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Full text of "Out west"



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LIBRARV 

OF THI. 

University of California, 

Received ^rytJUyd/o , iSg g^. 

Accession No. 6/6 f ^ • Class No. ^ %lf C*^ 



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UNE, I89f T^Sl. Ill, No. 1 








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Bancroft Librery 



THE 



Land of Sunshine 



A SOUTHWESTERN MAQAZINE 



EDITHD BY 



CHARLES F. LUMMIS 



OF THE 

■UNIVERSITY 

Volume 111 
June to November, 1895 



Land of Sunshine Publishing Co. 
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Copyright 1895 
Land of Sunshine Publishing Co. 



INDEX TO VOL. HI. 

A Country of Outings, illustrated. pagb 

The Seaside 92 

The Mountains 144 

— Almond, The, illustrated Horace Kdwards 76 

Amargosa, On the, (story) Chas. Howard Shinn. 57 

An Afternoon Tea, (story) illustrated L,illian Corbett Barnes. 202 

A Pre-Discovery of Gold Mary M. Bowman. 279 

Arcady, A Glimpse of, (poem) Klla M. Sexton. 231 

At Long Beach, (poem) C. F. L,. 73 

— A "Truly" Geranium, illustrated 212 

At San Gabriel, (poem) illustrated J. Torrey Connor 269 

Callade of California, A ...Edward W. Barnard. 115 

Beauty as an Educator, illustrated Charlotte P. Stetson. 193 

California Children y 80 

California Condor, The, illustrated T. S. Van Dyke. 262 

Camino Real, The, illustrated Auguste Wey. 156 

Cheerful Soul, A, illustrated T. S. Van Dyke 116 

Children's Paradise, The. illustrated 7 

Chinese Maiden, A (full page illustration) 219 

Chrysanthemums, illustrated Harriei F. Crocker. 278 

ClifT-Dwellers, The, (poem) illustrated J. C. Davis. 264 

• Coming of the Father, The, illustrated 131 

Cordon of the King's Highway, The, illustrated C. F. Holder. 269 

Cowboy Race, A, (poem) illustrated j C. Davis. 109 

Coyote, The, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 215 

Death Valley, (poem) Eleanor F. Lewis. 261 

Desiderio the War-Captain (full-page illustration) 29 

Eagle Rock, illustrated 164 

Echo Mountain, illustrated '. 144 

Elsinore, illustrated K. Harris. 289 

El Molino Viejo, illustrated Emily Gray Mayberry. 59 

Escondido, illustrated 243 

-Fig, The, illustrated 21 

First Printer in California, illustraleJ Mary M. Bowman. 30 

-^ First Schools Here, The, illustrated Mary M. Bowman. 169 

— Flowers in Calilornia, illustrated Juliette Estelle Mathis. 253 

Fog aud the Facts Norniau Bridge, M. D. 166 

Gateway to the Mountains, A (frontispiece^ 102 

Give Me the Desert (poem) Joaquin Miller. 103 

Glimpse of Arcady, A, (poem) Ella M. Sexton. 231 

Grand Canon, The, illustrated C. F. L. 195 

Grand Veranda, The, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 63 

Hearing a Spanish Song (poem) illustrated J. C. Davis. 57 

Hermit's Cabin in theTejuaga, A (full-page illustration) 118 

Highland Chief, The, (full-page illustration) 88 

Highlands, illustrated Win. .Marion. 89 

Interpreter, The Charles Dwight Willard. 104 

In the Canada del Molino (frontispiece) 252 

-Mn the Lion's Den By the Editor. 36, 81, 133, 187, 235, 283 

It is Good to be Alive (poem) Charlotte Perkins Stetson. 116 

Invalid in Southern California, The Norman Bridge. M. D. 25 

Jackrabbit, The, illustrated T. S, Van Dyke. 116 

— Just Corn ,84 

Kingdom of Water, The, illustrated Fred L. Alles. 227 

La Jolla (poem) Rose Hartwick Thorpe. 78 

Learning Spanish H y O. 281 

Legend of Mt. Tauquitz, The illustrated Helen E. Coan. 173 

Los Angeles, illustrated Owen Capelle. 43 

Lyrics from Sage Laud (poem) Nancy K. Foster. 164 

Memories of "Our Italy, " illustrated Elizabeth B. Custer. 51 

Memory, A (frontispiece) i 

Mexican Recipes Linda Belle Colson. 275 



t Mission of San Juan Capistrano, illustrated Adeline Stearns Wing, 109 

• Mission of San LuisRey, illustrated Adeline Stearns Wing. 161 

« Mission of Santa Barbara (frontispiece t 50 

Model School, A, illustrated Caroline M. Severance. 194 

Mother Mountains, The, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 119 

Mountain Fire, The, illustrated Harold Stanley Channing. 268 

Mountain Sheep, The, illustrated T. S. Van D5'ke. 11 

Mt. San Bernardino (full-page illustratioui 88 

Narrow World, The (story) Charles Dwight Willard. 3 

Old Stage-Station, The, illustrated R. Harris. 168 

Ontario, illustrated 247 

On the Heights (poem Louis James Block. 223 

Orange Blossoms, A Study in, (full-page illustration; 234 

Orange County Beaches, illustrated Augusta E. Towner. 98 

Ortega Falls (full-page illustration) 79 

Our Game Fishes Charles Frederic Holder. 67 

Our Schools, illustrated Kate Tupper Galpin. 178 

Out-of-Door Studies in Southern California, illustrated. 

In Pepper Lane Estelle Thomson. 74 

A Quiet Cove Estelle Thomson. 266 

Two Little Corredors Estelle Thomson. 162 

Under the Megarrhiza Estelle Thomson. 23 

,— Pampas Industry, The, illustrated Clara Spalding Brown. 125 

Paradise of Age, The Cephas L. Bard. 232 

Pasadena and its Origin, illustrated H. A. Reid. 174 

Paseo, The (poem) L. Worthington Green. 153 

Patio, The, illustrated Charles F. Lummis. 12 

Picturesque Byways, illustrated R. Garner Curran. 78, 185 

Picturesque Walks, illustrated H. S. Channing. 164 

Pioneer of '31, A, illustrated H. D. Barrows. 127 

Quits (story) R. Harris. 260 

Redondo, illustrated 95. 198 

— Rosesof Santa Barbara, illustrated Juliette Estelle Mathis. 70 

San Juan's Day at Dolores (poem) illustiated Charles F. Lummis. 2 

San Luis Rey (frontispiece) 200 

' San Luis Rey, The Mission, illustrated Adeline Stearns Wing. 205 

San Luis Rey (poem) B. C. Cory. 211 

San Pedro (full-page illustration'^ 274 

Santa Barbara (poem) Francis F. Browne. 161 

Santa Barbara, The Flower Festival, illustrated 35 

Santa Monica, illustrated E. B. Woodworth. 54 

Santa Paula, illustrated Mary M. Bowman. 140 

Seasons Revised, The (poem) W. M. Bristol. 259 

Side-lights on "Ramona," illustrated Auguste Wey. 17- 

Sierra Madre, In the (.full-page illustration) 124 

Snake-Death, The (story) Ross B. Franklin. 154 

,^Some Lemons M. Y. Beach. 130 

Southern California Country Home, A (full-page illustration) 136 

Spent Gold (poem) Anna C. Murphy 177 

Squirrel Inn, illustrated Eva Mitchell Cook. 223 

St. Hilda's Hall, illustrated 241 

Stockton's Capture of Los Angeles, illustrated H. A. Reid. 220 

—Sugar Beet, The, illustrated G. H. Williams. 32 

Superior Northerner, The Charlotte Perkins Stetson. 209 

That Which is Written the Editor. 40, 85. 138, 190, 238, 286 

The Transplanting (poem) Charles F. Lummis. 34 

Timberline in the Sierra (poem and frontispiece) C. F. L. 152 

Under the Love-vine (poem) Jennie Kruckeberg. 263 

University Place, illustrated 5° 

-^Victoria Regia, The, illustrated Edmund D. Sturtevant. 27 

Voyage, The (poem) Julia Boynton Green. 213 

Whale Rock, illustrated R- Garner Curran. 185 

Wilson's Lake (full-page illustration) 282 



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THE LAND OP-^Sfi 

SUNSHINES 



VOL. 3, No. 1 



LOS ANGELES 



JUNE, 1895 



San Juan's Day at Dolores. 



BY CHAS. F. LUMMIS. 







! Never was fiesta fair as good 
San Juan's today — 
A thousand souls at mass this morn, 

and what a glory when 
They ran the chicken-races ! How 

Felipe swept away 
The squawking prize — first cavalier 
among a hundred men ! 



How like a rock from off the cliff he thundered 

down the plain ! 
And how the chase behind him roared in a 
tumultuous flood ! 
And how he beat the grapplers off, 

with feathered blows amain ! 
And how 

his white teeth 
laughed thro* bronze 



besplashed 
with manly blood ! 



Copyrighted 1895 by Und of Sunshine Publishing Co 




^:mj 




Ah, tall Felipe of my soul — Felipe of the vow ! — 

The priuceliest and proudest and the bravest everywhere ! 

There in Don Pedro's portico they make the baile now — 
Ay ! how my heart is dancing, for Felipe will be there ! 

The candles, how they flutter on the snowy- whitened wall — 
Coquetting with the shadows in the rafters dark above ! 

And yonder hobbles Crooked Juan, best musico of all ; 

And old Jose, 'with his guitar that knows the songs of love. 

And now they come by twos and fours along the darkening street — 
The seiioritas all in white ; in decent black, the men. 

Ah, what a pretty, when with weaving arms and twinkling feet 
We'll swing the sinuous cuna down the porch and back again ! 



And now the music kindles, and the 'dobe floor 's awake 
To pulse with eager feet — and still Felipe no 'sV aqui ! 

Ungrateful ! — And I sit me here a laughed-at for his sake 

Who swore to waltz the cradle-waltz with me — with 

none but me ! 

Ay, Holiest Mother ! Here ! With her f— Perdita on his 
arm ! 
So, perjurer and unashamed, ye know me? 
Stand apart ! 
Tu, little fool, run blameless, who couldst not 
withstand his charm. 
But he — I love him — love him — and with 
this I claim his heart ! 





The Narrow World. 

BY CHARLES DWICHT WILLARD 

OMETHING had happened! 

There was such a rosy flush on her cheek, so bright a gleam 
in her eye, and on his face such an utter abandon of joy, that 
anyone — even a man — could have guessed the truth. 

Fortunately they had chosen the hill road, the least traveled 
of all the ways that lead down from the Montecito valley into 
Santa Barbara, and for the first half hour after the event they 
met no one. 

It was what the inhabitants of the Channel City call " a gen- 
uine Santa Barbara day." The sun shone warm and bright, and a 
soft perfumed breeze came out of the west. There was June in the air, 
although the calendar was set for midwinter. The birds sang in the 
trees above them, the squirrels chirped from the hill-side, and their 
horses, wandering at times from the road, sank to the knee in a 
waving sea of flowers. 

" First of all," she said, breaking the silence of a whole minute, " you 
must tell my father." 

" Certainly," said the young man. ** Who's afraid ? " 
"You have never seen papa do the role of the cruel parent," said the 
girl ; " he can be quite a dragon. As you are a kinsman, however — " 
" A fifth cousin," cried the young man, with a laugh. 
"Well, fifth cousins are better than nothing, aren't they ? " 
"Truly ; how else should we be here today? " Then the young man 
added with peculiar and significant emphasis : " I am inclined to pride 
myself on that little scheme." 

The girl brought her horse to a sudden stop and turned her clear 

brown eyes, half opened under their long lashes, upon her companion. 

"That little scheme," she repeated, slowly. " I don't understand." 

The young man laughed uneasily. "Why, Catherine," said he, 

"you don't mean that you have believed in the entertaining fiction 

about our great-great-et-cetera-grandfather? " 

"Old Ebenezer Strong?" exclaimed the girl. "How dare you call 
him fictitious, when I saw his portrait at my own grandfather's." 

" As your ancestor, my dear one, he is an undoubted reality — but as 
mine, I regret to say, he is merely a figment of your worthy father's 
imagination. In short — I would fain break it to you as gently as possi- 
ble — we are not fifth cousins at all, but just plain ordinary — " 
" Not fifth cousins ! " 

" No, darling ; and if you are going to faint, please fall on this side, 
with your head right here on my shoulder," 

" I won't ! Wretched boy, how could you deceive poor papa so ? " 
" I didn't deceive him. He deceived himself. From the very beginning 
of our acquaintance he seemed determined to locate me somewhere on 
the Weston family tree, and you aided and abetted him in the attempt." 



4 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

** Richard Strong, how can you ! " 

"I have a sweet and gentle disposition, and when he asked me if I 
was not descended from Ebenezer Strong, of West Brighton Center, and 
you looked at me so appealingly — " 

" I didn't, any such thing ! " 

"Why shouldn't I assent? I have doubtless had several hundred 
ancestors named Strong, and I took the chances that some one of them 
rejoiced in the prenomen of Ebenezer. It is just the sort of a name that 
my forbears were given to putting upon themselves, as an effective and 
continuous mortification of the flesh. A horse-hair shirt, now, would 
be nothing to it. " 

" You may laugh, if it pleases you," said the girl severely, "but if 
papa had known you were not a relative we should not be riding alone 
together. He generally disapproves of the Eastern people who spend 
the winter at the hotel." 

"If you really feel that I have been guilty of false pretenses," said the 
young man, drawing his horse a little nearer, "suppose we begin all 
over again." 

"Keep your distance, sir ! " exclaimed the girl, steering to the opposite 
side of the road. " If we are to start fresh, let it be from the very 
beginning, three weeks ago." 

" Now, as to your father," resumed the young man, " I think I under- 
stand him pretty well, because my one and only parent, the governor 
himself, is constructed on much the same plan. Wherever he goes he 
is continually in search of the lost tribes of the Strong genealogy. The 
last letter I had from him in Colorado, where he is spending the winter, 
contained the announcement that he had unearthed four or five new 
cousins — choice specimens, I doubt not, that he will expect me to meet 
and embrace on my way home." 

" Perhaps it was wrong," he continued, after a moment of reflection, 
" to play upon that little peculiarity of your father's, to get into his 
good graces, but you must consider the extraordinary provocation, dear. 
It seemed like my only chance — are you sorry I took it ? " 

She looked her answer but did not speak it, and then, avoiding the 
hand extended to seize her own, she struck her horse a light blow and 
dashed down the road ahead. 

A long, even canter in silence followed, and they were well into town 
before the conversation began again. Then, fearful of observation, they 
spoke in commonplaces. 

They turned into State street, and stopped at the post-ofiice, the 
morning's mail having constituted the chief cause for the trip to town. 
Richard Strong dismounted and presently appeared with a letter in his 
hand. 

" None for you," he said. "This is for me, from the governor. I'll 
wager it has something in it about cousins." 

" Let me see," said the girl, holding out her hand. He tore the letter 
open and gave it to her. Then he swung himself into his saddle, and 
they started slowly down the street. 



THE NARROW WORLD. 5 

Suddenly the girl gave a faint cry. 

" Papa has been writing to him ! " she exclaimed. 

" Writing to him ? What for ? " 

"He has asked him to pay us a visit on the score of relationship, and 
your father — " 

"Well ?" said the young man, excitedly. 

" He says he will start immediately — the very next day." 

"Let me see the date of the letter. Ye gods ! It has been delayed ! 
He must have got here this morning !" 

"The train has been in two hours," she said glancing at her watch. 

"I must see him immediately," said her companion, nervously turn- 
ing his horse first one way and then another. " Who would have 
dreamed that both the old boys would take that cousinship so seriously ?" 

" I did, sir, I knew from the very beginning that it would make 
trouble some time." 

" From the very beginning? " repeated the young man, pausing in his 
excitement long enough to note the force of this chance admission. 
" So you acknowledge, do you — " 

"There's the hotel 'bus," cried the girl, hastily changing the subject.. 
" Perhaps the driver can tell us something." 

A long, empty vehicle was passing them on its way. up the street. 
Strong called to the driver and he stopped. 

" Did you bring up a tall gentleman this morning, with a white mous- 
tache and goatee and gold eye-glasses ? " 

" Yes, sir. Your father, don't you mean ? " 

The young people exchanged startled glances. 

* ' How did you know ? ' ' 

" He was enquiring for you, sir, as soon as ever he got to the hotel ; 
and when he found you were gone, he went and hired a buggy." 

" A buggy — what for? " 

" He asked the way to Judge Weston's place in the Montecito. He 
said the Judge was a near relative of his." 

" A near relative ! " groaned the horrified Strong, while his companion 
turned away her face, although whether to conceal a look of anguish or 
a laugh will never be known. 

The omnibus proceeded on its way. 

" We must hurry," said the young man, spurring his horse to a canter. 
"The less time they have together before explanations are made, the 
better." 

" What do you think they will do ? " asked the girl. 

"I don't dare to think. You see on everything except this family 
tree business our respective parents are as far apart as civilized humans 
can be. Your father, now, is an elder in the church, while mine has 
lost all the religion he ever had ; and he has never recovered from the 
habit of using swear words, acquired during years of service in the 
regular army." 

" O dear ! O dear ! " 

" Then again, Judge Weston is an ardent Republican." 



6 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

" And is your father a Democrat? " 

"Worse than that — he is a Mugwump," 

" How interesting ! I have always longed to see one of them." 

" And my father believes that Bacon wrote Shakespeare's plays." 

" Heavens ! Let us ride faster. Papa will have slain him before we 
get there." 

"Really, Catherine," said the young man, when they had slackened 
their pace to climb the hills, " it would not surprise me if they positively 
refused to enter into partnership as fathers-in-law." 

" Never mind, Richard," said the girl smilingly. "Father has never 
yet refused me anything, when my happiness was at stake — as it is now. ' ' 

Strong shrugged his shoulders. ''Mine has," he answered. " He is 
made of flint, the old General ; and if he should take it into his head to 
say no, it would be awkward in ways I don't like to mention." 

"Nevermind," said the girl, smiling again and lifting her veil to the 
rim of the jaunty sailor hat. 

And a moment later the young man felt much encouraged, and the 
gallop was resumed. 

On a slight knoll surrounded by a grove of live-oaks and faced With 
an avenue of old palms, there stood the ample residence of Judge Wes- 
ton. As the young people came through the gate and entered upon the 
graveled roadway, they observed two elderly gentlemen emerge from a 
small forest of rose bushes and start briskly down the path toward them. 
Presently the shorter of the two took his companion's arm and they 
walked along in evident peace and amity. 

" They haven't found it out yet," the young man whispered. 

Judge Weston assisted his daughter to alight. " Catherine," said he, 
"this is General Strong, the father of our young friend." 

The General bent low in an old-fashioned obeisance, and Miss Catherine 
instinctively made him a courtesy out of the minuet. 

"Father!" 

"Dick, my dear boy ! " 

"See here," exclaimed the Judge suddenly. "You were mistaken, 
Richard, in what you told me about old Ebenezer Strong." 

The young man braced himself for a struggle. 

"And to think, Dick," cried the General, reproachfully, "that you 
never once mentioned to the Judge that your great-great-grandfather, 
Hezekiah Strong, married a Weston." 

"And that brings us even nearer than we had supposed," added the 
Judge. "Fourth cousins instead of fifth." 

" It was stupid of me to forget that," said the young man, huskily. 

" And now that I have seen Miss Catherine," said the General, taking 
her hand and passing his arm about her waist, " my only regret is that 
the relationship is not several degrees nearer yet." 

Then Catherine looked at Richard, and he told what had happened on 
the way to town. Straightway there was a great amount of hand- 
shaking and a good deal of kissing done in broad daylight under the 
palms. 



f 



The CHILDREN'S Paradise. 



BY ONE OF THE HEIRS. 



^ 



HE gentleman and scholar who wished to know : " Why should 
I work for posterity? What did posterity ever do for me?" 




they are not enviable. Posterity has done a good deal for some of us. 
You will even find some folks with heart and head to confess that they 

meaning of life till 
posterity came along 
dren, it is true, are 
height of the fashion, 
we are pleased to call 
them. Dress and balls 
of showciety are eas- 
them. Yet there still 
ioned simpletons who 
babe at the breast, for 
cy head against the 
a less number of deep- 
actually take as much 
the flesh of their flesh 
their bone as 
the flesh of 
greed mastiff, 
t i o n of pa- 
not horizon- 
functory kiss 
dial spank- 
They go so far as to ponder 
ponsibilities and to plan 
ture — "What is this child ? 
of management does its 
require? Should it be 
pushed forward or held 
back? What will be best 
for its body, and what for 
its mind? " 

Among this unfashion- 
able class the least fashion- 
able have already discov- 
ered that life is builded upon a physical foundation, and that climate 
has something to do with physique. No scientist has doubted that, in a 
century ; but the application of science to so trivial a matter as the 
breeding of human beings is revolutionary. It is properly reserved for 
the breeding of horses, cows and dogs. 

These foolish sentimentalists of whom I speak are little short of her- 
etics. They are even venturing to doubt the essential orthodoxy of these 



never knew the real 
the advance guard of 
to show them. Chil- 
not just now the 
The march of what 
civilization is against 
and other noble aims 
ier enjoyed without 
persist some old-fash- 
care for the tug of a 
the cuddling of a flee- 
waistcoat ; and 
er dotards who 
thought for 
and bone of 
for flesh of ' 
their pedi- 
Their no- 
rental love is 
ed with a per- 
here and a cor- 
i n g yonder, 
upon their res- 
for the fu- 
What line 
character 




Union Eng. Co. 



Photo, by Schumacher. 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



f% f!% f* 




Union Eng. Co. Photo by Steckel. 

household words: "Now, Mary, you mustn't open the outside door, or 
we shall all be frozen ; " "Johnny, don't you dare go out without your 
overcoat and your tippet and your arctics and your earmuffs and your 
mittens ; " " Mercy, you crazy child ! Do you want to catch your death 
of cold ? Look at that slush ! No, go up and play in the nursery, and 
be sure the register is wide open." 

In the nature of things, not everyone can leave the amiable climes 
where these home proverbs are as necessary as the furnace ; and in the 
nature of us, we do not wish that everyone should. The area of decent 
temperatures in the United States is rather limited ; and we of Southern 
California are becoming disposed to be "select." But there is ample 
room here for all who do not bring up their children on the hit-or-miss 
plan ; for all who are given to taking thought for their young. 

Some people leave their children money. Some bequeath them 

brains Some die seized of nei- 
ther the one nor the other to de- 
vise. Both heritages have dan- 
gers as well as advantages. 

But the best legacy you can 
leave your child is to rear it in 
a climate which loves children — 
instead of the old-bachelor surli- 
ness of Eastern weather. It is 
1.^" "^^^ worth more to your baby than all 

the money you will ever see, than 
all the grey-matter you could 
ever express from your skull 
with a horse-pistol — this chance 
to form its body and its mind 
in the Happy Land ; to live 
next to God and Nature ; to play 
in God's sun and air, and suckle 
Union Eng. Co. Photo by Steckel at Nature's breast ; to be out of 




fc 



THE CHILDREN'S PARADISE. 



^^py -^9^^ '"^ 



^ ^ 




Union Eng. Co. 



Photo, by Steckel. 



doors every day in the year ; to be playmate of eternal roses and peren- 
nial birds; to know "snow" only as "what makes the mountains 
pretty ; " and "cold" only as a word in the morning paper which tells 
of teacher and school-children frozen to death yesterday back where you 
and I were born. 

Southern California is the paradise of children. The climate which 
begets such flowers as make the pride of Eastern hothouses seem mere 
caricatures, is no less kind to the human bud. Babe or flower, between 
here and the East is the precise difference between the frail house-plant 
and the Exuberant growth of the semi-tropics. The deadly " summer 
sickness " of the East is an unknown quantity with us. The 
risky " second summer " is no peril here. Our babies breathe 
God's oxygen the whole year, instead of the vile poison of an 
air-tight house for four months of it. They are mortal still ; 
but their chance of life is far better, and life itself far sweeter. 
The traditional diseases of childhood are perhaps less inevit- 
able here ; they are certainly less fatal. 

For development of mind and morals, Southern California 
is fully as well equipped as Eastern communities, and in time 
must be better equipped — unless every law of nature and evo- 
lution is a liar. But if there were nothing else here than the 
one fadl that here children have really "a fair show for their 
lives" it would be an attraction to those who think as much of 
their offspring as they do of their grocery business in Sheboy- 
gan or their "social standing" in Swampscott. 

It is not a matter of taking anyone's word for it. Just sit 
down with yourself and think about it. Bear down on your 
mental processes as hard as you do about the next flu(5luation 
of wheat, the proximate full-dress ball. What is the common- 
sense of it? As a matter of artistic taste, do you prefer slush 
or butterflies? Roses or zero? Siestas or bronchitis? Would 
you thank anyone for instrudting you that outdoor air is purer 
than the cast-oflf atmospheres of inhabited rooms with closed ^^ «"«• co Piioto. by steckei. 




lo LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

windows and a puzzle which predominates — the lifelessness of 
artificial heat or the human smell ? You haven't yet advertised 
for a tutor to coach you whether 70° above or 10° below zero is 
the more comfortable and the safer temperature ? Any con- 
scientious scruples against believing that frosted ears, , 
chilblains, pneumonia and consumption are not de rigueur 
in the scheme of human happiness ? Take you long to 
make up your mind whether a living organism will 
thrive better in sunlight or in cellar ? Whether a sky 
under which roses and strawberries flourish from Jan- 
uary to January again is apt to be as genial to other 
forms of life as one under which roses, noses and 
water-pipes freeze solid if left out in the weather ? 

If these answers come hard, pray do not toil after 
them. In that case we could nerve ourselves to get 
along without you. There is room for but a few mil- 
lion people out here ; and having already some 
samples of the other sort, we would just as soon that 
the remaining seats be rigidly reserved for folk who 
will not lower the present average of intelligence. 

But if your head be of more use to you than merely 
as a vehicle for a mouth ; if you know how to cook 
an idea after it is caught — why, then it might be well to turn a mental 
process toward these matters. 

And while you are about it, you might also ponder upon the mental 
as well as the physical bias which climate gives a child. The irritation, 
the scepticism, the irksome imprisonment of a barbarous climate — are 
these any better for the moral than for the bodily tissues ? And is there 
glib on your tongue any more logical reason why your children must 
suflFer these things than that you did ? 




Collier, Eng. 



Photo, by Stetkel. 



From the Train. 

BY JULIA BOYNTON CREEN. 

In these wild mountain regions who could guess 
Such lavish beauty lurks ! Each rocky rift 
Holds dainty nodding blooms, a wayside gift 
Simply the vagrant butterfly to bless. 
To lure the wandering insect by its dress 
Or haply to reward the wild bee's thrift. 
Here is no rapt Linnaeus to uplift 
His voice devout to praise such loveliness — 
Strange scarlet stars, the low blue iris, pink 
Of wonderful azaleas on the brink 
Of dizzy chasms — a transient glimpse I gain, 
A dazzling vision from the ruthless train. 
Ah me, what riches blooming but to God 
Beyond my sight in deeper glens untrod ! 



The Mountain Sheep. 




ly T. S. VAN DYKE. 

OWHERE else within 
sight of civilization 
does the bighorn so 
persistently cling to 
the home of his fathers 
as on the great snow- 
clad hills whose sum- 
mits float like clouds 
on the north of the 
valley of San Gabriel. 
Along with the grizzly 
bear he still looks 
down with contempt 
upon the orchards that 
are so fast climbing the 
lower slopes of his 
lofty home, and cares 
as little for the electric 
lights that star the 
dark world below as 
for the iron horse 
whose sooty breath 
mars the pure sunlight 
of the vast plains by 
> day. 

. ^, „ ^_^ Delighting in all 

that is rugged and 

Union Eng. Co. Photo by Jackson, Denver. rOUgh, the bighom 

finds here a home to his taste ; and many a band yet roams the sharp 
spurs and long knife-blade ridges that from the main peaks break away 
to the plains on the north. Here where perennial streams trickle from 
banks of snow that defy the summer's sun ; where, thousands of feet 
below, the wind sings through ranks of pine, he looks out over miles of 
towering peaks and soaring ridges, and stands guard over his band on 
ground that only the most daring hunter ever thinks of approaching. 
No task on earth perhaps so hard as to get a sure shot at this wary 
animal on such ground — but therefore all the more attraction in the 
pursuit. Many have tried it with unbounded admiration for an animal 
that can all but fly over ground where the hunter dares hardly creep. 
Down hillsides of sliding shingle, on which the slightest step of man 
starts half an acre going and sends boulders of ever-increasing size 
whizzing past his head, the bighorn skips like a sunbeam ; and as if too 
high above earth to bow to the law of gravitation, he seems to care 
nothing for the height of a precipice. Over the steepest slopes of ice he 
plays as if shod with diamond ; and for a change loves piles of boulders 
in which the hardy fir long since ceased to struggle for a foothold. 



12 LAND or SUNSHINE. 

Intense is the caution required to keep out of range of the bighorn's 
far-reaching sight ; and vain often, in the vast jumble of hills, the attempt 
to avoid the wavering currents that may carry him the tainted air. Vain 
often the attempts to see him as upon some little shelf of rock he looks 
down upon the clouds that linger in some great abyss ; and harder yet 
to reach the beetling crags above, that command his position, without 
alarming him. And when hours of patient toil have rewarded the 
hunter's care, and he has crept and climbed to where he can look over 
some shining crag and get a sure shot, as he thinks, at the unconscious 
game, he often is deceived by the air of these high regions, so dry and 
thin that its clearness annihilates distance. The ball falls low ; and 
before the echoes from a thousand cliffs storm your ear, there is the 
sound of shingle flying under plunging hoofs and the game has gone 
down, over or up some place which you thought would turn him ; while 
over the more open place where you thought you would get a good run- 
ning shot if the other missed, there is nothing but a waste of rock or 
snow. Still worse, perhaps, the disappointment when you fail to make a 
killing shot, and down into the dark ravines the wounded game goes 
flying with gravitation and fear aided by pain. Vain is generally any 
attempt to descend the sides of the yawning gulf. Though the dark 
cedar nods from its sides and the silver fir sparkles in the sun, they will 
aid little in keeping half the hillside from sliding beneath your step. 
And though the brook sings beneath massive oaks farther down, where 
some little park looks so bright and close, you will never reach it on this 
route. Before you can do so by any other, the vulture whose dark form 
is winding in the blue a mile above will have your game. 

But when you have gauged the distance right and held the rifle true, 
and the game falls in painless death, you have something worth many 
days of toil and patient waiting, and far more satisfactory to your pride 
than the grandest moose that ever Indian called to your ambush while 
you did only the dirty work ot pulling the trigger at a distance where 
you could not miss. 



The Patio. 

BY CHAS F. LUMMIS. 

UEER, isn't it, when you come to think, that people who have 
invented railroads, telegraphs, telephones, and nearly every 
other conceivable facility for making themselves work harder 
and get less time to care whether they live or not — that such geniuses, 
who can run the business alphabet backward, forward and from the 
middle to both ends at once, haven't got past their a, b, c in home- 
building ? Hot and cold water, incandescent lights, sanitary plumbing 
and the other inventions are — conveniences. They save time — so that 
we may have more to get weary with invoices or the visiting list. But 
they do not reach the heart of the matter— which is the joy of home. 
No one sits down in the bath-tub to reflect what a blessing piped water 



THE PATIO. 13 

is. No one pulls up a chair to gloat over the beauty and facility of the 
chandelier. Nay, we snap off the water and snap on the gas and run 
for the first car to the grindstone to which our noses are respectively 
addicted. 

But many of us would like to enjoy air and flowers and fountains if 
we knew just how. Unfortunately, the Saxon tradition has always been 
that the outdoor side of the house was invented chiefly to show off". 
" Beautiful grounds ! " Yea, verily ! Peacocked in front of the house, 
where the stranger must see them and you mustn't — for the twin super- 
stition demands that the parlor (damnable word and worse invention) 
shall command the lawn. No honest man will sit at home in anything 
that can truthfully be called a parlor ; and as a matter of fact, in the 
United States 90 per cent, of the adlual family life is lived in rooms 
which wouldn't know the "front yard" if they met it on the street. 




THE PATIO AT CAM 



Pljoto. by Waite. 



Right here in Los Angeles, which should be the most homelike city in 
the world — and will be, when we get a little further taught — how many 
dare sit out in shirtsleeves or wrapper to take solid comfort in the pret- 
tiest portion of their land ? They simply do not do it ; and here where 
everyone ought to be out of doors some hours of at least 325 days in the 
year, it is a rare sight to see lawn or piazzas in process of being enjoyed. 

It is all because of this congenital fault in the ground-plan. The lawn 
and veranda are in the wrong place ; and privacy, the soul of home and 
of comfort, is sacrificed to show. You could just about as harmoniously 
sit out upon the sidewalk. 

If we do not care to learn anything else from our new environment, 
we might at least learn this which comes so close home. The Spanish 
American would as soon think of sticking his bedroom into the street. 
He carries his lawn into the house and keeps it there. Every room 
opens upon it, and every member of the family is joyed and benefited by 



THE PATIO. 



15 



it. It is the patio — the central court-yard about three or four sides of 
which he builds his home ; and to those who really care for home it is 
the best invention man has made since he rubbed two sticks together 
and got warm by the product. 

The patio is not of universal Spain. It is specifically an invention of 
the province of Andalusia, and exclusively of the Spanish Mediodia. 
But in the Spanish colonies of the New World it has become almost 
universal — so eminently lovable that neither tradition nor bigotry could 
hold out against it. 

Given, a space of earth large enough to be fit anyhow to be lived upon 
by a family. Then make the rim against the street as attra(5live as 
vanity shall demand ; but build your house around at least three sides of 
a generous plot, and make that the best. You can sward it and beflower 
it and set it with trees and fountains and the song of birds ; and if you 




Collier, Eng. 



Photo, by Slocum, San Diego. 
THE ACRE-AND-A-HALF PATIO OF THE CORONADO. 



surround it with long, deep piazzas or real portales of Roman arches, 
like Mission corridors, you will begin to wonder how you ever called 
the other thing a home. 

A few people in Southern California have already learned the lesson. 
The largest and noblest patio in the United States is that of the Hotel 
del Coronado, whose architect did what probably no hotel archite(5l ever 
did before — made a 750-rooni pile homelike. At Miramar (also in San 
Diego county) E. W. Scripps, of the well-known Eastern newspaper 
syndicate, has recently finished a delightful home on the Spanish plan, 
with a huge azotea (promenade roof) and a patio 150 feet square. 
Wm. H. Burnham, near Orange, has adopted the like wisdom in build- 
ing his home. At Crescenta Caiiada the Gould castle holds a superb 
60-foot patio within its granite walls. Several charming homes on this 



i6 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



common-sense plan bask among the orange-groves of Riverside. Mr. 
Hayne has recently completed one with a 40-foot patio in the Montecito. 
Judge Widney is preparing to erecft a very attractive one at Garvanza ; and 
several Angeleiios are making ready their plans for homes of which the 
patio shall be the heart. There are also, of course, some of the genuine 




THE PATIO AT GUAJOME 



Photo, by Waite. 



old-time patios, of the Spanish days, still left in Southern California. 
Notable among these are the patios at Camulos (Ventura county), at 
Guajome and at the Forster hacienda in San Juan Capistrano. 

A rather costly but admirable refinement upon the original idea is to 
roof the patio with glass, so that it can open to the sky in all other 
weather, but be closed in days of rain. By this plan one could sit out 
among the trees and flowers every day of the year ; and could also add 
to one's garden all the purely tropic plants which do not thrive to per- 
fedtion out of doors in any climate that civilized man cares to dwell in. 
Edmund D. Sturtevant, the expert florist, is an enthusiastic advocate of 
the glass covered patio from the flower-lover's standpoint. 

There are still people who have not ridden on a railway ; and millions 
even in the United States who have never patronized telegraph or tele- 
phone. Every improvement, every inven- 
tion, is long handicapped by tradition. But 
common sense in the long run always 
outwinds superstition ; and the patio is 
inevitable. Fifty years hence, the Southern 
Californian who shall build a $10,000 dry- 
goods box and call it a house will be an 
oddity. The average man will by then be 
living in a home adapted to the country 
and meant quite as much to be comfortable 
as to be showy. 




THE SCRIPPS AZOTEA AND PATIO. 



-SiDE-LlGHTS ON "RAMONA/' 



iY AUGUSTS WEY. 




fONCERNING the writing of the 
most famous book of Southern 
California, Ramona, and con- 
cerning its locaUy the Pasadena Loan 
Association has accumulated a mass 
of testimony so interesting, valuable 
and unimpeachable that it is to be put 
inlopermanenr bibliographic form. 

Among those whose evidence will 
be thus presented was that noble old 
type of the courtly cavalier, the late 
Don Antonio F. Coronel, State Treas- 
urer of California under the old re- 
gime. His testimony alone, to those 
who knew him, would forever set at 
rest the needlessly vexed question, 
"Where was the 'Home of Ra- 
mona?'" Others who contribute 
reminiscences or evidence touching 
the book and its author are Dona 
Mariana, widow of Seiior Coronel ; 
Mrs. J. de Barth Shorb ; the ladies of 
the Del Valle rancho at Camulos ; 
Hon. J. J. Warner, one of the most 
venerable figures of Los Angeles ; 
Hon. Abbott Kinney, who served up- 
on the same Indian Commission with 
Helen Hunt Jackson ; and others. 

The material now in the Associa- 
tion's hands readily arranges itself 
into the following chapters : 

I. Helen Hunt Jackson in Los 
Angeles. 2. The name "Ramona." 
3. "Alessandro." 4. Historic Cam- 
ulos. 5. Local origin of some episodes in the book 
translation of Ramona. 7. Bibliographica. 

Outlines of some of these chapters may be sketched here. The first 
chapter will detail the arrival of Mrs. Jackson in Los Angeles with cer- 
tain letters of introduction ; her calling upon Don Antonio at the old 
Coronel adobe residence ; her interest in the house, and her desire to 
make it the locale of her projected novel ; and Don Antonio's recom- 
mendation that she take, instead, the lovely old Camulos rancho; a 
Sunday of preparation for the book ; a correspondence with Mrs. Jack- 
son ; concerning the name " Majel ; " Mrs. Jackson's associations with 
Los Angeles. 

Chapter II — The name "Ramona;" testimony of Jeanne C. Carr 





HerveTriend, Eng. 

A STUDY FOR 



Photo, by C. F. Luinmia 
AJ.ESSANDRO." 



6. The Spanish 



i8 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



and of Mrs. J. de Barth Shorb (daughter of Ramona Yorba, whose ashes 
lie within the Mission San Gabriel) ; the common Spanish masculine 
name Ramon, and its feminine Ramona ; other Ramonas on the record 
books. 

Chapter III — "Alessandro ; " Mrs. Jackson's use of the Italian in- 
stead of the Spanish form of the name — one of the few inaccuracies of 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



DON ANTONIO F. CORONEL. 



Photo hv Miss Salter. 



her "local color;" ''The Indian, Alessandro " — a character-study by 
Chas. F. Lummis, with photographic studies in illustration. 

Chapter V — " Father Salvierderra's " [Mrs. Jackson got it " by ear ; " 
the real name was Zalvidea] appearance in a "glory" of wild mustard, 
suggested by a drive on the "adobe road" from Los Angeles to Pasa- 
dena and the Mission San Gabriel; Doiia Mariana and the "Jesucito" 



SIDE-LIGHTS ON " RAMONA." 



19 



of her oratory ; the Indian mass, until recently said at the Mission San 
Luis Rey for the repose of Mrs. Jackson's soul. 

In view of the genuine and growing interest in that remarkable book 
whose sales keep up steadily after so many years, and in the circum- 




Engraved hy Harry C. Jones, Editor of The t^uarterly Illustrator. N Y. Photo, by E J. Crandall. 

DON ANTONIO AND DONA MARIANA. 

" She is the younu wife of a gray-headed Senor of whom— by his own gracious permission — I shall speak by 
his familiar name. Don Autonio 

• He is sixty-five years of age. but he is young; the beat walker in Los Angeles today; his eye keen, his blood 
fiery quick: his memory like a burning-glass bringing into sharp light and focus a half-century as if it were as 
yesterday."— EiUOEs in the City of thk Anuels, Helen Hunt Jackson in The Century Magazine, 1883. 

Stances of its creation, there will be unquestionably a welcome for these 
interesting and authoritative commentaries and annotations which 



j^' 



■'/ 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

. ^ Association, an indefatigable worker for 

/r// > ty €/ *-^<^«i- scholarly ends, plans to issue. 

-'' ^ As to the local setting of the story, 

^/tlf<\rin/x^ ^^/'7'Z^/C< t^*^ these are established facts: Having 

^ formulated the plot and general struct- 

'Idjt m-ijky^ -^^UtA/t y^/y^j t^t^^ • ure of her novel, Mrs. Jackson one day 

xy V suggested at the friendly old adobe of 

7 CiyU^c^ ^^^^^^^' the Coronels that she locate the story in 

^^^^^^^^^^^— the spot where so much of its inspiration 

jj i /4J y-i /^ / ^^^ come to her — namely, in Los An- 

^/y eA^ ^^^^ '^ /ri /'' ^ ^^^^® ^^^^^^' ^°^ specifically in this very 

^ adobe with whose laden orange trees 

(Antonio Tgnacio de Jesus Hilarion Ursula de las once mil j ••• ■, •L-i- -^i j 

virgenes Franco coronei.) aud acacia boughs, histonc rccitals and 

DON ANTONIO'S SIGNATURE. oM-fashioucd suurisc hymns her own 

stay in Los Angeles had been so charmingly associated. But Dona 
Mariana declared there remained but one Spanish homestead where the 
original life of a California hacendado could still be studied in all its 
poetry and importance ; and told of the patrician character of Camulos. 
Here, she added, might still be studied the pressing of the mission olive 
in the old morteros ; the gathering of the vintage in Hispano-Indian 
fashion ; the making of Spanish wine ; the Spanish sheep-shearing, un- 
der an Indian Capitan. Here were still the picturesque retainers ; here 
were distinguished family traditions — all the elements, in fact, upon 
which the book might grow with historic fidelity. 

• Upon Mrs. Jackson's suggestion that a stranger could not expect to 
, receive welcome, if even recognition, in such a home, she was assured 
of adequate introduction ; and was in fact provided with cordial personal 
letters, armed with which she went to Camulos. 

The Sefiora del Valle, the noble and widely beloved lady of that little 
principality, was absent on an errand of mercy when Mrs. Jackson ar- 
rived at Camulos. Had the author of Ramona met that soul of gentle 
dignity it is probable that the novel never would have included in its 
personnel a "Seiiora Moreno." 

As to Dona Mariana, she often yet is grieved and bewildered by the 
perennial and sometimes disagreeable consequences of her suggestion 
.of Camulos to the novelist ; and sometimes confides, to those she trusts, 
a regret that she had not permitted "Ramona" and "Alessandro" tX) ^ 
elope from the unpretentious old Coronei adobe — or even, as has been 
teasingly suggested, to harness Baba into the old carreta which used to 
stand by the door. 

Illustrative material for the bibliography is abundant and rich; and may 
appropriately begin with Los Angeles subjects — including portraiture. 

On an immortally sunny afternoon Don Antonio put on for (as it 
proved) the last time the historic Spanish 'dress in which he had orice 
been part of the picturesque life of old Los Angeles ; and posed with 
Doiia Mariana in a series of pictures which have become priceless. One 
of these is- reproduced with this article, thrpugh the courtesy of the 
Association. No less charming portrayal of this gallant and large-souled 



THE FIG. 21 

old man is the later photograph, with the smoking-cap (in which he 
never smoked) upon his head ; and upon his face the expression so fa- 
miliar to thousands who loved him. A fac-simile of his complete signa- 
ture is also given — written as a special favor to the Association. It is a 
curious study in genealogy and ecclesiastical patronage. 

This is but a faint hint of the countless interesting matters to be 
treated in the Bibliography of Ramona ; but perhaps enough to indicate 
how thoroughly valuable the work will be. 




The FiGy 

BY HORACE EDWARDS. 

J HE fig has not yet taken in Southern California the com- 
mercial position which might be expected of a tree here 
perfectly hardy, rapid-growing and prolific. The Padres 
who planted the first trees on this coast had only the 
ordinary blue or black fig, which ranks lowest among the 
dozen or more varieties now cultivated here. 

Being easily propagated by cuttings, the trees planted at the 
Missions became parents of thousands in all parts of the State, 
Few valuable trees thrive under neglect as does the fig. A twig 
thrust haphazard into the ground in a few years developed into a thrifty 
tree. So the blue fig spread, ijntil today it is found from end to end of 
the State. The old miners planted it freely ; and now frequently all that 
remains to mark a once thriving settlement is the dark foliage of figs 
carelessly set out by people long since dead. 

For year* no thought was given the fig as an orchard fruit ; those who 
planted it at all being content with a few for shade or ornament. But 
in the great horticultural development from i860 to 1870 considerable 
attention was given to fig culture, and the introduction of more valuable 
varieties — particularly those that produce the dried fig of commerce. A 
number of varieties were procured, among them the white Adriatic, 
which most nearly approaches the commercial fig of any we have yet 
obtained. It produces a good-sized white fruit, which, properly dried 
and packed, is very toothsome and commands fair prices. Single trees 
fifteen to twenty years of age are claimed to have produced an average 
of $100 worth of fruit in one crop ; and it is a fact that the crops are 
immense and the prices for properly cured fruit satisfactory. It has 
been demonstrated that the figs produced in the lower foothills are far 
superior to those grown on the plains and in the valleys. When care- 
fully cured, the white Adriatic fig of the foothills can be differentiated 
only by an expert from the imported Smyrna fruit. 

Some years ago several thousand cuttings from the groves of Smyrna 
were imported and distributed. These grew rapidly into fine trees, but 
invariably refused to mature fruit. The young figs set thickly in due 
season, but at a certain stage they blighted and fell to the ground. 
Every device failed to overcome the difficulty. Finally it was suggested 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



L A Eng. Co. 



that the solution of the difl&culty was caprification — the cultivation of 
the capri, or male fig, and the introduction of the blastophaga psenes, 
or fig wasp, which, making its home in the capri fig emerges thence 
when that fruit is in blossom, and carries the pollen to the cultivated fig, 
which it thus impregnates. This method has been followed in Smyrna 
from time immemorial, the custom being to hang garlands of the capri 
fig to facilitate the journey of the blastophaga from one to the other. 
We have now obtained the capri trees. An experimental shipment of 
blastophaga was made from Smyrna, but the insects arrived in poor 

, condition and soon died. 

However, tests were made 
by artificially introducing 
the pollen ; and, without 
exception, the fruit so 
fertilized matured, being 
the first that had ever 
ripened on the trees in 
question, though heavy 
crops had regularly set 
and blighted for several 
seasons. 

Believers in caprifica- 
tion naturally deem this 
a proof of the correctness 
of their theory ; and have 
taken steps to introduce 
the blastophaga system- 
atically. It has been fre- 
quently shown in Smyrna 
by actual tests that trees 
provided with the capri 
figs produced abundant 
crops, while in seasons 
when they were not so 
provided there was a total 
failure. 

Those who have ex- 
perimented most thor- 
oughly in fig culture are most enthusiastic in their belief that it is des- 
tined to become of great importance. The fig is adapted to a very wide 
range of soil and climate ; it survives neglect which would certainly be 
fatal to any other fruit ; it is long-lived and produces yearly a succession 
of heavy crops ; and there is already a remunerative demand for the 
inferior qualities now produced. Crystalized and canned figs have been 
received with great favor, and need only to be generally known to 
become largely consumed. Every one who has land in this section should 
plant at least a few fig trees, not only for the fruit, but because the fig is 
one of our most beautiful deciduous trees. 




A FORTY-FOOT FIC-TREE. 



Photo, by Waite. 



OuT-OF-DooR Studies. 

FIFTH PAPER-UNDER THE MEGARRHIZA. 



BY ESTELLE THOMSON. 




le megarrhiza (wild cucum- 
ber) vine, in March, I found a pair 
of California thrashers rearing 
twins in a little house high in a rhus laurina clump, sheltered by a 
canopy so dense that only glimpses showed here and there between 
dancing leaves. The house itself was a wickerwork structure piled 
of brown rhus rails, and above it hung a unique and beautiful frieze — 
a heavy rope of cucumber vine suspended from twig to twig and 
thickly strung with spiked green seed-vessels. Whenever I wished to 
peer into the fascinating retreat, or to lift the downy babies — which I 
did daily — I had first to make way for my fingers cautiously under that 
prickly barrier ; and I think no other intruder ever discovered the quaint 
eyrie in the bush-top, although nearly every rhus thicket of hundreds 
was trodden and plundered by egg-collecting boys. 

When the megarrhiza seed-cases have aged and their spiked burs gape 
at the beak, a lovely lace work shell, very open and often very white, 
may be extricated. This, later on, serves as the daintiest of apartment 
houses, the rounded partitions of its four chambers as well as its outer 
walls being of perfect-patterned lace. The large, firm seeds, numbering 
originally not less than a dozen, rattle with a muffled sound in their 
papery walls as the detached dwellings blow about, mere bleached skel- 
etons drifting along the ground, heaped in hollows, anchored in branches 
and lodged in crotches of rhus wood that hold them prisoners. Fre- 
quently the entire complement of seeds is found intact, after all their 
bufFetings hither and yon by the wind ; and scarcely a cell is tenantless. 
Within the little lace-divided galleries reside happy families, chiefly of 
spider-kind ; their airy apartments closed with fine gauze and the spider 
young tucked snugly into white silk beds. If it becomes necessary to 
rip the cells apart to pursue inspection, I discover usually a single spider 
fully grown, numerous pearly infants in cradle-heaps of film and lace, 
and perhaps eggs in a rounded bunch enveloped in floss ; and always 
there are ample stores of skeletons and skins, with wings and legs of 
beautifully irridescent things, betokening rich living on the part of those 
who dwell in tenements so aristocratic. 

Finding one day a gossamer tent stretched between the tips of two 



24 



LAND OK SUNSHINE. 




" Turk's-head " balls at the base of a bit of rhus and megarrhiza, shelter- 
ing a burrow underground, I tried to bring my glass to bear on the 
domestic interior, when by accident I overturned one of the cactus sup- 
ports and laid bare the heart of a swarming camp. The entire substance 
of the old echinocactus— "devil's pincushion," as the Spanish say— had 
become a mealy mass of fungi, literally alive 
with infinitesimal ants lugging family stores 
and plying homely vocations. Picking 
up the roof which had sheltered this 
animated heap I brought it home, 
and it is a study curious and 
interesting. Every particle of 
fleshy matter gone, it now is a 
hollow crown, dry and fiercely 
spiked, turned russet by ex- 
posure, spine-tip interlocking 
with spine-tip and holding the 
little armor firm by that singular 
contact. It simply is the frame- 
work of former cactus beauty, with 
muscle and adipose removed ; and a 
more novel house-roof could not well 
be fashioned. 
I have pried out many a secret from the broken 
rhus wood ends, their jagged surface screened by curtains of film. In 
these cavern-like depths of living fibre innumerable insects have a 
retreat, swathed in webs ; and it is surprising how prodigally their small 
larders are stored. The tiny occupants scamper swiftly when I invade 
their tunnels ; but I always handle them with care and remember to draw 
the megarrhiza vines carefully across their hiding-hollows : for possibly 
those might spy upon them who would not respect the privacy of their 
domestic concerns and the generous condition of their game preserves. 
It was under the megarrhiza that I once was rewarded by finding a 
most beautiful treasure — the lacework case, or closed covers, of a lobe of 
gray and venerable prickly-pear, from which all the dessicated interior 
had perished. Prying the case apart, the hollow space was partitioned 
by tissue sheets into chambers, in each of which were dry and shining 
wormskins, a few roaming ants and spiders, and in one a square of 
silvery, perfect honeycomb : ample evidence of the thrift of some wild 
worker who had made the old opuntia receptacle a home. I hardly 
should have been more surprised to see the green lance of a Spanish 
bayonet — which was its neighbor and over which the megarrhiza lavishly 
tangled — with its long, slim body, keen prow, evenly upturned edges 
finished with ropes like linen 
cunningly curled, utilized as a 
boat and filled with white-cap- 
ped rowers resting their oars in 
those queer rowlocks. 




The Invalid in Southern California 

BY NORMAN BRIDGE, M. D 



M 



)OW can he best make the climate count for his betterment? 
This is a question of surpassing moment. Little things tell ; 
it needs the last grain to tip the scales, and as to many a poor 
fellow who comes here, if the final grain is wanting, he may as well have 
staid at home. Nearly all the invalids make mistakes, some of them 
fatal ones. 

One obstacle to recovery is homesickness. Nostalgia spoils the 
appetite, colors the world, and makes cowards. A man of ordinary 
courage can control himself in many things ; he will stop his bad and 
tempting habits ; he will bear pain and grief heroically ; but he falls at 
the touch of this blight. The bump of fortitude itself is sick. 

Invalids should not be sent here alone among strangers to take care of 
themselves, unless they have a power of self-containment equal to new 
conditions under the depression of sickness. But many do come alone 
and to a gloom that no sunshine can lift. 

Most of them come expecting a three months' vacation will restore 
them. But nothing less than a stay of two years is worth much for the 
tuberculous patients, and five years is a safer minimum. 

Another obstacle is the current belief among the unthinking that the 
night air is baneful, and that the sick man should never go out in it. 
This rule is as rational as that other one that you must not see the new 
moon over your left shoulder. The night air is distinctly cleaner than 
the day air, has thirty per cent, fewer microbes and is therefore better to 
breathe. It is only cooler than the day air, and no one ever did or ever 
will take cold by reason of this fact if his body is kept warm by cloth- 
ing or otherwise. The only medicinal thing, if any, in the climate is 
its peculiar atmosphere ; and to deprive a sick man of it in its purity for 
twelve hours each day is a crime. The paramount advantage of being 
here is the out-door life it allows, and the more invalids have of it the 
better. They should be out every day that is not stormy, cold days 
included, and be clothed sufficiently. 

A tent is the best shelter for many invalids ; its superiority over a 
house of wood is in the freshness of its atmosphere ; its air is fresh 
because it is in perpetual motion with the breeze outside. 

The fear of night air prevents ventilation of sleeping rooms, and sit- 
ting rooms in the evening. The night air is poison, so it must be kept 
out ! To add to the horror of such unsanitary conditions, rooms are 
heated with colossal lamps, and gas stoves unconnected with the chim- 
ney. When in use, these are positively noisome, yet to the effrontery of 
some Californians they are "odorless. " Light one after entering a room, 
and its bad odor will steal upon you insidiously, and, if your olfactories 
are dull, you may be slow to notice it. But if you can smell, enter a 
room where one has been burning for an hour, and say if you enjoy it. 

Rooms should be well ventilated at all times ; insomuch that you can 
enter them from the outer air and not discover a stuflFy odor. Nothing 



26 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

less than this should be tolerated by a person below his normal standard 
of health, yet this rule is not fulfilled in the life of one invalid in ten, the 
world over. 

The sin of unhealed houses in winter is one that will, as it ought to, 
haunt some Californians who think they mean to be very good. Their 
mode of living in this particular is constructive suicide, if not con- 
structive murder. The habits of the old Californians transmitted to the 
later generation, the price of fuel, and thoughtlessness, if not laziness, 
have conspired to bring it about. Twelve years ago very few houses in 
Los Angeles had any means of heating beyond a single fire-place (the 
most costly device of all), and some abominations of kerosene stoves. 
Year by year, as sense and sanity grew, the chimneys and stove-pipe 
holes of new houses increased. Now the tubular furnace and hot water 
heating are becoming fashionable. People are learning what was 
true when Columbus arrived, that the coast hereabouts is not tropical, 
but a cool country free from ice and snow, and that artificial heat is 
needed on cool evenings and days as truly, although not as much, as in 
Chicago or Boston. 

The sin of scant clothing is nearly as great as that of bad house-heat- 
ing. Many people, especially women, are afraid of warm clothing ; 
overcoats and wraps seem to have teeth and are liable to bite them. 
They wear thin underclothes and night gowns, the latter usually of cot- 
ton, and then wonder they are harassed by colds and useless coughs. 
They put on what clothes they must, instead of all they can bear, which 
latter should be the rule in all dry countries, especially for invalids. 
All clothing as far as possible should be of wool ; there is hardly another 
country where in the cooler seasons and hours thick wool clothing is so 
grateful. All night gowns should be woolen, and in winter thick. 

The atmosphere here is remarkably diathermanous ; as soon as sunset 
or shadow comes the temperature drops rapidly — as in every dry spot in 
the world — and more clothing is needed and artificial heat at times ; and 
for this nothing else is needed. 

There is a great amount of blundering in the matter of exercise and 
the way to spend time out of doors. Invalids should exercise moder- 
ately, if they can without fatigue ; never immoderately. Too much 
exercise by tuberculous patients has done incalculable harm. If one has 
daily fever he should conserve his strength by keeping still. 

It is not necessary while out of doors on a cool day to exercise to avoid 
cold-catching. If you are clothed all over to a consciousness of warmth, 
you may sit out by the hour, in the shade even, and be safe. But the 
average man quite fails to understand this ; he will take long drives in 
an open carriage, in the wind, and be serene about it, but refuse to sit 
on his porch ten minutes. The breeze is too fresh and cold for him, and 
he scorns to sit with an overcoat and lap robe, as a lady scorns to swing 
her arms while walking, or to wear her last year's bonnet on the street. 



The Victoria Regia. 

BY EDMUND D. STURTEVANT. 

• HIS most magnificent relative of our common water lily is a 
native of South America, and is named in honor of the Queen 
of England. From a seed the size of a pea it will, under pro- 
per conditions, in seven months produce a plant having a spread thirty 
feet in diameter with perhaps eight or ten leaves each six feet across. 
The flowers are lovely beyond description ; but the monster leaves of 
the plant are its glory. It is most fascinating to watch the expansion 



©p' 




Union Eng. Co. 



THE VICTORIA RECIA — BLOSSOM AND LEAF. 



and growth of these leaves on a plant of normal size. Out of the heart 
of the plant rises to the surface of the water an oblong ball or wrinkled 
mass of vegetable tissue about ten inches across and covered thickly 
with long sharp thorns. The next day it is expanded into a lovely 
bronze-colored salver some eighteen inches in diameter and having an 
upturned rim tinted with crimson. From this time on, its growth is 
about eight inches a day until it attains full size. The stem, also cov- 
ered with thorns, is joined to the leaf in the center, and is like a rope 



28 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



over an inch thick. The under surface of the leaf has a series of strong 
veins radiating from the center, and often three inches deep, giving it 
power to support readily the weight of a child ; and with the assistance 
of a few thin pieces of wood placed on the^surface it will support an 
adult. The rim of the leaf is also a great curiosity, being in the ordi- 
nary plant three inches^high. A variety of recent introdudlion has this 
rim sometimes six inches high. The flowers on good plants are twelve 
inches across ; pure white, withjpetals more numerous than in the com- 
mon water lily. They exhale a most delicious" perfume, like that of 
pine-apples, which pervades the air for a considerable distance. 

"We have sometimes looked for a passing moment . . . and — stayed 
for more than an hour unable to leave the fascinating scene. After the 
strange flower-bud has reared its dark head from the placid tank, mov- 
ing a little uneasily, like some imprisoned water-creature, it pauses for 
a moment in a sort. of dumb despair. Then trembling again, and col- 
lecting all its powers, it thrusts open with an indignant jerk the rough 
calyx leaves, and the beautiful disrobing begins. The firm, white cen- 
tral cone, first so closely infolded, quivers a little, and swiftly before 
your eyes the first of the hundred petals detaches its edges and springs 
back, opening toward the water, while its white refle<ftion opens to meet 
it from below. Many moments of repose follow — you watch — another 
petal trembles, detaches, springs open, and is still. ... As petal by petal 
slowly opens, there still stands the central cone of snow. . . . Meanwhile 
a strange, rich odor fills the air, and nature seems to concentrate all 
fascinations and claim all senses for this jubilee of her darling. So pass 
the enchanted moments of the evening, till the fair thing pauses at last 
and remains for hours unchanged." 

In the morning the flower closes entirely, to open the second evening, 
when another wonderful transformation takes place. Every snow-white 
petal has assumed a deep pink color, and the flower has lost its fra- 
grance. A new flower appears about every four days. 

For many years after its introduction the Vi(5loria was grown only in 
expensive glass houses especially constructed for it, in a large tank, 
with submerged hot- water pipes to give the high temperature necessary 
to its perfect development. A few years ago an enthusiastic cultivator 
of water-lilies, then residing in the East, conceived the idea of growing 
it in the open air. A basin was constructed in a sheltered and sunny 
position, with the usual arrangements for artificially heating the water, 
but entirely without the glass covering. The experiment proved an 
entire success, and since then the plant has become very popular in 
public parks and some private gardens where choice collections of aquat- 
ics are grown. In California each year may be seen a fine specimen in 
the conservatory at Golden Gate Park. It has also been grown out- 
doors in the Cahuenga Water Garden, and in one of the parks of Los 
Angeles, in both instances without artificial heat ; but in the absence of 
this aid, the low night temperature of this climate prevents the leaves 
and flowers from attaining their normal size. Even with this limitation 
the Royal Water lyily is an object of remarkable interest. 




^ DESIDERIO, THE TIGUA WAR-CAPTAIN. 



Copyright 1895 by Chas. F. Luromis. 



\ The First Printer in California. 



tY MARY M. BOWMAN. 




PON JOSE DE LA ROSA was born in the city of Puebla, 
Mexico, January 5, 1790. Estimated by the diversity of voca- 
tions in which he engaged, his long life was also a busy one. 
He was by turns tailor, watch-maker, printer, book-binder, 
editor and "student up to the point of being ordained for the priest- 
hood." He had bound books for the government, and fought for 
its independence as a lieutenant in the Mexican army. 

In 1834 he came to California with the first colony, the Compania 
Cosmopolitana, organized in the city of Mexico by Juan Bandini, 
Jose Maria Padres and others whose names are interwoven with 
the early history of the State. In this company of about two hundred 
and fifty people, many were educated, some owned property and all hqd 
professions or trades. Among them was the family of the late Don 
Antonio F. Coronel, that gallant figure which has recently passed away. 
Their departure from San Bias (west coast of Mexico) on the govern- 
ment vessel Morales, and the brig Natalia ; the landing at San Diego ; 
the rest at Missions San Luis Rey and San Gabriel ; their narrow escape 
from shipwreck off Point Concepcion, and the wreck of the Natalia in 
December at Monterey, are records of history. Included in their stores 
of goods and household effects, they brought a supply of type and a 
small printing press. Don Jose held a commission from President Santa 
Ana, to do the governmental and ecclesiastical printing. He opened his 
office in Monterey and carried on the work alone, "always with the 
sentinel guarding the door." He published the questions and answers 
for the government, he explained ; discussions and decrees between 
Mexico and the provinces, the record of all movements and affairs here 
to send back to el Presidente, in Mexico. This work he continued in 
Monterey until in July, 1846, Commodore Sloat hoisted the American 
flag and took possession of California, when the office and contents were 
delivered to the Americans — " on which occasion," said Don Jos^, draw- 
ing his slight stature up to its full height, "I represented the Mexican 
government." Don Jose's tenderest memories clung to the past, and 
naturally to the good Fathers of St. Francis of Assisi. " Ah," he said, 
" you should have known good Padre Majin at the Mission San Carmelo — 
there are none like him now." He was a wise and holy man ; he healed 
the sick and foretold all that would happen. He told them the black- 
robed [secular] priests would come. 

In the earthquake of 1835, a spring of water came up in the floor of 
the sanctuary at San Carmelo ; and the next temblor almost destroyed 
the buildings. 

When I asked " Which do you like best, Don Jos^, the old times or 
the new?" it was the fanning of a dying ember into glowing flame. 
Every faculty was aroused and the musical Spanish seemed to roll in 
volumes from his tongue. " The old times ! " he cried. "They were the 
best ! There is no religion now. Fathers and mothers are not so careful 



THE FIRST PRINTER IN CALIFORNIA. 



31 



in training children ; they are not taught obedience and the command- 
ments as when I was young. There is no privacy in these days ; all that 
is done at night is blazoned to the world in the morning through the 
newspapers, and there are too many newspapers. In the old times there 
were no collections taken in the sanctuary. Now the first thing is the 
plate dashed up under the nose." 

He had once written his recollections and given them to a friend, to 
be published ; but they were lost somewhere, and the friend was dead, 

would not know 
had played in 
events of the 
had witnessed 
tions. ' * I am 
page of my 
However, he 
and might live 
and expressed 
strings of his 
broken — other- 
sing and play 
I first met Don 
passed the cen- 
but time had 
with him. His 
abundant and 
gray. The up- 
firm and even, 
dim, but his 
and memory 
following year 
centennial 
bration of the 
Revolution ary 
tween the two, 
much the better 
courtly old gen- 
familiar figure 
of San Buena 



so the world 
the part he 
the important 
State — and he 
all the revolu- 
now on the last 
life," he said, 
was quite strong 
some years yet ; 
regret that the 
guitar were 
wise he would 
for me. When 
Josd, he had 
tury mile-post, 
dealt gently 
hair was quite 
not entirely 
per teeth were 
the eyesight 
hearing good 
clear. In the 
I attended the 
birthday cele- 
daughter of a 
soldier, and be- 
Don Jos6 was 
preserved. The 
tleman was a 
on the streets 




DON JOSE DE LA ROSA. 



Ventura, under a broad-brimmed sombrero, making his way carefully 
by the aid of a heavy walking stick. "Buenos dias, aniigo mio, buenos 
dias,'' was his cordial salutation to each passer. The celebration of his 
one hundredth birthday was a public testimonial of the respect and 
esteem in which this venerable citizen was held in the community where 
he was a resident some fifteen years. His ordination for the church 
doubtless left its impress on his life, for he lived and died a celibate. 
Don Jos^ de la Rosa died in January, 1892, at the age of one hundred 
and two years ; another link dropped out in the slender chain that holds 
a utilitarian and gain-seeking present to the pastoral and poetic past. 



The Sugar Beet. 



©p' 



BY C. H. WILLIAMS. 

»HE great profits of fruit-growing in Southern California have not 
changed the fact that we needed a crop more valuable than 
grain, which could profitably be cultivated on valuable land 
and without necessitating that the farmer wait several years for any 
return for his work and outlay. In fruit-growing, after considerable 
initial expenditure for land and trees, the farmer has to wait three to 
five years before he can expect much income. For tiding over these 
years, raising poultry, planting vegetables between the trees, and so 
forth, are all good in their way ; but many industrious people have not 
means to plant an orchard after paying transportation for themselves 
and families from the East. 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



TAKING IN A LOAD OF BEETS AT CHINO. 



Over four years ago, a crop was introduced into California which fully 
fills this "long-felt want/' It is the sugar beet. Few who have not in- 
vestigated have any conception of the possibilities of beet-sugar culture 
in California. 

The United States sends abroad annually over $100,000,000 for sugar. 
All this could now be kept at home ; giving an income of $1000 a year 
each to 100,000 families, or supporting 500,000 persons directly, and many 
more indirectly. Recently Germany produced 1,200,000 tons of beet su- 
gar ; the United States 25,000. France paid its enormous debt to Ger- 
many with its beet-sugar crop. In Belgium, good beet-sugar land brings 
twice as much as our highest-priced orange land, because it pays good 
interest on that figure. In Denmark, the sugar-farmers have risen 
from poverty to affluence, though the manufacturers have to pay 
a tax of 3^ cents on every pound, while the sugar-making season lasts 
only 100 days as against six to nine months in California. 



THE SUGAR BEET. 



33 



The produ(5lion of beet sugar in this State was first attempted at Alva- 
rado in 1869 ; and experiments were made in other localities. It was 
easy to produce the beets ; but inexperience and lack of suitable appli- 
ances prevented successful manufadlure of sugar. But the experimenters 
were men of determination ; and modern American ingenuity has solved 
the most difficult problems, and processes have been so simplified and 
cheapened that, even at the present unprecedented low prices, the 
fa(ftories are operated at a fair profit. 

The deep cultivation which the beet requires greatly improves the 
land ; the soil becoming deepened and disintegration and solution of 
mineral constituents much accelerated. The tap-root of the beet goes 
very deep, loosening soil which most plants fail to reach. The nourish- 
ment thus obtained passes partly into the leaves and is left with them 
on the ground at harvest time. In Europe, farmers are anxious to plant 
beets, as they find their next crop on the same soil increased 33 per cent. 
The pulp, after the Sugar is removed, makes excellent food for cattle, and 




I^Al 1 4 



i 






Uuioa Lu^'. Cu. 



THINNING BEETS AT ANAHEIM 



Uarden City I'hoto. Co. 



can be sold to farmers for little or nothing after paying them liberally 
for the privilege of extracting the sugar. 

That the sugar beet in Southern California is a complete success has 
been amply proved by the experience of four seasons at the great Chino 
factory. In fact, results there and at Anaheim (in percentage of sugar 
and in yield) have astonished European experts. This year about 6,000 
acres of sugar beets will be harvested at Chino. A conservative estimate 
of the average yield is twelve tons to the acre. Some fields will yield 
twenty tons ; the average would be much higher if there were not so 
much new land, too rank for successful beet culture. The factory will 
slice 100,000 tons of beets this season, which will yield about 305 pounds 
sugar to the ton. Some growers own their land, others rent on shares. 
Of the latter class there are now three hundred. The company advances 



34 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

the seed and takes as rent one-fourth the crop. It pays $3.50 for beets 
which assay 12 per cent, sugar ; and 25 cents per ton additional for each 
unit per cent, above that amount. The average of sugar in the Chino 
beets has been about 13^ per cent. 

The Chino fadlory will disburse this season about $400,000 ; and ex- 
pe6ls within a few years to pay out one million dollars annually. For 
fuel, petroleum is used ; and a pipe line is being laid from the oil fields 
at Puente to the factory. 



The Transplanting* 

A thousand years against the North the Saxon oak has wrenched 
A livelihood from grudging soil ; against a hostile sky 

Uplifting its undaunted head, and mighty branches clenched — 
Too storm-beleaguered half to live, too stubborn yet to die. 

Impassively and stern it faced the bullying icy blast, 

Half-mockingly smiled back when sham of sunshine smirked about — 
The winter-thief that stripped it stark and froze it hard and fast ; 

The summer-cheat that coaxed it fight another winter out. 

Slow circles counted up its years ; the centuries were told 
By inch and inch of rugged girth — and scars for every year. 

For every year a deeper crop of wrinkles manifold, 

And less of sap to stir its heart or give its leaflets cheer. 

Aye ! Strength is noble everywhere — but even it may wrong 
The strenuous arms, the iron hearts, it bids forever strive. 

For strength is meant for something more than merely to be strong ; 
And life is not a lifetime spent in strain to keep alive ! 

Bethink you — nay, but let it rest. For what was not, shall be. 

The unbreakable grain of oak was wrought, in that embittered past. 
Against the far, unreckoned day when Southern skies should see 

The stern old giant's saplings set to kindlier soil at last ! 

Where Mother Nature smiles : " They called you oaks, at home, forsooth ! 

But wait — I fain would show you, now, nty notion of a tree ; 
And what an oak was meant to be, that shall fulfill in truth 

Its own potential, and the scope of acorns yet to be ! 

*' The where it shall expand at will, unvexed and undeformed ; 

Nor curse the earth for miserly, nor count the sky a foe. 
Shall set its leaves in certainty, and feel its pulses warmed 

To joy of life and grace — and strength — its sires could never know." 

'Twere well we let the mother-heart work out the mother- will — 
Her face is sweet with fruitful years, with conscious mastery calm. 

It may be she shall teach us here to keep the staunchness, still, 
Of oak — the while we learn as well the evergreen of the palm ! 

• Read at the annual banquet of the Chamber of Commerce, May 15. 




Union Eng. Co. Photos, by Newton, Santa Barbara. 

MEMORIES OF THE SANTA BARBARA FLOWER FESTIVAL. 

The Santa Barbara Flower Festival of 1895 surpassed all its predeces- 
sors, and was a wonder of beauty and taste. The illustrations give but 
a hint of the extraordinary charm of the occasion. 




A DISTINGUISHED Mrs. E. B. Custer, the widow of the gallant General who 

CONTRIBUTOR. ^,^g ^^^ ^f ^^j. f^^ wholly chivalric figures— the hero of the 

Little Big-Horn who rode to death while cowards skulked within sound 
of his dying volleys — is herself one of the most lovable and most 
widely beloved personalities in American letters. Her books have won 
hearts everywhere ; and her readings from them have made her easily 
the most popular of the many American authors who now read from 
their own works. 

Southern California has had no more charming — and no more charmed 
— convert ; and her visit to us several years ago is as pleasantly remem- 
bered by her as by those who met her here. For the July number of the 
Land of Sunshine Mrs. Custer has contributed an article upon her 
memories of Southern California. It is full of the personal charm of 
the writer, and will be read with pleasure here and abroad. Mrs. Custer 
is just now taking a vacation in England. 

THE MONTH OF June in Spanish America is the month of San Juan, the 

SAN JUAN. beheaded Disciple. The 24th is his specific feast, kept with 

particular ardor in tens of thousands of towns from Colorado to Pata- 
gonia. A curious fixture of the celebration is the gallo race. The logic 
does not appear, for St. John was not, so far as heard from, either a 
bronco-rider or a snatcher of roosters. If he had been, perhaps Herodias 
might not have danced his head off so fluently. But whatever the reason 
for it, the chicken-scamper is wholly set apart to his honor. It belongs 
to the 24th of June, and to no other day in the year ; and as it is the 
gallantest and most stirring sport of rural Spanish America, the saint 
is to be congratulated on the distin6lion. 

A live rooster is buried to the neck in the road, and the competing 
horsemen sweep by at full gallop, each in turn swooping low from his 
saddle to clutch the tiny mark. It would be none too easy were the 
object lifeless ; and with the clever ducking and dodging of the bird it 
is monumentally difficult. At last, however, some superb rider will 
grasp the prize and be off with it like the wind, with all the field in mad 
pursuit. He fights them off as long and as pluckily as he may, belabor- 
ing them freely with his feathered club ; but at last is overborne by 
grappling numbers, and the chicken is forcibly dismembered, a new 
struggle and race arising over each bedraggled shred. Cruel ? No more 
than chasing your chicken across the yard to behead it for dinner. The 
bird is instantly killed by the clutch which drags it from the ground ; 
and the prior fri6lion on its feelings is no worse than when you dis- 
courteouslv shoo it out of the flower-bed. 



IN THE LION'S DEN. 37 ' 

No one writes more charming nursery verse than Eugene " green fields and 
Field. This is probably not to be wondered at. It seems rea- pastures new." 

sonable to infer that he could also interpret monkeydom with sympa- 
thetic insight. Fancy a man of letters skipping over the State principally 
occupied with a thermometer, to be hauled from his pocket and blinked 
at whenever he could thereby show a delicate courtesy to his hosts ! 
Also, whenever he was in a condition to take the readings. One is irre- 
sistibly reminded, by Mr. Field's progress through California, of Steven- 

"A blue-behinded ape, I skip 
Upon the trees in Paradise." 

For Mr. Field was out here, last year ; and those who care for such 
fishing as the catostotnus teres affords, had fun with him. Brakemen 
and bootblacks recognized their legitimate prey — and he very appropri- 
ately treats the result in his "Sharps and a Flat" column in a Chicago 
paper. 

We have hospitably entreated here every conceivable kind of a tender- 
foot, and many kinds that are inconceivable ; but Mr. Field has the 
happy distinction of being, in the classic phrase of Vanderbilt, "more 
kinds of a" etc., "than any other man now extant." As if the ther- 
mometer episode were not enough to be proud of, he also relates that 
he was to go to Madame Modjeska's ranch, but desisted because he 
heard that mountain lions were killing all the calves thereabout. He 
was prudent, but selfish, in staying away. Probably the pumas had 
their mouths made up for just one more. 

Ever since his return to Chicago (where he certainly need not carry 
a thermometer) he has been demonstrating how much better $5 per col- 
umn for "smart" prevarication is suited to his literary quality than is 
the sober sense of occasionally sober travelers. 

These reflections are not because Eugene did not love our climate. 
Providence is kind enough to this country to keep some classes from 
wishing to settle here. But a certain self-respe(5l and dignity are ex- 
pected of a literary man, in these days. And Eugene seems to have 
come to California for a change when he really should have gone to the 
nurse. 

Native Sons of the Golden West probably wouldn't help it if where to be 

they could ; but they will never know what they miss. It is a born. 

great pity not to have been born in the East — for the same reason which 
induced the philosophical Yankee lad to whittle his finger once in a 
while. "What in the world do you do that for ? " someone asked him. 
" Well," he drawled, " it feels so plaguey good when it gets well ! " 

The Land of Sunshine this month contains fifty per cent. as to some pic- 

more illustrations and reading-matter than ever before — and it tures. 

has habitually been the most liberal ten cents' worth ever published on 
this Coast. The new form — the standard magazine shape vfhich^S^'O "vl^ 
monthlies adopt if they can afford it — enables far more artistic )yg^XKl^ig^^ ^^ ^ 
of the pages. The wide margins, the marginal illustrations, and other 
mechanical devices made possible by the new form, all go to make an 




38 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

artistic whole which has no reason to blush in much older and richer 
company. 

The frontispiece this month is the first of a very remarkable series of 
photographs made in Southern California by T. H. Palache, a San Fran- 
cisco amateur of unusual ability. His studies of our Missions are the 
most artistic that have ever been made ; and it is to be hoped that the 
present series is not the last of his work in so fascinating a field. 

The portrait of Desiderio Jaramillo, capitan a guerra of the Tiguas, 
will interest those who care for fine types, and will be particularly 
acceptable to the thousands who admired his ere<5l, tall figure and strong 
face in the Pageant of the Pacific during the Fiesta de Los Angeles. The 
photograph was made in Isleta, N. M., the morning on which the forty 
Pueblos got home to their quaint village-republic with infinite stories to 
tell of the beauties of " Califor-r-r-nia." 

ALL "coming our In its promise for Southern California, this year starts as no 

WAY." other year has started in at least a generation. The rainfall, in 

volume and distribution, could not have been bettered if we had managed 
the faucets ourselves. The temperatures have been ideally genial — 
perfect " growing weather." The orange crop was the largest and finest 
ever raised in this country, and all our other crops promise to surpass 
themselves. Being human, we meet an occasional hitch in a perverse 
market or in Eastern hard times ; but these things do not come home to 
us — they only worry us a little from afar. There are local differences of 
gait ; but whether deliberately or swiftly, every part of Southern Cali- 
fornia is pushing steadily ahead. In Los Angeles, six new buildings are 
going up every working day in the year. In the country, every farm is 
growing more valuable every year ; and every year thousands of acres 
of virgin soil are being won over to motherhood. With every ten years 
Southern California is doubling in population and in wealth — and it is 
barely entering the doorway of its future. 

AN AMBITIOUS The Mazamas, a club of mountain-climbers organized on top of 

P'-AN. ^1- Hood a year ago, will try on the loth of July to heliograph a 

message from British Columbia to Mexico and back. Parties are to 
ascend Mts. Baker, Rainier, St. Helens, Adams, Hood, Jefferson, Three 
Sisters, Diamond, Thielsen, Scott, Pitt, Shasta, Teliae, Round-Top, 
Dana, Lyell, Stillman, Whitney, Lowe, Baldy, and such others as will 
complete the chain. T. B. White, 14 Worcester Block, Portland, Or., is 
secretary of the club. 

A STEP BACK- The retirement of Miss Tessa L. Kelso, librarian, and of Miss 

^^^^- Adelaide R. Hasse, assistant, is a misfortune not only to the pub- 

lic library but to all Southern California. We have had here, in this 
city of less than 100,000 people, many things excellent, and just one 
wholly metropolitan — a public library of the first class ; one which gave 
us standing throughout the United States. The evolution of such a 
library from an original litter of books is wholly due to these two 
trained experts and to a board of library direcftors which was not com- 
posed of Philistines — a board created with a somewhat higher purpose 



IN THE LION'S DEN. 39 

than "to fire someone." The class of folk who think they think, pre- 
sume that to be a librarian one has only to be "educated." The people 
who think, are aware that the profession now is based on a long tech- 
nical training. Scholars here will always thank the Board which en- 
abled, and the two ladies who made, an institution we were proud of; 
and they will as little forget the discreditable first inje(5lion of politics 
into the last place where politics should ever enter. There are people 
capable of taking pride in the city in which they live ; and then there 
are politicians. In the new board the proportion is two against three. 
Therefore the backset to intelligence prevailed, though the minority 
made a manly fight. 

The dainty tint-block which enriches the new cover adds the a unique 

finishing touch to its appropriateness and beauty. It is no ere- feature. 

ation of art, but the art of the Creation — a direct reprodudlion of a piece 
of cactus " lace," the stru6lure of a lobe of the opuntia tuna or prickly 
pear. It is a distindlive product of the Southwest. Up to date the Land 
OF Sunshine is the only magazine in the world whose cover was ever 
embellished with drawings by the Almighty. 

The Land of Sunshine with its May number rounded out the first "goin' on two." 
and most critical year of magazine life. It has put on flesh with every 
month, and enters its second year a typical Southern California young- 
ster — fat, happy, big for its age, and not very bad-looking. The twelve- 
month has conclusively proved the correctness of our belief that nothing 
is too good for Southern California. With every number the magazine 
has been made better ; with every number its circulation, its patronage 
and its influence have made phenomenal increase. The conscientious 
work put into it, the pride in making it more and more worthy its 
intelligent clientage, more and more fit to stand as a type of Southern 
California culture before the critical tribunals of the East— these have 
met most generous recognition. It has attracted the best writers in 
Southern California and many from abroad— the first California publica- 
tion for which some of them have cared to write. It has promptly won 
honorable recognition in the East. All the great newspapers of the 
country have reviewed it favorably ; and its articles are quoted not only 
throughout the Southern California press, but in the dailies of Boston, 
New York and Chicago. Many leading scholars and writers of the East 
read it regularly and with interest. It is a revelation to many of them 
that this se<5lion supports a magazine of this class ; for there still pre- 
vails a benighted notion (unhappily perpetuated by a certain sort of 
publications here) that we raise more oranges than brains. Good news- 
papers appear much earlier than good magazines in the development of 
a country ; and that this section, which may fairly be called only ten 
years old, supports to growing excellence such a publication as this, is 
the best testimony the East has ever had to our civilization and intelli- 
gence. And ;t may be remarked that the Land of Sunshine is not 
tired of growing. It will improve just as fast and just as far as its public 
shall care to have it. 




THAT 

WHICH IS 
WRITTEN 



■^p:- 



There are indications that even 
Literature is putting from forth the 
skirts of conservatism a tentative toe west- 
ward. If she find the walking good, it may be that 
she will presently step out our way. It must be only 
an accident, of course, that Chicago is the home of what Whittier called 
"the best literary weekly in the United States" — namely, The Dial. 
Neither Boston nor New York — nor for that matter any other American 
city — has a fortnightly of anything like the cleverness and tone of the 
Chap Book, the remarkable little publication only a year old, which 
already has become a necessity to all who make any pretension to liter- 
ary taste. And it is no less curious that the most beautifully-printed 
periodical in America, the Inland Printer, also emanates from the City 
that Gets There. Can it be that the senile centers have inadvertently 
allowed their brains to spring aleak, even as their bone and brawn have 
been dribbling westward lo, these many years ? 



A REMARKABLE 
WEEKLY. 



WHAT SAPPHO 
ESCAPED. 



The San Francisco Argonaut is not the most numerously, but 
beyond reasonable doubt is the most widely, read publication 
west of Chicago. It is wholly unique in the weekly field, and by its 
ability has taken a rank of which not only its conductors but the Coast 
should be proud. The skill with which it is edited, and the vigor and 
impetus of its editorials compel attention and interest. It is inordi- 
nately partisan and consistently bigoted ; but even those who least agree 
with it cannot but concede that it is about as good reading as weekly 
literature furnishes anywhere in the world ; and they read it no less 
avidly than those with whom its tenets harmonize. 

It is doubtless just as well that the Swan of Lesbos took to the 
^gean some 2400 years before L. B. Pemberton of Los An- 
geles did her in Sappho, and Other Songs. If his strophes could have 
beset her ear, she would scarce have thought Phaon worth drowning 
for. 

" They open not those fleecy gates 
To let earth-worn Celestials by. 
Great Zeus, Phoebus, Athene, 
Aphrodite, Eos, Selene 
From this majestic world have fled." 

But Mr. P. gets back from Olympus with both feet in his " Farewell to 

the Muse " : 

" Oh, gladly I'd stay with thee still. 

And hug thee, sweet phantom forever ; 
But the landlord will come with his bill, 
And it's sloppy to move in this weather. 



^^ALIFORHV^, 



THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN. 

" The minstrels of the air do not sing 

When storms and misfortune hang over — 
If they'd half my troubles on the string 
They'd conclude they're a long ways from clover. 

" My lyre has been only a toy, 

I scarcely have yet learned a chord ; 
But I'll just hand it down to my boy. 
And go out and cut wood in the yard. 

* * * * 

" There's been ever a vague, sweet something 
I've labored in vain to express ; 
But this won't paint the house in the spring, 
Nor buy our new baby a dress." 

Let US trust the poet may find a job which will save the children of his 
loins and of his head from danger of exposure to the weather. Los 
Angeles, published by the author. 

Rounsevelle Wildman, editor of T/ie Overland, has published an " overland " 

in book form his Panglima Muda, a Romance of Malaya. It novelette. 

is a small volume, prodigal of local color and of panoramic adventure, 
with killings to beat Tombstone's palmiest days, a due rescue of beauty 
in distress, and the traditional " lived-happy-ever-after. " The Overland 
Publishing Co., San Francisco. 

The Book Buyer, New York, says of Mrs. Margaret Collier a merited cow- 

Graham's Stories of the Foothills: "The charaAer-drawing pliment. 

is remarkably strong, the sense of humor and pathos marked, and the 
artistic reserve of the story-teller never relaxed. Such work as this was 
wisely rescued from the uncertain keeping of the magazines." 

P. W. Dooner, an attorney of this city, has put forth a slen- minor notes. 

der pamphlet, The Genesis of Water. It is a thoughtful and 
ingenious speculation upon an important gap in the Nebular Hypothesis. 
Los Angeles, published by the author. * 

In Harper's Magazine for May, Owen Wister has one of the finest and 
most powerful of all his stories of Western life. La Tinaja Bonita is a 
tale of the Arizona desert, told not only with extraordinary vividness, 
but with an understanding quite beyond the hope of the " West-from-a- 
Car-Wiudow" young men. 

Percival Pollard, a peculiarly clever writer, associated with C. M. & 
R. T. Shutz, has begun in Chicago the publication of The Echo, a 
humorous and artistic fortnightly. Will H. Bradley, the American 
Beardsley, is doing a series of colored frontispieces for it. 120 Fifth 
Avenue, Chicago. 

Cephas L. Bard, M. D., Ventura, has published an interesting mono- 
graph, A Contribution to the History of Medicine i7i Southern California. 
It is full of quaint medical customs of the Indians and early Spanish 
settlers. 

Prof. T. S. C. Lowe, the "wizard of Echo Mountain," has printed in 
an interesting pamphlet his Early Aeronautic and Meteorological Inves- 
tigations. 



Los Angeles, 

THE METROPOLIS OF THE SOUTHWEST. 



m 




►HE size of a city is usually reckoned by the 
number of human beings within its official 
^ boundaries. Unfortunately, the census does 
not come often enough to be of much value in 
keeping track of populations which double 
in five years or so. The census of 
1890 gave Los Angeles 59,000 people, 
which made it the 57th city in the 
United States. Since then there has 
been phenomenal growth ; estimates 
made January i, 1895 (from voting lists 
and school registers) credit Los Angeles 
with 85,000 population — which is a 
conservative rather than an enthusi- 
astic figure. That would rank the 
city 32nd in the nation. 
Present size, however, is not the only measure of a city's importance. 
Its location, the character of its people, the nature and extent of the 
region logically tributary to it, its sources of income, its record of things 
done, its program of things to be done — all these, and more, must be 
broadly considered by him who would cast the youthful city's horoscope. 
Chicago was small, too. 

Suppose a line drawn along the Mexican boundary from our San Diego 
to El Paso, Texas ; thence to Santa F^ ; thence to the center of Utah ; 
thence to San Luis Obispo. There you have the commercial watershed 
of Los Angeles — an area of over 300,000 square miles; more than Maine, 
New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connedlicut, Rhode Island, 
New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Car- 
olina and Georgia, all put together. Of this enormous range, Los 
Angeles must logically and will in facfl be the metropolis, with all the 
name implies. 

The problems of modern railroading lie as much in grades as in miles ; 
and the easiest grades to the Pacific are by the valleys that center in 
Los Angeles. The shortest distance from Atlantic to Pacific tide-water, 
over the most pracfticable gradients, has its western terminus here. Los 
Angeles, it is true, does not lie precisely upon the ocean's edge ; no more 
do London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna. While the original settlement of 
Los Angeles was due to minor local advantages, its latter unprecedented 
multiplying of population in a decade, its selecflion as the terminus of 
transcontinental railways, its enormous accretion of adlive capital — these 
have come from a general comprehension of the fa(5l that this has been 
adapted by nature to be the site of a great city. 

Of this 300,000 miles of Southwest, vast stretches are still desert ; and 
desert much of it will forever remain. But enormous areas of it will be 



44 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



reclaimed by irrigation ; and those portions will support a population 
five to one greater per acre than equal areas in the Eastern agricultural 
States. Several million people will live and prosper by agriculture under 
irrigation in Arizona, New Mexico, Southern California and Utah ; and 
their products will pay tribute to this city. 

Immediately surrounding Los Angeles is a district unique in climate, 
unparalleled in the variety and value of its produ(5ls, which in the natural 




Union Eng. Co. 



A WASHINGTON STREET LAWN. 



Photo, by Stiffler. 



course of events will contain one great city and several small ones. The 
present population of the seven southern counties is about a quarter of 
a million. In Southern California t)etween six and seven million acres 
of arable land can in time be reached by irrigation. This will support 
an agricultural population of between one and two million people, 
directly ; indirectly (in the handling and distribution of their output) 
half as many more. Cities must grow as their tributary country devel- 
opes. When Southern California is "settled up" and planted to its 
profitable capacity, Los Angeles will have a population of half to three- 
quarters of a million people. Those who have seen it grow in a dozen 
years from 12,000 to at least 85,000 will not deem the estimate large. 

It is well for a city, as for an individual, to have more than one string 
to its bow. Agriculture alone has never built up a great city — though, 
to be sure, agriculture has never before had just such a chance as here. 
The distinctive crops of Southern California are of a particularly high 
class, and as a rule bring the grower an income which seems fabulous to 
the Eastern farmer of wheat or corn. The foremost wealth of Southern 



LOS ANGELES. 



45 



California is in the soil ; but there must be other bases of prosperity 
besides. Ten years ago, when the sudden growth of Los Angeles was 
about to begin, it was a common sneer of Eastern visitors that the city 
was founded upon nothing but climate. The extraordinary success of 
agricultural and manufacturing enterprises since then, and the large 
income annually accruing to the country from legitimate development 
of its resources, have silenced the sneer ; but there is still much truth in 
the saying that Los Angeles is founded on climate. No other city in 
the Union has so large percentage of residents who are not in active 
business ; who brought money with them, or live upon an income from 
investments elsewhere. On every principal residence street are to be 
seen the homes of people of wealth and refinement who have come to 
prolong life and to make it worth prolonging ; to escape the discomforts 
and dangers of Eastern weather ; to be happy in a climate which knows 
no extremes either of heat or cold. Before the war, this class was 
absolutely unknown in the United States ; but now it is growing with 
astonishing rapidity. The inevitable social and commercial mill of the 
East is turning it out in greater volume every year. This graduating 
class — as it may fairly be called — already numbers tens of thousands 
every year. They are the people who, having acquired money, turn 
about to see how to get some good of it. They are, nine times out of 
ten, educated and moral. They naturally fear and shun the raw, 
unfinished civilization of most Western cities. But Los Angeles is — and 




Collier, Eng. 



A GLIMPSE FROM FIRST STREET HILL. 



the visitor's first glance shows that it is — no frontier town. There is 
nothing wild and woolly in Southern California. Its growth has been 
not only astounding in volume and rapidity, but wholly unprecedented 
in quality. It has filled up with educated and well-to-do people ; and 
for reasons too evident to need discussion, it will continue to fill up with 



46 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



the same sort. The one fa<5lor of those who come purely for the loveliest 
and most comfortable home that can be found, and not to earn a living, 
is in itself enough to make a large city here iu ten years. This is no 
guesswork, but logic inevitable as the laws of physics. A perfect climate 
could not have made a city, fifty years ago ; today it can and must — so 
long as the climate is in the United States. 

As was said at the outset, it is not merely population that makes a city 
large and important. Some chief cities of China hold human beings by 
the million ; but for their significance to the world they might as well 
be rabbit-warrens. The population of Los Angeles comes about as near 
being nei as is possible in any city. Our "foreign element" is — a few 
thousand industrious Chinamen and perhaps 500 native Califomians who 
do not speak English. The ignorant, hopelessly un-American type of 




Herve Friend, Kng. 



DOWN SPRING STREET. 



Photo, by Waite. 



foreigners which infests and largely controls Eastern cities, is almost 
unknown here. Poverty and illiteracy do not exist as classes. 

L,os Angeles has not been a manufaAuring city, and it never will be 
stri<5lly one. If natural laws did not settle the matter — as they do, 
definitively — man would promptly interpose as soon as he realized that the 
chief charm (and therefore the chief capital) of the city was threatened. 
Those who live here now are as little anxious as those who are coming 
to dwell in a Pittsburgh atmosphere or among a Birmingham population. 
But such manufa(5lures as physical laws will in any event permit are well 
for us ; and the recent discovery of petroleum at our very doors not only 
enables such enterprises but makes them inevitable. Two years ago, 
manufacturing in Los Angeles meant coal at $8 per ton ; today it means 
oil at a figure equivalent to coal at I2.50. As a result of this discovery, 



LOS ANGELES. 



47 



a number of manufa(5luring establishments in Los Angeles and the sur- 
rounding country are springing to immediate prosperity. A few years 
hence we shall keep at home millions of dollars now sent East annually 
for certain manufa<5lured articles — and without the befogging of our sky 
or the invasion of a criminal class. 

The Nicaragua canal must sooner or later become a fa6l. Stupid or 
careless legislators may retard but cannot prevent it. A deep-sea harbor 
at San Pedro, only twenty miles from Los Angeles, and another at San 
Diego — 140 miles, but no less tributary — are equally certain. And then a 
vast commerce, not alone for all the great Southwest, but for the East as 
well, will flow through this channel. 

It has frequently been said — and with truth — that in the making of 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



Photo, by Jm. L. Smith. 



A BIT OF WESTLAKE PARK. 

cities nature herself is not a more potent fa(5lor than man. There are 
striking examples, familiar to every educated person, in the middle 
West, where towns which had the "natural advantages" have been 
forever outstripped by towns that had the right men. Los Angeles has 
both. The favoritism of nature is plain to be seen by anyone who may 
care to look ; the quality of American nerve and determination that 
dominates here is read in the history of Southern California for the past 
ten years, as compared with that of any other section within 1200 miles. 
The livest of " live Americans" have decreed that here shall be a great 
city — and a perfe<5t city to live in. They are making their word good at 
a rate and with a fullness no city in the Union ever witnessed before. 
In ten years they have made a sleepy adobe village into a large, ener- 
getic, beautiful city ; with the best facilities of lighting and of transit, 
I 



48 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



THK STIMSON RESIDENCE. 



Photo, by H. M. Linsley. 



the finest public and business buildings, the loveliest homes. And they 
are just getting their hands in. Los Angeles is today improving more 
rapidly and more substantially than ever before ; while its social atmos- 
phere is one of which the oldest and most cultured American com- 
munities might well feel proud. 

Los Angeles covers thirty-six square miles. It w^as the first city in 
America to be lighted wholly by electricity ; and is today one of the 
best-lighted. It was years ahead of New York in getting modern rapid- 
transit street railwaj'^s ; and in these facilities is now far ahead of any 
city of its size in the East. It has nearly loo miles of street railways, 
mostly eledlric and cable ; and fully loo miles of cement sidewalks. 
The courthouse, which cost $500,000, is the finest public building in the 
far West. The city hall cost $200,000, and would be a credit to New 
York. No other city of its size has so many handsome and costly busi- 
ness blocks ; and certainly no other has such a host of beautiful homes. 
Churches, schools, parks, sewers, water supply, theaters, banks (with 
deposits aggregating $11,000,000) — all are on the best and most liberal 
scale ; and in all of them Los Angeles has actually outstripped in a dec- 
ade what any Eastern city of the like population has achieved in thrice 
the time. All these things mean something. It is no fool's paradise, 
nor boomer's dream. It has been done by the brains and energy of the 
typical American — here, for the first time in American history, fully 
free to expand to full potency, to work with Nature and not against 
her. 



"^r^ 




Union Eng. Co. ^ LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF LOS ANGELES, 437 S. BROADWAY. Putnam, Photo. 



J> ^ 



" ' University Place. 

VERYONE who has paid any attention to the diredlions and 
manner of growth of the city of Los Angeles is aware that an 
overwhelming proportion of that development has been for 
three years tending — and still tends — southwest. A great many calcu- 
lations have been upset within the last ten years ; and section after 
section which was "sure to be the coming part of town " Has somehow 
failed to lead the race after all. Meanwhile the southwestern portion 
of the city, and its environs just across that line — which a decade ago 
were waste lands or barley-fields where the writer used to hunt rabbits 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



RESIDENCE OF E. W. SANDISON. 



Photo, hy I'ierce. 



— have stepped to the front of the column, and stay there without effort. 
In five years, even, the locality has multiplied many fold in population 
and wealth — and as for beauty, in a degree wholly indescribable. Part 
of this swift development is doubtless due to the University eledlric 
car-line, the best rapid transit in the city ; and part, apparently, to the 
un worded impulse of man to push on toward the setting sun, nearer 
to the sea-breezes, deeper into the country green. 

University Place is in and of this favored section. It lies across the 
city's corporate line ; but no one could tell where the municipality ends 
and the suburb begins. Los Angeles is built up, a city from its center, 
clear out to and beyond University. It is a ride of twenty-five minutes 
from the heart of town. The tract is a great garden ; fine residences 
and charming cottages, set in orchards of citrus and deciduous fruits, or 



UNIVERSITY PLACE. 



51 



embowered in roses, palms, and other semi-tropic leafages which seem to 
reach perfection here. This astonishing transformation from the bare 
fields of 1886 has been achieved without other irrigation than that from 
private wells, twenty to forty feet deep ; until recently the Pico Heights 
and City water companies have begun to supply the tradl. 

The ele(5lric line runs to Park station on the S. P. R. R. branch to 
Santa Monica, and near Agricultural Park, where every winter the finest 
blooded horses in America are to be seen. 

Amid these beautiful surroundings stands the College of Liberal Arts 
of th^ University of Southern California, with its spacious buildings and 
ample campus, hemmed by the towering eucalyptus. This is the oldest 
institution of its sort in Southern California, is steadily growing in pat- 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 



Photo, by Pierce. 



ronage, and manifests a progressive spirit in faculty and students alike. 
The Casa de Rosas, or Frobel Institute, a successful kindergarten in a 
building which is itself an education to the eye, is near by ; so the peo- 
ple of University have fully their share of educational facilities at their 
very doors. 

The Place has two churches — the Methodist Episcopal and the Cen- 
tral Baptist — a large and flourishing public school, a post-office of its 
own, stores and other facilities. It is largely settled by business men 
who prefer to get away, after business hours, from the noise and unrest 
of the city's heart, to home and rest among the greenery and flowers. 
What sort of folks they are, cannot half so well be told in words as by 
sight of what they have made in a few years from the raw material — 
one of the most charming localities in Southern California. It is beau- 



52 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




* ■ fr 




Herve Jriend, Eng. 



RESIDENCE OF W. J. AHERN. 



Photo, by Pierce. 



tiful as a whole, and doubly beautiful in detail of its shady streets and 
homelike homes. Its soil is a perfect sandy loam, in which all fruits 
and flowers do admirably, and to which mud is unknown. 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



UNIVERSITY M. E. CHURCH. 



Photo, by Pierce. 



The Only Exclusioe 
Wholesale 
^ House 
In Southern 
Califtornia 




315.317 SOUTH MAIN STREET JosArufe/es, G/. 




SfiQinpooinQ 
Hoir Dressino 
MQnicurino... 
FQciQi ireatmenl 
-loiiemnicies 

VISIT THC 

SALONS .... 
de PARIS 

Mrs. Weauer-Jachaon 
Mr. ftobert RubirtI 

TELCPHONC 
1266 

253 



P 5AtOrv*S DE PARIS ^"spring 

i 433 a 3P«iNc n/Miuj. STREET 



qM g-^i^^gegS T^^i gSgB felM] 



H. JEVNE 



§MSM§MSMSSSMSMSMSi1 



WHOLESAI.E ( y l-C ( ) ( M r\ RETAII. 



IMPORTER OF 



English, French, German and Italian TABLE LUXURIES. 

Goods packed and delivered at depot free of charge, and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 

136 and T38 NORTH SPRING STREET 

Please mention that you " saw it in the I<and of Sunshine." 



Santa Monica. 



ly E. B. WOODWORTH. 




UR Southern California Long Branch, the most populous 
and most popular seaside resort in three hundred 
miles of coastline, is Santa Monica. 

An important requisite of the locality ambi- 
tious to be chief suburb and watering-place of 
such a city as Los Angeles is that it be easily 
accessible. In this primary condition, Santa 
Monica leads. It lies at the seaward end of the 
fruitful Cahuenga valley, which runs back to 
Los Angeles itself. The two cities are already 
linked by branches of the two great railway 
systems, the Santa Fe and the Southern Pacific. The 
service is limited only by the demand, and ranges from 
the lowest winter schedule of eight trains each way daily to a summer 
time-card of over twenty trains. The run is about half an hour. In a 
short time even this liberal service will be supplemented by one or more 
rapid-transit eledlric lines. No other seaside resort has such facilities as 
those which Santa Monica already enjoys ; and in a<5lual running time, 
Santa Monica is some 40 per cent, nearer Los Angeles than any other. It 
lies, furthermore, on the side to which by far the largest and most rapid 
development of Los Angeles is now tending. All along the frostless 
foothill belt are numberless villa sites of unsurpassed- beauty. At no 
distant day the intervening miles will be one continuous settlement of 
the wealthy and cultured. 

The climate which has made Southern California famous is most 
equable along the sea — Nature's great equalizer. Santa Monica shares 




Union Kiig. (' 



iEACH AND -V 



Photo, by Rile, Sapte Monica. 



SANTA MONICA. 



55 



this advantage with other coast towns. It is also the shortest way by 
water from Los Angeles to San Francisco ; southward coastwise traffic 
reaching this city several hours earlier via Santa Monica than bj' any 
other port. The finest steamers that ply in these waters stop regularly 
at the Southern Pacific's mammoth wharf at Santa Monica. 

The town itself was platted on generous lines, with broad streets and 
avenues shaded with wealth of semi-tropic leafage ; and an arrangement 
of lots and blocks at once convenient and sanitary. Many of the private 
residences are models of comfort, surrounded with all the beauty of 
generous Nature here, of shrub and flower and lawn. The newer blocks 
are of substantial brick. The winter population exceeds 2700, while the 
summer count brings it well up among the cities of second rank in 
Southern California. There are adequate public and high schools, six 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



A CALLA LILY HEDGE. 



; Photo. by^Rile, Santa Monica. 



churches and handsome church buildings, numerous civic societies, two 
substantial banks, a well-patronized weekly newspaper (the Outlook), 
the new and extensive North Beach bath-houses, the finest on the 
coast, with several others ; numerous hotels, including the Arcadia 
which ranks among the leading ones of the coast ; a good public library ; 
a complete and efficient water system ; a street railway ; electric lights ; 
miles of broad cement walks — and a progressive government. 

There is enough variety in the topography of the townsite to suit 
every taste. The " North Side," as it is locally termed, is a plateau 50 
to 100 feet above the sea, gently sloping from the foothills south and 
west, and looking down upon the sandy beach and blue sea by a pre- 
cipitous bluff". The "South Side" presents the variations of surface 
which often lend a landscape its greatest charm. 

Three miles inland from the beach is the Pacific branch of the National 
Home for Disabled Veteran Soldiers, with over 1600 inmates. The 
grounds cover 300 acres ; and liberal appropriations by Congress have 



56 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



surrounded the handsome buildings with beautiful gardens, orchards and 
parks. The Home is reached by a loop of the S. P. R. R. , and diredlly 
from the town by the S. M. & S. H. street railway. 




A HOME IN SANTA MONICA. 



SANTA MONICA, 



57 



The Y. M. C. A. of Los Angeles and other cities makes Santa Monica 
its summer home, and has fitted up grounds and buildings here. The 
Southern California Lawn Tennis Association holds its annual tourna- 
ments here on fine asphaltum courts. Here, too, are the spacious 
grounds of the Southern California Polo Club, whose yearly tourneys, 
lasting through the "season," are a decided attraction. The G. A, R. 
encampments, like those of the National Guard, and other important 
annual gatherings also add to the summer gaiety of Santa Monica. 

The entire bluff along the beach is dedicated for park purposes, and is 
thus a permanent possession of the public. From it the view is a pan- 
orama of extraordinary beauty. In front, is the ever-varying expanse 




of ocean. To the right. Point Duma pushes a protecting arm out to sea, 
while the nearer foothills sweep inland with kaleidoscopic play of lights 
and shadows. Cityward, the rich plains contrast with the distant moun- 
tain ranks, captained by their white-headed sentinel "Old Baldy." To 
the left is a broader stretch of valley, with lesser hills; while seaward 
are the fine profiles of Santa Catalina island. 

O'erlooked by the mountains and kissed by the sea, Santa Monica is 
the center of a panorama of unspeakable beauty. Nestling at the focus 
of cape and bay, of hill and plain, of mountain, sea, isle and shore — it 
is all such a scene as must awaken even in the dullest brain the respon- 
sive thrill which only Nature's self, in her most perfedl blending of form 
and color, can ever stir. 



HOTEL AKCADIA, Santa Monica, Cal 



The only first-class 
tourist hotel in this, 
the leading- coast re- 
sort of the Pacific. 150 
pleasant rooms, large 
and airy ball room, 
beautiful lawn and 
flower gardens. Mag- 
nificent panoramic 
view of the sea. First- 
class orchestra. Surf 
bathing unexcelled, 
and private salt water 
baths in bath house 
belonging to Hotel. 
Services of the popular 
chef from the Hotel 
Green, Pasadena, have 
been secured. 

S. REINHART 

Proprietor 
Time from I.OS An- 
geles by Santa F6 or 
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes. 




FUN ALL DAY FOR TWO BITS 

77?^ Santa Monica North Beach Bath House 

Reopened on Decoration Day after some weeks spent in making- Ex- 
tensive Improvements. Henceforth an enormous heater will 

WARM THE BIG PLUNGE 

And as the Establishment w^ill never close again until it wears out or 
burns down, you can always be sure of a First-class Bath, in the 
Surf, in Porcelain Tubs, or in the 

AFORESAID WARM PLUNGE 



SCHUYLER COLE, ROBERT F. JONES. 

Colegrove, Cal. Bank of Santa Monica, 

Santa Monica, Cal. 

LOANS NEGOTIATED 

Cahuenga and Santa Monica Property 

a Specialty. 




Pirope»<ty Gained Fop, Rented, Bought, 
Sold arid Exehanged. 

OFFICES : 

204 Bradbury Block, Los Angeles, Telephone 
Bank of Santa Monica, Santa Monica, Cal. 
Telephones 2 and 42. 



A HOME BY THE SEA 



CHOICE LOTS AT 



SOUTH SANTA MONICA 

(OCEAN PARK) 



ONLY $100 



Easy Terms. Close to the DEPOT 
and BATH HOUSE. 



SEE DAY ABOUT IT 

127 S. BROADWAY 



Please mention that you " saw it in the I,and of Sunshine. 



PUBLISHERS' Department. 



Tb6 l^ai\d of ©arv^birve 

THE SOUTHERN GALlFORNfA 
MAGAZINE 

Published monthly by 

The Land of Sunshine Pubfishing Co. 

501, 502, 503 STIMSON BUILDING 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

F. A. PATTEE, business Manager 

li.oo A Year. io Cents a Copy. 

Bntered at the I,os Angeles Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 



For advertising rates^ address the Business 
Manager. 



All MSS. should be addressed to the Editor. 
No MSS. preserv'ed unless accompanied by return 
postage. 

Questions Answered, — Specific information 
about Southern California desired by tourists, 
health seekers or intending settlers will be fur- 
nished free of charge by the Land of Sun- 
shine. Enclose stamp with letter. 



A TAI.K WITH ADVERTISERS. 

As the Land of Sunshine successfully reaches 
the end of its first year, and starts out into a new 
one with a largely increased pace, its publishers 
gratefully acknowledge the practical cheer which 
they have received. 

While the presence oi many new advertise- 
ments is a material strengthening, yet there is 
equal encouragement in finding still in evidence 
the advertisements of those who joined forces 
with the Land of Sunshine at its Inception. 
Such patronage is the best acknowledgment of 
the value of the advertising medium in which it 
is found, as well as proof positive of ability to 
tell a good thing when it is first presented. 



SURFACE INDICATIONS. 

The Land of Sunshine perforce was its own 
precedent. It had no well beaten paths to assure 
its course. Commercially its field had not been 
educated up to the standard it had determined 
to establish. Today— well, it even has would-be 
imitators in the field. A year ago, few of those 
most friendly to the idea had the temerity to 
believe that so creditable a production as its first 
number could be maintained— much less be con- 
stantly bettered. Some, it is true, are still 
contributing little else than wonder of how this 
has been accomplished, yet all acknowledge the 
Land of Sunshine to be a possibility and a 
necessity. 

If instances of dozens of subscriptions from 
each of numerous individuals are evidences of 
merit; ifnews stand sales equaling those of nearly 
all the leading periodicals combined, are proof of 
popularity ; if the editorial comment of the lead- 



ing papers of the day is competent assurance t)i 
creditable performance and great promise ; if 
the affidavits which have been made from time 
to time of an average growth of circulation 
during the past year of 700 per month is at all 
significant— then the advertiser who secures the 
yearly rates of today possesses a vein which will 
prove a veritable gold mine if patiently and in- 
telligently worked. 



INTERESTING FACTS. 

The Land of Sunshine is on the reading-room 
tables of the leading libraries, resorts and 
Chambers of Commerce of America. 

It is in the hands of the principal news com- 
panies of the world. 

It is distributed for inspection and sale on local 
and overland passenger trains and on Pacific 
Coast steamers. 

With the exception of the one leading daily 0/ 
Southern California, it has the largest local cir- 
culation of any regular publication in this sec- 
tion, and is perhaps the only other Southern 
California publication which certifies to its 
circulation. 

The Land of Sunshine never goes into the 
waste-basket. 

It cannot be found wrapped around old shoes 
at the cobbler's. 

It is so handsome, so readable, so full of the 
.spirit of Southern California that its local readers 
exhibit it with pride to their neighbors and 
eventually send it to their Eastern friends with 
their unqualified endorsement. 



LOGICAL CONCLUSIONS. 

The Land of Sunshine therefore reaches 
those of u.se to you — and effectively. 

It is of use to those whom it reaches and will 
be kept and carefully perused. 

Whether you are a hotel man, a dealer in land 
or a merchant, it is a sound business investment 
for you to patronize a publication which is so 
effectively bringing to your locality those who 
may become your customers. You certainly de- 
sire as customers its local readers — and, if you 
notice, you see it everywhere you go. 



OPINIONS EAST AND WEST. 

" Most readable and attractive numbers." 

—Editor The Nation, N. Y. 

" Has the merit of being chuck full of its sub- 
ject . . . brings its locality home to the reader . . . 
remarkably romantic and interesting." 

—Harper's Weekly. 

" A spicy, readable magazine, calculated to be 
of great service to the land to which it has dedi- 
cated itself."— Chicago Advance. 

" A perfect reflection of the land in which we 
live."— Los Angeles Times. 

" A good index of the culture and enterprise of 
Southern California."— San Francisco Chronicle. 



CONDENSED INFORHATION. 




UNIQUE SECTION 

The section 
generally 
known as 
Southern Cal- 
ifornia c o m- 
prises the 
seven counties 
of Los Ange- 
les, San Ber- 
n a r d i n o. 
Orange, Riverside, San Diego, Ventura and 
Santa Barbara. The total area of these 
counties is 44,901 square miles. The coast 
line extends northwest and southeast a 
distance of about 275 miles. 
The population in 1890 was 201,352. 
Los Angei^KS, the leading county of South- 
ern California, has an area of about 4,000 
square miles, some four-fifths of which is 
capable of cultivation, with water supplied. 
The shore line is about 85 miles in length. 
The population increased from 33,881 in 1880 
to 101,454 1111890. Horticulture is the prin- 
cipal industry. There are over 1.500,000 
fruit trees grow- 
ing in the coun- 
ty. Los Angeles 
city, the com- 
mercial metrop- 
olis of Southern 
California, 1 5 
miles from the 
coast, has a pop- 
ulation to-day 
of about 85,000. 
Eleven railroads 
center here. 
There are about 
100 miles of 
graded and 
graveled streets, 
and II miles of 
paved streets. The city is entirely lighted 
by electricity. There is a $500,000 court 
house, a |2oo,ooo city hall, and many great 
and costly business blocks. 

The other principal cities are Pasadena, 
Pomona, Whittier, Azusa, Downey, Santa 
Monica, Redondo and San Pedro. 

San Bernardino County is the largest 
county in the State, is rich in minerals, has 
fertile valleys, and considerable desert, much 
of which can be reclaimed with water from 
the mountains. Population about 30,000. 
The county is traversed by two railroads. 
Fine oranges and other fruits are raised. 

San Bernardino city, the county seat, is 
a railroad center, with about 8,000 people. 
The other principal places are Redlands, 
Ontario, Colton and Chino. 



Orange County was segregated from 
Los Angles county in 1889. Area 671 square 
miles ; population, in 1890, 13,589. Much 
fruit and grain are raised. Most of the land 
is arable, and there is a good supply o^ 
water. 

Santa Ana, the county seat, is an attrac- 
tive place, with a population of 5,000. Other 
cities are Orange, Tustin, Anaheim and 
Fullerton. 

Riverside County was created in 1893 
from portions of San Bernardino and San 
Diego counties. Area 7,000 square miles ; 
population about 14,000. It is an inland 
county. 

Riverside, the county seat, is noted for its 
extensive orange groves and beautiful homes. 
Other places are South Riverside, Perris 
and San Jacinto. 

San Diego County is a large county, 
the most southerly in the State, adjoining 
Mexico. Population about 40,000. The 
climate of the coast region is remarkably 
mild and equable. Irrigation is being rapidly 
extended. Fine lemons are raised near the 
coast, and all other fruits flourish. 

San Diego 
city, on the bay 
of that name, is 
the terminus of 
the Santa Fe 
railway system, 
with a popula- 
tion of about 




A PORTION OF REDLANDS VALLEY 



21,000. 

Across the bay 
is Coronado 
Beach with its 
mammoth ho- 
tel. Other cities 
are National 
City,Escondido, 
Julian and 
Oceanside. 

Ventura County adjoins Los Angeles 
county on the north. It is very mountain- 
ous. There are many profitable petroleum 
wells. Apricots and other fruits are raised, 
also many beans. Population in 1870, 10,071. 
San Buenaventura, the county seat, is 
pleasantly situated on the coast. Population 
2,500. Other cities are Santa Paula, Hue- 
neme and Fillmore. 

Santa Barbara is the most northern of 
the seven counties, with a long shore line. 
There are many rugged mountains in the 
interior. Semi-tropic fruits are largely raised, 
and beans in the northern part of the county. 
Santa Barbara, the county seat, is noted 
for its mild climate and rare vegetation. 
Population about 6,000. Other cities are 
Lompoc, Carpenteria and Santa Maria. 



R osecrans Ranch Lands 

ABOUT SEVEN MILES 



Southwest of Los Angeles and in Line with the City's Growth 



FINE VIEWS AND 
DELIGHTFUL CLIMATE 



and Ports of San Pedro and Redondo. Cheapest rates via Redondo Railway. 

25 Minutes '^^'Ro,"^™,, 

Klegant Suburban Sites, and also 

Choicest Lemon and Deciduous Tracts 



To City, or Beach 



Abundant, independent water cheaply available. No water needed for com, beans and deciduous 
trees. Exhibit at Chamber of Commerce. Four leading city streets will reach this choice, specula- 



tive tract. Address owner, 



CARL F. ROSECRANS 

BOX 303. CITY OFFICK, 113 SOUTH BROADWAY. 




15 Acres in "Washington Navels, 4 years 
old, in first-class condition, always had best of 
care ; soil, the very best ; water right ample, and 
cost only nominal ; elevation above the frost line. 
A gilt-edged property in the best citrus section 
of the country. Price, $io,coo. 

ALSO 

20 Acres Choice Selected Oranges, at 

Covina, fine condition, 4 years old ; location ad- 
joining the celebrated " Baldridge " grove ; beau- 
tiful cottage, profusion of flowers and plants ; 
splendid barn, and everything in "apple pie 
order." Price, $12,000. A complete home in 
choice neighlx)rhood that will bring in a large 
revenue every year. 

Will sell or exchange either of above for first- 
class Eastern property. 

MERRILL & DAVIDSON, Brokers, 
129 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Write us for information about Southern Cali- 
fornia. 



FOR SA LE AT A BA RGAIN. 

fl FIR8T-CL1188 INCOME-PAYING OLIVE ORCHARD AND 
NURSERY IN THE POMONA VALLEY 



This fine prop 
miles from the 
and Santa F6 rail 
ter of the city of 




CTty is situated 2 
Southern Pacific 
ways and the cen- 
Pomona. It com- 



prises 44 acres of 
land, being a deep 
and rich sandy 
loam soil, planted 
almost whollv to 
olives. Specifical- 
ly, t h e re are 15 
acres in bearing 
olive trees, and 27 
acres one. two and 
three years old ; two acres in family orchard, 
comprising all the better varieties of citrus and 
deciduous fruits and nuts in bearing. 

An abundant supply of water for irrigation and 
domestic purixjses is'obtained by pumping, the 
motive being a five horse-power gasoline engine, 
furnishing a never-failing flow of water. 

Tnis fine property, including the fixed im- 
provements, for $12,000; two-thirds cash, bal- 
ance on time at 8 per cent net. 

Address for particulars ALFRED WRIGHT. 
P. 0.60x382, Pomona, Cal. 



Please mcutijii that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 




^ - ^ 



The Apery -Staub Shoe Co, 



AT 256 SO. BROADWAY 




HAVE OPEHED THE HAjSlDSOJVIEST AND 
MOST ARTISTIC SHOE STORE OH THE 
PACIFIC COAST ^ ^ ^ 



And carry a complete stock of High-Class 
Foot Wear in every department. 



We Guarantee that Every Pair of Shoes 

Will give satisfaction. To secure the confidence 
of our Customers will be our aim. 

. . . AVERY-STAUB SHOE CO. 




THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL 

SANTA BARBARA, CAL. 

Strictly tirst-class in every respect. Best location in the city. 
Letters and Telegrams promptly answered. 
Free Bus to and from all Trains and Steamers. 

W. S. LOW, Proprietor. 



BARGAINS! 



$!.( a foot, city lots in Kohler 

Tract, between 7th and 8th Sts. 

Iiistallnient.s. Also, Ten acre lots, best fruit land, 

Anaheim ; 704 trees, walnuts, apricots, peaches. 

$100 per acre ; $28 cash, 8 years time, 6 per cent. 

VV. J. FISUKR, 227 W. Second St. 



I FOR DISTILLING DRINKING- 
j^^TER C H EA P ER THAN " 
A FILTER.CANBEUSED 
ON ANY 6T0VE, SIMPLE, 
DURABLE, PORTABLE 
WEIGrMT 5 LBS. PRICE 
*6.qo.SEND FORCIR. 

F.E.BROWNE, 
LO.S AN&ELES,CAL. 




CALIFORNIA WINE MERCHANT 



We will ship two sample cases assorted 
wines (one dozen quarts each) to any part 
of the United States, Freight Prepaid, 
upon the recipt of $9.00. Pints ( 24 in 
case), 50 cents per case additional. We 
will mail full list and prices upon appli- 
cation. 



Respectfully, 

C. F. A. LAST, 

131 N.Main St., 

Los Angeles, CaL' 



Please mention that you "saw it iu the Land of Sunshine.' 



A PROSPEROUS CITY. 

There is probably no section of the United States 
where business is in a more solid and flourishing 
condition than it is in Los Angeles to-day. The 
real estate sales for the past year amounted to 
$15,000,000, and most of this property was sold for 
the purpose of improvement. Buildings have been 
going up for months past at the rate of five and 
six a da3^ 

The solid character of the Los Angeles banks was 
well shown during the recent financial panic, which 
had such disastrous results in some sections of the 
country. Only one bank succumbed to the flurry, 
and this was a bank of minor importance which 
had been known to be shaky for some time past. 

The bank clearances have for a year past shown 
an improvement almost every week, while the figures 
from a majority of other cities in the United States 
have frequently shown a decrease. 



Oldest and Largest Bank in Southern California 



Farmers and Merchants Bank 



Of L1O8 Angeles, Cal. 



Capital (Paid up) 
Surplus and Reserve 
Total - 



$500,000.00 
820.000.00 



$1,320,00000 

OFFICERS 

L. W. Hkllman. Prest. H. W. Hellman, V. Prest. 
jNo. MiLNER, Cashier. H. J. Fleishman, Ast. Cash. 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry, C. E. Thorn, A. Glassell, 

O. W. Childs, C. Ducommun, T. L Duque, 

J. B. Lankershim, H. W. Hellman, I. W. Hellman 



Sell and Buy Foreign and Domestic Exchange. 
Special Collection Department. 
Correspondence Invited. 



Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Company. 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Streets, 

(Temple Block.) 

Capital Stock - - $200,000 Surplus and profits $11,000 

Five per cent, interest paid on term deposits. 

Money loaned on real estate only. 

OFFICERS 

T. L. DuQUE, President. J. B. Lankershim, V.-Pres. 
J. V. Wachtel, Cashier. 
DikkCtors— H. W. Hellman, KasparCohn. H. W. 
O'Melveny, J. B. Lankershim, O. T, Johnson, T. L. 
Duque, I. N. VanNuys, W. G. Kerckhoff, Daniel 
Meyer, S. F. 




t^OTi^ 



OF I.OS ANGEI.KS. 

Capital Stock $400,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits over 230.000 

J. M. Elliott, Prest. W. G. Kerckhoff, V. Prest. 

Frank A. Gibson. Cashier. 

G. B. Shaffer, Assistant Cashier. 

directors: 

J. M. Elliott, F. Q. Story, J. D. Hooker. 

J. D. Bicknell. H. Jevne, W. C. PatterSon 

W. G. Kerckhoff 

No public funds or other preferred deposits received 

by this bank. 



FOR SALE 



AO 




^l\/IS 



STREET 



TB 



/XC^ 



THE TRACT OF HOMES 

Don't fail to see this beautiful tract, the finest in 
the city, four 80-foot streets, one street 100 feet wide; 
all the streets graded, graveled, cement walks and 
curbs; streets sprinkled; shade trees on all streets; 
lots 50 and 60 feet front; city water piped on all 
streets; rich sandy loam soil. Tract is fifteen to 
eighteen feet higher than Grand avenue and Fig- 
ueroa street. 2 electric cars; 15 minutes' ride to the 
business center; one block nearer than Adams and 
Figueroa streets; building clause in each deed, no 
cheap houses allowed; buy and build your home 
where you will have all modem improvements and 
be assured that the class of homes will cause the 
value to double inside of 12 months; 5000 feet on 
Adams street. We ask you to see this tract now; if 
out for a drive, go through this tract; go out Adams 
street to Central avenue; or take the Central or 
Maple avenue cars to Adams street, and see the 
class of improvements; lots offered for sale for a 
short time for $200. $250, $300 to $600 on the most fav- 
orable terms. Office conier of Central avenue and 
Adams street. Free carriages from our office at all 
times. 

GRIDER &, DOW, 

139 S. BROADWAY TEL. 1299 

Los ANGELES. CAL. 

Headquarters for Lemon and Orange Groves and 
Fanning Lands. 




Hotel St. ^ngclo 



american and 
-^ s^^european 
Plans 



(Srand avenue 

AND ■ 

Temple Street 

Loa Angeles, Cal. 

A. M. SMITH, Proprietor 
Delightful. Healthy Location within five minutes 

walk of business center. 
Large, air>' rooms. Cui-sine finest in the city. 
Rates $1.00 per day and upward 

Xclcplione 9TJH 



Please meatiou that you '* saw it in the I<and of Sunshine." 



S35.00 per Acre 

FOR LANDS 

LOCATED IN 

SOUTHERN . 
■i CALIFORNIA 

will grow Oranges, Lemons, 

and all other Fruits. 

I35.00 takes the choice. 

Remember, $35.00 for land as 

good as any in the State. 

Reached by the Southern Cali- 

Jfomia Railway. 




SAN iWARCOS 
LAND COMPANY 

D. P. HAL.K, Manager. 

1336 D St., San Diego, Cal. 

W. G. JACOBS, Superintendent, 

San Marcos, San Diego Co., Cal. 



CARL ENTENMANN ^ILnUu 
Manufacturing Jeweler 

^::^^tz^^:^ . ..Pioind seller m mm 

I' > (irder or repaired '' 

iJold and Silver School and Society Badges & Medals a siiecialty 

ROOMS 3, 4 AND 7 UP STAIRS 

2M% South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Almonds! Olioes! Prunes! 

Would you like an Almond, Prune or OliTe Orchard in CalifomiaT 
I make a business of selling lands for the special production of the 
above, cheap, on long time, and will plant and care for same until 
in bearing, if desired. For full particulars address 

R. C. SHAW, Colonization Agent, 

230>^ S. Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



LftS GflSITftS SflNITflRIUM.. 



POlNDEXfER « WaDSWORTH 

BROKKRS 

305 West Second St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Buy and sell Real Estate, Stocks, Bonds and Mort- 
gages, on commission, make collections, manage 
property and do a general brokerage business. 
Highest references for reliability and good business 
management. 




Situated in the Sierra Madre foot hills, altitude 
2,000 feet. Most equable climate in Southern Cal- 
ifornia. Pure mountain water, excellent cuisine ; 
easily reached by Terminal R. R. and short car- 
riage drive. 

0. SHEPARD BARNUM, Propr. 

Drawer 126, Pasadena, Cal. 



$1.25 Per Acre 




$1.25 Per Acre 



Government Lands 



THIS IS 

THE LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Not only is this so, but it is a land of great promise, 
where you may secure a home on the most favorable 
terms now offered in the United States. 

Choice Government Lands at 
$1.25 per Acre. 

25 cents cash, balance 25 years at 6 per cent per 
annum. No requirements as to improving or living 
upon the land. For climate, healthfulness and rich- 
ness of soil it is unsurpassed ; where you can raise 
nearly anything grown in America, north or south. 

We also have choice improved farms and fruit 
lands near Los Angeles, at I30.00 and upward per 
acre. Southern California property to exchange for 
Eastern property. For information and printed 
matter address L,OY & HURIN, 338 South 
Broadway, L>o8 Angeles, Cal. 



is absolutely beyond comparison. 




>^ 



'""'^"'TvPEwn.u^a^^^*' 



LEO. E. ALEXANDER & BRO. Gen. Agts. 

WM. n. H. II.VV WAKI). Miiijr. 

216 South Broadwau, Los Angeles. 

••■TCLCPHONC 794 — 

San Francisco Office : 218 Sansorae Street. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the I,and of Sunshine. 



NEWS ITEMS. 

The publishers of the L,and of Sunshine have 
their share of human weakness for the good 
things of life. During a dry moment recently 
they treated themselves to a drink of the much 
vaunted Napa Soda Lemonade and have thus un- 
wittingly contracted s>. delicious habit. 

The Napa Soda Springs are the Pacific coast 
rivals of the famous Manitou springs if not their 
superiors They at least furnish a beautiful and 
health restoring place to visit. 

All hail to the young man who by opening a 
distributing house in Los Angeles has brought 
this natural ferrated soda beverage to our very 
door. 



The report of the State Board of Health puts 
San Diego at the head of the list. 



Among the handsomer of the real-estate offices 
of the city, the new quarters at 139 S. Broadway, 
iust fitted up and occupied by Grider & Dow, 
stand with the first. The indication of pros- 
perity is not surprising, for the Adams street 
tract is too choice a proposition not to be recog- 
nized by the class of people whose appreciation 
of good things is making Los Angeles what it is. 
And as these matters — like other good rules- 
work both ways, there is every reason to pre- 
sutne that the attractiveness of the offices will 
still further accelerate the progress of the tract 
to its full possibilities. 



The attention of our readers is called to the 
advertisement of Messrs. Fricker & Esden in 
our pages. A visit to their store in Mott 
Market will well repay anyone interested 
in procuring the choicest clelicacies for the table, 
of which they make a very tempting display, 
calculated to entice the most exacting appetite. 



The annual banquet of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, May 15th, was a memorable occasion. 
Two hundred representative men of Los Angeles, 
and invited guests, made a notable reunion. The 
speaking was admirable; and the banquet was 
spread by Christopher, which is as much as to 
say that it was the best possible. 



Los Angeles is already a remarkable musical 
center with demands requiring metropolitan in- 
stitutions. An interesting illustration of one of 
these is presented on page 49 of this number. 
Its proprietor Mr. A. W. Fisher has been in the 
music business for nearly eleven years in Los 
Angeles, and opened his present establishment 
at 427 S. Broadway, November 1894. It is the 
only strictly piano house in the city and is 
especially famous for its fine stock of world-re- 
nowned Sohmer Pianos. Organs, and other makes 
of pianos are also kept in stock. As a gentleman 
and reliable dealer Mr. Fisher needs no recom- 
mendation in this section. 



Messrs. Moore & Parsons at 229 West Second 
street — Investment Brokers — have successfully 
made an innovation in their line of business — by 
handling only such property as they list under 
an agreement as exclusive agents. They find it 
operates for the advantage oftheownei as well 
as themselves. This firm is one of the most en- 
terprising in Los Angeles, doing much by their 
push and energy to help build up our city. Their 
success is the legitimate result of their reputa- 
tion for reliability, conservatism and good judge- 
ment, while their high class references to local 
and Eastern Banks vouch for their .standing and 
integrity with the stranger. 



The managment of the Redondo Hotel made a 
great hit recently by means of their recent musi- 
cal at Fitzgerald's music house Los Angeles. The 
audience was composed of invited guests who 
were each presented with generous bunches of 
carnations from the three acre carnation bed at 
Redondo Beach. 



The Norwood, one of the nicest smaller hotels 
on Ocean Avenue, Santa Monica, bids fair to do 
a business during the coming summer season 
exceeding that of a number of years past. It is 
certainly as pleasantly situated and as cozy a 
place as any in this cool Pacific resort. Facing 
the ocean it commands a view unsurpassed. 
Large shade trees and a well kept lawn add 
much to the attractiveness of the location, mak- 
ing it a place which thoae .who see once desire 
to visit again. 




AND 



s^VI 



Herve hum, 



P 



HOTO 
ENGRAWER 



314 W. FIRST ST., 

LOS ANGELES 



Chac. Sumner, Photo. 

Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



TIP 
TOP 

COUGH 
SYRUP 



The California Wonder 

For all COUGHS and COLDS 

If your druggist doesn't keep it. 
send us 50c. in stamps and we 
will forward prepaid one bottle. 
We will give with each bottle 
so ordered an absolute guarantee 
to return the money it you are 
not satisfied with the results. 
Price 50c. All Druggists. 
TIP TOP MEDICINE CO., 

San Diego. California 



I SELL Tf\E E,f\RJH ■ . . 

HKAOQUARTCRS AT POMONA. CAL. 




C n Y I believe the best investment in California 
On I I to-day is the Howland Olive Orchard : 150 
acres — 120 acres solid to olive orchard, balance va- 
riety of fruits, etc. Olive mill and the latest ma- 
chinery for pressing oil that cost over $5,000. The 
income from the property this year is nearly |8,ooo, 
and yet but one-fifth of theorchard is in bearing. 
The Howland Olive Oil from this plant took the 
first premium at the World's Fair at Chicago in 
competition with the world ; also first premium 
at Mid-winter Fair and at the late Citrus Fair at Los 
Angeles. For full particulars of this property, or 
for anyhing in the line of Real Kstate, call on or 
address "The Old Man." 

R. S. BASSETT, POMONA, CAL. 



W. U. Townsend 



F. E. Biles, NoUry Public 



Townsend, Bifes S Co. 

REAL ESTATE iSB LOANS 

30 S. RAYMOND AVENUE, 

Pasadena Agents for the famous Raymond Im- 
provement Company lands, one of the finest tracts 
in Southern California ; also have large and small 
tracts for sale all over Southern California. 

Property looked after for non-resident owners, 
taxes paid, rents collected. 

We refer by permission to the First National Bank 
of Pasadena, California. 

Correspondence solicited. 

W. H. MOHR 

123 So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Notary Public. Searcher of Records. Confidential 
Business Agent. Looks after Taxes and Assessments 
and keeps you posted. Correspondence solicited. 



2,500 



Carloads of Oranges 
From Rioerside this 
Season _ 



Orange Grooes 
Orange Lands 



WITH BEST WATER 
SUPPLY IN THE STATE 



JARVIS & BUSH 



WRITE FOR 
INFORMATION 



Riverside, Cal. 



TEBPIESTREEI DINING PIIRIORS '•"•™°"'' 

AND Home Bakery 

Ice Cream, Home Made Bread. Pies aud 
Cakes. 127 Temple St. , Los Angeles, Cal, 

RICHARD ALTSCHUL, 

REAL ESTATE 

\23}4 W. Second St. 

Burdick Block. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



FOR SALE. 



special to the Land of Sunshine.— 6-room modem 
new Colonial cottage. Hall, bath, hot and cold 
water, patent water closet, fine mantel, lawn, street 
graded, etc. Only $2,500. Terms, $500, cash; balance 
monthly. One of many good homes in Los Angeles 
for sale. Before you buy, see TAYLOR & CO., 102 
South Broadway. 



OVERTON & FIREY 

POMONA. CAL. 

Orange and Lemon Groves in full bearing for 
sale. Also unimproved lands well located. 

We have several fine Orange Groves for ex- 
change for eastern property. 

Ifyou want a home in the leading Orange pro- 
ducing section in Southern California, call on or 
address us. 

Correspondence solicited. 

OVERTON & FIREY, 

POMONA. CAI.. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sxtnshinb. 



YOUR 



MAGAZINE 



THE LAND OF SUNSHINE is the only magazine of its class. It has no com- 
petitor. It has not only an enormous field, but one of the most fascinating 
fields on earth. People everywhere like to read about Southern California and the 
Southwest. They like the marvelous energy of this new land ; they are charmed 
with the romance of this land which is so old. The Land of Sunshine presents 
both aspects adequately. Of the material development of a region so lovely that it 
is annually drawing tens of thousands of the best people in the East from their life- 
long homes, these pages give graphic and expert expression. It is safe to say that 
never before has such complete pictorial and textual presentation been made of the 
material side of California as the Land of Sunshine; is making. Of the intellectual 
side — the romance and the poetry, the history and the legends, the charms of nature 
and the possibilities of man, the sturdy Saxon stock now and here for the first time 
in history given room to expand under genial skies — the magazine will give the 
best setting. 

Among its contributors are 

Mrs. Gen. Guster, 

Charles Howard Shinn, 

Charles Dwight Willard, 

EsTELLE Thomson, 

T. S. Wan Dyke, 

AUGUSTE Wey, 
Ad. F. Bandelier, 

Charles Frederick Holder, 

Charles F. Lummis, 

l. worthington green, 

cJULIA BOYNTON GREEN, 

and other writers whose work is welcome in the best periodicals in the United States* 
It is not only attracting people of established literary reputation, but calling out to 
their best effort the younger writers who will make reputations in its pages. 

It employs the best artists and the best engravers in its field. 

In text and illustration the Land of Sunshine is a magazine enjoyed by 
thousands of cultured people in the East ; and one which no Southern Californian 
can afford to do without. 

Don't you think so yourself, at 

ONE DOLLAR A YEAR? 



The Carleton Hotel 




Pasadena, Cal. 

The most central, convenient 
and quiet location in the city. 
Strictly first-class in every re- 
spect. Elegantly furnished, sun- 
ny rooms, single or en-suite. 
Table unsurpassed by others at 
double our rates. 



The "Salisbury" diet, and diets for Invalids 
generally, a specialty. 

Rates 82.00 per Day and upward. 

Special rates by the week or month 
upon application. 



G. N. CHASE, 

Proprietor. 



THE WlNDEMERE • 

■■ OCKAN AVE., SANTA MONICA 

FACES THE OCEAN 

Commanding the finest view of any family hotel 

in this p>opular Pacific Coast 

Seaside Resort. 

Accommodations the Very Best 

Write for information. 

The attention of our readers, who desire 
stri<5lly pure olive oil ^ is drawn to the ad- 
vertisement elsewhere in our columns of 
the El Montecito Manufadluring Co. Of 
all the good things manufactured in 
Southern California, this olive oil and the 
other produdls from it, stand preeminent 
for purity and efl&ciency. 

Fop Fine Out Door and otfier Uiews 

...CALL ^ 

PUTNATV^ 

THE PHOTOGRAPHER 

Temple Block Los Angeles, Cal. 



MUSEUM*OF COMPARATIVE. ZOOLOGY. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



1h^ (0^ t%'r 



Vk«.1^. 3<. 4 faJO^^tto., 



(//•a^) 






^ 



Lc^c/vC/^fci^ jk-f 



•tfe 












'^.clic^ l^tUJ^ . 






Please mention that you "saw it in the I«aiid op Suitshinb.' 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HOTELS. 

Space in this column not for sale. 
AVAIiON. 
Hotel Metropole— American plan. 
CHULA VISTA. 

Casa de las Flores— American plan. 
COKONADO BEACH, 
fiotel del Coronado— Largest in the world; $3 
per day ; $17.50 per week ypward. 

ECHO MOUNTAIN. 

Echo Mountain Mouse— On line of Mount Lowe 
Railway. Open all the year. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Hotel Lincoln— First-class family hotel. Second 

and Hill sts. 
The Hollenbeck — American and European 

Strictly first-class. 
Ramona Hotel — European plan. 75c. per day. 

OCEANSIDE. 
South Pacific Hotel— American plan. 

ONTARIO. 
Southern Pacific Hotel— First-class. 

PASADENA. 
The Carleton — ^American plan : $2.00 a day. 

POMONA. 
Hotel Palomares — First-class throughout. 
Keller's Hotel— Rates $1.25 and $1.50 per day. 

REDLANDS. 
Hotel Windsor — Tourist and commercial, cen- 
trally located and thoroughly first-class. Rates 
$2.50 per day up. 
Baker House — Convenient to depot and postofl&ce. 
I1.25 to $2 per day. 

RIVERSIDE. 

Glenwood Tavern— Strictly first-class house. 

SAN DIEGO. 
Hotel Brewster — Splendidly equipped; American 

plan. I2.50 per day and upward. 
Horton House — Fine cuisine; central location; 

American plan. $2 and $2.50 per day. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The Commercial— American Plan. 
SANTA MONICA. 

Hotel Arcadia — Rates $3 per day upward. 
The Windemere— Family hotel. 
The Norwood— Family hotel. 

SAN FRANCISCO HOTELS. 

Pleasanton Hotel — American plan; $3 per day 

and up. 
Palace Hotel— American and European plans. 

LEADING CHURCHES OF LOS ANGELEH. 



East Los Angeles — Cor S Workman and Hawkins sts. 
First— N E cor S Broadway and Sixth sts. 

CATHOLIC. 

St. Vibiana Cathedral— S Main st near Second. 
St. Vincent's— Cor Grand Ave and Washington st. 
La Parochia— The Plaza. 

CONGRBGATIOXAL. 

East Los Angeles — N Daly, near Downey ave. 

First— SW cor Hill and Sixth sts. 

Plymouth— S side Twenty-first st opp Lovelace ave. 



EPISCOPAL. 

Christ Church— cor. Flower and Pico sts. 
St. John's— S E cor Figueroa and Adams sts. 
St. Paul's— S Olive, bet Fifth and Sixth sts. 

LUTHERAN. 

First English— S E cor Flower and Eighth sts. 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

Epworth— N W cor Bellevue ave and Centennial st. 
Bellevue (South) Bellevue ave, near Beaudry ave. 
First— S side Broadway, bet Third and Fourth sts. 
Simpson— 734 S Hope st. 

Trinity (South)- E side Broadway.bet Fifth and Sixth 
University — S W cor Wesley ave and Simpson st. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

Boyle Heights — Chicago ave, bet E First & Michigan 
First — S E cor Second st and Broadway. 
Second— cor. Downey ave. and Daly st. 
Immanuel— S E cor Tenth and Pearl sts. 

UNITARIAN. 

Church of the Unity— N E cor Third and Hill sts. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 
a09 South Broadway. 

BOARD OF Directors : 

E. A. Forrester, President. 

G. W. Parsons. 

O. T. Johnson. P, M. Porter, Secretary: 

Robt. Hale, A. H. Voigt, Treasurer. 

J. Ross Clark. Willard D. Ball, 

General Secretary. 

The Norwood, one of the nicest smaller 
hotels on Ocean Avenue, Santa Monica, 
bids fair to do a handsome business dur- 
ing the comming summer season which 
shall exceed that for a number of years 
past. It is certainly as pleasantly situated 
and as cosy a place as any in this cool 
Pacific resort. Facing the ocean, it com- 
mands a view unsurpassed. Large shade 
trees and a well kept lawn add much to 
the attradtiveuess of the location, making 
it a place which those who see once desire 
to visit again. 

The school census of Los Angeles city, 
just completed, shows 16,966 children of 
school age, an increase of more than 15 
per cent, in a year. There are 6437 
children not yet of school age, making 
a total of 23,403 persons under 17 years 
old. Of these 427 were foreign born. 
In the school list there are 624 more girls 
than boys. 

Coronado will have a summer school. 



Attention is called to the illustration on 
page 53 of the Weaver, Jackson & Co. 
Hair Dressing and Manicuring Parlors. 
This is a strictly metropolitan institution 
equal to the demands of any city. 

5T5 

; N. MAIN 

ST. 

Los Angeles 

GAL. 




lEADQUARTCRS 

FOR MOUNTrO 



Sourijt Uie\u Depot 



AND UNMOUNTED VIKWS 



The Lines of the 



• • • • 



SOUTHERN GftLlFORIHIfl RfllLWflY 



Reach every City, Seaside and Mountain Resort in the five southern counties. 
By DO other line can one obtain so comprehensive a view of the typical features 
of Southern California, including the 




Flnelu Illustrated 
DescrlDtlve Matter 
of Southern Galltornia 



The "Kite Shaped Track," and "Surf Line" and 

full information can be obtained by calling on 
any agent, or 



^^ 



Principal Cities 
Tourist Resorts 
Orange Groves 
riountain Scenery 
Old nissions 
Vineyards 
Grain Fields and 
Ocean Views 



:. W. MoG£B, City Passenger and Ticket Agent 

129 Nortb Spring: Street, or lia Grande Station 
liOB Ang^eles, Cal. 



TI16 LOS flngeies Terminal Railway 




DIVERGES FROM LOS ANGELES, THE METROPOLIS 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 



m^AN PPriRR niVKinN Runs through a Sne agricultural and grazing country to Long Beach, and 
ORn rcunu UITIOIUH then for five miles along the ocean to San Pedro Harbor, where connec- 
tions are made with the Pacific Coast Steamship Company for all points North and South, and with 
the Wilmington Transportation Company for Catalina Island. At Terminal Island (East San Pedro,) 
there is a fine Bath House and Pavilion, open all the year, and the finest still water bathing on the 
Coast is found here ; also boating on the bay, and sailing on the ocean with power launches or yachts. 

TUP PA^AnPNA niVKinN Runs to Pasadena, also up to Altadena, at the base of the mountains, and 

ini. rWJHULnH Umoiun at Altadena connects with the Mount Lowe Railway for Rubio Canon Pavilion 

up the incline to Echo Mountain House, and to the observatory on Mount Lowe, enabling tourists to 

go from Los Angeles to the top of the Sierra Madre Mountains in a very short time and with but 

one change. 

MCI PlinAI P niVKinN Runs through one of the finest valleys in Southern California, noted for its 
OLLHUHLL UITIOIUH 5,,^ deciduous and citrus fruits, to Glendale, and on to Verdugo Perk, the 
finest picnic grounds adjacent to Los Angeles. 

There are Twenty-Six Passenger Trains a day between Los Angeles and Pasadena ; eight passenger trains 
a day between Los Angeles and Glendale and Verdugo Park ; six passenger trains a day between Los 
Angeles, Long Beach and San Pedro ; eight passenger trains a day between Los Angeles and Altadena. 

Picnic Grounds at Verdugo Park, Devil's Gate, Millard's Cafion, Eaton's Canon and Rubio Cafion on the 
Mount Lowe Railway. Finest Mountain, Valley and Ocean Scenery in Southern California. 



T. B. BURNETT, 
Vice-President and General Manager, 
Los Angelbs. 



W. WINCUP, 
General Freight and Passenger Agent, 
L08 Amoblbs. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshinb. 



WHAT 

SORT OF A 

BOOK 

Will a volume of this magazine make ? 

DO YOU KNOW 

Any handsomer or more artistic pages ? 
Any more lavish illustration ? 
Any cleaner typography ? 

Page by page, it is a beautiful thing, is it not ? 

Bind up the six numbers of a volume, or the twelve numbers of a 
year — and just think for a moment. It will be a rather unusual book, 
will it not? Do you know any other locality about which there exists so 
complete and so beautiful a book as this will make concerning the most 
interesting of all localities — Southern California ? 

And every year it will yield two more such books. Think of it, at 
a dollar a year ! 

Not a stupid page in it. A local magazine but broad in sympathy. 
Made by the best writers in the Southwest ; men and women who are 
recognized in the East as writers. Not an asylum for the .fattener of 
waste-baskets, but a workmanlike, competent, alert, terse, graphic 
magazine which pays its contributors and expects from them their best 
work. 

Over joo^beautiful illustrations a year. 
$i.oo a year. loc. a copy. 

Land of Sunshine Pub. Co., 

501-503 Stimson Building. Los Angeles, Cal. 



SOLC WCSTCRN AQCNTS 
POR 



V^OOD & CHURCH 

Lake View Lands 



Fine Soil, abundance of Pure 
Artesian Water piped to each 
Ten Acre Tract. 



We have a fine list of Los Angeles and Pasadena City Property. Some Bargains. 

123 S. Broadway, 16 S. Raymond Ave. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PASADENA, CAL. 



" Very Attractive." 

Zion's Herald, the old and influential organ of 
the Methodist church in New England, says : 

"Land of Sunshine" is the title of a very 
attractive, well-illustrated magazine published 
in Los Angeles, Southern California. During 
the nine months of its existence it has been re- 
ceived with ever-increasing favor ; and that 
Charles F. Lummis is the editor, augurs well for 
its success. The February issue is filled with 
good reading, redolent of that sunny land. 
'■ Out-of-Door Studies in Southern California," 
" The Seasoning of Thomas," " A Night-Bloom- 
ing Giant," " Reminiscences of the ' Boom,' " 
"One Side of the Desert," "Something About 
the Adobe," " Silk Culture : A Successful Exper- 
iment," " Redlands — the City of Magic," are 
the topics treated. Send lo cents to the publish- 
ers, F. A. Pattee & Co., Stimson Building. Los 
Angeles, Cal., for a copy of this unique monthly. 



"Rich In Bright Articles." 

The San Francisco Chronicle of May 5, says : 
The May number of the Land of Sunshine 
is rich in bright articles and attractive illustra- 



tions. Among the best papers are " Trouting in 
the San Bernardino Mountains," by Alfred I. 
Townsend ; " One Man Against the Wilder- 
ness," a sketch of the remarkable work of J. W. 
Milner, near Whitewater, in building a home on 
the rocky foothills at the ba.se of Mount San 
Jacinto ; and " Reminiscences of the Boom," by 
Harry E. Brook. The editor, Charles F. Lum- 
mis, gives some straight talk from the shoulder 
about the folly of State division, and he also 
gives a picture of the new cover of his magazine, 
with a California mountain lion as a symbol of 
the physical strength and grace of California, 
and a rose as a type of mental refinement. Next 
month his periodical appears in a regular mag- 
azine form. 



An object lesson in the way brains and labor 
create values here is the 44 acre olive orchard of 
Alfred Wright, at Pomona. To bring his place 
up to its present paying basis. Mr. Wright has 
surmounted some difficulties during the past 
eight years which will not be hereafter encoun- 
tered. In one respect he now is "out of the 
woods" — yet surrounded by a fine forest of 
olive, almond and orange trees, together with 
such home comforts as should make the heart of 
their possessor ache to part with. However, 
circumstances sometimes alter cases — as Mr. 
Wright explains elsewhere in this number. 



ALMOND CULTURE. MAHZAM* COLONIES. 

Arrangements are completed in the now celebrated 
almond district of Manzana to plant villa lots of iJ4 
acres each in the "Guest House Addition to Manzani 
Coiony" on the monthly instalment plan, $10 only 
down secures the contract and starts the trees grow- 
ing. Monthly payments from I3.50 to |8.oo per month, 
according to length of time. Lots laid out to order, 
with walks, lawns, etc., as directed. Send for 
circular to THOS. W. HASKINS, 401-403 Stimson B'Idg, 
Los Angeies. 1530 acres are now in trees, mostly 
almonds, in Manzana ; 800 more in the near vicinity 

McKOON & YOAKUM, 

l^eal Estate, 
234 West First Str«et, Los Angeies. Cal. 

PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Finest yards of thoroughbreds. Settings for 
sale. Also juicy broilers and chickens to roast. 
Also fat squabs. 

15 Forrester Ato., Southwest, 

Near junction Union and Hoover, Los Angeles. 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS 

San Francisco. 

steamers leave Port Los Angeles and Redondo 
every four days for Santa Barbara, Port Harford 
and San Francisco. 

Leave San Pedro and East San Pedro every 
four days for San Francisco and way ports. 

Leave Redondo and Port Los Angeles every 
four days for San Diego. 

Northern Routes embrace Portland, Puget 
Sound, Victoria and Alaska. 

W. PARRIS, AGENT, 

123}< W. Third St., Los Angeles. 



^ff Ji'HARP>AirAMg)OW ^ 
PMERAlBlREeTOgg^P^BALMER'S 

rEL'IO£9 536 S. SPRING ST., LPS^NGELLES. 



536 S. SPRING 5T 



Please mention that yotf "saw it in the Land of Sunshikb.' 



MINNEAPOLIS BEACH COLONY 





Rates $2 to $4 per day. 
Special by week. 
Large Sample Room free. 



1,500 ACRES LAND WITH WATER 

At low prices, on very reasonable terms. Located 35 miles north of San Diego, on 
Santa Fe R'y. Soil is of the richest, well adapted to fruits and nuts. The fine 
ocean beach, surf bathing, fishing and sailing, extended views of mountain 
ranges, make the location unsurpassed. 

SILK CULTURE 

Offers special employment, in which free instructions are given by an expert. 
Address: MINNEAPOLIS BEACH COLONY CO., 



be fe^otei 

...Wli\d6op 

Redlands, California 

TOURIST. COMMERCIAL and FAMILY 



Under its new management this hostelry has been 
refitted throughout with all modem conveniences 
and arrangements for the comfort of its guests. The 
sleeping rooms are large and air5^ most of them com- 
manding a mountain or valley view of picturesque 
grandeur. Many of the suites have private baths 
connected. The proprietor has devoted especial at- 
tention to the " cuisine," and has received many 
encomiums of praise from guests for its excellence. 
In fact, the Windsor is left with regret, many of its 
guests hesitating to give the final adieus. 

H. L. SQUIRES, 

Proprietor 




The completion of a pipe organ in Los 
Angeles, such as that to which the public 
were invited to listen for the first time at 
Simpson Tabernacle on the evening of 
May 14th, is an event of no small 
importance to the music world of the 
Pacific coast. That it is the largest and 
finest in the city further commends it to 
more than a mere passing notice. Prof. 
H. J. Stewart, organist of Trinity Church, 
San Francisco, who presided at this initial 
test of the quality and capacity of the 
instrument, ranks among the leading 
organists of this part of the country. 

speoiKUTies 



The Leading Crockery 
HouseHn Los Angeles 




CHEESE 

Swiw 

Roquefort 

Limbnrger 

Brie 

Oregon Cream 

French Cream 

Pineapple 

Holland 



MEATS 

Smoked Tongue 

" Beef 
Head Cheese 
Bologna 
Liverwurat 
Mettwurst 
Salami 



FISH 

Smoked Salmon 
Halibut 
" Sturgeon 
" Herring 
Salt Salmon 

Bellies 
" Mackerel 



■''pecial attention paid to Country Orders. Price List on application. 

OLIVES Telephone 1398 PICKLES 

FRICKER &, ESDEN, Mott Market, Los Angeles 



H. F. VOLLMER & CO. 

We carry the bbst and make prices to suit the 
times. 

116 S. Spring Street 

NEAR FIRST 

Haviland China and Cut Glass our 
Specialties. 

Woodburu Bu6ine66 Co ffege 

226 S. Spring St., Los Angei,ks 

Oldest, Largest and Best. Seud for Catalogue. 



G. a. Hough, 

President. 



N, G. Felker, 

Vice President. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



Hotel Pk lotv^tx res 




A strictly first-class house ot 130 large 
rooms, elegantly furnished. Situated on 
the main lines of the Southern Pacific 
and Santa Fe Railways, 32 miles east ot 
Los Angeles. Rates, $2.50 to I3.50 per 
day ; $12.50 to $17.50 per week. 



POMONA, CALIFORNIA 



V. D. SIMMS,:Manager. 



A feto Pure California Articles made from the Oliue 



If your dealer doesn't keep them, 
rrite to lis for prices, etc. 



BY EL MONTECITO MANUFACTURING CO.: 

J) PUKK OLIVK OIL 

Q^ OLIVE OIL CANDY 

^ EMULSION OF OLIVE OIL 



P. O. BOX 1512 EL MONTECITO M'F'G CO., SANTA BARBARA, CAL. 




FIHEST 
CAFE... 



...CITY 



Private Dininn Rooms 
and (irill R(H>in 



Oysters and 
Clams 

on Shell 



211-216 
W. Second 6L 



LOS ANGELES 
CAL. 



H. H. MORROW ■^n.lhHo.e) 

Mufroy'x co.'s CeieDraled ()6I]I0I1 I 638 

Wholesnie and Ret.iil Dcalor jii all kiii>ls of 

Teas, Coffees. Spices, Extracts, Baking Powders 

M "I iii,i.i~ |.roiiil'lly anil consi'icMitiiuisly tilU-.l. 

310 WEST SIXTH STREET. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Please menti'^ 




JOHN I). MVAH 



LOS ANGELES 

INCUBATORS 
AND BROODERS 
ARC BEST 

Poultry Supplies 

Boiip Cutlers. Alfalfa 
Cutters. Shi-ll Grinders, 
Spray Pumps. Ciipon- 
i/.inK Sets. Drinkiiii.' 
fountains, Poultry 

Books, etc. CataK>gue& 
Free. 



17 H, Second St. 



If n\. ^i^lll^^J 



OK THK 



UNIVF-RSTTT- 




EYOND DOUBT the most charming Hotel of Southern 
California is the 

REDONDO HOTEL 



OPEN WINTER AND SUMMER 

17 Miles from Los Angeles. 

16 DAILY TRAINS via Southern California and Redondo Rys. Permanent guests 
furnished transportation free over either line. 

RATE5 -$2.50 PER DAY AND UP. NO IN6IbE RQ0M5 

Has incandescent lights, gas, hot and cold water, grates and commodious closets in every room. Fine 
mountain view. Acres ot Carnations. Beautiful lawn extending to the ocean. One of the best Hot Salt 
Water Natatoriums on the coast. CHAS. A. BKANT, ManaRer, Kedondo Beach, Cal. 






"^he most centrally lo- 
cated, best appointed 
and best k'ept 3otel 
in the city. 

^American or Suro- 
pean Plan. 



Rates 



reasona 



ble. 



Second and Sprino Sts. 

Los Angeles. Cal. 




'■e:o!IS 



HEALTH, PLEASURE, SCENERY 

Mo ' Mounialn • House 

Summit of Great Cable Incline, Mount I^ovve Railway, 
Kcho Mountain, California. 
Finest Kqiiipped Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 
The cost of a night on the mountains, to witness the 
sunset and the sunrise, with its incomparable scenery, 
lighted cities by night, the great World's Fair Searchlight, 
numerous cages of native animals, a look through the 
;reat telescope, including hotel accommodations and all 
iares on Mount Lowe Railway, only I5.00. Weekly rates, 
including Mount Lowe Railway fares, from $17.00 to 
$25.00 per week, according to selection of rooms; steam 
heat and open fires in every room. Situated above the 
frost line, affording perpetual flowers. More sunny days 
than in any other spot in California. Table unsurpassed. 
Finest equipped livery stables at Altadena Junction and 
Echo Mountain. Reserve rooms early by telegraphing 
at our expense. 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway, Mount Lowe Tally-ho Line and Pasadena street cars make direct connection 
with Mount Lowe Railway. Address. ECUO MOUNTAIN HOUSE, Echo Mountain, California. 




1895 Vol. Ill, No. 2 TV^IDSUTV^Tv^ER ISUTV^BE 

MRS. GENERAL CUSTER'S "^^«"'^^.. o^'r .talv... 




iSHINQ CO., 



Tierra Bonita Colonies 



GROWERS OF 

ALMONDS, OLIVES and PRUNES 

OWNERS 

AND 

MANAGERS OF THE 

136 S. Broadway, Los Angeles 1114 Chicago Stock Exchange, Chicago, ill. 

OUR ADVANTAGES IN A NUT SHELL: 

2,000 feet (14 mile) above sea level ; i,ooo feet higher than any other fruit raising location ; 2,000 feet 
higher than 90 per cent. oY them. Timbered mountains to windward. Absolute freedom from fog 
and dew. Perfect fortification against insect pests. 1,600 acres of orcharding. The handsomest trees 
in the State, ist prize for fruit at Chicago World's Fair. Sales of orchards only to the best people. 
Planting every acre sold. The healthiest point in California. 34 miles from Lo.<= Angeles. 

We now have the largest solid planted orchard iinder one management in California. Send for 
OUT map. showing relative advantages of all colonies in the State. Also our illustrated folder of Col- 
ony scenes and purchaser's photos. 



RANCH PROPERTY IN LARGE TRACTS FOR COLONIES. 

W9f We have three looo-acre tracts lying under our new ditch and reservoir system, very choicely 
located, in close proximitj- to our Tierra Bonita Colonies, in the founding of which we have had such 
phenomenal success. These lands lie well up in the foothills, are close to and under the new ditch. 
The soil is disintegrated granite, rich in alluvial matter, and lies adjoining some of the most beauti- 
ful orchards in this county. We know of no field of operation in Southern California that has so 
man}' advantages and so few drawbacks as these tracts of land, from 2,300 to 2,800 feet above the sea 
level, with no scale pests ; absolutely sheltered from the damp breezes of the fogs. The ideal fruit 
land of this portion of the State. These lands we can sell in tracts of 500 or 1000 acres each, and can 
from our e?:perif nee in colonizing in the past two years give very valuable assistance, aid and help- 
fulness to parties who desire to enter this field of operations. Parties must have standing and rep- 
utation, with assurance of carrj'ing through these enterprises, to be recognized. We should be glad 
to confer with such parties who desire to take up any of the Eastern fields where the people are 
ready and anxious toenjer upon such colonizing when it is built upon a substantial and business basis. 



Hotel Pkl-otv^kres 




POMONA, CALIFORNIA 



— ■^'•4»-* — 

A strictly first-class house ot 
130 large rooms, elegantly fur- 
nished. Situated on the main 
lines of the Southern Pacific and 
Santa ¥6 Railways, 32 miles east 
ot Lbs Angeles. Rates, $2.50 to 
$3.50 per day ; $12.50 to $17.50 per 
week. 

V. D. SIMMS, Manager. 



PACIFIC SANITARIUM 

Telephone 138. Hope and Pico Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

BEST PRIVATE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 





Sunny rooms, saniUry plumbing, home cooking, trained 

ur^i-> ' iiiihs, iJp.Ivanisin. Karadisiu. and iiiassaL-i' ; as.j.tio 



THE COMMERCIAL nui'EL 

S .\ N T .\ 1? A 1 : n .4 K -A . C' A T. . 



Strictly 



p. m. Telephoiit; 



>\ . •« ! ( > \\ , I'ropi Ktor 



Please mention uiai y< 



^he mo8t centrally lo- 
cated, beat appointed 
and best Icept Botel 
in the city. 

^American or Suro- 
pean Plan. 



reasonaoie 



ble 



Rates 



Second and ... 

Spring Streets 

Los Angeles. Cal. 





Finest 
Cafe ... 



IN THE 

..CITY 



Private Dining 
and (irill Hoom 



Oyaten and 
Claini 

on Sh«II 



211-216 
W. 6econd 5t. 

LOS ANGELES 
CAL. 



H. H. MORROW (English House) 

Importer of Murray & Co.'s celebrated 

nPllInn Tpac Wholesale and retail dealer in 
UGIIIUII I t3fl& Teag, Coffeefi. Spioen, 
Kxtrarts, Makings Powders. Mail orders 
promptly and conscientiously filled. 

310 W. Sixth St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



BARGAINS! 



$14 a foot, city lots in Kohler 

Tract, between 7th and 8th Sts. 

Installments. Also, Ten acre lots, best fruit land, 

Anaheim ; 704 trees, walnuts, apricots, peaches. 

|ioo per acre ; $28 cash, 8 years time, 6 per cent. 

W. J. FI8HICR, »27 W. Second St. 




JOBN D. MKKCKR, 117 



LOS ANGCLC8 

INCUBATORS 
ANO BROOOCRS 

anc acsT 

Poultry SuppiiflS 

Bon» Ciitt«n, Alfal- 
fa Cutteri. ShHI 
Orinden, Spray 
P u m p 1, Caponia- 
in* S«t«. Drinkinic 
PoanUina, Poultry 
Book*, •««. CnU- 
locnMPro*. 

St. 



Please mention that vou " saw it in the Land of Sunshinb." 




Wli\d&op 



Redlands, Cal. 



Tourist, Commercial and Family. 

Under its new nianageiuent this host-elry 
has been refitted throughout with all 
modern conveniences and arrangements 
for the comfort of its guests. The sleep- 
ing rooms are large and airy, most of 
them commanding a mountain or valley 
view of picturesque grandeur. Many of 
the suites have private tiaths connected. 
The proprietor has devoted especial atten- 
tion to the "cuisine," and has received 
many encomiums of praise from guests 
for its excellence. In fact, the Windsor is 
left with regret, many of its guests hesi- 
tating to give the final adieus. 



Rates $2 to $4 per day; 
by week. 
Ivarge Sample Room free 

H. L. SQUIRES 



Special 



PROPRIETOR 



Silver bought 

Manufacturing Jeweler 

. DioiDonfl seller oofl Enflrover 

specialty 



Every description' of Gold 
and Silver Jewelry made 
to order or repaired 



Gold and Silver School and Society Badges & Medals 

ROOMS 3. 4 AND 7 UP STAIRS 

217^ South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Woodbury Bu6ine66 Coffepe 

226 S. Spring St., Los Angeles 

Oldest, I,argest and Best. Send for Catalogue. 



G. A. Hough, 

President. 



N. G. Felker, 

Vice President. 




LflS GflSITflS SflNlTftRlUM 





~^ ZOS'JJSouthMajs.jSt.. 



Situated in the Sierra Madre foot-hills, altitude 
2.000 feet. Most equable climate in Southern Cal- 
ifornia Pure mountain water.excellent cuisine ; 
easily reached by Terminal R. R. and short car- 
riage drive. 

0. SHEPARD BARNUM, Propr. 

Drawer 126, Pasadena, Cal. 



OVERTON & FIREY 

REAL ESTATE 

POMONA. CAL. 

Orange and Lemon Groves in full bearing 
for sale. Also unimproved lands well located. 

We have several fine Orange Groves for 
exchange for eastern property. 

If you want a home in the leading Orange 
producing section in Southern California, call 
on or address us. 

Correspondence solicited. 

OVERTON & FIREY, 

POMONA, CAL. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshhtb." 



HHi^ERTV St in^ILSON 




View from Smiley Heights, Redlands, looking north. 

PROPRIETORS CLUB STABLES 

OPP. wiND«ow HoTct. REDLANDS, CAL. 

tir Carriatres. in charge of thoroughly competent drivers, 
meet each incoming train, ready to convey tourists to every point 
of interest in and about Redlands. 
N. B.— Be sure »nd ask for Club Stable rigs. 

ALMOND CULTURE. MANZANA COLONIES. 

Arrangements are completed in the now cele- 
brated almond district ol Manzana to plant villa 
lots of 1% acres each in the "Guest House Addition 
to Manzana Colony" on the monthly instalment 
plan, $io only down secures the contract and 
starts the trees growing. Monthly payments 
from $3.50 to $8.00 per month, according to length 
of time. Lots laid out to order, with walks, 
lawns, etc., as directed. Send for circular to 
THOS. W. HASKINS, 401-403 Stimson B'Idg, Los 
Angeles. 1530 acres are now in trees, mostly 
almonds, in Manzana ; 800 more in the near 
vicinity. 




/"*■»: 



SANTA eATALI/SA ISLAATD 




Grand Attractions 
for the 



SPECIAL RATES AT 



The Marine Band 



«5Mr«»,,«K <^««Bor. Hotel HETROPOLE The Augmented orchestra com- 

Suttinrjer Season prising twenty Soloists ot 

1895 FOR WINTER GUESTS exceptional merit. 

Apply for illustrated pamphlets and full information to 

WILMINGTON TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

222 S. SPRING STREET, LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the I<and op Sunshine." 



"AN AGRICULTURAL GOLD MINE." 

"HOW I PAID FOR MY FARM IN CHINO."— Booklets. 



SENT FREE. 

Mention "I^and of Sunshine. 



Addre.s, W. H. HOLABIRD, 

404 South Broadway, L,OS ANGEI.ES. 





UKO.HKrXlECMBAUll" 




FUN ALL PAY FOR TWO BITS 

Sanbhon ica Nortfi Beacfi Bath House 

\ ^^Reopened on Decoration Day after some weeks spent 
^■S^ in making Extensive Improvements. Henceforth an 



in making Extensive 
enormous heater 



\SriI^Iv W^fl:RlVI THK BIG PIvUNGE 

And as the Establishment will never close again until it 

wears out or burns down, you can always be sure of a 

First-class bath in the Surf, in Porcelain Tubs, or 

IN THE AFORESaiD ^W^ffRlVI PLUNGE + + 

Please mention that you "saw it in the 1,and of Sunshine." 



^^-^^ 



Of THPl 



(DJIIVJB31I1 



irl 



VOL. 3, No. 2. 



THE LAND OF 

SUNSHINE' 



LOS ANGELES 



JULY, 1895 



Memories of "Our Italy. 



Ik' ELIZABETH BACON CUSTER. 



w 



^HEN I first heard Southern California called the Italy of Amer- 
ica, there arose within me that protest which we often feel but 
do not express when we think a statement is greatly exaggera- 
ted. When I finally went there, I did not exadlly go in to scoff and 
remain to pray, but I went with the expectation of being disappointed. 
The long strip of American desert, the heat and dust of the Mojave, made 
us feel that we must be rewarded at once; after coming out of that hope- 
less country, with every evidence of tropical luxuriance. 

It was cold that spring, and summer did not run to meet us over velvet 
swards of green. Every day two semi-invalids in our party awaited the 
cure that the first southern zephyr would give, but still the rasped and 
tender throats remained unhealed. Finally Mr. Charles Dudley Warner 
came to breakfast one morning with some droll remarks about "This 
picnicking after summer being rather unsatisfa(5lory." The next day 
we met summer, and oh, what bloom and fragrance and delightful 
atmosphere it recalls ! We forgot at once that there were parts of our 
land where the March winds still blew, and the snow- 

banks refused to melt. 

It was an Italy and without A. the trying features of that 

exquisite land of poetry, his- /^W tory and art. It is difficult 

in Italy to escape from the 4«if|^r^^ sight of beggars, from 
squalor and poverty. 
Even the photographs 
which I take up now, 
living over an Italian 







52 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



pilgrimage, make me almost involuntarily put my handkerchief to 
my face, for that was the way in which I saw much of the beauty of 
that marvelous land. The odors of the loathsome surroundings of some 
of Italy's choicest spots enter your nostrils at the same time that the 
beauty of the scene penetrates your brain. While you see all that nature 
can do in California, you are at the same time in the midst of our own 
countrymen, the most delightful people in the world, and made more 
so by the sunshine which mellows and enriches natures, as it darkens 
the purple of the grape and deepens the bloom on fruit. 

There is nothing like the effect that life in the open air has upon 
the disposition as well as the health. In California, everything invites 
you to remain out of doors, 

I scarcely remember at all the interiors of houses. It must be because 
life in the open air was so tempting that you unconsciously spent your 




Herve Friend, Ku-. Plioto. by Ellis 

existence on the galleries. These were the width of a room, perhaps fif- 
teen or twenty feet, sometimes roofed over, sometimes with only a trellis 
through which the sunshine flickers and the roses shower their petals. 
These piazzas are shaded by jalousies of reeded matting, through which 
the air penetrates. They are furnished charmingly ; rugs on the floor, 
wicker furniture — chairs, tables and sofas — the tea service, writing 
desk, books, magazines and papers. The wide gates were open at one 
of the homes I remember. We walked up an avenue hedged on either 
side with shrubbery of every description. At the end of the avenue was 
a circle and in the center a huge palm ; the circle divided the avenue 
and it met again at the foot of the steps of the house. 

Home after home I saw where roses of the rarest varieties ran riot over 
the roofs of the houses. There seems to be a separate set of shoulders 
in our brain which we shrug when we hear any startling statement. We 
would not want anyone to see the visible movement of our actual 



MEMORIES OF "OUR ITALY. 



53 



shoulders ; but I am sure had I been told that roses climbed to the chim- 
neys, I should have made a mental dissent to such a statement ; but I 
saw them over and over again. In the Royal Academy in London, four 




LADY BANKSIA ROSES 



Phot... l>y Pierc 



years ago, there was a pidlure before which people stood three deep. It 
was "The Feast of Heliogabalus " by Alma Tadema. The delightful 
bacchantes of the festa were bedded in rose petals, their laughing, 





SIERRA MADRE VILLA. 



54 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



dimpled faces looked 
out from billows of 
bloom. The only place 
where it might have 
been painted, without 
seeming to be a license 
of an artist's imagina- 
tion , would be Califor- 
nia. I remember a 
basket of roses that 
was sent me that con- 
tained fifty varieties. 
As we walked in the 
outskirts of Los An- 
geles, oranges from 
the groves we were 
passing fell at our feet. 
We had only to stand 
on tiptoe to pick them 
from the trees; and, 
at this safe distance, 
I confess we did so. 
Whether it was be- 
cause it was stolen 
fruit or not, there 
never seemed to be 
such freshness and de- 
licacy of flavor. How 
I wished that it were 
possible to carry away 
a tree by which we were "twice blessed," for the air was fragrant 
with the odor of the waxlike blossoms lying against the ripe fruit. 
Think how we cherish, in the green-houses here, an orange tree, and 
what an event it is to have it bear fruit, while, in the land of sunshine, 
one has to wait barely eighteen months after planting to eat fruit 
from its branches. And then it does not take any time at all to get 
up an avenue. On that famous twenty-mile drive in the Pasadena 
country, I remember an avenue several miles long, shaded by full-grown 
trees only seven years old. 

Of all the interesting features of that drive, my memories center 
around Sierra Madre Villa. It seemed to me that I had reached the 
gates of heaven, or at least "the land where it is always afternoon," 
when I passed under the arches of green into the garden of the Villa. 
To breathe the fragrance and be surrounded with the blossoms of my 
three favorite flowers at one time was more than I had ever expelled on 
earth. The white jessamine, the honey-suckle and the orange flowers 
made every breath you drew a delight. Within perhaps twenty miles 
was the sea, a delicate horizon of shimmering silver. Perhaps all the 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



Photo, by Elli; 



A COLD OF OPHIR BUSH. 




L. A. Edk Co. 



SPEND YOUR LIFE ON THE VERANDAS.' Drawn l.y KJnier W«chtel. 



5^ LAND or SUNSHINE 

landscapes had attuned my soul to appreciation and opened my eyes to 
beauty, but I remember thinking that no ocean had ever seemed so 
blue, so sparkling, so beautiful, as the Pacific when I first saw it and 
afterwards stood on its sands. 

The old missions of Southern California add immensely to the pictur- 
esqueness of the land. They are often the first ruins that an American 
has ever seen. The adobe softens to a beautiful gray with time, and 
lichen paints its tracery over an admirable background. The green 
mold and rust on the bells, which are hung one above another in three 
tiers in the little tower of these churches, and the arches of the cloisters 
are all beautiful to eyes that have seen only the stereotyped architecture 
of our land. 

As I think over all the lovely features of that semi-tropical land, they 
all beckon to me to return. Whenever I am tired, it always seems to 
me that nothing would rest the body and soul like sitting in the sun- 
shine and among the flowers of Southern California. But I try not to 
say too much to those who have not been there, for occasionally, you 
know, there comes a winter like one you had five or six years since. 
Two different parties of friends left the cold of the north for the glow of 
the Occident. One had been winter after winter to the Bermudas; he was 
frail and needed warmth, but did not find it that winter in California. 
He referred perpetually to winters in the South, and to winters he had 
spent in Southern lands, and made invidious comparisons. He spent 
his days wrapped in woolen rugs and furs, and his nights shivering with 
discomfort. He used to be so aggravated by what he considered the 
impertinent effrontery of the flowers going on blooming while every one 
of the party was chilled and miserable. Finally one morning his family 
said : '* Where are you going, father? " "I am going out to kick the 
roses ! ' ' 

So I do not dare express all the enthusiasm that I feel about Califor- 
nia, for fear there may come an unprecedented winter again. But we 
must never count too fully on anything for, though it is a trite saying, 
it is true, that there are exceptions to every rule, and where there is one 
who would do violence to a blossoming flower in his spite at being cold, 
there are thousands who recall, as I do, in the odor of an orange as it is 
cut at breakfast, and in the bouquet of the Zinfandel and Angelica, a 
world of charming experience. And, fortunately, if we cannot go to 
California as often as we wish, it comes to us in its fruits and its vintage. 




Hearing a Spanish Song. 



iY J. C. DAVIS. 



Pathos and pain of the soul of singing, 
Melody mingled of love and tears ; 

Sorrow's song, that for aye goes ringing 
Down through the long and the lonely 
years ; 

My lips athirst and my heart that hungers, 
My empty arms that are reached in vain, 

Thrill responsive and throb and quiver 
Unto the chords of thy weird refrain. 



Carry me back, O waves of music — 

Back to the palms where my lost hopes lie 

Dead Love out of the dead past calls me ; 
Carry me back — and let me die ! 





On the Amargosa. 

BY CHARLES HOWARD SHINN. 

AP'S going away to find a job of work, Little Mischief. You'n 
Ma keep the cabin while I'm gone, an' don't forget yer old 
Pap." 

It was in the shadow of a rude shack on Joe Delavan's 
desert claim. What he wanted it for, or how he ever got there 
with his wife and baby boy, or, having once seen the place, 
why he had staid till the baby was three years old, are ques- 
tions that would take a superhuman intelligence to answer. 

Desolate ? The place was awful in its arid monotony. Sand, 
heaped up around the roots of sage bushes and cacti, swept to 
the very door of the shanty. A spring that just managed to 
keep a little grass alive, oozed forth from a low hill of rock. Beyond it 
was another desert. People said there was silver somewhere around ; 
my friend Delavan spent a good deal of his time looking for it. But 
now Joe's money was gone, and he was forced to strike out on a new 
line. 

" Mary, ye stay with Little Mischief, an' there's enough to eat for the 
month. 'Tis easy to get a job on the A. and P. railroad, where me 
cousin's a section boss. When I get me pay I'll come back for you." 

Long before sunrise Joe was off ; Mary and Little Mischief were left 
alone. There was a cow feeding on the small oasis by the spring ; there 
was flour, and a few other things were in the house — and the nearest 
neighbor only twelve miles away. 

Dear, sturdy Little Mischief ! What wicked voices called thee out of 



58 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

the desert to slip away from watchful mother-care, and creep into the 
sage bushes that April afternoon ? 

The next day a prospedlor with laden mule pushing slowly across the 
rim of the desert, met a wild, wandering woman circling desperately 
around high-heaped sands, too hoarse to speak above a whisper. Pretty 
soon he understood her story. There was a baby lost in the desert, and 
twenty hours had passed. 

Slowly the prospedlor forced her back to the shanty, and began, with 
infinite patience and skill, to unravel the tangled skein of the baby's 
footsteps from the door. I wish I knew that prospector's real name, and 
history : " Old Nevada " was all I ever heard, and he, too, was looking 
for silver in the Amargosa country. 

After a little. Old Nevada caught up the trail, and Mary walked behind 
him, leading the mule, with food and water. Little footsteps, wayward, 
and dim in the sand, led off into the desert. Then the baby had lain 
down, and started up in fright. A coyote was walking beside it, closer 
and closer, shoulder to shoulder — and then another, and another — and 
the baby's cries or motions had frightened them away, again and again, 
for hours. 

" It is almost night," whispered the mother. " Let us go faster ! " 

"We cannot," said Old Nevada, and went on steadily, picking up the 
blurred trail in the desert. It wandered five miles away from the shanty 
to the edge of an old alkali flat, and still the coyotes accompanied it. 
Turning, it came wavering back, almost to the door of the cabin. 

" Thar was the baby," said Old Nevada, " about the time you met me, 
ten miles the other way." 

They made hasty torches, for the night was at hand. The prospeAor 
clung fast to the trail, while Mary explored the sage brush far ahead on 
the new line of search, swinging her light to frighten away the coyotes. 
Again Little Mischiefs feet turned toward the old alkaline lake, in hap- 
hazard, wandering fashion ; and again the coyotes drew closer, and dis- 
turbed his more frequent rests. Old Nevada noted signs of utter 
weariness and suffering that wrung his heart ; but he could not hasten 
without losing the trail. Mary stumbled and fell, rising again without 
feeling any pain, and startled a thousand times to sudden hope by 
shadows that seemed like a sleeping child. And the night waned, and 
freshened to dawn, and the desert wind arose. 

They were among sand dunes, by the barren alkali sink. Looking up, 
Old Nevada saw a gaunt coyote scurrying past, and a little fluttering 
garment far off in a hollow of the sands. He ran forward, crying out, 
and Mary rose from where she had fallen a moment before, and fell 
again, and, struggling as one who swims against a mighty river, reached 
his side. He lifted a little body from the sands. Torn it was by thorns 
and rocks, and almost naked, and scorched by the sun, but, as he 
pressed Mary's hand against the child's heart, she felt a quiver of life, 
and from the poor parched lips came a sigh more feeble than the flutter- 



EL MOLINO VIEJO. 59 

ing sound from the weakest of new-born babes, as Little Mischief was 
caught back from Death's threshold. 

That was two years ago, and if you hunt up Joe Delavan's shanty in 
one of the frontier station towns you will know that this story is true 
the moment you look into Little Mischief's eyes, so deep and wonderful 
they have grown. Mary and Old Nevada say that the baby remembers 
all of it, and that he saw and heard things not to be told in words as he 
walked for hours with the hungry desert coyotes at his side, and some 
prote(5ling spirit between. Perhaps they are right ; I cannot tell. 

SUtc University, Berkeley, Cal. 



" El Molino Viejo. 



BY EMILY CRAY MAYBERRY. 



VEN in this realistic age, stabbed through with rationalism — an 
age whose crowning achievement is that perfedlion of unbear- 
ableness, the self-made man — the weather-gnawed walls of a 
gray ruin speak to the heart. 

El Molino Viejo has lain Sphinx-like for nearly a century and a quar- 
ter, at the mouth of a miniature cation — a very lover's paradise, thrid- 
ded by a limpid stream whose rhythmic turbulence babbles under azure 
skies ; past Daphnean haunts of interwoven sun and shade, under self- 
centered oaks, gliding in and out its brackened ways, until at last its 
wilful beauty emerges to be harnessed to humdrum utility ; to gladden 
broad acres and the hearts of their owners, over this modern " Vale of 
Kashmir," the San Gabriel valley. 

About one hundred and twenty -three years ago — long before the pro- 
gressive and aggressive American came — the dripping wheels ground 
the com whose planters and harvesters have long since ceased from their 
labors. Though the "mill-wheels have fallen to pieces, Ben Bolt," and 
the red roof-tiles have "tumbled in " (to the grips of the relic-hunting 
tourist), the walls and buttresses are proof against a century's storms. 

Since the advent of the ubiquitous American, many enterprising indi- 
viduals have spent much of time and patience to discover the secret of 
its materials ; but all alike have failed. As nothing like it is to be found 
in other ancient Spanish ruins in the State, it has been supposed that 
part of the ingredients might have been brought from Spain. Another 
theory is that the cement was made in the Arroyo Seco, and mixed with 
bullock's blood — which is known to render any cement almost ada- 
mantine. 

The main building is two stories, 25x60 feet, with a wall five feet thick 
at the base, tapering to four feet at the top, on a foundation of stone and 
cement. The floor timbers under the first story are of live-oak, 8x10, 
and are laid ten inches apart — showing that the building was not State- 
contra(5l work, but put there "for keeps." They are sound as when 
they were first rough-hewn. It is braced on the northeast and southeast 

Illustrated by Anna W. Bradfleld. 



6o 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



corners by conical abutments of solid masonry. There are three wheel- 
houses, and they, with the masonry for storing and conducing the water, 
are all as firm today as when construdled a hundred and twenty-three 
years ago — with the single exception of one wall, in which is a crack 
running its full depth, caused by the earthquake of 1884, and visibly 
widened by that of 1894. The old mill-stones, between which the corn 
was ground, are at San Marino, the ranch of Hon. J. de Barth Shorb. 

In 1855 the mill was fitted up as a residence, and I have been told that 
the workmen employed to cut through the walls for two small windows 
were twenty days in doing it, and bankrupted themselves in tools. 
There was formerly a saw-mill, built somewhat later, to the east of El 
Molino and considerably nearer Lake Vineyard — a natural body of water 
containing about forty acres, with a central depth of twenty feet. This 
saw-mill was of live-oak, and evidently was removed, as there remain 
some of the oaken piles that supported it, sound as granite, and almost 
as hard to cut. They were slightly charred and wound with strips of 
rawhide. 

In these times of luxury, laziness, and labor-saving, when one pauses 
long enough to refledl on the many hindrances of unskilled Indian 
labor, remoteness from civilized materials and supplies, danger from 
treacherous savages — either one must believe that those ancient Padres 
were inspired by a faith that does not seem to uphold and guide anyone 
to a very alarming extent now-a-days, or one must acquire enduring ad- 
miration of their splendid human courage, brains and perseverance. 

Mr. Gray, foreman on El Molino rancho for many years, informed me 

that he hauled from the ad- 
jacent bluff and its vicinity 
as many stone pestles and 
mortars as he could load 
on a four- horse 




wagon ; but all have gone the way of the 

roof-tiles, to the insatiate tourist. The large 

number of these crude domestic implements would indicate a large 

colony of Indians on the bluff, probably during the constru<5lion of the 

mills and dam. 



EL MOLINO VIEJO. 



6i 



In excavating round the 
dam (built nearly at the 
same time and of the same 
enduring cement and oak), 




the foreman exhumed a hand-wrought hammer with iron flanges run- 
ning up from the poll. The wooden handle had long since fretted to 
dust. Although of clumsy workmanship, and now honeycombed by the 
rust of years, it is, unlike the hands by which it was welded and wielded, 
still capable of good service. 

Eight or nine years ago, an old negro showed a young man a time- 
worn parchment inscribed with unknown hieroglyphics. He declared 
an old Spaniard had given it to him on his deathbed, saying he had 
obtained it of an old comrade about to die, who told him it was "mucho 
dinero." The negro also said the Spaniard had told him that the padre 
who alone possessed the key to the parchment had died of small-pox 
on board ship and been buried at sea, taking his secrets with him. The 
young man, who had a sprinkling of text-book Greek, was able to deci- 
pher enough (aided by a diagram on one side) to see that it purported to 
indicate that treasure was buried somewhere in the neighborhood of El 
Molino. He did not enlighten the darkey, but took the son of the owner 
of the ranch into his confidence, and they essayed to do some digging. 
Surprised at their labor, by the foreman, they filled in the excavation 
and desisted rather than part with their secret. The mystery of the 
yellow parchment is still hidden under its century of secrecy and Cali- 
fornia soil. 

I well remember my first view of El Molino, eighteen years ago. To 
one born and reared in Yankee-land, its pi<5luresque loveliness burst 
upon the senses like a stray bit out of the Arabian Nights. It was dur- 
ing its occupancy as a residence by Col. E. J. C. Rewen, who added three 
or four rooms of wood, now fast falling to decay. 

Entering a winding driveway shaded with the green and gold of fruit- 
ing orange trees, already odorous with thronging buds, we followed the ' 
gently-tilted way in and out under balsamic boughs of pine, cedar, pep- 
per and eucalypti, whose emerald tints were sublimated and enriched by 
roses clustering at their feet, or emulating their ambition to reach the 



62 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

scented sky, by climbing in delirious abandon from bough to bough. 
Clustering round a fountain — its masonry hidden by trailing myrtle, 
smilax, and blue-eyed periwinkle — were throngs of white lilies lifting 
faces of spotless purity to the spray. And throned on a vase of lilies in 
the center, that ostentatious bird of the Orient showily flaunted his 
three-eyed plumage in our unaccustomed faces. 

On our right, glimpsing through interspaces of interwoven foliage, 
was Lake Vineyard ; and darting from tree to tree with a flash of white 
wings, whistling derisively in hilarious braggadocio, that truly American 
bird, the mocker, seemed to be here, there, and everywhere at once. 
Swinging round the fairy fountain we came in view of El Molino from 
the south ; glorified on each side the driveway by an oleander, gorgeous 
in fullness of bloom and perfume — a veritable breath from the Alham- 
bra of Spain, their leafage still whispering of the dark-eyed, rich- 
cheeked maids of Andalusia. The modern wooden door and trellis 
were half-hidden by masses of passiflora ccsrulea, starred with its em- 
blematic flowers, clambering all over the front, and gracefully vaulting 
to the roof. 

On the east side, projedling from an arch in the second story, was a 
small wooden balcony festooned with drifting sprays of roses of every 
liue — no niggardly handfuls, but a generous abundance, and all growing 
from the same sturdy stem, twenty-three inches in circumference, on 
which they were grafted. Below it a spring mirrored other groups of 
lilies, like Sisters of Charity bending above the sacred font. 

If anyone, however blase, will pass the ghost-beleaguered hour of 
midnight under the stars that look down on the silence of the ruin, 
while Luna "drives together the airy crowd" of bygone years, I will 
promise him an experience as novel as it is eldritch and awesome. 

Gray-hooded monks thridding their ways with muttered preces emaces, 
are fleetly etched on the pale moon ; and low murmurings mingle with 
rising winds that die away in multitudinous sighs amid the sentinel 
pines. Invisible garments rustle, and stray whisperings half aff"right 
the ear sensitive to even the stir of the faint-footed mouse in the wain- 
scot. Swarms of musky bats cut the moonlight, or hang motionless 
under the moldering eves. 

" O'er all there hung the shadow of a fear, 
A sense of mystery the spirit daunted, 
That said as plain as whisper in the ear, 
The place is haunted." 

The present owner is not 
greatly "given to the melting 
mood ; " so the old mill has 
leaped the chasm of fifty years 
of romance, and now serves as 
a " bunk-house " for the work- 
men of the rancho — 

"Imperious Caesar dead and turned to clay 

Alhambra, Cal. 




• The Grand Veranda 





©p' 



BY CHAS. F. LUMMIS. 

HAT we can keep a straight face when we go out- 
side our own houses and look back at what we are 
pleased to term "porches," speaks either well for 
our self-control or ill for our vaunted American sense of 
humor. Such stingy, snippy, inconsequent, incompetent 
apologies for a usefulness outgrown ! Those are not porches 
— they are merely reminders that the porch was borrowed 
by England from countries where it means something ; and 
that it has come on down to this day and to our corner of 
the imitative footstool, as brilliant a testimonial to our inner 
thoughtfulness as the sword-button still on the back of our 
coats or the nick without which no man dare wear his lapel. 
If man progressed by no swifter strides in other directions 
than in his fun<5lion of home-maker, we should still be 
homesteading in our ancestral caves ; letterless, breech- 
clouted and lighted to bed by the sole stars. 

The porch — as we fetched it from northern Europe to America, 
and later from our Eastern States to God's country — is as purely a 
superstition as the sword-button. It records — in very much the 
fashion of a geologic stratum — the fa<5l that Saxons once strayed into 
a livable country, saw a portico and brought home the shadow if not 
the substance of it. Naturally, in their bleak clime, it could not be 
much used ; therefore it went into mere ornament ; and the chara<5ler- 
istic march of devolution — which works in architedlure precisely as 
it has worked in five-toed horses — presently dwarfed it to a "stoop." 
What was learned as an out-door lounging-place came to be remem- 
bered merely as a shelter to keep the householder dry while he should 
exalt his umbrella to sally into the storm. 

We have, it is true, done a little better out here in Southern Cali- 
fornia. It is possibly safe to say that on the average our porches here 
are twice as spacious as we respe(flively had "back East." Even 
more ; there are comparatively few houses here choked off with mere 
"stoops." The majority have what are by courtesy called porches or 
piazzas — several times as long as the traditional "stoop," if not much 
wider. On some of them there is even room to swing a hammock — 
lengthwise. 

Now there may be architecfls who shall persuade us that a piazza 
six or eight feet wide is good manners ; but it most certainly is not 
good morals, in any country which God made to be sat out in. It is 
a flat slap in the face of providence ; as imbecile a superstition as 
that other brilliant device of a window frame without any window in 
it — and far more pernicious, for people nowadays merely laugh at 
the one, and they have not all learned to smile at the other, because 
it is so much more deceptive a counterfeit. 

Now whatever you may prefer to call that original invention of 



64 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




Collier, Eng. ^ PUEBLO INDIAN PORTAL. 

sunny climes — whether piazza, from Italy, or veranda (or portico) 
from Spain — pray do not walk away with the notion that it was 
invented merely to enable the architeA to tack on an extra $200 to 
his bill. That is about all we get out of it, for we are easier meat to 
the contra(5lor than he found when folk took more time to live and 
less to play social packbeast ; but the veranda is not his. It belongs 
to some man — of whose very name, nation and date on the dial of 
time we are ignorant — that took more thought to add a cubit to his 
comfort than to his costliness. He was not a full-dress gentleman, 
nor probably even a scholar. It is highly reasonable to infer that he 
was lax in his grammar and had not yet got past an unconventional 
garb for the which he was much more indebted to the flajdng-knife 
than to the tailor. But at any rate, what few brains he had were not 
boxed and stored in some aboriginal McAllister's warehouse. Prob- 
ably he was a Moor — and a very superstitious one, for his invention 
runs a long way back — but he knew enough not to need any setter- 
of-the-pace to tell him when it rained. He did not chase someone to 
ask if he might turn up his G-string or turn down his calling-card. 
He wanted to be comfortable even if the incompetent next door pre- 
ferred discomfort. This is a general trade-mark, indeed, of unpro- 
gressive races. The very Indians of our New World — or of so much 
of it as makes such things climatically possible — know enough to 
make " a porch as is a porch." 

A piazza less than ten feet wide is an abortion — simply because it is 
incompetent to perform the functions of a piazza. It ought to be at 
least twelve feet wide, and fourteen is still better. In a country like 
this Southwest, where a "porch" can really be something more than 
a •' contractor's extra," it is meant to be an out-door hall. 

As in very many other things which pertain to home comfort, the 
Spanish-American is in this some thousand years and a whole multi- 



THE GRAND VERANDA. 



"L^'i:, 



plication-table more civilized than the self-respedled Saxon ^^K<|l((hii, 
plants and looks down upon him. His portal— as the veradiia^is 
chiefly called in Spanish-America — is invariably a thing of beauty 
and of sense. It is put where it can be used ; and it is meant to be 
used; and it is used. That it is incidentally an archite(5lural nobility 
does not alter the fa(5l — indeed Ruskin might claim was based on the 
fadl — that its prime object is comfort. How comfortable it is, never 
can be guessed by those who have never sighed with very pleasure in 
its gracious, spacious, airy coolness. 

If anyone cares to take a little primary lesson in the gentle art of 
living, one should go first on a warm summer day and try to fancy 
that one is happy on the porch of the average redwood box of those 
we are building here ; and then go sit or lounge in a real portal — like 
that of the old de la Guerra homestead in Santa Barbara, for instance. 

The verandas of the unmitigated tropics are not generally ideal, for 
easily comprehensible reasons ; and narrow balcones of two stories 
take their place. In Mexico and Central America are some fine ones, 
however ; and in Peru — a country many times nearer the equator than 
Southern California, but by reason of its sea-current much like this 
in climate, though not so good — are probably the noblest portales in 
the New World. The convent of Santo Domingo in Lima (where I 
have had the privilege of making the only photographs ever taken 
inside that venerable pile) has thousands of feet, around its patios, of 
ideal portales. On the ground floor, they are in Roman arches and 
walled with magnificent encaustic tiles of 290 years ago ; in the sec- 
ond story the arches are Moresque, and opener to the light. Anyone 
who can look at the portal of Santo Domingo pictured on page 66 







Herve Friend, Eng. Photo, by Fletcher. 

PORTAL OF THE DE LA GUERRA ADOBE, SANTA BARBARA. 



OUR CAME FISHES. 67 

(and another and no less charming one, from the central patio of the 
same building was shown in the June number) without wishing for a 
chair or a hammock in "the likes of it," is — well, is legitimate food 
for the contracflor. 

It is also a charming fashion in those Spanish- American cities to 
surround two or three sides of the plaza mayor or public square with 
portales, just as if it were a giant patio. One who has walked them 
will never forget the cool, marble-paved street-corridors of Lima, or 
those of Arequipa or Guayaquil or Guatemala. Even the old palacio 
of Santa F^, N. M. , has this saving grace ; and its uneven but hos- 
pitable grand-veranda endears it above many a building of five 
hundred times its cost. 

Even a portal should be built not only with generosity but with as 
much brains as the owner has to spare. In actual dividends of com- 
fort it is, in this blest country, worth half the total value of the 
house ; but it should not be permitted to cripple the rest. In this 
sunniest land in the civilized world we cannot get along without the 
sun. People who do not care can face to China if they prefer ; but 
any other sort of a house will face the south. On a south front the 
veranda must be careful not to shut out the light from the inner rooms. 
The noble Roman arches are too massive and shadowy for that place ; 
even the rectangular American porch is better there. And the high, 
light, graceful Alhambrian arch is best of all. When home-making 
comes to be half as scientific as sausage-making has become, houses 
generally will be built in the one possible shape which allows every 
room to have out-doors on both sides — namely, round about a 
patio. In such a plan the Roman arch can wisely be used inside — 
and there is no other home-architecture in all the world so gloriously 
comfortable if it be restrained from too much interference with the 
light. An ideal combination is the Moorish pattern for the front 
veranda, and the Roman for the verandas on the inner court. 



Our Game Fishes. 



BY CHARLES FREDERICK HOLDER. 



WING to a peculiarity of the coast line of Los Angeles county, 
good smooth-water fishing is confined mainly to the ofF-shore 
islands of San Clemente and Santa Catalina, that, like great 
krakens, are the ocean vanguards of the land of the afternoon. From 
early times these have been famous fishing-grounds. The hooks taken 
from the island graves tell the story of prehistoric fishermen. Florida 
has its tarpon, Canada its salmon, but Southern California has a number 
of game fishes that in time will be equally famous. In the winter and 
summer the giant black sea-bass {StereoUpts gigas), ranging up to 600 
pounds, the white fish and others can be caught ; but in early spring 
there comes in from the unknown a horde of gamy fish — the yellowtail, 
from ten to sixty pounds ; the sea-bass, from ten to seventy ; the albi- 



68 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

core, king of sulkers ; the tuna, from fifty to looo pounds ; the bar- 
racuda, ten or twelve ; while the rock-bass of four to seven poiinds is 
ever present. Throughout the long summer these fish — except the bar- 
racuda — fairly swarm, affording sport with a light rod and fine tackle 
equal to that found in any salmon river. 

Any tyro can pull in a sea-bass with a rope or blow it up with dyna- 
mite, but the approved method today is to give the game a chance for its 
life and try conclusions with it with an i8-strand line and a light rod, 
eight to sixteen ounces. With such an equipment you row along the 
rocky shores of the island, looking down into the water fifty or sixty 
feet. You see the forest of kelp, the dark unfathomed caves, and are 
lost in the beauty of it all — when a shriek from your reel sounds the 
alarm. Away goes the line in twenty-foot sedlions, torn off in savage 
jerks ; and the grand rush of two hundred feet of line is made before 
you touch the brake — a magnificent burst of speed that makes the 
slender rod bend while the light line cuts the water and vibrates like 
the string of some musical instrument. Now the fish turns and comes in 
like an arrow, and you reel for your life. Now he is away again, the 
line hissing, the steel throat of the reel screaming in high staccato 
notes. Now you turn him ; then he turns you ; is up near the surface, 
running like a shadow ; then down two hundred feet, sulking like a 
salmon. What strength, what reserve force, what fertility in tricks — all 
designed to take you unaware and break the magic thread that would 
not stand one fair jerk ! He is the king of fighters; but finally, when 
you are trembling with weariness and ready to surrender, he comes in — 
a glorious mass of color ; gold, iridescent, blue and silver, flashing in 
the sunlight, even now tossing his yellow tail in defiance as the gaff 
lifts him before your admiring eyes and lands him in the boat as forty 
or more pounds of additional ballast. 

There is a difference in individuals, but such a yellowtail fought me 
twenty-five minutes ; w^hile another, weighing sixty-two pounds, strug- 
gled with a fair fisherman and a light rod for two hours in the harbor of 
Avalon, towing the boat almost across the bay in its efforts to escape. 

The yellowtail, amber fish or white salmon, is the Seriola dorsalis of 
science, and attains a length of five feet and a weight of seventy pounds. 
It is closely allied to the little pilot-fish Naucrates, and to one of the 
gamiest fish I have caught in the Gulf of Mexico — a yellowtail that is 
rarely found over eight pounds in weight, a dainty creature with soft 
eyes and rich tints. 

Your next catch as you round the bend of the island near Church 
Rock may be the sea-bass. He strikes the bait in a desperate run, and 
the reel hoarsely protests as the line goes out in fierce jerks. Sometimes 
he does not stop. I have had 350 feet carried off, and half the rod, before 
I could recover ; but this is rare. The first rush of the fish will often 
take 150 or 200 feet, and when his mad surprise is over the brake stops 
him and then it is human skill against that of a cunning fish. I have 
been told that the sea-bass is not so good a fighter as the yellowtail, and 
this may be true ; but in the large specimens taken I have found worthy 



OUR GAME FISHES. ©9 

foemen ; and after nearly half an hour, reeling, fighting, lifting the 
sulker, have almost confessed myself beaten before I saw the fish. He 
is an adept in tricks, a sea lawyer. One moment he comes at you like 
a shot, and you despair of reeling in the line ; then he will turn, hoping 
to take you unaware, and dart straight away, carrying the tip of your 
rod deep into the blue water. He tows the boat round and round, 
keeping the boatman busy. Now he is two hundred or more feet down, 
seeking kelp or weed as an ally ; then he plashes in the sunlight at the 
surface ; but finally he is reeled in, a blaze of golden bronze that hurls 
back the rays of the sun and at once dazzles and delights you. Up he 
comes on the gaff, and your man braces back proudly to show the four 
or five feet of adlivity that later tip the scales at perhaps sixty pounds. 
The sea-bass represents one of the gamiest fish of the East — the weak- 




fish, and is known as Cynondon nobile, a regal fellow surely. The 
schools of these fish and yellowtail seen about Santa Catalina defy 
description. I have rowed through acres of them, the big fish dividing 
and passing around the boat, the color of the ocean being changed by 
their vast numbers. 

Along shore an eight or ten pound barracuda on an 8-ounce split bam- 
boo is not to be despised ; while several varieties of rock bass, ranging 
up to six and even ten pounds, on the south shore, are keen fighters, a 
fair substitute for the black bass of the East. 

The white-fish {Caulolatilus princeps) is another gamy catch; and 
what shall we say to the black sea-bass that averages 300 pounds and 
ranges up to 600? In Florida the capture of a hundred-pound tarpon is 
considered heroic ; but at Santa Catalina I have seen a 138-pound black 
sea-bass taken on a tarpon rod in a battle of two hours and a half. 



70 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



In this limited space our marine fishes can be but touched upon. Ii 
properly caught with light tackle they afford sport which should add a 
new attraction to Southern California and divert some of the anglers of 
the famous Eastern clubs to this region where piscatorial worlds 
unconquered await them. 

Pasadena, Cal. 



The Roses of Santa Barbara. 

BY JULIETTE ESTELLE MATHIS. 

S Southern California is the home of the 
rose, so may Santa Barbara and en- 
vironments justly be called the rose's 
heaven, as here the queen of flowers 
finds a glorious immortality. None 
ever die a natural death ; they blow 
on and grow on forever. The sun does 
not scorch nor the frost freeze them ; 
and when day disappears the very skies 
reflect the roses on Santa Barbara's 
beautiful breast. From mountain to 
beach she is one great rose-garden. Her 
canons are all ablaze with pink thickets 
of the wild bloom. Her parterres and 
enclosures are gorgeous with the count- 
less tints of high-bred beauties, whose 
variety is infinite and whose name 
legion. Second-story windows are framed in these cups of color and 
incense, while cottage roofs are crowned with roses whose tireless vines, 
after reaching the chimney, go clambering down the other side. We 
have hedges of roses, our lawns are bordered and flower-beds filled 
with roses. We even make pillows of the petals. 

Of the following families there are over two hundred and fifty 
varieties grown in Santa Barbara county. The ever-blooming trees ; 
hybrids, with but one season of bloom of about three months' dur- 
ation ; Bourbons, always in bloom ; Bengal, China, Provence, Japan- 
ese, Damask, Scotch, Noisette, Banksia and a hybrid tea, which 
blooms a little all the year. Some varieties of these families will 
grow almost anywhere if given only water. After getting started 
they live without irrigation and bloom profusely after the rains set in. 
Slips planted in April bloom in July, if well watered. For piazza 
and window-screens, the La Marque, a large pure white rose ; the 
Cloth of Gold, a rich, creamy yellow, thick and satiny in texture ; 
the Banksias, both white and yellow, with a fragile, fluttering, shaded 
pink, scentless rose, commonly called the Spanish, but by florists the 
Mousselaine, are the most common. 

In our famous Rose Carnivals the white and yellow Banksias and 




ROSES OF SANTA BARBARA. 



71 



the pink Duchess are the most used for decorative purposes, as they 
possess a staying quality quite necessary on those occasions. A 
dainty, deep cup-shaped rose of an exquisite shade, as delicately 
perfumed as an apple-blossom is this same Duchess. It is the most 
ubiquitous of all the cultivated varieties and is found in every gar- 
den. It blooms constantly and lavishly, repaying with compound 
interest any care given it. Although a bush by nature, it reaches the 




A SANTA BARHMfxA rcuoc:o< 



72 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

roofs of porches if supported and trained. The Beauty of Glazen- 
wood is one of our showiest climbers. Its color (shading from deep 
pink and yellow out to the merest suggestion of either, all in one 
flower, and no two alike) make it a marvelous display of radiance. 

For personal adornment the Duchess is the favorite, its tinted foli- 
age adding to its charm. La France is the most effective for house 
decorating, possessing size, color, intense sweetness and durability. 
Its luscious pink blossoms are often fifteen inches in circumference 
and sometimes six inches in diameter. Cabbage roses are grown 
here in profusion and of immense size ; they are appropriately 
christened, but the odor is in favor of the rose, which resembles the 
old-fashioned blush rose of our grandmothers. Moss-roses are culti- 
vated to a very limited extent. The Marie Von Houte deserves 
special mention, the outer petals being pink and the inner ones cream 
white. It is a free bloomer and of heavy, rich texture. The Bride 
possesses the peculiar quality of masquerading as a white rose under 
a misty veil of pink, a sort of diaphanous illusion. The Gloria de 
Rosamonde is the sweetest of the red roses after the Jacqueminot and 
almost as common as the Duchess. It grows tall and straight, is 
self-supporting and a redundant bloomer, not very durable, but with 
petals of crimson velvet that fall widely apart, showing a golden 
heart when fully blown. In my own garden there is a Jacqueminot 
standing eight feet and three inches high, with blossoms from four 
and a half to five inches in breadth. The florist calls it a freak, as 
four feet is the usual height. The Maria Henrietta, a magnificent 
peony-red climber, bears blossoms as big as a berry-dish from the first 
season's slips, and the vine grows with the rankest luxuriance. The 
White Cherokee is used extensively to drape stone walls, country 
fences and city verandas. Its glossy foliage enhances its beauty 
wonderfully. The Papa Gontier is another exceedingly large red 
rose grown extensively, with blossoms often five inches and over in 
width. Tea roses are occasionally as large as this, and commonly 
four inches across. Among the fragrant climbers none are richer in 
perfume or more satisfacflory to the senses than the Mar^chal Niel. 
It grows to the greatest perfedlion in this favored region and its fruity 
fragrance seems a flavor more than a perfume, tempting to bite rather 
than smell. The Gold of Ophir is another yellow climber, more 
luxuriant of vine and the prize bloomer in size, being often over six 
inches across, but without fragrance. 

Of all the roses, the Castilian carries the banner for the quintessence 
of sweetness. The ancient gardens of Persia, famed in song and 
story, held nothing to excel its pink perfection. If you desire a 
delirium of harmless intoxication, set a vase of them before you and 
shut out the world. If visions of the dark-eyed daughters of sunny 
Castile, or the sweet senoritas of Southern California, with witchery 



AT LONG BEACH 




L. A. Ensr. C. 



IV Rocd, Santa Barbara. 



of glance and gliding grace of movement, do not dance before your 
enchanted fancy it will be because your imagination is already 
pledged to some other divinity or you are dead to floral influences. 

Santa Barbara. Cal. 



At Long Beach. 

I love the surf-beat down the shore, 
The rhythmic, deep, recurrent roar 
That lulls the weary evermore — 
The echoing, cadent sea. 

I love the tumbling breakers' play. 
That leap and clap their hands alway 
And laugh their joy as giants may — 
The white-lipped, shouting sea. 

I love the farther headland's light 
That twinkles now, now fades from sight ; 
A memory in the heart of Night — 
Of Night, that loves the sea. 

I love the beckoning moon that paves 
A path to heaven across its waves. 
Of hope to bridge a million graves — 
The moonlit, midnight sea. 

I love the darkness on the deep ; 
For so, when I (and all) shall sleep, 
That stout heart still its throb will keep — 

The grave, eternal sea. c. k. l 




OuT-OF-DooR Studies. 

SIXTH PAPER. 



BY ESTELLE THOMSON. 



one day I surprised a courtship. An orchard 
oriole had come up as a suitor, in an elegant 
orange coat with black trimmings, to enter into 
matrimonial negotiations ; and he conducted his wooing 
in so resistless a fashion, singing such frequent and impassioned love- 
songs, that every quill in his little body shook. 

His appearance was announced by a mellow call, and he commenced 
to parade before the female of his choice. She was a modest maiden, 
and she eyed him in a capricious manner, then flirted saucily and perked 
her head. The gallant swain wheeled, as if to salute her ; but with a 
piquant toss she evaded him. The ladylove presumably knew that he 
wished to hurry up affairs ; and while he poured a second amorous song 
straight out from his heart in impetuous crescendo, she plainly had no 
idea of making a union hastily. Tree life among the pepper-flowers 
was too sweet to abandon it without deliberation. Her only response 
was a critical stare. He paused to redress a feather, while she preened 
coquettishly. Then the hilarious courtier, his courage not a whit abated, 
began to puff out his plumage and waltz in wild abandon, ruffling his 
coat until it looked like a little brush, raising his aristocratic crest and 
anon cooing persuasively. His wings drooped, his tail was full spread ; 
his small form was replete with eloquence. His song was a frenzied 
gush. How any damsel could resist such ecstatic overtures was a marvel. 
To all appearances he must have told her, then and there, once for all, 
that she must settle his fate. The coy sweetheart listened, with head 
cast down ; and as the jubilant strain was finished with a romantic flour- 
ish, she suddenly dodged and turned as though making labored prepara- 
tions to quit his presence — but she did not leave ! And finally all was 
amicably settled, for at the parting glimpse I had of them together they 
were flying off" on what seemed to be a wedding journey toward the or- 
chard ; and a few weeks later I am sure it was the same gay cavalier 
(looking somewhat subdued) whom I met one evening walking with 
his little son. Then I remembered a beautiful cup-shaped nest on a 
limb, observed shortly before, where a wee wife sat brooding a span- 
new egg. 

In Pepper Lane many migratory birds pause to rest and 
replenish their stomachs, on their frequent journeys north 
and south. Great numbers of the feathered population 
also seek the pepper-trees solely for a night's lodging. 
In a single tree of gigantic spread several hundred 
titmice have for years come regularly at sundown, 
pouring into the branches and crowding to get bed- 
chambers. Such babel and calling ! Such a fuss to 
become settled ! One can hear it a long ways. 







y^.rv?' 



*^Jr 



-^d 



IN PEPPER LANE. ^^^j-^-^^ 

Once a pair of thrashers, probably a newly-wedded twain, cam^^jay *• W *i5 
velvet coats and spent some time prospecting among the pepper-twigs. 
I thought they surely were about to set up housekeeping ; but although 
they kept me in suspense for several weeks they eventually laid their 
new foundations and reared their family in an adjoining evergreen. 
Comparatively few birds make the pepper-boughs their home, however 
much they may like them for tarrying places. 

The pretty, spotted meadow lark drops her eggs among fine grasses 
in little hollows at the lane's edge. As I crossed a footway my steps 
startled a sitting bird from a tussock, aud she flew up swiftly, disclosing 
four speckled eggs with only the flimsiest portiere of grass and stubble 
between her and my spying eyes. She lost one treasure by the disclos- 
ure ; but the balance of her brood came out of their shells and no doubt 
are helping now to swell the musical performances of the world. 

It is singular what telegraphic messages pass here between the blue- 
birds. Families and clans seem to arrange their arrival and departure 
by flashing of signals. The blackbirds, too, must have a complete 
aerial service. The entire ether might be "lined" for them. I look out 
from my window, and not a jet coat is visible anywhere ; in another 
minute there is a gloss like a black cloud coming in from all quarters — 
a whirling, chattering mass descending upon the earth. 

A mocking-bird sits up on my neighbor's chimney and pours forth 
such a flood of music that the air rings with melody, not only by day 
but through the moonlight nights. If all other birds were silent, that 
music-box in his wonderful throat would suffice to keep life merry. 

At the far end of the lane, at certain seasons a diminutive lake bars 
the way — hardly more than a good sized rainwater pool. Here the birds 
hold high revel. At an early hour I am awakened by a rush of wings, 
and cries and calls. The lively fellows are taking a morning plunge, 
preparatory to duties of the day. At half-past four precisely, by their 
infallible watch and mine, the first bather dips into the pool. Then fol- 
low swift splashings. By six o'clock toilets are made and the birds in 
great numbers start out on their flights. I can see them against a back- 
ground of blue eucalyptus trees, spinning through the air. Sometimes 
they fly straight up into the sky, as if on errands into heaven ; or they 
set out singly, with a parting note ; while still others wheel together in 
vast flocks, with a twittering medley of sounds. When the lake is dry 
they drink and bathe wherever they find moisture ; and many a time I 
am amused to see finches flocking to 
the tin roof of my balcony, where fog 
has left pools which ripple as the sun 
strikes them, alighting to wash them- 
selves or quench thirst, and fly up 
quickly as they meet their shadows. 
The shadow of a bird proves as form- 
idable to a bird as the shadow of a 
man to a man. 



^Ti 




The Almond, 



BY HORACE EDWARDS. 



^' 



Eng. Co. 
WILD ALMOND 



HE most precious as well as the most precocious of all nut-bear- 
ing trees known to commerce, the one most famous in song and 
legend and prophecy, from the time of Joseph and his coat of 
many colors down to the present, the select and dainty nut which refuses 
to grow anywhere in the United States except in California, is the 
almond. From the childhood of the race, it seems to have been 
invested with a certain sanctity ; to have been deemed not only the 
most delicious of nuts, but the one fittest for a symbol of sacred things. 
Among the "best things of the land " which Jacob sent by his sons to 
Egypt were almonds. The golden candlestick of the Most Holy Place 
was wrought in form of the stem and singularly beautiful blossom of the 
almond. In the Tabernacle of Witness the divine favor was shown by 
causing that the rod of Aaron " budded, blossomed and yielded almonds." 

Whether it be from the scriptural tra- 
dition, or from the poet's standpoint of 
beauty — for an almond tree in bloom is 
exquisitely lovely — or merely from the 
unquestioned fact of its daintier appear- 
ance and more delicate taste, the almond 
is today not only the highest priced but 
the most in demand of all nuts in the 
world's markets. In 1889-90 the United 
States imported 1813,278 worth of al- 
monds, and 1800,367 worth of all other 
nuts. This is a startling comparison, 
particularly when we remember that 
these almonds cost (duty paid) 2o>^ 
cents, and other nuts an average of less 
than 9 cents. 

The almond is evidently a discerning 
tree. The United States Agricultural 
Report, 1890, pp. 415 and 417, says: 
. . . "only mention this nut to state to 
all experimenters that it is useless to try 
to grow the almond of commerce this side 
of the Rocky Mountains, except possibly 
in New Mexico and Southwestern Texas. 
This is thoroughly established. . . It is 
too tender in the North, and does not 
bear in the South. In California it is an 
eminent success." 

Not everywhere in California, however ; 
for there are only certain localities where 
the almond attains full perfection. It 
seems to require freedom from fogs and 




Photo, by Maude. 
ANTELOPE VALLEY. 



THE ALMOND. 



77 



from the trade winds ; and an altitude 
of looo to 2500 feet above the sea. It 
is being most successfully grown in 
the interior valleys, where all these 
conditions are most favorable ; and 
these localities are producing the 
finest nuts in the market — nuts which 
the most competent judges believe are 
destined to drive foreign almonds from 
the American field. 

The commercial test is the oil-pro- 
ducing quality of the nut in proportion 
to its weight (in the shell). The im- 
ported Tarragona and Languedoc al- 
monds are used as the basis of measure. 
Rating these two varieties at 100 per 
cent., the best California varieties 
(Nonpareil, I X L and Ne Plus Ultra) 
run 140 %. Not only in quality but in 
appearance, the new varieties propa- 
gated in California much surpass the 
imported varieties, and are much 
heavier bearers. 

Aside from the fact that there is but 
a very limited area in North America 
where the almond can be successfully 
grown, so that its market will be sure 
and profitable, several other consider- 
ations make it a peculiarly desirable 
crop. It begins to bear at three years 
old — and some varieties yield three 
pounds to the tree at that age. It is 
one of the simplest of all our crops in the management, requiring less 
expert knowledge than most ; it does not have to be harvested on just 
such a day for fear it will spoil, nor shipped the day it is picked. The 
grower can gather it at leisure and store it till he is ready to sell — two 
great advantages over fruit crops. 

Webster Treat, an authority on almond culture in California, reports 
that from 190 five-year-old trees he gathered 3502 pounds of nuts which 
he sold in Chicago at 22 cents. This is I316.82 to the acre. At eight years 
old, the trees will double this crop ; and at twelve years nmltiply it by 
4^. A matter of $1500 to the acre is rather startling to Eastern agri- 
cultural ideas. 

The illustrations to this article are from photographs of the vdld almond 
indigenous^ to the Antelope Valley, and a cultivated variety in the same 
peculiarly favorable location. 




A.EiiK. Co. Photo, by Maude. 

ALMOND OF COMMERCE, ANTELOPE VALLEY. 



78 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

La Jolla! 



BY ROSE HARTWICK THORPE. 



The land's-end here, of rugged mould, 
Fronts grim and grand the tossing sea. 

The rock-strewn ledges, fold on fold, 
Withstand the water's battery. 

The caverns where the waves make moan 

Are spiked with columns carved from stone. 

Those caves, dark -mouthed, mysterious, 
Ingulf the eddying, swirling tide, 

And beat their prey delirious, 

With dash and lash from side to side 

Through corridor and vaulted dome, 

Then hurl it forth in froth and foam. 

Behold this rock's storm-chiseled face : 
His giant arms that sea-ward reach 

To bar its progress. See the grace 
Of yonder crescent-curving beach 

Where bathers sport and children play 

From June to June the year's long day. 

' The Curio of the Sea."— (Charles Dudley Warner.) 



©p^ 



Picturesque Byways. 

BY R. GARNER CURRAN. 

►WENTY miles above the far-famed Ojai valley, Ventura county, is 
the Matilija canon ; rugged, rocky and romantic at every turn of 
the current. The path is narrow, but not straight, and few there 
are that find it. St. Peter does not have to stand guard at the entrance, 
and inquire, "Be ye mounted, or be ye on foot? " The last five miles have 
to be traversed by shank's ponies. You cross and recross the little brook 
which comes dancing down, whispering of the beauties of its mountain 
home. The stream is bordered with shady sycamores, alders, and even 
a few forlorn pine trees, which appear to have fallen from grace, as most 
of their species are at a higher altitude on the mountain side. You 
scramble over fallen trees, piles of drift, tangled underbrush, loose 
boulders, up, up, like a never-ending treadmill ; you are beginning to 
grow weary. Suddenly, when you least expect it, you find yourself in 
a natural amphitheater, surrounded with rock walls over a hundred feet 
in height. At your feet is a beautiful pool of clear mountain water. 
Before you a double waterfall nearly a hundred feet high. There is 
nothing of great magnitude to impress you — only the beauty of the 
scene. It is charming, exhilarating, unique. You can hardly tell how 
you got there. You were so unprepared. You seem all shut in — with 
yourself — and God. 





■^^ 




r J..: V 



i.^ 



i «' 



ORTEGA FALLS, IN THE MATILIJA. Photo, by MUs Nin. K. Soule. 



California Children. 

BAYARD TAYLOR'S OPINION. 

The June Land OF Sunshine in an illustrated article entitled "The 
Children's Paradise," briefly outlined the heritage of health and happi- 
ness which life in this climate means to a child, and what it will mean 
for the race. 

Bayard Taylor, the most famous of American travelers — and certainly 
not open to suspicion of being a " boomer" — wrote in i860 these words : 

"The children of California are certainly a great improvement upon 
those not born among us. Nowhere can more rosy specimens of health 
be found. Strong-limbed, red-blooded, graceful and as full of happy 
animal life as young fawns, they bid fair to develop into admirable types 
of manhood and womanhood. To them, loving their native soil with no 
acquired love, knowing no associations which are not linked with its 
blue skies and its yellow hills, we must look for its proper inhabitants, 
who will retain all that is vigorous, earnest and generous in the present 
race, rejecting all that is coarse and mean. For m3'self, in breathing an 
air sweeter than that which first caught the honeyed words of Plato — in 
looking upon lovelier vales than those of Tempe and Eurotas — in wan- 
dering through a land whose sentinel peak of Shasta far overtops the 
Olympian throne of Jupiter — I could not but feel that nature must be 
false to her promise, or man is not the splendid creature he once was, if 
the art, the literature, and philosophy of ancient Greece are not one da}^ 
rivaled on this last of inhabited shores ! " 



A Distinct Gain. 

OjrTS promotion to octavo form has given this magazine a great im- 
I petus at home and abroad. Its thousands of old friends are pleased 
•^ at the evidence of prosperity — not many Western yearlings can 
afford so expensive a dress as this — and all are charmed with the incom- 
parable gain in artistic effect and dignity. The vocal dollars of new 
friends are making themselves heard from all sides. Even the few who 
feared for the result of any change are now frank to admit that the 
magazine was right in assuming that Southern California is not so ignor- 
ant that it does not know what the proper shape for a monthly is. 

The old folio style was wiser and safer for the beginner, but the Land 
OF Sunshine is no longer an experiment. It is now an institution ; and 
the amateur form which was so generously forgiven in its apprenticeship 
would be no longer pardonable. A newspaper-shaped monthly, no 
matter how handsome or how bright — and we are led to believe that 
the Land OF Sunshine showed something of both qualities — cannot 
get rid of the face suspicion that it is ephemeral and an advertising 
scheme. This magazine was never a fly-by-night nor an advertising 
dodge ; and it is as glad as its readers are that it has risen above a form 
which discredited its earnestness, its value and its permanency. Today, 
no man can mistake its face. It is a magazine inside and out; and 
thereby not only more credit but more value to the land it loves and is 
here to serve. 




It is sometimes useful to remember that the Garden of Eden had no 
other riches than those which primeval man drew straight from the gen- 
erous breast of Mother Earth. Adam found no need to put his finger to 
the buzz-saw of commerce. If Eve had not been bitten with the voice 
of the serpent, and particularly if she had married less of a cad, there 
never would have been necessity to remedy the mistakes of the Creator. 
The first manufacturing came in with the primal curse, when our stark 
First Parents had to make tracks. And since then we have always had 
to make something. 

We shall never hark back to all the pristine joy of the only thing God 
ever "saw, and it was good." In our frontal perspiration, more or less, 
we must still earn our bread — and it doubtless tastes much better now 
that we teach the Almighty a lesson in refinement and regret that He 
should ever have so far forgotteti Himself as to mention sweat. Therein 
may lie one reason, by the way ; for we can never again grow innocent 
enough to be naked nor get naked enough to be innocent. But if the 
Author's first edition is out of print, in the modern Eden, revised, im- 
proved and greatly enlarged, there will be enough of the original to take 
the edge off the curse. Here is where every prospect pleases and man 
isn't half so vile as he can be where there is any excuse. 

One thing makes Southern California unique. Its wealth is intrinsic 
and not epiphytic. Its future rests upon the guarantee of the Almighty 
— not upon the activity of earthworms. In some lands a sufficiently 
determined footpad can make Nature stand and deliver her lean purse, 
whose contents may suffice to keep him alive until he shall again meet 
her coming down the lanes of spring ; but here there is no need of a 
"hold-up." All are her children; and the queen-mother dowers them 
as befits princes and princesses. 

Mines we have, and shall have far more ( for, as every observer knows, 
the gold of California has not yet been so much as tithed); manufactures 
we shall pile upon the head of those we have already ; for there are 
some articles which can and will be made here profitably. Probably 
no other equal population has today an equal commerce ; and in this 
short decade we have not yet even grazed the skin of our commercial 
future. Everything, in fact, which makes other communities rich and 
prosperous we have in some measure — and will have in greater. 

But these things are not what will map the future of California. They 
are not what shall make this the thing that half a century from now will 
see — a commonwealth unique in the whole world; of people decent. 



82 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

intelligent, independent in circumstance ; loving life and finding it ; 
abolishers of failure ; re-inventors of the lost art of content. 

In all those other directions we shall still be surpassed by ten thou- 
sand other localities. Africa and South America will smile at our gold- 
mines ; Pennsylvania and Russia and Peru at our oilfields ; innumerable 
smoky burgs at our manufactures ; a myriad of great centers at our 
commerce. But there is one peculiarity of this region which will more 
than balance the account. When all is said and done, California will be 
the happier home of a happier people than any of them — or all. 

Money does not breed, it merely accretes. Wall-street might be 
shocked and pained to be reminded that it does not constitute wealth ; 
but to the prosperity of the nation, or even of New York, it occupies 
very much the relation of the flea to the dog. It may somewhat accel- 
erate circulation — chiefly by impelling the dog to scratch it — but it 
does not make blood. It never created one drop of the circulating me- 
dium in its life, and it never will. 

The wheat-fields of Dakota, the mines of Pennsylvania, the forests of 
Michigan — these make blood. So do the very fisheries of Marblehead ; 
and the tatterdemalionest maple-tapper in Vermont stands higher as a 
unit of value to the land he unpremeditatedly inhabits than all the mil- 
lionaire mistletoes. This is nothing communistic. The millionaires 
are as necessary to human nature as the sap-boiler to political economy; 
but we are so sympathetic snobs as to have lost the true proportions. 
The one shifts W2alth ; the other creates it. 

Every State in the Union makes blood. So, for that matter, does bran. 
But a man outwearies his mandible in consuming enough bran to main- 
tain a fair circulation. California bears to the rest very much the relation 
of porterhouse steak to boiled sole-leather. In pleasure of mastication, in 
joy of digestion, in swiftness of assimilation and net gain in red corpus- 
cles, the comparison is a fair one. A man may champ enough sole- 
leather to disconcert starvation ; but he might be in better business. In 
California he will be. 

That is the soul of the Golden State — and particularly of its golden- 
est end. It produces the economic blood, which is wealth, as no other 
civilized or civilizable country can. More of it and faster. And that 
means far more than we sometimes stop to think. It stands for the In- 
dependence of Man, as distinguished from his dependence upon a chance 
to cut the Other Man's throat. 

There is no other country in the world where so small a patch of land 
will uphold the unit of civilized life — a family. Do not misunderstand 
this. I know a hundred tropics where ten acres will produce thrice as 
much as ten acres here — and let it rot on the ground. They have not, 
and never will have, a market. We have. A family can live on one 
anden in Sicily — but not according to American (even Eastern Ameri- 
can) standards of life. Our lexicon is a greedy definer. "A living" 
means meat for body and mind ; it means the beautifying of the home, 
the education of the children. 

In the section which far inore than any other has dominated United 



IN THE LION'S DEN. 83 v 

States history, whose stern, indomitable vims has "taken" from Maine 
to California, you may know what the life was of the man and his fam- 
ily whose horizon was 160 acres. We all respect the gprim cleanliness of 
his life ; but we cannot forget the pathos of his shoulders, the tragedy 
of the claws he called hands. Do yqu so despise the laws of the Uni- 
verse as to presume that for ten generations you shall hate and fight the 
physical world which surrounds you and then stand as erect or see as far 
as if in all that time you had loved Nature and worked her will ? 

Ten acres here, as logically treated, means more than 300 acres in New 
England or 200 acres in the very garden of the Middle West. It means 
in money a livelihood for a family; it means in other things more than a 
million would buy in the East. Twenty acres, properly administered, 
means not only that but gradual accumulation of a competence. It 
means not only comfort and happiness for the present generation ; but 
that you leave to your heirs and assigns forever one sure fence 
against want, for so long as they shall care to hold it. Gould's millions 
may be dissipated — and will be, when a bigger flea comes along — but 
that patch of ground will create every year, so long as it shall remain 
dirt, enough wealth to support a family in refinement. 

If this does not interest you, you may take a sight draft on us for the 
time you shall have wasted in reading it. It was not written for those 
who dare not stoop to pick up a new idea for fear of rush of brains to 
the head. 

So the leading daily of the Pacific Coast finds the Land of "unique in periodical 
Sunshine ; and the verdict seems to accord with the evidence. literature." 
This is, so far as known, the only actual "magazine of locality " published 
anywhere in the world ; the only one wholly and consistently devoted 
to the intellectual and material development of a specific area ; the only 
one which studies from every angle, mental and physical, romantic and 
historic, legendary, actual and potential, a definite field. To the historian 
and scientist, such study, consistent, persistent and expert, of any locality 
whatsoever, cannot fail to be of genuine value ; but to the general reader 
there are few localities which could sustain interest in such treatment. 
The Land of Sunshine is so fortunate as to possess the most variedly 
interesting field in the civilized world, and to have no competitors there- 
in. It has a million square miles, a thousand years of legend, three 
hundred and fifty years of history, God's own sample-case of physical 
geography and scenery, the cream of modern intelligence and progress, 
as a few of the features of the domain that logically belongs to it. That 
does not threaten imminent danger of monotony. It is the one field 
which appeals to every side of human nature ; which draws as with a 
magnet the plain man who has no other ambition than to be well and 
happy and give his wife and babies a chance ; to the man whose whole 
self has run to business acumen, and whose only concern is the harvest- 
ing of dollars ; to the student and the philosopher ; to the poet and the 
artist and the romancer. It is a little world of its own ; so blest and so 
many-sided a world as we nor our fathers dreamed of before we discov- 
ered it. 



84 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

A MATTER OF "Dropped dead on the street." In New York, in Boston, in 

PREFERENCE. Philadelphia, in Chicago. Apoplexy? Oh, no — merely the 

season of the year. A couple of weeks before, the genial climate in 
which 80 % of American enlightenment prefers to dwell had a chill that 
ruined the fruit crops and damaged the rest. Then on the 3rd of June 
the summer fashion came in, and christians began to fall along the curb- 
stones. And sunstroke is such a pleasant death to die ! It is so fit end- 
ing to a well-spent life ! The field of glory isn't a marker. Upright 
aborigine, now, doesn't it make you proud of your intelligence that you 
elect to live where you are apt to die just because you meet your own 
weather on the street ? 

Meantime, we who have graduated to this wild and woolly frontier — 
where, by the by, are more schoolhouses and more churches per thousand 
population than in any corner of New England — never see a day too hot 
to trot around in, nor a night wherein we need less than a warm cover 
between us and the temper of the air. This one who here feebly voices 
the mind of quarter of a million has taught his hide under every inclem- 
ent sky, from the snows of Maine to the altitude-bleakness of Bolivia. 
He is not over-tender ; and yet while New York is sunstriking itself he 
is daily pattering city pavements and nightlong sleeping under two 
Navajo blankets and a rug of vicuna fur. That is the difference between 
wet air and dry air. 

Californians feel sorr}^ for the East in winter, when we are picking 
oranges and they are freezing their ears, while they are taking pneu- 
monia and we are taking comfort. But in summer this Happy Land, 
fresh with the breath of the sea, sometimes hot in the sun, always cool 
in the shade, fairly feels its heartstrings twinge, as if it ought to send 
missionaries with a club to persuade the sweltering States that summer 
is not necessarily fatal ; that God meant it to be on the contrary a pleas- 
ure to those who know enough to go where they can get it "straight." 

THIS, THAT AND It is pleasant for so young a magazine to be able to promise for 

T' OTHER. near numbers contributions by John Muir, Joaquin Miller, 

Flora Haines Longhead, Charles Warren Stoddard, Charles Nordhoff, 
Ad. F. Bandelier, Charles Howard Shinn, Charles Frederick Holder, 
T. S. VanDyke, and Charlotte Perkins Stetson, besides the staunch little 
band of competent writers whose work in these pages has been so widely 
enjoyed. 

Rose Hartwick Thorpe, who contributes a poem to this number, is the 

author of Curfew Shall Not Ring Tonight, without which the general 

• march of civilization and the specific gravity of high-school oratory 

must have " ceased continuing " some time ago. She is now a resident 

of Pacific Beach, San Diego county. 

Mrs. J. C. Davis, of Highlands, a clever contributor to Puck and other 
periodicals, begins in this issue a series of poems, charmingly illustrated 
by herself. Her verse is full of music and of feeling. 





THAT 

WHICH IS 
WRITTEN 



^I-^5^3e^ 



A BOOK which any educated Cal- 
ifornian should be ashamed not to 
possess and to know is John Muir's Moun- 
tains of California. Except one, there has been no 
man in American letters by whom to measure our 
real seer of the sierra ; and even so tall a yardstick as Thoreau does not 
quite reach. Thoreau himself could not have written this noble book. 
Even in charm of interpretation he was less by so much as the conven- 
tional Nature he knew is short of Nature's tallest stature ; and in scien- 
tific horizon he stands still shorter of Muir. 

This is about as much as may be said of any man who turns paper to 
immortality in dire(5l behalf of Nature ; but it will stand true. People 
everywhere of brains and heart will read this book and love its author ; 
and Califomians with an added glow that such a man belongs to one of 
the few countries about which he could have written such a book. The 
presswork is DeVinne's own ; but such a volume has a right to perfedl 
illustration. The Century Co., N. Y. $1.50. 



AGE BEFORE 

BEAUTY 



The Overland, under Rounsevelle Wildman — while no longer 
"the Only Magazine in California," nor in modern times 
" Edited By Bret Harte " — is firing up in worthy ambition to thaw the 
indifference with which Coast and East alike have frosted it lo, these 
many years. We hope it will succeed. To have been a Coast magazine 
of any sort for twenty-seven years is considerable record ; and both the 
Overland and its subscribers have fairly earned by their patience some 
fruit to the old boughs. 

Millicent Shinn edited the magazine with much pluck, ta6l, skill and 
modesty, but it has needed cold cash and a spread of "patriotism." 
Somehow it has never taken hold upon the southern half of the State ; 
and the northern half seems not to have "gone much on magazines." 
It may be that Mr. Wildman will prove the needed "digger-up." He 
is young, ambitious and hopeful ; and has moved the sanctum out upon 
the front doorstep to be sure that no passer escapes the editorial eye. 

Its phenomenal " plainness " (to use a New England euphemism) has 
perhaps done more than any other one thing to inhibit the Overland as 
a fadlor in the gaiety of nations ; and its habit of paying contributors in 
glory and a complimentary copy has not tended to give it the inner 
grace which often redeems a homely countenance. Let us trust that 
Mr. Wildman shall find the cosmetics and the hypophosphates to give 
his mature inamorata a little less reliance in pride of ancestry and a 
little more hope of posterity. It is pleasant to be able to say that at any 



86 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



rate the Overland* s June poster is the best conceived and most efFedlive 
that has been seen in magazinedom in several moons. 

And, by the way. The Overland chopping-block bear — which has 
been headed to the left since the memory of man runneth not to the con- 
trary — is observed suddenly to have taken a right-about face. In May 
he was still paddling westward, as per tradition. With June he is chas- 
ing himself toward the effete East. What mean these symbols? Is 
Bruin starting back after our own and only Bret ? Or does he think to 
"take a sneak " past the sandlum to the quiet of the back rooms? Or 
is he merely turning tail at the advent of the California Lion ? 

It is comforting that in this newest and remotest of American jhe great 

communities there are people sufficiently abreast with modern myth-killer 

research to be aware of the greatest historian of Spanish America — and 
the greatest American historical student. In Southern California is a 
scholarly and growing band of them that not only recognize the signifi- 
cance of Ad. F. Bandelier, but have patiently followed him through his 
crowded monographs. No other historian whatever, except the peerless 
Parkman, ever so logically and heroically piled upon documentary 
research the saving field-knowledge; and while Parkman stands far 
foremost in the ability of expression, his physical infirmities fenced him 
in and his hardships in the field and the scope of his bibliographic ex- 
ploration were child's play to Bandelier's. A Livingston in devotion to 
his field, a Humboldt in grasp (and Humboldt's own disciple), a student 
who has seen more of the countries he studied than any other historian 
living or dead, a bibliognost whose one peer in the United States went 
with the death of Dr. Moore of the Lenox library — Bandelier at 52 has 
little more to ask of fame, except that he be permitted to correlate and 
carry out to their logical conclusion his published works, and add to 
them the fruits of his latter labors. Of the class of fame, that is, which 
the historian values. It will largely come after his death ; but it will 
outlast a few thousand newspaper reputations. 

His latest book — and the one which probably comes nearest to being 
"popular"— is The Gilded Man (D. Appleton & Co., N. Y., $1.50). 
Bandelier was the first to give the world an intelligent account of El 
Dorado ; and that most wondrous of all stories of a Golden Fleece is 
fully drawn in this volume. Equally important, and even more 
interesting to western students are the six chapters relating to the Seven 
Cities of Cibola, and his romantic "find" concerning one of the mur- 
derers of La Salle. There are errors of typography due to the author's 
absence in Peru, — like "Primua Relacion," and the like — but they do 
not detract from the value of this extraordinary book, which cannot be 
omitted from any library that pretends to represent American history. 
It is one more monolith piled upon the grave of the Romantic School of 
history — that silly closet fable-mill whose race this scientist-scout 
has dried up forever. It was Lewis H. Morgan, the father of American 
archaeology, who sounded the death-knell of the romancers that call 
themselves historians ; and it is almost quarter of a century since he 
did it. Since then Parkman and John Fiske (and in less degree Justin 



THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN. 8? 

Winsor) have laid their clubs to the tottering giant; but it was re- 
served for Bandelier's unique knowledge of the field and of documen- 
tary evidence to make a definite funeral. His first explorations in 
South America (where he is still at work) drove the last nail in the coffin 
of the Romantic School ; and here is a sufficient gravestone. 
LARKS AND The latest in the literary firmament is a bird. Namely, The 

""^YS- Lark^ by Bruce Porter and Gelett Burgess, San Francisco. 

These two young men put out, as nothing but a lark, an alleged 
*' No. I," with no notion of going beyond ; but their venture has so pos- 
sessed the East that there is vociferous call for more — and the larkers 
have been rather forced to continue, willy-nilly, the rather able take-off 
on modern decadent illiterature. The monthly is printed on fire-cracker 
paper with delicious abandon. An idea of its build may be had from 
the tail-piece to this page, which is ensmalled from a full-page "illus- 
tration." 

The Lark is very funny. But not half so funny as the New York 
Tribune, which takes it in defundl earnest. Maybe the Fijians would 
kindly worry along on plain rats for awhile, to enable the Bible Societies 
to concentrate their missionaries upon the American metropolis. 

The handsomest weekly-shaped monthly now in California is 
The Traveler, San Francisco. Devoted largely to the hotel 
interests, it is worth while for its fine half-tones and its ambition. It 
has the folio shape — somewhat larger than that from which the Land 
OF Sunshine has graduated ; and mechanically is the most attra(5live 
publication of its class in the country. And it is so far superior, both in 
looks and in brains, to any of its imitators in the State that comparison 
would be impossible. 

Edgar S. Maclay, whose History of the United States Navy is attradt- 
ing the warm commendation of critics throughout the country, is a son 
of Rev. R. S. Maclay, sometime dean of the Maclay College at San 
Fernando. 

The May Century has an interesting and valuable article on the arid 
lands by Wm. E. Smythe, editor of the Irrigation Age. 

t\it^ Illustrated American, New York, published jn its issue of May 
i8 an article, with illustrations, on the Fiesta de Los Angeles. 

1 NEVER, SAW A PUiiPLE COW 1 NEVE& HOPE TD SE ONE 




BUT ! CAN TELL YOU ANYHOW ll) RATHER JK THAN BE ONt* 



Highlands. \^^ o» **' 

THE BUCKLE OF THE CITRUS se^A/l^QI^'^g^^^ 

BY WILLIAM MARION. 

URING my first sojourn in the land of sunshine I heard an an- 
cient resident say: " Californy's as spotted as a coach-dog." 
Had his manner of speech been that of the Hebrew poet, he 
might have added, "Yea, verily, a land where diversity doth prevail," 
for diversity is everywhere apparent. The forces of Nature have graven 
it upon the landscape, and the Author of Life has written it across the 
earth in the indigenous vegetation. 

Southern California is an aggregation of valleys — natural subdivis- 
ions — political geography being subservient to topography. The con- 
ditions of soil and climate, like the coast of Maine, are regular only in 
their irregularity. 

Altitude and distance from the coast govern the temperature, subje6l 
to the configuration of the country across which the ocean breezes must 
travel. These causes, however, are not wholly competent to mark the 
confines of the acres adapted to orange and lemon culture. The final 
question is that of relative elevation, for the climatic differences within 
each valley are greater, perhaps, than those between any two valleys 
considered as units. 

Following this explanation, an analysis of the location of Highlands 
will show why it has come to be known as the "buckle of the citrus 
belt." 

The San Bernardino valley is farther from the coast without an inter- 
vening range of mountains than any other spot in California. This 
means that here prevails a combination of the advantages of the coast 
and inland climates peculiarly favorable to the production of citrus 
fruits. Highlands and Redlands respectively, separated only by the 
Santa Ana river, occupy the north and south sides of this valley. Neck 
and neck in the race for prestige, Highlands claims the buckle by one 
point only — that of presenting a southerly slope to the midwinter sun. 

A decade ago it was not clearly understood that this locality was any 
better adapted to orange-growing than the other foothill sections. The 
Highlander then apportioned his land to three distinct ventures — citrus 
fruits, raisins and peaches, or apricots. Survival of the fittest, however 
is a cardinal law of nature, and today scarcely a raisin vineyard re- 
mains; they were simply incidental to the demonstration of the the- 
orem and have been wiped off the board to make room for the orange. 

A decade hence the problem /'What to plant ? " will have been solved 
in each climatic segregation of California by the discovery that the 
conditions there existing are especially suited to the production of cer- 
tain things. The San Joaquin valley will send forth its raisins, the moist 
lands wherever situated will be given over to sugar beets, alfalfa and 
kindred crops ; and Highlands will continue to grow oranges. 

Five years ago the bulk of the Highland crop — and the crop was not 
then very bulky — was sold to middlemen who justified themselves in 



90 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

branding the boxes ' ' Riverside ' ' by the plea that it was necessary to 
make them sell. At present, however, the produdl is nearly all 
packed by the growers themselves, and the Highland label is the best 
possible assurance of a market. 

A few months ago the press chronicled the shipment by the president 
of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express of a large number of boxes of High- 
land oranges to prominent people at home and abroad. Among the 
number were President Cleveland and ex-Premier Gladstone. Speaking 
of the matter, Mr. R. T. Blow, the company's representative at San 
Bernardino, said : '* For the past two or three years it has been the cus- 
tom of our president, Mr. John J. Valentine, to send a small box of 
choice fruit from Southern California to his numerous friends in diflfer- 
ent parts of this country and Europe, comprising prominent railroad, 
steamship and express officials ; and heretofore the selection has been 




L.A.Eng. Co. ACROSS THE roOTHILLS. Photo, by Flower, San Bernardino. 

made from other se<5lions. Believing the Highland oranges to be supe- 
rior to any others grown in this country or elsewhere, I submitted a 
sample of them in comparison, with the result that Mr. Valentine, 
through Mr. William Pridham, Superintendent at Los Angeles, gave the 
order for Highland fruit. Our first shipment was 175 boxes to diflferent 
addresses. Another shipment of 99 boxes was made on March 20th. 
Result, I am daily in receipt of orders and inquiries about the Highland 
fruit from all parts of the country." 

This is competent evidence as to the quality of Highland oranges, and 
should be marked " Exhibit A i." 

Furthermore, at the Southern California Citrus Fair, held at Los 
Angeles in March last, the $50 gold medal for the best box of oranges 
was awarded to G. W. Prescott, for a box of Washington Navels from 
his Highland orchard — corresponding to the medal won by E. F. Pierce 
of East Highlands two years ago. We rest. 



HIGHLANDS. 



91 




L .A. Eng. Co. 



Photo, hy Flower, San Bprnardino. 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA INSANE ASYLUM. 



The Highlands are on the small loop of the Southern California Rail- 
way's "Kite-shaped" track. From any foothill, one's eye may fol- 
low, a dozen times a day, the course of the trains as they leave San 
Bernardino, threading their way through twenty-seven miles of orchard 
and meadow ; and, returning to San Bernardino, pull out at a Gilpin 
gait along the main track. 

The term Highlands is used collectively, to designate the three con- 
tiguous distri(5ts known as Highland, East Highlands and West High- 
lands, their respe(5live post-oftices being Messina, East Highlands and 




Phirfo. by Flowpr, Sau B«niardino. 
A COMFORTABLE FARM-HOUSE. 



92 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Del Rosa. The total area, which is defined by natural limitations 
(mountains, river and lowlands), is about lo square miles. The altitude 
is 1 200 to 1800 feet, and distance from the Pacific about 50 miles. 

Water for irrigation is obtained from Twin creek, City creek, Plunge 
creek, Santa Ana river and Bear Valley reservoir. The supply is abun- 
dant and is delivered in cemented ditches, 

Last year's orange crop amounted to 125 carloads. That for the season 
just ended will be over 200. 

There is comparatively little unplanted orange land in Highlands. The 
real-estate broker, with his dulcet and harmonious voice, is not here. 
The burden of search is on the would-be purchaser of a grove, who does 
wisely in taking an option at first figures lest the owner on refledlion 
go higher. 

Possession of an orange orchard is not necessarily synonymous with 
immunity from toil, neither with countless riches ; for industry and ta(5l 
have been inevitable to the successful husbandman in all ages and lands. 
But the man of average ability and ducats, wishing to escape from the 
ice-bound north and dwell in a realm whose beauties of climate and 
scenery cannot be pidlured, whose fruits and flowers are constantly in 
season to please the palate and delight the eye, may find in Highlands a 
home surrounded by all that tends to make life enjoyable — including a 
comfortable income. 



A Country of Outings. 

I -THE SEASIDE.* 

BY AN OUTER. 

VKR since Veisco Nunez de Balboa in 15 13 discovered the blue 
South Sea, which later (and perhaps more appropriately) became 
the Pacific, the consensus of mankind has ranked it as not only 
the greatest and the noblest but the most romantic and most amiable 
ocean. Its colors, its disposition, its very shores, are matchlessly lovable 
and peerlessly lovely. That sometimes magnificent beast the Atlantic 
has admirable moods ; but its childish fretfulness, its maniac rages, rob 
it of full dignity. To its vast brother on the west it is as a bellowing 
mad bull. The giant Pacific is never flurried, never crazy. It knows its 
power ; but its long, mighty roll is eloquent of calm reserve. And to 
the fair shores that neighbor it, it comes £is a tender father, not as a rabid 
bully. 

Southern California, incomparably more than any other country 
peopled by English-speaking bloods, is the land of outings. Winter 
and summer we clamber up its tall peaks and souse in its rippling sea. 
The writer has bathed in the Pacific here on the coldest and hottest days 
in ten years — in January a swift, exhilarant plunge, in July a long wallow 
in the glorious breakers. But of course the bulk of outing is done by 
summer, when the glowing sky invites to the mountains or the coast, 
and when one is secure that no rain will mar the picnicking. 

* To be followed in the August number by an article on the mountain outings. 



A COUNTRY OF OUTINGS. 



93 




Herve Friend, Enn. 



AT SANTA BARBARA. 



The Southern California coast-line of 275 miles is not only as long as 
from Bar Harbor to Long Branch, but fully as varied. It has all the 
attractions of all the Eastern watering-places together — except the 
gambling, the fakirs and the occasionally impossible weather — and 
many beauties which they can never possess. The summer here is so 
incomparably pleasanter and more comfortable and safer than summer 
was ever known anywhere east of the Rockies, that one who for the first 
time passes that season here half believes himself translated. There are 
no sunstrokes, no wilting with heat, no sweltering discomfort. 

There is a host of seaside resorts in this comfortable summer country ; 
all charming, each with its own special advantages. The person who 
cannot fit his or her specific ta-ste in resorts must be curiously constituted. 

I/Ovely, quiet, cultured Santa Barbara is northernmost of our chief sea- 




Collier, Eng. 



VENTURA-BYTHE-SEA 



I'liuio. I>y Morrill. Venti 



94 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



side gems. The only drawback to it is that the beauty of valley and 
mountains is so close to that enchanting Channel that it is apt to distract 
one from undeviating devotion to the beach. A similar division of 
interest characterizes Ventura-by-the-Sea. Its inland charms are so 
great that the most determined sea-goer is apt to stray at times. Some 
of the most exquisite mountain by-ways of all Southern California are 
hidden in the ranges of Santa Barbara and Ventura. 

Santa Monica, the oldest and most populous of our seaside resorts, was 
noticed and pictured at length in the June number. Every Sunday in 
summer train after train, loaded to the guards, conveys its crowds from 
Los Angeles and interior towns to this popular beach ; and thousands of 
lodgers and campers fill the town and dot the shore with their tents. Its 
social attractions in the season, its bathing, fishing, and other advant- 
ages, together with the great convenience of reaching it from the city, 
conspire to make it the summer rally ing-point of many thousands. 




SANTA MONICA. 



Redondo, one of the comparatively new resorts, but one of the most 
charming, is already secure in the front rank. It is 17 miles from Los 
Angeles, and reached by two lines of railroad; and is making a bid 
for high-class patronage by offering every comfort and refinement to 
cultured visitors. Its famous baths, its pebble beach and bathing beach, 
its matchless acres of carnation pinks, its Rebagliati Spanish Quintet — 
the finest in California — and many other attractions have fixed the 
•' Redondo habit" so firmly on a great many people'that they would not 
think of any other resort. 

Thousands also visit Terminal Island and the vicinity of San Pedro — 
the best shell-gathering point on our whole coast. It is a class by itself, 
less a great resort than a beautiful beach — but with all needful accessories 
for a day's "seasiding." 

The little town of Long Beach, next south, is peculiarly fortunate ; and 
though various circumstances have denied it the rapid growth of some 



A COUNTRY OF OUTINGS. 



95 



resorts, it has the inalienable birthright which will insure it a brilliant 
future. To the writer's knowledge there is not in North America another 
so noblebeach as this seven miles of gently-sloping, firm, white sand. 
It is the ideal bathing spot. Long Beach is also the home of the Southern 
California Chautauqua Assembly. 

Catalina Island, 30 miles off the coast, is making phenomenal strides in 
vogue as a place of summer recreation, and in the season becomes 
populous with campers. The almost incredible clearness of its deep 
waters, the rugged ] mountain scenery, the fine wild-goat hunting, the 
matchless fishing, the superb yachting grounds and still coves for rowing, 
have l)rought it up to the front rank of popularity in spite of its distance 
from "town." 




Herve Friend, Eiig. 



REDONDO. 



Photo, by Hill, Pa&adciia. 



Passing the beach resorts of Orange county, which are treated by 
themselves in a following article, we come to the southerly beaches of 
the California coast-line, which, while less " run to town," are not a whit 
behind their northern neighbors in natural advantages. 

The village of Oceanside, on its fine bluff, has a delightful beach 
"downstairs," and must one day be not only a handsome town but a 
favorite seaside Mecca.. So also of Carlsbad and other minor points 
along the southern coast. 

La Jolla (named in blissful ignorance of the Spanish it aimed at, which 
was Aayicya) is unique. Its low, abrupt cliffs, fantastically carved and 
fluted by the patient sea, its weird caves, hollowed by the same tidal 
action, its limpid waters alive with goldfish — a wonderful natural aqua- 
rium — all give it a charming character of its own. 

San Diego on its Ijeautiful bay, and Coronado, just across on the 
enchanted peninsula — with open-sea breakers on one side, bay bathing 



96 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



-O/VG BEACH. 



on the other side not two hundred feet away, and magnificent tank- 
bathing between, and the luxuries of the finest hotel in America to boot 
— are the last word of our Southern California outings, and in some 
ways the most delightful. The boating and fishing and bathing are 
equal to any in the world ; and within stone's throw, so to speak, are 
many other diversions, making a range of amusements which probably 
no other one resort commands. 




BATHING AT OCEANSIDE. 



>' OF 



^^ivs 




o^t 



YACHTING OFF C ATA LIN A. 



98 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



All these resorts are easily reached by rail (except Catalina island, by 
steamer from San Pedro) ; all have adequate accommodations for the 
visitor, and some of them extraordinary artificial attractions, besides the 
characteristic natural charms of which each has its own. 

S - 




^ ^.-milB-rW't '?H!!«iiJ|| 



L A. Eiig Co. 



AT THE CORONADO. 



Photo, by Maude. 



Three Orange County Beaches. 



BY AUGUSTA E. TOWNER. 



Y May the school children of Orange county begin wearying 
papas and mammas with ' ' O dear ! how soon can we go to New- 
port ? " For this is the place for the school-child's vacation. It 
is so accessible, safe, roomy, with chance for the rough and tumble of 
camp life, yet with the conveniences of civilization in sight. 

It was after the " boom " that the Newport Wharf and Lumber Company 
was formed, railroad and wharf built — and Santa Ana gloried in a sea- 
port. Before this there was an apology for one on New Port bay, a nar- 
row body of water winding for miles between low, bare hills to the tule 
swamps at its head. But the bar was shifty and dangerous, and crossed 
by only a few small vessels. 

Now, with its wharf over 1200 feet long, and railroad connection with 
the Santa Fe, all kinds of vessels, sail and steam, freight and passenger, 
plying between Puget Sound and San Diego stop here. Lumber comes 
in in vast quantities. Grain goes out by carloads, and produce from live 
stock to eggs ; indeed, most of the traffic of the fertile Santa Ana valley 
is *'yo-hoed" in and out here by brawny wharf hands and nimble 
sailors. 

There are two hotels ; the largest kept open during "the season," the 
other all the year. There are dozens of cottages to rent, any amount of 



THREE ORANGE COUNTY BEACHES. 



99 



nonnoDO 




;iiiiiiii]riT;iiiwiii:iiiil1tTtlli.lTi!itiiiiui.ii;!Miiii.ffli.iJiwi.ii 



" kJ'iMtiW^^^'' 



fcy 



RF AT NEWPORT. 



tenting room, very many private cottages, restaurants, and a store. 
During "the season " the baker, butcher, milk man, fruit and vegetable 
peddler make regular trips. There is good water ; also telephone con- 
nection with town, and passenger trains two or three times a day. 

The bathing facilities are excellent and perfectly safe. There is 
pleasant boating on the bay. Clams of several varieties are gathered, 
both on the bay and ocean sides. And then there is fishing. When 
the fish are biting, the wharf bristles with poles like a giant porcupine. 
Many a thrifty workingman catches his year's supply of fish here, salt- 
ing and smoking it himself — halibut, yellow-tail, mackerel andtom-cod. 
Out a few miles are fishing banks where the professional fishermen work. 
The industry has grown enormously since the wharf was built. Seining 
is carried on regularly ; and sometimes three tons of fish are shipped at 




Collier, Eng. 



BATHING AT LACUNA. 



loo LANDZOF SUNSHINE. 

once. The variety of fish caught off the wharf is very great — from the 
dainty pompano and silvery smelt, to the gamy yellow-tail and that big 
black pig of the ocean, the "jew fish." Some claim the genuine Bay of 
Biscay sardine is found here, and prophesy California sardines, packed 
in California olive oil, as one of the industries of the future. 

Laguna and Arch Beach, also popular, are not reached by rail. From 
El Toro (a station on the Santa Fe line to San Diego) a stage takes pas- 
sengers over a most picturesque road to both these places — which are 
within about a mile of each other. 

Arch Beach is a most romantic spot ; set like an amphitheater amidst 
hills, its oceanward frontage precipitous, with fanciful arches at base of 
the cliff, against which the breakers fling high their spray. A curious 
natural rock -arch gives name to the beach. There is a small hotel, and 
good water is piped to the cottages. Arch Beach is exceedingly attrac- 











Collier, Eng. 



'*V;>»^V^, 



THE ARCH, ARCH BEACH. 



live, too, out of season, when wild flowers cover the hills, or winter 
storms roll in a thunderous surf. 

Laguna — 18 miles from Santa Ana by carriage, a lovely drive through 
the Laguna canon, which is named from the two little lakes therein — is 
one of the oldest resorts in the county, and most patronized now by 
"fashionables." The caiion's mouth opens wide and level, with rising 
land on either side, and cottages scattered all the way to Arch Beach. 
Families in Riverside, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, and even out of the 
State, own cottages here, as well as Orange county people. Here society 
functions alternate with the frolic of the daily "dip." The hotel is 
comfortable ; and there are fine opportunities among rocks and caves to 
study and collect marine forms. 

Some one has said the people who can take inexpensive pleasures in a 
simple, healthful way are blest ; and with such a trio of watering-places 
Orange county is thrice happy. 



TIP 
TOP 

COUGH 
SYRUP 



2,500 



The California Wonder 

For all COUGHS and COLDS 

If your druggist doesn't keep 
it, send us 50c. in stamps and 
we will forward prepaid one 
bottle. We will give with 
each bottle so ordered an ab- 
solute guarantee to return the 
money if you are not satisfied 
with the results. 

Price 50c. All Druggists. 
Tip Top Medicine Co,. San Diego. 

Carloads of Oranges 
From Rioerside this 
Season «_, 



Orange Groves 
Orange Lands 



WITH BEST WATER 
SUPPLY IN THE STATE 



JARVIS & BUSH 



WRITE FOR 
INFORMATION 



Riverside, Cal, 



WHEN YOU VISIT 

SAN DIEGO 

REMEMBER . . . 




RATES 

S2 50 PER DAY 

AND UP 



American Plan Only. Centrally 
located. Elevators and fire escapes. Baths, 
hot and cold water in all suites. Modern con- 
veniences. Fine large sample rooms for com- 
mercial travelers. 



i 

[ft 



I 
I 



A New 
Mantel Store 



ART STAINED GLASS 
GRILL WORK 
PARQUET FLOORING 
MARBLE WORK 
GRATES, TILES 



Every Mantel Newness and every Mantel Ele- 
gance — a stock of which Chicago might be proud — 
We are going to sell very low — That's the way we 
expect to get you to know us — We are willing to 
show you all about Mantels — If you will only come 
and look — Thai's fair. 

TuTTLE Mercantile Co., 
Bradbury BIdg. 308-310 South Broadway. 



I 
I 

1 
i 

I 

I 
I 

I 

i 



lU 



Please mention that you "saw it in the I<anp op Sunshikb. 



PUBLISHERS' Department. 



The Laivd of ^ar\6bii\€ 



THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
MAGAZINE 

Published monthly by 

The Land of Sunshine Pubfisfiinp Co. 

501, 502, 503 StiMSON BUILDING 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

F. A. PATTEE, business Manager 






$i.oo A Year. io Cents a Copy. 

Entered at the I,os Angeles Postofl&ce as second- 
class matter. 

For advertising rates, etc., address the Business 
Manager. 



All MSS. should be addressed to the Editor. 
No MSS. preserved unless accompanied by return 
postage. 

Questions Answered. — specific information 
about Southern California desired by tourists, 
health seekers or intending settlers will be fur- 
nished free of charge by the L,and of Sun- 
shine. Enclose stamp with letter. 



FIGURES TAIiK. 

Those who prefer the unsupported word 
of irresponsible solicitors— so long as 
circulation is set high and prices low — 
to a certified statement of reasonable cir- 
culation, with prices corresponding to it 
and to the custom of all responsible pub- 
lications of the same class, can only be 
taught better by experience. Circulation 
and efifectiveness, or the lack of these 
essentials, soon become as apparent as 
the rates charged generally indicate. No 
publication will knowingly render the 
advertiser service at less than cost, and 
it stands to reason that 8, coo copies of 
a high-class publication cost more than 
1,300 shoddy imitations of it. The 
publisher of the 1,300 imitations will 
undoubtedly talk 15,000, but his rates will 
invariably certify 1,300 — so will results. 

A GROWER. 

From its inception the Land of Sun- 
shine has enjoyed a steady and natural 
growth. Affidavits published from time 
to time during the past year show an 
average monthly increase of 700 per 
month. Not so phenomenal a growth as 
some Eastern monthlies have enjoyed — 
after they were well established — but 
certainly a more rapid growth and larger 
circulation than any Eastern magazine 
enjoys in Southern California. 



:^?^liM5Hlfir 










WHAT IT MEANS. 

The affidavits reproduced on this page 
mean : 

1st. The largest monthly circulation 
in the West. 

2d, The largest sworn circulation of 

any kind on the Pacific Coast outside of 

San Francisco and with the exception of 
one Los Angeles daily. 

3d. With the exception of the latter, 
the only certified regular circulation in 
Southern California. 

4th. Above all to the advertiser they 
mean proof positive of the most attrac- 
tive, the most lasting and therefore the 
most effective way of reaching those in 
this section who are of use to him — with 
the added satisfaction that the character 
of the publication is such as to impel 
every local reader to eventually send 
copies East where they win to Southern 
California future customers. 




FOR SALE 



40 




4/VfS 



STREET 



t^"^ 



o-f 



THE TRACT OF HOMES 

Don't fail to see this beautiful tract, the finest 
in the city, four 8o-foot streets, one street loo feet 
wide ; all the streets graded, graveled, cement 
walks and curbs; streets sprinkled; shade trees 
on all streets ; lots 50 and 60 feet front; city water 
piped on all streets; rich sandy loam soil. Tract 
is fifteen to eighteen feet higher than Grand 
avenue and Figueroa street. 2 electric cars; 15 
minutes' ride to the business center; one block 
nearer than Adams and Figueroa streets; build- 
ing clause in each deed, no cheap houses allowed; 
buy and build your home where you will have 
all modem improvements and be assured that 
the class of homes will cause the value to double 
inside of 12 months; 5000 feet on Adams street. 
We ask you to see this tract now; if out for a 
drive, go through this tract; go out Adams street 
to Central avenue; or take the Central or Maple 
avenue cars to Adams street, and seethe class of 
improvements; lots offered for sale for a short 
time for |2oo, $250, I300 to |6oo on the most fav- 
orable terms. OflBce corner of Central avenue 
and Adams street. Free carriages from our office 
at all times. 

GRIDER & DOW, 

139 S. BROADWAY TEL. 1299 

LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

Headquarters for Lemon and Orange Groves and 

Farming Lands. 



THE 
ABBOTSFORD 
INN 



CORNER 

EIGHTH 
AND HOPE 

STS. 



LOS Angeles. 

CAL. 



Select Tourist and Family Hotel. American 
Plan. All new, with refined appointments. 
Electric Bells, Incandescent Light and Steam 
Radiator in every room. Capacity, 200 guests. 

BY J. J. MARTIN. 




FOR SA LE AT A BA RGAIN. 

A FIRST-CLASS INCOME-PAYING OLIVE ORCHARD AND 
NORSERY IN IHE POMONA VALLEY 



This fine prop- 
miles from the 
and Santa F6 rail 
ter of the city of 



erty is situated 2 
Southern Pacific 
ways and thecen- 
Pumona. It com- 




prises 44 acres of 
land, being a deep 
and rich sandy 
loam soil, planted 
almost whollv to 
olives. Specifical- 
ly, there are 15 
acres in bearing 
olive trees, and 27 
acres one, two and 
three years old ; two acres in family orchard, 
comprising all the better varieties of citrus and 
deciduous fruits and nuts in bearing. 

An abundant supply of water for irrigation and 
domestic purposes is obtained by pumping, the 
motive being a five horse-power gasoline engine, 
furnishing a never-failing flow of water. 

Tnis fine property, including the fixed im- 
provements, for $12,000 ; two-thirds cash, bal- 
ance on time at 8 per cent net. 

Address for particulars ALFRED WRIGHT, 
P. O. Box 382, Pomona, Cal. 



$10 



$10 



PER ACRE 

FOR FINE LANDS 

IN THE 

FANITA RANCHO 

EL CAJON VALLEY 
1669 Acres for - . 318,000 
1420 Acres for - - 812,000 

Smaller Tracts for $30 to $80 per acre. 
WILL GROW ANYTHING. 
This property is twelve miles from the city of 
San Diego and two miles from Cuyamaca Rail- 
road. It belongs to the estate of Hosmer P. 
McKoon, and will be sold at the appraised value. 
For further information address 

FANNIE M. MCKOON, EXECUTRIX. 

Santee, San Diei^o Co., Cal. 



Please mention that you "saw W in the Lakd of StJNSHiNE. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST. 




Photo, by Tre» .t : Collier, Eng. 

THE LAND OF SU NSH I N E AT YOUR OWN DOOR 

FOR 10 CENTS A COPY. 

Beginning with the June issue, the 
lyAND OF Sunshine Publishing Company 
adopted a carrier system of its own by 
which Ivos Angeles readers receive their 
magazines in the best possible condition 
and time. 

The above cut represents its bicycle 
corps, with Pacific Cycle Co. wheels, 
loaded and ready for the route. The 
carriers of this portion of the system are 
Masters Fay Cole, Frank Hutton, Harry 
Fish and Reg. Baumar — all bright 
trustworthy lads, who wear badges of 
identification. 

Current numbers should reach subscrib- 
ers by the first of every month. Oversights 
should therefore be promptly reported. 

Those desiring to purchase the Land 
OF Sunshine from month to month at 
their homes or offices .should send their 
addresses to the publishers, 501-503 Stim- 
son Building, Los Angeles. 

A complete illustrated history and 
hand-book of Catalina Island can now be 
secured for 25 cents from news dealers or 
the Wilmington Transportation Co. 



liike tbe Beautiful Vestibule to a Liovely 
Home. 

The I,AND OF SuNSHiNK with the June num- 
ber appears in regular magazine form, in beau- 
tiful and dainty dress, fully'illustrated, and with 
the fragrant breath of this blossoming South- 
land all about it. It is distinctively a Southern 
California magazine, filled with the story of our 
industrial resources, the rare charms of'our cli- 
mate and " out-of door studies." It is like the 
beautiful vestibule to a lovely home, through 
which you can catch glimpses of all that lies be- 
yond and within. We bespeak a prosperous fu- 
ture for this child of L,os Angeles, " The I^and of 
Sunshine.— Z.oi Angeles Times. 



The coming to Los Angeles of the Tuttle 
Mercantile Co. during the last month has 
been an event of more than ordinary 
commercial importance. They have 
opened in the Bradbury Building what is 
beyond a doubt the largest and finest 
stock of mantels, grates, marble work, 
and grill work west of Chicago. The store 
has been fitted up with a lavish hand, 
making it by far the most magnificent 
establishment of its kind on the coast. 
There is no home-builder in Southern 
California but will find a visit to their 
store a matter of profit as well as of 
pleasure. 

F. W. King, one of the foremost of 
Southern Californians in all that pertains 
to its welfare, left for Honolulu June 24th 
for a much needed rest. 



Visitors who have seen the mountain 
railways of the world continue to be 
astonished and delighted by their first 
trip to Echo Mountain. There are plenty 
of higher peaks, but there is no other 
place on earth where one can ride by rail 
to a mountain -top and see just such a view. 




The Modern Oxygen Cure for Disease. 



SEND FOR BOOK. 



W AISON ex CxU., 124 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Please mention that you "saw it in Ihe Land of Sunshine." 



The graduating exercises of the Los 
Angeles Business College took place at 
the Los Angeles Theatre, Monday even- 
ing, June 24. The stage was beautifully 
and artistically decorated, and the large 
graduating class arranged on raised seats 
made a fine and striking appearance. 
Hon. James McLachlan delivered a stir- 
ring address, and the nmsical part of the 
program was rendered by such talent as 
Mr. and Mrs. Modini-Wood, the Reba- 
gliati Quartette and Edwin H. Clark, 
who all sustained their enviable reputa- 
tion as artists. The readings by Miss 
Addie L. Murphy were highly enjoyed 
by all. The conferring and distribution 
of diplomas by President Shrader, as- 
sisted by two little girls dressed in pink, 
was pretty and appropriate. The salu- 
tatory by Miss Dook, and valedictory 
by Mr. Casson were brief and full of 
good thoughts. 



In the preparation of the article on the 
almond in this number, aside from gov- 
ernment reports, valuable assistance has 
been given by Palmer & Chapin and Rev. 
T. W. Haskins, D. D., experts. 



The Pacific Cycle Co., manufadlurers 
of the only wheel made on the Pacific 
coast. Fadlory and salesroom, 618-624 
S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. Buy a 
home-made wheel. 



L. L. NEWERF— REAL ESTATE. 
226 S. Spring. Mngr. Southern California 
Land and Nursery Co. 4»-speciai attention 
invited to the culture of the olive. 

Write for information. 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS 

San Francisco. 

steamers leave Port Los Angeles and Redondo 
every four days for Santa Barbara, Port Harford 
and San Francisco. 

Leave San Pedro and East San Pedro every 
four days for San Francisco and way ports. 

Leave Redondo and Port Los Angeles every 
four days for San Diego. 

Northern Routes embrace Portland, Puget 
Sound, Victoria and Alaska. 

W. PARRIS, AGENT, 

123H W. Third St., Los Angeles. 

THE PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU 

GUARANTEES PROMl'T, ACCUK.'^TE AND 
RKMABLE SERVICE. 

Supplies notices and clippings on any 
subject from all periodicals on the Pacific 
Coast, business and personal clippings, 
trade news, advance reports on all con- 
tract works. 

10$ AN6EIES0FFIGUI0 WEST SECOND STREET 

P. o. box 944 



Orange Orores, Residence and Busineas 

Property for sale. 
Correspondence Solicited. 



John P. FJ8k, Jr. 



REDLANDS, CAL. 



Hotel Anacapa 

^i^ SAN BUENA VENTURA 

F. HARTMAN. Proprictoh. 
Accommodations first-class in every respect. 

CfiaiTiDion Liveru Sta&fe 

DAVIS &, BROWN, Proprietors. 

SANTA F»AUI-,A. CALIFORNIA 

Finest Turnouts. Popular Price*. Reliable 

Teams. Courteous Drivers. Location 

the Best. 

'Bus to all trains and free to Passengers for the 

Hotel Petrolia. 



FETXJERMMN HOUSE 

Mrs. I. L. Fetterman, Prop. 
Pine Avenue near New Wharf, LONG BEACH. CAL. 

FETTERMAN & SONS 

rROPRIETORS OF THE 

L0NGB[i(![|[IM«»of[[DSm[8 

First-Class Carriages and Horses con- 
stantly on hand. 
Cor. First Street and Pacific Ave., opposite Parl(. 



Cornmercial Phototrrnphy 
ill all its Branches 



Larfcest Collection of Views 
In Southern California 



F. H. MAUDE & CO. 

• • • Lands cape Photogr aphers 

Careful Attention given to Developing and Printing for 
Amateurs. Lantern Slides made to order from NegaliveM 
or Pictures. .Stereopticons and Slides for sale or rent 

211 W. First St. Log Angeles, Cal. 

piNE IJALF-TONE PRINTING 

SPECIALTY 

|^IN6SLEY- 
gARNES 

& 

[N|euner 



Printers and Binder* to «>«a «?>»..•.•... d^^.^... ... 

•UxLorSunHi... 123 SOUTH BROADWAY 




Please mention that you "saw it in the Land ok Sitn^hink. 



T\t.TuHj( To 

i |f(.rt.■i.wa•^^<.T 




C W A M - 



■LARfat T^NCTe or 
CUM^TiL 



vi^ 




Union Eng. Co. 



A CONTRAST. 



The above representation of two en- 
velopes, addressed to Messrs. Moore & 
Parsons of Los Angeles, illustrates the 
climatic experience of an Eastern friend 
of theirs during the month of May, 1895. 
In one instance the writer wades, while 
duck hunting, with comfort through 
Southern California waters. A week 
later he pictures his experience on his 
return to Ohio. At the latter date the 
press of the country contained such sad 
head lines as *' A quarter of an inch of 
ice at exposed places in Ohio, Virginia 
and Pennsylvania;" "Two million dol- 
lars damage to New York vineyards ; " 
"Peach and other fruit trees levelled to 
the ground by the weight of snow, and 
ground frozen hard enough to bear 
weight of heavy teams in Wisconsin ; ' ' 
"Killing frosts in Nebraska and West 
Virginia;" "25 degrees in Allegheny 
Co., Pa.;" "Snow falling in Minnesota, 
and grain and small fruits damaged." 

Two weeks later readers were startled 
by the following press dispatches : ' ' Hot 
winds blowing over portions of Kansas, 
Missouri and Nebraska, completely de- 



stroy crops ; " " Water in some localities 
shut off for all purposes except for fight- 
ing fire ; " " Sand blown over the corn in 
Nebraska;" "Withered vegetation in 
Iowa;" "Suffering from drouth near 
Bloomington, 111.;" "Cyclones create 
havoc in Missouri, ' ' etc. ; while many cases 
of sunstroke occured throughout the East. 

During the period covered by these re- 
ports California was also having some 
characteristic weather which Director 
Barwick of the California Weather Service 
summarizes as follows : 

" The average temperature for Fresno, 
72 ; Independence, 68 ; Los Angeles, 66 ; 
Sacramento, 70 ; San Francisco, 68 ; San 
Luis Obispo, 68, and San Diego, 62. As 
compared with the normal temperature 
there was an excess of heat as follows for 
the Weather Bureau stations named : 
Fresno, 5 deg.; Los Angeles, 3 deg.; Sac- 
ramento, 5 deg.; San Francisco, 8 deg., 
and San Diego, 12 deg. The total pre- 
cipitation was nothing ; this excess of 
heat and sunshine with deficiency of 
moisture has been extremely beneficial 
to all crops." 



MINNEAPOLIS BEACH COLONY 



1,500 ACRES LAND WITH WATER 

Allow prices, on very reasonable terms. lyocated 35 miles north of San Diego, on Santa F6 R'y. Soil 
is of the richest, well adapted to fruits and nuts. The fine ocean beach, surf bathing, fishing 
and sailing, extended views of mountain ranges, make the location unsurpassed. 

SILK CULTURE 

Offers special employment, in which free instructions are given by an expert. 

Address: MINNEAPOLIS BEACH COLONY CO., 

Minneapolis Beach, San Diego Co., Cal. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the I,and of Sunshine." 




g EYOND DOUBT the most charming: Hotel of South- 
_ J^, ern California is the 

Redondo Hotel 

OPEN WINTER AND SUMMER 

17 A/liles from Los Angeles* 

16 DAILY TRAINS via Southern California and Redondo Rys. Permanent 
guests furnished transportation free over either line. 

RATE5 $2,50 PER DAY AND UP. NO lN51bE RQ0M5 

Has incandescent lights, gas, hot and cold water, grates and commodious closets in every room. 
Fine mountain view. Acres ot Carnations. Beautiful lawn extending to the ocean. One of the best 
Hot Salt Water Natatoriums on the coast. 

CHAS. A. BRANT, Manager, Redondo Beach, Cal. 



SCHUYLER COLE, ROBERT F. JONES. 

Colegrooe, Cal. Bank of Santa Monica, 

Santa Monica, Cal. 

LOANS NEGOTIATED 

Cahuenga and Santa Monica Property 

a Specialty. 




Ppopenty Cafed Foi», Rented, Bought, 
Sold and Exehanged. 

OFFICES : 

204 Bradbury Block, Los Angeles, Telephone 
Bank of Santa Monica, Santa Monica, Cal. 
Telephones 2 and 42. 



PIONEER POMONA PAPER 

ESTABLISHED IN 1882 

Has Never Missed an Issue. Always Reliable. 
Subscription $2 per year, with clubbing arrange- 
ments by which home subscribers may get an- 
other valuable journal for half publisher's rates : 
li.oo for six months. Local subscribers who pay 
full price are given lower rates on subscriptions 
for parties in other States. Sample Copies Free. 

CAREFUL ATTENTION TO LOCAL 
INDUSTRIES. 

WASSON & GOODWIN, Proprietors 
POMONA, CAIilFOBNIA 




CALIFORNIA WINE MERCHANT 



We will ship two sample cases assorted 
wines (one dozen quarts each) to any part 
of the United States, Freight Prepaid, 
upon the recipt of $9.00. Pints ( 24 in 
case), 50 cents per case additional. We 
will mail full list and prices upon appli- 
cation. 



Respectfully, 

C. F. A. LAST, 

131 N.Main St., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land op Sunshine.' 



A PROSPEROUS CITY. 

There is probably no section of the United 
States where business is in a more jjolid and 
flourishing condition than it is in Los Angeles 
to-day. The real estate sales for the past year 
amounted to $15,000,000, and most of this property 
was sold for the purpose of improvement. Build- 
ings have been going up for months past at the 
rate of five and six a day. 

The solid character of the Los Angeles banks 
was well shown during the recent financial panic, 
which had such disastrous results in some sec- 
tions of the country. Only one bank succumbed 
to the flurry, and this was a bank of minor im- 
portance which had been known to be shaky for 
some time past. 

The bank clearances have for a year past shown 
an improvement almost every week, while the 
figures from a majority of other cities in the 
United States have frequently shown a decrease. 



Oldest and Largest Bank in Southern California 

Farmers and Merchants Bank 



Of Ii08 Angeles, Cal. 



Capital (Paid up) 
Surplus and Reserve 
Total - 



1500,000.00 

820.000.00 

$1,320,000.00 



OFFICERS 

L.W. Hellman, Prest., H.W. Hellman, V. Pres. 
jNO.MiLNER.Cashier., H.J.FLEiSHMAN.Ast.Cash. 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry, C. E. Thom, A. Glassell, 
O. W. Childs, C. Ducommun, T. L. Duque, 
J. B. Lankershim, H.W. Hellman, I. W. Hellman 



Sell and Buy Foreign and Domestic Exchange. 
Special Collection Department. 
Correspondence Invited. 








% PAID UP CAPITAL, $500,000 

Transacts a general Banking business. Buys and sells Foreign and Domestic ExchanKe. Col- 
lections proraptlj attended to Issue letters of credit. Act as Trustees of Estates, Executor, 
Administrator, Guardian, Receiver, etc. Safe Deposit Boxes for rent. Solicits accounts of Banks, 
Bankers, Corporations and individuals on favorable terms. Interest allowed on time deposits 

Officers: H.J Woollacott, President James F. Towell. 1st Vice-Pres. Warren Gillelks 
2nd Vice-Pres. J. W A. Off. Cashier. M. B. Lewis, Asst. Cashier. " ' 

Directors: G. H BonebraKt W. P. Gardiner, P. M. Green, B. F. Ball, H. J. Woollacott James 
F. Towell, Warren Gillelen, J. W. A. Off, E. C. Howes, R. H. Howell, B. F. Porter. 



'^?^^(^^,^^=>iV'^^^<n> 




(f-^JtVS 



M, W. Stimson, Prest. 



C. S. Cristy, Vice-Prest, 



W. E. McVay, Secy. 



Security Loan and Trust Company 

^^CAPITAL ^200,000^^ 

223 South Spring St., Los Angeles, California 

CHOICE GUARANTEED MORTGAGES for sale. Safe, clean, strong, simple, and in every way 
extremely desirable and satisfactory. Interest collectible at your own bank the day due. 

We offer nothing but what we have invested our own money in and are willing to guarantee. 
Sent anywhere in the United States, Send for pamphlet. 




^im/t^ 



OF I.OS ANGELES. 
Capital Stock $400,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits over 230,000 

. M. Elliott, Pre.st.. W.G. Kerckhoff, V.Pres 

Frank A. Gibson, Cashier. 

G. B. Shaffer, Assistant Cashier. 

directors: 

. M. Elliott, F. Q. Story, J. D. Hooker, 

. D. Bicknell. H. Jevne, W. C. PatterSon 

W. G. Kerckhoff 

No public funds or other preferred deposits 

received by this bank. 



Main Street Savings Bani( and Trust Company. 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts, 
(Temple Block.) 

Capital Stock $200,000 Surplus and profits $1 1 ,000 

Five per cent, interest paid on term deposits. 
Money loaned on real estate only. 



T.I.. Duque, President. J. B.I^ankershim, V.Pres. 
J. V, Wachtel, Cashier. 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kaspar Cohn, 
H. W. O'Melveny, J. B. Lankershim. O. T, John- 
son, T. L. Duque, I, N. VanNuys, W. G. Kerck- 
hoff, Daniel Meyer, S. F. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



"Attracting Attention Overth* Country.'' 

*' Californians will have reason to rejoice if the 
Land of Sunshine, edited by that brilliant word 
painter, Charles F. Lummis, developes into an 
other "California Magazine," as it promises to 
do. Under the guidance of such an editor any- 
thing is possible, for the man who wrote ' The 
Land of PocoTiempo' should be competent to 
guide to success any descriptive or imaginative 
magazine in the land. The number for June is 
profuse in illustrations, equal to the best in the 
New York magazines, and with such writers as 
T. S. Van Dyke as contributors, it is no wonder 
that the Land of Sunshine is attracting atten- 
tion over the country."— San Francisco News 
Letter, June 15. 



WHY YOU SHOULD USE OUR 

GAS STOVES 

i8t. Because they are much cheaper than coal 
stoves. 

and. Because they cost less to keep in re- 
pair. 

3rd. Because they save enormously in "time 
and temper," require no attention and can be 
lighted and extinguished in a minute. 

4th. Because they make neither dirt, smoke 
nor ashes. 

5th. Because they take up very little space, 
and for this reason are especiiilly desirable for 
those who have small kitchens or who reside in 
flats. 

LOS ANGELES LIGHTING CO. 

457 SOUTH BROADWAY 



5TEPHEN5 k MICKOK 

AQKNTS 



,JJ\ 



"AiaMUJoO;! 



433 South Broadtoay, Los Angeles 



Agents wanted in every town in Southern 
California, Arizona and New Mexico. 



Provident Savings Life 



OF NEW YOnK. 

SHEPPARD HOMANS, President. 



E. G. SGHNABEL, 

TCL. aas <!en«ral Agent for' .Southern Culifornia. 

lie Soutb Bvoadoiay. 



Almonds ! Olioes ! Prunes ! 

Would you tike an Almond, Prune or OUt* Orchard in Cali- 
fornia f I make a bntineis of ^lliof lands for the special 
production of the aboTe, cheap, on long time, and will plant 
and care for tame until in bearing, if desired. For full pax- 
tienlan address 



R. C. 



SHAW, Colonization Agent, 

230^ S. Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



RICHARD ALTSCHUL, 

REAL ESTATE 

\1ZYz W. Second St. 

Burdick Block, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



$1.25 Per Acre 




$1.25 Per Acre 



Gov6rnm6ni. Lands 



THIS IS 

THE LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Not only is this so, but it is a land of great 
promise, where you may secure a home on the. 
most favorable terms now offered in the United 
States. 

Choice Governnaent Lands at 
8)1.25 per Acre. 

25 cents cash, balance 25 years at 6 per cent per 
annum. No requirements as to impro\'ing or 
living upon the land. For climate, healthfulness 
and fertility of soil it is unsurpassed ; where you 
can raise nearly anything grown in America, 
north or south. 

We also have choice improved farms and fruit 
lands near Los Angeles, at $30.00 and upward per 
acre. Southern California property to exchange 
for Eastern property. For information and 

Srinted matter address LOY & HUKIN, 
38 South Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 




HOFPriAN 
CAPE 



® ® ® 



ELEGANT 

GRILL ROOM 
AND PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Finest Cuisine. Seroice Unexcelled. 

M. L. POLASKI CO. (Inc. ) Proprietors 

Q1pr S. SPRING STREET 

^ • ^ LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the lyAjJD qf Sunshine." 



CONDENSED INFORflATION. 




UNIQUE SECTION 

The section 
generally 
known as 
Southern Cal- 
ifornia com- 
prises the 
seven counties 
of Los Ange- 
les, San Ber- 
n a r d i n o, 
Orange, Riverside, San Diego, Ventura and 
Santa Barbara. The total area of these 
counties is 44,901 square miles. The coast 
line extends northwest and southeast a 
distance of about 275 miles. 

The population in 1890 was 201,352. 
Los ANGEiyKS, the leading county of South- 
ern California, has an area of about 4,000 
square miles, some four-fifths of which is 
capable of cultivation, with water supplied. 
The shore line is about 85 miles in length. 
The population increased from 33,881 in 1880 
to 101,454 in 1890. Horticulture is the prin- 
cipal industry. There are over 1,500,000 
fruit trees grow 
ing in the conn 
ty. Los Angeles 
city, the com- 
mercial metrop- 
olis of Southern 
California, 1 5 
miles from the 
coast, has a pop- 
ulation to-day 
of about 85,000. 
Eleven railroads 
center here. 
There are about 
100 miles of 
graded and 
graveled streets, 
and II miles of 
paved streets. The city is entirely lighted 
by electricity. There is a $500,000 court 
house, a $200,000 city hall, and many great 
and costly business blocks. 

The other principal cities are Pasadena, 
Pomona, Whittier, Azusa, Downey, Santa 
Monica, Redondo and San Pedro. 

San Bernardino County is the largest 
county in the State, is rich in minerals, has 
fertile valleys, and considerable desert, much 
of which can be reclaimed with water from 
the mountains. Population about 30,000. 
The county is traversed by two railroads. 
Fine oranges and other fruits are raised. 

San Bernardino city, the county seat, is 
a railroad center, with about 8,000 people. 
The other principal places are Redlands, 
Ontario, Colton and Chino. 




POMONA VALLEY 



Orange County was segregated ^^^^ 
Los Angles county in 1889. Area 671 square 
miles ; population, in 1890, 13,589. Much 
fruit and grain are raised. Most of the land 
is arable, and there is a good supply of 
water. 

Santa Ana, the county seat, is an attrac- 
tive place, with a population of 5,000. Other 
cities are Orange, Tustin, Anaheim and 
Fullerton. 

Riverside County was created in 1893 
from portions of San Bernardino and San 
Diego counties. Area 7,000 square miles ; 
population about 14,000. It is an inland 
county. 

Riverside, the county seat, is noted for its 
extensive orange groves and beautiful homes. 
Other places are South Riverside, Perris 
and San Jacinto. 

San Diego County is a large county, 
the most southerly in the State, adjoining 
Mexico. Population about 40,000. The 
Iclimate of the coast region is remarkably 
imild and equable. Irrigation is being rapidly 
iextended. Fine lemons are raised near the 
Jcoast, and all other fruits flourish. 

San Diego 
city, on the bay 
of that name, is 
the terminus of 
the Santa Fe 
railway system, 
with a popula- 
tion of about 
21,000. 

Across the bay 
is Coronado 
Beach with its 
mammoth ho- 
tel. Other cities 
are National 
City,Escondido, 
Julian and 
Oceanside. 

Ventura County adjoins Los Angeles 
county on the north. It is very mountain- 
ous. There are many profitable petroleum 
wells. Apricots and other fruits are raised, 
also many beans. Population in 1870, 10,071. 
San Buenaventura, the county seat, is 
pleasantly situated on the coast. Population 
2,500. ' Other cities are Santa. Paula, Hue- 
neme and Fillmore. 

Santa Barbara is the most northern of 
the seven counties, with a long shore line. 
There are many rugged mountains in the 
interior. Semi-tropic fruits are largely raised, 
and beans in the northern part of the county. 
Santa Barbara, the county seat, is noted 
for its mild climate and rare vegetation. 
Population about 6,000. Other cities are 
Lompoc, Carpenteria and Santa Maria. 



Fh. jevne 



WHO.BSA.B g ROGER 



RBTAIL 



IMPORTER OF 



English, French, German and Italian TABLE LUXURIES 



Goods packed and delivered at depot free of charge, and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 



136 and 138 NORXH SPARING STREET 



FA RHINO AND 
ORCHARD LAND 
FOR COLONY 
ENTERPRISE 

POR SALE BY 

FRED. J. SMITH, 

POnONA, CAL. 



W. H. MOHR 

123 So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Notary Public. Searcher of Records. Confiden- 
tial Business Agent. Looks after Taxes and 
Assessments and keeps you posted. 

Correspondence solicited. 



POR SALE. 



Special to the Land of Sdnshine.— 6-room 
modern new Colonial cottage. Hall, bath, hot 
and cold water, patent water closet, fine mantel, 
lawn, street graded, etc. Only $2,500. Terms. 
$500. cash; balance monthly. One of many good 
homes in Los Angeles for sale. Before you buy, 
see TAYLOR & CO., 102 South Broadway. 



Olive Trees 



And all kinds of Nursery 

Stock for sale at 



• THE POMONA NURSERY 



Send and get a copy of our book on 
Olive Culture, niailetl tree 



HOWLAND BROS., Proprietors, 

POMONA, CALIFORNIA 

I SELL T-HE BflRT-H... 



HEADQUARTt 



RS AT POMONA. CAL. 



Ax34!£^ 




r n Y I believe the best investment in California 
On I I to-day is the Howland Olive Orchard : 
150 acres — 120 acres solid to olive orchard, balance 
variety of fruits, etc. Olive mill and the latest 
machinery for pressing oil that cost over l5,ooo. 
The income from the proi>erty this year is nearly 
$8,000, and yet but one-fifth of theorchard is in 
bearing. The Howland Olive Oil from this plant 
took tne first premium at the World's Fair at 
Chicago in competition with the world ; also first 
premium at Mid-winter Fair and at the late Citrus 
Fair at Los Angeles. For fu'l particulars of this 
property, or for anything in the line of Real 
ICstate, call on or addiess ^' The Old Man." 

R. S. BASSETT, POMONA. CAL. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunsbinb." 



WHAT 

SORT OF A 

BOOK 

Will a volume of this magazine make ? 

DO YOU KNOW 

Any handsomer or more artistic pages ? 
Any more lavish illustration ? 
Any cleaner typography ? 

Page by page, it is a beautiful thing, is it not ? 



Bind up the six numbers of a volume, or the twelve numbers of a 
year — and just think for a moment. It will be a rather unusual book, 
will it not ? Do you know any other locality about which there exists so 
complete and so beautiful a book as this will make concerning the most 
interesting of all localities — Southern California ? 

And every year it will yield two more such books. Think of it, at 
a dollar a year ! 

Not a stupid page in it. A local magazine but broad in sympathy. 
Made by the best writers in the Southwest ; men and women who are 
recognized in the East as writers. Not an asylum for the fattener of 
waste-baskets, but a workmanlike, competent, alert, terse, graphic 
magazine which pays its contributors and expects from them their best 
work. 



Over 500 beautiful illustrations a year. 
$i'.oo a year. loc. a copy. 



Land of. Sunshine Pub. Co., 

501-503 Stimson Building. Los Angeles. Cal. 



WOOD & CHURCH —«—■;""• 

Fine Soil, abundance of Pure I 1 . T*/! I ^ 

^rijr".^?^'c'^*''*° *' Lake VieNv Lands 

We have a fine list of Los Angeles and Pasadena City Property. Some Bargains. 



123 S. Broadway, 



16 S. Raymond Ave., 



LOS ANGBLES, CAL. 



I'ASADENA.CAL. 



McKOON & YOAKUM, 

f^eal Estate, 
234 West First Straet. Los Angeles, Cal. 



URI EMBODY 

NOTARY PUBLIC AND CONVEYANCER 
132 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Sumner P. Hunt 
Theo. A. Biien 



I 

Qrafiitesfs 

424 STIM80N BUILDING 



p.. 



.'^.■^ ' ^ ^ ! i ^ ' «^im^ui'^ ' 



'T'"" ' ■ '■• ' "^ 



LOS ANGELES, 
CALIFORNIA 



T«L. 261 




THE LOS ANGELES TERiVllNAL RAILWAY 

TUP ^Ali PFHRR niVKinitl Runs through a fine agricultural and grazing country to Long Beach, 

inC ORn rmnU UIIIOIUI and then for five miles along the ocean to San Pedro Harbor, where 

connections are made with the Pacific Coast Steamship Company for all points North and South, 

and with the Wilmington Transportation Company for Catalina Island. At Terminal Island 

(Kast San Pedro.) there is a fine Bath House and Pavilion, open all the year, and the finest still 

water bathing on the Coast is found here ; also boating on the bay, and sailing on the ocean with 

power launches or yachts. 

TUP PA^ADPNA niVKinN Runs to Pasadena, also up to Altadena, at the base of the mountains, 

int. rHJHUCnH umoiun and at Altadena connects with the Mount Lowe Railway for Rubio 

Canon Pavilion up the incline to Echo Mountain House, and to the observatory on Mount Lowe, 

enabling tourists to go from Los Angeles to the top of the Sierra Madre Mountains in a very short 

time and with but one change. 

TUP CI PNRAI P niVKIflN Runs through one of the finest valleys in Southern California, noted for 

inC OLLHUHLL UiTIOlUn {^^ the fine deciduous and citrus fruits, to Glendale, and on to Verdugo 

Perk, finest picnic grounds adjacent to Los Angeles. 
There are Twenty-Six Passenger Trains a day between Los Angeles and Pasadena ; eight passenger 
trains a day between Los Angeles and Glendale and Verdugo Park ; six passenger trains a day 
between Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Pedro ; eight passenger trains a day between Los 
Angeles and Altadena. 
Picnic Grounds at Verdugo Park, Devil's Gate, Millard's Caiion, Eaton's Cation and Rubio Ca&on on 
the Mount Lowe Railway. Finest Mountain, Valley and Ocean Scenery in Southern California. 
T. B. BURNETT, W. WINCUP, 

Vice-President and General Manager, General Freight and Passenger Agent, 

Los Angeles. Los Angeles. 



i 



PNERALBlREeTOR^I^P[BALMER'§ 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land ok Sunshine." 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HOTELS 

Space in this column not for sale. 
AVAI.ON. 

Hotel Metropole— American plan. 
COKONADO BEACH. 

Hotel del Coronado— Largest in the world; 
$2 per day and up; $17.50 per week upward. 

ECHO MOUNTAIN. 

Echo Mountain House — On line of Mount 
Lowe Railway. Open all the year. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Hotel Liincoln — First-class family hotel. Sec- 
ond and Hill sts. 

The Hollenbeck — American and European 
Strictly first-class. 

Hotel Ramona — European plan. 75c. per day. 

Westminster — American and European plan. 
Select. 

ONTARIO. 

Southern Pacific Hotel — First-class. 
PASADENA. 

The Carleton— American plan : $2.00 a day. 

POMONA. 
Hotel Palomares — First-class throughout. 
Keller's Hotel— Rates $1.25 and $1.50 per day. 

REDLANDS. 
Hotel "Windsor — Tourist and commercial, 
centrally located and thoroughly first-class 
Rates $2.50 per day up. 

REDONDO. 
Redondo Hotel — American plan. High class 
summer and winter resort. 

SAN DIEGO. 

Hotel Brewster — Splendidly equipped; Amer- 
ican plan. $2.50 per day and upward. 

Horton House — Fine cuisine; central loca- 
tion ; American plan. $2 and $2.50 per day. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The Commercial— American Plan. 
SANTA MONICA. 

Hotel Arcadia — Rates $3 per day upward. 

The Windemere— Family hotel. 

The NorAvood, Ventura — Family hotel. 



SAN FRANCISCO HOTELS. 

Pleasanton Hotel — American plan ; I3 per 

day and up. 
Palace Hotel — American and European plans. 



LEADING CHURCHES OF LOS 
ANGELES. 

BAPTIST. 

East Los Angeles — Cor S Workman and Hawkins 
First— N E cor S Broadway and Sixth sts. 

CATHOLIC. 

St. Vibiana Cathedral — S Main st near Second. 
St. Vincent's— Cor Grand Ave and Washington. 
La Parochia — The Plaza. 

CONGREGATIONAL. 

East Los Angeles— N Daly, near Downey ave. 

First— SW cor Hill and Sixth sts. 

Plymouth— S side Twenty-first st opp Lovelace. 

EPISCOPAL. 

Christ Church— cor. Flower and Pico sts. 
St. John's— S E cor Figueroa and Adams sts 
St. Paul's— S Olive, bet Fifth and Sixth sts. 



LUTHERAN. 

First English— S E cor Flower and Eighth sts. 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

Epworth— N W cor Bellevue and Centennial aves 
Bellevue (South) Bellevue ave, near Beaudrv av 
First— S side Broadway, bet Third and Fourth 
Simi>son— 734 S Hope st. 

Trinity (Sth)—E side Broadway.bet Fifth & Sixth 
University— S W cor Wesley ave and Simpson st. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

Boyle Heights— Chicago ave, bet E First & Mich. 
First— S E cor Second st and Broadway. 
Second— cor. Downey ave. and Daly st. 
Immanuel— S E cor Tenth and Pearl sts. 

UNITARIAN. 

Church of the Unity— N E cor Third & Hill sts. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 
»09 South Broadway.. 

Board of Directors : 

E. A. Forrester, President. 
G. W. Parsons. 
O. T. Johnson 
Robt. Hale. 
J. Ross Clark. 



F. M. Porter, Secretary: 
A. H. Voigt, Treasurer. 
WillardD. Ball, 

General Secretary. 



Can Hardly Have Too Much Of.' 



The Dial, Chicago, the leading literary 
journal of the West (and Whittier called 
it "the best in the United States " ) says 
in its issue of June 16 ; 

"Southern California's young and agreeable 
literary periodical, the Land of Sunshine, (pub- 
lished at Los Angeles), celebrates the beginning 
of its second year bj' assuming a more distinct- 
ively magazine form and donning a new and 
striking cover, in its issue for June. The illus- 
! trations ot the number are unexpectedly good, 
j and the reading matter is varied and attractive. 
: The "local color " of course predominates, both 
in text and pictures ; and this, we fancy, will be 
to most readers the chief charm of the bright 
little periodical,— for the "local color " of South- 
ern California is something that its lovers can 
hardly have too much of." 



POlMDEXfER « WaDSWORTiI 

\ BROKERS 

j 306 West Second St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Buy and sell Real Estate, Stocks, Bonds and 
j Mortgages, on commission, make collections, 
manage property and do a general brokerage 
business. Highest references for reliability and 
good business management. 



For Fine Out Door and otfiep l/iew6 

...CALL --r' — 

THE PHOTOGRAPHER 

Temple Block Los Angeles, Cal. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



MAXWELL'S 
LOS ANGELES 

City Directory 



GAZETTEER OF SOUTHERN CALIEORNIA 



ooI]89 



OOO 



Embracing a Directory of the Residents of Los Angeles City and Sub- 
urbs, a Classified Business Directory of the City, a Miscellaneous 
Directory of the Municipal and County Officials, Courts, 
Societies, Schools, Churches, a Street Directory, etc. 

Also a Gazetteer of the Seven Southern Counties of California, comprising 
an Alphabetically Arranged lyist of Every City, Town and Post- 
office in Southern California, with a List of the Business and 
Professional Men, Description and Population of each, 
the County and City Governments, etc., etc. 



PRICE $5.00 



LOS ANGELES DIRECTORY COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 
432 Stimson Block, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



A. M. PARSONS 



J. P. MOORE 



MOORE ©• PERSONS 

property flgerpts and \nvestment oi'okers, 



229 W. SEeOMB STREET 



RgmI Ssferfe: 



t 



Choice Southern California Properties. 
Ranches, Orange. Olive, Walnut, Alfalfa 
and Deciduous Fruit Lands of every 
description. Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena Property a specialty . . . 



L-OS KNOEL-eS. C £-. 

References by Permission : 
Los Angeles National Bank, Los Angeles. 
Southern California Nat. Bank, Los Ans^iles. 
First National Bank, Schuyler, Neb. 
Allen Bros , Wholesale Grocers, Omaha Neb. 
Nicollet National Bank, Minneapolis, ^^inn. 
Ex-Gov. W. R. Merriam, St. Paul, Minn. 



$32 



OnO ^ ^°^ 3-story Brick Business Block, right on First Street, in the heart of business, in 
j\J\J\J Los Angeles. Basement. Store and offices, and upper floors always full of tenants. 



OOO ^^^ ^^^^ Asphaltum 
jyjxjyj best paying properties anywhere. 



Never a room empty. Income g}i per cent, steady. This is a gilt-edged chance for a prime income 
investment. Correspondence invited. 

line in the State of California. A rare chance to buy one of the 
Owner engaged in manufacturing business, and 
must sell this in order to enlarge the other to meet demands. 

<&0 R 000 ^° Acres right in the city of Riverside, Cal., in navel oranges. Absolutely one of the 
*r^^5^"" finest properties in the" city. Artesian water, 120 lbs. pressure. Shipped the first 
two cars of oranges out of Southern California this year. For building sites it is unequalled in 
beauty as it lays high and right on street car line. A superb investment ; an investigation will 
reveal that the half has not been told. 



Write to headquarters for information. 
Make our office your headquartc-s when in 
our beautiful citv .... 



MOORE & PARSONS 



239 W. SECOND STKEKT. I.OS ANGE]LKS, CAL, 



Its Neighbors Say of the 
Sunshine. 



.and of 



" A production of which all Southern Califor- 
nians should be proud. . . A mazagine that all 
who are interested in everything that is sui 
generis to this section ought to have in their 
homes." — San Jacinto Searchlight 

" Bright as a June day, and artistic in all its 
features. The local flavor is delicious, and the 
matter is well written and carefully edited. 
There is an article in the June number called 
' The Children's Paradise,' with unique illus- 
trations, which will cause every mother who 
reads and who has a delicate child to know no 
rest for her soul until she gets her treasure to so 
bright a spoi."— Commercial Bulletin, Los An- 
geles. 

"A beautiful publication. Its contents are 
distinctly Southern Californian and elegantly 
illustrated."— Powona Times. 

" Finely illustrated and well editc;d. Within 
the next decade the Pacific Coast will give to the 
world of letters a national magazine ; and her 
coast sisters will within that time produce a 
' school of writers.' To this end is Mr. Lummis 
to be commended and all honor to him if he dis- 
covers the writers of this school."— IVoodland 
Democrat. 



Floating: ^ Magazine. 

The career of the Land of Sunshine in its 
new venture as a magazine publication will be 
watched with interest. Its undertaking is an 
heroic one unless it has a large fortune back ot 
it, since floating a fully equipped magazine now- 
adays is declared by those who have had experi- 
ence, to be like pouring water into a gopher 
hole. The publishers of Scribner's Magazine 
said recently that half a million of dollars was 
expended for that publication before if" turned 
the corner,' and began to yield any revenue, and 
it had more gratuitous advance booming than has 
probably ever been given any other magazine. 

Hence we say the undertaking of the pub- 
lishers of the Land ok Sunshine is heroic. 
Their work thus far has been highly creditable 
to themselves and to California, and it is to be 
hoped that their magazine will be a financial 
success from the start. If it is, it will be a grand 
thing for this land of sunshine as well as for 
its publishers. It is worthy of success and 
should have generous support, for as indicated 
above the success of a magazine has not been of 
late so much of a question of the survival of the 
fittest as the survival of the largest capital.— 
Pomona (Cal.) Progresi. 

"The Land of Sunshink appears for June 
in a more beautiful dress than ever before, and 
that is saying a good deal. "—Redlands Facts. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land op Sunshinb. 




Umou 
Ipboto 

Co, 



121'. 

SOUTH 
BROADWAY 



L09 ANGELES 
CAL. 



•nie iiait-tones ou zini. 
per. Line cuts. 



FOR YOUR VACATION 

TAKE A TRIP TO THE 



GRAND CANYON OF THE COLORADO 




tes art- low aiul the ])iovisiou 
Fk Routk for full inforinatii 
of illustrated descriptiou bo< 

Plea«« mention 



onif)tt ample. Write to or call ou the nearest agent of the 
to loMN y. Bykne, (ieu'l Pas.i. ARt.. Los Angeles. Cal., for 



f^OTEL AHCADIA, Sant^ Monica, ea I 



The only first-class 
tourist hotel in this, 
the leading coast re- 
sort of the Pacific. 151 
pleasant rooms, largt 
and airj'^ ball room, 
beautiful lawn and 
flower gardens. Mag- 
nificent panoramic 
\'iew of the sea. First 
class orchestra. Sur. 
bathing unexcelled, 
and private salt water 
baths in bath house 
belonging to Hotel. 
Sen,'ices of the popular 
chef from the Hotel 
Green, Pasadena, have 
been secured. 

S. RCINHART 

Proprietor 

Time from Los An- 
geles by Santa F^ or 
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes. 




B©M© wM&wMTMim m^wmm 




3,500 FEET ABOVE THK LEVEL OF THE SEA. 



NEVER CLOSES. 

Best of ser\-ice the year round. Purest of water, 
most equable climate, with best hotel in Southern 
California. ♦ 

Ferny glens, babbling brooks and shady forests 
within'ten minutes' walk of the house. ' 

Low weekU- rates -will be made to individuals 
and families for the summer, to include daily 
railway transportation from F:cho Mountain .to 
Altadena Junction and return. 

Livery stables at Echo Mountain and Altadena 
Junction ; none better. 

Special rates to excursions;, astronomical, 
moonlight, searchlight parties, banquets and 
balls. The grandest mountain, caiiou, ocean and 
valley scenery on earth. 

Full inlorm'ation at office of 

MOUNT LOWE RAILAVAY 

Cor. Third and Spring streets, Los Angeles. 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLOCK, 

Pasadena, Cal. 
ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE. 

Postoffire, Echo Mountain, California. 



AND 



AA 



Herue Priend, 

PHor< 
EN 



OTO 

QRAUER 



314. W. FIRST ST., 

LOS ANGELES 




Please mention that you "saw it in the I,ani> ui .Sln 



N^ 



7W;OUlSTKIIS NUTVYBeR 



HUGUSTf 1895 noII'V h^l^^^ 




10 



CENTS I-AND OF SUNSHINE PUBLISHING CO., 
A COPY 501-503 Stimson Building. 



$1 



A 
YE/ 



FUIN ALL DAY FOR TWO BITS 



6anta"honica Mortfi Beacfi Batfi House 



s^ 



Reopened on Decoration Day after some weeks spent 
in making Extensive Improvements. Henceforth an 
enormous heater 



>VI1^1^ WraRM THE BIG Pl^UNGE 

And as the Establishment will never close again until it 
wears out or burns down, j-ou can always be sure of a 

First-class bath in the Surf, in Porcelain Tubs,, or ' 

IN THE ^FORESaiD ^VSTMRIVI PLUNGE 




Windsor 

Redlands, Cal. 

Tourist, Commercial and Family. 

Under its new management this hostelry 
has been refitted throughout with all 
modern conveniences and arrangements 
for the comfort of its guests. The sleep- 
ing rooms are large and airy, most of 
them commanding a mountain or valley 
view of picturesque grandeur. Many of 
the suites have private baths connected 
The proprietor has devoted especial atten- 
tion to th^ "cuisine," and has received 
many encoiniums of praise from guests 
for its excellence. In fact, the >ViifDSOR is 
left with regret, many of its gfuests hesi- 
tating to give the final adieus. 

Rates $2 to $4 per day; Special 

by week. 

Large Sample Room free. 

H. L. SQUIRES, PROPRIETOR 



Pavilion Gycieru 

t and 

Ridlno ^^^ 
SgHooi ^ 

)[ 



<isi 




The finest Riding School on the Pacific 
Coast 

Telephone 1669 

H. T. HAZARD. Prop. 

High Grade, Medium 
Grade, New and 

"""""Haud BICyCLES 

for Ladies, Gents, 
Boys and Girls. 

ANY SIZE, STYLE 
OR WEIGHT 

) We allow more for second 
hand Wheels than any other 
dealers, as we can use them in 
our Riding School. 

Wheels cleaned and kept in 
repair at a nominal price. 



Rentino ond Repairino 

Cor. Fifth 

and Olive 
Sts. 



Please mention that " you saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



^he moat centrally lo- 
cated, beat appointed 
and beat kept Botel 
in the city. 

aAmerican or Suro- 
pean Plan. 

Ratea reaaonable. 



Second and ... 

Spring Streets 

Los Angeles, Cal. 




SAfSTTV eATALITNA ISLA/SP 




Grand AttPaetions for the Summe»« Season, 1895 

""■" '"\^ Hotel Metropole, New Island Villa and little Harbor Inn 

The Famous MARINE BAND and ORCHESTRA. I'ret- open air concerts everv day throiiKhout the 

season. Illnstrated pamphlets and full information mailed to any address. 
Send for complete Illustrated History and Hand.book ot Santa Catalina Island, by Charles Frederick 
Holder. Price 25 c. For sale by all newsdealers. 

WILMINGTON TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

222 S. SPRING STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



H. H. MORROW (^»*»Ho"^) 

Importer of Murray & Co.'s celebrated 
npilinn Tpac wholesale and retail dealer in 
UCUIUIt I Mb Tea., CoflTees. Splees. 
KxtriftctM, llakins Powders. Mail orders 
promptly and conscientiously filled. 

310 W. Sixth St.. I.0S Angeles, Cal. 



QARnAINC I lU a foot, dty loU in Kohler 
DHnUfllllO ! Trmct, between 7th and 8th Sts. 
Installments. Also, Ten acre lots, best fruit land, 
Anaheim ; 704 trees, walnuts, apricots, peaches. 
|ioo per acre ; $28 cash, * Ylirff U*"^ 6 per cent. 



Please mention that you " aaw 




Sumner P. Hunt 
Theo. A. Eisen 



im I INT 

QreBifeets 

424 STIMSON BUIIDING 



LOS ANGELES, 
CALIFORNIA 



TEL 261 




poimdexter « wm>swoRfri 

BROKERS 
305 "West Second St., Iios Angeles, Cal. 

Buy and sell Real Estate, Stocks, Bonds and 
Mortgages, on commission, make collections, 
manage property and do a general brokerage 
business. Highest references for reliability and 
good business management. 




Woodburu Business Coffege 

226 S. Spring St., Los Angei^es 

Oldest, Largest and Best. Send for Catalogue. 



G. A. Hough, 

President. 



N. G. Felker, 

Vice President. 



LftS GflSITflS SANITARIUM 



Situated in the Sierra Madre foot-hills, altitude 
2,000 feet. Most equable climate in Southern Cal- 
ifornia . Pure mountain water.excellent cuisine ; 
easily reached by Terminal R. R. and short car- 
riage drive. 

0. SHEPARD BARNUM, Propr. 

Drawer 126, Pasadena, Cal. 



OVERTON & FIREY 

REAL ESTATE 



POMONA, CAL. 

Orange and Lemon Groves in full bearing 
for sale. Also unimproved lands well located. 

We have several fine Orange Groves for 
exchange for eastern property. 

If you want a home in the leading Orange 
producing section in Southern California, call 
on or address us. 

Correspondence solicited. 

OVERTON & FIREY, 

POMONA, CAI.. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



HOTEL AHeATDIA, Santa Monica, eal 



The only first-class 
tourist hotel in this, 
the leading coast re 
sort of the Pacific. 150 
pleasant rooms, large 
and airy ball room, 
beautiful lawn and 
flower gardens. Mag- 
nificent panoramic 
view of the sea. First- 
class orchestra. Surf 
bathing unexcelled, 
and private salt water 
baths in bath house 
belonging to Hotel. 
Services of the popular 
chef from the Hot 
Green, Pasadena, ha\ r 
been secured. 

S. REINHART 

PROPBItTOR 

Time from Los An- 
geles by Santa F^ or 
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes. 




CARL ENTENMANN X^{^uTh1 

Manufacturing Jeweler 

Kvery description of Gold 
kod Silver Jewelry made , 
to order or repaired — 

Gold and Silver School and Society Badges A. Medals a specialty 

ROOMS 3. * AND 7 UF STAIRS 

2\1]4 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Diomond setter and Enyraver 



RICHARD ALTSCHUL, 

REAL ESTATE 

123;^ W. Second St. 
Burdick Block, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



FOR YOUR VACATION 

TAKK A TRIP TO THt 



GRAND CANYON OF THE COLORADO 




X i.^ .cic- .11 c low and the provisions for comfort ample. .. . ... .^ ur call on the nearest agent of the 

Santa Fk Koutb for full information, or to John J. Byrnk, Gen'l Pass. Agt., I/)8 Angeles. Cal., for 
a copy of illustrated description book. 

Please mention that you " saw it in the LAI^P OP 3y?78PlNB." 



HKiZERTV Si iA^ILSOISL 




View from Smiley Heights, Redlands, looking north. 

PROPRIETORS CLUB STABLES 

OPP. WINDSOR HOTEL. REDLANDS, CAL. 

tW Carriages, in charge of thoroughly competent drivers, 
meet each incoming train, ready to convey tourists to every point 
of interest in and about Redlands. 
N. B.— Be sure and ask for Club Stable rigs. 



Ij. l.. newerf— real estate. 

226 S. spring. Mngr. Southern California 
Land and Nursery Co. ^s-Special attention 
invited to the culture of the olive. 

"Write for information. 



McKOON & YOAKUM, 

l^eal Estate, 

234 West First Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




Hotel Pklotv^hres 




POMONA. CALIFORNIA 



A Strictly first-class house ot 
130 large rooms, elegantly fur- 
nished. Situated on the main 
lines of the Southern Pacific and 
Santa F6 Railways, 32 miles east 
ot Los Angeles. Rates, I2.50 to 
$3.50 per day; $12.50 to $17.50 per 
week. 

V. D. SIMMS, Manager. 



THE PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU 

GUARANTEES PROMPT, ACCURATE AND 
RELIABLE SERVICE. 

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Please mention that you "saw it in the I^and of Sunshine." 




A GATEWAY TO I HE MOUNTAINS. Photo. hy^Miss Nina E. Soule. 



THC LANDS OF THE SUN EXPAND THE SOUL. 



'mwf h 1 



THE LAND OF 

SUNSHINE' 



VOL. 3, No. 3. 



LOS ANGELES 



AUGUST, 1895 



Give Me the Desert. 



Bi' JOAQUIN MILLER. 

ND oh, the music of this world — 
That sweetest music, of mute lips : 
White ships with canvas ever furled ; 
Proud, silent, stately, peopled ships 
That wait, wait winds that never come — 
Forever breathless, ever dumb ! 

And oh, the pathos of the path 
By hermit hut on mountain chine ! 
The drama of that hermit hath 
Such music as the mountain pine. 
But where the master, minstrel where 
To strike the hermit's harp of air ? 

Give me the desert ! I should trust 
Nor sea nor ship nor mountain chine. 
Nude nature, ashen, prone in dust ; 
So like this bittered life of mine. 
Give me the desert, emptied quite 
Of all that maketh man's delight. 



The desert ! dust, bone, stone for me. 
And there, companioned but by Him 
Behold my faith shall grow a tree 
So bright all others shall grow dim ; 
So tall no serpent eye can sight ; 
So green no slander tongue can blight. 

The Hightti, Oakland, June 3, 05. 



Copyriybtad 1895 by Land of Sunthine PublishinK Co. 




The Interpreter. 

BY CHARLES DWICHT WILLARD. 

" I am all the daughters of my father's house — 
And all the brothers, too." 

—Twelfth Night. 

Scene : Home place of the Iberrolas, a long, irregular adobe with tile roof partly 
fallen in. The walls are crumbled and in places show zigzag openings. A broad, 
roofless veranda runs along the side wing, now the only habitable portion of the 
house. On this veranda in the shade of the overhanging pepper trees are several 
rawhide chairs, and a ragged hammock. 

Enter Hugh Rodman and John Daniels. Thev stop before the veranda and look 
about. 

Rodman : The original Iberrola — whoever he was — certainly under- 
stood how to select a good location for his house. 

DanieI/S : It commands a beautiful view. 

Rodman : Here, on this very spot, I mean to build a residence worthy 
of my family and name — something in the Mission style, that the form 
may be in keeping with its environment. 

DanieIvS : An admirable plan. I hope that nothing may prevent its 
fulfillment. 

Rodman: You see how the case stands. {Points with his riding" whip.) 
My property begins yonder with the olive grove and extends back to the 
foothills, a magnificent estate — one of the finest in all Southern California 
— but ruined for my use by the lack of this wretched little piece, half 
covered with the crumbling adobe. 

DanieI/S : And you say you have tendered him — 

Rodman : Two or three times its value in money, or ten acres of land 
with a comfortable house thrown in. 

DaniEI^S : What beastly avarice ! 

Rodman : No. Let us do him justice. I believe he is influenced 
entirely by sentiment. His ancestors were born in this house, and he 
will not leave it. 

DanieI/S ( IViih a glance at the ruins') : It appears to be leaving him 
pretty fast. Well, the law does not recognize sentiment, and I think we 
shall have no difficulty in working up a case ; that is, if you are determined 
to proceed. 

Rodman : I mean to be just to the old man. He shall be none the 
poorer on my account. But this piece of property I must have : if not 
by fair means — then through the law. 

DanieIvS : Thank you, kindly. 

Rodman : Today for the last time I will make him and his daughter 
a reasonable tender. If he refuses, then set your moles at work to burrow 
under his title. 

DanieIvS : His daughter ? 

Rodman : She acts as interpreter, for he speaks no English. 

DaniEIvS : Then your recent acquirements in the Spanish language — 

Rodman : Would hardly carry me through an interview of such im- 
portance. I understand it well enough, but am painfully conscious ot 
my short-comings in speech. The girl should be present in any event, 
as she is the old man's only surviving relative. 



THE INTERPRETER. 105 

DANiEiyS : Does she speak good English ? 

Rodman : Miss Beatrix was educated in one of the best schools in San 
Francisco, and is a cultivated, well-bred young woman. 

DanieIvS : Indeed ? Good-looking ? 

Rodman : She is the most beautiful woman I ever saw. 

Daniels : You are not serious. 

Rodman : I was never more so. 

DanieIvS {After a short pause, during which he again surveys the ruin): 
Well, if a good-looking and cultivated young woman is living in this 
place, rest assured she is dying to get away, and it is with her, not the 
father, that we should be doing business. Just offer her a couple of new 
gowns and some spending money, and see how quickly she will fetch the 
old man around. 

Rodman {Slowly shaking his head) : Ah, but you have not seen her. 
She is an enigma, a sphinx. 

Beatriz enters the veranda from the house. 

DanieIvS : I have known a number of these Mexican girls — {turns 
toward the house) But who is this lady ? 

Rodman ( removing his hat and approaching the veranda) : Miss 
Beatriz, I salute you. 

Beatriz {with cold politeness) : You are welcome. {She glances at 
his companion.) 

Rodman : My friend, Mr. Daniels. 

Daniels bows with great deference. 

Beatriz: You are welcome, sir. {To Rodman.) Do you wish to 
talk with my father, the Seiior Iberrola? 
Rodman : With your father and yourself. 
Beatriz : I will interpret, if you wish. 

Enter Iberrola. He bows to the visitors and smiles cordially as he takes them each by the hand. 

Iberrola (/« 6^a«/5A): Friends, I bid you welcome. Your presence 
gives me great pleasure. Daughter, will you thank the gentlemen for 
the honor they do us in this visit ? 

Beatriz (r(?/fl?/y) : My father bids you welcome. (^5/^<?/o Iberrola 
in Spanish.) They have come again, my father, to talk about the land. 
I think the older man is the Seiior Rodman's steward, or perhaps his 
lawyer. 

Iberrola {In Spanish) : Ah ! I knew he would return. Now, if 
you manage wisely, my daughter, he will pay well for the land. 

Daniels {aside to Rodman) : The old man looks so good-natured 
and easy-going that I should think — 

Beatriz : Will you be seated, gentlemen. My father will talk with 
you. 

Rodman {after a pause) : Miss Beatriz, I come to renew the offer I 
have heretofore made your father for his land, and to take his final an- 
swer. I offer him a thousand dollars for these two acres ; and for the 
house whatever valuation may be placed upon it by fair-minded arbitra- 
tors. That is twice what the land is worth, but I wish to deal liberally 
with him. 



>/'• 



^^ LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

BEATRiz {in Spanish) : The gentleman says he thinks one hundred 
dollars is enough for such a miserable piece of land, and the adobe is of 
no value whatever. 

Rodman {in astonishment) : Oh, excuse me, I — 

DANIEI.S {catching his arm) : I read it all in 3^our face. Hush ! Be 
careful. 

Bkatriz {in Spanish) : He talks just as he did before. He means to 
cheat us, my father. These Americans are all rogues. 

IBERROI.A {in Spanish) : I do not understand, for by his face he should 
be generous. Try again and see if he will not give more. Tell him that 
all the land hereabout is worth two hundred dollars an acre. 

Rodman : What does your father say. Miss Beatriz ? 

Beatriz : He says : ' I thank the gentleman for his offer, but I cannot 
accept it. This piece of property is all that now remains from my father's 
estate, and you have not enough riches — all the Americans in California 
have not enough riches — to buy it from me.' 

Rodman : Then he speaks just as he did the last time ? 

Beatriz : Yes, Seiior. Every time he has spoken the same. 

Rodman: Ah, I understand. Well, we are fortunate to have your 
services as an interpreter. Miss Beatrice ; but I am disposed to ask of you 
something more. Can you not use your influence with Seiior Iberrola in 
my behalf? He must sell the property sometime ; why not now when a 
fair price is offered ? 

Beatriz: I must tell you, sir, that I have no influence with my 
father. I am only a woman, and to him little more than a child. When 
he sold the rest of his land I strove to — to — advise him, but he would not 
listen to me. 

IberroIvA {in Spanish) : What are you sajdng to one another, my 
daughter ? 

Beatriz {in Spanish) : He says that much of the surrounding land 
has sold at fift}^ dollars an acre, but I answered him that it was long ago. 
Now it will bring more. 

Iberroi^a {in Spanish) : That is right, my daughter. 

Beatriz {to /Rodman) : I have spoken to him, Seiior, but he will not 
heed me. 

Rodman : Tell me. Miss Beatriz, how it happened that your father sold 
the remainder of his estate. Ten thousand acres he has parted with for 
trifling sums, yet he refuses now to sell me this fragment at a fair price. 

Beatriz : Shall I interpret to him ? 

Rodman : No, no. Answer me yourself. 

Beatriz : My father parted with some of the land before he under- 
stood its true value — and the rest was stolen from him. 

Rodman : Stolen from him ! 

Beatriz : Yes. In your American law courts. There are lawyers that 
know how to steal land, just as horse-thieves know how to run off stock. 

Converses in a low tone with her father. 

Rodman : I say, Daniels, now is the proper time for you to bring 
forward the lawsuit suggestion. 



THE INTERPRETER. 107 

DANiEiyS : Excuse me ; I am merely a listener at this interview and 
decline to take a hand. But tell me ; is my guess correct ? Does the 
interpreter hold the key to the situation ? 

Rodman : Yes ; that is it exactly. 

DanieLvS (chuckling-) : And you have picked the lock and gotten 
inside ? 

Rodman: Where I feel more like a thief than a gentleman. I should 
have told her at the outset — {he pauses to listen.) 

iBERROivA [in Spanish) : Speak not with such harshness, nor so 
proudly to the Americans. I am told that the young man has inherited 
great wealth and is well disposed toward his neighbors. Tell him frankly 
of our distress, of the many hours, day and night, you spend over your 
needle work, by which alone we are saved from hunger. Appeal to him, 
in the name of his family, for the honor of his country, not to defraud 
an old man and his helpless daughter. 

Rodman {aside to Daniels) : My conscience is easier for having de- 
ceived this young woman, when I think how villainously she has wronged 
me to her father. 

Beatriz : Gentlemen, my father wishes to give you his final answer. 

Rodman : Let us hear it. 

Beatriz : I will repeat his words as he spoke them : ' For many gen- 
erations my ancestors have held these lands, ten thousand acres in 
extent, from the mountains down to the sea. Here in this house were 
bom my grandfather, my father and myself. Years ago when I was but 
young, the Americans came to this country and with honeyed words of 
friendship persuaded me to sell part of the estate to them. Gentlemen, 
the man who sells his land is by so much false to his ancestors and a 
traitor to his country. I was ignorant then, but now I understand. 
When I would sell no more, they incited my neighbors to go to law with 
me over the place of the boundary line. As the costs of the suit increased, 
my lands disappeared, until today, gentlemen, you see me living like an 
Indian on a mere chile-patch, in a house fast crumbling to dust. My 
peons are scattered and lost, and of my own blood none survive save 
my daughter. And you ask me, for a miserable handful of gold, to leave 
the one piece of earth that still remains, and go forth among strangers 
landless as a beggar. Ah, that I had a son, gentlemen, to give you my 
answer, that being a man and the inheritor of the name and the estate, 
he might share with me in this refusal ! I shall never sell this land. 
Mine it is now and mine it shall remain to the day of my death. Let 
this answer be for once and for all.' 

IberroIvA {in Spanish) : You have spoken well, my daughter. I see 
in the young man's face that he is moved. 

Beatriz {in an undertone) : The Virgin forgive me ! 

She conyerses aside with lier father. 

Rodman : Daniels, I have changed my mind. My happiness no 
longer depends upon the possession of this piece of property. 

DANiEiyS : She is magnificent. WTiat eyes, eh ! But remember, if 
the old man is disposed to vSell, some one may buy and hold for blackmail. 



io8 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



Rodman : I have a plan to cover that. 

He turns to the old man and addresses him in Spanisli. At the first words Beatrix starts forward and looks 
wildly about her. 

Rodman {in Spanish) : Since my last visit here, Seiior Iberrola, I 
have acquired some knowledge of your idiom, and if you will bear with 
my errors I will speak in it. 

IberroIvA {in Spanish) : Your speech is clear, Senor Rodman. I am 
pleased to hear you. 

BkaTriz {in English) : You have deceived me ! 

Rodman : Or was it you that sought to deceive me, yes, and your 
father as well ! 

Bbatriz : You will not betray me ? 

Rodman : That rests with yourself. 

Beatriz : And has it all been in vain ; must we give up the land ? 

Rodman : That also rests with yourself. 

Beatriz : With myself, Senor ? I will do anything that I may in 
honor — 

Iberroi^a {in Spanish) : Will you not speak in Spanish, that I may 
understand you ? 

Rodman {in Spanish) : As regards the property, Seiior Iberrola, you 
say you will sell. Good ; I will give you two thousand dollars for it. 

Beatriz : Oh, Seiior ! 

Rodman {in English) : Hush ! If I do not buy it, some one else will. 

Beatriz : But you said — 

Iberroi^a {in Spanish) : The price is munificent. My answer is brief. 
I accept. 

Beatrix clasps her hands and sinks back in her chair. 

Rodman {in Spanish) : And now that the place is mine, to do with 
as I please, I will ask Miss Beatriz to accept it as a present from me. 

Beatriz : I cannot accept such a gift from you, Seiior. 

Rodman : One moment ; wait till you hear the conditions that are 
attached. 

IBERROI.A : Speak not rashly, my daughter. What are the conditions ? 

Rodman : If at any time Miss Beatriz chooses to part with the land, 
let me be the purchaser. 

Beatriz : If I should accept it, Seiior, I would do as you wished in 
such a matter. But it is too valuable a gift and I — 

Rodman : I told you it rested with yourself. 

Beatriz {after a pause) \ And what other condition, Seiior? 

Rodman : A little one, yet it may mean much. It is right that people 
whose lands adjoin should know one another well and be good friends, 
is it not ? 

IbERROI^a : Verily, Seiior, you will always find a warm welcome in 
this house. Henceforth you shall be to me as my own son. 

Rodman : And you, Beatriz ? 

Beatriz {putting forward her hand): We shall be good friends, 
Seiior Rodman. 

They stand for a moment looking one another in the face. 

DANiEiyS {interrupting) : I say, Rodman, the next time we come I 
shall bring an interpreter of my own ; for me, this is just a trifle dull ! 



A Cow-BoY Race 



ry J. c. DAVIS. 



A pattering rush like the rattle of 
hail 

When the storm king's wild coursers 
are out on the trail, 

A long-roll of hoofs — and the earth 
is a drum ! 

The Centaurs ! See ! Over the prai- 
rie they come ! 



A rollicking, clattering, battering beat; 

A rythmical thunder of galloping feet ; 

A swift swirling dust-cloud — a mad hurricane 

Of swarthy grim faces and tossing black mane. 




Hurrah ! In the face of the steeds of the sun 
The gauntlet is flung and the race is begun ! 



Highland, Cal. 



The Mission San Juan Capistrano. 



3Y ADELINE STEARNS WINC. 




HEN, alighting from the prose of a railway carriage, we come 
upon this picturesque ruin of semi-Moorish architecture, set in 
opalescent landscape of green hills and purple mountains, we 
feel that we have wandered into another century, or become 
part of an old-time poem. There seems to be a peculiar, 
dreamy atmosphere about the place, shared even by the small 
village — which is a sort of Sleepy Hollow, and the most con- 
servative place in America. 

We remember that there were days when California was an 

almost fabulous country, called " LasCalifornias," and supposed 

to consist of a series of islands inhabited by griffins and by black 

and warlike amazons, whose armor was of gold and silver. We 

do not wonder that Spaniards galore flocked in search of the land of 

"The Seven Cities," whose roofs were said to be of gold and whose 

portals studded with turquoises. 

They were all disappointed in their search for wealth ; but a strange, 
prosaic people came later, who, digging in the earth, found the gold. 

Strange things were always happening in connection with this coast. 
It was on the island of San Fernandez that Captain Woodes Rogers found 
Alexander Selkirk ; and in consequence Robinson Crusoe has delighted 
generations of children far more than could any amount of gold. 

Simon Hatley, of the "Gentlemen Adventurers," while on a piratical 

• St. John the Beheaded. 



THE MISSION SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO. 




L. A. EnK. Co. 



THE OLD FONT. 



journeys to this coast, just be- 
fore doubling the Cape, shot 
the albatross which suggested 
Coleridge's immortal /^ime of 
the Ancient Mariner. 

When we remember how this 
mission itself sprang up in the 
midst of a wilderness, and blos- 
somed so quickly into all that 
it was of good and rich and 
beautiful, it seems like a tale 
from the Arabian Nights, and 
this a bit of old Spain, trans- 
ported here on a Magic Carpet, 
and then turning to ruin and 
decay, like most fairy gifts. 
And still the place has an 
atmosphere of its own that holds for you a forgetfulness of the present 
and compels you to its mood. You see this lovely country and the mis- 
sion buildings with the eyes of the devoted priests who gave up all of 
love and fame to bring the savage heart to God. 

The Padres chose not only the most fertile spots but those best adapted 
to their half-Moorish architecture. We constantly see its Roman tower 
and rounded arches. San Juan Capistrano was founded in 1776. The 
main buildings, constructed of adobe, were originally in the form of a 
square enclosing a court-yard, the first church being part of this square. 
Covered brick corridors whose roofs were supported on one side by 
pillars twenty-three inches square, and arches with spans of twenty feet, 
and on the other by the walls of the buildings, ran along the four sides 
of the court. There was another covered corridor in front of the build- 
ings and (for the garrison and their families) houses whose main line ran 
at right angles to the front corridor. They also had a corridor. 

The church built in 1806 was the grandest ever reared by the Francis- 
cans in California. It was almost exactly like that of San Francisco 
Antigua, in Guatemala, also an earthquake ruin, though not so large. 
The roof, of stone and cement, was a series of domes, surmounted by 
a bell-tower 125 feet high. We can still see the niches in which statues 
once stood behind the high altar, bits of carving in the stone capitals of 
pilasters, and traces of a delicate greenish blue frescoing. In the center 
of the dome-shaped ceiling of the sacristy is a curious head of Indian 
workmanship. Four bells hang on the northeast corner of the present 
church. 

In the first church are the graves of Father Vicente Oliva and some of 
the Forster family ; and the open grave whence the remains of Padre 
Vicente Fuster were removed. 

The roofs are of tiles, and their red, over the cream color of the old 
walls and against the blue sky, makes a series of exquisite pictures, 
especially when seen through one of the arches, with the red brick 



112 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

showing through the plaster of the pillars. No photograph can do 
justice to this scene. Its color and its atmosphere are to it what perfume 
is to a flower — its very soul. 

We watch misguided persons sitting about and perpetrating horrors in 
red and nightmares in green under the name of water-colors, and lament 
that the mission should be thus caricatured. Would that one of our 
great artists would come and do justice to the most picturesque ruins in 
the United States ! 

Everywhere are indications of the labor of the savage, who seldom 
has an idea of symmetry. The rooms are not perfect parallelograms ; 
pillars are irregular ; and the span of the arches is not always the same. 

In the vestry of the church now used for service are some interesting 
relics. There is a wheel with bells fastened to its rim and turned by a 
crank. This has been used in the service, at the Elevation of the Host, 
since the founding of the mission. A very old silver dish, whose curves 
are enough to turn a curio-hunter a bright emerald green, contains 



^^■^^^^^^^^ta 




|p?_ 


- ■■■■ ' *l 
-mm 


ipllf 


^s^q^ 


L_ 






i 



Herve Friend, Eng. GENERAL VIEW OF THE MISSION Photo, by Maude. 

something shaped much like a pestle, but with holes in the larger end, 
for sprinkling holy water. There are a curious old chest of drawers, a 
hair trunk, and some fine old vestments. A short time ago the twenty- 
two carat gold pedestal and crown belonging to the statuette of the 
Virgin were stolen. 

This mission used to have barrels of gold and silver service, but it has 
disappeared — some of it was taken back to the College of San Fernando, 
and after the secularization some of the administrators melted it or took 
it away to be used in their families. 

In a sort of cupboard in one of the rooms are some excellent wooden 
statuettes of saints, of Indian workmanship. The draperies are well 
rendered, the faces good, and the glass eyes gaze through and beyond 
you in a way which suggests unchanging sainthood, no matter to what 
indignities they may be subjected. 

In another closet is a board studded with handle-like irons ; and, when 
you twist it rapidly from side to side, it makes a tremendous noise. Then 
there is a three-cornered box, studded with similar irons, and in this a 



THE MISSION SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO. 



"3 



loose stone was rattled — the whole noise being something appalling and 
indescribable. Both these contrivances were used in the Good Friday 
processions.* 

In the old bapistry is a fine stone font with a curious division, which 
separates the basin for holy water from the place over which the child's 
head was held during the sprinkling. The cover is of Spanish cedar, 
handsomely carved by some long-dead Indian. 

In the first church is a worm-eaten old confessional, full of secrets. 
The stately Bishop's chair, in which the first Bishop of California was 
consecrated, is at the house of Judge Egan, a stone's throw away. 

Over the rooms now used by the priest are some of modem construc- 
tion. To reach them you must climb from his Reverence's sitting room 
up an incredibly steep stair-case, with impossibly short steps, which 

"To simulate, in the service called " las tinieblas," the clanking of chains in PurKatory. — Ed. 




CORRIDORS ON THE PATIO. 



[14 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 



slant in so that you shall not fall. You are rewarded by finding in one 
the remains of what was once the finest library in the State. The books 
are in odd leather and sheepskin bindings, and of all conceivable shapes. 
Some of them have a portly dignity quite beyond that of our common 
books of the present day. The quaintest is a little, much-thumbed daily 
prayerservice, printed in red and black. It is thicker than long or wide, 
and once had metal clasps. 

There is not an English book in the collection, and nothing printed 
so late as the Nineteenth century. Most of them are in Latin or Spanish, 
many in manuscript written with a quill. The first page of the record 
of marriages is written and signed by Junipero Serra, the saint and 
pioneer of California. 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



Photo, by Bertrand. 



Within the last ten years many of the arches have fallen ; and within 
twenty-five the buildings have been barbarously treated. There is 
scarcely a trace left of the 'dobe wall which once enclosed the eighty 
acres of orchard, vineyards and gardens. 

Belonging to the mission were once aqueducts, reservoirs, cisterns and 
zanjas, of brick, stone and cement. In the village are still many 
covered masonry aqueducts. Across neighboring ravines were extensive 
flumes, supported on brick piers, in a style now unused ; but they have 
been ruthlessly used as quarries, and scarcely a vestige of them remains. 

Near where a trail once used by the padres comes from the hills into 
the valley is a sycamore, which must have been old when San Juan was 
founded. At noon the shade measures a hundred and fifty feet. 

Near Capistrano is a clump of trees under which the celebrated bandit, 



A BALLADE OF CALIFORNIA. "5 

Flores (who, with his men, plundered and terrorized the pueblo for 
days), ambushed and killed the Sheriff of Los Angeles county and all 
but one of his posse. The last arms of the Californians were hidden in 
the mission of Capistrano and captured by Fremont. 

We wander back through the quaint little village, with everywhere 
its adobe ruins, and revel in the calm content of the placid inhabitants. 
They sit in bright-colored clothes under the brush roofs of their piazzas, 
and obligingly make water-color pictures of themselves. 

In the rush of our century Capistrano stands calm and still. Kind 
Nature goes on draping the sad old ruins of the mission with bewildering 
lines and colors — or does she wave, in each tiny grass and flower on the 
crumbling walls, a flag of triumph over those who invaded her unbroken 
privacy ? 

Ulendale, Cal. 

A Ballade of California. 

BY EDWARD W. BARNARD. 

Cythera desolated overseas 

Lies, all her storied charms afar dispread 
On torrid winds and reeking in the lees 

Of Neptune's salt sea-wine. Her lovers dead 

'Tombed in the jagged reef, their vows unsaid 

For everness of eons. There is moan 

In ev'ry surge that tumbles o'er her throne 
Once set on hills that bathed in airs divine. 

But better things than she e'er shewed are shown 
On this thrice happy strand of song and shine. 

The golden fruit of the Hesperides 

From reach of mortal ken is faded, fled : 
The blossoms that made drunken Hybla's bees 

With surfeit sweet of sweets, long since are shed. 

Arcadian wines and ways are soured or sped ; 

But here are groves of gold bound in a zone 

Of bloom as honey-sweet as Hybla's own ! 
The deep delights of Cypris' kingdoms nine 

Are Sodom-apples by the pleasures known 
On this thrice happy strand of song and shine. 

My strong, young mariner, ship an ye please 

To unsunned, blustrous bays where sails are shred ; 

Or summer, if ye list, in Arctic dise, 

Or draw equator wards the journey's thread. 
When grog is plenty and the mate's abed 
No shrieking gales ye mind from east'ard blown. 
But strength will fail, and hours grow lorn and lone. 

Then, make the last port on this shore of mine',! 

Here's Youth's Renaissance — care forever flown, 

On this thrice happy strand of song and shine. 



ii6 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Prince, leave the Orient's ashes and atone 

For misspent years. The East is haughty grown ! 

We lack her tumult, tinsel, manners fine ; 
But Beauty speaks from peak, from tree, from stone, 

On this thrice happy strand of song and shine. 

Fall River, Mass. 



^' 



A Cheerful Soul. 

BY T. S. VAN DYKE. 

•HE large hare of California, or "Jack-rabbit," is the embodiment 
of happiness and contentment. Adversity seems to develop 
rather than repress his love of life. No one who has not seen 
him run his morning race with the sunlight as it streams blazing over 
the desert, skimming miles of the fiery plain like a bird, all alone, too, 
and for the mere fun of running ; no one who has not seen him spend 
the day beneath an artemisia whose sickly shade but intensifies the heat, 
and come forth smiling at evening to run the sun a race to bed, can 
appreciate his happy nature. How he lives for years (as in the desert) 
where there is no green feed for miles, never touching water even with 
plenty of it at hand, running leagues every day at full speed in a fiery 
furnace with but five per cent, of moisture in the air; how he keeps the 
water in his blood without evaporating it through his lungs even if his 
skin were waterproof; and how, during years of this kind of life, he 
keeps cheerful and fat on ground that even the lizard has to vacate, are 
problems I leave to others. That he should be content on this side of 
the mountains, is not remarkable. 

Plant an alfalfa field near by and he soon gets lazy. Prosperity over- 
comes him and he falls an easy prey to dogs that he could laugh at when 
he raced the plains. But when in good running order the hare can lead 
the best hounds the merriest chase of any animal that lives. When 
grey tints creep over the wild oats that have so long robed the rolling 
hills in a carpet of gold, and the goldenrod reverses these colors in the 
meadow, before the winter rains have so softened the ground that it is 
unsafe for fast or rough riding, a dash after the hare on a good horse and 
behind good dogs is one of the most charming of outings. 

The horse enjoys the sport as well as the dogs do; and tries his best to 
outrun the procession. The ground flies beneath you, the surrounding 
mountains swim in a haze, the whole amphitheater seems to turn around 
while you are standing still. Vainly the hare twists and sends the dogs 
spinning ahead in confusion, while he scuds away on his new tack with- 
out the loss of an instant, so far as you can see. All ordinary dogs fall 
out of the race. Even the wiry and swift coyote, though he loves hare 
more than anything else, rarely if ever feels hungry enough for a stern 
chase. But if the greyhounds are good and the brush not too near, the 
hare's doubling only postpones his end, however untiring his foot, or 
frequent his twists. Vainly he lays his ears flatter upon his neck and 
lets out another link of his reserve speed. Before he has made many 




L. A. Eng. Co. 

turns he is caught — perhaps in mid air — and dogs and hare go rolling 
over in a heap together. 

And yet there is more satisfaction in seeing the smooth scamp shake 
another reef out of his sail as he nears some haven of cover and vanish 
in it, just as you think he has made his last tack. 

For the rifle the hare makes the finest of all running targets. He 
seems fully aware of it, and gives you all the sport there is in it. Now 
he makes a sudden burst of speed just as you think you have held far 
enough ahead of him, and the dry earth flies just behind his flickering 
tail. He has been running so swift and so low that you have figured 
only on his forward motion. He seems aware of it; and as the next 
shot flies from your repeater he skips high in air and goes gaily on, with 
the dust flying beneath. Then as you again hold far ahead of the line 
of brown, now vanishing more swiftly than ever, it executes as fancy 
a twist as you ever saw before the hounds, and a puff" of dust flies from 
one side of it. Before the empty shell has reached the top of the arch 
in which it leaps whizzing above your head with your haste to reload, 
you are alone with the reflection that you shot "mighty close, anyhow ! " 



It is Good to be Alive. 

BY CHARLOTTE PBRKINS STETSON. 

It is good to be alive when the trees shine green 
And the steep red hills stand up against the sky ; 
Big sky, blue sky, with flying clouds between — 
It is good to be alive and see the clouds drive by. 

It is good to be alive when the strong winds blow, 
The strong sweet winds blowing straight off" the sea, 
Great sea, green sea, with swinging ebb and flow — 
It is good to be alive and see the waves roll free. 



yTHE Mother Mountains. 



»y CHAS. F. LUMMIS 




HERE is wonderful significance in the name Sierra Madre ; a 
poetry which the self-satisfied race would be none the worse 
for capacity to feel ; an aptness upon which science at a 
latter century's end cannot improve. It means more than 
the shaping of an infinite brood of foothills ; more than a 
synonym for "the tallest range." It is not Mother of 
Mountains, but Mother Mountains; whose offspring is — 
Southern California. 

Into the mysteries along whose rim we crawl, the child- 
heart sees often deeper than do the brains of maturity. So it 
is, perhaps, nothing strange that a simple people of the childhood of the 
race, feeling dimly but truly toward wisdom yet to dawn, "put names" 
beyond which the author of Cosmos could not have gone. 

For in all lands and in all times the mountains have been the mothers. 
Upreared from the driveling chaos that was without form and void, 
redeemed from the curse of barrenness that lay upon all the flat-breasted 
earth in the Beginning, they grew up to be mates of the sea. To him 
they have borne all that is. Every landscape that man looks or has ever 
looked upon was begotten of the ocean vapors upon the mellowing 
peaks. Every grain of sand of those that make the globe was conceived 
in that womb of rock and brought forth in piecemeal labors. Every 
tree and grass-blade, every throb of animate life, traces descent to the 
mountains at last. They are the geographic Eve. 

There is no longer the stature of their youth, nor its fire. They are 
bent with ages, wrinkled and gray with infinite motherhood ; but in 
their heart is still the life of the world. Still the sea reaches up to them 
by sun and winds, still they quicken with his vapors to bear the germs 
of earth-life ; still they suckle the thirsty land, and cover its rock-bones 
with plumpness from their own emaciation. 

So the Sierra Madre has been the geologic mother of Southern Cali- 
fornia. There can be no erosion on a dead level ; and without erosion 
there never would have been soil. It is the Mother Range whose up- 




Collier, En(t. Phot«. l>y A. W. de la Cipiir Ciirrol 

' MT. WHITNEY. THE HIGHEST PEAK IN THE UNITED STATES. 



120 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 





L. A. Eng. Co. 



GETTING INTO THE FOOTHILLS. 



Plidto. bv Fletcher. 



rising caught the clouds and frosts which else would have passed by ; that 
armed water with the alternate weapons of gravity and cold (the only 
agents by which it could ever conquer rock on an earth-building scale); 
that has given of her ripening granites to be carried down to fill this 
once vast lap of primary rock with soil, upon which an Eden blooms 
today. And it is still going on. Every day by infinitesimals the 
maternal transfer of tissues proceeds. The peaks grow gaunter, the 
valleys wax fat. Beyond them the Pacific, ever changing but never 
changed, unaged by the ages, mumbles lazily to the shore or blinks 
approvingly to that patient, wrinkled, snow-crowned face up yonder — 
what is left of the stark young range he took to wife when Time was 
new. 

There are many higher mountain chains, and many of more promising 
exterior ; yet world-wide travelers who peer inside this vast brown 
barrier between God's country and the desert are invariably charmed. 
The Sierra Madre has a character of its own. It is unlike any other 
range easily accessible to civilized man ; and by its setting is peerless. 
Helen Hunt Jackson, before she had seen California, wrote of Cheyenne 
mountain, Colorado, as "the only mountain in the world without a 
base; " but here are some hundreds of miles of peaks far higher than 
Cheyenne and fully as abrupt from the plain. The greatest of American 
mountaineers, John Muir, calls them "more rigidly inaccessible, in the 
ordinary meaning of the word, than any other range I ever attempted 
to penetrate." Mr. Muir's notions of penetrating, however, are special- 
istic. The hunter will think with him ; but the fisherman, camper or 
general mountain " outer" will hardly think of the thing at all. The 
angles of the range are all astoundingly swift. The peaks of the entire 
Southwest are almost invariably abrupt ; but another great chain of 
mountains of anything like such precipitousness is not in all North Amer- 
ica. Indeed, there is only one comparison in the whole New World — 



THE MOTHER MOUNTAINS. 



131 



the giant Cordillera of Peru and upper Chile. That far exceeds the 
Sierra Madre in length and altitude, and is about as sheer ; but lacks 
the unique beauties of the Southern California cordillera. 

There is, probably, no other place on the globe where so much geo- 
graphy is crowded into so few miles. The 22,000-foot peaks of Peru rise 
above a country of the tropics ; but, though nearer the equator, Peru is 
less fertile than Southern California, and has no spot where the tourist 
may rise in two hours from palm and banana to the snow-bred conifers 
— nor could, even if there were air-line railroads. Probably Popocate- 
petl — highest peak north of Panamd — is nearest rival ; but it does not 
matcli the graphic contrasts of California. 




FALLS IN RUBIO GLEN. 



122 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

To look up from the aisles of an orchard heavy with orange-blossoms 
and golden with fruit to snowpeaks whose summits are not ten miles 
away in an air-line is an experience not to be had outside of the New 
Garden of Eden ; and is a hint of the surprises in store for the traveler. 
There is no other place known of man where half an hour's ride will 
carry one from Florida to Maine, as it will at one point of the Mother 
Mountains — and would at all points if each peak had its mountain rail- 
road. I believe there is no other spot where the dweller in a city of 
80,000 can leave a home among bananas and oranges and within 25 miles 
find the northern trout, deer, bear, bighorn, and other game ; or ride 
from his door on electric cars to the heart of a wilderness of great peaks, 
gashed with vast cations. 

Ivos Angeles is less than 500 feet above the sea — and no Southern Cal- 
ifornia town of any size is 1500 feet. The Sierra Madre, not a dozen miles 





Herve Friend, Eng. 



MT. SAN ANTONIO, FROM THE HOGBACK. 



away as the crow flies, has an average altitude higher than any moun- 
tain in the Bast, and peaks towering twice as tall. Their snows endure 
far into the summer, on the northern slope, and sometimes on the south- 
ern — the magnificent reservoir which gives to drink to all this thirsty 
land. The streams are invariably small but surpassingly beautiful — 
signed "perfect" with heaven's own autograph of trout. There are 
dizzy caiions, exquisite waterfalls, ferny dells, great forests of giant pines 
and firs, hidden caiiadas shady with enormous sycamores — and on the 
last peaks the bald domes of colossal granite. You will hardly clamber 
to these beauties up the face of the wall, precipitous and chaparro- 
matted ; but at every few miles Nature's self has opened the door for you 
by some half-hidden cleft. There you shall find that what looked from 
outside a simple brown wall of 6000 to 11,000 feet high, upheaved in a 
single ridge, is in fact a very wilderness of peaks, where you might 



THE MOTHER MOUNTAINS. 



123 




. Eii)i Co. Phot. 1. by Miss Ehse Cleimnons. 
A HIGHLAND TROUT- BROOK. 



wander for years and still not ferret out 
the last canon nor make conquest of the 
ultimate summit. When you consider 
that the White Mountains — which, 
though only toys in comparison with 
grown-up mountains, are still among 
the most attractive of spots — could be 
pitched over the Sierra Madre, any- 
where, and forever lost, their wild heads 
not even peeping over the "hog-backs," 
their biggest trees looking like saplings 
among their new neighbors, their no- 
blest gorges unidentified among a thou- 
sand as wild and deep ; and that ten 
White Mountain ranges strung end to 
to end would make but a small part of 
the Sierra Madre, superficially, and in 
height and savagery would still less 
match it — why, then you may come at 
some notion of the mountaineering 
pleasures that are practically at the door of all Southern California. 

Peaks loftier than Mont Cenis or the Simplon, peaks twice as tall as 
Mt. Washington, here look down not on the timorous valleys of Switzer- 
land nor the winter-slaved intervales of New Hampshire, but upon a land 
of eternal summer, whose semi-tropic fruits and flowers climb to their 
very feet. Here the palm and the chirimoya wave ; yonder five miles 
the same stream which irrigates them swarms with the trout of Maine. 
Here is the perennial humming-bird ; and ten miles up there the haunt 
of the glacial cimarron. In the same half day you may pluck roses from 
a bush that has clambered to your ridgepole in three years, and the alpine 
vegetation of Labrador. In " winter" you can snowball at 9 a. m., and 
at 1 1 be bathing in a summer sea. It makes a radical difference whether 
geography be stretched out flat or stood up on end ; and that is why you 
can here travel several thousand miles north in the course of two or 

three hours. 

Another curious fact is that 
every town in Southern Califor- 
nia — an area, you remember, 
larger than New Hampshire, 
X'ermont, Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut, and Rhode Island, 
with an extra Massachusetts 
iid two more Rhode Islands 
h r o w n in for luck — is 
handier" to such mountains 
than Concord is to the White 
range or Boston to the Berk- 

Photo. by B. C llmii.iiii. ,. ,.,, _, 

AMONG THE PINES. shire hills. That is to say, 




'^- 



Collier, Ei 



M 






THE PAMPAS INDUSTRY. "5 

New England might have an equal chance for mountain outings if a 
procession of double-decked Mt. Washingtons stretched from Bangor to 
Philadelphia, with spurs abutting upon Montpelier, Concord, Boston, 
Holyoke, Providence, Hartford and Albany. 

This vast huddle of granite giants is worthy to be better known than 
it is. Whether you take it in little or in large ; whether you dip into 
one or many of the " raging Sespe " or the noble recesses from Antelope 
Valley, or the handier caiions within easy reach from Los Angeles — 
Millard's Caiion, Arroyo Seco, Rubio Canon, Eaton Canon, San Gabriel 
Caiion, San Antonio Canon — or Mt. Lowe, Wilson's Peak, "Old 
Baldy," Mt. San Bernardino, Mt. San Jacinto, or any other of the host 
of peaks and gorges, it repays you as few mountain regions do. You 
can hardly find a valid excuse for ignoring it ; since no other great 
mountain range in the world can be explored so cheaply, so handily, 
with so many "modern conveniences." Nature — who knows, quite as 
well as the philosophers, that mountains have as much to say in the 
development of human character as in the modeling of continents — has 
seen to it that here no thing shall be lacking that can aid her experi- 
ment in the evolution of a new race. 

The highest peaks in California are bunched at the southern end of 
the Sierra Nevada, culminating in Mt. Whitney (nearly 15,000 feet) the 
loftiest mountain in the United States. In the Sierra Madre itself the 
tallest peaks are Mt. San Bernardino (see page 88, July number) 11,800 
feet; Mt. San Jacinto and Mt. San Antonio. 



The Pampas Industry. 

BY CLARA SPALDING BROWN. 

'MONG the many characteristic industries of Southern California 
is the unique one of cultivating for decorative purposes the 
beautiful, feathery fronds known as pampas grass. It is not 
many years since specimens of this ornamental grass sold in Eastern 
cities for one dollar each. They were placed in vases on parlor mantels, 
or adorned a corner with their crossed stems tied with ribbon, attracting 
wondering admiration wherever they were seen. 

Southern California is the only part of the United States where the 
Gynerium argenteum, as it is known in botanies, is grown for sale. The 
extent of the industry may be realized from the fact that about 2,000,000 
plumes are now harvested in this se<5lion each year, which are marketed 
in Europe, as well as in the Eastern States. 

Pampas grass originally came from South America, the seed being first 
cultivated in England in 1843. Plants were brought to this country in 
1848, and for years thereafter were used in Eastern lawns during the 
summer, and kept in cellars while there was danger from frost, no partic- 
ular attention being paid to the plumes. In 1872 Mr. Joseph Sexton, of 
Santa Barbara, planted pampas seed and started a new industry on the 
Pacific Coast. He soon discovered that if the plumes were cut from the 
plant before they had burst entirely from the sheaths which cover them, 



"6 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

exposure to the sun would cause them to become fluffy. Samples 
treated in this way were sent to Peter Henderson, New York, and or- 
ders for more were at once received from that eminent florist. Mr. 
Sexton now has 5,000 hills of the grass, which yield about 250,000 plumes 
a year, and several other persons in Santa Barbara county are largely 
engaged in the business. 

Los Angeles county produces about half the pampas crop of Southern 
California. The pioneer of this county in the industry is Mr. J. M. Stew- 
art, of this city. His plantation was very profitable, but is now a thickly 
settled part of the city, having been divided into residence lots at the 
time of the '* boom." 

Mr. W. C. Holman, of Downey, has been growing pampas grass on a 
large scale for more than ten years, and is perfe<5lly satisfied with the 
results. Mrs. Harriet W. R. Strong, of Whittier, planted this graceful 
grass between her young walnut trees six years ago, and has marketed 
300,000 plumes in one year, employing a harvesting force of over sixty 
hands. 

There are male and female plants, but, as the plumes of the male are 
not ornamental, only the roots of the best female plants are used for 
propagation. They are divided, one hill making six good plants, and 
are set 10x16 feet apart in soil which has been plowed deep and culti- 
vated. Each hill will produce a few small plumes the first year, and 
from 75 to 150 plumes the second and third years. The plants some- 
times grow twenty feet tall and measure sixteen feet across. After the 
fifth year the old ones are cut or burned down. In valleys no irrigation 
is required ; on high ground the plants are watered once a month during 
the summer. Early in September the sharp-edged grass is trimmed, 
and the plumes are cut as soon as their tips emerge from the coverings. 
The sheaths are then pulled oflf by hand ; usually women do this work, 
skillful hands earning $1.50 a day. Boys lay the plumes in an open, 
sunny spot upon the ground, and gather them in after they have dried 
sufl&ciently. This takes two or three days in some localities, while in 
others, where there is no fog or dampness, one day suflBces. Next, they 
are packed away in a curing-house for a few weeks, then arranged in 
three grades for shipment. The first grade plumes are three feet long, 
or more. If they are to go by express, they are packed in bales of 2000 
plumes, covered with burlap. Boxes holding about 3000 plumes are used 
for freight. Prices have ranged from $200 a thousand in the beginning 
of the industry down to $30 in times of poor sale. At present the plumes 
bring from $40 to $60 a thousand. 

Their availability for decoration has not been fully realized until quite 
recently. Mrs. Strong did much to show the public the possibilities of 
pampas when she created her beautiful palace in the California building 
at the World's Fair. She utilized the grass for the outer covering of the 
walls, for friezes, dados, fringes, tapestry hangings, rugs, and many ar- 
tistic designs, within. Wanamaker's great store in Philadelphia has 
been strikingly adorned with plumes furnished by Mrs. Strong. Through 
her efforts the pampas, or Columbian plume, as she termed it, became 



A PIONEER OF '31. 



127 




C<rflier, En«. DRYING PAMPAS PLUMES. 

known as a national emblem. During the last Presidential campaign, 
both Republicans and Democrats throughout the country carried in their 
conventions and ratification processions devices invented of pampas by 
this energetic lady. A year or two ago it was the fashion in England to 
use pampas plumes to simulate the coat-of-arms of Prince Albert. Half 
a million of them were sent from California for this purpose. 

They are very eflfeclive on such occasions as weddings, balls, and en- 
tertainments public or private. They may be dyed any color and used, 
as flowers are, to give each room distinctive features. In their natural 
color of rich, creamy white, light as a pufif and graceful beyond descrip- 
tion, they are always admirable. A pleasanter occupation could scarcely 
be found than the cultivation of pampas grass. 



Lm Ansele*, Cml. 



A Pioneer of '31. 



BY H. D. BARROWS. 



Y the death recently of Jonathan J. Warner, there disappeared 
the last but one of that notable band of American pioneers who 
settled on this far-distant and almost unknown shore of the 
South Seas some sixty-odd years ago. The men who could in those days 
traverse a continent and face all the hardships and dangers incident to 
such a journey, the greater portion of which was through a hostile 
Indian country ; or who could travel 15,000 or 20,000 miles by water 
around the great antarctic capes, that they might find a new and better 
land where they could establish for themselves homes, must have pos- 
sessed unusual force of character. Effeminate men did not then, nor do 
they in any age, undertake such journeys. 

It was the good fortune of the writer of these lines to know personally 
nearly all of that early group of Argonauts, who were bom mosUy 
about the beginning of this century, and who arrived in California a 
little before or a little after 1830 ; and he can truly say that their portraits 



^. 



^1* 



[28 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



as they hang in the chambers of his memory, have such a clear-cut and 
characteristic individuality that, by some subtle alchemy of the 
imagination, they seem to become more picturesque and interesting as 
they recede further and further into the dim past. 

I believe Alfred Robinson, who came in 1829, is still living in San 
Francisco ; all the rest have set out — some of them a generation ago — on 
that longer journey to a farther and fairer land. 

Col. Warner was born in Lyme, Conn,, November 20, 1807. He was 
named Jonathan after several of his ancestors, and Jonathan Trumbull 
after Governor Jonathan Trumbull of Connecticut ; but when, in after 
years, he was rechristened in Catholic California (then a province of 
Mexico), inasmuch as Trumbull had no equivalent in Spanish, and was 
not easily pronounced by Spanish- speaking people, he was named Juan 
Jose ; and he has ever been known since as John J., or J. J. Warner. 

He went west to St. Louis, an invalid, in 1830, in search of a milder 
climate than that of his native State. There he joined a trading party 
bound for Santa Fe. From that point he set out with ten other men for 
California, in September, 1831. The object of the expedition was to buy 
mules and horses for the Louisiana market, and they took along with 
them five pack animals laden with Mexican silver dollars. The party 
traveled by way of Albuquerque, San Xavier de Tubac and Tucson, 
reaching Los Angeles December 5, 1831. In 1837 Col. Warner was 
married to Anita Gale at San Luis Rey. Miss Gale had been brought 
up in the family of Don Pio Pico's mother, and Don Pio stood as sponsor 
at Mr. Warner's marriage, thereby becoming, according to the beautiful 
custom of all Spanish countries, the padrino or god- father of the married 
couple. Both of them thereafter, to the end of their lives, without 
exception, addressed Don Pio by the endearing title of ''padrino ;^^ 

and he as uniformly addressed them 
as " ahijados,'' or god-children. 

In 1840-41, Col. Warner visited the 
Atlantic States, going and returning 
by way of Mexico. While on this 
visit he delivered a public address in 
Rochester, N. Y., in which he urged 
the building of a Pacific railroad. 
Afterwards Stephen Whitney achieved 
a national reputation by taking up and 
elaborating Col. Warner's suggestion. 
Thirty or forty years later Col. War- 
ner's dream was realized, and he had 
the pleasure of riding across the con- 
tinent over such a road, as a guest of 
its builders. In 1844, having been 
naturalized as a citizen of Mexico, he 
received a grant of the rancho Agua 
Caliente, since widely known as " War- 
Uni«nEug.co. ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^_ ^g^'s ranch," where many a foot-sore 




A PIONEER OF '31. 



129 



traveler emerging from the great Colorado desert 
has found a hospitable haven of rest. In 1857; 
having been compelled by hostile Indians 
to abandon with his family his ranch, 
he moved to Los Angeles. The 
following year he commenced the 
publication of the Southern Vineyard 
newspaper, first as a weekly, and 
afterward as a semi-weekly. While 
a resident of San Diego county, 
and after the admission of Califor- 
nia into the Union, he represented 
that county in the State Senate ; 
and in i860 was elected to the 
Assembly from Los Angeles 
county. 

Col. Warner was a clear thinker 
and a man of much intellectual 
ability. He has long been recog- 
nized as an authority in matters 
relating to early California (Ameri- 
can) history. He came of good stock, 
of English extraction. His father, Selden 
Warner, was a graduate of Yale college 
in 1782 ; his eldest brother was the father of 
Mrs. Waite, widow of Chief Justice Morrison 
R. Waite of the U. S. Supreme Court ; his 
maternal grandfather, Samuel Selden, was 
a colonel in the revolutionary army, and was the great-grandfather of 
Chief Justice Waite. 

He always [took an interest in the political, social and indus- 
trial life of our country ; and watched somewhat closely the trend 
of the world's thought. He was an omnivorous reader. When Mrs. 
Helen Hunt Jackson was here studying the Mission Indian question, 
she gained much valuable information concerning them and their ways 
from Col. Warner. She also obtained from him historical and other data 
relating to the pastoral life of the Californians, both before and after the 
close of the Mission era, which she with consummate art wove into the 
story of Ramona. 

Col. Warner was one of the founders and was the first^president of 
the Historical Society of Southern California. He left an unfinished 
manuscript of reminiscences of early California, which also includes a 
somewhat detailed account of the various trading and trapping expedi- 
tions which reached California in the early decades of this century. His 
intimate acquaintance with the personnel of those adventurous com- 
panies who "blazed the way" for the march of American civilization 
across the continent, makes these reminiscences very valuable. 

He was joint author with Judge Benjamin Hayes and Dr. J. 




L. A. Eng. Co. Photo, by Schumacher. 

COL. WARNER JUST BEFORE HIS DEATH. 



I30 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

P. Widney of the (1876) Centennial Historical Sketch of Los Angeles 
County, a valuable publication, now out of print. His contribution 
covered the period from 1776 to 1847. 

During the latter years of his life, as he neared the age of eighty, his 
eyesight failed him, and he finally became totally blind ; but his intel- 
lectual faculties remained clear to the last. He died April 11, 1895, in 
his eighty-eighth year, at his home just southwest of this city. He left 
three living children and several grandchildren. And so passed away 
one of the notable American founders of this commonwealth. 

Los Angeles. 

Some Lemons. 

BY M. Y BEACH. 



^' 



•HE largest lemon ranch in this country, if not in the world, is at 
Chula Vista, a suburb of San Diego ; its present 1,000 acres soon 
to be increased by 500 acres of young trees. This large lemon 
grove is all in one patch, level as a bam floor ; one side bounded by San 
Diego bay. When it comes into full bearing it will yield 1,200,000 to 
2,000,000 boxes of marketable lemons every year. The present Eastern 
price of cured lemons is $3. 50 to $4.50 per box. If these prices are 
maintained, the lemon industry will be of much importance to California. 
San Diego county excels as a lemon district. Proximity to the coast 
seems necessary for growing the best lemons. There are hundreds of 
thousands of acres of mesa land adjacent to San Diego on which lemons 
can be grown. North of the city boundary the Linda Vista district of 
43,000 acres of rolling mesa is about to be put under irrigation . Lemon 
ranches now established there yield abundant crops. All around San 
Diego bay lemon ranches have been started during the last three years, 
the combined product of which may soon exclude foreign lemons from 
the home market. In fact San Diego county might supply the markets 
of the world with lemons, so favorable are the climatic and soil con- 
ditions. 

Lemon growing requires care and skill. It was not until recently that 
Californians followed the best methods for securing the largest results 
from their orchards. Experience proves that Lisbon, Sicily and Eureka 
lemons are the varieties for cultivation in this district. The trees are 
planted eighty to the acre. Each acre needs one foot of water annually, 
or from 350,000 to 400,000 gallons, costing about $35 per acre annually. 
A tree is strictly in full bearing when eight to ten years old. As yet, 
there are not many full-bearing trees in this county. In 1893 there 
were 8,000 ; there are nearly 16,000 this year. There were 162,000 non- 
bearing trees in 1893 ; the number this year is 283,000. 

Immunity from frost gives San Diego an advantage over other lemon- 
growing sections. The temperature, while never too low, is sufficiently 
cool to prevent too much sugar forming in the fruit. Consequently the 
acid test of the lemons is about 92 per cent. The acid test of lemons 
grown elsewhere is about 85 per cent., according to published reports. 



THE COMING OF THE FATHER. 131 

The principal harvesting time is from November to February. Lemons 
are picked by hand, placed in trays in the curing house and allowed to 
cure for about two months, in a temperature as nearly 60 degrees as 
possible. Packers sort them, wrap in tissue papers and box for ship- 
ment. The most desirable lemons measure 2% to 2% inches in diameter, 
are thin-skinned and full of acid. When properly cared for, California 
lemons keep perfectly for six to eight months. In keeping qualities 
they excel any other lemons in the world, and have thus far won all 
honors in competition with lemons from other districts. 

A properly cared-for ranch should be cultivated semi-monthly. Once 
in several years the trees are enveloped in a canvas covering and 
thoroughly fumed with chemicals. A white and a black scale once 
injured the trees, but these pests are now fought successfully and inex- 
pensively. Ranchers who do not neglect their trees, have very little 
bother from scale. To keep trees healthy, fertilizer is used occasionally. 
This, with constant cultivation and judicious irrigation, is all that is 
needed. 

Profits from lemon culture vary (according to the skill of the rancher 
and his ability to market his fruit at the best paying moment) from $50 
to $250 per acre, average. A lemon tree should yield five boxes annually. 
Exceptional trees have yielded forty. It costs 75 cents a box to pick and 
pack the fruit. Some San Diego ranchers have actually shown net profit 
of one dollar per box, or $400 per acre. Good lemon lands (with water) 
set with three-year-old trees costs $250 to I500 an acre, though much 
higher prices have been recorded. 

San Diego, Cal. 



The Coming of the Father* 

"Within two miles of the house he struck off from the highway into 
a narrow path . . . overgrown with the wild mustard. 

"The wild mustard in Southern California is like that spoken of in 
the New Testament, in the branches of which the birds of the air may 
rest. Coming up so slender . . . that dozens can find starting-point in 
an inch, it darts up . . . five, ten, twenty feet . . . interlocking with 
all the other hundreds around it, till it is an inextricable network like 
lace. Then it bursts into yellow bloom still finer, more feathery and 
lace-like. . . . The cloud of blossom seems floating in the air. . . . With 
a clear blue sky behind it ... it looks like a golden snowstorm . . . 

"Father Salvierderra soon found himself in a veritable thicket of 
these delicate branches, high above his head, and so interlaced that he 
could make headway only by slowly and patiently disentangling them, 
as one would disentangle a skein of silk." 

And thus, coming through the mustard, he meets "Ramona." [See 
next page.] 

* Kanionu, by Helen Hunt Jackson : pp. 50, !>1. 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



Drawn by A. F. Harmer for California Fourth Reader. 
THE COMING OF FATHER SALV lERDERRA. 




The N. Y. Independent, one of the oldest and most powerful of the 
religious papers of the United States, in a very kind notice of the 
I^AND OF Sunshine (June 13) says : 

" The expert study of an interesting locality under all its aspects, with lavish illus- 
tration, will not be worthless to the historian ; and a maga/ine that does this cannot 
fail to interest the general reader as well. We cannot help regretting however that 
the editors have been so stirred up by Mr. EJugene Field's visit as to have saluted him 
with such a roaring all around the ring in their ' Irion's Den.' " 

Bless your heart, dear Independent, this comes of not getting enough 
into God's open to know the voice of the beasts. That was no roar — 
and you ought to be aware that none of the American felidae ever roar 
anyhow. We are no Hottentot lion, but the straight California article. 
That was merely the robust purr of the puma when he befalls predestined 
prey. If ever in your gunless walks abroad you shall experience a 
mountain lion emerging from the bush, rubbing his head against your 
leg and purring up to you with a reassuring smile of two-inch ivories — 
then you will understand all about it. 

But we appreciate the delicate compliment which lurks in these regrets. 
Though not expert in woodcraft, the Independent is high-minded and 
clear-minded. Another journal might leap before it looked — but not 
the Independent. It deemed regrets worth while for what it mistook for 
a "roar" on the Lion's part. But it wasted no sorrow on the prior and 
provocative vocalist from out a lion's skin. 

With a sworn circulation of 8,000 at one year old, the Land a congenial 

OF Sunshine has no cause to complain of the ingratitude of clientage. 

republics. That means, in this case, at least 50,000 readers — for, being 
a special magazine, and the only one of its class in existence, it has an 
attention per copy which no general periodical can expect. Conducted 
with self-respect ; earnest and untrammeled in its beliefs ; in its mechanics 
tolerably near perfection ; printed upon the same paper as Scribner's, 
and more lavishly illustrated in proportion to its pages than any other 
magazine in the United States — it believes itself safe in saying that its 
field is coming to be rather proud of it, just as the East is becoming 
interested. 

The Land of Sunshine on its side is too proud of Southern California 
to think the leavings of other people's waste-baskets "good enough for 
out here." If it did not believe its field to be the best in America, it 
would not be here itself, and certainly would not be holding up a finger 
for other people to come. It wants no other class here than the best ; 



134 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

and to that class is not ashamed to say : *' Yes, we would like such people 
as you to share God's country with us. There is room for people who 
wish to learn the real way to spell 1-i-f-e, people who think further back 
than the roof of their mouths, people whose heads are not merely 
vehicles for a nose to be led around by. But do not hurry about it, and 
do not take anyone's word. Look at everything else you can — the more 
the better. Then look at this. If you do not recognize it as superior, 
by all means do not stay. But if you do find it just a little ahead of 
anything you can discover elsewhere, and out of comparison with what 
you were born to — as we have found it — why, then we '11 be glad to have 
you help us work out the new problem of what Saxon energy shall do 
for the world and for itself where it does not lose half its steam in 
friction against the weather." 
WHAT And have you by now run down the last logical thought of 

'"'' ^"-^ what it all means — this every ten acres a family livelihood, 

this every twenty acres a family competence ? It is about as 
tall a problem as the Saxon mind ever gave itself to wrestle withal. 

The Lion, not having brains to burn, cannot pretend to overtake the 
whole herd of ideas in this field; but there are a few lagging thoughts 
upon which he feels competent to pounce. 

Southern California is not altogether farmed by farmers — even of the 
godfearing and intelligent class which once possessed New England. 
Where sky and soil are thus sympathetic — where the sheep's noses no 
longer go to the grindstone that they may nibble between the rocks, and 
the blunderbuss is not in vogue to persuade corn into a flinty earth, and 
there is no devouring agent to put up lightning-rods and jobs — here is 
an astonishing amount of cultivation of the soil by cultivated people. 
Professors, clergymen, lawyers, doctors, men of education, no matter 
what their previous condition of professional servitude, find here a 
peculiar charm in "gentleman farming" — or whatever else you may 
prefer to term it. No longer scared " off" the earth" by the mean 
tyrannies of agriculture as it stands in the East, they begin to realize 
what was meant by the myth of Antaeus — and to joy in doubling their 
strength, as he did, every time they touch Mother Earth. They find 
it not only the most independent but the most fascinating home-life in 
the world ; and every year more and more of them go back to this 
sanity of first principles. Doubly aware that "man made the town," 
they are glad to have discovered a spot where they shall not feel dis- 
respectful in believing that " God made the country." 

In theory, a man's own house is his castle, though civilization has 
removed the drawbridge and gates. Bnt in undiminished fulness a 
man's own plot of land in this country is his kingdom. Probably that 
is one of the charms of the thing — the fascination of living en Grand 
Seigneur, in an independence which hardly need care whether the rest 
of the world wags or no. Every man likes that ; every man would like 
to have it. It has something of kingship — and the most virulent repub- 
lican approves of a monarchy when he can be the monarch . It has also 
something of conquest and discovery. But it takes acres to frame either 



IN THE LION'S DEN. 135 

feeling. No one has quite enough imagination to feel lordly in a domain 
squeezed between the back porch and the sidewalk. Columbus himself 
could have discovered little more, in such space, than some new curst- 
ness of the plumber. But where there is room to plant and to harvest — 
there it is diflferent. 

No man can turn a dull hide to the thrill of playing the conjuror. To 
make something of nothing— who does not stir at that? Here he can. 
He sticks a row of switches into the ground, and almost "while you 
wait" — lo, they are fruited trees. He buys a thousand feet square of 
dust and squirrel-holes, and transforms it, in the twinkling of an 
almanac, into a combined garden and bank. He pays his little compli- 
ment of water and the plow ; and grateful earth answers with an emerald 
eloquence that fairly bewilders him. 

But this is another trail. What we are to bethink us now is not how 
and why these things delight here a class of people never before 
attracted to the soil, but what the condensed fertility of these lands 
means for the economics of the community. Not what it might possibly 
be imagined to be capable of causing ; but what it inevitably must cause, 
under every law of the laws by which we shape our life. 

That ten acres will support, and twenty acres slowly enrich, a family 
in Southern California, will have several sure results. 

In place of congested cities and abandoned farms (the logical con- 
dition where climate is a curse and farming a slavery) the tide here will 
set the other way, and population will be so balanced as never in any 
other English-speaking community of modern times. Cities will accrete 
— though never vast and feverish ones — but the wonder of the common- 
wealth will be outside them. They will be "just cities " — only prettier ; 
as a flower-garden is prettier than a stone-heap. But the ' * rural dis- 
tricts " will be and look unlike any other where man ever turned a 
furrow. Not lonely reaches of dreary fields, with here and far yonder a 
sad little farmhouse. Nay, the traveler by these roads will skirt con- 
tinuous hedges under arching trees ; with something like ten "farms " 
to the mile on either side ; with " farmhouses" as unlike the Eastern 
variety as is the typical one pictured on page 136 ; with homes that 
testify to culture and comfort ; with fields bearing unmistakable witness 
that they are never drowned out nor burned out nor frozen out. In a 
word, the country will be one long village, a little "spaced ;" with its 
schools, churches, libraries, stores repeated at every two or three miles ; 
and its length and breadth gridironed with electric roads. 

It will have a population ruddy with out-of-doors, with not one day in 
a lifetime behind shut windows ; ungnarled by desperate labor ; gener- 
ous because happy, genial because un worried, tolerant because unpro- 
vincial, intellectual because with means, leisure and incentive for culture. 
There will be no " Shanty -towns " and no "North Ends" — for a very 
simple reason. Barbed wire would not keep out undesirable classes, but 
the price of land will — $300 an acre is as tall a fence as is needed around 
any community. That the acre pays from 50% to 200% interest on that 
figure is an added attraction to provident people ; but it does not let in 




pp^. i n 




f I 





IN THE LION'S DEN. 137 

those who have never saved a cent. Such things have been heard of as 
rascals with money ; biit on the average any community feels safer in 
the hands of men who have something to show for the years they have 
been at work. This value of the acre means also the ultimate impossi- 
bility of great holdings — the curse of any country. 

Human nature is never to be perfect ; but unless history and science 
are alike a fool, such a community means a new race. It will be little 
burdened for prisons and asylums, and not at all for poorhouses. It will 
have no tenements, no slums — and sanitariums only for the newcomer. 
It will still be human. It will still be socially and meteorologically 
short of heaven. Rain will continue to be moist, and some minds to be 
dry. But by-and-large it will be a community whose units shall live 
easier, live better, live longer ; shall be more alive, and more glad to be 
alive, and more fit to be alive, than the units of any other population 
this side that 2x6 which is all of earth the Creator gave any man in fee 
simple. 

A special courtesy of the State Board of Education enables this a wise 

magazine to present in advance a photo-engraving of the departure, 

original drawing by Harmer which (smaller) will grace a page of the 
California Fourth Reader, soon to issue from the press. Not only is 
this fine illustration to an extract from Ramona eminently desirable as 
art, but still more as an earnest of the progressive and modern spirit 
which is stirring the educational systems of the State. It will not 
injure even a school-child to read home classics in place of the stereo- 
typed mediocrities which have long passed current as " good enough " 
for anything so unimportant as young minds. 

The Lion is glad to find himself mistaken in his one criticism a willing 

of the Argonaut. He cheerfully conceded that admirable convert. 

journal the brainiest literary weekly in the West, but had misgivings that 
it was " partisan and bigoted." He is pleased to learn that this is not 
so. The Argonaut says it is neither ; and the Argonaut ought to know. 
Furthermore, it says so in such cordial and unbigoted wise and with 
such generous compliments, that the Lion is almost persuaded that his 
ingrowing claw is directly chargeable to the Cleveland administration : 
and that there is only one church in the world that ever did toast heretics 
a delicate brown — or ever would if it had a chance. 

Ward-heeling in the Public Library was bad enough ; ward- turn them 

heeling in the schools is worse. It looks to be near time to 
keep boards of education out of the mouths of persons who would not 
know education from a porous plaster if you held the two under their 
nostrils, and who care less than they know. 

On page 109 for San Fernandez read Juan Fernandez, It escaped the 
proofreader till too late. 



OUT. 




THAT 

WHICH IS 

WRITTEN 



As THE evolutionist would have 
presumed, anglomania in New York 
seems to be passing the cutaneous stage. 
The attention of Brander Matthews, cleverest and 
most logical of our lion-twisters, is respectfully called 
to this question : " How many years of sartorial and literary imitation 
before the victim acquires so truly British a mind as to be impermeable 
to jokes? " 

Really, now, the San Francisco Lark should either suppress itself or 
provide a diagram and a trepanning outfit with each copy that goes to 
New York. The Critic is its latest victim. That amiable censor looks 
upon the Lark's "monthly, 5 cents a copy ; %\ a year" as "a curious 
mistake " — even while recording the fact that the Lark's first number 
was meant to be its last. And yet there are confidence-men who will 
waste their time in the West, while the walking is good between here 
and New York. 
'aunque se If the fine paper, lavish margins and first-class typography 

VISTE DE SEDA." which are coming to be expected of Wm. Doxey, the San 
Francisco bookman and publisher, could give a book its place in Cali- 
fornia literature, there would be no question about the rank of Roses 
and Thistles, a fat volume of verses by Rufus C. Hopkins. Its general 
"dress" compares handsomely with the best work of the big Eastern 
publishers. 

Mr. Hopkins is seen to be an aged gentleman of amiable instincts, 
thoughtful bent, some travel — and a totally deficient ear. Also some 
lack of humor. Two random verses almost anywhere may define the 
whole book. For instance (p. 310) : 

" Uncle Samuel was a farmer, sir ; 

A worthy man was he, 
And true and honest was he, too, 

As any man could be. 

" But bade them well to watch the farm 

And see the gates were shut. 
And that the neighbors' pigs did not 
Into the garden get." 
As Mr. Hopkins confesses to 70-odd years it would be hardly fair to 
judge his uncertain feet by prosodic laws ; nor to marvel at the soldier 
of Cortez who was exhibiting his sweetheart's photograph in 15 18 ; 
nor to ask that in Spanish dramas there be at least a drop of Spanish 
thought ; nor to object to pages peppered with didactic and irrespon- 
sible italics. Mr, Hopkins seems to have had his pleasure out of the 



THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN. I39 

book ; and so far as Mr. Doxey's part is concerned, nothing remains 
to ask. 631 Market street, San Francisco. $2. 

The New York Critic of June 15, in a two-column review, praise of 
praises Tales from the Foothills as we do not remember to have the praised. 

seen it praise any other Californian book of recent years. It is praise 
not only generous but enthusiastic ; and — what is much more to the 
point — just. A hint of its tone may be taken from this : 

" Literature does not consist so much in saying things as in not needing to say them, 
and for the most part the distinguishing feature of Mrs. Graham's art is that it is so 
much like life that it uses silence somewhat the way God does. Comparisons are in- 
vidious, of course, but inasmuch as the First Author has from the beginning left His 
best things unsaid, it is not a little strange that we have been so long in realizing the 
inspiration of inference. Mrs. Graham's reserve seems like the reserve of things them- 
selves. . . . Mrs. Graham's work is idealism realized." 

Santa Barbara at a Glance, by Frank Sands, is one of the most minor 

attractive brochures that has been sent out from California. notes. 

The half-tones are particularly fine, the information is well presented, 
and the only grief to the judicious is a Weggish propensity to "drop 
into poetry " of an irrigated sort. As to the mechanical beauty of the 
booklet it is enough to say that it is by the printers of the Land of 
Sunshine. Published for the author, Santa Barbara, 35 cents. 

The San Francisco News Letter fills its field peculiarly well and is 
now in its 50th volume. Spicy in local topics, it is not behind on 
broader questions. Few truer truths have been written of our mission- 
arying than are in its issue of June 29. Its remarks about "the black- 
smith's art" as exemplified by a mis-spelled and wild-grammared Los 
Angeles monthly are also eminently " pat." 

F. W. Hodge, one of the best equipped specialists of the Bureau of 
Ethnology, has put out a valuable pamphlet on The Early Navajo and 
Apache. He establishes several important deductions concerning these 
two chief tribes of the Southwest, though one might wish that he had 
made rather clearer the fact that the Apaches descend from the 
Navajos and the Navajos from the Pueblos ; and that he were not uncer- 
tain about Ts6-gihi, which is merely the well-known " Canon du 
Chelly." But these are minor omissions, and he has no sins of commis- 
sion. Apply to the author, Washington, D. C. 

Chips takes after the Chap Book — as is the fashion since that brilliant 
Chicago fortnightly set the pace. It is no trick to be small and archaic ; 
and many young men seem to fancy that is all they need attain to rival 
its success. Chips has its own gait to discover ; but meantime is worth 
while if only for its irreverent department "the Cynic." 407 Nassau 
Chambers, New York. 50 cents a year. 

Cosmos Mindeleff, Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, has republished 
his interesting paper. Cliff Ruins of the Canyon de Chelly, in pamphlet 
shape. He is a field student and an effective one ; and the result of his 
explorations is always of value. Apply to the author. 

The Outlook, N. Y., founded and still conducted by Lyman Abbott, is 
everywhere recognized as able and admirable. Its "Recreation Num- 
ber " (June 15) is probably the handsomest edition ever issued by a 
religious weekly. 



/ Santa Paula, 



BY MARY M. BOWMAN. 



©p' 



'HE Santa Clara valley of the South holds the thriving little town 
of Santa Paula on its heart, the central setting in its chain of 
possessions. Extending southwest from the San Fernando 
mountains to the sea, the valley is forty-five miles long and averages 
two to three miles wide, with a funnel-shaped flare at the end. On the 
north it is rimmed by a broken range of mountains and foothills, that 
hide in their depths smaller valleys and caiions, the paradise of the 
sportsman, and in beauty of scenery unsurpassed. The clear streams 
tumbling noisily down caiions, breaking into cascades over rocks, loiter- 
ing in still pools, rushing on through ferns and brakes and wooded hills, 
under branching sycamores and clean-limbed alders, lure the lover of 
trout fishing till the very abundance of the catch impels him to desist. 



k^ynLlflii. i "..; ■" 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



GENERAL VIEW OF SANTA PAULA. 



On the south, a lower spur of the Coast range stands sentinel until 
midway between the town and the ocean it ends abruptly at Punta de 
Ivoma. From here there is a wide, open stretch of country skirting the 
sea, to where the blue Conejos bound the horizon and Point Magu rears 
an impregnable bastion against the restless, dashing waves. 

There is no district in the county so remote that it has not a hand- 
some school-house of modern architecture and ample accommodations ; 
and the sponsors at christening displayed rare good taste in perpetuating 
the musical names of the country. 

Santa Paula is situated at the confluence of Santa Paula, or Mupu 
creek and the Santa Clara river. The town-site is the east end of the 
grant described in the records as the Rancho Santa Paula y Saticoy. 
An abundant supply of water is obtained from the creek, a mountain 
stream, and is piped five miles down the valley. Like all streams in 
California, it varies with the rainfall ; but if by any freak of nature it 

Photos, by King Bros., Santa Paula. 



SANTA PAULA. 



141 




Hervc Friend, Eng. THE U N I V ERSALI i> I cHUh!CH. 

should fail, the river, winding round the base of the south mountain, 
can fill all demands. A few miles above the town, Sespe and Pirn Creeks 
pour their waters into the Santa Clara, which has a fall of several hun- 
dred feet before it is swallowed in old ocean's hungry maw. 

To say that Santa Paula has a population of twelve hundred conveys 
no adequate idea of the number of people who buy and sell in its 
markets and form its society. From here to San Buenaventura the 
valley is an almost continuous town, with its miles of apricot and other 
fruit orchards, and its elegant homes fast displacing the plainer dwell- 
ings of early days. 

It is a community of good churches, excellent schools and intelligent. 





l-^-'W ^^ 



Herve Friend, Eng. 



THE HIGH SCHOOL. 



142 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 




Union Eng. Co. ORANGE-PICKING MACHINES, THE BLANCHARD GROVE. 

enterprising citizens, fully in touch with all progressive , ideas and 
movements. 

Previous to the recent oil development in Los Angeles, this was the 
center of the largest petroleum producing district on the Coast ; and 
while Ik)S Angeles may lead a close race in quantity, Santa Paula yields 
an oil of finer grade. The Union Oil Company owns the largest refinery 
on the Coast, with a pipe line to San Buenaventura where the oil is run 
into storage tanks for steamer shipment. It manufactures gasoline, 
naptha and other distillates. 

The Santa Clara valley possesses exceptional advantages in its variety 
of resources. In the Sespe caiion are the quarries of beautiful brown 
stone which enters into the construction of many of the finest buildings 
in the State. ' ' Sespe grapes ' ' stand for the richest and most luscious 
product of the vineyard. On the hill-sides are long rows of white 
stands that resemble the camp of a miniature army. It is an army of 
busy workers, making tons of the delicious white sage honey that carries 
off the prize in many competitive exhibits. 

The largest citrus grove is that of N. W. Blanchard, one of the pioneer 
orange-growers of the State. His orchard embraces one hundred acres, 
sixty in oranges and forty in lemons. So fully has he solved the prob- 
lem of lemon curing that fruit from " La Naranjal " commands the 
highest prices in the market. He employs from fifty to seventy-five 
hands and ships from forty to fifty carloads a season. One of the pro- 
jected industries of the valley is the manufacture of olive oil, as many 
acres of that berry are coming into bearing. 

One million dollars' worth of beans — mainly limas, small white and 
bayous (a small brown bean) — are shipped annually East, presumably 
to Boston. In 1893 the area planted to this useful edible in the Santa 
Clara valley, was 26,000 acres ; and the average yield per acre was 1000 
pounds, though in certain sections it ran as high as 1900. The soil is 



SANTA PAULA 



143 




Collier, Eng. RESIDENCE OF C. W. FAULKNER 

as loamy and fertile eighty feet deep as on the surface, and the condi- 
tions of soil, fogs and climate are such that no irrigation is used or 
needed, except for alfalfa and citrus fruits. 

Within the past three years a tract of four hundred acres has been set 
to lemons, which in the near future will be one of the horticultural 
sights in the State and a source of vast profit to the owner. 

Cut off from the world, Ventura county could produce the necessities and 
luxuries of life within itself— cattle, sheep, and hogs ; beans, corn, barley ; 
fruits, nuts, oil and wine. It is a vale of plenty, of peace and of beauty. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 




Collier, Kng. 



HOME PLACE OF C. H. MCKEVETT. 



>^A Country of Outings. 



^' 



II-SOME MOUNTAIN RESORTS. 

'HREE hundred miles of mountains, ranging up to about 12,000 
feet in the highest peaks, is a fair general proclamation of what 
Southern California has to offer in the way of mountain out- 
ings. There are other countries which can match that ; but no other in 
the world which has in that array of mountains so many charming 
resorts, and a perfect ocean, equally easy to be enjoyed, within eye-shot. 
Easily foremost of the mountain resorts of California, if not of the 
United States, in combination of scenery with man's most daring 
achievements, is the wonderful combination which may be collectively 
termed Mt. Lowe. Here cable and electric power boost the traveler 
from the orange groves of Altadena smack up the steepest acclivities of 
the precipitous sierra. From the Terminal Ry. station an electric car 
zigzags up the grades to Rubio caiion ; and from Rubio Pavilion (altitude 
2200 feet) the great cable incline shoots straight up the side to the top of 
Echo Mountain (altitude 3500 feet). The incline is 3000 feet long, and is 

the steepest railway in 
the world ; its succes- 
sive gradients being 
62, 65, 58 and (at the 
summit) 48 per cent. 
— its lowest grade be- 
ing equal to the steep- 
est on Mt. Pilatus, 
Switzerland, while its 
highest is more than 
one-half as steep 
again. Compared to 
the audacity of its 
engineering the only 
other mountain rail- 
roads in North Amer- 
ica — those on Pike's 
Peak and Mt. Wash- 
ington — are mere 
child's play. 

The Echo Mountain 
House (as high above 
the sea as Mt. Vesuvi- 
us) is one of the best 
appointed hotels in 
California ; and in- 
comparably ahead of 
any mountain hotel in 
the East. From this 
point at the head of 




Union Eng. Co. 



Photo, by Waite. 



ECHO MOUNTAIN AND ITS PATH. 
*See July number. 



A COUNTRY OF OUTINGS. 



145 



the cable incline an electric 
road will run to the sum- 
mit of Mt Lowe, which is 
about as high as Mt, Wash- 
ington. At this writing 
the road is completed to 
Crystal Springs ( altitude 
5000 feet) ; and even the 
great Incline pales in com- 
parison with its magnificent 
scenery. The projector and 
accomplisher of this enor- 
mous enterprise is Prof. T. 
S. C. Lowe — organizer of 
the balloon service in the 
civil war, inventor of the 
first ice-machine, inventor 
of water-gas, and first to 
apply electricity to moun- 
tain railroading. The road 
is already largely patron- 
ized. An astronomical ob- 
servatory in charge of the 
eminent Dr. Lewis Swift; 
the most powerful search- 
light in the world, and 
other attractions add to 
the unique enjoyments of 
Echo Mountain. 

From this wonderful 
mountain development down 




Uei ve Friend, Eng. Photo, by Waitc. 

THE GREAT CABLE INCLINE. 

to mere camps for the hunter and fisher- 




ECHO MOUNTAIN HOTEL AND OBSERVATORY. 



VlxoUt. )>)• Wttite. 



146 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 




Union Eng. Co. 



MARTIN'S CAMP. 



Photo, by Hill. Pasadena. 



man, there is every intervening step. In the same general division of 
the range are Martin's Camp, Strain's Camp, and other delightful mild- 
roughing-it resorts, reached by horse and burro over trails of wonderful 
interest. There are also comfortable " camps" in the principal cations. 
In the magnificent Bear Valley country are unsurpassed hunting and 
trouting. Strawberry Valley fascinates all who visit it. So do the 
Cuyamaca and other ranges neighboring San Diego. In Ventura and 
Santa Barbara counties are most beautiful camping-grounds, in mountain 
and canon. In a word it is wholly safe to be said that nowhere else in 
the world can man find so many restful pleasures of mountain scenery 
and mountain sports, so easy of access, so comfortable in point of stay, 
so cheap, so varied and so delightful. 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



STRAWBERRY VALLEY. 



Photo, by Waite. 



A COUNTRY OF OUTINGS. 



147 




STRAIN'S CAMP. 



Photo, by Hill, Pasadena. 




Collier, Eng. 



IN SANTIAGO CANYON. •*'" 



A Model Electric Road. 



'NY city in the country might well 
be proud of so perfect an electric 
transit system as that of the new 
Pasadena & Los Angeles Electric 
Railway ; and it is doubtful if any 
other city can yet match it. Cer- 
tainly New York has no surface 
road remotely to be compared with 
this. It is to the usual electric line 
what a Pullman service is to an 
old-fashioned car. 

This road, which runs from 
4th street, Los Angeles, to 
Chestnut street, Pasadena ( a 
distance of eleven miles), was begun in 1894 and opened for traffic May 
I, 1895. Its route is a most fortunate one, through the hitherto quiet 
district between Los Angeles and its chief suburb ; and the effect of the 
line is already felt in every front- foot of the distance. Thus made easy 
of access, the charming valley of the Arroyo Seco will be built up densely 
all the way. 

The first week's operation of the road proved the inadequacy of the 
original single track ; and the work of double-tracking the entire line 
has just been completed. There are three long bridges — one of 300 feet 
(steel truss) over the Arroyo Seco in this city ; one 900 feet long and 45 
feet high over the Arroyo at Garvanza ; and one of 700 feet across the 
Terminal Ry. in South Pasadena. The roadbed is substantially laid on 
a heavy subgrade of gravel ; and the track is of heavy steel T rails spiked 





L. A. Eng. Co. 



THE GARVANZA BRIDGE. 



Photo. l)y Putr 



A MODEL ELECTRIC ROAD. 



149 



to 6x8 redwood ties. The power station consists of two brick structures 
100x175 and 60x175 feet, with iron roof. There are installed three 250 
horse-power Stirling boilers of the latest improved type; two Ball Si. 
Wood compound condensing engines, of 250 and 450 horse-power, res- 
pectively ; two 300 horse- power Edison generators ; one 200 horse-power 
Westinghouse generator. There are twenty combination cars (open and 
enclosed) 35 feet long, finely upholstered and finished in mahogany, 
with plate-glass windows. They were built by the American Car Co. 
and the J. G. Brill Co., and are equipped with Westinghouse 40 horse power 
motors of latest design, making 80 h. p. to the car. The cars also have 




L. A. Kiip. Co. 



INTERIOR OF CAR. 



Photo. l>y I'litnam 



the best Standard air-brakes — a necessity, since the grades range from 3 
to 7.6 %. The car-house, 100x175 ^eet, will accommodate 32 long cars, 
with room for paint and repair-shops. All the buildings are of brick, 
on 3o-inch concrete foundations. A phenomenal water supply is furnished 
by the company's well. A complete machine-shop is fitted with all the 
latest and best machines necessary to a railway plant. 

It is the intention to extend this system to a connection with the Mt. 
Lowe Railway at Altadena, which will greatly add to the public con- 
venience and the patronage of the road — already extraordinarily large. 

This important enterprise was planned and has been pushed to com- 
pletion by Mr. E. P. Clark, Vice-President and General Manager. It 
was begun at a time when there was little doing in railway construction, 




^t'^'^t* ^K''. 



ISO 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



and duritig the great strike which temporarily paralyzed the entire 
country ; and his success is a testimonial to his pluck and judgment. 
Associated with him are Gen. M. H. Sherman and friends who were 
largely interested in the Los Angeles street railways. 

With its important termini, delightful itinerary, and magnificent 
equipment, the P. & L. A. Electric Ry., already a large success, has 
every promise of growing to much greater things. 

It may be well to add that the exceptional street railway facilities of 
]>s Angeles are largely due to the ability, activity and unselfishness of 
Gen. Sherman, who was a moving spirit in all the enterprise, and was 
for five years president of the Los Angeles consolidated street railway 
systems. 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



POWER AND CAR HOUSES, PASADENA. 



Photo, by Putnam. 



The Port of Redondo. 

YS^EDONDO is a young and flourishing little town on the coast, 
IV^ about 17 miles southwest of Los Angeles. It is not only a 
Jfc \ charming pleasure resort, but also a busy port. A large number 
of steam and sailing vessels touch at the wharf every month, and for 
some time past as much and sometimes more freight has been handled 




there than at the old port of SanJPedro. The Pacific; Coast steamships 
stop there regularly. There is a large warehouse and much grain is 
shipped. Not only does the company own the hotel, the wharf and the 
townsite, but also a well equipped narrow-gauge railroad which runs 
frequent trains from Los Angeles. This and the Southern California 
railway furnish ample transportation facilities. A new wharf is under 
way to accommodate the immense and growing lumber trade. 



qlB SS^^ ^^ ^Sg^iai^igl^l i^lBl 



|^H^J_EVNEJ 



®MMMSMSMMMSMMMMM§11 



WHOLESALE 



GROCER 



RETAIL 



IMPORTER OF 



English, French, German and Italian TABLE LUXURIES 



Goods packed and delivered at depot free of charge, and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 



136 and T38 NORTH SPRING STREET 




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The Fountain of Youth Located. 

t (S%HILE the Indian may not be much of a guide in the selection of 
\9\j townsites and corner lots, his judgment in medicinal waters is 
• • never at fault. Every mineral spring in the United States 
which is now recognized as of medical or tonic value was patronized by 
the red man long before Columbus. Particularly on this Coast, medical 
experts have recognized the hygienic wisdom of the aborigines, both in 
the curing of disease and the habits by which they prolonged life to an 
extraordinary degree. 

Among the natural dispensaries most in vogue among the prehistoric 
aborigines of the Coast were the remarkable waters now known as the 
Napa Soda Springs. This is not strange. The Indian had no book 
learning, but he was no fool. His observation was matchless ; and he 
had a queer way of doing what he found beneficial — witness, for instance, 
the universal Indian habit of breathing with closed mouth, asleep or 
awake, sitting still or running. 

With the American occupation of California, these wonderful springs 
were not slow to be appreciated. Indeed they were so promptly and so 
thoroughly appreciated that their early history is a romance of plots 
and counterplots, seizures and fights for possession. 

The Indians are gone, the squatters forgotten ; and if they could come 
back they would not recognize the spot which they once knew so well 
and valued so highly. A colony of noble stone structures has taken the 
place of Indian temescal and squatter's cabin ; and the waters they once 
trudged leagues to reach or held with rifles, are now bottled and expressed 
all over the country and quaff"ed with delight in innumerable modern 
homes. The Napa Soda leads the California list ; and all through the 
East is winning its way against all other waters. It travels even to 
Central and South America — for the wealthy Dons know a good thing 
against their palates, and would have it if they had to send twice as far. 
During ex-President Harrison's visit to this Coast, at the time he lectured 
at Stanford, he gave these springs the recognition of a week's visit. Many 
other notables have thus demonstrated their esteem for the charm of this 
locality and health-restoring virtue of its waters. 

Col. John P. Jackson, a well-known figure in California history, bought 
the springs in 1872, and has spent immense amounts to make them a 
resort so beautiful that they give the most blasd traveler a thrill of delight. 
The noble scenery, the splendid buildings and all attractions that wisely- 
spent and ungrudged money can give to a gem of nature, have combined 
to make the springs unique. And whether one can go there or not, the 
magnificent waters, sealed in all their effervescent freshness, are acces- 
sible everywhere and to all homes, and need no more than one trial to 
make themselves a necessity. 

The Los Angeles agency for these famous waters is managed by Mr. 
John P. Jackson, Jr., son of the owner, a young man whose ability and 
genial qualities are doing very much for his business and for himself. 



PUBLISHERS' Department. 



The l^avid of ^ai\Sbme 

THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
MAGAZINE 

Published monthly by 

Tfie Land of Sunshine Pubfisfiing Co. 

501, 502, 503 Stimson BUILDING 
LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



F. A. PATTEE, business Manager 

$i.oo A Year. io Cents a Copy. 

Entered at the lyOS Angeles Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

For advertising rates, etc., address the Business 
Manager. 

All MSS. should be addressed to the Editor. 
No MSS. preserved unless accompanied by return 
postage, 

LARGE. 

As has been amply demonstrated, the certified 
regular edition of the I,and of Sunshine sur- 
passes that of any monthly in the west, and of 
any regular publication whatsoever in Southern 
Caliiornia, with the exception of one daily. 
Moreover, the scarcity of all back numbers up 
to date, demonstrates that its editions are not in 
excess of its circulation Copies of its first volume 
do not go begging at 50 cents a number, while it 
has already become necessary to reserve the 
June and July numbers of the present year for 
the most urgent demands only. 
LASTING. 

Nevertheless custodians of waste baskets 
can search in vain for the I,and of Sunshine 
for it finds a permanent place on the center 
tables and in the libraries of the land. 

Although a large majority of its subscribers 
reside in this locality, it has long been evident 
from the many inquiries and subscriptions pour- 
ing in from abroad, that a majority of local 
readers eventually send their copies to distant 
riends. Many not wishing to part with their own 
monthly copy devote another and sometimes 
fifteen subscriptions to their Eastern friends. 
EFFECTIVE. 

There are very few residents of Southern Cali- 
fornia but are endeavoring to induce some 
one to this section. The3' recognize in the 
Lanij of Sunshine an invaluable ally in the 
good work. They find it more efficient and cer- 
tainly cheaper than letter writing, and that it 
c ontains nothing they need apologize for. In 
fact, they are rather proud of it, and dc not 
hesitate to send abroad so creditable a reflection 
of the locality in which they are interested. 

While the reputation of its editor, Mr. Chas. 
F. lyummis, carries the magazine into circles 
where no other Coast magazine can hope to pen- 
etrate, and while its ci.rculation has been intelli- 
gently and energetically pushed by its business 
management, the accompanying communica- 
ions deniDastrate that it also has a voluntary 



circulation enjoyed by no other magazine- 
This demand must increase rather than dimin' 
ish, as the field eager to receive it is practically 
limitless. 



^^//^■' 






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iu:^^.-*^c dor:;:; />*>^< eic/ar^i^ ^ ^ 






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$1.26 Per Acre 




$1.25 Per Acre 



Governmeni) Lands 

THIS IS 

THE LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Not only is this so, but it is a land of great 
promise, where you may secure a home on the 
most favorable terms now oflfered in the United 
States. 

Choice Government Lands at 
81.26 per Acre. 

25 cents cash, balance 25 years at 6 per cent per 
annum. No requirements as to improving or 
living upon the land. For climate, healthfulness 
and fertility of soil it is unsurpassed ; where you 
can raise nearly anything grown in America, 
north or south. 

We also have choice improved farms and fruit 
lands near Los Angeles, at $30.00 and upward per 
acre. Southern California property to exchange 
for Eastern property. For information and 
printed matter address L,OY Sl HURIN 
338 South Broadway, L.os Angeles, Cal' 



City 
Property 



Country 
Property 

one of the best all round STOCK, DAIRY AND FRUIT ranches (270 acres; 



WOOD & CHURCH 



fit Urrttl in the state. Owner badly in debt. Must Sell. No Exchange. 

We have a fine list of Los Angeles and Pasadena city property, some are batgains. 
Mortgagees and Bonds for Sale. 

123 S. Broadway, Pasadena Office, 

lios Angeles, Cat. 16 S. Raynotond Ave. 

THE 
ABBOTSFORD 



CORNER 

EIGHTH 
AND HOPE 

STS. 



LOS Angeles. 

CAL. 




Select Tourist and Tamily Hotel. American 
Plan. All new, with refined appointments. 
Electric Bells, Incandescent Light and Steam 
Radiator in every room. Capacity, 200 guests. 

BY J. J. MARTIN. 



NEVER CLOSES. 

Best of service the year round. Purest of water, 
most equable climate, with best hotel in Southern 
California. 

Ferny glens, babbling brooks and shady forests 
within ten minutes' walk of the house. 

Low weekly rates will be made to individuals 
and families for the summer, to include daily 
railway transportation from Echo Mountain to 
Altadena Junction and return. 

Livery stables at Echo Mountain and Altadena 
Junction ; none better. 

Special rates to excursions, astronomical, 
moonlight, searchlight parties, banquets and 
balls. The grandest mountain, cation, ocean and 
valley scenery on earth. 

Full information at office of 

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY 

Cor. Third and Spring streets, Los Angeles. 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLOCK, 

Pasadena, Cal. 
ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE. 

Postoffice, Echo Mountain, California. 




3,500 FEET ABOVE THK LEVEL OP THE SEA. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land op Sunshine." 



LOS ANGELES LEADS. 

That there is no section of the United States 
where business is in a more settled and flourish- 
ing condition than it is in Los Angeles today, as 
illustrated by the following comparative show- 
ing, taken from the American Land and Title 
Register. Real estate transfers for March, 1895 : 

New York, $i3.'H»7.o67 ; Chicago, $11,000,000; 
Philadelphia, $7,593,533 ; St. Louis, $2,811,179 ; San 
Francisco (report for February), $714,801 ; Pitts- 
burg, $1,200,269 ; Los Angeles, $1,701,90^; Portland 
(Oregon), $338,657- 

Building operations tor March, 1895 ; Chicago 
$3,200,000 : PhiladeliJhia, $2,618,122 ; Brooklyn, 
$1,942,417; Cincinnati, $413,670; New Orleans, 
$234,555 ; Pittsburg, $210,407 ; Los Angeles, $226,822. 

Real estate transfers for April, 1895 : New York» 
$14,500,000; Chicago, $10,700,000; Philadeli>hia' 
$9,331,339 ; St. Louis, $2,820,519 ; San Francisco, 
$2,624,145 ; Pittsburg, $2,374,150 ; Kansas City, 
$1,139,964; Denver, $1,048,076; Portland, Or., 
$431,304 ; Los Angeles, $1,705,987- 

The building operations for April are as follows: 
Chicago, $3,871,000 ; Philadelphia, $4,202,842 ; 
Brooklyn, $1,854,572; New Orleans, $270,831; 
Pittsburg, $563,928 ; Denver, $120,200 ; Los Ange- 
les, $300,368. 

The solid character of the Los Angeles banks 
was well shown during the financial panic of 
1894, which had such disastrous results in some 
sections of the country. Bank clearances have 
for a year past shown an improvement almost 
every week, while the figures from a majority of 
other cities have frequently shown a decrease. 

Los A ngeles Clearing House for month ending 
July, 1895: Deposits, $1,232,869.08; Balances, 
$175,689.10. Corresponding, 1894 : $723.605.75 ; 
I131. 950.92. 



Oldest and Largest Bank in Southern California 

Farmers and Merchants Bank 

Of L.08 Angreles, Cal. 

Capital (Paid up) - - - $500,000.00 

Surplus and Reserve - - - 820.000.00 

Total ... $1,320,000.00 

OFFICERS 

L.W. Hellman, Prest., H.W. Hbllman, V. Prcs. 
H. J. Fleishman, Cash. G. Heimann, Ast. Cash. 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry, C. E. Thom, A. Glassell, 
O. W. Childs, , C. Ducommun, T. L. Duque, 
J. B. Lankershim, H.W. Hellman, I, W. Hellman 



Sell and Buy Foreign and Domestic Exchange. 
Special Collection Department. 
Correspondence Invited. 
Safe Deposit Boxes for rent on reasonable terms 

M. W. Stimson, Prest. C. S. Cristy, Vice-Prest, 
W. E- McVay, Secy. 

FOR GOOD nORTGAGE LOANS 

ANO OTHER SATE INVESTMENTS, 
WHITE TO 




CAPITAL $200,000 

223 South Spring Street 

JL1O8 Angfeles, California. 






Paid Up Capital, 9500,000 

Transacts a general Banking Business. Buys 
and sells Foreign and Domestic Exchange. Col- 
lections promptly attended to. Issue letters of 
credit. Acts as Trustees of Estates, Executors, 
Administrators, Guardian, Receiver, etc. Solicits 
accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations and 
Individuals on favorable terms. Interest on 
time deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



Officers : H. J. Woollacott, President ; James 
F. Towell, ist Vice-President ; Warren Gillelen, 
2nd Vice-President ; J. W. A. Off, Cashier ; M. B. 
Lewis. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors : G. H. Bonebrake, W. P. Gardiner, 
P. M. Green. B. F. Ball, H. J. Woollacott. James 
F. Towell, Warren Gillelen. J. W. A. Off, F. C. 
Howes, R. H. Howell, B. F. Porter. 




&^i^ 



OF I.OS angei.es. 

Capital Stock $400,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits over 230.000 

J. M. Elliott, Prest., W.G. Kerckhoff, V.Pres 

Frank A. Gibson. Cashier. 

G. B. Shaffer, Assistant Cashier. 

directors: 

J. M. Elliott, F. Q. Story, J. D. Hooker, 

J. D. Bicknell. H. Jevne, W. C. PatterSon 

W. G. KerckhoflF. 

No public funds or other preferred deposits 

received by this bank. 



5TEPI1EN5 ^ lilCKOK 




AGENTS 



A!aMUJ03 



433 South Broadwat), Los Angeles 



Agents wanted in every town in Southern 
California, Arizona and New Mexico. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



SCHUYLER COLE, ROBERT F. JONES, 

Colegroue, Cat, Bank of Santa Monica, 

Samta Monica, Cal. 

LOANS NEGOTIATED 

Cahuenga and Santa Monica Property 

a Specialty. 



.V ES> 



ROOM 204. 



fiOBT.F. JONES & GO. 



BRADBURt eiOCK, 



PnopePty Caped Fop, Rented, Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

OFFICES: 

204 Bradbury Block. Los Angeles, Telephone 
Bank of Santa Monica, Santa Monica, Cal. 
Telephones 2 and 42. 



FOR SALE 



Ao 




^ 



"^I^S 



STREET 



-fV^^ 



O^ 



THE TRACT OF HOMES 

Don't fail to see this beautiful tract, the finest 
in the city, four 8o-foot streets, one street loo feet 
wide ; all the streets graded, grraveled. cement 
walks and curbs; streets sprinkled; shade trees 
on all streets ; lots 50 and 60 feet front; city water 
piped on all streets; rich sandy loam 'oil. Tract 
is fifteen to eighteen feet higher than Grand 
avenue and Figueroa street. 2 electric cars; 15 
minutes' ride to the business center; one block 
nearer than Adams and Figueroa streets; build- 
ing clause in each deed, no cheap houses allowed; 
buy and build your home where you will have 
all modem improvements and be assured that 
the class of homes will cause the value to double 
inside of 12 months; 5000 feet on Adams street. 
We ask you to see this tract now; if out for a 
drive, go through this tract; go out Adams street 
to Central avenue; or take the Central or Maple 
avenue cars to Adams street, and see the class of 
improvements; lots offered for sale for a short 
time for $200. $250. $300 to $600 on the most fav- 
orable terms. Office corner of Central avenue 
and Adams street. Free carriages from our office 
at all times. 

GRIDER &. DOW, 

139 S. BROADWAY TEL. 1299 

Los ANGELES. CAL. 

Headqiiarters for Lemon and Orange Groves and 

Farming Lands. 




CALIFORNIA WINE MERCHANT 



We will ship two sample cases assorted 
wines (one dozen quarts each) to any part 
of the United States, Freight Prepaid, 
upon the recipt of $9.00. Pints ( 24 in 
case), 50 cents per case additional. We 
will mail full list and prices upon appli- 
cation. 



Respectfully, 



C. F. A. LAST, 

131 N.Main St., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



$10 



PER ACRE 

FOR FINE LANDS 

IN THE 



$10 



FANITA RANCHO 

EL CAJON VALLEY 

1669 Acres for - . $18,000 

1420 Acres for - - $12,000 

Smaller Tracts for $30 to $80 per acre. 

WILL GROW ANYTHING. 

This property is twelve miles from the city ot 
San Diego and two miles from Cuvamaca Rail- 
road. It belongs to the estate of Hosmer P. 
McKoon, and will be sold at the appraised value. 

For further information address 

FANNIE M. McKOON, Executrix. 

Santee, San Diego Co., Cal. 



Pkasc mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



I SELL T-HE BflRT+i.. 



HEADQUARTERS AT POMONA, CAL. 



ECHl^i^ 




C n Y I believe the best investment in California 
On I J to-day is the Howland Olive Orchard : 
150 acres — 120 acres solid to olive orchard, balance 
variety of fruits, etc. Olive mill and the latest 
machinery for pressing oil that cost over $5,000. 
The income from the property this year is nearly 
$8,000, and yet but one-fifth of theorchard is in 
bearing. The Howland Olive Oil from this plant 
took the first premium at the World's Fair at 
Chicago in competition vrith the world ; also first 
premium at Mid-winter Fair and at the late Citrus 
Fair at Los Angeles. For full particulars of this 
property, or for anything in the line of Real 
Estate, call on or address "' The Old Man." 

R. S. BASSETT, POMONA, CAL. 

H016I ?mM 



Location Central 
Rates Reasonable 
Beds Clean 
Table First-class 
Service Courteous 



Santa Paula, Cal. 



Free '"Bus 
To and Prom 
_AII Trains 



ORMAN OAK, Manager 

First-class Livery in Connection. 

The Pacific Cycle Co., manufacflurers 
of the only wheel made on the Pacific 
coast. Factory and salesroom, 618-624 
S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. Buy a 
home-made wheel. 



FOR SALE. 



Special to the Land of Sunshine.— 6-room 
modern new Colonial cottage. Hall, bath, hot 
and cold water, patent water closet, fine mantel, 
lawn, street graded, etc. Only $2,500. Terms. 
$500, cash; balance monthly. One of many good 
homes in Los Angeles for sale. Before you buy, 
see TAYLOR & CO., 102 South Broadway. 



$35 PER ACRE 



For Lands located in 
Southern California. 
Will grow Oranges, Lemons, and all other fruits. 
$35.00 takes the choice. Remember, $35.00 for 
land as good as any in the State. Reached by 
the Southern California Railway. 




SAN MARCOS LANO COMPANY. 
I>. P. HAIi£, Manager, 

1336 L> St., San Diego, Cal. 

W. G. JACOBS, Superintendent, 

San Marcos, San Diego Co., Cal. 




HopmAN 



ELEGANT 

GRILL ROOM 
AND PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Finest Cuisine. Sercice Unexcelled. 

^^ 

M. L. POLASKI CO. (Inc.) Proprietors 

Q1 p: S. SPRING STREET 

^ I ^ LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Matting, Oil Cloth and Linoleum 

Bedding 

Window Siiades 



TELEPHONE 242 



WM. S. ALLEN 



Silk and Lace Curtains 

Portieres 

Curtain Fixtures 



rnporter and 

. . . Dealer in 



Baby Carriages 
Upholstery Goods, Etc. 

332-334 South Spring Street 



Furniture 
— Carpets 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



A. M. PARSONS 



J. P. MOORE 



MOORE & PERSONS 

Property flgerpts and Investment 3^okers, 

•229 W. SECO/ND STKE&T.. 



Reccf isfate . . . 



f 



Choice Southern California Properties. 
Ranches, Orange. Olive, Walnut, Alfalfa 
and Deciduous Fruit Lands of every 
description. Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena Property a specialty . . . 



LOS T^NGEL-eS. CKL. 

References by Permission : 
Los Angeles National Bank, Los Angeles. 
Southern California Nat. Bank, Los Angeles. 
First National Bank, Schuyler, Neb. 
Allen Bros , Wholesale Grocers, Omaha, Neb. 
Nicollet National Bank. Minneapolis, Minn. 
f:x-Gov. W. R. Merriam, St. Paul, Minn. 



|32 



000 "^ ^°^ 3-story Brick Business Block, right on First Street, in the heart of business, in 
y\J\J\J Los Angeles. Basement. Store and offices, and upper floors always fi 

This is a gilt-edged chance for a prime income 



Los Angeles. Basement. Store and offices, and upper floors always full of tenants. 
Never a room empty. Income 9}^ per cent, steady, 
investment. Correspondence invited. 

<j&1 £i 000 "^^^ ^^** Asphaltum Mine in the State of California. A rare chance to buy one of the 
t|plvJ,v/\/U best paying properties anywhere. Owner engaged in manufacturing business, and 
must sell this in order to enlarge the other to meet demands. 

000 ^° Acres right in the city of Riverside, Cal., in navel oranges. Absolutely one of the 
y\J\J\J finest properties in the city. Artesian water, 120 lbs. pressure. Shipped the first 
two cars of oranges out ot Southern California this year. For building sites it is unequalled in 
beauty as it lays high and right on street car line. A superb investment ; an investigation will 
reveal that the half has not been told. 



$35 



Write to headquarters for information. 
Make our office your headquarters when in 
our beautiful city .... 



MOORE & PARSONS 



239 W. SECOND STKEKT. LOS ANGEI.ES, CAI, 



THE LOS ANGELES TERiMINAL RAILWAY 

THF ^All PFRRfl niVKinN Ruus through a fine agricultural and grazing country to Long Beach, 
IHL JMH VLUnv umoiU'i and then for five miles along the ocean to San Pedro Harbor, where 
connections are made with the Pacific Coast Steamship Company for all points North and .South, 
and with the Wilmington Transportation Company for Catalina Island. At Terminal Island 
(Kast San Pedro,) there is a fine Bath House and Pavilion, open all the year, and the finest still 
water bathing on the Coast is found here ; also boating on the bay, and sailing on the ocean with 
power launches or yachts. 

THF PA^ARFNA niVKION Runs to Pasadena, also up to Altadena. at the base of the mountains, 

int. rwOHULRM UlTiOIUW and at Altadena connects with the Mount Lowe Railway for Rubio 

Cation Pavilion up the incline to Echo Mountain House, and to the observatory on Mount Lowe, 

enabling tourists to go from Los Angeles to the top of the Sierra Madre Mountains in a very short 

tune and with but one change. 

THF Ri FNIIAI F RIVI^IRN Ruus through one ofthe finest valleys in southern California, noted for 
MIL ULLHUMLL UITIJIUH itg the fine deciduous and citrus fruits, to Glendale, and on to Verdugo 

PBrk, finest picnic grounds adjacent to Los Angeles. 
There are Twenty-Six Passenger Trains a day between Los Angeles and Pasadena ; eight passenger 

trains a day between Los Angeles and Glendale and Verdugo Park ; six passenger trams a day 

between Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Pedro ; eight passenger trains a day between Los 

Angeles and Altadena. 

Picnic Grounds at Verdugo Park, Devil's Gate, Millard's Caiion, Eaton's Cation and Rubio Canon on 
the Mount Lowe Railway. Finest Mountain, Valley and Ocean Scenery in Southern California. 
T. B. BURNETT, W. WINCUP, 

Vice-President and General Manager, General Freight and Passenger Agent, 

Los Angeles. Los Angeles. 



PNERALBlREeTQgl^l^BAIMER'S 

TEl-10^9 — 536 S. SPRING 5T.,Lps;\MGa^S. 



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WHEN YOU VISIT 

SAN DIEGO 

REMEMBER . . . 






t\ 



RATES 

$2 50 PER DAY 

AND UP 



American Plan Only. Centrally 
located. Elevators and fire escapes. Baths, 
hot and cold water in all suites. Modern con- 
veniences. Fine large sample rooms for com- 
mercial travelers. 




GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS 

San Francisco. 

steamers leave Port Los Angeles and Redondo 
every four days for Santa Barbara, Port Harford 
and San Francisco. 

Leave San Pedro and East San Pedro every 
four days for San Francisco and way ports. 

Leave Redondo and Port Los Angeles every 
four days for San Diego. 

Northern Routes embrace Portland, Puget 
Sound, Victoria and Alaska. 

W. PARRIS, AGENT, 

123K W. Third St., Los Angeles. 

The LONG BEACH BREAKER 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

AND DEVOTED TO LOCAL INTERESTS 

Price SI .00 a Year 

Send stamp for "' 

Sample ^^ GALER, Publisher 

Fop Fine Out Door and otfiep Views 

...CALL -n I— 

THE PHOTOGRAPHER 

Temple Block Los Angeles, Cal. 



FARniNQ AND 
ORCHARD LAND 
FOR COLONY 
ENTERPRISE 

FOR SALE BY 

FRED. J. SMITH, 

POnONA, CAL. 
SANTA ANA INCUBATORS 




BROODERS 

OF THE 

NEW MODEL 

Are the best Hatchers and 
raise the strongest chicks. Full 
description given in the circu- 
lar with prices of everything 
used by the poultry raiser. 
Address Santa Ana In-cvbatoe 
Co , Santa Ana, Cal. 



S. BARTHOLOMEW 
Manager 



Poland Rock 
Water 

Company 2I8 West First St 

Telephone 1101 

piNE [^ALF-TONE pPINTING 

SPECIALTY 



I^INGSLEY- 
gARNES 

& 

Neuner 
Co. 



''"•'IlI/t.t/s^'fK';.- 123 South Broadway 




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PACIFIC SANITARIUM 

Telephone138. Hope and Pico Sts.. Los Angeles. Cal. 

■ C«T ^RIVATC HOSPITAL IN SOUTHCRN 




Sunny rooms, sanitary plumbing, home cooking, trained 
nurses, baths, OaWanisin, Faradism, and massage ; aseptic 
operating room. Physicians placing patients here can personally 
look after them and be assured of courteous treatment. Electric 
and cable lines only one block away. Address DR. J. E COWLKS, 
as above, or at office, Bryson Block, rooms 1, 2 and 3 Hours, 
lu to 12 a. m., 3 to 5 p. m. Telephone 1172. 



WHY YOU SHOULD USE OUR 

GAS STOVES 

ist. Because they are much cheaper thati coal 
stoves. 

and. Because they cost less to keep in re- 
pair. 

3rd. Because they save enormously in "time 
and temper," require no attention and can be 
lighted and extinguished in a minute. 

4th. Because they make neither dirt, smoke 
nor ashes. 

5th. Because they take up very little space, 
and for this reason are especially desirable for 
those who have small kitchens or who reside in 
flats. 

LOS ANGELES LIGHTING CO. 

457 SOUTH BROADWAY 



Olive Trees 



And all kinds of Nursery 
htock for sale at 



• ■THE POMONA NURSERY 

.Send and get a copy of our book on 'v "V 'v 

Olive Culture, mailed free ^^*t 

HOWLAND BROS., Proprietors, 

POMONA, CALIFORNIA. 




THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL 

SANTA BARBARA, CAL. 

.strictly first-class in every respect. Best location in the city. 
Letters and Teleprrams promptly answered. 
Free Bus to and from all Trains and Steamers. 

W. S. LOW, Proprietor. 



Fi ill[F« 



AJ4D 



^'vy^v^ 



Herve Priend. 

PHOTO 
ENQRAWER 



314 W. FIRST ST. 



LOS ANGELES 




Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



An Old Proverb 

Says " 'Tis hard to make an empty bag stand 
upright." It's just as hard to please yourself ^ 
in mantel-buying in a small stock. Why 
not come to a store that has a stock of looo 
Mantels to choose from ? 










The Tuttle Mercantile Co. 

Bradbury Building, 308=310 S. Broadway 





TTlnion 
pboto 
lEnQraving 

Co- 



1213^ 
SOUTH 
BROADWAY 



LOS ANGELES 
CAL. 



Fine half-tones on zinc and 'cop- 
per. Line cuts. 



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SOHOOL ISUTV/^BER 



SEPTEMBER, 1895 nuX'! 




10 



CENTS LAND OF SUNSHINE PUBLISHING CO., 

INCORPORATED 

A COPY 5(M-503 Stimson Building. 



$1 



A 



FINE CARRIAGES, CARTS AND BICYCLES 



SOLE AGENTS 

Columbus Buggy Co. 
New Haven Carriage Go, 
H. D. Gates & Co. 

Rubber tires 
New Styles 
NEW Colors 




HAWLEY, KING &, CO., 210-212 N. Main St. 



/r\otper may I <^o oat to 5u/i/T\? 

Ye$, my darlir}<$ d2a<^\)ter, 

But tt?(? fion\) Bea(;l? Batl? 15 tl?(? Qiqest plaqe 

per a ^irl to <$o ipto tl?(? u/ater. 



Santa iVlonica North Beach Bath House 




Warm Plunges 

HOT Salt baths in 
Porcelain Tubs 



Clean White Beach 

and Special Warm Plunge 

for 

Ladies and Children 




L.Blankenhorn. /Manager. 



^ ./»H' . AMo/fionOoADtHAir-Tosts- 



f-^-^^- 



^mr 




OUR TELEPHONE \2\\ 59 BrQADWAY r»u«-»u« LQ5 AnGELES.CaL. No. 1552 



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*^he moat centrally lo- 
cated, best appointed 
and best kept Botel 
in the city. 

oAmerican or Suro- 
pean Plan. 

Rates reasonable. 



Second and ... 

Spring Streets 

Los Angeles, Cal. 




. . . SANTA CATALI/NA ISLA/NP 




Grand AttPaetions fop the Summei* Season, 1895 

sPcc. P.T.S iiQfgi Mgtropoie, New Island Villa and little Harbor Inn 

The Famous MARINE BAND and OHCHESTRA. Free open air concerts every day throughout the 

season. Illnstrated pamphlets and full information mailed to any address. 
Send for complete Illustrated History and Hand.book of Santa Catalina Island, by Charles Frederick 
Holder. Price 25 c. For sale by all newsdealers. 

WILMINGTON TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

222 S. SPRING STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



H- H- MORROW (English HouM) 

Importer of Murray & Co.'s celebrated 

nPllInn Tpac wholesale and retail dealer in 
UOUIUM \mh Teas, CofleeH. Spleen. 
ICxtravts, Bakiug Powders. Mail orders 
promptly and conscientiously filled. 

310 W. Sixth St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



BARGAINS! 



I14 a foot, city lots in Kohler 
Tract, between 7th and 8th Sts. 
Installments. Also, Ten acre lots, best fruit land, 
Anaheim ; 704 trees,- walnuts, apricots, peaches. 
|ioo per acre ; $28 cash, 8 years time, 6 per cent. 

W. J. FISHER, »27 W. Second St. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land ok Sunshimb.' 



Snmner P. Htint 
Theo. A. Eiien 



424 STIM80N BUILDING 



LOS ANGELES, 
CALIFORNIA 



TCL. 261 




i>OlNDEXfER 9( WaDSWORTH 

BROKERS 
305 West Second St., IjOS Angeles, Cal. 

Buy and sell Real Estate, Stocks, Bonds and 
Mortgages, on commission, make collections, 
manage property and do a general brokerage 
business. Highest references for reliability and 
good business management. 





I^LGRAVING^ 



Woodbupu Bu6ine66 Coffeoe 



226 S. Spring St., Los Angei.es 

Oldest, Ivargest and Best. Send for Catalogue. 



G. A. Hough, 

President. 



N. G. Felker, 

Vice President. 



LflS GftSITflS SftNITflRIUM .. 




Situated in the Sierra Madre foot-hills, altitude 
2,000 feet. Most equable climate in Southern Cal- 
ifornia . Pure mountain water.excellent cuisine ; 
easily reached by Terminal R. R. and short car- 
riage drive. 

0. SHEPARD BARNUM, Propr. 

Drawer 126, Pasadena, Cal. 



SANTA ANA INCUBATORS 




BROODERS 

OF THE 

NEW MODEL 

Are the best Hatchers and 
raise the strongest chicks. Full 
description given in the circu- 
lar with prices of everything 
used by the poultry raiser. 
Address Santa Ana Incubator 
Co , Santa Aha, Cal. 



The Pacific Cjcle Co., ™irS?"e7?„ad'e '5n' 

the Pacific coast. Factory and salesroom, 618-624 
S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. Buy a home- 
made wheel. 



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liLfeiotei 

Wli\d6op 

Redlands. Cal. 

Tourist, Commercial and Family. 

Umlnr iti new miiiin{((Miirnt thi« hostelry 
li'iii l>cen retltt«<l throuKhout with all 
iiimlern convenienrM nnd arraiiKenirnU 
for thp comfort of iu rumls. The ileep- 
ing roomt are large ami airy, moat of 
them comnianding a inouniaiii or valley 
view of picture«>|ue Kraiidpiir. Many of 
the suite* have private hath* conncrie<t 
The proprietor haa devoted ntpecial atten- 
tion to the "cuiaine," and haa receiveil 
many encomiums of praise from gueala 
for its excellenrc. In fact, the Wianaoa is 
left with rt-Kret, many of its gnesta besi- 
tatini; to give the Hnnl adieus. 

Rates $2 to I4 per day; Special 

by week. 

Large Sample Room free. 

H. L. SQUIRES. PROPMiKTOM 



PACIFIC SANITARIUM 

Telephone138. Hope and Pico Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

■ CST PRIVATE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHCRN 
CALIFORNIA 




Sunny rooms, sanitary plumbing, home cooking, trained 
nurses, baths, Galvanism, Faradism, and massage ; Electric 
and cable lines only one block away. Address DR. J. E. COWLES, 
as above, or at office, Bryson Block, rooms 1, 2 and 3. Hours, 
10 to 12 a. m., 3 to 5 p. m. Telephone 1172. 

Corregpondence invited from tlie Kast. 



$35 PER ACRE 



For Lands located in 
Southern California. 
Will grow Oranges, Lemonn , and all other fruits. 
$3500 takes the choice. Remember, $35.00 for 
land as jfood as any in the State. Reached by 
the Southern California Railway. 




SAN MARCOS LANJfJ COMPANY. 
D. P. HALB, Manager. 

1336 D St., San Diego, Cal. 

W. G. JACOBS, Superintendent, 

San Marcos, San Diego Co., Cal. 



ANb 



^^'yy^^t 



Herue Priend, 

PHOT' 
EN 



OTO 

QRAUER 



314 W. FIRST ST.. 

LOS ANGELES 




TTT 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of SuNSHnraS" ^ ' j ' ^'■>^f^\ 



HKiZERTV St JnilLSON 

r " ^ — ^ 




View from Smiley Heights, Redlands, looking north. 

PROPRIETORS CLUB STABLES 

opp. WINDSOR HOTEL. REDLANDS, CAL. 

K^ Carriages, in charge of thoroughly competent drivers, 
meet each incoming train, ready to convey tourists to every point 
of interest in and about Redlands. 
N. B.— Be sure and ask for Club Stable rigs. 

L.. L,. NE WERF— REAL ESTATE. 
226 S. Spring. Mngr. Southern California 
Land and Nursery Co. i8s-speciai attention 
invited to the culture of the olive. 

Write for information, 

McKOON & YOAKUM, 

l^cal Estate, 

234 West First Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




3*'^' 



HoxEL Pklo7v\;kres ® 




POMONA, CALIFORNIA 



A strictly first-class house ot 
130 large rooms, elegantly fur- 
nished. Situated on the main 
lines of the Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe Railways, 32 miles east 
ot Los Angeles. Rates, $2.50 to 
I3.50 per day ; $12.50 to $17.50 per 
week. 

V. D. SIMMS, Manager. 



FOR SALE. 



special to the Land of Sunshine. — 6-room 
modem new Colonial cottage. Hall, bath, hot 
and cold water, patent water closet, fine mantel, 
lawn, street graded, etc. Only $2,500. Terms, 
$500, cash; balance monthly. One of many good 
homes in Los Angeles for sale. Before you buy, 
see TAYLOR & CO., 102 South Broadway. 

For fine Out-door and Other Views 
...CALL Tl iM 

•— PUTN TKTSU"" 

THE PHOTOGRAPHER 

Temple Block Los Angeles, 



Cal. 



l^^giMMMit^-^ 


^ 


[^ 


/ 



LOS ANGELES 

INCUBATORS 
AND BROODERS 

ARE BEST 

Poultry Supplies 

Bone Cutters, Alfal- 
fa Cutters, Shell 
Grinders, Spray 
Pumps, Caponiz- 
inn Sets, Drinking 
Tountains, Poultry 
Books, etc. Cata- 
logues Free. 



JOHN D. MEKCEK, 117 E. Second St. 



Please mention that yotti" saw it in the Lanp of Sunshine." 



fTiiriVErv.'iTYl 




Phoio. and Eng. by Herve Friend. 



TIMBER-LINE IN THE SIERRA. 

Their brothers, purring far below, 
Are trim and shapelier to the eye ; 

But these recked not of scars, to know 
A pine's last frontier toward the sky. 



THE LANDS OP THC SUN EXPAND THE SOUL. 




n 



THE LAND OF'^I 

SUNSHINE^ 






^^S'n 



on 



VOL. 3, No. 4. 



LOS ANGELES 



SEPTEMBER. 1895 



The Paseo. 

BY L. WORTHINCTON GREEN. 

HE wavering heat is broken by long rows 
Of slim acacias, palms and alamos ; 
In brave attire there walk, between, 
Jos€, Andres and Agustin. 

Andres, Jos6 and Agustin 

Stroll down the alameda slow 
Neath spreading boughs with plats between 

Where rose and belled granada grow. 
Tall gray sombreros, silver-trimmed, 
Bedecked with spangles, ample-brimmed, 
Shade from bright rays by clouds undimmed 
The eyes of all. 

They loiter on with airy grace ; 

A turn of head this way and that, 
While sparkling smiles light up the face 

Accenting gay, theatric chat. 
Their jaunty jackets reach the waist 
With rows of buttons closely placed ; 
And braided trousers, tightly laced, 
Costumes complete. 

A greater charm is found by far 

Than shade, bright flowers and tropic weather 
In Juana, Inez and Leonor 

All pretty maids who drive together. 
Clear olive faces, lips of red — 
But back of them the warder's head ; 
The duefia, aye accredited 

For watchful eyes. 

The wavering heat is broken by long rows 
Of slim acacias, palms and alamos ; 

In brave attire there walk, between, 

Jos^, Andres and Agustin. 



Copyright 1895 bjr Land of Sunthine Publishing Co. 




The Snake-Death. 

BY ROSS B. FRANKLIN. 

T was moons and moons ago, Wash-tai-ok-shela,* 
before the big gun of the white soldier thundered 
when the sand-hills were sleepy ; when the coyote 
yelped in the draws as our people came back over 
the trail from the setting sun with the winter's 
meat. The smoke from our tepees curled lazy, 
then, Wash-tai-ok-shela, and did not scatter in 
fear the white man would see it and come with 
speaking thunder to drive us from our lands. 

" Old Weenah was young in those days. Her 
eye was bright and her hair like the darkness ; and 
her feet were swift. 
"See! yonder, where the buzzard is flying over the trees — there, by 
the big white rocks — 

" The days had grown still and bright ; the sumac was almost the color 
of the sunset ; the creeping vine was shedding its leaves and the grass 
was harsh, and rustled in the night winds ; the water- fall was lonely 
and the tumble-weeds had begun to fill up the draws. 

"Weenah sat many hours, there, to watch the moon come over the 
hills, for when it should come red and round, our people were to return 
from the hunt. The children were hungry, and the dogs gnawed bones 
the vultures had left. 

"The moon came, one night, red and round, and Weenah bent her 
ear to the trail to listen for the swish of the tepee poles dragging behind 
the ponies ; but she only heard the dry grass. Once, she thought she 
heard the cry of the hunters, and she bent lower and held her breath ; 
but there was no swish, swish. Then she sat upon a log and her heart 
ached and a lump came in her throat and the rain from her eyes, for the 
moon did not turn to white and she trembled — for the Cheyennes were 
revengeful. Weenah remembered when thej'^ came and burned our 
village and drove away our ponies ; when Weenah's mother took her in 
her arms and fled to the big cave. 

" Soon a step was in the grass. Weenah clutched her knife in the 
shadows — for she could strike hard and sure. It was not the Cheyenne, 
but old Ne-we-ta-a who had beaten the tom-tom more than forty great 
suns at the hunt-feast and the scalp dance. 

"'Weenah sits in the shadows and waits for the hunters,' she said. 
' Hark ! The crows have flown in fours and the moon has not turned 
white. Ne-we-ta-a's snakes have shed the rattle-skins today for the 
second time, that they may louder sound the warning — the Cheyennes 
have met our hunters ! Woe to the hungry Sioux ! Ne-we-ta-a has 
spoken ! ' 

"Weenah crawled to her lodge and burned her necklace of bears' 
claws, that the smoke might go far over the trail and carry much 
strength to her people. 

• Sioux for " Good little boy." 



THE SNAKE-DEATH. '55 

" The next day she watched the crows fly in fours again : the next 
night the moon rose, red and round ; and the water-fall sounded more 
lonely. Weenah laid yonder and listened until the shadows grew short. 
Then she heard. Listen, Wash-tai-ok-shela ! It was not the hunt cry, 
but the long whoop of the war-trail ! With feet like the deer she sped 
to the village and the fires were put out. The children cried and the 
dogs moaned. 

"Our people came — not all of them — and their arrows were spent 
and their meat was lost. While the women were seeking their braves 
and the war-cry was dying into the low chant of desolation, Weenah 
glided about in quest of Swift-Ragle. Had he not come ? She could 
not see, for there were no fires and the moon was red and gave no light 
through the clouds. She used to find him in the dark, for his eyes were 
like the stars and his form was like the big tree. Weenah gave the cry 
of the coyote — Swift- Ragle always heard and answered that. Had the 
Cheyennes — ? No! Swift-Ragle was too brave and strong, and his 
arrows were too swift. 

'• Ne-we-ta-a shook her head and said : ' Swift-Ragle was a coward and 
did not fight when the Cheyennes found our braves. They have bound 
him to the board. Tomorrow he shall die, for it will rain.* 

" Wash-tai-ok-shela, if you love old Weenah, tell her that Swift-Ragle 
was no coward ! His father's girdle held the scalps of a score of 
Cheyennes, and his mother fought with our braves more times than the 
moons of your life. 

" But they were jealous, the braves. Weenah had no smiles for them. 
Swift-Ragle was in the way. How could Weenah love them all? Her 
heart was not a tumble-weed and her smiles were not the leaves, to fall 
everywhere. 

' ' Ne-we-ta-a passed on and sat at her lodge chanting that the Spirits 
would smooth the trail to the happy hunting grounds ; for the Cheyennes 
had killed many of our hunters. 

" Weenah could scarcely reach her bear-skins for her heart was heavy. 
She would lie down upon her knife — tomorrow it would rain and Swift- 
Ragle would die. No ! She would creep to the tree where he stood, 
bound. Swift-Ragle should take the trail over the hills to the Chey- 
ennes. Perhaps some day he would come back and get her. 

"Ne-we-ta-a was chanting; the moon was hidden behind the clouds 
which would rain tomorrow ; the coyote yelped — Weenah cut the raw- 
hides and Swift-Ragle was free ! Wash-tai-ok-shela, he was no coward ! 
He would not take the trail over the hills. He frowned and said no 
word, nor moved. And they found him standing there in the morning, 
when the sky was gray, with the death-song upon his lips. 

" Who would cut the thongs but Weenah? So she was bound and 
taken over yonder with him that she might see him die when it rained. 
Why had she not lain upon her knife ! 

"Old Ne-we-ta-a twisted the hemp string, large and strong; and 
brought her snakes and tied them by their tails to the springing willows. 

* S«nt«nce of death of the Sioux when a disgraceful death is to meted. 

'V 






156 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Swift-Eagle looked at the crows flying in fours, and at Weenah, who 
was bound on the other side to see him die. 

"The hemp string was not long and if Swift-Eagle could have moved, 
he would not have waited for the rain. They bound him to the board 
and switched the snakes to fury. Each time they sprang the springing 
willows bent, then pulled them back. Much they struck ; their fangs 
fell short but a finger from Swift-Eagle's face ; but his eyes did not 
close, 

" Weenah heard the winds coming ; coming with the rain which soon 
fell. The hemp string grew damp and began to stretch. 

" A tumble-weed rolled over the snakes , they struck again and again 
and Swift- Eagle's face was the mark. He smiled and the death-song grew 
w^eaker. And the winds carried it away to the Spirits. It was done. ' ' 

Denver, Col. 



• The Camino Real. 

BY AUGUSTE WEY. 

" And was there a road, Don Antonio, which led directly from Mission to Mission 
as the recognized highway of official travel when California was a part of Spain ? " 

" But yes, and assuredly, there was a road." 

" And had it a name ? " 

" It commenced in Guatemala ; it ended at first in Monterey : then in San Fran- 
cisco de Asis : then in San Francisco Solano, the last of the Missions north." 

" And it was called — Senor Don ? " 

" It was called either the Camino del Rey or the Camino Real in our Spanish. You 
have it in your :English, as well : it is—" 

" Oh, Don Antonio, a thousand pardons in English and Spanish ! You mean 
' The King's Highway.' " 

(Recorded interview with Don Antonio Coronel, I^os Angeles, 1891.) 

NDER the Spanish Bourbon, Carlos III, and his successors, Carlos 
IV and Fernando VII, Spain colonized the semi-mythical Cali. 
fornia of the Spanish records and established in it both Church 
and State under such conditions as resulted, according to Mr. Charles 
Dudley Warner, in "that adobe and ranchero civilization which, down 
to the coming of the Americans, in about 1840, made in this region the 
most picturesque life that our continent has ever seen." 

The Highway upon which this picturesque civilization, commenced 
by Carlos III, was strung, and along which, pictorially, it was "grouped " 
with the artistic sense of Velasquez and Murillo, remains forever to Cal- 
ifornia, ready in every condition of atmosphere, local color, tradition 
and future possibilities, to vie with Canterbury as a pilgrimage of travel 
and go beyond it in importance and paintability. Running into Cali- 
fornia on the south from San Diego, as a direct continuation of the 
preceding Jesuit mission cordon of Lower California, it ended, at the 
time of the secularization of the Franciscan establishments, at San 
Francisco Solano on the north, a mission famous for the skill of its 
neophyte Indians in that curious "feather-work" we associate with 
Montezuma and Cortez. 
T\i\^ Camino Real \v^.% never since its foundation been, for a single 



THE CAM I NO REAL. 



157 



day, other than a traveled road ; but 
its musical name is not often uttered 
now, even by the Spanish-speaking 
Californians, and is as unknown to 
Americans as are the faces of the three 
Spanish kings whose couriers rode 
successively upon it, bearing the 
royal rubrica and the accompanying 
signature " Yo el Rey.'' W 

Recent eminently practical corres- 
pondence and awakened enthusiasm 
lead me to suggest a revival of the 
fiame as well as a concerted revival 
of the road itself, and its Spanish 
traditions, along the whole line of the 
four presidios, twenty-one missions 
and three pueblos, which formed the 
original cordon. Such a revival 
might, I believe, form a motive and 
furnish a common inspiration for the 
three civilizations, Spanish, Mexican 
and American, meeting along this 
still existing roadway, as well as an 
avowed purpose with which to fear- 
lessly guide the actual crusade of 
California travel into as historic a 
path as leads anywhere to the end of 
the world. 

The tithing of both this crusade 
and the road, for some great and 
agreed-upon charity or associated 
charities from San Diego to San 
Francisco Solano has already been 
submitted to certain cardinal points 
along this line and met with instan- 
taneous approval and promised con- 
currence. As a practical itinerary for 
such a pilgrimage I have what I 
believe to be the immortal material 
left me by Don Antonio Coronel, including the whole line of travel 
which he himself followed in zarape and sombrero, walking with the 
friars from mission to mission, a Franciscan day's journey apart, or 
riding "as only Mamelukes and Californians could ride" in his old 
saddle carved and inlaid with silver by the Indian armorers of Santa Inez. 

This line of travel, set down in his trembling Spanish hand, is illus- 
trated with the "rhythm of the castanets" in the fandango; sketches of 
costume ; patterns of Cordovan leather and inscriptions on old Toledo 
blades. Don Antonio had a separate legend of this Highway for every 




From Harper's 

Copyright, 1894, by Harper A 
Bros. 

CARLOS HI. 



" The family of Boiirl>oii. which traces its descent thruuith ' Saint 
Louis ■ to Hiiuh Capet . . . which in Spain produced the most enli|(ht- 
ened of her nionarchs after IsaV)ella I, in the person of Charles III, 
must always interest the historical student ' Kate Mason Rowland 
in Harpers Magazine, January, 1S95. 



158 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 




day in the year. As a soldier, he knew its mil- 
itary details and the life of the four presidios ; 
^ ^ as a citizen, the municipal history of the three 

Jg^^ ^ pueblos ; as a Californian, the strange and ever- 

fascinating record of padre and Indian living "in 
community " under Franciscan rule. 

For all this, our "illustration" mentioned 
above came alternately from his own museum 
upon the ground floor of his house in Los Ange- 
les, the library in its third story and his own 
inexhaustible memory, and included many por- 
traits obtained from Mexican and Spanish 
sources, two of which are furnished here. Both 
of them are associated in countless ways with 
the Camhio Real and both have given it forever 
such local color as is an inspiration toward reviving it. 

Governor Manuel Micheltorena (whose watch Don Antonio always 
wore upon all our pilgrimages over the Los Angeles part of it, and 
which faithfully kept for us to the last the railroad time of " the North 
Americans") has made many a brave entry along it, the scarlet and 
gold of his aide-de-camp alternating with the sky-blue and silver of his 
secretary ; and Father Antonio Peyri for over thirty years was a familiar 
figure upon it, walking in the Franciscan habit, girded with the Fran- 
ciscan cord. Who has not read of the ride of the Indian neophytes of 
San Luis Rey, to the old embarcadero of San Diego to bring him back 
to the mission he was leaving forever? The story of three hundred 
Indians galloping through the midnight only to see the ship Pocahontas 
weighing anchor for Mexico, and the hands of Father Antonio uplifted 
in a last blessing upon California — will yet be painted for us and written 
and dramatized, as it now is only told. 



Union Eng. Co. 

GOV. MICHELTORENA 




Uniuu Ent;. Co. 



THE MISSION OF SAN CARLOS. 



From an Old Print. 



THE CAM I NO REAL. 



159 



Meantime, it is pleasant to connect this so-well-remembered going 
away with the recent Franciscan " Return" to 
this same mission of the great French King, 
Saint and Crusader, Louis IX ; he who was the 
glorious ancestor of Carlos III and His present 
Majesty of Spain. 

It was Governor Manuel Micheltorena who 
vainly decreed the Restoration of the Church 
establishments south of San Luis Obispo. The 
group of friars and that of the Franciscan 
Indians brought up from Mexico, are proofs of 
the actuality of the accomplished "Return," 
and the Re-establishment. Father Peyri, to 
whose portrait the neophytes are said to have 
knelt for years after his departure, is only one 
of a line of priests, as Micheltorena is one of 
the line of picturesque Governors which illus- 
trates the King's Highway. Everywhere it is 
as it should be, an example of pictnre-wri^in^;', 
in the language of Spain and characteristic as the Dresden Codex itself. 

We were standing, not long ago, in the San Gabriel valley, with the 
mountains behind us, and to the south of us the hills in which, Mr. 
Bishop says, ''the falconry parties of Fromentin or a conference of rival 
Aral) chiefs by Pasini might beheld ; " and I was wishing as usual, not 




Union Eng. Co. 

FATHER ANTONIO PEYRI. 
Fnrever associatcil witli the secularization of 



assi 

Sau Luis Rey a 
tlieciiiliarcailei 



of its neophytes to 
Kroin an old print. 




h. A. Eng. Co. 

THREE FATHERS OF THE FRANCISCAN RE-ESTABLISHMENT, SAN LUIS REY. 



i6o 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




Union Eng. Co. 



THE MISSION OF SANTA BARBARA. 



From an Old Print. 



SO much for the falcons and the Arab chiefs as for Fromentin and Pasini 
— when the president of one of the great American railroads, whose 
private car we had left lying at the foot of the Raymond hill, in Pasa- 
dena, said suddenly to me : 

" I knew that this was our Italy, but tell me, why has no one ever told 
Americans that America contained Spain ? Hereafter I cross our conti- 
nent and not the Atlantic ocean to find it. Here then, you have it 
incarnate : the mountains, the barrancas, the atmosphere, the color, the 
Spanish light." 

" But not the Alhambra," I said. " Perhaps travelers may not recog- 
nize it without. Besides, no one, Mr. Warner included, has yet written 
' Their Spain.' That is something reserved, in literature." 




Collier, Eng. 



THE OLD CORONEL HOME. 



From Painting by A. F. Harmer 



SANTA BARBARA. 



i6i 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



Photo, by A. C. Vromaii. 
FRANCISCAN INDIANS OF THE RE-ESTABLISHMENT. 



"I believe you," he answered, as he mounted his horse to ride away 
through the hills into the Spanish atmosphere. 

When T/tetr Spain is on our library shelves beside Our Italy, 
leading again, as Don Antonio knew it, "from Guatemala to San Fran- 
cisco Solano," will be found the true and Californian Caniino Real. 

Pasadena. 



Samta Barbara. 

BY FRANCIS F. BROWNE. 

Between the mountains and the sea, 
Walled by the rock, fringed by the foam, 

A valley stretches fair and free 

Beneath the blue of heaven's dome. 

At rest in that fair valley lies 
Saint Barbara, the beauteous maid ; 

Above her head the cloudless skies 
Smile down upon her charms displayed. 

The sunlit mountains o'er her shed 
The splendor of their purple tinge. 

While round her like a mantle spread 
The blue seas with their silver fringe. 

Enfolded in that soothing calm. 
The earth seems fair and heaven near ; 

The flowers bloom free, the air is balm, 
And summer rules the radiant year. 



KditoT The Dial, Chicago. 




BY ESTELLE THOMSON. 



fORREDOR DEL CAMINO is the Spanish name of a little neighbor 
of mine who lives among the chaparral. Runner of the road, 
it means. 

She is an interesting bird, with irridescent plumage, a tail much out 
of proportion to her body in length, and an aristocratic crest ; and she 
scorns the society of her species, preferring to associate with barnyard 
fowls and human beings. She has reared several broods in a thicket 
close by, and during incubation I find her one of the tamest of wild 
creatures, permitting the hands almost to touch her before she will take 
flight. She likewise allows the little paisanos to be taken out of the 
nest and freely handled, without in the least resenting such familiarity. 

My corredor's spirited husband, while a chick, was first encountered 
one morning after a heavy storm in a very doleful condition ; and being 
yet in tender plumage and seized with chills, he was brought home by 
hand, decidedly draggled. Here he was nursed through various infantile 
disorders until robust and adult. He soon developed great affection, but 
his vanity predominates over all other traits, his proudest ambition being 
to pose and strut before a mirror where, at any hour, he views himself 
with admiring glances. Yet no cat can rid the barn of mice more 
effectually than he, and so proficient has he become in the accomplish- 
ment that the family sooner would lose every domestic fowl of the yard 
than part with the "Little Colonel." 

Two of " Little Colonel's " offspring had a queer history. 

Stolen when young from their mother's nest, they were adopted by 
their captors and given the names Bimbo and Betsy. It was then that 
they became my fascinating study. As they grew they developed to be 
plump and prettily speckled with brown, while that tuft of changeable 
steel-blue feathers which shot up directly in the center of the crown of 
each, standing jauntily erect, gave them a very saucy air. They certainly 
were handsome, and they also were great pets, being known to nearly 
the entire town. 

It was not long before they were as fond as kittens of attention ; and 
they solicited caresses, as well from strangers as the family. They loved 
to be cuddled, and would climb into their foster-mamma's lap and "give 
kisses" in the most captivating fashion ; while they ran as fast as their 
stout legs could carry them whenever they heard their names spoken, 
spreading their short wings and making a queer kl-i-c-k ! kl-i-c-k ! that 
was their only attempt at song. Sometimes they escaped from the yard 



TWO LITTLE CORREDORS 



163 



to the street ; then it was necessary only to open the window and call 
"Come, Bimbo! Come, Betty!" when two little topknotted heads 
would appear quickly over the fence, with two funny long tails bobbing 
up stiffly behind them. But ah, they would suck eggs ! And otherwise 
they were very mischievous. They were capital to clear the garden of 
slugs ; they snapped at every lizard ; each day they looked for a mouse 
from the trap to be fed to them whole — the trap never must be left idle ; 
and if a live bird by any means was procured they played with it as a 
cat with its captive, finally swallowing it ; while they incessantly eyed 
the canary and begged for it when it hung in their sight. They were 
ravenous for fresh meat, and it was laughable to see them follow the 
spade : evidently they knew its use among the garden clods, and the 
minute it was grasped they followed it out, trotting nimbly and looking 
for worms. 

They were pampered darlings, if not spoiled ; and they came to think 
all smaller life created for their prey. Bimbo had an especial fondness 
for flickers, having found by rare experiments that this little Mexican 
bird affords a delicious meal. Several times after such a dainty repast 
he had chased and captured young chickens from the barnyard brood, 
swallowing the downy morsel whole, and at first evading both detection 
and punishment. One day, having temporarily escaped to the secluded 
lower end of the garden, he saw a flicker which for some minutes had 
been feeding under an oak tree. Suddenly Bimbo darted from the 
hillock where he was watching and, tail erect, ran fiercely down the 
knoll. He came at such tilt upon the woodpecker that it had no warn- 
ing of an enemy until the bigger bird pounced upon it from 
the rear and gave it a sharp blow with his beak. Vain 
Bimbo ! he was ready for his mouthful : but the astonished 
flicker wheeled about, gave an angry stare, and then threw 
up its wings and cut the air quickly. It made 
but a short dash, when it alighted at safe dis- 
tance and lifted its voice in indignant protest 
against such conduct, scolding well. Bimbo 
stood as if stunned. It was a most unlooked- 
for turn of affairs, and his crest must have 
been lowered as he walked away. 

For a long time these interesting twins 
afforded amusement in the neighborhood ; 
but at last, so great was the vigilance their 
keeping entailed, they were caged. Their 
cage was ample, but it was not like out-of- 
doors ; and there was within them the 
instinct that called for freedom, if not for the 
chaparral. Confinement told upon them. 

Bimbo pined and died. Then Betty pined and died. Two littlel] 
mounted birds with glass eyes poise in silent state over the mantel 
shelf now : but they are a sorry substitute for two little living birds 
with merry mischief in them, balancing above the garden wall. 




w 



Picturesque Walks. 

BY HAROLD STANLEY CHANNINC. 

^HILE walks in any direction from the heart of Los Angeles give 
ample recompense, one offers unusual attractions. The pedes- 
trian should follow the electric car-line out Buena Vista street 
and just before reaching the river turn to the left up a road at the 
bottom of a ravine with flower-clad slopes. He is almost immediately 
in Elysian Park with its innumerable little valleys and swales, where 
hours can profitably be spent. Or, he can follow a narrow trail along 
the bluffs which rise from the wooded valley of the river. 

If inclination urge him farther afield, he can cross the river, instead, 
turning to the left up the old San Fernando turnpike. After four or five 
miles, to the right, across a little bridge, he enters Eagle Rock valley. 

The valley, shut in by steep, brush-clad hills on the north, full of 
wild caiions, and low ridges covered with wild mustard on the south, 
slopes gently up to the east, where it abruptly terminates at Eagle Rock, 
one of the most remarkable natural freaks in the vicinity of Los 
Angeles. 

This huge dome of grayish pudding-stone drops perpendicularly on 
the west to the valley below. From one point weathering and disinte- 
gration have caused it to simulate a large, clear-cut profile; and on the 
north are two large caves, in the more accessible of which a man 
formerly led a hermit existence. 

The view from the summit is very beautiful. Westward, at one's feet, 
winds the Eagle Rock valley, dotted with cosy homes throughout, until 
it merges into the greater valley of the Los Angeles river, with the rug- 
ged San Fernando peaks beyond. Eastward lie the San Gabriel valley, 
the Sierra Madre, and the snow-peaks of Old Baldy, San Bernardino and 
San Jacinto. 

The return can be made by way of Pasadena if desired. 

Pasadena. 



Lyrics from Sage-land, 



BY NANCY K. FOSTER. 



When from mountain-base rises in soft waves of light. 
The mist-silvered sage with its long fingers white, 
And the honey-bee revels in seas of new sweet, — 
To fall thinking of you, it is meet, it is meet ! 

When the quail leaves his ambush with flutter and stir. 
And the humming-bird circles and darts with low whirr. 
When the butterfly pauses to rest her long mile,— 
To fall thinking of you is worth while, is worth while ! 

When the mimulus bell grows in clusters apace, 
And the yucca's tall taper burns white in one's face, 
When the scents from the foot-hills blow balsam and rest 
To fall thinking of you is the best, is the best I 

Los Angeles 







Union KuB- Co. 



EAGLE ROCK AND ITS VIEW. 



Drawn by P. O. Mueller. 



^' 



The Fog and the Facts. 

BY NORMAN BRIDGE, M. D. 

fHE saddest unhappiness of our existence is that which is unneces- 
sary — and this constitutes much of our suffering lot. 

A strictly impartial judge is rare — many there are who try to 
be impartial, and who think they are ; but one who can completely put 
aside his preconceptions, even those which he would confess are not 
based on evidence, is a rara avis indeed. 

As to the commonest things of life, we sometimes need to forget, if we 
can, those notions we have absorbed, and to reach others by thought. 

Some ideas are settled in the public mind by experience, by that sense 
that is so common that it is common-sense. But if we are to judge our 
occasional morning fogs by this standard, the court and the jury must 
be the earlier Californians rather than the latter-day accessions of hyper- 
critical, hypersensitive, if not hypereducated, invalids. There is per- 
haps such a thing, as O'Rell says of the Bostonians, as being educated 
beyond one's intellect ; and the most evolved refinement of society leads 
to amazing sins against proportion. We seem likely never to want for a 
subject for dispute as long as we have fogs. 

To most pulmonary invalids a fog is supposed to be baneful. It aggra- 
vates all their symptoms, and chills them to the bones ; and any escape 
from it by location or altitude is justifiable. But the old residents find 
no fault with it, but rather like it, and wonder why -such a tempest is 
raised about the subject. The morning fog in summer beclouds the sun 
till the sea-breeze comes up, and so the whole day is delightful. 

Fog is the expression of great and sudden changes in atmospheric 
temperature. 

Southern California is a region capable, by its proximity to the equator, 
of great heat at times ; especially when there is little motion of air, and 
the sun shines. Yet it has the cold ocean on one side, and, near by on 
the other, mountains so high as to furnish a marked degree of cold, 
especially in the absence of sunshine. Hence the land and the atmos- 
phere warmed by the sun are certain to be often chilled by these 
influences as the winds blow, and fogs ought to be expected. 

Our atmosphere is always charged with invisible moisture, more or 
less ; more when the temperature is high, less when it is low. 

Cool the air gradually, and water is deposited. Dew is one form of 
such deposit ; the cooling is gradual, and most at the surface of the 
earth and of objects that radiate the heat of the day. Fog is another 
form of deposit, and occurs when a large body or stratum of the atmos- 
phere becomes suddenly chilled ; it is water in particles so minute as to 
float in the air, and so plentiful as to be visible as a white cloud. 

The fog "comes in from the aea," we say; we can see it come; it 
starts at the shore and travels toward the mountains. But this is often 
all a mistake ; the fog doesn't usually come in from the sea (although 
it may move landward), but is made at the point where we observe it. 
Some cold air charged with less moisture comes from sea or mountain. 



THE FOG AND THE FACTS. 167 

anywhere, mixes with the warmer air with more moisture, which at once 
precipitates its watery vapor as fog, and wherever the cold current of 
dryer air strikes the warmer and moister air, there is likely to be fog, 
whether on land or sea. A cold spell after a few hot days always means 
fog. 

For many it is hard to understand that the fog is not a wicked impor- 
tation, but is mostly created at the spot where it is seen. So, too, it is 
hard to realize that when the sun dissipates the fog in the early fore- 
noon, there is afterward the same amount of water in the air there was 
before — and the identical water, too. It has become invisible from the 
warming of the air that has dissolved the fog particles. 

Expectant attention leads us often to discover from phenomena the 
effects we are looking for. Those who believe fogs are harmful, and that 
the only blessed thing is sunshine, are hurt by them ; they have an 
aggravation of symptoms or catch cold ; while they who believe fogs are 
useful to temper the heat, to save the complexion and to moisten vege- 
tation, they who like gray days, find fogs enjoyable. 

Our apotheosis of sunshine inclines us foolishly to hate fog and rain. 

Not only is it true that there is as much moisture in the air after the fog 
is dissolved — but there is reason to think the watery particles of inhaled 
fog do not reach the lungs as such, but rather as invisible watery vapor, 
exactly as is true of ordinary atmosphere. In view of this fact it is 
diflficult to see how a fog could much harm a pulmonary invalid, unless 
it should last a long time. True, the fog particles strike the face and 
clothes of one exposed to it, and give a sense of chilliness that requires 
more clothing ; so do the night air and a cold day. 

But it is unsupposable that if the fog particles do strike the throat 
they can do special harm for the few minutes or hours that a fog lasts. 

A few people with sensitive throats declare they are always awakened 
by the irritation produced by a fog coming on after they fall asleep ; but 
I well know that many such will sleep on through hours of the densest 
cloud and never discover any irritation till they are told that a fog exists. 
My own belief is that fogs as they occur in Southern California are very 
little harmful to any patient except by their coldness and the abolition 
of sunshine they produce, and the remedy for this injury is clothing, 
and a fire if necessary. This belief is shared by most discriminating 
patients. 

A few patients, apparently free from a too fertile imagination, do in- 
sist that a fog irritates their throats and increases cough, and they must 
be believed. But if the increase of cough also increases the capacity to 
clear the respiratory passages of morbid matter, it is so far an advantage. 
Cough is nature's conservative means of self-protection. 

For our own comfort as well as for truth it is important to deal with 
this subject free from fancy and imagination ; exactly what we usually 
forget to do. 

Consistency continues to be a jewel ; and the psychology of fog in 
Southern California is verily a thing of amusing interest. 



The Old Stage-station. 



>Y R. HARRIS. 



m 



►AVE you relatives that crossed the plains in the early days by 
the " Overland route ? " Have you ever listened to their true 
stories of hardship and suffering, of miraculous escapes from 
murderous Indians, of thirst on the great desert when luke-warm water 
was measured out by the spoonful ? 

To a native born (whose mother crossed the great deserts in those 
early days, and in after life would gather her children around the old 
stone fire-place of an evening and tell them the stories of the plains) 
there is perhaps nothing more interesting than those old thick, adobe- 
walled, mud-roofed, deserted stage stations. 




Eng. Co. 



THE OLD STAGE-STATION. 



There are the great hand-hewn beams that support the heavy roof ; 
perhaps transported from some distant range on human shoulders. 
There are the closely woven lules, bound to slender poles with neatly 
cut strings of rawhide — miles of them — all in turn covered with eight 
to twelve inches of dirt. There is the portico, held up by columns of 
adobe four feet square. There is the huge fire-place, from which the 
light is thrown across the main room, through the crumbling corridor, 
and into the dark recesses beyond. The pale moonlight drops in 
through the broken roof. 

On the white wall is a stain — efforts have evidently been made to 
remove it. Through the plaster there are two little round holes. You 
take out your knife and dig away at the adobe ; out tumble two little 
battered chunks of lead. They are pistol balls. 



THE FIRST SCHOOLS HERE. 169 

There in the corner lies a broken table, around which gathered the 
returning miner from the gold fields, the professional gambler and the 
reckless stage-driver. The little graveyard, just above the house, with 
its quaint little mounds of white sand, bespeaks the result of many of 
these sittings. 

Below, in the flat, are the alkali springs — I can taste the water yet ! 
All around are the ruins of old adobe corrals, where the desert teamster 
kept his mules ; where he fed them hay that cost |2oo per ton. 

Each old ruin has its own spectre — we wish they might haunt our law- 
makers till they appropriate sufficient means to preserve an old station, 
ghost and all. For this is all we will have, soon, to remind us of "The 
days of old, the days of gold." 




The First Schools Here. 

BY MARY M. BOWMAN 

HE educational advantages in California, before the 
American occupation, were limited and spasmodic. 
Schools were established by the various Governors, 
but were apt to lapse for want of money, scarcity of 
persons qualified to teach and indifference of parents. 
The only revenue for support of the school master 
was derived from fines and land dues ; the home 
government contributing small and uncertain aid. 

The sons of wealthy families were sent to Mexico 
and the Hawaiian Islands. Education for girls was 
limited. To embroider, to cook and mend, to do plain sewing, was sup- 
posed to be enough. They learned to read among themselves, or received 
instruction from visiting or resident priests. 

A daughter of one of the leading families, born in Los Angeles eighty 
years ago, taught herself from newspapers brought in the trading vessels. 
When the Alvarados came, she obtained a primary reader. " When that 
was finished," she says, "I learned nothing more, for there were no 
more books." She learned to write after her marriage. 

In the city archives is recorded a payment of twelve dollars by the 
Alcalde, Sept. 29, 1827, for a bench and table bought at San Gabriel for 
a school here, supported by private sulbscription and some slight aid 
from the municipal fund. It evidently did not continue long. In 1836 
a school was opened at San Gabriel, and the Governor detailed Ensign 
Guadalupe Medina for schoolmaster. The school had an attendance of 
61 pupils, but lasted less than half the year, the Governor having recalled 
the officer to his military duties. Four months later the teacher returned, 
but the building being required for a barracks the school was once more 
suspended. In 1844 Don Manuel Requina, in congratulating the retiring 
Ayuntamiento on having established a primary school in the town, stated 
that the Departmental Government had appropriated I500 for that pur- 
pose, and had given leave of absence to Ensign Medina to act as 
preceptor. The learned preceptor held an examination, ** which 



lyo 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




Union Eng. Co. 

DON FRANCISCO BUSTAMENTE. 



proved his devotion to his duties 
and the rapid improvement of the 
youth of Ivos Angeles." The En- 
sign, who was an excellent penman , 
made and copied a complete census 
of the town and adjoining district, 
in 1836, and left on record the fol- 
lowing list of school furniture, the 
property of the Ayuntamiento : 36 
spelling books ; 1 1 second readers : 
14 catechisms by Father Ripaldi ; 
I table without cover ; 6 writing 
desks ; i blackboard. 

School opened the first Monday 
in June, " with solemn mass and 
the concurrence of all the leading 
people." The hours were from 8 
to IT a. m., and 2 to 5 p. m., except 
Sundays, national holidays, and 
saints' days of the town. On their 
own saint's day pupils were ex- 
cused certain hours. The course 
of study was reading, writing, the 
first four rules of arithmetic and Father Ripaldi's catechism. 

The old families of lyos Angeles are indebted to Don Ygnacio Coronel 
and family for many advantages enjoyed by their children. His first 
school was established in 1838 and continued at intervals for more than 
ten years. The system of teaching was a combination of common school 
and kindergarten work. The text books contained illustrations of the 
latter, and some of those in use at that time, brought by the Hijar colony 
in 1843, are preserved in the valuable historical collection of Don 
Ygnacio's son and assistant, the late Don Antonio. The supply was 
scant, and to make them go around, lessons were written on the black- 
board. At one time the school was held in the parish building adjoining 
the Plaza church, where some of the old benches are still kept. A lady 
who was one of Don Ygnacio's pupils in 1848-9, says the school room 
was then in Don Ygnacio's residence, an old adobe house on upper Los 
Angeles street. The boys and girls sat on opposite sides of the room, 
on long wooden benches, except in writing hours, when they were pro- 
vided with tables. They used primers and spelling books, and studied 
arithmetic through the first four rules. Religious instruction was by 
this time relegated to the church. Instead of the catechism, Don 
Ygnacio taught them to dance, and as each pupil completed the study 
of a book he gave a little dance in the school room as a reward of merit. 
His daughter Soledad, who instructed the smaller children, played the 
harp on these occasions. The successful pupil was crowned with Cas- 
tilian roses by the other scholars. In this lady's school days, girls were 
taught to write ; but when a sister six years older attended the Guiardo 



THE FIRST SCHOOLS HERE. I?! 

school to learn embroidery, the master went to the father and asked if 
he should teach her to write. The father said : " No, if girls were taught 
writing they would be sending letters to their sweethearts." On Satur- 
day Don Ygnacio held a half-day session for the scholars to write a 
specimen of their penmanship to carry home. His methods of teaching 
were considered more modern than any preceding, and his pupils speak 
of him with affectionate interest. 

The records of Los Angeles county (vol. i, pp. 69, 70) contain a doc- 
ument in Spanish, of which an idiomatic translation follows : 

" In the city of I^os Angeles at the twenty and one days of the month of June of 
1850, I, Abel Stearns, ist Alcalde and President of the Ayuntamiento, with Don Fran- 
cisco Bustamente, by the faculties which the said Ayuntamiento granted me in session 
of the month of February, we have celebrated the following contract : 

"I, Francisco Bustamente, compromise me to teach to the children first, second 
and third lessons, and likewise to read in letter [script ] to write and count, and so 
much as I may be competent to teach them of orthography and good morals. The 
children must concur to the school at the 7 of the morning, well clean and neat. They 
will have o! reading three hours, those who may have some beginning of writing and 
counting; and those who have not, they will continue until the eleven and a half, in 
which they will give their lessons, so as to retire to their homes. The Saturdays will 
be dedicated exclusively to review, until the 10 of the morning, when they will be dis- 
missed. When the children may be in state of to examine them, advise the Ayunta- 
miento, that it may present itself to the examination. My compromise runs for four 
months counted from the day 6 of May of the current year, in which I began, until the 
day 6 of September ; paying me each month for my wage the quantity of $60, and $20 
for the to rent of the house in which is placed the school ; which quantities shall be 
satisfied me from the municipal funds. 

" I, Abel Stearns, in name of the Illustrious Ayuntamiento, said that I accept the 
articles in which Don Francisco Bustamente counts his compromise ; and I bind the 
Illustrious Ayuntamiento, as per the faculties granted me, that it shall pay him 
punctual-and-monthly from the said funds the $60 of his wage and $20 for the payment 
of the house in which is placed the school. 

" And both, for so much as respectively touches us to fulfil, I the first-mentioned, 
bind my person and my goods, present and future, and 1 the second bind the wealths 
of the reputed Funds for that in fulfilment we be exact . . . The which contract we 
form with the secretary of the Yllustrious Ayuntamiento. 

" Abel Stearns. 

" Francisco Bustamente. 

" Jesus Guiardo. 
" June 21, 1850." 

Don Francisco Bustamente, like his predecessors, had been a soldier. 
He came to California from Sonora, a captain in the Mexican army and 
a cousin of General Urrea, who achieved distinction on the battlefields 
of Texas. His school opened, with about fifty boys, in a building near 
the site of the Phillips block on Spring street. The course of study was 
the same as in earlier schools, except that the scholars were supplied 
with slates but no blackboards. The teacher was severe in discipline, 
especially in inculcating habits of personal cleanliness. One of his 
scholars remembers that their hands and finger nails were inspected 
every morning ; and if not up to the standard neatness, the lads were 
soundly punished on the oflfending members. 



The Legend of Mt. Tauquitz. 




BY HELEN E COAN. 

N the east side of a stretch of hill-encircled country 

g^^Si^^ffl'^iSg towers the mountain of San Jacinto, white to the 
v^sS^k^Gs base in winter, and keeping the snow on its peaks 
f Ji^'tfi »Bj late in the spring, when the green of the valley is 
'* ' interwoven with yellow and purple, blue and 

crimson and white, and patches of gray -green 
appear far up on the foothills, with the soft purple 
sage and its parasite, the golden love-knot. 

Often when the sun has just disappeared, leav- 
ing the valley swathed in shadow, the mountain 
peaks take a transparent deep-red glow, like the 
crystals of the hyacinth stone. So there is special 
appropriateness in the Spanish naming after St. Hyacinth. 

But the mountain assumes its most fascinating aspect when the day is 
cloudy. Then its rugged contours melt in a mass of blue gloom ; cloud 
trails along its shoulders, the fragments flitting across ; a wind blows 
down the caiion and along the river — the white foaming stream seems 
fleeing from the mountain — and then, of all times, one is tempted to 
explore its dread solitudes. 

Winding up a caiiou, we came upon the c/iosa of one of the Indian 
families who prefer these wilds to the tamer settlement of Soboba. 
There, by the door, under the porch roof of brush, the old, old grand- 
mother sat on the ground, hushing the baby on its pillow beside her, 
while the rest of the family were at their meal. Bent and wrinkled with 
perhaps a hundred years, her shrunken arms clasped around her knees, 
her dim eyes blinking from beneath the kerchief that covered her head 
— as I looked at her I felt a reverence for age in the abstract, and a pity- 
ing wonder ; what is and has been the life of this piece of humanity, 
the thread of whose existence is so long drawn out ! 

The baby stirs — she mimics its little whimper, croons to it and pats it. 
They are a deeply interesting people — living close to the earth, with 
only common sense and tradition to guide their strength and weakness. 
This is one of the tales the old grandmothers tell, the legend of Tau- 
quitz. Tauquitz is the Indian name of a spur away on the southern 
slope of the mountain, where the ridges bristle with pine trees. The 
name is pronounced almost in one syllable, the / being scarcely sounded. 
Peculiar explosive sounds are frequently heard in the vicinity of Tau- 
quitz, sometimes several reports in a day. Various explanations have 
been offered of these shocks. But the Indians account for them in a 
way of their own. 

They say that long ago all the clans of the San Jacinto valley were 
united under one chief, named Tauquitz. He was a tall, handsome man, 
keen and very bold ; so that he gained ascendency. 

But as years went by, Tauquitz became very arbitrary. The people 
grew dissatisfied and began to dislike him. Yet they feared his strength 



74 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 



and cunning, and knew not how to cast him off. At last a beautiful 
girl, daughter of the chief of one of the tribes, disappeared, and no trace 
of her could be found. Then another maiden was lost, and while they 
were still seeking her, word came that the daughter of another chief was 
missing. Kvery woman in the valley trembled. The men were enraged ; 
they suspected Tauquitz. They searched his cabin, and the scalps of 
the girls were found in the pouch of the hated chief. He was seized and 
brought before a council of the principal men of the clan, who con- 
demned him to death by fire. 

So the preparations were made, and all the people came together. 
Tauquitz, grim and silent, with eyes of fire, was bound to the stake and 
the wood was lighted. But look ! as the blaze went up, the form of 
Tauquitz suddenly disappeared, and a great spark of fire flew into the 
air, was wafted eastward toward the mountain, and vanished. Then all 
the people knew that Tauquitz was a witch, who had disguised himself 
as a man among them, to work them harm. 

And ever since that time, these strange sounds have been heard from 
the mountain. It is because Tauquitz has taken up his abode there in a 
cavern ; ever and anon he goes out to catch a young girl whom he im- 
prisons there ; and the shock that we hear is the sound of the great stone 
as Tauquitz claps it upon the mouth of his cave. 

The old men and women of the Indians believe this as firmly as our 
grandparents, perhaps, believed in the existence of Luther's horned 
Satanas. But the young Indians, if asked about it, deny that they have 
ever heard such a legend. 

Los Angeles. , 



/Pasadena. 

ITS FIRST OWNER, FIRST HOUSE, AND ORIGIN OF ITS NAME. 

BY H. A. REID, A. M., M. D. 

N the dim, far-away time, when the Spanish padres 
held sway over the Indians and lands where the 
city of Pasadena is now, there lived a woman of 
purest Spanish blood, and much devoted to her 
chosen work of aiding the priests in every way to 
christianize the Indians. She was as zealous and 
faithful a missionary as any of the priests. Her 
name was Eulalia Perez de Guillen ; and her hus- 
band, Antonio Guillen, was one of the king's 
soldiers, on duty as military guard of the Mission 
establishments. He appears to have been first 
stationed at San Diego ; but in 1801 she comes into 
notice at San Gabriel. I cannot follow her career in detail ; but during 
the later years of Padre Zalvidea's administration, within which this 
Mission achieved its preeminent industrial and commercial success, 
Eulalia was bookkeeper, paymaster, treasurer, and kept the keys of the 
Mission's rich storehouses and its money room. In this latter were 




JNIVERSITY 



EARLY PAASDENA. 



^hwQ^^. 




EULALIA PEREZ. 

From an old photu. 



sometimes bags of silver dollars piled 

up all around as high as she could 

reach ; and no matter whether it was 

one dollar for an Indian's work, or 

$20,000 for a ship-load of Yankee 

notions at San Pedro, not a dollar was 

paid out except through her, upon the 

padre's order. In addition to this, she 

had oversight of the Indian women at 

their several tasks, such as spinning, 

weaving, tailoring, flour-sifting, bread 

making, etc., in all of which needful 

arts she gave them instruction and 

training ; and also taught them the 

moral and social decencies and relig- 
ious forms of civilized life. 

In 1826 Padre Zalvidea was sent to 

San Juan Capistrano, and Padre San- 
chez took his place at San Gabriel. 

After Zalvidea went away, he prepared 

a deed for three and a half square 

leagues of land to this woman, and 

.sent it to his successor for confirmation. 

Padre Sanchez confirmed it on Easter 

{San Pascual in Spanish), 1827, and so the rancho San Pasqual took its 

title name from the church calendar day on which it was formally con- 
firmed to Eulalia Perez de Guillen. She died at San Gabriel, June 8th, 

1878. Dr. J. P. 
Widney, in his 
book, California 
of the South — 
says she was 
"aged 143 years, 
having been 
born at Loreta, 
in Lower Cali- 
fornia, in 1735. 
The age of Se- 
iiora de Guillen 
has been estab- 
li.shed beyond a 
doubt." I knew 
Dr. Widney as a 
good Methodist 
brother, not 
given to ro- 
mancing, yet I 
doubted if even 




Herve Friend, Eng.* f-jj^sT HOUSE IN PASADENA. 



Photo, by KoM. 



176 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




ELLIOTT 
A Founder of Pasadena. 



climate could stretch a human life 
to double the Scripture measure. 
This marvelous woman was the 
mother of eleven children — eight 
daughters and three sons ; and I 
found one of those daughters still 
living who was born in 1812, when 
her mother was seventy - seven 
years old, according to Dr. Wid- 
ney's dates — and I found there 
was still another daughter born 
about eighteen months later than 
this one. Theii I wagged my 
head. Here is too much longevity 
and too latitudinous maternity. 
But now comes T. F. Barnes and 
vouches that he knew a Mexican 
woman at Phoenix, Arizona, who 
gave birth to .a daughter when 
she was 74 years old, and the 
child weighed eight pounds. He 

weighed it himself. The woman was reported to be 80 years old ; but he 

made inquiry about it and ascertained that she was really 74 years old. 

So I withdraw my doubts. 

In 1831-32, Gov. Eachandia set out resolutely to enforce the law for 

secularizing the Missions, which had been frustrated for nearly ten years. 

In April, 1832, he sent a body of Indian troops to "borrow" $20,000 from 

the San Gabriel Mission treasury. Old Eulalia refused to give up the 

keys, and hid them. Then her money room was broken open and bags 

containing $20,000 were taken from it 

as a " loan." But the costs of enforcing 

the law ate it all up, so the * ' loan ' ' was 

never returned. 

The first white man's habitation ever 

built on Rancho San Pasqual was the 

west L of the old adobe ranch house 

which is still standing a few rods below 

the south border of the Raymond Hotel 

grounds, in South Pasadena. Jos^ Perez, 

a son of a cousin of Eulalia Perez de 

Guillen, resided here in 1839, and the 

house had been built or commenced 

two years before. His wife was a 

daughter of Don Antonio Lugo, com- 

mandante of Los Angeles in 18 18 and 

the 'Twenties ; and after Perez died she married Stephen C. Foster, 

the Yankee from Maine, graduate of Yale college, etc. The Mexican 

army was camped between this house and the Monterey road, on January 






^^eaZ '^^^^ -^^^ ^ ^:C 



yia-i.,,^ci^ 



0/.if^c 






The original niomoruudum from which the 
name Pasadena was chosen. 



SPENT GOLD. 177 

9th and loth, 1847, after the two days' battles at San Gabriel ford and on 
the mesa east of Los Angeles. Commodore Stockton marched into Los 
Angeles on the morning of the loth ; and about the same time the 
Mexicans dispatched from this old house a preliminary committee to 
negotiate terms of surrender with Col. Fremont, who had just reached 
San Fernando old Mission by an arduous, storm-beaten march down the 
coast from Monterey. And this move resulted in the historic "capitula- 
tion of Cahuenga." 

In May, 1873, at the office of Berry & Elliott, in Indianapolis, was 
organized the "California Colony of Indiana," with Dr. T. B. Elliott as 
president. Its plans and efforts failed ; but out of these eventually came 
the " San Gabriel Orange Grove Association ; " and out of this came the 
city of Pasadena. The origin or derivation of the name " Pasadena " has 
been set forth in " Bancroft's Railway Guide" and several other publica- 
tions, as from the Spanish language ; but this is an entire mistake — its 
true origin being from the memorandum slip shown in the engraving, 
never before published, which the Land of Sunshine is permitted to 
use from advance sheets of my "History of Pasadena," now in press. 
Calvin Fletcher was a leading member of the Orange Grove Colony, and 
was specially desirous to secure for it some name that should be distinc- 
tively new, not hackneyed or worn out ; and Dr. Elliott wrote to a college 
classmate of his who had gone as a missionary among the Ojibway [Chip- 
pewa] Indians of Michigan and Wisconsin, explaining the lay of the 
land, the general situation, and what the colony desired in the way of a 
name. In answer to this, his friend sent him the document shown in the 
engraving. Dr. Elliott settled upon the word ' ' Pasadena ' ' as the most 
euphemistic, comprehensive, and suitable in meaning, of all the words on 
the slip, and advocated it^ Some wanted " Indianola " as the name; 
some wanted " Grenada ; " and other names were suggested ; but finally, 
at a Colony Association meeting on April 22, 1875, a motion to adopt the 
name "Pasadena" prevailed by a vote of four to one; and from. that 
hour the word won its way in the world's nomenclature. There are now 
Pasadenas in Texas, Florida and New Jersey, all taking name from ours. 



Spent Cold, 



BY ANNA C. MURPHY. 



Oh, for the time of the mustard's prime, 
For the shifting haze of its yellow maze. 

For the airy toss of its dancing gloss, 
For the amber lights along the heights 

of the verdurous April ways ! 

Oh, for the tryst of the lark in its mist. 

For the fleeting flash of his breast's gold plash. 

For the thin fused gold of his song, retold 
Like the flute's uplift as echoes drift 

from the orchestra's silenced clash ! 



Our Schools. 



BY KATE TUPPER CALPIN. 

EOPLE of intelligence appreciate that no wealth of 
climate atones for a dearth of educational oppor- 
tunities, and wisely ask, before making their home 
in a new localit}-, what schools it has. A bird's 
e3e view of Los Angeles reveals how many of its 
prominent buildings are devoted to education. 
The High School crowns one hill, the College of 
the Sacred Heart another, the State Normal School 
another ; to the west is the Los Angeles College, 
and to the south is the University of Southern Cal- 
ifornia. At considerate distances are placed the 
small public school buildings, the city's wise policy 
having been to build many eight- to sixteen-room buildings rather than 
a few imposing edifices at equally imposing distances. The great num- 





Union Eng. Co. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, LOS ANGELES. 



Photo, by Maude. 



ber of school-buildings would indicate that there were enough and to 
spare ; but the population has outrun school-room facilities. In spite of 
the facts that no election for school bonds has ever failed to carry by an 
almost unanimous vote, and that school building has for many years 
been uninterrupted, there is not at present seating room for all the 
children. Bonds for 1309,000 were voted last March, however, and this 
city of phenomenal growth hopes to furnish, in the near future, ample 
school facilities for all its children. 

The founders of the public school System of California had the suc- 
cesses and the failures of other States to profit by. California's school 
system is as perfect a piece of educational mechanism as could well be 
devised. Perpetual motion of educational machinery without the 



OUR SCHOOLS. 



79 



application of exterior force is no more an educational than a mechan- 
ical possibility. Its successful operation is entirel)' dependent upon the 
applied teaching force. Schools vary with the excellence of the 
teachers. The standard of teachers is high, however, and Californians 
are justly proud of their public schools. One reason for this high stand- 
ard is that Californians knew from the l)eginning what the older States 
had to learn — that a trained teaching force is essential to the operation 
of a good public school system — and Normal schools were early estab- 
lished. Many excellent teachers have been attracted from the Eastern 
States, also, by climatic and wage conditions. 




Union Eng. Co. 



LOS ANGELES HIGH SCHOOL. 



Photo, by Pierce. 



i8o 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



The course of study is similar to that of the best Eastern schools ; 
begins with the kindergarten and fits for the university. The city High 
School is on the accredited list of Berkeley and Stanford Universities. 
Special teachers of physical culture, music, writing and drawing are 
employed in the public schools ; and Spanish, French and German, as 
well as Greek and Latin, are taught in the High School. 

Kindergartens were at first supported by subscription, but a few years 
since were made a part of the public school system. At present there 
are 13 14 children five and six years of age enjoying the delights and 
benefits furnished them by 49 kindergartens in Los Angeles. The old 
Free Kindergarten Association is supporting kindergartens for children 
under school age in the more crowded districts of the city. 




K U i 



Herve Friend, Eng. 



A SUBURBAN SCHOOL, TEMPLE STREET. 



Photo, by Pierce. 



There are two well-supported schools — both private enterprises — for 
the training of kindergartners. The recognition of the importance of this 
training for all young women (as the majority will become mothers and 
all will be more or less associated with children) is steadily growing in 
Southern California as elsewhere. At first only those who expected to 
be kindergartners availed themselves of the training school ; but the 
number who look upon it as a means of high culture is steadily 
increasing. Frobel believed that in America would first be realized his 
dream of the systematic and intelligent training of girlhood for mother- 
hood. Frobel's disciples in Southern California see hopeful signs that 
their section of America will first realize that dream. 

Frobel Institute, having its home in beautiful Casa de Rosas, is in its 



OUR SCHOOLS. 




PATIO OF CASA DE ROSAS. 

third year. It aims not only to train kindergartners but to teach 
children from the kindergarten to the college, on Frobel's principles, 
Casa de Rosas was pronounced by the judges at the Columbian Exposi- 
tion a model of school architecture. Constructed with conscientious 
regard for light, heat, ventilation and utility, it is also a perfect bit of 
Moorish architecture. Its cool gray walls are traced with climbing roses 
and its court is enriched with tropical plants. Children in the atmos- 
phere of its beauty alone can not fail to be uplifted. 

The subject of manual training has received much attention ; and 
discussion of the subject has led to initiative steps for making it part of 




A SCHOOL-ROOM, CASA DE ROSAS. 



l82 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 



the public school work. The State Normal School has the past year 
made preparation for the teaching of Sloyd, and the Junior class will 
begin the work. As soon as the Normal School can furnish teachers of 
Sloyd the public schools will probably adopt it. 

The Orphan's Home is beginning to give systematic industrial train- 
ing this year, and the Throop Polytechnic School at Pasadena has done 
four years' successful work in this line. 

General, intelligent, active interest in education is evidenced by the 
large audiences that eagerly gather for the discussion of educational 
subjects. 

In addition to the public schools there are numerous private ones. 



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Herve Friend, Eng 



,L :^n-.LL'l SCHOOL. 



Photo, by Hill, Pasadena. 



The Methodists, Catholics, Baptists, Presbyterians, Episcopalians and 
Congregationalists have each their church schools in easy reach of Los 
Angeles, with fine buildings, and in some cases generous endowment. 
Three business colleges are largely patronized, and select schools for 
boys and girls abound. Advantages in music and art in Southern Cali- 
fornia are remarkably fine. The climate has attracted hither many 
musicians, and the scenic peculiarities many artists ; so that in few cities, 
outside the great Eastern centers, are better opportunities. 

The Whittier State School, within an hour's ride of Los Angeles, is 
attracting national attention by its success in reformatory work. It 
follows closely the most advanced thought in child-saving. Industrial 
training to the extent of giving each boy or girl a trade ; physical 
culture, including military drill ; regular school work, and stimulating 



OUR SCHOOLS. 



183 



moral influences suited to individual needs are features of its work. 
The school is deemed one of the best of its kind in the country. 

In fact, Southern California, with Los Angeles as its center, is doing 
its full share of experimenting, as well as work, in educational lines and 
is obtaining recognition for definite results. 

In the sound body, nature's gift to the California child, the sound 
mind finds its habitat. Nations in which climatic conditions are similar 
to those of Southern California have attained the highest intellectual 
development and have for centuries dominated the world of letters. No 
wonder that the ambition of Californians soars high. 

The schools of California have many characteristic and interesting 
features, although following conservatively the methods of the East. 
What material for artists the various groups of children present ! Where 
but in California could a Chinese kindergarten with its kaleidoscope of 
color be found ? Where more often than in Los Angeles schools the 
strong and delightful contrasts of race types ? Heads black and white, 
with all the intermediate shades of brown and red and gold and yellow, 
bob and twist before the artist ; eyes the color of the sky, the sea, the 
harvest fields and the moonless midnight look into his ; all possible 
skin tints tempt his brush, and the grace, vigor and beauty of abounding 
health continually delight him. The student of ethnology or sociology 
finds our schools as full of food for thought. All the races of the earth 
have therein their representatives. Verily the teacher holds in her hand 
this nation's destiny ! The Spanish, German, Italian, Chinese, Japanese 



Hfe. 





Hcrve KrivuJ, Kug. 



SEVENl t-EN I H i/Ktfc/ iCHOUL. 



i'hoto, by U.U, I'oiaUcna 



i84 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



and other baby lips learn their native language from the teacher. With 
very many of these children English is the teacher-tongue and not the 
mother-tongue. The teacher must also inculcate that loyalty the 
mother can not teach because she can not know. Upon the public 
schools, upon the young women who teach in them, more than upon 
statesmen, depends the solution of the national problems. 

Los Angeles. 

There are in the city of Los Angeles 40 public schools, of a total value of 1751,870 ; 252 teachers whose 
salaries aggregate $200,699 ; a school enrollment of 12,191 children (in 1893-94) besides 1073 in private schools. 




Herve Friend, Eng. SPRING STREET SCHOOL. P'^"*"- ^^ P'""®- 

Just Corn. 

OUTHERN CALIFORNIA makes no great pretense as a corn 
growing country, like some of the States which boast that corn 
is king. This is not because we can't grow corn here, but simply 
for the reason that in this section horticulture yields larger profits than 
the raising of grain and root crops. Still, the crop of Southern California 
is by no means to be sneezed at. A large percentage of the corn crop of 
the State is raised in the counties of Los Angeles, Orange and Ventura. 
The crop of Los Angeles and Orange counties was recently estimated at 
200,000 centals, worth about |225,ooo. Probably 75 per cent, of the crop 
is shipped to San Francisco. Corn is generally raised here without 
irrigation, and brings a much higher price than in the East. It is the 
finest that can be grown and the yield is immense. In some cases the 
stalks grow to the height of over 20 feet. 

Much corn is grown here upon land that is also made to produce a crop 



PICTURESQUE BYWAYS. 185 

of grain or hay the same season. After harvest in the fall the land is 
quickly plowed and seeded to barley or wheat. This is cut for hay when 
the grain is in the milk, generally the latter part of March or early in 
April, and corn planted again. 

Marvelous stories are told of yields that have been obtained from corn 
fields of this section under favorable conditions. Thus a man in Ventura 
county, who had 59 acres in corn, gathered 4,000 pounds per acre from 
eight acres ; and from the rest of the land, 2,500 to 3,000 pounds to the 
acre. A man who had a five-acre ranch on the San Gabriel river did still 
better. He received one-third of the corn for the rent. His share 
amounted to 12,590 pounds of ear corn, which is equivalent to a yield of 
7>554 pounds per acre. Deducting one-fifth for the cob, leaves 6,044 
pounds of shelled corn or about 108 bushels per acre. At the price of 
com in California such yields are calculated to excite the envy of Eastern 
farmers. 

Egyptian corn is a variety that has been grown to a considerable extent 
in the irrigated sections of Southern California for use as a fodder plant 
and for fattening hogs, feeding chickens, etc. It is also grown to some 
extent without irrigation. Its leaves are excellent for stock of all kinds, 
and its peculiar grain, little larger than tomato seed, is good food for 
horses. The grain has also been ground for family use. It makes an 
excellent breakfast dish, something like farina. The stalks sometimes 
grow seven feet or more in height and about an inch in diameter at the 
root. Those who have planted this corn in dry sections say that it grows 
luxuriantly where other corn would not survive. 



Picturesque Byways. 



iY R. GARNER CURRAN. 



//* /g%HAIvE ROCK," Ventura County, is about four miles northeast 
\9\j of Nordhoff, on the old Hines ranch, and is perched on a 
* • ledge that stands out from the mountain as if built especially 
for its resting place. The ledge is surrounded with lemon and olive 
orchards. One olive orchard of 45 trees produced 650 gallons of oil last 
year. Whale Rock itself is 75 feet long and about 30 feet high. The 
outline is perfect and very distinct, as can be seen by the picture. 
The eye, fin, tail are all as natural as they would be in a petrifaction. 
The formation is of dark red sandstone. Many ledges in the vicinity 
are filled with fossil shells, and immense oyster beds extend for miles 
along the foothills. (See next page.) 

From the top of Whale Rock one has a fine view of the most pictur- 
esque little valley in the world. Topa-Topa, high and haughty, rises 
5,000 feet above you, while beautiful orchards, vineyards and woods of 
live and white oaks stretch out below. Sulphur Mountain shuts out a 
view of the ocean to the south, but its thickly wooded sides and charm- 
ing little canons make a pleasing frame to the lovely picture. 

Los Angeles. 




It may or may not have occurred to You Who Ivive Back Yonder as a 
significant thing ; but now that it does occur you will not be slow to 
weigh it. Live where you may, you know people who have removed 
from your locality to California. You have heard from them or of them 
since the move, and have very likely wondered why it " went to their 
heads " so soon. But you may have noticed this one thing. When they 
had rooted here, acquired property and the California habit, they didn't 
l)egin to tempt those among their old neighlx>rs whose guardians have to 
lock them up every time a bunco-steerer strikes the town. They did not 
try to "rope in" the professional suckers. On the contrary — and no 
doubt you noticed it — they began on their own relatives and dearest 
friends ; on the people for whose happiness they would be likely to have 
some personal concern, in whose intelligence and morals their very ties 
indicate confidence. 

Now when you take this fact off into a quiet corner and think all 
around it for awhile, it ought to give you an idea — unless you are too 
proud to accept presents from strangers. Some difference, isn't there, 
between a " boom country " full of touts exploiting their lungs that they 
may sell out and get out, and a land to which the happy inhabitants are 
most anxious to fetch their loved ones, even if they have to pay their 
fare ; and are no less anxious that incompetents .shall not come on any 
terms ? 

The Boston Public Library^ has 610,375 volumes ; the Los An- nota 
geles Public Library has 42,313. The circulation of books in bean. 

1894 by the two institutions was respectively 2,100,604 and 489,086. That 
is to say, the Boston Library had fourteen and a half times as many lx)oks 
but circulated less than five times as many. In other words, the Los 
Angeles Public Library circulates nearly three times as many lx>oks in 
proportion to its size — and is therefore nearly three times as efficient — 
as the pride of the City of Culture. The figures also indicate that the 
circulation of l)Ooks was about three per head among Bostonians and 
seven per head among Angelefios. Only people " educated beyond their 
intellects " (I thank thee, Max, for teaching me that word ! ) will see no 
significance in these facts. They point the moral this magazine has been 
preaching — the extraordinary average intelligence of this population. 

Miss Beatrice Harraden, of Ships that Pass in the Night and in 
the modern crowd, has been doing some months in Southern 
California. She is so amiable and well-meant a little woman that it is a 



AFTER WHICH. 

THE FOG. 



i88 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

pity she should have handicapped herself by picking to be born in Eng- 
land. A sense of humor, now, would add much to her enjoyment of this 
country where are no snobs. A still greater misfortune is it to carry one's 
horizon with one, like the familiar insular hat-box. Miss Harraden has 
seen sixteen square feet here, by design. Her California is a San Diego 
county fly-speck of three or four British Younger Sons, married with 
Elder Daughters, gnawing around the edge of an unfamiliar and too-large 
mouthful. By these tokens she reckons that Charles Dudley Warner will 
have to account at the bar of God for having larger eyesight ; and that 
our own Van Dyke is Another. On the head of her valuable studies of 
half a dozen impossible " mud-students," she is writing a story based on 
The Fearful Homesickness of Women in California. And really, she is 
young enough to know better. 

THE WRONG LAW The lyiou cannot wholly lie down with such sages among the 

'^ "^^^ California editors as hold that Judge Ross's decision adverse to 

the Wright irrigation act is ** a blow to one of the leading in- 
dustries of the State." Nor does he have to. It is good morals not to 
cry before you are hurt ; still better, not to cry when you are. And in a 
case like this, you know much better afterward than at the time whether 
you really are hurt or not. The decision is not against irrigation, but 
against a specific law which allows the voters of a district — whether 
property -owners or not — to levy upon your holding for an enterprise 
which you may not desire and by which you may not be benefited. 
There was irrigation in California before the Wright law was born ; and 
there will be irrigation some eons after mankind shall have forgotten that 
such a statute ever existed. At present, most sections of the State irrigate 
without any assistance of public funds. 

It may be, as some hold, that the voice of the people is the voice of 
God ; but in that case, the Almighty must change his mind at some- 
thing like every other election. 

The voice of the people has given the metropolis of the Union for half 
a century as infamous misrule as ever existed under the sway of a despot ; 
and thinking upon New York, one may well pause on the brink of a law 
which allows one's land to be mortgaged on behalf of a business enterprise 
managed by popular vote. Development of water under the Wright act 
was doubtless an excellent thing when properly managed — but how when 
it was mismanaged ? I^ike the little girl of nursery literature : 

" When it was good, it was very, very good— 
And when it was bad, it was horrid." 

The deadly thing about the law was that it turned property over to the 
hands of politics — and politics means no longer the rule of the majority, 
but the rule of the self-seekers. 

The miserable part of the business is that in the five years this law has 
adorned the statute-books some $19,000,000 of bonds have been issued 
under its provisions, and $15,000,000 of them transferred to holders of 
water-rights or sold to investors — and all before a final decision upon its 
constitutionality (assuming that the decision of Judge Ross is final). 



IN THE LION'S DEN. 189 

When the 21st-century historian shall exhume this mouldy incident 
and lay it before his readers, he will need some reasonable explanation. 
He may suggest that harmless idiocy was a qualification for the legislature 
in our day ; since our law-makers, themselves innocent enough of tech- 
nical knowledge, did not have an expert commission whose duty it should 
be to decide as soon as a law was passed — or, better yet, before it was 
passed — if it would hold water. It will certainly puzzle future genera- 
tions to understand why we did not bring to bear on the problems of law- 
making some of the common sense which we do not omit from our own 
business. 

The National Popular Review, published in Chicago and a safe 
edited by Dr. P. C. Remondino, a well-known authority, has summer. 

in its June issue a long and valuable consideration of " Southern Cali- 
fornia in Summer." Among other things the writer discusses the 
reasons why heat in the humid atmosphere of the East often kills, while 
in the arid atmosphere of the Southwest it is not even uncomfortable. 
He cites : 

'■ The great mortality that overcame New York city during the week ending July 6, 
1882, when meteorological conditions alone produced more deaths than the Asiatic 
cholera during the week of July, 1866, or the deadly week of January. 1S90, known as 
the 'grippe' week (490 more for the hot week than for the grippe week, and 229 more 
than for the great cholera week) .... Southern California climates are a delight as 
well as the haven of rest and recuperation .... We really have no summer, in the 
sense of an Eastern summer, and therefore do not need the winter frosts so necessary 
elsewhere to do away with the after morbid effects of such summers .... Southern 
California undoubtedly gives the smallest infant mortality in the United States. From 
birth to the age of five years— the period so fatal to child life elsewhere — childhood is 
safer in this region than in the localities that boast of distinct seasons, especially of 
hot summers .... During a residence here of 22 years we have not seen a single case 
of cholera infantum which we could say was due to climatic causes." 

Curious how one-sidedly this much-pictured country has been shown ! THIS, THAT 

Ninety-nine per cent, of the photographs sent out from here to the world AND T'OTHER. 

are as if this were dead-level semi-tropics. In reality there is rather more 
here than palms, roses and oranges. The Land of Sunshine intends to be under- 
stood abroad when it says that Southern California reaches from Florida to Maine. It 
has more than a suspicion, too, that it will reveal some pictorial news about this 
extraordinary land even to the majority of those who live here. It has not yet dis- 
covered anyone who cannot be surprised by Southern California ; and it aims to show 
all sides. 

The Land of Sunshine Publishing Co. was duly incorporated under the laws ot 
California August 8, 1895, with a capital stock of |io,ooo. Its officers are : President, 
W. C. Patterson ; Vice President, Chas. F. Lummis ; Secretary, F. A. Pattee ; Treas- 
urer, H. J. Fleishman ; Directors, the above and Charles Cassat Davis. The other 
stockholders are I). Freeman, Geo. H. Bonebrake, Charles Forman, Wni. LeMoyne 
Wills, F. W. Braun, W. H. Holabird, Charles Dwight Willard, S. H. Mott, Andrew 
Mullen. F. K. Rule, I. B. Newton, K. E. Bostwick, Fred L. Alles, E. W. Jones. John F. 
Francis, Harry Ellington Brook and C. M. Davis. A list of better names could not be 
drawn in Southern California. 

There needs immortal patience to answer the undying query " and have you any 
schools out there in California ? " No one should need to ask the question. This is 
no Botany Bay and no Hoop-pole township. The 90 per cent, of us who dominate this 
new country are Eastern born and bred. We were just as well educated as our 
cousins who staid at home ; and more traveled. We have as many schools, as hand- 
some schools, as expert schools as any other numerically equal population in the world. 




THAT 

WHICH IS' 
WRITTEM 



Probably there need be no sur- 
prise that in these thrifty times Sir 
Edwin Arnold, M. A., K. C. I. E. , etc., should 
have rehashed (in the Cosmopolitan for August) that 
venerable tale of Rampsinitus and his pre-Yankee 
architect. Still less wonder that he has been able to tell it in more words 
than did the Father of History — who had not discovered I^iterature at 
;^5 per looo. But it gives one pain in the equator to find Sir Edwin 
retelling not the original but the version of John South Phillips — and 
retelling it not a tenth so well. Plagiarism is bad enough, but such a 
blunder as this is worse than crime. Sir Edwin's tale is not " expanded 
from the brief Greek text of Herodotus," but from the deadly-clever 
verse of Phillips — as half an eye may see by comparing Euterpe 11^ 121 ^ 
with The Treasury of Rampsinitus. The coincidence is more than 
extraordinary — it is simply impossible. The stupid theft is doubtless 
blamable not to the alphabet-with-Sir-Edwin-at-its-head, but to the 
inevitable friend- with-a-story who has *' let him in." 

A STORY OF I^r. O. W. Nixon, for 17 years president and literary editor of 

THE PIONEERS. the Chicago Inter- Ocean — and himself a pioneer of the North- 

west — has made a very interesting story of How Marcus Whitman 
Saved Oregon. It should be in every Western library. Whitman, the 
young missionary who made his wedding journey to Oregon in 1835, 
was a typical American hero. The country, already in the grasp of the 
Hudson Bay Company, was about to be absorbed by Great Britain. To 
save it to the United States, Whitman made a magnificent ride, in the 
winter of 1842, through all sorts of hardships and danger, to Washing- 
ton. He compelled the careless ears of President Tyler and Secretary 
of State Daniel Webster ; and finally animated the government to take 
possession of an area we would now be loath to part with. His patriotic 
mission a success, Whitman returned to his frontier post, taking the 
first large colony of Americans into Oregon. He was butchered, with 
his wife and many others, in the massacre of Waiilatpui, November, 
1847. I^r. Nixon— who went to Oregon in 1850, and taught in the "little 
log school-house on the Willamette," and was purser of the first steamer 
ever built in Oregon — adds some unpretentious chapters of his own 
pioneer experiences. The book makes no literary claims, but is an 
earnest and interesting contribution of material for American history. 
The Star Pub. Co., Chicago, $1.75. 



THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN. 191 

Mr. Stephen Crane is clearly the ablest poet of the age ; since a linear 
his verse sells in open market for more per line than does genius. 

anyone's else. In his Black Riders, the relation of lines to excellent 
white paper suggests nothing else so much as a pair of black ants chas- 
ing themselves across a bedspread. On some pages there are three 
lines, and on some so many as a dozen — which is sheer waste. Mr. 
Crane would have sold just as many copies if he had never exceeded 
three lines to the page. It gives to suspect that vanity was stronger 
than the lust for gain with him — a triplet would not hold so much 
Crane as this (grammar and all) : *^ 

vii. 

' ' Mystic shadow, bending near me, 

Who art thou ? 

Whence come ye ? 

And— teli me— is it fair 

Or is the truth bitter as eaten Are? 

Tell me! 

Fear not that I shall quarer 

For I dare— I dare, 

Then, tell me! " 

L/Ct it not be dreamed that this daring darer is a fool. He has thoughts 
— by long-distance telephone, with the wires generally crossed. It is a 
miser who would grudge a dollar for such a diagram of "where we are 
at " in literature, and of just what it takes to get a name nowadays. It 
is " dead easy" — 

I was in the hole ; 

I looked up; 

There was one who gave me the laugh. 

Saying, " Tou're broke! " 

Well, then, you lie! 

I can write 

This particular sort 

Thirteen times as fast 

As I can think,— 

And as suckers outnumber. 

$1 a copy goes. 

Copeland & Day, Boston. 

The Philistine is more debtor to its printers than to its bible. meat for 

Its mission on earth is to throw stones — which would rather the jawbone. 

class it with the tribe of Jesse. A little course in scripture before chris- 
tening would have given it to know that one Samson had small trouble in 
killing off some thousand Philistines with a weapon still popular among 
critics. Also that the "best man " who ever was a Philistine, and the 
biggest — Goliath of Gath — was not a disburser but a recipient of the 
furtive pebble. It was presented to him between the eyes ; and the sub- 
sequent Philistinism interested him no more. 

No one grudges an occasional pelting of the mutual back-patters of 
literature ; but proportion is in all things. Kven professional Davids 
should tend their flocks now and then, and use the sling only upon 
occasion. East Aurora, N. Y. Monthly, $1 a year. 

One should not expect too much of magazines — and nowa- sand in 
days one does not. Still, there remains a shock when the their sugar. 

Review of Reviews gravely prints (in its original part) an article by the 



192 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Le Plongeons, on Mexico as the Cradle of Man's Primitive Traditions^ 
or on anything else. Are we never to be done with the imbecilities of 
the Romantic School ? Has a magazine editor no moral responsibility 
to his readers ? Shall he sell them counterfeit knowledge in exchange 
for their standard two-bit pieces and be blameless ? Would it have cost 
the Review of Reviews an unreasonable sum to preserve itself from 
ridicule by learning beforehand how the " explorers " who discovered 
prehistoric telephones in Yucatan stand in the scientific world ? Must 
one be so innocent, before one can steer a magazine, as never to turn a 
hair at swallowing twaddle like " Maya art superior to Egyptian," and 
such other follies as science has been a generation in getting rid of? In 
a word, is there law to forbid that an editor shall know anything of 
the world's advance since he was the southernmost figure of his class in 
the district school ? 

A STUDENT'S J^st why Clias. A. Keeler's little volume of poems should be 

MUSE. called A Light Through the Storm may puzzle the average 

mariner ; but it is too studious and too earnest to be carped at. Its 
serious sin is youth — the most reformable in the calendar. Mr. Keeler 
(who is one of the live scientists of Berkeley) has thoughts ; and he may 
be heard from in poetry as well as in science. His ear is good, his ideal 
high (though plague on him for rhyming it with feel and reveal !) and 
his expression excellently clear. The book is in Doxey's best style ; 
illustrated from paintings by our great Keith and drawings by Mr. 
Keeler's bonuie young wife, who is of the literary Mapes family. Wm. 
Doxey, 631 Market street, San Francisco. 

METROPOLITAN That ouc may be possible though a critic, is proved by the Book 

BUT NO FOOL. Buyer, published by the Scribners (New York, $1 a year). It 
is easily the best of its class ; the business medium of a great publishing 
house, but self-respecting, scholarly, and never a guy. That mild joke, 
for instance, which so sorely trapped the Critic, found no innocent in the 
Book Buyer. Its August number says of the San Francisco Lark : 

" The third number ... is an improvement even upon the monumental first 
number. There is but one thing to regret about the July issue . . . and that is the 
publisher's announcement that the price of the Lark is five cents a number and sixty 
cents a year. In the initial issue the price of a single number was set at five cents, 
and it was to be issued monthly ; subscription, $1 a year. These terms were lark -like 
and admirable, and it is a great pity that they have been changed." 

g^P^y The Lark is still out on it. Number 4 is in evidence with no 

LEAVES. premonition of sobering up. The best thing about the Lark 

is its sui generosity. It is unlike anything nearer to hand than Alice 
in Wonderland. 

The poem in this issue by Francis F. Brown, editor of the best critical 
journal in the United States, the Chicago Dial, will be included in his 
volume of verses. Volunteer Grain, to be published this fall by Way & 
Williams, Chicago. 

T. S. Van Dyke, a valued contributor to these pages^ has just issued 
his fourth book. Game Birds at Home. Fords, Howard & Hurlbert, 
N. Y. $1.50. 



Beauty as an Educator, 

BY CHARLOTTE PERKINS STETSON. 

flf T is a new thing for the little ones of mankind to go to a school 
I called the House of Roses. Dotheboy's Hall they have had ; Mr. 
JL Gradgrind's geometrical surroundings ; the stiff grandeur of our 
Finishing Schools for Young Ladies ; the plain comfort of Rugby and 
its peers ; and the big, ostentatious public school building of America, 
where the educational effect of hard-finished white walls, neatly orna- 
mented with a broad band of blackboard, is tried upon them. 

But a House of Roses ! A house that savors of fairy-land, that has 
strange curves and corners dear to young imagination, climbing stair- 
ways and flower-screened roof- gardens, airy play-ground rimmed with 
flowers and shaded with awning, all beautiful, rich, suggestive, mys- 
terious — this is a new thing in school houses. 

And why not ? 

We who take such pains to " make home beautiful," who decorate 
our churches for festivals and our halls for any sort of entertainment ; 
for what reason under heaven do we leave our schools so ugly — our 
schools, where the mind of the child is supposed to be trained, where he 
is sent to be educated ? Can you educate a child in an atmosphere of 




A CORNER OF THE CASA DE ROSAS. 



blank, depressing ugliness and expect him to know beauty and appreci- 
ate it thereafter ? Suppose our landscape was all black and white, and 
we had to spend all our lives in rectangular rooms — should we be even 
as good as we are now ? 

The old idea of education has always seemed to consider childhood 
as a period of penal servitude. 

Today we are beginning to learn that it is not essentially wicked to be 
young ; that a child's behavior is necessarily different from a grown 
person's, and should be allowed for ; and that the years in which children 
are learning how to be people should be surrounded with every wise and 
lovely influence. 

Prominent among these is the influence of beauty ; real, true, high 
beauty, "the kind you read about;" beauty that shall keep the 
memories of nature and the hopes of paradise fresh in the child heart, 
and that shall put far oflf the day which Wordsworth so pathetically 



194 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 



describes, when " the shadows of the prison house close round the 
growing boy." Here there are shadows of palms and broad banana 
leaves across cool, breeze-swept pavements, shadows of delicate frond 
and tendril, of bud and bloom, shadows of arch and pillar and leaf- 
softened eaves — no shadows of the prison house in the House of Roses. 



1 



A Model School. 



BY CAROLINE M. SEVERANCE. 



T is a great boon to many a citizen of our frontier town 
drawn the eyes 



which has 



of the world 
upon itself — to be 
able to number, 
among its multi- 
plied natural at- 
tractions,', the edu- 
cational advantages 
of so admirably en- 
dowed a school as 
Casa de Rosas. Its 
exterior beauty is a 
model of its in- 
terior, in appoint- 
ments for the best 
well-being, artistic 
and hj^gienic, of its 
young people. A 
school which is 
based upon the 
divine model of 
the family, where 
brother and sister 
grow and study side 
by side to the great 
gain of both, and 
whose latest claim 
upon public faith 
and regard is the 
addition of Mrs. 
Kate T. Galpin to 
its corps of expert 
teachers. Her 
scholarship, s u c - 
cess in the past, and 
the magnetism of 
her lofty character, 
are guarantees for 
its immediate 
future. 




The Greatest Thing in the World. 



©p 



HERE are people who will write back full descriptions of the 
Great White Throne to the Podunk Palladium —\{ thty shall 
succeed in smuggling their present intelligences into heaven. 
Meantime, some of them try to word-picture the Grand Canon of the 
Colorado. But less immodest visitors will feel with a well-known writer 
who said : ' ' The sense of proportion is not always in me. I have done 
many ill things. But put it on my tombstone that I have seen the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado and never attempted to describe it ! " And one 
writer took thither a critic, who had grown restive under his superlative 
statements. When they climbed together from Hance's camp and stood 
suddenly upon the brink of that greatest thing in the world, neither had 




Union Eng. Co. 



GENERAL VIEW OF THE GRAND CANYON. 



words. But when they had stared till darkness shut out that wonder and 
came stumbling back to camp, the one laid his hand to the other's shoul- 
der and whispered : *' And ? It beats the liar, no ? " And the other took 
a long breath and said : " That it does. No liar can catch up with it ! " 
There is no describing the Grand Canon ; but a few general truths 
about it may lead those who really have souls to go and see it. It is the 
greatest chasm on earth — the longest, widest, deepest, most magnificent. 
The Yosemite and the Yellowstone are noble where they are, but lucky 
in being far from this incomparably nobler and vaster gorge. They 
could play hide-and-seek in its immensity and never find one another. 
All the White Mountains and Alleghenies and Adirondacks, all the Col- 
orado and Northern Pacific canons, could be tucked away in petty corners 
of it and never noticed. The greatest quebradas of the Andes or the 
Alps or the Himalayas are babies beside it. There is only one thing 
which keeps it from being the most famous scenery in the world, as it is 
already the grandest ; and that is that it is in a country whose patriots 



196 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




Union Eng. Co. 



FLAGSTAFF AND MT. ACASSIZ. 



Photo, by Osborn, Flagstaff. 



import such ideas as they have. Up to this time, two Englishmen see 
the Grand Canon for every American that does. 

It is so easily reached that there is no pardon for them who neglect it. 
The Pullmans of the Santa Fe overland carry one to Flagstaff, Arizona, 
the growing town among the pines at the foot of Mt. Agassiz ; and thence 
a comfortable stage-ride brings one to the camp on the very verge of the 
Canon. There is no hardship about it. Adequate accommodations are 




Union Eng. Co. 



AT THE FOOT OF THE HANCE TRAIL. Photo, by Osborn, Flagstaff. 



THE GREATEST THING IN THE WORLD. 



197 



there, in the Presence that would make anything but a porker forget 
whether he ate or starved. It is one of the few things in this advertising 
world which really " beats the liar ; " which can never be overstated nor 
exaggerated ; a masterpiece upon which the Almighty has spent his 
eloquence, and before which the tongue of man turns dumb. It is a 
thing which has never been adequately pictured and never will be. The 




"^5^;;4' 




Union. Eng.Co 



198 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



best photographers in America, the greatest artists in the United States, 
have beaten their heads against it. They have got some fine pictures, it 
is true ; but no one knows better than themselves how utterly they have 
failed to show the real Grand Caiion . 



Redondo. 

,KDONDO is one of the most charming seaside resorts of California, 
and lacks nothing that might add to the comfort and pleasure of 
visitor or resident. Its delightful hotel and grounds, its bathing 
facilities, its scenery and its growing importance as a port, all combine to 
guarantee it a great future. Its fine pier not only accommodates a fast- 
increasing commerce, but is a favorite resort for fishing. The townsite 
of Redondo is one of great beauty and has already attracted the attention 




of a number of wealthy people, who have built residences for themselves 
here. In addition to the bracing sea air and the absence of malaria, 
which is insured by the high grounds and dry, porous soil, the town is 
favored with an unlimited supply of pure, sweet water piped to ever}^ 
door. Only seventeen miles from Los Angeles, reached in a short ride 
from the Southern California metropolis by either the Southern California 
or the Redondo Railway, highly favored by nature, and aided by the 
most progressive spirit of modern enterprise, Redondo is one of the most 
promising points in the best country in America. 



E. McD. Johnstone, editor of The Traveler, San Francisco, died Aug. 19, after a 
short illness. For several years he was employed by the Southern Pacific railroad to 
write descriptive matter about its field ; and he gave that advertising literature a value 
it does not often attain. His Southwest by South is deemed one of the most artistic bits 
of railway advertising ever published. Three years ago he founded The Traveler, a 
monthly journal "devoted to the interests of hotels, resorts and travel ; " and it has 
been a growing success in his hands ; thanks largely to his unusual faculty for getting 
artistic effects in illustration. 



PUBLISHER'S Department. 



The l^avid of ^ai\6bfi\e 

THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
MAGAZINE 



li.oo A Year. io Cents a Copy. 

Published monthly by 

The Land of 6un6fiine Pubfisfiing Co. 

INCONPORATKO 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President - - - - W. C. Patterson 
V.-Prest. & Managing Editor, Chas. F. Lummis 
Secretary and Business Mgr. - F. A. Pattee 
Treasurer - - - - H. J. Fleishman 
Attorney - - - - Chas. Cassat Davis 

SOI -503 Stimson Building, los angcles, cal 

Entered at the Los Angeles Postofl&ce as second- 
class matter. 

Address advertising, remittances, etc., to the 
Business Manager. 

All MSS. should be addressed to the Editor. 
No MSS. preserved unless accompanied by re- 
turn postage. 

Questions Answered. — Specific information 
about Southern California desired by tourists, 
health seekers or intending settlers will be furn- 
ished free of charge by the Land of Sunshine. 
Enclose stamp with letter. 



TO CONVERT KANSAS. 
A vigorous campaign in behalf of the Land of 
Sunshine will be made in Kansas this fall by 
Miss Emma R. Bristol, than whom the magazine 
could desire no better representative in the Sun- 
flower State. There will be no need of introduc- 
tions, for Miss Bristol knows Kansas and Kansas 
knows Miss Bristol. For five years she was Chief 
Clerk of the Agricultural Department of Kansas ; 
for a term in the Department of Education, and 
for several years connected with the legislature. 
Among the florists of Kansas, the Bristol Sisters 
held easily the first rank, and were known and 
respected from one end of the State to the other. 
The family has been for several years resident in 
Southern California, and has won as honorable 
standing here. Miss Bristol is on the eve of de- 
parture for her old home in the interests of the 
Land of Sunshine, general and particular ; and 
as her audience is assured and her text the best, 
there is no doubt she will be a most successful 
evangelist. The Kansans will do themselves good 
by listening to her. 

OTHKR POINTS COVERED 

By authorized agents of the Land of Sunshine 
are as follows : 

Southern Caltfornia— 

G. H. Paine, Los Angeles. 
Oliver O. App, " 
Robt. L. Sanders, San Diego. 
W. M. Bristol. Highlands. 
C. P. Donnell, Los Angeles. 

Northern California— 

J. M. Shawhan, 520 Commercial Street, San 
Francisco. 



Chicago — 

Theron P. Keater, 112-114 Dearborn Street. 

Kansas and contiguous territory- 
Miss Emma R. Bristol, Traveling Agent. 

New England— 

By Bancroft Traveling Stereopticon Land of 
Sunshine Lectures, etc. 

Honolulu- 
Hawaiian News Company. 
Golden Rule Bazar. 

London— 

A. F. Spawn, 122 Pall Mall. 

Gay & Bird, 5 Chambers Street. Strand. 

Paris- 
Breton's, 17 Ave. de r Opera. 

NEWS DEALERS. 

The Land of Sunshine is supplied to news 
dealers through the American Neii's Co. of New 
York, the IVestern Neifs Co. of Chicago, the 
Colorado News Co. of Denver, the San Francisco 
Neivs Co. of San Francisco, while Southern Cali- 
fornia is supplied direct from the home office. 
LIBRARIES. 

It is regularly supplied to all libraries of im- 
portance throughout the United States and Can- 
ada, and is on the reading room tables of famous 
hotels and resorts, of the London, Chatham and 
Dover Railway, London, the Galignani Library, 
theN. Y. Herald reading room, and the Ameri- 
can Art Association of Paris, etc., etc. 
SUBSCRIBERS. 

How well the Land of Sunshine is liked 
wherever it is seen abroad is demonstrated by 
the following communication from an intelligent 
reader who received a .sample copy of the maga- 
zine one year ago, subsequently came to Southern 
California and invested, and now, after being 
a reader of the Land of Sunshine for a year, 
concludes that he cannot do without it. 



<tu H HAMroflO M 
«*L«B Aw«irtit 






r/x-<^ '*~1?^ — 







,^j^ /^«^/^kJ=^o- 







ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



Southern California in general, and Los Ange- 
les in particular, are noted for their enterprise 
and push. Among the institutions of this city 
that are strictly in touch with all that is progres- 
sive and enterprising is the L,os Angeles Business 
College. This school has outgrown its Main 
street location, and is about to move into the 
stately and elegant new Currier Block, 212 W. 
Third street, adjoining the Bradbury Building. 
It will occupy the entire fifth floor, which has 
been fitted up in the best of stj'le especially for 
this College. 

The most perfect summer resort in America, 
the Hotel del Coronado, is a great educator to 
visitors from the effete East. Its summer season 
has been above the average ; and it is now pre- 
paring for its perfect winter. 

The corporation which has long borne the title 
Mathews & Bosbyshell Co. will hereafter be 
known as the Mathews Implement Co. Mr. 
Newell Mathews, its president and principal 
owner, needs introduction to none but the most 
recent comer. Fair in his methods, just in his 
conservatism, open to conviction, public spirited 
and industrious, he has, during the nine years 
since he established the present business, become 
a power in the agricultural implement business, 
as well as one of the representative people of 
this section. With increased capital and more 
perfect organization, this already prosperous 
establishment is on the way to still more remark- 
able success. 



The commencement exercises of Woodbury 
Business College, held at the Los Angeles Theatre 
on Monday evening, July 29th, was an unusually 
brilliant affair. The house was crowded with a 
representative audience, and the different features 
of the programme received liberal applause. The 
seventy-eight members of the class of '95 pre- 
sented a handsome appearance seated on the 
terraced stage, which was elaborately decorated 
with flowers. The ladies were all in white, and 
the gentlemen in conventional evening dress. 

Southern California is to be well represented at 
the World's Fair at Atlanta, Georgia. The Cali- 
fornia Building, which is situated in the very 
center of the grounds of the Exposition, will 
contain a large display of Southern California 
products, under the management of the Los An- 
geles Chamber of Commerce. When it was 
learned that no State appropriation was avail- 
able for this purpose, the public-spirited bu.siness 
men of Los Angeles city responded promptly to 
the call of their representative organization, and 
subscribed about $6,000 to pay the expense of 
shipping a part of the permanent display now in 
the Chamber to Atlanta. The greater part of the 
immigration work thus far.undertaken in behalf 
of this section has been done in the west and 
northwest. At Atlanta a new field will be touched 
upon and the early advent of several thousand 
southern families to Southern California will 
undoubtedly follow this piece of good advertising. 
The Land of Sunshine will be included among 
other literature distributed at the Fair. 



CALIFORNIA HOTELS. 

5pace in this column not for sale. 
ANAHEIM. 

Commercial Hotel Rates $1.50 to $2 per day. 
AVAI.ON, CATAI.INA ISI^AND. 

Hotel Metropole. 

CORONADO. 

Hotel del Coronado-First-class in all respects. 
ECHO MOUNTAIN. 

Echo Mountain House — On line of Mount 
Lowe Railway. Open all the year. 
LOS ANGELES. 
Abbotsford Inn— Tourist and family home. 
Hotel Nadeau— European plan. $1 day up. 
Hotel Ramona — European plan. 75c. per day. 
Hotel Westminster— Strictly first-class. 
The Hollenbeck —American and European. 

PASADENA. 
The Carleton — American and European plan. 

POMONA. 
Hotel Palomares — First-class throughout. 

REDLANDS. 
Hotel Windsor — 2 to $3 per day. 

RIVERSIDE. 
Hotel Glenwood — Strictly first-class house. 

SAN BERNARDINO. 
The Stewart— Rates $2.50 per day. 

SAN DIEGO. 
Hotel Brewster — American plan ; I2.50 up. 
Horton House — Rates %2 and $2.50 per da5-. 

SANTA MONICA. 
Hotel Arcadia — Rates $3 per day upward. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Palace Hotel — American and European plans. 
Pleasanton Hotel — American plan; $3 per 
day and up. 

NICOLL tHTTAriOR - 

Visitors and Strangers ! 

"We can serve you at home, 
abroad or traveling. 

Garments made at short no- 
tice or expressed to any part of 
the United States or delivered 
through any of our stores in the 
different cities. 

iH S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



City 
Property 

WE OFFER 



WOOD & CHURCH 

one of the best investments in block property in the city 
always rented atgj^ per cent, on price asked— *3a,000. 



Country 
Property 

right in center, 



We have a fine list of Los Angeles and Pasadena city property, some are bargains. 
Mortgages and Bonds for Sale. 

123 S. Broadway, Pasadena Office, 

L08 Angeles, Cal. 16 S. Raymond At«. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the I<anp of Sunshinb. 



Notliino M Gift-Edge Business ProDOsitions 

Should be offered to Business Men. They have no time to investigate chaff. 
We invite the attention of Investors to the following, selected from our large 
list of Business Openings, all of which we have carefully investigated, and 
can conscientiously offer to our clients with our unqualified endorsement : 

$30,000 



A stock company, inanufacturing an indispensable article to street car lines, and the 
best in existence, fast superseding all others, and vastly superior. This can be 
abundantly verified. Proposition too heavy for present owners, who lack capital. One to three men 
with capital can be shown here an opportunity of a lifetime, and no experiment to deal with. 

Will place a business man of ability in a corporation in this city 
which .stands at the head of the list. Doing immense business. All 
men of long experience, wealth and highest commercial standing and references. You will make no 
mistake, if you wish to transfer your interests to this city, in giving this a thorough investigation. 

Partner wanted to assist in entering a business that is long established in the best 
location in this city. Is growing so rapidly as to make it desirable to form stock 

company, and greatly enlarge facilities. Practical man at the head who is considered here a man of 

rare ability. A fortune awaits the man who is first to take this chance. 

The above are representative propositions from our list, and will stand the 
closest inquiry. Correspond with us freely. Our references will indicate to 
you who we are. We want to .serve you. 



$20,000 to $50,000 



$10,000 



RCFKRCNCCS (By Permission) : 
Los Angeles National Bank. 
Merchants' National Bank, Los Angeles. 
First National Bank, Schuyler, Neb. 
Allen Bros. Wholesale Grocers, Omaha, Neb 
Nicollet National Bank, Minneapolis, Minn, 
Bx-Gov. W. R. Merriam, St. Paul, Minn. 



MOORE dL PARSONS, 

Real Estate and Investment Brokers, 



s. E. 



COR. 20 AND BROADWAY. 

LOS ANGELES, GAL. 




FOR 

YOUR 
VACATION 



TAKE A TRIP TO 
THE 



GRAND 

CANYON 
,:: COLORADO 



The rates are low and 
the provisions for com- -^ 

fort ample. Write to ^^ 

or call on the nearest 
agent of the 

SANTA FE ROUTE for full information, or to John J. Byrne, Geni Pass. Agent, 
Lo8 Angeles, Cal., for a copy of illustrated descriptive l)ook. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Lakd op Sunsbinb. 



LOS ANGELES LEADS. 

That there is no section of the United States 
where business is in a more settled and flourish- 
ing condition than it is in Los Angeles today, as 
illustrated by the following comparative show- 
ing, taken from the American Land and Title 
Register. Real estate transfers for March, 1895 : 

New York, $13,697,067; Chicago, |ii, 000,000; 
Philadelphia. $7,593,533 ; St. I^ouis, $2,811,179 I San 
Francisco (report for February), $714,801 ; Pitts- 
burg, $1,200,269 ; Los Angeles, $i,yoi,go4; Portland 
(Oregon), $338,657. 

Building operations tor March, 1895 ; Chicago 
$3,200,000 : Philadelphia, $2,618,122 ; Brooklyn, 
$1,942,417; Cincinnati, $413,670; New Orleans, 
$234,555 ; Pittsburg, $210,407 ; Los Angeles, $226,822. 

Real estate transfers for April, 1895 : New York. 
$14,500,000; Chicago, $10,700,000; Philadelphia. 
$9,331,339 ; St. Loms, $2,820,519 ; San Francisco, 
$2,624,145 ; Pittsburg, $2,374,150 ; Kansas City, 
$1,^39,964; Denver, $1,048,076; Portland, Or., 
$431,304; Los Angeles, $1,705,^7. 

The building operations for April are as follows: 
Chicago, $3,871,000 ; Philadelphia, $4,202,842 ; 
Brooklyn, $1,854,572; New Orleans, $270,831; 
Pittsburg, $563,928 ; Denver, $120,200 ; Los Ange- 
les, $300,368. 

The solid character of the I,os Angeles banks 
was well shown during the financial panic of 
1894. which had such disastrous results in some 
sections of the country. Bank clearances have 
for a year past shown an improvement almost 
every week, while the figures from a majority of 
other cities have frequently shown a decrease. 

Los Angeles Clearing House for month ending 
July, 1895: Deposits, $1,232,869.08; Balances, 
$175,689.10. Corresponding, 1894 : $723,605.75 ; 
$131,950.92. 




^&im£^ 



OF I.OS angei.es. 

Capital Stock $400,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits over 230,000 

J. M. Klliott, Prest., W.G.Kerckhoff, V.Pres 

Frank A. Gibson, Cashier. 

G. B. Shaffer, Assistant Cashier. 

directors: 

J. M. Elliott, F. Q. Story, J. D. Hooker, 

J. D. Bicknell. H. Jevne, W. C. PatterSon 

W. G. Kerckhoff. 

No public funds or other preferred deposits 

received by this bank. 

M, W. Stimson, Prest. C. S. Cristy, Vice-Prest, 
W. E. McVay, Secy. 

FOR GOOD nORTGAGE LOANS 



ANO OTHER SAFE IN VCSTMENTS, 
WRITE TO 




J 



CAPITAL $200,000 

223 South Spring Street 

JL08 Ang^eles, California. 



6TffrBls^lRU6T ^ 



Paid Up Capital, S500,O00 



Transacts a general Banking Business. Buys 
and sells Foreign and Domestic Exchange. Col- 
lections promptly attended to. Issue letters of 
credit. Acts as Trustees of Estates, Executors, 
Administrators, Guardian, Receiver, etc. Solicits 
accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations and 
Individuals on favorable terms. Interest on 
time deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



— kS7-6 — 

Officers : H. J. Woollacott, President ; James 
F. Towell, I st Vice-President ; Warren Gillelen, 
2nd Vice-President ; J. W. A. Off, Cashier ; M. B. 
I,ewis, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors : G. H. Bonebrake, W. P. Gardiner, 
P. M. Green, B. F. Ball, H. J. Woollacott. James 
F. Towell, Warren Gillelen, J. W. A. Off, F. C. 
Howes, R. H. Howell, B. F. Porter. 



OLDEST AND LARGEST BANK IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

FaRIVIERS m IV|ER(K4NT5 BaIK 

OF LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

Capital ( paid up ) - - - $500,000 OO 

Surplus and Reserve - - - 820,000 OO 

Total - - - - $1,320,00000 

officers: directors: 

I. W. Hellman President W.H.Perry, C. E. Thom, A. Glaslell 

H. W. Hellman Vice-President O. W. Childs, C. Duccommun, T. I,. Duque. 

Henry J. Fleishman Cashier J. B. Lankershim, H. W. Hellman, J. W- 

G. A. J. Heimann Assistant Cashier Hellman. 

Sell and Buy Foreign and Domestic Exchange. Special Collection Department. 
Correspondence Solicited. 

Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 




CALIFORNIA WINE MERCHANT 



We will ship two sample cases assorted 
wines (one dozen quarts each) to any part 
of the United States, Freight Prepaid, 
upon the recipt of $9.00. Pints ( 24 in 
case), 50 cents per case additional. We 
will mail full list and prices upon appli- 
cation. 



Respectfully, 

C. F. A. LAST, 

131 N. Main St., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

5TEPMEN5 §- MICKOK 

AQKNTS 




433 South Broadtcay, Los Angeles 



Agents wanted in every town in Southern 
Californiu, Arizona and New Mexico. 



FOR SALE: 



EXTRA CHOICE '"'"^"o^tM'lI'-'-"' 
ALMOND AND OLIVE LAND 

One mile from Postoffice. All Improvements. 
PRICB VERT LOW. 

For circulars address : 

S. p. CUSHMAN, 

Del Sur, Cal. 



Use only our thoroughly Indelible S 

Ink. This ink is being used by all the > 
) Steam lyaundries of the city, and is warrant- c 
f ed to be indelible. We also manufacture \ 
< everything in the line of Rubber Stamps, ) 
S Seals and Stencils. ? 

C NOBLE & CHIPRON STAMP CO., ^ 

S 126 S SPRING STREET, LOS ANGELES. CAL. ) 



$10 



PER ACRE 

FOR FINE LANDS 

IN THE 



$10 



FANITA RANCHO 

EL CAJON VALLEY 
1669 Acres for - . $18,000 
1420 Acres for - - $12,000 

Smaller Tracts for $30 to $80 per acre. 
WILL GROW ANYTHING. 

This property is twelve miles from the city ol 
San Diego and two miles from Cuyamaca Rail- 
road. It belongs to the estate of Hosmer P. 
McKoon, and will be sold at the appraised value. 

For further information address 

FANNIE M. McKOON, Executrix. 

Santee, San Iliego Co., Cal. 



$1.25 Per Acre 




$1.26 Per Acre 



60VER1N/VIENT LANDS 



this IS 

THE LAND OF SUNSHINE 

Not only is this so, but it is a land of great 
promise, where you may secure a home on the 
most favorable terms now offered in the United 
States. 

Choice Government Lands at 
•1.26 per Acre. 

25 cents cash, balance 25 years at 6 per cent per 
annum. No requirements as to improving or 
living upon the land. For climate, healthfulness 
and fertility of soil it is unsurpassed ; where you 
can raise nearly anything grown in America, 
north or south. 

We also have choice improved farms and fruit 
lands near Los Angeles, at $30.00 and upward per 
acre. Southern California property to exchange 
for Eastern property. For information and 

grin ted matter address L.OY & HURIN, 
38 South Broadway, L.08 Anseles, Cal. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land op Sunshinb. 



^ PECIAL ATTENTION is called to 
^^w the very attractive line of new 
{^)j vehicles offered in our No. 6i, all 

^~^ leather top Buggy; our No. 44 
Phaeton, and our No. 234 Canopy-top 
Surrey, made by the Enterprise Carriage 
Co.. of Miamisburg, Ohio. Ahead of all 
competition ; being low in price, but neat 
in finish and appearance, and can- 
not fail to give entire satisfaction. 
This factory proposes to keep (£ 

ahead in the march of 
improvement, and to 
give best value for the 
money. 

Write U8. All in- 
quiries cheerfully an- 
swered. Address : 

MATHEWS 

IMPLEMENT 
CO., 

120. 122 AND 124. 
S. Los Angeles St. 

Los ANGELES, 'CAL. 




THE 
ABBOTSFORD 



CORNER 

EIGHTH 
AND HOPE 

STS. 



LOS ANGELES. 
CAL. 




Select Tourist and Family Hotel. American 
Plan. All new, with refined appointments. 
Electric Bells, Incandescent Light and Steam 
Radiator in every room. Capacity, 200 guests. 



BY J. J. MARTIN. 



NEVER CLOSES. 

Best of service the year round. Purest of water, 
most equable climate, with best hotel in Southern 
California. 

Ferny glens, babbling brooks and shady forests 
within ten minutes' walk of the house. 

Low weekly rates will be made to individuals 
and families for the summer, to include daily 
railway transportation from Elcho Mountain to 
Altadena Junction and return. 

Livery stables at Echo Mountain and Altadena 
Junction; none better. 

Special rates to excursions, astronomical, 
moonlight, searchlight parties, banquets and 
balls. The grandest mountain, canon, ocean and 
valley scenery on earth. 

Full information at ofBce of 

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY 

Cor. Third and Spring streets. Los Angeles. 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLOCK, 

Pasadena, Cal. 
ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE. 

PostoflSce, Echo Mountain, California. 




3,500 FEET ABOVE THK LEVEL OF THE SEA. 



CARL ENTENMANN iJfve^l^ugM 
iVIanufacturing Jeweler 

Every description of Gold 
and Silver Jewelry made 
to order or repaired 
Gold and Silver School and Society Badtrcs & Medals a specialty 



Dioiofl seder onfl Enprover 



ROOMS 3. 



UP STAIRS 



2My2 South Spring Street, Los Angeles Cal- 



IiOS AHGEliES, CAIi. 

If you wish to buy or sell any Real Estate in this 
city, call on or address 

RICHARD ALTSCHUL 

123>^ W. Second Street, Los Angeles, Gal. 



Please meation that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



I SELL THE BflRT-H.. 



HEADQUARTERS AT POMONA, CAL. 







^/'flMONf<V^^ 



r n Y I believe the best investment in California 
O/i I , to-day is the Howland Olive Orchard : 
150 acres — 1 20 acres solid to olive orchard, balance 
variety of fruits, etc. Olive mill and the latest 
machinery for pressing oil that cost over $5,000. 
The income from the property this year is nearly 
$8,000, and yet but one-fifth of theorchard is in 
bearinjj. The Howland Olive Oil from this plant 
took the first premium at the World's Fair at 
Chicago in competition with the world ; also first 
premium at Mid-winter Fair and at the late Citrus 
Fair at Los Angeles. For full particulars of this 
property, or for anything in the line of Real 
Estate, call on or address " The Old Man." 

R. S. BASSETT, POMONA, CAL. 



lAIUV ^*^ " SI.OW-COACH all your 
ft M T '*^** ' ^'^'^ ""''^ ^^ THK RUT 

of •• old foKyiH'n ! " 
Procure a GAS STOVK and "get In 
line" with all the progreHsive "up to 
date " houfiekeepers of the present day. 
The polntfi of excellence in a gaH iitove 
are too many to enumerate. Call and 
see a GAS COOKINC; STOVK in opera- 
tion. 

LOS ANGELES LIGHTING 
COMPANY 

457 South Broadway, TiOR Angelc, Cal. 



SETH ABBOTT 

ENCINITOS RANCH 



MANAGER 
OF 



Thirty miles from San Diego, north, near the 
ocean and Santa F6 Railway. Cheap as any 
land in the country. For circulars, address 

SKTH ABBOTT. 

8»9 4 th Street, San Diego. 



THE LOS ANGELES TERMINAL RAILWAY 

TUC QAU DPRRn DIVKinN K»"s through a fine agricultural and grazing country to Long Beach. 

inC own rCUnU UITIQIUH and then for five miles along the ocean to San Pedro Harbor, where 
connections are made with the Pacific Coast Steamship Company for all points North and ^outh. 
and with the Wilmington Transportation Company for Catalina Island. At Terminal Island 
(East San Pedro,) there is a fine Bath House and Pavilion, open all the vear. and the finest still 
water bathing on the Coast is found here ; also boating on the bay. and sailing on the ocean with 
power launches or yachts. 

TUC PA^ARPNA niVKIRIJ Ru"S to Pasadena, also up to Altadeua. at the base of the mountains- 

inC rWOMULnH UmOIUIl and at Altadena connects with the Mount Lowe Railway for Rubio 

Caiion Pavilion up the incline to Echo Mountain House, and to the observatory on Mount Lowe, 

enabling tourists to go from Los Angeles to the top of the Sierra Madre Mountains it 

time and with but one change. 

Mfil PNn Al F niVl^inN Ru°s through one of the finest vallevs in Southern California, noted for 
OLLnUWLL UlTIOiUn ijs tije f^^e deciduous and citrus fruits, to Glendale, and on to Verdugo 

PBrk, finest picnic grounds adjacent to Los Angeles. 

There are Twenty-Six Passenger Trains a day between Los Angeles and Pasadena ; eight passenger 
trains a day between Los Angeles and Glendale and Verdugo Park ; six passenger trains a day 
between Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Pedro; eight passenger trains a day between Los 
Angeles and Altadena. 

Picnic Grounds at Verdugo Park, Devil's Gate, Millard's Caiion, Eaton's Canon and Rubio Cafion on 
the Mount Lowe Railway. Finest Mountain, Valley and Ocean Scenery in Southern California. 



in a very short 



T. B. BURNETT, 
Vice-President and General Manager, 
Los Angeles. 



W. WINCUP, 
General Freight and Passenger Agent, 
Los Angeles. 



PMERALRlREGTQgl^T^BALMER'S 

TELI029 — 536 S. SPRING ST., LOSANGELLES.. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land ok Sunshine." 



WHEN YOU VISIT 

SAN DIEGO 

REMEMBER . . ■ 




RATES 

$2 50 PER DAY 

AND UP 



American Plan Only. Centrally 
located. Elevators and fire escapes. Baths, 
hot and cold water in all suites. Modern con- 
veniences. Fine large sample rooms for com- 
mercial travelers. 




'HormAN 

CAPE 



® ® ® 



ELEGANT 

GRILL ROOM 
AND PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Finest Cuisine. Sercice Unexcelled. 

M. L. POLASKI CO. (Inc.) Proprietors 

Q^ p: S. SPRING STREET 

^ ' ^ LOS ANGELES, GAL 




GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., 



GENERAL AGENTS 

San Francisco. 

steamers leave Port Los Angeles and Redondo 
every four days for Santa Barbara, Port Harford 
and San Francisco. 

Leave San Pedro and East San Pedro every 
four days for San Francisco and way ports. 

Leave Redondo and Port Los Angeles every 
four days for San Diego. 

Northern Routes embrace Portland, Puget 
Sound, Victoria and Alaska. 

W. PARRIS, AGENT, 

123)i W. Third St., Los Angeles. 



FARHINQ AND 
ORCHARD LAND 
FOR COLONY 
ENTERPRISE 

FOR SALE BY 

1 FRED. J. SMITH, 

POnONA, CAL. 



Commercial Travelers' Trade 

Respectfully Solicited. 



:\}^ 



BEST 

LOCATED 

HOTEL 

IN 

SAN DIEGO 



ORTON 



l^ 



Free 'Bus to and 
from all Trains 
and Steamers. 



OUSE 



W. E 



HADLEY, 

PROPRIETOR 

San Diego, CaL 



Conducted on the American Plan. 
First-class in every respect. 
Special Rates to Families. 

rates: $2.00 AND $2.50 PER DAY 



PiNE I^ALF-TONE pPINTING 

SPECIALTY 

I^INGSLEY- 
gARNES 
& 
^EUNER 

Co. 



•'"•'Urorlla"."" 123 SOUTH BROADWAY 




HUNTBR & CAMFIELiD 

General Real Estate Agents 
112J^ S. Broadway. Telephone 319 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



THE VERY THING YOU HAVE BEEN WANTING 



'^m: 




A HOME 
IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

riNC RKSIOCNCC OR RANCH 
PRO^CRTV 

BY THE SEA-SIDE OR AT THE FOOT OF 
THE MOUNTAINS 

In or near a progressive community. Pure air, 
l)eautiful surroundings. 



IF YOU WISH TO KNOW 

All about it and how easily it can be 
accomplished 

WRITE TO 

ROBT. F. JONES &, CO., 

204 BRADBURY BLOCK, 

LOS ANGELES. 




f H. JEVNE^ 



WHOLESALE 



GROCER 



RETAIL 



[MPORTER OK 



English, French, German and Italian TABLE LUXURIES 

Goods packed and delivered at depot free of charge, and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 

136 and 138 NORXH SPRING SXRBBX 



SAMUEL B. ZIMMER 




ROBERT C. REAMER 



Rooms 44, 45, 46 

Lawyers Block 



San Diego, California 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



f^OTEL AKCADIA, Santa Monica, Ca 



The only first-class 
tourist hotel in this 
the leading coast re- 
sort of the Pacific. 15c 
pleasant rooms, large 
and airy ball room, 
beautiful lawn and 
flower gardens. Mag- 
nificent panoramic 
view of the sea. First- 
class orchestra. Surf 
bathing unexcelled, 
and private salt water 
baths in bath house 
belonging to Hotel. 
Services of the popular 
chef from the Hotel 
Green, Pasadena, have 
been secured. 

S. REINHART 

Proprietor 
Time Irom Los An- 
geles bv Santa F6 or 
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes. 




ATTENTION, INVESTORS 



680 Acres of fine flat land, suitable for 
the raising of beans, corn or barley, or the 

— - — ^ - = planting of olive trees, can be bought for 

SS50 per acre. This property joins the olive ranch of Ellwood Cooper, 10 miles from Santa 
Barbara; is on the County Road and 20 rods from the new main line of the Southern Pacific R.R. 
(now building). Wants to be seen to be appreciated. Apply to the exclusive agent for the property : 

LOUIS G. DREYFUS, Real Estate Agrent, 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 



THE PLACE rOR YOU 16 ON OUR LAND6 



RAPID 
TRANSIT 



San Diegc 



NATIONAL 
CITY 



OTAY RAIL- 
WAY. 




HlCwCLass 
FAMILY 

HOTEL 

ar 

Chula 

VfSTA 



A large selection of valley and mesa lands, irrigated and unirrigated, 910.00 to 9350 per acre. 
All our lands near San Diego developed by sixty miles of railroad and supplied with water under 
pressure by the SWEETWATER DAM ANI> IRRIGATING SYSTEM. The most perfect 
water supply in California, Several five and ten acre tracts, planted and unplanted, with attractive 
houses, commanding beautiful views and making delightful homes, on CHUL.A VISTA, the mosi 
beautiful suburb in Southern California. Citrus and deciduous fruits grow to perfection. 
Easy terms, if desired, on all our property. Attractive advertising matter free. 

SAN DIEGO LAND AND TOWN CO., 

NATIONAL CITY, CAt. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine.' 



LKVISHL-V lLL-VSTRP:Tp: 



OeXOBER, I» 



PAISfS 




10 



CENTS LAND OF SUNSHINE PUBLISHING CO., 

INCORPORATED 

A COPY 501-503 Stimson Building. 



$1 



A 

YEAR 




HOTEL GREEN, PASADENA, CAL. 
J. H. HOLMES, MANAGER. 



NOW OPEN 

PASADENA'S 

MAGNIFICENT 
^ * MORESQUE 
* PALACE 

THE j^OTEL 

Green 



The newest and finest Hotel in 
los Angeles County. Tennis Court, 
Billiard Room, Private Theatre, 
Klevators, Electric Lights, Gardens, 
Reading and Writing Rooms. Con- 
servatory. Promenade, Orchestra, 
«)ver 300 sunny and spacious 
Rooms, with private Parlors and 
Bath Rooms : convenient to three 
lines of steam railway ; Los Angeles 

& Pasadeda Electiic Cars pass the 

door. 

Every Modern Convenience 



[T\ot\)er may I ($o out to 5U7i/i\? 

Yes, ^y darliQ<$ daij($t?ter, 

But t\)<i JVortl^ Beac^t? Batl? 15 t\)<^ pi(;est pla^e 

por a ^irl to ^0 ipto t\)<i water. 

Santa Monica North Beach 
Bath House 



WARM PLUNGES 

HOT SALT BATHS IN 
PORCELAIN TUBS 




t2^ 



Clean White Beach 

and Special Warm Plunge for 

Ladies and Children 



^HOTEL T^-ReA-DIA. Santa Monica, Cal 

The only first-class 
tourist hotel in this, 
the leading coast re- 
sort of the Pacific. 150 
pleasant rooms, large 
and airy ball room, 
beautiful lawn and 
flower gardens. Mag- 
nificent panoramic 
view of the sea. First- 
class orchestra. Surf 
bathing unexcelled, 
and private salt water 
baths in bath house 
belonging to Hotel. 
Services of the popular 
chef from the Hotel 
Green, Pasadena, have 
been secured. 

8. REINHART 

PROPRICTOR 

Time from Los An- 
geles by Santa F^ or 
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes. 




Please mention that '* you saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



^he mo fit centra III/ lo- 
cated, best appointed 
and best kept Botel 
in the city. 

oAmerican or Suro- 
pean Plan. 

Rates reasonable. 



Second and ... 

Spring Streets 

Los Angelest Cat. 




City 
Property 



WOOD & CHURCH 



Country 
Property 

Uir nCCCD ^ magnificent Suburban Home of 20 acres, orange and ornamental trees ; hojise 
flL Urrlin alone insured for $17,000. Price »a5,000. Close to Pasadena. 
We have a fine list of I^os Angeles and Pasadena city property, some are bargains. 
Mortgages and Bonds for Sale. 

123 S. Broadway, Pasadena Office, 

liOS Angeles. Cal. 16 S. Raymond Are. 



ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 




Hotel and Observatory, ;t, .')("• feet »l>ove sea level. 

NEVER CLOSES. Best of service the year round. Purest of water, most equable climate, with 
best hotel in Southern California. Ferny (jlens, babbling brooks and shady forests within ten minutes' 
walk of the house. Low weekly rates will be made to individuals and families for the summer, to 
include daily railway transportation from P^cho Mountain to Altadena Junction and return. Livery 
stables at Echo Mountain and Altadena Junction ; none better. Special rates to excursions, astronomi- 
cal, moonlight, searchlight parties, banquets and balls. The grandest mountain, cation, ocean and 
valley scenery on earth. Full information at oflBce of MOUNT LOWIC RAIL. WAY, Cor. Third 
pnd Spring streets. Los Angeles. Grand Opera House Block, Pasadena, Cal. Kcho Mountain House. 
Postomce, Echo Mountain, California. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the I<and of Sunshik|(.' 



Sumner P. Hunt 
Theo. A. Eisen 



EISEN I m 

424 8TIMS0N BUILDING 



LOS ANGELES, 
CALIFORNIA 



261 




poindexter « wadsworth 

BROKERS 
305 West Second St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Buy and sell Real Estate, Stocks, Bonds and 
Mortgages, on commission, make collections, 
manage property and do a general brokerage 
business. Highest references for reliability and 
good business management. 





ZOS %t.£0UTHj4AINjSr. 



Wo odbury Bu6ine66 Coffepe 

226 S. Spring St., Los Angeles 

Oldest, Largest and Best. Send for Catalogue. 



G. A. Hough, 

President. 



N. G. Felkbr, 

Vice President. 



LftS GftSITftS SflNlTflRIUffl 




Situated in the Sierra Madre foot-hills, altitude 
2,000 feet. Most equable climate in Southern Cal- 
ifornia . Pure mountain water.excellent cuisine ; 
easily reached by Terminal R. R. and short car- 
riage drive. 

0. SHEPARD BARNUM, Propr. 

Drawer 126, Pasadena, Cal. 



SANTA ANA INCUBATORS 




BROODERS 



NEW MODEL 

Are the best Hatchers aiirt 
raise the strongest chicks. Full 
description given in the circu- 
lar with prices of everything 
used by the poultry raiser. 
Address Santa Ana Incvbatoe 
Co , Santa Ana, Cal. 



The Pacific Cjcle Co., S^wS^rmal 'oJ 

the Pacific coast. Factory and salesroom, 618-624 
S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. Buy a home- 
made wheel. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Lahd of Sunshinb. 




liLMotei 
Wii\d60P 

Redlands, Cal. 

Tourist, Commercial and Family. 

Under its new management this hostelry 
has l><>en refitted throughdut with all 
modern convenienres and arrangements 
for the comfort of its guests. The sleep- 
in); rooms are large and airy, moat of 
them commanding a mountain or Tallejr 
view of picturesque grandeur. Many of 
the suites have private baths connected 
The proprietor baa devoted pspecial atten- 
tion to the "cuisine," and has received 
many encomiums of praise from guests 
for its excellence In fact, the Wianioa is 
left with regret, many of its guests het.!- 
tatiiig to give the final adiea.s. 

Rates $2 to $4 per day; Special 

by week. 

Ivsrge Sample Room free. 

H. L. SQUIRES. PnoPMicTOM 



worth a trip 
Southern O 
'alifornia ^ 



Your Health ! '-; 

Sunny rooms, sanitary plumbing, home cook- 
ing, trained nurses, baths, Galvanism. Faradism 
and Massage, its convenience to electric and 
cable cars' ADDRESS. Or. J. E. Cowles. 



/ 

1. 1- 


.''n 




k 


\M: 


^^11 



<tQC DCD APDC Por Lands located in 
^UU ILn AUnL Southern California. 
Will grow Oranges, Leraon.s.and all other fruits. 
$35.00 takes the choice. Remember, $35.00 for 
land as good as any in the State. Reached by 
the Southern California Railway. 
This land at $35 per acre will not be on Ihe market 
after January j^th nfxt. 



PACIFIC SANITARIUn 
Telephone138. Hope and Pico Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

BEST PRIVATE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 

Office, Bryson Block, Rooms 1, 2 and 3 

Hours 10 to 12 a. m., 3 to 5 p, m. Tel. 1172 




SAN MARCOS I.ANI> COMPANY. 
D. F. HAL.K, Manager. 

1336 I> St., San Diego, Cal. 

W. G. JACOBS. Superintendent, 

San Marcos, San Diego Co., Cal. 



^ L.Blankenhorn. A\anagcr.- 




OUR TELEPHONE l2li 59 BRQADWAY r»jr«u« L95 ANGCLCS.CAL. "" No. 1552 

Above is an idea of our Line etching (zincograph) from original design, for Covers, Programs, Labels, 

Letter Heads. Advertisements, etc. Finest quality guaranteed in this as in our Half-tone work. 

Designing a specialty. Finely equipped plant. Skilled artists and workmen. 

WS^ Note the specimens of our Half-tone work in this number. 



Pleas^mentlon that yon " saw it in the Land of Sunshinb. 



H[7=C^ERTV S^ iAZIIL-SON 




View from Smiley Heights, Redlands, looking north. 

PROPRIETORS CLUB STABLES 

OPP. WINDSOR HoTEi. REDLANDS, CAL. 

tW Carriages, in charge of thoroughly competent drivers, 
meet each incoming train, ready to convey tourists to every point 
of interest in and about Redlands. 

N. B.— Be sure »nd ask for Club Stable rigs. 

Li. Li. NEWERF— real ESTATE. 
226 S. Spring. Mngr. Southern California 
Land and Nursery Co. ^os-special attention 
invited to the culture of the olive. 

Write for information. 

For fine Ont-door and Other View^ 

...CALL ^ 

THE PHOTOGRAPHER 

Temple Block Los Angeles, Cat. 




Hotel Pklotv^kres 



A strictly first-class house ol 
130 large rooms, elegantly fur- 
nished. Situated on the main 
lines of the Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe Railways, 32 miles east 
ot Los Angeles. Rates, $2.50 to 
I3-50 per day; $12.50 to $17.50 per 
week. 

V. D. SIMMS, Manager. 




POMONA, CALIFORNIA 



FOR SALE. 



Special to the Land of Sunshine.— 6-room 
modern new Colonial cottage. Hall, bath, hot 
and cold water, patent water closet, fine mantel, 
lawn, street graded, etc. Only $2,500. Terms. 
I500. cash; balance monthly. One of many good 
homes in Los Angeles for sale. Before you buy, 
see TAYLOR & CO., 103 South Broadway. 

RARHAIN^I Jua foot, dty lots in Kohler 
DAnUAIIIO ! Tract, between 7th and 8th Sts. 
Installments. Also, Ten acre lots, best fruit land, 
Anaheim ; 704 trees, walnuts, apricots, peaches. 
$100 per acre ; $28 cash, 8 years time, 6 per cent. 

FISHSR, 237 W. Second St. 



W. J. 



^ 


p 

z' 



JOHN I>. MBRCER, 117 



LOS ANGELES 
INCUBATORS 

AND BROODERS 
ARC BEST 

Poultry Supplies 

Bone Cutters, Alfal- 
fa Cutters, Shell 
Grinders, S p r » y 
Pumps, Caponiz- 
int: Sets. DrinkinK 
K'ountains, Poultry 
Books, etc. Cata- 
logues Fre«. 

E. Second St. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



'^*^ at THE 

'uitiversity; 



THE LANDS OF THE SUN EXPAND THE SOUL. 






m 



THE LAND OF 

SUNSHINE 



VOL. 3, No. 5. 



LOS ANGELES 



4 'r, 



"^IK 



OCTOBER, 1895 




An Afternoon Tea, 

eV LILLIAN CORBETT BARNES. 

ACK from the glare of the road she turned 
with a sigh of relief into the eucalyptus 
grove. Her aimless wanderings carried 
her through narrow, sinuous paths and across 
sunlit avenues— still with the eucalypti rising 
sombre about her. At last she happened upon 
r: the house. Cautiously she climbed the steps and 
^ groped her way along the deserted porch, where 
honeysuckle vines made darkness of the day. But 
when she turned a corner and looked suddenly down 
the tunnel-like gallery to the end — ah! the gleam 
and the glory of that California rose-garden ! Al- 
ways afterward, wherever she happened to be, she had only 
to shut her eyes to see it — far off, silent like some en- 
chanted close. For a moment she stood motionless, then began to walk 
slowly onward with the uneven step of the slightly lame. " I am sure 
to wake up before I get to it," she whispered. Nevertheless she slippe<l 
off her hat and gloves and went on as though she had a right. At the 
end, the porch turned and broadened, and a flight of steps led down into 
that rare wilderness, where the full perfume of the La France mingled 
with the spice-laden odor of the Marechal Niel, while in riotous confu- 
sion spread the blood-red Jacqueminot, wandered the pink Duchess, 
shone the white La Marque — flaunted a myriad-blossoming host ! She 
knew but the one sweet old name for them all — roses! Into their 
thickets she did not attempt to penetrate, but stood contentedly looking 
down, then, the sun getting hot, turned to step back a little — started 
— flushed. 

" I beg your pardon," she said, " for intruding." 

•' It is I who intrude," came the answer, and a man emerged from 
the shadow and took off his low-crowned, soft, black felt hat. 
" I do not belong here," she said. 
'• Then we are both — shall I call it guests? " he answered, smiling at 

Copyright 1S95 by Und of Sunihine Publitbing Co. 



202 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

the odd little figure before him with its bright brown eyes and prema- 
turely withered face. 

" No —you are the host, by right of first possession/' she replied. 

" Then I may get you a chair ? " 

" How can you get it ? This house seems barred against — guests." 

"There was a time, long ago, when this house was good to me. Per- 
haps it is friendly yet. Will you wait while I discover? " 

"Yes," she answered. 

He disappeared down the gallery — a broad-shouldered, brown-skin- 
ned man in semi-religious dress. Presently an old-fashioned window 
near her swung open and let him out, bearing a wicker chair. 

" Open Sesame ! " she cried. 

He laughed and, going back, returned with a footstool. "Are you 
comfortable? " he asked, placing it at her feet. 

" Very, thank you," and, when he had seated himself, she went on : 
"Don't you think there is something haunting about this house ? A 
pleasant, ghostlike sense of home, very grateful to wandering folk ? " 

"Are you a wanderer, too — Dorothy? Do you mind being called 
Dorothy ? The name seems made for you." 

"Not in the least" — she looked keenly at him — "Richard. I go 
wherever I am sent," she continued with a touch of weariness. " I 
have always been doing it. I had forgotten there was such a place as 
home until today — something in the house reminded me, I suppose. My 
newspaper — " 

"Nay, nay, Dorothy," he interrupted, " I am afraid that you, too, 
have a vocation — an avocation, at any rate. Suppose we forget. Sup- 
pose we pretend — do you like to pretend? I do — that you are just 
Dorothy at home under your own vine and eucalypti. And I am just 
Richard. * We are but children of a larger growth.' " 

She laughed. "I have had to imagine many things, never this." 
And then, leaning forward with a puzzled air, " After all, you are Rich- 
ard only when you smile. At other times you become — what shall I 
say ? Ricardo ? ' ' 

"The fault of an ancestor from Seville. How often have I told you 
about him, Dorothy — you are always Dorothy, just Dorothy — have you 
forgotten his rose-garden and his voyages ? ' ' 

" Only that you may tell me again, Richard." 

" I am glad you never tire of my stories. Once upon a time, then, 
there was a rose-garden, something like this, in Seville — but, my dear, 
isn't it time for tea? (Say yes.)" 

" We are all out of tea," she objected. 

"You do not know your own resources, house-mistress ! Let us try — 
we could never get on without it. Nay, it is my turn," he added gaily 
as she half rose to help him. 

"Suit yourself," she replied, settling comfortably back. 

He went inside and returned presently with a small tea-table, a spirit- 
lamp, a little swinging kettle, and two newly- washed cups and saucers. 
When the water was actually beginning to boil in the kettle, she said. 



AN AFTERNOON TEA. 

shaking her head, " I am afraid you ought not to bring 
out." 

" We always do, Dorothy," he answered reproachfully. " If 
objects, we will remember him in our prayers. And now for the tea 
Behold, faithless and unbelieving ! " From an inner pocket he pro- 
duced a tiny, Japanese-labeled package and poured a bit of the contents 
into each cup. " Didn't you yourself send me after this? Didn't Kin- 
katiwa himself present it with an Oriental bow? 'For the Mistress 
Dorothy,' he said." 

She had a sensation of being in a dream, which 'deepened as he con- 
tinued. 

" But you are telling nie now that the milkman forgot to bring the 
milk ? I can remedy that, too. Then you are to acknowledge your 
friend a miracle- worker." 

From a lemon tree in the garden he gathered a couple of ripe, yellow 
lemons. " Do you drink Russian tea? Of course I ought to know." 

*' Invariably — when I can get it." 

" And sugar? " 

" Two lumps, thank you. 
I admit the miracle," she 
laughed over the preferred 
cup. " But the setting is not 
quite perfect." 

"Ah?" 

"You have brought the 
coffee cups." 

His face fell. 

" Let it pass," she said 
with a forgiving wave of her 
hand. " What do you ex- 
pect me to stir it with?" 
He^picked a rose-twig and, 
carefully cutting away its 
thorns, gave it to her. " I 
suppose I might unearth the 
spoons" — he began doubt- 
fully. 

" Oh, never mind ! Lemon 
juice isn't good for spoons. 
Besides, I like to see you 
accommodate yourself to the 
resources of Juan Fernan- 
dez." 

"My ancestor had to do 
so." 

' ' The one from Seville ? ' ' 

" Yes. On one of his voy- 
ages"— 





204 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

" No — begin at the beginning, ' Once upon a time ' — I want to be 
sure you leave nothing out." 

" Obedience is my second nature. Once upon a time, in a rose-garden 
in Seville ' ' — 

" Dorothy " leaned back in her chair and listened, her eyes fixed on 
the visible rose-garden before her, with its tall, bright foliage of palm 
trees. The pleasant, rhythmic voice blent with the murmur of bees and 
the rustling of leaves. She was quietly, lazily, sleepily happy. The 
world of storm and stress dwindled to its vanishing point and went out, 
leaving behind only a rose-garden, a dream-haunted house, and Othello 
— telling stories. 

They had drunk another cup of tea together, had been out in the gar- 
den that he might teach her the names of the roses one by one, still 
holding fast to the beautiful, children's game of " keeping house," and 
the sun was setting behind the trees, before she said, " And now I have 
to go away — on an errand, Richard, just a little errand. You must take 
good care of the house." 

" Let me walk to the gate with you," he replied, " It is too dark for 
you to go alone." 

As they passed under the eucalypti, he said lightly, yet with a touch 
of regret in his voice — the afternoon fantasy had struck deeper than 
either of them cared to show — "Only a little errand, Dorothy? The 
little errand of life, I suppose. And whereabouts does it take you ? " 

"Just to Canada," she answered. "To Victoria. I was telegraphed 
yesterday." 

" Ah ! and I am sent down into Mexico — to Vera Cruz." 

" Outlaws, both ! " she laughed, but with a catch in her throat. 

"Nay — exiles, only exiles," he replied. 

They stood for a moment at the gate, looking out through the quickly- 
descended twilight to the flickering village lights and the darkening 
foothills beyond. Then she started as a sudden thought struck her and 
said, " I suppose I might ask you — ought to, in fact, for I have so little 
time, and it seems to me that you may know ! My telegram told me to 
lookup — to interview — Father Marina, some kind of Jesuit celebrity 
passing through here — his native country, though New England claims 
him in part. Strange that even a half-Puritan should be a Jesuit — " 

She stopped, for a curious expression had crept over his face and he 
was holding out both hands as if to cry her mercy. "Dorothy! 
Dorothy ! " he pleaded. 

Smit with wonder at her own stupidity, she laid her hands in his. "I 
do not want to know, after all," she said swiftly, "I will write and tell 
them I could not find out." 

"Thank you. But you will remember your home ? " 

"I will remember." Her voice trembled; she withdrew her hands 
and turned away. 

" Good bye, Dorothy," he called quietly after her. 

She looked back. 

" Good bye, Richard,^' she replied and went on with bent head. He 
stood looking down the road whither she had gone, long after her waver- 
ing shadow mingled with the night. 

Pasadena. 



"i f Hi id^ 



The Mission San Luis Rey. 







w 



1Y ADELINE STEARNS WINO. 



£^2ri 



R were a dozen members of the Society for the Preser- 
vation of the Missions, on a tour of inspection. A 
night and a day we had been at San Juan Capistrano ; 
and could understand why, with its fresh sea breeze and 
healing waters, it was once the health-resort for all the 
other missions. Our interest in the picturesque ruin was 
divided by the queer, old adobe village. There was hint 
of romance in the fine dark eyes of the inhabitants. 
There were the delightful stories told by the witty Irish 
judge who combines in his own person all the oflSces of 
the village. Best of all, there was the shy and unspeak- 
ably beautiful young daughter of the Spanish grandee of the place — 
she looked a Madonna in the bud. 

From all these enticements the artist members of the party had to be 
dragged almost by force, and we again sped southward. Two miles 
from the Mission we came to San-Juan-by-the-Sea, once the port of much 
of the interior. From the high yellow bluffs, hides and tallow were 
thrown down to British and Russian trading vessels by night, since 
traffic with ships of any foreign nation was strictly forbidden, and the 
Spanish galleons themselves must sail only from Cadiz or Seville. 

Skirting the Pacific, and with a sea of billowy hills and mountains on 
the other side of us, we came to Oceanside, the port of San Luis Rey. 




rnioii Kng. C... GENERAL V I EW OF TH E M I SSION . JMiot... l.y Klanclianl. 

Next day was the Fourth of July, and every carriage in town was in 
use. We were forced to make the six-mile journey to the Mission in a 
springless wagon. But the landscape was beautiful, and we kept meet- 
ing wagon-loads of Spanish and Indian people ; all picturesque and 
some strikingly handsome. 

San Ivuis Rey is in the Santa Margarita valley, forty miles from San 
Diego. The great Mission church, with the lovely flowing lines of its 
fa9ade, stands impressively upon an elevation, set in a fine mountainous 

' San l.uis Key de Kruiuia. St. l.ouis. Kiiik »( Kraiiie il.uuis IX). 



2o6 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



landscape, and with the marshy San Luis river shimmering at its feet. 
The general plan of the buildings is the same as at Capistrano — a 
cloistered quadrangle built about a paiio measuring 250 x 280 feet, with 
the church at one corner. 

San lyuis Rey, founded in 1798, under the auspices of the Marquis of 
Branciforte, became the most extensive Mission in California, famous 
for its wheat and — its baker, Paulino. It was the only Mission which 
remained prosperous long after secularization. 

The Indians here were mostly of the Gaitchim tribe (the Ketchis of 
Buschmann) and unusually intelligent. The church, with its walls in 
some places 56 inches thick, is of burnt brick filled in with adobe, and 
plastered inside and out with white, hard lime cement. It is well pre- 
served and has not been materially altered since the days of Father 
Peyri. The nave measures 30 x 160 feet, and the ceiling is about 80 feet 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



DOWN THE CORRIDORS. 



Photo, by Maude. 



high. Only one of the eight bells remains in the bell-tower. The still- 
brilliant frescoes, some quaint and some beautiful, with charming har- 
monies of colors, were all painted by the Indians ; most of them 
as bright and fresh as if done yesterday. There were frescoes represent- 
ing Indians with bows and arrows ; angels (in blue and gold) ; Don Pio 
Pico on horseback ; draperies, and wreaths of flowers. The colors were 
mostly vegetable and mixed with glue. The Indians made them all. 
The yellows were extracted from poppies, blues from nightshade, and 
red from a stone on the beach. There were also some dim frescoes still 
on the outside walls of church and court. 

Near the main altar, above which was an octagonal dome, we saw 
fresh flowers on the grave of Padre Zalvidea : and in one of the many 
niches was the lonely wooden statue of a solitary saint, standing like a 
Casabianca. A flight of stairs led to the quaint old pulpit, and a cement 




THE hACHAUA. 



1 1 > T H P.Ucl.e. 



2o8 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



font was in a front room of the church. The red-tiled roof was supported 
by rough beams, over which hides were stretched, and on them brush 
strewn. The kitchen chimney was enormous and ornamented with open 
diamond brick work. Timbers, stretched from the top of the cloister 
arches to the walls of the enclosing buildings, formerly supported a 
floor for the accommodation of the many visitors who flocked to see 
(after the secularization) the bull-fights in the court. Around this floor 
was a balustrade of latticed brick work. 

It is said that in latter days, while Don Pio Pico was administrador 
of the Mission, he himself, gorgeously dressed in black velvet and silver 
lace, once took part in a bull-fight here and carried off all the honors. 




Plioto. and Eng. by Herve Friend. FOUNTAIN AND STAIRCASE. 



THE SUPERIOR NORTHERNER. 209 

He also distinguished himself as an actor in B,pastorela written by Padre 
Florencio of Soledad. 

The court-yard still contains fountains and some pepper and fruit 
trees — some planted by Father Peyri, others by Don Pio Pico. Many 
of the cloister arches have fallen, but one can still see the entire plan. 
Store-rooms, dormitories, and other rooms where the various trades 
were taught, were in the surrounding buildings. The good old priests 
must have been most versatile, for they taught the Indians apparently 
every industry known to man or woman — from cooking, sewing, 
and weaving, to agriculture and bricklaying. The entire Mission was 
in perfect condition up to 1850, when it was used as barracks for United 
States soldiers. In its palmy days the gardens were particularly beauti- 
ful. In addition to its own vast ranch, of which 56 acres were enclosed 
by a high adobe wall, the Mission San Luis Rey owned ranches, sitios, 
estancias at Santa Margarita, Las Flores, Pala, Agua Caliente, and else- 
where. It raised olives, oranges, peaches, grains, cattle, and horses. 
In 1827 San Luis had 2686 Indian neophytesf' Here the soldiers, who 
acted as guard, had a herd, the proceeds of which were devoted to deco- 
rating the Virgin's image. But the Indians are all gone, and in their 
stead are the Franciscan brothers lately moved in from their college of 
San Fernando, Mexico. The ruined arches of the Mission are as pictur- 
esque as those of a Roman aqueduct. Beyond the buildings, high ridges 
of half melted adobe wall stretch half a mile; and there are ruins of 
distant adobe buildings. 

The departure of the good and wise Father Peyri from this Mission, 
scene of his chief labors, has already been described in these pages ; and 
how the Indians followed him by night to San Diego. Some even swam 
after the ship from whose deck he waved them his benediction. Four 
accompanied him to Rome ; and there one became a priest. The 
neophytes left behind were wont to pray to his picture, as to a saint, 
even after his death. Had ever man a more touching epitaph ? 

(ileii.lale. 

The, Superior Northerner. 



®r' 



BY CHARLOTTE PERKINS STETSON. 
{a new ENCLANDER.) 

'HRRK are those — mainly from New Kiigland, and having, as a 
rule, a pair of well-modeled glasses balanced on a dignified 
ancestral nose — who contend that the climate of Southern 
California is " debilitating." 

Not only debilitating to the health of the body, which is bad enough, 
but debilitating also to that high moral tone which distinguishes — here 
the New Knglander magnanimously enlarges his boundaries and says : 
*' Those who live in colder climates." 

And the Southern Californian, who is pretty sure to be either a New 
Englander himself or the descendant of one, bows to the tradition and 
feels his moral tone being lowered by degrees and his physical health 
insidiously undermined by our blessed sunshine. 



2IO LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

It is funny, by the way, to see how these people speak of " physical 
health" as if it were a species of carnal indulgence anyway, a low 
thing, to be treated with modest discretion like other "pleasures of the 
senses." 

It is also funny — very funny — to observe that most of them come 
here to get it ; here, where those who know how to live spend a hundred 
years or so of painless, vigorous life, and even those who don't are kept 
alive, in spite of their foolishness, far longer than they could have with- 
stood the " bracing " climate of their beloved home. 

But this may sound childish to the acute New England mind, so let us 
be logical — if eight years in California have left enough mental power 
to ratiocinate. 

You maintain, O New Englander, that the climate of your native land 
is responsible for the unparalleled good health and beauty as well as 
mental force and moral elevation of your people ? 

The New Englander here admits ( his mental force seeing the trap 
and his moral elevation not permitting him to be dishonest) that they 
are not much to boast of physically, save for " endurance," but that the 
other qualities are all there, and that the climate did it. And he says 
a good deal about the character developed by meeting storms, etc., and 
how they have filled all America with — well, with Americans. 

If this be so, O New Englander, how is it that the noble savage, who 
had all these advantages long before you, did not manifest the same 
traits — no, nor any of them — not even the "energy;" that same 
savage being on occasion distinctly lazy ? 

The New Englander here is forced to admit that race has something 
to do with it, but hastily transfers his position to the Anglo-Saxon 
character, and shows that, too, was the result of climate — the " love of 
liberty" — the "spirit of conquest" — the "sense of justice" — all 
apparently begotten between a few select degrees of latitude and not 
elsewhere. 

You think then, O New Englander, that the ancient Saxon — a guz- 
zling, fighting, dirty animal — and his compeers of the Celtic and Ger- 
manic tribes, were superior creatures ? And if the climate produced 
these manly virtues, are not Lapp and Finn, and Sclav as good as they? 
Siberia has a fine bracing climate — where is its conquering civilization ? 

Then the New Englander gets a little mad, for his mental force per- 
ceives that you are guying him, but his moral elevation prevents any 
unseemly display of temper, and he admits that climate alone will not 
produce even these results, and that he refers to the modern Anglo- 
Saxon, descendant of these northern tribes, and conqueror of the world. 

Then — if you like to — you may begin patiently to explain that the 
Anglo-Saxon character is the result of many more influences than in- 
heritance from those old northerners. 

That which makes modern civilization is the science which began in 
Chaldea and Phoenicia, and filtered down through Egypt, Arabia, Italy 
and Spain ; the enterprise which sent the ships of Tyre around all 
Africa ; the courage and discipline and sense of justice which gave Rome 



SAN LUIS REY. 



21] 



the world to rule ; the art which came all glorious from Greece aud to 
which Italy gave rebirth ; the literature from the same great sources, and 
the religion of Judea. Without these humble contributions from lands 
which were none of them cold enough to spoil the fig crop, our northern 
ancestors would have guzzled and fought undisturbed to this day. There 
is not a human virtue or power that can not be found in those splendid 
races born around the Mediterranean ; no civilization has been greater 
than theirs and no religion worth speaking of but what has'come from 
these warm lands. 

Cold climes make thick fur and ferocity — or thick blubber and 
voracity. 

Fruit and sunshine are good for body and brain and soul. 

When the conquering New Englander has done exterminating the 
Indian and struggling for a living, let him come here and live — calmly, 
wisely, nobly, healthfully and happily. 



San Luis Rey. 



BY B. C. CORY. 




Two leagues away from Ocean - 
side, upon the mesa steep, 

Where wailing winds of winter 
time fall whispering asleep ; 

Where the dying river creepeth 
to its grave beneath the sand. 

And solemn silence sleepeth 
o'er the dun deserted land ; 

Where sunsets, wierd and won- 
derful, roll waves of mvstic 
light 

Across the frowning forehead of 
the swift advancing Night ; 

Still stands this cloistered mys- 
tery, whose wasted walls en- 
fold 

Vast stores of hidden history 
unwritten or untold. 

Its solemn stately arches, and its sadly silent bells. 

Its crude and crumbling capitals like drowsy sentinels — 

They are ghosts of vanished grandeur, when, through these arches wide, 

Flowed high and haughty life, whose dust sleeps in the dust beside. 

Some noble names of sunny Spain upon these graves are writ ; 
They sought for power, they wrought for gain — and all is gone of it. 

But other dust sleeps by their side, whose spirit, once elate. 
Hoped here to lay foundations for a mighty Christian State. 
'Mid sorrow, toil and loneliness they taught the Name of Love 
And sought to see in dusky eyes the love-light from above. 

Sleep, Brothers of Junipero ; your strange, sad task is done ! 
The passion of your saintly lives immortal power hath won — 
Among the south Sierras, and o'er their mesas wide, 
The duskv children of the sun adore the Crucified ! 



©p* 



A Truly*' Geranium. 

►O the Californian who goes East, a humor of the situation is see- 
ing what people call "flowers" back there. Brought up in a 
generous land where Nature is neither stingy nor ashamed of 
her handiwork ; where plants grow as if they liked it ; where winter-long 
the slopes are tapestried with infinite wild-flowers — to find himself now 
where "flowers" are poor, pale little whiffets nursed in pots, is funnier 
than politics. He smiles within at the necessity of withdrawing the 
plants from the vicinity of the double window, and of keeping the 
furnace eruptive through the night. He finds pleasure in contemplating 
folk who think a climate where Marechal Niels cost four bits a bud is fit 
for human occupation. If he were not a Westerner, with the racial 
childishness outgrown, he would laugh out loud to see how the pride of 
a |io,ooo hothouse is a pitiful floral runt which would scarce be given 
fence-room in " God's Country." 

The geranium is probably the most universal intimate flower of the 
East ; and he finds it there a shivering caricature a foot tall — and at two 
feet a monstrosity. He thinks of the back fence at home over-run with 
real geraniums, perennials whose stems are thick as his wrist ; of how 

every year the owner 
has to cut out from 
such a hedge more 
wood than would 
make a thousand 
show geraniums in 
the East ; of gerani- 
ums trimmed to the 
habit of a tree, and 
a rod tall. And while 
he will not say much, 
he cannot help feel- 
ing that the narrow- 
ness of winter -bit 
communities must 
be as hard upon en- 
lightened flowers as 
upon enlightened 
people. 

When he gets home 
he may very likely 
send his Eastern 
friends this photo- 
graph, of a geranium 
growing out of doors 
in Southern Califor- 
nia. It is only 22 
feet tall. 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



JUST A GERANIUM. 



The Voyage. 

BY JULIA BOYNTON CREEN 

First Day. 

Little green waves, little gray-green waves of the sea 

I sit at your feet by the hour, and I watch you frolic and play, 
Thinking (ah, foolish thought !) the sea is the same today, 
As soft and gentle and kind a thousand leagues away 

Where the gallant ship sets sail that will bring my dear one to me. 
Hoping (ah, foolish hope ! ) by this prayerful breath of mine 
I can soothe and smooth all this turbulent waste, and make it 

fair and fine, 
I can soothe and smooth for one little week all this deep tem- 
pestuous brine. 

Second Day. 
Emerald waves, O emerald waves of the sea. 

White as a eucharist lily your foam, and green as its leaves 
Your cool and translucent hollows. O happy shore that receives 
This lovely largess for aye ! O sorrowing shore that grieves 
When the tidal transport slowly ebbs, and the beautiful glee 

Of ripple and wavelet and billow and breaker is spent at last ; 
When the clamor dies and the great sea lies like a lover, his 

passion past ; 
When the final embrace is over, the uttermost garland cast. 

Third Day. 

Snowy surf, O radiant snowy surf. 

The land she leaves is all snowed over in early spring 

With a glory of jasmine bloom, the whitest and sweetest thing ! 

Sung over by rapturous birds and worshipped by bees a-wing. 

O surf you are white as Hawaii's bloom, and green as her turf 
Are the waves you crown. O sea be safe as their island sward 
To her pilgrim feet ! O spray be sweet as the jasmine's fragrant 

hoard ! 
O ocean birds, sing blithesome words and o'er my ship keep guard ! 

Fourth Day. 

Ravenous waves, O fierce and ravenous waves, 

How can I think today of her who is far from home ! 
Far toward the sky-line, trouble and danger and inky gloom ; 
Throbs of fury, hither, and mountainous shocks that come 
And hiss and shriek on the sand in a pallid passion of foam. 

Cruel swells that shape in a merciless mock of graves ; 

They scoop the bed, then swiftly spread a mound like a new-made 

tomb. 
Then scatter it o'er as a last scoff more with a white profusion of 
bloom. 



214 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

Fifth Day. 

Riotous gales, O riotous gales of the sea, 

I will have none of your kisses softened to suit my cheek ! 
Here will I walk alone, where I meet you, bold and bleak-; 
Where you sting my face with your bitter spray, and whistle and 
shriek 
As you whistle and shriek in the sails of the struggling Belle Marie. 
Boisterous gales, where'er in your giant games you go. 
As you sweep your strength down the mighty length of the con- 
tinents, and strow 
Like careless boys, your cast-off toys, oh spare one ship I know ! 

Sixth Day. 

Sunny calm, O breathless calm of the sea, 

Sleep of the weary sea, the minion meek of the moon, 
More than a sleep meseems, rather a sudden swoon ; 
After the mighty gales, oh how can you drop so soon 

With heavy wings on the deep, delaying the Belle Marie ! 

Out in the hot still space float slothful shallop and smack, 
Dogged by their silent nether ghosts, cordage and canvas slack, 
Never a breeze their sails to seize and favor the journey back. 

Seventh Day. 

Pitiless fog, O ghostly white sea-fog, 

You have blurred the sky-line out, you have blinded the world 

with a pale 
Impalpable curtain of surging mist. Oh, what can avail 
Powerful screw, and steam and compass and mast and sail, 
What can they all avail with this on all like a clog ? 

Impotent now the skill and wisdom of master and mate, 
What, oh, what can the swiftest ship do more than wait and wait. 
Or speed ahead through the present dread and hazard a fearsome 
fate? 
Arrival. 

Little green waves of the sea, O billows and winds and calm, 

Listen to this my joy — you have known my dolor and dread — 
Welcome the Belle Marie, she has safely and swiftly sped, 
The one I waited has come and the greeting words are said. 
Here on the beach I come to sing my jubilant psalm ; 

Her brow and her small white hands are white as your whitest 

foam ; 
Her cheeks like your faintest rosebud pink, when you mirror the 

sunrise bloom ; 
Her eyes the hue of your deepest blue ; O sea she has come ! she 
has come ! 

Los Angeles. 



The Coyote* 



^si'^^ 



o*. 





BY CHAS. F. LUMMIS. 

F all the beasts that roam the plain, there are but two liarsT 

We have the Psalmist's expert opinion as to all men ; but he 

might not have thought it worth mentioning if he had known 

the American prairie Ananias. In another form of vocal 

deceptiveness, the coyote leaves the biped prevaricator as 

far behind. One man in a million can become a ventriloquist ; 

every coyote is one by birth. And so far as heard from he is the only 

breathing thing that has that unvarying birthright. 

Least of the wolves, or greatest of the foxes, canis latrans is one 
of the most curiously interesting animals on earth — and one of the 
least understood. In body (except for bis head) he is a small wolf, 
in mind a fox, in morals a mixture of both. I have known him 
rather intimately for near a dozen years, and only trust that the 
pleasure has been mutual. 

The Indian folklore of the Southwest invariably ranks him as the 
butt of all other wild animals — and none but the inexpert will dare fly 
in the face of Indian observation. But so far as concerns man and his 
one flatterer, the dog, the coyote shines brilliant by comparison. If the 
higher wits play rough tricks on 
him, he gets even by still more 
practical jokes upon his two in- 
feriors. The Southwestern shep- 
herd or poultryman who does not 
know his metal as a wag, is of 
scant experience yet ; and the 
dogs should be still better in- 
formed. Besides his humor he 
has astonishing faculty as a strat- 
egist ; and some of his jokes are 
classics. I have known him — 
and in many different localities 
— to raid chicken-yards or sheep- 
corrals in perfect safety despite 
a watch of dogs competent to 
tear him limb from trunk. One 
of him, with nightfall, would 
take post on a hill off" to the 
east and begin to fill the sky with 
howls. Forth from their ward 
would stampede the valiant dogs. 
The joker would lead them off" 
into the hills a fool's errand ; 
while his accomplices swept in 
from the west, ravished the chick- 
en-yard, and were safely away 
♦Pronounced Co-y6h-ty. 




HiTve f'ripiid, Ems. 

" HlC JACET 



lirnwn by N. J. Th«r|>e. 
OF THE LAMB. 



2l6 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



long before the duped canine sentinels came limping back with tongues 
out and tails depressed. I never have been able to prove that the deco}' 
had an arrangement whereby his accomplices should afterward " whack 
up ; " but it is a safe guess that no such sharper goes out and sings for 
fun and lets himself be swindled out of his share of the booty. The trick 
is so common on the frontier, and so invariably successful, as to be 
a proverb. Seeing a wild dog with so much wit, and the tame one 
so perennially witless (for the hounds never learn the joke) one might 
wonder at it — if one did not remember that. the domestic cams is handi- 
capped by long looking up to the least observant animal that goes on 
legs. 

The coyote is a characteristic part of the Southwestern landscape. 

" A shade on the stubble, a ghost by the wall, 
Now leaping, now limping, now risking]a fall, 
lyop-eared and large-jointed, but ever alway 
A thoroughh- vagabond outcast in gray — " 

as Bret Harte sings of him in much better verse than observation. 
"Lop-eared," indeed ! One of his peculiarities is the rigid up-and-for- 
wardness of his large ears, which not only never lop but never unstiffen. 
And to figure a coyote " risking a fall " is a smilable^matter. It is the 
weak point of the greatest California fictionist, and runs through all his 
work — that he would much rather be brilliant than be right. He never 
fails to be picturesque, and rarely fails to be unnatural. For example, 
when he dubs our friend 

" A barefooted friar in orders of gray — " 

words which tickle the ear, but are so impossible that in a less musical 
mouth they would be silly. 

The coyote's vocal talents are first to command notice. It is no meta- 
phor to call him the only four-footed ventriloquist. He really is one ; 
and can so "place " his voice that you shall not know if it came from 
north, east, *■ south or west. , And as a multiplier — well, hearing one 
coyote, no newcomer but will swear it is a dozen ; and even the frontiers- 
man does not live who can always be sure if there be one coyote, or two, 
or three. Sometimes you may see the very Indians in doubt. That 
wail is the strangest, wierdest, most baffling sound known to any wilder- 
ness — a wild medley of bark, howl, shriek and whine, utterly indes- 
cribable"; andjas to its articulation, glib as nothing else I know except 
the sound of irregular musketry. The swift patter of its vocables is 
something'almost incredible. It is this voice which has earned him his 
scientific name — which is most unscientifically applied. He is not a 
barker {latrans) but a bewailer, and should have been ticketed ululans. 
His cry is utterly unlike the long, grisly howl of the wolf or the bron- 
chial bark of the dog. 

He is the Southwestern troubadour and gipsy — 

" A furtive-nosed 

Gray streak, composed 

Of mouth, brush, legs and lung." 



THE COYOTE. 



217 



Vl7EIi2 



No other animal whatever — in the New World, at least — can be 
heard so far. Only two in North America can run so fast — the ante- 
lope and the little blue fox. 

" The wan jackrabbit's lofty ear 

I'nfurlswhen I am heard ; 
But vain he flees — I see that he's 

Right decently interred. 
And'when spring mutton conieth ripe 

I may remark I am 
On hand. to .see — in fact, I'm the 

Hie jacet of the lamb." 

Now and then someone stumbles upon a coyote's burrow and exca- 
vates the pups ; but otherwise one never sees a baby coyote. Foxes, 
yes— and many a time ; and if there be a prettier sight than Madame 
Reynard frolicking with her fluffy whelps, the hunter has yet to know 
it. But for all the glass or the trail ever show, one would judge coyotes 
to be born full-grown. They are fed in their burrows until fully com- 
petent for piracy on their own hook. 

Coyote is one of the Aztec words adopted into Spanish from the 
Nahuatl confederacy about the Lake of Mexico, and brought up to our 
Southwest by the conquistadores who discovered New Mexico in 1539 and 
colonized it permanently in 1598. Its original form was coyotl — and it 




A YOUNG COYOrt. 



2i8 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

is safe, in general, to count as of Aztec derivation any word adopted 
from the Spanish which ends in o-t-e or a-t-e, like metate, petate, pelote, 
and the like. 

This animal — whose pelt is the handsomest worn by any frequent 
beast in North America — used to be called the "prairie wolf;" but 
only the innocent and the dictionaries so call him now. He has none 
of the wolfish ferocity and none of the wolfish seriousness. He is a wag 
— and like most wags, timid ; though I deem it no honor to their intel- 
ligence that many call him a coward. Do they expect a thirty-pound 
wild dog to attack man ? But nothing can be more ridiculous than fear 
of him. A hunter would sit down as unconcerned amid a thousand 
coyotes as if they were rabbits — unless he had something stealable. 
As a sneak-thief, the coyote is enterprising as his big grey cousin is as a 
highway robber and assassin, I have several times had a coyote step 
across me while I slept ; and among the diversions of our wedding jour- 
ney in the wilderness was the waking one night to find two coyotes 
fairly over us, trying to get the saddle-bags from between our heads and 
the big pine-tree which was our hotel. It needed no more than the 
creak of an eyelid to send the interlopers flying. No, they are no 
wolves. The cranial arch has nothing of the strength which character- 
izes the skull of the wolf, but has the foxy flatness. The muzzle, also, 
could not possibly be taken to be a wolPs. The name given by the 
First Americans, and perpetuated by the first Caucasians in America — 
who knew and named the coyote three full centuries before any man of 
English tongue ever saw one — is far the fittest one ; and for a wonder 
is now almost universal. 

The drawing from life by Tharpe and the photograph by Brewster, 
accompanying this article, are the best likenesses of the coyote ever pub- 
lished — it were almost safe to say the only respectable ones. It is a 
cynical commentary on our imitative scholarship that the American 
textbook does not exist which has a recognizable picture of this wholly 
American beast. The encyclopedias, the Century Dictionary^ the 
Standard Dictionary, all print coyotes which might better serve as 
stuffed Spitz-dogs — they are much less like coyotes than like imposi- 
tions on the trustful. 

The habitat of the coyote practically corresponds with the area dis- 
covered by the Spanish in North America — Mexico and the Southwest, 
and the treeless Great Plains. And whenever and wherever, he is the 
cleverest thief, the artfullest dodger and the most tireless serenader 
that ever sung the moon down. 





L. A. Eng. Co. 



SOUTHWESTERN TYPES— A CHINESE MAIDEN 



Pbolo. by Stanton. 



Stockton's Capture of Los Angeles. 



>y H. A. REID, M. D. 



mp^ 




N January 8th and 9th, 1847, two battles were fought 
between the American forces under Commodore 
Stockton and the Mexican forces under Governor- 
General Flores. The first day's battle took place 
at San Gabriel ford, on the old stage road leading 
out by way of Aliso street ; and a passenger going 
from Los Angeles to Orange on the Santa Fe rail- 
road, by looking out of the car window on the north 
side all along for half a mile before reaching the 
San Gabriel bridge, and up stream from the bridge, 
will be looking upon the battle field of that day. 
The second day's engagement was on the open plain of the Laguna 
ranch (south of the old stage road), now owned by the widow of Col. R. 
S. Baker. Among the prominent Spanish families of Los Angeles at 
that time was that of Doiia Encarnacion Abila, widow of Don Francisco 
Abila of the Las Cienegas rancho. Her city home was the adobe build- 
ing which is still standing, a few rods north of the plaza, Nos. 14, 16, 18 
Olvera street. The roar of cannon and rattle of musketry in the battle 
of the 9th could be plainly heard all over the city, producing intense 
apprehension and terror ; and Doria Encarnacion fled from her house to 
the home of the old Frenchman, Louis Vignes, for protection against 
the expected vengeance of the victorious "gringo " army — for her son- 
in-law, Lieut. Col. Garfias, 
was a cavalry officer on the 
Mexican side, and had ob- 
tained horses for his troops 
from Rancho San Pascual, 
which was then in her 
possession. Commodore 
Stockton marched into the 
city with drums beating 
and flags flj'ing, and hoist- 
ed the American flag over 
it again [he and Fremont 
had taken Los Angeles 
once before, without a bat- 
tle, Aug. 13, 1846] ; and he 
took Dofia Encarnacion's 
deserted house for his 
headquarters. Its present 
owners, her descendants, 
say it still remains just as 
when the Yankee Commo- 
dore occupied it, except 
that a new roof has since 
been put on it. 




L. A. Eng Co 



From a painting. 
SENORA DONA ENCARNACION ABILA. 



STOCKTON'S CAPTURE OF LOS ANGELES. 221 




THE ABILA ADOBE. 

Stockton's Headiiuiiitcis, Jan. 1S47. Still stanJing, 



f hoto. by Pierce. 



rhiingeJ. 



After their defeat the Mexican array retreated and encamped on land 
now owned by the Raymond Improvement Company, right where the 
Southern Pacific R. R. depot for South Pasadena stands; and from there 
they commenced their negotiations with Col. Fremont, who had just 
reached San Fernando old mission on 
his difficult and snow-blockaded winter 
march down the mountainous coast from 
Monterey. From this resulted the formal 
surrender of the California troops under 
Gen. Andres Pico to Fremont — the his- 
toric " Capitulation of Cahuenga," which 
was finally consummated at the old Ca- 
huenga ranch house on January T3th. 
Fremont then marched into the city, 
bringing as trophies the two brass howitz- 
ers which were the principal cannon the 
Mexicans had had in the two days' bat- 
tles. Stockton appointed Fremont Gov- 
ernor, and he took the two-story adobe 
mansion of Alexander Bell for his gub- 
ernatorial headquarters. This building 
was said to be the best one then in the 
city, and a current joke was that " noth- 
ing but the best was good enough for 
Fremont." It stood at the southeast 
corner of Los Angeles and Aliso streets, 
where the Haas block is now. This is 
the simple fact about Fremont's head- 
quarters, as vouched for to me by Hon. 



'W 




t.. A. Bug 0<i 



Phot... «iy Wwtervelt. 
DR. JOHN S. OKIFFIN. 



222 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Stephen C. Foster and Don Francisco Garcia (114 years old on May i, 
1895), who were both here at the time. Yet an old adobe building on 
Main street, away out near 13th, which was not built until about five 
years after Fremont's governorship, has been photographed and sold 
extensively to tourists and relic seekers as the historic " Headquarters." 
The popular story that Fremont as the first American governor occupied 
the residence of Don Pio Pico as the last Mexican governor, is altogether 
a fiction. Pico's residence then stood where are now Nos. 171 to 201 
North Spring street. 




LOS ANCrELES 3r 

"/nifrfrcB /v LLrrr ii* 

r 
r 



Union Eng. Co. 



MAP SHOWING HISTORIC POINTS. 



1. — Commodore Stockton's headquarters, January 10 to 14, 1847. 

2. — Stockton's troops encamped on the plaza. 

3. — Col. Fremont's headquart«rs while Governor of California, in a two-story adolic house owned by Alexander 



4. — An old one-story adobe house owned by Pio Pico, whose son-in-law, Jose Moreno, lived there. House still 

standing. Pico himself had lodgings and an office there in later years. 
5. — Residence of Pio Pico while he was Governor. 
0. — Headquarters and barracks of Lieut. Gillespie, where the "battle of Los Anjieles " was fought, September 

23, 1846. The same buildings were occupied by Col. Fremont's tri>oi)s, January and February, 1S47. 
7. — AdoJje buildings occiipied by Col. Stevenson's troops, 1847. This structure was afterward used as county 

and city jail, 
s— Adobe building occupied by Quartermasters department, 1847. 
'■). — Adobe building used as military hospital — now all torn away. 
10. — Residence of Jose Antonio Carrillo. 

1 1. — Residence of Jose Sepulveda. The present Pico hotel stands on these two lots. 
12.— Residence of Manuel Garfias, a Mexican Lieut. Col. in the battles of January 8, 9, 1847, and owner of Kancho 

San Pascual. 
L! — B. D. Wilson's store : the two old iron cannon were planted there in 1849, and are there yet. 
14. — Abel Stearns's corners, where were planted in 1849 the two old iron cannon which now lie at west front of 

court house. 
l."i. — Old church at the plaza, for which the original roof -timbers were gotten out by the Yankee ' iiiratc prixiner," 

Joe Chapman in the Sierra, in 1818-19. 
16.— The " Fort," which was commenced by Gov. Micheltorena in 1844 ; used l.y Lieut. Gillespie in September, 
1846 ; built in proper military form by Col. Fremont in January. 1847 ; further improved by Col. Steven- 
son the same year. Now entirely obliterated. 

I prepared the above diagram from information furnished me at different times by the following old-time 
t^alifornians, who are still living : Hon. Stephen C. Foster, aged 74: Francisco Garcia, 114 on May 1, 189.5; 
(J. W. Robinson, 86 ; Elijah Moulton. 74 : Theodore Rinipau, 69 ; Jose Perez. 63 : Pio Zabaleta. 62 ; Judge B. S. 
Faton, 72 ; Dr. John S. Griffin, 79 ; l>csides printed records, and my own examination of ''Fremont's Redout" 
in December, 1883. 



ON THE HEIGHTS — SQUIRREL INN. 223 

The chief medical officer of the American troops in the battles of 
December 6th, 1846 (San Pascual in San Diego county), and January 
8th and 9th, 1847, was Dr. John S. Griffin, who still resides in Los Ange- 
les, on Downey avenue, at the venerable age of seventy-nine. He was a 
prominent business man of Southern California in a former generation, 
having been engaged in many large enterprises with such men as Hon. 
B. D, Wilson, Capt. Phineas Banning, ex-Gov. Downey, and others. 



On the Heights. 

BY LOUIS JAMES BLOCK. 

Bluer the sky, and more serene. 

Perfumed the air, 
Thin shadows touch the valley green. 

Speed here and there. 

The land laughs with the wind and sun. 

The mountains stand, 
Veiled in the mist by distance spun, 

On either hand. 

The silence weaves its tender spell. 

Sweeter than song, 
Around ; high up the soft clouds dwell, 

And moveless throng. 

Thought's weary stress dissolves in peace, 

Care fleets on care, 
Life celebrates a new release, — 

The dream is fair. 



Chicago. 



Squirrel Inn. 

BY EVA MITCHELL COOK. 

Y^AR up the south side of a high peak in the vSan Bernardino range, 
•f^ nearly six thousand feet above sea-level, stands the Arrowhead 
^ mountain club-house, in the heart of a gigantic pine forest ; yet 
so situated, that between the enormous trunks and from under the 
drooping branches, as through a frame of God's handiwork, a panorama 
of the beautiful valley is seen far as the eye can reach. 

The club is as unusual in its purpose and management as in the site 
chosen for its habitation. Its members are manly men, of high place in 
commercial and professional circles, and are properly fond of their rods 
and guns ; yet also are they devoted to their families, and the club-house 
is intended and used as much for their pleasure as for that of the 
members themselves. 

Squirrel Inn ( so called after Frank Stockton's clever story ) is built 
after the manner of that ingeniously devised hostelry, of mammoth 
logs, with the stairs leading to the second story outside, and the squirrel 
sitting bolt upright over the main entrance, a tireless sentinel and host. 

The Arrowhead Mountain Club was organized in '92, and its ra^^ft^fir^ -^^ 



t^: 



.<' 



224 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



ship numbers sixteen representative men. Some of them are connected 
with the Arrowhead Water Company, and when the latter commenced 
the gigantic work of tunneling the peaks that the waters on the other 
side might be utilized in irrigating the lands on this, a fine road was 
built, which served to make transportation possible for the water com- 
pany, and at the same time made the various mountain fastnesses 
accessible for other purposes. Then it was that the club decided on the 
site for its club-house, and purchased some mountain land ; and the Inn 
was built. 

The drive is by no means the least enjoyable part of a visit to Squirrel 
Inn, for it is made over a road of notable engineering, with a constantly 
changing vista of wonderful scenery that delights eye and mind. 

Leaving San Bernardino, the road crosses the valley, penetrates the 
narrow canon that winds up past the side of the peak which bears on its 




Collier, Eng. Photo, by Slocum, San Diego. 

breast the famous arrowhead, and winds on through oak and manzanita 
groves, by a little mountain stream, that is, in winter, a dashing torrent ; 
on to the grade proper ; thence on again and up, turning and twisting, 
until, over the tops of the trees and smaller peaks the valley below 
widens and grows ever more beautiful. 

When the top of the ridge is reached, behold ! the hardy sentinel pines 
are all about, and between their trunks on the north the eye travels 
across rolling ridges, each lower than the other, down to the waste of 
the great Mojave desert, bounded by the horizon line. Toward the south 
are also seen ridges which drop lower and lower to the San Bernardino 
valley, with its towns and hamlets ; its water courses, vineyards and 
orchards ; its perennial and hopeful green and promise of wealth and 
prosperity — to the waters of the blue Pacific in the distance. 

The ridge once gained, the road continues on its apex under a forest 
of pines for several miles until the Inn is reached, and the four hours' 
drive, which has been such a continuous delight, is at an end. 



SQUIRREL INN. 



325 



The club-house is a large, rambling structure ; the bark -covered logs 
of the exterior a fitting and harmonious shell for the hard-wood finish 
within. The main entrance gives immediately into a large living-room, 
with mammoth old-time fireplace where young tree trunks in five or six 
foot lengths are burned whole. 

Through the windows on either side one gets delicious glimpses of the 
pine forest. A large sanctum for the ladies is on the left ; and on the 
right a den for the men in which indulgence in the weed and other 
comforting privileges may be enjoyed. In the dining-hall fifty people 
may sit at once about a huge table. Above stairs are the pleasant sleep- 
ing rooms. 

The interior finish is a light hard wood — floors, walls, ceilings. Great 
rugs and skins are on the floors, the windows are shaded with dainty 
curtains, a piano is against one wall, glass cases of stufl*ed birds stand 




("liier, lint:. SQUIRREL INN. ' '""" "> ^'>" ■"" •^•'" "">•■" 

about ; and a music rack, hat rack, frieze and other ornamental and 
useful pieces of furniture are made of small gnarled branches of forest 
trees, cleverly woven together, and decorated with pine cones and acorns. 

Verily the land of the olive and the pomegranate, the exotic sunny 
south, must be more than four hours away ; there is no suspicion of 
oranges, magnolias or other tropical belongings in this frosty, exhilar- 
ating air, with snow under foot and ice all about. 

The club members have the privilege of selecting sites for cottages for 
their own use, the only restrictions being that they shall be built of logs 
and so placed as to face the Inn. 

During the season a chef and retinue of servants are in attendance. 
The members, their families and friends enjoy club privileges at a modest 
weekly rate, and stages convey guests, mails, and provisions to and from 
San Bernardino. When the mercury is at its highest notch in the valleys, 
cool mountain breezes sigh through the pines that surround Squirrel Inn, 
and fan the brow with their spicy fragrance. 



The Kingdom of Water. 



BY FRED L. ALLES* 




Collier, Eng. ARTESIAN WELL, 



,ATER is King in Southern California 
— an uncrowned king but recipi- 
ent of unstinted homage. True, 
water would be worthless without land 
upon which to use it, but in a territory 
where there is so very much more land 
than water in sight, water will long re- 
main monarch. 

Dreary and bleak for uncounted cen- 
turies were the mesas and valleys of 
Southern California during the long 
"dry " seasons and brief, indeed, were the intervening "wet" months 
when the winter rains gave sufficient moisture to cover the bare, parched 
floor of the valleys with a carpet of wild flowers. The early Indian saw 
nothing in the mountain streams save a hiding place for trout, or a 
gathering place at some quiet pool for wild animals. The advent of the 
Latin conqueror did little more in the way of material development than 
to show what could be done — which, like the standing on end of 
Columbus's egg, was vital, after all. The coming of the Anglo-Saxon 
changed the face of nature quickly, as he put all the water in sight into 
instant use and then went on a hunt for more. And when the Anglo- 
Saxon, as exemplified by the thrifty and pushing Yankee, goes on a 
hunt he generally brings home his game. 




L. A. Eni:. to, A SOI RCii I.N SA.N ANTONIO CANON. 

'Secretary of the National Irrigation Conf^resit. 



228 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 



A quarter of a centurj^ ago Southern California had enough available 
water in sight in rivers and mountain streams to irrigate perhaps 20,000 
acres of land. Today there is probably twenty times that amount of 
land under irrigation, and the acreage is being increased annually at a 
rate which is surprising. 

Those unfortunate people who are compelled to grow food and fruit in 
a land where rainfall alone is depended upon for a water supply have 
little idea of the comfort and convenience of irrigation. When the 
summer sun is high in a cloudless sky, and its hot rays are robbing the 
atmosphere of every particle of moisture ; when the leaves of tree and 
plant begin to curl and droop under its fervid glances ; when the surface 
of the soil blisters and bakes from overmuch evaporation, the farmer 
and fruit-grower in the supposed-to-be-rainy, but too frequently the 
rainless, belt, pray longingly and fervently for water. Often their 
prayers remain unanswered. 




1 A.hiiL. Co A TUNNKI. FOR WATER — SAX ANTONIO CAKON. 

The Southern California horticulturist, under the more favorable con- 
ditions existing in a land where irrigation is practiced, noting that his 
trees or vines need a drink, simply opens out a series of furrows in his 
orchard with a common corn plow, turns the water into these furrows 
from the main ditch, and in a few hours the ground is saturated, just as 
if a refreshing rain had fallen, and the leaves on tree and vine assume 
their usual gloss and vigor. 

No loss of crop ever comes to the fruit-grower on the golden shores of 
the Pacific Southwest by reason of either flood or drought. These two 
items are responsible for fully one-half of all the losses with which 
farmers and fruit-growers meet in less favored regions. If all possible 
loss from too much or too little water could be avoided, fruit growing in 
the Eastern States would be taken from the domain of chance into the 
field of certainty. Nothing will ever make this possible except a change 
to the climatic conditions which exist in the arid west. 



THE KINGDOM OF WATER. 



229 



In Southern California there is no fruit upon either tree or vine when 
the usual rains come, with the single exception of the orange, and this 
fruit is rarely injured by excessive rainfall. 

Orchard planting, as a rule, is done here only on lands having a safe 
supply of water for irrigation ; and this can always be easily and cheaply 
applied exactly when needed, and, as a result , we have no losses from a 
lack of water. 

Irrigation is not an expensive method of watering the soil. The land 
purchaser usually gets one share of water in some responsible water 
company with each acre of land which he buys, and in this way he and 
his neighbors are the owners, in fee simple, of the water on which they 
depend for irrigation. Having paid for his land and water, he is at no 
expense in the future save the nominal cost of keeping the pipes in 
repair and paying the wages of the zanjero who attends to the distribu- 
tion of the water. This expense varies somewhat ; but rarely exceeds 




Kng. 



A MAIN DITCH, NEAR AZUSA 



five dollars an acre per year, and is often very much less. This cost 
would be considered trifling by an Eastern orchardist if he could freshen 
up his trees after a season of prolonged drought. 

The water supply of Southern California is as certain and secure as is 
the sunshine. The rainfall during the winter months varies somewhat, 
but this does not affect the supply depended on for irrigation so much as 
does the snowfall. The latter in the mountain region is remarkably 
regular. On the tops of the Sierra Madre, whose giant peaks pierce the 
clouds at heights of from eight to twelve thousand feet, there are great 
valleys with rockribbed walls which are lined with enormous snowbanks 
every winter. Under the gentle wooing of a semi-tropic sun these snow 
walls melt into purest water, which runs off in silver threads and rills, 
down the cations, through rocky gateways, into the valleys below, where 
it is caught up by the thrifty husbandman and fed through ditches and 
furrows to the roots of tree and vine. Here the sparkle of the snowflake 
and the golden glint of the sunbeam unite to make the nectar of the 



230 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



orange and the amber bead within the cells of the grape. Many great 
reservoir sites have been discovered in the fastnesses of the rock-ribbed 
mountain valleys, and some of these are now being utilized for summer 
storage of winter waters. Surveys have been made of catchment basins 
and drainage areas and other available sites, for these great artificial 
lakes will soon be made to conserve the heretofore wasting waters of 
winter rain and snowfall, which are so valuable in beautifying the lovely 
valleys which lie spread out between mountain and sea. And not only 
is the water from these great mountain reservoirs to be sent out to make 
an emerald cover for many brown fields, but the genius of its captors 
has decreed that on its way down from the tremendous heights it is to 
be harnessed to great wheels and thus be made to spin out power and 
light for use in the cities of the plains below. 

The title to water here is just as absolute and as good as the title to 
the land, and is acquired in practically the same manner — by appropria- 




IRRICATINC A YOUNG ORCHARD 



Photo, by Maude. 



tion or by purchase. Unoccupied government land can be secured any- 
where in the United States by the citizen who wishes to use it for a 
home, on the payment of a small land office fee. Unappropriated water, 
except that in navigable streams, can be secured in exactly the same 
manner by showing upon what arid land it is intended to use the water 
for irrigation. The bulk of the really desirable government land has 
long since been taken up, and it can be obtained now only by purchase 
from the original homesteader. So, too, the bulk of the available visible 
water supply has long since been filed on, and it can be had now only by 
purchase from the original appropriators. The title to water is usually 
vested in incorporated companies, and an interest in the water is usually 
evidenced by certificates of stock which are bought and sold just as stock 
is bartered in any other corporation, and the title passed is just as abso- 
lute as that vested in any other form of property. 



A GLIMPSE OF ARCADY. 231 

Two forms of acquiring water are recognized in the arid section : prior 
appropriation and riparian right. 

Under the doctrine of prior appropriation, the first user of the water 
is entitled to it, his actual use of it being preceded by a formal filing, as 
is done in land or mineral filing in the government land office, and this 
right is recognized even against that of the owners of land abutting on 
a stream, if such owner failed to file a claim for water on his land. 

Under the doctrine of riparian rights, all land abutting on a stream is 
entitled to its just proportion of the water flowing by, sufficient for its 
proper irrigation, and this claim is good even against land owners a])ove 
and below who may have been using the water for years. 

In California the doctrine of prior appropriation has always been 
recognized as legal and just, but in many States of the West the doctrine 
of riparian rights is recognized as the law. 

Los Angeles. 




A Glimpse of Arcady. 

BY ELLA M. SEXTON. 

In clamorous waves the city's roar 
Beats on and on through stifling airs, 

With deafening din re-echoing o'er 
Her stony clattering thoroughfares ; 

Yet, inner silence broods with me — 
The charmed trance of Arcady. 

Shut in by towering walls, the sky 
A pallid glimpse, God's sunlight dear 

Past dusty casements flickering by, 
With Toil and Gain for warders, here 

A yearning prisoner held, for me 
Still smile the fields of Arcady. 

Dull, dull and cold each printed page, 
Long-columned figures sway and reel. 

While round me fellow-toilers wage 

Life's struggle, chained to Fortune's wheel 

From duty's lash a truant, free 
I roam with fauns in Arcady. 

Ah, Heart of Mine, await me there, 
While snows of orange-blossoms fall, 

Till at your lead our footsteps fare 
And follow changeless Summer's call. 

Fulfilled our every dream shall be 
In yonder longed-for Arcady ! 



8«n Francisco. 



^' 



The Paradise of Age. 

>HE Land of Sunshine has before now touched upon the effect 
of such a climate as this in prolonging human life. It will 
appeal to the common sense of the average reader that a 
country where plants which our youth knew as shivering annuals become 
venerable perennials — where, for instance, geraniums grow a rod tall ; 
where the castor bean is a veritable tree, with a trunk six inches thick — 
would be likely to be a good country for human longevity. And so it is. 
So eminent an authority as Dr. Norman Bridge says that " here the aged 
may set back the hands upon the dial of their years." And what these 
beneficent skies will do by evolution, after a few generations, in length- 
ening the span of life of its Saxon inhabitants is an interesting specula- 
tion not without some known data to guide the estimate. 

Dr. Cephas L. Bard, of Ventura, in his readable pamphlet Contribu- 
tions to the History of Medicine in Southern California^ says of the 
aborigines of this section : 

" That thej' possessed as a race greater longe\-ity than their successors there 
remains no doubt. The great majority of skulls examined are indicative of very 
advanced age, the cranial sutures being entirely consolidated, with no vestiges of their 
existence. The records of the Missions furnish many instances of death at extreme 
old age. Those of San Buenaventura give the ages of three Indian women buried 
there as, respectivelj', loo, 105, and 114 years. Father Martinez, in charge of the 
Mission of San Miguel, shortly after its foundation, wrote that it possessed three 
Indian women, each of whom was more than 100 years old. The records of the other 
Missions reveal the presence now and in the past of numerous Indian centenarians. 
The ages of Fernando and Placido, who died at Los Angeles, were estimated at 102 
and 137, The latter danced at a fandango a short time prior to his decease. Justiniano 
Roxas, who died at Santa Cruz in 1878, was baptized at that Mi-ssion in 1792, and his 
age then was put down by the officiating padre as about forty. Within the last few 
years there have died in Kern county four Indians, each of whom was undoubtedly 
oven 00 years old. They were Canillo (Alcalde of Tejon). Alfonso, Rafael and Fran- 
cisco. They helped to build the Mission of San Fernando. An Indian named Gabriel 
died in Monterey some time ago who was reported to have been 140 years of age. 
Dr. Remondino, in a paper read before the State Society in 1890, gives some interesting 
instances of prolonged savage life in San Diego county. At the Mission of San Tomas 
there lived an old Indian 140 years old. On the Sweetwater was an Indian man 115 
years old, and one died at the county seat. 109 years old. At Capitan Grande were 
several Indian women over 100 years old. Warner's ranch furnishes one 130 years of 
age. The present chief of the almost extinct local tribe at San Buenaventura, Juan de 
Jesus, is an active old centenarian, who can be seen on the streets every day. As an 
evidence of his virility it may be said that the last ot his series of squaws presented 
him ten years ago with twin papooses. Dr. Fergusson of Bakersfield informs me that 
an old Indian named Sebastian lives there, who at the age of 90, rides forty to fifty 
miles a day.'' 

Of the Spanish-speaking successors to the Californian Indians and the 
effect of this climate upon them, Bayard Taylor in 1846 already remarked 
their great improvement over the original type. Dr. Bard says : 

"The vocation of the native Californians was conducive to the fullest development 
of physical perfection. Paying no attention to agriculture, their bodies were not 
marred by the stooped shoulders of those whose existence depends upon what they 
take out of the soil. The care of their herds of cattle and bands of horses was the 
ideal of a pastoral life. The newcomer was a Crusoe and his man Friday was the 
mustang. From morn to night, man and horse, mind and muscle, roamed like cen- 
taurs over our fertile plains, finding enjoyment rather than work in the slight care 



THE PARADISE OF AGE. 233 

which the flocks entailed. Their adobe homes, barring their imperfect ventilation, 
met every requirement of the climate, being warm in winter and cool in summer. 
They fully appreciated the sanitary worth of sunlight. Ever mindful of the adage of 
their Castilian forefathers, " Where the sunlight enters, the doctor goes out," they 
built their adobes on the open plain, with no intervening shrubbery to shut off the 
genial rays of a southern sun. Their diet consisted of beef, mutton, bread, coffee, 
chocolate, with but few vegetables. Their flour was universally devoted to the man- 
ufacture of tortillas, thin circular pieces of bread, made by rolling a i>aste of flour on 
their stone metates, and then baking them. The frijole, or bean, was the chief of the 
few vegetables used, and today is the ever-present feature of the menu of the native 
Californian. The dietetic importance of this legumen cannot be overestimated. Its 
portability, durability, and nutritious worth, render it the most valuable and available 
constituent of the armies and navies of the world. Loyalty to my own bean-growing 
county prompts me to dilate upon the virtues of this prince of seeds. Our soil and 
climate are peculiarly adapted to the culture of what has contributed so much to the 
comfort and welfare of the native Californian. An attractive feature of the display of 
the productions of Southern California at the Columbian Exposition was Ventura's 
pagoda, representing in its construction one hundred and twenty-five different species 
of beans. The Macedonian soldiers, who conquered the world, were fed upon the 
black beans of Sparta. Frederick Field, in a lecture ' On the Mineral Resources of the 
Andes,' says : ' that in 1851, two large stones, one weighing 356 pounds, and the other 
349, representing the richness of the Chile mines, were forwarded to me for exhibition 
purposes. Both stones had been taken from a depth of more than 300 feet, and had 
separately been borne on the shoulders of a man, he having to ascend, not by ladders 
or other aid, but by climbing up the nearly perpendicular slope of the mine ; and the 
food the miner lives upon is an interesting subject for the physiologist. He seldom 
takes meat, and when he has that luxury, it is simply served out in long thin strips, 
which have been dried in the sun. His chief diet is the haricot bean, and without this 
nutritious vegetable he never could perform the work required of him.' At the pres- 
ent date the amount of work performed by the California vaquero, or the Basque 
sheep-herder, whose diet consists almost exclusively of carne seco. frijoles, tortillas, 
with a little coffee, is astonishing. 

As to the theory — just now resurrected in re the bicycle — that much 
riding militates against paternity, Dr. Bard continues : 

" The size of an ordinary California family furnishes a complete refutation of these 
fallacious deductions. The average number was about ten. That of some families 
was most remarkable. In 1882, at a dinner party at San Luis Obispo, tendered by 
three native California gentlemen to a Bostonian, the guest boastfully remarked that 
he belonged to a family of thirteen children. One of his entertainers quickly re- 
sponded that whilst such a family might be regarded as extraordinary in the East, it 
was not so here. ' For example,' said he ' my friend on your right belongs to the Dana 
family, which has twenty-two children ; my compadre on my left belongs to the Hart- 
nells, who have twenty-two ; and I am one of the twenty-six children claimed by the 
Castros.' In the county of Ventura there resides today an estimable lady, from whose 
face the lines of her former beauty have not as yet been effaced. Dolia Concepcion, 
wife of Don Francisco de la Guerra, who was closely identified with the early history 
of our State, who has presented her only husband twenty-one children. Another one, 
Feodora Olivas, has borne her only spouse twenty-one : and Soledad Vanez, who is 
still in the prime of life, has given her sole life-companion twenty children. Bayard 
Taylor says: ' A native was pointed out to me as the father of thirty-six children, 
twenty of whom were by his first wife and sixteen by his second.' Secundo Robles 
got by one wife twenty-nine children. Jos6 Maria Martin Ortega, the eldest of 
twenty-one children, had as many by one wife. Carlos Ruiz, of Santa Barbara, was 
the father of twenty-five children by one wife." 




And what is "provincial ? " The dictionaries tolerably agree 
that it is " pertaining to a province ; uncultured, narrow, 
countrified." Which is all very well, so far as it goes — but, like their 
average makers, the dictionaries often do not go far enough. They are 
very learned men, these whose personal words, given weight of type on 
twenty pounds of paper, go bumping down the ages ; but they are 
geographically rather Rhode Islanded. The foot of the class might 
easily define them as "bounded on the north by the base-burner, on the 
west by book shelves, on the south by the servant girl, and on the east 
by the Society for the Prevention of Learning Anything Not Yet 
Printed." Why, particularly, "countrified?" The hayseed can be 
narrow and not half try ; but he must stay out all night if he would out- 
narrow the city wiseacre. He has his lean side ; he is even so modest as 
sometimes to envy urban "ease" — but never so dull that he cannot 
laugh at urban dependence. When he shall take time to make his own 
dictionaries (and country boys were the first lexicographers) he will per- 
haps define provincial as "uncultured, narrow, citified." For the 
metropolis is only a smaller, narrower, and somewhat more ignorant 
province. It has forgotten half as much as it ever knew about the 
science of health and the gentle art of living — though it has invented 
many new ways and degrees of getting tired in trying to have a good 
time. It has not grown more honest or more chaste or more amiable, 
and certainly not more self-reliant. It has learned not to gape on its 
own street-corners, and forgotten how to keep its mouth shut when it 
runs across something it w«7 used to. It will admit that " God made the 
country and man made the town ; " and will indicate its judgment of 
the comparative smartness of the two architects by its choice of resi- 
dence. It counts the Almighty rather provincial anyhow. 

Now if one may dare amend the big book makers, "provincial " has 
nothing to say with locality. It may be countrified or citified, and is as 
often the one as the other. It really means narrowness, lack of horizon, 
conceit in ignorance — the only misfortune that man is glad of. It 
means the " we-are-the-people " spirit ; the attitude of looking down 
upon everything we are ignorant of; the loss of the sense of proportion 
of the individual earthworm to the terrestrial crust. These things 
obtain as much in city as in country — often more, for motlesty is against 
provincialism. The jay is equally ignorant — but he more frequently 
knows it. 

For greenness, a country lane cannot out-verdure the city. It is a 
different hue of green, that's all. A smilable example has been in 



EARMARKS OF 

THE PROVINCIAL. 



236 LAND or SUNSHINE. 

everyone's eyes for two years. For that time New York has been in 
convulsions over its electric cars. The trolley has killed more metro- 
politans than it ever caught greenhorns ; and whom it has not killed it 
seems to have scared out of the semblance of growth. Never was any- 
thing taken so seriously, since our grandfathers shuddered at the witch- 
craft of Fulton and Stevenson. The New York papers have trolley on 
the brain. The weeklies are never done with ghastly cartoons on this 
unparalleled agent of death ; and the dailies have editorials to beat the 
cartoons. One can understand how New York, being used to bobtail 
horse-cars for years after wakeful country towns had decent rapid transit, 
should shiver a little at progress ; but hayseeds would have grown to the 
occasion within a year or two. This country town of Los Angeles has 
had for a decade much better transit — and has never been scared. Out 
here in the provinces we don't get ourselves run over ; and if we did, we 
would make less roar than the province of Manhattan does when it 
barely sees a six-mile car come bumbling down its chattering streets. 
A TYPICAL Chicago University, when it sees the man it wants, buys him — 

CASE. though it had not quite the price to "call" the best Greek 

teacher in the country from Harvard and half its figure. Out here we 
have not yet exactly reached $io,0(X) salaries ; but we " give boot " — and 
somehow the bargain seems to go through. The average traveler gasps 
at noting the class of educational work done here on the edge of the 
world ; but anyone inured to the hardships of thinking would presup- 
pose it. Shall it be imagined that only bankers, bakers and doctors can 
read a thermometer ? May not even a teacher know enough to come in 
out of the snow ? At any rate, it has become a typical characteristic of 
' our development that he does come in. 

The Lion would be glad to think Pomona College can pay John Com- 
fort Fillmore, the new director of its School of Music, the salary 
Milwaukee has been paying him ; but does not believe it can. In legal 
tender, that is. On the final balance-sheet it will undoubtedly be found 
to have paid him far more — including health for his family, for which 
he has come. Here in a young frontier college, not yet burdened with 
many endowments, but earnest and workmanlike and with the premium 
of position in one of the loveliest corners of the New Eden, comes this 
case typical of many. Mr. Fillmore is not only a musician, but a 
musical scientist ; an eminent authority in folk-music, and discoverer of 
the most important because the elemental fact in the study of all prim- 
itive song. If history, archaeology, ethnology and their like have 
remained up to within a generation the mere burlesque of sciences, it is 
first of all because their followers sat in that smug blindness which may 
be brutally phrased as : " God made Us ; the rest of the race happened." 
This creed is still popular ; but students have to get out of it or out of 
the company they wish to keep. It is realized now that English is not 
God's " native tongue ; " that He made no blunder when He bifurcated 
Frenchmen, Russians and Hottentots — in a word, that human shape 
means human nature. When that light dawned, history and anthropology 
and their train began to become sciences. In music the dawn was late. 



IN THE LION'S DEN. 237 

Mr. Fillmore's startling thought that the vocal build of aborigines might 
resemble that of other men — that is, simply, that Indians are human 
beings — and his logical working-out of the discovery, demolished a 
great many arm-chair reputations, it is true, but at once established his. 
He has forever unhorsed the imbecile tradition that savage music was 
" a different kind of music " from civilized — that is, that it was unre- 
lated to harmony. He has not only guessed but proved that aboriginal 
music runs on harmonic lines, just as any other music does. Its discords 
rise from Lack of the fixed standards we have — just as civilized people 
sing " off " when unchecked by an instrument or by special training. 
Mr. Fillmore is the sort we want, out here ; and, it may properly be 
added in general, so is Pomona College. 

The recent death of Frank M. Pixley wipes off the slate one a jason of 
of the strongest names in weekly journalism. As little beloved "''"^ coast 

as strong men are liable to be, rather more distrusted than one could 
have wished, he was widely admired and widely felt. No crisper English 
is current, and none straighter to its mark, than he wielded ; and even 
people who were enraged by his editorials could not forbear to read. 
He had the counting-room sense quite as strongly as the literary ; and 
shrewdly foreseeing in damnation of the Democrats and the " Pope's 
Irish" a profitable play on prejudice, he made the two "features" 
prominent and perennial. But if these things savor of demagogy, he 
balanced the account when there came a pinch. Upon current questions 
he was fearless and forceful ; and his weekly and our own Los Angeles 
daily Times were the only papers of any prominence in California which 
stood fast and stood true in the great strike of '94. 

In State politics Pixley cut considerable figure ; but his great claim to 
remembrance is that he founded and made The Argonaut, the most 
original, most readable and most widely read weekly west of New York. 
Of late he had failed in body and mind, and it is several years since his 
pen ceased. But he drew the line, and his lieutenants — notably Hart — 
have kept the Argonaut toeing it. No man leaves a hole in the sea 
when he pulls his head out from it ; and Pixley's paper will progress 
without Pixley. Nevertheless, the West owes the dead man many thanks 
for many things, and a bit of green memory. 

The Palmer collection of Southern California antiquities— a stitch 
probably the most perfect collection ever made anywhere in "^ time. 

the archaeology of a specific area, and by far the most valuable, scientifi- 
cally, ever made in California — promises at last to be lodged permanently 
in this city where it belongs. Some months ago the initiative was taken 
by this magazine, and interest was aroused to prevent the threatened 
loss of that which Southern California could never replace. This 
country is under innumerable obligations to the Los Angeles Chamber 
of Commerce, but it has no larger debt than the preservation of this 
priceless nucleus without which we should never be able to make a com 
plete Southern California museum. The collection is now display 
the permanent exhibit of the Chamber. J^^^^^C^ 



W-'t 




THAT 

WHICH IS 

WRITTE 



Theodore S. Van Dyke, a valued 
contributor to these pages, is as favor- 
ably known in a far larger circle, not only 
as a foremost authority on sport with rod and gun, 
but as one of the most fascinating writers upon all 
such topics. His Still-Hunter has been pronounced by that most 
cautious newspaper critic in the United States, the N. Y. Post, " altogether 
the best and most complete American book we have yet seen on any 
branch of field sports." His works on California have been warmly 
complimented, too, by Charles Dudley Warner. 

Mr. Van Dyke's new volume, Game Birds at Home, is in dress hand- 
somer than any of its predecessors ; and in reading interest and honest 
value is a worthy complement to them. He knows the hunting-field in 
detail as perhaps no other man of equal literary ability does ; and he 
writes as very few hunters can. Now and then one may wax impatient 
with a bit of the style, where it loiters on the border of the sentimental 
or the conscious ; but the next turn it is more than atoned for by a pas- 
sage that whizzes to the mark, graphic as an arrow. This criticism is 
limited to the beginning of the book ; in later chapters there is less 
flower-picking. The man whose blood does not kindle at reading of the 
sandhill crane, the wild turkey, the wild goose, and " Days Among the 
Ducks" could profitably use a gun in but one way — and that would 
vitiate his life-insurance. New York, Fords, Howard & Hulbert. $1.50. 

AN ISLAND Mr. H. Rider Haggard could undoubtedly weave a wondrous 

HUMORIST. story with the scene laid in New York city. He might make 

the natives talk Ojibway and hunt plesiosauruses on Broadway. He 
could fill the street-arabs with a bushel of kohinoors in every pocket, 
and lodge them in log cabins whose i8-carat logs were hewn from the 
gold-fossil forest primeval which occupies the Bowery. He would not 
forget the royal blood of the street-sweepers, nor the emperorship of the 
ragmen. The heroine would be beautiful, and her christian name 
Unitedkingdom ; while the chief villain would be a typical American — 
and the hero, of course, a lignum vitae gentleman from the only country 
which produces heroes. 

There would doubtless be a howl of derision at this, for there are 
many who know what New York is like. That local color would be not 
a whit more impossible or silly than the local color he uses in Heart of 
the World ; the only difference is that there are not so many people 
familiar with Mexico and Central America— though it would be hard to 
conceive denser ignorance than Mr. Haggard's own. Having grasshop- 



THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN. 239 

pered over a little of railroad Mexico and read a few English hooks as 
misreprevsentative of the country as his own are, he is equipped — for it 
is surely too much to ask that a writer who makes only |2o,ooo a year or 
so should bother himself to chase verisimilitude at all. Such drudgery 
is well enough for fellows like Weyman, who give us honest local color ; 
but it is quite too slow for larger genius. Mr. Haggard conscientiously 
mis-spells two-thirds of the Spanish words he uses, and misuses a fair 
share of the rest ; and this is his least blunder. There is hardly a turn 
in his clever plot which does not betray impossible ignorance of his 
material ; and his sense of humor is what could be expected. Americans 
and Spaniards are introduced only as villains ; the Indians are even 
given to loving — an Englishman ! The writer does not know how to 
make them talk, act or think ; to the ways of the country, its history 
and geography, he is absolutely impermeable ; and to the initiate his 
treatment of the subject is one of the richest pieces of unconscious 
humor ever written. 

Against all this it need hardly lie said that Mr. Haggard has written a 
gorgeously readable book. The plot is excellent, the action drags not at 
all, and it is a story which tempts one to stay at it till the end. New 
York, Longmans, Green & Co. 

There is not, perhaps, in all literature a more elusive trail a pearl in the 
than Hawthorne's. No one else ever made dreams so truthful winnowing. 

or truth so dreamy. Very probably no other ever will. It is the wonder 
of his style — even while he walks the earth you see the play of sunlight 
under his both feet. 

The story by Miss Lillian Corbett Barnes, in this issue, is not Haw- 
thorne nor a taxable imitation of Hawthorne. But it is Hawthornesque 
— a motif so fragile a careless breath might snap it, a touch so delicate 
one half fears with the heroine that one may awaken before coming to 
the end. It is such stuff as dreams are made on — and very gentle 
dreams ; a story of unusual promise. 

A revised and enlarged edition of Charlotte Perkins Stetson's edged 
In This Our World, and other poems, is just out. There are, tools. 

in this remarkable little volume, many things uneven, but also many 
that were never so well done before. Mrs. Stetson's eye for tradition is 
merciless, and her sarcasm of a quality I do not just remember else- 
where — so cool, unbitter and inevitable that the " two-edged sword " to 
which one critic has likened her seems all too bungling. She is rather 
a razor — and decidedly not a " safety." It is of that edge which leaves 
many to walk on and talk on without a suspicion that it has divorced 
their heads from their logical shoulders. The booklet would be worth 
while even if it contained nothing more than the unforgetable Similar 
Cases, where 

" these things passed for arguments 
With anthropoidal apes." 

San Francisco, J. H. Barry, 429 Montgomery st. Paper, 50 cents. 



240 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

STRAY Miss Anna C. Murphy, whose poem Spent Gold was printed in 

LEAVES. ^jjg September number, is one of the valued aids in the text- 

book department of the State Board of Education. Rhythm comes by 
right to a grand-niece of Father Prout, of the Bells of Shandon. 

Louis James Block, the Chicago philosopher and poet, author of the 
volume of poems entitled The New World, was this summer renewing 
his acquaintance with Southern California. This number prints a con- 
tribution from his able pen. 

The Critic of August 31 gives the place of honor to a cordial review, 
by Beatrice Harraden, of Margaret Collier Graham's life and writings. 
A very fair portrait of the author of whom Southern Californians are 
proud is printed in the same number. 

John K. Reynolds of San Diego has set to very appropriate music the 
sweet and widely quoted poem De Massa ob de SheepfoV, by Sally Pratt 
McLean (now Mrs. Greene) whose first novel. Cape Cod Folks, made such 
a stir. R. L. Durant, Los Angeles. 50 cents. 

Dr. F. Franceschi of Montecito has published a useful pamphlet, 
Santa Barbara Exotic Flora, noting the astonishing number of foreign 
fruits, trees and flowers now "naturalized" in Santa Barbara county. 
Santa Barbara, published for the author. 35 cents, 

Clarence Herbert New has made a very readable novel of Franc Elliott, 
his maiden effort in this line, though he has for a couple of years been 
writing acceptable short stories. He has traveled considerably, and has 
gathered useful bits of local color here and there around the world. 
Paper, 50 cents. G. W. Dillingham, New York. 

The ambitious new Boston publishing house of Lamson, Wolffe & Co., 
makes its bow to the public this fall. It aims to put forth the hand- 
somest up-to-date book- work yet seen. Its list includes a volume of 
short stories by Charles G. D. Roberts, the brilliant Nova Scotian, and a 
tale of Peruvian treasure and adventure, The Gold Fish of Gran Chiniu, 
by Chas. F. Lummis. 

The Chicago Echo is one of the few new papers with reason to be. It 
is a fortnightly reproduction of what is best in up-to-date illustration, 
of the poster and cartoon schools, with special attention to foreign work 
in these sorts. This makes it of genuine value as a document, besides 
its intrinsic interest. Its covers are original posters by leading American 
startlers, 122 Fifth ave., Chicago. 

The Land of Sunshine does not publish two-page poems — a page, as 
a rule, is twice too long. But The Voyage, in this number, is proof that 
a manuscript can be good enough to upset the traditions. Mrs. Green, 
now a resident of Los Angeles, writes verse of no uncertain or common 
touch. She was the Julia Boynton whose thin volume of girlish but 
noteworthy poems, Lines and Interlines, was brought out by the Putnams 
a few years ago ; and several of her sonnets have been given place in 
collections. Mr. Green also does good verse for this magazine and some 
of the Eastern ones. 



w 



St. HILDA'S Hall. 

|E are beginning to realize that schooling does not begin and end 
with the schoolroom door ; that the influences of environment 
and personality are quite as important as those of the text-book ; 
that health and good breeding and highmindedness are as worthy to be 
learned as arithmetic. 

The modern common sense of education has no better exponent in 
vSouthern California than St. Hilda's Hall. This school for g^rls, now in 
its ninth year, has already won high and honorable standing. Situated 
in the heart of the beautiful Glendale valley, it has every benefit of en- 
vironment, in climate, scenery and health ; is retired from city distrac- 
tions, yet convenient to city advantages. It is six miles north of Los 
Angeles, with good railroad facilities ; at the foot of the Tejunga range, 
with views of mountain, valley and caiion which are almost an education 
in themselves ; and with all the beauties of a semi-tropic land. 




LDA-S HALL. GLENDALE. 



by KertrHiid. 



A fine building, elegantly furnished, spacious and attractive grounds, 
and all the equipments of a well-ordered school are matters of course. 

The principal, Miss K. V. Darling, is a New England woman of high 
repute there and here ; a scholar of wide reading, broad views and 
wholesome common sense. The impress of her character is upon all 
the school ; and the whole atmosphere is of refinement as well as of 
intelligence. Her staff of experienced teachers is competent and earnest 
Hygienically the school has made a remarkable record ; in mental and 
moral culture it is an institution in which we have every reason for pride. 
It is valuable not only to Southern California, but to the many 
families in the East whose daughters are at home interrupted in their 
schooling by the rigors of climate and consequent danger to health. 
St. Hilda's certainly does not take invalids ; but many girls who were in 
the East of too frail physique to pursue their studies, here find new 
health and vigor and become fitted not only to live but to learn. 



' ESCONDIDO. 

^g^^HE Escondido valley is located in San Diego county, on a branch 
>-^J line of the Southern California railway, about fifteen miles in- 
^ land, and about thirty-five miles north of the city of San Diego. 
This valley has one of the finest irrigation systems in Southern Califor- 
nia. The water is taken from the San Luis Rey river, an inexhaustible 
supply, and is stored in a reservoir covering about 200 acres, with a dam 
eighty feet in height built of granite. The system is now in good work- 
ing order, and will provide a bountiful supply of water for all time to 
come for irrigating the 13,000 acres of land inside the Bscondido valley 
at a nominal cost to the owners. 

All fruits susceptible of production in a semi-tropic climate are grown 
in this valley to the highest state of perfection. There is no finer lemon 
growing section to be found in California than here, where no killing 



Collier, Eng. ESCONDIDO HIGH SCHOOL. Photo l.y Cox. 

frost ever reaches. Here the prune, peach, apricot, apple, pear, fig, 
olive, almond, and in fact all deciduous fruits are grown successfully 
without water ; and it is anticipated that with the inexhaustible supply 
of water for irrigation there will be no limit to the possibilities of fruit 
culture in this fertile valley, and to the growing of alfalfa and general 
farm products. 

It is a well known fact that a peasant family in the old country will 
obtain a comfortable living from two or three acres, where the diversity 
of products is limited as compared to that of Southern California. 
Then why should not the occupant of five or ten acres in the Escondido 
valley, where he can produce every fruit or vegetable susceptible of 
growth in the temperate or semi-tropic climates of the world, be inde- 
pendent and attain a competence ? 

This valley is especially adapted to the support of a large population. 



244 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



Its soil, climate and peaceful surroundings invite all who are seeking a 
home of peace and plenty to come here and share it with those who 
have already found this truly Arcadian retreat. 

Considering the quality and general advantages of the Escondido 
country, its lands range very low in price. Good lands of all descrip- 
tions run from $35 to $60 per acre inside the irrigation system, in the 
valley proper. Lands without irrigation, adapted to the growth of grain 
and fruit, can be purchased at prices from $10 to $35, within a short 
distance of the city of Escondido. The lands inside the irrigated 
limits are subdivided into small tracts of from 5 to 20 acres. 

The city of Escondido is located at the terminus of a branch line of 
the Southern California railway, and contains about 800 inhabitants. It 
has several brick business blocks, a bank, two brick school buildings 




Collier, Eiig. 



BUSINESS HOUSE OF GRAHAM & STEINER. 



costing |6o,ooo, several churches, a hotel costing 145,000, and other im- 
provements of the most substantial character, showing that the cit}^ is 
entering upon a permanent growth. It has a tributary country around 
it extending from 12 to 35 miles, with no rival town intervening, and in 
this adjacent territory there are located many large and fertile valleys, 
among them the San Marcos, Poway, Bernardo, Bear, San Pascual, 
Fresno, etc. All lines of business are represented here, excepting the 
saloon. There is a complete school system, including a high school. 
There are ten teachers employed in the Escondido school district. 

The climatic conditions of the Escondido country are unexcelled in 
Southern California. Protected by the coast range from the harsh winds 
and fogs of the coast, with a pleasant ocean breeze during the entire 
summer, there are no extremes of heat and cold ; and those seeking 
relief from throat or asthmatic or pulmonary troubles can certainly find 
no more favorable location. 



FAVORITE RESORTS. 



245 




|H0SE planning to spend the approaching winter 
in Southern California, with headquarters in 
the vicinity of Los Angeles, will l?e interested 
in so charming a place as Redondo Beach. 
This favorite resort is situated only sixteen 
miles from the metropolis of Southern Califor- 
nia, and connected with it by the Redondo 
railway, and also by the Southern California 
railway, with its free chair car service. With 
the ocean at its feet and a magnificent view of the in- 
terior mountain ranges ; with the finest seaside hotel in 
Los Angeles county and the attractions of a fine warm 
plunge, busy 
wharf scenes, 
acres of car- 
nations, and a 
most health- 
ful location, 
Redondo pre- 
sents oppor- 
tunities which 
will be fully 

appreciated by both the home-seeker 
aud the tourist. 

Commercially Redondo is making 
rapid strides. Its present fine wharf 
service has already become so inade- 
quate to the demand that a second 
wharf has become a necessity, and is 
now Hearing completion. This places 
Redondo on a splendid footing as a competitor for ocean trade. 




Warm SaU Water Plttog*. 




aud 

and 



MONG the Southern California towns noted for elegant 
homes, fine drives and scenic surroundings, Pasadena 
has already become famous. It also leads the list of 
interior towns well able to take care of the most fas- 
tidious visitor. Those who prefer to sojourn a matter 
of eight miles from the metropolis and twenty-five 
miles from the ocean, will not only be delighted with 
this rose embowered "crown of the valley," but will 
recognise in its magnificent Moresque palace — the 
Hotel Green, no small inducement for tarrying long. 
The modern appointments of this great caravansary, 
and its convenience to three lines of steam railway 
an excellent electric railway line, all providing frequent service to 
from Los Angeles, are advantages not to be overlooked. 



' Ontario. 

fflTN the most perfect section of that wonderful first-slope from the 
I vSierra Madre — that magic acclivity which fascinates at first glance 
•^ and never loses its charm ; that elusive gradient which makes uphill 
look down and downhill up — almost overhung by the noble peaks of 
San Antonio and Cucamonga ; gently uptilted to the southern sun, and 
breathed across by the Seabreeze from the west, Ontario, "the Model 
Colony," fully merits its name. It is one of the prettiest towns in the 
United States, and one of the pleasantest to live in. 

Ontario was founded in the summer of 18.S2 by the Chaffey Bros., now 
of Australia, probably the most extensive colony-builders living. Work 
on a great scale was begun at once. In December the infant town had 
already a weekly paper. The trees along Euclid ave., now the finest 




ONTARIO AND SAN ANTONIO HBICHTS ELECTRIC RY. 

boulevard in California, were set out in '83. In another year the village 
had a college, school, public library, churches, postoffice, hotel, etc., etc.. 
and over $400,000 worth of land had been sold. In 18S6, the beginning 
of the "Boom," Ontario took great strides, getting an impetus which 
has continued ever since. In two years the value of buildings erected 
was over $470,000. 

The Ontario of today is not only beautiful but so well-ecjuipped, pros- 
perous and progressive as only a Southern California community of its 
size knows how to be. An Eastern town twice its population would not 
dream of having such improvements as Ontario has quite as a matter of 
course. Fine business blocks, handsome churches and schools, fine 
residences, surrounded by what is already becoming a great forest of 
citrus and deciduous orchards blocked out by splendid shade-trees — that 
is Ontario at thirteen. 



248 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 




« ."^ ^ 



Herve Friend, Eng. 



A FOURTH OF JULY TURNOUT. 



Two transcontinental railroads serve Ontario — the Southern Pacific 
on the south, the Santa F^ on the north. The latter road is about to 
move its depot to Euclid ave. There is also a railroad to the great sugar 
factory at Chino. 

For years Ontario had a unique street-car line — a car drawn up the 
double-shaded way in the center of Euclid avenue by mules ; and 
returning from the beautiful San Antonio Heights by gravity, the mules 
riding behind in a stall on wheels. But now this ingenious device has 
been supplanted by a high-class electric road. Euclid avenue, by the 
way, is seven miles long and 200 feet wide ; with a row of great trees at 




Herve Friend Eng. 



RESIDENCE OF CHARLES FRANKISH. 



ONTARIO. 



249 



each side and a double row down the center. The illustration is from a 
photograph made some years ago. Now the trees are so high that so 
diagramatic a picture cannot be made. 

The city is lighted by electricity, beginning this month — this and the 
electric railway being operated by the Ontario Electric Co., which has 
already expended $95,000 in the work. Its power-house, engines and 
equipment are all of the latest and best. The electric cars are the hand- 
somest in the market, finished inside in antique oak, white enamel and 
gold, and upholstered in leather. The line is now eight miles long ; 
and an extension which will double this mileage is projected. The city 
has also just completed a fine sewer system. 

An abundant supply of first-class water has already been developed ; 
and two large-scale water-mining enterprises are rapidly increasing the 
supply. The Prankish and Stamm enterprise has spent $50,000 in a 
tunnel now about 4000 feet long, and to be made a mile. It already 
gives 30 inches of water, and is expected to increase this stream greatly 
when it shall be completed. The Bodenhamer system is constructing a 
4x6 tunnel which will be 8500 feet in length and cost $80,000. The indi- 
cations are that this tunnel will develop a very fine stream. 

Besides its admirable public schools, Ontario has a progressive and 
efficient academic institution — Chaffey College — whose graduates have 




Union Eng. Co 



CHAFFEY COLLEGE. 



250 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



taken high rank wherever 
they go. The faculty is 
wise enough not to try to 
cover both college and pre- 
paratory work ; but con- 
fining itself to the four 
years' preparatory course, 
holds fast its high stand- 
ards of scholarship and 
character. It is an in- 
stitution worthy of its pro- 
gressive community, and 
the community is proud 
of it. 

The Sierra Madre, close 
behind the town, affords 
not only the magnificent 
scenery which by itself 
would make the fortune of 
any place in the Kast, but 
the most charming recesses 
for summer outings. San 
Antonio cafion with its fine 
camping-grounds and trout 
fishing and its minor tribu- 
taries, of rare beauty — like 
lovely P'ern cation — the 
hunting in the inner range, 
and all the other charms 
of snowy mountains in a 
sunn}' land add much to the pleasure of the Ontarians. 

Ontario orchards are famous for the beauty and quality of their pro- 
ducts. Particularly in lemons, the Model Colony leads the procession — 
and it means no small thing to lead where fruits are so perfect as in 
Southern California. Ever}- year these orchards grow more valuable, 
and every year great numbers of new ones are planted on soil before 
virgin. One company alone has 1500 acres set to young trees, of which 
the oldest are but two and a half years old. Five years from now, when 
all the present new orchards shall have been added to the great acreage 
of bearing trees, it will make a section even richer and more beautiful 
than it is now — which is saying a great deal. 

A model young city, with city conveniences and country health and 
pleasure ; peopled with the intelligent, well-to-do and law-abiding — there 
are no paupers and no saloons — Ontario is a spot that neither home- 
seeker nor tourist can wisely drop from his itinerary'. 




H<>r\>- Krieiul, Kii}:. 

FKRN CANON, NEAR ONTARIO. 




COT, F. W. HART 



SoilTllERN (aLIFORNIA 

ONTARIO COLONY is twelve years old. 
li«» thirty-eight miles east of Los Angeles, in the 
rich San Bernardino valley, on two trans-conti- 
nental railways. Is the home of the orange and 
lemon, and also of the peach, pear, apricot, nec- 
tarine, prune, olive, raisin grape, etc. We shipped 
the past season 320 carloads of oranges and lemon? 
and 125 cars of deciduous fruits and raisins. A fine 
health re>ort : six churches, good schools, a flour- 
ishing Methodist college, and, best of all, vo 
SALOONS. New electric street car line running 
throughout entire length of colony. For descrip- 
tive circular address with stamp. 

F. W. HART, 

North Ontario, Cal. 



H. C. OKKLEY & CO.. 

The Oldest Real Estate and Investment Co. in Ontario 

Have by their long residence in this locality acquired a practical knowledge of the value of 
property, and would be pleased to answer any and all inquiries from intending purchasers. 

Address all communications to H. C. OAKL.KY & CO.. Ontario. Cal. 



ONTRRIO hOTEL 



STRICTLY 

FIRST-CLASS 

HOUSE.... 




TOURIST 

COMMERCIAL 

AND 

...FAMILY 



ONTARIO, CAL. 

</5rHi>i HOUSE or eleven years ha.s been a favorite with Eastern visitors, commercial travelers and 
^ the traveling public generally. It is situated in the midst of ample grounds, beautified by 
orange trees and shrnbbery. and its verandas aflord fine vistas of the ' model colony ' of Southern 
California. The Euclid Avenue Electric Cars pass the house and connect with all trains on the Santa 
F6 Railway at North Ontario, and the Southern Pacific depot is only two blocks distant. The house 
has this season been thoroughly renovated by painting, papering and re-furnishing, and the table 
service is excellent. Rates. W^.OO per day ; ««.00 to <ll'4.00 per week. 



CHOICE BEARING ORANGE ORCHARDS 



from 9300 per acre upward. Fiist-class 
Fruit Lands within one mile of depot. 

from *«5 per acre upward. Kor the iuomI desirable Real Estate and Best Bargains, apply to or 

address CHAS. PRANKISH. ONTARIO, CAL. 



Please mention that you "taw it in the I<ANp oy Sunshink. 



c^^* -C-C-CtJ. -t^t *-» , 
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<^ -^-^fi- 'U-ex-f*-ci-*t.j y£«'*»rs^ *x^ fr-t-^^-t^d ex-flex^ e^ec-ttaft^o t^d- ^-t. f't^e^'Cd- , /i'//t-f>-/^ -z^^.- a^^«.4- 

A.tx.tjL.^**a. ex. d-^^-a^ex-i^s. #<y,<WiSf /i^»»-» rx-ne:/ e:/a.f-f.T.«d-^Ylf> j6-A;>6 *^ d^-t^A^f 9^^ , ex-t-i-e/ o-t^-t. 
d.-l^'t-t^«.-^d. «»**«7^ es!-*'-*-*-***-"^ t«- «»<«. s^/«^*-/-/^«5^ -^o- t>-4 v^eX'fr^r.-t^-Crx-C <f**ac d Aexrx(*> ■irx<'*'.i rr*^ex( 

'Sy^ ■t/o--t^ ex-t-^r.- **i3.-^ <#♦ «z- y^-<B-x<^/io-»* ^«»- r>a--*'t^<g ^*/.<» «?.-»*<a/ *««^-^« i^«a * tf-«.£t* *<».*4 
««^ o.-»^c-e. , 'txJ-i^- -vu-t-^^ <n»*.«^ ^i.-t. ■^o-'.^-t. ifex-t^exS t!*.-f^ip/ <Hf>-^«x^..€x:d- <l(a--t <x. -u-e--t-vf- ■<.««p<*«--»^- 
<x^-^^at^t-f /V«- «*«-«»^<E^ «» d^'e-t^€-€X--Ci^^ a-^ //C« GCeae.d.1 n-/: 6-t-f,d t-ii" J d . 

Uft.t*-td -/^t^c^ .- 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land or Sunshinb." 



CALIFORNIA HOTKL8. 

Space in this column not for sale. 
ANAHEIM. 

Commercial Hotel— Rates $1.50 to |2 per day. 

AVAI.ON, CATALINA ISI.AN1>. 
Hotel Metropole. 

CORONADO. 
Hotel del Coroiiado-First-classinall respects. 

£CHO MOUNTAIN. 
Echo Mountain House — On line of Mount 
Lowe Railway. Open all the year. 
L,OS ANGELES. 
Abbotsford Inn— Tourist and family home. 
Hotel Nadeau— European plan. |i day up. 
Hotel Ramona— European plan. 75c. per day. 
Hotel Westminster— Strictly first-class. 
The Hollenbeck —American and European. 

PASADENA. 
The Carl eton— American and European plan. 

POMONA. 
Hotel Palomares— First-class throughout. 

REDLANDS. 
Hotel Windsor — 2 to I3 per day. 

RIVERSIDE. 
Hotel Glenwood — Strictly first-class house. 

SAN BERNARDINO. 
The Stewart— Rates $2.50 per day. 

SAN DIEGO. 
Hotel Brewster— American plan ; I2.50 up. 
Horton House— Rates $2 and I2.50 per day. 

SANTA MONICA. 
Hotel Arcadia— Rates $3 per day upward. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Palace Hotel— American and European plans. 
Pleasanton Hotel — American plan; $3 per 

day and uo. 
Occidental Hotel— Quiet and excellent. 
Brooklyn Hotel —American and European. 
The Baldwin — American plan. 
The California — American and European. 
Hotel St. Nicholas— Family and Commercial. 



AN OIIfiNG[ GROV[ IN RlllNDS 

Will be sold cheap. Contains g^ acres navel 
buds, two acres iu bearing, baliince been set two 
or three years and has small crop this season. 

Enough deciduous fruits for home use. All 
trees and flumes in good condition. 

Ten shares water (worth |i,ooo cash) goes with 
the place. Small house and barn. One of the 
finest views in the valley. 

PRIC E $3,500 



Address : 



Terms to suit. 



E. S. LIBBY 



Red lands, California 



iommerciaf Jzptei, 



ANAHEIM 
^■u- ^ ^ ^ ORANGE CO. 

This house has been reno- 
vated throughout. Accommodations that will 
please you. Free 'Bus and good Sample Room. 

L. G. MAXWELL. Pmo^mictom. 



NICOLL T H£ TAILOR 

Visitors and Strangers I 

We can serve you at home, 
abroad or traveling. 

Garments made at short no- 
tice and expressed to any part of 
tlie United States or delivered 
th.rough. any of our stores in th.e 
different cities. 

iH S. SPRING STREET 

I,OB ANGEI^ES, CAI,. 



THE 
AB30TSF0RD 



CORNER 

EIGHTH 
AND HOPE 

8T8. 




LOS ANGELES. ^^ 
CAL. 



SELECT 
TOURIST AND FAMILY HOTEL 

American Plan. All new, with 
refined appointments. Electric 
Bells, Incandescent Light and 
Steam Radiator in every room. 
Capacity, 200 guests. 

BY J. J. MARTIN. 



E. W. GRANNIS, GROCER 

1111 WEST ADAMS ST. TEL. WEST 1 36 

BEST STORE IN SOUTHWEST LOS ANGELES. 

The largest and finest stock, the best facilities. Orders by mail given prompt attention. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunsbixb." 



PUBLISHER'S Department. 



Tb6 l^ai\d of oar\6bii\6 



THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
M AQAZI N E 

$i.oo A Year. io Cents a Copy. 
Published monthly by 

The Land of Sunsfiine Pubfefiing Co. 

INCORPORATED 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

W. C. Patterson - . . . President 
Chas. F. Lummis, V.-Prest. & Managing Editor 
F. A. Pattee - Secretary and Business Mgr. 
H. J. Fleishman - - " - - Treasurer 
Chas. Cassat Davis . . . . Attorney 

501-503 Stimson Building, los angcles. cal 



Entered at the Los Angeles Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 



Address advertising remittances, etc., to the 
Business Manager. 

All MSS. should be addressed to the Editor. 
No MSS. preserved unless accompanied by re- 
turn postage. 

Questions Answered.— Specific information 
about Southern California desired by tourists, 
health seekers or intending settlers wfll be furn- 
ished free of charge by the Land of Sunshine. 
Enclose stamp with letter. 

OCTOBER, 1 895 



♦*PUBt.ICITY PAYS." 

If advertising did not pay, why its universal 
practice ? Why the constant increase in the 
number of its devotees and the amount of ad- 
vertising they continue to do ? The present 
generation has hardly distinguished itself by 
pronouncing bO unanimously in favor ot a bad 
thing. It therefore stands that advertising is a 
good thing— and good things always pay. Ad- 
vertising is simply the multiplication of the 
knowledge of one's usefulness among those of 
use to him, thereby increasing the chances ol 
success. And yet there are those in business 

who are 

UNBELIEVKKS 

in the efl&cacy of advertising. Unfortunately for 
all concerned, they indulge in it somewhat. But 
instead of recognizing in it a science calculated 
to bring results, they look upon it as a necessary 
evil, which must be made the best of; or see 
in it only an opportunity of getting their name 
in print; or else advertise simply because 
others in their line do. They would be better 
pleased if their competitors would be less enter- 
prising and allow the world to ascertain in its 
own good time that it is no longer necessary or 
profitable to plow with p. peaked stick or depend 
upon a flint. This class of advertiser can invest 



in horse flesh and make every cent tell. It doesn't 
take him long to choose aright between fifty 
acres of swamp and fifty feet of inside city prop- 
erty. But he deems it unnecessary to use his 
brains in advertising. Therefore, opposed to it as 
he is from theory, the results which ensue 
from his kind of practice invariably upholds 
nis theory, whereat he becomes a life member 
of the minority who claim " advertising doesn't 
pay." 

Another class of failures, although far in ad- 
vance of the foregoing, are those who indulge in 

PK<>Miscuc)U.s ai>vi:ktising. 

Believers in advertising from theory, they reason : 
•• a little advertising being a good thing, why not 
lots of it — everything in sight — instance : 
Pears's Soap ? " Well and good, provided one's 
purse is long enough. But if it isn't ? Then, per- 
chance, the profits of the business have been 
expended in advertising which was spread out 
so thinly in order to cover the entire field, as to 
become ineffective in everything. Promiscuous 
advertising has also the distinction of perpetua- 
ting worthless and illegitimate and otherwise 
impossible mediums to the detriment of better 
ones. 

JUDICIOUS ADVKRTISING. 

The sagacious business man looks upon ad- 
vertising as an investment worthy his best 
business ability. He knows that matters of real 
worth need not fear the light of day, and he 
therefore possesses himself of the facts. He 
recognizes at once in the proffer of cheap rates 
and large circulation inconsistent facts. He is 
not looking for a waste-basket circulation. He 
realizes that a medium to be ol any value to him 
must first be of use to others— to as many others 
as possible, but of use. As attractive as possible, 
but meritoriou.sly so. Neither does he take an- 
other's word for it altogether, but studies into 
the matter until he finds the earmarks of merit, 
whereupon he writes his advertisement intelli- 
gently, adapting it to the medium in hand, and 
prepares for the results sure to ensue. The 
sagacious business man also recognizes the dif- 
ference of value between two creditable mediums, 
one of which in every way strengthens his own 
proposition while the other distracts the atten- 
tion from the locality or thing in which he is 
interested. He believes in indirect as well as 
direct returns, and that the former are often the 
most permanent. If he is a hotel manager or 
real estate dealer, he knows that the most effec- 
tive medium he can choo.se is one unequivocally 
and intelligently devoted to his locality. If a 
merchant, he realizes that it is a business prop- 
osition to help maintain such a publication m 
its work of bringing permanent customers to his 
locality, and he certainly proposes to reach its 
readers already on the ground. Advertising 
broadly, intelligently and persistently the judi- 
cious advertiser reaps broad results. With him 
it pays not only today but tomorrow as well. 



What Others Think About Jt. 

/ , I ' // 




< " ""/ "" ) 

CAPITAL 4s.ooo.ooo*t 



itkm^ ifuUm l^n-^i arm , 



I > RAIIROAO 



^"""'•"^ '— "-'^^ y./ /,^. /../,/ Auc. 16, 1895. 

l.'.r. P. A. Pattee, 

Bus.Mngr.I^and of Sunshine, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
Dear Slr:- 

I took occasion a month or two ago to place a small advertise' 
nent In ycur beautiful magazine. 

It affords me pleasure to say that I received more replies 
from that small advertisement, appearing only twice, than from any other 
medium used during the past four raonthb. 

Kindly call and arrange for a permanent advertisement to 
appear at an early date. 

Very truly yours, 



Oeni.Mngr.Chlno Ranch Co. 



Everyone familiar with Napa Soda Springs knows that its enterprising owner, Col. J. P. Jack- 
sou, who has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in advertising and beautifying these famous 
springs, has had occasion to learn what kind of advertising pays. The following is his opinion 
concerning an advertisement placed in the August edition of the Land of Sunshink by his son. 
J. P. Jackson, Jr., who has charge of the Napa Soda interests in Southern California : 



1. 



The reputation oi the following firm and the exceptional success of their Adams Street Tract. 
Los Angeles, certainly renders their opinion a most competent one : 

^y^ ^,.^^^/^W., th Seneaoer ,^j, ^ 

F. A. Pattee Ksq. 

B-ar..V.gr "Lanu of Sunshine" 
Los Angelas, California. 
Dear Slr:- 

Klndly send .is a aozen of your beautliXil Septeraotor edition 
which we see is just out. 

We know of no oetter prc-^entation of Southern California nor 
one which seeir.s to "catch on" ritore effectively. 

The aave/tisement which we have been running has iDducea a 
large number of inquiries from .so many aifferent portions of the United 
States ana foreign countries that we are satisfied the "Land of Sunshine" 
has beer, a very important factor in making certain a large inialgration 
to Southern California this winter. 

Wishing you success In the gooa work»w» remain 

Your* rosi»«ctfUlly 



(^ttiA/r%/^/^c 



a-ci^t 



ITEMS or INTEREST. 

The Kansas friends of Miss Emma R. Bristol 
will welcome her return this month from her 
Southern California home. As she goes in the 
interest of the Land of Sunshine, her mission 
is fraught with interest to both Southern Cali- 
fornia and the Sunflower State. 

A bright and newsy bi-weekly paper issued in 
North Ontario is the I'alley Mirror, the editor 
and publisher of which is Mr. Ira D. Slotler, a 
young man. combining ability as an editor with 
energy and push. Although Mr. Slotter has 
been in North Ontario but a short time, he has 
confidence in the future of the place and is 
willing to wait. In the mean time he is issuing 
a creditable paper. 

When a representative of the Land of Sun- 
shine rode up to the Glenwood in Riverside from 
the evening Santa Fe train, Wednesday, the loth 
of September, there was not room enough in 
the 'bus to accommodate the guests. It was 
necessary to call into requisition the services of 
anoth'-r carriage. What better evidence could 
one want of the popularity of the Glenwood and 
Frank Miller? This is not gush, nor palaver 
either, but such patronage at this time argues 
well for the tourist season this winter. There 
are a good many coming, and the Glenwood is 
going to secure a large share of them. 

Many who read this issue of the Land of Sun- 
shine will wish to learn more of Ontario. All 
such are advised to send lo cents to the Ontario 
Record for a copy of the Souvenir edition of that 
paper. It is a 36-page number, very charmingly 
written and illustrated. Two dollars guarantees 
weekly visits of the Record for a year. 

It is hardly necessary to call additional atten- 
tion to this pretty pleasure spot, for this issue of 
the magazine contains so much about Ontario, 
with a large advertisement of the Ontario Hotel 
containing all information needful. A glance at 
the advertisement cut shows the desirable sur- 
roundings, the nicely trimmed cypress hedges, 
and the luxurious growth of \'ines which well 
nigh hide the front of the building. Old friends 
will be pleased to learn that the interior has been 
lately renovated ; fresh paint, new carpets in 
hall, parlors, and on stairways giving a bright 
pretty effect. Those who visit Ontario and this 
hotel this winter, will be " glad they came." 

That the old order of things is constantl}- yield- 
ing place to the new, is exemplified by the' pub- 
lishing business established by R. E. Blackburn 
of the Ontario Observer. His home-print service 
has greatly improved the country press of South- 
ern California Much of the matter used is 
selected from the press of this Slate, among 
which appear frequent quotations from the Land 
of Sunshine. Such matter, being pertinent to 
this section, is just what local and Eastern 
readers want. 

Those who have been with Mrs. Squires 
previous winters, and who know how pleasant, 
and home-like the Windsor has been, will 
experience a certain amount of pleasure in no- 
ticing wherein their winter home is to be im- 
proved. The entire exterior has received a new 
coat of paint. In the office new paint, linoleum, 
beautiful house plants, and more than all, a 
mammoth coal heater, which will dispel the 
occasional chill so noticeable to Easterners, will 
greet their eyes. Then the writing room is to 
be newly fitted up. parlors, halls and stairways 
recarpeted, and the most pleasant news possibly 
of all, the dining room is to be enlarged, new 
flooring laid where the delightful terpsichorean 
art may be indulged in to satisfaction, or in 
plain common English, dancing. In fact, Mrs. 
Squires expects to give a very delightful danc- 
ing party about the commencement of the holi- 
days. The indicator points to a larger number 
of tourists at the Windsor this winter than lor 
many years. 



The Redoudo Hotel closes today, September 
2oth, but will doubtless soon be reopenea for the 
winter season. Much credit is due its lessee, 
Mr. Dan .McFarland, for the manner in which 
this most elegant of Los Angeles county seaside 
hotels has been conducted during the summer 
season just closed. Under such supervision, 
supplemented by some such ally as the Santa 
Fe or the Raymond and Whitcomb Excursion 
Co., Redondo would not only become a joy to ex- 
cursionists, but also of the greatest benefit to 
its immediate section. 

The Girls' Collegiate School, of Los Angeles, 
formerly at 416 W. Tenth street, will re-open 
September 26, at 1918 Grand Avenue, under the 
tutorship of Miss Parsons and Miss Dennen. 
This thorough and attractive school for girls 
furnishes lull courses in English studies, ancient 
and modern languages, music, art, physical cul- 
ture and elocution. As a happy home is an 
essential to a good student, pupils from a dis- 
tance receive every possible care and attention. 
Adjoining this centrally located and commodi- 
ous school building, is the home, a new building 
with bright cheerful rooms, newly furnished. 
No less of an assured succes is the Kindergarten, 
opened under the able direction of Miss Jessie 
Quinn. 



WHEN YOU VISIT 

SAN DIEGO 

REMEMBER . . . 




RATES 

$2.50 PER DAY 

AND UP 



American Plan Only. Centrally 
located. Elevators and fire escapes. Baths, 
hot and cold water in all suites. Modern con- 
veniences. Fine large sample rooms for com- 
mercial travelers. 



i Use only our thoroughly Indelible S 

\ Ink. This ink is being used by all the ) 
) Steam Laundries of the city, and is warrant- ? 
t ed to be INDELIBLE. We also manufacture \ 
< everything in the line of Rubber Stamps, ) 
S Seals and Stencils. ? 

t NOBLE & CHIPRON STAMP CO.. ) 

S 126 8 SPRING STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. \ 



^ PECIAL ATTENTION is caUed to 
>^y the ver>' attractive line of new 
{^)j v«hlcle« offered in our No. 6i, all 
^•^ leather top Bug^gy ; our No. 44 
Phaeton, and our No. 334 Canopy-top 
Surrey, made by the Enterprise Carriage 
Mfg. Co., of Miamisburgj O. Ahead of all 
competition ; being low in price, but nea^ 
in finish and appearance, and can- 
not fail to give fttlire satisfaction. 
This factory proposes to keep 
ahead in the march of 
improvement, and to 
give best value for the 
money. 

Write U8. All in- 
quiries cheerfully an- 
swered. Address : 

MATHEWS 
IMPLEMENT 
CO.. 

120, 122 AND 124 
8. Los Ancclcs St. 
Le« ANacLcs, CAt. 




Tll/o 




tf< 



we sell me tariii" 



BASSETT h SMITH 



R07MV:01S73C 



ARF Vni I booking for a Home ? Are you looking for 
ni\L l\j\J an Investment? Do you want to locate in 
one of the Finest Spots on this Flarth ? Our opinion is 
that that spot is the POMONA VAL.T.FY. There may 
be equals, but no superiors. 

We have for sale in this valley and elsewhere. Olive Orchards, Leiuon Orchards, Orange'* 
Orchards, also orchards of Prune, Peach, Plum, etc., etc.. large or small: also Stock 
Ranches, Bee Banches, and large tracks of Land for Colony purpose. We believe the 
OLIVE INDUSTRY will make one of the best paving investments on this coast 



POMOtCh^'^^ 



We now have for sale 
the noted . . . 



Howland Olive Ranch ^^" Olive Oil Plant 



150 Acres with fine Olive Oil Mill, income last year over $8,000. For Information or Descrip- 
tive Matter about California or anv of her industries, call on or address 



BASSETT 3c SMITH 



poivioNn 

cai 



SAMUEL B. ZIMMER 



ROBERT C. REAMER 



Rooms 44. 49. 46 

Lawyers Block 




Please mention that you *' saw it in the Lanp of Snirsstirft." J 



o'^i^?i-:.\ 



V Ca • TwrstO"? 



Growth of a California City. 

The building permits issued in Los Angeles 
last month exceeded those of San Francisco by 
over lioo.ooo, and this month promises to eclipse 
the previous month's record. The average in- 
crease during the past year has been nine houses 
a day, showing a net gain in population of at 
least :o,ooo, and there are now fewer houses to let 
than ever before. This is a remarkable showing 
for the middle of summer, when the exodus to 
the seaside is supposed to take place, and the 
problem that confronts property-owners now is 
how to provide buildings fast enough to accom- 
modate the large influx of winter visitors. 

In the first week of October elections are to be 
held for the purpose of annexing a large outlying 
territory, when, if all goes well, I,os Angeles will 
have a population exceeding one hundred thou- 
sand.— Oakland Tribune. 




OF I.OS ANGELES. 

Capital Stock $400,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits over 230.000 

J. M. Elliott, Prest., W.G. Kerckhoff, V.Pres 

Frank A. Gibson. Cashier. 

G. B. Shaffer, Assistant Cashier. 

directors: 
J. M. Elliott. F. Q. Stor>', J. D. Hooker, 

J. D. Bicknell. H. Jevne, W. C. Patterson 

W. G. KerckhoflF. 

No public funds or other preferred deposits 
received by this bank. 



M. W. Stimson, Prest. C. S. Cristv, Vice-Prest, 

FOR GOOD nORTQAGE LOANS 



W. E. McVay, Secy. 



ANO OTHCR SAre INVK8TMCNTS. 
WRITE TO 



Security Loan and Trust Company 

CAPITAL $200,000 

223 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Paid Up Capital, S50O,OOO 



Transacts a general Banking Business Buys 
and sells Foreign and Domestic Exchange. Col- 
lections promptly attended to. Issue letters of 
credit. Acts as Trustees of Estates, Executors, 
Administrators. Guardian. Receiver, etc. Solicits 
accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations and 
Individuals on favorable terms. Interest on 
lime deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



STS 

Officers : H. J. WooUacott. President ; James 
F. Towell. 1st Vice President ; Warren Gillelen. 
2nd Vice-President ; J. W. A. Oflf. Cashier ; M. B. 
t,ewis. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors: G. H. Bonebrake, W. P. Gardiner. 
P. M. Green. B. F. Ball, H. J. WooUacott. James 
F. Towell. Warren Gillelen, J. W. A. Off, F. C. 
Howes, R. H. Howell. B. F. Porter. 



OLDEST AND LARGEST BANK IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

FaRNIERS and lil|ER(riANfS BaMK 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Capital ( paid up ) - - - .$500,000 OO 

Surplus and Reserve - - - 830,000 OO 

Total - - - - $1,320,00000 

officers: directors: 

I. W. Hellman President W, H. Pkrry, C. E. Thom, A. Glaslell 

H. W. Hellman Vice-President O. W. Childs. C. Duccommun, T. L. Duque. 

Henry J. Fleishman Cashier J. B. Lankershim. H. W. Hellman. I. W. 

G. A. J. Heimann Assistant Cashier Hellman. 

Sell and Buy Foreign and Domestic Exchange. Special Collection Department 
Correspondence In\'ited. 

Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Stjushjnb." 




CALIFORNIA WINE MERCHANT 



We will ship two sample cases assorted 
wines (one dozen quarts each) to any part 
of the United States, Freight Prepaid, 
upon the recipt of $9.00, Pints ( 24 in 
case), 50'cents per case additional. We 
will mair full list and prices upon appli- 
cation. 



Respectfully, 

C. F. A. LAST, 

131 N. Main St., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 







ELEGANT 

GRILL ROOM 
AND PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Finest Gnisine. Serrice Unexcelled. 

M. L. POLASKI CO. (Inc.) Proprietors 

2^p: S. SPRING STREET 
' ^ LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



HUNTER ft CAM FIKLt> 

General Real Estate Agents 
llft^ 8. Broadway. Telephone 319 



A Home in Southern California 

riNK NKSIOKNCC ON MANOM 

pnorcRTV 

BY THC SEA-SIDE OR AT THE FOOT OF 

THE MOUNTAINS 

In or near a progressive commuDity. Pure air, 

beautiful surroundings. 




IF YOU WISH TO KNOW 

All about it and how easily it can be 
accomplished 
WRITE TO 

ROBT. F. JONES &. CO., 

328 SOUTH BROADWAY 

LOS ANGELES. 



5TEPHEN3 %- HICKOK 

AOKNTS 






433 South Broadtoai), Los Angeles 



Agents wanted in every town in Southern 
California, Arizona and New Mexico. 



Commercial Travelers' Trade 

Respectfully Solicited. 

Free 'Bus to and 
from all Trains 
and Steamers. 



;}^ 



ORIGIN 



BEST > 

LOCATED 

HOTEL 

IN 

SAN DIEGO 



B\\ 



OUSE 



W. E HADLEY, 



moPRicroN 



San Diego, Cal. 



Conducted on the American Plan. 
First-class in every respect. 
Special Rates to Families. 

rates: $2.00 AND $2.50 PER DAY 



Please mention that you • saw it in the Lkw of Stjnshiwk." 




Millard Cafion Fall. Sierra Madre Mountains, near Los Angeles 



DO YOU WANT A HOHE? 

AT ONTARIO 



ii 



The Model Colony" 

of Southern California 



ORANGE GROVES wbhave 

SOUD BANKS 

LEMON GROVES first-class hotels 

OLIVE ORCHARDS electric light 

ELECTRIC RY. 

WE HAVE APRICOT ORCHARDS complete 

GOOD LAND PEACH ORCHARDS ^^""^^ 

GOOD water system 

GOOD SCHOOLS PRUNE ORCHARDS 

GOOD CHURCHES ALMOND ORCHARDS 

GOOD SOCIETY 



In ^, lo, 20 or 40 Acre Tracts. 



At reasonable prices and on terms 
to suit purchasers. 



For full information and descriptive pamphlet, write to 

HANSON & CO., 

Or, 122 Pall Mall, London, England. UlltariO, California 

nease mention that you "saw It in the Land of Scnshinb." 



Chicago Doesn't 

And Chicago has over a million people — to say nothing of the 
millions tributary. 

St. Louis Never Did — 

And it has a half-million, and a big territory. 

Brooklyn Cannot, 

with its three-fourths of a million. 

The Middle West Will Not, 

Despite its enormous area, vast interests and great population. 
It is not merely quantity, then, but quality that decides the question — for 

Southern California Does 

Support a magazine, and feel a little proud of it. Curious ? Not 
a bit ! Southern California is the only American commonwealth 
which has no waste population. It is the only community in the 
world 90 % of whose population live in it because they choose to, 
and not because they were born to. Its less than quarter of a 
million people are net. Know how to read, and care what they 
read. And particularly they love their adopted country, and are 
proud of it, and have a patriotism in it keener, higher and stronger 
than exists in any other portion of the United States. Good 
reason for that, too — but to go into that, read the Land of Sun- 
shine. 

You Can Afford To. 

One dollar a year — and it makes two volumes of over 600 pages 
and 500 illustrations, aggregate ! 



fa 


wwT^mw^ 


wm^i^ 






^STEr 



Ontario L 



iveru 



5IKES & BRADFORD 

Proprietors 

C:?fion Work a Specialty 
First Class Rigs 
Prompt Service 

Only Tally-Ho 
In Ontario.... 

"K" STReET 

WKST or BANK 



HAWLEY, KING & CO 



FINE CARRIAGES AND 
BICYCLES 




210 NORTH MAIN STREET 



$10 



PER ACRE 

FOR FINE LANDS 

IN THE 



$10 



FANITA RANCHO 

EL CAJON VALLEY 
1669 Acres for - . $18,000 
1420 Acres for - - $12,000 
Smaller Tracts for $30 to $80 per acre. 
WILL GROW ANYTHING. 
This property is twelve miles from the city ol 
San Diego and two miles from Cuyamaca Rail- 
road. It belongs to the estate o'f Hosmer P. 
McKoon, and will be sold at the appraised value. 
For further information address 

FANNIE M. MCKOON, Executrix. 

Santee, San I>leg:o Co.. Cal. 

THE PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU 

GUARANTEFS PROMPT, ACCURATE AND 
RELIABLE SERVICE. 

Supplies notices and clippings on any subject 
from all periodicals on the Pacific Coast, business 
and personal clippings, trade news, advance 
reports on all contract works. 

LOS ANGEUSOFHCUIO WEST SECOND MET 

P. O. BOX 944 



NI00RE5 ^ LEACri 

Reaf Estate Dealers 



ONTARIO, (AL. 



VERY CHOICE PROPERTY 
FOR SALE 

^^ WE SOLICIT 

^*^ CORRESPONDENCE 



LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS 

San Francisco. 

steamers leave Port Los Angeles and Redondo 
every four days for Santa Barbara, Port Harford 
and San Francisco. 

Leave San Pedro and East San Pedro everj- 
four days for San Francisco and way ports. 

Leave Redondo and Port Los Angeles every 
four days for San Diego. 

Northern Routes embrace Portland, Puget 
Sound, Victoria and Alaska. 

W. PARRIS, AGENT, 

123Ji W. Third St., Los Angeles. 



Poland 

>Vater 

Company 



Rock 

s 



BARTHOLOMEW 

Manager 

218 West First St. 



Telephone 1101 



Albert Scbreiber 
Manager 



Southern 

Pacific 

Hotel 



000 



Ontario, Gal. 



This first-clasa hotel has a wide renown for 
the excellence of its table, and the elegance of 
its furnishings. It is the only first-class hotel in 
Ontario, and has for years been a favorite resort 
for tourists. 



Please mention that you "saw It in the Lawd of Sunshine. 



^^or4«°^^«Te;, Co 



A SUPERB AND PURE 



.. TABLE BEVERAGE 




'• What all s it like child ? 
Tastes like yo' foot's asleep" 

CORONADO MINERAL WATER 

Blends perfectly with wine. 



If your Dealer or Hotel has it not 
drop us a line at. 



CORONADO. CALIF. 

Los Angeles Agency, 114 West First Street 
San Francisco Agency, 318 Battery Street 

GOVERNMENT LANDS 

THIS IS 

THE LAND OF SUNSHINE 

Not only is this so, but it is a land of great 
promise, where you may secure a home on the 
most favorable terms now offered in the United 
States. 

Choice improved farms and fruit lands near 
Los Anpeles, at $30.00 and upward per acre. 
Choice Guvemnit^nt Lands at 
SI. 35 per Acre 
in I,incoln County, Southern Nevada, on pro- 
posed R R. lines between I.os Anff*-les and Salt 
Lake and Denver. 25 cents cash, balance 25 years 
at 6 per cent per annum. No requirements as to 
improving or living upon the land. For climate, 
healthfulness and fertility of soil it is unsur- 
passed ; where you can raise nearly anything 
gfrown in America, north or south. 

For information and printed matter addres« 
LOY & HURIN, 
338 South Broadway, Los Anseles. Cal. 



Income Investments in Los Angeles 

MOORE &, PARSONS 

Have some of the choicest propositions in this city of wonderful growth, business 

and close in. Income Properties a specialty. 

Correepondence is Solicited with Parties -who Contemplate an Investment. 



REFERENCES (By Permission) : 
Los Angeles National Bank. 
Merchants' National Bank, Los Angeles. 
First National Bank. Schuyler, Neb. 
Allen Bros. Wholesale Grocers, Omaha, Neb 
Nicollet National Bank, Minneapolis, Minn 
Ex-Gov. W. R. Merriam, St. Paul, Minn. 



MOORE & PARSONS, 

Real Estate and Investment Brokers, 



S. E. Cor. 20 AND Broadway 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



The CH^FFBY SCHOGI^... 

IN HEALTHFUL (both ways) ONTARIO 

1. The only Endowed Preparatory School. 

2. Fifteen Teachers ! Specialists. 

3. No Cast Iron Courses. Each pupil carefully considered and such 
studies prescribed as best meet his needs and' aim in life. 

4. City Advantages with Country Influences. Dout send your 
boy or girl to the city, you risk more than his life. 

6. The "College Home," a real HOMK. The Matron a mother 

to every bo^ and girl. Good board, good habits, good time. 
6. Chaffey Graduates Succeed ! 




WRITE TO DEAN . ___»_«^ 

WILLIAM T. KAAIDALL, 



Ontario, Cal 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Lamd of Sumshwb." 



k 




:*iaiR" III 




HOME 



IN SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 

See Our Adams St. Tract 

On the finest residence street in Los Angeles close to the 
best improvements in the city, double track Electric Cars run- 
ning: through tract ; cement walks and curbs, water piped, 
graveled streets lined with palms ; pure air, rich sandy 
loam; no mud. CQfin and 



up 
139 South Broadway, 



WRITE™.. 

and make your selection. 



Pine Haff-Tone Printino 

A SPECIALTY 

!-BillNE8 I \m[\ COifliY 



Printers and Binders to " Land of 
Sunshine." 



123 SOUTH BROADWAY 




The EsGondido Iiand and Touan Co. 

IS SELLING, ON EASY TERMS 

Land at $35 to $65 per acre, With Water 

Their land cannot be excelled in the 
State. It is in cultivation. No expense 
for clearing. Beautiful place, ^f^ stores, 
churches schools and hotels. Otanges, 
lemo'is and all fruits do well, as can be 
seen by orchards in bearing. Grain, 
hay and alfalfa are a success. This 
beautiful valley and little city are on a 
branch of the Santa Fe Railway, twelve 
miles from the sea and 600 feet above 
it. Water is secured by an Irrigation 
District, which is now supplying the 
valley with water from the San Luis 
Key river. 

Compare These Prices 

With those of other lands with water 
that are free from kiiMng frosts and 
destroying winds. For particulars ad- 
dress 
JERRY TOIlES, 0«n«i»«l manag*!*, nas D street. San Dicflo. Cal. 

Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sukshink." 





FOR 
YOUR 
VACATION 



TAKE A TRIP TO 
THE 



GRAND 
CANYON 



;: COLORADO 



The rates are low and 
the provisions for com- 
fort ample. Write to 
or call on the nearest 
agent of the 

SANTA FE ROUTE for full information, or to John J. Byrne, G^n'l Pass. Agent 
I<os Angeles, Cal., for a copy of illustrated descriptive book. 



pavilion Gucieru 

RidTna 
School 

][ 



<f\> 




The finest Riding School on the Pacific 
Coast. 



Telephone 1669 
H. T. HAZARD, 



Prop. 



High Grade, Medium 
Grade, New and 

^'^-Lnd BICrCLES 

for I^adies, Gents, 
Boys and Girls. 

ANY SIZE, STYLE 
OR WEIGHT 

') We allow more for second- 
hand Wheels than any other 
dealens. as we can use them in 
our Riding School. 

Wheels cleaned and kept in 
repair at a nominal price. 

Renlino and RepQirino 

Cor. Fifth 

and Olive 
StS. 



-^ff J^MARP AASTAMi) ON ^ 

FgNERALRlREeTOfe^T^BALMER'§ 



Please mention that you "saw it in the 1,and of Sunshine. 



THE PLACE rOR YOU 16 ON OUR LANDS 



RAPID 
TRANSIT 




HiaM-CL«*« 
FAMILY 

HOTEL 

*T 

Chula 
Vista 



A large selection of valley and mesa lands, irrigated and unirrigated, 9IO.OO to 9350 per acre. 
All our lands near San Diego developed by sixty miles of railroad and supplied with water under- 
pressure by the SWEETWATER DAM AND IRRIGATING SYSTEM. The most perfect 
water supply in California, Several five and ten acre tracts, planted and unplanted, with attractive 
houses, commanding beautiful views and making delightful homes, on CHUL.A VIST A, the most 
beautiful suburb in Southern California. Citrus and deciduous fruits grow to perfection. 
Easy terms, if desired, on all our property. Attractive advertising matter free. 



SAN DIEGO LAND AND TOWN CO., 

NATIONAL CITY, CAL. 



Silver bought 

Manufacturing Jeweler 

^^silvTrt^'^at ...Dioinil seller 00(1 Enprom 

o order or repaired 

Gold and Silver School and Society Badges k Medals a specialty 



217^ South Spring Street, Lot Angeles, Cat. 



liOS fiHOEIiES, CAIi. 

If you wish to buy or sell any Real Estate in this 
city, call on or address 

RICHARD ALTSCHUL 

123>^ W. Second Stroet, Los Angeles. Cal. 



[i HIliF-IOIIES 



AND 



-^^Heri/e Priend. 

PHOTO 
ENQRAV/ER 



314 W. FIRST ST., 

LOS ANGELES 




Please mention that you "aaw it in* the Xand of* Sonshinb." 



\ J> K A ^ yT- 
OF TnK 

:..iVERSlTY 




LiLi TflH VEfll^ l^OUfiD 



May and June 
Weather 



AT 



Hotel del Coronado 




The region around San Diego Bay is sunny and warm, 
but always refreshing and invigorating. 

Hotel del Coronado is 
the most charming resort for 
pleasure travelers — a perfect v ,| iLi 

haven of delight and comfort. - ^ ^^^ '/^ 

Open the year round. 
VJRiJE FOR Booklet and Terms. 

E. S. BABCOCK, Manager, 

Coronado Beach, California. 




Please mention that you *' saw it in the Land Of Sunshine " 



I "^^^^ iQ^i-^lT^^OKE SPECIAL EDITIO/^ 

W0VBMBER, 1895 



Volume 111 

Number 




CENTS LAND OF SUNSHINE PUBLISHING CO. 

INCORPORATED 

A COPY 501-503 Stimson Building. 




THOTEL green, PASADENA. CAL. 



G. G. GREEN, OWNER. 



J.H. HOLMES, MANAGER. 



NOW OPEN 

PASADENA'S 

MAGNIFICENT 
* ^ MORESQUE 
* PALACE 

THE HOTEL 

— —Green 

The newest and finest Hotel in 
Los Anpeles County. Tennis Court. 
Billiard Room, Private Theatre, 
Klevators. Electric Lights. Gardens, 
Reading and Writing Rooms, Con- 
servatory. Promenade, Orchestra, 
Over 300 sunny and spacious 
Rooms, with private Parlors and 
Bath Rooms ; convenient to three 
lines of steam railway ; Los Angeles 
& Pasadeda Electric Cars pass the 
door. 

Every Modern Convenience 




Cut This Out 



Or show this magazine at our office 

AND MAKE A DIME 

To anyone presenting this advertisement we will issue a receipt, 
good at any time for one reduction of loc. from the regular price 
125c.) ot oneol our baths. 

Santa Monica North Beach 
Bath House 

Warm Plunges 

HOT Salt baths in 
Porcelain Tubs 



Clean White Beach 

and Special Warm Plunge for 

Ladies and Children 



ONT8RIO HOTEL 



A 

STRICTLY 
FIRST-CLASS 
HOUSE.... 



m^ I 




tourist 
commercial 

AND 

....FAMILY 



ONTARIO, CAJL. 

<^'his house or eleven years has been a favorite with Eastern visitors, commercial travelers and 
^ the traveling public generally. It is situated in the midst of ample grounds, beautified by 
orange trees and shrnbbery, and its verandas afford fine vistas of the ' model colony " of Southern 
California. The Euclid Avenue Electric Cars pa.ss the house and connect with all trains on the Santa 
F^ Railway at North Ontario, and the Southern Pacific depot is only two blocks distant. The house 
has this season been thoroughly renovated by painting, papering and re-furnishing, and the table 
service is exce llent. Kates. »-4.00 per day; »8.00 to iBl'e.OO per week. 

Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine " 



'^he mo8t centrally lo- 
cated, beat appointed 
and beat kept 3otel 
in the city. 

oAtnerican or Suro- 
pean Plan. 

Rates reasonable. 



Second and ... 

Spring Streets 

Los Angeles. Cal. 




^^IVrty WOOD & CHURCH g?o"p"e*% 

Uir nCCCD a magnificent Suburban Home of 20 acres, orange and ornamental trees ; house 
flL UrrLn alone insured for $17,000. Price *a5,000. Close to Pasadena. 
We have a fine list of I^os Angeles and Pasadena city property, some are bargains. 
Mortgages and Bonds for Sale. 

123 S. Broadway, Pasadena Office, 

liOS Angeles, Cal. 16 S. Raymond Ave. 

Echo mountaTFTThous e 




Hotel and Olwervatory, 3,5WJ frot above »ea level. 

NEVER CLOSES. Best of service the year round. Purest of water, most equable climate, with 
best hotel in Southern California. Ferny glens, babbling brooks and shady forests within ten minutes' 
walk of the house. Low weekly rates will be made to individuals and families for the summer, to 
include daily railway transportation from Echo Mountain to Altadena Junction and return. Livery 
stables at Echo Mountain and Altadena Junction ; none better. Special rates to excursions, astronomi- 
cal, moonlight, searchlight parties, banquets and balls. The grandest mountain. caSon, ocean and 
valley scenery on earth. Full information at office of MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY, Cor. Third 
and Spring streets. Los Angeles. Grand Opera House Block. Pasadena, Cal. Echo Mountain House. 
Fostoffice. Bcho Mountain, California. 

Please mention that you " saw it in the Lakd w Sumshihb." 



lilE.G'HRFFBY SCHOOL 




IN HEIlLTHFUKDOltl ways) ONTARIO 



4. 



6. 



The only Endowed Preparatory 
School. 

Fifteen Teachers ! Specialists. 

No Cast Iron Courses. Each pupil care- 
fully considered and such studies pre- 
scribed as best meet his needs and aim in 
life. 

City Advantages with Country In- 
fluences. Dont send your boy or girl 
to the city,3'Ou risk more than his life. 

Tlie " College Home," a real HOMK. 
The Matron a mother to every boy and girl. 
Good board, good habits, good time. 

Chafl'ey Graduates Succeed ! 



WRITE TO DEAN. WILLIAM T. "RANDALL, Ontario, Cal, 



Is it -worth a trip 



to Southern <J> 



Your Health ! ..«„,_.. 

Sunny rooms, sinitarj' plumbing, home cook- 
ing, trained nurses, baths. Galvanism, Faradism 
and Massage, its convenience to electric and 
cable cars? If so, ADDRESS. Dr. J. E. Cowles. 



1^^:^. 




PACIFIC SANITARIUn 

Telephone138. Hope and Pico Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

BEST PRIVATE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 

Office, Bryson Block, Rooms 1, 2 and 3 

Hours ID to 12 a. m., 3 to 5 p. m. Tel. 1172 



<tOC DCD APDC 'P'or Lands located in 
^UO rLn AUnC southern California. 
Will grow Oranges, Lemons, and all other fruics. 
$35.00 takes the choice. Remember, I35.00 for 
land as good as any in the State. Reached by 
the Southern California Railway. 
This land at $35 per acre will not be on the market 
ajter January j^th next. 




SAN MAKCOS LAND COMPANY, 
I>. F. HALJK, Manager. 

1336 D St., San Diego, Cal. 

W. G. JACOBS, Superintendent, 

San Marcos, San Diego Co., Cal. 



•^ L.BLANiffiNnoRN. /Managed. 




-^^^mmUK^^w 



OUR TELEPHONE l2li 59 BR9ADWAY 



LQS AnGCLCS.CAL. No. 1552 



Above is an idea of our Line etching (zincograph) from original design, for Covers, Programs, Labels 

Letter Heads. Advertisements, etc. Finest quality guaranteed in this as in our Half-tone work. 

Designing a specialty. Finely equipped plant. Skilled artists and workmen. 

Hf^ Note the specimens of our Half-tone work in this number. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine. 



HHVERTV St inZILSON 



^^VHH 


P 


- 


-nwr— r 


- ■ " - '^^^ 


'^:fr^ 


'^-'■;^--- ■ 





View from Smiley HeifhU, RedUnds, looking north. 

PROPRIETORS CLUB STABLES 

OPf.. WINDSOR HoTci. REDLANDS, CAL. 

iW Carriages, in oliarne of tliorouglily competent drivers, 
meet each incoming train, ready to convey tourists to erery point 
of interest in and about Redlands. 
N. R— Be ture and ask for Club Stable rigs. 

li. L.. NEWERF— REAL ESTATE. 
226 S. Spring. Mngr. Southern California 
Land and Nursery Co. .^-special attention 
invited to the culture of the olive. 

Write for information. 

515 

N. MAIN 

ST. 

Los Angeles 

CAL. 




HCAOQUARTCRS 

FOR MOUNTED 



5ouri$l: l/ieu; Depot 



AND UNMOUNTED VIEWS 




^*| 



HOTEL AKCADIA, Santa Monica, Ca 



The only first class 
tourist hotel in this, 
the leading coast re- 
sort of the Pacific. 150 
pleasant rooms, large 
and airy ball room, 
beautiful lawn and 
flower gardens. Mag- 
nificent panoramic 
view of the sea. First- 
class orchestra. Surf 
bathing unexcelled, 
and private salt water 
baths in bath house 
belonging to Hotel. 
Services of the popular 
chef from the Hotel 
r.reen, Pasadena, have 
been secured. 

S. REINHART 

Proprietor 
Time from Los An- 
geles by Santa F^ or 
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes. 



^^^^HKhca::. 


s 








II 

m 


m 

4 


m 


*s*^;. 


^A>tf.^t^|*|||||gT 






|l(P— '" 


f 

I 


"^ 


7^ 


■■^^Zj^^^S 


Vi 


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1 


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^'^T?a^ 



FOR SALE 

Special to the Land of Sdnshine.— 6-room 
modern new Colonial cottage. Hall, bath, hot 
and cold water, patent water closet, fine mantel, 
lawn, street graded, etc. Only $2,500. Terms. 
J500. cash; balance monthly. One of many good 
homes in Los Angeles for sale. Before you Duy, 
see TAYLOR A CO., 108 South Broadway. 



BARGAINS! 



$14 a foot, city lots in Kohler 

Tract, between 7th and 8th Sts. 

Installments. Also, Ten acre lots, best fruit land, 

Anaheim ; 704 trees, walnuts, apricots, peaches. 

|ioo per acre ; $28 cash, 8 years time, 6 per cent. 

W. J. FISHER, 221 W. Second St. 




LOS ANGCLCS 
INCUBATORS 

AND BROOOCRS 
ARC BEST 

Poultry Supplies 

Bone Cutter*. Alfal- 
fa Cutters. Shell 
(irinders, S p r a ]r 
r u ro p 1, Caponii- 
init 8«U, Drinkinf 
FoantAina, Poultry 
Rook*, etc. Cata- 
locueaPre*. 

JOHN I>. MKRCER, 117 E. Second St. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land op Sunshinb.' 



^»«#@/»<^ 



Sumner P. Hunt 
Theo. A. Eisen 



I 

m mm building 



LOS ANGELES, 
CALIFORNIA 



261 




FROBEL INSTITUTE, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Woodburu Bus iness Coffepe 

226 S. Spring St., Los AngeIvES 

Oldest, IvSrgest and Best. Send for Catalogue. 



G. A. Hough, 

President. 



N. G. Felker, 

Vice President. 





M 20.'i\S0UTH^AJNJST. 



FRiJBEl INSTITUTE <-—.,) 

COEST flDAmS ST. COR. HOOVER ST. 
LtOS HriGELiES 

All grades taught, from Kindergarten to College- 
Training School for Kindergartners a specialty. 

PROF. AND MME. LOUIS CLAVERIE. 

Circular sent on application. 



LflS GflSITflS SflNITflRIUm .. 




Situated in the Sierra Madre foot-hills, altitude 
2,000 feet. Most equable climate in Southern Cal- 
ifornia . Pure mountain water, excellent cuisine ; 
easily reached by Terminal R. R. and short car- 
riage drive. 

0. SHEPARD BARNUM, Propr. 

Drawer 126, Pasadena, Cal. 



SANTA ANA INCUBATORS 




BROODERS 

OF THE 

NEW MODEL 

Are the best Hatchers and 
raise the strongest chicks. Full 
description given in the circu- 
lar with prices of everything 
used by the poultry raiser. 
Address Santa Ana Incubator 
Co , Santa Ana, Cal. 



The Pacific (^H^fL'^-!!!!*"'^ 



FACTORY AND SALESROOM, 

618-624 South Broadway 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Lawd of Sunshinb. 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



IN THE CaSaDA del MOLINO. 



Photo, by Maude. 



L 



Ttrt 



■*? 



^.. 









THE LANDS OF THC SUN EXPAND THE SOUL." 



THE LAND O^'m 

SUNSHINE^ 



VOL. 3. No. 6. 



LOS ANGELES 



NOVEMBER, 1895 




Flowers in California. 

BY JULIETTE ESTELLE MATHIS. 

HR most munificent of goddesses is our Flora. 
I shall never forget my first April advent to these 
gardens of God. I fell asleep amid the glisten- 
ing snows of the Sierras while the train sped on 
toward my Pacific home-to-be. And when the 
dawn awakened me, I looked out upon purple 
lakes of lupin, on golden seas of sun-flowers, 
buttercups and poppies ! The blood rushed to my 
head and I cried aloud in frantic delight. As we flew 
down the Sacramento valley, past rose-covered cottages, 
pink and white orchards of plum, peach, apple and almond 
bloom, I felt translated as was Enoch. I had read of the gold and silver 
mines of California, but never of the surface gold of her flowery foot-hills, 
or the wealth of silver-white blossoms that crowd her cations, drape her 
steeps, and cover her meadows. Her wild sweet lilacs among the 
chapparal, her red columbines in rocky clefts, her scarlet Indian 
pinks by the mountain wayside, her "mariposa" lilies, fragile as the 
butterflies they represent, her batallions of whitely gleaming Spanish 
bayonets (yucca) ranked on upland slopes, or standing singly, sentinels 
of her mysterious fastnesses of cliff" or desert, were revelations of a 
floral luxuriance I had supposed impossible outside the tropics. Our 
vState flower — christened by botanists Hschscholtzia, because the 
(German naturalist, J. F. Von Eschscholtz first classified it — is called 
in the liquid Spanish Amapola and also dormidera [the sleeper]. 
What incongruous fate sent that big mouthful of consonants to displace 
either of those tender, melodious and appropriate names ? Santa Bar- 
bara county alone produces seven kinds of wild poppies. The " Matilija," 
filling five-acre tracts with great, white, crinkled corollas, big as a saucer, 
containing central disks of powdered gold on stems eight and ten feet in 
height, is the queen of poppies. The cultivated varieties are large, 
abundant and varied, of every known poppy hue and texture. 



Copyrlflit 18% by Und uf Sunshine PublithioK Co. 



254 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



^K * " 1 Over 300 varieties of wild 

^B^ flowers have been discovered 

^^^*^ ""v near, Paso Robles alone. 

There are leagues of violet 
b r o d 36 a that successfully 
masquerades as real violets 
in "carnival" time; and 
miles of yellow mustard 
bloom, which also serves a 
particularly decorative pur- 
pose in festivals. Miniature 
rose-pink hollyhocks and 
yellow sunflowers abound in 
the caiions ; while you walk 
upon the daintiest arabesque 
of airy blue-and-white for- 
getmenots to gather them. 
The only wild violet I have 
found is more a pansy, being 
yellow with a brown eye. 
Of garden violets every 
known variety flourishes in 
greatest perfection here. A 
new violet, very large, long- 
stemmed and fragrant, called 
the California, is now culti- 
vated and sold by florists. 
It has not yet become com- 
mon, is a true violet color 
and is attracting much attention. The white double violet grows as 
large as an inch and a quarter in diameter, and is very prolific. Pansies 
are a marvel for size and combination of shades. Pure white, black and 
pale lavender, light blue, purple and yellow form the scale of color from 
which every imaginable chord of harmony is evolved. They are often 
three inches across. The wild white morning-glory is a pest to the 
farmer, but what a fragile, graceful flower it is ! The wild clematis is a 
lovely, ethereal climber that finds more favor, as it keeps within the 
sphere for which nature seemingly designed it, an exquisite drapery for 
unsightliness. Of the wild lilacs there are six species, some of them 
cultivated in the Old World as ornamental shrubs. The wild cherry is 
exceedingly beautiful ; the pure white blossoms in clustered spikes, set 
thickly among dark glossy foliage. Down in the sand, close by the sea- 
shore, a delicate little thing lifts its small cluster of shaded purples, 
bright and pale, with soft sage-green leaves, all day in the sun or fog 
alike. It looks so frail and is so hardy that it is quite a curiosity. It is 
called the wild lantana, from its resemblance to that native of Mexico 
brought here by the padres. California has a monopoly in the snow- 
plant {sarcodes sanguined), found in the Sierra Nevada's higher altitudes 




Ms*«& 



Photo, by Cook, Sauta Barbara. 
FUCHSIA, 15 FEET HIGH. 



FLOWERS IN CALIFORNIA. 



255 



just after the melting of the snow. It grows about a foot high, sending 
up a bright pyramid of small pendant bells and fleshy stems, red fire to 
the. eye but ice to the touch. 

Among flowers apparently indigenous to Southern California, the great 
family of cacti is conspicuous. The largest known collection is that 
belonging to Mr. Samuel Hammond, of San Francisco, who shows 550 
varieties. Many of these uncouth monsters bear intensely sweet, brilliant 
and graceful flowers, suggesting the old alliance of Beauty and the Beast. 
The " night-blooming cereus " is a magnificent specimen of this strange 
tribe. It opens slowly during the early evening, is of purest white, 
remains in perfect flower until dawn and then as slowly closes its dream 
of a summer night. This plant, so rare in many places, is a very free 
bloomer in Southern California. The floribunda (datura) arrests the 




Union En(. Co 



256 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



■ '^'^^^^f^^^'^^^^flMffl^ 



tourist's eye immediately. It 
is a mighty shrub, eight to ten 
feet high and broad in propor- 
tion, dropping big, cream-white, 
funnel-shaped bells, the size 
of a goblet, thickly along its 
branches. It exhales a power- 
ful perfume amid the dews of 
night, though scarcely percep- 
tible in the daytime. The calla 
lily (which is not a lily at all) 
attracts attention by its com- 
monness and luxuriance. There 
are several varieties, some quite 
dwarfs beside those standing 
nearly five feet, with blossoms 
so large that a visitor from Can- 
ada looking out at them in the 
moonlight, remarked: "It is 
hard to believe that those are 
callas — they look more like 
milk pitchers!" Many thou- 
sands of these gleaming chal- 
ices, carrying their yellow taper 
of inner light, are annually used 
in glorifying our churches at 
Easter-tide. They are also em- 
ployed as hedges and grouped 
about hydrants as artistic screens. Nurserymen cultivate them by 
the acre, and large fields of them can be seen in Ventura, Santa Bar- 
bara and Ivos Angeles counties. Our floral hedges, when not of roses or 
callas, are usually composed of marguerites or geraniums. Both these 
families are exceedingly satisfactory from their habit of constant flower- 
ing. They have no seasons. Geraniums, including pelargoniums, are 
important denizens of Pacific Coast gardens. Perfectly hardy, surviving 
all manner of neglect and unkindness, repaying the least care with a 
wealth of perfumed foliage (as in the rose geranium) ; many of them 
striped and variegated ; with flowers of every shade in the scale of red, 
from white to dark crimson, combined with some of the purples ; grow- 
ing as climbers, trailers or sturdy, independent shrubs ; or peeping in on 
the upper windowsills — they are indispensable in this country, as truly 
typical of our gardens as is the poppy of the foot-hills. 

California makes a marvelous display of chrysanthemums. This 
flower, though native of Japan, has been so successfully domesticated 
here that it would be impossible for any locality to exhibit finer, larger 
specimens or greater variety than are yearly seen at our " chrysanthemnm 
shows." 

Among garden favorites running riotous as if determined to claim all 




Collier, Eng. 



Photo, by look, Santa Barbara. 



HELIOTROPE, 15 FEET HIGH. 



FLOWERS IN CALIFORNIA. 



257 



the soil in sight, are the nasturtiums, sweet-alyssum, marigolds and 
mignonette. They are most persistent pioneers; never satisfied until 
they get outside the fence. They sprout up everywhere, after the first 
rain, if once planted, not waiting for that if irrigated. Of blossoming 
vines that curtain the humblest, unpainted cottages with picturesque 
screens of verdure, or create rest for the eyes in place of unsightly heaps 
of debris, water-towers and rough fences, the white and purple passion- 
flower, the scarlet, pink and rose-colored tacsonias, with honeysuckle 
and ivy-pelargoniums, are the most luxuriantly common. The wisteria 
is a purple wonder in April, draping the very roof with its long pendant 
clusters of leafless bloom. The leaves follow in May. It is one of the 



* V ^^tSSffla^RCfW^^iAfe^ 




Herve Friend, Eng. 



Photo, by Reeil, Santa Barbara. 



few vines of deciduous habit. Many varieties of jasmins and clematis 
are extensively grown in our State, the latter family being remarkably 
showy. The Bourgainvillea is a marvelous magenta mass of thickly- 
growing vine with unlimited aspiration. Water ivies and smilax bloom 
profusely here, the latter in delicate sprays of greenish-white, resembling 
the currant, but far more ethereal and excessively fragrant. The ripened 
seeds are like bunches of currants, and sprout with certainty in the 
autumn, though the pointed, funny little tubers are generally used for 
propagation. Fuchsias and begonias in their infinite variety are grown 
luxuriantly on the shady side of dwellings ; many of them taking the 
place of vines at porches and windows. Among the flowering vines, the 
glossy-leaved tacsonia, with its pale pink trumpets lined in crimson vel- 
vet, presents a picture that cannot be overlooked. The Bignonia venusta 
is never weary until it has draped the shingles lavishly with its long 
clustering garlands of bright orange bugles. It is one of the most 



258 LAND OF SUNSHINE 




Union Eug. Co. CALLAS. Photo, by Reed, Santa Barbara. 

effective decorations for interiors furnished or finished in natural woods. 
Our shrubs are hard to classify, so many of them develop into trees 
here. The heliotrope ranks first in fragrance, and thoroughly shades a 
veranda fifteen feet from the ground. The Spanish broom [genista) was 
introduced by the Mission padres, and is a constant bloomer in brilliant 
yellow. Dipped in palest blue, the plumbago lifts its delicate boughs to 
shelter arbors and summer-houses. The "red hot poker" {tritonia) 
excites curiosity by its oddity. The "bird of paradise" [Strelitzia 
tegind), from the Cape of Good Hope, poises on outstretched wings of 
scarlet and gold above a mass of cana-like foliage. The cana family 
proper, in its superb display of color and flower here, is quite a revela- 
tion to those accustomed to the short summer exhibit of Eastern florists. 
The tawny " lion's tail," from Mexico, is a fuzzy, fierce importation of 
dark red and orange. We are indebted to Mexico and Spain for many 
of our choicest plants. The Ian tana, in its different dresses of white, 
pink, yellow, orange and purple, is one of them ; hardy as a weed, and 
luxuriant in growth. The streptosolen is a tall shrub with swaying, 
pendant branches of fine foliage, always in flower, a rich shaded orange 
and yellow in color. I cannot overlook the sweet-peas, whose variety 
no man can number. Eighty-five were shown by one gentleman from 
Santa Clara at a recent meeting of the State Floral Society. As a lawn 
decorator the hydrangea is peerless in its pink domino, which completely 
conceals both bush and leaf, and frequently attains six and seven feet 
in height, resembling a mound in shape. The tall, rose-crowned 
hibiscus, both single and double, is much used for lawns, and divides 
honors with the flaming poinsettia. The wonderful pink and white 
oleanders of Los Angeles cannot be produced in like splendor very near 
the ocean. The magnolia, with its ivory globes of overpowering odor 
and magnificent proportions, is undisputed autocrat of all blossoming 
trees. After it may be mentioned the many yellow, fragrant acacias ; 
tree poppies with delicate, shaded, white and crimson flowers ; pome- 
granates as scarlet as those that decorated the sacred robes of Israel's 
high priest. "Umbrella plants," tall and stately, with broad-spreading 
fan-like leaves and large spikes of white or purple blossoms, are grown 
in groups by landscape gardeners. The taconia stans, from Texas, is 
another of the bright yellow galaxy that glitters in many gardens 



FLOWERS IN CALIFORNIA. 



259 




Hervc Friend, Ens;. 



HYDRANGEA. 



:<\ Ree.i. Santa Baibii 



English laurestinas, decorated with pretty bunches of tiny white flowers 
and red buds, are often seen. The snowy, sweet syringas flower far more 
profusely in California than in their Eastern homes. Camellias are very 
hardy on this coast, and the shrub is of enormous size as compared with 
those of the Northern States. 

But space and time are exhausted, though not the endless category of 
our floral collection. And when all this resplendent carnival of color is 
over, and our prodigal Flora dreams awhile on the brown bosom of her 
hills, there are roses always in cafion and garden ; the blood-red roses of 
love, the yellow roses of art and ambition, pink roses of plenteousness 
and peace — and always, better still, the fair white roses of unutterable rest. 

SnntH Riirhara. 



Hi(hl«nd. 



The SEASONS: Revised, 

BY WM. M. BRISTOL. 

Sunny southern Summer 
Lazily has passed ; 
Autumn with its splendor 
Vanishing at last 
Ushers in the showers, 
Harbingers of Spring — 
June, November, April 
Make a merry ring. 




26o 

Quits. 

BY R. HARRIS. 

HE sun was slowly sinking behind the pine-crested 
Julian mountains. It did not mellow the burnt, 
volcanic ridges of the desert's rim, nor cool their 
fever ; the hard-cut, naked rocks reflected their 
day-long stored heat so fiercely that the wane of 
day brought no perceptible change in the fiery at- 
mosphere. 

Two officers rode down the old Indian trail, deep- 
sunken in the top of the ridge that borders San 
Felipe arroyo. Their clothing, their air, their jaded horses all bespoke 
them unfamiliar with the locality. But it was equally clear that they 
were veterans ; and they pressed on doggedly. 

** The trail's freshing up a bit," commented the foremost. " I reckon 
before night we can begin to look out a little — for if we are very fur 
behind him I'm no judge." 

" Fur or near, we naturally got to get him ! " replied the other — and 
his hand fell along the butt of his sixshooter. 

But when the sun went out and slow stars began to brood above the 
hushed desert, and the throbbing eye had rest, at last, from the glare, 
they were still riding. The long night they rode, startling the dead 
silences with click of hoofs where winrows of volcanic pebbles lay 
across the swales ; speaking nothing, peering mechanically forward, 
sometimes listening, sometimes dismounting to make sure again of the 
hoof-prints of the stolen herd. Now it was a file of dark ridges, up and 
down, up and down ; and now a broad reach of white sand that seemed 
rising up out of the gloom. 

The stars flickered and were done. The sun flamed over the horizon 
and kindled the furnace of the sky. The men were still riding. Their 
faces looked old and drawn ; their horses had turned suddenly gaunt. 
The sand before them was curried smooth by the wind. One looked at 
the other, his eyeballs turning stiffly, and lifted one shoulder an inch. 
The other made no sign, but stared down the trackless sands. The 
trail was gone. Presently a horse fell and did not rise. 

When the lurid sun again blazed down the sky toward the silhouetted 
pines of the Julians, two men on foot, with black, swollen faces, and 
clothing tattered by the cactus, stood before a mounted Indian, whose 
tough, fresh horse sniffed at them distrustfully, 

" I no got water," he repeated dispassionately. " How you ask to me, 
water? You come catch. You take away horses. You put me in jail." 

"No! No! We won't tech you nor the horses! Just water — for 
God's sake, water ! " 

The Indian sat silent a moment. Once he half bent forward — and 
then slowly settled back. 

"You no lie ? All you lie, I think. When get water, no care." 

"No! We'll swear never to lift a finger at you. Only show us — 
water! See" — and the speaker pulled the sixshooter from his belt 



QUITS. 261 

and flung it off among the tunas. His companion followed suit. 
** See, what could we do without our guns ? " 

The Indian nodded his head and lifted the rein. " I show you," he 
said laconically, and dropped his rifle against a mesquite in ratification 
of the truce. " So " — and he pointed ahead. 

" No, go on and show us ! " creaked the younger man, with a curious 
shiver. 

" Not like " retorted the Indian, his face stiffening a little. "Perhaps 
you no want water ? " And he was turning back. 

The man who had first thrown away his sixshooter choked upon an 
oath. " Damn you — lead off"! " His voice was weak and like a rusty 
hinge, but he had whipped a short "bulldog" from an inner pocket. 
At this treachery in the face of death the Indian shrugged his shoulders. 
There was a swift spark in his eye, but not a muscle twitched as he said 
calmly : "Good — I take you to the water." 

"See, he was goin' to fool us," mumbled the officer — noting that 
Pablo turned his horse in an entirely different direction from the one he 
had pointed out. " Y' aint smart enough, cuss you!" And to the 
Indian : "Straight, now, fer your life ! " 

Pablo made no answer. He did not seem to notice the revolver ; nor 
yet the handcuff"-end dangling from the other man's hip pocket. He 
led them straight across the ridges, up a higher, rockier slope ; and at 
its top reined in and pointed silently. 

Down yonder was a cleft in the rocks ; with straggling bushes and a 
little rim of grass. The two men dashed down the slope, staggering, 
falling, scrambling up again, flinging themselves headlong in that clear, 
warm puddle, burying their faces in it. 

Up on the ridge Pablo sat watching meditatively. He could see the 
revolver lying black on the grass ; the nickeled handcuff" flashed like a 
signal. 

" N-h ! I think not lie any more, those ! " he muttered gravely, 
turning his horse's head. 

They are not likely to, who drink once of the arsenic spring in 
Poison-Water Gulch. 

Riverside. 

Death Valley. 

BY ELEANOR F. LEWIS. 

It is a space of silence, strange and deep ; 
The sun burnt mountains, near its ashen side. 

Look down impassive on its death-like sleep. 
Under its "skeleton plant " the rattlers glide, 
Among its painted rocks the lizards creep. 

Across the brazen madness of the sky 

A flock of wild geese wing their faltering way, 
With weary pinions, and with echoing cry. 

Below, in desert sands that shine and shift. 
Lie the unburied dead ; the heat-waves drift 
Over the loneliness of graves ; by torrid day 

Or torrid night, breathless and gleaming, lie 
Its barren reaches where no shadows hide ; 

And over all, its silence, strange and deep. 

Los Angele:>. 



262 




The California Condor. 

BY T. S. VAN DYKE. 

ALIFORNIA would rather 
be expected to have the 
largest of our birds. So 
it has, though the fact is not 
generally known ; for the condor 
of North America floats only 
over the dreamy hills of the 
Pacific Coast. Miles above sea- 
level, winding in long curves 
through the topmost blue, this 
condor may yet be seen above 
the highest mountains, descend- 
ing toward evening in immense 
spirals till, on some sharp crag 
or storm-beaten trunk, he folds 
his wings for the night. 

According to Dr. Coues, this 
bird rivals in size the condor of 
the Andes. He gives its spread 
of wing at about nine and a half 
feet, which is over a yard more than that of the largest eagle or swan. 
Specimens have been found that measured over ten feet. 

The California condor is almost black, appearing jet black against the 
sky, except under the wings, where the forward half of the lining is 
almost white. It has no white ruff around the neck (as has the Andean 
bird), but a fringe of long, narrow feathers on the lower half of the 
neck, reaching to the shoulders, has the appearance of a black ruff. 
Standing on the ground it is about four feet high, and at a distance looks 
like a large New Foundland dog sitting up for a bone. It is a surprise 
to one who sees it for the first time. Its appetite is in proportion to its 
spread of wing, and after dinner it almost outweighs the ostrich. 

The condor was once abundant in Southern California, and before the 
rapid settlement of the country could be seen almost any day circling 
over the lowlands. But the town-lot stakes seem to have disgusted him ; 
and though Leucadia, the Beautiful, sits silent as ever by the sounding 
sea, and barley waves again on the Sunset Tract, the dark form of the 
condor dots no more the sky above them and the curling waves no 
longer see him furl his great wings. 

More than those of the frigate, the albatross or any other bird, the 
movements of the condor becloud the secret of sailing or soaring that 
has so long puzzled all philosophy. Hundreds of times as I lay in the 
shade of some rock has the condor sailed around me so near that with- 
out a glass I could plainly see the brown eyes in the reddish black head. 
For hours I have watched him with a strong opera glass that I always 
carried in hunting deer. Sometimes at long intervals, though often not 
at all, the bird flaps both wings as when rising from the ground ; and 



UNDER THE LOVE-VINE. 263 

sometimes, for a second, when poising on the breeze before descending 
on a long incline he bends the tips of the wings inward a little, but not 
enough to give any motion. But between these two movements and 
absolute stillness of wing there is nothing the glass can detect at fifty 
feet. Stranger still, both these motions become more rare as the bird 
rises into thinner air, until, at a point where one would suppose the most 
powerful stroke of wing necessary to sustain its weight, all motion 
ceases. From the top of Greyback, of the San Bernardino range, almost 
twelve thousand feet above the sea, I have seen the condor floating with 
infinite grace fully twelve thousand feet higher ; but the glass failed to 
show any motion of the wing. 

Almost infinite in variety are the evolutions the condor performs in 
this thin air without visible motion of muscle or feather. Now he floats 
directly against a strong breeze, rising all the way. Then with equal 
ease he swings sidewise across it, first descending, and then rising in a 
slope perhaps quarter of a mile long ; all the way at a right angle to the 
course of the breeze, simply sliding across it. And yet during the whole 
fall and rise the bird, instead of falling back from the line on which he 
started, actually advances hundreds of feet in the face of the breeze. 
With equal ease he wheels backward down the breeze, not falling but 
rising on its swift tide even hundreds of feet before turning. How does 
he hang perfectly still on the breeze, not wobbling, like the poised 
hawk, but floating as softly as the scrap of cloud below you on the 
mountain's breast? And how does he drift backward on that same 
breeze with head to it, and rising instead of falling ? And when you 
have exhausted your wonder, he wheels on a long sweep with the tip of 
one wing pointed almost to the zenith and the other to earth, standing 
on edge in the sky, yet still rising instead of falling. Yet not a motion 
can you detect, though near enough to mark the serrated edges of the 
feathers and hear them hiss as they cut the air with marvelous velocity. 

Los Angeles. 



Under the Love-vine. 

BY JENNIE KRUCKEBERC. 

Come where the love-vine hangs m the willow and quails go coupled 

to drink ; 
Where marks in the sand have doubled the story of many a mischievous 

mink. 
Come where wild blackberries bramble and clamber to reach to the 

loftier shade — 
To fruit where the wild birds need them most and myriad nests have 

made ; 
Where clematis hangs from over and wavers to dip in the fondling 

stream, 
As the balm-of-Gilead gives and quavers in the love of a summer dream. 
Come where the love-vine loops in the willow and quail go coupled 

to drink ; 



264 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



Where cresses huddle in green forever and gilias get their pink ; 

Where river sand is washed and warming, sunnily white and mellow, 

Where the phacelia gets its blue, and the mimulus its yellow ; 

Where bubbling springs with cheer emboweled are fain to break and flow. 

And love's responses livingly quiver in breezes soft and low. 

Come where the vines loop yellow in willows and quails go drinking in 

pairs, 
And give to the driving driftwood waters life's importunate cares ! 




The Cliff-Dwellers. 



BY J. C. DAVIS. 



Small, dainty woven sandals, worn and pressed 

By busy feet, forever now at rest ! 

" One touch of nature " — and a mist of tears 

vSpans the dim chasm of unnumbered years 

And makes these gentle folk, before unknown, 

In one short hour my own — my very own. 

Life's tide runs backward to their vanished days ; 

With them I thread the sheer, precarious ways 

That up the dizzy cliff's precipitous face 

Give perilous passage to their dwelling place. 

A peaceful people, neither rude nor bold. 

Like "feeble conies" in tTieir rocky hold 

Securely hidden from the wide world's ken. 

They lived, loved, toiled and perished ! How, and when? 

Silent those chambered sanctuaries now ; 
Save by defiant Nature's frowning brow 
Unchallenged the intruder, foe or friend, 
Pries in their dusty cells to guess their end. 



But oh ! these little sandals of the dead ! 
Worn by their rugged pathways to a thread - 
Lead me away — Upon my heart they tread ! 



Highland. 




Union Eng. Co. 



Driiu II l«y J . C. Davis, after |>hoto. by C. F. Luiiimi 



266 

OuT-OF-DooR Studies. 

A QUIET COVE. 



BY ESTELLE THOMSON. 



OME one has drawn a battered boat into a cove under the eucalyp- 
tus trees, where the high "gums" shower me with tassels and 
seed-cups while I loiter. 

The sea stretches wide before the boat ; and when the ocean is in a 
gentle mood it coos and laughs upon the strand. But it suits me better 
when it leaps and rages as though wild, trampling and clawing to reach 
its prey. The little boat quivers through all its fibers as the white break- 
ers mock and strike at it ; yet I, unconcerned within it, always feel 
triumph as the mad things slink back, cowed, whimpering, licking the 
sand as they go, to hide in the depths and let others advance where they 
have striven to climb and failed. 

As I go down the hillocked beach that leads to the boat and cove, I 
cross a car track. At intervals a lavish bloom is spread in gorgeous 
streaks along the warm sand, as if it were jolly with sheer delight at 
living. Yet even here extremes meet. Today I found an entire family 
of glorious great primroses, their yellow faces fresh and young, that had 
laid themselves directly across the iron rail with evident suicidal intent, 
waiting to be decapitated. Poor things ! Can it be that they proved life 
in the Flowery World too much for them ? That they found it too hard 
a task to properly nourish themselves, on these tide-washed flats, and so 
resolved to die ? 

What dainty trifles these eucalyptus flowers are, drifting down ! The 
blue gum's bloom is faintly tinted and delicately fringed ; the sugar 
gum's flowers are much more vivid, sheathed while in bud in little close 
caps, sharply pointed. As the blossom matures, the horn-like sheath, 
lined with pure canary color, pushes up and off" and an entire tassel of 
gold stamens is revealed. Sometimes the surface at the tree's base is 
strewn with these fallen sheathes, now deeply tanned and their canary 
lining turned by exposure to dull nankeen. They are like tiny bugles, 
blowing about ; but they soon grow stiff" and rattle as they touch together. 
The bees hang noisily over eucalyptus flowers ; but what they rifle that 
tickles a bee-palate I fail to discover. Certainly the nectar they may 
sip, or the stores of pollen they gather up for bee babies' food or for 
bread-making, have a rank, peculiar taste like medicine. 

The sea affords finer background for the scores of birds flying past- 
as the purple headland off" there forms a background for the sails of the 
fishing-boats scudding by. Sometimes those sails seem, in sunlight, to 
be unfolding like perfect great white flowers against the sombre ridge. 
Occasionally the sea shines rippleless as a surface of glass ; and out upon 
its apparently waveless bosom the three purple islands repose, as clear- 
cut as cameos, as if they floated there in the brilliant sun. The column 
of the lighthouse at the headland's base — white and slim as a pillar of 
wax, capped with its dark hood — stands out against the sky as if etched 
upon it ; and when a yacht swings its sail up to the slender shaft, wheels 
about as though making salute and tips away, it completes the picture. 




A QUIET COVE. 267 

Not long ago I watched a band of 
black ducks journeying along. They 
swam buoyantly, a large company, far 
out beyond the breakers. I 
wondered if any yacht could 
make time so neatly and so 
easily. Suddenly a solitary / 
black sailor was seen bearing \ 
rapidly forward from toward 
the borderline of Mexico. 
The haste with which he 
came seemed almost incred- 
ible, as I marked his progress 
with my eye against the hor- 
izon. What news he had been 
dispatched to bear I cannot aver ; 
but he must have carried iniport- 

tant advices, to be delivered only to ducks of appointed degree : for he 
passed group after group of his fellows, never stopping until he reached 
one bird which he appeared to recognize and accost. I should say that 
the two touched bills in greeting ; then they held apparent conference ; 
and as swiftly as he had come, the messenger wheeled and, in company 
with the comrade, disappeared for a full minute under the waves. The 
next that I saw of them the two were moving side by side, evidently at 
great speed, toward the Mexican shore. 

There is nothing I view from the cove more brilliant than the cardinal 
lights of the fiery mesembryanthemums. If garnets and rubies had been 
sown along the way, incrusted in diamond crystals, the effect hardly 
could be more dazzling. In infant days their rudimentary lobes are like 
deep-dyed red rice grains, placed together endwise above the gravel, a 
delight and a study. As they age, I amuse myself with breaking their 
fleshy stems, a finger's girth in size, as .scintillating as if sleet had coated 
them. If the sun strikes them they take on all the hues of the rain- 
bow. But when I crack their joints, or foliage, or little ruby calixes, 
only a pale watery juice exudes: yet the least contact with their bead- 
work gives my hands a singular and distinguished glitter that is quite 
pleasing in its magnificence while it lasts. The ice-plant flowers have 
an earthy fragrance and a pinkish tinge, with yellow eyes and long 
fringed eyelashes that are very fine and full. They are aristocratic in 
being late sleepers. I go out and sit by their sand-pillows and watch for 
them to awake. Nine o'clock, and their eyes are closed. Ten o'clock, a 
few lashes uncurl. Eleven o'clock, and the lazy loungers stir softly and 
turn to feel the hot touch of the sun's kiss. But at twelve o'clock, when 
all other life on the sand-dunes begins to blister, the mesembryanthe- 
umms hold up their starry faces, full blown, and seem to say "Good 



268 

The Mountain Fire. 



®r" 



BY HAROLD STANLEY CHANNINC 

»HE air vibrates with the heat, although a gentle southwesterly 
breeze every now and then playfully snatches up little whirls of 
dust in its exuberant moments ; the mountains seem immeas- 
urably distant through the yellowish haze, and one can just see a faint 
glimmer of snow on the crest of the great sentinel peak which guards 
the eastern portal of the valley. 

Even the birds which usually fill the air with love-ditties are quiet. 
The sky is one unbroken expanse of pale blue, not even a cloud break- 
ing its monotonous glare. 

But suddenly a wisp of smoke rises over yonder rugged peak, and 
rapidly increases in size. Now it pours up in a huge pillar to a height 
of many thousand feet, and a crown of snowy -white condensed vapor 
caps it. Then an upper current seizes and tears this crown into filmy 
threads which drift away horizontally, followed by the smoke which 
soon forms a heavy, ill-defined streak across the sky. And still the fire 
grows and spreads, fanned by the strengthening sea-breeze. Noon 
wears on to evening and evening to night ; and with the night the sea 
breeze dies and the land breeze is born. The fire which has been 
valiantly fighting downwards against the sea breeze all day, now sweeps 
down the mountain with the north wind as an ally. 

For scores of miles the glorious sight is visible, and a couple of miles 
away the sight is incredibly grand. Here a whirling, twisting pillar of 
fire, rushing resistlessly onward ; there a huge puff of inky black smoke, 
the dying remonstrance of a pine, mingles savagely with the sulphury 
yellow breath of a patch of greasewood. Over yonder ravine tumbles a 
regiment of flames. Hesitating momentarily, as if to locate the enemy, it 
suddenly charges up a woody slope with a fusilade louder than musketry. 
And so it rages, now pausing for a breath, now gathering tenfold vigor, 
through all the long night. Towards morning the whole mountain slope 
lies bare and black, excepting one long ridge too steep for brush to grow 
on its sides, but heavily clothed with chapparal on its crest. The fire 
has worked in from both ends and the distance between the opposing 
cavalcades of flame is momentarily decreasing. The land breeze is 
dying out and a faint tinge of dawn pales the east. 

Slowly the flames approach ; they are now within a short distance of 
each other. The brush is very dense between them and they wax 
riotous and wild and plainly threaten each other. All at once at some 
unseen signal, two tongues of flame shoot up into the air opposite one 
another and absorb all the adjacent blaze until two towering, swirling 
whirlwinds of flame oppose. Moving more rapidly towards each other 
they collide in a burst of glory, break, commingle and disappear. The 
fire has burned itself out. Suddenly the sun shoots a solitary ray 
over the snow peak. 

A new day has begun. 



At San Gabriel 

BY J. TORRZY CONNOR. 

Narrow windows pierce the walls, 
In the nave no sunlight falls — 
Shadows mock the tapers pale. 
Ah, but love is quick to see, 
Shadows may not hide from me 
Pancha at the altar rail. 

Pancha, with an air demure. 
Tells her beads ; those lips would 

lure 
Gabriel himself from rest. 
Vailed her eyes, but well she knows 
I have found the crimson rose 
Worn an hour upon her breast. 

Los Angeles. 




Union Eng. Co. Photo, by T/orenz. 



The Cordon of the King's Highway. 




BY CHARLES FREDERIC HOLDER. 

HAT the itinerary for the revival and rehabilitation 
of the old Camino Real or King's Highway, as out- 
lined by Auguste Wey in the September Land of 
Sunshine, is a practical one, those are sure who 
have been privileged to know accurately the work- 
ing plans of the Pasadena Loan Association. 

I myself, as a traveler in the saddle, by rail and as 
one of a delightfully successful coaching party, can 
testify to the possibilities of this route of travel, from 
actual experience and charming memories. Only 
lack of time has prevented me from following out the same plan discussed 
with me years ago ; thereby gaining the personal glory of being the first 
recorded modern journey er following intentionally in the footsteps of 
Don Antonio Coronel and the frailes before him. 

The director says laughingly, she is confident the first traveler to appear 
"officially" upon the revived Camino Real will be Don Quixote on 
Rosinante in a California saddle and armed cap-a-pie ; but she is prepared 
to go out in person and welcome him into New Spain. "There are 
windmills enough," she adds, "along the entire route — and we need 
Cervantes." 

First in the practical plan I have mentioned for bringing into use again 
this famous and romantic old road which led "from Guatemala to Mon- 
terey" would be an appeal to the Board of Supervisors of Los Angeles 



270 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

county for assistance in tracing the remains of the Camitto Real through 
the county itself. Next, a consideration of the Indian trails leading into 
the main route of travel, and only less celebrated than the main high- 
way. These are : 

1 . The old San Pedro road, associated in racing annals with Don Jose 
Sepulveda and the victory of the Black Swan. This was the road con- 
necting San Pedro, as the embarcadero of San Gabriel, with the mission 
itself and the pueblo of Los Angeles. 

2. The Wilson Trail, with more traditions than it has feet of altitude 
above the South Sea : traditions which connect it directly with the San 
Gorgonio Pass (and Captain Anza) on the east ; with the " Twin Peaks " 
of Catalina on the west, and with Redondo and Santa Monica upon the 
coast line north of Point Fermin. 

3. Redondo itself, from which the neophyte Indians of San Gabriel 
and San Fernando, under the direct orders of the friars, started ( ' ' always 
at midnight," said both Rogerio and Don Antonio) for Catalina and 




Herve Friend, Eng. jfj^ PRESTDIO OF MONTEREY IN 1792* 

Clemente, to exchange the woven serge made under the new civilization 
for the soapstone cooking vessels which were part of every properly 
equipped mainland kitchen from San Luis Obispo to the Dominican 
establishments in Lower California. 

These "trails," followed out in connection with the main route through 
Los Angeles county, the Association will appeal next to Orange county 
below and Ventura above in the Spanish cordon. 

I feel assured that very many readers will be glad to have in tabular 
form an official list of the towns and missions of the cordon, from San 
Diego up. It is as follows : 

THE 21 FRANCISCAN MISSIONS ON THE CAMINO REAl,, 
IN CAWFORNIA. 

1. San Diego de Alcala (Saint James of Alcala) — Presidio and Mission. 

2. San Luis Rey de Francia (Saint Louis, King of France) — Louis IX. 

He was a member of the Tercer Or den of the Franciscans. 

' From ■' A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean and Round the World, m 1790-95." By Captain 
George Vancouver, Voi. II, p. 440, London, 1798. 




L. A. Kill,'. Co. 



THE FAMOUS STATUE OF SAN LUIS REY. 



Photo, by Crauddll. 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 



3. San Juan Capistrano (Saint 
^%^^ ^grn^ John Capistran ) — The warrior 

^^^^^^ priest who fought at Belgrade. 

"* 4. San Gabriel Arcangel (The 

Archangel Gabriel). 

5. San Fernando Rey de Espana 
(Saint Ferdinand, King of Spain) 

6. San Buenaventura ( Saint 
Bonaventura) — Seraphic Cardinal . 

7. Santa Barbara, Virgen y 
Martir (Saint Barbara, Virgin and 
Martyr). 

8. Santa Ines, Virgen y Martir 
(Saint Agnes, Virgin and Martyr), 

9. La Purissima Concepcion — 
(The Immaculate Conception). 

10. San Luis Obispo de Tolosa 
(Saint Ivouis, Bishop of Toulouse). 

11. San Miguel Arcangel (The 
Archangel Michael). 

12. San Antonio de Padua (Saint 
Anthony of Padua). 

13. Nuestra Senora de Soledad 
(Our Lady of Solitude). 

14. San Carlos Barromeo de 
Monterey (Saint Charles Barromeo) 
— Presidio and Mission. 

San Juan Bautista (Saint John the Baptist). 

Santa Cruz (The Holy Cross). 

San Jose' de Guadalupe (Saint Joseph of Guadalupe). 

Santa Clara (Saint Clara.) 

San Francisco de A sis (Saint Francis of Assisi) — Presidio and Mission. 




L. A. Eng. Co. From figurine by Macliuca 

SAN DIEGO DE ALCALA. 



15- 
16. 

18. 
19- 




Eng. Co. 



MISSION SAN BUENAVENTURA. 



or THR 

^NIVERSITI 



-^^UFORN\K 



THE CORDON OF THE KING'S HIGHWAY. 273 

20. San Rafael Arcangel (The Archangel Raphael). 

21. San Francisco Solano (Saint Francis Solano). 



It is also well worth while to give here Forbes's * list of the "Jurisdic- 
tions" of California in the Spanish days. It includes the io\xr presidios 
(garrisons), three pueblos (towns) and twenty -one missions — counting 
from north to south. 

JURISDICTION OF SAN DIEGO. 

Presidio of San Diego ; Mission of San Gabriel ; Mission of San Juan 
Capistrano ; Mission of San Diego. 

JURISDICTION OK SANTA BARBARA. 

Presidio of Santa Barbara ; Mission of La Purissima ; Mission of Santa 
Inez ; Mission of Santa Barbara ; Mission of Buenaventura ; Mission of 
San Fernando ; Town of La Reyna de Los Angeles. 

JURISDICTION OF MONTEREY. 

Presidio of Monterey ; Village of Branciforte ; Mission of San Juan 
Bautista ; Mission of San Carlos ; Mission of Nuestra Seiiora de Soledad ; 
Mission of San Antonio ; Mission of San Miguel ; Mission of San Luis 
Obispo. 

JURISDICTION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Presidio of San Francisco ; Town of San Jos^ de Guadalupe ; Mission 
of San Francisco Solano ; Mission of San Rafael ; Mission of San Fran- 
cisco ; Mission of Santa Clara ; Missionof San Jos^ ; Mission of Santa Cruz. 



This paper may well close with these interesting answers by Rev. Father 
Joseph O'Keefe, O. S. F.; (General Aux- 
iliary- of the Re-establishment, and an 
authority upon Franciscan history and 
ceremonial) to questions by the Director 
of the Loan Association : 

" The Franciscan Missions were established 
at the distance of a day's journey apart. For the 
Fathers on foot, was this thirty miles? " 

" About that, more or less." 

" What was anordinary day's journey, mule- 
back ?" 

" About forty miles." 

" Between what Missions does the original 
Camino Real still exist ? " 

" I cannot say, at present." 

" Does it exist between Pala and San I.uis 
Rey?" 

" Yes ; also between San Diego and, San l,uis 
Rey." 

" Between Santa Barbara and Santa Inez ? " 

" Yes ; but it has been changed— or rather, a 
part is not used now." 

"If we could succeed in making a good and 
continuous roadway from San Diego to San Fran- 
cisco Solano, would there not possibly arise 
Spanish or even Indian inns or Posadas which 
might be built according to the original Fran- 
ciscan architecture in California ? " 



" Certainly." 

"►From Soul^ & Gihon, 




61. 



L. A. EiiK. Co Kr..tM ti-uMiir l.y .Ma<-l,u 
SAN FRANCISCO SOLANO. 



275 

Some Mexican Recipes. 

BY LINDA BELL COLSON. 

ON A PEPITA — Senora Dona Josefa Medrano de Garcia, in full 
formality, Pepita being the diminutive of Josefa — lived just 
across the Jardin de San Felipe from us, so we saw a great deal 
of her. She did not at first call on us, but sent her daughter, Refugia, 
accompanied by a maid. Refugia was not yet sixteen, but already had 
half a dozen pretendientes or suitors. vShe could speak English fairly 
well ; but Dona Pepita not a word. 

Refugia was a pretty girl with bright dark eyes, a lovely mingling of 
brown and pink in her dimpled face ; and was dressed in a simple black 
gown, with a black tapalo (shawl) over her shoulders, leaving her coils 
of hair uncovered. 

Later, we called on Doiia Pepita. She was very small and plump, with 
sleepy brown eyes, a slow smile, placid expression and languid manner. 
But she was a famous housekeeper. Whenever among our Mexican 
friends we praised any culinary effort, they always used to say : "Ah, but 
you should taste Dona Pepita's ! " 

She was always sending delicacies to us. One afternoon it was a plate 
of crisp, golden-brown wafer-like cakes of the most fairy-like descrip- 
tion — Bunuelos (pronounced boon-you-dy-los). They were so delicious 
that Agnes and I went at once to Dona Pepita and begged that next time 
bunuelos were made in her kitchen we might look on . 

" With much pleasure, senorita. If you will do us the honor to dine 
with us on Thursday, we shall make bufiuelos, that you may see." 

Mexicans generally dine at two p. m., and the usual dinner is of six 
or seven courses. There is always soup, either " dry " or " watered " — as 
Refugia translated it for me. The latter is what we understand by 
"soup," the former being boiled down until literally dry. On this 
occasion it was dry and of rice — sopa de arroz seca. Soup is always fol- 
lowed by cocido — a dish of the meat and vegetables boiled in the soup 
and taken out before the stock was reduced. It is generally served with 
salsa de chile, red-pepper sauce. 

The third course is called principio, and is the most often varied. This 
time it y^as'' chiles rellenos de picadillo" (stuffed green peppers), so 
exceedingly good that I begged Dona Pepita for her recipe. With ever>' 
course were served piping hot tortillas — a thin cake of ground corn. 
After the principio comes the roast — this time a turkey. It tasted very 
much as turkey does with us ; but the stuffing was new, and we liked it 
so much that Dona Pepita kindly told us how to make it. The next 
course ■wQ&ftijoles (beans), which are always served just before dessert, 
and in this case was followed by a delicious dulce of candied peaches and 
half a dozen different kinds of fruit. 

The afternoon was already waning before Dofia Pepita ordered a pretty, 
black -eyed maid to bring out to the corridor where we were sitting a 
small brasero with a lighted charcoal fire. Then, when the batter of 
milk, eggs and flour was prepared and a saucepan of lard was bubbling 
on the brasero, and after Refugia had dropped a twenty-five cent silver 



276 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



piece into it (that the lard might be clarified, she explained), we were 
taught how to make bufiuelos. 

When the lesson was over, Dona Pepita was so exhausted that she 
declared we must have tnerienda — the Mexican equivalent for our five 
o'clock tea, the place of tea being generally taken by chocolate. At this 
^ particular merieiida however, we had tamales to eat and 

atole to drink. Atole de pifia, being translated, means pine- 
apple gruel ; but gruel is a very poor word for the memor- 
able beverage made in Doiia Pepita's kitchen. 

One of the first things we did after reaching home was to 

try atole ; and I give below our anglicized edition of the 

recipe. We also speedily made bufiuelos, and were so 

charmed with the result that we gave an afternoon tea to 

friends, where our atole and bufiuelos were much admired. 

We brought a little iron mould with the wooden handle 

from Mexico, bat any tinsmith could easily make one 

from the sketch I have given. 

BuxuELOS— Mexican Fritters.— iJ^ ft»s. of flour, 1^ pints of milk, i egg, a pinch 
of sugar and salt, 3 teaspoonfuls of Royal baking 
powder. Mix the flour, baking powder, sugar 
and salt together and sift. Beat the egg and mix 
it with the milk; beat again, then add to the 
other ingredients and stir thoroughly. The bat- 
ter should be as thick as rather thick pancake 
batter. Have some lard hot as for frying dough- 
nuts ; dip the mould carefully into the batter, 
just enough to cover the bottom, then shake it 
gently in the lard until the buiiuelo floats away 
on the lard. When it is cooked to a golden 
brown, fish it out with a lork. Continue to dip 
the mould first in the batter, then in the lard 
until all the batter is used up. Then either dip 
the cakes in a simple syrup of sugar and water, 
or powder with sugar. the buxuelos mould. 

I give Doiia Pepita's recipe for tamales more out of curiosity than any- 
thing else — for I do not think many readers will be industriously 
enough inclined to try them. 

Tamales. — Place some ripe corn with a little piece of lime, and enough of water to 
well cover it, on the fire and let it boil until the corn begins to peel. When it is cool, 
rub between the hands until the skin and the kernel separate. Rinse in several 
waters, and with a knife pick the little black points out of each grain, and leave it 
soaking in water out in the air over night — the Mexicans believe the dews possess 
special virtue for blanching the corn, and a good cook prides herself on the whiteness 
of \\^x tamales. The next day the corn is ground on the melate (in a mortar will do). 
Then for nine pounds of the prepared corn take a pint of warm water and an ounce 
of salt ; mix and beat with the hauds, adding gradually 2 lbs. of melted lard. Con- 
tinue beating until when you place a little ball of the dough on water it will float. 
Have some dried corn husks ready (which have been well washed), and on each husk 
place a generous spoonful of the dough ; add some guiso (stuffing), tie up and steam 
for about four hours. 

Guiso.— Toast some red peppers, taking care that they do not burn ; then soak 
them in tepid water until they are soft. Remove the seeds and veins ; grind in a 
mortar with a piece of bread fried in lard, a little bit of chocolate, some cinnamon, all 
moistened with a little stock, in which a small bit of pork has been boiled. Put all 




SOME MEXICAN RECIPES. 277 

these, with a little lard, into a saucepan and when it Imbhles add the pork minced 
fine. Let it boil up and it is ready for the dough. 

Sweet Tamales.— Are made in precisely the same way, only that the salt is 
omitted and i Ih. of white .sugar added, and raisins, cut up almonds and ani.seseed are 
imt in the dough according to taste. 

Of course the above quantity makes a large number of tamales. They are difficult 
to make well, but are extremely delicate and delicious. 

Atole de Pi5Ja (Pineapple Gruel). — The Mexicans prepare the corn for aiolr in 
much the same way as for tamales ; but it is very nice made as follows : Into 5 pints of 
fast boiling water sprinkle 11 heaping tablespoons of Indian meal and j teaspoonful of 
.salt. Stir well and boil for an hour. Grate one-half of a large pineapple : mix with 
it one pound of sugar, a small bit of cinnamon, i pint of boiling water, .stir well and 
.strain into the boiling meal. Stir the mixture well again, pour into a pitchtr and 
serve hot or cold. If cold, it looks pretty in glass custard-cups. 

Cnn>ES RKLLENOS DK PicADiLLO (Stuffed GrccH Peppers). -Choose large green 
peppers with a thick skin Toast them for a few minutes the Mexicans put them 
right on the coals, but they toast nicely on the stove or on a hot pan. Tfieu remove 
the thin outer skin, the seeds and the veins, which are very hot (or, as the Mexicans 
.say, " mny bravo " ). I,et them soak in salt and water for an hour ; this will remove 
all unpleasant fieriness. Stuff and fry either plain or rolled in egg and bread crumbs ; 
and before removing them from the fire pour over them some tomato sauce. To make 
the stuffing, chop up some cold meat fine, mix with it an onion, a clove, salt, all chop- 
ped fine, and cook ; adding, if you wish, a sprinkle of vinegar. To make the sauce, 
toast the tomatoes in the .same manner as the peppers, mash them with a little salt, 
strain and cook with a little butter. 

Mexican Stuffing for Tdrkey.— Soak a couple of rolls or a piece of bread, 
finely crumbled, in a quart of milk. When sufficiently soaked, add three eggs (with- 
out beating), 2 oz. butter, a little salt and dust of nutmeg, 4 oz. almonds blanched and 
cut into small pieces. After beating this mixture well, put it to bake in the oven ; and 
when it is cooked (you can tell this by testing it with a straw as you would a cake) 
.stuff the turkej\ 

Chile Sauce.— Take some ripe peppers and toa.st on the fire until they are the 
color of gold. While they are still warm, remove the outer skin, the veins and seeds. 
Add to what remains, when cool, the juice of an equal number of tomatoes toasted in 
the same manner as the peppers, a little salt, an onion (if liked), and crush all together 
with a little water. 

Krijoles, or Mexican Brown Beans.— Boil the beans in an earthen vessel until 
they are very .soft. This will take four to eight hours. Mash them, have .some lard 
boiling hot in a frying pan, pour the mashed beans into it and let them fry until they 
are comparatively dry. Sometimes shredded onions are stirred into the lard just 
before the beans are added ; or grated cheese or pods of red peppers. 

Candied Peaches.— Take 25 large peaches and let them lie in water for a little 
while, then remove the down by rubbing with a cloth. Stone them and put them in a 
kettle with 2 lt»s. granulated sugar— a layer of peaches and a layer of sugar — add one- 
half pint water and place on a moderate fire. When the syrup is thicJi^^lte»off the 
fire, and put peaches and syrup together in a dish. Flatten the peachy with a wooden 
spoon and turn from time to time, putting tHe'm in a place where the sun will shine 
on them. When they are nearly dry, roll in colored sugar. They will keep along time. 

Sail Diego. 




278 



Chrysanthemums. 



BY HARRIET FRANCENE CROCKER. 



*APAN, "the Land of the Chrysanthemum," is far away ; but the 
United States can boast one small corner, at least, where this 
superb flower attains its most wonderful development and 
blooms in perfect beauty. 

In the Eastern States these favorite flowers hold sway beneath the pro- 
tecting glass of greenhouses, carefully guarded, and zealously watched. 
At the interesting chrysanthemum shows which are yearly becoming 
more popular in the Eastern cities, flower-lovers are delighted with the 
size and beauty of the blossoms which testify to the cultivator's care 
and skill. But what are these exhibits compared with the wonderful 
display one sees in Southern California — chrysanthemums which never 
knew a shelter save the blue sky itself, no covering but the golden 
sunshine, no careful regulating of temperature ? For here the choicest 
varieties grow and bloom out of doors among the roses and lilies. 




Collier, Eng. Photo, by King. Santa Paula. 

At the annual chrysanthemum fair held in the beautiful Universalist 
church in Santa Paula, such a profusion of flowers, and of almost in- 
credible size, was displayed, that even here, where one so soon grows 
accustomed to seeing flowers on a large scale, they awaken wonder. 
Very many of the blossoms measured twelve inches in diameter, and 
some even attained the wonderful dimensions of fifteen inches. But 
although so large, there is not the least suggestion of coarseness in 
texture or coloring. Delicacy of tint distinguishes the chrysanthemum 
even on so large a scale, and almost every color is seen in a well- 
arranged display — pure white, cream-colored, lemon-yellow, golden- 
brown and orange, bronze and purple, crimson and deep purple, and 
pink through all the lovely gradations of that hue. 

One admired feature of the exhibit was an exact miniature of the 
church where the fair took place. The model was from three to five 
feet high, and composed entirely of chrysanthemums. 



279 

' A Pre-Discovery of Gold. 

BY MARY M. BOWMAN. 

OjrN the April number of this magazine was printed a sketch, with por- 
I trait, of Olive Mann Isbell, the first American school-teacher in 
^ California. 

When the Isbell party reached the head of Bear river in 1S46, they 
camped several days to rest. After drying towels they had washed in 
the stream, the women were surprised to find them heavy with some 
shining substance. "What do you suppose it is, Olive ? " asked Mrs. 
Aram. 

" I don't know," replied Mrs. Isbell, "but I think it must be isinglass." 

When some of the richest mines were discovered on Bear river the 
mystery was explained. The ladies then knew who had been the first 
Americans to find gold in California, though they never put forward 
their claims to that much disputed honor./ 

In October, 1847, Doctor Isbell and wife settled on a stock ranch em- 
bracing three leagues of land, obtained from the Indians, eight miles 
north of the present site of Stockton, on the Calaveras river, on the trail 
leading from San Jose to Sutter's Fort. 

The Wimmers, who were to board the men during the building of 
Sutter's Mill, arrived in California the same year as the Isbells ; and the 
Doctor being their physician, the families at the mill and the ranch 
kept in touch. Mrs. Winimer had lived near the gold mines in Georgia 
previous to her marriage. 

Soon after settling in camp she observed glittering particles in the 
water, which she declared were gold. Her son and others had picked up 
small flakes, over which there was much dicussion. 

It was not surprising therefore that she, washing clothes near the 
ditch on that eventful morning, should have been attracted by Marshall 
examining intently something in his hand. "What is it?" she asked. 
" I believe it is gold" he replied. " Bring it here," she said, " put it in 
my soap suds. If it turns black it is not gold, but if it comes out bright 
it surely must be gold, it is so heavy." 

They put the nugget in the suds, and the world knows how well it 
stood the test. 

After an unsuccessful attempt at gold-finding, in which they came 
near losing their lives at the hands of the Indians, Captain Weber, Dr. 
Isbell and ten other men organized the Stockton Trading Company and 
opened a trading post where Weaverville now stands. They took ample 
supplies of beef, bought all the goods to be had at Sutter's Fort and em- 
ployed twenty-five Indians to dig for them. The bewitching metal came 
in so fast, the stock was soon exhausted, even to their clothing, save 
drawers and shirts. Before this news reached the ranch, Mrs. Isbell sent 
to the rancheria on the Calaveras, for an Indian to dig a well. When 
he appeared the blood froze in her veins, for he was dressed in the 
Doctor's boots and the corduroy trousers she had made him. "Where 
did you get those clothes?" she asked excitedly, fearing her husband 
had been killed. " Bought them," he responded laconically, "Indians 



28o 



LAND OF SUNSHINE. 



getting all white man's clothes now." The next day Captain Weber re- 
turned with tidings of their success. They had sent to Verba Buena for 
beads, calico, raisins — in fact anything to please the red man's fancy. 
They traded pound for pound ; a pound of beads or calico for a pound 
of gold. Small wonder that men almost lost their reason in such an ex- 
perience. Mrs. Isbell sent her ribbons, handkerchiefs and finery to swell 
the medium of exchange. With the aid of a boy nine years old she 
managed the ranch and made short gowns and petticoats for the squaws 
for which the company paid her two ounces of gold a suit. 

One midnight in the month of August, a band of Mokelumne Indians 
led by chief ]os6 Jesus appeared at the ranch. 

" What do you want ? " ask the mistress. 

*' We have found gold on the Stanislaus river," said the chief. 

Turning to old Juan, her vaquero, she said ; " Have my mare saddled 
at four o'clock and we will go to see the Doctor." With supplies of 
bread, butter and meat they set off in the morning and when the sun set 
had reached camp with the news, and Mrs. Isbell was sewing on a calico 
dress for a squaw who insisted on appropriating the one she wore. But 
when it was finished one of the stronger sex took it for his own use. 
Camp Weber was soon deserted for the new field on the Stanislaus, which 
proved to be the richest yet found. 

This camp at the first mines opened in California left its impress in 
the town of Weaversville — whose name is a mispronunciation of Captain 
Weber's. 

The first visit Doctor Isbell made to the ranch from the Stanislaus 
he carried (with the aid of a boy) eighty pounds of gold. He threw the 
sack on the floor and opening it said to his wife ; " Here, Olive, hold 
your hand," and placed in it a kidney-shaped nugget that weighed seven 
pounds and three ounces, the largest taken out. It was sent to Mrs. 
Isbell as a gift from the Company. It was afterwards sold to some 
Englishmen, in San Francisco, for $3,000 ; and they sent it to Her 
Majesty, the Queen. 

In the absence of banks, gold was concealed below the floor, under the 
bed ; disguised in every conceivable shape, even put under setting hens — 
for the country by this time was fast filling with " Sidney ducks," from 
Australia and hordes of gold-seekers from everywhere ; and the halcyon 
days were past. 

The Isbell ranch on the main highway to the diggings became the 
stopping place for travelers, and at the prices paid in those days the 
mistress found her own gold mine. 

Los Angeles. 




28l 

Learning Spanish. 

#5^^HK experience of a middle-aged friend of mine is a fair illustration 
>^| of how Spanish is «<?/ mastered in six lessons. He wrestled 
^ with the language for six months and made no progress what- 
ever. What he learned one day he forgot the next, and finally gave up 
the attempt. 

He thinks that if he had started earlier in life, when he had more teeth 
and energy, or had not placed so much confidence in Ollendorf, he might 
have become the proprietor of a few useful phrases. 

In the matter of Ollendorf, I sympathized with him. Many people 
are seduced by the beauty and simplicity of the language, and the pos- 
sibility of extended commercial relations with Mexico, to invest a block 
of their capital in a Spanish Ollendorf. This is usually the first onslaught 
on a foreign tongue. Some deem it the principal part of the business, 
and are greatly surprised to find that their Ollendorf does not do the 
rest. When they purchase the fee simple of an inside method of doing 
something difficult, they naturally look for an era of restful endeavor. 
It does look easy at first ! 

You glance at the vocabularies intelligently and find many free-born 
American words feebly disguised in Spanish lace ; you recognize so much 
of the Latin you skipped at college that you are satisfied the labor of 
acquiring the language has been overestimated. You only require a 
teacher to give you a few lessons in pronunciation perhaps, and the 
trick is done ! 

When you have mastered Spanish, you can glide gently into Italian, 
Portuguese and French — you learnt some French at school, you know — 
and then you can think in five languages ! 

Alas ! the purchaser of an Ollendorf finds, sooner or later, that he has 
not secured the right kind ; that all the spare time he formerly controlled 
has left him ; and the more he seems to know, the less he comprehends. 

It is my private opinion that one thousand Ollendorfs are purchased 
before one person masters Spanish, and he that learns the language 
never bought one. 

I have been introduced to several patented methods of learning Spanish 
in a week or two, but never cultivated their acquaintance. Next to 
living among a Spanish-speaking people, the best method is to employ a 
good teacher, and then work as if you had to do it for a living. 

While the language is several degrees easier than Chinese, it is difficult 
enough to give trouble. You realize this when you get close up to it. 

The first thing an intelligent American discovers in Mexico is that the 
natives use a poor quality of Spanish. This was my own experience, 
but as the Mexicans were not disposed to mind it, I let the matter drop. 

There is one sensible thing about the Spanish language — the alphabet 
means something. You cannot take a handful of letters and call them 
a word — as we do in English. Utility is not sacrificed to architectural 
beauty, as in Russian and some other languages. If you wish to spell a 
word, you enumerate its component sounds, if you happen to remember 
them, and get the letters. Desiring the word, you gently call the letters 
by their baptismal names, and you have it. In our own anti-phonetic 
language, the spelling is for protective purposes, but in Spanish we spell 
for revenue only ! H y O. 



IN THE 

LION'S DEN 



The holiday number (December) of the Land of Sunshine a distinguished 
will be far and away the handsomest, most readable and most number. 

valuable magazine ever issued in the Southwest. In letterpress and 
illustration the standard has been set unusually high. The leading 
article will be a charming and historically valuable paper by Jessie Ben- 
ton Fremont, the Isabella of our overland Columbus. Mrs. Fremont, 
now a resident of Los Angeles, is at 71 a woman of extraordinary intel- 
lectual power and charm. To talk back with her to the frontier days 
with their heroic simplicity, their large manhood, is quite like a breath 
out of Homer. Her broad grasp of those pregnant events 

quorum pars magna fuit 

which changed the whole balance of North America, is wonderfully 
adequate and clear. A daughter of statesmen when we had such folk, 
wife and mate of the savior of the West, friend of the leaders of govern- 
ment and of those large pioneers who builded for the nation faster and 
more wisely than our government ever did, she has had great opportun- 
ity and the mind to profit by it. The article will be copiously illus- 
trated, and will attract attention throughout the country. The other 
features of the magazine will be fully in keeping ; the best work of the 
best writers of the Southwest. 

With this number the magazine concludes its third volume — another 
and so far its best. Success beyond its expectations, cordial mile post. 

praise up to the full desserts of its earnest efforts, and an outlook which 
grows larger and brighter monthly, have marked its progress in the six 
months. Its fourth volume will be better than its third — but it will be 
a mistake not to bind and preserve Vol. Ill, which is the most diversi- 
fied and most illustrative work on Southern California ever yet published. 

Perhaps we should not so often forget what science really is an original 
— neither an inaccessible mystery nor a holy show, but merely himself. 

our old friend Common Sense, working out to his logical goal — if we 
were not beset with so many self-unmade " scientists " who work the 
newspapers and make "discoveries." They are the argus-I'd gentle- 
men who procreate Lost Races and proclaim Pre-historic Palaces from 
New Mexico to Bolivia, and Riderhaggard their finds in publications 
which measure science by sensation. They are earnest and learned; 
but the one thing they lack. They bloom for a time, but are straight- 
way cut down and cast into the oven, simply because they cannot stand 
the searching sun of common sense. 

Prof. J. L. Wortman, of Columbia College, is the latest typical inno- 
cent. He has exhumed on Bitter Creek, Col., what he is pleased to 



284 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

term the Original Man — not to mention the eohippus — and he says 
that now all talk against evolution has got to stop ! It stopped, among 
people who ever think, without waiting for Mr, Wortman. It is highly 
probable that his Original Man is the bones of a cowboy's late lamented 
monkey, as is declared by the people where he dug ; but whether it is or 
not, a college professor who digs for Original Man in the geology of 
Colorado had best take a course on the range. As for Bitter Creek "the 
higher up you go, the wusser they get," and his monkey is " from the 
headwaters." 
NOT It is never too late to learn — but one may be pardoned for 

QUITE YET finding it sometimes a trifle too early. We can stand rather 

much from Frank G. Carpenter, who saws the universe into three- 
column lengths once a week, usually with laudable economy of sawdust; 
but at the way he boosts his latest cordwood upon the buck it is time to 
protest. 

So Miles "is the only regular oiiicer who has conducted a systematic 
Indian campaign," is he? God save the bark! Furthermore, Mr. 
Carpenter — beside whom the ashes of Columbus must find themselves a 
fool — has discovered that the only serious trouble with Miles is his 
modesty. As he interviewed the warrior, his information on this point 
is presumably authentic. 

A genial globe is this, where men who strode across it yesterday in 
unconscious gianthood are today kicked in their graves by the pigmy 
parvenu. And it is a pretty trait of a new country, where the compara- 
tive is yet unborn, that we cannot dress a living hero without stripping 
all the dead ones. 

Mr. Carpenter may not know it, but there were Indian campaigns in 
America before Miles was born, and two or three good men. There 
have been several " regular officers " in the army of the United States, 
and several of them have made systematic Indian campaigns. American 
history was not quite a desert before he came to oasis it. Not to go back 
farther — for any man who knows the history of his country remembers 
some names — there was a Christian and a gentleman by the name of 
Mackenzie, whose record may outlast boiler-plate fame ; and before and 
since him have been many more, along the rising tide-line of our 
frontier. And, by heaven, there was one George Crook, who conducted 
more Indian campaigns that his successor has seen, and as systematic 
ones, and never kept an aid-de-camp Dapray to newspaper him. He was 
not such a modest man as to pursue reporters nor to hunger aloud for 
the Presidency ; but he managed to keep his egotism out of the public 
nostril. 

Gen. Nelson A. Miles has been and is a gallant soldier. His rise from 
crockery clerk in a Boston shop to (now) general commanding our 
small but husky army testifies to his courage, brains and appreciation of 
American politics. He has been not only a good soldier, but — what is 
not always synonymous — a successful one ; partly because he deserved 
to rise, partly because he knew how to. With him, peace hath had her 
victories no less renowned than war — and "pulls" as potent. His 



IN THE LION'S DEN. 285 

marriage, brought him the re-inforcements of the Sherman forces, 
general and senator. He understood what the press is made for and 
what society is made of; and his taste in aid-de-camps has never been 
equaled. 

His conduct in Chicago during the Debs rebellion was admirable. So 
would have been Col. Graham's or Col. Shafter's, if either of these 
gentleman had been in his place — and so of a hundred others. The 
average officer of the United States army has his faults, but may safely 
be trusted to be neither a scrub nor an anarchist. 

Gen. Miles's Indian campaigns have not one serious fault from the 
military side — unless we are to credit the allegations of disregard of his 
superior officers. His Arizona conquest of the Apaches was perfect ; and 
upon it his latter fame chiefly rests. But it must not be forgotten that 
Crook invented that campaign and did the major work of it. Miles 
merely closed it, and upon Crook's own lines. Absolutely the only in- 
novations he brought to the campaign were heliotrope signals and — print- 
er's ink. These worked well elsewhere, but not much in the field. He 
got Geronimo and peace solely by the tactics Crook invented and was 
cursed for — the use of Apache scouts. 

It is idle to ask that any mortal shall be without sin and perfect ; but 
somehow one would rather a great man's lean side ran to almost any- 
thing else than the hiring of press-bureau aid-de-camps and the detrac- 
tion of " rivals." There is room in the world for all of us — nay, more 
luckily still, there are even rooms for all of us, and we can lock the 
door. But this trying to turn everyone else out of this mortal house is 
not even good policy. The Agamemnons who deny brave men before 
them, lack humor. They have their day — but the newspapers are not 
immortality. They are not even the Presidency — and neither is any 
other sort of print. And until every man of this generation shall have 
gone beyond the route of politicians there are apt to be voices to speak 
up from the wilderness whenever self-seekers forget (or worse) the Gray 
Fox — the most seasoned, the most unvain, the manliest and the greatest 
Indian -fighter the United States ever had or now ever can have, but not 
the only seasoned, manly or great one. 

The National Irrigation Congress, in its annual session at a distinct 
Albuquerque, discussed many matters pertinent to the great loss. 

interest of the Southwest — that vast area in which we have learned how 
to make agriculture " science, not chance." The international question 
of the sponging-up of the Rio Grande in New) Mexico was ably dis- 
cussed ; but the " Fierce River of the North " will keep on being 
" bravo " when its room would be better than its company ; and being a 
sandbank when thousands along its lower course are starving for a 
ditchful of water. A real misfortune to the congress — and fully so felt 
by the members — was the withdrawal of Fred L. Alles from the secre- 
taryship. Mr. Alles had given to his post unusual ability and experi- 
ence ; and it is a pity for the cause that he did not feel that he could 
longer sacrifice his personal business. But the congress has consolation 
in remembering that it had a secretary who was a gentleman and a 
scholar. 

If the National Educational Association really knows what is good for 
it, it will accept the invitation to hold its annual meeting in Los Angeles 
next July. It could not well go farther or fare better. There will 
hardly be such another chance for its members to get taste of the best 
education there is, and the sort many of them most need. Some of them 
will put very new wrinkles indeed .into their ideas of the United States, 
and learn something of what geography means, some news of history 
and ethnography. Also, something aboiit horizon and hospitality. 

I7EF.:iT7| 





THAT 

WHICH IS 

WRITTEM 






AND MUCH THAT 

SHOULD NOT BE 



NTiL John Dalton, we did not even 
know we were color-blind. Engineers 
who took red si<;nals for green ones went 
their appointed way as angel -makers, and no questions 
asked. But nowadays, thanks to that " atom-chem- 
ist," we have less credulity in the universal eye ; and no one 
need apply for place as a trainman who cannot prove himself 
competent to read safety or danger by their hue upon a lantern. " The 
will of God " is not so keen for railroad accidents as it used to be. 

Every editor and every ms. -reader must wonder when we are to have a 
literary Dalton. Probably not soon. The feet of the millennium will be 
at the door when we begiu to eye-test those who aspire to run a train of 
thought ; and fine or imprison any grammar-blind degenerate who shall 
be caught with a Penn in hand hopeing you are the Same. 

It is wholly beyond belief, to those outside the business of knowing, 
how many thousands (of worthy folk who in other walks of life elude 
the pound-keeper) look upon scrambled spelling, miraculous grammar 
and a pointlessness that passeth understanding as entirely fit to be sub- 
mitted for publication. Not only are they competent to send verses (with 
inflammatory rheumatism in every foot) to the North American Review, 
or a love-story to The Nation ; blind not alone to the sex but to the life of 
the periodical they "read" every week or month, they do not even 
notice that it does not print other crimes against language, and is there- 
fore unlike to print theirs. They are, in a word, intellectually color-blind. 
Still more surprising is that moral stone-blindness which marks a large 
class of scribblers. It would not seem to need overmuch vision to per- 
ceive that the man who lies because he is too lazy to tell the truth is as 
sinful as the fellow who ' ' went to " deceive — and even more contemptible. 
If the publisher were to use his material and pay him with a forged 
check, how swiftly he would perceive the fraud — how promptly appeal 
to the constable ! Every magazine is attempted by these cracksmen ; 
even a small and young one does not escape. The most impudent recent 
jimmy found in this office is a " historical article " on the discovery of 
California. Its author is a newspaper man ; but it is as unredeemed a 
tissue of impossibilities as was ever written on the history of the South- 
west — and that is saying much. The writer counts among the discoverers 
of California "a priest named De Niza," who "wrote a story of his 
adventures." 

" His yarn was to the effect that a party, including himself, had left Florida 10 years 
previously for the west, and that all except himself and three others, one of whom was 
the negro cook, had been killed by Indians. After much traveling . . . they reached 
the end of their journey— described as the present New Mexico. . . . They came to a 



THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN. wj 

mountain, from the^heights of which they looked down into a beautiful valley and saw 
seven large cities, which were called the Seven Cities of Cibola . . . could see that they 
contained innumerable bags of silver and gold, and that the arrowheads were of 
emeralds. . . . He describes the Seven Cities as being within seven leagues of his 
position on the mountain-top. Acoma is undoubtedly the site of one of the Seven 
Cities; and Lagun (sic) is another. They are one hundred miles apart. This priestly 
romancer had undoubtedly been told of the Seven Cities of Cibola by friendly Indians. 
... It is not known what became of the romancer, but his report brought out another 
expedition, with soldiers, and they remained." 

Another pleasant reflection about all this is that it will be printed 
somewhere as fact ; and by the unstudious will be believed. There is 
not a true line in it — and it is so easy to learn truth ! Fray Marcos of 
Niza had nothing to do with California. He never was in Florida, and 
never pretended to have been. He was not of the party of Cabeza de 
Vaca ; and that party never saw one of the Seven Cities, nor an inch of 
New Mexico. Fray Marcos came up to Zuiii from Culiacan, Mexico ; 
and never made any such report as is here credited to him. Acoma was 
no more one of the Seven Cities than New York is ; Laguna was not 
founded till a century and a half after Fray Marcos's time ; and the two 
are not 20 miles apart. It is perfectly well known what became of the 
heroic priest who discovered New Mexico, and saw the " Cities of Cibola " 
in 1 539, and led Coronado to them the next year. He was no "romancer," 
but a man of lofty character and much learning, who scrupulously dis- 
criminated between what he saw and what he was told. Nor did the 
"expedition with soldiers " remain. 

Such are fair samples of the extraordinary mass of falsehoods which 
these remarks may keep someone else from being swindled with — and 
the case is typical of one phase of magazine experience. There is only 
one thing harder to be understood than a person who can do such things, 
and that is how he has thus far escaped getting on Hubert Howe Ban- 
croft's staff of " historians." 

Dr. H. A, Reid, the painstaking historian of Pasadena, is stray leaves. 
nearing the end of years of labor. His large and exhaustive volume on 
the "Crown of the Valley" is nearly through the press, and promises 
to be one of the most interesting and valuable local histories ever printed 
in the far West. Dr. Reid has done an important service in running 
down the truth of many much disputed matters which bear on broader 
history. His determination of the true site of Fremont's headquarters 
in IvOs Angeles, it may be added, is corroborated by Gen. Fremont's own 
statement to his daughter in 1888. 

Though still off rather new blocks, Chips improves — and so long as 
it does, one should not dilate too much upon the room for improvement. 
Still, one may hope that the publishers will not carry out their red-letter 
threat : 

" The next issue oi Chips will appear on Saturday*, Nov. "J, and will Ix* issued weekly 
thereafter on Saturdays." 

That might really become tiresome to the general reader, though an 
amiable plan for the editor and for such contributors as find themselves 
in " the next issue." 150 Nassau st., N. Y. 5 cents a copy, $2 a year. 



288 LAND OF SUNSHINE. 

Capt. John G. Bourke, U. S. A., has made a pamphlet of his Our 
Neutrality Laws. Capt. Bourke is one of the best writers and one of 
the most widely known students in our army, and has turned his many 
years of service on our frontiers to valuable scientific account. The 
present pamphlet is instructive reading to Americans patriotic enough 
to wish the development of a foreign policy which shall no longer leave 
us a laughing-stock among civilized nations. Published for the author, 
Fort Kthan Allen, Vt. 

Some stir was made recently over a series of alleged remarkable pho- 
tographs of wild beasts from life by A. G. Wallihan, of Colorado. He 
was modestly proffering to magazine editors one of the pictures and 
a little of his literary skill for $50. He did break into The Cosmo- 
politan. Now comes the Denver Great Divide^ alleging that all these 
wild brutes were cleverly stuffed ones, toted out and stage-set in the 
wilderness. But the taxidermist's best work was done on the public. 

Elizabeth Knight Tompkins, a California writer whose novel Her 
Majesty was a success, has just published An Vnlessoned Girl, a story 
of school life. It is the sort of book most girls will like to read — and be 
none the worse for reading. It is bright, natural and unaffected, reason- 
ably planned and directly told. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, I1.25. 

The Critic of Sept. 28 praises T. S. Van Dyke's Game Birds at Home as 

" A distinct advance over its predecessors from the same pen, and we think that no 
better praise can be bestowed upon it than to say that the sportsman lives vividly over 
again his own days afield as he wanders with the author." 

It would seem that by this year of grace respectable publications in 
the East might have learned how to spell " bronco." As some of them 
haven't — including so careful a weekly as Puck — it may be well to remind 
them for the «th time that there is no such word as "broncho " in any 
language, and never was. 

Prof. A.J. McClatchie, of Throop Polytechnic (Pasadena), has issued 
in pamphlet his valuable Flora of Pasadena and Vicinity. He lists 1056 
species and varieties (of which 62 are new to science) ; and is confident 
that there are still others to be found. Published for the author, 25 cents. 

Geo. Hamlin Fitch, the literary editor of the San Francisco Chronicle 
is giving his Sunday page a flavor quite uncommon among the news- 
papers of that metropolis. One reason may be that he knows something 
about literature. 

Fred'k W. Blanchard has issued in very handsome shape his march 
Our Italy, which was played by the Royal Hawaiian Band and much 
admired. The Blanchard-Fitzgerald Music Co., I^os Angeles, 50 cents. 

Stone & Kimball, Chicago, are bringing out in their important list of 
fall books The Sister of a Saint, by Grace EHery Channing Stetson, 
Pasadena. 



@p' 



289 

' Elsinore. 

•HE high hills through which the train has twisted for the past 
half-hour give way. A shrill whistle, the grind of the flanges on 
the curve — and the train stops broadside to the six and a half 
miles of blue water comprising Elsinore lake. 

For two miles the stage carries one along the lake's eastern edge. A 
bath in the hot sulphur springs is the first thing in order. How the 
medicated waters seethe and bubble from the earth ! You are assured 
by the attendant that he was carried there on a stretcher, unable to 
move hand or foot, but now, after a few month's bathing, is able to 
carry the heaviest invalid with ease. Hundreds have come with stiffened 
joints and feeble bodies^ and in a few months have gone away erect and 
strong. 
After tea, a row on the placid lake. You forget that you have crossed 




Union Eng. Co. ^ BIT OF THE LAKE Plioti>. by McMillen, Kiverside. 

dry plains in dusty cars. The verdure of the buckthorn and chaparral 
carpeting the foothills has turned to a velvety cushion of many hues ; 
the darkening canons invite to the by-paths along their rippling streams. 
Twinkling lights all around bespeak happy homes and prosperous 
farms on the slopes that lean from the lake's edge against the granite 
base of the foot-hills. 

Nearly a hundred years have flown since the Spaniards first settled in 
this beautiful place. La Laguna de los Machados was deeded to a 
family of that name. Here they lived the quiet, pastoral life peculiar 
to early California. Thousands of sleek cattle grazed on the adjacent 
mesas, bands of sheep reposed under the old sycamore that still affords 
shade to the camper. The old Machado adobe near the northern corner 
of the lake still stands under the mulberry trees. 

In the morning, as one starts on the fifteen-mile ride over the boule- 
vard that skirts the lake, one is charmed by the magnificent natural 




i 



ELSINORE. 



291 




mt^m^ 



Collier. Kng. CRESCENT BATH HOUSE. Plioto. by McMilleii. RiverMd.-. 

mirror that reflects the hills and sky. The ridges, velvety with foliage ; 
the canons deep and dark ; the spots where gray granite bursts through ; 
the oak trees ; the manzanita and wild plum bushes — all are portrayed 
in minute exactness. 

Nature has not dressed the hills in vain, for this year the bee has 
gathered from their variegated blossoms one hundred and fifty tons of 
nectar. And such honey — transparent and pure as the flower from 
which it comes ! 

But here we stop and gaze in admiration at long rows of prune trees 
laden to the trunk with the blue fruit ; while yonder, between rows of 
grapevines, are a dozen happy girls and boys picking the juicy fruit 
for drying into raisins. Green fields of alfalfa are on every ranch ; 
five to seven times a year it calls for the reaper, yielding from one to 
two tons per acre each harvest. 

All around the lake the same bustle and activity, the same beautiful 
scenes of home life are repeated. Here an apricot orchard ; here a 




Plioto. by McMillen, 
BUNDYS HOT SULPHUR SPRINGS HOTEL. 



292 



LAND OF' SUNSHINE. 



vineyard ; there a prune or fig orchard surrounds a neat cottage. 

There is no irrigation, the soil — an alluvial deposit — being sub-irri- 
gated from the abundance of water underlying it at a depth of four to 
twelve feet. 

Away across the lake, shimmering in the morning sun, lies Elsinore. 
One involuntarily looks for the castle where the melancholy Prince of 
Denmark suffered ; but one's dream is cut short by the practical driver : 
" Fruit ain't the only thing we raise here. You see that band of hogs 
there? They feed 'round the edge of the lake and keep fat. Of course 
fruit's a pretty good thing, especially when you can get 1,600 pounds of 
prunes off three trees, as I did this year. We've shipped thirty thousand 
sacks of grain, besides twenty cars of dried fruit." 

Thirty thousand tons of lignite coal is annually mined six miles 
northwest of Elsinore. The mountains all around teem with miners 
and prospectors ; eight miles north is the celebrated Good Hope Mining 



''T^M 





gniiiriiyiiiiL." -^ 




LAKEVIEW HOTEL. 



Photo, by McMillen, Riverside. 



Company, employing from thirty to seventy-five men on its rich prop- 
erty ; while in close proximity to the city an asbestos mine is in con- 
stant operation. 

Then there is the clay and pipe works, working a yellowish, sticky 
clay that is readily moulded to any required shape and when burnt 
becomes very hard and strong, especially adapted to irrigation and 
sewer pipes. 

The lake is fed by the San Jacinto river, which has its source in the 
grand San Jacinto mountains towering thirty miles away. Its overflow 
by a narrow outlet close to the city is taken on to South Riverside and 
used for irrigation. 

Close by the banks of this outlet are the Hot Sulphur Springs, to 
which in times of old, came the aborigine with his ailments. 

Originally the Rancho delos Machados, comprising the land surround- 
ing the lake, contained fourteen thousand acres ; but after being sold to 
the founders of Elsinore, it was subdivided into small tracts containing 
from ten to fifty acres, where the ideal small farm of California is made 



ELSINORE. 



293 



a reality. A house, perhaps a six or eight room cottage, neatly painted, 
is shaded by a few huge fig-trees ; a double row of dark green orange 
trees lines the gravelly drive ; a fountain plays in the bright flower 
garden ; a lawn of blue-grass runs to the edge of the cool veranda — all in 
turn surrounded by neat orchards of every variety of deciduous fruit 
trees. Down in the meadow a waving field of alfalfa surrounds a few 
cows ; a garden where the family vegetables are raised, a strawberry 
and blackberry patch, and a melon reserve all contribute to the happi- 
ness of the owners. Thus a population of two thousand people live 
within sight of the only fresh water lake of any magnitude in Southern 
California. 

The town has half a dozen stores, a bank, three hotels, livery 




L. A. Eng. Co. 



ELSINORE BANK BUILDING. 



Photo. byMcMillen, Riverside. 



stable, drug stores, blacksmith shops, schools and pretty dwellings 
overlooking the entire community. It is reached by the Santa Fe 
branch from San Bernardino. The Santa Fe system proposes to extend 
its line from the present station at the foot of the lake through the 
center of Elsinore to the coal mines and terra cotta works at the head. 
Probably the line will later be extended to South Riverside, lessening the 
distance to Los Angeles by 40 miles. 

Here the sportsman may find game that will match his cunning. Early 
in the fall great flocks of ducks arrive from the cold northern countries. 
A little later, long V's of white geese settle on the lake's edges. The 
foot-hills abound with California quail. Cotton-tail rabbits and dove 
are also plentiful, while in the higher mountains, deer abound. 

California is overflowing with favored spots, each one seeming to 
surpass, but Elsinore is unique, inasmuch as there is none other like 
it in the Land of the Afternoon. 

R. H. 




294 



The Harbor of Sam Pedro. 

F Los Angeles is to become the great city that its in- 
habitants confidently expect, it must have ocean 
commerce and a port that will accomodate deep 
water traffic. On the one hand it is not likely that 
it can grow to a large size without such a commerce, 
and on the other hand if it should obtain fair pro- 
portions, a large amount of deep-water traffic will 
come as a natural consequence. Most of the lum- 
l)er which enters into the construction of the 15,000 
buildings in Los Angeles was brought here by water, 
and a large part of all the coal used has come by 
the same route. Grain and wine and fruit products are carried away 
from Los Angeles by water, and the volume of such export material is 
steadily increasing. Since the government established a harbor at San 
Pedro, nearly a million dollars has been collected in import duties, 
enough to pay all the cost of the original construction. This latter fact 
should be borne in mind in any discussion as to the right of this section to 
have a harbor constructed by the general government, as a large percent- 
age of the smaller harbors constructed along the nation's coast line have not 
paid a tithe of their original cost. In one year the sum of $160,000 was 
collected at San Pedro in import duties, which is five percent, interest on 
a larger amount than is proposed to put into the work of constructing the 
outside deep-water harbor. 

The local traffic is, however, only one element — and not the largest — 
that enters into the question of the need for harbor improvements. Na- 
ture has not favored the western coast of the United States as she has the 
eastern, and from San Francisco to San Diego, a distance of about 600 
miles, there does not exist a single harbor available in its natural state 
for deep-water traffic. All the Australian, Chinese, Japanese, East In- 
dian or Sand^\dch Islands products seeking to find their way into this 
country' must enter by the north, and if they are destined for the south 
must be conveyed there by rail. The transcontinental routes from San 
Francisco to the east and south abound in heavN- grades, and traffic car- 
ried on through that port or through any of the harbors further north 
pays a serious tax in consequence. It is a short cut by easy grades from 
Los Angeles to New Orleans, and whenever the deep-water harbor is 
finished at San Pedro, a large amount of Oriental traffic will go by that 
route. Los Angeles is moreover, the commercial center of an area of 
nearly a quarter of a million square miles, generally known as the South- 
west, and embracing Arizona, New Mexico and parts of Colorado, Utah, 
Nevada and California. As this section developes and becomes more 
thickly settled, a great commerce will spring up between it and outside 
countries, much of which must be carried on through Los Angeles and its 
port. From these three sources of traffic, the local or Southern Califor- 
nia, the general or Southwestern, and the i n tern ational-transcon tit ental, 
there is a large volume of business ready to be transacted through a deep- 



THE HARBOR OF SAN PEDRO. 295 

water harbor, in addition to the very respectable business now in ex- 
istence. ; ^ ^-Oiwi^rQ 

The question of where the deep-water harbor of Los Angeles is to be 
located is one that is no longer open to discussion. In 1871, the United 
States government had a thorough examination made of this section of 
the coast and selected San Pedro as the proper place to begin the con- 
struction of a permanent harbor. Before that time this port had been 
generally accepted by mariners, even back to Cabrillo, 350 years ago, as 
the most available point for landing men and goods. During the years 
from 1 87 1 to 1892, appropriations were regularly allowed by congress un- 
til $955,ocx) had been expended on the work, and the depth at mean low- 
tide of the water in the interior lagoon or estuary had been increased 
from about r^ to 16 feet (22 feet at high tide). About that time the 
question having been raised as to the relative availability of San Pedro 
and certain other locations, a commission was appointed to go over the 
ground and render a final decision. This was in 1891. The decision was 




Collier, Kut; SHOWING ENTRANCE AND ROADSTEAD OF SAN PEDRO HARBOR. •'»" is, Photo. 

in favor of San Pedro. Kfforts were then put forth to secure an appro- 
priation for the construction of a deep-water harbor in the outer bay, but 
the Southern Pacific Railway objected on the ground that the report of 
the commission of engineers contained important errors. A second com- 
mission was therefore appointed, containing five of the most eminent har- 
bor engineering authorities in the country, who made a thorough inves- 
tigation and reported in most unequivocal terms in favor of San Pedro. 
In all, this examination has been made five different times, with each time 
the same result. The standard authority on the subject of harbors in 
the United States is very naturally the engineering bureau of the gov- 
ernment. This bureau, being part of the Department of War, is not 
subject to change with every administration, and therefore contains the 
most thoroughly expert and at the same time the most disinterested 
authority available in such work. When the government is disposed to 
make harbor improvements in any quarter, the engineers of the War 



296 



LAND OF SUNSHINE 


















V^-^ .^^-^ /Jr 












i ■ .' ' u\ -^ 






\\ : / ^: ^^/ 




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1! : ^^' /""^ A 


^Ciit^ 


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/V\ • i'." / •^2\* 


C> 








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fc^t^a^fr'/SS/'— 




' " /a52~ 



MAP OF SAN PEDRO HARBOR AND BAY, WITH PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS. 



THE HARBOR OF SAN PEDRO. 297 

Department are called upon to propose a plan. If any doubt exists as 
to the practicability of the proposed scheme, it is referred back to 
another set of engineers who give it a second consideration. Congress 
then votes to adopt or reject the plan, and if it is adopted a series of 
appropriations follow from year to year until the required sum is allowed. 
Now inasmuch as the harbor work cannot be undertaken without an 
appropriation from Congress, and inasmuch as that appropriation is 
dependent upon the favorable report of the engineering authorities, it is 
interesting to note what has been said on the subject of San Pedro Harbor 
by these authorities. In summing up the case the last commission of 
engineers (1892) say : 

" The present interests of the coastwise and foreign transportation of Southern 
California do not justify the construction of such a harbor, although they would 
doubtless be benefitted thereby ; but the prospective requirements of foreign com- 
merce amply warrant the government in its establishment, even at large expense." 
. . . . •' The Board is of the opinion that the location at San Pedro is decidedly the 
best, considered as a place of shelter and for receiving and discharging freight ". . . . 
" also the best as regards adaptability for construction and maintenance " . . . . "also 
the best and the cheapest as regards capacity for defense" .... " also the most 
eligible location in depth, width and capacity to accommodate ihe largest ocean- 
going vessels aud the commercial and naval necessities of the government." 

As far as the United States government is concerned no controversy or 
question exists, and the same may be said with regard to the great 
majority of the people of this section. It is greatly to be regretted that 
the Southern Pacific Railway still exerts its powerful influence at Wash- 
ington against this needed improvement. This corporation has in so 
many ways shown itself valuable to Southern California that its friends 
and well-wishers are hopeful its opposition to San Pedro is about to come 
to an end — but if not the work must go on just the same. 

On consulting the map which accompanies this article the reader will 
note that the harbor of San Pedro, as projected, consists of two parts : 
(i) The outside bay or deep-water harbor, which is to be constructed by 
the building of a sea wall curved from Point P'irmin to the south and 
east, which will protect the harbor from the southwestern winds. (2) 
The inner harbor which has been constructed by the filling in of the 
east, side of the lagoon with a substantial stone breakwater. By this 
means the tide currents have been carried over the bar in such a way as 
to scour out the entrance, giving, as has been said, 22 feet of water at 
high tide — enough for most of the coast-wise traffic. Two projects of 
improvement are under consideration : One for the construction of the 
outer sea wall, which will cost over two and a half millions of dollars, and 
will make a harbor capable of holding all the deep sea commerce ever 
likelv to come to this section ; and the other for the further dredging of 
the interior basin, giving it greater wharfage to the north and allowing 
the entrance of vessels of deeper draught. In a recent special report, 
Col. W. H, H. Benyaurd, U. S. Corps of Engineers, declares that if the 
dredging of the interior basin were resumed a sufficient depth of water 
could soon be secured to accommodate all except the very largest ocean- 
going vessels — sufficient, at least, for the probable traffic of the next four 
or five years. The extension of wharves and other improvements to a 
point nearly 2000 feet beyond where the former work ended shows the 
growth of the harbor, and will call for an extension of the government's 
work in that direction. One or two hundred thousand dollars put into 
dredging this interior basin will accomplish a vast amount of good, and 
it is generally understood that the effort at the next session of Congress 
will be put forth chiefly along that line. 

It is now four years since all government work ceased at San Pedro, and 
the people are impatient to see it resumed. No other individual public 
enterprise bears with such importance on the future welfare of this 
section, and for that reason it will call out the undivided interest of our 
active and progressive business men. 







298 

Education of a Chinese Physician. 

BY T. FOO YUEN, M. D. 

N my country the practice of medicine is a 
very honorable and lucrative profession, 
1^ ^ ^^ ■ •* the right to follow which is purposely 

made very difficult. The boj- whose parents 
choose for him this life-work, is told at the 
outset that it means an arduous course of 
study, commencing usually at about the age 
of fourteen years and continuing until the 
OFFICE, PEKiN, CHINA. studcut has rcachcd the prime of life. In 
China a professional man expects to live and work until he is eighty or a 
hundred years of age, or even older, and is fully satisfied to devote the 
first half of his life to a preparation for usefulness in the other half. 

All the studies of the Chinese boy who is to be a physician are directed 
in the one channel. He is not taught literature or science before he is 
taught medicine, but every faculty of his mind is concentrated upon his 
chosen career. He is first taught to read and write, and is then placed at 
once under the tuition of a skilled physician and begins with the study 
of botany. The Chinese use in their practice of medicine only vegetable 
substances, roots, herbs, barks, leaves and berries. More than three 
thousand of these remedial agents are employed, and the student must 
be thoroughly familiar with all the properties of each. He must be able 
to analyze and classif}- them, to tell the localities in the broad Chinese 
empire where each is grown to the greatest perfection, and the proper 
season for gathering it. He must understand all its medicinal properties 
at various stages of growth, and, as he becomes farther advanced in his 
studies, he must know the properties of these herbs in the combinations 
that make up the varied and complicated prescriptions of the Chinese 
physician. He moves from place to place and studies under different 
physicians so as to become familiar with the plant-growths of all 
sections. 

From nine to twelve years are devoted to these researches. The pros- 
pective physician is now a man of from twenty-three to twenty -six years. 
He remains with different physicians about ten years longer, acquiring a 
thorough knowledge of the effects of his herbs upon the human system, 
and studying the preparation of prescriptions. The next step is diag- 
nosis. Chinese physicians diagnose disease entirely by the pulse. The 
theory of this is that the condition of each of the vital organs, whether 
normal or abnormal, and the constitutional power, or vitality, of the 
individual are indicated by the pulse. This theory rests upon certain 
well defined principles, the practical application of which requires a 
great deal of experience. The student is not permitted to see the 
patients whose bodily ailments he is to explain. An arm is thrust 
through an aperture in a door and his only guide in reaching a decision 
is the pulse. As he advances, every possible test of his proficiency in 
this respect is applied. 

The studies are constantly reviewed and every step is committed to 



THE EDUCATION OF A CHINESE PHYSICIAN- 299 



memory. The Chinese student is kept as much as possible by himself. 
The preference is to send him away from home at the very commence- 
ment and to keep his mind busy with his work, even to the exclusion of 
home and family matters. His vacations are few and far between. The 
object of this rigid discipline is two-fold : to develope the mental faculties 
and to make the student, as far as posrible, independent of text-books. 
Were every book in the medical libraries of China to be destroyed by 
fire, their contents would still exist intact in the minds of those who 
have mastered them. 

After gaining facility in diagnosis by the pulse, the student commences 
to write prescriptions, still under the supervision of skilled doctors. He 
has already been taught the functions of the different vital organs, the 
construction of the human body and the effect of medicines upon diges- 
tion and nutrition. In China all these facts were determined by vivisec- 




DOCTOR'S OFFICE, LOS ANGELES. 



Photo by Putnam 



tion, which was very largely practiced thousands of years ago, principally 
by enterprising individuals. The results of these investigations were 
discredited by the mass of the Chinese people, as they are today by 
English-speaking races, and the existence of the custom, at any period, 
has frequently been denied. But the truth is, that it was once largely 
followed, although in secret, and the Chinese student of medicine is 
today referred to vivisection as the origin of most of the theories upon 
which his science is based. 

After about twenty years of study under tutors, the Chinese physician, 
now a man of from thirty-three to forty years, knocks at the door of the 
university. The examinations required at this point are very rigid and 
many students fail in them. There is in China only one university — the 
Imperial University of Pekin — at which purely Chinese methods of 
instruction are still pursued. There are other universities, organized by 
Foreigners under government patronage, at which the arts and sciences 
of Europe and America are taught. But of these I do not intend to speak. 



300 LAND OF SUNSHINE 

As a rule only two years are spent at the university, the student in that 
time reviewing his whole course, with constant memorizing of medical 
principles. The theory and philosophy of medicine are taught him after 
he has already learned their application in practice. The Chinese uni- 
versity student works almost entirely at night. 

Surgery is in China a distinct profession from medicine, and the student 
of the latter is not trained in specialties. He becomes, however, 
thoroughly versed in hygiene, everything pertaining to diet and the 
relative values of foods in health or disease, and in preventive medicine. 
He believes that, except in cases of accident, all derangements of the 
human system arise from imperfect nutrition or a disordered state of one 
or more of the vital organs, frequently caused by the disturbing effects 
of climatic conditions or the influences of the five natural elements, 
namely : fire, water, earth, vegetation and minerals. His treatment is 
usually directed towards restoring the harmonious action of these organs 
and consequently the strength and vitality of the patient, leaving to 
nature the directing of that strength to the seat of disease. 

The educated Chinese believe in keeping well rather than in 
becoming ill and then perhaps being cured. All well-to-do ♦J\l\^ 
Chinese families employ physicians by the year, whose duty is ^fnlVi 
to prevent sickness rather than to cure it. In matters of health ^^ 
the Chinese are, as a rule, temperate, sober and self-restrained. ^~ $\ 
The hurry and worry of American business life are unknown in 
China. Were the American people, with their superior hered- 
itary endowments of mental and physical force, as careful in ^ 
observing the laws of health as are my countrymen, they would 
be to the latter a race of giants as compared with a race of pig- 
mies. Yet, with the conditions as they exist today, I believe 
that the ancient peoples of China will long outlast the Cau- 
casian races. 

Some Educational Figures. 

^C^i^HE annual report of the Board of Education of the city of Los 
^-^j Angeles is significant of the progress of the schools. The total 

^ number of census children (between the ages of 5 and 17 years) 
is 16,956, in 1895 ; an increase of 2,213 over 1894. There are 290 teachers 
this year, as against 252 last. In 1885 the number was 68. 

The County Superintendent of Schools reports a total of 34,245 children 
of school age in Los Angeles county ; besides 13,148 under five years old. 
Of these, only 1026 are foreign -born, and 46,367 are natives. There are 
in the county 394 primary, 170 grammar and 6 high schools. There are 
600 teachers, of whom 486 are women. Their salaries aggregate I360, 122; 
and the value of buildings and furniture amounts to 11,395,030. None of 
these schools run less than six months ; and only three of them less 
than eight months. 

Besides these public schools there are in the county 17 private schools, 
with 129 teachers and 1361 pupils. 



^ 




> 




n 
1 


1 S-. 

1 " 
1 



i^J^ : 



' Ontario. 

ITUATED at a distance of 35 miles from the Pacific ocean, and 39 
miles east of Los Angeles, on the main line of both the Southern 
Pacific and Santa Fe railways, is the beautiful town of Ontario. 
In location, climate, soil and water privileges, Ontario has many ad- 
vantages — fine business blocks, electric cars and lighting, handsome 
churches and schools, fine residences, surrounded by what is already 
becoming a great forest of citrus and deciduous orchards, blocked out 
by splendid shade trees— such is Ontario at thirteen years. How many 
Eastern towns twice its age and population would ever dream of half 
its progress? The elevation, ranging from 950 to 2500 feet, insures 
a most healthful and agreeable climate, while the conditions for grow- 
ing citrus and deciduous fruits cannot be excelled. 




A WATER-SUPPLY SOURCE, SAK ANTONIO CASON. 

For the past two years Ontario has planted more orchard lands than 
any other district in Southern California, the firm of Hanson & Co. alone 
having planted over 1500 acres to the various kinds of citrus and decidu- 
ous fruits. This they are selling in 10 or 20 acre tracts at prices ranging 
from $150 to $400 per acre, according to location of lots and water priv- 
ileges. These prices are for three-year old orchards. The streets and 
avenues are planted to ornamental and shade trees, and kept in good 
order. There are some beautiful residences now on their tract. 

They also have several orchards in full bearing which are good value, 
and will bear investigation. Anyone desiring further information should 
write for pamphlet to Hanson & Co., Ontario, or 122 Pall Mall, London, 
England. 



A Home In Southern California 

PINC NCSIOCNCC on RANCH 
PROPERTY 

BY THE SEA-SIDE OR AT THE FOOT OF 

THE MOUNTAINS 

In or near a progressive community. Pure air, 

beautiful surroundinjfs. 




IF YOU WISH TO KNOW 

All about it and how easily it can be 
accomplished 
WRITE TO 

ROBT. F. JONES & CO., 

328 SOUTH BROADWAY 

LOS ANGELES. 



H 



ORTON 



Rates S2.00 ana #2.50 
per day. 



l^ 



OUSE 



Liberal Reduction to 
Permanent Guests. 



Sunny Rooms. 
Center of City 
Table Unsurpassed 



5an Diego • • • 



W. E. HADLEY, 

PROPRIETOR. 



Silver bought 

Manufacturing Jeweler 

L"U-r/S'„';.t ...DiDmonii seller end EPimet 

to order or repaired " 

Oold and Silver School and Society Badges k Medals a specialty 

ROOMS 3, 4 AND 7 UP STAIR* 

217H South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cat. 




NEW LAKE VIEW HOTEL AND CRESCENT BATH HOUSE 



ELSINORE. RIVERSIDE COUNTY, GAL. 





The only Hotel located on high ground. First- 
class in every way. Gas, electric bells, tele- 
ehone. etc. Pine compartments, cuisine the 
est. Guests accommodated in every way. 

S. W. Harnry, Prop. 



Hot Mineral and Mud Baths under the care ot 
resident physician of 25 years experience. 

Specific diseases receive proper attention to 
affect permanent cure. Dr. G. W. Howard 

Mary A. Howard. M.D 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshiitb." 




Our Portrait Department EGO 

is presided over by STUDIO 

PROF. POWERS, PLACERE 

the recipient of i68 medals. ^^^^ 

Bbutnam 



Commercial 
pbotograpber 



Portraits, 

Landscapes and 
Panoramas. 



portraits 

AND 
VIEWS 



are the perfection of the art, and absolutely 
permanent. 



I TE|V[PliE BLiOCI^ 

■^ Entrances ]Spri^"|f- l^^ f\T)<^elQ% (^bL 



Fine Half-Tones and Engravings 



.-x^VI 



HeRUE pRItND, 



311 W. First 6L Dh 

I. r 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



OTO 
ENGRAUER 



liOS AflGHIiES, CALi. 

If you wish to buy or sell any Real Estate in this 
city, call on or address 

RICHARD ALTSCHUL 

1233^ W. Second Street, Los Angeles, Gal. 



FOR 

YOUR 
VACATION 

TAKE A TRIP TO 
THE 

GRAND 

CANYON 
.:: COLORADO 

The rates are low and 
the provisions for com- 
fort ample. Write to 
or call on the nearest 
agent of the 

SANTA FE 

ROUTE 

for full information, or 
to John J. Byrne, 
Gen'l Pass. Agent, 
Los Angeles, Cal., 
for a copy of illustra- 
ted descriptive book. 




Please mention that " you saw it in the Land of Sunshinb. 



r 



■^^k 





IF YOU WANT 



A HOME" 



SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 



*% 



See Our Adams St. Tract 

On the finest residence street in I. as Ani;eles close to the 
best improvements in the city, double track Electric Cars run- 
ning through tract ; cement walks and curbs, water piped, 
graveled streets lined with palms ; pure air, rich sandy 
,oan,;„om„d. ^^QQ^r,, WR|TE^. 

139 South Broadway, and make your selection. 



]_^os flngeles 



E. p. JOHNSON, President 
JNO. C. DOTTER, VPre8. 
A. C. JONES, Secretary 
A. H. VOIGT, Treasurer 



purnitare rto.. wholesale 

^^ and Retail - 



The Largest and Best Assorted 
Stock of [- II 

rurniture, 



Carpe U, Bedding, '^'^^I ^^JUf^^jJt 
225. 227 and 229 6. Broadway. 

LOS ANGELES, GAL. 



|"h. jevne I 

WHOtESALE f T r\ ( ) ( H IX RgTATlT 



IMPORTER OF 



English, French, German and Italian TABLE LUXURIES 

Goods packed and delivered at depot free of charge, and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 

136 and 138 NORTH SPRING SXRKBT 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Lakd of StnrtHiNB.' 



^^ONADO^WSTER Co 



A SUPERB AND PURE 



TABLE BEVERAGE 




Tastes like yo' foot's asleep " 
CORONADO MINERAL WATER 

Blends perfectly with wine. 



If your Dealer or Hotel has it not 
drop us a line at- 



CORONADO, CALIF. 

Los Angeles Agency, 114 West First Street 
San Francisco Agency, 318 Battery Street 

DEL SUR RANCH CO; 

(Incorporated.) Owners of 1440 acres 
ofthe best foot-hill 



ALIVIOND 



LAND 



OLIVE 



in Southern California, will plant forthemselves, 
this winter, from three to four hundred acres to 
Almonds and Olives. They will sell some of 
their land, plant and care for it until in bear- 
ing, on very liberal co-operative terms. 

fliiiKl EiQiil onfl Olive Teo semi-llnDual Poymenls. 

This makes it easy to acquire a valuable income- 
producing property. An income sure to increase 
with age. The whole plan is fully explained in a 
circular to be had free on application to the office 
ofthe DEL SUR RANCH CO., 1227 Trenton Street, 
LOS ANGELES, CAL., or tone of the owners) 
pen CAI/IMC ^30 Chestnut St., 
UtU. UAMIlO) PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
New York, Philadelphia, and I^os Angeles 
Reference. 



THE 
ABBOTSFORD 



CORNER 

EIGHTH 
AND HOPE 

STS. 



LOS ANGELES, 
CAL. 




SELECT 
TOURIST AND FAMILY HOTEL 

American Plan. All new, with 
refined appointments. Electric 
Bells, Incandescent L,ight and 
Steam Radiator in every room. 
Capacity, 200 guests. 

BY J. J. MARTIN. 



Are You an Invalid or a semi-Invalid? 



? 



Have you consulted physicians of your own race without relief? 
Are you sufficiently candid to cast aside the prejudices of a Caucasian 
and to investigate a system of medicine that has been tested and approved 
for three thousand years in the most populous country of the world? 
Do you believe in the possible existance of a method of healing which 
I discards poisonous drugs and effects cures by simple, harmless, but power- 

ful and efficacious remedies ? 
If you answer the above questions in the affirmative, you should consult T. Foo Yuen, M. D., a 
graduate of the Imperial College of Medicine at Pekin, China. His office and residence are at No. 17 
Barnard Parl<. Los Angeles, California. For further information read article in this number, by the 
Dr. If you live at a distance or iesire further information before consulting him, write to him for 
interesting and valuable literature explaining the Chinese system of theratjeutics. It states the 
experience of some of California's foremost citizens, men and women of wealth, intelligence and 
refinement, who, during the past forty years, have found life and health in this system when all 
others failed them. x. FOO YUEN, M. D., P.O. Box 1717, Station F, I^os Angeles, Cal. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the I^and of StwSHiNB." 



Items of Interest. 



FOREMOST ON THE COAST. 

With the completion of the Boston Dry Goods 
Store edifice, Broadway has settled the question 
as to which is to be the most popular retail stree 
in Los Augeles. The lesson taught bv the re- 
moval of this establishment from its old quarters 
on N. Spring street into its magnificent new 
Quarters on S. Broadway, is the survival of the 
fittest and the inevitable transfer of business to 
the coming center of the city where frontage and 
rents have not as yet reached prohibitive prices. 
Among the pioneers in this movement was the 
Los Angeles Furniture Co., to which the Boston 
Dry Goods Store is now neighbor, and with 
which it shares the distinction of occupying ex- 
clusively the entire four floors and basement of 
two of the finest modern buildings in this city. 
Much credit is due the enterprise of Mr. C. W. R. 
Ford, president of the firm of J. W. Robinson & 
Co., in that they are now owners and proprietors 
of by far the largest and best appointed dry goods 
establishment on the Pacific Coast. The build- 
ing, replete in all respects with the latest im- 
provements necessary in the conducting of a 
metropolitan dry goods establishment, is, as 
regards plans, design and supervision, the work 
of Eisen & Hunt, architects. As can be seen 
from the illustration on page 305, it is a fair 
sample of the French plesance style of architec- 
ture, and would be an ornament to any city. 



A HOME ENTERPRISE. 

It is a matter of no small interest that Los An- 
geles has a full fledged bicycle factory. The 
Pacific Cycle Co., established here about three 
years ago under the management of Mr. F. E. 
Olds, the expert, has recently taken in new 
capital and members, and a new factory will 
soon be built. The establishment is already pre- 
pared to put up a first class bicycle, con.sidtrable 
fine machinery having arrived from Chicago, as 
well as all the latest novelties in bicycle sundries. 



A CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 

The office of Robt. F, Jones & Co., whose ad- 
vertisement appears in this number as hereto- 
fore, 328 S. Broadway, has been changed to Santa 
Monica. 



A WORD IN SEASON. 

You will be sorry, one of these day», if you fail 
to have the volumes of the Land of Suksbinb 
bound ; and if you do not attend to it now, you 
are apt to be too late. Few copies of Vol. I can 
be had at any price, while several of the numbers 
of Vol. Ill are already at a high premium. 

Lay the si-x numbers ending with this month 
together and just see what a beautiful book they 
will make. Do you know of any other way to 
get such a volume on Southern California ? Over 
joo pages, over joo illustrations ! Ft/ty-six 
different localities pictured. Over zoo articles, 
dwelling upon the different phases of Southtrn 
California. Don't you think, yourself, such a 
book is worth saving ? 

Any bookbinder can do it for you. Or, if you 
will present at this office the six numbers in 
good condition, we will ^ive you the bound vol- 
ume in half morocco imitation for $1.40. or in 
half morocco, genuine, for Sz.oo. 

Owing to the scarcity of back numbers, the 
publishers are compelled to quote the following 

f)rices for furnishing both binding and copies 
or volumes : 

Vol. I (June to Nov., '94, inclusive) imitation half 

morocco, I3.50 ; half morocco, genuine, $4.00. 

Vol. II (Dec. '94. to May, '95. inclusive) imitation 

half morocco. |2.oc ; half morocco, $2.50. 
Vol. Ill (June to Nov. '95, inclusive) imitation 
half morocco, $2.50 ; half morocco. Ji.oo. 
As it will not be long before these prices will be 
necessarily raised, it behooves those who have 
not retained their back numbers and desire the 
valuable addition to their library of complete 
volumes of the Land of Sunshine to act quickly. 

LOCAI. TRANSPORTATION. 

Running as it does from the ocean at San Pedro 
and Long Beach, through Los Angeles and Pas- 
adena, to Aliadena at the foot of the great cable 
incline of the Sierra Madre mountains without 
change of cars, tourists will find in the fast and 
frequent service of the Los Angeles Terminal 
Railway lines facilities not to be overlooked in 
doing this locality. Then, too, there is the 
Glendale division, through one of the finest val- 
leys in Southern California to fine picnic and 
hunting grounds, and Verdugo Park, while 
Devil's Gate and numerous other points are well 
worth a trip over this line to see. 




The Modern Cure for Disease 



WATSON & CO., 



SEND POK BOOK. 

Pacific Coast Agents, 

124 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



E. W. GRANNIS, GROCER 

1111 WEST ADAMS ST. TEL. WEST 1 36 

BEST STORE IN SOUTHWEST LOS ANGELES. 

The largest and finest stock, the best facilities. Orders by mail given prompt attention. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunbbinb." 



The I^6ii\d of ^ai\6bir\e 



THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
MAGAZINE 

$i.oo A Year. io Cents a Copy, 
Published monthly by 

The Land of Sunshine Puhfishing Co. 

INCORPORATED 

501-503 Stimson Building, los angcles, cal 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
W. C, Patterson - - - . President 
Chas. F. Lummis, V.-Prest. & Managing Editor 
F. A. Pattee - Secretary and Business Mgr. 
H. J. Fleishman .... Treasurer 
Chas. Cassat Davis .... Attorne'V 



STOCKHOLDERS 



Chas. Forman, 

D. Freeman, 
F. W. Braun, 
Jno. F Francis, 
C. G. Baldwin, 
S. H. Mott, 

W. C. Patterson, 

E. W. Jones, 

H. J. Fleishman, 
W. I^eMoyne Wills, 
Cyrus M. Davis, 
Chas. F. Lummis, 



Geo. H. Bonebrake, 
C. D. Willard. 
F. K. Rule, 
Andrew Mullen, 
I. B Newton, 
Fred L- Alles, 
M. E. Wood. 
Chas. Cassat Davis, 
Wm.H. Holabird, 

E. E. Bostwick, 
H. E. Brook. 

F. A. Pattee. 



Entered at the Los Angeles Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 



Address advertising, remittances, etc., to the 
Business Manager. 

All MSS. should be addressed to the Editor. 
No MSS. preserved unless accompanied by re- 
turn postage. 



Questions Answered.— Specific information 
about Southern California desired by tourists, 
health seekers or intending settlers will be furn- 
ished free of charge by the Land of Sunshine. 
Enclose stamp with letter. 



NOVEMBER, 1 895 



A BUSINESS VIEW OF IT. 

Patriotism is good in its place, but business is 
business. More customers here than you want ? 
If not, where are you going to get nerw ones ? Are 
you going to try to get the inhabitants of Los 
Angeles to "come to California," or would you 
rather reach out for those who are not here 
already ? 

As to those who are coming, do you think they 
will have io trade with you, when they never 
heard of you but have been reading your rival's 
adyertisenient for half a year or so ? 

Here in Southern California only one other 
publication of any kind is so widely read as the 
Land of Sunshine ; and no other California 
publication is half so much read abroad. You 
know for yourself whether you can get out of 
range of the Land of Sunshine here. You do 
not need to be told that no other publication in 
this part of the country has ever had the respect- 



ful-attention indicated by the following typical 
notices from representative papers all over the 
United States. 

Thousands of Eastern people whose eye is on 
California are reading the Land of Sunshine. 
Smith, your rival, may not be half the man you 
are, but already they know his name and place 
of business, and have heard what he has to say. 
When they come here, don't you think they'll be 
likely to hunt him up? 

The way to get your share of their trade is to get 
your shate of their attention. The man who waits 
for business to find him may get some, but 
mo?t milkers nowadays have learned that they 
have to go after the cow. 

Here are fair samples of what they think of the 
Land of Sunshine in this State and the East : 

ALL, ONE WAY. 

"The magazine, as we have said more than 
once, is unique in periodical literature " 

—San Francisco Chronicle. 

" Good reading anywhere."— Hartford, Conn., 
Courant. 

" Bright and winning."— The Dial, Chicago. 

"In every way a credit to California."— San 
Francisco Call. 



" Always exceedingly beautiful. 
Pa., 7ruih. 



Scrantoni 



" Has a bright and cheerful look, and gives the 
impression that it has come to stay."— 7/i<r Critic 

N. Y. ' 

" Profuse in illustrations, equal to the best in 
the New York magazines, it is attracting atten- 
tion all over the world."— San Francisco A'ews 
Letter. 

" Full of good reading."— Detroit/owywa/. 

" As interesting and entertaining as it is 
beautiful."— Chicago Inter Ocean. 

"Attractive and interesting." — New York 
Homejournal. 

" Remarkably romantic and interesting." — 
Harper's Weekly. 

" Ought to gain in popularity."— Springfield, 
Mass., Republican. 

" Very good reading."— Boston Pilot. 

"An admirablemonthly."— rA^^yg^onaw/. San 
Francisco. 

" A delightful little magazine."— 7%^ Christian 
Advocate, N. Y. 

" Protusely illustrated and filled with enter- 
taining reading."— ZzV)m" J Herald, Boston. 

"Many entertaining articles and beautiful 
pictures."— Nashville, Tenn., American. 

"A bright and beautiful monthly."— Chicago 
Advance. 

" Maintains its promise of growth. "—Louisville 
Courier-Journal. 

"Entitled to rank in the very forefront." — 
Bristol, Conn., Press. 

"The handsomest publication ever issued in 
Southern California."— Los Angeles Herald. 

" Full of flavor of Southern California and the 
Southwest. — ^Aibafly, N. ¥., -y4f-j-M5.- 

"Seems to bring with it the fragrance of 
Southern California." — Minneapolis Tribune. 

"Should find a place on every table in the 
country."- Phoenix. .\. T., Gazette. 

" If Californians know the value of advertising 
they will patronize this publication unstintedly," 
— Evening Wisconsin, Milwaukee. 

"A perfect reflection of the land in which we 
liv e."— Los Angeles Times^ 



SOLID INSTITUTIONS. 

The solid character of the Los Angeles 
banks was well shown during the financial 
panic of 1894, which had such disastrous 
results in some sections of the country. 
Bank clearances have for a year past 
shown an improvement almost every 
week, while the figures from a majority 
of other cities have frequently shown a 
decrease. 

Los Angeles Clearing House iox month 
endingjuly, 1895 : Deposits, $1,232,869.08; 
Balances, 1175,689.10. Corresponding, 
1894: $723,605.75; $131,950.92. 



Security Savings Bank 



AND TRUST CO. 



148 SOUTH MAIN ST.. NtAn sccomo 

- 9130, 000. 00 



Capital and Surplas 



OFFICXRS : 

•;j; F. Sartori. Prest. Maurice S. Hellman. V-P. 
W. D. Lonoyrar, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS : 

H.J.Fleishman, C.A.Shaw, F.O.Johnson, 

H. W. Hellman, J. F. Sarlori, W. L. Graves. 

J. H. Shankland. J. A. Gravss. M. L. Fleming, 

Maurices. Hellman, W. D. l,ongyear. 

Five per cent, interest paid on Term Deposits. 
Three per cent, on Ordinary Deposits. 

MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE 



OLDEST AND LARGEST BANK IN SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA. 

Farmers and Merchants Bank 



OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Capital (paid up) 
Surplus and Reserve 

Total 



1500,000.00 
- 820,000.00 

- $1,320,000.00 




OFFICERS : 

I. W. Hellman President 

H. W. Hellman Vice-President 

Henry J. Fleishman Cashier 

G. A. J. Heimann Assistant Cashier 

DIRHCTORS \ 

W. H. Perry, C. E. Thom, J. B. Lankershim, 
O. W. Childs, C. Duccommun, T. L. Duque, 
A. Glaslell, H. W. Hellman, I. W. Hellman. 
Sell and Buy Foreign and Domestic Kxchange. 

Special Collection Department. 

Correspondence Invited. 



^ia/u/t^ 



or L.OS ANUKJ^lCS. 

Capital Stock $400,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits over 230.000 

J. M. Elliott, Prest., W.G. Kerckhoff, V.Pres 

Frank A. Gibson, Cashier. 

G. B. Shaffer, Assistant Cashier. 

directors: 

J. M. Elliott. F. Q. Story, J. D. Hooker, 

J. D. Bickuell. H. Jevne, W. C. Patterson 

W. G. KerckhoflF. 

No public funds or other preferred deposits 

received by this bank. 






Paid Up Capital, S500,000 

Transacts a general Banking Business. Buys 
and sells Forei^in and Domestic Exchange. Col- 
lections promptly attended to. Issue letters of 
credit. Acts as Trustees of Estates, Executors, 
Administrators, Guardian. Receiver, etc. Solicits 
accoujjts of Banks, Bankers Corporations and 
Individuals on favorable terms. Interest on 
lime deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



— ^TS — 

Oflficprs : H. J. W'^ollacott. President ; James 
F. Towell. ist Vice President ; Warren Gilielen, 
2nd Vice-President ; T. W A. Off, Cashier ; M. B. 
Lewis. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors : G. H. Bonebrake, W. P. Gardiner, 
P. M. Green. R. F. Ball, H. J. WooUacott. James 
F. Towell, Warren Gilielen. J. W. A. Off, F. C. 
Howes, R. H. Howell, B. F, Porter. 



M. W. Stimson, Prest. C. S. Cristy, Vice-Prest, W. E. McVay, Secy. 

FOR GOOD nORTQAGE LOANS 



ANO OTHER SArE INVCSTMrNT*. 
WNITK TO 



Security Loan and Trust Company 



CAPITAL $200,000 



223 South Spring Street, Los Ans^eles, CaL 



Please mention that you "saw It in the I«AifD of Sunshimb." 



HAWLEY, KING & CO. '^"^^ ^b1c?c1' 



AGES AND 
ES 




210 NORTH MAIN STREET 



LOS ANGELES, GAL. 




CALIFORNIA WINE MERCHANT 



We will ship two sample cases assorted 
wines (one dozen quarts each) to any part 
of the United States, Freight Prepaid, 
upon the recipt of $9.00. Pints ( 24 in 
case), 50 cents per case additional. We 
will mail full list and prices upon appli- 
cation. 



Respectfully, 

C. F. A. LAST, 



NICOLL TH£ TAILOR 

Visitors and Strangers ! 

"We can serve you at lioine, 
abroad or traveling. 

Garments made at short no- 
tice and expressed to any part of 
the United States br delivered 
tlirough any of our stores in the 
different cities. 

134 S. SPRING STREET 

1,0s ANGEI^ES, CAI,. 




131 N. Main St., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Dr. Pierce's Galvanic 
CHAIN BELT 

A perfect Electric Body- 
Battery for curing Chronic 
Weakness or disease of male 
or female. It imparts vigor 
and strength where medicines 
fail. " Pamphlet No. 2 " contains full 
information. Write for it. Address : 
MAGNETIC ELASTIC TRUSS CO., 
"02 Sacramento Pt , San Francisco. F. W. Bbaitk & Co , Whole- 
sale Agents, Los Angeles, 

ARE YOU COniNG^ 

To the Land of Sunshine ? 

THEN WRITE TO 

MOORE & PARSONS 

Real Estate Brokers. 

S. E. COR. 2ND AND BROADWAY, 
LOS ANGELES, 

To tell you all about it, especially 

LOS ANGELES AND PASADENA 

Best of References furnished. 



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



O" PECIAL ATTENTION is caHed to 

,^y the very attractive line of 
\^)j vvhiclea offered in our No. 6t, all 
^-^ l«'ath«r t<»|» Itufc^y: our No. 44 
Phaeton, and our No. 234 (.'anu|iy-t«>p 
Surrey, made by the Enierpnse Carriage 
Mfg. Co , of Miaraisburg, O. Ahead of all 
competition ; being low in price, but uea^ 
in finish and appearance, and can- 
not fail to give ftttire satisfaction. ^ 
This factory proposes to keep Q. 
ahead in the inarch of 
improvement, and to 
give bfst value for the 
money. 

Write us. All in- 
quiries cheerfully an- 
swered. Address : 

Mathews 

IMPLEMENT 
CO., 

120. 122 AND 124 

S. Los Angeles St. 

Los ANaELCS, Cal. 




p^WP:r: 




BASSETT & SMITH 



"ti.Pmm^^' 



11 DC yAl I Looking for a Home? Are you looking for 
ni\L 1\3\j an luvestment? Do you want to locate in 
one of the Finest Sppts on this Karth ? Our opinion is 
that that spot is the POMONA VALLEY. There may 
be equals, but no superiors. 

We have for sale in this valley and elsewhere, Olive Orchards, Lemon Orchards, Orang^e 
Orchards, also orchards of Prune, Peach, Plum, etc., etc., large or small; also Stock 
Ranches, Bee Ranches, and large tracks of Land for Colony purpose. We believe the 
OLIVE INDUSTRY will make one of the best paying investments on this coast 



We now have for sale 
the noted . . . 



Howland Olive Ranch ''''° Olive Oil Plant 



i§o Acres with fine Olive Oil Mill, income last year over $8,000. For Information or Descrip- 
tive Matter about California or anv of her industries, call on or address 



BASSETT & SMITH 



POMONX 
CJtl^ 



SAMUEL B. ZIMMER 




ROBERT C. REAMER 



Rooms 44. 45, 46 

Lawyers Block 



San Diego, California 



PleaRe mention that you ' saw it in the Land ok Sunshinb." 



QJTJinjTJTJiruTTinnjTJxriJTJTJTJiJxrL^^ 




BARRIE 



•CHARLES SCR1BNER5 SONS NEW \ORK' 

S/1MP5CN LCVV MAR510N t-Ca Lmito L3Na)ON 



Author of "The Little Minister, " has 
just completed the novel upon which 
he has been at work ever since the 
publication of that famous story. 

SCRIBNER'S 

Magazine has secured it, and will 
begin it in serial form in the January- 
number, under the title of 

" SENTIMENTAL TOMMY." 
Readers of the Magazine for 1895 
may confidently look for a work of 
greater genius and power than any- 
thing the author has yet done. 



Subscription ^3.00 a yean 

Charles Scribner's Sons, New York:, 

OTJTJ UTJXTTJTJTJIJIJ U"lJTjriJinJTJTJ UXr^^ 



For One Dollar 

We will send you Stafford's New Magazine 
for one year, and besides will send you fifteen 
complete books for a premium— the whole fifteen 
books in fifteen separate volumes (handy pocket 
size, bound, not trashy pamphlets), are sent you 
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Send one dollar for Pt xfford's New Magazine 
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49~ Please mention this magazine. "&. 



INITIAL NU MBER N OW READY 

KEY-NOTE— " The growth of individualism in 
Education is the most promising feature in the 
social outlook of America todaj-. It is worth 
while to be educated."— /'r«zrf<?w^ David Starr 
Jordan. 

\t Ain In [flniii 

Edited by P. W. SEARCH 

A New Magazine devo'ed to the Conservation 01 
the Individual in Ma- s Education and the essen- 
tial Principles of Educational Unity. 

Terms : Two Dollars Per Year. 

Address 

The Advance in Education, 

■L06 Angefes, Cafif. 



H. H. MORROW 

(English House) 

Importer of Murray & Co.'s 
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CEYLON TEAS 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

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Mail orders promptly and conscientiously filled. 

310 W. SIXTH ST.. LOS ANGELES. 



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine." 



TO READ 



ST. NICHOLAS 



HAS BEEN SAID TO BE 



A LIBERAL EDUCATION. 



The best Magazine for the entire Family. 
|3 per year. 

The Century Co., New York. 




CzarBicyclcs ARE Unexcelled. 

They are guarauteed to be ptrfcct in material 
and manufacture. We guarantee the Czar to be 
superior to any wheel we have haudled. Shictly 
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H. O. HAINES. 

339 N. Los Angeles Street. 



$10 



PER ACRE 

FOR FINE LANDS 

IN THE 



$10 



FANITA RANCHO 

EL CAJON VALLEY 



WHEN YOU VISIT 

SAN DIEGO 

REMEMBER . . . 



1669 Acres for - 
1420 Acres for - 



$18,000 
$12,000 

Smaller Tracts for $30 to $80 per acre. 

WILL GROW ANYTHING. 

This property is twelve miles from the city ot 
San Diego and two miles from Cuyamaca Rail- 
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For further information address 

FANNIE M. McKOON, EXECUTRIX. 

Santee, San Diego Co., Cal. 



D^dHVINGfo. 



CNGRWINCSfORTnt PRINTING PRE55. 




RATES 

$2.50 PER DAY 

AND UP 



American Plan Only. Centrally 
located. Elevators and fire escapes. Baths, 
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I Elsinore, Riverside Co., Cal. 

The best springs and baths on the Pacific 

Coast Temperature of water, from 96 to no deg. 

Tlotel and bath house under one roof; in the 

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For circulars and testimonials, address 




Hot Springs Hotel, Elsinore, Cal. 

E. Z. BU'NDV. PROP.' 



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IN ONTARIO 

The Model Colony" 

of Southern California 



a 



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In ^, lo, 20 or 40 Acre Tracts, 



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For full information and descriptive pamphlet, write to 

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SAN DIEGO LAND AND TOWN CO., 

NATIONAL CITY, CAT.. 




INTERIOR VIEW OK MONTGOMERY BROS. JEWELRY STORE, 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

The Largest of its kind in Southern California. 




UU THE YEAl^ I^OU^SiD 



May and June 
Weather 



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The region around San Diego Bay is sunny and warm, 
but always refreshing and invigorating. 

Hotel del Coronado is 
the most charming resort for 
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Open the year round. 
WRITE FOR Booklet and Terms. 

E. S. BABCOCK, Manager, 

Coronado Beach, California. 




Please mention that y* 




AND ot Sunshine." 



«r*r.- 



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