyed by a 
scrutiny of the official records eyer since the battery was 
organized. 
The fol1owing general order speaks for itself: 
.. Headquarters, 
Iontreal, 17th l\larch, IRSï. 
"'#- 
" General Order NO.3. 
"The Lieutenant-General Cpmmanding having had an 
opportunity of seeing the Volunteer Field Battery and Foot Companies of .\rtillery, 
and the Yolunteer ßli1itia Rifle Companies manæune yesterday on the ice, in 
company \\-ith Her :\lajesty's 39th Regiment of Foot, desires to express his satis- 
faction at the soldier-like steadiness and appearance of the Provincial Forces. The 
manner in which the Field Battery took up its position on the ice and opened fire 
\\"as most creditable. The alacrity with which the officers and men of these 
:\li1itia Forces turned out at the request of their Commandant, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Dyde, sho\\'s an esprit highly commendable and fu11 of promise. 
"(Signed), \\T. J. DTTRBAX, Colonel 
"Depu ty Quartermaster General." 
report in 1866, :\Iajor-General Lindsay reported as fo11ows on 


In his annual 
the Battery: 
"The ßlontreal 
corps displays great 
pattern guns. 
" Half the battery was stationed recently at Huntingdon, and performed seyere 
marches O\-er execrable roads." 
The same officer reporting on the operations along the frontier in connection 
with the Fenian Raids of that year remarked: 
" In March and June the \'olunteer Force was suddenly ca11ed out for actiye 


Field Battery, under Major Stevenson, is well drilled, and the 
zeal to the sen-ice. They are badly equipped, and hm"e old 



 
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75 



service on account of threatened Fenian incursions. 
such alacrity that the enrolled men literally sprang 
required by their country. 
"The latter emergency tuok place at a period when the greater part of the 
members of the Force were exposed to much inconvenience and personal loss. 
They cheerfully left their agricultural and commercial pursuits and at once 
responded to the demand of duty to the state. " 
Lieutenant-Colonel Osborne Smith, Assistant Adjutant Genera) of Militia, and 
Commanding the Volunteer l\Iilitia Force on the South \Yestern Frontier had the 
following to say of the force that had been under his immediate command during 
the trouble :- 
" It is my pleasing duty to report to you most satisfactorily on this force. The 
officers generally are zealous and intelligent, whilst of the general conduct and 
spirit displayed by the men I cannot speak too highly. " 
Colonel P. Robertson Ross, the then Adjutant General, in his report for 1869, 
remarked in connection with a reference to a voluntary parade of the l\Iontreal 
Force on the 6th of August: 
,. After the usual inspection, the brigade marched past in open column of 
companies headed by the Troop of Cavalry and the Field Battery, and again in 
contiguous colull1ns at quarter distance, after which a change of front was effected; 
the brigade deployed, skirmishers were thrown out, and the whole advanced under 
co\"er of the fire of the artillery-subsequently retiring, the gnns taking up other 
positions to cover the retreat, fresh skirmishers and suppurts from the reserves 
were extended, relieving those first employed. 
"Several charges were made in good style, and the manæuvres, considering 
the very few opportunities that have of late been afforded the Montreal force for 
Brigade drill, were very creditably performed. 
"The manner, in particular, in which the Field Battery took up its various 
positions, fired and manæuvred, was most praiseworthy, and both its commander, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson, and those under him, proved themselves to be not 
only well acquainted with, but very proficient in the performance of their duties." 
Speaking of the Field Artillery in general in the same report, Colonel 
Robertson Ross said: 
.. \Vith regard to the Field Batteries of Artillery, ten in number, they are in a 
perfectly serviceable and effective condition, and this satisfactory result reflects 
great credit not only on the officers in command of these Batteries, but on the 
indi,"idual officers and men composing them. 
"At various reviews which were held last summer, these batteries worked well 
in brigade, taking up positions in good style, and firing with ease and rapidity; and 
they unly require, in addition to the periodical practice instruction in firing shot and 
shell, to be trained at the annual drills in Brigade, in co-operation with Cavalry and 
Infantry, to acquire and maintain an adequate and reasonable degree of efficiency." 


These calls were obeyed with 
to anns on their services being 


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HOSPITAL SJ.RGFA"\.T\V\LLACE DA\\SO' 
3 QUARTER'IASfER SFR(;J..'AXT H. T. IIULUBROOI.-:I- 
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The gallant Colonel closes his remarks on the subject with the following trite 
ohservation : 
II The power and value of Field Artillery is so well known, and the moral 
effect produced by it, during operations in the field, so great, that the maintenance 
of these Batteries in a state of efficiency at all times, is a matter of the greatest 
importance." 
The same officer in his report the following year dwelt upon the difficulty 
experienced at this time in procuring horses. He remarked: 
II This battery was practised in gun drill and field manæunes. The In- 
spector of Artillery reported their gun dril1 as very good, the driving as indifferent. 
\\-ith regard to this battery, which is commanded by a zealous and energetic 
officer, and composed of an intelligent and fine hody of men, the ever recurring 
difficulty it experiences in procuring horses wheuever required, practically seems 
to render it non-effective." 
Lieutenant-Colonel Fletcher, C. 1\1. G. had the following to say about the 
Battery in his annual report for 1880: 
"The l\Iontreal Field Battery, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Stevenson ,,-ent into camp for ten days on the Exhibition grounds near l\Iontreal. 
The Battery mustered in full strength. The camp ,,'as well laid out. The drill 
and camp duties ,,-ere efficiently carried out, as they have always been under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson. The Battery was inspected on the 21st of Augnst 
hy Lieutenant-Colonel Irwin, Inspector of Artil1ery. and the Brigade Major. in 
presence of the l\Iajor-General Commanding, 
II A detachment of the Battery went suhsequently to the Island of Orleans for 
gun practice and I have heard that good practice was made this year." 
In 1886 the Battery was inspected hy Lientenant-Colonel l\Ionti7amhert, 
Assistant Inspector of Artil1ery, and his official report was as follows: 
II Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson commanding. Inspected on St. Helen's 
Island, on 30th August. The turn-out of the Battery conld hardly be mnch better. 
Fine men, clean and smart, with well fitted clothing and al1 booted. They had 
their guns, equipment, carriages, harness, etc., in the most perfect order. Field 
manænvres good. Gun drill very good, Gzowski competition very fast and well 
done. The camp arrangements of this Battery were excel1ent. Gun practice was 
performed at the Island of Orleans, Quebec." 
In 1887 the Battery was inspected hy :\Iajor Short, B Battery, R. C. A., Acting 
Assistant Inspector, who reported as follows: 
"Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson commanding. I inspected this fine Battery 
on St. Helen's Island on the 28th of June and found it, as usual, in an excellent 
state of efficiency. The horses, guns, harness, clothing and equipment in the most 
perfect order. The field manæuvres, marching past, gun drill, answers to 
questions and Gzowski shift, excellent. In fact the whole turn-ont reflects the 
greatest credit on al1 concerned. The gun practice was performed at Qnebec." 
ï S 



In 1888 Lieutenant-Colonel :\Iontizambert ,,"as agam the inspecting officer, 
and he had the follo,,'ing report to make: 
"Lieutenant-Colonel Ste\"enson commanding. Inspected on St" Helen's 
Island on the 4th .July. Found no falling off from its usual marked efficiency. 
Horses good, but rather too heavy a class. Guns, carriages, harness, clothing and 
equipment in first rate order. :\Iarching past, field manæuvres, gun drill, answers 
to questions and Gzowski competition all good and very creditable to all ranks. 
Their gun practice was performed at the Island of Orleans, near Quebec, under my 
superintendence on the loth September, when the high score of 394 was made." 
Lieutenant-Colonel In\"in ""as the inspecting officer in 1890 and he reported 
as follows: 
.. This Battery performed its ann ual drill in camp on St. Helen's Island and 
\\"as inspected by the Deputy Adjutant General and myself on the 13th August. 
The general state of efficiency ""as, as usual, \'ery creditable to all concerned. 
The range-finding practice was subsequently performed at a range near Lachine, 
the Battery turning out \'oluntarily for the purpose. Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson 
informs me the range is a good and safe one, so that it ,,"ill be possible to go 
through a similar practice next year during the annual drill." 
In his annual report in 1891, :\Iajor-General Herbert, then commanding the 

Iilitia force, made his famous comparison of the different branches of the service 
which was so flattering to the artillery force. The General said in part: 
" The relative degree of efficiency of the three arms in the ActÜ'e l\Iilitia is as 
follo,,"s: Artillery, 1; Cavalry, 2; Infantry, 3. 
., The superiority of the Artil1ery, and the marked inferiority of the Infantry, 
are traceable to the same cause, viz: the manner in which the duty of inspection 
is carried out. In the Artillery, the system instituted by General Strange, when 
Inspector of Artillery, and still efficiently carried out, makes the inspection at 
once a test of efficiency, a means of instruction and a source of emulation" The 
inspection of the other arms has degenerated into a mere parade or review, which 
is productive of no good result at all, but, on the contrary, frequently directs the 
efforts of commanding officers into a wrong channel. The encouragement of a 
spirit of emulation in real efficiency, and not in mere show, is most desirable." 
As a matter of fact, the Battery has never undergone a poor inspection, and 
has never been criticised as inefficient by an inspecting officer. On the contrary 
e\'ery commanding officer the Canadian Militia has ever had, as well as the regular 
staff inspecting officers have bestowed unstinted praise upon officers and men for 
their efficiency and soldierly conduct. 
It is doubtful if any other battery of field artillery in the armed forces of Her 
l\Iajesty could make a similar claim. 
I t must be remembered too, that few field batteries in the Royal Artillery can 
claim such a long continuous career as the l\Iontreal Field Battery. From 1819 to 
1846 there was no field artillery in Britain equipped, except seven troops of Royal 


79 



Horse Artillery, and these had only two guns each, with horses and men in 
proportion. The only field batteries in the whole service kept equipped were in 
Canada. At \\Toolwich there was material and horses for three field batteries of 
instruction: companies took them over in turn for a few months for drill, when 
they were handed over to other companies. It was not until 1852, three years 
only before the organization of the Montreal Battery, that an impetus was given 
to field artillery in the British Army by the horsing of 104 guns and their 
organizations into permanent batteries. 
In view of the then so recent establishment on a permanent basis of this 
branch of the service, the acknowledged efficiency of the Battery in the first years 
of its existence is all the more remarkable and creditable. 
The Battery, under command of Major Costigan, took part in the big review 
held on Logans' Park on Jubilee Day, 1897. The Battery was at the time encamped 
on St. Helen's Island. They were embarking on the steamer when an overturned 
boat was noticed drifting down the swift current, some distance out from shore, 
with several men clinging to the bottom. A terrific wind storm \Vas raging, and 
the surface of the St. Lawrence was very rough. There was a small boat near the 
wharf, but the spectators on the Island appeared afraid to put out in it. \Vith the 
men of the Battery it was different. Sergeant-l\Iajor Kendal and Trumpeter 
Bishop jumped into the boat and put out for the drowning men. It was hard work 
to force the skiff against the sea, and the frail craft was almost swamped. But they 
succeeded, and, with great risk to their overladen boat, brought those who had been 
in the water to land. The rescue was a gallant one, and largely through the 
representations and efforts of Lieutenant-Colonel Stevenson, the act was acknow- 
ledged by the Royal Humane Society of Canada, which bestowed medals upon 
Kendal and Bishop. 
The present officers and men of the Battery certainly have every reason to be 
proud of the past record of their corps from its very earliest existence; and in the 
official commendations which have been elicited by its efficiency, no less than in 
the honourable traditions which have been handed down by successive officers, 
non-commissioned officers and men, in the natural loyalty of Her Majesty's 
Canadian subjects, and in their determination to keep the Union Jack flying 
for all time over this broad Dominion, they dra\\. an inspiration which should 
result in keeping their splendid corps for all time true to its good old motto 
" Always Oll Hand ". 



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7.-<.IIf. .."'.. --&.4 



LIST OF OFFICERS 


( 


THOSE WHO H-\YE SERYED IN THE l\IOXTREAL FIELD B\TTERY, 
 
A
D THE DATES OF THE OFFICI \1. GAZETTES 


COXCERXIXG THF.:\I. 


\Vm. f-rancis Coffin, Capt. Sept. 27 1855. Was a 
:\Iajor in Montreal Light [nfantry, Feb. 
26 18-t7 In command Artillery forces of 
Montreal. Transferred to staff of lTpper Ca- 
nada :\[ilitia Dec. II 1856. 
Henrv Hogan, 21)(] Lieut. Sept. U lti55, ,st Lieut. 
Xov. '4 ,855, Capt, July 3 '856. Brevet Major 
:\Iarch 31 1858, Ueut,-Col. _\pril 10 1863' 
From Royal Montreal Cavalry. Appointed 
Commander of Io'ield Artillery and Foot 
Artillery of Montreal, Dec. I' 1856. Retired 
with rank Aug. 10 ,866. 
Henry Bulmer, 2nd Lieut. Nov. 14 ,855, 1st Lieut. 
Feb, 15 ,856, Capt. July 3 ,856. Removed to 
Vol. Foot Artillery Dec. [, ,856. Placed 
on unattached list April 2 lti57. 
J. Owen. 1st Lient. Sept, 27 18S5. Re<;igne(l Dec. 
'5 Iti5 6 . 
A. Lamontagne, 1st Lieut. Sept. 27 ,855 Resigne,] 
""ov. 14 ,855, 
A. A. Stevenson, 2nd Lieut. July 3 ,856, 1st Lieut, 
Dec. 15 1856, Captain April 2 1857, Major, 
Jan. 22 1862. Ueut.-Co1., March '5 1867. 
Retired retaining rank April 24 1891. 
\Vm. Masterman, 1st Lieut., Dec. ",856. Retired 
v.ith rank, :\Iarch 3' 1858 
Wm, Robb, Lieut. Dec. II ,856. Resigned Jul} 
9 ,858- 
\\'m. Aylmer, 2nd Lieut. .\pril 2 ,857, ,st Lieut. 
March 3' 1858. Placed on unattached list 
Aug. 8 1860. 
\\'m ;\[cGibbon, 2111! Lieut. :\Iarch 3[ 1858, ,st 
Lieut. July 91858, Major April 23 ,.';67, Lieut.- 
Col. April 23 ,872. Retired \\ith Rank, 
July 28 1882. 
Jos Bowden, 2nd Lieut. July 9 I 85S. ,st Lieut. 
Aug, 8 ,81)0. Resigned Oct. 31 ,867. 
T. \\" Boyd, 2nd Lieut. Aug. 8 1860, ,st Lieut, 
Feb, ,,867' Retired \\ith r.lIIk July 6 ,877. 
Geo. E. Fem\Ïck. Surgeon Nov. '4 IS55. Surgeon- 
:\Iajor Aug. 22 '879. Deceased. 


Henry Chapman, Paymaster Jan, 31 1862. Faile,] 
to re-enroll, 


Duncan McEachran, Veterinary Surgeon, June 22 
,877. Resigned Aug. 27 18S6. 
\Y. R. Oswald, ,st Lieut. June 22 1877. Rre". 
Capt. March 2' 1878, Brev. Major J llile 3 
,881. Appointed Lieut.-Col. Montreal Gar- 
rison Artillery June 24 188,. 
E. G. Green, 2IHl Lieut. June 22 1877. 1st Lieut, 
Ang. 5 '&<;'. Capt. Aug. 13 1883. From 
Toronto Field Battery. Deceased. 
J. S. Hall, 2nd Lieut, Aug, 5 ,881. 1st Lieut, :'Ilay 
29 ,885. Capt. Aug. 27 1886. Major April 
24 ,891. Retired retaining rank Feb. 9 '!'95. 
George R. Hooper, 2nd Lieut. :\Iay 29 ,885. 'st 
Lieut, Aug. 27 Piti6. Capt. April 24 189" 
Major FeL. 9 1895. Transferred to Artillery 
Reserve of Officers Feb. 27 18g7. 
Chas. :\lcEachran. "et. Surgeon, Aug. 27 1886. 
H. H. Hogan, 2nd Lieut April 6 lti88. Left limits 
July 31 1890. 


R. Costigan. 2nrl Lieut. July 3[ ,890, 1st 
April 24 [891. Capt, Feh. 9 ,895, 
Feb. 27 ,897. 
J. A. Benyon, 2nd Lieut. June 26 189I. Transferred 
to B Battery. R. C. A. Oct. 13 ,893. 


Lieut. 
Major 


C, \\'. Wilson, Surgeon Major, March 9 18g5. 
F. B. Wilson, 1st Lieut. May ,nth ,8<)6, Trans- 
ferred A. R. of O. Oct. 20 ,896. 
DonaM A. Smith, 2nd Lieut, :\I..y 16 '8g6, ,st Lieut. 
Feb. 5 1897. Capt. May ,6 1898. 
A, T. Ogilvie, 2nd Lieut, Dec. 23 18g6. Capt. Feb. 
27 1897- From 3r(! Victoria Rifles, Trans- 
ferred to R. C. A. 
F. A, Crathern, 2nd Lieut. :'Ila} 28 1897, 1st Lieut. 
Sept. 27 ,898, 
E. T. Bartlett, 2nd Lieut. :\Iay If) 1898 Left limits 
July 15 1898. 


George \V. Stephens, Jr, 2')(] Lieut. :\hn ,6 1898. 
,st Lient. Sept. 27 ,898. 


81 



ROLL uF 


HONOUR. 


THE FOLLOWIKG ARE THOSE WHO, BY THEm GEXEROl'S SCRSCRIPTIOXS TO Ol'R 
H[STORY Fl'XD, HAYE SHOWN THEIR ApPRECIATIO
 OF THE 
1IoNTREAL FrELD BATTERY. 


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\\-arden King & Son 
rho,. Rohertson & ('0. 
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rhl' Bdl Telephone 1"0. 
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"m. I>ow & Co. 
Hon. I . .f. Forget 
U iram "alker &. Sons, Limited 
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r, \. C. i\I.ldore, :\1, 1'. 
R. \\ïl,on-Smith 
Rubert Archer & Co, 
:l.lonlreal CifY & Ilistricl Sa\ ings Ban\.. 
I lanson Hr(\
. 
S ('arsley 
( 'orlicelli Silk << '0. 
1>. n. i\lann 
\\'m. Kearney 
\\ illiam I\lann 
I ',ma(lian Expre" Co. 
II Stanley Bir\..eU, \1. n, 
rhe Thos. 1).1\ idson i\I'f g, Co., Ltd. 
The Rohert \litchell Co.. Ltd. 
('orheil & I e\eillé 
1'. (;. Roddick, :\L D, :\L I' 
Fdix Sauvageau 
"cLaskill, i )ougall & Co. 
Silverman, Boulter & ('0. 
\\", (;, Reid 
The :\[onlreal Rolling Mills ('0. 
Eugene F. Phillips Electrical Works 
-\rniot, I eCOUfS & I arivière 
1- Rallrav & Co. 
\ \ alter (i llagar 
1 )iamond Glass Co, I.td, 
lohn I.abatt 
:'\. F. (;ault 
F. Tremhlav 
Peter L\ all . 
S. I la, i
 & Sons 
Belding, Paul & ('0. 
rhe \\ eHern I Dan & Trust ('0. 
\\. C. I\lcInt}re 
(;, \- (;reen 
II. II urtubise 
Elder, Deml"ter & ('0. 
The Ames-Ilolden Co. 
The Investment Co 
Chard, Jackson & Co 
F. (;011 Petm} , 1\1. 1'. 
Morton, Phillips & ('0. 
\. kingman 
The J, C. :\lcLaren Belling ('n. 
E. Leonard & Sons 
II. I, Beemer 
J f 111ey & Son 
J. (;. Mackenzie & Co, 
(;anh & Co. 
rhe Edward Cayan.lgh Co. 
lohn.\ Bulmer & Co. 
\ \. Stracha n 
J.". l'a'1 uette 
John Ilope & ("0. 


82 


('anadian Abestos ('0. 
The Canada Eng. & I.itho Co. 
.foseph Decarie Fils 
lohn Lee & Son 
'rhe Fairhan\..s Co. 
\\. Ilerbert EVaJh 
[{ohert l\lac\..a} 
E. \. Small & Co. 
\. .\. _\yer & Co. 
John l\lcDougali & Co. 
Laporte, 'Iartin & Co. 
rhe Sun 1 ife ,'-surance Co. of Canada 
Cyrille Laurin 
Dominion Wire M(I!;. Co. 
Furness, \\'ithe\ & ('0. 
Je}'es' Sanitary Compounds Co. of Can, 
Ilgdensburg Coal and 1'0\\ ing Co. 
r. & R :\lcLea 
'rhe Tnt-t and loan Co, of Canada 
l'il\..ington Bros. ltd. 
(;raharu & ('0. 
R. I. Tooke 
\\,-O'Brien 
lIugh :\Icl ennan 
rhe (;ranl". Ruhber ('0. 
Linotype (iO. 
j I. B. i\luir & Co. 
The .\hbe\ Effervescent Salt Co. I hI. 
\\'r.!. Rutherford 
r ames lohns!on 
(;. N. 'Ducharme 
'as. Rohin
on 
Capt, W. II. Ben}on 
rhe Stdndanl Shirt Co. I.td, 
rhe Sanden Electric Co. 
Bartlett Fra7Îer of I Int. I '0. I ld 
Chas. Sheppard 
Ilem} Bulmer 
\\. II. 1>. Young 
Faucher & Fils 
F. 1>. :\Ion\.., 12, C. 
rhe :\[ontreal \Varehousing ('0. 
r. R. IlIÎbaudeau 
-rhe \\"il(htman SpOlting (;oods ('0. 
Joseph Riendeau 
).ap. Charhonneau 
James \\ïlliamoon 
()wen :\. E,ans 
\\. r. \\ hite, II. C. 
R. S :\[urchis.';n 
\\'. Herbert Burroughs 
r. B. Resther 
},l. I'erranlt 
(
agnoll & Caron 



II. Chas, :\ e\son 
_\ntoine Robert 
:\[acmaster 8.: \Iaclennan 
Beaudin, Cardinal. I oranger 8.: St. 
{;ermain 
\\"m. Ewing 
W. \\'. Robertson 
lobn T. Bethune 
\[arcotte Bros. 
:\Ieredith B. Bethune 
Renaud, King & l'atter:-oon 
B. E. :\lcGale 
Dominion Bag Co. 
\ almard Lamarche 
:\[arin &. \Iorin 
los. \-enne 
L. 'I. (;rotbe 
II. :\lcCormick 
"-. Dangerlit'ld 
lIenr} Birks &. Sons 
Chas. (;urd 8.: Cc,. 
James lIarper 
I . Cohen 8.: Son 
lames Cochrane 
'Iames Hutton &. Co. 
\1. 1I0nan 
R. B. Hutcbison 
Charles Charland 
1. :\1. Beausoleil 
l;. Marsolais 
Chas. A, Barnard 
C. Beausoleil 
\rthur (;agnon 
l;eo. \\". Sadler 
e. Theoret 
John :\rcnougall 
I. I J, Couture 
\Iajor J. P. A_ Des Trois- \I"ism!' 
H. n. \mes 
II. B. Rainville 
I'he Wilson CO'} 
Jas. Eveleigh &. ('0. 
lames Robertson 
-F. F, Parkins 
_ \. Turcotte 
Fitzgibbon. Schafheitlin & t .". 
William :\Id ellan 
I' E. Leblanc 
F. Barnard 
Frank I. lIart 
I. W, Î'\ke 
E S. :\Iajor 
_\. A. Tbibaudeau 
lean de Sieves 
\[underloh '& Co. 
Fred R. Allev 
las. lIutchi
n 
J. Cradock Simpson 
Chas. Meridith 
lean raché 8.: Co. 
'W, J. I'mpin 8.: Co. 
\. R. Meeker 
'110\\ ard &. Co. 
"'m. Mackinzie 
\\ m. Weir & Sons 
] :urnett &. Co. 
1<ls. F. Burnelt 
t. R. Hosmer 
R. lIickerdike 
I. G (;rant 
Jas. Perrigo, \1. I I. 
JIOTken Bros. 
J. I. I eo 


Louis Beaubien 
\ndre\\ Baile 
Robert Craik, \1 D. 
Francis W. Campbell, !II. D. 
II. Joseph 
II. H. "-olfe & Co. 
\. Desjardins 
\[ichel ] efebvre & Co. 
Frs. Martineau 
I. L. Robidoux 
'1. Palmer &. Son 
'F. 1'. I acbapelle, \1. n. 
_\. B. Cross 
F. Buller, :\L D. 
Fredf'rick G. Finle}, \1. D. 
Fdmond (;ohier 
los. Brunet 
\Iaj. R. I. bans 
lames law 
-I amf'S Ste\\ art. :\1. I I. 
: \. ] I, Hlackar1f'r, ;\1. I I. 
e. F. Gilderslee\e 
Colin Campbell 
II. .\. Ekers 
lIenn H. ] "nan 
I J. ,,'. Ross 
A. S. E\\ ing 
Stonewall Jackson Cigar Factor} 
:\lcClary Mfg. Co. 
I. D. Mamha, jr. 
R. lIemsley 
\Iaior 7eph. lIebert 
B. &. s. I I. Thompson 8.: C". 
Thomas Ligget 
ludson Ames 
'1. B. Rolland & Fils 
('has. Cas"ils 
C. O. Bf'auchemin &. Fils 
II. \ïneherg & Co. 
Patrick Kenn} 
Frank Pall7é 
R. C. lamieson 
\_ T. -lliggin s on 
Alex, ;\rcFee 
Henri lonas &. ('c>. 
Garand I'errou\ &. Co, 
('has, P. Cousins 
:\Iaj. \\ alter II, I anrie 
The Canadi..n Bre\\ ing Co. 
"-m. Francis 
lIon. T. O. \ïllene",'e 
las. ,\-. Ilarte 
'las. :\Ioore 
David ïamphell &. Son 
"-m, :\[eldrum 
" . ". Craig 
I.. II. I1ebert 
\. (;. ;\IcBean &. Co. 
las. Currie 
'\. Beullac 
las. Wilson 
\\-. F. :\Iuir 
10hn Carruthe" 8.: l... 
i'. \\. Wilson, \1. I I. 
C. D. :\Ionk 
Edouard Rm 
1. I. l'alme
 
"1- I: \[ullin 
.] lenrv S. \hlssen 
I I. P. I abelle 8.: fïe 
\. Corbeil 
E. 1-". Craig 
Car1ieux 8.: Derome 


R:; 


II}. Archibald 
(). Dufresne, jr. 8.: Frère 
Thomas Da\idson 
_\, G. Thompson 
Lionel 1. Smith 
S. \Y. Bo\d 
C. S. Can;phell 
Major". "'. Blaiklock 
] I. Fauteux 
\. T. Pa'erson 
I I, K. :\lcLaren 
"-alter Drake 
(;eorge R. Prowse 
lames :\1. Aird 
i ;eorge W. Reed & Co, 
\Y. T. :\IeLaurin 
:\Iomreal Lumber Co. 
II. II. Brosseau & ('0. 
t ;ilmour, Sch",field 8.: Cu. 
Chaput, Fils & Co. 
rsmond I.. Clarke 
.\Iex, 
cott 
(;eo. ". ] amb 
rr. H. Bro\\ n 
(;eo. S. Kimber 
R. 
. Tomb\1I 
The Gilbert lllasting and Dredging ('0 
lIun. [as. O'Brien 
I'. N'-Heney & Co. 
I. Wilson 
10s. Bonhomme 
'J:. Ethier 
R. Chartrand 
K. Boissevain 
C. O. Clark 
\Y, D. :\lcLaren 
W. R. \[iller 
A. lmce 
J. ltenry Smith 
1. R. Walker 
(;aspard l>eserres 
lion. 1. Ald. Ouimet 
T. \. - Trenholme 
lion. I. K. \\ ani 
I J. \. '\IcPherson 
-\. J, Brice 
B. Tansf'\ 
William :\ivin 
1I0dgson Bros. 
I. e. & (;, D. Warrington 
R. \\, Sheppard 
1'. ". \leI agan 
\Ie>.. \\. <. ;ranl 
F. ('. \Iount & Co. 
_\. II. :\lcGillis 8.: Co. 
"-. \\. Le;\les,urier 
Carler. (;alhrailh & Co. 
Fred. Fo\\ ler 
las. Sutherland 
i t,.Col. I. Ferrier 
I I IIatt';n 
.\. Patenaude & Cie. 
\ ost &. Co. 
Hrol'hy, ('ains & Co. 
\Iartin Frère. & ('''. 
lohn _\. Pillo\\ 
k. (;. Ilood 
Peter Reid & Sons 
\ ]fred C. ] I. Fru:mcke 
law, \01lllg & Co 
.I. F. Riepert 
\\. C. E. I.} man 
.las, \Iexander 


--- 


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. 

. 


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J. R. I 10u
alI 
Letendre & ,\rsenault 
Ilolmes & \rpin 
Albert Holmes 
I ecIaire & Bruneau 
r. Simpson 
(; l;. Foster 
\. T. \Vi ley & Co. 
lohn Millen & Son 
\\. J!. Gifford 
.I as. A. Ogilvy & Sons 
(;eo. 1'. Wait & Co. 
It.-Co\. I-I. I. Miller 
I ames Strachan 
}'. W. Radfurd 
Taylor, relfer & Co. 
F. N. Cusson & Co. 
los. Bonbomme 
t. \. Cantin 
(;ibb & Co. 
!.. J. A. Surveyer 
'1', Berthiaume 
\\. Graham 
,. C Everett 
X. Connelly 
Theo. [.anctot 
\rthur Dansereau 
Higgins & Holland 
Joseph Pont 
lames Thom 
:rees & Co. 
Reliance Cigar Facton' 
S. L. Richard 
Victor Lemay 
.\thert D. Nelson 


Hanbury A. Rudden 
l;eo. A. Simard 
E, Giroux 
J. Darley 
X. U. Thibault 
\\. I, Potts 
J, F. :\[organ 
I.ucien Bernier 
I t. - Co\. Frank Ca\erhiI\ 
P. McKenzie 
British American Dyeing Co. 
Villeneuve & Cie. 
J. \\'. Bishop & Co. 
William Robb 
(;eo. ()'KeiI\ 
Henri Iluhois 
Wm. Masterman 
","m. Wiseman 
A. Ramsay 
I. O. Gra\'e1 
A. S. & \\". I!. Masterman 
R. I\[ acfarlane 
T. W. Peel 
.r. \\. Hughes 
Sell.. irk Cross (). C. 
Wm. McNally 
 . 
(;ordon A. Melville 
E, ,\. l;erlb 
Hon. I. \\'urtele 
J. Beñjamiu ]lageuais 
E Lemire 
Major J. I.. Bittiuger 
Olas. Lavallee 
J, A. De-jardius & Co. 
Geo. Barrall 


Laurentiau llaths 
John Sharp 
P. Elliott 
G. Fauteux 
F. A Chagnon 
G. .\rmstr
n," & Co. 
Rev. lames BarcIa, 
lohn kobertson & Son 
Rev. C. Chiniquy 
I. :'.larien 
:1. (). Labrec<lue & Cie 
C. Salaberrv 
Walter Paul . 
F. L. Beique Q, l". 
R. T. Ruttan, :\1. ii, 
J. W. Stirling, M. 1>. 
Arthur A. Brown, ì\I. II. 
r. ,\Iex. Hutchison, 111. I I. 
\Vm, Gardner, M. I I, 
P. A. 'lilIoy 
Robert [rwin 
Geo. ï. Xicbolson 
(;eo. W. (;ardner 
[[eury C. Scoll 
\". Tetrault, jr. 
\\". E. [leeks, M. [I. 
.I, 'IcGregor Mowat 
F. RicJ..ells 
E. (;authier 
C. Robillard & Co. 
Capt. John Lawrence. 
X. Sorrenskey 
Murris :-'[ichaels 
[\. E. Borden 


84 



3lze Cup that Cheers 
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1 always 3lze Cup that Strengthens 


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BOVRIL
 


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-}) XOT ONLY STIM"CLATES THE l\IE:NTAL _\)JD 
v BODILY ACTIYITY. BUT S"CSTAIXS A)JD 

 
 
 0 i-JOURISHES THE SYSTEl\1. 


For sale by all 
Druggists 
and Grocers. 


BOVRIL, Limited 


27 ST. PETER STREET, 


MONTREAL. 



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fí 




 CRAIG STREET, 
.. . MONTREAL. 


(b
 Sun 


HEADQUARTERS FOR. . . 


5:ife J1ssu r ance Comþan}:J 
of Canada. 
Head Office, - - - - MONTREAL. 


. . 


F 
A 
I 
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B 
A 
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K 
S 


STAXD.\RD SCALES. 
ASBESTOS DISK Y AL YES 
ASBESTOS PACKED Ü >CKS 
- - -- 
TRUCKS A 
D H.um CARS 
PORTABLE FORGES . 
FACTOR\." AND MILL SUPP LIES 
SCALE REPAIRIXG. ...... 
All Sca les m ade in confor mity 
with CANADIAN REQnRE:\IEKTS 
and shipp
 i nspected . . . 
-= 
jalrbanks Standard Sea Its. 


R. MACAULAY, President: HON. A. W. OGILYIE, 
VIce-President: T. B. MACAULAY, F.I.A.. 
Secretary and Actuary. 


THE SUN OF CANADA issues a very attract- 
ive policy contract. free from conditions 
and restrictions as to military service. The 
policy is indisputable from date of issue and 
nonforfeitable after it has been two years 
in force 


AGENCY DEPARTMENT. 
JAMES C, TORY. Superintendent, 
J. MACDONALD OXLEY,) ManaEers 
O. LEGER - - ) Montreat District. 


. 


-- 


. 


From R. & H. B. KIRKWOOD, 
Jewellers and Silversmiths, Tradesmen by Appointment to the 
Royal Highlanders, The Duke of Albany's Seaforth High- 
landers, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, The Gordon 
Highlanders. 


66 & 68 Thistle Street, Edinhurgh, N.B. 
18th ðMarch, 1898. 
BOND'S SOAP-BIG BEE BRAND. 


We have tried this soap on numerous arttcles, hoth silver 
and hrass, in most cases 'bt'ry heavily tarnishtd, and we 
found the effed highly satisfadory and the tarnish, ho"we'ber 
had, immediately remo'bed. 
We consider this soap a most 'ba/uahie medium for clean- 
ing and polishing articles such as "we have experimented upon, 
military accoulrements, etc.. etc. 
I T 0 Messrs. Bond's Soap Co., Ltd. 
Salford, Manchester. R. & H. B. KIRKWOOD. 


1\' 


The OFFICERS and MEN of THE CANADIAN MILITIA are respectfully 
requested to read the follo"nJing testimonial regarding 


BOND'S 
SOAP 


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For Sale by the 
RET AIL 
TRADE 
Everywhere, 



H AMIL TON 
p OWDER 
C OMPANY 


. 


. 


.J..J.
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. 


INCORP- 
ORA TED 
1861. 


MANUFACTURERS 
OF .. 


. 


I,r 
 DYNAMITE 

o DUALIN:
 


AND OTHER FORMS OF.. . 



 
HIGH EXPLOSIVES 


AND OF _ 


. 


SPORTING, G 
MILITARY OF 
,," BLASTING U N PO \TV D E R ALL 
KINDS. 


THE ARTILLER[STS A
D SPORTS;\IE
 
OF THE DO:\II
IO
. WHO HAYE rSED 
THE H.UIILTO
 POWDER FOR SO 
l\I.\XY YEARS. 
EED 
O REC():\Dm
D- 
ATWX OF ITS QL\I.IT\". 


HEAD OFFICE. MONTREAL. 


BRANCH OFFICES AND MAGAZINES 
AT PRINCIPAL CANADIAN POINTS. 


\. 



. 


Co/in )Yfcflrfqur 
 Co. 

i: 






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--'y::!v{.\..v{.'- 


!HZõntreal 
Wall 2aper 

 
Jaetor!l 



 


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:

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1030 Notre Dame St.. 


MONTREAL. 


ConSU111ers Cordage C0111j1ang, ( rimited) 


MONTREAL. 


Manufacturers of ..-. ./ 


.Rop
 and 6ind
r (win
 


Made only from pure and strongest fibres by expert and experienced operatives. 


E"
rv eoil an
 Ball Warrant
d. 


HAY, HIDE and 
BALING ROPE, 
þ 
CHEESE and LP 
PAPER CORD, 


LATH and 
SHINGLE YARN, c\Ji) 
HEMP and 
 
JUTE PACKING, 


PLOUGH LINES, 
CLOTHES LINES, 
WRAPPING TWINES. 


.. .. .. tarnd Rigging of all Rinds. .. .. .. 


.. FIRMUS" Transmission Rope of finest selected Mantla. Binder T<wine that runs the hat"Vester all day <without a stop. 


n 



FOR --........ (} 
 Ð 
UP-TO-DA TE . . . 
( 
SJlén's 
TEL.. MAIN 554, 
 

 $trllisnillgs 
'
 
GIVE US t j L 
A CALL. G 
 0 
BRA IS' 263 ST.}AMES ST. 


( tbt RQbtr
al 




 


. 
\1 


\;


 


C HIS Magnificent and Modern Hostelry stands on the very shore 
of Lake St. John, the great inland sea north of Quebec, and is 
equipped with all up-to-date improvements and conveniences. It 
is the headquarters of anglers in the waters where swims the peer- 
less ouananiche, and controls the best fishing grounds in this region for tbís 
great game fish as well as for trout, pike, wbítefish, etc. All of these 
waters are thrown open FREE to guests of the Hotel, where guides and 
equipment are furnished. 



 
 (b
 Island fious
 
 
 


I 
 BY Ih. n orth". I.la.d S.a. 


Is run in connection with t:h
 
ob
r\1al and is situated at the Grand Dis- 
charge. The salubrious climate and other advantages of Lake St. John 
make t:h
 
Ob
r\1al a favorite health and summer resort. CHARGES 
REASONABLE. 
For further illforIllatioll in r
feretlce to THE ROBER\9AL or ISLA'D HOl.SE. 
appl
 to 11. C;. HE 1>,\1 "'
. .\lnnnl}:pr. 
Before Juue ,st.-Quebec. 'The Rohenat," Rohena'. P.Q.-.\fter June 'st. 


. 
\1 






 


\'II 



7'111':. . . . 


l7

 

 

 

 


Standard 


rife Jlssuranee 
eonzpang . . . . . 


E,..., uhli!>òt/.eod 1.....:!.1 


Total Assets. - - $43.000.000 
Assurance in force. 117.000.000 
Investments in Canaáa.14. 000.000 



 Special rates to Military and Naval Officers, covering 
whole world residences and War risks. 
Endowment, Limited Payment, All Life and Family 
. . . , Trust Policies. . . . 

 HEAD OFFICE FOR CANADA: 

 157 St. James St., MONTREAL. 
w. M RAMSAY, J. HUTTON BALFOUR. 

 .... MANAGER. SECRETARY 

 
 E. H. BROWN, INSP. ENGLISH DEPT, 
'. _.A' E CHAMPAGNE, INSP. FRENCH DEPT 


I n
;stÌÙ
nt 

 
cY 

ompany "0" A W O.

:.
;", 


1.1.\1 "I'I;H. 


W. L. HOGG, 
MANAGER 


eapita/: 
$ 5 Q. D 1IQ.D 0 
o 

 
 
P, O. Box 557-<..V 


TELEPHON E 
MAIN 782 


47 St. Francois XaÞier Street. 
MONTREAL. 


Condon and [ancasbir
 

 [if
 
 


. . ,1897. . . 


Invested Funds 


Interest Overdue Only 


$6,280,000 


$2,005 


A Record Without å Parallel. 


T HE first consideration of every Insurer OUGHT to be the 
solidity of the Institution to which he Intrusts the duty 
of providing for his old age or for his dear ones In case of 
early death. 
The facts quoted above eloquently attest the care with 
which the funds of the Company are invested. 


CHAIAMAN CANADIAN BOARD 


t:h
 
t. I)on. Cord Strathcona and mount 
oval 


B. HAL. BROWN, Gen. Man. 
J. L. KERR, Asst. Man. 


cA. STEVENS CJ3ROWN. Ontario Inspector. Galt. 


Edwin Hanson. 


WílIiam Hanson. 


3lånson 5Jros. 


... 


In

stm
nt and 
Bond Brok
rs. 
@ 


.. . 


FIRST-CLASS securities suitable for 
.,/ Insurance Companies. Banks, Trus- 
tees and Private Investment bought and 
sold. 



 
Canada Life Building, 
MONTREAL. 


VIII 



Fit, 
Style - -- 
and Service 


Are tbe prominent features 
of our. . . 
_ t. fin
 
 

"
:ÞÃ<
 ' footw
ar 


The Ames Holden Co. 


Of Montreal, Limited 


Warehouses at 


St. John, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, 
Vancouver and Victoria. 


VOéI KNeW' 
 


Granby 
R.ubbers 


<). 
'
i 
, .......
. 
, 
 
,.CRAN8V. 
-- 


ARE THE BEST 
 
 


THE 


1 . 


., 


,RojaI 
EleGtviG 
(ompanj 


. , . SUPPLY. , . 


Electric Current for 
Power, Light, Heat, 
every HOUR 
of every DAY 
in the YEAR 


. . . TRY US FOR... 


Ju rniture, 
SJedding and 
2/pho/sterg 
Worn. 


.JI. 
Renaud, King & patterson 
652 CRAIG STREfl' 


.JI. 


P.S.-We furnish 


CHAIRS AND TABLES 


for entertainments. 


. 


. 


[X 




, 


. . Drink . . 


I.I.IJ 


RADNOR J
 
"J!j 




 


EMPRESS 
OF 
TABLE 
WATERS 


. . . mlx
s wltb anvtblng 


Sold a.t a.ll-. 


Leadmg ClubS I Restaurants l Grocers l 


<Dte 


ROBERT MITCHELL CO" 


(LIMITED) 


MANUFACTURERS 
OF - . 


. 



 BRASS 
, GOODS 
# 
 }}", FOR !'I.UMfiERS, 
. GAS AND 
STEAM-FITTERS 


GAS AND ELECTRIC LIGHT 
FIXTU RES, ETC. 


CHILDREN "LOVE" 
JUNKET 


A fact appreciated by mothers who recognize in it the 
ideal nourisher as well as tempter, 
Of all light family foods none is prepared in less time, 
with less heat. with less trouble or at less cost than J un- 
ket, made with 



 

 

 "'- 


V 



 


HANSEN'S JUNKET TABLETS 


A quart of milk, a little fruit juice or flavoring, colored, 
if preferred, with one of Hansen's Pure food Colors. and 
just one Junket Tablet form the ingredients. 
Sold hy Croct'T!-. and Drug
bts ill packelsof 10 tablets at 15 c . 
Hooklet of recipe'i accompaDie
. 
AGENTS FOR CANADA 
EVANS & SONS, limited, - Montreal and Toronto. 


211c:'ntyre Son 
& <Lo., 


\3 11ictori"1 Square, 
'" 
,-2nontreQl. 


211 a n 11 f actu rers' 
agents 
.
 

V-' 


,11\(1 . , 


3mportcrs 


(If . 


. . 


J)ry 
<Boobs. 


x 



S taLle F ittings, Feed B oxes, Ha}T R acl{s, 


Wrought 
and East Iron 
Stall 
Di\'islons. 


II 
 


I 
filii a 
l.!..1Ii 
1a=::J 
 1 
:0 ,r'1 
 
 
l 
m;1 1. ' \\ ,'IPlllIl 1 1 ,' J;: J 
,
 JIIII " _ _ 
I" ,".' ilIi I-<
 .11, "II,. > ' 
. I I '1111)1 , ' l 
,--;t ,
 '.. - 1 
I . ,.... I '
...dY L 
I Ii" í' I" I I;.
-..
 \. : j I L t 

 
.11 II \ \ 
\ \ ':'\
. ?\, ( 
,j - u 
__ _ -_<:... -3- "''''"./ ____ 






 
." c _'1 0 "b
 o "b
 
 "b't..'I'1...'-. I 






 


q
-N
 






 


Brass I;itching Rings. 


a 


Estimates given for 
Complefe Fixtures I 
 
for Stables. ----= 



- 


------.....
- 


- -
 


WARDEN KING & SON, 637 Craig St., montr
al. 


Best \V orn1anshi p 


AND 


Latest Designs 


'.' IN. 


OO<>-O-O-OOO<>-O-O-Oooo<>-<><><X>-O-OOO<>-O-O-OOO<>-O-O-O 


DESKS 


<><><X><>O<><><X><>O<><><X><>OooooOO<>-O-O-O<><><X><>O 


TEES & CO. 


.......... 
 Office Furniture 


UNDERT AKERS AND 
.- - - - 


. 


EMBALMERS 


300 ST. JAMES ST, 


.:J. .:J. .:J. .:J. 9ll 0 n Irea I. 


A. T. \JILEY & CO. 


IMPORTERS 


fin
 Cbina, 
.Rrt Pott
rv, 
Cut 61ass 
and [amps 


-- ------ 



oI, 


SPE IAL TIE 



'Iub, Restaurant, 
""boat. and Hosý,tal 
"plies 


ALSO WEDDING AND PRESENTATION GOODS 


2373 St. Catherine Street. 






 MONTREAL. 


\:1 



THOS. ROBERTSON & CO. 


LßnTED 


Plumbers" Steamfitters' and 
Boiler l\lakers' Supplies . 
@ 
ROLL RIlVI CAST IRON ENAMELLED BATH 
rQ-, 
-w 


"THE DIANA" 


r 


1 1 ', 


=---== 


I
 


=== 


ê 


- 


='" 
.
 -.. 
..:,. " 
- .-.JA } 
.--=- 
 í' 


___
 II 
1.'11I1,,_11I1 ",' ,___ 
._1 _II' -
 lIlt 


---- 


............. 


T
 


11 s.. 
'
 


-
 
.,.. 


o 


41 
Ai1 
I I=--, j 
1
1h. - 
, . 
r,. -T gþ,. --- ' 
"''''';::::-4;


 ' 

 -c=-oc :
-:?


 
_
 _ _ 
= 


 
 _ __=-




 

_
 
y-= 
 
 

 
þ _ /' 
 -
;. 

- 
 - 
 -\ 
 :::: 7

 J:


 ,

- 
, 
æ- 
_. - 'þ" ", . \" \" / =
 

L
 

 
 - 



 

_ 
_ I 
r\ 

 
11 


<\-..1" III 
-illlllll 1Ii 




'II
 r
 
.. I ,,, 


OFF'CE A:o.f"::'SA '\,p'.ElRoo:\! 


STORES A:o.fD LEAD PIPE FACTOR\' 


63 8 , 640 þ.y.
 642 Craig St. 


Cor. C01111110n þ.y.
 Colborne Sts. 


Montreal. 


XII 




 


t
 

 JI $500,000.00 
 
6 6uarant

 e e Ír\' 

 Silver plated knives, forks and 
 
spoons bearing this mark 
j
W'mOGERS,* 
are warranted to be the best of 
Brass and Tr ^ n B 
 dst 
 ads 
 silverplate and to last as long 
 
\I 
 
 
 as silver plated ware can last. 
 
1 s'

iî
 
 
. 
, tbis guarantee. 
 
It's wortb the consideration 
of purchasers of plate. 
1794 nom Dame St. montreal. 



 






 
 

 Stan




i
 CO. 
 ..n T'''

 '
REMB{'Ã';' Td. 62ß 

 [imlt
a 
 


I
II
:a 
6 Manufacturers of . . . b@ Manufacturers of . . . 

 SHIRTS, 
 

 
 COLLARS, 
 

 ETC. 
 

 




 


. . Establ1shed J 859 . . 
"'.'" 


H. R. IVES & CO. 


MANUFACTURERS 
OF.. . 



... 

 LETTER PRESSES, 

Å
 HARDWARE, 
T IRON FENONG, STAIRS, 
ETC., ETC., ETC. 


Qu

n Str

t , montr
al. 


e e 


MONTREAL. 


Doors, Sasb
s and Blinds, 
mouldings, Etc., 


Turning, Shaping and Joiners' Work 
of ecve,.y desaiption. 


400 WILLIAM ST. 



 


MONTREAL. 



 


XIII 



-'"- 

 


-I 
-:: l,:
 "/t - ;
l- '
't:Oi
"
 1'1 :1' 
I ! .i'_Æ1_
_ . }d1 "L:
 lll_ 

, 
........

\


._;...
 
 
 
.
 
II


I:
 <0- 
,.
 
ICj;r.;. y-tr l 
't 
 ' 1 \ftj,'i1. .":' 
 
._,!J: tJl
. - 
\'S !! !
I
'}
;I'Ult 
'Ýp-- J - f 
 
' I f
i mm 
1f3
 - -tiì l
 1íìf
l'm1 ,I!I 


r
lU k 

 ;_'_ 
. - _
_


....t
 

__ fG1:
 


(b 
 O " f f\ r A Caf
 ' C(I

:

i
ite 2
:


 
'" 4\ 
 " drat. and within 
a hlock of the 
leaning jev
elk'rr and IIp-toWlI dr
 J{oods 
tores. Clno;oe to the 
Acsdem)o of MUSIC and the 
nf:en'... Thf:atn:'. The best appointed 
rt.
taurallt in Canada. Can he:' re:'3chf:d b\" all Jines of the elec- 
tric car 
en. ice. . 
::\Ieals å 10 COJ Ie unlilmidllight Sf:pa.rate dining-roomo;o 
for ladie!õ. Tahle \Vines a specialty. 


THE OXFORO CAFE, 36. 38 & 40 University Street. 


Amiot, Lecours 
& Lariviere ..... 



 Hardware 
Merchants 


Specially.... 
Contractors' Supplies . . . 


59 J 
i-<V 593
.a 
St. Lawrence Street 


T e1epbones : 
Bell, East J6J6. 
Merchants, J 83. 


Montreal, Que, 


McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 


MaJlufacturers of 


Standard 


RAILWAY 
CARRIAGE . . 
PIANO Varnishes 
FURNITURE , 

 


Also "ZANZER/NE," 


House. School and 
Church Varnishes 


OFFICE: 


30 St. John Street 
Montreal. 


Factory and Warehouses: 
CORNER MANUFACTURERS, Ð'ARGENSON 
and ST. PATRICK STREETS, Canal Bank, 


o Fire Bricks and Fire Clay 
o English, Scotch and American. 
(') 


Boiler Sealing Blocks 
Gas Retorts 
Sto'Pe Linings and Grate Backs 
Drain Pipes and Connections 
Farm TIles 
Portland Cements 


(.'I 
o 


English, Belgian, German, AmerIcan 
and Canadian. 


Builders and Contractors' Supplies 


F. HYDE {3 CO. 


OFFICE. . . 


31 WELLINGTON ST. 
ßVl0NTREAL. 


Yards. . . 
KING, QUEEN and 
WELLINGTON STREETS. 


XIV 



J. Slatt/oau &- eo.} 
r// '/ 
utjrllr mu/. lok/(t:.-r' 

 Jlftj/U/" J'(')'j 


. 


miff //7 / / /' / . / 
1/ I/olp)a/f? J
I {/("CtJlltJtJ. 


. 


(jFf'(,. . 
(/J ú' OJ 
81 :://. y
 /r.)' . //;'f" I, 


../",.It',.';('J. . 


81 9/. C(;'
)'/":J ,qJ"NWJllJlf" .%w-I, 


./ItJJl/;r(/(f I 


DIAMONDS 


WE are in a position to give a spe- 
cial value in Diamonds, Our 
stones are personally selected in Eu- 
rope, bought for cash, mounted in our 
own factory, and sold at the lowest 
margin of profit, 


R. HEMSLEY 


255 p.
'Q 257 S1. James Street 
1915 Notre Dame Street 
MONTREAL. 


Established 28 Years. 


Merchants' Telephone 
1531. 


Bell T e1epbone, 
East 1425. 


Eorbtil 
 [
Otill
 


... 


· Manufacturers 


· of . . . 




 
(f!j) 
r 


DOORS, 
SASHES, 
. Etc. 


. 


N.B.-Alcways on hand a large 
assortment of mouldings of all kinds. 


. 


PAPINEAU ROAD 
13 and 15 Josephat Lane 


Rtf'll t {'II 
\"I. Call1l'l/lir a1/lll)r
IIOIltiKIII Wit', I
 


MONTREAL 
The ALE 

 
and STOUT 


 


OF.. . 



 


JOHN 
LABATT 


LONDON, 


are undoubtedly 



 (b
 6
st 
 


PURE, WHOLESOME, 
and SOUND BEVERAGES. 



 


Sold 
Everywhere. 


X\. 



\JATS2N'S 


0J.ì

 
0J.ì 
8UNÐEE
 
0J. 




 
0J.ì 
VlliISKY 
 
w 







 



 Is popular aU 
the world. 


over 


GIVE 
IT A 
TRIAL. 




 


ESTABLISHED 1856 


- - TH E 


J. C. [1cLarcn Bc1tin
 CO. 


MANUFACTURER{) 


H E tt . 
xtra Oak-tanned Leather Beltmg, 
H Th " I tt . 
1St e brand Rubber Beltmg, 


General Mill Supplies. 


FACTORY, MONTREAL 
292. 294 and 296 ST. JAMES STREET 


%ronto Office. 69 Bay Street. 


E. LEONARD & SONS 

 
l 


Engin
s, Boil
rs, 
fi
at
rs, 
St
am Pumps 


COMPLETE OUTFITS FOR ALL DUTIES. 


HIGHEST ECONOMY AND PERFECT REGULATION. 


00 


CORNER 


Common and91azaralh 
/raals, 


MONTREAL. 


International 


Rc
i8tration 


ONLY $3.00 A YEAR. 


The Annual Registration Fee inc1udes the Premium to the 


Ocean Accident amI Guarantee Corporation, 
LTD" 


OF LONDON, ENGLAND 


Capital 


$1,000,000 


FOR A 


Special Accident and Disease Policy, 


under contract \Hth this C01Jlpany. for $1500 in car;;e of deßth 
sustained by accident whi1
 riding in any cOI1'\"c::yance or \.t:hic1e 
propelled hy !-Iteam, electricin. cahle or horse-pO\Vf''T. and a 
wf:el....ly illdel11llity of ß1S. for nõt exct'eding- ten ,vt"eks. in case 
of di
ahi1ity front ßccidents sustained while riding as above. 
while cvc1ing or suffering fronl typhoic.l. typhu
I 
carlet fe\.'er 
or sn1aft pox. as explained in po1ic)o _ Pnder Phil1 .. A, I, the 
annual ft:'e of 
1.00 for rt:'gi.!-otration includes the prelniulU for a 
policy for 
5oo.o0 in case of death resulting fronl accident sus- 
taint:d a
 aho,-e specified, and a weekly inr1emnitv of f/ j , for 
not exceedinJ{ 'h'e v
.eek... in cßse of rli..ahi1ity front accu1ents 
or disease!oi Jnentioned ahove. n,' paying an extra annual 
pn-nlium of 
2, you secure in addition to plan ,. A II or .. B " the 
henefits of heing registered at the offices of this Con1l>any in 
l.ondon_ Pari... and other European cities, \\ here \\e ha\'e offices 
or repre"iel1tathes. 


MANY OTHER BENEFITS. 


rill Pili tUIi/a's call 011 or '1('1 it/' to 


HECTUI
 HrRTrBISE, Gcncral Agcnt. 
204 ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL. 


xn 



B. LEDOUX & CO. 



 


v:G\;.? .1' <:!,

 , 
'1J"a.J.$ 'fI::'
 
 


'.1.,



 
$] '''''

( 
 
' i
ir . 
T;J
 ' 
, 
f.liti 
-
.:


 


. . earrlag
 mak
rs · · 


TO 


England's CJ?oyal Family and also for H. R. H. 
Princess Louise and His Excellency the Mar- 
quis of Lorne, Countess of Derby and 
Lord Earl of Verby, Goevernor 
General of Conàda. 
}flwavs on band · · · 
LA TEST DESIGNS in 
CARRIAGES and SLEIGHS. 
· · }f fall Sollclt
d. · · 


93 Osborne St.. 


Montreal. 


e. 0. Seal/chemin & 71ls 



 


Booksellers and Publishers, 
Printers and Bookbinders, 


256 St. Paul Str

t, 


MONTREAL. 


Publishers of the re71CJ<W71ed . . . 

arousse s F;.enc
 -DidionarH 
WITH SUPPLEMENT OF . . , 


Canadian 6eosraÞ
H and 
BiosraS
H' - - .. 


fI@'" The best companion book of all who study, read or 
write the French language. 


Large '2mo volume, ',200 pages, 5,000 articles de\'ote,1 
to Canada, numerous engravings, maps, etc, 


Prlc
, 


Bound 75 c
nts. 


Eu
rytbing In tb
 Station
ry [in
 


L 


cc . ;' 
, . 


w 


2TIortol1, Pl]ill ips & ([0. 


Stationers, 



Ianl
 
ook 2Hal\ers 
. . 


 printers, 


\755 an
 \757 !1otre Dame Street, 


. 


!11ontreal. 


Cabl
 COd
S, 
Comm
rcial Books. 




 


J. J. UllEV & SON 


... 


564 Craig St, MONTREAL, Canada. 


montr
al 
Wir
 
Works 


. . . 


ESTABLISHED 1830 
BELL TEL. MAIN 2167 


. . . 


Architectural and Ornamental Wrought Iron Fencing 
and Grilles, Store Front Guards, Elevator Guards, Interior 
and Exterior Folding Gates, Safe Deposit and Burglar- 
Proof Vault Guards, Office Railings, Bank RailinRs, Iron 
and Steel Gates, Railroad Guards, Hatchway Guards, 
Fencing and Drive-way Gates, Window and Fanlight 
Grilles, also all kinds of Animal and Bird Cages. 
J[a/lltjildw'lTS', ,Jrcl1iil'ds' allli Ellgillce1s' 01,'1/ 
dcs
[[lIs CrlrtjitlÚ' cxemil'd ill ßrass, COþþ'T, A/lIl,'akd 
...."It'd or [roil, /I'il'l', Hal's or Nods, 
F:still1ates allli d,'siglls jilmis/u'd for stnial Wire 
/I "01 kjòr ClllIrdles, Public Halls, (?ffices, &,-, 
IV,' f{uaralll,',' qualilJ. o/mail'rialalld ';"01'/.:111(//1- 
s/Iiþ 10 be ulIl'x,'dkd. . 


xnI 



ESTABLISHED 1871 
.. 


T;e CentraloCumher Yard 
ßorn
r Dorch
st
r 
and St. ßharl
s.Borromm

 Sm
ts. 


Mahogany, Quartered Oak, Quartered Sycamore, 
Walnut, Cherry, 
and all Hardwoods, Fancy Woods, Etc. 


Riln=Dri
" ma"l
 floOring 
<fM 


PINE, SPRUCE, HEMLOCK 
LATH and SHINGLES. ,:I. 


. 


DIMENSION TIMBER CUT TO ORDER. 

:g
a
t';?

 of DRESSED LUMBER of all kinds. 


-\11 orners hy mail prolnptly fined "dth special care. 


JOHN A. BULMER B CO, 
MONTREAL. 


STRACHAN'S -- 
Gilt -Edge Soap 

 Q GILT EDGE SOAP is a h=ehold"word 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific. While it 
r is recognized as the best Laundry Soap offered 
to the public, 'We gi<ve a'WlilY premiums, hånd- 
somer and more useful than any other manufac- 
turers in Canada. The next time you 'Want a soap 
that "will gi<ve you satisfaction ask your grocer for 
one of our thirty-tcwo page premium books. We 
- gi<ve e<verything from a sheet of music to a high- 
grade piano by returning to us a certain number of 
soap "wrappers. CJ3esides Pianos "we gi<ve in pre- 
miums Bicycles, Se"wing Machines, Art Sirber- 
ware, crra'be[[ing Bags, Books, etc.. etc. 


We do not palm off anything of a trashy nature 
and you will find that it will pay you to exchange 
GILT EDGE WRAPPERS for some of our at- 
tractive and useful articles. 



 


WM. STRACHAN & CO., 
28-40 St. Timothée Street. 


Gilmour, Schofield 
 Co. 


DRY GOODS JOBBERS 


. . . 


WE INVITE ALL MERCHANTS WHO ARE IN A 
POSITION TO PAY CASH TO VISIT OUR STORE. 


This business "was established to proted the man 
'Who can take his cash discounts. 


WE CLAIM WE CAN SAVE YOU FROM 10 TO 25 PER CENT. 
AND THESE ARE OUR REASONS: 


".e sell on <ihort dates. 
\\.e make no had debts. 
"
e ne\. 
r hnv ahead. 
"We contiunål1y hunt for bar- 
gains. 
\Ve gh'e our customers the 
benefit. 
"We ne\"er huy front the first 
tnan, 


"?e hn\. by cotnpari-.ou, 
"We thoroughly kno\\ our 
husincs-. 
"'e do an our owu hnyiuJ{. 
\\"f: tu.lke 110 bad stock 
\\W e mind our 0\\ n bu!-'ine"'s 
In huving \\e 'keep our coun- 
ciL 
\\W e 'keep the expen...es dov
.n 


The secret of success: 


Know where to buy. 


COME AND SEE US 


Never mind if you are not in a posÜion to buy, the day may 
come when you WIll be free. 
Respectfully, 


GILMOl'R, SCHOFIELD & CO, 
364 St. Paul Street, MONTREAL. 


TAYLOR, TELFER & CO, 


manufactunrs and fontractors 


DEALERS IN 


ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 


TELEPHONES. 
FIRE AND 
BURGLAR 
ALARM SYSTEMS. 



 


Personal Attention Gicven to CJ?,epair 
... 
Work of all kinds. 


ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 


. 
44 13Peur}J Street, 


TELEPHONES: 
BELL MAIN 1123 m ^ ntr 
 a l . 
MERCHANTS 610 \J '" 


xnn 



Coteau St-Pierre Tel. Bell West mount J80 
T d. Marcbands J304 


@ 
Joseph Decarie, Fils 


 
 


Manufacturier d
 


Briques
 


et Entrepreneur 

 


P. O. BOX 55. 


VILLE DE ST-HENRI. 


BELL TEL: MAIN 1499. 


MERCHANTS' TEL. 846. 


ry.., 
'W 
.;t, 
atenaude & eo, 


DEALERS IN , 


Coal and Wood 


Ijav. Oats. 6raln of all kinds. 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 


360 CRAIG STREET 


OPPOSITE VIGER SQUARE 


MONTREAL. 


........ 


TEL. MAIN 611. 


REMOV ABLE 
 
W Steam Pipe and Boiler Coeverings, 
Paper Mill Board. . . 

 0 0 


Stoeve Linings and Fihre . 
Steam Packings. . . . . . 


Ashestic 


Wall 


Plaster and 
Woofing. 



 


Canaáían cAsbestos Company 


Corner of St. Peter and c.!oundling Sts. 
__ r MONTREAL. 


uhe Oldest.' ohe !l.Jest.' 
ohe Celebrated 
A 


Coon's $ie/zd 


Sani/zg Shinder 


.Ytlwa.!fo:J !Heliable. 
to 


The exact name "COOK'S FRIEND" and no other 


. . 
IS genuine, 
Purest materials, properly balanced and carefully 
compounded, have placed the Cook's Friend 
in the front rank and keep it there. 
All the best Grocers keep Cook's Friend in stock. 


XIX 



Cb
 eanada Engrauing :::
:

::m 
and [itbograpbing ßO'y [imlt
d 


CAPITAL, $150,000 



PRINTING kNR:
tHkTSS 


Stock Certificates, Bonds 
and Loan Documents. 


5 Þ 7, 9 Þ !!þ Bleury Street þ 



 
 


MONTREAL. 


UNION CARD AND PAPER CO. 
----- ------ - - -- - - - 


. 


GlaZed, EQamelled, lithO. aQd Coated papers 
CardbOardS and PlauJng Cards . . . . . . 

 olored Chinas a nd Ticket Boards 


NO.8 LATOUR STREET, 
..... MONTREAL. 


LUNcH - 
FROM 12,30 A.M. TO 3 P,M. 


WM O'BRIEN 
PROP. 


. PHONE MAIN 2889 
......... 



 



 


t
 . 
. 
O:5Jriens -=- 
-'--- 
CaÎé - -- - 
ù 
G goice -"Wines, W.O'. R
 < -- :oJ 
v"V
1I-'J'-'J 
S:iquors 
0 
and Gisars. 

 . 
. 
80 St. James St. .:fI. MONTREAL. 


HIGH GRADE CIGARS 


"" 


ASK FOR 


"RtlianCt ROSt=bUd" 
,""",--or" (oscana " 


IF YOU WANT SOMETHING 


. 


CHOICE AND RELIABLE 



 



 ."'

::::':""""'!" 

\ NOTHING 
pi TO EQUAL 
r THEM, 


RELIANCE CIGAR FACTORY 


62 McGILL STREET. MONTREAL. 



olme8 8 ßrpiQ 


PACKING 


.. 


BOX 
MANUFACTURERS 


fumhcr 21icrd1ants 


BELL TELEPHONE 8415 


""be. 


231 CHATHAM STREET, 


MONTREAL. 


xx 



ROOFING 
...AND Asp HAL TING 
.....- 


. "Our Work 
Survives n 


. 


Sh

t m
tal WOrk, 'It m
tal SkVlights, 

ooflng mat
rials, Builalng Papns. 
f
m
nt tUbS, 
Jlsphalt, f
mcnt, ana til
 Work. 


Canadian Agents 


CßOscrON CßLOWER CO. 


Hot Blast Heating 


and Pneumatic 
Stock Conveying. 


t19 
6
org
 w. R

d 
 eO. 


C. T. WilLIAMS. Proprietor. 


783 
 785 ßraig Sf. 


. . . montr
al. 


TELEPHONE UP 933, 


TERMS CASH, 


. . II
'I t:
I
""on
 1&15 , . 


. . . 


Jllb
rt fiolm
s 


Wbolesale 
Manufacturer of 


Gas, Electric and 


Combination Gasaliers and 


Brass Work. 


Write for my prices . . . 
t t th
v ar
 th
 [oW
Sf. 


t19 
231 ßbatbam Sf. 


. . montr
al. 


r J 0 h 11 



 ----' 
...111lIFpll!J 


ct 


Ç'o.. 


m
n's furnisbings 


QUALITY HIGH! PRICES LOW! 


n
Ck ti
s, :-Oew and natty, price
. 15, >5, .;5.50 and np. 
fOllars, Xew styles Bnd Be<t make" price,. 5, 15, >0 Bnd >5. 
Brac
s, Strong and dnrable. at >
. 35, 50. 60, ;." and SI.OO pair. 
6IQ

St Forwalkillgordrhil1gat i
. 1100. "'[.25.1.50. "2 25 pT. 
Shirts, .'\11 kinds at all price<. 
night Shirts Large and Roomy at SO. 75 and $1.00 each 


MILITARY BRUSHES, 
HAIR BRUSHES, SHAVING BRUSHES, 
TOOTH BRUSHES, 
LEA THER GOODS, Etc., Etc. 


fohn 9ll1lrph.!J & Co., 


2343 St. Catherine St., 


Corner Metcalfe. 


ALLAN 


LINE 


Roval mail St
amship ßo'v. 


ESTABLISHED 1854. 


The Company's fleet consists of 34 Steamers aggregating 
134,937 Tons. 
10,000 Tons) buildin g 
8,000" I 


TUNISIAN 
CASTILIAN 


Steamers sail weekly from Montreal during tbe Season of 
navigation to Liverpool, London, and Gla-g..w, also di.tinct 
services from Xew York, Boston ami Pbiladelphia to Glasgo\\. 
The vessels are provic1ed with every known device to secure 
Safety \\hich has al\\a
s been considered as of first import- 
anCe by the management. The Pas.enger Steamers are all 
modern and care has been taken to insure the comfort of al\ 
the passengers. To promote this end, the emire passt'nger 
acC'ommoltation is ligh,ed with the incandescent electric light. 
The saloons and staterooms are near the centre of tbe >hip, 
promenade deck tbe whole width and 150 feet long, Smok- 
ing rooms, Music rooms, etc" etc. 
Special attention has been given to the ventilation and 
sanitary arrangements. 
An experienced Surgeon is carried on all the Passepger 
Steamers. Rates of passage lower than by most first-da5s lines. 
Circular giving rateS and sailings on application to any 
Agent or 


H. &. A. ALLAN, 
MONTREAL. 


XXI 


.I 



THE BUGLE 
... 

 BRAND 


Is what all Soldiers 
Shou ld Drink . . . 


o
-}> <> I 
'-W <p, 

Í"..)ß I 
o
 -n1>,"'7.rv 



::: 


OLD SCOTCH WHISKY 
OLD TOM GI;\J 
UNS\VEETENED GIN 
BASS' ALE 
GUINNESS'STOUT 
t t t rh
V ar
 th
 6
st. 


......,. I' 


See that 
You get 
Them. 


. 


J. & R. McLEAt Agents 
23 COMMON ST. 


105 MEDALS AWARDED 


... 


..... . B) St..ecial Royal ".arrant to...... 


HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN 


H.R.H. The Prince ofWale5. 


"" "J EYES' 
 
.,:
t.'-::'" FLUID ". 
1- 
 


THE STANDARD DISINFECTANT, 
NON-POISONOUS 


COL. McKINNON, Secretary of the NATIONAL RIFLE 
ASSOCIATION, writes: 
"I am desired by the Committee to inform you that they are 
qulie satisfied Wl
h the manner in which you carried out the disin- 
fection of Bisley Camp, dunng the last and previous years, and 
<VIII gladly entrust the work to you this year. ,. 


SAMPLES ON APPL/CA TION. 


Je}Jes 8anifar}J Compounds Co. 
of Canada, 
3G Hospital Street, __01. __01. MONTREAL. 


Stafldard J3 rand s 


. 


POmmERY cHßmPßGNE 
Kilmarnock Sc
tcn WniSky 
ScOweD De's min eral Waters 
JonQstOQ'S Clarets 
SaQdemSQ'S Ports and SOerries 
Jßarie Brizard & Ro ger's Liqueurs 
BoucOa rd's BurgUQdies 
. KocO, LautereQ's aOiQe WiQes. 


. 


. 


. 


&
 l 
 IF you wish to shoot well, 

 
 
 "'" see that your eyes are 
in perfect condition. 
Many persons think that they have per- 
fect sight when they might have more 
distinct vision. 


CEO. BARRA T 


PRACTICAL OPTICIAN 
2365 St. Catherine Street VI 
lYlONTREAL 


A Full Line of 
Optical 600d5 
also. . 


=-- 


 


.. 


eam
ras 


.. 


-,- 


and .. 
Photograpbic 
SUPpll
5. 


'- - 
....--'" 
k 


,. 


Dt""-t'lopill
 .uut 
printing OQne 011 
Tt:'a..un.lhle tenus. '- 


ßa,aloguu info - 
 - 


"-- -----" 


XXII 



AOUIN & IrZWEIRE 


Manufacturers of 


Sash, Doors and Mouldings 
Turning, Carving, Etc. 


PLANING AND ,)j..
,___ 
.+- > 
-41 

 
)>)'
 
. 
SA W MILL. . , 


@ 


-Corner Vinet and Tracy Streets 


....... 


ST. CUNEGONDE. 


PHONES ,Bell 8002 
I Merchants 1249. 



 
 
 


@ o 
" . 0 
<Po' 


Swimming t 
T urkish t 
Russian and 
Private 


Baths 

 @ 


Laurentian Baths, 


Cor. Craig and Beaudry Sts. 



'--MONTREAL. 


LADIES. . . 


Monday Morning, Wednesday Afternoon. 


'''RodCJoers'' 
b 
Cutler,'r 


PLEASE SEE 
THAT THIS 
EXACT 
MARK 
IS ON EACH 
BLADE. 


SOLE AGENTS FOR 


H,-\S XO 
EQL\L 


IS ST. HELEX STREET, 
"" 
 1IO
TREAL. 


By wearing one of 


ENJOY 
YOUR 
OUT OF DOOR 
SPORTS 


Snoreg's Rigbg Waterproof BicgCle 
Dr Golf Suits -- 
 


They admit the air but keep out 
the rain. The feeling. appearance, or 
porous properties of ordinary t"'e
d are 
not changed by RIGBY. It sImply 
renders goods repellent to ""ater, yet the 
cost is not increased. 


XXIII 



Perrin's Gloves 



 ,. 


.. 
.. 


For LADIES 
GENTLEMEN 
and CHILDREN 



 

 


If you need a pair of Stylish 
and durable Gloves 


... 


Ask for 


..-../ 


5Prrin's Sloves 
, 




 


They are 
the 


Best 


T HE MOLSONS BANK 


INCORPORATED BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT 1B!5B 


HEAD OFFICE, - MONTREAL 


P.id up C.p't.I, $2,000,000 00 
Re.t Fund, $1,500,000 00 
Re.erve for Reb.te on Current Oi.counts, $60,000 00 
Profit .nd La.. Account, $26,829 68 $1,606,829 68 


Board of Dlndou: 


WM. MOLSON MACPHERSON, President. 
S. H. EWING. Vice-Pr..idenl. 
W, M. RAMSAY, SAMUEL FINLEY. 
HENRY ARCH BALD. J. P. CLEGHORN, 
H. MARKLAND MOLSON. 


F WOLFERSTAN THOMAS, General Manager. 
A. D. DURNFORD,/nspeclor ti. 
?t
't5


AN, : Assl. Insp 


Colledions T1'!âde in all Parts of the Dominion 
and returns promptly remitted at Lo'West Rates 
of exchange. 


Commercial Letters of Credit and Travellers' Circular Letters 
Issued, Available in all Parts of the World. 


BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA 


1.1.\01 


(Incorporated J832) 


Capital, 


s
r"
 and "ndi"id
d Profits, 


$1,500,000.00 
$1,626,634.20 


LIST OF OFFICES 
neva Scella nrw BrunsWick Ontarle 
Amherst, Campbellton, Toronto. 
Annapolis, Chatham, Wnt Tndln 
Bridgetown, Fredericton, Klngston,Jamalca 
Digby, Moncton. 
Halifax, Newcastle, Prlncr f:dward Ts'd 
Kentvllle, St. Andrews, Charlottetown, 
Liverpool, St. John, Summerside. 
New Glasgow, 5t. Stephen, newfenndland 
North Sydney, Sussex, St. John's, 
Oxford, Woodstock. 
Pictou, Harbor Grace. 
Stellarton. Ðurbtc Unltrd Stain 
Westvllle, Montreal. Chicago, III. 
Yarmouth. Paspeblac. Calais, Me. 


7he 5lohert 5lerord eO. 

imiled, 


cStaamslllP ./'tgants 


.,iJ ð ' Commission 9llarchants 


23 and 25 
ST. SACRAMENT ST. 


. 


Montreal 


AGENTS FOR 


Donaldson Line f01 Glasgow. 
crhomson Line for Lonáon. Leith. de. 
Pickforá {3 Black Line for the West 
Ináies. 
Cory Ltne for Caráiff. 


XXI\' 



Montreal City and District 
Savings Bank 


Establish
d 184t1 


Capital SubsC7'tbed - 
Capital Paid up - 
Reser<ue - 
UndhJided Profits 


$2,000,()(X}.00 
600,000.00 
400,000.00 
193,000.00 


Hon. Sir William Hingston, 
Henri Barbeau, 


- President. 
- Manager. 


Head Office, 


176 ST. JAMES ST. 


BRANCH OFFICES 


656 NOTRE DAME EAST 
2312 NOTRE DAME WE.ST 
1232 ST, CATHERINE ST. 
COR. GRAND TRUNK AND SHEARER ST. 


The Bank's Act oj Incorporation is so framed as to afford all 
possible protection to Deposl
ors mcluding zoomen and minors. 


Fred R. Alley & Co. 


 
.e REAL
 
EST A TE 
INVESTMENT 


........ 


. 



 
f 


AND... 


. 


FINANCIAL 
AGENTS. 


. 


. 


. 


116 ST. JAMES STREET, 
fJVJONTREAL. 


Telephone, 
Main 1251. 


GARTH&CO. 


MA
UFACTURERS 
... 
PLUMBERS 
þ,y.<;) STEAMFITTERS 


Porcdain 
 Enamdl
d 
Tron Batbs 
 
 
 


BATH TRIMMINGS. 
GAS p.
'J ELECTRIC FIXTURES 



 
536 to 5.12 Craig St. lIONTREAL. 


Eug
n
 f. Pbillips ..... 
;o
!:;if



: EI
ctrical WQrks 
Sec. and Treas. 
(LIMITED) 
MONTREAL, Canada. 


Bare and Insulated Electric Wire 


Electric Light Line Wire 
Incandescent and Flexible Cords 


Railway Feeder and Trolley Wire 


Americanite, Magnet, Office and 
Annunciator Wires 
Cables for Aerial and Underground Use. 


u. s. FACTORY: 
AMERICAN ELECTRICAL WORKS, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
Ht:w yo..... STOAI: : 
P. C. ACKERMAN, AGENT, 10 CORTLAND STREET. 


CHICAGO STO'U: : 


F. E, DONOHOE, AGENT. 241 MADISON STREET, 



xv 



WHEN YOU WANT... 


Silh j/zread 


. 


21nderloear, 
Sfosieru or &Ûtts 


. 


. 



 

 


. 


stamped on the goods, is proof of the maker's 
faith in the quality of them. 


eorticdli Silk eO. t [fd. 
12 Sf. nïcbolas Sf. 
. . . mcnfr
al, ean. 


McClary Man'f'g Co. 


MANUFACTURERS 
OF . 


Sto

St furnac
St 
Enam
"
d War
t Cinwar
t 
tt 


Head Office: 


LONDON, ONT. 


Branches: 
Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver, 


m 
W Al TER C. HAGAR, 


J'n.:Jurance !l.Jroke r .3 

 ...- 


. . . SPECIAL AGENT. . . 


THE GUARDIAN FIRE AND LIFE 
ASSURANCE CO. þ 


Of London, Eng. 


@ 
313 CJ30ard of Trade CJ3uildingÞ 


8rIonfreal, Canada. 


æ 


-/' 


r- 
?,/ 


r 
- - 


..r!'" 
r:' , 


... 
" - ( 
.. .f 
Jj,' 'I . ; 
I --;: l H". 
"111 11'1'11:1 
J; .. 
:
... 

 
 . If" 
. . 
 . 
'I: I.. ILfl: ......... 
I ,.
 
_, L 
BISHOP ENGRAVING and 
PRINTING CO. 


288 ST.]AMES ST., <'j'aâng Victoria Sq.) 
Station
rs Blank Book makm, 
ngra\1
rs. . 
t [ithographm, Book 
 :Job Prlntm 


THE BEST WORK AND RIGHT PRICES. 
GET OUR PRICES Fo.. YOUR NElEna. 


BISHOP ENGRAVING and 
PRINTING CO. 
288 ST. JAMES STREET, M TREA 
<'j'aâng Victoria SQ.) n. ON L. 


xxn 



! 
 



 



 
e. ._ 
..... 
..... 
._ e. 
..... 
.- -. 



 


Bell Tel. 
8025. 


Merchants 
Tel. 550. 


mitCb
II' s 
Scotch and Irish 
Whiskies 


-w 
Edward ea
anagb eQ. 


Manufacturers. . . 
Importers and Agents. 


CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 


.Jtardware, Oils, !Paints, Coal. 


...ARE... 


. . . Sp
cialti
$ . . . 


Always Popular 


llluminating and [ubricatlng Oils, 
"Sun" Bcil
r ecmpcund e e e 


TAKE 

NO 
OTHER. 


2547-2553 NOcrRE DAME Scr. 


Corner Seigneurs Street. 


WAREHOUSES. . 1r Jf 
Sf. Henri. Mile End, 1 Yl ONTREAL 
and 355 Richmond Sf. · 



 
CAPITOL SCRANTON 
COAL 



 
 Us
 
 
 



i: 


JI first=dass 10 c
nt 
Smok
. 


It 
is 
r- 
tb
 t:!; C 
\ 6
st 
: 
 ;:! ____ .;..

 '\ 
.\ 
 (
\) r>. .)) 
G 
 
jY";
>s

J'fr 

 
\ \Sfi)
rC: 

 
 

-

 



.
 


., e 


E. N. CUSSON & CO. 


MONTREAL. 


XXYII 



Pilkington Brothers t Ltd Official Figures 


MANUFACTURERS 
. 
OF.. . 


.. 


Polisb
d Plat
 
 
 


 .. 
o . . . and Window (1lass 


9/a/n and !íJevelled 
9ll/rror 9/ales, 


Rolled Plate, Fancy Cathedral Glass, &c. 


DEPOT: 


Busby Lane, 


MONTREAL. 


I WANT A... 


c. THEORET 
 


...... 


LAW BOOKSELLER 
. .1 
p,ÿ.'J PUBLISHER e e e 
11 AND 13 
ST. JAMES ST, ...MONTREAL, CAN. 


",0,& 


......PUBLISHER OF...... 


ABBOTT'S RAILWAY LAW OF CANADA, 1896 
B LI G H 'S QUEBEC STATUTES LAW INDEX, '98 
CRANKSHAW'S JUSTICES OF PEACE'S GUIDE, '95 
H 0 L T'S INSURANCE LAW OF CANADA, '98 
LAFLEU R'S CONFLICT OF LAW. - '98 
LA REVUE LEGALE. - - - - - - '98 
LA REVUE DE JURISPRUDENCE, - - '98 
R.S, WEI R, LLD., CIVIL CODE P.Q" - '98 


FOPR LEADING PAPERS 
OF CANADA 


.:J..:J..:J. 


Montreal Daily Star. . . 5'0,0001 
Montreal Weekly Star . 100,000 t 150,000 
[liThe FaJIlHy Herald find \Veekl) Star"] J 


Toronto Daily Globe . . :H'5 oo } 
Toronto "Teekly Clobe 26,000 60,5 00 


Toronto Daily Mail. . . 32,000 } 
Toronto \\Teekly l\Iail, . 25,000 57,000 


London Daily Ach-ertiser 8,000 } 
Lonclon\VeeklyAch-ertiser 22,000 3 0 ,000 


Deæmber, r898. 


New Hat. +,l!t;:-=-
 
,
 

 
AND I WANT TO 
FIND OUT. . . 


j. E. D
slauri
rs 
 eo'S 


-- 



 


Hat 
Store 


IT IS AT ... 
No. 2050 NOTRE DAME ST. 


2 Doors from Chaboillez Sqr. 


One minute walk from 
G. T. R. Station. 


MONTREAL. 


xxnu 



LINOTYPE COMPANY, 
=è-
 
The linotype /
 ' 
Type Bar Machine I 
 , 
i

 

 
- 
,'JùB ] '

' 
,
i 
 , 
-.i fJ! '-, 
i
-:
It !ltl t
 . . r .
 fr
 -
. . 
...1 
11 "W h 
.L ,n.
, J 
I -- 
-
 /- 

,
 ------- 


MAKERS 
OF. . 


The "Oliver" 
Typewriter 
Special Tools 
Special 
Machinery 


WORKS AND OFFICES 


156 St. Antoine Street, 


Send for 
Catalogues. 


...MONTREAL. 


, . . ESTABLISHED 1854_ _ . 


.. . 



. [a
all

 
 
 


IMPORTER and 
MAKER of all kinds of 


.
 
. 


MUSICAL 
 
INSTRUMENTS 


C}?epairing of all kinds. 
CViolins made to order. 


35 Sf. [amb
rt Hill, 


montr
al. 


]. P. JI. d
sCrOiS maiSOnS 
eO. 


I.I
 


. 


fmporlers 
.i' 9llanllTactllrers 


. 


Wholesale 


SJÛllill erg 

i: 


goods 


"" 


'V"_ 


1801 NOTRE DAME ST., 


. 


Montreal 


FELIX SAUVAGEAU 


General Contractor 
and Valuator. -- 
, 


Carpenter, Joiner & Builder 

 All kinds of Jobbing 

 promptly attended to. 



 


SHOP and 'OFFICE : 


189 ST. ANTOINE STREET. 


Bell Telephone, 
Main 2637, 


... MONTREAL. 


XXIX 



FAUCHER & SON 


Tmpor 'rrs and Dra'rrs In fiardwar
 


Carriage Wood Work & Trimmings 


SMITHS' COAL 


AGI:NTS fOR 


R. Ingbam ßlark
 6J ßo's I Condon, Eng.) Uarnlsb
s 


796 to 802 CRAIG STREET 
Corner of ... 
. C)' Jl. Q '7I.T7" RE ' .il L 
Little 5t ""ntoineStreet. 
""ctrJI JY j J n 


\Y. H. D. YOU
G. L.D.S., D.D.S. 
.... __un 



Æ
- 
 
ij
cçn

1NJ 
 

 
 
 - -- 
 

INJ1ín
 'f 

_ j

'
 
 1694 NOTRE DAME ST.. 
=-=-s;;
= 
 MOf'.:TREAL. 


ONLY FIRST-CLASS. WORK. 
Teeth Extracted without Pain by New Process. 
Sets ordered in the morning can be delivered in the 
afternoon. Telephone, Main 2515, 


vVightman
fl 
Sporti ng Goods Co. 


FISHING TACKLE, FOOTBAL
S, 
BOXING GLOVES, 
STRIKING BAGS, SNOWSHOES, 
CAMPING GOODS, ETC, 


403 ST. PAttI. STREET 
. . . MONTREAL. 


Our Motto" THE BEST." 


6 d ' GINGER ALE. 
SODA WATER, 
ur S APPLE NECTAR, 
CREAM SODA, 
-
 KOLA, 
CALEDONIA, &c. 
to b
 obtaln
d from all first-class groms. 


2 Gold, 3 Silver, 5 Bronze Medals Superior Excellence 
and .7 Diplomas awarded for.. 


J. EVELEIGH & Co. 


H. P. LABELLE & CO. 


Manufacturers of 


TRUNKS & TRAVELLING BAGS 


STEAMER TRUNKS 
AND SAMPLE CASES OF I[VI[RY DESCRIPTION 


Military Cases, Cartridge Boxes, Haversacks, 
STRAPS, OFFICERS' TRUNKS, ETC, 


Head Office and Factory - VITRE. cor. of Elizabeth St. 
City Warerooms 245 ST. JAMES ST. 




:
 PALMER'S 
{Ìj'--:;'
 Nl:W STYL E5 IN 
ìil . HAIR GOODS 
'-\.:'f..t;
\\:'- We carry the LARGEST STOCK 
,.' .... in Canada, 


OUR BORDEN HAIR GOODS. . . 
ARE UNEQUALLED fOR WEIGHT. QUAlITY AND BEAUTY. 


1745 NOTRE DAME ST. 


TEL. MAIN, 391. 


1657,1659,1661 NOTRE DAME ST, 
MONTREAL 


MANUFACURERS 


\ND. . . 


FURNITURE DEALERS 
PARLOR, BED ROOM, DINING 'Z:ur n i t ur
 
ROOM, HALL AND KITCHEN'" 
ETC., ETC., ETC. 


Saw and Planing MilL.. 
H 
 F A IU ,.

 X 


Doors, Sashes, Blinds, Turning, Shaping, Mouldings 


Sawing and Planing 


10 FAUTEUX AVENUE 


Bell Tel. 8593. 


ST. CUNEGONDE. 


xxx 



TELEPHONE. MAIN 2733. 


x X $Jrosseau & eo. 


REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
AND INSURANCE BROKERS. 
LOANS and INVESTMENTS 
PRIVA TE ESTA TE a"d TRUST admi"ist.r.d. 


13 ST. LAMBERT HILL, 
BETWEEN NOTAE DAME AND ST JAMES ST 



MONTREAL. 


B. ETHIER
 


DEALFR 1:\. . . 


\VOOD and COAL 


. ............ 


N APOLEO
 STREET, near Canal 
and 1119 ST. J.UrES STREET 
. . . MOXTREAL 


MUNDERLOH & CO. 


ALL KINDS OF 


ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
ELECTRIC FIXTURES 
DYNAMOS, MOTORS, ETC. 


61 Sf, Sulpice Street, '" MONTREAL 




 f\
r20I
 

 HIGH CLASS 
- 
 CIGAR 
The 

 
CJ3lackstone 0 (j 
Cigar Factory M 1 
. . . MAKERS . . . ontrea 


J · ....
.Q..
..H 9. 
 M ç: . ... _......... 
Q: 

lR\lR\ll
ij
 M
[K\
IR\ 
G 1W1\!

n

. 
}U'OC
S>S>. 

. 


RepaIrs of all kinds on the shortest notice 
and at Low PRICES. 


WITH LARGE STORAGE 
94
,,
!;2

:
d
:
' MONTREAL 


Office Tel" Main 1265. 


Branch and Residence Tel. 3087 


E. e. mount 
 
o.t 


PLUMBERS. . . 
GAS and STEAMFITTERS 
and ROOFERS 
.& .:J. .:J. .:J. 


c 


BrADcb 510ft : 
eot
 Sf. Jlntoin
 

oad 


784 eraig Str

t, 
it it .. mcntr
al. 


TELEPHONE, MAIN 1694. 


CABLE AOORI[5S: 
BREVET. MONTREAL. 
OIRI[CTOAY COOl[ USED 


_ Orr,cE: reR . 
PATENTS, DESIGNS, TRADE MARKS 
OND COPYRIGHTS, 


HANBURY A. BUDDEN 


F. M,CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF PATENT AGENTS 


u. s. REGISTERED ATTORNEY No 1088. 


ADVOCATE, PATENT AGENT. 


NEW YORK LIFE BUILDING, MONTREAL. 


For the BEST forms of . . . 
LIFE & ACCIDENT INSURANCE 
The 

 Travelers Insurance 

) 
t"i Company 
Of HARTFORD, CONN. 
[tb
ral eontracts FRANK F. PARX,INS, 
Chref eAgent, 
13t1 St ]am
s Stn
t. 
. .. montnal, P.Q 


Apply to 


<< 


[ow
st Ratu. 


XXXI 



Dominion Wire Mfg. Co. 



 . . LIMITED. _ 


. ----.:W ORKS AT LACHINE 


(NEAR MONTREAL.) 


OffICES: 
TEMPLE BUILDING 
MONTREAL. 
p.
 65 FRONT ST, E" 
TORONTO 
WAREHOUSE: 
492 ST PAUL ST. 
MONTREAL. 


. . ll!anu'aClnrrr. 0' . . 


Iron, Steel, CJ3rass and Copper Wire 
Steel and CJ3rass Wood Scre'J:vs 
Steel Wire Nails 
Steel and Brass Jack Chain 
" Crescent" Coat and Hat Hooks 
Spring Cotters, Staples 
Wìre 'Ðoor Pulls 
Bright WÚ'e Goods and Mill Wìre Goods. 
All carefully packed and neatly labelled 
and guaranteed second to none. 


MORRIS MICHdlELS 


, . Tmportrr 0' 'finr. . 


Øaoana 
" 


Cio'at:s 
" " 


and of high grade European novelties 
of every description. 


ROTUNDA WINDSOR HOTEL AND CHATEAU FRONTENAC 


MONTREAL. 


QUEBEC, 


Established in /882 


}'ð'ler virr e's 
-Restaurant 


o 


1752 NOTRE DAME STREET 
MONTREAL 


GORDON A. MELVILLE, Proprietor. 


TELEPHONE MAIN une: 


E. A. GERTH 



 


2235 St. Catherine St. 
Queen's Hall Block 


MONTREAL 


Dir
tt ImpQrt
1'$ t t t 
fiigb Class fia
ana Cigars 
JlArnt . 
W. D. & H. O. WILLS, Bristol, Eng. 


TOBACCOS t 


and 


t 


CIGARETTES 


], BENJAMIN DAGENAIS 



 


GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
NO, 210 GUY STREET 


'" 


,., 


" 


MONTREAL. 


.. 


Bell Telephone 8118 


.... 


All kind. of Bulldinlts erect. 
ed and General Repairs 
done at the shortest notice. 


) 


f:stimales 'nrnisbed. 
$atls'actlon guaranteed. 


SPECIAL T'\ : P
ans and Esti- 
mates furnished for Embossed Ceilings in SteelJ' AluminumJ' etc.J' etc. 
All kinds of Goods made of Steel in Sheets for the Huilding Trade. 


J. O. LABRECQUE & CIE 


Wood and Coal 


83 WOLFE STREET 


Bell Telephone, East. 7257. 
Merchants Telephone 358. 


. . . MONTREAL 


Bell Telephone 83 II. 


E. LEMIRE 


. . Dqalrr in 


Wood & Coal of all kinds. 
Straw, Grain and Hay. 


Wholesale & Retail. 


367 RICHMOND ST. 


Jill ordrrs promptlv executed In all parts 
0' tbe cltv wltbout extra cbar9r. 


MONTREAL. 


SPECIALTY: Dry wood for lighti"g stwe.. 
at lIIudera.fe prices. 


XXXII 



r. eohen << Son, 
Anthracite & Bituminous CO A L 
COALS: Cape Breton & Scotch Steam Coal, 
American & Welsh Anthracite also Smith Coal. 
FOUNDRY SUPPLIES: 
Lehigh Coal, Coke, Moulding Sand, Plumbago 
Facings, Stove Polish, etc. 
DRY CUT WOOD & CHARCOAL 
36 PRtNCE !SoT. MONTREAL TELEPHONE 814 


1mport
a air
ct from mJn
$. 


Merchants' Tel. 135. 
Bell Tel. East 806. 


CHS. CHARLAND 


.. DEALER IN 


Hay, Stra'W; 
 WOOD {3 COAL 
Oats, Bran, &c. 


OF ALL KINOS. 


53 VITRE STREET 


Specialty: Kindling Wood of all/llnds. 


. . . MONTREAL. 


The James Robertson Co. 
Limited. 


Lead . . . 
Manufacturers 


MONTREAL 
TORONTO, 
WINNIPEG 
ST. JOHN. 


SHOT A SPECIALTY. 


H. BOKER B CO. 

i: 


Razors, 


, 


Scissors, 


Pocket- Cutlery. 


l TR
E BRAND 


H. VINEBERG & co. 


WHOLESALE 
CLOTHIERS 


25 ST. HELEN ST. COR. NuTRE DAME ST. 


MO;\JTREAL. 


PATENTS TRACE MARKS 


OWEN N. EVANS 


Patent Attorney 
(Foreign Member Chartered Institute Patent Agents, Eng.J 
Successor to the late F. H. REYNOLDS, 
"Temþre Buirdins. ST. JAMES ST. 
MONTREAL. 


COPYRIGHTS 


DESIGNS 


When you want a good, large load of Dry 
Kindling Wood, cut Slabs, Hardwood, 
or any kind of good Coal, be sure 
and call up 
lilt" Wilson Company 


HEAD OJ"FIC
: 
'PHONES, 

I
't

2i.927. 188 WILLIAM STREET, 


L. BRUNELLE 


[Merchant CJã.í[or 


/906 Notre Dame St. 


BAl__ORAL BUlLDI"'c.. 


BELL TEL. MAIN 106. 


. . . MONTREAL. 


H. JOSEPH & CO" 


CANADA CHAMBERS, J6 ST. SACRAMENT ST. 
MONTREAL 


Real Estate and General eAgents 
and Valuators. 
Special Attention gi<Den to Management of Estates 
BELL TELEPHONE MAIN 2866. 
CABLE ADDRESS' .. CALLJO," MONTREAL 


I PI PlRI.A.L 
[MBR.OGftTIOfi 
- r rIf.L Y RH[u
AT'SM, LUMI!;AGO 
flQl C6[5T CoLOS.SOR[THROAT: 
CORES SPRAINS.BRUISU,STlrr..N[SS.nc, 


XXXII[ 



MILK! 



 



 


A\"oid the danger of tuberculosis and other 
diseases resulting from unhealthy animals, and 
uncleanly dairies, hy taking your milk from. ' 
ELMHURST FARM . fJ;;g
1a;a
n&"J:%:/:D"V"S. 
A limiterlnumber of families supplied com- 
mencing' 1st August inst. 
T. A. TRENHOLME, Prop. 
Tel. Mount /480. MONTREAL WEST. 


D. A. McPherson & Co. 


. . . Exporters of . . . 


Cb

s
 and 6utt
r 


o 


. 


D
al
rs in f1rain and Cbf
st factory SUI!I!Ii
s 
, 


.... .. 


7J William Street, $ MONTREAL. 


L0ST 
'\' 


..-../ 


U For the <want of a nail a shoe 'Was lost: for 
the CWdnt of a shoe the horse 'Was lost: for the 
'Want of a horse the rider 'Was lost, being (}<Ver- 
taken and slain by an enemy." 
Military n1t
n \\ ill a\"oid a similar ca1.lInity 0\ er- 
taking them, if they \\ ill only insist upon their farrier 
shoeing their horses \\ ith the" C" brand horse nails, 
made by 


THE CANADA HORSE NAIL COMPANY 


MONTREAL 


GASCON FISH CO. 


Curers and Packers of . . . C df ' h 
Dressed, Dried, Boneless, 0 1S 
Salted and Fresh w
 .:f. 


H IVORY" 


GASCONS, 


Brand of Bon
l
ss Cod 


Bonaventure Co., Que. 


Ð. HATTON & CO., Sale cI1gents. 


L. J. A. SURVEYER 


I ESTABLISHED lRee) 


6 ST. LAWRENCE MAIN STREET 
. . . MONTREA L 


IRONMONGER 
CUTLERY 


 BUILDING HARDWARE 
TOOLS, &c. 


r;;C:;;


1 
o LARGEST SWORN DAlLY CIRCU- 0 
g LA TION IN CANADA WITHOUT g 
<> EXCEPTION. 0 
I üv.. 65,000 

 I 
0 0-ס<>סo-o0-ס<>סo-o0-ס<>סo-o 0<><><>-0-000 0-ס<>-ס-o-o <> 


7Jò/unteer Jfouse 


WILLIAM WISEMAN, Prop. 


461 Craig Street MONTREAL 


J. w. et-Ju
Qe) 



 HEATING, PLUMBING, 

 
'_. VENTILATING, GENERAL JOBBING, 
2 ST. ANTOINE ST. Tel. Main 548. 
26 BAYLE ST. , , . MONTREAL 
124 IRVINE AVENUE WESTMOUNT. 


R


_
_!-:,_
_
_
_
 C!?_r:-!!:'l_
_C_T_
_I?._ 
T 


Tel. Up BDl. 


, Cb
 f',1 
nsington 
W Ò)'--'
)
 


W M. POTTS. PROPRIETOR 


122 W'NDSOR STREET 


. " . MONTREA L. 


4 0001'18 "RO'" C. P. A. DEPOT 


Choicest of Wet Goods alld Cigar.. 


P. ELLIOTT 


JÞ 


D
al
r in . . . 


eboic
 6roc
ri
S, C
aSt 
Win
s, [iquors, PrO\1iSiOns t EtC. 
FINE CREAMERY BUTTER a Specialty. 
CornEr CJ3erthelet and City Councillors Streets, 
.wONT REAL. 


xxxn" 



Your 3teadquarters .. .. .. 


While in Montreal should be 



, rb
 St. [awr
n
ç
 
an 


WQý: 

W' 
-

., 
, '
r 


BECAUSE it is the most centrally situated and 
--- -- ------------------------------- 


!

_
Eë:iI_ly___
o
911cted Hotel in the city. 
Its cuisine and service are of the highest order, 
and it counts amongst its many Patrons the leaders 
of the Social and Political worlds of both Continents. 
---- _ "---- 


IllUSTRATED GUIDE BOOK 
FREE UPON ApPLICATION. 



lt? 
/'/ 1 \" 


j-{envý j-{ogatt, 
Proprietor. 







.S;,.


:.ð
:..5O\
:.ð:,S;;;:, 
1Jf!7

.P
:';3'p

.P


.P

 

 You 
r
St
nt 
 

 Want a 
 

 6 i
 y 
l
 
 
 
t!lJ. \. \. \. 
 
f!l}. f!l}. 
f!l). \Vt' are sure. hecause fI1"\ 
. . yuu "ant the BEST. ".V
. 

 T ALKlNG P
INTS: 
 
l!J. f!J. 

 Beautiful1\" designed fral11t:..,. fI1"\ 
. . Drop of crank hanger. 2* illche.s. ".V
 

 Se'"en-inch crank
 '"' 
;11
 Fxpanders in handle:: hars and "iaddlt: PO"'t. 
 
,,:\['\1. Elegant hlack and oth-e 
Tt'en fini
h. 
IJ
 
fri., The most desirab'e ,addles_ 
 
":\l
 Ro!'e'\\oo
 fil1i
hed rinls. 
 
@. Dunlup tire.... Etc.. etc.. etc 
Ï!J) W
 
 

 b tb and"'
ar
 
f!J'Q a

 
m !lOinq to s
1I a 
Ï5h lot of tlwm 

 T, W. BOYD & SON $75.00 

 MONTREAL, QUE, 
.











*-
 


$35.00 
$50.00 


J. -Emile Vanier, 
B.A.S. 
A.M. Canadian Soc. C.E. 
Member Soc. C.E. of France. 
Member Soc. of Architects of the 
Province of Quebec. 


SPECIAL TIES. . . 



 

 

 

 
IMPERIAL 
-t BUILDING 


ROADS 
".c RAILROADS 
..c.;C 
WATER WORKS 

 SEWER- 
AGE SYSTEMS 
..c"..c POWER 
PLANTS OF cALL <JJESCRIP- 
TIONS.;C.;C ELECTRIC LIGHT- 
ING 
"..c ARCHITECCIVRE ...c
 
ETC. 

..c 


MONTREAL. 


xxx\' 



Inðian (afavvQ (uve 
\ 
. 


J '-' S extremely rapid in its action on Catarrll, is entirely non- 
.....}-+ poisonous, and does not irritate the throat and nose when 
inhaled. It is also taken internally, acting as a tonic, in- 
creasing the blood circulation, and thus assisting the whole system to 
throw off the disease. 
This preparation is the most efficacious remedy for CATARRH 
now on the market. It was first prepared by the famous Sikhs, in the 
East Indies, and brought to this country by a British veteran. It has 
cured thousands of cases of CATARRH all O\'er the world. It is 
. curing thousands in Canada, It will cure \"on. \Yrite us, we will 
prO\'e our claim. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


INDIAN CATARRH CURE CO. 



 


I J. HISLOP, Proprietor I 


. .. Room No. 6-J46 ST. JAMES STREET 
d $ 00 
 ___ Montreal. 
SOc. an 1. . 


Price, 


HEAD OFFICE OF THE 


Jhe Jrust and 
oan 


"METROPOLITAN" PLATE GLASS INSURANCE Co. 


'i-.i 


c. A. SHARPE 


<;ucc )Y to Quesnel. Sharpe & Co \ 


IMPORTER OF. . . 


1Ø
 Platt, Window 

"d ornamtntal61ass 


PAINTS, OILS, VARNISH, 
WALL PAPER, ETC. 


Manufacturer of Mirrors. 
Bevelling a Specialty. 


J 621 Notre Dame Street, 
tcl
pbon
, mitin 2718. MONTREAL. 


Compang of Canada. 


INCORPORATED I3Y ROYAL CHARTER 
A. D. 1845. 


CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED $7.500,000 
. With powerio incre-se to $/5,000.000. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL - - $1.581.666 


RESERVE FUND 


$924,138 63 


MONEY TO LEND. 


ON CITY PROPERTY 
AND IMPROVED FARMS 


AT LOW RATES 
AND ON VERY DESIRABLE TERMS. 


ADDRESS: 


THE COMMISSIONER 


th
 trust and [oan ßompanv of ßanadA 


26 St. James Street. MONTREAL. 


XXXVI