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Full text of ""Our home favorite.""

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O N O ^ ^^ 




MARK M. COHN.J?^^^ 

Will offer to the ladies of Saratoga at the beginning of 
each Season, 

SPRING. SUMMER, FALL AND WINTER: 

The most Complete Assortment and 

NEWEST STYLES 

#|ri' BUTTONS! BUTTONS !!fcfe# 

TO BE IFOXJISriD, 

We shall always have the Latest Designs, and make this one of our 
LEADING ARTICLES. 

Laces! Laces! Laces! 

The increasing demand for Laces will make us strive to 
fully satisfy our customers, when they wish to buy. 

RIBBON DEPARTMENT! 

Will contain all the newest shades, and every width and 
shade imaginable. This department is sa,»'^W-T'-^*^*^w 
and favorably known, we simply aajj^lBoPYRiGH'?^'^^^^ 
to come and see. jT^ * mr* . \c\c\a 



340 Broadway, Saratoga Sprin^f^f^ 



HEREICK & LODEWICK, 



3SS Broadway, 



Has the largest and finest assortment of 




And in fact everything that is connected with a 
First Class Shoe Store to be obtained in Saratoga, 

OPPOSITE GEAUD UNION HOTEL. 
All kinds of Shoes and Sh'ppers Made to Order. 



RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 
RIX. 

400 



Ca-EISTTTIITEI 
OHINESE FLOSS. 

BERGMAN'S ZEPHYR WORSTEDS. 

danvas, «verykin<I. Steel Cut Bcadsi. (Jold Cut Beads. 

GOLD AND SILVER CARDBOAED. 
NEW LACE FICHUS. 
Gerniantown Yarn.- Yarn of all kinds. 

FEATHERS and HATS. 

0-rea.t ISed-ijLCtiorL I 

HOSIERY, YANKEE NOTIONS, &c. 

AT 

I ^Kl • JIS • Broadway. 



"OUR HOME FAVORITE, 



PUBLISHED BY 



iMi 



i oiing 



omen f) 



jmu mmm mnk 



First Baptist Church, 



SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 






(^ 



,c^ 



1882. 




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1882, by the Young Women' 

Home Mission Circle of the P'irst Ikiptist Church, Saratoga Springs, N. Y., 

in tiie office of th<- Librarian of Congress, at Washington! 



SARATOGA SPRINGS : 

TIIK DAILY SARATOC.IAN STEAM JOl! PRINT 

1882. 



WEMM ©&®WH1M'I 



i^^ 



A'^v 



^UK ^TOCK IS ^-LWAYS TH£ ^AKGEST, 



AND 



STYLES ALWAYS THE LATEST, 



AT 



FMICJES dUME TO GIVJE SATI8JFACTIOW. 



A VERY LARGE ASSORTMENT OF 



h\ 



$ltnn 4 



5"* 



i 



Always in Stock. 

The CHILDREN'S Department 

Is particularly well stocked, and with an extended 
experience we can offer 

SUPERIOR^ i]xi>tjcem:ieints 

To purchasers of Nice Goods. 

Leading Clothiers, 

436 BROADWAY, South Cor. Caroline St. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 



We offer to cooks and to sages, 
Our book with confident grace ; 

The names you find on its pages, 
Invite you its merits to trace. 



There are many who love dainty dishes. 
Others, what is substantial and good, 

And in deference to all of these wishes 

The "Home Circle" tells how to mix food. 



If you fail on first trial, don't sorrow. 
The rule may be right, don't complain 

A motto for you we will borrow. — 
Have patience and, "Try, try again." 



This book is for sisters and mothers ; 

But allow us to whisper to you, 
That in helping yourself, you help others, 

Our title page shows what we do. 



C. B. THOMAS. 






W. E. BROWN. 


¥1 


vus 


a 


1E©W1, 


COAL, 










WOOD, 




LATH, 


LIME, 




KINDLINGS, 






CEMENT, 


PLASTER, 




HAIR, 




SEA SAND, 








CHARCOAL. 



DffYPOQ • ' '^'^ 'WEST CONGRESS STREET, and 

UUAUtJ^ , 3g4 BROADW^AY, opposite United States Hotel. 

sarato<;a springs, N. Y. 

Bt^^All Telephones Connect with Our Offices. 



Any family who purchases this Cook Book, wants to 
buv their Groceries of 



F. f. HEWITT I 



432 Broadway, SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 

They keep the best 




CANNED GOODS, 

And all first-class goods kept this side of New York. 
E^^Connected with Telephone Exchange, 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Breads, ------...- 6 — 8 

Breakfast and Tea Dishes, -.-.-.. lo — 21 

Cake, Loaves, --------- ^q — 88 

Cake, Layer, --_- 88 — 93 

Cake Fillings, -------- - 9^ — qG 

Cookies, Doughnuts, Etc., ------- gG — 100 

Confectionery, --------- m — 113 

Creams, Jellies, Custards, Etc., ------ 71 — 75 

Fish, 34 — 36 

Meats, ---------- 3Q — 44 

Miscellaneous, - - - - - - - - • - 122 — 125 

Pastry, ---------- 51 — 56 

Puddings, - , - - - - - - - - 59 — 69 

Pudding Sauces, -------- 6g — yo 

Pickles, Catsups, Etc., ------- 103— ioS 

Salads, 25 — 28 

Soups, --.------- 29 — 32 

Sick Room, Food and Drinks, ------ 115 — ng 

Sick Room, Remedies, ------- 120 — 121 

Vegetables, - - - . - - - - - - 46 — 48 

Yeast, ---------- 5 



456 Broadway, 



GEO. M. CRIPPEN, 



Largrest Stock of 









<» 



Lowest Prices on 






Saratoga. 



YEAST. 



A little leaven, Icaveneth the: whole lump. 



YEAST. 



Boil I handful hops in i qt. water 20 min. Strain and 
add T cup sugar, i grated potato,, i tablespoon salt, 2 
tablespoons Hour. Be sure the mixture is well scalded. 
Wlien lukewarm add yeast to raise it. 

Mrs. Chaunckv Williams. 

POTATO YEAST. 

6 medium sized potatoes boiled in sufficient water to 
cover. 1-2 oz. hops boiled in qt. water. Strain the hop 
water on 2 qts. tiour and i cup sugar. Stir together; 
add the potatoes mashed through a colander in the wa- 
ter in wliich they were boiled. When sufficiently cool add 
I cup yeast and let rise. It is then ready for use. 

Mrs. R. S. Moscrip. 

YEAST. 

I pt. scorched corn, 2 handfuls hops, 8 large potatoes. 

Put hops and corn in small bags, place in a kettle with 

the potatoes and boil 2 hours. Mash through colander, 

then add i cup sugar, 1-2 cup salt and enough more 

boiled water to make a gallon. Wlien cool add i pt. 

yeast, let it rise and then bottle. 

Mrs. C. Wells. 



bread; 



" Here is bread which strengthens man's heart, and therefore 
called the staff of life." 



WHITE BREAD. 

2 qts. warm water, large 1-2 pt. home-made yeast, 2 

tablespoons salt, tiour to make a thin sponge. Sprinkle 

top with Hour, set in warm place to rise over night. In 

the morning add flour to make a stiff dough, and knead 

until it will not stick to the hands, adding a little soda 

and butter, if desired. Let it rise again, then knead 

thoroughly, and make into loaves. When quite l.ight 

bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. C. Wells. 

GOOD WHEAT BREAD. 

To I pt. sifted Hour, add 2 tablespoons white sugar, i 
tablespoon salt; turn on boiling water until all is scald- 
ed, stirring it well until it is a thick paste. When suffi- 
ciently cool, stir in well, i yeast-cake previously soaked 
in lukewarm water, and set in a warm place to rise; 
when very light, sift flour in bread-bowl, make a hollow 
in center, put in the yeast just prepared and i qt. luke- 
warm water; make into a soft dough, cover and set to 
rise over, night In the morning add t cup lard, 1-2 
teaspoon saleratus, more Hour, and knead until the 
mixture does not stick to the hands. Eet rise for 
2 or 3 hrs., then mould into loaves, let stand about 15 
min., then bake. This quantity makes 4 good sized 

loaves. 

Mrs. B. M. Whealey. 



SWEET HOME-MADE BREAD. 

I tablespoon lard, i of sugar, i teaspoon fine salt, i 
cake f:ompressed yeast, 3 pts. nold water, stir in llour 
until quite still, sift over the top, and set to rise in a 
warm place until morning; then knead 1-2 hr. Make 
immediately into loaves; when light bake 3-4 hr. 

J. E. Barrett. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

At night take sponge for the number of loaves de- 
sired, and add i cup of Graham Hour, and i tablespoon 
sugar for each loaf, (molasses may be used if pre-, 
ferred.) Knead with wheat flour until it will not 
stick to the hands, and set in moderately warm 
place until morning. Knead well, and when very liglu 
knead again and put into pans. When quite light, put 
into moderate oven and bake i 1-2 hrs. 

C. A. Deuel. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

3 cups graham, 3 cups rye, 3 cups wheat flour, i cup 
brown sugar, i cup good yeast, little salt. Mix Hour well 
together while dry, then add enough warm water to make 
a thick sponge, that will drop from spoon; let stand over 
night, then stir down, and put in pans; when light 
again^ bake in a slow oven nearly i hr. 

Mrs. B. R. Barrett. 

BROWN BREAD. 

I cup molasses, i cup sweet milk, i cup sour milk, i 
cup water, 3 cups Indian meal, 2 cups wheat flour, 1 tea- 
spoon soda, I teaspoon salt. Steam 4 hrs. 

Julia Swasey. 



8 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

3 cups graham Hour, 2 f:ups corn meal, 3 cups warm 

water, i cup molasses, i teaspoon soda, a little salt. 

Steam 2 1-2 or 3 hrs. 

Emma Why land. 

BROWN BREAD. 

2 cups warm water, 2 cups sour milk, i cup molasses, 
I heaping teaspoon soda, a little salt, 3 cups rye liour, 3 
cups Indian meal. Steam 3 hrs. and bake i hr. 

Leila Ma gee. 

BROWN BREAD. 

2 1-2 cups Indian meal, i 1-2 cups Hour, 3 cups butter- 
milk, 1-2 cup molasses, i even teaspoon soda, a little 

salt. 

Mrs. S. K. Thomas. 

STEAMED INDIAN BREAD. 

4 cups Indian meal, 2 cups graham Hour, 4 cups sour 
milk, I cup molasses, i large teaspoon soda, a little salt. 
Steam 3 hrs. 

Josephine Tefft, 



10 



BREAKFAST AND TEA DISHES, 



"Now to breakfast with what aopetile you have. 

"Then good digestion wait on appetite. 
And health on both." 



PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

Place 2 qts. iloiir in pan, make hollow in center of 
flour, put in i pt. warm milk, 1-2 small cup butter, 1-2 
cup yeast, i tablespoon sugar, little salt. Let stand sev- 
eral hrs. before mixing, then mix little softer than bread 
dough. In the morning mould, roll out, cut with a tum- 
bler. Place a small piece butter in center of each roll, 
fold sides together in shape of a turnover, place on tins 
to rise. When light bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. C. S. Smith. 

SWEET RUSK. 

I qt. sweet milk, 3 tablespoons yeast, flour to make 
thick batter. Let rise over night, then add i cup lard, i 
cup sugar, and 3 eggs well beaten, reserving white of 
1 for frosting. Let rise, then knead well, cut in any 
desired shape and put on buttered pans, let rise again; 
when quite light, bake quickly. Make a thin frosting 
and spread on wdiile hot. 

Mrs. C. Wells. 

CREAM Biscurr. 

I qt. flour, I pt. cream, 2 heaping teaspoons cream 
tartar, i even teaspoon soda, a little salt. 



II 

LIGHT TEA BISCUIT. 

I qt. flour, piece of butter size of an egg, 2 teaspoons 
cream tartar sifted with the flour, i teaspoon soda, a lit- 
tle salt and enough sweet milk to make soft dough. 

Mrs. S. G. Allen. 



RAISED MUFFINS. 

I pt. milk, I tablespoon butter, yolks of 3 eggs, 1-2 
cup yeast, a little salt; set at night. Just before putting 
in the rings in the morning, add the whites of the eggs 
well beaten and flour enough to make a stiff batter. 

Ida Mallery. 



MILTON MUFFINS. 

I egg, I pt. milk, i pt. flour, little salt. Beat egg 
light, add part of milk, all the flour, then the rest of 
milk. Bake 20 minutes in buttered tins. Serve hot. 

Addie Verf.eck. 



MUFFINS, 

I qt. sweet milk, 3 eggs, i cup butter, 4 tablespoons 
good yeast, flour to make a stiff batter. Set over night, 
and bake in gem pans in a hot oven for breakfast. 

Mrs. J as. Den'I'on. 

WHEAT MUFFINS. 

I T-2 cup flour, 1 cup sweet milk, i egg, i tablespoon 

melted butter, 1-2 teaspoon salt, i heaping teaspoon 

baking powder. 

Mrs. John Marston. 



RAG MUFFINS. 

2 cups flour, I tablespoon shortening, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, little salt, wet with milk, roll thin, 
spread with butter and sugar, roll like rolled jelly cake, 
cut in slices, and bake. 

Mrs. Parker. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

Boil 1-2 cup rice soft and dry, then add 3 teaspoons 
sugar, piece of butter size of an egg, little salt, i pt. 
sweet milk, t cup yeast, i qt. Hour; let it rise over 
night. If sour in the morning add a little soda dissolved 
in milk. Bake in muffin rings. 

Mrs. M. S. Granger. 



POP-OVERS FOR BREAKFAST. 

2 cups milk, 2 cups Hour, 2 eggs, i teaspoon sugar, 

salt. Bake in hot moulds. 

E. A. Ensign. 

* 

SALLY-LUNN. 

T qt. flour, 4 eggs, 1-2 cup butter, 1-2 cup sugar, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, nearly 2 cups sweet milk. Bake 

in gem pans. 

Mrs. M. S. Granger. 



WAFFLES. 

Melt I oz. butter, add i qt. buttermilk or sweet milk, 

3 eggs, little salt, 1-2 teaspoon soda, flour enough to 

make a stiff batter, lastly add the whites of the eggs well 

beaten. 

Mrs. M. S. Osborn. 



RICE WAFFLES. 

Boil 1-2 cup rice, then add 2 well beaten eggs, i pt. 
sweet milk, a pinch of salt, i 1-2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der and about i pt. flour. Ba^ke in waffle irons, butter- 
ing while hot. This receipt will fill the irons about 5 
times. 

RICE CAKES. 

3 eggs beaten very light, i pt. milk, 1-2 pt. rich cream, 
I tablespoon cooked rice, little salt. Beat in lightly, 
enough flour to make a thin batter; bake in shallow 
tins in a quick oven. 

Mrs. E. Pitney. 

NORA'S BREAD CAKES. 

Soak pieces of bread in sour milk until soft; rub 
through a colander; add a little more sour milk. To 
about 2 qts. of this, add i well beaten egg, a little salt, 
about I teaspoon soda and flour to make a batter a little 
thicker than for ordinary pancakes. Bake on a griddle. 

« 
FLANNEL CAKES. 

I qt. milk warmed, 2 eggs, i teaspoon salt, i tablespoon 
butter, 1-2 cup yeast, flour enough to make a smooth 
batter; mix at night and they will be light for break- 
fast. Do not stir them until just before you put them on 

the griddle. 

Mrs. F. R. Barrett. 

SCONES FOR BREAKFAST. 

I cup sour milk, 1-2 teaspoon soda, 1-2 tablespoon melt- 
ed butter, little salt. Mould soft, cut in squares and 

bake on moderately hot griddle. 

Mrs. H. B. Wright. 



14 

GRAMAiM MUFFINS. 

f cuj) graham Hour, i cup wheat flour, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, T tablespoon butter, i 1-2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, little salt, 1 cup of milk or water. 

Miss Kate Pike. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

2 eggs, 2 cups sweet milk, 1 cup graham flour, i cup 
wheat flour, i tablespoon sugar, little salt; heat the gem 
pans hot, fill almost full. Bake 1-2 hour. 

Mrs. S. Gilbert. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

I qt. graham flour, i large pt. sour milk, i teaspoon 

soda, T tablespoon melted butter, i tablespoon brown 

sugar. 

Mrs. Charles H. Tefet. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

3 cups graham flour, i 1-2 cups wheat flour, i pt. wa- 
ter, 1-2 cup yeast, 2-3 cup sugar, a little salt. To be 
stirred up the night before. 

Mrs. R. S. Moscrtp. 

CORN CAKES. 

I eggy 1-2 cup sugar, i tablespoon butter, 1 cup wheat 
flour, I 1-2 cups corn meal, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
1-2 teaspoon salt, 1 cup milk. 



Nora Morse. 



CORN MUFFINS. 



■2 eggs beaten very light, 2 lablesj)0()ns sugar, piece of 
butter size of a walnut, 1-4 teaspoon salt. Beat together; 



15 

then add i cup flour, i cup corn meal into which 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder has been stirred, and i cup sweet 
milk. Have ready warm gem pans well buttered, put i 
large spoonful into each pan. Bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. N. D. Morev. 

FRENCH CORN MUFFINS. 

1-2 cup sugar, 1-2 cup butter, i 1-2 cups flour, 1-2 cu[) 

meal, i cup milk, 2 eggs, 3 heaping teaspoons baking 

powder. 

Mrs. C. S. Smith. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

I 1-2 cups flour, T-2 cup corn meal, i cup sweet milk, 

3 teaspoons baking powder, 3 tablespoons sugar, i table> 

spoon butter. 

Mrs. W. H. Eddy. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

1 pt. sweet milk, i 1-2 cups Indian meal, 1-2 cup flour, 
2 eggs, butter size of butternut, 1-2 cup sugar, 1 tea- 
spoon soda, I teaspoon cream tartar. 

Mrs. B. F. Bloomfield. 

RYE BREAKFAST CAKES. 

2 cups rye flour, 1-2 cup molasses, i 1-2 cups sweet 

milk, I teaspoon soda, little salt. Bake at once in gem 

pans. 

Mrs. C. Neher. 

BAKED OMELETTE. 

I cup milk, I teaspoon Hour, i teaspoon salt, 6 eggs, 
yolks and whites beaten separately very light, particu- 
larly the yolks; mix flour gradually and thoroughly 



i6 

with the milk. Put in a pudding dish, and mix in the 
yolks well. Lastly mix in whites lightly, not thor- 
oughly Put I dessert spoon of butter in very hot 
spider, add the above and bake 5 to 7 minutes in a quick 
oven. When done slip on a hot platter and serve imme- 
diately. 

Mrs. Warren Wescott. 

OMELETTE. 

Beat 6 eggs, whites and yolks separately, then put to- 
gether, add 6 tablespoons milk and a little salt. Pour 
into a hot frying pan well buttered. Serve hot. 



Mrs. C. S. Smith. 



OMELETTE. 



6 eggs, beat whites to a stiff froth, yolks to a smooth 

thick batter, add to the yolks i cup milk, pepper and 

salt. Have the pan hot, put in a piece of butter size of 

a walnut, pour in the yolks, then spread the whites over 

the top. When done through, fold together and turn on 

a hot platter. 

Mrs. B. R. Barrett. 



HAM OMELETTE. 

6 eggs well beaten, add to them about 1-2 pt. lean 
cooked ham, chopped fine, pepper and salt. Have your 
pan hot and butter enough to fry. When done double 
it over. Serve hot. 

OYSTER OMELETTE. 

Made same as above, using chopped oysters instead of 

ham. 

Mrs. F. M. Hewitt. 



17 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Put butter enough in a spider to keep tlie eggs from 
sticking, break in the eggs, cut with a knife as fast as 
they cook, 2 or 3 minutes will cook them. 

Mrs. C. Neher. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Soften a little butter in a narrow cake tin. Break in r 
doz. or more fresh eggs, salt and pepper to taste, put 
small pieces of butter over the top. Be careful not to 
break the yolks. Bake in hot oven 20 minutes, set away 
to cool, turn out and cut in slices. Place between thin 
slices of buttered bread. 

Mrs. J. Q. Adams. 

CLAM FRITTERS. 

6 clams, chopped or not, i cup milk, i teaspoon bak- 
ing powder, add liquor from clams, salt, pepper and 
liour for rather stiff batter. Fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. W. H. Gibbs. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

6 ears of sweet corn, cut corn from cob, add i egg, i 
tablespoon milk, 2 1-2 tablespoons flour. Fry in hot 
lard. 

Mrs. Isaac Hoyt. 

POTATO SOUFFLE. 

Boil 4 large potatoes and pass through a sieve. Scald 
1-2 cup milk, I tablespoon butter and add to the potato 
with a little salt and pepper; beat to a cream and add 
I at a time the yolks of 4 eggs, beating. Beat the whites 
to a stiff froth with a little salt and pour them in, stir- 



i8 

ring as little as possible. Put the mixture in a buttered 

dish, allowing room to rise; bake 20 minutes and serve 

immediately in same dish. 

Cora Whyland. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Pare and slice very thin with potato slicer. Let 
stand in strong alum water 1-2 hr. Wipe dry and fry 
ill hot lard to a light brown, stirring occasionally. Salt 
while hot. 

F. T. Wells. 

CHIPPED POTATOES. ^ 

Wash and pare as many potatoes as needed; slice 
them with potato slicer, put into an earthen vessel and 
cover with ice water, placing a large piece of ice on top. 
Let them stand over night. In the morning take them 
from the water, dry carefully in a towel, then put them 
into a kettle of boiling fat, stirring occasionally. When 
brown, skim them into colander and salt a little. 

Mrs. N. D. Morey. 

STEWED POTATOES. 

Slice cold boiled potatoes into a farina boiler, sprinkle 
with salt and pepper; cover with cream and cook with- 
out stirring. 

CATSKILL POTATOES. 

Pare and slice, let them lie in cold water about an 
hour; butter a deep dish and put in a layer of potatoes, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper, and a good bit of butter, 
then another layer of potatoes seasoned, and so on until 
the dish is filled. A little chopped onion improves it 
very much. Cover the whole with milk and bake 2 or 3 
hours. 



SCOLLOPED POTATOES. 

Slice cold boiled potatoes quite thin. Hutter a pud- 
ding dish, put in a thin layer of potatoes and then a 
layer of bread or cracker crumbs, season with salt, pep- 
per and butter, then add another layer of potatoes, and 
so until the dish is filled. Just before putting in the 
oven, pour over them sulficient sweet milk to moisten 
well, beating eggs in the milk if desired. Bake from 40 
to 60 minutes in a moderate oven and serve hot. 

Fannie F. Wells. 

IRISH POTATO CAKES. 
Boil 10 large potatoes, mash, then add 1-2 cup milk, 
butter size of an egg, little salt, tlour to thicken. Roll, 
cut in squares, and bake brown on griddle. Serve hot 
with butter. 

BREAKFAST DISH. 

To I cup milk add 1-2 teaspoon salt, i large spoon 
sugar, and a well beaten egg. Into this, dip slices of dry 
bread, let soak a moment, then fry on hot buttered grid- 
dle or spider. 

Mrs. J. T. Carr. 

BEEFSTEAK TOAST. 
Chop cold steak very fine, cook in a little water, add 
butter or cream, thicken, season with butter, salt and 
pepper, pour it over slices of toast. 

Mrs. L. E, Johnson. 

MEAT CROQUETTES. 

To cold meat, chopped fine, add same quantit}' boiled 
rice, I egg. Season to taste with butter, salt, pepper 
and savory. Mix well together, make into cakes, roll 
in egg and fine crackers. Fry in hot lard. 

Celia Cole. 



FORCEMEAT BALLS. 

Take finely minced cold veal, i egg, moisten with 
cream, add pepper, salt, 2 tablespoons catsup, and a 
little nutmeg. Make into small balls, roll in bread 
crumbs, and fry brown Very nice for supper. 

Mrs. C. M. Tefft. 

CHICKEN OR VEAL CROQUETTES. 

I lb. boiled chicken or veal, chopped fine, 1-2 pt. milk, 
in which boil a small onion; strain this, and thicken 
with 2 tablespoons flour; add 2 eggs, and butter size of 
an egg, season with pepper, salt, nutmeg, and a little 
sage or sweet marjoram. Add this to the meat, and 
when thoroughly cold, mould into oval patties, dip into 
Ggg, roll in bread crumbs, and fry in a little lard. 

Mrs. M. S. Osborn. 

SCOTCH COLLOPS. 

Cut I large onion into small pieces, and cover with 
water, let it simmer for a few moments, then add 2 tea- 
spoons flour; season with pepper and salt. Add i 1-2 
lbs. or more, of fresh round of beef, minced fine. Sepa- 
rate and stir thoroughly; let it stew 15 or 20 minutes. 
Add a piece of butter and serve when the meat is per- 
fectly tender. 

Mrs. Wm. Carragan. 

MEAT BALLS. 

Chop meat very fine, add an equal quantity soaked 
bread crumbs; salt, season with pepper, onion, parsley, 
or thyme, as desired. Make into balls and fry in lard, 
to tlie desired color. 



21 

MEAT BALLS. 

I lb. raw beef or veal, chopped, 6 Boston crackers, 
rolled fine and sifted, yolks of 2 eggs, salt, pepper. Mix 
all thoroughly, then roll into small balls, stick a clove 
in each and fry until brown. 

K. S. 

MARY'S COD-FISH BALLS. 

Wash and soak in cold water, for 2 hrs., a piece of fish 
the size required; pour off the water, add more, and let 
come to a boil. Mash the fish fine with potato masher, 
add hot boiled potatoes, and mash all together. Put in 
a good large piece of butter, and pepper to taste. Make 
into cakes. Fry in hot fat. 

FISH BALLS. 

To a piece of boiled fresh halibut, mashed very fine, 
add an equal quantity of hot boiled potatoes. Mash all 
together, add pepper and salt to taste, 2 eggs, and a lit- 
tle sweet milk. Make into cakes, with a piece of butter 
inside each cake. Fry in hot fat. 

Mrs. Wm. BT. Deuel. 



is 



SALADS 



"Uh, herbaceous meat ! 
'Twould tempt the dying anchorite to eat. 
Back to the world he'd turn his weary soul, 
And plunge his fingers in the salad bowl. 



BEEF SALAD. 

I cup beef and 3 hard boiled eggs chopped fine, i des- 
sert spoon mustard, a little salt; red and black pepper, 
and enough vinegar to make it pack nicely. Set in cold 
place until ready to use, then turn into another dish. 

M. M. R. 

. CABBAGE SALAD. 

Chop fine, i large cabbage. Make a dressing of 3 
eggs, 6 tablespoons milk, 3 tablespoons melted butter, 1 
tablespoon salt, i tablespoon mustard, 1-4 teaspoon red 
pepper, i cup vinegar. Put the salt, mustard, pepper, 
and vinegar on the stove, when hot, add milk, eggs and 
butter well beaten together; let this boil, then pour over 

cabbage. 

L. M. F. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

I egg, 1-2 cup milk, 2-3 cup vinegar, butter size of a 
butternut, i tablespoon mustard, i tablespoon sugar, 
salt and pepper to taste. Boil vinegar, sugar, salt and 
mustard, then add milk and egg well beaten together. 
While hot pour over a qt. of chopped cabbage. 

Mrs. William Waterbury. 



26 



CELERY SALAD. 

I small head cabbage and 2 bunches celery, chopped 
very fine. Take i cup vinegar, piece of butter size of 
an egg^ yolks of 2 eggs, i teaspoon mustard, i teaspoon 
salt, 2 teaspoons sugar, a pinch of cayenne pepper. Mix 
these well together; put on the stove and heat until it 
thickens, stirring all the time. When cold add 2 tea- 
spoons sweet cream, and pour over the salad, if not moist 

enough, add cold vinegar. 

Celia Cole. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

The white meat of a cold boiled chicken or turkey, 3-4 
the same bulk of celery, 2 hard boiled eggs, i raw egg, 
well beaten, 1 teaspoon each of salt, pepper and made 
mustard, 3 teaspoons salad oil or melted butter, 2 tea- 
spoons white sugar, 1-2 cup vinegar. Mince the meat 
well, cut the celery in small bits and set in a cool 
place while you prepare the dressing. 

Dressing. — Rub the yolks of the eggs very fine; add 
salt,- pepper and sugar, then the oil, putting in but a few 
drops at a time, add the mustard next, then the raw 
egg, well beaten, and lastly the vinegar. Sprinkle a lit- 
tle salt over the meat and celery, and pour on the dress- 
ing. 

Mrs. F. M. Hewitt. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Boil 3 chickens until tender, salting to taste. When 
cold, cut in small pieces and add twice the quantity of 
celery, cut fine; or chopped cabbage, and four hard 
boiled eggs, chopped fine. Mix thoroughly together. 

Dressing. — Put over the fire a saucepan with i pt. 
vinegar and butter size of an egg. Beat 3 eggs with 2 



27 

tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons mustard, t tablespoon 
black pepper, i teaspoon salt, and pour slowly into the 
boiling vinegar; let it thicken, but be careful not to cook 
too long or it will curdle. When cold pour over tlie 
salad. Garnish the dish to your own fancy. 

Mrs. N. Waterhurv. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Slice cold boiled potatoes quite thin, arrange with 
alternate layers of chopped pickles, sliced onions and 
potatoes. 

Dressing. — For 8 potatoes, mix 4 tablespoons salad 

oil with pepper and salt, to which add slowly 

1-2 cup vinegar. Pour over salad and set near ice to 

cool. Garnish with hard boiled eggs, sliced, and sprigs 

of parsley. 

J. A. C. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Cut 2 good sized boiled potatoes in square pieces, 
and 2 stalks celery in small bits. Add to this i table- 
spoon tomato, I tablespoon vinegar, 2 of table oil, pep- 
per, salt, and a small bit of onion. 

J. M. Weaver. 

DEVILED HAM. 

To about 1 lb. boiled ham, chopped fine, add 4 or 5 
medium sized pickled cucumbers, chopped. Pour over 
this the dressing. 

Dressing.— 4 hard boiled eggs; rub the yolks fine and 
mix with 2 teaspoons of made mustard, i teaspoon salt 
and I teacup vinegar. 

This may be made of pieces of ham either fried or 

boiled, and in a smaller quantity, but should be about 

as moist as chicken salad. 

S. Ella Waterp.urv. 



28 

CANNED SALMON DRESSING. 

Boil together 3 eggs well beaten, 2 tablepsoons melted 
butter, 1-2 teaspoon dry mustard, 1-2 cup vinegar, a 
little salt and cayenne pepper. When cold add a little 
milk to thin. 

Mrs. E. M. Prouty. 

SAUCE FOR SALAD OR FISH. 

Mash the yolks of 2 hard boiled eggs with a mustard 
spoon of mustard; add pepper and salt t(j taste, 3 table- 
spoons salad oil, 3 tablespoons vinegar and 1-2 table- 
spoon catsup. 



F. M. OLMSTED & CO., 

SUCCESKORS TO JO!IN ToON, 

Hosiery, Gloves, Underwear 

AND FINE FURNISHINGS, 

NO. i CONGRESS HALL BLOCK, 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 

WM. H. GIBBS, 




458 Broadway, SARATOGA SPRINGS. 

Pianos and Organs sold on installments at lowest prices and easy terms. 



. JOHN H. WILLIAMS, 

RESIDENT 

DRY GOODS, 

410 BROADWAY, 

Opposite Arlington Hotel, SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 

B. R. BAf^RETT, 

394 Broadway, SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Manufacturer of 

LADIES^ FURS. 

Seal Sacques and Small Furs made over into Fash- 
ionable Shapes. 



GHARLBS H. ADAMS, 



Manufacturer and dealer in 



426 Broadway, 
SARATOGA SPRINGS, Ji. Y. 

LADIES' AND GEINTS' LUNCH ROOMS, 
Cor. Division & Matilda Sts. 

Dealer in 

And Nuts of all kinds in their season. 

Sliell Oysters and Clams 

A Speciality. 



W. H. THOMAS, 



Manufacturer of 



c^o.<-^->^m 



mmwi m$ Kiwi 






MONUMENTS, HEADSTONES &c. 

Corner Broadway and Grove Street, 

SA-K-ATOO^ SPl^IIVOS, TV. Y. 

" l[t^' Importer of Scofcli and English Granite, specimens ol' which 
can be seen at the works. 



29 



SOUPS. 



" Some like it: hut, 
Some like it coljd, 
Some like it in the pot 
Nine days old." 



CLEAR SOUP STOCK. 

Wash and boil in 2 gals, cold water, a beef shank. Add 
I spoon salt and boil 10 lirs. Strain and cool. In the 
morning skim off the fat, and turn gently into soup ket- 
tle being careful not to turn in the sediment. It is tlien 
ready for any kind of soup. If you wish to have a jelly, 
boil in 6 qts. water instead. 

Mamie S. Adams. 

BARLEY SOUP. 
Wash 1-2 cup pearl barley and boil slowly in 1 qt. 
water 3 hrs., then turn into soup ketttle with 3 qts. stock. 
Boil and season with salt and pepper. Sago, macaroni 
and vermicelli soups, may be made in the same way, 
but require only 2 hrs. boiling. 

Mamie S. Adams. 

BEAN SOUP. 

3 lbs. beef, i stalk celery, 3 good sized tomatoes, and 

a small piece of ham bone boiled together in about 4 

qts. water. Parboil i qt. beans, strain and add to above. 

Slice I large onion and brown in butter, then add it to 

the soup. In tlie same butter, brown i tablespoon flour, 

and add this, stirring frequently. It should cook fully 

5 hrs. 

J. M. Weaver. 



so 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 

Soak over night i qt. peas in i qt. water. Boil in this 
water i hr., then change to fresh water. Boil in this i 
lb. corned beef untilytiie peas are soft, then strain 
through a sieve; adtl butter and season to taste. 

Mrs. F. M. Hewitt. 



CABBAGE SOUP. 

T small head cabbage, slice 1-2 into 3 pts. water. Put 
the remainder of the cabbage in and cook until entirely 
done. Take out all but the sliced cabbage, to this add 
3 pts. warm milk, 3 eggs, quite a large piece of butter, 
salt and pepper to taste. Slice bread in small pieces, 
and put into the soup. Let come to a boil and serve. 

Mrs. F. M. Hewitt. 

OX-TAIL SOUP. 

Separate at the joints, 2 ox-tails, and boil w4th i onion, 
I carrot, (whole) a few cloves, a blade of mace, and a 
stick of cinnamon. Boil 2 hrs., then strain liquor into 
soup kettle. Separate tails from vegetables, spice them 
and add to the liquor, with 2 qts. stock, salt and pepper. 

Boil up once and serve. 

Mamie S. Adams. 

VERMICELLI SOUP. 

2 lbs. lamb from which all fat has been removed, 3 qts. 
water. Cut up the meat, cover closely and boil until it is 
in shreds. Then season with salt, sweet lierbs and 2 tea- 
spoons Worcestershire sauce. Boil 10 min., strain, and 
return to fire. Have ready 1-3 lb. vermicelli boiled ten- 
der in clear water; add this to soup, boil up once nnd 

serve. 

Annie Shonts. 



31 

DUMPLIiNGS FOR SOUP. 
I pt. flour (measure before sifting,) t teaspoon cream 
tartar, 1-2 teaspoon soda, 1-2 teaspoon salt, i teaspoon 
sugar. Sift all together, and add milk to make dough 
stiff enough to roll. Cut into small cakes, put into the 
soup, cover tight and boil 10 min. Be sure the sou}) 
boils fast enough to get up good steam, and keeps boil- 
ing while dumplings cook, else they will be heavy. 

Mamie S. Adams. 

CORN SOUP. 

12 ears raw green corn. Split the kernels and rub 
from the ear with a spoon. Boil the cobs for 2 hrs. in 
I gal. water with i onion chopped and i qt. tomatoes. 
Then strain and add the corn, butter the size of an egg, 
I cup milk and i tablespoon flour. Season and serve. 

Mrs. Wm. Carrigan. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Allow 2 tablespoons tomato to a person. Boil in i 
pt. water. Add soda size of a pea, and milk for as large 
a soup as desired. Boil, and add rolled cracker, salt, 
pepper and butter. 

Addie Barrett. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

I doz. large tqmatoes boiled until soft in 2 qts. water. 
Strain through a colander, then add i qt. milk, 1-2 tea- 
spoon soda, a little butter, salt and pepper. Thicken 
with bread crumbs or roiled crackers. 

Mrs. O. F. Stilks. 

OYSTER SOUP. 
I pt. water, i pt. milk, scant 1-2 cup butter, salt and 
pepper to taste. Let all come to the boiling point, then 



32 

add T teaspoon cornstarch dissolved in a little water and 
I qt. oysters. Let boil up and serve. 



Mrs. Clark. 



POTATO SOUP. 



6 potatoes boiled and mashed through colander. Add 
1 qt. milk, butter size of an egg. Season with salt, pep- 
per and nutmeg or any other spice. 

Mrs. N. D. Morey. 



34 



FISH. 



''With hooks and nets you catch us. 

You never regard our pains; 
Yet we reward you, with dainty food, 
To strengthen your body and brains." 



CLAM CHOWDER. 

Wash 33 clams, and boil in a little water until the 
shells open. Remove the clams and chop fine; turn 
off the liquor. Slice into the kettle a piece of salt pork 
about half the size of your hand, fry until brown; re- 
move pork, and put into the kettle the clam liquor — 
about I qt., and 2 medium sized onions chopped. Boil 
a few minutes then add 4 sliced potatoes. When tender 
add 3 pts. water and i qt. milk. Boil again, then add 3 
tablespoons flour rubbed smooth in a little milk, the 
clams, pepper, salt and 12 Boston crackers split. Boil 

for a moment and serve. 

Mary F. Waterbury. ■ 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Chop 50 clams, peel and slice 10 or 12 good sized po- 
tatoes, and add to the clam liquor with enough 
water to cook them; then add i pt. milk, and cover 
all with rolled crackers enough to thicken, 1-4 lb. butter, 
pepper, and if necessary, salt. 

Mrs. B. S. Badcley. 



35 

SCOLLOPED OYSTERS. 

I qt. oysters, drain and remove all bits of shell. But- 
ter a deep dish, cover the boitom with rolled crackers, 
tiien a layer of oysters seasoned with salt, pepper and 
small bits of butter, then another layer of crackers, and 
so on until all the oysters are used, leaving crackers on 
top. Pour over all, milk enough to moisten through, in 
which is stirred 2 well beaten eggs. Bake. 

Mrs. B. S. Badgley. 

SCOLLOPED OYSTERS. 

A layer of grated bread, cover with oysters, then 
another layer of bread, etc. Between the layers put salt, 
pepper and butter the size of a walnut. Fill the dish 
with milk and bake. 

OYSTER PIE. 

Crust for Pie. — i pt. flour with 2 teaspoons baking 
powder sifted through. Then mix thoroughly through 
the flour 1-2 cup butter; wet with milk, roll soft. Line 
a 2 qt. dish with the crust; then proceed as with scol- 
lopped oysters, — a layer of oysters highly seasoned with 
pepper, salt and plenty of butter, then a layer of crushed 
crackers, and so on until the dish is nearly full. Pour 
over it i cup milk, cover with the crust, and bake in a 
moderate oven. 

Mrs. O. a. Day. 

OYSTERS ON TOAST. 

Toast slices of bread; butter and lay them in a 
hollow dish. Set the oyster liquor over the fire, season 
with salt and pepper, and just before it boils add the 
oysters: let them boil up once and pour over the toast. 

Mrs. Crawford. 



36 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Drain good sized oysters in a colander; then dip each 
one into beaten egg, then into softened bread crumbs 
and fry until brown in 1-2 lard and 1-2 butter. Salt and 
pepper them before turning over. Put pieces of butter 
on platter; take up oysters and place butter on them. 

Mrs. F. R. Barrett. 

SCOLLOPED FISH. 

Skin and cut into small pieces a cod or haddock and 
lay in a deep earthen dish. Dredge in about 1-2 cup 
flour, I spoonful salt, i of pepper. Cut and strew in 
about 2 spoons butter. Cover with new milk and bake 
40 min. 

Mamie S. Adams. 

BOILED TROUT. 

Wash well and wipe dry. Wrap in well flowered 
cloth, tie closely and place in boiling Salted water. Al- 
low 8 or 10 min. to each lb. Skin them after they are 
cooked. For the dressing, heat 1 pt. milk, salt, thicken 
with flour and i well beaten egg. Pour this over the 
fish, putting on butter and pepper in spots. 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 



BAKEJ) WHITE FISH. 

Prepare a dressing of fine bread crumbs, a little, salt 
pork chopped very fine. Season with sage, parsley, 
pepper and S'llt. Fill the fish and sew it up. Sprinkle 
the outside wilh s;ilL, |)cpper and bits of butter, dredge 
with flour, and bake. Baste o!ten. Serve with egg or 
parsley sauce. 

Mrs. Crawford. 



39 



MEATS. 



"The innocent animal life must oass. 

That it may fill our own, 
As passed the sweet life of the >jrass 
It fed upon." 



BEEF A LA MODE. 

From a round of beef, remove all bone, gristle and the 
tough parts about the edges; then with a thin, sharp 
knife, make perpendicidar ineisions in the meat al)()ut 
1-2 inch apart. Cut into strips about as thick as your 
finger 1-2 lb. salt pork; prepare a dressing same as fcjr 
turkey, and into each of the incisions thrust strips of the 
pork, (so far down that the upper ends are just level 
with the surface) and soniG of the dressing. Proceed 
thus until tlie meat is thoroughly plugged, then place in 
a baking pan with a little water, cover tightly, and bake 
4 or 5 hrs. When done, spread over the top the re- 
mainder of the dressing, return to the oven and brown. 
Thicken the gravy with tlour and pour over the beef. 
Cut in slices and serve either hot or cold. 

Mrs. Crawford. 

ROAST LAMB AND MINT SAUCE. 

Stuff a hind quarter of lamb, with fine bread crumbs, 
pepper, salt and butter. Sew the flap firmly to 
keep in place; rub the outside with salt, pepper, butter 
and a little of the stuffing or flour, and roast 2 hrs. 
Serve with the following mint sauce : — Chop the mint 



40 

fine, pour on a little hot water, let it stand on the stove 
a short time, then add a little vinegar, and sugar to 
sweeten. 

Mrs. J. Palmer. 

ROAST TURKEY. 
Lard — By cutting fat salt pork into thin, narrow slices, 
put (j«e end in eye of larding needle, run needle under 
skin and draw pork half thrcjugh, about 1-2 in. apart. 
Make dressing of 2 qts. dry bread soaked in cold water to 
cover; when soft press out all the water, mix in 1-2 onion 
(or less) grated, i teaspoon pepper, i tablespoon salt, i 
^^^, butter size of <:^^^. Stuff with this, breast first. Cross 
and tie down legs, fasten wings to body, and neck under 
body with skewers. Rub over with butter, dredge with 
salt and pepper and thickly with flour, and bake. For 
8 lbs. allow I 1-2 lirs. Baste often with drippings; be- 
fore serving baste with butter to give frothy appearance. 
Place on a rack in pan so as not to lie in gravy. This is 
a first rate mode for roasting any kind of bird. 

Mamie S. Adams. 

BROILED CHICKENS. 

Place the chickens in a kettle with about 2 tablespoons 
water; cover tightly; steam about 2 lirs. on the back of 
the stove. Then remove carefully, and t(j the liquid add 
butter, allowing a piece a little larger than the size of an 
^^Z ^^ each chicken ; pepper and salt to taste ; let this 
come to a bijil. Broil the chickens, and dip each one in 
the prepared butter, and lay on hot platter. Pour over 
them the remainder of the hot butter. 

Mrs. Wm. B. Deuel. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 
Boil I or 2 chickens in a little water, with a little salt; 
when well cooked take all the meat from the bones, re- 



41 

moving the skin, and keeping the light and dark meats 
separate; chop and season to taste with salt and pepper; 
arrange in layers of light and dark in a meat presser — 
or any mould or pan will do, add the liquor it was boiled 
in, which should be about a cup full, and place a heavy 
weight on top. When cold, cut in slices and serve. 
Turkey boned in the same way, and sliced instead of 
chopped is very nice. 

Mrs. W. H. Corbin. 

ROAST WILD DUCK. 
Soak the ducks over night in salt water; in the morn- 
ing put them in fresh water; change several times. Roast 
with dressing, or not, as preferred. Serve with currant 
jelly. 

Mrs. Crawford. 

IRISH STEW. 

Take cooked or uncooked meat; that which is cooked 
and cannot be served in good shape will do nicely. Put 
in kettle of boiling water with 3 turnips, 1-2 doz. onions, 
carrots and cabbage if desired. Boil 3-4 hr., then add 
desired number of potatoes. Remove vegetables when 
done, and add to liquor, milk, butter, salt and })epper. 
Boil and pour over vegetables. Parsley or thyme im- 
proves the flavor. 

POT-PIE. 
I egg, I small pt. milk, 2 full teaspoons baking pow- 
der, a pinch of salt and flour enough to make a stiff bat- 
ter that will drop firmly from the spoon, into the kettle. 

Boil slowly 15 or 20 min. 

Susie Caskey. 

MEAT PIE. 
Line a deep pan with a good crust; parboil the meat 
and put it in, season highly, nearly fill the pan with the 



42 

meat liquor, add a piece of butter, sprinkle with flour, 
cover with a thick crust and bake. Chicken, clam or 
oyster ])ie may be made in the same way. 

Mrs. H. E. Norton. 

TOMATO PIE. 

Cover the bottom of a })udding disli with bread 
crumbs, then make a layer of cold roasted beef or mut- 
ton chopped fine, then a layer of tomatoes sliced. Sea- 
son with salt, pepper and butter, and so on until the dish 

is full. 

Mrs. Wm. Waterbury. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

I qt. sweet milk, 3 eggs, i even teaspoon salt. Add 
flour to the consistency of sponge cake. This is to be 
placed in a dripping pan, under a roast of beef on 
frames, when the roast is half done; the pudding to re- 
ceive the drippings frcjm the meat. Cut in squares and 

serve on platter with the meat. 

Mrs. Wm. Carrigan. 

FRIED SALT PORK. 
Cut the pork in rather thin slices; freshen by pouring 
boiling water over slices; let stand a few moments; 
drain; roll in ihjur and fry until crisp. Drain ofl most 
(jf the grease from frying-pan; stir in the hot pan 2 ta- 
blespoons flour, nearly i pt. new milk, pepper and salt 
if not salt enough. Boil up and turn into gravy dish. 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

SALT PORK FRITTERS. 

Cut pork in thin slices, freshen and fry it. Make a 
batter of i egg, 1-2 pt. milk, salt and flour enough to 
make it quite stiff; dip the pork in while hot and fry to 
light brown, 

Mrs. Edgar Hewitt. 



43 

HAM TOAST. 

1-4 lb. lean boiled ham, chopped fine, mix with yolks 
0(3 eggs, well beaten, i oz. butter, 2 tablespoons cream, 
a little cayenne pepper. Stir over the fire until it 
thickens. Spread on hot toast. 

Mrs. Crawford. 

BEEF LOAF. 

2 lbs. lean beef chopped fine, 3 eggs well beaten, 4 
soda crackers rolled, i teaspoon butter, and salt and 
pepper to taste. Make into a loaf and bake, basting oc- 
casionally with warm water and butter. Cool thorough- 
ly before slicing. 

L. C. Douglass. 

FRIED VENIZON. 

When the means to boil are not at hand, the next best 
method is to put into frying pan slices of salt pork. Fry 
slightly, then put in venizon, season and cook well. 
Dish on to hot platter, and keep hot while making gravy. 
Place a tablespoon dry flour in frying pan, being sure 
to have fat boilino: hot. Stir until brown and free from 
lumps, then add water, season and pour over meat. 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

SWEETBREADS. 

Scald in salt and water, remove stringy parts, then put 
in cold w^ater a few^ moments, and dry in a towel. Dip 
in egg and rolled cracker, and fry brown in butter; when 
done place on a hot dish. Pour into tlie pan i cup sweel 
milk, a little butter, pepper, salt, and a little parsley 
chopped fine. Thicken with a little Hour when boiling- 
Pour over the sweetbreads. Can be served with or 

without gravy. 

Mrs. E. M. Prouty. 



44 

OYSTER SAUCE. 

1 pt. of oysters cut fine and boiled 5 minutes in their 
own liquor, i cup .milk, i tablespoon butter rubbed 
smooth in i tablespoon Hour, salt and pepper to taste. 
Let boil. Serve with turkey. 

Mrs. H. p. G. 



46 



VEGETABLES. 



'Better is a dinner of herbs where love is, than a 
stalled ox and hatred therewith.'' 



ESCALOPED TOMATOES. 
Take smooth tomatoes, cut a small piece out of tlie 
stem end, removing the juice, and some of the pulp. 
Put them in a baking dish and fill them witli bread 
crumbs, seasoned to taste with salt, pepper and butter. 
Put a small piece of butter on top of each. Bake in a 

moderate oven about i hr. 

Mrs. J. T. Carr. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Take i doz. large, round tomatoes; cut them off 
smooth at the stem end; take out the seed and pulp. 
Chop fine i lb. lean steak, 2 slices bacon, with inside (^f 
tomatoes; season this with 1 finely chopped onion fried, 

1 dessert spoon salt, 1-2 teaspoon white pepper, a little 
cayenne, and i tablespoon finely chopped parsley Add 
4 rolled (M'ackers; if too stiff, thin with stock or cold 
gravy. Fill tomatoes with this dressing, packing tightly; 
sift cracker crumbs over top; bake i hr. in a quick oven. 

K. S. 
BROILED TOMATOES. 

Take large smooth tomatoes, just ripe; split, making 

2 slices. Broil on a toaster. Put on a hot dish; season 
with salt, pepper and butter. Serve immediately. 

Mrs. N. Watkrjjury. 



47 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Season with pepper and salt a small lialf bowl of flour. 
Wash and cut in 3 or 4 slices, discarding the ends, mod- 
erate sized tomatoes. Dip the slices in the flour and fry 
in lard and butter or drippings — the latter is preferable. 
Turn carefully when brown. At the last, leave 4 or 5 
pieces in the spider; pour a little hot water with them, 
add the remainder of the flour mixed in a large cup of 
milk; when thickened and brown, pour over the toma- 
toes. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Cover I qt. of beans with boiling water, let stand 1-2 
hr., then put in fresh water, boil well 20 min., then pour 
off the liquid. Put in a bean pot and cover with water; 
add 3 tablespoons molasses, a piece of pork; salt and 
pepper to taste. Send to baker to be baked over night 
in brick oven, or bake at home from 8 to 10 hrs., keep- 
ing them closely covered. Water should be added occa- 
sionally to prevent them becoming dry. 

F. T. Wells. 

WHIPPED POTATOES. 

Steam or boil required number of potatoes, add salt, 
pepper, (cayenne if preferred) butter and milk. Whip 
to a cream with a fork. 

Mrs. W. Eddy. 

TO FRY EGG PLANT. 

Cut in thin slices and soak in salted ice water about 
2 hrs. Just before time to serve, dry in towels, and dip 
each piece into egg and then dredge with rolled cracker. 
Fry in lard to a delicate brown. Must be served as 
soon as fried or it will not be crisp, and the delicacy of 
the dish is lost. 



48 

Summer crook-neck squash is very nice prepared in 
the same way. 



C. A. D. 



BAKED MACARONI. 



Break 1-2 lb. macaroni in small pieces. Stew gently 
20 min. in water slightly salted, (it should be soft but 
not broken or split.) Drain well; put a layer in the bot- 
tom of a buttered pudding dish, upon this grate some 
mild rich cheese; scatter over it bits of butter. Spread 
on the cheese more macaroni, etc., until the dish is full, 
having top layer macaroni, well buttered. Add a few 
spoonfuls of milk or cream and a little salt. Cover and 
bake, then brown nicely, and serve in a pudding dish. 

Anna Shonts. 

MACARONI AND CHEESE. 

Parboil macaroni until soft. Butter a pudding .dish, 
put into it a layer of rolled crackers, on that one of mac- 
aroni, then one of grated cheese. Fill the dish in this 
order, having top layer crackers, then pour on cold 
sweet milk until dish is full. Bake, browning nicely. 

Serve hot. 

Mrs. E. M. Prouty. 



String-beans, peas, asparagus and parsnips can be 

made very tender if cooked a few minutes in lard, (about 

2 tablespoons to the qt.,) stirring constantly. Then add 

boiling water and cook for a few minutes longer. Pour 

off the water and add more, and finish cooking in the 

usual way. This mode requires less time, and late in the 

season when these vegetables are apt to be tough will 

make them tender and fresh. 

C. A. D. 



2^. lE^. ISOIDID-3r, 
MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS, 

»4?i BROAI3WAY, 

Will call the attention of the ladies of Saratoga and vicinity to the uniisuallj' 
large and attractive assortment of 

FANCY FEATHERS, FLOWERS, RIJ5B0NS, RUCHIN^^S, 

And importations of many novelties. Also a complete line of the most popular 
CORSETS manufactured. 



CRAWFORD & FONDA, 

FINE BOOTS and SHOES, 

AND RUBBERS, 

IVo. 434. Broad^vay, 

SAR.ATOOA SPRIIVOS, IV. Y. 

iH^Counected with Telephone Exchange. 



LUMBER 
FOR SALE! 

AT THE 

STEAM MILL. 
W. W. WORDEN. 



E. R. WATERBURY, 



DEALER IN 



Fine Watches, Clocks, 

JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, 

SPECTACLES, EYE GLASSES, &c., 

AT LOWEST PI^IOES. 

378 Broadway, 
SARATOGA SPRINGS. 



Particular attention given to repairing fine Watches, Clocks, Jew- 
elry, &c. [Charges Moderate.] 

THE SARATOGA YICHI SPRING 

Is the only Alkaline Water found in Saratoga, and a specific in 
those troublesome affections arising from 

ASOIDTTY OF THE STOMACH, DYSPEPSIA, KIDNEY AND 
BLADDER DIPFIOULTIES. 

This water contains more 

BICARBONATE OF SODA, [82.873 GRAINS,] 

and is more highly impregnated with carbonic acid gas, and more 
agreeable to the taste, than any other Saratoga water. 

The Saratoga Vichy is an excellent table water, and superior to 
the French Vichy, as it contains more natural carbonic acid gas, and 
mixes readily with all wine. 

This is not a Cathartic water, and can be drank at all times with 
its characteristic effects, viz., as a Nervous Stimulard, and in diseases 
of the Stomachy Kidneys and Bladder. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS, GROCERS AND HOTELS. 

Address, SARATOGA VICHY SPRING CO., 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 



SI 



PASTRY 



"Bread, ' men say, "is the staff of lift 
But they will often concede. 

That were it not for our dainty pies; 
The staff would be heavy indeed. 



GOOD PIE CRUST. 

4 cups flour, 2 cups lard, i cup cold water. 

Nora Morse. 

PIE CRUST. 

I pt. flour, 1-2 teaspoon salt, 1-2 cup lard. Rub well 
together and add water sufficient to make dough, (not too 
stiff;) roll out, spread thinly with butter, fold, spread 
again, fold and roll out. . Knead as little as possible. 

Mrs. G. I. Humphrey. 

TART CRUST. 

I cup lard rubbed into flour, 3 tablespoons ///// of 
water, white of i egg beaten stiff, i tablespoon white 
sugar. Roll quickly and thin; cut into round pieces. 
Take 1-2 the pieces and with a cutter size of a thimble, 
cut a hole in the center with about 6 around it. When 
baked, spread the plain pieces with jelly; cover with 
open work pieces. 

Mrs. G. L. Humeston. 

CREAM PIE. 

Boil together 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons cornstarch and 1-2 
cup sweet milk, then add cream enough to fill the pie. 
Sweeten and flavor to taste. Bake with i crust. 



5^ 

CREAM PIE. 

1 pt. milk, 3 small tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 
a little of the cold milk, add yolks of 2 eggs well beaten, 
and stir into the rest of the milk heated. Stir and cook 
until thick and smooth; take from lire, add 2-3 cup 
sugar, salt and flavoring. When cool, pour into crust 
previously baked; cover with a meringue made of the 
whites of the eggs, and brown slightly. 

Katp: Pike. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

Line a deep plate with a crust. Fill with a custard 
made of 3 well beaten eggs, a little salt, 1-2 cup white 
sugar, milk enough to fill plate. Grate nutmeg over 
the top. Bake slowly. 

Mrs W. H. Gibbs. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

2 eggs and 2 tablespoons white sugar beaten together; 
I cup cocoanut, (if dessicated, previously soaked in a lit- 
tle milk,) and milk enough to fill pie dish. A little 
almond extract is a great improvement. Bake with 1 

crust. 

Mrs. N. Waterbury. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

1 pt. milk, 3 eggs, i grated cocoanut and sugar to 
sweeten. Bake with 1 crust. When done- cover with a 

meringue and brown. 

Mrs. G. L. Humeston. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD PIE. 

T-4 cake Baker's chocolate, grated, i pt. boiling water, 
6 eggs, I qt. milk, 1-2 cup white sugar, 2 teaspoons 
vanilla. Dissolve the chocolate in a little of the milk, 



63 

stir into the water and boil 3 min. Cool, add beaten 
egg (reserving whites of 3,) flavoring and milk, and pour 
into pie dishes lined with crust. When the custard is 
"set" — but not more than half done — spread over it the 
whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff, with 2 tablespoons sugar. 
This may be baked without crust, in a pudding dish or 
cups set in boiling water. 

Annie Shonts. 

ORANGE PIE. 

2 good sized oranges. Grate the outside and squeeze 
out the juice, add i cup sugar, yolks 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons 
cornstarch and i cup boiling water. Cook over hot 
water, then pour into a baked crust. Cover with the 
whipped whites of 2 eggs sweetened; and brown. 

Celia Cole. 

GARP^IELD PIE. 

I small bowl stewed sour apples sifted, i tablespoon 
flour, yolks of 2 eggs beaten, a small piece butter, 1-2 
the juice and grated rind of i lemon, and sugar to 
taste. Bake with i crust, then cover with meringue 
and brown. 

Mrs. B. R. Barrett. 

■ MARLBOROUGH PIE. 

I cup sifted apple, i cup milk, 1-2 cup sugar, 1-2 cup 
butter, I well beaten egg and nutmeg. Bake with i crust. 

Mrs. Kate Cole. 

SPICED APPLE PIE. 

4 good sized apples, 2-3 cup raisins, i teaspoon cinna- 
mon, 1-2 teaspoon cloves, a little nutmeg, butter size of 

walnut, 1-2 cup sugar. 

Mrs. C. Neher. 



54 

APPLE PIE. 

Line a pie dish with crust, fill with sliced sour apples; 
then lay upper crust lightly over, and trim the edges 
without pinching. When baked remove upper crust, 
season apples with sugar, bits of butter and spice, cover 
again with the crust and serve warm. 

PINEAPPLE TART. 

1 pineapple. Carefully remove all specks, weigh and 
take same quantity sugar, 1-2 quantity of butter, i tea- 
cup cream and 5 eggs. Stir butter and sugar to a cream. 
Line pie dish with a good crust and bake to a light 
brown in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Chas. R. Day. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

3 Boston crackers, i cup sugar, i cup molasses, 1-2 
cup melted butter, 2-3 cup vinegar, i cup chopped 
raisins, i teaspoon cloves, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, i 
spoon salt and pepper, 2 cups water. 

Mrs, Griggs. 

MINCE MEAT. 

2 qt. bowls of chopped meat, 4 qts. chopped apples, i 
qt. molasses, i qt. sugar, i lb. raisins, i lb. or less, citron, 
3 qts cider, i tablespoon cloves, i of allspice, i of cinna- 
mon, 4 nutmegs, 2 tablespoons salt, 3 lemons, (juice only.) 
Scald all together 3 hrs. 5 lbs. meat makes 3 bowls. 

RAISIN PIE. 

I cup raisins chopped fine, i cup water, i cup brown 
sugar, I tablespoon Hour. Set on the stove until it 
boils, then bake between 2 crusts. 

Mrs. G. L. IIumeston. 



55 

RAISIN PIE. 

Grate the yellow from i lemon; discard all the white 
rind and seeds; chop remainder of lemon and i cuj) 
stoned raisins. Add to these a little salt, piece of butter 
size of walnut, 1-2 cup molasses, i cup brown sugar, 2 
cups water. Boil all together 5 min., then thicken with 
5 tablespoons flour. Bake between 2 crusts. This 
makes 2 medium sized pies. 

Mary F. Wateruury. 

CRANBERRY PIE. 

Wash and chop (not very fine) i 1-2 cups cranberries; 

add 1-2 cup seeded raisins and i cup sugar. Sprinkle 

on a little flour and spice, and bake between 2 crusts in 

moderate oven from 1-2 to 3-4 hr. 

Mrs. J. Q. Adams, 

LEMON PIE. 

I lemon, i cup sugar, i cup water, 1 tablespoon flour, 

and 2 or 3 eggs, according to the size of pie plate. 

Grate the lemon, stir in the sugar and flour, then the 

water. Roll very fine 4 butter crackers; stir in before 

adding white of i egg and yolks of 3 well beaten. Bake 

and cover with soft frosting made of the 2 whites and 

sugar. Browm slightly. 

Mrs. a. Hall. 

LEMON PIE. 

I cup white sugar, i lemon, i tablespoon cornstarch, 2 
eggs, I teaspoon butter, i cup boiling water. Beat 
cornstarch with yolks of eggs, and stir into boiling 
water; add sugar, juice and grated rind of i large lemon, 
and the butter. Have ready a pie dish lined with rich 
paste, pour in the mixture and bake. Cover with 
meringue made of the whites of 2 eggs and a little 

sugar. Brown in the oven. 

Mrs. O. H. Cromwell. 



56 

LEMON PIE. 

The grated rind and juice of 2 lemons, i 1-2 cups 
sugar, yolks 5 eggs, 2-3 cup milk, butter size of an egg. 
Beat the butter, eggs and sugar together, add the milk 
and lemon and bake in a lower crust. When done 
spread with a meringue and brown slightly. 

Cora Whyland. 

LEMON PIE. 

Rind and juice of i lemon, i egg, 3-4 cup sugar, 2 
tablespoons flour. Stir well together; add i 1-4 cups 
hot water and let the mixture boil well. Cool; then 
spread between 2 crusts previously baked and cooled. 

F. T. Wells. 

POTATO PIE. 

Grate 2 small potatoes, and rind of i lemon. Cut the 
pulp of the lemon into i pt. water and boil. Strain and 
add to the above, with i well beaten egg, a pinch of salt, 
and sugar to sweeten. Bake with 2 crusts. 

C. A, Deuel. 



JAMES MINGAY, 






Pint Dmii Sutt (t f em M& 



ACIC RELIir 



txihe: best 



FAMILY REMEDY 



of ^11 






'4! MOM) Mi 



Mfel 



FOR THE CURE OF ALL 



BILIOUS DISORDERS. 



t^" '^Beware of Imitations.' 



175 Washington St., Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

DEALER IN 

IXeiv Pianos, Warranted for five years, from $200 to $1,000. 
Secoud-Hand Piano»i from $50 to $200. 
l>Jc^v (>rg-an«i, AVarranted for five years, from $50 to $1,000. 
iSecoiid-l&antl Org-an^ii, from $25 to $75. 

Of every description, furnished on short notice and at NEW YORK and BOS- 
TON PRICES. 

Instruments sold on installments and to rent. Second-hand Pianos and Or- 
gans Bougrht or sold on commission. 

J^^Any Piano or Org^an in fllie cnarket sold at ICcasonable 
Prices. 

TUNING AND REGULATING PliiNOS AND ORGANS, 

And any repairs needed done on short notice. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 
Orders can be left at J. A. Smith's Jewelry store. 358 Broadwray, D. Gibbs & 
Son, 458 Broadway; and at 175 Washington street, or by mail. Address P. O. 
Box 817. 

INSTRUCTIONS GIVEN IN VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 



18iS ililftElBEi 1881 

DEALER IN 



447 BROADWAY. 

If^^Those wishing anything in the Furniture line would do well to visit this 
Old Established House before purchasing elsewhere. 



JAS. GARSIDE, 

Dealer in 

MEAT, VEGETABLES, POULTRY, 

Fresh and Salt Pork, Sausages, Lard, Etc., 

NO. 27 CAROLINE STREET, 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

llI^"Connected with Telephone Excliange. 



sy 



PLAIN AND FANCY PUDDINGS, 



"Puddings, my friends, do a mission fullill. 

They add to tiie dinner, and also — the bill; 

They cause men to wish, with what ardor they may, 

I'hat the meal which foretells them, came three times a day." 



FIG PUDDING. 

6 oz. brown sugar, 6 oz. chopped suet, i egg, i cup 
sweet milk, 3-4 lb. figs, i qt. liour and 3 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder. Chop suet and figs together, then mix in 
other ingredients, adding the Qgg last. Steam 4 hrs., 

and serve with sauce. 

Josephine Tefft. 

FIG PUDDING. 

1-2 lb. figs, chopped, 1-2 lb. bread crumbs, i cup suet, 
I tablespoon sugar, 3 eggs. If too stiff add 2 table- 
spoons milk. Boil 2 hrs. in a mould. 

Addie Verbeck. 

CHERRY PUDDING. 

2 eggs, I cup sweet milk, 3 teaspoons yeast powder, 

tlour to make a stiff batter, and as many cherries as can 

be stirred in. Boil or steam 2 hrs. Serve with fruit 

sauce. 

Mrs. D. C. Hoyt. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

I cup sweet milk, 1 cup common molasses, i cup 
chopped suet, i cup raisins, 1 cup currants, i cup 



6o 

chopped citron, 3 cups flour, 1-2 teaspoon soda, spices- 
Steam 3 hrs. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. E. M. Prouty. 

SUET PUDDING. 

I cup suet chopped fine, i cup boiling coffee, i cup 
brown sugar, 2 1-2 cups flour, i 1-2 teaspoons baking 
powder, i cup raisins, i cup currants, 1-2 cup butter- 
nut meats. Steam 3 hrs. 

Mrs. John H. Williams. 

SUET PUDDING. 

I cup chopped suet, i cup sugar, i 1-2 cups boiling 
water, i cup chopped raisins, i tablespoon salt, i 1-2 tea- 
spoons baking powder. Stir stiff with flour, and steam 

3 hrs. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. Capen. 

SUET PUDDING. 

I qt. flour, I large cup chopped raisins, i cup chopped 
suet, 1-2 cup molasses, 1-2 cup brown sugar, 2 cups 
sweet milk, i teaspoon soda, a little salt. Mix and steam 
3 hrs. Serve with sauce. 

A. M. Patrick. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

I pt. sweet milk, 3 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
flour to make a stiff batter. Steam 2 hrs. 

Annie Graves, 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

I 1-2 cups milk, 1-2 cup moLasses, 2 eggs, 3 tablespoons 
melted butter, 3 cups flour, 2 cups raisins, stoned and 
chopped, 2 teaspoons baking powder, a little salt. Steam 
2 hrs. Serve with a sweet sauce. 

Mrs. Merritt. 



BLACK PUDDING. 

I cup molasses, i cup cold water, i teaspoon soda, i 
teaspoon salt, i qt. flour, i cup fruit. Steam 3 hrs. in a 
well buttered 6 qt. pail covered tightly. Serve with 
sauce. 

Susie Caskey. 

STEAMED GRAHAM PUDDING. 

1 1-2 cups graham flour, 1-2 cup molasses, i cup 

chopped suet, 1-2 cup sweet milk, i Ggg, 1 even teaspoon 

soda, 1-2 cup stoned raisins, 1-2 cup currants, i teaspoon 

each cloves, cinnamon, allspice and salt. Steam 2 1-2 

hrs. 

Mrs. D. Rockwell. 

BOILED INDIAN PUDDING. 
1-2 cup chopped suet and 3 cups Indian meal stirred 
into 3 cups boiling milk. Cool; add yolks of 2 eggs and 
2 tablespoons sugar beaten together, 1-2 teaspoon soda, 
salt, I cup raisins, cherries or currants; and lastly beaten 
whites of 2 eggs. Boil in tin pudding mould from 3 to 4 

hrs. Serve with sauce. 

Mary F. Waterbury. 

STEAMED INDIAN PUDDING. 

2 cups corn meal, 2 cups flour, 1-2 cup molasses, i 
egg, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, i teaspoon soda. Wet 
with milk until about as thick as cake. Steam 3 hrs. 
Do not remove cover while steaming. 

Mrs. W. E. Russell. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

I qt. milk, scald; 1 teaspoon salt; 7 tablespoons yel- 
low meal, i large cup West India molasses, 2-3 cup kid- 
ney suet, chopped fine. Bake slowly 3 or 3 1-2 hrs. 

C. A. Deuel. 



62 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

Stir into i qt. boiling milk, 7 tablespoons corn meal, 
sweeten with sugar or molasses; add butter size of an 
egg, a little salt. Just before baking add i cup cold 
water. Flavor with nutmeg or cinnamon. 

Mrs. Wm. F. Hall. 

CURRANT PUFFS. 

1-2 cup butter, 2 teaspoons sugar, i cup milk, 3 eggs, 
I teaspoon soda, 2 of cream tartar, 2 cups Hour, i cup 
currants or raisins, steam in buttered cups 1-2 hr. 

M. E. L. 
GERMAN PUFFS. 

4 eggs, TO tablespcjonstlour, 1 tablespoon butter, 1-2 tea- 
spoon salt, 3 cups milk. Bake in cups or a dish 1-2 hr. 

Serve with sugar sauce. 

Alice Shaw. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

2 cups flour, mixed with 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

1 egg, I tablespoon butter, 3-4 cup sugar, 1-2 cup sweet 
milk, flavor to taste. Bake quickly. Serve hot with 
liquid sauce. 

Mrs. Crawford. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Pare and slice thin, enough apples to fill a dish 2 
inches deep; then make a batter to pour over them as 
follows: — I egg, 1-2 cup sugar, i teaspoon melted butter, 

2 cu]>s flour. 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 3-4 cups 
sweet milk. Bake, and serve with sauce. 

Nora E. Morse. 



63 

APPLIi PUDDING. 

T qt. sweet apples after they are cliupped fine, t e_c:g, 2 
tablespoons sweet milk, to wliieh add enough Hour to 
make a stiff batter; stir in the apples and a little salt. 

Bake a long time in a slow oven. 

M. E. Leggett. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Make a paste like baking powder biscuit, roll it into 
a sheet less than 1-2 inch thick, cut in squares, and lay 
in the center of each a juicy, tart apple, pared and cored. 
Bring the corners together and pinch slightly, lay in a 
buttered pan, the pinched edges downward, and bake to 
a light brown. Serve with a rich sweet sauce. 

Mrs. F. R. Barrett. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

I qt. flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder thoroughly 
mixed in the flour, 3 tablespoons butter, chopped in the 
flour as for pastry, i egg well beaten and mixed with 
the milk, 1-2 teaspoon salt, i tablespoon white sugar. 
Mix very soft, almost like cake, and spread on tin with 
a spoon. Spread each layer with butter before adding 
the next, and they will separate easily after they are 
baked. When done spread each layer with berries and 

sugar the usual way. 

Mrs. J. T. Carr. 

FRUIT ROLEY-POLEY. 

I (\\. flour, 3 heaping teaspoons baking powder, 2-7, cup 
shortening, %alt. Mix very soft with milk; roll oul in 
an oblong sheet, spread the fruit through the middle, 
leaving a margin on each side of 1-2 finger to fold down 
and confine the fruit. Roll up closely. Steam in a 
buttered dish i hr. 



64 

GREEN CORN PUDDING. 

12 ears green corn, grated, i qt. sweet milk, 3 table- 
spoons butter, 3 tablespoons sugar and 3 eggs. Bake in 
a buttered dish until it begins to thicken. 

Ollie Griswold. 

POOR MAN'S PUDDING. 

2 qts. milk, i cup rice, 1-2 cup sugar, a piece of butter 
the size of a walnut, 2 teaspoons salt. Flavor with nut- 
meg. Bake 2 hrs, stirring several times during first hr. 
Serve nearly cold. 

Mrs. H. E. Norton. 

RICE PUDDING. 

Put T small cup rice and i qt. milk with a pinch of 
salt in a farina kettle and boil i 1-4 hrs. Beat well i 
cup sugar and yolks of 4 eggs; pour boiling rice over 
them stirring well with a fork. When cold make mer- 
ingue of the 4 whites. Lay over the top ahd brown. 

Mary F. Waterbury. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

2 eggs, I qt sweet milk, a little salt, 4 apples chopped 
fine. ' Stir in flour to make a thin batter, and fry in hot 

lard. Serve with sweet sauce. 

Mrs. J. Palmer. 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING. 

6 slices of wheat bread spread with butter, with a 
layer of raisins between each slice; pour over a pt. of 
milk and let soak awhile. Then beat 4 eggs and stir 
them into a pt. of milk and pour over the pudding and 
bake. Serve with sauce. 



65 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

I pt. nice fine bread crumbs, i qt. milk, i cup sugar, 
yolks of 4 eggs well beaten, grated rind of i lemon, a 
piece of butter size of an egg. Bake until done but not 
watery. Whip the whites of the eggs stiff, add i teacup 
sugar into which the juice of the lemon has been ex- 
tracted and beat well. Spread over the pudding a layer 
of jelley. Spread the whites of the eggs over this. 
Brown slightly in the oven. To be served cold. 

Ida Loomjs. 
ORANGE PUDDING. 

4 large oranges; reject the peel, seed and inside tis- 
sue, then cut the remainder in small pieces. Put in a 2 
qt. baking dish with i cup sugar. Make a custard of i 
tablespoon cornstarch, yolks of 3 eggs and i })t. milk; 
cool, and add to the oranges. Make a meringue of whites 
of 3 eggs and i tablespoon sugar; spread over top and 

brown. 

Mrs. B. F. Bloomfield. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

I Clip sugar, butter size of an egg, i lemon, 6 small 
crackers pounded, 2 eggs and not quite i pt. milk. Beat 
eggs and sugar together; add grated rind and juice of 
lemon, then the crackers, and lastly the milk. Bake in 
quick oven. 

CREAM PUDDING. 

Scald I qt. milk, thicken with 4 tablespoons corn- 
starch (wet with a little milk,) and boil 4 minutes, add 4 
eggs, 4 tablespoons sugar; boil 7 minutes; flavor. When 
done, put into a wet dish and spread 2-3 cup sugar over 

it. To be served cold. 

Addie Barrett. 



66 



DELMONICO PUDDING. 

I qt. milk, scalded, yolks of 3 eggs well beaten, 5 
tablespoons sugar, 3 of cornstarch dissolve*d in a little 
milk. Stir all into the milk while boiling. Pour into 
a pudding dish. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff 
froth, add 2 tablespoons powdered sugar, spread on the 
pudding and brown slightly. Flavor both custard and 
frosting. To be served cold. 



C. A. Deuel. 



LEMON CREAM, 



Into 2 cups boiling water, stir 2 even tablespoons corn- 
starch wet with a little milk; add juice and rind of i 
lemon, yolks of 3 eggs well beaten, 2-3 cup sugar. Boil 
in a custard kettle for 5 min,; when cold add the whites 



of eggs well beaten. 



Mrs. Brown. 



FRENCH TAPIOCA CUSTARD. 

5 desert spoons tapioca, 1 qt. milk, i pt. water, 3 eggs, 
I heaping cup sugar, a pinch of salt. Soak tapioca in 
water 5 hrs. Let milk come to a boil, add tapioca, stir 
until boiling hot, then add gradually yolks of eggs and 
sugar beaten well togetlier. Let it cool, but not too 
long or the custard will break; pour into dish it is to be 
served in, and stir in gently the whites of the eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth. Flavor and cool. Eat with cake, canned 
fruit, &c. 

Mrs. J. F. Con key. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Soak over night 2 tablespoons tapioca in t-2 teacup 
milk (or enougii to cover); bring t qt. milk to boiling 
point; beat well together the yolks of 3 eggs, 1-2 teacup 
sugar, and i teaspoon lemon or vanilla. Add the tapi- 



67 

oca, and stir the whole into the boiling milk. Let boil 
and turn into the dish and immediately spread on the 
whites of the eggs. Serve cold. 

Emma Whyland. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

I cup tapioca soaked in i qt. water over night, i cup 

sugar, I 1-2 pts. milk, 4 eggs. Bake 30 min. Frost 

when done. 

S. J. Wadsworth. 

APPLE TAPIOCA. 

Soak over night as many dessert spoons of tapioca as 
you intend to use of apples. In the morning pare and 
core tart apples and place them in the bottom of a pud- 
ding dish. Fill each apple with sugar and a small bit 
of butter. Add the tapioca, a, little more sugar, nearly 
cover with. water, sprinkle cinnamon over the whole, 
and bake until the apples are tender. Serve warm or 
cold, with or without sugar and cream. 

Mary F. Watereurv. 

APPLE SAGO. 

1-2 cup sago, 21-2 cups cold water, i cup sugar, but- 
ter the size of a walnut, a little salt. Put sago in pud- 
ding dish with the water, and set in oven 3-4 hour. Pare, 
quarter and core 4 large apples, halving quarters. Add 
sugar, salt, butter and apples to the sago, and bake 3-4 
hour. 

Leila Magee. 

BLANC mange: 

Boil I cjt. milk; tliicken wilh 2 tablespoons cornstarcii 

dissolved in a little milk. Add 3 tablespoons sugar, a 

pinch of salt. Flavor 

Addie Barrett. 



6g 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Dissolve 3 tablespoons cornstarch, and stir into i pt. 
boiling water, with 1-2 cup sugar, and little salt; beat 
the whites of 3 eggs to a stiff froth, stir into cornstarch 
while hot, beating thoroughly. Flavor and put in mold 
to cool. Make a custard of 3 yolks, i teaspoon corn- 
starch, 1 pt. milk, 1 tablespoon sugar. Flavor. Serve 
together cold. 

E. A. Ensign. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Pour I qt. boiling milk over 10 large tablespoons 
stale bread crumbs, sweeten; add i tablespoon butter. 
Flavor with vanilla when cold and stir in 5 tablespoons 
grated chocolate, yolks of 4 eggs and whites of 2, (re- 
serving the other 2 for frosting) — and bake. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

I qt. milk, i teacup sugar, 4 tablespoons cornstarch. 
Put cornstarch into a cup with a little of the milk to dis- 
solve, and stir it into the remainder of the milk while 
boiling. Add whites of 3 eggs well beaten; when 
cooked flavor with vanilla. To 1-2 the pudding add i 
teacup cocoanut, to tlie other 1-2, add 1-4 cake chocolate 
melted. Put the cocoanut mixture in the mould first 
and then the chocolate above it. Cool and serve with 
boiled custard made of the yolks of the eggs. 

Mrs. V. L. Todd. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

I qt. sweet mil k, 4 tablespoons grated chocolate, 4 of 
cornstarch, 4 of i^rown sugar. Dissolve cornstarch in 
milk, and the chocolate in 2 tablespoons hot water. Boil 



milk, add cornstarch, cliocolate and a little salt. Boil 
until thick. Flavor with vanilla. Pour into moulds. 
To be served with cream sauce. 

E. Lena Curtis. 



CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

2 sections chocholate dissolved in i qt. milk, i cup 
sugar, yolks of 6 eggs, i heaping teaspoon cornstarch. 
Beat the yolks, add sugar and cornstarch; stir all slowly 
into boiling milk in which the chocolate is dissolved; 
add a pinch of salt and let cook a few minutes, stirring 
constantly. Eat cold with cake. 



Emma Whyland. 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 



WHIPPED-CREAM SAUCE. 

Mix together a plateful of whipped cream (flavored 
with vanilla,) the beaten wdiites of 3 eggs and pulverized 
sugar to taste. Pile a bank of this mixture in center of 
a platter, and form a circle of little fruit puddings, 
(steamed in small moulds) about it, or place a large pud- 
dins: in center with circle of sauce around it. 

Mrs. D. C. Hovt. 



FOAM SAUCE. 

I qt. milk, piece of butter size of an egg, 2 heaping 
tablespoons cornstarch or tiour. Whites of 3 eggs, and 
extract, (or currant jelly makes a pretty change,) 1-2 tea- 
spoon salt, sweeten to taste. Boil the milk in a farina 
kettle, cook cornstarch thoroughly. Just before serving, 



70 

add the well beaten whites to the mixture, and beat all 
together a moment; it will be a foamy mass. Remove 
from the fire before adding eggs or extract. It requires 
a good egg-beater to make this nice. 

Mrs. J. T. Carr. 

EGG SAUCE. 

Rub butter and sugar to a cream, add i egg well 
beaten, boil i cup milk and add slowly. Flavor. 

Mrs. Howard. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

I pt. boiling water, 2-3 cup sugar, butter size of an 
egg. Let all come, to a boil, then add i tablespoon corn- 
starch dissolved in cold water. Cook until clear. Fla- 
vor to taste with vanilla, lemon or nutmeg. 

Mrs. N. Waterbury. 

LEMON SAUCE. 

Stir I tablespoon butter and i cup powdered sugar to 
a cream, add i egg beaten stiff, juice and grated yellow 
rind of i lemon, and i tablespoon cornstarch. Add boil- 
ing water until proper consistency. Boil up once. 



71 



CREAMS, JELLIES, CUSTARDS, ETC. 



ICE Cr^EAM. 

I qt. milk, i qt. cream. Soak 3-4 oz. jelatine i hr. in 
I pt. milk. 'JMien set it on the stove in farina boiler until 
thor(nighly dissolved. 4 eggs well beaten, i pt. sugar 
beaten with them. Strain the hot jelatine on eggs and 
sugar, add the other pt. milk and the cream, and straijn 
into freezer, i tablespoon flavoring. Heating jelatine 
and milk is all the cooking this cream requires. 

Josephine Tefft. 

ICE CREAM. 

Scald I qt. milk. Beat together 2 eggs and 2 cups 
sugar and stir briskly into hot milk. When cold add 1 
pt. cream,* whipped. Flavor. 

Hattie Holland. 

CUSTARD ICE CREAM. 

Put I qt. milk in a pail set in boiling Avater. Beat 
thoroughly 4 eggs and sugar to taste; then add i tea- 
spoon cornstarch wet in a little cold milk. When the 
milk is nearly boiling, add this mixture, stirring until it 
begins to thicken. Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. N. Watereurv. 

FRENCH FLUMMERY. 

T heaping tablespoon gelatine in 3 tablespoons milk. 
Boil gently until dissolved, then strain. Whip i pt. 



72 

sweet cream, sweeten and flavor to taste, then add the 

boiling gelatine, stirring very fast. Put in moulds and 

set on ice. Serve with cake. 

Mrs. F. V. Hewitt. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Take lady fingers or cut stale sponge cake 1-2 in. 
thick and line three i qt. moulds dipped in cold water, 
leaving 1-2 in. space between slices. Soak 1-2 box gel- 
atine in cold water to cover, i hr., then dissolve in nearly 
1-2 cup boiling water. Put i 1-2 pts. cream into deep 
bowl, whip to froth, and skim into 4 qt. pan set on ice. 
When all wliipped move froth one side and pour off 
what has returned to milk. Whip this again. Stir in i 
cup powdered sugar, i teaspoon vanilla and the gela- 
tine, stirring from bottom until it begins to stiffen. 
Pour into the moulds and set on ice at least i hr., then 
turn on a flat dish to serve. Have cream cold while 
whipping. 

Mamie S. Adams. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

I pt. sweet cream whipped light, 1-2 oz. gelatine dis- 
solved in I gill hot milk. Whites of 2 eggs beaten to stiff 
froth, I small teacup powdered sugar. Flav^or with 
vanilla. Mix the cream, eggs and sugar, and lastly beat 
in the gelatine and milk which should be quite cold. 
Line a dish with thin pieces of sponge cake or lady 
fingers, and fill v^ith the mixture; also cover the top 

with the cake. 

Mrs. S. K. Thomas. 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 

I small box Cox's gelatine soaked i hr. in a little cold 
water. Heat i pt. milk in custard kettle; add gelatine, 
I cup sugar, and yolks of 3 eggs well beaten. . When 



73 

cooked and cold, add i qt. whipped cream, and the 
wliites of 3 eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Beat well 
together, put in mould, and set on ice to cool. 

Mrs. Brown. 
SPANISH CREAM. 

I pt. milk, 1-3 box gelatine. Soak gelatine in the 
milk 1-2 hr., then boil about 20 min.; add yolks of 4 
eggs and i cup sugar. Cook until it thickens; then stir 
in lightly whites of 4 eggs beaten to stiff froth, and 
flavor. Wet the mould, then pour in mixture to cool. 

M. M. R. 
VELVET CREAM. 

I qt. milk, 21-2 sheets isinglass dissolved in a little 
milk. Boil, then add 2 eggs and i cup sugar beaten 
together. Flavor to taste, and pour into mould. 

Leila Magee. 

FRUIT TRIFLE. 

Put strawberries or any kind of fresh fruit into a dish, 
cover them with sugar, then a layer of macaroons. 
Pour over this a nice cold custard. Cover with a mer- 
ingue. 

Mrs. Chas. Day. 

TUTTI FRUTTI, OR FROZEN PUDDING. 

I cup sugar, 1-2 cup flour (scant,) 2 eggs, i generous 
pt. milk, I tablespoon vanilla, i qt. cream, i small cup 
sugar, 2 tablespoons gelatine, and i or 1-2 lb. canned 
fruit. Mix flour, i cup sugar and eggs together, and 
stir into hot milk, cook 20 min.; cool a little and add 
gelatine (previously soaked i hr. in cold water to cover.) 
When cold, add second cup sugar, flavoring, and the 



74 

cream whipped to a froth. Freeze lo min., same as ice 
cream, then add the fruit cut line, and freeze solid* 

Mamie S. Adams. 

LEMON JELLY. 

Soak I 1-2 oz. gelatine in i qt. cold water 30 min. 
Then add i pt. boiling water, i cup sugar, juice of i 
orange and 3 lemons. Boil briskly 5 min. Strain into 
moulds, and put on ice to cool. 

N. E. Morse. 

LEMON JELLY. 

2 oz. Cox's gelatine, 3 pts. water, stick cinnamon, 2 
cups sugar and juice of 5 or 6 lemons Soak gelatine 
1-2 hr. in i pt. cold water. Set dish on stove, and stir, 
adding i qt. boiling water. Let come to a boil and 
strain into moulds. 

Mrs. M. a. Magee. 
♦ 

COFFEE JELLY. 

Soak 1-2 box Cox's gelatine in 1 cup cold water. 
When dissolved add 3 cups hot coffee and i cup sugar- 
Strain into mould, and set on ice or in a cool place to 
harden. Serve with cream. It should be made the day 
before needed. 

Mary F. Waterbury. 

CUSTARD. 

I qt. milk, 3 eggs, 2-3 cup sugar, i tablespoon corn- 
starch. Flavor to taste. 

Miss Kate Pike. 

COCOANUT CUSTARD. 

I pt. milk, 3 eggs, (reserving whites of 2 for frosting) 
and a small piece of butter. Sweeten to taste and bake. 



Beat whites of eggs, add a little pulverized sugar, and 
1-2 clip cocoanut. Spread this over the custard and 

brown. 

M. M. R. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

Juice of 2 lemons, whites of 2 eggs, 3 tablespoons of 
currant jelly and 20 lumps loaf sugar mixed together 
and beaten to a froth. Put this into a deep dish and 

pour cream on to float it. 

S. J. Wadsworth. 

FLOATLNG ISLAND. 

To I qt. scalding milk add yolks of 4 eggs, 2 table- 
spoons cornstarch, 4 tablespoons sugar, and i cup milk 
beaten well together. Stir until boiling hot, then pour 
into a dish to cool. Beat whites of 4 eggs stiff, and add 
I tablespoon powdered sugar. Drop this in spoonfuls 
into boiling milk. Cook, drain on a platter, then put 

on top the custard. 

Mrs. G. Burdick. 



J. M. COLCORD & CO., 

pritggisffj I ^,|wtliei4irie?l 

Pure Drugs, 

Medicines, Chemicals, Trusses, 

Supporters, Shoulder Braces, Select Toilet Articles, 

Choice Perfumery, Fancy Goods, Etc. 

We uffer our patrons two 

GREAT INDUCEMENTS! 

j\l. Clemi Fi'eNli Stcx^lc and Popiiliii* I'l'icfoss. 

0pp. U. S Hotel, Sakatoga SrKiNCis. 

GEO. L AMES, 



DEALER IN 



HARD\A^ARE, 

House Furnishing Goods, 

Stoves, Tin and Hollow Ware, Lamps, Silver Plated 

Ware, Cutlery, &c. 

Otill and Exfimiiie As.soi'tment iind I?i*i<^es. 

404 Broadway, 
SARATOGA SPRINGS. 



w. m. wAfisif sm 



Fine Ready Made 



Otn-'fft-l 



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-AND- 



GENT'S FUKNISHIN6 GOODS. 



BOIS AID CHILDBEi'S SUITS 



lA SPECIALTY. 



Pit 1 



1#F 



w 



-AT- 



W. R. WATERBURY'S, 



424 IJroad way. 



SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y, 



79 



CAKE 



"If you would make good cake, 
Let Patience fill a measure full; 
Deal muscle with unsparing hand, 
And strew through all, full 
Many 2i grain of common sense." 



FRUIT CAKE. 

I lb. sugar, i lb. flour, 4 lbs raisins, 1 1-2 lbs. citron, i 
lb. currants, 3-4 lb. butter, 10 eggs, 1-2 teaspoon soda, 1 
teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves, allspice and 1 nut- 
meg. 

Mrs. F. V. Hewitt. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, i cup molasses, yolks of 5 
eggs, 3 large cups flour, 2 lbs. raisins, 2 lbs. currants, 1-2 
lb. sliced citron, i teaspoon soda dissolved in 1-2 cup 
water, nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon to taste. 

Mrs. a. Safford. 

PORK FRUIT CAKE. 
3-4 lb. pork, chopped fine, i lb. raisins, i lb. currants, 
I lb. sugar, 3-4 lb. citron, i gill molasses, 4 cups flour, i 
teaspoon soda, 2 eggs, i cup boiling water. 

Mrs. F. M. Hewitt. 

COFFEE FRUIT CAKE. 

2 cups butter, 3 cups sugar, i cup molasses, i cup very 
strong coffee, i cup cream or rich milk, yolks of 8 eggs. 



8o 

I lb. raisins, i lb. currants, 1-2 lb. sliced citron, 1-2 lb. 
figs cut in strips, 5 cups browned Hour. When flour is 
cool, sift into it 4 heaping teaspoons baking powder, a 
little salt, and spice to taste. Flour the fruit well before 
stirring in; beat thoroughly and bake from 4 to 5 hrs. 

Addie Verbeck. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

I pt. sugar, I pt. butter, i pt. molasses, i pt. strong 
coffee, 2 qts. flour, 2 teaspoons soda, i lb. raisins, 2 lbs. 
currants, spices of all kinds. 

Julia Cogswell. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

I cup cold coffee, i cup molasses, i cup sugar, 1-2 cup 
butter, I egg, i teaspoon soda, spices and raisins as de- 
sired. 

E. Patrick. 

BUTTERMILK CAKE. 

1 pt. buttermilk, quite sweet, 2 1-2 cups brown sugar, 
2-3 cup butter, i lb. chopped raisins, i lb. currants, 2 1-2 
teaspoons soda, 4 cups flour, spices to taste. Will keep 
3 months. 

Mrs. Kate Cole. 

BREAD CAKE. 

2 cups bread dough, i 1-2 cups sugar, i 1-2 cups 
molasses, i cup butter, 3 eggs, i teaspoon soda, i nut- 
meg, I pt. raisins, i pt. currants, spice to taste. Mix in 
eggs and sugar well beaten together, then add tlie other 
ingredients and let rise same as bread. Makes two 
loaves. 

Mrs. W. H. Gibbs. 



RAISED CAKE. 

2 lbs. flour, 1-2 lb. butter, 1-2 lb. lard, i 1-4 lbs. sugar, 
3-4 lb. raisins, 3-4 lb. currants, 2 eggs, 2-3 teaspoon salc- 
ratus. Lemon, cinnamon and nutmeg to taste. Mix 
thoroughly all the flour, 1-2 of the shortening and 1-2 
cup of yeast, with enough sweet milk to make a very 
stiff sponge. Let rise over night, then add the other 
ingredients. Let rise again; put in buttered pans, set 
in a warm place for 3-4 of an hour, then bake slowly. 
Makes two loaves. Let stand several days before cut- 
ting. 

Mrs. C. Wells. 

DRIED APPLE CAKE. 

2 cups chopped dried apples and 2 tablespoons mixed 
spices; simmer 2 hrs. in 3 cups molasses; then add 
enough water to make the original quantity. Cool, add 
2 eggs, I cup mixed butter and lard, 4 large cups flour, 
2 cups raisins, i teaspoon saleratus. Bake slowly. 
Makes three loaves. Let stand 48 hrs. before cutting. 

Mrs. C. Wells. 



ALMOND CAKE. 

I lb. sugar, i lb. flour, i lb. raisins, 1-2 lb. butter, 1-2 
lb. citron, 2 lbs. almonds, blanched and chopped, 10 
eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 1-2 a grated nutmeg. 

Mrs. M. a. Slote. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

I cup sugar, i cup flour, 5 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking 

powder; bake and let cool. Blanch i lb. almonds, stick 

in the top of the cake and frost. 

M. M. R. 



82 

SPICE CAKE. 

I cup butter, i cup sugar, i cup sour milk, i cup 
molasses, 2 eggs, i teaspoon soda, 2 cups flour, i cup 
chopped raisins, 2 teaspoons cloves, 2 teaspoons cinna- 
mon. 

Mary Cat-laghan. 

HUCKLEBERRY CAKE. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 5 eggs, i cup 
sweet milk, i teaspoon soda dissolved in hot water, i 
teaspoon nutmeg, i teaspoon cinnamon, 1 qt. fresh 
huckleberries thickly dredged with flour. Stir the but- 
ter and sugar to a cream; add the beaten yolks, then the 
milk, the flour, the spice, the whites beaten stiff, the 
soda; lastly add the huckleberries, stirring very care- 
fully so as not to bruise them. Bake in a moderate 
oven. 

Mrs. Frank Marston. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

I 1-2 cups sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 2 cups flour, whites 
of 4 eggs, 3-4 cup milk, i teaspoon cream tartar, 1-2 tea- 
spoon soda and i cup walnut meats. 

Mrs. Edgar Hewitt. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

I cup butter, 3 cups sugar, i cup sweet milk, 4 1-2 
cups flour, 4 eggs, the whites beaten to a stiff froth, i 
teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar and i grated 
cocoanut. 

Emma Whyland. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

1-2 cup dark brown sugar, 1-4 cup butter, 1-4 cup 
milk, I Ggg, 1-2 teaspoon soda, t cup flour. Grate 1-4 



^3 

cake Baker's chocolate and mix with 1-4 cup sugar, 1-4 
cup milk and i egg. Cook together. When cool flavor 
with vanilla, add to the above, and bake. 

Mrs. W. p. Smith. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

1-2 cup butter, i cup sugar, i cup milk, 2 eggs, i tea- 
spoon soda, 2 teaspoons vanilla, 1 1-2 cups flour. From 
the above take 2 tablespoons milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 
I teaspoon vanilla and the yolk of i egg, (reserving the 
wdiite for frosting,) grate 1-4 cake chocolate; put all 
these together and heat until chocolate is dissolved. 
The last thing before putting in the oven, stir this mix- 
ture thoroughly in the cake. 

Carrie E. Waterp.ury. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

1-2 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 1 cup 
grated chocolate, i cup milk, 5 eggs. Flavor with 
vanilla and put cocoanut in frosting. 

M. S. Osborn. 

CHOCOLATE MARBLE CAKE. 

1-2 cup butter, i cup milk, i cup sugar, 2 eggs, i 1-3 
cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder. Melt i square 
of chocolate in 3 tablespoons milk and add 1-2 cup 
sugar. Mix 3 tablespoons of the white dough in the 
chocolate, then put in buttered pan a layer of the white 
dough and i of the dark and so on until all is used. 

Carrie Holland. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

The whites of 4 eggs, i cup sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 1-2 
cup sweet milk, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, i 
teaspoon soda, i teaspoon lemon. For the dark part use 



84 

yolks of 4 eggs, i cup brown sugar, 1-2 cup butter, i-^ 
cup sweet milk, 2 cups flour, 1-2 teaspoon each of cinna- 
mon, allspice, cloves and nutmeg, 1 teaspoon soda and 2 
of cream tartar. 

Mrs. G. a. Smith. 

STRIPED CAKE. 

1 1-2 cups sugar, 1-2 cup butter, i cup water, whites of 
5 ^g?s, beaten to a froth, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
and enough flour to make a dough. Put a layer of 
dough in a buttered pan, then sprinkle with red sugar, 
add another layer and so on until the dough is used. 

Mrs. C. E. N. 
POUND CAKE. 

3-4 lb. butter, i lb. sugar, i lb. flour, 10 eggs, 1-4 tea- 
spoon soda. Rub butter and sugar to a cream, add 
yolks of eggs beaten thick, then flour, and lastly, whites 
of eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake immediately. 

Mrs. F. V. Hewitt. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

6 eggs beaten very light, add i cup sugar and beat 

again, flavor to taste; then add i large cup flour, stirring 

as little as possible. Bake immediately. 

E. Pitney. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

2 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, i cup pow- 
dered sugar, 1 cup flour and i 1-2 teaspoon baking pow- 
der. Stir into this mixture 1-2 cup boiling water. Bake 
slowly in sliallow tins. When done, frost, check off into 
squares and place 1-2 an English walnut meat on each 

square. 

Mrs. L J. Merritt. 



^5 

ANGEL'S FOOD. 
The whites of ii eggs beaten to a stiff froth, i 1-2 cups 
powdered sugar, i cup sifted Hour, 1 teaspoon cream 
tartar. Sift the cream tartar and tlour three times, tlie 
last time into the beaten eggs and sugar. Mix in care- 
fully w4th as little stirring as possible 1-2 teaspoon each 
of lemon and vanilla extracts. Bake 40 minutes in a 
hot oven, using a warm pan with tube in center. When 
done, turn the pan over on the edge of cups to cool. 
Break when cold; never cut. 

M. S. OSBORN. 

SNOW CAKE. 

1 1-2 cups sugar, i 1-2 cups flour, whites of 10 eggs, 1 

teaspoon cream tartar. 

Mrs. Wm. Van Dorn. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, i cup milk, i cup butter, 3 cups flour, 
whites of 6 eggs, and 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Mrs. V. L. Todd. 
LILY CAKE. 
2 cups sugar, i cup butter, i cup sweet milk, i cup 
cornstarch, 2 cups flour, 1-4 teaspoon soda, 1-2 teaspoon 
cream tartar, whites of 5 eggs. Flavor with lemon. 

Mrs. C. M. Tefft. 

GOLD AND SILVER CAKES. 

Gold. — Mix the yolks of 8 eggs well beaten, wuth i cup 
sugar, 3-4 cup butter, 1-2 cup sweet milk, 2 cups flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder mixed with flour by sifting. 

Silver. — 2 cups fine siigar, 1-2 cup butter, 2 1-2 cups 

flour, 3-4 cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

whites of 8 eggs well beaten. 

Mrs. Henry Smith. 



S6 

GOLD AND SILVER CAKES. 

Yolks of 3 eggs, i cup sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 1-2 cup 
sweet milk, i 1-2 cups flour, i teaspoon baking powder, 

1 teaspoon lemon. For silver cake use same quantity 
of ingredients with whites of eggs instead of yolks. 

Ella Farrington. 

WHIPPED-CREAM CAKE. 

I cup sugar, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons softened butter, 4 

tablespoons milk; beat well together then add i cup 

flour, 1-2 teaspoon soda and i teaspoon cream tartar 

mixed through the flour. Bake in small dripping pan. 

Whip 1-2 pt. sweet cream to "a stiff froth; sweeten and 

flavor to taste, and when cake is cool spread over the 

top. Serve while fresh. The cream will froth easily if 

previously cooled on ice. 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

SNAP DOODLE. 

1 egg, I cup pulverized sugar, butter size of a walnut, 

2 cups flour, I cup sweet milk, 3 teaspoons baking pow- 
der. Beat very light, turn into a dripping pan; over the 
top sift powdered sugar and over that, either chocolate 
or cocoanut. Bake quickly. Serve in square pieces 

while hot. 

M. E. Leggett. 

HONEY CAKE. 

1-2 cup butter, i cup white sugar, i cup honey, 2 eggs, 
I pt. flour, I teaspoon baking powder, i teaspoon cara- 
way seeds if desired. 

S. J. Wadsworth. 

DELICIOUS CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, i cup butter, i cup milk, 3 eggs, i lieap- 
ing teaspoon baking powder, 3 cups flour. 

Mrs. J. S. Greene. 



87 

FEATHER CAKE. 

I scant cup sugar, i heaping cup flour, 1-2 cup milk, 2 
tablespoons butter, i egg, 2 tablespoons baking powder. 
Flavor with lemon. Stir in cocoanut if desired. 

Mrs. J. Palmer. 

LEMON CAKE. 

3 cups sugar, i cup butter, i cup milk, 5 eggs, whites 

and yolks beaten separately, 4 cups flour, 2 teaspoons 

cream tartar, i teaspoon soda, the juice and grated rind 

of I large lemon. 

Julia Cogswell. 

SOFT MOLASSES CAKE. 

I cup sour cream, i cup molasses, i teaspoon cloves, 
I teaspoon soda, a little salt, and flour to make a thin 
batter. 

SOFT GINGER CAKE. 

Put in a cup i tablespoon melted butter, 4 tablespoons 
boiling water; and fill it with molasses, add i teaspoon 
ginger, i teaspoon soda, and flour to thicken. 

Mary B. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

2-3 cup molasses, 1-2 cup brown sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 

I cup sour milk, i egg, i teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons 

ginger, a little salt and 2 cups flour. 

S. D. Barton. 

SOFT MOLASSES CAKE. 
I cup molasses, 1-2 cup butter or drippings, i cup cof- 
fee, I teaspoon cinnamon, i scant teaspoon cloves, i tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in the coffee, t-2 cup English cur- 
rants, and flour to make as stiff as pancake batter. 

Mrs. S. G. Allen. 



88 

HARD GINGERBREAD. 

3 oz. fried pork drippings, i pt. molasses, i tablespoon 
ginger, i tablespoon alum, 2 spoons soda. Put the 
alum and soda into separate cups, and pour on each 6 
tablespoons boiling water. Mix the drippings into the 
flour as for pie crust, then add molasses, alum and soda. 
Mix soft and roll. Splendid. 

Mrs. Howard. 

HARD GINGERBREAD. 

I cup molasses, 1-2 cup shortening, 1-2 cup soilr milk, 
I teaspoon saleratus, spices, flour to roll very soft. 
Make into cake about 2 inches in thickness and bake in 
slow oven. 



LAYER CAKES. 



CREAM CAKE. 

4 '^g&s, I cup sugar, i large cup flour, 2 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder. Bake in 3 or 4 round tins. 

Cream. — i pt. milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons 
cornstarch, i egg; cook. When cool, flavor, and spread 
between layers. 

Mrs. C. p. Parker. 

CREAM CAKE. 
3 eggs, 3 tablespoons water, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, I 1-2 cups flour. Beat thoroughly the yolks of eggs 
with I cup white sugar, add the v/atcr, then the flour, 
lastly the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake 
in 4 tins in a quick oven. 

Filling — Beat i egg with 2-3 cup sugar; add 1-2 cup 
butter, 1-2 pt. milk; scald, then add i tablespoon corn- 



89 



Starch wet in a little milk and stir until smooth. Be 
careful not to scorch. 

Mrs. G. I. IIuMruREY. 



APPLE JELLY CAKE. 

4 eggs, I cup sugar, i cup flour, piece of butter the 
size of an egg, i teaspoon cream tartar, 1-2 teaspoon 
soda. Bake in 4 round tins. 

Filling. — I large sour apple pared and grated, the 
juice and grated rind of i lemon, i cup sugar. Boil 3 
minutes. When cool spread between the cakes. 

Addie p. Barrett. 

SPONGE JELLY CAKE. 

3 ^ggs, I cup sugar, i cup flour, i teaspoon cream 
tartar, 1-2 teaspoon soda. Bake in long tins. While 
warm spread with jelly and roll quickly. 

Mrs. Lewis Wood. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der dissolved in i cup sweet milk, 3 eggs, grated rind 
of I orange, and flour. This makes 2 round loaves of 
3 layers each. 

Filling. — 6 oranges; grate the yellow rind into a dish; 
discard the white, and slice the oranges as finely as pos- 
sible into same dish. After the juice has settled re- 
move some pieces from the top; thicken the rest with 
powdered sugar; put some of the sliced orange between 
layers and on top of cakes, pouring some of the syrup 

over each. 

Mrs. J. F. Conkey. 



90 

ORANGE CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, i cup sweet milk, yolks of 
5 eggs, whites of 3, juice of i orange, grated rind of 2, 2 
teaspoons baking powder mixed with 3 cups flour. 

Filling. — Whites of 2 eggs, juice of i orange and pow- 
dered sugar. 

Mrs. Geo. W. Putnam. 

LEMON-CHEESE CAKE. 

2 cups pulverized sugar, 3-4 cup milk, 1-2 cup butter, 
whites of 6 eggs beaten to a stiff froth, 2 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, 21-2 cups flour. 

Cheese for Cake. — Yolks of 3 eggs, 1-2 cup butter, i 
cup sugar, juice and grated rind of 2 lemons; mix all 
together and cook to the consistency of honey. Let 
cake and cheese cool before putting together. 

Mrs. H. B. Wright. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

1-2 cup butter, 1-2 cup cornstarch, 1-2 cup sweet milk, 
I 1-2 cups sugar, i 1-2 cups flour, 1-2 teaspoon soda, i 
teaspoon cream tartar, whites of 6 eggs. First mix 
butter and sugar, then add cornstarch, then the milk 
with the soda dissolved, next the flour with cream 
tartar, lastly whites of the eggs. Bake in 4 square tins. 

Filling. — Make a frosting of the whites of 5 eggs and 
15 tablespoons powdered sugar. Spread between layers 
and on top and sides of cakes, sprinkling with 1-2 grated 
cocoanut. 

Carrie E. Waterbury. 

COCOANUT. CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, 1-4 cup butter, 1-2 cup milk, 2 cups flour, 
I whole egg and 2 yolks, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 



91 

Filling. — Beat the whites of 2 eggs to a stiff froth; add 

1 cup sugar and i 1-2 cups grated cocoanut. Spread 
between the layers. 

Mrs. C. p. Phillips. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

1-2 cup butter, i 3-4 cups sugar, i cup sweet milk, 3 
cups flour, I 1-2 teaspoons baking powder, whites of 4 
eggs. Bake in 4 round tins. 

Filling. — Melt 2 squares Baker's chocolate; add i cup 
sugar, I tablespoon flour,* i cup milk and i egg, reserv- 
ing enough of the white for top frosting. Cook until 
thick, and when partly cool stir in cocoanut; spread 
between layers, frost the top, and sprinkle with cocoa- 
nut. 

Mary F. Waterbury. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMEL CAKE. 

6 eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, 2 cups 
powdered sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 4 tablespoons sweet 
cream, 4 tablespoons chocolate, rubbed in the cream be- 
fore it is beaten into the cake, 2 heaping cups flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder. Flavor with vanilla. 

Filling. — Boil 3 cups white sugar with a very little 
water until it ropes. Beat the whites of 3 eggs to a 
stiff froth and into it pour slowly the hot sugar, stirring 
constantly until entirely cold, then add i teaspoon citric 
acid. 

Mrs. E. M. Prouty. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, i small cup butter, i cup milk, 3 1-2 
cups flour, 4 eggs, (reserving whites of 2 for frosting,) 

2 teaspoons cream tartar, 1 even teaspoon soda. Bake 
in square tins. 



92 

Frosting. — 6 tablespoons Maillard's chocolate, grated, 
whites of 2 eggs, (do not beat.) Heat together, over hot 
water, until smooth and shining, tlien add i 1-2 cups 
powdered sugar and i teaspoon vanilla. Frost the bot- 
tom of the cakes while cakes and frosting are hot, as the 
frosting must run smooth without using a knife. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

I cup sugar, i cup milk, 2 tablespoons butter, i ^^^^ 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 2 cups flour. Bake in 3 
round tins. 

Filling. — 6 tablespoons grated chocolate, i cup sugar, 
I cup milk, I Q^^, I teaspoon vanilla. Cook until 
very thick, stirring constantly, then spread between lay- 
ers and on top of cake. 

Mrs. a. Safford. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

I 1-2 cups sugar, 3-4 cup butter, 3 eggs, i cup water, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, and flour to thicken. Divide 
the mixture into three equal parts; bake the top layer 
plain, to the second add 2 heaping tablespoons red sugar 
sand, and beat until sugar is dissolved. Mix thoroughly 
with the third layer 4 tablespoons grated chocolate. 

Put together with any desired filling. 

F. T. Wells. 

BROWN STONE FRONT. 

I 1-2 cups sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 2 eggs, i cup sweet 
milk, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder; flavor 
with vanilla. For the dark part use i 1-2 squares grated 
chocolate, 1-2 cup brown sugar and 3 tablespoons milk. 
Add 7 spoonfuls of the white part and stir well. 
Bake the dark in 2 layers and the white in 3. 

Filling. — Melt T-4»cakc of chocolate in a very little 
water; boil, then thicken with powdered sugar. 

E. Lena Curtis. 



• 93 

CONFECTIONERY CAKE. 

1 1-4 cups sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 1-2 cup sweet milk, 
2 1-2 cups flour, 3 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Reserve 1-3 of the mixture, and add i teaspoon mixed 
spices, 1-2 a nutmeg, 2 tablespoons molasses, 1-2 cup 
raisins; bake in three layers; place the dark layer in the 
center, using any desired filling. 

Mrs. O. F. Stiles. 

VARIETY CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 2 1-2 cups flour, 1-2 cup butter, 3-4 cup 
milk, whites of 8 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Flavor with lemon. Divide the mixture in three equal 
parts; bake the top layer plain, to the next add 1-4 lb. 
chopped citron, and to the third 1-4 lb. chopped raisins 

Filling. — Make a soft frosting, flavor with lemon, and 

put between and over the layers, adding grated cocoanut 

to the frosting if desired. 

Mrs. Sarah A. Slote. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 31-2 cups flour, i cup 
sweet milk, 3 eggs, i teaspoon soda and 2 teaspoons 
cream tartar. Bake in layers. ' 

Filling. — I 1-2 cups walnut meats dried thoroughly in 
the oven and finely powdered. Mix with i cup sour 
cream, sweetened to taste. Spread between layers. De- 
licious. 

Mrs. B. F. Bloomfield. 



94 



FILLINGS FOR CAKE. 



FIG CAKE FILLING. 
Between each layer, place sliced figs covered with 
thin frosting. 

S. D. Barton. 

LEMON FILLING. 

Juice and grated rind of i lemon, i egg, i cup sugar, 
I large teaspoon cornstarch, 1-3 cup hot water. Cook 

until thick. 

Mrs. S. Gilbert. 

LEMON JELLY. 

Mix the juice and grated rind of 2 lemons with 3-4 

cup sugar, i egg, 1-2 cup water, i teaspoon butter and *i 

tablespoon flour. Boil until thick. 

Susie Caskey. 

LEMON CREAM. 

2 cups sugar, whites of 2 eggs, 1-2 pt. boiling water, 

juice of 2 lemons, i teaspoon citric acid, i teaspoon 

vanilla. Boil the water and sugar together until thick, 

without stirring; beat the eggs to a stiff froth; pour the 

boiling sugar over them slowly and stir to a stiff cream. 

When cool add the flavoring. 

Mrs. M. S. Osborn. 

ORANGE CUSTARD, 
l^ind and juice of i orange, i small cup ]30wdered 
sugar, 1-2 cup cold water, i tablespoon cornstarch, i egg 
and a small piece of butter. Cook until it has the con- 
sistency of custard. 

C. A. D. 



95 

SOUR CREAM FILLING. 
I cup thick sour cream, stirred thin, i cup sugar, r 
egg well beaten. Thicken with Dessicated Cocoanut. 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

ALMOND FILLING. 

I pt. sour cream, beaten as light as possible, i lb. 
blanched almonds, chopped fine, 2 eggs, whites and 
yolks beaten separately, i teaspoon vanilla. Sweeten to 
taste with powdered sugar. 

COCOANUT CREAM. 

I cup sweet milk, 5 tablespoons sugar, beaten whites 
of 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons cornstarch, 1-2 cup cocoanut. 
.Cook over hot water and stir constantly until it thick- 
ens. When cold spread between layers. 

Mary F. Waterbury. 

COCOANUT FILLING. 

I grated cocoanut, juice and grated rind of i lemon, 
I cup sugar, i egg. Stir together over hot water. Then 
spread between layers. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM. 

To I pt. boiling water add 1-2 cup sugar and 1-2 cup 
grated chocolate. Cook until dissolved, then add 2 des- 
sertspoons cornstarch rubbed smooth in a little cold 
milk, T egg, 1 dessertspoon butter. Cool, and flavor 
with I teaspoon vanilla. Enough for 2 round loaves. 

Mary F. Waterbury. 



96 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

5 tablespoons grated chocolate with enough cream or 
milk to wet it, i small cup sugar and i egg well beaten 
together. Stir over the fire until well mixed. Flavor 
with vanilla. 

Mrs. G. I. Humphrey. 

FROSTING. 

7 rounding tablespoons fine sugar, and the white of i 
egg beaten to a stiff froth. Lay on while the cake is 
warm. 

ICING. 

Boil until it will "hair" i cup white sugar in enough 
water to dissolve it, then add the white of i egg well 
beaten and stir briskly until cool enough to spread on 
cake. The frosting should not be applied until the cake 
is quite cool. This will frost tops of 2 cakes. 

Addie Verbeck. 



COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS, ETC. 



CREAM PUFFS. 

I cup water, i scant cup butter; boil together and add 
2 cups flour while boiling. When cool add 6 eggs well 
beaten, 1-4 teaspoon soda dissolved in i tablespoon 
milk. Bake in quick oven in small tins well greased. 

Cream. — Boil 2 cups milk. Beat 2 eggs; add i large 

cup sugar and 3-4 cup Hour. Stir into the boiling milk. 

Flavor to taste. 

C. A. D. 



97 

PRUNELLA DROPS. 

2 cups sugar, i cup butter, i cup milk, 2 eggs, i tea- 
spoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar; Hour to make stiff 
enough to drop firmly from the spoon. Flavor with 
vanilla, and bake in a quick oven. 

Susie Caskev. 

SPONGE DROPS. 

Beat to a froth 3 eggs and i cup sugar, stir into this i 
heaping coffee cup Hour, into which i teaspoon cream 
tartar, and 12 teaspoon soda are mixed. Flavor with 
lemon. Drop in teaspoonfuls on buttered pans. Watch 
closely as they will burn easily. 

Nellie Ballou. 



CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

I cup butter, i 1-2 cups brown sugar, 2 eggs, 2 table- 
spoons sweet milk, not quite 1-2 teaspoon soda, i 1-2 
squares chocolate. Flour to roll soft. Sprinkle with 

sugar and bake in quick oven. 

F. T. Wells. 



COCOANUT COOKIES. 

2 eggs, 2 cups sugar, i cup butter, 1-2 cup sweet milk, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, i cup cocoanut. Flour 

enough to roll nicely. 

Mrs. J. S. Green. 



SUGAR COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, i cup butter, i cup sour milk, 5 cups 
flour, 2 eggs, I teaspoon saleratus, and caraway seeds. 

Mrs. C. S. Smith. 



98 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 eggs, 1-4 cup sweet milk, 

7, teaspoons baking: powder. 

^ ^ ^^ Mrs. W. 



GOOD COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, i cup butter, i cup sour cream, 3 eggs, i 
teaspoon soda. Mix soft, roll thin. Sift powdered 
sugar over them and gently roll it in. 

Mrs. E, R. Wooley. 



COOKIES. 

I Ggg, I cup sugar, 1-2 cup butter, 3 cups flour, 1-2 tea- 
spoon soda. 

Mrs. M. L. Granger. 



SUGAR COOKIES. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 4 eggs, a lit- 
tle soda. 

Carrie Noyes. 



COOKIES. 

2 cups butter, 2 cups sugar, 1-2 cup sweet milk, 4 eggs, 
I teaspoon soda. 

E. J. Stannard. 



COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, i cup butter, i cup milk, i teaspoon 
saleratus, and nutmeg. Roll very thin, sprinkle 
with sugar; cut, and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. S. Gilbert. 



99 

CRULLERS. 

4 ^ggs, I cup sugar, butter size butternut, 1-2 cup 

milk, I teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar. 

Knead until hard. 

Mrs. D. C. Hoyt. 



DOUGHNUTS. 

I 1-2 cups sugar, i tablespoon butter, 2 eggs, i pt. 

sweet milk, 4 teaspoons cream tartar, 2 of soda, a little 

salt and nutmeg. 

Mrs. Lewis Wood. 



DOUGHNUTS. 

I 1-2 cups sugar, piece of butter size of English wal- 
nut, 2 cups sour milk, 2 eggs, i teaspoon soda, a little 

salt, spice to taste. 

Mrs. H. B. Wright, 



BREAKFAST PUFFS. 

To I pt. bread sponge, add 2 eggs, i dessertspoon of 
lard, and a little soda. Mix to a stiff dough, and set in 
a warm place to rise. Roll out, cut in squares, and fry 
like doughnuts in hot lard. To be served with pow- 
dered sugar. 

Mrs. M. a. Slote. 



MOLASSES COOKIES. 

2 cups New Orleans molasses, i cup butter, lard, or 
better still, pork drippings, i tablespoon ginger, i table- 
spoon saleratus stirred in the molasses until very light, 
I teaspoon pulverized alum dissolved in i cup boiling 
water, flour enough to roll nicely. 

Mrs. W. H. Cori?in. 



lOO 



GINGER COOKIES. 

I cup sugar, i cup molasses, i cup shortening i table- 
spoon vinegar, 4 tablespoons boiling water poured upon 
2 teaspoons soda, to be added last. Do not mix too 

hard. 

Mrs. Geo. W. Putnam. 



GINGER COOKIES. 

2 tablespoons milk, 3 tablespoons butter, i teaspoon 

ginger, i teaspoon soda. Put into a cup and fill it with 

molasse*s. Mix soft, and bake quickly. 

Mrs. W. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

2 cups molasses, i cup lard, ginger and salt to taste. 
Set on the stove until it boils; then take off and add i 
teaspoon soda dissolved in hot water. Stir in flour rap- 
idly while foaming until very stiff. Cool and roll out 
very thin. 



C. A. Deuel. 



GINGER SNAPS. 



I cup sugar, i cup molasses. 1-2 cup butter, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, 1-2 teaspoon ginger. Flour 

enough to roll them hard. 

Mrs. N. Waterbury. 



103 



PICKLES, CATSUPS, Etc. 



"Had ambitious mortals minded naught, 
But in loose joy, their time to wear away. 

Had they alone the lap of dalliance sought, 
Where would the art of pickling been to-day ?" 



MIXED PICKLES. 

300 hundred small cucumbers, 4 green peppers sliced 
fine, 3 heads cauliflower, 3 heads cabbage, i large root 
horse-radish, i qt. small beans, 2 qts. green tomatoes. 
Put this mixture in a brine for 24 hrs., afterwards, drain 
3 hrs. Sprinkle in 1-4 lb. each white and black mustard 
seed, I tablespoon black ground pepper. Let this come 
to a boil in just vinegar enough to cover. Put in a small 
piece of alum. Drain again, and when cold mix well 
with I pt. mustard prepared as for the table. Cover the 
whole with strong vinegar. 

Mrs. \Vm. Van Dorn. 

MUSTARD PICKLES. 

I pt. small onions, i cauliflower, both scalded in salt 
and water, 2 qts. green tomatoes, 1-2 pt. cherry peppers. 
Slice the tomatoes and sprinkle salt on them over night, 
strain off the juice in the morning; 2 qts. small pickles, 
or large ones sliced, 2 qts. nasturtions, put in a jar 
with the others, pour on vinegar enough to cover 
them, so as to know just the quantity wanted, pour it off 
and put on the stove. To each qt. of vinegar use 1-2 
cup brown sugar, 1-4 lb. ground mustard, i tablespoon 



104 

flour. Mix flour a,nd mustard smoothly with cold vine- 
gar, and pour it in the hot vinegar. When the flour is 
cooked, pour hot over the pickles. 

Miss Truman. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

I qt. large cucumbers, peeled and cut lengthways, i 
qt. small cucumbers, i qt. small onions, i qt. sliced green 
tomatoes, i large cauliflower, 6 green peppers, quar- 
tered. Put all these in weak salt water 24 hrs. Scald 
in same water, then drain. 

Paste — 6 tablespoons Taylor's mustard, i tablespoon 
tumeric, i 1-2 cups sugar, i cup flour. Mix these thor- 
oughly, then add 2 qts. best vinegar. Scald a few 
moments, stirring constantly. Turn over pickles. 

Ollie Griswold. 

PICKLED ONIONS. 

Peel as many small onions as desired and boil in milk 
and water 5 minutes ; then drain them thoroughly. To 
1-2 gal. vinegar add 2 1-2 teaspoons each of salt, alvmi, 
mace, cloves and mustard. Put the spices in bags. Pour 
all boiling hot over the onions. 

Mrs. G. I. Humphrey. 

MANGOES. 

As late as possible, before frost comes, gather small 
and perfectly green musk-melons. Cut a square piece 
from the side of each, with a sharp-pointed knife, make 
the incisions smooth, that the pieces may be returned. 
Take out the inside, wash and put them in weak salt 
water for a week ; then rinse and drain. Fill full with 
very small cucumbers, onions, nasturtions, green grapes, 
and chopped cabbage seasoned with white mustard seed; 
fit in each piece and wind twine lightly around to hold 



in place. Put them in a jar and cover with vinegar, 
after a week drain off liquor, heat and skim it, pepper 
and spice it highly, then pour on hot over the mangoes. 

Mrs. W. C. B. 

HIGDUM. 

To I gal. green chopped tomatoes, add 6 chopped onions 
and salt to taste ; drain in a colander, with a weight on 
the top, for several hours. Add i pt. grated horse-radish, 
4 large peppers chopped, i tablespoon ground pepper, 4 
tablespoons ground mustard, 1-4 lb. white mustard seed. 
Mix very thoroughly, pack in a jar, and add enough boil- 
ing vinegar to saturate. Keep closely covered. 

Mrs. W. C. B. 

QUEEN OF ODE SAUCE. 

I pk. green tomatoes, 4 green peppers, 4 red peppers, 

1 cup salt, I cup sugar, 2-3 cup grated horse-radish, i 
tablespoon each cloves, allspice and cinnamon, 4 large 
onions. Chop the tomatoes fine, sprinkle in the salt, 
and let stand over night, then drain off the water. Chop 
the onions and peppers fine, mix all together, and cover 
with vinegar. Boil until well cooked. 

Mrs. E. Fosmire. 

PICKLED GREEN TOMATOES. 

I pk. green tomatoes, 10 green peppers, and 8 onions, 
sliced, 2 tablespoons mustard seed, 2 cups brown sugar, 

2 tablespoons each cinnamon, cloves and allspice, 1-2 

cup salt, and vinegar to cover. Boil until tomatoes can 

be cut with a fork. Tomatoes should stand, sliced, in 

salt and water over night. 

Kate Pike. 



io6 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

I pk. tomatoes, i qt. vinegar, i oz. each cloves and 
cinnamon, 4 lbs. brown sugar. Boil the tomatoes in the 
vinegar, sugar and spices until they are tender. Strain 
and boil, until quite thick, add 2 tablespoons salt and i 
teaspoon pepper. 

Mrs. Isaac Hoyt, 

TOMATO BUTTER. 

Take 8 lbs. ripe tomatoes, peeled; let them stand in 
vinegar over night, in the morning drain. Scald together 
I qt. sharp vinegar, 14 teaspoons ground cloves, 3 tea- 
spoons cinnamon, 1-2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, a little 
mace, 4 tablespoons mustard seed, 3 lbs. brown sugar. 
Add the tomatoes, and boil slowly 4 hrs. 

Mrs. Howard. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

To I gal. tomatoes, after they are heated and strained, 
add 4 tablespoons each salt and mustard, 2 tablespoons 
black pepper, i tablespoon each allspice, cloves and cin- 
namon, I teaspoon each mace and cayenne pepper, i pt. 
cider vinegar. Boil to a proper thickness. 

Mrs. L. E. Walker. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

I pk. tomatoes, 6 green peppers, 6 large onions, 1-2 
teacup salt, i pt. vinegar, i oz. each cloves, cinnamon 
and allspice. Cook all together until tender, then put 
through a sieve, and boil i hr. Just before bottling, add 
a bottle Worcestershire sauce. Whole spices must be 
used. 

Carrie E. Waterburv. » 



♦ 107 

CURRANT CATSUP. 

5 lbs. currants, 3 lbs. sugar, i teaspoon each of cloves, 
cinnamon, allspice, salt and black pepper, i pt, vinegar. 
Boil 20 min. Very nice. 

Mrs, Howard. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

12 large peppers, 12 onions, 12 tomatoes, 6 teaspoons 
each cloves, allspice and cinnamon, 2 tablespoons gin- 
ger, 8 cups cider vinegar, 3 cups brown sugar, salt to 

taste. Boil 3 hrs. 

Mrs. p. F. Allen. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

30 large ripe tomatoes, 4 green peppers, 4 onions, all 
chopped fine; cook about 3 hrs. Then add 2 tablespoons 
mixed spices, i cup each sugar and vinegar, i tablespoon 
salt. 

Annie M. Graves. 

CUCUMBER SAUCE. 

Peel as many cucumbers as needed; grate and drain. 
To each pt. of pulp add i pt. vinegar, i teaspoon black 
pepper, 1-2 teaspoon red pepper, 1 1-2 teaspoons salt, and 
3 tablespoons raw onions, chopped fine. Put in tight 
cans, without cooking. 

Mrs. Storm. Emans. 

PICKLED GRAPES. 

Nice bunches of purple grapes not quite ripe, pick out 

all imperfect ones. Make a pickle of 4 lbs. sugar and i 

qt. best vinegar, and spices to taste, to 7 lbs. of grapes. 

Boil sugar, spices and vinegar, skim and pour over 

grapes. Repeat this 3 times. 

Mrs. J. T. Carr. 



io8 . 

PICKLED PEARS. 

7 lbs. fruit, 3 lbs. sugar, 1-2 pt. vinegar. Spice to 

taste. 

Carrie E. Waterbury. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

5 lbs. currants, 4 lbs. brown sugar, i pt. vinegar, i 

tablespoon cinnamon, 2 tablespoons cloves, i tablespoon 

allspice. Boil slowly until a little thick. Serve with 

meat. 

Mrs. B. R. Barrett. 

PRESERVED CURRANTS AND RAISINS. 

9 lbs. currants, 3-4 lb. sugar to i lb. of currants, 3 lbs. 
raisins. Soak raisins in water over night; and let the 
currants and sugar stand together also. In the morning 
boil the raisins until tender; heat the currants and sugar, 
add the raisins without the water and boil 10 min. 

Mary F. Waterbury. 



II 1 



CONFECTIONERY, &c. 



'All human children have a sweetish tooth." 
—Hood. 



MOLASSES CANDY. 

2 cups molasses, i cup white sugar, i tablespoon vine- 
gar, a small piece of butter. Boil from lo to 20 min. 
Try, by dropping a little into cold water, if it hardens, 
It is done. Pour into a flat buttered dish, and when cool 

work it with the hands. 

C. GussiE Adams. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

2 cups molasses, i tablespoon sugar. Boil together 
until it hardens when dropped in cold water; add butter 
size of an q^^ and 1-3 teaspoon soda. Pour into but- 
tered pans; when cool, pull until it is the desired color, 

Nellie Ballou. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

1 cup each of grated chocolate, milii, molasses and 

sugar, a piece of butter size of an q^^\ boil together 

until the mixture hardens when dropped into cold 

water; add vanilla, pour in buttered tins, and mark in 

squares when nearly cold. 

Mrs. W. H. Corbin. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

2 cups molasses, i cup sugar, i cup milk, 1-2 cup 
chocolate, a piece of butter the size of an (i^^^. Boil the 
milk and molasses together, scrape the chocolate fine. 



112 

and mix with just enough of the boiling milk and 
molasses to moisten; rub it perfectly smooth, then with 
the sugar, stir into the boiling liquid, add the butter, 
and boil 20 min. Try as molasses candy; and if it 
hardens pour into a buttered dish; before it becomes 
perfectly cold, cut into pieces. 

C. GussiE Adams. 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

2 cups powdered sugar, 1-2 cup water. Boil about 5 
min., then beat until it turns to a cream, after which 
make into drops. Melt 3-4 cake chocolate, and dip the 

drops into it. 

C. GussiE Adams. 

SUGAR CANDY. 

1 1-4 lbs. sugar, 1-2 cup water, 2 tablespoons vinegar, 

I tablespoon butter, i teaspoon lemon or vanilla. Boil 

without stirring 1-2 hr. 

C. S. Butler. 

POP CORN BALLS. 

For 4 qts. popped corn, take i cup molasses, 1-2 cup 
sugar, T-2 teaspoon cream tartar. Boil until brittle, 
then add 1-4 teaspoon soda and a large tablespoon but- 
ter. After popping corn, sort out all hard kernels. 
Pour the boiling mixture over the corn, stir well and 

ball immediately. 

F. T. Wells. 

COCOANUT PUFFS, 

2 cups cocoanut, i cup powdered sugar, beaten whites 

of 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons Hour or cornstarch. Drop on 

buttered paper. Bake quickly. 

Mrs. E. M. Proutv. 



113 
SUGAR KISSES. 

Whites of 2 eggs and 3-4 lb. pulverized sugar stirred 
together until very light. Drop on buttered paper in 
teaspoonfuls, and bake in quick oven. 

Mrs. Wm. P. Smith. 



115 



THE SICK ROOM 



FOOD AND DRINKS. 



BEEF TEA. 

Fill a glass can with lean beef cut into small pieces ; 
cover closely and set in a kettle of cold water. Boil 
until the juice is all extracted. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

Boil the first and second joints of a chicken in i qt. 

w^ater until very tender. Season with very little salt 

and pepper. 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

To REMOVE GREASE FROM BROTH. After pouriug it 

into a dish, pass clean white wrapping paper quickly 
over top of broth, using several pieces until all is re- 
moved. 

LEMONADE. 

juice of I lemon, i spoonful sugar. Pour on i cup 
boiling water, and cool. 

DRINKS FOR BRONCHIAL AND LUNG 
TROUBLES. 

I lemon, i tablespoon flax-seed. Pour on i pt. boiling 
water. Strain and make very sw^eet. 

Wash a few pieces Irish moss. Pour on 2 cups boil- 
ing water. Let it simmer (not boil) 2 hrs. Strain, add 
juice of I lemon and sweeten to taste. Flavor with 
vanilla or nutmeg. 



ii6 

I teaspoon slippery-elm, i cup boiling water. Strain. 
Flavor with lemon juice; sweeten to taste. 

Beat lightly i Qgg and i spoonful sugar. Stir in i cup 
new milk and a little nutmeg. 

CORN TEA. 
Brown and pound in a mortar i cup sweet dry corn. 
Pour on 2 cups boiling water and steep 15 minutes. 
This is light and nutritious and can be taken when the 
patient is very weak. 

TOAST TEA. 

Brown thoroughly some bread, cover with cold water, 
and let it stand until colored, then it is ready to drink, 
and preferable to clear water. 

Mamie Adams. 

TOAST COFFEE. 
Toast bread very brown, pour on boiling water. 
Strain, and add cream and sugar. Nutmeg if desired. 

Mrs. W. H. Corbin. 

Brown wheat Hour in the oven and put i teaspoonful 
in a tumbler of milk. 

Julia B. Swasey. 

VINEGAR WHEY. 
Boil I cup milk and stir in i spoonful of vinegar or 
more until it curdles. Strain. 

M. S. Adams. 

SIMPLE GRUEL. 

I tablespoon cornstarch, 2 tablespoons tlour dissolved 
in I cup milk. Add this to i qt. boiling water, and let 
boil 3 or 4 minutes. Sweeten with i tablespoon white 
sugar, and grate in a- little nutmeg if desired, a little 
salt. 



INDIAN MEAL GRUEL. 

i qt. boiling water, i spoonful Hour, 2 of Indian meal 
Wet in cold water. Boil 3 minutes, season with salt, and 
strain Eat with cream and sugar if desired, 

M. S. Adams. 

WHEAT BALL PORRIDGE. 

Put I pt. wheat Hour in a strong muslin bag and tie 
tightly. Drop into boiling water and boil steadily 3 or 4 
hrs. When cold, peel, and grate i tablespoon or more 
into a little cold w^ater and rub smoothly. Scald milk 
and water, 1-2 each, and add the flour. Let boil 2 or 3 
minutes, and salt a little. Excellent for summer dis- 
orders. 

PLUM PORRIDGE. 

Into 1 qt. boiling water, stir 2 spoonfuls flour mixed 
with cold milk. Add a handful raisins and a little grated 
nutmeg. Boil 20 minutes. Season with salt, and strain. 

Mamie Adams. 

CREAM SOUP. 

I pt. boiling water, 1-2 teacup cream. Add broken 
pieces toasted bread and a little salt. 



BAKED MILK. 

Bake 2 qts. milk 8 or 10 hrs. in moderate oven in a jar 
covered with writing paper tied down. It will be thick 
like cream. Good for very weak persons. 

Mrs. W. H. Corbin. 



n8 

OAT MEAL JELLY. 

I lb. oat meal, 2 qts. water, a little salt. Bake in the 

oven in a covered dish, until it thickens to a starchy 

appearance. Strain through a sieve into a mould. Serve 

with sweetened cream. 

Mrs. S. S. Wolffe. 



CRACKED WHEAT PUDDING. 

To I qt. new or unskimmed milk, add 1-3 cup cracked 

wheat, 1-3 cup sugar, a little salt, a small piece stick 

cinnamon. Place in moderate oven. Bake 2 hours or 

longer. When about half done, stir in the crust already 

formed and it will form another sufficiently brown. 

When done the wheat will be soft, and the pudding of a 

creamy consistency. May be eaten hot or cold. A 

handful of raisins may be added. 

Mrs. W. H, Corbin. 



PARCHED RICE. 

Cook in custard kettle 1-2 cup parched rice in i pt. 

boiling water, salted. When done serve with cream and 

sugar, 

Mrs. W. H. Cordin. 



GRAHAM GEMS. 

Mix graham flour with 1-2 milk and 1-2 water, add a 
little salt and beat, making the batter thin enough to 
pour. Have gem pans very hot. Grease and fill 
quickly; bake in hot oven about 1-2 hr. Will not be 
good unless well beaten. Practice will teacli just the 
proper consistency of batter and temperature of oven. 

Mrs. W. H. Corbin. 



119 

TOASTED CRACKERS. 

Split Boston crackers, toast, butter while hot, and pile 
together. Serve imniediately. 

PANADA. 

6 Boston crackers, split, 2 tablespoons white sugar, a 
pinch of salt, and a little nutmeg. Arrange the crackers 
in layers with tlie salt and sugar scattered between; 
cover with boiling water, and set in a warming oven 
(with the dish closely covered) for i hr., or until the 
crackers are clear and soft but not broken. Serve 
warm, with more suarar and cream if desired. 



120 



SIMPLE REMEDIES, 



TROCHES 

1 oz. pulverized cubebs, i oz. pulverized licorice, i oz. 
pulverized gum arable, 2 drachms of ipecac, 1-2 lb, pul- 
verized sugar. Put in watfer enough to moisten; warm 
slightly; roll thin, cut out with a thimble and dry. 

Mrs. a. Mallory. 

COUGH BALSAM. 

2 oz. balsam of fir, 50 drops oil of tar, i qt. gin, 1-2 pt. 
molasses. Mix balsam and gin together; after 2 hrs. 

add tar and molasses. 

Mrs. L. Humeston. 

COUGH MIXTURE. 

Shake well together 6 teaspoons castor oil and 3 tea- 
spoons spirits of camphor. Add 3 teaspoons paregoric 
and 3 tablespoons molasses. Shake all well together 
and before using it. Dose, i teaspoonful several'times a 

day. 

Carrie E, Waterbury. 

FOR HOARSENESS. 
Cover 1-2 pt. wheat bran with i qt. water. Simmer 
down to I pt. Strain and add sliced lemon and loaf 



FOR CANCER OR PURIFYING THE BLOOD. 

To make 8 GALS. OF THE Syrup. — 2 1-2 OZ. sarsapa- 
rilla root, 2 1-2 oz. sassafras bark, 2 1-2 oz. mezereon 



12T 

bark, 2 1-2 oz. licorice root, ilb. raisins, jammed. Boil 
sarsaparilla 4 hrs , then add the other ingredients and boil 
2 hrs. Strain and bottle when cold. Dose, i gill 4 times 
daily. It is better to make 1-4 of this at a time. 

N. H. Watereury. 

HOP BITTERS. 
4 oz. hops, I oz. biichu, i oz. mandrake, i oz. dande- 
lion, 1-2 oz. prickley-ash bark. Steep in 2 qts. water, 
strain; when cool add 1-2 pt. alcohol. Keep in corked 
bottles. Dose, i to 3 tablespoons 3 times daily before 
meals. After meals for dyspepsia. 

Mrs. a. G. Deuel. 

TAR OINTMENT. 
I pt. lard, 1-2 pt. tar, rosin size of an egg, bees-wax 1-2 
size of an egg. Simmer together 1 hr. Good for salt- 
rheum, burns, &c. 

Mrs. A. Day. 

MARIGOLD OINTMENT. 

I pt. lard, meit, then stir in as many marigold flowers 
as you can. Set in a warm place for 2 days. Strain. 
(Use large marigold flowers.) Good for rheumatism, 

strains, bruises, &c. 

Mrs. a. Day. 

LINIMENT. 

The marigold flowers put in alcohol is an excellent 

liniment. 

Mrs. a. Day. 



122 



GENERAL ITEMS FOR THE -HOUSEWIFE. 



CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 

Boil the y('//o7C' rind in a syrup of white sugar until it 
granulates. Pack in jars with the syrup. It keeps well 
and is nice for mince pies and molasses cake. 

Mrs. J. T. Carr. 

MOCK CREAM FOR COFFEE. 

Boil I spoonful of cornstarch in i qt milk. A great 
improvement to coffee or chocolate. 

A COOLING DRINK. 

2 oz. tartaric acid, 2 lbs. white sugar, juice of 1-2 
lemon, 3 pts. water. Boil together 5 min.; when nearly 
cold add whites of 2 eggs well beaten with 1-2 cup 
flour and 1-2 oz. wintergreen or other flavoring. Bottle 
and keep in a cool place. Take 2 tablespoonfuls for a 
tumbler of water, add 1-4 teaspoon soda, stir and drink 
immediately. 

Mrs. C. S. Smith. 

GRANDMOTHER'S HARVEST DRINK. 

I qt. water, i tablespoon sifted ginger, 3 heaping 
tablespoons sugar, 1-2 pt. vinegar. 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

TO KEEP EGGS A YEAR NICELY. 

3 gals, water, i qt. salt, i qt. slacked lime. Prepare 
the liquid and let it stand 3 or 4 days to allow the heat 
from the lime to escape. If put on sooner it seems to 



harden yolks of eggs. Obtain eggs as early as possible, 
and pack with great care, as the least crack causes future 
loss. Pour the lime water over the eggs and cover with 
liglit pieces of board. 

Mrs. J. T. Carr. 

BAKING POWDER. 

4 oz. baking soda, 3 oz tartaric acid, i pt. flour; sift 

several times. 

Mrs. W. H. Gibbs. 

BLUEING. 
I oz. Prussian blue, 1-2 oz. oxolicacid, i qt. soft water. 

Mrs. W. H. Gibbs. 

TO PRESERVE HAMS. 



To 4 gals, water, add 8 lbs. salt, 2 oz. saltpetre, i qt. 

using. 

Mrs. W. 



molasses. Boil and stir it well. Cool before using 



FOR PACKING BEEF. 

For 100 lbs. beef, take 4 qts. fine salt, 4 lbs. brown 

sugar, 3 oz. saltpetre, 3 oz. saleratus. Mix all together. 

Pack beef closely in layers, sprinkling the salt, etc. 

through it. Add no water, but place a weight on the 

top. 

F. W. Waterbury. 

TO COLOR BROWN. 

Chop I lb. catechu, dissolve in kettle hot water, then 
strain. Add to it 2 oz. blue-vitriol and stir until dis- 
solved. Work the goods in this liquor 2 hrs. at boiling 
heat. Dissolve in another kettle 3 oz. bichromate of 
potash in sufficient hot water to cover the goods. Work 
in this 1-2 hr. Then wash in 2 or 3 waters having in a 



little soap. Very deep color in wool, but lighter in cot 
ton, I lb. will color from 4 to 10 lbs. of goods, accord- 
ing to shade. 

SOFT SOAP. 

6 lbs. sal-soda, 3 lbs. lime, 7 lbs. solid grease, 4 gals, 
water. 

Mrs. M. S. Osborn. 

HARD SOAP. 

Pour 4 gals, boiling water on 6 lbs. washing soda and 
3 lbs. unslacked lime. Stir well, and let settle until per- 
fectly clear. Drain off the water and put in it 6 lbs. fat, 
2 oz. borax, i oz. hartshorn, (the liquid.) Boil until it 
thickens. 

Mrs. Howard. 

COLOGNE. 

1-2 oz. oil of bergamot, 1-4 oz. oil of lemon, 1-8 oz. of 
oil of lavendar, 3 drops oil of rosemary, 3 drops oil of 
cloves, 1-2 drachm oil of neroli, 1-4 oz. jessamine, 5 
grains best musk, 3 pts. deodorised alcohol. 

Mrs. N. D. Morey. 



To prevent cakes from drying put 6 or 8 nice apples 
in the jar or box with the cake. When shrivelled re- 
place with fresh ones. 

It is a great improvement to bread, to dry the flour by 
setting it in a warm place 24 hours before using. 

To cut v/arm bread or cake so that it will not be heavy, 
heat the knife before using it. 

To brown frosting, — pass a hot griddle or shovel of hot 
coals over the surface. 



125 

Ripe peaches can be quickly peeled by pouring hot 
water over them. 

Blanch almonds in the same way. 

Canned fruit standing in the light, loses natural color, 
Keep closely covered from the light, and dark fruit as 
plums and cherries will retain bright color. 

To prevent skin of plums, crab-apples, or any similar 
fruit from cracking in canning or pickling, prick each 
one 6 or 8 times with a pin. It can be done quickly. 

After cleaning oil-cloths, wet them with clear milk 
and rub dry with cloth. After a few applications, will 
look as though varnished, and loses the stiffness usually 
seen. 

The juice of ripe tomatoes will remove fruit or vege- 
table stains from the hands Avithout injury to the skin. 

A fresh tomato leaf crushed and applied is a good 
antidote for bee sting. 

Plug up mice holes with soap. The mice cannot get 
through. 

An application of alcohol will restore the color to 
furniture discolored by heat. 

Horse-radish put in small pieces into pickles prevents 
mould rising on the top of vinegar. 

To remove ink and fruit stains, — to grains oxolic acid 
in I 2 pt. water. Wet the article in hot water, and apply 
to top of the bottle ; rinse well. 

To wash mirrors, window glass, etc., — wash first with 
a clean soft cloth and clear water, then go over them 
the second time with a chamois skin wrung out of clear 
cold water. Do not wipe. 

Sure death for carpet bugs ? ? ? 



-r 



A FULL AND COMPLETE STOCIC 

Of the latest designs in 
WINDOW S!5liA13ES, 

I^ictures aixd FramcH, 

Stationerij, Artist's Material, &e., &c. 

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Prints, 
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NEWELL & DAEROW 


Hosiery, 
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and 

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Dry Goods, 

No. 450 


Notions 

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4^0 


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450 



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Wm. WATERBURY, 

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Nos. 420 and 422 BROADWAY, 



Grand Opening. 

CHINA HALL. 

New Department. 



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Teas, Coffees, Sugars, Spices, &c. 

rmE FRUIT, OOlirFFOTIONEEY AND OIGAKS A SPEOIALTY. 

No. 414 Broadv/ay, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

C^ Connected with Telephone Exchange. 



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SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

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OFFICE NO. 1 & 2 ARLINGTON HOUSE BLOCK. 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

BAKER & RECORD'S 

Ground Floor Gallery, 

448 Broadway, 
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 



We make Photographs from Miniature to Life vSize, 

and finish them in Crayon, Oil, Wnter 

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John H. Darrow, 



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SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Can Always be Found at 
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ERY INC. 
1^ JUL 85 

W N. MANCHESTER, 
^ INDIANA 46962