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Full text of "Our cook book"

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SOCIETY 



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1»WAG0N 

LETTERING, 

SHOW CARDS, ETC. 

12 MIDDLE ST., LOWELL, MASS. 



OaR»G09K«B(DOK. 



PUBLISHED BY THE 



LADIES' AID SOCIETY 

OF THE FIFTH STREET BAPTIST CHURCH, 

LOWELL, M^S Q . 

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Copyrighted, 18SS, 
8y Ladies' Aid Society ol the Fifth Street Baptist Church. 



"We may live without poetry, music and art; 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart; 
We may live without friends; wo may live without books; 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks. 
He may live without books, — what is knowledge but grieving? 
He may live without hope, — what is hope but deceiving? 
He may live without love, — what is passion but pining? 
But where is the man that can live without dining? " 

— [Owex Meredith. 




FROM THE PRESS OF 

ADAMS & FARLEY, 83 MIDDLE STREET. LOWELL, MASS. 

1888. 



OUR COOK BOOK. % 



«FflNCY»GROCERIDS» 

Fine Teas, Coffees and Extracts. 

Fine Chocolate and Cocoa, Preserves and Sauces. 

C. W. CHENEY, 23 Central St. 

Pine*&i5teiT|»El8tf|irig, 

SARGENT, - 14 MIDDLE STREET. 

SYLVESTER BEAN, 



DEALER IN 






ALL THE SPUING STYLES IN 

PAPER HANGING AND WINDOW SHADES. 

70 Bridge Street, Lowell, Mass. 



>* 






31 East Merrimack Street, 31 

5£est GSvu&litjr of O-oodLs. 
Everything Warranted. All Goods delivered promptly. 

A. A. WH ITMAN. 



TO OUR. PATRONS. 



-@ *_^3^.« £^> 



Dear Pnend< 



This book is gotten out by the Ladiks Aid Society of the Fifth 
Street Baptist Church of Lowell. Our object has been the old one — to 
make some money. We have recarpeted our Church, and by this means 
have tried to help pay for it. We are gratified at our success. Our 
task has been arduous, for it has involved hard work, but it has been 
a pleasant one. We have made many acquaintances and have been 
treated with almost uniform courtesy. We thank our advertisers for 
their generous response to our call. We sincerely hope their invest- 
ment will be profitable. We are sure it will, if they let their wives have 
a copy of this book, for men, we are told, do like a good dinner. For 
ourselves, we know better than ever whom to patronize, and to whom 
to refer our husbands and friends. We also thank the friends who buy 
the book. May it enlarge their culinery vision! And so we launch 
our little book upon the sea, hoping its esculent suggestions may find 
safe harbor in many a larder, and gather smiles and benedictions 
around many a well filled board. 



LADIES' AID SOCIETY. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



FRENCH & PUFFER, 

Importers and Wholesale Dealer- in 

C RO C KE R Y, 

( --xhina, and Table eaTLERY;\_; 

Solid Silver and Plated Ware, 

Lamp Goods, Wooden Ware, Brooms, Brushes, Baskets, Ma ts.etc. 

k W8BS; i« CENTRAL STREET, LOWELL. 



Jobbers arid Retailers, 

37 MD 52 MERRIOQACK STREET, 
SIMPSON & ROWLAND, 

W®%M§M^1 siiiiii, 

Coffee Roasters and dealers in Foreian Fruits, 

47 to 51 MIDDLE STREET, 



LOWELL, MASS 



iBca^j • |t<ate 8 f team • ©gj€« lllorKg, 

27 PEESCOTT STREET, LOWELL, MASS. 



OtJR COOK BOOK. 



mmw 



Corn Bread. 

Two cups Iudiau meal, two cups flour, one tablespoon butter, two 
tablespoons sugar, one pint sweet milk, one egg, a liitle salt, one tea- 
spoon soda, two of cream of tartar. Bake twenty minutes in small 
cake pans. If sour or butter milk is used, one teaspoon soda but no 
cream of tartar. 

H. Merkiam. 

Pop Overs. 

One cup milk, two cups flour, one egg, one teaspoon soda, two of 
cream tartar, three tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons melted butter. 
Oven not over hot. 

H. Merriam. 

Grahani Muffins. 

One cup graham flour, one cup wheat flour, one and a half cups milk, 
two tablespoons sugar, two teaspoons baking powder and a little salt. 
Have your pans hot and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. B. B. Hart. 

Indian Cake. 

One cup each of Indian meal and flour, one-half cup sugar, one fourth 
cup cream, two teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon salt. Mix a 
little stiffer than for fritters. 

Mrs. F. W. Cobb. 

Potato Yeast. 

Four large boiled potatoes mashed fine, one pint boiling water, two 
tablespoons brown sugar, one of salt. When partly cool add yeast. 

K. 

Rye Drop Cakes. 

One pint sour milk, three eggs, one scant teaspoon soda, a little salt 
and rye meal, to make a batter that will spread a little but will not 
run. Drop with a spoon into round tins and bake fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



SHERMAN & MANNING, 

Dealers in 

Furniture, Carpets and Draperies, 

WAREROOMS, 

Ros. 3 to 1 5 ^out(?wic^ Bloc^, Prescott ^treets, 
Lowell, Mass. 

WM. A. MACK. GEO. H. WATSON. 

W. A. MACK & CO., 

Manufacturers of and dealers in 

RANGES, PARLOR AND OFFICE STOYES, 

Portable and Brick Hot-Air Furnaces, Iron Fences, etc. Every 

Description of Copper, Tin and Sheet Iron Work. All orders 

for Pump work executed promptly. Stores and 

Ranges of all kinds repaired. 

1^5 Shattuck Street, - Lowell, 
ADAMS & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail dealers in 



W Wb Wt Wf !I$ TIf Til TIP 'iffff* Ufa 



'I : 1P 



AND tfPH0L2SrERY GOODS, 

Appleton Block, Central Street, Lowell, Mass. 



W. H. SPALDING & CO., 

(Succensor to Fiskk & Spalding.) 

Paper Hanging, f inflow Shades, 

Painters' and Artists' Supplies. 
117 CENTRAL Am 14 JflCKSOJi STREET. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



R. I. Brown Bread. 

Three cups Indian meal, two cups flour, one cup molasses, one quart 
milk, one teaspoon soda. Pour into a two quart dish and steam from 
three to five hours 

Mrs. A. G. Kirby. 

Parker House Rolls. 

One half cup yeast, and half cake dry yeast, two quarts flour, one 
pint boiled milk (cooled), two tablespoons sugar, two of lard and a 
little salt. Make a batter of part of flour and let rise, then stir in the 
rest of the flour and rise again. Make into rolls, placing- a small piece 
of butter between the folds and rise again. 

Q. 

Flour Gems. 

Two cups of flour, one cup milk, one cup water, one half teaspoon of 
soda, one teaspoon cream tai tar, a little salt, mix well, and pour 
into hot gem pans. 

Mrs. J. Barnard Brown. 

Brown Bread. 

Two cups sour milk, two-thirds cup molasses, one teaspoon salt, one 
large teaspoon soda, flour, rye and corn meal each one half cup. Place 
in pail and boil five hours. X. 



10 OUR COOK BOOK. 



WILLIAM E. LIVINGSTON, 



DEALER IX 



Coal, Woofl, Lime, Cement, M, Gravel, Mortar-Stone, Hair, 

Kaolin, Plaster, Bricks, Fertilizers, Straw, Hay, Grain, Flour, Etc. 
No. 27 TEOMDIRE ST., No, 33 MEREIMAOK ST. 

Lowell, Mass. Calderwood's Cigar Store. 

PURE GOODS! 

ORRIN B. RANLETT, 






Nos. 69 and 72 Dutton St., Lowell. 



A. L. BROOKS & CO., 

Manufacturers and dealers in 

|LUMBER| 



Moulding and Packing Boxes, 



CHHS. LITTLEFIELD & CO., 

Manufacturers <>f all kinds of 

Paper Boxes, 

NO. 3 WARREN ST., - - LOWELL, MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 11 



• 



Cucumber Pickles. 

One bushel of fresh cucumbers, one cup salt. Place in a vessel a layerof 
cucumbers and sprinkle salt'over them. Repeat the process until all arc 
used. Pour on boiling water to cover them. Cover closely and let 
stand until morning. Then drain oft' the water and cover with boiling 
vinegar spiced to taste. Cover closely till cold, when they are ready 
for use. Two or three green peppers improve them. 

Mrs. M. I. Rhattuck. 

Chili Sauce. 

Take eighteen large ripe tomatoes, three green peppers, and a large 
onion chopped fine, one and a half cups vinegar, one half cup sugar, 
one tablespoon salt, one teaspoon ginger and cinnamon. Boil one 
hour. 

Mrs. M. I. Rhatttjck. 

Chili Sauce, No. 2. 

Three pounds tomatoes, one onion chopped fine, two green peppers 
chopped fine seeds and all, two cups vinegar, two tablespoons sugar, 
one tablespoon each of salt, ginger, mustard, ground cloves, and half 
a tablespoon nutmeg. Boil three quarters of an hour. 

A Friend. 



Spiced Currants. 

Five pounds currants, four pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, two table 
spoons each of clove6 and allspice. Boil three hours. 

A Friend. 



Ketchup. 

Eighteen ripe tomatoes, one onion, one cup sugar, two and a half 
cups vinegar, two teaspoons salt, one teaspoon each of cinnamon, gin- 
ger and cayenne pepper. Cook the tomatoes and onion until well done, 
strain, add vinegar &c, and cook thirty minutes. 

Mrs. F. W. Cobb. 



12 OUR COOK BOOK. 



F. W. CHADBOURNE, M. D., 

O R R I C J£, 

Room 3, Wyman's Exchange. 
P. H . H K K LO N, 

Boarflini Hack and Livery Stable, 

ifhcosntx: stable. 

PRESCOTT STREET, - LOWELL, MASS. 

K. J. WHITMAN, 

^-S-DEALER IX-^-- — 

OYSTERS, CLAMS, LOBSTERS, 



And Fish of all kinds, Fresh, Salt and Smoked. 

No. 27 East Merrimack St., - - Lowell, Mass. 

B. N. WEBBER. established 1S2S. P. P. STILES. 

BUTTRICK & CO., 






And dealers in Flour, Butter, Cheese, Country Produce, Sugar. 
Coffee, Teas, Spices, Etc., Etc. 

20 Market Street, - - Lowell, Mass. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 13 



Chow— Chow. 

One peck of green tomatoes chopped fine: add one half tf>a-cup of salt 
and let it stand over night. Tn the morning drain off the water, add 
one onion and two green peppers chopped fine, also dessert spoonhil 
of cinnamon, clove, allspice, mustard and ginger and one half cup 
sugar. Cover with vinegar and cook one hour. 

Mrs. F. W. Cobb. 

Old Virginia, Chow— Chow. 

Three pecks of ripe tomatoes, three of green tomatoes, five large heads 
of cabbage, one dozen large onions, one dozen ripe peppers, half a 
pound of celery. Chop very fine, cover with salt and soak twenty-four 
hours, then drain off brine, thoroughly cover with strong vinegar and 
add three pounds of sugar. Scald one hour, add one cup grated horse 
radish, two tablespoons white mustard seed, one of cloves, two of all- 
spice, one of ginger, and one of ground mustard. Cover closely and 
set away for a month. This is excellent. 

Miss C. Long. 

Chili Sauce, No. 3. 

Peel and chop twelve large ripe tomatoes, two onions, add two table- 
spoons salt, two of sugar and four cups vinegar. Boil from two to 
four hours. 

K. 

Onion Pickle. 

< >ne peck of onions soaked in salt and water over night. In the 
morning peel them, put in milk and water, set on the stove to simmer, 
then put iu bottles, add vinegar and stop tightly. 

Mrs. Coburx. 

Pickled Mackerel. 

Three dozen small mackerel, clean aud wipe dry. Mix together the 
following: One cup salt, one tablespoon allspice, one tablespoon 
cloves. Open each fish and sprinkle with above mixture, place iu lay. 
ers m stone jar sprinkling each layer with mixture. Heat enough cider 
vinegar to cover; pour on while hot, cover closely and bake fivehours. 
Let this stand 24 hours before serving. Eat with lemon juice like sar- 
dines. * 



14 OUR COOK BOOK. 



A. C. SKINNER, 

Merrino Underwear, Corsets, Yarns, Cloves, Ribbons, Dress Trim- 
mings, Laces, Embroideries and Hosiery. 

58 and 60 Merrimack Street, - - Lowell, Mass. 



II. J. EACOTT. B. C. EACOTT. 

EACOTT BROTHERS, 

Successors to MATTHEW EACOTT, 

DEALERS IN BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAM, 

EGGS, BUTTER, VEGETABLES AND FRUITS,, 

77 Bridge Street, Centralville, Lowell, Mass. 
CHERMAFS DINING ROOMC 

3 — AND DOMESTIC BAKERY,— 3 

Cor. Middlesex and Gorham Streets, Lowell, Mass. 

Meals served at all hours. Cenuine Home Made Bread and Pastry of all kinds fresh 

every day, at wholesale and retail. Hoi Rolls il | p. m. All kinds of Cold Meats by 

theorderor] . 1. Pro 1 idence River Oysters in every style. Open Sundays from 

7 a. in. to 7 p. in. Horse-cars pass every 7 minutes from all puts .;( the city. 

Op. B. & M. Depot. C. M. SHERMAN, Prop, 



J. LINNELL SHAY, 

Wholesale and Retail dealer in 

Fresh and Pickled Fish, 

OYSTERS, CLAMS, LOBSTERS, ETC. 

73 BRIDGE STREET, LOWELL, MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



FT] 



Lemon Pies. 

One cup boiling water, one tablespoon corn starch dissolved in 
cold water and stirred into the boiling. Remove from stove and add 
onecup sugar, and butter the size of an egg. When cold add one egg well 
beaten, the juice of one lemon and a part of the grated rind. This 
makes a large pie. 

DelijA A. Bean. 

Lemon Pie No. 2. 

Beat well together one egg, one cup sugar, pinch of salt, and the 
juice of one lemon, dissolve one tablespoon corn starch in a little cold 
water and pour over it one cup boiling water. Add one teaspoon but- 
ter and the grated peel of the lemon. Stir well together and bake with 
two crusts, wetting the top crust with milk. 

F. M. C. 

Lemon Pie, No. 3 

One cup sugar, one lemon, the yolks of two eggs, a tablespoon of 
flour, a cup of milk. Frost with the whites. 

Miss. ('. LONG. 

Lemon Pie, No 4 

Grate four large apples with the pulp and juice of two lemons, add 
two eggs and one cup of sugar. This makes two pies. 

Mrs. S. M. Milliken. 

Creaai Pie. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, three tablepoons cold water, one teaspoon 
cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda, one and one half cups flour, 
and a little salt. 

Cream. Two eggs, three tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons of corn 
starch. Beat well together and pour in one pint boiling milk. This 
makes two pies. 

Mrs. C. W. Nevkks. 



16 OUR COOK BOOK. 



FRANK S. BADGER. CHARLES S. GELDERT. 

BADGER & GELDERT, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

FURNITURE, 

Office and Store Fittings. House Finish. Wood Turning a Specialty. 
MECHANICS' MILLS,^ ^DtnTON STREET". 

WARREN & COBURN, 
Pfi©t©g rapfierg camd ^\ew Qrtigfe, 

P.O. BUILDING. 

CABINETS made at one half price. Use the Elevator. 

CHAS. W. DURAXT. established 1846. GEO. G. ROGERS. 

DURAjNT & ROGERS, 

Successor to BACON BROS. 

#@wtitts mi pil?§ssslt&ii 

Sterling Silver Ware. Fine Plated Ware. Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

receives special attention. Designs furnished, and Engraving of all kinds 

neatly executed. Diamonds, Spectacles, Watches, Clocks, Bronzes. 

25 Central Street, - - Xj©"well, 3^dla,ss. 



EDWARD N. WOOD & CO., 

Successors to Samuel N. Wood & Son, 

WHOLESALE AND RETILLERS 

Flour, Grain, Feed, Hay and Fertilizers, 

47 MARKET STREET, LOWELL, MASS. 

EDWARD N. WOOD. GEORGE C. EVANS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 17 



Cream or Cocoanut Pies. 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, oue half cup water, one half teaspoon 
soda dissolved in the water, one teaspoon of cream of tartar, one 
and a half cups flour, and a small lump of butter. 

Cream. One half cup sugar, one half cap flour, one egg. Beattheegg, 
stir in sugar and flour, stir in a half pint boiling milk, and two table- 
spoons cocoanut. Frost it and sprinkle thickly with cocoanut before 
dry. 

Roscoe B. Thomas. 

Lemon Custard Pie. 

Three eggs, three tablespoons of boiled milk, one cup sugar, thejuice 
of one lemon. Leave the whites of two eggs for frosting. Mix the in- 
gredients, adding the milk last. Bake as custard. "When done beat 
the whites of the eggs with a fork, spread over the top, and return to 
the oven to brown. 

Mbs. F. W. Cobb. 

Washington Pie. 

One tablespoon butter, one cup sugar, one egg, one cup milk, one 
teaspoon lemon, two teaspoons cream of tartar, one teaspoon soda 
sifted with two and a. half cups flour. Fill with jelly or cream, frost the 
top, and sprinkle on freshly grated cocoanut. 

F. M. C. 

Sponge Cream Pie. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, one and a half cups flour, two teaspoons 
Royal baking powder, one half cup cold water. Just before putting 
in oven add one tablespoon hot water. 

Cream. One egg, one quarter pint milk, one quarter cup sugar, one 
quarter cup flour. Salt and flavor after cooking. 

Mits. Lucy E. Shaw. 

Beef Pie. 

Take cold roast beef or steak, cut into thin slices, and put a layer in- 
to a deep pie dish with flour, pepper and salt and chopped onion 
or tomato. Place beef and seasoning in alternate layers until the 
dish is full. If you have gravy put it in, if not put in butter and water 
to make gravy. Mash one dozen boiled potatoes with half a cup of 
cream or milk, a little butter and salt. Spread over the pie, brush over 
with egg, and bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 



18 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



Pft 



BfM-sr'mm Sam wi»f 

Beacon Hill Linen, 

Commomwealth Linen, 

Hnglish Light Weight, 

Fine Papers for Polite Correspondence. 

These papers are manufactured by CARTER & KARRICK of 
Beacon St., Boston, the most fasnionable stationers in New England. 

Have you ever bought paper by the pound? You will find it less 
expansive and more satisfactory than any other way. 

The sole agents for Lowell are 

TAYLOR BROS., 



STATIONERS, 



3 CENTRAL ST. 



SHELF PAPER, TISSUE PAPER, PAPER NAPKINS, 

All Colors and Best Quality. 



s 



UBCKIPTIONS taken for all publications. Lowest club rates 
given on two or more. We have always, among many other 
publications: 



GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, 
THE HOUSEHOLD, 
YOUNG LADIES JOURNAL, 
THE SEASON, 
HARPERS BAZAAR, 



ST. NICHOLAS. 
WIDE AWAKE, 
YOUTH'S COMPANION, 
BABYLAND, 
NURSERY, 



-^sist/i/yinr^ 



TAYLOR BROS., STATIONERS, 

3 Central Street, Lowell. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 19 



Cookies. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, two eggs, one half cup milk, one 
teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda and flour to roll 

stiff. 

F. M. C. 

Ginger Snaps. 

One pint molasses, one cup shortening, one tablespoon ginger. Put 

in tin dish and let boil thin. Set away to cool. When nearly cold add 

two teaspoons soda and a little salt, stir until it foams and use flour 

enough to roll. 

Mrs. Coburn. 

Jumbles. 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, one cup butter, one half cup sweet milk, 
one teaspoon soda and flour to roll. 

K. 

Cookies. 

J— 
Two eggs, one cup sugar, one half cup butter, three tablespoons" 

milk, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda. Roll very 

soft and flavor to taste. 

K. 

Sugar Cookies. 

/Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one half cup sour milk, one half tea- \ 
spoon soda, flour to mix stiff. Roll thin and bake quickly. 

Mrs. Sylvester Bean. 

Ginger Snaps. 

Bring to a scald one cup of molasses and stir in one tablespoon 
of soda. Pour it while foaming over one cup of sugar, one egg and ona 
tablespoon ginger beaten together, then add one tablespoon vinegar, 
and flour enough to roll stirred in as lightly as possible. 

H. 



20 OUR COOK BOOK. 



J>M^ J®Wf:ilMli @ililfil\^' 



HEADQUARTERS FOR RELIABLE 

Boots, Shoes, Trunks%Tra¥elling Bags 

OP ESTTEIIVS- DESCBIPTIOIT. 

119 CENTRAL ST., - LOWELL, (DASS. 

_^F. G. MITCHELL & C0.^_ 

Ladies Please Remember the 

BON MARCHE 

WHEN LOOKING FOR 

NEW DRESS OR NEW SPRING GARMENTS. 

W\ERIGAN^ 
AhLOTMENT*- 
« ASSOCIATION. 



~-l/1/7 



F. H. & F. L. KILGORE. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 21 



Cookies. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, four eggs, one half cup milk, two 
teaspoons cream of tartar, one of soda, and one of ginger. Flour to 
roll. Bake quickly. 

Mrs. Palmer. 

Ginger Snaps. 

One cup sugar, one egg, two cups molasses, one half cup shortening, 
salt, table spoon ginger, one half cup cold water, small tablespoon 
soda. Make stiff with flour, roll quickly and bake slowly. This will 
make a large six quart pan full. 

K. 

Molasses Cookies. 

One cup boiled molasses, one cup sugar, one tablespoon vinegar,two 
tablespoons water, one egg, one heaping teaspoon eoda, and a little 
salt. Beat the sugar and egg together, then turn in the boiling mo- 
lasses. Add the vinegar and water with the soda in it. Flour enough 
to roll. 

Mrs. Lucy E. Shaw. 

Do you use Royal Baking Powder? 



22 OUR COOK BOOK. 



eemPbimER^ @p 



THE BIJOU 



Boot and Shoe Store, 



10 & 12 Merrimack Street, 



LOWELL, MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 23 



;reani» ai^cl ^tistards^ 



Floating Island. 

Put one and a half pints of milk into a dish of hot water to heat. 
When boiling hot lay on the top of it the beaten whites of two eggs, 
let them cook fifteen minutes, turning over once. Then skim out into a 
pudding dish, a:id make a boiled custard of the milk, the yolks of the 
eggs with one whole one added, and one half cup of sugar. Flavor and 
turn over the whites. 

Mks. Wells. 

Whipped Cream. 

Put one pint nice cream into a bowl, whip with egg beater until stiff 
enough to cut with a knife, add one half cup sugar, one teaspoon va- 
nilla. Whip all together,turn into a mould, and set away in a cool 
place until next day. It may be put in an ice chest and used the same 
day, but it is better if kept overnight. 

Mrs. C. 

Apple Float. 

Take one pint stewed apple, whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth, four tablespoons sugar, beat all together till stiff enough to 
stand alone. Fill a deep dish with boiled custard, pile the float on top 
and serve. 

Della A. Bean. 

Apple Foam. 

Pare, core and boil till soft six juicy apples, beat the whites of two 
eggs to a stiff froth, add three tablespoons powdered sugar. Beat 
thoroughly, the more the better. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. S. M. Shattuck. 

Apple Custard. 

Pare, core, cook, and strain through a sieve eight juicy apples, add 
a half cup sugar and the grated rind and juice of one lemon. Put in a 
deep dish, and when cold turn over it a custard made of the yolks of 
four eggs, one half cup sugar and a pint of milk. Frost with the 
whites of the eggs and four tablespoons sugar. 

F. M. C. 



24 OUR COOK BOOK. 



SHEPARD, NORWELL & CO.; 



UpHeliterY Bepartrrjerit 



GRAND OPENING OF ECRU, LEMON, STRAW AND GOLD 



CHINTZ, MADRAS, MUSLINS, 



BY THE YARD AND PIECE. 



FROM 23 CENTS TO $1.00 PER YARD. 



If you cannot find what you want in your own 
city send to us for samples, 



SHEPARD, NORWELL & CO., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK 



Tapioca Cream. 

Cover three tablespoons of tapioca with water, and let it stand 
over night. In the morning pour off the water, and put the tapioca 
into one quart of milk over the fire. When it boils stir in the yolks of 
three eggs, two thirds of a cup of sugar and a little salt. Stir until it 
begins to thicken. Make a frosting of the whites of the eggs and 
spread on top, sprinkle with sugar and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. S. M. Milliken. 

Rice Cream. 

One quart milk, three eggs, one half cup rice, one lemon, one tea- 
spoon salt, one half cup sugar; steam the rice, milk, and salt together 
until rice is soft; beat the yolks of eggs with one tablespoon sugar and 
the grated rind of the lemon. When the rice is soft, take from steamer 
and add yolks, stirring until it thickens. Pour into dish. Beat whites 
with rest of sugar and lemon, put on top and brown in oven. 

F. M. C. 



-@ -a^6^». ®^> 



Soft Ginger Bread, No. 1. 

Dissolve one teaspoon of soda in one cup of boiling water, pour 
this mixture upon a piece of lard the size of an egg, add one cup mo. 
lasses, one teaspoon ginger and a little salt. Mix soft and bake quick- 
ly. 

Mrs. J. B. Brown. 

Soft Gingerbread, No. 2. 

Six cups flour, two cups molasses or sugar, one and a half cups milk, 
two teaspoons each of ginger and soda, a half cup lard. Bake slowly. 

Mrs. J. B. Brown. 

Hard Gingerbread. 

One cup each of sugar and molasses, one half cup each of milk, 

cream, and butter, one teaspoon each of ginger, cream of tartar and 

soda, two eggs, and flour to mould. 

Mrs. Palmer. 

Molasses Gingerbread. 

One half cup sugar, one half cup molasses and of sour cream, one 
teaspoon each of soda and ginger, two cups flour, a pinch of salt. 
"When all is well mixed, add one well beaten egg. 

Mrs. Palmer. 



26 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



C. M. Chamberlin, 



II 



fcflu 



1 4mi 



W Ml 



6 MARKET ST. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 27 



Good Soup. 

Take a marrow bone weighing - four pounds meat and all, put. in a 
kettle with cold water enough to cover it; when it begins to boil, skim 
thoroughly, add a very little salt to bring up the scum. When it has 
cooked about three hours, add more salt and pepper. About two 
hours before the soup is done, take three large sized yellow turnips, 
slice them thin, cut in squares and put in kettle, also six me- 
dium sized onions sliced up, also three sliced carrots, and three 
quarts of sliced potatoes. Take two slices of home made bread, cut 
up in thin squares, and add to the mixture when nearly done. Have 
sufficient stock by adding water to make as thin as desirable. Pepper 
and salt to taste. Cook until done. This will feed six persons, provi- 
ded that they have good appetites. 

Mrs. A. R. Abbott. 
Cakes for Soup. 
Break one egg into flour and mix to roll. Roll very thin, let it dry, 
then roll up like jelly cakes, cut in strips and cook ten or fifteen min- 
utes. 

Mrs. A. R. Abbott. 
Pea Soup. 
Three quarts of water to a pint of split peas, boil until they aresoft, 
strain and return to kettle with a small piece of salt pork. Season 
with salt pepper and a little sugar. 

Miss C. Long. 
Tomato Soup. 
Three quarts of pork stock, and one quart of tomatoes, sifted half 
cup of rice. Season with salt, pepper and sugar. Just before serving 
add a cupful of milk. 

Miss C. Long. 
Tomato Soup. 
Stew six good sized tomatoes as for the table, add pepper, salt and 
butter. Scald one quart of milk, and when it conies to a boil add the 
tomato, having added a pinch of soda. Breat up crackers and put in. 

Mrs. H. Hove v. 
Dumplings for Soup. 
One pint flour, two small teaspoons baking powder, one half tea- 
spoon salt, one teaspoon sugar, one small cup milk. Mix and roll 
about half an inch thick. Put them in when the soup is boiling, and 
cook ten minutes, being careful that the soup does not stop boiling. 

Mrs. M. J. Shattuck. 



28 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



J. B. TRUEWOFTHY, 

REAL ESTATE #j FIRE INSURANCE, 

No. Prescott Street, 
FISH & PLUMMER, 

REAL ESTATE jge MORTGAGES, 

1^0©m 4, P. 0. iBiairdiag, ^©ajelf, (Dass. 

(o) 

MORTGAGES NEGOTIATED. MONEY TO LOAN. TENEMENTS TO LET. 



J. V. Kayks. 



E. J. Tarr 



J. V. KEYES & CO., 

DRY 609BS, 



124 and 126 

LOWELL, 



St., 

MASS. 



MARTIN & LANGLEY, 

Tin Ware Manufacturers, 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Tin. Glass, Britannia and Wooden Wares, 

Stoves, Hollow Ware, Paper Stock, 

and Peddler's Supplies. 

.74 and 176 MIDDLESEX STREET, 

Lowell, Mast. 



FRANK D. BILLINGS, 

—GENTLEMEN'S— 

FURNISHEMATTER, 

214 Middlesex Street. 

LOWELL, - - MASS. 

C. ZIMMER, 

Dealer in 

Guns, Pistols, Fish Poles 

AND FISHING TACKLE. 

Locks repaired and Keys fitted. 

All kinds of repairing promptly 
attended to and Neatly executed. 

16 Fftiddle St. howell. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 29 



Strawberry Pudding. 

Take one half box of good gelatine arid soak in one half pint of 
«ater one honr, then add one cup sugar and one pint of boiling water 
and stir all together. When it is nearly cold, stir in one quart of fresh 
strawberries. Turn into a mould or deep dish and set away to hard- 
en overnight. In the morning make a boiled custard of one quart of 
milk and reserving the whites of three for frosting, a pinch of salt and 
a cup of sugar. Put this in a cool place. Just before serving beat 
the whites to a froth and drop into hot milk to set. Turn the custard 
over the gelatine, dot the custard and serve. Any other kind of fruit 
may be used. 

Miss. C. Long. 

Corn Starch Pudding. 

To one pint of boiling water add three tablespoonfuls corn starch, 
two tablespoonfuls sugar and a little salt. Beat the whites of three 
eggs to a stiff froth and stir into it; while boiling add juice of one lemon 

Mrs. H. Hovey. 

Bird's Nest Pudding. 

One half cup butter, one cup sugar, two cups Hour, one half cup milk 
two eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. Put a layer of the cake in a 
tin, then a layer of sliced apple, then the rest of the cake. Bake an hour 
in a slow oven. Serve with the following sauce. One cup water, one 
half cup sugar, one teaspoon flour. When a little cool add one beaten 
egg, a little butter and flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

Mks. Wells. 

After Thought Pudding. 

One pint of nice apple sauce sweetened to taste, the yolks of two 
eggs beaten with it. Put into a buttered dish and bake ten or fifteen 
minutes. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and add half a 
cup of line sugar. Spread over the top and return to oven to brown. 

Mrs. A. G. Kirby. 

Batter Pudding. 

Three eggs, one pint milk, nine tablespoonfuls flour, salt and bake 

half an hour. 

Mrs. H. Hovey. 

Everybody use Royal Baking Powder. 



30 OUR COOK BOOK. 



The Undersigned takes pleasure in informing 
you that he has established a 

1CREAM ERYI 

In Dracut, and is now prepared to furnish 

PURE MILK, SWEET SKIM MILK, BUTTER MILK, 

( ^GREAM AND B&YTER.^^_) 

Milk Delivered Daily at the House of the Customers. 



A large experience in the Dairy business 
enables me to assure entire satisfaction to all 
my patrons. Your orders solicited. 



--#F. L. PEAB0DY,#— 



Proprietor ©meat (Sreamer^. 
P. 0. Box 1 *$0, fi ©ajeff. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 31 



Portland Pudding. 

One cup molasses, one cup chopped raisins, one cup sweet milk, one 
half cup sugar, one teaspoon of clove, one teaspoonful of cinnamon 
one half a nutmeg, two teaspoons cream of tartar, one teaspoon 
soda, one teaspoon salt, two eggs, three cups flour. Steam two 
hours and a half. 

Mrs. Palmer. 

Tapioca Pudding-. 

Three tablespoons of tapioca, one quart of milk, one tablespoon 
of butter, two eggs, a little salt. Cook the tapioca in a little water 
until soft. When cool add the other ingredients and bake half an hour. 

C. 

Circassian Pudding 1 . 

Boil six tablespoons of dried bread crumbs in one pint of milk, 
stir in the yolks of three e^rgs beaten with six tablespoons of sugar 
and a piece of butter as large as an English walnut. Take from the 
fire, and stir in the beaten whites of three eggs. Flavor with vanilla. 
When the mixture is cool, pour in a buttered dish and baka slowly un- 
til it is set. 

Mrs. A. G. Kirby. 

Cracker Pudding. 

Two scant cups of powdered cracker, one quart of milk, three eggs, 
spices, salt and sugar. Beat the yolks of the eggs and mix with the 
pudding, and add the grated rind of a lemon. AVhen the pudding is 
baked, let it cool a few minutes, then beat the whites of the eggs to a 
stiff froth with one and a half cups of sugar and the juiceof one lemon. 
Pour over the top and brown in a quick oven. 

Mrs. H. Hovey. 

Light Plum Pudding. 

Cut baker's brick loaf in slices, cutting off all crusts. Butter and lay 
in layers in a deep earthen dish, with raisins, currants, and citron be- 
tween. Make a custard of four or five eggs to a quart of milk and one 
and a half cups sugar ; salt and nutmeg to taste. Pour over the bread, 
and bake two hours or more. 

Sauce. Rub well together a cup of sugar and a tablespoon of 
butter. Add a few drops of hot water at a time, and beat until it 
creams. Flour to taste. 

Mrs. L. G. Barrett. 



32 OUR COOK BOOK. 



R. & J. 6MHRIST, 

Desire your patronage in the various lines of 
Goods which they constantly kept on hand. 



Silks, Velvets %Dress Goods, 



From every quarter of the globe including many 
excellent items of American manutacture. 



KID GLOVES % HOSIERY, 

TO SUIT ALL TASTES AND PURSES. 



We allow no one to undersell us and are constant- 
ly offering very great bargains. 



R & J. GILCHRIST, 

5 and 7 Winter Street, Boston, 



OUR COOK BOOK. 33 



Cottage Pnddiug. 

On cup sugar, two eggs, oue quarter cup butter, one cup milk, one 
pint flour, two teaspoonfuls cream of tartar, one teaspoon soda, 
one teaspoon lemon. 

Mrs. Palmer. 

Charlotte Russe Pudding. 

Heat one and a half pints of milk to near the boiling point, stir into 
milk the yolks of four eggs, one half cnp sugar and one half table- 
spoonful corn starch dissolved in a little cold milk, let thicken like 
custard, and flavor with vanilla. Lay slices of sponge cake in a. deep 
dish and pour the custard over it. When cool beat the four whites 
and sweeten with one half cup of sugar, spread over pudding and 
brown in oven. This is very nice. 

F. M. C. 

Mrs. W's Bread Pudding. 

Soak a cup of bread crumbs in a quart of milk two hours, then stir 
in a small half cup of molasses, a teaspoouful of cinnamon, a little 
salt, one egg, piece of butter the size of a walnut, half cup raisins. 
Bake iu the oven. 



K. 



Snow Pudding. 



Pour one pint of boiling water on one half a box of Cox's gelatine; 
after the gelatine is dissolved, add the juice of two lemons, and two 
cups sugar; strain through a bag when nearly cold. Beat all with the 
whites of three eggs nearly an hour, make a soft custard with the 
yolks of two eggs, one pint of milk, flavor with vanilla. Pour the 
custard over the pudding just before servfng. 

K. 

Peach Pudding. 

Pare and slice thin five peaches, place iu a deep dish aud pour over 
them the following mixture. One cup sugar; one pint milk, boiled to. 
getlier, then add the yolks of two eggs, two tablespoons corn starch, 
two tablespoons sugar. When cool beat whites of eggs for fiosting. 

K. 



34 OUR COOK BOOK. 



ADAMS & F/IRLEY, 
!©©£ eteel job Printer; 

AND PUBLISHERS. 



CALL AND SEE US WHEN IN NEED OF 

Cards, Plain or Fancy Tickets, Receipts, Wed- 
ding Cards and Invitations, Circulars, 
Pamphlets, Rent Bills, Letter Heads, 
Note Heads, Etc., Etc. 



f m GOOD • WORK * OR * NO • WORK, t» * 

? IS OUR MOTTO. | 

. . . . <^2 :— <8^63*V». ' S^> 

ADAfflS & FARLEY, 

Fine Job Printers, 

Re. *S (Diddle $tre«t, 

IiOTVXSXjIi. - MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 35 



Indian Pudding. 

Five tablespoons Indian meal, one coffee cup molasses, two eggs, 
one teaspoon salt beaten together. Boil one quart of milk, pour on 
above ingredients and bake slowly two or three hours. 

K. 

Charlotte Russe. 

One pint of cream beaten stiff, whites of two eggs well beaten, stir in 
half a cup powdered sugar and flavor with lemon or vanilla. Let it 
cool before pouring on cake. 

K. 

Queen of Puddings. 

One pint of nice bread crumbs, one quart of milk, one cup of sugar, 
the yolks of four eggs, the grated rind of one lemon, a piece of butter 
the size of an egg. Bake like a custard. Spread slices of jelly of any 
kind over the top and cover the whole with the whites of eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth with one cup of sugar, and the juice of the lemon. 
Brown slightly in the oven. 

Z. 

Lemon Pudding 1 . 

Pour one quart boiling milk over one pint of fine bread crumbs. 
Let stand a half hour, then add yolks of three eggs, two large table- 
spoons sugar, and the grated rind of half a lemon. Stir, bake slowly 
about an hour. Let the pudding cool a few minutes, then spread a 
layer of jelly over it, and cover, with frosting made of the whites of 
three eggs, one half cup of sugar, and the juice of one lemon beaten 
together. Brown slightly in the oven- v. 

■ - • : - . . .A Fkiend. 

Creamy Sauce. 

One half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, four tablespoons cream 
or milk, one teaspoon vanilla, three additional teaspoons milk or 
cream. Beat the butter to a cream, add sugar gradually and milk 
gradually. Place the bowl in which the sauce has been ma le in a dish 
of boiling water, stir a fev minutes until it is s nooth and if i« e ul.y to 
serve. 

Mrs, Hovev. 



86 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



MRS. F\ W. COBB, 

lit fcti ft! Pit p® * INwH 

BOSTON, NEW ENGLAND — 

CONSERVATORY METHOD, 



No, 70 First Street, 



Lowell, Mass. 



J. B. STEWART, 






SOTJO AOENT FOR 



$1 



Plumbing, Gas and Water-Piping, 

No. 85 BRIDGE STREET, - LOWELL, MASS. 

NEW GOODS! NEW STYLES! 
lilaff Papers # llJimdoaj r|g<ade;g, 

The Celebrated Pioneer, Prepared Paints, 

E. MORRILL. Agent, 264 Middle s ex St., Lowel l. 

KIMBALL & CO., 

-**©ress • ^©oels ® a • !§f)GGi&l\fyh- 

Nos. 93, 95 and 97 MERRIMACK STREET, 

ILiO-well, ------ 3iv<Ca.Es. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 37 



Foaming Sauce. 

Beat half a cup of butter to a cream, add one cup granulated sugar, 
stir until white and foaming. Just before serving pour a cup of boil- 
ing water on it and stir a moment. 

Mas. A. G. Kibby. 

Strawberry Dessert. 

Fills cups loosely with strawberries, and pour over them corn starch 
blanc-mange to fill the interstices between the berries. When cold 
turn out and serve with sugar and cream. 

Della A. Bean. 

Apple Pudding. 

Pare six large apples, take out cores, place in a deep dish and pour 
custard or light batter over them. Bake one hour. To be eaten with 
sauce. 

Della. A. Bean. 

Pudding Sauce. 

One cup sugar, two cups hot water, one egg, a little salt, one heap- 
ing tablespoon flour. Stir the flour and sugar together dry, then stir 
into the water slowly and set on stove to boil. After cooking thor- 
oughly stir in the beaten egg, and remove from stove immediately. 
Flavor to taste. 

* - • Mrs. M. I. Shattuck. 

Blueberry Pudding. [ 

Sweeten a quart of canned blueberries to taste, and set on stove in a 
porcelain kettle. Make a crust of a pint of flour, two small teaspoons 
baking powder, one teaspoon sugar, one half teaspoon salt, and a 
small cup of milk. Cut into small cakes, drop into the boiling berries, 
and steam till done. ,< « 

Mrs. Lucy E. Shaw. 

Chocolate Pudding. 

Put one and a half pints of milk, one cup sugar into a tin pail placed 
in a kettle of boiling water. Put one half pint of milk into a sauce-pan, 
add a heaping tablespoon grated chocolate, bod slowly a few minutes. 
Wet a tablespoon corn starch in two tablespoons milk, stir into th« 
boiling milk in the pail, add chocolate alter straining, and the beaten 
yolks of three eggs, stir until smooth, flavor, frost with the whites of 
three eggs, and a teaspoonful of sugar. 

Mrs. Hyde. 



38 OUR COOK BOOK. 



mLLM FARM DAIRY, » 

0ffice and ©epof, ¥1®. $9 $>GQ®nd Street, 

E. G. HAM, Proprietor, 

Successor to William H. Shedd, 

^WHBLESALE AND RETAIL? DEALER IN MIl2K.r^ 
Orders delivered in all parts of the city. 

Go to SHATTUCK'S SHOP, 

31 WEST THIRD STREET, 

If you want your Horses shoed after the rules of Nature. 
Special attention paid to that branch of business. 

Also Carriage Repairing and General Jobbing. 



C. A. THORNING, 

(Established 1878,) 

■**$ rKanufacturing Confectioner and Oaterer, 
Parties and Fairs supplied with Ice Cream. 

Highland Hall, Corner Branch Street and Smith Avenue, 
LOWEI2L, MASS. 



ALV I N LAWRE NCE, 



THIRTY -ONE YEARS A 



'iMtitil 



Acknowledged by competent judges to be the best in Lowell. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 39 



Layer Cakes. 

Three eggs, three tablespoons butter, one cup sugar, one cup flour, 
three tablespoons milk, one teaspoon cream of tartar, and one half 
teaspoon soda. 

Mrs. C. W. Nevers. 

Chocolate Cake. 

One half cup butter, one cup sugar, one and one half cups flour, one 
half cup milk, two eggs, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half tea- 
spoon soda, and two and one half tablespoons chocolate. 

Mrs. C. W. Nevers. 

Mountain Cake. 

One cup sugar, two eggs, one half cup butter, one half cup milk or 
water, two cups flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, and one half 
teaspoon soda. Flavor with nutmeg. 

Mrs. Caverly. 

Jelly - Roll. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, two cups flour, one half cup cold water, 
two teaspoons Royal Baking Powder mixed into the flour. Beat 
eggs with a beater two minutes, add the sugar, and beat with 
a spoon five minutes, add half the flour and stir thoroughly, then 
the water and mix well, then stir in the remainder of the flour. Bake 
in a shallow pan ten by sixteen inches. When done turn out on a 
damp cloth, spread with jelly and roll immediately. 

Mrs. F. W. Cobb. 

Marble Cake. 

White part.— One half cup butter, one half cup milk, one cup white 
sugar, two cups flour, whites of three eggs, one teaspoon cream of 
tartar, and one half teaspoon soda. 

Dark part. — Yolks of three eggs, one half cup butter, one cup mo. 
lasses, two and one halt cups flour, one half cup milk, one teaspoon 
cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda, one quarter spoon each of 
clove, cinnamon and nutmeg. 

Mrs. Cavebly. 



40 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



WARRE N L. FLOYD, 



""Tfo 



SAVINGS BANK BUILDING, 

18 SHATTUCK STREET, - LOWELL, MASS. 

CENTRALV1LLE NEWS DEPOT, 

Choice Fruit and Confectionery a Specialty, 

CHAS. A. EVELETH, Prop., 

99 BRIDGE STREET, - - LOWELL, MASS. 

COOK, TAYLOR & CO., 

Fjjll Assortment of Black Dress Goods, 

Including- Henrietta Cloths, Cashmeres, Serges, Sebasta- 
pols, Drap de Almas, etc., etc. 



48 and 50 Merrimack Street, 



Lowell, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

H. W. ERDIS, 

@K@iee traits 

<afid (BomfeetloRGr^, 

3 Merrimack and 165 Central Sts., 

LOWELL, MASS. 



Win. H. LATflOP, M. D. 



, JUI A/., 



15 First Street, 



LOWELL, MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 41 



Picnic Cake. 

Two eggs, and white of one more, three cups sugar, one cup butter, 
three cups flour, one cup milk, one tablespoon cream of tartar, and 
one half teaspoon of soda. 

Mrs. C. W. Nevers. 

Spring Roll. 

Four eggs, one cup sugar, one cup flour, one half teaspoon soda, 
and one of cream of tartar. Flavor to taste. Bake quickly, turnout, 
spread with jelh , and roll immediately. 

Miss. C. Long. 

Nice Marble Cake. 

White part.— Two cups white sugar, three cups flour, one half cup 
butter, one cup sweet milk, whites of live eggs, two teaspoons Royal 
Baking Powder. 

Dark part.— One tablespoon butter, two thirds of a cup of brown 
sugar, one half cup molasses, one cup raisins, yolks of three eggs, one 
half teaspoonful soda, one half teaspoon of each kind of spice, and 
flour to make very stiff. 

Mrs. F. M. Lewis. 

Angel Cake. 

Beat the whites of six eggs to a stiff froth, two thirds' cup sugar, 
one half cup flour after sifting four times, one half teaspoon cream 
of tartar, in flour, one half teaspoon vanilla. 

Mrs. S. M. Milliken. 

Union Cake. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three cups flour, one 
half cup corn starch, four eggs, two teaspoons cream of tartar, one 
teaspoon soda, two teaspoons extract of lemon. 

F. M. C. 

Chocolate Sponge Cake. 

Onecupsugar,two eggs, one square of chocolate,oue half cup sweet milk, 
one teaspoon Royal Baking Powder. Put the chocolate where it will 
melt, then add the milk. Beat the yolks of the eggs, and stir in sugar 
and flour with baking powder, then add the beaten whites and lastly 
the milk, and chocolate. 

Mrs. S. M. Milliken. 



42 OUlEt COOK BOOK. 




•«»HAYBEN^ 



ARTISTO 






BHETOGRABHER. 



'isisi/i/innsi^-- 



iltlt H@ftliiii& Slin% 



LOWELL, MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 43 



Nice Cheap Fruit Cake. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, two cups sour milk, two cups 
raisins, live cups flour, one teaspoon soda, salt, cassia, cloves. Citron 
to taste. This makes two loaves. 

F. M. C. 

Tea Cake. 

Two cups of sug'ar, one cup of butter, one cup of milk, three eggs, 
three cups of flour, one teaspoonful cream of tartar, and one half tea- 
spoon of soda. Beat the butter and sugar together, add beaten 
yolks, then the beaten whites, add the soda dissolved in milk, and stir 
in flour and cream of tartar last. 

Mrs. S. M. Milliken. 

Filling For Cake, No. 1. 

One cup of figs cut fine, one half cup water, cook until thick, then 
add two-thirds of a cup of sugar, and boil a few minutes. Cool before 
using. Mrs. S. M. Milliken. 

No. 2. 

One cup powdered sugar, one quarter of a cup of water, simmer 
gently until it is stiff when dropped into water, the white of one egg, 
one half cup each of chopped raisins, and walnut meats, a tablespoon 
of cocoanut, and a few drops of vanilla. 

Mrs. S. M. Milliken. 

Snow Cake. 

Whites of five eggs beaten to a stiff froth, two thirds tumbler of 
white sugar, one half tumbler flour, and one half teaspoon cream of 
tartar. K. 

Ribbon Cake. 

Two and a half cups sugar, two and a half cups flour, two teaspoons 
cream of tartar, one teaspoon soda, one cup butter, one cup milk, four 
eggs. Make three parts. To one part add one cup raisins, one cup 
currants, and spice to taste. 

Mrs. Coburn. 



U OUR COOK BOOK. 



an^-^XjES if*. roaHtsow, 

Wholesale and Retail dealer in 

GROCERIES, FLOOR, TEAS, COFFEES, ETC, 

For a family Flour, try our "Middlesex." None geuuiue unless my 
name appears on every bag' or barrell. 

The best results to be obtained from the receipts in this book, can 
be obtained by purchasing only pure Spices, Cream of Tartar, Flour, 
and Groceries in general of 

CHAS. F. ROBINSON, 251 MIDDLESEX ST. 

We match any prices, of same quality goods with anj r store in the 
city. 



"PHOTOGRAPHY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES." 
ftouprefs $\ud'iB, 51 Gentred $\. 

It is the best appointed in New England and most popular 
on account of its superior work in Photograph, Crayon, Pastal, 
Ink, Etc. 

Children's Photographs a Specialty. 



C. I. W. MflYN/lRD & CO., 

TRIMMINGS, BUTTONS, LACES, ETC,, 

_A»_rt IfcTeed.le T77"or3s: l!v£a,teria,ls- 

78 Merrimack St., - Lowell, Mass. 

DR. C. F\ HARRIS, 

^DENTIST,^ 

48 Central Street, Lowell, Mass. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 45 



White Cake. 

Three cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, one cup flour, one 
teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda, one cup corn starch. 

K. 

Fruit Cake. 

Five and a half cups flour, four eggs, two cups sugar^bno and a half 
cups molasses, one and a half cups butter, one cup sweet milk, one tea- 
spoon saleratus, one lb. raisins, one lb. currants, %lb. citron. 

K. 

Tumbler Cake. 

One tumbler each of sugar, molasses, milk and butter, four eggs, 
five tumblers fc>ur, one teaspoon soda, one pounds raisins, one pound 
currants, citroii and spice to taste. 

Mrs. Palmer. 

Frosting" for Cake. 

One tablespoon gelatine soaked in one tablespoon cold water half 
an hour, add one tablespoon boiling water, and one cup of powdered 
sugar. Flavor to taste and spread on cake while warm. 

K. 
To prevent cake from falling, let the tin drop suddenly on the table 
two or three times before baking. 

K. 

Raisin Cake. 

One cup sugar, one half cup butter, onecup milk, three cupsflour, two 
eggs, one cup chopped raisins, two teaspoons Royal Baking Powder. 

Mks. F. W. Cobb. 

Sponge Cake. 

Three eggs beaten five minutes, add one and a ball cups sugar, beat 
+en minutes, one half cup cold water, with one half teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in it, two cups flour sifted four or five times, one teaspoon 
cream of tartar nfixed with it, and one teaspoon of lemon. 

A Friend. 



46 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



M 



)o( 

DR. FOLSOCD, 188 CENTRAL ST. 

A new gold filling, a perfect filling put in without the use 
of mallet aft without any pain. This is new and novel. 



DENNIS O'BRIEN, 

llDRUGGISTli 

83 Bridge Street, Lowell, 



MKS. E. A, SABINE, 
122 MERRIMACK STKEET, 



Lowell, 



Mass. 



M. H. DAGGETT, 

BEST 

BOOTS #5 SHOES, 

CHEAP FOR CASH. 

27 John St. , Lowell, Mass. 



T. £* F^BEELL. 



CASH MARKET 



74 Bridge Street, Lowell, Mass. 



OfJR COOK BOOK. 47 



Jelly Cake. 

Stir well together three well beaten eggs, one cup powdered sugar, 
one cup flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, mixed with the flour, 
one half teaspoon of soda dissolved in three tablespoons of water. 
Spread in two pans and bake. When done turn bottom side up on a 
napkin, spread with jelly, roll quickly, and wrap in napkin. 

A Friend. 

Tea Cake. 

One egg, one cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, one and a half cups 
flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda, and a 
piece of butter the size of an egg. 

Mrs. T. Barnard Brown. 



Sponge Cake. 

Four eggs beaten a little, one and one half cups sugar, two tea- 
spoons cream of tartar, and one teaspooon soda dissolved in a half 
cup cold water, stir to a foam, and mix with eggs and sugar. Add 
two and a half cups flour, and beat well. Bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. I. Barnard Brown. 



Figf Cake. 

One cup sugar, one half cup butter, two eggs, one half cup milk, one 
half teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream of tartar, two cups flour. 
Bake in three sheets. Take half a pound of figs chopped fine, add the 
whites'of two eggs beaten stiff, and three-fourths of a cup of sugar. 
Put on the stove in a kettle of hot water, stir till well mixed, then 
spread between the layers, and on the top. This is very nice. 

Mrs. D. N. Patterson. 

Cheap Fruit Cake. 

Five and a half cups flour, four eggs, two cups sugar, one cup mo- 
lasses, one. and one half cups butter, one cup mjflk, one teaspoon soda, 
one pound raisins, two teaspoons cinnamon, one small teaspoon eac D 
of clove and mace. 

Mrs. M. I. Shattuck. 



48 



OUR COOK BOOK. 




This Market is run on the same principle as the Public 

Markets of Boston and other large cities. You can 

always find the largest line of 

Chicago Dressed Beef, 

LAMB, MUTTON, VEAL, POULTRY, GAME, ETC., 

At from ioto 25 per cent, less than can be bought anywhere 
this side of Boston. A specialty of 

FINE VERMONT BUTTER 

Which is received direct, and sold at wholesale prices. Call 

and s^e for yourself. 



499 ESSEX ST., 

Lawrence, Mass. 



B.B.HART, 

Prop. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 49 



French Cake. 

Three eggs, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, one half cup butter, 
three cups flour, three teaspoons Royal Baking Powder, two teaspoons 
lemon extract. 

Mrs. Mary Patterson. 

Frosting without Eggs. 

One cup sugar, four tablespoons milk, set on the stove, and stir 
constantly until it boils. Boil without stirring five miuutes. Take from 
stove and stir until cold. Chocolate frosting may be made like the 
above with a small teaspoon of Baker's Breakfast cocoa added while 
boiling. 

Mrs. M. I. Shattuck. 

Snowhall Cake. 

One cup sugar, one half cup butter, two cups flour, one half cup 
milk, whites of three eggs, two teaspoons Royal Baking Powder. 

Mrs. B. B Hart 

Walnut Cake. 

One cup sugar, one half cup butter, one cup milk, three cups flour, 
two eggs, two teaspoons Royal Baking Powder, one cup chopped wal- 
nuts. 

Mrs. B. B. Hart. 

Cake to Keep. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, three cups flour, one third cupmilkj 
five eggs, one teaspoon Royal Baking Powder. Beat butter and su- 
gar together, add yolks of eggs, flour, baking powder and milk. Beat 
whites of eggs to a stiff froth and stir in last. 

Mrs. Belle A. Fardick. 

Dried Apple Cake. 

Two cups of dried apples soaked over night. Chop, and stew in two 
cups of molasses three hours, add two eggs, one cup each of milk, sugar, 
and butter, one teaspoon soda, a little salt, spices of all kinds, and 
flour to make the consistency of soft gingerbread. 

Mrs. B. B. Hart. 



50 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



^«x m* m Jri|lAJi|cM apt %&Wk* 



Commission Merchants 



-AND DEALERS IN- 



FIomp, Spqih, 



Feeel eteel 



w 



Fertilizers and Gereals of all Kinds. 



34, 36 and 38 MIDDLE ST 



X_i©"well. 



Mass. 



OCR COOK BOOK. 51 



Circle Cake. 

One egg, one cup sugar, two cups (lour, one third cup butter, one 
half cup sweet milk, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon 
soda. Flavor with rose or lemon. If steamed this may be used for a 
pudding. 

Mrs. A. R. Abbott. 

Aunt Betsey's Cake. 

One cup butter, two cutis sugar, one cup molasses, five cups flour, one 
and one half cups cold water two eggs, one nutmeg, one pint chopped 
raisins, one teaspoon each of soda, salt and clove. Bake one and a 
half hours in a slow oven. Two loaves. 
N. B. Begin the baking between four and five, p. m. 

Dea. G. Leighton. 

Year Cake. 

One cup sugar, one cup butter, one cup molasses, three cups of flour, 
four eggs, one half pound currants, one half pound raisins, one quar- 
ter pound citron, one quarter teaspoon saleratus, one teaspoon 
each of all kinds of spices. 

Mrs. H. Hovey. 

Currant Cake. 

Two cups flour, one cup sugar, one half cup butter, one half cup 
milk, two eggs, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda. 
Currants. 

Mks. H. Hovey. 

Ribbon Cake. 

Two cups sugar, three eggs, two thirds cup butter, one cup sweet 
milk, three cups flour, one teaspoon saleratus dissolved iu the milk, 
and a little salt. Fiavor with lemon or almond. Put half the above 
in two tins, and to the remainder add two tablespoons of molasses, 
one teaspoon cinnamon, one half teaspoon clove, a little nutmeg, and 
a tablespoon of flour. 

Miss Helen Richardson. 



52 OUR COOK BOOK. 



MRS. L. A. GROVER, 

LADIES' JWD GENTS' 




601115, 

16 and 18 Merrimack St., Lowell. 



'CI 



OPEN SUNDAYS. 



MANDRAKE 



y^C^S^^c 



SARSAPARILLiAf 



Is composed of the concentrated extracts of Mandrake, Yellow 
Dock, Dandelion, Sarsaparilla, Burdock, Buchu, Hops, Gen- 
tian, Chamomile, Red Clover, Stillingia, etc., and will be 
beneficial in all complaints, arising from a disordered Stomach, 
Torpidity of the Liver, a Constipated state of the Bowels, and 
a Scrofulous or other impurities of the blood. 

ilsFreparecL "\oy 

G. C. BROCK, - DRUGGIST, 

.Lowell, Mass. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 53 



Cream Cakes. 

To one cup of boiling water, add one half cup of butter. While boil- 
ing on the stove, add on« cup of flour, and stir untd very stiff and 
smooth, then put away to cool. When cold add four eggs whole and 
6tir until thoroughly mixed. Drop into one dozen cakes on a buttered 
tin leaving an inch of space around each one. Reserve a little white 
of egg to brush over top just before putting in oven. Bake abont 
half an hour in a moderate oven. 

Cream. — One pint of milk, one egg, six heaping teaspoons flour, one 
half cup of sugar, and a pinch of salt. Flavor with lemon. 

Mks. Wells. 

Chocolate Cake. 

One and a half cups of sugar, piece of butter the size of an English 
walnut, two eggs, one cup of milk or water, in which a scaut teaspoon 
of soda is dissolved, two scant teaspoons cream of tartar, and flour to 
make a thin batter. Flavor and bake in three small tins. For the 
filliug cut one square of Baker's chocolate in small pieces, put in a 
sauce pan with a little hot water, let it melt, add a little butter, flavor 
with a few drops of vanilla, and when cool spread between the cake. 

A Friend. 



- 



Caramel Cake. 



Two eggs, one cup sugar, one half cup milk, oue half cup butter, two 
cups flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon saleratus > 
Vanilla. Bake in three sheets. 

Caramel. — Two cups sugar, two thirds cup milk, butter the size of 
an egg. Boil until it begins to harden, then stir until almost cold. 
Flavor with vanilla and spread over cake. 

Mrs. N. C. Mallory, Aurora, 111. 

Fruit Cake. 

One cup butter, one cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one cup 
milk, three cups flour, four eggs, one half teaspoon cream of tartar 
one teaspoon soda, one pound raisius, well chopped, and one nut- 
meg. This makes two loaves, and will keep six months. 

Miss. C. Long. 



54 



OUK COOK BOOK. 



JUST MAKE UP YOUR MIND TO VISIT THE 

Grocery House of F. D. Munn & Son, 

12 JOHN STREET, LOWELL, 

And purchase a pound of their best Tea and Coffee. The 
goods are sold on their merits and warranted to be all that is 
claimed. Try a pound of each and be convinced. 



rs FRaiT STORE, 



Foreign emd ©©mestl© traits of alf KiRds, 

2E:ra. ■ft5iL©J.2r Elcasou. 



8 East Merrimack Street, Lowell, Mass. 






OFFICE, 22 SHATTUCK ST. 



On April ist the net price of Gas will be reduce to one 
Dollar and ten cents per thousand feet. 




OUR COOK BOOK. 55 



A Nice Cake. 

Three and a half cups sugar, five cups flour, one cup butter, one cup 
milk, six eggs, two teaspoons cream of tartar, and one of soda. 

Mus. A. G. Kikby. 

Date Cake. 

Four eggs, one small cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, two 
teaspoons cream of tartar, one teaspoon soda, three cups flour, and 
one pound of dates cut up. We recommend this very highly. 

Miss C. Long. 

Chocolate Cake. 

Two eggs, one half cup of sugar, butter size of an egg, one half cup 
milk, one cup flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon 
of soda. Beat the whites and yolks of eggs separately. 

Frosting. One egg and one tablespoon flour beaten together, one lnrge 
cup of milk, three quarters cup of sugar, one half cup of grated choco- 
late. Dissolve the chocolate in water, turn the milk in and boil ten 
minutes, then turn in the rest, and boil five minutes. Flavor with va- 
nilla. 

X. 

Cup Cake. 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup sweet milk, four 
eggs, five cups of flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half tea„ 
spoon soda, a tumbler of citron. Flavor with lemon. 

Miss C. Long. 

Sponge Cake. 

Beat the whites and yolks of four eggs separately. To the yolks 
add one cup of sugar, and a small teaspoon of Royal Baking Powder, 
and beat five minutes, then cut rather than beat in the whites of eggs 
stopping the minute they are evenly mixed. Then add one cup of flour 
and stir no more than necessary to mix it in. Flavor if preferred 
Bake in a moderate oven about half an hour, or until it will not stick 
to a broom splint. 

Mrs. C. W. Wells. 



56 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



Don't Buy Cheap Impure Candies 

For your little ones, but give 

SHERMAN A CALL 

2nTo. S3 Central St., 
Where you can find all kinds of Can- 
dies, manufactured daily of the chois- 
est materials. 



J. L. CHALIFOUX, 



WJi o I eirff^ff/K e.f a i I ©lot Iii ejw 

Ko. 1 5 e/enf^al ^ptreet, Qowell, PHass. 

Strictly one price. We occupy three floors of this elegant building 
all of which are loaded with Clothing, Hats and Furnishing Goods. 
We have the finest Boy's Clothing Department in this city. We make 
a specialty of extra sizes for large men. 

WHITHED & Co., 



Ittffil 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



|Q* ttSAUMi 



-HuJW 



^?y^ WSJ?!* '"""v: ' '.."' *^' . ": 

ELEVATOR AND STOREHOUSES-FOOT OF HOWARD ST. 

Office, 29 Merrimack Street, Lowell. 

The results obtained from using the recipes 
given in this book will be much bettherif the 

USED ARE THOSE PREPARED BY 

GEO. S. HULL & Co., - Five-Cent Bank Building, 

Cor. 2>v£errirrs.a,clr and. Tola.ri Streets. 
W r e guarantee strength and purity. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



Dayton Cake. 

One and one half cups sugar, one third cup butter, one third cup 
milk, three cups flour, three eggs, one half teaspoon cream of tartar- 
one half teaspoon soda and one nutmeg. 

Mrs. Cavebly. 

Pound Cake. 

One and one half cups sugar, one and one half cups Hoar, one cup 
butter, five eggs, one half teaspoon of Royal Baking Powder. Melt 
the butter and stir into the flour, then add the beateu eggs and sugar, 
aud stir till free from lumps, then add baking powder. 

Mrs. Nevers. 

Sponge Cake. 

Three eggs, beat two minutes, one and one half cups sugar, beat five 
minutes; one cup flour, one teaspoon cream tartar, beat two minutes; 
one half cup cold water, one half teaspoon soda, beat one minute; add 
one large cup flour, salt and flavor to taste. Bake twenty minutes. 
This makes two loaves. 

Mrs. Sylvester Bean. 



S8 OUR COOK BOOK. 



^ATTENTION-** 

The place to have a first class Team, double or single, 
also to get your horses boarded with the best of care, at rea- 
sonable rates, is at 

G. H. TRYDERS, 15 SECOND STREET. 

P. S. Horses. Harnesses and Carriages bought, sold or 
exchanged. 

^^G. • H. • T. 









121 MARKET STREET. 

THE ONLY PLACE IN THE CITY WHERE THE 

&moug ©calumet B^tterine: 

0«,m Be Sad, 



A. H . CLUER, 

Light and Heavy Express and Driving Harnesses, 

BLANKETS, WHIPS, COMBS, BRUSHES, ETC, 

Particular attention paid to Oiling and Repairing Harnesses, 
Carriage Trimming, etc. Satisfaction guaranted. 

t"£ Bridge Street, - - $j®me>U, Q)<ass. 



OUR COOK ROOK. 59 



Mi^cn.uin^ors, 



Jellies. 



For every pint of juice take .1 pint of sugar. Heat sugar in a pan in 

an open oven, or where it will get boo hot to handle. Boil fruit juice, 
twenty five minutes, stir in hot sugar, and boil five minutes. 

Z. 

Baked Hams. 

Take a small or medium sized ham, trimmed into good shape. The 
evening previous to cooking, soak in a pan of hot water three or four 
hours. In the morning make a stiff paste of rye meal, mixed with 
water, and cover the ham entirely with the paste. Rake five or six 
hours in a moderate oven. When done remove crust, take off skin, 
and dredge with powdered bread crumbs. Save the skin to cover the 
cold ham when it is put away. 

K. 

Beef Tea. 

Cut half a pound of lean beef, into very small pieces and put it into 
a wide mouthed bottle, add half a cup of cold water, and cork tightly. 
Put the bottle in a basin of cold water, aud place on the fire where it 
will come to the boiling point, but not boi'. Keep at this temperature 
two hours, then strain, and season with salt. Q- 

Doughnuts. 

One cup sugar, one egg, salt, nutmeg, two tablespoons each of melt- 
ed lard, and cream of tartar, one teaspoon soda, stir in hour, care 
being taken not to get in too much. 

V. M. C. 

% 

Merricks. 

Two eggs, two tablespoons each of butter, and sugar, flour to mix 
stiff, roll thin and fry in hot lard as doughnuts. 

Della A. Bean. 



60 OUR COOK BOOK. 



Appropiate Holiday Dish, Happy Woman "A La Mode." 

Take one piece of silk with smaller quantity of brocade satin to 
correspond, stir in buttons to match, also spool of silk, twist, braid, 
etc., use a bit of canvass for stiffening" season with laces, ribbons or 
other trimmings to suit the taste roll in one of Grant & Cobb's wrap- 
pers, and put in a dark closet to serve for breakfast Christmas morn- 
ing; with side dishes of jewelry, furs, gloves, etc. This dish may be 
made of less expensive ingredients, and still make a Happy Woman. 



PUTNAM & SON. 

Clothing, Hats 

—AND— 

FURNISHING GOODS. 

Central Street, Cor. of Warren, and 3 and 5 Hurd Street, 

K. H- PARKER, M. D , 

Homoeopathist, 

Office, 128 FRerrimac^ $t., kowell. 
m° Office hours: 8 to 9% A. M., 2 to 3% and 7 to 9 P. M. -®| 

E. J. EIOKEE, 

KNG R AVK R 

^>f Initiate, (Donograms and Inscriptions 

On Watches, Rings, Bangles, Spoons, Forks, Mugs, Tea Sets, Ice 
Pitchers. Waiters, etc., etc. etc. 

No. i Prescott Street, ... Lowell, Mass. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 61 



To Keep Eggs. 

To four quarts of air slacked lime, put two tablespoons cream of 
tartar, two of salt, and four quarts of cold water. Tut fresh eggs into 
a tight firkin, and pour the mixture over them. The water may settle 
away so as to leave the upper layer uncovered. If so, add more of the 
mixture, cover closely and keep in a cool place. 

I have put down eggs this way for twenty years, in summer, for win- 
ter use and have never found a poor one. 

Mrs. M. I. Shattuck. 

Veal Loaf. 

Two pounds lean veal, after it is boiled. Chop fine, add three well 
beaten eggs, three pounded crackers, one half tablespoon salt, one 
half of black pepper. Moisten with the water in which the meat was 
boiled. Bake in a bread pan half an hour. Slice cold. 

A Friend. 

Spiced Berries. 

Eights quarts blueberries, four pounds brown sugar, one q' art vine- 
gar, one tablespoon each of clove, allspice, and cinnamon. Crush the 
berries, add the sugar, vinegar, and spices. Let boil till it begins to 

thicken. 

A Friend. 

A Nice Varnish. 

Two ounces gum shellac, put into one half pint alcohol. This 
makes old furniture look like new. 

Miss. C. Long. 

Breakfast Dishes. 

Place the gem pan on the hottest part of the stove, while stirring to- 
gether two teacups each, of flour and Indian meal, one pint of milk, 
one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream of tartar, two tablespoons 
sugar, and a little salt. Beat quickly. Pour batter in pan, and when 
it begins to rise, put on grate in oven. 

Meats left over from dinner may be chopped, seasoned with one 
part sugar, and two parts mustard wet up with vinegar. 

Cold boiled potatoes, sliced, and toasted brown are palatable. 



62 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



Hoods 

r 



PurifiestheBlood. 

IOO DOSES&I.OO 




BARRISTERS HALL 

LOWELL, MASS. 



ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHER. 



-♦THE MAGEE MYSTIC RANGE.*- 

We give a few names who are using this, the best, having 
the latest improvements, etc., etc. — 

W. M. Walker, A. H. Abbott, Rev. J. C. Emery, Fred 
D. Wyman, E. C. Leslie, Rev. H. Holman, J. M. Wilson, 
R. L. "Nutting, F. E. Lewis, Gen. A. Chase, Stanley Mans- 
field, E. W. Wright, Rev. J. Gouch, Mrs. E. McArdell, 
Alfred Taylor, E. W. Hicks, Wm. Lairdieson. 

N. J. WEIR & CO., * 51 MARKET STREET, 

O. K. HILL, 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Jobbing and repairing in all its branches neatly executed 
and promptly attended to. 

192 and 194 Middlesex Street, Lowell, Mass. 



OUR COOK BOOK. (53 



Pan Dowdy. 

Slice twelve apples pretty thick, put two slices of pork in a pot and 
fry out slowly. Make a cream of tartar paste. Put a layer of apples, 
and then a layer of paste, and so on till all is used. Add half a cup of 
molasses, half a cup of sugar, and a cup of cold water, cook three- 
quarters of an hour. 

Mrs. H. Hovey. 

Apple Pan Cakes. 

Two cups of sweet milk, one egg, two tablespoons sugar, half a tea- 
spoon soda, same of salt, flour for a thin batter, two good sized 
apples, pare, and slice into the batter. Drop into hot fat. 

H. 

To prevent fruit jars from cracking, place a tablespoon in the jar 
while fillin»- with hot fruit. 



Oyster Chowder. 

One pint oysters, one quart milk, two potatoes, one large onion, 
butter size of an egg, salt, pepper, and one teaspoon flour. 

Mks. Wells. 



Welsh Rarebit. 

One pound of cheese, two eggs, one half teaspoon mustard, one 
quarter teaspoon salt, a little pepper, one tablespoon melted butter, 
one half cup milk. Break the cheese in small pieces, and put it, with 
all the other ingredients in a bright sauce pan, which put over boiling 
water. Stir until the cheese meets then spread on slices of crisp toast 
and serve immediately. 

Mrs. Wells. 

Rice Mush. 

One cup rice, half a cup of corn meal, a little salt, well cooked in a 
pint and a half of milk or water. When cold cut into slices, and bake 
or fry. Serve hot. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 



64 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



'" '."., "";':. ' 



dkiai 



m 



FOR' 



Bare*&rairifed*IRilk. 



gyc(s 



The secret of the success of MRS. S. M. MORSE, the 
well known Milk Woman of Dracut, is simply this : She 
furnishes nothing but Pure Grainfed Milk to her patrons for 
the same price that others charge for Swill Milk. Conse- 
quently she has got nothing but the 



ery Best People 



for customers, as she has the opportunity of choosing. All 
who prefer Pure Milk to Swill Milk will receive 
prompt attention by addressing 



9 

462 Beacon Street, 
LOWELL, - MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 65 



Omelet. 

Three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, half a teacup milk, 
one tablespoon flour, half of butter, pepper and salt to taste. Stir the 
Hour into half of the milk, and melt the butter in the other half; put 
the whites in last. Bake in jelly pans, and serve hot. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 



Baked Egg's. 

Break eggs into a buttered dish, far enough apart for the yolks not 
to touch each other, sprinkle with salt and pepper, putting a little 
butter on each if wished. Bake until the whites set. Serve hot on 
toast. Mrs. M. C. Cole. 



Escalopetl Tomatoes. 

Scald and remove skins of fully ripe tomatoes. Cover the bottom of 
a buttered pudding dish with a layer of sliced tomatoes seasoned 
with pepper and salt, cover with pepper and ealt, cover with a layer of 
bread and butter, and so on until the dish is full, finishing with the 
tomatoes. Bake one half hour in a moderate oven, and serve hot. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 



Fritters. 

One pint sour cream or milk, one half teaspoon soda, a little salt. 

Mix soft with flour. 

Mrs. B. B. Hart. 



Cream Fish. 

Pick any kind of cold, baked or boiled fish into small pieces, and put 
in a dish. Take one pint of milk and season to taste, with butter, 
salt, and pepper; let the milk boil, then thicken with one tablespoon of 
flour. Pour over the cold fish, and bprinkle with cracker crumbs, and 
bits of butter. Bake about twenty minutes. This is nice for break- 
fast or tea. 

Mrs. D. N. Patterson. 



66 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



W. F. PARKER, 



mm 



hWR: 



H^IKfi 



From Select Dairies. 



138 Hildreth Street, 



Lowell, Mass. 



DR. C. M. FISH, 



8MM 



tarai 



2 Wells' Block, Lowell, Mass. 
Residence, 33 Kirk St. Office Hours 2 to 4, 7 to 9. 




FOR THE 



tseth 




^»T PRICE 25<FA BOTTLE l*£/ 

^fc^ySr e: . w. h oyt & co Tjy%$. 

' ff^ PROPRIETORS OF -^"^^^ 

'HOYT's GERMAN COLOGNE 

LOWELL.MA53, 



OUR COOK BOOK. 67 



Scrambled Codfish. 

Pick codfish in pieces, and soak overnight. In the morning add one 
cup sweet milk; when hot, not boiling, three eggs well beaten, and stir- 
red briskly into the fish. Be careful not to boil it. Season with Bait, 
and pepper. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 

Codfish Toast. 

Freshen nicely picked codfish by putting in water over night. In 

the morning, add sweet cream or milk, and butter, and pour overnice- 

lv toasted bread. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 

Oyster Fritters. 

Half a pint sweet milk, two eggs well beaten, flour to make a batter, 

a little salt and soda. Tut in the oysters, and fry in hot butter and 

lard mixed. 

Mrs. M. C. Cole. 

How to Cook Ham. 

Put the ham into cold water, boil slowly five or six hours, then take 

out and trim for the table. Place in a baking pan and set in a hot 

oven until brown. 

Mrs. J. B. Brown. 

Doughnuts. 

One cup sugar, one cup milk, one egg, one pinch ginger, and salt, 
two teaspoons cream of tartar, one of soda, and flour to knead. 

Mrs. Palmer. 

Escaloped Potatoes. 

Slice thin cold boiled patatoes. Butter au earthen dish, put in alayer 
of potatoes and season with pepper, salt and butter, and sprinkle on 
a little flour. Put another layer of potatoes and seasoning, and so 
on until the dish is tilled. Pour on a cup of milk just before putting 
in oven. Bake three quarters of an hour. X. 



68 OUR COOK BOOK. 





HOUSEKEEPERS. 



We have constantly on hand and for sale, in large and 
small quantities, many articles now considered indispensable 
in well-regulated families, and call your attention to a few, 
viz : — 

Ammonia, of full strength. Glycerine, chemically pure. 

Benzine, doubly deodorized, for cleaning cloths, Gloves, or 
most delicate fabrics. 

Alcohol, ninety-five per cent. 

Gum Arabic, white and common. 

Gum Camphor, pure refined. 

Wax, sperm and paraffine. 

Bees' Wax, white and yellow. 

Sal Soda. Copperas. 

Chloride of Lime. Disinfectant. 

Sulphur. Brimstone. 

Potash. Lime, &c, &c. 

Soluble Blue. A prepared Dry Blue, soluble in water. 
One-quarter pound will produce the Best Liquid Blue, in 
sufficient quantity to last a family one year. Would have 
been recommended without doubt by Miss Parloa had she 
done washing instead of diplomatic puddings. 

Stove Lining An excellent article, as it saves time, trouble, 
and expense. A little of it in the house enables one to 
repair a cracked or broken lining without trouble or delay. 
We have sold tons of it, and it gives universal satisfaction. 

Soaps, for laundry and house use. 



- -jr. •'&■ "# -.'tTssjrsW' 



C. B. COBURN & CO ; 



■ 9 

35 MARKET STREET. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 69 



Fish Chowder. 

For six persons, take three slices of fat pork and fry in the kettle 
until crisp and brown, then take it out on a plate, add a layer of sliced 
potatoes, and of sliced onions, and five or six pounds of haddock cut in 
slices, then a layer of crackers. Repeat these layers, till the kettle is full. 
Pour on boiling water till it covers the ingredients, boil slowly half 
an hour, pepper and salt to taste. Add half a pint of milk, and but- 
ter the size of an egg, just before serving. A most excellent chowder. 

Mrs. A. R. Abbott. 

Fried Apples. 

Cut good cooking apples in quarters, put in a hot spider in which a 
lump of butter has been placed. Sprinkle considerable sugar over them 
pour on a very little hot water. Cover closely and serve as soon as 
cooked. 

Mrs. C. W. Nevers. 

To Remove Iron Rust. 

Rub with dry cream of tartar while the cloth is wet, hang where the 
sun will shine directly upon it. Repeat the process if necessary. 

Mrs. C. W. Nevers. 

A New Recipe. 

Do you wish a new recipe, simple, delightful? 
Breakfast, dinner, or supper appropriate tor, 
Whose components can always be found in the pantry, 
Requiring no visit to cellar or store. 

A blessing t'will prove when you're late with your breakfast 

When children are fractious or fretful, or Will 

Brings home a choice friend from the city to dinner, 

And the partridge won't brown, and the kidneys won't gri'll. 

Take a gill of forbearance, four ounces of patience, 
A pinch of submission, a handful of grace; 
Mix well with the milk of the best human kindness! 
Serve at once with a radiant smile on your face. 

Pray try this new recipe, much burdened house-wives, 
It's sure to turn out a most perfect success. 
Its name? Why Good Temper, a rich boon from Heaven, 
Our souls and our spirits to comfort and bless. 



70 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



[>,A P 



■x£--i yj . 



Residence, H $\1\%. $freet, 



OFFICE, 52^ MERRIMACK ST., LOWELL. 
J. B COVER & CO., 



-DEAl.LRS I.N- 



HFLOUR»flND»GRAIN,N 

¥l®$. 31 Qfid SsSiatta^S St., floajelf, (|)<ass. 



yj 



BEST* FLOUR 

IS THE B EST, 
ASK YOUR GROCER FOR IT. 

G. J. & E>. B R A DT, 

MANUFACELKEKS of 

BREAD, CAKES «& CRACKERS 

OIF* j^.XjIj XSLXCTXDS. 

BAKERY, WHITING STREET, LOWELL. 

All orders thankfully received, and promptly attended to. 



OCR COOK BOOK. ?1 



Baked Macaroni. 

Cut in small pieces, turn on boiling water, add one teaspoon salt, 
boil twenty minutes, turn into a sieve, and wash thoroughly with cold 
water. Butter a pudding dish, put in a layer of macaroni, pieces of 
butter, pepper and salt, grated cheese, and so continued until the mac- 
aroni is used. Cover with milk and bake slowly. Very nice. 

Mks. C. W. Nkvers. 

Pork Hash. 

Chop fried salt pork fine, and mix with cold mashed potatoes, two 
hard boiled eggs, well chopped, two slices bread cut up fine. Stir all 
together with hot fat ; let it remain long enough to brown underneath. 
Serve with the brown portion on top. It is very appetizing for bieak- 
fast. 

Mrs. C. W. Nevers. 

Crab Apple Jelly. 

Wash the apples, cover with water, let boil until tender, drain 
through cheese cloth. To every four cups juice add five cups sugar. 
Let the juice boil before adding sugar, then about two minutes after 
sugar is added. Put at once into glass. 

Mrs. H. Swann. 

Citron Preserve. 

Pare the citron, boil in water in which a little piece of alum has been 
dissolved, boil until perfectly tender, sprinkle with sugar and let re. 
main over night. In the morning cut in small pieces, remove seeds, 
and to every pound of fruit add three quarters of a pound of sugar. 
Boil slowly until the fruit is a. rich yellow. Cool in stone jar before cov- 
ering. 

Mrs. H. Swan.v 

Lobster Salad. 

One lobster, one head lettuce, three eggs, two tablespoons butter, 
one tablespoon mustard, two teaspoons salt, one of red pepper. Chop 
lobster, and lettuce fine, add salt, pepper and mustard. Boiltheeggs 
hard, chop fine, warm the butter, and add last. Moisten the whole 
with vinegar. 

Mrs. H. Swann. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



ESTABLISHED 1866. 




THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF 



Trunks, Bags, Extention Case Trimks%Sliawl Straps 

To Be IFoia-rLcL in. Lowell. 
Repairing of Trunks and Bags a speciality. Call and See us. 

GEORGE F. ALLEN, 9 AND n MIDDLE STREET. 

0. A. WILL/IRD, M. D. 



O X^ T* I C E: 

ROOM 6, WYMAN'S EXCHANGE, 



THAD. STEYENS, 

BERBER. 



G. M. DUDLEY, 



»%1 



rfi> fill*' mi - 



Watches cleansed and repaired. 
Jewelry repaired. 

DON'T CROSS THE BRIDGE 

FOR YOUR WORK. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 73 



Roast Turkey. 

Having dressed carefully rub inside with salt, hang up to drain one 
hour, if you have time then wipe dry. Make the dressing of bread 
prumbs seasoned with salt, pepper, sage, butter, or pork chopped fine, 
one egg, oue half an onion chopped. Wet all with water. Fill thecrop 

first and sew up; then the body. Tie the legs to the body, rub the tur- 
key with butter partly melted as this will give it a nice brown. Bake 
one and a half to two hours or more, according to size. Baste often. 

Mrs. Barker. 

Doughnuts. 

Three pints of flour, two teaspoons cream of tartar, one of soda, 
piece of butter the size of an English Walnut, two eggs, one cup sugar, 
a little nutmeg, and milk enough to moisture. Beat the eggs separ- 
ately. 

Miss. Ira Sweatt. 

A Recipe for Salad. 

To make this condiment, your poet begs 

The pounded yellow of two hard boiled eggs; 

Two boiled potatoes, pass'd through kitchen sieve, 

Smoothness and softness to the salad give; 

Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl, 

And half suspected, animate the whole; 

Of mordant mustard add a single spoon, 

Distrust the condiment that bites so soon; 

But, deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault 

To add a double quantity of salt; 

Four times the spoon with oil from Lucca crown, 

And twice with vinegar produced from town; 

And, lastly, o'er the flavored compound toss 

A magic sou peon of auchory sauce. 

Oh, green and glorious! O, herbaceous treat! 

T'would tempt a dying anchorite to eat; 

Back to the world he'd turn his fleeting soul, 

And plunge his fingers in the salad bowl! 

Serenely full the epicure would say, 

"Fate cannot harm me, I have dined to-day." 

Sydney Smith. 



74 



OUR COOK BOOK. 




Housekeepers reading this 
book should use 

BRIDAL VEIL 

as it is the Best Bread Flour 
in the world. Every customers 
is a new friend and recom- 
mends it to her neighbors. 

We carry a full line of 

Pure Spices, Fancy and Staple 
Groceries 

and it will be to your advantage to call and examine our stock 
and prices before you buy. 

Also local agent for Health Food Company produce. 

BOSTON BRANCH GROCERY, 

197 Middlesex St., Opp. Northen Depot. Telephone 32-3. 

To Purify the Blood, increase the Appetite and restore Vigor 
to the weak and languid. 

CARTER'S SARS/IP/IRILLA AND IRON 

IS UNSURPASSED. 
PRICE 65 CENTS, REDUCED FROM ONE DOLLAR. 

CARTER & SHERBURNE, DRUGGISTS, 

Corner Merrimack and Bridge Streets, Lowell. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 



Marble Bank Building, Oor. John and Merrimack Street. 

First-class work at Lowest Prices. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 75 



Ice Cream. 

One pint milk, three eggjs, one half cup flour, one half cup sugar; 
scald all together. When cold add one pint of cream and a pinch of 
salt. Very nice. 

Mrs. M. J. Studley. 

Citron Preserve. 

Pare and cut the citron into small blocks, and boil in clear water un- 
til perfectly tender. Place the fruit in a culendar and drain. Throw 
away the water. Make a rich syrup of four lbs. of sugar to five lbs- 
of the fruit, add a little water, and cook until it is thick, (this takes 
but a short time.) Adi to the syrup the fruit, and lemons boiled 
tender then sliced. Allow the whole to boil a few minutes, and then 
can it. Use about three lemons to five lbs of the fruit. 

Mrs. L. G. Barrett. 



Raspberry Jam. 

Mash the berries, place them on the stove, boil them fifteen minutes, 
add three quarters of a lb. sugar to each pound of fruit, and boil 
twenty minutes. Put up in tumblers. 

Mrs. L. G. Barrett. 



ppto%s^» ®B5?wsswtf* 



Buns. 

At noon mix one half cup of yeast, one half cup of milk, and one cup 
of flour. Put in a warm place. A.t night add one half cup of milk, 
three quarters cap of sugar, a piece of butter as large as a butternut, 
and flour to knead. In the morning, add a few currants or chopped 
raisins, and make into tiny biscuits. Put away to rise. When they 
are very light, beat a portion of the white of egg, and rub over the top 
before baking, or put a little melted sugar over them on taking from 
the oven. 

Mrs. Mary B. Hubbard. 



76 OUR COOK BOOK. 



READ THE FOLLOWING BARGAINS. 

5 Quires of Writing Paper for 25 cents, 5 Quires of School Paper for 
10 cents, Packet of Fine Quality Writing Paper for 5 cents. Nice 
Horn Comb 10 cents, Hair Brushes, Tooth Brushes, at lowest prices. 
Hood's Tooth Powder. A large stock of Toys for Children. Tissue 
Paper all shades. Shelf Paper 5 cents dozen. "Good Cheer" book for 
young people, list price 75 cents, now selling for 38 cents. 
Oall and. See tla.3 DBarg-a-izis. 

PEARSONS, 147 BRIDGE ST., CENTRALVILLE. 

THE BEST SPRING MEDICINE 

Kidder's # Bitters, 

Cure Headache, Loss of Appetite and Purify the Blood, 

— PREPARED BY — 

F. & E. BAILEY & CO., APOTHECARIES, 

Cor. Merrimack and John Streets. 

MRS. W. H. DAVIS, 

FIRST CLASS EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, 

23 John Street, Lowell, Mass. 

^oCOMPETENT HELP FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE.Ov 



HIGHEST QUALITY-LOWEST PRICE. 

Vienna! Bakery 

AND CREAMERY LUNCH, 

fto. 10 and 12 Paiae ^treet, bowell, FRass. 
Delicious Hot Rolls every afternoon at 4 o'clock. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 77 



Johnny Cake. 

One cup Indian meal, one cup sour milk, one half cup flour, one tea- 
spoon soda, and one of salt. Bake quickly. 

Mits. TmsBELL. 

Full of pluck.— Countryman, to dentist: "I shan't pay notin' extra 
for gas. Jest pull her out if it does hurt." Dentist: "You are plucky 
sir. Let me see the tooth." Countryman: "0, 'laintme that's got 
the toothache— it's my wife! She'll be here in a minute." 

Painless Dentistry. 

Professor, sternly: "I cannot understand, Mr. Jones, how you can 
be so stupid." Jones : "Perhaps, sir, it is because you have given me 
a piece of your mind." 

Noodle Soup. 

Boil a soup bone four or five hours; an hour before dinner beat two 
eggs well, add flour to make stiff enough for rolling out. roll very thin 
and let lie half an hour, then cut in thin strips and add to the soup; 
boil fifteen minutes, and you will have very good noodle soup. 

A Fkiend. 

"Doctor, when do you think a man weighs most?" asked a patient 
who was undergoing a course of dietary treatment. "When he steps 
on my corns," answered the doctor. 

Cocoanut Cakes. 

One pound of pulverized cocoanut, two cups flour, cup and a half of 
pulverized sug;ar. Soak cocoanut over night. Drain all off dry in 
morning. Beat sugar and the whites of six eggs until almost still 
enough for frosting. Take greased tissue paper on plate, and drop 
not more than a teaspoon on a plate. B. G. 

Sugar Candy. 

Six cups of granulated sugar, half a cup of vinegar, half a cup of 
water. Put all on the stove together, and boil (without stirring) un- 
til it hardens when dropped in cold water. Flavor with vanilla, and 
pour into buttered tins. This may be improved by adding English 
walnuts. X. Y. Z. 



78 OUR COOK BOOK. 



—THE ROAD TO WEALTH.= 

First, you must start right, make up your mind that 
you will not ask for credit, but you will always pay 
cash for the necessaries. If you commence right and stick to 
it, you will find that it will be very much easier obtaining the 
wealth you wish for. If you buy your Groceries for cash and 
are prudent, you will have quite a snug little sum in the savings 
bank January ist, 1889. Above all do not fail to trade at the 

ENTERPRISE, 

5 PRESCOTT STREET. 

We have found that the people at the ENTERPRISE are 
always reliable and you will find that you can always obtain 
the best of everything and at the lowest possible price. They 
always keep the finest Teas and Coffees that can be selected in 
the country, and hundreds of other bargains which we have 
not time and space to mention. 

_^ — )THE BEST( — ^_ 

$3.50 FRENCH KID BOOT 

— ^IN I2OWELL AT%~- 

90 BRIDGE STREET, 

OR 30 CENTRAL STREET. 

«*C R I T E R I O N§* 

Once and You Will Call Again. 
They lead the city on Fine Choice Good low for Cash. 
Garments, Suits, Gloves, Corsets, Carpets, Draperies and 
Ruggs a specialty. 

FOSTER, BRICKETT& SABGENT, 

Cor. Central and Middlesex Streets. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 79 



Cream Walnuts. 

White of one egg - beaten to a froth, and a teaspoon of cold water; 
stir in enough powdered sugar to make a thick paste; thesugarshould 
be sifted before using. When stiff enough to mould with the hands, 
form into little balls the size of a cherry, then press the half of an 
English walnut into the side, and set aside to harden. Vanilla im- 
proves this. X. 

The cashier of a business house in New York finds that the following 
notice, posted in front of his desk, serves as a useful purpos; "Never 
address your conversation to a person engaged in adding figures. 
There is nothing so deaf as an adder." 

Pop-Corn Balls. 

Put a large cup of molasses in a pan, add a small lump of butter, 
and boil together. Pour over the popped corn, stir well, and press 
into balls as hot as can be handled. Rub the hands with butter while 
making the balls. Z. 

Butter Taffy. 

Two cups of brown sugar, half a cup of butter, two tablespoons of 
vinegar, and two of molasses. Boil until it hardens in water, then 
pour on buttered pans. 

Carlotta Thompson. 

A. Chicago store displays this legend : "The Truth Spoken here." 

"Why, Miss Howjames," said the Chicago girl, "you dontmeanthat 
it is all over between you and Mr. Grinshaw?" "What I have told 
you," replied the Boston lady haughtily, " is the— the undraped actu- 
ality." 

Breakfast Cake. 

One egg, one cup of sweet milk, two cups flour, one cup Indian meal, 
two tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons cream of tartar, one tea- 
spoon soda. 

Mkb. C. N. Spencer. • 



80 OUR COOK BOOK. 



J. & J. M. PEARSON, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN' 

Mediterranean, Tropical, California, Mfta%Native Fruits, 

And Country Produce of all kinds, Nuts, Apples, Oranges, 
Lemons, Bananas, Grapes, Peaches, Pine Apples, etc. 

Bank: Block, Shattuck Street. 
NORHIS BROSTHERS, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

PORK, LARD, HAM, BACON, SAUSAGES, 



-~^v ETC., 33 T" . <r^- 

20 Middle Street, - - Lowell, Mass. 

^GOOD DAIRY MILK AND CREAM*- 

Delivered to your door daily by E. G. GRANT. 



Particular attention paid to milk for infants. All orders 
by mail promptly attended. 

E. G. GRANT, Box 20, No. BILLERICA. 



SOLON BARTLETT, M. D., 



OFFICE HOURS :- 



Morning, 9 to 10. Noon, 12 to 12^. Afternoon, 2 to 4. 
Evening, 7 to 9.— TELEPHONE. 

OFFICE, 52^ MERRIMACK ST, - RESIDENCE, 115 BRIDGE ST. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 81 



Johnny Cake. 

One cup Indian meal, one cup sour milk, one half cup flour, one tea- 
spoon saleratus, one teaspoon salt. Bake quickly. 

Mrs. Thissell. 

"I wouldn't cut that tree down if I were you," said a visitor, to a 
Richland township farmer who was about to chop down a very large 
oak. "Remember that after you fell it, you cannot replace it." 
,, Can't I," replied the fanner. "You don't know. After I chop it down, 
what is to prevent me from chopping it up?"— Pittsburg Chronicle. 



Cabbage Salad. 

Put the milk and the vinegar on to heat in separate sauce-pans ; 
when the vinegar boils, add butter, sugar, salt, and pepper, and stirin 
the chopped cabbage; cover and let scald and steam — not boil — for a 
moment, meanwhile remove hot milk from stove, cool a little and 
stir in the well-beaten and strained yolks. Return to stove and boil a 
moment. Dish cabbage and pour custard over it, stir rapidly with a 
silver spoon until well mixed, and set immediately in a cold place. 

Buckeye Cook-Book. 
Recommended by Mrs. C. IN. Nevers. 



At an evening party in Cork, a lady said to her partner, "Can you 
tell me who that exceedingly plain man is sitting opposite to us?" 
"That is my brother." "Oh, I beg your pardon," she replied, much 
confused; "I had not noticed the resemblance." 



Clam Chowder. 

Fry slowly two slices of pork cut into small bits. Add four large 
potatoes well sliced, two large sliced onions, the clam juice, pepper and 
salt, if needed, and water enough to cover the mixture. Boil until the 
potatoes and onions are nearly done, then add a quart of clams taken 
out of the shells while raw. Boil this mixture a few minutes then add 
a cup of milk and a little thick ning. Pour over halves of cracker and 
lumps of butter, and serve at once. 

Mrs. F. S. Crawford. 



82 OUR COOK BOOK. 



The Largest Assortment, 

The Latest Styles, 

The Most Reliable Makes, 

The Lowest Prices. 



We make a specialty of Comfort Shoes for both Gents 
and Ladies. Shoes that fit at once withont the painfull pro- 
cess "breaking in." Try them once. 



We shall show the largest and most complete line of 

teftti llti isi ili|>f tti 

Ever seen in this city, in French and American Kid, 
Straight Goat, Glazed Dongola, and Fancy Colors, 



We Unite Comparisons in Qualify and Prices. 



THE BIJOU SHOE STORE, 

Nos. 71 and 72 Merrimack Street. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



Id the village of L. a minister one Sunday when about to publish the 
bans of marriage, discovered he could not find the names. Not wish- 
ing to make a long pause, he repeated, "I publish the bans of mar- 
riage between" — Still no signs of the paper. He began again, "I pub- 
lish the bans of marriage between" — Still no paper could be found. 
He began once more, "I publish the bans of marriage between" — The 
beadle, wishing to enlighten him as to where the paper containing the 
names was, cried out to the consternation of the congregation: 
"Atween the cushion and the desk, sir.'' 



"What I'd like to know," said a school-boy, "is how the mouths of 
rivers can be bo much larger than their heads." 



Pigs in Blankets. 



Slice English Bacon very thin, place an oyster in the centre of each 
slice, pepper and fold together, fastening with two tooth picks crossed. 
Fry brown without using salt or butter. 

Mrs. C. N. Nevers. 

Citizen(to coal dealer)— Say, I want a ton of coal. Coal Dealer— All 
right. Shall we send it up right away? Citizen— Oh, no. If it's any- 
thing like the last, I'll just call for it on my way home, and carry it up 
in my overcoat pocket. — Washington Critic. 



To Cook Asparagus. 

Cut one bunch of asparagus into inch pieces. Boil until tender in just 
water enough to cover it. Salt to taste. Pour on a cup of milk, 
thicken with a spoonful of flour, add a tablespoon butter and three 
hard boiled eggs sliced thin. Stir gently while it boils a few minutes, 
then pour over slices of buttered toast. 

Mrs. F. R. Strout. 

Wife (on her husband's return from his office)— I came across a lot 
of your old love-letters to-day, dear, in one of the trunks upstairs. 
Ah, John, how you aid love me! Husband— Yes, indeed. Is dinner 
ready? I'm as hungry as a tramp.— Harper's Bazaar. 



84 



OUR COOK BOOK. 



J. H. HART. 



J. E. COUILLIARD. 



HART & CO.'S, 



EMPLOYMENT OFFICE AND COLLECTING AGENCY, 

Telep2s.o:n.e, 224-z. 

No. 34 Post-Office Block, Lowell, Mass. 

Reliable help furnished at short notice for hotels, boarding houses 
and private families. All claims entrusted to us for collection v\ ill re- 
ceive prompt attention. Rent collecting a specialty. 



SNYDER BKOS., 



60 Merrimack St. 

Best Work at Reasonable Prices. 
Largest practice in Lowell. 



MERRILL'S 

Steal Laundry, 

182 Middlesex St., Lowell. 



Family Laundry done in first 
class styles. 

HAMILTON & FROST, PROP'S. 



GEORGE E. ffiETGALF, 

INSURANCE 



J. C. MELLOON, 

FIRST CLASS MliAT AND GROCERIES. 

Orders Delivered Free of Charge. A Full Line of 
Canned Goods in Stock. 

Cor. of Seventh and Bridge Streets, Lowell. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 85 



Wife — I declare I am almost ashamed to go to church with this hat 
on. It isn't at all the style. Husband— Is this Bridget's Sunday out? 
Wife — No. Husband — Why dont you borrow hers? 

Cocoaimt Cracker Pudding". 

Roll three common crackers fine and add one quart milk heated to a 
scald. Let them soak, while beating yolks of three eggs, three-quar- 
ter cup sugar aud a pinch of salt. Mix with cracker and milk, then 
add one cup cocoanut and small piece of butter. Bake in a moderate 
oven. When done frost with the three whites and brown. 

Mrs. F. R. Strout. 

According to an old superstition of the mediaeval church, whenever 
a cock crows, a lie is being told. The reason that cocks crow so per- 
sistently in the early morning hours, is because the morning papers 
are being set up. — Exchange. 

Salad Dressing 1 . 

One tablespoon mustard, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon sugar, 
add four tablespoons boiling water and mix till smooth; add one half 
cup melted butter, stir thoroughly. Add three beaten eggs, si ir rapidly; 
then half a cup vinegar, stir constantly; add two-thirds cup boiling 
milk gradually to prevent curdling. Cook in double boiler (must not 
be tin), till of the consistency of soft custard. This will keep several 
weeks. 

Shreded, or finely chopped raw white cabbage is a very palatable 
relish served with above dressing. 

A Stuffed Beefsteak. 

Prepare bread scalded soft and mixed with plenty of butter and a 
little pepper and salt. Lay it upon one side of a round of steak, cover 
with the other, and baste it down with needle and thread. Salt and 
pepper the outside of the steak and place it in a dripping-pan with 
half an inch of water. When baked brown on one side, turn, and bake 
the other. 

Fresh milk boiled with loaf-sugar will soothe a cough when other 
things tail. 



86 OUR COOK BOOK. 



EEMOVAL-BUILDING TO BE TORN DOWN. 

I shall remove to 39 Central Street about April 1st 
With a Choice Line of 

Patrons of the old stand are invited to give us a call. 

ALBERT S. FOX, c . "oTn%o. 12 CENTRAL ST, 

PATTE N & CO., 

-^FLORISTS,^ 

(Uest foartH Street, ^oroelf, QIqss. 
Greenhouses, - - Tewksbury Centre. 

G. A. HAYWARD. J. F. IIAYWARD. 

LOWELL RUBBER CO., 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

R61BBER#G0ODS 

Of ^-ver3r ^Description. 

HAYWARD BROTHERS, Proprietors, 

61 Cozitx-A.1 Street, Xjoxtc-oII. 

M. J. FLETCHER & Co., 

DEALERS IX 

PORK, LARD, HAM, BACON, PIG'S FEET 

Pork and Bologna Sausages, 
60 MARKET ST., * • LOWELL, MASS. 



OUR COOK BOOK. 87 



The secret of a good day is a good morning, and a good morning 
always begins the night before. So, many things toward a good start 
the coming day can be done the hour before you retire. 

It is a good plan to wrap cans of fruit in newspapers and put them 
away in a dark, cool place. The wrapping in paper and keeping dark 
is said to prevent the bleaching of the fruit. 

For stains on the hands nothing is better than a little salt, with 
enough lemon juice to moisten it, rubbed on the spots and then washed 
off in clear water. 

In a basin of water, salt, of course, falls to the bottom; so never 
soak salt tish with the skin side down, as the salt will fall to the skin 
and remain there. 

Never Done. 

"Men work from morn till set of sun." They do. 
"But woman's work is never done.'' Quite true. 
For when one task she's finished, something's found 
Awaiting a beginning, all year round. 

Whether it be 

To draw the tea, 

Or bake the bread, 

Or make the bed, 

Or ply the broom, 

Or dust the room, 

Or floor to scrub, 

Or knives to rub, 

Or table to set, 

Or meals to get, 

Or shelves to scan, 

Or fruit to can, 

Or seeds to sow, 

Or plants to grow, 

Or linens to bleach, 

Or lessons to teach, 

Or butter to churn, 

Or jackets to turn, 

Or polish glass, 

Or plate of brass, 

Or clothes to mend, 

Or children to tend, 

Or notes indite, 

Or stories write— 
Those oars propel your barks o'er household seas 
In sunny heavens where you rest at ease, 
And, one word more, don't you forget it, please. 

— [Western Plowman. 



88 OUR COOK BOOK. 







LOWELL CO-OPERATIVE 

15S6GI 

-^CREAfflERY, 

Corner Hampshire and Hildreth Streets, - Lowell, Mass. 




Pure Milk, Butter Milk, 

Cream, Butter, Skim Milk 

and Fresh Eggs, 

Constantly on hands and Orders delivered promptly in all 
parts of the city. 



0rde:r bg Fegt^l or ^elepSens:, 

PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



"I Bring You Health." 

It is certain that Catarrh is 
caused by a poisoned and 
scrofulous state of the Blood. 
The best remedy, therefore, 
for this disease is 

Ayer's Sarsapariila, 

which, if perseveringly used, 
according to directions, eradi- 
cates every trace of Catarrhal 
virus from the system. No 
other treatment proves so ef- 
fectual in reaching the source 
of this loathsome and danger- 
ous malady. 

"When Ayer's Sarsapariila was re- 
commended to me for catarrh, I was 
inclined to doubt its efficacy. Having 
tried so many medicines with little ben- 
efit, I had no faith that anything would 
cure me. I became emaciated from loss 
of appetite and impaired digestion. I 
had nearly lost the sense of smell, and 
my system was badly deranged. I 
was about discouraged, when a friend 
urged ine to try Ayer's Sarsapariila and referred me to persons whom it had 
cured of catarrh. After taking half a dozen bottles of this medicine, I am con- 
vinced that the only sure way of treating this obstinate disease is through the 
blood. My cure is perfect." — Charles H. Maloney, 113 River St., Lowell, M(tss. 
" I was troubled with catarrh for over two years. I tried various remedies, 
but received no benefit until I commenced tailing Ayer's Sarsapariila, a few 
bottles of which cured me." — Jesse M. Boggs, Holman'a 31ills, Albemarle JV. C. 

Ayer's Sarsapariila, 

PREPARED BY DR. J. C. AYER & CO., LOWELL, MASS. 

Sold by Druggists. Price $1. Six bottles, $5. Worth $5 a bottle. 




THE MOST POPULAR 

Medicine for Throat and Lung Difficulties has long been, and still is. 
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, It cures Croup, Whooping Cough, Bronchitis, 
and Asthma ; soothes irritation of the Larynx and Fauces ; strengthens 
the Vocul Organs ; allays soreness of the Lungs ; prevents Consumption, 
and, even in advanced stages of that disease, relieves Coughing and in- 
duces Sleep. There is no other preparation for diseases of the throat 
and lungs to be compared with this remedy. 

Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. Sold by Druggists. Price SI. Six bottles, $5. 



s. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



; l 




014 488 540 5 * 



CONTRACTOR FOR 




I 





and Water Flit 



ALSO DEALER IN 



PLUMBING MATERIALS, 



Pipe and Fittings of Every Description. 



:,• i 



:ii 



Office, 94 Central St., Shop, 265 Middlesex St,, 



LOWELL, MASS.