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Full text of "Our Quaker Friends of ye olden time; being in part a transcript of the minute books of Cedar Creek meeting, Hanover County, and the South River meeting, Campbell County, Va"

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OUR 

Quaker Friends 

OF YE OLDEN TIME 



BEING IN PART A TRANSCRIPT OF THE MINUTE BOOKS OF 

CEDAR CREEK MEETING, HANOVER COUNTY, 

AND THE SOUTH RIVER MEETING, 

CAMPBELL COUNTY, VA. 



J. P. BELL COMPANY, Publishers, 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA. 

1905 



\ 









I JUL 19 lyub 
i /7^2 o O G 



Copyright, 1905, ^ 
JAMES PINKNEY BELL. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE. 



My maternal ancestors, the TeiTell family, were Quakers, and 
sometimes in mj early childliood I attended their meetings for 
worship, held in the old Meetinghouse at Golansville, in Caroline 
County, Va., and still retaining a love for tliese good people, 
I have for some time past contemplated publishing a book giv- 
ing an account of their religious belief, and manner of conduct- 
ing their meetings. 

Through a member of the Society of Friends, in Richmond, 
Va., I have obtained extracts from some of their old Min- 
ute books, which I hope will be of interest to my readers ; I also 
make extracts from The Southern Friend (a religious journal 
published in Richmond during the Civil War). 

"Southern Heroes," a book published since the war, setting 
forth the stand taken by Friends, who would endure persecution 
rather than go forth to slay their fellow man. 

I also have a little tract issued by the New York Yearly Meet- 
ing, entitled: "A Brief View of the Doctrines of Friends," 
which I shall use. 

The Quakers have done much for the Christian world in 
preaching that the baptism of the Holy Spirit is essential to 
salvation, and that at all times, and under all circumstances, 
they should seek to be guided by the Holy Spirit ; hence, when 
they assemble for worship, they wait in silence before the Lord 
until they shall feel that he has given them a message to deliver 
to the people. It was this belief in the giiidance of the Holy 
Spirit and this silent waiting before the Lord that gave rise 
to the saying that the "Quakers are waiting for the Spirit to 
move them." 

There is a depth of meaning to this waiting before the Lord 
that only the true spiritually minded can comprehend. True wor- 
ship is the communion of the soul with its Maker. 



Iv publisher's notice. 

"Friends" have done niueli for the bettering of the world in 
liberating their slaves and in aiding in every way possible the abol- 
ition of slavery. Also their faithful testimony against Oaths 
has made the Courts accept the "Affirmation" as binding the same 
as the oath, and all who have conscientious scruples against taking 
an oath can take the "affirmation." 

My readers will be interested in reading over the "Marriage 
Certificates" to see that the Quakers really marry themselves, 
or as they say, "take each other in marriage." First, consent 
of the parents or guardians must be obtained ; then the consent 
of the Meeting. In olden times the man and woman had to go 
before the men's meeting, and then before the women's (Month- 
ly Meeting) and "declare their intentions," as it was called. But 
now they send in their "intentions" in writing, and the Monthly 
Meeting appoints a committee to visit them, and ascertain 
whether they are free from any other engagements and have 
full consent of parents or guardians. "No obstruction appearing," 
they can be married as soon as they may desire, after the favor- 
able report of tlie committee. 

The Monthly Meeting that accepts the report of the Com- 
mittee appoints another Committee to attend the mai-riage, to 
see that it is conducted in the proper manner, and report to the 
next Monthly Meeting. 

In reading tlie Disownments, you will discover tliat most 
of them were for "marrying out," that was, marrying one of 
another demonination, or being married by an "hireling priest," 
as the ministers of otlier churches were called. The Quakers 
began after a while to see that this was a serious loss to the 
Church, and now they are allowed to marry tJiose of other 
churches, if they are married by "Friends' Ceremony." 

The members are still dealt with and disowned for drunk- 
eness, immorality, or for engaging in clandestine trade, and are 
advised against hazardous or speculative trade, or engaging in 
any business beyond their ability to manage. 

The reader Avill also notice that before granting a Certificate 
of Removal, the Monthly Meeting saw to it that the business 
affairs of the applicant were properly adjusted and settled before 



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PUBLISHEE'S NOTICE. V 

the certificate was granted, that their business affairs should not 
bring discredit upon the Meeting. 

The Friends not only liberated their own slaves, but also used 
every effort for the abolition of slavery. They did not allow 
their members to hire a slave, or take the position of overseer 
of slaves. The Quakers in North Carolina and A^irginia were 
at one time a large body, but the bitter feeling against them, 
because of their anti-slaveiy views caused them to seek homes 
in the free States, and soon many of the meetings were so de- 
pleted that they had to be ^'laid down." Doubtless many of 
my readers in the Western States will say, as they read these 
pages, "Yes, my ancestors came from Virginia.'' 

*J. P. BELL, 
Of J. P. Bell Company, 

Lynchburg, Va. 

♦ Quaker name : James Pinkney Pleasant Bell. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Births and Deaths 3-47 

Marriages 51-106 

Removals 109-141 

DiSOWNMENTS 145-157 

Confession and Condemnation ..... 161-166 
Appendix : 

I. Historical Sketch 171-239 

II. Doctrines Held by Society of Friends . . 240-248 

III. Declaration of Faith 249-251 

IV. Prominent Families 252-262 

V. Colonial Church 263 

One Hundred Years Ago— (A Poem) . . 264-265 

VI. The Diary of John B. Crenshaw . . . 266-277 

Index 279-287 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS 



A EECOED OF BIETHS AND DEATHS AMONGST FRIENDS 

TAKEN FROM THE OLD RECORD BOOK OF 

CEDAR CREEK MEETING, HANOVER 

COUNTY, VIRGINIA. 



Children of Richard and Ann Bloxsom of Louisa County. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Sarah 12-14-1764 

William 8-24-1766 

Richard 12-18-1767 

Obadiah 4-10-1770 

Gregory 10-17-1771 

Gideon 9-17-1772 

Ann 11- 7-1774 

Mary' 9- 7-1776 

Elizabeth 11-17-1779 

Children of William and Mary Ballard. 

Thomas 11-12-1735 

Frances 12-12-1737 

Byrmn 2-27-1740 

Delphin 1- 5-1742 

Moorman 3-16-1747 

David 4- 9-1750 

Children of George and Cicely Bell of Louisa County. 

Robert 2-15-1764 

George 7-13-1767 

Nathan 4- 5-1769 

Ashley 12- 2-1770 

Anthony 7-22-1773 

Pleasant 12-21-1777 

Children of Benjamin and Tace Bates of Hanover County. 

Lucy 5- 6-1795 

Micajah 6-12-1797 

Martha 3-17-1800 



4 BliiTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Tace Crew 10-11-1803 

William Savery 4- 7-1806 

Fleming . . . .' 3- 1-1808 

Children of Fleming and TJnity Bates of Hanover County. 

Benjamin Spence 8-l-i-180-4 

Margaret 3-12-1806 

Deborah 7-24-1807 

Lemuel 11- ^-1808 

Unity 3- 6-1810 

Hannah 6-15-1811 

Fleming 10-25-1812 

Edward 5-11-1814 

Children of Philip and Susana Brooks of Hanover County. 

(from Culpeper). 

Sarah 11-22-1802 

Children of Menoah and Anne Chiles of Caroline County. 

John 5- 3-1747 

Anne 9- 6-1750 

Henrv 5-11-1752 

Patty 3- 9-1757 

Samuel 12-12-1759 

Children of Joseph and Agnes Crew of Hanover County. 

Armisbv 8-31-1745 

Mary 1-26-1749 

Micajali Crew 7-22-1750 

Nicholas 3-26-1752 

Agatha 3-19-1753 

Snkey 7-16-1754 

Josepli ~ 

Children of Thomas and Judith Cheadle of Caroline County. 

Mollv 8-13-1748 

John 8-27-1749 

Geor<ro 10-19-1750 

Thomas 10" ^-1753 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. O 

Children of Micajah and Judith Clark of Louisa County. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Christopher 3-20-1737 

Eobert 6-15-1738 

Mourning 6- 6-1740 

Micajah ^ 12-27-1741 

Jolin 10-26-1743 

Edward 10-12-1745 

Children of Boling and Winifred Clarke of Louisa County. 

Christopher 2-29-1743 

Elizabeth 11-12-1744 

Children of Frances and Christianna Clarke. 

MoUey 9-17-1747 

Betty 11-22-1748 

NichoLas 2- 6-1750 

Francis 2- 7-1753 

Children of John and Anne Clarke. 

Thomas 7-30-1746 

Francis 8- 5-1748 

John 11- 3-1750 

Children of James and Judith Crew of Hanover County. 

Unity 8-31-1760 

Littleberry 12-18-1762 

Jesse 1-18-1765 

Obadidi 3-31-1767 

Sarah 7-16-1769 

Judith 2- 1-1772 

James 1- 5-1774 

Dorothy 6-27-1776 

Benjamin 5-21-1779 

Mary 7-20-1781 

Children of Micajah and Margaret Crew. 

Tace 8-30-1776 

Lemuel 8- 5-1778 



6 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Unity 9-25-1780 

Walter 12-28-1784 

Talitha 2-10-1788 

Margaret 5-31-1790 

Susanna 10-15-1792 

Deborah D 11-25-1794 

Children of Pleasant and Amy Cobb of Caroline County. 

Thomas 4-21-1786 

Eebecca 10-20-1787 

Mary 3-18-1789 

Rhoda 9-30-1790 

Abigal 3-28-1792 

Elizabeth 11-19-1793 

Pleasant 12-13-1795 

Joseph 6-21-1797 

Ansehn 4-16-1799 

Joanna 6-17-1803 

Eobert 2-16-1806 

Children of Samuel and Ann Couch of Goochland County. 

Daniel 

Ann Wolston 

Margaret 

James — — 

Deborah 

Eebecca 2-26-1796 

Mary Younghusband 

Children of Littlebury and Huldah Crew of Hanover County. 

James 9-22-1798 

Benjamin 11-16-1799 

John 4-30-1801 

Milley 9-21-1802 

Children of James and Charlotte Cowgill of Hanover Co. (Culpeper) 

Rachel 18-18-1794 

Abigal 10-16-1796 



BIETHS AND DEATHS. 7 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

John 8-31-1798 

James 5-24-1801 

Children of Jesse and Peggy Crew of Hanover County. 

Lancelot 8-19-1807 

EHzabeth Ladd 9-39-1808 

Judith 10-15-1809 

Owen Milton 6-29-1811 

Obadiah 11- 5-181-3 

Children of Walter and Sarah Bacon Crew of Hanover County. 

Jane Temperance 1-17-1821 

Margaret Talitha 8-31-1822 

Mary Rice 9-34-1834 

William Rice 13-12-1826 

Sarah Bacon 4- 1-1828 

Susan Unity 3-27-1830 

Walter Fleming 1-14-1833 

Deborah Tace 9-14-1833 

Micajah Lemuel 6-13-1835 

Samuel Izard 10-16-1837 

Ann Eliza 13-16-1839 

Martha Louis H- 9-1841 

Lucy Bell 8-18-1844 

Nathaniel Edmond 8-10-1848 

Children of Nathaniel C. and Deborah D. Crew Crenshaw. 
John Bacon 5- 2-1820 

Children of Nathaniel C. and Mary Y. Crenshaw. 

Edmund Austin 3- 4-1827 

Children of Nathaniel C. and Jane Denson Pretlow Crenshaw. 

Elizabeth Ann 5-21-1830 

Mary Jane 7- 5-1833 



O BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of John Bacon and Rachel Hoge Crenshaw. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year, 

Nathaniel Bacon 12-18-1845 

Deborah Ann 5-18-1848 

Margaret Elizabeth 6-22-1849 

James Hoge 12-23-1851 

Eliza Catharine 11-22-1853 

Eachel Frances 10-20-1855 

John Austin 5-16-1857 

John Chapman 7-30-1858 

Children of John Bacon and Judith Willets Crenshaw. 

Willetts Bassett 12-16-1861 

Mary Frances 11- 9-1863 

Jndith Isabella 7-10-1865 

Edmimd Bacon 5-27-1869 

Walter Crew 8-17-1870 

Sarah Willetts 2-17-1872 

Children of Alfred and Hannah Cranstone. 

Charles 4- 1-1853 

Alfred Henry 3-12-1855 

William 3- 4-1859 

Children of James Hoge and Belle Pleasants Crenshaw. 

James H., Jr 2- 8-1880 

William Pleasants 3-11-1881 

Eachel 3-25-1882 

Henry Pleasants 4-29-1884 

Walter Crew 6-11-1887 

Joseph Pleasants 11- 2-1890 

Children of John and Judith Douglas. 

Charles 4-29-1732 

Elizabeth 12-18-1733 

Thomas 9- 2-1740 

Polly 6-12-1744 

Judith 7-18-1746 

John 8- 8-1748 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 9 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Anne 2-10-1750 

Achillis 2-22-1753 

Dorcas 1- 9-1755 

Children of David and Mary Garland. 
Elizabeth 9-10-17^5 

Children of Daniel and Mary Harris of Hanover County. 

John 1-11-1731 

Edith 12-20-1733 

Cornelius 11-11-1735 

Moses 3-31-1738 

Mary 10-20-1740 

Daniel — ■ 

Nicholas — 

Thomas 

Children of Samuel and Martha Hargrave of Caroline County. 

Jesse 7- 8-1752 

Samuel 9- 9-1754 

Elizabeth 12-28-1756 

Mary 3- 7-1759 

Martha 8-10-17G1 

Sarah 10-15-1763 

Thomas 1-31-1766 

John 8-21-1768 

Children of Moses and Elizabeth Harris. 
Sarah 11-11-1762 

Children of Moses and Sophia Harris. 

WiUiam Eley 12- 3-1768 

Sally and Priscilla 4-27-1772 

Children of Henry Philip and Mary Hart. 

James Philips 6-20-1741 

WilHam 2-13-1743 

John 3-18-1745 



10 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Joseph 12- 3-1743 

Elizabeth 2- 3-1751 

Children of Jeremiah and Ann Harris, Cedar Creek, Hanover. 

Sally 6- 7-1767 

John 8-11-1769 

Lucy 3-15-1772 

Cheadle 6- 9-1774 

Elizabeth 11-22-1779 

Children of John and Alice Hutchins of Goochland County. 

Jonathan 2-28-1763 

Agatha 1-21-1764 

Susanna 1-15-1769 

Mary 1-20-1771 

Elizabeth 1-12-1772 

Thomas 11-23-1774 

Strangeman 9-15-1776 

William 8-14-1778 

Patrick 3-10-1781 

Children of Joseph and Rachel Hargrave of Caroline County. 

Garland 1-30-1793 

Lucy 2- 3-1797 

Children of Thomas and Chlotilda Harris of Hanover County. 

Deborah 12-17-1787 

Rebecca 9-24-1790 

Benjamin 2-24-1794 

Isabella 4- 2-1803 

Sarah Ann 1-15-1809 

Children of Samuel and Lucy Har grave of Caroline County. 
Salley 3-12-1784 

Children of Benjamin and Sarah Harris of Caroline County. 
Thomas 3-17-1760 



BIETHS AND DEATHS. 11 

Children of James and Rebecca Hunnicutt of Goochland County. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

John Murdaugh 12-16-1773 

Ann 9- 6-1775 

Miriam Murdaugh 9-21-1777 

James 2-12-1780 

Thomas Pretlow 9- 5-1782 

Children of Thomas and Unity Harris of Hanover County. 

Benjamin ' 2-10-1806 

Children of Benjamin and Mary Johnson. 

Thomas 11-14-1749 

John 1-14-1751 

Andrew 4- 7-1754 

William 8-12-1756 

Children of Ashley and Agatha Johnson of Amelia County. 

John 12-19-1747 

Children of Ashley and Mary Johnson of Amelia County. 

Elizabeth 5-14-1753 

Mary 12-18-1753 

Jane 5-29-1755 

Gerard 1-36 1757 

Benjamin 7-10-175S 

Drusilla 4-26-1761 

Anne 1-15-1763 

Ashley 5- 4-1766 

Edith 9-11-1769 

Thomas Watkins 11-23-1771 

Children of Jesse and Elizabeth Johnson of Amelia County. 

Benjamin 10-21-1752 

John 1-31-1754 

Jesse 9-7-1755 

William 5- 8-1757 

Sarah 4-10-1759 

Thomas 12- 1-1760 



12 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Elizabeth 9- 7-17G3 

Jane 4-19-17G6 

Agatha 10- 8-1768 

Watkins 4-15-1770 

Children of William and Agatha Johnson of Amelia County. 

Milley 3-12-176G 

Elizabeth 10-24-1768 

Zachariah 1-27-1770 

WiDiam 7-28-1771 

Rachel 11-30-1774 

Charles 3- 4-1777 

Pleasants 8-12-1780 

Thomas 4-14-1783 

Christopher 5-24-1785 

Moornican .* 6-26-1787 

Children of John and Lydia Johnson of Amelia County. 

Judith 8-13-1755 

Susanna 3-28-1757 

James 8-27-1758 

Samuel 2-18-1761 

Joseph 10- 1-1763 

John 2- 5-1766 

Thomas 12-29-1769 

Lydia 1-29-1779 

Children of Gerard and Judith Johnson. 

Jane 5-30-1762 

Elizabeth 12 1763 

Benjamin 10-21-1765 

Judith • 11-11-1767 

Gerard 6- 4-1769 

John Watkins 3- 5-1771 

David 9-30-1772 

Elizabeth 12- 3-1774 

Samuel —16-1776 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 13 

Children of John and Lydia Johnson. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Jonathan .• 3-13-1771 

Strangeman 9-28-1772 

Benjamin 3-26-1774 

Agatha 11-21-1776 

Ashly 1-15-1780 

Children of Rohert and Sarah Johnson of Louisa County. 

Margaret 8- 5-1752 

Children of Benjamin and Agnes Johnson of Louisa County. 

Sarah . .' 1-30-1729 

Christopher 11-22-1731 

William 4-25-1734 

Benjamin 8-24-1736 

Penelope 2-27-1739 

Collins 6-28-1741 

Edward 2-23-1744 

Agnes 12-11-1746 

Children of Elijah and Betsy Johnson of Louisa County. 

Thomas Garland 4-22-1794 

James 1-12-1796 

Sally 6-26-1797 

Patsey 2-16-1801 

Children of John and Dorothy Johnson of Hanover. 

Benjamin 12-15-1797 

Sarah 10-27-1799 

Penelope 2-13-1802 

Judith 5- 9-1804 

James and Deborah 5-28-1807 

Deborah 11- 8-1809 

Unity and Mary 4-11-1811 

Children of Catlett and Sarah Jones. 

Ann 4- 8-1804 

Benjamin 4-20-1805 



14 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Thomas and Rachel Moorman of Louisa County. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Mary ' 12-19-1730 

Zachariah 2- 2-1732 

Micajah 6-28-173.5 

Elizabeth 2- 2-1738 

Thomas 6- 6-1740 

Mildred 11-25-1742 

Pleasant 3-19-1745 

Children of Charles and Mary Moorman of Louisa County. 

Elizabeth 2- 9-1738 

Lucy 2-20-1741 

Aggy 2-26-1743 

Charles 6-28-1746 

Judith 6-26-1748 

Molley 9-25-1751 

Eobert 11-16-1753 

Thomas 11-25-1756 

Children of John Wilson and Mildred Maddox of Hanover County. 

Thomas 4- 2-1775 

John 1-16-1777 

William Griffin 3- 9-1779 

Wilson 4- 9-1781 

Children of William Griffin and Mary Maddox of Hanover County. 

Edwin Milton 7-21-1810 

William Garland 6- 1-1812 

Maria Ann 5-10-1815 

Children of Thomas and Jane Maddox of Caroline County. 

Eliza 4- 2-1811 

Wilson 7-24-1813 

Children of John and Sarah Peatross of Caroline County. 

Mary 1-11-1776 

Amey 1-22-1778 

Anna 4- 5-1780 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 15 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Ehoda 6-27-1784 

Elizabeth 2- 9-1790 

Nelson 4-25-1792 

Children of Samuel and Sarah Parsons, Bellville, Goochland County. 

Samuel Pleasants 9- 5-1783 

Margaret P ll-25-178(i 

Children of Thomas Snowden and Elizabeth Tucker Pleasants, 
Elizabeth Snowden 1-20-1792 

Children of William Henry and Mary Pleasants of Goochland 

County. 

Thomas Snowden 11-29-1796 

Joseph Jordan 1-19-1799 

Children of Joseph Jordan and Martha Bates Pleasants of Hanover. 

Benjamin Bates 7-23-1820 

Mary Snowden 8-3-1824 

William Henry 5-16-1827 

George Dillwyn - 10- 7-1830 

Ann Josephine 8-16-1833 

Margaret Isabella 6-26-1836 

Walter Frederick 6-16-1839 

Julia and Maria 6-30-1842 

Children of William Henry and Eliza J. Pleasants of Richmond. 

Lydia Ahce 3-26-1853 

Heney Abijah 9-15-1854 

Martha , Isabella 2-26-1859 

Asa Janney 11-27-1869 

Children of William and Elizabeth Ratcliffe. 

Mary 3-25-1760 

Harrison 3-11-1762 

William 1-14-1764 

John 11-11-1766 

Gideon 5-21-1769 



IG BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Alfred and Mary Terrell Ricks of Southampton County. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Julia W 

EHzabeth H ■ — — 

Richard A — ■ — - — - — • 

Mary Winston — 

Walter A 

Deborah 

Samuella T 

Julia W married Bowling H. Winston, of Indiana. ISTo children. 

Elizabeth H. married Oswin ^Vllite, of North Carolina. 

Alfred R. White, son of Elizabeth H. and Oswin White. 

Walter A., never married. 

Deborah married John Pretlow, of Southampton County. No 
children. 

Ella T. married John C. Winston. No children. 

Children of Richard A. and Eliza Crenshaw Ricks. 

*Julian W 3-11-1882 

Katharine C 6-20-1883 

Richard A., Jr 6-10-1885 

James Hoge 7-15-1886 

Children of Mary W. Ricks and Samuel B. Pretlow. 

Mary Terrell — 

Fannie M 

Julia — 

Jane D 

Children of Thomas Stanley by his first Wife. 

Maddox 8-17-1715 

Elizabeth 3-29-1718 

Children by Elizabeth his second Wife. 

Margery 8-1-1722 

Mary 6- 5-1729 

Thomas 2- 9-1731 

Pleasant 4-25-1733 

.John 1-27-1735 

* Died 6-2U-1882. 



BIETHS AND DEATHS. 17 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Zachariah 10- 6-1737 

Sarah 1- 6-1739 

Anne 6- 7-1741 

Nathan 1- 7-1743 

Joseph 10-21-1747 

Children of James and Catharine Stanley of Hanover County. 

William 6- 4-1739 

James 3-26-1731 

Mary 6-27-1733 

Martha 3-21-1736 

Micajah 4-28-1739 

Agnes 6-20-1743 

Strangeman 11- 7-1745 

Elijah 10- 7-1750 

Children of Huldah and Maddox Stanley of Hanover County. 

John 1-23-1747 

Elizabeth 5-15-1749 

William 7-22-1750 

Obediah 4-27-1751 

Mary 10- 7-1753 

Eachel 6- 6-1757 

Huldah 9- 2-1759 

Maddox 3-15-1761 

Children of James and Elizabeth Stanley. 

Caleb 8- 6-1758 

Children of William and Elizabeth Stanley. 

Samuel 9-21-1759 

Hannah 1- 2-1762 

Children of Achillis and Elizabeth Stanley. 

Agnes 6-24-1768 

Jesse 10-24-1770 



18 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Zachariah and Sarah Stanley. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Susannah 12- 8-1775 

Abraham 8- 7-1777 

Abigal 3- 5-1780 

Zachariah 19-15-1782 

Children of Thomas and Unity Stanley. 

Moses 11-15-1781 

John 11- 2-m3 

Temperance 2-22-1786 

James 3-10-1787 

Joseph 2- 9-1789 

Benjamin 2-10-1791 

Judith 9-28-1793 

Abigal 10-19-1796 

Unity 8-19-1799 

Children of littlebury and Agness Stanley. 

Solomon 12-26-1787 

Martha H- 8-1789 

Children of Thomas and Edith Stanley. 

Milley ^- ^-1791 

Edmund 2-10-1793 

John 9-19-1795 

Elijah 9- 8-1796 

Frances 10" 1-1^98 

Children of Thomas and Priscilla Stanley. 

Isaac 3-24-1803 

Tliomas Binford 9- 5-1805 

Children of Waddy and Rebekah Stanley. 

Samuel ^ 1-1796 

Priscilla 7-15-1798 

Lucy ^- 9-1801 

Anne 6-23-1803 

Joel 11-18-1805 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 19 

Children of Henry and Anne Terrell of Caroline County. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Tear. 

Henry 1-29-1735 

Thomas 8-20-1736 

Betty 9- 7-1738 

Anne 9-15-1740 

Children of Henry and Sarah Terrell of Caroline County. 

Ursula 3-11-1746 

Charles 8- 3-1748 

Judith 2- 6-1750 

Abigal 10- 6-1751 

George 6-28-1753 

Tarlton 11-19-1754 

Children of David and Sarah Terrell of Caroline County. 

Agga 12-17-1749 

Benjamin 11- 7-1750 

Edward 2-12-1753 

Sarah 1-10-1755 

Winifred 10-14-1760 

Mary 4- 6-1757 

David 3-11-1763 

Henry 8-13-1767 

Samuel 12-12-1769 

Children of Pleasant and Catharine Terrell. 

Lucy 9-17-1763 

Jesse 5-10-1765 

Eobert 1-24-1768 

Samuel 1- 8-1770 

Eachel 5- 3-1772 

Kancy 2-17-1775 

Pleasant 11-26-1778 

Lemuel 7- 2-1781 

Mary 2- 3-1784 



20 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Samuel and Elizabeth Harris Terrell. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Mary Ann 11- 3-1801 

Samuel 12-29-1802 

Walter ' 4-14-1805 

James 12- 2-1808 

Henry 3- 2-1815 

George Fox 10-16-1817 

Children of Lemuel and Rebecca Terrell. 

Catharine Pleasant ("Kitty") 3-28-1805 

Robert S 1807 

Nancy Ann — — 1809 

Nicey Lynch 1812 

Lindsy L 1814 

Ehoda W —^1816 

Mary — — 1818 

Sarah Eebecca 1822 

Thomas Henry 1825 

Children of Catherine Pleasant (Terrell) Bell. 

James Pinlmey 11-18-1830 

William Lemuel 3 1833 

Robert Henry 4-19-1836 

Mary Margaret — - — -1838 

Rhoda Ann 

Ricbard Thomas — - — 1846 

Children of Thomas and Rebecca Terrell. 

Mathew Peatross 11- 8-1762 

Amy 11- 8-1766 

Rhoda 4- 8-1770 

Thomas 2-17-1772 

Timotbv 3-23-1774 

Joannah 3-31-1776 

Joseph 9-29-1777 

Rebecca 12-22-1780 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 21 

Children of Jonathan and Margaret Terrell. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Elizabeth 3-38-1778 

Chiles 2-26-1780 

Nanny 6-17-1782 

John" 5-24-1784 

Miriam 11- 2-1786 

Matilda 3-18-1789 

Caleb 5-17-1791 

Thomas 2-24-1794 

Children of Jesse and Mary Terrell. 

Sarah 6-10-1788 

Parmelia 10-27-1790 

Children of Jesse by Mary his second Wife. 

Ehoda 10-15-1796 

George 1- 1-1799 

Mahlon 8-17-1802 

Samuel 8-24-1804 

Eliza Ann 4- 3-1807 

Children of Matthew Peatross and Sally Terrell. 

Mahala 4-27-1790 

Rachel 11- 2-1795 

Thomas 2-15-1798 

Clark 11-29-1799 

Joannah 4- 3-1802 

Mathew 3-28-1804 

Children of Timothy and Miriam M. Terrell. 

Maria 4-25-1799 

Children of Timothy by Mary his second Wife. 

Caty 7-11-1804 

Children of Joseph and Sarah Terrell. 

Anna Lynch 1- 2-1807 

Lucy 8-23-1810 

Joseph Walker 9- 5-1812 

William Penn 2-25-1815 



23 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Deaths taken from the family Bible of Mary A. Terrell Ricks. 

DIED. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Pleasant Terrell 1-11-1803 

Caty,, Ms wife 4-24-1813 

Samuel, son of Pleasant and Caty 8-14-1844 

Elizabeth, wife of Samuel 1- 5-1853 

Robert, son of Pleasant and Caty Terrell, married Nancy Nelson 
1-4-1817, who died 5-27-1825, and he married Sarah T. Burruss. 
Eobert died 2-9-1845, without issue. 

Children of Samuel and Elizabeth H. Terrell. 

Mary A. T. Eicks 10-18-1870 

Samuel 10-19-1826 

*Walter 1-30-1887 

James P 10-14-1867 

Henry 0., supposed to have been killed by the Indians. . 

George Fox 5-28-1855 

Children of Benjamin and Margaret Vaughan of Hanover County. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Matilda 1-29-1796 

Lemuel 8-12-1797 

Bowling 8-30-1799 

Joseph 8-22-1801 

John Ladd 11-21-1803 

Benjamin 11-30-1805 

Anna Ladd 3-22-1808 

Lucy Dabney 3-24-1810 

Margaretta B 7- 2-1813 

Mary 7- 2-1813 

Children of Nathaniel and Jemimah Winston of Caroline County. 

Mary 7-28-1750 

Samuel 9-19-1752 

Pcbecea 2-28-1755 

Anthony 4- 1-1757 

George 12- 7-1759 

* Walter TerreU married M. Talitha Crew 10-3-1850, who died 10-13-1853, leaving one 
daughter, Mary Terrell, now Mrs. Euclid Saunders, of Iowa City, Iowa. 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 33 

RECORD OF DEATHS TAKEN FROM THE OLD RECORD BOOK 

OF CEDAR CREEK MEETING OF HANOVER COUNTY.* 

DIED. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Byrom. son of Byrom and Eleanor Ballard 12-14-1769 

Byrom, sou of Byrom and Eleanor Ballard 11- 9-1774 

Bates, Fleming, son of Benjamin and Tace Bates 9- 8-1809 

Bates, Tace, daughter of Benjamin and Tace Bates 9-19-1892 

Bates, Margaret, daughter of Fleming and Unity Bates. 3-22-1806 
Crew, Margaret, daughter of Micajah and Margaret 

Crew IS- 3-1863 

Crew, John, son of Littlebury and Huldah 10-26-1801 

Crenshaw, Rachel, wife of John Bacon Crenshaw 11-20-1858 

Crenshaw, Rachel, daughter of J. B. and R. H 9 1857 

Crenshaw, John A., son of J. B. and R. H 9 1857 

Crenshaw, John C, son of J. B. and R. H 11-14-1863 

Crenshaw, Willetts, son of J. B. and Judith 9-17-1863 

Crenshaw, Mary F., daughter of J. B. and Judith 9-13-1864 

Crenshaw, Edmund B., son of J. B and Judith 3-18-1870 

Crenshaw. Walter C, son of J. B and Judith 3-10-1871 

Crenshaw, Nathaniel C, son of John aud Elizabeth. . . 5-22-1866 
Crenshaw, John Bacon, son of Nathaniel and Deborah. . 5-10-1889 
Hargrave, Salley, daughter of Samuel and Lucy Har- 

grave, of Caroline County 10-27-1786 

Johnson, Sarah, daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth John- 
son 9- 4-1794 

Jones, Ann, daughter of Catlett and Sarah Jones 5- 2-1805 

Johnson, Deborah, daughter of John and Dorothy .... 7-13-1810 
Pleasants, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas S. and Eliza- 
beth T 8-31-1796 

Pleasants, Martha E., daughter of Joseph J and Martha 

, 9-14-1842 

Pleasants, Lydia A., daughter of William H. and Eliza 

J 6-27-1853 

Pleasants, Henry A., son of William H. and Eliza J. . . 3- 2-1883 

*This Record Book has been very poorly kejit, as can be seen. 



24 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

EECORD OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS AMONGST FRIENDS 

m CAMPBELL AND BEDFORD COUNTIES, 

TAKEN FROM THE OLD SOUTHRIVER 

MEETING BOOK. 



Children of Christopher and Judith Anthony. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Mary 9-2 1766 

Joseph 12- 8-1767 

EUzabeth 10- 9-1769 

Charles 10-21-1773 

Children of Christopher and Mary Anthony. 

Christopher 12- 6-1776 

Samuel 1-26-1779 

Hannah 10-27-1781 

Sarah 2-21-1784 

Penelope 4-15-1786 

Jordan 8-10-1788 

Rachel 6-25-1791 

Charlotte 10-19-1793 

Children of Joseph and Rhoda Anthony. 
Samuel Parsons 2-12-1792 

Children of John and Rachel Anderson. 

Richard P 4- 9-1780 

Rachel 1-20-1783 

Orpah 6-24-1785 

Elizabeth 7-16-1788 

Wm. Pauling 4- 4-1792 

Children of Byrum and Eleanor Ballard. 

Mary 6-16-1764 

Betty 11- 1-1765 

William 7-20-1767 

Byrum 5-14-1769 

Amos 11-15-1770 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 25 

Children of Barclay and Judith Ballard. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Byruin 6- 9-1773 

Johnson 11- 3-1776 

James 10-23-1777 

Lvdia 13- ^-1778 

William 1-15-1780 

Susanna 2- 9-1781 

Samuel 6-26-1783 

Thomas 3-21-1785 

Children of William and Elizabeth Ballard. 

Anthony 2-22-1789 

Eleanor 6- 5-1790 

Mary 1-23-1792 

Asa 8-19-1793 

Children of William and Nancy Ballard. 
Granderson B 4-27-1808 

Children of Byrum and Sarah Ballard. 
Philip 6-18-1793 

Children of Richard and Ann Bloxom. 
Charles 10-27-1784 

Children of William and Nancy Bloxom. 

James 8-11-1795 

Ann Smith 5- 8-1797 

Elizabeth T 12-23-1799 

Mariah 12-11-1802 

Children of Benjamin and Rachel Butterworth. 

Nancy 5-21-1791 

Moorman 3- 5-1793 

Benjamin 10-24-1794 

Isaac 5- 7-1796 

Samuel 6-30-1798 

Eachel M 7-11-1800 



26 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

William 9-27-1802 

Henry Thomas 6- 4-1809 

Children of James S. and Deborah Butler. 

Mary 8-11-1812 

Ann John.son 11-13-1814 

Martha 8-27-1816 

William 9-19-1818 

James Edward 9-17-1820 

Alfred 5-29-1822 

Joseph 5- 5-1824 

Children of Stephen and Mary Butler. 

Deborah 2- 4-1797 

Joseph 2-24-1800 

Children of Stephen and Matilda Butler. 

Anselm 10-24-1811 

Edna 3-16-1813 

Mary E 5-28-1815 

Matilda 7- 9-1817 

Children of Josiah and Susannah Bailey. 

Almeda 5- 7-1805 

Eobert Barclay 8-31-180G 

Judith 2-24-1808 

Daniel 6-11-1809 

James Edwin 8- 9-1800 

Mary Byrnm 12- 6-1811 

Susannah 5- 6-1813 

Children of Stephen and Louisa Butler. 

Matilda Ann 10-13-1822 

William Exom 10-27-1824 

Children of Thomas and Elizabeth Bailey. 

Mary 4- 9-1806 

John 1-21-1807 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 27 

Children of Thomas and Patty Burgess. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Elizabeth 9-32-1801 

Joseph 10- 9-1803 

Jesse 11- 9-1805 

Moses 4-28-1807 

Mary 2- 1-1809 

Tace and Martha 9- 5-1811 

Children of James and Agatha Candler. 

Lucy 2- 3-1787 

Daniel 4-17-1788 

Johnson 6-14-1789 

Elizabeth 6- 6-1792 

James 1- 4-1794 

John 7- 7-1795 

Henry 4-27-1797 

Children of Mahlon and Elizabeth Cadwalader. 

William 3-21-1810 

Jane Daniel 9- 6-1812 

Deborah Douglas 8-18-1815 

Judith Johnson 12-26-1818 

Children of John and Rachel Coffee. 

William 5- 5-1786 

John 9- 2-1787 

Joseph 8-6-1789 

Eachel 9-10-1791 

Mary 2-18-1793 

Children of Thomas and Jane Cadwallader. 

Elizabeth 1-31-1786 

Mahlon 9-26-1787 

Jonah 8-11-1789 

Israel 7-28-1792 

Children of Nicholas and Druscilla Crew. 

Micajah 6-26-1783 

John 9- 3-1785 



28 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Joseph and Eebecca Curie. 

BORN. 

Mo. Day. Year. 

Sarah 12-15-1791 

Children of John Candler. 

John 2- 9-1766 

Henry 1-22-1769 

Children of Samuel and Annie Davis. 

William 7- 3-1770 

John 9-24-1774 

Thomas 2-18-1777 

Micajah 6-30-1779 

Children of William and Mary Davis. 

John 10-21-1775 

Henry 1-21-1777 

Susannah 4-29-1780 

Elizabeth 12- 5-1782 

Benjamin 6- 8-1785 

Isaac 5-10-1788 

Polly 3-25-1790 

Nancy 10-26-1792 

Louisa 3- 4-1794 

Deborah 4-25-1797 

Children of Micajah and Mary Davis. 

Susanna 5-18-1776 

Nancy 5- 9-1778 

Martha and Mary 3- 6-1780 

Samuel 3-22-1782 

David 3- 7-1784 

Eichard 12-19-1785 

Micajah 10-25-1787 

Annis 7- 1-1789 

Eobert Pleasants 9-26-1792 

Children of Elizabeth and Achillis Douglass. 

Eobert Terrell 8- 1-1780 

Sarah 6-19-1781 



BIETHS AND DEATHS. 2& 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year, 

Judith 6-27-1783 

Milley 8-18-1785 

Deborah 11-33-1787 

Elizabeth 1- 9-1790 

Mary 1-24-1792 

Agatha 1-12-1794 

Charles Terrell 9-12-1795 

John Lynch 11-26-1797 

Achillis Moorman 12-17-1800 

Children of James and Hannah Daniel. 
Mary 12- 4-1791 

Children of Daniel and Edith Easley. 

Sarah 2-13-1793 

Mary Ann 10-17-1794 

R^ath 8-20-1796 

John 9- 9-1798 

Daniel 6- 2-1800 

Rachel 6-14-1802 

Richard 9-22-1804 

Isaac 8- 2-1806 

Children of Moses and Mary Embree. 

Rachel 10 1775 

Moses 11- 8-1779 

John 3-19-1784 

Children of John and Ann Fowler. 

Mary 10-22-1775 

William 2-17-1778 

John 5-22-1780 

Christopher 4-25-1782 

Nancy 12-10-1784 

David and Judith 5-10-1787 

Thomas 3-77-1790 

Children of John and Rachel Fisher. 
Robert 10- 2-1800 



30 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Joseph and Hannah Fisher. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Sylvanus 10- 8-1797 

Eachel 5-14-1799 

William 11-24-1800 

Children of Robert and Catharine Hanna. 

Thomas 5- 2-1777 

Benjamin G-14-1779 

Esther 9- 6-1781 

Da^•id 1- 9-1784 

Caleb 8- 4-1786 

Robert 5-28-1789 

Children of Isaac and Rachel Hatcher. 

James 7-16-1789 

William 5-22-1791 

Lydia 12-17-1792 

Children of Robert and Catharine Hatcher. 

Esther 4-10-1792 

Catharine 11-25-1794 

Ann 7-30-1797 

Children of Moses and Ruth Hendrick. 

Amos 8-16-1759 

Cloe 4- 5-1763 

Sarah 11-20-1764 

Judith 9- 7-1766 

Obadiah 10-26-1767 

Betty 11- 2-1769 

Jeremiah 10-20-1772 

Moses, Jr., 2-12-1778 

Children of Amos and Hepzibah HoUoway. 

Phebe 1- 3-1787 

Job 5-10-1793 

Aaron 4-16-1795 

Stephen 6-13-1789 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 31 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Ehoda 3-25-1793 

Hulda 8-30-1798 

Jason 1-14-1801 

Children of Asa and Mary Holloway. 

Stanton 2-2G-1787 

Mary 2-20-1789 

Sarah 8-19-1791 

Isaac 6-15-1793 

Hannah 10-15-1796 

Eli 9-18-1798 

James 12-12-1800 

Children of William and Sarah Holloway. 

John 5- 7-1791 

Isaac 5-19-1792 

Betsy 9-17-1793 

Pleasant 4-23-1795 

Samuel 9-12-1797 

George 6- 3-1800 

Children of Ashley and Milley Johnson. 

Jeptha 6- 9-1783 

Jonathan 3- 8-1785 

Daniel 7-29-1787 

William 1- 1-1790 

Nancy 4-24-1792 

Abner 9- 1-1794 

Agatha 1-17-1797 

Martha 7- 7-1799 

Children of Joseph and Agatha Johnson. 

Simeon 6-20-1786 

Joseph 2-10-1788 

Betsy 1-22-1790 

John 7-24-1793 

Polly 12-16-1795 

Kitty Winston 3-15-1798 

Elvy 8-29-1800 



32 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Watkins 1-23-1803 

Caroline Agnes 9- 9-1805 

Children of Samuel and Susanna Johnson. 

Thomas 3-21-1790 

Samuel 12-28-1791 

Moorman 1-27-1794 

James 1-23-1796 

garah 3-28-1798 

John .'.'.'..' 4-19-1800 

Children of Moorman and Elizabeth Johnson. 

Susanna 10- 3-1780 

James 12-19-1782 

Milley 1- 7-1785 

Micajah Moorman 1-15-1788 

Christopher H- 2-1791 

Thomas Chiles 13- 8-1794 

Charles M 9-20-1797 

Achillis Clark 3-11-1800 

Children of William and Agatha Johnson. 

Nancy 6-23-1791 

Children of William and Sarah Johnson. 

Unity 6-17-1793 

Eichard 9-11-1794 

Jerusha 12-24-1796 

Obadiah 5-26-1798 

Gideon 4-26-1800 

Children of John Jr. and Rhoda Johnson. 

Joseph 4- 7-1791 

Mieajah • 12-28-1792 

John 1- 3-1795 

Charles 1-14-1797 

Pollv 1-14-1799 

Lewis 3- 7-1801 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 33 

Children of Christopher and Milley Johnson. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Susanna 7- 3-1785 

Micajah 1-11-1788 

Penelope 2-24-1790 

James 9-26-1792 

Elizabeth 5-18-1795 

Children of Charles and Susanna Johnson. 

David Terrell 3-10-1797 

Anna 10-18-1798 

Susanna 7-17-1800 

Children of David and Rachel Johnson. 

Collins 1- 3-1799 

William 10-30-1800 

Children of Christopher and Sarah Johnson. 

Samuel Hargrave 11-21-1785 

Caleb 12- 1-1787 

Patsy 7-19-1791 

Lilliburn 8-20-1793 

Zalinda 12- 8-1796 

Adeliza 10-24-1799 

Children of William and Susanna Johnson. 

Ashley 7-17-1756 

Agnes 1-31-1758 

Martha 3-19-1760 

Jeptha 3-19-1761 

Euth 6-12-1763 

Eobert 5-18-1765 

Kewby 2-12-1767 

Sarah 9-29-1769 

William 1- 6-1772 

Johnathan 12-22-1774 

Elijah -- 7-11-1777 

Ann 1-11-1780 



34 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Benjamin and Mary Johnson. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

William 12-22-1757 

James 12-20-1759 

Eachel 3-26-1762 

Elizabeth 5-15-1764 

Mildred 7- 4-1766 

Christopher 3- 4-1769^ 

Lemuel 8-27-1782^ 

Anselm 3-25-1786 

Matilda 1-28-1792 

Polly 2-13-1797 

Gerard and Lucinda 3-21-1799 

Children of Christopher and Betty Johnson. 

Charles 9-27-1753 

Ann 8-13-1755 

Mary 5-27-1757 

Benjamin 2-21-1759 

Agnes 1-18-1761 

Christopher 1- 4-1763 

Nicholas — ■ 

Betty 8- 3-1767 

Thomas 1- 4-1770 

Timothy 3-30-1772 

David 10- 6-1776 

Colhns 10- 6-1776 

Mourning 1-31-1779 

Samuel 7-30-17^2 

Children of Charles and Molley Johnson. 

Moorman 2-21-1780 

Betty 10-22-1781 

Children of James and Rachel Johnson. 

John 7-24-1782 

Micajah 5-24-1784 

Edmond 5-24-1786 

Ehoda 5-27-1788 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS, 35 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Chiles 11-28-1790 

Barclay 11-18-1793 

Achillis 2- 6-1795 

Lydia 5-11-1797 

Susanna 3-18-1800 

Children of Nicholas and Patsy Johnson. 

Nancy 2- 3-1789 

Garland 10-26-1790 

Pleasant 10- 4-1795 

Jessie 6-26-1798 

Johanna 3-26-1800 

Salley 10-23-1804 

Minor 5-29-1806 

Martha 11-23-1809 

Children of Newby and Sarah Johnson. 

Achillis Douglas 6-18-1802 

Edward Lynch 1- 9-1806 

Children of Jonathan and Judith Johnson. 

Wm. Douglas 11-14-1805 

Micajah T 11-23-1807 

Eobert 2-19-1810 

Elizabeth 7-14-1812 

Susannah 9-29-1814 

Achillis Douglas 2- 8-1817 

Sarah Ann 10-28-1819 

Mildred Tyree 1-12-1822 

Children of Simeon and Delilah Johnson. 
Alfred Carroll 8-18-1806 

Children of Anselm and Deborah Johnson. 

Anselm Douglas 3-18-1811 

Children of Nicholas and Caty Johnson. 

Gri£Bn 1- 5-1812 

Mary Ann 12-30-1830 



36 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of Isaac and Sarah Johnson. 

BORN". 
Mo. Day. Year. 

John 9-30-1787 

Elizabeth 4-18-1789 

Joseph 3-30-1791 

Mary 2-29-1793 

Catharine 3- 5-1795 

Sarah 12- 1-1798 

Isaac 4 -3-1801 

Children of John and Martha James. 

Benjamin 10-13-1799 

Elizabeth 4-16-1801 

Children of Henry and Mary Kerby. 

Esther 11- 5-1762 

Obadiah 2-13-1765 

Jeremiah 10- 5-1767 

Archibald 11- 6-1769 

Ezekiel 6-23-1771 

Sarah 9-11-1773 

Hendrick 12-17-1774 

Orpah 10-28-1775 

Mary 1- 6-1778 

Eichard 6-30-1780 

Children of John and Mary Lynch. 

Matilda '' 1-19-1769 

Zalinda 2- 6-1772 

Edward 6 24-1774 

^S^ 3-31-1777 

John 8-20-1779 

Christopher 5-19-1782 

Mary 12- 6-1784 

Charles Clark 4 1787 

William 4- 9-1789 

Anselm 11-25-1793 

Hannah B 11-26-1796 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 37 

Children of Joel and Sarah Lewis. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

John 7-13-1791 

Children of Edward and Mary Lynch. 

Sarali 10- 8-1796 

Zalinda 7- 6-1798 

Micajah Terrell 10- 1-1800 

John 8-15-1802 

Charles Edward 10-30-1804 

Christopher 3-29-1807 

Mary 9-15-1808 

Matilda_ 9-16-1811 

ferrzabeth Ann 8-24-1813 

Children of Jocabad and Sarah Lodge. 

Wm. Johnson 3-21-1794 

Laban 7-16-1796 

Nelson 2- 1-1799 

Selina ^ 6-17-1801 

Children of Zachariah and Betty Moorman. 

Anna 10-18-1756 

Molly 5-10-1758 

Milley 10- 2-1760 

Henry 12-11-1762 

Eachel 1-26-1765 

Agatha 5-13-1767 

Thomas 10-22-1769 

Samuel 

Children of Micajah and Sarah Macy. 

John 7- 1-1795 

Sarah 11-25-1796 

Samuel 4- 1-1802 

Children of Micajah and Susannah Moorman. 

Cliiles 6-16-1758 

Thomas 12-11-1755 

Betty 10-30-1760 



38 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Eachel 3-11-1763 

Milley 3-15-1765 

Charles 1- 8-1767 

Ehoda 8-15-1769 

Susannah 

Dosha 

Nancy 3-18-1775 

Sarah 6-1 1778 

Micajah 9-20-1779 

Molly 4-15-1782 

Children of John and Ann Martin. 

Samuel 7-29-1768 

James 9-14-1770 

Sarah 3-28-1773 

Children of Stephen and Mary Morelan. 

Aden 7-20-1774 

Abigal 11-14-1776 

Jonah 3-16-1779 

William 12-11-1781 

Isaac • 4-18-1785 

Huldah 3-28-1788 

Eichard 2-18-1791 

Mordica 5-14-1793 

Children of Thomas and Africa Moorman. 

Eeuben 3-29-1777 

Nancy 1- 7-1779 

Micajah 3-10-1781 

John Hoye 11-13-1783 

Chiles 8-15-1786 

Thomas 1- 5-1789 

James 2-10-1791 

Charles Terrell 6-25-1795 

Children of Charles and Elizabeth Moorman. 

William 3- 8-1792 

Nancy Paxon 7-20-1796 



BIKTHS AND DEATHS. Sd, 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Fanny Herndon 4-10-1798 

Eobert Alexander 2-15-1801 

Children of Daniel and Elizabeth McPherson. 

Mary 10-30-1783 

Anna 6-27-1786 

Sarah 7-29-1789 

Elizabeth • 3-10-1792 

Martha 4-22-1794 

Children of Beverly and Ann Milner. 

Dudley 7-15-1779 

Euth 4-27-1783 

Moses 7- 4-1785 

Beverly 1- 1-1788 

Sarah 4-7 1790 

Amos 11-29-1792 

Joseph 10-16-1795 

John 8-25-1800 

Children of Reuben and Lydia Moorman. 

Pauline 3-12-1800 

Children of Andrew and Sarah Millbourne. 

Zenas 9- 8-1783 

Samuel 12-12-1786 

Johnathan • 1-20-1789 

William 6-17-1791 

Jacob 5-10-1792 

Lot 7-31-1795 

Annie 8-24-1797 

David 3-15-1800 

Children of Isaac and Elizabeth Pidgeon. 

John 1-10-1794 

William 3-5- 1796 

Isaac 3-10-1798 

Eachel 2-25-1801 



40 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

Children of John Paxon. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Dosha 5-12-1794: 

Children of Asa and Grace Plummer. 

Eli 2-11-1797 

Deborah 10-20-1798 

Anna 4-10-1802 

Jesse 7-12-1803 

Ezra 11-21-11805 

Children of Minter Pirn and Jemima Perdue. 

Gresham 12-28-1790 

Eebecca 6-23-1793 

Children of Zenas and Elizabeth Preston. 

Albert 4-17-1813 

Vickers 9-29-1815 

Urban 10- 9-1817 

Children of Enoch and Matilda Roberts. 

John Lynch 11-12-1789 

John Lynch 5-10-1791 

Samuel 10- 2-1793 

William 2-28-1798 

Mary Ann 11-28-1799 

Zalinda 1806 

Children of Joseph and Martha Rhodes. 

Amy 10-12-1791 

Moses 4-28-1794 

Children of William and Phebe Stanton. 
Aaron 8-10-1784 

Children of James and Mary Stanton. 

Hannah 12-19-1794 

John 12- 7-1798 

Children of William and Catharine Stanton. 

Elizabeth 10-18-1789 

Phebe 12-31-1791 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 



41 



BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

^nn 9-28-1794 

Mahlon 3-28-1797 

Samuel 10- 1-1799 

Children of Latham and Huldah Stanton. 

Hepzibah 10-14-1798 

Elizabeth Hunnicutt 12-16-1800 

Gulielma 4- 8-1803 

Daniel 4- 6-1805 

William 9- 7-1807 

Stephen Butler 9- 8-1809 

Children of Joseph and Dosha Stratton. 

David 11-23-1793 

Susanna H" 3-l'^95 

Nancy 11-16-1797 

Joseph 2-2-1800 

Micajah 1-22-1802 

Esther 3- 4-1804 

Children of Daniel and Mary Stratton. 

David 6- 6-1782 

John 12-16-1784 

Margaret 8-11-1787 

Mar3^ 2- 6-1793 

Daniel 3- 9-1797 

Children of Benjamin and Anna Stratton. 

Eebecca 12-24-1796 

Naomi 7-28-1798 

Levi 8-23-1800 

Children of Mahlon and Salley Stratton. 

Levi 5- 8-1799 

Children of Micajah and Sarah Terrell. 

Eobert 5-23-1755 

Elizabeth 8- 6-1757 

Agatha 9-28-1759 

Charles L 10-30-1761 



42 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Sarah 11- 3-1763 

Samuel 4- 7-1766 

Ann 10-26-1768 

Mary 4-28-1773 

Children of Edward and Mary Terrell. 

Lucy 4-25-1773 

Sarah 10-15-1775 

Edward 2-18-1778 

Elizabeth 9- 8-1781 

Mary 7- 2-1784 

Johnson 10-21-1786 

Children of David and Mary Terrell. 

Christopher 5- 5-1793 

David 11-26-1795 

Judith 1-23-1798 

Pleasant 2- 2-1791 

Children of Edward and Jane Terrell. 

Judith 8-28-1796 

Christopher 7-18-1798 

Gerard 11- 3-1800 

Jean 12-25-1802 

Children of Richard and Jane Tullas. 

John 9-26-1762 

Elizabeth 2- 3-1765 

Eichard 8-24-1768 

Martha 2- 9-1771 

Children of John Tullas. 
Nancy 1-11-1801 

Children of John and Mary Timberlake. 

Elizabeth 2- 9-1783 

Mary 8-26-1784 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 43^ 

BORN. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Eichard 9- 6-1786 

Agnes 7-16-1788 

Christopher 9- 6-1790 

John 9- 4-1793 

Mourning 10- 8-1794 

Sally 8-26-1797 

Children of Joseph and Elizabeth Wright. 

Thomas 9- 7-1779 

Nancy 2" 1-1783 

Mary 10- 6-1784 

John 10-27-1786 

EHzabeth 10-27-1788 

Benjamin 9-21-1791 

Children of Samuel and Chloe Welch. 

Euth 7- 7-1784 

John 12-19-1785 

Moses 2-10-1788 

Turner 2-16-1790 

Children of Abraham and Lettia Wildman. 

Jonah 7- 8-1779 

Elizabeth 7-11-1781 

Amey 3-25-1783 

Deborah 8-21-1785 

Mahlon 1-19-1788 

Mary 2-20-1790 

Sarah 2-26-1792 

Nancy 7- 6-1794 

Jesse 10- 1-1796 

William 7-19-1800 



44 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

HECORD OF DEATHS AMONGST FRIENDS OF CAMPBELL AND BED- 
FORD COUNTIES. TAKEN FROM THE OLD 
SOUTHRIVER MEETING BOOK. 

DIED. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Anthony, Judith, wife of Christopher Anthony 1- 9-1774 

Ballard, Byruni, son of Byrum and Eleanor Ballard. . .12--20-1769 

Bloxom, Obadiah, 4- 8-1790 

Ballard, Eachel, (82 years of age) 6-10-1792 

Butterworth, Isaac, son of Benjamin and Eachel 12- 2-1801 

Butler, James, Jr 11- 8-1801 

Butler, Joseph, 9-24-1802 

Ballard, James, 5- 7-1810 

Ballard, William — • 8-1816 

Ballard, Barclay, 5- 4-1814 

Butler, Stephen, 12- 2-1815 

Bailey, Exom, 5-10-1818 

Butler, Matilda, daughter of Stephen and Matilda Butler 9-20-1817 

Butler, Matilda, wife of Stephen Butler 11-10-1817 

Bailey, Anna, wife of Exom 8-11-1818 

Bond, Isaac, 12- 7-1823 

Butler, Mary, daughter of James L. and Deborah Butler 8- 8-1825 

Ballard, Judith, wife of Barclay Ballard 7-17-1824 

Butler, James, 6-26-1828 

Curie, Sarah, daughter of Joseph and Eebecca Curie. . . 2- 6-1792 

Curie, Eebecca, (40 years of age) 7-17-1793 

Candler, Agatha, wife of James Candler 12-31-1817 

Candler, James,, 1- 3-1826 

Douglas, Eobert Terrell, son of Achillis and Elizabeth 

Douglas 9- 7-1780 

Douglas, Agatha, 10- 5-1794 

Douglas, Achillis, (aged 57) 11- 5-1810 

Douglas, Charles Terrell, 8- 5-1818 

Douglas, Mary Terrell, (aged 29) 10-13-1820 

Douglas, Elizabeth, widow of Achillis 2- 8-1826 

Davis, Samuel, son of William and Zalinda Davis 9- 4-1818 

Davis, John, son of William and Zalinda Davis 3-16-1824 

Davis, Sarah, wife of Henry Davis 3- 9-1824 

Davis, William, 9- 1-1829 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 45 

DIED. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Davis, Mary, widow of WilHam, (aged 85) 2-29-1839 

Davis, Zalinda, widow of William Davis, Jr. (aged 67) . 5- 9-1839 

Davis, Annis, widow of Samuel Davis, (aged 91) 12-14-1831 

Eccols, William, 4 — -1771 

Eecols, Sarah, 2 1778 

Eccols, William, 2-16-1794 

Embree, Eachel, daughter of Moses and Mary Embree. . 4- 9-1788 

Embree, Maiy, wife of Moses Embree 2- 1-1793 

Farmer, Henry, 5- 9-1787 

Farmer, Agnes, 11-10-1797 

Fisher, Eobert, 8-27-1797 

Fowler, John, 3-12-1810 

Fowler, Ann, (aged 77) 4- 7-1819 

Hanna, Caleb, son of Robert and Catharine Hanna. . . . 7-15-1790 
Hanna, David, son of Eobert and Catharine Hanna. . . .10-25-1791 
Hanna, Esther, daughter of Eobert and Catharine 

Hanna 11- 5-1791 

Hendrick, Moses, 9-11-1794 

Hargrave, Elizabeth D. J., 6-14-1847 

Johnson, Martha, daughter of William and Susannah 

Johnson 5-14-1760 

Johnson, Agnes, daughter of William and Susannah 

Johnson 11- 8-1773 

Johnson, Jeptha, son of William and Susannah Johnson. 3-8-1775 

Jolmson, Benjamin, 8-18-1769 

Johnson, Edmund, son of James and Eachel Johnson. . 7-18-1790 
Johnson, Achillis, son of James and Eachel Johnson. .11-11-1796 
Johnson, Chiles, son of James and Eachel Johnson. . 5-29-1794 

Johnson, Timothy, 12- 5-1801 

Johnson, Sarah, wife of William Johnson, Jr. (of Sen- 
eca) (aged 40) 5-21-1804 

Johnson, Eachel, wife of David, 12- 5-1805 

Johnson, Agatha, wife of Joseph Johnson (aged 42) . , 7-26-1805 

Johnson, Betty, wife of Christopher, Sr., 3-16-1809 

Johnson Martha, wife of Nicholas Johnson 11-23-1809 

Johnson, John, Sr. (Ivy Creek) (aged 84) 8-31-1816 

Johnson, David, (aged 63) 4-15-1816 



46 BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

DIED. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Johnson, Sarah Ann, daughter of Johnathan and Judith 

Johnson 3- 7-1821 

Johnson. Dehorah, wife of Lillibum, 5-13-1820 

Johnson, l^lildred Tyree, daughter of Johnathan and Ju- 
dith Johnson 1-12-1822 

Johnson, Sarah, wife of ISTewby, 9-26-1826 

Johnson, Mary, (aged 93) 7-25-1849 

Johnson, Gerard, 6-16-1857 

Johnson, Judith, wife of Johnathan Johnson, 3-26-1848 

Jones, Martha, widow of Thomas Jones, (aged 82) 2-26-1825 

Kerby, Elizabeth, (in her 80th year) 11- 6-1778 

Kerby, Eichard, Jr., 10 1781 

Lynch, Salley, daughter of John and Mary 2-25-1794 

Lynch, Anna, widow of Charles Lynch 2-14-1804 

Lynch, Hannah B., wife of Stephen Lynch 11-10-1817 

Lynch, Anselm, son of John Lynch, Sr 11-12-1814 

Lynch, John, 10-31-1820 

Lynch, Mary, (aged 77) 8- 5-1829 

Moorman, Thomas, 11-10-1767 

Moorman, Cliiles, son of Micajah and Susannah 9-22-1768 

Moorman, Betty, wife of Zachariah 7-14-1773 

Moorman, Eeuben, (aged 36) 9- 7-1813 

Macy, Sarah, daughter of Micajah and Sarah Macy 8-12-1797 

Macy, Sarah, wife of Micajah Macy 1-25-1797 

Moorland, William, son of Stephen and Mary Moorland. 6-3 -1786 

Plummer, Deborah, 10-11-1802 

Plummer, Anna, 8-23-1804 

Pidgoon, Elizabeth, wife of Isaac Pidgeon 8-15-1806 

Pidgeon, Sarah, wife of Isaac Pidgeon 5-1-1810 

Eussell, Elizabeth, 11-18-1763 

Eoberts, John Lynch, 7-21-1790 

Eoberts, John Lynch, (two sons of the same name) . . . .11-16-1813 

Eoberts, Enoch, ,. 4- 7-1819 

Roberts, Zalinda, daughter of Enoch 11-21-1814 

tloberts, Matilda, 12-22-1830 

Stanton, Phebe, wife of William Stanton, (aged 63) . . . 5-22-1802 
Stabler, Mary Annis, wife of Eobinson Stabler 8- 5-1838 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 47 

DIED. 
Mo. Day. Year. 

Terrell, Samuel, son of Micajah and Sarah Terrell 11 1776 

Terrell, David, (aged 76) 2-14-1805 

Tellas, Jane, (aged 79) 1-22-1813 

Terrell, Jane, 6- 2-1815 

Welch, Moses, son of Samuel and Chloe 6-26-1790 

West, Jane, 12-20-1791 

Ward, Sarah, 1-20-1792 

Wildman, William, 3-10-1801 



MARRIAGES 



MAKRIAGE CERTIFICATES TAKEN FEOM THE OLD 

RECORD BOOK OF CEDAR CREEK MEETmG, 

HANOVER COUNTY, VIRGINIA. 



WHEREAS Achillis Douglas, son of John Douglas, of Orange 
county, and Elizabeth Terrell, daughter of Micajah Terrell, 
of Caroline county, having published their intentions of taking each 
other in marriage before several Monthly Meetings of the people 
called Quakers, according to good order used amongst them, whose 
proceedings therein after deliberate consideration thereof, with re- 
gard to the righteous law of God, and example of his people recorded 
in the Scriptures of truth, in that case was approved of by the said 
Meeting, they appearing clear of all others and having consent of 
parents and friends concerned. 

Now these are, therefore, to certify to all whom it may con- 
cern, that for the full accomplishment of their intention this 10th 
day of the 10th Month, 1779, they, the said Achillis Douglas and 
Elizabeth Terrell, appearing in a public assembly of the said people 
and others, met together at their public Meeting House in Caroline 
county, and in a solemn manner he, the said Achillis Douglas, did 
take the said Elizabeth Terrell by the hand and openly declared as 
f olloweth : Friends, you are my witnesses that I do this day take 
this, my friend, Elizabeth Terrell, to be my wife, promising, with 
the Lord's assistance, to be a good and faithful Husband to her till 
death separates us (or words to that effect), then and there Eliza- 
beth Terrell did in like manner declare as foUoweth : Friends, you 
are my witnesses that I do this day take this, my friend, Achillis 
Douglas, to be my husband, promising, with divine assiscance, to 
be to him a good and faithful wife until death should separate us 
(or words to that effect). And the said Accillis Douglas and Eli- 
zabeth (now his wife) as a further confirmation, did then and there 
to these present set their hands, she assuming his name. And we 
whose names are hereunto subscribed being present at the solemni- 
zation of their said marriage and subscription as witnesses, have 
hereunto set our hands, the day and date first written. 

Achillis Douglas, 
Eliz^vbeth Douglas. 



52 MAKRIAGES. 

Witnesses : — Micajah Terrell, Elizabeth Eastin, Pleasant Ter- 
rell, Sarah Terrell, John Douglas, Ann Barksdale, Ursula Cheadle, 
Salk\y Hargrave, Elijah Johnson, Milley Douglas, Mary Hargrave, 
Catlet Jones, Rachel Moomian, Eebecca Terrell, Agatha Terrell, 
Thomas Terrell, Elizabeth Cheadle, Judith Cheadle, Martha Har- 
grave, Salley Chiles, Lucy Cheadle. 



Wliereas Pleasant Cobb, son of Robert Cobb, of Caroline county, 
and Amy Terrell, daughter of Thomas Terrell, of said county, hav- 
ing published their intention of taking each other in marriage, be- 
fore several Monthly Meetings of the people called Quakers, accord- 
ing to the good order used among them, vt^hose proceedings therein, 
after deliberate consideration, was approved by the said Meetings, 
they appearing clear of all others, and having consent of parents, 
and other Friends concerned. Now these are to certify all whom it 
may concern, that for the further accomplishment of their inten- 
tions, this 15th day of the 6th Month, 1785, they the said Pleasant 
Cobb and Am^ Terrell, appearing in a public assembly of the said 
people, met together at their public Meeting House in Caroline 
county, and in a solemn manner he, the said Pleasant Cobb, did take 
the said Amey Terrell by the hand and did openly declare as fol- 
loweth : Friends, you are my witnesses that I do this day take this, 
my Friend, Amey Terrell, to be my wife, promising, with divine 
assistance, to be unto her a true and faithful Husband until death 
should separate us (or words to the like effect) ; then and there Am- 
ey Terrell declared as f oUoweth : Friends, you are my witnesses, that 
I do this day take my friend. Pleasant Cobb, to be my husband, 
promising, with divine assistance, to be unto him a true and faithful 
wife until death should separate us (or words to that purpose) . And 
the said Pleasant Cobb and Amey, his wife, as a further confirma- 
tion, did then and there to these presents set their hands, she assum- 
ing his name as Cobb, and we whose names are hereunto subscribed, 
being present at the solemnization of their said marriage and sub- 
scription, and as witnesses have hereunto set our hands the day and 
date above written. 

Pleasant Cobb, 
Amey Cobb. 



MARRIAGES. 53 

Witnesses : — Nancy Hnnnicntt, Eliza Cheadle, Eebecca Terrell, 
Milicent McGhee, Ehoda Terrell, Mary Terrell, Agatha Cobb, Eachel 
Moorman, Pleasant Terrell, James Bates, Ursula Cheadle, Eebecca 
Winston, Clark T. Moorman, Samuel Winston, JSTancy Macgey, 
Mathew P. Terrell, ISTathan Winston, ISTancy Bates, Thomas Ter- 
rell, Samuel Cobb, Jos. Hunnicutt, Martha Winston, Jonathan 
Terrell, Lewis Cobb. 



^Vliereas Mathew P. Terrell, son of Thomas Terrell, of Caroline 
county, and Salley Moorman, daughter of Clarke T. Moorman, of 
said county, having published their intentions of taking each other 
in marriage, before several Monthly Meetings of the people called 
Quakers, according to the good order used among them, and after 
deliberate consideration, was approved by the said Meeting, they 
appearing clear of all others, and having consent of parents and oth- 
er concerned Friends. Now these are to certify to all whom it may 
concern that for the further accomplishment of their intentions this 
11th day of the 5th Month, 1788, they the said Mathew P. Terrell 
and Salley Moorman, appearing in a public Assembly of the said 
People in the county of Caroline, and in a solemn manner, he the 
said Mathew P. Terrell taking the said Salley Moorman by the hand 
did then and there openly declare as followeth : In the presence of 
this assembly, I take Salley Moorman to be my wife, promising, 
with Divine assistance, to be unto her a faithful Husband until 
death doth separate us (or words to that effect). Likewise the said 
Salley Moorman declared as followeth : In the presence of this 
assembly, I t::.ke Mathew P. Terrell to be my Husband, promising, 
with divine assistance, to be unto him a faithful wife until death 
doth separate us (or words to that effect). And the said Mathew P. 
Terrell and Salley Moorman (now his wife) as a further confirma- 
tion, did then and there to these presents set their hands (she as- 
suming her name to be Terrell) and we whose names are hereunto 
subscribed, being present at the solemnizing of their said mar- 
riage, and subscription, and as witnesses, have hereunto set our 
hands the day and date above written. 

Mathew P. Terrell, 
Salley Terrell. 



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MARRIAGES. 55 

Witnesses: — Pleasant Terrell, Mary Hargrave, David Terrell, 
Elizabeth Hargrave, Micajah Terrell, Maiy Harris, Thomas Terrell, 
Salley Chiles, Thomas Cliiles, Elizabeth Terrell, Jesse Hargrave, 
Eachel Burftiss, Judith Cheadle, Anthony Winston, Ann McGhee, 
Lucy Cheadle, George Winston, Eachel Moorman, Deborah Terrell, 
Eobt. Farish, Molley Chiles, Steven Farish, Eebecca Winston. 



Whereas, Joseph Hargrave, son of Samuel Hargi'ave, deceased, 
of Caroline County, and Eachel Ten-ell, daughter of Pleasant Ter- 
rell, of the said County, having publickly declared their intentions 
of taking each other in marriage, before several Monthly Meetings 
of the people called Quakers in said County of Hanover, according 
to the good order used amongst them whose proceedings therein 
was approved by the Meeting, they appearing clear of all other en- 
gagements, and having consent of parents and Friends. 

Now these are to certify all whom it may concern, that for the 
accomplishment of their said intentions, this 14th day of the 3rd 
month 1790, they, the said Joseph Hargrave and Eachel Terrell, 
appearing in a publick assembly at our Meeting House in Caroline 
County, and in a solemn manner he, the said Joseph Hargrave, 
taking the said Eachel Terrell by the hand, did openly declare as 
f olloweth : "Friends, you are my witnesses that I take Eachel Ter- 
rell to be my wife, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto 
her a faithful husband until death," or words to that effect, and 
then and there, in the said assembly, she, the said Eachel Terrell, 
did declare in substance as f olloweth : "Friends, ye are my wit- 
nesses that I take Joseph HargTave to be my husband, promising, 
with Divine assistance, to be unto him a faithful wife until death," 
and the said Jos. Hargrave and Eachel, his now wife, as a further 
confirmation thereof, did then and there to these presents set their 
hands, and we whose names are hereunto subscribed, being present 
at the solemnizing of the above said marriage and subscription, as 
witnesses have hereunto set our hands, the day and date as above. 

Joseph Hargrave, 
Eachel Hargrave. 

Witnesses : — Pleasant Terrell, Jesse Hargrave, Samuel Har- 
grave, Thomas Hargrave, Samuel Terrell, John Hargrave, Eobert 
Terrell, Obadiah Crew, Christopher Terrell, William Burrus, Pol- 
ley Hewlett, Heni7 Burruss, Mathew P. Terrell, Pleasant Cobbs, 



56 MAEHIAGES. 

Jonathan Terrell, John Peatross, Clark T. Moorman, Thomas Ter- 
rell, Samuel Clules, Millicent Hargrave, Nancy Terrell, Amey 
Cobbs, Eebecca Terrell, Eachel Moorman, Margaret Terrell, Salley 
Terrell, Ehoda Terrell, Ehoda Moorman, Judith Harris, Elizabeth 
Cheadle, Lucy Hargrave, Ursula Cheadle, Lucy Temple, Catharine 
Ellis, Susana Hargrave, Molley Terrell, Sarah Terrell, Lealy 
Cobbs, Milhcent Hewlett. 



Whereas, David Terrell, of Camjibell County, and Patty John- 
son (daughter', Ashley and Martha Johnson), of Louisa County, 
having declared their intentions of marriage with each other before 
several Monthly Meetings of the people called Quakers at Cedar 
Creek, in the County of Hanover, according to the good order used 
among them, they appearing clear of all other marriage engage- 
ments, were approved by said meeting. 

These are to certify all whom it may concern, that for the accom- 
plishment of their said intention, they, the said David Terrell and 
Patty Johnson, appearing in a Publick Meeting of the aforesaid 
people, at Cedar Creek Meeting House in Hanover County afore- 
said, this twenty-fifth day of the Second month, in the year of our 
Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety-three; and in a 
solemn manner he, the said Da^dd Terrell, taking the said Patty 
Johnson by the hand, did openly declare as followeth: "In the 
presence of the Lord and this assembly, I take Patty Jolmson to 
be my wife, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto her a true 
and faithful husband until death shall separate us," or words to 
the same effect, and then and there in the said assembly the said 
Patty Johnson did in like manner declare as followeth : "In the 
presence of the Lord and this assembly, I take David Ten-ell to be 
my husband, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a 
true and faithful wife until death shall separate us," or words to 
that effect. And the said David Terrell and Patty, now his wife, 
as a further confirmation of their said marriage did then and there 
to these presents set their names, and we whose names are hereunto 
subscribed, being present at the solemnization of the above said mar- 
riage and subscription in the manner aforesaid as witnesses thereto, 
have also to these presents subscribed our names the day and year 
above written. David Terrell, 

Patty Terrell. 



MARRIAGES. 57 

Witnesses : — Henry Terrell, Samuel Parsons, Mica j ah Crew, 
Clark T. Moorman, William Johnson, Benjamin Bates, Jr., Thomas 
Harris, John Harris, Jonathan Terrell, Mathew Terrell, Thomas 
Ladd, WiUiam Stabler, Nathan Bell, Joshua Stanley, Waddy Stan- 
ley, Gerard Johnson, Ann Jones, Sarah Bell, Mary Brooks, Nancy 
Hunnicutt, Thomas Hatton, Samuel Terrell, John Crew, Jr., 
Eachel Harris, Mary Ladd, Eaehel Ladd, Betsy Watkins, Thomas 
Doswell, Lemuel Crew, Judith Crew, Edith Harris, Tace Crew, 
Sarah Harris, Salley Watlcins, Cattlet Jones, Eobert H. Crew, 
Eachel Moorman, Margaret Crew, Mary Hatton, Susannah Harris, 
Salley Ladd. 



Whereas, Eobert Crew, son of Benjamin Crew, deceased, of 
Charles City County, and Nancy Terrell, daughter of Pleasant and 
Caty Terrell, of Caroline County, having declared their intentions 
of taking each other in marriage, before several Publick Meetings 
of Friends in Virginia (according to the good order used amongst 
them), and having consent of parents and Friends concerned. 

Now, these are to certify all whom it may concern that for the 
full accomplishment of their said marriage this 14th day of 9th 
month 1794, they, the said Eobert Crew and Nancy Terrell, ap- 
pearing in a Publick ]\Ieeting of Friends and others at 'their Meet- 
ing House in the above said County of Caroline, and the said Eob- 
ert Crew, taking the said Nancy Terrell by the hand, did solemnly 
declare as f olloweth : In the presence of this assembly I take Nancy 
Terrell to be my wife, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto 
her a true and faithful husband until death. And then and there, 
in like manner, the said Nancy Terrell did declare as followeth: 
In the presence of this assembly I take Eobert Crew to be my hus- 
band, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a true and 
loving wife until death. And we, whose names are hereunder writ- 
ten, being present at their said solemnization, have as witnesses of 
their said marriage and subscription hereunto set our hands, the 
day and year above written. 

Egbert Crew, 
Nancy Crew. 

Witnesses : — Eachel Hargrave, Amy Cobb, Salley Terrell, 
Pleasant Cobb, John Peatross, Samuel Terrell, Eobert Terrell, 



58 MARRIAGES. 

Margaret Crew, Margaret Terrell, Lucy Hargrave, James D. Ladd, 
John Johnson, ]\Iathe\v Terrell, Joseph Hargrave, Ann Jones, Sal- 
ley Chiles, Jonathan Terrell, Jesse Hargrave, Pleasant Terrell, 
Catlett Jones, Samuel Hargrave. 



^Aliereas, Timothy Terrell, son of Thomas Terrell, of Caroline 
County, and Miriam Murdauh Hunnicutt, daughter of James Hun- 
nicutt, deceased, late of the County of Goochland, having published 
their intentions of taking each other in marriage before several 
Monthly Meetings of the people called Quakers in Hanover Coun- 
ty, agi-eeable to the good order used among them (they appearing 
clear of all others), and having the consent of parents and Friends 
concerned. 

Now, these are to certify all whom it may concern, that for the 
full accomplishment of their marriage, they, the said Timothy Ter- 
rell and Miriam Murdaugh Hunnicutt, appearing in a Publick 
Meeting of the aforesaid people and others, at their Meeting House 
at Geneto in Goochland County, the 10th day of the Sixth month 
in the year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety- 
eight, the said Timothy taking the said Miriam by the hand and 
openly declaring as followeth : "In the presence of this assembly. 
I take Miriam Murdauh Hunnicutt to be my wife, promising, with 
Divine assistance, to be unto her a true and faithful husband until 
death." And there in the said assembly the said Miriam Murdauh 
Hunnicutt did in like manner declare as followeth : "In the pres- 
ence of this assembly I take Timothy Terrell to be my husband, 
promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a true and faith- 
ful wife until death," or to that effect. And as a further confirma- 
tion of their marriage, they, the said Timothy Terrell and Miriam 
Murdauh, now his wife, did then and there to these presents set 
their hands, and we whose names nvv. hereunto subscribed being 
present at the solemnization of their said marriage and subscrip- 
tion, have as witnesses thereof, hereunto set our hands, the day and 
yaw above written. Timothy Terrell, 

Miriam M. Terrell, 

Witnesses: — John Hunnicutt, Joseph Terrell. James Hunni- 
cutt, Joseph Hunnicutt, William H. Pleasants. Obadiah Crew, Sam- 
uel Couch, Thomas Harris, Samuel Parsons, Jesse Crew. Benjamin 



MARRIAGES. 59 

Kussel, Samuel P. Parsons, Tliomas Hunniciitt, Ann Hnnnicutt, 
Mary Peatross, Elizabetli Winston, Elizabeth Peatross, Mary Pleas- 
ants, Elizabeth Pleasants, Henrietta M. Pleasants, Elizabeth Stan- 
ley, Susannah Hatton, Mary P. Younghusband, Amey Peatross, 
Margaret P. Parsons, Mary Hatton, Sarah Parson, Mary Brooks. 



Whereas, John Bell, son of Xathan Bell, of the County of Han- 
over, and Joanna Terrell, daughter of Thomas Terrell, of the Coun- 
ty of Caroline, having declared their intentions of taking each other 
in marriage before two Monthly Meetings of the people called 
Quakers, according to the good order used among them, and having 
permission of parents and Friends concerned. 

These are to certify all whom it may concern, that for the full 
accomplisbment of their said marriage that they, the said John 
Bell and Joanna Terrell, appearing at a Publick Meeting of the 
aforesaid people and others at their Meeting House in Caroline 
County the twelfth day of the Fifth month One Thousand and 
Eight Hundred, and the said John Bell taking the said Joanna 
Terrell by the hand, did in a solemn manner declare as followeth : 
"In the presence of the Lord and before this assembly I take this 
my friend Joanna Terrell to be my wife, promising, with Divine 
assistance, to be unto her a true and loving husband until death." 
And then and there in the same assembly the said Joanna Terrell 
did in like manner declare as followeth: "In the presence of the 
Lord and before this assembly I take this my friend John Bell to 
be my husband, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him 
a true and loving mfe until death" (or words to that purport), and 
as a further confirmation of their said marriage the said John Bell 
and Joanna., his now wife (she assuming the name of her husband), 
have hereunto set their hands, and we whose names are hereunto 
subscribed being present at the solemnization and subscription, 
have as witnesses set out hands, the day and year above written. 

John Bell, 
Joanna Bell. 

Witnesses : — Thomas Terrell, Joseph Terrell, Rebecca Bell, Mar- 
garet Terrell, Pleasant Cobb, Jonathan Terrell, Ann Peatross, Jesse 
Terrell, Lemuel Crew, Eebecca Terrell, Mathew Terrell, Timothy 
Terrell, Nancy Chiles, Caty Terrell, Mary B. Terrell, Sally Terrell, 
Pleasant Terrell, Lewis Cobb, Amey Cobb, Mary Bell. 



60 MARRIAGES. 

Whereas, Timothy Terrell, son of Thomas Terrell, of Caroline 
County, and Mary Terrell, daughter of Pleasant Terrell, of said 
County, haWng published their intention of taking each other in 
marriage before several Monthly Meetings of Friends, according 
to the good order used among them, which, after deliberate consid- 
eration, was approved by the said meetings, they appearing clear 
of all other marriage engagements, and having consent of parents 
and other concerned Friends. 

Now, this is to certify all whom it may concern, that for the 
further accomplishment of their intention, this 10th day of the 
Third month 1803, they, the said Timothy Terrell and Mary Ter- 
rell appearing in a Pulilick Assembly of Friends in the County of 
Hanover, he, the said Timothy Terrell, in a solemn manner, taking 
the said Mary Terrell by the hand, did openly declare as f oUoweth : 
In the presence of this assembly I take Mary Terrell to be my wife, 
promising, with Divine assistance, to be to her a faithful husband 
until death shall separate us (or words to that effect), and the said 
Mary Ten-ell did in like manner declare as follows : In the pres- 
ence of this assembly I take Timothy Terrell to be my husband, 
promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto liim a faithful wife 
until death shall separate us (or words to that effect). And the 
said Timothy Terrell and Mary (now his wife) did as a further 
confirmation, then and there to these presents set their hands. And 
we whose names are hereunto subscribed, being present at the sol- 
emnization of the said marriage and subscription as witnesses, have 
hereunto set our hands, the day and year above written. 

Timothy Terrell, 
Mary Terrell. 

Witnesses: — Lucy Hargrave, Salley Terrell, Sarali Jones, 
Each el Moorman, Salley Terrell, Jr., Susanna Hatton, Pleasant 
Terrell, Jr., Lemuel TciTell, Catlett Jones, Thomas Harris, Benja- 
min Bates, Jr., Eebecca Terrell, Margaret Crew, Sarah Hatton, 
Jane Ladd, Unity Crew, Mathew Terrell, Joseph Terrell, Pleasant 
Cobb, Micajah Crew, Lemuel Crew, Thomas Stanley, Walter Crew, 
Thomas Hatton, Waddy Stanley, Isaac Ratcliff, Joshua Crew, Wm. 
H. Pleasants, Joseph Wilkins, Thomas Hatton, Jr., Philip Brooks, 
John Maddox. 



MARRIAGES. 61 

Whereas, Joseph Terrell, son of Thomas Terrell, of Caroline 
County, and Sarali Terrell, daughter of Jesse Terrell, of said 
county, having published their intention of taking each other in 
marriage, before several Monthly Meetings of Friends, according 
to the good order used amongst them, which, after deliberate con- 
sideration, was approved by said meetings, they appearing clear of 
all others, and having consent of parents and other concerned 
Friends. 

Now, these are to certify to all whom it may concern, that for 
the accomplishment of their said intentions, this 15th day of the 
Fourth month 1804, they, the said Joseph Terrell and Sarah Ter- 
rell, appearing in a public assembly of Friends in Caroline Coun- 
ty, and in a solemn manner, he, the said Joseph Terrell, taking the 
said Sarah Terrell by the hand, did then and there openly declare 
as f olloweth : "In the presence of this assembly, I take Sarah Ter- 
rell to be my wife, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto 
her a faithful husband until death shall separate us" (or words 
to that effect) . Likewise the said Sarah Terrell declared as f ollow- 
eth : "In the presence of this assembly, I take Joseph Terrell to be 
my husband, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a 
faithful wife until death shall separate us" (or words to the like 
effect). And the said Joseph Terrell and Sarah Terrell (now his 
wife), as a further confirmation did then and there to these pres- 
ents set their hands. And we whose names are hereunto subscribed, 
being present at the solemnization of the said marriage and sub- 
scription, have as witnesses thereof hereunto set our hands, the day 
and year above written. Joseph Terrell. 

Sarah Terrell. 

Witnesses: — Mathew Terrell, Jesse Terrell, Pleasant Cobb, 
Lemuel Terrell, Timothy Terrell, Pleasant Terrell, John Bell, 
Chiles Terrell, Joseph Hargrave, Kobert Terrell, Christopher G. 
Broaddus, Eeuben T. Clarke, Eebecca Terrell, Patsey Hargrave, 
Mary B. Terrell, Lucy Hargrave, Ehoda Cobb, William Fitzhugh, 
Ann Peatross, Caty Terrell, Mary Terrell, Eachel Hargrave, Miriam 
Terrell. 



Whereas, Lemuel Terrell, son of Pleasant Terrell, deceased, of 
the County of Caroline, and Eebecca Terrell, daughter of Thomas 



62 MARRIAGES. 

Terrell, of the said County, having declared their intentions of tak- 
ing each other in marriage before two Monthly Meetings of Friends, 
according to the good order used among them, and having consent 
of parents and Friends concerned. 

These are to certify all whom it may concern, that for the full 
accomplishment of their said marriage, they, the said Lemuel Ter- 
rell and Eebecea Terrell, appearing in a Pul)lick Assembly of the 
aforesaid people and others in the County of Caroline, this 15th 
day of the Fourth month 1804, and the said Lemuel Terrell, taking 
the said Kcbecca Terrell by the hand, did in a solemn manner de- 
clare as followeth : "In the presence of the Lord and before this 
assembly, I take tliis my friend Eebecea Terrell to be my wife, 
])romising, with Divine assistance, to be unto her a true and loving 
husband until death shall sei)arate us," and then and there in the 
same assembly the said Eebecea Terrell did in like manner declare 
as followeth : "In the presence of the Lord and before this assem- 
bly, I take this my friend Lemuel Terrell to be my husl^and, prom- 
ising, with Divine assistance, to be imto him a true and loving wife 
until death shall separate us" (or words to that purport). And as 
a further confirmation of their said marriage, the said Lemuel Ter- 
rell and Eebecea, his wife, have hereunto set their hands. And we 
whose names are hereunto subscribed, being present at the solemn- 
ization and subscription, have hereunto as witnesses set our hands, 
the day and year above WTitten. 

Lemuel Terrell, 
Eebecca Terrell. 

Witnesses: — Joseph Terrell, Mathew Terrell, Pleasant Cobb, 
Timothy Terrell, Pleasant Terrell, John Bell, Chiles Terrell, Jos- 
eph Hargrave, Miriam Terrell, Eeuben T. Clarke, William Fitz- 
hugh, Sarah Terrell, Ann Peatross, Caty Terrell, ]\Iary B. Terrell, 
Marv Terrell, Lucy Hargrave, Ehoda Cobb, Eobert Terrell, Chris- 
topher G. Broaddus, Rhoda Peatross, Patsey Hargrave. 



Whereas, Eobert Ladd, son of William Ladd, deceased, of Charles 
City County, and Mary Terrell, daughter of Pleasant Terrell, de- 
ceased, of Caroline County, having declared their intention of tak- 
ing each other in marriage before several Monthly Meetings of 
Friends held at Cedar Creek in Hanover Coimty, according to the 



MARRIAGES. 63 

good order used among them, their proceedings, after due inquiry 
and deliberate consideration, being approved, and having consent of 
parents and Friends. 

Now, these are to certify all whom it may coiicern, that for the 
accomplishment of their said marriage this 15th day of the Sixth 
month, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and 
Seven, they, the said Robert Ladd and Mary Terrell, appeared at 
a Publick Assembly of Friends and others in Caroline County, and 
the said Robert Ladd, taking the said Mary Terrell by the hand, 
did openly and solemnly declare as follows : "In the presence of 
this assembly, I take Mary Terrell to be my wife, promising, with 
Divine assistance, to be unto her a faithful and loving husband un- 
til death shall separate us," and the said Mary Terrell did then and 
there in the said assembly, in like manner declare as as follows : 
"In the presence of this assembly, I take Robert Ladd to be my 
husband, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a faith- 
ful and loving wife until death shall separate us,'' and the said Rob- 
ert Ladd and Mary, his wife, as a further confirmation of their 
said marriage, did then and there to these presents set their hands, 
and we whose names are hereunto subscribed, being present at the 
solemnization of said marriage and subscription, have as witnesses 
thereof set our hands, the day and year above written. 

Robert Ladd, 
Mary Ladd. 

Witnesses : — Robert Terrell, Joseph Terrell, Jesse Crew, Ben- 
jamin Crew, Thomas Cohb, Lucy Terrell, Mary B. Terrell, Sally 
Terrell, Nancy Terrell. Lucy Hargrave, Jesse Ladd, Joseph Ladd, 
Walter Crew, Pleasant Terrell, Pleasant Cobb, Ann Johnson, Amey 
Cobb, Mahala Terrell, Susan W. Mills, Nancy Crew, Ann Ladd, 
Margaret Vaughan. 



Whereas, Alfred Ricks, of Southampton County, State of Vir- 
ginia, son of Richard Ricks and Julia his wife, and Mary Ann Ter- 
rell, daughter of Samuel Terrell and Elizabeth his wife, of the 
County of Caroline and State aforesaid, having declared their in- 
tentions of marriage with each other before a Monthly Meeting of 
the rehgious Society of Friends held at Cedar Creek, in Hanover 
County, according to the good order used among them, and having- 



6-i MAKKIAGES. 

consent of the parties concerned, their said proposal of marriage 
was allowed by the said meeting. 

Now, these are to certify whom it may concern, that for the full 
accomplishment of their said intentions, this 12th day of the 
Fourth month in the year of our Lord Eighteen Hundred and 
Twenty-two, they, the said Alfred Eicks and Mary Ann Terrell, 
appeared in a Publick Meeting of the said people held in Caroline, 
and the said Alfred Eicks, taking the said Mary Ann Terrell by 
the hand, did on this solemn occasion openly declare, that he took 
her, the said Mary Ann Terrell, to be Ms wife, promising, through 
Divine assistance, to be unto her a faithful and affectionate hus- 
band until death. And then, in the same asseml^ly, the said Mary 
Ann Terrell did in like manner declare that she took him, the said 
x\lfred Eicks, to he her husband, promising, through Divine as- 
sistance, to be unto him a faithful and affectionate wife until death, 
and, moreover, they, the said Alfred Eicks and Mary Ann Terrell 
(she, according to custom of marriage, assuming the name of her 
husband), did, as a further confirmation thereof, then and there 
to these presents set their hands. And we whose names are here- 
unto subscribed, being present at the solemnization of the said mar- 
riage and subscription, have as witnesses set our hands, the day and 
year above wi'itten. 

Alfred Eicks^ 
Mary Ann Eicks. 

Witnesses: — Amelia H. "Winston, Deborah Pretlow, Margaret 
Vaughan, Nancy Terrell, Sarah Ann Harris, Bowling Vaughan, 
Williamson Talley, Lemuel Terrell, Thomas Terrell, Mary W. 
Eicks, Isabella Harris, Sally Terrell, Anna L. Vaughan, Eobert 
Terrell, George F. Terrell, John Bell, Eobert Scott, Jr., Kittie P. 
Terrell, Anna L. Terrell, Samuel Terrell, Benj. Jas. Harris, Thom- 
as Harris, John L. Vaughan, George Winston, Jr., Eobert 
Eicks, Jr. 



Whereas, Oswin White, son of Thomas and Martha E. White 
(the former deceased), in the County of Perquimmans and State 
of North Carolina, and Elizabeth H. Eicks, daughter of Alfred and 
Mary A. Eicks (the former deceased), in the County of Caroline 
and State of Virginia, having in writing laid their intentions of 



MARRIAGES. 65 

marriage with each other before a Monthly Meeting of the Eelig- 
ious Society of Friends, held at Eichmond, and having consent of 
parents, their said proposal of marriage was allowed of by the said 
meeting. 

Now, these are to certify whom it may concern, that for the full 
accomplishment of their said intentions, this the 9th day of the 
First month in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred 
and Sixty-one they, the said Oswin White and Elizabeth H. Ricks, 
appeared in a meeting of the said people held at Eichmond, and 
the said Oswin White, taldng the said Elizabeth H. Eicks by the 
hand, did openly declare that he took her, the said Elizabeth H. 
Eicks, to be his wife, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto 
her a loving and faithful husband until death should separate them, 
and then, in the same assembly, the said Elizabeth H. Eicks did in 
like manner declare that she took him, the said Oswin White, to be 
her husband, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a 
loving and faithful wife until death should separate them. And, 
moreover, the said Oswin Wliite and Elizabeth H. Eicks (she, ac- 
cording to custom of marriage, assuming the latter name of her 
husband), did, as a further confirmation thereof, then and there 
to these presents set their hands. And we being present, subscribed 
our names as witnesses. 

OswiN" White^ 
Elizabeth E. White. 

Witnesses: — Ada C. Butler, Octavia A. Whitlock, Judith A. 
Crenshaw, Nannie J. Pleasants, Micajah Bates, Samuel Sinton, 
Mary J. Crenshaw, Jos. P. Elliott, Julia W. Eicks, Pattie A. Bates, 
Jane C. Whitlock, Eliza J". Pleasants, E. H. Whitlock, Geo. D. 
Harwood, Wm. L. Elliott, E. A. White, Mary W. Eicks, Eichard A. 
Eicks, Elizabeth P. Harwood, Mollie C. Lyne, Wm. H. Pleasants, 
John B. Crenshaw, Nath. C. Crenshaw, Eobt. H. Whitlock, Walter 
F. Pleasants. 



Whereas, John Pretlow, of the County of Southampton, State 
of Virginia, son of Joseph and Mary Pretlow (deceased), and De- 
borah Eicks, daughter of Alfred and Mary Ann Eicks (the former 
deceased), of Caroline County, having in writing laid their inten- 
tions of marriage with each other before a Monthly Meeting of the 



66 MARRIAGES. 

Keligious Society of Friends, held at Riclimond, and having con- 
sent of parents, their said proposal of marriage was allowed of by 
the said meeting. 

Now, these arc to certify whom it may concern, that for the full 
accomplishment of their said intentions, this the 9th day of the 
Second month in the year of our Lord Eighteen Hundred and 
Sixty-five, they, the said John Pretlow and Deborah Eicks, appear- 
ed in a meeting of the said people, held at Prospect Hill, the resi- 
dence of Mary Ann Eicks in Caroline County, and the said John 
Pretlow, taking the said Deborah Eicks by the hand, did openly 
declare that he took her, the said Deborah Eicks, to be his wife, 
promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto her a loving and faith- 
ful husband until death should separate them. And then, in the 
same assembly, the said Deborah Eicks did in like manner declare 
that she took him, the said John Pretlow, to be her husband, prom- 
ising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a loving and faithful 
wife until death should separate them. And, moreover, they, the 
said John Pretlow and Deborah Eicks (she, according to the cus- 
tom of marriage, assuming the latter name of her husband), did, as 
a further confirmation thereof, then and there to these presents set 
their hands. 

John Pretlow, 
Deborah Pretlow. 

Witnesses: — Jane C. Wliitlock, Judith A. Crenshaw, John B. 
Crenshaw, Joseph J. Pleasants, Mary J. D. Crenshaw, Emma 
Scott, M. 0. McLaughlin, Deborah A. Crenshaw, H. Virginia 
AVliitlock, Pattie A. Bates, Maria L. Scott, Henry Bates, Samuel 
B. Pretlow, Eobt. H. Whitlock, Joel Cook, Walter F. Pleasants, 
Achilles D. Johnson, Thomas C. Hackett, Mary Ann Eicks, Mai-y 
W. Eicks, Ella T. Eicks, Walter A. Eicks, Julia W. Eicks. 



Whereas, Bowling H. Winston, of Sugar Eiver Monthly Meet- 
ing, in the County of Montgomery, in the State of Indiana, son of 
Pleasant and Elizabeth C. Winston (the latter deceased), of the 
State of Indiana, and Julia W. Eicks, daughter of Alfred and 
Mary Ann Eicks (the former deceased), of the State of Virginia, 
having in writing laid their intentions of marriage with each other 
before a Monthly Meeting of the Eeligious Society of Friends, held 



MARRIAGES. 67 

at Cedar Creek, State of Virginia, and having consent of parents, 
their said proposal of marriage was allowed of by the said meeting. 
Now, these are to certify whom it may concern, that for the full 
accomplishment of their said intentions, this the 11th day of the 
Seventh month in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hun- 
dred and Sixty-six, they, the said Bowling H. Winston and Julia 
W. Eicks, appeared in a meeting of the said people, held at Eich- 
mond, and the said Bowling H. Winston, taking the said Julia W. 
Eicks by the hand, did openly declare that he took her, the said 
Julia W. Eicks, to be his wife, promising, with Divine assistance, 
to be unto her a loving and faithful husband until death should 
separate them. And then, in the same assembly, the said Julia W. 
Eicks did in like manner declare that she took him, the said Bowl- 
ing H. Winston, to be her husband, promising, with Divine assist- 
ance, to be unto him a loving and faithful wife until death should 
separate them. And, moreover, they, the said Bowling H. Wins- 
ton and Julia W. Eicks (she, according to the custom of marriage, 
assuming the latter name of her husband), did, as a further con- 
flnnation thereof, then and there to these presents set their hands. 
And we being present, subscribed our names as witnesses. 

Bowling H. Winston, 
Julia W. Winston. 

Witnesses: — Elizabeth P. Harwood, Wm. H. Pleasants, Ellen 
P. Pedin, Eliza J. Pleasants, Ann Sumner, Jane C. Wliitlock, 
John W. Turner, Deborah A. Crenshaw, John B. Crenshaw, Judith 
A. Crenshaw, Eobt. H. Whitlock, Henry Bates, Mica j ah Bates, 
John Pretlow, Oswin White, Eichard A. Eicks, Walter A. Eicks, 
Mary J. Whitlock, Mary W, Eicks, E. C. Winston, M. S. Wliit- 
lock, Pattie A. Bates, Lucie K. Butler, H. Virginia Wliitlock, Sal- 
lie Worthington, Joel Cook. 



Whereas, Eichard A. Eicks, of Caroline County, State of Vir- 
ginia, son of Alfred and Mary A. Eicks (both deceased), of the 
aforesaid County and State, and Martha S. Whitlock, daughter of 
Eichard H. and Jane C. Wliitlock (the former deceased), of the 
City of Eichmond, State of Virginia, having in writing laid their 
intentions of marriage with each other before a Monthly Meeting 
of the Eeligious Society of Friends, held at Eichmond, and having 



68 MARRIAGES. 

consent of surviving parent, their said proposal of marriage was 
allowed of by the said meeting. 

Now these are to certify that for the full accomplishment of their 
said intentions, this, the eleventh day of the Sixth month in the 
year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-three, 
they, the said Eichard A. Eicks and Martha S. Whitlock, appeared 
in a meeting of the said people held at Eichmond, and the said 
Kichard A. Eicks, taking the said ]\Iartha S. WQiitlock by the hand, 
did openly declare that he took her, the said Martha S. Whitlock, 
to be his wife, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto her a 
loving and faithful husband until death should separate them. And 
then, in the same assembly, the said Martha S. Wliitlock did in like 
manner declare that she took him, the said Eichard A. Eicks, to be 
her husband, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a 
loving and faithful wife until death should separate them. And. 
moreover, they, the said Eichard A. Eicks and Martha S. Whitlock 
(she, according to the custom of marriage, assuming tlie latter 
name of her husband) , did, as a further confirmation thereof, then 
and there to these presents set their hands. And we being present, 
subscribe our names as witnesses. 

Eichard A. Eicks, 
Martha S. Eicks. 

Witnesses : — M. J. Vest, Kate Crenshaw, Sallie S. Summerell, 
Jane C. AVliitlock, Deborah E. Pretlow, Martha A. Bates, John B. 
Crenshaw, I. H. Holladay, Sallie B. Leeds, A. St. C. Butler, M. J. 
^Vlritlock, Ella T. Eicks, G. W. Taylor, 0. A. Whitlock, M. Bates, 
Emma E. Hall, E. H. Whitlock, Cora B. Butler, Judith A. Cren- 
shaw, M. E. Crenshaw, I. J. Hawkes, M. D., Laura P. Hall, James 
G. Whitlock, Ellen P. Pedin, Frank T. Bates, Wm. J. Hart, Sam- 
uel Sinton, David Jordan, Maggie Bates, Henry A. Pleasants, Sam- 
uel A. Swann, H. V. Whitlock, Isaac Hawkes, James W. Pedin, W. 
A. Eicks, John C. Winston, Mary Willetts, Jeremiah Willetts, 
Eloise Carpenter, Julia W. Winston, Ellen Harwood, Deborah C. 
Leeds, Charles E. Whitlock, E. P. Harwood, James H. Crenshaw, 
S. J. Harwood, Geo. D. Harwood. 



Whereas, Eichard A. Eicks, of Caroline County, State of Vir- 
ginia, son of Alfred and Mary A. Eicks (both deceased), of the 



MARRIAGES. 69 

aforesaid County and State, and Eliza C. Crenshaw, daughter of 
John B. and Eachel H. Crenshaw (the latter deceased), of the 
County of Henrico, State of Virginia, having declared their inten- 
tions of marriage with each other before a Monthly Meeting of the 
Eeligious Society of Friends held at Eichmond, and having consent 
of surviving parent, their said proposal of marriage was allowed of 
by the said meeting. 

Now these are to certify to whom it may concern, that for the 
full accomplishment of their said intentions this, the twenty-third 
day of the Sixth month, in the year of our Lord One Thousand 
Eight Hundred and Eighty-one, they, the said Eichard A. Eicks 
and Eliza C. Crenshaw, appeared in a Public Meeting of the said 
people held at Eichmond, and the said Eichard A. Eicks, taking 
the said Eliza C. Crenshaw by the hand, did on this solemn occasion 
openly declare that he took her, the said Eliza C. Crenshaw, to be 
his wife, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto her a loving 
and faithful husband until death should separate them; and then, 
in the same assembly, the said Eliza C. Crenshaw did in like man- 
ner declare that she took him, the said Eichard A. Eicks, to be her 
husband, promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a lov- 
ing and faithful wife until death should separate them. And, 
moreover, they, the said Eichard A. Eicks and Eliza C. Crenshaw 
(she, according to the custom of marriage, assuming the name of 
her husband) , did, as a further confirmation thereof, then and there 
to these presents set their hands. And we whose names are here- 
unto subscribed, being present at the solemnization of the said mar- 
riage and subscription, have as witnesses thereto set our hands, the 
day and year above written. Eichard A. Eicks, 

Eliza C. Eicks. 

Witnesses : — John B. Crenshaw, Judith A. Crenshaw, Nathl. 
B. Crenshaw, Deborah C. Leeds, Josiah W. Leeds, Margt. E. Cren- 
shaw, James H. Crenshaw, M. Belle Crenshaw, J. Belle Crenshaw, 
Sara W. Crenshaw, Elizabeth H. White, Deborah E. Pretlow, Ella 
T. Eicks, J. D. Pretlow, Mary J. D. Pretlow, Sallie B. Leeds, W. H. 
Pleasants, I. J. Hawkes, Geo. D. Pleasants, Wm. F. Terrell, Mrs. 
J. C, Hann, Mrs. Leroy A. Crenshaw, A. L. Pleasants, A. J. Pleas- 
ants, Charles H. Corey, Mabel Burruss, 0. A. Wliitlock, E. H. 
Whitlock, Eliza J. Pleasants, Sadie B. Leeds, Chas. K. Willis, Sam- 



70 MARHIAGES. 

uel B. Lucy, Annie M. Hill, Elvira M. Hawkes, Mary Louisa But- 
ler, Maggie A. Ferrell, M. M. Terrell, C. G. Paleske, Mrs. Thos. W. 
Sydnor, Jane C. Wliitlock, Lucy K. Butler, D. C. Eichardson, John 
C. Winston, John P. Bates, J. A. Terrell, E. P. Harwood, Wm. M. 
CouUing, Frank T. Bates, Rowland Hill, Samuel Sinton, Mrs. E. 
L. Crensliaw, IMary J. Whitlock, H. A. Pleasants, Austin C. Leeds, 
James G. Whitlock, Jos. J. Pleasants. 



To Friends at Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, Hanover County, Va. 

Dear Friends: 

Our Esteemed Friend, David Terrell, a member of our Meeting, 
being about to join in marriage with Patty Johnson, a member of 
yours, requests our Certificate for the purpose ; tliis may certify on 
liis behalf that, on enquiring, we do not find anything to hinder his 
proceeding therein. 

Signed on behalf of South River Monthly Meeting, held this 19th 
day of the 1st Month, 1793. Achillis Douglas, Clerk. 

To the Monthly Meeting at White Oak Sivamp in Henrico County. 

Dear Friends : 

Jesse Terrell having requested our Certificate in order to join 
in marriage with a member of your meeting, these are to certify 
on his behalf that he hath a right of membership amongst us, and 
is clear of marriage engagements as far as we know. 

Signed in, and by direction of our Monthly Meeting, held at Ce- 
dar Creek, in Hanover county, tbe 8th of the 3rd Month, 1794. 

MiCAJAH Crew^ Clerk. 

To Friends of Henrico Monthly Meeting. 

Dear Friends : 

Samuel Terrell having requested our Certificate in order to ac- 
complish his marriage with a member of youj* meeting, we have to 
inform you that he is a member of this meeting ; he has the consent 
of parents and friends concerned and is clear of all other marriage 
engagements as far as appears to us; we, therefore, recommend 
him in his undertaking to your Christian care and regard, and re- 
main your friends and brethren. 

Signed in and on behalf of our Monthly Meeting, held at Cedar 
Creek, in Hanover county, the 12th of the 4th Month, 1800. 

Benjamin Bates, Jr., Clerk. 



MARRIAGES. 71 



MAEEIAGE CERTIFICATES OF SOUTH RIVER MONTHLY 

MEETING.* bEOFORP Co.,^Jr\- 



WiLLiAM Ballard and Rachel Moorman were married at South 
River Meeting-house 8-25-1768. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Zach 
Moorman, Micajah Moorman, Charles Moorman, Clark Moorman, 
Gillis Moorman, Benjamin Johnson, William Johnson, Byrum Bal- 
lard, Thomas Ballard, Bowling Clark, Micajah Terrell, Christopher 
Anthony, Henry Tate, Sarah Terrell,, Winifred Clark, Susanna 
Johnson, Eleanor Ballard, Martha Ferrall, Martha Ferrall, Jr., 
Betty Moorman, Susanna Moorman, Lucy Johnson, Elizabeth 
Ferrall, Sarah Tate, Penelope Johnson, Mary Ferrall, Mary Tim- 
berlake, Judith Goode, Agnes Clark. 



William Ballard and Elizabeth Anthony were married at 
South River Meeting-house 4-24-1788. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Mary 
Anthony, Molley Anthony, Mary Ballard, Anna Sea, Mary Johnson, 
Judith Ballard, Phebe Stanton, Penelope Johnson, Salley Johnson, 
Robert Hanna, Ashley Johnson, James Candler, Elizabeth Doug- 
las, Betty Johnson, Jane Gipson, Hepzabih Holloway, Edward 
Lynch, Christopher Anthony, Jr., Christopher Anthony, Christo- 
pher Johnson, Achillis Douglas, William Johnson, William Ballard, 
John Lynch, William Stanton, John Candler, Mary Lynch, Matilda 
Lynch, Mary Timberlake, Rachel Ballard, Sarah Tate Anthony, 
Barclay Ballard, Moses Cadwalader, Jr., Charles Anthony, John 
Timberlake, William Clement, Robert Johnson, Timothy Johnson, 
Sarah H. Tate. 



Byrum Ballard and Sarah Hutton were married at South River 
Meeting-house 9-20-1792. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Minto 
P. Perdue, Christopher Anthony, James Erwin, Mary Embree, 

♦The form of the certificate of marriage amongst Quakers is substantially the 
same in all cases, and the abridgement here of the form is made to save space and 
useless repetition. 



72 , MARRIAGES. 

Elizabeth Embree, Sarah Turner, Sarah Lewis, Elizabeth Turner, 
Newman Eugris, James Mazley, Edward Tend, William Pidgeon, 
Evan Lewis, Esther Eichards, Elijah Eichards, Delia Turner, Joel 
Lewis, Sarah Lewis, Hannah Larrew, Mary Anthony, Nathan Hale, 
Samuel Oliphant, Jesse Lewis, Polley Haynes, Henry Thurman, 
Magdalen Erwin, Susanna Perdue, Mary Erwin, Alice Bond, Ee- 
bekah Moorlan, Eachel Coffee, Thomas Cadwalader, Moses Embree, 
Euth Paxon, Benjamin Paxon, Elizabeth Hamner, Joseph Evoute, 
Eachel Pidgeon, Jolm Coffee, Nancy Moorlan, Moses Cadwalader, 
William Ballard, Jr., Amos Ballard, Jesse Cadwalader, Mourning 
Ballard, Elizabeth Ballard, Euth Cadwalader. 



William Blocksom and Mary Butler were married at South 
Eiver Meeting-house 1-21-1795. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Agatha 
Johnson, Patty Terrell, Mary Johnson, Sarah Johnson, Nancy 
Davis, Susannah Terrell, Elizabeth Pidgeon, Harrison Eatcliff, 
William Johnson, Gideon Blocksom, Jonathan Butler, John W. 
Johnson, Charles Smith, Isaac Pidgeon, Thomas M. Clark, Mary 
Davis, Drusilla Crew, Sally Butler, Mildred Eatcliff, Nancy Butler, 
Mary Blocksom, Eichard Bloxsom, Sr., James Butler, Nicholas 
Crew, David Terrell, Abner Grigg, Wm. Johnson, Eichard Block- 
som. 



Joseph Bradfield and Cynthia Cary were married at South 
Eiver Meeting-house 9-13-1798. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Martha 
Baugham, Mary Lynch, Mary Terrell, Sarah Millburn, Elizabeth 
Lea, Jesse Williams, Joseph Fisher, Jr., Benjamin Hanna, Thomas 
Maddox, John Bradfield, William Butler, Samuel Carey, Eachel 
Cary, Sarah Cary, John Cary, John Fisher. 



Thomas Burgess, son of Joseph Burgess, and Betsy Hendrick, 

daughter of Moses Hendrick, of the County of Halifax, were 

married at Banister Meeting-house, in the County of Halifax, 

lO-lG-1791. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Eobert 

Planna, Ashley Johnson, Betsy Anderson, Sally Slaughter, Daniel 



MARRIAGES. 73 

Terry, George Wood, Daniel Easly, Kachel Anderson, Joseph Kir- 
by, Anna Anderson, Edith Easly, Joseph Fisher. 



Thomas Bailey and Elizabeth Timberlake were married at 
South Eiver Meeting-house 6-16-1803. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Lydia 
Johnson, Susanna Ballard, Polly Timberlake, Hannah Pennock, 
Mary Butler, Sarah Johnson, Priscilla Butler, James Stanton, 
James Martin, John Timberlake, Jonathan Johnson, Josiah Bailey, 
John Pennock. 



Josiah Bailey, of Campbell County, and Susanna Ballard, 
daughter of Barclay and Judith Ballard, of Bedford County, 
were married at Ivy Creek Meeting-house, in Bedford County, 
7-15-1804. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Thomas 
Johnson, Johnson Ballard, William Butler, Amos Holloway, Nich- 
olas Johnson, Benjamin Johnson, John Swinney, Joseph Johnson, 
Ehoda Johnson, Agatha Johnson, Hepsabeth Holloway, Salley 
Macey, Betsy Butterworth, Kancy Johnson, Susanna Stone. 



William Ballard, son of Barclay and Judith Ballard, of Bedford 
County, and ISTancy Butterworth, daughter of Benjamin 
and Eachel Butterworth, of Campbell County, Virginia, were 
married at South Eiver Meeting-house 11-14-1805. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Barclay 
Ballard, Benjamin Butterworth, James Ballard, William Stanton, 
James Candler, John P. Swinney, Edward Lynch, Timothy Grew- 
ell, Isaac Pidgeon, Polly Butterworth, Betsy Butterworth, Polly 
Ballard, Huldah Stanton, Fancy Johnson, Deborah Douglas, Mil- 
dred Eatcliff . 



Daniel Burgess, son of Joseph and Deborah Burgess, of the Coun- 
ty of Campbell, and Euth Milliner, daughter of Beverly and 
Ann Milliner, of Halifax County, were married at South Eiver 
Meeting-house 11-14-1805. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Wil- 
liam Stanton, Barclay Ballard, Stephen Butler, Mary Butler, Enoch 



74 MARRIAGES. 

Roberts, Isaac Pidgeon, Polly Burgess, Grace Plummer, Thomas 
Burgess, Jolm Burgess, Joseph Burgess, Jr. 



James Ballahd. son of Barclay and Judith Ballard, of Bedford 

County, and Betsy Butterworth^ of Campbell County, were 

married at South Eiver Meeting-house 2-13-1806. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Wil- 

ham Ballard, Benjamin Butterworth, Josiah Bailey, Jonathan 

Johnson, William Butler, John Lynch, James S. Butler, Thomas 

Burgess, Wm. Davis, Jr., Polly Butterworth, Milley Butterworth, 

Nancy Ballard, Susanna Bailey, Mildred Eatcliff, Anna Lynch. 

Matilda Eoberts, Druscilla Burgess, Sally Lodge, Mildred Tyree, 

Judith Johnson, Betsy Douglass, Alice Grewell, Mary Butler, Za- 

linda Davis, William Stanton. 



William Butler, son of Stephen and Mary Butler, and Nancy 
Johnson, daughter of William and Susanna Johnson, both of 
Campbell County, were married at South River Meeting-house 
4-15-1806. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Lat- 
ham Stanton, Stephen Butler. Jr., Edward Butler, Jonathan But- 
ler, Harrison Eatcliff, Deborah Butler, Jeptha Johnson, Enoch 
Roberts, William Johnson, Jr., Mary Butler, Susannah Johnson, 
Sarah Lodge, Huldah Stanton, Elizabeth Douglas, Newby Johnson, 
Sarah Johnson, Matilda Roberts, Mary Douglas, Zalinda Davis, 
Jonathan Johnson, Stephen Butler, William Johnson, Sr., Robert 
Johnson, Deljorah Douglas, Elizabeth Douglas, Sarah Johnson, 
Judith Johnson. 



Joseph C. Burgess, son of Jonathan and Margaret Burgess, of 
Campbell County (Margaret deceased), and Martha John- 
son, daughter of Christopher and Sarah Johnson (both de- 
ceased), of Bedford County, were married at South River 
Meeting-house 4-13-1808. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Stephen 
Butler, Josiah Bailey, Jonathan Burgess, Charles T. Arthur, Thom- 
as Burgess, Benjamin Johnson, Nicholas Johnson, Joseph Johnson, 
Samuel Fisher, Daniel Burgess, John IL Moorman, Caleb Johnson, 



MARRIAGES. 



75 



Nancy Johnson, Matilda Johnson, Elizabeth Fisher, Mary Burgess, 
Betty Burgess, Ehoda Johnson, Agatha Johnson, Susanna Bailey, 
James Mallory. 



Steven Butlee, son of Stephen and Mary Butler, of the town of 

Lynchburg, and Louisa Bailey, daughter of Exom and Ta- 

bitha Bailey, were married at South River Meeting-house 

12-13-1821. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Lil- 

bourn Johnson, William Butler, William Davis, Jonathan Johnson, 

William Davis, Jr., James S. Butler, AchilUs M. Douglas, William 

Butler, Jr., Daniel Johnson, John L. Douglas, John L. Davis, 

Micajah T. Johnson, Mary A. Davis, Deborah Butler, Ann Eliza 

Bailey, Delitha Butler, Sarah Johnson, Sarah L. Davis, Sarah 

Snead, Mary Jane Adams, Anselm D. Johnson. 



Tristram Coggshall and Lucy Terrell, of Campbell County, 
were married at South Kiver Meeting-house 3-21-1790. 
The following mtnesses signed the marriage certificate : Sarah 
Terrell, William Johnson, Byrum Ballard, Mary Davis, Samuel 
Davis, Betty Hendrake, Susanna Johnson, Dosha Moorman, Nancy 
Moorman, Achillis Douglas, Mary Betts, Ann Fowler, Elizabeth 
Douglas, Betty Johnson, John Paxon, Thomas Bedford, John 
Candler, Jr., William Bloxom, Eachel Paxon, Mary Baughan, Anna 
Terrell, Euth Pidgeon, Sarah Tennison, Sarah Johnson, Susanna 
Davis, Sarah Johnson, William Stanton, WilUam Davis, Eachel 
Ballard, Sarah Hutton, James Candler, Henry Terrell, Eobert 
Hanna, Ashley Johnson, Eichard Bloxom, Eobert Johnson. 



Moses Cadwalader, Jr., and Mary Ballard, of Bedford County, 
were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 5-23-1792. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Joseph 
Teazel, Abigal Moorlan, Eebecca Morland, Elizabeth Teazel, Susan 
Morlan, Thomas Davis, Henry Hurt, Joseph Moorland, Polly 
Haynes, Stephen Moorland, Christopher Anthony, Ann Moorland, 
Mevory Anthony, Annis Davis, Sarah Johnson, Eachel Pidgeon, 
Eachel Coffee, Sarali Hutton, Euth Cadwalader, Judith Ballard, 



76 MARRIAGES. 

Elizabeth Ballard. William Pidgeori;, Samuel Davis, Moses Cad- 
walader, ]\Iary Cadwalader, Joseph Wright, Philip Teazle, Aden 
Moorland, Moses Hurt, Byrum Ballard, Thomas Cadwalader, Jesse 
Cadwalader. 



Mahlon Cadwalader, son of Thomas and Jane Cadwalader, and 
Elizabeth Douglas, daughter of Achillis and Elizabeth 
Douglas, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 
6-10-1809. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Achil- 
lis Douglas, Thomas Cadwalader, Joseph Stratton, Jonathan John- 
son, John Lynch, Sr., Eichard Tyree, Benjamin Johnson, Eeubin 
Moorman, Isaac Pidgeon, Etchison Grigsby, Jonah Cadwalader, 
Joel Lewis, Judith Johnson, Deborah Douglas, Mildred Tyree, 
Polly Lynch, Penelope Anthony, Mary, Butler, Susanna Johnson, 
Elizabeth Cadwalader, Sarah Johnspn. 



William Davis, son of Samuel and Annis Davis, of Bedford Coun- 
ty, and Zalinda Davis, daughter of John and Mary Lynch, of 
Campbell County, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 
5-13-1793. 

The names of witnesses : William Johnson, Arch Lacy, William 
Stanton, George Eoberts, Eobert Hanna, Catharine Hanna, Gerard 
Johnson, Susanna Miller, Vernon Metcalf, Matilda Eoberts, Mary 
Terrell, Ann Terrell, Sally Lynch, Elizabeth Douglas, Polly Fow- 
ler, Sarah Lodge, Agatha Dicks, Elizabeth Johnson, John Lynch, 
Samuel Davis, Enoch Eoberts, John Davis, Sr., Achillis Douglas, 
Thomas Davis, Micajah, Mary Timberlake, Gideon Lea, Ashley 
Johnson, John Baughan, David Johnson, William Dicks, Ashley 
Johnson, Jr., Edward Terrell, Newberry Johnson, Dudley Cave, 
Penelope Johnson, Susanna Johnson, Millie Johnson, Eebecca 
Preston, Joseph Johnson, Sarah Terrell, Mildred Johnson, Anna 
Lea, Alice Taylor, Tace Nichols, Micajah Terrell, Jr., Samuel Ter- 
rell, Eobert Johnson, Christopher Johnson, Eobert Burton, Isaac 
Parrish, James Martin, Tace Baugham, Mary Terrell, Mourning 
Johnson. 



MAKKIAGES. 77 

Samuel Erwin, son of James and Mary Erwin, and Sarah Holms^ 
daughter of William and Mary Holms, were married at Goose 
Creek Meeting-house, in Bedford County, 7-4-1793. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Mar- 
garet Dobyns, Moses Embree, Joel Lewis, Sarah Lewis, Thomas 
Cadwalader, Jane Cadwalader, Eachel Pidgeon, Ben Paxon, John 
Coffee, Eachel Coffee, Will Tuggle, Moses Cadwalader, Carls An- 
thony, Susanna Erwin, William Pidgeon, Mary Bond, Moses Cad- 
walader, Jr., Samuel Oliphant, Esther Eichards, Benjamin Bond, 
Euth Cadwalader, Hannah Anthony, Lucy Phelps, Betsy Bobbitt, 
Sarah Pidgeon, Sally Gregg, Amos Harris, Elizabeth Harris, Jane 
Bobbitt, James Erwin, Mary Erwin, Margaret Harris, Elizabeth 
Sehoby, Jane Erwin, Mary Harris, Magdalen Erwin, Hanna Har- 
ris, Daniel McPherson, Mary McPherson, Mary Anthony, Mary 
Burns, James Burns. 



Elias Fisher, son of Joseph and Ann Fisher, and Hannah Curle, 
daughter of Joseph and Eebecca Curie, all of Campbell Coun- 
ty, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 9-24-1793. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Wm. 
Stanton, Wm. Johnson, Gerard Johnson, Eobt. Johnson, Eobt. Han- 
na, Eobt. Wright, Catharine Hanna, Abel Lodge, Benjamin Hanna, 
Thomas Hanna, Jane Tillus, Elizabeth Douglas, Humphrey 
Baugham, Sally Lynch, Elizabeth Lea, Ann Leer, Sarah Johnson, 
Phebe Stanton, Martha Baugham, Sarah Lodge, Joseph Curie, Jos- 
eph Fisher, Eobt. Fisher, John Baugham, Samuel Fisher, Samuel 
Cary, Ann Curie, Tacy Baugham, Cynthia Cary. 



John Fisher, son of Joseph Fisher, and Eachel James, daughter 
of Thomas James, of the County of Campbell, were married at 
South Eiver Meeting-house 10-17-1799. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Wil- 
liam Stanton, Stephen Butler, Phebe Stanton, Mary Butler, Han- 
nah Fisher, Mary Holloway, Joseph Fisher, Elias Fisher, Isaac 
James. 



78 MARRIAGES. 

NiMROD Farguson, son of Nimrod Farguson, and Anna Ander- 
son, daughter of John Anderson (all of Halifax), were mar- 
ried at Bannister Meeting-house 1-14-1801. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Daniel 
Easly, Dudley Milner, James Turpin, John Farguson, Eichard An- 
derson, Obed Hendrick, Abner Gregg, Edith Kirby, Judith Ander- 
son, Mary Parker, Betsy Parker, Isaac James, Thomas Burgess, 
Betsy Burgess, Mary Milner, Judith Borum, Orpha Kirby, Eachel 
Anderson. 



Samuel Fisher, son of Joseph Fisher, and Elizabeth Johnson, 
daughter of Benjamin Johnson, of Bedford County, were mar- 
ried at Ivey Creek Meeting-house, Bedford County, 12-22-1803. 
The following witnesses signed the certificate : Benjamin John- 
son, John Johnson, Amos Holloway, William Butler, Joseph 
Fisher, Elias Fisher, Betty Burgess, Tacy Lodge, Hannah Fisher, 
Hepzabah Holloway, Sarah Johnson, Ann Fisher. 



Amos Holloway and Hepzibah Stanton, of Campbell County, 
were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 10-20-1785. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Wil- 
liam Stanton, Wm. Johnson, Achillis Douglas, John Fowler, Ash- 
ley Johnson, Wm. Stanton, Jr., James Johnson, Wm. Ferrell, Ma- 
tilda Lynch, Mary Lynch, Latitia Wileman, EachfiLEalkrd, Susan- 
na Johnson, Eachel Moorman, Ann Fowler, Sarah Johnson, Euth 
Johnson, Mary Anthony, Ann Lea, Elizabeth Douglas, Judith 
Feddell. 



William Hallowat and Sar.\.h Stanley, of Bedford County, 

were married at the South Eiver Meeting-house, in Campbell 

County, 7-19-1790. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Micajah 

Davis, Wm. Stanton, William Ballard, John Lynch, Eobeda Han- 

na, Abijah Eichards, Achillis Douglas, David Terrell, Tristram 

Coggshall, William Snead, Mary Betts, Eachel Coffee, Euth 

Pidgeon, Eachel Pidgeon, Sarah Bloxom, Susanna Johnson, Sarah 

Lewis, Anna Lea, Eachel_£allard, Amos Holloway, Wm. Stanton, 

Catharine Stanton, Hepzibah Halloway, Jane Johnson, Elizabeth 

Douglas, Sarah Stanley. 



MAKRIAQES. 79 

Abner Holloway and Betsy Stanley, of the CoTinty of Bedford, 
were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 10-14-1797. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Elias 
Fisher, Jesse Williams, Aaron Stanton, Mourning Johnson, Sarah 
Cary, Nancy Ferrell, William Butler, Elizabeth Curie, Christopher 
Johnson, Eobt. Hannah, Eichard Bloxsom, Elizabeth Hendricks, 
Benj. Hanna, John Johnson, Thos. Hanna, John Lynch, Amos 
Halloway, Hapzibah Holloway, Wm. Stanton, Latham Stanton, 
Huldah Stanton, Mary Butler, Mary Halloway. 



Charles Johnson and Molley Moorman (daughter of Zacheriah 
Moorman), of Bedford County, were married at South Eiver 
Meeting-house, in Campbell County, 8-16-1778. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Chris- 
topher Johnson, Zachariah Moorman, William Johnson, Benj. 
Johnson, Ashley Johnson, Benj. Johnson, Jr., Thomas Moorman, 
^WijJiam^^Ballard, John Clarke, Edward Terrell, Elijah Bocock, Jolin 
Lynch, Christopher, Edward Clarke, Samuel Stanley, Zedekiah 
Candler, Lucy Johnson, Mary Miller, Elizabeth Johnson, Molley 
Johnson, Mary Ferrell, Susanna Johnson, Miller Moorman, Eachel 
Moorman, Eachel Jolmson, Anna Bocock, Agnes Johnson, Susanna 
Moorman, Eachel^ B allai'd, Eachel Moorman, Sarah Goode, Mary 
Anthony, Priscilla Stanley, Jane Tillus, Elizabeth Terrell, Ann 
Candler, Mary Terrell, Elizabeth Moorman. 



James Johnson and Eachel Moorman, of the County of Bed- 
ford, were married 3-18-1781. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Micajah 
Moorman, Eachel Ballard, James Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Bar- 



clay Ballard, Judith Ballard, William Johnson, Christopher John- 
son, Ashly Johnson, Benjamin Johnson, Henry Moorman, William 
Ferrell, John Lynch, Micajah Davis, Charles Johnson, Mary John- 
son, Milley Moorman, Penelo|>e Johnson, Elizabeth Johnson, 
Christopher Anthony, David Johnson, Mary Anthony, William 
Davis. 



80 MARRIAGES. 

Joseph Johnson and Agatha Moorman, daughter of Zachariah 
Moorman, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 
4-17-1785. 
The following wdtnesses signed the marriage certificate : Chris- 
topher Johnson, John Lynch, William Stanton, Christopher An- 
thony, Ann Candler, Milley Johnson, Molly Johnson, James 
Johnson, William Davis, Elizabeth Douglas, Judith Ballard, Susan- 
na Miller, John Candler, Samuel Davis, Mary Timberlake, Eachel 
Johnson, Mary Johnson, Salley Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Zach- 
ariah Moorman, EachelBallard, John Johnson, Eachel Moorman, 
Achillis Douglas, Betty Johnson, Ann Lay, Susanna Johnson. 



Samuel Johnson, of the County of Campbell, and Susanna 
Moorman^ of said County, were married at South Eiver Meet- 
ing-house 1-20-1788. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Eacjiei 
Ballardj Judith Ballard, Ehoda ]\Ioorman, Dosha Moorman, Mi- 
cajah Moorman, John Johnson, David Terrell, Eleanor Ballard, 
Elizabeth Douglas, Mary Johnson, Euth Johnson, Sarah Johnson, 
Susanna Miller, Betsy Johnson, Charles Moorman, James Johnson, 
William Johnson, Christopher Anthony, Samuel Davis, Micajah 
Davis, ]\Iary Anthony, William Ballard, Christopher Johnson, Wil- 
liam Davis, Charles Brooke, Achillis Douglas, Barclay Ballard, 
Ashley Jolmson. 



John Johnson, of Bedford County, and Ehoda Moorman, of 

Campbell, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 

10-21-1789. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Micajah 

Moorman, William Johnson, Joseph Johnson, Andrew Moorman, 

James Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Moorman, William 

Bloxom, Charles Moorman, Thomas Johnson, Moorman Johnson, 

Thomas Johnson, Joseph Stratton, Samuel Davis, Eichard Bloxom, 

Mary Davis, Annis Davis, Agatha Johnson, Susanna Johnson, 

Betty Moorman, Dosha Moorman, Sarah Stratton, Milley Johnson, 

Susanna Johnson, Nancy Moorman, Eachel Johnson, Prudence 

Moorman. 



MAKRIAGES. 81 

William Johnson, son of William Johnson, and Sarah Bloxom, 
daughter of Eichard Bloxom, all of Campbell County, were 
married at South Eiver Meeting-house 11-30-1791. 
Names of witnesses to marriage certificate: William Bloxom, 
Benjamin Stanton, William Johnson, Richard Bloxom, John John- 
son, Micajah Moorman, Joseph Johnson, Thomas Johnson, Wm. 
Johnson, James Johnson, Charles Moorman, Samuel Johnson, 
David Johnson, Christopher Johnson, Henry Terrell, Charles 
Johnson, Thomas Moorman, Achillis Moorman, Barclay Balla rd, 
Benjamin Johnson, Henry Brown, Ashley Johnson, Gerard John- 
son, Jr., Mary Davis, Betty Johnson, Neoma Stratton, Agatha 
Johnson, Judith Johnson, Betty Moorman, Dosha Moorman, Rachel 
Moorman, ISTancy Moorman, Africa Moorman, Jean Johnson, Mil- 
ley Johnson, Salley Moorman, Mary Herndon, Salley Johnson. 



Charles Johnson and Susanna Terrell, of Campbell County, 
were married at Hill Creek Meeting-house 3-17-1796. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: David 
Terrell, Wm. Johnson, Henry Terrell, David Terrell, Jr., Samuel 
Terrell, Charles Moorman, David Johnson, John Richardson, Rich- 
ard Bloxom, ISTancy Davis, Milly Johnson, Molly Johnson, Mathew 
Davis, Letitia Wildman, Mary Davis, Mildred Ratcliif, Susanna 
Davis, Druscilla Crew, Agatha Johnson, Rachel Johnson, Molly 
Richardson, Mourning Johnson, Betsy Moorman, M. Davis. 



Timothy Johnson and Lydia Ballard, of Bedford County, were 
married at Ivy Creek Meeting-house 8-14-1799. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Chris- 
topher Johnson, Barclay Ballard, Wm. Stanton, Benjamin Johnson, 
Micajcih Macy, Amos Holloway, Jonathan Johnson, John Tellus, 
Mourning Timberlake, Susanna Ballard, Betsy Johnson, Ann 
Fowler, Rachel Jolinson, Rhoda Johnson, Sarah Johnson, Martha 
Johnson. 



Newby Johnson, son of William Johnson, and Sarah Douglas, 
daughter of Achillis Douglas, were married at South River 
Meeting-house 2-13-1800. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Wm. 



82 MARRIAGES. 

Johnson, Sr., Acliillis Douglas, Elizabeth Douglas, Charles L. Ter- 
reU, Sarah Lodge, Nancy Johnson, John Lynch, Wm. Stanton, 
Harrison Eatcliff, Ann Lynch, Enoch Eoberts, Ann Pidgeon, Mil- 
dred Ratcliff, Sarah James, Betsy Lea. 



Pleasant Johnson and Nancy Moorman, both of Campbell 
County, were married at Seneca Meeting-house, 1-14-1801. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : ilgatha 
Jolinson, Polly Moorman, Lydia Moorman, Betsy Moorman, Mary 
Ferrall, Mildred Ratcliff, Letitia Wildman, Mary Timberlake, Wm. 
Johnson, Sr., Thomas Moorman, James Johnson, Daniel Stratton, 
Ashley Stratton, Micajah Moorman, Charles Johnson, William 
Johnson, Jr., Joseph Stratton, Jr. 



Jonathan Johnson, son of William and Susanna Johnson, and 
Judith Douglas, daughter of Achillis and Elizabeth Douglas, 
all of Campbell County, were married at South River Meeting- 
house 1-17-1805. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Acliil- 
lis Douglas, Wm. Jolinson, Mildred Douglas, Micajah Terrell, 
Robert Johnson, Nancy Johnson, Matilda Roberts, Zalinda Davis, 
Elijah Johnson, Mary Butler, Wm. Butler, Richard Tyree, Deborah 
Douglas, Betsy Terrell, Polly Lynch, Wm. Davis, Jeptha Johnson, 
Joseph Fisher, William Stanton, Newby Johnson. 



Anselm Johnson^ son of Benjamin and Mary Johnson, of Bed- 
ford County, and Deborah Douglas, daughter of Achillis and 
Elizabeth Douglas, were married at South River Meeting-house 
7-10-1810. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Achil- 
lis Douglas, Benj. Johnson, Lemuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson, 
Samuel Fisher, Nicholas Johnson, Mahlon Cadwalader, James S. 
Butler, Etchison Grigsby, James Cox, Garland Johnson, Stephen 
Butler, Jr., Nathan Dicks, Wm. Davis, Jr., Samuel Davis. William 
Davis, Harrison Ratcliff, Stephen Butler, John Lynch, Josiah 
Bailey, Latham Stanton, Daniel Burress, Isaac Pidgeon, Edward. 
Lynch, Jonathan Butler, Elias Fisher, Elizaljeth Fisher, Mary 
Lynch, Mary Butler, Zalinda Davis, Matilda Johnson, Lucy John- 
son, Jonathan Johnson, Nancy Butler. 



MARRIAGES. 83 

Joseph Johnson, son of James and Penelope Johnson, of Bedford 
County, and Betsy^ Ballard, daughter of Benjamin and 
Rachel Butterworth, of~'Campbell County, were married at 
South Eiver Monthly Meeting-house 2-8-1812. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Benja- 
min Butterworth, Milley Defer, Jonathan Johnson, Anthony John- 
son, Jas. S. Butler, John L. Roberts, Jonah Cadwalader, Jonathan 
Butler, Judith Johnson, Moorman Butterworth, Zalinda Lynch, 
Matilda Roberts, Josiah Bailey, John H. Moorman, George Akers, 
Stephen Butler, Rachel Johnson, Thomas Ballard, Mary Butler, 
Susanna Bailey, Priscilla Butler. Stephen Butler, Jr., Matilda But- 
ler, Deborah Butler, Deborah Butler, Jr. 



LiLBURN Johnson, son of Christopher and Sarah Johnson, and 
Deborah Butler, daughter of Stephen and Mary Butler, were 
married at South River Meeting-house 1-14-1819. 

The follo-^-ing witnesses signed the marriage certificate: James 
S. Butler, Pleasant Johnson, Caleb Johnson, Jonathan Butler, 
Lemuel Johnson, John Davis, John H. Moorman, Joseph Boyce. 
Richard Tyree, John F. Hawkins, Micajah T. Lynch, Charles Fish- 
er, Achillis Douglas, James Butler, Sr., Polley Lynch, Mary John- 
son, Lucinda Johnson, Zalinda Lynch, Mildred Tyree, Louisa Bail- 
ey, Ann T. Lynch, Rebecca Preston, Mary Lynch, Zalinda Davis, 
Judith Johnson, Anna Lynch, Mary Ann Lynch, Sally Bailey, Lucy 
Jones, Eliza Lynch, Sarah L. Davis, Mary A. Davis. 



John James, son of Thomas and Sarah James, and Martha 
Baugham, daughter of Humphrey and Elizabeth Baugham, 
were married at South River Meeting-house 4-18-1799. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Thomas 
Reeder, Priscilla Reeder, Joseph Fisher, Thomas Hanna, Jonathan 
Carey, James Butler, Lucy Baugham, John Lynch, Stephen Butler, 
Sarah Lodge, Judith Douglas, Mary Lynch. 



84 MARRIAGES. 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATES BEDFORD MONTHLY MEET- 
ING, BEDFORD COUNTY.* 



Henry Kerby and Mary Anderson were married at Bedford 
Monthly Meeting held 12-20-1761. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Charles 
Lynch, Charles Neal, Bowling Clark, Micajah Moorman, William 
Johnson, Daniel Candler, John Candler, Christopher Johnson, 
Sarah Lynch, Sarah Terrell, Winfred Clarke, Susanna Johnson, 
Anna Lynch. 



Evan Lewis (son of Jehu Lewis and Alice his wife), of Bedford 
County, and Sarah Tennison, daughter of John and Ann 
Tennison, of Amherst County, were married at South River 
Meeting-house, in Campbell County, 4-22-1790. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Wil- 
liam Johnson, William Ballard, Ashley Johnson, Robert Johnson, 
William Betts, Enoch Roberts, Christopher Gatt, Micajah Boudlas, 
Susanna Johnson, Betty Johnson, Sarah Johnson, Rachel Ballard, 
William Stanton, John Johnson, Christopher James, Robert Hanna, 
John Davis, Henry Tennison, Salley Johnson, Salley Martin, 
Rachel Paxon, Mary Baugham, Penelope Johnson, Mary Fowler, 
Phebe Stanton, Zalinda Lynch, Mary Betts, Jane Tullas, Jesse 
Lewis, Ann Lewis, Matilda Roberts, Margaret Tennison. 



JocABAD LoDGE^ SOU of Jocabad and Catharine Lodge, and Sarah 
Johnson^ daughter of William and Susannah Johnson, of 
Campbell County, were married 11-22-1792 at South River 
Meeting-house. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Wil- 
liam Johnson, William Stanton, John Davis, Alice Fisher, Gerard 
Johnson, Robert Johnson, Achillis Douglas, Policy Fowler, Betsy 

* Taken from the minutes of Southriver Monthly Meeting, of which they were a 
part. 



MARRIAGES. 85 

Fisher, Betty Johnson, Elizabeth Douglas, Jonathan Johnson, Wil- 
liam Johnson, John Preston, John Johnson, Edward Lynch, Eob- 
ert Fisher, Ashley Johnson, Mary Tenner, Matilda Eoberts, Rebec- 
ca Preston, Euth Micker, John Headon, James Martin, Joseph 
Fisher, Mariah Wright, John Eoberson, Eobert Hanna, Eachel 
Wright, Zalinda Lynch, Nancy Johnson, Sarah Johnson, Mourning 
Johnson. 

Jesse Lewis, son of Jehu and Alice Lewis, of Bedford County, and 
Eebecca Morelan", daughter of Jason and Nancy Morelan, 
were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 3-20-1793. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Amos 
Ballard, William Ballard, Nathan Hale, Sarah Ballard, Moses 
Hurt, William Eeardson, Elizabeth Ballard, Edna Dickenson, 
EHza3allard, Eachel Feazel, Susannah Hanna, Elizabeth Wright, 
Mourning Ballard, Euth Straasberry, Judith Ballard, Jonan Moor- 
Ian, Thomas Johnson, John Davis, Sr., Micajah Davis, Elizabeth 
Hamner, Sarah Blackley, Jason Moorlan, Joel Lewis, George 
Lewis, Nancy Morelan, Jos. Eichardson, Abigal Moorelan, Martha' 
Ehodes, Betty Eichardson, Evan Lewis, Joseph Ehodes, Esther 
Eichards, Ada Moorlan, Moses Embree, Mary Moorelan, Jr., Aaron 
Feazle, Barnet Feazle. 



Daniel McPherson, son of Stephen and Mary McPherson, and 
Mary Bond, daughter of Edward and Mary Bond, all of Bed- 
ford County, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 
6-20-1793. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Eebec- 
ca Lewis, Nancy Morelan, Jonah Dobins, William Pennock, Moses 
Cadwalader, William Pennock, Sr., John Pennock, Thomas Dobins, 
Chas. Pidgeon, James Cadwalader, Stephen Morlan, Philip Wil- 
liams, Euth Paxon, Hannah Lerrow, Sarah Pidgeon, Euth Cad- 
walader, Joel Lewis, Sarah Lewis, Mary Anthony, Chris. Anthony, 
Benj. Bond, Moses Embree, Allan Bond, Mary Kutzs, Samue; Er- 
win, Wm. Pidgeon, Eachel Pidgeon, John Coffee, Abijah Eichai !s, 
Jane Cadwalader, Eachel Coffee, Edward Bond, Mary Bond, Saml. 
Oliphant, Henry Newman, Hannah Harris, Elizabeth Dobins, Mag- 
dala Erwin, Alice Pennock, Jane Erwin, Mary Harris, Hannah 
Pidgeon, Sarah Holmes. 



86 MARRIAGES. 

MiCAJAH Macy, of Bedford County, and Sarah Holloway, of 
Campbell County, were married at South River Meeting-house 
9-25-1794. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Samuel 
Gary, James Johnson, Mary Betts, Achillis Douglas, John Lynch, 
Elizabeth Douglas, Cynthy Cary, Salley Snead, Thomas Hanna, 
Judith Doiighii^, Elilm Macy, Amos Holloway, Asa HoUoway, Isaac 
HoUoway, Hepzibah Holloway, William Johnson, Hannah Fisher, 
Mourning Johnson, Sarah Fisher, Nancy Johnson, Tacy Baugham, 
Rachel Wright, Elizabeth Lea, Hannah Fisher, Jonathan Johnson, 
Wm. Stanton, Sr., Phebe Stanton, Wm. Stanton, Jr., John Pres- 
ton, Joseph Coffin, Robert Hanna, Catharine Hanna, Rebecca Pres- 
ton, James Stanton, Daniel James, Mary Stanton, Mary Holloway, 
Zacheus Stanton, Abner Holloway, Sarah Douglas, Mathew 
Baugham, Hari-y Major. 



Joseph Morelan and Mourning Ballard, of Bedford County, 

were married at Upper Goose Creek Meeting-house, in said 

County, 8-20-1794. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Micajah 

Moorman, Richard Bloxom, x\shly Johnson, Joseph Curie, Moorman 

Johnson, Thomas Moorman, James Johnson, Reuben Moorman, 

Gerard Johnson, Sr., David Johnson, Sarah Terrell, Susanna 

Moorman, Susanna Davis, Gerard Johnson, Mary Butler, Wm. 

Johnson, Eliza Johnson, Naomi Stratton, Rachel Johnson, EjEfie 

Moorman, Anna Bloxom, Elizabeth Douglas, Nancy Moorman, Jane 

Tullas. 



Jason Moreland, son of Jason and Ann Moreland, and Martha 
TuLLis, daughter of Richard and Jane Tullis, of Bedford 
County, were married at South River Meeting-house, in Camp- 
bell County, 5-14-1796. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Sarah 
Johnson, Lydia Johnson, Susanna Moorman, Lydia Ballard, Rhoda 
Johnson, Wm. Stanton, Mary Butler, Thomas Hanna, Ashley John- 
son, Barclay Ballard, Benjamin Hanna, Mary Lynch, Betsy John- 
son, Milly Johnson, Matilda Roberts, William Davis, Christopher 
Johnson, Achillas Douglas, Zacheus Stanton, John Lynch, Elijah 



MARRIAGES. 87 

Johnson, Eichard Tullis, Wm. Fowler, Joseph Bradfield, Jonathan 
Johnson, Samuel Gary, Hannah Fisher, Mary Holloway, Rebecca 
Preston, Jallis Tullis, John Tullis, Ann Tullis, Betty Hendrick, 
Sarah Hendrick, Mary Anderson, Hepzibah Holloway, Robert 
Hanna, Mildred Johnson, Mary Betts, Mourning Johnson. 



Reuben Moorman, of Campbell County, and Lydia Johnson^ of 
Bedford County, were married 1-13-1799. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Thomas 
Moorman, James Johnson, Benjamin Jolinson, Thos. Johnson, Jos- 
eph Johnson, Barclay Ballard, Nicholas Johnson, Timothy John- 
son, James Ballard, David Johnson, Christopher Johnson, Amos 
Holloway, John Wilkison, Africa Moorman, Elizabeth Johnson, 
Judith Ballard, Rachel Johnson, Hepzibah Holloway, Nancy Moor- 
man, Polly Moorman, Mary Johnson, Lydia Ballard, Elizabeth 
Johnson, Huldah Stanton. Elizabeth Daugherty, Susan Ballard, 
Lettice Daugherty. 



Micajah Macy, son of John Macy, of Bedford County, and Sarah 
Fisher, daughter of Joseph Fisher, of Campbell County, were 
married at South River Meeting-house 4-18-1799. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Hepsi- 
bah Holloway, Nancy Johnson, William Stanton, Benjamin Hanna, 
John Timberlake, Matilda Roberts, Joseph Fisher, Jr., Humphrey 
Baugham, Robert Hanna, Mary Lynch, Ann Fisher, William John- 
son, Sr. 



Dudley Milner, son of Beverly Milner, and Mary Anderson, 
daughter of John Anderson, were married at South River 
- Meeting-house 12-13-1800. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Daniel 
Easly, Nimrod Farg-uson, Richard Kirby, Joseph Fisher, Jr., Wil- 
liam Davis, Jr., Edward Lynch, Robt. Hanna, William Johnson, 
Micajah Terrell, Jonathan Johnson, Anna Anderson, Ruth Milner, 
Orpha Kirby, Mary Butler, Susanna Davis. 



88 MARRIAGES. 

Hugh Morgan and Judith Johnson were married at Seneca 
Meeting-house, in Campbell County. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certiiicate : Gerard 
Johnson, Elias Fisher, Charles Moorman, Charles Johnson, Ashley- 
Johnson, Wm. Johnson, Micajah Moorman, Susanna Moorman, 
Elizabeth Terrell, Eachel Johnson. 



John H. Moorman, of Campbell County, and Betsy Johnson, of 
Bedford County, were married 7-12-1806. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Joseph 
Stratton, John Lynch, Stephen Butler, Josiah Bailey, Rebecca 
Preston, Mary Lynch, Mildred Ratcliif, Susanna Da\ds, Nancy 
Johnson, Mary Davis, Judith Jolinson, Zalinda Davis, Thomas 
Moorman, Eeuben Moorman, Simeon Johnson, Chiles ]\Ioorman, 
Rhoda Johnson, Dosha Stratton. 



Benjamin Faxon, son of Jacob and Mary Paxon, and Ruth 
PiDGEON, daughter of William and Rachel Pidgeon, were mar- 
ried at Goose Creek Meeting-house, in Bedford County, 
5-24-1792. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Joel 
Lewis, Sarah Lewis, Samuel Anthony, Hannah Lewis, Martha 
Rhodes, John Pennock, Samuel Oliphant, Mentor P. Perdue, Annis 
Davis, Moses Cadwaladcr, Mary Cadwalader, Mourning Ballard, 
Jesse Cadwalader, William Tugg, Elisha Schooly, Thomas Davis, 
Amos Ballard, Patrick Hix, Mary Bond, Edward Bond, Henry 
Thurman, William Davis, Sarah Lewis, Ruth Curie, Isaac Hatcher, 
Rachel Hatcher, Mary Anthony, James Erwin, Mary Erwin, Mag- 
dala Crew, William Pidgeon, Rachel Pidgeon, Elizabeth Hanna, 
Ruth Cadwalader, Men. Bond, Moses Embree, Rachel Schooly, 
Samuel Davis, Christopher Anthony, Hannah Curie, Samuel Er- 
win, Benjamin Bond, Micajah Richards, Esther Richards, Moses 
Embree, Jane Erwin,Mary Betts, William Betts, John Coffee, 
Rachel Coffee, Joseph Crouch, Hannah Pidgeon, Charles Pidgeon, 
Isaac Pidgeon, Wm. Pidgeon. 



MARKIAGES. 89 

Isaac Pidgeon, son of William and Rachel Pidgeon, of Campbell 
County, and Elizabeth Hammer, daughter of John and 
Eachel Hamner, of the County of Bedford, were married at 
Goose Creek Meeting-house 4-5-1793. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Han- 
nah Larrow, Moses Cadwalader, Euth Cadwalader, Edward Bond, 
Mary Lenord, Mary Burruss, Evan Lewis, Jesse Lewis, Elizabeth 
Woodford, Rebecca W. Lewis, Sarah Holmes, Mary Harris, Aaron 
Betts, Stephen Moorlan, John Coffee, Wm. Pidgeon, Jr., Charles 
Pidgeon, Alice Lewis, Joel Lewis, Sarah Lewis, Martha Rhodes, 
Gulielma Perdue, Samuel Erwin, Mary Bond, Alice Pennock, 
Magdala Erwin, Elizabeth Harris, Mary Anthony, David Hale, 
Mary Richards, William Pidgeon, Sarah Pidgeon, Mary Betts, 
Rachel Coffee, Benjamin Bond, John Pennock, Charles Anthony, 
Thomas Cadwalader, Amos Harris, Christopher Anthony, Samuel 
Erwin, Abigal Richards, James Erwin, Mary Erwin, Rachel 
Schooly, Moses Cadwalader, Moses Embree, Susanna Betts, Moses 
Embree, Jr., John Embree. 



Asa Plummer, son of Joseph Plummer, of Berkley County, and 
Grace Burgess, daughter of Joseph Burgess, of Campbell 
County, were married at Seneca Meeting-house 1-12-1796. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: M. 
Randle, Nancy Moorman, Priscilla Butler, Rachel Hatcher, Lettia 
Wildman, Susanna Johnson, Ann Blocksom, Ann Blocksom, Jr., 
Mary Blocksom, Mary Moorman, Sarah Moorman, Mary Blocksom, 
Sr., Wm. Johnson, Abner Grigg, Richard Blocksom, Richard Block- 
som, Jr., Benj. Stratton, Gideon Blocksom, Joseph Burgess, Thom- 
as Burgess, Daniel Burgess, John Burgess, Druscilla Burgess, 
James Butler. 



Charles Pidgeon, son of William Pidgeon, and Ann Gregg, 
daughter of Abner Gregg, all of Campbell County, were mar- 
ried at Seneca Meeting-house 5-15-1799. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Ash- 
ley Johnson, Benjamin Stratton, Daniel Burgess, Naomi Stratton, 
Isaac Pidgeon, Susanna Johnson, Abraham Wildman, Thomas Bur- 
gess, William Pidgeon, Elizabeth Pidgeon, Dosha Moorman, Mary 
Bloxom. 



90 MARRIAGES. 

John Egberts and Eachel Taylor were married at Bedford 
Monthly Meeting 12-20-1761. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Charles 
Lynch, Charles jSTeal, Micajah Moorman, Bowling Clark, Wm. John- 
son, Daniel Candler, John Candler, Chris. Johnson, Sarah Terrell, 
Sarah Lynch, Winnifred Clark, Susanna Johnson, Anna L}Tich. 



William Stabler, of Londonn County (son of Edward and IMary 
Stabler, of Petersburg, deceased), and Deborah Pleasants 
(daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Pleasants, of Goochland 
County), were married at Cedar Creek Meeting-house, in Han- 
over County, 6-4-1789. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Thom- 
as S. Pleasants, Edward Stabler, William H. Pleasants, Samuel 
Pleasants, Jr., Samuel Parsons, James Hunnicutt, Thomas W. 
Pleasants, B. Watldns, Cary Pleasants, Joel Eoyster, Thomas E. 
Pleasants, Joseph Woodson, Sarah Parsons, Mary Younghusband, 
Elizabeth Pleasants, Polly Younghusband, Elizabeth Pleasants, 
Jr., Elizabeth T. Pleasants, Eebecca Hunnicutt, Elizabeth Watkins, 
Frances Eoyster, Polly Pleasants, Sarah Pleasants. 



Thomas Snowden Pleasants, of Goochland County, son of Thom- 
as and Elizabeth Pleasants, of said County, and Elizabeth 
Tucker Pleasants, daughter of Jacob and Sarah Pleasants, 
of Henrico County, were married 12-16-1790. 
The follo\\ang witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Samuel 
Parsons, John S. Pleasants, Thomas W. Pleasants, Philip Pleas- 
ants, Thomas E. Pleasants, Cary Pleasants, Thomas Harris, 
Obediah Crew, B. Watkin, Jolin Harris, Achillis Barksdale, Sarah 
Parsons, Elizabeth Pleasants, Polly Pleasants, Mary Younghus- 
band, Eliza Pleasants, Mary Brooks, Angey Eoyster. 



Edward Staj3Ler, of Alexandria, son of Edward and Mary Stabler 
(deceased), of the town of Petersburg, and Mary Pleasants, 
• daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Pleasants (the latter de- 
ceased), of Goochland County, were married at Cedar Creek, 
in Hanover County, 2-27-1794. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Thom- 
as Pleasants, Ecuben Pleasants, James B. Pleasants, Eobert Pleas- 



MAREIAGES. 91 

ants, William H. Pleasants, John Pleasants, John P. Watson, J. W. 
Pleasants, Samuel P. Parsons, Thomas Hunnicutt, Philip Pleas- 
ants, Gerard Hopkins, Samuel Parsons, Mieajah Crew, Benjamin 
Eussell, James Vaughan, E. Turner, Sarah Pleasants, Dehorah 
Pleasants, Mary Younghushand, Elizabeth T. Pleasants, Jane 
Pleasants, Sarah Parsons, Mary P. Younghushand, Rebecca Hun- 
nicutt, Elizabeth Stanley, Polly Watkins, Milley M. Hunnicutt. 



Tarlton Woodson Pleasants, son of James Pleasants, of Gooch- 
land County, and Sarah Pleasants, daughter of Thomas 
Pleasants, of the said County, were married at Friends Meet- 
ing-house at Genito 5-17-1803. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Wil- 
liam H. Pleasants, Archibald Pleasants, John T. Pleasants, Philip 
S. Pleasants, Eobert Watkins, Alban Gilpan, Thomas Hatton, John 
Johnson, Samuel Hough, Thomas B. Watkins, Obadiah Crew, Dan- 
iel Couch, James Hunnicutt, Joseph Woodson, Jr., Byars Crawford, 
Matilda Pleasants, Dorothea R. Pleasants, Susanna E. Pleasants, 
Ann Maria Smith, Sally Watkins, Eliza Hunnicutt, Eliza Pleas- 
ants, Mary Trevillian. 



Taelton Woodson Pleasants, son of James Pleasants, of Gooch- 
land County, and Talitiia Crew, daughter of Mieajah and 
Margaret Crew, of Hanover County, were married at Cedar 
Creek 6-13-1812. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Mieajah 
Crew, Benjamin Bates, Lemuel Crew, Walter Crew, William H. 
Pleasants, Margaret Crew (Ann Taylor and EHzabeth Wood from 
Ohio), Margaret M. Crew, Martha Pleasants, Thomas Hatton, 
Daniel Couch, James Hunnicutt, Thomas Hunnicutt, Philip 
Brooks, Isaac Parker, Isham Burch, Abner Brooks, Ben W. Ladd, 
Susanna Pleasants, Margaret Vaughan, Deborah Harris, Lucy 
Bates, Sarah D. Ladd, Susanna Brooks, Eliza M. Gordon, Emily 
Pleasants. 



92 MARRIAGES. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, son of "William H. and Mary Pleasants, of 
Goochland County, and Martha Bates, daughter of Benja- 
min and Tace Bates, of Hanover County, were married at 
Cedar Creek 10-9-1819. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Micajah 
Crew, Wm. H. Pleasants, Lemuel Crew, Fleming Bates, Walter 
Crew, Thomas S. Pleasants, Micajah Bates, Oliver Ladd, Thomas 
Hatton, Josiah Eatcliff, Joshua Bates, Nathaniel C. Crenshaw, 
Thomas Hunnicutt, James Hunnicutt, Wm. S. Bates, Isaac Lead- 
better, Benj. S. Bates, William John Clarke, Wm. E. Irby, Lemuel 
Hargrave, Samuel S. Gilpin, Samuel B. Eice, John Crew, Edmund 
B. Crenshaw, William Ellett, Margaret Crew, Lucy Bates, Tace 
Bates, Margaret M. Crew, Unity Bates, Elizabeth A. Pleasants, 
Margaret A. Webster, Margt. Vaughan, Jane Dabney, Martha Har- 
grave, Unity S. Harris, Sarah Stanley, Deborah Bates, Isabella 
Harris, EUzabeth Hunnicutt. 



Benjamin Bates, of Hanover County, son of Benjamin Bates 
(deceased), of York, and Henrietta Maria Pleasants, 
daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Pleasants, of Goochland 
County, were married at Genito Meeting-house 8-13-1812. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Micajah 
Crew, William H. Pleasants, Walter Crew, Joseph Pollard, Isaac 
Webster, N. M. Vaughan, Isaac Pleasants, Ben. W. Ladd, Micajah 
Bates, Joseph Pleasants, James Hunnicutt, Henry Clarke, Thomas 
S. Pleasants, Philip S. Pleasants, Granville Smith, Margaret Crew, 
Paulina Pleasants, Lucy Bates, Martha Pleasants, Damaris Pleas- 
ants, Susanna W. Pleasants, Abby Clarke, Deborah Harris, Margaret 
W. Pleasants, Eliza P. Pleasants, Chlotilda Harris, Phebe Mills, 
Ann Pleasants, Eebekah Harris, Eliza Hunnicutt, Emily Pleasants, 
Eebecca M. Eussell, Betsy Watkins, Lucy C. Downer, M. L. Pleas- 
ants. 



MARRIAGES. 93 

Edward S. Pleasants, of the City of Eichmond, in the County of 
Henrico, son of Tarlton and Talitha Pleasants, of Goochland 
County, and Tacy E. Bates, daughter of Micajah and Mary- 
Bates, of the City of Eichmond (the latter deceased), were 
married at Friends' Meeting-house, in the aforesaid city;, 
3-18-1846. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Henry 
Clarke, Thos. M. Alfriend, Wm. John Clarke, A. Pleasants, Thos. 
S. Pleasants, Charles J. Sinton, David H. Eead, Jolin D. Graff, 
Wm. Tyree, B. Slade, W. M. GasMns, John H. Eiddick, Elizabeth 
E. Whitlock, Theodore Carrington, Henry B. Eead, Sarah I. Sin- 
ton, Mary Ann Spencer, Jane C. Whitlock, Mary B. Ladd, Susan 
S. Gaskins, Marcella Tyree, Eliza H. Lee, Martha B. Nicholls, 
Elizabeth Waddel, Frances Andrews, Mary C. Pleasants, Eebecca 
Spencer, Mary M. Clarke, Micajah Bates, Martha Ann Bates, Henry 
Bates, Martha Ann Bates, Catharine Bates, Wm. S. Bates, Mary S. 
Pleasants, Mary Bates, Nathaniel C. Crenshaw, Fleming Bates, 
George F. Terrell, Mary Pleasants. 



Enoch Eobards, of Campbell County (late of Philadelphia), and 
Matilda Lynch, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 
1-29-1789. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Eliza- 
beth Douglas, Susanna Johnson, Betty Johnson, Elizabeth Cafi:ery, 
Anna Lea, Sarah Johnson, Salley Johnson, Eachel Paxson, Lucy 
Terrell, Sarah Martin, Eobt. Hanna, Eobert Johnson, John Paxson, 
William Betts, Mary Betts, Eobert Wright, Wm. Stanton, Catharine 
Stanton, James Martin, Edward Lynch, Catharine Hanna, Ashley 
Johnson, John Lynch, Wm. Johnson, Chris. Johnson, Zalinda 
Lynch, Benj. Johnson, Anselm Lynch, Wm. Stanton, Aehillis 
Douglas, Henry Terrell, John Hargrove. 



Joseph Stratton, son of Joseph and Naomi Stratton, and Dosha 

Moorman, daughter of Micajah and Susannah Moorman, all 

of Campbell County, were married at Seneca Meeting-house 

12-19-1792. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Joseph 

Stratton, Micajah Moorman, Wm. Johnson, Joseph Johnson, Thorn- 



94 MARRIAGES. 

as Johnson, James Johnson, Kichard Bloxsom, John W. Johnson, 
Thomas Moorman, Abner Gregg, Moorman Johnson, Ben Sehofield, 
Lemuel Johnson, Charles Moorman, Wm. Johnson, Wm. Bloxsom, 
Naomi Stratton, iVgatha Johnson, Eachel Johnson, Ann Bloxsom, 
Sally Moorman, Mary Betts, Jane Johnson, Judith Johnson, JSTancy 
Moorman, Susanna Johnson, Elizabeth Johnson, Polly Moorman, 
Eachel Johnson. 



Benjamin Stratton, son of Joseph Stratton, and Amy Curle, 
daughter of Jos. Curie, were married at South River Meeting- 
house 1-20-1796. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Letitia 
Wildman, Betty Moorman, Agatha Johnson, Nancy Moorman, Su- 
sannah Johnson, Eebecca Preston, Joseph Stratton, Sarah Curie, 
Joseph Curie, Hannah Stratton. 



Latham Stanton, son of Wm. Stanton, and Huldah Butler, 
daughter of Stephen Butler, all of Campbell County, were mar- 
ried at South Eiver Meeting-house 9-14-1797. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Ann 
Lay, Eachel Cary, Nancy Johnson, Susannah Johnson, Mary 
Lynch, Lydia Johnson, Hannah Fisher, Sarah Lodge, Tacy Nicols, 
Cyntha Cary, Elizabeth Johnson, Betty Johnson, Sarah Johnson, 
Benjamin Johnson, Humphrey Baugham, Timothy Johnson, Eob- 
ert Hanna, Jonathan Johnson, Enoch Eobards, Eobert Johnson, 
Benjamin Hanna, Jacob Nicols, Joseph Bradfield, William Fowler, 
Christopher Johnson, Harry Majors, Wm. Stanton, Sr., Pheby 
Stanton, Sally Butler, Stephen Butler, Sally Butler, Hepzibah Hol- 
loway, Aaron Stanton, James Stanton, Zacheus Stanton, Jonathan 
Butler, Wm. Butler, James Butler, James Staunton Butler, Asa 
Hollowav. 



Mahlon Stratton and Sarah Moorman, of Campbell County, 

were married at Seneca Meeting-house 10-17-1798. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Micajah 

Moorman, Eeuben Moorman, James Hunnicutt, James Stanton, 

William Johnson, Joseph Stratton, James Johnson, Abner Gregg, 



MARRIAGES. 95 

Aslily Johnson, Drnscilla Burgess, Hannah Stratton, Mary Via, 
Polly Moorman, Ehoda Johnson, Anna Stratton, Agatha Johnson, 
Milley Johnson, Sarah Gregg, Sarah Curl, Letitia Wildman. 



Zacheus Stanton, son of William Stanton, and Sally Butler, 
daughter of James Butler, all of Campbell County, were mar- 
ried at Hills Creek Meeting-house 10-16-1800. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Mary 
Bloxom, Sr., Nancy Butler, Sarah Curie, Elizabeth Pidgeon, 
Martha Terrell, Susannah Fox, Druscilla Crew, James Butler, Sr., 
Jonathan Butler, Wm. Bloxom, Latham Stanton, David Terrell, 
Eichard Bloxom, Butterworth Benjamin. ^ 



Jacob Stratton, son of Joseph Stratton, and Eebecca Curle, 
daughter of Joseph Curie, all of Campbell County, were mar- 
ried at Senaca Meeting-house 11-13-1800. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Sarah 
Curie, Mary Via, Hannah Stratton, Amy Stratton, Dosha Strat- 
ton, Betty Wildman, Betty Moorman, Chisy Hubank, Nancy Moor- 
man, Africa Moorman, Euth Gregg, Agatha Johnson, Letitia 
Wildman, Shady Stratton, Joel Stratton, Joseph Curie, Daniel 
Stratton, Abraham Wildman, Eichard Bloxom, James Jolmson, 
Benjamin Stratton, Jonah Wildman, Eeuben Moorman. 



EoBiNSON Stabler, of the town of Alexandria, of the District of 
Columbia, son of Edward and Mary Stabler (the latter de- 
ceased), and Mary A. Davis, daughter of William Davis, Jr., 
of the town of Lynchburg, Va., were married at South Eiver 
Meeting-house 10-16-1828. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Wil- 
liam Davis, Jr., Annis Davis, Edward Lynch, Susannah Davis, 
Jonathan Johnson, Eebecca Preston, NanBy Dudley, Mary A. An- 
thony, William Davis, Margaret Anthony, Edward L. Johnson, 
Samuel B. Anthony, Achillis D. Tyree, George E. Eoberts, Sarah 
L. Davis, Mary M. Johns, Louisa Davis, Catharine L. Hunter, 
Sarah Ann Davis, Zalinda L. Winston, Matilda Lynch, Mary Ann 
Mays, Elizabeth H. Eoberts, Mary C. Powell, James E. Eoyall, S. 



96 MARRIAGES. 

H. Davis, Charles H. Davis, A. F. Bigger, Peter C. Nelson, Eichard 

C. Perkins, Micajah T. Johnson, George Wliitlocke, Gerard E. 
Johnson, Henry I. Brown, Lucy E. Ward, J. T. Patton, E. M. 
Johnson, Micajah T. Lynch, John W. Bagwell, Catharine F. Smith- 
son, Eohert Johnson, Deborah D. Davis, Moses Preston, Elizabeth 

D. Davis, Anna Stabler, Joseph Janney, Jr., George D. Davis, 
James Beal, Judith Johnson, Elizabeth D. Johnson, John Davis, 
Jr., Henry Latham, Mary Lynch, William Cadwalader, E. E. 
Phelps. 



William Ferrell, Jr., and Judith Goode, both of Bedford 
County, were married 1-27-1780. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Jolin 
Lynch, William Ballard, Ashley Johnson, William Johnson, Chris- 
topher Jolmson, Barkley Ballard, Edward Terrell, Benj. Jolinson, 
William Martin, Glover Baker, Mary Lynch, Molley Johnson, Jacob 
Straley, David Jolmson, Eichard Timberlake, Jolin Timberlake, 
Mary Baker, Lucy Johnson, Molley Johnson, Euth .Johnson, Sarah 
Macey, Eacliel Ballard, Jane Ferrell, Eebecca JFerrell, Hannah 
Ferrell, Sarah Goode, Ann Fowler, Eliza Jolmson, Jane Tillus, 
Agnes Jolmson. 



John Tillas and Sarah Moorlan, of Bedford County, were mar- 
ried 5-14-1788. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Joseph 
Wright, William Ballard, Amos Harris, Mary Ballard, Elizabeth 
Harris, Mary Ballard, Elizabeth Ballard, Esther Eichards, Eleanor 
Ballard, Mourning Ballard, Mary Haynes, Jason Moorlan, Abigal 
Moorlan, Mary Moorlan, Nathan Dabny, Jolmi Stratton, Philip 
Teazle, Byrum Ballard, Ann Moorlan, Stephen Morlan, Eebecca 
Morlan, JEliza Tillas, William Morlan, Dosha Morlan, Eliza Morlan, 
Mary Morlan, Hannah Morlan. 



David Terrell and Molly Anthony, daughter of Christopher 
Anthony, were married at South Eiver Meeting-house 
9-25-1788. 
Christopher Johnson, William Johnson, Ann Fowler, Matilda 

Lynch, John L}Tich, Wm. Stanton, Joseph Anthony, Wm. Ballard, 



MARRIAGES. 97 

Jr., Achillis Douglas, Saml. Terrell, Robert Hanna, Wm. Davis, 
David Johnson, Wm. Davis, Jr., Betty Johnson, Jane Tillas, Eliza- 
beth Johnson, Rebecca Morlan, Elizabeth Tillas, William Betts, 
Ashley Jolinson, Charles Anthony, Elizabeth Ballard, Betty John- 
son, Rachel Ballard, Elizabeth Douglas, Sally Johnson, Ruth John- 
son, Rachel Paxon, Mary Betts, Sarah Johnson, Susanna Johnson, 
Mary Terrell, Lucy Terrell. 



Edward Terrell, son of David Terrell, of Bedford County, and 
Jane Johnson, daughter of Gerard and Judith Johnson, of 
Campbell County, were married at Seneca Meeting-house 10- 
19-1794. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Micajah 
Moorman, Richard Blocksom, Ashley Johnson, Joseph Curl, Moor- 
man Johnson, Thomas Mooi-man, James Johnson, Reuben Moor- 
man, Gerard Johnson, Sr., David Johnson, Sarah Terrell, Susanna 
Moorman, Susanna Davis, Mary Butler, Gerard Johnson, William 
Johnson, Eliza Johnson, Naomi Stratton, Rachel Johnson, Effey 
Moorman, Anna Blocksom, Elizabeth B. Douglas, Nancy Moorman, 
Jane Tillas. 



Thomas Terry and Sarah Hendrick, of Bedford County, were 
married 1-17-1797. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Chris- 
topher Johnson, Wm. Johnson, Matilda Roberts, Elizabeth Johnson. 
Other names omitted for want of space. 



Samuel Welch, of Campbell County, and Chloe Hendrick, 
daughter of Moses and Ruth Hendrick, of Halifax County, 
were married 9-21-1783. 

Witnesses' names: Amos Hendrick, Judith Hendrick, Mary 
Welch, Sarah Terrell, Sarah Ward, Mary Anthony, Mary Davis, 
xVnnis Davis, Tirzah Davis, Betsy Anthony, Patty Cavil, Lettus 
Gosney, Christopher Anthony, Micajah Davis, David Terrell, Wm. 
Davis, Sr., Richard Davis, William Davis, Patrick Cartey, Isham 
Welch, Samuel Terrell, Charles Anthony. 



""X 



98 MARRIAGES. 

Xath^vniel Winston, of the city of Richmond, son of George and 
Judith Winston, and Zalinda Lynch, daughter of Edward 
and ]\rary Lynch, of Lynehl)urg, were married at South Eiver 
Meeting-houso 5-C-1819. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: John 
Lynch, Edward Lynch. Eliza H. Clark, Sarah L. Davis, Henry 
Clark, Sarah L. Terrell, Pleasant Winston, A. T. Lynch, Micajah 
Lynch, John Davis, Charles Johnson. D. D. Davis, Mary Lynch, 
Zalinda Davis, Ann Lynch, Mildred Tyree, Matilda Roberts, Judith 
Johnson, Sarah Johnson, Mary Davis, Rebecca Preston, Mary A. 
Da\ns, Betsy Moorman, Mary Ann Mays, Wm. Davis, Lucy Moor- 
man, Richard Tyree, Mahlon Cadwalader, Jonathan Johnson, Wm. 
Davis Jr., Charles Fisher, Achillis Douglas, A. Liggett, James 
Benaugh, Wm. Gray, Joseph Boyce, Ammon Hancock, Thomas 
Moore, Jr., Richard Adams, Matilda Roberts, Jr., M. Davis, Jr. 



Joseph Anthony, of Campbell County, and Rhoda Moorman, of 
Caroline County, were married at Golansville 5-15-1791. 
The following witnesses signed tlie marriage certificate : Clarke 
T. Moorman, jVfathew P. Terrell, Thomas Terrell, John Payne, 
Catlett Jones, Jonathan Terrell, Ursula Cheadle, Salley Terrell, 
Ann Stevens, Pleasants Cobbs, John Peatross, Anthony New, Isaac 
Winston. Joanna Terrell, Lucy Winston, Salley Chiles, Judith 
Cheadle, Rachel MooiTrian, Salley Terrell, Rebecca Terrell, Rhoda 
Terrell. 



Benjamin Bates, son of Benj. and Hanna Bates, of York County, 
and Tack Crew (daughter of Micajah and Margaret Crew), 
were married at Cedar Creek Meeting-house, in Hanover Coun- 
ty, 12-16-1793. 
The following \ntncsses signed the marriage certificate : Deborah 
13arbey and Rebecca Young, ministers from Old England, and Da- 
vid Cummings, from Pennsylvania, Margaret Crew, Chlotilda Har- 
ris, Mary Pleasants, Sarah Pleasants, Mary P. Younghusband, 
Unity Stanley, Edward Stabler, Thomas Hatton, Fleming Bates, 
Lemuel Crew, Wm. H. Pleasants, Thomas Ladd, Wm. Jackson, 
Micajah Crew, Clark T. ]\Ioonnan, Thomas Stanley, Joshua Stan- 
ley, Thomas Harris, Jr. 



MARRIAGES. 99 

Fleming Bates, of Prince William County, son of Benjamin and 
Hannah Bates, of York County, and Unity Crew, daughter 
of Micajah and Margaret Crew, of Hanover County, were mar- 
ried at Cedar Creek 11-16-1803. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Micajali 
Crew, Benj. Crew, Lemuel Crew, Walter Crew, Nicholas Crew, Mica- 
jah Crew, Jr., Daniel Couch Samuel Johnson, Joshua Crew, David 
Evans, Thomas Hatton, Littleherry Crew, Thomas Stanley, Sr., 
Joshua Stanley, Isaac Eatcliff, Thomas Stanley, Thomas Hatton, 
Jr., Catlett Jones, Clarke Moorman, Waddy Stanley, Thomas Stan- 
ley, Jr., James Cowgill, Thomas Harris, Margaret Crew, Talitha 
Crew, Unity Ladd, Deborah Harris, Eliza E. Pleasants, Mary Hat- 
ton, Eachel Moorman, Margaret Eatcliff, Susannah Hatton, Sarah 
Jones, Sarah Eichardson, Martha Eichardson, Margaret Crew, 
Louisa Storrs, Jane Brooks, Charlotte Cowgill, Marianna L. 
Pleasants. 



Barclay Ballard, son of William Ballard, of Bedford County, and 
Judith Jolmson, daughter of John Johnson, of Amelia County, 
were married 3-37-1776. 

The following witnesses sig-nod the marriage certificate : Ashley 
Johnson, Jesse Johnson, Gerard Johnson, William Johnson, Ben. 
Johnson, Mary Johnson, Ehzaheth Johnson, Judith Johnson, 
Agatha Johnson, Jane Jolmson, Susannah Johnson, John Johnson, 
Sr., Lydia Johnson. 



Ashley Johnson, of Campbell County, and Milley Johnson, of 
Amelia County, were married 3-13-1783. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Wil- 
liam Johnson, Ashley Johnson, Sr., Jesse Johnson, Gerard Johnson, 
John Johnson, Joseph Johnson, Thomas Johnson, Elizabeth John- 
son, Elizabeth Johnson, Jr., Mary Johnson, Lydia Johnson, Jane 
Johnson, Sarah Johnson, Druscilla Johnson, Samuel Johnson, 



100 MAERIAGES. 

Christopher Johnson, son of Christopher Johnson, of Campbell 

County, and Sarah Hargrave, daughter of Samuel Hargrave 

(deceased), of Caroline County, were married at Golansville 

Friends' Meeting-house, Caroline County. 

The f ollo^ving witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Samuel 

Hargrave, Thomas Hargrave, Pleasant Terrell, Thomas Terrell, 

John Burch, John Kussell, Pleasant Cobbs, Mathew Terrell, Jesse 

Terrell, Rebecca Terrell, Martha Hargrave, Elizabeth McGeehee, 

Amev Terrell. 



Elisha Johnson, son of Eobert Johnson, of the County of Surrey, 
in North Carolina, and Jane Johnson, daughter of Ashley 
Johnson, of Amelia County, Va., were married 3-16-1783. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Agatha 
Johnson, Judith Johnson, Elizabeth Johnson, Jane Johnson, Susan 
Johnson, Drusilla Johnson, Anno Johnson, Lydia Johnson, Eliza- 
beth Johnson, Elizabeth Piller, Jesse Johnson, Jr., Ben. Johnson, 
Thomas Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Wm. Johnson, Wm. Johnson, 
Jr., Andrew Johnson, Andrew Moorman, Gerard Johnson, Johns 
Johnson, Wm. Johnson, Gerard Johnson, Sr., Ashley Johnson. Sr., 
Jesse Johnson, Milley Piller, Judith Johnson, Lucy Winston, Chris- 
tian Winston, Sarah Johnson. 



James Candler, son of John Candler, of Campbell County, and 

Agness Johnson, daughter of James Johnson, of Louisa 

County, were married 1-16-1786. 

The following -wntnesses signed the marriage certificate: James 

Johnson, Catlett Jones, George Bell, Sr., Elijah Johnson, Lewis 

Johnson, Peter Crawford, George Bell, Xehemiah Bloomer, Martha 

Johnson, Patty Johnson, Mary Johnson, Massey Johnson, Cisley 

Bell, Betsy Johnson, Lucy Johnson, Ashley Johnson. 



Nicholas Johnson, son of Christopher Johnson, of Campbell 
County, and Martha Hargrave, daughter of Samuel Har- 
grave (deceased), of Caroline County, were married at Golans- 
ville Meeting-house 4-16-1788. 
The following witnesses signed tlie marriage certificate: Jesse 

Hargrave, Thomas Hargrave, Joseph Hargrave, Pleasant Terrell, 



MARRIAGES. 101 

Jonathan Terrell, Clarke T. Moorman, Pleasant Cobbs, Mathew 
P. Terrell, Henry Chiles, Ben. Burch, Robert Terrell, Joseph Mc- 
G-eehee, Samuel Winston, Ann McGeehee, Margaret Terrell, Salley 
Chiles, Ursula F. Cheadle, Caty Terrell, Rhoda Moorman, Rachel 
Moorman, Sarah Pettrus, Rebecca Terrell, Salley Moorman, Salley 
Rogers, Policy Hewlett, Rhoda Terrell, Elizabeth Redd. 



John Johnson, son of Jesse Johnson, of Amelia County, and 
Nancy Hunnioutt, of Powhatan County, were married at 
Genito Meeting-house, in Goochland County, 13-12-1790. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Joseph 
Hunnicutt, Jesse Johnson, Ashley Johnson, Jr., Ben. Watkins, Jos- 
eph Watkins, Watkins Johnson, Thomas Watkins, Thomas Stanley, 
Samuel Parsons, John S. Pleasants, Cary Pleasants, Reuben Pleas- 
ants, Daniel Clark, Robert H. Ross, James Pleasants, Jr., John 
Hunnicutt, Mary Watkins, Elizabeth Watkins, Salley Watkins, 
Polly Pleasants, Elizabeth T. Pleasants, Mary Brooks, Mary Wat- 
kins, Nancy Jude. 



Elijah Johnson, son of Ashley and Martha Johnson, of Louisa 

County, and Betsy Watkins, daughter of Benjamin and Pris- 

silla Watldns, of Goochland County, were married at Cedar 

Creek Meeting-house, in Hanover County, 4-13-1793. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Polly 

Watkins, Sarah Harris, Betsy Johnson, Ann Jones, Janey Redole, 

Rachel Moorman, Margaret Crew, Unity Stanley, Mary Pleasants, 

Rachel Harris, Sarah Parsons, Sarah Hatton, Sarah Pleasants, 

Judith Crew, Mary Hatton, Tace Crew, Edith Harris, Thomas 

Stanley, Catlett Jones, William Jackson, Samuel Terrell, Samuel 

Parsons, Thomas Harris, Thomas Hatton, John Harris, Joshua 

Stanley, Benjamin Russell, Clark T. Moorman, Micajah Crew, 

Thomas Harris, Pleasant Cobbs. 



John Johnson, son of James Johnson, of Bedford County, and 
Dorothy Crew, daughter of James Crew (deceased), of Han- 
over County, were married at Cedar Creek Meeting-house 11- 
16-1796. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Judith 



103 MARRIAGES. 

Crew, Elizabeth Johnson, Unity Stanley, Chlotilda Harris, Eachel 
Mooi-man, Judith Hart, Mary Crew, Tace Bates, Margaret 
Vaughan, Unity Crew, Susannah Hatton, Susannah Davis, Micajah 
Crew, Thomas Hands, Jesse Crew, Littleberry Crew, Obadiah Crew, 
Catlett Jones, Joshua Stanley, Thomas Stanley, Waddy Stanley, 
Edmund James, Malcolm Hart, Benj. Bates, Jr. 



Thomas T. Cobbs, son of Pleasant Cobbs, of Caroline County, and 
Elizabeth Johnson, daughter of Benjamin Johnson (deceas- 
ed), of Hanover County, were married at Golansville Meeting- 
house, in Caroline County, 4-16-1806. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Pleas- 
ant Cobbs, Joseph Terrell, Jonathan Terrell, Lewis Cobbs, Samuel 
Terrell, Pleasant Terrell, Matilda Terrell, Eebecca Terrell, Mary 
Terrell, Salley Terrell, Rebecca Terrell, Salley Terrell, Rhoda 
Cobbs, Ann Cobbs. 



Catlett Jones and Ann Barksdale, of Orange Couxity, were mar- 
ried at Cedar Creek, in Hanover County, 3-2-1789. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Achil- 
lis Douglas, Christopher Johnson, Clark T. Moorman, Eobert 
Pleasants, James Hunnicutt, Benjamin Johnson, John Harris, 
Micajah Crew, Benjamin Crew, Thomas Terrell, Pleasant Terrell, 
Nathan Bell, Thomas Harris, Elijah Johnson, Thomas Pleasants, 
Samuel Parsons, Thomas Hatton, Eobert Watkins, Eachel Moor- 
man, Eebecca Terrell, Eachel Harris, Chlotilda Harris, Edith Har- 
ris, Sarah Parsons, Judith Crew, Susan Watts, Deborah Pleasants, 
Margaret Crew, Sarah Hatton, Ehoda Moorman, Judith Harris, 
Salley Terrell, Mar}^ Baughan, Mary Johnson, Ann Ladd, Sarah 
Crew, Mary Pleasants, Priscilla Ladd. 



Joseph Jokd.in, of the County of Southampton, and Eebecca 
Harris, daughter of 'Jliomas and Chlotilda Harris, were mar- 
ried 11-17-1819, at Cedar Creek Meeting-house, in Hanover 
County. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: Thom- 
as Harris, Micajah Crew. Benjamin Harris, Euth Jordan, Thomas 
Himnicutt, Samuel Terrell, Thos. S. Pleasants, P. Winston, Lemuel 



MARKIAGES. 103 

Crew, Olivia Ladd, Joshua Bates, Mieajah Bates, Samuel B. Eiee, 
Lemuel Vaxighan, James Holman, Thomas Terrell, Boiling 
Vaughan, Joseph Maule, Jos. D. Bates, Walter Crew, Joseph 
Vaughan, Elizabeth Terrell, Eliza M. Gordon, Isabella Harris, Mar- 
garet Vaughan, Unity S. Harris, Mary Ann Terrell, Margaret M. 
Crew, Mary M. Pope, Elizabeth Hunnicutt, Elizabeth Maule, Unity 
Bates, Anna Crew, Catharine M. Dabney, Martha M. Dahney, Anna 
L. Vaughan, Jane Dabney. 



Obediah Crew, son of James Crew (deceased), of Goochland 
County, and Mary Peatross, daughter of John and Sarah 
Peatross, of Caroline County, were married at Golansville 
Meeting-house 3-10-1799. 
The followdng witnesses signed the marriage certificate: John 
Peatross, Thomas Terrell, John Johnson, Jesse Crew, Timothy 
Terrell, Thomas Peatross, William Peatross, Malcolm Hart, Rich- 
ard Peatross, Anthony New, Pleasant Terrell, Pleasant Cobb, 
Mathew Terrell, Dorothy Johnson, Joanna Terrell, Sally Terrell, 
Caty Terrell, Rhoda Anthony, Amey Cobbs, Anna Peatross, Nancy 
New, Elizabeth Peatross, Rebecca Terrell. 



Gilbert Congdon, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth Congdon, of 
Providence, R. I., and Elizabeth A. Crenshaw, daughter of 
Nathaniel C. and Ann C. Crenshaw (the latter deceased), of 
Hanover County, were married at Cedar Creek Meeting-house 
2-14-1856. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Wm. J. 
Carpenter, J. Alonza Smith, J. Walker Carpenter, J. D. G. Brown, 
William R. Winn, Edward W. Kimloys, Chas. H. Vaughan, Thos. 
L. Jones, Benjamin Vaughan, John Ellett, Robert W. Bigiow, J. 
Clifton Carpenter, Jesse Stanley, Thos. F. Waldrop, Jos. P. Ter- 
rell, H. L. Tiller, John I. Jones, Abram Stanley, Mary I. Vaughan, 
Lavinia A. Brown, Unity W. Fulcher, Indianna H. Crenshaw, En- 
dora I. Lowry, Francis I. Stanley, Nathaniel C. Crenshaw, Eliza 
H. Crenshaw, Samuel H. Congdon, Mary J. Crenshaw, John B. 
Crenshaw, Rachel H. Crenshaw, F. Edmonia Crenshaw, Nathaniel 
B. Crenshaw, Margaret M. Crew, Edmund Taber, Mary H. Pretlow, 



104 MARRIAGES. 

Julia C. Pretlow, Joshua Pretlow, Jordan D. Pretlow, Tace C. 
Bates, Samuel Janney, Gerard Hopkins, Abram V. Trimble, Eich- 
ard A. Eicks, Martha A. Bates, Micajah Bates, Hannah Bates. 



Joel Cook, son of Josiah and Lydia Cook, of Isle of Wight County, 
and Deborah Harris, daughter of Thomas and Chlotilda 
Harris, of Hanover County, were married at Cedar Creek 
1-17-1817. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: P. 
Winston, Micajah Bates, Bowling Vaughan, Lemuel Vaughan, Jos- 
eph Pretlow, Nathaniel C. Crenshaw, Lemuel Crew, Philip Brooks, 
Thomas Hunnicutt, John Crew, Thomas Harris, Benjamin Harris, 
Ehjah Cook, Joseph Poster, Wm. H. Pleasants, Jolm Pretlow, 
George I. Knight, Thomas S. Pleasants, Thomas Hargrave, James 
Crew, Eebecca Harris, Ehzabeth Cook, Isabella Harris, Eliza M. 
Gordan, Margaret Vaughan, Elizabeth Bates, Elizabeth Maule, 
Margaret M. Crew, Jane Brooks, Eliza Hunnicutt, ]\Iartha Har- 
grave, Lucy Bates. 



Thomas Stanley, son of John Stanley, and Unity Crew, daugh- 
ter of James Crew, were married at Cedar Creek Meeting- 
house, in Hanover County, 12-20-1780. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: John 
Stanley, James Crew, Micajah Crew, Joshua Stanley, Littlebury 
Stanley, Sliadrack Stanley, Moses Harris, John Harris, John Shel- 
ton, Nicholas Stanley, Hutcliins, John Anderson, Agnes Stanley, 
Ursula Stanley, Mary Payne, Elizabeth Strong, Sarah Strong, Ee- 
becca Stanley, Sarah Stanley, Huldah Stanley, Mary Strong, Mar- 
garet Stanley, Nancy Shelton, Dollcy Payne, Elizabeth Harris, 
Susannah Stanley. 



Littleberry Stanley, son of Thomas Stanley, and Aggatha 

Stanley, daughter of John Stanley, were married at Cedar 

Creek Meeting-house, in Hanover County, 3-2-1787. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate : Ursley 

Stanley, Elizabeth Strong, Eebecca Stanley, Judith Crew, Peggy 



MARRIAGES. 105 

Stanley, Lucy Camron, Edith Harris, Eachel Harris, Nancy Stan- 
ley, Mary Alvis, Susannah Stanley, Jane CalHhan, Dorothy Aus- 
tin, Sarah Harris, Mildred Maddox, Susannah Harris, Elizabeth 
Camron, Catharine Camron, Edith Stanley, Eachel Callihan, Fan- 
ney Stanley, Fanney James, Huldah Stanley, Martha Stanley, 
Waddy Stanley, Joshua Stanley, James Crew, Thomas Stanley, 
Micajah Crew, John Harris, John W. Maddox, John Harris, Sam- 
uel Harris, James Stanley, John Strong, George Strong, Fort. 
Sydnor. 



LiTTLEBEERT Crew, SOU of James and Judith Crew, and Huldah 
Stanley, daughter of John and Milley Stanley, were married 
at Cedar Creek Meeting-house 7-11-1797. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: John 
Stanley, Jesse Crew, Obadiah Crew, Jonathan Stanley, Joshua 
Stanley, Thomas Stanley, Waddy Stanley, Benj. Bates, Jr., Thomas 
Hatton, Catlitt Jones, Lemuel Jones, Fleming Bates, Micajah 
Crew, Edwin James, John Thompson, Thomas Mallory, Judith 
Crew, Huldah Stanley, Unity Stanley, Edith Stanley, Eebecca 
Stanley, Mary Crew, Agness Stanley, Chlotilda Harris, Eachel 
Moorman. 



Joshua Stanley, son of John Stanley, and Eachel Harris. 
daughter of John Harris (deceased), were married at Cedar 
Creek Meeting-house, in Hanover County, 12-12-1798. 

The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: John 
Stanley, Thomas Stanley, Thomas Harris, Jonathan Stanley, 
Joshua Stanley, Thomas Harris, Littleberry Crew, Catlett Jones, 
Clark Moorman, Thomas Stanley, Jr., Waddy Stanley, Thomas 
Hatton, Jesse Crew, Fleming Bates, Lemuel Crew, Obadiah Crew, 
John Johnson, Eachel Harris, Edith Harris, Sarah Harris, Eebecca 
Stanley, Unity Stanley, Mary Hatton, Eachel Moorman, Margaret 
Vaughan, Judith Crew, Chlotilda Han-is, Unity Crew, Susanna 
Hatton. 



106 MAKRIAGES. 

JoxATiiAX Stanley, son of John Stanley, and Mart Crew, 
daughter of James Crew (deceased), were married at Cedar 
Creek Meeting-house 12-19-1798. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage certificate: John 
Stanley, Littleberry Crew, Jesse Crew, Joshua Stanley, Sr., Joshua 
Stanley, Jr., John Johnson, Thomas Stanley, Sr., Obadiah Crew, 
Thomas Stanley, Jr., Waddy Stanley, Catlitt Jones, Clark Moor- 
man, Micajah Crew, Thomas Harris, Thomas Maddox, Lemuel 
Crew, Moses Stanley, Fleming Bates Judith Crew, Dorothy John- 
son, Judith Hart, Unity Stanley, Eachel Moorman, Margaret 
Vaughan, Sarah Harris, Rachel Stanley, Unity Crew, Jane Hart. 
Margaret Crew, Ann Jones. 



Thomas T. Cobb, son of Pleasant Cobb, of Caroline County, and 
Martha Stanley, daughter of Littleberry Stanley, of Han- 
over County, were married at Cedar Creek Meeting-house 
12-4-1808. 
The following witnesses signed the marriage ceremony : Little- 
berry Stanley, Pleasant Cobb. Thomas Maddox, Solomon Stanley, 
John Maddox, Thomas Stanley, Joshua Crew, Thomas Stanley, 
Walter Crew, Benjamin Bates, Lemuel Crew, James Winston, Ed- 
ward N". Clough, Samuel Higgason, Benjamin Vaughan, Jr., Tace 
Bates, Susanna Maddox, Elizabeth Harris, Elizabeth Blackburn, 
Abigal Cobb, Eebecca Cobb, Nancy Stanley, Margaret Vaughan, 
Agness Stanley, Deborah Harris, Eachel Moorman, Susanna Hat- 
ton, Amy Stanley, Sarah Blackburn, Milly Stanley, Sally Pleasants, 
Margaret Crew, Guli E. M. Stanley, Sarah Ladd, Elizabeth Clough, 
Nancy Stanley. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 



To the Monthly Meeting of Friends at Cedar GreeTc, Hanover 
County. 

Deae Feiends: 

Mary Terrell having lately removed from these parts (by mar- 
riage) and now resides within your limits: these are therefore to 
inform you that she is of an orderly life and conversation, a fre- 
quenter of our religious meetings, and a friend in Unity. We, 
therefore, recommend her to your Christian regard, and are your 
affectionate Friends. Signed by order and on behalf of our Month- 
ly Meeting, held at the White Oak Swamp in Henrico County, the 
1st day of the 12th month, 1789. James Ladd^ Clerk. 

Unity Ladd^ Clerk This Time. 



To Friends of Cedar CreeJc Monthly Meeting. 

Deae Feiends: 

Mary Bailey Terrell, being removed by marriage to reside within 
your limits, requests a few lines by way of certificate. These do, 
therefore, certify on her behalf that she is a member in unity with 
us, and of orderly life, as such we recommend her to your Christian 
care and notice. We remain your loving friends and brethren. 

Signed in and on behalf of our Monthly Meeting held at White 
Oak Swamp, the 7th day of the 2nd month, 1795. 

Thomas Ladd, 

ISABETH LaDD. 



To the Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Southriver, in Camp- 
hell County. 

Deae Feiends : 

Pattey Terrell (wife of David), having removed from us and set- 
tled within the limits of your meeting, we certify that she is a mem- 
ber of our religious society and orderly in her life and conversation 
whilst among us, and as such we recommend her to your care, and 
remain your friends. 



110 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

Signed in and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting of Friends, held 
at Cedar Creek, in Hanover County, the 13th of the 6th month, 
1795_ MicAjAH Crew, 

Chlotilda Harris, 

Clerks. 



To the Monthly Meeting of Friends held in Henrico County at 
White Oak Swamp. 
Dear Friends : 

Our Friend Nancy Crew, having (by marriage) removed within 
the limits of your Montlily Meetings, requests our certificate to join 
her thereto. These may certify on her behalf that she was a dili- 
gent attender of our religious meetings, and as far as appears, of an 
orderly life whilst amongst us ; and as such we recommend her to 
your Christian care, and are your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of our Monthly Meeting, held at Cedar 
Creek, in Hanover County, the 28th of the 2nd month, 1795. 

MiCAjAH Crew, 
Chlotilda Harris, 
Clerks. 



Littleberry Crew was granted a certificate of removal from 
Wrightsborough Monthly Meeting, held the 5th day of the 3rd 
month, 1796, at Wrightsborough in Georgia, to Cedar Creek Month- 
ly Meeting, held in Hanover County in Virginia. 

Camm Thomas, Clerk. 



Margaret Crew was granted a certificate of removal from White 
Oak Swamp Monthly Meeting in Henrico County to Cedar Creek 
Monthly Meeting in Hanover County. 

Signed in and on behalf of our Monthly Meeting held at White 
Oak Swamp the 2nd day of the 1st month, 1802. 

Eobert Crew, 
Jane Ladd, 

Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. Ill 

Jesse Crew was granted a certificate of removal from Cedar 
Creek Monthly Meeting held the 13th of the 3rd month, 1802, to 
the Southland Monthly held in Culpeper County. 

Benjamin Bates, Jr., Clerk. 



Joshua Crew was granted a certificate of removal from a Month- 
ly Meeting held at Wliite Oak Swamp, Henrico County, the 6th of 
3rd month, 1803, to Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, Hanover Coun- 
ty. EoBERT Crew, Clerk. 



To Cedar Creeh Monthly Meeting. 

Dear Friends : 

Jesse Crew having made application to us for a certificate in or- 
der to be joined to your meeting, he sometime ago produced one to 
this meeting, was received, and as he has not been much among us 
since, therefore we cannot say much more al)out him, than as a 
member of our Society we recommend him to your care and are 
your friends. 

Signed in and by order of Southland ]\Ionthly Meeting, held the 
2nd of the 11th month, 1803. Levi Lukens, Clerk at This Time. 



To Cedar Creeh Monthly Meeting in Hanover County. 

Dear Friends : 

Nicholas Crew, with his wife Druscilla, and their two sons, Mi- 
cajah and John, having removed and settled within the limits of 
your meeting, hath requested our certificate to join them thereto. 
On enquiring we do not find but that their outward affairs are set- 
tled, and they being members of our Society, we recommend them to 
your care, and are your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of our Monthly Meeting at South Eiver, 
in Campbell County, the 10th day of the 9th month, 1803. 

Joseph Fisher, Clerk. 
Eebeccah Preston, Clerk This Time. 



A certificate of removal to Wliite Oak Swamp Monthly Meeting 
was granted to Joshua Crew by Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting the 
11th of the 2nd month, 1804. Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



112 CEETinCATES OF REMOVAL. 

To Salem Monthly Meeting in Ohio State. 

Dear Friends : 

Obadiah Crew and his wife Mary with their children, John, Sara, 
Judith and Eliza Ann, having removed within your limits, we here- 
by inform you that they are members of our religious Society, of 
conduct in a good degree orderly, and that his affairs are settled to 
satisfaction, as far as we find. As such we recommend them to 
your Christian care and oversight and remain your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting held at Cedar 
Creek, in Hanover County, the 11 of the 4th month, 1807. 



To the Monthly Meeting of Friends at Salem in the State of Ohio. 
Dear Friends : 

Lemuel Terrell, a member of our Meeting, requests our certificate 
to join himself, his wife Eebecea and daughter Kitty, to your 
Meeting. These are to certify that they have been frequent at- 
tenders of our Meetings and have settled their affairs to satisfaction 
and as such we recommend them to your Christian care and over- 
sight and remain your friends and brethren. 

Signed in and on behalf of our meeting, held at Cedar Creek, in 
Hanover County, Virginia, this 13th day of the 9th month, 1806. 

Benjamin Bates, 
Chlotilda Harris, 
Clerks. 



To the Monthly Meeting at Wayne Oah, in Charles City County. 

Dear Friends: 

Thomas Scattergood Terrell having removed within the limits 
of your meeting these are to certify that he hath a right of mem- 
bership among us and inquiry being made we find his affairs settled 
as far as we know, we therefore recommend Mm to your Christian 
care and oversight and are your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, the 
12th day of the 9th month, 1812. Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



To Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting in Hanover County, Virginia. 
Dear Friends : 
Kebecca Terrell having removed with her husband within the 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 113 

verge of your Meeting, requests our certificate thereto. On enquir- 
ing, nothing appears to obstruct our recommending her with their 
four minor children, namely, Kitty Pleasant, Nancy Thomas, Eob- 
ert Samuel and Nicy Lynch, to your Christian care and notice, and 
remain your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of Salem Monthly Meeting, held the 
17th of the 11th month, 1812. 

John Street^ 
Esther French^ 
Clerks. 



To the Monthly Meeting of Friends, held at Short Creek, in the' 
State of Ohio. 

Dear Friends : 

Sally Terrell, with her children, Mahala, Kachel, Thomas, Clarke, 
Joanna and Mathew, having removed within the limits of your 
Meeting, requests our certificate. We may inform you that she is 
a member of our religious society, in good esteem among us, she 
being diligent in the attendance of meetings, exemplary in her de- 
portment, and, as far as appears, has settled her affairs to satisfac- 
tion. Desiring her growth in the truth, and the preservation of 
her infant charge, we recommend them to your Christian care and 
are your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting the 9th 
of the 10th month, 1813. 

Lemuel Crew^ Clerk. 

Deborah Harris, Clerk This Time. 



To Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting of Hanover County, Virginia. 

Dear Friends : 

Thomas Terrell having removed and settled within the limits of 
your meeting, requests our certificate to join him thereto. This 
may certify that on enquiry we find nothing to obstruct. We there- 
fore recommend him as a member of our Society to your friendly 
care and notice and are your friends. 

Signed in and by order of Short Creek Monthly Meeting of Ohio, 
held the 18th day of the 4th month, 1820. Lewis Walker, Clerk. 



114 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

To WayanoaJc Monthly Meeting in Henrico, Charles City County. 
Dear Friends : 

A certificate for Caty Terrell being requested to join her to your 
meeting, these are to certify that she is a member of our religious 
Society. As such we recommend her to your Christian care and are 
your friends. 

Signed by direction of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, held the 
9th day of the 4th month, 1831. 



To Sinithficld Monthly Meeting, Ohio. 
Dear Friends : 

William J. Lewis having removed within the verge of your Meet- 
ing with his wife, Ann L. T., and their infant child, Sarah E., and 
requested our certificate, we do therefore certify that they are mem- 
bers of our religious Society and that their affairs appear to be set- 
tled to satisfaction. We recommend them to your Christian care 
and oversight and are your friends. 

Signed by direction and on behalf of our Monthly Meeting of 
Friends, held at Cedar Creek, in Hanover County, Virginia, the 
14th of the 9th month, 1833. 

Nathaniel C. Crenshav^^, Clerk This Time. 
Ann Crew, Clerk This Time. 



To South Biver Monthly Meeting in Campbell County, Virginia. 
Dear Friends : 

Lucy T. Johnson having removed ^vithin the verge of your Meet- 
ing, these are to certify that she is a member of our religious So- 
ci(>ty. As such we recommend hor to your Christian care and over- 
sight and remain your friends. 

Signed by direction and on l)ehalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meet- 
ing, held the 14th of the 9th month, 1833. 

Nathaniel C. Crenshaw, 
Ann Crew, 

Clerks at This Time. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 115 

To Pleasant Plains Monthly Meeting of Friends, Jefferson County, 
Iowa. 

Dear Friends : 

Edwin Terrell, a member with us, having removed within your 
limits, has requested our certificate to join him to you, and finding 
nothing to prevent, we hereby recommend him to your Christian 
care and oversight. 

Signed by direction and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meet- 
ing, held the 19th of the 7th month, 1847. 

Walter Crew^ Clerk. 



Edwin Terrell asked for a certificate to Spring Creek Monthly 
Meeting in the State of Iowa, which was granted by Cedar Creek 
Mo. Meeting, held in Eichmond, Virginia, the 11th day of the 1st 
month, 1854. 

John B. Crenshaw, Clerk. 

Nathaniel C. Crenshaw, Correspondent. 



A certificate of removal to Salem Monthly Meeting in Oliio was 
granted to Littleberry Crew and Huldah, his wife, with their minor 
children, James, Benjamin, Mildred, Judith and Sarah, by Cedar 
Creek Monthly Meeting Hanover County, Va., held the 14th day of 
the 11th month, 1807. 

Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



A certificate of removal to Salem Monthly Meeting in Oliio was 
granted to Judith Crew by Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, the 12tli 
day of the 12th month, 1807. 

Benjamin Bates, 
Chlotilda Harris, 
Clerks. 



A certificate of removal to Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting in Han- 
over County, Va., was granted to Peggy Crew (late Ladd) by Way- 
noke Monthly Meeting, held the 2nd day of the 1st month, 1808. 

Egbert Crew, Clerk. 

Mary Ladd, Clerk at This Time. 



116 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAi. 

A certificate of removal to Waynoke Monthly Meeting was 
granted to Joshua Crew by Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting the 14th 
day of the 1st month, 1809. 

Benjamin Bates^ Clerk. 



A certificate of removal to Waynoke Monthly Meeting was 
granted to Jesse and Margaret Crew, with their infant children, 
Lancelot, Elizabeth Ladd, Judith, Owen Milton, and Obediah, by 
Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, held the 11th of the 2nd month, 
1813. 

Lemuel Crew^ 
Deborah Harris, 

Clerks. 



A certificate of removal to Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting was 
granted to Ann Crew (lately Hargrave) by Waynoke Monthly 
Meeting, held the 6th day of the 4th month, 1816. 

Egbert Crew, Clerk. 
Deborah Harris, Clerk This Time. 



A certificate of removal to Baltimore Monthly Meeting was 
granted to Mica j ah Crew (minor son of Lemuel Crew) by Cedar 
Creek Monthly Meeting, held the 13th day of the 5th month, 1837. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, Clerk. 



A certificate of removal to Cincinnati, Ohio, was granted to 
Thomas F. Crew by Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, held the 14th 
day of the 9th month, 1839. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, Clerk. 



A certificate of removal to Short Creek Monthly ]\Ieeting, Ohio, 
was granted to Lemuel Crew, his wife Anna, with their children, 
Margaret E., Samuel H., Walter, Tarlton, Deborah D., Henriette, 
and Anna, by Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, held the 11th day of 
the 2nd month 1843. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, Clerk. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 117 

Extracts from the Certificates Granted by South River 
Monthly Meeting to Other Monthly Meetings. 



John Stanley, Sarah, his wife, and their children, Sussanna, Ab- 
raham, Abigal and Zachariah, removed to Westfield Monthly Meet- 
ing, Surry County, 2-18-1792. 

AcHiLLis Douglas, Clerk, 
Matilda Egberts^ Clerk. 



William Davis, his wife, Zalinda, and daughter, Sarah, removed 
to Goose Creek Monthly Meeting in Bedford County, 4-11-1795. 

Achillis Douglas, 
Matilda Egberts, 

Clerks. 



James Johnson, Penelope, his wife, and their children, Elizabeth, 
Sarah, Joseph, Jesse, Judith, Mary, Penelope, Anthony, Agnes and 
Eachel, removed to Goose Creek in Bedford County, 5-9-1795. 

Achillis Douglas, 
Matilda Egberts, 

Clerks. 



John Johnson, son of James, removed to Cedar Creek Monthly 
Meeting in Hanover County, 1-18-1794. 

\ Samuel Davis, Clerk This Time. 



Abraham Eunker removed to New Garden Meeting in North 
Carolina, 1-18-1794. Samuel Davis, Clerk This Time. 



Eichard Tullis, Jr., removed to Goose Creek Monthly Meeting in 
Bedford County, 2-13-1796. Achillas Douglas, Clerk. 



Eobert Wright and Eachel, his wife, removed to Fairfax Monthly 
Meeting, 4-9-1796. 

Joseph Fisher, Clerk at This Time. 
Matilda Egberts, Clerk. 



118 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

Joseph Anthony and Ehoda, his wife, and Samuel Parsons, their 
son, removed to Henrico Monthly Meeting, 9-10-1796. 

AcHiLLis Douglas, 
Matilda Egberts, 

Clerks. 



Thomas Burgess removed to Deer Creek Monthly Meeting in 
Harford County, Md., 4-18-1797. Joseph Fisher, Jr., Clerk. 



Naomi Davis removed to "White Oak Swamp Monthly Meeting, 
8-11-1798. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Matilda Egberts, Clerks. 



Jesse "Williams, Sarah, his wife, and their children, Micajah Ter- 
rell, Anna and Acliillis, removed to New Garden Monthly Meeting 
in North Carolina, 4-13-1799. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Matilda Egberts, Clerks. 



Agatha Dicks with her four minor cliildren, namely, Nathan, 
Sarah, Micajah, Achillis, removed to New Garden Monthly Meet- 
ing in North CaroHna, 2-8-1800. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Eebecca Preston, Clerks. 



Micajah Davis, his wife Mary, and their children, Susanna, Mar- 
tha, Mary, Samuel, David, Eichard, Micajah, Annis and Eobert 
Pleasants, removed to "White Oak Monthly Meeting in Henrico 
County, 12-14-1799. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Matilda Egberts, Clerks. 



Samuel Carey, Eachel, his wife, and their children (to-wit) , Jona- 
than, Sarah, John, Samuel, Eachel, Thomas and Elias, removed to 
Westfield Monthly Meeting, North Carolina, 8-11-1800. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Matilda Egberts, Clerks. 



Cynthia Bradficld and infant son, John, removed to Westfield 
Monthly Meeting, 11-8-1800. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Matilda Egberts, Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 119 

James Stanton with Mary, his wife, and their children, Hannah 
and John, removed to Centre Monthly Meeting, North Carolina, 
5-9-1801. 

Joseph Fisher^ Jr., and Matilda Roberts, Clerks. 



John James, with Martha, his wife, and their cliildren, Benjamin 
and Elizabeth, removed to Westland Monthly Meeting in Pennsyl- 
vania, 7-11-1801. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Rebecca Preston", Clerks. 



Rohert Hanna, with Catharine, his wife, and their children, Rob- 
ert, Esther, Catharine and Ann, removed to Westland Monthly 
Meeting in Pennsylvania, 9-12-1801. This same Monthly Meeting 
granted Certificates of removal to Thomas and Benjamin Hanna on 
the same date. Joseph Fisher, Jr., Clerk. 



Jonas Harris removed to Westland Monthly Meeting, 9-12-1801. 

Asa Holloway, with Mary, his wiie, and their children, Stanton, 
Mary, Sarah, Isaac, Hannah, Eli, and James, removed to Westland 
Meeting, 9-12-1801. 

Benjamin Stratton, with Amy his wife, and their children, Re- 
becca, Naomi and Levi, removed to Westland Monthly Meeting, 
9-10-1801. 

James Ferrell (being in his minority) removed with his father 
to Westland Meeting in Pennsylvania, 10-10-1801. 

Daniel Stratton, with Shady, his wife, and their children, John, 
Margaret, Mary, Daniel, and Elias, removed to Westland Monthly 
Meeting in Pennsylvania 10-10-1801. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Rebekah, Clerks. 



Mary Via removed to Westland Monthly Meeting In Pennsyl- 
vania, 9-11-1802. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., and Matilda Roberts, Clerks. 



Jacob Stratton, with Rebecah, his wife, removed to Westland 
Meeting, 9-11-1802. 



120 CERTIFICATES OP REMOVAL. 

John Tellus, with Sarah, his wife, and their cliildren, Eebeccah, 
Richard, Jane and Mary, removed to Westland Meeting, 9-11-1802. 

Joseph Stratton, with Naomi, his wife, and their children, Han- 
nah and Joe, moved to Westland Meeting, 9-11-1802. 

Joseph Fisher and Matilda Roberts, Clerks. 



Nicholas Crew, with Driicilla, his wife, and their sons, Micajah 
H. and John, moved to Cedar Creek Meeting in Hanover County, 
9-10-1803. 

Joseph Fisher, Clerk, and Rebekah Preston, Clerk at This Time. 



James Stanton and Agnes, liis wife, moved to Gravelly Rim Meet- 
ing in Dinwiddle County, 11-12-1803. 

Joseph Fisher and Matilda Roberts, Clerks. 



Extracts from the Certificates of Removal Granted by South 
River Monthly Meeting of Friends in Campbell County, 
Virginia, to Various Monthly Meetings in the State of Ohio. 



Gideon Bloxom removed to Concord Montlily Meeting, 10-13- 
1804. 

William Bloxom, Ms wife Mary, and thoir children, James, 
Nancy, Elizabeth and Mariah, removed to Concord, 8-10-1805. 

Mourning Timberlake removed to Concord, 11-9-1805. 

Abraham Wildman, with Ijettia, his wife, and their children, 
Jonah, Elizabeth, Amy, Deborah, Mahlon, Mar}-, Sarah, Nancy and 
Jesse, removed to Concord, 9-14-1805. 

Joseph Fisher and Matilda Roberts, Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OP REMOVAL. 121 



Certificates to Middleton Meeting, Ohio. 



William Eeader removed 4-10-1805. 

Amos Holloway with his wife, Hepsibah, and their children, 
Phoebe, Stephen, Ehoda, Job, Aaron, Hnlda, Jason, Anna and 
Elizabeth, removed 8-10-1805. 

John Fisher, with Eachel, his wife, and their children, Eobert 
and Joseph, removed 8-10-1805. 

Thomas Eeader, with Priscilla, his wife, and their children, Eliz- 
abeth and Priscilla, removed 10-9-1805. 

Nancy Terrell removed with her father 4-12-1806. 

Joseph Eeader removed 4-14-1804. 

Joseph Fisher and Matilda Egberts, Clerks. 



Dudley Milner, with Mary, his wife, and their children, Anna 
and Caty, removed to Plainfield Meeting 8-10-1805. 

Daniel Easley, with Edith, his wife, and their children, Sarah, 
Mariatn, Euth, John, Daniel, Eachel, Isaac and Stephen, moved to 
Plainfield Meeting, 4-8-1809. 

JosiAH Bailey and Judith Johnson, Clerks at This Time. 



To Salem Meeting, in Ohio. 



Aaron Stanton removed 11-9-1805. 

William Davis, Jr., Clerk at This Time. 



Zacheus Stanton, with Salley, his wife, and their infant daugh- 
ter, Hannah, removed 4-12-1806. 

William Stanton and his daughter, Deborah, removed 4-12-1806. 

Joseph Curie removed 2-8-1806. 



122 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

]\Iicajah Macy, with Sarah, his wife, and their sons, John and 
Samuel, removed 5-9-1807. 

Timothy Grewell, with Alice, his wife, and their daughters, Sarah 
and Mary, removed 5-9-1807. 

Joseph Fisher, Jr., with Hannah, his wife, and their children, 
Sylvanious, Eachel, William, Isaac, Amasa and Anne Knight, re- 
moved 5-9-1807. 

William Davis, Jr., and Matilda Robert, Clerks. 



To Miami Meeting. 



Pleasants Johnson, with Nancy, his wife, and son, Thomas, re- 
moved 2-8-1806. 

Susanna Johnson, wife of John Jolinson, removed 2-8-1806. 

Ashley Johnson, with Milley, liis wife, and their cliildren, Jona- 
than, Daniel, William, Nancy, Abner, Agatha, Martha, Ashley and 
Thomas, 4-12-1806. 

Extracts from the Certificates Granted by the Various Monthly 
Meetings to the Following Friends to Unite Them with 
South River Meeting, Held in Campbell County, Virginia. 



Timothy Grenell with Alice, his wife, and daughter, Sarah, re- 
moved from Goose Creek Meeting, held in Bedford county, 4-4- 
1805. 

John Davis and Mary Anthony, Clerks. 



William Coffee removed from Plainfield Monthly Meeting, held 
11-24-1810. 

Isaac Wilson, Clerk. 



Deborah Butler removed from Western Branch, in Isle of Wight 
county, 7-25-1812. 

Eobert Jordon and Martha Jones, Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 123 

Arm Anthony (wife of Christopher Anthony), with her infant 
children, James and Mary Ann, removed from Cedar Creek, in 
Hanover county, 2-8-1812. 

Benjamin Bates^ Clerk. 



Sarah Ballard removed from Goose Creek Meeting, in Bedford 
county, 1-7-1813. 

John Davis and Mary Anthony^ Clerks. 



Sarah Snead removed from Clear Creek Monthly Meeting in 
Highland county, Ohio, 7-29-1814. 

James Hadley and Rachel Hunt^ Clerks. 



Mariah Butler (late Bailey) removed from Upper Monthly Meet- 
ing, held alternately at Burleighly in Prince George County, 6-17- 
1815. 

John W. Watkins and Delitha Hunnicutt, Clerks. 



Benjamin Butler (son of Joseph Butler) removed from Western \J 
Bxanch Meeting in Isle of Wight county, 1-28-1815. 

Samuel Copeland, Clerk. 



Exum Bailey, his wife, Anna, and their children, Louisa, Eliza, 
William, Joshua, Mary and Delitha, removed from Upper Monthly 
Meeting held alternately at Gravelly Eun, in Dinwiddle county, 
5-24-1817. 

MiCAjAH Butler^ Clerk for the day. 
Christianna Peebles, Clerk. 



Sarah Ladd, removed from Cedar Creek 8-14-1817. 

Lemuel Crew and Rebecca Harris, Clerks. 



Asa Wood removed from Waynoak 10-3-1818. 

Robert Crew^^ Clerk. 



Ann Lynch removed from New Garden, N. C, 8-28-1819. 

William Stanley and Abigal Lambert^ Clerks. 



124 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

Charles Fisher removed from New Garden, IST. C, 4-24-1823, 

Levi Coffin^ Clerk. 



Nathaniel Winston removed from Waynoak, in Henrico county, 
8-1-1829. 

Amos Ladd, Clerk. 



This meeting being informed that Martha Eogers, a minor 
daughter of Timothy and Anna Eogers, is placed within the com- 
pass of your Meeting. These may certify that she is a member of 
our Eeligious Society, as such we recommend her to your Christian 
care and oversight, and are your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of Yonge St. Monthly Meeting of 
Friends, Upper Canada, held 1-12-1832. 

Thomas Linville, 
Clerk and Correspondent. 
Margaret Wright, 
Clerk. 



Certificates of Removal to Miami Meeting, Ohio. 



Christopher Johnson, with Milley, his wife, and their three 
children, Micajah, Penelope and Elizabeth, removed 2-8-1806. 

Eichard Bloxom, with Ann, his wife, and their children, Ann, 
Molley, Elizabeth and Charles; also their grandchildren, Unity, 
Jerusha, Eichard, Obediah and Gideon Jolinson, removed 10-11- 
1806. 

Jeptha Johnson removed to Salem, Ohio, 10-11-1806. 

David Terrell, with Mary, his wife, and their children. Pleasant, 
Christopher, David, Judith, Sarah, Joseph and Mary, removed 10- 
11-1806. 

William Johnson and Agatha, his wife, with their children, 
Christopher, Moorman and Nancy, moved 9-13-1806. 

Charles Moorman and Betsy, his wife, and their children, Wil- 
liam, Nancy, Fanny, Eobert, Betsy and Agatha, moved 9-13-1806. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 125 

Charles Johnson and Susanna, his wife, and their children, David, 
Anna, Susanna, Polly, Sally and Nancy, moved 9-13-1806. 

Benjamin Butterworth and Eachel, his wife, and their children, 
Moorman, Benjamin, Samuel, Rachel Moorman, WJillflam and 
Henry Thomas, moved 10-10-1806. 

Elias Fisher and Hannah, his wife, moved 8-14-1813. 

Agatha Dicks, with her son, Achillis, moved 9-10-1814. 

Jocabed Lodge and Sarah, his wife, with their children, William 
Johnson, Laban, Nelson, Seline and Caleb, moved 9-10-1814. 

William Butler and Nancy, his wife, moved 9-19-1814. 

John Davis and Hannah, his wife, with their children, Anna 
Maria, Jourdon, Samuel, Anthony, Sarah and Charlotte, moved 11- 
12-.1814. 

John Davis also requested a certificate for Christopher Anthony 
Jonson, which was granted at the same time. 

Josiah Bailey and Susanna, his wife, and their children, Almeda, 
Robert Barclay, Judith, Daniel, James Edwin, Mary Byrum and 
Susanna, moved 12-11-1814. 

Joel Lewis and Sarah, his wife, and their son, Daniel, moved 
10-20-1815. 

Jane Cadwalader and children (names not given) moved 9-14- 
1816. 

Thomas Cadwalader, Jr., moved 10-12-1816. 

Nancy Ballard and her children, Granderson, Butterworth, Saml. 
Moorman, William Frederick and Elizabeth Ann, moved 7-12-1817. 

Thomas Welch moved 10-9-1819. 

Thomas Cadwalader moved 10-14-1820. 

Charles Fisher moved 12-10-1825. 



126 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 



Removed to Fairfield Meeting, in Ohio. 



Judith Borum and her children, Obed, Allen, Catharine and 
Sarah, moved 8-12-1809. 

John Timberlake and Mary, his wife, and their children, Agness, 
John, Mourning, Salley and Judith, moved 11-11-1809. 

Daniel Burgess and Euth, his wife, and their children, Anna, 
John and Sarah, moved 8-11-1810. 

John W. Johnson and Milley, his wife, and son, Gerard Moor- 
man, moved 9-8-1810. 

James Johnson and his wife. Eachel, with their children, Bart- 
lett, Lydia, Susanna, Nancy, Polly and Milley, moved 9-8-1810. 

Latham Stanton and Hulda. his wife, with their children, Hep- 
sihah, Elizabeth, Hunnicutt, Gulielma, Daniel, William and Stephen 
Butler, moved 9-8-1810. 

Eachel Anderson and her son, William, moved 1-13-1811. 

Euth Hendrick moved 1-12-1811. 

John Burgess removed (with his wife, Drucilla), 10-12-1811, 

Deborah Burgess removed 10-12-1811. 



Oertifloates to Fairfield and Other Meetings in Ohio. 



Gregory Bloxom removed from Southriver Meeting to Plainfield, 
10-12-1811. 

William Johnson and his wife, Susannah, removed 8-8-1812. 

William Holloway and Salley, his wife, with their children, John, 
Isaac, Betsy, Pleasant, Samuel, George, Sally and William, removed 
8-8-1812. 

William Johnson, Jr., removed to Plainfield 10-10-1812. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 127 

Asa Pliimmer and Grace, his wife, with their children, Eli, Jesse, 
Ezra, Tacy and Lott, removed 8-14-1813. 

Martha Burgess and her children, Adeliza and Sarah Hargrave, 
removed 8-14-1813. 

Thomas Burgess and Elizabeth, with their children, Elizabeth, 
Joseph, Jenny, Moses, Mary, Tacy and Martha, removed 8-14-1813. 

Ebeneazer Speakman and his wife, Elizabeth, with their children, 
Thomas, Ebeneazer, Jacob, Ann and Pheby, 2-8-1817. 

Letishia Burgess removed 4-8-1820. 

Margaret Fose removed 10-11-1821. 

Gulielma Perdu removed 12-13-1821. 



Certificates to Center Meeting, in Ohio. 



Susanna Moorman and her granddaughter (under her care) re- 
moved 9-9-1809. 

Molley Moorman removed 9-9-1809. 

Ehoda Johnson and her children, Joseph, Micajah, John, Charles, 
Polly, Lewis and James, removed 11-11-1809. 

Samuel Johnson, with Susanna, and their children, Thomas, Sam- 
uel, Moorman, James, John, George, Susanna, Lydia and Joseph, 
removed 9-8-1810. 

Joseph Johnson, Jr., removed 10-12-1811. 

Thomas Ballard, with Sarah, his wife, removed 9-10-1814. 

Lydia Moorman with her children, Charlotte E., Nancy, John, 
Thomas and Eeubin, removed 12-13-1817. 



Certificates to Nevir Garden Meeting, in Ohio. 



Amos Preston, removed 4-14-1810. 



128 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

Certificates to Gall Creek Meeting, in Ohio. 



Joseph Johnson and his children. Polly, Kitty, Winston, Elvira, 
Watkins, Caroline, and his grandson, Alfred Carroll Johnson, re- 
moved 10-9-1813. 



Certificates to Clear Creek Meeting, in Ohio. 



Patty Terrell, removed 10-20-1815. 

Ann Lea, removed 11-9-1816. 

Elizabeth Lea, removed (with her parents) 11-9-1816. 

Euth Kirby, removed 5-1-1819. 

Sarah Cox, removed 5-1-1819. 

WilUam Coffee moved to Plainfield 11-9-1811. 

William Davis, Jr., Clerk. 
Lucy Hargrave. 



Jesse Cadwallader, with Amy, his wife, and their children, John, 
Isaac, Moses, Mahlon, Silas, Betsy and Jonah, removed 5-1-1819. 



Certificates to Cincinnati Meeting, in Ohio. 



William Stanton, with Catharine, his wife, and their children,. 
Phebe, Anna, Samuel, Ehoda, David, Joseph and Mary, 10-11- 
1817. 

Elizabeth Fisher, with her husband, and their children, Mary 
Ann, Lucinda, Elwood, Sarah, Hannah and Matilda, removed 12- 
13-1817. 

Deborah Butler (with her husband) and her son, Anselm D. John- 
son, removed 9-11-1819. 

Mary Butler removed 9-10-1825. 

Stephen Butler, with Louisa, his wife, and their children, Anselm, 
Matilda, Edna, Mary Elizabeth and William Exum ; also his broth- 
er-in-law, William H. Bailey, removed . 



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CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 129 



Certificates of Removal Received by Southriver Meeting.^ 



From Our Monthly Meeting Held in Fredericl-sburgh Township, 

8. C, 2-14-1762. 
To Friends in Virginia and Elsewhere in America. 

Our esteemed friend, William Terrell, having requested this 
meeting some time ago of his intention of moving into your parts 
with his family in order to settle there, and requested a Certificate 
for that purpose, now these are to certify that he is of a sober and 
orderly life and conversation, a diligent attender of meetings, both 
for Worship and Discipline, and also a diligent laborer in the work 
of the ministiy, having a sound testimony to bear, and is much 
esteemed by his friends and others, and on enquiry we do not find 
but he leaves this place clear of debt. His vrife Martha is of a sober 
and orderly life and conversation, and a diligent attender of meet- 
ing. Their children are not yet grown up. So with desires for 
their preservation and growth in the truth, and that they may be 
serviceable where their lot may be cast, we remain your friends and 
brethren. Signed in and on behalf of our said Meeting. Samuel 
Wiley, John Millhouse, Henry Millhouse, Robert Millhouse, John 
English. William Elmore, James Millhouse, Wm. Smith, Zeb. 
Gauntt, Joshua English, Robert English, Joseph English, Timothy 
Kelly, Samuel Kelly. John Kelley, Mary Tomlinson, Sarah Russell, 
Mary Kelley, Rel)ecca Millhouse, Mary Cook, Mary English, Mary 
English, Jr. 

A similar Certificate was granted by the same Meeting to Isaac 
and Sarah Pidgeon on the same date, 2-14-1762, and signed by the 
same members. 



To the Monthly Meeting of Friends Held at Southriver, in Bedford 
County. 

Dear Friends : 

Our friend, Micajah Terrell, having removed from our Monthly 
meeting within the verge of yours, without our Certificate, these are 
to certify you that we have made inquiry into his life and conver- 
sation whilst among us and find that he was a member in unity (in 
most respects), and we recommend him to your Christian care and 



130 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

oversight and remain your friends and brethren. Signed by order 
and on behalf of our said Meeting held at Golansville in Caroline 
County 7-9-1762. 

Samuel Haegrave, Clerk. 

A similar Certificate was granted his wife Sarah at the Monthly 
Meeting held at Cedar Creek in Hanover County 8-14-1762. 

Samuel Hargeave^ Clerk. 



To Friends at Their Next Monthly Meeting to Be Held at South- 
river. 

Dear Friends : 

Whereas, our friend Byrum Ballard hath applied to us for a Cer- 
tificate to you, these are therefore to inform you that after the 
necessary inquiry being made we find him clear from any engage- 
ments of marriage and in unity with us and as such we recommend 
him to your notice, desiring his growth in the truth. We remain 
your friends and brethren. Signed on behalf of the Montlily Meet- 
ing held at Cedar Creek 4-8-1763. 

Samuel Hargrave, Clerk. 



From the Montlily Meeting Held at Cedar Creeh in Hanover Coun- 
ty, 12-18-1763. 
Dear Friends : 

Mary Johnson and Betty Moorman having removed from under 
the care of our Meeting and settled within the verge of your Meet- 
ing, they have requested of us a few lines by way of recommendation 
unto you, and we hereby certify that their lives, conduct and conver- 
sation hath been such that we have good unity with them, and rec- 
ommend them to your care and subscribe ourselves your friends and 
brethren. William Stanley, Clerk. 



From Our Monthly Meeting Held at Cedar Creel, 2-11-1764, to the 

Monthly Meeting at Southriver. 
Dear Friends : 

Benjamin Johnson having removed within the limits of your 
Meeting and having requested of us a few lines by way of recom- 
mendation unto you, after the usual care taken, we do not find but 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 131 

what he has settled his outward affairs to satisfaction, and we fur- 
ther certify on his behalf that his manner of life and conversation 
hath always been such as rendered him held in unity with us and we 
recommend him to you. 

Strangeman Hutchins, Clerk. 



From Our Monthly Meeting Held at Cedar Creek, 2-11-1764, to the 

Monthly Meeting at Southriver. 
Dear Friends : 

Whereas, Zachariah Moorman hath removed from under the care 
of our Meeting and settled within the verge of your Meeting, he 
hath requested of us a few lines by way of Certificate unto you. Af- 
ter due care taken we do not find but what he has settled his out- 
ward affairs to satisfaction. We further certify on his behalf that 
Ms manner of life and conversation hath been such as rendered him 
a member in unity among us and as such we recommend him to 
you. Strangeman Hutchins^ Clerk. 



From Our Monthly Meeting Held at Golansville, Caroline County, 
3-9-1767, to the Monthly Meeting at Southriver, in Bedford 
County. 
Dear Friends : 

The bearers hereof, Thomas and Rachel Moorman, having re- 
moved from under our care and within the verge of your Meeting, 
requested us for a few lines as a recommendation to you. After due 
care taken we do not find but that he has settled his worldly affairs 
to satisfaction and has always been esteemed orderly persons and 
held in good unity among us and as such we recommend them to 
you. Signed in and on behalf of said Meeting by 

Samuel HARGRiVE^ Clerk. 



From Our Monthly Meeting Held at Neiu Garden, N. C, 2-35-1775, 
to the Monthly Meeting Held at Southriver, in Bedford Coun- 
ty, Virginia. 
Dear Friends : 

The occasion of our writing to you is on account of James John- 
son who requested our Certificate to join in membership with you 



132 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

and having left his outward affairs to satisfaction and condemned 
his goin*; oiit in marriage, we therefore recommend him to Divine 
protection and yoiir Christian care, desiring his growth in the best 
things. Signed by order and in behalf of said Meeting. 

John Talbot, Clerk. 



To Ihc 'Monthly Meeting of Friends Held at Southriver, in Bedford 
County. 

Dear Friends : 

Edward Terrell and Mary, his wife, having removed from us 
within the verge of your Meeting, we therefore thinlc it necessary 
to acquaint you that they have had their education amongst us. 
Their lives whilst amongst us were in a good degree orderly, and, 
after the necessary enquiry, we understand that their affairs are 
settled to satisfaction. "We therefore recommend them to your 
Christian care and oversight. Signed in our Monthly Meeting held 
in Caroline, 5-13-1775. 

Samuel Hargrave, 
Mary Payne, 

Clerks. 



From Our Circular Monthly Meeting of Wo7nen Friends Held at 
Ftlachwater and Burley in Surry and Prince George Counties, 
8-23-1776, to the Montlily Meeting of Women Friends Held at 
Southriver, in Bedford County. 

Dear Friends: 

Mary Antliony, being lately removed within the limits of your 
Meeting, requested our Certificate. These may certify on her be- 
half that she is a member in full unity and as such we recommend 
her to your care, ardently desiring her preservation in the blessed 
truth. Signed in and on behalf of our said meeting by 

Edward Stabler, 
Mary Stabler, 
Clerks for the Day. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 133 

A Certificate of removal from Cedar Creek, Hanover County, to 
Southriver, in Bedford County, was granted Judith Ballard by 
Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, 6-14-1777. 

Samuel Hargrave, 
Mary Payne, 

Clerks. 



To the Monthly Meeting Held at Southriver, Bedford County. 

Dear Friends : 

David Johnson removed within the verge of your Meeting and 
requested a few lines from us. This may certify on his behalf that 
he has been orderly and his affairs are settled to satisfaction. We 
therefore recommend him to your Christian care. Signed on be- 
half and by order of the Monthly Meeting held at Cedar Creek, 2- 
25-1780. John Payne, Clerk. 



To Southriver Monthly Meeting. 
Dear Friends : 

Application being made to us for a few lines by way of Certificate 
for Stephen Moreland and Mary, his wife, with their three children, 
namely, Edwin, Abigal and Jonah, we may inform you that they 
left our parts without acquainting the Monthly Meeting of their 
intention of removing, which was contrary to the advice of our 
Yearly Meeting, but with respect to their conduct it appears, after 
the needful enquiry, that their lives and conversation have been in 
some good degree orderly. They attended our religious meetings at 
times and have settled their outward affairs to satisfaction as far as 
we know. We therefore recommend them and their children as 
members of our Society to your Christian care and oversight, desir- 
ing their preservation and growth in the truth, and remain your 
loving friends. Signed on behalf of our Monthly Meeting at Fair- 
fax, held 11-25-1780. 

Thomas Matthews, 
Lydia Hough, 

Clerks. 



134 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

From the Monthly Meeting Held at Cedar Creek the lUh of the 
4:th Month 1781, To Friends of the Monthly Meeting at South- 
river. 

Dear Friends : 

James Johnson and family removed wathin the verge of your 
Meeting and requested a few lines from ns. This may certify on 
their behalf that they have lived orderly and his affairs settled to 
satisfaction. We therefore recommend them to your Christian care. 
Signed on behalf of the Meeting. 

John Payne, Clerk. 



To the Monthly Meeting Held at Southriver. 

Dear Friends : 

Our writing to you at this time is on account of David Terrell, 
who now resides within the verge of your Meeting, and requests our 
Certificate for himself and children. These may certify that after 
the needful enquiry we have cause to believe his affairs are settled 
to satisfaction. His life and conversation being in a good degree or- 
derly whilst among us, we therefore recommend him, together with 
his children (namely, Sarah, Winnifred, David, Henry, Samuel, 
Susanna, and Ann), to your Christian care, and with desires for 
their growth in the truth, we remain your friends and brethren. 
Signed on behalf of our Monthly Meeting held at Cedar Creek, 8- ^ 
24-1781. ^}\^^ 

John Payne, Clerk. 



From the Monthly Meeting Held at Cedar CreeTc, Hanover County, 
3-9-1782, to the Monthly Meeting at Southriver. 

Mary Johnson having moved within the verge of your Meeting 
and requested a few lines from us, this may certify on her behalf 
that she has lived orderly and has settled her affairs to satisfaction. 
We therefore recommend her to your Christian care. Signed on 
behalf of Meeting. 

John Payne and Mary Payne, Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 135 

Mica j ah Davis and family were granted a Certificate of removal 
to the Monthly Meeting at Southriver by Cedar Creek Monthly 
Meeting, 4-13-1782. 

John Payne and Eachel Harris^ Clerks. 



To the Monthly Meeting of Friends at Southriver, in Campbell 

County. 
Dear Friends : 

Micajah Terrell and Deborah, his wife, having removed within 
the verge of your Meeting and requested our Certificate, we there- 
fore certify in their behalf that they are in unity with us and that 
the said Micajah's affairs are settled to satisfaction as far as appears 
to us. We also recommend to your care and notice his children, 
viz., Agatha, Sarah, Ann, Mary and Micajah, as members of our 
Society, and remain your friends and brethren. Signed in and on 
behalf of our Monthly Meeting held at Cedar Creek 7-14-1782. 

John Payne, Clerk. 

Rachel Harris, Clerk at This Time. 



These Certificates of removal were granted by Fairfax Monthly 
Meeting to unite the following Friends with Southriver Monthly 
Meeting: Eichard Lewis and Hannah, his wife, 12-25-1790; Wm. 
Stabler and Sarah Mathews. Samuel Fisher, son of Joseph, Sr., 
being a minor and apprenticed to his brother, Elias Fisher, we com- 
mend him to your care and oversight. Signed on behalf of the 
Monthly Meeting held 5-1-1793. Thomas Mathews, Clerk. 



Mary Harris, 6-22-1793. 

Thomas and Sarah Matthews, Clerks. 



Joseph Fisher and Ann, his wife, and their children, John, Han- 
nah and Ann, 4-26-1794. 

Thomas Mathews and Hannah Beal, Clerks. 



Sarah Fisher, daughter of Joseph Fisher, 4-26-1794. 

Thomas Mathews and Hannah Beal, Clerks. 



136 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

Hannah Bradfield, 11-28-1795. 

Asa Moore and Hannah Beal, Clerks. 



Sarah Millhurn. 2-25-1797. 

Asa Moore and Hannah Beal, Clerks. 



The Folio-wing Certificates -were Granted by Various Monthly- 
Meeting's Unitingr the Fpllo-wing Friends "with Southriver 

Mon hly Meeting, -'-'n ['.fvlt l^ . » 



John Preston and Eebecca, his wife, and their minor cliildren, 
Zenas, John, Amos, Moses, Sarah, Peter, Ann and William, removed 
from Goose Creek Monthly Meeting, in Loudoun County, 7-30-1792. 
James Moor and Sarah Smith Clerks. 



James Curie, Ruth, his wife, and their son, Josepli, removed from 
Goose Creek Meeting, 5-30-1791. 



/ 



James Daniel, Hannah, his wife, and their four minor children, 
Eebeekah, William, Jasper, and Hannah, 12-2G-1791, removed from 



V Goose Creek Meeting. 



Thomas, John and Daniel Burgess removed from Deer Creek 
Meeting in Maryland, 9-27-1792. John Cox, Clerk. 



Isaac Hatcher, Rachel, his wife, and their children, Nancy, James 
and William, removed from Goose Creek Meeting, 10-29-1792. 
James Moore and Sarah Smith, Clerks. 



Ashley Jolmson, Sr., Mary, his wife, and their minor children, 
Ashley, Thomas, Walkins, Drusilla, Anna, and Edith, removed 
from Cedar Creek Meeting, in Hanover County, 1-12-1793. 

MiCAJAH Crew and Chlotilda Harris, Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 137 

Abram Bunker removed from New Garden Monthly Meeting, 
Guilford County, N". C, 1-26-1793. Enoch Macy, Clerk. 



Mary Terrell was granted a Certificate on the same date. 

Enoch Macy and Deborah Evins, Clerks. 



James Butler, Priscilla. his wife, and their children, Mary, Ta- 
bitha, Ann, Jonathan, Sarah, Edward and Mathew Kobert, removed 
from Blackwater IMonthly Meeting in Prince George County, 3- 
16-1793. Wyke and Ann Hunnicutt, Clerks. 



Agatha Dix and her children, Nathan, Micajah and Sarah, re- 
moved from Springfield, N. C, 3-2-1793. 

Mathew and Hannah Coffin, Clerks. 



Fairfax Monthly Meeting, held 3-20-1791, granted Certificates 
of Eemoval to Southriver Monthly Meeting to Joseph Curie and 
Rebekah, his wife, and their seven children, viz., Hannah, Emma, 
Charles, Rebekah, Elizabeth, Susanna, and Samuel; also to Jacobad 
Lodge. Signed in and l)y order of Fairfax Monthly Meeting. 
William St.\:bler and Sarah Mathews, Clerks. 



Goose Creek Monthly Meeting, held 5-30-1791, granted Certifi- 
cates to Samuel Cary and Eachel, his wife, and their children, 
namely, Cyntliia, Sarah, Jonathan, John, Samuel, Rachel and 
"Thomas. 

James Moore and Sarah Smith, Clerks. 



Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, held S-37-1791. granted a Cer- 
tificate to Rhoda Anthony, to unite her to Southriver Meeting. 

Micajah Crew and Chlotilda Harris. Clerks. 



Crooked Run Monthly Meeting, held 9-2-1791, gTanted a Cer- 
tificate to Asa Holloway, Jr., to unite him with Southriver Meeting. 

Jonah Lupton, Clerk. 



138 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 

Fairfax i\[onthly Meeting, held 9-24-1791, granted Certificates 
of Kemoval to Kobert and Betty Fisher and to Joseph Fisher, Jr. 
Thomas and Sarah Matthews, Clerks. 



Crooked Run Monthly Meeting, held 9-24-1791, granted a Cer- 
tificate to Mary Holloway. 

Jonah Lupton and Eunice Alt, Clerks, 



Crooked Rim Monthly Meeting, held 5-2-1789, granted Certifi- 
cates to Men Bond and Sarah, his wife. 

Goldsmith Chandler and Sarah Brown, Clerks. 



Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, held 5-9-1789. granted Certifi- 
cates to Mary Bunch and her Children, James and Ann Bunch. 

MicAJAH Crew and Rachel Moorman, Clerks. 



Crooked Run Monthly Meeting, held 7-4-1789. Certificates were 
granted to Edward and Mary Bond and their children, viz., Benja- 
min, Martha, Ruth and Hannah. 

Goldsmith Chandler and Sarah Brown, Clerks. 



Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting, held 5-8-1790. Certificates were 
granted to Gerard Johnson and Judith, his wife, and their children, 
Benjamin, Samuel, Jorard. Watkins, David, Elizabeth, Jane and 
Judith. 

MiCAJAH Crew and Rachel Moorman, Clerks. 



Fairfax Monthly Meeting, held 5-32-1790. A Certificate was 
granted to Elizabeth Oliphant to unite her with Southriver Meeting- 
James Moore and Sarah Mathews, Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 139 

Extracts from the Certificates Granted by Various Monthly- 
Meetings to the Follo-wing Friends to Unite Them -with 
Southriver Meeting, Held in Campbell County, Virginia. 



Asa Plummer removed from York Monthly Meeting 4-13-1793. 

Eli Kirk, Clerk. 



Patty Terrell from Cedar Creek Meeting, in Hanover County, 
6-13-1795. Patty Jones from Cedar Creek Meeting, in Hanover 
County, 8-22-1795. 

MiCAjAH Crew and Chlotilda Harris, Clerks. 



James Butler removed from Blackwater Meeting, in Surry 
County, 12-20-1794. 

Wyke Hunnicutt, Clerk. 



Stephen Butler and Mary, his wife, and their children, Huldah, 
William, James Stanton, Stephen and Jonathan, removed from 
Blackwater, in Surry County, 2-20-1796. 

Thomas Pretlow, Clerk for the Day. 

Patience Bailt, Clerk. 



Hanner Fisher removed from Goose Creek Monthly Meeting, in 
Bedford County, 2-3-1797. 

Mentor Pim Purdue and Mary Anthony, Clerks. 



William Davis and Mary, his wife, and their minor children, Su- 
sannah, Elizabeth, Benjamin, Isaac, Polly, Nancy and Louisa, re- 
moved from Goose Creek, in Bedford County, 4-1-1797. 

Mentor Pim Purdue and Mary Anthony, Clerks. 



William Hunnicutt removed from Blackwater, in Surry County^ 
4-15-1797. 

Wyke Hunnicutt, Clerk. 



140 CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL, 

Thomas Macldox removed from Goose Creek, in Bedford County, 
6-3-1797. Mentor Pim Puiidue, Clerk. 



Charles Pidgeon removed from Goose Creek, in Bedford County, 
11-1-1797. 

William Davis. Clerk. 



John Burgess and Drusilla, his wife, removed from Deer Creek, 
Maryland, 2-25-1798. John Cox and Sarah Ely, Clerks. 



Henry Davis removed from Goose Creek, in Bedford County, 
4-7-1798. 

William Davis, Clerk. 



William Davis removed from Goose Creek, in Bedford County, 
6-1-1799. 

John Davis and Mary Anthony, Clerks. 



Sarah Davis removed from Goose Creek, in Bedford County, 
10-4-1800. 

John Davis and Mary Anthony, Clerks. 



James Stanton removed from Blaekwater, in Surry County, 
9-18-1800. 

Wyke Hunnicutt, Clerk. 



Thomas Bailey removed from Goose Creek, in Bedford County, 
6-6-1801. John Davis, Clerk. 



Edward Terrell removed, with Jane, his wdfe, and their children, 
Elizabeth, Mary, Johnson, Judith, Christopher and Gerard, from 
Goose Creek, in Bedford County. 

John Davis and Mary Anthony, Clerks. 



CERTIFICATES OF REMOVAL. 141 

Josiah Bailey removed from Upper Meeting, held at Gravelly 
Eun, in Dinwiddle County, 5-33-1802. 

James Hunnicutt, Clerk. 



Hugh Morgan removed from Deer Creek, in Harford County, 
Maryland, 10-38-1803. Isaac Cole, Clerk. 



Micajah Terrell removed from Western Branch, Isle of Wight 
County, 11-36-1803. Robert Jordan, Clerk. 



William Stanton, his wife, Catharine, and children, Elizabeth, 
Phebe, Anna, Mahlon, Samuel and Ehoda, removed from Cane 
Creek, N. C, 3-4-1804. 

Solomon Dixon and Denah Hobson, Clerks. 



DISOWNMENTS 



DISOWNMENTS. 



James Crew was disowned by Cedar CreeK Monthly Meeting of 
Friends, held Seventh month 8th, 1786, for selling one of his fel- 
low men into bondage, and refusing to redeem him therefrom, and 
so far having given way unto a spirit of libertinism as to be con- 
cerned in gaming. 

MiCAjAH Crew, Clerk. 



Sarah Crew, daughter of James Crew, was disowned the 9th day 
of the 5th month, 1789, for marrying one who was not a Friend, 
which was contrary to the Discipline. 

MiCAjAH Crew, 
Eachel Moorman, 

Clerks. 

Judith Crew, daughter of James Crew, was disowned the 9th of 
the 4th month, 1791, for marrying contrary to the Discipline. 

MiCAjAH Crew, 
Eachel Moorman, 

Clerks. 

Nicholas Crew was disowned for drunkenness and adultery while 
living in Hanover county; he removed to Campbell county, and 
some years later wrote a letter to Cedar Creek monthly meeting con- 
demning his conduct and asking Friends to forgive him and to re- 
ceive him into membership again. The following members of 
South Eiver meeting wrote a letter to friends of Cedar Creek, testi- 
fying as to his good character since living among them, Wm. Davis, 
David Terrell, Micajah Davis and Eichard Bloxom, and he was re- 
ceived again into membership Tenth month 8th, 1791. 

^ Micajah Crew, Clerk. 



William Crew, of Albemarle county, was disowned for using "ill 
words, fighting, etc.," the 10th day of 5th month, 1794. 

M. Crew, Clerk 



146 DISOWNMENTS. 

Whereas, Micajah Crew, Jr., son of Nicholas Crew, of Hanover 
county, has so far deviated from our known rules as to use spirituous 
liquors to excess, also has engaged in military services, for which 
conduct he has been dealt without the desired effect, and has sub- 
sequently entered into marriage contrary to the rules of our Discip- 
line, we do, therefore, disown him from being any longer a member, 
until he shall make satisfaction for his conduct. 

Signed in and on behalf of a monthly meeting of Friends held at 
Cedar Creek, in Hanover county, the 14th day of the 3rd month, 
1807. Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



Nicholas Crew was again disowned for using spirituous liquor^, 
and for neglecting to attend meetings for worship. Signed in and 
on behalf of Cedar Creek monthly meeting in Hanover county the 
10th of the 4:th month, 1813. Lemuel Crew, Clerk. 



^Vllereas, Deborah Crew, daughter of Micajah and Margaret Crew, 
having so far deviated from the known rules of Friends as to join in 
marriage with a man not of our religious society, we, therefore, 
disown her from being any longer a member of the same until she 
make satisfaction. Signed in and on behalf of a monthly meeting 
held at Cedar Creek the 14th of the 8th month, 1819. 

Lemuel Crew, 
Rebecca Harris, 

Clerks. 



Walter Crew, son of Micajah and Margaret Crew, married con- 
trary to the Discipline and was disowned by a monthly meeting held 
at Cedar Creek 4th month 8th, 1820. Lemuel Crew, Clerk. 

John Crew was disowned for using intoxicating liquors to excess 
at a monthly meeting held at Cedar Creek 4th month 11th, 1829. 

At a monthly meeting held near Southriver the 21st of the 7th 
month, 1764 (Bedford county, Va.). 

Whereas, John Hampton, a reputed member of our Society, the 
people called Quakers, has betaken himself to the vain fashions and 
ways of the world and entirely withdrawn himself from attending 
our meetings, rendering himself no ways agreeable to the rules of 



DISOWNMENTS. 147 

our Discipline, we do, therefore, testify against him and all his dis- 
orderly conduct and that we have no unity with such disorderly 
spirits, disowning him from being a member of our Society until it 
may please God to give him a place of repentance, which is our sin- 
cere desire. Signed in and on behalf of our meeting. 

William Candler, Clerk. 



Eobert Brooks disowned, 1-26-1766, for following the "corrupt 
ways of the world." W. C, Clerk. 



John Candler disowned, 3-20-1767, for using "spirituous 
liquors." 

Peter Holland disowned, 9-19-1767, for absenting himself from 
meetings for worship and Discipline and attending the Baptist 
church. 

Charles Lynch disowned, 12-20-1767, for taking "solemn oaths." 

John Caldwell disowned, 6-18-1768, for taking a wife contrary 
to the rule of the Discipline." 

John Kerby and Joannah, his wife, disowned by request, 6-18- 
1768, for leaving their own meeting and worshiping with the Bap- 
tists. William Ferrell, Clerk. 



Micajah Clarke disowned, 10-21-1770, for "frequenting places of 
sport and gaming." 

Mary Johnson disowned, 7-20-1771, for "marrying out from 
among Friends and by an hireling Priest." 

Thomas Johnson disowned, 10-21-1771, for "following the vain 
fashions of the world." Zachariah Moorman, Clerk. 



Anne Moorman disowned, 4-18-1772, for "marrying out from 
among us and by a hireling Priest." 

Zachariah Moorman disowned, 3-19-17Y4, for "being married 
by a hireling Priest." 

Benjamin Terrell disowned, 5-8-1774, for "following the vain 
fashions and customs of the world." 



148 DISOWNMENTS. 

Andrew and William Jolinson diso\\Tied, 2-18-1775, for "joining 
with the vain customs of the world, such as horse racing and fre- 
quenting places of diversion." Byrum Ballard, Clerk. 



Elizabeth Pagon (formerly Ferrell) disowned, 5-18-177G, for 
being married by a hireling Priest." Sarah Goode, Clerk. 



Ehzabeth Johnson disowned, 5-16-1778, for marrying a near rel- 
ative and being married by a hireling Priest. 

John Lynch and Sarah Goode, Clerks. 



Mary Baker (formerly Ferrell) disowned, 7-17-1779, for being 
married by a hireling Priest. 

Milley Johnson (formerly Moorman) disowned, 920-1779, for 
the same cause. 

Benjamin Johnson, Sr., disowned, 8-19-1780, for purchasing and 
receiving manumitted negroes. John Lynch^ Clerk. 



South River Meeting, Held in Oampbell County. 



Priscilla Goff (formerly Stanley) disowned, 2-15-1783, for mar- 
Tjing contrary to the rules of the Society. 

Eachel Miller (formerly Johnson) disowned, 5-10-1785, for the 
same cause. 

Rebeccah Ferrell disowned, 9-18-178-1, for following the fashions 
and customs of the world. 

John Lynch and Mary Anthony, Clerks. 



]\Ioses Kendrick disowned, 8-18-1787, for purchasing a slave and 
also for retaining in bondage those that he had once liberated under 
his band and seal. 

Barzilla Barnard disowned, 12-20-1788, for fighting, swearing 
and drinking. 



DISOWNMENTS. 149 

Charles Johnson, son of Benjamin Johnson, deceased, disowned, 
7-17-1789, for figliting and using spirituous liquors. 

Thomas Johnson (son of Christopher) disowned, 8-20-1791, for 
fighting, and spreading a report to the injury of his neighbor, also 
for marrying contrary to the rules of Friends. 

Obcdiah Kerby disowned, 8-18-1792, for purchasing a slave and 
holding him in bondage. 

Eichard Tullis disowned, 12-15-1792, for retaining a negro in 
bondage. 

Thomas Moorman, son of Zachariah, disowned, 12-15-1792, for 
holding a slave. 

Thomas, Watkins Johnson disowned, 3-21-1791, for being so far 
transported with passion as to utter some profane expressions. 

4SL2§-Sall-9Jd disowTied, 5-10-1794, for fighting and laying a 
wager, etc. 

Samuel Martin disowned, 12-20-179-1, for the practice of gaming 
and for military exercises. 

Samuel Jordan Harrison disowned, 8-16-179-1, for Joining the 
Free Masons and conforming to sundry practices used amongst 
them that are burthensome to Friends, such as marching in proces- 
sion with music and weapons of war, and also in the uniform of an 
apron, etc. 

Samuel Terrell disowned, 3-21-1795, for having allowed himself 
to be so transported with passion as to utter some very unbecoming 
speeches, and threatening expressions to the dishonor of our pro- 
fession. 

Samuel Moorman disowned, 3-21-1795, for holding a slave. 
John Schoolfield and James Martin disowned, 8-8-1795, for en- 
listing in military service. 

Thomas Johnson disowned, 10-6-1796, for drinking spirituous 
liquors. Achillis Douglass, Clerk. 



Gideon Lay, Jr., disowned, 4-8-1797, for enlisting himself as a 
soldier. 

John Preston, Jr., disowned, 8-11-1798, for laying wagers and 
using profane language. 



150 DISOWNMENTS, 

William Fowler disowTied, 8-11-1798, for using profane language. 

William Harrison disowned, 12-8-1798, for following the vain 
fashions of the world, making "bets" and using profane language. 

Benjamin Bradford disowned, 9-14-1799, for attending and an- 
swering to his name at a military muster. 

Moorman Johnson disowned, 10-13-1799, for being guilty of gam- 
ing, using profane language and attending places of diversion. 

John Fisher, Jr. 



John Bradfield disowned, 11-9-1799, for attending a meeting for 
military exercises and using profane language. 

Betty Johnson (daughter of Charles Johnson) disowned, 12-1-4- 
1799, for dancing and attending places of diversion. 

Benjamin Barnett disowned, 4-12-1800, being concerned in mili- 
tary services. a 

John Johnson, Jr., disowned, l-9-18'92, for using spirituous 
liquors to excess. 

Samuel Johnson, son of Christopher. Jr., disowned, 4-10-1802, 
for using profane language and attending places of diversion. 

Thomas Johnson, son of John, disowned, 12-11-1802, for taking 
strong drink to excess, offering to fight and hiring a slave. 

Micajah Moorman, Jr., and Susanna Johnson were disowned, 3- 
12-1803, for marrying (they being first cousins), and for being 
married contrary to the rule of Friends. 

John Fowler disowned, 7-9-1805, for ceasing to attend our re- 
ligious meetings and for following the vain customs of the world, 
also using profane language. 

Christopher Lynch disowned, 10-12-1805, for following the vain 
customs of the world and for hiring slaves. 

William Johnson, Jr., disowned, 4-12-1806, for moving out of the 
State without endeavoring to settle with his creditors. 

William Eoberts disowned, 6-8-1816, for using intoxicating 
liquors to excess and for fighting. 

Asa Wood disowned, 6-30-1821, for playing cards, taking oaths, 
attending places of diversion and joining the Masonic Society. 



DISOWNMENTS. 151 

Samuel Fisher disowned, 8-12-1820, for disposing of a colored 
boy named James, wlio was entitled to his freedom, and he has since 
fallen into the hands of those who hold him as a slave, and said 
Samuel would not endeavor to restore James to his freedom, al- 
tliough Friends urged him to do so. 

Gervas Johnson disowned, 5-8-1824, for accomplishing his mar- 
riage contrary to the rules of Friends. 



Whereas, Ehoda Terrell, daughter of Thomas Terrell, of Caroline 
County, who had an education amongst us, hath, contrary to the 
good order used amongst Friends, joined in marriage to a man not 
of our Society ; and having been repeatedly cautioned against it, we 
therefore disown the said Ehoda from being a member of our re- 
ligious Society until she makes satisfaction. Signed in and on 
behalf of a Monthly Meeting of men and women Friends held at 
Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 8th of the 3rd month 1704. 

MiCAJAH Crew, 
Eachel Moorman, 
Clerks. 

Whereas, Jonathan Terrell, who had a right of membership in 
our religious Society, hath so far deviated from the principles we 
profess as to enter into marriage contrary to the rules of our Dis- 
cipline, and endeavors to justify his conduct in so doing, we do 
therefore disown him from being a member of our Society until he 
make satisfaction. Signed in and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting 
held at Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 13tli of the 6th month 
1807. 

Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



Whereas, Pleasant Terrell, son of Pleasant Terrell, deceased, late 
of Caroline County, who had a birthright amongst us, hath so far 
deviated from the known rules of our Discipline as to join himself 
in marriage with one not of our profession, we therefore disown him 
from being a member of our religious Society until he make satis- 
faction. Signed in and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting of Friends 
held at Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 8th day of the 7th 
month 1807. Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



152 DISOWN MENTS. 

\Miereas, Robert Terrell, of Caroline County, who had a birth- 
right with us, hath so far neglected his duty as a member of So- 
ciety as to decline the attendance of our religious meetings and the 
observance of the rules of the Discipline of Friends generally, he 
having been dealt with without the desired effect, we do therefore 
disown him to be a member with us. until he condemns his conduct 
in these respects. Signed in and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting 
held at Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 12th of the 12th month 

1807. 

Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



"V^^iereas. Jesse Terrell has been in the practice for some time of 
hiring slaves, and having been labored with, and tenderly advised 
with bv Friends to decline a practice so contrary to the rules of our 
Discipline and the Divine precept which requires us to do to others 
as we would be done by; he hath, instead of complying therewith, 
further proceeded to the purchase of several. We therefore testify 
against such practices and hereby disown him, the said Jesse Ter- 
rell, from being a member of our religious Society until he con- 
demn the said conduct to the satisfaction of Friends. Signed in 
and on behalf of a Monthly jMeeting hold at Cedar Creek in Han- 
over County the 14th day of the -ith month 1810. 

Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



Whereas. John Terrell, of Caroline County, who had a birthright 
among Friends, hath so far deviated from our known rules as to 
join himself in marriage with a woman not of our religious pro- 
fession, we do therefore disown him from being a member of our 
Society until he make satisfaction. Signed in and on behalf of a 
Monthly Meeting held at Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 10th 
day of the 11th month 1810. 

Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



Whereas, Chiles Terrell, who had by birth a membership in So- 
ciety with Friends, hath, contrary to our Discipline, joined in mar- 
riage with a woman not professing with us, we do therefore disown 
him from beinff a mcml)er until he make satisfaction. Signed in 



DISOWNMENTS. 153 

and on l)ehalf of a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Cedar Creek 
in Hanover County the <Sth of the 12th month 1810. 

Benjamin Bates, Clerk. 



Whereas, Milley Terrell, who had a hirthright among Friends, 
has so far deviated from the known rules as to join in marriage with 
a man not of our religious Society, we do therefore disown her from 
being a member of our society until she make satisfaction. Signed 
in and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting held at Cedar Creek in Han- 
over County the 9th day of the 3rd month 1811. 

Benjamin Bates, 
Chlotilda Harris, 

Clerks. 



Whereas, Caleb Terrell has, contrary to the known rules of the 
Society, engaged as an overseer of slaves, and been active in the 
performance of military services, and disregarding the advice of 
Friends still continues in the the practice, we do therefore disown 
the said Caleb Terrell from being a member of our religious So- 
ciety, until he make satisfaction. Signed in and on behalf of a 
Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Cedar Creek in Hanover Coun- 
ty the 10th of the 7th month 1813. Lemuel Crew, Clerk. 



Wliereas, Matilda Terrell, of Caroline County, has so far devi- 
ated from the rules of our Society as to join in marriage with a 
person not of our profession, and having been visited and labored 
with in order to convince her of the error, without the desired ef- 
fect, we therefore disown her from being any longer a member of 
our Society until she is disposed to make satisfaction. Signed in 
and on behalf of Cedar CJreek Monthly Meeting held the 11th of the 
oth month 1816. Lemuel Crew, 

Deborah Harris, 

Clerks. 



Whereas, Ehoda Terrell (daughter of Jessie Terrell), who had a 
birthright amongst us, has so far deviated from the order and Dis- 
cipline established among Friends as to become united in marriage 



154 DISOWNMENTS. 

with a man not of our religious Society, we therefore disown her 

from being a member of our Society until she make satisfaction. 

Signed in and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting held at 

Cedar Creek the 9th of the 5th month 1818. 

Lemuel Crew, 
Eebecca Harris, 

Clerks. 



Whereas, George Terrell, who had a right of membership among 
Friends, but having so far deviated from their known rules as to 
marry a woman not of our Society, we do hereby disown him from 
being any longer a member of our Society, until he make satisfac- 
tion. Signed on behalf and l)y direction of a Monthly Meeting of 
Friends held at Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 12th day of 
the 7th month 1823. Samuel Tehrell, Clerk. 



Whereas, Samuel Terrell (son of Jesse Terrell), of Caroline 
County, who had a right of membership amongst us, has so far 
deviated from the good order established by our discipline and the 
advice of Friends as to unite in marriage with a person not of our 
religious Society, we therefore disown him from being any longer a 
member of our Society until he shall make satisfaction. Signed by 
direction and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at 
Cedar Creek the 12th of the 5th month 1827. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, Clerk. 



Whereas, Kittie Terrell* (daughter of Lemuel and Eebecca Ter- 
rell), who had a birthright amongst us, has so far deviated from the 
known rules of Friends as to marry a man not professing with us, 
we therefore disown her from being any longer a member of our 
religious Society until she make satisfaction. Signed by direction 
and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting held the 11th of the 
7th month 1829. 

MiCAjAH Bates, 
Tacy Bates, 

Clerks. 



♦ Catharine Pleasant Terrell (Kittie) married James Bell. 



DISOWNMENTS. 155 

Whereas, Eliza Ann Terrell (daughter of Jesse Terrell, of Caro- 
line County), who had a right of membership amongst us, has mar- 
ried contrary to the rules of our Society and the good order estab- 
lished among Friends, we therefore disown her from being any 
longer a member of our religious Society imtil she make satisfac- 
tion. Signed by direction and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting of 
Friends held at Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 12th day of 
the 6th month 1830. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, 
Tacy C. Bates, 

Clerks. 



Whereas, Nicey L. Terrell* (daughter of Lemuel and Eebecca 
Terrell), who had a birthright among us, has so far deviated from 
the known rules of our Society as to marry a man not professing 
with us, we do therefore disown her from being any longer a mem- 
ber of our religious Society until she make satisfaction. Signed by 
order and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting held the 9th 
of the 4th month 1836. 

Walter Crew, 
Ann Crenshaw, 
Clerks at This Time. 



Whereas, ISTancy Terrell,f who had a right of membership 

amongst us, has married contrary to the rules of our Discipline, we 
do therefore disown her from being any longer a member of our 
religious Society until she make satisfaction. Signed by direction 
of our Monthly Meeting of men and women Friends held at Cedar 
Creek in Hanover County the 14th day of the 2nd month 1835. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, 
Tacy C. Bates, 

Clerks. 



Whereas, Joseph W. Terrell, who had a right of membership 
amongst us, has married contrary to the rules of our Discipline, 



* Nicey L. Terrell married Joel Luck, 
t Nancy married LiBton Cobb. 



156 DISOWNMENTS. 

we therefore disown him from being any longer a member of our 
religious Society until he make satisfaction. Signed by direction 
and on behalf of a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Cedar Creek 
in Hanover County the 9th of the 5th month 1835. 

Walter Crew, Clerk at This Time. 



Whereas, Robert S. Terrell,* who had a birthright amongst us, 
has so far deviated from the testimonies which we have deemed it 
our duty to bear as to engage in overseeing slaves, and having been 
visited by a committee of our meeting on the subject, has not only 
manifested no disposition to cease the practice, but has also inform- 
ed the committe that he is in the habit of mustering, thereb}^ mani- 
festing that he has not the love and fear of God in his heart, we do 
therefore issue this our testimony against such practices and dis- 
own the said Robert S. Terrell from being a member of our relig- 
ious Society until he makes satisfaction. And may the Lord in his 
mercy open his understanding to a sense of the CAnl of his ways and 
strengthen him to return to the Testimonies of Truth. Signed by 
direction and on behalf of the Monthly Meeting of Friends held 
at Cedar Creek in Hanover County the 11th day of the 7th month 
1835. Joseph J. Pleasants, Clerk. 



Whereas. Edwin Terrell, who had a right of membership among 
us, has married contrary to the rules of our Society and the good 
order estal)lished among us by which he has forfeited his right, we 
do therefore disown him from being any longer a member of our 
religious Society until he shall make satisfaction. Signed by direc- 
tion and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting held the 12th 
day of the 8th month 1843. Joseph J. Pleasants, Clerk. 

^\^lereas, Mary Ann Terrell (late Hunnicutt), who liad a right 
of mcmljershi]) among us, has married contrary to the rules of our 
Society and the good order established among \\s, by which she has 
forfeited her right, we do therefore disown her from being any 
longer a Tiieml)er of our religious Society until she make satisfac- 

* K. S. Terrell married Eliza Hargrave. 



DISOWNMENTS. 157 

tion. Signed by direction and on behalf of Cedar Creek Monthly 
Meeting of Friends held the 12th day of the 8th month 1843. 

Joseph J. Pleasants, 
Mary Bates, 

Clerks. 



Whereas, Walter Terrell,* who has a right of membership with 
us, has married contrary to the Discipline of our Society, and hav- 
ing been visited by a committee of Salem Monthly Meeting of Iowa 
on our behalf, without manifesting any disposition to make acknowl- 
edgment for the same, we do therefore disown the said Walter Ter- 
rell from being any longer a member amongst us, until he make 
satisfaction. Signed by direction and on behalf of Cedar Creek 
Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Eichmond the llth day of the 
7th month 1852. John B. Crenshaw, Clerk. 

* Walter TerreU married M. Talitha Crew October, 1850. She died in 185:?, and in 
1854 he married her sister Jane. Talitha left one daughter, Mary T., now Mrs Kuolid 
Saunders, of Iowa City, Iowa. Walter Terrell died January 30, 1887, and his wife 
Jane died in August, 1888. 



LETTERS OF CONFESSION 



LETTERS OF CONFESSION AND 
CONDEMNATION. 



Dear Friends : 

I having been a member of your Meeting, but going contrary to 
the good order and rules of Friends to be married by an hireling 
Priest, which practice I do fully condemn and am heartily sorry 
that I have been the cause of trouble and sorrow to Friends and 
greatly desire to be reunited to my friends, which I submit to the 
freedom of the meeting_, 1-2-1778. Eichard Kerby. 



At a Monthly Meeting held at Cedar Creek the 14th of the 7th 
month, 1781, Moorman Johnson sent to this meeting condemning 
his outgoings in marriage, also a recommendation from some of the 
members of your meeting, where he has of late resided, on which he 
is reinstated into the Society and is recommended to the care of 
the Southriver Monthly Meeting. Moses Harris, Clerk. 



To the Monthly Meeting to be held 2-17-1787. 

Dear Friends : 

I have at some time past acted in a disorderly manner in fighting 
and thereby brought a scandal on Truth and a wound to my own 
mind, the practice I do utterly condemn myself in so doing, and if 
Friends will pass by my conduct in that respect, am in hopes 
through Divine assistance never to do the like again. 

Edward Terrell. 



To the Monthly Meeting to he Held at Southriver 9-15-1787. 

Dear Friends : 

I have to acknowledge that being off the true watch I have given 
way to the spirit of resentment so far as to gratify that revengeful 
spirit by the putting forth mine own hand to the dishonor of Truth, 
which has been a matter of sorrow to me, and do sincerely condemn 
the same ; and notwithstanding such conduct may justly deserve the 
censure of my friends, yet I have a hope and earnest desire remain- 



162 LETTERS OF CONFESSION. 

ing that I may be enabled through a watchful care and diUgent at- 
tention to that principle of Light and Grace to surmount every dif- 
ficulty that in future may be permitted to attend me. I therefore 
submit my case to the solid consideration of the Meeting, and re- 
main vour friend. John Lynch. 



Dear Friends : 

By birth having had a right of membership with you, I inconsid- 
erately went out in marrying a near relative and thereby justly for- 
feited my right, which transgression the Father of Mercies hath 
been pleased to give me a sight and sense of, and it has been cause 
of sorrow and deep mourning to me in a particular manner that of 
marrying near relative, which lays with greater weight on me than 
any other part of my conduct, for which I was disowned ; and, dear 
friends, I now freely and sincerely condemn all such practices as 
being out of the line of truth and contrary to good order, and desire 
to make such satisfaction that you may be easy with in receiving me 
again into membership, hoping, tlirough Divine assistance, for the 
future to conduct myself to the satisfaction of Friends and the peace 
of my own mind. Elizabeth Johnson. 

10-8-1787. 



Dear Friends : 

Being suddenly overtaken with ])assion too unguardedly beat a 
man, which I am really sorry for, and do heartily condemn myself 
in so doing, and all such rash undue liberties, and believe if I had 
a little reflected I should have been preserved from such unbecoming 
conduct, and for your satisfaction can assure that it is my resolu- 
tion to endeavor to conduct consistent with our profession for the 
future, and remain your very loving friend, etc. John Fowler. 

6-20-1788. 



Dear Friends: 

Having gone out in marriage contrary to the good order amongst 
Friends, and having a sight and sense of my error, I do sincerely 
condemn the same and myself in so doing, and hope in future to 
conduct myself more circumspectly and agreeable to good order, and 
request that you may accept of this condemnation which I submit. 

4-18-1789. William Terrell. 



letters of confession. 163 

Dear Friends : 

Having so far deviated from the peaceable principles professed 
by us as to suffer the spirit of anger and resentment so to prevail as 
to procure firearms for my safety, all which conduct I do condemn, 
hoping at the same time that my future conduct will evince the sin- 
cerity of this my acknowledgment. Enoch Eobarts. 

6-20-1789. 



Dear Friends : 

Whereas I, the subscriber, having been so far off my watch as to 
be guilty of abusive conduct towards a neighbor of mine, and also 
using some unwary language, all which I see to be wrong and in- 
consistent with the peaceable principles we profess, and being sorry 
therefor, do condemn the same, desiring Friends to accept this my 
acknowledgment and continue me under their care as my future 
conduct shall render me worthy. Given under my hand this 16th 
day of the 7th month, 1789. Griffin Dobbins, 



Dear Friends : 

Having lately behaved myself in a very unbecoming manner to a 
Friend, both in words and action, which I am sorry for and do en- 
tirely condemn the same in myself and hope that in future my life 
and conduct will evidence the sincerity of my condemnation. 

8-15-1789. William Bloxom. 



Dear Friends : 

I having married contrary to Discipline, for which I was justly 
disowned by you, and being lately measurably sensible of the dis- 
advantage of such a separation, do therefore condemn my miscon- 
duct in that respect and desire to be reinstated to Friends again, 
and hope my future conduct will evidence the sincerity of this my 
acknowledgment. Milley Johnson. 

9-17-1791. 



Dear Friends : 

I once had a right amongst you and knew not the worth of it, and 
by taking undue liberty and suffering myself to be married by an 
Hireling Minister, caused me to lose my right, which I found to be a 
great loss when it pleased the Lord to open my eyes and show me 



164 LETTERS OF CONFESSION. 

whereabouts T was. Therefore, like a returning prodigal, I make 
request to come under your care again Judith Brown, 

8-12-1792. 



Dear Fimends: 

We acknowledge that we have deviated from the principles of 
Friends in kissing the Book, etc., which we were inadvertently 
drawn into not knowing the difference between an Oath and an Af- 
firmation, which we are heartily sorry for, and if Friends can pass 
by this offence we hope in future to be more cautious how we com- 
mit such errors. Timothy .ind David Johnson. 

1-18-1794. 



Dear Friends : 

I acknowledge I was much to blame for fighting or seeking any 
revenge, which is inconsistent with what we profess, for which I 
have been very sorry for and blame myself for, and hope I shall en- 
deavor to take care hereafter David Terrell, Jr. 



Dear Friends : 

As I have been charged with beating and abusing a man, which 
I do confess that I suffered passion so far to prevail over me as to 
be guilty of the charge, for which I am sorry, and have been with 
the man and made him satisfaction for the same, and hope that if 
Friends can look over this my transgression that I may, through 
Divine assistance, be able for the future to govern myself in a bet- 
ter manner, and desire to subscribe myself. Your friend, 

Wm. Johnson, Jr. 

Dear Friends: 

I hereby condemn my conduct in having been active in procuring 
a substitute to serve in the ]\Iilitia, although by indirect means, also 
removed and left some accounts unsettled, all wliieh has given 
trouble and uneasiness to Friends, which I have been made sensible 
of and sorry for. Hoping my future conduct may be more con- 
sistent, I desire Friends may accept this my aclcnowledgment and 
continue me under their care. William Betts. 

1-15-1798. 



LETTERS OF CONFESSION. 165 

Dear Friends: 

Wliereas I have so far deviated from the rules of good order 
which we profess as to be guilty of drinlving strong drink to excess, 
I hereby give this as my humble acknowledgment that I am truly 
sorry for it and do condemn myself in so doing, and request my 
Friends to pass by this my offense, and hope my future conduct will 
render me more worthy. William Stanton. 

9-3-1799. 



Esteemed Friends : 

Whereas I stand justly disowned for marrying contrary to Dis- 
cipline, and now being sensible of my error, I do sincerely condemn 
the same, with desires to be reinstated. If Friends can accept this, 
I hope my future conduct will evidence the sincerity of the same. 

8-11-1799. Betty Timberlake. 



Betsy Neely, of Halifax County, condemned her conduct in mar- 
rying out and asked to be reinstated 4-5-1801. 

Susanna Johnson made a similar confession and request 8-8-1801. 

Aaron Stanton condemned his conduct in having accomplished 
his marriage contrary to Discipline, 5-11-1805. 



Dear Friends: 

I have done amiss in hiring a slave, for which I am sorry and 
condemn the practice, and have set her at liberty until her year is 
up, and if Friends will look over my misconduct I hope to be more 
careful for the future. Moorman Johnson. 

11-9-1805. 



Mica j ah Johnson condemns his conduct in having been married 
by a 'Tiire-teacher," 8-9-1805. 

William Johnson, 9-13-1812, condemns his conduct for having 
been married "in the ways of the world." 

Garland Johnson, 2-13-1813, condemns having accomplished his 
marriage "contrary to the known Eules and Discipline of Friends." 



166 LETTEK8 OF CONFESSION. 

Mildred Tyree, 3-14-1818, condemns "having deviated so far as 
to marry contrary to the Eules of Friends." 



Dear Friends: 

The act of fighting of which I have been guilty has often caused 
me to feel regret on account of its repugnance to the principles of 
the Society in which I have been raised and in which it is my desire 
to remain, and I trust that Friends will judge of my case in the 
spirit of forbearance. Achillis D. Johnson. 

4-7-1829. 



APPENDIX 



APPENDIX I. 



HISTORICAL SYNOPSIS. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE ORIGIN OF QUAKERISM. 

From volume entitled "Southern Quakers and Slavery." 

The Quakers were the radicals of the Protestant Eeformation, 
and, although they were in existence before the days of George Fox, 
yet to the latter is due the fact that he first put himself in the front 
of the movement and became its founder. Hence a history of this 
kind would be incomplete without some account of him. 

The founder of the Society of Friends was George Fox (1634- 
1691). He was born at Drayton in the Clay, in Leicestershire, 
England, in July, 1624:. His father was a Puritan weaver, and the 
son, originally intended for the Church, was apprenticed to a shoe- 
maker and dealer in wool. At a very early age Fox had ''a gravity 
and stayedness of mind and spirit not usual in children," and 
when he was eleven "knew pureness and righteousness." In 1643 
"I left my relations, and broke off all familiarity or fellowship with 
young or old." For the next few years he was in spiritual darkness 
and groped after the light. He met with struggles, and temptations, 
with buffets and jeers, but the work of the Lord went forward, and 
many were turned from darkness to light by his labors. 

He dates the beginnings of his Society from Leicestershire in 
1644. The course of Quakerism was at first toward the north of 
England. It appeared in Warwickshire in 1645; in Nottingham- 
shire in 1646; in Derby, 1647; in the adjacent counties in 1648, 
1649 and 1650. It reached Yorkshire in 1651; Lancaster and 
Westmoreland, 1652 ; Cumberland, Durham and JSTorthumberland, 
1653; London and most other parts of England, Scotland and Ire- 
land in 1654. In 1655 Friends went beyond sea "where truth also 
sprang up," and in 1656 "it broke forth in America and many other 
places." 

Fox was unremittent in his missionary labors, and traveled over 
England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. He visited the West Indies 
and North America. He went twice into Holland. His first im- 
prisonment was at Nottingham in 1649. It was a strange thing 



172 APPENDIX. 

then to be in prison for religion, and some thought him mad because 
he "stood for purity, righteousness and perfection," but the sim- 
plicity, the earnestness, the devotion, and the practical nature of 
this system when contrasted with the dry husk of Episcopacy and 
the jangling creeds of the Dissenters soon won him adherents by the 
thousands. They came mostly from the lower ranks of society, but 
from all sects. 

Quakerism is distinctively the creed of the seventeenth century. 
Seekers were in revolt against the established order. It gave these 
seekers what they were seeking for. In theology it was un-Puritan ; 
but in eultus, forms and modes it was more than Puritan. The 
Quaker was the Puritan of the Puritans. He was an extremist, and 
this brought him into conflict with the established order. He be- 
lieved that Quakerism was primitive Christianity revived. He 
recognized no distinction between the clergy and laity; he refused 
to swear, for Christ had said, swear not at all; he refused to fight, 
for the religion of Christ is a religion of love, not of war; he would 
pay no tithes, for Christ had said, ye have freely received, freely 
give ; he called no man master, for he thought the terms rabbi, your 
holiness and right reverend connoted the same idea. He rejected 
the dogmas of water baptism and the Puritan Sabbath, and in 
addition to these claimed that inspiration is not limited to the wint- 
ers of the Old and Kew Testaments, but is the gift of Jehovah to 
all men who will accept it, and to interpret the Scriptures men must 
be guided by the Spirit that guided its authors. Here was the 
cardinal doctrine of their creed and the point where they differed 
radically from other Dissenters. Add to this the doctrine of the 
Inner Light, the heavenly guide given directly to inform or illumi- 
nate the individual conscience, and we have the corner-stones of 
their system. 

His success at first was not rapid, but sure. Even the name 
'"Quaker," like that of "jMethodist," was given in derision. Th(! 
Society of Friends is their true appellation. But as our object in 
the publication of this book is mainly to confine ourselves to mat- 
ters which touch Quakerism in Virginia and a few adjacent states, 
we cannot trespass upon our limits in regard to its illustrious 
founder by giving an account of his European career, but must 
confine it to North America. It may seem singular that there are 
not a few well-read people who do not even know that George Fox 



APPENDIX. 173 

was a visitor to the "North American Phintations," as tliis country 
was called. He came over in the year 1672, and the volume from 
which we quote has this to say of his travels and labors here. 

We left George Fox going over to the Eastern Shore. In a 
day or two he set out for New England. He labored there, then re- 
turned to Maryland, held meetings on both sides of the Bay, and on 
the fifth of November set sail for Virginia from Patuxent Kiver. 
In three days they came to Nancemund (Nansemond). Fox 
reached it by going down Patuxent Eiver, down Chesapeake Bay 
and up Nansemond Eiver. Here a great meeting was held. To 
this meeting came one Col, Dewes, "with several officers and magis- 
trates, who were much taken with the declaration of truth." Then 
Fox "hastened towards Carolina; yet had several meetings by the 
way, wherein we had good service for the Lord: one about four 
miles from Nancemum water, which was very precious; and there 
was a men's and a women's meeting settled, for the affairs of the 
church. Another very good meeting we had at William Yarrow's, 
at Pagan Creek, which was so large that we were fain to be abroad, 
the house not being big enough to contain the people. A great 
openness there was, the sound of truth spread abroad, and had a 
good favor in the hearts of people: the Lord have the glory for- 
ever !" 

"After this," Fox continues, "our way to Carolina grew worse, 
being much of it plashy, and pretty full of great bogs and swamps ; 
so that we .were commonly wet to the knees, and lay abroad a-nights 
in the woods by a fire: saving one of the nights we got to a poor 
house at Summertown [Somerton], and lay by the fire." The 
whole of this itinerary can be traced pretty clearly; coming down 
the Chesapeake and sailing up Nansemond Eiver, as we have seen. 
Fox and his companions, Eobert Widders, James Lancaster and 
George Pattison, probably took horse before they reached the Widow 
Wright's. They entered North Carolina by way of Somerton, Va., 
and went by canoe down Bennett's Creek, called by Fox Bonner's 
Creek, into "Macocomocock river," which is doubtless the modern 
Chowan, to the house of Hugh Smith, "where people of other pro- 
fessions came to see us (no Friends inhabiting that part of the 
country)." This house was probably situate in the western part of 
the present county of Chowan. "Then passing down the river 
Maratick in a canoe, we went down the bay Connie-oak [Edenton] 



174 APPENDIX. 

to a captains who was loving to us and lent us his boat ( for we were 
much wetted in the canoe, the water plashing in upon us). With 
this boat we went to the governor's; but the water in some places 
was so shallow, that the boat, being loaded, could not swim ; so that 
we put off our shoes and stockings, and waded through the water a 
pretty way." The Governor's residence was probably near Eden- 
ton. Fox says he and his wife received them "lovingly," but they 
found a sceptic in the person of a certain doctor, who "would needs 
dispute with us," declaring that the light and the spirit of God 
were not in the Indians, and who "ran out so far that at length he 
would not own the Scriptures." 

"We tarried at the Governor's that night; and next morning he 
very courteously walked with us about two miles through the woods, 
to a place whither he had sent our boat about to meet us. Taking 
leave of him, we entered our boat and went al^out thirty miles to 
Joseph Scot's, one of the representatives of the country [probably 
in Perquimans, near Pasquotank County]. There we had a sound, 
precious meeting; the people were tender, and much desired after 
meetings. Wherefore at an house about four miles further, we 
had another meeting; to which the Governor's secretary came, who 
was chief secretary of the province, and had been formerly con- 
vinced." 

Fox also went among the Indians and spoke to them l)y an inter- 
])retcr, and "having visited the north part of Carolina, and made a 
little entrance for the truth among the peopl,e there, we began to 
return again towards Virginia, having several meetings in our way, 
wherein we had good service for the Lord, the people being gen- 
erally tender and open. ... In our return we had a very precious 
meeting at Hugh Smith's .... the people were very tender, and 
very good service we had amongst them. . . . The ninth of the 
tenth month we got back to Bonner's Creek .... having spent 
about eigliteen days in the north of Carolina. 

"Our horses having rested, we set forward for Virginia again, 
traveling through the woods and bogs as far as we could well reach 
that day, and at night lay by a fire in tlie woods. Next day we had 
a tedious journey through bogs and swamps, and were exceedingly 
wet and dirty all the day, but dried ourselves at night by a fire. 
We got that night to Sommertown. . . . Here we lay in our clothes 
by the fire as we had done many a night before. Next day we had a 
meeting; for the people .... had a great desire to hear us; and 



APPENDIX. 175 

a very good meeting we had among them, where we never had one 
before." After traveling about a hundred miles from Carolina into 
Virginia they were again among Friends. They spent about three 
weeks in Virginia, mostly among Friends. They had large and 
precious meetings. At the Widow Wright's "many of the magis- 
trates, officers and other high people came. A most heavenly meet- 
ing we had; wherein the power of the Lord was so great, that it 
struck a dread upon the assembly, chained all down, and brought 
reverence upon the people's minds." The parish priest threatened 
to interfere, "TDut the Lord's power .... stopped him .... The 
people were wonderfully affected with the testimony of truth. . . . 
Another very good meeting we had at Crickatrough, at which many 
considerable people were, who had never heard a Friend before; 
and they were greatly satisfied, praised be the Lord ! We had also a 
very good and serviceable meeting at John Porter's which consisted 
mostly of other people, in which the power of the Lord was glo- 
riously seen and felt, and it brought the truth over all the bad 
walkers and talkers ; blessed be the Lord !" 

During the last week of his stay Fox spent time and pains cor- 
recting evils that had come into the Society and in "working down 
a bad spirit that was got up in some," and then, ""having finished 
what service lay upon us at A^irginia, the thirtieth of the tenth 
month [30 December, 1672] we set sail in an open sloop for Mary- 
land." 

Thus ended the on]|_y visit of George Fox to Virginia and Caro- 
lina. It was his good fortune to see his Society organized and pros- 
pering in each. In Virginia the number of Friends was more 
than doubled by his preaching, while "a large convincement" was 
upon many others who had not yet professed. The connection 
between these bodies and the English societies was close. An ex- 
change of letters began. Fox sent copies of Edward Burrough's 
Words to Col. Thomas Dewes at Nansemond; to Major-General 
Bennett; to Lieutenant-Colonel Waters, in Accomack; to Justice 
Jordan, near Accomack, in Potomac; to the Governor of Carolina, 
and others. There was soon, no doubt, some sort of union between 
the meetings in Virginia and Carolina, but this has not been at any 
time an organic one, for the Quakers of North Carolina steadily 
fought against the idea of being absorbed by their Virginia neigh- 
bors. There has always been unity of thought and feeling between 
the Society in the two States and their history is one. 



176 APPENDIX. 

QUAKERISM IN VIRGINIA. 

As the existence of Quakerism in Virginia on an extensive scale^ 
prior to and long after the American Eevolution, admits of no dis- 
pute an account of its introduction in Virginia and other Southern 
States is eminently demanded. The record shows that Massa- 
chusetts was the first American colony in which Quakerism was 
preached. The second seems to have been Virginia, although there 
is little difference in the time of its appearance in this colony and 
in Maryland. The person to plant the standard of Quakerism in 
the South was Elizabeth Harris, a native of London. Of her per- 
sonal history we know little. She entered Virginia in 1656, and 
arrived in England on her return about July, 1657, '^'in a pretty 
condition." Bowden says "her religious labors were blessed to 
many in that province, who were sincere seekers after heavenly 
riches, and she was instrumental in convincing many of the primi- 
tive and spiritual views of the Christian religion professed by 
Friends." 

We may say that, Virginia was first settled by the English, May 
13, 1607. Under the preaching of an English woman, Elizabeth 
Harris, in 1656, the first Friends' meetings were established. 
Friends were no more welcome here than among their brother Eng- 
lishmen in Massachusetts. The current extravagant stories con- 
cerning them were believed, and they were evidently thought to be 
a very dangerous class of people. In 1660, Virginia enacted the 
following law concerning them : "Wliereas, there is an unreason- 
able and turbulent sort of people commonly called Quakers, who, 
contrary to law, daily gather unto themselves unlawful assemblies 
and congregations of the people. ... It is enacted that no master 
or commander of a ship or other vessel do bring into this colony 
any person or persons called Quakers, under the penalty of one 
hundred pounds sterling, to be levied upon him and his estates by 
order of the governor and council or the commissions in the several 
counties where such ships shall arrive; that all such Quakers as 
have been questioned, or shall hereafter arrive, shall be appre- 
hended wherever they shall be found, and they be imprisoned, with- 
out bail or mainprise, till they do abjure this country, or put in 
security with all speed to depart this colony and not return again. 
And if any should dare to presume to return hither after such de- 
parture, to be proceeded against as contemners of the laws and 



APPENDIX. 177 

magistracy, and punished accordingly and cansod again to de})art 
the country, and if they should the third time be so audacious and 
impudent, they are to be proceeded against as follows : That no 
person shall entertain any of the Quakers who have heretofore been 
questioned by the governor and council, or which shall hereafter be 
questioned, nor permit in or near his house any assembly of the 
Quakers, under penalty of one hundred pounds sterling; that com- 
missioners and officers are hereby required and authorized, as they 
will answ^er the contrary at their peril, to take notice of this act, 
to see it fully effected and executed, and that no person do presume 
on their peril to dispose of or jmblish their books, pamphlets, or 
libels bearing the title of their tenets and opinions." 

In the early settlement of Virginia, Friends as well as others 
took up large tracts of land, and many of them settled near where 
Eichmond, Winchester and Norfolk now are. Tradition tells us 
of one who took up 40,000 acres of land, another 4,000. We hear 
of one Pleasants, who owned many slaves, and was determined to 
have one thousand. At one time he held nine hundred and ninety- 
nine, but he failed to reach the full thousand before the Friends 
of Virginia decided that it was unrighteous to hold their fellow- 
men in bondage. By this decision he was very much annoyed. A 
committee went to visit him on account of his slave-owning, but 
he would not leave his field to meet them, so they waited patiently 
until he came to dinner. He then had their horses put in the 
stable and invited them to dine with him with true Friendly hospi- 
tality. But when dinner was over, he wished to hasten l:)ack to the 
field with his sable farm hands. The committee finally induced 
him to tarry for a season of waiting before the Lord. For some 
time they sat in silence, and then arose, saying if he would have 
their horses brought they would now proceed on their wav. They 
departed without once mentioning the object of their visit; but 
he knew for what they came and was obliged to think about it. 
When upon his bed that night he said he dreamed that he died and 
was about to pass through the gateway of heaven, when a little 
darkey lad closed the gate, and he was not allowed to enter. He 
said he did not intend to be kept out of heaven by the darkeys, so 
the next morning he summoned the blacks and tol,d them they 
were all free from that day. He arranged for those who wished 
to remain with him to work for wages, and said that with about 



178 APPENDIX. 

half the number of servants his business was more profitable than 
before. 

By the year 1817, all Friends in Virginia had freed their slaves. 
As in Xorth Carolina, so in Virginia, the principles of Friends, 
for some time before the late Civil War, were so at variance with 
tlie prevailing sentiment around them that most of them moved 
AVest, so that at the time the war began, there were in the State 
only a few small remnants of meetings that met to worship God 
after the manner of Friends. One of these small meetings was in 
the vicinity of Winchester, which city has been made famous as 
the centre of important military operations during the Bevolution 
as well as during the Civil War. 

From the above it will be seen that while Virginia is second to 
Massachusetts as to the advent of Quakerism, there is no dispute as 
to the date in which the Old Dominion first heard the gospel as 
propounded by the good people nor the name of the good woman 
who did so. It may be noted that no allusion is made to the erec- 
tion of any church building, although there were many converts. 
In all probabilit}^, as the Quakers were then under the ban, they 
held their meetings in private houses of Friends. 

As to the antiquity of claimants as to first churches, we find on 
page 23 of the volume from which we Just quoted the following: 

Again, on the 12th of November, 1663, Hill found another 
Quaker meeting at the residence of Eichard Kussell, and summoned 
some 35 persons, including John Porter, Sr., and John Porter, Jr., 
to court. Ten days later Hill discovered a Quaker meeting on the 
ship Blissing, at anchor in the southern branch of Elizabeth river, 
and summoned John Porter, Jr., who was speaking ; James Gilbert, 
master of the ship ; Mrs. Mary Emperor, and others, to court. De- 
cember 15 they were fined 200 pounds of tobacco each, this being 
their first trial. On the same day others were fined 50 pounds each 
for absenting themselves from juiblic worship, and the grand jury 
presented John Porter, Jr., and Mrs. Mary Emperor and others 
for attending a meeting on that day at the house of Mrs. Emperor. 
The trial for the offense of ISTovember 13 occurred on February 14 
following. John Porter, Jr., and Mrs. Mary Emperor were fined 
500 pounds of tobacco each, for it was their second offense; Richard 
Russell was fined 5,000 pounds of tobacco for permitting the meet- 
ing to be held at his house, and the others were fined 200 pounds of 
tobacco each, as it was their first offense. The trial tor the meet- 



APPENDIX. 179 

ing held at the house of ]\Irs. Emperor on December 15 also came 
off then. Mrs. Emperor and John Porter, Jr., were ordered to be 
sent out of the colony, it being their third correction. Ann Godby 
was fined 500 poimds of tobacco, it being her second correction, and 
others were fined 200 pounds, as it was their first. The sentence 
of transportation passed against Porter and Mrs. Emperor was not 
carried out. They were joersons of influence in the county, and as 
there was no profit to the informer in their transportation the sen- 
tence was probably allowed to die of itself. Hill's term as sheriff 
expired in 1664, and there was no further persecution of Quakers 
in this county until 1675. 

If we accept this account in its ecclesiastical sense then we may 
say that the Quaker Church was established in Virginia in the year 
1663. Coming directly to the building of Meeting-Houses in Vir- 
ginia the first one recorded was Buffkin's, on the east or Vir- 
ginia side of Nansemond Eiver. This house was 20x20, the inside 
was ceiled, and the floor was laid with planks and was fitted with 
pews and seats. It cost 3688 pounds of tobacco, of which the main 
contributors Avere John Miu'dah, 530 pounds; Eol^ert Jordan, 580 
pounds; Ben Small, 520; John Porter, 500 pounds, and John Hoi- 
lowell, 350. Another house, 25x20, was built on the west branch 
of Xansemond in 1692, and so important was the question of nails 
that it was recorded that Francis Bridle gave them. They were 
all hand-made, or, as we say, "wrought nails." There were meet- 
ing-houses in Virginia before this, no douljt, but we have no record 
of them. Among the names recorded we find the following: Pleas- 
ants, Terrell, Howard, Woodson, Watkins, Porter. Ellyson, Jor- 
dan, Binford, Cate, Hunnicutt, Crew, Clarke, Munford and many 
others, which figure largely on the roll of Cedar Creek, Golansville 
and other churches. If you add to this list a few other names that 
we find more frequently in the eastern counties, such as Picks, it 
will be seen that many of their descendants are prominent to-day. 

Continuing the Virginia record, we find that the Quakers, after 
having gained a footing in eastern Virginia, branched out and 
established meetings in Loudoun and Frederick Counties, but 
whetlier they had Meeting-Houses as such or met at private houses 
the record at this early date does not state. It may be noted, how- 
ever, that the meeting in east Virginia, although the oldest, were the 
first to decline, Quakers having entirely disappeared from Norfolk 
Countv before 1700. 



180 APPENDIX. 

CHAPTER II. 

QUAKERISM IN NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA. 

'NMk'U Quakerism was tlms expanding toward the west in Vir- 
ginia, a similar but independent movement was going on in North 
Carolina toward the south. The first Quaker counties of North 
Carolina were Perquimans and Pasquotank. Here it was planted 
by Edmundson and Fox in 167"?. ^Migrations from these original 
seats of the faith began as early as 1T();3. The movement crossed 
Albemarle Sound and went south. By the middle of the century 
there were Quakers in Hyde, Beaufort, Craven, Carteret, Jones, 
Bladen and Lenoir counties. They probaljly had meetings for wor- 
ship in all of these counties. 

In Carteret county. Core Sound ]\Ionthly ]\Ieeting was set up in 
1T33. It was probably the oldest in the section and its records 
have been preserved. In IT-iT Quakers in Carteret were strong 
enough to send one of their number to the Assembly. But in IT 71 
Core Sound Monthly Meeting was small, for it seems that most of 
its meml)ers had moved farther into the interior of the State. At 
the end of the last century the principal families of Quakers in the 
meeting bore the names of Stanton, Williams, Harris, Brown, 
Howard, Mace, Thomas, Davis, Arnold, Hollowell, Horn, Overman, 
Dew, Bogue, Bishop, Bundy, Borden, Parker, Chadwick, Hellen, 
Scott, Physioc, and Cartright. 

In 1748 we find mention of a monthly meeting on Falling Creek, 
then in Dobbs, now in Lenoir county. This monthly meeting was 
probably not far from the present town of Kinston, and continued 
here until January G, 1772, when it was the judgment of Friends 
that, since most of the Friends about the Meeting-IIouse on Lower 
Falling Creek had died or had moved aAvay, the monthly meeting 
should be held at IJichai'd Coxe's. near Upper Falling Creek. In 
July, 1772, it was said that Friends had settled on several branches 
of Contentnea Creek, and as they were distant from meeting, it was 
agreed to put a first day's meeting at Arthur Bryant's, and '"at a 
monthly meeting held at (ireat Contentney, the 12th of the 9th 
mo., 1772," it was also agreed that the monthly meeting should be 
transferred to Arthur Bryant's. From this time the Falling Creek 
Monthly ]\Ieeting disappears and Great Contentnea takes its place. 
It was at the time of its organization farther from the sea-coast 



APPENDIX. 181 

than any other monthly meeting in ^orth Carolina. It was known 
later as Contentnea JMonthly ^Meeting. We find among its members 
in the eighteenth century the following names : Beeman, Overman, 
Bogne, Hollowell, Cox, Pike, Pearson, Hall, Mayo, Wooten, Edger- 
ton, Arnold, Copeland, Bundy, Morris, Doudna, and Outland. From 
these names we are led to infer that connection with the meetings in 
Carteret County to the east and Northampton county on the north 
was close. 

Perhaps we can illustrate the expansion of Quakerism in east- 
ern Virginia and eastern North Carolina in no better way than by 
quoting the journal of William Eeckitt, who visited these meetings 
in 1756-57. He says of the meetings in Virginia : "I visited all the 
little handfuls scattered up and down in these parts, and often had 
service in families. I met with Samuel Spavold, who likewise was 
much engaged in the service of truth. His labor of love in the 
work of the gospel was indeed great in this part of the Avorld ; those 
of other societies being much reached by his ministry." 

Eeckitt then set forward to North Carolina; held meetings at 
Piney AVoods, Wells, Old Neck, and Little Eiver, all in Perquimans 
county; lodged with Thomas Nicholson, the author; probably did 
not go into Pasquotank county, but turned to the west, accompanied 
by Joshua Fletcher and Francis Nixon. He says, "I then set forward 
towards a wilderness country, where the inhabitants were very thin. 
.... Our first meeting after we left Perquimans was at John 
Coupeland's. . . . There were but few friends, but people of other 
societies came in, who had notice; amongst whom was an officer 
of the army . . . ." The first established meeting they reached 
was at Fort Eiver (Eoanoke?), "where a meeting had been recently 
settled, of such as had been convinced." They then came to Henry 
Horn's in Edgecombe county, who had been convinced from among 
the Baptists, for the inhabitants of this section belonged principally 
to that faith ; then they came to a small meeting at Neuse in Wayne 
county, and then ninety miles to the meeting at Core Sound. The 
destination of Eeckitt was to the Friends in South Carolina. "The 
first meeting we had after we left Core Sound, was at Permeanus 
Hauton's who gave us an invitation to his house, and sent to give 
notice to his neighbors, though some lived several miles distant. 
We got to his house about the time the meeting was appointed, where 
we found seats placed, and every thing in such convenient order for 



182 APPENDIX. 

a meeting-, as I thought I had seldom seen. His rooms being little, 
he had placed seats in his court yard, and under the windows, that 
I believe all could sit and hear without the least troubling one an- 
other; and indeed I thought his la1:)or and good inclination were 
blessed, for a solid time it was, and I found openness to declare the 
truth amongst them. . . . "We staid one night at AVilmington, the 
capital town in jSTorth Carolina; but it being their general court 
time and the privateers having brought in prizes, the people's minds 
were in great commotions, so that I could find no room nor freedom 
to have a meeting, though several called Quakers lived there, Init 
held no meeting, except when strangers came." They crossed a 
branch of Cape Fear Eiver and then Avent to Carver's Creek. ''Here 
was a small gathering of Friends. AVe staid their first day meeting 
over, and then went to Dan's [Dunn's] Creek, where we found rn- 
other gathering of such as call themselves Friends, but had been 
much hurt, and scattered in their minds from the true shepherd, 
by an enemy that had sown tares." 

^\e find Quakerism planted in South Carolina in much the same 
manner as it was in North Carolina, but inasmuch as letters writ- 
ten from the scene are more interesting than a dry historical record, 
we will quote a letter written by Samuel Fothergill, a missionary 
from Charleston, S. C, February 13th, 1755. He says: 

"Since I wrote you from Waynoak. [Va.], I have visited all vhe 
residue of Virginia and North Carolina, and last night arrived here, 
and have had a meeting here this day, amongst a poor miserable 
handful of professors, and believe I must visit all their families 
before I can easily leave this place. I expect to be in Georgia, 150 
miles south of this place, sometime next week, and then return 
northwards, 800 miles, upon a line, without much stop, except seven 
meetings which I left as I came southwards. 

"On the 2d instant, after a ride of fifty miles, we were obliged 
to lie in the woods all night. 

"I have this day had a large, good meeting, to my satisfaction; 
but the meeting house being small was inconvenient. ]\Iost of the 
principal inhabitants attended, and I expect the use of the Baptist 
meeting house on first day evening, to take leave of the inlialtitants 
of this place, who have given general instances of their regard. 

"George Whitfield passed through this town a few days ago, to 



APPENDIX. 183 

Georgia, having travelled very hard from Pliiladelphia, to get to 
his flock before we came amongst them. 

"The state of the church is generally low, and exceedingly so in 
this place; there is very little of the form, and much less of the 
power, of truth amongst them. My heart has been bowed into 
strong concern, and close labor for and with them, and hope for 
some little reviving of secret care in particular; but alas, many 
seem awakened for a time, and sink afresh into lukewarmness." In 
the same letter he says : "I have now been to the extent of my visit 
southward, being 120 miles further than any Friend hath travelled 
on religious account, and am setting my face northward. I pro- 
pose another public meeting in this place to-morrow, and then to 
leave." He was also invited to visit the Sea Islands, and expected 
to do it, but "found a prohibition." These people seemed "desirous 
the testimony should be exalted by others, but won't lend a hand. 
.... When we left Charleston we had near 450 miles to ride to the 
next settlement of Friends, through a country little inhabited, and 
in wdiich accommodations were scarce enough, though we made shift 
to get into some cal)in or other at nights, but had not my clothes off 
for several nights successively, or any things at times to lie down 
upon but a bear skin or boards." 

It will be of interest to us to see the names of some of the per- 
sons who were the leaders in this extensive migration, for their 
children became prominent in the Society in North Carolina, and 
their grandchildren went to the West and became equally prominent 
there. From Warrington Monthly Meeting, Pa., there were twenty- 
three arrivals; among them were Isaac and Peter Cox, Peter 
Nathan and Zacharias Dicks, Isaac Pidgen, John Beeson, Joseph 
Ozburn, Isaac Jones, Jacob and Abram Elliott, Thomas Kendall, 
William Beynolds, James and Aaron Frazer. Eight, came from 
Bradford Monthly Meeting; among them were Ebenezer Worth, 
Phineas, John and Richard MendenhaU ; while another Richard 
j\Iendenhall, William Reynolds, and Thomas Dennis, Jr., came from 
New Garden, Pa. ; eleven came from Cedar Creek ]\Ionthly Meeting, 

"Va., including Philip Hoggatt, William and Zachariah Stanley, 
Robert, John and William Johnson; eight from Caroline Monthly 

' Meeting, Joseph Hoggatt, Stringman and Nathan Stanley, Talton 
and James Johnson; eight from Hopewell and six from Fairfax; 
from Hopewell came Richard, Isaac, Nathaniel and John Beeson, 



184 APPENDIX. 

Benjamin lirittain, John Beals, James Langiey, Joseph Hiatt ; 
from the neighboring Fairfax came George Hiatt, William Ker- 
aej, Micajah Stanley, William Ballinger; Joseph Unthank and 
family came from Eichland, Bucks county, Pa. ; James Bro-mi, 
James Johnson came from East Nottingham, then in Pennsylvania, 
now in IMaryland. The westward movement from the eastern 
Xorth Carolina meetings was begun from Perquimans Montlily 
meeting by Henry, Jacob and Joseph Lamb, who came up in 1760, 
and thus set in motion a movement that was to attain large pro- 
|)ortions fifty years later. 

The names given in the above lists do not represent all the 
Quaker settlers who came to central North Carolina between 1751 
and 1770, it gives only representatives of certain families that have 
since attained considerable distinction in the section and who first 
made this and the surrounding Quaker settlements a success. They 
represented some of the oldest and best Quaker families in Penn- 
sylvania. The New Garden settlers were soon reinforced by other 
immigrants who also came from old Quaker stock. These were 
the settlers from Nantucket Island, Mass. This movement began 
in 1771, and Libni Coffin was the first Nantucket man to arrive at 
New Garden. 

We get some particulars from the life of Elijah Coffin: "The 
island of Nantucket being small, and its soil not very productive, 
a large number of people could not be supported thereupon. . . . 
The population of the island still increasing, many of the citizens 
turned their attention to other parts, and were induced to remove 
and settle elsewhere, with a view to l)etter their condition as to 
])rovide for their children, etc. A while before the Eevolutionary 
war, a considerable colony of Friends removed and settled at New 
Garden, in Guilford county. North Carolina, which was then a 
newly settled country. My grandfather [William] Coffin [1720- 
1803] was one of the number that thus removed. His removal took 
place, I ])eli('ve, in the year 1773." Again, Obed Macy, writing of 
the period about 1760, says that because of the failure of the whale 
fishery some went to New Garden, N. C, others to Nova Scotia and 
Kennebec : "Very few of whom benefited themselves, and some, 
after a few years' stay, returncHl.'' Again, about the outbreak of 
the Eevolution, because of llic derangement of their business by 
the war, othei-s went to New Yoi-k and North Carolina. 



APPENDIX. 185 



THE STOPPAGE OF SOUTHERN MIGRATION. 

In 1780 two-thirds of the inhabitants of Nantucket were Quak- 
ers. We find among their leaders the Coffins, Starbucks, Folgers, 
Barnards and Husseys. Some of these became leaders in the Caro- 
lina migration, which was particularly large, 1771-75. During this 
period of five years there were no less than forty-one certificates 
recorded at New Garden Monthly Meeting from Nantucket out of a 
total of fifty certificates received. In this number there were eleven 
families, and it included many families that have since been promi- 
nent in that section of the State. We find among these immigrants 
Libni Coffin, William (Jr.), William, Barnal)as, Seth (and wife), 
Samuel (and family), Peter and Joseph Coffin; Jethro Macy, 
David, Enoch, Nathaniel, Paul (and family), Matthew (and five 
children) and Joseph Macy; William, G-ayer, Paul (and family) 
and William Starbuck; Richard, William, Stephen, and Stephen 
Gardner; Tristrim, Francis and Timothy Barnard; Daniel Francis 
and Jonah Wortli; John Wickersham; William Eeece; Jonathan 
Gifford; Eeuben Bunker; Nathaniel Swain; Thomas Dixon. 

This southward migration stopped almost as suddenly as it be- 
gan. This was caused by the war of the Eevolution. In 1775 
there were eight certificates from Nantucket. In 1776 there was 
but one. In that year the migration from Virginia begins again 
with an occasional belated settler from Delaware or Maryland. But 
it never attained important proportions. During the seventeen 
years, 1783-1800, there Avere thirteen certificates received, less than 
one a year; some came from Nantucket, the most from Pennsyl- 
vania, but these were partly count erlxilanced by the five certificates 
granted to parties who returned to their old homes. 

It seems accurate to say that all of these new meetings had prac- 
tically attained their full growth by the outbreak of the Eevolution. 
Migration from the northward was steady until then. It then 
ceased largely, and from that time the meetings were kept up by 
the natural increase, not by the new arrivals. 

It is quite interesting to record here what a good Quaker brother 
says as to the superiority of the North Carolina Ijrand to that of 
Virginia. 

The superiority of Carolina Friends over Virginia Friends, both 
in temporal and spiritual affairs, is also shown clearly by Hugh 



186 APPENDIX. 

Judge, who visited Southern Quakers in ITSl. In speaking of his 
travels in the Hopewell section of Virginia he says: "We arrived 
there safely; hut though it was a poor place, it was much better 
than the former, for we got a tolerably good bed, and corn blades 
for our horses;. but they had no bread, milk, cheese nor butter for us. 
I asked whether we could have some water boiled, which they did 
in a large kettle, for they were entire strangers to tea and tea- 
tackling, having nothing of the kind. However, getting some hot 
water, I made some tea in a quart mug ; and, having tea and sugar 
as well as bread and meat with us, we fared pretty Avell on our own. 

"Set out before sunrise, and called at several places before we 
could get any breakfast, or anything for our horses to eat. At length 
we obtained some corn blades for them, and a broken kettle to boil 
water for ourselves a breakfast. So sorrowfully poor is the situa- 
tion and condition of many of the inhabitants of old Virginia that 
travelers are hardly beset to get a little refreshment; yet they 
abound with negroes." 

When South Carolina is reached there is found to be no essential 
difference in the evolution and development of the meetings in the 
northern and central part of the State, save that immigrants com- 
ing into this province, 1760-75, unlike those in Virginia and North 
Carolina, found some Quaker meetings already established in their 
line of march. Two of these. Pee Dee and Gum Swamp, were in 
j\Iarlborough county, S. C. "The Friends there," says Eeckitt, 
"though their circumstances in the world were but low, treated us 
very kindly. Their love to truth and diligence in attending meet- 
ings are worthy of notice; for they had nigh one hundred miles to 
go to the monthly meeting they belonged to, and I was informed 
very seldom missed attending it." These Friends "were truly glad 
to see us, they being seldom visited." 

Another Quaker meeting on their line was that at Wateree. It 
was in, or near, Camden, in Kershaw county. It was also known 
as the Fredericksburg or Camden meeting. ]\Iary Peisley and 
Catherine Peyton visited it in 1753. They found the Society very 
low as to religious experience, but "some of the youth were under a 
divine visitation, which afforded comfort and encouragement." 
Eeckitt visited them in 1757, and says "several of the Friends from 
Ireland had been settled about six or seven years." 

They seem to have grown ra])idly, for in 1755 we find Wateree 



APPENDIX. 187 

mentioned as a monthly meeting, but whether it was established by 
jSTorth Carolina Yearly ]\[eeting we do not know. In 1757 we find 
that certificates were taken from New Garden to Wateree, and in 
1761 parties returned to New Garden. In 1762 they were visited 
by William Hunt of North Carolina. So far as any evidence to 
the contrary is to be found, this monthly meeting, as well as other 
meetings in South Carolina, at first led a purely independent ex- 
istence. They were congregational as far as government goes, and 
it seems some did not elect at first to come under North Carolina 
Yearly Meeting. Up to this time all South Carolina Quakers seem 
to have come by the sea route. Charleston, Edisto, Wateree, were 
all of the same character in this respect. But when the southward 
migration swept over North Carolina and reached South Carolina 
these older meetings became less important relatively, and their 
connection with North Carolina Yearly Meeting becomes more dis- 
tinct as the immigrants become more powerful. In 1768 Fred- 
ericksburg Monthly Meeting was joined to the Western Quarter of 
North Carolina Yearly Meeting, and was held at Bush River, which 
was a settlement mostly of parties who had come overland from the 
north. In 1770 a committee was appointed to investigate the state 
of these Friends. They recommended the settlement of a monthly 
meeting at Bush Eiver, in Newberry County, which was done, and 
that Fredericksburg Monthly Meeting "should return to the 
Wateree until further orders." This was also done, and from this 
time Bush River increases while Fredericksburg decreases. It 
dragged its slow length along through the Revolution and was laid 
down about 1782. Job Scott was there in 1789. "I had a very 
small, yet precious meeting at Camden, S. C, where no member 
of our Society liveth, except one very ancient woman ; though once 
there was a settled meeting of Friends there." To this meeting 
there had come the families of Lamb, Parkins, Cox, Smith, Thomas, 
Pierson, Gant. 

There seems to have never been more than one Quaker center in 
Georgia. Quakers were particularly favored under the Georgia 
charter, but it is not probable that any Friends appeared in the 
colony early enough to avail themselves of the advantages ofi^ered. 
Samuel Fothergill was the first Quaker preacher to visit Georgia. 
This was in 1755. "I went thence [Charleston] to Georgia, and 
had a large meeting in the court-house, and some opportunities in 



188 APPENDIX. 

the inn where I lodged, to some service, though tliere were not any 
there who bore our name." The vagueness of this letter leaves us 
in doubt as to the sections visited. 

The first effort at Quaker settlement was in 1758. In that year 
"Certain Quaker families entered the province and formed a settle- 
ment about seven miles above Augusta upon a tract of land known 
to this day as the Quaker Spring. The territory within which they 
fixed their abodes had been formerly owned Ijy a tril^e of Indians 
called the Savannahs. Thence were they expelled by the Uchees, 
who occupied adjacent lands. Peacefully inclined as they were, 
these Quakers hoped to dwell in amity with the neighlwring Indians. 
AVhile engaged in clearing lands and in building comfortaljle homes 
they Avere alarmed by the intelligence that the Cherokees were on 
the eve of invading the white settlements. Without pausing to 
ascertain the truth of the report, they hastily abandoned the coun- 
try, leaving behind them no trace of their short occupancy save a 
spring-and a slender memory.*' 

The next effort was more successful. On the third of July, 
IT TO, the General Assembly of Georgia granted to Joseph Mad- 
dock (or Mattock) and Jonathan Still a tract of 40,000 acres of 
land in St. Paul's Parish, Columbia (now McDuffie) County, Ga., 
to be held in trust for the Quakers. Here they began the town of 
"Wrightsborough, on Town Creek, sixteen miles from Appling, the 
county seat, and named it for Sir James Wright, Governor of the 
colony. The records date from 1773. In that year a preparative 
and a monthly meeting were organized in Wrightsborough town- 
ship l)y representatives sent from New Garden. The certificates 
recorded show that the Quaker population was made up of settlers 
from South Carolina, Xorth (Virolina, A'irginia, Pennsylvania, and 
Burlington in AVest New Jersey. The outlook for a speedy develop- 
ment of their settlement was very promising when Indian trou])les 
in 1774 prevented further ex])ansion. We have an account of this 
Indian incursion from one who was so close to the sufferers that it 
may l)e interesting to reproduce. It is written by Eachel Price 
(nee Kirk) in her Account of the Kirh Family (MS.). It tells 
how her sister, Tamar Kirk, married Phineas Mendenhall and re- 
moved with him to Guilford County, N. C. This was about 1763. 
The account continues : "I have retained the recollection of a young 
num of the name of John Wickersham, who was acquainted with my 



APPENDIX. 189 

sister Mary. He went to Carolina some time after her, where they 
renewed their attachment and were married and settled there for a 
time, but the State of Georgia opened for settlement, inducing 
many to move there. My sisters and their families were both of 
them amongst those who went about 300 miles from their then 
settlement into the State of Georgia to a place settled by Joseph 
Mattock and Mattock's Settlement. There they lived in peaceable 
possession of their homes undisturbed by the natives for a consider- 
able time until there was a new purchase made by the Govern- 
ment, with which the Indians seemed dissatisfied. My brothers- 
in-law, with others, l^ought land in it; as it was considered very 
good, many were induced to make settlements on it, to clear and 
sow it with grain, but the frequent incursions of Indians was cau,se 
of great discouragement to them, so that it was deemed best by 
many not to reside on it. They therefore left it, but when the grain 
that they had sown was ripe, they thought that they wou.ld go there 
and gather it, the distance not being far from their first settlement 
where they resided. Sister Tamer, her husband and three sons 
went for that purpose, leaving their two daughters behind at home. 
Early one morning sister went to milk a cow they had with them; 
while her hands were thus engaged a party of Indians were lying 
in wait, fired on them, put an end to her useful life, also killed her 
eldest son ; the youngest they took captive, and kept him in captiv- 
ity about two years. They adopted him and were kind to him, and 
when redemption was offered for him, he had become so much at- 
tached to them and to their manner of life, that it required some 
persuading to get him from them. The father and other son made 
their escape. 

"This awfully trying circumstance made such an impression on 
the minds of sister Mary and husband that they came as soon as 
they could get away to North Carolina to their former settlement. 
In that neighborhood they lived for many years. . . . They of later 
years moved with their children and their families to Indiana, 
where they are settled." 

There were then about twenty families in the Wrightsborough 
connection. They report at that time : "Meetings are middling well 
kept up and love and unity subsist in a middling good 
degree amongst us." But the Indian incursion caused the popu- 
lation to become unstead}^, and many returned to the older colonies. 



190 APPENDIX. 

Wc find, liowever, a few wlio ventured that far Houtli during the war 
of the devolution. Daniel A\'illiams went down from Pennsylvania 
in 1777 to AVrightsborough, and in 1778 writes back to the people of 
Pennsylvania: "I got liberty to move into an empty cabin near my 
nnele, where we staid about six or seven weeks. During our abode 
there 1 dealt with a man for 100 acres of land in the old purchase. 
There were al)out seven acres cleared, and a nice house just built 
thereon, and al)out -10 bearing peach ti'ees planted out. We moved 
there near the beginning of the second month, and I fell to grub- 
l)ing and clearing a piece of ground, and got five acres ready to plant 
in corn in ])retty good season, and have ten acres now growing of 
likely corn. . . . Our country is exceedingly fertile, and takes but 
little to render it complete. One discouragement there is to the set- 
tlement of it. and that is the frequent incursions of the savages, 
who almost every year cause some part of the settlement 
to break, though it is hard to penetrate above two or three 
miles within the English l)oundaries. Though we have often heard 
it was their decision to cut us otf, yet the interposition of the Divine 
Hand has hitherto frustrated their intentions when no human 
])Ower seemed sufficient. Notwithstanding discouragements of this 
k'ind appear, yet it is truly astonishing to see with what rapidity the 
country is settled and improved; this country which 11 years ago 
was a wild uninhabited wilderness. There are several people here 
this fall that are much indisposed with a fever that is not common 
in this country, for we have generally good water and clear, wdiole- 
some air in the middle of summer. ... I shall advise if any of our 
friends should incline to come out here soon, that they bring no 
more money Avith them than what will bring them out, for we have 
no scarcity of paper currency. I would be very desirous if brother 
Isaiah would send 10 or 1"^ lbs. of iron out by William Benson, 
for it is a very scarce article here and rates I believe at $2.00 the 
pound." 

Georgia Friends were drawn fi-om all the meetings to the north- 
ward almost without exception. We find among them the families 
of Farmer, Pugh, Stubb, ,lon(^s, James, A'ernon, j\Ioorman, Upton, 
Williams, Webb, Dixon, Sey})old, Coppock, Brown, Hodge, Men- 
denhall. 

The Georgia meetings rejjorted to the Bush Piver Quarterly 



APPENDIX. 191 

Meeting, and this in turn to the JSTorth Carolina Yearly Meeting. 
In 1775 we find Georgia mentioned in the North Carolina Yearly 
Meeting records. South Carolina had heen mentioned for the first 
time in 1770. The change in the center was soon felt; in 1777 
came the j^roposition to remove the Yearly Meeting from the east; 
in 1786 request was that it he held at Centre, in Guilford County. 
It was held here the next year, and then alternated hetween the 
east and the west until 1812, when the last Yearly Meeting in 
northeastern North Carolina was held at Little Eiver. 

It is now possible for us to take a summary revicAv of the results 
obtained thus far. The promise of an aggressive and rapid growth 
nuide in the youth of Quakerism was not fulfilled in its maturer 
years. This promise was particularly clear in North Carolina. 
During the seventeenth century the records show that the Society 
in that colony was quietly but steadily extending its outposts and 
was being strengthened by immigration and conversions. To such 
an extent was this true, that in 1716 Eev. Giles Eainsford writes to 
the S. P. G. that the "poor colony of North Carolina will be soon 
overrun with Quakerism and infidelity if not timely prevented by 
your sending over able and sober missionaries as well as school- 
masters to reside among them." But this almost phenomenal 
growth of the native element ceased soon after the Established 
Church became well organized. Quakers never played in North 
Carolina under royal government the part they had played under 
the government of the Proprietors. They Avere still less important, 
relatively, in Virginia. During the last third of the eighteenth 
century they obtained their fullest growth in each of the several 
States under consideration. Soon after the beginning of the nine- 
teenth century their decline becomes visible. The period of high- 
est and fullest growth has itself a period of depression. The Eevo- 
lution, like the Civil War, Avas a time of suffering to the Quakers. 
Many left their ranks and Avere disoAA'ned to take part in the strug- 
gle for liberty, and the Society Avas much depleted. On the other 
hand, the convincements were much more numerous than they had 
been in former years. Despite all the care Avhich Friends might 
use to keep unAvorthy and timid persons out of the Socity, the num- 
ber of "war Quakers" was considerable, and the Society did not 
prosper for some years after the end of the war. 



192 APPENDIX. 

CHAPTER III. 

THE REPLANTING OF SOUTHERN QUAKERISM. 

In the preceding chapter an account of the decline of Southern 
Quakerism was given. In this we sliall see it was replanted and be- 
came quite vigorous. 

In the half-century included 1)etweeu 1732 and the close of the 
Eevolution a new and vigorous element was injected into the life of 
Southern Quakerism. ]\Iost of these new settlers were from Penn- 
sylvania, but some had delayed a few years in ]\Iaryland; some 
were from 'New Jersey, and some from Nantucket. Some were of 
English antecedents, but many were Pennsylvania Germans, and 
some were Welsh. The influence of these new settlers was so dis- 
tinct and overwhelming that I have ventured to call this movement 
the replanting of Southern Quakerism, for had this movement not 
taken place, Quakerism A^ould hardly be an appreciable factor in 
these States to-day. 

These immigrants seem to have had but one motive in coming 
South. This motive was distinctly economic. Their movement 
is parallel to that of the Scotch-Irish. These two waves passed 
over the same ground at the same time, but the two did not inter- 
mingle, for the gentle and peace-loving Friend, who decried all 
war, avoided the holding of office, sought not his own, and put his 
abiding faith in the personal presence of God, free grace and the 
powers that be, had little in common with the restless, aggressive, 
fighting, ruling Scotch-Irish, or with the democratic but stern 
tenets of Calvinism. 

About 1725 the vanguard of the Quaker movement appeared at 
Monocacy, Maryland. Here, like a true wave of Teutonic migra- 
tion, it rested for a time. It reached Hopewell, Ya., in 1732, and 
the next twelve or fifteen years were spent in subduing northern 
Virginia. In 1743 an advance-guard had gotten as far as Car- 
ver's Creek, in Bladen county, N. C. The next twenty years are 
marked by the swarms of Quakers that came pouring into the 
central sections of North Carolina, many of them falling by the 
wayside, however, in Campbell and Bedford counties, Va., where 
South Piver Monthly Meeting was organized in 1757. From about 
1760 to the Pevolution the horde passed through North Carolina, 
and pressed into South Carolina and Georgia. 



APPENDIX. 193 

Like a true migration again, this movement did not take the 
form of an overflow, but of successive waves. Many parts of the 
line of marcli were comparatively or even absolutely free from 
Quakers. It is idle for us to speculate on the reasons why they 
settled in the particular sections they did. It is possibly due to 
that "invincible attraction" which Walter Bagehot points out as 
playing such an important part in the formation of national char- 
acter. Some accidental advantage, perhaps the excellence of the 
soil, located the first immigrant, and the gregarious instinct did 
the rest. 

It now becomes us to narrate the planting of these meetings 
more in detail. 

The beginning of this new movement southward, the counterpart 
of the movement of the next century w^estward, is to be found in 
the Hopewell settlement in Frederick County, Va. x\bout 1735, 
Friends from Salem, IST. J., and Nottingham, then in Pennsylvania, 
but thrown by Mason and Dixon into Maryland, settled in the 
upper part of Prince George Count}^, Md., near the Monocacy, a 
tributary of the Potomac. They were erected into 'a meeting by 
Xew Garden Monthly Meeting, Pa. In 1732 Alexander Ross and 
a company crossed the Potomac, and thus initiated the migration of 
which we are now to write. In that year they obtained a charter 
for 100,000 acres of land situated on Opequan Creek, a tributary 
of the Potomac in what is now Frederick County, Virginia. A set- 
tlement was begun here by Alexander Eoss, Josiah Ballenger, 
James Wright, Evan Thomas and other Friends from Pennsyl- 
vania and Elk River, Md. A meeting called Hopewell, or 
Opeckon, was established the same year, and one called Providence 
in 1733. They were organized in 1735 into Hopewell j\Ionthly 
Meeting, under the auspices and care of Chester Quarterly Meeting 
in Pennsylvania. 

In 1733 other Friends removed from Bucks county, Penn., and 
settled in Fairfax, now Loudoun county, about ten miles south of 
the Potomac, east of the Hopewell settlement, and near where the 
town of Waterford now is. When these parties settled in northern 
Virginia there were no Quakers in this section, and few inhabitants, 
i^he meeting for worship of the Fairfax settlement was at first held 
1 the house of Amos Janney, the first Quaker settler here. The 
anneys became a large and influential family, produced among 



194 APPENDIX. 

others the liistorian, Samuel McPherson Janney, and some of the 
name still reside in the county. The meeting was called Fairfax, 
and dates from 1733. A meeting-house was erected in 1741 and 
called by the same name. VIn 1744 Fairfax Monthly ]\Ieeting}was 
established. This also became a branch of Chester Quarterly Meet-, 
ing and Philadelphia Yearly IMeeting. "^d.'!?"? ^ f^ /^rt^'-*A' 

These meetings soon attracted the watchful care of traveling '^ 
Friends. John Fothergill visited them in 1736. The state of the 
Society in Virginia, he said, was "low and painful'' ; those advanced 
in years were, in general, "very insensible of true feeling, or suit- 
able zeal for truth's advancement in themselves, their families or 
the church." John Churchman (1705-1775) went down in 1741 to 
see if the Friends at Fairfax "were in number and weight suf- 
ficient to have a meeting settled amongst them." He also visited 
the families on the Shenandoah and says, "T believe that the delight 
in hunting, and a roving idle life, drew most of them under our 
name to settle there." 

The meetings in I^oudoun, Fairfax and Frederick counties were 
never as distinctively Virginian as those farther south. They 
looked first to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, and after 1789 to 
Baltimore Yearly Meeting. Their distance and the inconvenience 
in traveling were doubtless important factors in this division. 
Then, too, the origin of the settlers had its effect. They were 
an offspring of the Pennsylvania meetings and looked naturally 
to them. 

These meetings in turn began to extend their Ijoundaries. 
Various meetings were established in Frederick, Loudoun, Cul- 
peper and (he adjoining counties. In 1756 a meeting-house was 
built and a meeting settled at Goose Creek. In 1760 Crooked 
Eun meeting was settled. A monthly meeting was established 
at Crooked Pun in 1782, and one at Goose Creek in 1785; at 
Southland in 1789, or earlier; and at x\lexandria in 1803 Migra- 
tion from Pennsylvania to northern Virginia continued brisk 
until the Kevolution. Day, Barrett, Beesoh, ' Piggott, Sidwell, 
Kirk, White, Brown, Wilson, Poss, Johnson, Bailey, Carter, Bal- 
lenger, Piigh, Pees, Branson, Wel)b. and Wright, were the names 
of some of the families that came south from Pennsylvania 
and settled in this section. There were in this immediate section 
one quarterly and five monthly meetings, with twenty or more 



APPENDIX. 195 

meetings for worsliip. There was much interchange between 
these meetings; as the settlers increased in nnmbers they took their 
certificates from the older meetings like Hopewell and Fairfax 
to the newer ones like Goose Creek. The meetings in this locality 
are now reduced to about eight. In the schism in 1838 a majority 
accepted the views of Hicks. The census of 1890 gives 96 as the 
number of Orthodox and 506 as the number of Hickside Friends in 
Fairfax, Frederick and Loudoun counties. Friends have entirely 
disappeared from the adjoining counties of Culpeper, Stafford and 
Orange, Va., as well as from Hampshire, Berkeley and Jefferson 
counties, W. Va., in all of which they had members during the last 
centur}^ 

We may safely conclude that the meetings in Campbell and Bed- 
ford, Pittsylvania and Halifax counties, Va., were built up almost 
entirely by this southward movement. There were two monthly 
meetings in this section. South River and Goose Creek. The former 
dates from 1757; the latter, which is not the same as the Goose 
Creek Monthly Meeting in the Hopewell Quarter, from 1794. 
These monthly meetings applied for a quarterly meeting. It was 
granted in 1797, and was known as Western Quarterly Meeting; 
but the number of Friends in the section decreased so much that 
Goose Creek Monthly Meeting was laid down in 1814 and the West- 
ern Quarterly meeting in 1817. South River Monthly Meeting 
survived the Virginia Yearly Meeting, and was laid down in 1858. 
These meetings lay in the direct path of southern immigration. 
I conclude that they received most of their increase from persons 
who got stranded, as it were, on the way South. But they were 
also a mixture of the native and foreign elements. The Clarks of 
Louisa and Albemarle counties, and the Terrells of Caroline, seem 
to have been in the Society before 1730, and had been turned toward 
Quakerism by the preaching of Joseph jSTewijy of North Carolina. 
The Lynch family, from whom the city of Lynchburg is iiamed, 
and who have also given us the term "lynch law," became members 
about 1752. It was the widow of Charles Lynch, died about 1753, 
Irishman and founder of the family, who organized the meetings 
in this locality. The Lynches, Davises, Johnsons, Cadwalladers, 
Douglasses, Anthonys, Holloways, Strattons, Fishers, Stantons, 
Moormans, Burgesses, Butlers, Pidgeons, Perdues, were some of the 
prominent Qaker families in Campbell and the adjoining counties. 



196 APPENDIX. 

At a later period the migration from northern Virginia became 
more frequent. Between 1775 and 1800 we find thirty parties, 
some with families, taking certificates from Fairfax and the north- 
em Goose Creek Monthly Meetings to South Eiver Monthly ]\Ieet- 



CHAPTER TV. 

CAUSES OF THE DECLINE OF SOUTHERN QUAKERISM. 

It is not our purpose in giving an account of Ye Quakers of Ye 
Olden Times to make one feature of the book more prominent than 
the rest. But inasmuch as the present generation knows but little 
about them, it is our aim to give a brief history of their origin, 
movements, doctrines and social life. 

Having already given an outline of their advent into this State 
and others, it now remains to notice the causes of their decline. 
These are five-fold : 

I. The removal of Friends to the West. This removal was it- 
self the result of at least three causes. The Quakers were Teu- 
tons. The old love of adventure was strong in their breasts as it 
was in the breasts of those who did not accept their religious 
view\'<. The influence of this spirit in extending the area of their 
settlements is acknowledged by John Churchman, John Griffith 
and other traveling ministers. It w\is the same spirit that had led 
to the discovery and settlement of America. It was an historic 
force. These Quakers, all unconsciously, were carrying out the 
spirit of their race. It was the same as the spirit which took the 
Angles and Saxons to Britain; which drove the Franks and later 
the ISTormans into Gaul ; led the Ostrogoths into Italy, the Visi- 
goths into Spain, and the Vandals to Africa. This was the first 
heart -beat, as von Eanke calls it. The second heart-beat leads the 
descendants of these same Teutons to the Holy Land on the 
Crusades; when their day was over the struggle was kept up in 
Spain against the Moors ; and the discovery of America was one of 
the results of the fall of Grenada. (2) Along w4th this historic 
spirit went the economic spirit — a search for more land and better 
land than was then available in the older States, for the best lands 
had been exhausted by continuous crops, and fertilizers were not 



APPENDIX. 197 

extensively used. To show that these two reasons would have 
led many to emigrate it is only necessary for us to study the de- 
veloiDment of Old England, or New England, or the Middle Colo- 
nies, or the Germany of to-day. (3) It may be an open question 
as to how many of these particular emigrants would have gone 
"West had there been no slavery in the South. But that slavery 
did have an overwhelming influence in the case under discussion 
no one can deny. 

II. Dissensions within the Society. As we have seen, the Hicks- 
ite schism divided and therefore weakened the Society in North- 
ern Virginia. 

III. Disownments for slight offenses, like marrying out of 
Society, and persistent efforts to force all men into the same nar- 
row mould, which is so visible in the earlier records of the Society, 
nave both cost it dear. 

lY. Two elements have prevented the growth of the Society. 
On the one hand, its extreme spirituality has been a load on the 
Society. No body of Christians has come so near fulfilling, per- 
haps, the injunction to worship in spirit and in truth as have 
Eriends. This deep spirituality is too high for most men. Their 
deficiencies must be supplied by forms and ceremonies. On the 
other hand, Quakers were the radicals of the Eeformation. They 
abominated above all things the forms, ceremonies and rituals of 
the Eoman Church; they were equally as uncompromising with 
those of the English Church. But in their very effort to escape 
fi-om the Scylla of ritualism they fell into the Charybdis of stiff- 
ness and inflexibility. They developed forms and ceremonies of 
their own which were no less ritualistic than those of the Eoman 
Church, and which were adhered to with such tenacity that the 
expression "rigid as a Quaker" became a by-word in the English- 
s]ieaking Avorld. To have no forms, no rites, no symbols, no 
liturgies is the root of Quaker forms. Their entire history is full 
of the adoption of external signs as the witness of the ministry of 
the spirit. Wearing sackcloth on the body and ashes on the head> 
as was sometimes done in early times, and a difference in dress, 
tell the very same story as the alb and cassock of the priest. The 
use of the thee and thou, the broad-brim hat, the curved coat, the 
sing-song tone of address, the wearing of hats in court, disownment 
of those who marry outside of Society, all point to the same effort 



198 APPENDIX. 

to indicate a corning out from the world. These things so utterly 
insignificant hy the side of the deep spirituality for which the 
Society has always stood, have been abandoned to a large extent. 
Quakers are not now generally known by their speech or their 
dress: but this was not the case until recent years, and the outsider, 
when first coming in contact with them, experienced, in many 
cases, a vague feeling of dread, and this feeling has repelled many 
who might have been attracted by their spirituality and by their 
strong insistence on moral character. 

Y. Aggressiveness of other denominations. The most careless 
perusal of the journals of the traveling Friends from the time of 
the Eevolution will convince the reader that Friends were being 
absorbed, as it were, slowly and imperceptibly, into the greater 
body of their more aggressive and vigorous rivals, the ]\Iethodists 
and Baptists. The journalists note frequently that their congre- 
gations are made up principally of outsiders; when denominations 
are given they are almost always Methodists and Baptists. These 
attended their meetings, entertained their preachers and absorbed 
their members. The completeness of this can be seen clearly in the 
journal of Samuel M. Janney, who notes the fact that there had 
been Friends in Culpeper, Orange and Albemarle counties, Vir- 
ginia, in the closing years of the eighteenth century; but in 18-il- 
42 they had disappeared. The Methodists had taken their place. 

It is true to say that Quakerism was absorbed in Virginia and 
North Carolina to a great extent by the Methodists. But it would 
be far from the truth to think that Quakerism thus disappeared 
leaving no trace behind. The influence which it has exerted on 
Southern Methodism has been very profound. It is probably ac- 
curate to call the Methodist Church the heir of the Quakers. In- 
deed it is entirely within the bounds of historical accuracy to say 
that the foundations of j\Iethodism in Virginia and North Carolina 
were laid by Edmundson and Fox rather than by Whitefield and 
Kobert Williams. The beginnings of Methodism are much nearer 
1672 than 1772. Methodism was a return toward the forms of 
primitive Quakerism. With them, as with the Methodists a cen- 
tury later, religion took the form of excessive emotion. The con- 
victed sinner shook from head to foot; there were many groans 
and sighs and tears ; then a sudden change, with a "sweet sound of 
thanksgiving and praise." In other words, the Quakerism of the 



APPENDIX. , 1U9 

Eevohitionary period was beginning to lose that aggressive and 
exuberant vitality that characterized it at the time of the death of 
Fox. It was sinking into that quietism which had characterized 
English Friends since the beginning of the eighteenth century. 
The continued enthusiasm of American Friends explains why the 
system retained its aggressive vitality and grew in numbers for 
almost a century after English (Quakers had reached their maxi- 
mum in numbers. When this spirit disappeared American Quak- 
erism began to lose numbers relatively. The early Methodists were 
simply leading their Quaker hearers back to the good old days of 
the past. 

The relations between Southern Quakers and Southern ]\Ietho- 
dists have usually been very cordial. Quakers seldom abandon out- 
right the scenes of former habitations. The}^ have returned to 
them in after years, have found few of their own members still 
alive, but have received a warm welcome at the hands of Metho- 
dists and others. Thus, although their last meeting in Pasquotank 
county, N. C, was laid down in 1854, they continued to visit and 
to preach among the j\Iethodists there for nearly a generation. In 
the same way Friends left Carteret county, E". C, for the West, 
1830-40, and regular services were suspended then, but Friends 
visited the section until their own meeting-house had perished from 
decay. They then held meetings in private houses or in the Meth- 
odist church, which was always open to them. A touching story is 
told of the three or four Quaker families who still lived in the 
section. One took up his residence in the meeting-house until he 
could erect a dwelling, and as long as the meeting-house stood this 
man and the two or three other families met regularly on Wednes- 
days and Sundays for silent worship. 



~ CHAPTEE y. 

THE CREED OF THE QUAKERS. 

While the religious belief of these quaint but Godly people has a 
"Thus saith the Lord" to buttress it, yet there are some articles of 
their faith which are so much at variance with the practices, if not 
the principles, of latter day Christians, that it will be of interest 
to notice them. Hence, we do so. 



200 APPENDIX. 

We make the following extracts from the Souihern Friend, Eich- 
mond. Ya.. edited by John B. Crenshaw: 

GllEAT TENETS OF THE QLTAKEriS. 

The Quakers hold four principles, which I shall distinguish by 
the name of Great Tenets. These are considered as arising out of 
the implied or positive injunctions of Christianity, and were insisted 
upon as essentials on the formation of the society. The first of 
these is on the subject of Civil Government. 

Civil Government had existed long before the appearance of 
Christianity in the world. Legislators since that era, as they have 
imbibed its spirit, so they have introduced this spirit more or less 
into their respective codes. But no nation has ever professed to 
change its system of jurisprudence, or to model it anew, in conse- 
quence of the new light which Christianity has afforded; neither 
have the alterations been so numerous in any nation, however high 
its profession of Christianity with respect to laws, as to enable us 
to say that there is any government in the known world, of chris- 
tian origin, or any government wholly upon the principles of the 
gospel. 

If all men were to become real christians, civil government would 
l)ecome less necessary. As there would be then no offences, there 
would be no need of magistracy or of punishment. As men would 
then settle any differences between them amicably, there Avould be 
no necessity for courts of law. As they would then never fight, 
there would be no need of armies. As they would then consider 
their fellow creatures as brethren, they would relieve tliem as such, 
and there would be no occasion of laws for the poor. As men would 
then have more solicitude for the public good, and more large and 
liberal notions than at any former time, they would of themselves 
conceive and raise all necessary public institutions and works. 
Government then is not so necessary for real christians. It is 
necessary principally, as the apostle says, for evil doers. But if 
it be chiefly necessary for evil doers, then governors ought to be 
careful how they make laws, which may vex, harrass, and embarrass 
christians, whom they will always find to be the best part of their 
communities, or, in other words, how they make laws, which chris- 
tians, on account of their religious scruples, cannot conscientiously 
obev. 



APPKNDIX. 201 

It is a tenet of the Quaker, on the subject of government, that 
the civil magistrate has no right to interfere in religious matters, 
so as either to force any particular doctrines upon men, or to hinder 
them from worshiping God in their own way, provided that, by their 
creeds and worship, they do no detriment to others. The Quakers 
believe, however, that christian churches may admonish such mem- 
bers as fall into error, and may even cut them off from membership, 
but this must be done not by the temporal, but by the spiritual 
sword. 

This tenet the Quakers support, first, by reason. Eeligion, they 
say, is a matter solely between God and man, tliat is, between God 
and that man who worships him. This must be obvious, they con- 
ceive, because man is not accountable to man for his religious 
opinions, except he binds himself to the discipline of any religious 
society but to God alone. It must be obvious again, they say, be- 
cause no man can be a judge over the conscience of another. He 
can know nothing of the sincerity or hypocrisy of his heart. He 
can be neither an infallible judge, nor an infallible corrector of his 
religious errors. "The conscience of man," says Barclay, "is the 
seat and throne of God in him, of whicli he alone is the proper and 
infallible judge, who, by his power and spirit, can rectify its mis- 
takes." It must be obvious again, they say, from the consideration 
that, if it were even possible for one man to discern the conscience 
of another, it is impossible for him to bend or control it. But con- 
science is placed both out of his sight and of his reach. It is neither 
visible nor tangible. It is inaccessible by stripes or torments. 
Thus, while the body is in bondage, on account of the religion of the 
soul, the soul itself is free, and, while it suffers under torture, it 
enjoys the divinity, and feels felicity in his presence. But if all 
these things are so, it cannot be within the province either of in- 
dividual magistrates or of governments, consisting of fallible men, 
to fetter the consciences of those who may live under them. And 
any attempt to this end is considered by the Quakers as a direct 
usurpation of the jDrerogative of God. 

This tenet the Quakers adopt again on a contemplation of the 
conduct and doctrines of Jesus Christ and of his apostles. They 
find nothing in these Avhich can give the least handle to any man 
to use force in the religious concerns of another. During the life 
of Jesus Christ upon earth, it is no where recorded of him that he 



202 APPENDIX. 

censured any nuin for his religion. It is true that lie re})rove(l the 
Scribes and Pharisees, but this was on account of their hypocrisy, 
because they pretended to be what they were not. But he no where 
condemned the devout Jew, who was sincere in his faith. But if 
he be found no where to have censured another for a difference in 
religious opinions, much less was it ever said of him that he forced 
him to the adoption of his own. In the memorable instance, where 
James and John were willing to have called lire from Heaven, to 
burn those who refused to receive him. he rebuked them liy an assur- 
ance that "they knew not what spirit they were of.'" And, with 
respect to his doctrines, nothing can be more full to the point than 
his saying, that "his kingdom was not of this world,'' by which he 
meant that his dominion was v/holly of a spiritual nature, and that 
men must cast off all worldly imaginations, and become spiritually 
minded, before they could belong to him. But no application of 
outward force, in the opinion of the Quakers, can thus alter the 
internal man. Xor can even the creeds and doctrines of others 
produce this elfect, except they become sanctioned by the divine 
influence on the heart. 

N'either is it recorded of any of the apostles, that they used any 
other weapons than those of persuasion and the power of God in the 
projjagation of their doctrines, leaving such as did not choose to 
follow them to their own way. They were explicit also in stating 
the spiritual nature of Christ's kingdom, from whence an inference 
similar to the former is deducible. namely, that no compulsory 
interference can be effectual in matters of religion. And St. Paul 
in particular, tells the Corinthians, that, in his spiritual services 
to them, he does not consider himself "as having any dominion over 
their faith, but as helpers of their joy. 

But if neither Jesus Christ, who was the author of that religion 
which many civil governments have established, nor the apostles, 
who afterwards propagated it, forced their doctrines upon other 
men, or hindered them by force from worshijiping in their own way, 
even though the former could have called legions of angels to his 
support, it certainly does not become weak, ignorant, and infallible 
men, because they are placed in the situation of governors, to set 
up their own creeds as supreme, and to throw penalties and restric- 
tions in the way of the religious exercise of others. 

But if governors, contrary to the example of Jesus Christ and of 



APPENDIX. 



2(i3 



his apostles, should interfere in religious matters, and impose laws 
upon the governed, of which, as christians, they cannot but dis- 
approve, then the Quakers are of opinion that the governed ought 
always to obey the laws of Jesus Christ, rather than the laws of any 
governors, who are only men. Thus when Peter and John were 
commanded by the rulers of the Jews to speak no more in the name 
of Jesus, they dared not yield obedience to their commands, reason- 
ing thus, "Whether it be right in the sight of God to hearken unto 
you more than unto God, judge ye." 

And as the governed in such case ought, in obedience to God, the 
Supreme Euler of the Universe, and the King of Kings, to refuse 
a compliance with the laws of their own governors, so they ought 
to be prepared patiently to submit to the penalties which are 
annexed to such refusal, and on no account, if just representations 
made in the meek and quite spirit of their religion, are not likely to 
be effectual, to take up arms or resist them by force. And this 
doctrine they ground, first, on the principle that it is not only more 
noble, but more consistent with their duties as christians, to suffer, 
than to give growth to the passions of revenge, or by open resistance 
to become the occasion of loss of life to others. And, secondly, on 
the example of Jesus Christ, and of the apostles and primitive 
christians, all of whom patiently submitted to the pains and penal- 
ties inflicted upon them by the governments of their respective 
times for the exercise of their religion. 

A second tenet, which the Quakers hold, is, that it is unlawful for 
christians to take a civil oath. 

Many and grievous were the sufferings of he Quakers, in the 
early part of their history, on account of their refusing to swear 
before the civil magistrate. They were insulted, fined, and im- 
prisoned. Some of the judges too indulged a rancour against them 
on this account, unworthy of their high olhce, which prescribed 
justice impartially to all. For when they could not convict them of 
the offences laid to their charge, they administered to them the oath 
of allegiance, knowing that they would not take it, and that con- 
fiscation of property and imprisonment would ensue. But neither 
ill usage, nor imprisonment, nor loss of property, ever made any 
impression upon the Quakers, so as to induce them to swear in 
judicial cases^ and they continued to suffer till the legislature, tired 
out with the cries of their oppression, decreed, that their affirmation 



204: APPENDIX. 

sliould in all cases except criminal, or in that of serving upon juries, 
or in that of qualifications for posts of honor or emolument Tinder 
government, he received as equivalent to their oath. And this 
indulgence towards them is continued to them h}^ law to the pres- 
ent day. 

The Quakers have an objection to oaths, as solemn appeals to 
God, because they are unnecessary. 

It is an old saying among the Quaker writers, that "truth was 
before all oaths." By this they mean, there was a time when men's 
words were received as truths, without the intervention of an oath. 
Ancient fable, indeed, tells us that there were no oaths in the 
golden age, but that, when men departed from their primitive sim- 
plicity, and began to quarrel with one another, they had recourse 
to falsehood to substantiate their own case, after which it became 
necessary that some exjDedient should be devised, in the case of 
disputes, for the ascertaining the truth. Hence Hesiod makes the 
god of oaths the son of Eris or of contention. This account differs 
but little from that of Polybius, who says, that the use of oaths in 
judgment was rare among the ancients, but that, as perfidy grew, 
oaths increased. 

And as it is a saying of the Quakers that truth "was before all 
oaths," so they believe that truth would be spoken if oaths were done 
away with. Thus, that which is called honor l)y the Avorld will bind 
men to the truth, who perhaps know but little of religion. But if 
so, then he, who makes Christianity his guide, wdll not be found 
knowingly in a falsehood, though he l)e deprived of the opportunity 
of swearing. 

But if it be true, that truth existed before the invention of 
oaths, and that truth would still be spoken, even if all oaths were 
abolished, then the Quakers say, that oaths are not so necessary as 
some have imagined, because they have but a secondary effect in the 
production of the truth. This conclusion they consider also as the 
result of reason. For good men will speak truth without an oath, 
and bad men will hardly be influenced by one. And where oaths 
are regarded, it is proljable that truth is forced out of men, not so 
much because they consider them as solemn appeals to God, as that 
they consider the penalties, which will follow their violation ; so that 
a simple affirmation, under the same pains and penalties, would 
he equally productive of the truth. 



APPENDIX. 205 

The Quakers consider oaths again as very injurious to moralit}'. 
For, first, they conceive it to be great presumption in men to sum- 
mon God as a witness in their trifling and earthly concerns. 

They believe, secondly, that if men accustom themselves to call 
upon God on civil occasions, they render his name so familiar to 
them that they are likely to lose the reverence due to it, or so to 
blend religious with secular considerations, that they become in 
danger of losing sight of the dignity, solemnity and awfulness of 
devotion. And it is not an unusual remark, that persons most 
accustomed to oaths, are the most likely to perjury. A custom 
house oath has become proverbial in our own country. I do not 
mean by this to accuse mercantile men in particular, but to state 
it as a received opinion, that, where men make solemn things 
familiar, there is danger of their moral degradation. Hence the 
Quakers consider the common administration of oaths to have a 
tendency that is injurious to the moral interests of men. 

This notion relative to the bad tendency of oaths, the Quakers 
state to have prevailed even in the Gentile world. As heathen 
philosophy became pure, it branded the system of swearing as per- 
nicious to morals. It was the practice of the Persians to give each 
other their right hand as a token of their speaking the truth. He 
who gave his hand deceitfully, was accounted more detestable than 
if he had sworn. The Scythians, in their conference with x\lex- 
ander the Great, addressed him thus : '"'Think not tliat the Scythians 
confirm their friendship by an oath. They swear by keeping their 
word.'' The Phrygians were wholly against oaths. They neither 
took them themselves, nor required them of others. Among tlie 
proverbs of the Arabs this was a celebrated one, "ISTever swear, but 
let thy word be yes or no." So religious was Hercules, says Plu- 
tarch, that he never swore but once. Clinias, a Greek philosopher 
and a scholar of Pythagoras, is said to have dreaded an oath so 
much, that, when by swearing he could have escaped a fine of three 
talents, he chose rather to pay the money than do it, though he was 
to have sworn nothing but the truth. Indeed, throughout all 
Greece the system of swearing was considered as of the most im- 
moral tendency, the very word, which signified "perjured," in the 
Greek language meaning, when analysed, ''he that adds oath to 
oath," or "the taker of many oaths." 



200 Al'l'KNDIX. 

But, al)ovc all, the Quakers consider oaths as unlawful for chris- 
tians, having- been positively forbidden by Jesus Christ. 

The words, in which they conceived this prohibition to have l)cen 
contained, they take from the sermon on the Mount. 

"Again, ye have heard, that it hath been said by them of old 
time. Thou shalt not forswear thyself, but shalt perform unto the 
Lord thine oaths." 

"But I say unto you. swear not at all. neither by heaven, because 
it is God's throne."" 

"Xor by the earth, for it is his footstool: neither by Jerusalem, 
for it is the city of the great King." 

"^'either shalt thou swear liy thy head, because thou canst not 
make one hair white or black."" 

"But let your communication be yea, yea; nay. nay: for what- 
soever is more than this cometh of evil." 

The next of the great tenets wdiich the Quakers hold, is on the 
subject of war. They believe it unlawful for christians to engage 
in the profession of arms or indeed to bear arms under any circum- 
stances of hostility whatever. Hence there is no such character as 
that of a Quaker soldier. A Quaker is always able to avoid the 
regular army, because the circumstances of entering into it is a mat- 
ter of choice. But where he has no such choice, as is the case in 
the militia, he either submits, if he has property, to distraints upon 
it, or, if he has not, to prison. 

The Quakers ground the illicitncss of war on several ])assages, 
which are to be found in the N"ew Testament. I shall not quote 
all the texts they bring forward, but shall make a selection of them 
on this occasion. 

Jesus Christ, in the famous sermon which he preached \\]wn the 
mount, took occasion to mention specifically some of the ])recepts of 
the Jewish law, and to inform his hearers that he expected of those, 
who were to be his true disci])les, that they would carry these to a 
much higher extent in their practice under the new dis])ensation, 
which he was then affording them. Christianity required a greater 
perfection of the human character than under the law. ^\en were 
not only not to kill, but not even to cherish the passion of revenge. 
And "whereas it was said of old, an eye for an eye, and a tooth for 
a tooth, T say unto you, says Christ, that ye resist not evil : but who- 
soever shall smite thee on thv right cheek, turn to him the other 



APPENDIX. 



2or 



also. And farther on in the same chapter, he says, "Ye have heard 
that it hath heen said. Thon shalt love thy neighbor, and hate thine 
enemy: But I say nnto you, love your enemies, bless them that 
curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them that 
despitefully use you and persecute you. For if ye love them which 
love you, what reward have you? do not even the Publicans the 
same? Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in 
heaven is perfect." Now the Quakers are of opinion that no man 
can receive this doctrine in his heart and assist either offensively 
or defensively in the operations of war. 

Other passages, quoted by the Quakers in favor of their tenet on 
war, are taken from the apostles Paul and James conjointly. 

The former, in his second epistle to the Corinthians, says, "For 
though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh : For the 
weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God 
to the pulling down of strong holds, to the casting down imagina- 
tions, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the know- 
ledge of God, and liringing into captivity every thought to the 
obedience of Christ." From hence the Quakers argue that the war- 
fare of Christianity, or that which Christianity recognizes, is not 
carnal, but spiritual, and that it consists in the destruction of the 
evil imaginations, or of the evil lusts and passions of men. That 
is no man can be a true soldier of Christ unless his lusts are sub- 
dued, or unless the carnal be done away by the spiritual mincL 
Now this position having been laid down by St. Paul, or the position 
having been established in christian morals, that a state of subju- 
gated passions is one of the great characteristic marks of a true 
christian, the Quakers draw a conclusion from it by the help of the 
words of St. James. This apostle, in his letter to the dispersed 
tribes, which were often at war with each other, as well as with the 
Eomans, says, "From whence come wars and fightings among you? 
Come they not hence even of your lusts that war in your members ?" 
But if wars come from the lusts of men, then the Quakers say that 
those who have subdued their lusts can no longer engage in them 
or in other words, that true christians, being persons of this descrip- 
tion, or being such, according to St. Paul, as are redeemed out of 
what St. James calls the very grounds and occasions of wars, can no 
longer fight. And as this proposition is true in itself, so the Quak- 
ers conceive the converse of it to be true also ; for if there are per- 



208 APPENDIX. 

sons, on the other hand, who deliberately engage in the wars and 
fightings of the world, it is a proof that their lusts are not yet sub- 
jugated, or tliat, though they may l)e nominal, they are not yet 
arrived at the stature of true or of full grown christians. 

A third quotation, made by the Quakers, is taken from St. Paul 
exclusively. "jSTow if any man have not the spirit of Christ, he 
is none of his." That is, if men have not the same disposition 
which Jesus Christ manifested in the different situations of his life, 
the same spirit of humility and forbearance, and of love, and of for- 
giveness of injuries, or if they do not follow him as a pattern, or if 
they do not act as he would have done on any similar occasion, they 
are not christians. Xow they conceive, knowing what the spirit 
of Jesus was by those things which have been recorded of him, that 
he could never have been induced or compelled, by any earthly con- 
sideration or power, to have engaged in the wars of the world. 
They are aware that his mission, wliich it became him to fulfil, and 
which engrossed all his time, would not have allowed him the oppor- 
tunity of a military life. But they believe, independently of this, 
that the spirit which he manifested upon earth would have been 
of itself a sufficient bar to such an employment. This they judge 
from his opinions and his precepts. For how could he have taken 
up arms to fight, who enjoined in the new dispensation that men 
were not to resist evil; that they were to love their enemies, that 
they were to bless those who cursed them, and to do good to those 
who hated them? This they judge also from his practice. For 
how could he have lifted up his arm against another, who, "when he 
was reviled, reviled not again ;" and who, in his very agony upon the 
cross, prayed for his persecutors, saying, "Father, forgive them, for 
they know not what they do." But if Jesus Christ could not have 
been induced or compelled to have engaged in a profession which 
would have subjected him to take away the life of another, so 
neither can any christian, "for if a man have not the spirit of 
Christ, he is none of his." 

An amusing as well as interesting story, which has a bearing 
ui)on this tenet, is told of a minister among Friends of more recent 
date, in a volume entitled "Southern Heroes." 

Owing to his popularity and activity in the temperance work, Eli 
Jones was elected by a large majority to the State Legislature of 
Maine, in 1854. The election was very unexpected to him, as he had 
not sought the place; but having been chosen largely on account of 





JOHN CARTER 



ALLEN U. TOMLINSON 





JOHN B. CRENSHAW 



I8HAM COX 



APPENDIX. 209 

his temperance principles, he said he wou]|d see what he could do 
"to help put new teeth into the old law," and much credit is due to 
him for the existence of the "Maine Liquor Law." 

When the time came to be sworn in as a member of the House, 
Eli Jones alone kept his seat while the others swore to do their 
duty. Then he arose and "affirmed" to the governor that he would 
faithfull}^ perform the duties of his office. 

Although he worked on important committees and was diligent 
in other duties of his office, he never addressed the House. Some 
of the members who knew his ability arranged a plan to call forth 
a speech from him. In the course of the session it became neces- 
sary to appoint a Major-General to the second division of the 
Maine militia. In 1838, Maine had undertaken by force of arms 
to assert her right to a region near her northern boundary, claimed 
l)y both her and Canada. There was much mustering of troops at 
the capital, and fully ten thousand soldiers marched through the 
deep snow and fierce cold to drive the enemy from Aroostook 
County. Though they were l^rave and ready for battle, happily no 
blood was shed, and peace was wisely made. But the "Aroostook 
War" became famous as a subject of banter, and many jokes were 
made at the expense of the officers. The old nursery rhyme was 
quoted : 

"The King of Prance, with twice ten thousand men. 
Marched up the hill, and then — marched down again." 

Primarily for these two reasons — to urge Eli Jones to his feet, 
and to joke the former officers by appointing a Quaker, an avowed 
peace advocate — he was unanimously chosen to fill the vacancy of 
Major-General. 

The nomination was so entirely unexpected by Eli Jones that he 
was at first perplexed by the situation. He saw that much Avas at 
stake, and that wisdom and caution were needed. Having his 
horse at Augusta, he drove that night to his home at Dirigo, fifteen 
miles away, chiefly, perhaps, to discuss the situation with his be- 
loved Sibyl and the Friends most suitable for counsel. After talk- 
ing far into the night with his brother-in-law, James Van Blarcom, 
he walked the floor alone until the new dav was daT\Tiing-. 

Upon reaching Augusta again, he found the occasion far more 
important than he had anticipated. The news had spread that the 
Quaker was to speak in regard to his appointment, and the Hall 



210 APPENDIX. 

of the Ixeprosentativos was crowded. Not only were most of the 
members of the Senate present, but many other citizens. The sul)- 
ject of the appointment was introduced, and Eli Jones spoke in 
substance as follows: 

"Whatever my andjitions may have been in times pa'^t, my aspira- 
tions have never embraced such an office as this as an object of 
desire. I can assure the House that my election as Major-General 
was an honor wholly unexpected. It is true that when the gov- 
ernor announced to the House the existence of the vacancy, a mem- 
ber privately remarked to me, 'I shall vote for you;' luit I replied, 
declining the honor, and jDroposed to return the compliment. 

"To my mind there is something ominous in this occurrence. 
I regard it as one of the developments of the times. Who of us. 
when assembled ten years ago, in quiet and retired places, to affix 
our signatures to pledges of abstinence from intoxicating drinks, 
would have believed that in 1855 we should be elected to the seats 
we now occupy, amid the overwhelming rejoicings of the people, 
and pledged to support the Maine Law? ^Vllo that at that time 
had visited the plantations of the South and seen the slave toiling 
under the lash of the taskmaster, would have believed that in 1855 
the people of the larger portion of this great land would have 
roused with stern determination to subdue the encroachments of 
the slave power, and have pledged themselves never to cease their 
labors until the wrongs of slavery should be ameliorated — nay, 
'inore, until slavery itself should be abolished? 

"Still more wonderful ! Wlio would have believed that the State 
of Maine, which a few years since gloried in an Aroostook expe- 
dition, and was noisy with militant training and the noise of arms, 
would, in 1855, exhibit the spectacle of a peaceable member of 
tlie Society of Friends being elected to the post of Major-General 
of a division of the militia, and that, too. by the representatives in 
their legislative capacity ? 

"But I have endeavored to regulate my own conduct liy the 
principle that legislation should not go very far in advance of pub- 
lic sentiment, and it seems to me that this election may possibly 
be ahead of that sentiment. J therefore submit this suggestion 
in all candor. 

"It is generally understood that I entertain peculiar views in 
respect to the policy of war. If, however, I am an exponent of the 



APPENDIX. 211 

views of the Legislature on that suhject, T will cheerfully under- 
take to serve the State in the capacity indicated. With much 
pleasure I shall stand before the militia of the second division and 
give such orders as I think best. The first would be, 'Ground 
arms.' The second would be, 'Eight about face; beat your swords 
into plowshares and your spears into pruning-hooks, and learn war 
no more." I should then dismiss evers^ man to his farm and to 
his merchandise, with an admonition to read daily at his fireside 
the Xew Testament, and ponder upon its tidings of 'Peace on earth, 
good will toward men.' 

"If, on the other hand, it should be determined that my election 
is a little in advance of the times, I am willing, as a good citizen, 
to bow to the majesty of the law, and, as a member of the Legisla- 
ture, to consult its dignity and decline the exalted position ten- 
dered me by the House — and I will now decline it. With pleasure 
I now surrender to the House this trust and the honor, and retire 
to private life." 

This speech was delivered amid interruptions of loud applause, 
and made a great sensation throughout the State ; and not in Maine 
only, but it was commented on by many of the newspapers, and 
appeared in the columns of English journals. 

The fourth and last tenet of the Quakers is on the subject of the 
unlawfulness of a pecuniary maintenance of a gospel ministry. 

In explaining this tenet, I am aware that I am treading upon 
delicate ground. The great majority of christians have determined 
that the spiritual laborer is worthy of his hire; that if men re- 
linquish the usual occupations by which a livelihood is obtained, 
in order that they may devote themsel,ves to the service of religion, 
they are entitled to a pecuniary maintenance ; and that, if they pro- 
duce a rich harvest from what they sow, they are of all men, con- 
sidering their usefulness to man to be greater in this than in any 
other service they can render him, the most worthy of encourage- 
ment and support. I am aware also of the possibility of giving 
offence to some in the course of the explanation of this tenet. To 
these I can only say, that I have no intention of Imrting the feel- 
ings of any; that in the church there are those whom I esteem and 
love, and whom of all others I should be sony to offend. Bat it 
must be obvious to these, and indeed to all, that it is impossible for 
me in writing a history of the manners and opinions of the Quak- 



212 APPENDIX. 

ers, to pass over in silence the tenet that is now before mo; and if 
I notice it, they must be sensible that it becomes me to state fully 
and fairlv all the aromnents which the Quakers give for the differ- 
ence of opinion, which they manifest from the rest of their fellow 
citizens, on tliis subject. 

It does not appear then, the Quakers say, by any records that can 
be produced, that Jesus Christ ever received any payment for the 
doctrines which he taught, neither does it appear, as far as his own 
instructions, which are recorded by the evangelists, can be collected 
on this subject, that he considered any pecuniary stipend as 
necessary or proper for those who are to assist in tlie promotion 
of his religion. 

Jesus Christ, on the erection of his gospel ministry, gave rules 
to his disciples how they were to conduct themselves in the case 
before us. He enjoined the twelve, before he sent them on this 
errand, as we collect from St. Matthew and St. Luke, that, "as they 
had received freely, so tliey were to give freely ; that they were to 
provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass in their purses, nor scrip, 
nor other things for their journey; for the workman was worthy 
of his meat." And, on their return from their mission, he asked 
them, "^AHien I sent you without purse, and scrip, and shoes, lacked 
ye anything? And they said nothing. Then said he unto them, 
But now he that hath a purse let him take it, and likewise his 
scrip.'' 

In a little time aftenvards, Jesus Christ sent out other seventy 
as disciples, to vrhom he gave instructions similar to the former, 
that they should not take scrip, clothes, and money with them. 
But to these he said additionally, that wheresoever they were re- 
ceived, they were to cat such things as were given them ; but where 
they were not received, they were to go their way, and say, Even the 
dust of your city, which cleaveth on us. we do wipe off against you." 
And as on that occasion he compared the ministers of his gospel 
to the laborers, whom a man sends to the harvest, he told them they 
were at lilierty to eat what was set before them, because the lal)orer 
was worthy of his hire. 

Tliis the Quakers conceive to be the substance of all that Jesus 
Christ taught upon this subject. They go therefore next to St. 
Paul for a farther elucidation of it. 

They are of opinion that St. Paul, in his epistle to Timothy, and 



APPENDIX. 



213 



to the Corinthians, and Gahitians, acknowledges the position, that 
the spiritual lahorer is worthy of liis hire. 

The same apostle, however, says, "that if any would not work, 
neither should he eat." From this text the Quakers draw two con- 
clusions, first, that when ministers of the gospel are idle, they are 
not entitled to bodily sustenance; and, secondly, that those only 
who receive them are expected to support them. The same apostle 
says also, "Let him that is taught in the word communicate unto 
him that tcacheth in all good things," l)ut he no where says, "to him 
that teacheth not." 

But though men, who faithfully spend their time in preaching 
the gospel, are entitled to bodily maintenance from those who re- 
ceive them, yet St. Paul, the Quakers say, as far as his own practice 
was concerned, thought it more consistent with the spirit of Chris- 
tianity, and less detrimental to its interests to support himself by 
the labor of his own hands, than to be supported by that of others. 
And he advises others to do the same, and not to make their preach- 
ing chargeable, "not because, says he, we have not power, but to 
make ourselves an ensample to you to follow us." 

This power the Quakers consider ministers of the gospel to abuse, 
who make their preaching chargeable, if by any means they can sup- 
port themselves; for St. Paul says farther, "what is my reward 
then? Verily that, when I preach the gospel, I may make the 
gospel of Christ without charge, that I abuse not my power in the 
gospel." Thus the apostle, they conceive, looks up to God and not 
to men for the reward of his spiritual labors. And the same apostle 
makes it a characteristic of the false teachers, that they make mer- 
chandize of their hearers. 

It is objected to the Quakers on this occasion, that St. Paul re- 
ceived relief from the brethren at Pliilippi, as well as from others, 
when he did not preach. But their reply is, that this relief con- 
sisted of voluntary and affectionate presents sent to him in circum- 
stances of distress. In this case the apostle states, that he never 
desired these gifts, but that it was pleasant to him to see liis relig- 
ious instruction produce a benevolence of disposition that would 
abound to their account. 

St. Peter is the only other person who is mentioned in the New 
Testament as speaking on this subject. Writing to those who had 
been called to the spiritual oversight of the churches, he advises as 



214 APPENDIX. 

follows: '"Feed the flock of God, which iis among you, taking the 
oversight thereof not by constraint hut willingly, not for lilthy 
lucre, but of a ready mind, neither as being lords over God's herit- 
age, but being examples to the Hock. And when the chief Shepherd 
shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away." 
Upon these words the Quakers make three observations : that min- 
isters should not make a gain of the gospel; that they should look 
to God for their reward, and not to men; and that Peter himself 
nmst have preached like St. Paul, without fee or reward, or he 
could not consistently have recommended such a practice to others." 

We may add here that the denomination known niiiong i;s today 
as Primitive Baptists hold to the same tenet as the Quakers in 
respect to paying preachers a stated salary. 

These four tenets it may be remarked are the causes why Quak- 
ers have been so bitterly and relentlessly persecuted. There are 
two great motives which influence unregenerate man more than 
aught else. They are "'interest" and "appetite." Quakerism as- 
sailed both and persecution was inevitable. 



CHAPTER VI. 

THE DRESS OF THE QUAKERS. 

We sluill now see why the Quakers are considered quaint. Vol- 
taire says, "Dress changes the manners," to which the Quakers make 
answer that Regeneration changes the dress, that of a savage into 
one of decency, that of a christian into one of simplicity. 

Quoting from the same volume, the author has this to say: 

T have now explained, in a very ample manner, the moral educa- 
tion and disci])linc' of the Quakers. I shall [)roceed to the explana- 
tion of such customs as seem peculiar to them as a society of chris- 
tians. 

The dress of the Quakers is the first custom of this luiture that I 
propose to notice. They stand distinguished by means of it from 
all other religious bodies. The men wear neither lace, frills, ruffles, 
swords, nor any of the oruaments used by the fashionaI)le world. 
The women wear neither lace, flounces. la])])ets, rings, bracelets, 



APPENDIX. 



215 



necklaces, ear rings, nor anything Ijclonging to this chiss. Both 
sexes are also particular in tlie choice of the color of their clothes. 
All gay colors such as red, blue, green, and yellow, are exploded. 
Dressing in this manner, a Quaker is known by his apparel through 
the whole kingdom. This is not the case Avith any other individuals 
of the island, except the clergy ; and these, in consequence of black 
garments worn by persons on account of the death of their rela- 
tions, are not always distinguished from others. 

I know of no custom among the Quakers which has more excited 
the curiosity of the world, than this of their dress, and none in 
which they have been more mistaken in their qonjectures concern- 
ing it. 

In the early times of the English history, dress had been fre- 
quently restricted by the government. Persons of a certain rank 
and fortune were permitted to wear only clothing of a certain kind. 
But these restrictions and distinctions were gradually broken down, 
and people, as they were able and willing, launched out into unlim- 
ited extravagance in their dress. The fifteenth and sixteenth cen- 
turies, and down from thence to the time when the Quakers first 
appeared, were periods particularly noticed for prodigality in the 
use of apparel, there was nothing too expensive or too preposterous 
to be worn. Our ancestors, also, to use an ancient quotation, "were 
never constant to one color or fashion two months to an end." We 
can have no idea by the present generation, of the folly in such 
respects, of these early ages. But these follies were not confined 
to the laity. Affectation of parade, and gaudy clothing, were ad- 
mitted among many of the clergy, who incurred the severest invec- 
tives of the poets on that account. The ploughman, in Chaucer's 
Canterbury Tales, is full upon this point. He gives us the follow- 
ing description of a priest : 

"That hye on horse wylleth to ride. 
In glytter ande gold of great arraye, 
T painted and pertred all in pryde, 
iSTo common knyght may go so gaye; 
Chaunge of clothying every daye. 
With golden gyrdles great and small, 
As boysterous as is here at baye ; 
All suche falshed mote nede fall." 



216 -APPENDIX. 

To tills he adds, that many of them liad more than one or two 
mitres, embellished with pearls, like the head of a queen, and a staff 
of gold set with jewels, as heavy as lead. He then speaks of their 
appearing out of doors with broad bucklers and long swords, or with 
baldries about their necks, instead of stoles, to which their basel- 
lards were attached. 

"Bucklers brode and sweardes longe, 
Baudryke with baselards kene." 

He then accuses them of wearing gay gowns of scarlet and green 
colors, ornamented with cut work, and for the long pykes upon their 
shoes. 

But so late as the year 1G52 we have the following anecdote of 
the whimsical dress of a clergyman. John Owen, Dean of Christ 
church, and vice-chancellor, of Oxford, is represented as wearing 
a lawn band, as having his hair powdered and his hat curiously 
cocked. He is discribed also as wearing Spanish leather boots with 
lawn tops, and snake bone band strings, with large tassels, and a 
large set of ribbands, pointed at his knees with points or tags at 
the end. And much al)out the same time, when Charles the second 
was at Newmarket, Nathaniel Vincent, doctor of divinity, fellow of 
Clarehall, and chaplain in ordinary to his majesty, preached before 
him. But the king was so displeased with the foppery of this 
preachers dress, that he commanded the duke of Monmouth, then 
chancellor of the university, to cause the statutes concerning 
decency of apparel among the clergy to be put into execution, which 
was accordingly done. These instances are sufficient to show that 
the taste for preposterous and extravagant dress must have operated 
like a contagion in those times, or the clergy would scarcely have 
dressed themselves in this ridiculous and censurable manner. 

But although this extravagance was found among many orders 
of society at the time of the appearance of George Fox, yet many 
individuals had set their faces against the fashions of the world. 
These consisted principally of religious people of different denomi- 
nations, most of whom were in the middle classes of life. Such 
persons were found in plain and simple habits notwithstanding the 
contagion of the example of their superiors in rank. The men of 
this description generally wore plain round hats with common 
crowns. They had discarded the sugar-loaf-hat, and the hat turned 



APPENDIX. 



217 



up with a silver clas]) on one side, as well as all ornaments belong- 
ing to it, such as pictures, feathers, and bands of various colors. 
They had adopted a plain suit of clothes. They wore cloaks, when 
necessary, over these. But both the clothes and the cloaks were of 
the same color. The color of each of them were either drab or gray. 
Other people who followed the fashions, wore white, red, green, 
yellow, violet, scarlet and other colors, which were expensive, be- 
cause they were principally dyed in foreign parts. The drab con- 
sisted of the white wool undyed, and the grey of the white wool 
mixed with black, which was undyed also. These colors were then 
the colors of the clothes, because they were the least expensive, of 
the peasants of England, as they are now of those of Portugal and 
Spain. They had discarded also, all ornaments, such as of lace, or 
bunches of ribands at the knees, and their buttons were generally 
of alchymy, as this composition was then termed, or of the same 
color as their clothes. 

The grave and religious women also, like the men, had avoided 
the fashions of their times. These had adopted the cap and the 
black hood for their head-dress. The black hood had been long the 
distinguishing mark of a grave matron. All prostitutes, so early as 
Edward the third, had been forbidden to wear it. In after times 
it was celebrated by the epithet of venerable by the poets, and had 
been introduced by painters as the representative of virtue. When 
fashionable women had discarded it, which was the case in George 
Fox's time, the more sober, on account of these ancient marks of its 
sanctity, had retained it, and it was then common among them. 
With respect to the hair of grave and sober women in those days, 
it was worn plain, and covered occasionally by a plain hat or bonnet. 
They had avoided by this choice those preposterous head dresses and 
bonnets, which none but those who have seen paintings of them, 
could believe ever to have been worn. They admitted none of the 
large ruffs, that were then in use, but chose the plain handkerchief 
for their necks, differing from those of others, which had rich point 
and curious lace. They rejected the crimson satin doublet with 
black velvet skirts, and contented themselves with a plain gown, 
generally of stuff, and of a drab, or grey, or buff, or buffin color, as 
it was called, and faced with buckram. These colors, as I observed 
before, were the colors worn by country people; and were not ex- 
pensive, because they were not dyed. To this gown was added a 



218 APPENDIX. 

green apron. Green aprons had been long worn in England, yet 
at the time I alhide to, they were out of fashion, so as to be ridi- 
euled by the gay. But old fashioned people still retained them. 
Thus an idea of gi-avity was connected with them ; and therefore 
religious and steady women adopted them as the gi-ave and sober 
garments of ancient times. 

It may now be ol;)served that from these religious persons, haljited 
in this manner, in opposition to the fashions of the world, the prim- 
itive Quakers generally sjjrung. George Fox himself wore the plain 
grey coat that has been noticed, with alchymy buttons, and a plain 
leather girdle al)out his waist. When the Quakers therefore first 
met in religious union they met in these simple clothes. They 
made no alteration in their dress on account of their new religion. 
They prescribed no form or color as distingiiishing marks of their 
sect, but they carried with them the plain habits of their ancestors 
into the new society, as the habits of the grave and sober people of 
their own times. 



CHAPTER YIT. 

THEIR FORMS OF SPEECH. 

Another peculiarity of the Quakers is their language, especially in 
regard to the pronoun "thou." That our readers may fully under- 
stand why they use this form of speech, we again quote from tlie 
same lucid author. 

As the Quakers are distinguishable from their fellow-citizens by 
their dress, as was am])ly shown in a former chapter, so they are no 
less distinguishable from them by the peculiarities of their 
language. 

George Fox seemed to look at every custom with the eye of a 
reformer. The language of the countrv. as used in his own times, 
struck him as having many censurahle defects. Many of the ex- 
pressions, then in use, appeared to him to contain gross flattery, 
others to be idolatrous, others to be false representatives of the 
ideas they were intended to convey. Now he considered that Chris- 
tianity required truth, and he l)elieved therefore that lie and his 
followers, who professed to bo christians in word and deed, and to 
follow the christian pattern in all things, as far as it could be found, 
were called upon to depart from all censurable modes of speech,. 



APPENDIX. 



219 



as much as they were from any of the customs of the world, which 
Christianity had deemed objectionable. And so weighty did these 
improprieties in his own language lie upon his mind, that he con- 
ceived himself to have had an especial commission to correct them. 

The first alteration, which he adopted, was the use of the pro- 
noun thou. The pronoun you, which grammarians had fixed to be 
of the plural nimiber, was then occasionally used, but less than it 
is now, in addressing an individual. George Fox therefore adopted 
thou in its place on this occasion, leaving the word you to be used 
only where two or more individuals were addressed. 

George Fox however was not the first of the religious writers, 
who had noticed the improper use of the pronoun you. Erasmus 
employed a treatise in showing the propriety of thou when ad- 
dressed to a single person, and in ridiculing the use of you on the 
same occasion. Martin Luther also took great pains to expunge 
the word you from the station which it occupied, and to put thou in 
its place. In his Ludus, he ridiculed the use of the former by the 
following invented sentence, "Magister, Vosestis iratus ?" This is as 
absurd, as if he had said in English, "Gentlemen, art thou angry." 

But though George Fox was not the first to reconnnend the sulj- 
stitution of thou for you, he was the first to reduce this amended 
use of it to practice. This he did in his own person, wherever he 
went, and in all the works which he published. All his followers 
did the same. And, from his time to the present, the pronoun 
thou has come down so prominent in the speech of the society, that 
a Quaker is generally known by it at the present day. 

The reader would hardly believe, if historical facts did not prove 
it, how much noise the introduction or rather the amended use of 
this little particle, as reduced to practice by George Fox, made in 
the world, and how much ill usage it occasioned the early Quakers. 
Many magistrates, before whom they were carried in the early times 
of their institution, occasioned their sufferings to be greater merely 
on this account. They were often abused and beaten by others, 
and sometimes put in danger of their lives. It was a common ques- 
tion put to a Quaker in those days, who addressed a great man in 
this new and simple manner, "why you ill bred clown do you thou 
me?" The rich and mighty of those times thought themselves 
degraded by this mode of address, as reducing them from a plural 
magnitude to a singular, or individual^, or simple station of life. 



220 APPENDIX. 

"The use of thou/" says George Fox. "was a sore cut to the proud 
flesh, and those who sought self-honor." 

George Fox, finding that both he and his followers were thus 
subject to much persecution on this account, thought it right the 
world should know, that, in using this little particle which had 
given so much offence, the Quakers were only doing what every 
grammarian ought to do, if he followed his own rules. Accord- 
ingly a Quaker-work was produced, which was written to show 
that in all languages thou was the proper and usual form of speech 
to a single person, and you to more than one. This was exemplified 
b}^ instances taken out of the scriptures, and out of books of teach- 
ing in about thirty languages. Two Quakers of the names of 
John Stubbs and Benjamin Furley, took great pains in compiling 
it; and some additions were made to it by George Fox himself, 
who was then a prisoner in Lancaster castle. 

This work, as soon as it was published, was presented to King 
Charles the second, and to his council. Copies of it were also sent 
to the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Bishop of London, and to each 
of the universities. The King delivered his sentiments upon it 
so far as to say, that thou was undoubtedly the proper language 
of all nations. The Archbishop of Canterbury, when he was asked 
what he thought of it, is described to have been so much 
at a stand, that he could not tell what to say. The book 
was afterwards bought by many. It is said to have spread con- 
viction wherever it went. Hence it had the effect of lessening the 
prejudices of some, so that the Quakers were never afterwards 
treated, on this account, in tlie same rugged manner as they had 
been before. 

But though this book ])rocured the Quakers an amelioration of 
treatment on the amended use of the expression thou, there were 
individuals in the society who thought they ought to put their 
defence on a better foundation, by stating all the reasons, for there 
were many besides those in this book, which had induced them to 
differ from their fellow citizens on this subject. This was done 
both by Eobert Barclay and William Penn in works, which de- 
fended other principles of the Quakers, and other peculiarities in 
their language. 

One of the arguments, by which the iise of the pronoun tliou was 
defended, was the same as that on which it had been defended by 



APPENDIX. 



221 



Stul)bs and Furley, that is, its strict conformity with grammar. 
The transhitors of the Bible had invariably used it. The liturgy 
had been compiled on the same principle. All addresses made by 
English christians in their private prayers to the Supreme Being, 
were made in the language of thou, and not of you. And this wa? 
done because the rules of the English grammar warranted the ex- 
pression, and because any other mode of expression would have been 
a violation of these rules. 

But the great argument (to omit all others) which Penn and 
Barclay insisted upon for the change of you, was that the pronoun 
thou, in addressing an individual, had been anciently in use, but 
that it had been deserted for you for no other purpose than that of 
flattery to men ; and that this dereliction of it was gi'owing greater 
and greater, upon the same principle, in their own times. Hence 
as christians, who were not to puff up the fleshly creature, it became 
them to return to the ancient and grammatical use of the pronoun 
thou, and to reject this growing fashion of the world. "The word 
you," says William Penn, "was first ascribed in the way of flattery, 
to proud Popes and Emperors, imitating the heathens' vain hom- 
age to their gods, thereby ascribing a plural honor to a single per- 
son, as if one Pope had been made up of many gods, and one 
Emperor of many men ; for which reason you, only to be addressed 
to many, became first spoken to one. It seemed the word thou 
looked like too lean and thin a respect; and therefore some, bigger 
than they should be, would have a style suitable to their own 
ambition." 

Another alteration that took place in the language of the Quak- 
ers, was the expunging of all expressions from their vocabulary, 
which were either superfluous or of the same flattering tendency as 
the former. 

In addressing one another, either personally or by letter, they 
made use of the word friend, to signify the bond of their own union, 
and the character, which man, under the christian dispensation, 
was bound to exhibit in dealings with his fellow-man. They ad- 
dressed each other also, and spoke of each other by their real names. 
If a man's name was Jolin, they called him John; they talked to 
him as John, and added only his surname to distinguish him from 
others. 

In their intercourse with the world they adopted the same mode 



222 APPENDIX. 

of speocli, for they addressed indi\iduals either by their phiin 
names, or they made use of the appellations of friends or neighbors. 

They rejected the word sir or madam, as then in use. Tliis they 
did, because they considered them like the word you, as remnants 
of ancient flattery, derived from the papal and anti-christian ages; 
and because these words still continued to be considered as titles of 
flattery, that puffed up people in their own times. Howell, who 
was before quoted on the pronoun thou, is usually quoted hx the 
Quakers on this occasion also. He states in his history, that "sir 
and madam were originally names given to none but the king, his 
l)rotlier and their wives, l)oth in France and England. Yet now the 
ploughman in France is called sir and his wife madam; and men of 
ordinary trades in England sir and their wives dame, which is the 
legal title of a lady and is the same as madame in French. So 
prevalent hath pride and flattery been in all ages, the one to give 
and the other to receive respect." 

The Quakers banished also the word master, or mister as it is now 
pronounced, from their language, either when they spoke concern- 
ing any one, or addressed any one by letter. To have used the 
word master to a person, who was no master over them, would 
have been, they considered, to have indicated a needless servility, 
and to have given a false picture of their own situation, as well as 
of those addressed. 

Upon the same or similar principles they hesitated to subscribe 
themselves as the humble or obedient servants of any one, as is now 
usual, at the bottom of their letters. "Horrid apostacy," says 
Barclay, "for it is notorious that the use of these compliments im- 
plies not any design or service." This expression in particular they 
reprobated for another reason. Tt was one of those which had 
followed the last degree of impious services and expressions, 
which had poured in after the statues of the emperors had 
been worsiiip|)e(l, after tlie titles of eternity and divinity had been 
ushered in, and after thou had been exchanged for you, and it had 
taken a certain station and flourished among these. CJood chris- 
tians, however, had endeavored to keep themselves clear of such 
inconsistencies. Casaubon has preserved a letter of Paulinus. 
■ Bishop of ISTola, in which he rebukes Sulpicius Severus for having 
subscribed himself "his humble servant." A part of the letter runs 
thus: "Take heed, hereafter, how thou, being from a servant called 



APPENDIX. 223 

-unto liberty, doth subscribe thyself servant to one wlio is thy brother 
and fellow servant; for it is a sinful flattery, not a testament of 
humility, to pay those honors to a man and to a sinner, which are 
due to the one Lord, one Master and one God." 

The Quakers also banished from the use of their society all those 
modes of expression which were considered as marks or designations 
of honor among men. Hence, in addressing any peer of the realm, 
they never used the common formula of "my lord," for, though the 
peer in question might Justly be the lord of many possessions, and 
tenants, and servants, yet he was no lord over their heritages or 
persons. Neither did they ever use the terms excellency, or grace, 
or honor, upon similar occasions. They considered that the bestow- 
ing of these titles might bring them under the necessity of uttering 
what might be occasionaly false. "For the persons," says Barclay, 
"obtaining these titles, either by election or hereditarily, may fre- 
quently be found to have nothing really in them deserving them, 
or answering to them, as some, to whom it is said, 'your excellency 
may have nothing of excellency in them, and he who is called your 
grace may be an enemy to grace, and he who called your honor may 
be base and ignoble.' " They considered also, that they might be 
setting up the creature, by giving him the titles of the Creator, so 
that he might think more higlily of himself than he ought, and 
more degi-adingiy than he ought of the rest of the human race. 

But, independently of these moral considerations, they rejected 
these titles, because they believed that Jesus Christ had set them an 
example by his own declarations and conduct on a certain occasion. 
\Yhen a person addressed him by the name of good master, he was 
rebuked as having done an improper thing. "Why," says our 
Saviour, "callest thou me good ? There is none good but one, tliat 
is God." This censure they believed to have been passed upon 
him, because Jesus Christ knew, that when he addressed him by 
this title, he addressed him, not in his divine nature or capacity, 
but only as a man. 

But Jesus Christ not only refused to receive such titles of dis- 
tinction himself in his human nature, but on another occasion ex- 
horted his followers to shun them also. They were not to be like 
the Scribes and Pharisees, who wished for high and eminent dis- 
tinctions, that is, to be called Eabbi Rabb of men ; but, says he, "be 
ye not called Eabbi, for one is your master, even Christ, and all ye 



224 APPENDIX. 

are brethren;" and he makes the desire which he discovered in the 
Jews, of seeking after w^orldly instead of heavenly honors, to be 
one cause of their infidelity towards Christ, for that such could not 
believe, as received honor from one another, and sought not the 
honor whicii conieth from God only; that is, that those persons, who 
courted earthly honors, could not have that humility of mind, that 
spirit that was to be of no reputation in the world, which was 
essential to those who wished to become the followers of Christ. 

These considerations, both those of a moral nature and those of 
the example of Jesus Christ, weighed so much with the early Quak- 
ers that they made no exceptions, even in favor of those of royal 
dig-nity or of the rulers of their own land. George Fox wrote 
several letters to gi-eat men. He w^ote twice to the king of Poland, 
three or four times to Oliver Cromwell, and several times to Charles 
the second ; but he addressed them in no other manner than by their 
plain names or by simple titles, expressive of their situations as 
rulers or kings. 

These several alterations, which took place in the language of the 
early Quakers, were adopted by their several successors and are in 
force in the society at the present day. 

Another alteration, which took place in the language of the Quak- 
ers, was the disuse of the common names of the days of the week, 
and those of the months of the year. 

The names of the days were considered to be of heathen origin. 
Sunday had been so called by the Saxons, because it was the day 
on which they sacrificed to the sun. Monday on which they sacri- 
ficed to the moon. Tuesday to the god Tuisco. Wednesday to the 
god Woden. Thursday to the god Thor, and so on. Now when the 
Quakers considered that Jehovah had forbidden the Israelites to 
make mention even of the names of other gods, they thought it 
inconsistent in christians to continue to use the names of heathen 
idols for the common divisions of their time, so that these names 
must be almost always in their moutlis. They thought, too, that 
they were paying a homage, in continuing the use of them, tluU 
bordered on idolatry. They considered also as neither ]\Ionday nor 
Tuesday nor any other of these days were days in which these sacri- 
fices were now offered, they were using words whicli conveyed false 
notions of things. ITence they determined upon the disuse of 
these words, and to put other names in their stead. The nu- 



APPENDIX. 225 

merical way of naming the days seemed to them to be the most 
rational and the most innocent. They called therefore Sunday the 
first day. ^Monday the second, Tuesday the third, and so on to Satur- 
day, which was of course the seventh. They used no other names 
but these, either in their conversation or in their letters. 

Upon the same principles they altered the names of the months 
also. These, such as March and June, which had been so named 
by the ancient Eomans because they were sacred to Mars and Juno, 
were exploded because they seemed in the use of them to be express- 
ive of a kind of idolatrous homage. Others again were exploded 
because they were not the representatives of the truth. Septem- 
ber, for example, means the seventh month from the storms. It 
took this seventh station in the calendar of Komulus, and it desig- 
nated there its own station as well as the reason of its name. But 
when it lost its place in the calendar by the alteration of the style 
in England, it lost its meaning. It became no representative of 
its station nor any representative of the truth, for it still continues 
to signify the seventh month, whereas it is made to represent, or to 
stand in the place of the ninth. The Quakers therefore banished 
from their language the ancient names of the months, and, as they 
thought they could not do better than they had done in the case of 
the days, they placed numericals in their stead. They called Janu- 
ary the first month, February the second, March the third, and so 
on to December, which they called the twelfth. Thus the Quaker 
calendar was made up by numerical distinctions, which have con- 
tinued to the present day. 

Another alteration, which took place very generally in the 
language of the Quakers, was the rejection of the word saint when 
they spoke either of the apostles, or of the primitive fathers. The 
papal authority had canonized these. This they considered to be 
an act of idolatry, and they thought they should be giving sanction 
to superstition, if they continued the use of such a title, either in 
their speech or Avritings. After this, various other alterations took 
place according as individuals among them thought it right to 
expunge old expressions, and to substitute new; and tliese altera- 
tions were adopted by the rest, as they had an opinion of those who 
used them, or as they felt the propriety of doing it. Hence new 
phrases came into use, different from those which were used by the 
world on the same occasions; and these were gradually spread till 



226 APPENDIX. 

thev bec-ame incorpoi-ated into the language of the society. Of 
these tlie following examples may suffice. 

It is not usual with Quakers to use the words lucky or fortunate, 
in the way in which many others do. If a Quaker had been out on 
a Journey, and had experienced a number of fine days, he would 
never say that he had been lucky in his weather. In the same 
manner if a Quaker had recovered from an indisposition, he would 
never say, in speaking of the circumstance, that he had fortunately 
recovered, l)ut he would say, that he had recovered, and "that it was 
a favor." Luck, chance, or fortune are allowed by the Quakers to 
have no power in the settlement of human affairs 

It is not usual with Quakers to beg ten thousand pardons, as 
some of the world do, for any little mistake. A Quaker generally 
on such an occasion asks a person's excuse. 

The Quakers never make use of the expression "christian name." 
This name is called christian by the world, because it is the name 
given to children in baptism, or in other words, when they are 
christened, or when they are initiated as christians. But the Quak- 
ers are never baptized. They have no belief that water baptism 
can make a christian, or that it is any true mark of membership 
with the christian church. Hence a man's christian name is called 
by them his first name, because it is the first of the two. or of any 
other number of names that may belong to him. 

The Quakers, on meeting a person, never say "good morrow," be- 
cause all days are equally good. Nor in parting with a person at 
night, do they say "good evening," for a similar reason, but they 
make use of the expression of "farewell." 

I might proceed, till I m.ade a little vocabulary of Quaker ex- 
pressions; but this is not necessary, and it is not at all consistent 
with my design. T shall therefore only observe, that it is expected 
of Quakers, that they should use the language of the society; that 
they should substitute thou for you; that they should discard all 
flattering titles and expressions; and that they should adopt the 
numerical, instead of the heathen names, of the days and months. 
George Fox gave the example himself in all these instances. Those 
of the society who depart from this usage are said by the Quakers 
to depart from "the plain language." 

The Quakers were certainly a consistent people and carried this 
jewel wherever they went — in the palace of the rich as well as the 



APPENDIX. 227 

cottage of the poor. The same reasons which led them to discard 
the use of "you" for "thou," also led them to keep their hats on 
when in the presence of those to whom their taking them off would 
be a mark of honor to which they were not entitled. An amusing 
instance of this occurred in the case of Fox himself. 

W^ien George Fox, and two other friends, were brought out of 
Launceston gaol, to be tried before judge Glynn, who was then 
chief justice of England, they came into court with their hats on. 
The judge asked them the reason of this, but they said nothing. He 
then told them that the court commanded them to pull off their 
hats. Upon this George Fox addressed them in the following 
manner: "Where, says he, did ever any magistrate, king or judge, 
from Moses to Daniel, command any to pull off their hats when 
they came before them in their courts, either amongst the Jews, who 
were God's people, or among the heathen? And if the law of 
England doth command any such thing, show me that law, either 
written or printed." Judge Glynn upon tliis grew angry, and 
replied that "he did not carry his law books upon his back." But 
says George Fox, "tell me where it is printed in any statute book, 
that I may read it." The judge in a very \nilgar manner, ordered 
him away, and he was accordingly taken away, and put among 
thieves. The judge, however, in a short time afterwards ordered 
him up again, and, on his return, put to him the following question. 
"Come," says he, "where had they hats from Moses to Daniel? 
Come, answer me. I have you fast now." George Fox replied, 
that "lie might read in the third chapter of Daniel, that the three 
children were cast into the fiery furnace by Nebuchadnezzar's com- 
mand, with their coats, their hose, and their hats on." The repe- 
tition of this apposite text stopped the judge from any further com- 
ments on the custom, and he ordered him and his companions to 
be taken away again. And they were accordingly taken away and 
they were thrust again among thieves. In process of time, however, 
this custom of the Quakers began to be known among the judges, 
who so far respected their scruples as to take care that their hats 
should be taken off in future in the courts. 

These omissions of the ceremonies of the world, as begun by the 
primitive Quakers, are continued by the modern. They neither 
bow nor scrape, nor pull off their hats to any, by way of civility or 
respect, and they carry their principles like their predecessors, so 



228 APPENDIX. 

far. that tliev observe none of these exterior parts of politeness even 
in the presence of royalty. The Quakers are in the habit on par- 
ticular occasions of sendings deputies to the king. And it is 
remarkable that his present majestv always sees them himself, if 
he be well, and not by proxy. Notwithstanding this, no one in the 
deputation ever pulls off his hat. Those, however, who are in 
waiting in the anti-chamber, knowing this custom of the Quakers, 
take their hats from their heads before they enter the room where 
the king is. On entering the room they neither bow nor scrape nor 
kneel, and as this ceremony cannot be performed for tliem by others, 
they go into the royal presence in a less seiwile, or more dignified 
manner, than either the representatives of sovereigiis or those who 
have humbled nations by the achievements of great victories. 

In the company of the Quakers a circumstance sometimes occurs, 
of so peculiar a nature, that it cannot be well omitted in this place. 
It sometimes happens that you observe a pause in the conversation. 
This pause continues. Surprised at the universal silence now pre- 
vailing, you look around and find all the Quakers in the room 
apparently thoughtful. The history of the circumstance is this. 
In the course of the conversation the mind of some one of the 
persons present has been so overcome with the weight or importance 
of it, or so overcome by inward suggestions or other subjects, as 
to have given himself up to meditation, or to passive obedience to 
the impressions upon his mind. This person is soon discovered by 
the rest on account of his particular silence and gravity. From 
this moment the Quakers in company cease to converse. They 
become habitually silent, and continue so, both old and young, to 
give the apparently meditating person an opportunity of pursuing 
uninteiTuptedly the train of his own thoughts. Perhaps, in the 
course of his meditations, the subject that impressed his mind 
gradually dies away and expires in silence. In this case you find 
him resuming his natural ])osition. and returning to conversation 
with the company as before. It sometimes happens, however, that 
in the midst of his meditations he feels an impulse to communicate 
to those present the subject of his thoughts, and breaks fortli, seri- 
ously explaining, exhorting and advising, as the nature of it permits 
and suggests. \Vlien he has finished his observations, tlie company 
remain silent for a short time, after which they converse again as 
before. 



APPENDIX. 



229 



The Quakers are generally supposed to be a stiff and reserved 
people, and to be a people of severe and uncourteous manners. I 
confess there is something in their appearance that will justify the 
supposition in the eyes of strangers, and of such as do not know 
them; I mean of such as just see them occasionally out of doors, 
but do not mix with them in their own houses. 

It cannot be expected that persons, educated like the Quakers, 
should assimilate much in their manners to other people. The very 
dress they wear, which is so different from that of others, would 
give them a stiff appearance in the eyes of the world, if nothing 
else could be found to contribute towards it. Excluded also from 
much intercourse with the world, and separated at a vast distance 
from it by the singularity of many of their customs, they would 
naturally appear to others to be close and reserved. Neither is it 
to be expected that those, whose spirits are never animated by music, 
or enlivened by the exhibitions of the theatre, or the diversions 
which others follow, would have other than countenances that were 
grave. Their discipline also, which calls them so frequently to 
important duties, and the dispatch of serious business, would pro- 
duce the same feature. I may observe, also, that a peculiarity of 
gait, which might be mistaken for awkardness, might not unreason- 
ably be expected in those, who had neither learned to walk under the 
guidance of a dancing master, nor to bow under the direction of 
the dominion of fashion. If those and those only are to be 
esteemed really polished and courteous, who bow and scrape, and 
salute each other by certain prescribed gestures, then the Quakers 
will appear to have contracted much rust, and to have an indisput- 
able right to the title of a clownish and inflexible people. 

I must observe however that these appearances, though they may 
be substantial in the estimation of those who do not Imow them, 
gradually vanish with those who do. Their hospitality in their 
own houses, and their great attention and kindness, soon force out 
of sight all ideas of uncourteousness. Their freedom also soon 
annihilates those of stiffness and reserve. Their manners, though 
they have not the polish surface of those which are usually attached 
to fashionable life, are agreeable when known. 

There is one trait in the Quaker manners which runs through 
the whole society, as far as I have seen in their houses, and which 
is worthy of mention. The Quakers appear to be particularly 



230 APPENDEX. 

gratified wlien tliose who visit tliem ask for what they want. In- 
stead of considering this as rudeness or intrusion, they esteem it as 
a favor done them. The circumstance of asking, on such an occasion, 
is to them a proof that their visitors feel themselves at home. 
Indeed they ahnost always desire a stranger who has been intro- 
duced to them "to be free." This is their usual expression. And 
if he assures them that he will, and they find him asking for what 
he wishes to have, you may ))receive in their countenances the 
pleasure which his conduct has given them. They consider him, 
when he has used this freedom, to have acted, as they express it, 
"kindly." Nothing can be more truly polite than that conduct to 
another, by which he shall be induced to feel himself as comfortably 
situated as if he were in his own house. 

As the Quakers desire their visitors to be free, and to do as they 
please, so they do not fail to do the same themselves, never regard- 
ing such visitors as impediments in the way of their concerns. 
If they have any business or engagements out of doors, they say so 
and go, using no ceremony and but few words as an apology. Their 
visitors, I mean such as stay for a time in their houses, are left in 
the interim to amuse themselves as they please. This is peculiarly 
agreeable, because their friends know, when they visit them, that 
they neither restrain, nor shackle, nor put them to inconvenience. 
In fact it may be truly said that if satisfaction in visiting depends 
upon a man's own freedom to do as he likes, to ask and call for what 
he wants, to go out and come in as he pleases; and if it depends 
also on the knowledge he has, that, in doing all these things, lie 
puts no person out of his way, there are no houses where people will 
be better pleased with their treatment than in those of the Quakers. 

The Quakers, as a religious body, agree in the propriety of grace 
before their meals, that is, in the propriety of giving thanks to the 
author of every good gift for this particular bounty of his provi- 
dence as to the articles of their daily subsistence, but they differ as 
to the manner and seasonableness of it on such occasions. They 
think that people who are in tlie habit of repeating a determined 
form of words, may cease to feel as they pronounce them, in wliich 
case the grace becomes an ol)lation from the tongue but not from 
the heart. They think also that if grace is to be repeated regularly, 
just as the victuals come, or as regularly and as often as they come 
upon the tal)le, it may be repeated unseasonal)ly, that is unseason- 



APPENDIX. 231 

ably with the state of the heart of him who is to pronounce it; that 
the heart of man is not today as it was yesterday, nor at this hour 
what it was at a former, nor on any given hour alike disposed ; and 
that if this grace is to be said when the heart is gay, or light, or 
volatile, it ceases to be a devotional act, and becomes at least a 
superfluous and unmeaning if not a censurable form. 



CHAPTER Aail. 

INDUCTION AS MINISTERS. 

The manner in which a person, male or female, is inducted into 
the ministry is also peculiar. 

Any member has a right to rise ^^p in the meetings for worsbip, 
and to speak publicly. If any one, therefore, should rise up and 
preach, who has never done so before, he is heard. The congrega- 
tion are all witnesses of his doctrine. The elders, however, who 
may be present, and to whose province it more immediately belongs 
to judge of the fitness of ministers, observe the tenor of his dis- 
course. They watch over it for its authority; that is, they judge 
by its spiritual influence on the mind, whether it be such as corre- 
sponds wdth that which may be persumed to come from the Spirit 
of God. If the new preacher delivers any thing that appears excep- 
tional)le, and continues to do so, it is the duty of the elders to speak 
to him in private, and to desire him to discontinue his services to 
the church. But if nothing exceptionable occurs, nothing is said 
to him, and he is allowed to deliver himself publicly at future meet- 
ings. In process of time, if, after repeated attempts in the office of 
the ministry, the new preacher should have given satisfactory proof 
of his gifts, he is reported to the monthly meeting to which he 
belongs. And this meeting, if satisfied with his ministry, acknow- 
ledges him as a minister, and then recommends him to the meet- 
ing of ministers and elders belonging to the same. No other act 
than this is requisite. He receives no verbal or written appoint- 
ment or power for the execution of the sacerdotal ofiice. It may 
be observed also, that he neither gains any authority, nor loses any 
privilege, by thus becoming a minister of the gospel. Except, while 
in the immediate exercise of his calling, he is only a common mem- 
ber. He receives no elevation by the assumption of any nominal 



232 APPENDIX. 

title, to distinguisli him from the rest. Nor is he elevated by tlio 
prospect of any increase to his worldly goods in consequence of his 
new office, for no minister in this society receives any ])eeuniary 
emolution for his spiritual labors. 

When ministers are thus approved and acknowledged, tliey exor- 
cise the sacred ofHce in public assemblies, as they immediately feel 
themselves influenced to that work. They may engage, also, with 
the approbation of their own monthly meeting, in the work of visit- 
ing such Quaker families as reside in the county, or quarterly meet- 
ing to Avhich they lielong. In this case ' they are sometimes 
accompanied by one of the elders of the church. These visits have 
the name of family visits, and are conducted in the following man- 
ner : 

When a Quaker minister, after having commenced his journey, 
has entered the house of the first family, the individual members 
are collected to receive him. They then sit in silence for a time. 
As he believes himself concerned to speak, he delivers that which 
arises in his mind with religious freedom. The master, the wife, 
and the other l^ranches of the family, are sometimes severally 
addressed. Does the minister feel that there is a departure in any 
of the persons present, from the principles or practice of the society, 
he speaks, if he believes it required of him, to these points. Is 
there any well disposed person under any inward discouragement, 
this person may be addressed in the language of consolation. All 
in fact are exhorted and advised as their several circumstances may 
seem to require. When the religious visit is over, the minister, if 
there be occasion, takes some little refreshment with the family, 
and converses Avith them ; but no light or trifling subject is ever 
entered upon on these occasions. From one family he passes to 
another, till he has visited all the families in the district for whieli 
he had felt a concern. 

A spirit of discernment and ])rop]iocy seems to have characterized 
the ministry of many preachers among Friends, and Mahlon 
Ilockett was noted for speaking to that which was in the minds of 
others, and telling them of their misdeeds. On one occasion tAvo 
ungodly men Avere discussing the manner in Avhich they should 
spend the Sabbath morning, when one of them said, "Let's go and 
hear Avliat oUl Mahlon has to say to-day." iVccordingly they Avent 
to Springfield meeting. Soon after they entered. Mahlon. fasten- 



APPENDIX. 233 

ing his eyes upon them, arose and said, "Well, let's go and hear 
what old Mahlon has to say to-day." He thus gained their atten- 
tion, and proceeded to preach a sermon which was hlesscd to the 
good of their souls. 

On another occasion a woman entered, while he was preaching. 
He stopped a moment, looked at her, and remarked, "Go and carry 
home that filling, and thou shalt have peace of mind." He then 
proceeded with his subject. The woman took home the filling, 
which she had stolen from a neighbor for whom she had been weav- 
ing, confessed her sin, and became a changed character. 

Two of the most remarkable prophecies concerning the civil war 
in this country were made by Joseph Hoag. He was born of Pres- 
byterian parents, in New York, in 1762. He became a Friend and 
minister, and settled at Monkton, A^t. In 1820 he was traveling 
with a companion, on horseback, visiting the meetings of Friends 
in Pennsylvania. As they were riding he suddenly stopped his 
horse; looking around him and then down to the gi'ound, he said 
to liis friend, "My horse's feet are wading in blood, even to the 
fetlocks." Upon this very ground, forty-three years later, was 
fought the terrible battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 2 and 3, 1863. 

Joseph Hoag's wonderful vision concerning the civil war and the 
abolition of slavery was widely published long before the war, but 
it should have a place here. 

VISION OF JOSEPH HOAG. 

"In the year 1803, probably the eighth or ninth month, I was 
alone in the fields and observed that the sun shone clear, but that 
a mist eclipsed the brightness of its shining. As I reflected upon 
the singularity of the event, my mind was drawn into silence the 
most solemn I ever remember to have witnessed, for it seemed as 
if all my faculties were laid low and unusually brought into deep 
solemnity. I said to myself, 'What can all this mean? I do not 
recollect ever before to have been sensible of such feelings,' and I 
heard a voice from Heaven say, 'This that thou seest which dims 
the brightness of the sun, is a sign of the present and coming times. 
I took the forefathers of this country from a land of oppression ; I 
planted them here among the people of the forest; I sustained 
them ; and while they were humble I blessed and fed them, and they 
became a numerous people; but they have now become proud and 



23-i APPENDIX. 

lil'ted up, and have forgotten Me who nourished and protected 
them in the wilderness, and are running into ever}^ abomination 
and evil practice of which the old countries are guilty ; I have taken 
quietude from the land, and suffered a dividing spirit to come 
among them. Lift up thine eyes and behold.' 

''And I saw them dividing in great heat. This division began in 
the church upon points of doctrine. It commenced in the Presby- 
terian Society and went through the various denominations, and 
in its 25 regress and close its effect was nearly the same. Those who 
dissented went off with high heads and taunting language, and 
those who kept to the original sentiment appeared exercised and 
sorrowful. And when this di\dding spirit entered the Society of 
Friends it raged in as high a degree as any I had before discovered ; 
and as before, those who separated went away with lofty looks and 
taunting, censuring language, while those who kept to the ancient 
principles retired by themselves. 

"It next appeared in the lodges of Free Masons, and it broke out 
like a volcano, insomuch that it set the country in an uproar for a 
length of time. Then it entered politics throughout the United 
States, and it did not stop until it produced civil war, and an 
abundance of human blood was shed in the combat. The Southern 
States lost their power, and slavery was annihilated from their 
borders."' 

No one day, in the estimation of the Quakers, can be made 
by human appointment either more holy or more proper for worship 
than another. They do not even believe that the Jewish Sabbath, 
which was by the appointment of God, continues in gospel times, 
or that it has been handed down by divine authority as the true 
Sabbath for christians. All days with the Quakers are equally- 
holy, and all equally proper for the worsliip of God. In this 
opinion they coincide with the ever memorable John Hales. "For 
prayer, indeed," says this venerable man, "was the Sabbath ordain- 
ed, yet prayer itself is Sabbathless, and admits of no rest, no inter- 
mission at all. If our hands l)e clean, we must, as our Apostle 
commands us, lift them up everywhere, at all times, and make every 
place a church, every day a Sabbath-day, every hour canonical. Aa 
you go to the market, as you stand in the streets, as you walk in 
the fields — in all these places you may pray as well, and with as 
good acceptance as in the church ; for you yourselves are teniples^ 



APPENDIX. 



235 



of the holy ghost, if the grace of God be in yon, more precions tliau 
any of those which are made with hands." 

Though, however, the Quakers iDclieve no one day in the sight 
of God to be holier than another, and no one capable of being 
rendered so by human authority, yet they think that christians 
ought to assemble for the public worship of God. They think they 
ought to bear an outward and public testimony for God ; and this 
can only be done by becoming members of a visible church, where 
they may be seen to acknowledge him publicly in the face of men. 
They think, also, that the public worship of God increases, as it 
were, the fire of devotion, and enlarges the sphere of spiritual life 
in the souls of men. "God causes the inward life," says Barclay, 
"the more to abound when his children assemble themselves dili- 
gently together, to wait upon him ; so that as iron sharpeneth iron, 
the seeing the faces of one another, when both are inwardly gathered 
unto the life, giveth occasion for the life secretly to rise, and to 
pass from vessel to vessel ; and as many candles lighted and put in 
one place do greatly augment the light and make it more to shine 
forth, so when many are gathered together into the same life, there 
is more of the glory of God, and his power appears to the refresh- 
ment of each individual; for that he partakes not only of the light 
and life raised in himself, but in all the rest. And therefore 
Christ hath particularly promised a blessing to such as assemble 
in his name, seeing he will be in the midst of them." For these 
and other reasons, the Quakers think it proper that men shot. Id 
be drawn together to the public worship of God; but if so, they 
must be drawn together at certain times. Now, as one day has 
never been, in the eyes of the Quakers, more desirable for such an 
object than another, their ancestors chose the first day in the week, 
because the apostles had chosen it for the religious assembling of 
themselves and their followers. And, in addition to this, that 
more frequent opportunities might be afforded them of bearing 
their outward testimony publicly for God, and of enlarging the 
sphere of their spiritual life, they appointed a meeting on one other 
day in the week in most places, and two in some others, for the 
same purpose. 

They believe that no ground can be made holy, and therefore 
they do not allow the places on which their meeting houses are built 
to be consecrated by the use of any human forms. 



236 APPENDIX. 

Their meeting houses are singularly plain. There is nothiug 
of decoration in the interior of them. They consist of a number 
of plain long benches with backs to them. There is one elevated 
seat at the end of these. This is for their ministers. It is elevated 
for no other reason than that their ministers may be the better 
licard. 

The women occupy one-half of these benches, and sit apart from 
the men. 

These benches are not intersected by partitions. Hence there 
are no distinct jdcws for the families of the rich, or of such as can 
afford to pay for them ; for, in the first place, the Quakers pay noth- 
ing for their seats in their meeting houses ; and, in the second, they 
pay no respect to the outward condition of one another. If they 
consider themselves, when out of doors, as all equal to one another 
in point of privileges, much more do they abolish all distinctions, 
when professedly assembled in a place of worship. They sit, there- 
fore, in their meeting houses undistinguished with respect to their 
outward circumstances, as the children of the same great parent, 
who stand equally in need of his assistance ; and as in the sight of 
Him who is no respecter of persons, but who made of one blood all 
the nations of men who dwell on all the face of the earth. 

The Quaker ministers are not distinguishable, when in their 
places of worship, by their dress. They wear neither black clbthes, 
nor surplices, nor gowns, nor bands. Jesus Christ, when he 
preached to the multitude, is not recorded to have put on a dress 
different from that which he wore on other occasions. Neither do 
the Quakers believe that ministers of the church ought, under the 
new dispensation, to be a separate jieople, as the Levites were, or 
to be distinguished on account of their office from other men. 



CHAPTEE IX. 

THE SACRAMENT AND BAPTISM. 

The Quakers, among other particularities, reject the application 
of water baptism, and the administration of the Sacrament of the 
Supper, as christian rites. 

These ordinances have been considered by many as so essentially 
interwoven with Christianity, that the Quakers, by rejecting the use 
of them, have been denied to be christians. 



APPENDIX. 



237 



But whatever may be the difference of opinion between the 
world and the Quakers, upon these subjects, great indulgence is due 
to the latter on this occasion. People have received the ordinances 
in question from their ancestors. They have been brought up to 
the use of them. They have seen them sanctioned by the workl. 
Finding their authority disputed by a body of men, who are insig- 
nificant as to numbers, when compared with others, they have let 
loose their censure upon them, and this without any inquiry crm- 
cerning the grounds of their dissent. They know perhaps nothing 
of the obstinate contentions, nothing of the difficulties which have 
occurred, and nothing of those which may still be started on these 
subjects. 

On the subject of the sacrament of Supper, similar difficulties 
have occurred. 

Jesus Christ unquestionably permitted his disciples to meet to- 
gether in remembrance of their last supper with him. But it is 
not clear that this was any other than a permission to those who 
were present, and who had known and loved him. The disciples 
were not ordered to go into all nations and to enjoin it to their con- 
verts to observe the same ceremony. Neither did the apostles leave 
any command by which it was enjoined as an ordinance of the chris- 
tian church. 

Another difficulty which has arisen on the subject of the Supper, 
is, that christians seem so little to have understood the nature of 
it, or in what it consisted, that they have had, in different ages, 
different views and encouraged different doctrines concerning it. 
One has placed it in one thing and another in another. Most of 
them, again, have attempted in their explanation of it to blend the 
enjoyment of the spiritual essence with that of the corporeal sub- 
stance of the body and blood of Christ, and thus to unite a spir- 
itual with a ceremonial exercise of religion. Grasping, therefore, 
at things apparently irreconcilable, they have conceived the strang- 
est notions; and, by giving these to the world, they have only 
afforded fuel for contention among themselves and others. 

In the time of the apostles, it was the custom of converted per- 
sons, grounded on the circumstances that passed at the Supper of 
the Passover, to meet in religious communion. They used, on these 
occasions, to break their bread and take their refreshment and con-r 
verse together. The object of these meetings was to imitate the 



238 APPENDIX. 

last friendly supper of Jesus with his disciples, to bear a public 
memorial of his sufferings and death, and to promote their love for 
one another. But this custom was nothing more, as far as evidence 
can be had, than that of a brotherly breaking of bread together. 
It was no sacramental eating. Neither was the body of Jesus sup- 
posed to be enjoyed, nor the spiritual enjoyment of it to consist in 
the partaking of this outward feast. 

In the process of time, after the days of the apostles, when this 
simple custom had declined, we find another meeting of christians, 
in imitation of that at the Passover Supper, at which both bread 
and Avine were introduced. This different commemoration of the 
same event had a new name given to it, for it was distinguished 
from the other by the name of Eucharist. 

Another difficulty, but of a different nature, has occurred with 
respect to the Lord's Supper. This has arisen from the circum- 
stance, that other ceremonies were enjoined by our Saviour in 
terms equally positive as tliis, but which most christians, notwith- 
standing, have thought themselves at liberty to reject. x\mong 
these the washing of feet is particularly to be noticed. This cus- 
tom was of an emblematic nature. It was enjoined at the same 
time as that of the Lord's Supper, and on the same occasion. But 
it was enjoined in a more forcible and striking manner. The 
Sandimanians, when they rose into a society, considered the in- 
junction for this ordinance to be so obligatory that they dared not 
disijense with it, and, therefore, when they determined to celebrate 
the Supper, they determined that the washing of feet should be an 
ordinance of their church. Most other christians, however, have 
dismissed the washing of feet from their religious observance. The 
reason given has principally been, that it was an eastern custom, 
and therefore local. To this the answer has been, that the Passover, 
fi'oni whence the Lord's Supper is taken, was an eastern custom also, 
but tbat it was much moi'e local. Travelers of different nations 
had their feet washed for them in the east. But none but those of 
the circumcision were admitted to the Passover Supper. If, there- 
fore, the injunction relative to the washing of feet be equally strong 
with that relative to the celebration of the Supper, it has been pre- 
sumed that both ought to have been retained, and, if one has been 
dispensed with on account of its locality, that both ought to have 
been discarded. 



APPENDIX, 



239 



In conclusion we will say. that, after having carefully read the 
record of this singular denomination, one cannot fail to be im- 
pressed with their loyalty to the teachings of the Bible, as they 
interpret it. If we were asked, What has Quakerism done for 
humanity ? our answer would be, a great deal. First, The abandon- 
ment of African slavery through its teaching. Secondly, It has 
emphasized the great idea of the fatherhood of God, and the broth- 
erhood of man. Lastly, It calls for "The Simple Life," antedating 
both in theory and practice the burden of this popular book for 
over two hundred and fifty years. Are not the teachings of such 
a church worthy of perpetuation ? We think so. And what is more 
to the point, if the American or any other people wish to practice 
"The Simple Life," let them become conscientious Quakers, and no 
modern novel will be necessary to show them the way. 



APPENDIX II. 



A BRIEF VIEW 

OF THE 

DOCTRINES OF CHRISTIANITY^^ 

AS SET FORTH IN HOLY SCRIPTURE 

AND HELD BY THE 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. 



DECLARATION^ OF FAITH. 

"We believe in God, the Father Almighty, Maker of Heaven and 
earth, and of all things visible and invisible; and in Jesus Christ, 
His only Son, our Lord, by whom He created all things ; and in the 
Holy Ghost, who proceedeth from the Father and the Son; and 
that these three, the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Ghost, are 
one in the Eternal Godhead. 

OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST. 

"We believe that Jesus of Nazareth was conceived of the Holy 
Ghost and born of the Virgin Mary, and that He is the beloved 
and only-begotten Son of God, in whom the Father is well pleased. 
We believe that the eternal Word, who was with God, and was God, 
was made flesh and dwelt among men in the person of Him, our 
Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. "In Him dweUeth all the fulness 
of the God-head bodily." He is the one perfect man, who hath 
fulfilled all righteousness, and who was in all points tempted like 
as we are, yet without sin. 

We believe that He died for our sins, that He was buried, and 
rose again the third day, that He ascended into Heaven, and is on 
the right hand of God, angels and authorities and powers being 
made subject luito Him. He is the one ]\Iediator between God and 
man, our Advocate with the Father, our High-Priest forever, who 
is able to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by Him, 
seeing lie ever livetli to nuike intercession for them. He baptizes 
with the Holy Ghost. He is the Shepherd and Bishop of souls,. 

* Taken from the Book of Discipline of tlie New York Yearly Meeting. 



APPENDIX. 241 

the Head over all things to the Church, the King who reigns in 
righteousness, the Prince of Peace. By Him the world shall be 
judged in rigliteousness, for the Father judgeth no man, but hath 
committed all judgment unto the Son, that all men should honor 
the Son, even as they honor the Father. We believe in the Deity 
and manhood of our Lord Jesus Christ, and that His willing sacri- 
fice upon the cross was the one propitiation and atonement for the 
sins of the whole world, wherein God hath declared His righteous- 
ness, that He might be just, and the justifier of him that believeth 
in Jesus. He is the Lamb of God, without blemish and without 
spot, with whose precious blood we are redeemed. The remission 
of sins which any partake of is only in and by virtue of that most 
satisfactory sacrifice, and no otherwise. 

We reverently confess and believe that divine honor and worship 
are due to the Son of God, and that He is in true faith to be prayed 
unto, and the name of the Lord Jesus Christ called upon, as the 
primitive Christians did, and that we cannot acceptably offer up 
prayers or praises to God, nor receive a gracious answer or blessing 
from Him, but in and through His dear Son. 

THE HOLY SPIRIT. 

We believe that the Holy Ghost is in the unity of the Eternal 
Godhead, one with the Father and the Son ; that He is the promise 
of the Father, whom C!hrist declared He would send in His name; 
that He is come and convicts the world of sin; that He leads to re- 
pentance toward God, and as the Gospel is kno^^ai, to faith in the 
Lord Jesus Christ. Coming in the name and in the authority of 
the risen and ascended Saviour, the Holy Spirit is the most precious 
pledge of His continued love and care. He glorifies the Saviour, 
and takes of the things of Christ and gives them as a realized pos- 
session to the believing soul. He dwells in the hearts of believers 
according to the promise of the Saviour: "I will pray the Father, 
and He shall give you another Comforter, that He may abide with 
you forever." He opens to them the truths of the Gospel as set 
forth in Holy Scripture, and as they exercise faith, guides, sancti- 
fies, comforts, and supports them. 

His light must ever be distinguished, both from the conscience 
which He illumines, and from the natural faculty of reason, which, 
when unsubjected to His holy infiuences, is, in the things of God, 
very foolishness. 



242 APPENDIX. 

Wo believe that the qualification for the Lord's service in the 
enduenieut of power for His work is bestowed on His children 
through the reception and baptism of the Holy Ghost. 

The Holy Spirit is the seal of reconciliation to the humble be- 
liever in Jesus, the earnest and the foretaste of the full commun- 
ion and perfect joy which are reserved for them that endure unto 
the end. 

THE HOLY SCRIPTURES. 

It has ever been, and still is, the l)elief of the Society of Friends 
that the Holy Scriptures of the Old and Xew Testament were given 
by inspiration of God; that, therefore, the declarations contained 
in them rest on the authority of God Himself, and that there can 
be no appeal from them to any other authority whatsoever; that 
they are able to make wise unto salvation, through faith which is in 
Christ Jesus. ''These are written that ye might believe that Jesus 
is the Christ, the Son of God ; and that believing ye might have life 
through His name." The Scriptures are the only divinely author- 
ized record of the doctrines which we are bound as Christians to ac- 
cept, and of the moral principles which are to regulate our actions. 
No one can be required to believe as an article of faith any doctrine 
which is not contained in them, and whatsoever any one says or 
does contrary to the Scriptures, though under profession of the im- 
mediate guidance of the Holy Spirit, must be reckoned and ac- 
counted a delusion of the Devil. 

man's creation and fall. 

It pleased God, in His wisdom and goodness, to create man out 
of the dust of the earth, and to breathe into his nostrils the breath 
of life, so that man became a "living soul,"' formed after the image 
and likeness of God, capable of fulfilling the divine law and of 
holding communion with his Maker. Being free to obey or to dis- 
obey, under the temptation of Satan, through unbelief, he fell into 
transgression, and thereby lost that spiritual life of righteousness 
in which he was created; and so death passed upon him as the in- 
evital)le consequence of his sin. As the children of fallen Adam, all 
mankind bear his image and partake of his nature; and until 
created ancnv in Christ Jesus by the regenerating power of the Holy 
Spirit, they are fallen, degenerated, and dead to the divine life. 

But while we hold these views of the lost condition of man in the 
fall, we rejoice to Ijelieve that sin is not imputed to any until they 



APPENDIX. 243 

transgress tlie divine law after sufficient capacity has been given 
to understand it, and that infants, though inheriting this fallen 
nature, are saved, in the infinite mercy of God, through the re- 
demption which is in Christ Jesus. 

JUSTIFICATION AND SANCTIFICATION. 

"God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten Son, that 
whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting 
life." 

AVe believe that justification is of God's free grace, through which, 
upon repentance and faith. He pardons our sins and accepts us as 
righteous in His sight for the sake of the Lord Jesus Christ; that 
it is received, not because of our works, but of our acceptance of 
God's mercy in Christ Jesus; that through faith in Him and His 
atoning blood, the guilt of sin is taken away and we stand reconciled 
to God. 

We believe that in connection with Justification is Regeneration ; 
that, being reconciled to God by the death of His Son, we are saved 
by His life, a new heart is given and new desires, old things are 
passed away, and we become children of God through faith in Christ 
Jesus. Sanctification, or being made holy, is experienced in con- 
nection with Justification in so far that every pardoned sinner, on 
account of faith in Christ, is clothed with a measure of His right- 
eousness and receives the promised Holy Spirit. 

The provisions of God's grace are sufficient to deliver from the 
power of evil, as well as from the guilt of sin, and to enable His 
believing children always to triumph in Christ. This is to be ex- 
perienced by faith : "according to your faith be it unto you." "Wlio- 
ever submits himself wholly to God, believing His promises, and 
exercises faith in Christ Jesus, will have his heart continually 
cleansed from all sin by His precious blood, and through the re- 
newing, refining power of the Holy Spirit be brought into perfect 
conformity to the will of God, love Him with all his heart, mind, 
soul, and strength, and be able to say with the Apostle Paul : "The 
law of the spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the 
law of sin and death." "This is the will of God, even your sancti- 
fication," and if any fall short of this experience, it is because they 
frustrate the grace of God. 



244: APPENDIX. 

THE RESURRECTIOX AND A FINAL JUDGMENT. 

We believe, according to the Scriptures, that there shall be a 
Eesvirrection of the dead, both of the just and of the unjust, and 
that God hath appointed a day in which He will judge the world 
in righteousness by Jesus Christ, whom He hath ordained. For, 
as saith the apostle, "we must all appear before the Judgment-seat 
of Christ, that every one may receive the things done in his body 
according to that he hath done, whether it l)e good or bad." 

AYe believe that the punishment of the wicked, and the blessed- 
ness of the righteous, sha\l be alike everlasting; according to the 
declaration of our adorable Eedcemer, to whom the judgment is 
committed, "These shall go away into everlasting punishment, but 
the righteous into life eternal." 

BAPTISM. 

"One Lord, one Faith, one Baptism." 

"John answered, saying unto them all. I indeed baptize you with 
water; 1nit one mightier than I cometh, the latchet of whose shoes 
I am not worthy to unloose: He shall baptize you Avith the Holy 
Ghost, and with fire." 

We believe the one baptism of the Gospel dispensation is that of 
Christ, who baptizes His people with the Holy Ghost. The ordi- 
nances instituted by God under the law were typical. When 
Christ the great Antitype came and fulfilled the law, He took away 
the hand-writing of ordinances, "nailing it to His cross," and since 
He opened the new and living way which He hath consecrated for 
us through the Veil, that is to say His flesh, we have access by 
faith, and enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, without the 
intervention of priest or ordinance, or any mediation, but that of 
Him, the one Mediator. 

We believe that He established no new rite or ordinance, and that 
the "one baptism" which now saveth, and which is essential to liv- 
ing membership in His Church, is that which He Himself admin- 
isters as the glorious Minister of the sanctuary, the baptism of the 
Holy Spirit, as saith the apostle, "by one spirit are ye all baptized 
into one body." It is only under this baptism that any can be 
truly made members of the one family of the redeemed, or be 
taught to understand the new relation to which God has called them 
by His grace under this, the new and everlasting covenant. 



APPENDIX. 



THE SUPPER OF THE LORD. 



245 



We believe that the true Supper of the Lord is the Comuiunion 
which His believing children are enabled to hold with Him, 
through the realization of the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ in 
their hearts, who hath cleansed them from all. sin, through the of- 
fering of His body, and the shedding of His blood upon the cross. 

This communion is described by Him in the words : "Behold, I 
stand at the door and knock ; if any man hear my voice, and open 
the door, I will come in to him, and sup with him, and he with me." 

We believe this experience to be essential to the life of the Chris- 
tian. It is only in the strength of this communion that he can 
pursue his heavenward journey, or bring forth fruit unto holi- 
ness; for, saith our blessed Lord, "except ye eat the flesh of the 
Son of man and drink His blood, ye have no life in you." 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

"God is a Spirit, and they that worship Him must worship Him 
in spirit and in truth." 

Worship is the adoring response of the heart and mind to the in- 
fluence of the Spirit of God. 

Having become His children through faith in the Lord Jesus 
Christ, it is our privilege to meet together and unite in the wor- 
ship of Almighty God; to wait upon Him for the renewal of our 
strength, for communion one with another, for the edification of 
bel,ievers in the exercise of spiritual gifts, and for the declaration 
of the glad tidings of salvation to the unconverted who may gather 
with us. By the immediate operations of the Holy Spirit, the 
Head of the Church alone selects and qualifies those who are to pre- 
sent His messages, or engage in other service for Him, and hence 
we cannot admit of a formal arrangement of exercises, or commit 
them to any individual. 

We believe that the worship of any heart or assembly most glori- 
fies God which most perfectly responds to the promptings of His 
Spirit, whether it be in vocal service or in silent adoration. 

THE MINISTRY. 

We believe the preaching of the Gospel is one of the means 
divinely appointed for the spreading of the glad tidings of life and 
salvation through our crucified Eedeemer. for the awakening and 



246 APPENDIX. 

conversion of sinners, and for the comfort and edification of 
believers. 

As it is the preorgative of the great Head of the Church alone 
to select and call the ministers of His Gospel, so we believe both 
the gift and the qualification to exercise it must be derived im- 
mediately from Him ; and that, as in the primitive Church, so now 
also, He confers them on women as well as men, agreeably to the 
prophecy recited by the Apostle Peter: "It shall come to pass in 
the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh, 
and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy;"' respecting 
which the apostle declares, "The promise is unto you and your 
children, and to all that are afar ofl^, even as many as the Lord our 
God shall call." As this gift is freely received, so it is to be freely 
exercised, in simple obedience to the will of God. 

The x\postle Paul, in speaking of his ministry, declares, "I neither 
received it of man, neither was I taught it, but by the revelation 
of Jesus Christ ;" that the exercise of it was not in the words which 
man's wisdom teacheth; but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; 
and that his speech and his preaching was not with enticing words 
of man's wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power; 
that the faith of his hearers might not stand in the wisdom of men, 
but in the power of God. Nothing but power from on high, re- 
newedly furnished, can enal)le men to preach the Gospel. ■ 

While the Church cannot confer spiritual gifts, it is its duty to 
recognize and foster them, and to promote their efficiency by all 
the means in its power. And while, on the one hand, the Gospel 
should never be preached for money, on the other it is the duty of 
the Church to make such provision that it shall never be hindered 
for want of it. 

PRAYER. 

Prayer is the result of a feeling of need and dependence upon 
God. The condition of heart and mind which cries, in substance, 
"God 1)0 merciful to me a sinner," must precede pardon and re- 
mission of sins. At every stage prayer is essential to Christian 
life. 

We believe that prayer and praise are indispensible to a growth 
in Grace, and for a qualification for those duties which devolve 
upon every Christian; that without these any religious experience 
which mav have been gained will finallv be lost. 



APPENDIX. 247 

Without prayer there can be no acceptable worship. It is there- 
fore incumbent upon all Christians, in their meetings especially, 
to seek after Divine help to offer spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to 
God, by Jesus Christ. Yocal prayer uttered in response to the 
promptings of the Holy Spirit is an important part of public wor- 
ship; and whenever God's people meet together in His name, they 
should reverently seek unto Him in united prayer. 

We would encourage parents and heads of families to be faithful 
in the exercise of this privilege before their children or households. 
The qualification for such services may differ in degree from that 
which should be looked for on more pul^lic occasions. The sen^e 
of need, of parental responsibility, of the priceless value of the souls 
entrusted to our care, not only warrants liut requires such acts of 
dedication, whilst our countless blessings claim the tribute of praise 
from thankful hearts. 

We believe the spirit of prayer and thanksgiving will certainly 
be bestowed upon us if we duly ask for it; and thus to ask is a 
prayer which may safely be regarded as always in accordance with 
the Divine will. ''If ye, then, being evil, know how to give good 
gifts unto your children, how much more shall your Heavenly 
Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask Him.'' 

"I wall, therefore, that men pray everywhere, lifting up holy 
hands, without Avrath and douliting." 

TESTIMONIES CONCERNING WAP, AND OATHS. 

^Yar. 

"'From whence comes wars and fightings among you? Come 
they not hence even of your lusts that war in your members ?" 

War conflicts with, and is a violation of, the principles, precepts, 
and injunctions of the Gospel, which breathe peace on earth and 
good-will toward men. It is entirely incompatible with the com- 
mands of our holy Eedeemer: "^'I say unto you that ye resist not 
evil" — ''Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to 
them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you 
and persecute you; that ye may be the children of your Father 
wliich is in heaven : for He maketh His sun to rise on the evil and 
on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust." 

We believe that the emphatic prayer of our Lord, "Forgive us 
our debts, as we forgive our debtors," and His declaration, "If ye 



248 APPENDIX. 

forgive not men tlieir trespasses, neither will vour Father forgive 
your trespasses," continue of binding force. And we believe that 
no Divine injunction or command that is binding upon individuals, 
under the Christian dispensation, can 1)0 rendered void by any 
number of individuals in a collective capacity as nations or other- 
wise. The prophecy which fortold the coming of the Messiah de- 
clared him to be the Prince of Peace ; and His birth was announced 
by the Heavenly anthem, "Glory to God in the highest, and on 
earth peace, good-will toward men." 

Oaths. 

With regard to Oaths, we believe that our Lord evidently forbade 
a kind of swearing which had been allowed before : "Ye have heard 
that it hath been said by them of old time. Thou shalt not forswear 
thyself, but shalt perform unto the Lord thine oaths; but I say 
unto you. swear not at all, neither by heaven, for it is God's throne, 
nor by the earth, for it is God's footstool, neither l)y Jerusalem, 
for it is the city of the Great King; neither shalt thou swear by thy 
head, liecause thou canst not make one hair white nor black ; but let 
your communication be yea, yea, nay, nay : for whatsoever is more 
than these cometh of evil." And the Apostle James declared, "But 
al)Ove all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither 
by the earth, neither by any other oath; but let your yea be yea, 
and your nay nay, lest ye fall into condemnation." 

We therefore consider the prohibition to include judicial oaths, 
and refuse for conscience' sake, either to administer or take an oath. 
In courts of law and in the authentication of documents, instead 
of taking an oath we make affirmation to the truth of that which 
we assert. 



APPENDIX III. 



DECLARATION OF FAITH. 

As Stated in the Epistle of George Fox to the Governor of 
Barbadoes, 1671. 



For the Governor of Barbadoes, with his Council and Assembly, 
and all others in power, both civil and military, in this island, from 
the people called Quakers. 

Whereas, Many scandalous lies and slanders have been cast upon 
us to render us odious, as thai? we deny God, Christ Jesus, and the 
Scriptures of truth, etc. : This is to inform you that all our books 
and declarations, which for these many years have been published 
to the world, clearly testify the contrary ; yet for your satisfaction 
we now plainly and sincerely declare that we own and believe in the 
only wise, omnipotent, and everlasting God, the Creator of all 
things in heaven and in earth, and the Preserver of all that He hath 
made ; who is God over all, blessed forever ; to whom be all honor, 
glory, dominion, praise, and thanksgiving, both now and for ever- 
more. And we own and believe in Jesus Christ, His beloved and 
only-begotten Son, in whom He is well pleased ; who was conceived 
by the Holy Ghost and born of the Virgin Mary ; in whom we have 
redemption through His blood, even the forgiveness of sins ; who is 
the image of the invisible God. the first-born of every creature, by 
whom were all things created that are in heaven and in earth, vis- 
ible and invisible, whether they be thrones, dominions, principal- 
ities, or powers ; all tilings were created by Him. And we own and 
believe that He was made a sacrifice for sin, who knew no sin, 
neither was guile found in His mouth ; that He was crucified for us 
in the flesh without the gates of Jerusalem; and that He was 
buried, and rose again the third day by the power of His Father 
for our justification; and that He ascended up into heaven, and 
now sitteth at the right hand of God. This Jesus, who was the 
foundation of the holy prophets and apostles, is our foundation; 
and we believe there is no other foundation to be laid but that 
which is laid, even Christ Jesus; who tasted death for every man, 
shed His blood for all men, is the propitiation for our sins, and not 
for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world ; according as 



250 APPENDIX. 

Jolm tlie Baptist testified of Him when he said, "Behokl the Lamb 
of God, which taketh away the sin of the world,"' John i, 29. We 
believe that ho alone is our Redeemer and Savioiir, the Captain of 
our salvation (who saves us from sin, as well as from hell and the 
wrath to come, and destroys the devil and his works) ; He is the 
seed of the woman that bruiseth the serpent's head, to wit, Christ 
Jesus, the Alplia and Omega, the First and the Last; He is (as the 
Scriptures of truth say of Him) our wisdom, righteousness, sanc- 
tification, and redemption; neither is there salvation in any other, 
for there is no other name under heaven given among men whereby 
we must be saved. He alone is the Shepherd and Bishop of our 
souls ; He is our Prophet whom ]\Ioses long since testified of, saying, 
"A prophet shall the Lord your God raise up unto you of your 
brethren, like unto me; Him shall ye hear in all things, whatsoever 
He shall say unto you; and it shall come to pass that every soul 
which will not hear that Prophet shall be destroyed from among 
the people," Acts ii, 22, 23. He it is that is now come, "and hath 
given us an understanding, that we know Him that is true." He 
rules in our hearts by His law of love and of life, and makes us free 
from the law of sin and death. We have no life but by Him, for 
He is the quickening Spirit, the second Adam, the Lord from 
heaven, by whose blood we are cleansed, and our consciences 
sprinkled from dead works to serve the living God. He is our 
Mediator that makes peace and reconciliation between God offended 
and us offending; He being the Oath of God, the new covenant of 
light, life, grace, and peace, the author and finisher of our faith. 
This Lord Jesus Christ, the heavenly man, the Emmanuel, God 
wdth us, we all own and believe in; He whom the highpriest raged 
against and said He had spoken blasphemy ; whom the priests and 
elders of the Jews took counsel together against and put to death ; 
the same whom Judas betrayed for thirty pieces of silver, which the 
priest gave him as a reward for his treason; who also gave large 
money to the soldiers to broach an horrible lie, namely, "That His 
disciples came and stole Him away by night whilst they slept." 
After He was risen from tbe dead, the history of the Acts of the 
Apostles sets forth how the chief priests and elders persecuted the 
disciples of this Jesus for preaching Christ and His resurrection. 
This, we say, is that Lord Jesus Christ whom we own to be our life 
and salvation. 



APPENDIX, 



251 



Concerning the Holy Scriptures, we believe that they were given 
forth by the Holy Spirit of God, through the holy men of God, who 
(as the Scripture itself declares, 2 Peter i. 21) spake as they were 
moved by the Holy Ghost. We believe they are to be read, believed 
and fulfilled (He that fulfils them is Christ), and they are "profit- 
able for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in 
righteousness, that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly fur- 
nished unto all good works," 2 Tim. iii. 16, 17 ; and are able to make 
wise unto salvation, "through faith which is in Christ Jesus." 

We believe the Holy Scriptures are the words of God, for it is 
said in Exodus xx. 1, "God spake all these words, saying," etc., 
meaning the Ten Commandments given forth upon Mount Sinai; 
and in Kevelation xxii. 18, 19, saith John, "I testify unto every 
man that heareth the words of the prophecy of tliis book. If any 
man shall add unto these things." "And if any man shall take 
away from the words of the book of this prophecy" (not the word). 
So in Luke i. 20, "Because thou believest not my words;" and in 
John V. 47 ; XV. 7 ; xiv. 23 ; xii. 47. So that we call the Holy Scrip- 
tures, as Christ, the Apostles, and holy men of God called them— 
the words of God. 

We declare that we esteem it a duty incumbent on us to pray 
with and for, to teach, instruct, and admonish those in and l^elong- 
ing to our families. This being a command of the Lord, disobe- 
dience thereunto will provoke His displeasure, as may be seen in 
Jeremiah x. 25 : "Pour out Thy fury upon the heathen that know 
Thee not, and upon the families that call not upon Thy name." 
Now, Negroes, Tawnies, and Indians make up a veiy great part 
of the families in this island, for whom an account will be required 
by Him who comes to judge both quick and dead, at the great day 
of judgement, when every one shall be rewarded according to the 
deeds done in the body, whether they be good or whether they be 
evil— at that day, we say, of the resurrection both of the good and 
of the bad, of the just and the unjust, "when the Lord Jesus shall 
be revealed from heaven with His mighty angels in flaming fire, 
taking vengeance on them that know not God and obey not the 
Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ ; who shall be punished with ever- 
lasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the 
glory of I-Iis power; when He shall come to be glorified in His 
Saints, and to be admired in all them that believe in that day." 
2 Thess. i. 7, 10. See also 2 Peter iii. 3, 7. 



APPENDIX IV. 



PROMINENT FAMILIES, 



THE DAVIS FAMILY. 

It very often occurs in tracing a line of ancestors that an author 
comes into possession of documents not contemplated nor contained 
in official records. These contributions, possessing all the charms 
of variety, include also the value of original documents, are mainly 
owing to data in the possession of private families, descendants of 
those officially mentioned in the body of the book. The compiler 
of this history of "Our Quaker Friends of Ye Olden Times" is 
fortunate in this respect, for contributions from unexpected sources 
have come in to such an extent, as to make him feel the embarrass- 
ment of riches — so much so, that what to use and what to reject is 
the main question, for to use all would swell this volume to un- 
wonted dimensions. 

However, since the compilation of these sketches began, we have 
come into the possession of documents giving so fully and clearly 
the genealogy and necrology of several prominent families whose 
descendants are numerous to-day, that, as an item of additional in- 
terest to the book, we publish them in full 

William Davis, Sr., son of John Davis and Susanna Smithson 
Davis, was born August 13, 1755. Married Mary Gosney, born 
January 15, 1755, located in Lynchburg. Both buried at South 
Eiver. He died March 19, 1853. 

Micajah Davis, Sr., located in Bedford county. William Davis, 
Jr., son of AVilliam Davis, Sr., born July 3, 1770, married Zalinda 
Lynch, daughter of John Lynch, the founder of Lynchburg. Both 
buried at Quaker Meeting House. John Davis, son of William 
Davis, Jr., was born September 24, 1774, married Hannah An- 
thony, daughter of Christopber Anthony, July 7, 1805. Eemoved 
to Cincinnatti in 1814, died August 13, 1830. Thomas Davis, born 
February 18, 1777, married Eachel Davis. Micajah Davis, Jr., son 
of Micajah Davis, Sr., born May 24, 1779, married Mary C. Gwat- 
kin. John Davis, son of Micajah Davis, Jr., married Ann Jen- 
nings. Henry Davis, born November 21, 1779, married Sarah An- 
thony, July 10, 1811, died December 11, 1863. Susan Davis, born 
April 29, 1780, died unmarried. Elizabeth, born December 5, 1782, 
died unmarried. Benjamin Davis, born June 5, 1785, married 



APPENDIX. 



253 



Cathariue Gilbert, (date not given). Isaac Joseph Davis, born 
November 10, 1788, died unmarried. Mary Davis, born March 25, 
1790, married Cornelius Pierce, (no date given). Nancy Davis, 
born October 26, 1792, married Peter Dudley, January 31, 1814. 
Louisa Davis, born March 4, 1795, died unmarried. Deborah 
Davis, bom April, 25, 1797, unmarried. Samuel and John and 
Sarah Lynch Davis, never married. Mary Annis Davis, born Febru- 
ary 26, 1805, married Eobinson Stabler, of Alexandria, Va., in ISTo- 
vember, 1828. Ann Maria Davis, born February 26, 1806, (these 
were twins), married Achilles Pugh, of Cincinnati, August 23, 
1832, died February 14, 1877. Mary Jordan Davis, born October 10, 
1808, married Caleb Taylor, of Cincinnati, January 1, 1830, died 
May 9, 1875. Samuel, (second) born August 12, 1809, married 
Eebecca Wallace, of Eushville, Ind., died July 2, 1887. Sarah 
Annis Davis, born March 8, 1811, married Hugh Smith, of In- 
dianapolis, Ind., died in November, 1888. Charlotte, born Febru- 
ary 21, 1813, died September 16, 1888. William, born March 23, 
1815, died in 1837. John, born April 15, 1818, died in October, 
1832. Charles, born July 11, 1820, died in 1836. Hannah Davis, 
born October 21, 1823, married Henry Stagg, of St. Louis, in 1842. 
All these, beginning with Mary Annis Davis, who married Achilles 
Pugh, of Cincinnati, were descendants of John Davis and Hannah 
Anthony, who moved to Cincinnati in 1814. 

Family of Samuel Davis. — Married Anne Lipscombe, August 
15, 1769, who located near Green Springs, Louisa county, who after- 
wards moved to Bedford county, where he died in 1779. First, 
Samuel Lipscombe Davis, who died young; second, George Dixon 
Davis, born June 10, 1805, and died in 1840. He married Mary A. 
Wills, March 4, 1840, and died in 1879. Fourth, John Thomas 
Davis, who married Margaret Preston (no dates given). All buried 
at Quaker Meeting House. 

Family of Thomas Davis. — Born February 18, 1877, and mar- 
ried Eachel Davis. Children : First, Annis Elizabeth, who married 
Pleasant Preston. Second, Micajah, who married, first, Mary E. 
Phi\lips, and then Sallie W. Seldon, who died in 1884. Third, 
Zalinda Lynch Davis, who married Frazier 0. Stratton. 

Children of Micajah Davis. — Married Mary C. Gwatkin. 
First, William, who married a Miss Alexander, (first name not 
given). Second, Charles, died unmarried. Third, Samuel Gwat- 



254 APPENDIX. 

kin, immarried. Fourth, John Gvvatkiu, unmarried. Fifth, Mary 
Annis, unmarried. Sixtli, Margaret, unmarried. The family of 
this Micajah Davis, unless William Davis left issue by his mar- 
riage with Miss Alexander, became extinct. 

Childkex of John Davis, who Markied Axn Jennings. — 
First, William Minor Davis, who married ^^annie Hunter Eubank. 
Second, Christopher Davis, who married, but name of wife is not 
given. Third, Mary Jane Davis, who married John Henry. 

Children of Henry Davis, born Xovember 21, 1T79, and mar- 
ried Sarah Anthony, July 10, 1811. First, Samuel Anthony Davis, 
married, hut name of wife not given, died September 13, 1821. 
Second, William Henry Davis, born December 23, 1802, died 
x\ugust 6, 1803. Third, Mary, born July 26, 1804, married, but 
husband's name not given. Fourth, Charles, born Xovember 30, 
1806. Fifth, Sarah A. Davis, born January 9, 1811, married first, 
William Smith, and secondly, Rev. Franklin G. Smith, rector of 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Lynchburg, May 29, 1838, and moved 
to Columbia, Tennessee, in January, 1871. Sixth, James Davis, 
born September 16, 1813, married, but wife's name not given. 
Seventh, Robert Jordan Davis, born August 13, 1815, and married 
Ann Cabell, of Amherst county, Ya. Eighth, Alexander Chris- 
topher Davis, born December 12, 1817, wife's name not given. 
Xinth, James Frederick Davis, born May 23, 1820, died in infancy. 
Tenth, Lucy Elizabeth Davis, born March 23, 1822, married 
William Tudor Yancey, dates of marriage and death not given. 

Children of Mary Davis, born March 25, 1790, who married 
Cornelius Pierce : Mary Pierce, who married Benjamin Brown ; 
Susan, who married James D. Taylor; Louisa, who married Luns- 
ford Lomax Loving Eobinson, name of wife not given. 

Children of Nancy Davis, who married Peter Dudley: John 
W., who married Andalusia Fourqueron, both of whom died in 
1878; Thonuis Stevens, who died unmarried; Mary Elizabeth, who 
married Capt. Thomas AV. Johns; Fanny Jane, who married James 
F. Payne; Nancy Davis, died in infancy; Peter L., who married 
Elizabeth Saunders; Henry D., died in San Francisco, unmarried; 
Louisa S., died in infancy ; Deborah Ann, who married Rev. W. H. 
Kinckle in Lynchburg; Maria Rose, who married J. Edward Cal- 
houn, and Robert L., no record. 



APPENDIX. 



255 



Children of Samuel Davis, son of Evan Davis, of Georgia, who 
moved to Kentucky: Hon. Jefferson Davis, U. S. Senator, Secre- 
tary of War, President of Confederate States, born in Christian 
county, 1808, first married Pocahontas Taylor, daughter of Gen. 
Zachary Taylor, secondly, Miss Elizabeth Hayes, died December 
11, 1889. 

Children of Ann Maria Davis, who married Achilles Pugh, of 
Cincimiati, Ohio, in 1832: Esther Pugh, born August 31, 1834, 
never married; John Davis Pugh, born March 10, 1838, married 
Laura Fay; Mary Taylor Pugh, born September 26, 1840, married 
John Widman, November 29, 1865; Achiljes H., born November 
24, 1846, married Mary L. Darr, June 14, 1875. 

Children of Mary Jordan Davis, who married Caleb Taylor, 
of Cincinnati: Hanna Taylor, born September 2, 1832, married 
Murray Shipley, May 22, 1851, died November 19, 1871 ; William 
H., M. D., born December 25, 1836, married first, Charlotte French, 
December 17, 1861, secondly, Mary Haines, 1871, thirdly, Helen 
Collord, 1880; Elizabeth L. Taylor, born January 27, 1839, married 
George Dean, July 25, 1868; Ann M., born June 20, 1841, married 
E. L. Johnson, October 27, 1864. 

Children of Samuel Davis and Eebeccah (Wallace) Davis: 
John Wallace Davis, born in 1841, married iu St. Louis; Charles 
H., married Florence Stagg, of St. Louis ; Ellen H., born in 1844, 
married Charles Braithwait, of Kendall, England, living there now ; 
Caleb T. lives in St Louis. 

Children of Sarah Annis Davis, who married Hugh Smith, 
of Indianapolis: Colonna Smith, who died young; Anna Mary 
Smith, unmarried. 

Children of Hannah Davis, who married Henry Stagg, of 
St. Louis in 1842. First, Charles Henry, (no dates). Second, 
Virginia Isabella, married "Moses" Forbes. Third, William 
Stagg, married, living in Springfield, Mo. Fourth, Charlotte, noth- 
ing recorded. Fifth, Henry, nothing recorded. 

Children of George Dixon Davis, who married Mary Ann 
Wills, March 4, 1840. First, John W., born April 20, died May 
18, 1869. Second, Thomas Dixon, born April 16, 1841. Third, 
Mary Virginia, born March 7, 1845, who married P. A. Krise, 
Lynchburg, Va., September 30, 1868. Fourth, Alice Smith, born 



25 G APPENDIX. 

January 3, 1847. Fifth, George W., died in infancy. Sixth, 
Eachel Ellen, died young. Seventh, Samuel B., died in his 24th 
year. Eighth, Micajah Preston, born xVpril 21, 1855, married 
Maude Mathews. Ninth, Creed Wills, born June 12, 1857, mar- 
ried Jennie Lybrook, August 18, 1885. Tenth, Eichard Taylor, 
born August 23, 1863, died in infancy. 

Children of John Thomas Davis, who married Margaret 
Preston: First, Mary Elizabeth, who married Camillus Christian. 
Second, j\Iargaret Preston. Third, Thomas, killed during Civil 
War. 

Children of Annis Elizabeth Davis, who married Pleasant 
Preston. First, Samuel D., who married Miss Saunders. Second, 
Thomas S., who married Miss Xannie Preston. Third, Elizabeth, 
no record. Fourth, John B. Prof., Bowling Green, Ky. Fifth, 
George, lived and died in Lynchburg. Sixth, Pleasant, married, 
name not given. 

Children of Micajah Davis, who married, first, Ellen E. 
Phillips, secondly, SalUe W. Selden in 1884. First, Thomas Ed- 
ward, lives in New Orleans, married Mollie Moore, of Texas. 
Second, Mary Annis, married W. W. Berry, died without issue. 
Third, Samuel Phil.lips, married Laura West, of Belleville, 111. 
Fourth, John Micajah, married Jennie Phillips, of Memphis, Tenn. 

Children of Zalinda Lynch Davis, who married F. 0. Strat- 
ton. First, Nannie E., married Dr. Marcellus Christian, of U. S. 
and C. S. navies. Second, Ellen Beaufort, married Eev. E. S. 
Gregory. Third, George Wadsworth, married Clara Hoffman. 

Children of William Minor Davis, who married Nannie 
Hunter Eubank. First, Thomas N. Davis, born May 7, 1842, mar- 
ried V. Blanche Thompson, February 11, 1874. Second, Jane 
Minor, changed to Jane Eubank. 

Children of Christopher Davis. First, Margaret Newman 
Davis, married Charles P. Hendricks. Second, Friend W. Davis. 

Children of Mary Jane Davis, who married John Henry. 
First, John Henry. Second, William D. Henry. Third, Kinckle 
Henry, died in infancy. 

Children of Mary Davis, who married Cornelius Pierce. First, 
j\Iary Puree, married Benjamin Brown. Second, Susan, married 
James D. Taylor. Third, Louisa, who married L. L. Loving- 
Fourth, Eobinson. 



APPENDIX. 



257 



Grandchildren of Nancy Davis, who married Peter Dudley, 
January 31, 1814. First, Ellen Dudley, who married William A. 
AVebb. Second, Eliza F., married W. L. Mallory. Third, Thomas 
E., who never married. W. B. Dudley, never married; John M. 
Dudley, never married; Andalusia married F. D. Tullidge; Nancy 
married Jolin Taylor; Peter E., married Mary Shaw; George E., 
married Annie Bachman; James Saunders Dudley, married Helen 
Younger; William Henry Dudley, no record; Grace D. Kinckle, 
married W. S. Adams. 

Grandchildren of Anna Maria Davis, who married A. D. 
Pugh, of Cincinnati. First, Achilles H., born March 13, 1876. 
Second, Therese Josephine, born October 31, 1879. 

Grandchildren of Mart Jordan Davis, who married Caleb 
Taylor, of Cincinnati, in 1830. First, Mary L. Shipley, born 
October 23, 1883. Second, Anna Charlotte, born May 18, 1885. 

[Note. — The name of Minor, which frequently is found in con- 
nection with the names of the Davises, is not a family name, but 
was first used as a designation to indicate minority, and was after- 
wards used as a middle name. In closing this list of the Davis 
family we have followed copy furnished the editor, and whatever 
mistakes may have been made, we flatter ourselves that this record 
for accuracy, at least, cannot be well surpassed in such a multitude 
of names. It wil,l be noted also that the ancestry of such distin- 
guished men as Jefferson Davis, Mark Hanna and many others 
reaching as far back as the third and fourth generations will be 
found in this list.] 

THE JORDAN FAMILY. 

No family in the state perhaps has a more undisputed and clearer 
line of descent, than that of Jordan. Beginning with Samuel Jor- 
dan, who was wrecked on the Vext Bermoothes in 1608, with Sir 
George Somers, arrived in Jamestown in 1609. Member of House 
of Burgesses, mentioned in census of 1623. Also two daughters 
by his wife Cicely, Mary and Margaret, aged two and four years. 
We have an almost unbroken record terminating with James Eobert 
Jordan in 1872, a long period of 172 years, beginning with Thomas 
Jordan, his son. 

Here is the record as we find it : Thomas Jordan, son of Samuel, 
bom 1600; married; wife's name not given; was a soldier under 



258 APPENDIX. 

Yeardl}'; had a land grant IGSi; a member of House of Burgesses. 
Then conies the following entry: Samuel, of 1632, and liobert 
killed by Indians in great massacre of 1622. They left the follow- 
ing children: Richard, living in 1679; had a son living in 1739; 
also John and Nicholas. Then comes Thomas Jordan, born in 
1634, who married Margaret Brasheres, and died in 1699. He 
was a son of Thomas Jordan, who served under Yeardley. He 
left the following children : Thomas Jordan, born 6th of January, 
1660, who married EHzabeth Burgh 1679; John, born 1663, 
married Margaret Burgh, 1688; James, 1665, married Elizabeth 
Eatcliffe, 1688; died 1695; Robert, born July 11th, 1688, Minister 
Society of Friends, married Christian Outland 1687, married again 
Mary Bolson 1690. Four other children, no names or dates given. 

James Jordan (brother), bom 11th month, 23d, 1665; married 
Ann Eatcliffe, 3d month, 29th, 1688. Children of same: first, 

John Jordan, born 1689; second, Elizabeth, married Scott; 

James (twin brother), horn 1689, died 1782, aged 93. 

The children by the marriages of Eichard and James Jordan 
bring us in unbroken succession until we reach the official records 
of the Quaker churches given in the body of this book. Hence we 
close the record here at 1690, 215 years ago. 

THE LYNCH, CLARK AND MOORMAN FAMILIES. 

As might have been anticipated, these large and influential 
families, most of whom, with the exception of the Lynch family, 
were Friends, figure prominently in the history of Our Quaker 
Friends of Ye Olden Times. As is well known, the Lynch family 
came from Ireland and were Catholics. 

Beginning with Col. Charles Lynch, of T^yuch law fame, we have 
the following record. He was born in 1736, married Anna Terrell 
January 12, 1755; died October 29, 1796. His children: First, 
diaries, who married Sarah Adams, his first cousin. Second, 
Anselm. who married Mrs. Susan Baldwin (nee Miller), in 1799: 
he was boni June 8th, 1764, died February 18, 1826. Third, Capt. 
"Staunton" John Lyncli, born in 1767; married his first cousin, 
Anna Ten-ell, and died in Tennessee in 1840. Christopher, never 
married. Sally Lynch, married her first cousin, Capt. Chas. 
Lynch Terrell. Sarah Lynch, born in 1738; married Micajah 
Terrell in 1754, John T^ynch, the re])uted founder of Lynchburg, 



APPENDIX. 



259 



was born in 1740; niarned Mary Bowles; died in 1820, leaving a 
largo family. First, Mattida (evidently Matilda), born in 1769; 
married Enocli Eo])ert.s 1789. Second, Zalinda, born February 
6th, 1773; married William Davis, Jr., May 13, 1793. Third, Ed- 
ward B., born in 1774; married Mary Terrell in 1796, and died in 
Waynesville. Sarah, born in 1777, died in 1704. John, born in 
1779. Hannah, who died in 1817. Christopher, born 1782. Mary, 
born in 1784, married Alexander Liggatt. Charles Clark Lynch, 
born in 1787, died in 1814. Anselm, bom in 1793, also died in 
1814. Howard, born in 1796. William, married Jane Humphrey. 
Micajah, married Ann ]\Ioorman. Penelope, daughter of Chris- 
topher Lynch, who married Ann Ward, died unmarried. Eecur- 
ring to the descendants of John Lynch, and beginning with Ed- 
ward B. Lynch, who married Mary Terrell, we find the following 
list of children: Chas. Edward, born October 30, 1804; Chris- 
topher, born in 1807; Mary, born in 1808; Matilda, born in 1811, 
married Chas. Albert Withers; Elizabeth Ann, Born'm^TSl'S, 
married DrrEichardTretlow, of Covington, Ky. 

THE CLARK FAMILY. 

Another family, with a well kept record, is that of the Clarks. 
Beginning with Micajah Clark, born Septeml)er 16th, 1718, and 
Judith (Adams), his Avife, we have an almost unbroken record for 
187 years. To give this entire record, would require space suf- 
ficient for a volume in itself, and we must content ourselves with 
an abridgement to points of special interest, such as an account of 
their marriages into other prominent families of today, etc. We 
find then, that Elizabeth Clark, evidently a sister of Micajah 
Clark, born May 2, 1713, married Joseph Anthony, April 22, 1741, 
who died November 23, 1785. It is an interesting fact that Mark 
Anthony Haden, living near Evington, Campbell county, Vir- 
ginia, and John Anthony, near Cascade, Virginia, are lineal descen- 
dants in the sixth generation of this Joseph Anthony. We also 
find the Anthonys and their descendants inter-married with the 
Moormans, the Lynches, Pendletons, Couches, Winstons, Davises, 
Terrells, Garlands, Eandolphs and Baldwins. But as many of 
these facts are briefly related in the body of this book, we omit them 
here. 



260 APPENDIX. 



THE TERRELL FAMILY. 

Accordino; to historical and traditional evidence, the family of 
Terrell is of Anglo-Xorman origin, and was founded in England by 
Sir Walter Tyrrell, a Norman Knight, about 1066, when William 
the Conqueror took possession of that country. The ancient ortho- 
graphy of the name was Tyrell, Terrail, Tyrrell, etc., until the 
fonn of Terrell was adopted by our direct ancestors several centu- 
ries ago, and the name has generally been so spelled to the present 
day, though some of the branches use the form of Terrill. 

From this old Anglo-Norman stock descended three brothers 
named William, James and John Terrell, of English birth, wlio, 
during the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell, being Quakers and 
grievously persecuted on account of their religion, passed over 
into Ireland as English colonists "within the Pale," and after a 
temporary residence emigrated from thence to America, the date 
being some time between the years 1665 and 1700. William Terrell, 
the first ancestor of the family branch in this country, settled in 
the Colony of Virginia ; one of the other brothers settled in North 
Carolina near Virginia, and the other brother is supposed to have 
settled in New England, but whether he founded a family in that 
Colony, or died without male issue, is not known. Another tra- 
dition is that the "three brothers" were sent to Virginia by King 
James the Second of England, about A. D., 1687, a^ explorers and 
huntsmen for the crown, and that they were each awarded for their 
services a royal grant of fifteen hundred acres of land in the coun- 
ties of Hanover, Caroline and King George. 

William Terrell, of the first generation married and had three 
sons: 1, David, Senior; 2, Henrj^, and 3, James. 

David Terrell, Senior, of the second generation, was born in 
Virginia, where he married and had ten children, seven sons and 
three daughters. Of this family we have scarcely any record, ex- 
cept as to one son, viz : 

Henry Terrell, called "the First'" to distinguish him from his 
son of the same name. He was a member of the Society of Friends, 
a lawyer by profession^ and very wealthy. He lived in Hanover 
and subsequently in Caroline county. He married iVnna Chiles, 
of an eminent Virginia family, by whom he had nine children, 
four sons and five daughters. One of the sons, George Terrell^ 



APPENDIX. '. 261 

was a soldier of the Eevohitioii and fought at Camden, S. C, 
under Gen. Gates. Another son was Thomas Terrell, 1st, (sec- 
ond of that name), who married Eebecca Peters, and many of their 
descendants removed to Ohio. Ursula married a Mr. Eaglan, and 
x4.bagail married Col. Durrett, of Albemarle county, Virginia. We 
have scarcely any trace of Charles, Anna, Mary and Nancy. An- 
other son was Henry Terrell, the 2d. He was of the 4th generation, 
and was born in Caroline county, in the year 1735, where he was 
brought up. He afterwards lived in Spottsylvania county. He 
married Mary Tyler, a daughter of Captain William Tyler, of 
Spottsylvania county, where they lived until the year 1787, when 
they emancipated their slaves and removed with their nine children 
to the District of Kentucky, and settled in Montgomery county. 
He was a pious member of the Society of Friends and the last of the 
immediate family who belonged to that sect. He died in Kentucky 
in 1811, in the seventy-sixth year of his age. The family record is 
very complete of all his children except as to Henry Chiles Terrell, 
George Terrell and their sisters, Mary and Elizabeth. Anna C. and 
Catharine died young. Eichard Terrell lived many years in 
Xatchez and New Orleans, and died in the last named city in 1845. 
Zachariah Terrell was a Captain of Kentucky troops under General 
Jackson at New Orleans, and died in Spencer county, Kentucky, in 
1861. The other son bore the name of John Terrell. He was of 
the fifth generation, born in Spottsylvania county, Virginia, in 
1772, and when al)out fifteen years old removed with his parents to 
Montgomery county, Kentucky, where he grew to manhood and be- 
came noted as an Indian fighter. He was a soldier in Colonel 
Hardin's regiment of Kentuckians and served in two expeditions 
against the Indians on the northern frontier under Generals Har- 
mar and Wayne. He married Abba Allan, of Montgomery county, 
in 1797. She was a sister of Hon. Chilton Allan, of Kentucky, ' 
who afterward became a prominent lawyer and statesman in that 
State. John Terrell in the early part of this century lived for 
several years in Indiana Territory, and in 1807 was com- 
missioned by Governor Harrison a Captain in the territorial militia 
service. In consequence of a severe wound which permanently dis- 
abled him. he moved back to Kentucky in 1810, and died in Louis- 
ville the next year. John Terrell and Abba Allan Terrell had eight 
children, five sons and three daughters, all of whom were born in 



202 ArPENDix. 

Kentucky (except Arch Allan I'crrell avIio was bom in Indiana Ter- 
ritor)'), and of them our records are full and complete. They were 
of the sixth generation, and are all dead except Aunt ]\[aria 
(Hobbs), who is still living, in her seventy-ninth A^ear, at Colum- 
bus, Indiana. The writer, W. H. H. Terrell, is of the seventh 
generation, and was born in Henry county, Kentucky, in 1827. 

Of the Terrells of Caroline, one branch of the family moved to 
Campbell county, Virginia, for we find that as early as February 
10th, 1754, IMicajah Terrell married Sarah Lynch, sister of 
Col. Chas. Lynch, of L}Tich law fame, while the doughty Colonel 
himself married Anna Terrell, !^IicaJah's sister, January 12, 1755. 
We will remark in conclusion that marriages of first cousins were 
much more common in those days among the wealthy than at pres- 
ent, and there was a reason for it, as property in those days was 
mainly confined to land and slaves, and the great land-owners en- 
couraged their children to intermarry Math their cousins in order 
to keep the property in the family. 



APPENDIX V. 



COLONIAL CHURCH, 



CEDAR CREEK, FAMOUS QUAKER MEETING HOUSE, PREY 

OF TIME. 

One of the few remaining old colonial churches is Cedar Creek 
Quaker Church, which is situated in upper Hanover county, Vir- 
ginia, near Montpelier post-office. It was constructed in the year 
1770. Its architect and builder was a man named Kimbrough. 
Most of the material of which it is built was brought from Eng- 
land. The body is of brick, and the old-fashioned steep roof was 
formerly covered with shingles. It has large galleries on all sides. 
The main body contains tAvo rooms, although it may be converted 
into one by a movable partition. In olden times it was the custom 
of this church for the ladies to sit in one room, and the men in the 
other. The body of the church is sixty by forty feet. The window 
blinds, doors. &c., are of solid heart pine plank. The old fashioned 
substantial woodwork on the interior is of heart pine, and is as 
sound as when placed there. All of this, of course, was sawed. 

At one time the church had a large membership, and at the big 
meetings thousands would often gather here. Eev. ISTathaniel C. 
Crenshaw and John Bacon Crenshaw were two of the prominent old 
pastors. With little hopes of this fast diminishing denomination 
ever again getting any foothold here, the church a short time ago 
was sold. 

This old structure, which is an interesting landmark, and a model 
of ancient architecture, is situated amidst a gloomy forest of pine 
and cedar, which now grow almost up to its walls, and near it runs 
a stream of clear, sweet water, known as Cedar Creek. 

[Note. — The South Eiver meeting Avas established in 1757, and 
"laid down' 1858, and in 1902, the old building was sold to the 
Presbyterians, some of whose members are descended from the 
Quakers who once worshiped here. 

Cedar Creek meeting was established in 1739, and "laid down" 
in about 1874. The meeting-house was built in 1797, and de- 
stroyed by forest fire in 1904. 

Golansville meeting was established in 1739, and "laid down" in 
1853. The building went to decay and the land reverted to the 
heirs of the Friend who gave the land.] 



ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. 



A Beautiful Poem on the Old Quaker Meeting House (South River) 



[The poetic lines below will be appreciated by those who have vis- 
ited the ruins of the old Quaker fleeting House not far from Lynch- 
burg. The author of the poem, ]\Irs. Lucy Randolph Fleming, 
wife of Eev. Dr. E. H. Fleming, died July, 1900. The poem has 
been extensively copied. It originally appeared in Harper's Bazar, 
and is entitled, "The Old ]\Ieeting House, 1794-1894."] 

The blue hills rise in stately strength, 

Streams ripple soft below. 
As on those long-gone Sabbath days. 

One hundred years ago, 

When in these crumbling, roofless walls. 

Where birds flit to and fro, 
The Quaker fathers worshiped God 

One hundred years ago. 

And word of truth, or praise, or prayer, 

In measured tone, and slow, 
Was spoken as the Spirit moved 

One hundred years ago. 

Here many a calm and saintly brow 

Seemed lit by Heaven's glow, 
And caught the promised peace of God 

One hundred years ago. 

Perhaps just here the sunshine fell 

On golden heads below, 
Where children lifted patient eyes 

One hundred years ago. 



APPENDIX, 265 

Here youth and maidens primly sat 

In silent, decorous row, 
But, as to-day, Love stole his glance 

One hundred years ago. 

In ancient graves, where trailing vines 

And tender wild flowers grow. 
Sleep those whose footsteps thither turned 

One hundred years ago. 

Long have these altar fires been cold. 

And only ruins show 
The temple holy to the Lord 

One hundred years ago. 

But true and simple faith abides, 

Though centuries onward flow — 
The fathers did not build in vain 
Who reared this modest forest fane 

One hundred years ago. 



APPENDIX VI. 



THE DIARY OF JOHN B. CRENSHAW. 



From " Southern Heroes." 

Virginia Friends had become so reduced by emigration that the 
yearly meeting was laid down in 1844. At the close of the war 
there were only four small meetings left, viz., Black Creek, Somer- 
ton, Cedar Creek and Eichmond. These formed what was then and 
is now known as the Virginia Half Year's Meeting. It belongs to 
Baltimore Yearly ]\Ieeting, as does Hoi^ewell Meeting, near Win- 
chester. Each of these meetings had its trying experiences, and the 
few men of legal age belonging to them were claimed by the strong 
hand of military law. 

At Eichmond meeting, John B. Crenshaw was the minister. He 
was bom May 2, 1820, at the home occupied by him during the 
war. In 1860 he married his second wife, Judith Willets, who sur- 
vives him. His father, Nathaniel C. Crenshaw, had been a soldier 
in the war of 1812, but l^ecoming convinced of the principles of 
peace and the sinfulness of slavery, he joined the Society of Friends 
and became a minister. His life was several times threatened on 
account o.t his pronounced and freely expressed opinions. He was 
ujiwilling to receive slaves by inlieritance, and suffered much on that 
account. It was said that he was the means of freeing more than 
three hundred slaves, and he lived to see all the colored people in 
this country free. He died in 186G at a good old age. 

John B. Crenshaw was much interested in church matters, and 
vas a strong peace man. Five miles north of the city he had a 
pleasant home, and kept open house for all Friends traveling in 
the ministry or on other church service. Owing to his acquaintance 
and influence with men of authority, he was often called upon to 
aid Friends and Dunkards who were drafted or conscripted into the 
Southern army. 

His widow has kindly given access to many letters and papers 
which show plainly how these unfortunate people depended upon 
his assistance, and looked to him to secure their release from prison 
cr from the ai-my. In many cases they did not look in vain. It 
is very apparent that they had great love for him and confidence in 



APPENDIX. 267 

liim. Slic states that he finally gave up his time almost exclusively 
to looking after the interests of these people. He labored by day 
and by night, often making long journeys, sometimes on foot, to 
visit the Friends who were sick, in prison, or in the army. Look- 
ing carefully into the merits of individual cases, and usually being 
able to present a clear case, the officials came to have great confi- 
dence in him, and for tliis reason and because of their regard for 
him as a Christian minister, they usually granted his requests. Be- 
sides the service thus rendered, his house was frequently for weeks 
the home of those whom he was serving. 

For about two years he edited and published the "Southern 
Friend," which became a necessity, as the people were unable to 
secure the publications of their Northern brethren, and they were 
so often misunderstood and maligned in the public press that some 
means of being correctly represented before the people was quite 
important. 

The committee that came from North Carolina in the interest of 
tlieir members came to Jolin B. Crenshaw's house and worked with 
his advice and assistance. Friends of North Carolina appreciated 
his services. He was cut off from Baltimore Friends, with whom 
he really belonged, and for the time being he was identified with 
North Carolina Yearly Meeting, and the Friends learned to es- 
teem him very highly "for his works' sake," as well as on account 
of his general nature. He kept a diary, at least a part of the time, 
during his busy life in these trying times. Having liberty to quote 
therefrom, we make a few extracts, which will serve to give the 
reader some idea of his continued activity in the cause of peace and 
good will to men. 

Under date of Fourth month 18th, 1861, he writes : "Attending 
the sittings of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. There is great 
excitement. Mobs going about forcing suspected persons to hoist 
the United States flag. It is indeed a very trying time, both in 
church and state." 

"19th. Left Philadelpliia about 11 p. m. We reached Baltimore 
on the 20th. Found the railroad bridge was burning. The cars we 
ccme in were promptly filled with soldiers, who went back and 
burned the bridges we had just crossed. We were left outside the 
city. Hired a carriage to the Washington depot. In Washington 
we found the Potomac boats in the hands of the government. We 



268 APPENDIX. 

wtnt to Alexandria, Ya., by a boat wliich, on arrival, was seized by 
Covernor Letcher of Virginia. Eeaclied home safety, for which I 
trust we are truly thankful." 

"28th. Xo heart to write, feeling too depressed with the condi- 
tion of my beloved country. A^irginia ! That thy counselors may 
in faith look to the only true God for guidance, is the prayer of my 
heart." 

"5th month 29th. Father Crenshaw came down to try to get to 
Baltimore to the meeting for sufferings. We felt called to petition 
the powers that be, on behalf of peace." 

"6th month 2d. Our j)oor little meeting nearly broken up." 

"7th month 30th. I rode around the neighborhood to see if I 
could raise anything for the sick in Eiclmiond. All that I saw 
promised to send something." 

"7th month 31st. Visited four hospitals for the sick and wound- 
ed soldiers. Most of them comfortably situated, but many of them 
wounded and suffering much." 

"8th month 14th. Again made collections for and visited the 
sick." 

"10th month 7th. A long and interesting meeting, during which 
a document was issued setting forth the condition of Friends in 
the present distressed condition of the country." 

"12th month 11th. Father asked permission of meeting to 
visit the Federal prisoners in the city ; I to accompany him, should 
we get the permit from the proper authorities." 

"12th month 22d. Father and I had a satisfactory meeting with 
the Federal officers, then with some of their men in Libby prison 
Richmond. On last Seventh-day I went to meet an appointment 
with the Massachusetts men. Had a very satisfactory meeting, and 
was urged to come again. 

"1st month 23rd, 1862. Went with father to visit Federal pris- 
oners, with some of whom we had a meeting. Some seemed serious, 
but others careless and noisy. Distributed Testaments and other 
books, which were gratefully received. 

"1st month 30th. Again, with father, had some very interest- 
ing meetings with Federal prisoners. Distributed more Testa- 
ments. The men seemed grateful, and some manifested a very 
tender spirit." 



APPENDIX. 209 

"4th month 4th. Went with Isham Cox and others to attend 
meeting for sufferings held at Deep Eiver. An exceedingly interest- 
ing occasion. The situation of young Friends subject to military 
call claimed most serious attention, and a memorial was prepared 
and a committee appointed to present it to their State Convention, 
now in session." 

"4th month 16th. On reaching Eichmond found Dr. Nicholson 
and Joseph Elliott awaiting me, and on the 18th father and I went 
with them to see the President. xVfter waiting for hours we were 
informed that we could not see him before 9 p. m., at his residence, 
whither we repaired at that hour. Were politely received, but he 
positively refused to accede to the petition which we presented, re- 
questing him to send a message to Congress recommending that 
Friends be released from military duty on account of religious 
scruples. He said he refused on the ground that it would be spe- 
cial legislation and open the door against us for further persecu- 
tion in a future day." 

"4th month 23d. Several balloons in sight, supposed to have in 
them Federals reconnoitering. About 6 a. m. we heard what seem- 
ed to be heavy firing at or near the head of Mechanicsville turnpike. 
There is a picket this afternoon at my bridge. Oh, that we may be 
able to maintain our principles as followers of the Prince of 
Peace !" 

"4th month 24th. Went to Aunt Crenshaw's. They were expect- 
ing the Federal army about noon. We learn that several were 
killed in the skirmish this morning. A large number of Confed- 
erate soldiers camped on and around my farm, expecting to fight 
tomorrow." 

"4th month 25th. Sent my wife and children to father's; so 
many soldiers coming in and out." 

"4th month 26th. Quiet in this neighborhood today." 

"4th month 28th. Went to meeting. The few Friends seemed 
glad indeed to see me. Hurried home on account of the soldiers. 
They are constantly wanting something, milk or something to eat 
and I supply them freely." 

"4th month 29th. A large division of the army on the road. 
Gen. D. H. Hill has selected my house as his headquarters. The 
Crenshaw and Johnson batteries are camped in the woods back of 



270 APPENDIX. 

niv barn, and from tliore all across the country- the woods are full 
of soldiers." 

"4th month 30th. Busy all day waiting on tlie soldiers, who are 
constantly calling for something." 

"5th month 31st. General Hill moved his headquarters to Yass, 
and General Gregg took up his at the house, having previously been 
below the hill." 

"6th month 1st. Went to our little meeting. Saw many wound- 
ed brought from the battlefields of yesterday and today, in which it 
is supposed that more than two thousand Confederate soldiers were 
killed." 

"6th month 4th. Continual crowd and care. A very stormv 
night. The poor soldiers must have suffered. My porches were 
full, and some of the sick were in the dwelling-house. Three 
houses in the woods full, and many lie in the barn and shelters. 
Many quite sick." 

"6th month 4th. Many sick soldiers left in my house and out- 
buildings, some with measles and some with pneumonia." 

"6th month 9th. Two of the sick dead." 

"6th month 13th. Pressed my wagon today to carry off the sick. 
xYU gone from the house but one. One poor man buried today, 
making three here.'' 

"6th month 23d. We hear much cannon firing here today, some 
so near we can see the smoke from the guns and see the shells 
burst." 

"6th month 2Hih. Fighting continues. Many lives lost on both 
sides." 

"6th month 29th. We hear that the Federals have been cut off 
from York river and driven across the Chickahominy." 

"7th month 9th. Father and I at meeting at Jane Wliitlock's 
house, our meeting-house having been taken possession of by the 
government." (The meeting-house was at that time at Nineteenth 
and Cary streets, one square distant from Libby prison.) 

"8th month 8th. Whiting's division of the Confederate army 
encamped on our farm. Left next day, having talcen some pota- 
toes and fruit and stripped plank from many panels of the fence, 
etc. Upon the whole I think we have cause to be thankful that we 
are not more injured. The officers placed a guard over the orchard, 
potatoes and houses." 



APPENDIX. 271 

"8th month 37th. John Carter and Nereus Mendenhall here, to 
present a memorial from North Carolina Meeting for Sufferings to 
the Congress of the United States. A copy is placed on the desk of 
each member." 

"8th month 28th. Went with Friends to see if we could get 
Thomas Elliott out of prison, but General Winder had received no 
reply from Petersburg, where he had sent for infonnation. By 
appointment we met Miles, the chairman, and other members of the 
military committee of the House, to explain, as well as we could, 
our principles on war. They asked us many close questions, which 
I trust we were led to answer to their satisfaction, as they express- 
ed themselves so at the close, and I feel that we have cause for grati- 
tude for help received on that interesting occasion. We hear that 
the committee of the House has already imited in recommending 
that Friends and Dunkards be exempted from military duty, etc." 

"8th month 29th. General Winder released Thomas Elliott on 
condition tbat I would give receipt for him and have him forth- 
coming when called for. On the 31st he was called for, and I had 
to give bond for $500 for his return whenever called." 

"10th month 1st. Letters from Dr. Mendenhall, asking my at- 
tention to tlie cases of several young men." 

"10th month 15th. I failed to find the young men, but met 
at camp here a number of other young Friends." 

"10th month 17th. Went to look up some young men. Jona- 
than Harris here for same purpose." 

"10th month 18th. Went with J. Harris. We paid the tax for 
five Friends and three Dunkards $-1000. Put in a petition for 
Jesse Gordon, who professes to be a Friend in principle. The Sec- 
retary of War agreed to pass him as a Friend, much to our relief." 

"10th month 19th. The Friends and Dunlvards from Camp Lee 
came to our little meeting today." 

"lOtli month 20th. Jonathan Harris and I got off young Gordon 
at the war office. Met some of the Virginia Dunkards brought here 
as conscripts, some of whom had paid the $500 tax into the State 
treasury. At their request I drew up a petition to the Secretary of 
War asking that those who had paid the tax might be allowed to 
return home until the Legislature meets, when they hope to be al- 
lowed to draw the money from the State treasury to pay the Con- 
federate treasury." 



272 APPENDIX. 

"10th month 2 2d. At Camp Lee found that the Friends had 
gone home, except young Gordon, who was too sick to go; also the 
North Carolina Dunkards. The Virginia Dunkards are not yet 
through with their cases." 

"10 th month 25th. We attended the meeting for sufferings of 
Xorth Carolina Yearly Meeting. An interesting occasion. Com- 
mittee appointed to consider the exemption law, and report. 
Friends seem very sweetly united in this time of trial and afflic- 
tion. Friends cannot accept the provisions of the law as just, or as 
what they had a right to expect. A number have placed money in 
my hands for exemption." 

"I have been engaged for several days assisting our friends Isham 
Cox and Allen U. Tomlinson in trying to get off some young 
Friends from military duty. Isham Cox stopped at a camp between 
Eichmond and Petersburg to see his son-in-law Woody, whom, with 
his brother, we succeeding in getting off. Isham Cox had a very 
acceptable service in our meeting, and left next day for home, tak- 
ing the Woody boys with him." 

"12th month 10th. Took my wife in the bugg}' to camp near 
Drury's Bluff, where General Daniel is in command, to visit the 
young Friends. They have been kindly treated and not required to 
perform military duty. Thompson is expecting exemption on ac- 
count of poor health; Stephen Hobson, hoping for release on the 
ground of being a miller ; and General Daniel tells us that an order 
has been issued for the release of J. Harvey and S. Hobson." 

"1st month 3d, 1863. Went to General Daniel's camp. The 
young Friends have left. Called at Drury's Bluff, but found no 
Friends there." 

"1st month 16th. Isham Cox here to get Friends released from 
army and prison." 

"1st month 17th. Engaged all day arranging for the release of 
six young Frionds,.for whom Isham Cox paid $3000." 

"1st month 18th. Isham Cox gave us what seemed food conven- 
ient for us at meeting today. He takes cars tomorrow for camp 
near Fredericksburg." 

"2d month 7th. Interceded for M. H. Bradshaw, not a Friend. 
Secretary of War agreed to pass him as a Friend. I paid the tax 
and brought him home with me." 



APPENDIX. 273 

'''2d month 9th. Got Bradshaw a passport home. Petitioned 
Secretary of War in behalf of Calvin Perkins." 

"2d month 19th. General Pickett's division of the army quar- 
tered here. A large portion in our woods. Colonel Brocton and 
aids stayed with us. All left at noon. Have burned a lot of wood 
and fencing." 

"3d month 2d. Successful in having the Secretary of War pass 
as a Friend William A. Wells. Paid the tax for him and arranged 
for liis discharge." 

"3d month 5th. Went with Matthew Osborne to see about re- 
moving the remains of his son Jesse, who died at Oakwood in 
Eighth month last. The superintendent showed us what he said 
he was sure was the grave. Sent the coffin to Eaper and Murray's 
to be packed for removal to North Carolina. On opening it, there 
was found only a skeleton, a little hair and some pieces of cloth." 

"3d month 19th. Letter from Thomas Kennedy's wife saying 
that he was sent to Eichmond." 

"3rd month 21st. Went to Riclmiond to see about Thomas Ken- 
nedy. Learned that he had been sent Xorth under a flag of truce." 

"3d month 31st. Went to meet Christian Robertson and his son- 
in-law (Dimkards), to help them to get the former out of the 
army." 

"■4th month 1st. Isham Cox here to try to get some young men 
exempted."' 

"4th month 2d. Went with Isham Cox, and we succeeded in get- 
ting all these cases exempted from military duty, for which we are 
truly thankful." 

"4th month 6th. I was favored to get the release of 0. Gordon, 
and paid the tax for him." 

"4th month 12th. Nathan Hunt, Jr., at our meeting today. 
Came home with me. I got a passport for liim to Fredericksburg 
tomorrow." 

"4th month 18th. Got a release for William P. Osborne. Learn- 
ed that Christian Robertson's application was refused; but they of- 
fered him a detail to hospital work. Procured a furlough for C. 
Robertson (Dunkard) to go home for ten days. He has not ap- 
plied for transfer to hospital duty." 

"oth month 1st. C. Robertson has returned, time to his prom- 
ise. Called at the war office, but found no decision in his case." 



274 APPENDIX. 



"Xi 



'oth month 2d. Took C. li. to get his furlough extended eight 
days. He went to riiiinhorazo hospital. His uncle came home 
with me." 

"5th month 6th. Coming from meeting with J. Harris we learn- 
ed that the Federals had been in strong force around fathers, and 
taken all his horses. Got passport for J. Harris to go home." 

"5th month 9th. Got an order to send Joseph Fell N'orth; also 
a discharge for Eli Bird, who came home with me much rejoiced." 

"5th month 14th. Went with Isham Cox to see Assistant Secre- 
tary of War on account of several persons who desire exemption by 
paying the tax imposed upon non-combatants." 

"6th month 9th. Took C. Robertson to Richmond to the Avar of- 
fice to see about his case. Got two Friends through and paid the 
tax for them." 

"9th month 4th. Went with Jolm Pretlow and William Brad- 
shaw to make an effort for Bradshaw's release. Hope we have suc- 
ceeded though it has to pass through a long routine yet." 

"10th month 1st. Isham Cox and J. Harris came in about night 
from Orange Court House. Found the grave of John Hobson. His 
father much distressed." 

"11th month 2d. Engaged with father preparing memorial to 
present to the Legislature, on exempting Friends from military 
duty." 

"11th month 5th. The memorial was presented to the half- 
year's meeting, which adopted it with great unanimity, and direct- 
ed 300 copies printed for distribution among the members of the 
Legislature. Friends parted in much love and unity, feeling that 
trials await us." 

"11th month 14th. Detained until late before the military com- 
mittee of House of Delegates, who treated me respectfully, but de- 
clined to do anything for Friends." 

"11th month 15th. Went to see Judge Camp1)ell, who wished to 
see me about the Hockett boys. He offers to send them ISTorth. 
Wrote to their father for advice." 

"11th month 21st. A defense which I wrote in reply to an attack 
on non-combatants appeared in the 'Whig' today." 

"12th month 7th. Tlie Secretan^ of War decided against T. R. 
Vestal. I asked for a special interview in regard to his case. T. 
R. Vestal is poorly," 



APPENDIX. 2Y5 

"12th month 11th. William Cox here to get me to assist him in 
the case of William Overman." 

"12th month 12th. Eeceived orders for the release of C. Eobert- 
son and John Eeynolds." 

"12th month 21st. Went to Camp Lee and paid $500 to Captain 
Maynard as exemption tax for my son, Nathaniel B. Crenshaw." 

"12th month 26th. Procured an -order to send A. C Fell North, 
and an order to discharge A. G. Eiish from the army. I paid tax 
for him in 6th month last, but he did not get his discharge." 

"12th month 28th. Lazarus Pearson came to see about Over- 
man." 

John B. Crenshaw's diary for the year 1864 is missing, but the 
year was spent in a continuation of the same arduous work as the 
extracts given indicate. A few quotations from the diary of 1865 
may here be given. 

"1st month 4th. At the enrolling oflfice I was handed an exemp- 
tion as a minister." 

"2d month 1st. Went with David Mofiitt before the Secretary 
of the Navy, and succeeded in securing the release of his son from 
the Confederate States navy." 

"2d month 3d. Went to see about the cases of several Friends 
who were suffering for the non-performance of military duties." 

"2d month 14th. Got an early start to see the Advocate General 
and several other officers. Saw W. T. Haley, H. Ford and Milliken. 
Obtained a recommendation from Hale's officers for his discharge. 
Eeturned to Petersburg very weary, having walked nearly twenty 
miles." 

"2d month 16th. On my way to Eiclmiond met James Hockett, 
Nathan Spencer and N. Farlow going toward my home. They 
came by appointment of their monthly meeting to look after 
Friends in the army." 

"2d month 17th. Waiting on Friends, he found Seth Laughlin 
died on the eighteenth of last month. Blair still sick." 

"2d month 20th. Went to father's. Found them more cheerful 
than expected from all that we had heard. The Federals took all 
of his horses and most of his provisions. Father is trying to use 
some of the broken-down horses and mules the Federals left on his 
place." 



276 APPENDIX. 

On the first of Fourth month John B. Crenshaw and his daugh- 
ter, now the wife of Josiah Leeds of Philadelphia, went to his 
father's, sixteen miles away, to attend meeting for worship at Cedar 
Creek on the Sabbath, where occasional appointments were made 
after the meeting had ceased to be regularly held. The next day, 
April 2d, Jefferson Davis and liis cabinet, and many prominent 
citizens of Richmond, left the capital of the fast-waning Confed- 
eracy. With the few troops remaining in the city, they hurriedly 
took their departure for a more southern point, for safety from the 
approaching Northern troops. Wliile John B. Crenshaw had been 
attending meeting with the little company in the country, a Friend 
minister from England was attending the city meeting, and on ar- 
riving home that evening they found him as a guest. The diary 
continues : 

"J. J. Neave, a minister from England, at my home. Early in 
the morning we heard hea.AT explosions, the blowing up of the mag- 
azines, and we learn that the Federals are in the city. J. J. Neave 
and I drove to the city and called on our Friends, whom we were 
glad to find composed. On coming out we were stopped by colored 
pickets, but they let us pass home. Warwick's mills and a large 
space around destroyed by the Confederates burning the tobacco 
warehouses." 

"4th month otli. Called on a number of Friends, among them 
Judge Campbell, with whom I had a most interesting interview. 
I rejoice that he remained in the city, believing that he A^dll be very 
useful in restoring order. Went to see some of my neighbors. Ser- 
vants everywhere very unsettled. One of my neighbors. Colonel J. 
B. Young, grossly insulted l)y the colored troops. His silver, etc., 
stolen, but was soon restored by an officer. Lawless men are tak- 
ing horses, etc." 

"4th month 8th. J. J. Neave and I were not allowed to go into 
the city. A number of the neighbors called to ask advice. The 
fright and harassment from robbers continues. At the request of 
the neighbors I drew u]) a statement of the manner in which the 
soldiers are robbing and insulting the people, and presented it to 
General Wirtzel, to whom I was introduced by Judge Campbell. 
The general promised to issue orders to repress the disorders.'" 

"4th month 12th. Had to get a pass to go home. Colored 



APPENDIX. 



277 



pickets at our toll-gate. We all renewed our allegiance to the 
United States." 

"4tli month 14th. Colored troops sent off and arrangements 
made to protect this section with white troops." 

"4th month 18th. Went with numbers to get their passes." 

"4th month 36th. Went with x\llen U. Tonilinson to affirm his 
allegiance to the United States. Got a pass to go to my home." 

"6th month 2d. Had a long interview with Judge Campbell's 
A\ ife with reference to his present condition as a prisoner." 

"6th month 3d. Writing a memorial to President Jolmson on 
behalf of Judge Campbell." 

"6th month 5th. Father and I had a consultation with Judge 
Campbell's wife. Met ¥. Ruffin and Colonel Ray in reference to 
memorial certificate, etc. Judge Lyons introduced us to Governor 
Pierpont, who received us courteously and gave father Willets a 
permit to visit the penitentiary and jails of the State, with request 
that he would report the result." 

"6th month 25th. After meeting, read to our Friends the 
memorial in behalf of Judge Campbell. I was unanimously re- 
quested to sign it in behalf of Friends in Virginia." 

"6th month 29th. Father Crenshaw started this morning for 
Washington with the memorial in behalf of Judge Campbell." 

Here ends the diary, but we know that John B. Crenshaw contin- 
ued in good works until the tenth of Fifth month, 1889, when he 
passed from works to rewards. 



INDEX. 



Anthony, 24, 44, 71, 96, 97, 98, 118, 122, 123, 148. 140, 135, 137, 132, 103, 85, 

Anthony 95, 77, 78, 79, 80, 88, 89 

Arthur 72, 74 

Alt 74 

Anderson 72, 73, 79, 84, 83, 104 

Akers 83, 93 

Andrews 93 

Alf riend 93 

Adams 75, 98 

Alvis 105 

Austin 105 

Bradford ... ^ ....... ^ , ^. . ..... .^.. .... . .98, 118, 150, 151 

Bates 4, 53, 64, 68, 65, 70, 154, 91, 92, 93, 102, 103, 14j5, 152, 153, 155 

Bates 156, 116, 104, 123, 115, 106, ifl, 112 

Ballard \^. . .5, 24, 78, 79, 80, ^1, 89, 75, 76, 81, 83, 85, 96, 86, 74, 75 

Ballard 123, 127, 132, 84, 148, 149, 23, 25, 26, 44, 71, 9/, 99, 123 

Ballard 73, 84, 149 

Butler. .26, 72, 78, 74, 79, 87, 88, 89, 76, 77, 82, 72, 73, 74, 75, 94, 86, 44, 65 

Butler 67, 68, 70, 97, 122, 125, 126, 128, 137, 139 

Bailey 26, 44, 123, 73, 74, 75, 88, 82, 83. 125, 140, 141 

Burgess 27, 72, 74, 78, 89, 95, 126, 127, 136, 140 

Butterworth 25, 44, 73, 74, 93, 95, 125 

Burch 100, 71, 101, 138 

BroA^Ti 16^ 81, 103, 138 

Bond 72, 88, 89, 77, 86, 138 

Bunker 136 

Baker 96, 148 

Brooks 4, 99, 104, 60, 90, 91. 80, 57, 59, 101, 147, -104 

Bloxom 3. 162, 97, 120, 44, 25, 78, 79. 81, 89, 75, 95, 94. 86 

Bloxom 172, 124, 126, 145 

Bagwell 96 

Boyce 98, 83 

Burruss 69, 89, 77, 55, 82 

Bobbitt 77 

Burton 76 

Bedford 75 

Boeock 79 

Broaddus 61, 62 

Benaugh 98 

Biglow 103 

Blackburn 106 



280 INDEX. 

Beal no. 136 

Bamett 150 

Bradfiold 72. 150. 9-;, 87, 1:56 

Baker ^ 148 

Byrum 126. 130 

Baiighan. 72. 75, 76, 77. 83, 94. 84, 86, 102 

Bell 3, 8, 61, 02, 64, 100, 57, 59, 102 

Barksdale 52, 90, 102 

Bloomer 100 

Barnard 148 

Betts 162, 97, 93, 78, 89, 75, 68, 84, 94, 86, 87 

Blackley 85, 86 

Boiidlas 84 

Bigger 96 

Brown 78, 96 

Clement 71 

Cranstone 8 

Curie 28, 44. 68, 97, 79, 88. 77, 94, 95. 86, 136, 137, 121 

Coffin 77, 85, 86, 124, 128, 137 

Cook 66, 67, 104, 129 

Cadwalader 27, 72, 71, 88, 89, 75, 76, 77, 96. 82, 83, 85. 125. 128, 98 

Carpenter 68, 103 

Copeland 123 

Congdon 103 

Cobbs. . .6, 52, 53, 54, 61, 62, 63, 98, 55, 56, 57, 59, 60, 100, 101, 102, 103, 106 

Cheadle 4, 52, 53, 54, 98, 55, 56, 101 

Chiles 4, 52, 54, 55, 98, 56, 58, 59, 101 

Clough 106 

Crawford 91. 100 

Cave 76, 97 

Coffee 27. 72. 78. 89. 75, 122 

Cummings 98 

Cowgill (e^.li &7, 99 

Crenshaw 23, «57, 09, 78, 70, 65, 66, 38, 92, 93, 103, 155, 156, 104, 114, 115 

Crew 5, 6, 78, 139, 145, 146, 72, 151, 154, 155, 156, 102, 103, 81, 95 

Crew 60, .58, 59, 57, 58, 114, 115, 116, 27, 23, 98, 106, 109, 110, 111, 113 

Crew 104, 105, 63, 153, 55, 56, 71, 38, 88, 91, 92, 90, 146, 120, 123 

Carey 97, 69, 72, 79, 77, 94, 83, 86, 87, 137, 72, 118 

Coggshall 75, 78 

Candler 27, 44, i?3, 79, 147, 80, 95, 75, 84, 100, 71, 73 

Clarke 5, 6, 61, 02, 97, 147, 71, 72, 92, 93, 79, 90, 84, 101, 147 

Callihan 105 

Caldwell 147 

Cameron 105 

Cole 141 

Cox 82. 178, 147, 136 

Chandler 138 



INDEX. 281 

Couch 91, 88, 58, 98 

Coulling 70, 93 

Caffery 93 

Carrington 93 

Douglas 28. 97, 98, 118, 29, 44, 71, 93, 78, 80, 76, 77, 81, 82 

Douglas 85, 8G, 102, 73, 74, 75, 149 

Davis 80, 79, 78, 81, 87, 88, 76, 74, 75, 28, 95, 96, 44, 82, 83, 85, 84 

Davis. .86, 97, 98, 117, 86, 118, 72, 102, 122, 123, 125, 135, 128, 139, 140, 145 

Dixon 141 

Dix 76, 82, 125. 137 

Daniel 29, 136 

Dabney 92, 96, 103 

Dickenson 85 

Daugherty 87 

Dobins 162, 85 

Darbery 08 

Defer 83 

Dudley 05 

Doswell 57 

Downer 02 

Easley 73, 87, 78 

Ely 140 

Evins 98, 137 

Elmore 129 

English 129 

Eccols 44 

Ellis 56 

Evoite 72 

Erwin 72, 71, 88, 89, 74, 85 

Embree 45, 71, 88, 74, 85, 89 

Ellett or Elliott 103, 65, 92 

Fisher 30, 98, 45, 78, 79, 88, 77, 94, 82, 83, 84, 85, 87, 125, 128, 135 

Fisher 138, 73, 74, 75, 139, 151, 72, 111, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 124 

Fowler 45, 162, 78, 75, 76, 94, 81, 84, 87, 150 

iFerrell 70, 71, 96, 119, 78, 79, 96, 82, 148 

Fose 128 

Fitzhugh 61, 62 

Feazle 85 

Fox 95 

Farrish 55 

Farmer 45 

Farguson 78, 8 / 

French H"^ 

Feddell 78 

Fulchur 103 

Grav 98 



282 INDEX. 

Gosney ^" 

Gipson "1 

Grigg 78, 89, 72, 95, 94 

Grewell 73, 74, 121. 

Gofr 148 

Goode 71, 79, 96, 148 

Gauntt 129 

Gordon 91, 103, 104 

Gatt 84 

Grigsby 76, 82 

Gaskins 93 

Hawks 70 

Hart 9, 10, 68, 106. 101, 103 

Halladay 68 

Holman ' 103 

Hatton 105, 106, 98. 71, 91, 92, 75, 57, 59, 60, 102 

Hewlett 54, 55, 56, 101 

Holmes 89, 77, 85 

Hamner 72, 89. 85 

Hurt 75, 76, 85 

Hale 72, 85 

Headon 85 

Hawkins 83 

Hunter ^5 

Hubank 97, 95 

Haekett 6(> 

Harwood 05, 66, 67. 68 

Harris 9, 10. 11, 54, 98, 115, 55. 64, 90, 91, 92, 89, 77, 56, 57. 58, 60, 96 

Harris. . .85, 146, 101, 98, 116, 123, 99, 104, 106, 110, 112, 113, 103, 119, 161 

Holland 147 

Harrison 149, 150 

Hanna 30, 69, 71, 96, 119, 45, 93. 79, 76, 75, 77, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 72 

Hendrick 30, 78, 79, 88, 94, 87, 126, 72 

Hendrake 45, 75 

Holloway 30, 31, 120, 71, 78, 79, 77, 94, 81, 86, 87, 126, 137, 138, 73, 119 

Hunnicutt 11, 104, 123, 91, 92, 90, 57, 50, 58, 94, 101, 102, 103 

Hunnicutt 138, 140, 141, 137 

Higgason l^*^ 

Hadley 123 

Hampton 146 

Hobson 141 

Hunt 123 

Hatcher 30, 88, 89, 136 

Hough 133 

Hargrave 9, 10, 23, 45, 52, 54, 55, 61, 62, 03, 100, 104, 92, 55, 56, 57 

Hargrave 58, 60, 128, 130, 132, 133 



INDEX. 



283 



Hutchins 10, 104, 131 

Hancock ^8 

Hill 70, 72, 75, 96 

Herndon 81 

Hall 08 

Hargrove 9, 93 

Hough 91 

Hopkins 01, 104 

Irby 92 

Jordan 68, 122, 102, 141 

Jones. . .13, 23, 46, 52, 98, 99, 103, 100, 122, 57, 58, 60, 83, 100, 101, 102, 103 

Jackson 98, 101 

Jude 101 

James 36, 105, 78, 77, 82, 83, 84, 86 

Janney 104, 96 

Johns 95 

Johnson 11, 12, 13, 85, 86, 87, 72, 45, 100, 101, 102, 103, 120, 127 

Johnson 128, 130,, 131, 133, 134, 125, 136, 137, 138, 147, 148, 73, 74 6 ^J 

Johnson 72, 75, 149, 150, 84, 83, 82, 96, 95, 94, 57, 58, 70, 77, 80, 81 

Johnson. . . .105, 88, 166, 89, 148, 78, 79, 90, 162, 91, 93, 88, 98, 100, 105, 106 

Knight 104 

Kerby 148, 36, 46, 161, 87, 84, 128, 147, 73, 78, 149 

Kendrick 148 

Kirk 137 

Kelly 129 

Kimloys 103 

Kutze 85 

Lacy :'■ r • •••;••• • 70 

Lynch 46, 150, 36, 74, 37, 72, 71, 97, 73, 148, 147, 123, 147, 87, 86, 85 

Lynch 148, 84, 83, 82, 162, 96, 95, 94, 76, 90, 88, 80, 79, 78, 9J - 3/ 

Lay ^ 80, 149, 94 

Lea 93, 78, 72, 82, 86, 76, 128 

Lodge 39, 78, 76, 77, 94, 74, 125, 84, 83, 82 

Lupton w 83, 84, 125, 74 

Lewis 37, 114, 72, 78, 88, 89, 76, 77, 137, 138 ^"^ 

JLadd 115, 123, 110, 106, 109, 98, 99, 63, 62, 84, 85, 125, 135 

Lerrow 72, 89, 102, 103 

Lukens m 

Latham 96 

Ladd 91, 92, 93, 60, 58, 51 

Lacy 76 

Lenord 89 

Leadbett'er 92 

Leeds 68, 70 

Lyne 65 

Liggett 98 



2S4 INDEX. 

Lowrj' 103 

Laniliert 123 

Linville 124 

Miller 76, 148, 73, 79 

Jlilner 39, 87, 72, 78 

Martin 38, 70, 84, 96, 85, 149, 93 

Mills 106, 63, 92 

Maddox 14, 00, 72 

Mallory 75 

Macey 37, 46, 81, 96, 86, 87, 137, 73, 121 

Morgan 141 

Maddox 105, 140 

Mbore 136, 137, 138 

Mathews 133, 135, 137, 138' 

Mazley 72 

Mays 98 

Millburn 39, 136 

Moreland 46, 38, 97, 72, 89, 76, 75, 96, 85, 80, 133 

Millhouse 39, 129 

Maule 103, 104 

McGeehee 53, 54, 55, 101 

Majors 94, 86 

McPherson 39, 77, 85 

Micker 85 

Mays 95 

Metcalf 76 

Morgan 88 

McLaughlin 60 

Moore 98, 99 

Mooi-man. .14, 46, 38, 39, 149, 150, 151, 148, 147, 145, 138, 131, 130, 124, 127 , 
Moorman. 100, 101, 102, 75, 82, 86, 115. 54, 37, 55, 56, 57, 60, 93, 94, 95, 84, 83 " 

Moorman 82, 76, 90, 88, 89, 78, 79, 80. 81, 38, 52, 53, 71, 97, 147, 98 

Oliphant 72, 88. 77, 85, 138 

Postor 104 

Paleske 70 

Peel)le3 123 

Pedin 67. 08 

Pleasants 15, 23, 68, 69, 116, 70, 65, 66, 98, 99, 104, 106, 91, 92, 93, 90, ^ 

Pleasants 58, 59, 60, 101, 102, 156, 154, 155, 156 

Preston 40, 98, 120, 111, 88, 76, 95, 96. 94, 83, 85, 86, 87, 127, 136, 149 

Pidgeon 46, 39, 72, 78, 88, 89, 75, 76, 77, 95, 82, 85, 72, 125, 140, 73, 74 

Plummer 40, 46, 89, 127, 139, 74 

Pagon 40, 148 

Perdue 40, 67, 72, 71, 89, 59, 127, 139, 140 

Pretlow 16, 69, 64, 65, 66, 68, 104, 103, 139 

Payne 98, 104, 132, 133, 134 



INDEX. 285 

.r 

Peatross 54, 62, 14, 15, 98, 60. 50, 57, 59, 101, 10:5 

Popo 103 

Parsons 15, 91. 90. 57, 58, 59, 101, 102 

Piller 100 

Paxson 97, 72, 93, 75, 77, 84, 85 

Pennock 88, 89, 85 

Phelps 77, 96 

Patton 90 

Perkins 96 

Powell 95 

Parrisli 76 

Pollard 92 

Parker 91, 76 

Ricks 16, 68, 63, 64, 65, 06, 67, 68, 104, 122 

Roberts 40, 46, 97, 98, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 93, 90, 76, 94, 95, 

Roberts 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 74, 150, 162 

RatclifTe 15, 99, 92, 81, 88, 60, 82, 72, 73, U 

Russell 46, 100, 59, 101, 129 

Redole 22, 101 

Redd 101 

Rogers 101, 124 

Rice 103 

Rucker 117 

Ross 101 

Richards 72, 78, 88, 89, 77, 96, 85 

Richardson 99, 70, 81, 85 

Reardson 85 

Robeson 85 

Reader 83 

Royall 95 

Royster 90 

Randle 89 

Rhodes 40, 88, 89 

Riddick 93 

Read 93 

Rice 92 

Strong 104 

Scott 64, 66 

Snead 75, 78, 86, 123 

Stanton 40, 41. 74, 71, 162, 73, 141, 165, 140, 120, 121, 128, 126, 86, 

Stanton 87, 84, 82, 94, 95, 77, 79, 76, 75, 81, 80, 79, 78, 93, 46, 119, 96 

Street 113 

Stone 73 

Swinney 73 

Schoolfield 149 

Smith 103, 91, 92, 129, 136, 137, 72 



2S6 INDEX. 

Swann 68 

Stevens 98 

Sumner 67 

Shejton 104 

Slaughter 72 

Stanley 104, 105, lOG, 117, 16, 17, 18, 101, 102, 91, 78, 91, 92, 57, 

Stanley 59, 60, 130, 98, 99, 103, 148 

Stabler 46, 98, 79, 90, 57, 135, 137 

Speakman 96, 95, 127 

Straasberry 85 

Stratton 41, 97, 119, 120, 96, 80, 81, 88, 89, 70, 95, 94, 93, 82, 86 

Schofield 94 

Smithson 96 

Straly 96 

Sehooly 88, 89. 77 

Speneer 93 

Slade 93 

Sinton 68, 70, 65, 93 

Sydnor 70, 105 

Sea 71 

Summerell 68 

Tiller 103 

Timberlake 43, 71. 73. 76, 81. 82, 96, 120, 162, 165 

Terrell 8, 12, 41, 149, 53, 151, 152, 156, 155, 154, 75, 147, 145, 

Terrell 141, 140. 139, 137, 134, 128, 129, 102, 103 

Terrell 19, 20, 21, 22, 84, 82, 96, 95, 59, 60, 57, 58, 56, 55, 76, 90, 

Terrell 87, 81, 80, 78, 79, 47, 41 

Terrell 42, 52, 53, 54, 55, 63, 64, 69, 70, 71, 61, 148, 62, 162 

Terrell 96, 97, 94, 109, 120, 100, 161 

Tend 72 

Terry ." 97, 73 

Tyree 98, 74, 83, 82, 95, 93 

Talbot 132 

Trimble 104 

Tomlinson 129 

Thomas 110 

Tullis 42, 47, 64, 117, 97, 86, 87, 84, 81, 96, 77, 79, 149, 119 

Turner 67, 72, 91, 85 

Tennison 75, 84 

TiMii])l(' 54. 56 

'J-ui^^l(. ., 77, 88. 

Tityltrr ': 68, 76, 90, 91 

Teazle ! - 75, 76, 96 

Thurman 72, 88 

Turpiii 78 

Trevillian 91 



INDEX. 287 

Tate 71 

Taber G4, 103 

Vest G8 

Vaiishaii 22, 105, lOG, 64, 63, 102, !)1, 1)2, 103, 104 

Via 95, 11!) 

Willis Gil 

Wood 73, 91, 123, 150 

^^'ilIiams 79, 72, 85, 120 

Wiley 129 

^^■hite 69, 64, 65, 67 

Welch 43, 47, 97, 125 

Wilson 122 

Wiim 103 

Winston 66, 67, 97, 64, 22. 70, 53, 68, 55, 59, 95, 100, 106, 101, 102, 104 

Watts 102 

Watkins 91, 90, 57, 101, 102, 126 

Wilkison 87 

Wright . ,-,-4$, 1 17, 76, 85, 86, 96, 93, 124 

Ward 47, 97, 96 

WTiitlock 69, 70, 65, 66, 67, iJ3, 96 

Wildman 43, 81, 89, 94, 95, 120 

Wilkins - - • 60 

Woodson 00, 91 

Willetts 6S 

Waldrop 103 

Woodford 89 

Williams 1 IS 

Waddell 93 

Watson 91 

Walker 113 

WebsteF 92 

W^orthingtcn 67 

Young 98 

Younghusband 90, 91 



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