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Full text of "Our College Times"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/ourcollegetimes1919211922 



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601 IEEE TOM 




OCTOBER 
1921 



,OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXKX>0000000<^OOOOCKXXXXXXXXXXX>CXXXXXX)OOOOOOOJ 

THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 




Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 

$5.50 

In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

W-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 

$7.50 $5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 

^OOC4X)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX}OOOOOOCXXXX300000000000000000COOC<>000( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo < 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

OOO0OO0OOOOOOOOOOOOOO€XXXXX9OOOOOOOOOOO0OOO0OO000OCXXK900OCX)0O0a 

jOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOeXXXXX)OOOOOOOC9000000000j 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 
"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO* 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 



Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L." Geyer 
Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



'OOOOOOOOOOOOCH300000000000CKXXXXXXX>OOCKXX>00000000000000000000' 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)GQOOOQQOQQQQOOOQQQQOQQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQQQOQQOOOQQQOQQOQQOQOOQOQ< 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 

J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer Jacob G. Hershey R. O. Diehl 

John R. Cassel J. B. Shenk John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder Monroe H. Metzler W. W. Moyer 

OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



GO TO 



HORSTS 1 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 
Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

—AND— 



J. T. SNYDER PAPER HANGER 



Florin, Penna. 



S. Market St., 



Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX}OOOOOOOOOS 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
)oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 




Write or Phone to 

FEY BONNET SUPPLY CO. 

Lititz, Penna. Bell-139R2 



For FREE catalogue of Ready-Made 
bonnets, bonnet-makers supplies 
and covering goods samples. 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE NEW 

FLORIN TRUST CO. 

Wishes to thank its many friends for their very generous support in making 
this new bank the successful institution it has become. We are getting new 
customers every day and extend an invitation to you to do your banking busi- 
ness with us. 

Interest paid on time certificates and savings accounts. 

WE GUARANTEE YOU 4 PER CENT. INTEREST AND 

100 PER CENT. SECURITY 



Florin Trust Company 

FLORIN, PENNA. 
E. J. NISSLY, President. N. F. ARNTZ, Treasurer. 



GO TO 



COLLEGE HILL GUY The BARBER 
DAIRY 



Pure Milk and Cream 



HE'S ON THE SQUARE 



Delivered Daily 



S. G. Graybill 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



SHOES OF QUALITY 

GO TO 

EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 

BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store'* 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches, 
Ivory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 



MRS. W. S. MORGAN, Proprietress. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
CO T\ L 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

Furnish The 

APPETITE 

And We Will Do The Rest 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



FREYMEYER'S BAKERY 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



Increase Profits by Liming 
Your Soil. 
White Lily Brand 99' o Cal. Carbon- 
ate Lime Will Fill Your 
Requirements. 
LANDIS STONE MEAL COMPANY 
Rheems, Penna. 



|00000000000000000&OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXKX>00000000^ 

DEMY & DETRA 



Dealers in 



Farm Implements and Repairs 



Ind. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



Your Patronage Solicited 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



O 
)oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)QOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 

THE BEE HIVE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



ry Goods, Notions 



AND FANCY GOODS 



Hosiery and Underwear 

ALWAYS THE LATEST 
in our 

Gent's Furnishing Department 



Visit Our Grocery Department 

"FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



BEST OF CANDIES 

We endeavor to keep a most complete line in stock at all 
times and respectfully solicit your patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 

Something New Every Day 
Cor. S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOO c 






WM. Z. ROY, Lancaster, Pa. 

Book Binder and Blank Book Manufacturer 



iM 



Date .LI Order No. 






Title 

Binding 



Owner 

Residence 
Remarks 



Cost 



.f* 



©ur College ftimes 

Volume XIX OCTOBER No. 1 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtown 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postofnce. 



: 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

■ 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

f Elsie Landis 
College News {j. D. Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 






Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Advisory Committee of Faculty 

J. S. Harley J. Z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Editorials 



BEGINNINGS 



Everything, big and little, com- 
plete and incomplete, had a begin- 
ning sometime and somewhere. 
Much speculative thinking has been 
done, as to the beginning of begin- 
nings. In other words, there is al- 
most no end to the discussions, past 
and present, as to the ultimate 
source of all things. Those of us 
who accept a great many things on 
faith call it God, and what an an- 
chorage to the soul this assurance 
affords ! Only he who trusts in God 
knows what it means. Many specu- 
lative theories have been expound- 
ed, as well as exploded; and, when 
all is said and done, most of us are 
of much the same opinion still. Phil- 
osophers may theorize, and scient- 
ists may go on discovering new facts 
yet none of them probably will ever 
arrive at an ulterior source, with, 
at least, any measurable degree of 
satisfaction. 

It is the beginning of smaller 
things than that of the universe, 
however, which concerns us chiefly 
now. So many affairs in everyday 
life depend on how we actually be- 
gin them. The old saying that "All 
is well that ends well", or "A bad 
beginning forebodes a good ending", 
is fraught with more or less doubt 
and superstition. It is better to say, 
"Well begun is half done". Why 



does a builder of a house insist on 
a firm foundation, — a thing so in- 
conspicuous and almost hidden from 
the public view? Or why does the 
engineer require that every stone be 
laid just right in the obscure sup- 
port of a large bridge? Simply be- 
cause it is the beginning of a mass- 
ive structure, and the strength of 
it depends upon the firmness of the 
foundation stones from the begin- 
ning. A single misplaced stone may 
involve the insecurity and death of 
hundreds of human lives. 

There is a striking parallelism 
in the preceding to the building of 
character. The strength and beauty 
of a character also rests on a foun- 
dation of good thoughts and right 
habits ; and thoughts and habits de- 
termining a character can often be 
traced to early life. The moral 
weakling began somewhere to sink 
and gradually go down. The de- 
bauchee is seldom swallowed up 
suddenly in the whirlpool of lust 
and vice in a single night. Some- 
where, and perhaps very early, 
there began in his life a tendency 
leading downward. It may have 
been a single wrong thought. Per- 
haps it was barely tolerated at first, 
but once endured, it was fondled, 
then pitied, and then embraced! 
Thoughts seldom remain alone and 
unfruitful. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



"Sow a thought, and you reap an 
action ; 

Sow an action, and you reap a 
habit; 

Sow a habit, and you reap a char- 
acter ; 

Sow a character, and you reap a 
destiny." 

School life abounds in lessons on 
"beginnings." Almost every day 
sees something well begun and well 
done, or something poorly begun 
and half done. Getting the first 
geometry theorem assures greater 
facility in getting the second. Mas- 
tery of the subject depends on the- 
orems mastered one by one, from be- 
ginning to end, with special empha- 
sis on the beginning. Getting one's 
breakfast in the morning, promptly 
at breakfast time, insures a certain 
degree of physical energy which 
no student can afford to begin the 
day's work without. A certain a- 
mount of physical exercise to begin 
a long period of study is a remark- 
able antidote for lack of concentra- 
tion and mental laziness. A Sunday 
quietly and religiously observed is a 
powerful forerunner to six busy days 
fraught with care and anxiety. 

Thousands of students have begun 
or are about to begin, a new school 
\ ear. Nothing is more important in 
a school career than to get a good 
grip on oneself the beginning days 
of the year. Surely, here, a founda- 
tion well laid, in first lessons mas- 
tered and programs carefully plan- 
ned, will result in the kind of in- 
tellectual house that will not fall 
when the rains descend and the 
winds blow. 



A year well begun in school, or 
out of school, is important; but, af- 
ter all, years are just made up of 
separate days. As the days, so shall 
the year be. Then, how do you be- 
gin your day? Someone has fitly 
said : "No day is well begun that 
does not begin with God". Quiet 
communion with God is nowhere 
more essential than at the dawn of 
a new day. It is like the tuning of 
an instrument. It produces harm- 
ony throughout the day because the 
soul is in tune with the Infinite. Not 
to be in tune means discord, and 
some of the results of this discord 
may be seen in the following verses: 

"Only a smile, yes, only a smile. 
That a woman o'erburdened with 

grief 
Expected, from you; 'twould have 

given relief 
For her heart ached sore the while, 
But weary and cheerless, she went 

away; 
Because it happened that very day, 
You were out of touch with your 

Lord. 
Only a word, yes, only a word, 
That the Spirit's small voice whis- 
pered, 'Speak; 
But the worker passed onward, un- 
blessed and weak, 
Whom you were meant to have 

stirred 
To courage, devotion and love anew 
because, when the message came to 

you, 
You were of touch with your Lord. 



"College men never graduate in 
a hurry. They do it by degrees." 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



COLLEGE LECTURE COURSE 

Eliabethtown College 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

The College Lecture Course this 
year will be the strongest and most 
attractive ever given by Elizabeth- 
town College. There are six num- 
bers, — four lectures and two music- 
al numbers. All of these numbers 
will be given in the town Market 
House. The following is a short 
write-up of each number: 

On November 2nd, Rabbi Stephen 
S. Wise will give his popular lecture 
on the subject "The Teacher in a 
Democracy". Rabbi Wise received 
his preparatory education at the 
College of the City of New York. 
He was graduated from Columbia 
University at the School of Philos- 
ophy with the Ph. D. degree in 1901. 
He is a man with a passion for, as 
well as a vision of, a better social 
order, endowed with a magnetic 
personality and rare oratorical gifts. 
He has the power to kindle in his 
hearers his own buring real for nob- 
ler living and a finer humanity. His 
personality bristles. He is a lump 
of human radium. He has the 
square shoulder of an athlete, and 
the firm face of a fighter. His 
speeches are whirlwinds of elo- 
quence and humor. He was chair- 
man of the Zionist Commission to 
the Peace Conference and one of the 
delegates to Paris of the American 
Congress. In January 1919 the 
French Government conferred up- 
on him the Cross of Chevalier of the 
Legion of Honor for eminent ser- 
vices to the French Republic. It 
is very unusual that Dr. Wise can 



be gotten for so small a town as 
Elizabethtown. 

On November 15, the Harp Trio 
and Raymond Simonds will appear 
as the second number of the Col- 
lege Lecture Course. The Zimmer 
Trio is the only Harp Trio in the 
U. S. Their ensemble work affords 
some of the most exquisite program 
numbers ever presented on any lec- 
ture course. There probably never 
was a company organized which ex- 
emplified better the ideal program, 
in a program which all manner of 
people could enjoy whether they be 
ultra-musical or non-musical. The 
program is diversified and consists 
of harp solos, duets, and trios. The 
vocalist with the Harp Trio is Ray- 
mond Simonds of Boston. He is un- 
questionably the leading Tenor of 
New England. He has a splendid 
physique, superb technique and a 
voice which displays with its re- 
markable modulations the direct 
spirit of the songs. This number 
will give unusual satisfaction to all 
classes who may come to enjoy it. 

On December 6th, Dr. Charles 
Eaton, the big brother of New York, 
will appear as the third number of 
the Course. Mr. Schwab says of 
Dr. Eaton, that he is the finest man 
with whom he has ever been associ- 
ated. He considers him one of the 
most valuable men we have today. 
Dr. Eaton is an author of note as 
well as an orator of extraordinary 
power. His contributions in the 
leading journals of the U. S., Cana- 
da, and Great Britain and his edi- 
torial in Lesley's Weekly are copied 
far and wide. He is a friend of the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



common people. In one year he ad- 
dressed over a milliom working 
men. For ten years he was pastor 
of the Madison Avenue Baptist 
Church. Before coming to New 
York he was pastor of the great 
Euclid Avenue Church of Cleveland 
Ohio, of which Mr. John D. Rocke- 
feller has been a member for more 
than sixty years. At present he is 
Editor of Lesley's Weekly and is 
considered the world's greatest pi- 
oneer as a civil and social engineer. 

The fourth number of the Lec- 
ture course will be given January 
18th by Dr. Harry Balkin, the Char- 
acter Annalist of New England. Mr. 
Balkin interprets, and explains 
truths about yourself which you 
have intuitively known but have 
been unable to analyze. His lecture 
points the way for the development 
and maintenance of your best char- 
acteristics; warns what is peculiarly 
hurtful ; counsels to self improve- 
ment; guides in the choice of a vo- 
cation and gives social advice. Sim- 
ply stated his lecture tells you how 
to achieve success through a greater 
and better understanding of your- 
self and others. It is a lecture ev- 
eryone should hear. His subject is 
"What Job Am I Best Fitted For?" 

The fifth number of the course 
will be given on February the 15th 
by the Crawford Adams Company 
which is unquestionably the most 
popular musical company on the 
platform. For the past eight years, 
thiswonderful organization has been 
offered all the dates possible to ac- 
cept in a season. In some towns it 
is returning this year for the sev- 



enth consecutive concert. In theso 
stirring times there must obviously 
be some reason for this continued 
demand. Crawford Adams is the 
answer. He is rightfully named, 
"Wizard of the Bow." Adams is 
not only an excellent violinist, capa- 
ble of presenting the best in music, 
he is also a striking example of the 
influence of a dominant personality 
on an audience, Adams presents 
three distinct phases of musical ef- 
fort — the classical and the stand- 
ard, imitations with the violin, and 
request numbers. The last named 
has made him famous from coast 
to coast. He asks the audience to 
name any number which they may 
wish to hear — without hesitation 
Adams plays the request. In nine 
years he has not failed to play the 
piece mentioned. With Adams are 
artists of a like calibre. Marion 
Wilkins, reader and Charles Co- 
burn LaPierre, pianist. Miss Wil- 
kins is a graduate of the Powers 
School in Boston. She has a radiant 
personality and exceptional ability 
as a reader. Charles Coburn La- 
Pierre, a graduate of the Faelton 
School, Boston. He is a soloist of 
unusual brilliance and an expert ac- 
companist. He has as extensive a 
repertoire as Mr. Adams and accom- 
panies him on all of the request 
numbers. 

The last and greatest number of 
the lecture course will be given on 
Mar. 14 by Dr. Newell Dwight Hillis 
Almost everyone who reads or 
thinks, knows of the tremendous in- 
fluence Dr. Hillis has exerted on 
American life during the past de- 
cade. Successor of Henry Ward 



14 



OUR COLl£GE TIMES 



Beecher, he is one of the foremost 
ministers in our country today. He 
has been pastor of Plymouth church 
Brooklyn, New York, for nineteen 
years. Dr. Hillis' new lecture "The 
National Crisis, Bolshevism or a Bet- 
ter America," is considered his most 
masterly effort. It is a vital, thrill- 
ing human lecture with "American- 
ism" as its dominant keynote. You 
cannot afford to miss hearing it. Dr. 
Hillis is a master of the English lan- 
guage, a master of oratory, a mas- 
ter at presenting to masses of listen- 
ers the fundamentals of American 
Philosophy. He has proved this ov- 
er and over again through many 
successful years and has spread the 
influence in countless directions, but 
now in his latest work the "Better 
America" lectures, he places his art 
within reach of everyone who is in- 
terested. These "Better America" 
lectures, unlike the old-fashioned, 
dry, educational essays, are packed 
full of interesting stories and facts 
about virile America, her resources, 
her people and all of their fine tra- 
ditions and hopes for a still greater 
nation. When Dr. Hillis lectures 
you cannot fail to receive some germ 
of truth which will blossom to pur- 
poseful inspiration in your own life. 
No lecturer is great in himself, it is 
the connotative ideas which his 
words arouse, which make him val- 
uable. Dr. Hillis opens fertile fields 
for your mind to explore. He in- 
spires you to bigger things and a 
nobler life. 



CALENDAR 
OF COMING EVENTS. 



Nov. 2, 8 P. M. Town Market Hall 

First Number of the College Lecture 
Course. Subject: 

"The Teacher in a Democracy" 

by 

Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, A.M., Ph.D. 



Nov. 11, 7.30 P. M. College Chapel 

Program in the interests of Peace 
Conference. Speaker: 

Dr. H. M. J. Klein, of F. & M. 
College. 



Nov. 14, 8 P. M. College Chapel 

FOUNDERS' DAY 

Speaker: Dr. M. G. Brumbaugh. 



"Books are blossoms in the gar- 
den of thought.'" 



All Are Invited. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Xiterarv 






LITERATURE. 

Milton says: "Literature is some- 
thing so addressed to after times, 
that they should not willingly let it 
die." Shakespeare's definition is, 
"Literature is something ad- 
dressed not to after times, but to an 
eternal present, and invested with 
such a touch of nature as to maks 
the whole world kin." But a mere 
definition can not take the place of 
what one may call a real feeling for 
Literature. Wadsworth must have 
had this feeling when he defined 
poets as "those who gave us nobler 
loves and nobler cares." 

The study of literature broadens, 
enriches, and elevates the mind. It 
presents ever changing vistas of hu- 
man experiences which furnish for 
us sources of inspiration. 

Literature besides appealing to 
the feeling and intellect, appeals al- 
so to the imagination. If it did not 
open this door of imaginative activ- 
ity, there would be nothing to trans- 
figure the every-day duties of our 
lives, and nothing to take us away 
from the sordid things of earth to 
center our minds on heavenly 
things. 

Then, too, the study of Literature 
develops the spirit of service. We 
may see this manifested in all of 
Shakespeare's great dramas. But 
to find the most sublime writings of 
this class, turn to the Bible, the 
greatest book in all Literature, the 
one which shall stand though heav- 
en and earth pass away. 



Above all, "Literature brings us 
face to face with great ideals, which 
tend to raise the level of our individ- 
ual achievement." And if, after we 
have made a study of Literature, 
our lives have developed and un- 
folded into something better and 
nobler, surely we have gained that 
which is invaluable. L.F. 



Debating in Literary Society. 

The members of the Homerian 
Society seem to have the brain 
capacity to make a very high 
grade society. There are sev- 
eral splendid debaters 'among its 
members and for this reason debates 
should be an important factor in 
the society. 

The debating team will give us a 
Prestige at other schools even if 
we do not win. There should be 
no reason for losing, however con- 
sidering the debaters we are capa- 
ble of securing. What is needed now 
is plenty of practice and thorough 
drilling. This can be secured by 
using a part of each society period 
for debates. 

In my estimation there is nothing 
so difficult as debating before one's 
own schoolmates. One has before 
him the most critical judges that he 
can care to have. This gives the in- 
valuable power of self control and 
confidence while on one's feet. 

Debating gives every one the 
chance to speak, and so we may 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



have a body of deep thinkers that 
need not be afraid to take their 
part in any phase of school work. 
It seems to me the debating team 
is the primary outcome of the so- 
ciety. W. F. 



Events Following Cupid's Visit. 

(From the Students' Viewpoint ) 

It happened this way, the cook 
had left the College, and was gone 
for a few days, when she returned 
from her venture, victorious, and 
proclaimed by all a conqueror. 

The most fitting and proper thing 
for the student body to do was to 
give a demonstration of their appre- 
ciation that the cook returned and 
also to welcome the "chef" ; for we 
all meant to make him feel at home. 
Some of us felt he might not feel 
comfortable in his new environment 

That night the boys planned to 
serenade. So on Monday night they 
gave them all the music they want- 
ed. Then the girls thought of some 
thing wiser and decided to have a 
kitchen shower. They all purchas- 
ed small gifts and met with the boys 
in Chapel just after supper. From 
there they all marched to the kitch- 
en, placed their gifts on one of the 
tables and awaited the exciting mo- 
ment for the cook and her husband 
to arrive and unpack the packages. 

Both were very shy and the cook 
refused to come before her husband 
arrived, but he could not be per- 
suaded to come; so she started to 
unpack, while he stood far behind 
trying to see what was going on. 



There were many interesting 
presents such as men's handker- 
chiefs, pennies, potatoes, beans, 
rolling pins, and many other useful 
articles. All watched very patient- 
ly and enjoyed the few minutes in- 
tensely. 

Then before parting a yell was 
given in honor of the cook and as 
the students returned to their rooms 
it was hard to tell which was the 
happier group ; the Newly Weds or 
the Students. 



The Rich Heritage. 

Man in his primitive stage began 
like a child without definite know- 
ledge, without definite beliefs and 
standards, without a social heritage 
with which to develop his capaci- 
ties. But as his powers of abstract 
thought and articulate speech be- 
gan to develop he could accumulate 
knowledge and pass it on to his fel- 
lows. Successive inventions and dis- 
coveries gradually increased his 
fund of knowledge. Ideals, stand- 
ards and values were handed from 
generation to generation, accumu- 
lating as they went, until finally in 
this late age of the world we find 
ourselves to be heirs to a richer her- 
itage than the world has ever 
known. How often we fail to real- 
ize the meaning and significance of 
such a heritage. 

One invaluable element in our 
heritage is our literature. It gives 
us the history of the race's experi- 
ence, shows us the causes and ef- 
fects of different events and move- 
ments. Good literature has been a 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



great means in developing our cul- 
ture and aesthetic nature. It brings 
us face to face with great ideals 
which increase our sense of respon- 
sibility for the stewardship of life 
and tends to raise the level of our 
individual achievement. It gives us 
a heightened sense of the demands 
which life makes and a better com- 
prehension of the "far-off" divine 
event toward which we move. It 
brings pleasure unlike that which 
arises from physical gratification. 
It brings deliverance to souls weary 
with routine or suffering the stroke 
of some affliction. Without our up- 
lifting poetry and other inspiring 
literary works the enlightenment 
of this age would be impossible. 

Then too think what the past con- 
tributed in the field of science. Thru 
it we have all our notable inven- 
tions, discoveries and conveniences, 
healthful and sanitary conditions. 
Science today enables the farmer 
and manufacturer to increase his 
productions. The toils and aches of 
the past give way to the conveni- 
ences of modern machinery, modes 
of travel and transportation. Our 
heating, lighting and communicat- 
ing systems are indispensible. An- 
aesthetics, medicine, and other scien- 
tific treatment now make curable 
diseases and other physical ailments 
which were at one time fatal. All 
this has come thru thought and ef- 
fort, by arranging knowledge un- 
der general truths and principles. 
This classified knowledge or science 
is a great part of our rich heritage. 

We are likewise heirs to the finer 
arts. Before man had acquired a 
form of language be communicated 



his thots and ideas to his fellows by 
making sounds and images. From 
age to age as man advanced in cul- 
ture and knowledge, art also devel- 
oped, still being used as a means 
of communication. This develop- 
ment continued until today we have 
the great masterpieces which not 
only appeal to our aesthetic tastes 
but hold before us high ideals and 
in a silent way teach the race the 
many valuable lessons. Music has 
developed from crude discordant 
sounds and noises to the very beau- 
tiful harmony and melody which 
thrills and inspires every soul. Mu- 
sic is a harmonizing element that 
makes for democracy. It is a medi- 
um of expression, a safety valve to 
the emotions and feelings which 
cannot be pent up. It is the truest 
of all means of communication with 
our Maker. It is something without 
which our present stage of culture 
and refinement would be impossible, 
and communion with God would be 
much more difficult. Every intelli- 
gent man or woman will agree that 
we could dispense with neither art 
nor music. They make us more ap- 
preciative of God, nature, and the 
capacities and instincts which man 
possesses. 

As Greece contributed art and 
culture, and Rome contributed law, 
so the Hebrew nation contributed 
the True Religion. Christianity is 
the forerunner of all forms of social 
progress. Wherever the principles 
of Christianity are practiced we 
have Democracy, that highest form 
of government, "of the people, by 
the people and for the people." 
True Democracy is nothing more 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



nor less than a government based 
on Christian principles. Christian- 
ity has freed the slave, ennobled the 
ideal of woman, and made the home 
a minature heaven on earth. 

When the writer of the Book of 
Psalms refers to the entering of the 
children of Israel into the land of 
Canaan by saying that the Almighty 
has given to his chosen people the 
heritage of the heathen, he recalls 
one of the truest illustrations of an 
earthly inheritance to be found on 
the pages of history. Here they got 
wells they digged not, houses 
they builded not, olive trees and 
vineyards that they planted not, 
and the land flowed with milk and 
honey. It was theirs for the taking, 
to use for their development and to 
the Glory of God. But when they 
missed their heritage they fell and 
were taken into captivity. Likewise 
the Grecians and Romans, just as 
soon as they misused their inherit- 
ance which they had received from 
their ancestors, fell. Instead of us- 
ing their resources as a blessing 
they turned them to a curse. Thus 
they failed to hand the good on to 
their fellows as God designed a peo- 
ple should. Without the transmis- 
sion of beliefs, standards, ideals, 
values and accomplishments such a 
thing as social progress, and our 
highest stages of development 
would be impossible. 

Since it is so easy to misuse our 
heritage, how important it is for us 
to learn this lesson from other for- 
merly cultured peoples, who degen- 
erated by misusing the patrimony 



which was given to them. We 
must appreciate the value of our 
birthright and the blood and sweat 
which it cost our ancestors. Let us 
realize what it means to live in this 
twentieth century. Our responsibil- 
ities are so much greater than were 
those in the past. We must be more 
highly developed, have higher 
ideals, accomplish more, and be 
more nearly perfect than our par- 
ents to be even as good as they 
were. 

We are only trustees of the val- 
ues transmitted to us. It is for us 
to use them properly and pass on 
to our posterity a still richer herit- 
age so that when we leave this mor- 
tal sphere there will be a contin- 
ual renewing of life, ever increasing 
as time moves on. C.H.R. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, misfortune has depriv- 
ed Professor Hoffer of his beloved 
mother, be it resolved that we, rep- 
resenting the faculty of Elizabeth- 
town College, of which Professor 
is a member, hereby express our 
kindred feeling in the sorrow which 
he is called upon to bear. We have 
the assurance that in the Christian 
religion may be found the grace 
and support which we all need in 
time of bereavement. 

We further resolve that a copy 
of the above be delivered to Profes- 
sor Hoffer and that these resolutions 
be published in the Eliabethtown 
Chronicle and in the College Times. 
Signed : 

Jacob S. Harley, 
A. C. Baugher, 
Emma C. Wampler. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



College IRcvvs 



Home Again ! 

Hurrah for the rush ! Indeed, 
there was a grand rush on the morn- 
ing of September 5. To those who 
had been here before it was rather 
a pathetic scene as we watched the 
parade. It was a parade of home 
seekers coming back to their Win- 
ter home. 

During previous weeks the Hill 
was seemingly dead, but at last it 
has awakened from its long sleep, 
and now in every nook and corner 
we can hear voices. 

There was quite a hustle and bus- 
tle until we became acclimated. It 
was interesting to watch the new- 
comers. Some of them soon made 
themselves feel at home while oth- 
ers thought the place not so very 
homelike. 



Mr. Meyer while preparing to 
study his Greek lesson: "Let us go 
swimming !" 



Prof. Nye — What is sorrow? 
Mr. Weaver — Sorrow is to have 
really loved and lost. 



Miss Babylon admits that she is 
larger longitudinally than Miss 
Trimmer, but horizontally "nothing 
doing." 



Philosophers have puzzled over 
the definition of "love." Mr. Wea- 
ver knows. Ask him. 



Ask Miss Baugher if she likes 
mice. If she replies in the negative 
ask her why she carries them to the 
mail box. 



Ask John why he enjoys his Jun- 
ior year at College. (Betty is not un- 
der restriction.) 



Mr. Meyer — I know a good joke 
on Sherman but I can't think of it 
now. 

Mr. Sherman — What is it? May 
be I can tell you. 



Miss Ziegler says she would love 
to live in the apartments because 
she thinks they have such lovely 
kitchens. 



Mystery unsolved: Why must Miss Walker— "Say kids — I beg 

Clarence Sollenberger go home ev- your pardon, ladies. Do you know 

ery week end? an y one wno nas "The Marks of a 

J World Christian?" 

Miss Thomas — "Good Morning 
Miss Hykes." 

Miss Hykes — "Please don't ad- 
dress me in that manner; just call 
me by my maiden name." 



There seemed to be difficulty in 
obtaining kitchen aid. The cook 
has discovered a new method. Mar- 
ry for charity. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



There seems to be a lack of inter- 
est in morning watch. It may be 
clue to the fact that we are not 
awakened by the arrival of Profes- 
sor Meyer on the Hill since he 
purchased his new Ford. Mostly 
Sedan. 



Professor and Mrs. Hoffer are 
the proud parents of Floy C. Hoffer 
who is engaged almost night and 
day in aiding Dorothy Elizabeth 
Baugher entertain the occupants of 
the "Fairview Apartments." 



A marked degree of leniency has 
been discovered by the students who 
came to College Hill this year. The 
one item of interest to quite a num- 
ber of the students is the extra two 
hours of social privileges to be ob- 
served Thursday evenings from four 
to six. The great Japanese puzzle 
of the whole matter is, what will 
the faculty do when the sun sinks 
in the west at four-thirty? 



Social. 



The Young Men's Welfare Asso- 
ciation invited the Young Women's 
Welfare Association to spend the 
first Thursday evening of the school 
year with them at a 'corn roast' 
held on the baseball diamond on the 
College Campus. 

The girls arrived at seven o'clock. 
Several games were played and 
then all sat around the fire. At this 
time toasts were given and stories 
told, and Professor E. G. Meyer fa- 
vored the students with a vocal so- 
lo. After the last ear of corn was 



eaten the students returned to their 
rooms feeling that they had spent 
a very enjoyable evening. 



Convocational Meeting. 

On Monday evening, September 
5th, the eve of the opening day of 
College a convocational meeting was 
arranged by the faculty. Quite a 
number of the members of the fac- 
ulty gave inspiring talks to the stu- 
dent body. Among the speakers 
were Miss Eliabeth Myer, the old- 
est member of the faculty, both in 
years and in service. Professor J. 
G. Meyer, the president of the Col- 
lege, Professor Byer, Professor 
Gingrich, and Professor L. W. Leit- 
er. The student body will do well 
to heed their suggestions. 

After the addresses had been giv- 
en the meeting was placed in the 
hands of the social committee. They 
had arranged a game in which each 
student was introduced to the stu- 
dent body. At ten o'clock every 
one went to his room feeling that 
the evening was well spent. 



The Senior Class of College Hill 
has just chosen its new officers in a 
private class meeting. The elec- 
tion resulted in Pres., Mr. Daniel 
Harshman; Sec, Miss Stella Walk- 
er; Treas., Miss Esther Trimmer; 
Vice Pres., Mr. Elias Edris. The 
newly elected officers will soon be 
busy with the many duties that come 
up during the senior year. 

The Junior class, too, through 
the efforts put forth by the Seniors 
last year, have been given the priv- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



ilege to organize their class. The 
election held by the class recently 
resulted as follows: Pres., Mr. Clar- 
ence Sollenberger; Vice Pres., Mr. 
Nathan Meyer; Secretary, Miss Es- 
ther Leister, and Treas., Mr. John 
Sherman. If we may judge by the 
number of class meetings held by 
the class, there will be much activ- 
ity shown by this class during the 
school year. 



The committee of the trustees 
who takes care of the building end 
of business on College Hill has su- 
pervised the building of two fine 
new structures on the College 
grounds. 

The fine new cottage which has 
just been built will make an ideal 
home for two families. The cot- 
tage measures 28x38 feet and is 
built on the double-house plan. The 
lower floor has a kitchen, dining 
room, and living room. The up- 



stairs has a bath-room, sewing room 
and two bed-rooms. The building 
is lighted by electricity and is heat- 
ed with the pipeless heater system. 
The hot and cold water system is in- 
stalled too. 

The cottage is to be occupied by 
Reverend Walter Thomas and fam- 
ily, and Professor Byer and family. 

The other new structure that has 
just been finished is a fine garage. 
This building measures 96x32 feet. 
There are eighteen divisions in this 
building, with enough room in each 
division for two machines. 

As this number of the Times goes 
to press there are 19 students en- 
rolled. A year ago today the enroll- 
ment was 165. 



On seeing the announcement of 
his sister's engagement in the paper, 
eight-year-old Jimmy said, "Oh 
Helen, here is your ad in the 
"Times." 



£;rcbanqes 



Only two exchanges have been 
received at the time of writing, 
The Spectator and the Ursinus 
Weekly. The former hails from 
sunny Kansas, giving the weekly 
chronicle of events at Mc. Pherson. 
The latter comes from the staid and 
classic East with its budget of inter- 
esting news. The editorial in the 
Weekly presents in clear English 
the standards of college work as 



composed with those of preparatory 
work. No student should fail to 
read it. 

Exchanges received during vaca- 
tion are as follows: Juniata Echo. 
College Rays, Daleville Leader, 
Hesston College Journal, Oak 
Leaves, College Record, Normal 
School Herald and Philomathean 
Monthly. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IRelicjious Iftotes 



Newville Sunday School. 

The Newville Sunday School has 
been doing splendid work during 
the Summer. They have kept up 
interest and attendance in a very 
commendable way. 

At present we have an average 
attendance of about eighty percent. 
of our enrollment. This is gratify- 
ing, when we consider that Newville 
has become large enough to have 
Sunday Baseball. We feel that 
more of the children in Newville 
should be in the Sunday School and 
we are just launching a contest be- 
tween the junior classes for an in- 
creased attendance. The boys say, 
"We will win," and the girls just 
as earnestly say, "No you will not-." 
With a spirit like this Newville 
Sunday School must grow. 

The faces of all the children 
beamed when the Superintendent 
suggested on last Sunday, that we 
want to have a Children's Service 
soon. On the evening of September 
eighteenth Professor H. H. Nye 
gave a very interesting and helpful 
"chalk talk" to the people. As this 
was the first service for the year 
quite a number of our new students 
took their first trip to Newville. The 
children gave a hearty response to 
the questions asked and seemed to 
enjoy the service. 

The day school of Newville is 
taught by Miss Emma Zeigler '21. 
The Sunday School staff consists of 
Stanley H. Ober, Superintendent; 
Prof. Harley, Ruth Minnich, Anna 
Brubaker, Daniel Myers and Mar- 



garet E. Oellig, all of whom are loy- 
al workers. We are planning great 
things for Newville. Remember us. 

M. E. O. 



Stevens Hill Sunday School. 

As you drive along one of the 
most beautiful country roads that 
lead from Elizabethtown, you come 
to a neat little church, the name of 
which is "Stevens Hill" because of 
its situation. 

As one stands on the hill and 
looks about, he seems to be sur- 
rounded with a continuous range of 
mountains, many small valleys and 
fields bearing the fruits of God'? 
goodness. 

Just the very situation and fresh 
atmosphere of the place makes one 
want to commune with his great 
and adorable Maker; one's very 
soul within him seems to cry, "What 
is man that thou art mindful of 
him." We see the cows grazing up- 
on the green hillside and hear the 
birds singing among the trees. 
They do not worry or fret, but they 
fulfill their mission, knowing God 
will take care of them, and as the 
deep blue heavens look down upon 
one he is made to blush, because of 
his lack of faith in God. 

Scattered about among these 
small hills and vales are dwelling 
houses, and from these places the 
people wind their way to the little 
church on the hill to worship and 
learn more about their wonderful 
Maker. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Every Sunday afternoon Rebecca 
McKonly, Mae Good, Francis Barr 
and Enos Weaver, students from the 
College, go to Stevens Hill to con- 
duct Sunday School services. The 
hospitality shown us is splendid. 
These people not only appreciate 
our coming but they are interested 
in the work, and this is very inspir- 
ing to the leaders. 

The attendance is made up large- 
ly of children, just as bright and 
lovable children as can be found 
anywhere. Their fresh rosy cheeks 
and pleasant smiles make one hap- 
py to spend some time with them. 

The attendance varies from twen- 
.ty to thirty. It is not so large but 
we hope for its growth. But why 
spend a Sunday afternoon in this 
way since the attendance is not so 
large? Why not spend the time 
leisurely and enjoy oneself? Ah 
No ! True happiness is only found 
in service, and deep down in the 
heart of each one of these precious 
lives we see a great man or woman. 

We know that God has a plan for 
each one of their lives, and it is our 
deepest desire to help them attain 
to that plan, and to know their God 
as a personal friend. Surely if one 
soul is won to Christ our efforts will 
be many times rewarded. 

We earnestly hope that the 
church at Stevens Hill may continue 
to grow and that it may prove to be 
a field from which God can call 
many willing workers. The prayers 
of our friends who are interested in 
like work would be greatly appreci- 
ated by the workers at Stevens Hill. 
And we hope that others may take 
advantage of like opportunities so 



that the kingdom of God may come 
into the lives of all peoples. 

M. E. G. 



Hawaii, The Paradise of the Pacific. 

The student Volunteers had charge 
of the services in Chapel on the 
evening of September 25. They pro- 
cured Colbert H. Kurokawa, form- 
erly a Buddhist, now a Christian, to 
give his lecture "Hawaii, the Para- 
dise of the Pacific." Mr. Kurokawa 
at present is a senior in Dickinson 
and he speaks the English language 
remarkably well. 

In the beginning of his sermon 
he told us of the land of perpet- 
ual spring, moonlight and music. 
He said Hawaii is interesting to us 
for a number of reasons: 

1. As an industrial point. 

2. As a military outpost. 

3. As a people. 

The people there compose only 
a very small part of the entire pop- 
ulation. They, like the Indians of 
America, are yielding to civilization 
and are slowly becoming extinct. 
The population of Hawaii is 250- 
000 of which only 50,000 are nat- 
ives. The most striking thing about 
the Hawaiians is their extreme sim- 
plicity. They live in huts with no 
furniture, eat mostly Poi — a kind of 
mashed sour potatoes — and use a 
vocabulary of only a few hundred 
words. 

He said you may forget most of 
what I have said but remember this 
story and duplicate it. 

Hawaii being a most cosmopolitan 
island has almost every religion on 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the globe. Mohammed has his repre- 
sentatives there, Buddha his, Con- 
fucius his, and Christ his. The Mor- 
mons, Roman Catholics and Christian 
Scientists also have an alarming 
hold on the islands. There is only 
one Christian to every six people of 
some other religious belief. Kura- 
kawa himself was being trained to 
be a Buddhist priest when a mission- 
ary from America told him of Christ 
He told us not to forget the miss- 
ionaries and said: "Where would 
I have been had it not been for that 
missionary?" The Buddhists watch 
the Christians very closely. When 
the Christians taught the Hawai- 
ians to sing "Jesus Loves Me," the 
Buddhists taught them "Buddha 
Loves Me." When the Christians 
organized a Y. M. C. A., the Budd- 
hists organized a Y. M. B. A. The 



Roman Catholics at present have a 
cathedral with a seating capacity 
of 1500. The Mormons have just 
recently erected a $500,000 temple 
and brought 40,000 people of their 
faith there. 

As Hawaii is the gateway to the 
United States and thousands of re- 
ligious-sick students are coming to 
America for religious truth, it is 
very important that their first im- 
pressions are those of Christianity. 
He ended by pleading "Remember 
Hawaii and Pray for Us." 

Is not our responsibility to the 
Hawaiians greater for having heard 
this lecture? E. E. L. 



The sage says: "Yesterday is 
dead ; forget it. Tomorrow does not 
exist: don't worry. Today is here; 
use it." 



Hlumni IRotes 



Our Alumni are scattered far 
and wide, rendering invaluable ser- 
vice in the various activities of life's 
callings. They are also well repre- 
sented on the Faculty of their Alma 
Mater. 



With the opening of the school 
year of 1921, thirteen alumni are 
members of the Faculty of Eliza- 
bethtown College : thirteen disciples 
of the school have become teachers 
in the school. They are the follow- 
ing: J. G. Meyer, '05, President of 



the College; R. W. Schlosser, '11, 
Vice Pres., (on leave of absence) ; 
H. H. Nye, '15, Sec; L. W. Leiter, 
'09, Registrar; J. Z. Herr, '05, 
Treas. ; Sara Shisler, '20; Mildred 
Bonebrak, '17; Lillian Falkenstein 
Willoughby, '14; J. H. Gingrich, 
'17; A. C. Baugher, '20; J. I. Baugh- 
er, '19; E. G. Meyer, '19; Emma 
Cashman Wampler, '09; L. D. Rose, 
'11, has also returned to his Alma 
Mater as Librarian. Lydia M. Lan- 
dis, '20, is serving as Secretary to 
the President. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



We regret that Prof. J. I. Baugh- 
er is not yet able to resume his reg- 
ular work at the College. He is 
slowly recovering from a severe, 
prolonged attack of typhoid. 



Among the latest additions to the 
Cradle Roll of the Alumni Associa- 
tion are : Lorna Belle Schwenk, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Schwenk, Elizabethtown, Pa.; Wm. 
E. Glasmire, Jr., son of Mr.' and 
Mrs. W. E. Glasmire, Hordum, Thy, 
Denmark ; Dorothy Elizabeth 
Baugher, daughter of Prof, and 
Mrs. A. C. Baugher, College Hill; 
Bertha Ruth Reber, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Reber, Lititz, 
Pennsylvania ; Floy Crouthamel 
Hoffer, daughter of Prof, and Mrs. 
I. S. Hoffer, College Hill; Richard 
Kline Dixon, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. C. Dixon, Parkerford, Penna. 



The first class graduated from 
Elizabelhtown College consisted of 
three ladies who completed the Ad- 
vanced Commercial Course in 1903. 
They were then known as Elizabeth 
Eby, Luella G. Fogelsanger and 
Bessie M. Rider. Our Alumni Asso- 
ciation is proud of these ladies who 
have set up and are realizing high 
standards of efficiency in their 
chosen spheres of service. 



Elizabeth Eby Byer has for some 
years been known as the wife of 
Prof. Frank J. Byer, and the mother 
of Paul Byer. Prof. Byer spent ten 
years in Chicago and vicinity dur- 
ing which time Prof. Byer was 
graduated from the Mount 
Morris College, Bethany Bible 



School, and Columbia College of 
Expression. He was a teacher in 
Bethany Bible School for several 
years and later President of Hebron 
Seminary, Nokesville, Va. Mrs. 
Byer is his faithful helper and has 
come back to her Alma Mater. We 
welcome them to College Hill. 
Thev and the J. Walter Thomas 
family occury the new dwelling 
erected on College Hill. 



Luella G. Fogelsanger has for 
some years past been a member of 
the Faculty of Juniata College. She 
spent the Summer of 1920 at Moody 
Bible Institute, Chicago, and also 
visited many points of, interest in the 
city. She represents the class of 
1903 in the realm of continued 
school life. 



The class of 1903 has a represen- 
tative on the mission field as well 
as in the realm of the home and of 
the school, as already noted. Bes- 
sie M. Rider has been a missionary 
nurse in Ping Ting Hsien, Shansi, 
China, since March, 1916. Her fur- 
lough is due in the Spring of 1922 
and we trust many of our Alumni 
may have the privilege of hearing 
her speak while she is in America. 
She was ill with typhus fever for 
about four weeks during the past 
Summer, but has fully recovered 
and has since nursed Dr. Horning, 
who had contracted the same di- 
sease. 



During the past Summer Bessie 
Rider enjoyed a vacation of seven 
weeks in the beautiful mountain 
regions near one of our mission sta- 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tions, Liao Chou. She was on Dr. 
Homing's case as nurse at this mis- 
sion station for three weeks of the 
seven. China has most beautiful 
scenery, and, as Miss Rider sat med- 
itating in the midst of nature's beau- 
ties, she wrote to some of her 
friends. From a letter dated Aug. 
11, 1921, we quote the following: 
"It is so peaceful as I sit here at 
the foot of the immense rock in the 
ravine and face the wonderful 
mountain just before me and the 
beautiful crystal spring water fall- 
ing in such vast volume from the 
cliff. I love this spot. But I must 
soon leave it. These blessed moun- 
tain experiences may not continu- 
ally be ours. There are duties to 
face which I trust I may be able to 
perform better because of the in- 
spiration received from Nature's 
teachings. Oh, that I might be able 
to convey streams of living water to 
a thirsty world as this beautiful 
stream conveys the flow from its 
great fountainhead to needy places 
in the earth." 



E. M. Hertzler, '20, is again a 
student at the College. The Hertz- 
ler family and the C. H. Royer, '21, 
family occupy the cottage on Col- 
lege Hill. At a recent council meet- 
ing in the Mechanicsburg church, 
E. M. Hertzler was elected to the 
ministry. 



B. Mary Royer, '21, who spent 
last year as a student at the College, 
is scheduled to sail from New York 
on Oct. 18, in company with Elsie 
Shickel, of Virginia. They are eag- 
er to take up their work on the In- 



dia field, and the best wishes of our 
Association attend them. 

Mrs. J. J. Heilman (nee Buckwal- 
ter,) '05, is one of our generous- 
hearted alumni. Since the home of 
Miss Elizabeth Myer, at Bareville, 
Pa., has been broken up by the 
death of Miss Myer's sister, the J. 
J. Heilman family have opened 
their doors and offered Miss Myer 
the use of several rooms in their 
home at 724 N. Lime St., Lancaster, 
Pa. This provides a quiet retreat 
for Miss Myer whenever she is away 
from Elizabethtown and her duties 
at the College. 



Prof. I. J. Kreider, '16, and Mrs. 
Kreider, formerly the College Art 
teacher, gave inspiring messages to 
the students at the regular Chapel 
exercises on Sept. 23. They are 
about to enroll as students at Beth- 
any Bible School, Chicago. Prof. 
Kreider was principal of the Den- 
ver, Pa., High school last year. He 
was elected to the ministry by the 
Ephrata church sometime during 
the Summer. Prof, and Mrs. Krei- 
der rendered splendid service as 
teachers in the Ephrata Daily Va- 
cation Bible School in June. 



Elizabethtown College always 
welcomes interest in her progress. 
Recently one of her loyal alumni, 
Mr. A. P. Geib, of the class of 1909, 
showed his interest in a substantial 
way by donating part of his private 
library to the College. The collec- 
tion consists of standard works on 
New Testament, education, and 
philosophy. Mr. Geib is a former 
Lancaster County boy but for a num- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



ber of years he has lived in the vi- 
cinity of New York, where he was 
at first connected with the Brooklyn 
Church of the Brethren and attend- 



he enrolled in Columbia University, 
receiving the A. B. and A. M. de- 
grees, and he now fills the chair of 
English in Montclair Academy, 



ed Dr. White's Bible School. Later Montclair. New Jersey. 



Btbletics 



Everybody out to see the big 
game tonight. Yes, we are ready 
to start! "Play Ball!" 



Such is the spirit existing on Col- 
lege Hill at present. What is more 
refreshing than to get out of doors 
after a hard day of mental work to 
enjoy two hours of thrilling experi- 
ence, such as playing a deuce game 
tennis, when every nerve is set and 
one is doing his best to win. Some 
students go to school, and get to 
work using their mental abilities 
from five in the morning till ten at 
night, not losing more time than to 
e*at. and sometimes almost forgett- 
ing to do that. They get no pleas- 
ure out of their school life and are 
slowly but surely on the road to 
physical collapse. They become 
pale and dull simply because they 
do not have enough exercise to keep 
the blood circulating. 

Watch the boy who is regularly 
taking his exercise, coming in from 
the base ball field or from tennis, 
happy, refreshed, and ready to get 
at the job before him, which will 
seem as play. Many are the stu- 
dents who go through school not 
taking enough exercise, only to find 



themselves incapable to fulfill life's 
duty after their school days are ov- 
er. Elizabethtown College stands 
for the development of the physical, 
intellectual, and spiritual sides of 
life. Let us not place all the em- 
phasis on one or two sides, but give 
each one proper attention. 



The Athletic Association met for 
the first time this year, Monday, 
Sept. 12, at which time the follow- 
ing officers were chosen for the 
year: Pres., Daniel Myers; V. Pres., 
Clarence Sollenberger; Sec, Mar- 
garet Oellig; Treas., Nathan Meyer. 



Walter Longenecker was chosen 
for track, Clarence Sollenberger 
as baseball manager; Pierce Brandt 
tennis. The results of "Solly" have 
been seen already as he has cleaned 
the courts and made them ready for 
many "Love" games to be played. 



In baseball several hotly contest- 
ed games have been played, one in 
which the school beat the Seniors 
5 to 4. The Seniors defeat was due 
mainly to the loose playing of the 
infield. However, it was thrilling 
from beginning to end. The batter- 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ies were as follows : Seniors — E. 
Eshleman c, Edris and D. Myers p; 
School — Trimmer c, Sollenberger 
p. 



Last but not least of the athletic 
activities is track. Mr. Brandt, the 



self capable of that position. Watch 
out, there are great things ahead 
for track. This is a sport in which 
everyone can participate. We are 
expecting soon to have relay races, 
high and broad jumping, pole vault- 
ing, and cross country runs. Clear 



manager, has already proved him- the track for they are coming! 



Dumor anb Clippings 



When truth is in your way you 
are on the wrong road. 



Boys Is Boys. 

Johnnie — "I wish I was Tommy 
Jones." 

Mother — "Why? You are stron- 
ger than he is, you have a better 
home, more toys, and more pocket 
money." 

Johnnie — "I know, but he can 
wiggle his ears, — Christian Advo- 
cate. 



Thru the sunset of hope, like the 
shapes of a dream, 
What paradise islands of glory 
beam ! 



"Hey Rodney, look here ! I 
weigh three pounds more'n you." 
"Aw g'wan, y're cheatin', Skinny. 
You're got y'r hands in y'r pock- 
ets." — American Boy. 



Talent is not required for grumb- 
ling; any one can grumble without 
even practicing. 



"That fellow was an impudent 
fraud. How did he manage to 



weedle money out of you?" 

"Oh, John, he told me such a 
sad, pitiful tale about his poor wife 
who was a widow with six little 
orphan children." 



No Royal Road to the English 
Language. 

An intelligent Frenchman was 
studying the English language. 
"When I discovered that if I was 
quick I was fast," said he, "and 
that if I was tied I was fast, if I 
spent too freely I was fast and that 
not to eat was to fast, I was dis- 
couraged. But when I came across 
the sentence, "The first one won one 
prize ; I was tempted to give up 
trying to learn English." 



Bats, a Ball and a Fan. 

"Isn't our pitcher grand?" said 
the enthusiastic young lady at the 
ball game. "He hits the bats no 
matter where they hold them. 



The time is coming when it will 
take more than a stuffed head, a 
long tailed coat and a white neck- 
tie to make a preacher. — Christian 
Cynosure. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



Store Opens 7:00 A. M. Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 

Saturday 10 P. M. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of the girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



3 *^J*4f*^^?*J{^r^if*^%^1*+K^*Jjt^f*+it\4ft \J \ 

EUZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 

I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 

J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 

Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



^qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqoqqqqqqqqqqqoqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq ' 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men'* 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWE1LER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
EUZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Largest Circulation and 
Advertising Patronage 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 
Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



Remember — 18 West High Street 

For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 

Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



J. W, ZMRP088 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY CO. H. H. BRANDT 



N. York-Chicago-Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king- account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



iQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^ 



Bueh Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



South End Grocery 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shellers, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



FRESH, FANCY and STAPLE 

GROCERIES, CANDIES and 

LUNCH GOODS 



"The little s ore with big business' 



Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

HornafiUs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 

GUNSMITH LOCKSMITH 

DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 1£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 

Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SH A VI NG PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 

Wholesale Sugar House 

318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHONOGRAPHS 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, :-: MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 
ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. T R I N K 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



I ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocsoooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 
iQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQQQGQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQOQOQi 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 



READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING , 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 

Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



iraiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiniiiiHinmiii 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



iibiiiiibiiiiibiiiiii 



■IIIIIBIIIIHIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIII 



IliailllHIlllHIl 



IIBIIIIHI 



Ban 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 



THE 



GROSS 



122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W. King St., Lancaster 



GARBER GARAGE 




'*'*" 4 '*•*"*' i'4'4'* 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Ind. Phone 605A 



FORD and FORDSON 



Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ 

KLEIN'S 
Milk Chocolate 

And 

Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Flour, Feed and Lumber 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 

JOQOOOOOOOOOOOQOOQOOOOGOOQOOOOOOOO 




0O0€X)O0OOOOO0CKX>0eX>(XXX>OOOOOOOOO00O00O000O000000000000O0000€K}O 

%J 

I HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

" MISSIMER & YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 




MEN'S 
PLAIN SUITS 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 

Come and be convinced. 




This is The Place for You to SAVE 
MONEY! g 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXdOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



— . 



giLLEBE Tfl 





NOVEMBER 
1921 



OOOOOCX}0000000000000000000000000< 



HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

MISSIMER Sc YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
g 26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 




MEN'S 
PLAIN SUITS 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Phssh Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 

Come and be convinced. 



This is The Place for You to SAVE 

MONEY! £ 

OOOOOCKX>OOO0O0OOOOOOOGlOOOOOO0O0OCOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOOOOOOO00CX)0OOO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCJOOOOOOOOO '^OOOOOCKXX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX>OOOOP 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

»oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

I oooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo < 



o 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L." Geyer 
Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



)OQOQQQQGQQQOOQQOQQQQQQQOQQOOQQQQQQQOOOOQOOQQOQQQOQOQOOQOOOOQ? 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen Sc Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outlifters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 



AND 



MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 

MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



'OOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOQOOOGQOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOQOOCQOOOOOOO 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

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John R. Cassel J. B. Shenk John B. Hossler 

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Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



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OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



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and 
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For FREE catalogue of Ready-Made 
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and covering goods samples. 



SCHMIDT 
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OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



s 5 a 



an H H 3 



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FLORIN TRUST CO. 

Wishes to thank its many friends for their very generous support in making 
this new bank the successful institution it has become. We are getting new 
customers every day and extend an invitation to you to do your banking busi- 
ness with us. 

Interest paid on time certificates and savings accounts. 

WE GUARANTEE YOU 4 PER CENT. INTEREST AND 

100 PER CENT. SECURITY 



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FLORIN, PENNA. 
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BUY AT THE 
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Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches, 
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a complete line of Jewelry. 



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OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 

COM 1_ 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
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LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



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OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



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©ur College fttmes 

Volume XIX NOVEMBER No. 2 

Published monthly during- the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtown 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress, 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

(Elsie Landis 
College News |j. D. Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Mtinager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 
J. S. Harley J. Z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



£Mtorial8 



The Pollyanna Attitude. 

Jean Stratton Porter has written 
a book which should and undoubt- 
edly will live. The unique charac- 
ter around which her book centers 
is Pollyanna. This is a poor orphan 
girl who has learned to play the 
game of gladness. She tastes the 
sugar even in burned cookies. Her 
world is filled with the fragrance of 
orange blossoms. She sees roses 
when her neighbors see thorns. She 
sings joyfully because she sees the 
rainbow of God's love in every 
cloud of misfortune. To her a man 
with rheumatism should be thank- 
ful that he does not have a broken 
neck. In a few words, she believes 
in not trying to take the beam out of 
her eye if it is a sunbeam. 

The vital question for each one of 
us is, "Have I assumed the Polly- 
anna attitude toward life?" If not, 
perhaps I am nervous and worried 
about some brick that is sometime 
in the future destined to land on my 
cranium? An authority on nervV 
culture finds the percentage of 
Americans with diseased nerves to 
be comparatively higher than that 
of any other nation. Why? For 
the simple reason that our attitude 
toward our daily activities imposed 
by our occupations is of a too seri- 
ous type. Many a promising youth 
has thus denied himself of a buoyant 
disposition and the consequent cap- 
acity for life-long usefulness in the 
state or' the church. 



It has been well said by a gifted 
writer that "the man who laughs is 
a doctor without a diploma ; his face 
does more good in a sick-room than 
a bushel of powders or a gallon of 
bitter draughts. People are always 
glad to see him. Their hands ins- 
tinctively go half way out to meet 
his clasp, while they turn involuntar- 
ily from the clammy touch of the 
dyspeptic who speaks as though he 
had inward pain. The man with 
the internal smile laughs you out of 
your faults while you never dream 
of being offended at him ; and you 
know not what a pleasant world you 
live in, until he points out the sunny 
streaks on its pathway." 

A sense of wit and humor destroys 
the cobwebs of the brain and re- 
moves the ennui of the nerves. It 
is the religion of laughter, — not 
frivolity or levity, — but clean, 
thought-provoking laughter, that 
should be frequently engaged in. 
Oh ! that out of our student body 
may come whole-souled, cheery, 
jovial people, who will go thru the 
world like a choir of Pollyannas 
filling every nook and cranny about 
them with exhilarating echoes and 
with ; tne irrepressible joy of their 
natures. 

Some one in describing one of 
these good-humored characters said, 
"It seemed as if he had in his blood 
the jollity of a hundred Christmas 
eves and the warmth and volume of 
their roaring Yule logs upon the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 1 1 



hearth." More to be desired is And hands that are swift and will- 
such a cheerful and contented spirit ing, 

than the wealth of the Indies or any Than to gnap the delicate slend er 

honor which the world esteems threads 
great. 

"Better to weave in the web of life 01 our curious llves asunder, 

a bright and golden filling, And then blame heaven for the 

And to do God's will with a ready tangled ends 

heart And sit and grieve and wonder." 



GRATITUDE 



Be grateful for the kindly friends that walk 
along your way; 

Be grateful for the skies of bleu that smile 
from day to day ; 

Be grateful for the health you own, the work 
you find to do, 

For round about you there are men less fortu- 
nate than you. 

Be grateful for the growing trees, the roses 

soon to bloom, 
The tenderness of kindly hearts that shared your 

days of gloom ; 
Be grateful for the morning dew, the grass 

beneath your feet, 
The soft caresses of your babes and all their 

laughter sweet. 

Acquire the grateful habit, learn to see how blest 

you are, 
How much there is to gladden life, how little 

life to mar ! 
And what if rain shall fall to-day and you with 

grief are sad ; 
Be grateful that you can recall the joys that 

you have had. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Xtterarv 



Thanksgiving — Where ? 

William Bates was a friendless, 
fatherless boy. He had come from 
Arkansas at eighteen to Lane Allen 
Academy at Whitehall, a beautiful 
provincial town in Southern Mis- 
souri. He occasioned little remark 
beyond that prompted by his un- 
obtrusive manner and his strict at- 
tention to his duties. Limited fi- 
nances obliged him to work at one 
of the mills three hours each week- 
day afternoon. Ere many weeks 
had passed, however, there were 
others beside Professor Talbot, the 
principal, who noticed traits in the 
young student that gave hope of the 
future useful man. 

Of all the studies in his program 
William liked philosophy best. 
Several members of the philosophy 
class beside William took an active 
part in the discussions which were 
frequent in the tri-weekly recitat- 
ions presided over by their sleepy 
old instructor, Dr. Wiley. George 
Cowden, an ambitious young man 
from a ranch on Pilot Knob, at first 
took a leading part in these argu- 
ments. 

As time went by a seemingly in- 
different girl, Adaline Stevens, 
whose brother Ralph chummed with 
Bates, and who seemed to have come 
to school merely to spend some of 
the money her father was rapidly 
accumulating on his thousand-acre 
ranch, took an increasing interest 
in the topics which arose while the 
class was considering Plato. She 



liked to challenge the ideas ad- 
vanced by Cowden and generally 
took sides with the less self-assert- 
ive Bates. Though she rarely pre- 
pared her lessons, it was evident 
that the discussions awakened some- 
thing noble in her nature, and that 
her serious ideas of life and society 
were not of the butterfly kind. 
Bates, it was evident, prepared ev- 
ery lesson conscientiously and his 
progress was noticeable; he seemed 
eager to escape the curse of error 
and to enter the realm of truth. 
His ideas cleared day by day. He 
had a feeling of wonder as he list- 
ened to the opinions expressed by 
Adaline Stevens and he knew he was 
being led to better ideals. One day 
as he waited for Dr. Wiley at his' 
home Miss Stevens entered, and, 
dur'ng the half hour that ensued be- 
fore the Professor arrived, William 
told tnt girl more about his purpose 
in life and the things that lay h:. his 
way than he ha I told her brother 
Ralph in the six weeks he hac 
roomed with him. 

On a Sunday afternoon ramble 
William made a chance acquaint- 
ance with a blind man named Brown 
living just across the range of hills 
at whose base lay Whitehall. Will- 
iam discovered that the man was an 
enthusiastic lover of history, that 
from being a prosperous farmer he 
was reduced to making a meager 
living for himself, his son, and las 
aged housekeeper, and that the on- 
ly joy life now afforded him was 
to receive an occasional visit from 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



some sympathetic friend who would 
read to him an hour from his favor- 
ite author. It became to William 
from henceforth a matter of relig- 
ion as well as of pure joy to call on 
the old man as often as his duties 
permitted and to read to him from 
Rollin's Ancient History or Macaul- 
ay's Lays of Ancient Rome. He had 
never failed Mr. Brown when he 
had set a date for a call. 

Bates had just sent a note of ac- 
ceptance in reply to an invitation 
from Brown that he spend to-mor- 
row, Thanksgiving, with him and 
thus make the day's experiences a 
green spot in the memory of both. 
An hour later Ralph Stevens hand- 
ed William the following note and 
requested him to read it immediate- 
ly and give him a verbal answer. 

Lane Allen Academy, 
Whitehall, Mo., 

Nov. 23, '21 
To William Bates: 

Father and Mother say it will be 
agreeable to them if we invite one 
of our school acquaintances for 
Thanksgiving dinner at our home 
at Deer Lodge Ranch. Will you 
favor us with your presence on that 
occasion? We will have a royal 
celebration of the three hundreth 
anniversary of the first Pilgrim 
Thanksgiving. You can go with us 
to-night at five when father meets 
us with the automobile ; or you can 
come on the morning train which 
reaches Compton Mills at ten-thirty. 
Across the fields from the station 
directly west is our house with a 
flag floating over the east wing. 
Ralph Stevens 
Adaline Stevens 



William had not realized till that 
moment how hard it would be to 
refuse an invitation to the Stevens 
house. In his spirit there was a 
struggle, and Ralph by his side was 
trying to read the boy's thoughts 
from the expression upon his face. 
He urged him to accept the invita- 
tion. He argued that Mr. Brown 
was considerate and would forgive 
him for not coming. But William 
could not dismiss from his mind the 
picture of the blind man spending 
Thanksgiving Day in loneliness 
when others were rejoicing. He 
definitely declined the invitation. 

As William Bates entered th^ 
blind man's home next day he found 
Adaline Stevens chatting with Mr. 
Brown in the greatest good humor. 
She at once explained to her sur 
priced fellow-student in philosophy 
that she had known of his visits to 
the Brown home and that she had 
arranged with the latter to put him 
to the test with the two invitations. 
She was glad he had proved true ; 
and now if Wiiliam agreed she 
would take them all to her home in 
their large car v hich stood outside. 
After dinner William could read 
from Rollin for an hour, thus mak- 
ing it an ideal day for Mr. Brown. 

Vhy weary you any longer with 
this tedious story : As is so often 
the case in life, the path of duty 
which William thought meant sac- 
rifice proved tha path to happiness. 
Willi&m never forgot the lesson* as 
he never forgot any lesson. Did he 
and Adaline forget each other alt- 
er their school days were ever? Oh 
no ! In a family Bible in their new 
home Adaline has written opposite 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the verse in Luke, "Seek ye first the 
kingdom, etc." this note ; "Thanks- 
giving Day, 1921." 



Life's Signboards 

Life after all is just a journey. 
For some of us it is short and seem- 
ingly uneventful. For others it is 
long and filled with rich experiences. 
And for still others the journey is 
fretted with trials and difficulties. 
Whoever we may be, we are ever 
traveling toward some destination. 

Have you ever taken a trip? 
You answer, "What a foolish ques- 
tion ! Surely I have taken many 
trips." But if I were to ask you to 
describe your experiences while tak- 
ing the trip, probably you would 
reply in words something like this, 
"Of course, I first got my ticket. 
Everyone knows the futility of 
thinking of taking a trip without 
paying for it. Then having settled 
myself comfortably, I awaited with 
pleasure the experiences which I 
knew my trip would bring." 

"First, I studied my fellow pass- 
engers and surmised and wondered 
what hopes and sorrows made up 
their lives. Having conjectured as 
long as it gave me satisfaction, I 
then turned my attention to the out- 
side world to feast my eyes on Na- 
ture's ever changing panorama. 
Beautiful meadows blooming pro- 
fusely with wild flowers first met 
my eyes; then fields of waving 
grain. Following in quick success- 
ion were undulating hills, woods and 
virgin forests, murmuring streams 
and sparkling brooks." And oer- 



haps. you would say, "Still my des- 
cription is not complete. For all a- 
long the way I noticed various signs 
and signals each having a specific 
meaning; and I passed over numer- 
ous bridges. Then stations, some 
small and unpretentious and others 
large and imposing, flew by in rap- 
id succession. At last as the famil- 
iar landmarks came into view, I 
knew I was nearing home. Then 
just as the sun set in all its glory ov- 
er the western horizon, its varied 
colors' blending perfectly, and its 
flaming rays lighting the sky, I 
reached home." 

Life can be compared and likened 
to a trip. The stations one passes 
along the way are infancy, child- 
hood, manhood, prime and old age. 
At the first station we have a short 
eventful wait. At the next station 
our wait becomes more eventful and 
more interesting. And so on, the 
wait at each station becomes more 
eventful and filled with greater ex- 
periences and more trying problems. 
At the last station our wait takes 
on a retrospective nature. Time has 
mellowed and made rich our life's 
experiences. We are ever looking 
back upon life's ups and downs, its 
joys and its sorrows, its heartaches 
and its compensations. At whatev- 
er station we stop, the wait will 
sometimes be interesting and full of 
enjoyment. Then there are times 
when we will think, Oh how weary 
is this wait, and how tired and lone- 
ly I am. 

Fleeting time is the train on which 
we pass through life. The fare or 
ticket we pay in terms of the sacri- 
fices We make. The signals and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



signboards we pass while on life's 
journey are many. We ofttimes 
encounter danger signals in the form 
of some friend's advice, and if we 
are wise we will heed it. Another 
signal which continually waves be- 
fore us is Opportunity. And again 
if we are wise, we will heed her 
signal. Still another signal, this one 
labeled "Conscience," flashes itself 
across our vision every step of our 
journey. 

Faith, hope, trust, service, — all 
are signboards placed all along our 
pathway, and we must grasp their 
meanings now if we would ever 
grasp them, for they pass by with 
amazing rapidity. Then there are 
bridges which must be crossed, 
typical of some grave decision ; or 
dangerous trestles which must be 
passed, typical of some of the risks 
one must sometimes take. 

The blooming meadows we pass 
on our journey signify the pleasure 
we can derive from life. The rug- 
ged hills are typical of our ups and 
downs. The murmuring streams 
and sparkling brooks are ever sig- 
nificant of contentment and enjoy- 
ment, while the woods and forests 
tvpify our trying problems and situ- 
ations. 

Life, then, after all is just a jour- 
ney, but how all important is this 
Journey; for whether long or short 
it will take us somewhere. Then 
when we are nearing the last station 
and we turn our faces to the west 
and see life fading away from us 
in all its glory and sublimity, why 
should we not smilingly say, "Now 
I'm home." L. F 



"College Education" 

(As a Freshman in Public Speaking 
Sees It) 

Upon my primary accession to 
the rostrum, fellow students, I pro- 
pose to dissertate, analyze, and pre- 
sent a diligent disquisition upon the 
familiar and opportune subject of 
a "College Education." 

From this topic, upon which I am 
about to deliberate, may be infer- 
red manifold trains of thought, so 
I shall contract the scope of this 
general problem to its utilitarian 
and resultant factors. 

We must be careful to limit our- 
selves scrupulously to what has a 
direct bearing upon oitr actual dis- 
course. 

Deeming this subject to be one un- 
worthy of negation, and, further- 
more, not wishing to elaborate my 
conversational ability, I shall refrain 
from probing into any detrimental 
obstacles in a College Education. 

The reason we attend this institu- 
tion of high morals and good prin- 
ciples, for young men and ladies, is 
because education is good and plen- 
ty here. In fact, education is the 
only commodity lying around loose 
in this world and the sole thing of 
which a person may have as much 
as he desires to haul away. Every- 
thing else is locked in a trunk with 
the key and hinges inside. 

The value of knowledge is not de- 
termined by the means of acquisi- 
tion, but by the tenacity with which 
you grip it. 

A college education generally in- 
vests one with internal quality, and 
clothes one with an external veneer. 
But many deviate from this prevai- 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ent rule and convey with them noth- 
ing but a supirficial show, while 
others of a more sensible and modest 
type rontmue to hold only the in- 
trinsic attributes. 

Do not deduce from this state- 
ment that a College transforms a 
fool into a gentlemen or lady, — 
whatever the gender may be. The 
father of a fool should not send it 
to a college, the proper place for 
such a thing is in a circus. 

Classmates, let this be my part- 
ing admonition: When education 
is passed around you should not be 
bashful, but reach right in and take 
a big helping every time. Be al- 
ways on the alert to get your share. 

R. B. 



Lecture Notes 

All our E. C. teachers should 
have heard the first number of our 
lecture course this year, a lecture 
by Rabbi Stephen S. Wise on the 
subject "The Task of the Teacher 
in a Democracy." Here are just a 
few of his most pregnant statements 
for your benefit, teachers. 

"Teachers are the real guardians 
of a city." 

Henry Van Dyke said, "Teachers 
are the poorest paid but the best 
rewarded of all public servants." 
Dr. Wise added, '"Teachers need 
less reward and more pay." 

"Teachers should feel that the 
class-room ought to be a miniature 
democracy, not a miniature des- 
potism. 

"The teacher must not suppress 
the child. Education is to evoke 
the growing mind and spirit. 



"Don't try to make all pupils like 
yourself. Perfection is inimitable 1 
Rather have Jack Smith be a num- 
ber one Jack Smith than a fifth-class 
Lincoln. 

"We teach many branches but 
not many roots" — Emerson' "There 
are so many subjects to teach that 
we forget the object of education." 
The school should have two aims in 
educating the child : "Intellectual 
Individuation" and "Moral Social- 
ization." 

"Ten millions of Americans think 
they think, when they only rehash 
someone's second or third-class 
thoughts. I'd rather think my very 
own thoughts, though second or 
third-rate, than some one else's first- 
rate thoughts. There is no one in 
the world good enough to do my 
thinking for me. Don't let the Pub- 
lic Ledger do your thinking for you ! 

"The trouble with Americans is I 
not that they do not think together ' 
enough, but that they too often think 
together and act apart, whereas we 
should think apart and act together. J 
When men think together (mob 
thinking) they don't think at all! ' 

"America is a spirit. 

The work of the teacher is Ameri- 
canization. Americanization is 
spiritual, and inward in nature. It 
is not birth but worth ; not descent 
but aspiration; not racial ancestry 
but spiritual, personal achievement. 

"American birth is not a badge 
of superiority. Whenever a man 
boasts of his ancestry you may be 
sure the best half of him is under- 
ground. To have a family tree is 
to remind one of the time when one's 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



Simian ancestry climbed in its 
branches ! 

"I hate uniformity. You can't 
level up. Leveling is always down. 
We don't have uniformity by out- 
ward similarity but by inward un- 
ity. God didn't want us all to be 
alike. One of anyone of us is 
enough! Standards lift up, but 
standardization pulls down. 

"America's reparation should 
mean America with the world and 



for the world in times of peace as 
well as war. 

"America is a shrine to which we 
should bring our lives. The world 
is coming to lay upon it a peace-off- 
ering. 

"The future rebuilder of the De- 
mocracy must be taught the unity 
and brotherhood of all peoples. 
That is the task of the teacher in 
this Democracy. 



College IKkws 



Miss Hykes — "Prof. Meyer will 
you please sign my excuse cards? 
I want to go home to see the optimist 
my eyes are poor." 

Prof. Meyer — "I believe it is the 
oculist you ought to see." 



Prof. Nye — "I wonder if there is 
some one in here who would like 
to work his way through college by 
swinging the clock pendulum?" 



Prof. E. Meyar in Chorus — "Those 
people who are standing in the front 
row aren't all there." 



Miss Trimmer — "When you girls 
sing the College song, sing the part 
'we love thy sons so noble' with all 
your might, and sing 'thy daughters 
brave and true' very softly." 



Prof. H/arley — "It is dangerous 
to generalize too much." 



The night after the outing N. 
Meyer was heard to say in his sleep, 
"Hey, Sherman, we are ready for 
the third journey!" 



Prof. Hoffer — "How do you draw 
a projection to a plane?" 

Miss Horst — "By hanging a per- 
pendicular." 



A Student — "Those Myers are 
all a mess." 

Miss R. Minnich quickly — "I'm 
not." 

(A rather unique announcement 
of the fact that two of our number 
have settled an all-important ques- 
tion.) 



Our little 'Billy' W. at the Type- 
writing-room door — wistfully : "Is 
this the Li-bid-die?" Whereupon 
Miss Bonebrake kindly directs him 
to the library. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Wanted — An alarm to signal 
when the time arrives to return to 
school before the doors are locked, 
to prevent crawling over the coal 
pile. 

Daniel Myer 
Alvin Brightbill. 



Wanted — A duster to protect the 
clothing in Ash showers. 

J. A. Rinehart. 



Prof. Rose — "Miss Bonebrake, do 
you have your lecture ticket?" 

Miss Bonebrake* — "That matter 
has been arranged for me." 



Upon passing the tripe, Miss Fike 
exclaimed: "Is that starfish?" 



Young Men's Welfare Association 

The Y. M. C. A. has been doing 
splendid work this year, both in 
creating and fostering a spirit of 
unity among the boys, and also in 
raising the standards and ideals of 
each individual member. Its so- 
cials and excellent programs have 
been a great factor in bringing this 
about. 

The programs are varied and are 
always interesting and profitable. 
Several of the Professors have giv- 
en talks. On October 21 Prof. Ez- 
ra Wenger gave an address on 
"Thrills and Emergencies." His 
talk was very timely and abounded 
with humor and truth. The associa- 
tion has scheduled a number of simi- 
lar lectures for this school year. 



Hallowe'en Social 

Hallowe'en night may have been 
dreary in some places because of 
the showers, but not on College Hill. 
The faculty invited the students to 
a social in the gymnasium at eight 
o'clock P. M. Promptly at eight 
the students began to march down 
the steps into the beautifully dec- 
orated room. The floor was covered 
with leaves, and branches with 
beautifully colored oak leaves were 
fastened all around the wall. Corn- 
fodder and pumpkin faces were al- 
so much in evidence. 

Games and contests were indulged 
in until nine-thirty. Then refresh- 
ments were served and enjoyed. All 
students were in their rooms by ten- 
thirty, telling their roommates how 
much they enjoyed the evening. 



Senior News. 



When Mr. Harshman, elected 
chairman of the senior class, 
changed his course it was necessary 
for him to resign his chairmanship. 
The result of the second election is 
that Mr. Ephraim Hertzler is now 
the chairman of the senior class. 

On the evening of 'October 26. at 
four-thirty, the senior class grouped 
in the front of Alpha Hall and start- 
ed to hike to Keener's Wood above 
town. After playing a number of 
games the class enjoyed the refresh- 
ments prepared and served by the 
social committee. After supper the 
toastmaster took charge and the 
class enjoyed stories, jokes, and 
music. At seven forty-five the class 
started back to College Hill and by 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



eight-thirty every member of the 
class was busily engaged, preparing 
their lessons for the next day. 



A Day In The Hills. 

"Oh what a glory doth this world 
put on 

For him who doth with fervent 
heart go forth 
Under the bright and glorious sky, 
and looks 

On duties well performed and 
days well spent." 

Saturday, October 15. was a big 
day for the students, especially for 
the ladies since they assisted the 
kitchen force early in the morning 
to prepare the noon lunch. After 
all was ready; i. e., the lunch and 
other preliminary arrangements 
which should naturally be taken 
care of in a co-educational school, 
the group started to the station. 

The 10:29 train took us to Cone- 
wago. The Conewago hills are an 
ideal place to study nature in every 
sense of the word. Those who spent 
part of their time studying nature 
by themselves soon discovered that 
they were at a loss, so the next 
thing to do was to search for an 
assistant. The next big feature was 
the dinner served in Cafeteria style. 
Dinner being over the students ex- 
plored different parts of the hills 
until the time arrived to return to 
College Hill. 

An outing of this nature is valu- 
able not only for the growth of the 
social side of life, which goes a great 
way in the development of charac- 
ter, but also for the physical deve- 



lopment which incidentally takes 
place. In addition to these values 
is the benefit to the intellectual side 
of life. It is said, "Constant occupa- 
tion prevents rust", but too constant 
occupation of the mind not only pre- 
vents rust but creates ennui. This 
mental condition demands a change 
which can be gotten only by laying 
books aside and by going out and 
appreciating nature. 

From the outing just described, 
all came back physically tired but 
mentally very alert and active, with 
new zeal and inspiration to go forth 
and pursue their work more in the 
spirit of play. — J. S. 



Notice 



Due to sight or oversight, since 
the last issue of our 'Times' our 
school has had the most phenomenal 
growth ever known in its history — 
an increase in enrollment from 19 
(?) to 190! 



Some folks save money, others 
send their children to college. 



The best time to be on time is a 
little before time. 



Note of Appreciation. 

The College makes this formal and 
grateful acknowledgment of Mr. 
Lewis L. Lininger's service to the 
cause. He gave his skillful service 
as an electrician at a reasonable 
rate for the wiring of the Fairview 
Apartments building, the new dou- 
ble dwelling and the College chapel. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



He further favored the College by 
securing at a big discount the ex- 
pensive electric light fixtures need- 
ed for the above-mentioned equip- 
ment. After securing the consent 
of the electric light company he per- 
sonally attended to the removal of 
the unsightly poles from the front 
to the rear of the grounds. 



The Library. 

At the opening of the present coll- 
egiate year a change in the adminis- 
tration of the Library went into 
effect. Mr. L. D. Rose, an alumnus 
of the class of 1911, was put in 
charge and he devotes all his time 
to the improvement and expansion 
of the Library. A full-time Librar- 
ian not only makes supervision more 
effective but also makes the Libra- 
ry more serviceable to facutly and 
students. Uniform quiet is observed 
during library hours. 

During vacation the Librarian 
visited the leading college and uni- 
versity libraries in the East. He re- 
turned with scores of suggestions 



which he is busily engaged in 
making effective, determined to 
make the Library a vital factor in 
our college life. 

Soon after the beginning of the 
year, Mr. Rose issued a pamphlet 
"Concerning the Library" which was 
distributed to teachers and students. 
Timely suggestions were given on 
using the Library to our mutual 
best interest. 

The Library is one of the busiest 
places on the Hill. Many of the 
students spend every vacant period 
reading magazines and newspapers, 
or doing some assigned reference 
work. 

Books have been received through 
Senator Penrose, J. Kurtz Miller, 
Frederick, Md., Congressman Griest, 
Amos P. Geib, '09, Montclair, N. J. 



E. C.'s Notorious Historian 

Why was the period between A. 
D. 500 and A. D. 1200 known as the 
Dark Ages?" 

Jesse B. (sleepily) — "Because 
those were the days of Knights/' 



Two of the exchanges we desire 
to acknowledge are green numbers: 
Juniata Echo and Oak Leaves, both 
being dedicated to the Freshman 
class. The Campus Times from 
balmy California presents its bud- 
get of news with an interesting 
sketch of La Verne's new President. 

We are pleased to acknowledge 
receipt of the following college 
periodicals: The Spectator, The 



Ursinus Weekly, The Campus Times 
Juniata Echo, Oak Leaves and Beth- 
any Bible School Bulletin. 

This number of Our College 
Times is being forwarded to a num- 
ber of periodicals which have not 
been on our list previously. We 
hope to have responses from every 
student publication that receives 
this number. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



IRelicuous fiotes 



B. Mary Royer who was home on 
furlough from India, gave us a 
farewell message in the College 
Chapel on the evening of October 9. 
The College quartette carried us 
into the right spirit for receiving 
Sister Royer's message by singing 
"Come Spirit Come." 

This is the message : "Fellowship 
is so essential for individuals, and 
it can be found nowhere but in the 
Christian Religion. A Christian is a 
unique somebody, if he were not 
unique he would not be a Christian. 

Speaking in a human sense the 
missionary life means separation, 
but it is a great thought to think of 
the home-coming which shall some 
day take place. Provision for this 
place was made by the Master. We 
do not know the geographical loca- 
tion of heaven, but we know it is 
with our Lord. We should count it 
an opportunity and a privilege that 
we can help others to this place. 
God's plan was that this work was to 
be carried on through human 
agency. 

Christ came for two reasons: 
first, because of his love for lost 
souls; secondly, to do God's will, 
for He prayed that the Father's will 
should be done. Now the Lord 
sends you and me, for we are part- 
ners with Him in this business. 

After spending several years in 
the foreign field and then returning, 
several comparisons are made. One 
requirement of the people of Ameri- 
ca is to acquaint themselves with 



the conditions of the world and find 
out its needs. 

Blessings come to us, not to keep 
them for ourselves, but to pass them 
on to others. Our Christianity must 
be kept moving or we will find our- 
selves stricken with spiritual morti- 
fication. 

The Lord will hold us responsible 
for others. Ignorance of their con- 
dition and needs will not excuse us. 
The Lord has given us the Gospel 
and now he expects us to carry it 
to those who are not as fortunate as 
we are. 

One thing which Sister Royer 
wanted to impress upon the home 
folks was to seek after a keener 
sense of relationship to God. At 
the close of the message Sister Roy- 
er expressed her appreciation for 
what her friends did for her while 
in the homeland. For the folks on 
College Hill to know her, was to 
love her. 



Stevens Hill Revival 

"But ye shall receive power, when 
the Holy Spirit is come upon you : 
and ye shall be my witnesses both 
in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and 
Samaria, and unto the uttermost 
part of the earth." — Act 1 :8. 

When Jesus Christ gave his dis- 
ciples this promise just before His 
ascension into heaven, he did not ex- 
clude Christian people of the twen- 
tieth century. When he said that 
Christian people under the influence 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



of the Holy Spirit were to be His 
witnesses unto the uttermost 'parts 
of the earth He did not exclude Stev- 
ens Hill. 

Because the workers in the Eliza- 
bethtown district realized that there 
were many persons in and about 
Stevens Hill who had not taken ad- 
vantage of God's plan of redemp- 
tion, whose lives could be so much 
more useful if they had, a series of 
meetings was opened for this pur- 
pose. 

The meetings opened October 16, 
and closed October 30. Elder W. H. 
Miller of Elizabethtown, pastor of 
Stevens Hill congregation, was the 
evangelist. Alvin Brightbill, one of 
the students at the college, was 
chorister. The singing was fine and 
did much to make the meetings a 
success. The splendid spirit which 
characterized the meetings in the 
beginning continued throughout the 
two weeks. The people of town, 
and the students as well, are to be 
commended for their faithful at- 
tendance, and for the inspiration 
which they gave the regular work- 
ers and the pastor, Elder Miller. 
God's Holy Spirit convicted souls as 
Elder Miller boldly declared the 
Truth, and on Sunday evening, Oct. 
23, one soul was convinced that to 
accept her Savior was the highest 
and best thing to do. 

The second week was a strenous 
one for Elder Miller. He visited 
in very many of the homes and, be- 
cause of the great distance between 
them, it often required considerable 
walking. Although no more were 
converted, the workers feel that the 
Holy Spirit abides there and that 



an inconceivable amount of good 
has been done. 

On Sunday, October 30, a pro- 
gram was rendered by the Sunday 
School children. After several reci- 
tations and exercises by the child- 
ren, Professor H. H. Nye, the dis- 
trict Sunday School secretary, gave 
the main address which was appre- 
ciated and much enjoyed. 

The Sunday evening service was 
well attended, and was very impres- 
sive. Several selections were given 
by a mixed quartet from the college. 
The meetings closed and the work- 
ers feel that they can continue their 
work with greater zeal, and with a 
deeper love for lost souls, because 
of them. R. M. 



Chapel Echoes 

There is no other position more 
noble than to be a pioneer for God. 
We need men to launch into the un- 
known truth. 



It is impossible to do the will of 
God without the help of Christ. 



The perfectness of a circle does 
not depend upon the vastness of its 
area, but upon its center; neither 
does the integrity of a life depend 
upon the vastness of experiences, 
but upon the heart. 

The heart determines the life. 



Some people look at the penny sj 
closely that they cannot see the 
dollar. 

Some people look at the immedi- 
ate advantages so closely that they 
cannot see future advantages. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Jesus Christ is the bed rock upon 
which we must build if we want to 
go into the world of service. 



There are some people waiting 
for an opportunity and die waiting. 

Not every great opportunity 
comes along and calls us. 



A true Christian is one who knows 
Christ, trusts Christ, loves Christ, 
resembles Christ, and serves Christ. 



Sail on, sail on, and on, — 
Press toward the mark for the 
prize. 



its rough edges. 

He who knows how to save has 
the philosopher's stone in his pock- 
et. 



Position in life is not bestowed, 
but acquired. 

Just as apples find a place in a 
barrel; so do we shake to the place 
our size determines. Don't get into 
a place where you rattle, but be big 
enough to fill the place. 



We can climb a mountain only by 



Talk to God and let God talk to 
you. Secret prayer accomplishes 
wonders in the world. The power of 
God helps to overcome bad habits. 



Hlumttt IKlotes 



It is interesting to note where the 
Alumni of the early years of our Col- 
lege are scattered in the pursuit of 
their various lines of work. The 
Senior Class of 1904 consisted of 
seven members. Three of these still 
reside in Elizabethtown; viz., Mrs. 
F. W. Groff, S. B. Kiefer and I. E. 
Shoop. These are contributing in a 
large way to the best there is in 
home, business, and church life. 

J. B. Henry resides at Rheems. He 
has charge of a number of men 
working in the quarries at that place 
All of our Alumni sympathize with 
the Henry family in the loss of their 
little daughter through an automo- 
bile accident. Mrs. Henry, who was 
also injured in this accident, is 
slowly improving. 



H. K. Garman and family are 
doing pastoral work in Philadelphia. 
Their relatives and friends are glad 
to welcome them to Elizabethtown 
when vacation time and other oc- 
casions permit their coming. 

H. H. Lehman and family reside 
in Pasadena, California. Mr. Leh- 
man is cashier of the largest bank 
in that city. 

W. K. Gish and family are located 
near Alderson, Alberta, Canada. 
Their nearest town is nine miles dis- 
tant. Their oldest child died during 
the influenza epidemic. Vernon, 
Arlene and Herbert are happy in 
their northern home. 



Three of our alumni are on Coll- 
ege Hill this year as seniors in the 
A. B. Course. Anna Wolgemuth. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



'08, our worthy Editor of the 
"TIMES" this year, has returned to 
complete her college work. She was 
a student at Bethany Bible School 
during the past two years. Supera 
Martz, '19, and E. M. Hertzler, '20, 
will also complete their college work 
in 1922. 

There is another A. B. senior who 
has come to us from Bethany Bible 
School. This is Wm. Willoughby, 
a native of New Mexico. Mrs. Lill- 
ian Falkenstein Willoughby, '11, is 
the loyal alumnus who has directed 
this new student toward our school. 
The Willoughby family occupies 
rooms in Memorial Hall. 



About three-fourths of the popu- 
lation of Denmark use the bicycle 
as their most common means of trav- 
el. W. E. Glasmire, '10, finds the 
bicycle very useful in getting about 
in pursuit of church duties. 

John F. Graham, '19, who has 
been a student at Bethany Bible 
School for several years, spent his 
vacation, for the most part, in Pen- 
nsylvania. He worked in two Daily 
Vacation Bible Schools, serving as 
principle of one in Maryland. Dur- 
ing October he conducted evangel- 
istic services at Earlville, Pa., in his 
home congregation. There were 
fourteen converts. He expects to 
continue evangelistic work for a few 
months and then return to Bethany 
Bible School. 

Nora Reber Hollenberg, '13, and 
husband are stationed at Vada, 
Thana Dist., India. They have been 
in charge of the station since last 
March because of the scarcity of 
workers. After some of the work- 



ers on furlough return to their work, 
the Hollenbergs will be able to en- 
gage in language study more stead- 
ily. They occupy a cozy bungalow 
surrounded by mango trees and are 
enjoying their new India home. 

George Capetanios, '16 is conduct- 
ing evangelistic services for the 
Church of Christ, Lancaster, Pa. 
He has charge of a pastorate in En- 
dicott, N. Y. He kindly remembered 
his Alma Mater with a visit in com- 
pany with his little daughter, Helen. 
His address to the student body was 
highly appreciated. 

Robert Becker, '14, is employed 
by The Big Four Railroad Co., as 
stenographer in their office at Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Mrs. J. A. Buffenmyer, '07, and 
two children recently visited among 
relatives and friends in Lancaster 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Buffenmyer 
are engaged in pastoral work at 
Uniontown, Fayette County, Pa. 
During a recent revival conducted 
by him at Potsdam, Ohio, there were 
twelve converts. 



Pat's Good Shot. 

A son of Erin once described his 
first day's shooting in the following 
way. "The first bird I ever shot was 
a squirrel, and the first time I hit 
him I missed him altogether, and 
the next time I hit him in the same 
place. After that I threw him from 
the tree with two stones, and he 
fell into the water and was drown- 
ed, and that was the first bird I ev- 
er shot. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Htbletics 



With the coming of autumn, the 
air begins to rush from the north- 
western hills. It is then that the 
atmosphere is invigorating. It is 
the time to keep moving in order to 
keep the blood circulating. There 
are different ways in which we can 
accomplish this. 

It seems tennis receives the most 
attention as some students play in 
the morning, afternoon, and evening, 
even after the sun has set. We won- 
der why so late in the evening? 
Ask the Bechtel brothers, they know 
Tennis is thus becoming more pop- 
ular .-in College Hill. Students are 
very eager to learn this game for it 
is one which gives the proper a- 
mount of exercise, besides afford- 
ing a splendid opportunity to study 
personalities. 

Baseball, although out of season, 
has been engaged in except when 
the weather would not permit. Ev- 
en though it has been cold at times, 
yet there were interesting games 
played. There were four teams or- 
ganized, two first and two second 
teams. The first teams were known 
as the Leaguers and Professionals. 
These two teams are very evenly 
matched. The batteries were as 
follows: Leaguers — E. Eshelman c, 
Edris p. Professionals — Trimmer 
c, D. Myers p. At present the 
Professionals are leading. The first 
game was thrilling from beginning 
to end. It was only by a whirlwind 
finish that the Professionals came 
Out victorious 5-4. In the second 



game all went well with the Leagu- 
ers until the last inning, when the 
Professionals began to send the ball 
to all corners of the lot. In this in- 
ning they scored five runs and vic- 
tory, the score being 6-4. It was the 
fine team work that enabled them 
to triumph. The second teams, 
known as the Giants and Indians, al- 
so met and had very close and ex- 
citing battles. The batteries were 
as follows : Giants — Forney c, Jesse 
Bechtel p. Indians — Hollopeter c, 
I. Royer p. At this time the Giants 
are leading with no defeat. Look 
out, first teams, you are next! 

The biggest game of the season 
was played Wednesday, Oct. 26, 
when the Literary Geniuses met the 
Financiers for the first time this 
season. With the rooters doing their 
best, the teams started with Edris 
pitching, Eshelman catching for the 
Financiers; and D. Myers pitching, 
S. Ober catching for the Literary 
men. There was no doubt, after the 
first few innings, about the outcome 
of the contest. The Literary men 
had on their batting togs and they 
never let up, once they started slam- 
ming the sphere. The interest of 
those on the grandstand was kept at 
a high pitch during the game by 
some thrilling plays. Sollenberger, 
3rd baseman for the Geniuses, sent 
a fine one out to deep center field, 
and Grubb made a spectacular run 
after it up the straw-stack only to 
lose the ball. Willoughby, who 
played in the left garden for the 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Geniuses, had forgotten his glasses 
and missed Eshelman's drive, which 
permitted the latter to race to sec- 
ond, later scoring. The fine play- 
ing of Wagner, star shortstop for 
the Financiers, who scooped them 
out of the ground and hurled them 
to first, prevented many runs being 
scored by the Geniuses. We must 
not forget the pitching of D. Myers, 
who had them whiffing the air by 
his curves most of the time. This, 
combined with the hitting of the 
Geniuses, spelled defeat for the Fi- 
nanciers. The final score was 8 
to 4. 

With the coming of autumn, track 
also was revived. This is an act- 
ivity which gives the body the need- 
ed exercise to do its work. Although 
it is not carried on very extensively 
we must not forget that it is a new 
form of atheletics on College Hill. 
However, the students are taking 



more interest in track, as is seen by 
the number responding to the call of 
Mr. P. Brandt, the Manager. Com- 
bined with track are high and broad 
jumping, and pole vaulting. There 
is no doubt that the interest in this 
phase of activity will increase in the 
future, and we hope to see it increase 
rapidly. 

We must not forget the girls who 
are always upholding their favorite 
teams by rooting. However, they 
do more than root as they have re- 
ceived a new hand-ball and bat. 
Now at times, instead of their being 
the spectators, the boys are in the 
bleachers. The interest taken by 
the spectators speaks for the suc- 
cess of the games. Several interest- 
ing games have recently been play- 
ed by the fair sex. We know they 
have greater success awaiting them. 
Let us watch their growth and al- 
ways lend them our support. 



IXHise anfc ©tberwtse 



Referred Question 

Why not begin a "Notorious 
printing establishment on College 
Hill? We have already four Trim- 
mers, a Ream, a floor Walker, a 
W T histler, two Brandts, and a design 
— Rose. 



Announcement 

The regular service will com- 
mence next Sunday evening at 7 
o'clock and continue until further 
notice. 



How Did he Die? 

Jackson — "How did your brother 
die?" 

Johnson — "He kicked a mule and 
the mule returned the compliment." 



Newspaper Views 

Prohibition has a hard time with 
inventive people — San Francisco 
Bulletin. 

It takes lots of horse sense to run 
a stable government — Indianapolis 
Star. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



My Bonnie 

My bonnie leaned over a gas tank 
The height of the contents to see ; 

He lighted a match to assist him— - 
O. bring back my bonnie to me. 



Slight Error 

Mr. Rose — "Did you see that 
honey bee in Prof. Leiter's Biology 
laboratory the other day?" 

Miss K. — "Honey bee? O, I guess 
you mean Willoughby." 



Sex — Middle Sex 

As a Scotch regiment was march- 
ing to the front in France, a French 
soldier who was watching them said ; 
"They can't be men for they wear 
skirts, and they can't be women for 
they have mustaches." "I have it," 
said another, "they're the famous 
Middlesex regiment from London." 



"Categorically Speaking" 

Consider the case of the harmless 
necessary cat. It is no stunt at any 
time for this particular species of fil- 
ine quadrupeds to fall off the roof 
of a tenement house, hit the rail of 
the fire-escape on the fourth floor, 
turn a back flip on an infringing 
clothes line on the third, carrom off 
a flag pole on the second, leave some 
fur on the sharp edge of a flower 
pot sunning on the window-ledge of 
the first and land in a barrel, of brok- 
en glass in the back yard, right side 
up, with care, and not so much as 
a mortgage executed on any of its 
nine lives. — Introductory paragraph 
of an Editorial — Public Ledger. 



One on the Lawyer 

One day two lawyers who were 
arguing opposite sides of a case be- 
came angry at one another and one 
of them pointing to the other said, 
"That attorney is the ugliest and 
meanest lawyer in this town." 

"You forget yourself, you forget 
yourself, Mr. Smith," said the court 
rapping for order with his gavel. 



Not Living Up To Their Names 

Bowman — Never seen with a bow. 

Babylon — Never saw the Euph- 
rates. •• • 

Brubaker — Never made brew, 
and is no baker. . 

Brightbill — Bright — but minus 
bills. 

Good — Isn't always good. 

Hart — Have a heart! 

Keller (German for cellar) — 
Lives on 3rd floor. 

Ream — Not made of paper. 

Strayer — Claims she never went 
astray. 

Winters — Who has a sunny dis- 
position. 

Wagner — Who never made wag- 
ons. 

Warner — Who never warns us a- 
bout the dining room. 

Whistler — Who warbles. 

Grimm — Who never wrote Fairy 
Tales. 

Harshman — Not so harsh as he'd 
have us think. 

Longenecker — Who never invests 
in high collars. 

Frye — Who cannot cook. 



28 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ftbanks$ivina 



Thankful for the glory of the old Red, White and Blue, 
For the spirit of America that still is staunch and true, 
For the laughter of our children and the sun-light in their eyes, 
And the joy of radiant mothers and their evening lullabies; 
And thankful that our harvests wear no taint of blood to-day, 
But were sown and reaped by toilers who were 
light of heart and gay. 

Thankful for the riches that are ours to claim and keep, 
The joy of honest labor and the boon of happy sleep, 
For each little family circle where there is no empty chair 
Save where God has sent the sorrow for the 

loving hearts to bear; 
And thankful for the loyal souls and brave hearts of the past 
Who builded that contentment should bo with us to the last. 

Thankful for the plenty that our peaceful land has blessed, 
For the rising sun that beckons every man to do his best, 
For the goal that lies before him and the promise when he sows 
That his hand shall reap the harvest, undisturbed by cruel foes; 
For the flaming torch of justice, symbolizing as it burns: 
Here none may rob the toiler of the prize he fairly earns. 

Today our thanks we're giving for the riches that are ours, 

For the red fruits of the orchards and the perfume of the flowers, 

For our homes with laughter ringing and our hearthfires blazing bright, 

For our land of peace and plenty and our land of truth and right; 

And we'er thankful for the glory of the old Red, White and Blue, 

For the spirit of our fathers and a manhood that is true. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



toooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocxx>ooooooo^ 

Store Opens 7:00 A. M. Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 

Saturday 10 P. M. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of the girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



(OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OOOOOOOOC 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 

I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 

J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



'ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men'* 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 

Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

- 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H, Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
EL'ZABETHTOWN, .-:,-. PENNA, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A C McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Largest Circulation and 
Advertising Patronage 

EHzabethtowi Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 




excellent ivork fair prices 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Remember — 18 West High Street 

For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 

Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO, 

N. York-Chicago -Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



J. W. ZARPD88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



[OOOOOOOOOOOOOOX90000000000000000000000QOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOI 

Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



Bueh Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



South End Grocery 



FRESH, FANCY and STAPLE 

GROCERIES, CANDIES and 

LUNCH GOODS 



'The little store with big business' 



Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 



FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

"HomafiUs'' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 

'EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 
David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS, 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 1£ N. Q. St, LANCASTER, PA. 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SH A VI NG PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 
, Wholesale Sugar House 
318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. h. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHONOGRAPHS 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, :-: MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 
ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATTS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. T R I N K 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor PJoIl National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. -Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 
JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^ 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS* 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 

Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial' will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



[iniiiiBiininiiiiii 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 



THE 



IS 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 



122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Y. M. C. A. Eldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

Elizabethtown - Penna. ; 46-48 W. King St., Lancaster 



GARBER GARAGE 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 




FORD and FORDSON 



Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

OQQOOQQOQQQQQOQOOOQQQQQQGQOQQQQQQQQOQOQOQQGQQQQQQQOQQQOQ 



KLEIN'S 
ilk Chocolate 

And 

Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate 



9> 



OOOOOOQQOOOOOQQQOQOQQQQOOQOQOQOOQQQOOOOOOOQOOQQQOOOOQOOO 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 



}O0000000000GQGQOG0OOOQOG9GO€K>OQGQO&G^^ 

THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 



Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 



$5.50 



In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 

17.50 $5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 

'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXdOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



.1 i i r i ii ■ i- Y t n ^^ - — — 



EM 

gOLLEEE TOKlfl 




CHRISTMAS NUMBER 
1921 



0O000O00O00O0O0O0OCXX>00O000OO0O0i 



HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

MISSIMER 8c YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 

Come and be convinced. 




This is The Place for You to SAVE 

^^m ^M^m^^m^^m MONEY! 
qqgqqqqqqqqqqqqooqqoqqqqqqqqoqoqqqqqqgoqqqqqqqqqgqqqqoqqqqqqqo 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOCXX300000000000000000000 3000(XK5000000O0000OO00OOO0O0€KXX> 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

6 
O0OOOOOOO0OOOOOOOOOOO0OOOO0GO0OOOO€XX>OGOOOCXX30O0O0OO00000O00OC3 

qOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

''THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

iQQQQQQQQQOQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQOOQOOOOQQQQQQ ( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. • 



The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treat. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, -:- PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

EL1ZABETHT0WN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L. Geyer 
Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



)OOOOOOCX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXX}0 



GANSMANS 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 



AND 



MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



DIRECTORS 
Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 
Monroe H. Metzler 



R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 

''OQOQQQQOQQQQQQC&QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQOQOQOQOQQQQQQQQQOQ ( 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



J. T. SNYDER 



Florin, Penna. 



GO TO 



HORSTS' 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 
Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

_AND— 

PAPER HANGER 



S. Market St., 



Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX}000000000000000000000000000000 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 




Write or Phone to 
FEY BONNET SUPPLY CO. 

LitJtz, Penna. Bell-139R2 



For FREE catalogue of Ready-Made 
bonnets, bonnet-makers supplies 
and covering goods samples. 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburo, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ifiiKlHIUHU 



BIIBflHHBI 



1I11IWIIIBIW11IBFH *' Hit 



■ ■ 



THE NEW 



FLORIN TRUST CO. 

Wishes to thank its many friends for their very generous support in making 
this new bank the successful institution it has become. We are getting new 
customers every day and extend an invitation to you to do your banking busi- 
ness with us. 

Interest paid on time certificates and savings accounts. 

WE GUARANTEE YOU 4 PER CENT. INTEREST AND 

100 PER CENT. SECURITY 



in Trust Company 

FLORIN, PENNA. 
E. J. NISSLY, President. N. F. ARNTZ, Treasurer. 



m 



COLLEGE HILL 
DAIRY 



GO TO 



Pure Milk and Cream 



Delivered Daily 



S. G. Graybill 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 
FOR 

SHOES OF QUALITY 

GO TO 

EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 

BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store" 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches, 
Ivory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 



MRS. W. S. MORGAN, Proprietress. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGENUTH 
COM L 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 

Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

Furnish The 

APPETITE 

And We Will Do The Rest 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



FREYMEYER'S BAKERY 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



Increase Profits by Liming 

Your Soil. 

White Lily Brand 99% Cal. Carbon- 

ate Lime Will Fill Your 

Requirements. 

LANDIS STONE MEAL COMPANY 

Rheems, Penna. 



DEMY & DETRA 



Dealers in 



Farm Implements and Repairs 



Your Patronage Solicited 



Ind. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
ooooooooooooooooooooooocaoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE BEE HIVE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



Dry Goods, Notions 

AND FANCY GOODS 



Hosiery and Underwear 

ALWAYS THE LATEST 
in our 

Gent's Furnishing Department 



Visit Our Grocery Department 

"FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



BEST OF CANDIES 

We endeavor to keep a most complete line in stock at all 
times and respectfully solicit your patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 

Something New Every Day 
Cor. S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo$ 



©ur College ZLimes 

Volume XIX DECEMBER No. 3 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtown 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

(Elsie Landis 
College News jj. D. Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 

J. S. Harley J. Z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



JSfcitortals 



"As You Like It." 

Christmas is almost here. We are 
wondering about some of the ques- 
tions that must arise in many, many 
minds at this season. Probably 
some of them run like this: Will 
they all be home this Christmas? 
Will Bill change his mind and come 
home too? Shall I go home and 
complete the circle, or accept the 
invitation to Frank's house? Will 
Mary come, and will she have 
changed since she left us? What 
good things will there be to eat? 
Which of all these beautiful gifts 
shall I give to Alice? What will I 
get in return, I wonder? Shall it 
mean to me a season of real rejoic- 
ing or just a gala day? They may 
be such as these, only millions more. 

What, after all, is your chief 
concern for this Christmas? Does 
the day promise much or little? 

Within yourself my friend, 
lies the power to make it very much 
"as you like it." If your happiness 
consists in the large number and 
the rich quality of the gifts you re- 
ceive, probably this is not in your 
power, except as you can regulate 
it by your own indiscriminate lavish- 
ness. If, on the other hand, it con- 
sists in seeing how many homes you 
can brighten and how many hearts 
you can cheer by word, or gift, or 
deed, then verily the power is thine ! 

Be not deceived. "The city of hap- 
piness is in the state of mind." You 
cannot center your interests on self 



and appear unselfish, and go on 
your way rejoicing. You cannot 
gratify your selfish desires and 
thereby make others happy. Your 
attitude toward others and toward 
the world will largely determine 
your happiness at this season. If it 
is not "as you like it," there is al- 
ways the possibility of changing 
your attitude until you do like it. 

If your presence in the home cir- 
cle will gladden more hearts than 
you could cheer at any other place, 
and circumstances favor your go- 
ing, then possibly the home is the 
place for you on Christmas. If, 
on the other hand, some obscure, 
out-of-the-way place is calling for 
your help on this self-same day, — 
a place where souls are hungering 
for just the bare crusts of the Bread 
you feed upon daily, — then may not 
even family ties hold or claim you. 

What it takes to make Christmas 
Day, 1921, 'as we like it,' is a fair 
indication of whose cause we repre- 
sent — our own or Anothers. 



"The Holy Supper is kept indeed 
In whatso we share with another's 

need: 
Not what we give but what we 

share, 
For the gift without the giver is 

bare; 
Who gives himself with his alms 

feeds three— 
Himself, his hungry neighbor and 

me." Lowell. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



<&n (going ^otne jf or Cfjrtfitmaa 



i. 

He little knew the sorrow that was in his 
vacant chair; 

He never guessed they'd miss him, or he'd 
surely have been there ; 

He couldn't see his mother or the lump that 
filled her throat, 

Or the tears that started falling as she read 
his hasty note; 

And he couldn't see his father, sitting sor- 
rowful and dumb, 

Or he never would have written that he 
thought he couldn't come. 



He little knew the gladness that his pres- 
ence would have made, 

And the joy it would have given, or he 
never would have stayed. 

He didn't know how hungry had the little 
mother grown 

Once again to see her baby and to claim 
him for her own. 

He didn't guess the meaning of his visit 
Christmas Day 

Or he never would have written that he 
couldn't get away. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Training School, January 8, 1922. 

Instructors 

Dr. C. C. Ellis 
Prof. Minor Miller 
Pres. Ross Murphy 
Bible Institute, January 23-29, 1922 
Instructors 

Eld. J. W. Lear 
Eld. W. S. Long 
Eld. I. S. Long 
Lecture "What Job I Am Best 
Fitted For" 

by 

Dr. H. H. Balkin 

8 P. M., January 18, 1922. 



He couldn't see the fading of the cheeks 

that once were pink, 
And the silver in the tresses: and he didn't 

stop to think 
How the years are passing swiftly, and 

next Christmas it might be 
There would be no home to visit and no 

mother dear to see. 
He didn't think about it— I'll not say he 

didn't care. 
He was heedless and forgetful or he'd 

surely have been there. 



Are you going home for Christmas? Have 

you written you'll be there? 
Going home to kiss the mother and to show 

her that you care 
Going home to greet the father in a way 

to make him glad? 
If you're not I hope there'll never come a 

time you'll wish you had. 
Just sit down and write a letter—it will 

make their heart strings hum 
With a tune of perfect gladness— if you'll 

tell them that you'll come. 

M. G. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Xtterarv 



Christmas Day in the Far 
West— 1852. 

Long ago when the eastern part 
of our country was stirred by the 
discovery of gold in California, 
many people left their homes and 
pushed to the West. Among these 
was a family by the name of Tivoli, 
who left their little home and circle 
of friends in Florida, and traveled 
west by way of the Santa Fe trail, 
to seek their fortune. 

Father and mother Tivoli were 
eager to start on the long journey, 
anticipating the wealth which they 
might obtain. The only anxiety they 
had was concerning their little twin 
babies, Mona and Fiona, for they 
feared the journey would be too 
hard for these children who were 
only three years of age. 

It was a bright spring morning 
in the year of 1848 when they left 
their little home in Florida and 
started across the continent in 
search of the gold country. They 
planned to reach the gold country 
before winter and be settled before 
the cold weather sets in ; and it 
looked as though they would, for 
everybody kept well, the weather 
was fine, the twins did not seem to 
mind the exposure, and everything 
went smoothly. They were sure 
they were near the gold country 
when they left the Santa Fe trail to 
meet the Spanish trail which led to 
Los Angeles. 

Upon leaving the Santa Fe trail 
they passed through an Indian vil- 



lage — now known as Pueblo, where 
the Indians seemed rather hostile, 
because of the whites rushing to the 
West to take possession of their 
land. The Tivolis, however, passed 
through in safety, and as long as 
the Indians were not molested they 
gave the whites no trouble. Just 
west of the village of Pueblo a large 
plateau appears which is now 
known as the Colorado plateau. 
Taking the Spanish trail which led 
to the southwest, the Tivolis passed 
through the plateau, thus avoiding 
the Rocky Mountains. They were 
so greatly impressed with the gran- 
deur of the great West that they de- 
cided to go no farther but remain 
and engage in grazing. They seem- 
ed to like the country where they 
had settled and year after year they 
stayed, until four years had passed. 
Ey this time Mona and Fiona were 
seven years old. 

Mr. Tivoli's possessions now be- 
came so extensive that he had to 
hire a helper. Therefore he asked 
a man by the name of Karl Kron, 
who was a Swede, to work for him. 
Karl was glad for the oppoutunity 
of making an honest living as well 
as for the comfort which the Tivoli 
home offered him. The twins learn- 
ed to love him dearly and called him 
Uncle Karl. 

One fine day a man and woman 
by the name of Smith came to the 
ranch and asked to stay awhile. 
They happened to be the missionar- 
ies sent to work among the Indians, 
and did not expect to find white 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



L3 



people living in the country. The 
Tivolis welcomed them to their 
home. The children were quite as 
glad as their parents to see white 
folks, and soon a warm friendship 
sprang up between them. As Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith and the Tivoli fami- 
ly talked over the work which the 
Smiths were doing, they often heard 
the story of Jesus. This seemed 
new to them, because they were of 
Spanish descent and of the Catholic 
religion — a religion which had lost 
its meaning to them through lack of 
practice. 

It happened one day near the 
middle of December, when the mis- 
sion workers returned from their 
work, that they asked the twins 
where they would spend Christmas. 
Mona and Fiona looked at them 
questioningly and said, "What is 
Christmas? Tell us about it 
please." Quickly they ran to Moth- 
er Tivoli and asked, "Where will 
we spend Christmas?" Mother 
said she guessed at home, but she 
didn't remember much about Christ- 
mas. Mr. and Mrs. Smith were 
asked to tell about it and they de- 
cided to do so after supper. 

When the work was all done, 
they gathered about the open fire- 
place to hear the Christmas story. 
They were told of the Babe of Beth- 
lehem and how that ever since his 
birth we always celebrate Decem- 
ber 25 as Christmas, because on that 
day, eighteen hundred fifty-two 
years ago, Jesus was born. They 
were also told how that everywhere 
Christ is known both Christians and 
sinners celebrate Christmas Day. 
Mona and Fiona listened very at- 



tentively and wondered what peo- 
ple did on Christmas. Mrs. Smith 
said if they were good she would 
tell them that another day. They 
promised and having been put to 
bed were soon sound asleep. The 
Smiths and the Tivolis talked 
while longer, and soon decided that 
the twins should have their first 
real Christmas. 

During the days following there 
was much planning and whispering 
going on about the ranch. The 
twins went to bed early; father and 
mother Tivoli and the Smiths stayed 
up late. Finally everything was 
ready. The evening before Christ- 
mas Karl went to the hills for a pine 
tree, and insisted that he wanted 
to set it up himself in the sitting 
room. 

At last Christmas dawned. The 
twins and everyone were up early. 
The morning's work was done, and 
all were invited to the parlor or 
sitting room, where a bright fire 
burned in the hearth. The twins 
fairly danced for joy. The beauti- 
ful dark green tree stood in a cor- 
ner decorated with strings of red 
and white popcorn, pine cones, 
brown nuts, and little yellow and 
red apples. On the top was a large 
golden star. The table was loaded 
with packages, and dishes of good- 
ies. There was lots of fun opening 
the packages and finding a surprise 
in each one. Mona got her first real 
doll, and Fiona his first store sled. 
The Christmas dinner was soon 
served and all enjoyed the good 
things immensely. This, however, 
was not the best part of the day. 
After dinner they all went to the 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



mission house where a service was 
to be held. The Smiths had arrang- 
ed a small tree in one corner, and 
had decorated the walls with green 
leaves. They then told the Christ- 
mas story again in the presence of 
about fifteen or twenty ranchmen, 
cowboys, women and children. 
When the story was finished, tears 
stood in the eyes of some ; and after 
a benediction was given all agreed 
that the day was one long to be re- 
membered, and promised to come 
back again. 

When father and mother Tivoli, 
the Smiths, and the twins got home 
they had a pleasant little chat and 
some supper. After supper they 
sat down and read and talked over 
the events of the day. The mission 
workers explained the plan of sal- 
vation by request of Father Tivoli, 
and both he and mother decided to 
accept Jesus as their Savior. In 
this way one of the first Christian 
homes in the great Colorado Plat- 
eau came into existence. C.A.M. 



The Home as Portrayed by 
Burns. 

The home occupies a very impor- 
tant place in the life of a race. The 
national life of a people depends in 
a great measure upon its home life. 
Many of the present day problems 
in education and morals would be 
more than half solved if America 
could boast of more ideal Christian 
homes. 

Robert Burns in his poem "The 
Cotter's Saturday Night" pictures 
the home life of a Scottish peasant 



family. Home here is a place to 
which an individual can go and un- 
load the weight of burdens and 
cares ; a place to which he can come 
for rest and peace from the turmoil 
of the busy, hurrying throng of the 
restless world; or for comfort and 
ease after following the plough or 
the reaper, when weary with his 
hard labor. The picture as shown 
by Burns reveals this beautifully, 
for the father is eager to get home, 
no matter how humble the place 
may be. It is his home, the place 
where his loved ones are ready to 
meet him with happy greetings. 
As the children gather about him, 
he forgets the aches and anxieties 
of his labor and toil. 

One of the pictures with a last- 
ing impression to be found in a 
Christian home, and which is also 
found in this poem of Burns, is that 
of the children and the parents sur- 
rounding the fireside in a complete 
family circle, lifting up their hearts 
in praise and thanksgiving to their 
Creator for the blessings so lavishly 
bestowed upon them. Even though 
they are poor, they feel grateful 
for their health, and for the love 
shown by parents and brothers and 
sisters. 

It is an inborn instinct which 
leads parents to care for and pro- 
tect their offspring. The parents 
take great pride in their children 
and their wishes are gratified when 
their boys and girls grow up to be 
good Christian men and women. 

A good home where all is peace 
and love is a real Paradise on earth. 

S. W. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Charm Strikes the Sight — 
Merit Wins the Soul. 

Gayly along" the roadside grow 
the sweet scented flowers with their 
dresses glistening in the sunlight. 
Along flits the buzzing bee, first be- 
ing attracted by the fragrance of 
perfume and then by the gorgeous 
splendor of the flowers. The bee 
did not hesitate and consider 
whether the flowers contained hon- 
ey, but because of the inviting odor 
and the attractive color of their 
gowns, he was at once entangled 
within the deceptive walls of beauty 
finding nothing but disappointment 
and. his keen anticipation unreal- 
ized. 

Not unfrequently are there people 
being led astray into captivity of 
sin because the fascination of splen- 
dor gains the favor of their immedi- 
ate desires and ignores the unwaver- 
ing excellence of merit. It is the 
time when a man "learns to look up- 
on illegitimate love with a careless 
mind" that he gets entangled with- 
in the web of sensuality and de- 
bauchery. He finally finds himself 
ensnared within the horrid walls 
of deception, never to regain an 
honorable position in life again ; he 
becomes a social outcast and at last 
he is placed in the dishonorable 
grave of solitude and darkness. 
Why should the enticing gestures 
and the flashy dress of the coquette 
curse the eye and crush the soul of 
man to the grave for transient 
pleasure? Place, O man! before 
your eyes the comprehensive vision, 
the charm of merit rather than the 
charm of the sight. 



It is not the fascinating features 
of beauty that contribute to ones 
permanent desirability ; but it is the 
invisible charm of the spirit, dis- 
seminating high ideals, that finds 
favor in the eyes of the honorable. 
It is the person whose physique is 
unsymmetrical, whose face bears 
the irregular lines of imperfection, 
who is generally the neglected 
member of society. But is society 
just? "Man looketh on the out- 
ward appearance, but God looketh 
on the heart." The purity and 
beauty of heart is merit that mounts 
the apex of rare choice in defiance 
of social gravity. 

Which one of the two" men is the 
most valuable to society, — the man 
who is buoyed into the constellation 
of public opinion by his sparkling 
gem studs and veneered speeches; 
or the man who lives in the back- 
woods, away from the eyes of the 
world, calmly and earnestly forg- 
ing his way to an ideal that will lift 
the whole world to realms of unseen 
truth ? The former man is general- 
ly the one selected; but men like 
"Uncle John" Brashear, who quiet- 
ly toiled year after year in his little 
shop, grinding and polishing astron- 
omical lenses so that folks could 
live in the realms of the infinite, is 
by far a greater asset to the world 
than the shallow, pretentious man 
who accomplishes nothing but that 
which meets the eyes of all his ac- 
quaintances. 

(Theme taken from "The Rape 
of the Lock" — By Alexander Pope.) 

F. H. B. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



A Christmas Story. 

It was the day before Christmas 
and the whole city of Chicago 
seemed to be getting ready to cele- 
brate Christmas. Stores and toy 
shops were crowded with people 
who were buying toys and many 
other beautiful things to make a 
joyful Christmas for their little 
boys and girls at home. 

In this city there lived on a fifth- 
story flat a poor man with his fam- 
ily, who had had no work for weeks 
and scarcely enough food to eat. 
As he looked through the windows 
he saw people carrying packages to 
and fro on the street below. This 
recalled to his mind the beautiful 
time they had had last year on 
Christmas day. He could no longer 
sit by the window, for it was grow- 
ing late in the day and his little girls 
were hunting their stockings to 
hang up for Santa Claus to fill. 

He started down the narrow stair- 
way and descended to the street be- 
low. As he walked down the street 
he noticed how beautifully the 
store windows were decorated, and 
saw many beautiful things which 
would make his little girls happy 
on Christmas morning. "But what 
am I to do," said he to himself, "for 
I have no money?" It was growing 
darker and darker and the wind 
was whirling little flakes of snow 
into his face. Still he journeyed 
onward to the residential part of 
the city. As he approached this 
part of the city he could see families 
eating their evening meal. Still 
others could be seen opening pack- 
ages that had been purchased 



throughout the day. There was 
one house on that street which 
looked more pleasent to him than 
the others. In this house lived a 
family by the name of Brown with 
whom he was well acquainted. 

As he stood gazing through the 
window he could see the Brown 
family with their little girl decorat- 
ing their Christmas tree with many 
beautiful things which delighted 
the little girl so much that she 
danced about in the room, and it 
seemed to him he could almost hear 
her say, "This is the prettiest tree 
we ever had for Christmas." As 
he stood watching them he thought 
of his own poor little girls at home, 
who probably now were hanging up 
their little ragged stockings for 
Santa Claus to fill. The longer he 
stood thinking the keener the 
thought struck him of the disap- 
pointment they would feel on 
Christmas morning to find their 
stockings empty, and besides what 
a sad Christmas they would have. 
"What shall I do?" said he to him- 
self. "I cannot go home without 
anything. Yet I have no money." 

Just then a plan came into his 
head. "I know what I will do. 
When those people are in bed I will 
just take a few toys off their Christ- 
mas tree which they will never miss, 
then my little girls will have a good 
time on Christmas too." 

Just a few minutes later the 
lights were turned off and the house 
was left in darkness. Then he went 
to the door and found it locked. 
Again he muttered to himself, 
"What shall I do if they have the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



windows locked?" Just then he 
spied a window that was not quite 
shut. This he raised very quietly. 
After tying a handkerchief over 
his mouth he crawled through the 
window to the room inside. Just 
then something seemed to whisper 
into his ear that someone was watch- 
ing him in the darkness of the night. 
He went on to the tree and paused, 
as the voice seemed to be speaking 
louder and louder to him. After 
listening for a time he discovered it 
to be his conscience, in the form of 
fear, that was speaking to him. Yet 
he never meant to steal. The 
thought of home again overtook 
him; consequently he took a candle, 
a little silver bell — he heard a noise, 
surely — a little girl clad only in a 
night-gown came running in saying 
*'Oh Santa Claus how glad I am to 
see you — but how funny you look! 
Why do you have that handkerchief 
over your mouth?" After taking 
her on his knee, he told her aboil/: 
his little girls at home. Hardly had 
he finished his statement when Mr. 
Brown, the little girl's father, heard 
her Talking and upon entering the 
room saw the burglar holding his 
little daughter. The thief at once 
told Mr. Brown, who did not recog- 
nize him, his pitiful tale ; also stat- 
ing that he did not mean to steal 
but thought that a few things i'rovn 
the tree would not be missed. Af- 
ter he had finished saying this Mr. 
Brown's little girl, who feared that 
her father would be angry and put 
him to jail, said, "We will not miss 
these things, father, which he tool:. 
Won't you let him have them and 
some of my ^andv. too?" This 



rouched Mr. Brown's sympathetic 
heart so much that he could not de- 
ny the request of his little girl, and 
he ga-e the burglar not only the 
things which he had taken but 
many others besides. 

Mr. Brown extended to him his 
best wishes for a Merry Christina? 
as he opened the door for the burg- 
lar to go out. The snowstorm, 
which was now ragine-, almost 
blinded the poor man's eyes: but 
his heart was light and his arms so 
full oi nice things that ha could 
scarcely carry them all. 



Princes and lords are but the breath 
of kings, 
"An honest man's the noblest 

work of God ;" ■ 
And certes, in fair Virtue's 
heavenly road, 
The cottage leaves the palace far 
behind. Burns. 



To Our Friends. 

One wish ere yet the long year 

ends; 

Let's close it with a parting 

rhyme, 

A pledge, a hand to all our friends, 

As fits the joyous Christmas time. 



This Christmas as never before 
let every Christian remember: 

"It is more blessed to give than to 
receive." 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



216 Rittenhouse St. N. W., 
Washington, D. C, 
Nov. 8, 1921. 
Our College Times, 

Elizabethtown College, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Dear Friend : 

I am enclosing herewith my 
check for $1.00 for which please 
enter my subscription to "Our Col- 
lege Times" for one year. Even 
though it is almost six years since I 
left Elizabethtown as a student, I 
have not forgotten her and still 
have hopes of returning for further 
work. I realize more every day the 
value of the training which I re- 
ceived while there, and still more 
the need for further training. 



I wish the whole student body 
could have had the privilege of 
being in the city this week to wit- 
ness the opening of the greatest In- 
ternational Political Conference 
for the limitation of armaments and 
promotion of peace the world has 
ever known since the days of the 
Prince of Peace; also the burial of 
the "Unknown dead" in the Arling- 
ton National Cemetery. 

Will look forward with pleasure 
to receiving the first number of the 
"Times", and may this letter carry 
the best wishes of Mrs. Replogle 
and myself to all readers and 
friends of the "Times". 
Respectfully, 

A. Jay Replogle. 



IReeolutions of Sytrwatb^ 



Whereas, on November 29, the 
Death Angel so unexpectedly enter- 
ed the home of Prof, and Mrs. L. 
W. Leiter and silently summoned 
from the family circle their little 
five-year-old daughter; Leah Ida, 
Be it resolved- 
First, That we, the faculty and 
students of Elizabethtown College, 
express our deep regrets at the 
passing out of one so sweet in dis- 
position that to know her was to 
love her. 

Second, that we extend to Prof- 
essor and Mrs. Leiter and all of 
their relatives our warmest sym- 



pathy in this hour of sore bereave- 
ment, and pray God to pour the oil 
of consolation into their bleeding 
hearts. 

Third, That a copy of these re- 
solutions be sent to the bereaved 
family, that they be placed on the 
faculty minutes, and that they be 
published in "Our College Times," 
and also in "The Elizabethtown 
Chronicle". 

Elizabeth Myer, 
Ethel A. Roop 
Alvin F. Brightbill 

Committee 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



If 



College Iftews 



Miss Kreider the night of the lec- 
ture — "Oh Miss Good, do you have 
Heart Throbs?" 



Prof. Myer in Chorus —"Will you 
please move together farther?" 



Prof. Herr to Mr. Thomas in the 
grocery department— "All right I'll 
take some of those sugar." 



but didn't like to eat it. Would she 
like to drink it? 

Miss Ziegler --"How long do you 
think a person should be en- 
gaged?" 

Miss Leister--"I think ten years is 
about right." 

Miss Ziegler-"Oh no ! that would 
be too long to wait." — Miss Marvel 
agrees it would be. 



Miss Maupin--"Yes, Mr. Nolt, 
your width and height are much the 
same." 



Mr. Brightbill in an extempo- 
raneous speech in public speaking 
class : "I have formed many friend- 
ships while here at school, but at 
present I think of only one. 



Quite a number of our faculty 
and students attended the meeting 
at Lititz on November 2 and 3. 



Many of our students and teach- 
ers attended the Lancaster Coun- 
ty Institute the week of November 
13. 



Miss Fike while eating mince pie 
said she liked the taste of the stuff 



Mr. Grubb (at the table)-"I will 
eat this crust so my hair will curl." 

Miss Bonebrake~"Much curly- 
hair does not make a person good- 
looking, but a person slightly bald, 
— a-a-little hair is good-looking. 



Wanted—Some one to interpret 
the part of the statement under- 
scored: The Rebers and the 
Shermans went to Lancaster. 



Wanted— By Miss Good and Mr. 
Brightbill— To know the meaning of 
"Prolonged conversation in the 
hall." 



A strange discovery — a walking 
magnet: One walks about the hill 
here who draws some one with her 
to Carlisle every time she goes. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Y. W. W. A. 

The Y. W. W. A. is continuing in 
active work. Each Friday evening 
the girls meet in the reception room 
from nine o'clock until ten thirty. 
The programs are well suited to the 
season and usually consist of select 
readings, debates, discussions, and 
music. 

On the evening of November IS, 
1921, a joint-meeting of the Y. M. 
W. A. and the Y. W. W. A. was 
held in the College Chapel. The 
program consisted of music and dis- 
cussions; and Professors L. W. Lei- 
ter and J. G. Meyer gave splendid 
talks to both organizations. 

Armistice Day Program. 

On the evening of November 11, 
1921, the citizens of Elizabeth town 
and community came to the College 
Chapel to hear a program given by 
the College to celebrate the signing 
of the armistice three years ago. 

In the address of welcome given 
by Prof. I. S. Hoffer, who was chair- 
man of the meeting, the immense 
cost of the past war was clearly 
shown. 

Prof. H. H. Nye discussed the 
reasons for the Disarmament Con- 
vention to convene the next day at 
Washington, and the personell of 
that convention. 

Dr. H. M. J. Klein of F. and M. 
College, Lancaster, Pa., gave a 
lecture on "Europe Three Years 
After." In his lecture he described 
the conditions of Scotland, England, 
France, and Beligum, just as they 
were when he made a tour through 
these countries during the past 
summer. 



Dr. Klein also said that in his 
mind the Scotch were the hope of 
Europe because of their splendid 
physical condition, their keen mind, 
and their strong religious spirit. 
He said that the entire country of 
England was on a strike. This was 
caused by individuals from Russia 
coming into their country and 
breeding discontent. In his lecture 
he pictured very vividly the battle- 
fields in France and Belgium. 

Founders' Day Program. 

On the evening of November 14, 
1921, a Founders' Day program 
was given in the College Chapel. 

In the address of welcome Prof. 
J. G. Meyer, who was chairman of 
the meeting, gave a brief history 
of the College from the time it was 
founded just twenty-one years ago 
to the present time. Among other 
statements that he made, this one 
was given: "Christian education is 
the only hope for the solution of 
many of the problems that arise in 
a Democracy." 

Dr. M. G. Brumbaugh gave an 
interesting lecture on "Democracy 
in Education." He said in part: 
"War is the most cruel, expensive, 
destructive, and life-losing thing 
that ever existed. War produces as 
well as reveals problems. Two of 
the largest problems revealed in 
America during the great World 
War are the problems of Physical 
Education, --how to best produce 
perfect bodies, -and the immigra- 
tion language problem. The inabil- 
ity to read and understand English 
in America is the cause of I. W. W. 
ism and Soviet Doctrine. If we 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



wish to be true, patriotic citizens of 
America we should stand for 
America and for its English lang- 
uage. 

In the latter part of his lecture he 
discussed how extremely wasteful 
America really is. 

The Student Council. 

The Student Council was formed 
for the purpose of having the stu- 
dents get in closer touch with the 
faculty. Through this council the 
students have a chance to make 
suggestions when dissatisfied with 



the rules and regulations. They 
also help establish and adminis- 
ter justice to violators. In short, it 
is a committee which is to work 
with the faculty for the welfare of 
the students. 

The Council consists of the presi- 
dent of the faculty as chairman, the 
two social directors, and three 
members from each of the two Wel- 
fare Organizations. 

We are looking ahead to great 
things' from the Student Council, 
and have as our aim student govern- 
ment in its full sense. 



IReliqious IKlotes 



A Spiritual Awakeningr. 

The recent religious revival in 
town, conducted by Bro. Frank 
Carper, of Palmyra, was indeed a 
season of blessings. Bro. Carper 
is a fluent, convincing speaker and 
his presentation of Bible truths 
brought conviction to a number of 
souls. To seven of our number on 
College Hill his messages, aided by 
the convicting power of the Spirit, 
brought peace unspeakable and joy 
unbounded. We trust that the home- 
coming shall continue. 

This series of efforts, together 
with that at Stevens Hill and 
others in the community, was in- 
deed another step in the growing 
Christian atmosphere on College 



Hill. For this we are truly grate- 
ful, and pray that the day may come 
speedily when this Spirit may car- 
ry conviction to everyone who feels 
its influence, and create in his or 
her life a fulness of joy in Christian 
service. 

To those who had previously ded- 
icated their lives to special service 
this revival was an inspiration and 
a challenge. We were made to real- 
ize more fully the worth of souls and 
the joy of service. We rejoice with 
others in the fact that men and wo- 
men are seeking the things of great- 
est worth. May we all with re- 
newed zeal interpret Christ in word 
and deed, that God may be glorified 
and souls may be brought into fel- 
lowship with him. S. F. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



A Glimpse Into the Newville S. S. 
Activities. 

The tide of interest at Newville 
is running high now because of an- 
ticipated programs as well as past 
programs. On Nov. 13 the children 
gave an excellent program. Be- 
sides their recitations, exercises, 
and songs, the ladies' and men's 
quartettes sang. This part of the 
program was followed by a most in- 
teresting talk on "Hearts," by Rev. 
Frank Carper, from Palmyra, Pa. 
To make a lasting impression on the 
open minds of the boys and girls, 
Brother Carper showed several 
kinds of hearts. The Newville child- 
ren could not help but get the mes- 
sage. 

Then, too, we are planning to 
give a Christmas program. Al- 
though Sunday Schools always give 
Christmas programs, we feel sure 
that the love for Christ of children, 
both young and old, is strengthened 
and renewed by them each year. 
So that your Christmas spirit may 
be more real and lasting, come out 
and hear the Newville boys and 
girls give praise to . God who gave 
Christ to the world to save souls. 

Even though the work is pro- 
gressing, your presence and prayers 
will mean much toward making the 
Newville Sunday School a bigger, 
better influence for Christ. A. B. 



Chapel Echoes. 

When you find nothing to do, 
your case is desperate. 



"Whatsoever thy hand nndeth to 
do, do it with thy might." 

That person or nation that looks 
forward to the development of the 
truth will not only be rewarded in 
this world, but also in eternity. 

God wants to be the true sover- 
eign of our hearts. Let us make Him 
ruler of our lives and be happy. 

Paul always wanted other people 
to reach as high attainments as him- 
self. When we wish others as much 
joy and happiness as we wish for 
ourselves we have the right spirit 
in our hearts. 

Set your ideals high. Set them as 
high as the heavens. A true ideal 
is never met without the assistance 
of the Divine. Never be satisfied 
until that ideal is reached in your 
life and mine. 

Our written and spoken language 
represents what we are. A man's 
speech is the representation of the 
man himself. We should always be 
careful in choosing our words, for 
they mean so much ofttimes. 



Ezekiel had confidence in his 
nation, even though their virtue was 
lowered. In the same way, the con- 
fidence our parents have in us is our 
staff and foundation and we dare 
not betray that confidence, but we 
must try to bring forth all the good 
that is in us. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



''Let's have everybody neighbors, 
Let's have everyone a friend, 
Let's all strive to help each other, 
And we'll have good times without 

end. 
For if this land is just a good place 

for some, 
Then our pride will take a fall ; 
So let's get together, work together, 
Play together, pull together, 
And make a good place for all." 



The doors of progress swing on 
the hinges of great personalities. 
These great personalities are com- 
paratively few. For us to be the 
right kind of hinges, a great deal of 
dross must be burned out of our 
lives. 

Hinges are often obscure. In 
order to be the effective kind, some 
of us must work in obscure places. 

Hinges also have heavy burdens 
to bear. — 

Chapel Talk by Chauncey Sham- 
berger, Elgin, 111. 



Gems from Dr. Bradley's Speech: 
"The United States of To-Morrow." 

What we wish to believe does 
not change the truth. 

Get the viewpoint of youth. 
You can deport bodies but you can- 
not deport ideals. 

If we question truth we will 
never find it. 

You tell me what a nation loves 
and I'll tell you what degree of 
civilization she has reached. 

The world would collapse with- 
out ideals. 

There is not a battleship, an acre, 
or a dollar, worth one drop of an 
American boy's blood. 

It is not back to Christ but ahead 
to Christ. 

The world never caught up to the 
spirit of Christ. 

Men have tried war, arbitration, 
and what not, but at last they 
awoke to that rule : "Do unto others 
as you would have them do unto 
you." — Report given by Witmer 
Eshleman. 



asKsiiwaaasjiaasi^s 



See how from far upon the Eastern roads 
The star-led Wisards haste with odours sweet! 
Oh I run; prevent them with thy humble ode, 
And lay it lowly at his blessed feet; 
Have thou the honour first thy Lord to greet, 
And join thy voice unto the Angel Quire, 
! From out his secret altar touched with hallowed fire. 

— Milton. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Bumnt IKlotes 



The Senior Class of 1905 con- 
sisted of thirty-one members. No 
doubt that class would not then 
have dared to expect that sixteen 
years later one of their number, 
Prof. J. G. Meyer, would be Presi- 
dent of their Alma Mater, nor that 
another, Prof. R. W. Schlosser, 
would be Vice-President of the 
same, and on leave of absence for 
futher preparation at Columbia 
University. Professors J. Z. Herr 
and L. D. Rose were also members 
of that class and now serve their 
Alma Mater as Treasurer and Li- 
brarian respectively. 

The following Alumni of the 
1905 Class reside in Elizabeth- 
town : Mrs. Blanche Fisher Morgan, 
wife of Wm. Morgan ; Mrs. Minerva 
Stauffer Fridy, wife of I. N. Fridy; 
Mrs. Opal Hoffman Keener, wife 
of Wm. Keener; Mrs. Mary Hess 
Reber, one of the teachers in the 
Elizabethtown High School. Allen 
Hertzler, D. L. Landis and I. E. 
Shoop are among the business men 
of the town. 

The class of '05 has furnished 
two missionaries to China. I. E. 
Oberholtzer, wife and children, 
Henry King, and the twin daugh- 
ters, Kathryn Ruth and Emma 
Marie, are located at Ping Ting in 
Shansi Province, North China. C. 
W. Shoop, wife and daughter are 
located at Canton, South China, re- 
presenting the United Brethren in 
Christ church in that field. 



Mrs. Ruth Stayer Hoover is the 
wife of Eld. D. P. Hoover, pastor of 
the church at Johnstown, Pa. 
Elizabeth Kline Dixon is another 
'05 Alumnus who is the wife of a 
pastor, A. M. Dixon, Parkerford, 
Pa. 

J. M. Miller, Sec'y of the Eby 
Shoe Co., and J. H. Breitigan, Cash- 
ier of the Farmer's National Bank, 
Lititz, have kept in close touch with 
their Alma Mater and have rend- 
ered Valuable service during the 
years since graduation. 

Representatives of the '05 class 
reside in various sections of the 
country, as follows: Mrs. Mary 
Hertzler Kilpatrick, Ohio; Mrs. 
Eliabeth Zortman Borthwick, New 
York; C. J. Hanft, W. Va.; John 
Stayer, Kansas; W. K. Gish, Can- 
ada. 

Mrs. Lydia Buckwalter Heilman 
of Lancaster has kindly remem- 

•q^ap Aq 'qo, jo muiniv A\onaj 
aiaq^ jo b^u^j aift uioji paAouiaj 
uaaq 9A^q 'ubui ssauisnq v 'uttiuqaq 
•jj Bazg puE 'jo^sutui is 'iqBiq 'H 'O 
'A'esiaji qSn^qua^TQ nuuy 'Sjjf 

•ssaufnjdjaq jo spaap pu^ s^isia \ig 
-uoibr.ODO Aq J8^j\[ Eiujy .iaq pajaq 



Kathryne Leiter, '18, is a student 
in Art and Music at Blue Ridge 
College, Md. 

The home of Prof. A. P. Geib, 
'09, and wife was recently gladden- 
ed by the arrival of a son, Philip, Jr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Prof. Geib is teaching in Mont Clair 
Academy, N. J. 

Prof. M. C. Kilpatrick, husband of 
Mary Hertzler Kiplatrick,'05, re- 
presents the Smith Standard Poul- 
try Co. as traveling inspector and 
lecturer. Robert and Julia Kilpa- 
trick are the companion of Mrs. 
Kilpatrick during the frequent ab- 
sences of their father from the 
home in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. S. P. Sumpman '11, is taking 
some work at the College, aiming 
to complete the A. B. Course at 
some time in the future. 

A daughter, Frances Lorene, was 
welcomed into the home of J. Oram 
Leiter, '16, and wife at Smithsburg, 
Md., on Sept, 18. 

James Blaine Ober, '09, is cashier 
and bookkeeper for J. E. Schilling 
Co., Miami, Fla. 

Eld. Chas. A. Schwenk and Mrs. 
Margaret Haas Schwenk, '10, pre- 



sented several fine pitcher plants to 
the Biological Department of the 
College. This gift is much appre- 
ciated by Prof. L. W. Leiter, Head 
of the Department, and by his body 
of students. 

The Alumni Association notjs 
with sadness the early departure 
from this life of Leah Ida Leiter, the 
only daughter of Prof. L. W. Leiter, 
'14, and Mrs. Leiter, '11. She was 
a most promising child and will be 
much missed by all on College Hill 

Prof, Linnaeus B. Earhart, '10, is 
teacher of Science at the Northeast 
High School for Boys, Philadelphia. 
There are twenty-five hundred boys 
in the school. Prof. Earhart is also 
teaching Chemistry in a Night 
School in the City in which over 
thirty-two hundred pupils are en- 
rolled. This is the second largest 
Night School in the country. 



]£tcbange8 



The Philomathean comes to us 
this month with a strong literary 
department. Pacific problems of 
the Disarmament Conference is 
timely chosen and well written. 

The November number of the 
Hesston College Journal from the 
"Sunflower State" is a credit to the 
editorial staff. The editorial on 
"Margins" and the essays are very 
good. 

The "Ursinus Weekly" is possi- 
bly our most regular exchange. Be- 



yond question it maintains a verv 
high standard. The editorials are 
well written and the various college 
activities are "covered" with the 
proficiency of professional news- 
paper men. 

We are also glad to acknow- 
ledge : Juniata Echo, Gettysburgian, 
Spectator, Campus Times, Oak 
Leaves, Bethany Bible School Bulle- 
tin, Normal School Herald, College 
Record and Vidette. The latter is 
the publication of the high schools 
of Lancaster, Pa. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Htbletics 



As fall weather is usually wet, you 
will not be surprised to find that 
athletics has been rather dull dur- 
ing the past month. It was an ex- 
ceedingly wet month, and this pre- 
vented out-door exercise to any 
large extent. However, this does 
not say that we were entirely dor- 
mant. New lower goals were er- 
ected and playing soon began. 
Four teams were organized, and 
interesting games were played. 
Two of the teams, captained by D. 
Myers and E. Eshleman, played a 
very exciting game. It was a hard- 
fought game, the ball going from 
one end of the field to the other, 
neither side having an advantage. 
At the end of the game the score 
was in a dead-lock at 1 to 1. 

Soccer is a sport which develops 
the body more than any other ac- 
tivity. Although it is almost neces- 
sary to have a pair of shin guards, 
yet it is a game worth while. 

As cold weather is coming on, 
the greatest of sports on College 
Hill, namely basket-ball, is coming 
into existence again. The spirit of 
basket-ball runs high and interest 
is being taken by many students, 
which speaks for its success. 
Hardly an evening passes without 
some one being in the gym prac- 
ticing. The students are eager to 



get the game started, and once they 
get started great things will be in 
^tcre for lovers of this sport. Ac- 
cording to present prospects, we 
will have one of the best basket- 
ball seasons ever enjoyed on Col- 
lege Hill. Many old players are 
with us again, and some fine ma- 
terial has also been added in sever- 
al new students who have joined 
our ranks. It is a game which re- 
quires skill. The body as well as 
the mind must be alert and active. 
It requires team-work to make a 
winning team. The person who ex- 
pects to play individually will not 
succeed very rapidly. Some of us 
may not be able to play at all, but 
if we are interested we will show 
our interest by supporting the play- 
ers by rooting. Watch the bulletin 
board to see what will happen. 

Not only has the spirit of basket- 
ball spread among the boys, but 
great interest is being taken by the 
fair sex. They are showing their 
interest by practicing when the 
gymnasium is vacant. Keen inter- 
est is being taken by both boarding 
and day-student girls. There is 
splendid material on either side and 
interesting games are in store for 
us. We well remember the excit- 
ing games played by them last year, 
and we are sure they will equal it 
this year before the season ends. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



IDumor an& Clippings 



Between You And Me. 

The world is old yet likes to laugh ; 

New jokes are hard to find; 
A whole new editorial staff 

Can't tickle every mind ; 
So if you meet some ancient joke 

Decked out in modern guise, 
Don't frown and call the thing a 
fake. 

Just laugh— don't be too wise! 



Edison's Questions Simplified. 

1. In what town is Elizabethtown 
College located? 

2. Who occupies the Oellig girls' 
room? 

3. What is the name of the Young 
Women's Welfare Association? 

4. Give J. G, Meyer's initials. 

5. Generally speaking, what is 
the occupation of L. D. Rose, our 
librarian? 

6. Give the name of the father of 
John Bechtel Jr. 

7. What is "Tillie's" nickname? 

8. Our piano teacher, Miss Royer, 
has charge of which department? 

9. What make of car is Jesse 
Reber's Ford? 

10. In what year will the class of 
'22 graduate? 



A Real Pollyanna. 

Old Man.--"Yess'm, I'se got but 
two teeth and I'se mighty thankful 
they meet." 



English As It Sounds. 

Here is a singular incident show- 
ing how easy it is to mistranslate an 
overheard remark. 

Said: Mrs. A., one of the over- 
hearers, "They must have been to 
the zoo, because I heard her men- 
tion a trained deer." 

"No, no" said Mrs. B., "They 
were talking about going away and 
she said to him, 'Find out about the 
train, dear' ". 

"I think you are both wrong," 
said Mrs. C. "It seemed to me they 
were discussing music for she said 
'A trained ear', very distinctly." 

A few minutes later the lady 
herself appeared and they told her 
of their argument. 

"Well, that certainly is funny," 
said she. "You are poor guessers. 
The fact is, I was asking my hus- 
band if it rained here last evening." 
Boston Transcript. 



Harding To The Conference. 

"Gentlemen of the Conference, 
the United States welcomes you 
with unselfish hands. We harbor 
no fears; we have no sordid ends to 
serve; we suspect no enemy; we 
contemplate or apprehend no con- 
quest. Content with what we have, 
we seek nothing that is another's. 
We only want to do with you that 
finer, nobler thing which no nation 
can do alone." 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



More things have been wrought 
by smiles than this world dreams of. 



We may now remove the screens 
from our windows and put the 
house flies at liberty. 



Women's Capes. 

Cape of Good Hope. .Sweet Sixteen. 

Cape Flattery Twenty. 

Cape Lookout Twenty-five 

Cape Fear Thirty 

Cape Farewell Forty. 



One good action is worth a hun- 
dred good intentions. 



"Do you know where the little 
boys go who don't put their Sunday 
School money in the plate?" 

"Yes'm— to the movies." 



O Ye Book Borrowers. 

' According to the Boston Herald 
a man put on his book plates this 
quotation from Sir Walter Scott.- 
"And please return it! For I find 
that, although most of my friends 
are poor mathematicians, they are 
good bookkeepers." 



Probable Use For Our Dumbbells. 

Scout Master, examining scout in 
'safety first' work— "What would 
you do supposing a deaf and dumb 
asylum were burning?" 
Smart Scout—Ring the dumbell 

Boy's Life. 



Suggested New Year Resolutions. 

Mr. Sollenberger— To teach my 
Friday evening class individually. 

Mr. Sherman-To devote all holi- 
day seasons to chauffering. 

Profs. Meyer and Nye— To assign 
more reference work daily. 

Girls of Alpha Hail-To crown 
Esther Queen of Israel. 

Faculty— To appreciate more 
fully the valuable suggestions from 
the Senior Class and the Welfare 
Organizations. 



Our Wish. 

For you may skies be bright and 
clear; 
That usher in the glad New Year. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



|OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGKX>00000000000000000000( 

Store Opens 7:00 A. M. Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 

Saturday 10 P. M. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of the girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>0000000000000000000000000000000< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 

I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 

J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 

Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat JVIarket 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELJZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Largest Circulation and 
Advertising Patronage 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of thes« books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIOER 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 



FactoruReiStll 
Shoes 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 

Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

Remember — 18 West High Street 

For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 

Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York~Chicago--Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



J. W. ZRRPD88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



[oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo; 

Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



«oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo( 



Buch Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 



THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



South End Grocery 



FRESH, FANCY and STAPLE 

GROCERIES, CANDIES and 

LUNCH GOODS 



"\he little store with big business' 



Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 
Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 



Cement and Fertilizer 
RHEEMS, 



PENNA. 



FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

HornafiUs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POnS DEPARTMENT STORE 
EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222^ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 

Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 
Wholesale Sugar House 
318 N. Arch St, Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHON OGR APHS 
L A. SHIFFE R 

39 S. Market St. Elizabethtown 

UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, :-: MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 
ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATFS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. T R I N K 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX}00000000 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman. Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 

)oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 

Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



iiniiiiniiiniiiiini 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA, 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 

THE 

GROSS CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W. King St., Lancaster 



^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

GARBER GARAGE 

Bel! Phone 43R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phone 60SA 



FORD and FORDSON 

Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

OOOQOOOOOOGOOQOOOQQOQOOOOOGO{)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOO 

KLEIN'S 
Milk Chocolate 

And 

Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

i 

Coal, flour, Feed and Lumber 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

dOOOOOOOQOOQOOOOQOOQOOOOQOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQO* 



THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 





"""ZM^ ' 

Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 



$5.50 



In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

W-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 

$7.50 $5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 



te-^&s 



|t»YW^HHR 



ios t©« 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 



>OOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO< 



^, ^' 



0yR 

gSLLUBE TDM 




JANUARY 
1922 



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Q 

o 

Q 

5? 



© 



s 

o 

8 

6 
o 

§ 

5 

o 
o 

Q 

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In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

AH Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 

Come and be convinced. 



O 




This is The Place for You to SAVE 

^H- n fe^rW , ■•■• •■' ii -^&fl MONEY! g 

H 

QQQQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ&XiQOQQOQOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo: 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

000000000000€XX>00©00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 
;OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX}OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX}00^ 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

iooooooooocoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



'The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



3 



AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L. Geyer 
Wm, Klein 



I. N. Hershey 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 



LANCASTER, 



PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 

$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price— Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 

Stamps 



LUxMBER 



AND 



MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



DIRECTORS 
Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 
Monroe H. Metxler 



R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



J. T. SNYDER 



Florin, Penna. 



GO TO 



HORSTS' 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

—AND— 

PAPER HANGER 



S. Market St., 



Eliza bethtowa 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

EL'ZABETHTOWN, PA. 

>OOOOOOCX>OOOOOC3OOOOOOOCX3OOOOOO0O0O000O00000O000OO00000000000O 




Write or Phone to 

FEY BONNET SUPPLY CO. 

Lititz, Penna. Bell-139R2 



For FREE catalogue of Ready-Made 
bonnets, bonnet-makers supplies 
and covering goods samples. 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisbui g. Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 



:U,:m m 



Fresh, Fancy and Staple Groceries, Candies and Lunch Goods 

"The Little Store With Big Business" 

LEVI C. HERSHEY, Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Butter and Condensed Milk 

HERSHEY CONDENSING CO. 



I ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



WHALEN & WHALEN 
Specialists in Fitting Glasses 

2nd Floor McCrory Bldg., 

17 East King Street, 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



COLLEGE HILL 
DAIRY 



Pure Milk and Cream 

Delivered Daily 



S. G. Graybill 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 
FOR 

SHOES OF QUALITY 

GO TO 

EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 

BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store'* 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches, 
Ivory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 



MRS. W. S. MORGAN, Proprietorew. 






OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 

COM L 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 

Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixture* 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

Furnish The 

APPETITE 

And We Will Do The Rest 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 



YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



FREYMEYER'S BAKERY 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



Increase Profits by Liming 
Your Soil. 
White Lily Brand 99% Cal. Carbon- 
ate Lime Will Fill Your 
Requirements. 
LANDIS STONE MEAL COMPANY 
Rheems, Penna. 



{OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXTOOOOOOO 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

Farm Implements and Repairs 



Your Patronage Solicited 



l nd. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
oooooooooooooocxx>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE BEE HIVE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



Dry Goods, Notions 

AND FANCY GOODS 



Hosiery and Underwear 

ALWAYS THE LATEST 



in our 



Gent's Furnishing Department 



Visit Our Grocery Department 

"FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



BEST OF CANDIES 

We endeavor to keep a most complete line in stock at all 
times and respectfully solicit your patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 

Something New Every Day 
Cor. S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



<S)ur College Juries 

Volume XIX JANUARY Number 4 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtown 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Aet of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 



_ , ( Elsie 

College News j T n 



Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

Elsie Landis 
Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 
J. S. Harley j. Z . Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Editorials 



Resolutions 



A band of men once resolved un- 
der oath not eat or to drink anything 
until they had killed the man whom 
they, in their jealous rage, consid- 
ered a pretender and an enemy to 
their faith. History does not tell us 
whether these men carried out their 
resolution or not. If they did, they 
most surely died of starvation, for 
we know it to be a fact that their in- 
tended victim lived on for at lease 
several years after the resolution 
was made. If these men were as 
good as their word, like brave men 
they died to keep it; if not, they 
were weak and vacillating. Such, at 
least, is the conclusion we usually 
draw when once an agreement has 
been entered into or a promise 
spoken. 

Some promises and agreements 
are made at sacred shrines, — the 
place lending its influence to the 
sacredness of the deed. Other 
agreements there are which are en- 
tered into by one person alone and 
his inner consciousness at the sacred 
altar of conscience. These are re- 
solutions. They are not necessarily 
New Year resolutions, for to the sin- 
cere man or woman 'New Year* is 
just another day like the other three 
hundred and sixty-five, each one of 
which he has determined to live bet- 
ter and nobler than the one before. 
New Year's day, as a great mile- 
stone in the span of a lifetime may, 
however, lend inspiration and give 
renewed impetus to the general 
course of resolutions. It then be- 



comes a stopping place where we 
get off to measure ourselves with 
the man or the woman we left there 
on the same day a year before. 

To many of us New Year reso- 
lutions mean a general yearly house 
cleaning. We look back of the doors 
into the nooks and corners of the 
closets, and on the topmost shelves 
of the past year to see what rubbish 
of faults and shortcomings have 
collected. What hideous spectres 
sometimes stare us in the face ! It 
behooves us all to look back and to 
compare ourselves with our past 
selves,— to profit by past failures and 
successes, — but pity the man or wo- 
man who does so, in something of 
a serious mood, only once a year. 
How dirty, disordered, and 'over- 
hung with cobwebs is that house 
that is cleaned but once a year! 
It becomes almost uninhabitable, or 
else is over-inhabited by undesira- 
ble occupants! A fac simile of such 
filth is the mind and heart that does 
not continually clean house and re- 
solve to burn up the rubbish as it 
accumulates. It too becomes unin- 
habitable to right thoughts and mo- 
tives, and is often preoccupied by 
sin and crime. Says Emerson, "To 
make daily a new estimate, that is 
greatness." 

New Year's Day, if it means any- 
thing Unusual, should mean a re- 
newed effort at thorough heart- 
cleaning, — not the revival of a lost 
art, but the reenforcement of a con- 
tinuous habit, — renewed as old 
"Father Time" ticks out the "Old" 
and chimes in the "New." 






OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



Living Beyond Our Profession. 

' The spirit of the times demands 
willing work rather than vain 
words; definite results, not mere 
formal resolutions; and real life 
experiences in preference to cold 
storage education. 

Do we claim the reward of a 
Christian? Do we live beyond the 
requirements of our creed? Does 
our presence make bad men good? 
If there is anything we can do to 
make doing right easy and doing 
wrong difficult we owe that act to 
our Christ. Perhaps it may mean 
personal sacrifice of health, honor 
and repute. Athletic lingo illustrat- 
ing this idea is "fair play," "per- 
sonal sacrifice for the group" or 
"victory in defeat." Inspired writ- 
ers have spoken of it as, "living 
sacrifice," "living beyond the law," 
"giving gospel measure" and "go- 
ing the second mile." 

Do we profess to be farmers? 
If so, may we be reminded that to- 
day calls for audacious farmers who 
will live beyond the traditional idea 
that the farm is the place for the 
untalented. Scientific farmers who 
will accept their part in feeding a 
persecuted Armenia, a heathen In- 
dia and China, and a needy Russia 
are in demand. Farmers who will 
not be satisfied to ride in automo- 
biles while their children walk in 
ignorance, intelligent farmers who 
will wield their influence for consol- 
idated schools, Vacation Bible 
Schools, Bible Institutes and the 
like surely may claim to live beyond 
their profession. Opportunities ga- 
lore for farmers serving in the 
healthful out-of-doors! 



Have we assumed the responsibi- 
lity of parenthood? A well-educated 
father has said, "The family is an 
ideal democracy into which the 
child-life is born. Where the home 
is only an opportunity for self-indul- 
gence, it easily becomes a cheap 
boarding house, a sleeping shelf, an 
implement for social advantage. 
But it costs too much to maintain a 
home if one measures it by the per- 
sonal advantages of parents. The 
family demands sacrifice. To fol- 
low lower impulses is to invite dis- 
aster. Do we hold that cabbages 
grow by law but character comes 
by chance?" The personalities of 
parents determines the spirit of 
good will in the family.- Are we 
living beyond our profession in the 
amount of time we give to the home ; 
in making family worship fascinat- 
ing and helpful, in supervising the 
precious leisure hours, in directing 
proper table talk, in providing for 
symmetrical development of body, 
mind and soul? 

Have we enlisted as teachers? 
If we have we are important per- 
sonages in a miniature democracy. 
The beliefs, ideals and aspirations 
of our pupils are determined to a 
large extent by our stamp of approv- 
al or disapproval. With such a 
sacred charge, dare we be satisfied 
to teach with minimum qualifica- 
tions? No! we want the best in 
preference to the second best. For 
the sake of human progress we are 
willing to live beyond contract or 
promise. We want reserve know- 
ledge to answer the inquisitive child. 
We want to be bigger than our job. 
Money can never pay the qualified 
teacher. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



We profess to be a democracy. 
But do we realize that we have 
made too loud a profession. Sta- 
tistics show that seventy per cent 
of our people who are mature in 
body are mentally but thirteen years 
old. Shall we entrust our govern- 



ment into the hands of a people 
thirteen years of age? We sincere- 
ly hope that the growth of the num- 
ber of colleges in America may soon 
mean government of a mature peo- 
ple, by a mature people and for a 
mature people. 



Our New President 




At the opening of the present aca- 
demic year a new man was found 
at the helm directing the various 
activities of our College. Near the 
close of the preceding scholastic 
year, Jacob Gibbel Meyer, head of 
the Department of Psychology and 
Education, was elected to the Presi- 
dency of the institution and prevail- 



ed upon by the Board of Trustees 
to discharge the responsibilities of 
the position during the year 1921- 
22. A few words about our new 
pilot may be appropriate. 

President Meyer's bass voice was 
first haard among the beautiful hills 
of Lebanon County, Pa., almost for- 
ty years ago. As a boy he grew up 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 

— 



on the farm where he developed a 
vigorous body and a love for Na- 
ture that are the proud possessions 
of every sturdy, rustic young man. 

At the age of five he enrolled in 
the rural schools near his home. 
Here he studied diligently for eight 
sessions, increasing his fund of 
knowledge and laying the founda- 
tion of the super-structure that was 
to follow. Not satisfied with hav- 
ing conquered all the courses offered 
in the rural schools of his day, this 
promising young man enrolled in the 
Mt. Zion high school and spent three 
more years in faithful study. 

The next wise move our future 
President made was to pack his 
trunk and come to Elizabethtown 
College where he enrolled in March 
1901. This was near the close of 
the first year of our institution which 
recently celebrated its twenty-first 
birthday anniversary. He selected 
the course in Education and gradu- 
ated four years later with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Pedagogy. 

After a few years' experience in 
the profession of teaching, our 
helmsman matriculated at Franklin 
& Marshall College from which in- 
stitution he was graduated in 1910 
with the title and degree of Bachelor 
of liberal Arts. Every college grad- 
uate is conscious of the fact that he 
has only been introduced to the 
wealth of the ages during his coll- 
ege course. Realizing this truth, 
our pilot continued his searches in- 
to the riches of knowledge by at- 
tendance upon the Summer Sessions 
of our leading Universities. The 
summers of 1905 and ^1907 were 
spent at the University of Penn- 



sylvania. From 1910 to 1914 sum- 
mer vacations were devoted to ad- 
vanced study at Columbia Univer- 
sity. He majored in Physics and 
Chemistry, taking Education as a 
minor. At the commencement cele- 
brated in June 1915 he was granted 
the degree of Master of Arts. The 
full year 1917-18 was spent in resi- 
dence at Teacher's College, Colum- 
bia University, at which time our 
prospective President majored in 
Education and fulfilled all require- 
ments for the degree of Ph.D. ex- 
cept his thesis. 

When President Meyer, as a shy 
youth, enrolled at his alma mater 
twenty years ago, he determined to 
overcome his bashfulness and as- 
sume a position of leadership among 
his fellowmen. Accordingly, he di- 
rected the activities of growing 
young America in the public school 
at Ronks, Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, one term. Upon gradua- 
tion in 1905 he taught preparatory 
subjects in his alma mater two full 
academic years. The spring term 
of 1910 was spent in teaching Math- 
ematics and Methods at Millersville 
State Normal School. 

Having learned to love our Coll- 
ege, President Meyer, upon gradua- 
tion from Franklin and Marshall in 
1910, returned to his first love. 
With the exception of a year at Col- 
umbia, during which he was an in- 
structor in the Horace Mann School 
for Boys connected with Teachers 
College, he has been with us ever 
since. In addition to his adminis- 
trative duties he fills the chair of 
Psychology and Education. 

While growing up into manhood 
our President learned to believe the 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



truth of Holy Writ: "It is not good 
for man to be alone." In October 
1910 he was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna Royer, a former student 
at the College, at Denver, Pa. Four 
bright, growing children complete 
the family circle. 

President Meyer had the blessed 
privilege of being brought up in a 
Christian home. Every day was be- 
gun with family devotions. Up- 
rightness in word and deed, princi- 
ples of sterling character and sim- 
plicity in daily living were incul- 
cated by pious parents. At the age 
of ten he yielded to the wooings of 
the Spirit and in the historic Little 
Swatara Church near his home, he 
covenanted with his maker to live 
the full life. 

The Elizabethtown church, re- 
cognizing his growing Christian 
character, in March 1911, asked him 
to exercise in the sacred office of the 
Gospel Ministry. President Meyer 
interpreted this request as the call 
of the Divine. His sermons are 
clear, logical, forceful, spiritual. In 
October 1918 he was ordained to the 
Eldership by the laying on of hands 
in the church at Elizabethtown. He 
has always taken a deep interest in 
the religious side of our College life. 
He is the author of a splendid little 
volume, "Things Worth While", 
consisting of a series of studies 
based on the Sermon on the Mount. 

President Meyer is not only an in- 
spiring teacher and a forceful min- 
ister but an able administrator. He 
has taken hold of the various details 
of college management with the 



energy so characteristic of the man. 
He is at his desk early in the morn- 
ing. Often he is thinking through 
some problems concerning the pro- 
gress of the college while we are in 
dreamland. President Meyer's whole 
heart is wrapped up in our college. 
He devotes his entire time to futher- 
ing the interests of the institution. 
Beside being a son of the college he 
has given a dozen years of loyal ser- 
vice to his alma mater. Well can 
we say that he is bound to our col- 
lege with bands of steel. President 
Meyer took a leading part in the 
movements which culminated a / 
month ago in the State Council of 
Education empowering the institu- 
tion to confer the baccalaureate de- 
gree in arts, science, letters and phi- 
losophy. Well does he deserve the, 
signal honor of being the first Presi- 
dent to confer the baccalaureate de- 
gree at our next commencement. 
Not only is he equipped to direct the 
scholastic side of our college, but he 
thoroughly knows the wishes of our 
constituents and the ideals of the 
membership that has contributed so 
liberally toward the support of the 
institution. President Meyer's first 
year begins a new year in our his- 
tory. With a fine Board of Trus- 
tees determining the policies of the 
college, the strongest faculty in our 
history, an earnest student body, 
and the whole hearted support of 
our constituents and alumni our col- 
lege is bound to move forward un- 
der the guidance of our new Presi- 
dent. May success crown his efforts 
and may his administration be a 
long and successful one. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Xitcrarv 



Anniversary Address. 
1921. 

We have met to commemorate 
the founding of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege on this the 21st anniversary. 
We are glad to welcome so many of 
our many patrons and friends to 
these exercises. 

Twenty-one years ago on the 13th 
of November, Elizabethtown Col- 
lege had her beginning. There 
were three teachers and six stu- 
dents. Since those days of small be- 
ginnings, she has steadily grown. 
About 2000 students have gone out 
from her halls. More than 500 
have finished courses. Her sons 
and daughters are filling places of 
responsibility all over the world. 
Sixteen are on foreign shores as 
missionaries. Some eighty are Min- 
isters of the Gospel in various de- 
nominations. 

We shall not take time to go into 
details. Suffice it to say that the 
ideals of her founders were high 
and their sacrifices great. 

It is fitting to say a word about 
the Church which has fostered and 
fathered this school. The Church 
of the Brethren, as many of her sis- 
ter denominations, is false to her 
history and her spirit if at any time 
she fails to welcome and foster 
scholarship and Christian Educa- 
tion. 7 he church was founded up- 
on no tradition. She was not born 
of ignorance. She was founded up- 
on principles and under opposition 



that required well trained leaders. 
That little gathering at Schwartz- 
enau was profoundly schooled in the 
Bible, Church History, the philoso- 
phy of the simple life and the doc- 
trine of protest that had sprung up 
under such men as Arnold of Wit- 
tenberg. Saur of Marburg, Franke 
of Halle, Spener, Hochmann, Fel- 
binger, and other University Trained 
men. 

Before the church was a score of 
years old she made lasting impres- 
sions on the life of Colonial Amer- 
ica. The Sower Printing Press was 
far-reaching in its influence, — more 
than 500,000 volumes having left 
this press before the Revolution. 

Then came a time after the Revo- 
lution when there was a lull in the 
interest which our forefathers took 
in Higher Education. But today 
there are a dozen or more Colleges 
and Bible Schools thriving in this 
little church. The nature of the 
times are urging the church to 
greater sacrifices and to a greater 
loyalty to her early vision. 

There are at least two reasons 
why Elizabethtown College and 
other Christian Institutions are 
needed. One reason is found with- 
in and the other without. 

The church has ideals and land- 
marks which she wishes to preserve 
for future generations. She has 
contributions to make to the world 
and her only hope is to make these 
through our Colleges. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Then too the leaders of the world 
are coming to realize that the claim 
that war will give us a better world 
is exploded. They are realizing that 
war, applied science, more money, 
more leisure and more organiza- 
tions will not solve our problems. 
Christian Education alone can solve 
them. 

Men must think right, love the 
right, and do the right. 

There is no higher calling, no no- 
bler work, no sacrifice more worth 
while, no movement more patriotic 
than that of Christian Education. 
No man's money is given to a nobler 
cause, no life is better invested than 
that which is invested in or sacri- 
ficed for or dedicated to so funda- 
mental a cause. 

Elizabethtown College has a share 
of the Educational burden to bear. 
If properly controlled, encouraged 
and supported, she will be a tre- 
mendous factor in blessing the 
Church and the world. To oppose 
Christian Education is to be crushed 
by the inertia of a mighty move- 
ment coming out of a glorious past 
made significant by costly experi- 
ences and profound convictions. To 
be neutral is to turn away from the 
greatest known opportunity of be- 
ing a blessing to future generations. 
To be indifferent is to be brushed 
aside like driftwood upon a river's 
bank. But to fall in line and to 
throw one's influence and energies 
on the side of Christian Education 
is to erect an eternal monument on 
the side of right and to make perma- 
nent contribution to the progress of 
mankind and to the coming of the 
Kingdom. J. G. Meyer. 



Business of E. C. 

"We have lengthened the ropes, 
may we not forget to strengthen 
the stakes." The oak tree that fell 
when the trees about it were cut 
away, fell because it had not enough 
roots to support its top. Every add- 
ed branch must mean a new root 
if a tree is to stand the storm. So 
a generation that lengthens the 
ropes must be followed by one that 
strengthens the stakes. A period 
of expansion is fraught with dang- 
ers of over-extension. A theatre 
in New York City was enlarged and 
not strengthened in its frame-work 
and not long ago the pillars holding 
the roof gave way and the roof came 
crashing in upon the people who 
were crowded in the building. Ev- 
ery out-thrust demands a corres- 
ponding in-thrust. It is the flying 
buttresses which hold the beautiful 
dome of the Cathedral in place by 
strengthening its walls. It is the 
hidden heavy cables of steel which 
support the suspension bridge and 
make it able to bear such enormous 
loads. 

"We have lengthened the ropes, 
may we not forget to strengthen the 
stakes." 

If we as young people lengthen 
the ropes of freedom we must 
strengthen the stakes of self-control. 
The first step in getting freedom is 
to get roots; then we can laugh at 
the storm. We must substitute the 
inner life for outward restraint. 
Goodness is not legal imposition 
from without but is life within. We 
do not want to babble like brooks 
and lack the peacefulness of deep 
seas. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



Peace is consciousness of reserve 
power. O the joy of a margin ! The 
business of Elizabethtown College 
is to maintain a high intellectual 
standard by offering heavy courses, 
and to maintain the New Testament 
standards of religion. 

"We have lengthened the ropes 
may we not forget to strengthen the 
stakes." Lord God of Hosts be with 
us lest} we forget! 

(Gist of Prof. R. W. Schlosser's 
Address on Standardization.) 



Peace and How to Maintain It 

The idea of peace is older than 
creation; and men, ever since the 
sin in the garden, have been talk- 
ing about it and longing for it. In 
Revelation we read about the meth- 
od used in heaven to bring about 
peace. Michael the great angel 
found the solution to the question 
by casting sin and its cause (Satan) 
out of Heaven. But as yet men in 
the past six thousand years have not 
been able to solve this question be- 
tween nations. 

The history of the world is over- 
shadowed by the constant groan 
caused by the absence of peace 
among the nations of the earth. 
However bright the victory may 
seem to the victorious side, and no 
matter how large the monuments 
erected to tell the story of victory, 
back of this scene is the suffering 
motherhood, which is the founda- 
tion of any nation however power- 
ful. 

Nations from ancient times to the 
time of the (League) of nations have 
tried to stand on the platform of 



peace, and at the same time have 
been manufacturing and pointing 
guns at each other, and were con- 
tinuously tempted to pull the trig- 
ger. 

Only a few years before the great 
world war six great nations of Eu- 
rope formed an alliance, shook 
hands, and congratulated each oth- 
er with the thought that the long- 
expected peace was reached by ed- 
ucation and arbitration. But they 
still manufactured guns and ships 
as before, and played with them un- 
til they exploded, which caused the 
alliance to be broken, and which 
caused the crisis of the world today. 
Nations of the world have been 
blinded with the thought that their 
strength lay in the equipments 
which they possessed for killing 
their neighbors. Because of this 
blind state of mankind it has been 
impossible for them to realize 
peace for more than a few years 
at a time. This is why the League 
of Nations failed. They forgot that 
to avoid the crisis of war, the cause 
must be removed. This cause is the 
dangerous war equipment. 

Every war record on the pages of 
history only demands a greater and 
more destructive war to-morrow. 
Do we want a greater war than the 
one just past? God forbid any- 
thing of the kind, but teach us the 
way of peace. If civilization is to 
mean anything, it surely should 
help us to adjust our difficulties in 
a better way. The uncivilized bar- 
barian that knew no God save the 
stones, rivers, sun, moon, and stars, 
used war as his method to seek 
peace. He never found lasting 
peace, and the civilized nations that 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



have used his method have not 
found it. This is; why we say his- 
tory repeats itself, simply because 
civilization thus far has not accept- 
ed any other method for seeking 
peace than that of war, given to the 
nations by their barbarian ances- 
tors. History could not even re- 
peat itself if men would not let it. 

How maintain peace? If from 
the time of the Greek sculptors to 
this day, instead of erecting monu- 
ments over the whole earth in honor 
of war, the same amount would 
have been erected in honor of peace 
so that the generations of peoples 
that had to look at them could have 
had the spirit of peace instilled into 
their lives instead of war, perhaps 
the shadow of war might not have 
been so dark. For what one gener- 
ation sows in the minds of its child- 
ren will be reaped in a future time. 
Germany is an example of this. 

An example of maintained peace 
is seen in the Rush-Baget agree- 
ment between England and the 
United States. After the war of 
1812, England was preparing to put 
a stronger fleet on the Great Lakes. 
President Monroe saw it would not 
be well to have guns continually 
pointed at each other, so he suggest- 
ed in a letter to England that the 
smaller the number of vessels on 
the Lakes the better it would suit 
the United States. Each country 
agreed to limit their armaments to 
one vessel of a hundred tons with 
one eighteen-pound gun on it for 
Lake Ontario and Lake Champlain. 
The other three lakes were to have 
two vessels each. The result of 
this agreement is four thousand 



miles of unfortified boundary be- 
tween two of the greatest powers 
of the world. They have not even 
had a guard or a barbed wire fence 
between them for over a century, 
and have enjoyed peace all the 
while. In honor of this century of 
peace, last September, at Blaine, in 
the State of Washington, the arch 
of triumph was dedicated. This 
arch stands half on American and 
half on Canadian soil. On the 
American side are these words, 
"Children of a Common Mother," 
while on the Canadian side are 
these words, "Brethren dwelling to- 
gether in unity." This monument 
instead of telling a story of war has 
the nobler message of peace for the 
world. 

We can maintain peace only by 
thinking as individuals, as societies, 
and nations. Think how foolish it 
is to fight, and unless we obey the 
laws of truth, justice, and holiness 
we cannot enjoy peace. Every na- 
tion in the past before it fell had 
some evil that undermined the mor- 
ality and purity of thought; & after 
the morals and thought-life of a na- 
tion are corrupted, the outside shell 
soon falls off. If our blessed United 
States which today stands first in 
wealth and education, wishes to 
maintain her place as the leading 
power of the earth we must guard 
against the evils that suggest cor- 
rupt thinking, for after all peace is 
a state of mind, and unless there is 
peace in the mind of the individual 
and of nations, the result will be in 
the form of war and crime. 

Blessed is that Nation whose God 
is Jehovah. R. S. F. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



College IFlevvs 



Standardization 



Harrisburg, Pa. 
Dec. 21, 1921 



Elizabethtown College, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



"Favorable action has been taken on ypur application 
for charter to grant degrees. Announce it thus to your 
student body." 

Signed — Dr. Thomas L. Finegan. 



President J. G. Meyer at once 
called a meeting of the faculty and 
the student body in the Chapel. 
Prof. H. H. Nye, Secretary of the 
College, read the memorable tele- 
gram to the assemblage which re- 
joiced in the passing of another sig- 
nificant milestone. A holiday was 
declared for the rest of the day. 

A letter from Dr. Thomas Finne- 
gan, President of the State Council 
of Education, reads as follows: 
"This is to advise you that at the 
meeting of the State Council of Ed- 
ucation, held on December 19, the 
application of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Elizabethtown College for an 
amendment of its charter in order 
that it may grant degrees in art, 
pure and applied sciences, philos- 
ophy, literature, and theology was 
approved." 

In order to celebrate the Stand- 
ardization of our College, special 
Chapel exercises were held Thurs- 
day forenoon, December 22. 

Elder G. N. Falkenstein opened 
the Exercises by reading the thir- 
teenth chapter of First Corinthians, 



and then led in prayer. The Col- 
lege quartet sang a selection. 

Prof. Schlosser gave an address 
on the History of E. C- In this ad- 
dress he compared the History of 
E. C. to a drama having four acts: 
The Infancy of E. C, The Early 
Childhood, The Later Childhood, 
The Period of Adolescence. As 
a theme he used. "We have 
lengthened the ropes; let us 
not forget to strengthen the stakes." 
At the close of his address he said 
there were two things for which ev- 
ery Christian student should strive. 
These are to maintain a high intel- 
lectual standing, and to maintain 
the New Testament standards of 
religion. 

Miss Elizabeth Myer gave a short 
talk after which the student body 
sang the College song. 

Elder G. N. Falkenstein then 
gave a talk on Standardization. He 
said the College is not the buildings, 
donors, trustees, etc., but it is the 
student body and the faculty. We 
must not forget our responsibility 
now, because a great deal more will 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



be expected from us than has been 
heretofore. If for no other reason, 
we should have a college education 
because of the balance it gives 
physically, mentally, socially, and 
religiously. 

The College Quartet sang the se- 
lection, "Press Towards the Mark." 

In the next talk given by Prof. 
Nye, he said there were three ways 
to get a school on the map: first, 
through athletics; second, through 
gloryfing the intellect; and third, 
through its Christian Manhood. 

Prof. Hoffer followed by saying 
that no student should look to other 
schools for his ideal, because the 
thing we pick from the other school 
may be just the thing they are try- 
ing to eradicate from their school. 
No college in this section of the 
country has the spiritual resources 
which we have here at E. C. 

At this time about half an hour 
was given to the students to express 
their appreciation for what Eliza- 
bethtown College has done for 
them. This was followed by short 
talks by I. W. Taylor of Ephrata, 
and Samuel Hertzler of Elizabeth- 
town, President of the Board of 
Trustees. 



The Flag Raising Program 

On the morning of December 14, 
the Stars and Stripes waved over the 
College campus for the first time. 
Special chapel exercises were ob- 
served to celebrate the event. 

Prof. Meyer led in prayer, after 
which the student body sang the 
College Song. Mr. Joseph Ketter- 
ing discussed "The True Meaning 



of the Flag." A quartet, composed 
of Mr. Israel Royer, Ephraim Meyer, 
Daniel Myers, and A. C. Baugher 
sang "God Bless Our President." 
Mr. Forney discussed "Peace, and 
How to Maintain It." Miss Stella 
Walker gave a select reading en- 
titled, "The American Flag." 

The flagpole was donated to the 
College by Mr. Gremminger. It is 
sixty feet in length. The flag is 
eight by fourteen feet in size. 



When Dr. Smith, Provost of the 
University of Pennsylvania, visited 
our College, he gave a short talk! 
in the College Chapel. He said in 
part: "It is a grand privilege to 
go to college. Of course there are 
always some who don't want to go, 
but those who do go never regret 
it. There are times in our college 
days when we don't like it, but twen- 
ty-five years from now we will have 
the scales removed from our eyes 
and we will see clearly." 

"No one should specialize until 
he has a solid foundation upon 
which to build. Several ways to do 
this is to read the best literature, 
choosing authors like Dickens, Scott 
and Thackeray. These men's works 
can be read and reread without 
growing tired of them. Always be 
thorough in your work, and play 
fair. Remember that life is work 
and while we are at work in college/ 
we are preparing for more strenu-l 
ous work outside." I 

"The time for serious and earnest 
thought has come. There are seri- 
ous problems arising in this day that 
need thinking people to solve them. 
Women have opportunities these 
days that they never had before. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



but now since women have the op- 
portunity to do things it is up to 
them to prepare for the work that 
they have to do." 



On the evening of December 6, 
1921, the student body enjoyed the 
lecture, "The Reign of the Com- 
mon People", by Charles Eaton. 

A number of our Volunteers at- 
tended the Student Volunteer Con- 
vention held at Princeton Univer- 
sity. They enjoyed splendid ad- 
dresses given by A. W. Moore, In- 
dia; Dr. Farmer, Philippines; Dr. 
E. M. Dodd, West Persia; Dr. Kumm 
South Africa; La Shun, China, and 
others. Those who attended the 
Convention were Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Reber, Mary Crouse, John Sherman, 
Chester Royer, Enos Weaver, Prof. 
Rose, Foster Bittinger, Francis 
Barr, Nathan Meyer, and David 
Brightbill. All report a very pleas- 
ant and profitable stay at the Uni- 
versity. 

Many of our professors have been 
busy during the school year hold- 
ing Bible institutes in the various 
churches throughout the Eastern 
and Southern Districts of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

A debating council has been ap- 
pointed by the President of the Fac- 
ulty to forward the interests of an 
inter-collegiate debate, which is 
scheduled to take place between 
Blue Ridge College and Elizabeth- 
town College early in the spring. 

Prof. I. S. Hoffer attended the 
National Law Enforcement Conven- 
tion held at Washington, D. C, Dec. 
6-8, under the auspices of the Anti- 
Saloon League. 



On the evening of December 22, 
the College Chorus Class rendered 
a Cantata in the College Chapel, 
entitled "The King Cometh." 

At noon on December 26, 1921, 
two delegates, Miss Margaret Cellig 
and Mr. Jesse D. Reber, the Presi- 
dents of the two welfare Associa- 
tions, started to Chicago to attend a 
Purity Conference held under the 
auspices of the World's Purity Fed- 
eration, which met Dec. 27, 28 and 
29. They brought back a big mess- 
age in behalf of Social Purity. 

Because of the celebration of the 
event of our Standardization, 
Christmas vacation started Friday, 
morning, December 23, 1921. At 
noon January 3, 1921, the college 
dormitories were filled with smiling 
faces, and the halls again resounded 
with happy voices, each wishing the 
other a Happy New Year. 



Small Boy on Shopping Expedition 

Small Lad — Give me ten cents 
worth of animal crackers, all lions 
and tigers. 

Grocer — What's the idea? 

Small Lad — 'Cause they scare the 
baby. 



Eat less — Breathe more. 
Talk less — Think more. 
Ride less — Walk more. 
Clothe less — Bathe more. 
Worry less — Work more. 
Waste less — Give more. 
Preach less — Practice more. 
— Pennsylvania School Journal. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IReltatoii* IKlotes 



Echoes From "The Student Volun- 
teer Convention" 

Princeton University, Dec. 2-4 

Jesus Christ wants us to realize 
that He is ever present. — Dr. Stev- 
enson. 



The world needs men not only of 
high character but men who can 
speak out the things that ought to 
he said in any great crisis — Dr. 
Stevenson. 



Every Christian must be guided 
and influenced by the dominating 
personality of Jesus Christ — Dr. 
Stevenson. 



All the world needs Jesus Christ, 
and longs for Him either conscious- 
ly or unconsciously. 



African native Christians give ^4 
or V2 or all of their income to the 
Lord. None give as little as 1-10. — 
Dr. Kumm. 



Sacrifice for Christ is only giving 
up the little things for "Bigger 
Things." 



Life is just a matter of selection; 
we can't take it all. 



Knowing that you're doing the 
good which no one else could do is 
your greatest compensation. 



27,000,000 widows in India are 
27,000,000 reasons why we should 
help. 



In Japan they have, 
gods, but no God; 
sins, but no Savior; 
soitows, but no Comforter; 
Death, but no Hope. 
Come. 



If your map from which you 
choose your place for Christian 
service is anything less than the 
world you are not sure your choice 
is God's choice. 



A call for Christian Service in 
any field is your knowledge of the 
need and your ability to meet that 
need. 



Weakness of Christianity is to 
profess much and possess little. 
Much to-day called Christian is 
really anti-Christian. (Dr. Kumm.- 



The Student Volunteers are the 
religious force among the students 
of the world. — Dr. Kumm. 



The caste system of India is like 
a ladder with a man on every wrong 
the lower one kisses the foot of the 
one above and the upper one kicks 
the face of the one below. — Dr. 
Moore. 






OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Chapel Echoes 

Life at its best demands individu- 
al thinking. 



Life is too brittle to fool with. 



The way to attain to the highest 
possibility in life is through sacri- 
fice. 



We should strive to bring free- 
dom to the world rather than to 
boast of our love for it. 



We need men of moral backbone 
in these days. 



Everything we undertake in life 
costs us something. 



Count yourself richer that day 
you discover a new fault in your- 
self, — not richer because it is there, 
but richer because it is no longer a 
hidden fault. 



Make sure that however good you 
may be, you have faults; that how- 
ever dull you may be, you can find 
out what they are ; and that however 
slight they may be, you had better 
make some patient effort to get quit 
of them. 



That friend does us a true kind- 
ness who tells us of the things in our 
character which appear as blemish- 
es. 



To learn of a fault is an oppor- 
tunity to add a new line of beauty 
to our life. 



A man is worth only as much as 
he is worth to his fellowmen. 



The shipwrecked sailor abhors 
the water, and is saved only by 
clinging to the rock: in like manner 
we may abhor sin, and ,are saved 
only by clinging to Jesus Christ, the 
solid rock. 



Resolutions 



Whereas God in His Infinite wis- 
dom has called from family and 
friends, Wm. E. Wilhoughby, the 
father of our fellow student and 
friend, and has thereby broken the 
family circle in this world, and 
whereas we deeply appreciate that 
the loss of the counsel and guidance 
of a father is irreparable : 

Be it resolved that- 

1. We the faculty and students 
of Elizabethtown College hereby ex- 
press our heartfelt sympathy to Mr. 
and Mrs. W. A. Willoughby and 
to the rest of the family, in their 
sorrow, and that we commend them 
to the healing grace and peace of 
the Heavenly Father, Who alone can 
satisfy our needs and more abund- 
antly supply wisdom and counsel. 

2. A copy of these resolutions 
be sent to Mr. and Mrs. Willoughby 
and to the other members of the 
family, and that they be spread on 
the minutes of the faculty, and be 
published in Our College Times. 

L. W. Leiter 
Supera Martz 
E. M. Hertzler 

Committee 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Hlumnt IKlotes 



The merit of an educational in- 
stitution is, in a very large measure, 
estimated by the quality of workers 
it furnishes the public. It is encour- 
aging to a growing institution to 
note that it has supplied trained 
talent of practical worth in many 
spheres of activity. The Senior 
Class of 1906, though not so large 
numerically, now has a splendid 
record of trained workers doing 
efficient service, and her Alma Mat- 
er is gratified in having had so large 
a part in making a commendable 
class record possible. 

Fourteen members, representing 
five courses, constituted the 1906 
class. Only three of these reside 
in Elizabethtown at present. Two of 
the number are members of our Col- 
lege Faculty, — Prof. R. W. Schloss- 
er, Vice Pres. of the College, now 
on leave of absence as a graduate 
student of Columbia University; 
and Prof. H. H. Nye, Secretary of 
the College, and teacher of History, 
Social Science, and Economics. 
Mae Dulebohn has been teaching 
in the Elizabethtown Public Schools 
for a number of years. She is in 
charge of the Sixth Grade this year. 

Luella G. Fogelsanger, who was 
also a member of the '03 Class, the 
first one graduated from the Col- 
lege, was the only representative of 
the Pedagogical Course in the '06 
class. She is now a member of the 
Faculty of Juniata College. 

Mrs. Nellie Hartman Schuler, 
whose husband died during the in- 



fluenza epidemic, is still in Lebanon. 
Ruth Stayer Hoover and family are 
busily engaged in church work at 
Johnstown. Hallie Campbell Ap- 
pel resides at Kinzer, Pa. 

C. S. Livengood and W. H. Thom- 
as were the West Virginia boys of 
'06. E'town College was the means 
of changing one of them into a 
Pennsylvanian. After marriage 
Mr. Livengood located at Union- 
town. He has since moved to Mech- 
anic Grove and is farming. He has 
four daughters in the public school 
nearby. Mr. Thomas returned to 
West Virginia after graduation, was 
married to a Uniontown, Pa., lady 
and has for some time been cashier 
of a bank at Bruceton Mills, W. Va. 

Wm. Foltz and family are living 
at Columbia, Pa., where Mr. Foltz 
is employed by the P. R. R. Co. 

The first graduate in the English 
Bible Course was in 1906 known as 
Elizabeth Zortman. She went to 
Philadelphia late,' and entered a 
nurses' training class. After com- 
pleting this course, she practiced 
very successfully in this profession 
for some time. She has for several 
years past been known as Mrs. Bor- 
thwick. Her present address is 
2527 Brown St., Flint, Mich. 

I. E. Oberholtzer completed the 
College Preparatory Course in '06. 
In '16 he and Mrs. Oberholtzer were 
appointed for the China Mission 
Field. The furlough of the Ober- 
holtzer family is due in 1923. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



26 



Death has claimed two active 
young men of this class — H. C. Kell- 
er, son of Trustee J. H. Keller, 
Shrewsbury, Pa., and E. Roy Engle 
of .California, son of S. P. Engle, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Marcia Mae Hollenberg is among 
the latest recruits for the mission- 
ary cause at Vada, India. Her par- 
ents, Fred. M. Hollenberg, formerly 
of Canada, and Nora Reber Hollen- 
berg, '13, welcomed her into their 
home late in October. 

We desire to introduce Edra Jean 
Hess to the Alumni Family — the 
daughter of Paul K. Hess, '15, and 
Ruth Bucher Hess, '16, residing in 
Elizabethtown. 

Phyllis Alberta Frey is the new- 
comer in the home of Spencer Frey 
and Ruth Taylor Frey, '20, Eph- 
rata, Pa. 

Salinda M. Dohner, '18, is work- 
ing in Florida during the winter 
months. She is located at West 
Palm Beach and is delighted with 
the southland. 

The Harry F. Shenk family is 
pleasantly located on a farm near 
Quarryville. Mrs. Shenk was for- 
merly Irene Scheetz. James, Mari- 
on and Thelma Shenk are happy in 
their country home. 

Esther Falkenstein Hill. '16, and 
husband, Benj. Hill, spent the holi- 
day vacation with the Falkenstein 
and Willoughby families. Mr. Hill 
is Sec. -Treasurer, of The Mechanics' 
Bank, Philadelphia. 

A number of Alumni represent- 
ing the Commercial Department of 
the College are occupying positions 
in rapidly growing business estab- 



lishments of nearby towns. Gen- 
evieve Drohn, '20, and Ruth Fogel- 
sanger, '21, are employed in the 
office of the Nissly Swiss Chocolate 
Co., Florin. Mary Wolgemuth, '21, 
serves the company of E. L. Nissly 
& Sons, Florin. 

Reba Reem, '21, is working in the 
office of The Independent Oil Co., 
Mount Joy, Pa. 

Sallie Groff, '21, is assistant book- 
keeper at the Masonic Homes. Eliz- 
abethtown. 

Verna Seiders, '21, is assistant 
bookkeeper at the Harrisburg Gen- 
eral Hospital. She is also Clerk for 
the Public Health Service for the 
U. S., in connection with that in- 
stitution. She has full charge of 
reports given by the Hospital con- 
cerning soldiers who are there as 
patients at the expense of the gov- 
ernment. 



Good News To All Our Alumni! 

Elizabethtown College is stand- 
ardized. — (fully) authorized to 
grant college degrees. 



Sequence To This News 
Many of our Alumni who have 
not completed a full College Course 
should return to their Alma Mater 
and take advantage of the splendid 
opportunities for advancement now 
offered ! 



In beginning the New Year re- 
member that he who does not do his 
best has no right to say opportun- 
ity has not come to him. 

Youth's Companion. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Btbletics 



With the coming of cold weather 
basket ball is becoming popular a- 
gain. It is the favorite game on 
College Hill. Even though we do 
not have a regular varsity team as 
yet, the interest taken is indeed very 
commendable. Students are prac- 
ticing continually and the spirit 
shown during tin game speaks 
for itself. 

Basket Ball gives splendid exer- 
cise to energetic students during the 
winter months. Many who dreaded 
physical culture when calisthenics 
were engaged in now take part 
cheerfully. Public games are held 
every Thursday evening which are 
well attended. The rivalry between 
the different classes is a source of 
interest for the students who, if 
they are loyal rooters, will support 
their team. 

One of the games played was be- 
tween the Financiers and the Liter- 
ary boys. The great team-work of 
the Financiers, who were mostly ex- 
perienced players enabled them to 
outplay their rivals. The game 
was fast and furious but the Finan- 
ciers could not be- halted, running 
up a score to 35 points against 8 for 
the Literary boys. 

The greatest game thus far was 
between the Fords and the Pack- 
ards which was indeed a thriller. 
Perhaps the names, when compared, 
were not very thrilling, but in the 
score of the teams there was not 



very much difference. The players 
for both teams were picked from 
some of the best shooters on College 
Hill. With Prof. Hoffer as referee 
the game started amidst cheers 
from the rooters. From the b'egin- 
i:'ng both teams played a close, 
g'.arding game, a". I a.s a re- 
sult not very many field goals were 
scored during the first half, with 
the Fords leading by 11 points to 
5 for the Packards. 

At the beginning of the second 
half the Packards recovered from 
the fright given by the Fords and 
began playing a fine brand of ball. 
When the whistle blew for the end 
of the second half, the two teams 
were running side by side with the 
score a deadlock at 19-19. There 
was nothing else to do but to play 
five more minutes to decide the is- 
sue. With renewed determination 
both teams again went to battle. 
After a few minutes of play, Longe- 
necker sent one through the net 
from the foul line. This proved to 
be the winning point, as the guards 
were doing excellent work, and no 
more points were scored before the 
final signal was given, the score be- 
ing 19-20 favor of the Packards. 

The victory was mostly due to 
the fine foul shooting of the Pack- 
ards who placed eight through the 
net from the free line against three 
for the Fords. Longenecker with 
six from the foul line and four field 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



goals was the high scorer for the 
Packards. D. Meyers was the high 
scorer for the Fords, bagging six 



goals from the field and two from 
the foul line. 

Following is the lineup: 



Packards 

Field Foul Pts. 



Longenecker, F . . . . 4 6 

Ober, F ..... 2 

Gingrich, C 2 

Reber, G 

Bcchtel, ( 



Total 



20 



Fords 



14 Bt'cher, F 



Field Foul Pts. 

2 15 

2 Brandt, F 

4 D. Myers, C 6 2 14 

N. Meyer, G 

Sherman, G 



Total 



19 



HErcbancjee 



The "College Record" Goshen 
College, Indiana, has an excellent 
editorial on the "Standard College" 
in the December number. Requis- 
ites of a standard college are pre- 
sented in a scholarly manner. A- 
mong these are strong faculty, ear- 
nest students, adequate buildings 
and equipment, endowment, and the 
spirit Of scholarship. ' 

The December number of the 
"Juniata Echo" came to us this 
month edited by the Academy and 
Business Students: Echoette is a 
very suggestive name. The paper is 
a credit to the staff and contributors. 

The December number of the 
Philomathean, Bridgewater College, 
Va., has an excellent article on the 
Function in a Democracy. "Ameri- 



ca's need for Religious Education" 
is also well written. 

We are also pleased to acknow- 
ledge receipt of the following week- 
lies: Campus Times, La Verne Col- 
lege, California; The Spectator, 
McPherson College, Kansas; and 
Ursinus Weekly, Ursinus College, 
Pa. 

The following monthlies for De- 
cember were received : Oak Leaves, 
Manchester College, Indiana; Col- 
lege Rays, Blue Ridge College, Md.; 
Hesston College Journal, Hesston 
College, Kansas; Daleville Leader, 
Daleville College, Va. ; Bethany 
Bible School Bulletin, Chicago, 111.; 
and the Pattersonian, Mount Joy 
High School, Pa. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IDumor an& Glippinqs 



Years 

Last night a year died ; 
It slipped off, outside 
Of things that we know, 
Along a way that years go. 

When years met out there 
In that strange place where 
Time stops, they suddenly 
Find they are eternity. 

Then they speak the same tongue ; 
The very old and the young; 
And the New Year can show 
Only what old years know. 

Nothing that man has done 
Since this old world begun 
Has changed hunger, fear, 
Love or death, year by year. 

So the oldest year there 
Knows of hope and despair, 
And the last year that died 
Tells of toil, loss and pride. 

And they all understand 
That man holds in his hand 
Only water that slips 
Thru his closed fingertips. 

And but one thing is sure 
Only love shall endure. 

Louise Driscoll. 



The Ocean's Plaint 

The ocean wearily exclaimed : 

"Incessantly I go ; 
I wonder that I don't get corns 

Upon my undertow." 

New York American 



"Wet" Measure 

2 pints — 1 quart 
2 quarts — 1 fight 

1 fight — 2 cops 

2 cops — 1 judge 

1 judge — 30 days. 

The Van Raalte Vanguard. 



Great suffering and great joy be- 
long to the same soul. 



"Higher or Lower" on Pullmans 

"Upper or lower?" politely asked 
the man at the Pullman window in 
the Pennsylvania Station. 

"What's the difference?" asked 
the smart Aleck. 

"Well, you see the lower is high- 
er than the upper, "said the arous- 
ed Pullmanite. "And the higher 
price is for the lower. If you want 
it lower you will have to go higher. 
We sell the upper lower than the 
lower. In other word?, the higher 
the lower. Most people don't like 
the upper, although it is lower on 
account of it being higher. When 
you occupy an upper you have to 
get up to go to bed and get down 
when you get up. You can have 
the lower if you pay higher. The 
upper is lower than the lower, be- 
cause it is higher. But if you are 
willing to go higher it will be lower. 
Which will you have?" 

— Public Ledger. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Store Opens 7:00 A. M. 



Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 



Saturday 10 P. M. 



HERTZLER BROS 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use, "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of the girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 
J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Fays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider &> Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A, C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Largest Circulation and 
Advertising Patronage 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE GARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 

Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 

Remember — 18 West High Street 

For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 

Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York-Chicago -Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



J. W, ZARPD88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



EHZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
hi. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



toooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



Bueh Manufacturing Co. 


Electric Wiring Fixture Repairing 
House Wiring Contract Work 


Elizabethtowon, Pa. 


MECHANICSBURG 


WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING 600DS W 


ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 
L. L. UNINGER 


THE COLLEGE TOWN 


We Save You Money on Wiring and 
Fixtures 






Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 


25 Per Cent. Discount on All Fixtures 


24 W. Marble St., MECHANICSBURG 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

• Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Hornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 
David D.. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 ^ N, Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 

Conducted; on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 

Wholesale Sugar House 

318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHON OGR APHS 
I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. T R I N K 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



(00OOO0O0OO0OOO0OOOOO0000000000000000O0000000OOO0OOOOOOOOOO0O( 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehrmn Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Ephleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 
toQOQQOOOQQQQQQQQGOQOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQQQOOOOOQOQOOQOQOOOQQQQQC 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

i 
Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA, 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 

THE 

GROSS CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - Penna. 



^QOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-45- W. King St., Lancaster 



GARBER GARAGE 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




and FORDSON 



Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

OOOOOOOCXX9000GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX90000000000 



mond Bars 



a 



The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 



QOOOOOOQOOOOOGOGOGOGOQGOOQOOOOOOOOGOOOOOQOOOQQOQOOOOOOOO 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 



THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 







Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 

$5.50 

In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade -workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

W-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 

$7.50 $5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 



£©& 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 

>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocooooooooooooooocx>ooooooooooo^ 



■im ,^ 



wm 




OLLEBE TDM 




FEBRUARY 
1922 



CXX9000CXXX>00000000<XK>OOOOOOOOOGOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^ 
to 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

I MISSIMER 8c YODER 

£ (The Home for the Plain People) 



26 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PENNA. 



PLAIN SUITS 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The -Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 

Come and be convinced. 






This is The Place for You to SAVE 

MONEY! 



OOOOOOOQOOOCQOCOOOOOQOOOO^XiOOOOQOOQOOQOOOOOOCOQOOOOOOQOOOOOOO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO '^OOOOOOOOOOOOOC 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET" 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

OOOOOOCXX}OOOOOOOOOOCK)OOOOOeXX$0(XXX)OOOOCXXXXX}000000000000000000 

> 90000QOOOOOOOOOOOOOCK>OOOOOOOOOOOCXX>OOOOOOCX)eX9000000000000000< 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

)OOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ' 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, -:- PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



'The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)000000000000OOOO00O000000000O000OOOOOOOOOOO0O0O0O0O0000000O0( 

AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L. Geyer 

Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



'OOO0OOOO0OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX)OOOOO000O0O0OO0000000000000000000< 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outlitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 



AND 



MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hies! and & Sons 

MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



{OQOOOOOQOOOOOOQQQOQQOOOOOOOOQQOOOQQOQQGOOQOOQOQOOQQGOOOOOQQQj 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer Jacob G. Hershey R. O. Diehl 

John R. Cassel J. B. Shenk John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder Monroe H. Metzler W. W. Moyer 

OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX)^ 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



J. T. SNYDER 

Florin, Penna. 



GO TO 



HORSTS' 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

—AND— 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St., Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



|OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX}OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXX}CXX}OOCXX>000^ 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
ooocxxxxxxxxxxx>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo6oooooooo2 




Write or Phone to 

FEY BONNET SUPPLY CO. 

Lititz, Penna. BelI-139R2 



For FREE catalogue of Ready-Made 
bonnets, bonnet-makers supplies 
and covering goods samples. 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



B B B E B i B B B B K E B B B B ■ B B fl B fi B B B I B.B B> fife 

SOUTH END GROCERY 



Fresh, Fancy and Staple Groceries, Candies and Lnncb Goods 

'The Little Store With Big Business" 

LEVI C. HERSHEY, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

! B B B B 2 fl S fl B fl B B B B B B B B B 9 B S fl S B B B B 

HHALEN & WHALEN 
Specialists in Fitting Glasses 

2nd Floor McCrory BIdg., 

17 East King Street, 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Butter and Condensed Milk 

HERSHEY CONDENSING CO. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :: PENNA. 



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OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



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©ur College TCtmce 

Volume XIX FEBRUARY Number 5 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtown 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

_ „ (Elsie Landis 

College News ] 

( J. D. Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings '. .Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 
J. S. Harley j. z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



3£fcttorials 



Our Work 

Work! We hear so much about 
it to-day. Some complain of having 
too much of it; others complain of 
having none at all. Probably it is 
the latter complaint we hear most 
frequently to-day, and have heard 
for some time past. For a year or 
more many home-fires have burned 
low, while the dying embers on the 
hearth reflected cheerless hearts, 
little pinched faces, empty larders, 
and hungry mouths. Why? Be- 
cause father was laid off "out 

of work !" Probably work of almost 
every kind was never more heartily 
welcomed and appreciated than it 
is to-day by the great mass of huma- 
nity. 

In a recent lecture to a body of 
students, Dr. C. C. Ellis, one of the 
foremost lecturers of our state, 
spoke of Happiness as being four- 
square. On one side it is bounded 
by Love, on another side by Wor- 
ship and on the third side by Work. 
Dr. Ellis reminded us that all three 
of these were beautifully portrayed 

in that famous picture by Millet 

The Angelus. The square was com- 
pleted by a fourth side which he 
named Play. Sad to say, this fourth 
side is all too often neglected, and 
as a result we have such diseases 
(peculiarly American) as nervous 
breakdown, neurasthenia, and what 
not! These four sides when evenly 
balanced form a complete square 
called Happiness; and all taken to- 
gether they constitute a beautiful 



and symmetrically developed 
character. 

I. S. Long, returned missionary 
from India, remarked recently that 
there were 5 three very noticeable 
traits characteristic of the American 
people to-day, probably growing out 
of conditions caused by the late war. 
They are Faith ; an increased feeling 
of Good Will toward our fellowmen; 
and, thirdly, a willingness on the 
part of all to work. He said it was 
true of Virginia, at least, that men, 
instead of hiring others to do their 
work for them, had determined this 
year to do it themselves. 

Dr. Balkin, the character analyst 
of Boston, has happily chosen as his 
profession the art of telling "What 
Job I am Best Fitted For." He has 
the unique faculty of discerning 
natural aptitudes by careful obser- 
vation of facial expression, shape of 
head and face, and general makeup. 
He is believed to have contributed 
much to the happiness of thousands 
of persons by finding for them the 
work for which they were best 
fitted. 

Have you found your work? Has 
your work contributed its fourth to 
the square of your happiness? Then 
thank God reverently for that work. 
Think of it as your friend. It has 
often befriended you, perhaps at 
times when you least regarded it. 
It was so hard, so tiresome and irk- 
some, you say? It was not nearly so 
tiresome and irksome as the same 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



hours spent in tedious idleness. It 
eased your distress and worry, it 
made rest sweet, and best of all, it 
brought with it its own reward. 



You found yourself a force in a 
great movement, stronger with 
each achievement for the struggle 
just ahead. 



Spring Normal and Summer School 

Elizabethtown College 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Unusual opportunities will be af- 
forded at Elizabethtown College 
for advanced training and continu- 
ed improvement. 

Courses for teachers, prepara- 
tory courses, and college courses 
will be offered during the Spring 
Normal and Summer School. 

The Spring Normal begins on 
April 24 and will continue six weeks. 

The Summer School will open 
June 19 and continue nine weeks. 

Strong Faculty. 

State Credit in Full. 

Beautiful College Campus. 

Educational Methods a Specialty. 

Address, 

Director of Summer School 

Elizabethtown College 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



THE ETONIAN 



The first Year Book of Elizabeth- 
town College will be published this 
year by the Senior Class. Surely 
every patron and College Times 
subscriber will want a copy. 



In order to be sure of getting one, 
we would advise you to send your 
subscription in early. 

For further information write to 
Elias Edris. Business Manager. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 






arv 



The Pillars of Democracy. 

We may liken Democracy to a 
large building having four gr. 
pillars erected upon a firm founda- 
tion. Floods of Autocracy, winds 
of Bolshevism, beat upon this house 
but it does not fall for it is fou 
upon a rock laid by master archi- 
tects. 

This rock is symbolic of a so 
whose basic principles disregard 
blood or breeding, caste or cla 
but which has merit as its criteria .i 
of achievement; whose dream is al- 
ways of a state in which no man 
shall have mastery over another 
without his willing consent, and 
whose highest aim is ever the sov- 
ereignty of the people with rulers 
as the people's servants. 

Upon such a rock rest the pillars 
of Democracy. One of these m 
nificent pillars is the Christian Home 
But time has left its stain upon it. 
The saddest patre in history is ti 
which records the neglect of child- 
hood in the home. Too many par- 
ents have lacked prudence and jus- 
tice in dealing with their childr 
Indifference as to thrift, social p 
ity, self-expression, and ideals oi 
right and wrong has blighted ina 
an unfolding life. 

What does a weakened h 
mean? A weakened home mea 
a weakened people. It shoir 
keenly noted that no other pill; 
absolutely no other, can tal 
place. To ] wn the 

tian Home puts a greater s. 



pon the other pillars and yet, how- 
ever strong and able, these can nev- 
.r perform the home's function. 

A good Chirsian home is the res- 
ervoir of the family strength, the 
estorer of energy, and the comfort- 
r of wounded spirits. Encircled 
.nd hallowed by love, it is the abid- 
ag place of the finest friendships. 
n every true home the mellowing, 
nriching, and inspiring influence 
of love is diffused from foundation 
o roof, even as the fragrance of 
orange blossoms pervades the at- 
mosphere at the bridal altar. When 
such conditions exist we may truly 
say, "Home is impregnable to the 
lfluences of evil. 

Another pillar of vital impor- 
ance to the stability of Democracy 
s the State. This pillar has been 
larred by ignorance and lack of 
ppreciation. Our boastful confi- 
ence in Democracy has been a 
loak behind which we hid our po- 
itical and social sins. How »dare 
re hide our wrong ! Shall we allow 
his pillar to crumble? Will we 
ermit humanity to dissipate? Nay, 
erily, we must accept personal re- 
ponsibility for seeing that the bal- 
rt box speaks the truth, that its ut- 
arances and dictates are in accor- 
ance with American ideas, that 
ur national and local expenditures 
re kept within the limits of 
ur income, and that our apprecia- 
on of the state finds expression in 
illing service to prevent or con- 
uer existing wrongs. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



Experience, however, teaches us 
that when all are responsible no one 
is responsible. Consequently we 
definitely and urgently call for re- 
formers and social engineers. Men 
and women who will encourage 
more intelligence in the expression 
of our civic life; Rational minded 
men who are willing to study sur- 
veys, give lectures, supervise com- 
munity organization and open li- 
braries; leaders who combine the 
spirit of the martyr, the audacity 
of the pioneer, and the system of 
the scientist; and statesmen whose 
slogan ever is "The Community for 
America and America for the 
world." By such cooperative eff- 
orts the strength of this pillar is 
multiplied. 

A pillar of no less importance is 
the school. The School too shows 
signs of deterioration. Who does 
not agree with this statement after 
knowing that five and one-half mil- 
lions of American children above 
nine years of age cannot read or 
write and that there are one thous- 
and schools in the state of Maine 
alone having twelve or less pupils 
enrolled. Shall we allow our youth 
who chance to be born in the waste 
places of our nation to be illiterate? 
Will a nation that rides in automo- 
biles allow its children to walk in 
ignorance? Is Pennsylvania justi- 
fied in being twenty-first in educa- 
tion, when she ranks second in 
wealth? These are momentous 
questions which educators have ask- 
ed the public. 

The public has awakened. The 
veil of ignorance has been cast a- 



side. Far-sighted men are making 
strenuous demands. 

They are encouraging centraliza- 
tion, consolidation and higher stan- 
dards. But what does this mean? 
It means that ere long there will be 
a national system of education hav- 
ing a representative in the national 
cabinet; that children will be con- 
veyed to large well-equipped school 
buildings; that Democratic teachers 
of professional training will teach 
what they are best adapted for; 
that salaries of educators will be in- 
creased to secure their best 
services, and that the dry bones of 
subject matter will be clothed with 
flesh and blood or real life. When 
such a system of education becomes 
universal it will establish and de- 
fend the ideals of liberty, justice, 
and righteousness. 

The all important pillar of Dem- 
ocracy is the church. This support 
has been affected by the World war. 
It has become in many communities 
a social or ethical, rather than a re- 
ligious agency. Shrapnels of disbe- 
lief, shells of theological vain-glory, 
have left their marks upon it. Some 
of these marks may be seen in these 
United States surveys. Millions of 
children in Protestant homes are 
not being touched by the education- 
al program of the churches. 

Twenty-seven million nominal 
Christians receive no formal or re- 
ligious training. The religious in- 
struction of sixteen million other 
Protestant children is limited to a 
brief half hour once a week, sand- 
wiched by a delayed preaching ser- 
vice and the American Sunday din- 
ner. "Let it be burned into the 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



minds of our church leaders that a 
church which cannot save its own 
children cannot save the world." 

This is an urgent call for Chris- 
tians of high calibre, — men who 
realize that the soul of education is 
the education of the soul; Chris- 
tians who will promote Sunday 
Schools, vacation Bible Schools, and 
other schools of religious educa- 
tion; leaders who will articulate 
themselves with the web of present- 
day life and concern themselves 
with its tangles and troubles. Such 
men will equip a generation of citi- 
zens who are: Open-minded rather 
than empty - minded; expressive 
rather than receptive; tolerant yet 
possessing convictions; broad and 
sympathetic, but loyal to Christian 
ideals for which they will struggle 
and, if need be, die. Men and wo- 
men of this type will strengthen the 
Church pillar a thousand fold. 

Friends of Democracy! Will you 
not help to strengthen Her sup- 
ports? If you lay claim to the bless- 
ing of American Liberty you must 
be prepared to pay the price. 

Is it not clear that the price which 
you must pay for liberty is the price 
it costs to keep these pillars strong? 
So long as our feet touch the earth 
let us put a premium on one hund- 
red per cent, manhood in relation 
to the home circle; the interests of 
the state, the highest type of edu- 
cation, and the sacred cause of re- 
ligion. Then, when earthly tasks 
are completed, our developed spir- 
its may leave this low-vaulted house 
and enter the eternal home of bliss 
where man shall be rewarded for 
his labors. — N. M. 



"Soldier Rest! Thy Warfare O'er." 

To-day, with the leading nations 
of the earth sitting in the Peace 
Conference planning a compromise 
for peace and its establishment, we 
feel that the words of Sir Walter 
Scott may soon be indeed a reality. 

Out of chaos will come order and 
respect for each other. But with 
the reality of an era of peace and 
good will among nations will come 
many changes both materially and 
educationally. 

Men will cease to be making plans 
to outdo their sister nation in the 
arts and crafts of war and that ener- 
gy will be devoted to something 
more beneficial to nations. That en- 
ergy may be expended in a great 
industrial invention which during 
war days was apparently spent in 
inventing the best man-killer or 
land-destroyer, violating, to say the 
least, one of God's commands to the 
human family. 

When we do not want such things 
any longer they will not be made. 
When nations think of neighboring 
nations as brother and sister, then 
God who keeps and cares for us all 
can look upon us with an eye of ap- 
proval and will send his blessings 
upon us, and His Holy Spirit will 
direct our ways. How fitting then 
that at our first session of the Con- 
ference, nations should invite Him, 
the Creator of all, to lead and guide 
the work of the Conference. 

This war has shown us that in our 
people lay dormant many possibili- 
ties for better and more enlightened 
citizenship. Our people are wait- 
ing to give their contributions in 
their respective lines of work. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Intellectually the war has shown 
us how great was the illiteracy 
among our American boys. Amer- 
ica had to first teach her boys to 
read and write in many cases before 
they could send them out to fight 
the battles of the world. 

There is a great revolution on at 
present which is making a great 
change in our educational system in 
the United States. Our boys and 
girls must get an education. There 
is no way of escape. The more en- 
lightened our people become the 
greater will be the effect on us in- 
dustrially. New ways of working 
economically will be found and pro- 
gress will be sure to follow. 

"Soldier rest! Thy warfare o'er." 
Some of the soldiers of the World 
War have come home. Thousands 
more have been laid to rest. May 
they truly never wake to dream of 
wars and may their last resting 
place never be the soil on which 
other boys shall give their lives in 
another war. With the burial of 
the 'unknown soldier' may we have 
buried forever the reality and hor- 
rors of war and bloodshed. M. O. 



Lincoln's Ready Wit 

While walking along Lincoln saw 
one of his enemies coming toward 
him, walking on the path. As they 
met this man stood in the middle of 
the path and said: "I don't get out 
of the way for a Jackass." Lincoln 
courteously stepped aside as he said : 
"Well, I do." 



• Quite a Stir 

What a stir had been created on 
the hill when the character analyst, 
Dr. Balkin left. Do you wonder 
why? 

Several of our professors had been 
analyzed by him and we students 
were anxiously waiting to meet him 
and have him tell us about our capa- 
bilities, as well as our limitations, 
when he escaped the crowd and left 
the Hill. 

It was interesting to us as stu- 
dents, and will be to our alumni 
also, to know what he said of some 
of our professors. Students read 
their teachers as much as teachers 
ever study the students. It was a 
lively student body that discussed 
the newly discovered as well as the 
already familiar qualities of their 
teachers, as told by this wizard of 
human nature. 

Prof. Meyer has a very special- 
ized brain which delights to go to 
the ends of knowledge in a certain 
field. He is quick in thought and 
action (who of us has not learned 
that by experience?) good to start 
something with enthusiasm, and if 
he is thwarted in one field he can 
do something equally well in 
another field. He is also credited 
with being too good natured. 

Professor HofFer is the philosophic 
or thoughtful and deliberative type 
of man. He likes to think his own 
thoughts and compare abstruse 
ideas. He will think three times be- 
fore he acts, but when he acts he 
carries things through to the end. 
He has a fund of knowledge of all 
kinds, is interested in many lines 
of work, is tactful, friendly and 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



spiritual. He is a philosopher in the 
real sense. 

Prof. Leiter is a bug-ologist and 
scientist, but is adapted to teach 
many lines of work, which he has 
done here already. 

Other teachers had private inter- 
views but, for some reason or other, 
none has entrusted to students the 
key to his personality. 



Dr. Balkin's Diagnoses of Special 

Cases Undergoing Prof. Hoff- 

er's Philosophic Treatment 

E. Hertzler — Fond of intuition — 
Amateur character analyst — Not 
sociable enough (He's married.) 

J. Sherman — Versatile — Far- 
sighted — Interested in things — Too 
indefinite in general plans (Due to 
social specialization.) 

H. Sherman — Mild — Easy-going 
— Amiable — Versatile — Needs more 
practical judgment — Teacher of 
many subjects (Branches or peo- 
ple?) 

A. Brubaker — Practical — Versa- 
tile — Likes to talk — Adaptable — 
Future physician (for domestic ail- 
ments?) 

C. Royer — Idealistic — Conscien- 
tious — fund of ideas — Adapted for 
social service, but lacks aggressive- 
ness. Remedy — summer salesman- 
ship.) 

N. Meyer — Mental motive type — 
Constructive ability — Engineering 
as a vocation — Lacks language pow- 
er (S. P. agency needed.) 

Sollenberger — Quick- in thought 
and action — Observant — Too mild 



— Interested in natural science 
(Maidenology.) 

W. Willoughby — Active type — 
Reverential — Just — Aptitude for 
preaching (self-evident.) 

S. Martz — Amiable — Tactful — 
Teacher of languages — Sympathe- 
tic personality but lacks aggression 
— Interested in abstract subjects 
(Chiefly the Epistle of John.) 

A. Wolgemuth — Versatile — Busi- 
ness acumen (Not all the C. T. Staff 
agreed.) 



Organized Labor. 

Unorganized labor is a thing of the 
past. 
The Unions of to-day are now 
growing fast, 
Our nations prosperity must meet 
its demands 
At home and abroad, in all 
foreign lands. 

Some people will tell you to boost 
the open shop, 
While others will say, "Put the 
union on top," 
The open shop opinion of the public 
may differ, 
While the Union will stand like 
the course of a river. 

Reports are received from the East 
and the West, 
Though the reports of the Unions 
all stand the test 
Of critics and writers, who all try in 
vain 
To crush the closed shops, with 
their might and their main. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 17 



Organized labor spells Industrial To stand all united in demand for 

Success, our rights, 

Where the open shops in time will And if they are not granted, the 

breathe its distress. result will be strikes. 

Our country's saviour has answered 

the call When unorganized labor can once 

When he exclaimed, "United we understand, 

stand, divided we fall." The result of their folly will per- 

ish off hand. 

Great men of a broad international The open shop men will members 

vision become 

Tell us we must have no labor Of organized labor, united as one. 

division; E. G. 



College Iflews 



Prof. E. G. Meyer:— "Turn to Prof . Nye :— "Why did they study 
page seven, please." "Praise the Astronomy first?" 
Lord." Stanley Ober: — "Because people 
couldn't see anything except the 

Prof. Nye : — "How do people heavens in those early days." 

think?" 

Miss Trimmer:— "From the Gen- Mr Rhinehart in Economics:— 

eral to the P acific." "Swamps may be rented after they 

have been irrigated." 

Miss Grubb :— "You can't have Prof . Nye ._«j suppose you mean 

any fun on our hall. No one lives drained." 
here but old maids." 



•d .c at <<™- ci. j-j Prof. Rose was seen in deep medi- 

Prof. Nye: — Miss Sherman did ... „ . T ., TT . H , 

, - 1 + tation m Library — Having read an 

you change your name since last n .. , . ,, . . * . 

qpmpqtPr?" artlcle in the Ameri can Magazine, 

semester "Getting Married at 42." 

Miss Sherman: — I change it ev- 
ery once in a while." 

Miss Margaret Oellig: — "Being 

Miss Landis:— "Is Miss Trimmer a member of the Student Council is 

in this room? Someone wants to an opportunity that no one should 

see her." miss." 

Miss Miriam Oellig: — "I wish Student: — "Did you take advan- 

someone would want to see me as tage of the opportunities it offers?" 

he calls for her." Miss Oellig: — "You betcha." 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Student: — "Do you expect to 
come back next year?" 

Mr. Weaver: — "I have so much 
education (meaning pedagogy) that 
I don't know if I want to finish this 
course or not." 



Our President, J. G. Meyer, spent 
part of the week ending Feb. 4 at 
Blue Ridge College, as an instructor 
in their Training School. 



The Senior class are letting their 
light shine on College Hill. They 
have erected a five-lamp post on the 
campus at the head of the drive, 
two bracket lamps at Memorial Hall 
entrance, and two lanterns at the 
front entrances to Alpha Hall. 



Among the good things we en- 
joyed during the Bible Institute were 
two lectures, or rather one lecture 
given in two periods, by Dr. Pace. 
It was his famous lecture, "The Law 
of the Octave in God's World and 
Work." Dr. Pace gave a striking 
demonstration of the laws of the 
universe and the inspiration of the 
Bible. 



During the week that Dr. Ellis 
was with us, he lectured to the two 
welfare organizations. To the Y. W. 
W. A. he gave his noted lecture, 
"The Four Corners of Happiness, 
and to the Y. M. W. A. he gave the 
lecture which may be obtained from 
the Brethren Publishing House, 
namely "The Call of the World to 
a Young Christian Man." 



The Student Council 

At the beginning of this semester 
the members of a new Student Coun- 
cil were elected. The election re- 
sulted as follows: Elias Edris re- 
elected; Clarence Solenberger, Dan- 
iel Myers; Margaret Oellig and Stel- 
la Walker re-elected; and Anna 
Brubaker. 

We believe we have a very pro- 
ficient council. The council whose 
term expired at the end of the first 
semester rendered very able service. 

On the evening of January 30, 
the Seniors went for a sleigh ride 
in two bob-sleds. They went out 
into the country about six miles and 
reached College Hill promptly at 
ten-thirty. It was a jolly time for 
everyone on College Hill. The Seni- 
ors thoroughly enjoyed the ride. 

A very instructive Bible Term, 
consisting of a two weeks' Training 
School and one week of Bible In- 
stitute work, was enjoyed by stu- 
dents and visitors of the College. 
The Instructors of the Training 
School were Prof. R. D. Murphy, 
President of Blue Ridge College j 
Prof. M. C. Miller, Head of the de- 
partment of Religious Education, 
Bridgewater College ; and Dr. C. C. 
Ellis, Vice President of Juniata Col- 
lege. 

The Instructors of the Bible Insti- 
tute were W. S. Long, Altoona; I. 
S. Long, a return Missionary from 
India; and J. W. Lear, Bethany 
Bible School, Chicago. 



In vain, sedate reflections we 
would make, when half our know- 
ledge we must snatch, not take 
— Pope. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



It 



IReitaious Iftotes 

ECHOES FROM THE TRAINING 
SCHOOL AND BIBLE INSTI- 
TUTE JAN. 8-28 



Sunday School Pedagogy 

If God cannot work through a 
man, He will work around him and 
let him sit along the roadside. This 
applies to mission work as well as 
to that of the Sunday School. 



Our mission problem is one of 
money not men. The reason for this 
is that people have not rightly de- 
cided to whom belong the goods 
which they call their own. 



The best way to save ourselves is 
to sa ve others. The most spiritual 
person of a community is the one 
who has poured out most of his life 
for others. 



Where your heart is, there is your 
mind. Where your money is, there 
Is your heart. If you have no in- 
terest in the proposition of the Lord, 
put some money into it. 



In all our considerations of ser- 
vice those who do most are paid 
least. 



Too often a man's success in life 

is measured by material prosperity. 

Pres. Ross D. Murphy, 

Blue Ridge College. 



Sunday School Methods 

On the physical side of life we 
have discovered that the child is 
not an adult, but not so in the re- 
ligious world. What goes into the 
first of life goes into all of life. 



The Bible is the course which 
should be taught in the Sunday 
School. 



Each lesson ought to have a defi- 
nite aim. Does the material always 
fit the aim ? 



Art is the greatest handmaid of 
religion. 



It is the business of the church to 
guarantee men's religious activities. 
Shall we become intelligent heath- 
en? 



The big demand today : — An ade- 
quate system of Religious Educa- 
tion. 



The church must build a great 
constructive program and do it im- 
mediately. 

Minor C. Miller, 
Bridgewater College. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Teaching and Learning Process 

There are two kinds of books, 
those of knowledge and those of 
power — the first are those which are 
constantly being replaced by others, 
while the books of power abide. 



Reading is the key which unlocks 
the stories in books. 



Good study involves the principle 
of keeping one's mind on his work 
and sticking to it. 



Interest is the thing which helps 
us to determine what we will do. 



We need to do more than master 
the material which we expect to 
teach. 

The head should always be bowed 
in prayer over the lesson to be pre- 
pared. 

Develop the truth. Don't get it 
intellectually without getting it also 
into your life. 



A great teacher has the ability to 
put a thing in simple language. 



Be temperate in good things but 
abstain from the evil. 



"Unconscious tuition" is the thing 
caught rather than the thing taught. 



The Master Teacher 

Christ was the Master Teacher. 
He came to save sinners which 
meant a Gethsemane and a Calvary. 



The greatest thing which a teach- 
er gives a pupil is not subject mat- 
ter but uplift which comes from 
heart to heart contact with a great 
personality. 



Christ is a personality worthy of 
the best imitation. 



The morrow of Christ's earthly 
life was ever dark, but not so dark 
as to drive away the angel of hope. 



A vision that encompasses the 
world was one of the characteristics 
of the Master Teacher. 



Where Christianity 
Christ. 



is there is 



Christ shed new light on old 
truth. 



The only theology which the 
world needs is that of Jesus Christ. 



The Teaching Relation 

Good pedagogy is common sense 
applied in the field of education. 



Tact is to touch a situation in 
the best possible way. 



The teacher can prove that he 
tried to teach, but the pupil alone 
can prove that he succeeded. 



The only right attitude a teacher 
can take is the student's attitude. 
Dr. C.C. Ellis, 
Juniata College. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



The tabernacle is a type of Jesus 
Christ. We are Christ's because He 
chose us. 



The grace of God is God doing 
for us what we cannot do for our- 
selves. 



The purpose of God in letting us 
remain is to have people find out a- 
bout Him through us. 



There is no judgment day for the 
Christian; that was accomplished 
at the cross. 



God wants us to see our position 
in the hope that we will be worthy 
of it. 



You must be like God before you 
can live in His presence. 



The Holy Spirit helps us to discern 
between true and false doctrines. 



There is no other light but that 
which Christians give. 

W. S. Long, 

Altoona, Pa. 



Ceremonial Doctrines of the Bible 

Baptism is important and essen- 
tial because it was authorized by 
God. 

The rite of Baptism is not the end 
of all things, but a means to the end 
of all things. 

Baptism is a pronouncement of 
a death, because a soul that is dead 
in sin must become dead to sin. 



Christ did not tell the disciples to 
wash one another's feet until after 
He had washed their feet, then he 
said, "Ye also ought to wash one an- 
others feet." Christ always taught 
by example or by parables. 

We find the best pedagogy and 
psychology in the teachings of 
Christ, the Master Teacher. 

Feet-washing is a symbol of meni- 
al, humble service. 



Fellowship is different in the 
church than elsewhere, not because 
we are with brethren but because 
we are with God and Christ . 



The communion prepares and fits 
us for Christian service. 

There is no such thing as Chris- 
tian service except through the 
death of Christ. 

When we partake of the bread 
and wine we proclaim the sacrifice 
which has taken place for us. The 
communion is a type which points 
backward to the Cross, and also for- 
ward to things when they shall be 
complete in Christ. It is a symbol 
of union between Christ and His 
church. 



The Anointing is not intended to 
prepare us to die, but to heal the 
sick. 

Any one who is ready to live is 
ready to die. 



Laying on of hands at Baptism 
and Ordination is a symbol of re- 
ceiving the Holy Spirit. 

J. W. Lear, 
Chicago, 111. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Four Corners of Happiness 

Dr. C. C. Ellis, of Juniata College, 
gave the girls quite a challenge 
when he spoke to the Y. W. W. A. 
on "The four Corners of Happiness." 
Three of these corners, Love, Work, 
and Worship, are portrayed in that 
beautiful work of art, "The Ange- 
lus," and the fourth corner is Play. 

According to Dr. Ellis, happiness 
is something that just happens to 
us and to get real happiness we 
must forget about our quest. There 
is quite a close relationship between 
work and happiness, for "Happy is 
the man who has found his work." 
Our work demands our first and 
foremost thought and interest. Dr. 
Ellis quoted from Bushnell: "Every 
man's life is a plan of God's, but it 
is for us to discover that plan. 
After we have discovered the plan 
the question arises, Are we able to 
do it? Therefore, the former quo- 
tation may be amended thus: 
"Happy is the man who has found 
his work and is able to do it." 

Love is an important corner of 
happiness for the life that knows 
no love knows no real happiness. 
There is no drudgery in the work we 
do for folks we love. For instance, 
there was a little newsboy whose 
brother Jimmie was crippled. 
Someone asked him if it wasn't 
hard to support himself and Jimmie. 
This brave lad said, "No sir, I should 
say not, Jimmie's someone to go 
home to, he's someone to divide with 
and to share my luck with." Then, 



too, we speak of going to church as 
going to service or meeting, when 
the fact is that we go to church to 
learn how to serve better through 
the coming week than we have ever 
served during preceding weeks. 

Beside work and love, there is a 
real need for play, but then don't 
let play take too large a portion of 
life. Play for recreation itself, but 
never be selfish even while you play. 
If you can ask the blessing of God 
on your play, as you should, then 
you are safe. 

Since there is no real happiness 
unless we worship something in one 
way or another, life would not be 
rich in Christian experiences if we 
did not have the love of God in our 
hearts. There is remarkable power 
in worship or prayer. General Foch 
was conscious of this or he would 
not have been on his knees while 
the battle was raging. When the 
news of victory came to Lincoln and 
his cabinet, they knelt down and 
gave God the honor for the victory. 
If worship is gone from a life, de- 
pend upon it that the finest and best 
is gone. The memory of a godly 
mother means, to a wandering boy, 
coming home before the sunset of 
life. Even though our round of 
life seems small it is not small if it 
is God's plan. Men live by work, 
love, play and worship. Then it is 
up to folks themselves to find their 
sphere in life which will bring real, 
geniune happiness throughout their 
entire lives. A. B. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



There is no such 
answered prayer. 



Chapel Notes 

thing as 



un- 



Prayer is the sincere longing of 
the heart. 



The devil may answer the 
prayers of our hearts as well as God. 



Through faith in Christ we may 
have the power to do the works 
that He did and even greater works 
than He did. 



Let us not cease to stress foreign 
missions, but let us put more em- 
phasis on home missions. 



There are two worlds; in the one 
there is sorrow, disease and con- 
fusion ; in the other there is harmony 
and peace. The only remedy for 
the ills of the former can be found 
in the realm of the latter. 



In order to get the most good 
out of life we must have some one 
to guide us who can see farther into 
the future than we are able to see. 



Some essentials to Spirit guidance 
are: obedience, meekness, a deep 
prayer life, and above all a willing- 
ness to be guided. 



Begin a new day as a new life, 
and begin each day with God. 



We may not all have many talents 
but we all have one, and we can at 
least be sincere in developing that 
one to the largest possible extent. 



God has his best gifts for those 
who will take them. Most of us are 
satisfied with the second best when 
we might have had the best. 



It is a fine thing to do one's whole 
duty, but it is far better to do twice 
as much as any one would have the 
heart to ask us to do, and thus go 
the "second mile." 



The greatest thing secured in col- 
lege is the inspiration from life con- 
tact with great leaders. 



The Time Between 

When day is done, God sends the 
the shades of night; 
I fold my hands softly upon my 
breast, 
And then it seems one instant till 
the morning light 
Breaks in the East — so doth my 
body rest. 
When life is done, and I have said, 
"good night," 
I shall not know that time has 
passed away; 
God keeps those hours between the 
dark and light; 
I close my eyes and wake to 
Heaven's day. 
Florence Belle Anderson 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




The Class of 1907 has the dis- 
tinction of having four foreign mis- 
sionaries among its representatives. 
J. F. Graybill and wife were en- 
gaged in church work in New Jer- 
sey and in school work at Hebron 
Seminary, Va., for some time after 
going forth from the College. They 
went to Malmo, Sweden, as miss- 
ionaries in 1911. They came to 
America on furlough in 1918 and 
returned to their field of labor about 
a year later. 

B. Mary Royer went to India in 
1913. She learned the Marathi lan- 
guage which is used in the section 
of territory in which she works. 
She spent the year, 1920-'21, in 
America on furlough. She returned 
to her Alma Mater for school work, 
completing the Pedagogical Course 
in 1921. She is now at work at 
Dahanu, Thana Dist., India, from 
which place she wrote recently: "I 
see so many opportunities for ser- 
vice and am more glad each day to 
be back. 

Leah Sheaffer Glasmire com- 
pleted the English Scientific Course 
in 1907 and Wm. E. Glasmire, her 



then future husband, completed the 
Music Teachers' Course. They con- 
tinued in school for some time as 
students and teachers. They went 
to Denmark in 1919. They have 
four children, — Martin Alexander, 
Charlotte, Joseph, and William, Jr. 

Ruth Stayer Hoover and Estella 
Hoffer Buffenmyer are active home 
missionaries. Their husbands are 
pastors of churches in Western 
Pennsylvania, at Johnstown and 
Uniontown respectively. 

Only two members of the '07 class 
are at present working at the Col- 
lege; Prof. L. D. Rose as Librarian 
and Prof. R. W. Schlosser as Vice 
President. The latter is at the Col- 
lege only occasionally because he is 
pursuing advanced work at Colum- 
bia University. Susan E. Miller is 
employed in her home community 
also. She is Secretary to the Supt. 
of The Masonic Homes. 

H. Bruce Rothrock represents the 
class on the Pacific coast, living with 
his family at 214 W. Sherman St., 
Newberger, Oregon. He is the 
father of three children. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Carrie Hess Reitz, Millway, Pa., 
and Ada Little Blough, E. Peters- 
burg, Pa., are home-makers. The 
latter is the fond mother of three 
daughters,— Esther, Marie, and 
Margaret. 

I. Z. Hackman is the professional 
accountant from this class. He has 
been filling responsible positions in 
Bethlehem and Philadelphia. He 
has been working in Philadelphia 
during the past two years. 

G. H. Light and Amos G. Hotten- 
stein, teachers, have been called 
away into a larger life in the beyond. 
Mrs. Light and two daughters re- 
side in Lansdale, Pa., and Mrs. Hott- 
enstein at Stewartstown, Pa. 

We are glad to announce the arri- 
val, on Feb. 3, of Dorothy Belle 
Leiter in the home of Prof, and Mrs. 
L. W. Leiter. 

David H. Markley, '17, is teaching 
the public school at Centreport. Pa. 
The Markey family spent several 
days on College Hill during Bible 
Institute. 



The following alumni are em- 
ployed in the office of the Klein 
Chocolate Co., Elizabethtown, Pa., 
— Elsie Snavely, '20; Maud Reese, 
'16; Marion Reese, '18; Mark Base- 
hore, '20; Ruth Burkholder, '21; 
Blanche Hege, '21. 

Ella Holsinger Germer, '18, and 
Hulda Holsinger, '20, are employed 
in the office of the W. A. W. Shoe 
Co. and Alta Heisey, '20, B. Irene 
Wise, '11, and Paul Zug, '20, in the 
office of the Kreider Shoe Co., Eliz- 
abethtown. 

The Committee on Student and 
Alumni Funds was recently organ- 
ized with Francis Olweiler, '11, as 
Chairman and Isaac T. Madeira, 
Sec'y. The other members of the 
Committee are J. H. Breitigan, '05, 
Frank W. Groff, J. M. Miller, '05, 
and Elam Zug '16. The President 
and Treasurer of the College are 
ex-officio members. Plans were con- 
sidered for using to advantage the 
student and alumnia funds received 
through the Endowment campaign, 
also for increasing these funds. 



SErcban^es 



The Philomathean from Bridge- 
water College, Virginia, comes to us 
this month with a fine article on the 
Limitation of Armaments Con- 
ference. Many of the articles in 
this periodical deal with questions 
of a public nature. 

McPherson College, Kansas, re- 
cently completed a campaign for 
funds to erect a Science Hall. 

In addition to the above named 
papers, we have received: Hesston 
College Journal, Kansas; College 



Rays, Blue Ridge College, Md. Oak 
Leaves, Manchester College, Ind., 
Normal School Herald, Shippens- 
burg, Pa., Gettysburgian, Gettys- 
burg College,, Pa., Juniata Echo 
Huntingdon, Pa., College Record, 
Goshen College, Ind., Daleville 
Leader, Daleville, Va., Bethany 
Bible School Bulletin, Chicago; 
Campus Times, LaVerne College, 
Cal. ; Ursinus Weekly, Collegeville, 
Pa., and Pattersonian, Mt. Joy High 
School, Pa. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Htblcttce 



Basket ball is now in full swing 
on College Hill. If there is any 
doubt come and peep into the gym 
between four and six o'clock each 
Thursday afternoon. Recently the 
gymnasium was decorated with new 
foul lines which improve it consider- 
ably, but we are looking for a new 
gymnasium in the near future. We 
think physical education is very es- 
sential in every student's life. 

The interest in basket ball was 
at its height on the evening of Jan. 
19, when a dual bill was played be- 
tween the Senior and Junior boys 
and girls. One reason for the 
heightened interest was the first ap- 
pearance of the girls on the floor 
this year; another reason was the 
rivalry between the Juniors and Sen- 
iors. At four o'clock the gymna- 
sium was filled to its capacity 
spectators being crowded on the 
windows and stairway. 

The game was called by Prof. 
Hoffer, after which the Senior and 
Junior girls started the fray. The 
game was exciting throughout, and 
the interest was kept at high tide 
by the continuous uproar from the 
rooters. The game ended with the 
Seniors leading, score being three 
to two. The acore indicates the 
splendid work done by the guards 
of both teams. 

After this contest, the Juniors and 
Seniors boys began to show a fine 
brand of ball. The Seniors had 
their team working smoothly and 



as a result the Juniors, with all their 
tenacity, could not overcome the 
strong Senior five. The splendid 
work of the guards for both teams 
is commendable. It was their fine 
work that kept the score lowered. 
The final score was 13 to 8 in favor 
of the Seniors. 

Following is the lineup: 

Seniors 

Field Foul Pts. 

Brandt, F l o 2 

Longenecker, F 3 l 7 

D. Myers, C 1 2 4 

Bechtel, G 

Reber, G 

Total 5 3 13 

Juniors 

Field Foul Pts. 

Bucher, F 1 1 3 

Royer, F 1 2 

Gingrich, C 1 2 

Grimm, G 1 1 

Sherman, G 

Total 3 2 8 



Chauffeur's Luck 
A blow-out which paid in gold 
was a real pleasure to a California 
man. While he was motoring thru 
Yuba County hills he had a blow- 
out. As he was jacking up the car 
in preparation for making repairs, 
he turned up a large gold nugget. 
— Independent 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



IDumor an& GUppinqs 



Music Guide. 

"Absent" Prof. Hoffer 

"Ave Maria" John Bechtel 

"At Dawning" .E. K. and A. G. B. 
"Dear Old Pal O'Mine" 

D. Harshman 
"Dearest Spot" (to music lovers) 

Reception Room 

"Forgotten"? ? ? D. Myers 

"Good Bye Broadway, Hello 

France" (or Frantz?) . N. Meyer 
"Home Sweet Home" ... J. Reber 
"Jest A 'Wearin' for You" 

Senior Boys for Their Cots. 
11 P. M., Jan. 30. 
"Loves Old Sweet Song" 

M. R. O. & I. D. B. 
"Lonesome — That's All" 

Prof. Manthey 

"My Laddie" E. Ziegler 

"My Task,,. . . .Substitute Teachers 
"Maryland, My Maryland" 

E. G. Meyer 

"Memories" S. Martz 

"One Sweetly Solemn Thought" 
(providing it is Good) 

A. Brightbill 
"O Promise Me" .... Israel Royer 

"O Israel" E. P. Trimmer 

"One Fleeting Hour" (Social Hour) 

Couples 
"O How I Hate to Get Up in the 

Morning" Students 

"Smiles" D. Brightbill 

"Somewhere a Voice is Calling" 

(Carlisle) C. Sollenberger 

"The Rosary" Library 

"Whispering Hope" S. Ober 

"Whispering" L. D. Rose 

"A Perfect Day" Monday, Jan. 30 



Is This Characteristic? 

"Ah, old fellow," said a gentle- 
man, meeting another, "so you are 
married at last. Allow me to con- 
gratulate you, for I hear you have 
an excellent and accomplished 
wife." 

"I have indeed," was the reply; 
"she is accomplished. Why, sir, she 
is perfectly at home in literature, 
at home in music, at home in art, at 

home in science in short, at 

home everywhere except" 

"Except what?" . * 

"Except at home" 

E. J. Hardy. 



Concerning Advertisements 

A sign in a restaurant in Marion 
Ohio: "Don't kick about our coffee, 
you may be old and weak yourself 
some day." 



Special This lot 400 pairs 

men's shoes in black calf-skin, Engl- 
ish and high toes, button and lace, 
dress and semi-dress shoes; They 

won't last long Price per pair 

$2.95. 



Ad in Vicksburg Evening Post. 

The enraged proprietor of the 

Gem Cafe rushed into the office 

after the newspaper was out. He 

was angry because his ad was signed 

"The Germ Cafe." The Wal- 

teaser. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



A Few Of Washington's Rules Of 
Conduct 

1. "Every action in company 
ought to be with some sign of re- 
spect to those present." 

2. "Sleep not when others speak, 
sit not when others stand, speak 
not when you should hold your 
peace, walk not when others stop." 

3. "Read no letters, books or 
papers in company; but when there 
is necessity for doing it, you must 
ask leave. Come not near the books 
or writings of anyone so as to read 
them, unless desired; nor give your 
opinion of them unasked; also, look 
not nigh when another is writing a 
letter." 

4. "Let your countenance be pleas- 
ant, but in serious matters some- 
what grave." 

5. "Show not yourself glad at the 
misfortune of another though he 
were your enemy. 

6. "They that are in dignity, or in 
office, have in all places precedency; 
but whilst they are young they ought 
to respect those that are their equals 
in birth or other qualities, though 
they have no public charge." 



"The one thought that runs 
through all the rules of conduct is 
to practice self control, and no man 
ever displayed that most difficult of 
virtues to such a degree as George 
Washington" Lodge. 



Clipped From "Essay On Last 

Words Of Great Men By Mark 

Twain 

Shakespeare was ready to die and 
as he drew his last breath said, 
"England expects every man to do 
his duty." And there was John 
Quincy Adams who, when death 
smote him in the House of Represen- 
tatives, said "This is the last of 
earth." Why the last of earth when 
there was so much more left? If he 
had said it was the last rose of sum- 
mer it would have had as much 
point. What he meant to say was, 
"Adam was the first and Adams is 
the last of earth," but he put it off 
a trifle too long, so he had to go with 
that unmeaning observation on his 
lips. Queen Elizabeth said, "Oh, I 
would give my kingdom for one mo- 
ment more 1 have forgotten my 

last words." And Red Jacket, the 
noblest Indian brave that ever 
wielded a tomahawk in defense of 
a friendless and persecuted race, ex- 
pired with these touching words 
upon his lips, "Wawkawampanoo- 
suc, winebagowallawsag amore- 

saskatchewan." There was not 

a dry eye in the wigwam. 



Discovery In Economics 

Talk is cheap because the supply 
exceeds the demand. 



"Because of the ancient belief 
that the spirits of the Chinese bur- 
ied in foreign soil cannot mingle 
with those of their ancestors, nat- 
ives of China have requested that 
the bodies of 300 Chinese be disin- 
terred at Cypress Hills Cemetery, 
New York, and sent to China for re- 
burial." Brief Topics. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



»OOOOCXXXXX}OCXKXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXX)000000< 



Store Opens 7:00 A. M. 



Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 



Saturday 10 P. M. 



HERTZLER BROS 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of the girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 
J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Fays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men't 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizahethtown 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Gentral Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Multiple Magazine Linotype Equipment 

JOB PRINTING 

See Our Press Print and Fold Them 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
S (rices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
t will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 




excellentwork fair prices 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMERS BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 

Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 

Remember — 18 West High Street 

For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 

Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY CO. 

N. York-Chicago-Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



J. W. ZARPD88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



>00000CXXX>0O0O00000O€X)0OOCXXXXX3eX>0O00OO00000OO0O0O0OO0O0O00005 

Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



Buch Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 



THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



Electric Wiring 
House Wiring 



Fixture Repairing 
Contract Work 



MECHANICSBURG 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

L. L. LININGER 



We Save You Money on Wiring and 
Fixtures 



25 Per Cent. Discount on All Fixtures 



24 W. Marble St., MECHANICSBURG 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Hornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222% N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 

Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 

Wholesale Sugar House 

318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa* 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHON OGR APHS 
I. A. SHIFFFR 

39 5. Market St. Elizabethtowa 

UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 
ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATFS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. TRINK 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



OOOCK)OOOOOOOOOOOOCKJOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX}OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOj 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. -Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 
)OQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQOQQOOOOOOOOOQQQQQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ<' 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F.APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 

Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



■ 



1 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



t Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



I H E £' ? I 



s s s a i i i i 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 

THE 

GROSS CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - - - Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W. King St., Lancaster 



QQOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQt 

GARBER GARAGE 

Bell Phone 43R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phone 60SA 



FORD and FORDSON 

Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

C<XXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC3000000000000 



o 



KLEI 



monci pars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC500000000000 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC3000000 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, flour, Feed and lumber 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOOGGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOO^ 



^O00000CK)000O0O0000O0OOOO00OO00O00OOOOO0OO0O0OOOO0OOOOe9OOOOOO< 

THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you - 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 




Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 



In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade -workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 



Sell At Two Prices 

17.50 $5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 



>ogoqoqoqqoqqoqqoqqqogoooqqoqgooqggqqooqqoooqqqqqqqqgqqqogogq< 



OWR. 

gilUEEETKl 



n 




ARCH 
1922 



Li 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocxx 



HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

MISS1MER & YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 



o 




- 




In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suite are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 

Come and be convinced. 




This is The Place for You to SAVE 

MONEY! 



o©CQGxx»o©©©eoo©CK>G>oeTO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO'JOOOC 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

5 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCO OOOO QOOOQOOOGOOQQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



D OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOO(X)0000000<XX>00000000000000(; 

o 

§ GETTING SOMEWHERE 

g Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 

§ half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 



o 



Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

I The Farmers' National Bank 

l LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

>OOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 



2 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, -:- PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOGOOOOOOOOCK>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOl 

AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L. Geyer 
Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



>QOOO<X>OCK>Q©OOQOQCKXXX>CK^^ 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 

MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



JOOOOOQOOOOOOOOQOOOOQOOOQOOOQOOOQQQQOOOOOOOOOOQOQOOOOQOOQOOO©* 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer Jacob G. Hershey R. O. Diehl 

John R. Cassel J. B. Shenk John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder Monroe H. Metzler W. W. Moyer 

OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



J. T. SNYDER 



Florin, Penna. 



GO TO 



HORSTS 7 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 
Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

__AND— 

PAPER HANGER 



S. Market St., 



Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



{OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOf 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

EL'ZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Write or Phone to 

FEY BONNET SUPPLY CO. 

Lititz, Penna. Bell-139R2 



For FREE catalogue of Ready-Made 
bonnets, bonnet-makers supplies 
and covering goods samples. 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 



Fresh, Fancy and Staple Groceries, Candies and Lunch Goods 

'The Little Store With Big Business" 

LEVI C. HERSHEY, Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Butter and Condensed Milk 

HERSHEY CONDENSING CO. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, :: PENNA. 



WHALEN & WHALEN 
Specialists in Fitting Glasses 

2nd Floor McCrory Bldg., 

17 East King Street, 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



El 



COLLEGE HILL 
DAIRY 



GO TO 



Pure Milk and Cream 



Delivered Daily 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 
FOR 

SHOES OF QUALITY 

GO TO 

EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 

BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store" 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



S. G. Graybill 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches, 
Ivory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 



MRS. W. S. MORGAN, Proprietress. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

Furnish The 

APPETITE 

And We Will Do The Rest 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



FREYMEYER'S BAKERY 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



Increase Profits by Liming 
Your Soil. 
White Lily Brand 99% Cal. Carbon- 
ate Lime Will Fill Your 
Requirements. 
LANDIS STONE MEAL COMPANY 
Rheems, Penna. 



|OOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXX>OOOCX)OOOOOOOOOCXXXKXKKXKXXX?000000000000000^ 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

Farm Implements and Repairs 



Your Patronage Solicited 



Bell p h ho n ne 6 6!-R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

)OOOOOOOOOOCXX30000CXX)OOOOCXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX>OOOOOOOOOOOC 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE BEE HIVE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



Dry Goods, Notions 

AND FANCY GOODS 



Hosiery and Underwear 

ALWAYS THE LATEST 



in our 



Gent's Furnishing Department 



Visit Our Grocery Department 

"FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



BEST OF CANDIES 

We endeavor to keep a most complete line in stock at all 
times and respectfully solicit your patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 

Something New Every Day 
Cor. S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



©ur College ftimes 

Volume XIX MARCH Number 6 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtown 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any. change of address to the business manager. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

(Elsie Landis 

College News ] T ~ _ , 

(J. D. Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 






Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 

J. S. Harley J. Z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Editorials 



Attitudes 



Senior 

Attitude, like personality, par- 
takes very much of the spirit of the 
individual. A personal attitude is 
an expression of the inner spirit 
as it reacts to the touch of a person 
or situation or a whole institution, 
if you please. Sometimes the atti- 
tude of a single person of a group 
is a fair thermometer of the whole 
"attitudinal" atmosphere. Wheth- 
er this is true of E. C. Seniors, or not, 
may be hard to tell. However, the 
general atmosphere, as sensed by 
one of them, is not at all poisonous 
or even unwholesome. 

The E. C. Seniors this year are 
not lacking in quanity. The ques- 
tion is, Is there enough quality in 
the class of '22 to salt the attitudes 
of a whole Hill of non-Seniors? 
There has been enough, at least, to 
shed a ray of light over the Hill to 
those who, on dark nights, could see 
neither coming or going, accompan- 
ied or unaccompanied. 

That Senior, wherever he be, 
who does not stand back of his class 
and duly support its interests, — so- 
cially financially, and otherwise, — is 
hardly a fair "Senior Product," 
even though he may get away finally 
with a degree or a sheep-skin. 

E. C. Seniors make use of social 
privileges once in awhile. A class 
of Seniors who will not laugh at a 
series of pranks played upon them 
during a prolonged absence, — so 



long as matters stay within laughing 
distance, — need only to be remind- 
ed of the time when they too were 
young and energetic ! How many 
years, fellow Seniors, since you 
stood in your Junior brother's 
place? Those who will not laugh 
may play safe next time by getting 
married or staying at home ! Life 
need not all be serious. 

Neither is life all a joke. That 
Senior class which has not the stabil- 
ity of character and dignity of bear- 
ing to leaven the lump and set the 
pace for a whole student body in 
matters morals, social, and religious 
had perhaps better soon jump off 
and drop into the ranks of "Fresh- 
man Ore" or "Sophomore Pig-iron." 
To once more undergo the refining 
process and be recast might bring 
the desired result, — a sample 
"Senior Product." 

E. C. Seniors believe in healthy 
athletics. Any college Senior who 
is interested in the athletics of his 
class, — a staunch supporter of fair 
play, and equally repulsed by foul; 
knowing how to lose a game as 
gracefully and peacefully as to win 
one, — need lend only his person or 
his influence to each Senior game to 
make his school athletics count 
for cleaner and healthier manhood 
and womanhood. 

E. C. Seniors aim to be democra- 
tic in their attitude toward their 
fellow students. That Senior who, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



because of being top-heavy, cannot 
stand on the upper rung of the 
scholastic ladder without kicking 
the faces of those who stand on the 
rungs below, deserves to topple off 
his lofty perch ; and, if he escapes 
with his life, to be jostled and el- 
bowed a bit by his inferior ( ? ) 
schoolmen in his effort to climb back 
again. 

We Seniors who "knock" when 
we ought to "boost;" blame when 
we ought to praise; who weep when 
others laugh and laugh when others 
weep ; who shirk our tasks and then 
blame the school or the president 
for our failures; who know more 
than our professors ever knew or 
can hope to know? — need perhaps 
only reverse the game now and then 
"to see ourselves as others see us." 
Our highest aim, nevertheless, is to 
represent the true spirit of the 
school. 

Lastly, that E. C. Senior who does 
not feel deeply grateful for the 
spirit of sacrifice and good will 
shown toward him by his teachers 
and the supporters of his Alma 
Mater; and who does not sooner or 
later, by word or attidute, return 
the compliment and show his ap- 
preciation of that spirit, hardly de- 
serves so much as "honorable men- 
tion" in the historic annals of Eliz- 
abethtown College. A Senior. 

Juniors 

Most writers define their terms 
ere they begin to expostulate upon 
any important subject. For this rea- 
son we have chosen to qualify, clar- 
ify, and enrich the concept "Jun- 
iors!" 

Juniors are students who have 



survived after being brought 
through Freshman furnace and 
Sophomore rolling process. They 
are students true as steel. 

The ideal attitude of Juniors to 
teachers and fellow classmates is 
one of good will. Juniors, as a rule, 
have caught the school spirit and 
hence they do their utmost to pro- 
mulgate it. This applies in debate, 
athletics, or any other school func- 
tion. 

The relation of Juniors to lower 
classmen is one of sympathetic 
radiation of acts of helpfulness. For 
in all things Juniors have been test- 
ed and tried just as Freshmen are. 
Juniors well remember that fiery 
furnace where their Socratic teach- 
ers mercilessly quizzed their dull 
minds to expose their ignorance. 
Juniors recall vividly when as 
Sophomores they had more educat- 
ion than Aristotle ever had, and how 
the college rolling process brought 
clown their haughty heads. 

The Juniors' attitude toward 
Seniors is one of obeisance as long 
as principle is not sacrificed. If 
Seniors ask Juniors to go one mile 
they willingly suggest the feasibi- 
lity of going twain. Juniors' per- 
sonalities are thus revealed by their 
sympathetic interest in their fellow 
class-mates but more especially in 
their dignified Senior pals. 

True Juniors have high ideals of 
sportsmanship. They are not gloat- 
ing winners nor rotten losers. They 
are always ready to give their vic- 
torious opponents due congratula- 
tions. They believe in playing the 
game of life straight and hard, so 
that they win even when they lose. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Xitcrarv 



Curtis Surrenders On Condition 

The train rocked comfortably, 
the sunlight streamed down upon 
the green farmlands, and Curtis was 
speeding New Yorkward from his 
home in Westchester County, for the 
purpose of closing a deal that would 
mean a fortune. 

Yet he did not seem happy as he 
slapped together the pages of the 
book he was reading and let it slide 
to the floor. "Sentimental slush!" 
he muttered. 

The article he had been reading 
was "The Soul of an Old Maid!" 
He had read it more than once and 
certain phrases went straight to his 
heart. 

Curtis was a bachelor and never 
thought much more of woman than 
to regard her as an amusement and 
as being a terrible nuisance. But 
this woman's cry of loneliness had 
pierced the wall of his bachelordom. 

Upon arriving in New York he 
took a suite at the Holland House 
and that evening Curtis read the ar- 
ticle again. He sat down at his 
desk without an instant's hesitation 
and wrote a line to the editor, ask- 
ing for the name and address of the 
woman responsible for "The Soul 
of an Old Maid." He had a mental 
picture of this Madonna beauty, — 
hair soft brown, slightly streaked 
in silver, of course; eyes blue, more 
likely deep gray; and lips — Well! 
he must see her. 

When the reply came the editor 
politely informed him that the 
policy of the magazine barred the 



giving of information relative to 
its contributors. 

The following day Curtis paid a 
visit to the editorial office and asked 
to see the editor. The editor looked 
like the captain of a football eleven 
as he entered the room. 

Curtis said to him, "I have here 
your refusal to grant a very simple 
request of mine." 

The editor, looking over the let- 
ter, said, "We have sent out a couple 
dozen of those within the past few 
weeks and have here thirty pro- 
posal of marriage for the lady." 

Curtis said, "This is not my rea- 
son for wanting to know the writer; 
but it is to procure part of the ar- 
ticle for a western magazine that I 
have an interest in." 

The only satisfaction Curtis re- 
ceived was that he send a letter to 
him, the editor, and he would see 
that it was forwarded to the writer. 

That night Curtis wrote a very 
guarded letter, requesting merely 
that she should agree to an inter- 
view and that it might prove ad- 
vantageous to both. 

The reply read: "If I knew just 
why you want to see me it would 
be easier to decide." She gave no ad- 
dress, requesting that he send his 
reply care of General Delivery. 
Her signature was Martha Fleming. 

He answered, "There are certain 
matters difficult to discuss on 
paper." The correspondence con- 
tinued for four weeks and in this 
time he received ten letters from 
her, but none of them gave him 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



much satisfaction or material means 
of identification. And Martha 
Fleming, General Delivery, con- 
tinued to be her address. 

Curtis sprang to his feet. One of 
her letters had mentioned the de- 
lightful, anticipation of her trips to 
the Post Office each afternoon 
That was the place to find her! A 
little before two o'clock that after- 
noon he entered the Post Office at 
Park Row and Broadway. He had 
spent over an hour on parade. 

"Miss Fleming's mail please," he 
heard suddenly. 

Curtis turned and found a girl, of 
about twenty-four years of age, 
very pretty indeed. She glanced 
over her mail and was gone. Curtis 
followed, and after boarding a 
northbound Broadway car he began 
to reconsider. This was not her first 
visit to the Post} Office because the 
man in charge seemed to know her. 
Some relative, no doubt, of Miss 
Fleming's. 

After descending from the car, 
Curtis followed her toward Gra- 
mercy Park. The girl mounted the 
steps of a brownstone house facing 
the Park. He was a few paces be- 
hind her. 

"I would like to see Miss Flem- 
ing," he said. 

She swung about, her lips moved 
but no sound came from them. 

Curtis smiled. "I asked for Miss 
Fleming, don't be frightened." 

"Oh, oh!" she gasped. "I wish I 
had not done it! I am she." 

"You!" remarked Curtis. 

"Yes, I— I wrote the Old Maid 
story. Writing is my profession. I 



am so sorry about these letters. But 
we tried the first one for fun, and 
then I got the fever. 'It was all ex- 
cellent material,' he said, 'I will be 
able to make use of it.' " 

"Who is he?" Curtis shouted. 

"Mr. Phelps, editor of the maga- 
zine. He is my husband." 

By this time Curtis was down the 
steps; and now he sleeps on his way 
to town from Westchester. 

P. U. 



Rhyming Lines 

Up in Juniata county, " 

Nearly eighty miles from here. 
Are the many, many landspots, 

Which I loved in childhood dear. 

There's the pleasant farm, the stone 
house, 
On which in summer green vines 
cling. 
Oh, how I do long to go there, 
With the coming of the spring. 

I see the horses, cows, and chickens 
Which frolicked on the hill; 

They seem to be 'most human, 
To one who loves them, still. 

There's the grey old country school- 
house, 

Standing on the Red Bank Hill. 
Yes, we played around its corners, 

Were the weather warm or chill ! 

Oh, the scenes of childhood days! 

How their memory lingers near, 
When I am far away from home 

In the spring time of the year. 

E. L. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Back To Nature 

Nature is calling back its own. 
For a great many years people have 
been going to the city to get rich 
quick, but today the pendulum is 
swinging back to nature and to life 
on the farm. 

In our criticism of farm life ver- 
sus city life we have been unfair. 
We have contrasted the extreme 
conditions in the city with the ex- 
treme in the country. The average 
home in either case would be the 
fair test. In the city only the better 
class of people count in society. 
They do not have to undergo the 
hardships of the less fortunate. 
Their homes are homes where lux- 
ury abounds, where every want is 
gratified. The poorer class, if taken 
care of at all, are cared for by chari- 
table organizations. 

Let us look at a home in the 
country. It is usually very com- 
fortable. Even though very plain 
in furniture, it is a place where 
virtue, intelligence, thrift and cour- 
age are vital factors. Stability and 
strength of character are developed 
here to a degree unknown to the 
city child. The country home is a 
unit. The family work together for 
the common good of all, while in 
the city father goes in one direction 
to his work, the boys one way, and 
perhaps a daughter to some other 
part of the city. They rush to and 
from their work, and spend their 
evenings in some entertainment to 
be found in the city. In the country 
more evenings are spent at home 
reading good magazines; perhaps 
being entertained by some good 



music on the victrola. The average 
home today has its "Ford" or "Over- 
land" and thus they can go to the 
nearby towns to occasional enter- 
tainments. 

Life on the farm is living as man 
was intended to live. Living in such 
close contact with nature, and con- 
stantly being in the fresh air when 
doing one's outdoor work, seem to 
be real fountains of health-giving 
water. A big proof that we need to 
get in touch with nature is the city 
park and its necessity. The life of 
a city person demands occasional 
times of rest and recreation. The 
city park serves as a rescuer, and 
we find over-worked, nervous folks 
seeking its haunts daily. The bab- 
bling brook, the green grass, and 
opening bud of the spring, — all 
bring us back to nature and the 
Supreme Power who ' orders and 
oversees it all. 

Country folks are exempt from 
the social evils so prevalent in the 
city. Insanity and suicide are twice 
as great in the city. The divorce 
question is almost unknown to the 
country as compared with the city. 
Are not all these social evils a di- 
rect violation of nature's laws? 
Live a clean life, get back to nature 
and be prosperous. 

"To him who in the love of Nature 

holds 
Communion with her visible forms, 

she speaks 
A various language ; for his gayer 

hours 
She has a voice of gladness and a 

smile 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



And eloquence of beauty; and she 

glides 
Into his darker musings with a mild 
And healing sympathy, that steals 

away 
Their sharpness, ere he is aware." 

M. O. 



The Open Shop 



On the Ope 11 Shop we all can count, 

For the loyal workers there are found; 

And they do their tasks with careful skill 
As with joy their duties they fulfill. 

The employer knows his men are true 
And try their best in all they do. 

New orders come so thick and fast 

Folks say their goods are made to last 

His men all work with might and main 
And thus the firm's success maintain. 

Each does his task with utmost care, 
For he knows success is rooted there. 

The employer tells them of his plan 
For he knows that everyone's a man 

And he says to each: "Your Wage I'll raise, 
Your faithfulness deserves my praise.". 

And when agitators there are sent 
The seeds of selfishness to plant, 

They say, "You can't impose on me, 
For here we have prosperity." 

"Your methods tend to cause a strike 
To cripple industry you'd like; 

You do not care how we might live 
Just so to you our cash we give." 

"And then you'd leave us to our fate 
And go to some far distant state, 

That there your poison you might spread 
Until its men would cry for bread." 

When union men are led to see 

That unions give less liberty, 
They'll throw their nonsense in the air 

And work for bosses that are fair. 

Then peace and great prosperity 
Within each worker's home will be, 

The reason any one can tell 

The Open Shop has worked so well. 

S. G. F. 



Sir Galahad 

The picture of Sir Galahad wa.< 
painted by George Frederick Watts, 
whose paintings are of such a nature 
as to suggest great thoughts that 
will appeal to the imagination and 
kindle in one's heart the best an I 
noblest sentiments. 

We see in Sir Galahad's face 
wonderful determination. He was 
of the finest type mentally and 
physically of those who were going 
in search of the purest and most 
sacred treasure, — the Holy Grail. 
Character marks the man, and the 
sturdy white horse by his side adds 
strength to the picture. 

Sir Galahad is clothed in armor, 
as was the custom of the knights 
of old. He had passed through the 
years of hardship leading to knight- 
hood, and now he is ready to face 
the world. 

One might name the picture "Me- 
ditation," for the knight is looking 
into the great distant future. Per- 
haps he sees the trials that lie in his 
path ; the cold and hunger that will 
come upon him; the disappoint- 
ments that he will meet; but in the 
distance he sees the objects for 
which he will overcome all these 
difficulties. He will bear all these 
and even more ; he will sacrifice 
life itself for that which he sees to 
be his duty. 

The picture is very popular. It 
can be found in many homes, and 
is the most popular picture in the 
schoolroom. 

H. G. 



16 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Ankleshvar, India, Dec. 19, 1921. 

To the Readers of the College Times: — 

How often I wonder how the Elizabethtown College 
family is getting along, — those who are there at present, and the large number who 
have gone out from there. Frequently I hear about some thru personal letters and 
I am always so glad for any news (good news I mean.) 

Recently I had a visit with Miss Royer and she, gave me a great deal of 
news, but the time was too short, so itj is to be continued sometime ; but when, I can 
not tell. Before she went on furlough it was) nearly two years that we had not seen 
each other. We are not a great distance apart, but not in the same language, so we 
have a few less chances to meet. 

We are having fine weather now, somewhat like America, though not cold 
enough to need a fire to warm by; but the thermemoter registers fifty-five some 
mornings and it will drop lower than that later on. How we do enjoy the good fresh 
air when we do not think of the poor who have very little clothing and no bedding. 
Sometimes I pity them and then I feel like scolding them, and maybe some of you 
would call it that if you heard me| talk to them. So many of these people are so 
shiftless and easily satisfied. I told them if they had a loin cloth on and a smoke pipe 
in their mouth they were happy. They were surprised that I knew. It is true they 
are not treated fairly by those for whom they work, and\ yet they are not anxious to 
take the advice we give them. 

The political unrest here has not helped conditions any. In some parts 
there has been considerable loss of life and property and now in a few days the people 
prophesy trouble in the last effort to gain Home Rule. The leader at the head of 
this says if Home Rule is not gained by the end of this month, he will either go crazy 
or die. He is already crazy enough, so his days may be few, for the Hindus see that 
it is not possible to gain self government. The non-cooperators show their colors by 
wearing a white cap made of homespun cloth, for all foreign cloth was to be burned, 
but it wasn't. Well these white cap fellows are as inconsistent as they can be. They 
take advantage of every comfort and convenience that Government gives; even the 
leader, Mr. Ghandi, will sit in an auto rather, than an ox cart or go on foot. 

Many of the poor and ignorant have been influenced to leave Government 
employ and are without anything to do now. Some five thousand young men were 
ordered to leave the Government institutions of learning and are nowhere in school 
today. In short, many of the India people are utterly disgusted with the move. 

Some have had fears that it would not be safe for the white person but 
so far we have had no fears. Around here it has been quiet. 

Not. many days till Christmas. One: time I received a letter from some 1 one, 
wondering whether we have Christmas at the same time as you had in America. 
Well India is far behind the times, but in this she is up to time and we celebrate the 
day, not quite when you do, but begin ten hours before you do. Our Christian 
people on this day do much like many people at home on Easter Day, they all come 
out in new clothes if at all possible. The giving of gifts is practiced. We often 
receive boxes of things from home, as well as money, to be used at this time, so we 
remember the children and the very poor. An offering is taken at the Christmas 
service for some special purpose. 

A beautiful practice among our Christians is to come early, while yet dark, 
on Christmas morn and sing Christmas Carols. The first time I heard it, I thot are 
the angels in heaven singing? I had not been told and so was surprised. 

My letter is getting too long, but I do not often take any space in the 
Times; that is one comfort. 

The season for touring in the village is oni now, but I have been hindered 
from going out this month but hope to go out early in January and stay out till 
the hot weather sets in, about March first. 

Only one more season after this till my furlough is due. It seems but 
a few years that I was in the homeland and when the time comes to leave one has 
a mingled feeling, — sorry to leave, yet glad to once more see the native land and 
people. 

Good wishes to the whole College Family. Sincerely, 



KATHRYN ZIEGLER. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



College IFlews 



Miss Landis — Aren't you feeling 
well? 

Miss Myer (Minnie) — No, I'm 
getting old and romantic. 



Mr. Rhinehart — Here is a short 
stanza on woman. 

Prof. Harley — I don't see how 
they could exhaust the subject in 
eight lines. 



Prof. — What are some of the 
famous fairs you read about in your 
English Literature? 

Mr. Wagner — "Vanity Fair." 



Prof. Nye — What other important 
buildings would you have seen 
walking through a town during the 
Medieval Period? 



Prof. Hoffer — Why is New York 
blessed with so many sky scrapers? 

Miss Kreider — Because the 
people don't have room on the 
streets. 

Prof. Hoffer — So some of the 
people must live near the sky now. 



"Neben der Mauer stand ein 
ziemlich groszes Wirtshaus." 
Mr. Brightbill translated as follows: 
— "Besides the wall stood a large 
sausage house." 



We are indeed sorry our sewing 
teacher, Miss Elizabeth Zeigler, had 
to go home for a vacation because 
of ill health. Miss Ruth Minnich 
has taken her position. 



(By the way, a party on the Hill 
has rented a mail box since Miss 
Zeigler's departure.) 



(Overheard) 

John Sherman was deeply ab- 
sorbed in a philosophy lesson. One 
of his chums was trying to get his 
attention but his efforts were all in 
vain. John's thoughts were roam- 
ing in the field of eclecticism. Fi- 
nally John was ready to respond, 
and before his pal could speak 
another word he said, 

"My Past is an exclamation, 
My Present is an interjection, 
My Future is a question, yet 
I hope to be a star some day." 



The Homerian Literary Society 
have recently revised their constitu- 
tion. We feel that this is a big step 
for the Society. Prof. L. D. Rose 
has contributed very liberally to the 
success of this work. This con- 
stitution is one of the most complete 
literary society constitutions that 
can be found. 



Mr. L. M. Miller, State Student 
Secretary of the Y. M. C. A., re- 
cently paid us a visit. Mr. Miller 
gave the gentleman an interesting 
address, and also spoke to the entire 
student body in the chapel. 



Our Student Government has 
taken another forward step. The 
Y. M. W. A. has recently adopted 
certain regulations and penalties 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



for offense; also methods of pro- 
cedure for enforcing said rules. 



On the morning of February 21 
Prof. Meyer agreeably surprised 
the student body by announcing a 
holiday for February 22. 



On the morning of February 22 
the students came to chapel to en- 
joy a Washington Program. The 
regular chapel services were con- 
ducted by Ephraim Hertzler, the 
president of the Senior Class. This 
was followed by an interesting pro- 
gram which ended in a number of 
round table talks on patriotism. 
The meeting was closed by Clarence 
Sollenberger, the president of the 
Junior Class. 



Rev. E. F. Yoder, pastor of the 
Church of God of Elizabethtown, re- 
cently conducted chapel exercises 
and gave a forceful address on the 
subject, "How Can Man Be Justified 
Before God?" 



A Valentine social on Valentine 
evening was enjoyed by the students 
and members of the faculty. 



Elder J. S. Noffsinger of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. was with us a few days 
ago, having come as a representa- 
tive of the General Education Board 
of the Church of the Brethren of 
which Board he is a member. This 
was his first offical visit to our in- 
stitution. While here he conducted 
chapel services and gave an inspir- 
ing address to the student body. 



Miss Mineva Neher of Bethany 
Bible School, Chicago, spent a few 
days with us recently. During 
chapel exercises she gave two ad- 
dresses full of the spirit of devotion 
and consecration. 



Recently the Crawford Adams 
Company gave a recital as one of 
the numbers of the College Lecture 
Course. Crawford Adams played 
the violin, Mr. LaPierre presided at 
the piano, and Miss Wilkins delight- 
ed the audience with her readings. 



A few mornings ago Pres. J. G. 
Meyer read the acceptance of the 
invitation sent to Ex-Provost Smith, 
of the University of Pennsylvania, to 
be the Commencement speaker on 
June 8. 



The Y. W. W. A. recently cele- 
brated the close of its first year's 
work and ushered in the beginning 
of another year of usefulness among 
the lady students. Pres. J. G. Mey- 
er gave the anniversary address, us- 
ing as his subject "The Girl at Col- 
lege." Miss Margaret Oellig has 
been chairman of this flourishing 
organization. 



Those Luminous Hand Watches 

The luminous hands on your 
watch are made so by radium ex- 
tracted' from carnotite ore found in 
Colorado. One gram of radium 
can be produced from two hundred 
and fifty tons of the ore, but over 
half a million watches can be lighted 
up with the luminous material made 
from that one gram. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



IReltatous Botes 



Chape! Echoes 

There is a plan for each individu- 
al life. If we forget to take Jehovah 
into that plan, it will be a failure. 

L. W. Leiter. 



Just as great as God is to us, so 
much honor and reverence we will 
pay to Him. If we cannot appreci- 
ate the Fatherhood of God, — His 
love, mercy and goodness, — He does 
not mean much to us. All these go 
hand in hand. 

Sara Shisler. 



It should inspire us to look at the 
moon and stars for God has or- 
dained them. "The heavens de- 
clare the glory of God and the firm- 
ament showeth His handiwork." 

Man is so small compared with 
the earth that he would not be seen 
with the most compound miscro- 
scope. 

The Father has put all things un- 
der man's feet, but man sometimes 
lets things g^t cm top of him. 

"What is man than Thou art 
mindful of him, and the Son of mar. 
that Thou visitest him? It is impos- 
sible for man to care for himself, 
but God is willing to do His part. 

A. C. Baugher 



Lot had great economic power 
but when he left Sodom he took 
nothing but his life. All his world- 
ly achievements had to remain be- 
hind. I. S. Hoffer. 



Paul said, "I was not disobedient 
unto the heavenly vision." "I for- 
get those things which are behind 
and stretch forth to those things 
which are before." 



These are splendid mottoes for 
our young men and women to-day. 
We should know how to forget past 
slights, defeats, and even successes. 
The reason so many are held down 
is because they go on thinking 
about their successes in the past. 

God made us and" breathed into 
us the breath of life. We will never 
be successful in life unless we func- 
tion in our particular specialty. 
If we don't function with out souls 
which He has given us, we are mis- 
sing the purpose for which we have 
been created. God never meant 
that we should spend our time in ac- 
cumulating mud. 

Carlyle says, "God takes a hand- 
ful of mud and make out of it 
rubies, diamonds and precious jew- 
els." What then would God do 
with a human being if we gave Him 
the opportunity? 

J. S. Noffsinger, Brooklyn, N.Y. 



The Dynamic of Purpose 

Our most precious possession is 
our life. We would take nothing 
in exchange! for it. We do not be- 
lieve in the transmigration of souls; 
therefore, we have only one chance 
to live. What shall we do? 

There are two possibilities, to 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



choose the high road to world 
service or the low road to world 
selfishness. Our personality should 
help us to decide. God has given 
each one of us possibilities to be 
developed. We must be gripped 
by a great, unselfish purpose that 
will keep us on our tiptoes all the 
time. The individual should feel 
the smallness of self as over against 
a big task. 



We have the one thing which the 
world needs. Are we going to close 
our eyes to these world needs and 
pass around on the other side? 

The real reason that we should 
live the sacrificial life is because 
Jesus is our Master; He has first 
claim on our lives. 

Mineva Neher. 
Traveling Sec. — Volunteer Band 



u 



Pinnacles in Civilization" 



Our present civilization is the 
outgrowth of a gradual unfolding 
of events from the dawn of man's 
existence to the present time, 
and many and varied have been the 
contributions made to its progress. 
It is a closely interwoven heritage 
that has come down to us through 
generation after generation, involv- 
ing centuries and even millennia in 
its making. It came, however, not 
through an unbroken line of events 
with every movement in the same 
direction, but rather through a 
series of elevations and depressions, 
of ups and downs, some tending for 
the better and some for the worse. 
The reign of a Pericles might send 
civilization one hundred years 
ahead of its time, whereas a Greek 
civil war may set it back no less 
than a hundred and fifty years at a 
pace fully as great or even greater. 

One of the interesting facts con- 
cerning this development is that 
while ages and peoples in the past 



have made their particular contri- 
butions to civilization, other nations 
and peoples are still making their 
contributions and will continue to 
• do so as long as time lasts. Some of 
the chief means of transmission 
from generation to generation have 
been literature, works of art, social 
traditions and customs. 

Of all ancient peoples whose con- 
tributions have directly or indirect- 
ly influenced our Western civiliza- 
tion, four stand out as pre-eminent 
whose culture has profoundly af- 
fected our own national thought 
and conduct. Suffice it merely to 
mention here in their order the 
names of these peoples with their 
special contributions, with more de- 
tailed reference later to the first 
one and its influence. The first of 
these is the Hebrew nation with its 
ethics and religion ; the second is 
Greece with its art and philosophy; 
the third, Rome with its govern- 
ment and law ; and the fourth, the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



ancient Germans whose contri- 
bution was given largely in the tra- 
dition of individual liberty, shown 
in the spirit of the Renaissance and 
the Reformation. 

To the Hebrew nation, then, is 
ascribed this most important of all 
the contributions to society, a 
standard of morality and religion, 
— one which, as Elwood says, is 
conquering the world — a fact that 
cannot be denied by the scientific 
student of culture, no matter what 
he may happen to think of the 
ethics or the religion. 

This ethical and religious supre- 
macy held by the Hebrew nation 
was not attained, however, at a 
single bound. As a people it grad- 
ually ascends the scale of value's 
till it reaches the pinnacle of 
Christ's life, and then from /this 
mountain peak decend on all sides 
the streams of influence which 
shall flow to all the world — some of 
which have flowed down to us in 
our present civilization, watering 
many a thirsty land along its course. 

In tracing this Hebrew ascend- 
ancy, we see first Abraham chosen 
of God to be the father of His 
people. God probably saw an 
Abraham a type of moral and re- 
ligious personality which was rare 
in that day and age — one which 
would serve Him well as the pro- 
genitor of a race morally fit to usher 
in the Messiah. Thereupon He 
makes a covenant with Abraham 
with the most profound and far- 
reaching promise ever made to man, 
— that his (Abraham's) seed 
should be as the stars in the heavens 
for multitude, and that in him shall 



all the nations of the earth be 
blessed. 

Later on when the life of the 
people merges into that of a nation, 
this same covenant is renewed with 
Moses on Sinai. Still later the prom- 
ise finds its wider and still more 
comprehensive outlook in the inter- 
national Gospel covenant made and 
sealed in the life and death of Christ 
himself. 

The above is a panoramic view 
beginning at ,a mere point, with 
each following dispensation spread- 
ing to ever-increasing proportions; 
from personal to national and from 
national to international boundaries. 
In each instance it seems that the 
obligation incurred by man, as the 
other party to the covenant, was a 
moral obligation of obedience and 
faithfulness. 

May we not infer from this, then, 
that God chose the morally best He 
could find to begin with; and that, 
since the issue was to be a moral 
and religious or rather a spiritual 
one, it was this phase of life that 
needed to be maintained or attained 
above everything else in that nation 
from which was to come a perfect 
representation of the character of 
God himself, in an only begotten 
Son? A people morally degenerate 
could not possibly perform this miss- 
ion to the world. It was this moral 
and religious character of the na- 
tion that would give it the needed 
prestige to make its contribution 
acceptable to current as well as to 
later civilization. 

But just as in the whole course 
of civilization there were elevations 
and depressions so the moral and 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



religious making of the Hebrews 
passed through valleys of disobedi- 
"ence and sorrow; from mountains 
of divine revelation to lone wander- 
ings in the wilderness ; from national 
prosperity to abject slavery and cap- 
tivity in a foreign land. All this 
indicates that they had to be purged 
of their sins as by fire. Their dis- 
obedience and captivity present the 
darkest side of the picture; but 
their return, free forever from idol- 
atry and with a renewed loyalty 
to God, reveals something of the 
brighter side. 

The Biblical narrative depicts 
much in the moral and religious 
character of the Hebrews which 
looks dark and foreboding and just- 
ly so, but where in all the pages of 
history could a contemporary na- 
tion be found which did not fall far 
below the Hebrews in the scale of 
morality and religion? As a people 
they were monotheistic in belief, 
their family life and ideals far sur- 
passed the best that can be said of 
their heathen contemporaries; and 
the fact that Assyria and Babylon 
turned their captors does not say 
that they were better or even as 
good as Israel or Judah. Far from 
it. They were only handy tools 
which served to purge this chosen 
nation of much that was still dross 
and stubble. 

The law had been given for their 
moral and spiritual uplift; leaders 
and prophets arose among them for 
their inspiration and correction, 
sorrows and tribulations had to be 
multiplied for their purification; 
men were tried and sifted ; and then 
in the fullness of time Christ came. 



It was the 'fulness of time' not only 
with respect to the Hebrews, but al- 
so in respect to the then civilized 
world, — particularly of a Greece 
and Rome, — whose open arms 
seemed purposely extended to re- 
ceive Him. In the birth of Christ, 
then we have reached the highest 
pinnacle in all the contributions to 
civilization. 

The descending streams of influ- 
ence from this mountain peak will 
be traced briefly as follows : At the 
fountain head of the stream was 
now the personality of a God-man 
with power to constrain men unto 
personal purity and to bring them 
back into unity with God; love be- 
came now the bed-rock determining 
the flow of the current; while ser- 
vice became the current itself. 

The great commission designated 
as the objective points for the Gos- 
pel message, first Jerusalem, then 
all Judea and Samaria, and lastly 
the uttermost part of the earth. 
True to the commission, the streams 
of influence have flowed outward in 
the exact order named, with only 
the complete fulfillment of the last 
point indefinitely prolonged. 

The course of Christianity which 
received such tremenduous impetus 
during the first two or three centur- 
ies received its set-back in the Dark 
Ages when all that then flowed was 
a mere undercurrent of true pietv 
and faithfulness. However, with the 
enlightenment of the Protestant Re- 
formation Christianity again looms 
u;; into power since when its influ- 
ence has been a dominant factor 
in civilization. Its power can be 
traced to our modern home and in- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



dustry, to schools and colleges, to forth conquering, until the time 

,,ails and hospitals, to churches and when He shall be proclaimed on^e 

missions. As long as civilization and for all the Mighty Conqueror, 

la-n- the Spirit of the Christ will go and the Prince of Peace. A. A. 




Fourteen years ago twenty-five 
young people were busily pursuing 
the senior year's work of their re- 
spective courses of study. The la- 
dies were in the minority in this 
class of 1908. 

Anna Wolgemuth, Orella Goch- 
enour and Maud Sprinkle complet- 
ed the Advanced Commercial 
Course. B. Orella Gochenour of '08 
is now known as Mrs. G. Walter 
Dulebohn, residing in Elizabeth- 
town. There are two children in 
the family. 

Maud Sprinkle Atkinson is a com- 
munity worker in Toledo, Ohio. She 
is also rearing her little niece, Eliza- 
beth Sprinkle. 

Anna Wolgemuth did office work 
at Rheems and worked at other pla- 
ces for some time after graduation. 
Later she returned to her Alma Ma- 
ter both as student and teacher. 
Then Bethany Bible School, Chica- 
go, claimed her as a student for two 
years. She will complete the A. B. 



Course at E'town in 1922 — a mem- 
ber of the first class to be granted 
this degree by Elizabethtown Col- 
lege. 

John Z. Herr, brother of Prof. J. 
Z. Herr, C. B. Latshaw, Trostle P. 
Dick and Martin Brandt also com- 
pleted the Advanced Commercial 
Course in '08. Martin Brandt is the 
only one of these who still resides 
in the vicinity of the College. 

Trostle P. Dick is a minister of 
the gospel and has spent some time 
at Bethany Bible School. The Dick 
family is now located at Carl '-le, 
Pa., and Mr. Dick is Missionary 
Secretary of Southern Pennsylvania. 

C. B. Latshaw is in the banking 
business at Waynesboro, Pa., and 
John Z. Herr, located in New York, 
City, is purchasing agent of The Cu- 
ban Cane Sugar Refining Co. 

Leah Sheaffer, now Mrs. W. E. 
Glassmire, completed the Piano 
Course as the first graduate of our 
school in this course. She and her 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



family are now serving as mission- 
aries in Hordum, Thy, Denmark. 

Nine young people completed the 
English Scientific Course in '08. 
Edith Martin has since been re- 
moved from this number by death. 

Gertrude Newcomer is teaching 
school near Waynesboro, Pa. Lill- 
ian Risser of '08 is now known as 
Mrs. Jonas Ebersole, Elizabethtown. 
Elizabeth Weaver has become Mrs. 
S. H. Landis, of our College town, 
and is the mother of five children. 

Daisy Rider Haldeman and hus- 
band lived in Philadelphia for some 
time, but then moved to Kansas, Mr. 
Haldeman's native state. They are 
now living in Kansas City, Mo., 
where Mr. Haldeman is engaged in 
the jewelry business. Mrs. Halde- 
man's sister, Bessie M. Rider of Chi- 
na, hopes to find time to visit the 
Haldemans immediately upon her 
return to America on furlough in 
June, '22, coming via the Pacific 
and across the states to Winona 
Conference. 

Prof. J. H. Fries and family are 
living at McPherson College, Kans., 
where Prof. Fries is teaching. Mrs. 
Gertrude, Hess Fries is a loyal rep- 
resentative of our school, and served 
as a teacher in the music department 
in our school some years after her 
graduation in '08. 

S. G. Meyer, well remembered as 
an orator by all who knew this class, 
is a minister and with his family is 
serving his people near Fredericks- 
burg, Pa. 

C. M. Neff of Lititz, Pa., is man- 
ager of the Lancaster Storage Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 



H. L. Smith and family are serv- 
ing their second term in India as 
missionaries sent by the Brethren 
in Christ Church. 

Reuben King, now a merchant in 
Richland, Pa., Enoch Madeira, fore- 
man in a York Silk Mill, and Wm. 
Barto were graduated from the 
school in the Regular Commercial 
Course. 

Russel E. Martin, of the Prepara- 
tory Course, is now an agricultural 
specialist in Hazelton, Pa. 

A. G. Hottenstein, E. R. Ruhl and 
Prof. H. K. Ober completed the 
Pedagogical Course in '08. Mr. Hot- 
tenstein was an enthusiastic educa- 
tional worker until removed by 
death. 

Prof. Ober has been continuing 
work along educational lines. He 
completed the B. S. Course in '19 
and the M. S. Course in '21 at Frank- 
lin & Marshall College. He also 
served as President of our College. 
At present he is a student of Educa- 
tion in The Teachers' College, Col- 
umbia University, New York City. 
He favors the College with an ad- 
dress occasionally; he is also kept 
busy delivering lectures as he finds 
time to arrange for such over week- 
ends. 

Kathryn Ziegler went to India as 
a Missionary after having complet- 
ed the English Bible Course. She is 
located at Ankleshwer and her main 
work is that of evangelism among 
the women. For several months 
during the year she and a native 
Bible woman go out tenting so as to 
be able to reach the women in vill- 
ages far distant from the station. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



36 



Prof. Ruhl has been working in 
the educational field at various plac- 
es. He is now teaching in New 
Jersey. 

Rhoda Martin, '16 is a clerk in 
the modernly equipped Freymyer 
Bakery of our College town. 

Maria Myers, '19 has been teach- 
ing the Union School in Colerain 
township, near Kirkwood, Pa., dur- 
ing the past school year. 

Prof. L. D. Rose, Ml, in a short 
speech in chapel recently, presented 
to the College a number of books, 
169 volumes, which had constituted 
the private library of his brother 
Calvin J. Rose, M7, now deceased. 

Mrs. Minerva Coble, '10, has been 
appointed to the office of Notary 
Public in our town. 



Minerva Reber, '21, is teaching 
the primary school at Goldsboro, 
Md., and Harriet Eberly, '21, is 
teaching the primary grade in Lit- 
itz, Pa. Emma Ziegler '22, is teach- 
ing the Newville School, near Eliz- 
abethown. 

We are pleased to announce the 
arrival of Anna Margaret Nye in 
the home of Prof, and Mrs. H. H. 
Nye, March 7. 

All of our Alumni should be sure 
to secure a copy of the ETONIAN, 
the first year book of the College 
that has as yet been offered for sale. 
The Senior Class is preparing the 
book, but it will include interesting 
items and photos Of the various 
phases of school life during the year 
in which Elizabethtown College was 
standardized. 



lErcbanQee 



The College Record, Goshen, Ind., 
comes to us this month with some 
strong articles in the literary section 
and with well balanced editorials. 

The Spectator, McPherson Col- 
lege, Kansas, is a weekly and "cov- 
ers" the various college activities 
with a proficiency approaching 
that of a metropolitan daily. Other 
college weeklies of the same type 
and standard are the Ursinus Week- 
ly, Collegeville, Pa., and the Gettys- 
burgian, Gettysburg College, Pa. 
For several issues the latter has 
been publishing articles by "try- 
outs" who are candidates for va- 
cancies on the staff to be filled near 
the close of the academic year. 



This is a splendid system of merit 
to find the best talent for the staff 
and thus maintain high standards 
of college journalism. 

Other periodicals recently receiv- 
ed are Philomathean, Bridgewater 
College, Va., Daleville Leader, Va., 
Hebron Seminary Bulletin, Va., 
College Rays, Blue Ridge College, 
Md., Juniata Echo, Huntingdon, 
Pa., Oak Leaves, Manchester Col- 
lege, Indiana; Bethany Bible School 
Bulletin, Chicago ; Hesston College 
Journal, Kansas; Campus Times, 
La Verne College, California ; and 
Pattersonian, Mt. Joy High School, 
Pa. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




It is indeed gratifying to see the 
progress made in basket ball this 
year. In spite of some warm weath- 
er many games have been played, 
one of the most exciting of which 
was that played between the Lit- 
erary and the Commercial students. 
These two teams had met before, 
and the Literary players had been 
outclassed by a large margin. This 
time they were out for revenge. The 
game started with the gymnasium 
filled to its capacity. The playing 
became more intense and exciting 
as the game proceeded. The Liter- 
ary men had on their fighting togs 
and for a time had things their own 
way. They started with such a 
spurt that their opponents were be- 
wildered. The first half ended with 
the Literary boys leading by the 
score of 15 to 13. Soon after the 
second half opened the Commercials 
began to show their real strength 
when they broke through the de- 
fence of the Literary boys. The 
latter were taken unawares and 
soon were in the rear. The final 
score was 34-19 in favor of the 
Commercials. Longenecker, Eshle- 
man, and Grubb shared shooting 
honors for the Commercials, each 
bagging four field goals. Myers 
was the high scorer for the Literary 
players, having four field ]goals and 
five fouls. Following is the lineup 
and score: 



Commercials 

Field Foul Total 

Boggs, F 2 2 6 

Longenecker, F .4 8 

Grubb, C 4 8 

Gingrich, G . . . .2 4 

Eshleman, G . . . .4 8 

Total 16 2 34 

Literary 

Field Foul Total 

D. Myers, F 4 5 13 

Ober, F 3 6 

I. Royer, C 

Grimm, G 

Reber, G 

Total 7 5 19 



Seniors 26 Juniors 14 

On the evening of Feb. 24, the 
Juniors and Seniors met for the sec- 
ond time this season, the latter hav- 
ing won the first game, 13-8. Now 
the Juniors were out to get revenge 
but it was of no avail. The Seniors 
ha'J their quintet working smoothly 
and nothing could stop them. They 
had their opponents guessing by 
their fine passing, and won by the 
score of 26-14. Longenecker and 
Myers shared shooting honors, each 
bagging four field goals and two 
foul goals. Who will be their next 
victim? 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



Not only has the spirit of basket 
ball gotten into the boys, but the 
girls are also very much enthused. 
Their games are played Wednesday 
evenings and there have been some 
interesting contests. One of the 
closest and most exciting games was 
played between the Blues and the 
Reds; those playing for the Blues 
were E. Trimmer, Walker, Margaret 
Oellig, M. Minnich, Grubb and Roy- 
er; for the Reds: Gerberich, R. 
Minnich, Hart, L. Trimmer, Miriam 



Oellig and H. Ziegler. The final 
score was 10-9 in favor of the Blues. 
E. Trimmer with five field goals 
takes all the shooting honors for 
the Blues. Gerberich scored eight 
of the Reds' nine points, while R. 
Minnich scored the other point. 
The game seesawed back and forth, 
no side being sure of victory until 
the final whistle blew. We are sure 
that the girls are making a success 
of it. Go to it girls ; it is yours to 
keep. 



Dumov anfc Clippings 



Echoes From "Homerian Review" 

The Homerian Review is publish- 
ed once a month by the Wild Onion 
Printing and Publishing Company. 
Subscription price is $1.83 per year 
anywhere west of the North Pole, 
and 9c extra for every 53 miles east 
thereof. Copies can be secured at 
4:00 A. M. in the morning on the 
Thursday following the fourth Mon- 
day of each month. 

Editorial Staff 

Editor E. S. Grimm 

.W. A. Willoughby 
Elias Edris 



Newsboys . 



Editorial 

There are some people so healthy 
that to be with them seems to make 
us more healthful and happier. 

They have the gift of bringing 
with them an outdoorness of sun- 
shine, mountain air, and strength 
which breathes itself into the weak 
and the ailing. 



It is always morning for a long 
time after they have gone on their 
way. 

It's not simply a boisterous person 
that has rushed in and out, but one 
who has a grip of right-mindedness 
with a readiness to share it with 
others. 

Governor McKinley, afterwards 
President McKinley, the martyr, 
like Abraham Lincoln, once said to 
a friend with whom he was dining, 
"I feel it a duty to impart a good 
idea or an upward impulse to every 
man I meet. 



Stories 

The Success of One of Our Students 

as a Hunter 

Mr. Paul Grubb a well known 
hunter and trapper of Palmyra, re- 
lates the following story of his hunt- 
ing trip last fall. "As I was walk- 
ing along in a woods near Palmyra, 
looking for game, I saw a rabbit 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



lying beside a rock. I pulled up my 
gun to fire and I'll be blamed if an- 
other rabbit didn't come out and lie 
down on the other side of the rock. 
I fired at the sharp edge of the rock, 
the bullet split in two and killed 
both rabbits. By this time I found 
myself lying in a brook which was 
back of me, owing to the kick of the 
gun. My right hand landed on a 
muskrat and my left hand landed on 
a beaver. When I got up my trous- 
ers were so full of brook trout that 
they burst one suspender button 
which flew and killed a partridge." 
Mr. Grubb relates this as the end 
of a perfect hunt. 



The best day for doing your best 
is the one that comes seven times 
a week. Forbes. 



Athletic Notes 

Mr. Daniel Harshman and Mr. 
Daniel Myers, two of the school's 
best athletes, will compete in the 
finals of the household and needle- 
work contest. There is quite some 
talk as to the final outcome, but we 
can be sure the best man will win. 
Both of the contestants are in good 
condition? as they have been practic- 
ing for considerable time. Every- 
body is invited to attend this meet, 
which will be held on the baseball 
diamond on the next 29th of Feb- 
ruary. 



Marvels of Science 

If a man were to take a common 
sewing needle up in an airplane to 
the altitude of seventy miles, nine 
inches, then drop it, the heat gener- 
ated by its friction with the air in 
its downward course would be great 
enough to convert all the water in 
Lake Superior into steam. 



The Young Innocent 

"You ought to have seen Mr. 
Marshall when he called upon Sis 
the other night," remarked Johnny 
to his sister's beau, who was taking 
dinner with the family. "I tell you 
he looked fine a-sitting along-side 
of her, with his arm " 

"Johnny!" gasped his sister, her 
face the color of a boiled lobster. 

"Well so he did," persisted John- 
ny. "He had his arm " 

"John!" screamed his mother 
frantically. 

"Why", whined the boy, "I 
was " 

"John," said his father sternly, 
"leave the room !" 

And Johnny left, crying as he 
went: "I was only going to say 
that he had his army clothes on." 



Helpful Advice 

Doctor — "It's nothing to worry 
about, merely a little boil on the 
back of the neck. But keep your 
eye on it." 

American Legion Weekly. 



"Flower in the crannied wall, 

I pluck you out of the crannies, 
I hold you here, root and all, in my 
hand, 
Little flower — but if I could un- 
derstand 
What you are, root and all, and all 
in all, 
I should know what God and man 
is." Tennyson. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 29 



^OOOOOOOQOO(X)OOOOOOOC)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOi 

Store Opens 7:00 A. M. Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 

Saturday 10 P. M. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of the girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 
ioooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>OOOOOCXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX}OOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXXX>0000000$ 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 
J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Fays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



?o OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ' 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H, Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Gentral Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 

Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Elizabethtown Chroicle 

Multiple Magazine Linotype Equipment 

JOB PRINTING 

See Our Press Print and Fold Them 

GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 




^I^llent work fair prices 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 

Sara Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

Remember — 18 West High Street 

For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 

Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York--Chicago--Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



J. W. ZARP088 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



Buch Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 



THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



Electric Wiring 
House Wiring 



Fixture Repairing 
Contract Work 



MECHANICSBURG 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

L. L. LININGER 



We Save You Money on Wiring and 
Fixtures 



25 Per Cent. Discount on All Fixtures 



24 W. Marble St., MECHANICSBURG 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

HornafiUs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222M N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 

Wholesale Sugar House 

318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Contections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHONOGRAPHS 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtoi 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 
ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. TRINK 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. NUsly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L.. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Heist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prise Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 

Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



limii!l!B!ll!IB!IUII 



IIHIIIIHIflinillllllBIMIIIIMim 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



m 

m 



■iiiiiniiinii 



an □ i b i 



i m. 



S S B ■ ■ ■ ■ 

.■■■■■ ■ r.:::r.j:;;^.;;.:- 



o s e 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Paslurizcd Milk and Creamsry Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 

THE 



122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF CQMPQ. BOOKS,. 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS v ., 

FINE STATIONERY 
PRINTING -. 
SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W. King St., . .."'. Lancaster 



GARBER GARAGE 



Bell Phone 43R2 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Ind. Phone 60SA 



FORD and FORDSON 

Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOQOOOGOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

KLEIN'S 
Milk Chocolate 

And 

Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 



ooooooooooooooooooooooooc>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

QOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQQQOQGQQQQQQQQOQQOQOQQOQQQQQQQGQQQQQQQQGi 



THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 




Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 



$5.5® 



In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 



No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 



tOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOTOOOOOCXXdOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^ 



~v^C ■','#£ 



0wr 

eOLLEBETDW 



n 




APRIL 
1922 






HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

MISSIMER 8c YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 



MEM 5 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

AH Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 
Come and be convinced. 

This is The Place for You to SAVE 

MONEY! 

o 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOCXdOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOCX)OOOOOOOOOOOCXXX>3000000000000000000000000CXX)0000 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suit*, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

CXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXX)CXXXX9000000000000000 

^ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocx>ooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

> OOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO < 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, -:- PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L. Geyer 
Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



GANSMAN'S LUMBER 



S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 

Stamps 



AND 



MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 

MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^ 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



DIRECTORS 
Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 
Monroe H. Metzler 



R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 

iOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO < 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



J. T. SNYDER 



Florin, Penna. 



GO TO 



HORSTS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 
Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

—AND— 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St., Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



> OOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOO<XXXXX)^^ 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

EL'ZABETHTOWN, PA. 

> oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo t 




Write or Phone to 

FEY BONNET SUPPLY CO. 

Lititz, Penna. Bell-139R2 



For FREE catalogue of Ready-Made 
bonnets, bonnet-makers supplies 
and covering goods samples. 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisbnrg, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 



Fresh, Fancy and Staple Groceries, Candies and Lunch Goods 

'The Little Store With Big Business" 

LEVI C. HERSHEY, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

HSE!2IB»E9H£aBBBBBIBB!lt%&!B?Ea9Ba 



Butter and Condensed Milk 

HERSHEY CONDENSING CO. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, :: PENNA. 



WHALEN & WHALEN 
Specialists in Fitting Glasses 

2nd Floor McCrory Bldg., 

17 East King Street, 

LANCASTER, PA. 




COLLEGE HILL 
DAIRY 



GO TO 



Pure Milk and Cream 

Delivered Daily 



S. G. Graybill 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



guy r 1 1 \ 1 1 -: r 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 
FOR 

SHOES OF QUALITY 

GO TO 

EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 

BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store" 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watche», 
Ivory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 



MRS. W. S. MORGAN, Proprietoret., 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COM L- 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

Furnish The 

APPETITE 

And We Will Do The Rest 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



FREYMEYER'S BAKERY 
EHzabethtown, Pa. 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 

LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



Increase Profits by Liming 
Your Soil. 
White Lily Brand 99% Cal. Carbon- 
ate Lime Will Fill Your 
Requirements. 
LANDIS STONE MEAL COMPANY 
Rheems, Penna. 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGQOOGOOOOOOQGOOOOOOOOOOOa 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

Farm Implements and Repairs 



Your Patronage Solicited 



I 

Bdi p h h°o n ne 6 6f-R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

oooooooooooooooooocxxxxxxxxx>oooooooooooooooooc>ooooooooooooooi 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)CX>OOOOOOGOOOOOOOOQQOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOQOOOOOOOS 

THE BEE HIVE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



Dry Goods, Notions 

AND FANCY GOODS 



Hosiery and Underwear 

ALWAYS THE LATEST 
in our 

Gent's Furnishing Department 



Visit Our Grocery Department 

"FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



BEST OF CANDIES 

We endeavor to keep a most complete line in stock at all 
times and respectfully solicit your patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 

Something New Every Day 
Cor. S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo c 



©ur College ZLimes 

Volume XIX APRIL Number 7 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtown 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

Elsie Landis 
College News j_ D Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 

J. S. Harley J. Z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Editorials 



Conscience or Crowd 

Every normal person wants to do 
the right. On College Hill this may 
be seen in our Societies, in our Wel- 
fare and Volunteer meetings. Who is 
not moved by a noble impulse when 
a sincere person contributes con- 
structively to any organization? 

Alumni, may we whisper a word 
to you? Recently certain members 
of your number out of their poverty 
donated certain gifts to this institu- 
tion. If you could fully realize the 
thrill that students experience when 
such gifts are given you would un- 
doubtedly join the ranks of these 
givers. The crowd says "get" while 
conscience says "give." 

Shall we be slaves to the crowd? 
Must we cater to their wishes even 
though we differ with them? Dr. 
Eastman says, "The fear of what 
They might say is often sufficient to 
drown the voice of duty and make 
us ashamed of our noble impulses. 

They make cowards of us. We 
should like to patch up that quarrel 
with the old friend, but we are a- 
fraid They will say we are weaken- 
ing. 

We should like to tell So-and-So 
in the spirit of friendship that we 
think he is making a fool of himself, 
that he isn't living up to the best 
there is in him, that he is going to 
wake up some day and find himself 
on the moral dump-heap, but we are 
afraid They will say we are intrud- 
ing. 



We should like to give a helping 
hand to a stranger, but we are afraid 
They will say we are forward. 

We should like to discontinue 
some of the ways we have fallen in- 
to but we are afraid somebody will 
say something, — call us "goody 
goody" or say we are getting con- 
verted, — and of course we could 
never stand that. 

We should like to stand out in our 
school and young people's gather- 
ings everywhere for standards that 
are high and clean, — but what will 
They say! 

The path of service is a rugged 
path, but those who climb it are 
assured of ultimate victory. Dr. A. 
tells the story of a Mr. B. and his 
fight at Harvard. He entered Har- 
vard College when the moral stand- 
ard among many of the students was 
low. Ideals were in the shadow. 
Character was a romantic thing 
for the sentimental only. But young 
Mr. B. lived his four years squarely 
and steadily, keeping the best to the 
front and making his life count by 
way of example and influence. It 
was up-hill work, but one by one 
other men took the same stand; and 
when Class Day of his senior year 
came and the class wished to ac- 
knowledge the strongest one of them 
all, and the man who had done most 
to tone up the life of the College, 
they singled out Mr. B. and gave 
him their united honor. 

They may call you "fool" now; 
your best friends may call you 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



"fool" but if the experience of the 
past is valid, your children will 
call you "Saint" and their judgment 
will be right. You may not be pop- 
ular; but you will be respected. You 
may not always have the most pleas- 
ant time in the world, but you will 
be useful." 



Shifters 

"Shifter" is a variable term to- 
day. It may apply to anything 
from a railroad engine to a student 
in college. The name might indi- 
cate almost anything, — good, bad, 
or indifferent, — but the recent fad 
styled the "Shifters" assumed rather 
awkard and absurd proportions in 
some localities much to the chagrin 
of some of its participants. 

Surprising, is it not, that a blind 
movement, like a hurricane, should 
sweep a continent from coast to 
coast in a week or less, taking every- 
thing in its wake, — hamlet, city, 



and rural district? More surprising 
still is the fact that the schools and 
colleges of the land, — instead of 
withstanding the storm and its de- 
moralizing influence, — fell in its 
wake, increasing the acceleration. 
But most surprising of all it is to 
find that the storm center should be 
located in a prominent and leading 
university of the East. It would 
have been far less surprising had it 
sprung from a poor-house or a re- 
formatory. Inmates of a poor-house 
might have some excuse for trying 
to get something for nothing." 

Whatever may have been the 
motive in creating the fad, fear of 
being dubbed a "poor .sport" was 
probably the paroxysm that seized 
upon the heart of its victims. Col- 
leges and universities that boast of 
their enlightenment could better 
prove their boast by running counter 
to a "shifters" movement, than by 
instigation or by quiet and calm ac- 
quiesence. 



IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS 



April 21 — Junior Oratorical Contest, 8 P. M., College Chapel 
APRIL 24 — SPRING NORMAL OPENS. 
April 28 — Intercollegiate Debate, 8 P. M., College Chapel. 
May 12 — Spring Cantata, 8 P. M., Town Hall. 
May 19 — Intersociety Debate, 8 P. M., College Chapel. 
June 4 — Baccalaureate Sermon, 7:30 P. M., College Chapel. 
June 5 — Music Program, 8 P. M., College Chapel. 
June 6 — Educational Program, 8 P. M., College Chapel. 
June 7 — Class Day Exercises, 2 P. M., College Chapel. 
June 7 — Public Alumni Program, 8 P. M., College Chapel. 
June 8 — Commencement Exercises, 9:00 A. M., College Chapel. 
JUNE 19— SUMMER SCHOOL OPENS. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Xtterarv 



Crumbs From the Rich Man's Table 

The America of Today and 

Tomorrow — by Newell 

Dwight Hillis 

No other nation ever made so 
much progress as America. All her 
progress is based on the Bible. 

Every man must be his own priest, 
his own cardinal; must think, speak 
and act for himself industrially, poli- 
tically and religiously. 

When the cheap land of America 
is all gone, the Huns and Vandals 
will rise up from our mines and loot 
out cities. 

Intelligent men and women do 
not care for compliments, but they 
will pay cash for true criticism. 

America stands ninth in education 
of her people. Education is wealth. 
Raw material cannot bring a great 
price unless education is used with 
it. 

Wisdom is better than rubies be- 
cause wisdom can manufacture rub- 
ies. 

We need men like Edison and 
Burbank to use brains in the service 
of mankind. 

Twenty people in a hundred in 
United States are illiterate. 

Do not under-estimate study. 
You can't put too much stress on 
obedience to the laws of God and 
sound learning. 

We have been producing things 
and hiring scholars. 

Bad in America is growing worse. 
Good in America, growing better. 



Little by little we become over- 
brained and underbodied. The 
brain shakes the body to pieces. 

Many a young man explodes his 
own ideas while the back kick 
knocks his own brains out. 

Nothing tests a country like its 
typical building. Ours is the luna- 
tic asylum. 

Read widely 

Think profoundly 

Keep faith in great convictions. 



Checking Up 

A colored boy walked into a lo- 
cal drug store and asked permission 
to use the telephone ; then he called 
up Mr. Jones and the following con- 
versation took place : — 

"Is dat you Mistah Jones?" 

"Yes." 

"Well Mistah Jones, did you get 
a colored boy to answer your ad?" 

"Yes." 

"Is he giving perfect satisfac- 
tion?" 

"Yes." 

"Well Mistah Jones providin' 
this colored boy don't give satisfac- 
tion, you call me at 504." 

The colored boy turned and start- 
ed out when the druggist who had 
overheard the conversation remark- 
ed. 

"You didn't do any good, did 
you?" 

"Yas Sir," came the reply "Fse 
dat boy dat's workin' down there 
and Fse just checkin' up." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



Prize Winning Oration of Homerian 

Contest 

True Patriotism 

What is true patriotism? Is it 
the shouting of hurrahs, the beating 
of drums, the tramping of martial 
feet? Or is it hoisting the flag 
openly while secretly locking up 
coal in the mines, storing up food- 
stuffs for a higher price, while wom- 
en and children suffer from cold and 
hunger? 

We think that a man must wave 
a flag, that he must fight, that he 
must die in order to be partiotic, 
while secretly he can indulge in pro- 
fiteering, oppress the poor, be a 
menance to society, and yet be 
called patriotic. 

What, then, is true patriotism? 
Every American knows how nobly 
our forefathers fought, bled, and 
died on the fields of battle; how 
they suffered hardship and endured 
pain. But to what purpose? — that 
they and their posterity might en- 
joy economic, intellectual and relig- 
ious liberty. They fought for the 
eternal principles of truth and free- 
dom. They were true patriots. 
Merely because they fought? No! 
But because they had the moral 
courage, the backbone, to stand for 
that which was dearer to them than 
life itself — liberty. That spirit was 
the germ of true patriotism. 

,True patriotism is living construc- 
tively for one's country. True 
patriotism is building good homes. 
C. T. Blanchard, a statistician of 
the Government Reclamation Ser- 
vice, said that sixty per cent of the 



American people may be classed as 
forces of disorder and discontent, 
socially and otherwise, because they 
have no homes. This nation needs 
more patriotic men and women to 
build good Christian homes, who 
will bequeath to the future, children 
that have physical vigor, moral sta- 
mina and an unfailing grip on things 
divine. Men and women who are 
today living clean, spiritual lives 
and who transmit to their children 
good, sound, healthy bodies and 
minds are truly patriotic and are a 
blessing to this nation. Men and 
women who, in their disregard for 
the future, transmit to. their chil- 
dren weak bodies, weak wills, and 
weak minds are not only not patri- 
otic, but are a curse to this nation. 
The first impulse of patriotism and 
morality is germinated, nurtured 
and largely, if not entirely, devel- 
oped in the family circle. How im- 
portant then is the home to the na- 
tion ! A Roman orator once said 
that the Empire was at the fireside 
and when the homes of the Roman 
Empire was destroyed, Rome fell. 
The home builder is a true patriot. 

True patriotism means serving the 
state, lifting up the ideals of the 
American people and inspiring all 
men to grasp the sublime principles 
of truth and right. This requires 
education. A true patriot will see 
to it that the United States will not 
stand ninth among the nations of the 
world in education. The people of 
the^United States must come to real- 
ize that the teachers hold the key 
which keeps the doors of civilization 
open. They must be regarded with 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



respect and be given remuneration 
in proportion to their importance in 
society. America must see to it that 
not more immigrants come into this 
country than we can absorb, and 
must make impossible the coming of 
undesirable immigrants. 

A true patriot will, serve his city 
his state, his nation to the best of 
his ability. He will do nothing for 
his own selfish ends, but everything 
he does will be for the greatest good 
to the greatest number. Here the 
nation's problems will be his prob- 
lems. The nation's sorrows will be 
his sorrows. The nation's joys will 
be his joys. A true patriot will 
work for a high standard of ethics 
to be established in this country. 
He must be a true follower of Chitist 
in order to do this. He must base 
his ethics on Christian principles. 

We have some patriots who are 
always ready to spend millions of 
dollars and sacrifice many lives for 
the sake of a few citizens who have 
been killed by another nation. But 
where are they when millions of 
people die of disease and starvation 
and become morally blind because 
of ignorance? How much money 
do they appropriate to avenge the 
death of these victims? And yet 
they are called patriots. 

The true patriot, is the one who 
gives his money, his time and his 
rery life to remedy these evils, to 
satisfy hunger and prevent disease 
and crime. He loves his fellowmen 
more than he loves himself. He 
eases pain and brings joy and hap- 
piness to the lives of all he meets. 
He gives all for his country. Liv- 



ing in Christ he has lost sight of the 
mean, low, selfish things. His is the 
true patriotic service. 

True patriotism in the last analy- 
sis is the evangelization of the 
world. America in order to save 
herself must save the world. We 
must give America, her principles 
of Liberty and Christianity, the fun- 
damental truths upon which she was 
founded, to the world. The Chin- 
ese, Japanese, Africans, Filipinos 
and Mexicans need America. The 
true patriot will give her to them. 

True patriotism catches its inspi- 
ration from God, is fostered and de- 
veloped in the home, spreads over 
this nation and extends to the far- 
thest ends of the world. • This high, 
sublime emotion, which spreads its 
wings and soars toward heaven, 
leaving far below pride, vanity and 
egotism, is enveloped by the thought 
of the good and glory of one's coun- 
try. That patriotism which leaves 
behind all smaller, lesser, personal 
interests and feelings, which ani- 
mates and arouses men to deeds of 
self-sacrifice, of valor and devotion, 
— that is the noblest, the sublimest 
of all public virtues. D. B. 



April 

The bills descend like April show- 
ers 
On my umbrella. Here's the bill for 
that, 
And here's the florist's bill for 
Easter flowers, 
And the milliner's for Helen's Easter 
hat. Arthur Gimterman. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



SPRING AND ITS DELIGHTS 

*'Oh, such a commotion under the ground 

When March called, "Ho! there! ho!" 
Such spreading- of rootlets far and wide, 

Such whispering- to and fro; 
And, "Are you ready," the snowdrop asked, 

"Tis time to start you know." 
"Almost my dear," the Scilla replied; 

"I'll follow as soon as you go." 
Then, "Ha! ha! ha!" c. chorus came 

Of laughter soft and low, 
From the millions of flowers under the 
ground — 

Yes, millions beginning to grow. 

"I'll promise my blossoms," the crocus said, 

"When I hear the bluebirds sing." 
A.nd straight thereafte , Narcissus cried, 

"My silver and gold I'll bring." 
"And are they dulled," another spoke, 

"The hyacinth bells shall ring." 
And the violet only murmured, "I'm here," 

And sweei giiew the air of spring. 
Then "Ha! ha! ha!" a chorus came 

Of laughter scft and low 
From the millions of flowers under the 
ground — 

Yes, millions — beginning t® grow. 

"Oh, the pretty brave things! thru the cold- 
est days, 
Imprisoned in walls of brown, 
They never lost heart tho the blast shriek- 
ed loud, 
And the sleet and hail came clown, 
But patiently each wrought her beautiful 
dress, 
Or fashioned her beautiful crown: 
And now they are coming to brighten the 
world, 
Still shadowed by Winter's frown; 
And well may thev cheerily laugh, "Ha ! 
Ha!" 
In a chorus soft and low, 
The millions ef flowers hid under the 
ground — 
Yes, millions — beginning to grow." 

Spring, the most delightful time 
of all the year, with its new life is 
coming to us again. It is then when 
nature all around us is rejoicing, 
when humanity after being confined 
indoors can again go back to the 
heart of nature. The soft white 
mantle that covered mother earth 
during the winter has given ample 
protection to the sleeping flowers, 



but now the silver rains and the gol- 
den sun are calling them forth from 
their winter's repose. There is 
pleasure and joy all around. All 
nature is happy in the anticipation 
of coming forth into newness of life, 
and who is not ready to fall in line 
and be in harmony with nature? 

At dawn when the first rays of 
the sun are peeping over the hill, 
the robin with breast so red is al- 
ready warbling his merry song, call- 
ing the world* from her night's re- 
pose. To the Irishman his dear old 
Tipperary seemed greater that ever 
in the spring, as he sang: 

"Oh, sweet is TippeTary in the 
spring time of the year, 

When the hawthorne's whiter than 
the snow. 

When the feathered folk assemble, 
and the air is all a tremble 

With their singing and their swing- 
ing to and fro." 

Who does not enjoy hearing the 
brave little bluebird cheerily sing- 
ing his merry song; or the thrush, 
his melody of full, rich tones; or the 
lark with its throat running over 
with the praises it is sending up on 
high? 

And who does not enjoy taking 
a walk out across the fields and 
along the hillside under the blue 
canopy of heaven? What beauties 
there are to behold ! The soft pussy- 
willows have answered the call of 
the south wind and arrived early. 
The daffodils are also seen nodding 
their golden heads in the breeze 
along the hillside. The fragrant ar- 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



butus is blossoming alone in the 
wood. The blue hepatica and the 
purple violet also lend their artistic 
touch to the splendor all around us; 
and the dandelion, that dear com- 
mon flower, is fringing the hillside 
and roadside with gold. Everything 
responds to this great new life of 
the spring. 

On the whole, poets and all stu- 
dents of nature have not been suc- 
cessful in depicting the wonderful 
beauty of spring. Words are in- 
adequate to describe the soft blue 
sky, the fresh spring odor, the 
beauty of the landscape, the flowers, 
and the trees, and the constant 
change that is taking place as every 
day brings something new from the 
season's store of mysteries and se- 
crets. Ralph Waldo Emerson says: 

"The rounded world is fair to see, 
Nine times folded in mystery : 
Though baffled seers cannot impart 
The secret of its laboring heart. 
Throb thine with Nature's throbbing 

breast; 
And all is clear from east to west. 
Spirit that lurks each form within 
Beckons to spirit of its kin; 
Self-kindled every atom glows, 
And hints the future which it owes." 

M. M. 



Polly's littte sister (entertaining 
Polly's beau), "O, Jack, guess what 
dad said about you last night!" 

jack — "I haven't an idea in the 
world," 

Little sister — "O, shame! You 
listned." Oral Hygiene. 



The Necessity of Early Guidance in 
Habit Formation 

During the late war, in every pub- 
lic building, on every thoroughfare, 
in every newspaper, magazine and 
postal impress, we read, "Save 
coal," "Save sugar," "Thrift," "Ec- 
onomy" and expressions of kindred 
import. Why? Because the Ameri- 
can people as a whole had not form 
ed habits of thrift and economy 
before our great nation was in the 
midst of a terrible war. Or perhaps 
at the time when guidance would 
have formed these desirable habits 
those under whose care we were, 
were unconcerned. 

It is an undisputed fact that hab- 
it is fundamental to all life. Were 
we not the happy possessors of hab- 
its we would be at the complete mer- 
cy of our environment. Habit is a 
dynamic for retardation or progress, 
for a degenerate character or an un- 
swerving pillar of morality. 

Figuratively speaking, we are all 
endowed with the machinery for 
habit formation. In the scientific 
world there is no machine which 
does not demand some attention or 
guidance, and still it is only an inor- 
ganic, inanimate invention of man. 
But when it comes to a mechanism 
of divine origin and immortal dura- 
bility, we are content to let it func- 
tion in fashions often unknown to 
itself. We would not plant a 
crooked apple twig, because we say 
it will grow into a crooked tree. We 
would not plant a diseased grain of 
corn, because we want a crop of 
hardy corn. Nevertheless we liter- 
ally allow our children early in life 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



to form "crooked" habits of think- 
ing, living and acting, and say noth- 
ing about it, until perhaps later 
when the innocent child has become 
the victim of his undesirable habits. 
Then we would straighten the crook, 
erace the blot, or cover the scar, but 
nine times out of ten it is then too 
late. 

Happy is the child whose parents, 
teachers and friends appreciate the 
need of early guidance in the for- 
mation of his habits, — habits which 
shall largely determine his rank 
among men in his later life. Happy 
is the child whose instructors know 
that in order to save coal, sugar and 
money we must first save through 
education. We would save our sug- 
ar, our coal, and our money, — all of 
which is commendable — but yet we 
allow much waste in education out 
of which the early formation of hab- 
its develops or unfolds. 

May the day be not far distant 
when we shall not only see on all 
public bill boards "Save coal," 
"Save sugar," but also "Guide your 
boy's education by helping him to 
form the right habits early." When 
a slogan like this is adopted and 
rigidly practiced, the details of rash, 
not fill our morning papers and the 
inhuman, and uncivilized crimes will 
statistics revealed by our intelli- 
gence tests will not cause us to shud- 
der; but our America will be a 
cleaner, safer, and saner 'Utopia.' 

— S. O. 



"The proud will not inherit the 
earth, only its ill-will." 



Fishing For Wildcats 

A fisherman's hen-roost had been 
visited by a wildcat. As these prec- 
ious fowls were conducive to a large 
part of his sustenance, the havoc 
wrought by this carnivorous animal 
proved to be quite disastrous both 
to the welfare of the hens and to 
the man's struggles to maintain an 
independent starvation. Did I say 
"independent starvation?" ah yes, 
'tis all too true. This ingenious and 
persistent, but ill-fated hero of the 
shoals and eddies sojourned in a 
ramshackle hut on the shore of Bay 
Rum, an insignificant indentation of 
the vast Atlantic. Even the envir- 
onment of the fisherman seemed to 
harmonize with his state of useless- 
ness. His means of livelihood grew 
more unprofitable as years went by. 
The catches were becoming fewer 
and the cunning fish were growing 
wiser and were eluding the sweep- 
ing net. So you can readily per- 
ceive that these hens meant a great 
deal to him by virtue of the fact 
that they laid many eggs and con- 
tributed nutritious flesh, both of 
which together reduced his expen- 
ses by a considerable degree. 

The fisherman could not afford 
these losses; so to put an end to the 
rampages of the wildcat, he baited 
a big hook and fastened it to one 
end of a long rope ; the other end he 
tied to his wrist when he went to 
bed. Morpheus, the god of slum- 
bers, entwined him in his encircling 
arms, and the fisherman slept in 
happy anticipation. 

When the somber shades of night 
descended, the hungry wildcat 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



stealthily crept upon his prey. Be- 
fore the animal reached the roost 
it saw a large morsel of meat. Not 
knowing about the snare, the wild- 
cat gulped down bait and hook, like 
a gourmand, and waked the fisher- 
man, who began to pull in his catch 
as he would when out in his boat. 
But this animal was not to be hand- 
led thus. When the frenzied ani- 
mal felt the pull, it ran towards its 
captor, sensing his direction by the 
pull of the rope. It climbed a vine. 
leaped into the room, and confront- 
ed its amazed captor. 

The fisherman in this predica- 
ment did some lively thinking and, 
remembering that music is reputed 
to charm savage natures, he grasped 
an antique mandolin and proceed- 
ed to charm the enraged creature 
by dashing the instrument over its 
head, while it was endeavoring to 
extract itself from the meshes of the 
entangled rope. The fisherman did 
not employ the prescribed method 
of producing enchantment by a 
musical instrument, but his method 
was more effective in this particular 
instance. He did not charm the 
savage creature, but instead he in- 
cased the head of the wildcat in the 
mandolin. Dodging the blind leaps 
of the wildcat, he managed to throw 
the rope over the head of the old- 
fashioned bed and in so doing sus- 
pended the struggling animal there 
to emit its last gasp. 

When the wildcat had succumb- 
ed, the fisherman skinned it and 
secured a high price for the beauti- 
ful pelt; thus he was amply paid for 
his adventure. R. B. 



The Sin of Gambling 

The death of King Saul in his 
conflict with the Philistines forms 
the final chapter in one of the 
world's great tragedies. Saul was 
the son of a noble family, possessed 
attainments and qualities which 
peculiarly fitted him for kingship 
in Israel, faced a life bright with 
hope and full of promise. He was 
anointed king over Israel and be- 
came their champion and leader in 
battle. The day came when he for- 
got God, sought strange sources for 
advice and inspiration and took re- 
fuge in his own strength. His life 
of high endeavor became ignoble 
in its results and finally the sword, 
which was the symbol of his regal 
power and of all constructive and 
righteous forces in his own life, be- 
came the instrument of his own de- 
struction. 

The story of this sad caicer very 
well illustrates the moral fact that 
so often our grossest sins are but the 
perversion of virtues. Qualities in- 
tended to bring us success, power, 
achievement and mental and spirit- 
ual growth are misdirected, abused 
and prostituted, thus becoming the 
means of our own defeat and de- 
spair. The sin of gambling is this 
kind of vice. The love of taking a 
chance, inherent in human nature, 
has often been the dynamo urging 
men and women to stake not only 
their money, time or possessions, 
but their very lives, for the purpose 
of reaching a noble and worthy end. 
Thus the world has enjoyed the 
work of a Columbus, a Harvey, an 
Edison, a Livingstone, etc. Now 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



when this same love for taking 
chances is used to while away the 
time or to play for stakes, it is di- 
verted from its real end to ends that 
are low, trivial and unworthy. 
Therein lies the curse of gambling. 
The faculty of man's being intended 
to be one of his strongest allies be- 
comes the implement of his own de- 
struction. The dazzling allurement 
of the game table so enslaves him 
that he is finally induced to sell his 
property and to surrender his self- 
respect to attain objects unworthy 
of real manhood. 

Furthermore, gambling affects 
the student in another way. One of 
the most valuable possessions the 
student has is leisure. At no other 
period of life will so much leisure be 
intrusted to him. The use of this 
time becomes one of his greatest 
opportunities and also one of his 
greatest responsibilities. To sur- 
render this privilege for the un- 
worthy ends of the gambler is to 
sin against his own future and to 
place a mortgage on his potentiality 
which will be foreclosed with un- 
erring certainty. The library con- 
tains the sifted treasures of the ages, 
the best thought of all time brought 
within easy reach ; the fields and 
hills beckon to healthful recreation 
or scientific interest ; the playground 
or gymnasium offers advantages 
for physical diversion, — yet the 
gambler spurns these for the in- 
dulgence of his misdirected desires, 
bringing him the gratifications of 
the moment which he prefers to the 
satisfactions of the future which 
would necessitate self-discipline, 



self-denial and the proper use of 
his time for useful ends. 

Again, the gambler is deceived 
into believing that it is possible to 
get something for nothing — a be- 
lief that is contrary to sound eco- 
nomic principles, that has been re- 
sponsible for many forms of social 
and political exploitation. The 
youth who thus deceives him- 
self is building on the sand — a 
structure erected on such a founda- 
tion cannot endure. These funda- 
mental objections to the indulgence 
in this practice should be sufficient 
to convince young men and women 
of the folly of devoting either time 
or energy in an activity which tends 
to destroy individuality and under- 
mine character. 

I. S. Hoffer 



IT IS NOT EASY— 

To apologize. 
To begin again. 
To take advice. 
To admit mistakes. 
To be considerate. 
To endure success. 
To obey conscience. 
To think, and then act. 
To be content with little. 
To accept just rebukes gracefully. 
To value character above mere 
reputation. 

But it pays. — Selected 



Education begins the gentleman, 
but reading, good company, and re- 
flection must finish him J. Locke. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



College Iftews 



Prof. Baugher (In Physics) — 
Mr. Bechtel, you tell the class what 
a plumb line is. 

Mr. Bechtel — Do they know what 
a bob is? 



Student — Isn't Mr. Stauffer's 
work fine. 

Miss Horst — Don't say that, I 
feel flattered. 



The students recently enjoyed 
several splendid chapel talks and a 
very interesting illustrated lecture 
by Captain Owen Wiard. 



The Welfare Associations had a 
joint meeting on the evening of 
March 31. A very interesting as 
well as instructive program was en- 
joyed by all who were present. 



Dr. McCuaig of New York gave a 
series of talks on "Social Purity" 
during the last week of March in 
the town churches and in the Col- 
lege Chapel. We believe that his 
work will tell in future as well as 
present generations. 



A sacred cantata entitled "Jeph- 
thah" will be rendered at 8 P. M. on 
the evening of May 12 in the Mar- 
ket House Hall by the College Chor- 
us Class. All lovers of music are 
cordially invited to attend. 



On March 10 Mr. Zimmerman, a 
Lebanon banker, gave an excellent 
address on "Modern Banking" to 



the Y. M. W. A. Valuable suggest- 
ions were given as to the methods 
and benefits of modern banking. 



The Music Department gave a 
splendid program on the evening of 
March 17. The friends of the school 
were very well entertained by both 
vocal and instrumental music. Prof. 
E. G. Meyer is the head of the vocal 
music department and Miss A. Gert- 
rude Royer is the teacher in instru- 
mental music. 



The Homerian Oratorical Con- 
test was held recently. The Chapel 
was filled with students, friends 
and patrons of the College. Mr. 
David F. Brightbiil, a student teach- 
er, received first prize ; Mr. Samuel 
Fahnestock received second prize; 
and Mr. Melvin Shisler, third prize. 
The judges were Prof. Conway and 
Rev. Yoder of Elizabethtown, and 
Rev. Schaum of Lancaster, Pa. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. Walter Thomas 
and family have moved to Mary- 
land, their former home. Mr. 
Thomas has been the steward at 
the College this year. They enter- 
tained the Homerian Quartet a few 
evenings ago. The boys report hav- 
ing had a very pleasant evening. 
They have also entertained at diff- 
erent times almost all the girls of 
College Hill. The girls had a jolly 
good time making taffy, fudge, and 
marshmallows. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



IRelicupus Botes 



All Day Meeting at Stevens Hill 

On Sunday, April 2, an all day 
meeing was held at Stevens Hill. 
We had been looking forward to 
this event with a great deal of pleas- 
ure knowing that it would be a day 
of Christian fellowship and spiritual 
feasting. 

As the day dawned it was with 
some uncertainty that we noticed 
the sun peeping from behind heavy 
clouds, but within a few hours we 
knew that it would be a bright day. 

An invitation having been given 
to the students, at about nine o'clock 
a truck load of them were on the 
way. Lunch had been provided and 
nothing seemed to be lacking. As 
usual we were welcomed by the Ste- 
vens Hill folk and made to feel very 
much at home. The morning ser- 
vice was opened by Elder W. H. 
Miller, pastor of the Stevens Hill 
congregation. Professor H. K. Ober 
and G. N. Falkenstein delivered two 
very good sermons. Dinner was 
served at twelve, and at two the 
afternoon session began. At this 
time the Sunday School children 
rendered an Easter program. We 
were glad to have as our guests the 
Newville Sunday School. We be- 
lieve that this part of the day's pro- 
gram was enjoyed to the full by all 
who were present. 

Lunch was served at four o'clock 
and as the evening service did not 



begin until six thirty we walked to 
the river near by and were inspired 
by the beauty of nature on every 
hand. 

The greater part of the evening 
was spent in singing. Later, Prof- 
A. C. Baugher delivered a sermon 
on ''The Message of the Cross," 
which was especially good. 

We left the little church house 
tired but happy, feeling that God 
had been there and had blessed us 
richly. 

I. R, M. 



Chapel Echoes 

It is in proportion as we do our 
work now that we will do it later. 
Our work in later years will only 
be a crystallization of our daily du- 
ties. The successful man has taken 
his weaknesses and made of them 
rungs in the ladder. The man who 
is a failure is the one crushed by his 
weaknesses. 

It is necessary not only to form 
the habit of being neat, accurate, 
careful and honest when it is re- 
quired but to form the habit of 
desiring to be neat, accurate, care- 
ful and honest. What can an in- 
dividual accomplish, without a pas- 
sion for his work! Lack of passion 
in one's work is the cause of much 
of the mediocre work in the world. 

J. G. Meyer. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



As long as we have a friend who 
says, "Try again," that long there 
are chances that we will succeed. 

If at' first you don't succeed, try, 
try again. J. G. Meyer. 



Let us love in deed and in truth. 

God takes the initiative in the 
temptations we suffer, for a great 
purpose, — to give us larger life and 
to help up to accomplish more good. 

We cannot always understand the 
significance of the*tests in our lives. 

In the face of temptation we are 
given one of the greatest opportuni- 
ties to glorify God. 

Armenian sufferers would not 
raise a finger to denounce Christ. 
They maintained their integrity for 
the sake of Christ and the truth. 

God tests us to show to the world 
how a faithful, godly person can 
suffer. 

The friendship of Jesus is worth 
while, because it helps us to over- 
come trials, and to endure sorrows. 

Ezra Wenger 



The one supreme business is the 
business of laying foundations for 
those who follow after us. 

Christ gave himself for unborn 
generations to the end of time. 

They never die who live for those 
who come after them. 

All advance lies along the path 
of self-control. 



Individuals should exercise them- 
selves in ability to see that which 
the common eye cannot see ; the 
ability to come into the very pre- 
sence of God and the ability to open 



the eyes to human need. 

Inherent selfishness is a natural 
impediment to progress. 

The things which need a place in 
our lives are the arts of translating 
vision into impulse and allowng im- 
pulse to be translated into compass- 
ion. You may crush compassion, 
but if you do, you will crush the 
God within you. The need of trans- 
lating impulse and compassion into 
service is imperative. 

Dr. McCuaig, New York City. 



Resolutions cf Sympathy 

Whereas our Heavenly Father in 
his mysterious way has seen fit to 
call to his ternal home Elder Abram 
H. Royer, father of our fellow stu- 
dent, Chester H. Royer, be it resol- 
ved, — 

First, That we, the Faculty and 
Students of Elizabethtown College 
express our deep regrets because of 
the calling away of this loving fath- 
er, this faithful minister of the Gos- 
pel, and devout Elder in the Church 
of the Brethren. 

Second, That we extend to Mrs. 
Royer and family our deepest sym- 
pathy in this sore bereavement and 
commend them to God who alone 
can heal the broken-hearted. 

Third, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the bereaved fam- 
ily, that they be placed on the Fac- 
ulty Minutes, and that they be pub- 
lished in "Our College Times." 
Elizabeth Myer,. 
Clarence Sollenberger 
Minnie M. Myer, 

Committee 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 




The Class of 1909, composed of 
twelve ladies and nine gentlemen, 
represents seven courses. A. P. 
Geib and H. L. Smith completed the 
Pedagogical Course in this year. 
Both these have since become min- 
isters of the gospel. Prof. Geib was 
united in marriage with a Brooklyn 
lady and they are now living at Ver- 
ona, N. J. Prof. Geib is teaching 
in Mont Clair, N. J. Philip Jr. is al- 
so m training under him. H. L. 
Smith won a California bride some 
years ago. The Smiths are serving 
their second term as missionaries at 
Sarhassa, India. There are two chil- 
dren in the family. 

Prof. L. W. Leiter is another min- 
ister of the gospel from the '09 class. 
His enthusiasm and efficiency along 
educational lines have grown with 
the years. He is now professor of 
biology in E'town College and also 
registrar. There are three sons and 
a daughter in the Leiter home. 

H. K. Eby, an educational work- 
er, and G. A.W. Stauffer, an active 
business man, added their share of 
zest to the activities of the '09 class. 
The former is Principal of the Holli- 



daysburg, Pa., High School and the 
latter is teller in the Chambersburg 
National Bank. 

Estella Frantz left- the teaching 
profession a number of years ago 
and became a homemaker as Mrs. 
J. Elmer Martin. Three children 
have come into the home. The Mar- 
tin family is located near Maple 
Grove Park on the outskirts of Lan- 
caster. 

Agnes Ryan Geib and Ella Young 
Kraybill are also homemakers. 
These successful teachers continue 
their interest along educational and 
religious lines in connection with 
their home duties. Mr. Raymond 
Geib, wife, and son Stanley live in 
the country and Mr. Geib teaches 
school. The Kraybill family lives 
near Mount Joy. There are two 
children in this home. 

Edith Engle, J. Blaine Ober and 
Edna Wittel completed the Steno- 
graphic Course in '09. Miss Engle's 
home is in our college town and she 
has done clerical work in her 
home. Mr. Ober is cashier and 
bookkeeper for J. E. Schilling Co., 
Miami, Fla. Edna Wittel has been 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



connected with the oil business for 
some years past. She was very suc- 
cessful as an oil specialist in New 
Orleans, La. Her present address 
is 671 No. Wilton Place, Los Ange- 
les, California. We hope to see 
Miss Wittel on College Hill some- 
time this summer after her long ab- 
sence. Her home is at Florin and 
her mother is looking forward to a 
visit from her in June. 

The five graduates in the Regular 
Commercial Course in '09 have all 
continued working along business 
lines. Anna M. Heisey is the only 
one of these who lives in our town 
at present. She is bookeeper for a 
firm in Mount Joy. Abel Maderia 
and family reside in Harrisburg. 
Mr. Maderia is employed in the off- 
ice of the State Workmen's Insur- 
ance. Miles Roth and family are 
located in the city of York where he 
is working as accountant. Joshua 
Reber and his Colorado bride, a 
daughter of Eld. A. G. Crosswhite, 
now of Ind., are now at home at 
3147 Prospect Ave., Cleveland, O. 

Gertrude Miller spent some time 
teaching in McPherson College, 
Kans. She is now doing office work 
for the American Medical Associa- 
tion, Chicago, and is living in the 
apartment of John Luke Hoff and 
wife, 327 So. Central Park Boule- 
vard. 

There was only one graduate 
from the English Bible Course in '09 
and only one in the Piano Course. 

The Class was blessed with musi- 
cians. Viola Withers, now Mrs. 
Francis Olweiler, completed the 
Piano Course. Francis Jr., two years 



of age, is already enjoying some of 
the results of this musical career 
entered upon at our school. After 
leaving the school, she continued 
her work at Combs' Conservatory 
of Music, Phila. 

Elizabeth Kline, now Mrs. An- 
drew M. Dixon, Jennie Miller, now 
Mrs. H. A. Via, and Emma Cash- 
man, now Mrs. Ray Wampler, rep- 
resented the Music Teachers' Course 
in this class. 

Mrs. Wampler and Junior are 
now living in the Fairview Apart- 
ments on College Hill. Mrs. Wamp- 
ler is teacher of drawing and art. 
She completed an Art Course at 
Bridgewater College in '13. The 
ranks of the '09 class have not yet 
been broken by death, but all the 
members of the class have been sad- 
dened by the death of Ray Wamp- 
ler, the husband of their beloved 
class-mate, during the influenza epi- 
demic. They are, however, grati- 
fied to note the splendid work Mrs. 
Wampler is doing in spite of her 
loss. 

Elizabeth Kline Dixon is the wife 
of Eld. A. M. Dixon, pastor of the 
church at Parkerford, Pa. She has 
done much work as musical director 
in that congregation and has even 
filled the pulpit in her husband's ab- 
sence. She is also the fond mother 
of Nancy and Richard Dixon. 

Mrs. H. A. Via was Head of the 
Music Department of the College 
for some years. She may now be 
addressed at Red Hill, Va. She is at 
present very busily engaged in giv- 
ing private piano and voice lessons 
some in the High School Auditorium 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



and some in their home. A number 
of high school pupils improve their 
vacant periods by taking these less- 
ons. Mrs. Via is also choir leader 
and director at the Methodist 
Church. Prof. Via is doing civil ser- 
vice work as rural mail carrier in 
his beloved native state. We trust 
all our Alumni will especially re- 
member Mrs. Via as the writer and 
composer of our College song, so 
dear on College Hill. 



Prof. Ezra Wenger, '18, delivered 
a spicy address on "The Function 
of Opposition" on the occasion of 
the anniversary of the organization 
of the Literary Societies, April 8. 

Carrie Dennis, '13, of our college 
town, continues to give private piano 
lessons in connection with her home 
duties. 

The Alumni family shares the sor- 
row of Sara Royer, '20, and Chester 
Royer, '21, in their loss of a loving 
father, Eld. Abram Royer, Ephrata, 
Pa. ; also a similar loss on the part 
of Maria Myers, '19. John E. My- 
ers passed away very suddenly on 
April 3. 

Paul Robert Hollinger is the wel- 
come newcomer in the home of A. 
C. Hollinger, '10, having arrived 
March 23. 

Mr. Hollinger is an energetic busi- 
ness man. We quote the following 
from a recent letter of his to the edi- 
tor of the 'TIMES" : "Tell the Col- 
lege family that I am in the "Wear- 
ever" aluminum business and if any 
are considering matrimony, I would 
be pleased to equip their kitchens." 
Address, 627 Pine St., Lancaster. 



lEicbangee 



We are pleased to acknowledge 
the receipt of several new college 
publications this month : The Cru- 
cible, Lebanon Valley College; Hav- 
erford News, Haverford College ; 
and The Phoenix, Swarthmore Col- 
lege. The last named contains an 
alumni address by Swarthmore's 
new President, Dr. Aydelotte, in 
which he announces honor courses 
open to students of exceptional abil- 
ity. 

The new staff of the Gettysburg- 
ian recently took charge of this 
publication that comes Weekly from 
the battlefield. 

A goodly number of college maga- 
zines have excellent accounts of al- 
umni banquets and reunions held 
during the winter season. This is 
an excellent way of tying up the 
alumni with their Alma Mater. 

Other exchanges received during 
the month are : The Philomathean, 
Bridgewater College, Va.; Daleville 
Leader, Daleville College, Va.; Col- 
lege Rays, Blue Ridge College, Md. ; 
Ursinus Weekly, Ursinus College, 
Pa.; Juniata Echo, Juniata College, 
Pa. ; College Record, Goshen Col- 
lege, Ind. ; Oak Leaves, Manchester 
College, Ind.; The Spectator, Mc- 
Pherson College, Kansas; Hesston 
College Journal, Kansas; Campus 
Times, La Verne College, California 
Normal School Herald, Shippensb- 
burg, Pa. ; Bethany Bible School Bul- 
letin, Chicago ; The Pattersonian, 
Mt. Joy High School, Pa. ; and Heb- 
ron Seminary Bulletin, Va. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




ILf If HI ; p 





The Juniors having been twice de- 
feated by their upper classmen 
made a desperate attempt to con- 
quer the Seniors in the final game 
of the season. The gymnasium was 
crowded with anxious spectators 
awaiting the outcome. From the 
first sound of the whistle the game 
was a mad rush, full of snap and 
dash. The Juniors were in the pink 
of condition and their flashy passing 
and skilful floor work was telling. 
The Seniors, on the contrary, some- 
how couldn't get together. This 
was evident because at half time the 
Juniors were leading to the tune of 
11-7. The Seniors were determined 
to win and at the beginning of the 
second half they made a desperate 
effort to overtake the Juniors, but to 
no avail. The score was 25-20 in 
favor of the Juniors and five more 
minutes were between the Juniors 
and victory. 

Then came the tragedy; the Seni- 
ors uncorked such a burst of blind- 
ing speed that the Juniors were not 
able to stand on account of the ter- 
rible onslaught. By this time the 
spectators were frantic with ex- 
citement; the cheering was deafen- 
ing; the seniors were gaining, — one 
minute to play and the score was 26 
— 25 in favor of the Juniors. Then 
came the deciding moment when 
the Seniors bagged another two- 



pointer and the Seniors won the 
game 27 — 26. 

Gingrich and Bucher divided the 
shooting honors for the Juniors 
while Myers, £he flashy center, 
starred for the Seniors. This game 
rang down the curtain of the most 
successful basketball season ever 
witnessed at Elizabethtown College. 
Following is the lineup and score : 

Juniors 

Field Foul Pts. 

Bucher, F 5 10 

I. Royer, F 2 1 5 

Gingrich, C 4 1 9 

Grimm, G .2 2 

Sollenberger, G 

Total 11 4 26 

Seniors 

Field Foul Pts. 

Brandt, F 2 1 5, 

Longenecker, F 3 1 7 

D. Myers, C 6 3 15 

Bechtel, G 

Reber, G 

Total 11 5 27 

The Junior and Senior girls en- 
tered the floor for their third contest 
of the season on March 22, the Seni- 
ors having captured the first two 
games. The Junior girls were out 
for revenge. The game was close 
and exciting and the score indicated 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



the excellent work done by the 
guards of both teams. The final 
score was 10-6 in favor of the Seni- 
or girls. 

On the eve of March 15, one of 
the most exciting games was played 
between the boarding and the day 
student girls. There were experi- 
enced players on both sides. For a 
while it seemed as if the game 
would be a tie, when suddenly the 
day students forged ahead several 
points. The boarding students, how- 
ever, were not to be outdone and 
began to display their real ability 
in playing. Finally they overcame 
the fast-going day students and 
won; the final score was 14-13. 
Ream, the forward for the day stu- 
dents, tallied five field goals; while 
E. Trimmer led the boarding stu- 
dents with three field and six foul 
goals. 

As spring is approaching, the ac- 
tivities on College Hill no longer re- 
main indoors. The Athletic Asso- 
ciation met to organize the outdoor 
activities. The following persons 
were elected for the different activi- 
ties: 

Tennis — John Sherman, manager. 

Henry Bucher and Jesse Bechtel 
assistants. 

Baseball — Walter Longenecker, 
manager. 

Hiram Gingrich and Israel Royer, 
assistants. 

Track — Paul Grubb, manager. 

P. B. Brandt and Fred Trimmer, 
assistants. 

Girls Activities — Margaret Oellig, 
— manager. 

Hannah Sherman and Nora Ger- 
berich, assistants. 



The interest shown in baseball 
thus far is very promising, as the 
students are continually practicing. 
Mr. Sherman is busy getting the 
tennis courts in readiness for any 
kind of "love" games to be played. 
Mr. Grubb is very alert in his work 
and, with the aid of his able assis- 
tants, success is well nigh assured 
in his particular field. May every 
student of Elizabethtown ;College; 
realize the value of physical train- 
ing and strive to develop a physique 
that will stand the stress and strain 
of everyday life. 



it. 



JUST A MINUTE 

"I have just a little minute, 

Only sixty seconds in it, 
Forced upon me, can't refuse it. 

Didn't seek it,' didn't choose 
But it's up to me to use it. 

I must suffer if I abuse it; 
Just a tiny little minute, 

But eternity is in it. 



"Therefore I will start anew this 

morning with a higher, fairer creed; 
I will cease to stand complaining 

of my ruthless neighbor's greed ; 
I will cease to sit repining while 

my duty's call Is clear; 
I will waste no moment whining 

and my heart shall know no fear. 

"I will look sometimes about me 

for the things that merit praise ; 
I will search for hidden beauties 

that elude the grumbler's gaze. 
I will try to find contentment 

in the paths that I must tread; 
I will cease to have resentment 

when another moves ahead. 

"I will not be swayed by envy 

when my rival's strength is shown, 
I will not deny his merit, but I'll 

try to prove my own ; 
I will try to see the beauty 

spread before me rain or shine, 
I will cease to preach your duty 

and be more concerned with mine." 
J. I. Baugher. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Mise anb ©tberwise 



Our Language 

fast — to go. 
fast — not to go. 
fast — to go without. 



Current Events 

Safety first — Take a 
course. 



College 



Four out of 22,000 men in jails 
and other penal institutions in New 
York State are College men. 



The way to be cheerful is to keep 
on believin' the sun is shinin' when 
the clouds is thick enough to cut. 

A. H. Rice. 



What Will be the Outcome? 

A controversey is being waged in 
Germany between those who be- 
lieve that the cremation of the dead 
should be stopped to save coal and 
those who think burial should not 
be permitted because the space 
which cemeteries take up is needed 
for agricultural purposes. 



I had six honest serving men, 
They taught me all I knew; 

Their names are "what" and "why" 

and "when" 

And "how" and "where" and 
"who." —Kipling. 



A man is rich in proportion to the 
things he can let alone. — Thoreau. 



April Fooling 

I April-fooled my teacher 

The other day in school 
And this is how I did it, 

I minded every rule. 
I studied all my lessons 

And didn't talk or play, 
And teacher says she wishes 

I'd fool her every day. 

Virginia Baker. 
— Magazine 



With all your getting get under- 
standing. 



Find Yourself 

10 to 30 are years of preparation. 

30 to 60 are years of creative 
work. 

60 to 70 are years of reward and 
satisfaction. — Efficiency. 



He who can bottle up his temper 
is a corker. Missionary Visitor. 



The Stork's Rival 

"Ma," said Billy, "Tis'nt the stork 
that brings babies, it's the milk- 
man." 

"Why Billy, why do you say 
that?" 

"Cause the milkman wrote on his 
wagon, "Families Supplied Daily." 



Life has no greater joy than that 
of feeling itself needed somewhere 
by some one. 

Record of Christian Work. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 29 



Store Opens 7:00 A. M. Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 

Saturday 10 P. M. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of he girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 

iO00000O0000OOOCXKXXXXX>O0OOOOOOOOO00O0OOO0OO0O00000000000000O^ 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>oooooooogoooqoooooogogqqqooqooooogogogoqoggogoooogoqoooooooq< 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 
J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Fays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



'oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ( 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men'* 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

Etizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A, C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 



Elizabethtown Chroicle 

Multiple Magazine Linotype Equipment 

JOB PRIN ING 

See Our Press Print and Fold Them 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 




etiglleirtwork fair prices 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, •:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMERS BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: PENNA. 



Remember — 18 West High Street 
For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 
Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY CO. 

N. York-Chicago-Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



J. W. ZMRPD88 - 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 

ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 

109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
K H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, - :- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



'OQOQQGOOQQQQQOQQQQQC 



Bueh Manufacturing Co, 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



Electric Wiring 
House Wiring 



Fixture Repairing 
Contract Work 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 



THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



MECHANICSBURG 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

L. L. LININGER 



We Save You Money on Wiring and 
Fixtures 



25 Per Cent. Discount on All Fixtures 



24 W. Marble St., MECHANICSBURG 



84 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seed*, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

HornafiUs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 }£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 

Wholesale Sugar House 

318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHONOGRAPHS 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 
FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 
ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATTS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. TRINK 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



315 



1 00O0OO0O00OOOOOO0OO0C500O0OOOO0OOOOOOOCX5OOOOOOO0OOOOOO0OO0OOO? 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. "KelleJW 

T. M. Brenerr.an Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Eohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 

3 ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 
W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

' -i- . vL'L- 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For '<■ 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For ©arby Brand 
A Trial will convince- '■■•••••../* ■•**! • 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



■miniii 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT 

Centre Square 



& SHAND 



LANCASTER, PA. 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 

THE 

GROSS CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown ... Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W. King St., Lancaster 



jpOOOQOQQOOOQOOOOCXJC^GOOOOOOQOGOOQO^ 

GARBER GARAGE 

Bell Phone 43R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phone 603A 



FORD and FORDSON 

Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOCQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC3000000000 



'The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate 



9* 



QQQQOQQQQOQQQQGOQOOQOGQOGGQQGQQQOQOQQQQOQQOGQQQQOOOQQQQQ 



DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

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THE W-A- 

Factory to you 



OE 



For the Man 

Quality at a Moderate Price 




Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 

$5.5.0 

In black or tan, -with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 



Sell At Two Prices 

$5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 






i , v ■ ^ 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 



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. A 



m 



«* < 



©yR 

gBLLEBE TOM 



I 1 




MAY 
1922 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOOOOOOOO0O000OO0O00000OO0OOO 

Q 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

MISSIMER & YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 

— — — —— — — — — — ■ ramwn i i .il i im i i n i m—n i. m— — — — — i»^—— — 

MEN'S 
PLAIN SUITS 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
! better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 
Come and be convinced. 

This is The Place for You to SAVE 
MONEY! 

i 

oooooooooooooooooooooocooooooooooocooooocooooooooooooooooooooo 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 300CJOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

I HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
g LANCASTER, PENNA. 

8 

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gOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC500000000000000000C50000000000000000000( 

o 

o 

8 GETTING SOMEWHERE 

o 



o Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 

o half is in reaching the destination. 

o 

§ When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 

§ from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 

5 added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

§ Tho you save but small amounts 

'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 



o 



o 



o 



The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

OOOOOOOOOG ooooooooooooooo-^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 1 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry P*. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, -:- PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L. Geyer 
Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



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KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 186,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
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Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

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AND 

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Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



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_AND— 

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S. Market St., 



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and 
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'The Little Store With Big Business" 

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1 

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ELIZABETHTOWN, :: PENNA. 



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BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store" 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches, 
Ivory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 

MRS. W. S. MORGAN, Proprietress. 



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CORL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
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All Kinds of 

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©ur College ^imce 



Volume XIX 



MAY 



Number 8 



Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtowm 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor • • Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

( Elsie Landis 
College News |j. D. Reber 

Alumni . .■ Martha Martin 

Athletics • Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 

• 
Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



J. S. Harley 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 
J. Z. Herr 



E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



j£6itorial8 



The Spirit of E. C. 

They tell us that the primary aim 
of a college publication should be 
to reflect the spirit of the school. 
But a thing must exist and shine be- 
fore it can be reflected. What is it, 
then, that constitutes the spirit 
which exists and hovers about our 
school, which we aim to reflect in 
Our College Times? 

Doubtless it, whatever it is, is 
more easily felt than described. 
Who has not at some time felt the 
pulse of school life almost the min- 
ute he had set foot on the campus or 
entered the halls of some college or 
other? We say it is in the air; but 
what is in the air? Whoever has 
felt that pulse-beat has at another 
time felt as keen a depression on en- 
tering the same halls when all was 
quiet and everybody was gone. The 
spirit of the school, therefore, was 
not the sum total of buildings, cam- 
pus and equipment, for these were 
still there. These are just what it is 
not. It is the sum total of several 
hundred or more individual spirits 
or persons, — all united by a common 
interest in their Alma Mater, — who 
make alive stone walls and dead 
equipment, that constitutes the 
school spirit of which we speak. 

To this school spirit each student 
and teacher makes his contribution 
either positively or negatively. What 
I say either adds or detracts; some- 
times what I do not say adds more 
than what I say or feel like saying. 
What I say in praise, however, does 



not add, it multiplies. What I do 
either raises or lowers the school 
temperature. What I do honestly 
and sincerely in hall and classroom, 
on court and campus, raises it by so 
many degrees. What I do ignobly 
acts the reverse. What I am, how- 
ever, counts most of all and goes 
farthest in creating that school 
spirit of which I ought to be justly 
proud, — if I am out and out for the 
school which is out and out for me, 
whose loss is my loss and whose 
gain is my gain. 

But what of the spirit on College 
Hill? There may be less demon- 
stration of it in yell, floating of ban- 
ners, class distinction, and fraternal 
orders than is felt in some places; 
but who will say there is not a great 
deal shown in real loyalty and 
whole-hearted support? Our beau- 
tiful College Song revives our spirit 
now and then. Gifts and donations 
reveal something of the same spirit. 
Surely we all felt something of this 
on the morning we sent away a few 
of "our sons so noble" to uphold, in 
intercollegiate debate, E. C.'s ideals 
on Maryland soil. We felt it no 
less here on the same evening. Com- 
pared with our feelings, what must 
the teams themselves have felt! 
Our literary productions, which 
appear herein, are intended espe- 
cially to reflect the inner life and 
work of the school, — as do also the 
notes and news which follow, — for 
those who have an interest and con- 
cern in the spirit of E'town College. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 11 



■ m B EBBBBBBBBBBB. B ■ ll!IB 5! H ■ B I B I C I B I B 5 B- :1 



THE ETONIAN 
A NEW MILESTONE 

IN 

E. C'S HISTORY 

ORDER NOW 

PRICE $2.00 

ADDRESS 

ELIAS EDRIS 

Business Mgr. 



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12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



literary 



The Human Omelette 

"A man weighing 150 lbs. con- 
tains approximately 3500 cubic feet 
of gases (O-H-N) in his constitution 
which at 80c per thousand would be 
worth $2.80 for illuminating pur- 
poses. He also contains all the ne- 
cessary fats to make 240 1-oz. can- 
dles ; thus, together with his 3500 
cubic feet of gases, he possesses con- 
siderable illuminating possibilities. 
His system contains 22 lbs., 10 oz. of 
carbon, enough to make 780 dozen 
or 9360 lead pencils. There are 
about 50 grains of iron in his blood 
and the rest of his body would sup- 
ply enough of this metal to make 
one spike large enough to hold the 
weight of his body. 

A healthy man contains 54 oz. of 
phosphorus. This deadly poison 
would be enough to make 800,000 
matches or enough to kill 543 per- 
sons. This with two ounces of lime 
constitutes the bones and brain. He 
contains 60 lumps of sugar of the 
ordinary cubical dimensions, and 
20 spoonfuls of salt. If man were 
distilled into water, he would make 
about 38 guarts, or more than half 
his entire weight. He also contains 
a great deal of starch, chloride of 
potash, magnesium, sulphur, and 
hydrochloric acid in his wonderful 
system. 

Break 1,000 eggs, including 
shells, in a large pan and you have 
the ingredients to make a man from 
his toe nails to the most delicate 
tissue of his brain." 



Happiness. 

You would not expect to become 
a great violin player without prac- 
ticing on the violin, or a great pia- 
nist without practicing on a piano. 
Neither can you achieve happiness 
except by trying to be happy. 

A distinguished • mamematician, 
who is also a physical scientist, says, 
"the formula for happiness may be 
expressed as follows, h-gjw? In this 
h stands for the amount of individ- 
ual happiness and is equal to what 
the individual has got, g, divided by 
w, what he wants. If a man has a 
great deal but wants ever so much 
more, his fraction of happiness may 
approach an integer. If he has got 
anything in the world and does not 
want anything more, according to 
the terms of the formula, he is in- 
finitely happy, for one divided by 
zero equals infinity. What is 
important for men for their hap- 
piness, then, is not so much to try 
to increase the numerator by add- 
ing to, or even multiplying, their 
possessions, but to decrease the de- 
nominator by lessening their wants 
and by decreasing the number of 
things without which they cannot be 
happy." 

Happiness is supposed to be a by- 
product of money, health, love, suc- 
cess and religion. But the fact is 
that happiness is not something 
handed down to you from 
heaven, neither can you get 
it by taking a pill or a drink, 
nor capture it by effort of the will. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



You must practice happiness if you 
want it, and you must do this by 
controlling your feelings, by con- 
trolling your thought. 

If, when we are not happy, we 
would take some time and think of 
only pleasant events that have hap- 
pened or look forward to those we 
expect, we would be able to face 
the world with happiness, and we 
should develop in ourselves this 
power of thought control. 

We must daily appreciate more 
the material pleasures; in, eating, 
we need not be gluttons. We 
should realize that the Creator in- 
tended the taking of food and drink 
to be a pleasure. We should also 
value our sleep. We must exercise, 
for we can all get great happiness 
here, especially through sports. 
"We must also increase the re- 
sources of happiness in our mind. 
Our mind is not given us simply for 
storing up facts and improving its 
reasoning power, but to store away 
joy-thoughts that will come to our 
aid at a moment's need, when 
gloom, anxiety, worry and remorse 
are upon us. 

There are times when we ought 
to be sad. If it is time to weep, 
weep. But the difficulty is, we see 
troubles that will never happen. 
Don't worry. If you have some un- 
pleasant thought find some happy 
thing that can absorb you and 
crowd out the unhappy one. 

Happiness is essential. It is a 
guarantee of good health, an asset 
in business and a blessing to society. 

H. G. 



Our First Debate 

The great debate is ended, 

The battle's lost and won; 

The sleepless nights the days of toil 

Have yielded heaps of fun. 

Ofttimes when work was tiresome 
We fretted, wished in vain 
To run away and hear no more 
The open shop refrain. 

Professors asked to hear us, 
Did yawn and sometimes doze. 
The impulse of the freshman was 
Oh, let's turn on the hose. 

Our captain stern and thoughtful 
Kept at us every day, 
So that we'd plan our speeches well 
And know just what to say. 

We now have ceased to worry 
About the meals we missed, 
For it has lessened very much 
The College deficit. 

The teachers though do worry 
About the work we missed ; 
They have our back work all mark- 
ed down 
On their debaters' list. 

Yet who of us are sorry 
Though long the fight did seem ; 
In days to come well ne'er forget 
E'town's Debating Team. 

L. F. 



Milk of Human Kindness beats 
cold cream for wrinkles. 

Missionary Visitor. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



My Visit To The Attic 

One evening when I was about 
nine years old I visited an old attic 
to explore its contents. When I had 
ascended two flights of stairs I came 
to the attic where everything was 
topsy-turvy. Here I thought was a 
real place for goblins. The atmos- 
phere was dry and stuffy. There was 
only one window and that one had 
not been opened for many days. 

As I glanced about me I saw ropes 
stretched crosswise along the raft- 
ers, on which were hanging some old 
clothes. On another side were 
stored broken chairs and tables. In 
the opposite corner were many box- 
es filled with books, papers, tools 
and other junk. 

I was especially interested in the 
latter corner. I walked around the 
boxes, when finally I discovered an 
old trunk. I opened it. Here I 
found many old relics. I tried to 
interest myself in viewing these var- 
ious old relics, hoping to overcome 
the strange feeling of fear that crept 
over me because of a queer noise 
which I could hear in the farther 
corner. But on the contrary my 
brightened state was increased. 

As I moved a piece of old home- 
spun cloth in the trunk, I aroused 
two mice. They made a desperate 
effort to escape from the radiating 
light of the lamp which I helti. In 
so doing they hopped clear of the 
trunk and landed on me. I being 
terrified by them left the trunk lid 
fall down, which made a thundering 
noise, and at the same time caused 
the lamp to be extinguished. 

I was in the dark and was sure I 



had awakened a hundred grotesque 
goblins of every variety. There I 
stood stock-still. Around me were 
gathering all kinds of hideous crea- 
tures. I made an effort to find the 
stairway, but only to bump my head 
against the rafters. Now I thought 
I was closed in. Suddenly I fell in- 
to an awful abyss receiving a terr- 
ible shock. I landed half a dozen 
steps from the foot of the stairway. 
I went down the remaining steps 
in a panic. I would never venture 
to visit the attic alone in the dark, 
and I even feared going into any 
dark rooms for a long time after- 
ward. E. W. 

A Ceremonial Fire 

The moon was shining full on a pile 
of pine boughs neatly arranged in 
the heart of a majestic pine forest. 
Suddenly from the shadows appear- 
ed an Indian maiden. Around her 
forehead sparkled a bright band of 
highly colored beads, that held in 
place two long braids of hair which 
hung loosely over her shoulders. Her 
gown was of heavy brown cloth, 
trimmed in leather and skins and 
set off by many colored beads. Her 
moccasined feet trod softly upon the 
dampened earth. She knelt before 
the pile of wood and lit it. She rose 
and solemnly spoke three Indian 
words. Girls dressed similar to her 
appeared until the fire was sur- 
rounded. To each bronzed maiden 
was handed a string of honor beadi. 
The girls in turn sang a song which 
spoke of truth, love, health, honor, 
. work, and strength. This strange 
gathering was the meeting of a 
group of modern Minnekahas. E. G. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



COLLEGE HILL 

(Autumn) 

As we look out over the campus, 
College Hill in autumn is, indeed, a 
beautiful spot. At the first appear- 
ance of Jack Frost, the trees begin 
to wear a robe of all the different 
hues of crimson and yellow ; a few 
trees will wear their green leaves a 
little longer than some others but 
soon they all shed their summer gar- 
ments. The cool north wind rustles 
the fallen leaves and piles some of 
them along the hedge, while it 
carries others*far into the fields. The 
last roses have been plucked and 
the sting of Jack Frost is putting 
the flowers to sleep for the winter. 
The grass is turning brown and looks 
as though it were dying, but it, too, 
will lie dormant during the long 
winter months. 

During the day the sun shines 
from the bright blue sky and sends 
its warmth to the earth, but the air 
is cool and chilly reminding us of 
the fact that winter is drawing near. 

From the baseball diamond we 
hear laughter and cheering, for ex- 
citing games are being played. As 
we take a glance at the tennis court 
we see games of great interest in 
progress. 

Turning to the western sky in the 
evening, we see the beautiful sunset. 
The sky is arrayed in all the gor- 
geous colors and we are made to 
appreciate nature more than we 
ever did before. College Hill in 
autumn is, an ideal place for nature 
lovers. 

L. E. W. 



COLLEGE HILL 

(Spring) 

As I was standing in the middle 
of the road looking to my right I saw 
a level baseball diamond, where the 
boys and girls spend many happy 
hours playing baseball and other 
games. 

To my left I saw a large brick 
building known as Fairview Apart- 
ment. This building was made more 
beautiful by the dark green grass 
and small green trees on each side 
of the concrete walk. Both grass 
and trees were breathing in the 
fresh air and the warm sunshine. 

Walking up the road a little far- 
ther, I saw to my right a large num- 
ber of maple trees waving their del- 
icate green leaves in the bright sun- 
light and giving shade to those who 
sit on the benches beneath them. 
Farther on I could see a small apple 
orchard shooting forth in full bloom 
and filling the air with fragrance. 
At the south end of this orchard I 
saw a double frame dwelling house, 
where lived two of the professors. 

Then looking again to the left I 
saw a large pole painted white and 
upon it floating in the balmy air, 
"Old Glory." 

I also saw another large brick 
building upon which was a bell tow- 
er. This building was Memorial 
Hall. Immediately before me was 
still another large building, also 
built of brick, known as Alpha Hall. 
In front of it was a beautiful green 
-terrace and four large flower beds 
with bright red geraniums, sweet 
smelling roses of a cream color, and 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



many colored pansies, also various 
other flowers which added very 
much to the beauty of the place. The 
walks leading from one building to 
the other were concrete, making the 
place very attractive. 

Every one passing through Lan- 
caster County should come to see 
this beautiful spot. P. S. 



Gardening. 

Digging, raking, planting, sowing, 
Cultivating, weeding, hoeing — 
What a job to get things growing. 

But no other job agoing 
Does so set the heart a-glowing 
June grass-scented breezes blowing, 
Woods with birds' songs overflow- 
ing, 
Then the eating and the oh-ing. 

If you want to do some crowing 
Get a little garden growing. 

— Lincoln Millet. 



Slight Difference. 

A clergyman who was a widower 
had three grown daughters. Hav- 
ing occasion to go away a few weeks 
he wrote home from time to time. 
In one of his letters he informed 
them that he had married a widow 
with six children. This created a 
stir in the household. 

When the minister returned home 
one of his daughters, her eyes red 
with weeping, said, "Where's the 
widow you married, father," 

"O ! I didn't bring her along, you 
see I married her to some other 
man." 

— Louisville Courier Journal. 



An Original Story. 

In a picturesque village in sunny 
Italy, there lived a little boy with, 
his parents in a cozy white cot- 
tage with brown-thatched roof. All 
the mystery of the South was in his 
musical name, Giovanni, and all the 
beauty of the homeland was in his. 
deep blue eyes. Here in this sunny 
land where eyes smiled and hearts 
were kind, Giovanni spent his child- 
hood. 

Giovanni's parents loved him 
with a love that was beautiful to 
see. Year in and year out, they 
worked in the fields tTt accumulate 
money to send their boy to school 
when he would be old enough. Gio- 
vanni spent much of his time roam- 
ing out of doors, communing uncon- 
sciously with the Divine through ob- 
serving Nature. He was a very im- 
aginative child and, being of Italian 
parentage, had also a remarkable 
artistic temperament. He fancied 
he heard in the whispering of the 
trees prophetic voices telling of his 
future. Again, he fancied he saw 
mirrored in the sparkling waters of 
the little brook his own image as he 
should appear when he would have 
become an important character. 
Even the wild flowers seemed to 
beckon him to his future career. 
ills mother and father were in sym- 
pathy with his dreams, and encour- 
aged him to believe confidently in 
that which was yet in store for him. 

Now Giovanni wanted a violin 
above everything else in the world, 
and his parents knew that their 
hopes and desires for their son could 
c-nly be realized through the medi- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IT 



urn of the violin. How the> sacri- 
ficed and toiled, and how patiently 
Giovanni waited, until there came 
a day when his father went to the 
city, and with the money that spelt 
love, hard work and sacrifice 
bought a violin for Giovanni. Much 
as he wanted to buy the best instru 
ment in the world for his son, he 
knew it was an utter impossibility, 
for a Stradivarius was almost price- 
less. Tenderly he carried the violin 
back home where, at the door, he 
knew his wife and child would be 
waiting for him. Giovanni's rap- 
ture knew no bounds when he saw 
what his father had bought him. 
His face took on a radiance that 
told how keenly and how deeply he 
had longed for a violin. Giovanni 
had now found himself. 

The days that followed were a 
typical reproduction of what all mu- 
sicians have to face — hours and 
hours of hard work and practice. 
But through it all Giovanni found 
a satisfaction and peace that paa- 
seth all understanding. 

Months passed, and still there 
was not sufficient money to send 
Giovanni to the great master of 
whom they had heard so much. 
Yet their faith was undaunted and 
their courage and trust unfaltering. 

One day while Giovanni was 
playing, his whole soul wrapped up 
in the music, a feeble old man came 
tottering down the road. Hearing 
the sweet strains of music, he stop- 
ped at the cottage. Irresistibly he 
was drawn toward the door, where 
he saw a little boy, with a dreamy 
far away expression in his eyes, 



playing a violin. There stood the 
old man watching intently the child 
who played so marvelously. But 
Giovanni noticed no one until he 
heard a heavy thud and, looking up, 
saw the old man lying in the door- 
way. He ran to him, offered a cup 
of cool, refreshing water and then 
called his parents. When they 
came they tenderly carried the old 
man to a bed, and made him com- 
fortable there. Anxiously they 
watched at his bedside for some 
sign of returning consciousness. At 
last they saw a flicker of an eyelash 
and the old man opened his eyes. 
For some time he only gazed aim- 
lessly about, then suddenly a flash 
of recognition flitted over his face. 
"Play," he said in a tone half a 
sob, half a gasp. Giovanni took his 
violin, drew the bow across the 
strings, and oh, the music that filled 
the room! Soft and low and sad, it 
was like the moaning of trees in 
winter. Then again, is was spright- 
ly and gay, then it sounded like the 
rippling of brooks and murmuring 
of mountain streams, and then Kfce 
the swaying of flowers in the sum- 
mer breeze. As Giovanni ceased 
playing, the old man whispered, 
"More." Then he drew frera the 
violin music like a choir of angels 
singing whose voices blended har- 
moniously into a perfect symphony. 
Truly the old man, the father, the 
mother and Giovanni himself v-r e 
carried away to the spirit world. 
As suddenly as Giovanni had begun, 
he stopped playing. The old man 
had recovered slightly from tin stu- 
por into which he had fallen, for he 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



motioned to the boy to bring a t.t? 
package to him. He had dropped 
it when he fell so suddenly in the 
doorway. Carefully he undid ihe 
rope which tied the package, and 
held to view an old worn violin case. 
Giovanni looked spellbound. The 
old man opened the case and with 
loving fingers very tenderly took out 
a violin. Giovanni's eye immedi- 
ately saw that the violin before bin 
was an article of almost priceless 
worth, for it bore the Stradivariu* 
trade mark. Not a scratch or mark 
marred its surface. With shaking 
hands the old man lifted the violin 
to his chin, and produced such 
strains the like of which are seldom- 
heard. They came from a soul 
bared of every earthly thing, a soul 
that was preparing to meet its Mak- 
er. On and on he played, even as 
the death throes of agony came up- 
on him. At last his strength failed, 
his arm relaxed, and in a whisper 
scarcely audible he uttered these 
words : "It is finished." As 
the last strain of the violin died 
away, he was ushered into the pres- 
ence of his Maker, on the wings of 
the perfect melody he had pro- 
duced. 

For several moments, tense with 
suppressed feelings, Giovanni and 
his father and mother stared at the 
old man. Then Giovanni's glance 
rested on the violin clutched in the 
man's lifeless hands. Reverently 
and tenderly he took the violin and, 
with his soul in his eyes, played up- 
on the Stradivari as, — an almost 
priceless instrument, and one which 
only the great masters and musi- 



cians ever dreamed of possessing. 
Try as he would Giovanni could not 
reproduce exactly th« strains of mu- 
sic that the old man had p. eyed. 
One certain cnoru had thrilled and 
thrilled him yet he co;-ld no«: find 
it. His mind se irched and groped 
for it, but it was -.»li in vain. 

For several »ia;-s the family 
mourned the death of his old man. 
and it was a quick, solemn proces- 
sion that followed his body to his 
resting place. There beside the 
murmuring brooklet hiui the nodd- 
ing poppies and whisoering trees 
they laid hir\ 

When they return* d to the house,, 
they noticed a letter worn and ye! 
low, which had slipped to the fioor 
•when the old man had untied the 
package. On the outside the words, 
"Open this letter and read," were 
written. Quietly they obeyed and 
this is what they read : 

"I'm nearing the end of my jour- 
ney, my strength is failing fast. To 
those who in my last hour befriend 
me, to them I give my most valuable 
possession, my violin. Love it as I 
have loved it. Cherish it as I have- 
always cherished it; and think of 
me as you play upon its strings. Use 
the bank notes enclosed in this let- 
ter and if the person who receives it 
has a passion for music take it", I 
pray, and place yourself under the 
instruction of the great master in 
Naples. Remember that true music 
is the sincere expression of the 
soul." 

When they read the name of the 
man who had written the letter, an 
exclamation of surprise, mingled 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



with doubt and unbelief, escaped 
their lips. Then he was one of the 
great masters of the day. Little 
children had lisped his name and 
fathers and mothers never tired of 
recounting his glorious career. True 
it was that of late they had not 
heard of him, but it was because 
he had gone to America that won- 
derful land of which they had heard 
so much. 

After reading and re-reading the 
letter several times, Giovanni's par- 
ents knew for a certainty that the 
future of their son was assured. 

So Giovanni went to school, and 
for many years was under the in- 
struction of the famous master at 
Naples. Finally he came before the 
greatest audiences of Europe. Time 
after time he met with such triumph 
and success as he had never dared 
to dream of. Wishing to realize 
further his fondest wish, he went to 
America. But this did not satisfy 
him, for he longed for his native 
land and loving parents. 

He sailed for sunny Italy, came 
to his childhood home, and found 
it even more picturesque and cozy 
than he had remembered it to be. 
But then it was his home, and upon 
it his parents' loving hands were 
written. When they embraced him, 
they told him he had surpassed ev- 
en their fondest dreams. Going out 
to the garden, he visited the grave 
of the man who had helped to make 
him what he was. Silently, with 
bowed head, he stood in rever- 
ent retrospection. Returning to the 
house he got his violin, and there 



by the grave of that great master, 
there by the murmuring stream, 
where the trees sighed and whis- 
pered in the breeze, he played as he 
never played before. What mat- 
tered the praise and honor of the 
world, what mattered their tribute 
and applause? Nothing mattered 
but to be back again in his child- 
hood home and native land where 
eyes smiled and hearts were kind. 
So he played on and on thinking of 
the man who lay at his feet, and of 
the lost chord he could never find. 
Turning his eyes to the west, he saw 
the glowing sun setting in all its 
glory, its delicate tints fading as he 
watched. Then in the brook that 
flowed by he saw again the beauty 
and grandeur of the sunset as it was 
mirrored in its sparkling waters. 
Inspired and fascinated, he watched 
the panorama before him, the fields 
of waving grain, the brilliant pop- 
pies, whose faint fragrance was 
wafted by the air, and far away the 
hazy outlines of the stately Apen- 
nines. On and on he played, in- 
spired by Nature's glowing picture. 
Suddenly he cried out exultantly, 
"I have found it." He had found 
the lost chord, there where so many 
years ago the old master had played 
it,— the chord which had seemed 
to come from the distant spirit 
realm. 

Giovanni looked heavenward and 
thought he saw the benign face of 
the old master smiling upon him. his 
hand beckoning him to come even 
as he had gone on the wings of the 
perfect melody he had produced. 

L. F. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



(ToIIcqc IFlews 



The spring Normal opened on 
April the 24th with an enrollment 
of forty-four students. 



Teacher — "What is a single tax?" 
Mr. Nolt — "Tax for the people 
who are single." 



Miss M. Meyer — It seems that ev- 
ery one who sits next to me drinks 
a lot of water. 

Mr. P. Grubb — I guess that is be- 
cause you are so dry. 



Miss L. Landis was heard to say : 
"Yes, I have found three men now 
but I get so provoked, none of them 
get serious at all." 



Mr. Bucher (rather solemialy) 
"I would not have gone with the 
girls if I had not come to the hill, 
but I am glad that I came." 



Question — Where can Israel Roy- 
er be found in case of emergency? 

Answer — At the bottom of the 
steps leading to the girls' dormitory. 



Mr. Kettering (on the way to 
breakfast one morning, beholding 
the wonders of nature) — "Look at 
the grass seed coming up." 



Student — "What is the opposite 
of philanthropist?" 

Prof. Hoffer — "A man hater." 



Mr. Barr — "Would you put much 
emphasis on dates when teaching 



history?" 

Prof. Meyer — "No, I don't think 
a teacher of today should require 
many dates." 



Arbor Day. 

The Senior Class gave a good pro- 
gram on the evening of April 20, 
in observance of Arbor Day. Miss 
Mabel Minnich recited, and Mr. 
Barr delivered an oration. Both 
vocal and instrumental music were 
interesting features of the program. 
Mr. W. E. Montgomery, of the 
State Forestry Department. Harris- 
burg, Pa., gave an illustrated lec- 
ture, revealing to us the beauty and 
usefulness of the forests of the 
United States. The lecture was en- 
joyed by all and was very instruc- 
tive. 

The next morning, following the 
regular chapel exercises, two beau- 
tiful evergreen trees were planted 
near the Fairview Apartment build- 
ing by the class of 1922. Each Sen- 
ior contributed a small box of soil 
from home. Just as the soil was 
sprinkled over the roots to f.urnish 
nourishment for their growth and 
development, and then was covered 
with sod, so the members of the 
class of 1922 desire to bury their 
lives in service. 



Junior Oratorical Contest. 

On Friday evening, April 21, we 
enjoyed one of the most interesting 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



programs given on College Hill. 
This feature, which was one of spec- 
ial importance, was the Junior Ora- 
torical Contest. The orators for this 
contest were members representing 
both Junior Societies, namely the 
Penn and Franklin. The interest 
manifested during the whole con- 
test was very keen because of the 
healthy rivalry for the prizes. 

The orators of the evaning were 
Roy Forney whose subject was 
"The Price of Peace." Clarence 
Holsopple who spoke on the subject, 
"The Channels of Ambition;" Lydia 
Landis who orated on the subject, 
"The Challenge of the World," and 
Lester Rover whose subject was 
"The Greatest Battlefield." These 
orations were very well given and 
the thought was of such a nature as 
to help all of us in life's career. 

There were three prizes awarded 
for the best three orations. Of these 
Roy Forney captured first prize, 
Lydia Landis second, and Lester 
Royer third. All those who recieved 
prizes are members of the Penn 
Society. This reminds us of another 
event drawing nigh, — the Inter, 
society Debate. Last year the de- 
bate was won by the Franklin but 
this year the Penns with renewed 
courage say: "We will have nothing 
short of victory." 



The Intercollegiate Debate 

On Friday morning, April 28, the 
negative debating team was sent to 
Blue Ridge College amid the cheers 
of the student body. 



At five o'clock in the evening the 
negative debating team from Blue 
Ridge College came to College Hill. 
A committee appointed to see to the 
welfare of our visitors took care of 
them until time for lunch in the din- 
ing room. 

The debate was delayed some- 
what on account of the late arrival 
of one of the judges. The Chairman 
called the meeting to order at eight- 
thirty. Both teams were full of 
their subject, and from the beginn- 
ing the audience was held in silence. 
The question for debate was: "Re- 
solved — that the Industries of the 
United States Should Adopt the 
Open Shop. The debaters decided 
that the "Open Shop" should mean 
a shop that admits both union and 
non-union men. Both sides present- 
ed good arguments and every one 
was wondering just what the deci- 
sion would be. 

After the debate was over the 
ushers took the judges votes to the 
chairman, who opened the sealed 
envelopes and immediately announc- 
ed the decision of the judges. The 
decision was two votes for Blue 
Ridge College and one vote for Eli- 
zabethtown. After the excitement 
had passed those deeply interested 
in the work of the other team rushed 
to the office to hear the returns 
from Blue Ridge. At ten-thirty the 
message came that the decision of 
the judges there had been two votes 
in favor of Elizabethtown and one 
vote in favor of Blue Ridge. Tally- 
ing reports showed an exact tie, the 
negative or visiting teams from each 
place winning 2 — 1. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



1Reliaiou8 "Motes 



Steven's Hill Sunday School 

These beautiful spring days have 
awakened all life. It has set not 
only the imprisoned bud and leaf 
free, but also worshippers of God 
who were confined to their homes 
because King Winter had congested 
the highways with sn®w and ice. 

Our Sunday School at Steven's 
Hill was very well attended all 
through the winter months, but 
since spring is here there has been 
an increase in attendance by those 
who were not able to attend during 
the winter months. A few families 
who moved into the neighborhood 
this spring are attending Sunday 
School, thus increasing the enroll- 
ment considerably. 

Elder W. H. Miller of Elizabeth- 
town, pastor of Steven's Hill congre- 
gation, recently conducted a two 
weeks' evangelistic meeting. The 
meeting began April 16. Many of 
our students went out in the even- 
ing to assist in the meetings by lead- 
ing the singing and by doing person, 
al work in the homes. 

The meetings closed April 30 
without any visible results in the 
way of converts, but we believe 
there has been much good done in 
the community through an awaken- 
ed interest and a desire "to go up 
to the house of the Lord" to worship. 

There is Sunday School every 
Sunday afternoon at two o'clock. 
All visitors are welcome. 



Tithing 

The programs of the Christian 
Workers Society, Volunteer Meet- 
ings, Prayer Meetings and other or- 
ganizations, during the week of 
April 22 — 29, was devoted to the 
subject of tithing. The purpose of 
this movement was to get every 
Christian of the Hill to thinking a- 
long the line of systematic giving. 
Some otf the gem thoughts dropped 
by the way are given here. 

"Bring ye the whole tithe into the 
store-house, that there may be food 
in my house, and prove me now 
herewith, saith Jehovah of hosts, if 
I will not open you the windows of 
heaven, and pour you out a blessing, 
that there shall not be room enough 
to receive it." Mai. 3:10. 

Tithing is setting aside one tenth 
of my income regularly and syste- 
matically, and using it for the work 
of the Lord. 

The silver and the gold belong to 
God — so everybody says. But say- 
ing it means nothing ; acting as 
though it were true means some- 
thing. 

Tithing pays in spiritual blessings, 
pays in temporal prosperity, pays 
in peace of mind, in having a ques- 
tion of duty settled. It transfers 
from you to your Heavenly Father 
the responsibility of deciding how 
much it shall be ; it permits Him to 
decide whether it shall be little or 
much, as He prospers you. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



The tithe of one's income to the 
Lord is not charity ; it is one's first 
and most pressing debt — a debt of 
honor; a sacred and supreme obli- 
gation ; an obligation resting on each 
and every Christian believer. 

Tithing is the first step toward 
the goal of stewardship. It is better 
to take the step first and one at a 
time. This is God's method. 



Traveling Secretary's Visit 

We felt very fortunate to have 
with us Miss Halliday, the Travel- 
ing Secretary of the Foreign Volun- 
teer Movement. Miss Halliday has 
been visiting the different colleges 
and spent May 3 and 4 with us. 
While here she gave a very inspir- 
ing message to the Volunteer Band. 
Following is a reaction of her mess- 
age. 

We cannot get along without 
daily prayer and meditation. The 
best time for this is in the morning. 
We should start the very beginning 
of the day with God and ask him to 
keep us through that day. 

Our vision sometimes grows dim 
by the mist in the valleys. We get 
our visions while on the mount- 
ain tops but we can't always stay 
up there. We must keep our sight 
so clear that we can see through the 
mist. 

Our job lies right here before us, 
not far off in the future. Do the 
things which are before you now, 
and some day you can do that great- 
er work. 



We must empty ourselves of self 
and let Him fill our earthen vessels. 
It is not our own personality that is 
to be impressed upon others, but 
Christ's through us. 

Miss Halliday also spoke to the Y. 
W.A.W. In this talk she showed us 
•the life of the India girl as she has 
seen it, and contrasted it with the 
life of the Amercan girl. She said, 
"Can we American girls still keep on 
enjoying our lives and in the mean- 
time see our India sisters living a 
life of sorrow and suffering? What 
can we do to help them? Am I 
willing to do what I can?" 

J. M. B. 



The Way to Win. 

Life is just a game to play, 

Play it! 
When you have a thing to say, 

Say it! 
Do not stammer "if" or "but", 
Courage takes the shortest cut. 
When your task is hard to do 
Grit your teeth and see it thru ! 

Life is just a prize to get; 

Get it ! 
If the stage is not well set, 

Set it ! 
Men of mettle seldom find 
What they're looking for behind, 
Fate is passing down the street, 
Follow him with nimble feet. 



"Beware of any immediate profit 
that will cost your future good will." 
— F»rbes. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




The class of 1910 had eight repre- 
sentatives of the Pecladogical 
Course, a larger number in this 
course than found in any preceding 
class or in any succeeding one until 
1920. 

Floy Crouthamel, as she was then 
known, was one of the pedagogical 
seniors of '10. Some years later she 
continued her school work at Jun- 
iata College where she completed 
her college work. For several 
years she served our college very 
acceptably as teacher and precept- 
ress, and again as preceptress and 
librarian. She is now known as the 
wife of Prof. I. S. Hoffer and the 
mother of Floy C. Hoffer. 

Kathryn T. Moyer completed her 
college work at Oberlin College, 
Ohio. She taught at Ann Arundel 
Academy near Baltimore, Md. for 
one year and there met Miss Gwinn, 
a southern lady, who urged Miss 
Moyer to come to North Carolina to 
teach. She has been teaching in 
that state for some years ; during the 
last two years in Reidville High 
School, N. C. 



Leah Sheaffer completed her 
third course of study at E'town in 
'10. Wm. E. Glasmire, who became 
the husband of Miss Sheaffer in '13, 
completed the course in voice cul- 
ture in '10. They have been work- 
ing in Denmark as missionaries 
since '19. Three sons and a daugh- 
ter add cheer to their distant home. 

Daisy Rider of Elizabethtown 
pursued the study and teaching of 
art some years after completing her 
pedagogical work. She is now Mrs. 
Haldeman of Kansas City, Mo. 

Samuel G. Meyer is located at 
Fredericksburg, Pa. There are four 
children in the Meyer home. Mrs. 
Meyer was also a former student of 
cur college, then known as Eliza_ 
beth Miller. Mr. Meyer has proved 
to be a very efficient minister of 
the gospel and a successful evange- 
list. 

Walter K. Gish has been farming 
on a large scale in Alberta, Canada, 
since '12. He has also done some 
teaching in that section. Mrs. Gish, 
formerly Miss Mazie Martin, also 
a former E'town student, taught 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



their home school during a part of 
the past year upon the resignation 
of the regular teacher. There are 
three children in the Gish home. 

L. D. Rose, after teaching for a 
number of years and doing some 
preaching, has returned to his Alma 
Mater as librarian. 

B. F. Waltz is now pastor of the 
Second Church of the Brethren, 
Altoona, Pa. Mary Myers, who 
later became Mrs. Waltz, was also 
graduated from our school in '10, in 
the English Scientific Course. Paul 
Kenneth and Benjamin Franklin, 
Jr., are the sturdy sons in the Waltz 
home. 

The other representatives of the 
English Scientific Course were 
Blanche V. and Grace I. Rowe, 
Florence Miller, Olive Myers, L. B. 
Earhart, Holmes S. Falkenstein and 
A. C. Hollinger. The Rowe sisters 
have been teaching in their home 
community, Smithsburg, Md. 

Florence Miller Sommer and fam- 
ily are living in Wildwood, N. J. 
Jean Elizabeth is the constant com- 
panion of Mrs. Sommer. 

Prof. L. B. Earhart of our college 
town is teacher of Biology in North- 
east High School for Boys, Philadel- 
phia, and Prof. Holmes S. Falken- 
stein, a graduate of Juniata College, 
is teaching English in a West Phila- 
delphia High School. 

A. C. Hollinger, the "Wear-ever" 
Aluminum Salesman, is the proud 
father of three sons, — Durell An- 
drew, Harold Clarence, and Paul 
Robert. 

L. Margaret Haas completed the 
English Bible Course in '10 and was 



married to Chas. A. Schwenk in the 
same year. They attended Bethany 
Bible School for some time and then 
returned to Loganton, Pa., where 
they are faithfully serving the 
church. Prof. Schwenk is also 
teaching, and Mrs. Schwenk has 
been very active in Sunday School 
teacher-training' work in addition 
to her home and other church 
duties. Laura Winona is making 
unusually rapid progress in her 
school work and, we hope, may be 
en College Hill after some years. 
Paul Edgar is the second child in 
this home. 

Lottie Becker, Frances Stephan, 
E. G. Diehm, and Ray E. Gruber 
completed the Regular Commercial 
Course in '10. Lottie Becker, now 
Mrs. Lee Hassinger, is the only one 
of these still residing in Elizabeth- 
toWn. She is the mother of one 
daughter, Evelyn Grace. 

Ray E. Gruber and family are lo- 
cated at Hummelstown where Mr. 
Gruber is employed as bookkeeper. 

Prof. E. G. Diehm completed the 
A. B. Course at Juniata College and 
the B. D. Course at Crozier Theolo- 
gical Seminary, since leaving our 
college. The Diehm family is liv- 
ing at Youngstown, O. Mr. Diehm 
is a minister of the gospel ; he also 
teaches expression in a high school 
There are three children in the 
home — Mary Jane, Joseph Edgar, 
and Ann Maria. 

Jos. U. Frantz, a teacher, Leba- 
non, Pa., and Enos Fry, clerk, of 
Cleveland, O., completed the Ad- 
vanced Commercial Course in '10: 
also Minerva Heisey, now Mrs. Mi- 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



nerva Coble, Notary Public, Eliza- 
bethtown. 

Mary E. Balmer, representing the 
Stenographic Course, is now Mrs. 
Huss. Her present location is not 
known to the editor. 

Abel W. Madeira of Harrisburg, 
Pa., and Prof. L. W. Leiter of our- 
College Faculty, .completed the 
Banking Course ; also E. Roy Engle, 
who has since died in California, 
where his wife and small daughter 
now reside. 

Olive Myers of Franklin Co., 
Walter F. Eshleman and Frances 
Stephan, of Elizabethtown, have al- 
so been removed by death. 

Lillian Becker, '14, taught the 
Chestnut Grove School in Rapho 
township during the past year and 
has returned to the College for the 
Spring Normal. 

Lottie Nies, '21, and Elizabeth 
Trimmer, '21, taught the Master- 
sonville and Midway Schools in Rap- 
ho township, respectively. Laura 
Hershey, '21, taught the Elstonville 
School, Penn township, during the 
past year. 

Vera Hackman, '21, who taught 
her home school during the past 
year, was a visitor on College Hill 
upon the occasion of the Intercol- 
legiate Debate, Apr. 28. She ex- 
pects to direct a Daily Vacation Bi- 
ble School in her home community 
during this summer. 

We quote the following from a 
recent letter received by the College 
from Rev. C. W. Shoop, '05. now a 
missionary in Canton. S. China : 

"The entrance of E. C. into the 
ranks of standard colleges consti- 
tutes a second call for felicitation 



from every alumnus and friend of 
the College. What a splendid rec- 
ord our Alma Mater is achieving. 
One of the very encouraging feat- 
ures in the development of E. C, it 
seems to me, is revealed in the 
splendid faculty roster as published 
in your bulletin of 1921-1922. I 
like the way in which the members 
of your faculty aspire. I note that 
most of them are taking their work 
seriously and are availing them- 
selves of privileges of post-gradu- 
ate study and so providing for their 
professional and personal growth. 
And that is what guarantees the 
growth of E. C, for as the faculty 
grow in intellectual, moral and spir- 
itual stature the College will inevit- 
ably be raised correspondingly on 
their constantly rising shoulders. 
And may our motto — as president, 
faculty, alumni and friends of E. C. 
—ever be 'EXCELSIOR' and never 
'EUREKA.' 

"Things are moving along as us- 
ual here in South China, except that 
we have not had, during the past 
year, either a revolution or a flood, 
one or the other of which seems to 
have been an annual occurrence un- 
til this last year. The Lord has 
been good to South China in giving 
moderate rains and a good govern- 
ment, so that we have enjoyed both 
peace and plenty. Kindly give my 
best regards to all the E. C. friends." 

On May 4, Stanley H. Ober, '21, 
son of Prof. H. K. Ober, and Chester 
H. Royer, '21, were elected to the 
Christian ministry by the Elizabeth- 
town Church of the Brethren. They 
are at present pursuing work at the 
College. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 




"Strike one — strike two — strike 
three — you're out," comes the voice 
of the umpire, as baseball is being 
resumed at the invitation of nature. 
What is more recreative than to en- 
gage in a snappy game of baseball 
or even to watch an exciting strug- 
gle when the bases are loaded, two 
strikes are called and a heavy hitter 
is eagerly waiting for a good swing 
at the ball. There is great interest 
here just now in this national sport 
of America. 

At 4 P. M. Wednesday April 26, 
the Commercials and Literaries, be- 
tween whom there is an old feud in 
baseball, were told to "Play Ball." 
The battery for the Commercials 
was — Eshleman C, Edris P.; for the 
Literaries — Ober C, D. Myers and 
Moore P. The boys on both teams 
showed some real fast work but the 
"Good Old Commercials" finally 
triumphed by the score of 7 to 3. 
There was a good turnout to see the 
game. All are earnestly invited to 
witness these contests. 

The great game of the season 
was staged between the Juniors and 
the Seniors on May the 2nd. Be- 
fore the Juniors realized what had 
happened the Seniors had driven 
six runs across the pan, in the first 
inning before the last runner was 
called out. The Juniors woke up 
by and by and began to play fine 



ball, but the Seniors were not to be 
outdone. The final score was 9 to 
6 in favor of the latter. The bat- 
tery for the Seniors was — S. Ober 
C, D. Myers P. ; for the Juniors — F. 
Trimmer C, and C. Sollenberger P. 
This is the first of a series of games 
to be played between these two 
teams and the interest will be in- 
creasing as the date for the second 
game approaches. 

Tennis is becoming very popular 
on College Hill once more. From 
three to six o'clock the courts are 
filled with players who are eagerly 
awaiting their turn as per schedule. 
This is a great recreational game, 
giving splendid exercise to the stu- 
dent. We are glad many of our 
students are interested in this sport, 
A tournament will be arranged in 
the nerr future and we are sure it 
will prove successful. 

Last but not least are the girls 
who are keeping pace with the 
boys' activities. In tennis they are 
doing excellent work and they have 
started another game which every 
one enjoys. This game is volley 
ball. Two new courts were ar- 
ranged for volley ball and the girls 
are making use of these courts. 
When this game is more thoroughly 
understood, we feel sure it will be- 
come popular. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Dumor an& (tlip&inae 



"A great artist can paint a great 
picture on a small canvas." — D. C. 
Warner. 



It's some consolation in these 
days of heart-breaking taxes to 
know that our public debt was re- 
duced fully one million dollars ev- 
ery day during March. — Editorial. 



Happy Suggestion for Uncle. 

Billy — ''Uncle, make a noise like 
a frog." 

"Why," asked the old man. 
"'Cause when I ask daddy to buy 
me anything, he says, 'Wait till your 
uncle croaks, Billy." 



A Modern Elephant. 

Johnny came back from the cir- 
cus very much excited: "O ma," he 
cried as soon as he got home, "Kate 
spilled some peanuts and what do 
you suppose the elephant did? He 
picked them all up with his vacuum 
cleaner." 



Taking a Chance. 

Magistrate of Irish court (after a 
turbulent scene amongst the gener- 
al public) "The next person that 
yells 'Down with England!' I'll have 
thrown out in the street." 

Prisoner (at once) "Down wid 
England!" 

— Literary Digest. 



The Concecrated Cross I Bear. 

Jackie — "Ma, what are they sing- 
ing about that 'Cross-eyed bear' in 
church," 



Jesus Is a Rock in a Weary Land. 

Mother — "Bob stop throwing 
stones and .come right in." 

Bob — "Why can't I throw stones? 
In Sunday School we sing, "Jesus 
Threw a Rock and Away He Ran." 



Revive Us Again. 

In the church where revivals were 
often held, another revival was be- 
gun. The meeting was opened by 
singing, "Revive Us Again." Little 
Paul came home and said, "O, Moth- 
er, they sang the right piece all 
right — "Revivals again." 



The Country's Call 

Give me men to match my 
mountains ; 

Men, to match my inland plains; 

Men with firmness in their pur- 
pose, 

Men with neurones in their 
brains. 

Give me men to match my prai- 
ries; 

Men, to match my inland seas — - 

Men whose thoughts shall have a 
pathway 

Up to ampler destinies. 

Altered from Thompson. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



|CX)00000000000000000000000000000000<XKX}OOOOOOOOOOOOCXX}OOOOOOC( 

Store Opens 7:00 A. M. Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 

Saturday 10 P. M. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOVYN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of he girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



toooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOl 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 
J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



IQOOOOOQQOOOQQQQOOQQQQQQOQQOQOQQOQOQOQOQOOOQOOOQOQOOOOOOOQOOO 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. 'Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 

Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Gentral Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31 R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Offico 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Multiple Magazine Linotype Equipment 

JOB PRINTING 

See Onr Press Prnt and Told Them 



GREIDERS 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



Remember — 18 West High Street 
For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 
Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



J. W. ZARPD88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO, 

N. York-Chicago-Pittsbiirg 




Lancaster, Penna. 
K H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 1 tins. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PfiNNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOC&OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOJ 

Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



>OO0OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO0OO0O0OOOO0OOOOOOOO0OOOOOOO00O000O000O0OOO< 



Buch Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 



THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Electric Wiring 
House Wiring 



Fixture Repairing 
Contract Work 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



MECHANICSBURG 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

L. L. LININGER 



We Save You Money on Wiring and 
Fixtures 



25 Per Cent. Discount on All Fixtures 



24 W. Marble St., 



MECHANICSBURG 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Hornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNiTZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 }£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 

Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency- for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 

Wholesale Sugar House 

318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. D0RSHEIMER 

Confections Afhletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHON OGR APHS 
I. A. SHIFTER 

39 S. Market St. Elizabethtowa 

UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, :-: MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATTS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. TRINK 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



;oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocxxxxx>ooooooocxxxx>oo 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United State* and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 
^QOQQQOQQOQQQQOOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQOQOQQQOGQQQQQqI 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 

Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



■111! 



!!n!!inil!!IH!IIIIHII!!nill!B!;!::BlllllHII!IB l !!:!BI!l!!Bi:! >l !S:!l:Si: 



■s ! i:-H'!i 'H ;i:iB:;! , :Biiii ! :B!ii;:B!ii:H , .ii:w! 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



■ 



■ 



■ 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. | 



i:Hlli:!n!IIIBIIi:ni!!!IH':ii:B:!IIH l !!!iBIII!IH'ii:;B!:i!!BI!l;:B< , iB:i!;H!!!::B!! 



II1BIH 



■ 

1 



LANCASTER SANITARY MUM CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Bailer 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 

Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 



THE 

ROSS CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 
SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W, King St., Lancaster 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOC5<3000QOOGOOOOO< 

GARBER GARAGE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phone 605A 




FORD and FORDSON 

Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOO 

KLEIN'S 
Milk Chocolate 

And 

Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooboo 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

OQAQOGeaOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCK^OOOOOOOOOOOCKJOOOOOJ 



}O0GGOOGOOOOOGGGOGOOOQOOOGGOGGOOOOOOOOGOOOOOCX3OOOOOOOOOOOGOOO< 



-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man ¥/ho Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 




Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 



In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

W-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 

$7.50 $5.50 

No ^Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 



»oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



EtoiR 

gSLLUBI TQW 




JUNE 
1922 



COOOOOOOOOOOOO(XX>CKXK)CO:XXXXX^ 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 

MISSIMER 8c YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 

MP— MM— ————— 1^— 1111 ■■■■ — i— —« — i II M l ill! —I— — 

MEN'S 
PLAIN SUITS 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at Jower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 
Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 
Come and be convinced. 

This is The Place for You to SAVE 
MONEY! 

i 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OCM30CX30000Q©Q©000©CXXXXXX>QOQCX>':>OCKX^ 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suits, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence issolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXKXXXXX3 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocxxx>( 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

^OCX>OOOOOOGOOOOOOOOO©©000000000000000000000000000000000000000( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, -:- PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOGK)OOOOOCX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXXXXX}000000004 

AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 
Amos G. Coble 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 
Elmer W. Strickler 

F. W. Groff 



B. L. Geyer 
Wm. Klein 
I. N. Hershey 



'OOOOO0OOOOOOOOOeXXXXX3OOOOOOOOOOOOOO000OO0O0OCXX>00O000000000O , 



GANSMAN'S 

3. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Street* 
LANCASTER. -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiesland & Sons 

MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OQGOQOQOQQQQOQOQGQOQOQQOOOQQQOQOOQQQQOQOQOQQQOQQQQOOOOOOOOOQ 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHE1M, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer Jacob G. Hershey R. O. Diehl 

John R. Cassel J. B. Shenk John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder Monroe H. Metzler W. W. Moyer 

• OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 

lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOi 




CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



J. T. 



Florin, Penna. 



GO TO 



HORSTS' 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 
Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

- —AND— 

PAPER HANGER 

5. Market St., Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETH TOWN, PA. 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooobooooooo 



OOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO "5000000 




SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisbnrg, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 



Fresh, Fancy and Staple Groceries, Candies and Lunch Goods 

'The Little Store With Big Business" 

LEVI C. HERSHEY, Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Butter and Condensed Milk 

HERSHEY CONDENSING CO. 



I ELIZABETHTOWN, :: PENNA. 



WHALEN & WHALEN 
Specialists in Fitting Glasses 

2nd Floor McCrory Bldg., 9 

17 East King Street, ' 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



■ 



■ 



COLLEGE HILL 
DAIRY 



Pure Milk and Cream 



Delivered Daily 



S. G. Graybill 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 
FOR 

SHOES OF QUALITY 

GO TO 

EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 

BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store" 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches, 
Ivory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 



MRS. W. S. MORGAN, Pro P rietore M . 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COAL- 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixture* 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

Furnish The 

APPETITE 

And We Will Do The Rest 



FREYMEYER'S BAKERY 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 

LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



Increase Profits by Liming 
Your Soil. 
White Lily Brand 99% Cal. Carbon- 
ate Lime Will Fill Your 
Requirements. 
LANDIS STONE MEAL COMPANY 
Rheems, Penna. 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocxxxxxxx>oooooooooo 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

Farm Implements and Repairs 



Your Patronage Solicited 



Bell p h h°one 6 o1-R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXdOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE BEE HIVE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



Dry Goods, Notions 

AND FANCY GOODS 



Hosiery and Underwear 

ALWAYS THE LATEST 
in our 

Gent's Furnishing Department 



Visit Our Grocery Department 

"FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



BEST OF CANDIES 

We endeavor to keep a most complete line in stock at all 
times and respectfully solicit your .patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 

Something New Every Day 
Cor. S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



©ur College XUtmes 

Volume XIX JUNE Number 9 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtowa 
College, Elizabettitown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

( Elsie Landis 

College News ] 

(J. D. Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 

J. S. Harley J. Z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BEfcitoriale 



Influence of Good Parents 

Good parents are worth countless 
numbers of reformers and social en- 
gineers. Newspapers and maga- 
zines often speak about fathers who 
are drunk, vicious and insane and 
depict mothers who are c.areless, 
indifferent and divorced. What 
about that multitude of good par- 
ents whose names may not appear 
in print? 

Let us place them on the screen 
for a few minutes. We now see 
smiles of approval and looks of dis- 
approval of parents with a fathom- 
less love for their children's suc- 
cess and happiness. We see child- 
ren respond to the touch of these 
natural master teachers and then 
satisfaction lighting up the faces of 
parents when they realize the fruit 
of their planting. We see parents 
placing a golden chain of confidence 
around their children to safeguard 
their future. 

What goes into the first of life 
goes into all of life is an established 
fact. Modern psychology teaches 
us that the child's temperament is 
determined largely between the ages 
of one and three. A sunny disposi- 
tion is caught by the child at his 
early age from the parents or per- 
sons in charge, of the child. 

Children who become successful 
farmers, far sighted business "men, 
silver-tongued orators, and great 
artists almost invariably get their 
impetus of influence during their 



golden age of memory, between the 
ages of eight and fifteen. Good 
mothers of to-day tell us they took 
bake-ology, make-ology and mend- 
ology during this age, under the 
close supervision of their mothers. 

In fact most men and women of 
success attribute their choice of 
books, friends, avocations, vocations 
and standards of living to the 
proved traditions and beliefs of ex- 
perienced fathers and wide-awake 
mothers. Normal children seek the 
highest and best that parents can 
give when they see preference to 
advantages of making certain 
choices in preference to others. 

A Wish For Parents 

Let every day be Parent's Day 
Make roses grow along their way 
and beauty everywhere 
Oh never let their eyes be wet 

With tears of sorrow or regret, 
And never cease to care ! 

Come grown up children and re- 
joice 
That you can hear a parent's voice. 
A day for them? For you they 
gave 
Long years of love and service brave 

For you their youth was spent; 
There was no weight of hurt or care 
Too heavy for their strength to 
bear, 
They followed where you went; 

Their courage and their love sub- 
lime 
You could depend on all the time. 

— Altered from Guest. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



Xitcrarv 



Origin of Mothers' Day 

The *>e. ond Sunday in May has 
come to be recognized as Mothers' 
Day. Miss Anna Jarvis of Philadel- 
phia is known as the originator of 
the idea of observing some special 
day in honor of mothers. In 1907 
she desired to commemorate the 
anniversary of her own mother's 
home-going, which event had oc- 
curred in 1906. She gave express- 
ion to her desires by making an ef- 
fort to have all persons, on a certain 
day, give some special recognition 
or token of remembrance in honor 
of their mother, whether living here 
or beyond. 

Between Easter and Pentecostal 
Day, how beautiful to observe a 
Mothers' Memorial Day ! The white 
carnation, the memory flower, is an 
emblem of the purity and fragrance 
in the lives of holy motherhood. Its 
whiteness stands for purity; its form 
stands for beauty; its fragrance 
stands for love ; its wide field of 
growth, for charity; and its lasting 
quality, for faithfulness — all a true 
mother's virtues. 

Jesus, Home, and Mother are 
words that touch the heart of the 
world deeper than any others. If 
it is an angel mother, she makes 
heaven more inviting; if still in the 
earthly home, she is the constant 
guide and unchangeable friend, 
moving about in sweet ministries 
and loving service. 

Not only are we to brighten the 
lives of our mothers; make them 
more honored, more loved, and more 



protected by their children, but to 
remind sons and daughters, especial- 
ly busy, successful men and women, 
of the unselfish devotion of their 
mothers, and possibly of their own 
selfish neglect to parents. We 
should ask men, women, and chil- 
dren to make their mothers feel 
on that May day that in her child- 
ren's hearts she is the "Queen of 
May." 



Eulogy of Mother 

Mother's love is abiding, perman- 
ent, eternal. Mothers' prayers fol- 
low us w T herever we go. If every- 
one forsake or fail us, still mother 
will never leave us. When the 
arrows of criticism fly thick and 
fast, she will always stand by you. 

In history great men have often 
attributed their greatness to their 
mothers. Who could cast aside 
such a love as mother's love. The 
face and prayers of mother can 
never be forgotten no matter where 
her boy may go. Her prayers are 
often the secret of .his success. 

What can you do to show your 
appreciation to her? It is splendid 
to send her flowers or a letter, but 
the thing that will satisfy her best 
will be your bringing to her a rich, 
consecrated Christian life. Never 
be ashamed to accept mother's 
Bible and her God. If you do less 
than this you will bring pain to her 
heart. Make every day a Mother's 
Day. . 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The Aristocracy of Achievement 

Throughout the history of all ages 
and all peoples and all countries 
there has ever been class distinction. 
No matter what the form of govern- 
ment has been this condition has ex- 
isted and still exists in a more or 
less extensive* form. Even in our 
democracy it is noticeable. And it 
will ever be so. "Some will always 
be above others. Destroy the in- 
equality today, and it will appear 
again tomorrow." 

The highest rank of people have 
always been the leaders. They set 
the pace and the world imitates. Be- 
cause of their responsible position 
in setting the standards for the 
masses, this class of people should 
constitute the noblest and best peo- 
ple in the nation. 

In studying the history of the 
different countries we find several 
ways by which man can become a 
member of an aristocracy. Pro- 
bably the most common way is by 
birth. Many are in this class be- 
cause they have inherited the posi- 
tion, not because of any deeds of 
their own. Others have attained 
the place by marriage. Many of 
our American girls have been eager 
to marry into the nobility of Eng- 
land, to marry men of titles because 
of the prestige they receive. Others 
have reached this enviable position 
because of favor. Perhaps some in- 
fluential man has given them a high 
position more for the sake of friend- 
ship, or for personal interest than 
for their ability to fulfill the obliga- 
tions of their office. And still others 
get there by luck. We too often 



judge a man by the size of his bank 
account. In these days when for- 
tunes are so easily made many men 
unworthy of the high place in life 
are given a name among the aristo- 
cracy. 

But last and best is the man who 
rises by virtue of his own achieve- 
ments. This is the man of whom I 
wish to speak. Today the others 
are loosing their hold and their in- 
fluence upon society. The leaders 
are men who have won their pres- 
tige by accomplishments, not of 
some other person, but of their own. 
The former classes have had their 
day. They must give place to the 
men to whom it rightfully belongs, 
to the men who earn it, to the only 
class of men who are worthy of the 
prestige it gives. . 

Fortunately, in our own beloved 
nation the men at the top have for 
the most part been men who have 
climbed up the ladder of success by 
achievements. 

In our national history we honor 
the names of Washington, Lincoln, 
Roosevelt and scores of others. In 
the history of our education we have 
written upon the walls of time the 
names of such men as Horace Mann, 
Henry Barnard, and Mark Hopkins. 
We revere the names of Longfellow, 
Whittier, Lowell, Irving, and Haw- 
thorne, who have done so much to 
enrich our literature. None of these 
men were geniuses. But each had 
a rich and resourceful personality, 
and each did his bit as he saw an 
opportunity. 

But I wohild not have you think 
that only the men and women whose 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



names are recorded upon the pages 
of history belong to this aristocracy. 
Some of the noblest and truest men 
of this class have never been heard 
of by the world. They have in their 
quiet way been doing the many little 
things. It is the man who is faith- 
ful in a few things that shall be 
made ruler over many things. 

Each one of us may place himself 
in this class since the only qualifica- 
tion is the ability to achieve some- 
thing worth while. There are three 
essentials in achievement, — a train- 
ed hand, an enlightened mind, and 
a definite purpose of heart. 

The one with the trained hand is 
a doer. Christ, the greatest of all 
men, our Master, was a doer. Could 
we do any better than follow his ex- 
ample? All persons who wish to 
climb to the top must be persons of 
action. For "a right act strikes a 
chord that extends through the 
whole universe, touches all mofal 
intelligence, visits every world, vi- 
brates along its whole extent, and 
conveys its vibrations to the very 
bosom of God." But this is imposs- 
ible unless we are able to think 
and to guide our actions. 

This leads us to the second essen- 
tial, an enlightened mind. In order 
to have an enlightened mind we 
must have a good general educa- 
tion. Then we can look at -every 
question squarely from various 
view points. I can almost hear 
some one say, "Oh, I never had a 
chance to go to school." But that 
is no longer a valid excuse. Altho 
going to school is an advantage, it 
is not an essential. Many of the 



men to whom the world will forever 
be indebted were "chimney-corner 
graduates". You can teach your- 
self. And you must. For what 
more is a college than a "place 
where you train yourself and teach 
yourself — under guidance and with 
certain advantages"? With our 
cheap editions of books, newspap- 
ers, and magazines, in the great 
school of life, there is no excuse for 
ignorance. Learn to act and to 
think. But do still more — have an 
aim, an ideal toward which you are 
striving. 

Carlyle said, "Have a purpose 
in life, and having it, -throw into 
your work such strength of mind 
and muscle as God has given you." 
"Providence has nothing good or 
high in store for one who does not 
resolutely aim at something high or 
good. A purpose is the eternal con- 
dition of success." We cannot make 
any plans nor do any definite work 
unless we know toward what we are 
striving. High ideals bring about 
great accomplishments. 

Perhaps this can best be illustrat- 
ed by the story of the life of Dr. 
John Brashear who, with the aid of 
his wife, worked after supper in a 
little shop built by themselves. 
They made what are considered the 
bsst astronomical instruments ever 
produced. When the Canadian 
Government wished to have the larg- 
est telescope in the world they 
turned to Brashear. Dr. Brashear 
said, "If there is anything in my life 
uncommon it is because from the 
time I was a boy, no matter what 
I tried to do, I tried to do it a little 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



better than it had ever been done be- 
fore." High ideals such as this are 
not without their reward. When 
Governor Brumbaugh was asked to 
name the greatest man in Pennsyl- 
vania he named Dr. Brashear. 
Charles M. Schwab says of him, "Of 
all the men of fame and achieve- 
ment I have ever known, he is the 
most wonderful. 

Among the many ideals of man- 
kind, God has never ceased to be 
the one true aim of all human as- 
piration. 

So with the hands of a doer, the 
mind of a thinker, and a heart throb- 
bing with a noble purpose, greater 
things can be accomplished than 
they have realized in the past. 

The most beautiful thought about 
it is that these qualities can be pos- 
sessed by you and me. It is for us 
to say whether or not we will pay 
the price of preparation. This prep- 
aration will cost self-denial and self- 
sacrifice, it will cost the denial of 
many hours of pleasure and amuse- 
ment, it will cost hours of .hard toil 
and study, it will cost dollars and 
cents, it may cost the price of fine 
apparel, or the price of a meal or 
two. But it is worth the cost, for 
while you toil you gain patience, 
perseverance, sympathy, apprecia- 
tion of the great and noble, and tol- 
erance for others, along with in- 
creased mental capacity and in- 
creased ability in adding your bit to 
relieve the great needs of society, — 
all of which goes to make up a life 
of service and achievement. 

The time for us to choose the class 
in which we would have our names 



enrolled is now, while we are in our 
youth. There are many opportuni- 
ties for service calling to the serious- 
minded young men and women of 
to-day. If we do not answer the call 
some one will suffer. Would that 
all would choose a life of the great- 
est possible service to-day! Would 
that all would choose to place their 
names among those who are mem- 
bers of an ^aristocracy not doomed 
to perish and decay with the ravages 
of time, but destined to be crowned 
with the immortal heroes of the ages 
after life's persistent struggle shall 
have exalted the lowly workman to 
a pinnacle of undying glory! 

Alta Nunemaker 



Good resolutions are for the 
weak. It is better to be able to look 
back to a day well lived than ahead 
to a month of promises. 

The Lamp. 



So when you walk in a field, look 

down 

Lest you tramp on a daisy's crown, 

But in a city look always high 

And watch the beautiful clouds 

go by. James Stephens. 



Do you enjoy giving things to 
people you don't like? Of course 
you don't. Nobody does. That be- 
ing true, why haven't we sense 
enough to remember with the phi- 
losopher: "You cannot envy, de- 
spise, or hate another without giv- 
ing him some of your time." — Sparks 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Marks of True Greatness 

Alice Gary says: 

"True worth is in being, not seem- 
ing-, 

In doing each day that goes by 
Some little good, not in dreaming 

Of great things to do by and by." 

True greatness is more than sta- 
ture. It lies not in wealth, nor in 
social position; not in what men ssy 
or think of us. Men great in the 
eyes of the world may be unknown 
to Him who will judge and reward 
true greatness. True greatness lies 
in greatness of soul. And God 
in His infinite wisdom can 
and does distinguish true greatness 
from the so-called greatness promp- 
ted by a desire tor honor. 

Jesus said, "If any man desire to 
be great, he shall be servant of all." 
So we so*? that service is a nrmrk of 
true greatness. The greatest, the 
richest, the strongest is truly great 
only as he is servant of the weak and 
poor. 

Real genuine service to mankind 
is prompted by love, and is not pos- 
sible without humility. H^v beau- 
tiftf! is a lif r ' of service! No better 
example of true greataess through 
&• i vice can be found than the life 
of CI rist. H s life was a busy life; 
but no matter how busy he was, he 
was always ready to help those in 
need. It was the great Jcve iJe ^ad 
for mankind that jprompted Him 
to stop by the wayside to heal the 
sick, and to give sight to the blind. 
It was His great love and compassion 
that prompted Him to tarry with ! he 
multitude and feed the five thousand 
hungry souls. The truly great one 



must be humble and have the spirit 
of helpfulness which was shown in 
the action of that student who, when 
she saw an old lady on her way to 
church drop her Bible, ra,n and 
picked it up for her. The truly great 
must also be kind and sympathetic 
and courteous in their daily life. 

Another mark of true greatness 
is self-control ; for if a man have all 
the other marks of success, he can- 
not be really successful and truly 
great without being able to control 
himself. Besides controlling his mo- 
tor activities, he must also be able 
to control his mental life. In what- 
ever vocation one is engaged, one 
comes to places where it is easy to 
think of one's failures and discourag 
ing circumstances, and forget the 
sunshine of the past and the bright 
hopes of the future. 
It's easy enough to be pleasant 

When life flows along like a song, 

But the man worth while 
Is the man who will smile, 
When everything goes dead wrong. 

Some one else has said, "Failure, 
to the man who receives it right, is 
only a spur to press forward in the 
fight. It takes a big soul to receive 
failure aright; to look on the bright 
side when darkness is all around; 
to appreciate our blessings in the 
face of disappointments ; to be sin- 
cere and honest under all trying 
circumstances. 

Dr. Raffles said, "I have made it 
a rule never to be with any one ten 
minutes without trying to make him 
happier." 

Fanny Crosby was deprived of 
her eyesight; but she didn't let the 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMBS 



thought of her infirmities dominate 
in her life. She thought of what 
she enjoyed and what she could do 
for humanity. And as a result of 
self control and her aim to serve, 
we have the beautiful hymns which 
she wrote. 

Another mark of true greatness 
is abandonment of self. 

Brooding over one's cares is a 
mark of selfishness and brings mis- 
ery all around. But the truly great 
man is the one who forgets himself 
and is happy in serving others. A 
certain author has said, "He who 
does nothing for others does noth- 
ing for himself." Mary Lyon had 
the welfare of others at heart. She 
had the chance to live selfishly in 
luxury, but she chose rather to give 
her life to pave the way for wo- 
man's education and so establish a 
school for girls. M. M. 



Our life is a keyboard. The mas- 
ter's fingers will sweep over it, and 
a weary world will catch notes of 
melody as we pass along. The life 
that is in tune with God is keyed to 
the note "of God. R. Miller. 



Simple Housekeeping 

Pres. Harding has set a real ex- 
ample in economy. The expense of 
running the White House; includ- 
ing the executive offices, was only 
$15,010 for the month of February. 
The average cost for a number of 
years has been between $20,000 and 
$25,000 per month. • 

Current Events. 



Education and World Peace 

Our advance toward world peace 
is the result of our advance in edu- 
cation. The two go hand in hand. 
We have advanced'not only in know- 
ledge of abstract science, but we 
now know more fully than ever be- 
fore the existing conditions of our 
country as a result of the past war. 
We also have a broader view of 
the world at large, and in these days 
of universal unrest we see the need 
of making a righteous adjustment. 

In the early days, war was the 
chief organ of civilization. When 
a question came up and the parties 
concerned did not agree, fighting 
was started. But this should not be 
the case now. We have been e.la- 
ca^ed, and we know that the great 
international problems confronting 
the world today cannot be settled 
by fighting. 

JL-.ve you not noticed that when 
two nations engage in war to settle 
a question, They do not settle it by 
fighting? War comes to a close, 
but there is no peace. Parties are 
still at war — not in arms, perhaps, 
but intellectually at war. The spirit 
of peace and good will to men does 
not come as a result of war. The 
two parties must get together in a 
conference and come to a common 
agreement before there will be 
peace. 

There must be peace if there is 
to he prosperity; and a certain writ- 
er has said that at the present time 
revival abroad must precede pros- 
perity at home. We cannot prosper 
if other rations do not prosper. No 
nation is big enough and. strong 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



enough to live alone and continue 
in peace and prosperity. 

There must be cooperation be- 
tween America and European nat- 
ion-. Our educated leaders know 
thi: They see that instead of trying 
to solve our national problems as 
has been done in the last decades, 
it is better to meet with the leaders 
of other nations and take up the in- 
ternational problems. They see that 
our national questions are a part of 
tne international problems. 

It has been sail that the United 
States grew as much that one week 
when the Disarmament Conference 
convened in Washington as it had 
during the previous forty years. We 
mar'c a great stride toward world 
peace and world welfare. 

We now know that there is an 
economic relationship between the 
nations. Politics can cast this fact 
aside or ignore it, but it will assert 
itself again and again until it is 
recognized. 

"All for one and one for all" is 
said by some to be too altruistic a 
slogan for a world composed as ours 
is at present. We must have a mot- 
to something like this one to direct 
the policies of the various nations if 
there is to be continued progress in 
industry as well as in education. 

We are making progress in educa- 
tion, but cooperation with other na- 
tions is necessary in order to contin- 
ue it. 

Abraham Lincoln, while on his 
way to the city, forgot about his 
clothes for the time being and as- 
sisted a pig out of the mire. His 
kindness to all classes of people as 
well as to all living creatures reveal- 



ed his greatness of soul. 

Respect for others especially our 
elders and their ideas is also a mark 
of true greatness. . Washington lov- 
ed his mother dearly and respected 
her highly. That policeman who 
is especially concerned that the 
aged ones and the small children 
pass his crossing in safety is a real 
n, an. 

Last but not least, one must have* 
an aim and must strive to attain to 
it. One does not dare to live with- 
out a goal toward which his living 
shall be bent, for no one can be 
truly great who does not strive 
with a definite purpose. One must 
look up. not down; forward, not 
back; and his ambition must be di- 
rected and inspired by God in order 
to attain to greatness. 

When world peace is once estab- 
lished and when the nations are 
working for world welfare instead 
of secretly planning destruction 
of life and property, there will be 
more time and more money given 
and used for the cause of education. 
It has been estimated that after the 
plan of the Disarmament Confer- 
ence is in effect United States will 
save $100,000,000 per year, an av- 
erage of $3.00 for each tax payer. 
This may be used for better schools 
in place of keeping up battleships 
and armies. If after the present 
war debt is paid, no more lives, no 
more property, and no more money 
need be used for war, but all will 
work for the advancement, of edu- 
cation, learning and culture, who 
can predict what strides we will be 
able to make in the next few de- 
cades alone? M. M. M. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The Eternal Conflict. 

The struggle is now on. The con- 
flict is being waged. It is a contest 
of error against* truth, and truth 
against error. Even since the trans- 
gression of Adam, man had to en- 
gage in this conflict. Until the end 
of time he will have to do with it. 
My hearers, it is for your encourage- 
ment that this message is delivered. 
The responsibility of the final out- 
come rests with you, parents of the 
home, teachers of the school, min- 
isters of the church, citizens of the 
state. 

The home is first and fundamen- 
tal. The home makes the first 
stamp and sets the first seal upon 
the plastic nature of the child. The 
home impresses the first marks of 
character upon the child. It uncov- 
ers the moral fountain, chooses its 
channels, and gives the stream its 
first impulse. The home gives the 
first tone to desires. It furnishes 
ingredients which either sweeten or 
embitter the whole cup of life. It 
is you, parents of America, who 
send the burning torch of enlighten- 
ment and self-control down thru 
the ages. You must help these 
young Americans to control their in- 
born passions. The training you 
give in the home will either make 
or mar character. Your influence 
is either a blessing or a curse. The 
influence you throw around your 
child is silent, calm, yet irresistible 
and permanent. It is like a calm, 
deep stream that moves on silently 
but with overwhelming power. 

The home is where the roots of 
habit strike deep into human na- 



ture. Good habits formed in the 
home will transform the community 
and the world. Great is the power 
of love for the right started in the 
home — it undermines like a wave, 
it rends like an earthquake, it melts 
like a fire, it inspires like music, it 
binds like a chain, it detains like a 
good story, it cheers like a sun- 
beam. 

The most renowned statesmen, 
the most eloquent lecturers, the 
greatest benefactors of mankind, 
all attribute their greatness to the 
fostering influence of home and 
mother. The home is not a school 
of solemnity and rigid discipline. It 
is not a place where virtue is 
made a task and progress a sharp 
necessity. It is a place for free and 
easy exercise of all desirable graces, 
where obedience is a pleasure, dis- 
cipline a joy, improvement a self- 
satisfying delight. 

Parents of America, appreciate 
the responsibility devolving upon 
you, seize your opportunities of 
training the youth of the land. 
Guide your children so that their 
souls may not be bound by slavery 
to bad habits. It is for you to de- 
cide whether your children will be 
adherents of truth or allies of error. 
Practice no deception in their pres- 
ence, allow no exaggerations in con- 
versation. Remember that every- 
thing which leaves the boundaries 
of truth must enter the precincts of 
falsehood. Remember that your 
contribution to the triumph of truth 
plays a large part in the eternal 
struggle. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Next in importance to the home is 
the school. The problems and bur- 
dens of the home are too many and 
too heavy for over-worked mothers 
to cope with adequately. The 
school steps in to relieve the home 
of its burdens and responsibilities 
in this struggle of truth against er- 
ror. Teachers and educators of 
America, listen to the voices of long 
ago, so long ago, yet so clear and 
near in their tones that you can hear 
the warning note sounding even 
now. Be careful and vigilant in 
this age-long conflict. It is a trum- 
pet call of ancient visions of free- 
dom coming across the centuries to 
the armies of education in America. 
Listen again in the quiet of our 
schools and you will hear the echo- 
ing thunder of a long-fought war. 
It is not yet ended. 

It is the war between the freedom 
of knowledge and the slavery of ig- 
norance. That warfare is the one 
business of education. It is the one 
reason why we need schools. 

Teachers and patrons, help the 
school to fulfill the need for which 
it was created. Give your child a 
liberal training and fit him for that 
for which he is adapted. Broaden his 
life and make it better worth living. 
Assist him in getting high ideals 
that will transfer into actual life. 

School education is in this day a 
mighty engine of progress. The 
teacher is an emancipator. The 
school delivers the children from ig- 
norant prejudice and counteracts 
tradition. The school brings har- 
mony, truth, and freedom into the 
life of the pupil who is waging the 
conflict against ignorance.. 



Teachers, educators, you are en- 
gaged in an eternal conflict. It is 
your sincere and untiring efforts in 
the school which will determine 
the success or failure of individuals 
and the nation. It is not an easy 
task. It is not a struggle againsi. 
flesh and blood, but against the un- 
seen powers of darkness, moral and 
intellectual darkness. Quit you like 
men, put on the whole armor of 
faith. Face your tasks unflinching- 
ly with renewed courage, greater 
zeal and a more vigorous enthus- 
iasm. Your efforts are not in vain 
but as the labor so is the reward. 

Of the institutions that contribute 
to the triumph of truth, the church 
has a very important- part. The 
church is the divinely instituted 
guardian of all the forces of right. 
It also is an educational institution. 
It stands for the spread of the high- 
est kind of knowledge and ultimate 
standards of conduct and right. The 
church is entrusted with the train- 
ing of the youth in religious educa- 
tion and spiritual truth. Unless 
training in religion and the great 
facts of the Fatherhood of God, the 
brotherhood of man, the divinity of 
Christ and the inspiration of the 
Bible keep apace with the training 
in secular things, the efforts of the 
church will be in vain and the con- 
flict lost. There never was greater 
need for the church to assert itself 
in the fulfillment of its mission. 

You, ministers of His flock like 
shepherds of old, lead on and the 
sheep will follow. Men and women 
from all walks of life have entrust- 
ed their souls to your guidance. 
They confide in you in times of 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



greatest joy and' times of deepest 
sorrow. Sinner and saint alike come 
to you for counsel and encourage- 
ment. Great is your opportunity 
arid tremendous your responsibility. 
You have been entrusted with the 
spiritual welfare of individuals and 
the nation. Your work begins at the 
cradle and ends at the grave. Re- 
gardless of position, intelligence or 
wealth, men and women everywhere 
are living temples in which the soul 
lives and the spirit dwells. These 
temples, the bodies of men, easily 
become defiled. It is your ministry 
that is so much needed on the - part 
of individuals to keep them from fal- 
ling and to direct their feet in right 
paths. A large part of the burden 
of tiding the youth from boyhood 
and girlhood to manhood and wom- 
anhood rests upon you, shepherds of 
the flock. Educate these youths to 
the truth, encourage them to be 
brave and stand firm, and they will 
prove faithful. Allow them to sow 
their wild oats, and they and the 
world will reap the harvest, they 
will have paid the price, their lives 
will be blasted, and the conflict lost 
forever. But teach these youths 
whole-souled obedience to duty, 
whole-hearted devotion to the high- 
est and absolute truth, and the in- 
stitution of the church will have per- 
formed its mission and the right out- 
come of the conflict will be certain. 

The fourth and last factor which 
we have chosen to discuss is the 
state of citizenry of our nation. 
What can the home do, what do the 
schools amount to, of what value is 
the influence of the church, unless 



the citizenry which go to make up 
the rank and file of our communi- 
ties and nation are willing to incor- 
porate the ideals of these institu- 
tions in their standards of conduct, 
laws, and jurisprudence. It too 
frequently is the case that there are 
double standards of living which 
make for confusion and internal 
weakness. For a nation to be ir- 
resistible for the right, the citizenry 
of that nation will have to be united 
on the highest planes of living. Un- 
less the citizenry is willing to im- 
bibe into its life and everyday con- 
duct only the highest ideal of the 
Christian home, the school and the 
Christian church, the efforts of these 
other institutions are futile. A na- 
tion enjoys the protection, intellect- 
ual freedom, and religious liberty 
that it does because of the influence 
of its Christian homes, schools, and 
churches. 

Citizens of this commonwealth, 
what are you willing to do to im- 
prove your community that the next 
generation may carry on this con- 
flict for triumph of right even m ire 
effectively? You need not be a 
great statesman nor a pow?rful 
lender to accomplish this. Allow 
civic duty to become a part of your 
Christianity. Make your community 
a fit place in which to rear the ris- 
ing generation entrusted to your 
care . 

Parents, patriarchs of the home, 
teachers, monarchs of the school, 
ministers, shepherds of the ■lock, 
citizens, members of society. Fight 
on brave hearts, falter not thru 
dark disaster nor thru bri/ht for- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



tune. The noble cause for which 

you strive is sure of victory. Error 

will l>e abolished, truth wiH triumph. 

Stella M. Walker 



The Character of Newsboy 

The newsboys are in general a 
class of poor boys. Psychology 
teaches us that the newsboy's mind 
is far more developed than the or- 
dinary boy's mind. It is very tire- 
some work to sell newspapers. It 
requires the greatest initiative, 



strong personality, determination, 
ability to pass off a stern rebuke, 
and the ambition to try again. The 
newsboy has one of the most difficult 
tasks that there are to do. He must 
please everybody and not mind if 
no one pleases him. The newsboy 
studies human nature. He knows 
a man's inclination at first sight. He 
can almost read a man's character. 
The newsboy becomes very alert 
and ambitious, and he exercisi-s 
good judgment. Many newsboys 
become leaders in our land because 
of their ample experience. 



College Iftews 



The last prayer-meeting for this 
school year was conducted by the 
Senior Class. The program consist- 
ed of discussions, music, and prayer. 

Miss Martha Oberholser, a mem- 
ber of the Senior class who is finish- 
ing the Junior College Course in Ed- 
ucation this year, entertained at her 
house the members of the Senior 
Class. All had a splendid time. 

The members of the student body 
who had charge of the outpost Sun- 
day School at Stevens Hill gave their 
farewell address to their pupils on 
Sunday evening May 29. 

Miss Anna Wolgemuth, the edit- 
or-in-chief of Our College Times, 
entertained the members of the 
staff on Thursday evening June 1. 
After a short program refreshments 
were served. 



Miss Lois Falkenstein entertained 
Miss Esther Trimmer, Miss Hannah 
Sherman, and Miss Elsie Landis at 
her home May 31. 

Professor J. G. Myer, president of 
the College, entertained the Senior 
Class at his home on College Avenue 
on the evening of June 2. All the 
Seniors who were present say they 
had a delightful time. 

Recently Professor Rose gave an 
interesting talk in the College Chap- 
el on the prospective library rules 
for next year. 

Miss Brubaker — "A lecturer at 
the Lancaster County Institute said 
that every girl who teaches in the 
rural school should change her bow 
once in a while." 

Mr. Carl Smith Dow, a student of 
the University of Pennsylvania gave 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



an address before the two welfare 
associations at the College on Friday 
evening at six o'clock. His subject 
was "The Challenge to the College 
Man." 

The students and teachers of Eliz- 
abethtown have again showed their 
liberality by giving not only their 
quota of six hundred dollars but a 
larger sum of seven hundred and 
fifty dollars toward the erection of 
a Boys' Building in Show Yong, Chi- 
na. The Colleges of the Church of 
the Brethren have been requested 
to raise $7,500 for the erection of 
this building. 

Mrs. Jenkins, the community 
nurse for Lititz and its vicinity, 
spoke to the two welfare associa- 
tions on the evening of May 25. 
She spoke on the subject of "Ideals 
for our Young People." 



The Spring Ouiing 

The student body enjoyed a vaca- 
tion on Memorial Day. They spent 
the day in the annual spring outing. 

Lunch was packed by members 
of the faculty and students who 
were willing to lend a helping hand 
to the social committee. Everything 
was in readiness to start at 9 :00 



o'clock. Two hay-ladder wagons 
were procured from a farmer living 
near the College. The students 
were ready to enjoy a straw ride to 
Governor's Stables, a famous spot 
of Revolutionery interest located 
near Falmouth. After lunch was 
served the students hiked about a 
mile thru the woods to 'the river. 
After several hours of enjoyment 
there, they returned to Governor's 
Stables. They were homeward 
bound by 4:30 P. M. and reached 
College Hill by 6:30 P. M. Every 
student says they had an enjoyable 
time. 



Faculty is Entertained by Seniors 

A few weeks ago the senior class 
decided to show at least part of 
their appreciation to the faculty for 
what they have done for them while 
here at school. A reception was 
scheduled and the faculty was in- 
vited to attend a program given by 
the senior class in the College Chap- 
el. After the program they went to 
the Commercial Hall which was 
tastefully decorated in the class col- 
ors and partook of refreshments. 
At ten o'clock promptly the fare- 
wells were given. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



TReliaious flotes 



Prayer Meeting 

The prayer meeting on Wednes- 
day evening May 31 was conducted 
by the Senior Class. Ephraim Hertz- 
ler, the president of the class, had 
charge of the meeting. The song, 
"Higher Ground," in keeping with 
the motto, "Gradatim" (upward 
step by step), was sung. Mr. Fran- 
cis Barr conducted the devotional 
exercises. Lester Royer discussed 
the topic, " What Elizabethtown 
College has done for me morally." 
Minnie Myer told what college life 
has done for her in the spiritual life. 
Mr. Willoughby told us what we 
owe to our Alma Mater. Nathan 
Meyer toolothe larger field telling 
us what our relation is to the world 
as we leave school life and launch 
forth into service. Miss Martz re- 
cited the poem, "Gradatim." A 
mixed quartette rendered several 
selections. Each one left the prayer 
meeting feeling that he had been 
benefited by the exercises. 



Chapel Echoes 

We should think of life as a day. 
Morning is the youth or spring time ; 
noon is the prime of life ; evening 
represents the close of life. What 
kind of day would you select to re- 
present your life?— of course it 
would be a beautiful spring day. 
Often as the day starts so it will end. 
You will die as you live. You can- 
not expect to have a bright, prospec- 



tive death if your days are dark and 
gloomy. We are always happy 
when we come to the end of a suc- 
cessful day. Give yourself over to 
God during the night and let Him 
have charge of you and use you as 
He will. If you close a day on earth 
in the attitude of prayer so you will 
close your life. 

A. C. Baugher. 

Children of God must be lights' of 
the world. Under the old dispen- 
sation men lived on a certain level, 
but when Christ came he gave high- 
er standards. Some folks live on 
peaks, others are lower down in life. 
It is impossible to keep right with 
God unless we grow. People often 
cast out of their lives just the things 
which would help to lift them. If 
you can't live a good Christian life 
at a Christian school you can't do 
it any place. 

R. W. Schlosser. 

There are certain props of charac- 
ter which help to keep us on high 
planes of living. Each individual 
has at least one main prop ; but is 
it the right kind of prop? Honor 
may be a main prop, but if it leans, 
then the standards will fall. Repu- 
tation may also be a prop to hold 
up the life of an individual. Inspir- 
ation is a motivating force at school. 
Some people build on that. Friends 
keep us close to ideals. Good homes 
and training should be factors in our 
lives. But not one of these dare be 
the main prop. The main prop of 
each life must be Jesus Christ. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




It is singular that the Class of 
1911 consisted of only - twenty-two 
members, and yet represented ten 
courses of study. 

R. W. Schlosser and L. D. Rose 
completed the College Course in 
that year, receiving their degree 
from Ursinus College. Prof. Rose 
taught school in western Pennsyl- 
vania for a number of years. He 
kept in close touch with his Alma 
Mater and established a Senior Ora- 
torical Contest at the College by do- 
nating the prizes from year to year. 
He has been our efficient College 
Librarian during the past school 
year. 

Prof. Schlosser was a teacher in 
his Alma Mater for some years. Dur- 
ing 1920 and '21, he directed the 
College Endowment Campaign. The 
success of this campaign was a great 
step toward the standardization of 
Elizabethtown College, which was 
finally realized December 21, 1921. 
Prof. Schlosser received his A. M. 
degree at Columbia University this 
year. He will be welcomed as a 
member of next year's faculty on 
College Hill. 



S. P. Sumpman, M. Gertrude 
Hess, H. K. Eby, and Jacob E. 
Myers represented the Pedagogical 
Course. Rev. Sumpman is now pas- 
tor of the Evangelical Church at 
Pottstown. He has been a special 
student at the College for some time 
and receives his A. B. degree in the 
Class of '22. 

M. Gertrude Hess taught music 
at the College for a while after 
graduation. She is now known as 
the wife of Prof. J. H. Fries of Mc- 
Pherson College, Kansas. They 
have resided in Kansas since 1916. 
There are three children in the 
home, — Harold, Ramona Ruth and 
Mildred. 

H. K. Eby and Jacob E. Myers 
have continued steadily in the teach- 
ing profession, the former as Prin- 
cipal of the Hollidaysburg High 
School and the latter as teacher of 
Latin in the Hanover High School. 
Mr. Myers is also a minister of the 
gospel and a very active Sunday 
School leader. 

Nora Reber, Mamie Keller and 
Lillian Falkenstein completed the 
English Scientific Course in 1911. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



These ladies, after teaching a short 
time, became home-makers. Both 
Miss Reber and Miss Falkenstein 
met their future husbands while 
students at Bethany Bible School, 
Chicago. Nora Reber became the 
bride of F. M. Hollenberg of Canada 
in June, 1919. They are now locat- 
ed at Vada, India, as missionaries. 
Marcia Mae arrived in their home 
last October. 

Lillian Falkenstein was married 
to William A. Willoughby, of # New 
Mexico. During the years in which 
they lived in Chicago, William 
George and Evelyn were welcomed 
into their home. They enjoy life on 
College Hill after having lived in 
the city for some years. Mrs. Will- 
oughby taught French and Spanish 
during the past year, and Mr. Will- 
oughby is completing the A. B v . 
Course as a member of the Class of 
'22. 

Mamie Keller has for some years 
been known as the wife of Prof. L. 
W. Leiter. They are the fond par- 
ents of Eugene, Emerson, Laban, Jr., 
and Dorothy Leiter. Leah Ida, the 
oldest of the children, was removed 
out of this happy home by death 
last November. 

Prof. L. W. Leiter was also a 
member of the '11 class. He com- 
pleted the College Preparatory 
Course. He was elected to the min- 
istry in the Antietam congregation 
and served that congregation faith- 
fully while residing there and also 
for some time after returning to 
College Hill as professor of Biology. 

Emma S. Miller represented the 
English Bible Course. She has been 



an active home missionary at var- 
ious places ever since. She is now 
engaged in city mission work in 
Chanute, Kansas. 

Prof. Tillman H. Ebersole, also a 
Preparatory Senior of '11, is a teach- 
er in the Elizabethtown schools and 
director of a local chorus. 

Prof. E. Merton Crouthamel, 
another Preparatory Senior of '11, 
has been teacher of mathematics 
in the High School at Souderton, Pa. 
Mrs. Mary Hershey Crouthamel is 
also a teacher in Souderton. She 
is receiving her A.B. degree with our 
'22 Class, having completed the re- 
quired work some years ago. Prof. 
Crouthamel completed- the A. B. 
Course at Juniata College. 

F. L. Olweiler, the fourth repre- 
sentative of the Preparatory Course 
in '11, is now Secretary of the W. 
A. Withers Shoe Company of our 
town. Viola E. Withers, 09, became 
his bride during the war-time. 
Shortly after, he left to serve his 
country in France. They are now 
the proud parents of Francis, Jr. 

Rhoda E. Markley, now a stenog- 
rapher in Buffalo, N. Y., and Henry 
J. Schaeffer, now a clerk in Butte, 
Montana, were the Seniors in the 
Advanced Commercial Course. 

Alice M. Garber, residing near 
Elizabethtown; B. Irene Wise, Pri- 
vate Secretary of the Kreider Shoe 
Company; and Elma Brandt, now 
Mrs. L. F. Blanck of Manheim, were 
seniors in the Stenographic Course. 
In the Blanck home are four sturdy 
sons, — John C, Harvey R., Luther 
G., and Leo F. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



James Smith completed the Bank- 
ing Course in 1911. He is a clerk 
in the Kreider Shoe Mfg. Company, 
Elizabethtown. 

Isaac S. Wampler of the Music 
Teachers' Course returned to his 
native state, Virginia. He is a sales- 
man for the Central Chemical Co., 
Harrisonburg, Va. 

Harry B. Longenecker has the 
distinction of having been the first 
graduate in the Agricultural Course. 
Mr. Longenecker and his family are 
now pleasantly located on a farm 
near Annville. 



Mildred I. Bonebrake, '17, teach- 
er of Shorthand and Typewriting 
at the College, recently entertained 
a few of her friends at the home of 
Paul K.Hess '15 and Mrs.Ruth Buch- 
er Hess '16. She announced her en- 
gagement to Daniel V. Harshman, 
a student in the School of Commerce 



and Finance at the College. The 
Alumni Family extends congratula- 
tions to these worthy young people. 

Bessie M. Rider, '03, a missionary 
nurse in China since '16, has return- 
ed to America on furlough. She 
will represent the Ping Ting Church 
as delegate to the Conference at 
Winona Lake, Ind. She will then 
come to Elizabethtown, her home. 
She writes that she is bringing with 
her a large banner for the College. 
The people of certain Chinese towns 
which had received help during 
famine time made a number of ban- 
ners and presented them to our 
Mission as tokens of appreciation. 
Each of our Brethren Colleges is to 
receive one of these large, beautiful 
banners. 

Anna Jane Hackman arrived in 
the home of Jacob Z. Hackman, '13, 
on April 23. 




As the end of the school year is 
drawing nigh base ball is becoming 
the favorite pastime. Quite a few 
games have been played with great 
interest on both sides. 

Literary vs. Commercial 

The Literaries and Commercials, 
between whom there is an old fued 
in baseball, were called to action 
for the second game of the season. 
The Commercials, by their splendid 



team work captured the first con- 
test. The boys came back with 
a determination to dethrone their 
rivals in the second game. At 4:15 
P. M. came the voice of the umpire, 
"Play Ball," when the Commercials 
went to bat. The hard hitting Fin- 
anciers could do nothing with the 
pitching of D. Myers. For three 
innings he had them whiffing the 
air. The Literary boys came to bat 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



with a grin. They tried to knock 
the ball out of the lot but the 
stonewall defense of their oppon- 
ents cut down all the rallies of the 
opposing team. 

In the second inning, however, 
one run was sent across the pan 
which places the Literary boys in 
the lead. In the fourth came the 
disaster for the Literaries. The 
Commercials began to connect with 
the ball. The infielders of the 
opposing force could not get to- 
gether and hold the ball, and be- 
fore they could redeem themselves 
the Commercials had driven three 
runs across the plate, which proved 
to be the winning runs. On the 
other hand the skillful pitching of 
Edris backed up by the strong de- 
fense kept the hard hitting boys to 
two runs. The final score was 6 to 
2 in favor of the Commercials, thus 
ending the series 2 to in favor of 
the Commercials. 

The batteries were : 
Commercials Literaries 

Edris, P. D. Myers, P. 

Eshleman, C. Ober, C. 

Juniors vs. Seniors 

The Juniors and Seniors crossed 
bats in the second game of the 
series, Tuesday evening May 23. 
The Juniors having been handed a 
defeat in the first combat went into 
the game with a desperate deter- 
mination to win. 

The Juniors were first up to the 
bat but somehow could not get into 
the old time form even though they 
did not lack confidence. The Sen- 
iors, however, came to bat strong 
and catching the Junior team off 



guard piled up three runs in their 
half of the first inning. 

The game for the next two inn- 
ings was nothing less than a pitch- 
ing duel. Edris and Sollenberger 
both pitching a fine brand of ball. 

The game had gone to the fourth 
inning and the score stood 3 — 0. in 
favor of the Seniors. The critical 
moment had 'come, something 
must be done. The Juniors realiz- 
ing this, opened the fourth framj 
with an old time rally and pounded 
the pitchers delivery for three tall- 
ies making the score tie at 3 — 3. 
It looked as though the Juniors were 
off, having found their old time bat 
and stride. The Seniors were re- 
tired in order and this inning also 
showed the real calibre of the Jun- 
ior infield. Altho the Seniors hit 
the ball it was to no avail. Every 
Junior was on his toes, playing like 
a professional athlete. 

The spectators were in an awful 
suspense, and at this stage of the 
game the interest ran exceedingly 
high. 

The Juniors opened the fifth inn- 
ing with snap and dash and suc- 
ceeded to put another run across. 
This appeared to all to be the winn- 
ing run. But the Seniors came from 
the rear and uncorking that mys- 
terious ninth inning easily put two 
runs over and the game ended 5 — 4 
in favor of the Seniors. 

It is needless to say that it was 
the game of the season. But as 
fate would have it the upper class 
men again triumphed and were 
proclaimed by all "kings of the 
diamond." 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Dumor anfc (Llipuinas 



Love in June 

Somethin' meller in the air 
Bees and blossoms everywhere 
Really don't intend to shirk 
But I jest can't get to work 
Seein' green new feathered trees 
Makes me trimbly in the knees 
Jest fall over in the shade 
In the greenest grass that's made 
Snoozin' to the bluebird's tune 
Anybody knows it's June. 

Feller watches dronin' bees 
Courtin' 'mong the blossom trees 
Birds is lovin' right in sight 
Don't mind strangers — "not a mite" 
So when I met Mary Lou 
Kissed her for "How d'ye do?' 
Told her she I love the best 
Got a shylike timid "yes" — 
No use talkin : any loon 
Knows 'at love is part of June. 



You Win, No. 3 

Three boys were boasting about 
the earning capacity of their fath- 
ers. The first said "My father can 
write a few lines, call it poetry and 
sell it for $10.00." The second said, 
"My father can draw a few lines, 
put a few dots on them, call it mu- 
sic and sell it for $25.00." The 
third said, "Huh! That's hothin'. 
My dad's a preacher and he can 
write a few lines, get up and read 
them in church and it takes six men 
to carry the money down the aisle." 

—Forbes. 



The pleasantest things in life are 
pleasant thot's and the greatest art 
in life is to have as many of them 
as possible. 



He is a great man who accepts 
the lemons that Fate hands out to 
him and uses them to start a lemon- 
ade stand. — Elbert Hubbard. 



Recipe for Opportunity 

2 willing hands 

1 alert brain 

1 strong will 

Season with loving kindness and 
you. have a successful life to serve 
at any time. 



When the shadows cloud life's sky 
And it seems no use to try 

When you catch no gleam of 
brightness in fair lot. 
Count your blessings o'er and o'er 
And in counting up the score 

Just be thankful for the things 
you haven't got. 



Proverbs 

He who knows not, and knows not 
that he knows not — be is a fool. — 
Shun Him. 

He who knows not and knows that 
he knows not, he is ignorant — Teach 
Him. 

He who knows and knows not that 
he knows, he is asleep — Awake 
Him. 

He who knows and knows that he 
knows he is a Senior — Follow Him. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX9000000000( 



Store Opens 7:00 A. M. 



Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 



Saturday 10 P. M. 



HERTZLER BROS 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUAR*E 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of he girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo« 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I: H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 
J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent « 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



>OOOOOQOGGOOCX)GQGOGOGQQOGGCXX>OOQOOOQQQOOOOOOOOOOQQOOGOOOOOOOO 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

Eiizabettitown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 



Elizabcthtown Chronicle 

Multiple Magazine Linotype Equipment 

JOB PRINTING 

See Our Press Print and Fold Them 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
prices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
It will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 




excelled work fair prices 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Remember — 18 West High Street 

For Staple 

GROCERIES AND ^FRUITS 

Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



J. W, ZMRFQ88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY CO. 

N. York-Chicago -Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 1 tins. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
K H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX>OCXXXXXXXX}OOCKXXX}OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXX>00000; 

Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



»OOOG<XXX3000CXXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OC 



Buch Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 



THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



Electric Wiring 
House Wiring 



Fixture Repairing 
Contract Work 



MECHANICSBURG 
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

L. L. LININGER 



We Save You Money on Wiring and 
Fixtures 



25 Per Cent. Discount on All Fixtures 



24 W. Marble St., MECHANICSBURG 

it 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 
Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, :-: PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Hornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATAS BIGGEST BEST STORE" 



Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222*6 N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 
Wholesale Sugar House 
318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHON OGR APHS 
I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtowa 



UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 

FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 

BALTIMORE, :-: MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need In Merchandise 
ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 

V. TRINK 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtowa 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 
DENTIST 
Out-of-Town Friday each week 
Elizabethtown, Pa. j 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L.- Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocer* 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phi la. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



3<? 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



I 



m 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



1 Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA, 



LANCASTER SAMTARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 

THE 

GROSS CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
piEP&ABETHTO^VN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

— at — 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. Bldg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W. King St., Lancaster 



GARBER GARAGE 

Bell Phone 43R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phone 605A 



FORD and FORDSON 

Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

(XXX5CXXXXXJOQOOOOQQQOOQOOQOGQGOOOQCOGOQOOOQQOOOOOOQGGGOGQ 



L E I N ' S 
Milk Chocolate 



Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 
MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOCOCOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOCX}00000{ 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOGOQOQQOOOOOOOGOQQOOOQOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOO£ 

THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 




Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 



$5.50 



In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

W-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 

$7.50 $5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 

ioooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooot 



0yR 




3 



COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 

JULY 
1922 



DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXXKXXXdOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

§ 

I HEADQUARTERS FOR PLAIN CLOTHES 



□ 



SSIMER 8c YODER 

(The Home for the Plain People) 
26 South Queen Street, LANCASTER, PENNA. 



'S 



In ready-to-wear or made-to-measure 
you will find them here at lower prices and 
better qualiities than elsewhere. 

The Suits are cut and tailored to fit. 

Also a full line of Overcoats and Rain- 
coats, Hats, Collars, Hose, Shirts, and line 
of Men's Furnishings. 

For Ladies we have Bonnets ready-to- 
wear and made-to-order, Bonnet Nets, 
Ribbon, Covering materials, Dress Goods, 
Shawls, Etc. 

SPECIAL — Ladies Coats in Peco Seal 
Plush Black at a real low price. 

All Wool Velour in Black, Navy, Brown, 
Ladies Standardized Suits very low priced. 

Ladies', Men's, Boys', and Infants' 

Sweaters. 

Boys' Suits, odd pants for Boys and 
trousers for Men, Overalls for both men 
and boys. 

Also full line conservative suits. 
Come and be convinced. 

This is The Place for You to SAVE * 
MONEY! 



000OOO00000O0O000000O0O03OO0000O0OO0O0000OOO00C3O0O00OOOO0000OC) 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX3000000000000003CXXXXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOCXX>OOCXXXX}0 

WHEN YOU NEED 
READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

HIRSH & BROTHER have been selling clothing in their present 
store since 1854 and are among the largest makers of Plain Cloth- 
ing in this country. They call you attention to their line of ready 
made and made-to-order Plain Suite, Broadfull Trousers and Cape, 
Overcoats, made by themselves and sold at "One Profit from Mill 
to Wearer" and at One Price to all. Samples will be sent upon re- 
quest and your correspondence iseolicited. 

HIRSH & BROTHER 

CENTER SQUARE AND NORTH QUEEN STREET 
LANCASTER, PENNA. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX)OOOOCXXX}OOOOOOOOOOOCXX)OOOOOOCXX}OOOCX90000000a 
JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^ 

GETTING SOMEWHERE 

Half the pleasure of traveling is in the journey. The other 
half is in reaching the destination. 

When you start to save money, much of the pleasure comes 
from the realization that you are traveling forward. There is 
added satisfaction when a definite sum has been reached. 

Tho you save but small amounts 
'Tis. REGULARITY that counts. 
We pay 4% interest on Certificates of Deposit and Savings 
Account Balances. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

"THE BANK ON THE SQUARE" 

^OOO00OOO0COOOOOOOOOOOO<XXXXXXXKXX3OOOO0OO00O0000O0O0000O000OO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Equipped Studio 
For Fine 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



For best results in developing 
and printing bring or mail your films 
to us. 

The Best Paper Used Which is 
"V E L O X" 

The Best Mouldings Used in Fram- 
ing Pictures and Diplomas 

All Work Guaranteed 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



'isures against Lightning Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $46,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 



SES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



AMOS G. COBLE, President. ELMER W. STRICKLER, V. P. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL . . . .$100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 162,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



J. S. Risser 
E. C. Ginder 



DIRECTORS: 

E. E. Coble 

Elmer W. Strickler 



B. L. Geyer 
Wm. Klein 



! Amos G. Coble F. W. Groff I. N. Hershey ] \ 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo o ooooo o oooooooooon 



GANSMAN'S 

3. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Street* 
LANCASTER. -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to Measure from $35 to $60 

Ready Made Suits for Young Men 
$15.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

One Price — -Always the Lowest 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading 
Stamps 



LUMBER 



AND 



MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 feet and long- 
er and deliver a barn complete in 
a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 185,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,400,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer Jacob G. Hershey R. O. Diehl 

John R. Cassel J. B. Shenk John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Cinder Monroe H. Metzler W. W. Moyer 

OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 

Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

Of Stocks and Bonds, Etc. 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 



Moving of Buildings, Slating 
Estimates on All Kinds of Buildings 



J. T. SNYDER 



Florin, Penna. 



GO TO 



HORSTS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 
Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

__AND— 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St, Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 




SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IIIIHinillHflllllllilHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllll^ 

SOUTH END GROCERY 



irig 



Fresh, Fancy and Staple Groceries, Candies and Lunch Goods 

•The Little Store With Big Business" 

LEVI C. HERSHEY, Elizabethtown, Penna. 



■ 



Butter and Condensed Milk 

HERSHEY CONDENSING CO. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, :: PENNA. 



WHALEN & WHALEN 
Specialists in Fitting Glasses 

2nd Floor McCrory Bldg., 

17 East King Street, 

LANCASTER, PA. 



m 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



COLLEGE HILL 
DAIRY 



Pure Ml Ik and Cream 



Delivered Daily 



S. G. Graybill 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 
FOR 

SHOES OF QUALITY 

GO TO 

EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 

BUY AT THE 
"The Jacob Fisher Jewelry Store** 

Center Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



We sell Pens, Pencils, Clocks, Watches. 
Iyory Pyralin, Cut Glass, Silverware and 
a complete line of Jewelry. 9 



MRS. Wv S, .MORGAN, Proprietore««. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

Furnish The 

APPETITE 

And We Will Do The Rest 



FREYMEYER'S BAKERY 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 

LIME AND CRUSHED STONE 



Increase Profits by Liming 
Your Soil. 
White Lily Brand 99% Cal. Carbon- 
ate Lime Will Fill Your 
Requirements. 
LANDIS STONE MEAL COMPANY 

1 

Rheems, Penna. 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX)OOOOOOOOOCXX>OOOOCXX)00 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealer* in 

Farm Implements and Repairs 

Your Patronage Solicited 



Ind. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE BEE HIVE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



Dry Goods, Notions 

AND FANCY GOODS 



Hosiery and Underwear 

ALWAYS THE LATEST 
in our 

Gent's Furnishing Department 



Visit Our Grocery Department 

"FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



BEST OF CANDIES 

We endeavor to keep a most complete line in stock at all 
times and respectfully solicit your patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 

Something New Every Day 
Cor. S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



©ur College XCimes 

Volume XIX JULY | (^ *r*~ Number 10 

Published monthly during the Academic year by the students of Elizabethtowa 
College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Price of yearly subscription, $1.00 

Single Copy, Fifteen Cents 

Six Subscriptions, $5.00 

This paper must be discontinued when subscription expires in compliance with an 
Act of Congress. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



STAFF 

Editor Anna Wolgemuth 

Assistant Editor Nathan Meyer 

Associate Editors 

Literary Supera Martz 

(Elsie Landis 
College News jj. D . Reber 

Alumni Martha Martin 

Athletics Daniel Myers 

Religious Notes Stella Walker 

Humor and Clippings Anna Brubaker 

Exchanges L. D. Rose 



Business Manager 

Enos Weaver 



Circulating Manager 

David Brightbill 



Stenographer 

Elmer Eshleman 

Advisory Committee of Faculty 

J. S. Harley J. Z. Herr E. L. Manthey 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



CMtorial 



COMMENCEMENT 
Before and After. 

Another commencement has come 
and gone. On June 8 another class 
was graduated from Elizabethtown 
College, launched out into a busy, 
restless world to struggle with the 
more complex problems of life. In 
fact, a whole student body was set 
at large, each to steer his own 
course through a world of green 
pastures with now and then its des- 
ert sands. 

Let us not make the mistake, how- 
ever, of thinking that real life be- 
gins only with commencement, and 
that life in school was very unreal 
and far removed from the heart 
throbs of the busy, pulsating world 
into which we are now going. 
Student life in college is different, 
of course, from the quiet life back 
on the farm or in the homes from 
which we came. On the other hand, 
college life is also different in some 
respects from the busy round of 
everyday life in the schoolroom, 
office, home, farm, or mission point 
to which we are going. Never- 
theless, life in school was life and 
very real life at that. To many of 
us it was a mountain top with op- 
portunities to live at one's best, but 
even then it was life athrob with 
the great heart of the world. It 
was not merely preparation for 
life, but real life in the making. 



Many were the opportunities af- 
forded every student to show him- 
self a real neighbor in a really help- 
ful way. Such chances for helpful- 
ness were without number, in the 
classroom, on the hall, yes every- 
where. 

When in school I could choose to 
be a true, confidential friend or a 
troublesome busybody, just like I 
could back home a few years be- 
fore, or just like I can now when I 
leave school and take my place in a 
restless and confused world of 
affairs. Even now I can be a turn- 
coat, or I can remove the mask and 
prove myself a friend as true as 
steel. 

Every student had opportunities 
galore to prove himself honest for 
the sake of right principle, or mere- 
ly for the sake of "the best policy". 
He could even cheat and be down- 
right dishonest when he forgot that 
character was worth infinitely more 
than a few paltry cents or a 95 per 
cent grade in a final test. Here a- 
gain what I chose to do honestly or 
dishonestly has already helped to 
determine my success or failure in 
later life and my fall or rise in God's 
unerring scale of justice. 

We even had some leisure in 
school that we could either use for 
the improvement of our own charac- 
ters or that we could misuse to our 
own harm, even to the harm of 
those whose time we stole while 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



squandering our own. We can do 
the same even now with the little 
leisure we may chance to have, and 
the likelihood is that we will spend 
it very much as we did back in col- 
lege. There is the greater likeli- 
hood, however, that we had some 
desires stirred, and some tastes 
created which will crave for the 
food that satisfies rather than for 
the leaves and husks. 

We had opportunities to bend 
ourselves to our tasks and to work 
as hard as we ever did back on the 
farm, or as we will now out in the 
busy world. The world may call 
college folks lazy then, if it will. 
Honest labor, mental or physical, 
brings its own reward, and diligent 
service rendered now to the world 
may yet convince a doubting neigh- 
bor or a brother standing afar off. 

Some who stand afar off have 
even said that school life makes one 
high-minded or conceited. If it 
does, it is not because there were no 
chances to stoop to lowly service or 
to minister to others needs while in 
college training. If this accusation 
is ever true, it is probably due to the 
fact that a little education is a dan- 
gerous thing, as it is sometimes de- 
clared to be. Nothing so thorough- 
ly humbles a sincere soul, bringing 
him to the feet of an infinite Creator 
and to the service of his fellowme'n, 
as a liberal education with God at 
the center of the learner's universe. 
. Yes, even back in good E. C. the 
chances for good or for evil were 
somewhat the same as we will meet 
them now, only we may expect 



temptations to come now with re- 
newed force, since it is a stern and 
not-less-exacting world we are up a- 
gainst, and since we are farther re- 
moved from the shelter of her in- 
fluence. Surely, our chances to live 
upright Christian lives, to correct 
evil habits and to replace them with 
good ones, and to steer clear of the 
many evils rampart today, will 
never be greater than they were 
back in the good old days at E. C. 

Thanks to the good influence and 
the high ideals of every Christian 
college in this free and enlightened 
America ! Every true Christian col- 
lege is a light to Amerka while 
America stands out as the great 
beacon light to the world. 



THE SENIOR CLASS 

The class 'who duty never shirked 
In classroom, hall, or gym; 

Who strife and mischief never worked, 
So jolly, friendly, too, — 

The much loved Class of Twenty-two ! 

The class of which E. C. will boast 
Throughout the coming years: 

Whose wondrous deeds will count the most, 
To whom much praise is due, — 

The famous Class of Twenty-two! 

Just like the lights they freely give; 

So shall the class e'er shine 
In different fields, all staunch and brave, 

Illustrious and true, — 
The loyal Class of Twenty-two! 

May each of you, whoe'er you be, 

No matter where you go, 
Uphold the standards of E. C, 

And Christian service do, — 
Thou noble Class of Twenty-two! 

Mrs. W. A. Willoughby. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Xitcrarv 



ALUMNI PROGRAM 



RECREATION 



The alumni program was as in- 
teresting, entertaining and helpful 
as any of the other programs of 
commencement week. 

The piano solo and vocal duets 
by former students were appreciat- 
ed by all. The speaker, Rev. Cape- 
tanios of Edincott, New York, was 
at his best and held the audience 
from beginning to end with his gem 
thoughts interspersed with his 
sparkling witticism. 

Some of his many statements 
were : "The latest book on new- 
fangled religion is 'Math and Re- 
ligion' — I always believed Mathe- 
matics was from the Devil". 

"People are pleasure-mad and 
can't even entertain themselves." 

"World and social order is a 
boarding-house with the old woman 
doing the work and the children 
governing the parents." 

Quoted — "Woman's dress is long 
enough to cover the subject and 
short enough to be interesting". 

"They talk of the new woman — 
I say let her come and bring the new 
man with her". 

To the little boy who asked what 
the chaplain is praying for: "No, he 
is not praying for the senators but 
for the people (which they gov- 
ern)". 



There are many kinds of recrea- 
tion. Some people count it real re- 
creation to have a quiet hour alone 
with a good book, others wandering 
in the fields studying nature, and 
others seeking, here and there, gifts 
from nature's bounteous store. 
Some may enjoy to spend their 
hours of leisure in association with 
others, in such exercise as involves 
physical exertion, like skating, 
swimming or playing ball. This 
form of recreation is very valuable, 
because it is one of the main sources 
of physical development, and with- 
out a strong physique one cannot do 
his best in the battle of life. 

The word recreation implies that 
it shall leave us re-created ; that is, 
with more energy for our work, not 
less. Therefore any recreation that 
does not do so should be avoided. 
The words of Charles Wesley's 
mother should be a guide to every 
young person in choosing what he 
will do or will not do. She said, 
"Whatever weakens your reason, 
whatever impairs the tenderness 
of your conscience, whatever ob- 
scures your sense of God, whatever 
increases the strength and authority 
of your body over your mind — that 
thing to you is wrong, however in- 
nocent it may be in itself". 

Nettie Maupin 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



THE SPRING OUTING 



Tuesday, the day of the outing, 
dawned, promising beautiful weath- 
er. All the students were eager to 
go. Finally all gathered in front of 
Memorial Hall and were packed in 
the wagons. We certainly were 
packed, just as some good house- 
keeper would pack her fruit in a 
jar. Finally we started and all 
were in good spirits. We had a 
long ride over hill and dale and a 
few hours later we arrived at our 
destination, "Governor's Stables". 
We then divided into groups and 
each group selected their chaperon. 
We started to explore the place and 
such climbing over rocks as we did 
was enough to stir every drop of 
red blood in us. Our group leader 
led us to a pretty little stream 
where we refreshed ourselves and 
whittled some sticks upon which to 
roast our "weeners". The call for 
dinner soon came and we were glad 
to go because everyone had a vora- 
cious appetite. 

After dinner there was a call by 
the group leader to go to the river. 
We were all eager to go. The 
group followed a small stream, and 
such a rocky stream many of us had 
never seen before. We were all 
warm and thirsty and were glad to 
be able to get a refreshing drink at 
a farmhouse. We continued on our 
way until we arrived at the river. 
The river looked very inviting to 
swimmers. Some of the boys were 
already splashing in the river, at 
the same time entertaining others. 



Some girls went in, and others fell 
in. We reluctantly turned towards 
home taking the road by Falmouth. 
All were tired by the time we reach- 
ed the wagons. After a few an- 
nouncements we started for home 
and arrived there in safety, feeling 
that we had had a most enjoyable 
time. 



CLASS SONG 



I. 

'Tis June again, Commencement time, 

Our faces now with gladness beam 
For we will shortly realize 

Our dreams which did so lofty seem; 
Our work and play so soon is o'er 
And classes too will meet no more, 
For now we leave E. C.'s dear halls 
To answer life's more urgent calls. 

CHORUS 

O College Hill, dear College Hill 

With "Upward step by step" our goal; 

We'll ever faithful be to thee 

As thru our lives we onward go. 

II. 

1922 has come 

The year which meant so much to all, 
How can we e'er forget the time 

When we first came here in the fall; 
'Twas then we organized our class 
And chose our leaders for the year, 
We also chose the butter-cup 
And black and lemon which are dear. 

III. 

The time has come for us to part 

And leave our friends and teachers too; 
We say farewell to one and all 

Of the dear class of '22, 
We lift our voices clear and strong 
To hail E. C. may she live long; 
We will forever cherish her 
And guard her honor as our own. 

Anna Brubaker. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



CLASS PROPHECY 



This is the one date of my life, a- 
side from my birthday, which I am 
not likely to forget. It is the date 
when I graduated from E. C. in the 
Junior College Course. I really 
ought to do something to commem- 
orate the event. What could it be? 
I know. I will re-read my prophecy 
written at that time and see how 
nearly correct I prophesied. It is 
so warm indoors I shall bring my 
chair out here and re-read it. 

Miss Anna Brubaker. 

The future for this Lititzite looks 
very promising. After teaching 
two years she will go to Juniata Col- 
lege to finish her work in the A. B. 
Course in Education. She will con- 
tinue to practice her music, but will 
take up nursing as her profession. 
In fact she will .be a second Mrs. 
Jenkins. It is difficult to tell just 
how she will write her name in the 
future but we expect a Ray will 
come on the scent somewhere. 

Walter A. Keeney 

It seems comparatively easy to 
foretell the future of this young 
man. After he teaches in the rural 
schools for a few years he will go 
back to E. C. and finish his A. B. 
Course in Education in three years. 
He will go back home where he and 
Florence will live on one of the most 
modernly equipped farms in the 
county. We expect to hear from 
him as the head of the Farmers' 
Association and chairman of the 
County Board of Education in York 
County. 



Miss Mabel Minnich 

Mabel will finish the Pedagogical 
Course at the end of two years. She 
will enter a rural school in one of 
the most backward communities in 
our state. After she has done real 
missionary work here, she will go 
back to E. C. and finish her work in 
the A. B. Course. After entering 
Bethany Bible School to get a more 
thorough knowledge of Bible truths, 
she will feel prepared to enter the 
India field of missions, where she 
will prove that she has been educat- 
ed for service. 

Francis Henry Barr 

This classmate of ours is likely to 
teach one of the rural schools in one 
of the counties of our state. He has 
so many in mind it is difficult to tell 
which one he will choose. A few 
years of his life will be spent in the 
mountains of Virginia. He will go 
to Bethany Bible School four years 
where he will get his B. D. degree. 
After he feels that he is thoroughly 
prepared for missionary work, he 
will sail for the African field of 
labor. 

Alta M. Nunemaker 

This star member of our class 
will teach within a few miles of Col- 
lege Hill next year. Many of the 
students who expect to teach in ru- 
ral schools will use her room for ob- 
servation work and practice teach- 
ing. After teaching a few more 
years in this state, she will go "Out 
Where the West Begins" and get 
her A. B. at Hesston College, Kan- 
sas. We are likely to hear from her 
as otie of the teachers in Hesston 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



College. The prophet thinks it will 
be the class of Methods in Teach- 
ing in the Junior College Course. 

Daniel Myers 

Some things about this man seem 
to be practically settled while oth- 
ers seem to be very difficult to de- 
cide. Dan will be at E. C. the next 
three years, when he will finish his 
work on the A. B. Course. The last 
two years he will be director of phy- 
sical education. After this we ex- 
pect to hear from him as principal 
of one of the York County High 
Schools. His love for physical edu- 
cation, his ability to organize and 
cooperate with his pupils, and his 
wonderful talent as a teacher, will 
bring to him the greatest success. 
He will answer the call from E. C. 
to coach teams in athletics. Furth- 
er than this the prophet cannot pre- 
dict. 

Martha Oberholtzer 

This classmate of ours will be 
teacher in the sewing department 
on College Hill for the next two 
years. Because she feels a strong 
missionary call to the China field, 
she will finish the A. B. Course and 
take two years of Bible training to 
get a thorough knowledge of Bible 
truths and how to teach them. 
Wedding" bells will ring for her. As 
soon as they feel thoroughly pre- 
pared they will sail for China. (How 
strange I have never heard from 
her.) 

Walter Longenecker 

Even though Walter finished the 
Commercial Course this year, we 



expect to hear from him in one of 
the rural schools of Lebanon County. 
Since this is almost out of his line, 
two years of experience will be e- 
nough for him. He will put his 
teaching ability to use by teaching 
bookkeeping in one of the Lebanon 
Commercial Schools. Since he al- 
ways delighted in doing athletic 
stunts, we are not surprised to find 
him discontented here. The next 
place we expect him to fill will be 
as teacher in the B. S. Course and 
assistant to Mr. Myers, the Physi- 
cal Education director. 

Esther Trimmer 
We will find this jolly girl on the 
hill the next few years. After she 
has finished her A. B. " Course she 
will enter the Conservatory of Mu- 
sic at Chicago. After she is thor- 
oughly trained in vocal music she 
will return to her Alma Mater and 
teach voice culture for five years. 
Finally and eventually we expect to 
hear from her living in their beauti- 
ful home in the Hawaian Islands, 
where her husband will be taking 
up work along missionary and edu- 
cational lines. 

Mr. Witmer Eshleman 

We can expect to hear from Wit- 
mer on College Hill the next two 
years. By this time he will have 
fininshed his Junior College Course. 
He will enter the schoolroom with 
the degree of teacher attached to 
his name. He will be satisfied with 
this only three years. Of couse he 
will return to College Hill for his A. 
B. degree. The next time we hear 
from him, he will be filling some 
high school principal's chair. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Miss Hannah Sherman 

Hannah will do her first real 
missionary work next year when she 
opens the little schoolhouse in the 
mountains about four miles from 
her home. The first few years she 
will not be satisfied with her work, 
but after a few more years she will 
not want to leave her pupils. In 
fact she will be a second Nealie 
Wampler. (She has not taught 
school all her life. She is now liv- 
ing in Maryland just across the 
Pennsylvania line. She is a splendid 
leader of the Farm Women's Asso- 
ciation in that section of the coun- 
try.) 

Mr. Ephraim Hertzler 

Next year Mr. Hertzler will teach 
Physics, Chemistry and Biology in 
Elizabethtown High School. His 
work will prove so satisfactory that 
they will want him to sign a con- 
tract for several more years. After 
two years' work at Bethany Bible 
School he will get his B. D. degree, 
after which we will find him in the 
mountains of Virginia where, 
through his wonderfully helpful 
sermons and his ability as a leader, 
he will be able to lead many souls 
to Christ. 

Miss Mabel Bomberger 

Mabel will stay on College Hill 
for the next four years. She will be- 
gin work on the A. B. Course next 
year. She is likely to take the 
course in education but will special- 
ize in music. After she has finished 
the course here she will enter the 
Peabody Conservatory of Music. 
She will answer the call from Eliza- 



bethtown and will be one of the 
most successful teachers E. C. has 
ever had on its list. 

Miss Minnie Myer 

Minnie will enter the schoolroom 
in some rural district next year. The 
next three years she will teach in 
the town schools at Ephrata. She 
will be offered the principalship of 
the home high school, but be- 
cause the girl has not seen the need 
of a full College Course she cannot 
accept the offer. This will spur her 
on to finish the A. B. Course in Edu- 
cation. She will take this course at 
E. C. After she has taken this 
course she will take the principal- 
ship at the Leola High School. 

Nathan G. Meyer 

It is difficult to tell the future of 
a prophet. They are likely to do so 
many different things. Next year 
we expect to hear from him as a 
successful teacher in one of the 
York County High Schools. After 
teaching here a few years he will go 
to Elizabethtown as the assistant 
principal of the Academic Depart- 
ment. After faithfully doing his 
duty here, he will go to Columbia 
University where he will get his Ph. 
D. He will come back to Elizabeth- 
town as one of the greatest Relig- 
ious Education teachers College Hill 
fias ever known. 

Lillian Becker 

It is extremely difficult to tell the 
future of a member of the class who 
has been with us such a short time. 
Next year we are going to hear of 
her success as a teacher in on? of 
the rural schools of Lancaster 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



County. She will be interested in 
rural school work, but she will final- 
ly accept the position of Assistant 
High School Principal in her com- 
munity. Some day she will finish 
the A. B. Course in Education and 
will then take the principal's chair. 

Stanley Ober 

Next year Stanley will teach in 
the sixth grade of the town school. 
He thinks he will stay only one year 
but the school officials will persuade 
him to stay three years because of 
his master ability as a teacher. Be- 
cause he feels the need of more edu- 
cation to do satisfactory work, he 
will decide to go back to E. C. for 
his A. B. degree. After this course 
is finished he will become principal 
of the Elizabethtown High School. 
He will stay here five years. Aside 
from his regular school work, he 
will be an active church and Sunday 
School worker in his home district. 
His name will also appear in the 
headlines of our local newspapers 
as one of the great social workers 
of our county. (If we had more 
social workers who would preach 
social purity with the enthusiasm 
that Stanley does, our nation could 
tell a different story.) 

Elsie May Landis. 



This being the Commencement 
Number of our "Times", four ora- 
tions should appear herein. Owing 
to lack of space, two of these ap- 
peared in the June issue, and the 
third failed to arrive in time for 
publication herein. 



PROPHECY 

The unique class of '22 has thot 
it feasible at this time to have us 
read and interpret select verses 
from the prophetic pages of the 
Etonian (the first year book of our 
College.) The part I shall select re- 
fers directly to the tribe of Ephraim 
Much of this prophecy has already 
been fulfilled while more remains 
to come to pass. 

To whom it may interest thus say- 
eth the prophet. There shall come 
forth out of the land of Lancaster 
County a versatile, agreeable and 
joyous woman. She will complete 
her work for the B. D. degree at 
Bethany Bible School, after which 
she will serve as editor of a religious 
paper and also as supervisor of a 
mission school. (I presume the pro- 
phet of old had in mind a personal- 
ity whom we know to-day as Anna 
Wolgemuth.) 

Among the cedars of Lebanon 
shall thrive a business man of no 
mean character — one who shall in 
a masterly way do his part in bring- 
ing capital and labor into a glorious 
harmony. Where other men see 
failure he will see success. (Un- 
doubtedly this will be fulfilled by 
our calm Vice President, Elias G. 
Edris, Jr.) 

A certain little industrious lady 
after finishing the Junior College 
Course on Mount College Hill will 
find her way back to teach the 
fourth and fifth grades in Pleasant 
Hill school, among the sunny hills 
and peaceful vales of Lebanon 
County. (Possibly this will be re- 
alized in the person of Elizabeth 
Kreider.) 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



In the garden spot of the world 
will spring up a witty, inventive 
business genius. He will be a pro- 
blem to discipline in his school car- 
eer. After leaving Mount College 
Hill he will surprise his Alma Mater 
by establishing and directing a large 
wireless manufacturing concern in 
Lititz. (This verse of phophetic 
truth speaks the future of Pierce 
Brandt.) 

There dwelleth in the city of Le- 
banon a sincere, studious and mod- 
est virgin who will take her major 
work for the M. A. degree in Reli- 
gious Education at Boston Seminary. 
She will teach a number of years in 
the States, after which she will sail 
as a foreign missionary to propagate 
a practical religion. (These words 
of the sage bespeak a big future for 
Stella Walker, one of our Commen- 
cement orators.) 

And as they will be sojourning 
in the Land of Promise ; i. e., Mount 
College Hill to Sugar Valley — 
which is a Sabbath day's journey — 
a genial and boon companion will 
say to her, "Will you say yes to my 
next question?" And she with her 
wonderful language powers and her 
keen sense of perceiving abstract 
ideas will answer sweetly, "Yes, 
thank you". (I must confess that 
the prophet is not easily understood. 
Different commentators differ, but 
the general concensus of opinion is 
that this has reference to one of the 
chief and able writers of the Eton- 
ian — Supera Martz.) 

And there shall come to live on 
Mount College Hill an aggressive 
social engineer and evangelist who 



will, after years of testing exper- 
ience, find his way to a large city 
mission where he will be pastor and 
a strong social purity worker among 
the young people. 

(Upon a moments reflection we 
think of a young man characterized 
by audacity and "pep" — Jesse Re- 
ber.) 

From the beautiful hills of Frank- 
lin County will come a woman, nob- 
ly planned. She will be a leader of 
many organizations of the fairer 
sex. She will serve as principal of 
a kindergarten of an urban school. 
(Judging from the historical setting, 
1922 A. D., we believe these words 
foretell something of the life plan 
of Margaret Oellig.) 

Now in those days there will be 
deacons appointed. And one of 
these shall come to Mount College 
Hill to study at the feet of Gamaliel 
(sometimes known as Irvin Hoffer). 
After leaving Mount College Hill, 
versed in science, philosophy and 
theology, this man of good report 
will prove a help to needy people. 
(The tribe of Ephraim has but one 
deacon — the prophet 'must have 
thot of Wm. Willoughby.) 

There will be two young men who 
after living a number of years on 
Mount College Hill and studying 
faithfully will complete their work 
for the B. A. degree. They will 
teach in the grades a number of 
years, after which they will special- 
ize in music. And it shall come to 
pass that among the maples of 
Mount College Hill will echo and re- 
echo the piano chimes and baritone 
voices produced by these lovers of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



music. (Friends — these men un- 
doubtedly belong to the tribe of 
Ephraim and most likely are two of 
our preparatory graduates. Lester 
Royer and Jephthah, sometimes 
known as John Bechtel.) 

In those days there will be a de- 
bate concerning the open shop. One 
of these debaters will be a woman 
of letters. Her success will largely 
be due to the traits inherited from 
her father — an historian. Later 
this precocious girl will serve as 
language teacher and coach of de- 
bating teams in a large college. 
(When we review the events of the 
past school year we see part of this 
verse fulfilled in the personage of 
Miss Lois Falkenstein.) 

In the latter days young men 
shall dream dreams and see visions. 
One of these men after having pro- 
cured much wisdom and knowledge 
on Mount College Hill will teach a 
few years in the States, after which 
his dreams will be realized in land- 
ing a position on the Hawaian Is- 
lands as government teacher and 
supervisor. (When we think of 
dreams we at once think of Joseph 
of old, but this verse of Etonian 
prophecy has reference to our Lititz- 
ite — Enos Weaver.) 

There will be an Ephraimite who 
with her cheerfulness, sincerity of 
purpose, and teaching ability will 
serve as a worthy member of the 
elders of Jacob or Israel (sometimes 
known as College Faculty). She 
will realize her ambition — Mission- 
ary to S. A. — in the face of adversi- 
ty. Every Barr will prevent her 
from taking the wrong course in 



life. (The prophet leaves very 
little room for speculation. He re- 
fers directly to a Pedagogical sen- 
ior — Elsie May Landis.) 

Thus we see, from these verses of 
prophetic writ, that the Ephraim- 
ites will do their part in helping 
their Alma Mater to make the world 
safe for Christian Education. They 
will look down thru the vista of 
time with eager eyes and will see 
appearing on College Hill a large 
gymnasium, a fine dining hall, a 
spacious auditorium, a boys' dormi- 
tory, more faculty cottages, a stu- 
dent body of not less than six hun- 
dred, a faculty of scholastic caliber, 
second to none in the educational 
world. 

The Ephraimites will count it a 
privilege to help to realize these 
dreams. To every S. O. S. call sent 
by their Alma Mater to them, the 
prophet predicts with certainty a 
willing and hearty response. 

Nathan G. Moyer. 



THE HOME-COMING MEETING 
OF THE VOLUNTEERS 

This meeting was held on the 
campus June 7, at 6:30 P. M. The 
purpose of the meeting was to greet 
the Volunteers who were on the Hill 
before, and also to say farewell to 
those who were leaving E. C. 

The meeting was conducted by C. 
H. Royer. A report was given of the 
work done by the Band during the 
past year, and also the outlook for 
the coming year. 

Professors Meyer and Byer each 
gave the Band an inspiring talk and 
encouraged them in their efforts. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The More Abundant Life 

Every human life has its beginn- 
ing in the solitary confines of a 
fleshly maternal house. After 
months of solicitude and tender nur- 
ture that life is ushered into the 
arena of a new world, like a newly 
unfolded blossom smiling for the 
first time upon the wide expanse of 
its desert home. This advent re- 
minds us of a new ship from an eter- 
nal shore, now embarked upon the 
ocean of life, moving steadily to- 
ward its last eternal destiny. Birth 
is the introduction of a life of un- 
told possibilities to a new world of 
limitless opportunities, — opportuni- 
ties which, if used, will steer life's 
bark to the shores of eternal hap- 
piness; opportunities which, if abus- 
ed, will send a life down across the 
span of time and space into the 
eternal abpss. 

This new life, — now abreast the 
wings of time, — experiences a two- 
fold growth in physical and mental 
habits, until the child comes to the 
parting of the ways. Then begins 
his choice between right and wrong; 
and the third, or moral, side of his 
nature strikes root in virgin soil. 
But the beauty and symmetry of this 
threefold development is condit- 
ioned by the richness of the racial 
and hereditary soil; the virility of 
the seeds of childhood habits; the 
soundness of his early training ; and 
the purity of the moral and social 
atmosphere, such as he breathes day 
in and day out, early and late, at 
home and abroad. In proportion 
to all of these will the child grow an 
abundant life ever reaching out to- 



ward a greater abundance of free- 
dom and power. 

To this abundant life men and wo- 
men must make their first contribu- 
tion in "right living" such as will pro 
mise to their offspring their rightful 
heritage — that of being well born. 
Their social contribution must con- 
sist in wise guidance and in the cre- 
ation of that atmosphere which will 
foster the ideal of peaceful and har- 
monious "living together," — illus- 
trated first in the home, then in the 
larger family of school, church, and 
state, — to be fulfilled finally in the 
realization of peaceful international 
relations. 

To this abundant life books and 
men must reveal their treasures of 
the past, to be interpreted in the 
light of the present and the future. 
The great book of Nature must 
make its contribution from her rich 
store of flower and insect, as well 
as of her laws of beauty, force, and 
harmony.' Art must create ideals 
and sentiments through apprecia- 
tion for the best in music, literature 
and painting. Even the heavens 
must declare the glory of God; and 
the Bible, the greatest book of all, 
must show forth God's truth, if 
young life is to grow and to grow 
abundantly. Why all this breadth 
of vision? Merely to make a living? 
No, hot alone to make a comfortable 
living with a more comfortable sur- 
plus; but to help interpret the mean- 
ing of life, so as to live in harmony 
with the laws of the universe and of 
God. He who in the love of truth 
can hold communion with her vis- 
ible forms, and can interpret the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



beauty and design of the least of 
God's creation to mean a manifold 
greater purpose in the threefold na- 
ture of man will live with his feet 
on the ground but with his eyes up- 
turned toward God and toward his 
fellowman. 

But however abundant this three- 
fold life may be, there comes a time, 
sooner or later, when man's moral 
growth is arrested. He is beset on 
every hand by misapprehension and 
fear. His efforts to live up to the 
morally best have failed, and he 
smiles upon his breast in acknowl- 
edgment of his sin and helplessness. 
In his distress and worry he comes 
finally to the foot of the Cross; and 
there in humble submission he hears 
the voice of Him who said; "I am 
come that ye might have life and 
that ye might have it more abun- 
dantly." He takes new hope; new 
life wells up in his breast. He sees 
a Savior who died for his sins, who 
arose for his justification; and who 
lived the abundant life perfectly 
that he might have life and have it 
more abundantly. 

Christ becomes his living ideal; 
and life is now dominated by a great 
purpose which that ideal inspires. 
The Spirit of the Christ now becomes 
the great moral and spiritual force 
in his life, and all his knowledge 
of men and of the world is energized 
and directed by that force. He has 
been born again in that now he has 
not life merely which is physical ; 
not mere mental power; not mere 
moral integrity; but a vital spiritual 
force which dominates them all. 
Such is the more abundant life, — a 
threefold life dominated and con- 



trolled by a spiritual ideal. 

A son of God, and joint heir 
with Christ, he now lives to the 
glory of God. His horizon enlarges 
and he understands the fatherhood 
of God to embrace the brotherhood 
of man; and as a brother to man. — 
with race prejudice and class lines 
disappearing at the Cross, — he min- 
isters to all alike in the name of a 
crucified, but risen Lord. 

In the light of God's mercy, he 
now sees virtues where once he saw 
only faults in his fellowmen ; and 
he laments the fact that too long he 
had missed the roses in his attempt 
to pluck the thorns. 

Love becomes the dominant note 
in his life, while humility character- 
izes every action. His devotion to 
his purpose sends him forth aspii'ing 
to the triT? and the beautiful, while 
ethers stop by the wayside to de- 
vour the husks and to wallow in the 
mire of lust and greed. 

He stoops on the Jericho road to 
«erve another's need while o rers 
ride by in luxury with sympathies 
untouched. 

To be more abundant, life, with 
all its imperfections and denials. — 
must mean a gradual ascent irom 
glery to glory, from peak to peak, 
toward the summit of that perfect 
character revealed in Christ Jesus. 
The transition in death then will 
moan that life continued in the great 
beyoncL — life more and m;>re abun- 
dant, lived in the eterni f v of God's 
presence and in the fui less of His 
glory. 



The time 1 as come when we must 
say farewell to all that is dear on 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



College Hill, — to all w-V) have so 
liberally contributed to our happi- 
ness and well-being during these 
days in College. 

To you, the trustees of our Col- 
lege, whose noble endeavors in the 
past and whose interest and con- 
cern for the mture welf ir-i of your 
sons and daughters have made pos- 
sible for us these years in Elizabeth- 
town College, to you we say fare- 
well. 

Our worthy President, and mem- 
bers of the lac ulty, you who have 
labored so faithfully in our behalf, 
Avhose inspiration and help have 
meant more to us than you can now 
know or than words can tell, we bid 
you a fond farewell. We shall ever 
strive toward the ideals you have 
inspired and long cherish the mem- 
ories of your friendly counsel. 

Members of the Junior Class, and 
fellow students, soon we to© must 



part, but we shall long renembcr 
the pleasant hours spent together 
here. We trust our associations 
have been mutually helpful, and we 
bespeak for you noble aspiratiors 
and true success in your future work. 
To you we say farewell. 

Classmates, together we have lab- 
ored long and hard; we have lo^.g 
shared our triumphs and defeats; 
but we too must part, — each to fol- 
low his own path of duty. As we 
journey on our paths will diverge 
farther and farther from this single 
path which we have followed thus 
far together. In whatever field 
those paths may lie, and whatever 
hardships we may encounter, may 
each of us show our loyalty to our 
Alma Mater by making real her 
ideals; and may these ideals ever 
inspire us to lives of greater ser- 
vice ; service rendered to the Glory 
of God. To you all a last and fond 
farewell. 




cs£ 



After the commencement exer- 
cises were over and all were re- 
freshed, we heard interesting nois- 
es on the baseball diamond. Soon 
many friends and students gather- 
ed to see the boys in gray and blue 
playing baseball against the Alum- 
ni. It was an interesting game, the 
ball going from one end of the field 
to the other, neither side having an 
advantage. The score being tie most 




of the time, it was hard to decide 
which side would leave the field 
with honors. The final score was 
10 to 9 in favor of the school. It 
was very interesting to see the pro- 
fessors trying to hit the ball and 
make home runs. 

School — P. D. Myers and C. H. 
Gingrich. 

Alumni — P. Edris and C. Smith. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Coll ege TK tews 

Text books finished, lessons learned, 
Happy school days are no more; 
But the honors we have earned 
Point to others, still in store. 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK 



The first number of the Com- 
mencement Calendar was the Bac- 
calaureate Sermon preached by 
Professor J. G. Meyer, president of 
the College. His text was "Cast 
your bread upon the waters for you 
shall find it after many days." 
(Eccl. 11:1). He tried to impress 
upon the minds of the class that the 
only life worth living is a life of ser- 
vice ; and that it is not so much the 
big things in life, but the little deeds 
of helpfulness we do daily, that 
make a life successful. 

On Monday evening the vocal 
and instrumental music depart- 
ments gave their program. The 
Chapel and Commercial Hall were 
filled with students and friends of 
the College. The program was well 
worth listening to. 



In previous years Tuesday even- 
ing of Commencement week usually 
was given to the Commercial De- 
partment for their program. This 
year the faculty saw fit to deviate 
from the regular plan and schedul- 
ed an Educational-Program for the 
evening, with Professor Omwake 
of Ursinus College as the main 
speaker. On Tuesday morning Pro- 
fessor Meyer received a telegram 



stating that Professor Omwake was 
suddenly taken ill and could not 
serve on the program. Professor 
Conover from the State Department 
of Education at Harrisburg filled 
his place. 

Professor Conover discussed the 
whole plan which Dr. Finnegan is 
trying to put across. He says there 
are five steps in the plan. The first 
step is Consolidated Schools, where 
every pupil, whether city or country 
bred, has an equal opportunity to 
get a thorough education in the 
fundamentals. The second step is 
Continuation Schools. These are 
necessary to give those a chance to 
get an education who must work to 
support themselves. The third step 
is compulsory School Attendance. 
Nothing breaks up a teacher's plans 
more than to have pupils come into 
the classroom a month or six weeks 
late in the fall and leave several 
weeks before school closes. The 
last two steps in the plan are Health 
Education and Better Trained 
Teachers. 

We are sure if Dr. Finnegan 
works his plans, in a few years we 
will have a school system in our 
state of which we can justly be 
proud. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Wednesday noon all class work 
was brought to a close. At two o'- 
clock the Class Day exercises were 
given. The president of the class 
gave the address of welcome. The 
different features of the program 
were music, pantomime, history, 
prophecy, and presentation speech. 
The Chapel and Commercial Hall 
were crowded with friends of the 
graduates and patrons of the Col- 
lege. 

Almost immediately after the 
program the Alumni Banquet was 
served to the Alumni of the school 
in the dining room. After refresh- 
ments were served, a number of 
toasts were given in response to the 
request of the toast-master, Profess- 
or R. W. Schlosser. 

At 7:30 P. M. the Alumni gave 
their public program. Miss Hattie 
Eberly favored the audience with 
several piano solos. Mr. Paul Engle 
sang several vocal solos. The speak- 
er for the evening was Rev. George 
Capetanios, a member of the class 
of 1916. 



On Commencement morning par- 
ents and friends of the graduating 
class and patrons of the College 
came early and soon had all the 
seating space filled in Commercial 
Hall and the Chapel. At 9:00 A. M. 
the faculty, trustees, and graduat- 
es marched into the Chapel. The 
address of welcome and oration, 
"The Aristocracy of Achievement," 
was given by Miss Alta Nunemaker. 
Stella Walker delivered an oration 
entitled "The Eternal Conflict". Mr. 



Ephraim Hertzler, president of the 
class, gave the third oration, "De- 
mocracy and Minorities". The 
valedictory oration, "The More A- 
bundant Life", was given by Miss 
Anna Wolgemuth. 

Dr. Edgar Fahs Smith, Provost 
Emeritus of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, delivered the commence- 
ment address to the graduates. 



At the last meeting of the Y. W. 
W. A. the following officers were 
elected: 

President — Mildred Baer. 

Vice President — Anna Heefner. 

Secretary — Kathryn Zug. 

Treasurer — Esther Trimmer. 



On Tuesday morning, June 6, Mr. 
and Mrs. Amsey Bollinger paid a 
short visit to College Hill. Mrs. 
Bollinger was formerly known as 
Miss Florence Moyer. She was one 
of the members of the faculty last 
year, teacher of sewing and domes- 
tic science. 



The largest Summer School ever 
known on College Hill is now in ses- 
sion. Many teachers from town and 
the surrounding country are enroll- 
ed. The total enrollment approach- 
es very closely the 100 mark. 



Among the Alumni enrolled as 
Summer School students are Mae 
Dulebohn, '06, Paul Schwenk, '20, 
Clarence Sollenberger, '20, Laura 
Moyer, '21, Stanley H. Ober, '22, 
and Lillian Becker, '22. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



IReltqious IFiotes 



BACCALAUREATE SERMON 

June 4, 1922 

Extracts 

Eccl. 11:1 — "Cast thy bread up- 
on the waters; for thou shalt find it 
after many days." 

These are the words of wisdom. 
They are words of council and ad- 
monition. They are a challenge to 
one's faith. And as long as God re- 
mains God they are true, so long 
good deeds are immortal and the 
compensation certain. 

We have in these words a picture 
of sowing rice and other grain from 
a boat during flood time. The hus- 
bandman pushes his frail bark from 
the embanked village to cast the 
grain, he would gladly eat, on the 
surface of the flood, — a type of 
Christian labor and service. 

We have in this text : 

I. The principle of Charity. 

II. The principle of Industry. 
III. The principle of Compensa- 
tion. 

The three thoughts we present: 

1. Giving we bless and are bless- 
ed. 

2. Working we thrive and cause 
to thrive. 

3. Spending we gain and regain. 
The college education that does 

not emphasize greater sacrifice, 
greater industry, and greater faith 
and trust in God for the final out- 
come of a life of sacrifice and ser- 
vice is not worthy of the name, nor 
time, nor money, nor effort. 



I. The Principle of Charity and 
Sacrifice 

Charity is twice blessed. (1) It 
blesses him that gives, even though 
he casts his bread upon thankless 
waters, hoping for nothing, soon to 
be forgotten, never to be returned. 
If no one else should be better off, 
for such charity, he shall be better 
off, his temper more generous, 
his life richer and his soul sweeter. 
(2) It blesses him that takes. The 
world of men and things is better 
for acts of kindness no matter what 
the sacrifice, however thankless the 
act may seem. What a desert life 
is for the ministry of charity. Many 
parts of the world are down, — Ar- 
menia is down, bleeding and half 
dead. Germany is down. Belgium 
is down. Austria is down, France 
is down, Russia is down. Italy is 
down. Asia, Africa and South 
America are in heathen darkness. 
Will the members of this class ac- 
cept the challenge and cast their 
bread upon the waters? 

God has endowed man with won- 
drous power to transform the des- 
ert into an oasis so it may blossom 
as a rose. Cast thy bread upon the 
waters. God has given us bread to 
feed the poor. God has given us 
money to build hospitals and schools 
and colleges. God has given us in- 
ventive genius to search out well- 
springs and smite rocks into living 
water. God has given us reason to 
carry fertility where ignorance and 
fear and superstition work desola- 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tion. God has given us wit and 
imagination to produce perpetual 
joy and gladness. God has given 
us love to transform dark continents 
and to hive sweetness like honey- 
combs. Man makes his own world 
and the world of others by what he 
gives. 

In Oliver Twist, Dickens shows 
how the sweet girlhood of a certain 
Christian girl came in touch with the 
soiled soul of sinning Nancy. The 
Christian girl so fully entered in 
sympathy into the life of the sinning 
Nancy that she broke down and 
cried aloud, saying, "If there were 
more like you there would be fewer 
like me." William of Orange, it is 
said, projected his life in sympathy 
and so completely entered into fel- 
lowship with the discouraged and 
the downcast that when he died the 
children in the streets cried aloud. 
May the members of this year's 
class cast their bread upon the wat- 
ers in order to make living easier 
and smoother for others. May they 
find joy in oiling the machinery of 
the home, the school, the church, 
the market, the street. 

II. The Principle of Industry 

Wrecked off the coast of Ireland 
there lay a vessel. The disaster 
happened on a calm, clear night. 
Men wondered what caused the 
wreck. Upon thorough investiga- 
tion it was found that one of the 
sailors, in trying to clean the com- 
pass box, clipped off a bit of steel 
from his knife blade, which deflect- 
ed the needle and wrecked the ves- 
sel. May no selfish ambition deflect 
us in the choice of a vocation but 



may the needle of God's guidance 
settle along the clear line of the dir- 
ection of His will. Having found our 
vocation, other things being equal, 
industry is a virtue and makes for 
growth and a richer life. 

My arm responds to exercise no 
less than does my soul. Industry is 
the handmaiden of religion. Even 
a book does not open to me of its 
own accord. It does not read itself 
to me. Honest toil and sincere 
effort are the price we must pay to 
open the closed books of life. 

Four men landed on a fertile 
tropical island. One said "How 
beautiful", the second "How rich", 
the third, "How wonderful", the 
fourth sailed away with the crew 
and said nothing. To him the is- 
land was a closed book. A year la- 
ter he returned to see how the men 
were getting along. He found the 
one had written a poem, the second 
had built a large barn and the third 
had collected a large museum. The 
first three of these four men have 
made a contribution to the world. 
The fourth is still sailing as a sailor 
over the seas trying to find an open 
book. 

III. The Principle of Compensation 

This is a universal principle. It 
operates in business, in education, 
in the social life, in religion. Put 
time, money, energy, brains, com- 
mon sense in your occupation and 
you will get large returns. Put en- 
thusiasm, effort, perseverance in 
your studies and you will become 
versatile. Put charm, personality, 
sympathy, consideration and hearty 
kindness into your social relations 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



and you will get in return affection 
and devotion. Give God a flickering 
aspiration and he will give thee 
balm for the bruised reed and flame 
for the smoking flax. Give Him the 
publican's prayer and he will give 
thee mercy like the wideness of the 
sea. Every act of charity, every 
noble effort put forth, every aspira- 
tion to holiness is fully and richly 
compensated. Give God thy life 
and He will compensate with eter- 
nal life, give thyself to God and He 
will give Himself to thee. Cast thy 
"bread" — thy time, thy talents, thy 
enthusiasm, thy money, thy best, 
thy very self, — upon the waters 



and thou shalt find it. Share thy 
crust and cloak and thou shalt have 
banquet and robe and house of 
many mansions. Cast thy bread up- 
on the waters with implicit faith in 
God and thou shalt find it after 
many days. You, members of the 
class of 1922, are the latest product 
of this College with a large tradition 
and high ideals of sacrifice and ser- 
vice. As you leave these halls and 
the fostering care and concern of 
your teachers, may your motto, 
"Gradatim", ever be a motivating 
force urging you to cast your bread 
upon the waters for you shall find 
it after many days. J. G. Meyer 




The Class of 1912 consisted of 
fifteen members. One of these, 
William K. Kulp, then of Ephrata, 
Pa., completed the English Bible 
Course. He was married to Miss 
Alma Hoffman of Elizabethtown, 
Pa., and served in the ministry at 
Mechanicsburg for some time. Lat- 
er he took up pastoral work . The 
Kulp family is now engaged in pas- 
toral work at Rockwood, Pa. 

Two of the class of ten years ago 



are still closely connected with the 
College. Professor H. H. Nye, who 
was a Pedagogical Senior in 1912, 
is Teacher of History and Social 
Science at the College. Mamie 
Keller Leiter, also a Pedagogical 
Senior, is the wife of Professor L. W. 
Leiter, Registrar of the College and 
Teacher of Biology. 

Four members of this class com- 
pleted the English Scientific Course. 
Gertrude Miller is now located in 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Chicago. She does clerical work 
for the American Medical Associa- 
tion. Orpha Harshberger has been 
teaching in her home community, 
Johnstown, Pa. 

M. Irene Scheetz is now known 
as Mrs. Harry F. Shank of near 
Quarryville, Pa. She is the fond 
mother of three children and the 
mistress of a pleasant country 
home. 

C. L. Martin and Mrs. Grace Moy- 
er Martin, '15, are living in Lancas- 
ter, Pa. There is one son in the 
home, Christian, Jr. Professor Mar- 
tin teaches History at the Boys' 
High School, Lancaster. 

Seven young people completed 
the Advanced Commercial Course 
in 1912. Russel W. Shank, Ava R. 
Witmer, Isaac J. Oaks, Paul M. 
Landis, R. Condry Long, and Fred 
L. Burgess have all been doing 
clerical work since leaving school. 
Gertrude Keller returned to College 
Hill as a student during the past 
school year. She has also been en- 
gaged in clerical work, having been 
employed in Washington, D. C. 

Wm. F. Christman, of the Prepa- 
ratory Course, has been engaged in 
educational work in Harrisburg, Pa. 



Mary A. Schaeffer, '13, now a 
missionary at Shou Yang, China, is 
recovering from a severe attack of 
typhus fever. 

John G. Hershey, '16, was united 
in marriage with Mano Baker, 
North Liberty, Indiana, on May 28. 
They visited the College on the oc- 
casion of the Baccalaureate Sermon, 
June 4. 



Anna Wolgemuth, '22, E. M. 
Hertzler, '22, Mrs. E. M. Hertzler, 
'15, Lois Falkenstein, '22, Lillian 
Becker, '22, Mrs. Mary Reber, '05, 
and John Sherman, '21, are among 
the workers in the Daily Vacation 
Bible School in the Elizabethtown 
Church held from June 26 to July 
14. Over 200 pupils are enrolled. 

George Capetanios, '16, Pastor of 
the Church of Christ at Endicott. N. 
Y., delivered the main address at 
the Alumni Literary Program dur- 
ing Commencement week. 

Professor I. J. Kreider, '16, and 
Mrs. Kreider have been students at 
Bethany Bible School during the 
year. Professor Kreider was prin- 
cipal of the Ephrata Daily Vacation 
Bible School which opened June 19 
and continued two weeks. He will 
direct similar schools in Western 
Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Emma Cashman Wampler, 
'09, Teacher of Art at the College 
during the past year, has gone to 
State College for the summer to 
pursue her art studies further. 
Junior Wampler will enter the kin- 
dergarten there. 

Mrs. Ruth Kilhefner Myer, '17, 
is Teacher of Art at the College 
during the summer and will contin- 
ue during the coming school year. 

The College Quartette, composed 
of C. H. Royer, '21, Professor E. G. 
Meyer, '21, Professor A. C. Baugher, 
'22 and John Bechtel, '22, rendered 
a number of splendid selections at 
the Conference of the Church of the 
Brethren at Winona Lake, June 7 
to 14. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



|000O0OOOO0OOOO0OOO0OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO<XKXXXX>O0OOO<XXXX>OOCKXXX>O( 

Store Opens 7:00 A. M. Store Closes 7:30 P. M. 

Saturday 10 P. M. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Just the correct dress for the College Girls. For Gymnasium 
or Class Room use. "Jack Tar Togs" are comfortable, neat and 
economical. We carry many different styles. 

Everything for the needs of he girls in the Sewing Class of 
the Home Economics Department can be found in our line of 
Staple and Fancy Notions and Dry Goods departments. 

We supply the wants of the College Boy in our Men's De- 
partment. 

We cater to the needs of inner self — we always have a fresh 
line of Groceries, Fruits and Sweetmeats. 

Agents for MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHING 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

■ J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Ass't. Cashier 
J. W. RISSER, Teller. CHAS. M. GREINER, Clerk. 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

Solicits a Share of Your Business. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

H. J. Gish 
Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
A. C. Fridy 



E. E. Hernley 
B. H. Greider 
W. A. Withers 
M. K. Forney 



>OO00CX)0O0OOOO00OOOOOOOOO000OO00000000O0000000000O0000000000O 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 

i . 

Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 



402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Sporting Goods 

Kwick-Lite Flashlights 
Kyanize Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

General Hardware 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31 R4 



ELIZABETHTOWN, ..-:-, PENNA. ij 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



A. C. McLANACHAN 

BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

New Edison Phonograph and 
Re-Creations 



The Phonograph With a Soul 
Edison Amberola and Records 



JACOB FISHER JEWELRY STORE 
Center Square 

W. S. MORGAN, Dealer. 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Multiple Magazine Linotype Equipment 

JOB PRINTING 

See Our Press Print and Fold Them 



GREIDER'S 
Firm Catalog 

Of Pure Bred 

POULTRY 

Illustrated and descriptions of all leading 
varieties. Tells what to feed for egg pro- 
duction as well as growing chicks. Gives 
{trices of eggs for hatching and stock. 
t will help you to select your breed. See 
that you get one of these books. Send 
10c in stamps or coin. 



B. H GREIDER 



Box C. 



RHEEMS, PENNA. 



FactoruRg'iSIlt 
Shoes 




excellent work fdir prices 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Records, Music Rolls, Stringed 

Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, 

Eastman Films 

FILMS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 
No. 24 South Market St. 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



GET YOUR BARGAINS 

WHERE THE CARS STOP AND THE 

CROWDS SHOP 



TRIMMER'S BUSY 

5c, 10c and 25c Store 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: PENNA. 



Remember — 18 West High Street 
For Staple 

GROCERIES AND FRUITS 
Wall Paper and Paper Hanging 



W. H. MILLER 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York -Chicago-Piftsbiirg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 1 tins. 



J. W. ZARF088 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

This store is your store to come 
to whenever it pleases you, a place 
to meet your friends — whether you 
purchase or not. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

F. C. FISHER 

FURNITURE 
and RUGS 



ELIZABEHTOWN, PENNA. 



109 East King 



Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 
H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL \ 

SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



[OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOS 

Keep Your Money at Work 

Current funds not needed for a few months can be kept actively earning 
by converting them into this Institution's Certificates of Deposit. 

These certificates pay 4%, are absolutely safe and are always worth 100 
cents on the dollar. Combined with a che king account one is assured the most 
efficient use of current funds. 

The complete facilities of this bank are always at your disposal. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 

CAPITAL $125,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS $150,000.00 



Bueh Manufacturing Co. 

Elizabethtowon, Pa. 



WE BUILD TIE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 



THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrow, Wood Saws, Corn 

Shelters, Pulverizers, Land 

Rollers, Water Troughs 



Electric Wiring 
House Wiring 



Fixture Repairing 
Contract Work 



MECHANICSBURG 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

L. L. LININGER 



We Save You Money on Wiring and 
Fixtures 



25 Per Cent. Discount on All Fixtures 



24 W. Marble St., MECHANICSBURG 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



D. G. BRINSER 

Dealer in 

Coal, Grain, Flour, Feed, Hay, Seeds, 

Cement and Fertilizer 

RHEEMS, PENNA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

HornafiUs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

DAVID L. LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

'■'■ ' ■■■■-■ -. ■• :s I- .:. ■■■■ - t ■; " ~ 

Clare's Lunch and Dining Rooms 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 



14-16 East Chestnut Street 
Lancaster, Pa. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222% N. Q.St. LANCASTER, PA. 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 

A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 



Both Phones 

D. S. BURSK 
Wholesale Sugar House 
318 N. Arch St., Lancaster, Pa. 

JOHN A. FISHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Lenses Duplicated and Repairing 



Opp. Post Office, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. D0RSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 

BOOKS STATIONERY BIBLES 

PHON OGR APHS 
I. A. SHIFFER 

39 S. Market St. Elizabeth* 



UNION FISH COMPANY 

Dealers in 
FRESH FISH, GAME, TURTLE and 

TERRAPIN 
BALTIMORE, :■: MARYLAND 

Whatever You Need la Merchandise 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU. 

V. TRINK 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 



Opp. Post Office, Elizabethtown 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 
DENTIST 
Out-of-Town Friday each week 
Elizabethtown, Pa. ■ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



>000CX}<XX}0000O00O0OOOCXXXXXXXXXXX)OOOOOOOOOO<XX}OOOOO0OOOOO0O001 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L„ Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshlenian Johnson B.- Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 

^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 



MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

W. N. CLARK COMPANY 

Rochester, N. Y. 



PRESERVERS AND CANNERS 

Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen Company 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



Pasturized Milk and Creamery Butter 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
Both Phones. Lancaster, Pa. 

THE 

GROSS CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

JOHN M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Elizabethtown - Penna. 



LOOSE LEAF COMPO. BOOKS 

WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

REAM'S BOOK STORE 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg. Lancaster, Pa. 

L. B. HERR & SON 

Lancaster's Headquarters for 

BOOKS 

FINE STATIONERY 

PRINTING 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

46-48 W. King St., Lancaster 



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I GARBER GARAGE | 

Bell Phone 43R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phone 60SA 

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FORD and FORDSON 

Authorized Sales and Service 
GENUINE FORD PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
FORD PRICES USED, ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 
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KLEIN'S 
Milk Chocolate 

And 

Almond Bars 1 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

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MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

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I THE W-A-W SHOE 

Factory to you 

For the Man Who Wants 
Quality at a Moderate Price 




Look the country over and you can't duplicate the value 
of this shoe, at 

$5.50 

In black or tan, with special oak-tanned leather sole, 
stylish last, high-grade workmanship. 

A Shoe That Will Wear and Wear 

W-A-W Shoe for Men 

Sell At Two Prices 

$7.50 $5.50 

No Higher No Lower 

Each Grade the Best at the Price 
A catalogue sent to any address you request. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 
Seems as Though They Never Wear Out 

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