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Full text of "Out west"

p^ 





LIBRARY 

OF THE 

University of California. 

Gl FT OF 

.'r!.i.AA;'''l.A-'OA\<^^^ 

Class ^?4-C 



^ 







Af 



2W' 
^NUARY, 1907 



Vol. XXVI, No. 1 




±U MiM 



Copyriplit 19<t". by Out West Macazine Company 



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A COPY 



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The Nation Back of Us, The World in Front 



Out West 

A Magazine of 

The Old Pacific and the New 



(FORMEBLY THE LAND OF SUNSHINE) 




EDITED BY 

Chas. F. Li-immis 

AND 

Charles Amadon IVIoody 

STAFF — David Starr Jordan, Joaquin Miller, Theodore H. Hittell, Mary Hallock 
Foote, Margaret Collier Graham, Charles "Warren Stoddard, Grace Ellery Chan- 
ning, Ina Coolbrith, ■William Keith, Dr. Washington Matthews, Geo. Parker 
Wlnship, Frederick Webb Hodge, Charles F. Holder, Edwin Markham, 
Geo. Hamlin Fitch, Chas. Howard Shinn, Wm. E. Smythe, T. S. Van 
Dyke, Chas. A. Keeler, Louise M. Keeler, A. F. Harmer, L. May- 
nard Dixon, Charlotte Perkins Stetson Oilman, Constance 
Goddard DuBois, Batterman Lindsay, Charles Dwight 
Willard, Elizabeth and Joseph Grinnell, Fred- 
erick Starr, Sharlot M. Hall, Ella 
Higginson, Mary Austin. 



Volume XXVI 
January to June, 1907 



Out West Magazine Company 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 






OUT WEST 

INDEX TO VOLUME XXVI 



PAGE 

Ad Viatores (poem), Christopher Stapleton 62 

Albuquerque, N. M., illustrated 81 

Alvarado Squatters' League, The, illustrated, Charles H. Shinn 23 

Angora Goats, illustration ■. 470 

April Baptism (poem), Neeta Marquis , 326 

Archaeological Institute of America, Report of Arizona Expedition, illus- 
trated, Charles F. Lummis 485 

Baron, A New Mexico, illustrated, George Baker Anderson 15 

Blossom Time in the Santa Clara Valley — A Prune Orchard in Bloom, 

illustration 148 

Blue Jay's Downfall, The (Orleans Indian Legends), Melcena Burns 

Denny '. 1 69 

Bonanzas of Today, The Nevada, illustrated, Willis George Emerson. .. . 103 

Bostonian Finds a New Home, A, illustrated 81 

Builders, The, illustrated, Ednah Aiken 209 

Calendar, Some Leaves from a California, Ethel Griffith 

'• 39, 155, 231, 327, 444, 545 

California Calendar, Some Leaves from a, Ethel Griffith 

• 39, 155, 231, 327, 444, 545 

California Responsible Government for, William E. Smythe 456 

California, The Japanese Problem in, David Starr Jordan 224 

Camels in the Southwest, The, (A Forgotten Experiment), illustrated, 

Sharlot M. Hall 302 

Card-Handler, The (story), James D. Kirkpatrick 256 

Capistrano, The Raven of (A True Wonder Tale), Constance Goddard 

Du Bois 430, 537 

Chiaroscuro (A Study in Black and White) (poem), Robert Evans 

Hutton , 360 

Chispah (story). Jennet Johnson 63 

Christmas at the Grand Canon, A, illustrated, Sharlot M. Hall 3 

Covina — "A City Among the Orange Groves," illustrated, J. L. Matthews. 477 
Coyote Goes the Sun Road (A Legend of the Klamath River Indians) 

(poem), John Vance Cheney 49 

Coyote's Journey to the Ocean, The (Orleans Indian Legends), Melcena 

Burns Denny y^ 

Crossing the Isthmus in 1850, illustrated, Benjamin W. Wells 295 

Dawn-Wind (poem), Aldis Dunbar ;i;i^ 

Death Valley (poem), Robinson Jeffers 443 

Desert Ghosts, The, Minnie S. Snell 361 

De Smet, Father, (biographical sketch), Alfred Talbot Richardson 56 

Easter Bells (poem), Ellsworth Lee , ^^3 

Ebas-Now-Wan-Ich and the Red Man (Orleans Indian Legends), Mel- 
cena Burns Denny ';^y 

Elves, The (poem), Louise Culver 314 






INDEX 



PAGE 

Faith of His Mother, The (story), Rose L. Ellerbe 262 

Fifty Years Ago, From, Alfred Talbot Richardson 56 

Flagstaff, Arizona, illustrated, M. I. Powers 269 

Garden Scene in the "Garden City" (San Jose), A, illustration 30 

Glendale, California, illustrated 572 

Glenwood Mission Inn, Riverside, illustration 482 

Goldfield and the Goldfielders, illustrated, by One of Them 124 

Government for California, Responsible, William E. Smythe 456 

Grand Canon, A Christmas at the, illustrated, Sharlot M. Hall 3 

Hach-A-Moon, the Locust (Orleans Indian Legends), Melcena Burns 

Denny 79 

Harp of a Single String, The (To Rosendo Uruchurtu, the Blind Inventor 

of the Rosendolin) (poem), Adelia B. Adams 255 

Huntington Beach, illustrated, C. R. Stuart 381 

Incident of the Prairie, An, Elmer Ellsworth Carey 349 

Indian Legends, Orleans, Melcena Burns Denny 73, 168, 267 

In Search of Truth, David Starr Jordan 334 

Isthmus in 1850, Crossing the, illustrated, Benjamin W. Wells.'. 295 

Japanese Problem in California, The, David Starr Jordan 224 

Joey Davie (story), R. C. Pitzer 243 

Juda of the Gorges (story), B. F. Sutherland 237 

June Scenes in the High Sierras, illustrated 506 

June Banks, Virginia Garland 558 

Knight of the Plains, A (story), Bertha S. Wilkins 315 

La Jolla, California, illustrated, John Bruce MacCallum. 183 

Landmarks Club, The 181, 467 

Last Flicker of the Candle, The (story), Gertrude Dix 524 

League, The Alvarado Squatters', illustrated, Charles H. Shinn 23 

Leaves from a California Calendar, Some, Ethel Griffith 

39, 155. 231, 327, 444, 545 

Legend of A-Sach-Wan-Neesh-Amor, The (Orleans Indian Legends), 

Melcena Burns Denny 267 

Legends. Orleans Indian, Melcena Burns Denny ^ 73, 168. 267 

Life's Rose (poem), Alice Rollit Coe 412 

Lion's Den, In the (Editorial Comment), Chas. F. Lummis 171, 365, 462 

Los Angeles Fiesta, illustrated 565 

Man Who Found His Tombstone, The, illustrated, Sharlot M. Hall 216 

Maxwell Grant, The, illustrated, George Baker Anderson 15 

Maying, Virginia Garland 438 

Missionary. The Passing of a Spanish, illustrated, Millard F. Hudson... 515 

Mittens in His Arizona Tent (story), Iheresa Russell 68 

Mountain Man and the Killer, The (Orleans Indian Legends), Melcena 

Burns Denny 168 

Museum, The Southwest, illustrated, Chas. F. Lummis 389 

Music of March, Virginia Garland •. . 250 

Myra of the Apple Pies (story), Ella Dexter Soule.- 149 

National City, illustrated, Ethel Griffith 473 

Nesting Time (story), Katherine Elspeth Oliver 450 

Nevada Bonanzas of Today, The, illustrated, Willis George Emerson... 103 

New Mexico Baron, A, illustrated, George Baker Anderson 15 

Oceanside. illustrated, W. S. Spencer 91 

Olives and Olive Oil, illustrated, Richard von Heine... 424 



170475 



iv INDEX 

PAGE 

Orleans Indian Legends, Melcena Burns Denny j^i, i68, 267 

Panama Canal. The, illustrated, Tracy Robinson 2"}'] 

Passing of a Spanish Missionary, The, illustrated, Millard F. Hudson.. 515 

Pima-Record Rod, The Story of a, illustrated, Sharlot M. Hall 413 

Pink Trip Slip, A (story), Eugene Manlove'Rhodes 50 

Pioneer (poem), Arthur B. Bennet 364 

Poinsettias (poem), Neeta Marquis 22 

Race for the Sunbeam, The, Pauline W. Worth 161 

Raven of Capistrano, The (A True Wonder Tale), Constance Goddard 

Du Bois 430, 537 

Reconstruction of San Francisco, The, illustrated, Edwin Emerson, Jr. . 191 

Record-Rod, The Story of a Pima, illustrated, Sharlot M. Hall 413 

Redlands — The City Beautiful, illustrated. Lyman M. King 371 

Responsible Government for California, William E. Smythe 456 

Rule-O'Thumb (story), Eugene Manlove Rhodes 552 

Running Water, Virginia Garland 354 

San Fernando, illustrated, S. M. Fairfield 95 

San Francisco, The Reconstruction of, illustrated, Edwin Emerson, Jr... 191 

San Luis Rey Valley, illustrated, W. S. Spencer 91 

Schieffelin, Edward (biographical sketch), illustrated, Sharlot AI. Hall... 216 

Sequoya League, The ; "To Make Better Indians" 180, 469 

Sierras, June Scenes in the High, illustrated 506 

Some Leaves from a California Calendar, Ethel Gi"iffith 

• • 39, 155, 231, 327, 444, 545 

Southwest Chapter, A. I. A., Report of Arizona Expedition, illustrated, 

Chas. F. Lummis 485 

Southwest Museum, The, illustrated, Chas. F. Lummis 389 

Southwest, The Camels in the (A Forgotten Experiment), illustrated, 

Sharlot M. Hall 302 

Spanish Missionary, The Passing of a, illustrated, Millard F. Hudson. . . . 515 

Squatters' League, The Alvarado, illustrated, Charles H. Shinn 23 

Story of a Pima Record-Rod, The, illustrated, Sharlot M. Hall 413 

"Struck It at Last," E. M. Hamilton 146 

Sunset (poem) , Neeta Marquis 72 

Sunset Gun, The (poem) , Eunice Ward 437 

Sunset Sea Moods (poem), Emma Plater Seabury 147 

Swallow's-Nest People, The, illustrated, Chas. F. Lummis 485 

Thompson of Tulare (story), Karl A. Bickel 31 

Tombstone, The Man Who Found His, illustrated, Sharlot M. Hall 216 

Treasure Seeker, The (poem), Kathleen L. Greig 167 

Truth, In Search of, David Starr Jordan 334 

Ubach, Father Antonio F. (biographical sketch), illustrated, Millard F. 

Hudson 515 

West Wind (poem) , Ellsworth Lee 236 

Where Would I Be? (poem), John Vance Cheney 170 

Wild Oats (poem), M. Tingle 523 

Youth in Spring (poem), Neeta Marquis . .' 536 

Copyright 1907 

BV 

Out West Magazine Company 




(alifornirfsi 

ftotel 
The 

(jlenwood 
Riverside 



Triumph 
o/^ Art and Qood Taste 



OUT ¥/EST 

A Maga^pine of the Old Pacific and tine Ne^w 

CHAS. F. LUMMIS ) ^,. 

CHARLES AMADON MOODY \ ^^^^^^-^ 
SHARLOT M. HALL, Associate Editor 



Among thr Stockhoi.dkrs and Contributors ark: 



DAVID STARR JORDAN 

President of Stanford University 
FREDERICK STARR 

Chicag-D University 
THEODORE H. HITTELL 

The Historian of California 
MARY HALLOCK FOOTE 

Author of "Tiie Led-Horse Claim," etc. 
MARGARET COLLIER GRAHAM 

Author of "Stories of the Foothills" 
GRACE ELLERY CHANNING 

Author of "The Sister of a Saint," etc, 
ELLA HIGGINSON 

Author of "A Forest Orchid," etc. 
CHARLES WARREN STODDARD 

The Poet of the South Seas 
INA COOLBRITH 

Author of "Song-8 from the Golden Gate," etc 
EDWIN MARKHAM 

Author of "The Man with the Hoe" 
JOAQUIN -MILLER 

The Poet of the Sierras 
BATTERMAN LINDSAY 

CHARLES FREDERICK HOLDER 

Author of "The Life of Affasstz," etc 
CHAS. DWIGHT WILLARD 

CONSTANCE GODDARD DU BOIS 

Author of "The Shield of the Fleur de Lis" 



WILLIAM E. SMYTHE 

Author of "The Conquest of Arid America," etc 

DR. WASHINGTON MATTHEWS 

Ex-Prest. American Folk-Lore Society 
WILLIAM KEITH 

The Greatest Western Painter 
CHARLES A. KEELER 

LOUISE M. KEELER 

GEO. PARKER WINSHIP 

The Historian of Coronado's Marches 
FREDERICK WEBB HODGE 

of the Smithsonian Institution, Washing-ton 
GEO. HAMLIN FITCH 

Literary Editor S. P. ChronicU 
ALEX. F. HARMER 

CHARLOTTE PERKINS STETSON GILMAN 

Author of "In This Our World" 
CHAS. HOWARD SHINN 

Author of "The Story of the Mine," etc 
T. S, VAN DYKE 

Author of "Rod and Gun in California," etc. 
MARY AUSTIN 

Author of "The Land of Little Rain" 
L. MAYNARD DIXON 

ELIZABETH AND JOSEPH GRINNELL 

Authors of "Our Feathered Friends" 



Contents — Janviary, 1907 

A Christmas at the Grand Canon, illustrated, by Sharlot M. Hall 3 

A New Mexican Baron, illustrated, by George Baker Anderson . 15 

Poinsettias, poem, by Neeta Marquis.' 22 

The Alvarado Squatters' League, illustrated, by Charles H. Shinn 23 

Thompson of Tulare, story, by Karl A. Bickel 31 

Some Leaves fro.m a California Calendar, by Ethel Griffith 39 

Coyote Goes the Sun Road (Klamath Indian Legend), poem, by John Vance Cheney. 49 

A Pink Trip Slip, story, by Eugene Manlove Rhodes 50 

From Fifty Years Ago (concerning Father DeSmet — "The Apostle to the North 

American Indians"), by Alfred Talbot Richardson 56 

Ad Viatores, poem, by Christophei- Stapleton 62 

Chispah, story, by jennet Johnson 63 

Mittens in an Arizona Tent, story, by Theresa Russell 68 

Orleans Indian Legends, by Melcena Burns Denny— VI: The Co3'Ote's Journey to 

the Ocean TZ 

That Which is Written, book reviews, by Charles Amadon Moody 78 

Albuquerque, New Mexico, illustrated 81 

Oceanside and the San Luis Rey Valley, illustrated, by W. S. Spencer gr 

San Fernando, illustrated, by S. M. Fairfield 95 



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Morris H. Wilson & Co., Real Estate, Pacific Electric Building, Los Angeles. 

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OufWcsT 



Vol. XXVI No. 1 



JANUARY, 1907 




'A CHRISTMAS AT THE GRAND CANON. 

By S HARLOT M. HALL. 
T WAS nearing the end of December in a year when the 

Wilderness was still wilderness, as it will never be 

* 

again — when wagon-roads were few and railroads dis- 
2^1 tant and no one stopped to look twice at a line of white- 
covered wagons headed westward. We were but one 
wagon, for we were seekers of other things than the new empires in 
the West. 

We had traveled for days through the largest forest left un- 
touched by ax and saw in the United States — the dark, beautiful 
Mogollon, lonely and unknown on its cliff-walled plateau. Long 
reefs and goirges of lava had turned us aside — lava brown and 
bright as when it flowed out of the earth. There were areas where 
volcanic clinkers and dull-red, sponge-like boulders of pumice half- 
buried in ash barred the way, and miles where a rough coating of 
lime over the broken lava struck fire from the wagon-wheels and 
cut harshly on hoofs and sole-leather. 

Climbing the strange round hills scattered over the plateau beyond 
the San Francisco peaks, like giant bubbles over a pot of mush, we 
had found them to be old vents and craters, some of them holding 
lakes of shining water shadowed by tall pines whose green tops 
never looked over the brown lava rim to the world beyond. Mid- 
afternoon the forest opened, the trees grew smaller, and between the 
gray trunks and low branches we caught glimpses of a dim, many- 
banked cloud across the distant horizon. The sun dropped down 
through the trees ; dusk and twilight and starlight came ; but we 
drove on, for the water-barrels were empty and we must reach the 
"Tanks" — the little rain-filled pools in the rock of the Rim — or make 
a "dry camp" and go thirsty till morning. 

Always the cloud came nearer, its up-piled masses turning to 

Copyright 1907 by Our West Maoazinc Co. All Rights Rcbkrvkd 



4 OUT WEST 

pale vaporous gray and lavender as the moon rose. The wind died 
down and the air had a hush as of waiting. The horses grew un- 
easy, shying and snorting with the instinctive animal sense of some- 
thing unusual ahead ; and, as the wagon stopped and I rode on alone, 
my prairie-bred pony shivered under me and at last refused to move. 

I had been watching the play of light on the many-banked cloud — 
now I looked down. The earth fell away at my feet as if the hemi- 
spheres had parted. Sheer walls of darkness swept down intermin- 
ably till they were lost in the pale-lighted cloud that came up to 
meet them. It was the Canon, veiled and mysterious under the 
night ; the dim, ever-changing cloud bank was the farther wall, fif- 
teen miles away from the southern Rim on which I stood. 

Breakfast was eaten long before the first sunlight began sifting 
down through the tall pines around the camp. The wagon-cover 
was drawn down over the bows at both ends and tied fast ; the 
horses were hobbled and turned loose to take care of themselves, and 
light packs were made up, a blanket and a lunch for each traveler — 
for this was the 24th of December, and Christmas eve was to be 
spent in the bottom of the cafion, as near the river as might be. 

The trail was new, scarcely a well-marked outline much of the 
way, leading down to a lately-discovered copper mine reputed to 
hold great wealth. Pitching headlong over the great clifT-wall of the 
Rim, it crawled along the face of precipices, here and there on a 
roadway of logs held to the rock by long, deep-driven iron bars. At 
the outer edge of this narrow path, unguarded by so much as a blade 
of grass, the walls dropped down till eyes and brain were dizzy with 
the depth. We passed through tunnel-like clefts and hollows in the 
time-worn rock, or went cautiously along the hand-breadth path 
that wound round and round the brink of a great promontory that 
seemed to sway and quiver under our weight as we crossed. 

Far below, so far that he looked no larger than a swallow, a great 
black eagle hung, rocking and dipping idly on his strong wings as 
he looked perhaps for some shy rock-rabbit for his Christmas dinner. 
Lower and lower we passed, by ledge and clifif and gorge, till the 
dwarfed brush that fringed the midway terraces as we had looked 
down became trees, and the little round rabbit-burrows along the 
ledges were revealed as wide-mouthed caves in clififs hundreds ol 
feet high. 

Something more than half way down we came to the mine — a raw 
new hole in the face of the clifif, the little tent of its prospector own- 
ers standing on the dump of waste ore lately taken out. Beyond the 
mine the trail grew constantly dimmer, now a faint thread crossing 
great scarps of sandstone, now lost on a mountain-side of sliding 
shale that rolled and rattled away behind our feet, startling the birds 
and rabbits in the depths below. 




fhoto by C. M. Shaw 



•'Thb Great Cuff Wax.!, ok the Rim" 



6 OUT WEST 

Planting our feet firmly, we slid down slanting cliffs coated deep 
with a beautiful moss in which small starry-white flowers were 
blooming, and dropped into hidden canons where the grass was green 
as spring. The air grew warmer and scarcely stirred by the lightest 
wind. The pines and upland growth gave way ; mesquite and cat- 
claw and cactus sparsely covered the long, desert-like slopes, and 
through the air, so still before, a far, low, throbbing sound came up. 

Nearer and nearer, now loud, now almost lost, the great voice 
called. Around every cliff-turn it seemed to wait, yet hours brought 
it no nearer. We were seven miles from the Rim and more than a 
mile down in the heart of the earth when the rugged, cactus-strewn 




Photo by C. H. Shaw 

'The River Roared its Chali^enge" 



slopes broke away and up the seamed and scarred gray cliffs the 
River roared its challenge. 

We filled our canteens at the water's edge and the dusk was al- 
ready beginning when I stole away to follow the long trail to the 
Rim — alone with the Canon and the night. The others would make 
camp under the cliffs without me and I would be half way to the 
mine before I was missed from the party — too late for following. 

My heart beat fast — not with fear, though there was danger, but 
with pure joy of daring. This night was mine, and the voice of the 
River went with me, singing a great Valhalla chorus flung up the 
mighty walls to the dark, over-leaning forest above. 

Back along the boulder-choked ledges, up over the moss-hung 



. A CHRISTMAS AT THE GRAND CANON 7 

cliffs; now stopping to trace the dim trail; now hurrying where it 
was plainest, for the better-marked way beyond the mine must be 
reached before dark. The loose shale slid away under my feet, but 
always I made the next step just as the path behind slipped down 
and was gone. 

At one narrow turn a boulder, dislodged from above, dropped at 
my feet, rebounded over the edge of the trail, and went crashing 
down the cliffs, sending up a line of sparks and fume of rock-smoke 
at it struck the projecting ledges. Long after the sparks were lost in 
darkness, the muffled thud, thud, came back, as it kept its way to the 
bottom. 




Photo by Clarence M. Shaw 

On the Trail to the River 



The last ray of light went out as I reached the little white tent, 
whbse owners, having "struck it rich," were celebrating Christmas 
in the town, ninety miles away. There should have been a moon just 
past the full, but already heavy clouds were rolling over the Rim, 
filling the Canon with mist and darkness, and the trees were shiv- 
ering in the low, purring wind that goes before a snow-storm. 

There was no turning back. Even in the face of the storm, more 
danger lay below than on the clearer trail above. And there was no 
stopping — the gray pelt of a mountain lion, shot as he leaped through 
the door of the tent, was staked out just beside the entrance — surety 
of no refuge there. I was not seeking refuge; there might be all 
the night-hunters of the Canon, lynx and lion and wild-cat, or some 




15 

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A CHRISTMAS AT THE GRAND CANON 9 

belated bear, abroad on the trail beyond ; but for this night we were 
of one kin. The Irish peasants hold that all the animals of earth 
sing together at midnight of Christmas Eve ; I would hear the hymn 
of my wild brethren and sing with them. The darkness settled down, 
impenetrable to any eyes not born and bred to the night. My feet 
kept the trail I could not see, and remembering the huge precipices 
around which we had wound our way in the morning, where one 
false step would mean death on the ledges a thousand feet below, 
I kept one hand always on the inner wall to guard against mischance. 

Sometimes I stopped and felt the way inch by inch, striking my 
hands on cactus and cat-claw till the fingers were torn and full of 
thorns, or letting my arm swing down over the edge of the trail into 
the black gulf beyond ; but the winter and the storm had harried all 
the smaller skulking things to shelter. The civet cats, the ill-favored 
spotted skunks, the surly gray badgers, were all far back in the 
rock-clefts and only the big, fearless, storm-loving hunters were out 
to share or dispute the trail with me. 

The voice of the river, made resonant by the night and the mist, 
came up to me. A fox barked in the caves and the sound echoed 
back and forth, weirdly multiplied, as if the hymn of the beasts was 
already beginning. Now and again the soft tread of cushioned feet 
seemed to lead or follow, and pebbles rolled down at some light leap 
from ledge to ledge. 

As I reached the great spur, over which the trail skirted the prom- 
ontory, the wind struck full, almost sweeping me over the edge and 
making the big rock hum and sing as if ready to fall. I crept into a 
crevice and held fast ; the clouds were rolled up and flung back and 
the full moon of midnight flooded the Canon. Wall by wall, peak 
by peak, gorge by gorge, the mighty panorama was unfolded. 

I crouched under the sheltering ledge, wrapped in awe and won- 
kier. What other eyes had ever watched through Christmas Eve on 
such a scene! Far away children were sleeping, dreaming of ex- 
pected toys; mothers were putting the last touches to the Christmas 
tree; homes were full of light and mirth. I. alone in the Wilder- 
ness, kept watch with the wild things of earth in their own place. 

And the hymn was coming. Down a dim side-canon a mountain 
lion called to his mate ; the wind caught up the cry and sent it on, 
mingled with the barking of the fox and the croak of a raven blown 
from his tree top. Other sounds drew in. till, with my head bowed 
on the rock, I seemed to hear the great earth-hymn sweeping up- 
ward ; the roar of the stormy forest, the voice of the River, the rush 
of the wind — and, upborne over all, the strange, uncouth, beast-cries 
blended for this one hour in mighty harmony. 

The wonder of it stayed after the wind was still and the Canon 
dark and the snow falling in big noiseless flakes. The towering walls 



lo 



OUT WEST 



seemed to hold the rhythm of that unworded anthem and the far-off 
hurrying water repeated its melody. But the wild hunters, having 
kept their watch with the Night, went back to their lairs, and I 
was alone on the trail. 

As I went on, the wet flakes whirling against my face and the snow 
crunching under my feet recalled the first Christmas I could remem- 
ber — a night not unlike this and in a land only a little less wild. 
Then I had crunched the snow under copper-toed boots and my 
head had brushed the flakes from the low bushes. The trees, inter- 
laced and bending with snow, had made a roof over the little creek 
where we walked on the ice. Far at the end of this low white tunnel 
a light streamed out from the arched openings of the lime-pits full of 




Photo by C. H. Shaw 



A Lava Chimney 



burning logs. Here the soft gray limestone quarried from the hills 
above was being turned into plaster for the rough walls of frontier 
homes — and here I was to find a strange new thing called Christmas. 

Black figures ran in and out in front of the pits, poking the fires 
with long poles and sliding fresh logs into the yawning red mouths. 
Beside one fire they were cooking supper — boiling coffee in an iron 
pot and toasting strips of buffalo-meat on sharp sticks held over 
the coals. 

On a ledge above the pit-mouth was a red apple and a little china 
box with blue bands, and two hands clasped on the lid. That was my 
Christmas ; and, curled in a buffalo-robe behind a pile of logs, I 
watched the leaping flames and marveled at my wealth. The apple 



A CHRISTMAS AT THE GRAND CANON 



A Typical Bit of the Plateau 

was eaten, reluctantly, weeks after when it had begun to wither ; 
but I have the box yet, and in every Christmas fire I see the red 
coals of the lime-pits and the dark figures of the men — and the snow 
and a little, wondering child. 

It was long past midnight when, with slow climbing, I came again 
to the Rim. At the top of the trail the camp lay white and still, the 
sheeted wagon covered with snow. I stood up on the tongue and 
felt for something in the dark — and then laughed ; for the some- 
thing was a knitted stocking of red yarn that a child had hung out 
of the front of a covered wagon years in the past. 

That wagon had stood in a clump of stunted pine trees on the sum- 
mit of the Rocky Mountains. It had left the far-oflF plains months 
before, and doggedly followed the old Santa Fe trail, road of the 
dreamers and Argonauts, through plain and desert and foothills, till 
now, on the very summit of the Great Divide, in a wilderness of 
snow, it stotxi quiet — a camp-fire dying low in front and inside a 
child who dreamed of Santa Claus. 

He was good, the old Saint, who belongs to little Ishmaelites as 
well as to city dwellers. In the morning there was a thick green 



Photo by E. A. Sllker 

Cinder Cones near San Francisco Mountains 
TJiese contain craters of considerable depth 



12 OUT WEST 

book in the red stocking — the songs a man had made as he followed 
the plough and turned the daisies under his share in a land half a 
world away. Songs that the child was to shout from the hill-tops 
of a yet wilder land, with only the herded cattle to hear. 

Christmas morning at the Grand Canon was just an eddy in a 
great white whirlpool of snow. The air was dark with it, falling 
in big, noiseless flakes ; the pines were wreather and hidden in it, 
their long limbs dragged down with the weight. The supple young 
oaks and undergrowth were laid tent-like on the ground, every twig 
pinioned with masses of snow. 

In these low tents the plumed mountain quail huddled in warm, 
twittering coveys, too sleepy and comfortable to fly at the approach 
of footsteps mufi^ed in the snow. The little rock-rabbits sat under 
the boughs and moved their long ears back and forth and opened 
their eyes wide in wonder at the changed world. 

When the camp was stillest the branches of a shaggy cedar parted 
cautiously and great eyes looked out at the tent and the sheeted 
wagon. A deer, a doe with the snow shining along her back and 
nostrils tense with curiosity ready to merge into fear, peered out, 
and behind her two well-grown spring fawns stood amazed at her 
boldness. An incautious movement sent her leaping away, flinging 
the snow from the low branches as she went. 

The snowflakes sputtered and spit as they fell on the big bank of 
coals where the Christmas dinner was presently cooking. A royal 
fireplace, such as Robin Hood might have had in Sherwood Forest, 
and a dinner to match. Little John never dressed finer venison, 
and Friar Tuck turned no spit for bird sugh as ours ; for this kingly 
fellow, who dangled twisting and turning on his length of wire 
from a convenient limb, was a wild turkey— the New World's gift to 
the Christmas tables of the Old. 

The huge bank of sweet cedar-coals over which he hung was kept 
in bound by a dead patriarch who would have been none ashamed 
in Sherwood ; and in the lee of this friendly back-log a haunch of 
venison roasted in a big Dutch oven, ringed round with plump quail, 
each one stuffed full, as was the royal bird himself, with delicate 
pinon nuts. 

We had gathered them a few days before, beating the little nuts 
out of the brown cones, to the cheating of our wild comrades — the 
ravens and the big, scolding, crested blue-jays — and scattered over 
the white fat of the haunch was a toss of wild marjoram, another 
gift of the forest to our feast. 

Robin Hood never tasted such delight, even in raiding the good 
abbott's luncheon panniers, as the potatoes baked in hot cedar ashes 
till their brown hides were ready to burst ; and Friar Tuck knv v no 



A CHRISTMAS AT THE GRAND CANON 13 

such delectable stuffing for pious ribs as yellow yams cooked in a 
frying pan under the dripping breast, of a pinon-filled wild turkey. 

Dinner was done to a turn when our belated river party tramped 
in with good will to do it justice. It began with a soup of plump 
young rock-rabbits stewed to jelly, with toasted pinon-nuts dropped 
in at the last moment. And it ended, not with wine and black coflfee, 
but with fragrant, amber-green tea brewed from a shrub whose 
clumps hung over the brink of the Cafion. A sovereign drink the 
herb-wise pioneers held this tea, and rarely good we found it, though 
it was known only by an Indian name. 

It was lucky for our own hungry party that the turkey was re- 
duced to a heap of bones and the haunch shorn of its juciest morsels 




Photo by Clarence M. Shaw 
Old Cypress Near Camp on River 



when the pad of unshod hoofs on the snow warned us that we were 
not -to be without Christmas guests — unbidden but willing feasters. 
The first breath of a camp fire that taints the wind takes an un- 
worded invitation to every brown son of the Wilderness within a 
day's ride ; and soon a circle of winter-pinched, cat-hammed ponies 
stood around the camp, humped up in comfortless knots with their 
heads drooping toward the fire around which their owners squatted 
cheerfully and made quick end of our Christmas dinner. 

After they had done, to scraping the last pot and wiping the last 
dish, we heaped the fire with dry cedar-logs and pelted it with pine 
cones that sent up long, popping trails of sparks, while our guests 
cleared away a circle of snow, spread a bid red-and-black Navajo 



H 



OUT WEST 




The Indian Gamblers 



blanket on the ground, and gambled with cards made of buckskin, 
on which the figures were rudely drawn and colored. 

At midnight, when belts and buckles of hammered silver and but- 
tons of silver coin, and even blankets and shirts, had changed own- 
ers many times over, they put away the cards, and, rolled in the gay 
blankets, slept around the fire, while the ponies waited with heads 
drooping lower and tower. Perhaps in their dreams they thanked the 
"white man's big medicine day" for a good feed, or reckoned the 
chances for breakfast. 

For me the Christmas night went out with another watch alone on 
the brink of the Caiion. A white, silent hour when the air seemed 
full of whispering voices; not the wild hymn of the beasts, but that 
greater call of the Unknown that has haunted the hearts of men in 
City and Wilderness alike since that mighty gorge below was no 
more than a hand-breadth trail through the forest. 

Dewey, Arizona. 





'a new MEXICO BARON. 

By GliORGli BAKER ANDERSON. 
URIXG the first half of the seventeenth century, when the 
island of Manhattan was for the most part virgin wild- 
erness, and before even the far-seeing British govern- 
ment considered the lands bordering upon the now his- 
toric Hudson as worthy of the stretching out of a hand, 
the government of the Netherlands — equally indifferent as to what 
became of the wild country to the north, fit only for fur-trading 
operations, as it believed — granted to one of its subjects a large 
tract of land bordering upon that river, conferring upon him prac- 
tically sovereign rights therein. Thus did Killaen Van Rensselaer, 
a wealthy diamond merchant of Amsterdam, become the first "pat- 
roon" of the "Manor of Rensselaerwyck," a vaguely described body 
of land embracing somewhere in the neighborhood of a thousand 
square miles. 

While the Manor of Rensselaerwyck was to all intents and pur- 
poses essentially a feudal estate, as much so as a European barony 
of that day, Van Rensselaer, the patroon, or lord, never saw it, but 
continued to live in civilized luxury in his home in the Netherlands, 
leaving the administration of this estate to his agents, and finally to 
those who became his heirs. Other manors were founded — in New 
York, in Pennsylvania and in New Jersey — but Rensselaerwyck 
was the only one which endured, even throughout the long period 
elapsing between the time of the British occupation of New Amster- 
dam, or Marjiattan, and the years immediately preceding the Revo- 
lution. 

From the days when the Manor of Rensselaerwyck flourished up 
to the closing years of the Mexican occupation and control of what 
is now the American Territory of New Mexico — a period covering 
about two centuries — further attempts at planting and, w'ith a legal 
status, maintaining quasi-feudal estates were signalized, for the most 
part, by dismal failure. It remained for Lucien Benjamin Maxwell, 
a native of Kaskaskia, 111., and one of the most striking figures of 
the early mountain frontier, to found a successful American barony. 
This was the famous "Maxwell ranch," or Maxwell Land Grant, as 
it is more commonly known in these days, a body of land, which, 
under the shrewd manipulation of capitalists and politicians, grew in 
one generation from a relatively insignificant tract, located princi- 
pally on the plains bordering upon the Red River in Northern New 
Mexico, to an estate equal in extent to something less than three 
times the area of Rhode Island. The original grant was limited by 
law to twenty-two square leagues, but in the documents giving judi- 
cial possession the Alcalde described boundaries which included over 
four hundred square leagues. Within this principality were included 



i6 OUT WEST 

between three and four hundred thousand acres of rich coal lands — 
the greatest unbroken body of that mineral in the United States. 

In 1823, Charles Hipolyte Beaubien, a French-Canadian, visitea 
the province of Nueva Mejico, in company with a number of his 
fellow-countrymen, in the expectation that he might find an oppor- 
tunity of investing his money with better prospects of profit than the 
East afforded. About that time Guadalupe Miranda, of Juarez, then 
known as "Paso del Norte," Mexico, received from the generous 
paternal Republic of Mexico a grant to a tract lying in the southern 
part of what is now Colfax county, New Mexico. Beaubien and 
Miranda entered into a partnership for the operation of the priv- 
ileges accompanying this grant, the former finally purchasing of 
Miranda his interest therein, holding the entire property unttil 1846. 
In the latter year Beaubien removed from Taos, which had been his 
home for twenty-three years, to the Cimarroncito, and found Max- 
well located a short distance north of the famous Abreu ranch, where 
a company of United States regulars were stationed for the pro- 
tection of traffic over the S"anta Fe trail. 

At this time Maxwell was herding sheep in a primitive way. 
About one hundred and fifty yards south of his rude adobe hut 
stood a house built by Kit Carson, and then occupied by him. The 
two men, having much in common^both lovers of the free, ad- 
venturous life which the mountains offered — soon became fast 
friends, and remained so until death separated them. Maxwell's 
sheep multiplied, and as the years rolled by his wealth increased so 
rapidly that, in spite of his profligacy, he could not rid himself of the 
burden it seemed to impose. He tried gambling, but, although it is 
said that he never "stacked the cards," his poker-playing served onl}' 
to add to his accumulation of treasure. 

At this time the whole region between "El Pueblo," in Colorado, 
and Fernando de Taos, in New Mexico, was almost unknown — cer- 
tainly unexplored, excepting those portions traversed by the few 
traders traveling between Santa Fe and the Missouri river. But 
every trader, every majordomo, every teamster, every soldier who 
passed over this part of the trail knew Maxwell, and most of them 
were known to him by name. 

Charles Beaubien died February 10, 1864, and Maxwell pur- 
chased the grant from the heirs, becoming, its sole proprietor, All 
restrictions as to the grazing of sheep now being removed, his wealth 
increased at a still greater rate. He had built for himself a great 
house at Cimarron, and here he continued to entertain in lavish style 
all comers — and there were many. During the height of his power 
and wealth he lived in barbaric splendor. He lived for the sheer 
pleasure of living, in utter disregard of the expense of the necessities 
and luxuries of life. Under his indifferent direction, thousands of 



A NEW MEXICO BARON 



17 




Chari<bs H. Trotikr-Beaubien, Original Owner of the 

"Maxwell Grant" 

From an Oil Painting Owned by His Daughter, Mrs. Pitra B. Abreu, Rayado, New Mexico 

acres of his grant were cultivated in a most primative fashion by 
native Mexicans, who, though as completely enslaved as the vassals 
of the ancient Goths and Saxons, were nevertheless kindly treated. 
His word was absolute law with them. They loved their master 
as a friend and kindly adviser, and never appealed to him for amel- 
ioration of their condition in vain — provided the lord of the domain 
did not shrewdly suspect them of misrepresentation. 

Maxwell's home at Cimarron, which is still standing, was as much 
of a palace as the time and the country afforded. Some of its apart- 
ments were most sumptuously furnished, after the prevailing Mex- 
ican style, while others were devoid of everything but table, chairs 



i8 



OUT IV a S T 



and cards for poker or "old sledge." He was an inveterate gambler. 
On occasions when his winnings were heavy, he would sometimes 
lend to the winner, the next morning, two or three times as much 
as he had won from him. Though he played for amusement only, 
and never with any whom he did not number among his personal 
friends, he always insisted upon a stake. Many men who were widely 
known throughout the Southwest in those days were his guests, and 
most of them had cause to remember his prowess at the game of 
"draw." Kit Carson, ex-Governor Thomas Boggs, Richens (Uncle 
Dick) Wootton, Don Jesus Abreu, Colonel Ceran St. Vrain and 
other men whose names are well known in the pioneer history of the 
Santa Fe trail made his home a rendezvous for years. He was a 
great lover of horses and not infrequently made enormous wagers 
on the results of races. He owned some of the most finely bred and 





















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:'*.*ff-^; 














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"^  , 












kk 


- 




11 






Mm 


'-jf 


^ 

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I 












- 













Maxweli/S Home at Cimarron 



fleetest horses in the West, and reposed unlimited confidence in their 
ability to win. At one time he caused to be inserted in the Kansas 
City newspapers advertisements calling attention to the virtues of 
one of his pet racers named "Fly," olTering to wager many thou- 
sands of dollars that she could win over any other race-horse in the 
United States. At this time Maxwell was president of a bank which 
he had established in Santa Fe. A waggish Kansas City banker cut 
out this advertisement, pasted it on a letter-head of Maxwell's bank, 
and writing beneath it the words, "Banking in New Mexico," hung 
it in a conspicuous place in the lobby of the Missouri institution. 

The rooms devoted to the culinary department of Maxwell's great 
house — the kitchen and two dining-rooms, one for the men and one 
for the women — were detached from the main residence. Men who 
visited him rarely saw women about the house. "Only the quick 



A NEW MEXICO BARON 



'9 




LuciEN Bbnjamin Maxwell 



rustle of a skirt, a hurried view of a rebosa, as its wearer, evanescent 
as the Hghtning, flashed for an instant before some window or half- 
opened door, told of their presence," wrote one of his guests in later 
years. His table service was for the most part of solid silver. Cov- 
ers were daily laid for more than two dozen persons, and vacant 
chairs were seldom to be seen. In addition to his invited guests, 
many forced themselves upon him as the result of his widely ad- 
vertised hospitality to all comers ; others came to him through ne- 
cessity, as the result of the location of his home on the main line of 
travel into the territory, at the point where the ascent of the moun- 
tain range to the west began. Coach-loads of passengers were fre- 
quently flood-bound at the ford in the Cimarron at that point and 
compelled to remain at his home until the subsiding waters permitted 
a continuance of the journey. 



2c OUT WEST 

Maxwell invariably kept a large amount of money— from twentv- 
five to fifty thousand dollars, usually in gold and silver coin — in an 
old bureau standing in the main room of his house. The drawers 
were never locked, and no precautions for its protection were ever 
taken. This money was the proceeds of the sales of his sheep, cattle 
and grain, principally to the army, at figures which would stagger 
a purchaser today. For years he made no effort to keep track of the 
number of his sheep nor of the amount of his wool clip. 

When this American lord was not at home entertaining his friends, 
he was visiting others. He loved to travel in state. He owned al- 
most every conceivable style of vehicle, but on his longer journeys, as 
when going to Taos, Santa Fe or Las Vegas, he usually traveled in 
a great thorough-brace Concord coach drawn by six or eight horses. 
Men who are living today and who accompanied him on some of these 
journeys say that he made it a rule to take small arroyos and irri- 
gating ditches at a gallop, regardless of the consequences to his 
equipage, his guests or himself. 

One instance will serve to illustrate Maxwell's nerve. On Julv 4, 
1867, ^^ caused to. be hauled from its place under the cotton wood 
trees that fringed his home an ancient howitzer which had lain there 
since the day the valiant General Don Manuel Armijo learned of the 
approach of Kearney's army. With the assistance of a captain in the 
regular army stationed at the barracks near by, he loaded this gun 
two thirds of the way to the muzzle and prepared for a grand salute 
in honor of the nation's birthday. A premature discharge followed, 
blowing away the captain's arm, destroying his eye and shattering 
Maxwell's thumb. A soldier was at once ordered to Fort Union, 
at a distance of nearly sixty miles, which he covered in four hours, 
his horse, the fleetest in Maxwell's stables, dropping dead as the 
rider alighted at the fort. The surgeon arrived at Cimarron in time 
to save the captain's life, and dressed Maxwell's thumb. A few days 
later, the latter, accompanied by Kit Carson, traveled to the fort to 
ask the surgeon to amputate the thumb, which was causing Max- 
well great suffering. Declining anaesthetics in any form, he main- 
tained an apparently stolid indifference to the great pain resulting 
from the operation ; then, just after the ligatures had been tied, as 
Carson placed a glass of whisky to his lips, he fainted. 

A few weeks after this disastrous celebration, gold was discovered 
near the head of Cimarron canon, near the site of the present town of 
Elizabethtown. The announcement was naturally followed by a 
great influx of fortune-hunters and adventurers from all parts of the 
country, and by scientific prospecting by representatives of capital. 
The discovery of the precious metal in easily worked placer-fields 
marked the beginning of the end of Maxwell's baronial reign. 
Feeling secure in his possession of the grant, a region of vaster ex- 



A NEW MEXICO BARON 21 

tent than some of the kingdoms of Europe, and anticipating untold 
wealth from the development of the mining properties at the base of 
Mount Baldy, he spent a fortune in the construction of a ditch forty 
miles long, extending from the source of the Red River to the new 
placer diggings. But this undertaking was a stupendous failure, the 
water entering the ditch at its head being lost by evaporation and 
seepage before it reached the proposed field of operations. Realiz- 
ing the fact that his title to this "addition" to his grant could find 
no status in the law, however valid the original grant might be, Max- 
well endeavored to keep the news of the discovery of gold from 
obtaining too wide a circulation. But he might as well have at- 
tempted to stay a whirlwind. Litigation to determine titles to the 
squatters' claims followed, and in order to save what he might from 
his now decaying fortune, he sold his title to the grant to an Eng- 
lish syndicate for a million and a quarter dollars, through the agency 
of Wilson Waddingham, David H. MolTatt and J. B. Chaffee. These 
men retained six hundred thousand dollars for their services, turn- 
ing the remainder over to the former proprietor. 

The deposed "monarch of all he surveyed," whose right there had 
been none to dispute until 1867, was in a state of perplexity as to 
what he should do with all this money. But he soon found plenty of 
advisers, and, at the behest of men in whom he had confidence, he in- 
vested something like a quarter of a million in the bonds of the first 
corporation formed for the construction of the Texas Pacfic rail- 
road, which proved a complete loss. In 1870 other advisers sug- 
gested to him that it would be profitable to establish a band in Santa 
Fe, inasmuch as there was at that time no banking house in either 
New Mexico or Arizona. The idea appealed to him, and he applied 
for a charter, with a capital of one hundred and fifty thousands dol- 
lars, furfiishing all the money himself and generously dividing ten 
shares among" a sufficient number of his friends to constitute the di- 
rectory required by the federal banking law. Thus was the First 
National Bank of Santa Fe founded in December. 1870. The orig- 
inal stock-certificates of this bank were unique in one respect, bearing 
a vignette of Maxwell with a cigar in his mouth. So great was his 
confidence in his friends that he signed in blank more than a hun- 
dred of these stock-certificates, in order that their anticipated sale 
might not interfere with his pursuit of pleasure in other haunts. 

Lucien Maxwell was a man of unbounded generosity, and pos- 
sessed unlimited confidence in those in whom he trusted at all. His 
charities must have amounted to a considerable fortune. John Bur- 
roughs has aptly described certain frontier characters as "wild civ- 
ilized men." The term fits Maxwell. He was one of the best repre- 
sentatives of the undefiled frontier, before the days of the "bad man ;" 
a type which passed with the extinction of the frontier in its original 



22 our WEST 

purity. He was eccentric, improvident in the extreme, liberal to a 
degree that was widely remarked even in those days of extreme lib- 
erality and good-fellowship, a man who was a constant marvel among 
his fellows. Those who knew him best — Carson, St. Vrain, Beau- 
bien, the Abreus, Scheiirich, Pley and a multitude of American 
traders and native Mexicans — found in him an object of undying 
affection. The solitude of the mountains and the remoteness from 
scenes of civilization infatuated him. His love for the wild was 
unconquerable. Though rough in manner, and quick to resent the 
slightest interference with what he regarded as his sovereign rights, 
there was nothing of the desperado about him. Nor was there in 
his make-up the slightest tinge of bravado. 

Maxwell's wife was Luz Beaubien, a daughter of one of the orig- 
inal proprietors of his grant. Three of their nine children are liv- 
ing. The last years of his life were spent at Fort Sumner, where 
he died in comparative poverty July 25, 1875. Strange as it may 
seem, there is in existence no monument to the memory of this most 
striking figure of the mountain frontier period ; nor to the memory 
of his chief friend and companion, Christopher Carson — two of the 
really big landmarks of the romantic period in the history of New 
Mexico. • 

Los Angeles. 



POINSETTIAS 

By NEETA MARQUIS 
^ LORES de la noche hiiena burn against the southern wall 
In a blaze of splendid color — radiant lamps on standards tall, 
Lighted by December's fingers for the Christmas festival. 

When the holy feast is over, still their tapers red will glow 
High upon the season's altar, while the days are chanting slow 
Masses for the passing spirit of the old year lying low. 

Flores de la nochc biicna — once again their torches clear 

Swing in welcome, when the mourning yields its place to coming 

cheer, 
For with gorgeous, proud paradings they will hail the new-crowned 

year. 
Los Angeles. 



"Fiores de la noche bueiia"— "Flowers of the Holy Night," so called in Mexico be- 
cause they bloom at Christmas time. 




THE ALVARADO SQUATTERS' LEAGUE. 23 
The ALVARADO SQUATTERS LEAGUH 

By CHARLES H. SHINN. 
jLVARADO Valley, with its great Spanish ranches and 
its idle emharcaderos along the shore of San Francisco 
Bay, where boats from Yerba Buena had often lain to 
load with hides and tallow from the far-off Mission 
herds, was waking into busy life after almost a hun- 
dred years of Spanish rule. It was the "golden prime of '49" in 
newly-conquered California, and one of the routes to the placers led 
across the wide pastures of Alvarado. 

Hence Captain Larkin ran a little stern-wheel steam-boat three 
times a week from that young giant of masculine cities, San Fran- 
cisco, up Alameda Creek to the hopeful new metropolis of Union 
City in the willow-swamps at the edge of salt water. The newspaper 
announcements, in which Captain Larkin took much pride, and for 
which he weekly paid the proprietors of the Alta California twenty 
dollars in gold, stated that the "new, fast and commodious California 
Queen connects at Union City with tri-weekly stages for Stockton, 
San Andreas, and the southern placers. Meals on board, $3.00." 

When the struggling little stern-wheeler came slowly up to the 
wharf, in front of the warehouse, dwelling, blacksmith-shop and 
store which constituted Union City on that June morning in 1849 
when this simple narrative begins, the stage was quickly filled with 
eager gold-seekers anxious to begin their long .land-journey across 
the San Joaquin and to the Sierra foothills. One young man, how- 
ever, shouldered his blankets and struck out into the valley, where at 
a few scattered points the smoke from pioneer cabins showed that 
Americans were taking* possession — hoping to secure homesteads 
later when the courts could pass upon the many, obscure and con- 
flicting land-titles then in existence. 

Young James Lindley had expected to seek his fortunes in the 
mines, but he was one of the few Californian pioneers who recog- 
nized the dangers and hazards of gold-seeking, and, as it happened 
he had met a prominent man in San Francisco, Samuel Brannan, 
who advised him to try farming in Alvarado Valley and gave him 
letters to several of the settlers. There seemed to be something 
curious about it, however, for outspoken Captain Larkin, who asked 
about everyone's plans, had said to Lindley: "Letters from Sam 
Brannan ? Then you want to hunt up the Mormon settlement. But 
you look too good a fellow to belong to that crowd." 

"I am not a Mormon. Far from it. But I had a letter from my 
uncle who knew Brannan long ago, and does not think the persecu- 
tion of the Mormons is justified, and Brannan thought I would do 
well in this region." 

"Then he expects to rope you in later, young man. The Mormons 



24 



OUT WEST 



are doing all they can to capture this country. Their old chaplain 
on the Brooklyn and ten more of the gang have some of the best 
lands. One of them has sold $150,000 worth of garden truck and 
vegetables to the miners. Yet ! you can look surprised, but it is a 
fact. Forty dollars for each sack of potatoes that Mormon was 
paid, on the ground, and five dollars for each cabbage head ! Now 
he is taking up all the land he can fence in. His teams go off in the 
Santa Cruz Mountains and haul fence-posts and rails nearly fifty 
miles. Old J. M. Jones is as much of a driver as any Connecticut 
man." 

"Well, I have a letter to him." 

"Go ahead !" said Larkin. "Go ahead and see what he says to 
you." 




On Alameda Creek, Near the Hills 



Lindley walked through the willows crossed by a "corduroy road" 
— logs laid in the mud. He reached the rich levels of the great al- 
luvial valley bounded by blue mountains ; before long he saw that 
there was indeed room, and to spare. A pioneer whom he met told 
him that about twenty-five American families had come in within 
eighteen months to take possession of a territory fifteen miles square. 
The old Spanish ranch-owners did not give any trouble ; their herds 
were mostly sold off or stolen, anyhow, and they were fencing small 
tracts to save a little land. 

"Evidently," said Lindley, "one does not buy land here. How, 
then, does he acquire that useful article?" 

"He settles on any open place that no one else claims ; goes into 
the willows and cuts brush, fences his field, builds a shack, dickers 



THE ALVARADO SQUATTERS' LEAGUE. 25 

with a Mexican for a pair of mustangs, and Captain Larkin gives 
him a plow and harness on credit. Then he breaks them mustangs, 
which is no joke ; and when it rains, he sticks in some potatoes." 

"It sounds easy," said Lindley. 

"Never was such farming in America," said the pioneer, laugh- 
ing. Kelsay sowed his potato-slices broadcast as he rode over the 
field on a box tied on his harrow — and the crop paid him enough to 
have bought a good farm in Illinois. Simm. the blacksmith, sold the 
grapes from one vine that the Mexicans had planted on the ranch he 
took up, for a hunderd and fifty dollars." 

"Where did the Mexican come in?" asked Lindley. 

"He gets good wages, four and five dollars a day whenever he 
wants to work. The Mexicans never had so good a time in their 
lives. Up at the Mission San Jose, yonder against the hills, a sleepy 




From an Old Print 

Monterey as Douglass, the Scotch Botanist, Knew it 

little place without even a store when I came here a year ago, they 
have a regular fandango every night. If you settle down here, you'll 
find out pretty soon how wuthless them Mexicans are." 

Lindley went on, with rather mixed feelings. This did not ex- 
actly square with his bringing up. He had read of the Missions, the 
priests and the Indians. The system, he knew, had passed away with 
the dominion of Mexico, but surely some equities remained. He 
reached the Jones farm by nightfall, and was taken around the 
valley, shown rich land, and oflfcred help to fence in a claim. 

"Whose was this before the Americans came?" he asked Jones. 

"It must have been part of the Alviso grant of fifteen square 
leagues, but none of it was even fenced, and much of it was never 
used. His title should not hold in the courts." 

"Why not buy it from him to begin with? I have a little money. 
What would he ask for a quarter-section?" 



26 



OUT WEST 



"If you buy it, you will have trouble with the Squatters' League. 
I don't say you are wrong, but you are certainly foolish. Alviso is 
living on a square mile out in the middle of the valley, and the set- 
tlers agreed among themselves to protect him in its possession and 
to shoot anyone who files on any of it. But he doesn't even plow his 
farm. They say it is mortgaged already. Half the Indians in the 
valley are down there." 

"Lend me a horse, Mr. Jones, and I'll go down and see Alviso.'.' 
"All right, young man. I like to observe the decay of the east- 
ern conscience out here. I have seen several that started in as yours 
does. Mine was something of the same kind when I had no money, 
but now that I am rich it doesn't trouble me. Still, when you see 
Don Francisco, tell him that if prices for produce keep up for a year 
or so, I'll buy a quit-claim deed from him. 




From an Old Print 
Monterey as Langsdorf and Rezanoff Saw it 



Don Francisco's home was a collection of adobe houses and huts. 
His numerous retainers, servants and dependents of every sort made 
up a patriarchal family of nearly a hundred men, women and chil- 
dren, to whom the old Spaniard was like a feudal chief. Every- 
where Lindley saw waste, confusion, ignorance and general dis- 
couragement ; but he saw close fellowship, courtesy and endurance. 
When he met the stately old man his heart went out to him, and fol- 
lowing his first impulse, he said : 

"Don Francisco, I have a little money, and I wish to buy a piece 
of your land six miles from here, near the mountain." 

"I cannot give you possession of any of my land in these days, but 
I thank you for coming to see me." 

"I will take possession myself, if the land is vacant when I re- 



THE ALVARADO SQUATTERS' LEAGUE. 27 

turn. Give me your own writing that the land is mine. That will 
satisfy me." 

"You may have to pay again for the land. 1 do not know. At 
least you will have trouble about it." 

"Then I shall defend myself, of course. lUit my fear is that I 
cannot pay your price." 

"What land do you want ?" 

"It is near yonder canon. There are oak trees and a spring there." 

"Yes. I know that place. I used to shoot elk at the spring, thirty 
years ago. My wife camped there with me, sometimes. Give me 
the money you have brought — I do not ask how much it is, nor care 
how little. Take the spring, and take as many acres as the American 




From an Old Triiit 

One Method ok Bear-Hunting in the Old Alviso Days 

laws will enable you to hold. Stay and break bread with me. No 
one else has come to me as you have." 

Lindley could hardly control his voice as he thanked the old Span- 
ish pioneer, and laid his little pile of money, less than three hundred 
dollars, upon the table between them. Don Francisco called in a 
servant, gave him the money and bade him see that extra supplies 
were served out. "Tell my people," he continued, "that this cabaJ- 
lero is my American friend. He has bought the Spring of the Elks, 
and he is a good man." 

Lindley returned v.ith his bill of sale, went on the land with Mr. 
Jones, and began to build a cabin. In a few days, a crowd of 
settlers called upon him. 

"We hear," they said, "that you have paid old Alviso for the land. 
Is that so?" 

"Yes." 

"Then you don't belong here; you are altogether too particular 



28 OUT WEST 

for this region. We meant to run you out, but Jones and the Mor 
mons say they won't have it. Jones tells us, too, that if you are 
busted he will pay your squatter's tax this year. Seems to have 
adopted you." 

"I don't believe you can get this land," said Lindley, "unless you 
kill me first. But what is this 'squatter's tax' you mention?" 

"We pay a dollar an acre as a fund. We may have to hire some 
big lawyers after a while." 

Lindley felt like asking him how many times this tax would have 
to be collected, and if it would not be much cheaper to buy the 
Alviso title, but he saw the settlers were not in a mood to listen to 
any argument. He urged them to wait a few days, and give him 
time to talk with Mr. Jones, as he did not like to incur obligations, 
and certainly he could not himself pay the squatter's tax. 




A Misty Morning in the Alvarado Valley 



"All right," they answered, "we can wait a week, but you will 
have to join the League and pay your assessment." 

"Will you protect my land till then? I may have to go to San 
Francisco first." 

"Yes, your claim will not be jumped." And the leader wrote his 
own name across the notice which Lindley had posted in accordance 
with the custom. Then they rode off, feeling certain that the "ten- 
der-hearted Yankee," as they had called him, would find discretion 
the better counselor. 

But Lindley had seen as in a flash the line of safety, and he went 
to San Francisco on the California Queen the next day to see Sam 
Brannan. 

"I believe you are right," said that keen-witted organizer of great 
enterprises. "A month ago I would not have helped you, but now 



THE ALVARADO SQUATTERS' LEAGUE. 29 

I can, and will. We planned before 1845 to plant Mormon colonies 
on the Pacific Coast, hold the harbors and extend the Kingdom of 
Deseret to the ocean. The gold discovery, bringing in thousands 
of strangers, set back our plans, but still we have growing colonies 
in several of the richer valleys, and I had hopes of success, since our 
Mormon workers have made millions in the mines to use in future 
colonization when the gold fever burns out. But now come orders, 
from the Prophet himself, to give up the whole plan, and release 
our colonists from their secret pledges. 

"It destroys the work of three or four years; it sets Mormonism 
back a half-century or more. Perhaps the cause will never recover 
from this failure to control California. But we are bound to obey 
the Prophet. 

"The bearing this has on your case is very plain. Carry this 
letter to Jones, who is the leader of the Mormons in Alvarado Valley. 
He can now take from the funds restored to his private use enough 
to purchase from Alviso the lands on which the Mormon families 
have settled. You can act as agent, since Alviso has confidence in 
you. If these ten influential members of the Squatters' League buy 
their claims and hang together, as they will, there will be no more 
talk of forced assessments or of driving you out. The rest of the 
squatters will of course continue to pay lawyers' fees, and in the 
end they will pay more than you have. * 

Jones and his neighbors found it easy to buy their lands from 
Alviso at about one-fifth of their market value, and when at the end 
of the week the Squatters' League descended on Lindley's cabin, 
meeting with his polite refusal to pay any assessments, the storm 
broke loose. 

Instantly the League split asunder into two groups of men, some 
with hands on weapons, and all excited or angry. Little by little 
Jones obtained a hearing, and put the case before them. 

"Now, fellow-citizens, you know I have always said that we were 
not treating Alviso right, or as we would like to be treated ourselves. 
But I could not do anything about it, for most of my money was 
tied up in the mines at Mormon Island. I have it back now, and I 
made a little settlement with Alviso. just as you have heard. It is 
a good thing to settle so cheap, and I can lend the money to any one 
who needs it. 

"If you take me up, there is no more need of a Squatters' League, 
but we ought to reorganize as a Land League of American Settlers, 
for we want surveyors, we want to fight the two or three other and 
fraudulent Spanish grant claims which still cloud titles in several 
parts of the valley, and we have had several cases of fences being 
burned and cabins burned while the owners were away." 

Thus the tide turned, and one after another the settlers joined the 
new organization, strengthening it in time until it became a power 
in county and state politics. They sent Lindley to the Legislature, 
a few vears later, and he had every Spanish vote in the district. 

Niles' Cal. 




THOMPSON OF TULARE 31 

THOMPSON or TULARE. 

By KARL A. BltKHL. 
ILENT" JIM McGAVIN, state boss, sat before a table 
littered with old newspapers, cigar boxes, a few vol- 
umes of the California Political Code and the 1903 
Blue Book, in his room in the Hornblower headquarters 
in the convention hall, silently figuring over a roll-call. 
His coat was off and his Panama hat was tilted far back, framing 
his wide forehead, aggressive nose and square-QUt, decided jaw. His 
thin lips were closed over his cigar, at which he was taking heavy, 
intermittent puffs. McGavin's sharp grey eyes traveled up and 
down the pages of the "call" for several moments. Then he sud- 
denly threw the paper on the table before him, and leaning over it, 
he quickly cast up a long line of figures, staring at the result. He 
scowled with disappointment, and with an angry fling threw the 
pamphlet to the floor. 

The only other occupant of the room was a younger man who 
watched the actions of the elder with interest from the other side of 
the table. McGavin turned toward hinj suddenly. 

"Thompson," he said, "I'm going to give you the chance of your 
life. You know how things are running out there. If Kendricks 
can hold that convention for another ten hours Hornblower is beat. 
That means investigating committees, railroad commissions and a 
good many other pious grafts the party can't stand just now. What 
happened to poor Ben Butler back in St. Louis won't be a circum- 
stance to what would happen here if that gang is turned loose in 
Sacramento. • 

"Bill," and the speaker turned half-way over the table in his ex- 
cited earnestness, "Kendricks must be beat. Four delegates will 
do the work Bill — and it's up to you to get those men. You can do 
it, Thompson, and no other man can. There wasn't a man in Cali- 
fornia that could have landed those votes for the sea-wall act last 
winter but you, and you've got to turn the trick again." 

The speaker got out of his chair and walked around the table to 
where the young man sat. He laid his hand on the younger man's 
shoulder, and, throwing into his voice all the wonderful chann and 
magnetism that had made him the success he was in politics, he said : 
"Tommy, you want to go to Washington next year for the Eighth. 
No matter how I found it out, you want to go. Nomination from 
this party in the Eighth means election. Now li.sten. Tommy ! You 
find four votes for Hornblower between now and adjournment to- 
night, and the nomination in the Eighth is yours." 

The elder man ceased speaking, and for a moment the room was 
silent. Thompson had settled deep into his chair, his hand over his 
forehead and eves. For a moment he did not move, and then he sud- 



32 OUT WEST 

denly arose and pushed back the chair. There was a striking contrast 
between the two men as they stood facing each other in the bare, 
silent room. 

McGavin was nearly sixty, with a short, stocky frame ; his hair 
grey and grizzled, and his heavy moustache streaked with white. 
His pale green eyes were deep set under snow-crusted cavernous 
brows. His clothes fitted him finely and were modish in cut ; his vest 
a magnificent spread of white, across which the sparkling links of 
his gold watch-chain gleamed. 

Thompson was fully thirty years younger — fair, slight, and with 
a drooping moustache. The hint of flashiness in his clothes sug- 
gested a college training. His jaw was a bit weak, and the lines of 
his lips wavered uncertainly between strength and timidity. 

His lips moved stiffly enough, now, however, and the words 
dropped clear and distinct. 

"Porter wants the Eighth, Jim," he said, "and he told me you had 
promised it to him. Besides it's a mighty big contract." 

"I know it's a big contract," answered McGavin. "That's why 
I called on you. I can fix Porter all right. He'd rather be on the 
Board of Equalization, anyhow. The railroad assessment comes up 
for revision, you know. That's worth a house and lot to any piker, 
and Porter's no fool." Thompson stood silent for a moment, drum- 
ming his fingers on the table edge. 

"All right, McGavin," he said finally. "Fll do my best, but don't 
say anything to Porter yet. Perhaps Pd rather go on the Board 
myself." 

He stepped to the door and turned the handle. "I won't see you 
again until it's all over. If I make good, you will hear about it all 
right." With that he opened the door and left the room. He hur- 
ried along the narrow corridor that led to the gallery overlooking 
the convention hall. It was almost six o'clock, and the delegates 
were pushing out of the big building and hurrying away to dinner. 

Thompson stopped for a moment and looked down upon the strug- 
gling mob of black forms forcing their way to the exits. They had 
overflowed the aisles and were crawling and jumping over the chairs 
in their hungry haste to reach the crowded hotels and cafes outside. 

"Fools," he muttered, and then turned toward the stairs. A mo- 
ment later he was at the secretary's desk. 

"Where can I find Kelly?" he inquired. "John Kelly of the Tu- 
lare County delegation." The official looked through his list. "Tu- 
lare is at the St. George," he answered wearily. "Kelly is on the 
platform and resolutions committee, but you'll find him there for 
dinner. The committee won't report until this cursed fight is over." 
The assistant jumped down from the platform and walked up the 
aisle with the questioner. 



THOMPSON OF TULARE 33 

"Who'd a thought old 'Fuzzy' Kendricks had the scrap in him?" 
he continued as the two left the building. "I guess he's got McGavin 
in a bad way. I heard Plumas was going to bolt to "Fuzzy' if Mc- 
Gavin didn't break the deadlock on the first ballot. God, I hope we 
don't have another all-night session." 

Thompson turned to the garrulous secretary sharply. The rea- 
son for McGavin's desperation grew more clear to him. "Who told 
you Plumas would bolt ?" he said. 

The secretary laughed importantly. "I heard Alec McCabe tell 
McGavin so about three o'clock," he crowed, "and McGavin swore 
like a pirate in the last act. It's straight. I guess Jim sees his finish, 
and from 'Fuzzy,' too. God, but it's funny," and the secretary 
cackled again. 

The pair reached the St. George steps in company. The secretary 
moved toward the bar-room. "Have something?" he called out. 
Thompson shook his head, and the two parted, the latter pushing 
his way towards the clerk's desk. 

Two minutes later he was being conducted to the Tulare dele- 
gate's room. He knocked at the door and a resonant voice answered 
him. 

"Come in !" the voice called. Thompson opened the door. The 
room was empty. "Right in here !" the voice called again. "Fm 
dressing, or I'd come out." 

Thompson went on into the inner room. Kelly was leaning over 
a wash basin. He straightened up as his visitor entered, energetic- 
ally drying his hands on a towel. Tall and spare, coatless and col- 
larless, he looked, with his short, wispy, scraggly beard and prom- 
inent Adam's Apple, like a slightly modernized Uncle Sam. The 
same keen, shrewd features, long arms and straggling legs were 
there. He came forward with a cry of pleasure when he saw his 
visitor. 

"Hello, Thompson!" he cried. "Sit down!" pulling out the only 
chair in the room. "Don't mind my dressing. I've got to do it. 
My daughter came up to see the show with me. You'd met her 
when you came in, but she went to the hall with a party and they 
haven't returned yet. I've looked for you. Bill, for the last two 
days, but couldn't get my hands on you. What kept you away ? It 
wasn't that girl, was it, Bill?" chuckling. "She's heard of you. 
That's partly why she came up, I guess." 

During this deluge Thompson sat on the chair, looking steadily 
at the wall. When the elder man ceased speaking, he turned to- 
ward him. 

"No, John," he said slowly, "I haven't been around to see you. 
I've been very busy at the convention. That's what brought me here 
now." 



34 OUT WEST 

"John," he said, turning sharply toward Kelly, "do you remember 
that afternoon back in '92 when you promised me that if the time 
ever came when I wanted anything you could give, I would only 
have to ask for it? Do you remember that day, John? During 
the last ten years the cause of that promise has died, but he died, 
John, leaving the Kelly name free from the stain of San Quentin's 
register, and during the ten years of his life, John, my mouth was 
closed. I've come tonight, John, to ask you to redeem that promise. 

"You've come down from Tulare, chairman, and the only mem- 
ber present of that delegation. You're uninstructed, and when you 
vote you throw six ballots as you will, Kelly," and for the first time 
Thompson looked up. "I want those votes tonight for Hornblower. 
Can I have them ?" 

While Thompson had been talking, Kelly had stood beside his 
dresser, nervously picking up and laying down his collar and rum- 
maging aimlessly with his hand among the brushes and combs. 
When the speaker had finished, he turned toward him, his hand 
hanging helplessly at his side. There was a curious look in his eye 
and a quirk to his lips, as if Thompson had suddenly stepped up to 
him and slapped him in the face. 

He picked up a collar-button and blindly attempted to place it in 
his shirt-bosom, but it sprang from his hand and fell to the floor. 
His eyes followed it uncertainly and then turned toward Thomp- 
son. The latter was staring stolidly at the red and green design of 
the carpet. 

"So you want me to throw Tulare to Hornblower?" said the elder 
man slowly. His voice was no longer a resonant, vibrant bass, but 
hoarse and tuneless. "To throw Tulare over to Jim McGavin and 
his crowd of parasites." He bent his head and then looked up 
again. 

"They sent me up from Tulare, Bill, alone and uninstructed. I've 
been in Tulare, now, going on thirty years. There isn't a kid from 
Visalia to Thunder Peak that doesn't know me, Bill" — the old man's 
voice grew suddenly tense. "Down in Tulare they call me 'Honest 
John,' and when they sent me down here they knew that I would 
vote right. Why, Bill, I brought the girl along to have her see me 
do it." He paused a moment and flicked his lips with his tongue. 

"All of the Kellys was honest," he continued simply, "but the 
one, and that was politics, and I'd like to die and have them still say 
I was 'Honest John.' I want to leave that name for Milly, so she 
can think of it after mother and I are gone and be proud they called 
her father 'Honest John.' I'm not a rich man, Bill, and back in 
Visalia they all know it. If I vote for Jim McGavin's gang tonight, 
what'll they say next year when I send Milly back East for a school- 
ing ? I was going to buy new furniture, too ; what will they say if 



THOMPSON OF TULARE 35 

Tulare goes to Hornblower tonight? I know what they said about 
Fisher, when he came back and bought city lots after the 'United 
Railways' bill went through. That's what they'll say about 'Honest 
John' Kelly." 

The old man stopped, choking. His lips twitched and his eyes 
were intense and narrow. He gulped, and went on: "I'm an old 
man now, Bill, and it's too late to live a bad name down, but I'd 
rather have it on, myself, than on him that's already dead, I 
would" — 

'Father," a clear, sweet voice called from the outer room, "may 
I come in?" 

The old man flicked his lips again before he spoke. 

"I'm busy now, child," he answered softly, "but I'll be in pretty 
soon with an old friend." 

He turned toward Thompson with a despairing gesture. Thomp- 
son stared steadily at the wall and made no sign. Kelly walked to 
the table, and gripping hard on a stubby pencil, he wrote a few 
lines on a sheet of paper. 

"Here's a proxy. Bill," he said. "I won't go to tire hall tonight." 
The paper fell from his hand and fluttered to the floor. Kelly turned 
with a deep in-drawn breath toward his collars, and then bUndly, 
with clumsy, trembling fingers, he began to put one on. 

Thompson took the paper and pushed it into his pocket. Kelly 
turned and addressed him : 

"Come," he said, "and meet my daughter." 

They went into the little sitting-room together. For a moment 
Thompson could see nothing, but with a rustle of skirts and a low 
exclamation Miss Kelly came forward from the dark corner, where 
she had been sitting, and into the light. "This is Mr. Thompson, 
Milly," said Kelly, quietly. "You have heard me speak of him often." 
At that moment the lights flashed on and Thompson saw her dis- 
tinctly for the first time. 

The blood fled from his face, and his heart jumped. Standing 
before him, though refined and spiritualized, was the face of the 
other Kelly — the dead Kelly — the weak one that had found the 
game too swift and the stakes too tempting, and had fallen. The 
picture of that afternoon, ten years before, when that same face, 
only torn with agony and distorted with fear, had stared into his 
and cried wildly for silence, flashed before him, like the quivering 
snapshot of a kinetoscope. He felt a wild desire to run, but dared 
not. 

Kelly had paused, and a slow flush came over the girl's face. She 
stepped forward slowly, almost bashfully, yet with her eyes full of 
curiosity. 

"Yes," said the same clear voice that Thompson had first heard, 



36 OUT WEST 

"I've heard of you often. Father has told me of our debt to you, 
and I am glad that I can thank you." 

The hot blood flushed back into Thompson's cheeks. "I'm amply 
repaid," he muttered, dropping his eyes to the floor. His soul 
cringed when he dared to look at her. 

"Are you attending the convention?" she inquired. "It's dread- 
fully exciting. Father looked for you yesterday. He's often told 
me you were the only honest politician in the state — ^besides himself," 
and her laugh rang out heartily. 

"Isn't that so, father?" She turned toward the elder man, who 
was looking at her gravely. "Didn't you say so, only yesterday ?" 

"I guess I did, girlie," Kelly answered. "I guess I did." 

"See," she cried, "I'm substantiated, Mr. Thompson. Now, you 
must live up to the record Pop's given you — old 'Honest John' 
Kelly." She turned as she said it and threw her arms about her 
tall father's neck, standing on tip-toe to accomplish the feat, 

"Poor Pop," she said softly, "that old convention is working you 
too hard." 

Thompson felt suffocated. The proxy, the bit of paper that car- 
ried her father's honor, seemed to burn in his pocket and sear his 
breast. He could stand it no longer, and he abruptly turned, and 
mumbling an excuse left the room and hurried down the street. 

It was after the dinner hour, and the streets were crowded with 
delegates returning to the convention hall. The convention would 
not be called to order for fully half an hour, and Thompson pushed 
through the moving mass of men until he reached an open street. 

Congressman from the Eighth! The prize glittered before him. 
It meant political success. From congressman from the rich and 
populous Eighth District to the executive mansion in Sacramento 
was but a short step. McGavin had promised him the nomination, 
and in the Eighth nomination meant election. 

The evening breeze swept up from the river, cold and damp, and 
he hurriedly buttoned his coat. As he did so the paper which he had 
carelessly shoved into his coat crackled protestingly. Thompson 
started. It was the proxy. A revulsion of feeling swept over him. 

"You're the only honest politician in the state — besides father." 
The clear, rich voice and laugh rang again in his ears. 

Honest — she'd never heard of the sea-wall deal — nobody had. 
Jim McGavin's mouth had been sealed by the bonds of self-interest. 
A strange feeling of pride in the term came over him, and he re- 
peated the sentence many times. 

" 'The only honest politician in the state.' What would she think 
in the morning? What would she think of her father — old 'Honest 
John' Kelly— dishonest?" 

He swung his arms and the paper again rustled suggestively. 



THOMPSON OF TULARE 37 

Congress and the governorship! No more taking orders. No 
more worry as to the year's bills. 

Heading committees — perhaps a cabinet office. He thrilled with 
all of the long-repressed longings and ambitions of his younger 
years. 

When Thompson reached the convention hall, the chairman was 
calling the delegates to order. 

The great, bare, ugly building was brilliant in the glare of six 
powerful arc-lights, suspended from the ceiling. Myriads of in- 
sects had gathered around the glaring bulbs and were beating their 
lives out to reach the quicker death within. Around the hall ran 
a wide gallery, crowded with spectators. The floor was black with 
delegates, each delegation seated around its county banner. Tulare 
was located off the main aisle, toward the rear of the building. 
Thompson found his seat without trouble. 

The sonorous voice of the chairman was calling the convention 
to order. 

"Gen-tel-men-of-the-convention!" he chanted, and then brought 
his gavel down upon the desk with a shattering crash. The dele- 
gates looked up startled. The chairman, fearing a disorderly ses- 
sion, had substituted a carpenter's hammer for his wooden gavel. 
Across his desk was a strip of boiler iron. 

"A motion has been made and seconded that we dispense with 
hearing the reports of the committees on resolutions for the present, 
and proceed with the balloting for gubernatorial nominee. 

"All those in favor will respond by saying 'aye.' Opposed, 'no.' " 

Rolling in' successive waves came the reply of "aye." The dele- 
gates were tired and impatient over the long contest. All over the 
hall the cry for a ballot rang out. It came in volleys and singly. 
Whole delegations would spring to their feet with one vociferous 
cry. Again the demand would be snarled out by a single delegate, 
like the cry of an angry dog. 

The chairman pounded the boiler iron. 

"The secretaries will call the roll," he cried. The great hall grew 
quiet. Twenty-four ballots had been taken without result and m^ny 
sensational rumors were rift in the air. The delegates felt uncertain 
and uneasy. 

It was rumored that Plumas would bolt to Kendricks ; that Kings 
had been "seen" by McGavin ; that there had been a split in Ala- 
meda ; that a "dark horse" would be sprung ; that money was being 
freely used. The delegates were "wobbly" — a condition feared by 
their bosses. Tired with the long session, many were ready to break 
away from their leaders and to run amuck through the carefully 
laid plans of their political generals. An unexpected turn in the 
voting, or a fiery speech might send them stampeding. A feeling of 
nervous expectancy filled the air. The delegates, the spectators, and 
even the blase officials were vibrant with uncertainty, 

"Alameda!" called a husky voiced secretary, "Alameda County!" 



38 OUT WEST 

"Alameda county — forty-seven votes for Hornblower !" called out 
a thin-voiced man, standing upon a chair in the midst of his dele- 
gation. A burst of cheers, howls and cat-calls greeted the announce- 
ment. Alameda was true to her colors. The voting went on with- 
out any appreciable change. Butte, Calaveras and Contra Costa 
voted according to their previous program, Fresno, Kern and Kings 
remained solid for Kendricks. Los Angeles raised a yell when it 
reported fifty-five votes for Hornblower. Mendocino, Merced and 
Modoc clung to Kendricks. 

San Francisco caused a flutter when it asked to be passed over, but 
before the request could be granted, the chairman announced an 
agreement and voted solidly for Hornblower. Sacramento, San 
Bernardino and Santa Cruz reported rapidly for Kendricks. The 
candidates were still running neck and neck. 

Suddenly and with the speed of wild fire ran the rumor, "Tulare 
has bolted to Hornblower." It swept down the main aisle and across 
the hall. The Kendricks men heard it and laughed. Jim McGavin 
heard it and smiled. 

Thompson, sitting alone under the Tulare county banner, heard 
the progress of the voting as if in a daze. The skirmish on the 
floor was of small moment. A mighty battle was being fought in 
his soul. 

Tuolumne, Tehama and Trinity had voted. The convention was 
still deadlocked. 

"Tulare county," called the secretary. "Tulare county." As if 
compelled by an immense magnet, the entire convention turned to- 
wards the Tulare county banner. 

With the call of the secretary, Thompson looked up stupidly. 
Then it came over him with a rush. The crisis had arrived. He 
gazed blankly across the hall. Amid the blackness of the gallery, 
a bit of white caught his eye. Then above it materialized the face — 
the memory-haunting face seared his brain. His vision cleared, and 
he saw her plainly, leaning far over the railing, staring at him hope- 
lessly, despairingly. She knew ! 

"Tulare county!" called the secretary, sharply, "Tulare county — 
six votes!" 

Thompson stumbled to his feet. The spell of the face was still 
over him. The hall was still — even the secretaries, with poised pens, 
leaned far over their desks and stared. He climbed upon his chair 
and raised his arm high into the glare of the lights, his face showing 
up white and drawn, but his eyes clear and determined. 

"Mr. Chairman!" he called out, his voice ringing out across the 
hall, "Tulare votes as 'Honest John' Kelly would have it vote — six 
for Kendricks." For an instant the quiet remained unruffled. Then, 
with an explosive howl, the Kendricks men leaped to their feet. 

All around him the delegates were crushing, shaking his hand, 
slapping his shoulder and cheering his name. On the outskirts of 
the mob a wild procession was in progress, led by the band and 
followed by dancing delegates, wildly waving their county banners, 
handkerchiefs and hats. But in the midst of all the uproar, Thomp- 
son heard and saw but one thing — his eyes were fastened on a spot 
in the gallery where a girl in white was leaning far over the railing 
and frantically cheering — cheering for Thompson of Tulare. 

Stanford Unversity. 




39 

SOME LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA 
CALENDAR 

By ETHEL GRIFFITH 

January 3d. 
jRAINY day. As yet it is true to say it has rained every 
day this year. 

Perhaps Southern California, having once moistened 
her dried conscience with a few light-hearted showers, 
has started a tendency toward rainy repentance and we 
may expect better things. Sheet after sheet of soft, warm rain sweeps 
over the valley, wrapping ever close and closer the bare old earth 
and giving promise of delicate, wild, sweet things that shall spring 
from her awakening heart. 

There is something in a great down-pour that liberates the spirit. 
It is as if the Old Mother herself had taken things in hand, and we 
could now relax and expect something to be done. The great, inert 
plains and defiant hills, so long tensioned to meet the drought, sud- 
denly relax under the caress of dark, warm rain — the browns and 
greys of their parched slopes melt into tender greens and delicate 
blues, and all wild, new-born things spring throbbing with joy of 
growth. Nature, in our abstemious land, observes her times of puri- 
fication, of fasting and prayer, of vigil and scourging of the spirit, 
with her great, calm, holy days of grey, sad hues ; with mighty winds 
that flail her naked breast; with still, tearless nights of deep unrest, 
under the pitiless stars. But the justification completed, there fol- 
lows the great baptism of God ; and such peace and joy as never were 
breath from- the spirit of the air and quicken in the earth's strong 
pulse. 

Even during these heavier showers the mocking birds in the or- 
ange grove under my window, keep up a cheery fusillade of small- 
talk. Gay comments on the weather, with forecasts of fresh sum- 
mer bugs and new leaf buds, and an occasional solo, or snatch of some 
last summer's melody. Merry, sweet-hearted little spirits of the air, 
they have never outlived their golden age of freedom and joy. Some- 
times I fancy there is a note of pity in the plaintive beauty of their 
evening songs, as if they sing to us earthbound folk of the glad, free 
reaches of their summer song, the ecstasy of flight, and the heaven- 
born gift of song. In the dull grey of these rainy days, I find the 
brightest tone of Nature's sombre pictures in the little feather-clad 
mockers of our gloom. Are they called mocking birds because they 
seem never to leave unscorned man's sadness and unfaith ? 

I walked down to the village between showers this afternoon. 
People, like gophers, are just emerging to sniflF the wind for scent of 
spring and to indulge in garrulous cheerfulness over the wetting. 
Men sprout kindness as twigs do leaves after a rain, and even the 



40 OUT WEST 

glummest chirps up as cheerfully as the frogs. All the parched and 
dusty thoughts split their kernels, and it is surprising what fresh 
and vigorous shoots the dryest mind will put forth. 

I notice that a few "cocoanut flowers" are out. Little pale, star- 
like blossoms on such short stems, they must have sprung up before 
the rain. They are the earliest, and as yet the only, flowers of the 
season; so much for that faith, "the evidence of things not seen." 
Some grew close by a friendly mud-puddle, looking serenely down 
into its glassy depths ; and it was indeed a fair picture, for the whole 
dome of the sky was embossed in its inch of yellow water. Perhaps 
the shallowest nature contains the blue heaven if we catch its true 
angle of reflection. 

January 7th. 

The rain is over and we have had three days of delicious warmth. 
The ground is soaking in sunshine and everywhere under foot the 
fiilaree is springing with such eagerness of haste and so thickly, that 
the tender stems lift little scales of dirt several inches square before 
piercing through it. 

This uniform and widespread elevation of the earth's crust over 
miles of grey hill-slope excites the eye. It is in truth the "resurrec- 
tion and the life everlasting." Plants here work desperately after a 
rain, as if they loved the sage Epicurus and during their few short 
weeks were determined to reach maturity and make the most of it. 
I find something contagious in the energy of these small spirits and 
something exhilarating and ambrosial in the moist, fresh smell of the 
dirt. This is growing weather and I can feel the sap rising higher 
these sunny days. I may put out some fresh buds before long. 

January 8th.- 

Today I looked over the garden with a view to replanting it. It 
has been sadly neglected and all the plots were overrun with sweet 
alyssum and marigold. I feel sure Elysium contains no such flowers 
as riot and maraud in my garden, but perhaps they are only degen- 
erate, Adamic outcasts of those distant immortal fields. These are 
distinctly common, and revel with marigold, true symbol of Mam- 
mon, with utmost familiarity. They have entirely overrun the car- 
nations and violets of last year. 

It seems somehow true that the ranker and coarser forms of Na- 
ture are dearer to her heart, as if she said : "Don't get too fine, my 
children!" And the more we culture and refine Nature's original 
work, the more we endanger its primal energy of strength and 
health. Old gardeners frequently use the hardy stems of wild rose- 
bushes upon which to graft their new and delicate varieties; and 
we are forced to be a little conservative and to keep some of the old 
original wildness whereon to graft our new-made culture. 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 41 

January 9th. 

I sometimes feel that this country ranch life that I lead, devoid 
though it be of much of the true aroma of society to be found in 
cities, has yet its rarer compensations. Here there is room to grow. 
People are stunted so easily by crowding. Here tougher, studier 
virtues have time to expand, and one lives close to the primitive 
workings of things, simply and healthfully as bunch-grass. 

There is something sane and serene about common meadow bunch- 
grass that is soothing to the mind. I wish there was more of it 
edging the roads to the village; but it thins and thins, like other 
honest virtues, as the roads converge, and is finally lost altogether on 
the highway. 

No one is fonder of society than I, but I have never found the 
presence of persons to assure it. And I am never so much alone as 
when some of my relatives call. 

I have come to classify people as wild, domesticated, cultivated and 
rare, and to choose my associates much as I do my garden-seeds, ac- 
cording as beauty or utility decides. My neighbors furnish me ex- 
amples of each classification and I love to visit from house to house, 
picking, as it were, a bouquet of personalities. Here a sprig of wild 
sage, there a fresh, wild hyacinth or rare tulip. 

Our nearest neighbors are a family of Spaniards, very poor and 
very genteel, the descendants of a fine old Spanish strain, but now 
languishing in an unfriendly land, like the pale, Castilian roses in my 
garden; stunted and enfeebled by the drought and all but giving 
over the struggle for existence. The mother came, the other day, 
asking that J give her some smallest thing to do about the ranch, 
explaining with all the frankness of pride, when at its best and too 
proud to conceal — "for we are very poor." I would gladly have as- 
sisted them without return, but they would not have it so. There is 
nothing more refreshing than a little self-respect and I have liked 
them the better for this. How dignified poverty becomes when it 
avows itself without whining ! Only the self-pitiers are really desti- 
tute. 

Quite another and hardier variety of person, whom I call my wild, 
free-blossoming rose-tree, is the little Yankee grocer's wife, of the 
neighboring village. Her mind is as open to the light as the stamens 
in the heart of the wildest briar rose, and she drops her ideas as 
freely as petals. A visit from her is like a breeze through a rose- 
tree, showering one continually with tiny petals which she can no 
more retain than a thistle its down. 

I am, she reasons, an unfortunate girl, living as I do alone with 
my father on the broad, untenanted expanse of the "Eureka Ranch," 
denied, as she thinks, the luxurious balm of feminine society; and 
she persuades herself that duty calls her often to our house with 



42 OUT wnsT 

cheerful and encouraging companionship. Especially is she called 
in the late summer and during the grape-picking season, when she 
often spends weeks at a time canning and bottling enough grapes to 
last her well thorugh the winter. She has introduced, at the 'vil- 
lage store, a new brand, the "Miss Dorothy" — extra sweet and of 
pleasing flavor ; a delicate compliment to me and to the "Eureka." 

I sometimes think I am a humble provision granted Mrs. Penrose, 
whereby she may exercise the rightful functions of her being and 
can no more forbid her to chatter than I can forbid the Cherokee rose 
to litter the garden walk during a wind. I do not know but that a 
little neighborhood gossip is indispensable to healthful country life. 
It is the private expression that at last makes public opinion and that 
keeps us to a wholesome and conservative balance. Gossip, when it 
does not descend into slander, may be only a mild, conversational 
tonic. There come certain flat, insipid hours, when the world runs 
on an ungreased axle, in which I welcome Mrs. Penrose without con- 
trition. 

Our other nearest neighbor, Jonas Breme, living just beyond the 
ranch-border to the west, I call my prickly-pear cactus. A great, 
fleshy, vegetable bachelor, seeming always parched of nourishing 
ideas and full of tiny, irirtating prickles. He comes often to spend 
an evening with father and his pleasantness is as heavy and offensive 
as the odor of henbane. He is as intrinsically a western character, 
as native and leisurely among our barren hills, as the sprawling, 
spiney plant whose name he bears, and to the casual eye his life is as 
serene. But beneath the easy, sun-baked calm of him there works 
one restless, ceaseless fever. He is gripped in the teeth of one all- 
consuming desire, and while he prunes his growing orchards or fol- 
lows the heavy cultivator down the long orange rows in the heat of 
the day, one thought sits always by his side. It is to sell out and get 
away — ^to strike trail for the East. 

He is tired, he says, of the monotony and solitude of California, 
Tired of the glare of her sunshine, her eternal sunshine and silence ; 
sick of the lean, sparse look of her, wearied to death of her winds 
and her sea. He desires only to pass his remaining years in his na- 
tive New Hampshire village, to dream away long, idle days by her 
summer trout-brooks, to crack the ripened butternuts in freezing 
autumn woods, or watch the first delicious falling of the snow. A 
long-cherished dream, whose realization is to be attained immedi- 
ately his place is sold. But to sell his place — an unaccomplished task 
these seven years. 

Perhaps one imagines he has had no purchasers ; but no — I think 
the real difficulty with Jonas has been that he has had too many. It 
is his purchasers that have prevented him from selling long years 
ago ; and if they continue to come and insist on offering him the ab- 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 43 

Burdly good prices that many do, it may easily be that Jonas will live 
and die on his western waste, chained like Tantalus to the wheel of 
his possessions, with the desire of his heart ever in sight yet never 
actually attained. For, with Jonas, the mere fact that anyone is 
willing to buy is enough to determine him quite definitely, for the 
time at least, that he will not sell ; and the more they offer and the 
more anxious they seem, the more firmly is he fixed in this decision. 
Reasoning that what is worth an exaggerated price to another may 
be worth all that or more to himself, he has several times, after an 
interview with a promising speculator, taken his ranch quite off the 
market and torn down his weather-worn sign — waiting, as he ex- 
plains, for the first vibrating shock of the boom which he knows is 
about to sweep, like a locust swarm, over the land. 

But investors are now rare and for some time Jonas's place has 
been entirely ignored. He is beginning to reconsider, and today, as 
I passed, I saw the sign, slightly mildewed but not hard to decipher, 
and bearing as it were a faintly venerable touch of antiquity, swing- 
ing above his gate. It has the solemn, homelike creak familiar since 
my childhood. 

January 13th. 

Under the shelter of a hoary sage-bush I found a deserted lark's 
nest this morning. It is too early for them to build, but a fine young 
fellow, who seemed to examine the nest with all the amused curiosity 
that a bachelor bestows on a baby carriage, was perched on a tuft of 
dried grass near by. He was wholly obsorbed in himself (after the 
manner of his age and sex), and preened his grey and golden feathers 
and practiced his songs without stint for my admiration. 

The song of the Western meadow-lark is a wild, sweet melody; 
his tones of a liquid mellowness peculiarly in harmony with the wind- 
swept marsh and plain. At present the gay young dandy thinks only 
of flight and song, the wonders of the marsh and mysteries of the 
sky; but Nature will take him in hand in a few weeks and trans- 
form him from the flightiest of beaus to the most provident of sires. 
He will share the domestic burdens equally with the sombre little 
mate, and brood and feed the nestlings with utmost fatherly care. 
Now he is sowing his wild oats in the form of delicious and prodigal 
songs — a harvest of melody that may be had for the gathering. 

I like the lark's habit of building on the marsh-land. It may have 
its dangers at flood tides, but the tragedy of the broken nest and the 
crippled nestlings is averted; and then, in the choice of location, 
there is evidence of a certain primitive faith in the sure foundation 
of things, a belief in the protection of the ground and the low-grow- 
ing grass and sedge that proclaims him one of the true and trusting 
children of the earth. 



44 OUT WEST 

The nest of the meadow-lark, as I find it hidden on the cold, damp 
ground, reminds me always of a verse of Lanier's : 

"As the marsh hen secretly builds on the watery sod, 
Behold, I will build me a nest on the greatness of God ! 
I will fly in the greatness of God, as the marsh-hen fles 
In the freedom that fills all the earth 'twixt the marsh and the skies ; 
By so many roots as the marsh-grass sends in the sod, 
I will heartily lay me ahold on the greatness of God." 

January 17th. 

The birds here herald the dawn. A great chorus of black-birds 
and mockers in the orange trees usher in the day. I notice the morn- 
ings they do not sing are always cloudy and grey. Phoebus can do 
his best (in this new spring weather, when the wheels of the year 
are still heavy with winter's damp), by aid of a little inspiriting 
music. The lark mounts straight up to the blue of his heart's desire 
and his song is sweet and pure as a baby's eyes. These morning 
songs are filled with the wild sweet ecstasy of youth and hope and 
joy of the dawning, but soften as the morning wears on. By noon 
all the note of aspiration and courage, the true hey-day of youth, is 
subdued to a contented chirp, or low, harsh chuckle of conversation — 
like middle-aged folk, who have bartered their high hopes, and at 
the last are contented with a good dinner. 

Learned this afternoon that Jonas is again hopeful. He has been 
showing his place to some English speculators. They will no doubt 
spoil the sale by offering him too much. 

January 19th. 

After being in the house all day, I become suddenly conscious of 
homesickness and must get out and "see the folks," as people say 
who are confined in solitary employments ; only I go out alone in Na- 
ture to find the only restful society I know. 

It has rained a little all day, but toward evening has cleared away 
somewhat. Far away the mountains sleep in a mist of cool blue- 
grey ; the hills billowing up to their feet look smooth and soft in the 
moisture-laden air. Their outlines are moulded in the haze to the 
most luxurious curves; a modulated, softly-toned back-ground for 
the flowering apricot-orchards that sleep at their base — those fresh, 
immortal babies of the landscape resting against the maternal hills. 

The ground is a coverlet of grass, shadowed beneath the trees in 
blotched patches of slate and blue. 

A dull sky. A few smoky clouds floating nowhere, suspended in 
the breathless air. Against the southern horizon a wash of deep, 
flat grey. 

There have been showers all day and it is even now sprinkling 
again. The air is heavy with moisture, but cool and deliciously 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 45 

fresh. The grass exudes sweetness as at dusk. Everything is per- 
fectly still. Is Nature taking a little rest while she awaits the sun? 
She does not seem asleep as at night. Everything is modified and 
softened by the haze in the air. The hills now look blurry, as though 
seen through fast-falling tears. It is beginning to rain in earnest. 

I know people who are afraid of getting wet, afraid of catching 
cold — afraid, it may be, they shall die! As if there is in all the 
world anything to overtake them more fearful than their own cow- 
ardly thoughts. Rain, cold or death can never damp a self-reliant 
man, but a timid mind is sick and on the decline already. 

The rain has ceased as suddenly as it came, and a mock-bird, who 
loves to make gossip and be the first at a bit of news, breaks the head 
of his song-bottle and sprays the air with a dash of melody. Im- 
mediately a dozen others answer in quick emulation. They chirp 
up quick and loud, like people who have been caught napping and 
wish you to know they have missed nothing. Such a harmonious 
melody of light music ! a fantasia, I think. Did one ever know a 
mock-bird to lose his spirit or to admit gloom or damp into his song 
on the rainiest day? He can scold, but he is seldom sad; and al- 
though he is quite shy, his instinct is rather a delicate reserve or pru- 
dence than fear. What a fresh, young, indomitable spirit! I find 
them dead sometimes, but never sick. So I hope to be found some 
day. 

Mrs. Penrose, very breezy with gossip, brought her sewing over 
this afternoon. She shook petal after petal in rapid conversational 
gusts, returning home quite bare of bloom. 

The prudence of the English speculators has quite exceeded my 
belief, for they have, it seems, actually secured his place from Jonas 
at about what he asks. 

January 22d, 
Last night it rained. I was aroused in the night by the pelt of big 
drops on the pane and to the flash of distant lightning. The sky was 
wild with flying clouds ; in the dim light the palms wrung their long 
leaves like a woman's hands, and the eucalypti bowed their tall heads 
before a mighty wind. 

A maddened, muttering sky bent close, scourging the earth with 
lash after lash of stinging rain. I stood a long while at the window, 
peering through blurred panes at the storm. I seldom feel any op- 
pression of solitude in nature, being conscious ever of a rich comrade- 
ship of kindred spirits in all her forms ; but something in the dis- 
turbing elements of the storm had insulated me, and the same old 
feeling of the utter helplessness of man in nature swept over me. 
Our prayers are often only a confession of our insulation and sep- 
arateness from Nature. We are all pagans at heart, shift the matter 
as we may ; and at that moment I could have made my prayer, with 
as good a faith as any Navajo, to the mighty Spirit of the Storm. 



46 OUT WEST 

A great chorus of frogs in the big puddle of the valley had been 
croaking joyously all night long, but came now upon my attention for 
the first time. I have never before heard them tune up with such 
ardor. Do they, too, frame a choir of devotion? Perhaps they 
know of some serene and courageous faith we should do well to 
cherish. 

This morning all the canons hold dashing little streams. The 
ground having been filled by the previous rains, the moisture is now 
beginning to ooze down the grassy slopes into the brooklets and the 
rivers are swollen to their banks. 

The alfilarilla forms now a deep, thick carpet wherein the foot 
sinks luxuriously. Little silver- and gold-backed ferns are springing 
up under sheltering brush, and on every knoll wild grasses and cycla- 
men plants crowd each other in growth. Tiny flower stalks are al- 
ready starting from the larger plants of the cyclamen, or "shooting 
stars," as the children call them. In a few weeks our valley will be 
a terrestrial Milky Way of bloom. 

"Oh Land of the West ! I know 
How the field flowers bud and blow. 
And the grass springs and the grain. 
To the first soft touch and summons of the rain, 
Oh, the music of the rains ! 
Oh, the music of the streams !" 

January 24th. 

Jonas has gone, and there is nothing to assure us that he was not 
a myth of the fancy except the old scare-crow which still flaunts on 
the strawberry knoll above his house, and which bears a striking, 
though flattering, resemblance to Jonas himself. 

Now that we have actually lost his characteristic musky fragrance, 
the neighborhood atmosphere is left a little flat, and we are watching 
his old place with doubt; for who knows what strange, obnoxious 
plant may spring up on the old cactus-knoll? It is a pity they are 
English. I, for one, dislike foreign importations. They are slow to 
adapt themselves to our climate and seem never to fully mature here, 
their temper being ever a little acid for lack of the proper, sheltering 
care they need. 

They are remodeling Jonas's little house and making quite a to-do 
over their occupancy. Nothing seems quite to suit them. Every- 
thing must be renovated and remodeled. I foresee that they will be 
fussy and exacting, for they have stretched a fine wire netting around 
their adjoining lemon-grove, separating it from ours, evidently in 
fear of trespassers. 

There is nothing so silently offensive as a wire netting — but it will 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR m 

serve at least one purpose if it keeps them in as well as us out. The 
English would like to remodel this country. 

I have had the garden spaded and raked and shall plant some 
sweet-pea seed and replant the violets where the marigolds have been 
laid low. It is good to sit down in the dirt with the violets and to let 
the roots of one's being absorb nourishment from the ground. We 
stand on tip-toe most of the time, ambitious to deny the solid earth on 
which we rest ; fairly raising our eyebrows in a frenzy to rise above 
our footing. 

The long, thin ivy that straggles up the highest pinnacle of the 
windmill, grows more pale and feeble as it ascends and finally tum- 
bles ignominiously down with the first serious wind. How much 
more adequate and self-reliant the chilicothe, or, as the Indians call 
it, the "man-in-the-ground," who takes a firm hold on the earth, 
and who can, if need be, retire altogether into his own privacy. What 
a sturdy, tough-hearted, self-sufficient old fellow he must be ! 

The garden path, in its humble way, is quite a center of social 
life. Such preparations of house-cleaning and home-making as are 
going on among the earth-worms ! They have a certain natural ba- 
rometer in the construction of their holes and are our safest weather- 
prophets; for as soon as they feel the air sifting down their holes, 
they have a general clearing-out and airing, and it almost invariably 
appears that a rain is over. 

A big hill of large black ants, whose domestic arrangements have 
long been my admiration and envy, seems now quite upset. Its in- 
mates run about in almost as much confusion and excitement as 
humans in house-cleaning time. In some ways insects seem not to 
be beyond the instinctive acts of humans. 

Speaking of house-cleaning, the English neighbors — their name is 
Dudley — have at last finished the preparation of their home and yes- 
terday they moved in. There are a mother, a widow, and one son, 
with a couple of servants and some good horses. 

The son is probably of his kind, sent to the West to cool off over- 
heated energies in the safe seclusion of an orange grove. A superior 
being, whose elevated nostrils breathe the higher ether than others 
hereabout. 

The mother I shall call upon after a decent interval, and she, being 
a lady of breeding, will retore in kind ; after which I shall remember 
her with a basket of guavas or a bunch of violets and trouble neither 
her nor myself with further attentions. For there is the wire netting, 
shining new and strong, rabbit-tight and six feet high. Nothing can 
alter the fact. 

I loiter over the planting of the violets. I shall have many more 
blooms than I can use. Flowers fulfill their mission of bloom only 
when they are sent as messengers of faith from one friend to an- 



48 OUT WEST 

other, I cannot picture myself thrusting them, blossom at a time, 
through the meshes of a wire netting. 

January 26th. 

Father is not at all well this spring. I find I shall be obliged to 
superintend the ranch alone this year. Have spent the greater part 
of the day in the saddle, overseeing the field-gangs, who are plowing 
the grain tracts for early sowing. 

The Dudleys are plowing their orange grove directly across the 
division-line. I have caught a number of glimpses, through the 
wire netting, of the son, who has taken a whom to work for him- 
self. He turned all his furrows the wrong way. 

This afternoon I set Pedro at work on the lemon-grove close to the 
house. I explained to him the necessity of plowing in such a way 
that the soil would be thrown up and around the trunks of the trees 
instead of away from them. Mr. Dudley, who was behind a protect- 
ing lime-tree at the time, has been plowing correctly ever since. 

January 29th. 

Called yesterday on Mrs. Dudley. 

She is a large, pervasive kind of person, with a face like Andrew 
Jackson's — strong and uncompromising as a church pew. Her eye 
shines dully under heavy eyebrows like the polished metal of a naval 
cannon, but declares now for peace rather than war, by its very evi- 
dent efficiency. She would make an ideal figure-head on the prow 
of a man-of-war. Her voice is warm and genial and stirs the air 
healthfully as a whiff of camphor. I like her. 

She is a very intelligent old lady, and I liked best of all a fine, 
well-bred reserve that prevented the usual discussion of personalities. 
She did not tell me her family history. I shall have to wait on the 
neighbors for that — but she met me cordially and frankly without 
triviality. 

I am never more complimented than when well-bred people grant 
me the fine courtesy of bluntness, sincerity and silence ; they may re- 
serve their manners and polteness for the servants. I was pleased 
to think that I was not so unfamiliar that I need be treated with airs. 

January 30th. 

Met the young Mr. Dudley at a reception to the new minister. Al- 
though I did fancy a slight ripple of recognition in his eyes, he did 
not betray by word or look that he had ever seen me. I like that ; 
it somehow suggests a certain reserve and inner roominess that are 
somewhat rare. He has very fine eyes, clean and frank and suggest- 
ive of open halls and patios, once you get beyond the vestibule. He 
seems to live in his own house and although he meets one at the 
door he neither invites one in, nor comes out to meet one. Most 
people either run out into the street to call aloud on all they see, 



COYOTE GOES THE SUN ROAD 49 

or else shut and block every avenue of approach to them, till one 
finally believes them to be little more than deserted tenements after 
all. Then there are people who have no spiritual privacy ; they live 
as it were, on their front porch. But this man seems to have a kind 
of reserved hospitality, as if he would gladly entertain noble guests. 
I should like to be invited in — but who knows ? I might only stand 
about and stare at the furnishings, and the entertainment might fall 
entirely short. 

Village society is greatly impressed by him and would gladly toss 
him up to the crest of its little wave, if he would have it so, but he 
is as unmoved in their midst as an old pile, around which the water 
rushes at flood tide. I am beginning to be a little impressed. Who 
knows but he may be a real man, after all? 

National City, Cal. 



coyote: goes the: sun road 

(A Legend of the Klamath River Indians.) 
By JOHN VANCE CHENEY. 

COYOTE, like some other folk we know. 
Had whims. Nothing would do but he must go 
The sun-road. Loping up an eastern hill. 
He camped under a redwood, tall and still. 
And spent the night. He knew — the cunning rover — 
It was the very one the sun rolled over; 
And there, at daybreak, stifT, with lifted hat, 
Plump in the middle of the road he sat. 
Up came the sun. "Ho, there," he cried, "make way ! 
Ho, there, one side ! good gentleman in gray." 
Coyote didn't budge. "Come, ho, there, you! 
Run ov€r me," he howled, "and cook me, too !" 
On came the jolly sun, his face as red 
As fire. "You see I can't turn out," he said ; 
"Pray you, don,'t be so foolish as to block 
My path ; get on the top of that old rock, 
And jump into my lap. Cook you ! not I. 
It's cool and lovely, higher up the sky." 
Stupid old sun! Coyote now would learn 
His golden road, yes, every crook and turn ; 
And he would know just what the day-god did 
When every night he slipt away and hid. 
Coyote chuckled all that day and night. 
And once more came the happy morning light. 
"What! What!" — he scarcely could believe his eyes — 
"The red-nosed rascal ! Round and round the skies, 
And, none the wiser, back here where I started !" 
The sun kinked his big eye ; and so they parted. 
Newberry Library, Chicago. 




50 our WEST 

A pinRl trip slip 

By EUGENE MAN LOVE RHODES. 
"The Duke has a long arm." 

Cyrano — (Drawing his sword) "Aye, but not so long 
As mine is when 'tis lengthened out — as thus !" 

pRST or second-class?" The supercilious ticket agent 
flicked an imaginary shred from his coat sleeve as the 
answer came. 

"Um — second-class, I guess — I'm more'n half out of 
money, and every few dollars helps." Jeflf Bransford 
waved an explanatory hand, with a flash of white teeth, wholly wasted 
on the other's icy official superiority, 

"Fifty-eight, five. Tourist sleeper?" 

"Why — no, I think I'll take a Pullman. Say, this here ticket is a 
sort of to-be-continued-in-our-next-affair, isn't it?" 

"Second class passage don't entitle you to engage berth in the 
Pullman." Click — click — click, went the stamping machine, and he 
threw the long green ticket on the counter with an air of cold hauteur. 

"Oh, well, what's the odds?" said Bransford, smiHng. "Better 
men than me have ridden side-door Pullmans before now. Let me 
have a lower berth in the Tourist, then." 

"Lower berths all taken." 

"Upper berth then — anything to keep peace in the family." An- 
other flash of white teeth; which glanced oflf the Impervious One 
like water from a duck's back. 

"Click — click — click. Four-fifty," said the machine, 

JefT looked at his berth ticket as he was getting his change. "Why, 
neighbor, this is only for two nights." For accompaniment he 
turned his head sideways, drew the corners of his mouth, arched his 
eyebrows, shrugged his shoulders, and turned up eloquent palms 
in protest. 

"This road only goes to Chicago." 

"But I can get a berth from there on, can't I ?" 

"I don't know, I'm sure. There are no tourist cars from Chicago 
east, that I know of." His indifference was most elaborate. 

"Umph !" Jeff held the ticket by one corner at arm's length, re- 
garding it with a malignant eye. "I seem to have bought a pig in 
a poke." He would have continued the investigation with a proposal 
to exchange for a first-class ticket, but the other scornfully walked 
away and seated himself, turning his back very pointedly, and re- 
suming his interrupted discussion with a fellow employe. He was 
indifferent to the G, P. at best, and the verdant and untraveled por- 
tion of it bored him excessively. And Jeff's wide-brimmed gray 
Stetson, gray flannel shirt, and somewhat striking tie marked him as 
a mere plebeian, not calling for any display of obsequiousness. 



A PINK TRIP SUP 5» 

Jeff's eyes contracted to a narrow slit, his lithe body crouched cat- 
like, as the wiry muscles bunched for a spring. Then the jaw re- 
laxed into a grin, and he turned away laughing to and at himself. 
"That fellow is paid good big money to answer questions," was his 
thought," and he acts like it was an insult to ask him anything— even 
to have a drink. I've a good notion to crawl his hump. But Lord I 
think of the fo6l questions he must have to answer in a year ! Fussy 
old ladies and gawky boys — there's two sides to everything, as the 
fellow said when he was branding the calf. Let her go — I can sleep 
in the day-car the rest of the way." And he went to check his 
trunk. 

The Golden State Limited pulled in on time, to the dot. Jeff got 
on, located his berth, talked with the nice old lady and gentleman 
who occupied the lower berth and were consequently his seat-mates, 
sized up the crowded car-load as decidedly uninteresting, and wan- 
dered into the smoker. He found the chairs easy in fact as well as 
name, with much room to stretch his legs — which was not the case 
in the tourist car. So he lit a cigar, admired the upholstery and fur- 
nishing, and noted the writing table with an approving eye, as he 
had some letters to answer. Next he discovered the current maga- 
zines, in handsome morocco cases. 

"Gee!" he ejaculated. "I never did travel much, but this is the 
swellest train I ever was on." 

And he settled himself to read. 

After a long delay they started and crept slowly through the city 
limits. As they reached the top of the mesa the conductor came in 
and looked at his ticket. 

"You can't *ride in this car or the chair-car on this," he said 
genially, pointing to a placard Jeff had not noticed before, which 
read: 

"None but passengers holding first-class Pullman tickets are en- 
titled to seats in this car. Others can obtain seats by paying seat-fare 
to the car-conductor." 

"All right, senor, I'll ante up the extra dinero. This lay-out just 
fits me. How much is it?" 

"You can't," said the conductor. "Second-class passengers have 
no privileges except starting and arriving. Sorry, old man — regula- 
tions you know. We didn't make them — " 

"H'm — ^and we moral lepers are not allowed in the smoker, nor 
chair-cars, either? No? Nor the cow-catcher? Come here — I want 
to see you a minute." He led the conductor out to the vestibule, 
glanced over his shoulder apprehensively, and spoke in hushed tones, 
holding the conductor's sleeve with agitated fingers. 

"Can a social outcast eat in the diner, or does he have to get a 
hand-out? You see, eating is a long-standing habit with me; I 



52 OUT WEST 

could break it off by degrees, I guess, but it would be hard to quit 
right off." 

The conductor grinned hugely, his eyes twinkling : 

"Yes, even second-hand passengers are allowed to eat — second 
table, of course. They get to use up the scraps that way." 

"Of course, of course." The shoulders shrugged up, the hands 
were voluble, the mouth drooped with assumed submission. "There 
isn't much difference between buying a second-class ticket and get- 
ting a short sentence to jail, is there ? But I was just fixing to secede, 
if I couldn't eat. I suppose people in my station of life really ought 
to carry a lunch basket." He produced a cigar-case and the con- 
ductor helped himself. "Say, isn't there some way I could slip into 
the smoker surreptitious, without you knowing anything about it? 
How about the car-conductor. Is he amenable to argument ? Would 
an additional stone-bruise on his conscience disable him ?" 

The conductor paused, his hand on the door-knob. "Oh, he leaves 
that in cold storage in El Paso when he goes on a trip — you can't 
insult him." 

As explained above, Jeff thenceforth occupied the smoker at his 
own good will and pleasure, with none to molest or make him afraid. 

From Chicago he took the South Side. This time, so far from 
barring him from the smoker, his ticket did not entitle him to ride 
anywhere else — the day-car being full. The conductor, as usual, 
looked at his ticket and poked a red fare-slip under his hat-band. 
Whereupon he took off his shoes, shaded his eyes with his hat and 
went to sleep. 

Now it so happened that his fare-slip dropped out. Wherefore, it 
came to pass that in the watches of the night, one prodded him in 
the ribs, and his dreams were broken by a gruff voice : 

"Tickets !" 

Jeff scrambled up and produced his ticket. "I've shown you this 
before," he said. 

The other — a very dignified and haughty personage indeed, six 
feet one, and pompous in proportion — looked at the ticket, then at 
Jeff, threw back his shoulders and threw out his chest : 

"Where did you get on ?" 

Jeff did not like his tone much. "At Chicago. That's in Illinois," 
he explained sweetly. 

The insulted one swelled up almost to bursting point. "Where's 
your fare-slip, sir?" His deep notes were most impressive. 

Jeff turned his hat around, and spread out an exculpatory palm. 
"Losty goney !" — cheerfully. "Perdido-se fue!" And he made his 
eyes round and innocent. 

"Well," thundered the now thoroughly enraged official, "I shall 



A PINK TRIP SLIP 53 

keep this ticket." Which he pushed into his pocket and would have 
passed on. But Jeff sprang lightly after him, laid a detaining hand 
on his shoulder and remarked, politely : 

"I beg your pardon, sir, but that ticket is mine. I paid good money 
for it. Give it here." 

The other glared at him. "And that fare-slip was mine!" 

"I'm sorry I lost the slip — or perhaps someone has taken it. But" 
— 2l magnanimous wave of the hand — "you can give me another." 

"I shall keep this ticket. You should not have lost your slip. 
Someone else may be riding on it, fo rail I know." 

"Well," said Jeff, judicially, "I can tell when a strange cow gets 
into a big herd of cattle, and them moving and twisting all around. 
If you can't keep track of fifty or sixty men and tell which one has 
paid, you'd make a damn poor cowboy — and I think you're a damn 
poor conductor, anyhow. I didn't pay my money for a slip, but for 
a ticket. That's what entitles me to transportation. The slip is 
merely a device to help you remember that you have examined that 
passenger's ticket. It is for your convenience entirely. If I lost one 
every fifteen minutes, and still had my ticket, all you could do would 
be to insist on seeing my ticket again. But that isn't the point. Sup- 
pose I had even lost my ticket — ^the part that concerns you. All you 
could do — if I had no voice in the matter at all — would be to collect 
fare from here to Buffalo — or you might put me off." His voice had 
been soft from the first — now its tones were positively silken. "From 
there on I take the Lackawanna. That ticket carries me from Buf- 
falo to New York. But I'm not going to pay you any fare to Buf- 
falo, either. I've paid once. You remember my face, and my ticket 
shows for itself. You give my toe the heartburn. Do you want me to 
go to the floor with you?" 

"You'll pay me fare to Buffalo or I'll keep this ticket!" snarled 
the red-faced and outraged autocrat. How do I know you haven't 
sold your slip to someone, and he's riding on it now ? I'll have you to 
understand I am the master here." 

Everyone in the car had been wakened by now, and was craning 
curious eyes at them. 

"If it comes to that" — Jeff's voice was more suave and caressing 
than ever, but his mustache was a-quiver, his lids drooped down and 
there was a steely glint in the brown eyes — also the expressive hands 
flourished no more. "If it comes to that, how am I to know you 
would not put my fare to Buffalo down in your flank, if I was daffy 
enough to give it to you? Who made you a judge and a divider 
over me, I'd like to know. Did it ever occur to you that we elect 
legislatures to make laws for us, judges to interpret them, sheriffs 
to execute them — even then reserving, by jury trials, some portion 
of undelegated power to ourselves? And a mental reservation of 



54 OUT wBsr 

personal veto over the decisions of any and all, at the long last? 
Your railroads cannot make a single regulation binding on one of us, 
except so far as we are pleased to accept them — much less you. 
You are proposing to be law-maker, judge, jury and sheriff! It 
might work but for one thing." 

"And what is that?" sneered the irate dignitary. 

Jeff smote himself lightly on the breast. 

"Me! You say you are Master here — I would have you know 
that an American citizen has no master ! Give me my ticket!" 

"I won't." 

As a spring is released when bent to highest tension, Jeff passed 
from absolute repose to swift and irresistible action. With one 
incredibly swift movement he swooped down, caught the railroader 
by the back of both ankles and raised them to a level with his own 
shoulders. Jeff weig*hed perhaps, one hundred and fifty pounds, 
his adversary over two hundred, yet this evolution was accomplished 
by a single, smooth, easy, even, graceful motion, seemingly without 
effort. 

As the reader has doubtless anticipated, the effect of this was 
that the conductor sat down on the floor with some alacrity — almost 
hastily, in fact. In the execution of this feat, he stopped almost 
immediately after reaching the floor. 

Jeff pounced upon him, rolled him over, twisted his right hand 
up behind his back as high as his shoulder-blades, held it there, palm 
out, with his own right, jerked ihim, groaning to his feet, and smote 
him two grievous left uppercuts to jaw and ear. Next he grasped 
the other's left wrist, pulled it back and so propelled him along the 
aisle. 

Then he made oration, whidh he punctuated by jerking his knee 
violently upward until it came into collision with the conductor. 

"Punch in the presence of the passenjare !" he chortled. "A pink 
trip slip — biff 1 — for a two-cent fare — biff ! — A blue trip slip — biff ! 
— for a five-cent fare — biff! Don't inform yourself that I can't hit 
you so hard you can't feel it, just because I didn't. I've got the 
dream tablets in either hand. But I need you alive for a congrega- 
tion to hear the sermon I'm going to give when I get your entire 
attention. Biff ! That's why I'm doing this instead of hitting you. 
Look over it, will you ? I can't trust my fists — they're too impulsive 
and have a good deal of expression at times. Biff!" 

(If you never enjoyed the "Come along," get some discreet friend 
to twist your arm behind your back, till you howl for mercy. There 
is no more delicious sensation than you shall feel when you persuade 
him to stop. Also, you will then understand why the conductor did 
not resent these indignities. There are but a few things a man can 
do when he gets caught in this steel trap — and fighting, or in fact, 



A PINK TRIP SUP 55 

any sort of resistance, is not of them. He may beg, groan, sob, 
weep, kneel, howl, scream, swear, screech, pray, whimper, shriek, 
moan, hop, skip, or swear some more. The conductor did them all, 
enthusiastically.) 

"Excuse me for doing this with my knees — I can't kick you, you 
know — you didn't give me time to put on my shoes — And that re- 
minds me — pardon this digression — that you didn't give me time to 
hunt for my fare-slip, either. A pretty judge you'd make — not let- 
ting the accused offer any defense or extenuation. Biff!" He 
marched the prisoner back to his own seat, lifted on the twisted arm, 
and sent him howling to his knees. 

"See it? Look good. Under the other seat now. O, you've 
found it, have you? Pick it up. You haven't any hands f Pick 
THAT up! Think you will give me back my ticket? Biff! Think 
you can leave me alone? If you don't, I'll hurt you next time — 
sure! 

"What's that? You'll telegraph for a sheriff? You'd better put 
in a postscript to bring an undertaker, too. What size coffin do you 
wear, anyway ? Say, you ought to wear a blab — you're going to step 
in that mouth of yours some day, and never get out. 

"Now, I'm goin' to make a few remarks for you to file for future 
reference. My text will be taken, from my unpublished book. Facts 
Not Generally Known, and reads as follows : *It is not true, as pop- 
ularly supposed, that railroad employees are endowed with the High 
Justice, the Middle, and the Low. On the contrary, they are paid 
expressly to aid and abet the comfort and convenience of the public' 
— What's that? You'll have the law on me? Maybe you don't 
know who I am ? You've heard of political Bosses who carried the 
legislature in their breeches pocket? Well, I've got them all faded 
to a frazzle. I carry the Court of Last Resort in mine." There was 
a momentary flash of ivory, silver and steel, its passing as swift and 
mysterious as its appearance had been. The frontiersman's eye was 
cold with deadly menace, the warning voice quiet and chill. The 
erstwhile bully shrank and cowered before them. "This is the Chief 
Justice, from whose findings there can be no appeal. Do not lightly 
invoke his decision. Let me sleep in peace — or you will! 

"Going? Good night — here's your tip. You won't take it? Do 
you want to provoke me to violence, sir? Take it, I say! Now say 
'thank you.' Louder! Oh, you're quite welcome, I'm sure. What- 
ever you do, be sure and look blithe and amiable wlien you wake 
me. I'm so sensitive — I was raised a pet, you know, and was never 
used to harshness. It gets me plumb exhilarated. 

"Never mind the sermon — just remember the text and meditate 
on it. I think you grasp the idea. You have my permission to 
depart." 

Jeff folded the rescued ticket, ignoring alike the applause and 
condemnation of his fellow-travelers, and settled himself for a little 
well-earned repose. 

"No more second-class tickets for little Willy. It's too eventful. 
Anyway, the best is none too good for me." 

Apalachin, N. Y. 




56 OUT WEST 

•from fifty years ago 

By ALFRED TALBOT RICHARDSON. 
AM asked why Father DeSmet never got among the In- 
dians of the Southwest, 

Some one else may ask — why should he ? 

The answer to the second question is that when one 
is called "Apostle to the North American Indians," one 
visits Indian tribes. 

The answer to the first is somewhat more complex. 
His failure to readh these tribes, the abrupt overturning of his 
carefully-prepared plans to that end, mark a crisis, and, if I have 
read his letters aright, the personal tragedy, in the life of a singularly 
attractive character, now lying half a century back in our history — a 
Jesuit, an American citizen and a man ; one whose personality made 
him instantly loved by high and low, wherever 'he went ; whom 
Abraham Lincoln saw fit to consult as an authority ; whom his Pope 
(Gregory) rose from his throne to embrace; by whose blanket-bed, 
in the slumber of exhaustion and age, Sitting Bull and Black Moon 
watched in person in the bloody days of '68 ; an "august character in 
our national history," as a Protestant biographer has finely called 
him, and with it all a gentle Catholic priest from first to last. His 
name is remembered to this day on many a reservation in the North- 
west, and those who received baptism in infancy from "Pere Smeet" 
are fortunate Indians. 

Contrary to a prevalent impression. Father DeSmet was not a 
missionary, in the sense in which Ravalli and D'Aste in Montana, 
for instance, were, and very many others, whose lifetimes of service 
are recorded, on earth, only in certain aging registers and on scat- 
tered gravestones in remote mountain valleys. He was nearly forty 
years old when he was sent as a missionary to the Potawatomies at 
Council Bluffs, and, save for the couple of years he spent with 
them, was never permanently located with any Indian tribe. But 
besides that the voice of Nature within him always called him back 
to the West, his remarkable gifts, which gave him, it has been said, 
the greatest influence over the Indians ever possessed by a white 
man, made him the constant mark for appeals for help, from Gov- 
ernment quarters, from the tribes themselves, and from those who 
had the conduct of the Catholic missions in their charge. Thus it is 
that (he mentions in a letter of 1849 having received within two days 
petitions from the Blackfeet, Crows, Sioux and Comanches; thus 
it was that for five years Bishop Lamy, of Santa Fe, was (no doubt) 
moving both heaven and earth to get him down into his country, and 
that ten years later Governor Gilpin of Colorado was working to 
the same end ; thus it was that a high official from Rome, sent over 

•Largely from letters never published. 



/ or 



FROM FIFTY YEARS AGO 57 

to straighten out Western aflfairs, greeted him with, "Father, you 
should be among the Indians." "Here I am. Send me !" responded 
Father DeSmet, already white with his sixty years. But it was not 
to be. 

"There are many," says a recent writer in Out West, "who have 
felt this spell of the West." Many indeed, from the day when one 
of Lewis and Clark's men turned back, when almost in sight of 
civilization, because the mountains called him. Father DeSmet was 
undoubtedly a signal instance of a man of the highest type — he sentit 
son gentilhomme ct, une lieue — falling completely under his spell. 
It is easy to recognize the symptoms now, though the disease had not 
been diagnosed in his day. "It has always seemed to me," he wrote, 
"that wlien one travels over the plains he feels more inclined to 
prayer, meditation, confidence in God." That was on his first jour- 
ney. It was not until he had crossed the mountains many times, 
wintered among them, learned the terrific Columbia and penetrated 
far north, and then returned to the deadly dullness of his office, that 
he perceived what had happened to him. "Pray hard that I may soon 
be sent back to my dear and beloved children of the plains," he writes 
in 1849 to one of his brethren; and "I regret very much the plains, 
the Indians, the wilderness with all its privations, miseries and dan- 
gers — these were treats indeed compared with the monotony with 
which I am surrounded." From this time onward this untameable 
desire never wholly disappears from at least his intimate letters, and 
it was with him on his deathbed. His last errand out-doors was to 
"bless" a new steamboat, built for the Upper Missouri traffic; the 
boat was named ^or him, and on it were rooms fitted up specially 
for his occupancy. It was to start for the upper country in a few 
days ; there the unchanged mountains were waiting. Was he assailed 
by a sudden temptation to go to them again, and die there? He 
returned to his room, strangely agitated, and never left it. That 
night he was feverish, and in a few days more he was dead. One 
can imagine what visions haunted his dying sight, and that he fancied 
himself on the boat, toiling up the great river once more through the 
scenes he knew so well. 

But he was an obedient member of a great Society, under orders ; 
he likens himself to a soldier. The post assigned him was that of 
procurator, or business man, of the Province of Missouri — a very 
onerous office. "We are overburthened," he writes once, in the 
quaint English into which he sometimes fell. "Letters pour in from 
all quarters, which keep us much busy." Besides the correspond- 
ence, he had the money affairs to look after, accounts with Europe 
and the Government, real estate and building operations at many 
points, branch missions and stations to oversee. It was only when 
his superiors could excuse him and somebody could be found to take 
his place that he could do anything personally for the Indian. It 



58 OUT WEST 

is this that makes so remarkable the extent of what he actually 
accomplished. 

This is why Bishop Lamy begged in vain for years for his- help 
among the Indians of the Southwest. "Oh, if we could have Father 
DeSmet here among our Indians !" was the burden of his letters to 
the Provincial, DeSmet's immediate superior. Once at least he vis- 
ited St. Louis to urge his petition in person; and at last he gained 
it, as it seemed. In January of 185 1, Father DeSmet has the promise 
of being relieved at St. Louis, and "hopes to be back among the 
Indians soon." But they reckoned without the General of the 
Order. 

What is done within the walls of the San Gesii at Rome is not 
the business of anyone. The apparent mystery surrounding the 
headquarters of the great Society has made it the prey of writers of 
domance, in France and elseWhere, though it is, very possibly, no 
greater than that maintained about the center of any large organiza- 
tion. DeSmet's papers contain copies of letters to the Father Gen- 
eral, but the voice in reply is inaudible to the outside world. A few 
quoted phrases, brief and in Latin, that is all ; rari apparent nantes. 

Father DeSmet had written him in February of the foregoing year 
to the effect that he was "better of his rheumatism," and ready to 
hit the trail for the plains any minute. Apparently no opposition was 
looked for from this quarter a year later, for in January, 185 1, he 
writes a friend that he hopes to visit soon "the Comanches in Bishop 
Lamy's diocese." The plan as now formulated was this. A new 
bishopric was to be established in the Trans-Mississippi. Popes have 
an awkward trick of taking away the best men from the Society of 
Jesus to make bishops of them, and the fact appears to be that 
DeSmet had with difficulty ave^rted this relative calamity from him- 
self; it had finally fallen upon one Miege, and bulls to that effect 
had been promulgated, appointing him Vicar Apostolic among the 
Indians east of the Rocky Mountains, and Superior of all the Indian 
Missions. Miege was, however, it would seem, no Indian man, and 
at once applied for DeSmet to stand back of him. The idea was 
extremely attractive to Father DeSmet; he writes in the highest 
spirit of the prospect of "taking Bishop Miege's bull to buffalo- 
grass," and is full of joyous jokes all through the spring. He had 
not seen the mountains in five years ; and it was not every day that 
one got a tenderfoot to initiate into the pleasures of wilderness life. 
He promised him "some of the finest dog-steaks that their country 
affords" as soon as they should arrive among the tribes. He planned 
to accompany him for "at least one or two years," introducing him 
to his new charges, and then himself to cross over into the Oregon 
country; with the hope of arranging to stay permanently, perhaps 
among the Flatheads and their neighbors? I cannot tell. He is 



FROM FIFTY YEARS AGO 59 

very busy and very happy all this spring. He is getting the affairs 
of his office in shape to leave, and records a discreet hope that "there 
will be no book-keeping in heaven ;" he has also to raise funds for 
the Miege expedition, which is no light matter, as money is worth 
20 per cent, and hard to get at that; he is "up to the ears in busi- 
ness." Then in April a new element is introduced into the plan. 
The Government has projected a grand Peace Council with all the 
plains tribes, to be held on the Platte that summer, and DeSmet's 
aid is urgently invoked ; so it is decided that Miege shall start without 
him (which he does about the middle of May), and DeSmet shall 
go up the river by the Fur Company's June boat, lead the Crows, 
Mandans, Aricaras and Sioux to the Council, and then join him as 
before arranged. 

Now comes the tragedy, the story of which is told in a letter that 
is scarcely legible, giving pathetic evidence of grief and soul-torment. 
The boat was waiting to start, when a communication arrived from 
the Father General, laying at DeSmet's door grave charges concern- 
ing the mountain missions, alleging concern for his health and dis- 
approving of his going among the Indians again. The mountain 
missions were in a bad way, and those in charge laid the blame upon 
Father DeSmet. He had planned on a scale — "made promises to the 
Indians," they said — which they found themselves unable to carry 
out. It was true ; but the fault was not with DeSmet, but with that 
Providence that seeth not as men see. DeSmet went among the 
Potawatomies a comparatively young man, or what is more to the 
purpose, fresh from his sheltered community life; he found his In- 
dians at the lowest point of a tribe's degradation, when they have well 
learned the new and lovely vices of the whites, and the reconstructive 
work has not begun. It never did begin with some of them, because 
there was no tribe left when that time came. DeSmet had sense; 
he was dissatisfied with his prospects for usefulness among the Pota- 
watomies ; he prayed much, no doubt. And then came down the 
river, which he had watched for two years rolling its fascinating 
floods past his cabin, certain Indians from the mysterious regions of 
the Northwest, seeking the white man's prayer, which they had 
heard of at their homes. Humble searchers after the Creator's will, 
sending to St. Louis in the '30's upon rumors of a new light among 
the whites, as they did to Nevada in the '8o's when a Messiah of their 
own race was reported, and as they will no doubt continue to do 
hereafter. Just where among our own people do we find a counter- 
mart to this phenomenon? The sight fired DeSmet's imagination, 
as it did that of many pious men further East. It was an answer to 
his prayers. He dreamed of a glorious Christian community in 
those remote mountains, far from the white man's contamination — 
perhaps a new empire, a place made ready for another seat for Saint 
Peter; for those were troubled times in Italy, and it is permissible 



6o OUT WEST 

for a member of the Society of Jesus to glimpse great plans. So he 
went among the Indians, and from them to Europe, and to each he 
gave "poetical and exaggerated accounts of the other" — at least so 
they turned out; for the mountains were not far enough away, and 
before the missionaries got well started, our active compatriots, 
frenzied financiers of the liquor and mining industries, were at their 
heels. Father DeSmet did not foresee the course of events in the 
Northwest; but neither did Daniel Webster. 

So he is rebuked in his fiftieth year, and in as deep trouble as can 
befall a missionary, which has come upon him, too, at the crudest 
possible time. Overwhelmed, he lays the letter before his Provincial 
and the council; they decide that the Government's errand may be 
done, taking upon themselves to make it right with the Father 
General; but that Miege and Lamy and their Indians must look 
elsew'here. So Father DeSmet starts on the waiting boat ; but the 
smiling landscape looks not as in other springs to his eyes, nor as he 
had seen it in anticipation. 

Shortly cholera breaks out; DeSmet escapes with his life, but 
buries in the river sand his beloved companion. Father Hoeken. He 
escorts the delegates of the northern tribes overland to the Grand 
Farce on the Platte, but there is none of his customary light-hearted- 
ness in his journal ; he makes a somewhat labored record of events, 
and a "map of hitherto unknown rivers, lakes and mountains," 
which goes to Washington with the new treaty; but there is surely 
no "poetry and exaggeration" any more. Arrived again in St. Louis, 
his friend and superior, the Provincial, is dead also. Thus do 
sorrows heap themselves, as they have been known to do to others, 
upon this good man. 

Almost his first care is to write Bishop Lamy, renewing his prom- 
ise to visit his Apaches and Comanches "some day if able." Then 
he quietly takes up his duties as procurator again. But there has 
been a change in the man. "I am brought low indeed," he writes 
to one; to another, "I am singularly afflicted and deprest by the 
charge of being the couse of misfortune, and of the destruction and 
abandonment of the Rocky Mountain missions." If an outsider can 
without indelicacy pry into the mind of a churchman, he was a 
broken-hearted and hopeless man this winter, and in the spring he 
had decided to give everything up, as appears in a very remarkable 
letter. He will, if allowed, return to Europe, there to spend the 
rest of his days "in the strict practice and observance of our holy 
rules, and in a perfect submission to the orders of my superiors." 
It "will be a struggle for me" to leave America, but he hopes to be 
"still useful to it, though at a distance." "I feel the necessity of this, 
after having passed so many years in the wild and distant missions of 
America, in which all my thoughts and endeavors have, as it were. 



FROM FIFTY YEARS AGO 6i 

so long been centred, in the midst of great struggles and contradic- 
tions. The examples of the beautiful death of Father Hoeken, whom 
the Lord has deigned to crown on the very battle-field, and the death 
of our worthy Father Elet, so edifying to us all, have made a deep 
impression upon my mind, by which I hope I shall profit till the end. 
May God's will be done." 

But this plan of retirement, too, was denied him ; and he spent the 
rest of his days, until death came upon him in serene old age twenty 
years later, attached to the St. Louis branch ; going among the upper 
tribes when occasion arose, and always ready to expose his life in 
their behalf ; called upon more and more often by the Government to 
act as peace-maker ; serving a year as army chaplain with this 
object; friend of Benton, Weed, the Blairs, Sherman, Rosecrans, 
Pleasanton ; always thinking on the Indian Question, the solution he 
had dreamed of in his early enthusiasm long abandoned, the dreadful 
problem growing more gloomy year by year, and he no more able 
than any other statesman, white or red, to see a way out of it. 

In 1853 Miege again wanted him to go among the tribes with him ; 
but he was sent to Europe instead. The next year the disturbed state 
of white men's affairs in Kansas and Nebraska seems to have kept 
Miege himself at home. Bishop Lamy came again, returning from 
Rome with permission from the higher powers this time for DeSmet 
to go with him among the Pueblos, Comanches and Navajos, and 
"absolutely determined to take me along with him ; but I could not 
at that moment leave my post here." He "may have a chance yet 
to go," he writes one friend ; "would return to the Indians tomorrow 
if I could" ; to another, "the years spent among the Indians I call 
the happiest of my life," and "prays to be allowed to spend the rest 
of his days in the Far West." He in fact entertained a hope of going 
to the Southwest in the spring of 1855; but several years of travel, 
mainly in Europe, supervened. 

The tale flags in interest ; but the man's earnestness never flagged. 
In the fall of '59 he resigned his army chaplaincy in Oregon, and 
crossed the mountains to Fort Benton, meaning to go south, as he 
tells us, overland from there and reach the Comanches at last ; but 
horses were not to be had, and he gave it up again. From letters 
written before starting on this expedition, it appears that he had not 
expected to return from it. "I am about to pay a last visit to my 
children of the plains," he wrote, "from which I may probably never 
return." It is likely that he had in mind the hardships of travel 
and the perils of war ; but he was deceived again, for he came back 
from the journey, as usual, better off physically than when he started. 
Father Congiato, the Superior of the Rocky Mountain Missions, 
had, however, in fact, applied to Rome for orders to keep DeSmet in 
the mountains ; but this too was refused. 



62 OUT WEST 

In 1861 he writes, "I would hardly dare offer my services anew, 
for age is creeping rapidly upon me." Still, in 1866, when William 
Gilpin, first territorial governor of Colorado, came again with the 
old appeal in behalf of the Spanish-speaking Indians, he was ready 
with helpful suggestions and even began to plan once more how it 
might be done. But the plains were on fire now. The tribes, seeing 
that no other way of happiness was open to them, had declared for a 
short life and a merry one, and were out to kill and be killed as 
largely as possible in the time that was left them. The middle West 
was no place for peace-makers nor missionaries. Still, even two 
years after this, when the call of duty reached him in his retirement, 
the old man, sole of all the white race able to do it, journeyed again 
to the North and penetrated to the bloody lair of Sitting Bull, the 
Dakota; and not only reached him and took his terrible hand in 
safety, but brought him out for one more peace council with his 
Great Father in Washington. 

So Father Pierre-Jean DeSmet never got to the Southwestern In- 
dians ; but it may be that his fame reached them. For wherever this 
man went — and 112 tribal names are listed in the index to his pub- 
lished writings — the wild men believed him. He showed them that 
it was possible for a white man to meet the highest requirements of 
the Indian ideal of character ; and so, perhaps, his soul is still working 
on toward the still, distant solution of the ancient Indian Question. 
North Yakima, Wash. 



IV 



AD VIATORES 

By CHRISTOPHER STAPLETON 
E ARE off, gallant hearts, to the West, 
Where the limitless gray of the sage 
Lies, tufting earth's undulant breast 
To the hurrying hub of the stage ! 



We are off to the West, and its pines ; 

To the river's first leap from its fount ! 
Where the face of the wild ever shines, 

And the sky-sculptured spires ever mount ! 

We are off to the West — to the call 
Of the mountains and torrent-shock ; 

To the song of the wind, and the fall 
Of white rivers that roar on the rock ! 
Virginia City, Nev. 




6i 
CHISPAH 

By JENNET JOHNSON 
ALF a dozen of us were chatting on the verandah one 
afternoon. Mr. Porter had been showing a small boy 
various sailors' knots with the awning ropes, and we 
had all been hoping for a reminiscence. 

As usual it came out of the unexpected. A discus- 
sion of the advantage of a deeply rooted family tree to the young 
person who has to strike out for himself doesn't promise much — but 
down went the awning rope, and Mr. Porter clasped both hands 
around his knees (a promising sign). 

"It's the cross-breeds that are brainy, every time," he said. "Thor- 
oughbreds are fools. And it's as true of animals as of men. You 
see it in Eastern and Western horses clearly." 

(We settled down happily.) 

"Now, you should have known Chispah." 

(You could depend upon Mr. Porter never to begin a story with, 
"I had a horse once.") 

"Chispah was a scrawny little bronco, dirty pine-needle color, with 
her nose smashed in and a scrub tail. I remember the first time I 
saw her. Joe Hadley was terribly hard up, and as I needed a horse, 
I had just about promised to take his, if I liked her. He brought her 
around about dusk one evening, but even a New Mexico twilight 
couldn't make her handsome. It couldn't hide another thing, either, 
and that was the meanness and the strength of that horse's character. 
I knew from the first glance at that hairy-headed figure that Chispah 
had a mind of her own, and the more I looked the more mind I saw. 

"Joe shuffled around a little, then blurted out: 'It's no use trying 
to fool you. Porter ; that horse is the best piece of concentrated cussed- 
ness in New Mexico. She's killed almost every man that's ever 
owned her, and she broke my leg last year. But I'll say one thing 
for her — she is the cleverest lady I've ever known.' 

"I'd been surmising that, myself, and I saw something else that I 
liked — there was no ugliness in Chispah's eye. If she was a devil, 
she had rules of the game and played it like an artist. 

"That night Chispah was in my corral, and Hadley went off, jin- 
gling his pocket and promising to hang himself if I prematurely 
crossed the Great Divide through Chispah's agency. 

"Well, I let the people at the Fort shake their heads, and for a 
week I spent my mornings out on the mesa — Chispah and I and a 
lariat. 

"My! What mornings those were! Chispah never used an un- 
necessary muscle. She'd stand like a saw-horse until I was in the 
saddle, and then — she'd walk off on her hind legs. Will you believe 
that I spent most of the week wrestling with that trick ? Throw her 



64 OUT WEST 

with the lariat — up she'd get and do it again! It was one of the 
finest bits of will I ever saw in my life, and I hated to break it, some 
way. Wonder if missionaries don't feel so when they break a fine, 
old, first-class heathen into a docile, follow-the-music, little Chris- 
tian. My, what a lot the heathen loses — from the artist's standpoint. 

"But after a while I decided that Chispah and I must be moving 
on to something new. So I threw her ten times one day — and she 
never walked on her hind legs with me again. 

"I knew that night, when I put her in the corral, that she was 
mine henceforth, body and mind. Not that she rubbed her nose on 
my coat or did any Black Beauty stunts — that wasn't Chispah's style. 
She only stood where I had left her and watched me go up to the 
house — watched me with those green eyes of hers — then gave a shrug 
and went to her supper — and I understood. 

"Did Chispah understand things? Let me tell you what she had 
learned before I had her a month. Whenever I said 'Down!' she'd 
drop under me on all fours like a kitten. She'd change her gait at 
the word of command — the mere word, mind you, not a motion of 
the bridle or knees. I'd say, 'Run,' and if I didn't look out I'd be 
left behind in the mud ; 'Trot !' — and she'd break into a trot in a flash. 

"To amuse the Boy, I trained her to ask for her dinner. He down 
when I was in the saddle and all those circus tricks. No, not all; I 
wouldn't make a horse lose her self-respect, even if she would do it 
gladly for me. And Chispah learned everything as easily as the 
brightest youngster in school. Everything that horse could do. Yes, 
ma'am — everything but talk. 

"You mustn't think that after Chispah's conversion she lost all her 
old character. Siie was only converted to me and my wife and the 
Boy. Chispah still hated people by nature — children especially — 
hated 'em like snakes. When one of the youngsters coming from 
school passed too near the hitching post — whist ! back would go her 
ears and her eyes would show ugly fire-spots. But after I had taken 
the Boy up and introduced him, Chispah knew that she was to be 
fond of hinij or she needn't love me. 

"Day after day I've seen the Boy taking bare-back rides around the 
corral. And I felt just as safe as if he had been on a rocking horse 
in the nursery — neither of which he ever owned, by the way. 

"He would walk under her, and make her show him her new shoes 
all day, if he pleased, and not a motion of an eyelash. And in all their 
plays she showed by the careful way she put her feet down, that she 
realized she must restrain her energy or she'd do some damage. 

"So, though Chispah held out hard against a new will, when she 
gave in, she gave in frankly and wholly. As for being affectionate 
and demonstrative, I knew I couldn't teach her that, any more than 
you can teach those things to people. The largest part of Chispah's 



CHISPAH 65 

heart was an organ of respect. I'm sure respect was the basis of her 
fondness for me. A gentle, conciHatory approach would have made 
her contemptuous, but those ten tumbles in one day won her ad- 
miration completely. 

"You like an affectionate horse better? I don't. The few times 
when Chispah came out of her reserve were worth all the whinny- 
ings of all the family horses I ever saw. 

"For instance, take the case of Tub. Chispah hated dogs among 
other things, and she didn't know that Tub was the Boy's new ter- 
rier. Before we had a chance to introduce them properly. Tub 
rushed down to the corral one morning and introduced himself. 

"I wasn't an eye witness, but my wife said that a ball of black and 
white flew straight into the air before it had time to yelp. So, later 
that day, the Boy and I took Tub out to the post where Chispah stood 
switching flies. Tub was reluctant, but I put him down by Chispah's 
head and I held him there and I said, 'Chispah, this is Tub.' 

"Tub evidently accepted it on the spot, like the honest little fellow 
he was, for that same afternoon I saw him asleep in the shadow of 
Chispah and the hitching-post, out there in the dusty road. 

"I tell you, you never could tell what was going on behind those 
inscrutable eyes. That is what I told everyone who had any dealings 
with Chispah, so it wasn't my fault if they didn't take care. 

"One noon I rode over to the barracks and left Chispah tied in 
front of the mess-room. I was always careful to isolate my lady, 
but on this occasion some kind fellow came along and turned her 
into the corral with half a dozen other horses. 

"When I looked out and noticed that Chispah was gone, I drew 
my conclusions, and by the time they were drawn I was at that corral 
prepared to see some bones and hanks of hair lying around. But all 
was peaceful as a school-hour. The bunch was calmly walking to 
the watering-trough, Chispah in the lead. 

"But as she was putting her nose down comfortably in the water, 
a big, smart gray of the Captain's shoved in and bit her neck. Well, 
I expected — I don't know what I expected — but I retreated a safe 
distance from the loose boards of that corral ! 

"Nothing happened. Chispah merely looked around out of those 
deep eyes of hers, sort of sized up the gray, pushed back through the 
bunch, and walked to the other side of the corral. 

"When I told the fellows about it, I told the Captain that he'd 
better keep his gray away from Chispah for some time. If you'd 
ever seen a man's eyes when a brother turned the joke on him too 
far in the mess-room, you'd know how Chispah had impressed me. 

"Well, a month passed and there was nothing doing. My wife 
and I speculated a little at first upon the extent of a horse's memory, 
then we forgot the matter. 



66 OUT WEST 

"Then the Gymkhanas came off. Chispah did her duty as quietly as 
a lamb and a couple of men even asked me if I'd train their horses 
before the next meet. Well, when the races were half over, I left 
Chispah standing on the side line while I ran back to speak to the 
referee. Her head was hanging and hr eyes were blinking like the 
last shreds of animation in a dray-horse. While I was talking to 
Syms, I saw the Captain ride up on his shiny gray and stop near 
Chispah to talk to some ladies. The gray looked at Chispah in a 
saucy way, but Chispah only blinked and dropped her head lower. It 
was the prettiest bit of weariness with life that I've ever seen acted. 

"After a while the gray got tired of trying to take a rise out of her 
neighbor and turned away in disgust. Then, I tell you, things hap- 
pened! Like a flash old Chispah turned herself sharp behind the 
gray — and then — 

"Well, the Captain stopped his steed half a mile away, but Chis- 
pah's neat little hoof-marks hadn't added much beauty to that shiny 
coat. 

"When I decided to leave New Mexico, Herndon, a young officer, 
came running over to buy. He was always keen after a bargain, but 
he was sometimes afflicted with cold feet. They attacked him when 
I put gentle Chispah's bridle into his hand and invited him to take a 
sample. He may have seen Chispah's little attention to the big gray, 
or he may have heard about it — anyway, he hung back. 

" 'I'd like to see the gait, first,' he said ; 'the figure she puts up and 
all that. You show her oflf^ Porter !' 

"I wish you had seen Chispah go off with me. No, 'go off' is really 
too strong an expression. It was what the darkies call 'inching,' I 
guess. She was a shambling, flop-eared mule, a beetle, a snail — I 
wondered if she had life enough to raise the next foot. 

" 'So,' I said to her as we crawled back into Herndon's presence, 
'so you don't want to be sold, old girl ?' 

"Herndon's superciliousness stood out all over him. 'Thought you 
said a horse for sale,' he jeered. 

"I handed him the bridle. 'Perhaps she will go better for you.' 

"I wish I had a photograph of that smile as Herndon ascended, and 
an enlarged one of the expression that followed it. 

"He was in one stirrup when the dust cleared away so that I could 
see Chispah at the end of the road, petitioning heaven with her front 
and hind feet alternately. 

"Herndon tumbled away home, the palest man you ever saw. I 
looked hard into Chispah's eyes, but she dropped her head and ambled 
wearily after me to the corral. I've never known her to smile outside, 
anyway. 

"Yes, 1 finally sold her to Lieutenant Littlebrant. He had devil 
enough in him to appeal to Chispah, I guess. Anyway, they got 



CHISFAH 67 

along all right together. I never saw him ride her much, of course, 
but Littlebrant wasn't a fellow who allowed any will in his atmos- 
phere except his own — ot a horse's, nor a dog's, nor a woman's, nor 
a man's. 

"One of the men wrote me, after I'd been gone a couple of months, 
about a little affair between Chispah and her new master. 

"I'd told Littlebrant that he could do almost anything with her as 
long as he didn't use spurs. But I told him if he ever tried that 
scheme, he'd be sorry — and sure enough he was. 

"Dickson wrote that he and Littlebrant were riding 'cross desert 
to town, and Littlebrant suggested a race. Now, Chispah was a 
pretty spry beast, but evidently Dickson's Peanuts ran her too close 
to suit Littlebrant. He pulled up and asked Dickson to lend him a 
spur. Dickson advised him not to try any experiments, but Little- 
brant said Chispah was a 'sly little cuss' and had 'worked on old 
Porter's feelings.' 'I'll be at the adobe ten minutes before you,' he 
boasted, and dug sharp into Chispah's flank. 

"Dickson says he never in his life saw a man stick on so well as 
Littlebrant. He rode like an Indian, but even then Dickson knew that 
he had lost control. Chispah was running wild, straight for an ar- 
royo, and Dickson held his breath. He got Peanuts up there as fast 
as he could, but there was no time to do anything. They were flying 
right on into that gully — at least so it seemed. 

"But when Chispah got to the very edge, Dickson says she stopped 
so short that it made him wink — and over her head sailed Littlebrant 
— Lord High Dignity Littlebrant — like a weak Roman candle, and 
landed in a clump of sage-brush on the other side. 

"Dickson said that Chispah simply shook herself and stood still. 
He didn't know that it was a shrug, and that a shrug was the ex- 
pression of Chispah's smile. Great mind, Chispah had." 

Mr. Porter shook his head and smiled and picked up a magazine 
lying in the hammock. Eleanor, who loves "Black Beauty" and has 
literary ambitions, leaned forward reproachfully. "How could you 
bear to part with her ?" she asked. 

We all smiled a little, but Chispah's master stooped and picked 
up the awning rope. His Panama shaded his face, but I saw that his 
lips were not smiling. 

"Oh, you mustn't care, you know, if you're a tramp," he said 
lightly. 

Recllands, CaL 




68 our WEST 

MITTENS IN HIS ARIZONA TENT 

By THERESA RUSSELL. 
F YOU can't keep cool, Mittens," said Mother Eve, 
"keep as cool as you can." 

That was when she caught me hanging over the can- 
teen. In those, the days of my petite and fluffy youth, 
keeping cool was the problem of existence. I asked 
Spottie what they meant by a problem of existence, and he said it 
was how to enjoy yourself when you were not having a good time. 

"The best solution," he added, "comes from Texas. It consists 
in repeating a charm that says, / like it better that-a-way." 

But there certainly was a charm about that canteen ; and the 
oftener it was repeated, the better it worked. When Mother Eve 
would bring it in, all dripping and cool, and hang it up in the breeze, 
I would watch her with my gleaming eye until I saw her back, then 
with one bound I would be sprawling over the top between the 
straps, swaying gently back and forth, and feeling ripply little thrills 
from my front paws drooping over one side, clear to my tail grace- 
fully extending down the other. But alack ! I am soon discovered 
and handed down. 

"It's always the way, Mittie!" remarks Mother Eve. "Extension 
of enjoyment is in inverse proportion to its intensity." 

When I asked Spottie to translate that for me, he said "It means 
the more you want a thing the more you can't have it." 

Yet it has been my experience that even if you can't have it, you 
can have something anyhow, if you yawp loud and long enough 
for it. 

"But I shall now lay down the Law of Compensation," Mother 
Eve would go on to say. 

It didn't look like that to me. It looked like a plain old gunny-sack 
soused into a tub of cold water and spread on the floor of the tent. 
But whatever its name, it certainly did feel good. After one trial, 
Spottie and I would take possession of it without even a prelim- 
inary sniff, roll on it, tumble on it, and try to spread as much of our 
hot little bodies on it as we could. 

"I wish," said Mr. Adam one day. "I had some one to pay as 
much attention to me as you do to those kittens." 

"Well," replied Mother Eve, winking confidentially at me — I 
courteously returned the wink — "whenever I see you going around 
here gasping for breath, with a strip of pink tongue lolUng out, I'll 
fix a wet blanket for you too." 

"Would I be expected to purr my thanks also?" 

"Any natural, spontaneous expression would be acceptable. When 
Mittens is taken with an extra spasm of gratitude, he licks my hand, 
and does it, too, with all the fervor and passion of prayer." 



MITTENS IN HIS ARIZONA TENT. 69 

"It is prayer — the same admixture of 'Thank you,' and 'Please' 
that we mortals present to the Divinity whose unseen hand feeds us." 

When Mother Eve and Mr. Adam would fall to talking like that, 
they seemed to forget everything else, and I would often have to 
remind them about dinner. It was lucky for them that I never for- 
got. Spottie was not to be depended on, either, as he was apt to be 
ofT stalking birds and baby cottontails. He was particularly fond of 
birds. He said they appealed to his aesthetic sense — but there was 
no use of their appealing to anything, once he had fixed them with 
his glittering eye. It was this artistic taste of his that came near 
leading him into trouble later on, and that too, just when he was 
exulting in a golden opportunity. Mother Eve had imported some 
funny, two-legged little beasts she called Hens. They had stiff, 
shiny fur, and a curious habit of talking constantly, aloud but in low 
religious tones, as they paced solemnly about, chewing up little peb- 
bles and bugs and grasshoppers. I never admired them much, but 
Spottie's scientific temperament led him to take an interest in them. 
One day he went flashing by the tent, all porcupiny with excitement, 
exclaiming "See there ! One of those old hens has found a whole 
bunch of little birds. Won't that be a grand feast, and so easy !" 
And in a trice he had pounced on one of the toddling yellow balls, 
and was off like a coyote. But Mother Eve had detected him. 

"Spottie!"' she called, and her voice sounded queer, as if she 
wanted to cry, but didn't have time, "Drop it, you scamp! You 
know better than that!" 

But Spottie sped on and she gave him a merry chase down to the 
river bank, soon returning, however, looking so dangerous that I 
quietly slipped under the tent. 

"Spottie has caught and eaten a little chicken!" she announced; 
and while I didn't see anything so tragic about that, I quaked for 
Spottie. 

"Wherefore I take it that the predatory Spot must mend his ways 
in this world or he'll find himself translated to the next," commented 
Mr. Adam, and his voice showed that he didn't sense the situation 
either, or realize how terrible it was. What would have happened 
I can't imagine, but some hours afterward Mr. Adam came up from 
the river with the chicken in his hand, alive and chirping in the 
absurd, infantile way that chickens have. 

"Why, what in the world ! Where did you find it ?" cried Mother 
Eve, beaming joyously. 

"Way down yonder in the sage-brush," he replied. "You scared 
poor Spot so badly that he dropped his quarry alive. I happened to 
hear it down there, yelping lustily for mamma, but as soon as it 
heard me it hushed up and hid so cleverly I had a good long hunt for 
it. Curious instinct, that of lying low when in danger — and, like 



70 OUT WEST 

most instincts, it is blind to the difference between real danger and 
salvation." 

So Spottie was pardoned and caught no more chickens. He said 
there was no real sport in it anyway, and that, after all, there was 
no game like mice. Now that was a sentiment I could sympathize 
with. I just love mice, myself. They are so delicious to play with 
and torment, and so plump and juicy to eat. Up at Virginia Camp, 
where we had a real cat-mother, she used to catch them for us, 
always bringing the first one to me, and even the second and third, if 
I wanted them, before Spottie could have his turn. Mother Eve 
says that is why Spottie has grown up so independent and capable, 
;wihle I am a lazy little fraud, not worth my bacon. Well, what's 
the use of being worth it ? To get or not to get it — that is the point 
And besides, I did try to reciprocate. 

One night, when the big light was hung out in the sky, along with 
all the little lights, I had fine luck hunting and caught more mice 
than I could eat. I was in a quandary (at least, I think that is 
what it was), having no cat-mother to take them to, and Spottie 
off on one of his excursions, when suddenly I had a happy thought. 

"Why, there's Mother Eve. She divides up with me all day, and 
I don't believe she ever has a thing to eat all night. Now's my time 
to divide with her, when I have too much and she hasn't any." 

So I picked out a nice fat mousie, with a long, slender tail, really 
a choice specimen, sprang with it over the board siding of the tent 
(you know they always kept the flaps rolled up so Spottie and I 
could get in and out whenever we pleased), jumped on to my lady's 
little cot and pattered proudly up to her face. She was sound asleep, 
so I had to brush the mouse's tail gently over her eyelids to wake 
her up. And then — upon my soul, this is a strange world ! I recol- 
lected, when I came to, Mr. Adam's saying one time that "women 
were like Providence; their ways were past finding out." 

"Sure," agreed the Colonel, "and we have to have the same faith 
in 'em that we do in Providence — that they mean right well, any- 
how." 

Well, perhaps they do, but they are plumb mystifying. Spottie 
was unsympathetic, as usual. 

"How often must I tell you," he said severely, "that there is only 
one real good, all-round motto that will stand the strain of practice, 
and that is Whatever you do, don't butt in. If you will persist in 
doing it, then don't be astonished if you're butted out again consid- 
erable spry." 

And the very next day Mr. Adam had an experience that proved 
Spottie's thesis to be correct. Mother Eve came up from the river 
bank with a smooth white piece of driftwood about as big round 
as her wrist. Then she began prowling around in the little box 



MITTENS IN HIS ARIZONA TENT. 71 

she called her "pantry," muttering to herself, "Let me see! The 
deepest thing I have to mix it up in is one of these soup-plates." 

Then she spied me sitting on the trunk as usual, watching to see 
if she was going to punch another can of cream. 

"Can you keep a secret, Mittie?" she inquired. But she didn't 
hand anything out to me, and I asked Spottie afterwards what she 
meant by a secret. 

"Why," he said, "it isn't anything; only you have to be careful 
to tell it to just one person at a time." 

But now Mother Eve went on, "We're going to have pie for 
dinner ! Now what do you think of that ? I've discovered a rolling- 
pin and invented a method, and what more do you want ?" 

So she rolled out a little blanket of dough, spread it in a tin plate, 
opened a can of peaches and poured them in and sprinkled sugar 
over the top. Then she mixed up another little sheet for a cover, 
trimmed it off and pinched the edges down, smiling at me all the 
while and humming a foolish little song about "Billy Boy," and how 
"she can make a cherry pie, quicker'n a cat can wink its eye," which 
I know was foolish, because I winked mine forty times before ever 
that pie was finally constructed. But at last it was all crimped and 
frilled, and Mother Eve ran out with it to the Dutch oven already 
heating over the camp-fire coals. However, instead of putting it 
in, she stopped suddenly and wrinkled her forehead all up. 

"What seems to be the trouble?" called out Mr. Adam, just then 
arriving from somewhere. "The prospect looks good to me." 

"May be a case of anticipation versus realization," she replied. "I 
just happened to think, Adam. That old Dutch oven is built on such 
an angle that while this tin will go in at the top easily enough, it 
won't go clear to the bottom. It will stick fast just about half way." 

"Should think it would bake all the better that way." 

"Bake well enough. That's as far as a man -would think. But, 
being baked, how are you going to get it out ? All the way I see is 
to turn the oven upside down and hammer on the bottom till the 
pie falls out." 

"That would be apt to disfigure the pastry some, wouldn't it?" 
said Mr. Adam musingly. "Ah, I have it. Blessed be bailing-wire ! 
We'll just slip a little piece under the tin, with the ends sticking up 
to lift it out by." 

"Noble idea," agreed Mother Eve, and together they lowered the 
precious pie into the yawning black kettle. But alas! It went in 
sideways. 

"Oh, listen at it !" wailed Mother Eve, dancing up and down with 
excitement. "The juice is all trickling out and sizzling on the bot- 
tom. Jerk it up straight, Adam, quick!" 

Thus adjured, Mr. Adam pulled on the wires, but he must have 



iz OUT WEST 

pulled too hard, for in the twinkling of an eye (and no fooling this 
time) that pie had leaped out of the oven and flopped vehemently 
over on to the sand, a battered and a hopeless wreck. Poor Mother 
Eve regarded it with a face that looked like the sky before a storm. 
Then she glanced up accusingly at Mr. Adam, and his looked so 
much worse that she sat down in the sand, now being irrigated with 
peach juice, and laughed till she cried. But that kind of tears never 
worried Mr. Adam any, and the sun came out on his countenance, 
too. 

"Well, Eve," he said, "if you take it that way, this pie will never 
give you indigestion. And if you'll be good enough to achieve an- 
other, I'll build a wire cage for it, with ribs to the four points of 
the compass and a handle on top, and it will work like a top, too." 

"Magnificent and stupendous scheme!" she cried, "whether it 
works or not. You may not be a success as a wire-puller, Adam, 
but you're a gentleman and a scholar." 

"I know what a gentleman is," I said later on to Spottie, when 
I was rehearsing the scene to him. "It's a man who is polite to little 
kittens. Most everyone I know is a gentleman. But I don't remem- 
ber ever hearing about a scholar." 

"They're not so numerous," admitted Spot, "and there are plenty 
of imitations. But the real article is unmistakable. It is simply one 
who has learned the difference." 

Thereupon, dinner being ready, we went in to help the folks eat 
it, and afterwards to help them take their siesta, and generally to 
make ourselves useful. It is a comfort to me to feel myself a useful, 
helpful unit in the social order. But I grieve to say that that idea 
doesn't seem to appeal to Spottie at all. I fear he is growing to be an 
anarchist in politics and an atheist in reUgion. He says life is more 
picturesque and dramatic from that point of view. "But for you,' 
he added, "the beaten trail of orthodoxy will be safer and easier. 
And besides, one of each kind is always better than two of one kind, 
for if 'variety is the spice of life,' sharp contrast is its sauce 
piquantey 

Stanford University. 



H 



SUNSET 

By NEETA MARQUIS 

E DROWNS there in the ruthless, bitter sea — 
The sun who rode triumphantly at noon ; 
While, pale with fright, looks on the helpless moon. 



Imploring fingers of tenacious light 

He still upholds — alas ! where none can save. 
He sinks — Ah, but he waged a gallant fight ! 
Mark where his blood still reddens on the wave. 
Los Angeles. 



73 



^* ORLEANS INDIAN LEGENDS 

By MELCENA BURNS DENNY 




VI. 

THE COYOTE'S JOURNEY TO THE OCEAN 

EE-NAAF-FICH, the Coyote, sat in his sweat-house, 
making twine. For days he did nothing but make 
twine. All the animals began to gossip about it. 
They came one by one and looked in. 
"What are you doing?" they would ask., 
"Only making twine," the Coyote would answer. "Only mak- 
ing twine, twine, twine." 

So they got tired asking him, and he sat there twisting it with 
his fingers and rolling it on his thighs, making piles and piles 
of twine. He didn't even take time to eat, and, when no one 
was around to listen, he sang about what he was going to do. 



t 



^ 



hi ^ J. h-CjUj.j j '' I J 



iU.*ii 



Ki-you-us, ne-wam-a-ich ! Tach-a-nee, tach-a-nee ! 
To the ocean, to get money! Traveling, traveling! 

At last he took notice how hungry he was, for he had not 
eaten for days. He made all the twine into a big money-bag 
and threw it ac;;"oss his shoulder. Then he started out from 
Orleans in the direction of the ocean. 

Pretty soon he came to a sweat-house. He slipped up, looking 
about him sharply, wondering if he would find anything to eat. 
There outside the door was a shallow cup of woven work, and 
it had something in it. It looked awfully good to the Coyote. 

He listened. Inside he could hear someone stirring. He 
dipped a finger into the cup, and thrust it dripping into his 
mouth. It was gooseberry juice. My, but it tasted cool and 
nice! 

Inside he heard a thin, high, little voice singing: 




<?* • 



± 



Na-ni-ni-co-wake ! 
I want to go swim ! 
It was the Lizard sweating. In a minute he would be rush- 
ing out for his swim in the river. The Coyote knew then what 



74 OUT WEST 

the gooseberry juice was waiting there for. In an instant he 
had Hfted the cup and drained it at one swallow. Nothing ever 
tasted so nice in all the world. 

Then the Coyote hid himself. The door was pushed open 
and out ran the Lizard, steaming with sweat. He snatched up 
the cup to drink the juice. There was not a drop left in it. 

"That's the Coyote's doings," said the Lizard aloud. But the 
Coyote stayed hidden. As the Lizard ran on, he made a thought 
in his mind. But he didn't say it aloud. This was the thought, 
and it sang itself to a little tune in the Lizard's mind : 

"I wish*the Coyote would be thirsty. I wish he would go to 
drink and find everything empty and dry." 

As soon as the Coyote heard the Lizard splash into the water, 
he came out from his hiding place and hurried away. As he 
went, he sang to himself how he was going to the ocean to get 
him lots of money. But he was fearfully hungry. He kept 
looking around for something to eat. Away ahead of him he 
saw smoke. 

"That is someone's house," he thought, and he began to sneak 
up again, ready to steal anything he might see. But it was not 
a house. It was a forest burning. He kept going, and kept 
going, and he kept singing: "I want to eat! I want to eat! 
Doesn't matter where ! I want to eat !" 

Then he saw a mole. It was roasted by the fire. He picked 
it up and ate it. It was so sweet! It was so nice! Then he 
saw another. He ate that, too. 

Pretty soon he came to a patch of Indian strawberries. They 
were thick as pebbles, and shone red and bright among their 
green leaves. He sat down and ate. They were so sweet ! 
They were so nice ! He ate until there wasn't one left. 

Then he went on. The fire had died out, and all through the 
forest, where it had been burning, the ground was scattered over 
with roasted moles and roasted grasshoppers. 

First he ate a grasshopper. Oh, it was so sweet, so nice ! 
Then he ate a mole. It was so sweet, so nice, too. Then he 
ate more moles, and more grasshoppers, and more Indian straw- 
berries, until he was ready to burst. 

When he could eat no more he passed on through the forest. 
He began to feel thirsty. He heard a creek running down below 
him, and the sound made him thirstier still. 

"I am so glad, so glad !" he sang to himself, running down 
toward the water. There it was, a clear, sparkling stream, glis- 
tening as it rushed over its clean, smooth stones. It was so wide 
one could not jump it, and so deep one could not wade it. The 
Coyote threw himself across a flat rock and stooped to drink. 



THE COYOTE'S JOURNEY TO THE OCEAN 

His lips touched bare rocks, hot with the noonday sun. 

The Coyote rose to his feet. There was no water anywhere, 
nor any sound of water. The Coyote looked up the stream 
and down the stream. There was not even a tiny pool. Even 
the sand in the crevices was parched and hot. 

The Coyote started slowly on. 

"Oh, what shall I do ! What shall I do !" he kept saying to 
himself as his mouth and throat got drier with thirst. 

Soon he heard another stream. He ran as fast as he could, 
and plunged himself in to drink. There was only dry stone — the 
water that he had stooped to drink was nowhere. 

He went on. He was feeling faint with thirst, and ready to 
drop, but he heard the murmur of another stream. He slipped 
up to it, hiding himself behind trees and boulders. The water 
bubbled over green moss and glittering pebbles. It wasn't a 
very big stream. The Coyote, still keeping himself hidden, took 
off his blanket, rolled it up, and threw it with all his might into 
the middle of the brook. He thought he could suck the water 
out of it, but the instant it touched the stream every drop of 
water vanished. Not even the corner of the blanket was wet. 

The Coyote looked at the blanket a while, and then went on, 
leaving it there. He heard a sound like wind, and he thought 
it was the ocean. He went on, and went on, and soon he saw 
that it was the river, down by Happy Camp. He wandered 
around till that was where he was. He was so weak he could 
scarcely walk along. At last he came to the edge of it. 

He lay down feebly across a big round stone, and leaned over 
toward the water. As his mouth drew close to it, the water 
shrank away and shrank away as he bent lower and lower. He 
could feel its coolness against his lips, but he could never quite 
touch it. If he drew up, the water rose again. It plagued him 
and played with him. At last he bent so low that all at once 
he fell in. 

The water was taken by surprise, and so was the Coyote. He 
nearly drowned before he could get his head out. Then the 
water floated him down, down, down toward the ocean. He was 
so cold he could not swim, and so weak it was all he could 
do to keep his head up. For three days and nights he floated. 
Then he came to the ocean, and the water washed him up on the 
beach. 

He lay there. He tried to get up. After a while he got up. 
He was so weak, and sick, and hungry, and cold. He saw a 
smoke. He made his way slowly toward it. 

Soon he came to two houses. In one he heard talk and laugh- 



76 OUT WEST 

ter, and a sound as if people were eating. The other was empty. 
He went in. 

It was a sweat-house. There was a fire burning, and it was 
nice and warm. One side of the sweat-house was built up of 
wood. He put some more on the fire. He began to feel good. 
He wanted to lie down and rest. He saw several pillows, which 
were the bodies of seals with the fur still on. He lay down on 
one. It felt soft and comfortable. Then he felt hungry. He 
ate one of the pillows. It was all fine grease. Then he ate 
another pillow. These were the two smallest. The grease and 
fat made him feel fine and warm. 

Then he began to feel afraid. The people in the other house 
were moving about. 

The Coyote hid himself in the pile of wood. And none too soon, 
for all the people came into the sweat-house to spend the night. 

They came over to the woodpile to throw more wood on the 
fire, but the Coyote lay still and made no sound. Then the 
people began to lie down, one by one, on their pillows. Two of 
them found that their pillows were gone. 

The people were all sleepy with their eating. 

"That's the Coyote's doings," they all said when they had 
looked the sweat-house over. So they lay down anyhow and 
went to sleep. They seemed to be stupid, good-natured people. 
It didn't trouble them. 

The Coyote went to sleep, too, feeling drowsy with all the fat 
he had eaten. In the morning the people woke up and went 
into the other house to eat again. The Coyote kept hidden in 
the wood. He thought he would wait till they had all gone 
before he slipped away. 

Soon they came back into the sweat-house, and the Coyote was 
glad to hear them begin to plan a long trip. He waited im- 
patiently for them to go. But soon a word caught his ear, 

"Better go up that way, by Oak-o-nahm-han-nich," said one. 

"What is that they call it?" thought the Coyote. "Oak-o-nahm- 
nan-nich? That's the long lake. That's my place. That's 
where I came from !" 

He listened to them make their plans. He felt very homesick 
and far away. Soon he heard the word again. He could not re- 
sist the sound of it. He sprang out from the woodpile and stood 
among them. 

"Oh, take me with you!" he begged. "Oak-o-nahm-han-nich, 
that's my country ! That's where I came from !" 

They laughed at him. 

"Where are the two pillows?" they said. "I guess we are 
likely to take you !" 



EBAS-NOW-WAN-ICH AND THE RED MAN 77 

He begged them hard, but they refused. Then he looked at 
them, and thought hard. They were very dull looking people, 
with no bright colors. 

"I will paint you pretty," he said. "I am a paint man. I will 
paint you all the colors, if you will take me!" 

The people talked among themselves, and finally agreed that 
they would take him if he would let himself be hidden in the 
bottom of the boat and not look out till he heard the boat strike 
the beach for landing. 

The Coyote gladly consented, and he let himself be covered 
with a skin in the bottom of the boat, and he did not look out till 
he heard the boat strike on a rock. Then he sprang out, and 
there was the long lake, and his own country ! 

The people all crowded about him to be painted, and true to 
his promise, he painted them pretty. As he painted them one 
by one, they were changed to ducks and flew away, back to the 
water again, where they had lived when they were people. The 
heads of some he painted green, and he painted their bodies with 
all the different paints, so that you can find eleven colors on them 
to this very day. And on the duck-girls' necks he painted white 
necklaces. Those, too, you can find, if you think about looking 
for them, for they have been wearing them ever since. 

The Coyote was so glad to be back in his own country that 
when he was through painting the duck-people he rolled around, 
and rolled around, and rolled around, kicking and kicking and 
kicking, and rollihg, till the whole place was rolled out flat and 
smooth as any floor. You'd notice it if you visited Orleans, but 
maybe you wouldn't know that it was the Coyote who made it 
so flat and level, because he was so glad to be home once more. 




EDAS-NOW^-'WAN-ICH AND THE RED MAN 

BAS-NOW-WAN-ICH, the Owl who goes hunting 
with a little dog (for such is the meaning of the word 
in the language of the Orleans Indians), was a great 
hunter. Every day he would kill a deer. He would 
go out with his little dog and scare up a deer some- 
where up on the river. The deer would leap into the water and 
swim down stream to get away from the dog. Down stream 
would be waiting Ebas-now-wan-ich's Little Brother, with bow 
and arrows, a boat and a knife. Down would swim the deer. 
Little Brother would watch him, hiding. Little Brother would 
shoot. Little Brother would leap into his boat. He would catch 
the deer and drag him to land. He would kill him with his knife, 
and cut him, loosening his skin, dressing him, drawing the skin 



78 OUT W EST 

together into the sack they call ach-hope, ready for carrying. 
Then Ebas-now-wan-ich would carry him to their home. 

One day Ebas-now-wan-ich scared up a fine deer with his little 
dog. The deer leaped into the river and swam down. Little 
Brother hid, waiting, shot his arrow, rowed out, dragged the deer 
to land, cut him, made him into ach-hope, ready for carrying. 
Then, when Ebas-now-wan-ich was about ready to carry him 
home, down the river came a great naked Red Man, bright red, 
with a long red knife swinging across his bosom by a thong. As 
he walked, the great knife swung back and forth. 

The Owls, Ebas-now-wan-ich as well as Little Brother, were 
frightened by his terrible looks. 

"Let me carry the deer," said the Red Man. "He is too heavy 
for you." 

"All right," agreed the two Owls, for they were too afraid to 
object. 

So the Red Man swung ach-hope up on his back, with the leg- 
straps coming across his forehead. Then he carried the deer ofif. 
The Owls were too afraid to follow. The Red Man took it some- 
where up the river, walking along the bank. 

The next day Ebas-now-wan-ich drove another deer down the 
river, and Little Brother killed it. Again the big Red Man came 
striding down the river bank, swinging his big red knife. 

"Let me carry ach-hope," he said. "The deer is too big for 
you." 

Again the Owls were frightened at his bigness and his red- 
ness, and let him carry off their game. 

Every day they would kill a deer, and every day the Red Man 
would come and carry it off. So Ebas-now-wan-ich and Little 
Brother grew so hungry they could hardly go to hunt. They 
were so thin that they could scarcely walk. 

One day the Coyote walked down the stream and found Little 
Brother waiting. 

"What are you waiting for?" he asked. 

"I am waiting to kill a deer." 

"When did you kill one last?" 

"Yesterday." 

"Then why do you look so hungry?" 

So Little Brother told him how every day they killed a deer 
and the Big Red Man came and made off with it. 

"Why don't you kill him?" asked the Coyote. 

"He is too big for us," said the Owl. 

"Well, I will kill him," replied the Coyote. 



HACH'A-MOOM, THE LOCUST 79 

So he hid himself, and Little Brother hid himself, and soon the 
deer Ebas-now-wan-ich had scared up came swimming down the 
river. Little Brother shot and hit him, and went out in his boat, 
and dragged the deer to land, and loosened his skin, and made 
him into ach-hope, ready for carrying, all according to custom. 
Then the Coyote dropped some heavy rocks into the sack the 
skin made, and hid again. Next came Ebas-now-wan-ich, pre- 
paring to carry off the game, and then came the big Red Man, 
swinging his red knife. This was as it always happened. 

"Let me carry ach-hope," he said. "The deer is too heavy for 
you." 

"All right," agreed the Owls, as they always did. 

So he stooped and placed the straps across his forehead. But 
when he tried to rise, the heavy rocks that the Coyote had slipped 
into the sack of deer skin weighed him down. While he still 
struggled, the Coyote leaped out and struck him again and again 
on his head, until he was dead. 

"You be that kind," he said, and the Red Man changed to an 
alder tree. "No longer come stalking down the river bank taking 
away the game that people kill. Stand by the river and watch 
the deer swim down, and the little hunter shoot him with his 
arrow, and row out and drag him in and make him into ach-hope, 
ready for carrying. But no matter how hungry you are, never 
move from where you stand. Just stand and wave your arms 
and swing your knife, and see if that will frighten them." 

So the naked Red Man was changed into an alder tree. And 
although sometimes, when the wind blows, you can see his knife 
swing across his bosom, he never moves from his tracks and 
frightens no one. You would never guess that he was red at all 
unless you cut into his bark. Then you would see that his blood 
is still as red as when he came scaring Ebas-now-wan-ich and 
Little Brother with his looks, and stealing away their game. 



^ HACH-A-MOON. THE LOCUST 

ACH-A-MOOM, the Locust, was a bad fellow. That 
was in the old days when he was so big everybody 
was afraid of him. He was so big he could do what 
he wanted to, and he never lost a chance to eat a 
man. Just the sound of his voice in the woods was 
enough to frighten anybody, though all he said was one big word. 




3 



Choos-poom ! 




8o OUT WEST 

Anyone who heard it was wise if he ran in the other direction. 
He loved to make the big sound and he went prowling about the 
woods killing folks for the fun of it, and eating everything. 

Now this is the way he came by his death. 

Ach-oo-weish, the Wildcat, and Apar-ach, the Fox, made up 
their minds to rid the woods of the big glutton. So they started 
out with nothing but their muscles and grit. They could hear him 
frightening folks with his thundering, "Choos-poom !" But they 
weren't scared by it. They came close to the place where he 
lived, and a woman came running out of a house and stopped 
them. 

"Where are you going?" she cried. 

"We're going to kill the bad giant that lives in these woods." 

"Not the Locust Man?" 

"Yes, the Locust man," said the Wildcat and Fox. 

"Oh," she said, trying to stop them, "he kills everyone ! He 
will kill you ! He is hungry all the time !" 

But they got past her, and because they were the only people 
who had ever come into the Locust's country, they surprised him. 
They were right up to him before he saw them. 

"Choos-poom !" he roared, making the big noise. It was the 
last time he ever said it, for the Fox clutched him in a strangling 
grasp, and the Wildcat pounded him on the head. But the Lo- 
cust was mostly noise and bluster and it was not hard to kill him. 

"You be that kind !" the Fox said as the big fellow began to 
shrivel. "No need to make your big Choos-poom ! Sit on a tree 
and make a little squeak ! Kill no more men with your noise, 
but eat the green leaves and squeak when the sun shines !" 

With one more blow he let the Locust go, for he had ham- 
mered him down to his present size. And that is why the locust 
is no bigger, though he eats as much in the course of a single 
summer as many a creature ten times his size. 

Berkeley, Cal. 



8i 



« A BOSTONIAN FINDS A NEW HOME. 

Albuquerque, N. M., November 2, 1906. 

My Dear Wife: — My daily postals have already informed you that I 
arrived here a little before noon a week ago today, on the "Flyer," that 
magnificently equipped Santa Fe train running from Chicago to the Pacific, 
with accommodations which make traveling a positive luxury. 

A very large hotel called the "Alvarado" adjoins the depot here. These 
are of the old Moorish architecture, and, with their quaint arches, towers 
and facades, form absolutely the most attractive and beautiful group of 
buildings I have seen since I left Boston. The hotel is managed by the 
Harvey Company, and you already know what they have done and are 
doing for the gastronomic satisfaction of the traveling public. 

As soon as I had registered, the clerk handed me your letter of the 21st, 
and I was soon in thought with you and the children, amid home scenes, 
and I enjoyed it thoroughly, even if it did make me feel a little lonesome. 
I will not say homesick, because (if you agree) we will make our new home 
here, and I already feel that we will never regret it. During the past 
month I have, as you know, visited every portion of New Mexico, and 
my letters prove that I am already an enthusiastic admirer of the Territory. 
The decided improvement in my health has contributed greatly to the forma- 
tion of a favorable opinion ; my acquaintance among the leading men of the 
different cities has impressed me ; and the number and attractiveness of the 
business openings have convinced me that I have found the favored spot 
in our country where wealth, happiness and health promise to follow 
promptly the setting up of our Lares and Penates. After studying this city 
for a week, I have decided that we should settle here, and my object in 
writing this letter is to convince you that T am ri^ht. Compare this letter 




Alvarado Hotbl and Santa Fe Station 



82 



OUT WEST 




Fruit Exhibit at Territorial Fair ' 

and the photographs which accompany it with my letters from the other 
cities of this great Territory, and I am sure you will agree with me. Whether 
you think I am right or not, get ready to come, and bring the children ; 
otherwise it may interest you to know that divorces are easily secured 
here. A lady informed me that after living here a year she applied fof 
a divorce on the ground of desertion, and in about seven weeks she was a 
free woman, and still attractive. 

Speaking of women, I wish you might see the ladies of this city — I am 
certain it would be a revelation to you. There are positively better-looking 




Photo by Porte 



The Main Street, Albuquerque 



BOSTON I AN FINDS A NEW HOME 



85 



and better-gowned women than in any place of its size I ever visited. The 
social life is all that could be desired. A woman's club is ably officered 
and has thoughtfully arranged and intelligently conducted departments; they 
are even now building a fine and commodious club house. The men are 
delightfully cordial, and I was surprised to find so much talent and education 
among the professional and business men who are prominent in city affairs. 
They have many social organizations, chief among which are the Masons, 
the Odd Fellows and the Elks. They have halls and club rooms which are 
comfortable and attractive. 

The feature which interests me in both the men and the women is the 
enterprise and push which characterize their management of city and private 
affairs; no jealousies appear, but all seem to work toegther for the good 
of the community. The Territorial Fair, which was held lately in this city. 




Presbythrtan Church, Albuquerque 

illustrates this, and also their extreme liberality. It was the 26th Annual 
Fair. Thus every year since the city began its modern existence, these 
exhibitions of the products of the country have been held. They have, I am 
told, afforded a week's pleasure and profit, but at an expense 6l about seven 
thousand dollars annually,' contributed by the enterprising citizens. 

The city is full of churches, there being no less than sixteen organizations, 
nearly all of which have church homes. Many of the church buildings are 
very creditable structures, the best having cost upwards of $20,000. With 
your love of music, you will be interested in knowing that one of the churches 
has a $5,000 pipe-organ. The people of the churches are workers, and most 
of the organizations have Ladies' Aid Societies, which are exceptionally 
efficient. Outside the churches, the humanities are carefully protected by 
benevolent and humane societies, and by an Anti- Saloon League. The 



84 



OUT WEST 




public school system is well adapted to its purpose, with a central school 
and four ward school buildings ; with a full corps of efficient teachers ; with 
a systematic curriculum from the primary department through a high-school 
course; it offers advantages second to none. The grades are fully up to 
similar grades in Boston. The University of New Mexico is located here, 
and not only has a preparatory department and a Normal course, but offers 
a full college education, either classical or scientific. The instruction is 
thorough and up-to-date, and the grade is the same as similar institutions 




An Albuquerque Ward School 



BOSrONIAN FINDS A NEW HOME 



85 



in the East. The number of pupils is only about 150, yet the college spirit 
is admirable, and but the slightest investigation demonstrates that good 
and efficient work is being done. College sports aref not neglected. A 
weekly paper and an annual publication, liberally patronized by the mer- 
chants of the city, keep alive an active interest. Basket-, foot- and base- 
ball are played with teams from the city and from Territorial institutions, 
and a track-meet is held every year. I know that if parents in the East 
realized the advantages which this institution affords, many weak and sickly 
boys, and girls, too, would be sent here to grow strong and well in the 
invigorating atmosphere of this sunny clime, and at the same time keep up 
in their studies with their more fortunate companions whose bodily health 
permits them to attend Eastern colleges and universities. 

The excellent private schools for boys and girls, conducted by somg 
Catholic organizations, a well-equipped business college and one or two 




Albuquerque Public Library 

private schools supplement the educational institutions maintained by public 
funds. The Methodists carry on an Industrial School for Mexican girls 
and a college for Mexican boys ; the Presbyterians have a large school for 
Mexican boys ; the Congregationalists a day school for Mexican boys and 
girls. In both the boarding schools for Mexican boys a theological depart- 
ment equips evangelists for religious work among their people. The United 
States Government has an Indian School here which accommodates over 
350 pupils. It is crowded this year, and more than $6o,oco will be expended 
in new buildings. 

You will see that, for a young city, Albuquerque has exceptionally good 
educational facilities ; and I have detailed these to show you the temper 
and inclination of the people. In fact, our children can do as well here 
as in Boston, and in some respects better. I say this after a very thorough 



86 



OUT WEST 




-^J^^^m^^^^MM 




St. Joseph's Sanitarium, Ai^buquerque 

examination of the public schools and the University. The teachers are, 
as a class, above the average, and the tone of the schools is excellent. 

I have, since my arrival in this city, been especially impressed with th& 
cleanliness of the streets, the great number and extent of brick and cement 
sidewalks, the beautifully kept lawns about the residences, and the abundance 
of flowers. The trees are so numerous and so large that from the hills 
on the east of the city the plain looks like an extensive forest with gables 
and roofs extending up here and there from the foliage. The private resi- 
dences have an appearance of comfort; and, while there are no very spacious- 
mansions, there are innumerable medium-size but artistically constructed 
homes. 

The business portion of the city is quite metropolitan in appearance. Ihe 
wholesale and retail houses carry extensive and varied stocks, and strictly 
up-to-date. The amount of business done is apparently very large ; this 
is a distributing point for a large extent of country. There are a number 




CiTv Park, Albuquerque 



BOSTON I AN FINDS A NEW HOME 



87 




COMMERCIAIv Cr.UB, ALBUQUERQUE 

of manufacturing establishments. The railroad has its shops located here, 
where about one thousand men are employed. The American Lumber Com- 
pany, employing 1200 men, has a very large saw-mill and a sash-and-door 
factory near this city. They cut over 300,000 feet of lumber each day, and 
turn out over 1200 doors every twenty-four hours. One of the most sur- 
prising things to me was the sight of this immense lumber-plant in a 
country which in my journeys seemed utterly devoid of timber. 

It is said that the population of the city is about 15,000. I presume this 
is an exaggeration, but there is so much life and activity, and so much 
accomplished, that I was inclined to place the number of inhabitants even 
higher than that estimate. 

The banks show a deposit of over five million dollars, and it shall be my 
object during the next few years to have a considerable portion of that 
wealth transferred to my private account. 

The city owes its wonderful growth, as I have intimated, to the vigor 
and progressiveness of its people, and most active is its medium of ex- 
pression, the Commercial Club, an organization of business men. They have 
a club building of brown sandstone three stories high, which is a beautiful 



88 OUT WEST 

structure. In visiting the club I met the Secretary, Mr. P. F. McCanna, 
who furnished the literature respecting the city which I sent you. He told 
me that he distributed large quantities throughout the East in response to 
inquiries. 

The Elks own their home here, a fine building, including a tasty opera 
house, recently completed at a cost of $75,000. 

I visited the Sisters' Hospital here, owned and maintained by the Sisters 
of Charity. It is certainly a delightful place in which to be sick. 

I need hardly say that the city has good water and sewerage systems, 
telephone, electric light and gas, and a well-maintained electric street-car 
line. A large public library building, the gift of one of Albuquerque's 
leading citizens, contains a well-assorted library of about 3,000 volumes. 
Store buildings and residences under construction in all parts of the city 




Barnett Block, Ai.buquerque 



Photo by Porter 



attest its present growth, and the difficulty of finding a house for rent 
shows that the population is more than keeping pace with the building 
operations. The city owns two or three parks ; one called Robinson Park, 
while not large, is well kept and abounds with fine shade trees and graceful 
flower beds. It is well patronized at all seasons and afifords a pleasant 
place of rest. 

Having lived all our lives in the old Bay State, and for the past thirty 
years in historic Trimountain, it may seem difficult to become reconciled 
to Hfe in this remote western section of our country; but I am confident 
we will soon love Albuquerque and its people ; for "where'er one man may 
help another, that spot of the earth is thine and mine." 

While I have written quite fully of Albuquerque as it might appeal to 
you, I have said little of its chief charm to me, its health-restoring climate. 
In order to appreciate this rightly you must experience it. Words are in- 



BOSTON I AN FINDS A NEW HOME 



89 



adequate for its proper description. Albuquerque is located nearly a mile 
above sea level, in the midst of the lofty ridges of the Rockies. A mighty 
river once cut a deep chasm here twenty miles or more wide, and deep as 
the present Grand Canon of the Colorado. In the course of time, deposits 
of sand and gravel almost completely filled up this stupendous gorge, and 
later the Rio Grande sought the sea through this valley. A natural drainage, 
which will serve populous communities for ages, was thus provided. Jhe 
mountains on the east, which rise nearly a mile above the valley, are piled-up 
masses of rock similar to many of the Swiss ranges, full of ravines with 
running water and groves of pines, and forming a background for the play 




F1R.ST National Bank, Albuquerque 

of light and shade and the strange lavender and mauve colorings following 
the setting of the sun. Nature has caused these Sandia Mountains to lift 
"their lofty and luminous summits" as a perpetual joy to all lovers of 
the grand and beautiful. But practically regarded, the^' serve as a buffer 
to the north and east winds, and thus greatly ameliorate climatic conditions 
in the valley. I do not know that an explanation has yet been given for the 
fact that a small area extending twenty miles north and south of Albu- 
querque, and not more than ten miles wide, has a smaller annual rainfall 
than any other portion of what is known as the arid west, but probably 
it is owing to some local convectional action. New Mexico is, or rather 
will be, the "Sunshine State." Rarely, I am told, does a day pass without 
some hours of sunshine. Statistics show that on an average, three hundred 
and fifty days in the year" are clear. There is a peculiar property to the 
sunbeams, noticeable to the most indifferent. The atmosphere, rare on 
account of the altitude, and light owing to the absence of humidity, allows 
the fullest effect to the radiance of the sun. For these reasons this place 
is peculiarly adapted for the treatment of many diseases, especially those 
of a tubercular character. This whole Rocky Mountain region is destined 



90 



OUT WEST 






llli ^. 

i i i I 

II I i S « ^ n 




Rio Grande Woolen Mii,ls (co-operative) 

to become the world's sanatorium for consumptives, and Albuquerque, if I 
mistake not, will be the most favored spot for the unfortunate victims of 
the White Plague. Every year, it is said, the number of invalids seeking 
climatic relief from their troubles, who resort to Albuquerque, increase. I 
have met a number of these, but Albuquerque has so many stirring, active, 
nealthy men and women that the sick ones are not unpleasantly prominent. 

I trust I have not wearied you with this long letter, but I specially desire 
you to feel that in coming to Albuquerque you will not only help me to gain 
complete health, but you will find here social and civic relations to make 
you happy and contented, and the right conditions, religiously and educa- 
tionally, for the best interests of our growing children. 

Let me know as early as possible when you will be able to start on your 
journey to your new home. 

Love to Alice and the boys and to you in abundance. 

Yours affectionately, 

Jim. 





9» 

*oceanside: and san luis rey valley 

By IV. S. SPENCER. 
OR a single locality that most nearly conforms to the require- 
ments for a home-site, that strip of territory in San Diego 
county of which Oceanside is the center is unmatched in the 
State. It extends for tvventy miles up and down the coast and 
reaches inland to comprise the valley of the San Luis Rey river 
and tributary valleys. Oceanside, the trade center of this 
favored locality, is on the main line of the Santa Fe railroad, and is the first 
place the traveller reaches on entering the county. 

For natural beauty of situation and sightliness, the city reflects credit 
on the good taste and judgment of its founders. Hundreds of beautiful 
homes, embowered in trees, spread out before the eye from a vantage-point 
on the top of the gentle slope upon which the town is situated, and the pro- 
fusion of shade and ornamental trees forms a welcome contrast to other 
seaside towns along this southern coast. 

Oceanside is incorporated and owns and operates its own water works, 
which furnish a plentiful supply of fine water pumped from deep wells in 
the bed of the San Luis Rey, and piped over the city under pressure. The 
town is lighted by electricity furnished by a private company. 

One of the main attractions of the town is the magnificent bathing beach, 
certainly one of the best on the whole coast, and to this is due the fast 
growing popularity of Oceanside as a resort. A large bath-house, with a 
cement plunge and fitted with facilities for hot salt- and fresh-water baths, 
adds to the opportunities for pleasure and l>ealthful sport. Fishing and 
hunting are excellent. 

While Oceanside has achieved a reputation as a resort, it is pre-eminently 
a city for the home-builder, and as such is growing rapidly. The many sub- 
stantial homes erected in the past year speak volumes for its attractiveness 
in this resoect. * 




Valley and Mission of San Luis Rey 




w 

Q 
en 

< 
w 
o 

o 

o 
> 

o 

w 
» 



OCEAN SIDE AND SAN LUIS REY 



93 



Public improvements more than keep abreast of private enterprise, as the 
several miles of graded streets and cement walk attest. Fully equipped gram- 
mar schools and a high school afford the required educational facilities. 

In this State of opportunities, Oceanside and the immediate country around 
afford one of the best, either for the home-seeker or the man with money 
for investment. The- city is the market and trading point for the fertile San 
Luis Rey valley, now the scene of important operations in the line of water- 
and power-development being undertaken by the Pacific Light & Power Co., 
a corporation of which H. £. Huntington, the builder of most of the inter- 
urban electric roads around Los Angeles, is the moving spirit. Work is now 
going on at the site of an immense dam on the upper part of the river, by 
which means power is to be developed and the water used for irrigating the 
thousands of acres of land between the mountains and the sea — and better 
land does not lie out of doors for farming or orchard, when provided with 




 V 'll'-^l^'f •aaE« 





Acres of Carnations 

a reliable water supply. This is now being done, and the result is sure 
to be the influx of many home-makers, as, owing to the moderate prices of 
land at the present time, compared with other localities even less favorably 
situated, an opportunity is afforded these to engage in farming, dairying 
or fruit-raising on a profitable basis. A well-equipped creamery affords u 
present market for milk, and shipping points for other products are near. A 
large acreage is annually being planted to alfalfa. 

An attractive and profitable industry for which Oceanside is becoming 
noted is flower-farming. Carnations, violets and other flowers are grown 
for the market, the carnations especially attaining an unusual perfection 
of bloom. Five- and ten-acre tracts of these beautiful flowers, of all hues, 
are a most pleasing sight, as well as a profitable possession. 

To the pleasure-seeker and tourist, the city and its immediate locality 
offer many attractions. Principal of these, and one that annually draws 
hundreds of visitors, is the old mission of San Luis Rev, four miles to the 



94 



OUT WEST 




The Mission Graveyard 



•east. With one exception, this is the largest of these ancient monuments 
to the zeal and piety of the fathers. It is now being restored on the old 
lines and is occupied by the Franciscan brotherhood as a school. 

In view of the many advantages, climatic and material, which Oceanside 
-undeniably possesses for the home-seeker, besides the many allurements for the 
one in search of pleasure or health, it can be said without exaggeration that a 
visit to the Golden State is incomplete unless Oceanside and northern San 
Diego county be made part of the itinerary. 



95 



^ SAN FERNANDO 

By S. M. FAIRFIELD. 
O mountain-circled little town, 

What legacies are thine! 
These wondrous ruins thrilling yet 

With memories divine — 
The padres' hopes and sacrifice — 

And, richer than the rest, 
Their burning love for all mankind, 

Is their supreme bequest. 



ESTLING against the foothills, at the extreme upper end of 
the beautiful valley bearing its name, San Fernando has a 
vista of encircling mountains ; a climate that restores invalids 
to health, and ripens the richest fruits grown in Southern 
California; a soil capable of producing whatever can be grown 
in semi-tropic conditions ; and an unfailing supply of under- 
ground water coming from the great water-shed of the mountains and 
canons, just at hand. 

Only twenty-one miles from Los Angeles, upon the main line of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad, with 250,000 acres of grain land in the valley 
and hundreds of prosperous families already enjoying Nature's rich feast 
so freely spread at her doors. 

An elevation of from 1060 feet to 1200 feet above sea level insures cool 
nights in summer and clear, dry air, without "killing" frosts. 




Mission San Fernando 



96 



OUT WEST 




A San Fernando Home 

It is a ranch community, with the comfortable homes of the prosperous 
farmers scattered about among the orange, lemon and olive groves. 

"A paradise for the aged and children." All ordinary diseases are lighter 
here, and there are few, if any, of the ills that aflflict children in colder and 
damper climates. 

Never within the memory of man, extending back nearly a century and a 
half, when the Franciscan Fathers established here one of their great Mis- 
sions for the Indians, has there been a serious earthquake in this region. 




A San Ff/rnando Home 



SAN FERNANDO 



97 




A San Fernando Poultry Ranch 

Slight and infrequent temblors, often hardly noticeable, are all that have 
ever been known here in the quake line. 

The chief productions of the smaller ranches are the citrus fruits — oranges, 
lemons and grape-fruit; but apples, pears, prunes, figs, loquats. plums, limes, 
peaches, grapes, apricots, persimmons, pomegranates, walnuts, olives and 
berries of every kind are grown successfully on many ranches, and repay 
the care and cultivation bestowed upon them. As the dry electric winds of 




The Old Toll Gate in Paconia Canon, San Fernando 



98 



O UT WEST 



the winter destroy all scale, smut and insect pests, the fruit and trees here 
are clean and uninjured bv these troubles of other localities. 

Freedom from most of the sea-fogs, and warm, dry air, produce conditions 
favorable to the breeding and rearing of hens, turkeys and ranch-stock. One 
of the largest and most successful poultry ranches in Southern California 
is situated here. With a never-satisfied market in the near-by city of Los 
Angeles, there is always profit in the raising of good poultry and livestock. 

Water is found at a depth of from 40 to 100 feet, and many ranches use 
their own wells and pumping plants. There is, however, a general water 
supply furnished by the "Maclay Rancho and Water Company," which draws 
its. water from Pacoima Cation and from large pumping plants upon its 
own lands at the upper end of the village. Domestic water is furnished to 
all citizens requiring it at the rate of $1.50 per month for 1000 feet, and 




A San Fernando Schooi< 

water for irrigating purposes at from i cent to 4 cents a miner's inch, as 
required. 

All lands in Southern California capable of producing first-class citrus 
fruits vary in value from $50 to $200 an acre, and often a much larger figure 
is paid. San Fernando has an abundance of such lands, and already pro- 
duces the finest grades of fruit and receives the highest price in the eastern 
markets. There wer^ about 350 carloads of citrus fruits shipped from this 
point last year, and the amount is yearly increasing. This fruit often brings 
25 cents a box above market rates, on account of its superior and "keeping" 
quality. In ordinary years a box of oranges nets the rancher about $1, 
and this gives him a liberal remuneration for all the outlays he has made. 
Special seasons like the one just passed increase the profit on each box to 
$2 or more, and at such times the orange rancher is one of the best paid 



SAN FERNANDO 



99 



producers in the land. A ten-acre orange grove in full bearing will easily 
yield 2000 to 3000 boxes of fruit a year. 

There are three local packing houses in San Fernando, from which fruit 
is shipped all over our land after being sorted, graded and boxed. The 
union or co-operative packing house is new and well equipped, arid any 
rancher can ship his fruit through its agencies by paying the proportion of 
the entire cost falling to his share. It would be fair to say that the average 
crop of citrus fruits at San Fernando yields from $150,000 to $20,000, while 
the returns last year were probably much in excess of tliose figures. 

Peculiar qualities of soil, as well as the climate, render the fruits grown 
here the equal of any grown at any point in Southern California. 




A San Pbrnando Orange Grove 

There are four churches in the village — the Methodist Episcopal, Presby- 
terian, Roman Catholic, and Seventh Day Adventist. 

There are three large district schools situated in different parts of the town, 
and a new Union High School building of the most modern equipment. 
The Seventh Day Adventists maintain also a preparatory school and college 
here. Able and efficient instructors and ample opportunity for a thorough 
common education are thus at hand for the benefit of all our children and 
youth. 

The mountains all about us are full of minerals. Iron, copper, gold and 
silver have been found in many places. In fact, this was one of the first 
points in which gold was mined, and the old padres found its digging a 
profitable industry fifty years before the "forty-niners" made their mad rush 



I oo 



our WEST 




Olive Picking at San Fernando 

to 'Frisco. There are great possibilities here in all the lines, and all this 
section abounds in oil. 

The disintegrating rocks, washed down by the winter rains, form a large 
part of the rich soil about us, and thus we are spared the trials of "hard pan" 
or impenetrable clay; while with ordinary irrigation and the sunshine over 
300 days each year, there are unlimited possibilities for vegetables, melons, 
alfalfa, grain, hay and all garden flowers. 

The old Mission Fathers began the growth of the olive here and produced 
the oil in crude presses over a century ago. Some of the trees they planted 
are still living. Within the last decade hundreds of acres of olive trees have 
been planted here, until today there is an acreage of some 2100 acres, which 
last year produced 2150 tons of olives. Of these, about 75 tons were pickled 
and sold for $11,845, while 72,625 gallons of oil were made, returning some 
$108,770; thus making our olive crop pay us about $120,000. 




OXNARD 



Hotel 

Oxnard 

one 

of 
Calh 

fornia's 

popular 

Hotels 



the: b haut I ful 

^^e Home of tKe American Beet 
Sugar Company. (Founcled in 1898) 



Has now 3000 population. Located in Ventura county, 66 miles from Los Angeles, in the best 
farming district in the state of California. Every business known to first class California towns is 
represented here. No property bought and sold for speculative purposes, and property is today worth 
par value. Water works, electric light, two telephone and telegraph companies, two banks, best of 
schools, good churches. 

For further information address SECRETARY BOARD OF TRADE, or any of the following 
well known firms: 



American Beet Sugar Co. 
Ventura County Power Co. 
Oxnard Mvery <& Feed Stable. 
I.ehmann Broa. 



Hill & Kaiibaeher, Real I^Mtate and Inn. 
Oxnard Furniture & PiuniblnK Co. 
W. R. Norton, Oxnard >'e>VM Agency. 
S. E. VauKlin, Jeweler. 



Robert Green, Barber. 



Incubators? 

Poultry Supplies? 



Brooders? 

Baby Chicks? 



We are in a position to guarantee our manufactured products, for we use these 
goods here at our Plant, on the largest scale ever attempted by anyone. 

We Make a Specialty of Furnishing SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORN CHICKS 
and Have tKe capacity for producing 

One Hundred THousand CHicKs Per Month 

Book your orders early and get the datings you desire; our stock is from the 
finest laying strain of Leghorns, ever produced. 

Write for our illustrated catalogue if you are in need of anything for the 
poultry business. 

Must Hatch Incubator Co. ^^l^ttyj^"^- 



RamonaToilet ^oap 



FOR SALE 



1 


->♦» 
















A HIGHLANDS HOME 



Oranges for 
Profit 



We Claim Mo St 
Perfect Conditions 

for the culture of this 
famous fruit. Most 
profitable orchards i u 
the State. We can show 
you, come and see for 
yourselves. Progressive- 
ness with substantiality 
our motto. Six miles 
from Redlands. Write 



Secretary Chamber of Commerce, Highlands, California 




The City of 

Fullcrton 



The Center of Trade for 
the Richest Section of 
Southern California. Sit- 
uated 23 Miles S.E. of Los 
Angeles on the Santa Fe 
R. R. 



A FULLERTON HOME 



It has two banks, two newspapers, our churches, two schools (grammar and high 
schools), water works, electiic lights, NO SALOONS, and all lines of merchandise 
represented in the several stores. ITS CLIMATE IS UNEXCELLED. 

THE AGRICULTURAL Jt^RODUCTS of the surrounding country are as 
varied as can be found in any other country on the continent. 

ITS PRINCIPAL EXPORTS are oranges, lemons, walnuts, hay, grain, cab- 
bages, Irish and sweet potatoes, and many kinds of small fruits. 

For further particulars address the Chamber of Commerce or any of the parties named below : 

Benchley Fruit Co., Packers and Shippers. Wlcl<ershelm & Oswald, Implements 

Gardiner & Fora, Real Estate. , J. Chilton, D. D. S. 

Fullerton Chamber of Commerce. Fullerton Hospital Association. 

Stern & Goodman, General Merchants. Wm. Starbuck & Co., Drugs and Stationery. 

Wm. Freeman. Thos. A. Challis, Butcher. 

E. S. RIchman, Orange County Nurseries. Chas. C. Chapman. 



Rich in Raisins, Wine, Peaches, 
Lumber and Water 



Heart of the Big Valley 

Fresno County produces Raisins by the ton, Wine by the hogshead, Lumber by 
the millions of feet, Oil by the trainload, Oranges by looo acres, Peaches by the 
carload. Figs, Apricots, Alfalfa and Minerals all are produced in immense 
quantities. , 

CANALS AND CREEKS 

The splendid fertility of Fresno County was caused in the first place through 
the beneficence of Kings River and the San Joaquin River, the two largest water 
courses. Sediment from these stream s has been carried out over the intervals 
each year since time immemorial, and it is these same streams through the efficient 
canal systems emanating from them that are making the lands thoroughly 
irrigated. 

FRESNO COUNTY PRODUCED IN 1905 

Live stock, value $5,000,000 

.\lfalfa hay 750,000 

Butter fat 1,000,000 

Lumber 2,000,000 

Wines ' 1,500,000 

Brandies 250,000 

Raisins 2,500,000 

Wool , 250,000 

Olive Oil 30.000 

Oranges and Lemons 75,ooo 

.Mmonds, walnuts, etc 7,500 

Honey and beeswax 50,000 

Crude Oil 1,250,000 

Poultry 750,000 

Eggs 100,000 

Melons .• 100,000 

Gold, silver, granite, etc 400,000 

Dried and green fruits 1.500,000 

Wheat and barley 1,000,000 

Total $18,512,500 

In 1906 values reached in production $22,000,000. 
For further information in regard to Fresno County write or address 

Gill Real Estate Agrency, Real EMtate. Sheperd-Teainie Co. Send for Free Home- 

Pernlta Invefttnient Co., OranK«' liand. neekern Guide. 

PearHonn Realty Kxchanfce, Real Kntate. Fulton & Grand Central HotelH, under one 

AV. >. Rohrer & fo.. Orange &. iirtxite I<and. manaiEcenient, Mpet'ial aoconimodationit 

JeMHC J^nson & V. M. Blancbard, Real for commercial traveler*. 

Estate. Sperry Flour Co., Flour, Feed and Grain. 




Comfort and Pleasure the 
Year Round at 

Oceanside 



SAN DEEGO 
COUNTY 



Fishing on the Pier. 



CALIFORNIA 



Speaking of climate, did you know that you could be comfortable every "month 
of the year at Oceanside? It is the IDEAL HOME SITE, with no extremes of 
heat or cold — a climate unsurpassed. Oceanside is growing now and prospects for 
the future are excellent. The largest reservoirs on the Pacific Coast are now being 
built on the headwaters of the San Luis Rey in the mountains 30 miles from the 
coast. The water will first be used to generate electric power and will then do duty 
in irrigating the fertile lands in Oceanside and vicinity. Come and see what we have, or 

Write Oceanside Board of Trade, or the following: 



P. J. Brannen, Hardware. 

J. Chauncey Hayes, Real Estate. 

E. D. McGraw, Real Estate. 

Thos. C. Exton, Druggist. 

Goetz Bros. & Co., General Merchandise. 

Frank Freeman, Dairyman. 

Irwin & Co., Implements and Hardware. 



Bank of Oceanside. 

O. S. Hecox & Co., Real Estate. 

Geo. P. McKay, Stationery. 

Martin Bros., Butciiers. 

Oceanside Lumber Co. 

J. D. Morrow, Jeweler. 




SANTA 
PAULA 



IN SANTA CLARA 

VALLEY OF THE 

SOUTH 



AN ORANGE GROVE IN JANUARY 



W^ ID ^ ^ ^ ,>. TH-rr/>4*TT-l-'U^«-t/v For proof we invite you to come 
e KaiSe iiVerytning and see for yourself. Large and 
small ranches for sale. Good vacant lots, residence and business property for sale. 
A good opening for several lines of business. We are growing. You are invited to 
come and grow with us. For information write any of the following well-known 
firms. 



C. H. McKevett, Banker, 
J. B. Titus, Insurance. 
C. E. King, Furniture. 
Santa Paula Water Co. 
People's Lumber Co. 



I. P. Browne, Grocer. 

L. W. Corbett, Furniture. 

The Cash Dry Goods Co., Clothing, Shoes. 

J. R. Cauch, Drugs and Stationery. 

Santa Paula Co-operative Association. 




ORANGE 

GEOGRAPHICAL CENTER OF 

ORANGE COUNTY, CAL. 



Is the busintis center and shipping; pcint for about thirty square 
miles of highly productive and densely populated territory. The 
surplus products sent out from this point last year were: 718 
cars of oranges, 68 cars of lemons, ij cars of dried apricots, J 
cars of English walnuts and nearly 1,000,000 pounds of unclassi- 
fied products in less than carload lots, without including ship- 
ments by express. Tbe orchards and packing houses furnish 
employment for many people. 
The CITY OF ORANGE covers about three square miles and has a population of at least zooo. It is headquarters for 
the Santa Ana Valley Irrigation Company and contains the fine building of the Orange Union High School District. Over 
100 buildings were erected in the city last year, one firm furnishing lumber for 7; houses; and the growth continues, |i7,}50 
worth of building permits being issued in the month of May. Located 14 miles from the coast at an elevation of about 
100 feet above sea level. Orange escapes the chilling fogs of the lowlands and the extremes of heat and cold of the 
interior valleys. With its natural advantages of abundant water, fertile soil and an equable climate, together with its 
educational, religious and social advantages, this city is certainly an ideal place for a home. 

Come and see for yourself or write any of lihe following for further information: 



Wm. H. Burnham. The Bank of Orange. 

Hallman A. Field, General MerchandlM. 

S. M. Craddick, Real Estate. 

Edwards & Meehan, Butchers. 

AInsworth Lumber Co. 

Ehleen A Grote, General Merchandise. 

O. C. PIxiey, Hardware. 



K. E. Watson, Druggist. 
Ira Chandler, Furniture. 
Adolph DIttmer, Druggist. 
Thompson Nurseries. 
J. A. Huhn Co., Real Estate. 
W. B. Park, Shoe Store. 
C. B. Bradshaw, Architect. 




*"Ihre City by the Mountains" 

Monrovia 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

Located at the base of the 
Sierra Madre Range, under the 
protection of "the 
everlasting hills." 

This charming city of 3,000 people is reached 

by a double-track electric line from 

Los Angeles. It is the dwelling place 

of the contented. The people have learned 

to almost worship the mountains, and 

all praise the curative properties of the 

air and water. Those who love beauty in 

nature and would combine city and suburban 

life will find 

An Ideal Spot here 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ADDRESS 



Frank J. Cornes, Groceries, Crockery, Etc. 

Board of Trade 

First National Bank of Monrovia. 

The American National Bank 

C. E. Slosson, Real Estate and Insurance. 

Edison Electric Co. 

Farman A. Rives, Real Estate and Insurance 

Monrovia Telephone Co. 

M}nrovla Realty Co. 



W. H. Evans, Real Estate and Notary. 

The L. W. Bllnn Lumber Co. 

The Boyd Lumber Co. 

C. F. Moore, Real Estate and Building 

Loans. 
J. A. Baxter, Livery and Feed. 
Monrovia Steam Laundry Co. 
Allen H. Nye, Hardware and Plumbing. 
J. H. McClymonds, Jr., Civil Engineer. 



San Bernardino, California 

Located in the center of a nia.gnificent and fertile valley and reached by three trans- 
continental railroads — the Salt Lake, Santa Fe and Southern Pacific. 

Population 15,000 and Increasing Rapidly 




The city owns and operates a splendid water works system, the main supply 
coming from artesian wells, one of which is shown upon this page. Two electric 
and two gas companies insure low rates for these necessities. Many miles of paved 
streets and cement sidewalks add to the attractiveness of the city. 

Fully equipped trolley lines radiate from San Bernardino to all surrounding 
towns and communities. 

The scenic beauty within and surrounding the city is unexcelled in Southern 
California. 

As a business and commercial center San Bernardino ranks among the best in 
the State. 

First class schools, Public Library and churches of nearly all denominations. 

For booklet and further information address 

Secretary Board of Trade, San Bernardino, California 

or any of the following leading business firms: 



San Bernardino Realty Board. 

ZVeff & Adair, Real Kstate. 

Boyd & Scott, Real Bstate & In»«uranee. 

Vestal & Hnbbnrd, Real Estate & Ini*. 

Star Realty Co., Real Estate. 

InHuranee, Loan & Land Co. 

Taylor Realty Co., Real Estate, Loans <& 

Insurance. 
Cochran & Ridenbaugh (Miniature Orange 

Groves, $300. 
San Bernardino Realty Co., Real Estate, 

Insurance & Loans. 
Pioneer Abstract & Title, Guaranty Co. 
San Bernardino Abstract Co. 



Con.solidated Abstract <& Title Guaranty 

Co. 
Arrowhead Garage. 
Home Furniture Co. 

David R. Glass, President Business College 
Geo. M. Cooley Co., Hardware. 
Mrs. C. H. Davis, Bradford Rooming House 
W. W. Brison, Jr. 
Board of Trade. 
San Bernardino National Bank 
H. M. Barton 
H. W'. Hagerman. 
T. A. Blakely. 




"Cures While You Sleep." 

Whooping-Cough, Croup, Bronchitis, 
Coughs, Diphtheria, Catarrh. 

Confidence can be placed in a remedy 
which for a quarter of a century has 
earned unqualified praise. Restful nights 

are assured at once. Cresolenc U a Boon to 

Asthmatics. 
ALL DRUGGISTS 

Sen J Postal for De- 
scripti've Booklet. 

Cresolene Antiseptic 
Throat Tablets for the 
irritated throat, of your 
druggist or from us, 10c 
in stamps. 

The 

Vapo-Cresolene Co. 

1 80 Fulton St., N.Y. 

LeemingtMiles Bldg. 
Montreal, Canada 




A PARTMENTS, Los Angeles 

fullv furnished, new, 3 rooms, gas, range, 
hot water, bath, telephone, $14.00 monthly. T. 
Wiesendanger, 311 Merchants Trust Building. 



/^LARENDON, Los Angeles, 

^^ Euroi>ean plan, tourist and commercial 

hotel. Central location, one block from Broad- 
way. Special rates by the week. 

'pHE NEW ROSSLYN, josAngeiss 

Comprising the Lexington and Rosslyn 
Hotels. American and European plans. Center of 
city — 285 rooms — 150 with bath. Rates, Ameri- 
can, $1.30 up; European, 75 cents up. Fine 
sample rooms. Free 'bus meets all trains. 



H 



OTEL WESTMINSTER, 



LOS ANGELES. Largest and best. Euro- 
pean plan. $1 per day and upwar-^s. Service the 
best. Cor. Mam and 4th Sts. V. O. Johmsom, 
Prop. 



OOTEL HOLLYWOOD, Hollywood 

* * Cal. Only hotel in the beautiful Ca- 

huenga foothills. Unique for home comforts com- 
bined with every modern convenience, of a first 
class hotel. 



H 



OTEL REDONDO, Redondo, Cal. 



18 miles from Los Angeles, at Redondo-' 
by the Sea. "The Queen of the Pacific." Open 
all the year; even climate. 




^;^ J-^^^-^^f w-^^ 










An investi- 
gation by a 
prominent 
publication | 
showed that i 
more than' 
half of the peo- 
ple preferred' 
our goods in 1 
but during 1906i 
evidently bought theni! 
Our works (the largest of 
their kind in the world) were run 
far into the night and yet could not 
supply the demand for 

''Siher Tlate that Wears" 

1907 — the sixtieth year since the 
business was established — will un- 
doubtedly mark a greater record in 
sales, prestige and influence in the 
trade. Sold by leading dealers 
everywhere. 

Send tor our Catalogue "A 39 " 

to assist in making selections. 
MERIDENBRITANNIACO.,Merlden,Conn. 

'Int«ni«tion«I flllrer Co.. HacoessorJ 




National 
City, Cal. 

On 
San Diego 
bay 



Residence of Phil C. Bauer, Paradise Valley > 

Five miles from the business center of San Diego, an ideal residence suburb. It 
is now being connected with the electric street railway, electric light and gas 
systems of that city. 

Fruitful orange groves and lemons of the best .grade supply an important citrus 
trade. Peaches, pears, plums and other deciduous fruits ripen to perfection. 
Write for booklet to Secretary BOARD OF TRADE or any of the following: 

Peoples State Bank, G. W. DeFord, Hay and Grain; A. E. Williams, Grocer; Paradise Valley 
Sanitarium, Hutchison Bros, Frank A. Kimball, Real Estate; San Diego Land Co., E. M. Fly, 
M. D.; M. K. Campbell, Phil C, Bauer, J. G. Fleming, Orange Grosver; T. R. Palmer, Attorney; 
L. Butler, Hardware; E. B. Eeach, Eemon Shipper; Theo T. Johnson, M. -D.; National City & 
Otay Railway. 




Hummel Bros. & Co. furnish best help. 116-118 E. Second 




REDLANDS IS A CITY OF HOMES 

It*s Scenery and Climatic Advantages MaKe it 

possible for anyone to have a beautiful suburban home surrounded by all the varied 
kinds of plants and shrubbery that grow in a temperate or semi-tropic region. The 
residences of Redlands may well be compared to those of any other town in Southern 
California, and it is just as possible for the poor or well-to-do man to have a gem of 
a home in an ideal setting as for the very rich. 

For information address Board of Trade, Redlands, Cal., or any of the following: 



WiUianiN-CurtiM Co., HenI 

'Entate. 
FirMt Ntificiiinl linnk. 
Cana I.tiiiin Il4»tel Co. 
J. J. NiiiikIiIoii. 
RedlandK AbMtrnct <& Title 

Co. 
Dike /k LoRle, Reni Entate. 
Jolin P. Hi^lit, Jr., Real 

Eniate. 
Hill CreMt Inn. 



Palm Confectionery, E. E. 

Cane. 
AnderHOn & Awher, Real 

ICMtnte. 
AuMtin & Clark Co., Real 

KMtnte. 
Kedlnndn linundry Co. 
John P. FlMk, Real Eittate. 
J. W. Jenkins, Electrical 

Contractor. L< 



AV. J. Davenport & McLaIn, 

ContrnotorM. 
Geo. S. IliKKin, Real Estate. 

D. M. Donald, Contractor. 
Mutual Orange DiNtribu- 

tors, Emit Shippers. 
.John lilodicett, I>ii ery. 
Redlands Fruit Atksoclation 
J. C. KeevcM, Hay & Grain. 

E. Huntini^ton, Contractor. 




Reasonable Hate* 



HOTEUCASA LOMA 



Excellent JtccommodationM 







=f^*^*"' ■■^y-"- 




THe City Progressive j^ ^t j^ j^ 



try to a bright, busy city with 
n business structures and sub- 
.s the story in brief of th<= 
ne of the coming cities of the 
rgy and enterprise was required 
re was an ample supply of these 
plemented by natural advantages 
each to the front row of western 



From a section of wild coun 
metropolitan advantages, moder 
stantial residences — in a year — 
growth of Huntington Beach, o 
South Pacific Coast. Capital, ene 
to accomplish the work and the 
requisites. These conditions, sup 
is rapidly bringing Huntington B 
coast cities. 

Big Profits on Small Investment 

The population and improvements are increasing at a phe- 
nomenal rate and as a result big profits are being made by in- 
vestors. Huntington Beach will enjoy the two fold advantage of 
being the shipping center of a vast agricultural district, and also 
a delightful seaside resort — one that will constantly attract a de- 
sirable class of people. An investment in Huntington Beach 
now will bring big returns. 

Huntington Beach "Holds the Keys" to the citrus fruit belt and the worlds greates 
celery fields 

Only 32 miles from Los Angeles, less than an hours ride. Take Paciflc-Electric 
Cars at 6th. and Main Sts. Los Angeles 

Huntington Beach Company, ''LKl'* 

First National Banlc J. E, Glenn Co., Orangre County Real Estate 

Seely & Gillespie, Real Estate Huntington Beach Tent City Co. 

The Hub Investment Co., Real Estate Pacific Tours Co. 

Jk W. Toms, Ivy Restaurant F. H. Hopewell, with J. E, Glenn Co. 
Leatherman & Talbert, Real Estate M. E. Helme, Furniture 

Lincecum & Thompson, Liivery Moueton & Cummlngs Realty Co. 
Geo. E. Phelps, Livery and Furnished Rms. W. C. Smith, Butcher 
Geo. M. Miller. PlnmbinK C. T. lugersoll. Carpenter and Builder 






m ,„ 



Happy New Yeai»! 

Turn over a new leaf and visit a few places outside 
of the "regular" track of tourist travel 




New Hotel "San Fernando Rey" 

After you have been "personally conducted" over all the show 
routes, and sampled all the sights that the stranger ought to see, try 
olive groves, and spend a week or two in getting acquainted with 
the Real Thing, enjoying the beauty of Nature, and resting in a 
home-like hotel. 

Come up to San Fernando and get over that "tired feeling" that 
you have gathered in roaming about the Resorts. 

Come up any morning or evening and enjoy a real rest. 



Address Secretary Board of Trade, 

San FernandOt Los Angeles County, California 



WHITTIER 



CALIFORNIA 

(TKe Hillside City) 




whittier's new high school building 

"For utility," says an educational journal, "the high school building at Whittier 
ii, perhaps, the most effective of any in Southern California. This school is' carry- 
ing on as complete courses as any in the state, including several unusual features. 
In fact, we knov^^ of no other public school w^hich provides so much for its patrons." 

The building with grounds and equipment cost $75,000. There are thirteen 
teachers, and an enrollment of over two hundred students — an increase of nearly 
thirty-five per cent, over last year, the best record of any school in Los Angeles 
county. 

The interest in the cause of education is only one of the many evidences that 
this is an enlightened, progressive community. 

There are NO SALOONS in Whittier. It is a city of homes, churches and 
schools. The place is situated on a gentle slope of the Puente foothills, fourteen 
miles from Los Angeles. It is a modern suburban city of 4000 inhabitants, on the 
Pacific Electric line, having paved streets in the business portion; and provided with 
a public park, an improved water system, electric lights, gas, etc. The new hospital 
will open in a short time, and a Carnegie library is soon to be constructed. 

The resources of this section are equal to those of any other place; and the loca- 
tion of the city affords a splendid view of the surrounding orange, lemon and walnut 
groves, while on the hills may be noticed the derricks of the various oil interests. 

Whittier must be seen to be appreciated. 

For further information, address the Secretary of the Board of Trade, or any 
of the following: 

Locks & Rendleman, Real Estate. Whittier National Bank. M. Horton, Pioneer Stables 

First National Bank of Whittier. Whittier Home Telephone Co. H. E. Humphrey, Hardware. 

S. W. Barton & Co., Real Estate. The Edison Electric Co. F K. Weeks, Grocer. 

Green'leaf Hotel. Whittier Hardware Co. Fred L. Baldwin, Pacific Cafe. 

C. W. Clayton, Real Estate & Insurance The Whittier Milling Co. E. J. Vestal. Grocer. 

Whittier College. Landrum Smith, Druggist Geo. L. Hazzard, Insurance. 

A. H. Dunlap. Levi D. Johnson, M. D. C. G. Warner. L. A. Bryan, Furniture & Pictures. 

A. Jacobs & Co., Groceries. E. H. White, Furniture and Undertaking. Truman Berry, Rancher. 

Metropolitan Music Co., S. A. Brown, Prest. F. A. Jackson, City Market. Alva Starbuck. 

TAKE PACIFIC ELECTRIC CARS FROM 6TH AND MAIN STREETS, LOS ANGELES 



REDONDO, CALIFORNIA 




Redondo is next to the busiest seaport in Southern California. If you doubt 
this assertion take a day oflf when in California and visit Redondo. During October 
ocean vessels discharged at our wharves 6,150,000 feet of lumber, 3,500 poles, 116,000 
ties, 2,ooo;ooo shingles and 42,000 barrels of oil. In addition to this hundreds of tons 
of freight were received for surrounding towns. 

Redondo has other attractions which will appeal to you. We have the beauti- 
ful Moonstone beach, nothing like it in the world; the most attractive residence 
sites that the eye ever gazed upon; the largest and most imposing high school build- 
ing in the state; three electric lines that furnish communications with Los Angeles 
and immediate towns. Realty values are enticing and a good opportunity is now 
presented for the prospective homeseeker to invest. 

Write to the Secretary of the Board of Trade for the latest descriptive folders 
telling all about Redondo. 

For further information address either of the following: 



Redondo Board of Trade. 
Redondo Improvement Company. 
Hotel Redondo. 
Chas. J. Creller, Real Estate. 
Redondo Realty Company. 
Montgomery & Mullin Lumber Co. 
Redondo Milling Company. 



C. Ganahl Lumber Company. 

J. F. Reber & Company, Plumbers. 

Wells & Company, Real Estate. 

Redondo Building Company. 

L. J. Quint. 

H. B. Ainsworth. 

A. J. Graham. 

A. B. Steel. 



TKis Picture SHo-ws a Part of a 4-0 A.cre Corn Field in San Jacinto, 

Riverside County, Cal. 

For Corn, Hogs, 
Poultry and 
Dairying 

n Southern Cal. 

San 
Jacinto 

cannot b e surpassed. 
Land with water $50.00 
per acre and up. For 
further particulars ad- 
dress 

Chamber of Commerce, cSufSIw^' 




Lodi, San Joaquin County, California 

FIFTY PER CENT INCREASE IN POPULATION IN TWO YEARS 
Home of tHe Famovis riame-XoKay Grape 



Souvenir Edition 
of the 

Lodi Home 
Magazine 

for December 1906 
Free to All 




Write for a FREE 
COPY of the 

Lodi Home 
Magazine 



LODI HIGH SCHOOL 

Further information upon application to any of the following : 
W. A. Young Lumber Co. Dougherty, Whitaker & Ray Co., Ho- 

LeMoin & Fish, Publishers. 



tel. 



TT J o TJT J Garner & Woodson, Land. 

Henderson Bros., Hardware. Northern Hardware Co. 



Beckman, Welch & Thompson Co., 

Grocers. 
W. J. Robinson, Barley Mill. 



John C. Bewley & Co., Real Estate. 
San Joaquin Land Co. 
The Realty Co. 



W'lurc tlic I'aliii Tree grows ami tlu' hlucgrass is fvorgrcen. 

Where Roses bloom in December or May. 

Where the Tourist may find a pleasure in sight-seeing. 

Where the Homeseeker finds it profitable and a pleasure to live in the famous 



Santa Clara Valley and County 

Pronounced 

{San Ho^say) 

is the county seat, located in the heart of the valley, 50 miles south from San 
Francisco and 8 miles from an open seaport — South San Francisco Bay. 



SAN JOSE 




Two of the Oldest Palm Trees in San Jose; 40 Feet High 

Population 40,000 and rapidly increasing with steady growth — no boom. We 
produced in 1906— 125.000.000 pounds of dried prunes. 900,000 cases of canned Peaches, 
Cherries, Apricots, Pears, besides millions of pounds of green fruits shipped by 
refrigerated cars. 

If you are seeking a home and any of your family are not in the best of health, 
come to Santa Clara Vallej% secure one of t he small orchard farms, raise poultry 
as well and you cannot lose monev. We will make room for =000 families and in 
the 'Glimmer children can earn good wages jiicking fruit. 

ATTRACTIONS FOR TOURISTS 

Lick Observatory, Stanford University, Famous Mineral Hot and Cold Springs. 
Ostrich Farm. Big Trees, Old Missions at Santa Clara and San Jose. Various Electric 
Trips and Drives amid 150 miles of orchards. For information and booklet send 
2c stamp and address. 

CKamber of Commerce, San jose. c ai. 

J. X. BrooKs, Secretary 




A Cc 



He 



-Christmas Amid Oranges and Roses 



Covina i 



'Ji City JImid. 
The Orange 
Groves 

Offers to the tourists and home 
seeker the charms afforded by 
Mountains, Valleys and Orange 
Groves, combined with all the 
comforts, conveniences and social 
attractions of the larg-e cities. 

Covina is situated on the 
Southern Pacific railroad and the 
new Covina line of the Pacific 
Klectric, in the center of the 
world famed San Gabriel Valley, 
in a thickly populated neighbor- 
hood, has first class Grammar 
and High School, six churches, 
two national banks, and savings 
bank, live newspapers, hotels, 
?ood stores, Carnegie library, 
ladies' and men's club houses, el- 
ectric lighting and power, gas 
and telephones, and finer roads 
for automobiling than any other 
-.own or city in the United States. 
Abundance of, pure water and the 
finest orange groves in the state. 
The place for a home, the place 
for investment. 



Honrly trolley car service with Los Angeles. Running- time thirty-live minutes. 



I. C. Fairly, Real Estate. 

First National Rank of Co- 
vina. 

J. Li. Matliews, Publisher. 

C. F. Clapp, Drugs & Sta- 
tionery. 

G. O. Dudderar, Confec- 
tioner. 



"Warner, Whitsel & Co., 

Grocers. 
C. W. Tucker, Photographer 
J. H. Collman. 
AV. A. Layman, Hotel Ven- 

domo. 
F. H. Fabrlck, Hardware. 
F. M. Chapman, Rancher. 



Covina High Lands Citrus 
Union, Fruit Packers. 

A. P. Kerckhoff, Rancher. 

P. E. Dudderar, Livery. 

"W. H. Rroadtvell, Merchant. 

C, \V. Potter, General Hard- 
■ware. 

W. <i.- Custor, Furniture. 

Mrs. I. I. C»ok. 



SAN PEDRO, ^xt'-iLt!^?^ 

San Pedro, the Harbor City 
of Southern California, the 
dreamland of the world, 
where nature has poured out 
her blessing with so lavish 
a hand that it is doubtful 
whether our great mother in- 
tended to build a home for 
the Gods or for humans. San 
Pedro, the future gateway of 
the orient; the one spot more 
SAN PEDRO HARBOR talked about, because more in 

the minds of the men who make the commerce of this country, than any other 
along the many thousands of miles of our coast line. San Pedro undoubtedly has 
the brightest future of any city on the west coast, aid is the place for the young 
man or the old, for the capitalist or the laborer. 

For information relative to commercial conditions and busines prospects, ad- 
dress The Chamber of Commerce, San Pedro, Cal., or 

A. P. Ferl Dodson Bros., Contractors L. Kelly 

J. A. Weldt John T. Gaffey Miss C. Rogers & Co., Real 

William W. Burke & Sons, Estate 

Grocers Alcorn & Cox., Real Estate 




Olsen Hardware Co. 



Hummel Bros. & Co., "Help Center," 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main 509. 



HivctsidCf Caliiotmei 



Next month orange picking in the greatest orange-growing district in the 
world will begin on a large scale, now YOU are interested so let the Cham- 
ber of Commerce or the firms named send you pictures, literature and infor- 
mation about the exact conditions here. 

Frank A. Miller, Glenwood Seaton & Klnneur Lumber Creamer Mfg. Co., Planing; 

Inn. Co. Mill. 

Rlverttlde Trust Co. Orange RIverHlde SavlngM Bunk <& Runh Lumber & Mill Co. 

GroveM. TruHt Co. Pacific liUmber Co. 

Arlington ApnrtnientH, Unic and KlKhlh Sta., FurnlNhed KoomH. 




Orange Groves and Mountains 




Where some 
of the 

2.000,000 

boxes of Or- 
anges grow 
and how they 
are picked 



Orange Picking Sc<n< 



Lodi ^**'"**'''^ 



Tract 



Adjoining Town-limits of 

Lodi, California 

2 Acre Lots 

3 Acre Lots 
5 Acre Lots 

Grapes and Alfalfa 

Write 

R. E. Wilhoit & Sons 

Stockton, Cal. 

or Eaton & Buckley 

Stockton, Cal. 
JOINT OWNERS 



WOODLAND 

The Capital of 

Yolo County, California 

WOODLAND is only 86 miles from San 
Francisco and 22 miles from Sacramento, 
the State Capital. WOODLAND has twelve 
churches, three two-story grammar school 
building's, one commodius high school, one 
Holy Rosary Academy, one well-equipped 
business college, the best talent obtainable 
for the schools, one Carnegie library build- 
ing, and fine free library, four social and 
literary clubs, twenty fraternal and bene- 
fit lodges one 200-barrel flour mill, one 
fruit cannery, two butter creameries, one 
fruit packing establishment, one winery, 
one olive oil and pickling plant, two large 
lumber yards, four solid banks, four ho- 
tels, one large city hall, one well-equipped 
Are department, four large grain and hay 
warehouses, a well conducted telephone 
system, an average rainfall of 17 inches, 
and many commodious business houses 
representing all lines of trade. 

For further particulars address any of 
the following: 

Bidwell & Reith, Real E:Ntate 

Woodland Grain and Milling; Co. 
R. E. Boyle, Books and Stationery 
Bank of Yolo 

Bank of Woodland 
Sierra I^umber Co. 

M. C. Canipo, Rancher 



GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA 

CHARMING IN ITS INFINITE VARIETY 

For the Home Builder, 
ideal location and environ- 
ment. Fifteen minutes dis- 
tant by electric road from 
the city limits of Los An- 
geles, City conveniences 
with country comfort. 

Climate unsurpassed, free 
from extremes of heat and 
cold. Abundance of mountain 
water. 

For fruit growing, flower 
culture and vegetable garden- 
ing soil unsurpassed and a 
market at the door. 

Lots and acreage at reason- 
able figures; an investment — 
not a speculation. 

For further information write any of the following: 
Bank of Glendale, R. A. Blackburn, Real Estate; Holman & Campbell, Real Estate; Glendale Improve- 
ment Association, E D. Goodc, County Road Overseer; T. Oilman Taylor, Seedsman; J. H. Wells, 
Geo. U. Moyse, Wm. A. Anderson, Contractor and Builder; J. F. Mclntyre, Lumber Yard; 
F. W. Mclntyre, Real Estate; E. K. Grant, Contractor and Builder; Thos. O. Pierce, Livery; 
Kober & Tarr, General Merchandise; A. L. Bryant M. D., Dr. R E. Chase. 












HHiH^^kaL^^il^HHIHB' . i -X ^HB^# 7^ 




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Sim^'-^^^^^^^^::^- - ' /^^^iJ^LdLl 






^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HHaB^Hc^^^^^^B^BBf^-'V* 




Do Yo^n N^ee Ttsisit Tree? 


It takes soil, water and sunshine to make a tree 


like that. This grizzley giant stands near Chico, 


in the great Sacramento Valley of California. The 


soil that grew that tree will raise five crops of 


alfalfa in one season, without irrigation. 


CHICO, BUTTE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 


Write to the Chico B-ard of Tiade, or 
the following tirms 


B. Cussick. J. A. E. Shuster. Baker, Jones & Smith. 
Sears & Farnham. Brown & Williams. Warren & Vadney. 
Home Real Estate Co. Diamond Match Co. James H. Jones & Co. 

C. C. Royce. W. J. Costar. 
Bank of Butte County. Taber & Hamilton. 



Mai^ysville 

CAPITAL OF YUBA COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 



THE GARDEN SPOT AND CITY 
OF THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY 



Orange, Lemon, Lime, Olive, Peach, Apricot, Pear, Berry and Alfalfa 
Lands in tracts to suit. Abundance of water for irrigation where needed. 
FINE CLIMATE 

Prices $25 to $100 per Acre, 

For particulars write MARYSVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, or any of the 
following well known firms: 




Marysville Woolen Mill. 

J. R. Garrett Co., Wholesale Grocers. 

Yuba Consolidated Gold Fields, Dredging. 

Valley Meat Co. 

Decker, Jewett & Co., Bank 

Hampton Hardware Co. 



Sperry Flour Co. 

C. T. Aaron, Real Estate. 

E. A. Forbes, Attorney. 

The Rideout Bank. 

M. J. Newkom, Real Estate. 




DO YOU 



Want a home 
in a land of 



Sunshine 

Fruit 

Grain? 



I have land in both 

Yuba and Sutter Counties 

Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Peaches, 
Apricots, Pears, Berries-^all grow here. 
Alfalfa grows many crops each year. 
Land in tracts to suit from 

$25 TO $J00 PER ACRE 



Write me at once, stating what you want. I will take great interest in finding property to suit you 
Descriptive matter free. Address 

M» J. NEWKOM, MARYSVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



ANYVn TUFATRIPAI Pflin PRFAM prevents early wnnkles. it is not a freckle coatinsr ; it re- 



moves them. ANYVO CO., 427 North Main St., Los Ansreles 



v*I^I<«Paioma Toii,et5?ap 



AT ALL 
DRUG STORES 



Help— All kincfs. See Hummel Bros. & Co., 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main 509. 



Escondido 

CALIFORNIA 



Offers great, 
inducements to the 
CITRUS and 
DECIDUOUS 
Fruit Growers 



«^:~:-'i 


M 


J^^^ 


1 


fc.^i^#** 




m 


^ 




W5. . 



KOUR-YKAR-OI.D CITRUS ORCHARD 



It has the desired soil. 

It has plenty of water — cheap. 

It has an abundance of cheap land. It.has foothill lands and valley lands. 

It is in no danger of frosts. 

The bearing citrus orchards this year netted their owners from $500.00 to 
$1000.00 per acre. 

It is the natural home of the raisin grape. 

Don't put your money in high priced lands, when you can buy better land her^ 
for a trifle— INVESTIGATE. 

Address CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Escondido, Cal. 



FLAGSTArr, ARIZONA 



The SnVLIOHT CITY" 

Svir»sHir»e 



Pvire Ail 




CLIFF DWELLING, WALNUT CANYON, NEAR LACSTAFF, ARIZ. 



Altitude 7,000 Feet 
Mountain Spring "Water 

Unrivalled as a resort for 
Health, Scenic Beauty and 
Sport. Gateway of the Grand 
Canyon and Navajo and Hopi 
Indian Reservations. Other 
points of interest within easy 
distance are: Prehistoric 
Cliflf Dwellings and Caves; 
Bottomless Pits; Sunset 
Mountain; Extinct Craters 
and Lava Beds; the Painted 
Desert; Natural Bridge; 
^lontezuma's Castle and 
Well; Natural Ice Caves; 
Meteoric Deposits; Petrified 
Forests; Trout Fishing and 
Deer Hunting in Season. 

Excellent Hotel Accommo- 
dations. Perfect Livery Ser- 
vice. Competent Guides. 

Outfitting Point for over- 
land trips in and around the 
Grand Canyon. 



More detailed information cheerfully furnished. Address the following: 
Babbitt Bros., leading Merchants Arizona Lumber and Timber Co. 



The Citizens Bank 



Commercial Hotel 



Hotel Weatherford 









CAPITAL OF PLACER COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 



A beautiful, healthful city, lo- 
cated in the mountains, where the 
climate is unexcelled, and where 
you can grow peaches, pears, 
plums, oranges and olives. . Dairy- 
ing, stock raising and creameries. 



J» 












Iwa^Bi 




"i'^^^WKi' ; ft f^-^^;^^-.**::^- N^^ 


■■■■■""■■■''■■■■""■■■'■'^■"""■■"-  ^"*«»*«^ ■■■■■■■■■--■ 


it i i . I .3 



COURT HOUSE AUBURN 



Special Inducements for 



Tourist Winter or Summer Hotel 



J. H. Wills, Real Estate. 
Auburn Lumber Co. 
W. W. Rodehaver, Real Estate 
William G. Lee Co. 



Freeman & Walsh 
J. W. Morgan, Dry Goods. 
E. S. BIrdsall, Olive Oil. 




HOTEL COLONIA, BIGGS 



BIGGS 

BUTTE COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 

The home of the orange, the 
peach, the pear and the nuts. 
Butte county oranges are mar- 
keted in the East six weeks 
before the Southern California oranges. Here are located the celebrated Rio Bonito 
orchards. 

Five crops of alfalfa are grown on the river bottoms each year without irrigation 
and there are 15,000 acres of upland now under irrigation by the Butte County Canal. 
The new Northern California Electric Railway, with 24 miles now completed, is pur- 
chasing rights of way east of Biggs, and will run through this section. 

The school facilities are the best, and the hotel accommodations are unsurpassed 
in the State. 

Land can be purchased for from $45 to $125 per acre. 
For further particulars address 

Board of Trade, Biggs, California , or 

C. N. Brown, Ruggles & Harper, G. K. Smith, Sacramento Valley Bank, E. Steadman, 
J. M. Hastings & Co., Chatfield & Smith, T. H. Fitch. W. A. Walker. 



Help— All kinds. See Hummel Bros. & Co., 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main 509. 



OROVILLE 

CALIFORNIA 

The Queen City of Butte County 




PRUir SCBNB NEAR OROVILLB, CALIFORNIA 

Oroville is the county seat of Butte County, California. It is at the end 
of S. P. from Marysville. on direct line of the Western Pacific. Is the terminus 
of the northern electrical line from Chico. 

More than $7,000 in gold is taken daily from the soil by dredging in the 
Oroville vicinity — over 35 dredgers in operation. 

A moderate and even climate. 

Oranges, olives, lemons and other fruit grows in abundance here. 

Land can be had from $15.00 to $100.00 per acre. 

The home of the Ehmann Olive Oil. 

Has two excellent banks. 

The Union Hotel, one of the best hotels in Northern California. 

Water and light in abundance, and hay, grain and live stock are staple 
products. 

Further information can be had by addressing Secretary Chamber of Com- 
merce, or any of the following well known firms: 



L. H. Alexander, Merchant. 
Ehmann Olive Co. 
Union Hotel and Annex. 
R. S. KItrIck, Lumber. 
Oroville Light & Pov»^er Co. 
Ophir Hardware Co. 
John C. Gray, Fruit Grov^er. 
Bank of Rideout, Smith &. Co. 



E. C. Tucker & Son, Real Estate. 

First National Bank. 

T. W. Green & Co., Real Estate. 

Z. D. Brown, Real Estate. 

W. P. Hammon, Dredoe Mining. 

Perkins & Wise Co., Merchants. 

E. Meyer & Co., Merchants. 

Lausen & Fetherston, Searchers of Record*. 



Brawley 



the 



Garden City 

of the Great 

Imperial Valley 




OFFICE BRAWLEY IMPROVEMENT COMPANY 



Brawley is noted for its early cantaloupes, early grapes and all kinds of early vegetables. The re- 
turns from these crops have exceeded $ioo per acre. In addition to this intense farming Brawley is 
the center of, and has tributary to it over 100,000 acres of the finest agricultural land in the valley, 
where hogs, dairying, sheep and general farming has proven very profitable. These lands are all 
irrigated with an unlimited supply of water taken from the Colorado River. For full information 
about town and acreage property, address any of the following: 



Imperial Investment Co. 

Hovley & Cady, Real Estate 

Stanley & Kellogg, Real Estate 

C. M. L.. & C. Co., Store 

Edith Meador, Post Ofllee and Store 

C. Darnell, Merchant 



Nellie Pellet, Merchant 

T. D. McKeehan, Merchant 

Imperial Valley Bank 

Hatchings & Co., Hard-ware 

Varney Brothers Co., General Merchandise 

Edgar Brothers, Implements 




SCENK OF BEAN FIELD NEAR GKIDLEV 



rOF. DIVERSIFIED FARMING 

Come to 

GRIDLEY 

California's Greatest Garden 

Gridley, Butte County, California, is 
one of California's best towns of 2000 
population. Has excellent stores, bank, 
newspaper, cannery, packing house, 
machine shops, grain warehouse, best 
of public schools, churches. On main 
line of the S. P. Railroad, 160 miles 
from San Francisco. 



CROP FAILURES ARE NEVER KNOWN. 

Fine irrigation system has just been completed. Resources and opportunities 
are abundant. Good land can be had reasonable. Several farms have recently been 
subdivided and can be had in whatever acreage wanted, at reasonable terms. If you 
are coming to California, write for booklet of Gridley, Butte County, California. 

Address Secretary Chamber of Commerce, or any of the well known firms: 



J. H. Jones, Real Estate. 
W. H. Gllstrap, Real Estate. 
Wm. Brown &■ Co., Stock Dealers. 
The Rideout Bank. 



W. H. Hall, General Merchandise. 
D. J. Parker, General Merchandise. 
Miller Bros., Retail and Wholesale Liquors. 
J. C. Adams, Retail Liquors. 




View of 
San Joaquin 
River 

The Fresno Irrigated 
Farms extend eigfht 
miles along the 
river at this 
point 



Ihe Fresno Irrigated Farms Co. 



CLIMATE 

Mild winters, Warm dry 
summers, Cool nights. 

SOIL 

A Rich sandy loam that 
grows anything. 

PRODUCTS 

Greatest variety of crops 
known in any country of 
the world. 

IRRIGATION SYSTEM 

Finest irrigation system in 
California— low rate oi62l4 
cents per acre, per year — 
80 miles of ditches now on 
tract. 



26,000 
ACRES 

of Land 

$35 per Acre and Upwards 

NEW TOWN of 

KER.MAN 

JUST STARTED 



ALFALFA RANCHES 

Dairy herds on credit — ask 
us about them. 

RAISIN LANDS 
Suitable land for raisin 
culture in the only raisin 
secton in the U. S. 
VINEYARDS 
Table grape or wine grape 
lands. 

MODERN 

CONVENIENCES 
Rural free delivery — Tele- 
phones, Electric power, 
Lights, etc. 

ORCHARDS 
Ail fruits known ito Cali- 
fornia grow here. 



Fresno Irrigated Farms Company, Inc. 

Main Office, 405-408 Kohl Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 
Los Angeles Office, 125 Pacific Electric Bldg. Fresno Office, 2154 I St. 



J^J^ 



The Flaming 
Tokay Grape 



The most productive 

gfrape raised in 

California 




Santa Rosa, California 




STREET SCENE IN SANTA ROSA 



^;inf ;i Pnc;) Vxm ^ Banks 2 Excellent Hotels i Flour Mill i Brewery 

>3ullla t\.U^d Ilu^ 4 Fruit Canneries i Woolen Mill Fruit Drying Factories 



2 Tanneries 



2 Lumber Yards 



Street Cars 



Municipal water works, with free water, free rural delivery and is situated in the 
heart of Stock Growing, Grain Farming, Hop Raising, Fruit Growing, of Sonoma 
County 

Excellent Public and Private Schools, Churches and Lodges. Excellent 
climate year round. Population 10,000. 52 miles from San Francisco; 5 trains 
daily to and from city. Gas and electric light. Telephones. Plenty of good 
land for sale cheap. For further information address any of the following: 



The Sonoma County Abstract Bureau. 
Santa Rosa Bank. 
Occidental Hotel Co. 
Santa Rosa National Bank. 
J. P. Fitts Lumber Co. 



Houts, Jewell & Peterson, Real Estate 

Eardley & Barnett, Real Estate. 

W. D. Reynolds, Real Estate. 

F. Berka, Lumber. 

Lee Bros. & Co., Draymen. 



COME TO COLUSA AND FIND 




Some of California's real wealth, rich soil. 

Easy and cheap irrigation. Price from $35 to $75 

an acre. 
Citrus and deciduous fruits on same acre. 
A climate of Italian softness. Railroad and river 

transportation. 
A great Ranch newly subdivided. Easy access to the 

markets. Fine schools. Good churches. 
A healthful home. Beautiful surroundings. 
For further information address any of the following 

well known firms: 



J. B. DeJarnatt &. Son, Real Estate, 
John C. Mogk, Real Estate. 
Colusa Milling Co. 
Farmers & Merchants Bank. 
Colusa & Lake R. R. Co. 



Geo. G. Brooks, Stationery. 

Colusa County Bank. 

Grenfell Lumber Co. 

G. W. Allgaier, Groceries and Provisions. 



Now Is The Time 



40,000 Acres of a Fine Old Spanish Land Grant, now being 
subdivided and offered for sale to those who wish a home 
amid the most attractive surroundings. 




SCENE ON THE MOLINOS RIVKR 



If yoM are t>ired of a cold dimate, if waving palms, golden oranges and green 
grass look better to you than ice and snow, if you want a climate where you can 
work every day in the year, you had better take advantage of the subdivision of this 
great Spanish Grant that is for the first time being offered for sale. Fertility of soil, 
river and rail transportation, electric car line under construction, telephone, electric 
lights, and abundance of water for irrigation, are some of the advantages of this 
great Estate. As a productive investment or for speculation this tract of land id 
unequaled, its rapid advance in value being absolutely certain. 

People buying from us in the early subdivision of this vast Estate will probably 
never have another opportunity so advantageous. 

This is the time. Come now or write immediately for booklet and full in- 
formation. 

SMITH CROWDER 

Manager Los Molinos Land Co., Los Molinos, Tehama County, California 



IMPERIAL c 



San Diego Covinty 

alifornia 



THE METROPOLIS OF THE IMPERIAL VALLEY 




WEST SIDE OF IMPERIAL AVENUE, IMPERIAL. IMPERIAL HOTEL IN FOREGROUn'd 

Imperial is the center of the largest body of irrigated land under one system in the United States, 
and Hon. Frank W. Mondell of Wyoming, chairman of the Irrigation C5ommittee of the House of 
Representatives, said after a recent visit: "I consider the owners of land in the Imperial Valley among 
the luckiest farmers in the United States They are singularly blessed by nature and by man. They 
have everything that they could ask to make themselves well to do. They have the soil, the climate, 
the WATER, and the location, with railroad facilities for marketing their crops, and good and 
constant markets for their products close at hand." For further information address any of the 
following: 



H. N. Dyke, Secretary Chamber of Com- 
merce 
Imperial Land Co. 

Varney Brothers Co., General Merchandise 
Edgar Brothers, Implements 



A. L. Hill, Hardware 

Salisbury Realty Co., Real Estate 

P. N. Chaplin & Son, Real Estate 

Imperial Valley Abstract, Title «S: Trust Co. 

I. L. Wili^on, Real Estate. 




Petaluma 



SONOMA 
COUNTY 



CALIFORNIA 



A Typical Chicken Ranch at Petaluma 



GREATEST POULTRY SECTION ON PACIFIC COAST 

Best facilities for diversity of agricultural pursuits, stock-raising, dairying, together 
with finest climate to be had in the State. Sonoma County ranks third in the State 
from an agricultural standpoint. 

]^T7'T' A T T T 11 7f A HAS good banks, excellent schools, churches, daily 
£ w* I EL I 11 lyi Z\ newspapers, planing mills, lumber yards, iron foundry, 
^^ steam and electrical railway and river transportation, 

good stores, etc. ONE HOUR'S RIDE FROM SAN FRANCISCO. Excellent 
Climate, Moderate Rainfall. Healthful! If you are looking for a home on a small 
investment, come to Petaluma. Write SECRETARY CHAMBER OF COM- 
MERCE or any of the following well known firms: 

J. W. Horn Co., Real Estate; Geo. P. McNear, Grain and Feed; D. W. Ravens- 
croft, "The Courier": Bank of Sonoma County; The Petaluma National Bank; 
M. Zartman & Co., Wagon Mfrs.; Cavanagh & Whitney, Liunber and Planing Mill; 
Camm & Hedges Co., Lumber, Millv^ork and Tanks; Schluckebier Hardware Co. 




Tulare 

CALIFORNIA 



Heart, 
of the 



San Joaquin 
Valley 




A Tulare (California) Fig Tree 



THE CITY OF TULARE is the business center of a large and prosperous 
farming territory of surpassing fertility. It has a population of 3,000, and is a 
thriving, progressive community. Its social life is of such a character as to make 
of it a very desirable home town. It has first class schools, churches, and a free 
public library. 

An Irrigation 
System Covering 
40,000 Acres 

and having 300 miles of canals and distributing ditches, surrounds the city, and 
belongs to the land free from all indebtedness. 

Good Alfalfa Land, $30 to $50 per Acre, Plenty of Water 

Two small creameries ship two tons of butter daily to Los Angeles. The new sugar 
beet factory pays $4.50 per ton for beets, and fifteen tons and upwards can be easily 
raised to the acre. 

If interested send for our free illustrated booklet. 

M. C. ZUMWALT, Secretary Board of Trade 

TULARE CITY, CALIFORNIA 




EUREKA, CALIFORNIA, 

Has regular and quick water communication with San Francisco, with freight 
rates ranging from $i.oo to $4.00 per ton, the cost of living and prices of merchandise, 
clothing, manufactures, and general supplies are governed by those those of the 
latter place, and vary but little therefrom. 

Humboldt County Has: 

Great extent, affording choice of location. Cheap lands in abundance. Its own 
lumber, fuel, food, wool, leather. Equable temperature, insuring bodily comfort. 
Healthfulness, especially absence of fevers and malaria. Diversity of products, giv- 
ing variety in occupations. Abundant rainfall, guaranteeing crops and water. Great 
natural resources in divers branches. Cheap lumber, making improvements inex- 
pensive. Cheap fuel, costing little more than the labor of taking it. Good schools 
within reach of every home. Good county government, honestly administered. Cheap 
freight rates by sea to all Pacific points. The largest and best body of redwood on 
earth. An honest, peaceful, law-abiding population 

Humboldt Has Not: 

Chinese, to compete with American labor. Irrigation, with its expense and liti- 
gation. Spanish grants, to cloud titles and bar settlement. Railroad land grants, 
to interfere with progress. Codling moths to destroy the apples. Colorado beetles 
to destroy the potatoes. Summer thunderstorms to interfere with harvests. Long 
winters when stock must be fed. Severe frosts to destroy vegetation. Crop failures 
from any cause whatever. Cyclones, blizzards, tramps or strikes. 

For further information address any of the following well known firms: 



H, L. Ricks, Pres. Chamber of Com- 
merce. 
Geo, W. Baker, Real Estate. 
Eurek? t-« Co. 
R. D. Johnston 
Delaney & Young 
Taylor & Zane 
J. H. Hunter. 



•G. A. Waldner, Western Hotel. 

Skinner-Duprey Drug Co. 

Thos. H. Perry. 

F. B. Hink 

Porter, Fautz & Brooks. 

J. C. Henderson. 

E. G. Kramer. 

Bank of Eureka 



^^ 






DON'T OVERLOOK 




• 


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T Jiwi^U 




^^^-— 


^ 


UKiaii 

CAPITAL OP MENDOCINO COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 




^^^^^^^ „ ^ 


^HH 


The Best and Fastest Grow- 
ing City in Northern CaL 






't^^^^^^H 








s^^l^'j^^P^W 


Ukiah is situated in the cen- 




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pdH^j 


ter of a beautiful valley 




surrounded by mountains. 




^^|^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HBMH|K&-eftl:A-M( ^- 


^HhHBH 


through which flows the 




^^^^gkgtkjk^^^^^g^^^^^^JSj^ 


^B^^^^mI 


Russian River. The land 




^^^^^^^^^^^HPBQ^M mS^ 


^S^^^BHH 


along the river is very rich, 




^^^^^^^^t^t^^^^^^i^^^ .A^l^l 


l^^^^^^^^N 


and a large acreage is in 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^K^H||^||jfl||^^H 


^^^^^^^^H 


hops and alfalfa. The bench 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^^^^^^^H 


^^^^^^H 


land lying between the riv- 




J^^^^^^H^HBH^HHnHliHII^HI 


IHHHBH^H 


er bottom and the moun- 








tains is particularly well 




suited to vineyards, and 


many acres are now planted to grapes 


Land can still be bought in this valley at 


reasonable prices, and it offers many a 


dvantages to the homeseeker. Good climate 


and water. No fogs or malaria. For 


further information address the following: 


Address Secretary, Board of Trade or any of the following names | 


Poage A. Woodward. Real Estate. 


Frank Sandelin, Palace Hotel. 


Jamison Bros., General Merchandise. 


C. Hofman, General Merchandise. 


L. B. Frasler, Real Estate. 


J. M. Owen, Real Estate. 


Mendocino County Abstract Bureau. 


Geo. W. Geacy, F-ashlon Stables. 


C. P. Smith. 





Docs It Make Any Difference To You 

Whether you get your oranges off 
in November and DecemiDer as 
they do at Porterville and get the 
top price, or wait as they do else- 
where until the market is glutted 
and prices low? 

Does It Make Any Difference To You 

Whether you pay $40.00 to $60.00 
per acre for as good alfalfa land 
as ever lay out of doors, with wa- 
ter, such as you can get at Porter- 
ville or twice that for no better 
land elsewhere? 

Does It Make Any Difference To You 

Whether you raise stock iq a coun- 
try that is ideal for stock and 
poultry such as you find at Porter- 
ville, free from the many pests and 
annoyances, or try an up-hill pull 
at the business elsewhere? 

DOES IT MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE TO YOU— 

But hold on stranger, just write to any of the firms below who will .send you a copy 
of PRACTICAL RESULTS that TELLS THINGS TRUTHFULLY and tells you 
what you want to know. 

If you have never heard — Porterville is in Eastern Tulare County and has made 
greater progress in the last three years than any locality in the state. 

Pioneer Banking Co. H. E. Ford, Real Estate. 

W. A. Sears, Real Estate. 




Pioneer Land Co., Real Estate. 

W. E. Premo, Real Estate. 

Porterville Lumber Co. First National Bank. 

A. J. DeLaney Co., Hardware, etc. 

Wliko Mentz. General Merchandise. 



Geo. D. Avery, Real Estate. 
Hail & Boiler, Real Estate. 
Williams & Young Co., Cattle and Dairying. 







1 


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M 


H| 


1 




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i^ 


1 


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Cathedral rock 



"LaJolla 
By-thc 
Sea" 



This picturesque winter and 
summer resort has an esti- 
mated population of 1200, and 
is within 15 miles of San 
Diego with a train service 



of four trains per day each way. La Jolla ofifers to those seeking residence, churches, 
a public library, a graded school, literary and social clubs for men and women, golf, 
tennis, boating, fishing and surf bathing the year round. Write or call upon the 
following firms: 

Mary H. Fltzhugrh, Real E:8tate. Mrs. A. P. Mills, Real E^state. 

Walter S. Lleber, Real Estate. I.. A. & S. D. Beach R, R. Co. 

C. D. Rolfe, Real E^state. I.a Jolla Mdrse, Co. 

E. J. Swayne & Co., Real Estate. L« Jolla Improvement Ass'n. 

La Jolla Bath House & Entertainment Co. 




A SCENE SHOWING ONE OF OUR INDUSTRIES. 

For further particulars, write to Board of Trade, Madera, California. 



Earlimont Colony 




Tulare 

County 

California 



A Land of Opportunity 

A Land of Promise 

Earliest Section 

Of California's 

Early Belt 



EARLIEST 

That's What Counts 

Earliest Oranges 
Earliest Grapes 
Earliest Figs 
Earliest Olives 



Quickest Returns 
Extraordinary Prices 



Gatliering the Earliest Oranges in the 
State near Portersville. 



EARLIEST VEGETABLES 
EARLIEST DECIDUOUS FRUITS EARLIEST SMALL FRUITS 

South of Portersville, earliest part of Tulare County. Rolling upland. At base 
of Sierra foothills. No killing frosts. No scale. No smut. No diseases. No 
heavy winds. A beautiful landscape. Responds to landscape gardener's art. Pure 
air. Unsurpassed climate. Remarkably healthful. Well located. Abundant cheap 
Water. Virgin soil, extremely rich. Close to railroad. Near to mountain camps 
and resorts. Splendid hunting and fishing grounds in easy reach. 

FIRST SUBDIVISION— TO THOSE WHO M^ILL IMPROVE 

Earlimont Colony Co. will care for property of absent owners. Land with water only 
$50.00 per acre. Purchasers given benefit of land at about one third usual price in 
preference to other modes of advertising first subdivision. Large tracts for sale for 
subdivision. A crop of early vegetables will pay for land first season. Orange 
groves begin to bear second season and increase rapidly each succeeding year till they 
net from $300 to $600 or more per acre. Good grammar school already on property. 
Store, postoffice, telephone, etc., will soon be established. A flourishing town soon. 
Electric roads in near future. Get in early and avoid the rush. 

Address all communications to WM. A. SEARS, Portersville, Tulare County, Cal. 



COLTON 



The Hub City of Southern California 
The Center of the Orange Belt 




Colton offers 
special induce- 
ments to Home- 
seekers who should 
be mindful of its 
splendid school 
and church privi- 
leges; its business 
(and social life, the 
ideal climate and 
the location as the 
HUB CITY. 



HOTEL AND PARK., COL 1 UN, CAL 



COLTON is a rapidly growing city of 4,000 inhabitants, and has exceptional prospects for the future. Colton 
is 56 miles east of Los Angeles, on the main line of three transcontinental railroads. You can' afford to pass through 
without stopping to investigate. For further particulars address any of the following: 

McRen & Hager, St. Clair 
Livery Stables. 

Colton Pharmacy 

J. M., More, Blacksmith. 

O. Li. Emery, HardvFare. 

G. B. Caster, Contractor & 
Builder. 

Mrs. M. A. Fox, Real Estate. 



Wilcox-Rose Mercantile Co. 

H. G. French & Co. 

The First National Bank of 
Colton. 

Colton Fruit Exchange, out- 
put 1906, 400 cars o£ or- G. M. Green, Supt. of Schools 
anges and lemons. Colton Grain & Milling Co. 

H. E. Fouch & Co., Real Es- D. C. Swartz, Undertaker, 
tate. M. A. Hebberd Co. 



<»regory Fruit Co. 
Hon. James D. Knox. 
R. Li. Deakins, Palace Cigar 
Store. 



"If You Will Write 

The Board of Trade, Santa Cruz, California, for booklet D, stating in what particular 



proposition you are interested, 



You Shall Know Why 

the following investments in that city are profitable: 

I. The erection of modern, furnished cottages of five, six and seven rooms on 
suitable ground. 

II. The establishment of a fruit canning and processing factory. 

III. The establishment of glass and sand -lime brick factories. 

IV. The erection of a one hundred and fifty room, modem, first-class hotel near 

the beach. 



Alhisquctqtsc 



NEW MEXICO 

A City of Realities 




You who arc looking for a nt w ■. iic Southwest give a few moments' time to 

the following facts and realities about NEW MEXICO'S greatest city: 

ALBUQUERQ UE 

Largest and most progressive city in New Mexico and Arizona. Population estimated at 20,000. Best 
climate in the United States. Located on main line Santa Fe Pacific Ry. 525 miles south of Denver. 254 
miles north of El Paso. 880 miles east of Los Angeles. County seat of Bernalillo County. Headquar- 
ters U. S. District Court. U. S. Marshal's office located here. Monthly payroll exceeds $200,000.. Pay 
roll and revenues approximate $2,500,000. Santa Fe Ry. has machine shops here. Albuquerque is an im- 
portant distributing point. Agricultural possibilities of Bernalillo county are great. Alfalfa, hay, corn, 
wheat, oats, sugar beets, etc. The culture of tobacco is being demonstrated with satisfaction. Acreage 
in apples, pteaches and other fruits is being extended each year. Wholesale trade covers a territory of 150 
miles or more in all directions. Many elegant homes with attractive environments. Territorial fair held 
here for the past twenty-four years, at an annual expense of $15,000. Wool Scouring Mills, handling over 
4,500,000 pounds annually. Rio Grande Woolen Mills Co., manufacturers, annual output $180,000. Al- 
buquerque Foundry and Machine Works, largest in the Southwest. Southwestern Brewery and Ice Co., 
annual capacity 30,000 barrels. The Crystal Ice Co., ice plant capacity 30 tons daily. The American 
Lumber Co.'s newsaw mill and box factory. 5 public schools and High school. University of New Mex- 
ico, the Hadley Climatological Labratory, St. Vincent Academy for girls. Immaculate Conception School 
for boys. United States Indian school, Presbyterian Mission school, city park, 12 churches, 6 newspapers 
(3 dailies), 3 National banks ($4,000,000 deposits); Montezuma Trust Co., capital and surplus $100,000: 
32 secret and fraternal organizations. Commercial Club with 200 members; th« Alvarado Hotel, the pride 
of the city, cost more than $200,000; water works, 2 telephone systems, electric and gas plants, 3 miles 
electric street car line, 3 planing mills; opera house recently built by the Elks' lodge at a cost of $75,000; 
sanitarium, run by Sisters of Charity; hospital: 2 building and loan associations; public library and free 
reading room, costing $20,000; flour mill, 3 lumber yards, 4 cigar factories. Further information of 
great value to those seeking homes in the Southwest furnished free on application by addressing 

Commetcial Cltib, Albt^qoerqiie, New Mexico 



First National Bank 

Bank of Commerce 

State Nationnl Bank 

Montezuma Triint Co. 

MorninK Journal 

Rio Grande ^Voolen Mills (Co-operative) 

Alhuqurrqiie AVool Soourlne: MIIIk 

.1. Korhcr A: Co., CnrrinKPM and HarnenM 

Metonlf & Straunn, Real Kstate 

Whitney Co., AVholennle and Retail Hard- 

AVootton A Myer, Real Iilatate ■ware 

Albert Faber, Furniture 



J. C. BaldrldKe, liUmber and Paint* 
Albuquerque Gas, E^lectrlc LiKbt A Poirer 
American laimber Co. Co. 

Albuquerque i-^oundry A Machine Works 
-Albuquerque Traction Co. 
G. L. Brooks 

rOrncHt MeyerH A Co., Wholesale Liquors 
University Heights Improvement Co. 
O. \V. Stronff's Sons, Furniture and Under- 
Crystal Ice Co. taking 
John S. Beaven, Coal and Wood 
A. K. Walker, Real Kstate 




Stop fighting the elements in a zero temperature. 
Try a battle with the waves, or the enjoyment of 
numberless other sports of sunny California. 

They are nearer than ever before — more restfully 
reached, in a shorter time. 

The Rock Islands "Train of Quality," 

Golden State Limited 



takes you from Chicago or St. Louis to California in 
less than three days. Runs over the warm Southern Route 
of lowest altitudes. 
The equipment of the train is entirely new. Pullman Com- 
partment Drawing-room Cars, Rock Island Mission-style Diners 
and Observation-BuflFet Cars. There is nothing finer on wheels. 

You should have our two new and dainty books, profusely illustrated 
and in colors. 

"California, the Golden State," contains in seventy-two pages a 
thorough, readable review of the resorts and scenic features of 
California, with a list of hotels and rates. 



" Rock IsLnd Trains to California" (twenty-four pages) gives a brief, easy-to-read story 
of the through service and interesting details of the journey via Rock Island Lines. 
Yours for the asking. Write to-day. 

JOHN SEBASTIAN, Passenger Traffic Manager, 
Chicago. 



Rock 
Island 



m 



KJ. 



m<. 



m 



^ 



The Qtfestionat Present 

Which is Better 



>-^C 



^ 



Eastern ^^ California 
Blizzards Mildness 

There is no question as to which i.s 
more comfortable nor as to the 

..Salt Lake Route. 

l)cing a desirable way to reach thi 
blessed region. 

'Tis the short sceni.c line be- 
tween Salt Lake City and 
Lo.s Angeles. 

Ji s fc J^^f Y 

T I C K E T 

Jt G EM T 

Jt b o u t It 



2^ 



■>^ 



r^ 





rful 



The ascent of Mount Lowe by trolley affords 
the visitor to Los Angeles one of the most marvel- 
ous and beautiful mountain railway journeys in the 
world. And it is only one of the features of a 
railway system covering 400 miles and reaching 
all the points of interest in the garden spot of 
America. 



TKe Pacific Electric IVail^way 

Depot at Corner of 6tH and Main 

Los Angeles California 



NAVAJO BLANKETS 

AJ^D INDIAM CURIOS J^t wholesale 

I have more than 250 weavers in my employ, including the most skilful now 
living, and have taken the greatest pains to preserve the old colors, patterns, 
and weaves. Every blanket sold by me carries my personal guarantee of its 
quality. In dealing with me, you will get the very finest blankets at wholesale prices. 

I also handle the products of the Hopi (Moqui) Indians, buying them under 
contract with the trading posts at Keam's Canyon and Oraibi and selling them 
at wholesale. 

I have constantly a very fine selection of Navajo silverware and jewelry, 
Navajo "rubies" cut and uncut, peridots and native turquois. Also the choicest 
modern Moqui pottery, and a rare collection of prehistoric pottery. 

J. L HUBBELL, '"<"'" trader 
Write for my Catalotfue - i a 1 /^ * • 

and Price List Oanado, Apachc Co., Arizona 



The Delightful Scenic l^oute to 

SANTA MONICA 

and Hollywood 

^. . ine, Comfortable Observation Cars — 
<*■ Free from Smoke \ 

Cars leave Fourth street and Broadway, Los Angeles, for Santa Monica via Sixteenth 

street, every 15 minutes from 6.35 a.m. to 9.35 p. m., then each hour till 11.35; or via 

Bellevue Ave., for Colegrove and Sherman, every hour from 6.15 a.m. to 11.15P .m. Cars 

leave Ocean Park, Santa Monica, for Los Angeles, at 5.45, 6.10, and 6.35 a.m. and every 

half hour from 6.55 a.m. till 8.25 p.m., and at 9.25, 10.25, and 11.05 P-m. 

Cars leave Los Angeles for Santa Monica via Hollywood and Sherman via Bellevue 
Ave., every hour from 6.45 a.m. to 6.45 p.m., and to Hollywood and Sherman only every 
hour thereafter to 11.45 P-m. 

For complete time-table and particulars call at office of company. 
Single Round Trip, 50c. lO-Trip Tickets, $2.00. 



The Los 
Angclcs- 
Pacific 
Railroad 




•* % £. '%^'> ^mr A «?_. 



^L c^A A 



>n„-. r>»_* 




AHundredMilesAlongOceanCliffs 



Shore Line Limited 



A daily limited parlor car train for passengers holding first 
class Rail and Pullman seat tickets. Los Angeles and 
San Francisco — I3j^ hours. Leaving each terminus at 
8 a. m. Arriving 9:30 p.m. 



THOS. A. GRAHAM, 

Ass't Gcn'l Freight & Pass. Agenti 



N. R. MARTIN, 

District Passenger Agent 



600 South Spring Street, comer Sixth, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



i r ^^ 



:z. 



THE ONLY Wffi' TO SEE 

SaUJHEKN CALIFORNIA 

IS VIA THB 




Wmt Ti^ciK 




-k. _ 









uu;Li! 



Two hours and fifteen minutes at Riverside for drives on far- 
famed Victoria and Magnolia Avenues. Two hours and twenty 
minutes at Redlands for drives to Smiley Heights and over the 
McKinley Drive, where a view of the surrounding country is had 
not excelled in Southern California. 

Returning via Covina reaches Los Angeles early in the 
evening. 

Do not fail to take this the most beautiful trip in Southern 
California. Full information with Illustrated Booklet at 600 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles. 

THOS. A. GRAHAM, Asst. Gen. Fr't. & Pass. Agt. 
N. R. Martin, Dist. Pass. Agt. 



[SPECIAl'MIM MRir MORNING FROM LOS ANGELES/^ 

R» [COKNECTING FROM PASADEMl F0R- I "^ 
SERJlDE&mLANDS 




The California Limited " ''d^"-lVVr:^7n'"' 

Rtinning Between California and Chicago 

Newest Pullman equipment, consisting of observation, drawing- 
room and compartment sleepers, buflFet-smoking car and dining 
car. "Santa Fe All the Way," Safeguarded bv block signals. Har- 
vey meals. The only train between California and Chicago, via any 
line, exclusively for first-class travel. 

En route visit Grand Canyon of Arizona and stop at El 
Tovar, the new $250,000 horel. under Harvey management. Pull- 
_ man service to and from Grand Canyon. 



:^--; 



N?^ture s 
M?ysterpiece 

of Scenic Grejideur. 




BY FAST LINE 

For San Francisco and Santa Barbara 



EXPRESS 

SERVICE 

LOW RATES. 




INCLUDING 
BERTH 

AND 
MEALS. 



LEAVE REDONDO 

Santa Rosa Wednesdays, 7 a. m. 

State of California Sundays, 7 a. m. 

LEAVE PORT LOS ANGELES 

Santa Rosa Wednesdays, 11 a. m. 

State of California Sundays, 1 1 a. m. 

Due a . San Francisco i p. m. following day. 

Connecting at San Francisco with Company's Steamers for Eureka (Humboldt 
Bay), Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria, Vancouver and Ports in Alaska and Mexico. 

Right Reserved to Change Schedule 



Alaska Excursions 



"Totem Pole Route" 

Season 1907 



The Palatial Alaska Excursion 
STEAMSHIP SPOKANE 

Will leave Seattle and Victoria June 14, 28, July 12, 26, August 9. 

LOS ANGELES TICnET OFFICE 

328 SoutK Sprin{( Street 

H. B. BRITTAN City Passenger and Ticket Agent 

G. W. ANDREWS ; Trav. Pass, and Freight Agent 

H. BRANDT District Passenger Agent 

C. D. DUNANN Gen. Pass. Agt., San Francisco 



4) 


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WINCHESTER 

Model 1907 SeUaoading Rifle 
.351 Caliber High Power 



^ 




''The Gun That Shoots Through Steele 



STANDARD RIFLE, 20 INCH ROUND NICKEL STEEL BARREL, PISTOL GRIP 
STOCK OF PLAIN WALNUT, NOT CHECKED, WEIGHT ABOUT 7^ POUNDS, 
NUMBER OF SHOTS SIX, LIST PRICE, ----- $28.00 







HIS new rifle, which has the thoroughly tried and satis- 
factory Winchester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge 
powerful enough for the largest game. The cartridge belongs 
to the high power smokeless powder type and represents the 
latest development in cartridge manufacture. Although quite 
small in size it is very powerful in execution. The magazine 
of this gun is detachable and can be inserted in the gun when 
the bolt is closed, making it quick, safe and handy. The de- 
tachable magazine in a rifle of this type has many advantages 
over the fixed magazine. It permits carrying extra loaded 
magazines by means of which rapid and continuous fir- 
ing can be maintained, and also makes it unnecessary to work 
the cartridges through the gun in unloading. This rifle is a 
six shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and 
simple and strong in construction. There are no moving pro- 
jections on the outside of the gun to catch in the clothing or 
tear the hands and no screws or pins to shake loose. The bar- 
rel is stationary like that of an ordinary rifle and the sights are 
attached directly to the barrel, which is essential for accuracy. 
The take-down device of the Model 1907 is simplicity itself. This 
rifle is easily loaded and unloaded; easily shot with great rapid- 
ity and easily taken down and cleaned. Ask your dealer to show 
you one of these rifles or send for a circular fully describing it. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



A MATTER OF HEALTH 




^AraK^ 




Absolutely Pure 

HAS HO SUBSTITUTE 




is a perfect food, as 
wholesome as it is 
delicious — highly 
nourishing, easily di- 
gested, fitted to repair 
wasted strength, pre- 
serve health and pro- 
long life. 

Be sure that you get 
the genuine, bearing 
our trade - mark on 
every can. 

HIGHEST JiWJtRTiS IN 
EUROPE and JfMERICJi 



Walter Baker 8i Co. Ltd. I 



Established 1780 Dorchester, Mass. 



•♦O 





THE ONLY FRUITS 
IM THE W O Fi L_ D 
Wl T-M $ I , OOO 

PURITV GUARANTEE 
OM EVERV _)AR 



BISHOPS 
CAUFORNIA 
PRESERVES 



SOLD BY ALL GROCERS 



B I S H O P & 
C O M P A N V 

i_os an<3e:l_e:s 

15 JAY 5T NEW YORK 





WINES 

OF UNQUESTIONED AGE 
=AND PURITY== 

Grapes raised in our vine- 
yards, pressed in our winery 
and aged by time in our wine 

cellars. 

DELIVERED FREE OF FREIGHT 
TO ALL EASTERN POINTS 

Two cases of Old Peerless XX 
wines— assorted, with one 
bottle 1888 California Brandy 

For $11.00 

Two cases of XXX oldest 
vintages - assorted, two bot- 
tles 1888 California Brandy 
and one bottle California 
Champagne 

For $15.00 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 

irrv California' 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



ni-A VTi^C* 



have been established over 55 years. By our system 



FEBRUARY. 1907 Nevada Mining Alumber Vol. XXVI, No. i 




'O 



CENTS 
A n r> p >^ 



Copyright I'JO". by Out West Maerazine Company 



LOS ANGELES 



SAN PRANCISCO 



5R<7 



Code: Bedford-M'Neil P. O. Box 772 

Cable Address: Polenz Phone 1 543 

Represented on all Leading Exchanges 

Geo. F. von Polenz & Co. 

Experts and Counsellors on 
Nevada Mining Securities 



MAIN STREET 

Goldfield, Nevada, U. S. A., February 1, 1907 
Mr. Investor 

Everywhere, U. S. A. 
Dear Sir: 

If you have followed the wonderful mining development of the State 
of Nevada, during the past three years, you undoubtedly realize the fact 
that the state has changed from a prospective into a money producing 
mining country. 

We have been located in Goldfield for the past three years and have 
closely watched the phenomenal growth of the mining industry. We 
issue a weekly 

MARKET LETTER 
which has enabled our numerous clients to reap large profits from their 
Nevada investments. We are everlastingly awake to the market condi- 
tions and are in a position to place before you legitimate mining invest- 
ments of unquestionable merit. We have our own mining engineer, who 
passes on all properties in person, before we advise our clients to buy or 
sell. 

We would be pleased to have your name and address for our files 
and we are sure that we can make you some money during the year of 
1907, if you will follow our judgment. 

Yours for legitimate mining, 

Geo. F. von Polenz & Co. 

Diet. GvP-B. 




HOTEL GREEN, Pasadena, Cal. 

Is the largest and finest fire-proof resort hotel in the west. Conducted on both the Ameri- 
can and European plan. A Hotel of refinement and the highest standard of excellence. 
Surrounded by Parks. 

American Rates $4.00 and Up 

European Rates $1.50 and Up 

G. G. GREEN, Owner J. H. HOLMES, Manager 



The Modern Land Not Only of Promise 

but of- — 

Splendid Certainty 

Not only of possibilities, but of probabilities as positive as that day follows night. 
The land of SOUTHERN ALBERTA, where in ten years the progress will be as 
great as the progress of thirty years was in Illinois. Where land as good as lies 
out of doors can be had fro:;n $15.00 to $25.00 per acre. Where if you wish to 
irrigate you get all the water you want for 

Fifty cents per acre annum 



Send for information to 

W. R. GUson, '^' lirLT'"- Los Angeles, CaL 



OUT ^A^KST 

A Tvlaga-Z^ine of ttie Old Pacific and ttie New 

CHAS. F. LUMMIS \ ^..^ 

CHARLES AMADON MOODY \ ^(^^^ors 
SHARLOT M. HALL, Associate Editor 



Among thk Stockhoi^ders and Contributors arb: 



DAVID STARR JORDAN 

President of Stanford University 
FREDERICK STARR 

Ctiicaffo University 
THEODORE H. HITTELL 

The Historian of California 
MARY HALLOCK FOOTE 

Author of "The Led-Horse Claim," etc. 
MARGARET COLLIER GRAHAM 

Author of "Stories of the Foothills" 
GRACE ELLERY CHANNING 

Author of "The Sister of a Saint," etc. 
ELLA HIGGINSON 

Author of "A Forest Orchid," etc. 
CHARLES WARREN STODDARD 

The Poet of the South Seas 
INA COOLBRITH 

Author of "Song's from the Golden Gate," etc 
EDWIN MARKHAM 

Author of "The Man with the Hoe" 
JOAQUIN MILLER 

The Poet of the Sierras 
BATTERMAN LINDSAY 

CHARLES FREDERICK HOLDER 

Author of "The Life of Asrassiz," etc 
CHAS. DWIGHT WILLARD 

CONSTANCE GODDARD DU BOIS 

Author of "The Shield of the Fleur de Lis" 



WILLIAM E. SMYTHE 

Author of "The Conquest of Arid America,'* etc 

DR. WASHINGTON MATTHEWS 

Ex-Prest. American Folk-Lore Society 
WILLIAM KEITH 

The Greatest Western Paintei 
CHARLES A. KEELER 

LOUISE M. KEELER 

GEO. PARKER WINSHIP 

The Historian of Coronado's Marches 
FREDERICK WEBB HODGE 

of the Smithsonian Institution, Washingrtor 
GEO. HAMLIN FITCH 

Literary Editor S. F. Chroniclt 
ALEX. F. HARMER 

CHARLOTTE PERKINS STETSON OILMAN 

Author of "In This Our World" 
CHAS. HOWARD SHINN 

Author of "The Story of the Mine," cVd 
T. S. VAN DYKE 

Author of "Rod and Gun in California," etc. 
MARY AUSTIN 

Author of "The Land of Little Rain" 
L. MAYNARD DIXON 

ELIZABETH AND JOSEPH GRINNELL 

Authors of "Our Feathered Friends" 



Contents — Febrxiary, 1907 



' ' Struck It At Last, ' ' frontispiece 102 

The Nevada Bonanzas of Today, illustrated, by Willis George Emerson 103 

Goldfield and the Goldfielders, illustrated, by One Of Them 124 

Struck It At Last, by E. M. Hamilton 146 

Sunset Sea Moods, poem, by Emma Plater Seabury 147 

Blossom Time In the Santa Clara Valley, illustration 148 

Myra of the Apple Pies, story, by Ella Dexter Soule 149 

Some Leaves from a California Calendar, by Ethel Griffith, II 155 

The Eace for the Sunbeam, story, by Pauline W. Worth 161 

The Treasure Seeker, poem, by Kathleen L Greig 167 

Orleans Indian Legends, by Melcena Burns Denny — VII: The Mountain Man and the 

Killer; The Blue Jay's Downfall 168 

Where Would I Be? poem, by John Vance Cheney 170 

The Lion 's Den, by Charles F. Lummis 171 

The Sequoya League 180 

The Landmarks Club 181 

La Jolla, illustrated, by John Bruce Maccallum ; 183 



Copyright 1907. Entered at the Los Angeles PostoflBce as second-class matter. (See Publishers' Page) 



Quick Easy Sure 
Money Money Money 

50000 Shares of Stock 
at 50c. per share 

in the largest Mica Mine in the 
World. Capitalized at $300,000 

Par Value $1 Per Share 

It is estimated we can take out from 1 
to 3 tons per day valued at from J1200 to 
$20,000 per ton. We think this stock will 
go to' $10.00 per share in one year. Get 
in quick. Make checks and drafts payable 
to 

T. M. Miller, Sec. and Treas. 

H. L Miller & Co. 

Fiscal Ag'ents 
414 W. 7th. St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



For the Sick 




Bailey's 



»nd Patented 



Samaritan 

Hot- Water Bottle 




The Ideal 
Holiday Gift 



It i> toft a< a pillow and soothes and relieves. Fits the 
body and stays in position. Largest heating surface of 
any hot-water bottle made. .* moist eloth placed in the 
disk-hollow steams the face in Neuralgia, Earache or Tooth- 
ache. Ends button together, making a petfect foot-warmer. 



An Eider Down 
Cover given with 
every mail order 



10-inch diameter '2 quarts). 1.30 
11 -inch diameter ^3 quarts), 1.73 
Erery One Guaranteed. 
Sent on receipt of price. Rubber Catalogue Free 

C. J. BAILEY CEL CO. 

22 Boxlston St.. Boston. Mass. 



WILMONT 




??«. $3.00 HAT 



Worn by the best dressers. 
Has the distinction of perfec- 
tion in style and quality. 

Mullen (SL Bluett Co, 

Cor. Spring and First 
Los Angeles, Cal. 




^ 



Sierra 

Mountain 

Boot 



Styles For 
Men and 
Women 



Men's Tan Viscolized Chrome Calf Creed 
moor, height 12 inches, heavy Viscolized 
sole, hand-sewed, widths A, B, C and D. 

Price $8. 00. 

Same, except height, 6 inches, $7.00 

Same, except height, 17 inches, $9.00 

Women's, height 16 inches, $7.50 

Send For Catalogue 

WETHERBY-KAYSER SHOE CO. 

217 S. Broad-way 
LOS ANGELES 



Saint Vincent's College 

Los Angeles, California 
Boarding and Day College 
and High School 

Military Drill and Calisthenics a Feature. 
For Catalogue write the President. 

$300 For Son^ Poems 

Send us your poem for examination, or write 
for full particulars to Orpheum Music Com- 
pany. Dept. C. 1183 Broadway, New York. 



Espcy's Fragrant Cream 

Will relieve and cure chapped hands, iips, rash, sun- 
Durn, chafed or rough skin from any cause. Prevents 
tendency to wrinkles or ageing of the skin. Keeps the 
face and hands soft, smooth, firm and white. It Has 
no eq\ial. Ask for it and take no substitate. 

PacKage of Espey's SacHet PoAvders 

Sent FREE on receipt of 2c to pay postage. 
P. B. KEYS, Agent, It! South Cen cr Ave., Chicago 



A Sure 



KiDDEft'S PASTILLES. Tg'P»°.flstllllia. 



POINSETTIA. 



New parlor game. Fascinating, exciting. Any number of players. Great for the holi- 
days. Entertains the entire family. Seems simple. Try it. Made of California 
orange-wood. Just the souvenir to send eastern friends. For sale at office or 
mailed promptly to any address upon receipt of 50 cents. Agents wanted. 

J. A. CRONKHITE MANUFACTURING CO. 



510 Mason Bldg. 



Fourth and Broadway 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



BEKINS VAN & STORAGE CO.tSSaU. 

Reduced Rates to and from All Points 



140 South Broadway Los Angeles 
1 01 5 Broadway, Oakland 



AXXi->^« Room 500, 95 Washington St., Chicago 
V/lilLCotg Montgomery St., San Francisco 



6*/7G Wayside Press 



Designing, Cngraving. Printing 
Estimates Promptly FurnisHed 

Commercial, BopK and Catalogue 

PRINTING (SL BINDING 



A. M. DUNN, Prop. 



Printers of 
"OUT -WE.ST" 



214 Fkanrlin street 

Los -A-ngeles 



J 



For Health 
Happiness and a 
Home Come to 



Sotithern 
California 



Write for information and illustrated 
printed matter, enclosing a 5-cent 
stamp, to 



THE 

Chamber of Commerce 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



J.H.PACKARD 

Banker 

and 

Broker 

Ensenada, Lower California 
Mexico 



Infornrtion concerning 
Mexico and Lower Cal- 
ifornia 'cherfolly furn- 
ished and business 
entrusted in my band 
given my personal 
attention 




Hotel Greenleaf 

'WHittier, Cal. 
MR. & MRS. JOHN R. PICKETT, Props. 



A. First Class Family 

and Tovirist 

Hotel 



Rates: $2 to $3 per Day- 
Special Rates by the "WeeK 



For tKe Indians 

THE SE^QUOYA LEAGUE '^ aiding the Mission Indians not 
^==^^=^==^===^^===1=^:=: only by remedying abuses and trying 
to get them better lands, but also by extending the market for their BASKETS. 
A representative collection is on sale, for the benefit of the Campo reservations, 
at reasonable prices and fully authenticated. These baskets can be had of 

Mrs. Chas. F. Lummis, 200 Avenue 42, Los Angeles 

60 Additional Baskets, of Much Variety, Recently Received. 
Prices, $2 to $10 THE MONEY GOES TO THE INDIANS 



Designated Depository of the United States 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES 

Special Ladies' Department 

Capital Stock $ 1,250.000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 1,456,023.98 

Deposits 15.213,974.30 

J. M. Elliott, President Stoddard Jess, Vice-President 

W. C. Patterson, Vice-President 

G. E. Bittinger, Vice-President 

John S. Cravens, Vice-President 

W. T. S. Hammond, Cashier 

A. C. Way, Asst. Cashier E. S. Pauly, Asst. Cashier 

E. W. Coe, Asst. Cashier A. B. Jones, Asst. Cashier 

All departments of a modern banking business 

conducted. 



The 

National Bank of California 

at Los Angeles 

Northeast Corner 2nd and Spring Streets 



John M. C. Marble, Pres. 

John E. Marble, Vice-Pres. 

J. E. Fishburn, Cashier 

F. J. Belcher, Jr., Asst. Cashier 

Hon. O. T. Johnson W. D. Woolwine 

Judge S. C. Hubbell R. I. Rogers 

Directors 

Solicits Business and Correspondence 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

526 California St«, San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $ 2,578,695.41 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1906 38,531,917.28 



F. Tillmann, Jr., President 

Daniel Meyer, First Vice-President 

Emil Rohte, Second Vice-President 

A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier 

Wm. Herrmann, Asst. Cashier 

George Tourny, Secretary. 

A. H. Muller, Asst. Secretary 

Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

Directors 

F. Tillmann, Jr., Daniel Meyer, Emil 
Rohte, Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, N. 
Ohiandt, J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. Kruse, 
W. S. Goodfellow 




MENNEN'S 

BORATED TALCUM 

TOILET POWDER 







1:^ 



WRITE TO MENNEN 

|if your dnippist does not sell Mennen's Borated 
Talcum Toilet Powder, and receive a free sample. 

Most dealers do sell Mennen's, because most people 
know it is thepure»tand safest of toilet powders — pre- 
serves the good complexion, improves the poor one. 
Put up in non-refillable boxe«, for your protection. If 
Mcnni-n's faci; is on the cover, it's genuine and a jruar- 
antce of purity. Deliirhtful after shavinu. Sold everv- 
wherc. or by mail 25 cc-nts. Sample Free. 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., Newark, N. J. 

Try Mennen's Violet f Borated) Talcum Powder. It lias the scent 
of fresh cut Parma Violets. 



DRINn 



Maicr & Zobclcin 

BREWERY 




LAGER-BEERS 

1 he best and purest brewed on the 

Coast, For sale in bottles 

and kegs. 

XelepKonesi Sunset. Main 91 
Home 91 




Mothers! 
Mothers!! 
Mothers!!! 

Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup 

has been used for over SIXTY YEARS 
by MILLIONS of MOTHERS for their 
CHILDREN while TEETHING with 
PERFECT SUCCESS. It SOOTHES 
the CHILD, SOFTENS the GUMS, AL- 
LAYS all PAIN, CURES WIND 
COLIC, and is the best remedy for 
DIARRHOEA. Sold by all Druggists 
in every part of the world. Be sure and 
ask for "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syr- 
up," and take no other kind. Twenty- 
five cents a bottle. 




Kstnblishua Ihl'-J. 

"Cures While You Sleep." 

Whooping-Cough, Croup, Bronchitis, 
Coughs, Diphtheria, Catarrh. 

Confidence can be placed in a remedy 
which for a quarter of a century has 
earned unqualified praise. Restful nights 

are assured at once. OesoUne is a Boon to 

Aithnuttcs. 

ALL DRUGGISTS 

Send Poital for Dc- 

icripti-ve Booklet. 

Cresolene Antiseptic 
Throat Tablets for the 
irritated throat, of your 
druggist or from us, 10c 
in stamps. 

The 

Vapo-Cresolene Co. 

J 80 Fulton St.. N.Y. 
Leeming:Mile8 Bldg. 
Montreal, Canada 




WINCHESTER 

Model 1907 SelMoading Rifle 
.351 Caliber High Power 




" The Gun That Shoots Through SteeV'* 



STANDARD RIFLE, 20 INCH ROUND NICKEL STEEL BARREL, PISTOL GRIP 
STOCK OF PLAIN WALNUT, NOT CHECKED, WEIGHT ABOUT Tj( POUNDS, 
NUMBER OF SHOTS SIX, LIST PRICE, - . . . . $28.00 

nHIS new rifle, which has the thoroughly tried and satis- 
factory Winchester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge 
powerful enough for the largest game. The cartridge belongs 
to the high power smokeless powder type and represents the 
latest development in cartridge manufacture. Although quite 
small in size it is very powerful in execution. The magazine 
of this gun is detachable and can be inserted in the gun when 
the bolt is closed, making it quick, safe and handy. The de- 
tachable magazine in a rifle of this type has many advantages 
over the fixed magazine. It permits carrying extra loaded 
magazines by means of which rapid and continuous fir- 
ing can be maintained, and also makes it unnecessary to work 
the cartridges through the gun in unloading. This rifle is a 
six shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and 
simple and strong in construction. There are no moving pro- 
jections on the outside of the gun to catch in the clothing or 
tear the hands and no screws or pins to shake loose. The bar- 
rel is stationary like that of an ordinary rifle and the sights are 
attached directly to the barrel, which is essential for accuracy. 
The take-down device of the Model 1907 is simplicity itself. This 
rifle is easily loaded and unloaded; easily shot with great rapid- 
ity and easily taken down and cleaned. Ask your dealer to show 
you one of these rifles or send for a circular fully describing it. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Hotel Cvunberland 

New VorK S. W. Cor. Broadway at 54th St. 




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NEW, MODERN AND ABSOLUTELY FIRE PROOF 

within one laliiule'ii walk ut bth Ave. "I. and Suliiruv uikI hi;. 
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Send For BooKlet 

H. P. STIMSON. Formerly With Hotel Imperial. 



DENIICURA 



ACH AIN of testimonials from dentists in 
practice attests the unequalled excel- 
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cleans the teeth, destroys bacteria, prevents 
decay. It is applied to the brush without the 
waste attending the use of powder. That you 
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send you free a sample tube of Dentacura and 
our booklet, "Taking Care of the Teeth." 
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Dentacura may be had at most toilet 
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DENTACURA CO., 107 Ailing St.. Newark. N. J. 



Possibilities for WKolesale Houses 

= A.t San l^uis Obispo — 

Two hundred and fifty-three miles from San Francisco, 224 miles from Los Angeles. 
Rail and water transportion. A port of entry. A populous territory. A great 
opportunity for Produce, Grocery, Hardware, Clothing, and other firms. This is 
the chance of a life time. Write for full information, or better, come and see for 
yourself. 

San ILuis Obispo, 

Califomi X 



Chamber of Commerce, 



Incubators? 

Poultry Supplies? 



Brooders? 

Baby Chicks? 



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If you need anjrthing for the poultry business, write for our new illustrated 
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RAMONAToiLET 30AP Ev^f„''v^H\'^,^ 



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Do You Want to Know About Southern California? 

^ AsK the Questions ^ 
• We will do the Rest • 

THIS IS THE WAY 


 


UNITED SYNDICATES CO., 
Long Beach, Cal. 

Dear Sirs: I would like to make a trip to Southern Cali- 
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questions by return mail: 

What is really back of Southern California besides climate, 
scenery, fruits and flowers in both winter and summer, and 
tourists, to make that God's favored place continue so to pros- 
per? 

What was the population of Los Angeles ten years ago? 

What is its population now? 

What do you think the population will be in 1912? 

What was the population of Long Beach ten years ago? 

What is its population now? 

What do you think the population of Long Beach will be in 
1912? 

What is back of Long Beach to make it so prosperous? 

Do you think it will continue so? and if so why? 

Why do you believe that Los Angeles and Long Beach will 
become one city? 

How small an investment is worth while? 




? 


? 


Please send me booklets, maps and any other literature or 
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Name 


Address 




1 


Add any other questions you may wish to ask regard- 
ing Southern California; write your name and address, 
tear out page and mail to 

he United Syndicates Co., ^* 


d. 


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14 Pacific Avenue 

LONG BEACH [Los Angeles County], CAL, 



LONG BEACH 

CALIFORNIA'S GREATEST BEACH RESORT 




PAVILION AND WHARF, LONG BEACH 



POPULATION 18,000 

Thirty-five minutes' ride from Los Angeles brings you to Long Beach, 21 miles 
due south. A model city, with a most excellent school system, water, light and power 
plants; six banks, with assets of more than $3,000,000.00. Streets oiled and a great 
many paved. The finest climate, due to its direct south exposure. It is reached by 
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The Bathing Beach is 14 miles in length, of hard white sand, with a width of 
300 to 600 feet. ' 

A feature of interest to all visitors is the Long Beach Bath House, an institution 
unequalled in America, containing Warm Salt Plunges, and all forms of baths. This 
institution maintains during the summer months, a complete Life Saving Service, 
offering visitors absolute safety whilst surf bathing. 

For copy of new booklet, just out, address Jas. A. Miller, Secretary Long Beach 
Chamber of Commerce, or any of the following firms: 



United Syndicate Co., Ltd. 
Alamitos Land Co. 
The National Bank of Long Beach. 
First National Bank of Long Beach. 
Tov»msend-Dayman Investment Co. 
R. Donaldson Brown, Real Estate, 
T. Sherwood Hodson, Jr., Real Estate. 
The Cowan-Wiseman Co., Real Es- 
tate. 
F. W. Steams & Co.. Real Estate. 
George H. Blount, Real Estate. 



E. L. Covert & Co., Real Estate, 

Young-Parmley Co., Real Estate. 

J. W. Wood, 

Long Beach Bath House and Amuse- 
ment Co. 

Dr. L. A. Perce. 

C. W. Hibbard, Real Estate and In- 
vestments. 

Wheeler Real Estate Agency. 

Tincher & Cox Realty Co. 

Kansas Realty Co. 



DO YOU WANT PORE FOOD ? 

See what this famous Pancake Flour contains* 
See the print on every package. 
Do not let dealers put off some other kind on you. 
They can make more profit on adulterated goods. 
This is pure food and costs YOU no more. 
Call any first-class grocer and order it. 



32 OUIMOEIS 



SELF 
RISING 

PAN- 
CAKE 

FLOUR 



SELF-RISING 




TRADE MARK 



DIRECTIONS 

VOK USING 

Allen's BB. B. Pancake 
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Mix 2 cups of this Flour 
vvitli 1 1-2 cups of cold 
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The addition of a small 
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of the most healthful and 
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MANUFACTURED ONLY BT 

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P«clfio Coast Factory, San Jose, CaU 

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$8.50 

OLIVE OIL g^^N^D^"' 

Quart bottles $11 per case of 1 dor. 

Pint bottles 12 " " 2 " 

Half Pint bottles 13 " " 4 " 

FREIGHT prepaid by us to your nearest rail- 
road station, provided your aggregate order of 
Wines and Olive Oil amounts to 100 pounds or 
over. For your guidance in this matter, we give 
the weight of 2 cases of wine — 100 lbs.; case 01 
olive oil, about 30 lbs. 

Edward Germain Wine Co. 

635 S. Main St. J-os Angeles, Cal. 




AVAKE YOUR SYRUP AT HOME 



With 



MAPLEINE 



and 
Su^ar 



Everybody likes the flavor of Maple, 
and every housewife knows It is al- 
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dissolve the sugar in water and add the 
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clude a cook book and set of comic 
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Crescent Mf^. Co. 

Seattle, "WasKin^ton 




TKe Range 

That 

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Housewife, cook and the whole fam- 
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good cook-stove quality. Over 4,000 
in use in Los Angeles and vicinity. 

JAMES W. HELLMAN 

161 N. spring Street Los Angeles^ CaL 



THE LARGEST MINING MACHINERY 
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SOL^ OWNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF THE WILFLEY 
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I 



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^ 

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General Offices, 42 Broadway, New York City 
Denver, Colo. EI Paso, Texas City of Mexico, Mexico 



J. W. GATES, 

Local Manager 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 

Branch Office, Nampa, Idaho 



I2J-J2I West Second 
South Street 



Pacific Coast Office, 412 ^^'et' 



San Francisco, Cal. 



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ON 



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Address 

GEO. F. TILTON 

Gen. Pass. Agent 
Dept. D. 

Brunswick Steamship Co. 

32 Broadway 
New York City 



SIGHTSEERS, LOOKl 




You havn't seen the beauties of the 
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ENSENADA (Lower Cal.) MEXICO 

Take the beautiful Steamer ST. Denis 
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Time Card of Steamer St. Denis 



LEAVE SAN DIEOO 

2, 5, 8. 14. 18, 24 and 
27th of each month, 
at 9 p. m., arriving 
next morning at En- 
sen ada 



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3, 6. 12, 15, 22, 25 and 
28th of each month at 
8 p- m- arriving next 
morning at San Diego 



ERRYS 



prove their worth at harvest time. 
After over fify years of success, 
they are pronounced tlie best and 
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1907 Seed Annnal free on request. 

D. M. FEKRV j£ CO., I>etrolt, Midi. 

i Can Sell Your Real Estate or Business 

No Matter Where Located 

Property and Business of all kinds sold quickly for cash 
in all parts of the United States. Don't wait. Write 
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on same. 

IF YOU WANT TO BUY 

any Kind of Business or Real Estate anywhere at any price, 
write me your requirements. I can save you time and 
money. 

DAVID P. TAFF, The Land Man 

4J5 Kansas Avenue Topeka, Kansas 




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Af/lIN 866e 




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Pre-Columbian 
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Genuine Prehistoric 
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Collectors supplied. Se- 
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desired. Prices reason- 
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Write for descriptions 
of specimens found in ex- 
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personally conducted ex- 
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Reamer Ling 

St. Johns, Arizona 

Membef Southwest So- 
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Continental Building & Loan 
Association 

CORNER MARKET AND CHURCH STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Paid in Capital and Reserve 
$3,000,000.00 



Pays 5 Per Cent Interest on Ordinary Deposits 
Pays 6 Per Cent Interest on Term Deposits 



WASHINGTON DODGE President 

GAVIN McNAB Attorney 

WM. CORBIN Secretary and General Manager 



AllVUn .TUCATDIPAI PniR PDCAM prevents early wrinkles. It is not a freckle coatiner ; it re- 
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tn "0(0 

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{H O as 



^ 



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Co 



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:il 



0) s 

J3 O 



THt NATION BACK OF US, THE WORLD IN FRONT 



mm:m mi?? » 



OutWcst 



Vol. XXVI No. 2 



FEBUARY. 1907 




THE Ni:VADA BONANZAS OF TODAY 

By WILLIS GEORGE EMERSON. 
TRIPPED of every contour that would please the eye, 
homely and unattractive, Nevada lies today the flat 
chess-board upon which is being played a game of ele- 
mental passions that is holding the attention of the en- 
lire civilized world. 
The desert state as the beacon light, has first attracted and then 
dazzled 50,000 men. The figures in the foreground of this remark- 
able picture of human interest and rampant greed are as unique and 
striking as in those traditional days when the miner was a millionaire 
or pauper, according to his ideas, sometimes within an hour. Three 
years ago the sage-brush state was living upon a" memory. Its little 
capital of Carson was filled with old-time citizens who gained a live- 
lihood from the one productive spot in the entire state and told over 
and over again the never-to-be-forgotten story of the old Comstock. 
As the levels in this enormous historic mine, which produced eight 
hundred millions of dollars and gave with a free hand the money 
to save the Union, sunk deeper and deeper into the bowels of the 
earth, the richness of the ores gradually became less and less and 
the terrific heat, which is 170 degrees on the lowest levels, was ren- 
dering the work more and more difficult. 

It seemed as if, with the gradual dwindling of this gigantic mine, 
the old state of Nevada was shrinking and dwindling, too. Occa- 
sional prospectors left the capital of the state and were gone for a 
week or a month, only to return with bitter stories of the hardships 
they had endured and with disconsolate tales of the barrenness of 
the rocks. 

When all seemed at a standstill, a straying mule from the camp of 
a prospector named Jim Butler, scrambling up a hill, broke a piece 
of rock from a ledge, but a short distance from the camp-fire. The 

Copyright 1907 by Out West Magazine Co. All Rights Rcskrvkd 



I04 OUT WEST 

aspect of the broken face of the rock attracted the attention of the 
miner and he threw it into a sack to be assayed upon his return to 
civiHzation. The assay gave astounding returns, and, when its re- 
sults became known, the town of Tonopah sprung to Hfe. 

Today the state of Nevada teems with energy. It is busy, it is 
rich, it is rough and ready, it is vital, and it is most keenly alive. 
Towns have sprung up like magic over the heretofore uninhabited 
plains. Dug-outs, tents and adobe houses were the first progenitors 
of this new civilization. Now the streets of the older mining camps 
are backed by substantial testimonials of the progress of recent 
years. But the spirit of '49 is there still, as evidenced in the sa- 
loons, whose rough signs, changing here and there to the planed and 
painted boards of maturer growth, still jet out over planked side- 
walks, calling attention to the liquors that may be obtained within. 
Small buildings lie in juxtaposition to stone edifices reared as testi- 
monials to the sudden fortunes that have been acquired by their 
owners. Gambling rooms, general provision stores, brokers' offices, 
laundries, bank buildings, and livery stables are all mixed and 
shuffled together like cards in a gambler's hands. Many of the 
saloons look as if they might be left over from the days when a 
man stood up with his back against the wall and the bowie knives, 
from artists in their use, whizzed by within half an inch of his head, 
the winner of the game being the one who could throw the closest 
without really hitting. 

Throughout the days and nights the roar of the blast and the 
rattle of machinery is heard from the mines. On the streets, great 
freight wagons trek through the dust, hauled by teams of forty 
mules, setting out on their destination from the industrial centers of 
the state toward the younger camps springing up in the distant 
horizon. When the night falls, the different "joints" flare with 
light, and the click of the ivory balls in the roulette wheels, the rat- 
tle of dice and the flip-flap of cards is borne to the ears of those 
strolling by on the street. Throughout the state, the life of the min- 
ing camps is much the same. With Tonopah possessed perhaps of 
the more advanced civilization and Goldfield crammed with the most 
intense energy, Carson City, the capital of the state, is the oasis of 
the entire desert. Its streets are dead and quiet after nine o'clock. 
It is the ideal home-site where those in the foreground of the battle 
of wealth house their wives and children. In the strife of its pet 
railroad, the old Virginia-Truckee, which carried the famous miners 
of the past years, has been cut off from communication by the 
Southern Pacific, which in contempt of its rival heads directly south 
from Hazen, relegating Carson to the position of an out-of-the-way 
stopping place. 

The mining camps of the desert state are the new blood that is 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS OF TODAY 105 

filling its veins. They sweep in a wide circle, radiating like the 
spokes of a wheel, with Goldfield as the hub. Their name is becom- 
ing legion and their wealth is fabulous. Fairview, Tonopah, Man- 
hattan, Wonder, Yarington, Bullfrog, Rhyolite, Searchlight, Beatty, 
Lida, Bonnieclare, and last but not least, Greenwater. 

Goldfield is the center of them all. It is the driver's seat from 
which the reins run out that guide the vehicle of state. It is an 
anomaly ; it is old and it is new'. The government is ridiculously 
simple — the Sheriff, the District Attorney and the Justice of the 
Peace run the town. On the other hand, it has a completely organ- 
ized fire department which throws grappling irons over wooden 
houses and jerks them into a place of safety in case of fire. Also, 




Photo by Dickerson 

An Average Bit op Southern Nevada 

somewhere in the archives of six months past, rest the forgotten 
papers of a Chamber of Commerce. 

In contra-distinction to every other mining camp in the world, 
automobiles are the most common means of travel for the pros- 
pector, and the sight of a miner speeding over the hills by means of 
electric power is but a touch of the individuality which marks this 
town for its own. Fully 12,000 souls have flocked to Goldfield seek- 
ing to find the realization of life-time hopes. Others are crowding 
in. The population is made up of a composite of the riff-raff of 
the world and of the most civilized. The shrewdest brains of the 
criminal fraternity have foregathered like vultures seeking their 
prey. Investors, capitalists, curiosity hunters, gentlemen of leisure, 
all throng the streets and jostle one another on the narrow side- 



io6 



OUT WEST 



walks. Some of these men have discovered that for which they have 
been seeking and are more or less satisfied. Like Antaeus, they 
have touched the earth and been strengthened ; or, emulating the 
stock frenzy of Wall Street, they have dabbled in mining shares, 
whose true basis of worth is in this case founded ujxDn the gold 
beneath their feet, and have come out with accumulated fortunes. 
To those who were succesful, their luck seems little less than mar- 
velous, but men are too busy to marvel long. The good fortune 
of others arouses them to renewed energies, seeking, climbing, strug- 
gling, they all toil along. At times they risk their all in a devil- 
may-care spirit and again they pinch their dollars until it seems as 
if they would break them. For them everything is at stake. This 
new Golconda offers to them another chance to gratify their ambi- 




Main Street, Goi^dfield, Jan. 1904 



?huto by Allen 



tions, their hopes, their lives. They see the land beautiful in the 
distance and the vision incites them anew. Perhaps still further 
back of this fairy land of glittering and partly realized hopes, rise 
up the gaunt shadows of past failures or unsatisfied desires. 

The barren plains and bald low-lying hills, rigged with derrick 
upon derrick, shaken with dynamite, rumbling with the whirl of 
the air-drill, is to them the field of the cloth of gold. The town is 
continually on the qui vive. From banker to waiter every nerve is 
at tension, every ear is awake to hear the first rumors of a new 
strike. Every home has its treasure box in which is laid aside 
the money with which to purchase in every new and promising in- 
vestment, and every home has its hidden stock which is thumbed 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS OP TODAY 107 

and fingered over and over, while the mind is dreaming air castles 
of the future. 

The stories of Nevada's wealth that reach outside ears are listened 
to for a moment and then forgotten, but truth overtakes and passes 
fiction. However, the state of Nevada is not all gold. While its 
mines first equalled and then left far behind the production of the 
foremost gold camps of the workl, yet much money has been spent 
in developing properties from which little ore has been taken. 

In Goldfield as in former mining camps there is a great element of 
luck. The original lessees of the Hayes-AIonette lease on the Mo- 
hawk spent over $100,000 in development and found nothing. They 
drifted toward every point of the compass excepting one. When 
Hayes and Monette took up the lease, there was only one thing 
to do. They set out to work in the only direction which had not 
been employed, and their drills bored into a body of ore which bids 




Copyright by A. Allen 

Goldfield tn November, 1903 

fair to surpass the days of the ancient Comstock. The richest of 
the Mohawk ore is a gray-black in appearance. This gold, for 
gold it is, is plastered over the face of the quartz for the thickness 
of one-tighth to one-quarter of an inch. It is so rich that the ore 
is stored in the vaults of banks for safety. 

Similar to the Mohawk is the story of the Reilly lease, which pro- 
duced over $1,000,000 in twelve weeks. This property had been 
abandoned by the original lessees, who had spent all they could 
rake and scrape of their own holdings, and then had borrowed from 
their friends in order to make a mine before giving up in despair. 
In this case the rich vein had been cut through and covered up by 
a treacherous miner who afterward sold his information, like Judas 
of old, for a pittanc". Many another lease has without return 
absorbed the capital of the man who started in with brilliant hopes; 



io8 



OUT WEST 




GoivDFiEi.D, Nevada, 

yet the wonderful richness of the desert state repays the persistent 
delver in its depth more often than it disappoints him. 

Some of these ore bodies are deep and some are not ; some are 
rich with ore, some barely assay, and it all lends an indescribable 
fascination to the game. It is a gamble a guess. It bears all the 
fascination of a game of chance, but, contrary to gambling rules, 
in this case the percentage is in favor of the man who plays. The 
down-sinking shaft will strike a body of ore, which grows beneath 
the feet ; it broadens out, it develops marvelous wealth. The 
miner, and his one or two partners, all of whom have been "grub- 
Staked" perhaps, awaken some morning rich men. For the first 
time in their lives they have difficulty in counting their money. 
They stand stunned in self-contemplation, and then, according to 
the man. they do one of two things — they either go on a long spree 
and drink and gamble until they are reddish-black in the face, and 
spend all they make, or they become men of affluence, pointed out 
as the successful figures of a mining camp. 

In the uncertainty of just what is beneath the ground lies the ex- 
citement, and excitement is contagious. The mining camps of Ne- 
vada today are on fire with enthusiasm. They seethe with earnest en- 
deavor, thev sweat with exertion. The prodigies of the camp are nu- 
merous. At Goldfield, from a fifteen-foot hole, the owners of the 
Kendall m.ine took $100,564. In ATanhattan, the great Consoli- 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS OE TODAY 



109 




NOVKMBKR, 1906 



Photo by Allen 



dated mine lying to the north of Timber Hill gave up its wealth in 
sacks which were valued at many hundreds of dollars to the ton, 
while at Greenwater the Indian metal has paid to so surpassing an 
extent as to cause a stampede that promises to surpass any dis- 
covery of precious metal yet found. Such finds of mineral wealth in 
this flat desert country of sage-brush and sand are like a brilliant 
remark from the lips of some man whose heavy and stupid features 
had led you to think him a clod. You are startled, you look twice and 
then you sit up and take interest anew. 

The recent discoveries of mineral wealth in Nevada are barely 
three years old and yet the state has already produced in its short life 
over thirty million dollars in gold. About five million was produced 
during the first year of the excitement, beginning with the discovery 
of Tonopah, and during the last twelve months an average has been 
maintained of from $2,000,000 to $7,000,0000 every thirty days. 

Notwithstanding this production, Nevada's territory has been but 
scratched. Its veins have been opened, but underneath the arteries 
have not yet been touched. The pioners of a mining camp are in- 
evitably poor. They are men willing to bear privation on a chance. 
They are sometimes "staked," and again they scrape together what 
money they can, invest it in a team of mules and a wagon or in a 
pack-train of burros, victuals and a tarpaulin, and pull out from civ- 
iliztion to search their way along the low-lying blulT or through 



no OUT WEST 

winding valleys, continnally searching, tapping, examining. They 
are lonesome men, these prospectors — many of them jeducated, slow 
to speak, given to much self-communing underneath the. stars. 

With the first report of a find by a prospector, if the exhibited ore 
assays well, there is an immediate deviation of the stream of wan- 
derers who trail in restless discontent up and down the land. Pell- 
mell they tumble into the new district. By auto, by stage, by every 
method of conveyance, some even on foot, they hurry toward the 
new discoveries. After them, treading in fact at their very heels, 
come first the saloon man and gambler and then the small merchant. 
Then, if the boom still increases and shows evidence of permanency, 
comes the promoter of active mind and ready tongue, the advance 
agent of the capitalist, and then the flood-gates are opened and in 
pour men of every walk of life. 

The stories of the wonderful wealth of Nevada have gone east 
and been thrown back as the vaporings of a desert Munchausen, but 
they have returned again and again, backed by letters from Western- 
ers with relatives in the East, from Easterners who had come West to 
see for themselves, from prospectors seeking capital for develop- 
ment, from engineers sent to investigate and report, from capitalists 
hurried to Nevada at the secret instance of trusted agents, until act- 
ing and re-acting, repeated over and over again, they have pried 
loose the equilibrium of Eastern investors and started down the slope 
of 1907 the most gigantic mining boom seen in the United States 
since the year 1881. 

More than any one State and city in the Union, Nevada and 
Goldfield represent every type of humanity. Forty-eight ex-con- 
victs are decent and law-abiding citizens within this busiest of 
mining camps. Twelve graduates of leading colleges of the land are 
acting as barkeepers or waiters or common miners ; while many an- 
other college man, more fortunate, has become a mining expert, or 
is the legal adviser of some of the tangled disputes that arise within 
the camp. Bunco-steerers abound. The most artistic card-sharks 
in the world have been attracted by the glamour of the excitement 
and by the greed for the immense sums of ready money which ac- 
company prosperity based upon mines. Mingled with these men 
are the rougher and simpler type of prospectors and plainsmen who 
have been bred into honestv and the singleness of purpose that goes 
with an isolated life where the sight of a fellow creature looming up 
on the horizon is a blessing undisguised. 

Nevada is the stronghold of the union miner. The hordes of men 
who were driven from Colorado in the Sherman-Bell episode of 
several years ago have taken up their homes in the new camps and 
have so joined themselves together as to render themselves a power 
to be considered and dealt with in everything pertaining to the true 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS' OF TODAY 



1 1 1 



interest of the new districts. They have not until lately shown the 
disposition of the old Cripple Creek days, and it is to be hoped that 
they never take an attitude such as made it necessary to drive their 
companions from Colorado. 

Stock brokers abound. Their offices are as thick as saloons, and 
the latter number twenty-five to a block. Their immense mail mat- 
ter floods the outgoing trains and overwhelms the railway mail clerks 
with the enormity of their business. No city of similar size in the 
world is today sending out one-half the mail matter that passes 
through the hands of the Goldfield postoffice clerks every thirty 
days. These employes of the Government are the hardest worked 
men and poorest paid of any who live in the camp on the desert. 
Thcv obtain merely the usual- scale of wages which is prevalent in 



BBCfiR*! 






SI- 



-^.ci 



A Holiday in Goldfield 



I'lioto bv Allen 



other cities and the bitterness of it all came to the surface some- 
what over a year ago in a strike which stopped the United States 
mail and crowded the room of the postmaster with a throng of ex- 
cited brokers. Much credit is due the original postmaster of Gold- 
field, who, by the way, was a woman. Mrs. Ella Collins, and who 
paid for much additional help out of her own pocket in those early 
days when there were no private boxes in the postoffice, and when 
a line of impatient seekers of mail trailed through the front end of 
the office building and circled in a snake-like file half around the 
block. 

Over eighty million dollars was invested in Nevada stocks during 
1906. The fall of the year just closed, saw one of the most sensa- 
tional rises in market value of stocks which has been known to the 



112 OUT WEST 

mining world. Led by the Mohawk mine, shares in which sold 
upon the streets for twenty-five and thirty cents only as far back 
as last April, and which climbed higher and higher until they at- 
tained the price of $20, stocks advanced rapidly until many which 
had been originally offered at twenty-five cents or less passed the 
dollar mark. A bootblack, whose mother had entrusted a certain 
wealthy mine operator with $300 of her son's savings, was made 
rich by investment in Mohawk stock. Men and many women were 
raised from poverty to wealth through long-forgotten purchases of 
stock to which many of them had long since ceased to attach any 
importance until recalled to their mind as a hazy memory of some- 
thing that had occurred in the past. 

On the strength of the great boom, many wild-cat companies 
were born and flourished for a time. Much stock was sold that 
possessed little value. Much money was obtained that was never 
invested in the ground, yet with it all, the tremendous richness of 
the district forbade anyone to disparage any property, for it is a miii 
ing-camp axiom that no one is able to see beneath the ground, and 
the most unlikely looking territory in this wonderful State is apt 
to prove a veritable treasure-box of ore. The effects of Eastern 
and California capital are plainly apparent in the camps of today. 
Where formerly a narrow-gauge road, crammed with passengers, 
puffed its dusty way toward Tonapah, and a stage swung and 
swayed through the hummocked plain toward Goldfield, today a 
Pullman car is brought directly into camp from the Oakland pier 
or is switched from the through Eastern train at Hazen and at- 
tached to the Goldfield sleeper. Contracts for railroads have been 
given to those who seemed the most capable of carrying through 
the work in the least possible time. Steel rails are lining the desert 
and lessening the hardships of travel and hastening the arrival of 
supplies and freight. The railroad south from Goldfield has nearly 
reached Rhyolite, while the railroad north from Searchlight, con- 
necting with the Salt Lake road, has already reached the southern 
metropolis. 

For the past years the Tonapah road, connecting with the South- 
ern Pacific at Mina Junction, has paid Mr. Brock of Philadelphia 
and his associates a bigger profit than any railroad of similar length 
in the world, and has been the incentive that has started the same 
group of men toward the construction of the road from Tonapah 
to Manhattan to be completed within six months from date. The 
"Borax Smith road" (the Tonapah and Tidewater Ry.) in the 
south is being hastened toward the wonderful copper camp at 
Greenwater and Senator Clark is already hauling ties for his rail- 
road to reach Greenwater from a junction a little south of Bullfrog. 

Among the most sensational stories of rapidly acquired wealth 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS OP TODAY 



•»3 



is that of George Wingfield, the business partner of Senator Nixon, 
who climbed the rungs of the ladder from a cattle-man compelled 
to seek a loan from Nixon's bank at Winnemucca, to the owner of a 
gambling establishment at Tonapah, and finally to a business part- 
nership with a United States Senator. The story goes that Mr. 
Wingfield, who is but twenty-nine years old, so impressed Nixon as 
president of the banking institution, that the Senator refused to 
accept a diamond solitaire ring a^ security for a loan, and gave the 
required money without note, upon the word of the penniless appli-. 
cant that he would repay him at a later date. When Wingfield ar- 
rived in Tonapah he wrote again to President Nixon of the bank at 
Winnemucca, asking for more money, and the same was promptly 




Photo by Dickerson 
Shaft ON Montgu.mkky-Shoshone Mine 
Owned by Schwab and associates, and valued at 120,000,000 

forwarded to him. Wingfield was a shrewd gambler, and his bus- 
iness in Tonapah prospered more and more as the days passed. He 
gained many friends among the rough men of the camp and gained 
much insight into the mining discoveries around about. He grad- 
ually obtained control of claim after claim, always "cutting in" his 
former benefactor, Mr. Nixon, for one-half, until gradually he ob- 
tained control of many of the best prospects in the state. From 
then on his influence grew. Backed by the strategy of the older 
men, he bought and sold and manipulated until his purchase, for 
the sum of $10,000,000, of four of the great mines of Nevada and 
their consolidation into one, made him the joint owner of eleven 
producing properties in that Golden State. As he became richer 



114 



OUT WEST 




A Banker's Home 

and richer, his money went into other fields and Wingfield the 
ex-rancher and ex-card-sharp became Wingfield the mine owner, 
the banker, the great promoter of business enterprises and a man 
whose influence is felt throughout the length and breadth of the 
State. The stories of his kindness to his former associates, o*f his 
generosity to his immediate friends and employees, are many and 
are typical of the largesse which seems to flow from the hands of 
these men, who are engaged in a pursuit in which dollars count as 
cents and thousands are reckoned even as hundreds are estimated 
in other vocations. 

The startling question today in Nevada is, not the future, but 
the immediate now ; the paramount individual question of gaining 
sufficient capital to develop the discoveries already made. It is not 
improbable that there are in the known gold district of Nevada to- 
day, a thousand claims that have the making, if not of a Mohawk, 
at least of great producing mines, and they remain unkhown simply 
because the individual acquainted with the discovery is not equipped 
with sufficient capital to sink shafts and run the drifts necessary to 
convert the prospects into an organized producing mine. 

It is safe to say that Nevada's great porphyritic belt, extending 
from the Comstock, with its record production, to Searchlight, and 
embracing an area four hundred miles from north to south and 
sixty to one hundred miles from east to west, is rapidly being proved 
the richest gold-bearing zone in the world. But while develop- 
ments of the past four years have given to this great zone a score 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS OF TODAY 115 




IN Rhyolite, Nevada 

or more of mining camps, of them all Goldfield has proved itself 
the richest. 

While Tonapah thirtv miles to the north is sending an output 
to the smelters averaging $40 per ton, and Bullfrog seventy miles 
south is making history with the production of ore having a tonnage 
value of $30, the Goldfield district, situated geographically in the 
center of the great Searchlight belt, is maintaining an output of ore 
having an average value per ton of from $300 to $800. 

Compared with other records, nowhere in the world's history of 
mining can such a high average of values be found. The average 
value of production of Cripple Creek was $30 per ton. In the 
Black Hills the mines are outputting ore of an average valuation of 
less than $5.00. The general value of ore mined in California 
ranges from $5.00 to $20.00 per ton. Altogether, tlfe African pro- 
duction of gold in the Transvaal shows an average tonnage value 
of $17.00 per ton. This feature of Nevada's production, has had 
and will continue to have an important bearing on the part this 
wonderful State is destined to play in the world's output of gold. In 
the history of mining, it has almost invariably been found that ex- 
ceptionally rich ore veins possess little, if any, permanency. The 
rich ledges of ore that have been encountered have proved 
"pockety." This was proven true of Cripple Creek, where practi- 
cally all the exceptionally rich ore has been found in narrow streaks 
and stringers. Stratton's great Independence mine has produced 



"6 OUT WEST 

some phenomenally rich ore, but its average output has not at- 
tained a valuation above $40.00 per ton. The Portland's output 
has not even attained this average, while the El Paso property, 
which heretofore has produced the highest grade of ore in Col- 
orado's great gold-camp, has yielded a tonnage having an average 
value of but $55.00. 

While there were many who were emphatic in their declaration 
that the ore-bodies would not go down, all of these theories have 
been proven fallacious. In the great Florence property, ore has 
grown richer with depth, as has been the case in the Combination 
mine and in the lower workings of the Jumbo, the Red Top and 
others. The gray-black ore of the Mohawk is the richest of them 
all, while the peculiar formation of the ore and the richness of the 
value is a surprise and a revelation to the miner and the mining en- 
gineer alike. The occurrence of gray copper in the ores of the 
Florence, January, and other prominent properties is considered an 
indication of the permanency of the ore bodies. After Tonapah had 
been discovered by Jim Butler and his recalcitrant burro, the be- 
lief in the richness of the entire district extending south from Tona- 
pah was firmly implanted in the mind of the "desert rats," who 
made their living first by prospecting, and then by turning over 
their prospects for enough capital to provide them food for a month 
and a day. 

But Al Meyers, who recently sold a hundred thousand shares of 
Mohawk stock for $4.00 per share and then watched it climb to the 
dizzy height of $20.00, was the first to set actively to work upon 
his belief. In the fall of 1902 he started out on a prospecting trip 
which took him into the Goldfield district, then entirely unexplored, 
although a train had passed over many of its richest mines for 
years past. In 1903 he had located the Combination Group. In 
passing over this ground one day he had kicked loose from an out- 
cropping, a block of quartz. This he had assayed and found that 
it averaged $4.00 in gold per ton. A piece obtained a foot lower 
gave returns of $22.50 per ton. From this assay Meyers con- 
cluded that further development would demonstrate that the values 
increased in geometrical ratio to the increase of depth. This theory 
proved correct. In performing the ten feet of assessment work 
 required by law to hold the title to the ground, Meyers opened up 
th Combination group, which has since proven to be one of the 
richest mines in the world, and was recently purchased by Nixon 
and Wingfield. He was without money to develop his find at that 
time, however, and so, having secured the property by correct 
notices and sufficient assessment work, he passed on to other ground 
and located the Mohawk and many additional claims. In October 
he bonded the Combination Group to capitalists from Chicago for 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS Of TODAY 



117 



$75,000. Five thousand dollars was all that the purchasers were 
obliged to put up from their own pockets. The mine paid for it- 
self from the grass-roots, and the enterprising financiers from Chi- 
cago completed the final purchase price on their property from the 
property itself. 

With the completion of this sale and the remarkable discovery 
of ore which immediately ensued, began the actual commencement 
of the Goldfield excitement, which has increased in geometrical ratio 
until today the district is the scene of the most aggressive and tre- 
mendous mining operations ever witnessed in the world, while a 
pay-roll of some 3,000 men and an output ranging from three to 
seven million dollars a month, has been the record for the last four 




One Method of Storing Ore 

months. In the short space of two years, a town of 15,000 people 
has been laid out on substantial lines, streets lighted by electricity, 
telephone and telegraph connection established to the great cities 
of the coasts, and complete water and sewerage system has been 
installed. Goldfield's position as a distributing point for the en- 
tire mining district, including Manhattan, Silver Bow, Goldcenter, 
Kawich, Wonder, Tokop, McGibbons, Tule Canon, Bullfrog, Lida, 
Rhyolite and Silverpeak, has been firmly established. 

Nevada will remain a boom State for years to come. No sooner 
does the excitement wrought up by a discovery in one locality 
steadv itself into earnest development along industrial lines than 
another discovery, even more wonderful than those preceding, 



I i8 



0U7^ WEST 



m^. 




.2^^ .* '= ■%^-» ifu^'^;^^^ 






%,,- 









Bui^IvFROG, 

sweeps miner, prospctor, and tenderfoot alike into a renewed frenzy 
of pursuit. 

In such manner the news was borne into Goldfield that seventy 
miles to the south, tremendous ledges of medium-grade ore had 
been found, that reared their heads for miles across the scraggy 
hills, and would prove great store-houses of mineral wealth which 
could be worked by the children of the present generation and by 
their unborn children yet to come. At first the original Bullfrog, 
with its beautiful blue quartz, was the center of the attention which 
swept in a widening circle to the south. Town after town sprung 
to life and dwindled to nothingness as new discovery after new 
discovery lured the miner still further on and on. But finally the 
center of the magic circle was reached, and Rhyolite, having cap- 
tured the wandering population, became the central city of the 
southern desert. 

To Messrs. Clark, Benson and Ladd, belong the credit of the 
founding of Bullfrog. It was their money that staked the persistent 
prospectors who, travelling on and on, enduring hardships almost 
unendurable, cutting the tops from their boots and strapping them 
to their feet when the original boot-soles were born through, carry- 
ing water for miles on rounded shoulders, bending over every prom- 
ising ledge, keeping continually at it until they finally located the 
district which "looked good enough to them." Then their "grub- 
stakers" came to the front and capital poured into the district to de- 
velop it. 



THE NEVADA BONANZAS OF TODAY 



119 



.,*^i^ 




-r*^ 



;«?., 



^•* ^- 



^^ 



y 



Nevada 

While the excitement around Ladcl Mountain and Bonanza Hill 
was at its height, Robert Montgomery, familiarly known as "Bob," 
walked into camp one evening and offered for sale certain claims, 
which he stated bore promising indications of ore. When asked 
the location of his property, he informed his hearers that it was 
about a mile up the caiion, pointing with his thumb over his shoulder 
to the east. Not one of those listening to his siren song responded ; 
in fact, they gave Robert the laugh and he was forced to retain the 
unwilling possession of his ground. It was but eighteen months 
afterwards that he bonded the now famous Montgomery-Shoshone 
mine to Chas. M. Schwab for five million dollars and the property 
which he had so anxiously sought to dispose of for a paltry thou- 
sand, placed him and his family in the ranks of millionaires. 

Rhyolite and its surrounding mines teem today with activity. The 
advent of the railroad from Searchlight on the south has lightened 
the effort of development to an appreciable extent. The town is 
booming. The miners dot the neighboring hills and the activity is 
second only to Goldfield. There are no sensational discoveries of 
high-grade ore in Bullfrog, but there are tremendous deposits of 
ore and gigantic true-fissure veins that maintain a steady average 
of value and which will pay a steady income for development for 
years and years to come. 

First Tonapah. next Goldfield, then Bullfrog, after that Manhat- 
tan. What a similarity of legend, which traced down still seems 
to be the truth, surrounds the discovery of Nevada's mining comps. 



I20 OUT WEST 

In the case of Manhattan, the story goes that Jack Humphreys, 
tippling quietly by himself as he rode in a jovial mood down the trail 
from Austin toward Tonapah, alighted from his horse to sleep off, 
beneath the shade of a pine tree, the effects of liquid he had im- 
bibed ; for Manhattan, may it be known, possesses more timber 
than the balance of Nevada's camps added all together. When Mr. 
Humphreys awoke from his sleep, his eye caught the setting sun 
and with a hasty epithet he scrambled hurriedly to his feet. His 
heavy nailed boot-heel slipped on a point of rock and it broke away 
beneath his tread. Upon examination, the character of the ore at- 
tracted his attention, for the eye of the miner is as keen for gold as 
the eye of the old-time Indian was keen upon the trail. He ex- 
amined it and his sudden hurry to be off was changed in the 
twinkling of an eye. The miner's magnifying glass was whipped 
from his pocket and beneath the lens, in the rock within his hand, 




Photo by Dickerson 

The Main Street of Rhyolite 

were many specks of free gold. His find was made on the first 
day of April and his claim was named the April Fool claim. He 
finished his journey, but never forgot his find, and later returned 
with three stalwart brothers and his father, when the entire family 
busied themselves in the location of what seemed to them to be 
the best claims of the district. 

The Humphreys knew Lawyer Vermilyea of Goldfield and in- 
terested him and several newspaper men. The camp was thor- 
oughly investigated and the results were so promising that the 
news was speedily given to the world and a town three miles long 
by a thousand feet wide grew up over night in the narrow valley 
of Manhattan. Further investigation merely intensified the value 
of the discovery until today Manhattan possesses thirty working 
properties and is producing a tremendous output of high-grade mill- 



THE Nil]' ADA BOXAKZA OF TODAY 



121 



ing ore. Its most recent discovery has been a wonderful find of high 
grade copper ore (and it is the opinion of mining experts that the 
entire Goldfield, Tonapah and Manhattan territory will at a depth of 
500 feet show a great underlying blanket of copper.) The dis- 
covery was made on the Manhattan Dividend property on Timber 
Hill and assays the wonderful average of 14.5 per cent, copper, with 
cross veins which give values as high as $72.00 in gold. This mine 
is being developed assiduously and every foot of depth obtained is 
subjected to the interested scrutiny of mining men. 

After the finding of Manhattan came the steadily growing belief 
in the tremendous copper deposits at Ely. Money was diverted into 
this camp for extensive development and today the entire mining 




Piioto by Dickerton 

Rhvowtk, Nevaija, Golden Scepter Mine in Foreground 

world has been shown that Ely posseses copper in tremendous bodies 
and of splendid average grade 

What may turn out to be the greatest discovery of the Nevada 
ore belt, as well as the latest one, is the find of copper at Green- 
water camp, really located in California, but only a few miles over 
the Nevada border line, and considered by all mining men as a Ne- 
vada discovery, inasmuch as there is no ingress or egress except 
through the lower towns of Nevada and inasmuch also as Green- 
. water lies in the very center of the great ore belt that sweeps the 
entire length of the desert state, trending from the north in a slightly 
curved line toward the southwest through the lower part of Califor- 
nia, then bending to the east and crossing into Arizona. 

Grenwater has seen fifteen million dollars invested in its properties 



OUT WEST 



within the past six months. It has been the heated subject of dis- 
cussion among the entire mining fraternity, and many noted ex- 
perts have crossed the desert and endured the hardships of travel to 
this lonesome locality at the head of Death Valley for the purpose 
of examining its marvelous ores. 

Donald B. Gillies, the mining expert of Chas. M. Schwab and the 
general manager of his Nevada property, has made the statement 
that he would readily transfer his entire holdings in Nevada, and 
he possesses many splendid ones, to spend the proceeds in the de- 
velopment of Greenwater, a camp which he proclaims to be the 
greatest discovery of copper ever made in the history of the world. 

Peculiar turns of fortune stand out in the foreground of Gold- 
field's kaleidoscope mass of excited humanity, with the distinctness 
of an etching. The lawyer of whom it was said that he remained 




Photo by Dickerson 
In the Suburbs of a Nevada Mining Town 

in Goldfield merely because of his inability to dispose of his type- 
writer, now retains it and draws a check for $50,000 besides, with 
ease. 

Meyers and Murphy, the original discoverers of the Golden 
Goose, today, by including all their holdings, possess a bank roll that 
is close to one million. Henry Weber, formerly a hotel clerk in 
Denver, is today erecting in Goldfield a five-story building of stone 
and reckons his cash assets at beyond the half-million mark. But- 
ler, Wingfield, Nixon, Parker of the Colorado & Southern, Lockhart 
whom he staked for twenty-five years before obtaining any return, 
Loftus also of Denver, Jim Davis, L. L. Patrick, Milton Detch, and 
more than one hundred and fifty others, as a result of their unfalter- 
ing belief, restless energy and determined efifort, are ranked over 
the six figure mark in this world's goods. 



THE NEVADA BONANZA OF TODAY 



1*3 



These men, almost to a man, less than thirty months ago were 
unable to spend $30 for a suit of clothes without much mental 
ransacking in order to determine the wherewithal with which to pay 
the bill. But the pendulum has been swinging and has certainly been 
swinging abnormally for an army of successful men whose wealth 
lias come to them, not from the avenues of commerce, but from the 
vaults of the hills. 

Because the immense total of nearly one hundred million dollars 
has been diverted from the channels of Eastern investment, there 
has been much scathing criticism of late of Nevada and its wonder- 
ful mining camps. A prejudiced press has in several instances dis- 
torted the truth and repressed facts. Nevada today is the richest 
mineral bearing State in the world. Discovery after discovery, 
mine upon mine, ore bodv after ore body, extending for miles on 




An Average Prospect Hole 



Photo by Dickerson 



the surface and for miles beneath, open up tremendous possibilities 
for those who are willing to engage in the strenuous life, where 
every waking moment is filled with fiercest struggle, and every hour 
of sleep away from the forge of possible discoveries is taken with 
reluctance and looked upon as a hindrance in the terrific game that 
is being played in the mad struggle for wealth. 

The youngest and most recent of the known mining discoveries, 
Nevada easily outstrips them all. The great State is full of anec- 
dotes, its history is crammed with picturesque incidents which are 
daily added to from a wealth of material which is ever new and 
always exciting. The panorama is a marvelous one. Individual types 
such as are seen nowhere else in the world abound. From the low- 
est to the highest, from the most selfish to prodigals of generosity, 
from the most stupid to the most intelligent, Nevada's civilization 
runs the gamut of personality and abounds in human interest. 

Los Angeles. 




I 24 



GOLDFIELD AND THi: GOLDFIELOURS 

BY ONE OF 7 HEM 

N THE course of American progress it becomes neces- 
sary for a portion of our people to take upon themselves 
the burden of the development of its remote districts, 
and bring to our country the advantages of their hid- 
den wealth. 
"We, the signers hereto, have undertaken this self-imposed task 
with every confidence that our efforts will prove of great benefit to 
the whole people, and that the mining operations of Nevada will add 
greatly to our National wealth and great gains to those who shall 
lend financial aid. 

"Here, in the desert, we have builded cities in permanent form ; 
here we have brought machinery, men and money, that we ourselves 
may be enriched and that we may secure for the uses of mankind 
the elemental treasure so bountifully bestowed by nature. 

"Goldfield, in the desert, is a city three years old, with a popula- 
tion of 15,000; with churches and schools; with four prosperous 
banks ; with many paying mines and many more under development ; 
with costly reduction works for the immediate treatment of ores ; 
with a stock exchange where prices are fixed by men who have in- 
timate knowledge of values; with its affairs in the hands of educated 
men and women. 

"Here is the greatest proven gold-mining district in the world, 
where operators and miners find prosperity and peace in an endeavor 
for common betterment. 

"Here we are located in the state of the smallest population, with 
wealth sufficient for an entire nation. Here, we have sought the 
aid of the whole people, that benefits for the whole people might re- 
sult. Here, have we prospered and given back to the development 
of Nevada the gains of our prosperity. 

"We began with prospectors and burros, and in a few years have 
builded cities, begun an unprecedented railroad construction, and 
are established on firm foundations for all time. 

"The possibilities of our Desert Country have not been unduly 
magnified, but are vaster than our utmost imaginings, and we point 
with pride to the appreciation which has marked our progress, grow- 
ing daily in magnitude wheresoever our fame has spread. 

"We of Goldfield, who have sown our faith, have garnered golden 
harvest, in which we invite all people to participate." 

This proclamation, followed by the autograph signatures of a 
large number of the representative men of Goldfield, appeared in 
December, 1906, simultaneously in the newspapers of thirty cities 
of the United States. 



GOLD FIELD AND THE GOLDFIELDERS i 25 

Beneath the siren song of the press agent, do you not catch a 
deeper note prolonged from another Declaration of Independence? 
Flamboyant perhaps, but full of the exultant pride of achievement 
and forecasting greater worlds to conquer. 

If you would survey the monuments of these pioneers, from the 
foothills of Columbia Mountain, Ipok around ! Here, not many 
months ago, stretched an unvvatered and unshriven desert shut in 
by shrunken and uncanny hills, metes and bounds of a moribund 
world. An amphitheatre of silence, unbroken since those hours in 
the twilight of the earth when yonder volcano last volleyed its sub- 
terranean thunders. What was once a dnst-puff, whirled from the 
trail of a mountain wolf, has grown into a cloud which now and 
again covers the landscape like a pall. Out of it emerges the twenty- 











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Phoio by Allen 
"Moh.\wk's Golden Acre," Goldkirld 

mule team, advance guard of the railroad, hurrying southward to 
Death Valley. The malapi is vocal with cries of the argonauts and 
their camp followers. Their tents and housings rise over night like 
an exhaltation ; their chariots shod with air go to and fro like weav- 
ers' shuttles. Out of the volcanic tufa at our feet, from Mohawk's 
golden acre, spring a forest of gallows-frames. Their timbers stand 
as thick as derricks in an oild field. Their engines are never silent. 
Day and night the sibilant cough of the exhaust marks the rising 
flood of Pactolus. Mohawk's acre holds the world's record of gold 
production. Thirty-five dollars a minute, two thousand an hour, 
fifty thousand a day, and in the last one hundred days of 1906 five 
millions of gold is added to the exchequer of mankind. This fabu- 
lous vein, purse of Fortunatus, is cached in a Monte Cristo cave, 



126 



OUT WEST 



one hundred and fifty feet as far as explored during the golden age 
of the leasers. 

Figures convey a meagre and misleading idea of the contents of 
this treasure vault. To say that 45,260 tons of ore extracted under 
the Mohawk leases produced $5,228,616 of gold in less than six 
months falls far short of the fabulous reality. There is still nearly 
$3,ooo,cx>o of high-grade ore to be added before the accounts of the 
leases can be made up. 

At the lower levels the nether G©ds seemed to have refined the 
mass by volcanic fires seven times heated. They poured the previous 
metal into fissures and set them in immense walls one hundred feet 
in length. Streaks and stringers of quartz widened into seams, and 
these into ledges. 









^^nbi 







Copyright by A. Allen 
The GoldfieIvD Stage of Days of not Long Ago 

I have seen the Goldfield miners, candles in mouth, clinging like 
bats to these walls. Under the wavering light every eye gleamed 
with avarice. The sharp end of the pick pried the rotten quartz from 
its matrix, and crumbled the almost pure gold into the hollowed hand, 
where it sparkled like fireflies in the dark. 

This dust, too precious to be mixed with the coarser rock, was 
packed into little sacks, which as fast as they were filled were hid in 
near-by chambers in the stopes. Stout doors secured this garnered 
wealth, and watchmen guarded it night and day. 

As the leasers' time dwindled to weeks, then days and finally 
hours, miners worked shoulder to shoulder in four-hour shifts, re- 
lieving one another that not a moment should be lost. 

Places in the ranks of this army commanded a premium to their 



GOLDFIELD AND THE GOLDFIBLDERS 



127 



fortunate pre-emptors. It was like the waiting line before a box 
office anticipating some noted dramatic spectacle. The right of 
seizure and search had not yet been placed on the statute books of 
the underground world of Goldfield. Therefore, under their shirts 
the men hung cunningly devised harnesses, taking tithes of all they 
extracted under the very eyes of their employers. It was better to 
suffer this loss than to replace the knave with a more honest and 
less skillful workman. 

Deadly perils lurked in these lofty stopes, imperfectly supported 
by timbers. Every blast loosened more than the debris of the drifts. 
The earth groaned and travailed, and the walls and ceilings of*the 
stopes threatened collapse and wholesale extinction of life. Yet 
such is the lust for gold, that the waiting line at the shaft watched 




Phoio by Dickerson 
Automobile Stage Between Rhvolite and Beatty 

enviously the workmen descend,' knowing that the privilege of a few 
hours' labor might mean a month's income under ordinary conditions. 

Is this a new tale of Scheherezade, translated from the Arabian 
Nights, or a modern miracle-play of the desert with stage miners, 
heroes and villains playing their brief parts in the limelight? Thus 
many men at a distance thought when these stories began to circu- 
late around the world. 

But those of us who were a part of these scenes can still hear the 
ceaseless rumble of mortars pounding ore in those pseudo assay- 
offices which honeycomb the back streets of Goldfield. Scores of 
their proprietors have grown rich by buying stolen ore piecemeal 
that ran one hundred thousand ilollars to the ton. 



128 



OUT WEST 



We can recall the wagon, heaped up as with sacks of grain, three 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars to the load ; and that forty tons 
of high grade, a carload lot, valued at one million dollars, was a very 
real and tangible asset of the Hayes-Monnette lease. 

Surely nowhere on earth has the God of Luck played so many 
pranks, or assumed so many protean shapes, as under the shadow 
of Columbia Mountain. 

''Right under that big hill lies my fortune," cried A. D. Myers, 
the prospector, to his partner, as they lay in camp one day in the fall 
of 1903 on the eastern slope of the Tonopah range. The next morn- 
ing' he went forth unerringly, as one led by fate and found the 
Mohawk. The rainbow's pot of gold became his by right of location. 
In one day he set his stakes over ground rich enough to pay the na- 




A GoivDFiELD Gala Day 



Photo by Allen 



tional debts of half the petty principalities of Europe. His original 
prophecy came true, but if the vision had been clearer he might have 
stood on the Mohawk outcropping, a modern Monte Cristo and cried, 
"The world is mine," for under his feet lay the riches of Ormus 
and the Ind. 

As well prophesy where and when the flake of snow will fall from 
some passing cloud, as to forecast the gifts of fortune in a mining 
camp. 

'■'From where do you think the gold comes?" asked the first gov- 
ernor of Victoria of an old Cornish miner' in Australia. The miner 
replied, leaning upon his pick and shaking his head lugubriously, 
"Where it is, there it is, and where it ain't, there be I." 

The history of the Combination Mine, a premier location of Myers, 



GOLDFIELD AND THE GOLDFIBLDERS 



I 29 



is replete with dramatic surprises. This mine lies over against the 
Mohawk, a little gulch separating the two claims. 

When a prospector has appropriated as large a part of the earth's 
surface as he can measure off in a day's work, he rests from his labors 
and sets forth to find a purchaser. If he has been fortunate enough 
to strike paying ore at grass-roots, he feels that a fortune is within 
his grasp. • 

Seventy-five thousand dollars looked like a king's ransom to the 
original group which located the Combination ground, not much 
more than an open cut on the crest of a hill, with quartz that assayed 
$28.00 to the ton. It might prove no more than a surface deposit ; 
so. like many others, they dropped their picks in the trench, fearing 




A Business Corner in Goldfield 



Photo by Allen 



their fate too much to risk all in sinking further on the vein. Others 
who had seen the same showing were more adventurous. A Colorado 
man, L. L. Patrick by name, held the option on which the first pay- 
ment of five thousand dollars was due and payable. Only twenty- 
four hours remained on Patrick's option and the money from his 
eastern associates had not arrived. A Tonopah mining operator and 
a Winnemucca banker had agreed with the owners to advance this 
payment and take over the property at the same price on the expira- 
tion of Patrick's option. Here was a situation replete with dramatic 
possibilities. The anxious owners already beginning to spend their 
immense windfall ; the holder of the original option watching time 
pass on the dial and fortune slipping through his fingers, with 



13° O UT WEST 

each tick of the clock. In the background the second comers were 
waiting and watching, confident that the coveted property would soon 
fall into their hands. Imagine the importunate messages passing 
out of the desert, each more despairing than the other, and into the 
offices of the Chicago capitalists, to whom such far-off issues seemed 
trivial, yet not to be hastily decided ! 

Under the sage brush slept The Treasure. It alone was serene, 
quiescent and indifferent. If it had been awakened and endowed 
with the gift of sight and speech. The Treasure might have over- 
looked the contention and selected its ow^n favorites, and thus diverted 
into new channels the inevitable flow of its golden stream. It was 
the prize of nature and of time, and the players recked not of it save 
as a counter in their game. The die falls with the click of the tele- 
graph key ; Chicago "has deposited five thousand dollars to the credit 
of L. L. Patrick to pay the first installment on the purchase of the 
Combination Mine." It lacked a few minutes of three o'clock in the 
banking house at Tonopah when this message was received. Per- 
haps it was The Treasure that spoke after all — who can tell ? On 
what slight motives and impulses hang the greatest of human de- 
cisions. 

The other chapters in the history of the Combination Mine follow 
swift and fast. Almost the next blast in the shaft discloses bonanza 
ore, and before the second payment was due the entire purchase 
price of the mine was taken out of the original workings. Boston 
and Chicago joined hands to develop this great property. The crest 
of the hill was covered with a concentrating plant and a stamp-mill 
of the most improved construction. Across the desert pipes were 
laid to a boiling spring, its waters were brought to the mill, and 
proved more than sufficient for its needs. 

Visitors to the Combination mine are taken to the site of the 
original discovery and told the story we have narrated. It seems 
more effective as one looks down into the opening, like the mouth 
of a crater — "Glory Hole" as it is called — where the workmen can 
be seen far below shoveling the broken quartz into the stopes, from 
whence it is lifted by the neighboring shaft, and automaticallv fed 
under the stamps and through the chlorination tanks. 

This mine, after enriching Patrick and the eastern shareholders to 
the extent in dividends of nearly a million dollars, has finally been 
joined to its neighbor across the little gulch. The Treasure has 
changed owners for a price, fabulous at least as compared with the 
mess of pottage for which the original prospectors bartered it. But 
with the change of ownership passes away the danger of apex suits, 
that bane of mining camps ; and if The Treasure, a little depleted 
after two years, is glad or sorry, who knows? Certainly not the 
writer of this chronicle. 



GOLDFIELD AND THE GOLDFIELDERS 



13' 



Mercurial Goldfield lies almost at the bottom of the railroad tube. 
Its prosperity fluctuates according to traffic conditions. At the top 
of the tube lies Reno, well watered, housed and comfortable. At 
the bottom yawns Death Valley full of borax, copper and dead men's 
bones. If the Lord of the Railway sends us cars, we can fill them 
with gold and after many days, they should return to us laden with 
coal, ice and edibles But if he forgets us, we freeze in winter and 
go parched and hungry through the long summer days. This is a 
condition, not a theory. 

During Nevada's interregnum between Comstock and Tonapah, 
these desert railways dwindled into dust-streaks. Stockholders 
went without dividends and bond-holders without interest. An 




The (tOldfield Fire of Sept. 1907 



Photo by Allen 



occasional train crawled in those days as far as Mina from the 
main line of the Southern Pacific, and beat back slowly against wind 
and snow-storms that threatened shipwreck at every mountain 
gorge. Discovery of the Mizpah mine by Jim Butler, on the present 
site of Tonopah, reversed all the old conditions. The profits of the 
Mizpah mine extended the narrow-gauge from Mina to Tonopah, 
and subsequently to Goldfield. Mina is a Turkish word, which be- 
ing interpreted means. "Gateway to the Valley of Promise." 
Fortunately for the railroad builders, these remote valleys soon be- 
gan to redeem every promise a thousand fold. 

It is good magazine form to abuse the transportation companies, 
but these earlv invaders of the desert had their troubles as well as 



132 OUT WEST 

their problems. They undoubtedly minimized the imi3ortance of this 
new territory. They delayed standardizing the old narrow-gauge 
track and providing adequate equipment and sufficient sidings. 
Their rates were all the traffic would bear. The Goldfield-Tonapah 
road at the present time about pays its cost in dividends to its stock- 
holders. 

An interview with the managers in Philadelphia discloses the 
fact that they are very human. They are mine owners as well as 
railroad men. They know the needs of the community. Railroads, 
they say, like mines, are not operated for the health of their owners. 

ft is true that during the winter months it took ten days to get a 
ton of coal from Oakland to Goldfield, and the freight charges were 
$10.00 per ton, or $400 per care. This for an ordinary 24-hours' 




Photo by Alexander 
A Prospector 

run. But "responsibility was not ours alone," they allege. "The 
Southern Pacific system, like our own connecting road, was short 
of cars, locomotives and fuel. An unexpected influx of population 
into southern Nevada made such demands upon railroad service that 
the most we could do was to carry ore out and provisions in. Good 
railroad men were hard to obtain. They turned miners and specu- 
lators and abandoned the locomotives on the track to plunge into 
the Walker Indian Reservation and prospect for gold. When over- 
worked locomotives broke down under continuous service, we could 
not obtain new ones from the eastern builders. They refused to ac- 
cept our orders except for six months delivery.'' 

Thus runs the railroad managers' tale. Underneath it lies one 
undeniable fact : The Railroad KiKngs, to whom these Western 
provinces are merely places for their pawns, their knights and their 



GOLDflELD AM) THE GOLDPlELDEkS 



'33 



rooks in the railroad ^ame, were, in 1906, too intent npon their 
moves in the Northwest to provide for the needs of the desert. 

But the cry of the Mohawk acre is more insistent than that of all 
other ungathered harvests anywhere. It will not be denied. It finds 
an echo in every banking house where gold is weighed in the balance 
and found wanting. 

Hence these rumors of new railroad projects which now fill the 
air. King Harriman, it is said, looks covetously at this Naboth's 
vineyard. He would like to add to the Southern Pacific system this 
Mizpah tentacle which is slowly feeling its way past the tents of 
Goldfield towards Bullfrog and the Green water country. It is an- 
noying to rule the body, and not one of its little members like the 
Goldfield-Tonopah road. 




On thr Way to the Prospect 



Plioto by 1' 



Hither also comes with his engineering and surveying corps, 
Gould, by way of Salt Lake and the Western Pacific. There are 
fertile valleys and rich mining camps between VVinnemucca and 
Tonopah. From the south a feeder of the Salt Lake and Los An- 
geles road has travelled northward as far as Beatty. By early 
spring it should be bringing goods in from Los Angeles and divid- 
ing the ore shipments to the Salt Lake smelter with the Southern 
Pacific. 

This pursuit of the people who dwell in tents is in amusing con- 
trast with the autocratic temper of the managers a few vears ago 
m this country. In those days Hawthorne, the present countv seat 
of Esmeralda County, boasted of a branch railroad. The railway 
officials decreed a new townsite some miles removed from the one 
established by the first settlers. The settlers naturally expected a 



'3 + 



OUT WEST 



road to come to them. Its managers, well supplied with cheap town- 
lots, refused to meet the old townspeople even half way. "If you 
don't move up to us,'' the railroad men said, "we will pull up 
our toy tracks and water-tanks and leave you stranded as before in 
the desert." "Pull away," replied the population of the county 
seat. The railroad took the town at its word, folded its rails and 
left the lawyers and judges who are obliged to visit the county seat 
during court terms to travel there over the abandoned road-bed in 
a ramshackle stage — which they do to this day. Let it be noted 
that the State of Nevada has not yet provided itself with a railroad 
commission, that modern weapon against railroad aggression. 

It must have been a remnant of the same feudal spirit which in- 
duced the Tonapah road to plant its station a mile and a half from 



p» 




— T 


-<r 






) 




11 ll 


^ -.--^ 


y^'* )^w^ 




1 


^^^^^^L' - ^~'l„._^4I^^^^^Hrs 





Copyright by A. AUen 

A Useful Friknd to the Prospector 

the town of Goldfield, expecting the town to come to it. This it im- 
■/iacably declined to do, albeit with much profane increment every 
train-time when compelled to pay two bits to the bus drivers and 
endure the added pangs of a corduroy road. 

When a railroad commission is appointed, one of the first prayers 
of the camp will go up for an improved train service between Gold- 
tield and northern points. It should be possible for the traveller to 
arrive and depart by night trains, thus mitigating the asperities of 
the long ride through the desert — in summer hot, dusty and uncom- 
fortable, and in winter bleak and depressing. Under such improved 
conditions, however, he will miss the arrival at night, the spectacle 
of innumerable dancing lights around the shaft houses of Milltown, 
the mad race of hacks and busses through the darkness and the 



GOLDFIELD AND THE GOLDFIELDERS 



'35 



sudden transition from the silence and calm of the outside world 
to the light and tumult of Goldfield streets 

"It is day all day in the daytime 

And there is no night in Creede." 
Cy Warman's couplet applied to the Colorado mining camp is 
equally true of Goldfield. In the dominion of chance the sun never 
sets. The faro and stud-poker dealer, the croupier and crap 
thrower, work like miners in eight hour shifts. To the peripatetic 
philosopher, games as they are played at Goldfield and the mine, 
offer some analogies. Superficially, the action and atmosphere of 
the temple of chance and the Bourse are similar. Reckless and rest- 
less votaries gather in both to watch the fall of the dice or the 




A Prospector at Home 



I'hoto by Diekerson 



rise of quotations. In the Bourse the caller cries out the bids of 
the brokers who press about his rostrum. A secretary records the 
bets, that is, the varying prices of the mining shares that are quoted 
on the board. Shut out by a low railing the excited sjieculators 
jostle and crowd each other. 

During the evening sessions the fair sex is much in evidence. The 
seats reserved for the ladies are always filled. The wife of a mme 
owner who has made $5000 over night by a leap in Bullfrog Con- 
solidated exchanges views on the market with the daughter of a 
miner. The father has just come oiT the night shift and brings tales 
of some new strike in the Diamondfield District. The former swings 
a line of 10.000 or 20,000 shares, the latter is satisfied with the buyer's 
option of 100 shares. Sabnes of $150 a month attract stenog- 



136 



our WEST 



raphers from every state in the Union, and young and old alike 
speculate with absorbed ardor and varying fortunes. 

"A mad scene, my masters," this gambling pit in the midst of a 
desert ! 

"What am I bid ?" 

"What is the stock offered at?" 

"A thousand Triangle at 10.*' 

"Sold!" 

"I'll give II for any part of 10,000." 

Such are the cries that startle the night. 

When the market soars ,^ lifted by orders from all parts of the 
world, this pit is a pandemonium. The crowd fills the room and 
overflows on the sidewalk, where a fringe of speculators kneel on 




An Unexpected use of Barrels 



Photo by Allen 



the iron grating and sliout their bids through the open windows inio 
the basement below. 

Out of this underground room runs a telegraph wire which keeps 
the night session of the San Francisco Mining Exchange in constant 
touch with the fluctuations of the local market. 

By the time this article is in print a direct wire to New York will 
have been added, involving arbitrage transactions with the "curb" 
and the mining exchanges of the principal cities of the country. 
When to the surplus money of the factory, shop and field are added 
the funds of capitalists, and investors in every part of the country are 
eager to trade in Nevada mining shares, it is easy to understand 
whv brokers grow rich, and one stock exchange is not enough for 
Goidfield. 



GOLDFIELD AND THE GOLDFIELDERS i 37 

After the Xortbern Pacific corner in kjoi. when that stock 
junij^ed from $ioo to $i,ooo per share, the air was full of tales of 
fabulous fortunes won and lost over night. He was lucky and ex- 
ceptional who bought at the bottom and sold at the top. The par 
value of the railroad stock is $ioo a share, and that of the Goldfield- 
Mohawk $i a share. The present market value of the mine repre- 
sents, therefore, an equivalent of $2000 a share in Northern Pacific 
stock, and the speculator has always been able to realize on his orig- 
inal investment from one hundred to one thousand per cent profit. 
Small wonder, then, that the average human animal, who takes to 
gambling as inevitably as ducks to a mill-pond, should be oven now- 
searching the mining stock reports for another Mohawk. 

Between the Scylla of the pit and the Charybdis of the gaming 




Photo by AUen 

lo.cxx) BoTTLBs Went to the Making of this Home 

table, the average miner, however fortified by union cards, has small 
chance to save either the proceeds of his eight-hour-a-day labor or 
the rewards of the most strenuous "high grading." 

In the old Comstock days the fall of the market was carefully 
planned to the end that the high wages paid should regularly return 
to the mine owners and stock manipulators, leaving to the mine 
worker at the end of each year little besides hopes and regrets. 

Historv may repeat itself in Goldfield, but thus far miners, *as 
well as all other classes of operators, have profited greatly by the 
rise in mining shares. So potent are the subterranean attractions, 
so irresistible the golden lure of stope and cross-cut, that men who 
sit for hours in the poisonous atmosphere of the saloons dealing faro 
will leave the game, not for rest or dissipation, but to go on a day- 



 38 OUT WEST 

shift with pick and drill in some ground which they have leased on 
royalty from the owner. 

Fashion, if you can, the dreams and imaginings of such men. 
With what feelings must they regard the blind worshipers of chance 
who crowd around their tables nightly, flinging away by a turn of 
a card or the wheel the earnings of hours of toil. 

Only that is magnificent which is unknown. Neither miner nor 
croupier recks of the percentage against every great coup. Each is 
willing to play the other's game — and both lose in the long run. 

If the Unions devoted a tithe of the effort they now expend in in- 
creasing wages and shortening hours, to schemes for improving the 
conditions under which their members live and especially enforcing 
habits of saving and thrift instead of reckless prodigality, they would 
show to the world larger reason for existence. But how tame, dull 
and uninteresting would Goldfield, the premier gold camp of the 
world, become by comparison with its present apparelling. 

In long, narrow and low-roofed saloons, glasses unceasingly clink 
over the sweating bar. The man from the Rand stand cheek by 
jowl with the exile from the Yukon, Australia and the Argentines. 
He who was deported from Cripple Creek recites his wrongs to his 
sympathizers in typsy heroic style. If — too common mischance — the 
blind goddess frowns upon the gamester, the house hands out a bar- 
ticket and hope flows again under the spell of renewed potations. 
If money is lacking for lodgings, the saloon offers a refuge. In the 
early morning hours far corners are crowded with rows of prostrate 
revellers to whom a sawdust bed brings brief oblivion. Here shows 
the seamy side of a great mining camp, since for these on the mor- 
row the Morgue may be the next resting place. 

Conditions which existed during the fall and winter of 1906 are 
not likely to be repeated during the coming year, and this despite an 
impending invasion of newcomers from all quarters of the world. 
The winter was unusually severe and inclement ; snow lay in drifts 
for weeks, instead of yielding to the first rays of the warm Nevada 
sun. Coal and wood sold at prohibitive prices, and no man's out- 
buildings were secure against his neighbor's imperative demands 
for fuel. 

To add to the general suffering, the daily train, which should 
have arrived in the evening, was delayed for hours between Mma 
and Tonopah by freight wrecks and misplaced switches. 

After spending the night in the crowded cars, the arriving pas- 
senger was unable to secure lodgings at any price. Seats around a 
hotel stove brought the price of a room and bath at the Waldorf- 
Astoria. The only pretentious hotel was totally destroyed by fire 
with unfortunate loss of life. 

It was a season of unparalleled excitement on the Exchange and 



GOLD f I ELD AND THE COLDFIELDERS «39 

feverish activity among the leasers, those especially who held the 
"open sesame" to the Mohawk Treasure House, and whose oppor- 
tunities of profit waned with the declining year. Orders for the 
purchase of stock poured in from so many quarters and in such 
amounts that the overworked and exhausted clerical forces of the 
brokers were physically unable to post and balance their books. The 
Stock Exchange was closed for three days. Exchanges have been 
closed in great trading centers, but generally for reasons other than 
the inability of their members to catch up with their business. 

Such was the plight of Goldfield when emissaries of the Eastern 
press flocked down upon her. They came avowedly to spy out the 
land, to expose its pretensions and let the truth and sunshine of the 
outside world into its darkest corners. 




Photo by PlokerFon 

Bucking the Tiger 

A careful digest of the many articles intended for Eastern circu- 
lation leaves this impression upon the reader: "Goldfield is a bad 
place to live in and an easy place to die in ; it is full of wicked min- 
ing brokers, who advertise worthless prospects as mines, and thus 
separate the innocent and unwary from their money at great expense 
of advertising in the very papers whose editors print daily warnings 
against mining shares and tips on the New York Stock Exchange." 

On the score of accommodations or luxuries of living, this city 
of the desert, as we have shown, leaves much to be desired. Her 
critics forget that she is yet an infant less than three years old. In 
their swaddling clothes, and at such a tender age, even the great 
cities of the Atlantic Coast were without hostelries supplied with 



14° 



O U T W E s r 



men roamed about their unlighted streets at night, and even now are 
not wholly exterminated from State, Chestnut and Wall streets. 
The chief difference between Law^son of Boston and McKenzie of 
Goldfield is that the latter has taken more money out of the ground 
than the former, although they are both in the mining and stock- 
brokerage business. 

You may say that "good wine needs no bush," but AIcKenzie 
carried that bonne boiiche, the Francis-Mohawk Lease, from door 
to door in Goldfield and Tonopah before he went to the public and 
secured the capital to sink his shaft on the Alohawk vein. Those 
who read his early advertisements and subscribed for his stock at 
twenty cents on the dollar are now able to secure a profit of 500 per 
cent on their investments. 




A Rock Drilling Contest 



Photo by Difikerson 



In these articles we read a great deal about the shady antecedents 
of the heads of certain so-called financial institutions and their min- 
ing properties in various Nevada camps, but we are given no sta- 
tistics of the output of the Goldfield mines, nor any information on 
which we can base a conclusion as to their merit and productiveness. 
In fact, these traveling correspondents, who came into the camp on 
one train and left on the next and spent the intervening time in 
collecting and tabulating stale gossip and hearsay evidence, doing 
their best, by innuendo and suggestion, to write down this new El- 
dorado, missed the essence and spirit of everything about them. 

The human tide that every hour of the twenty-four ebbs and 
flows through the streets of Goldfield carries not mere wreckage 



GOLDFJBLD AND THE GOLDFIBLDERS 



14! 



or flotsam and jetsam. The salt of the earth is here as well as its 
scum. On the frontier, a man soon finds his level. No higher type 
of manhood can be found anywhere than these mine owners in a 
camp where it is said "a million dollars is the unit of the account — 
vou hand it over, and it is not polite to ask for any chanj^e." To this 
type belongs Taylor, who sold the control of the Red Top and Jumbo 
mines to Wingfield and Nixon f«r $1,200,000. There was not a 
scrap of paper to bind the bargain. After the verbal option was 
given, and before it was exercised, the market quotation of the mines 
showed a paper profit of $2,000,000 to the purchasers. Did this ap- 
parent loss on the one side and gain on the other cause Taylor to 
swerve from his word, or, as thev sav in Nevada, fail to "come 




fhoio by Allen 



Election Day in Goldfieij) 



through?" He might easily have demanded and received half a 
million additional if he had chosen to enter the ranks of "welchers," 
a word which is well understood on the coast since the San Fran- 
cisco fire — but Taylor was made of different stuff. It probably never 
occurred to him to "hold-up" or "shake-down" his old-time friends, 
who relied on his honor and good faith. 

Myers, "the father of Goldfield." of Mohawk and Combination 
fame, is made of the same stuff. He passed his word to deliver 
100.000 shares of Mohawk to Carstairs, a Philadelphia capitalist, 
for $400,000 in cash, providing the money was forthcoming in five 
days. Before the end of that time the market price of the stock 
showed a profit to the purchasers of nearly half a million dollars, and 



14* OUT WEST 

a few weeks later the share of the mine which he disposed of for 
$400,000 was worth, in open market, $2,000,000. His precious Mo- 
hawk, which he had held intact since he had located the mine, was 
not deposited in escrow with any bank or trust company. He had 
not received any payment on account, he merely passed his word 
to deliver it under certain conditions. These conditions being com- 
plied with, subsequent gain or loss on either side affected him not at 
all. He probably regretted that he had not asked and received a 
higher price — but he tendered the stock, when and as due, on de- 
mand. There are many more in Goldfield like Myers and Taylor — 
jealous of their word and proof against any temptation to break it. 
Others there are in this mixed throng of money seekers of whom 




l)\- iMckerson 

The Main Street of Beatty 

men say : "Look out for him ! He has a shady past ; he was in- 
dicted back East, and is out here under an alias, or masquerading 
under some new firm name. His capital consists of unlimited assur- 
ance and investors' lists, made up of thousands of names of men and 
women of small means who buy mining or other shares, led thereto 
by cunningly worded circulars, which he is an adept in preparing." 
What will you? These are the jackals and ghouls of every industry 
which catches the public eye. Caveat emptor. These men get only 
the leavings of the honest and law-abiding, and are soon found out 
and passed on to the next camp until the United States gets too hot 
for them, when they turn up in South America or some foreign 
country, using the same arts on new victims everywhere. 

Two questions are asked outside where one meets those whom the 



GOLDFIELD AND THE GOLDFIELDERS • 43 

fame of Goldfield draws like a magnet: How can I secure a share 
of its prosperity? and how long will it last? Judging the future by 
the past, there are as many new fortunes likely to be made in 1907 
as were made in 1906. Unless all signs fail, we are entering upon 
a season of speculative excitement greater than the West has ever 
known. The stakes to be played fpr in the future will be larger, and 
th small investor and operator must look farther afield. 

Goldfield is not only a great mining camp itself, but the contagion 
and intoxication of rapidly multiplying fortunes induce a kind of 
splendid optimism among the owners. This spirit manifests itself 
in excursions unto the remotest corners of the State, and no district 
is so inhospitable that the touring car of the Goldfield capitalist will 
not seek to explore it at the first rumor of a new strike. 



t 





'<-JS8l 



J 



J- 



Some Natives of Nevada 



I'lioto by Allen 



Goldfield men have developed Fairview, Wonder, Searchlight, 
Round Mountain, Bullfrog, Manhattan, Rose Bud — as far north as 
the copper camps of Ely, and south as far as Greenwater and Death 
Valley. 

Goldfield is no place for the lazy or incompetent. The man of 
constructive imagination who sees opportunity and pursues it with- 
out knowing discouragement or fatigue — to such a one this primitive 
life has much to offer. The society of men like himself, the mys- 
teries of untrodden deserts, and sky-piercing mountains, the develop- 
ment of natural resources, almost virginal and fresh from the Cre- 
ator's hands. 

Beyond yonder horizon may lie another Tonopah or Goldfield 
with new rewards for the tireless Argonaut. 



4+ 



OUT WEST 



The world wonders at the reports of new strikes followino- upon 
one the heels of the other in this desert country. Why were these 
discoveries not made by the Mackays, Floods, O'Briens and their 
followers, who lifted Nevada so high before the world's gaze less 
than two-score years ago? This is the reason. Formerly the pros- 
pector, with his faithful burro, journeyed timidly from spring to 
spring, not daring to extend the area of his search beyond a circle a 
few leagues in extent. The great mineral zones of Southern Nevada 
were thus secure from from his excursions. With the advent of the 
railroad new stations with water supplies sprang up. Where for- 
merly one lonely man wended his solitary way through caiion and 
valley, now scores of well-equipped prospecting parties bring back 
tales of new discoveries miles from their base of supplies. As soon 



wS^ '  




WALDORF-ASTORIA 




An Early Type of Hotel 



Copyright by A. Allen 



as the news is verified, the capitalist is hurried thither in his automo- 
bile, tents rise as if by magic, water-pipes are laid from the nearest 
creek and the world learns that another mining camp has been found 
in the desert. 

Under former' conditions such rapid development would have 
been impossible. Railroad transportation has wrought this change, 
and as new lines are built and extended, other deposits of silver and 
gold and copper will be found from the development of which will 
spring another crop of millionaires. 

Goldfield is well situated to become the center of this new domain. 
It holds the key to the southern country. There it seems destined to 
become another Denver. It is not lacking in natural advantages de- 
spite its isolation and present environment. Those who live in it the 
vear around find no fault with the climate. It is neither too hot in 



GOLDFIEIJ) AND THE GGLDPIELDERS 



45 




The Prospkctor En I outk 

summer nor too cold in winter. Those who have taken great for- 
tunes out of the ground are loyal and bent upon building a city both 
habitable and attractive. 

If there was any chance that the new railways planning to reach 
Goldfield would l)y competition reduce freight rates, the city would 
take on a magical growth. The present rates and the high prices of 
labor handicap progress, and in the past men have been too busy 
picking money out of the ground to take any thought how they were 
housed and fed. 

.\s to the permanence of the cam]), let those who are doubtful read 
the reports of such well-known geologists and mining engineers as 
John \V. Finch and Charles C. Moore, men who have lived there for 
a long enough period to pass an intelligent judgment. 

Goldfield, Xc\ 




h6 



"^^STRUCn IT AT LAST" 




By E. M. HAMILTON. 

EIXG out of health, I concluded to go camping; so fixed 
up a one-horse rig, took one of my sons with me and 
started out for the desert or any place that we might 
happen to go. I fetched up on the north side of An- 
telope V alley, about ninety miles north of Los Angeles. 
Being of an industrious disposition, I commenced to prospect. I 
prospected a little different from most prospectors. I saw a red 
looking hill on the north side of the valley. I liked the looks of it, 
so I took my horse and wagon and went in the gulches. They, be- 
ing short and steep, were easy to prospect. I took a sack of dirt 
and called it No. i, leaving a mark so that I could find the place in 
case there was anything in the dirt. I kept this up until I got the 
wagon loaded, then I drove three miles to a place where there was 
water and panned the dirt out. I found free gold in all the gulches. 
Then I went on the north side of the hill and done the same. I also 
found gold. I had learned to track Indians in the early times and 
read signs. I looked at that gold. It was rough and lay among 
broken stones, not gravel. I says to myself, it's a native of this 
place. Like the Irishman, I had it surrounded, so I was not long 
in finding the lead. I happened to find the lead in the barest place. 
There was a dike or large bunch of rock that assayed about $35.00 
per ton. I thought there was gold enough in the dike to pay for a 
two-stamp mill, so I traded places and took money that belonged 
to the family and built the mill. When I came to break up that dike, 
if the gold had been put on with a whitewash brush it could not 
have been much thinner, so I was in debt, mill on hand and no 
pay-rock or ore. I did not give up. I kept on. My money was 
gone and so was my friends. Family helped me for awhile. They 
W'cre short of means of support. My boys left me. Said there was 
nothing there. I worked all alone, sunk a shaft on the lead. The 
ore run about $2 per ton. I would carry the ore up on my back 
out of the shaft. Sometimes I was so weak I hardly could get a 
sack out of the shaft. I managed to get out about three-quarters 
of a ton. This made a load for the horse. I got out one load per 
day. . I kept this up until I got out about ten tons at the mill, then I 
would take the horse and wagon and gather sage-brush to make fuel 
for the mill. Then I would mill it, get about $20 out of the ten tons 
and buy some more pork and beans and do so again. I mixed sage- 
brush with the hay to make it last. I kept this up for about two 
and one-half ye?rs. I had hopes of finally striking it. There is a 
rule among miners, if you have a color, follow it. I finally became 
worn out financially, physically and almost mentally. If I had got 



"STRUCK IT .IT LAST" «47 

hurt, I might have laid there and perished, for there wag no one near 
me. I was about to give up when the idea occurred to me, why, 
go down on a lower level, the lead runs diagonally across the hill. I 
went and looked around. I saw nothing that looked as though it 
had anything in it more than I saw a little clay sticking to the rock 
that looked as if it might be a foot-walj. I scratched down with my 
hands and took a handful of dirt where I had water. Found it 
must have had twenty-five cents in the horn.- Went back, found it 
scattered all around. Just then, I would not have swapped places 
with Gov. Gage. I did not care so much for the money value, but 
I had triumphed over all difficulties. I sacked twenty-one tons of 
dirt, had to pick the roots out of it while sacking it. I sent it to the 
Selby Smelting Works. It brought me $4500 net in sixty days. I 
did not owe anyone a cent. Everything being so unusual, I placed 
myself in the exact position in which I was when I found the gold 
in the horn and had a kodak picture taken, which might be titled 
"From Poverty to Wealth" or "Struck It At Last.'' I have taken 
out some $200,000 and the mine is hardly commenced to be worked. 
I own the mine all alone. I have been offered large sums of money 
for it, but to give me a large sum of money at my age it would 
cause me lots of trouble, but where it is it causes me no trouble. 
Rosamond, Cal. 

The photograph to which Mr. Hamilton refers is reproduced as the frontis- 
piece of this numher of Out West. His account of the circumstances which 
led up to the "strike" is printed verbatim, partly because it is an interesting 
and truthful record of facts — partly as a set-oflF against the traditions of the 
discovery of great mines by a mule, a boot-heel, or a chance revolver-shot. 
some of which appear on other pages of this magazine. Chance is a factor in 
the prospector's life, but the grimmest kind of hard work is by far the more 
conspicuous factor.-^TSrfi'/or. 



SUNSET SEA MOODS 

By EMMA PLATER SEABURV. 

THE mountain ravines are a-dust with gold. 
The sky is amber and pink and rose, 
.\nd mirrors its opaline tints with the sea ; 
.\nd Santa Cruz shines through the gossamer fold 
Of violet mists — while the glad wave flows. 

Bringing the dream of my life to me. 

***** 

Black is the beetling cliflF and dark is the storm-swept sky ; 

The island is shrouded in mist, and the ocean is angry and gray ; 
Only a gleam of light in the sea-gull's wing on high — 

And the treacherous wave has seized my dream, and drifted it far 
away. 

Chicago, 111. 




>49 



MYRA or the: apple pies 

By ELLA DEXTER SOULE 
YRA'S hands, slender and swift, were busy with the ap- 
ples in her lap, their crimson and yellow parings coil- 
ing at her feet. Her song ceased as her father, old and 
bent, came slowly down through the arbor. His cane 
brushed aside the dead leaves that flecked the walk. 
Scarce four feet away he stopped, lifting his hat from his shiny 
pate, and regarded her with stern grey eyes from beneath heavy, 
white brows. 

"That harum-scarum scamp Jack Travers has joined the emigrant 
train that starts west tomorrow ! Gold and California ! They have 
all gone gold mad. Will none stay to gather corn and pumpkins? 
Bah! They are mad, I" tell you." 

The girl's knife fell to her feet as she hastily bound up a cut finger 
But she raised her chin and spoke evenly, almost indifferently : 

"Going tomorrow ? They will have a hard, cold journey. Luck- 
ily no women or children are in the train. See, father, what a 
host of pies we may have this winter. I have been paring all day." 

"Yes, yes," assented the old man, absently. "But where are you 
going?" 

"Supper time," she called cheerily over her shoulder, as she 
brushed by him, and the blue dress was lost from sight at a turn 
in the path. 

He sank heavily upon the vacant bench. "Well, well, thank God 
she doesn't care ! Took it as cool ! Thank God ! I couldn't give her 
up. She is my all." 

While Myra at her gable window pressed a white, fearful face to 
the pane and gazed at the fast mellowing sky. 

"Out there, out there, with Indians and starvation an^ death ! 
Oh ! I cannot bear it. He must not !" and down went the bright 
head on the sill. 

At twilight she heard his whistle. Her father, silhouetted against 
the west window, was nodding in his chair. Down through the 
blighted garden she came. 

"Myra !" 

"Jack!" 

"They told you?" 

"Yes! Must you?" 

"Oh, I must. And little girl, Myra, you'll wait for me ? I'll bring 
gold when I come. And I — there, there, don't cry, little girl. How 
hot your cheek is ! Well, put your head here and cry if you must. 
We'll not talk of it now." 

Later when the pale little moon had long dropped out of sight, 



15° OUT WEST 

in the deeper darknes sshe slowly retraced her steps, alone, her face 
wet with her tears and his. 

Months dragged by. Yes, months and years. The old man grew 
more feeble and querulous. Myra always devoted, singing soft and 
low at her work, or standing at sunset gazing thoughtfully off to 
the west-land, her cheeks like the apple blooms, eyes shadowy, and 
hair blown on her temples. 

Occasionally the monotonous quiet and peace of the little village 
was broken by the return of some of its wanderers. Tales they 
brought of wondrous wealth to be had for just the taking. Tales 
there were, too, of sickness and death and attack by treacherous 
savages — of pitiful chapters read in the tumble-down, deserted 
wagons out on the trackless prairie. 

In Myra's little Bible she tucked a letter — dim and torn with many 
readings and tears, and worn over her heart till it became so tattered 
that she laid it in its sacred place to be touched tenderly. No need 
to read it — every word was written on her heart. One letter in two 
long years of waiting! The goal had been reached. He was well. 
He hadn't found wealth yet, but it was surely coming. 

Then one day the sunset brought him, big, bronzed and handsome. 
She felt so little beside him, and half afraid. All about him breathed 
the spirit of the great West. Already he was nest-building. So 
many had come to get wives and families to join them out there in 
God's Country. Myra's heart leaped glad at the thought, then 
stopped at the sound of her father's cane tap, tapping, on the arbor 
walk. 

Then she fought the battle as old as the .world itself between Love 
and Duty. She chose to stay with the cross old man, while her 
heart, breaking, followed her lover back over his weary journey. 

Sunset again — this time far to the west. Three horsemen urged 
their tired ponies over the grassy sod of beautiful Shasta Valley 
toward the blue rim of hills in the west. At their base, just beyond 
a lower ridge, dark with its growth of scrubby oaks, nestled the 
straggling town of Yreka. Just a city of shacks and glimmering 
tents, the metropolis of Northern California in the early fifties; the 
goal of the gold-seeker and home-gainer who left native town and 
childhood scenes to carve for himself his destiny in the new rugged 
country. 

Weariness and disappointment were written on the three faces. A 
long, hard chase of hours had been fruitless, and as they retraced 
their tracks of the morning they spoke in no mild terms of the culprit 
who had so eluded capture and punishment. On the previous day a 
Mexican prospector had driven from camp two of the best pack- 
animals in the West. Hours later, a boy of the tribe from which 
the town of Yreka derived its name told, by signs and broken words, 



MYRA OF THE APPLE PIES lU 

of the stealing. There had been mounting in haste. The party, upon 
reaching Butcher Hill, two miles east of the town, had divided, tak- 
ing several trails. 

The three had found tracks and ridden madly in pursuit. But far 
down on the timbered banks of the McCloud they had lost the trail, 
and fearing attack from some hostile tribe upon so small a company 
of white men, they were compelle*d to turn their horses reluctantly 
toward the north. 

On a swelling slope they stoppe dto rest their tired horses. The 
younger of the trio lifted his wide hat from his damp hair and hung 
it on his saddle-horn, letting his eyes wander over the panorama 
before them. Mt. Shasta's head of perpetual snow still reared itself 
in the sunshine, though its timbered base had long rested in deep 
purple shadow. Dusk had begun to hover over all the lowland. 
"Goose Nest," to the right, was frosted with the touch of the first 
fall of snow, and the beautiful Siskiyous, still further north, reflected 
the glory of the after-glow in their snow-filled gorges. 

Countless dark, ill-shapen volcanic hills nestled at Shasta's base, 
low, brown and bare, skirting the valley. Silvery green were the 
patches of wild oats, shoulder high, beside the darker green of the 
natural meadow-grass. A quarter of a mile from where they sat, 
resting, the bleam of the river ford could be seen through grey wil- 
lows and rustling cottonwoods. As their eyes reached it a cry broke 
almost simultaneously from their lips. "A train !" cried the younger. 
"Emigrants! Two, four, six, seven wagons and a goodly drove of 
cattle. Hurrah !" And forgetting his pony's need of rest he drove 
home his spurs and was off like the wind. His companions, scarcely 
less eager, followed. 

Men whose faces they had never before seen, they met like broth- 
ers; while the women and children, browned and tired and ragged 
from travel, gathered eagerly round at sight of welcoming white 
faces. 

Months had passed on the road; some of their number slept by 
the way; their cattle were bony and footsore; the number of their 
wagons sadly diminished; yet, they gave joyful thanks to God at 
the journey's ending. 

Around a crackling fire the men smoked and told tales of their 
travel, while the darkness fell and the children, one by one, were 
tucked to rest in the rickety old wagons. Travers — for he was the 
one who had first reached the camp — asked eager hurried questions 
of a grizzled old man from Ohio and the vicinity where his own 
boyhood had passed. 

"And old man Long — did you know him ?" 

"Who? Old Henry? Oh, yes, but he died more than a year 
ago"— 



152 OUT wnsT 

"And his daughter?" Travers could, scarcely force his lips to 
ask. The burden of three years of separation was so crushingly 
heavy. 

"You mean Myra, the gal that makes the best pies in the country ? 
Why, she's with us now over there with the women and brats." He 
pointed over his shoulder to the glow of the second fire within the 
circle of wagons. 

Travers sprang to his feet, the blood booming in his ears. Myra ! 
Coming to him ! Then, out on the night air there sounded a pitiful 
low wail. 

"What's that?" asked one of the circle. "A panther?" 

"Naw; that's Myra's baby," answered the old man. "The little 
brat has cried for the last four nights, till none of us could sleep. 
It isn't going to live, but you can't tell her." 

Her baby! Then she was another's, and it was not to him she 
was coming! He stumbled off in the darkness, till, almost within 
the other circle of light, he stopped. 

She sat on the ground, quite close to the blaze, rocking herself 
gently backward and forward, with the tiny wailing form on her 
breast. Her hair, loosened and falling, hid her face and covered her 
arms and shoulders. Soft and low she sang a wordless^ tender 
lullaby. To the right some half a dozen of the other children played, 
barefooted, in the fire-light. Large, washed, white pebbles from the 
river-bank formed a miniature emigrant train, while on a pile of turf 
some brown burs were the Indians, watching. 

Thus they lived again the days of thrilling anxiety, crossing the 
Modoc country and rounding Indian Point. Now, that they had 
gained a peaceful country claimed by neither the Scott Valley nor 
Modoc tribes, their elders tried to forget the last week of peril, 
while the children with keen delight rehearsed its horrors. 

At the sight of Myra, Travers groaned aloud and the children 
heard. One of them saw him and ran to Myra, crying, "Myra! 
Myra ! I see an Indian standing, watching you !" 

Myra raised her head and looked straight toward him, but the 
firelight blinded her so that she saw nothing. Unconsciously he 
stepped toward her, his arms out, his heart drawn by her dear 
beauty. 

"I see nothing," she said slowly. "You are nervous from your 
horrid games. Go tell one of the men, that they may be more watch- 
ful. I am nervous myself. Often I hear someone calling me softly. 
Someone" — then the baby wailed, and her face bent low, shaded 
again by her hair as she held the tiny sufferer to her face for warmth 
and comfort. 

Travers stumbled away through the tall grass to where his pony 



MYRA OF THE APPLE PIES 153 

was feeding. He fumbled with the bridle, then silently rode out 
into the night. 

In the solitude of the tangled woodland a man beat over a rushing 
stream. The claim was panning unusually well, but his shoulders 
stooped in a weary fashion, his eye had lost its light, save the gleam 
of the gold-seeker, and about his mouth new lines had formed to rob 
it of its boyishness. Through the leafless branches the first rays of 
the sun fell and played in the water at his feet. He stopped, straight- 
ened and squinted at the sky, "Noon," he muttered. The horse- 
shoe bend of the mountain about Humbug Creek hid it in shadow till 
the day was half over. 

He gathered his washings, then silently kindled a fire, placed a 
blackened pot upon it and moved about preparing the meal, mean- 
while often glancing down the trail toward the gap in the moun- 
tain. Presently a man's form swung into sight, leading a heavily 
packed pony. 

"Hello, Jack !" he cried as soon as he sighted the camp. "I 
thought I must find you here after hunting the town over. What 
possessed you to leave me without a word ? I expect you'll leave me 
alone in the diggings some day without so much as "good-bye,' " 

"No danger," laughed the other grimly, "It is paying too well at 
present," And he passed over to him the little canvas sack, heavy 
with nuggets and "dust." An oath of astonishment broke from 
Sterling's lips and he would have turned at once to the mine, but 
the whinny of his tired horse brought him back to the present and 
its duties. 

As the load was disposed of, Sterling kept up a constant flow of 
comment on the quality of provisions he had purchased and their 
price, furnishing bits of mining gossip he had heard in Yreka. If 
he detected a new note in his companion's voice and manner, or 
rather the absence of the old ring, he made no sign, though he 
glanced at him shrewdly from time to time. 

If there was one person Jim Sterling loved, it was the boy Jack 
Travers, He had been drawn to him first by his reckless daring in 
an Indian skirmish in which they had both figured. Later, the cords 
of attraction were changed to chains of real affection by daily com- 
panionship with one whose sense of humor and cheerful courage 
were so potent. For almost two years they had mined together 
about Yreka, and now upon the Humbug, 

When they had finished their meat and coflFee Sterling produced 
with a great air of mystery a package well wrapped in a home-made 
sack, or poke, of which, to his disappointment, Travers took not the 
slightest heed, buried for the moment in sightless reverie, 

"See here, boy," he chuckled ; "I have something to make your 
mouth water. It took the 'dust' to buy it, but it's worth it. If I 
hadn't been the unselfish mortal that I am, you wouldn't be getting 
a smell now to pay you for your base desertion out there last week 
in the valley. But see !" 

Here he held before the other's eyes a big, old-fashioned, home- 
made dried apple pie, the amber juice oozing thorugh its golden 
crust, Travers caught it and gazed at it. 



15+ OUT WEST 

Every dent and tracing on its surface were as familiar to him as 
the writing from the Httle hand that hade it. His grasp loosened and 
he let it slip, first to his knee, then to the carpet of dead leaves at 
his side. Down went his head on his arms, and, choking, long- 
pent-up sobs shook him. Sterhng's own eyes were blurred as he 
looked away. 

'"Homesick, old chap?" he laughed tenderly in a voice so husky it 
could scarcely be his own. "I declare, it made me so ! Homesick 
as a dog, and I have knocked about so long I had quite forgotten I 
ever had a home. The boys are all wild about them — only one to 
the man — and they stand in line before the shack and watch her 
through the window, taking them from the oven all smelly and hot. 
Lord! you should see her — pretty as a picture — big eyes and her 
hair all fluffy about her face. She makes a pretense of putting it 
back. But it won't stay, no more than her dimples will stay hid. 
She has got a fortune in those sacks she brought clear from Ohio. 
Why, boy, that's your State. Maybe you climbed the very trees that 
grew those apples." 

Travers had not raised his head, but the other saw he was listen- 
ing, breathless. Delighted at his success, he continued : "Seems her 
old daddy died and she had no one left, so she came with some 
friends of hers out here to find a harum-scarum chap that got her 
promise years ago. Not a fellow in camp but has laid himself and 
his 'dust' at her feet. But she shakes her head and thanks them 
that sweet. 'Myra of the apple pies,' they call her. Myra ! That's 
a pretty name," he mused. "I'll warrant that fellow of hers has him 
a squaw down on the Klamath, and a cabin full of little brown half- 
breeds." 

Travers lifted a tense, tear-stained face. "But the baby?" he de- 
manded hoarsely. 

"I was coming to that," spoke the other, failing to marvel at the 
other's knowledge of it. 

"You remember Indian Point, way out in the Butte Creek coun- 
try? Well, as the train was crawling along out there, who should 
they spy but a white man, afoot, and in his arms he carried a tiny, 
half-starved baby. Its mother had died, and he, crazy with grief, 
had left her in the wagon and was wandering about, bareheaded. 
Of course they fed and nursed them, but the fever was in his veins 
and he died the next morning, just as they sighted his wagon, away 
from the trail and the buzzards about it. 

"They buried them there and Myra took the baby for hers. Poor 
little fellow, he flickered out, too, that night at the ford, and — what 
has struck you, boy !" 

Travers had sprung to his feet, shook his shoulders as if to rid 
them of a giant's load, then bounded to where his horse was feeding. 
With feverish haste he commenced to buckle the bridle caught frorii 
the crotch of a near-by tree. 

Hold on !" cried Sterling in alarm. "Stop and have a bit of her 
pie — you haven't touched it." 

"Don't stop me! I am going to her!" 

The bushes swayed behind him, and, closing, shut him from sight. 
Sterling stared after him, speechless. 

Then slowly he stooped, and rescued the precious pie. 

Little Shasta, Cal. 




'55 



SOMi: LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA 
CALENDAR 

By ETHEL GRIFFITH. 
II. 
HE fragrance of orange blossoms thickens the orchard 
air Linnets keep up a constant twittering. Nest- 
building everywhere. Cherokee roses in prime. 

Prickly pear cactus blooming freely. Give me the 
cactus — that indomitable King of the Drought ! It is 
more an intrinsic plant of California than any other. The home and 
larder of the rabbits, in time of famine, and the refuge of quail and 
all small, timid, unprotected folk, who seek its strong barricade of 
thorns with assurance of protection, it sprawls easily over our great, 
bare hills at its infinite leisure, drinking the dews by night and 
catching the sunshine in its blossoms by day. Those creamy flower- 
cups — what distilled and concentrated sunshine they contain ! The 
air about them is heavy with the indescribably strong, ripe perfume 
they exhale. Gnats and flies are apt to seek its enchantment and 
one often finds them in stupors of ecstasy sunk down among the 
stamens, having tasted too freely of the wine of its intoxicating 
sweetness. 

Found Hall Dudley at work in his east pasture as I came up 
through the valley. 

"Good morning," he said, and stopped plowing. 

When people who are employed for themselves are willing to 
knock ofif work for a chat, it is a good sign. Nothing is more ad- 
mirable than a little leisure in aflfairs — it harbors self-respect. Busi- 
ness too often means mere busy-ness. Is it not Euripedes who says 
that "Zeus hates busybodies and those who do too much?" 

I did little more than return his greeting; but he stood still, look- 
ing at me curiously, as if he found me as peculiar a specimen as the 
cactus bloom I was carrying. He has a level, impersonal, quizzical 
glance that is wholly unique, and I have often wondered what he dis- 
covered by it. His eyes are deeply shadowed and give the impres- 
sion of recesses from within which he gazes. It is said that from the 
deepest pits one can best see the stars. His sight goes beyond sur- 
faces, of that I am sure. 

February 7th. 

White forget-me-nots in bloom. Are not white flowers a synthe- 
sis of all hues, containing them all in solution ? They are like great, 
white souls of purity and warmth, whose experiences of many dyes 
are fused at last in the harmonious tone of a strong, white life. 

Chickweed seeded, and the hills a mahogany brown with the seed- 
cases. Humming-birds mating. Their delicate whirr over the bios- 



156 OUT WEST 

soms is like some fairy sewing-machine. They are planning their 
nests and spying out the good locations. There is a fine green-and- 
gold pair seriously considering a home in the honeysuckle of the 
south verandah. I hope they finally decide to take it for the season. 

Mr. Dudley tells me he has a humming-bird's nest in an orange 
tree close by their house. It contains two eggs, very small and 
white — evidently the variety known as Allen's. 

"Old-man" is covering the hills with a delicate grey-green. It 
has put out new shoots below the old dead shafts that remain gaunt 
and ragged from the seven years' drought — the stacked arms of that 
most memorable siege. The new stems shoot above the old stalks 
bravely and with better footing, like strong souls determined "to 
rise on their dead selves to higher things." 

I love, on these warm, soft mornings, to lie on the great slope 
of some valley-fronting hill and to soak in the sunshine. I would 
learn repose of the granite boulders, whose faces are scarred but 
never wrinkled. The rattlesnakes lie coiled and unblinking upon 
their warm tops, and little painted-metal lizards flash iridescent 
in the sun. How soothing to the eye is the grey of rocks and of all 
ancient, weather-beaten things; a neutral color, tolerant of shifting 
light and shade; it gives a repose that harmonizes, blends and sus- 
tains all the rest — a fit background for the gay tones of passing wild- 
flowers. It is the color of things that are meant to last — the sym- 
bol, perhaps, of eternity. 

What moderation we learn from these slow-crumbling, leisurely 
rocks ! Their millenniums of growth, their aeons of maturity and 
disintegration; such seasons of heat and cold, of drought and flood, 
as have passed them by — yet all as lightly as the shadow of a cloud 
floating across the valley. In their sure growth Time enters not, 
for it is not. Duration is only a word, if we were but undeceived ! 

I love them, the rocks — the great, ample, suflicing rocks on whose 
stout hearts I may lie and feel all things come sweet and true again. 
Centuries and aeons pass, and what are they? I do not know that 
they are longer in the sum of eternity than the lark's song, which 
rises from the mist-laden valley to me on my rock of the hill. And 
lying here so close against this gray, hard stone, whose very life is 
yet kin to my own, I do not know that I am younger than itself. 

In the thick weeds at the boulder's foot, one little cricket is sing- 
ing to himself. A shrill, homely, humble little song; he is pleasing 
himself as naturally and unconsciously as a child. I am sure if I 
were quite awake or had ever been awakened I could understand 
what he says; it is near and integral as the blood in my veins. I 
do not think there is the sHghtest doubt but that he and I are one. 

The pungent odor of wild herbs is strangely affecting. A crushed 
bur-teasel leaf; a sprig of "old-man," rolled between the fingers; a 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 157 

bite of caraway ; their strength is of the strength of Nature herself 
and suggests an endless bounty — a perpetual vigor. 

The humble weeds, with tiny, inconspicuous blossoms, whose 
foliage carpets the hills, but whom no one notices or loves ; the little 
delicately formed flowers, each part complete in tiny perfection, 
whom no one sees ; each like the Ijeart of some common man lost in 
the crowd, but true to itself, as Nature ordains, these — I love. Little 
pale alfilerilla stars, so soon bleached ; the tiny yellow blooms of the 
burr-clover; and little, homely, earth-loving plants unnamed and 
unnoticed. 

Bladderpod and loco-weed are in full flower and seeding pro- 
fusely. Their pods are as plump and vivacious as a rooster's wat- 
tles; one would suppose they had a mission in life, they grow so 
confidently — yet everyone dislikes them. The loco is the greatest 
bane of the cattlemen and bladderpod has a vile, gaudy flower, to 
know which is to suspect the existence of sin and a whole moral 
world in vegetable life, such impure, ill-conditioned life as it sug- 
gests. 

February 12th. 

Mrs. Dudley called this afternoon. It takes a long time to get 
acquainted with deep-hearted people, just as it requires more than 
twenty minutes to cook large potatoes, but I do not wish to hurry 
my friendships nor slice my vegetables ; trusting for a finer, mealier 
product from a little moderation and leisure in affairs. 

I am going to enjoy her very much, of that I am sure, although 
I am yet hardly beyond the border-line of her reserves. 

Set the white Wyandotte hen this morning. 

February 14th. 

Last night a frog under my window sang and sang his orison to 
the night and the stars. Such a husky, mellow note ; sturdy and rank 
as the weeds in which he lay, and full of a cheerful courage, as one 
who said confidently to all the world, "It is true ! It is true ! It is 
true!" Like most enthusiasts, his argument was at the last only 
an assertion, but I for one was convinced. I, at least, believed him ; 
and in the end, who is not convinced by sincerity? There is no 
withstanding it. Later, shifting his position and freshening his 
ardor, he sang out boldly and with a note of surprise, "Sure enough ! 
Sure enough ! Sure enough !" We never know the limitations of 
our faith until by wider revelations we rise to firmer levels. I fell 
asleep, his glad recitative in my ears. 

What noble truth cheered his cold heart, sitting there in the damp 
and the dark, that he should shame the devotion of my freshest hours 
by his faith? There may be a health and a dawning to some rare 
souls in the very circumstances that only serve to call down our 
night. 



15S OUT WEST 

February 17th, 

The meadow-lark's song breaks out on these still mornings, like 
the bursting bubble from some hidden spring of melody. I would 
search for the Spring of Song. I think it is the same that Ponce 
de Leon sought to renew his youth — the fountain of immortal vigor 
and perpetual youth. Certainly no lark ever yet grew old. 

I have frequently noticed that the mocking-birds chirp up pleas- 
antly just before or after a rain, at dawn or sunset, moonrise or at 
the bursting of sunlight through clouds. They seem delighted at 
any change on the face of Nature, and hasten, like excited little 
children, to spread the news as fast as they can. 

The jagged peaks of the mountains are obscured this morning by 
a soft mattress of feathery clouds. What a delightful couch upon 
which to stretch one's self, along the tops of them ! Nature is airing 
and shaking up her bolster before settling down for the summer. 
How ample and inviting the Table Mountains look in the white 
light. Whose luncheon were they built to hold? They do not look 
oversized, but are in just proportion to out-of-doors. Men seem 
to creep about at their base. Who will crawl among the gods at 
their banquet, and gather a few crumbs dropped from the summits, 
or a sip of ambrosia, to carry back to the ant-hills of men? 

I have many times suspected California to be the lately inhabited 
abode of the gods. Sometimes I fancy I catch the white of a trail- 
ing robe over the cloud-capped peaks — and who knows when they 
may again return? (Perhaps when we have grown large enough 
to receive them.) The vastness of the plan is quite out of propor- 
tion to our petty occupancy. 

February 23d. 

This evening, at sunset, I was out watching the Arizona arioles 
feeding their babies in a swinging nest woven in the leaf of a palm 
tree; and later wandered on to the west knoll, where, since old 
time, has lived a fine colony of ground-owls. The owls were all at 
their burrows, resting like Adam in the cool of the day and enjoying 
the fall of the dusk. The old ones rumpled their necks pompously 
and courtesied finely, their great, fierce, yellow eyes fairly boring 
through the deepening twilight; but the little ones, after ranging 
up alongside, exactly as if they posed for a family photograph, were 
suddenly smitten either with fear or embarrassment and tumbled 
ignominiously down the hole, leaving the burden of hospitality on 
older heads. 

Continuing my walk to a hill on the west, I stood a long while 
watching the solemn fall of the night over the marsh and the sea. 

Far away over the valley came that lone, wierd, terrified cry, the 
inimitable hunger-call of the coyote. So high and thin and piercing, 
it ripples icily along the nerves, like the cold touch of bared steel, 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 159 

and leaves, as it ceases, a very prick of sound on the aching silence 
of the night. It is like the voice of the one lost and damned and 
I can never hear it without emotion. 

As the dark drew on, the owls began to hoot to each other across 
the mist-filled spaces. Since a child I have always listened to this 
wild, wise, mournful wail of the burrowing owl as to the inspired 
oracle of some holy hermit of the bills. I do not know what it 
means, but it is fraught with all the loneliness that besets the human 
soul, when first it learns the isolation of personality. 

Presently, into the great, empty vault of the sky, like the slow 
entrance of heaven's mighty choristers, a few large, golden stars 
slipped into place; and far away over the mist-capped mountains, 
heralding the approach of that white and magic priestess of the 
night, came the pale, tender radiance of the rising moon. 

February 26th. 

This morning, coming down stairs, I was met at the foot by the 
grinning Chinese cook. He harjded me a covered basket, brought, 
as he explained, an hour ago, and "by a man." Eastern phlegm 
revealed no more and I lifted the cover. 

There, fast asleep, and snoring gently, lay a warm, furry ball. It 
was the shaggy, large-headed kitten of a wild-cat. I cannot see a 
kitten without a thrill — they are as exciting as a colored baby, and 
I instantly snatched him up. He spat and bristled most adorably, 
but my attention was diverted by the discovery of a card on a cord 
around his neck. It read : 

" 'Man tames nature only that he may at last make her more free 
even than he found her.' 

"Keep him, please! He wants to be free." 

It was from Hall Dudley. I shall keep him, but I do not want him 
too tame. And what does he mean by freeing him? 

I shall call him Bacchus, because Bacchus was the most thoroughly 
whole-spirited, unbreakable lad in the whole chronology — and I do 
not doubt he would have been born, like the kitten, in America, if he 
had been given the chance. 

I have pinned the card in a corner of my mirror and shall read it 
occasionally. It rather pleases me. 

Is it true, then, that there is a sense in which untamed nature 
is not free? 

February 28th. 

Such a morning as tempted Proserpine to the meadows, such 
glorious promise is in all Nature. These rare moments of the early 
hours will live forever, and however the echoing dark may shut 
them from our sight, they but follow Aurora, and it is we who are 
left behind. 



i6o OUT WEST 

Nature now expresses her mood in a veritable and most audible 
song of joy. Who can fail to respond to the almost human laughter 
that ripples with a light breeze over the dew-sprinkled, sparkling 
hills, the shade-flecked valleys and the twinkling sheen of the water 
as it murmurs musically against the clean-swept sand? 

Over all is the benediction of the sun, his light, like a living pres- 
ence, pure, warm and delicious over and through all. Sunshine — 
sunshine, clean and white; purifying, revivifying and at last har- 
monizing all into the great theme of the day's Te Deum. 

Who can come suddenly upon a broad field of the little yellow 
daisies, now blooming, without emotion? They are massed so gor- 
geously and on so prodigal a plan, a very cloth of gold, fit covering 
for this land of precious mineral and priceless golden sunshine. But 
ever this gilded flooring reminds me of the unexplored, unsought, 
and unfound riches that miner has yet to uncover. Where is the 
divinely appointed man who shall strike the true mother-lead to the 
spiritual wealth of this land? I see the faint hint and promise of it 
in the far-beckoning and misty horizon. I feel the whispered breath 
of it in the friendly breeze that loiters long ere it passes and linger- 
ing in the tall grasses would leave a meaning and whisper soft its 
secret to some lowly listening ear ; but most of all, in the fathomless 
depths of over-arching blue, there is a wonder and a glory to which 
spotted man may not lift his eyes unrebuked — too full it is of the 
majesty of God. 

"O Earth! thou hast not any wind that blows 
Which is not music: every weed of thine 
Pressed rightly, flows with aromatic wine ; 
And every humble hedge-row flower that grows, 
And every little brown bird that doth sing. 
Has something greater than itself, and bears 
A living Word to every living thing, 
Albeit it holds the Message unawares. 

All shapes and sounds have something which is not 
Of them: A Spirit broods amid the grass; 
Vague outlines of the Everlasting Thought 
Lie in the melting shadows as they pass ; 
The touch of an Eternal Presence thrills 
The fringes of the sunsets and the hills." 

I do not doubt but that California belongs to the Sun. She has 
more sunlight, more warm, white, odorized sunshine than any other 
habitable land. Yet she does not shrivel under a blazing sky, nor 
glimmer mistily through murky heat, but tingles warmly and whole- 
somely under a high, steady, serene warmth and lies white and calm 
under the Sun's great watchful eye. She is the all-prized darling 
of Mars and I think Phoebus quickens his pace a little as he sweeps 
across the Sierra Nevada mountains of a morning. 

National City, Cal. 




i6i 

THE race: for the: sunbeam 

By PAULINE W. WORTH 
HE desert sun, sinking over the horizon, left a glory of 
crimson, turquois and gold, changing as if my magic, 
the monotonous brown of the barren hills to such a 
beauty as defies an artist's uttermost skill. The last 
rays lingered caressingly upon a pile of ore — ore that 
looked as if it were solidified sunbeams, for it glittered and smiled 
back at the sun, seemingly recognizing relationship — ore with riches 
untold, laid bare by the faithful pick of the weary, almost discour- 
aged, prospectors. Gold enough in sight to make a man mad — 
unbounded wealth, which meant the reward of years of privation 
and hardships and the realization of long deferred hopes. 

By the side of this wonderful gift of Mother Earth, stood two 
men — ^the one, upright and compelling, with a steady blue eye that 
could look squarely at any man; the other, stooped and shrinking, 
with a shifting eye that evaded the direct look of his own dog. 

They looked into one another's eyes, each feeling the question that 
was in the other's mind. The taller man spoke first : 

"I guess it's up to us. Hank, what do you think? 

The little man shifted from one foot to the other. "What's up 
to us? Nothing but to cash in a little of this dope we-ve hit, I 
reckon." 

"Now, don't try to retrench, Hank, because that don't go with 
me. You know when you tried to do away with me last winter, 
when you thought you had found the pay dirt, you queered your- 
self for a pardner, and it's been only the fear of this, 45 that has 
kept you decent this long. This little document, signed up by us 
both, is what we go on now. I am willing to give you a square deal 
on it and we'll start tonight. I will just read this over before we 
start. Understand you keep your hand out of reach of this paper. 
If you make a move while I'm reading it, I'll plug you." 

The man sullenly moved away a few yards, while the other pro- 
duced from a buckskin wallet a piece of brown paper, from which 
he read : 

"We, the undersigned, do make this agreement, that when we 
uncover pay ore we will start from this camp at the same time, 
going in whatever direction we choose, and that the first man who 
places upon the dump ten thousand dollars ($10,000) he shall be 
the sole owner of the aforesaid claim. The other party agrees to 
accept the ten thousand dollars as payment in full for his share. 

"Signed PRICE HOWARD. 

"HENRY BASHFORD." 

"I think you understand that all right, Hank. Of course, not be- 



i6z OUT WEST 

ing versed in law, it possibly does not sound as legal, or has not 
as much form as it should have, but I think it will hold without 
any trouble. There is no use to mince matters any, Hank — we are 
pardners, but not friends. There is no need for me to tell you my 
opinion of you. You know what that is. You may be hung some 
day for murder, but never for killing a man in a fight. The man 
who falls from your gun will have the bullet in his back." 

"Guess you haven't much edge to go on. If I remember correctly, 
some ten years ago you wasn't above a little game of chance, with 
a rattle of chips to it, yourself." 

"In this country it isn't what a man once was, Hank, it's what he 
now is. But we are wasting time. It is now half past four — at 
five we leave this camp. I don't know which way you are going. I 
am going to Goldfield. We will both have to walk, but we can come 
back any way that we see fit." 

The men worked silently, covering the ore so recently uncovered, 
making the camp look like an abandoned one. 

Just at five each man swung his canteen over his shoulder and 
faced in opposite directions. Hank called back over his shoulder: 
"Kid, I'm thinking that you'll have a run for your money. I've got 
eight miles the best of you." 

Howard volunteered no answer, but struck out with long, easy 
strides across the desert. Sixty miles against Hank's fifty-two! 
Would he make it ? The months of prospecting, with their days and 
days of walking, were now showing their effect, and mile after mile 
was covered without causing any fatigue. 

The moon rose after a while, drenching in a soft, white blaze the 
stretch of echoless, shadowless waste that lay before, taking away a 
part of the loneliness that enveloped him. Surely he was in a world 
apart, a great recumbent, sleeping world ; not a leaf or twig to 
catch the faint south wind; not a bird, or any living thing to mur- 
mur drowsily at his passing. But, strange to say, the man's thoughts 
were far from the scene before him, far from his treacherous pard- 
ner, and far from the new wealth that was hanging in the balance. 
All these things vanished, as had the colors of the sunset, and left his 
thoughts in a little four-roomed adobe house in the town toward 
which his face was set. There he could see a brown-eyed, brown- 
haired girl, with a sweet wistful face. He was wondering whether 
he dared delay long enough to see her and get one kiss from the 
pure, sweet lips, but he knew that even ten minutes lost might mean 
failure and the strong heart within him decided that his duty lay 
in securing that fortune that he might reward her patient waiting, 
faith and loyalty. 

His muscles grew sore and finally numb until his whole body was 
like some automatic machine that could not stop. The myriad 



THB RACE FOR THE SUNBEAM 163 

indefinable noises seemed to be chanting to him, "Hurry 1 hurry!" 
The sand grew heavy and his feet heavier ; he wondered momentarily 
where he was going — then he remembered and he wondered how 
many weeks he had been walking. Once a coyote barked and it, 
too, said "Hurry !" and he tried to walk faster. 

Reaching into his hip pocket "for his handkerchief, he felt the 
specimens he was carrying in, and the contact with them gave him 
renewed courage. The sharp, cold air struck him, and shivering he 
drew his coat together and buttoned it, wondering why he had not 
thought of it before. 

At last the lights of Goldfield came into sight and his heart leaped. 
Only a few more miles, but each mile now seemed a league. 

On and on he pressed until Main street was reached, then he 
stopped. He pulled out his watch and noted the time. In a dazed 
way he stood watching the second-hand revolving, then he felt a 
friendly slap on the shoulder and heard a familiar voice saying: 
"Hello, Price, old man! When did you get in? How's the pros- 
pect? You look fagged out." 

"George !" His hand grasped that of his friend in an iron grasp. 
"You are the man I have walked thirty miles to see. I need you." 

"All right. I am yours to command. But don't stand here! 
Come up to my office. You haven't been here since this building 
was up, have you?" 

Howard sank into a gratefully luxurious office chair, and imme- 
diately began to tell his story to his friend. When he had finished, 
he said, "Can you get ten thousand dollars for me inside of an 
hour?" 

The serenity of his friend was as unruffled as if he had been asked 
the time of day or to have a cigar. He sat for a moment in deep 
thought and then answered, "I will have to hustle a little, if I do. 
Don't suppose a check would do, would it?" 

"No, it has' to be currency. And for God's sake, hurry! Hank 
has eight miles the best of me, and it's millions at stake — mil- 
lions !" 

"There's a bottle of 'Old Taylor' in the other room ; you'd better 
take a drop. I'll be back soon. Make yourself comfortable." 

The last few words were all but lost on Howard, who was 
already falling asleep. He was aroused in a short time by his 
friend's voice saying, "Here you are, old boy ! A bunch of fellows 
were going into 'Frisco in the morning and I just delayed them one 
day. What they had made a pretty neat jackpot, and it was easy to 
make up the rest. My machine will be here in a minute and you 
can sleep in the back seat. I will wake you up only long enough 
to get directions." 

Howard put the packet of bills on the inside of his friend's shirt, 



i64 OUT WEST 

then gave his hand to his friend. "Thank you, old man, and thank 
you for the offer of the machine ; but there is a possibility of even the 
Jbest automobile breaking down, and there is no possibility of my 
little pinto's breaking down. I'll 'phone to the stable and they'll 
have her ready by the time I get there. You know I left her here 
for — for the use of a friend of mine. I would rather trust to a 
fagged-out horse than a disabled automobile. George, what was 
that you said about a jackpot? Oh yes, I remember. Good bye, 
George! If I get to the Sunbeam first, you're half and half. If 
Hank gets there first, I'll bring this back." 

Down the familiar street, past the Nixon block, with a glance at 
the Palm restaurant, where he had had many jolly dinners, Howard 
hurried. A word spoken in jest burned in his brain, and he 
repeated to himself, "Jackpot." 

A few minutes' walk brought him to the door of the Northern. 
The music and the brilliancy of its lights attracted him — compelled 
him to enter. The months of exile from everything that had the 
semblance of recreation or enjoyment crowded before him, leading 
him to forget for the moment that delay was ruin, and he forced 
his way into a game. He forgot the bed of gold in the desert ; he 
forgot the pardner whose soul was as black as the spades that he 
held in his hand; he even forgot the wistful brown eyes that had 
never been out of his mind for a moment since he had first seen 
them. 

He began to lose and the excitement grew intense. The men all 
knew that he was not a "playing man," and a crowd of onlookers 
soon gathered around. 

Gradually his pile of chips began to dwindle down. The fev.er got 
into his blood, and he grew reckless. Thrusting his hand into the 
bosom of his shirt, he drew forth a thick packet. Throwing it down 
on the table, he exclaimed, "There is ten thousand dollars in bills! 
Now let's see if we can't have a real game !" 

Something about his appearance made the other players hesitate 
as though to decline the challenge, seeing which he spoke again — this 
time with a hardly concealed sneer : 

"Well, I'd never be a quitter, whatever else I was." 

The blood rushed to the face of one of his opponents. 

"Quitter? Hell! I'll just cut the cards with you, best two in 
three, for the ten thousand." 

This time it was Howard's turn to hesitate, but for an instant 
only. Then he begkn to shuffle the cards. 

A few moments later he arose unsteadily and walked out. Once 
more in the open air, with the cool breeze fanning his hot temples, 
he remembered, and with a groan, he turned and staggered down 
the street. His pinto hitched in the block below, whinnied at the 



THE RACE FOR THE SUNBEAM 165 

sight of him. He went up toiler and laid his head against her white 
face. 

"Pinto," he said, his voice choking with emotion, *'you mustn't 
love me any more, I'm not fit for anybody to love, I am a traitor and 
worse. I've heard that we've all got to be fools once in our lives, 
but hooted at the idea; always maintained that a man could always 
be man. God, why couldn't I have gotten mine when it didn't 
matter so much." 

In answer the pony rubbed her nose against his sleeve, caress- 
ingly, as if to say, "You have never been anything but a friend to 
me ; why should I care what you have done otherwise ?" 

In a moment his whole attitude changed He squared his shoul- 
ders, and with his head erect he started at a brisk pace up the 
street. 

At the foot of the stairs of the building that he had left an hour 
before, he stopped; then again squaring his shoulders he mounted 
the stairs and gave a thundering knock on his friend's door. Upon 
receiving no answer he pulled out his watch. Of course, George 
would not be in his office at that hour. 

He turned and slowly retraced his steps. When he reached the 
street, he heard the puffing of an automobile, and to his intense relief 
he saw his friend jump out and rush toward him, 

"Howard, we thought you had met with foul play. We saw the 
pinto still tied down there, and we have been searching all the dark 
comers for you. For God's sake, boy, you are as white as a ghost ! 
What's happened?" 

"Come up to the office and I'll tell you. You didn't look in the 
darkest corner. Don't touch me^ — I'm not fit for anybody to touch. 
George, I've taken my trip up Fool's Hill, all in one hour. I never 
was attracted to the Hill until it meant everything that the world 
holds — then I went up with full steam. I gambled away your ten 
thousand." 

George coolly unlocked the office door and they went in. 

"Is that all?" 

"Is that all? God, man, what more could it be? Isn't that 
enough? After ten years, too! You'd think a fellow could down 
the devil himself in that time. But there's a chance for me to 
make good to you, even though I've thrown away my own chance. 
Hank's reputation is against his raising money quickly — he has 
exploited too many wild-cats." 

Once more pulling out the contract, he read, " 'The first man 
who places upon the dump ten thousand dollars ($10,000) he shall 
be the sole owner of the aforesaid claim.' You see that doesn't 
specify that it has got to be Hank or me — it says 'the first man.' 



i66 OUT WEST 

You can put it on there yourself as well as I can. I'll show you 
the way and the claim is yours." 

George swung his chair around suddenly and looked Howard 
square in the eye. "Price Howard," he said slowly, "some people 
think I haven't the morals that I should have, and maybe I haven't. 
But as low as they might think me or as mean as I might be, I have 
never been known to turn on a friend. I think my credit is good at 
the Northern for ten thousand — I always find them pretty white 
people — and I know my car is good for thirty miles in forty minutes. 
You go and wake up Jack, while I go to the Northern, and he can 
run you out. I'd go myself, but I'm too blamed sleepy. I'll attend 
to the pinto when you're gone." 

Over the same road that he had traveled so wearily a few hours 
past. Price Howard sped in a magnificent automobile built espe- 
cially for the desert roads. 

The chaufifeur who knew every bolt and screw in the machine, 
handled it with a master hand and urged it on and on. With an 
almost human eflfort the machine responded, skimming over the 
sunbaked desert, super-heated by drinking in the heat of ten thou- 
sand summer suns. 

When the last hill was rounded and the camp came into sight, 
Howard leaned forward, clutching the wheel. The sight which 
met his eyes caused him to sink down into the seat with an ashen 
face. A drooping, worn-out horse was tied to the tent-stake and 
Hank was sitting on the dump ! 

Upon the approach of the automobile Hank sat up, rubbing his 
sleepy eyes. "Well," he drawled, "did you get the coin?" 

"No need to ask that — you are here first, and the claim is yours." 

"You are dead right about me bein' here first, but I reckon you 
are mistaken about the claim a-bein' mine." 

"What?" 

"I said that you was mistaken about the claim a-bein' mine, be- 
cause I didn't raise no money." 

"Hank Bashford, you fool with me and I'll kill you. I am in no 
mood for jokes. We will settle up this deal and I will get out just 
as we agreed." 

"I ain't a-foolin', Price ; wish to God I was, but I found that you 
wasn't the only one that mistrusted me. The man I was dependin' 
on was out of town." 

Howard stood as if turned to stone. The certainty that he had 
won, brought up so suddenly against the previous certainty that he 
had lost, stunned him. His senses had undergone a thousand 
shocks and strains within the last twenty-four hours, until they 
seemed impervious to any further emotion. 



THE RACE FOR THE SUNBEAM 167 

Mechanically he held out the bag containing the money. "You 
can count it, Hank, and see if it is all there." 

"Do you say that it is all there?" 

"All I have is my friend's word that it is, and that is enough 
for me." 

"Well, I reckon it's enough for me, too," and, stuffing the bag 
into his pocket, he went on: "I v^ish you luck, Kid! You are on 
the square. Shake. Good bye!" 

Howard watched him walk away, his head down, and a dejected 
droop to his shoulders, and a wave of pity swept over him. The 
night, with all of its horrors, came up before him, and he muttered 
under his breath, "There is so much bad in the best of us, and so 
much good in the worst of us — " Then, coming to himself with a 
start, he called, "Hank, Hank. Just a minute ! I want to say that 
when this mine is sold, you will find one-fourth of the money de- 
posited to your credit in Cook's Bank. The half goes to the man 
who raised that money you have in your pocket. By the way, 
Hank, you'd better not hit out across this lonesome country without 
a gun. Here's mine — take it along." 

Hank gulped. "You'd trust me with a gun and you unarmed?" 

For answer Howard drew the trusty .45 and handed it over to 
Hank without a word. Then, starting toward the tent, he said : 
"Let's have some breakfast, boys! I wonder, Hank, if you'd mind 
staying here while I go to town. There is a — ^a — party, over there, 
whom I haven't seen for a year and I have a little story I want to tell 
to her. Would you mind staying?" 

"I'd stay in an egg shell for you, Kid. But say — I don't want 
more of this thing than you are getting. You take this bag back 
to your friend, and tell him that he's share and share alike with us. 
And, Kid, you might just mention to him that there don't have to 
be no signed contract to that effect, because, from now on. Hank 
Bashford's word will be as good as any man's bond. You know 
in this country it ain't what a man once was — it's what he is now." 

"You're dead right. Hank. We're friends." 

Los Angeles. 

THE treasure: seeker 

By KATHLEEN L. GREIG. 

OH ! rose and gold of sunrise. 
The wide world is my home ! 
Around me the desert sand-sea, 
With sage-brush for its foam. 

Oh! gHtter and gleam of noon sun, 

Like jewel-dust on the trail! 
West-land of golden treasure, 

Your promise cannot fail. 

jOh ! copper and gray of sunset ! 

I close my eyes and dream ; 
Old home beyond the mountains. 

How far away you seem ! 
Redondo, CaL 



1 68 



^ ORLEANS INDIAN LEGENDS 

By MELCENA BURNS DENNY 




VII 
THE MOUNTAIN MAN AND THE ttlLLER 

N THE long ago there were great peaceful giants, 
Mah-rook-alah, the Mountain Men. They lived in- 
side the mountains. Did you ever see any of them 
in your travels? The Orleans Indians still ask you 
seriously what you know of them. It is rumored 
that some of them still live, and now and then an Indian comes 
home who thinks he has seen a Mountain Man, and many of 
them have been near their habitudes. 

Now, at the time these Mountain Men lived shut in their 
mountains, there was a bad man living in the midst of the 
valley whom they called the Killer. He carried big sharp stones 
hidden in his buckskin, and every day he went out and killed 
someone. 

He was too much for even the Coyote to tackle alone. So, 
one day when the Coyote wanted very badly to kill him, he 
decided to go to a Mountain Man and get his help. The Moun- 
tain Man was no fighter, but he was big. "All right," said the 
Mountain Man when the Coyote had told him his errand, 'T will 
go with you to t-he Killer's house." 

So they went to the Killer's wigwam, but no one was home 
except one little girl. 

"Where is your father?" asked the Coyote. 

"Oh, somewhere !" she replied. 

So they went in and waited. 

They waited so long that both grew tired, and began to scuffle 
and jump about. While they were scuffling and jumping about, 
the Killer lifted the flap and came inside. 

"You two had better wrestle," he said to his two visitors. 

So the Mountain Man and the Coyote had to wrestle. But the 
Mountain Man was so big and awkward that he soon had to stop. 

"Now you two had better wrestle," said the Mountain Man. 

So the Killer and the Coyote had to wrestle together. The 
Coyote's coat was so smooth and slippery that the Killer couldn't 
get a grip. Every time he grasped him his hands slid off. The 
Mountain Man watched, and as the Coyote grasped at the Killer's 
coat, he saw the sharp stones hidden underneath. Soon one of 
them dropped. The Mountain Man kept an eye on it. The 
Coyote, too, saw it on the ground, but the Killer was too busy 
wrestling to notice it. The Coyote knew that the stone was 
magical. 



THE BLUE JAY'S DOWNFALL 169 

It was the Mountain Man's turn to wrestle with the Killer. 
He couldn't wrestle very well. But just as the Killer was about 
to dispatch him, the Coyote sprang up with the Killer's sharp 
stone and struck the victor with it on the head. 

"You be that kind," he said, and the Killer was changed to 
flint. "Go home with the Mountain Man and be shut in the 
mountains. Wrestle no more, kill no more, only lie in the 
mountains of Mah-rook-alah, the Mountain Men, and they will 
guard you well." 

So he was shut in the mountains with the Mountain Men, 
where he has been ever since. Only when Indians shape him 
into arrowheads, he still goes killing, and through the valley 
where he once dwelt the arrowheads are scattered. But the 
place where his wigwam stood is grown high with grass, and 
the valley is in peace. 




THE BLUE JAYS DOWNFALL 

T ONE time, the Blue Jay, Cach-a-cach, was a fairly 
honest fellow. But he always had the fault of not 
providing for himself as the other animals did, but 
trusting to presents and his fees as a doctor to get 
along. So he oftentimes went hungry, and was 
always coveting the abundance that others had. 

Near where the Blue Jay lived alone was a very numerous 
family, who were always having a good time. He could always 
hear them laughing while they feasted on hazel nuts and pine 
nuts and berries. No one else ever seemed to have as much as 
they did. They were the Chipmunks. 

But one day one of the Chipmunks got sick, and they sent for 
Cach-a-cach, the Blue Jay, because he was a doctor. The doctor 
danced and sang, and the Chipmunk got better. So the Chip- 
munks gave him a basket full of hazel-nuts. 

The Blue Jay had not had so much to eat for a long time. Oh ! 
how good they were, those hazel-nuts ! He made up his mind 
that he wouldn't cure the Chipmunk completely, in the hope that 
they would send for him again and maybe would give him another 
basketful of hazel-nuts. 

So sure enough, they did send for him again, and he danced 
and sang and almost cured the Chipmunk, and sure enough they 
did give him another basketful of hazel-nuts. But next day the 
Chipmunk had a second relapse. 

They sent for Cach-a-cach three times, and gave him three 
basketfuls of hazel-nuts. Then, when the Chipmunk was still no 
better, they grew suspicious and sent away oflf for another doctor. 

This second doctor was the Humming Bird. He came to the 



170 



OUT WEST 



Chipmunk's house and doctored and danced and sang, making the 
Chipmunk well. But this is the song the Blue Jay had to listen 
to: 



ij 



;» 




± 



-iHJ^ 



UjIjjjL 



-h^ 



Cach-a-cach mo-wan-ich ! Ani-ani-a-nee ! Wood-o-hotee Kiddi- 

[ishow 
Blue Jay doesn't help ! Doctors and doctors ! Keeps thinking, "I 

[wish I had 




-U J 



'Srv 



Sip-as-is Kon-tow-pun ! 

A basketful of hazel-nuts !" 

He sang so long that everyone came by and heard what he was 
saying. So after that everyone knew that Cach-a-cach the Blue 
Jay wasn't an honest fellow, and that he was a greedy doctor. It 
is to be supposed he didn't try to keep up appearances any longer, 
after the Humming Bird had told on him. At any rate, he is only 
a common thief today, though he has had plenty of centuries to 
reform in. 



W 



WHERE WOULD I BE? 

By JOHN VANCE CHENEY 

HERE would I be? 

Where the black pine sighs between the bowlders, 
Where I can watch the sea-birds, 
Where I can smell the sea; 



?• Where, with the day, 

•"^ The deer get up, and sniff the hill-wind. 

Where the quail scratch in the open. 
And bobbing rabbits play; 

Where, growing gold. 
The gray dawn shivers on the ledge-rocks, 
And shadow sprawls, at noontide, 

Round brown boles old and old ; 

Where peaks, at morn, 
Put on wild yellow of the light; 
Where the stars, on blowy midnights. 

Swing like the tasseled corn. 

Newberry Library, Chicago. 



171 




Every public library has to make head against more or less inertia 
of ignorance and selfishness. Some, beyond an occasional trustee 
who "don't see no use in buying reference books, nohow," and the 
daily clamor for the latest novel, have the plague of demagogues. 
A few cities in America condescend to "Library Wars." 

The Los Angeles Public Library really has a non-partisan Board,* 
and far less than its share of inconsiderate patrons. But in the his- 
tory of the United States there has probably never been another 
"Library War" so discreditable to intelligence, so preposterous and 
childish as we have had. It isn't fair, however, to dignify it by a 
military name. It takes two sides to make war, and the Library 
wasn't the other side. It has been calmly minding its own business 
(which is the public business), saying nothing and fighting nobody, 
but vastly improving its service. 

Possibly this forbearance was a mistaken policy. In any event, 
some time patience ceases to be a virtue. As the people of Los 
Angeles are mostly adult and sane, it is perhaps time that they be 
shown precisely the source, the motives, and the meaning of this 
persistent yipping at the heels of a public institution which stands 
next to the public schools in its educational value. It is a curious 
exam.ple of how much easier it is for two or three persons to injure 
their community, if they try, than for many thousands to help it in 
the like degree if they don't try. 

This Library serves a population of 250,000 — and better in pro- 
portion to its means than almost any public library in the world. 
The statistics printed in this magazine for September, 1906, and 
others in the i8th annual Library Report (now in press), show 
that we rank in the forefront of American public libraries. Yet this 
institution, of which good citizens are proud, has been bedeviled at 
home ; and the city, as well as the Library, industriously scandalized 
abroad — on, by and for the account of less than half a dozen persons, 
for motives of revenge or ambition. I do not mean for an instant 
to belittle the honorable and intelligent people (numbering in all pos- 

•As to profession, two lawyers, one doctor, one merchant, one real estate 
and insurance agent. As to politics, two Republicans, two Democrats,, one 
Non-Partisan. As to religion, one Jew, one Unitarian, one Catholic, one 
Episcopalian, one Christian Scientist. 



17^ OUT WEST 

sibly as many as one-tenth of one per cent, of the adult population) 
that have been imposed upon in their finer feelings by the lamentable 
whisper of conspirators too smart to show themselves at all. Nor 
have I any fault to find. All of us are more or less liable to have 
our judgment warped by gossip. The older we get, however, the 
less we should allow ourselves to build on the quicksand of tattle. 
The three worst foundations in the world for life, policy or public 
duty are jealousy, a grudge, and a guess-so. 

It certainly cannot seem that I am swift to wrath, or stirred by 
personal grudge — of this, eighteen months' patience under vulgar 
assaults and secret defamation from certain sources should suffice 
to acquit me. Without any intention to do so, I may have "turned 
the other cheek also." What I say now is simply for the sake of 
the institution and its utility to the whole public. It seems time that 
the city understand the ridiculous facts in the case — for the Three 
Tailors of Tooley Street are not a circumstance. 

* * * 

After a long and exhaustive judicial inquiry, in which both sides 
were represented by attorneys, and subpoenaed witnesses, and had 
full swing, the City Council unanimously sustained the Library Board 
in its action of June 21, 1905 — the change of librarians. The legality 
of this action was undisputed. The investigation absolutely ac- 
quitted the Board of improper motives. 

But by a singular coincidence, whenever a local newspaper breaks 
in a new reporter, he discovers "trouble in the library." One cherub- 
faced young man has come to me for explication of no less than seven 
diflferent "troubles," for all of which I referred him to the annual 
report of 1905. Ten months back is hardly fresh for eggs or a 
daily. The grown-up newspaper men and the respectable newspapers 
long ago discovered the futility of these False Alarms ; it is only the 
novices who discover (or are discovered by) "library troubles" that 

Aren't So, 

* * * 

The coyoteing of the library for nineteen .months is incited exclu- 
sively by and in the interest of two persons ; one a librarian dis- 
charged some eight years ago for cause, and one troubled employee. 
The only politics that have been done in or concerning this library 
since I have had cognizance of it have been done by these two 
persons and their friends and the people they have beguiled.* 

This is the only party that for a year and a half has been pulling 
strings and laying pipes and putting up jobs in the City Hall, in 

*Though indeed the question of Women's Eights has been a factor. My 
glad revenge here has been to establish the first suffrage for women in any 
pulilic library anywhere, or in any public institution in any city in Cali- 
fornia (the Library Senate). It works as well as the most ardent- suffrag- 
ette hooes general suffrage for women would work everywhere 



IN THE LION'S DEN 173 

women's clubs, and in the personal ear. They are the only ones 
who have raided, haunted, beleaguered and besought Mayors, Coun- 
cilmen and other city officials, and business men and reporters. 
Theirs is the only side that is doing these things now, in a subter- 
raneous attempt to pack the Board of Library Directors for the sake 
of "reforming the library." Whether they would "reform" it back 
to the City Hall, and to the hopeless old bookkeepings, and the hun- 
dred other incompetencies the new growth has left behind, I do 
not know. They are the only side that has studiously, steadily and 
vindictively tried to incite insubordination in the library staff. In 
this they have had the dissatisfaction of absolute unsuccess. With- 
out any effort on the part of the Librarian to do anything except 
to secure faithful service and reward it with fair play, the common 
sense of this staff has brought it to almost absolute unanimity of 
loyalty to the institution — to an extent which never existed here 
before. The petty persecution to which many of our young women 
attendants have been subjected by these conspirators has had an 
effect opposite to that desired. Even so with the public. There are 
fewer and fewer who credit the malicious gossips. The best citizens, 
and those who most use the library, are aware that it is still not 
perfect, but that it has made enormous strides in convenience, in 
usefulness, and in character — and that it is growing in all three. 

Absurd as it may sound, these conspirators have not only tried to 
discredit the library at home, and resorted to forged letters sent 
broadcast in the name of the library — they have procured to be 
mailed to other American cities and libraries the foolish falsehoods 
they have caused to be published in inconsiderate periodicals here. 
They have worked, and are working, to rob the city of the library 
building which almost any American city of this size already has; 
against procuring for Los Angeles the annual convention of the 
American Library Association for which half a dozen larger cities 
are now pulling the strings. 

I may be mistaken in my concept of a public library as an institu- 
tion supported by all the people for all that will use it, and in pro- 
portion of the importance of their use. I may be mistaken in think- 
ing that those who for personal revenge, or for ambition, or for 
political preferment, or for money, or for notoriety, or for misplaced 
sympathy, attempt to cripple an institution which serves the minds 
of nearly 3,000 citizens a day, are not themselves practicing the 
highest duty of good citizenship. But I hope to die with these 

mistakes still on top in my head. 

* * * 

The most persistent and most unpardonable of these attacks oft 
the Los Angeles Public Library (rivaled only by a pink evening 
Penny Dreadful) have been made by a local weekly of the "Town 



174 OUT WEST 

Topics" type,* and known as "The Graphic' The editor is R. H. 
Hay Chapman — a person who might be of some utiHty to the com- 
munity he digs a living from if he knew how, or cared. He was 
the first and easiest victim of tattle, and for nineteen months has 
steadfastly fyced the Public Library. Of every paragraph he has 
ever printed about this institution, I am willing to undertake to prove 
the essential falsity and folly. His besetting weakness — after his 
guillibility and his lack of judicial sense — is the British calm with 
which he adjudicates a universe he knows only by smatters. To any- 
one who has ever seen an English butler in full flow of solemnity, no 
more need be said. 

For instance, a few weeks ago Mr. Chapman had violent remarks 
to make about "the arbitrary and insolent action of Dr. Lummis in 
ordering the library kept out of the telephone book." I did not 
order it kept out. That order was given by my predecessor for 
excellent reasons. For that matter, the library never has been "in 
the book." 

Mr. Chapman finds serious fault with the number and variety 
of the periodicals in the library under my charge. He is blissfully 
ignorant that they are now not only far greater in number of copies 
and of titles than ever before, but that they are now accessible to 
readers, as they were not when I took charge. I found the foremost 
fifty titles withdrawn from circulation — simply because too many 
people used them ! 

In a labored editorial, under date of July 21, 1906, when he had 
had more than a year to accommodate his mind to its first interest 
in the public library (which interest began with a chance to abuse 
me), Mr. Chapman solemnly urged Reform — in opposition to some 
straw-man whom he imagined to have asked that the library be 
closed on Saturday afternoons, like other departments of the city 
government. My space is more valuable than his; but what is 
quoted from him is quoted to the letter : 

"If its hours are to be modified, the library should be opened on Sunday 
instead of closed on Saturday afternoon. ... I know that this state- 
ment will rouse the extreme Sabbatarians, but that makes no difference. 
Los Angeles is gradually becoming emancipated from the domination of 
Puritanism. . . . The newspapers spread their Sunday horrifiers before 
us; the street cars run; the beaches attract; the theaters are open; base- 
ball is played; the "Sunday restaurants" are taxed to their utmost capac- 
ity; many stores are open; the cigar trade flourishes. But if a man 
. . . wishes to read a book, the puritan idea rules and says nay. The 
library, which should be open, is closed. . . . The bofik-seeker may not 
care to hear a sermon that day — many sermons preached in Los Angeles 
are hopelessly dull or are the product of second-class brains. But the 
book-lover is denied the treasures of literature that day. He can go to a 
"Sunday restaurant" but is denied the library. Open the doors." 

*I do not by this definition insinuate cash blackmail. An editorial in 
these pages a few months ago covered this matter generically. The 
category is of weeklies that live on and by back-door gossip. 



IN THE LION'S DEN 175 

This would be an excellent innovation now, if it had not been made 
before the year 1889, and operative ever since. This is as wise, as 
truthful, and as public-spirited as any suggestion or statement Mr. 
Chapman has ever made about the Public Library since he has dis- 
covered there was one. 

But perhaps the choicest jewel of*the gentleman's interest in, and 
knowledge of, the library and of books concerns one of the greatest 
accessions the library ever had. It also concerns that Library Di- 
rector on account of some personal grudge toward whom Mr. Chap- 
man is now attempting to blackmail the community; is threatening 
that unless the Mayor does a certain thing, the Graphic will not 
allow this city to have a library building, nor the library to be left 
unbedeviled, and so on. In conversation with one of the foremost 
attorneys of this city, Mr. Chapman said of this Director: "Yes, 
he is a good fellow, and a good Director, but awfully bigoted. He 
is filling up that library with Papist trash. Why, he's ordered 
sixty volumes of Jesuit Relations at $3 a volume!" Sir Oracle 
had never heard of the greatest historical work in America. The 
Jesuit Relations are not "Papist books," but the first record of the 
pioneering of the Mississippi River, the Great Lakes, Canada, and 
the Northern United States. 

Following his first wanton attack on the Public Library, Mr. 
Chapman was personally oflFered the record. He decHned it. He 
has never once looked for the facts. In the presence of more than 
half a dozen prominent citizens he recently assured me that the 
Public Library "would have to follow the advice of the Graphic." 

Maybe it will. 

* * * 

If there ever was a case of rank ingratitude in any community, it 
is the treatment given in the last year and a half to the senior 
member of the Library Board (in point of service). This institu- 
tion in its 35 years has enlisted the time and thought of many of 
our best citizens, and of many who are personally dear to me. 
Without any comparisons whatever that touch their personal qual- 
ities and endowments, it is the cool fact that Mr. Dockweiler has 
done more for the Public Library than any other man in the city; 
simply because, along with faithful service, he has given his time 
to it for much longer than anyone else. He knows more about the 
library than any other director or ex-director that I have encoun- 
tered — as should be expected from his experience, covering in all 
more than eight years. His knowledge has been invaluable not 
only to me but to the other members of the Board during my admin- 
istration of the library. He is not only active, but initiative — and 
always liberal. A vast majority of the reforms and advancements 
ever made in this library were made while he was a member of 



176 OUT WEST 

the Board, and with his support — even down to the fundamental 
matter of dividing the Hbrary into departments. As I had the brunt 
of the campaign to escape from the City Hall quarters, of which 
every librarian and every Board had helplessly complained for seven- 
teen years, I am entitled to state the fact that while all the Board 
were helpful in this basic reform, the library would still be in the 
old rat-hole if it had not been for Mr. Dockweiler. 

While I agree with him neither in politics nor in religion, and 
while I cannot imitate his charity, and while it is not the "diplomatic" 
thing to do, I should not have done my duty as a man if, at the 
close of his term, I did not record the fact that, having known this 
library fairly well for a good many years, and knowing it still better 
now, I believe it owes more to him than to any other one person; 
and my conviction that not one of those who have actively attempted 
to injure the library ever did so much for this community in any 
function whatever, or in all functions put together, as he has done 
in this. 

And yet because selfish interests of place, or of fad, or of revenge 
enter into these things, any man who gives his time for a public 
utility may expect to be coyoted by those who have no other interest 
in public aflfairs than what they can "make out of it" in money or 
revenge. This one man has been singled out for lynching by gos- 
sip — his associates (all of whom are respectable, responsible and 
successful citizens) being complimented with a declaration that they 
are "hypnotized" by him. The Dockweiler Myth has grown in pre- 
cisely the same way that an ogre myth grows among Hottentots, and 
as myths grow everywhere among innocent minds. A man widely 
known for professional integrity and for the uncommon cleanliness 
of his personal and family relations, he has been secretly attacked 
even as to decency. I am not sure that any woman ever told a lie. 
It is a recognized scientific fact that a certain type of the dearest 
feminine minds do believe anything they would Like to believe; 
therefore it is not a lie when a lady tells things that are Not So. As 
a matter of fact, a considerable number of lovely, virtuous, intelli- 
gent, refined women in this city have uttered more untruths in this 
library matter in a year than a trained chorus of mere male liars 
could tell in a decade — and with the added effectiveness of their 
own deep-seated conviction. If they ever learn what they have really 
done, they will never forgive themselves. 

Nothing is easier than to make a child afraid of the dark — and we 
are all more or less susceptible as to the things we don't know. A 
Carlyle can convince us intellectually of heroes whose initials we 
forget; but a wanton nurse-maid can erect an ogre to haunt us 
forever. 



IN THE LION'S DEN 177 

About a century ago a certain class of English nurses used to 
scare their peevish babes into a state of coma by promising to "bring 
Napoleon right over to eat you up." Very much in the same way 
a few people, who have hired themselves to nurse the public as to 
the library, have created Mr. Dockweiler as Bogie — the "Politi- 
cian," the "Trouble-Maker," the "Arch-Conspirator," and heaven 
(and the infant class) knows what not. Seven or eight years ago 
this Director assisted Directors Earl Rogers, Wm. M. Garland, E. K. 
Foster and W. F. Burbank to discharge an incompetent Librarian. 
The Board was unanimous. Of course to the person discharged 
this was, and could be, nothing but "politics and conspiracy" on the 
part of the Board. This is the whole basis of that shudderable tra- 
dition of "politics in the Los Angeles Public Library," which has 
not only been used to discredit this institution at home ever since 
1900, but has been carefully broadcasted by the same persons to the 
American Library Association and its official publication, to the 
public shame of the city. So persistent was this that practically 
every distant library publication in America has commented on 
"the bad record of Los Angeles in the corruption of its Public 
Library." I feel safe to say that none of them will ever so comment 
again — for they are sane publications, and they have found out how 

egregiously they were imposed upon. 

* * * 

As to this library, I have given it, and am giving it, my heart, my 
time, my strength, and my few faculties. Since the day I took 
charge of it, I have not taken time to do any literary or historical 
work — not one article — though my market is not only good but 
urgent at five cents a word. I have not been able to advance by a 
page any one of the six books which were nearly done when I took 
the library — any one of which could have been finished for the pub- 
lishers in one month by half the daily work I give the library. I 
have not been able to keep up, half the time, the hour of outdoor 
exercise any man needs who works so long at a desk, nor even to 
have reasonable time with my family. Nobody sees me at theaters, 
or concerts, or lectures, or social functions, or resorts, or in any 
one whatsoever of those proper diversions to which even city offi- 
cials are entitled, and of which I am fond — not to say baseball and 
football games. Probably smarter people could do both work and 
play. I cannot ; and since I took the library as a trust, though un- 
willingly, it has been given the preference. 

The Los Angeles Public Library is in better shape than ever 
before, both from the intellectual and the business standpoint. It 
is better in its quarters (the size, the quality, the ventilation, the 
hygiene, and the comfort of them), in the safety of its stock, in its 
accommodations for the public, in its usefulness to readers, in the 
spirit of the staff, in its bookkeeping, in its figures, in its activities, 
in its standing in the profession — than it ever was before. It is 
very far from perfect or content. God forbid that it should ever 
get so good that earnest effort cannot make it better. But it is 
"inching along." The i8th annual report, which is now in type, 
and will be sent to anyone on application free of cost, sets forth 



178 OUT WEST 

something of the reforms that were needed and have been made in 
the last sixteen months — and something of reforms still needing to be 
made. 

There is probably no other man in California whose death would 
leave so deep a sorrow upon the State, and the sense of loss so keen 
among so many good citizens of so many kinds as George Montgom- 
ery, Archbishop Coadjutor of San Francisco, and formerly Bishop of 
the Roman Catholic Church for the diocese of Los Angeles and 
Monterey, who passed from this life untimely last month. 

Bishop Montgomery came to Los Angeles at a time when precisely 
such a man was most needed in his role. He did more, probably, 
not only for his own faith, but for human tolerance and good fellow- 
ship and good citizenship, than any other one man has done in Cali- 
fornia. The absurd and un-American A. P. A. fatuity was at its 
height here, and nowhere in the United States was there the religious 
tolerance which seems now permanently founded among us. Mont- 
gomery was precisely the man for the difficult situation. A gentle- 
man, a scholar, and a patriot; simple as a child, absolutely without 
thought of self, broad and tender in his sympathies — it was a very 
short time before he had captivated a city in which his church had 
before been left to its followers. It was a strange event then — and 
is one of my happiest memories — that a decade ago I brought this 
Roman Catholic Bishop and the Episcopalian Bishop (Johnson) to 
sit side by side on the same platform, and to talk and work earnestly 
and in harmony for the same cause — the Landmarks cause. 

This will seem insignificant only to those who did not know the 
situation as it was. It is one example of the man whose death is a 
loss to the whole State. There was no good work of this community 
in education, or civics, or charity, or religion (regardless of creed) 
in which he was not helpful and of weight ; and as a man and friend, 
he is mourned as deeply by men of other faiths and of no faith at 
all as by those whose spiritual guide he was. God rest him — and 

give us more of his kind ! 

* * * 

Mexico has many scholars ; but she lost the dean of them when 
Alfredo Chavero died — and for that matter, the world lost one of its 
greatest Americanists. Those who never saw him will be grateful 
for the competent work he did for scholarship and the knowledge of 
our own hemisphere; those who have visited Mexico in the inter- 
national conferences of various scientific bodies, or known it more 
intimately otherhow, will feel a personal grief at the demise of this 
most courtly and learned and lovable old man. His literary gift was 
also of a high order; and his hospitable home was a treasure-house 
of art and history. It is a question if he was not the most distin- 
guished man in Mexico, next after his staunch friend, the wonderful 

Diaz. 

* * * 

It is foolish to be cynical under any circumstances ; and even 
when a High School commencement, with its sweet girl graduates, 
and blue-ribbon parchments, and sea of fluff and feathers, and general 
stage-setting (more nearly resembling heaven than most of us are 
ever likely to see again) has passed like a good dream — even then, 
it is a fool pessimist that will wonder what in thunder they really 



IN THE LION'S DEN 179 

learned in High School anyhow. What's the odds? They doubt- 
less learned at least as much as was good for them. If they didn't 
learn "too many things that ain't so," let us all be glad. Particularly 
is it to rejoice that most of them came through the four years without 
indigestion ; and were still happy, healthy, rosy and light of foot. 

It's a long way, however, between cynicism and fun ; and even the 
victims were able to see the humor (or part of it) of a recent test 
of their knowledge. Those who could not perceive the joke were 
the ones who failed to pass. There is no singular reflection upon 
them, since the graduates of our greatest colleges are found as igno- 
rant of as many things ; but it is worth while to be laughed at now 
and then, if we can avoid being laughed at the second time for the 
same thing. 

In examining nearly a score of High School graduates who applied 
for position in the Public Library, it was evident that the frequent 
complaint of educators that college men did not know enough about 
English literature and American history and other common furnitures 
of the mind, is of application outside the colleges. 

Some of these young ladies, ambitious to be attendants in the 
largest Public Library in the West, were themselves surprised at 
what they did not know. One asserted that the greatest California 
humorist was "Marcus Whitman" — and she might have h< n pro- 
moted for that one answer, if Whitman could be held responsible 
for the people who have since insisted on making him "save Oregon." 
Another was sure that Leigh Hunt and Walt Whitman were the 
"gfreatest California poet and humorist" respectively. Others thought 
that "Truthful James" was written by Jerome K. Jerome, and 
"Roughing It" by Bret Harte, or J, T. Trowbridge, or by Bayard 
Taylor. One thought that Mark Twain had written some poems, but 
never heard that he wrote a book — didn't even know that he was 
"funny," One classified John Brown as "a half-breed who caused 
a raid," Another rated Tecumseh as "a famous Indian Chief, friend 
of the Pilgrims," Witte came out in one paper as "a famous EngUsh 
General in the Boer war;" and Carnot as "one of the Ministers of 
War after the French Revolution in Napoleon's time." Several 
could not name any work whatever by Drake, or Halleck, or Willis, 
or Aldrich; and one, in answer to a request for the four greatest 
poets in English literature in the last fifty years, could name only 
Ella Wheeler Wilcox. Called upon to name two Puritan and two 
Cavalier poets, nearly all candidates went without a Cavalier alto- 
gether, and gave for their Puritans Whittier and Bryant and Cotton 
Mather. Several had never heard of Decatur, Daniel Boone, Commo- 
dore Perry, Alexander Stephens, Senator Tom Benton ; and several 
could not name a battle in which Stonewall Jackson was implicated. 
The question, "Name the four great religious orders of the Middle 
Ages?" brought out some astonishing answers — e. g. "The Roman 
Papacy, Luther and Wesley;" "Roman Catholicism, Greek Catholi- 
cism, Protestantism, Mohammedanism." It is less surprising that 
hardly one of the lot knew the correct name of this city or could 
give its population in 1880, 1890, 1900, and the present estimate. 
These things they will all have to learn who passed the examination, 
even with conditions; and as for the rest — thank God we all have 
time to learn according to our desire. 

Chas. F. Lummis. 



i8o 







TO 



(lNCORF»OFlATeD ) 

MAK.C BETTER. INDIANA 



! 



Se-quo-ya, the American Cadmus" (born 1771, 
died 1842), was the only Indian that ever invented 
a written language. The League takes its title from 
this great Cherokee, for whom, also, science has named 
("Sequoias") the hugest trees in the world, the giant 
Redwoods of California. 



NATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
David Starr Jordan, President Stanford University 
Geo. Bird Grinnell, Ed. "Forest and Stream," N. Y. 
Clias. Cassat Davis, Los Angeles 

C. Hart Merriam, Chief Biological Survey, Washington 

D. M. Riordan, Los Angeles 
Richard Egan, Capistrano, Cal. 
Cbas. F. Lummis, Chairman 



LOS ANGELES COUNCIL 
Prkstj Rt. Rev. J. H. Johnson 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Wayland H. Smith (Sec. of the Council) 
Miss Cora Foy 
Mrs. Arturo Bandini 
Mrs. J. E, Coleman 
Chas. F. Lummis, Chairman 




Advisory Board 
Mrs. Phebe A. Hearst, University of California Treas., W. C. Patterson, Pres. Los Angeles, Nat'l Bk. 

Archbishop Ireland, St. Paul, Minn. Dr. t. Mitchell Prudden, Col. Phys. andSurg'np. N. Y. 

Ex. U. S. Senator Thos. R. Bard, California Miss Alice C. Fletcher, Washington 

Edward E. Aycr, Newberry Library, Chicago p. W. Hodge, Smithsonian Institution, Washington 

Miss. Estelle Reel, Supt. all Indian Schools,Wa8hington Hamlin Garland, author, Chicago 
W. J. McGee, Director St. Louis Museum Mrs. F. N. Doubleday, New York 

F. W Putnam, Peabody Museum, Harvard College Hon. A. K. Smiley, (Mohonk), Redlands 
Stewart Culin, Brooklyn Inst. George Kennan, Washington 

Geo. A. Dorsey, Field Columbian Museum, Chicago 

HE Third Bulletin of the Sequoya League is now 

in press, and will soon be mailed to all who request 

it, (address Wayland H. Smith, Secretary, 1006 S. 

Hope Street). This reviews the work of the 

League, and gives a roster of its members. 

A large number of the baskets made by the Campo Indians are on 

sale by Mrs. Lummis, 200 East Avenue 42, The League purchases 

all these baskets for spot cash, and sells them for the benefit of the 

Indians. 

Special Agent Kelsey, who has been appointed by the government 
to carry out the provisions of the Act for relief of the Southern 
California Indians, is carefully investigating lands which might be 
purchased in place of the shamefully worthless "reservations" now 
occupied by several of these groups. Mr. Kelsey is a Californian, a 
lawyer, and an honest and wise man. He knows Indian conditions, 
and land values, and other things. People who try to swindle the 
government and the Indians in this case will be left out at the start — 
even as the Warner's Ranch Commission warned all persons offering 
lands for sale that any attempt to hold up the government would 
eliminate their property from consideration, no matter what its merits. 
Most people took this warning seriously, A couple of ranch-owners 
did not — and were deeply grieved when the Commission refused to 
hear them at all. They came back afterward, begging for a chance 
to sell at half what they first asked. 

Funds for thb Work 

Mrs. Mary A. Forman, Los Angeles, $4. 
Elizabeth W. Johnson, Pasadena, $2. 



i8i 




LAM0MARK! 




-^^ 



marmKtvtr' 



TO CONSERVE THE MIS- 
SIONS AND OTHER HISTORIC 
LANDMARKS OF SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 



THE Landmarks Club shares with the community a hard loss 
by the sudden death (in Japan) of John G. Mossin, its treas- 
urer and one of its directors. A man without the suspicion 
of self-seeking anywhere in him. he was one of the quiet forces 
that make a city strong. His position in the banking world was of 
highest trust, but he never lost that delicacy of artistic taste nor of 
business conscience wjiich has so often been of public service in 
his many relations as a good citizen. 

The club has double cause for mourning, since among all its un- 
selfish workers the most tireless, the most devoted and the most ef- 
fective one has been the noble woman thus suddenly widowed in a 
far land. 
The following resolution was adopted : 

Re it resolved by the Directors of the Landmarks Club that we realize a 
deep and grievous loss in the death of our associate and treasurer, John G. 
Mossin. As citizen and man he was of distinct value and credit to this com- 
munity ; and his services to this Society in its work for the public good have 
earned permanent gratitude. 

Be it resolved further that we convey to her whose loss is greatest, the 
widow of our friend (and herself a most indefatigable worker in the Land- 
marks cause), our heartfelt sympathy. 

A most worthy work in the preservation of landmarks has been 
undertaken by the public-spirited women of Whittier, who have 
organized for the preservation of the old and historic mansion of 
Pio Pico, the last Mexican Governor of California. With the senti- 
ment and the business sense, which make the best kind of public 
spirit, these ladies propose to secure, repair, and maintain this in- 
teresting structure, which is one of the last of the characteristic 
adobes : and they will very likely make it also a local museum. 

The Landmarks Club is assisting in this work by a considerable 
contribution of money and by expert direction of its architects. 

Funds for the Work. 

Previously acknowledged, $8728.50 

New contributions: 

$1 each — Chandler Parks Barton, Los Angeles ; Anna Schneller. Prairie 
du Sac. Wis. 

Received from Salmons & Batchelder rent rooms at Pala, $72 to April 
I, 1507. 




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•83 




« LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA 

By JOHN BRUCE MACCALLUM. 
N San Diego County, California, there is a little village called 
El Nido — the nest. On the map it is named La Jolla, but 
to me it is always El Nido ; for, like the nest of a sea-gull, 
it is built on the edge lOf the cHflfs, and the waves roll and 
crash against the rocks beneath it all day and through the 
night. It is never quiet there, for on the calmest days the 
surf still comes pounding over the crags to break against the solid rock a 
hundred feet below the village. At one place, where the cliflfs are not so 
sheer, the houses have crept timidly down almost to the water's edge. And 
against the windows of these houses the spray, on a stormy night, drifts 
Hke fine rain. They say that those who live there sometimes awake in the 
night and are afraid, for their dreams are filled with the terror of the sea. 
Most of the people of the village have built their homes on the top of the 
cliff, and there one finds a straggling row of cottages. At each end the 
single wide street ends vaguely in the gray sagebrush of the plain, which 
rolls back like a frozen sea to the hills in the distance. Here, beside one 
another, there are two worlds — the cliffs with the salt spray and the roar 
of the sea, and just beyond them the plains with their endless brush and 
their dusty sunshine. Between these worlds lies La Jolla, like the sea-gull's 
nest, between the sea and the sky. 

The ordinary tourist comes seldom to the village, and when he does it is 
with an air of expecting little. He comes by a train which makes no pre- 
tensions — one of the queer little side-lines that wander off to interesting 
places — and he passes through fields which promise him nothing. He alights 
at the little station with the tang of the sea in his nostrils, and he straightens 
up with a full breath of the salt air. Scattered palm-trees in the village 
give a certain vague sense of comfort, but he turns always to the roar of 
the surf, and stands on the edge of the cliff to watch. With the surge of 
the waves in his ears, he climbs down the steep side of the rock and stands 
on the gray stone shelves that barely escape the water at high tide. There 




A La Jolla Street 



184 



OUT WEST 




Goldfish Point, 

is a strange fascination for him in the swirling currents that follow the 
retreating breakers ; there is a new sense of terror and delight in the 
crash of the waves at his feet. Already the witchery of the place has 
seized him. He finds a shelving rock dryer than the rest and sits with his 
chin in his hands, looking and listening, with all the music of the sea sinking 
into. his dreams. 

No one knows why he stays at La Jolla ; no one can tell you why he 
postpones his departure from day to day. Perhaps the sea could tell, but 
the sea hides well its secrets. Sometimes the fog comes in, cold and damp, 
like a great ghost arisen from the sea. You see it rolling toward the shore 
like a live thing, reaching out with great trembling arms, stretching out 
long, vague fingers, until you feel it touch your face. It wraps you about, 
and its cold breath sends you shivering to your fireside. Then you say 
to yourself that you will go away, back to your work, or on to some 
warmer place. But the next morning the sun shines hot overhead, the 
fog is gone, and the rocks and sand are dry and warm. The leaves of the 
palm-trees move lazily in the sunshine; the hills stand out clear against the 
blue sky ; the waves are more beautiful than ever, and — you stay. 

If you are an invalid, and the cold lands of the East and North have 
cast you out and sent you drifting westward and southward, you may creep 
like a tired bird into the nest, and in the warm sunshine listen to the 
unending song of the sea. Perhaps in its various tones may be interwoven 
even the voices of some that have been left behind. Memories stir 
easily in the shifting tones of the sea music; and, half dreaming, you may 
make what song you will. If the tyrannies of love and medical science have 
ordered you south, you may find La Jolla a nest warmed by the sun and 



LA JOLLA 



'85 




La. Joi.la 



Photo bv Slocum 



perched in the safe hollow of the cliff, where you may cast aside for a 
time the weariness of the world. 

If you look down from the water's edge at a pool where the waves do 
not come, you see gold-fish moving here and there. Sometimes you catch 
only the gleam of red and gold as they scatter in confusion to escape some 
great hsh which swirls in among them with sinister purpose. You see 
strange shell-covered creatures fastened to the rocks. You see, perhaps, 
a crab creeping awkwardly sideways just under the water ; you could easily 
touch it, but you wait and watch its beady bright eyes, and its queer jointed 
legs. Suddenly it disappears in a crevice of -the rock, and very doubtfully 
you roll up your sleeves and feel for it. You pull your hand out in a sort 
of brief panic, suddenly wondering what other live things might be hidden 
there. 

At low tide the sea shrinks away and leaves a new world clinging to the 
ooze-covered rocks — a world of soft, trembling creatures strange to the eye 
and stranger to the touch. There is left stranded, as it were, the whole 
great world that lives always in the swing and the swirl of the under- 
currents. Unfamiliar creatures these are, strangely adapted to their sur- 
roundings, so different often from those animals which you know, that you 
can imagine a Caliban to say that the things on the earth God made, but 
these came otherwise. 

Sometimes there appears a little band of seals leaping and playing in tie 
sunshine, or a school of porpoises, or one or two jewfish. There is such 
evident joy in their movements, such easy control, such pure delight in 
life, that there comes to you a certain sense of envy. After all, you can 
only look on at this marine world ; the delightful lack of responsibility 
which these deep-sea creatures seem to possess is a thing apart from your 



OUT WEST 




AlIvIGator Head, La Jolla 

life ; you are merely a spectator from 'the dry land ; you are a prisoner in 
the air, just as they are prisoners in the water. But the envy is short-lived, 
and in the end you shiver at the thought of life as it must be in the darkness 
and silence of those swirling currents of the deep-sea levels. There is 
something grand and heroic in the existence of life amid such gigantic 
movements and forces ; but the vagueness and horror of it are irresistable. 
Even in the peace and quiet of La Jolla there comes, too, the terror 
of the sea. A storm that has gathered strength from the limitless sweep 
of the Pacific strikes the sheer walls with terrible force, shaking them to 
their foundations. Above the roar of the wind there comes, too, the deeper 



^^■j 


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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Bl^^^^^^^^ 






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The La Joli.a Ci^iffs 



LA JOLLA 



187 




"" ' A Daring Divk at La Joi la 

thunder which the waves make as they crash into the caves and hollows 
of the shore. The whole great anger and force of the sea may fall upon 
the rocks, but after the storm is over La Jolla will still lie quietly smiling 
in the sunshine. One remembers it always as a sun-lit, peaceful place where 
the waves are large only to make the sea more beautiful, and where the 
wind blows only to bring the cool sea air. And to you who have come to 
love its rocks and waves, there will always be the desire to return. Some 
time when the world weariness is more than you can bear, when life seems 
a complex thing, you will drift back again out of the great world to La Jolla, 
to listen to the sea, to wonder at the strange beings it harbors, and to find 
rest in that sun-lit spot which lies like the sea-gull's nest between the sky 

and the sea. 

* * * 

This is one man's opinion of La Jolla, the home-like little town by the 



OUT WEST 




TORKEY I'lKES, NEAR La Joi.I.A 

blue Pacific. Come and see it for yourself and give us your opinion, for 
if you come, La Jolla will gain a friend. 

What is the charm of La Jolla? Why does its steady growth continue 
and increase from year to year? La Jolla holds within itself the answer. 
Come and read it in the wonders of sea and sky, hill and field with which 
Mother Nature has endowed La Jolla, the Gem. 





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The Ark," La Joli.a 




Triumph 
o/ Art and ^ood Taste 



Out West Magazine Company 

CHAS. F.LUMMIS, President J. C. PERRY, Secretary and Treasurer 

C. A. MOODY, Vice-Presidetit and General Manager 

PUBLISHERS OF 

OUT WEST 

r.^- Av. J CHAS. F. LUMMIS 

tdued by ^ CHARLES AMADON MOODY 



Entered at the Los Angeles Postofflce as Second-class Matter. 



yi J._^__|.l^:_. _' Usit^c will be cheerfully furnished on application, and con- 

■* "•'^^'^* llollig IvalCd . . tracts accepted on a positive guarantee that, rates and 
circulation considered, the OUT WEST is cheaper than any similar publication in the United 
States. Special discounts allowed on 3, 6 and 12 month contracts. Rates of cover-pages and 
other preferred spaces (when available) will be named on application. The publishers re- 
serve the right to decline any advertising not considered desirable. 

Size of column 2i/^x8 inches — two columns to the page. Last advertising form closes on 
the 15th of month preceding date of issue. Advertisers are earnestly requested to Instruct 
as early as the 5th whenever possible. 

Subscription Price . . 

any other country. 

All manuscript, and other matter requiring the attention of the editor, should be ad- 
dressed to him. All letters about subscriptions advertising or other business, should be ad- 
dressed 

OUT WEST MAGAZINE COMPANY, Los Angeles, California 



$2.00 a year delivered* post-free to any point in the 
United States, Canada, Cuba or Mexico. $2.75 a year to 



COVINA 



'A City Amid the 
Orange Groves" 




Picking Oranges — A Typical January Scene 

Covina is situated on the Southern Pacific railroad and the new Covlna line of 
the Pacific Electric, in the center of the world famed San Gabriel Valley, in a thickly 
populated neighborhood, has first class Grammar and High School, six churches, two 
national banks and savings bank, live newspapers, hotels, good stores, Carnegie 
library, ladies' and men's club houses, electric lighting and power, gas and telephones 
and finer roads for automobiling than any other town or city in the United States. 
Abundance of pure water and the~ finest orange groves in the state. The place for a 
home, the place for investment. 

Hourly trolley car service frith \jOti Anselett. Running time thirty-flve luiniiteM. 
For further information write to Board of Trade, Covina, Cal. 



fo' 



''llj^^^^^^save the boat facto y'« 
 *^ ^^r Dig profit and the cost of la- 
bor. J I,,? II amateurs — manv 
as inexperienced as you — built 
UiAis last year by the Brouks System 
r>f exact size patterns and illustrated 
nst ructions. 

M3^':f\\ Catalog Rivrs 

^/^ ^^\ \ lumplcte infor- 

^■■^ ■^W' mation about 

buildmg boats, all kinds and sizes — Canoes 
— Sailboats — Rowtx»ats and Launches — 
quotes prices on patterns — knock-down 
frames with patterns to finish and complete 
knock-<lown t)oats ready to put together. 

REDUCED PRICES. PaHemi of all Rowboiti and 
Cano««. Sl.M) lo $2.00. Launchet and Sailboat* 
2t ft. and pndrr, $4 to ift. From 21 In 30 It.. In- 
clusive. SS.OO to $10.00. 




Our imttorn!* ntut the 
iiiiilcrials cost but .1 trifir 
('iiiii|Mir<-<l with II f.'ictorv 

llUlll iMMlt. Silt isllllt Kill 

iiraiitofd or riioiicy 
i-fiiiKitMl. mm't full 
lo ^i-ikI for < iitaloK. 



Kuiir 



fROOK^ 



The 

serving pieces 

here illustrated are the 

equal of sterling silver in de- 

aiid finish. Add to this the 

ilily of 

"1847 ROGERS BROS." 

^^^■^ ".Si/rrr J'lale That Mrari." 

and the result Is the best silver-plate that 
money can buy. Sold by leading dealers. 
Knives, fork), spoons, etc., to match. 
Srtiil for Calalogne "8-39" showinc: 

lal.sl <|.>,i(,rtlS. 

MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO.. 

MiRIDIN, 
CUMN. 



BROOKS BOAT MFG. CO. 

tu.i .1 lk« r.tl'tn ll)M'at '.r K...t lli,.l4.>t 

HUp sirrr*., Sastiiaw, Mirk, l. M. A. 





Lea & Perrins' 
Sauce 

Tbe Original 

Worcestershire 



For Seventy Years the Favorite 
Sauce, throughout the world, 
for Soups, Fish and Gravies. 

Beware of Imitations! 

JOHN DUNCAN'S SONS, Azenti, ITew York. 



Free Engineers' —" I Free Engineers' 

l^eport I Report 

Send Your ^lame 
^ At Once ^ 

We are on the ground at Goldfield. We have special 
representatives in all the prominent mining camps of Nevada. 
We get news of all the important strikes and can advise our 
clients when to buy to make a profit. 

We Send You Free Our 
Nevada Market Letter 

Gives an unbiased view of the doings in Nevada mines 
and stocks. If you are contemplating the purchase of Nevada 
mining stocks, our market letter and advice will assist you to 
select good paying investments. 

Also complete, reliable information about the money- 
making camps of Nevada, where fortunes are being made bv 
investors who either visit the mines personally, or receive 
accurate reports about stocks and the condition of the diflferent 
mines by experts who are on the ground. If you are an 
investor and have personally visited the Nevada mines, you 
will be interested. If you have not seen the mines personally, 
our advice as experts on the ground may put you on the 
right road to success and the selection of safe profitable 
investments. 

Stimler, Higginson & 
Company 

Mine Owners and Brokers 

Rooms 5, 39. 40 Nixon Block Goldfield, Nevada 

Nevada Market Nevada Market 

Letter Free ' Letter Free 



ONE FOR. YOU! 

''Goldfield Gossip' f"^t 

EVERYBODY ^ ^ EVERYBODY 
READS IT! ^ ^ LIKES IT! 

WJ T\ f , t Foi" OCTOBER . . 5,000 /^ ^ 

W e r rinted ^^^ November io,i60 (.OOICS 

Vy ^ A lllltWVI. p^^ DECEMBER J5,200 ^^^y^l^^O 

And We Have One Copy Free for You 

Issued twice-a-month on 1st. and 15th. 10c a copy. $2.00 a year 

FREE! FREE!! FREE!!! 

You be the judge. You decide. Which of these two opinions is 
correct? Here are two editorial opinions: 
From editorial in Goldfield Tribune, Oct. i6. — 

"The entire magazine is conceived in such poor taste and so disjointed 
is the execution that it suggests rather random ravings than the sober 
effort of a talented man." 
From editorial in Nevada State Journal, Reno, Oct. 14. — 

"Gossip's" thirty-two pages fairly sparkle with interesting matter that 
runs the entire gamut ifrom grave to gay, and all written in a frank, 
sprightly style that is truly refreshing." 

"At times 'Gossip' is so startlingly frank as to make one gasp." 

WHO IS RIGHT? 
Here you have the honest opinions of two bright and independent 
newspapers. Which is correct? 

FREE TO YOU 

Upon receipt of a postal saying, "Send me sample copy of "Gossip" 
free. Then you will be able to judge. 

Remember: Gossip is not a House Organ, or a Promotion Sheet. It 
is a live, genuine Magazine, anxious to help along ALL NEVADA by tell- 
ing the facts about our wonderful camps. 

Gossip is [or 'will be] on Sale "I f^^^ 

at all Newsdealers XV-^C 

The Free Offer quoted above must be taken advantage of at once 
Address on a postal. 

««/^^^^; »» BlocK 21, Goldfield 
OOSSip Nevada 



> 



The Answer is in Our 
Market Letter 



Free for the Asking. Write for It 



LET US TELL YOU IN OUR MARKET LETTER THE STORY 

OF NEVADA'S MINES. 
WE ARE MAKING AND HAVE MADE MORE MINES THAN 

ANY OTHER PROMOTION HOUSE IN THE COUNTRY. 
OUR ENGINEERS ARE IN EVERY SOUTHERN NEVADA 

GOLD CAMP. 
WE INVITE YOU TO BECOME A SHAREHOLDER IN SOME 

OF OUR MINING ENTERPRISES. 



estor 



Patrick, Elliott & Camp, 

Incorporated 

CONSERVATIVE BROKERS AND 

MINE MAKERS 

Home Office, Nixon Block, Goldfield, Nevada. Eastern Office, 6 Wall 

Street, New York, N. Y. 






Will You li^°Z Wonder? 

Diamondfield Jack Davis, The Man 
Without a Failure^ 

Known throughout Nevada and the Ufiited States at large as one of. the most 
successful operators in the mining world today. Those who have followed him m 
the past have made fortunes. He is the owner of and has developed more producmg 
mines than any other one man in Nevada. 

His Famous Diamondfield Mines 

Are known throughout the land as among the richest in the Goldfield District. His 
discovery and acquisition of this rich mineral section was characteristic of that 
marvelous mining acumen which has since won him recognition as one of the 
greatest mining experts of the day. It was this discovery that made him famous in 
Goldfield history as "DIAMONDFIELD JACK DAVIS." 

Mr. Davis was the original locator and owner of the well-known QUARTZITE 
MINE, which, under his management, produced over $500,000 within the first year, 
and which was subsequently merged with the BLACK BUTTE MINES, forming 
the Diamondfield Black Butte Consolidated. He was one of the original owners of 
the DAISY MINE, the stock of which was put on the market at 15 cents and has 
since sold as high as $6 per share. As the owner and gjeneral manager of the 
DIAMONDFIELD TRIANGLE MINE, he has made that property one of the 
most attractive and profitable investments in Goldfield and in the past three months 
this stock has netted its fortunate holder a profit of 850 per cent. Besides these, he 
was the original owner of the GOLDFIELD BELMONT, GREAT BEND ANNEX, 
GOLDFIELD EUREKA and numerous other great Goldfield properties. 

Follow Him in Wonder 

The new and wonderfully rich Mining District situated eighteen miles north of 
Fairview. Already high-grade shipping ore has been opened up in thirty different 
places — a showing that even eclipses GOLDFIELD at a similar stage of develop- 
ment. 

The great property of the District, the NEVADA WONDER MINE, was 
located on the 26th day of May, and less than four months later was purchased by a 
syndicate of Philadelphia capitalists headed by John W. Brock, of Tonopah mining 
fame, for a cash consideration of $300,000. TODAY THE MINE IS VALUED AT 
TWO AND A HALF MILLION DOLLARS. Properties in the immediate vicinity 
of the Nevada Wonder Mine, such as the LAST CHANCE, JUNE WONDER, 
MAE, DAISY WONDER, JACK POT and others, have since been sold for enor- 
mous sums of money — $700,000 being paid for the JACK POT MINE alone. 

A report reaching Goldfield some weeks ago of a rich strike on the Daisy Won- 
der property, adjoining the Nevada Wonder Mine, Mr. Davis, with a party of 
.prominent Goldfield mining men, immcjliately left for Wonder, and after a thorough 
examination purchased a heavy interest in the mine. This great property has been 
incorporated as the 

DAISY WONDER MINING CO. 

Capital stock 1,000,000 shares, par value $1.00 per share. 400,000 shares in the 
treasury, full paid and forever non-assessable. 

For Fvirther Particulars Apply to 

Davis, WKeeler & Co., Inc. 

Mine Owners and Operators 220 Main St., Goldfield, Nevada 

Our Special Nevada Market Letter Free. WVite for it. 





It gives a full description of all work being accomplished among the Standard 
Mines. Also a sjmopsis of operations on The Goldfield Mining Stock Exchange, 
with List of Quotations. Send for it. 



IN RECOMMENDING TEIE PURCHASE OF ANY PARTICULAR 
MINING SECURITY, WE DESIRE TO STATE THAT WE MAKE A 
PERSONAL INVESTIGATION OF THE MANAGEMENT AND CARE- 
FULLY EXAMINE THE MINE BEFORE REFERRING THE SAME 
TO THE CONSIDERATION OF OUR CUSTOMERS. 

TO AVOID ERRORS WE ALSO KEEP AN :EXPERIENCED 
AND EFFIEFIENT CORPS OF MINING ENGINEERS, WHO ARE 
CONSTANTLY AMONG THE MINES, TESTING ORE BODIES AND 
CLOSELY WATCHING THE TREND OF THE VEINS. 

IN THIS MANNER WE ARE IN A POSITION TO GIVE THE 
MOST RELIABLE INFORMATION ON NEVADA STOCKS AND 
MINES THAT MONEY AND EXPERIENCE CAN PURCHASE. 

SHOULD FURTHER INFORMATION BE AT ANY TIME 
DESIRED BY THOSE WHO WISH TO INVEST IN MINING 
STOCKS, WE PLACE OUR SERVICES AT THEIR DISPOSAL AND 
ARE PERFECTLY WILLING TO AFFORD . ANY KNOWLEDGE 
THAT LIES WITHIN OUR POWER. 




B r o K e r s 

Members of the Goldfield Mining Stock Exchange 
Goldfield, Nevada 



William J. Brewer 



INCORPORATED 



Members Goldfield Mining 
Stock Exchange 

Listed Nevada Stocks Bought 
and Sold on Commission 

Orders from Out-of-Town Ex- 
change Brokers Given Care- 
ful Attention 

Engineers^ Services for the Ex- 
perting of Mines Furnished 

Investors Reports on Proper- 
ties Supplied 

New York and San Francisco 
Connections 



^^^ William /. Brewer 

GOLDFIELD. NEVADA 





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ines and 
StocKs 



A AVORLD o/ MONCY 

is being made by investors in 

NEVADA ^ 

A.re yo\i getting your share? 

Mining properties developed. Listed stocks bought 
and sold. All inquiries carefully answered from 
definite information. Member Goldfield Mining 
Stock Exchange. 

The latest map of Nevada, published to sell at one 

dollar, will be sent free on request. Ask for it today. 
J. C. McCORMACH. 

Goldfielcl _ _ _ _ Nevada 



Ihe 

Kenneth Donnellan 
Company 



INCORPORATED 



Stock Brokers 

Members San Francisco StocK and 
ExcKan^e Board 



XonopaH, Goldfield, Bullfrog, 
ManHattan and Green-wrater StocKs 

TKe ONLY broKerage 
House in Nevada Hav- 
in^r a direct PRIVATE. 
W^ I R E between Gold- 
field, TonopaH and San 
Francisco. 

OFFICES: 

Goldfield, Nevada Tonopah, Nevada 

561 California Street, San Francisco 




OFFICERS: 

Judge H. F. Bartine President J. R. Dortch Treasurer 

Maj. W. A. Stanton Vice-Pres. T. E. Enloe Secretary 



H. F. Bartine, 



W. A. Stanton, 



T. E. 

DIRECTORS: 

N. H. Truett, 



T. E. Enloe. 



J. R. Dortch, 



The above named gentlemen with one exception are the ofificers and directors 
of the Mohawk Leasing and Development Co., operating the "Truett lease" on 
the famous Mohawk, which paid the largest dividend ever paid by any company 
in Goldfield in the same length of time, namely loo per cent on the original 
investment in the space of four months. They are also the officers of the 
Greenwater Black Jack Copper Mining Co. The stock of this company was 
placed on the market less than sixty days ago, and has now been withdrawn 
from the market. You may rest assured they will not oflfer anything to the 
public that they do not believe to be a good investment. 

Write to the Secretary for full information, maps, etc., of the Goldfield 
Nevada Kimberly Mining Co. 

T. E. ENLOE, Secretary 



Box 616 



GOLDEIELD, NEVADA 



W. H. Whitmore Bert L. Smith 

W. H. Whitmote 
& Co»  

Mining StocKs and 
Insurance 

BOX 214 GOLDFIELD, NEVADA 



Representative Weir Bros. & Co. New York 

John S. Cook & Co., Bankers 

GOLDFIELD AND RHYOLITE, NEVADA 

Capital - $250,000.00 

FULLY PAID 

General Banking Business Transacted 



GEORGE S. NIXON. President 

GEORGE WINGFIELD, Vice-President H. T. COOK, Assistant Cashier 

JOHN S. COOK. Cashier 1. J. GAY. Assistant Cashier 



East ComstocK 
..Wonder.. 

The best buy in Nevada at 15c per share 

The East Comstock Wonder Mining Company owns two claims 
in the heart of the Ramsey District, and will be ranked with the 
producers at an early date. Assays have been taken that give 
returns of $600.00 to the ton. Strikes of rich ore are being made all 
around this property, and thousands of dollars have been offered 
for the adjoining claims. 

Will be snipping Ore 
^^ Within 30 Days ^^^^ 

The East Comstock Wonder Mining Company also own the 
Dana Claim situated six miles southeast of the Comstock Lode. 
On the property there is now piled up thousands of tons of ore, 
and during the month of November shipping will be commenced. 
The ore runs from $6.00 to $300.00 a ton. Arrangements have been 
made whereby the milling ore can be handled at $2.50 a ton, so 
you can see this property will pay from the start. Put in your 
order before the stock is listed. It would double inside of 30 days 
if listed now, but our allotment of 100,000 shares has to be disposed 
of before this can be done. We are selling this stock rapidly. Send 
us your subscription without delay. This is positively the best 
stock on the market at 15 cents a share. 

THE G. S. CLACK 

BROKERAGE CO., Inc. 

GOLDFIELD, . ... . NEVADA 



Don't Invest In 



GOLDFIELD 



Don't invest in Greenwater. Don't invest in any 
Nevada security until you know what you are doing. 
Ascertain the facts always before investing. I have 
been personally in Nevada for nearly three years 
and am familiar with all the leading districts. I 
have representatives in every camp throughout the 
entire state. 

You can keep thoroughly in touch with the mines 
and the market of Nevada by reading my 

MARKET 
LETTER 

which is issued weekly and sent ABSOLUTELY 
FREE upon request. My clients are making tre- 
mendous profits. Why not you? Get in line for 
profitable investments. Write me today. 

G. S. Johnson 

...BroKer... 

Goldfield, . . . Nevada 



L. M. Sullivan Trust 
Company 

Paid-Up Capital . . . $250,000 

L. M. Sullivan, Pres't. 

Goldfield, == Nevada 

We are the Promoters, Fiscal Agents and Transfer Agents 
of the Following Winners: 

Stray Dog Manhattan Mining Co. 

Jumping Jack Manhattan Mining Co. 

Indian Camp Manhattan Mining Co. 

As You Like It Manhattan Mining Co. 

Eagle's Nest Fair view Mining Co. 

Fairview Hailstone Mining Co. 

Lou Dillon Goldfield Mining Co. 

Silver Pick Extension Mining Co. 

Furnace Creek South Extension Min- 
ing Co. 

Great Bend Consolidated Mining Co. 

WRITE FOR OUR NEVADA MINING 

SECURITIES REVIEW, /^ree on Request 



Current News Free 



Nevada Mines and Market 

REGULAR. WEEKLY LETTER. 
Treating of All Nevada Camps 



Our MaiKng List: I^rTt^e^^I^L? 

Ask for Qur weekly market letter* 

Ask for our private telegraph code* 

Ask for data or advice on any mine 
or stock* 

It is all cheerfully furnished free on 
request* 



M^e are Members of tHe Mining E.xcKan^es of 
Goldfield, Reno and San Francisco. 0\ir referen- 
ces: any banK in SoutKern Nevada, tHe American 
National in San Francisco, R. G. Dun & Co. 



W. F. BOND (Sb COMPANY 

The Oldest Established Brokerage Business in 
GOLDFIELD, NEVADA 



^^ 



For 


Information 


N 


Regarding 


^ .... . 




Nevada 

Gold 

Mines 

WRITE 


• 



t^f t^^ t^^ 



Ernest Kennedy & Co. 

Mining BroSiers 

Goldfield, ManKattan, 

Nevada 



^. 



J 



We Are On The 

Ground 



And are in a position to know exactly what is doing 
in this wonderful camp. If you own any stock in 
Southern Nevada write to us. We have an expert 
Mining Engineer whose duty it is to investigate 
any and all properties; we pay this man a hand- 
some salary and you can have the benefit of his 
experience. If you will take the time to write to 
us we will be pleased to have our Engineer make 
you a detailed report on any property in which you 
may be interested. We will also be glad to answer 
any questions regarding Goldfield, and will take 
lime to furnish the most accurate information. 
Write us if you are interested. 



J. C. IQnd Company 

INC. 

Goldfield, . . . Nevada 

I\ind Building 

Members — Goldfield Mining Stock Exchange. Reno Stock 
and Bond Exchange 

Reference — Any Bank in Goldfield 



$1,000,000 




^/^ $1,000,000 
E6« 



We own and control over one million dollars worth of real estate that is for 
sale and we will loan you at 6% net almost enough money to buy any of our lands. 
We will sell you a small tract and plant the same, and cultivate until it comes into 
bearing, at a reasnoable price. Below is a plat of one of our choice tracts. 





COUNTY 




ROAD 


12 


n 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


t 




5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4.9 


5 


5 


5 


4.94 




Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 




13 


14 


\5 


J6 


J7 


J8 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4.90 


5 


5 


5 


4.95 




Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 




COUNTY 


ROAD 


30 


29 


28 


27 


26 


25 


20. 1 1 Acres 


20.31 Acres 


20.53 Acres 


20.59 Acres 


20.94 Acres 


21.04 Acres 



THE OAnS 



Commonly Rno^wn as 
©6c Bro-wrn Xract 



situated one mile east of Visalia, Tulare County, California, is the NEW COLONY 
placed on the market February ist, 1907. 

It is a conceded fact and all agree that this is the choicest body of land ever 
placed on the market in Tulare County. Some of the lots in this beautiful tract 
are covered with magnificent Oaks, the value of which is very great, being orna- 
mental as well as being a landmark for which Visalia is famous. These trees if cut 
into wood, would make thousands of cords, and if sold at present prices would pay 
for the land, at the prices we are asking. 

We have received a great many inquiries from people in our own city regarding 
this tract, which alone is a guarantee that it is very choice property. 

The prices on these lots will be given on application, and they are very 
reasonable and will be sold on easy terms. So, if you want to make the best buy 
you have ever made, you had better call or write us at once or it will be too late. 

Golden West Real Estate Co., Visalia, Cal. 



r 



A 




UNIVERSITY CLUB OF REDLANDS 

Buy a Stop-Over Ticket to Redlands, Cal. 

You will not enjoy to your fullest your stay in Southern California unless you give a week 
or two at least to the great orange growing belt, of which Redlands is the commercial 
and scenic center. Any railroad will sell you a stop over ticket good for ten days, so it is 
no longer necessary to rush through this most delightful section. Redlands is a city with 
good hotel facilities with a counlry club, a splendid public library and all the other at- 
tractions that appeal to tourists. Magnificent drives lead through the canyons and hillsi 
from which the most magnificent scenery of this end of the state can be seen. (Give 
yourself :he pleasure of making a stay in this delightful spot.) 

For information address Roard of Trade, Redlands, Cal., or any of the following: 
WIlllamM-CnrtiB Co., Real HJatare. John P. Fiak, Real Kittate. 

ci;« r.::^r^\^r^, •»• W. Jenk.n«, Eleetnoa. Contractor. 

J. J. NauKbton. '^' •*• Davenport & McLaln, Contractors. 

RedlandM Abntract & Title Co. Geo. S. IllKKin. Heal Edtate. 

Dike & LoKle, Real Estate. D. M. Doniild. Contractor. 

Jobn P. IIlKbt, Jr., Real ENtate. Mutual OranKe DlHtribu tor«. Fruit 

HIU CreHt Inn. Sbii perM. 

Palm Confectionery, E. R. Cawe. John IlIodKett, Lii err. 

Anderson &, Asher, Real Rstate. Redlands Fruit Association 

Austin &. Clark Co., Real Fstnte. J. C. Reeves, Hay &. (irnin. 

Redlands liaundry Co. 1^. B. Huntinf^ton, Contractor. 




iU.sr^^-!'' 



R*atonable Rat** 



HOTEL CASA LOMA Excellent Accommodations 




Residence of HUTCHISON BROS. Paradise Valley 



on San Diego, 
Bay 



National City, Cal, 

.Five miles from the business center of San Diego, an ideal residence suburb. It 
is now being connected with the electric street railway, electric light and gas 
systems of that city. 

Fruitful orange groves and lemons of the best .grade supply an important citrus 
trade. Peaches, pears, plums and other deciduous fruits ripen to perfection. 
Write for booklet to Secretary BOARD OF TRADE or any of the following: 
Peoples State Bank, G. W. DeFord, Hay and Grain; A. E. Williams, Grocer; Paradise Valley 
Sanitarium, Hutchison Bros, Frank A. Kimball, Real Estate; San Diego Land Co., E. M. Fly, 
M. D. ; M. K. Campbell, Phil C. Bauer, J. G. Fleming, Orange Grower; T. R. Palmer, Attorney; 
L. Butler, Hardware; E. B. Leach, Lemon Shipper; Theo T. Johnson, M. D.; National City & 
Otay Railway. 




Oxnard 

The 
Beautiful 

The Home o f 
American Beet 
Sugar Company 
(Founded 1898) 



Hotel Oxnard, one 
of California's pop- 
ular Hotels 

Has now 3000 population. Located in Ventura county, 66 miles from Los Angeles, in the best 
farming district in the state of California. Every business known to first class California towns is 
represented here. No property bought and sold for speculative purposes, and property is today worth 
par value. Water works, electric light, two telephone and telegraph companies, two banks, best of 
schools, good churches. 

For further information address SECRETARY BOARD OF TRADE, or any of the following 
well known firms: 

American Beet Siigrnr Co. Hill & I^aubnclier, Real Estate and Ins. 

Ventura County Power Co. Oxnard Furniture & Plumbing Co. 

Oxnard I-ivery & Feed Stable. W. R. Norton, Oxnard Ne^vs Agency. 

I<ehinann Bro«. S. E. Vaughn, Jeiveler. 

Robert Green, Barber. 



Earlimont Colony 




Tulare 

County 

California 



A Land of Opportunity 

A Land of Promise 

Earliest Section 

Of California's 

Early Belt 



EIARLIEST 

That's What Counts 

Earliest Oranges 
Earliest Grapes 
Earliest Figs 
Earliest Olives 



Quickest Returns 
Extraordinary Prices 



Gathering the Earliest Oranges in the 
State near Portersville. 



EARLIEST VEGETABLES 
EARLIEST DECIDUOUS FRUITS EARLIEST SMALL FRUITS 

South of Portersville, earliest part of Tulare County. Rolling uplatid. At base 
of Sierra foothills. No killing frosts. No scale. No smut. No diseases. No 
heavy winds. A beautiful landscape. Responds to landscape gardener's art. Pure 
air. Unsurpassed climate. Remarkably healthful. Well located. Abundant cheap 
Water. Virgin soil, extremely rich. Close to railroad. Near to mountain camps 
and resorts. Splendid hunting and fishing grounds in easy, reach. 

riRST SUBDIVISION— TO THOSE WHO W^ILL IMPROVE 

Earlimont Colony Co. will care for property of absent owners. Land with water only 
$50.00 per acre. Purchasers given benefit of land at about one third usual price in 
preference to other modes of advertising first subdivision. Large tracts for sale for 
subdivision. A crop of early vegetables will pay for land first season. Orange 
groves begin to bear second season and increase rapidly each succeeding year till they 
net from $300 to $600 or more per acre. Good grammar school already on property. 
Store, postoffice, telephone, etc.. will soon be established. A flourishing town soon. 
Electric roads in near future. Get in early and avoid the rush. 

Address all communications to WM. A. SEARS, Portersville, Tulare County, Cal. 




On a Solid Foundation . . . . 

Huntington Beach is not the product of frenzied real estate 
operators and blatant advertising-. Its future is not problematical — 
it is ASSURED. It will be the shipping center for millions of 
dollars worth of products. It stands at the threshold of the vast 
citrus fruit belt and the world's greatest celery fields. „ 

AND MORE=— — 



It is a delightful seaside resort, with the backing of a wealthy 
agricultural district. Ocean Avenue, one hundred feet wide, three 
miles long and lined with palms and cement curbs and walks, 
is the finest marine speedway in the Southwest. Capital, energy 
and enterprise on the part of substantial business men have 
MADE Huntington Beach. Big profits have been made — bigger 
profits ARE TO BE MADE by investors. , ,„ 

From Los Angreles only 32 miles, less than an hour's ride. 
Take Pacific Electric cars at Sixth and Blain Sts. Lios Angeles. 

Huntington Beach Company, ''LK!'* 

First National Bank J. F. Glenn Co., Orange County Real Fstate 
Seely & Gillespie, Real Fstate Huntington Beach Tent City Co. 

The Hub Investment Co., Real Fstate Pacific Tours Co. 

J; W. Toms, Ivy Restaurant F. H. Hopewell, with J. E. Glenn Co. 
Leatherman & Talbert, Real Fstate M. F. Helme, Furniture 

Liincecum & Thompson, Livery Moncton & Cummings Realty Co. 
Geo. F. Phelps, Livery and Furnished Rms. W. C. Smith, Butcher 
Geo. M. Miller, Plumbing c. T. Ingersoll, Carpenter and Builder 



^^^^Sto 






Rivei'sidet Califoi'tiia 



Center of Ctilttire — School Facilities 
of the Highest Order 




GRANT SCHOOL 



GOOD SCHOOL Facilities 
are necessary. Observe the 
beautiful buildings wherein 
our children find modem 
conveniences. 



SITUATED in a section 
where Orange Growing i s 
the chief industry and the 
mental attainments of the 
people are of the highest 
order 




HIGH SCHOOL 



CKamber of Commerce 

or the following firms will be pleased to inform you of our town 



n. n. nuHh. 

Rlvlno T^and Co., Valencia Grove*. 
Geo. P. Klliott, Real Kiitate. 
F. Fay Sibley, Automobilen. 
Riverniile Abntract Co. 
FirHt National Banlc. 
Riverni«le Title & Trnut Co. 
ShlelM <& Son, Plumbingr & Heating. 
Home Telephone Co. 



Jar\'ifi & Dlnnmore. 
Frank A. Miller, Glen^vood Inn. 
RIverMide Trnst Co., Orange Grovea. 
Seaton & Kinnear I/umber Co. 
Rivernide SavinKM Banic & Traiit Co. 
Creamer MfK. Co., Planing Mill. 
Rnaa Lumber & Mill Co. 
Paeifle Lumber Co. 

Arlingrton Apartmentu, Lime and ESigrhth 
StN., Furniftiied RooniM. 



Opportunity Conies Once 

- To Every Man ^^"^^^=^- - 

,jy A7/1//J '^ ^^^ Opportune Time 
^^ ^yOUJ at San Fernando 




A San Fernando Orange Grove 

Los Angeles City has purchased a Reser- 
voir Site 1-2 a Mile from the town 

Now is the time for investments, also for cheap lands for 
homes. San Fernando is only 20 miles from Los Angeles. Has 
good land, Good climate, Good water and is ideal for fruit raising 



Address Secretary Board of Trade, 

San Fernando, Los Angeles County, California 



Escondido 

CALIFORNIA 



Offers great, 
inducements to the 
CITRUS and 
DECIDUOUS 
Fruit Growers 




FOUR-YEAR-OLD CITRUS ORCHARD 



It has the desired soil. 

It has plenty of water — cheap. 

It has an abundance of cheap land. It has foothill lands and valley lands. 

It is in no danger of frosts. 

The bearing citrus orchards this year netted their owners from $500.00 to 
$1000.00 per acre. 

It is the natural home of the raisin grape. 

Don't put your money in high priced lands, when you can buy better land her-^ 
for a trifle— INVESTIGATE. 

Address CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Escondido, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO, 




SAN PEDRO HARBOR 
the minds of the men who make the commerce of this country, than 



CALIFORNIA 

THe Harbor City- 
San Pedro, the Harbor City 
of Southern California, the 
. dreamland of the world, 
where nature has poured out 
her blessing with so lavish 
a hand that it is doubtful 
whether our great mother in- 
tended to build a home for 
the Gods or for humans. San 
Pedro, the future gateway of 
the orient; the one spot more 
talked about, because more in 
any other 



along the many thousands of miles of our coast line. San Pedro undoubtedly has 
the brightest future of any city on the west coast, aid is the place for the young 
man or the old, for the capitalist or the laborer. 

For information relative to commercial conditions and busines prospects, ad- 
dress The Chamber of Commerce, San Pedro, Cal., or 

A. P. Ferl Podson Bros., Contractors L. Kelly 

J. A. Weldt John T. Gaffey Miss C. Rogers & Co., Real 



Olsen Hardware Co. 



William W. Burke & Sons, Estate 

Grocers Alcorn & Cox., Real Estate 



Hummel Bros. & Co.. "Help Center," 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main .soq. 



Santa Rosa, California 




STREET SCENE IN SANTA ROSA 



Santa Rosa has 



5 Banks 2 Excellent Hotels i Flour Mill i Brewery 
4 Fruit Canneries i Woolen Mill Fruit Drying Factories 
^^===^^=^^^^=^^^ 2 Tanneries 2 Lumber Yards Street Cars 

Municipal water works, with free water, free rural delivery and is situated in the 
heart of Stock Growing, Grain Farming, Hop Raising, Fruit Growing, of Sonoma 
County 

Excellent Public and Private Schools, Churches and Lodges. Excellen,t 
climate yejir round. Population io,ooo. 52 miles from San Francisco; 5 trains 
daily to and from city. Gas and electric light. Telephones. Plenty of good 
land for sale cheap. For further information address any of the following: 



The Sonoma County Abstract Bureau. 
Santa Rosa B£ink. 
Occidental Hotel Co. 
Santa Rosa National Bank. 
J. P. Fitts Lumber Co. 



Houts, Jewell & Peterson, Real Estate 

Eardley & Barnett, Real Estate. 

W. D. Reynolds, Real Estate. 

F. Berka, Lumber. 

Lee Bros. & Co., Draymen. 



COME TO COLUSA AND FIND 




Some of California's real wealth, rich soil. 

Easy and cheap irrigation. Price from $35 to $75 

an acre. 
Citrus and deciduous fruits on same acre. 
A climate of Italian softness. Railroad and river 

transportation. 
A great Ranch newly subdivided. Easy access to the 

markets. Fine schools. Good churches. 
A healthful home. Beautiful surroundings. 
For further information address any of the following 

well known firms: 



J. B. DeJarnatt & Son, Real Estate. 
John C. Mogk, Real Estate. 
Colusa Milling Co. 
Farmers &. Merchants Bank. 
Colusa &. Lake R. R. Co. 



Geo. G. Brooks, Stationery. 

Colusa County Bank. 

Grenfelt Lumber Co. 

G. W. Allgaier, Groceries and Provisions. 



San Bernardino, California 

Located in the center of a magnificent and fertile valley and reached by three trans- 
continental railroads — the Salt Lake, Santa Fe and Southern Pacific. 

Population 15,000 and* Increasing Rapidly 




The city owns and operates a splendid water works system, the main supply 
coming from artesian wells, one of which is shown upon this page. Two electric 
and two gas companies insure low rates for these necessities. Many miles of paved 
streets and cement sidewalks add to the attractiveness of the city. 

Fully equipped trolley lines radiate from San Bernardino to all surrounding 
towns and communities. 

The scenic beauty within and surrounding the city is unexcelled in Southern 
California. 

As a business and commercial center San Bernardino ranks among the best in 
the State. . . '*' ' 

First class schools. Public Library and churches of nearly all denominations. 

For booklet and further information address 

Secretary Board of Trade, San Bernardino, Califcrnia 

or any of the following leading business firms: 



Snn Bernardino Realty Board. 

Neff & Adair, Real F.Mtate. 

Boyd & Scott, Real Kntate & InHurance. 

Vental <& Hiiltbard, Real Rntate & In«. 

.^tar Realty Co., Real Kwtate. 

InHiiranoe, Loan & Land Co. 

Taylor Realty Co., Real Rntate, liOanM & 

Innuranoe. 
Cociiran A Ridenbanelt (Miniature Oranfce 

GroveN, $300. 
San Bernardino Realty Co., Real Estate, 

InNuranee & Loanw. 
Pioneer Abstract & Title Guaranty Co. 
San Bernardino Abntraet Co. 



Coniiolidnted AliMtraet & Title Guaranty 

Co. 
Arrofrhead Garase. 
••on»e Furniture Co. 

David R. GlaNN, PreHldent KiiNineMM College 
(ieo. M. Cooley Co., Hard^vnre. 
Mrs. C. H. Davin, Bradford Rooming: Iloutte 
W. W. BriHon, Jr. 
Board of Trade. 
San Bernardino National Bank 
H. >f. Barton 
H. AV. Haeerman. 
T. A. Blakely. 



GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA 



GHARMING IN ITS INFINITE VARIETY 

For the Home Builder, 
ideal location and environ- 
ment. Fifteen minutes dis- 
tant by electric road from 
the city limits of Los An- 
geles^ City conveniences 
with country comfort. 

Climate unsurpassed, free 
from extremes of heat and 
cold. Abundance of mountain 
water. 

For fruit growing, flower 
culture and vegetable garden- 
ing soil unsurpassed and a 
market at the door. 

Lots and acreage at reason- 
able figures; an investment — 
not a speculation. 

For further information write any of the following: 
Bank of Glendale, R. A. Blackburn, Real Estate; Holman & Campbell, Real Estate; Glendale Improve- 
ment Association, E D. Goode, County Road Overseer; T. Gilman Taylor, Seedsman; J. H. Wells, 
Geo. U. Moyse, Wm. A. Anderson, Contractor and Builder; J. F. Mclntyre, Lumber Yard; 
F. W. Mclntyre, Real Estate; E. K. Grant, Contractor and Builder; Thos. O. Pierce, Livery; 
Kober & Tarr, General Merchandise; A. L. Bryant. M. D., Dr. R E. Chase. 




IMPERIAL ^iir:::r: 

THE METROPOLIS OF THE IMPERIAL VALLEY 




WEST SIDE OF IMPERIAL AVENUE, IMPERIAL. IMPERIAL HOTEL IN F0REGR0Un"d 

Imperial is the center of the largest body of irrigated land under one system in the United States, 
and Hon. Frank W. Mondell of Wyoming, chairman of the Irrigation Committee of the House of 
Representatives, said after a recent visit: "I consider the owners of land in the Imperial Valley among 
the luckiest farmers in the United States They are singularly blessed by nature and by man. They 
have everything that they could ask to make themselves well to do. They have the soil, the climate, 
the WATER, and the location, with railroad facilities for marketing) their crops, and good and 
constant markets for their products close at hand." For further information address any of the 
following: 



H. N. Dyke, Secretary Chamber o£ Com- 
merce 
Imperial Land Co. 

Varney Brothers Co., General Merchandise 
EdgaT Brothers, Implements 



A. L,. Hill, Hardware 

Salisbury Realty Co., Real Estate 

F. N. Chaplin & Son, Real Estate 

Imperial Valley Abstract, Title & Trust Co. 

I. f,. Wilson, Real Estate. 




View of 
San Joaquin 
River 

The Fresno Irrrigated 
Farms extend eight 
miles along the 
river at this 
point 



The Fresno Irrigated Farms Co» 



CLIMATE 
Mild winters, Warm dry 
summers, Cool nights. 

SOIL 

A Rich sandy loam that 
grows anything. 

PRODUCTS 

Greatest variety of crops 
known in any country of 
the world. 

IRRIGATION SYSTEM 

Finest irrigation system in 
California— low rate of 62}^ 
cents per acre, per year — 
80 miles of ditches now on 
tract. 



26,000 

acr.es 

of Land 

$35 per Acre and Upwards 

NEW TOWN of 

KERMAN 

JUST STARTED 



ALFALFA RANCHES 

Dairy herds on credit — ask 
us about them. 

RAISIN LANDS 
Suitable land for raisin 
culture in the only raisin 
secton in the U. S. 
VINEYARDS 
Table grape or wine grape 
lands. 

MODERN 

CONVENIENCES 
Rural free delivery — Tele- 
phones, Electric power, 
Lights, etc. 

ORCHARDS 
.Ml fruits known ito Cali- 
fornia grow here. 



Fresno Irrigated Farms Company, Inc. 

Main Office, 405-408 Kohl Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 
Los Angeles Office, 125 Pacific Electric Bldg. Fresno Office, 2154 I St. 



J^J^ 



The Flaming 
Tokay Grape 



The most productive 

grape raised in 

California 




WHITTIER 



CALIFORNIA 

(The Hillside City) 




VVHITTIER'S new high SCHOOr^ BUILDING 

"For utility," says an educational journal, "the high school building at VVhittier 
is, perhaps, the most efifective of any in Southern California. This school is carry- 
ing on as complete courses as any in the state, including several unusual features. 
In fact, we know of no other public school which provides so much for its patrons." 

The building with grounds and equipment cost $75,000. There are thirteen 
teachers, and an enrollment of over two hundred students — an increase of nearly 
thirty-five per cent, over last year, the best record of any school in Los Angeles 
county. 

The interest in the cause of education is only one of the many evidences that 
this is an enlightened, progressive community. 

There are NO SALOONS in Whittier. It is a city of homes, churches and 
schools. The place is situated on a gentle slope of the Puente foothills, fourteen 
miles from Los Angeles. It is a modern suburban city of 4000 inhabitants, on the 
Pacific Electric line, having paved streets in the business portion; and provided with 
a public park, an improved water system, electric lights, gas, etc. The new hospital 
will open in a short time, and a Carnegie library is soon to be constructed. 

The resources of this section are equal to those of any other place; and the loca- 
tion of the city affords a splendid view of the surrounding orange, lemon and walnut 
groves, while on the hills may be noticed the derricks of the various oil interests. 

Whittier must be seen to be appreciated. 

For further information, address the Secretary of the Board of Trade, or any 
of the following: 

Locks & Rendleman, Real Estate. Whittier National Bank. M. Horton. Pioneer Stables 

First National Bank of Whittier. Whittier Home Telephone Co. H. E. Humphrey, Hardware. 

S. W. Barton & Co., Real Estate. The Edison Electric Co. F. K. Weeks, Grocer. 

Green'leap Hotel. Whittier Hardware Co. Fred L. Baldwin, Pacific Cafe. 

C. W. Clayton, Real Estate & Insurance The Whittier Milling Co. E. J. Vestal. Grocer. 

Whittier College. Landrum Smith, Druggist. Geo. E- Hazzard, Insurance. 

A. H. DuNLAP. Levi D. Johnson, M. D. C. G. Warner. L. A. Bryan, Furniture & Pictures. 

A. Jacobs & Co., Groceries. E. H. White, Furniture and Undertaking. Truman Berry, Rancher. 

Metropolitan Music Co.. S. A. Brown, Prest. F. A. Jackson, City Market. Alva Starbuck. 

TAKE PACIFIC ELECTRIC CARS FROM 6TH AND MAIN STREETS, LOS ANGELES 



fSAN 



DIEGO, 



TKe Liveliest City on tKe 
Pacific Coast J^ J^ J^ 




San Diego has the finest water on the Pacific Coast with a supply more than suffi- 
cient for a City many times its present size. 

The above cut shows the aerating table at the entrance of the water to the City 
Reservoir. The City's water is secured from Mountain Water Sheds where it is im- 
pounded in several large reservoirs and conveyed to the City through a twenty-four 
inch pipe a distance of nearly forty miles, and before entering the Reservoir it passes 
through one of the most perfect filtering plants to be found on the Pacific Coast, 
thence from the aerating table into the City Reservoir. 

The Population of San Diego Has Nearly Doubled 
in tKe Past Five Years, Being Now about 40.000 

Its building permits have more than doubled during the past year, having been $i,- 
193,170.00 in 1905, and $2,761,285.00 during 1906, and is destined to become the largest 
City in California, outside of San Francisco. 

It Has One of tKe Finest Harbors in tKe World 

and upon the completion of the Panama Canal, will be the nearest Pacific Coast Port 
for the Atlantic Sea-Board Trade. This taken in connection with the San Diego 
Arizona railroad, in process of construction, and the Tehuantepec railroad now ready 
for traffic, guarantees to San Diego the jobbing and supply trade for the entire South- 
west portion of the United States. 

Its Climate Is tKe Most ELquable in tKe W^orld 

The temperature seldom being lower than forty-five degrees in Winter and never 
reaching the freezing point, and usually not warmer than eighty degrees in Summer, 
never rising above ninety. 

For either investments or homes, it now offers the best advantages in the United 
States. 

FOR BOOKLETS ON THE SUBJECT OF AGRICULTURE, FRUIT- 
GROWING, SILK CULTURE, OR MINING IN SAN DIEGO COUNTY, 
ADDRESS 

THE CHAMBE:R or commerce, l^Xlif^Hi^^L 




Mai^ysville 

CAPITAL OF YUBA COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 



THE GARDEN SPOT AND CITY 
OF THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY 



Orange, Lemon, Lime, Olive, Peach, Apricot, Pear, Berry and Alfalfa 
Lands in tracts to suit. Abundance of water for irrigation where needed. 
FINE CLIMATE 

Prices $25 to $100 per Acre* 



For particulars write iMARYSVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, or any of the 
following well known firms: 



Marysvllle Woolen Mill. 

J. R. Garrett Co., Wholesale Grocers. 

Yuba Consolidated Gold Fields, Dredging. 

Valley Meat Co. 

Decker, Jewett & Co.. Bank 

Hampton Hardware Co. 



Sperry Flour Co. 

C. T. Aaron, Real Estate. 

E. A. Forbes, Attorney. 

The RIdeout Bank. 

M. J. Newkom, Real Estate. 




DO YOU 



Want a home 
in a land of 



Sunshine 

Fruit 

Grain? 



I have land in both 

Yuba and Sutter Counties 

Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Peaches, 
Apricots, Pears, Berries — all grow here. 
Alfalfa grows many crops each year. 
Land in tracts to suit from 

$25 TO $100 PER ACRE 



Write me at once, stating what you want. I will take great interest in finding property to suit you 
Descriptive matter free. Address 

M. J. NEWKOM, MARYSVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



ANYVn TUFATRIPAI Pflin PRFAM prevents early wnukles. it is not a freckle coating; ; it re- 



moves them. ANYVO CO., 427 North Main St., Los Antreles 



>&PTaloma Toilet5?ap 



AX ALL 
DRUG STORE: 



Help — All kinas. See Hummel Bros. & Co., 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main 509. 




EUREKA, CALIFORNIA, 

Has regular and quick water communication with San Francisco, with freight 
rates ranging from $i.oo to $4.00 per ton, the cost of living and prices of merchandise, 
clothing, manufactures, and general supplies are governed by those those of the 
latter place, and vary but little therefrom. 

Humboldt County Has: 

Great extent, affording choice of location. Cheap lands in abundance. Its own 
lumber, fuel, food, wool, leather. Equable temperature, insuring bodily comfort. 
Healthfulness, especially absence of fevers and malaria. Diversity of products, giv- 
ing variety in occupations. Abundant rainfall, guaranteeing crops and water. Great 
natural resources in divers branches. Cheap lumber, making improvements inex- 
pensive. Cheap fuel, costing little more than the labor of taking it. Good schools 
within reach of every home. Good county government, honestly administered. Cheap 
freight rates by sea to all Pacific points. The largest and best body of redwood on 
earth. An honest, peaceful, law-abiding population 

Humboldt Has Not: 

Chinese, to compete with American labor. Irrigation, with its expense and liti- 
gation. Spanish grants, to cloud titles and bar settlement. Railroad land grants, 
to interfere with progress. Codling moths to destroy the apples. Colorado beetles 
to destroy the potatoes. Summer thunderstorms to interfere with harvests. Long 
winters when stock must be fed. Severe frosts to destroy vegetation. Crop failures 
from any cause whatever. Cyclones, blizzards, tramps or strikes. 

For further information address any of the following well known firms: 



H. L. Ricks, Pres. Chamber of Com- 
merce. 
Geo. W. Baker, Real Estate, 
Eureka t-^ Co. 
R. D, Johnston 
Delaney & Young 
Taylor & Zane 
J. H. Hunter. 



G. A. Waldner, Western Hotel. 

Skinner-Duprey Drug Co. 

Thos. H. Perry. 

F. B. Hink 

Porter, Fautz & Brooks. 

J. C, Henderson. 

E. G. Kramer, (Revere House) 

Bank of Eureka 




OF FIVE ACRES 
AND UPWARDS 

in the Counties of 

Ftesno and Merced 
California 

MILLER AND LUX 

Los Banos, Merced County 
California 



WOODLAND 

The Capital of 

Yolo County, California 

WOODLAND is only 86 miles from San 
Francisco and 22 miles from Sacramento, 
the State Capital. WOODLAND has twelve 
churches, three two-story grammar school 
buildings, one commodius high school, one 
Holy Rosary Academy, one well-equipped 
business college, the best talent obtainable 
for the schools, one Carnegie library build- 
ing, and fine free library, four social and 
literary clubs, twenty fraternal and bene- 
fit lodges one 200-barrel flour mill, one 
fruit cannery, two butter creameries, one 
fruit packing establishment, one winery, 
one olive oil and pickling plant, two large 
lumber yards, four solid banks, four ho- 
tels, one large city hall, one well-equipped 
fire department, four large grain and hay 
warehouses, a well conducted telephone 
system, an average rainfall of 17 inches, 
and many commodious business houses 
representing all lines of trade. 

For further particulars address any of 
the following: 

Bidwell & Relth, Real E^state 

Woodland Grain and Milling Co. 
R. E. Boyle, Books and Stationery 
Bank of Yolo 

Bank of Woodland 
Sierra Lumber Co. 

M. C. Campo, Ranclier 




HOTEL COLONIA, BIGGS 



BIGGS 

BUTTE COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 

The home of the orange, the 
peach, the pear and the nuts. 
Butte county oranges are mar- 
keted in the East six weeks 
before the Southern California oranges. Here are located the celebrated Rio Bonito 
orchards. 

Five crops of alfalfa are grown on the river bottoms each year without irrigation 
and there are 15,000 acres of upland now under irrigation by the Butte County Canal. 
The new Northern California Electric Railway, with 24 miles now completed, is pyr- 
chasing rights of way east of Biggs, and will run through this section. 

The school facilities are the best, and the hotel accommodations are unsurpassed 
in the State. 

Land can be purchased for from $45 to $125 per acre. 
For further particulars address 

Board of Trade, Biggs, California, or 

C. N. Brown, Ruggles & Harper, G. K. Smith, Sacramento Valley Bank, E. Steadman, 
J. M. Hastings & Co., Chatfield & Smith, T. H. Fitch. W. A. Walker. 



Help — All kinds. See Hummel Bros. & Co., 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main 509. 



REDONDO, CALIFORNIA 




Redondo is next to the busiest seaport in Southern California. If you doulit 
this assertion take a day off when in California and visit Redondo. During October 
ocean vessels discharged at our wharves 6,150,000 feet of lumber, 3,500 poles, 116.000 
ties, 2,000,000 shingles and 42,000 barrels of oil. In addition to this hundreds of tons 
of freight were received for surrounding towns. 

Redondo has other attractions which will appeal to you. We have the beauti- 
ful Moonstone beach, nothing like it in the world; the most attractive residence 
sites that the eye ever gazed upon; the largest and most imposing high school build- 
ing in the state; three electric lines that furnish communications with Los Angeles 
and immediate towns. Realty values are enticing and a good opportunity is now 
presented for the prospective homeseeker to invest. 

Write to the Secretary of the Board of Trade for the latest descriptive folders 
telling all about Redondo. 

For further information address either of the following: 



Redondo Board of Trade. 
Redondo Improvement Company. 
Hotel Redondo. 
Chas. J. Creller, Real Estate. 
Redondo Realty Company. 
Montgomery & Mullin Lumber Co. 
Redondo Milling Company. 



C. Ganahl Lumber Company. 

J. F. Reber & Company, Plumbers. 

Wells & Company, Real Estate. 

Redondo Building Company. 

L. J. Quint. 

H. B. Ainsworth. 

A. J. Graham. 

A. B. Steel. 



"If You Will Write 

The Board of Trade, Santa Cruz, California, for booklet D, stating in what particular 
proposition you are interested, 

You Shall Know Why 

the following investments in that city are profitable: 

I. The erection of modern, furnished cottages of five, six and seven rooms on 
suitable ground. 

II. The establishment of a fruit canning and processing factory. 

III. The establishment of glass and sand -lime brick factories. 

IV. The erection of a one hundred and fifty room, modem, first-class hotel near 

the beach. 



This Well is on $50.00 per acre Land and 
at a Depth of 200 Feet in San Jacinto, 
Riverside County, California — 

For Soil, 
Water, Cli- 
mate and 
Price 

This cannot be sur- 
passed in California 

For further infor- 
mation write 

Chamber of Commerce, ?2lifSrm^' 




OROVILLE 

CALIFORNIA 
The Queen City of Butte County 




FRUir SCBNB NEAR OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 

Oroville is the county seat of Butte County, California. It is at the end 
of S. P. from Marysville. on direct line of the Western Pacific. Is the terminus 
of the northern electrical line from Chico. 

More than $7,000 in gold is taken daily from the soil by dredging in the 
Oroville vicinity — over 35 dredgers in operation. 

A moderate and even climate. 

Oranges, olives, lemons and other fruit grows in abundance here. 

Land can be had from $15.00 to $100.00 per acre. 

The home of the Ehmann Olive Oil. 

Has two excellent banks. 

The Union Hotel, one of the best hotels in Northern California. 

Water and light in abundance, and hay, grain and live stock are staple 
products. 

Further information can be had by addressing Secretary Chamber of Com- 
merce, or any of the following well known firms: 



L. H. Alexander, Merchant. 
Ehmann Olive Co. 
Union Hotel and Annex. 
R. S. Kitrick, Lumber. 
Oroville Light & Power Co. 
Ophir Hardware Co. 
John C. Gray, Fruit Grower. 
Bank of Rideout, Smith &. Co. 



E. C. Tucker & Son, Real Estate. 

First National Bank. 

T, W. Green & Co., Real Estate. 

Z. D. Brown, Real Estate. 

W. P. Hammon, Dredae Mining. 

Perkins & Wise Co., Merchants, 

E. Meyer & Co., Merchants. 

Lausen &, Fetherston, Searchers of Records. 



Lodi, San Joaquin County, California 

FIFTY PER CENT INCREASE IN POPULATION IN TWO YEARS 
Home of tKe Famous Flatne-ToKay Grape 



Souvenir Edition 
of the 

Lodi Home 
Magazine 

for December 1906 
Free to All 




Write for a FRFE 
COPY of the 

Lodi Home 
Magazine 



LODI HIGH SCHOOL 

Further information upon application to any of the following : 
W. A. Young Lumber Co. Dougherty, Whitaker & Ray Co., Ho- 

LeMoin & Fish, Publishers. *^^' 

TT J T5 TT J Garner & Woodson, Land. 

Henderson Bros., Hardware. Northern Hardware Co. 

Beckman, Welch & Thompson Co., john C. Bewley & Co., Real Estate. 

San Joaquin Land Co. 



Grocers. 



W. J. Robinson, Barley Mill. 



The Realty Co. 




CATHEDRAL ROCK 



"LaJolla 
By-thc 
Sea" 



This picturesque winter and 
summer resort has an esti- 
mated population of 1200, and 
is within 15 miles of San 
Diego with a train service 



of four trains per day each way. La Jolla offers to those seeking residence, churches, 
a public library, a graded school, literary and social clubs for men and women, golf, 
tennis, boating, fishing and surf bathing the year round. Write or call upon the 
following firms: 

Mary H. Fitzhueh, Real Estate. Mrs. A. P. Mills, Real Kstate. 

Walter S. Lieber, Real Estate. L.. A. & S. T». Beach R. R. Co. 

C. D. Rolfe, Real Estate. La Jolla Mdrse. Co. 

E. J. Swayne «& Co., Real Estate. L« Jolla Improvement Ass'n. 

l^a Jolla Bath House & Entertainment Co. 



FRESNO COUNTY 

 
( ^ 

Rich in Raisins, Wine, Peaches, 
Lumber and Water 

Heart of the Big Valley 

Fresno County produces Raisins by the ton, Wine by the hogshead, Lumber by 
the millions of feet, Oil by the trainload, Oranges by looo acres, Peaches by the 
carload. Figs, Apricots, Alfalfa and Minerals all are produced in immense 
quantities. 

CANALS AND CREEKS 

The splendid fertility of Fresno County was caused in the first place through 
the beneficence of Kings River and the San Joaquin River, the two largest water 
courses. Sediment from these stream s has been carried out over the intervals 
each year since time immemorial, and it is these same streams through the efficient 
canal systems emanating from them that are making the lands thoroughly 
irrigated. 

FRESNO COUNTY PRODUCED IN 1905 

Live stock, value $5,000,000 

Alfalfa hay 750,000 

Butter fat 1,000,000 

Lumber 2,000,000 

Wines i ,500,000 

Brandies 250,000 

Raisins 2,500,000 

Wool 250,000 

Olive "Oil 30.000 

Oranges and Lemons 75,000 

Almonds, walnuts, etc 7,500 

Honey and beeswax 50,000 

Crude Oil 1,250,000 

Poultry 750,000 

Eggs 100,000 

Melons 100,000 

Gold, silver, granite, etc 400,000 

Dried and green fruits 1,500,000 

Wheat and barley 1,000,000 ' 

Total $18,512,500 

In 1906 values reached in production $22,000,000. 
For further information in regard to Fresno County write or address 

Gill Real Estate Agrency, Real Entate. Sheperd-TeaKue Co. Send for Free Home- 

Peralta InveMtment Co., Orange I^and. neekerH Guide. 

Pearctons Realty ExchaniEre, Real Kntate. F^ulton & Grand Central Hoteln, under one 

M'. BT. Rohrer & Co.. Oranee «S: (irnpe Land. management, Mpecial aeeomniodatlons 

Jefise Janson & V. M. Rlanchard, Real for coniniereial travelern. 

Estate. Sperry Flour Co., Flour, Feed and Grain. 
Dewitt H. Gray & Co., Real Fstate. 



" 










I^P 




Petaluma 






^sr?^|## 


&%^\i^. ^M^^^^U SONOMA 




1 

Best 
with 
frorr 

PI 

goo 
CHir 
inve 

ME 

crof 
M. . 
Carr 


v-.j^s 


N^^f •?■>: 


COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 




A Typical Chicken Ranch at Petaluma 

GREATEST POULTRY SECTION ON PACIFIC COAST 

facilities for diversity of agricultural pursuits, stock-raising, dairying, together 
finest climate to be had in the State. Sonoma County ranks third in the State 
1 an agricultural standpoint. 

■^ ^T* AT T T TI 7f A HAS good banks, excellent schools, churches, daily 
■• 1 Zi 1 M yl lL newspapers, planing mills, lumber yards, iron foundry, 
■^ *^ ■i-' Vi/ xiXiM. steam and electrical railway and river transportation, 
i stores, etc. ONE HOUR'S RIDE FROM SAN FRANCISCO. Excellent 
late. Moderate Rainfall. Healthful! If you are looking for a home on a small 
stment, come to Petaluma. Write SECRETARY CHAMBER OF COM- 
RCE or any of the following well known firms: 

V. Horn Co., Real Estate; Geo. P. McNear, Grain and Feed; D. W. Ravens- 
t, "The Courier"; Bank of Sonoma County; The Petaluma National Bank; 
Zartman & Co., Wagon Mfrs.; Cavanagh & Whitney, Lumber and Planing Mill; - 
im & Hedges Co., Lumber, Millwork and Tanks; Schluckebier Hardware Co. 



Brawley 



the 



Garden City 

of the Great 

Imperial Valley 




OFFICE BRAWI^EY IMPROVEMENT COMPANY 



Brawley is noted for its early cantaloupes, early grapes and oil kinds of early vegetables. The re- 
turns from these crops have exceeded $ioo per acre. In addition to this intense farming Brawley is 
the center of, and has tributary to it over ioo,ooo acres of the finest agricultural land in the valley, 
where hogs, dairying, sheep and general farming has proven vary profitable. These lands are all 
irrigated with an unlimited supply of water taken from the Colorado River. For full information 
about town and acreage property, address any of the following: 



Imperial Investment Co. 

Hovley & Cady, Real E^state 

Stanley Jk. Kellogre, Real Estate 

C. M. I.. & C. Co., Store 

Edith Meador, Post Office and Store 

C. Darnell, Merchant 



IVellie Pellet, Merchant 

T. D. McKeehan, Merchant 

Imperial Valley Bank 

Hutohin^s & Co., Hardvrare 

Varney Brothers Co., General Merchandise 

Edgrar Brothers, Implements 




Tulare 

CALIFORNIA 



HearL 
of the 



San Joaquin 
Valley 




A Tulare (California) Fig Tree 



THE CITY OF TULARE is the business center of a large and prosperous 
farming territory of surpassing fertility. It has a population of 3,000, and is a 
:hriving, progressive community. Its social life is of such a character as to make 
of it a very desirable home town. It has first class schools, churches, and a free 
public library. 



An Irrigation 
System Covering 
40,000 Acres 



and having 300 miles of canals and distributing ditches, surrounds the city, and 
belongs to the land free from all indebtedness. 

Good Alfalfa Land, $30 to $50 per Acre, Plenty of Water 

Two small creameries ship two tons of butter daily to Los Angeles. The new sugar 
beet factory pays $4.50 per ton for beets, and fifteen tons and upwards can be easily 
raised to the acre. 

If interested send for our free illustrated booklet. 

M. C. ZUMWALT, Secretary Board of Trade 

TULARE CITY, CALIFORNIA 




ORANGE 

GEOGRAPHICAL CENTER OF 

ORANGE COUNTY, CAL. 



Is the busiiitis center and shipping point for about thirty square 
miles of highly productive and densely populated territory. The 
surplus products sent out from -this point last year were: 718 
cars of oranges, 68 cars of lemons, IJ cars of dried apricots, 5 
cars of English walnuts and nearly 2,000,000 pounds of unclassi- 
fied products in less than carload lots, without including ship- 
ments by express. The orchards and packing houses furnish 
employment for many people. 
The CITY OF ORANGE covers about three square miles and has a po- alation of at least 2000. It is headquarters for 
the Santa Ana Valley Irrigation Company and contains the fine building o. the Orange Union High School District. Over 
100 buildings were erected in the city last year, one firm furnishing lumber for 7; houses; and the growth continues, $17,350 
worth of building permits being issued in the month of May. Located 14 miles from the coast at an elevation of about 
200 feel above sea level. Orange escapes the chilling fogs of the lowlands and the extremes of heat and cold of the 
interior valleys. With its natural advantages of abundant water, fertile soil and an equable climate, together with its 
educational, religious and social advantages, this city is certainly an ideal place for a home. 

Come and see for yourself or write any of tihe lollowing for further information: 



Wm. H. Burnham. The Bank of Orange. 

Hallman & Field, General Merchandise. 

S. M. Craddick, Real Estate. 

Edwards & Meehan, Butchers. 

AInsworth Lumber Co. 

Ehleen & Grote, General Merchandise. 

D. C. PIxley, Hardware. 



K. E. Watson, Druggist. 
Ira Chandler, Furniture. 
Adolph Dittmer, Druggist. 
Thompson Nurseries. 
J. A. Huhn Co., Real Estats. 
W. B. Park, Shoe Store. 
C. B. Bradshaw, Architect. 




SCENE OF BEAN FIELD NEAR GKIDLEY 



FOR DIVERSIFIED FARMING 

Come to 

GRIDLEY 

California's Greatest Garden 

Gridley, Butte County, California, is 
one of California's best towns of 2000 
population. Has excellent stores, bank, 
newspaper, cannery, packing house, 
machine shops, grain warehouse, best 
of public schools, churches. On main 
line of the S. P. Railroad, 160 miles 
from San Francisco. 



CROP FAILURES ARE NEVER KNOWN. 

Fine irrigation system has just been completed. Resources and opportunities 
are abundant. Good land can be had reasonable. Several farms have recently been 
subdivided and can be had in whatever acreage wanted, at reasonable terms. If you 
are coming to California, write for booklet of Gridley, Butte County, California. 

Address Secretary Chamber of Commerce, or any of the well known firms: 



J. H. Jones, Real Estate. 
W. H. Gllstrap, Real Bstate. 
Wm. Brown & Co., Stock Dealers. 
The RIdeout Bank. 



W. H. Hall, General Merchandise. 
D. J. Parker, General Merchandise. 
Miller Bros., Retail and Wholesale Liquors. 
J. C. Adams, Retail Liquors. 




Tr 

It takes soil, water and sunshine to make a tree 
like that. This grizzley giant stands near Chico, 
in the great Sacramento Valley of California. The 
soil that grew that tree will raise five crops of 
alfalfa in one season, without irrigation. 

CHICO, BUTTE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 



B. Cussick. 
Sears & Farnham. 
Home Real Estate Co. 

C. C. Royce. 

Bank of Butte County. 



Write to the Chico Board of Trade, or 
the following firms 

J. A. E. Shuster. 
Brown & Williams. 
Diamond Match Co. 
W. J. Costar. 
Taber & Hamilton. 



Baker, Jones & Smith. 
Warren & Vadney. 
James H. Jones & Co. 



COLTON 



The Hub City of Southern California 
The Center of the Orange Belt 






-j^Y^-'fit.^ 



Colton offers 
special induce- 
ments to Home- 
seekers who should 
be mindful of its 
splendid school 
and church privi- 
leges; its business 
/and social life, the 
ideal climate and 
the location as the 
HUB CITY. 



HOTKL AND PARK, COLTOX, CALi 

COLTON is a rapidly growing city of 4,000 inhabitants, and has exceptional prospects for the future. Colton 
is 56 miles east of Los Angeles, on the main line of three transcontinental railroads. You can'ilafford to pass through 
without stopping to investigate. For further particulars address any of the following: 

McRen & Hagrer, St. Clalr 
Uvery Stables. 

CoItoD Pharmacy 

J. M. More, Blacksmith. 

O. L. Emery, Hard'trare. 

G. B. Caster, Contractor & 
Builder. 

Mrs. M. A. Fox, Real Estate. 



Wllcox-Rose Mercantile Co. 

H. G. French & Co. 

The First Sfational Bank of 
Colton. 

Colton Fruit Exchange, out- 
put 1906, 400 cars of or- 
anges and lemons. 

H. E. Fouch & Co., Real Es- 
tate. 



Gregory Fruit Co. 

Hon. James D. Knox. 

R. Li. Deakins, Palace Cigar 

Store. 
G. M. Green, Supt. of Schools. 
Colton Grain & Milling Co. 
D. C. Swartz, Undertaker. 
M. A. Hebberd Co.. 



DON'T OVERLOOK 

Ukiah 

CAPITAL OP MENDOCINO COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 

The Best and Fastest Grow- 
ing City in Northern CaL 

Ukiah is situated in the cen- 
ter of a beautiful valley 
surrounded by mountains, 
through which flows the 
Russian River. The land 
along the river is very rich, 
and a large acreage is in 
hops and alfalfa. The bench 
land lying between the riv- 
er bottom and the moun- 
"tains is particularly well 
suited to vineyards, and 
many acres are now planted to grapes. Land can still be bought in this valley at 
reasonable prices, and it ofi^ers many advantages to the homeseeker. Good climate 
and water. No fogs or malaria. For further information address the following: 

Address Secretary, Board of Trade or any of the following names 




Poage &. Woodward, Real Estate. 
Jamison Bros., General Merchandise. 
L. B. Frasler, Real Estate. 
Mendocino County Abstract Bureau. 
C. P. Smith. 



Frank Sandelin, Palace Hotel. 
C. Hofman, General Merchandise. 
J. M. Owen, Real Estate. 
Geo. W. Geacy, Fashion Stables. 



Atbuqisctquc 




NEW MEXICO 

A City of Realities 

You who are 
looking for a 
New location in 
the southwest 

Give a few moments' 
time to the following 
facts and realities 
about ' 

New Mexico^s 
Greatest City 

Albuquerque, 



J. KORBEIR & CO., Carriage Repository 



Largest and most progressive city in New Mexico and Arizona. Population estimated at 20,000. Best 
climate in the United States. Located on main line Santa Fe Pacific Ry. 525 miles south of Denver. 254 
miles north of El Paso. 880 miles east of Los Angeles. County seat of Bernalillo County. Headquar- 
ters U. S. District Court. U. S. Marshal's office located here. Monthly payroll exceeds $200,000.. Pay 
roll and revenues approximate $2,500,000. Santa Fe Ry. has machine shops here. Albuquerque is an im- 
portant distributing point. Agricultural possibilities of Bernalillo county are great. Alfalfa, hay, corn, 
wheat, oats, sugar beets, etc. The culture of tobacco is being demonstrated with satisfaction. Acreage" 
in apples, peaches and other fruits is being extended each year. Wholesale trade covers a territory of 150 
miles or more in all directions. Many elegant homes with attractive environments. Territorial fair held 
here for the past twenty- four years, at an annual expense of $15,000. Wool Scouring Mills, handling over 
4,500,000 pounds annually. Rio Grande Woolen Mills Co., manufacturers, afinual output $180,000. Al- 
buquerque Foundry and Machine Works, largest in the Southwest. Southwestern Brewery and Ice Co., 
annual capacity 30,000 barrels. The Crystal Ice Co, ice plant capacity 30 tons daily. The American 
Lumber Co.'s new saw mill and box factory. 5 public schools and High school. University of New Mex- 
ico, the Hadley Cliniatological Labratory, St. Vincent Academy for girls. Immaculate Conception School 
for boys. United States Indian school, Presbyterian Mission school, city park, 12 churches, 6 newspapers 
(a dailies), 3 National banks ($4,000,000 deposits); Montezuma Trust Co., capital and surplus $100,000; 
32 secret and fraternal organizations, Commercial Club with 200 members; th« Alvarado Hotel, the pride 
of the city, cost more than $.200,000; water works, 2 telephone systems, electric and gas plants, 3 miles 
electric street car line. 3 planing mills; opera house recently built hy the Elks' lodge at a cost of $75,000; 
sanitarium, run by Sisters of Charity; hospital: 2 building and loan associations; public library and free 
reading room, costing $20,000: flour mill, 3 lumber yards. 4 cigar factories. Further information of 
great value to those seeking homes in the Southwest furnished free on application by addressing 

Commetcial Civhf Albdqoerqtfe, New Mexico 



Fimt National Bank 

Bank of Commerce 

State National Bank 

Montezuma Trunt Co. 

Mornine Journal 

Rio Grande W'oolen MUIs (Co-operative) 

.Albuquerque ^Vooi Soourinsr MHIm 

J. Korber & Co., Carrlaicen and Harnenn 

Metcalf & Strannn, Real Kstnte 

Whitney Co., \VhoIeiinIe and Retail Hard- 

AVootton A Myer, Real E}atate Tvare 

Albert Faber, Furniture 



J. C. BaldridjBre, Kumber and Painta 
Albuquerque Gas, Klectrlc l.ight A Power 
American Lumber Co. Co. 

Albuquerque Foundry & Machine Worka 
Albuquerque Traction Co. 
G. Li. Brooks 

RrneMt Meyern <& Co., Wholesale Llqnora 
ITnivernity Heisrhts Improvement Co. 
O. \V. Strongr's Sons, Famltare and Under- 
Crystal Ice Co. taklnc 
John S. Beaven, Coal and Wood 
A. E. AVnlker. Real Kstate 



FLAGSTArr, ARIZONA 



THe SHYLIGHT CITY" 
SxinsHine 



Pure Air 




Citizens 



Altitude 7,000 Feet 
Mountain Spring AVater 

Unrivalled as a resort for 
Health, Scenic Beauty and 
Sport. Gateway of the Grand 
Canyon and Navajo and Hopi 
Indian Reservations. Other 
points of interest within easy 
distance are: Prehistoric 
Cliflf Dwellings and Caves; 
Bottomless Pits; Sunset 
Mountain; Extinct Craters 
and Lava Beds; the Painted 
Desert; Natural Bridge; 
Montezuma's Castle and 
Well; Natural Ice Caves; 
Meteoric Deposits; Petrified 
Forests; Trout Fishing and 
Deer Hunting in Season. 

Excellent Hotel Accommo- 
dations. Perfect Livery Ser- 
vice. Competent Guides. 

Outfitting Point for over- 
land trips in and around the 
Grand Canyon. 



More detailed information cheerfully furnished. Address the following: 
Babbitt Bros., leading Merchants Arizona Lumber and Timber 

The Citizens Bank Commercial Hotel Hotel Weatherford 



Co. 



Docs It Make Any Difference To You 

Whether you get your oranges off 
in November and December as 
they do at Porterville and get the 
top price, or wait as they do else- 
where until the market is glutted 
and prices low? 

Does It Make Any Difference To You 

Whether you pay $40.00 to $60.00 
per acre for as good alfalfa land 
as ever lay out of doors, with wa- 
ter, such as you can get at Porter- 
ville or twice that for no better 
land elsewhere? 

Does It Make Any Difference To You 

Whether you raise stock in a coun- 
try that is ideal for stock and 
poultry such as you find at Porter- 
ville, free from the many pests and 
annoyances, or try an up-hill pull 
at the business elsewhere? 

DOES IT MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE TO YOU— 

But hold on stranger, just write to any of the firms below who will .send you a copy 
of PRACTICAL RESULTS that TELLS THINGS TRUTHFULLY and tells you 
what you want to know. 

If you have never heard — Porterville is in Eastern Tulare County and has made 
greater progress in the last three years than any locality in the state. 
Pioneer Land Co., Real Estate. Pioneer Banking Co. H. E. Ford, Real Estate. 

W. E. Premo, Real Estate. W. A. Sears, Real Estate. 

Porterville Lumber Co. First National Bank. Geo. D. Avery, Real Estate. 
A. J. DeLaney Co., Hardware, etc. Hall & Boiler, Real Estate. 

Wliko i\^entz, General IVIerchandise. Williams & Young Co., Cattle and Dairying. 




Do It Now! 



Come "wHere yovi can en- 
joy tKe rest of yovir life in 

A Garden of Pure Delight 







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A Country Bridge in Santa Clara Valley 

Santa Clara Valley 

The all year round climatic conditions are excellent. We raise mere prunes, 
apricots, cherries, peaches and pears than any other county in the state. We 
shipped of dried and green fruits and canned fruits 666o cars in the fall of 1906. We 
can make room for 5000 families of a few thousand dollars each on small orchard 
farms which are self-supporting. Keep 1000 hens and make them pay all your 
living expense. 

See the attractions. Lick Observatory, Stanford University, Alum Rock 
Park, Congress Springs and others. Beautiful Drives and Rides through miles 
of orchards on Urban and Interurban electric lines. 

S^N JOSE CfoXo") 

Is located in the heart of the valley 50 miles south from San Francisco and is 
growing rapidly. 

For information address 

San Jose Chamber of Commerce IZyifll^ol'^,:; 



Jos. H. Rurker & Co.. Kenl Kiitate. 

A. C. Darby, RenI ENtate. 

Van Fleet & Co., Real Kdtate. 

Cane Bros., Real Kstate. 

Knxle Brei^ery. 

Home I" nlon, GrocerleM. 

Hotel Brintol. 

Spencer &. Healey, A'eterlnary SurKeons. 

Fred M. Stern, Send for Co^vboy Oatflt 

CatnloKue. 
Ketl St2ir l.siiiiidry. 



T. S. MontKoniery &. Son, Real Estate. 

T. C. Barnett, Real Estate. 

Jobnson & Temple, RenI Kstate. 

First National Bank of San Jose. 

Garden City Rank and Trust Co. 

A. Damonte & Co., MfK. Calif. Glaee Fruits. 

The Bank of San Jose. 

Seeurity State Bank of San Jose. 

Cambers-Hayes Co., Furniture. 

Trlnkler-Dohrniann Co., Crockery. 

E. A. & I. <>. Hayes. 

The .1. K. AriiiMhy Co.. Dried Kniit Packers. 




A SCENE SHOWING ONE OF OUR INDUSTRIES. 

For further particulars, write to Board of Trade, Madera, California. 









CAPITAL OF PLACER COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 



A beautiful, healthful city, lo- 
cated in the mountains, where the 
climate is unexcelled, and where 
you can grow peaches, pears, 
plums, oranges and olives. . Dairy- 
ing, stock raising and creameries. 




COUKT HOUSE AUBURN 



Special Inducements for 



Tourist Winter or Summer Hotel 



J. H. Wills, Real Estate. 
Auburn Lumber Co. 
W. W. Rodehaver, Real Estate 
William G. Lee Co. 



Freeman & Walsh 
J. W. Morgan, Dry Goods. 
E. S. BIrdsall, Olive OH. 





The ascent of Mount Lowe by trolley affords 
the visitor to Los Angeles one of the most marvel- 
ous and beautiful mountain railway journeys in the 
world. And it is only one of the features of a 
railway system covering 400 miles and reaching 
all the points of interest in the garden spot of 
America. 



TKe Pacific Electric Rail^way 

Depot at Corner of €>tH and Main 

Los Ang'eles California 



NAVAJO BLANKETS 

AMD INDIAN CURIOS j^t wHousuie 

I have more than 250 weavers in my employ, including the most skilful now 
living, and have taken the greatest pains to preserve the old colors, patterns, 
and weaves. Every blanket sold by me carries my personal guarantee of its 
quality. In dealing with me, you will get the very finest blankets at wholesale prices. 

I also handle the products of the Hopi (Moqui) Indians, buying them under 
contract with the trading posts at Ream's Canyon and Oraibi and selling them 
at wholesale. 

I have constantly a very fine selection of Navajo silverware and jewelry, 
Navajo "rubies" cut and uncut, peridots and native turquois. Also the choicest 
modern Moqui pottery, and a rare collection of prehistoric pottery. 

J. L HUBBELL, """"" Trade, 

Write for my Catalogue ^ 1 a 1 i- * • 

and Price List Ganado, Apachc Co., Arizona 



The Los 
Angclcs- 
Pacific 
Railroad 




The Delightful Scenic Route to 

SANTA MONICA 

and Hollywood 

Fine, Comfortable Observation Cars — 
Free from Smoke 

Cars leave Fourth street and Broadway, Los Angeles, for Santa Monica via Sixteenth 

street, every 15 minutes from 6.35 a.m. to 9.35 p. m., then each hour till 11.35; or via 

Bellevue Ave., for Colegrove and Sherman, every hour from 6.15 a.m. to ii.iSP .m. Cars 

leave Ocean Park, Santa Monica, for Los Angeles, at 5.45, 6.10, and 6.35 a.m. and every 

half hour from 6.55 a.m. till 8.25 p.m., and at 9.25, 10.25, and 11.05 P-ni. 

Cars leave Los Angeles for Santa Monica via Hollywood and Sherman via Bellevue 
Ave., every hour from 6.45 a.m. to 6.45 p.m., and to Hollywood and Sherman only every 
hour thereafter to 11.45 V-tn. 

For complete time-table and particulars call at office of company. 
Single Round Trip, 50c. 10-Trip Tickets, $2.00. 

316-322 West Fourth Street. Los Angeles Trolley Parties by Day or Night a Specialty 






AHundredMilesAlongOceanQif f s 



Shore Line Limited 



A daily limited parlor car train for passengers holding first 
class Rail and Pullman seat tickets. Los Angeles end 
San Francisco — M% hours. Leaving each terminus at 
8 a. m. Arriving 9:30 p.m. 



3 



THOS. A. GRAHAM. 

Ass't Gcn'l Freight & Pass. Agent. 



N. R. MARTIN, 

District Pas-engir Agent 



6oo South Spring Street, comer Sixth, LOS ANGELES, CAL 



^^:^ 



^ 






FHE ONLY W/Cr TO SEE 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

IS VIA THH 



mm TmLK 




l^iMMiri.:ijminiiii.!iiiiMni,niiii]-ii;iiir<iuiiVHi!" 

Two hours and fifteen minutes at Riverside for drives on far- 
famed Victoria and Magnolia Avenues. Two hours and twenty 
minutes at Redlands for drives to Smiley Heights and over the 
McKinley Drive, where a view of the surrounding country is had 
not excelled in Southern California. 

Returning via Covina reaches Los Angeles early in the 
evening. 

Do not fail to take this t'le most beautiful trip in Southern 
California. Full information with Illustrated Booklet at 600 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles. 

THOS. A. GRAHAM, Asst. Gen. Fr't. & Pass. Agt. 
N. R. Martin, Dist. Pass. Agt. 



ISPECIAIMIMBSE HIKING FROM LOS ANGELES/c^^Bi 

K[C0MKECT]M(If:ROM,.mSAMM]F0R [^^mf 





wi m i 



4iC.>^ 



'■ — I"--  -m [r 



IS an all'thcyearm' round 

DJilLY TIIJUN 



The California Limited 

Rtfnning Between California and Cbicago 

Newest Pullman equipment, consisting of observation, drawing- 
room and compartment sleepers, buffet-smoking car and dining 
car. "Santa Fe AU the Way," Safeeuarded bv block signals. Har- 
vey meals. The only train between California and Chicago, via any 
line, exclusively for first-class travel. 

En route visit Grand Canyon of Arizona and stop at El 
Toyar, the new $250,000 hofel. under Harvey management. Pull- 
man service to and fro'm Grand Canvon. 



>3f.- 



J^. 




GRAND CANYON of ARIZONA 

Reached Only via tHe 

S ANTA FE 





Out-of-doors all day amid 
riptning fruit* and budding flowers 



The dear ones grow 
strong and ruddy in 
California 's sunshine. 



The finest 

train over any 

southern route to Cahfornia is 

the Rock Island's 

Golden State Limited 



The train runs ov^er the warm southern route of low altitudes. The 

equipment is brand new, embodying the latest devices that con- 
tribute to pleasurable traveling. 

The Diners provide meals of superior excellence — cooked and 



served right. 



Carries Sleeping Car Passengers Only, 

Daily from Chicago and St. Louis to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara 
and San Francisco. Two other fast California trains daily. 

The details of the service and numerous interesting points en route are made plain in our 
illustrated book, " Rock Island Trains to California." 
A thoroughly readable review of the resorts and scenic features 
of California, with a list of hotels and boarding houses, is con- 
tained in a dainty and profusely illustrated book of 72 pages, 
"California, The Golden State." 

Both books are free to anyone contemplating a trip to California. 
Write to-day. 

JOHN SEBASTIAN. P«»eiif er Trsfi- Manager. CHICAGO. 



Rock 
Island 







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Cadillac— Model H 

Where Dependability and Economy Meet 

These are the great foundation stones of Cadillac 
success— unfailing reliability under all sorts of service; 
cost of maintenance so low as to be almost incredible. 
In the magnificent line of Cadillacs for igoy these 
qualities are more manifest than ever before. The 
Model H has proven itself the four-cylinder triumph 
of the year. 

From motor to muffler this machine is an example 
of simple construction, of finish really super-fme, of 
accuracy not surpassed in any other mechanical 
creation— all of which are more pronounced because 
of the wonderful factory facilities and system that 
stand behind the 






» 



The 

superiorities of Model H are so 
numerous that to select features deserving special 
emphasis is difficult. Those of prime importance are 
remarkable ease of control and smoothness of riding, 
whatever the road conditions. The car is practically 
noiseless in operation; perfect balance of action re- 
moves all vibration. The enormous power is so 
positively applied that whether for speeding or hill 
climbing Model H is there with energy to spare. 
The body possesses lines of beauty and grace and 
reflects stvle unmistakable. 
Your dealer will gladly give you a demonstration. 



Modrl 11—30 h.p. ronr.«]rllndrr TnnrinK <'>r 
 odrl <;— 30 h. p. Fonr-ff Itndrr ToiirlRg Cir 
Moflrl N— 10 h. p. Four pnnarn^r emr 
Modf-I K— 10 h. p. Knnabou t 



(DtMribrd In TBUloit H T) 

CIlMcrlbMl In Calalnr 6 t) 

( I)r»rribMl In I'nUloK M T) 

I llpM-rihpd In ('iiUl«g M T) 

Send /or special Catalog of car in Ivhich you are interested, as 
abope designated. 
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR CO., Detroit. Mich. 

Member Asso. Licensed Auto. Mfrt. 



A MATTER OF HEALTH 




^MH^ 




Absolutely Pure 

AMS HO SUBSTITUTE 




is a perfect food, as 
wholesome as it is 
delicious — highly 
nourishing, easily di- 
gested, fitted to repair 
■wasted strength, pre- 
serve health and pro- 
long life. 

Be sure that you get 
the genuine, bearing 
our trade - mark on 
every can. 

yl -r HIGHEST JUDJtRDS IN 
4r/ EUROPE and J^M ERIC Jt 

Walter Baker & Co. Ltd. 

Established 1780 Dorchester, Mass. 










BISHOP'S 
GALiroRNlA 
PRESERVES 



THE ONLY FRUITS IN THE 
WORLD GUARANTEED BY. 
$1,000 TO CONTAIN NO SUB- 
STITUTES FOR PURE SUGAR. 



50LD BY ALL GROCERS 



BISHOP& COMPANY 

LOS ANGELES. 

IS JAY 5T. NEW YORK 



WINES 

OF UNQUESTIONED AGE 
==AND PURITY== 

Grapes raised in our vine- 
yards, pressed in our winery 
and aged by time in our wine 
cellars. 

DELIVERED FREE OF FREIGHT 
TO ALL EASTERN POINTS 

Two cases of Old Peerless XX 
wines— assorted, with one 
bottle 1888 California Brandy 

For $11.00 

Two cases of XXX oldest 
vintages - assorted, two bot- 
tles 1888 California Brandy 
and one bottle California 
Champagne 

For $15.00 

MAIL ORUER' RLLED PROMPTLY 

>ri\ta/ifon\ia' 

Los Angcies. Cal. 



Plv\MO<; 



have been established over 55 years. By our system 
of pay ments'every family in moderate circumstances 



~ t/rtcD 



MARCH, 1907 THE REBUILDING OF SAN FRANCISCO Vol. XXVI. No. 




CENTS 
A COPY 



'WJNCHB^TBR 



Model 1907 Self-loading Rifle. 

un 

// 



.351 Caliber, High Power 



The Gun That Shoots Through Steel " 




Standard rifle, 20-inch round nickel steel barrel, 
pistol grip stock of plain walnut, not checked, weight 
about 7 ji pounds, number of shots 6. List price, $28. 

A HANDY, HANDSOME POWERFUL GUN: The Model 1907 .351 Caliber 
High Power is a six-shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and 
simple and strong in construction. It is a serviceable, handy gun from butt to 
muzzle. There are no moving projections on the outside of the gun to catch in the 
clothing or tear the hands, and no screws or pins to shake loose. It is easily loaa- 
ed and unloaded, easily shot with great rapidity and easily taken down and cleaned. 

THE .351 CALIBER HIGH POWER CARTRIDGE represents the latest de- 
velopment in powder and cartridge manufacture. Although small in size, it devel- 
ops tremendous velocity and energy, making it powerful enough for the largest 
game. The soft point bullet mushrooms splendidly on animal tissue, tearing a 
wide killing path. The regular cartridge will shoot a metal patched bullet through 
a ^-inch steel plate. This most modern type of cartridge also possesses the added 
advantage of economy. Owing to the comparatively small amount of metal used 
in the shell, it costs much less than old style cartridges no more powerful. 

THE WINCHESTER SELF LOADING SYSTEM is positive, safe, strong 
and simple. There is nothing experimental about it. Tested by use and abuse for 
two years, it has proved its absolute reliability and practicability. In these quali- 
ties there is no self loading system that approaches it. We were the pioneer manu- 
facturers of self loading rifles. 

A SIMPLER AND MORE HANDY TAKE DOWN device than that used in 
the Winchester Model 1907 is next to impossible. A few turns on the take-down 
screw, found at the rear of the receiver, and the rifle is separated into two parts, 
the stock and action being in one and the barrel and receiver in the other. When 
taken down, the exposed working parts are all accessible, making it easy to clean 
the action. , 

RAPIDITY OF FIRE: This rifle has a detachable rnagazine, which can be in- 
serted in the gun w.hen the bolt is closed, making loading quick, safe and easy. 
The superiority of this style of magazine for this type of rifle was demonstrated 
at the recent National Matches at Sea Girt, when the Winchester Self Loading 
system won all the competitive prizes for rapid-fire shooting; the record being 
fifty shots in one minute, against twenty fired- from the other self loading rifle 
having a fixed magazine. Still another advantage of the detachable magazine is 
that it makes it unnecessary to work the cartridges through the gun in unloading. 

COMPARISON IS CONVINCING: We know of no better way for a pros- 
pective purchaser to become convinced of the superiority of the Winchester Model 
1907 -351 Caliber High Power Rifle than by comparing it with other makes of 
similar guns. Look at them, handle them, price them, load them, take them 
down, shoot them, test their penetration, killing power and range if you will. In 
fact, compare them in any way you see fit. 

Circular fully describing this rifle sent free upon request 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., New Haven, Conn. 




THIS IS PART of a secondary canaL The main canal is J 7 
miles long, 44 feet wide at bottom, 84 feet wide at top, and 
carries 10 feet of water. Southern Alberta has the cheapest 
irrigated lands in America, raising the largest average crops in 
America; cheap fuel, good water, good markets, as much sunshine 
as California, cool summer nights, no oppressive eastern heat, a 
delightful autumn, and very short and moderate winter. Average 
yield of winter wheat in 1906 for Calgary district was 44 ^_> bush- 
els. One man thrashed an average of 118 bushels of oats off of 80 
acres and sold them for 27c a bushel. You can raise all kinds of 
grain, alfalfa and sugar beets. Cheap transportation. This land, 
which will double in value in two years, is now $15 to $25 an acre 
on easy terms, with water at only 50c an acre per annum. Think 
of it and address 



W. R. GILSON, 



121 E. FOURTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Brooders? 

Baby Chicks? 



Incubators? 

Poultry Supplies? 

We manufacture only the best goods and hatch only the best S. C. White 
Leghorn Chicks on the market. 

If you need an3rthing for the poultry business, write for our new illustrated 
catalogue and price list. 

Must Hatch Incubator Co. ^^I^tHl!?^- 



Help — All kinds. Sec Hummel Bros. & Co., 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main 509. 



OUT ^A^EST 

A ]VIa.sa^itae of ttie Old Pacific and ttie Ne^w 



CHAS. F. LUMMIS 
CHARLES AMADON MOODY 
SHARLOT M. HALL, Associate Editor 



Editors 



Among thb Stockhoi,ders and Contributors are: 



DAVID STARR JORDAN 

President of Stanford University 
rREDERICK STARR 

Chicago University 
THEODORE H. HITTELL, 

The Historian of California 
MARY HALLOCK FOOTE 

Author of "The Led-Horse Claim," etc. 
MARGARET COLLIER GRAHAM 

Author of "Stories of the Foothills" 
GRACE ELLERY CHANNING 

Author of "The Sister of a Saint," etc, 
ELLA HIGGINSON 

Author of "A Forest Orchid," etc. 
CHARLES WARREN STODDARD 

The Poet of the South Seas 
INA COOLBRITH 

Author of "Songrs from the Golden Gate," etc. 
EDWIN MARKHAM 

Author of "The Man with fhe Hoe'* 
JOAQUIN MILLER 

The Poet of the Sierras 
BATTERMAN LINDSAY 

CHARLES FREDERICK HOLDER 

Author of "The Life of Agrassiz," etc 
CHAS. DWIGHT WILLARD 

CONSTANCE GODDARD DU BOIS 

Author of "The Shield of the Fleur de Lis" 



WILLIAM E. SMYTHE 

Author of "The Conquest of Arid America," etc 

DR. WASHINGTON MATTHEWS 

Ex-Prest. American Folli-Lore Societj 
WILLIAM KEITH 

The Greatest Western Paintei 
CHARLES A. KEELER 

LOUISE M. KEELER 

GEO. PARKER WINSHIP 

The Historian of Corouado's Marches 
FREDERICK WEBB HODGE 

of the Smithsonian Institution, W ishing-too 
GEO. HAMLIN FITCH 

Literary Editor S. F. ChronicU 
ALEX. F. HARMER 

CHARLOTTE PERKINS STETSON GILMAN 

Author of "In This Our World" 
CHAS. HOWARD SHINN 

Author of "The Story of the Mine," etc 
T. S. VAN DYKE 

Author of "Rod and Gun in California," etc 
MARY AUSTIN 

Author of "The Land of Little Rain" 
L. MAYNARD DIXON 

ELIZABETH AND JOSEPH GRINNELL 

Authors of "Our Feathered Friends" 



Contents— MarcH, 1907 



The Reconstruction of San Francisco, illustrated, by Edwin Emerson, Jr ipr 

The Builders, story, by Ednah Aiken 209 

The Man Who Found His Tombstone, illustrated, by Sharlot M. Hall 216 

Still-Born, poem, by Virginia Garland 223 

The Japanese Problem in California, by David Starr Jordan 224 

Some Leaves from a California Calendar, by Ethel Griffith, III 231 

West Wind, poem, by Ellsworth Lee 236 

Juda of the Gorges, story, by B. F. Sutherland 237 

Joey Davie, story, by R. C. Pitzer 243 

Music of March, by Virginia Garland 250 

The Harp of a Single String, poem, by Adelia B. Adams .* 255 

The Card-Handler, story, by James D. Kirkpatrick : 256 

The Faith of His Mother, story, by Rose L. Ellerbe 262 

Orleans Indian Legends, by Melcena Burns Denny — VIII: The Legend of A-Sdch- 

Wan-Neesh-Amor 267 

Flagstaff, Arizona, illustrated, by M. I. Powers 269 



Copyright 1907. Entered at the Los Angeles PostoflSce as second-class matter. fSee Publishers' Page) 




"Cures While You Sleep." 

Whooping-cough, Croup, Bronchitis, 
Coughs, Diphtheria, Catarrh. 

Confidence can be placed in a remedy 
which for a quarter of a century has 
earned unqualified praise. Restful nights 

are assured at once. Cresolenc U a Boon to 

Asthmatics. 
ALL DRUGGISTS 

Send Postal for De- 
scrifiti've Booklet. 

Cresolenc Antiseptic 
Throat Tablets for the 
irritated throat, of your 
druggist or from us, !0c 
in stamps. 

The 

Vapo-Cresolene Co. 

J 80 Fulton St., N.Y. 
I.ccmingnMiles Bldg 
Montreal, Canada 




For the Sick 




Bailey's 



Trade- Mark 
and Patented 



Good 

Samaritan 

Hot- Water Bottle 




The Ideal 
Holiday Gift 



It is soft as a pillow and soothes and relieves. Pits the 
body and stays in position. Largest heating surface of 
any hot-water bottle made. K moist eloth placed in the 
disk-hollow steams the face in Neuralgia, Earache or Tooth- 
ache. Ends button together, making a petfect foot-warmer. 



An Eider Down 
Cover given with 
every mail order 



lO-inck «<ineter '2 quarts). I.50 
IMnchdlamtter Oquarts). \.75 

Every One Guaranteed. 

Sent on receipt of price. Rubber Catalogue Free 

C. J. BAILEY (EL CO. 

22 Bo>-lston St., Boston. Mass. 



ne:\v arrivals 
Hand Tailored Ready-to-wear 

SPRING 
SUITS 

$15. $18. $20, $22, $25 and up 

Every clothing store boasts of its 
ten, fifteen or eighteen dollar suits 
— so do we but with equal force 
do we claim to solve the question 
of profitable clothes for the tailor 
vexed fellow who is casting about 
to escape from what his good sense 
tells him are badly executed, over- 
expensive attempts at fitting him. 
In no particular can the best, most 
exclusive tailor surpass in work- 
manship, finish or fabric the clothes 
we offer you, and our price will 
show a clean; substantial saving — 
one-third, like as not. We are 
anxious to demonstrate to your en- 
tire satisfaction that what we say 
is so. 

Mullen & Bluett Clothing Co. 

FIRST AND SPRING STS. 



College Boot 



o r 



Yo 



ung 




WOMEN 



A smart boot for 
general street wear. 
Patent calf with mat 
kid quarter, medium 
low military heel 
an d welted exten- 
sion sole. Button 
style also 



I $ 



t 



WRITE FOR 
CATALOGUE 



Wetherby-K a y s e r 

' Shoe Compan>^ 

217 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Saint Vincent^s College 

Los Angeles, California 
Boardint^ and Day College 
and High School 

Military Drill and Calisthenics a Feature. 
For Catalogue write the President. 

Victor Deavity Pins 

Entirely new idea in fasteners for stock 
collars, cuffs, waists, dresses, children's 
clothes, etc. Price 25c postpaid. Merrill & 
Co., 426-28 Mason Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Ferry Seeds 
are not an experiment, but 
with proper cultivation, they 
assure success from the start. Users 
have no doubts at planting nor dis- 
appointments at harvest. -Get 



mnEtdS 



for biggest, surest, best crops— at all 

dealers. Famous for over 50 years. 

1907 Seed Annual free on request. 

D. M. FERRY & CO., 
Detroit, Mich. 



Espey's Fragrant Cream 

will relieve and cure chapped hands, iips, rash, sun- 
Durn, chafed or rough skin from any cause. Prevents 
tendency to wrinkles or ageing of the skin. Keeps the 
face and hands soft, smooth, firm and white. It Has 
no ecfvxal. Ask for it and take no substitute. 

PacKa^e of Espey's SacHet Po-wrders 

Sent FREE on receipt of 2c to pay postage. 

P. B. KEYS, Agent, 111 South Cen er Ave., Chicago 



A Sure 



KIDDER'S PASTILLES. '.§??"^.Asf hma. 



STO>?ELL & CO., fif rs. 



iWi 



Sold by iiU DruKKists, 

or by mail. 35 rents. 

Cliarlestowu, Mass- 



Rider Agents Wanted 

in each town to ride and exhibit satnple 

IQ07 model. IVrite for Special Offer, 

Finest Gnamnteed ^ 1^% if^^ ^ ^^ 7 

1907 Models ^*«/ ■€» <9^# 

with Coaster-Brakes and Puncture Proof tires. 
1905 & 1906 Models ^7#«« 4frfO 
all of best makes V ' «■» ^ M^ 

SOO Second - Hand Wheslm 

All Makes and Mod- tf O 4t% 0O 
els, g-ood as new yf^ tW ^O 
Great Factory Clearing Sale. 
We Ship on Approval ivithcnit a cent 
deposit, pav the freight and allow 
TEN DAVS' free TKIAL.. 

Tire8,coa8ter-brake8,sundries,etc. 
half usual prices- Do not buy till 

you get our catalogs- Write at once. 

MjkAD C¥CLJS CO., Dept.it 2u^CI^caeo 




The Waysde Press 



"^ A. M. DUNN, Proprietor ^ 



Designing 
Engraving 
Printing 



Printets o f 
OUT WEST 



Estimates 
Promptly 
Furnished 



j 214 Franklin St» Los Angeles 



<s. 



COMMERCIAL, BOOK AND CATALOGUE 

PRINTING and BINDING 



FOR HEALTH, 


HAPPI- 


NESS AND 


A HOME 


COME 


TO 



Southern 
California 



Vrite for information 
and illustrated printed 
matter, enclosing a 5 
cent stamp, to 



THE: 



Chamber of Commerce 



Los y\n^ele9, Cal. 



J.HPACKARD 

Banker and 
Broker ... 



Ensenada, Lower California 
Mexico 

e^ 

Information concerning: Mexico 
and Lower California cheerfully 
furnished and business entrusted in 
my hand given my personal 
attention 



Lea & Perrins' Sauce 



THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

is invaluable to the fastidious 
cook. It adds zest to her Gravies 
and spice to her Salads, and im- 
proves the flavor of Fish, Game 
and Soups. Its rare rich flavor 
makes Lea & Perrins' Sauce 
the most useful of all seasonings. 



' r- 



Beware of 
Imitations 



|ohn Duncan's Sons,AgtS.,N Y 



Designated Depository of the United States 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES 

Special Ladies' Department 

Capital Stock $ 1.250,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 1,456,023.98 

Deposits 15.'213,974.30 

J. M. Elliott, President Stoddard Jess, Vice-President 

W. C. Patterson, Vice-President 

G. E. Bittinger, Vice-President 

John S. Cravens, Vice-President 

W. T. S. Hammond, Cashier 

A. C. Way, Asst. Cashier E. S. Pauly, Asst. Cashier 

E. W. Coe, Asst. Cashier A. B. Jones, Asst. Cashier 

All departments of a modern banking business 
conducted. 

The 

National Bank of California 

at Los Angeles 

Northeast Corner 2nd and Spring Streets 

J. E. FisHBURN, President 

W. D. WooLwiNE, Vice-President 

R. I. Rogers, Cashier 

F. J. Belcher, Jr., Ass't. Cashier 

Solicits Business and Correspondence 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

526 California St», San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $ 2,578,695.41 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1906 38,531,917.28 



F. Tillmann, Jr., President 

Daniel Meyer, First Vice-President 

Emil Rohte, Second Vice-President 

A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier 

Wm. Herrmann, Asst. Cashier 

George Tourny, Secretary. 

A. H. Muller, Asst. Secretary 

Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

Directors 

F. Tillmann, Jr., Daniel Meyer, Emil 
Rohte, Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, N. 
Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. Kruse, 
W. S. Goodfellow 



BEKINS VAN & STORAGE CO. 

Reduced Rates to and From all Points 



Shippers of 

Household Goods 



140 South Broad V ay, Los Angeles 
1015 Broadway . . . Oakland 



OFFICES 



Room 500, 95 Washington St., Chicago 
9 Montgomery St., . . San Francisco 



Oil and Mining at San Luis Obispo 

/•v^UNDREDS of thousands of acres of proven oil lands awaiting de- 
tuWlLt velopment. Our harbor ships more oil than any other port in the 
IZ31 State. One of the largest refineries in the world will be in opera- 
> tion in March, 1907. Our mountains abound in building stone, bi- 
tuminous rock, asphaltum, onyx, quicksilver, chrome, manganese, copper, iron, 
antimony, and gold. 

Chamber of Commerce, ^^i-JfJUrZa^^ 



^tfi»Vaioma Toii.et5?ap 



AT ALL 
DRUG STORES 



ANYVO THEATRICAL COLD CREAM 



prevents early wrinkles. It is not a freckle coatinfir ; it re- 
moves them. ANYVO CO., 427 North Main St., Los Anreles 



Hummel Bros. & Co. furnish best help. 116-118 E. Second. 



MENNEN'5 

^"-TOILET POWDER 



Talcum 



MARCH WINDS 



are powerless to liartn the skin and complexions of 
tliiise who acijuire the Kood liahit of daily usinx 
>I<-iiii<*n'H ItorattHi Talciiin I'owdcr, tlie imrest and 
safest of sootliinjj an<i hcaliuK toilet uowders. 

Mennen'H is a sjitisfylntf linish of a <ieliKhtfnl 
shave, the most essential itemoiiu lady's toilet table, 
and in the nursery indispensable. 

Flit up in ■aa-Kfillablr boirt, for your protection. If 
Menncn's Lite is on the cover, it's (vaiilne and a Kuaran- 
tee of purity. Ocliifhtful .ifter shaving. Sold every- 
where, or liy mail J5 tents. .Sample free. 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., Newark.N. J. 

Try Mennens Violet (Borated) Taltuni Powder. 
It has the scent of fresh cut Parma Violets. 



DRINK 



Maier & Zobelein 

BREWERY 




LAGER-BEERS 

1 he best and purest brewed on the 

Coast. For sale in bottles 

and kegs. 

T«l«phonesi Svinset, Main 91 
Home 91 





Mothers! 

Mothers ! ! 

Mothers ! ! ! 

Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup 
has been used for over SIXTY YEARS 
by MILLIONS of MOTHERS for their 
CHILDREN while TEETHING with 
PERFECT SUCCESS. It SOOTHES 
the CHILD, SOFTENS the GUMS, AL- 
LAYS all PAIN, CURES WIND 
COLIC, and is the best remedy for 
DIARRHOEA. Sold by all Druggists 
in every part of the world. Be sure and 
ask for "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syr- 
up," and take no other kind. Twenty- 
five cents a bottle. 

Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 
1906. Serial Number 1098 



Die in 
Open Air 
Seekingf 
Water. 




and grain for it. Dry, clean; never leaves a mark. 

At Drue cists — 15c a box. M ''""" •'""'''*'«"'' "» ^J*: 

•'"^ for one or ooc. for three 

boxes, expres! prepaid. Also ask your druggist for Yankee 
Roach Powder or send us z.')C.; we'll mail direct to you. 

"Never fails." 

The Rat Biscuit Co. 26 Fisher St. Springfield, O. 



Earlimont Colony 




Tulare 

County 

California 



A Land of Opportunity 

A Land of Promise 

Earliest Section 

Of California's 

Early Belt 



EARLIEST 

That's What Counts 

Earliest Oranges 
Earliest Grapes 
Earliest Figs 
Earliest Olives 



Quickest Returns 
Extraordinary Prices 



Gathering the Earliest Oranges in the 
State near Portersville. 



EARLIEST VEGETABLES 
EARLIEST DECIDUOUS FRUITS EARLIEST SMALL FRUITS 

South of Portersville, earliest part of Tulare County. Rolling upland. At base 
of Sierra foothills. No killing frosts. No scale. No smut. No diseases. No 
heavy winds. A beautiful landscape. Responds to landscape gardener's art. Pure 
air. Unsurpassed climate. Remarkably healthful. Well located. Abundant cheap 
Water. Virgin soil, extremely rich. Close to railroad. Near to mountain camps 
and resorts. Splendid hunting and fishing grounds in easy reach. 

FIRST SUBDIVISION— TO THOSE WHO W^ILL IMPROVE 

Earlimont Colony Co. will care for property of absent owners. Land with water only 
$50.00 per acre. Purchasers given benefit of land at about one third usual price in 
preference to other modes of advertising first subdivision. Large tracts for sale for 
subdivision. A crop of early vegetables will pay for land first season. Orange 
groves begin to bear second season and increase rapidly each succeeding year till they 
net from $300 to $600 or more per acre. Good grammar school already on property. 
Store, postofifice, telephone, etc., will soon be established. A flourishing town soon. 
Electric roads in near future. Get in early and avoid the rush. 

Address all communications to WM. A. SEARS, Portersville, Tulare County, Cal. 



TROPICAL 
RIPS 



ON 



SUMMER 
EAS 

By tKe Dee Line 

New York to Havana 



$60 



for 12 day round trip includes 
all expenses on steamer and al- 
io ws 2 days stop in Havana, or 



Good 6 Months if Desired 

Optional Trip en route to 
Jacksonville, Florida, $7.00 

Every Ocean Comfort, Luxurious 
Staterooms, Promenade Decks, Superb 
Cuisine, Rooms en suite with Bath. 
Electric Lighted Throughout 

SEMI-MONTHLY SAILINGS 

Tickets, reservations and full informa- 
tion on request. 

Address 

GEO. F. TILTON 

Gen! Pass. Agent 
Dept. N. 

Brunswick Steamship Co. 

32 Broadway 
New York City 



SIGHTSEERS, LOOKl 




You havn't seen the beauties of the 
Pacific Coast until you visit 

ENSENADA (Lower Cal.) MEXICO 

Take the beautiful Steamer ST. Denis 
from San Diego and you'll be well repaid 

Time Card of Steamer St. DenU 



LEAVE SAN DIEGO 

2, 5, 8„ 14, 18, 24 and 
27th of each month, 
at 9 p. m., arriving 
next morning at En- 
senada 



LEAVE ENSENADA 

3, 6, 12, 15, 22, 25 and 
28th of each month at 
8 p- m arriving next 
morning at San Diego 



Hotel Cumberland 

New YorK S. W. Cor. Broadway at 54th St. 




Ideal Location. Near Theatre", Shopn ami f'ciitral I'ark. r'liie 
Cuisine. Kxcelleut Food and rcanonablc pricPH 

NEW, MODERN AND ABSOLUTELY FIRE PROOF 

Within one minute's walk i.r fJih Ave. "L" and .Subway and ac- 
les^iblc to all Kurfncc cur liiH-^. Transient ratea $2.50 with Bath 
and up. SEND FOR SOOKLET 

Under Management of 

H. P. STIMSOf , Formerly with Hotel Imperial, New Yort( 



Do You Want to Know About Southern California? 

^ AsK the Questions ^ 
• We will do the Rest • 

THIS IS THE WAY 



UNITED SYNDICATES CO., 
Long Beach, Cal. 

Dear Sirs: I would like to make a trip to Southern Cali- 
fornia. I have heard of the wonderful opportunitie's to make 
money in your land of sunshine and flowers. I am not in the rich 
tourist class, but if you can prove to me that I can make money 
by investing a small amount of capital in a gilt-edge real estate 
proposition, you may be able to interest me to the point where 1 
can afford to make a trip there to see for myself. 

I thank you in adtvance if you will answer the following 
questions by return mail: 

What is really back of Southern California besides climate, 
scenery, fruits and flowers in both winter and summer, and 
tourists, to make that God's favored place continue so to pros- 
per? 

What was the population of Los Angeles ten years ago? 

What is its population now? 

What do you think the population will be in 1912? 

What was the population of Long Beach ten years ago? 

What is its population now? 

What do you think the population of Long Beach will be in 
1912? 

What is back of Long Beach to make it so prosperous? 

Do you think it will continue so? and if so why? 

Why do you believe that Los Angeles and Long Beach will 
become one city? 

How small an investment is worth while? 



Please send me booklets, maps and any other literature or 
information that would be of interest to a homeseeker or in- 
vestor, pertaining to Southern California, and particularly to 
Long Beach, its new harbor, and the commercial possibilities. 

Yours truly. 
Name 

Address 



Add any other questions you may wish to ask regard- 
ins Southern California; write your name and address, 
tear out page and mail to 

The United Syndicates Co., = 

J4 Pacific Avenue 

LONG BEACH [Los Angeles County], CAL. 



MOTWi 



mtmm 



^mm 



LONG BEACH 

CALIFORNIA'S GREATEST BEACH RESORT 




PAVILION AND WHARF, LONG BEACH 



POPULATION 18.000 

Thirty-five minutes' ride from Los Angeles brings you to Long Beach, 21 miles 
due south. A model city, with a most excellent school system, water, light and power 
plants; six banks, with assets of more than $3,000,000.00. Streets oiled and a great 
many paved. The finest climate, due to its direct south exposure. It is reached by 
the Southern Pacific and Salt Lake Railway Systems and the Pacific Electric Rail- 
way, the finest electric system in America, if not in the world. 

The Bathing Beach is 14 miles in length, of hard white sand, with a width of 
300 to 600 feet. 

A feature of interest to all visitors is the Long Beach Bath House, an institution 
unequalled in America, containing Warm Salt Plunges, and all forms of baths. This 
institution maintains during the summer months, a complete Life Saving Service, 
oflFering visitors absolute safety whilst surf bathing. 

For copy of new booklet, just out, address Jas. A. Miller, Secretary Long Beach 
Chamber of Commerce, or any of the following firms: 



United Syndicate Co., Ltd. 
Alamitos Land Co. 
The National Bank of Long Beach. 
First National Bank of Long Beach. 
Townsend-Dayman Investment Co. 
R. Donaldson Brown, Real Estate. 
T. Sherwood Hodson, Jr., Real Estate. 
The Cowan-Wiseman Co., Real Es- 
tate. 
F, W. Steams & Co., Real Estate. 
George H. Blount, Real Estate. 



E. L. Covert & Co., Real Estate. 

Young-Parmley Co., Real Estate. 

J. W. Wood. 

Long Beach Bath House and Amuse- 
ment Co. 

Dr. L. A. Perce. 

C. W. Hibbard, Real Estate and In- 
vestments. 

Wheeler Real Estate Agency. 

Tincher & Cox Realty Co. 

Kansas Realty Co. 









CAPITAL OF PLACER COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 



A beautiful, healthful city, lo- 
cated in the mountains, where the 
climate is unexcelled, and where 
you can grow peaches, pears, 
plums, oranges and olives. . Dairy- 
ing, stock raising and creameries. 




COURT HOUSB AUBURN 



Special Inducements for 



Tourist Winter or Summer Hotel 



J. H. wills, Real Estate. 
Auburn Lumber Co. 
W. W. Rodehaver, Real Estate 
William G. Lee Co. 



Freeman A. Walsh 

J. W. Morgan, Dry Goods. 

E. S. Birdsall, Olive Oil. 




A SCENE SHOWING ONE OF OUR INDUSTRIES. 

For further particulars, write to Board of Trade, Madera, California. 



OROVILLE 

CALIFORNIA 
The Queen City of Butte County 



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PRUir SCBNB NEAR OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 

Oroville is the county seat of Butte County, California. It is at the end 
of S. P. from Marysville. on direct line of the Western Pacific. Is the terminus 
of the northern electrical line from Chico. 

More than $7,000 in gold is taken daily from the soil by dredging in the 
Oroville vicinity — over 35 dredgers in operation. 

A moderate and even climate. 

Oranges, olives, lemons and other fruit grows in abundance here^ 

Land can be had from $15.00 to $100.00 per acre. 

The home of the Ehmann Olive Oil. 

Has two excellent banks. 

The Union Hotel, one of the best hotels in Northern California. 

Water and light in abundance, and hay, grain and live stock are staple 
products. 

Further information can be had by addressing Secretary Chamber of Com- 
merce, or any of the following well known firms: 

L. H. Alexander, Merchant. 
Ehmann Olive Co.  
Union Hotel and Annex. 
R. S. Kltrlck, Lumber. 
Oroville Light & Power Co. 
Ophir Hardware Co. 
John C. Gray, Fruit Grower. 
Bank of Rideout, Smith & Co. 



E. C. Tucker & Son, Real Estate. 

First National Bank. 

T. W. Green & Co., Real Estate. 

Z. D. Brown, Real Estate. 

W. P. Hammon, Dredae Mining. 

Perkins & Wise Co., Merchants. 

E. Meyer & Co., Merchants. 

Lausen &. Fetherston, Searchers of Records. 



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i^.'wvij/C^ r\^ <x^tyf~J^^ (A..^a--xn/La ^n^tt^e^ Jf'*~'^ — X--*? 

'^ 1 1 F M ' *^ R R P) FLOUR CO ( ^^<^' ^^^ ^ C©^^"^ Jv^cito;^) ^-/^ stern fCq c^okt 



(ii. 



GALIFORNIA' 

WINES 





The Pure Juice of 
Selected Grapes 

Aged by time alone. We 
make a feature of shipping 
east two cases assorted 
wines containing 24 bottles 
(5 to gallon) for 

$1 1;£2 

Freight prepaid to any 
R. R. station in the U. S. 

Write for Price List 



EDWARD GERMAIN WINE COA 



e>3d So. Mam Sk^r. 

I.OS AN«EI_ES 0/M_. 



Is It Worth Trying? 

Thousands of house- 
wives have answered 

YES: 
Mapleine 

Is a household necessity 
with it we can make 
our table syrup (better 
than Maple) and flavor 
our puddings, cakes, 
icings, candies etc. 
to perfection 

As an inducement to 
try MAPLEINE we will 
mail you a 2 oz. bottle, 
enough for two gallons 
of syrup. Our Cook 

Book, and set of Comic Post Cards, in colors. 

All for 35 cents, (stamps) 

Cresent Mfg. Co. 'iV's,' Seattle, Wash. 




Baldwin and Opal 
REFRIGERATORS 



Constitute the most Elaborate, most Extensive, 
most Economical and most Perfect line in Existence 




We exhibit about SO Different 
patterns and sizes 



J 



ames W. Hellmarit 

AGENT 



OPAL 

TMr KING or 

REFRIGERATORS 



i59-t6t N. Spring St. Los Angeles, CaL ba 



SNOW WHITE iNsiDc AMDomoa 

OAK CASES WITH OPAL UMIMQ 





HOME/8/ 
/^A/N 866e 




s 



m wmm ^''"Spiim^ 



Pre-Columbi a n 
Relics 

Genuine Prehistoric 
Pottery, Ornaments and 
Implements. DIRECT 

FROM THE RUINS in 
Arizona and New Mexico. 
Collectors supplied. Se- 
lect what you wish from 
my collection, examina- 
tion by photprraph or as 
desired. Prices reason- 
able. 

Write for descriptions 
of specimens found in ex- 
plorations of the ruins; 
personally conducted ex- 
cavations. Address 

Reamer Ling 

St. Johns, Arizona 

Membef Southwest So- 
ciety, Archaelogical In- 
stitute of America, etc. 




Continental Building & Loan 
Association 

CORNER MARKET AND CHURCH STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Paid in Capital and Reserve 
$3,000,000.00 



Pays 5 Per Cent Interest on Ordinary Deposits 
Pays 6 Per Cent Interest on Term Deposits 



WASHINGTON DODGE President 

GAVIN McNAB Attorney 

WM. CORBIN Secretary and General Manager 



lilVlin TUCITDIPII nni n PDCIM prevents early wnnUles. It is not a freckle coating- ; it re- 
ANllU'lnLAIlllllAL llULU UIilAIV] movesthem. ANYVO CO., 427 North Main St., LrOsAnireles 




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THE NATION BACK OF US, THC WORLD IN FRONT 





^lOufWCSTJ 



Vol. XXVI, No. 3 



MARCH. 1907 




the: reconstruction or san 

FRANCISCO 

By EDWIN EMERSON, JR. 
AN FRANCISCO is rebuilding along the lines of neces- 
sity. Apparently its people are unconscious that the 
city has become a far more important point of the world 
than in former years. By the time the shattered city 
has been rebuilt, its inhabitants will find that it has be- 
come a city twice as large as before the great fire. 

Sortie 2,500 acres were left charred after April 21, one year ago. 
This part of the city is taking life again as before. It all seems des- 
tined to be "down town." By the time the city is rebuilt solid to 
Van Ness avenue — the wide avenue where the fire was stopped — 
San Franciscans will wake to the fact that they have a city pre- 
pared for a million inhabitants, most of whom will already be there. 
From present indications this is expected to require from three to 
four years' work. 

The civic center of San Francisco, before the earthquake and fire, 
was the corner of Market, Kearney and Third streets, where the 
great newspaper buildings stood. That point is even now one of the 
most important in the current of the new city's life, but it will not 
hold or regain that prestige singly. Already the after-fire concen- 
tration of retail shops and department stores along Van Ness avenue 
and Fillmore street has seriously upset the calculations of San Fran- 
cisco real-estate speculators. 

The business population of San Francisco has scattered, and is 
still scattering. Even the lawyers have gone far adrift. Ultimately 
these professional men will probably be drawn together again around 
the courts to come. 



The illustrationt not otherwise credited are from photof;raphs taken by H. C. TiDbetts for Sunset and 
Out Wbst is indebted to the courtesy of that magazine for permission to use them. 



Copyright 1S07 by Out West Magazine Co. All Rights Reserved 



I 92 



OUT WEST 



The banking and financial district will remain about where it was, 
near the old mint and the reconstructed stock exchange and mining 
exchanges. 

The wholesale district also, while it has now drifted far out into 
the Potrero, is bound to come back within easier reach of the water- 
front, and railroad freight-depots. Present indications show that it 
will be more scattered along the water-front, but in other respects it 
will be more conveniently located. 

The down-town shopping district, which now still lingers up-town 
along the wide expanse of Van Ness avenue, will surely move down 
again. But when this happens it will be found to extend over a 
section several times as large as formerly, and it will be supplemented 
by an up-town district of hardly less importance. 



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A B[T OF California Street, Mills Building at Extreme Right 

The theaters and places of amusement, almost without exception, 
have moved up-town — and mean to remain there, or move even still 
further up. 

The only class of business that has distributed itself helter-skelter, 
and without regard to former limitations, is the liquor trade. De- 
spite the increase of San Francisco's liquor license fees, saloons and 
"speak-easy" grocery dramshops, have scattered themselves all over 
town. On the so-called Barbary Coast, the sailor's dives are worse 
than ever before. At many "South of Market'' street-corners, there 
are four saloons at each corner. The former city ordinances, re- 
stricting rum-shops to one mile beyond the military reservations of 



RECONSTRUCTION OF SAN FRANCISCO 



•93 



the Presidio and Fort Mason, have become a dead-letter. Only along^ 
Van Ness avenue and the aristocratic Pacific avenue are no saloon 
signs to be seen. Fashionable restaurants and the social clubs that 
have moved up into that residence district supply their place. 

San Francisco, while losing the compactness of its former years, 
is unconsciously preparing itself for a population as great as that of 
Manhattan Island. The center of the town, accordingly, will be 
very much larger in extent and will lie at least a mile further up 
town. 

In a year's time it has become evident what the future of San 
Francisco will be. After all, the rehabilitation of 2,500 burnt acres, 
while doubtless a gigantic undertaking, need not be long protracted ; 







 

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LuoKj-NG South fkom {Sutter and Stockton Streets 

for, of necessity, it must begin and be carried on everywhere at once. 
One hundred million dollars will be spent during the year 1907 in 
reconstructing San Francisco, but the work for which this money 
pays will be scattered over a very wide area. At least seventy-five 
thousand men will be engaged in it every working day. 

San Francisco can be roughly divided into the seven districts of its 
seven hills — to-wit, the down-town business district ; the Latin Quar- 
ter, with Barbary Coast to the northward; "South of Market," with 
the Mission and Potrero residence- and factory districts ; Nob Hill, 
with the Western Addition ; Pacific Heights, and Ocean Beach. So 
it was before the fire, and so it will be again. The city is following 
its old lines, but is stretching them. 

So far as rebuilding is concerned* San Francisco can be districted 



RECONSTRUCTION OF SAN FRANCISCO 



»95 



as before. Telegraph Hill, the North Beach parts of the Latin 
Quarter, and the South of Market district, as well as the Potrero, had 
an advantage in that all their woden buildings were completely burned 
to the ground. There was little to clear away but ashes before re- 
building began. This was taken advantage of first by the whole- 
salers, who were anxious to locate themselves closer to the railroad 
yards, as well as to the water-front. 

They were the pioneers in the burnt district. They had to have 
a place of business as soon as possible after the fire; for their out- 
side business made demands upon them no less insistent than be- 
fore. The markets that dealt in such perishable goods as fresh 
fruit, meat and fish had to get under shelter "instanter." 




Photo by R. J. Waters & Co. 

Excavating kor a Samsome Street Warehouse 

They built right away and started the wheels of commerce by 
telegraph. Corrugated iron proved quickest and most effective. 
After that came reinforced cement. The wholesalers have now grad- 
ually occupied more or less temporary structures throughout all the 
old wholesale and shipping districts, and have increased the size of 
this district by a large addition to the southward. The work of re- 
placing this important part of the city's activities under permanent 
shelter is going on all about San Francisco, over and under the 
temporary buildings already occupied. It is only a question of time 
before all the wholesalers will be properly housed. 

While these all-important establishments were falling on their 



196 



OUT WEST 



feet, "South of Market" was overgrown by wooden shacks and 
buildings with a leaven of brick that has made the whole wide area 
populous. 

There will be this difference between the new and the old "South 
of Market" section, that so much of its actual ground-space has 
been taken up by business houses that the district will not be able to 
hold the population it had before. This, in its turn, must crowd 
the Mission district, as is happening already. 

That portion of San Francisco which lies just beyond the Mission, 
under the Twin Peaks, will grow to contain a very large population. 
That is where the workingmen are seeking homes — and workingmen 
are multitudinous now in San Francisco. 




Photo by Waters 
In the Italian Quarters of North Beach 

On the other side of the city, the Latin Quarter has sprung up in 
thousands of gaily-colored wooden buildings, all over Telegraph 
Hill and down to the "Barbary Coast," just where it was before. 
This quarter of the town has been built up more rapidly and more 
compactly within the twelve months since the great fire than any 
other quarter of the city. There is a hum of hammers and such 
lusty cry of workers there as must have sounded of yore in the 
building of Carthage. On reason for this is that the Italians, Mex- 
icans, and Portuguese — in short, the "Dagos" — have built up their 
own homes without regard to labor-union restrictions or contentions. 
When the American workingmen, plying this trade or that, have 



RECONSTRUCTION OF SAN FRANCISCO 



197 



laid down their tools to go on strike, the "Dagos" never turned aside 
from their task, but have worked away busily as ants — men, women 
and children — without regard to eight-hour rules, Sundays or even 
Saints' fiestas. 

After all, though, this has been but a side current. Its gush ex- 
presses unlimited faith in the future of the great city at the Golden 
Gate, but it is effective only within its own channels. 

The rush of new San Francisco will leave the quaint Latin Quar- 
ter to one side. The new Chinatown, too, when the Chinese shall 
have come straggling back from their present haunts in Oakland 
and Alameda, will be a mere side-show in the development of the 




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II. 

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i).yiifiiin. 




The Shreve Building, Post and Grant Ave. 
Tbe foundation of the Bohemian Club is ju&t opposite 

city. The center of population will roll far up Market street toward 
the Twin Peaks. 

The rebuilding of the Latin Quarter and the "South of Market" 
district being more or less of an accomplished fact, nothing remains 
to be considered* in the rebuilding of San Francisco's burned dis- 
tricts but the very center of the city. This is fed by streets that 
run out like the ribs of a fan, focusing in the Ferry Building, at the 
foot of Market street. 

Palpable signs of activity there w^ere slow to come. All last sum- 
mer architects were drawing plans and advertising madly for 
draughtsmen, and consfniction companies were preparing to draw 
in men from the whole country; but there were no outward signs 



RECONSTRUCTION OF SAN FRANCISCO 



'99 



of effective industry except the clearing away of bricks and twisted 
scrap-iron. This in itself presented a problem of discouraging mag- 
nitude, although it proved to be less formidable than it looked at 
first blush. 

The great work that is being undertaken in that most important 
district of San Francisco is at last beginning to tell. The signs of 
persistent and thorough work all through the center of the city show 
that this part, once it rises up, will arise majestically, as if by magic. 

The center of the city shows signs of rebuilding in an analogous 
manner. This business-center is shaped somewhat like a piece of 
pie, with the Ferry Building at the sharp point of the angle. The 
space between the two sides of the angle increases in width as you 




i.i.. J......... '. ..,_...; .-, ...;;i.\(.., Ai I'o.vELL .\ND Market 

move up town. Market street, the main business artery of San 
Francisco, bisects this triangle lengthwise. At the present time the 
greatest amount of rebuilding is close to the point of the angle, but 
it is gradually spreading out and pushing into the burned section, 
until almost the whole piece has been rebuilt solid to Van Ness ave- 
nue, following one line of the angle. 

Following the other line, along Mission and Folsom Streets, there 
has been an even quicker activity, though of a less permanent char- 
acter. It is certain -that Market street will become an even much 
more important artery of the city's life than it was before; for it 
points down the neck of the peninsula, whither the bulk of the 
increasing population is straining. 



200 OUT WEST 

The whole work of rebuilding San Francisco has been cumulative. 
Men have come to this far-distant point of the westernmost rim of 
America by hundreds each day. They have come in train-loads 
from the East — workingmen from the American factory-centers, 
and from the over-crowded kingdoms of Europe. They have come 
in ship-loads from the Hawaiian Islands and from Japan. Many 
of them were unable, perhaps, to speak or to understand one word 
of English on the day of their arrival, but all were eager to work — 
and always there has been work for them to do. Even if ten times 
as many men flocked to San Francisco as have come throughout 
this year, there would still be enough work for them all, and plenty 
over. 

No matter what work they might be engaged in, their wages in 
almost every instance have improved. As a result, there is plenty 
of money among the floating population of San Francisco. Much 
of it undoubtedly goes to the saloons and places of amusement, but 
not the least part is going into the upbuilding and furnishing of 
permanent homes. 

The following tables, prepared by the official representatives of the 
building trades and the affiliating labor organizations in San Fran- 
cisco, will show better than mere words just what the reconstruction 
of San Francisco means for the workingmen engaged in it : 



ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN BUILDING TRADES IN SAN 
FRANCISCO, JANUARY i, 1907. 

NUMBER RULING WAGES 

YEAR AGO. PRESENT. YEAR AGO. PRESENT. 

Baggage Messenger & Transfermen 40 30 $15.00 wk $15.00 wk 

Bakers' Drivers 108 72 18.00 wk 21.00 wk 

Bakers' Pie Bakers 19 28 15.00 wk 18.00 wk 

Barbers 726 527 16.00 wk 18.00 wk 

Barber Shop Porters and Bath- 

House Men 47 33 iO-50 wk 10.50 wk 

Bartenders 612 782 18.00 wk 20.00 wk 

Beer Drivers 297 316 18.00 wk 25.00 wk 

Blacksmiths 120 145 2.50 da 2.75 da 

Boat Builders 44 37 4-CO da 4.00 da 

Boilermakers 50 170 .40 hr -44 hr 

Bookbinders 201 178 19.50 wk 19.50 wk 

Bookbinders — Bindery Girls 260 263 8.00 wk 9.00 wk 

Bootblacks 286 206 12.00 wk 12.00 wk 

Boot and Shoe Workers 310 310 

Brewery Workers — Bottlers 220 340 13.50 wk 15.00 wk 

Brewery Workers— Brewers 511 475 2i.oowk 2i.oowk 

Broom Makers 25 14 2.50 da 2.50 da 

Butchers 118 451 18.00 wk 20.00 wk 

Carriage and Wagon Makers 211 417 3.50 da 4.00 da 

Cemetery Employes 198 182 2.50 da 2.50 da 

Cigar Makers 246 262 16.00 wk 18.00 wk 

Clerks— Drug I75 I57 85.00 mo 85.00 mo 

Clerks— Ppstoffice new 136 900.00 yr 900.00 yr 

Clerks— Retail 258 225 20.00 wk 20.00 wk 

Clerks— Shoe 175 I54 20.00 wk 20.C0 wk 



RECONSTRUCTION OF SAN FRANCISCO 201 

NUMBER RULING WAGES 

YEAR AGO. PRESENT. YEAR AGO. PRESENT. 

Clerks — Shipping new 106 5.00 da 

Cloak Makers 125 92 17.00 wk 19.00 wk 

Cooks 507 530 2.50 da 3.50 da 

Coopers' Hands 352 376 3.00 da 3.50 da 

Coopers — Machine 72 89 2.50 da 3.25 da 

Engineers — Marine 1188 1248 

Firemen — Stationary 314 158 2.75 da 3.00 da 

Freight Handlers 152 139 2.25 da 2.50 da 

Garment Workers 1036 515 9.00 wk 9.00 wk 

Gas Workers 314 353 2.50 da 2.50 da 

Glass Bottle Blowers ,.... 181 133 35.00 wk 35.00 wk 

Glove Workers 156 85 3.00 da 3.00 da 

Hatters 8 15 25.00 wk 25.00 wk 

Horseshoers 125 117 4.00 da 5.00 da 

Iron Molders 700 710 3.50 da 4.00 da 

Janitors 97 103 2.00 da 2.50 da 

Laborers 2900 1800 2.25 da 2.50 da 

Laundry Workers 1650 1050 6.00 wk 6.00 wk 

to to 

18.00 wk 18.00 wk 

Machinists 1450 1355 3.25 da 3.75 da 

Machinists— Ship 115 150 325 da 3.75 da 

Machine Hands 132 43 2.50 da 3.00 da 

Milkers 352 214 **35.oomo **40.oomo 

Musicians 650 654 22.50 wk 25.00 wk 

Organ and Musical Instrument 

Makers new 54 4.00 da 

Pattern Makers 98 no 4.00 da 5.35 da 

Pavers 34 34 5.00 da 6.00 da 

Photo Engravers 85 102 21.00 wk 25.00 wk 

Press Feeders 240 265 12.00 wk 14.00 wk 

Pressmen 360 315 22.50 wk 26.00 wk 

Pressmen — Webb 108 108 4.00 da 4.50 da 

Riggers and Stevedores 1800 2000 4.50 da 5.00 da 

Riggers 40 60 5.00 da 5.00 da 

Seamen — Fishermen 2500 2500 *25o.oo *250.oo 

Seamen — Firemen 1200 1200 **50.oo nio **50.oo mo 

Seamen — Sailors 5000 5000 **45.oo mo **5o.oo mo 

Seamen— Stewards 1235 1355 **7o.oo mo **7o.oo mo 

Ship Calkers 149 153 5.00 da 5.00 da 

Ship Joiners 155 115 4.00 da 5.00 da 

Shipwrights 171 184 5.00 da 5.00 da 

Shoe Cutters 48 52 16.50 wk 17.50 wk 

Shoe Repairers 16 12 

Stage Employes 115 115 30.00 wk 35.00 wk 

Steam Fitters and Helpers 167 no 3.25 da 4.00 da 

Street Railway Construction Wkers. new 614 2.25 da 

Street Railway Employes 2170 1678 .26*4hr .26^/4hr 

Soap Makers & Candle Workers... 93 93 4.00 da 5.00 da 

Stereotypers & Electrotypers . . ! 69 72 4.00 da 5.00 da 

Sugar Workers 357 310 

Tailors 182 182 20.00 wk 20.00 wk 

Teamsters 1820 2604 3.50 da 4.00 da 

Teamsters — Expressmen 50 42 

Teamsters— Hackmen 304 203 2.00 da 2.50 da 

Teamsters— Ice Wagon Drivers 83 74 80.00 mo 80.00 mo 

Teamsters— Milk Wa.gon Drivers.. 360 330 75.00 mo 90.00 mo 
Teamsters — Mineral Water Wagon 

Drivers 63 34 21.00 wk 21.00 wk 

Teamsters— Stablemen 198 354 2.50 da 3.00 da 

Typographical 921 825 21.00 wk 23.00 wk 

Waiters I4n 1456 lo.oowk i2.oowk 



202 OUT WEST 

YEAR AGO. PRESENT. YEAR AGO. PRESENT. 

Waitresses new 225 10.00 wk 

Woodworkers — Box Makers 255 241 2.00 da 2.50 da 

Woodworkers — Picture Frame Mkrs 40 31 15.00 wk 18.00 wk 

Totals 39,724 39,157 

*For six months and keep. 
**Salary per month and keep. 

Number one year ago 39.724 

Number at present 39,i57 

Decrease 567 

BUILDING TRADES AND AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS IN SAN 
FRANCISCO, JANUARY i, 1907. 

Bricklayers and Masons 402 1806 $6.50 da $8.00 da 

Bridge & Structural Iron Workers — Inside Inside 

Housesmiths 390 700 3.00 4.00 

Bridge & Structural Iron Workers — Outside Outside 

350 450 

Bridge Builders 280 450 4.00 5.00 

Pile Drivers 395 432 3.50 4.00 

Carpenters 3067 9802 4.00 5.00 

Carpenters — Millmen 1144 1463 3.50 4.50 

Carpenters — Millwrights 100 125 4.00 5.00 

Carpenters — Stair-builders 70 no 4.00 5.00 

Carpet Mechanics 140 150 4.00 4.00 

Cement Workers 500 900 4.50 6.00 

Electricians 297 653 4.00 5.00 

Electricians — Linemen 500 650 3.00 3.75 

Elevator Conductors & Starters.... 182 21 50.00 mo 55.001110 

to to 

60.00 mo 60.00 mo 

Elevator Constructors 125 200 4.00 da 5.C0 da 

Engineers — Hoisting no 221 5.00 6.00 

Engineers — Stationary 382 307 4.00 4.00 

Furniture Handlers 100 175 2.50 3.00 

Gas & Electric Fixture Hangers... 95 150 4.C0 5.00 

Glaziers 150 250 4.00 4.50 

Granite Cutters 50 50 4.C0 5.00 

Hod Carriers . . "T 389 1060 4.00 5.00 

Lathers 125 250 4.00 6.00 

Longshore — Lumbermen 900 iioo 4.00 4.50 

Lumber Clerks 100 250 3.50 4.00 

Mantel, Tile & Grate Setters 50 75 5.00 6.00 

Marble Cutters 241 253 4.C0 5.00 

Marble Cutters — Setters 56 43 2.50 3.00 

Mosaic Workers 20 40 2.50 3.50 

Painters ., 1900 1800 4.00 4.50 

Painters — Sign Writers 85 189 4.50 5.50 

Painters — Varnishers 217 251 3.50 4.50 

Plasterers 256 654 5.00 7.00 

Plumbers 512 955 5.00 6.00 

Roofers — Felt & Composition 150 250 4.00 5.00 

Sheet Metal Wkrs — Cornice Makers 180 487 4.50 6.00 

Sheet Metal Workers — Roofers... 80 no 4.50 6.00 

Shinglers 106 150 4.00 5.00 

Stone Cutters 115 297 4.50 5.00 

Stone Sawyers 25 30 4.50 4.50 

Teamsters — Building & Material... 350 1400 2.50 3.00 

Window Shade Workers 30 50 3.50 4.50 

Housemovers 100 150 4.00 5.00 

Totals 14.466 28,459 



RECONSTRUCTION OF SAN FRANCISCO 



203 



From the time of the earthquake to the present day, over 5,000 
permits for permanent buildings, not including many more thou- 
sand permits for temporary structures, have been issued in San Fran- 
cisco. So far $65,000,000 have been invested on this work. During 
this year one hundred million more will be spent. 

As a result of all this work, San Francisco is growing up like a 
young forest springing from the base of a burnt giant redwood tree. 
Much of its first growth, undoubtedly, is like that of mushrooms 
sprouting up over night. 

For many years to come. San Francisco will be a wooden city, 
as before. To the north it will be almost nothing but wood ; to the 




Fairmont Hotel 

south it will be half wood and half brick; but through the center, 
converging toward the ferry point, there will be a solid body of 
splendid modern buildings. 

Fear of further earthquakes has stimulated the building of so- 
called "Class A" structures, with steel frames throughout, or re- 
inforced concrete. Some buildings combine the use of the two. 
Brick and stone will serve merely as a facing for steel structures. 
Hundreds of these are now building, and many are completed. 
Thousands more, of all sizes from two stories up, will follow within 
the next two years. Then San Francisco will have more of this 
highly desirable class of buildings than any other city in America. 

It is argued from their splendid immunity to earthquake shocks 



Z04 



OUT WEST 



before, that further earthquakes, if they shall come, will not injure 
these structures. 

So far as human life in the city is concerned, the new San Fran- 
cisco has already surpassed the old rallying goal of the gold-seekers, 
railroad-barons, and other fortune-hunters of early days. The activ- 
ity of the streets and the rush of retail trade alone, throughout San 
Francisco, would point to a rapidly increasing population. There 
are but two ways at present of making an accurate gauge — the school 
attendance and the rosters of the labor unions. Bank clearings, postal 
receipts, and other ordinary means of judging a city's growth can 
scarcely be depended upon in the changed conditions of San Fran- 
cisco. 




Looking North from Third and Howard 

In the schools during the last winter, thirty-five thousand chil- 
dren have been entered. There were thirty-seven thousand one year 
ago. 

In the labor unions, on the other hand, there has been a very large 
increase. This shows that what the city has lost in children, it has 
gained in the number of grown, working men. 

The increase has been most noticeable in the building trades. The 
other organizations, while losing here and there, have made up in 
other places, so that they now stand even. 

In the building trades, before the fire, there were enlisted 14,466 
men. Now there are more than 35,000 — and this figure will have 
been surpassed by the time this article is published. In other labor 



RECONSTRUCTION OF SAN FRANCISCO 



organizations of San Francisco, before the fire 39,724 were en- 
rolled. Now there are over 40,000 men. 

These figures are uncertain. Many of the San Francisco" unions 
the city so soon as they have made their little pile, others come to 
contain a large floating population. But while many workmen leave 
take their place. 

High wages are attracting these men ; but for the most part they 
are settling, and bringing their families with them. 

San Francisco has been advertised all over the world for the 
largesse of its present wages. This has attracted the best mechanics 
from all parts of the globe. They are mostly in the prime of life 
and capable of doing the best work in their various trades. San 




Geary Street, Looking West from Grant Ave. 

Francisco, thus, is obtaining the combined experience of skilled 
workmen from all parts of America, Europe, and even from South 
Africa, Australia and New Zealand. All the British colonies have 
supplied men, particularly carpenters and masons. 

Even the Orient, which for many years has been more or less 
excluded from supplying its bone and sinew to the development of 
the Pacific Coast, as we all have been made aware recently, has been 
pouring its swarms of coolies and cunning Oriental workmen into 
San Francisco. These men demand and receive the same wages as 
their white fellow workers, though entrance into the unions is barred 
to them. As a result of all this influx, and the liberal wages earned 
by these Orientals, a new "Jap Town'' has sprung up in the heart 




< 

O 
W 

w 
H 



RECONSTRUCTIOX Of SJX FRANCISCO 



2C7 



of San Francisco's white residence-districts, with a larger popula- 
tion of Japanese than were ever harbored in the Chinatown of old. 

What then has become of the former denizens of old San Fran- 
cisco ? 

During the days immediately following the earthquake and fire, it 
will be recalled, more than 350,000 people fled from San Francisco, 
leaving barely a fourth of its population. Judging by the reports of 
the labor unions, about two-thirds of these refugees came back. Only 
the leisure class, the aged, the unfit, and the Chinamen have kept 
away. The missing third has been supplied by people of similar 
classes and occupations — those that stood their ground. 

The refugees who remained camped about the city in shelter- 




Spring Valley Water Works Building 

tents and shacks got under solid roofs as soon as possible. Either 
houses built by the relief corporation have been supplied to them ; or, 
aided by loans from the relief fund, they have been able to rear roofs 
over their unsheltered heads. 

By this time the available house-room has about caught up with 
the demand. Rents are no longer soaring, nor will there be lack of 
plenty of places in which to sleep. Of the refugees who still remain 
in the open-air camps, in Golden Gate Park and elsewhere, most are 
preparing to pull up stakes before the next rainy season. 

The great thing about San Francisco, and its reconstruction, is 
that the bulk of its people never lost heart. There is no quavering 
among them about their present or their future. Those who re- 



2o8 



OUT WEST 



mained in the city were there to stay, and thousands who have come 
since then have caught the same spirit. They, too, have come 
to stay. 

The burning of the city, with all the loss entailed, was by no means 
so important a matter as whether the citizens would be willing to 
put their money back into the city. In the past, and in other countries, 
cities have been overthrown by earthquake or consumed by fire, and 
these cities have been abandoned by their people. Nothing remains 
of them now but their deserted ruins. 

The people of San Francisco never lost faith in their city. Almost 
without exception they have spent all their insurance money, and 
other funds derived from outside, on their city-to-be. This abiding 
faith and courage, more than aught else, has brought them financial 
aid from others. This is San Francisco's best financial asset, far 




Cali, Building from Mission and Third 

surpassing the city's former achievements, or its advantageous posi- 
tion as a mining outlet, or as one of the greatest of all marts for 
world-commerce. 

One of the most notable instances of the efifect of such faith on 
others has been the increasing investments which E. H. Harriman 
and the Goulds have made in their railway terminals at San Fran- 
cisco. Mr. Harriman, for instance, has shown himself willing to 
risk $2,000,000 on the single investment of the new Palace Hotel. 

San Francisco, as a city, has proven to the world that a community 
as such can remain intact even without buildings, until the time that 
buildings can be provided. After all, as Doctor Jordan said of his 
apparently ruined University, last April, "It is not buildings that 
hold together a college or a town, but the spirit that abides among 
the people that live there." 

San Francisco. 



209 




*THE buildi:rs 

By EDNAH AIKEN. 

|RS. PEYTON paused at her hill-window to look down 
upon the city which was springing up from the ashes 
with the youthful vigor of a green sapling in a burned 
forest. The forest simile was in her mind now. She 
had been in timber counties, and had seen the charred 
stumps standing like tortured sign-posts in the blackened fields ; had 
seen, later, the young and tender growth which mercifully shrouded 
the disaster. The grove of ghastly chimneys which had covered the 
San Francisco hills was now being replaced by blocks of wooden 
buildings rising magically like Aladdin's palace in a night. From 
her crowded days, she would steal many similar moments to marvel 
at these ant-like people who were so doggedly, and withal so gaily, 
restoring their ant-hill. The streets below her teemed with energy 
and congested traffic ; the cars were laden with absorbed faces ; great 
girders blocked the streets and pavements ; there was a small of 
freshly planed pine in the air. The scene was as new as Spring. 

A soft sigh escaped her. She wished that she were a man, that 
she might claim her share in the upbuilding of her loved city against 
which a coincidence of disaster had nearly effected annihilation. The 
series of catastrophes which would have stunned a frailer people had 
stimulated the San Franciscan, who was attempting the impossible 




Merchants' Exchange and Kohl Buii^ding 




O "3 

HI M 

l_I as 



THE BUILDERS 



with his shackled hands. She thought of George Faville, who had 
been Hterally burned out of a sick bed. He had not waited for the 
staying of the fire at the broad avenue to locate fleeing real estate 
agents, wringing from them easy leases for lots and buildings on 
the next small retail street. Before ten days had passed, he was 
housing firms whose salvation depended on immediate habitations. 
There was her burly neighbor, McMurtree, who, with a few soldiers, 
had cleared the main business street of brick and tortured wire in 
three hours ; Jardine, who was putting up a mimic forest of little 
green shacks to protect the refugees that winter ; Milton, who was 
stringing wires and laying rails over impossible grades, to carry 
the army of laborers — oh, how she wished that she were a man ! 




Using Railroad Trucks kor Removal of Debkis 

At the present rate of civic house-cleaning, the city would bear a 
semblance of order in three years, instead of the five which the most 
sanguine had prophesied in April. The streets were being opened, 
the tottering walls and chimneys were down, business was better 
than it ever had been before. There were plans for a great and 
beautiful city ; her husband's friends who met at their home every 
Sunday afternoon would tell their plans and hopes for the future, 
and Mrs. Peyton's ears always tingled. 

But she could not help, even a little. Her hands were tied, every 
minute pre-empted in doing just the sordid things, the mere routine 
of living. She could not give any assistance, or even time to plan 
for the great work. The buildings which had once supported them 



OUT WEST 



so generously had all been burned, the sites alone left to remind them 
of future prosperity. To turn them into income property, her hus- 
band had to abandon temporarily his profession, working as con- 
tractor for the architect who was supervising- their houses. The of- 
fice-buildings were going up — but slowly. It would be a year, or 
more, before there would be any returns. 

She sighed again as she turned from the scene which never failed 
to stimulate her ambition and imagination, though it was futile to 
dream of usefulness. To make it possible for them to live until the 
offices were opened, she had filled her large home with friends whose 
homes had been burned — servants were scarce — the days were not 
even long enough — 




Photo by R. J. Waters & Co. 

The WHITTEI.L, City of Paris, and Newman-Levinson Builwings 

The telephone bell was ringing as she went down the stairs. 

"Is this you, Madge?" a fagged voice asked, and before she could 
say good-morning, it broke directly into its errand. "I need a girl 
terribly. Can't your fine housemaid get me a friend, possibly? I'm 
so tired of experiments. I tried so hard to convince my last girl that 
iliis was a fine place, but she would not stay!" 

A laugh rang back over the wires. "Perhaps she did not like the 
way you did the work! Forgive me! But I'm looking for a girl 
myself. My head is in a towel this minute — the housekeeper's halo, 
Jim calls it. I hate haloes ; they are too sanctimonious — too advertis- 



THE BUILDERS 



2 i 3 



ing! Didn't I tell you that my treasure was married? Last week. 
Her sweetheart was a carpenter, you see, and I had thought that it 
would be years before I would lose her. But, bless you, he's getting 
ten dollars a day as a foreman. Is your husband earning ten dollars 
a day. Sue? She has a nice fiat, and two new tailor-suits. When did 
you or I have a new tailor-suit. Sue? Poor thing! You are too 
tired to be teased. I'm sorry. Good-bye." 

She hung up the receiver thoughtfully. Sue was tired, poor little 
woman, taking boarders, with three children scarcely out of their 
cradles. Mrs. Peyton was stooping for her duster when the front 
bell pealed. 

She had given her orders to the man, and was turning away, when 




The "Little Palace" Hotel 

he stopped her. "I'm leaving, Mrs. Peyton. This is my last morn- 
ing. I'd like to say good-bye." 

"Going?" She stretched out a dainty but democratic hand. "Oh, 
dear, but I'm sorry. No one can fill my orders as you do. There's 
old Mr. Adams, who must have his steak two inches thick, and Mrs. 
Johnson, who must have it thin. Xo one can lard a pot-roast as you 
can, and your crown-roasts ! Where are you going ?" 

"I'm not going away, Mrs. Peyton,'' he responded. "I'm going to 
stay right here and help rebuild this glorious city of ours. Being a 
butcher's clerk is too slow — one can't help. I've hired out as an ap- 
prentice to a carpenter. I'll get five dollars a day." 

"Have you ever done anything like that before?'' she asked. "No? 



2 14 



OUT WEST 



Yes, of course, we can all learn. Well, I wish you lusk. Good-bye." 
She was dusting in the front hall when a ring carried her to the 
back door. 

"I've called for da mon," the scavenger explained brokenly. "This 
worg is too leetle for me. I wanta help builda one gran' beautiful 
city of Zan Franzisco. I laya de brick. No, nevair before, but I 
learn, and getta more of da mon, so I go." 

"Even Pietro," she murmured, as she went back to her dusting. 
Willard, her ten-year-old, was cleaning brick, everybody had his 
share, but herself and the other w^omen. Her step was growing 
heavy as she mounted the stairs to Mr. Thomas's room, and before 
she had reached there, the bell rang again. "And I used to be- 




St. Francis Hotel 

grudge giving my maid twenty-five dollars a month ! 1 thought it 
an easy place !" 

"Vegetables going still higher?" she exclaimed. "And fish.^ It's 
absurd, with vegetable gardens growing all around San Francisco, 
and the best fisheries in the world ! Go to a different store ? Oh, I 
didn't mean that — I'm not blaming you. Oh, you said I'll have to 
go to a different store because you are going out of business ? I sup- 
pose you are going to help rebuild this glorious city, yes? Oh, a 
locksmith. Why, of course. All the houses must need locks. Fish 
and vegetables are cjuite unimportant — a mere detail. I don't blame 
you. Good morning." 

"My sex never looked so helpless, or so pitiful,'' she commented 



THE BUILDERS 215 

as she climbed the stairs once more. "It's getting absurd. There 
goes that bell again. When the offices are opened, I'm going to pay 
the housemaid thirty-five dollars a month. But I wish I were a 
man!" 

The crowning blow came when Sing resigned his kitchen throne. 
Mrs. Peyton had no laugh to meet that situation. Ten years in her 
service, and to leave her now! "I'll give you fifteen dollars a week," 
she urged in final desperation. You wouldn't leave me with all 
these people to cook for? Where you go?" 

"You saba camp, new car camp. Miss Peyton? I go cook camp, 
catch heap money, go back China next year. City all bloke, China- 
town all gone. I make money, go back China, buy store, come back 
open store in new Chinatown. Joss velly angly. You saba last 
year, lilies no bloom? Bad — velly, velly bad. Chinaman say bad 
things come, Joss frown. Chinatown all burn up. Joss glad Sing 
help build Chinatown." 

Mrs. Peyton managed to keep the impending catastrophe from her 
boarders, and directed a cheerful dinner, setting the table again after 
Sing had cleared it, for Mr. Peyton, who was never home these 
glorious days until nine. Mrs. Peyton never let him know that she 
suspected that it was because he disliked the boarders. Of course, 
it was spoiling the home, but it was only for a year. Anybody can 
do anything for a year. And this was her best hour. She listened 
to his chronicle of activity — his triumph in buying a shipload of lum- 
ber before it had left Seattle, getting it cheaper ; his influence which 
had enabled him to get the carload of brick another man claimed; 
his wrestle with his foreman, ending in his own defeat and a raise 
of wages the unions demanded. Mrs. Peyton's eyes glowed as she 
listened. Sightly houses would cover their lots within a year — oh, 
it was great to be a man ! To raise a city from the dead, that was 
what her husband and other men were doing. 

As she laid her head on her pillow that night, her day, panoramic 
in its futility and uselessness, unrolled before her. Hampered on 
every turn by such absurd obstacles, she was too busy trying to live 
to be able to help, she and all the other womeu, many taking board- 
ers, some doing their own washing, or their own sewing, for the 
first time in their lives, swamped in the daily routine of daily living — 
these thoughts were passing through Mrs. Peyton's tired brain, when 
a new view shook all the sleep from her eyes. Who was it who was 
helping the builders? What would they do if the women should 
strike ? 

In her excitement she spoke aloud. "I wonder who is rebuilding 
this glorious city, after all 1" 
San Francisco. 



2 I 6 



^THE MAN \VHO FOUND HIS TOMBSTONE 

By S HARLOT M. HALL. 



f 


M=m 1 


IB 


OB 


^^^*^^iB 


HR^/'^uyj^n 



S' 



|OME men are born to* go up and down 
and out of one door, till they are 
carried stark and still out through 
the same door way and down the same 
street to sleep beside the little and 
great of their name. And here and 
there a man is born to be the path- 
maker of his generation ; to follow 
strange trails, eternally seeking wider 
horizons, and to lay down his bones at 
last, uncompanioned, in the wilderness 
that was his strong city and his kindred. 

Edward Schieffelin was such a man, born to the wilderness and 
to great dreams as other men are born to cities and the small traffic 
of life. While still a child he began to wander, for his parents 
removed with their family from the home in Western Pennsylva- 
nia to Jackson county, Oregon, traveling with teams along the old 
emigrant trail. 

Here Schieffelin grew from boyhood to early manhood, hunting 
and prospecting and learning something of ore and mineral from the 
weather-beaten old prospectors who drifted back and forth between 
the coast and the mountains of Eastern Oregon. He dreamed al- 
ready of the great mine he was to discover, as other men dream of 
the pictures they shall paint or the battles they shall win. 

Before starting for Nevada, at the age of twenty-two, he wrote 
in a letter : "I am restless here in Oregon and wish to go some- 
where that has wealth for the digging of it. I can't say that I care 
to be rich — it isn't \that. If I had a fortune, I suppose I'd not keep 
it long; for, now I think of it, I can't see why I should. But I like 
the excitement of being right up against the earth, trying to coax 
her gold away to scatter it. Nevada seems to be a land of immense 
promise in that line, and even if I strike nothing there I'll have the 
sport of hanging on the edge of buried millions, and that will be 
worth while." 

That letter is characteristic of the man to the day of his death ; 
to him the game was the biggest thing, and a bigger satisfaction than 
winning was to have tried. If he outfitted and tramped a thousand 
miles looking for a mine that refused to be found, the going, the 
hunting, was still the best reward. 

In common with many others, Schieffelin reached Nevada too 
late to locate anything of value. He worked a while for a "grub 



THE MAN WHO FOUND HIS TOMBSTONE 217 

stake" and increased his knowledge of mining, and then took the 
trail for the newest strike, the McCracken silver mine at Signal, in 
Western Arizona. Here, too, he was too late to locate property 
worth developing, and presently tramped on in company with some 
Indians to Wickenburg, the great gold camp of Central Ariozna. 

At Wickenburg, Schieffelin met the big, quiet, young German, 
Al Sieber, already favorably known for his skill in managing Indians 
and his courage and efficiency as a scout. Sieber was just starting 
with a party of Indian scouts to explore the Huachuca mountains 
and select a location for the military post to be established there. 

The country between was little known, but rumored to be rich 
in mineral. Schieffelin was anxious to prospect it, and Sieber was 
glad to have the young miner join his party. TheVitien had much 
in common and the friendship that grew up betwe^ir them on the 
trip was never broken. 

In the foothills of the Mule mountains, Schieffelin was attracted 
by the out-croppings along a wash leading into the San Pedro river, 
and left Sieber's party to prospect them. This was in the late sum- 
mer of 1877, and was Schieffelin's first sight of the land that was 
to fulfill his dream. 

There were a few ranches on the San Pedro river and one mine, 
the "Bronco," had been located on the present road between Tomb- 
stone and Charleston, but the whole section was overrun with hostile 
Apaches, and a man took his life in his hands when he went into it. 

The miners working at the Bronco had been fired upon and one 
or two killed while they were at work. Schieffelin took the job of 
guarding them, and on Sundays, when they were idle, he took his 
rifle and canteen and prospector's pick and went up into the Mule 
mountain foothills. 

One day Al Sieber rode by with his scouts from Fort Huachuca 
and found his friend sitting on the dump with the long rifle across 
his knees. 

"What are you doing, Ed?" he asked. 

"Guarding the boys, and prospecting in the hills when t have a 
chance. Some mighty good-looking stones up there, Al." 

"Well, old Cochise has broke loose again ; look out or it will be 
your tombstone you will find." Sieber rode on and the undiscov- 
ered district had received its name. 

With prophetic faith, Schieffelin already saw the great mine and 
tried to enlist help in prospecting it ; but it seemed to others the sheer 
flinging away of life to go into the hills in the very shadow of the 
grim walls of "Cochise's Stronghold," as the granite cliffs and 
canons hedging the southern side of the Dragoon range were called. 

During the winter Schieffelin went in alone and put up monu- 
ments on one claim, then went back and pulled them down, fearing 



2l8 



O U T IV E s r 



they might lead someone to the ledge. He worked in Tucson for 
a "grub stake," and in February, 1878, went back alone with his 
rifle and pick and canteen and little store of food. 

He followed straight up the sand-wash that runs between low hills 
covered with granite bowlders weather-worn into -fantastic shapes. 
On the last rock-ribbed hill overlooking all the country behind and 
before he made his camp. There was a thread of water in the 
wash above, and the hill-top was fort and lookout in one. 




E. L. ScHiKFFEi^iN IN 1878 

Just before he found the Tombstone Property 

On up the wash the hills rolled away, smooth and rounded, un- 
scarred by so much as a bowlder, but the ravine cut through deep, 
reddish-white ledges, and fragments of float trailed down along the 
wash like the line of bait leading up to a trap. 

Such bait had led many a man into the trap and left his bones 
to bleach among the greasewood. Schiefifelin heard the Indians 
prowling along the wash below him at night and seldom built a fire 
night or day for fear the smoke or light would betray him. He 
slept between two huge bowlders in a grave-like recess and kept 




Kdward vSchieffelin About i88i 
In his prospecting dress, with the pick and canteen that were buried with hir 



OUT WEST 



out of sight as much as possible, prospecting cautiously till he found 
the big, rough ledge which he named the "Tough-nut." Sure that 
he had struck a great mine, he went back to Tucson with his sam- 
ples. There was not even an assay office in the old adobe town, 
and no one cared to look up a prospect under such grim guardianship 
as that of Cochise's red-handed renegades. 

Schiefifelin decided to go to Signal, where his brother Al was at 
work. He had just about money enough to buy horse-feed on the 




Edward L. Schieffelin 
Shortly before his death, May 12, 1897 

trip, and to Ed Schieffelin his horses came first and were fed if he 
went hungry himself. He did go hungry, as his mother tells ; he 
stopped at a little ranch, hoping to get a few days work, but found 
none. It was too late to go on, and presently the rancher asked 
him to eat supper. In later years Schieflfelin used to call that supper 
the best meal he had ever eaten, and to say that he knew the kind 
heart of the rancher's wife prompted the invitation. 

At Signal, Richard Gird assayed the ore and found that it carried 



THE MAN WHO FOUND HIS TOMBSTONE 221 

500 ounces in silver. He formed a partaership with the brothers 
and the three went back to the section which Ed had named Tomb- 
stone — recalling Al Sieber's grim warning a- year before. They lo- 
cated other claims, and in a year Edward Schieffelin saw his dream 
made true. He had found a great mine, and where he had camped 
and hidden from the Apaches the hills were alive with prospectors. 

He was too true a prospector to sit down and watch the growth 
of the camp or to spend in cities the wealth he had won in the hills. 
He never learned other men's uses for money, and the swift-won 
fortune melted in his hands. He gave much of it away outright 
to his parents and brothers, and to friends who had helped him or 
shown him kindness. He had no ambition to start a business or to 
build a palace home, as many of the Nevada silver kings had done. 
In a year or two he was back in the hills, following the dream of 
another great mine — a greater Tombstone. 

On his earlier prospecting trips Schieffelin nearly always went 
alone. H he had a party with him, he took every thought for their 
safety, but alone, with his saddle mare and pack burro, he went 
fearlessly into the Indian country and was never molested. His 
old comrades say the Indians held him in great respect, possibly 
because of his courage, and somewhat because of his long curling 
hair, which seemed to set him apart from other white men. 

He liked best to go alone; he belonged to the mountains and the 
desert. He was never lonely except in cities and among people. 
He was a shy man and a modest one, a good deal reserved, a man 
whose manner was never familiar and about whom there was a 
quiet dignity that repelled familiarity. As an old comrade said, 
"He was different, and every man he met felt it." 

Schieffelin was never a "Hail fellow, well met." He had never 
a large circle of acquaintances, nor did he make friends lightly ; but 
his friendship once given was never recalled, and the men who 
knew him best hold his memory in almost womanly tenderness. 
There was indeed a good deal of the woman about him, and much 
of the poet. He gave quaintly apt and whimsical names to the mines 
he found; the "Tough-nut,' a tangled, infolded ledge, truly "a 
tough nut to crack ;" the "Lucky Cuss" and the "Contention," so 
called for a brief contention as to location rights. 

He was a picturesque figure always, but it was the inborn quality 
of the man, that very difference in his attitude toward life, which all 
who knew him recognized. He said once, when asked about the 
prospecting trips that led to the discovery of Tombstone : "I wasn't 
looking for bullets, but I felt if one happened my way it wouldn't 
make much difference to anyone but me, and I never could figure 
out that to be dead would be unpleasant. Some people seem to know 



^^^ OUT WEST 

all about such things, but I'm a bit stupid, I suppose, for I've never 
been able to learn the alphabet of birth and death." 

Schieflfelin cared little for display of any sort, and to the end of 
his life wore the dress of a prospector; double-breasted red or blue 
flannel shirt with embroidered pick and shovel crossed on the bosom, 
soft slouch hat, and trousers tucked into high dragoon boots. 

The boots and long hair were not merely vanity. SchieffeUn suf- 
fered with neuralgia all his life, and died from it at last, and wore 
his hair long as a protection ; and the boots were such as months of 
tramping among the cactus and thorn-armed desert growth made 
necessary. 

In the nineteen years between the discovery of Tombstone and 
his death, Edward SchiefiFelin penetrated nearly every mining region 
on the Pacific Coast, from Alaska to Lower California. A year or 
two after the sale of the mines, he fitted up a wagon and traveled 
for months in Death Valley, returning confident that it would one 
day be a great mining country. 

He secured government permission to prospect in Alaska, had 
a boat built in sections and taken to St. Michaels, and with three 
companions spent a year exploring the Yukon river, bringing out 
enough gold-dust and nuggets to lead him to prophesy the discover- 
ies of later years. 

He returned again and again to prospect in the mountains of 
Jackson county, Oregon, where his boyhood had been spent. And 
there he was found dead in his cabin door, a little sack of ore inside 
that assayed $2,000 in gold to the ton, and in his pocket notes that 
showed that he believed he had found another and greater fortune. 

He might well have chosen this end. Alone, as he had lived, fol- 
lowing the dream of his life; seeing it widen again to golden cer- 
tainty — and then the swift summons to leave the lesser dream and 
follow the larger; to take the last, long, unblazed trail and set face 
outward on an eternal prospecting trip. 

Schieffelin had been in the hills only a short time, going up from 
Los Angeles, where, after his death, his mother received the letter 
telling he rthat he had made another great strike. It was a rainy 
spring and the wet mountains brought out his old enemies, rheuma- 
tism and neuralgia. 

Returning from his last trip to his new find, he met an old man 
who lived in the section and told him that he would not go out 
again till it cleared up. At his cabin he built a fire and put a pot 
of beans on to cook; then sat down in the door with a book in his 
hand to wait for supper. 

Days after the old man found him, face forward on the ground, 
the beans boiled dry, and a little tramp dog, that Schieffelin had 
picked up and been kind to, guarding the still form of the man who 



TfiE MAN WHO FOUND HIS TOMBSTONE "3 

had been his friend. The dog was half-starved, but he had to be 
beaten off by force, and when the body was taken away he dis- 
appeared and was never seen again. 

In spite of the sack of ore in the cabin, the notes in his pocket, and 
the letter to his mother, Edward Schieffelin's last great strike was 
never found. Many have looked for it, and his people believe that 
the dog returned to the spot in search of his master and that his 
bones may some day be a clue to the "greater Tombstone." 

Edward Schieffelin did in truth find his tombstone on that bowlder- 
strewn hill in sight of Cochise's Stronghold ; like the grim old chief, 
he sleeps in the heart of the land he loved best. When his will was 
opened it was found to contain this note : 

"It is my wish, if convenient, to be buried in the dress of a 
prospector, my old pick and canteen with me, on top of the granite 
hills about three miles westerly from the city of Tombstone, Arizona, 
and that a monument such as prospectors build when locating a min- 
ing claim be built over my grave, and no other slab or monument 
erected. And I request that none of my friends wear crape. Under 
no circumstances do I want to be buried in any graveyard or ceme- 
tery." 

On his last visit to Tombstone Schieffelin had told his old comrade 
Harwood that he wanted to be buried under the big bowlders where 
he had made his first camp in 1878. There the grave was blasted 
out of the solid granite, and on the 23rd of May, 1897, twenty years 
from his first sight of the nest of low hills and the wide-sweeping 
valley, Edward Schieffelin made his last camp and staked his last 
claim. 

Dewey, Arizona. 



STILL-BORN 

By VIRGINIA GARLAND 

FRUITLESS the dreams, the passion and the pain! 
His soft mouth pressed to my full breast in vain — 
Oh, my tired eyes, so burning hot and dry ! 
My baby dear will never laugh nor cry. 

• 4 i '-i'-:' 
Weeping you are? Wait! Let me rest awhile 

And feign the close-curved happy arm — the smile. 

Moulded so sturdily — No! Let him lie — 

My baby dear will never laugh nor cry. 

'Twas but last night o'er his pink bed we smiled — 
And now that other cradle 'waits my child ! 
The soft small gowns — hide them unsoiled aside — 
Our baby dear that never laughed nor cried. 




2«4 

• THE JAPANESE PROBUUM IN CALIFORNIA 

By DAVID STARR JORDAN. 

HE present problem of the relations of California to 
Japan involves a number of distinct questions. Largest 
of these is the general question of the immigration of 
Japanese laborers. As to this we may say : 

Any limitation on the free movement of people is 
an evil, as is any other restriction on personal liberty. But sometimes 
a nation is obliged to make a choice of evils. Our question is this : 

At present shall we choose the evil of restriction, to avoid worse 
evils? If so, in what way can we obtain the result honorably and 
peacefully? It is clear that we want nothing on any lower terms. 

There are in Japan, mostly crowded along the southern coasts of 
three of its four great islands, half as many people as there are in 
the United States — as many as dwell to the westward of our center 
of population, which is Greensburg, Indiana. This people has de- 
veloped in isolation for 2,500 years. The nation is highly civilized 
and highly specialized, and on the whole, man for man, as compe- 
tent as the people of any other nation. 

Among other things they have developed an elaborate caste-sys- 
tem, from the chains of which they are trying to escape, and later 
they will try still more earnestly. 

Among them, below the scholars, the warriors, the poets, the 
artists, the artisans, the farmers, the peasants, is a lower caste of 
unskilled laborers, roustabouts, dock- and farm-hands. Some of these 
are intelligent, honest, hopeful. All of them are relatively clean and 
relatively industrious and docile. But they do not show Japan at her 
best. Wide-faced and stolid, they can be told at sight from the fine- 
spirited samurai and from the narrow-featured, keen-witted, and 
clever Japanese of the higher classes. To this lower class belong 
most of the small merchants in old Japan. 

There are very many differences between the Japanese and Chi- 
nese. Except in appearance, in being Asiatic, and in ability to live 
cheaply when need be, they have very little in common. But from 
the economic standpoint, they stand in much the same relation to 
American labor. The number of Japanese and Chinese in California 
is still too small for either to be an economic factor of importance, 
but the possibilities of immigration are very great, and the labor 
leaders are trying to prevent what they could not remedy if they 
should wait many years longer. The great body of citizens of Cali- 
fornia neither welcome nor dread Oriental immigration from an eco- 
nomic point of view. They recognize that there are many excellent 
men among Chinese laborers, many thoroughly worthy among the 

with the article written by Dr. Jordan for Out VVbst have been incorporated parts of a previous pub- 
lication the lame authority in the Boiton Transcript. 



THE JAPANESE PROBLEM IN CALIFORNIA. 225 

Japanese workers. There are all grades of men among both, as 
among the members of the most favored nations. 

In the heat of controversy many wholesale charges have been made 
against the Japanese, but most of these things are true of offensive 
individuals only. Comparing men of the same social rank, the Jap- 
anese make as good a showing in California, morally and intellectu- 
ally, as the immigrants of any other nation. 

Among the Japanese people, the virtues of life are all closely joined 
together. The name of Bushido, "the warrior's way," means the 
spirit of honor, the way a man should do things, and this honor cov- 
ers all the virtues of sobriety, honesty, hopefulness, patriotism and 
religion. It is the heart of Japanese character. It makes this charac- 
ter and in turn is created by it. 

The Shinto religion, the primitive religion of Japan, is often de- 
fined as "ancestor worship." It is more than this, far more, but it is 
also less than this. It has been called no religion at all, because it has 
no creed, no ceremonies necessary to its practice, no sacred legends 
or mysteries, and nothing of the machinery or spiritual power which 
characterize great religions in other countries. It makes no prose- 
lytes. It opposes no belief and insists on none. It is the animating 
spirit that causes a Japanese to love his children, to be kind to his 
wife, to help the stranger, to be loyal to Japan, to devote his life to 
her service, and, above all, to be worthy of the traditions of his an- 
cestry, to be a man, even as his great fathers were, and to do no act 
which is unworthy of his class of Samurai, of his education or of his 
training. 

No other land has better soldiers than the Japanese, not because of 
their strength or endurance, for they are a small, feeble folk, but 
because they will obey orders, because they wish to obey, for in so 
doing they do their part in the glory and the upbuilding of Japan. 
The Japanese students belong largely to the Samurai class, the old 
feudal retainers, and the feeling of loyalty to Japan is the animating 
spiirt in all their studies and in all their work. It is the spirit of 
honor, the Bushido, the warrior's way, the religion of Japan. 

So long as the Japanese keeps this feeling he is worthy of trust. 
When he loses his religious spirit, his spirit of personal pride, what- 
ever his rank or creed, he becomes a degenerate, open to the attacks 
of all the vices. For this reason, a Japanese who has lost his self- 
respect and grown careless or indolent is one of the least useful of 
men, and soon sinks to the level of the similarly outcast Anglo-Saxon. 

These facts will help us to understand certain criticisms on Japan, 
The merchant complains that the Japanese have no business head 
and are careless of their contracts. In this connection we may note 
the paradox in the relations of the Japanese and Chinese to business 



««6 OUT WEST 

methods and to public honesty. The Chinese are the business men of 
the Orient. The word of a Chinese is his bond and his contracts are 
carried out to the letter. In Japan the merchant who has miscalcu- 
lated asks his creditors to pay his debts. This same good nature he 
shows to others, if conditions are reversed. His sense of good taste, 
his sense of equity, is stronger than his respect for contract. Yet, 
while from the highest to the lowest the public life of China is cor- 
rupt, there are few countries on earth so honestly governed as Japan. 
The spirit of honor animates a Japanese official, and a public office 
with him is a sacred trust. 

The contractor complains that the Japanese laborer is lazy, drunk- 
en, overbearing. This is true in a degree, for only the unemployed, 
the idle and thriftless Japanese, are likely to swell the ranks of un- 
skilled or contract labor. This vicious system of semi-slavery, the 
social curse and the financial gain of Hawaii, has brought under our 
flag a class of Japanese not useful to us and not creditable to Japan. 

The missionary says that Japan is given over to materialism, and 
that Herbert Spencer holds greater sway over even the converts to 
Christianity than the church. The man of science notes the prefer- 
ence of the Japanese scholar for memorization of words or for half- 
understood abstrusities of philosophy. It is said that there is no 
philosophy in Japan, and into this vacuum comes Herbert Spencer. 
The man of the world finds the Japanese immoral, not remembering 
that vice is everywhere near him that seeks it. 

But all these criticisms are skin deep. Under all is the great, 
loyal, generous nation, the embodiment of good hope, good taste, and 
good will, a people who love their homes, their children and their 
country, on whose soil no foreign invader has ever yet set foot. 

The attitude of the average man on the street, in California, to- 
wards the Japanese is one neither of welcome nor of antipathy. Some 
Japanese house-servants and most Japanese students make themselves 
beloved within the circle of their acquaintance. The struggles of 
some of these penniless but ambitious young men to secure an Amer- 
ican education and to fit themselves for professional usefulness in 
Japan, have few parallels in the history of education. The future 
professor, the future admiral, the future general, works in a Califor- 
nia kitchen, not because he wishes to spy out the land, but because 
through daily work lies his only means of securing an education. 
He cannot work for his board at the Imperial University of Tokio, 
because almost all available means of earning money are closed to 
him by the Japanese labor guilds. It is said that carrying news- 
papers and delivering milk are the only trades left open, and in a 
land almost without cows the second of these gives opportunity for 
very few. So the young Samurai look towards America, and espe- 



THE JAPANESE PROBLEM IN CALIFORNIA. tzj 

dally towards California, where the high schools and universities 
give them generous welcome with the free tuition these Far Western 
institutions of the greater America extend to the aspiring youth of 
all the world. 

In the earlier days few of the laborers came to America, but the 
planters of Hawaii brought over some 50,000 of them, holding them 
in a state of semi-slavery from which the annexation of Hawaii de- 
livered them in 1900. 

In 1900, the government of Japan prohibited the direct immigra- 
tion of this class to the United States. This was in the belief that 
they made a bad impression on Americans, and that the higher in- 
terests of the empire might be imperilled by their presence in Amer- 
ica. I do not know who took the initiative in this suggestion. I was 
in Japan at the time. I was freely told that Japan wanted the good 
will of America ; that she would do whatever America might wish in 
emigration matters ; but that in whatever action might seem best, she 
must take the leading part. She had then just escaped (through the 
good offices of America) from the national humiliation of the out- 
side consular jurisdiction in her treaty ports — Nagasaki, Yokohama 
and Hakodate. Such humiliation she would not again endure; and 
her dependence was on America — a nation which had always been 
her friend, and from which her people, as well as her national as- 
pirations, had always received justice. 

As Japan has checked direct immigration to the United States, so 
will she check indirect immigration through Hawaii, Canada, or 
Mexico, if we politely and diplomatically ask her to do so. This re- 
quest cannot come from ''Exclusion Leagues," newspapers. State 
Legislatures, nor yet from Congress. It can be received only through 
the President of the United States, and his Department of State. 

Do w« wish to check this immigration of Japanese laborers? 

From the standpoint of American laborers, yes. These people 
work at lower wages than Americans ought to receive. They are 
exploitable to a greater degree than American workmen. Moreover, 
the reckless greed shown by lower-class Japanese in Korea, the one 
blot on the recent history of Japan, will not lead other nations to 
welcome the same class of people if they threaten to come in numbers. 

From the standpoint of good government, yes. The weak of 
other nations dilute our citizenship. The immigration from some 
nations of Europe has already caused great political mischief. A 
large immigration of Japanese laborers would cause still more. If 
they become permanent residents, they ought to become citizens as 
well. A permanently alien, non-voting population makes for social 
and political disorder. A population semi-foreign but voting, igno- 
rant of American principles and regardless of the national future, 



»28 OUT WEST 

also makes for evil. In witness of this, we have the political situation 
in San Francisco today. 

Shall we exclude them on racial grounds? No. A nation must 
not yield to race prejudices. It must reckon men as men. Racial 
prejudices are narrow, provincial, aboriginal. This is an Anglo- 
Saxon country at heart, no doubt, but it is the only country pos- 
sessed by milUons of black men, and by millions of white men who 
are not Anglo-Saxon. The man who is really white is known as 
such by his tolerance of others. 

Is it to our financial interest to receive Japanese laborers? Be- 
yond question, yes. The Pacific Coast everywhere — farmers, fruit- 
growers, canners, lumbermen, housekeepers, road builders — every- 
where there is a demand for cheap, coarse labor — a demand which 
the white men cannot meet, and for the lack of which California 
loses hundreds of thousands of dollars every year. California is by 
no means a unit on the question of the immigration of Japanese 
laborers. The fruit-growers openly welcome it. Business men gen- 
erally quietly favor it; and, outside of San Francisco and the labor 
unions, it is not clear that a majority of the people are opposed to the 
free admission of Japanese laborers, or even of the Chinese. 

Others feel that the development of the state is better retarded 
than secured through servile labor. In my judgment, the social and 
political disadvantage arising from the presence of Asiatic laborers 
in large numbers overbalances, on the whole, the economic gain from 
their presence. This view, according to the press, is also that taken 
by Mr. Roosevelt. It is an open secret that the President has been 
for some time at work to secure exclusion by the only possible means 
—friendly co-operation with Japan. It is also an open secret that 
the only obstacle in his way has lain in the attacks on Japan by Cali- 
fornia politicians, and by aggregations led by European agitators,' 
careless of the honor of their adopted country, as well as of its fun- 
damental political ideas. Hard words on one side of the ocean pro- 
voke similar echoes on the other, and the Japanese, like other people, 
have their apostles of discontent. The attempt to use the exclusion 
sentiment in the interest of small politics has put the President to a 
great disadvantage in the game of diplomacy, in which the officials 
of Japan are themselves masters. There can be no doubt, however, 
of his ultimate success in this, as in other matters to which he has 
put his hand. But in whatever is done, our country must play what 
we may call a gentleman's part. It will secure its ends, but at no 
sacrifice of its own honor and dignity, nor of that of Japan. In 
Roosevelt's hands, this country will win respect by respecting the 
rights and the dignity of other nations. 

The school question of San Francisco has importance only as it 



THE JAPANESE PROBLEM IN CALIFORNIA. 229 

reflects on the honor of the United States. We have pledged our- 
selves to give to the Japanese resident in America the same rights 
and courtesies which are awarded to Englishmen, Germans or mem- 
bers of other civilized nations. This implies that no racial discrim- 
ination shall be made against Japanese as Japanese, and a national 
treaty under our constitution is supreme law. 

It is conceded that the national government has no control over 
California schools. But it has responsibility for Japanese school 
children. In a sense, all resident aliens or foreigners are wards of 
the nation, and the nation is bound to see that these children are as 
well treated as other alien children. The rights of foreigners, what- 
ever they may be, are in the hands of the nation. If any foreigners 
have rights in the schools, these children have the same rights. 

Among the Japanese are a few grown boys who try to learn Eng- 
lish in the grammar grades. It might be well to shut out these, but 
as a matter of fact their occasional presence has made no trouble of 
any consequence. Neither have the Japanese children been the source 
of any friction. They are intelligent, docile and clean — more so 
than the average children of most European immigrants, and no 
patrons of the schools have complained of their presence. The school 
board may have good reasons for their action, but these reasons have 
not appeared. That it appears to be a step towards relegating the 
Japanese in America toward the "J'"^ Crow" position of the Chinese 
and Africans, is the reason why the local Japanese resent it. It is also 
clear that the Japanese Government will not allow its subjects to be 
placed in that attitude by any other nation. Since the humiliating 
foreign control of the treaty-ports was abrogated in 1899, Japan has 
looked upon herself, and justly so, as a nation of the first rank, and 
as such a nation should, she looks after the welfare of her citizens 
wherever they may be. 

The action of the school board in transferring the Japanese chil- 
dren, for racial reasons, to the schools of an inferior race (inferior 
in their estimation and in ours, as shown by our exclusion laws) was 
apparently a clear violation of our treaty with Japan. It was, there- 
fore, clearly illegal and unconstitutional; and it must have been a 
most unwelcome addition to the diplomatic difficulties of the Pres- 
ident. The effect of the whole incident has been to delay the settle- 
ment of the immigration question, to develop some hard feeling and 
harder language, to raise the spectre of state rights, and to threaten, 
for the moment, the international good will. 

The question of law may be settled by the courts. The question 
of immigration will be settled by Japan, in whatever way our sober- 
minded people may wish it settled. And, as time goes on, we shall 
learn to understand Japan better, and she will understand us. It is 
an open question still which can learn the most from the other. Mean- 



230 our WEST 

while again, this is sure — we have every reason to be on friendly 
terms with Japan, and Japan has every reason to retain and to prize 
the good will of America. 

. The lesson of the Shimoneseki incident in 1863 has never been lost 
on Japan. Every schoolboy knows it and its meaning. Certain 
ships, Dutch, French and American, passing through the Inland 
Sea, were fired on at Shimoneseki. Afterward, these, with a British 
ship, bombarded and destroyed the town, collecting at the same time 
$3,000,000 as indemnity, which was divided among the Powers. 
I^ater investigation showed that the blame was not all on one side, 
and the United States returned the $750,000 to Japan. This chival- 
rous act of common courtesy, never known before or since among 
great Powers, at once placed the United States in a class apart in 
dealing with affairs in the Orient. When the vulgar politicians of 
Europe whom we call the "Great Powers" ceased nagging Japan, 
outrages and unfriendly feeling passed away. Commerce rests on a 
basis of mutual trust and mutual esteem. That nation will control 
the trade of the Pacific which has most to sell, sells it most cheaply, 
and in such form that other nations will wish to buy. Trade cannot 
be built up by force of arms, nor are its profits ever great enough to 
make good the cost and waste of a great navy. Trade follows no 
flag save the flags of merchant vessels. The man who talks of war 
as a necessity in commercial competition, whether in Japan, Califor- 
nia or Washington, is a public enemy. Of all the nations of the 
Orient, Japan is the only one which can in truth be called well gov- 
erned. Japan is the only one which has had undisturbed possession 
of herself. The Japanese choose their own ruler, make their own 
laws, train their own armies, control their own trade. They are the 
only Oriental people free from the mighty curse of opium, for they 
have the right to exclude it from their ports. The trade of Japan is 
great and growing. The profits of this trade must go to those from 
whom the Japanese may choose to buy. To the end of controlling this 
trade and through it the trade of the Orient to which Japan holds the 
key, we have to oflFer only fair dealing, personal courtesy, and the 
chivalrous spirit which draws together men and nations. 

"Let us discard," said Abraham Lincoln, "all this quibbling about 
this man and the other man, this race and that race and the other 
race being inferior, and therefore that it must be placed in an in- 
ferior position." 

Stanford University. 




«3i 



SOME LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA 
CALENDAR 

By ETHEL GRIFFITH. 
III. 

March ist. 
JWLS hooting this evening with unusual clearness. 

Swallows are stealing mud where the flume leaks. 

The neighbors' bams will all be plastered with the 

same adobe this year. It is a great building-time and 

the air about the barn is full of swirling wings. 

Larkspur in its glory. Cyclamen gone. Barley and wild oats in 

full head ; some of the valley ranchers are mowing. Mustard higher 

than a horse's head. The tender green of last month is ripening to 

a heavy, darker hue, and on sunny slopes the grass is turning brown. 

Am reminded that spring is gone. We see with regret the passage 

of the seasons, having never quite appropriated the gift each oflfers 

before the stately processional has moved on ; and the spring, whose 

special radiance was so dear, is gone forever. We cannot hope for 

such another; we cannot anticipate such riches in Nature that she 

can duplicate the spring just vanished. 

We may fill our eyes with the purple of the fading sunset; but 
when its ray has penetrated through the outer sight and we begin for 
the first time really to see it, it has merged its purple into lavender, 
its lavender into grey, leaving the startled senses still athirst. Nature 
runs too fast for our short legs. We hang on the back of her car, 
but half the time our feet are off the earth and we do not cover the 
ground in her course. We are still children clinging to her hand ; 
we must drag behind. Shall we never grow up? Shall we never 
walk as her companion and friend ? 

There is a sympathy in Nature which is man's chief, although 
mostly unconscious, reliance. There is a kindness in the soft and 
tender blue of the heavens that melts the stoniest heart. Such a lov- 
ing rebuke and reminder ! How can we live so mean under the sky ? 

March loth. 
A shower this morning — the air sparkling and with a snap like 
charged water. The earth's electricity, blanketed all night by the 
clouds, burst out at dawn, popping off the clouds and revealing a 
warm and tolerant sun, who has the air of having been an unmoved 
observer all the time. 

I made a discovery this morning, and as a result I am glad to 
say that the Dudley's wire netting no longer marks a boundary line 
to my regard. It still remains, but is a blot only to the landscape and 
not to the spirit of neighborliness. 



23* OUT WEST 

Mrs. Dudley, it seems, had heard (and who, pray, can tell me 
how?) so much of my intense dislike of them and my great fear of 
their intrusion upon us, that before any other preparation of home- 
making she ordered the erection of the wire fence as a symbol of 
assurance to me. 

She forbears to keep chickens, lest by some mischance they find a 
rent in the net and fly over into my garden. And lately she has 
thought of planting a hedge of eucalyptus so I might work among 
my flowers without fear of observation. 

my unruly, untamable, too whimsical tongue, have you betrayed 
me at last ? Do the trees hear, and do the stones speak ? True, I did 
whisper some confidential words down into the innocent depths of 
my violet roots as I planted them; but surely the bouquets I have 
lately sent her contain no such complaint. Indeed I like them very 
well. 

But one cannot find walls enough or space enough to smother nor 
to contain one unkind thought. It flies out swifter than a carrier- 
pigeon and is more impossible of recapture. 

The white Wyandotte came off her nest today. She brought with 
her twelve yellow, fluffy, little chicks ; and this afternoon I sent Mrs. 
Dudley a basket filled with grasses, on which reposed the mother 
with all her babies. 

March nth. 

Coming from the house this early morning into the magic of Cali- 
fornia Out-of-Doors, I leave behind me the myriad trivialities that 
breed like moths behind enclosed walls and enter a Land of Divine 
Realities. A kind of noble disillusionment takes place, and I perceive 
that I am not so mean as I had thought. Surely man must be Some- 
body more than he dreams, so ample and magnificent have been the 
preparations of his environment. Were we the veritable gods of 
Olympus we could ask for nothing to complete the splendor of this 
day. 

The great, softly-outlined hills lie relaxed in the gray of early twi- 
light — so serene, so moderate, of such infinite leisure. The unmatched 
spirit of the hills charms me beyond that of any human character I 
have yet known. Their amplitude is always a reproach, a hint, and a 
reminder. 

1 have often wondered if the soul of man were of equal splendor 
with the perfection in beauty of Nature. We do not know, but we 
have little faith. We have never truly seen a man, or the sight 
might have split our ^meager shells and we should have gladly 
stretched our cramped and aching souls in the light of him. 

There are reports that they have lived, and we have the treasured 
accounts of two or three, handing their cherished stories down the 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 13$ 

ages as our chief comforts and guides. Yet our lives are not much 
changed. We cannot believe but that these were intrinsically dif- 
ferent from ourselves. We call them "divine" to mark a distinction 
rather than an identity. We do not believe in our own divinity, but 
love, for the most part, to creep about denying our names and hiding 
our heads in the dust, like beetle-bugs, if we are about to be ad- 
dressed. It is no wonder that we cannot on our lives look for one 
moment at the sun. 

What little life we may possess is cherished in secret, and if, by 
any chance, we are uncovered in hiding, we hastily roll over, like 
so many saw-bugs and pretend to be dead. 

I do not understand the awful curse of lethargy and cowardice 
with which we are almost universally possessed. 

March 13th. 

What does this great flood of caterpillars mean ? They are eating 
up everything in the garden and although the white Wyandotte works 
herself nearly into prostration, they increase under her claws. It 
looks to me as if here was a big mistake. Nature has certainly slipped 
up on her domestic economy in working so long to perfect the grass 
only to bring on the caterpillar. The ranchers say a big black bug, 
"with a forked tail," will soon appear and will exterminate them — 
but I am in doubt. Persons of dark characters and with forked tails 
have never been associated in the world's history with reform. 

I am looking for trouble. The caterpillar subject is enormous. Its 
philosophical aspect alone might command the attention of a college. 
Their sudden uprising and complete dominance of the vegetable 
world is as impressive and as unaccountable as Sin itself. 

My sweet-pea plants are mere skeletons these days. It is time for 
another Luther and a reformation. 

One thing I would like to know — why a caterpillar falling down 
one's neck or sleeve can inspire such instant frenzy of revulsion. The 
feeling is perfectly unreasonable; they are softer than a flower and 
known to be as harmless ; and yet there is no phrase in the descrip- 
tion of the Orthodox hell that exerts a more awful power over me 
than the one where the "worm dieth not." How can anything so soft 
in nature be so hardened in sin? 

March 17th. 

I hurried away from the house this morning lest Mrs. Penrose 
come by and invite me to church. I do not find it possible to worship 
in her church, and I sometimes think my most sacrilegious hours 
have been spent there. I had the courage this morning to run away 
from it, in order that I might come out here on the hill, where I can 
enjoy the vast, unhoused service of Out-of -Doors. 

I brought no Bible ; I do not see but that we should write our own 



234 OUT WEST 

Bibles now as well as ever. Who was Moses on his mountain, that 
we should perpetually defer to him ? I think I shall be myself, on my 
cactus knoll, and God helping me, that will be enough. 

I do not carry the "Word" between respectable black covers under 
my arm, but love to lie a-listening on the slope of some heaven-front- 
ing hill when God speaks to His world. I am very young and very 
foolish, and I can understand hardly a word; but I love the great 
Heart that lies behind all meanings, and I know it has for me not 
one shadow of blame or reproach. In all the sunny mystery of the 
holy morning, there is only unbounded, unspoken, encompassing 
Love. 

I shall not miss the minister's prayer, when the grandeur of silence 
can be had for the asking ; and I know no finer devotion (if prayer be 
the union of the soul of God with His created world) than the meet- 
ing of earth and heaven at the horizon line. 

I love to watch the tender melting of sea and sky when the ocean 
lies grey and calm under the bending blue of a near and friendly 
heaven. It is an aspiration and a union pure enough to sink, un- 
filtered by the intellect, down into the heart. 

Overheard, as I sit here, float great sleepy white clouds against an 
exquisite purity of blue. They have drifted in from the sea, the 
waters of which have been caught up to heaven. A translation in- 
deed — it is even such a benediction as the prophet Elijah knew. Has 
this, then, been the sigh of the waves, whispered so long while I 
listened in the early mornings as they broke upon the beach? Is 
it the same prayer that springs from the heart of all life, for transla- 
tion and re-birth ? 

The deep melody of the rising wind and the awakening surf is 
more majestic than a thousand organs. I choose a wind-swept hill 
for inspiring music ; and for the soloist, let the father lark sing to 
his mate on the sod ! There is a feeling in his song that only the 
great Choir-master has taught him. 

The seeding and fruition of many flowers and the aromatic fra- 
grance of strong-scented herbs fills the air with an indescribable 
sweetness. Holy incense, indeed, is this that rises from the browned 
and singeing hills. The infinite mystery and beauty of the morn- 
ing sweeps over the soul, like a wave of dear remembered music, 
melting the heart and washing away its scars and stains. In such a 
time and place, it is no sacrilege to talk of experiencing a change of 
heart. 

March 19th. 
Filaree is seeding, its clocks marking the hours of spring's earliest 
fruition. Hyacinths now in full bloom. They are borne on unusually 
large stems and have big full-blown heads. 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 235 

The birds lately are singing more than usual ; they fill the valley 
with a stream of melody. It flows evenly and somewhat monoto- 
nously all day long, the slight wind blending and unifying the vari- 
our strains. (Occasionally a meadow-lark breaks out with a great, 
soft bubble of song, irresistibly rising to the surface of the musical 
stream.) It is their mating season, and, not content with the twelve 
hours of daylight, one or another ardent mock-bird serenader bursts 
out every moonlighted hour of the night. The orange orchard is a 
veritable First Grove, and every little Adam seems bent on making 
the most of it. Today I stretched my hammock under the trees to 
listen to them ; but Hall Dudley, who was picking oranges the other 
side of the wire netting, came through the new gate he has just put 
in, and we talked, instead. 

"Are you Eve?" he asked, as if he had read my thought of the 
grove, and had attached his own meaning. 

"I know who you are/' I said. 

"Who?" 

"Well, you aren't Adam! so you must be That Other One." 

"How do you know I'm not Adam?" And, drawing up an old 
field box, he sat down to discuss it. 

People mistake who say it was a woman who first made trouble in 
a garden. 
Saw some dodder, or "love-vine," for the first time today. 

March 23d. 

Chanchalag^a, or Indian fever-medicine, now conspicuous. The 
earth is getting very noticeably browner and the hills look singed. 
Yellow daisies are gone and in place of their fresh bright color comes 
the tar-weed with its old-gold, like a rusty middle-age after a prodigal 
youth. Filaree clocks are ripe and blowing about in small eddies; 
every little weed or tuft of grass has a tiny bank on the windward 
side. Black ants are working incessantly storing the seed. They 
struggle heroically under the long unwieldly clocks, which the plant 
provides to screw the seed into the ground at the first rain ; and their 
hills are bordered with a great number from the discarded ends. 
They move about hurriedly, as though agitated, their big heads 
wagging and antennae working — bunting each other in a kind of gro- 
tesque courtesy of greeting, and then hastening on again. Two ants 
are struggling with the dead body of a small beetle, which is about 
twenty times their united bulk. They finally succeed, after some ten 
minutes' heroic work, in carrying, heaving and rolling it down the 
hole. It is quite exciting to watch such superb strength and energy. 

Beetles are now unusually lively; they scuttle about as if sent for. 
Something in the season has stirred their slow spirits, and I seldom 
find them squatted, as is usual, with their heads buried modestly in 



136 OUT WEST 

the dust and abdomen tilted at an absurd and painful angle toward 
the sun — bent as it were, in pious meditation, like so many Hindu 
ascetics — but, instead, they are doing much traveUng. I find them 
always ambitious to cross the road, scuttling here and there through 
the heavy dust with the utmost possible speed. The fever of worldly 
adventure burns hot in their sluggish veins, and they take to the 
road as naturally as men — ^believing, no doubt, like others, that there 
is virtue in adventures of the highway. They stumble blindly about 
among the tar-weeds, and crawl with laborious pain to the six-inch 
pinnacle of some brittle grass-stalk, only to tumble off again with a 
loud crack of their stiff shells and steer away with the utmost possible 
speed for another. It is as if they were drugged with a strong de- 
lusion of adventure, and their cry of the road, on these warm days, 
is an incessant, "Hurry up! Hurry up! Hurry up!" I would like 
to know what it is all about, but am far from being able to guess. 

I confess that this impulse, even in animals of my own species, is 
beyond comprehension. I know people whose excitement over af- 
fairs is much greater than that of the beetles. But although they at- 
tempt a breathless explanation, I do not understand. They run madly 
about, chasing a real-estate boom, or a mining excitement, or a new 
oil field, quite as though their lives were the occasion to do some- 
thing else, anything else, than to live nobly. Their entire existence 
is one weary, perpetual race for some material trifle ; but when they 
have climbed to the dizzy height of some six-inch ideal, and find it 
leads nowhere, they simply tumble down with resounding crack — 
and, like the beetles, steer hard off for the next one. 

Caterpillars are now entirely gone, and many yellow butterflies 
and a few grey moths have appeared. 

Saw a great many buzzards wheeling about some carrion on the 
on the salt-marsh today. They were weatherbeaten, ragged and 
quarrelsome as so many hoboes, and fought and cursed each other 
as profanely as men. 

National City, Cal. 



WEST WIND 

By ELLSWORTH LEE 

BLOW strong, blow strong, 
Wind of the west, wind of the sea ; 
Sweep through the branches and chant a song 
Of waves, of storms and of sea-birds free. 
Blow strong, blow strong! 
Scatter the mists that have hovered all day ; 

Lash the wild clouds as they scurry along ; 
Sing as you toss the dead leaves in your play. 

Blow strong, blow strong. 
Wind of the west, wind of the sea ! 




*37 



JUDA or THE, GORGES 

By B. F. SUTHERLAND 

)WN, down into the fastness recklessly galloped the 

living storm ; hard hoofs pounding with energy of fear 

and anger, the shrill bugle of the leader calling loudly 

to him who faltered, and mingled with it all the urgent 

cheer of one who followed, seemingly with no intent 

but to hasten a catastrophe, while the gorges protested in a voice 

caught from Chaos when she rended these hills. 

The band of "broomtail" ponies wheeled as only broomtails can, 
and scurried through a pass that seemed too narrow but led to open 
ground and a hope of escape. Close at their heels sounded the 
urgent cheer, and a fury of blind wrath swept the charging troop 
'round and 'round in a diminishing circle — the "mill" of wild horses 
driven to senseless despair. 

With a yell that was startling but not unmusical, a little rider, 
gracefully sitting a buckskin cayuse that seemed to require no guid- 
ance, circled about them, twirling a loop of slim line that gyrated 
with a cutting whir-r of which no words could convey an idea. 

A lank racer that led the mad whirl tossed his head high, the slim 
line darted out cunningly, and a flurry of dust obscured the scene. 

When the dust-cloud dissipated, there was only a prostrate horse 
in the foreground, the mounted figure to one side, and a tense line 
stretched between that told the tale of a capture. 

Two horsemen riding briskly down one of the narrow box-canons 
had tried for half an hour to account for the strange sounds, and now, 
as they rounded a curve in the canon, the simple solution burst upon 
them in a scene that was less rare in the old West. Both were 
strangers in the locality through which they were riding — the Cliff- 
dweller region in southwestern Colorado, known as the Yellow- 
jacket Breaks. Profesor Stevens Yonge, deserving of Fame, a 
slave to Science for the love of her, had come from Boston out to 
the Breaks to seek thai which may be learned in the prehistoric ruins 
which here abound. Just why Mr. Charles Ford, the dashing one, 
who rode with some skill, had accompanied him may not be inferred 
from his subsequent conduct ; but he, too, was from our American 
Athens, and was rather knowing in rock-annals and ethnology. 

"A woman, by all that's pleasant!" Ford exclaimed, with quick 
interest, as they approached the little nondescript astride the buck- 
skin pony. 

With an easy air, he advanced to offer the lady assistance in dis- 
mounting; but something in his flippant mock-gallantry aroused her 
indignation, and she flushed angrily, while the small head assumed a 
poise that no one could afford to misunderstand. 



«38 OUT WEST 

"Be careful, sir!" she said. "The horse may struggle and en- 
tangle you in the rope." And she might as well have added, "Take 
no Hberties with me !" for she looked all of that. 

Professor Yonge hastened to her and inquired in his grave defer- 
ential manner if he could aid her in any way. He was under the 
impression that "the animal could not long endure that strained po- 
sition without serious discomfort," but confessed that his knowledge 
of such matters was theoretical rather than practical. His frankness 
appealed to her, and his scholarly air and the spectacles — that ut- 
terly failed to invest him with the dignity that is merely age — gave 
his personality an indescribable charm. 

"You are very good," the young woman replied, "but the cayuse 
is about as comfortable as he will be when I let him get up. You 
see he's got to be branded, and then I will lead him to the corral and 
keep him there until he is tame — which will be at some undetermined 
time in the future. Have you lost your way?" 

"Yes, we have," Ford quickly intruded, "but I will gladly help 
you to brand your capture." 

Ford seemed always willing to prolong a conversation with a girl, 
and this one was decidedly not ugly ; besides, she had astonished and 
piqued him with her language and her manner of breeding that did 
not seem to harmonize with the environment. 

"My uncle, John Loeb, with whom I live, often guides tourists 
to the cliff-dwellings, and if you care to wait till I have attended to 
the pony I have caught, I will take you to the house; but I shall 
manage the cayuse fairly well without assistance." 

Even that very pointed remark was not sufficient for Ford. As 
he came nearer she sprang from the saddle and ran to the struggling 
bronco, leaving the buckskin to "hold." 

"Have you a match?" she inquired of the Professor, as naturally 
as if he had been Uncle John Loeb, of lifetime acquaintance. "If you 
have, you might kindle a small fire to heat the iron, and we shall the 
sooner be on our road home. There, that will be enough brush ; it 
takes only a little to heat my iron, for I don't believe in burning a 
thing to death, just to let people know who owns it. Now, if you 
will stand back a little, sir," to Ford, "I will hog-tie his feet. Thank 
you. I have been after this one for nearly a year, but never could get 
the bunch to mill until this morning. That is the only way to catch 
a fine one like this — in the Breaks." 

The wild pony was branded at length, and hoppled so that he could 
neither run nor fight, both of which tactics he was disposed to at- 
tempt, and the party started up the gorge. 

"Now," said the Professor, "I presume that if I attempt to drive 
this remarkably vindictive animal for you, he will either kick me 



JUDA OF THE GORGES 239 

or entangle you in the tether, which I see you have, perhaps judi- 
ciously, secured to the saddle-horn. I will ride a little to one side, 
and avoid rendering your hazardous situation more dangerous by 
ignorantly interfering," And he withdrew a little distance. 

The Professor had a stiff way and a precise, but one instinctively 
felt the goodness that lay behind all that he said. 

Ford, with characteristic intrusiveness, rode at the little horse- 
hunter's side. They progressed much as a tram-car on three triangu- 
lar wheels might be expected to do — by lunges and abrupt halts — but 
Ford's small impertinences were in no wise interrupted thereby. 

"Mr. John Loeb's niece was duly christened, I assume?" he pre- 
sently ventured. 

"Yes, sir; they have in Boston an exactly similar custom, no 
doubt?" 

"Ah, pardon me ! My name is Charles Ford, and that of my vir- 
tues, Legion. My family, who live in Boston, as you seem to sur- 
mise, are unappreciative, and have sent me out here to be well rid of 
me — and to annoy the natives." 

"And my name is Juda Loeb — or so they call me," she answered, 
modestly. 

"Stevey, come this way a moment!" he called to the Professor, 
who had fallen to the rear. 

"Allow me to present to you Miss Juda Loeb — so-called ; and you 
are Professor Stevens Yonge, you know." 

Quick anger burned on the Professor's face, but he acknowledged 
the introduction with courteous gravity, apologizing for its tardi- 
ness, and paused until they had proceeded a little way. 

"Now, Juda, please tell me how you obtained an education and 
training on this utmost verge of the frontier?" was the next at- 
tack. 

From the girl's face the look of innate refinement almost van- 
ished, giving place to a lightning flash of the spirit of the old West. 
The fire died, gently, as fades the light on a white cliff, and in sweet 
humility she faltered, "I — I know so little!" Then, again. Ford 
looked at her, and saw in fancy the gray crags of a Colorado peak 
where the red fire leaped from cloud to battlement, and the armored 
hills hurled back each bolt. 

"I am alone, sir; do not make me a liar!" she said. 

And the broomtail supplemented that rebuke with a well-timed 
kick from the one free heel his captor had left him; for the perse- 
cutor absorbed in his pleasantries, had been incautious. The man 
actually screamed with pain, and declared that he should be cooped 
up for a month with old Loeb and a broken rib; but Juda, white 
with wrath, offered neither sympathy nor aid. 

She rode straight ahead, nor ever glanced backward until she had 



«4o OUT WEST 

reached a turn in the gorge, where she dismounted to open a rude 
gate. Nor did her new acquaintances fall far behind. Ford's in- 
juries were not really serious, and as soon as he began to recover, he 
informed his friend that he intended to proceed no farther in that 
direction. The Professor could control his indignation no longer. 

"You will go up to John Loeb's house," he said, "if only to apol- 
ogize for your behavior." And there was that in his word which 
compels. 

They rode on, and when the little horsewoman dismounted they 
were hastening to open the gate for her. 

Juda Loeb looked back at them, and then, as if in dumb terror, 
pointed toward a craggy bluflf where a rock cabin surmounted by a 
staff was visible. A flag of vivid scarlet flaunted from the staff- 
head. 

"The flag ! The flag !" the poor girl cried in wild despair. "Uncle 
Johnny is dead. Oh, often and often, when we talked over our sig- 
nals, he has told me that when the red flag went up I should know 
that Uncle Johnny had gone far away. And I have seen his whibe 
bits of cloth for miles and miles and knew that all was well. Oh ! — 
the red flag that means — death — all alone !" 

She dropped the lariat-end from the saddle-horn as she mounted, 
and rode swiftly towards her home. 

Astonished beyond measure and bewildered, the Professor fol- 
lowed, and Ford rode not far behind. The latter, unimpressed, broke 
the silence. 

"If John Loeb was dead, he has come to life again ; for there goes 
the flag up and down, and up again, hke a ship's wig-wag apparatus." 

"The old gentleman is doubtless in distress, and is endeavoring to 
attract the attention of his niece, or any persons who may be in this 
vicinity. I trust we may be in time to do him a service," the Pro- 
fessor replied, his heart always simpler than his words. 

Presently, they galloped up to the cabin. The door was ajar, and 
Juda was talking in soft, low tones, and weeping. 
- "We will get help. Uncle Johnny, we will get help. Someone 
will come, and you will not go away and leave Juda all alone." 

But the old man was evidently delirious. In one hand he held a 
cord that seemed to control the signal flag, while he feebly called, 
"Going Juda! Going soon. Come quickly, little Juda, and bid old 
Johnny good-bye." 

The Professor went quietly to Juda's side and tried to reassure 
her, but one glance at the old man convinced him that the race was 
about run ; the Hunter in Life's gorges would hurl the noose, pres- 
ently, and lead the captive home. They could only make him as com- 
fortable as circumstances permitted, and wait. 



JUDA OF THE GORGES 14 « 

Three days and nights the Professor watched and comforted, and 
his many acts of unobtrusive kindness helped the hours to drag less 
wearily. No one, except a horse-hunter whom they dispatched in 
search of a doctor, had visited the stricken home, and it was unlikely 
that any assistance could be procured within a radius of sixty miles. 
During the long watch-hours Juda's life-story was gradually un- 
folded, and acquaintance that cannot be measured in time grew up 
between them. 

On the third evening, Juda and Professor Yonge were sitting on 
the rude porch in a sort of constraint that now seemed strange to 
both. Professor Yonge hesitated to approach the subject of Juda's 
situation when her uncle should leave her alone in the wilderness. 
Juda held the red flag in one hand, softly caressing it. 

"Do you know," she said, "this scrap of red bunting has a curious 
history. My uncle lived in Munich at a time when the anarchists were 
making trouble. A Bavarian nobleman had difficulty with his tenants, 
most of whom were Socialists. My uncle believed in the theories of 
Socialism, and wrote several treatises on the subject, which so en- 
raged the old Count that he declared he would compel Uncle John 
to publicly retract his beliefs, or leave the country. The people 
started to riot when they heard of it, and a few of the desperate — 
desperately poor — tenants raised a red flag and began a march on the 
Count's palace. Uncle John marched quietly with the screaming mob 
until they were in v'.ew of the palace, and then he approached the red 
standard, and, when ihe rioters least suspected his intention, snatched 
the flag from the bearer and tore it from the pole, saying that So- 
cialism meant law and order and fraternal love — not murder. Some 
soldiers witnessed the act, and when Uncle John was arrested with 
the leaders of the mob, they protested so loudly that the officers re- 
leased him, with the understanding that he should start for the fron- 
tier on the same day. Uncle John and my mother came to America 
at once, and in America my mother, whom I do not remember, mar- 
ried my father, and lived with him one happy year, as Uncle John 
says, until an awful day when a thing happened of which I cannot 
tell you ; but poor papa was not to blame — I know he could not have 
been to blame ! He came home looking white and strange, and in 
an hour he died of heart failure. It was something about money, but 
I cannot tell you. I was born the same day, but mother and father 
lie side by side in a grave I have never seen. 

"I was only five years old when Uncle Johnny brought me out 
here — so little and helpless. He taught me to read, and we have some 
good books in the big box in there. More people come here than 
you would think — sometimes four or five in one week. And I have 
had more teachers than any girl you ever saw." 



242 OUT WBST 

The ingenuousness of her last remark, and the weak little laugh 
that accompanied it, charmed the Professor. 

"When Uncle Johnny's little stock of money was gone," she con- 
tinued, with the confidence of a babe, "we dug in the ruins, and the 
tourists bought the pottery and stone axes we found ; but the worst 
of it came when the 'last old Athtec had been dragged from his 
crypt,' as Uncle Johnny says, and we found not a relic but his poor 
old bones. I remember Uncle Johnny said his head was of Jewish 
cast, and of course a Hebrew would not be buried with his dishes; 
but it made it hard for us. I know that Uncle Johnny never dug for 
the money alone, for the rarest specimens always went to Washing- 
ton, and no money ever came from there ; but we had no other means 
at all, at that time." 

And the Professor merely said "Ah !" — but thought much. 

"Then Uncle Johnny taught me to ride, and in a month I could 
ride — ride — you know I can! It was then we contrived the signals 
to enable us to communicate when I was out after wild ponies ; for 
Uncle Johnny was growing very feeble — and we must live. We sell 
the ponies I catch, and we are so happy. Oh, no, no ! I had forgot- 
ten." And she turned away in tears. 

"But I didn't tell you that our red flag was the very one that 
caused my mother and Uncle Johnny to go into exile," she resumed. 
"The flag was made by a girl that Uncle Johnny — loved; and he 
says that the people were truly desperate from want, but mistaken, 
nevertheless, and most of them died in prison for their sympathy 
with him. "Poor Karmee!" 

At last, the old man was very, very easy, and Juda stole from the 
bedside and went out to the corrals, where she looked long and wist- 
fully at her ponies, and then at the old familiar crags and the ruins, 
where once in other times the other maids that are gone may have 
stood, pensive and questioning life. The ponies scampered about 
the corral, evincing not the slightest interest in her, or kicked vi- 
ciously when she approached them. The long-haired little beasts 
seemed all coat and besom until they elevated their heels, and then 
they were all heels. But they can kick ! 

"My beautiful ponies !" she was saying when her grave friend ap- 
proached her, an expression on his face that was neither a smile of 
amusement nor sympathy with the sentiment she expressed; but 
might have been summed up in the Professor's quaint way, thus : 

"This is a very interesting specimen of pure girlhood, the intrica- 
cies of whose excellent mind I am totally unable to follow ; but that 
she is worthy of all deference and the best affection of all good men 
not even a person non compos mentis would dare to question. Now, 
what the Pegasus does she admire in those degenerate representatives 
of the genus Equus !" 



JUDA OF THE GORGES 243 

As if in answer to the thought, she turned to him with a little dep- 
recating laugh. 

"They are not very fine," she said, "but then, I — you see — I caught 
them." 

That was it — she had won them from the Breaks. Each poor Uttle 
scrub represented the prize for a race she had run stoutly and had 
not lost — and a man loves his own. 

The Professor understood; and then he unconsciously compared 
this little maid with the favored ladies of that Athens-by-the-Bay ; 
for his acquaintance v/as limited, almost wholly, to cultured women. 
The child of the gorges stood in a dream, the nimbus of purity upon 
her brow, the light of the sun-kissed gorges in her eyes; and the 
Professor weighed many things in a balance, 

"No better quality than womanly grace sits on any brow," That 
was his decision, 

"And now," the maid resumed, "I must leave it all. It would 
never do for me to live here all alone since Uncle Johnny has gone ; 
but it will always be home to me." And that which strong men 
must not do, the little child of Nature did so touchingly that the Pro- 
fessor say only one thing to answer, and, indeed, found no fault with 
the circumstances. 

"My child, you shall come back to this very interesting locality as 
often as you desire !" he protested. "And if you will permit me to 
come with you — but I presume you regard me as being very much 
of a nature with a fragment from the Tertiary geological stratum. 
As a matter of record, I am only thirty, and I — in fact, I have formed 
a very deep regard for you — that is, I love you dearly !" 

The latter clause, at least, was plainly comprehensible, and of satis- 
fying character ; and she ran to him with a little cry. 

"All my life I have had someone to love, though it was only Uncle 
Johnny, and now he has gone so far away — you are so good !" 

Farmington, New Mexico. 



JOEY DAVIE 

By R. C. PITZER 

T'S been my luck," said Diogenes Beason, "to see many a 

man make a plumb fool out o* himself, over a female. 

I done it proper, wunst, but I'm married an' repented 

now, an' anyhow, that ain't got anything to do with 

Davidson. An' I want to tell you about him, as soon 

as I get myself rested up. Why, yes, seeing it's chilly. Whisky 

straight tonight, thanks. Here's us! 

"Davidson was a friend of mine, back in the eighties. It's a mild, 
gentle name, specially with Joseph for its handle, but most every- 
body thought he was a hell-roarer. He had a monstrous reputa- 




244 OUT WEST 

tion as a lady-killer, though he'd never talk about his conquests. He 
wouldn't brag none, that is, but just drop accidental remarks here 
an' there, an' let out a secret now an' then, mentionin' no names an' 
compromisin' nobody. But you bet the camp o' Fryingpan reckoned 
Davidson were its Beau Lotharo. He'd pertend to talk in his sleep 
about a girl named Laury, ask clairyvoyants regardin' her location 
an' actions, an' he let on to be amazin' stuck on her, but she never 
materiaUzed. None o' Davie's women ever got alive but one; he 
were the bashfulest man God ever made, an' he were so ashamed 
of it that he pertendcd to have sweethearts in every camp in the 
state, just to keep the boys fr'm kiddin' him, I reckon. 

"He didn't know nothin' about women at all, an' women knowed he 
didn't ; but he fooled the men proper — all but me. Knowin' women 
myself better'n any Westerner livin' — I can't put it stronger with- 
out seemin' stuck up, pardner — I savvied Davie's gag right away 
quick. But I didn't let on, for it didn't hurt him none, an' it didn't 
hurt no woman in particular, though it were hard on the sex, sup- 
posin' 'em runnin' after that pink-an'-white cuss, an' leavin' men like 
me to go courtin' in vain. Why, wunst I writ as many as five hun- 
dred proposals o' marriage, an' didn't get no acceptance, but one 
fr'm a girl what turned out mulatter. Hey? Oh, yes, Davidson. 

"Joey Davie were a gambler, but he were that lamby an' kittenish 
nobody'd 'a' guessed it; an' I don't believe he rightly suspicioned it 
himself. He got in the bus'ness by accident, most likely; but there 
he were, anyhow, when I knowed him, runnin' a faro table f'r Jim 
Bell, an' a-bunkin' with Sport Randolph, the most immoral gazabo 
in Fryingpan, if I do say it. Come afternoon, them two 'ud join the 
gang in the hotel piazzer, 'n' chew the rag about things lurid an' 
various, always a-leadin' up to some yarn. I wasn't no slouch my- 
self, when it come to makin' spontaneous lies to amuse the boys. I 
remember wunst — Now, how in the devil can I tell you about David- 
son if y' go on a-buttin' in an' a-interruptin' of my yarn, hey? Oh, 
all right, don't mention it. Sure I'll have another, old man. Yes, 
whisky. 

"I remember wunst, we was alT gathered in that there aforemen- 
tioned piazzer, gassin', when Sallie McGurk come past. We all got 
out hats off in a hurry, an' Davie kept his'n lowered till she got 
around a corner. Then he fetched a gentle, dyin' sigh, which nobody 
didn't notice but me. I see his eyes was dreamy — you know the 
look, most likely, or the feel of the look, anyhow — an' his cheeks was 
sure red. Everybody'd made some crack at Sal as she hiked past — 
everybody but Joey Davie — an' she'd shot back, pert an' funny. 
You couldn't get the best o' her in no joke them days. 

"When she got out o' sight, Randolph makes the boys laff with 



JOEY DAVIB «45 

one o' his would-be-funny japes, an' Joey Davie bites his cigar in 
two. But he says nothin'. He were a most peaceful cuss. 

" 'She's a pritty girl,' I says. 

" 'Most too pritty," says Randolph, winkin'. 'I'm glad Joey hain't 
taken no likin' to her, f'r I'm fair gone myself. I wouldn't wonder 
if she was waitin' around the corner for me,' he says, an' strolls off, 
ca'm an' easy. 

" 'Two of a kind,' says Jim Bell. 

"Joey Davie sort of blushed ag'in, an' took the floor. 'Gents, 
says he — he spoke most awful fine language, bein' a university man 
— 'gents,' he says, 'I been patiently listenin' to them there remarks 
o' your'n, an' I want to say you're all plumb off your base. If there's 
an exceptional fine girl in this here burg, she's Miss Sarah McGurk. 
If there's anybody better'n her this side o' hell — heiven,' he said — 
'show her to me. Gents, I repeats you are sure loco, an' untruthers, 
moreover.' He didn't say 'untruthers ;' I've forgot the word, but it's 
liar without the fireworks, sabee? 

"'You're a ideelist,' says Jim Bell, sneerin'; 'I hope that there 
attitude ain't contagious.' 

" 'Rats,' says Ted Asgill, 'don't you know Joey Davie ? He's like 
them ancient dooks what believed in chivalreous denials o' obvious- 
osities. He'd hang himself to prove the honorable angelism o' Little 
Sulphuretto, he would.' 

" 'He's jealous o' Randolph,' I says, puttin' in my bray like a 
blame burro. 

" 'Randolph's a-smoking' a cigar an' hidin' out by his lonesome, 
meanin' to come back an' brag,' says Joey Davie. 'That there girl 
wouldn't have no truck with Sport, She knows what sort o' Garden 
o' Eden snakes we are,' he says. 'Come along ! I'll show you Miss 
McGurk a-climbin' of the mountain road, an' Sport kickin' his heels 
in a doorway somewheres.' 

"I never sec Davie's blue eyes quite so ca'm an' glassy, so I goes, 
wonderin' what he'd been drinkin'. We seen Sport an' Sal walkin' 
up the hill toward her old man's shack, an' Sport's arm was around 
her, most affectionate. 

"The boys give Joey Davie the ha-ha, but he marched off, sayin' 
nothin' an' lookin' rather bilious. We reckoned that was the end o' 
that there epysode. 

"Sal were rather pritty, all right, but a pritty girl is only a pritty 
girl. In this here monstrous big city, pardner, I can sure see them 
by the hundred every night, as they go home frm work. Yes, a 
pritty girl's a pritty giil ; but a soul's a soul. Sometimes y' find them 
in cahoots, an' then she's a beaut; but mostly a pritty girl's just a 
pritty girl ; an' Sal were a pritty girl. Xind-a little, an' big-eyed, an' 



246 OUT WEST 

havin' them timid, O-won't-you-pertect-me attitudes, she sure were 
a prime fav'rite, but I didn't take no stock in her. She were too sassy, 
too obvious an' exceedm' desirin' admiration by the pound, havin' a 
new beau every month, an' old ones hangin' around. 

"Now, it's a sure fact that Joey Davie were a mild man, a bashful 
man, an' a ideelist; that's a hell of a combination. As I said, he 
walked away lookin' yellow, an' later on I seen him all by his lone- 
some moonin' around in the dusk. He didn't eat no supper, and, 
come night, he weren't in his place at the faro-table, so Jim Bell 
had to manipulate them boxes himself. An' he were sure sore on 
Davie. 

"Along about midnight, Davie wandered in an' took Jim's lip with 
the patience o' a burro. That were always his way — you couldn't 
rile him. I, bein' interested, you understand, went over an' began 
buckin' the tiger, just to get a square look at Davie's face an' see if 
his ideel were recoverin' fr'm the hard knock Sal an' Randolph gave 
it. But Joey's eyes were as blue an' ca'm as usual, an' he droned along 
with his spiel in noways different 'n' he'd always been. That got me, 
for I certain reckoned that he'd be cut up. I'd fixed a little romance 
f 'r him, you see ; but he didn't come up to my conception o' the he-ro. 
He didn't even get drunk, like any respectable man 'ud 'a' done ; an' 
him an' Sport went off to bed together, thick as gamblers. An' the 
next day they was off fishin' an' takin' life easy. I reckon Joey 
Davie pumped Sport considerable, 'n' found out the lay o' the land, 
f'r that afternoon — me bein' lazy an' layin' around waitin' f'r some- 
body to buy my claims — Davie comes up an' says: 

" 'Diog, I'd like to confab with you.' 

" 'Sure !' I says, an' we took a fash'nable stroll. 

" 'Diog,' he remarks, after a thoughtful hike down the crick, 'do 
you reckon Sport's already married to somebody somewhere?' 

" 'An' him a gambler ?' I says, facetious. 'Hain't you in the same 
boat, Joey?' 

" 'I'm a gentleman,' says Joey, stiff an' military. 'I ain't no angel, 
but I'm better,' he says, 'bein' a man. I don't take no stock in Sport's 
talk ; talk's cheap — ' an' he blushes, rememberin' his own talk, I guess, 
though his never mentioned no names — 'but girls is easy impressed,' 
says he. 'They ain't got no experience in man-nature, 'n' 're too 
damn trustful. That girl's too good for Sport, anyhow,' he says, an' 
swore heavy. 

" 'D' you know her intimate ?' I hints. 

" 'I've seen her some, 'n' et Christmas dinner at her old man's,' 
he remarks, 'an' I certain ought to know her. She's out o' place m 
this here camp.' 

" 'She sure is,' I says ; but I were ambiguous. 



JOBY DAVin «47 

" 'She'd ought to be took down to civilization,' he reflects. 'Diog, 
I don't reckon it's a good thing f'r her to be intimate with Sport, an' 
yet, there ain't no way to let her know what a skunk's like, 'Tain't 
manly to tell her, an' 'tain't manly to let her trot along in ignorance o' 
skunks. I'm referrin' to Sport Randolph,' he says, an' he looks me 
in the eye. 

" 'I ain't a-quarrelin' with your defynations,' I says. 

" 'Now,' he reasons, 'how in blazes is she to be kept clear o' that 
cuss ?' 

" 'Oh, well,' I says, 'butt in an' cut him out.' I sure reckoned 
that if he'd get intimate he'd lose them fool idees. 'You're a lady- 
killer,' says I, 'an' everybody knows it, but you're the best man, an' 
everybody knows that, too.' 

"Joey Davie flushed up to his eyes, an' he says, 'Diog, do you talk 
about your friends? Do you gossip, Diog?' I shakes my head. 
'Well,' he continues, 'old man, I'll tell you something. I'm a blame 
fool.' 

"I laflFed. I couldn't help it. 

" 'I've been dreamin' about women,' he says, 'an' a-cussin' Fate 
because she hain't never throwed no right-minded girl my way, an' 
all the time there was Fate wavin' Miss Sarah McGurk under my 
nose. I don't reckon I've got the sand to go an' call on her ; an' I 
suppose it's too late, anyhow. It always is too late, Diog,' he says; 
'did you ever notice that ? Fate's a gay girl for p'isonin' your whisky, 
an* then givin' you champagne f'r a chaser. Now, look here, you're 
sure experienced in women's ways,' says he to me. 'You tell me 
how to disillusion Miss Sarah without doin' my pardner no dirt.' 

" 'Joey Davie,' I says, 'a cayuse can't balk an' run away to wunst ; 
hearts 'n' di'monds can't both be trumps. Tell him you're goin' to 
take a hand in the game, an' then stack the deck,' I says. 

" 'You're immoral, Beasom,' he remarked ; an' he left me. 

"Next mornin'. Sport Randolph collars me. 'Beasom,' he says, 
'I'd like to take a walk with you.' 

" 'I love walks,' I answered ; an' after a infusion o' motive-power, 
we walked. 

" 'You're a friend o' Joey's ?' Sport says, sudden. 

" 'Well, Sport,' I acknowledges, 'I don't want to seem stuck up, 
but I'm proud to say I am. An' have you any objections?' 

" 'Now, now,' he says, laffln', 'I ain't goin' to quarrel with you. 
I'm a friend o' his'n, myself, but not enough so to talk man to man 
about certain things,' says he. 'It ain't every friend as can get in the 
insides o' a man. Now, Beasom, Joey's gone an' made a locoed burro 
out o' himself, an' he needs ropin'. Can you rope him ?' 

" 'Oh, you're jealous,' I snorts. 'Let Joey alone. He ain't in no 
danger, an', what's more, Sal ain't, neither — not fr'm him.' 



248 OUT WEST 

" 'Do you know Sal ?' 

" 'Why,' I says, 'I don't reckon she's particular fast, but I guess she 
can trot some, an' all she needs is trainin'. Joey's a good moral in- 
fluence,' I says. 

" 'Beasom,' he remarks, serious, 'Joey Davie's gone an' writ out a 
proposal o' marriage to her. Here it is ; she passed it on,' he says ; 
an' he takes a letter out o' his vest. 

"I reckoned he was goin' to hand it around the camp to make the 
boys laff, an' I sure got boilin' mad on the sudden. Sport, he jumps 
back and sticks his hands up quick, an' that saved him, for I didn't 
shoot. 

" 'I see you are his friend,' he says, cool as usual. 'But I weren't 
a-goin' to show it, Beasom. Here, keep it yourself.' An' he let the 
paper drift down to the ground. 

"I picks it up an' restores peaceful relations. 'Now,' I says, 'we'll 
resoom our interestin' conversation,' An' I tears the letter into little 
bits. 

" 'Hell,' says Sport, 'you've done it ! You needed that to open his 
eyes with,' he says. I see the point, an' I kicks myself, proper. 

" 'What 're we to do ?' Sport demands. 

"I scratched my chin. 'First of all, what's Sal goin' to do?' 

" 'That,' he says, 'hain't got no answer. One 'ud think you didn't 
know women, askin' such blame riddles. She don't know, so how the 
devil can I know ? Just now,' says he, 'she ain't goin' to do nothin'. 
"Silence," she says, "cuts deep." But then, Diog, silence gives con- 
sent, too. I reckon she'll change her mind, by-m-bye, an' smile at 
him, an' Joey Davie'll hike out after a preacher.' 

" 'Sport,' I says, 'do you like Joey enough to make him mad ?' 

" 'That's accordin' to circumstances.' 

" 'The thing to do,' I says, 'is to take that there female out o' 
this camp.' Sport sort of got red, an' hesitated. 'Can't you do it?' 
I demands. 

" 'Hold on !' he says, sudden, 'I buck. I ain't a-goin' to be sad- 
dled with no woman,' says he. 'Tell you what I will do, though. I'll 
go out walkin' with her in the twilight, an' make most tremenjous 
love where Joey can see us. An' furthermore, I'll get her to talkin', 
an' a-makin' fun o' him, accordin' to her nature; for she sure is 
full of witty japes about everybody ; an' I guess she can sling a few 
at Joey Davie if I prompt her. You must have him where he's got to 
listen. But he mustn't have no guns on,' he says, 'or I can't feel 
comfortable doin' my share o' them japes ' 

" 'Sport,' I chirps, 'that's the ticket, an' we'll certain stump him. 
Now look here ; him an' me'll be up in my cabin tonight, along about 
eight o'clock, a-playin' coon-can. An' you two'll pass along the 



JOBY DAVIB . 249 

road just outside. Bein' with me, Joey won't do nothin' but smile, 
'n' talk as if he didn't hear nothin', an' keep on playin' cards, per- 
tending not to notice. That talk o' yours'U give me an openin', an' 
I'll butt in an' ease my mind proper. When I get done, I reckon there 
won't be no ideels left in Joey's framework.' 

" 'That's the sure cheese,' says Sport ; 'pile it on heavy. I'll give 
you a heap of pointers.' An' he done so. 

"We was good conspirers, all right, an' everything worked just 
like it does on the theater stage; all except Sal's talk. When they 
got close to my cabin, Sport opened up, an' he certainly roasted Joey 
most funny ; but Sal just kept her blame mouth shut except to re- 
mark that Sport didn't understand Joey Davie, an' it weren't quite so 
funny as he thought. An' she asked him if he'd given the letter back 
to his pardner. 

"When they got past, I begins, but Joey lays down his cards 'n' 
says, 'Diogenes, choke it off!' I done so, not likin' his eye. 

" 'Now, pardner,' ho resooms, 'I'll tell you somethin'. That there 
girl hain't had no chance; that's all. Her enviryment is rotten,' he 
says, 'an' her friends is more so. Good-night !' says he ; an' he left 
me. But I were jubilant, for I seen he'd got a knock-out crack, an' 
didn't have no mind left f'r spoutin'. 

"That were all right, an' Sport an' me shakes hands, private, down 
in Jim Bell's. But next mornin', I'll be dog-goned if Joey Davie 
weren't missin'. Sport comes up to my shack, an' he says : 

" 'Where's Joey ? Say, I didn't know it'd hit him so hard. Hope 
he ain't eaten no bug-powder. He didn't come in last night.' 

"We mosies over to McGurk's, an' found the old man rairin'. He 
come hot-foot f'r Sport, an' they mixed ; but when I got 'em sep- 
arated, by darn ! we found out that Sallie McGurk were missin', too. 

" 'Diog,' says Sport, 'it's a tragedy for the newspaper. Darn our 
hides,' he says, 'an' his, too, if he's alive. He'd better not be, for 
I'll get him, sure ! He's gone an' shattered the shatterer o' his ideels. 
He's murdered her, sure pop !' 

" 'By golly,' I says, 'I believe you're right. It's dangerous ruinin' 
ideels.' 

Beasom stopped and studied his empty glass. 

"Now, look here," I protested, "that isn't the story. Davidson was 
a gentleman — you said so yourself. He didn't do anything so hor- 
rible." 

Beasom solemnly stood up and walked to the door, beckoning me to 
follow. 

"See that sky-scraper?" he asked, pointing across the street. 
"That's Joey Davie's. Him an' Sal live up in a reel stone house 
somewheres, an' Sal's president o' the High Art Club. She were a 
slap-up girl, only needin' opportunities; an' Randolph; were just 
workin' a low-down trick on me. He were tryin' to scare Joey 
Davie away, bein' afraid plumb to death o' Joey's rivalree. But he 
weren't half so afraid o' that as he were o' me, later on. I organized 
a c'mittee o' one, an' sent him to Arizony. I was figurin' on sendin' 
him to another place, but he preferred Arizony." 

Denrer, Col. 




MUSIC or MARCH 

By VIRGINIA GARLAND. 
I DO not feel that the walls of my redwood cabin are 
stolid. I have reared in my house no dense bul- 
wark against the free fluidic passage of elemental 
magnetism. I may say my dwelling is not unim- 
aginative. It takes the impact of the winds in 
responsive spirit, the rhythmic brushing of lee- 
ward boughs in according tone. The tonic touch 
of the cold, the calling warmth of the sunlight, it seems to know with 
sentient pleasure — a sort of remembered^ wood-thrilling delight. 

Without architecture, my house has atmosphere. I can hear the 
springy plash of each rain drop tripping the slant forte of my roof, 
or the sudden gust sweeping them together in running tone. Within, 
I am sheltered, but not insulated from any electric mood of the sky. 
Rather has my small brown roof-tree been taken back into the kin- 
ship of the trees, hearing what they hear ; responding to what they 
answer ; possessed and a part of the surrounding forest. 

* 5|t * * * 

Far off I hear the coming of the wind, gathering in mid-air above 
my cabin, forming in musical spirals among the high sequoias. Now 
the movement disentangles itself from the trees, drops in long ban- 
ners of sound toward my roof. A big piccolo is made of my chimney ; 
the room fills with fluted murmurs. Long-drawn, plaintive waves 
seem to lift the floor, spreading fast from the hearthstone in deep- 
ening inundations, in treble-sweet, wailing eddies of cumulative har- 
mony. 

Yet I can make no record of the fleeting notes ; follow no distinct 
melody in the blurred tide of sound, that ceases as suddenly as it 
came. Perhaps it is this lack of capacity to catch the escaping vibra- 
tions, the covert variations of the wind-songs, which persuade us to 
a sort of wistful sadness in listening. We interpret almost every 
prolonged note in nature as a monotone, when it is the failure of our 
limited hearing to grasp the infinite modulations, to hear but a 
broken undertone through the progression of the mighty themes. 

We have been trained as a race for centuries to the receptivity of 
the human expression of music and yet there are some who hear 
in the songs of the masters only a crashing noise, a dominant volume 
of unmeaning sound. As a people, I suppose we are wholly unde- 
veloped in the capacity of really hearing Nature's music. One sweet, 
swelling note flutes down my chimney — and the wind has passed on. 
I cannot follow, though tense with longing, to hear that song which 
is wrapping my loved earth about. 



MUSIC OF MARCH 251 

The winds are flying so fast today in such swift-playing, rollick- 
ing measure, one is taxed in listening. To follow each fleeting phrase 
would be to dash with them from ridge to hollow, from river-gorge 
to meadow-land, from tree-top to buttercup-slope. No lingering 
cadences finished with a single tree I The forest seems a bit put out 
with this cavalier treatment, but towards evening it has serenely 
caught the long swell again. Over the willows an eerie soughing — 
slow, languid up-rising of long branches — drooping trail of sweep- 
ing boughs — Lydian measures. 

The burly valley oaks, sprinkled with meshing of tender green, 
yield themselves rigidly. The gray sycamores, spurred with pointed 
buds (too young to rustle) shiver — turn aside austerely. Well, the 
wind knows the timbre of each tree. The pliant chestnut-oaks give 
themselves utterly, tangled in their own music. Twinkling leaves, 
curling branches, whirled in reverting arches, turned about like a 
pebble in a brook, flowing over and over in one continuous circle — a 
tempestuous rondo. 

The Sequoia intones the majestic fugue, each tremulous, reeling 
bough securely placed in fixed, musical concord. The great bole rocks 
against the sky, reverberating with the primal theme. The mighty 
resonance goes forth, controlled, contained, predominating. The 
lower boughs begin to swing with the answering melodies, crossing 
and recrossing, carrying the accent higher and higher in varying 
modulations and with subtle change of key. Intermediate harmonies 
are swept from the ends of plumy, tossing branches. The basic deton- 
ation is heard again through a swirl of retreating, chasing, fleeting 
notes — rushing into high, distant melodies — whispered into the 
clouds — returning by leafy levels — sifting through quivering needles 
— gathering in volume — coming with a sea-sounding swell to earth 
again. 

Of all the trees the Madrono is the most emotional, making its re- 
sponses to the wind full of wild color — unexpected, glowing action — 
unique, brilliant ardor. In a grove, a single tree preludes a soft- 
toned ritornello. One after another takes up the strain, until all 
are singing together a warm, wreathing symphony. Except in 
the roughest stress of weather, the body of the tree scarcely 
sways, the whole musical movement being up and down — eccen- 
tric, shifting boughs falling upon the rising wind-chords. 

The Madrono permits no hurried massing of its singing leaves. 
Its wide-hung branches take the plunge of the wind openly; the 
precipitate currents slip through its colorful spaces baffled, but with 
ever-returning exaltation. 

Slow, swathing chords meet lingeringly about its smooth, round 
limbs. Broad, bending leaves drift against the wind's voice in sinu* 
ous counter-play. If one branch is pinioned down, another breaks 



^S^ OUT WEST 

loose in rich, vivacious action. It has too much to give to be simply- 
played upon by the winds. The twisted copper branches, swerving 
down obliquely across the main limb, are not easily cast back into 
confluent lines. Poised so they catch the idlest, drifting air, yet vig- 
orously resistant to any sudden overwhelming towards one direction ; 
keeping their individual flow of movement; guiding each intertwin- 
ing chord. Before it will lose its innate realization of what the wind 
means to it, what it means to the wind, it will be snapped in twain. 
It is often broken by this unmastered mingling, and the red-streaked 
splintered heart of it lying open to the sky is a beautiful thing, vi- 
brantly alive. Around it the repentant winds are deterred, calling, 
summoning starting leaf and twig. Alluring still, though passion- 
broken, the Madrono springs with resilient sapling growth again. 

Falls a chain of quiet days. Cool, still, star-scintillant nights, 
linked into warm, golden moments. A resting in dreamy spell, the 
month's impetuous spirit lying coiled on hill and valley, with elusive, 
tentative charm, soon to be broken, flung aside, whirled into the high 
tumult of the dominant moods of March. The silent voices of the 
forest are singularly apparent, as if, in this pausing interval, they 
were quivering urgently into expression, reclaiming the hours 
eagerly. 

When the silence of beauty draws upon all the absorbent atten- 
tion, the recording faculties are merged into one. Color is heard — 
perfume takes hue — odors are palpable — silence becomes audible, and 
motion is music. The eyes are not sufficient to see all there is in this 
forest, the ears to hear, or the hands to touch. With all the senses 
commingled, keen, must the intricate scales of understanding be 
tried. One hears, then, the waxen bells of manzanita beating softly 
together. A pink trillium bent to earth with a sister stem suddenly 
springs upright, setting free a peal of perfume. The thrill of rising 
sap leaps to the listening fingers, and the musical push of growing 
tilings pulsates in the air. 

There rises an arietta of spiraled vapour, out-breat"hing from an 
old log. The long light, glinting down interwoven threads of gossa- 
mer, gives a thrill of joy which must be put into filmy cadences of 
fairy sound. Undoubtedly this still music is counted in the process 
of life as fully as the thunder of a wild sky — the worlds within 
worlds held together, it may be, as securely by a cobweb sound, as 
by the laws of gravitation. 

Where purple shafts rise above the brushwood, the low early sun- 
shine, beaming up through an eastern-lying cafion, strikes full on 
base and lower limb, radiating in level, sun-moted light, earth- and 
root-revealing beams. Here, at almost the same hour every sunny 
morning, a little local ground-wind rises, caused by the quick heat- 



MUSIC OP MARCH t^i 

ing of night-cooled earth — the rest of the forest quite still — only 
where the slant warmth draws, the curving breeze slips under in fol- 
lowing currents. Curling about the oaks and ceanothus, snatching 
at low-hanging boughs, shaking the pendent hazel-blossoms, run- 
ning like a squirrel over the chaparral, crooning the while; liquid, 
sunny motion about the massive roots ; singing to baby saplings, fin- 
gering tangles of oxaUs and violet, lulling all the lowly things, tell- 
ing their stories, taking their messages to and fro. A soil-close little 
breeze, sounding a simple madrigal, one of those humble melodies 
made to ease, and to linger in the heart. 

4c )tc )tc « ;(( 

There is a vital charm about an old log lying deep on the mazy 
floor of the forest. Nor is it unspoiled of a certain mellow, still 
ripening music. Fallen, prostrate, decaying, it yet has dignity, vital- 
ity, usefulness. One might study for years the life it harbors, the 
tenure it holds. To know an old log through and through from 
beam to end would be to know one's self not ignorant. Its history, 
from the young tree to its last absorption into earth and air, is 
pretty closely woven into all the things that are. 

I have found in Winter the scaled, cold-avoiding lizard torpidly 
imbedded in its warm cavities, and in Summer, the smooth, heat- 
escaping little saurian called the "water puppy" snugly lying in the 
same place. With the first heat, the bright lizard drags itself out, 
basks in a warm spot until the sun has limbered its scales. With 
the first rains, the water-dog comes sprawling out, dry, attenuated, 
feeble, to soak in some wet corner into plumper shape. 

Hylas and snakes, grubs, cocoons, ants, termites, lodge with the 
old log. The winter-wren tucks its nest under the mossy bark. Al- 
most every creature of the woods uses it for some purpose — home, 
harbor, refuge, trysting place. No wonder it takes its downfall 
graciously, knowing that not until the last crumbling whiff of it is 
dry on the air, shall its utility be spent. And even then, has the 
spirit of the tree failed? It but suspends its form, awaits its 
re-entry, called into existence again by some strain of unknown 
music the human ears cannot catch. 

 4c 4c * aK 

The wind rises in the night — slow, steady, prescient with the in- 
tention of increasing fury. Scudding clouds tear at the wan face of 
the moon, and the morning sunlight is racked with the barred flux- 
ing of violent shadows, cast from whirling trees. 

The forest rolls and shakes about the house. Somewhere distant- 
a long monitory swish cuts through the air ; the ^reat tree jars the 
earth in falling. A slack shelf of ground slides echoing into the 
river. 

The fiercest velocity of the storm is passing overhead, against ex- 



*54 OUT WEST 

posed mountain-ridges, among the high Sequoias. From this broad 
river of violence, lesser eddies of the gale branch down the cafion; 
beat with somewhat spent force upon my roof. 

What name for this mad music? The thunder of its mighty 
changes' are beyond the ears ; only the battering dimension of sound 
is heard in howling monotone. 

Even the Sequoias, which wait for the master hand of the mag- 
nificent winds to sweep their harping columns, seem bewildered, 
wrung into twisted confusion. This is war to the teeth, and to the 
center of things. Martial music beating! I must somewhat force 
the remembrance that it is a warfare which leaves no lasting scars, 
which breaks but to build again. 

A flock of chickadees whirls past the window, flung fluttering, up- 
side-down, against the willows, righting themselves with frolic en- 
joyment, faring forth on the wind again. 

The storm begins to work in my blood. I am suddenly amazed at 
myself, crouching over the fire. This is March — unquelled, riotous ! 
Am I not a part of the unbridled hours ? What am I doing here, in 
the sheltered back-water of the hills, when a great sea of frenzied 
music is calling on the highlands? 

I know the mountain-road is beset with hazard — loose, overhang- 
ing banks slipping from the taloned roots of shaken trees, branches 
cast savagely across the way. 

As I climb into the swift zone of furious wind, I am afraid. But 
more compelling than fear is the summons of the storm. Detonating 
roar of mighty trees — volley of cracking boughs about me — in a 
pause, a blue- jay's resentment thrown raucously on the gale. 

With frantic rush I round the high headland, and the sheer valley 
slopes away filled with torrential, billowing green, with the crested 
spume of up-flung boughs. 

Beyond this bend I cannot go, though I breast the attempt over and 
over, just for the wild joy of being beaten back, flung against the 
brow of the mountain. 

Some sage has said there are forty-seven kinds of madness in the 
winds of March. Certainly some sort of supernormal frenzy seizes 
upon me. This wind suits me. There is enough of it. I wish I 
might be lifted, hurled down the seething spaces of the valley. I 
fling my arms, my hair, to the storm. I leap and shout aloud. What 
have I to do with that little brown house in the hollow? This is 
my voice shrieking to the sky — my strength, breaking, wrench- 
ing. I am the storm! 

But not for long. My littleness and my fear take cold grasp of 
my senses again. A wholesome awe of the wind's ravages sends me 
rushing down the homeward trail, not a scratch on me, my body 
clean-swept with the pruning winds, washed in swimming currents 



MUSIC OF MARCH 155 

of mighty air. I fall against my door, exhausted, exhilarant, happy. 
Ah ! At my doorway a broken branch strikes me full in the face. I 
take the stinging blow in philosophic humor ; for in this same man- 
ner life deals with us in many comings and goings. We may meet 
foreign foes unassailed, come from strange dangers unscathed, and 
on our own threshold struggle in the greatest battle, finding perhaps 

the ominous danger in the safe recesses of our own hearts. 

« * «  * 

There is harshness in the music of the forest — dissonance — cruelty. 
But always the healing harmonies are woven over ; and is not sweet 
music more poignantly true when it plays upon the brink of discord ? 

Like the trees, we are sounding our harmonies, swept by mighty 
fateful winds into sudden journeys, new endeavors, rhythmic return 
of youth and hope ; and our joy and our grief, our pleasure and pain, 
make one great song. 

Brookdale, Santa Cruz Co. 



THE HARP or A SINGLE STRING 

(To Rosendo Uruchurtu, the Blind Inventor of the Rosendolin.) 
By ADELIA B. ADAMS 

OSOUL, whose prison house, with blinds drawn tight, 
Forced him to look within, to find the light. 
Reflecting there, his past remembered well. 
And in self pity yearned the tale to tell. 

He saw a changing play, with sorrows rife, 
Played on the one unchanging string of life; 
Then, calling to his aid his minion, Thought, 
A magic harp, of but one string he wrought. 

And o'er that mystic string, in pensive wail. 
He tells to souls without his tragic tale. 
No usual music hear they, listening. 
But sentient words vibrating o'er that string. 

As, plaintively, a child, late gone astray, 
Tells of the hurts it met with on the way. 
And cannot all forget, though now it knows 
It nears its home — its refuge from all woes — 

That lonely soul its recollections plain 
To hearers, thrilled to sweet responsive pain 
By memories that stir each soul to tears, 
As 'twere its own sad story that it hears; 

For, differing from that wild, sweet Israfel, 
Whose own heart was his lute, when he did sing, 
This prisoned soul, that sings so wildly well. 
Vibrates all heart-strings — touching that one string. 
Los Angeles. 




.256 



the: card-handler 

By JAMES D. KIRKPATRICK 
jOE hired out as an irrigator merely to mask his true pro- 
fession; in reality he "handled the cards" for a living. 
Hired men are so scarce in Montana during July that 
he had to ply his shovel very little each day to keep his 
place on Knapp's ranch. The long summer twilights of 
every evening found him seated in the corner of one or the other of 
the bunk houses, preymg upon the wages of the other men. 

He was very smooth in the way he did everything. Mrs. Knapp 
regarded him as quite an exemplary young man. He changed his 
working shirt frequently and wore overalls that fitted him. At the 
family table he appeared very much to advantage, he did not devote 
all of his time to feeding, but conversed with Mr. and Mrs. Knapp, 
passed dishes without being asked, and ate with his fork. He spoke 
good English ; most agreeable to all, he gracefully stroked the cofifee 
from his moustache with a clean red handkerchief. 

The men, however, suspected him. He always took his seat in a 
corner, where no one could watch him play his hand, and he was 
always winner at the end of the evening. 

Big Jean had no traits in common with Joe. Deep drinking had 
brought him so low that the poor-house loomed gloomilv before his 
heavy eyes — eyes reddened by alcohol and turned apart b> an inici- 
nal disorder. Old habit made him smooth his hair, and, if there was 
water in the bucket, wash his hands and face before sitting down to 
the table. Once seated, he ate in silence, eyes fixed upon the table. 
Small wonder that Jean's bleared blue eyes and scarred face suf- 
fered by comparison with Joe's quick black eyes and smooth-shaven, 
regular features. This awkward, sodden Jean had a heart of gold, 
but it was disguised from women like Mrs. Knapp. Men doubted 
him, for he was so untrustworthy when a saloon was near. But the 
horses knew him, in their dumb, instinctive way. He never let them 
thirst, no matter how many check-reins must be let down, and he 
stole oats for them when they were not otherwise provided. When 
the nervous animals reared and staggered on rocky hillside footing, 
his shattered nerves gave way and he roared brutal curses at them. 
But at the end he said : 

"Ye poor devils, ye can't he'p yerselves, I reckon. 'Tain't natteral 
for to pull with nothin' in yer and them rocks rollin' under yer. 
Come, lead up thar, Doc, ye lazy cuss!" 

The worst horses worked for him after a time. 

Joe fleeced Jean one evening. Little craft was required to manip- 
ulate the sheafs ; Jean was so weighted down by reason of years of 
drunkenness and contempt of well-dressed people that his percep- 



THE CARD-HANDLER. 257 

tion was blunted. Joe drew the rude table into his accustomed cor- 
ner, seated himself on a cracker-box behind it, with deft and con- 
fident hand sorted three acres and a pair of kings out of the pack, 
and called upon Jean to be sociable and have a game. Jean silently 
drew up a box opposite Joe. The latter produced a bottle of whiskey 
and the abridged pack of cards. Then, by the light of a candle and 
the waning twilight, the game commenced. Jean had a little luck 
now and then, but when a good plump jack-pot lay on the table the 
aces and kings emerged and prevailed. When Jean's July wages 
had gone across the table into neat cylindrical piles at Joe's right 
hand, I. O. U.'s for the wages of August began to pass across the 
table. 

By this time three more men had lounged in and were watching 
Jean play his hand. All of them had previously lost to Joe. One 
of them nudged Jean with his knee, gave him a meaning look, and 
advised him : 

"Bite it off here, Jean. Ye're cleaned out." 

Jean considered heavily for a moment his worthless hand and his 
sleek opponent. The fruits of a month's hard work lay there across 
the table. No wonder ; he had held scarcely a pair of face-cards to 
defend them. Certainty and anger flared up out of an hour's sus- 
picion. He got to his feet with his fists clenched on the table and 
kicked his box backward. Leaning forward, he fixed one of his 
bloodshot eyes on Joe's face and growled : 

"Ye or'nary dog, ye've bit me, ain't yer? Ye've raked my last 
red out o' me, an' more. Jes' stan' out there in the floor and I'll 
pound some o' yer black blood out o' yer." 

Joe was no coward, but there were two kings and an ace still 
clasped between his knees, and both his hands were perforce "above 
board." If he stood up, a face-card might flutter out into sight and 
be his death-warrant. The candle was wedged between two nails 
so high up the wall that he could not knock it over by apparent awk- 
wardness. 

"Ain't you got any sporting blood in you, Jean? Can't you lose 
like a gentleman? You talk as though I didn't play fair. If I 
thought you meant that, I'd put lead in you, right where you stand." 

The three onlookers sneered. Jean lowered at him a moment. 
Then the four went out and left Joe behind the table. 

During that night a herd of range-horses among the neighboring 
buttes got thirsty and trotted off in search of bottom-land and water. 
Instinctively they turned toward the irrigating ditches within the 
ranch fence. As they approached the fence, they smelled the alfalfa 
and water and excited each other into a stampede. When they 
reached the fence, down went post and barbed-wire like so much 



258 OUT WBST 

pack-thread. Their thirst satiated, they stayed on and breakfasted 
on the alfalfa. 

This convivial band caught the attention of the men when they 
turned out next morning. In a moment two saddle-horses were 
brought and saddled. Jean mounted one and set off to expel the 
marauders. 

"Kin you stick a horse, Joe?" said a man. 

Joe saw in a flash by the sneering faces about that the men had 
been discussing him in the night — doubting his courage, his ability, 
and his honor. Now he must show himself the equal of any of 
them, or be drummed out of camp. 

"Sure !" said he, and mounted the bronco. He could ride a well- 
broken horse as well as any man, but cards by night and sleep by 
day had sapped his nerve and strength. He knew this bronco to be 
only half broken and more than half "mean." First came two vio- 
lent bucks. He lost his right stirrup, but maintained his seat. Then 
the horse bolted. Jean already had the band of range-horses started 
toward the breach in the fence. Joe's bronco took the bit between 
his teeth and made in the same direction, at an acute angle with the 
fence. The determined rider, struggling to regain the lost stirrup, 
was deaf to the cries of "Jump, jump," from the men. Hoping to 
pass through the breach or to regain control of his horse, used to 
taking desperate chances to gain his ends, he clung to cantle and 
reins until too late. The infuriated bronco suddenly swerved close 
to the fence. In a ninstant the cruel barbs cut through stirrup- 
leather, overalls, flesh and bone. A scream from the horse and a 
hoarse cry from Joe. The man hung quivering on the top strand 
of barbs, while the wretched horse stood on his hind legs in the open 
and struck out with his fore feet, as if to defend his lacerated 
shoulder. 

With a sick heart Jean lifted Joe from the wire that was torturing 
his body and laid him upon his back in a dry ditch. With hands that 
trembled from drink, but not from alarm, he cut away a latigo from 
his saddle and knotted it into a rough tourniquet. Then he placed 
Joe's now unconscious body across his saddle, and, while another 
man supported the body in position, walked the horse home. 

They put Joe on the bed in the spare-room of the cabin ; there he 
lay, still as death, until the doctor was brought from town, eight 
miles away. Mrs. Knapp fluttered about and wrung her hands until 
the latter had done his work and gone. Then she set about to nurse 
Joe. 

The nursing went well until next day. Mrs. Knapp went fre- 
quently to the bedside of the "poor boy," and shed a few tears when- 
ever she smoothed the blankets that covered the mutilated form. 
But in the middle of the next forenoon delirium came upon the suf- 



THE CARD-HANDLER. , *59 

ferer. Out came the story of his life — how he had deserted his wife, 
lived vilely, debased himself to the lowest levels. The thread of 
his narrative was frequently broken, but the details were too vivid; 
so Mrs, Knapp announced at noon that she would take no more 
care of "that low gambler." 

"Who'll do it, then ?" asked Jean, bluntly. 

"You can, if you are so interested," 

"I b'leeve I might as well," said Jean, 

Morning, noon and night Jean gave his clumsy ministrations to 
Joe. Between times the patient raved and raved and cared for him- 
self as best he could. The doctor came from time to time to change 
the bandages. Jean heard him say that, unless Joe were kept cleaner, 
he would die. That night Jean heated a ten-gallon can of water, 
threw his own grimy blankets into a tub, and poured the boiling 
water onto them. He stirred them round and round with an axe- 
handle until he could bear to put his hands in the water. Then 
came a long and awkward scrubbing, after which he hung them out 
to dry on the wire-fence. 

"They look kind o' dirty," he muttered next day, when he took 
them in, "but it's clean dirt." So he changed Joe's bedding. 

At length the fever burned itself out, and Joe's wits came back to 
him. Strength came gradually to his body, but the leg was maimed 
and useless. When a man is case-hardened, as Joe was, he keeps 
his pain and grief to himself. He lay suffering like a dumb beast, 
merely waiting for what fate should next put upon him. He saw 
no hope but to turn professional card-sharper. Meanwhile he 
awaited in silence the restoration of his strength. 

In early October the time came when he could and must depart. 
The boundless hospitality of pioneering days still obtains in Mon- 
tana. He knew that it would be a long time before Mr. Knapp 
would ask him to go, but he was full of that spirit of the adventurer 
which makes him detest dependency. As soon as he was able to 
hobble about on crutches, he asked Jean to take him to town the 
next time he drove in. 

Next day, before breakfast, Jean told Joe that after breakfast 
he was to drive to town with a load of baled alfalfa, and Joe might 
go with him. Joe's clothes were already packed into a bundle, so 
all he had to do was to eat his last meal at the table where he had 
once made himself so agreeable. He ate in silence, heedless of 
others, his head bent forward. This is the attitude that prevails 
among men who have played their high cards and lost the stakes 
early in life's game, but are too inert, or too "game," to withdraw 
before the hopeless end. When he saw Jean go to harness his 
team, he left the table, without saying good-bye, and swung himself 
on his crutches out to the big wagon. 



»6o OUT WEST 

The morning was cold and clear, the air fresh and sweet. Joe 
would not look about at the familiar objects of ranch life — the har- 
rows and mowers, huge-timbered corral, sage-brush, and spooled 
barbed-wire. He did not care to have them too fresh in his mind 
when he settled himself for life amid cigar-smoke and lewd pic- 
tures. Until Jean came to help him up to the wagon-seat, he kept 
his eyes upon a certain shoulder of Iron Mountain. This projec- 
tion was called Gopher Ridge, because one "Dad," after the vicissi- 
tudes of a life's prospecting, had settled upon that ridge and 
"gophered" in search of gold until death quieted his futile pick. 
Dad had died, as so many prospectors do, with his boots on, chilling 
beneath grimy blankets, terribly athirst because there was no one to 
give him water. Joe gazed at the great shoulder, bristling with fire- 
killed trees, and considered how a crippled gambler must come to 
his end. 

Once mounted upon the high seat, with the crutches wedged be- 
tween two bales of hay to keep them safe, the two became silent. 
Thus they remained for a mile, while the big horses went at a jog- 
trot over the level floor of the valley. Now and then a rabbit started 
from behind a sage-bush and skipped away up the side of some butte. 
Joe sat with his eyes on the near "wheeler," and Jean never once 
turned his eyes from his team. A big rattlesnake, overtaken while 
crossing the road, coiled himself below his hateful head and sent 
up a loud whir-r-r, with no effect upon the two men. The iron-shod 
hoofs beat him down or left him unharmed — neither of them looked 
to see. A western ranch-man is in a very distracted state of mind 
when he does not attend to the killing of each "rattler" that he 
meets. At the end of a mile they had to cross a gulch diagonally. 
The road sidled into the gulch on one side, and sidled out again on 
the other. Accordingly, the wagon careened to left and to right, al- 
ternately, during the passage. Because the hay pressed on the back 
of the seat, preventing his clinging to it, and because he had but one 
foot to brace with, Joe well-nigh slipped from the seat and under 
the wheels, when the wagon lurched to the left. Jean deftly grasped 
the reins in his right hand and supported Joe with his left until the 
wagon righted. 

"You like to got yours, that time," said Jean. 

"I wish to God I had," said Joe, gruffly. 

"Ye ain't turnin' yer toes up yet, are ye? I thought ye had more 
grit." 

" 'Tain't the grit that I ain't got, Jean. I ain't got no reason to 
go on livin'. I'm down and out. I used to like doin' men at cards, 
just to be smarter than they was. I reckon I can go on doin' 'em, 
unless I get plugged, sometime. But what fun'U I get out of it? 
Ain't card-handlin' my job now? Ain't I got to work at it like any 



THE CARD-HANDLBR. »6i 

Guinny in the ditch? You're dam' right, I have. And when I get 
so as I can't make good at the shufflin', they'll send me over the 
road like a hobo." 

"What did ye do before ye began card-handlin' ?" queried Jean, 
when he had pondered the other's words for a time. 

"Compositin'. It was in Duluth — had a wife, an' kids, and all 
that. My wife, she kicked too much because I was out with the 
boys, pokerin', about every night. I got sick of it, and skipped out." 

"What's compositin'?" 

"Settin' up type to print with." 

"Kin ye do it without two legs?" 

"I reckon." 

"Why don't ye go back an' find yer wife an' tell her yer goin' 
to settle down and work steady again?" 

No answer came. They rode on once more in silence, already ap- 
proaching town. To the left were ranches, guarded by miles and 
miles of barbed-wire. To the right lay government land, sloping 
back to huge buttes a mile away. On top of these, resembling so 
many animals from a toy Noah's Ark, grazed two or three bands 
of range-horses. Joe was striving to think clearly; to face himself 
as he used to be ; to imagine how his wife would receive him. Jean, 
with awkward courtesy, stared at the distant horses as if to decipher 
their brands. 

After a long time Joe asked : "What was that you said about 
goin* back? I was thinkin' about som'thin' else." 

Jean repeated his suggestion. Joe's brow was clear and his cheeks 
were flushed. His mind was already made up to go, but he wanted 
to test his own sincerity by a little argument. 

"You've got money enough, ain't ye ?" ended Jean. 

"Yes; it don't take but about thirty dollars. But I was thinkin*, 
if this idea of goin' home is such a doggone good one, why don't 
you go home yourself? You can't stick it out at hard work, an* 
drinkin' like you do, more than a couple of years." 

"I know it," assented Jean, in his thick voice. "My eyes is gettin' 
bad fast. I've got a sister out in St. Joe that 'd be glad to see 
me, but I'm ashamed to go 'round her. I'm so low down an' or'nary, 
nothin' can't he'p me." 

"When I skipped out," said Joe, "my old woman told me that 
she'd rather see me in hell than 'round teachin' the kids to go wrong." 

"You go back home," said Jean, blinking his blood-shot eyes. 

"I reckon I will," said Joe; and Jean turned the horses down a 
side-street toward the railroad station. 

Nordhoff, Cal. 




262 



THE FAITH OF HIS MOTHER 

By ROSE L. ELLERBE. 
|HE crisp, sun-baked greasewood stalks crackled and 
snapped like a cheerful wood blaze, although the foot- 
steps of Epifanio were not heavy. Hardened as he 
was to the burning noonday heats and the nightly 
chills of the desert side of the mountains, the boy 
panted in the parching air, and lifted his heavy sombrero to catch 
any possible stirring breeze. Then he plunged down a bank and 
across a wide "wash" of sand and broken rock, so hot that it burned 
the soles like coals of living fire. Beyond, close to the river of white 
sand — that was sometimes a river of fleeting waters — stood a clump 
of sycamores, each one warped and deformed by wind and drought ; 
some of them dying from the fatal sapping of the mistletoe. The 
roots of one doomed giant had thrown up a lusty group of sprouts. 
Kpifanio crept beneath the shelter of their broad, heat-wilted leaves, 
laid down his gun and empty game-bag, and, with a sense of re- 
turning comfort, let his eyelids fall. 

The sun had almost slipped behind the mountains when the sleeper 
was aroused by the crunching of footsteps. He turned upon his 
stomach and peered out cautiously. A man had left the trail and 
was seeking the shade of the sycamores. Epifanio recognized the 
type at once — a desert miner trailing to the outside. Another glance 
at the shuffling, uncertain stepping, and the vacancy in the desert- 
blackened and sharpened face, revealed why the stranger was here, 
miles from the main road through the pass. The miner stumbled 
to a seat in the first patch of shade, brushed ofT his flopping hat with 
an impatient gesture, and took a long, eager gulp from the flask in 
his hand. Presently he raised himself upon his knees and began to 
look about him with an air of secrecy that made Epifanio hold his 
breath. Evidently his neighbor was in a suspicious mood, and the 
revolver in its holster behind the flat hip was conspicuous. It was 
well that the searching eyes wavered and blinked foolishly. Satis- 
fied, the man sat down again, drew a chamois money-bag from his 
breast and poured a little stream of coin into a bandanna in his lap. 
Epifanio could not see it, but as the owner mumbled to himself and 
fumbled it back into the bag, he caught the gleam of gold. The 
dazed brain lost count, the enticing clink of coin again followed an 
angry shake of the bag, and again, with many pauses and curses, 
the money was replaced. At last the capitalist was reassured. He 
dropped the bag back into its safety-deposit, took another drink, ad- 
justed his hat for a pillow and lay down. Soon the rasping breath 
of drunken sleep defiled the solemn desert stillness. 

Epifanio remained motionless and thought — or perhaps he only 



THB FAITH OF HIS MOTHER 263 

felt. He had no schooling but that of Nature and circumstances. 
His life had been passed in this niggardly valley, facing the mystery 
of the great waste. Here he had sown and reaped the handful of 
barley from the little level patches of the ranch, and herded the few 
head of stock, or chopped wood in the mountains above. Only since 
his father had been killed down there on the railroad, and dry year 
upon dry year had cut short the crops and starved the beasts, he had 
worked for a few months as a section-hand and had gone once into 
the desert with a prospector whose "prospect" had vanished, after 
weeks of deadly toil, leaving the laborers without pay. 

The best days that he had known had been spent in the canons, 
and on the ridges of his mountains, with gun in hand, seeking deer, 
rabbits, ground-squirrels — anything that might fill an empty stomach 
when rations were scant and there was no "dinero." It was one of 
these times now. The day before, his mother had agreed with him 
that he must go down to the railroad station and seek work. He 
should have started that morning, but a fire was running on the 
other side of the range. It was ix)ssible that a deer or two might 
flee over the divide ; or, at any rate, a bag of rabbit or quail would 
help his mother tide over the days of waiting. There was only the 
milk from one half-starved cow and the hatful of potatoes that the 
dribblings from their spring had kept alive. 

The situation began to shape itself in Epifanio's mind. His 
mother, who always had a smile and a cheering word for her son, 
however scant the fare or pitiless the elements, stood out sharply 
in his vision. They had been close companions. He had lived his 
childhood and youth largely in hers, as she told him over and over 
again of that "bonita ciudad de Mejico," which was still home to 
her; of its cathedral and its schools, and of her father, who had 
been "un hacendado, muy rico." The hope of returning some day 
to her childhood home had been constant and strong. "It is not 
lonely and still, as this place, nor full of strange screams and rush- 
ing ears and wagons, like San Bernardino. It is a place of beauty 
and peace," she would declare with vivid gestures. And the father, 
on his brief visits to his home, would answer soothingly, "Si, si, 
Teresa; some day we shall go back to that Sonora to leave our 
bones." 

But her heart had grown faint of late. Last week she had spoken 
sadly, "I shall never see 'la bonita ciudad' again, son, nor the graves 
of my people. But, chiquito, when I die thou wilt take me down 
to Agua Mansa and lay me in consecrated ground, no?" 

The son had thrown away a half-smoked cigarette and had sworn 
with strong words that she should live for many years, and should 
yet go back to Sonora and see her old home and the grave of her 
father. 



^^'^ OUT WEST 

His mother's heart-rooted desire — and the gold there on the 
miner's breast. There was a connection between the two that must 
be solved. The boy had never before held a thought so closely, so 
consecutively. His head was dizzy with the effort; but he saw it 
all clearly. 

The gold once in his own breast, the rest would be simple. His 
mother must take to the mountains with him. On the high trails of 
the San Jacintos they would be safe. Their own countrymen and 
the Indians whom they might meet, would never betray them to the 
Americanos. Far to the southward his mother had a kinsman. There 
they could rest and outfit for the trip to Sonora. 

His plans settled, Epifanio backed out from his lair and carefully 
scrutinized the mesa, the trails, the hills beyond, the entire horizon. 
Every clump and hillock, every rock and gulch was familiar, and 
he was soon satisfied that no human eye was upon him. Then he 
bent over the man while he penetrated with his eye the hiding place 
of the gold. With cautious touches, he unbuttoned the heavy shirt, 
inserted his fingers and lifted the bag from the swelling chest. As 
it swung free, the man stirred, threw up an arm and raised his head. 
With the bag in his clenched hand, Epifanio struck him a sharp blow 
on he forehead and the old man dropped back to the ground. The 
boy was terrified. He crouched low and listened with straining ears 
for breath. Then he straightened up. He had not meant to hurt 
the old man; surely it was not death there before him. But — if it 
were — there was no moment to spare. They must strike the trail and 
hide in the mountains as soon as possible. He looked about once 
more, with sure instinct doubled once or twice upon his own tracks, 
then struck out swiftly but warily, across the rising ground, toward 
his home canon. As he turned the bend that brought into view a 
low adobe house, backed against a hill so barren that every stone 
and water-gash stood out in sharp ugliness, a moman arose from 
the doorstep and came to meet him. 

"Hola, son," she cried, "but thou hast been gone long. Thy game- 
bag empty! 'sta malo," and she laughed. Then as she looked into 
his face she perceived that her boy was no longer a boy. 

"What hast thou?" she questioned rapidly. "What has hap- 
pened ?" 

His answer had been rehearsed. "There is no more feed or game 
in this cursed country, madre. We will stay here no longer to starve. 
Tonight — this very night, we will start and go to Juan Hermosillas. 
We will be there nearer thy blessed 'ciudad.' " 

She caught his arm. "What is it, my son? What hast thou 
done?" 

"It is only that I am sick of this country and the hardness of it," 
he answered with poorly feigned indifference. "Come, put together 



THE FAITH OF HIS MOTHER 265 

what thou wilt not leave — it is little enough, God knows — and we 
will start. It is moonlight, and the days are too hot for journeying 
now." 

"My son, what hast thou done? Tell me." she commanded. He 
had never disobeyed that tone. Slowly he drew out the bag of gold 
and held it before her, 

"It is gold," he whispered, "enough to take us to that good coun- 
try, *el Mejico,' and to buy a bit of land where thou canst live in 
peace." 

"Gold! Holy Mother! But where?" 

The light in her eyes compelled the unwilling confession : "I took 
it from a drunken man down there under the sycamores." 

"Holy Virgin," she wailed, "my son a thief!" and then she clutched 
his arm. "Is that all?" she gasped. "Didst thou — art thou a mur- 
derer also?" 

"No !" he lied, sharply. "I did not hurt the man." 

"A thief! Holy Mother!" she repeated hysterically, then shook 
his arm. "Drunk, didst thou say? Then perhaps he has not yet 
found his loss. Take the gold back to him, my son, take it back !" 

Epifanio Lopez braced himself, stubbornly. "I will not do that," 
he said, decisively. "The man is a miner. He can get more gold. 
But we — we will have this — or none. It is the chance the Holy 
Mother has put in our way." 

He went inside the house and ate the food that waited for him. 
The mother sat down on the step again and drew the black cloth 
that had slipped to her shoulders over her face, while she moaned 
and prayed. 

"She will not stay alone," Epifanio thought, "she will come when 
she finds that I go." He brought out ammunition and reloaded 
shells enough to fill up his cartridge-belt. Then he moved about the 
house, making his few preparations. When all was ready he went 
to her. 

"Come, little mother," he pleaded. "Come — it is but two or three 
days in the mountains, and then we will be at Juan's. We shall find 
horses and a wagon there, and it is not far to Sonora. Juan said 
that." 

She looked up at him with a face pitiful in its long and despair. 

"I cannot go, hijo; that money is bad money. The saints and the 
Virgin will not bless it, and they will curse thee. And, Epifanio, I 
care not so much now for the old home. They are all gone — mi 
padre, mi madre — all! I care more that the saints shall love thee, 
my son," 

He listened without understanding. The saints and the Virgin 
were very hazy, distant unrealities ; the gold, warm on his heart, was 
real and present. He made one more appeal which she, with sobs. 



266 OUT WEST 

denied; then he left her and started along the trail that led to the 
heart of the mountains. He turned, after going some distance, and 
looked back. He could just distinguish her black figure kneeling 
against the blackness of the doorway. She was praying, he knew. 
He had been a few times with her to the little Catholic church down 
at Agua Mansa, fifty miles away, but knew nothing of what was 
taught there, except as the words and the life of his mother had 
shown it to him. He could not understand why there should be 
saints and crossings and fasts; he could not comprehend why the 
Holy Mother and the Son — and God Himself — should trouble about 
the doings of Epifanio Lopez. But such was the faith of his mother. 

In a little while he again stopped and looked behind. It was too 
dark now to distinguish anything at the doorway ; but his eye caught 
a slight black shape moving swiftly down the path. His mother 
was going to find his victim ! 

If she should find the man down there dead — if she should know 
her son a liar and a murderer! Terror griped his heart. He was 
powerless to move, although the impulse to rush forward and hide 
in the darkness ahead was strong upon him. Dropping to his knees 
and lifting his hands high, he prayed aloud. "Oh, Holy Mother of 
Jesus and all of the saints, John and James and Peter and — Teresa, 
and all of you — don't let that man die! I will give him back his 
gold. I will burn a candle in the shrine, if you will only keep him 
alive ! Holy Virgin, hear me, hear me !" 

Strength came back to him and he began to run down the canon. 
The moon was not yet up and he stumbled and leaped over the rock- 
strewn trail in darkness. As he hurried into the open valley and 
neared the sycamores, the moon slid above the mountains and he 
could see distinctly a dark form beside a prostrate body. Poised in 
tense waiting, he watched his mother put the bottle to the lips, bathe 
the forehead, and chafe the great, coarse hands with her slender 
fingers. After what seemed endless time, the man suddenly drew up 
his knees, breathed stertorously, and, half turning, settled into a 
more comfortable position. Epifanio came swiftly forward and 
knelt by the two. As his mother lifted her face to his, he saw a 
marvelous transformation, from heart-crushing despair to joy be- 
yond speech. His own veins beat full with gladness. He took the 
gold from his breast and she, with deft fingers, held the shirt open. 
The sack slipped back into place. The man stirred uneasily, then 
sank into sleep. 

Without words the mother and son walked softly through the 
moon-bathed valley and along the hard path, flecked with soft light 
and black shadows, that wound through their own canon. Within the 
cabin the woman threw herself upon the floor in front of the niche 
in the adobe wall that held a crude picture of the Mother and Child, 
over which was draped the rosary and cross of her girlhood. Laugh- 
fng, weeping and gesticulating with all the ardor of her warm blood, 
she poured out a torrent of broken thanks. The son, with a grave 
face, lit a bit of tallow candle and set it within the shrine. Then he 
knelt awkwardly beside his mother and crossing himself, muttered, 
"Gracias, senora Virgin! Gracias!" 

Los Angeles. 



267 



^ORLEANS INDIAN LEGENDS 

By MELCENA BURNS DENNY 




VIII 

THE LEGEND OF A-SACH-WAN-NEESH-AMOR 

O YOU know the bird the Indians call A-sach-wan- 
neesh-amor, the moss-eater? You see him by the 
streams, hopping around, eating moss. We call him 
the water-ousel. 

Once upon a time A-sach-wan-neesh-amor was a 
man. He always could be found by some stream fishing. Every 
day he would catch a salmon. As soon as he caught it, he would 
cut off its tail, with a little bit of the meat attached, and lay it 
aside. Then he would build a fire, cook all the rest, and eat it. 
When night came he would go home to his wife and children, and 
hand them the tail for their supper. 

"It's all I have," he would say. "When I caught the fish some 
bad Indians came and took it all away but this." 

Then he would sit down with his hungry family and eat his 
share of the tail. 

This went on for a long while, till his wife and children grew 
starved and thin. And still they did not complain, but made out 
with the tail as best they could. At last one day when the man 
went down to the stream to fish, the mother sent one of the chil- 
dren after him to watch till the bad Indians came. She wanted 
to know who they were. 

The child hid, and after a while the father caught a fine big 
salmon. He laid him on a rock, took his knife, cut off a section 
next to the tail, laid it by, and then went to work to cook the rest. 

The child watched till he had eaten it every bit. Then she ran 
home to her mother. 

That night, when the fisherman went home with the tail, he 
found his house empty. He looked all around. No one was in 
sight. He called. There was not a sound. 

Then the fisherman began to run around, hunting everywhere 
and calling. The place was empty. He stood in the door look- 
ing away down the valley. There was a smoke. 

"Ah," he thought, "that is my woman's smoke." So he started 
running as fast as he could, he was so glad at the thought that it 
was her smoke. He ran and ran until he reached the place where 
he had seen the smoke. He looked about. There was nothing. 
Only frogs jumping into the river. It sounded like laughing. 

He looked back towards his home. There he saw another 
smoke. So he started running back. He called aloud, he was so 



268 OUT WEST 

glad, and stopped to listen. No sound, only frogs jumping. It 
sounded like laughing. 

On he went. He ran as fast as he could, and he could see the 
smoke all the way. When he got there and ran inside, there was 
no fire. The place was empty. Only mice were running. It 
sounded like laughing. 

He called out for his wife, and listened. There was no sound, 
only mice running. He could not bear their laughing. He 
caught one. 

"Tell me where my wife has gone," he said. 

The little mouse laughed again. 

"Tell me, or I'll kill you r 

Then the mouse got scared. 

"I don't want to tell," it said. 

The man got out his knife. 

The mouse pointed to an Indian mortar, a stone with a hole 
rpunded out in it from grinding acorns. 

"Down that hole," said the mouse. 

The man went down the hole himself. He came into another 
country, down below, that was just like ours. There were moun- 
tains and rivers and trees and bushes, but there were no pine- 
trees on the mountains there, any more than there were at that 
time in the upper world. There were lakes and meadows and a 
beautiful trail winding about. 

The fisherman looked as far as he could see, and at last his 
eyes found his wife and children. They were far away, climbing 
a mountain, and their faces were turned away from him. 

He started running as fast as he could, and calling with all the 
breath he had. But they did not turn back. The closer he got 
the more he called, but not one of them turned a head. They 
went on, climbing slowly, one behind another, following the crest 
of the ridge. 

At last he got close enough to hear what they said, but not 
one of them turned to look at him. This is what the mother said : 
"Do not turn ; do not listen ; do not look." 

"Let me talk," he begged, but they did not listen. 

Then he grew angry and clutched the child, that was nearest 
him. He struck her with his fist and she changed to a pine-tree. 
Then he struck the next child, and she turned to a pine-tree too. 
But when he was about to strike the woman, she turned on him 
and he changed into a small black bird. 

"You be that kind !" she said. "Live by the water and eat 
moss. See salmon and want to catch it, and cut off its tail and 
eat all the rest. But hop about instead, always by the water, 
always eating moss." So she changed him to A-sach-wan-neesh- 
amor, the moss-eating bird, and that he still is to this day. 

Then she changed herself to another pine-tree, and she and her 
children still go one by one. climbing the mountains Indian file, 
never turning, never listening, never looking back — always 
climbing, climbing, climbing. 

Berkeley, Cal. 



269 




'flagstaff, ARIZONA 

By M. I. POWERS 
JT IS strange, the erroneous ideas one sometimes gets of a place 
in a general desultory way without actual knowledge. A 
prominent San Franciscan, in Flagstaff last summer, enjoying 
the cool, delightful climate for the first time, remarked, "I 
always had the idea that Flagstaff, being in Arizona, was a 
hot desert sort of a place. This is certainly a perfect summer climate." 

He was right. The climate in the summer and autumn is unsurpassed. 
The glorious sunshine, the dry bracing air and the cool delightful tempera- 
ture afford a welcome relief from the heat and dust of the city and the 
depressing sultriness of the lower altitudes. Asthmatics find relief here ; and 
the climate is excellent for bronchial and tubercular troubles, particularly 
adapted because of the dryiness to living and sleeping out of doors. 

Flagstaff, further, possesses more points of interest, not found elsewhere, 
and within easily accessible distance, than many more widely known resorts. 
The San Francisco peaks, with an elevation of nearly 14,000 feet above the 
sea-level, afford from the summit, easily accessible in a day's trip, one of 
the most magnificent views to be obtained anywhere. From here can be 
seen portions of several states and the Painted Desert. 

A few hours drive through the pines brings one to the lava beds and 
Sunset Crater, an apparently frozen sea of lava surrounding extinct vol- 
canoes. The Cliff Dwellings but nine miles away, the Cave DwelHngs, Lake 
Mary and other nearby points give opportunity for many drives and trips 
through picturesque woods and cations. Pictures of some of these places 
may be seen in the December number of Out West. 

Oak Creek, with its trout-stream and roses in a cafion with sheer walls 
of rock 1000 feet high, is a splendid place for an outing of days or weeks. 
Beaver Creek, Montezuma's Castle, the cafion of the Little Colorado, and 
last but not least the Grand Caiion of Arizona ai-e yearly visited in many 
overland trips from Flagstaff. It is an outfitting point for that weirdest of 
all religious ceremonies, the Moqui Snake Dance. 

Commercially, Flagstaff is a lively little city of 2000 inhabitants, situated on 




San Fr.\n'cisco Peaks 



FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA 





A Fl.AGSXAKK iiUSINHSS i>XKEliT 

the main line of the Santa Fe, 344 miles west of Albuquerque and 544 miles 
east of Los Angeles. It nestles in the pines at the foot of the San Francisco 
mountains, the town itself having an elevation of nearly 7,000 feet above sea 
level, with an abundance of spring water for city use. The water system 




Citizen's Bank, Flagstaff 



27 2 



U T IV EST 




Photo by A. E. Hackett 

Northern Arizona Normal School and Dormitory, Flagstaff 

also supplies the Arizona Lumber and Timber Company plant and during 
certain periods of the year the Santa Fe Railway. The question of an addi- 
tional reservoir, for storage of the water wasted through the overflow of the 
present reservoir, is being strongly agitated, and this will no doubt be built 
in the near future. This will furnish ample water for commercial enterprises. 

Lumbering, stock-raising and ranching are the principal industries. It is 
the supply-point for trading posts and settlements for a radius of a hundred 
miles around. It has two excellently appointed hotels, two successful banks, a 
large department store, and other stores representing exclusive lines of dry 
goods, groceries, gents' furnishings and drugs, with the usual complement 
of restaurants and other business houses. Four churches are represented 
with suitable structures, one nearing completion, built of sandstone at a cost 
of ten thousand dollars. 

Flagstaff is the home of the Northern Arizona Normal School, a territorial 
institution, and the Lowell Observatory, famous for the work of Professor 
Lowell in the study of the planet Mars. 




hliolo by A. h,. ±iacKett 



Emerson School, Flagstaff 



FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA 



273 



One large sawmill gives employment to three or four hundred men ; another 
mill is in the course of construction. An extensive article on the lumber 
industry of Northern Arizona appeared in the December number of this 
magazine. The country immediately tributary to Flagstaff being in the San 
Francisco Mountain reserve, stock-grazing is under supervision of the United 
States government. Large areas of open range outside of the reserve are 
also tributary and make this the supply point. 

Applications for homesteads in the reserve are referred to an inspector, 
and if the land is reported favorable for agricultural purposes, it is open to 
homestead. With the adoption of the system of dry farming now being 
taken up in New Mexico, under similar conditions with favorable results, 
and the utilization of the Department of Agriculture's investigations in 
growing the hardy alfalfa and the wheat from Northern European countries, 
stock-raising and ranching will be largely increased. Ranchers raise upwards 




Coconino County Court House, I-lagstaff 

of 100 bushels of potatoes to the acre, and an abundance of grain-hay. The 
mountain ranches supply quantities of garden produce, and the Oak Creek 
ranchers make several trips a week during the summer and fall months with 
fruit — melons, apples, pears and peaches. 

Arizona sandstone, quarried at Flagstaff, was used in the construction of 
the Brown Palace Hotel at Denver, and in public buildings at Los Angeles. 
The residence of Mr. Spreckels at San Francisco, built of this stone, with- 
stood the fire following the earthquake better than any other stone, and will 
be rebuilt of the same material. 

Tufa rock, a gray stone, very light in weight and fire-proof, is unexcelled 
for fire-places and decorative purposes. It can be cut with an ordinary ax 
when first quarried, but hardens when exposed to the elements similar to 
cement. Lithograph-stone of an excellent quaHty can be quarried, and sam- 
ples are now undergoing tests. It is pronounced by experts to be of as good 
quality as that imported at present from Germany. Any information will be 
cheerfully furnished by the Board of Trade, Flagstaff, Arizona. 







THE FAMOUS 






Santa 


Cli 


ara Valley 

CALIFORNIA 


and 


County 




-Sorting Prunes on Trays and Uij 



Santa Clara County Is Pre-eminently the Horticul- 
tural County of tHe State 



S^M JOSE 



' Population'" 
, ao,ooo , 



Pronounced "San Ho*Say" 

Is in the heart of the Santa Clara Valley 50 miles south from San Francisco and is 
rapidly growing. The city is supported by the surrounding valley and its products. 
An elegant up-to-date cosmopolitan center with all modern conveniences and buildings. 

Secure a home where the boys and girls will grow up healthy, big and strong, 
cind in the summer the fruit orchards offer employment to all who v*ash the out door 
life We have millions of Prune, Peach, Apricot and Cherry trees in the valley. 

For our new booklet send 2c stamp and address 

San Jose Chamber of Commerce lZ,i?^hlli 

T. S. MoutKoniery & Son, RenI EN^ate. 

T. C, Burnett, Heal Extate. 

Johntton & Temple, Real Entate. 

FirMt National Rank of San JoHe. 

(iarilen City Rank and TruMt to. 

A. Uamonte & Co., Mt«. Calif. Glaee Fruits. 

The Rank of San Jowe. 

Seeiirlty State Rank of San Joae. 

CaniherN-Hayen Co., Furniture. 

Trlnkler-Dohrinann Co., Crockery. 

F. A. & I. O. HayeM. 

The J. K. ArniHby Co., Dried Fruit Packers. 



JoH. II. Rucker &. Co.. Real KNtute. 

A. C. Darby, Real Estate. 

Van Fleet & Co., Real Kntate. 

CaMc. $hort A Ryan, Real Fntate. 

Ka^Ie Rrewery. 

Home L nitin, Grocerieci. 

Hotel BrlMtol. 

Spencer & Healey, Veterinary SurKeonn. 

Fred M. Stern, Send for Cowboy Outfit 

Catalogue. 
Red Star Laundry. 




HOTEL GREEN, Pasadena, Cal. 

Is the largest and finest fire-proof resort hotel in the west. Conducted on both the Ameri- 
can and European plan. A Hotel of refinement and the highest standard of excellence. 
Surrounded by Parks. 

American Rates $4.00 and Up 

European Rates $1.50 and Up 

0. G. GREEN, Owner J. H. HOLMES, Manager 



COVINA 



'Ji City Jlmid the 
Orange Groves" 




Picking Oranges — A Typical January Scene 

Covina is situated on the Southern Pacific railroad and the new Covina line of 
the Pacific Electric, in the center of the world famed San Gabriel Valley, in a thickly 
populated neighborhood, has first class Grammar and High School, six churches, two 
national banks and savings bank, live newspapers, hotels, good stores, Carnegie 
library, ladies' and men's club houses, electric lighting and power, gas and telephones 
and finer roads for automobiling than any other town or city in the United States. 
Abundance of pure water and tlieflnest orange groves in the state. The place for a 
home, the place for investment. 

Hourly trolley car service -with Los Angeles. Runn iiig time thirty-five minutes. 
For further information write to Board of Trade, Covina, Cal. 



^r We furnish an ex- 

act size pattern of every 
part and illustrated instruc- 
tions covering each step oi, the 
work. No tool experience neces- 
sary — with the Brooks System you 

Our erg Free ^^^ElllllinfiUii^'" 
Illustrated Catalog tells how 21,311 inex- 
perienced people built boats by the Brooks 
System last year — quotes prices on pat- 
terns — knock down frames with patterns to 
finish and complete knock-down boats ready 
to put together. Gives testimonials of a few / 
builders with photographs of their Iwats 
and valuable boat information found no- i 
where else k 



Grutly Raduced Ptins. Patterns 

(.1 ciiiues and rowboati |l. {o 

ito ^z.co. Lauiichci andsail 

boaK, ZO ft. and under jt^ 

to $5. Hrom Zl to 50 ft. 

inclusive, #? t.i Jio. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded. 

BROOKS BOAT MFC 

^vw »hlp St 



CO. 

Saginaw, Mich., U. S. A. 



WOODLAND 

The Capital of 

Yolo County, California 

WOODLAND is only 86 miles from San 
Francisco and 22 miles from Sacramento, 
the State Capital. WOODLAND has twelve 
churches, three two-story grammar school 
buildingrs, one commodius high school, one 
Holy Rosary Academy, one well-equipped 
business college, the best talent obtainable 
for the schools, one Carnegie library build- 
ing, and fine free library, four social and 
literary clubs, twenty fraternal and bene- 
fit lodges one 200-barrel flour mill, one 
fruit cannery, two butter creameries, one 
fruit packing establishment, one winery, 
one olive oil and pickling plant, two large 
lumber yards, four solid banks, four ho- 
tels, one large city hall, one well-equipped 
fire department, four large grain and hay 
warehouses, a well conducted telephone 
system, an average rainfall of 17 inches, 
and many commodious business houses 
representing all lines of trade. 

For further particulars address any of 
the following: 

BIdwell & Relth. Real Estate 

Woodland Grain and Milling Co. 
R. E. Boyle, Books and Stationery 
Bank of Yolo 

Bank of AVoodland 
Sierra LiUmber Co. 

M. C. Campo, Rancher 




TT\m 



ied 



Farms 

OF FIVE ACRES 
AND UPWARDS 

in tile Counties of 

Fresno and Meirced 
California 

MILLER AND LUX 

Los Banost Merced County 
California 



Mai»ysville 

-A Capital of Yoba County, California 

THE GARDN SPOT A'ND CITY 
OF THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY 

Orange, Lemon, Lime, Olive, Peach, 
Apricot, Pear, Berry, and Alfalfa 
Lands in Tracts to Suit 

Abundance of Water for Irrigation where Needed liL^a tl 

Prices $25 to $100 per Acre^ 

For particulars write MARYSVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, or any of the 
following well known firms: 




Marysville Woolen Mill. 

J. R. Garrett Co., Wholesale Grocers. 

Yuba Consolidated Gold Fields, Dredging. 

Valley IVIeat Co. 

Decker, Jewett & Co., Bank 

Hampton Hardware Co. 



Sperry Flour Co. 

C. T. Aaron, Real Estate. 

E. A. Forbes, Attorney. 

The RIdeout Bank. 

M. J. Newkonr,, Real Estate. 




Oxnard 



Tlie Beautiful 



FIFTH STREET, LOOKING WEST 



The Home o f 
American Beet 
Sugar Company 
(Founded J898) 



Has now 3000 population. Located in Ventura county, 66 miles from Los Angeles, in the best 
farming district in the state of California. Every business known to first class California towns is 
represented here. No property bought and sold for speculative purposes, and property is today worth 
par value. Water works, electric light, two telephone and telegraph companies, two banks, best of 
schools, good churches. 

For further information address 

Secretary Board of Trade 

or any of the following well known firms: 

American Beet Suii^ar Co. Hill «& Ijaubaeher, Real Kstate and Ins. 

Ventura County Power Co. Oxnnrd Kurnlture & Plumbing Co. 

Oxnard I^lvery & Feed Stable. W. R. Norton, Oxnard News Agency. 

I^ehmann BroN. I.. K. Vaugh, Jeweler. 

Robert Green, Barber. 



Hummel Bros. & Co., "Help Center," 116-118 E. Second St. Tel. Main 509. 



Escondido 

CALIFORNIA 



Offers great* 
inducements to the 
CITRUS and 
DECIDUOUS 
Fruit Growers 




FOUR-YEAR-OLD CITRUS ORCHARD 



It has the desired soil. 

It has plenty of water — cheap. 

It has an abundance of cheap land. It has foothill lands and valley lands. 

It is in no danger of frosts. 

The bearing citrus orchards this year netted their owners from $500.00 to 
$1000.00 per acre. 

It is the natural home of the raisin grape. 

Don't put your money in high priced lands, when you can buy better land her<* 
for a trifle— INVESTIGATE. 

Address CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Escondido, Col. 







Residence of HUTCHISON BROS. Paradise Valley 



on San Diego, 
Bay 



National City, CaL 

Five miles from the business center of San Diego, an. ideal residence suburb. It 
is now being connected with the electric street railway, electric light and gas 
systems of that city. 

Fruitful orange groves and lemons of the best grade .supply an important citrus 
trade. Peaches, pears, plums and other deciduous fruits ripen to perfection. 
Write for booklet to Secretary BOARD OF TRADE or any of the following: 
Peoples State Bank, G. W. DeFord, Hay and Grain; A. E. Williams, Grocer; Paradise Valley 
Sanitarium, Hutchison Bros, Frank A. Kimball, Real Estate; San Diego Land Co., E. M. Fly, 
M. D. ; M. K. Campbell, Phil C. Bauer, J. G. Fleming, Orange Grower; T. R. Palmer, Attorney; 
L. Butler, Hardware; E. B. Leach, Lemon Shipper; Theo T. Johnson, M. D.; National City & 
Otay Railway. 



Ramona Toilet ^o A p 



FOR SALE 
EVERYWHEPPE 



This Well is on $50.00 per acre Land and 

at a Depth of 200 Feet in San Jacinto, 

Riverside County, California — 

For Soil, 
Water, Cli- 
mate and 
Price 

This cannot be sur- 
passed in California 

For further infor- 
mation write 




Chamber of Commerce, 



San Jacinto, 

CALIFORNIA 



GLENDALE, C ALIFORNIA 

CHARMING IN ITS INFINITE VARIETY 

For the Home Builder, 
ideal location and environ- 
ment. Fifteen minutes dis- 
tant by electric road from 
the city limits of Los An- 
geles- City conveniences 
with country comfort. 

Climate unsurpassed, free 
from extremes of heat and 
cold. Abundance of mountain 
water. 

For fruit growing, flower 
culture and vegetable garden- 
ing soil unsurpassed and a 
market at the door. 

Lots and acreage at reason- 
able figures; an investment — 
not a speculation. 

For further information write any of the following: 
Bank of Glendale, R. A. Blackburn, Real Estate; Holman & Campbell, Real Estate; Glendale Improve- 
ment Association, E D. Goode, County Road Overseer; T. Gilman Taylor, Seedsman; J. H. Wells, 
Geo. U. Moyse, Wm. A. Anderson, Contractor and Builder; J. F. Mclntyre, Lumber Yard; 
F. W. Mclntyre, Real Estate; E. K. Grant, Contractor and Builder; Thos. O. Pierce, Livery; 
Kober & Tarr, General Merchandise; A. L. Bryant M. D., Dr. R E. Chase. 




San Bernardino, California 




San Bernardino's Big Artesian Well No. 2, Capped. 
Snow Capped Mt. San Bernardino in Distance 



Located in the center of a 
magnificent and fertile val- 
ley and reached by three 
transcontinental railroads — 
the Salt Lake, Santa Fe and 
Southern Pacific. 

Population 15,000 

and Increasing Rapidly 



The city owns and op- 
erates a splendid water 
works system, the main 
supply coming from arte- 
sian wells, one of which is 
shown upon this page. 
Two electric and two gas 
companies insure low rates 
for these necessities. Many 
miles of paved streets and 
cemeni sidewalks add to 
the attractiveness of the 
cit>'. 

Fully equipped trolley 
lines radiate from San 
Bernardino to all sur- 
rounding towns and com- 
munities. 

The scenic beauty with- 
in and surrounding the 
city is unexcelled in South- 
ern Califo'mia. 



As a business and commercial center San Bernardino ranks among the best in 
the State. 

First class schools. Public Library and churches of nearly all denominations. 
For booklet and further information address 

Secretary Board of Trade, San Bernardino, California 
The San Bernardino Merchants' Protective Association 

or any of the following leading business firms: 

Snn lieninrdino Itenlty Bonrd. 

Xeff <& Atliiir. Real KMtnte. 

Boyd <& Scott, Keal Kntnte & InMurnnce. 

VeMtnl & Ilubhnrd. Keal Kntate & In*. 

Star Kealty Co., Keal Kiitate. 

luMiiranoe, Loan & Land <°o. 

Taylor Kealty Co., Keal Entate, liOanM & 

In Mil rail re. 
Cftrliraii <&: Kidenbnneh (Miniature Orangre 

GrovcM, $300. 
San Ilernardiuo Kealty Co., Real Eminte, 

InMiiranoe A: liOanM. 
Pioneer Ahntraot & Title Guaranty Co. 
San Rernardino Abxtract Co. 



ConHolldated AbHtrnet & Title Guaranty 

Co. 
Arro^-head Garage, 
-tome Furniture Co. 

David K. GlaMM, PreMident RuKlneMS College 
(ieo. M. Cooley Co., Hardware. 
Mm. C H. DaviM, Bradfonl KoominK House 
A\'. W. BrlMon, Jr. 
Board of Trade. 
San Bernardino National Bank 
H. M. Barton 
H. "W, HatEcerman. 
T. A. Blakely. 




CATHEDRAL ROCK 



"LaJolla 
By-thc 
Sea" 



This picturesque winter and 
summer resort has an esti- 
mated population of 1200, and 
is witliin 15 miles of San 
Diego with a train service 



of four trains per day each way. La Jolla offers to those seeking residence, churches, 
a public library, a graded school, literary and social clubs for men and women, golf, 
tennis, boating, fishing and surf bathing the year round. Write or call upon the 
following firms: . 

Mary H. Fitzhugh, Real E:state. Mrs. A. P. Mills, Real Estate. 

Walter S. Lleber, Real Estate. I.. A. & S. D. Beach R. R. Co. 

C. D. Rolfe, Real Estate. La Jolla Mdrse. Co. 

E. J. S^vayne <& Co., Real Estate. La Jolla Impro-vement Ass'n. 

La Jolla Rath House & Entertainineiit Co. 







iiKiiSMwiMiirittTE?i?^^™'^^WK '^^^^^^^3M 


Petaluma 

SONOMA 
COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 

► N PACIFIC COAST 

stock-raising, dairying, together 
County ranks third in the State 

cellent schools, churches, daily 
ills, lumber yards, iron foundry, 
ailway and river transportation, 
SAN FRANCISCO. Excellent 
looking for a home on a small 
\.RY CHAMBER OF COIVI- 

rain and Feed; D. W. Ravens- 
The Petaluma National Bank; 
tney, Lumber and Planing Mill; 
cs; Schluckebier Hardware Co. 


 ^^^^'^^i^^i^^P^f^f  ^^ ' i 


A Typical Chicken Ranch at Petaluma 

GREATEST POULTRY SECTION C 

Best facilities for diversity of agricultural pursuits, . 
with finest climate to be had in the State. Sonoma 
from an agricultural standpoint. 

"DUT' A T TTl\/r A ^^^ ^°°^ banks, ex 
K h 1 AIM VI A newspapers, planing m 
 ■L- A -t^ -l- V-riTl -n. gjgjj^ ^^^ electrical r 

good stores, etc. ONE HOUR'S RIDE FROM { 

Climate, Moderate Rainfall. Healthful! If you are 

investment, come to Petaluma. Write SECRETi' 

MERCE or any of the following well known firms 

J. W. Horn Co., Real Estate; Geo. P. McNear, Gi 

croft, "The Courier"; Bank of Sonoma County; 

M. Zartman & Co., Wagon Mfrs.; Cavanagh & Whi 

Camm & Hedges Co., Lumber, Millwork and TanI 



Southern California 




j; ilil 



If you intend to visit Southern California you will want to see 

REDONDO BEACH 



j^ 



j^^ 



W^HicH is Ei^Hteen Miles From Los Angeles 



Redondo Beach is one of the best open harbors on the coast. We have three 
large wharves from which ocean vessels are daily discharging their cargoes. 
As a residence place it cannot be equaled. 
Cur schools are modern in all respects. 
Our churches are flourishing. • . 



We Have the 
Beautiful 



Moonstone Beach 



Nothing Like It 
in the World 



Redondo has three electric lines and the Santa Fe Railroad. Running time from 
Los Angeles by electric car, 40 minutes. 

The Redondo carnation fields are famous the world over. 

Our present population is about 3500, and it is rapidly increasing. 

Visit Redondo Beach and you will find that what we tell you is the truth, and 
you will want to become a resident. 

The famous "Hotel Redondo" is situated in the center of a beautiful eight-acre 
park. It is first class in all its appointments. 

For further information address either of the following: 



I{e<l<iii(i«» Iinproveiiieiit C«. 

lt<Mloii<l» lliiiiril <il' Trade. 

Hotel KeiUiiMlo. 

CliiiM. .1. Crollpr. RenI KMtate. 

Itrdontio IteiiKy <°«>. 

^TontKoiixTV &. Mullen Lumber t'u. 

Ke«I«iiHlo >fiilin8; Co. 

<'. (iiiuulil Lumber Co. 



J. l-\ Keber & <'«.. I'lumbera. 

WellM A, Co., Keiil IXnte. 

Keilondi; ISulldiuK Co. 

I/. .1. Huinl. 

H. II. Ainxwortb. 

A. J. Urnhaui. 

A. B. Steel. 



HUNTINGTON 
BEACH 




j\ Safe Prediction 

If present indications count for anything Huntington Beach will assume 
within a few years an important position among the leading cities, of the 
Pacific Coast. Its rapid growth thus far, its present activity, the scope of 
its improvements and the fact that it "holds the key to the citrus belt and 
the world's greatest celery fields," is proof of its brilliant future. It is the 
most rapidly growing beach town on the southern coast. The unlimited 
capital behind it, the energy and enterprise of the discerning business men 
responsible for its creation, is positive assurance of its success. 

W^ealtK for tKe Investor 

Huntington Beach spells opportunity for the homeseeker and investor. 
Improvements costing hundreds of thousands of dollars have been and are 
being established. Building progresses rapidly. Property is selling faster 
here than at any other point along the ocean front. With the advent of 
spring and summer, values are bound to take another big advance. Shrewd 
people are now taking advantage of the activity in anticipation of the in- 
creasing demand for choice and stable beach property in a location progress- 
ing commercially and socially. 

Less tHan 60 minutes* ride from Los Angeles — 32 scenic miles. TaKe 
tWe Pacific Electric cars at SixtW and Main streets, Los Angeles. • 

Huntington Beach Company "\"^I?*e,e"''« 



First National Banlc j 

Seely & Gillespie, Real E:state 

Tbe Hub Investment Co., Real Bstate 

J; W. ToniH, Ivy Restaurant 

I^eathernian & Talbert, Real Estate 

lilncecuin «fc Thompson, Livery 

Geo. E. Phelps, IJvery and Furnished Rma. 

Geo. M. Miller. Plumbing: 



Glenn Co., Orange County Real Fstate 

Huntingrton Beach Tent City Co. 

Pacific Tours Co. 

F. H. Hopewell, with J. E. Glenn Co. 

M. E, Helme, Furniture 

itfoncton & CumminKs Realty Co. 

W. C. Smith, Butcher 



»«ll 




MT. SAN BERNARDINO B^ MOOM.lCili 

Buy a Stop-Over Ticket to Redlands, Cal. 

Vou will not enjoy to your fullest your stay in Southern California unless you give a week 
or two at least to the great orange growing belt, of which Redlands is the commercial 
an<l scenic center. Anv railroad will sell you a stop over ticket good for ten days, so it is 
no longer neces-arv to rush through this most delightful section. Redlands is a city with 
good hotel facilities with a coun ry club, a splendid public library and all the other at- 
tractions that appeal to tourists. Magnificent drives lead through the canyons and hills, 
from which the most magnificent scenery of this end of the state can be seen. (Give 
yourself .he pleasure of making a stay in this delightful spot.) 

For information address Roard of Trade, Redlands, Cal., or any of the following: 



WilllaniM-rurtlii Co., Real Hlatate. 

KIrMt N'nt ioiifil Ilnnk. 

Cann lionia Hotel Co. 

J. J. IVniiicliton. 

RedlandM AliNtrnct <& Title Co. 

Dike & I>OKie, Kenl EMtnte. 

John P. HiBht, Jr., Ileal KMtate. 

Hill CreNt inn. 

Palm Confectionery, E. K. Caae. 

Andernon & Aaher, Real Entate. 

AuHtin <& Clnrk Co.. Real Entatet 

RedlandM Laundry Co. 



John P. Fink, Real Entate. 
J. W. JenkinM, KleetrlrnI Contractor. 
W. J. Davenport & Mcliain, CnntrnctorH. 
Geo. S. BiKKin. Real Entate. 
D. M. Donald. ContJrnctor. 
Mutual OrnuKe Dliitribu torti. Fruit 
Shii pern. 
John BlodKett, I^ili er y. 
Redlandn Fruit Ai^aoclatlon 
J. C. Reevew, Hay & (irnin. 
L. E. Huntlneton, Contractor. 




v: 



R«asonable Rates 



HOTEL CASA LX)MA 



Ejccellent Mccorftnoilations 




,e GFe^t 



OFFiCJC BKAWIJ.V IMPROVEMENT COMPANY 

isioerial Valle 



Brawley is noted for its early cantaloupes, early grapes and ull kinds of early vegetables. The re- 
turns from these crops have exceeded $ioo per acre. In additioii to this intense farming Brawley is 
the center of, and has tributary to it over 100,000 acres of the fluest agricultural land in the valley, 
where hogs, dairying, sheep and general farming has proven very profitable. These lands are all 
irrigated with an unlimited supply of water taken from the Clolorado River. For full information 
about town and acreage property, address any of the following: 



Imperial Investment Co. 

Hot/ley & Cady, Real Estate 

Stanley A Kellogrg, Real Estate 

C. M. L. & C. Co., Store 

Edith Meador, Post Office and Store 

C. Darnell, Merchant 



Nellie Pellet, Merchant 

T. D. McKeehan, Merchant 

Imperial Valley Bank 

Hntchin^s <& Co., Hardyrare 

Varney Brothers Co., General Merchandise 

Edgrar Brothers, Implements 



COLTON 



The Hub City of Southern California 
The Center of the Orange Belt 




Colton offers 
special induce- 
ments to Home- 
seekers who should 
be mindful of its 
splendid school 
and church privi- 
leges; its business 
/and social life, the 
ideal climate and 
the location as the 
HUB CITY. 



HOTEL AND PARK, COLTON, CALi 



COLTON is a rapidly growing city of 4,000 inhabitants, and Kas exceptional prospects for the future. Colton 
is 56 miles east of Los Angeles, on the main line of three transcontinental railroads. You can i^afford to pass through 
without stopping to investigate. For further particulars address any of the followng: 



'Wilcox-Rose Mercantile Co. 

H. G. French & Co. 

The First National Bank of 
Colton. 

Colton Fruit Exchange, out- 
put 1906, 400 cars of or- 
anges and lemons. 

H. E. Fouch & Co., Real Es- 
tate. 



Gregory Fruit Co. 

Hon. James D. Knox. 

R. L. Deakins, Palace Cigar 

Store. 
G. M. Green, Supt. of Schoolet 
Colton Grain & Milling Co. 
D. C, Swartz, Undertaker. 
M. A. Hebberd Co. 



McRen & Hager, St. Clair 

Livery Stables. 
Colton Pharmacy 
J. M. More, Blacksmith. 
O. L. Emery, Hardware. 
G. B. Caster, Contractor & 

Builder. 
Mrs. M. A. Fox, Real Estate. 



Opportunity Knocks but Once 



IF IT HAS NOT ALREADY 
KNOCKED AT YOUR DOOR 



MOVE TO RIVERSIDE 

Opportunity lives here, and you'll hasten it's knocking by moving to Riverside 




"Rovibidovix Scenic Drive-way" 

Besides shipping one-fifth of the Oranges grown in Southern California. Riverside has abun- 
dant fields of Alfalfa and Grain. It grows immense quantities of Grapes. Decidious fruits 
do well also. Chickens thrive, and Riverside boasts of having some of the finest chicken 
ranches south of Petaluma. Dairying is a paying business. Street car facilities reach every 
part of the city, covering an area of fifty-six square miles. For further information address 



The Riverside Chamber of Commerce , 



or the follow- 
ing firms; 



II. li. HiiMh. 

Kivino I.nnd Co., Valencia Grovea. 

Uvtt. V. F>IIiott. Real Entate. 

F. Fay Sibley, Automobile*. 

ItiverNide Abntrnot Co. 

Firnt Nationnl Rank. 

RIvprHlde Title & Trnut Co. 

SbiriM <& Son. Plumbing & Heating. 

Home Telephone Co. 



Jnrvin & DinNmore. 
Franic A. Hiller, CilenT^'ooil Inn. 
RIverMtile Trunt Co., Orange Grovea. 
Seaton A: Klnnear I^uniber Co. 
Rlvemlde Savinga Hanic & Truat Co. 
Crenmer Mfg. Co., Planing Mill. 
RuMM Lumber & Mill Co; 
Pacifle liUinber Co. 

Arlington Apartmentn, liime and Eighth 
StH., FurulHhed RoomM. 



IMPERIAL c 



San Dieg'o Covinty 

alifornia 



THE METROPOLIS OF THE IMPERIAL VALLEY 




WEST SIDE OF IMPERIAL AVENUE, IMPERIAL. IMPERIAL HOTEL IN FOREGROUN'd 

Imperial is the center of the largest body of irrigated land under one system in the United States, 
and Hon. Frank W. Mondell of Wyoming, chairman of the Irrigation Committee of the House of 
Representatives, said after a recent visit: "I consider the owners of land in the Imperial Valley among 
the luckiest farmers in the United States They are singularly blessed by nature and by man. They 
have everything that they could ask to make themselves well to do. They have the soil, the climate, 
the WATER, and the location, with railroad facilities for marketing their crops, and good and 
constant markets for their products close at hand." For further information address any of the 
following: 



H. N. Dyke, Secretary Chamber of Com- 
merce 
Imperial Land Co. 

Varney Brothers Co., General Merchandise 
E}dg:ar Brothers, Implements 



A. L.. Hill, Hardware 

Salisbury Realty Co., Real Bstate 

F. N. Chaplin & Son, Real Estate 

Imperial Valley Abstract, Title & Trust Co. 

I. I.. Wilson, Real Estate. 



€*pend Your Summer 



In the Pines 



FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA 

IN THE SHADOW OF THE SAN FRANCISCO PEAKS 
Clear, Dry Atmosphere. Altitude 6900 Feet. Pleasant Days. Cool Nights 

Unexcelled WATER service, 
from MOUNTAIN 
SPRINGS. Outfitting point 
for overland trips to the 
Grand Canyon, Painted Des- 
ert, Navajo Reservation, 
Hopi Snake Dance. Points 
of interest within eas}- access. 
Cliff Dwellings, Ice Caves, 
Petrified Forest, Cave Dwell- 
ings, Sunset Mountain, Lava 
Beds, Extinct Craters, Mon- 
tezuma Castle and Well, Na- 
tural Bridge. Trout Fishin£ 
on Oak Creek from June isl 
to Sept. 1st. Ample Hotel 
Service. U-to-date Livery. 
Competent Guides. Stop- 
overs allowed on all tickets 
to and from California via 
the Santa Fe. 

For further particulars ad- 
dress, , 




cliff Dwelling, Walnut Canyon; Near Flagstaff, Ariz. 

Babbitt Bros., Leading Merchants. 
Arizona Lumber & Timber Co. 



The Citizens Bank. 
Commercial Hotel. 



Hotel Weatherford. 




EUREKA, CALIFORNIA, 

Has regular and quick water communicati^ with San Francisco, with freight 
rates ranging from $i.oo to $4.00 per ton, the cost of living and prices of merchandise, 
clothing, manufactures, and general supplies are governed by those those of the 
latter place, and vary but little therefrom. 

Humboldt County Has: 

Great extent, affording choice of location. Cheap lands in abundance. Its own 
lumber, fuel, food, wool, leather. Equable temperature, insuring bodily comfort. 
Healthfulness, especially absence of fevers and malaria. Diversity of products, giv- 
ing variety in occupations. Abundant rainfall, guaranteeing crops and water. Great 
natural resources in divers branches. Cheap lumber, making improvements inex- 
pensive. Cheap fuel, costing little more than the labor of taking it. Good schools 
within reach of every home. Good county government, honestly administered. Cheap 
freight rates by sea to all Pacific points. The largest and best body of redwood on 
earth. An honest, peaceful, law-abiding population 

Humboldt Has Not: 

Chinese, to compete with American labor. Irrigation, with its expense and liti- 
gation. Spanish grants, to cloud titles and bar settlement. Railroad land grants, 
to interfere with progress. Codling moths to destroy the apples. Colorado beetles 
to destroy the potatoes. Summer thunderstorms to interfere with harvests. Long 
winters when stock must be fed. Severe frosts to destroy vegetation. Crop failures 
from any cause whatever. Cyclones, blizzards, tramps or strikes. 

For further information address any of the following well known firms: 



H. L. Ricks, Pres. Chamber of Com- 
merce. 
Geo. W. JBaker, Real Estate. 
Eureka Ice Co. 
R. D. Johnston 
Delaney & Young 
Taylor & Zane 
J. H. Hunter. 



G. A. Waldner, Western Hotel. 

Skinner-Duprey Drug Co. 

Thos. H. Perry. 

A. B. Hink. 

Porter, Fautz & Brooks, Real Estate. 

J. C. Henderson. 

E. G. Kramer, (Revere House) 

Bank of Eureka 



SAN PEDRO, ^lti,l2:>?l'' 

San Pedro, the Harbor City 
of Southern California, the 
dreamland of the world, 
where nature has poured out 
her blessing with so lavish 
a hand that it is doubtful 
whether our great mother in- 
tended to build a home for 
the Gods or for humans. San 
Pedro, the future gateway of 
the otient; the one spot more 
talked about, because more in 
the minds of the men who make the commerce of this country, than any other 
along the many thousands of miles of our coast line. San Pedro undoubtedly has 
the brightest future of any city on the west coast, aid is the place for the young 
man or the old, for the capitalist or the laborer. 

For information relative to commercial conditions and busines prospects, ad- 
dress The Chamber of Commerce, San Pedro, Cal., or 

A. P, Ferl Dodson Bros., Contractors L. Kelly 

J. A. Weldt John T. GafFey Miss C. Rogers & Co., Real 

Olsen Hardware Co. William W. Burke & Sons, Estate 

Grocers ' Alcorn & Cox., Real Estate 




SAN PEDRO HARBOR 



"If You Will Write 



J 



The Board of Trade, Santa Cruz, California, for booklet 
D, stating in what particular proposition you are interested, 



You Shall Know Why 



the-following investments in that city are profitable: 
I. The erection of modern, furnished cottages of five, 
six and seven rooms on suitable ground. 

II. The establishment of a fruit canning and processing 
factory. 

III. The establishment of glass and sand-lime brick 
factories. 

IV. The erection of a one hundred and fifty room, mod- 
ern, first-class hotel near the beach. 



Fresno Covinty 

IN THE HEART OF CALIFORNIA 
AND THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY 

Irrigation Is the Key to Su ccessful Farming in Fresno County 

No matter how good the land may be, without water it cannot be made to 
produce unfailing or abundant crops. So true is this that no one who is informed 
as to the conditions in this State thinks of buying land without a water right. To 
any who have gone through a season of drouth, the advantage of having water to 
put onto crops when needed must be apparent Irrigation means that the farmer 
may control conditions. He is not dependent upon rains that may give him too 
much or too litt:e moisture. One who has never used irrigation soon learns that 
it is the ideal method of farming. The water supply is taken from the Kings 
river, which has its source in the glaciers and perpetual snows of the highest 
mountains in the United States, 

The reader may ask, "What can I 

_,^ do with a piece of Fresno County 

#/ 7/1/7/ Y^nil inn Tifi land. I would like a home in Calif cr- 

I find a place where a man of mod- 
/ ♦« J^fry^nrk C^ r% tt tl 't\') erate means can be successful, start- 
LIL £ I t^^lLU ^U U, ILL y j^g ^^^ enough to build a comfort- 

_^ able house, buy the necessary farm 

^■■■MHBi^^^^^BHaa^^^^BHM^^^^^ tools and team and make a payment 

on my land?" We desire to say to the 
reader who may be looking for such a 
place, that we believe he will find upon 
investigation, Fresno County to be just the place. You can start in just this way. 
Many others have done so, and many more ate doing so. .You can, in a short 
time, own a farm of any kind you wish, a property of value, and with the exception 
of a small amount needed to start, it is possible to earn it all from your land and 
labor. You can plant some alfalfa and raise some corn, pumpkins, grain and other 
feed for stock. You can have some cows, a few will do to start with. 

You can sell your cream every day to the creameries, keeping the milk to feed 
the hogs. You can have your garden and produce all the vegetables, small fruits 
and berries that you want, and have some to sell. You can keep some chickens 
and trade your eggs at the stores for your groceries, and you will find it profitable 
to raise all the eggs and poultry you can for market. There is always a demand for 
these at good prices. 

If you want an orchard or vineyard and have not sufficient capital to plant one 
at once and wait for it to come into bearing, you can trust to the above method for 
support and plant a few acres of trees or vines each year. You can thus acquire 
an orchard or vineyard without feeling the cost. You can work out of doors nearly 
every day in the year that you want to. You can keep warm in the winter without 
burning up everything that you have made during the summer. You may live 
where there are no blizzards, snow-stormy nor cyclones, no thunder and lightning 
nor sunstroke. You may live in a pleasant land amid pleasant surroundings, have a 
profitable employment and in a few years own a good farm and a good home. 
Many others have made a success of it. Why should you not do so? 

For further information in regard to Fresno County write or address 

GIU Real Kdtate Agency, Renl EHfate. Sheperd-Teagrue Co. Send for Free Home- 

Peralta Inventment Co., Orang:e liand. Heekern Guide. 

PearMonn Realty Bxchang;e, Real KKtate. Fulton & Grand Central Hoteln, under one 

AV. X. Rohrer & Co., Orange & Grape I..and. nianaKeinent, Hpecial accommodationa 

Jesse Janson & F. M. Blanctaard, Real for commercial travelern. 

Estate. Sperry Flour Co., Flour, Feed and Grain. 

IJe^yitt H. Gray & Co., Real Kstate. >ares & Saunders. 



1: 



.1, 



The Royal Flame Tokay Grape 




It is situated in the heart of the 
great San Joaquin Valley, on the 
main line of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, between Sacramento and 
Stockton, 

And Has Become Famous 
For it's 

4fc Royal Flame 4* 
lokay urapes 

Over one-third of the table grapes 
from California were shipped from 
Lodi, the growing, prosperous city. 
No better grapes grown anywhere. 
No better soil. No better water, 
(and in great abundance). No bet- 
ter climate. (Summers warm and 

delightful, nights cool and refresh- 
ing). No better roads. No better 
place for a home or investment. 



1-8 Actual Size. It's Color is a Deep Lilac-Pink ' — ~ *" — 

Every product of the temperate and semi-tropical zones can be grown within 
a radius of five miles around Lodi, the largest body of fine rich sandy sediment 
loam in the State. 

Before deciding, see Lodi, and you will find there is No Better Place. 
For more detailed information address 



Henderson Bros., Hardware. 

\V. A. Young: Lumber Co. 

\S,\ J. Robinson, Barley Mill'. 

Dougherty, Whltaker & Ray Co., Hotel. 

The Realty Company. 

John C. Bewley & Co., Real Estate. 



T.eMoin & Fish, Publishers. 
Northern Hardware Co. 
Sart Joaquin Land Co. 
Garner & Woodson, Land. 
Beekman, Welch & Thomson Co. 



Grocers. 



For the Indians 

THE SE^QUOYA LEAGUE '« aiding the Mission Indians not 

- only by remedying abuses and trying 
to get them better lands, but also by extending the market for their BASKETS. 
A representative collection is on sale, for the benefit of the Campo reservations, 
at reasonable prices and fully authenticated. These baskets can be had of 

Mrs. Chas. F. Lummis, 200 Avenue 42, Los Angeles 

60 Additional Baskets, of Much Variety, Recently Received. 
Prices, $2 to $10 THE MONEY GOES TO THE INDIANS 



Albtiquetqtie 



NEW MEXICO 

A Gty of Realities 




You who are 
looking for a 
New location in 
the southwest 

Give a few moments' 
time to the following 
facts and realities 
about 

New Mexico^s 
Greatest City 

Albuquerque, 



ALBERT FABEIR. Furniture and Carpets 



Largest and most progressive city in New Mexico and Arizona. Population estimated at 20,000. Best 
climate in the United States. Located on main line Santa Fe Pacific Ry. 525 miles south of Denver. 254 
miles north of El Paso. 880 miles east of Los Angeles. County seat of Bernalillo County. Headquar- 
ter« U. S. District Court. U. S. Marshal's office located here. Monthly payroll exceeds $200,000.. Pay 
roll and revenues approximate $2,500,000. Santa Fe Ry. has machine shops here. Albuquerque is an im- 
portant distributing point. Agricultural possibilities of Bernalillo county are great. Alfalfa, hay, corn, 
wheat, oats, sugar beets, etc. The culture of tobacco is being demonstrated with satisfaction. Acreage 
in apples, peaches and other fruits is being extended each year. Wholesale trade covers a territory of 150 
miles or more in all directions. Many elegant homes with attractive environments. Territorial fair held 
here for the past twenty-four years, at an annual expense of $15,000. Wool Scouring Mills, handling over 
4,500,000 pounds annually. Rio Grande Woolen Mills Co., manufacturers, annual output $180,000. Al- 
buquerque Foundry and Machine Works, largest in the Southwest. Southwestern Brewery and Ice Co., 
annual capacity 30,000 barrels. The Crystal Ice Co , ice plant capacity 30 tons daily._ The American 
Lumber Co.'s new saw mill and box factory, s public schools and High school. University of New Mex- 
ico, the Hadley Climatological Labratory, St. Vincent Academy for girls. Immaculate Conception School 
for boys. United States Indian school, Presbyterian Mission school, city park, 12 churches, 6 newspapers 
(2 dailies), 3 National banks ($4,000,000 deposits); Montezuma Trust Co., capital and surplus $100,000; 
32 secret and fraternal organizations. Commercial Club with 200 members; th« Alvarado Hotel, the pride 
of the city, cost more than $200,000; water works, 2 telephone systems, electric and gas plants, 3 miles 
electric street car line, 3 planing mills; opera house recently built by the Elks' lodge at a cost of $75,000; 
sanitarium, run by Sisters of Charity; hospital: 2 building and loan associations; public library and free 
reading room, costing $20,000; flour mill, 3 lumber yards, 4 cigar factories. Further information of 
great value to those seeking homes in the Southwest furnished free on application by addressing 

Commercial Citshf Albeqtferqfie, New Mexico 

J. C. Baldrldice, dumber and Palnta 
Albuquerque Gaa, Klectrlc Llsht A Power 
American I^umber Co. Co. 

Albuquerque Foundry A Machine ^/^orka 
Albuquerque Traction Co. 
G. L. Brooks 

Krnent MeyerH «$: Co., ^VholeHale Liquor* 
Unlvemlty HelKhtn Improvement Co. 
O. W. Strong;'* Sons, Furniture and Under- 
Crystal Ice Co. taUas 
John S. Heaven, Coal and "Wood 
A. F. Walker, Real Kstate 



First National Bank 

Bank of Commerce 

State National Bank 

Montezuma Trust Co. 

Morniner Journal 

Rio Grande ^V'ooIen Mills (Co-operative) 

Albuquerque M'ool Scourlnic Mills 

J. Korber i& Co., CarrlaKen and Harness 

Metcalf & Strauss, Real Kstate 

\Vhitney Co., Wholesale and Retail Hard- 

\Vootton A Myer, Real Estate 'ware 

Albert Faber, Furniture 





The ascent of Mount Lowe by trolley affords 
the visitor to Los Angeles one of the most marvel- 
ous and beautiful mountain railway journeys in the 
world. And it is only one of the features of a 
railway system covering 400 miles and reaching 
all the points of interest in the garden spot of 
America. 



The Pacific Electric Rail^way 

Depot at Corner of 6tH and Main 



Los Angeles 



California 



NAVAJO BLANKETS 

AND INDIAN CURIOS AT \sr H O L E S A L E 

I have more than 250 weavers in my employ, including the most skilful now 
living, and have taken the greatest pains to preserve the old colors, patterns, 
and weaves. Every blanket sold by me carries my personal guarantee of its 
quality. In dealing with me, you will get the very finest blankets at wholesale prices. 
• I also handle the products of the Hopi (Moqui) Indians, buying them under 

contract with the trading posts at Keam's Canyon and Oraibi and selling them 
at wholesale. 

I have constantly a very fine selection of Navajo silverware and jewelry, 
Navajo "rubies" cut and uncut, peridots and native turquois. Also the choicest 
modern Moqui pottery, and a rare collection of prehistoric pottery. 



Write for my Catalogue 
and Price List 



J. L HUBBELL, '"■'"" trader 

Ganado, Apache Co., Arizona 



The Los 
Angclcs- 
Pacific 
Railroad 

316-322 West Fourth St. 
L S A N G E L E S 

Trolly Parties by Day or 
Night a Specialty 




The Delightful Scenic Koute to 

SANTA MONICA 

and Hollywood 

Fine, Comfortable Observalion Cars — 
Free from Smoke 

Cars leave Fourth street and Broadway, Los Angeles, for Santa Monica via Sixteenth 

street, every 15 minutes from 6.35 a.m. to 9.35 p. m., then each hour till 11.35; or via 

Bellevue Ave., for Colegrove and Sherman, every hour from 6.15 a.m. to ii.isp .m. Cars 

leave Ocean Park, Santa Monica, for Los Angeles, at 5.4s, 6.10, and 6.35 a.m. and every 

half hour from 6.S5 a.m. till 8.25 p.m., and at 9.25, 10.25, and 11.05 P-ni. 

Cars leave Los Angeles for Santa Monica via Hollywood and Sherman via Bellevue 
Ave., every hour from 6.45 a.m. to 6.45 p.m., and to Hollywood and Sherman only every 
hour thereafter to 11.45 P-m- 

For complete time-table and particulars call at office of company. 
Single Round Trip, 50c. lo-Trip Tickets, $2.00. 



^^^ 






WINTER. SERVICE 1906-07 
TWO - FINE - PAST - TRAINS 

EVERY DAY EAST OVER THE 

SUNSET ROUTE 

THROUGH NEW ORLEANS 

UNSURPASSED SERVICE OBSERVATION PARLORS CAFE 
DINING CARS DRAWING ROOM SLEEPERS 

PERSONALLY CONDUCTED EXCURSION SLEEPERS 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA WASHINGTON CINCINNATI CHICAGO BOSTON 



■^^m^ 




Winter Made Summer 




California to the East through 
a land of perpetual summer 
—the Cotton and Rice fields 
of the Sunny South 

Personally Conducted Ex- 
cursions to and from Chicago, 
Cincinnati, Washington, 
D. C, and other points. . . 

Information as to the pleas- 
ure and comfort of this 
route may be obtained at 
City Ticket Office ...... 

600 South Spring St., Los Angeles 

or from any Agent of the 
Company 




South 



ern 



acme 






^^Inside Track 



9f 



Southern Pacific 



Longest Stops at Riverside 
— Redlands for Sightseeing 

$3.00 Rotfnd Trip 

May be done in a day or you may pass eight 
days enjoying the beauties of the country. 
Ask for Illustrated Booklet 

600 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



J 



Th 



ornia Limited 



ii an all'thcyear^round Daily Train 

Running bet-ween California and CKica^o 

Newest Pullman equipment, consisting of observation, drawing room 
and compartment sleepers, buffet-smoking car and dining car. "Santa 
Fe JUl The Way.*' Safeguarded by block signals Harvey meals. 
The only train between California and Chicago, via any line, exclu* 
sively for first'class travel. 

Kn route visit Grand Canyon of Jfrizona and stop at El Tovar 
the new $250,000 hotel under Harvey manage- 
ment. Pullman service to and from Grand Canyon 



•k. 



V 




GRAND CANYON OF ARIZONA "'^tMr'^ Santa Fe 




GOING EAST - 
- Ttys SUMMER? 

There will be very low round trip 
rates to Eastern Cities during 

May, June, July and August 

LOOK FOR PARTICULARS 
NEXT MONTH 

Salt Lake T(pute 

...IS THE RIGHT WAY.. 

See About it at 601 South Spring St. Los Angeles 
OR ASK - 



F. A. WANN. 

Gen'l. Traffic Manager 



OR 



T. C- PECK. 

Ass't. Gen'l. Pass. Agt. 




Persistent demand by motorists everywhere, especi- 
ally among Cadillac enthusiasts, for a thoroughly high- 
grade, medium-powered, four-cylinder automobile, at a price 
somewhat lower than the large touring cars, has led to the 
production of our new Cadillac Model G. 
Thus early in the season this racy new type has been universally ac- 
cepted as a notable example of advanced automobile engineering. 
The motor, conservatively rated at 20 horse power, is finished in its 
vital parts to guages that insure mechanical accuracy to the thousandth 
of an inch. It is equipped with our automatic ring type governor, which 
when set by the lever at the steering wheel for a certain speed will practically 
maintain that speed under all road conditions, up hill or down. A new type 
of muffler is used, giving a silent exhaust, at the same time almost entirely 
eliminating back pressure. 

Direct shaft drive; transmission of a selective type sliding gear, with gears of a new design 
that facilitates meshing without crashing and grinding. Direct drive on high speed with no 
gears in mesh. Wheel base, 100 inches; stylish body design. 

At every stage of designing and finishing, Model G has received all the care and thought 
that could possibly be given a car costing twice as much. Like the other Cadillac 
Models, it is the car for the critical motorist who wants to know why before he buys. 
Let your dealer show you by giving you a demonstration. 



Model G-20 h. p. Foar-Cy Under Touring Car. 
Model H 30 h. p. Four-Cylinder Touring Car. 
Model M— 10 h. p. Four Passenger Car. 
Model K 10 h. p. Ranabont. 



I Described in Catalog G Y ) 

I Described in Catalog H Y ) 
I Described In Catalog M Y 

(Described In Catalog M Y ) 



Send for special Catjlog of car in which you are interested, as aborc designated. 
CADILLAC nOTOR CAR CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Meml/tr Asso. Licensed Aud . SIfrt. 




Snc ULU KCUADLC, 




^AklK<^ 




Absolutely Pure 

HAS MO SUBSTITUTE 




is a perfect food, as 
wholesome as it is 
delicious — highly 
nourishing, easily di- 
gested, fitted to repair 
wasted strength, pre- 
serve health and pro- 
long life. 

Be sure that you get 
the genuine, bearing 
our trade - mark on 
u^s" vato*. ^'^^'^y can. 
yf 'J HIGHEST JiWJtRDS lAf 

Walter Baker & Co. Ltd. 

Established 1780 Dorchester, Mass. 



Registered 



♦«r 





"THE ONLY FRUITS 
IN -the: WOR 1_ D 
\A/I -TM $ I , OOO 

PURITV GUARANTEE 
OKI EVERV ^AR 



BISHOPS 
PRESERVES 



SOLD BY ALL GROCERS 



B I S H O P & 
C O M P A N V 
LOS ANGELL-ES 
15 JAY ST NEW YORK 





WINES 

OF UNQUESTIONED AGE 
=AND PURITY— 



Grapes raised in our vine- 
yards, pressed in our winery 
and aged by time in our wine 
cellars. 

DELIVERED FREE OF FREIGHT 
TO ALL EASTERN POINTS 

Two cases of Old Peerless XX 
wines — assorted, with one 
bottle 1888 California Brandy 

For $11.00 

Two eases of XXX oldest 
vintages - assorted, two bot- 
tles 1888 California Brandy 
and one bottle California 
Champagne 

For $15.00 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 

jrr\ California"' 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



VflQP PIANOS 



have been established over 55 years. By cor system 
of paymentsevery family in moderatecircumsiances 
can own a VOSE piano. We take old instruments 
in exchang-e and deliver the new piano in your 



VPRIL. 1907 



Vol. XXVI, No. A 






lO 



CENTS 
A COPY 



Ji'vrii'bt I '*'". by Out West Magazine Company 



LOS ANCjS^^'^^pN^AN FRANCISCO 

217 NEW HIGH ST 

I U>J|VERSITY 



128 FOURTH AVE. 



$2 



A 
YEAR 



wmcmsTER 







^^ 



Lever Action Repeating Shotgun 

10 ALGE 

For wild fowl shooting the lo gauge W^inchester Lever Action 
Shotgun always has been and always will be popular. It is a"ganie 
getter" and the only lo gauge repeater on the market. It is bored 
to handle either black or smokeless powder equally well, and for 
strong, hard and accurate shooting it cannot be beaten. The 
action of the gun is strong and positive and not apt to get out of 
order from exposure or any ordinary handling. In fact, these 
guns have stood all kinds of use and abuse for years and given 
universal satisfaction. If you are going fowling, take one along. 

Sold by Dealers Everywhere 

Winchester Repeating Arms Co., - New Haven. Conn. 



FORD 



Prompt 
Deliveries 



T"wo E.rrors Can't 
Correct one MistaKe 

COLONEL INGBRSOLL USED TO SAY "To be 

a successful liar one must have a g^ood 
memory; for one He will only fit another 
lie made for that express purpose, whereas 
a truth will fit any other truth In the 
universe." 

AVK HEAR A LOT THESE DAYS about "hand 
made" motor cars. (Its funny but the 
same concerns who, a year agro, prated of 
"quality not quantity" as if the two were 
incompatible, now build 1,000 to 2,000 cars 
per year and still expect you to believe It 
is "hand work," "personal supervision" and 
all that sort of rot. 

FORD CARS ARE MANUFACTURED — have 
been made In immense quantities and by 
modern American methods from the first. 
And the first Foxd ever made is still giving 
excellent service — what of the "cut and 
try" contraptions made In that same year? 

HAND WORK AT BEST is but a series of 
mechanical Inaccuracies, each made to fit, 
as nearly as may be, another. Ingersoll 
would call them mechanical fibs; and mak- 
ing one mechanical fib to fit another does 
not concel the error any more than two lies 
make a truth. And when you want to 
replace a part, the maker will need a 
mighty fine "memory" to give you one 
that will fit — you'll find he forgot. 



WHEREVER THE "PERSONAL EQUATION" 

is permitted to enter, absolute uniformity 
and accuracy are Impossible. (Did you 
ever read a letter written on a hand made 
typewriter? Would you buy one for |100? 
Certainly not. Yet it would cost |10,000 to 
make one.) That's the way with "hand 
made" cars — the only evidence of superior- 
ity is the fancy price. Superior eftlclency — 
It Is not there. 

SIX-CYLINDER FORD CARS are the product 
of the brightest minds, the most efficient 
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treated in Ford furnaces. No other con- 
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A fSOOO CAR IN EFFICIENCY — luxurious ap- 
pointments, performance and endurance. 
The Ford price Is made possible by Ford 
methods and Ford quantity production. We 
could command the fancy price too — but we 
are looking farther ahead than a year or 
two. You know the Ford policy. 

ADD TO THE QUALITY OF THE CAR "Ford 
courtesy" — the replacement, cheerfully, 
promptly, gratis, of any part that shows 
a defect In work or material — and the 
value cannot be equalled. 



1907 Ford Model K — e-cylinder motor. 40 h. p. at the wheels; will climb anything the 
wheels can hold on the "high"; six to sixty miles per hour by throttle control alone- — no 
need for transmission, except for reversing; two complete and separate systems of Igni- 
tion — magneto and storage battery — jump spark; two sets of plugs; 120-Inch wheel base; 
34x4-lnch tires; all the latest features and Improvements, the silence of an electric, the 
nexibllity, the steady pulling power of a "six"; the simplicity and reliability of a — FOKD. 
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A Demonstration is a Revelation 




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FORD RUNABOUTS (4 cylinder) Model N. $600 MODEL R. "edhion de luxe' 



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FORD MOTOR COMPAINY, 

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OUT ^WKST 

A Magaisine of ttie Old Pacific and the New 



CHAS. F. LUMMIS 
CHARLES AMADON MOODY 
SHARLOT M. HALL, Associate Editor 



Editors 



Among tb.% Stockhoi^dbrs and Contributors ark: 



DAVID STARR JORDAN 

President of Stanford University 
FREDERICK STARR 

Chicae^o University 
THFODORE H. HITTELT/ 

The Historian of California 
MARY HALLOCK FOOTE 

Author of "The Led-Horse Claim," etc. 
MARGARET COLLIER GRAHAM 

Author of "Stories of the Foothills" 
GRACE ELLERY CHANNING 

Author of "The Sister of a Saint," etc, 
ELLA HIGGINSON 

Author of "A Forest Orchid," etc. 
CHARLES WARREN STODDARD 

The Poet of the South Seas 
INA COOLBRITH 

Author of "Song-s from the Golden Gate," etc 
EDWIN MARKHAM 

Author of "The Man with the Hoe" 
JOAQUIN MILLER 

The Poet of the Sierras 
BATTERMAN LINDSAY 

CHARLES FREDERICK HOLDER 

Author of "The Life of Afirassiz," etc 
CHAS. DWIGHT WILLARD 

CONSTANCE GODDARD DU BOIS 

Author of "The Shield of the Fleur de Lis" 



WILLIAM E. SMYTHE 

Author of "The Conquest of Arid Americsu" etc 

DR. WASHINGTON MATTHEWS 

Ex-Prest. American Folk-Lore Society 
WILLIAM KEITH 

The Greatest Western Paintet 
CHARLES A. KEELER 

LOUISE M. KEELER 

GEO. PARKER WINSHIP 

The Historian of Coronado's Marches 
FREDERICK WEBB HODGE 

of the Smithsonian Institution, WashingrtoB 
GEO. HAMLIN FITCH 

Literary Editor S. F, Chronicli 
ALEX. F. HARMER 

CHARLOTTE PERKINS STETSON GILMAN 

Author of "In This Our World" 
CHAS. HOWARD SHINN 

Author of "The Story of the Mine," etc 
T. S. VAN DYKE 

Author of "Rod and Gun in California," etc 
MARY AUSTIN 

Author of "The Land of Little Rain" 
L. MAYNARD DIXON 

ELIZABETH AND JOSEPH GRINNELL 

Authors of "Our Feathered Friends' 



Contents— April, 1907 

A Native Home in the Canal Zone, frontispiece 276 

The Panama Canal, illustrated, by Tracy Robinson 277 

On the Trail to Governor's Camp, Big Basin, illustration 293 

Crossing the Isthmus in 1850, illustrated, by Benjamin W. Wells 295 

The Camels in the Southwest, illustrated, by Sharlot M. Hall , 302 

The Elves, poem, by Louise Culver 3^4 

A Knight of the Plains, story, by Bertha S. Wilkins 315 

April Baptism, poem, by Neeta Marquis 326 

Some Leaves from a California Calendar, by Ethel Griffith. IV 'yil 

Easter Bells, poem, by Ellsworth Lee 333 

Dawn- Wind, poem, by Aldis Dunbar 333 

In Search of Truth, by David Starr Jordan 3v34 

An Incident of the Prairie, story, by Elmer Ellsworth Carey 349 

Running Water, nature study, by Virginia Garland 354 

Chiaroscuro, poem, by Robert Evans Hutton 360 

The Desert Ghosts, story, by Minnie S. Snell 361 

The Pioneer, poem, by Arthur B. Bennett 3^4 

In the Lion's Den, editorial, by Chas. F. Lummis 365 

Redlands — The City Beautiful, illustrated, by Lyman M. King 37i 

Huntington Beach, illustrated, by C. R. Stuart 380 



Copyrlght*1907. Entered at the Los Angeles Postoffice as second-class matter. fSee Publishers' Page) 




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217 S. Broadway Los .Angeles 



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Die in 
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Saint Vincent^ s College 

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Military Drill and Calisthenics a Feature. 
For Catalogue write the President. 



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KiDDEft'S PASTILLES ^51?^'- Asthma. 



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and grain for it. Dry, clean: never leaves a mark. 



At ririK^t/icIc l«»r a hnY If yours hasn't it, send us 25c 

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Capital Stock I 1.250,000.00 

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W. C. Patterson, Vice-President 

G. E. Bittinger, Vice-President 

John S. Cravens, Vice-President 

W. T. S. Hammond, Cashier 

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DIRECTORS — N. B. BlacUstone, P. W. Braun, 
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Deposits, Dec. 31, 1906 38,531,917.28 



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A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier 

Wm. Herrmann, Asst. Cashier 

George Tourfty, Secretary. 

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Directors 

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Vol. XXVI, No. 4 



APRIL. I907 




the: PANAMA CANAL 
By TRACY ROBINSON. 

HE Canal question is elemental. It deals with the mag- 
nificent idea of dividing a hemisphere. That which 
Nature failed to accomplish, man undertakes to solve. 
History treats of no enterprise so gigantic. No wonder 
that it appeals to the imagination, stimulates the energy, 
and challenges the courage of the American people. 

The failure of the French gave into our hands their splendid work, 
at a price far less than its actual worth, especially when the value of 
the Panama Railroad is considered. The latter cost $7,000,000, 
and was sold to the French Company, with the exception of less 
than 1,500 shares of $100 each, for nearly $20,000,000. 

It is worth today more than the latter sum, as a common carrier, 
independent of the inestimable value it is and will be in the con- 
struction of the Canal. Some people seem to think that all com- 
mercial traffic over the railroad ought to be surrendered to the 
Tehuantepec route, now that the latter is opened for traffic, but it 
would be much wiser to pursue the course recommended by Mr. 
John F. Wallace, while he was chief engineer, and increase the 
terminal and other facilities so as to do twice, thrice, or five times 
the business of the present time, in addition to Canal work. That 
wise man foresaw that if the traffic was not encouraged, but was 
diverted, it might not return when the Canal should be opened. 
Therefore the folly of talking about cutting it off, by failing to pro- 
vide for it. The money earned would be of very little account, it 
is said, but perhaps our people might think otherwise when they 
know that it could be made to amount to two or three millions per 
annum, if properly handled by a competent man. 



jnastrations are from pbotograpbs by Fisbbaugh. 



Copyright 1907 av Out WcsT Magazine Co. All Rights Rcscrvcd 



278 OU T W EST 

But the railroad is, after all, a side issue. The main thing is 
the Canal— THE CANAL! 

On the arrival of M. de Lesseps at Colon, December 31, 1879, I 
had the honor to be one of the Committee of Reception. The first 
impression of the Grand Old Enthusiast, as he may be called, was 
not altogether favorable. He was a small man, already past "pier 
70," without any distinguishing marks of greatness. But when he 
spoke, there was something about him that was winning. It was 
always said that he was magnetic. At all events, when, after re- 
plying to many questions in the frankest, readiest manner, he said 
with great emphasis in conclusion, "THE CANAL WILL BE 
MADE," his auditors believed it. And for my part, I have never 
ceased to believe it. 




Native Street at Empire 

All the world knows that the French failed. But not altogether 
ingloriously. At least the name and fame of M. de Lesseps were 
not tarnished, and the work performed remains a monument to the 
French. Our engineers unite in praise of it. With our money and 
our steam-shovels they would have succeeded without a doubt. 

The question now is, however, how are ive getting on? 

The treaty or convention between the United States and the new 
Republic of Panama, under which it became possible to complete the 
Canal, was signed at Washington, by John Hay and Bunau Varilla, 
on the i8th day of November, 1903. The same was ratified by the 
Provisional Government of Panama, December 2, 1903, and by the 
Senate of the United States on February 23, 1904. It has therefore 
been in force three years. On the 4th of May, 1904, the French 
Canal Company made formal transfer and delivery of the Canal 



THE PANAMA CANAL 



279 



property of all descriptions to the Government of the United States. 
These transactions cost the United States fifty millions cash — and 
cheap at that! We came into possession of actual and prospective 
potentialities of almost unlimited scope, embracing the Panama Rail- 
road, already mentioned, and a strip of land ten miles wide from sea 
to sea, to be thenceforth called the Canal Zone, with rights of pos- 
session, if not of actual ownership, equal to every need. 

With the exception of the two cities of Panama and Colon we 
are in possession of the great Isthmian Transit, and these cities are 
so situated that the termini of the Canal are reached without having 
to pass through cither. What more could be desired ? In time they 




The Panama Water Supply at Rio Grande, Canal Zone 

may apply for admission to the Zone, and in fact the whole Republic 
of Panama m.ay ask for annexation. 

M. de Lesseps said, during the memorable interview before men- 
tioned, that he would make the Canal in six years. Little did lie 
know or dream of the difficulties in his way! It was more than half 
that period before a beginning had been fairly made. In our case it 
is certain that no great progress has been made since May 4, 1904, 
except in the departments of sanitation and quarters. These have 
been pushed until is seems impossible that anything more is needed. 
The magnificent hospital buildings and grounds at Ancon, inherited 
from the French, have been restored and added unto until it is 
doubtful if there is a more perfect establishment of its kind in the 
world. At Colon the old French hospital has been converted into 
an admirable .series of fine modern buildings of great extent. There 



28o 



OUT WEST 



can be no doubt that this department has been managed with excel- 
lent skill, even though the cost has been great. Health being the 
first consideration, perhaps the money (and time) spent should not 
be regretted. 

Nor has the building department been behindhand in providing 
quarters for employees, white and black. About 2,000 buildings of 
all kinds were left by the French. Some of these were large and 
fine, but most of them had been used for laborers' quarters, and all 
were in need of repair. A great many new buildings, hundreds of 
them, have also been erected, including hotels, some of which are 
large and expensive. Hotel Tivoli, at Ancon, is of the latter class. 
It is, perhaps, the largest and finest hotel-building between San 




Dining Halt, at Ancon Hospital 

Diego and Valparaiso. It is now, since January ist, open to the 
public, and will no doubt in its superb situation attract a large num- 
ber of guests of the tourist order, as soon as it becomes known. 
It is on a hill fronting the east, and overlooks the city of Panama and 
the beautiful islands of the bay, as far as Taboga on the south, with 
a wide expanse of sea towards the Pearl Islands, with a range of 
splendid hills, known as the Lesser Andes on the land side. Yes, the 
situation is indeed superb ! Although this hotel was not yet quite 
finished, President Roosevelt stopped there. 

Other hotels along the line, and at Cristobal, the Atlantic terminus, 
have been built for white employes. As a general thing they are 
said to be badly kept. There is universal complaint. 



THE PANAMA CANAL 



z8i 



The Panama Railroad has been double-tracked about half its 
length of forty-seven miles since it was taken over. 

The amount of material, left by the French along the entire length 
of the Canal, and especially on the Culebra section, is astonishing. 
It is estimated at from 150,000 to 200,000 tons, a great deal of 
which had never been in use. Every conceivable thing ever invented 
in the way of machinery connected with excavation is scattered 
everywhere. A considerable number of single pieces weigh many 
tons each, and are a nuisance, as they cannot be used for any purpose, 
and are in the way. This stuff is of no value, even as old iron. It 
would cost more to get it away than it is worth. 

Under the terms of the treaty, the cities of Panama and Colon 




American Quarters at Kmpire 

were to be put in order. The former has been supplied with water 
and its streets have been paved with vitrified brick, two very great 
improvements. It now, for the first time, conveys the impression, 
and puts on the airs, of a modern city. Over Soo houses have already 
had water introduced. 

Colon has not been so fortunate. Front street (width twenty-one 
feet, length 2150 feet), has at last been paved with brick, and some of 
the cross-streets are repaired with crushed stone, but by far the 
larger part of the town is still in a wretched state. A writer of repute 
said recently in a respectable New York journal, among other things : 
■'Swamp-built Colon is a natural hotbed of disease. ... It 
must still remain the receiving and distributing station for the vast 
bulk of men and supplies that are pouring into the Zone. Thus the 



28z 



OUT WEST 




Part of "Coolie Town," Colon, Feb. 9, 1907 



m- 




1^ -^ I- n-'/ 


^t%_^^ 









Part of ''Coolie Town," Colon, Feb. 9, 1907 

300 yards from sea-front where white residences, church, shops and hospital are located 



THE PANAMA CANAL 



283 




Part of Panama kailkuau Shops, Fkh. 9, 1907 




■ll 



. .,4 iV »-« 







Part oj Hospital Buildings, Colon, Feb. 9, 1907 



284 



OUT WEST 



health of the whole Isthmus depends upon the health of Colon." 
"The island's engineering surgeons have been sadly slack."' And 
so on. But times change ; and hope whispers that perhaps in a year 
or two the alligator may disappear from his lair in the very midst 
and middle of the city. One measuring six feet was caught a month 
ago, within a hundred yards of the Market, and it has been no un- 
common thing now and again to bring in one to delight the small 
boy and to enliven the passing show. Nothing that had been said or 
written, up to a year ago, about the neglected condition of the town 
was overdrawn, and even now it is bad. It has been a dark stain 
on initiatory Canal work. Poor Colon ! 

The labor question appears now to be in a fair way of satisfactory 




A Church in CotON 

settlement. West Indians, other than Jamaicans (who have been re- 
strained by obdurate Governor Swettenham), have been flocking in 
by the thousand, while Spanish and Italian laborers now form quite 
an important element, and will doubtless continue to arrive. There 
were, on the 31st of January, 1861 Spaniards and 1185 Italians at 
work — 3046 all told. The Italians, although more difficult to control, 
are regarded the best workmen. They prove handy about track- 
work and on the dirt-trains. The Spaniards, although more quiet, 
are not so strong and able-bodied. The West Indians are : From 
Barbadoes, 9,000; Martinique, 4,000; Jamaica, 6,000, and miscel- 
laneous, about 2,000, or 21,000 in all, thus making a grand total of 
24,000 men. Add to this the number of white employes, stated as 
5,640, and the entire number is close upon 30,000. They are divided 



THE PANAMA CANAL 



^85 




French Engines Rusting at Kmpire 



into "gold men" and "silver men," the former including the whites 
and a few from the colored race. These get paid in good, sound 
money of the United States, while the others receive what is called 
in local phrase "tin money," or Panama silver coin, worth only fifty 
cents in the dollar. 

The feeding problem has been solved, at least for the present, by 
the plan initiated February ist, under which the men are fed at 
kitchens provided by the Commission, and the cost deducted from 
their pay. 

If the contractors for building the Canal bring from the southern 
States a large contingent of negro laborers, as reported, the labor 
problem would seem to be in the way of solution without the aid of 
China or Japan. 

So far as actual work on the Canal is concerned, comparatively 



f 






»»vJ*»-W? 


l^fli'l 




■..-.u ^ 


^k4 









Abandoned Machinery at Empire 



z86 



OUT WEST 



little had been done up to the end of 1906. The Culebra Cut was no 
deeper than when the French left it, and as a matter of fact is no 
deeper today. This statement is made from personal observation, 
on the third day of February, 1907, when I passed twice through 
the whole length of the great cut. It was a mistake to say that the 
present American level (in November last) was "sixty-five feet be- 
low that reached by the French." There are strips of jungle that 
have grown up in the cut, and are still growing, which mark the 
bottom of the French excavation, that are beloiu the American level 
reached at the above date. These strips are narrow, it is true; but 
they were there in evidence at the date of my trip. The greater 
part of the American work has been done in removing the im- 
mense land-sUdes that had occurred since the French left, and in 




Old French Machinery at Paraiso 

widening the cut. These great slides have only now been removed. 
At present there is evidence of effective work all along the deep 
cutting between Bas Obispo and Paraiso, a distance of seven-and- 
one-quarter miles. From the exact summit, where water runs either 
way, the work-trains divide, one set going towards the Pacific, the 
other towards the Caribbean. There were, on February 3d, fifty 
steam-shovels in commission, I was told, forty-one of which were in 
the great Culebra Cut and its approaches. The average work of 
each shovel is stated as 700 yards daily, working an average of four 
hours, the other four of an eight-hour day being taken up by "waits" 
caused by one thing and another. It is expected that in March there 
will be a daily output (excepting always Sundays, when all exca- 
vation ceases and work is confined to repairs, moving tracks, etc.) of 
20,000 cubic yards in this Culebra-Obispo division. 



THE PANAMA CANAL 



287 




CuLEBRA Cut Looking North, June 1903 

The steam-shovel is a wonderful invention. At rest it looks like 
a big sullen monster, and at work this monster seems to be endowed 
with almost human intelligence. When forty or fifty or one hundred 
of these machines shall be digging all at once, the dirt will indeed fly ! 

In the month of January, 566,000 cubic yards were taken out, 
which is double, I am told, the output of the best French work. As- 
surance is given that in a short time this will be largely exceeded. 




\^ui.EBRA Cut Looking south, uctobkk 



THE PANAMA CANAL 



289 



The problem of finding "dumps" and of keeping the working tracks 
in shape, is a very difficult one, and has been placed in exceedingly 
able hands. A large part of the excavated material will have to be 
hauled long distances, which will add to the time and expense. The 
new dirt-cars, however, now in use, forty-three feet long, and capa- 
ble of carrying twenty cubic yards each, and the ingenious "unload- 
ers," by which a whole train of sixteen to twenty cars can be un- 
loaded in a few minutes, make the old methods of performing such 
work look primitive and antiquated. In fact, taken in connection with 




A Dynamite Hj^ast in Cui,ebra Cur 

the big steam-shovels, they are factors of tremendous interest and im- 
portance. They make it seem more than ever certain, handled as 
they are and will be by intelligent men of our race, that the saying 
of M. de Lesseps, before quoted, was prophetic. The Canal will 

BE MADE ! 

The Gatun Dam is another matter of the first importance. A 
strong feeling prevails that it is a mistake, and that a Canal at sea- 
level should be made, at whatever cost of time and money. A hun- 



THE PANAMA CANAL 




The Gamboa River Running Throitgh the Canal at Empire 
Nov. 17, 1906 

dred millions more or less, and five or ten years longer, would not 
count, a half-century or a century hence. The question is still worth 
grave reconsideration. 

There is considerable activity at Gatun, in preliminary work, but 
it will be a long time before any part of the immense dam, with its 
adjacent locks, will be visible to the naked eye. It is easy to say 
that such a dam can be made, "a mountain of earth"' as it is described, 
and such unheard-of locks, but not so easy to say with any certainty 
that they will prove a success. In short, it must be regarded a tre- 
mendously uncertain experiment, with equally tremendous possi- 
bilities of failure. A sea-level channel once opened might in time 
by the process of gradual enlargement, become a veritable grand, 
wide, deep "Straits of Panama." 




The Chagres River at High Water, Gatun, Nov. 17, 1906 



'.i)l 



OUT WEST 




A STEAM ShoveIv in the Canal During a Flood 



Not alone will America, wonderful Republic of the West, have in- 
terest in the completion of this, our cyclopean enterprise, but the 
whole round world and all the future generations of mankind, while 
time endures^ shall have share in that interest. 

Then let the grand undertaking be commensurate with the his- 
tory and traditions of our country, with our dignity and wealth and 
power, and with our foremost position among the Nations, a perpetual 
honor to the flag we worship and to the home we love. 

Colon, February, 1907. 




A Slide in Culebra Cut 




On the Trail to Governor's Camp, Big Basin 
In the mountaiuB 20 miles West of San Jote' 



'95 




CROSSING the: isthmus in 1850 

By BENJAMIN W. WELLS. 

^ THE "Letters of An Argonaut" published two years 
ago in Out West^ Thomas Goodwin Wells gave some 
account of a journey across the Isthmus made in De- 
cember, 1850. His brother, Edwin R. Wells, who 
accompanied him on this journey, made a fuller account 
of it in a pocket diary. Preserved by a strange chance, it has just 
come to light twenty-three years after his death. Written from day to 
day, it gives a vivid record of what must have been an experience 
common to thousands of early Californians. The sudden break in 
the narrative may be attributed to Chagres fever, which seized the 
writer almost immediately after his embarkation at Panama. Later 
leaves in the same notebook contain memoranda of the contracts for 
rebuilding the banking house of Wells & Co. at the corner of Clay 
and Montgomery streets in June and July of 1851, and have some 
economic interest. 

Sunday (Dec. 8, 1850) we made St. Andrew's Island. Saturday night we 
laid by all night, lost. The Captain could not tell where we were, and was 
afraid of getting onto some of the shoals that are in that neighborhood, but 
Sunday we made the Island and Monday morning early we made land, but 
did not get into Chagres until near night on account of not knowing where 
the port was exactly. We went down the wrong way and had to go back 
again. It was late when we got anchored. The wind was fresh and the surf 
was breaking nearly across the mouth of the harbour, so we did not land 
until the next morning, which was Tuesday, the lOth. Well, we landed all 
safely and got some breakfast. Found a poor fellow there accused of robbing 
his companion, and they raised a jury to try him. They brought him in 
guilty and sentenced him to be whipped, twenty-five lashes every hour until 
he would give up or tell where the money was. 1 hey had commenced 




Shingling a Panama House 



296 



OUT WEST 



whipping him before we left, but I do not know how it came out. The two 
were travelHng home to the States together. Well, we made a bargain with 
a little steamboat to take us up to Cruces, i. e., the boat should take us up 
some 44 miles and take along small barges and send us up in them the rest 
of the way. We were all anxious to get out of Chagres, which is the dirtiest, 
meanest place, I think, on the face of the earth. All concur, however, in 
placing Cruces alongside of Chagres. While here and for some distance up 
the river I could, I thought, feel myself breathing in pestilence in the at- 
mosphere. The rainy season was not quite over, and when the sun was out 
the steam or vapour was constantly rising from the ground, which is exceed- 
ingly rich. The river bottoms are covered with a dense growth, large trees 
and small trees, bamboo and vines interwoven so thick as to make a passage 
through them for a man impossible. Everything grows most luxuriantly, 
but the people, a mixture of Spanish, Indians and negi;oes, are so indolent 
that very little is produced, and of course we fared rather slim in the eating 




Flat Arch in an Old Ruin, Panama 

line. The only thing that we relished at all was ham, and that only occa- 
sionally, for it all had to be brought here, and a great deal spoiled in bringing 
it, and of course it had to be used all the same as though it was ever so good. 
Well, about one o'clock Tuesday we bid good-bye to Chagres with as hearty 
a good will as you can possibly imagine. We bought, however, before leav- 
ing, an india-rubber overcoat and blanket of the same. We got up about 
twenty-two miles that evening ; stopped at a place called "Dose Hermanes," 
in English, Two Women or Two Sisters. Well, there was no place on board 
the boat to lie down. The baggage took up all the room about the decks, with 
nothing overhead but an awning. Some few, I believe, lay down upon the 
trunks. My brother and myself went up to the ranch and got something to 
eat. The house was made by setting four posts down firmly in the ground, 
then running bamboo round from corner to corner at the upper end, and 
then the rafters from there, and tied with thongs of rawhide, and then run-' 
ning bamboo across the rafters again, fa.stening the same way and then 



CROSSING THE ISTHMUS IN 1850 297 

thatching with a kind of cane that has a leaf resembUng corn blades some- 
thing, and in this way they make a very tight roof. Some of the houses are 
built entirely of bamboo stuck close together in the ground and cut as long 
as they want the house to be high, and then put on the roof as before 
described. None of them, however, have any floor, simply the earth, and 
this they keep brushed oflf clean as convenient. However, this house we 
stopped at the first night was covered with canvas. We were shown a place 
where we might spread our patent bedsteads, and being tired we retired pretty 
soon. I put my mosquito-bar over mine and directly got into refreshing sleep, 
but about one o'clock 1 was awakened by the rain pouring down upon the foot 
of my bed. I threw off my bar, and as my umbrella stood handy, I raised it 
right quick and sat in that position until the rain was over, when I got up 
and put on my boots, the only article of clothing I had taken off, shut up 
my bed and thought I would sit up the rest of the night, but the landlady 
showed me another place that looked dry, and I was induced to try it once 
more, and laid until morning, but did not sleep any more. We started the 




Washday on The Chagres River 

next morning about five o'clock, but did not get far before we had to take to 
the small boats, and then we had a great deal of confusion. We gave the 
Captain $20 extra to furnish us with two boats, and we were to take in two 
others, making six in the two boats. But they found boats were rather scarce, 
so we had to put all our baggage and the four of us into our boat, and that 
loaded it down so that with the hands we had we made poor progress. One 
of our hands was of no account. 

Well, we got up to the place called Palmkin Pt., the night that the 
steamboat should have brought us, but instead of being the first to arrive 
were the third boat. We got some supper up at the ranch and slept upon 
our trunks in the boat that night, with a small awning spread over us. We 
were determined to go ahead the next day, so my brother went in one of 
the mail-boats with Mr. Whitney, the mail agent, and we hired another hand 
to go to Cruces and paid him $12. We bought two skiff oars and paid $4 
for them and started at five o'clock the next morning, and sure enough we 
beat everything to Gorgona. There we overtook Mr. Whitney and my 
brother, who started about three o'clock, some two hours before us. The 



298 



OUT WEST 



representations were so favorable that my brother concluded to stop and go 
across from this place. Monsieur Simon agreed to give us saddle mules for 
$16 each, and our baggage for $10 for one hundred pounds, and start us at 
eight o'clock the next morning, which would be Friday, and insure our bag- 
gage to go through in twenty-four hours from the time it started, under a 
forfeiture of one-half the price, which was not to be paid until the baggage 
arrived in Panama. When the other boats came up the most of them stopped, 
which made a company of some thirty or more with their baggage, and 
Monsieur Simon was very obsequious, but the next morning that gentleman 
was not to be seen — was sick. The boats we had come in had either gone on 




- ' — *■ --^--' 
A Panama Washlady 

up to Cruces or returned to Chagres, so there we were completely at their 
mercy. The party started about 10 o'clock A. M. Mr. Strong, Mr. Hill and 
myself, and Mr. King's man, Patrick, stayed behind to see the baggage started. 
All this time they were making good promises, but when four o'clock P. M. 
arrived they told us there would be no more baggage started that evening, 
and if we did not go we could not have our mules the next morning; that 
the baggage would all be started early the next morning. Well, we con- 
cluded to go. Mr. Kruger, wife and child, Mr. Dennison, Mrs. Merrill, Mrs. 
Plumer and child, and a Mr. Hopkins had left some half hour ahead of us 
with the guides, the children carried in a chair prepared for the purpose, 
lashed to a man's back. I was some little distance behind Strong and Hill, 



CROSSING THE ISTHMUS IN 1850 299 

and Patrick was a little behind me. When I came up with the other party, 
Mrs. Merrill's saddle had turned and she was walking. The guide had 
caught her mule and fixed her saddle. Mr. Dennison, in whose charge she 
was, was some distance ahead, holloaing to me and Patrick to help Mrs. 
Merrill. I dismounted and put Mrs. Merrill all right and mounted again and 
went ahead. I told Mr. Dennison I thought he had better get the ladies 
ahead of him and then he could see to them so much better. We pressed 
Patrick into his service, and I went on after Strong and Hill, and passed, I 
thought, over as bad a road as could possibly be, before dark — some places 
where the mules would just stand stiff and slide down almost perpendicular 
precipices four or five feet, and across mudholes up to their bellies, and I 
began to get courage and thought we should get through without any very 
great trouble, but soon after dark I found great trouble in guiding my mule. 
You see they do not put bridles on the riding mules, only occasionally, and 
mine happened only to have on a halter fastened to a headstall under the 




■i\!'!_-^ ", -i .:'^:^' - '-■■• THE Isthmus 

jaw, and the rascal would every little while jump out one side into the 
bushes to avoid a deep mudhole and jam my legs against trees or get 
entangled in vines and it was not long before I got .so entangled in a vine 
that I was likely to get hauled off the mule, and by exerting all my strength 
I stopped the mule and turned him down into the mudhole, where he floun- 
dered and fell. 

(Here the narrative is broken. On another page is written: "Arrived in 
Panama, Saturday, 14th, one o'clock. Sailed from Panama Tuesday, 17th, 
twelve o'clock.") 

The banking house of Wells & Co. on the corner of Clay and 
Montgomery streets was burned on May 4, and reopened for busi- 
ness on June 20, 1851. Memoranda of contracts made in this con- 
nection have interest as indicating how building was done at that 



300 



OUT W EST 



time and at what cost. There are also memoranda regarding rent of 
the four rooms on each of the three upper floors, for instance : 

State Court wants three rooms, third story, $500 per month, cash. 

Rooms in the second story at the head of stairs, $100 each, rear rooms 
$150 each [per month]. 

Fourth story, head of stairs, $50, corner $100. 

The range of office-rents would seem, then, to have been from $50 
to $150, above the ground floor. 

There are memoranda of two contracts for plastering, both with 
N. B. Clark, who "agrees to plaster the ceiling in the basement at 
87J/2 cents per square yard," and to "furnish all the materials and 
plaster the building of Wells & Co., corner Clay and Montgomery 
streets, in a good and workmanlike manner, of the best material, 




Hut in the Panama Jungle 

good three-coat work, commencing in the hall of first floor and on the 
three upper floors, for the sum of $2,300 complete in three weeks. 
San Francisco, 5th June, 185 1." 

Town & Van Winkle, "in Sansom near Pine Street" offer to 
furnish sash at "$14 for each window in the three upper stories." 

A carpenter, Henry Reeve, offers to build a "staircase to com- 
mence in the cellar and run to the roof. Rail and banister to be of 
mahogany, the doors of pine, the sash to be of mahogany and roof 
to be furred out so as to make a level ceiling in the upper story, fast- 
enings for doors and windows including locks for the doors to be of 
the most approved kind, the whole to be done of good material and 



CROSSING THE ISTHMUS IN 1850 



301 




(V Day At Kmpikk 



ill a workmanlike manner and completed for occupancy in six days 
after the plastering is completed, $3,500." 

Messrs. Kilbourn and Greer : "Estimate for finishing the building 
complete commencing with the staircase as it is from the cellar to tiie 
roof and all the work in the three upper stories, together with all the 
fastenings of the most approved kind, locks included, such to be of 
mahogany, also stair rails and banisters, the rest pine, good material 
and to be done in a good workmanlike manner for the sum of 
$3,000." 

These demands do not seem, under the exceptional circumstances, 
exorbitant, but that contracts for such sums should have been so 
loosely drawn and informally recorded, is not without interest. 

New York City. 




Ruins OF Porto Beli.o — i a.na.ma .navv in .midduk Distance 



30Z 



THE CAMELS IN THE SOUTH\VEST 



(A FORGOTTEN EXPERIMENT) 




By SHARLOT M. HALL. 
IX THE eighteenth of December, 1902, there died at 
Tyson's Wells, on the old desert road from the Colo- 
rado River to Wickenburg, a man who was part of 
one of the most romantic experiments ever undertaken 
by the United States government — a man around whom 
a picturesque, half-historic atmosphere has always clung, and whose 
name will never be quite forgotten in the old Southwest. 

Like the gaunt, age-stricken remnant of his old-time charges, 
"Hi Jolly" — the form to which "Hadji Ali" became converted 
upon the tongues of his associates of another race — the last of 
the camel drivers, went back to the desert to die. He was a 
young man when he rode into Arizona on his high Syrian camel- 
saddle, convoying that troop of strange beasts before whom 
cavalry horses, pack-mules, and Indians hostile and friendly fled in 
terror. He had grown gray and grizzled and seen the very memory 
of his coming forgotten and the last "ship of the desert" a heap of 
weather-bleached bones, before he went to his own long bed in the 
sand. 

A particularly comprehensive and eventful life had been his in the 
land of his adoption, and, since the days when the camel-saddles were 
piled in a heap and abandoned near Gila Bend, and their ungamiy 
bearers turned loose to fare as best thev could in the desert, he had 




Illustrations are reproduced from "Report of the Secretary ofWar communicating in- 
formation respecting purchase of camels for the purpose of Military transportation— 1855- 
66-57." 



THE CAMELS IN THE SOUTHWEST 



303 



been scout and mule-packer, miner and prospector by turns; but 
always keeping to the desert, like the true Bedouin he was in spirit 
if not in birth. 

In his later years he could generally be found prospecting up and 
down the Plomas mountains, or perhaps straying over to the Har- 
cuavar or Harqua Hala — those strange, sun-blistered ranges thai 
cross and recross the desert and lure men to death every year with 
their famous lost mines, the "Peg Leg," and "Nigger Ben," and 
dozens more as elusive and alluring. After months of prospecting. 
Hi Jolly would turn up now and then with his pockets full of speci- 
mens and some reminiscence of old times on his lips. He liked best 
to talk of the camels, and of his agreeing to stay in the United 
States one year and staying a little short of fifty. 




Bactrian Camel From Central Asia 

From its outset the camel experiment was brimful of incident 
and excitement. Nothing of the sort had ever been undertaken be- 
fore, and even apart from the fact that some of the Oriental gov- 
ernments practically prohibited the exportation of camels under any 
pretext, it was the general belief that the animals would not survive 
a sea-voyage of any duration. Their distribution hitherto had been 
almost wholly by caravans and camel-dealers, and the few camels in 
Europe were mostly lodged in zoological gardens and regarded 
solely as curiosities. 

Two things led the United States government to approach the sub- 
ject from the utilitarian view-pohit. The recently acquired territory 
west of the Missouri river presented such problems in transporta- 
tion as, it was believed, could only be paralleled in the deserts of 
Asia and Africa ; and the armies of Persia had their "Zembourek," 



304 O U T W EST 

the famous camel artillery, while the French troops in Algiers had 
found camels of much assistance in their military movements. 

For once tradition dovetailed admirably with necessity. Here was 
a land of scant herbage and insufficient and precarious water-sup- 
ply, a region believed to contain vast sandy plains and half-barren 
uplands, and known to be infested by turbulent Indian tribes whose 
hawk-like descent on passing travelers demanded the nearest ap- 
proach to a winged pursuit. And beyond was California, with her 
gold and her thronging Argonauts, ready to pay an ounce of yellow 
dust for the safe carriage of a letter in quicker time than the slow 
sea-voyage around the Horn or across the Isthmus. 

From the desert to camels was a natural transition, and the mat- 
ter was urged so earnestly and seriously by grave statesmen and mil- 
itary authorities that, on March 3, 1855, ^ bill was approved by 




Embarkation of Camels 

congress authorizing the expenditure of $30,000.00 in buying and 
bringing to the United States enough camels to make a thorough 
test of their practical value in the Southwest. 

The whole matter was placed in the hands of the War Department. 
Jefiferson Davis, then Secretary of War, made a thorough and ex- 
haustive study of the subject and seems to have been its most en- 
thusiastic promoter. Almost immediately he set about preparations 
to carry out the plan, and, on May 16, 1855, directed Major Henry 
C. Wayne to "proceed to the Levant without delay and make such 
investigations as, with the knowledge you already possess of the 
animal and of the views and intentions of the government in relation 
to its introduction, will enable you to execute the law of Congress." 

With Major Wayne was associated Lieutenant D. D. Porter, 
afterward Admiral Porter, who, with the naval store-ship ''Supply," 



THE CAMELS IN THE SOUTHWEST 305 

was ordered to join Major Wayne at Smyrna and arrange for the 
transportation of the camels to the coast of Texas, where they were 
to be landed. 

Major Wayne's orders took him to all the large cities of the Ori- 
ent. It was expected that he would find the finest camels in Persia, 
and he was ordered to spare no travel and expense in getting the very 
best, as only stock of the highest grade was desired. 

He was given letters to such Europeans as were known to have 
had experience with camels, from whom it was hoped that he might 
gain valuable information as to their care. He did learn somewhat 
from the Zoological Gardens in London and much more from offi- 
cers who had served with the French troops in Algiers; but all in 
all, the important things were to be learned a little later from a big, 





^^^Hlr vXv^^vom '•*' ^>^ 




HIm 




'^•*~--~----"  *«^^^^ 11 







Cambl Secured for a Gal,e 

rough burden-camel, bought of the Bey of Tunis and loaded into the 
"Supply"' with all the dignity of a high Moorish official going on 
board his private vessel. 

"The Bey" (as he was christened) had just settled down com- 
fortably in his unusual quarters when Major Wayne learned of the 
camels of Tuscany and went oflF to Florence and Pisa to examine 
them. For two hundred years the dukes of Tuscany had been breed- 
ing burden-camels exclusively for thelir own use, rigidly limiting the 
number born each year and permitting no animal to be owned out- 
side their own stables. 

These Tuscan camels were the strongest endorsement which the 
new venture had yet received. Major Wayne found them ill-fed 
and unsheltered, exposed to every hardship and neglect, made to 



3o6 



OUT WEST 



bear loads of twelve hundred pounds, and at night turned out in the 
pine-forests to find such food as they might in a climate colder than 
Northern Texas. Yet they were as robust and hardy as possible 
and seemed to adapt themselves comfortably to their unfriendly en- 
vironment. If as much might be expected in the United States, the 
range of the camel would be extended indefinitely. 

From Tuscany Major Wayne went on to Constantinople and 
thence to Alexandria, that centering point for great caravans from 
all over the Levant. The news of his coming and his mission flew 




Dromedary from Muscat 

before on the very wind and every sore-backed and superannuated 
camel in Asia Minor was doctored up and hurried down to the coast, 
to be generously urged upon the United States at the grievous sacri- 
fice of ten times its value. 

No end of camel lore was accumulated in short order — a good deal 
of it by disastrous experience with glib-tongued, dark-skinned deal- 
ers, and the untimely purchase of mangy, worthless beasts who were 
kept just long enough to prove their unfitness and sold again for 
whatever they would bring. 

It was found presently that Smyrna was the best buying and 



THE CAMELS IN THE SOUTHWEST 307 

loading point and a motley herd of camels from all parts of Asia 
was accumulated there — double-humped Bactrians, single-humped 
Arabians, and the hardy breeds of the Crimea. 

Lieutenant Porter became extravagantly enthusiastic and pictured 
the planters of the Southern States transporting their cotton to mar- 
ket and ploughing their fields by camel-power, importing those un- 
beautiful animals in place of stud-horses and breeding them to re- 
place mules and oxen. Camel beef was extolled as superior to that 
of cattle, and the milk and wool were reckoned as valuable con- 
siderations. 

It is interesting, now that the lapse of years has again relegated 
the camel in the Western world to the circus and menagerie, to know 
how they were expected to become part of the domestic economy of 
every well-regulated Southern farm. 

From Smyrna Major Wayne went to Cairo, with the hope of se- 
curing some of the fleet dromedaries of the Egyptian desert in ad- 
dition to the burden-camels already purchased. Here the Khedive 
promptly informed them that no dromedaries could be taken out of 
his country. He presently compromised on two, and, after ardent 
persuasion and a long and tedious explanation of the intention of the 
United States government, raised the number to four — two of each 
sex. 

To these the Viceroy of Egypt offered to add six dromedaries of 
finest strain as a personal gift to the United States; but when his 
generous offer was accepted such a miserable lot of diseased old 
street-camels was sent down that both the American representa- 
tives felt justified in refusing absolutely to receive them. A second 
lot no better than the first were sent down with profuse Oriental 
apologies and refused with equal politeness tempered with Western 
firmness. 

After this event the harassed camel-hunters shook the dust of 
Cairo from off their feet and went back to Smyrna to complete the 
purchase there, and to buy also such pack-saddles and trappings as 
might be necessary. From Cairo they took with them three Arabs 
to assist with the care of the stock, for it was part of the experiment 
to learn as much of native methods as possible. Earlier in the voy- 
age Arab help had been shipped at Tunis and found to be much less 
satisfactory than the American sailors ; but it was believed that the 
care in breeding and calving required an experienced attendant, and 
the natives were employed primarily for that reason. 

At Smyrna two Greeks, Hi Jolly and Greek George, expert camel- 
drivers, were employed to assist in the loading and in the selection 
of the pack outfittings. With the aid of a sort of camel-chute which 
Lieutenant Porter invented, the loading was hurried along as 



3o8 O U T W EST 

smoothly as if the woolly giants had been so many bales of Turkish 
rugs — bales ranging from i,4CX) to 2,000 pounds in weight and from 
six to seven and a half feet tall. 

The only difficulty came when the humps of some of the big 
Bactrians refused to fit in under the deck, and as the camel could 
not very well be sliced down, the deck had to be raised; for the 
hump is a camel's *'crazy-bone" and the smallest bruise on it leaves 
him sulky and pouting for days. Indeed, pouting was found to 
be the camel's most prominent temperamental characteristic. He 
was patient and humble, easier to load and care for than a cavalry 
horse, and not given to fighting except at certain seasons ; but an 
injury to his feelings, or to his hump, would cause him to drop his 
long lip and pout like a school-girl till the. fit passed. 

Curious slings were arranged, in which every camel was swung 
to prevent accidental injuries from slipping and falling when the 
ship rolled in heavy weather, and all care was taken to make the 
ungainly beasts as comfortable as possible in their enforced con- 
finement. They were less trouble and fared better than so many 
horses, and several little camel-babies appeared before the voyage 
was over. 

The Egyptians had a curious practice of taking the baby camel 
by force as soon as the birth began and keeping it for several days 
so wrapped in rags that it could not stand or reach its mother, feed- 
ing it on rancid butter all the while. It was small wonder that the 
first little new-comers on the "Supply" found life under this treat- 
ment too heroic an undertaking; but Hi Jolly took charge of the 
rest and by allowing nature her own way landed several camel-colts 
who lived to grow up in the land to which their mothers had been 
unwilling immigrants. 

The "Supply" landed her cargo of thirty-four camels, old and 
young, at Powder Horn, on the Gulf coast of Texas, May 16, 1856. 
The big animals were wild with joy at feeling firm ground under 
their feet once more. They ran and frisked and played like horses 
turned to pasture and would scarcely permit themselves to be sad- 
dled and led to Indianola, a short distance inland, from which point 
they were presently moved to a special camel-camp in the Green 
valley, about sixty miles from San Antonio, named Camp Verde. 

They had borne the journey so well and shown themselves so use- 
ful in moving supplies from Indianola to Camp Verde that the re- 
ports of Major Wayne and Lieutenant Porter were most enthusiastic 
and strongly urged the importation of a second cargo of camel-cows 
to increase the breeding stock. Consequently, early in June, Major 
Wayne was, at his own request, left in charge of Camp Verde, and 
Lieutenant Porter was returned to Smyrna for the second lot of 
camels, landing forty-one at Powder Horn, January 20, 1857. 



THE CAMELS IN THE SOUTHWEST 309 

The Texas people were much interested in the curious animals 
which were expected to resolve into smallest terms the long trail west- 
ward into California. When Major Wayne came into San Antonio 
for supplies his camel-teams attracted as much attention as a circus. 
He soon proved to his own satisfaction and that of all onlookers that 
the camels could carry astonishing loads with comparative ease, even 
over muddy roads such as they had never been accustomed to. At- 
tached to a big government wagon, two of the Bactrians did the 
work of four or six mules, and one of them carried more than a 
"^ousand pounds of grain, as an experiment in packing. 

On ship-board some of the camels suffered so much with the heat 
in their close quarters that it was found best to shear them. An ex- 
I^rt spinner, Mrs. Mary A. Shirkey of Victoria, Texas, spun from 
this wool enough undyed yard to make a pair of socks, which she 
knitted and which were sent to President Pierce as the first example 
of what might yet be a great industry. 

With the most brilliant hopes for their future, small bands of 
camels were sent out from time to time with government expeditions, 
and were found to answer admirably as pack-animals, barring cer- 
tain drawbacks. Major Wayne, with the largest faith in the ex- 
periment, urged that the speed-camels would form admirable mounts 
for scouting-parties in the pursuit of Indians, and that in case of 
attack they could be made to lie down and form a convenient breast- 
work, like the trained war-camels of Persia. Moreover, the very 
sight of them inspired such fear that a troop so mounted would be 
safe from ambush and sudden surprise. 

Unfortunately it was quickly developed that only Hi Jolly and his 
companion could stay on a camel going at full speed without turn- 
ing sea-sick or being lashed to the saddle — and American army offi- 
cers showed the least possible affinity for Asiatic camel saddles. As 
pack-animals no end of difficulty arose; for if the packs were im- 
properly adjusted a sore-backed, useless camel was the result, and by 
the time they were rightly in place, under the directions of the Greeks, 
the bulk of the American helpers were under guard for "insubordi- 
nation and violent and abusive language." 

A cavalry march in company with the camels often became a 
stampede, and the soldiers told off for duty as camel hostlers devel- 
oped such a deep-rooted hatred for their charges that more than one 
camel who was reported as having "become unmanageable and es- 
caped into the desert," did so with the full approval and assistance of 
his unwilling guards. 

No doubt further experience would have developed methods of 
packing more adapted to western needs, and saddles as useful as the 
Oriental type without their discomfort; and time would probably 



3io OUT WEST 

have modified the extreme dislike which the American soldiers and 
packers manifested toward the unfortunate beasts, who were strang- 
ers in a strange land. With longer association both men and horses 
became familiar with the habits of the camels — the horses no longer 
stampeded at sight of the uncouth aliens, and it was seen that under 
kind treatment they not only lost their traditional ill-temper but be- 
came most docile and obedient, and even affectionate. 

It is a matter for genuine regret that this experiment which was 
regarded with so much enthusiasm by Major Wayne and Lieutenant 
Porter, the men best fitted to pass judgment, failed entirely by reason 
of unfavoring circumstances. The camels were healthy in their new 
home, were strong, capable and intelligent, and increased freely, and 
in the right hands would have proven as good carriers as in the 
Orient. But the beginning of the Civil War was the end of the camel 
experiment. 

The troops in western Texas and on into Arizona were withdrawn 
for active service in the South, and the little posts that had pro- 
tected the mail route were abandoned. Part of the camels were re- 
turned to Camp Verde with the idea of ultimately sending them back 
to Smyrna, but some time after the close of the war the survivers 
were sold to showmen and menageries. 

The camels in Arizona were taken to Drum Barracks near Los 
Angeles and there cared for, being herded on the surrounding hills 
and sometimes used experimentally in trips to Fort Yuma. It was 
still believed that they would prove useful in carrying supplies and 
mails across the desert, and there is little doubt that they would have 
done so if properly handled ; but the men who had studied the matter 
were actively engaged elsewhere and there was no one competent to 
direct the packing and feeding of the big burden-bearers. 

The Oriental tradition that the camel could eat and drink enough 
to last him on a long journey was accepted as literal truth. The fleet 
dromedaries, which in their own countries are fed and watered as 
carefully as a race-horse, were overfed, overwatered, and then sent 
into the desert at full speed by men who would have laughed at such 
treatment for the poorest pack-mule. They failed, as any animal 
would have failed, and were condemned and cast aside as useless be- 
cause of the ignorance and prejudice of the persons in charge of them. 

About 1866 those remaining at Drum Barracks, between thirty and 
forty, were sold to a Frenchman, who took them north into Nevada 
with the idea of using them to pack goods to the mining-camps as 
far as Idaho and Montana. Away from the yielding sands of the 
desert, on the stony mountain-trails, the camels quickly became too 
footsore to travel. Wherever they went on a road, freight were 
were frightened and before long their owner was ordered to take 



THE CAMELS IN THE SOUTHWEST 3>» 

his uncanny pack-train out of the country or see them shot by 
the teamsters. 

He brought them back to Fort Yuma, and, when he died there 
shortly afterward, the camels were turned loose in the desert to shift 
for themselves. No other attempt of any importance was made to 
use them and they soon retired to the least-frequented foot-hills, 
where bands of them would now and then be seen by prospectors. 
It has been said that the Indians killed some of them for food, but 
this is not likely. The strange animals inspired too much awe and 
superstitious fear, and were avoided rather than hunted. White 
hunters, however, from time to time killed them out of curiosity or in 
efforts to capture them for shows. And in the ranges they fre- 
quented, some were shot by stock-men and prospectors whose ani- 
mals they had frightened. Left to themselves, the camels would 
have been as much at home as on their native deserts, but they were 
driven slowly to the most remote water-holes and barren ranges. 

All sorts of weird and impossible tales grew up around them. To- 
day their ghosts haunt certain peaks and canons ; and along the edge 
of the desert it is told gravely that wandering up and down, always 
keeping well away from the inhabited sections, is an old prospector 
who leads three camels on which he has packed a fortune in nuggets 
gathered little by little — gold that has cost his reason. The story of 
a big red camel still bearing a tall saddle to which is lashed a human 
skeleton is also current coin at desert campfires. 

The last camel taken alive was captured in 1884 or '85 by a Mex- 
ican who was prospecting around the Harqua Hala mountains. It 
was a dromedary, a pitiful old beast, mangy and rawboned with age 
and hardship, soured and suspicious by years of loneliness and ad- 
versity. 

It was with no little difficulty that the Mexican lassoed the poor 
old derelict of a long- forgotten experiment and led him into Phoenix, 
hoping to sell him for a few dollars to someone bent on a new sort 
of speculation. But the camel market was particularly dull and the 
ancient dromedary proved to be an expensive and uncompanionable 
piece of property, whose appetite threatened to bankrupt rather than 
boom the fortunes of his finder. 

So in despair the Mexican hunted up one of his creditors- -a man 
to whom he had long owed ten dollars, with good prospect of passing 
the debt on to his heirs. After considerable persuasive pleading, the 
dromedary changed hands and the Mexican loaded up his burro and 
hurried back to the hills, rejoicing at his easy escape and determined 
to stick to prospecting in the future. 

The purchaser had gotten an advance hint of a "great traveling 
circus and menagerie" due to show in Phoenix the following month, 



ill O U T W EST 

and it seemed probable that a reasonable interest might be realized on 
the ten dollars — a genuine Arizona camel should prove marketable 
if only as a feature of the bill-boards. 

Pasture was engaged for the ancient beast, and that very evening 
he was taken out of town and turned into an alfalfa-field along with 
a herd of young mules. The next morning there were mules hung 
up all along the barbed-wire fence and bogged down in the ditches, 
and more agile or more frightened mules scattered all over the ad- 
joining country. The camel was providently getting outside of as 
much alfalfa as possible when his speculative owner received an 
urgent call to "take his confounded circus out of that pasture mighty 
quick." 

So he was brought back to Phoenix and domiciled in his owner's 
back-yard, which unluckily was near enough the public road to dis- 
turb the equanimity of passing teams. Long before the circus ap- 
peared, the speculator's nearest neighbor lodged a complaint against 
him with the city officials for maintaining a public nuisance — every 
time she attempted to go out driving, her horse saw the camel 
and tried to climb into the buggy. 

As a last resort, the speculator bethought him of a friend, a gam- 
bler who owned a saloon in which there was a spacious back-room. 
Here surely his unlucky purchase might be stalled in peace till the 
circus came around, and might serve as a drawing-card for the sa- 
loon between times. After an eloquent discussion, the arrangement 
was made and all might yet have been well had not the camel's hump 
stuck in the doorway. He refused stubbornly to "scrooch down" 
to fit the circumstances, and the top of the door-frame and some of 
the roof-beams had to be knocked out before, with the aid of clubs 
and stones and vigorous language, the "ship of the desert" was again 
in harbor. 

But his feelings and hump had both been more or less bruised in 
the proceeding and he was mad — too mad to eat when half a dozen 
bales of hay were stored in his shed, too mad to drink, and mad 
enough to be anything but a safe and pleasant attraction for a first- 
class saloon. Then all at once, after a week of sulking, he ate up the 
whole lot of hay, tags and all, and kicking down the door departed 
swiftly and silently for the desert. 

His relieved owner and temporary host embraced each other with 
congratulations when they discovered his absence, but away out on 
the Five Points road trouble was brewing for them. 

The camel had taken his leave sometime before daylight ; about 
the same time a rancher started for Phoenix with a big hay-wagon 
loaded with baled alfalfa and drawn by four skittish young mules. 
Just as he reached a point where the road and canal ran about level 



THE CAMELS IN THE SOUTHWEST 3 '3 

and parallel, and the latter bank-full, the mules gave a snort and he 
caught a fleeting glimpse of something big and dun swinging down 
the middle of the road like a stampeded windmill. The next thing 
of which he was really conscious was of sitting on top of a baled- 
hay dam across the canal and watching the water back up and flood 
the neighborhood. His wagon was somewhere under the hay and 
the mules and harness were strung along the road well into Phoenix. 

A mile or so further on, the camel, still holding the middle of the 
road and going at full speed, ran foul of a butcher driving a herd of 
hogs to town. The butcher was left standing alone on the bank of 
the canal, contemplating a hogless landscape. Distant grunts and 
terrified squeals from all quarters of the compass assured him of the 
magnitude of the job ahead of him. For weeks after, the local papers 
were full of notices of stray hogs all over the Salt River valley. 

The camel swept on and disappeared in the desert, leaving a train 
of upset buggies and frightened horses in his wake. He was never 
heard from again, but the hog-man and the mule-driver spent fruit- 
less days searching with wrath in their hearts for his unhappy owner 
who was just then out of town on important business. 

Several years later a lone camel watered at a small spring in the 
Harqua Hala mountains not far from Harrisburg. He was so wild 
that no one ever succeeded in getting a rope on him and finally a 
prospector, whose burros he had stampeded, waylaid him on the 
trail and shot him. The skeleton still lies by the side of the trail — 
grim relic of the last of the camels in Arizona. 

Though this is the last camel known to have been seen, Hi Jolly, 
up to the time of his death, declared that there was a small band of 
camels living in the narrow wedge of desert north of the junction of 
the Gila and the Colorado rivers, and that another small band wan- 
dered in the tule jungles of the Colorado delta, just below the Mex- 
ican boundary. The statement is repeated by other desert pros- 
pectors, but has not been verified. 

When General Crook set out to reduce mule-packing in the United 
States army to an exact science, Hi Jolly and Greek George were 
among his most valuable assistants. With "Hank" and "Yank" they 
sent their long-eared caravans along any trail that an Apache moc- 
casin could climb. The packers had a saying that Crook always 
started out with a big pack-train because the mules were so handy 
to feed the troops on when rations gave out. 

Greek George killed a man in New Mexico, in the 'seventies, and 
soon after killed himself to avoid capture. His death was laid at 
the door of the Apaches and only a few of his old comrades know 
the truth. 

In his last years, Hi Jolly was almost as reluctant to encounter 



31+ OUT WEST 

civilization as was the long-neglected survivor of his old-time 
charges. He had outlived the stirring early days of which he and 
his friends were part, and found no one to remember them, except 
now and then some old-timer who, like himself, had drifted into 
an out-of-the-way corner to wait orders for the last trail. To these 
he was fond of telling of packing with Crook ; of the death of Greek 
George in New Mexico, and particularly of how in the old days he 
stampeded a German picnic in the outskirts of Los Angeles. 

In his boyhood. Hi Jolly had served with the French army in 
Algiers, and had a more than French contempt for the Germans. 
While he was still near Los Angeles, in care of a few of the camels, 
he got wind of a great gathering of Germans to celebrate some good 
fortune of the Fatherland. Hi Jolly was not invited, but the Ger- 
mans turned out en masse. The meeting-place was the beautiful 
"Sycamore Grove," in the Arroyo Seco, which the picnickers reached 
in every sort of conveyance obtainable, from a landau to an ex- 
press-wagon. "Die Wacht am Rhein" had been sung with rousing 
enthusiasm and the speaker of the day was just warming up to his 
work, when Hi Jolly bore down on them in a high yellow cart drawn 
by two big, solemn camels. 

Even Hi Jolly never attempted to describe in detail the scene that 
ensued. The picnic as one man walked home dinnerless, and the 
hills around Los Angeles were strewn for weeks after with bottled 
beer, and wienerwurst, and fragments of halters and disabled ve- 
hicles. Old scores were avenged — and for the future camel-driving 
was officially restricted to the military reservation. 

Dewey, Arizona. 



THE ELVES 

By LOUISE CULVER. 

THE elves have lighted poppy flames 
On all the hills of spring; 
They've taught the happy linnet choirs 
A hymn of joy to sing. 

They've spread the trailing sunset clouds 

On trees and fields at night — 
They're flowers and airy butterflies 

Before the morning light. 

And last they found old Care asleep. 
Haggard and gaunt and grim — 

A mound of wild flowers hides him now, 
And none can waken him. 
Palo Alto, Cal. 




315 



A KNIGHT OF THi: PLAINS 

By BERTHA S. WILKINS. 
j|OU can't see that I have succeeded in anything, but the 
truth is that I have never failed." 

Jack Montgomery leaned forward in his saddle to 
read the face of the young woman at his side. She was 
thoughtfully stroking her horse's mane. 

"That is true," he said. "I have never failed, but you can't see 
success unless it's recorded on sheepskin with a blue ribbon around 
it!" 

"You seem determined to misunderstand me," she interposed. 

"No, I believe I'm right," he began with passionate deliberation. 
"You have Uved so long in the world of theory, in the book-world, 
and you have so great an admiration for the achievements of the 
scholar, that you cannot appreciate achievement in the field of real- 
ities." 

"We deal with realities in our laboratory," she replied, with a 
hint of impatience in her voice, 

"It's impossible to bring the difficulties of real life into your world 
of theories," he contended. "I have studied my surroundings care- 
fully and have worked for what seemed worth while. When I was 
a cow-puncher at eighteen, I made up my mind to get a bunch of 
cattle and a range of my own. At twenty-nine I had them. Then I 
convinced the boys that it would be a good plan to clean out some 
of the wild devils in these parts who were making things unsafe for 
the rest of us. We decided that the laws of our country should be 
enforced. Now I am serving my second term as sheriff, and it's 
better with the county, to say the least. I've known life as men live 
it. Even as a boy I knew only the real thing. There were no card- 
board rivalries and little tin triumphs in my life. It was easy to get 
my range stocked with cattle compared with the work of handling 
these camps, with prospectors and Mexicans and rangers and In- 
dians all rattled together as they are. But my success is not recorded 
on parchment." He took off his hat, keenly alert to the effect of his 
challenge. "Only degrees count with you; you appreciate nothing 
else I" 

"You must not go on in this way," Celia Thornton replied. "I do 
appreciate what you have done. If I did not, you would not be rid- 
ing where you are, and you would not have spent your evenings 
with the university 'school-ma'ams' and — " 

"And yet you refuse to take me seriously," he insisted bitterly. 
"I am not a school-man, so there is no chance for me !" 

"I do have objections to marrying you," she said calmly, "and I 
refuse to flirt." 



3i6 our wBsr 

''You refuse me a chance to even try to win. I say your school 
world is a sham; when you get out into real life, you can't see 
straight!" he persisted hotly. 

"When I came, a few months ago, I could see that you were wast- 
ing more time than was right for a young man, throwing dice. 1 
could see that you were smoking more cigars than were good for 
you — there were some things that I could see straight enough !" 

"Can't you let by-gones be by-gones?" he expostulated, laughing. 
"I'm down from ten cigars a day to three, and I haven't played dice 
for a long time. You see, I yield without an argument when you are 
in the right, but I insist that your ideals of success are out of plumb, 
and that you hold scholarship above true ability and manhood !" 

"We contend that the higher intellectual training develops ability 
and manhood." 

"It may, and it may not. That article on 'The Share of the 
Toiler,' by your professor of economics, is simply rot. He makes out 
a miner's life to be quite delightful! Think of the dripping, steam- 
ing depths of hell as pleasant places of abode, and the shorter work- 
ing day an affliction upon the mine-owners ! That's his contention. 
When I see an intellectual flunkey add insult to injury, as he does in 
that article, I want to land a good right-hander on his jaw to make 
him see straight !" 

She studied his passionate face intently. 

"I agree with you ; his conclusions are false," she assented. "He 
"has not lived it, as one must to realize it all." 

"And yet you stand in awe of that long row of initials danghng 
to his name and you laud his scholarship to the skies !" he insisted 
scornfully. "At the same time a boy with first-hand experience might 
trip the great professor up on his own ground !" 

"There are so many lines involved in the study of economics," she 
admitted. "Mistakes do occur." 

"That's a gentle name for damnably misleading statements," he 
said. "But that's no concern of mine. I assure you that I did not 
plan this long ride to waste the time discussing economics. My 
point was an entirely selfish one. It seems to me unfair to be so 
counted out. I am willing to wait, but I insist upon being counted 
as in the race to win !" 

"I'm blinded to all such thoughts by the delights of the intellectual 
life," she began deliberately. "You ask me to give up my freedom 
to plan lines of study and of investigation. I long to move with the 
deep, vital currents of human life. Heavens ! Do I envy any mar- 
ried woman that I know?" 

"For that matter, they'd envy you if there's any of that to be done," 
he broke in. "As for the deep, vital currents of human life, is there 
anything more vital than home-life — and the love-life ?" 



A KNIGHT Of THE PLAINS 3 '7 

"My plan is to go to Europe next year," she began evasively. 

"With that misleading professor of economics in the party," he 
said, jealously. 

"Later, after seeing the sights somewhat, I want to take a course 
of sociology in the Leipsic University," she went on. 

"And then Professor Campbell will join you?" 

"There will be a number of university friends to enter Leipsic at 
that time," she remarked nonchalantly. 

"Your working for honors and degrees may be very fine," he said, 
"but when you are playing with the little brown children in the 
camp, you look as if you were getting more out of life than when 
you are planning to win scholarships. When you ride up to a Mexi- 
can home and they greet you as I have never seen them greet anyone 
else — 'Seiiorita Maestra, Seiiorita Maestra' — then your face lights 
up true to your best self." 

"It's because I speak their language and sing their songs and 
my scientific training helps me to understand these simple primitive 
people !" she urged. 

"Yes, and then again, no. You say that Miss Crane took exactly 
the same course at the university — Spanish and all of it — yet she 
keeps these people at the other end of a pole. You had the sense for 
the human before you had the training." 

She made no reply and, after a pause, he continued : 

"I don't know how a woman may feel about it, but I confess to 
being homesick or rather home-hungry. I hardly remember my 
mother and since her death I have not had a home ; but I do remem- 
ber the delight of seeing her when I had been away from her. Home 
would mean so much to me that only the real home would satisfy 
me now. These silly, high-stepping girls around here can't make a 
home, and the women who come out from the cities in their fine 
feathers to land big game among us fellows, they couldn't make a 
home to save their cheap lives. It takes a real woman to make a 
home !" 

She nodded assent. 

"Phil Windham, across the divide, has the only real home in 
these parts," he continued. "He came out from Philadelphia for his 
health some years ago and his home came with him. Now he is 
strong and well, and his cattle have multiplied and flourished, and 
his home has been an eye-opener to some of us boys." 

"You spoke of our spending the summer with them," she said. 

"Yes, I want you to know that home. Mrs. Windham is the kind 
of woman it takes to make a home, and you are that kind of a 
woman, too." 

"Remember, it takes a man, too!" she suggested with spirit. 



3i8 OUT WEST 

"Yes; Phil Windham is that kind of man, and I am one in the 
making." 

He drew himself up in his saddle as he spoke, and bared his head 
to the evening breeze. She saw in the semi-darkness of the twilight 
a face showing lines of self-restraint and manly purpose; here, she 
felt with a thrill, was the harp of a soul which it was in her power to 
vibrate to the deepest human emotions. 

"That one home has been like a hope for heaven," he went on, "but 
no sham will do. Two of the boys did what they could to have a 
home like Windham's. They got the plans of the houses from Wind- 
ham and good advice; but the girls they married haven't home in 
their range. They fuss a lot about layer-cake and pillow-slips — it's 
enough to make one sick. Yet I know the poor fellows are trying 
to do their part !" 

"Mrs. Windham must be a wonderful woman — is she handsome ?" 
she asked mischievously. 

"No, she is not handsome, but she gets a lot out of life. 
She loves all outside, and then she has her children that she pards 
with, and her books and music. The best turn she ever did me was 
when she slipped 'Middlemarch' into my saddle-bags one day when 
I was mounting to take the cattle up to the meadows. Since that 
time there has been no danger of my being roped in by one of the 
Rosamond stripe. Since then I have dreamed of a home of my own 
such as Dorothea might have made for Lydgate," 

There was a pause. "It would have been a home like the Wind- 
hams' ?" she asked, simply. 

"Exactly ! That makes it all real — and I shall fight for my Dor- 
othea now that I have met her ! But a man is not alone in danger." 

He paused until she looked up with a question in her eyes. 

"I want to say something more, if you will not misunderstand — " 

"Go on — I promise to be good." 

"As you know, I've lived among these people in Green's Hotel for 
years, Billy Green and I were friends. After his death, I took his 
place somewhat with the old folks. I've played dice and cards and 
smoked and hunted with the men — done everything but get drunk 
and lose my self-respect. Though surrounded, I was lonely even 
here in the village, except for the books. The characters created by 
George Eliot and Scott and all the old and new writers are realities 
so vivid to me that I live by them." 

"They are realities to me, too," she said. "Yet I have not been 
alone !" 

"Yet you do not see your own danger !" he hazarded. 

"Danger? What do you mean?" 

"You are in danger of making the same mistake that Dorothea 



A KNIGHT OF THE PLAINS J19 

made when she married Edward Casaubon. You are blinded by 
this man's learning and his pretensions." 

"You base your opinions against him upon that one article?" she 
asked. 

"In part upon that article," he replied staunchly. "Such an article 
attracts attention and makes promotion easy in the great school 
world. Nothing he could have done could have helped him more. 
I believe it was a 'gallery play.' You may think that it is jealousy 
which prompts me to speak against him, but that is not my reason. 
I want to strengthen your own doubts of him. If I am not mistaken, 
you have halted at the very edge of danger and it is not too late. 
This is entirely aside from what you may decide in my case. Do you 
understand that I might want to save you from him, though you 
might not decide in my favor?" 

She nodded assent, calmly looking into his face tense with sus- 
pense. She turned to the mountains as if to draw from their blue 
depths something to help her solve a mystery. 

"As for myself," he began, "I should not want a woman to live 
in this desert country, unless it pleased her to do so. It is not a 
question of geography — it's a question of life and death." He 
studied her profile, keenly wistful. "But I am wasting time," he 
continued uneasily, "I haven't told you my reason for getting up this 
party to Gray's Falls today." He paused for her question. 

"And that was?" 

"I wanted to make my position clear to you. I shall not be counted 
out ; and then I very much want you to ask Professor Campbell to 
join us in camp at Silver Peak Meadows this summer. You will be 
there with Mrs. Windham and the children. I shall come as I can 
get away. Windham oversees my cattlemen. Remember, I chal- 
lenge Professor Campbell to win his lady, as I shall try to win her, 
just as the knights fought in the tournaments of old. I want only a 
fair chance with him. What do you say ? Will you give it to me ?" 

She touched her horse into a lazy lope. 

"What do you say?" he persisted. "Is it a go?" 

"I've promised to let him know where I am to spend the summer," 
she assented, slowly. 

"That's all I ask." He said it with a hint of relief in his voice. "I 
shall not feel resentful again. I wanted only a fight in the open. 
And now, can you give me something to — live on?" She noticed 
the emotion under his voice, held firm by force of will. 

"All that I can say is that my north star is failing me lately." Her 
voice had lost its note of levity. "I admit that I'm at sea about some 
things ; but you are doing what will be of incalculable benefit to you, 
even if — " 



320 OUT wBsr 

"For the present I promise to say no more," he said, "but my 
future refuses to consider an 'If,' " 

The evenings at the camp-fire were the focus of the pleasures at 
Silver Peak Camp. It was at the camp-fire that Mr. Windham took 
out his violin, and drew from his audience smiles or tears at will. 
He told stories, too, so droll and yet so simple that even old Tulee 
could catch the joke when they were translated into her native tongue 
by her grandchildren. There was the "Yodler's Chorus of Indian 
Boys," led by Jack Montgomery, with echo accompaniment by Snow 
Cannon. Moto Yato, the Japanese cook, and his trick dog, Natli, 
added to many an impromptu programme; but Miss Thornton's 
singing was always the last thing called for, "to dream on." 

"Montgomery, finish the programme this evening by singing 
'Home to Our Mountains' with Miss Thornton," Windham said, on 
one occasion. 

She hesitated for a breath, and Jack Montgomery had remained 
calmly leaning against the tree near Professor Campbell, until she 
began to strum unerringly on her guitar the harmony of Verdi's 
duet for tenor and contralto. Then the young man seated himself 
at her right. When the last tender cadence had died away, Wind- 
ham remarked to Professor Campbell : 

"Jack does that tenor part amazingly well. Mrs, Windham trained 
him in it. She insists that the song was written for his voice." 

Upon the professor's intellectual face a cold light had dawned. 
His voice was strained as he said, "It's quite remarkable to see what 
the various members of your party can do by way of entertainment," 

"Yes, In cities these matters are left to the professionals ; but here 

we are thrown upon our own resources," 

"It certainly is remarkable," 

****** 

Celia Thornton lay day-dreaming in the hammock. The dark 
green of the pine-boughs against the blue sky fascinated her. She 
could hear the children, white and brown, at play in the meadows. 
The murmur of the Indian women came over from the kitchen- 
camp, where they were at work under the direction of the gentle 
Japanese cook. 

"Oh, this dear idyllic spot !" she exclaimed with a sigh of delight, 
when Mrs. Windham seated herself near with her babe in her arms. 
"How beautiful it all is — this harmony of the natural and the ar- 
tistic." 

"We are glad to find anyone who can appreciate our mountains 
as we do," rejoined Mrs. Windham, "Mrs, Green and I have 
camped together now for several summers," turning cordially to the 
old woman who joined them with a basket of mending. 



A KNIGHT OF THE PLAINS 3»« 

"Yes, it's six years now since I came for the first time," responded 
the newcomer. "We've had all kinds of company up here, too, but 
I've never had anyone give me the fidgets like I had this morning 
when Professor Campbell was telling me that Jack Montgomery 
seemed to be a very promising young man!" Mrs. Windham and 
Celia Thornton exchanged smiles of understanding, since Mrs. 
Green's intense partisanship for Jack Montgomery was the source 
of much amusement among the members of the little camp. " 'Prom- 
ising,' Jack 'promising,' " she repeated, scornfully. "Why, bless me, 
he's been fulfilling ever since I've known him ! Even when he was 
just a strip of a cow-puncher, he was different from the other fel- 
lows by paying his way and keeping sober. Borrowed every book 
of any account in the whole neighborhood to take out on the range. 
Then he'd buy new ones as you made out the list. Mrs. Windham. 
We've been running a regular circulating library at our hotel for 
years, and it's all Jack's doings. It was Jack saved your husband 
from going into that wild-cat mining scheme and it was Jack that 
advised Mr. Windham's buying the old Beckett ranch that's making 
him independently well-off ! He's always been ready to do the next 
one a good turn at any time — talk about promising ! May not have 
such a long-winded education as some — he took in and used what he 
could learn as an engine uses coal and water. I declare I'm so 
hdgety, I'll go in and take a nap." Celia Thornton sat up, smiling 
dreamily into the face of her friend as they watched the old woman 
enter the low, rambling log-cabin. 

"That's all true about his helping us," Mrs. Windham remarked, 
rising with her babe. Celia Thornton nodded assent. 

"If baby's asleep, give her to me ; I'm going to sleep, too, and I 
like to hear her breathing in my arms." Mrs. Windham laid the 
sleeping babe into the younger woman's arms. 

She slept so soundly, that she did not hear two horsemen who drew 
rein, slopped a moment near the hammock, and then silently passed 
on down the trail. 

Jack Montgomery was the first to speak. 

"Professor Campbell, I've decided to make a clean breast of a mat- 
ter that has been on my mind for some time. What we saw just 
now made me feel like taking off my hat. I don't know how you 
may feel about it." 

The professor nodded. 

"Well, to be square with you, I'm in the race to win Miss Thorn- 
ton for myself," the young man said bluntly. 

"Do you mean to say," asked the professor, deliberately, "that you 
are a suitor, with the hope of making her your wife?" They had 
stopped under a pine-tree and faced each other. "Do you mean this 
seriously, Montgomery ?" 



3" OU T W BST 

"That's exactly what I want you to understand," returned the 
young man. "You didn't count me in." His clear-cut face was pale 
and determined. "I am not a learned man and therefore not sup- 
posed to be a gentleman. As your silk-hat crowd hold that word, I 
am not, and I may never be a gentleman. But I refuse to take a man 
in any way unawares. I want you to know that I am to be reckoned 
with in this matter. I promise to give you a hard fight, Campbell." 

"This is preposterous," began the professor, eyeing his antagonist 
coldly. "Miss Thornton is a descendant of one of the best famiUes 
in the country, as am I, also. Surely you have not her permission to 
speak to me on this matter," 

"I've not asked her permission, nor shall I," Montgomery an- 
swered coolly. "As for my family history, it may be humble, but it's 
clean." 

"So you mean to tell me that you are harboring the thought of 
keeping that queen among women here in this region of sage-brush 
and sand?" asked the professor with two-edged sarcasm. 

"This isn't a question of location," Jack answered, doggedly. 

"Since you have opened this subject, I insist upon making my 
position clear to you. Please do not interrupt me." The professor 
turned his horse slightly as he spoke. "Miss Thornton is a young 
woman of most extraordinary intellectual ability. As my wife, she 
would have intellectual associations worthy of her own best attain- 
ments. At my side she would meet the leaders of the world in art 
and culture lines. She would be surrounded by everything that 
wealth can give, for I do not by any means depend upon my salary. 
I should make it my pleasure to anticipate her every wish. To her 
who has all this before her, you would offer — a little home in this 
forsaken wilderness with its intolerable intellectual isolation." 

As he ended, the professor turned away as he might have indicated 
the end of a private interview with a student. 

"That bill of fare won't tempt Celia Thornton. It's an insult to 
her, that's my opinion !" Montgomery broke in hotly. He, too, was 
turning away when the footfall of a horse on the trail from the valley 
arrested their attention. The professor's horse neighed a welcome 
to the jaded animal which now emerged from the hemlock boughs. 
The swarthy face of the rider lighted up as he approached the sheriff. 

"I got letter for you," he said panting with the weariness of the 
trail. "Sheriff Davis, Pine County, tell me give you this letter." 

Montgomery opened the message. The professor was turning 
to go. 

"One moment, Professor. I'm called to the valley. Bud Benton 
of Pine County has been murdered by one of our Mexican boys. 
They will run the poor devil down, though I swear he did only the 



A KNIGHT OF THE PLAINS 3*3 

honorable thing!" He turned to the Indian kindly. "Go to the 
camp, Roger, and eat and rest. You heap tired. No tell anybody 
at this camp. No tell Indian woman, white woman," he urged. 
"You savey? No tell." 

The Indian nodded assent as he proceeded toward the camp. 

"It's important, Campbell, that the ladies should not hear of this." 
The young frontiersman was turning his horse toward the valley. 
"Both Mrs. Green and Miss Thornton understand the native lan- 
guage fairly well. I'll ask you to see that the Indian is cared for and 
further instructed to say nothing. Remember me to the friends in 
case I should not return!" 

"Is it dangerous, do you mean ?" asked the professor, confused. 

"Yes, it's dangerous business. The history of the county proves 
that. There have been two sheriffs killed in just such a mix-up, and 
several deputies. Adios !" 

"A message from Mr. Green by Indian George Roberts," whis- 
pered Mrs. Green, calling Celia Thornton to a private conference. 

"And this all means, Mrs. Green?" the young woman asked with 
wide eyes, after hearing the story. 

"It means a pitched battle between the Mexicans and the sheriff 
and his men, in Natches' Dive; that is their stronghold. They'll 
never give up Ramon Ruez, trust old Josepho, his uncle, for that; 
and Jack can't let the boy escape. It looks as bad as that other night 
that I dare not think about. Before that murderer was arrested, 
eight men lay dead upon that floor. Sheriff Keeler was one of them, 
and my Billy was brought home to Uve ten minutes." 

"We must be going, Mrs. Green," cried Celia Thornton, spring- 
ing up. "There may be something we can do ! If you are not strong 
enough, I'll go alone with George and Sally 1" 

"No, I'm going! Mr. Green says there is no telling what you 
might do. He has planned for us to go down Beckett's trail. That 
will give us twelve miles rest and shade in a wagon and Robinson's 
covered stage in the valley." 

"I'll be ready in ten minutes," cried the young woman. "Mrs. 
Windham is busy with the children. She need not know. There is 

no reason for delay !" 

****** 

"You are not going down to the valley!" Professor Campbell's 
voice was strained with exasperation. "Why, child, what do you 
mean by such a proceeding? It's an intolerable ride! They'll pull 
through without your help. A sheriff takes precautions. Trust to 
those whose business it is." 

"Mrs. Green and I are going. There may be wounded men to 
care for." 



324 OU T W BST 

"At least there will be time enough to start in the morning !" he 
expostulated. "These trails at night are — " 

"Oh, yes, time enough !" she echoed, giving an order to the Indian 
who stood waiting with the horses. 

"I insist upon your staying altogether," the professor urged, "1 
will go and do what I can." 

"When will you go to do what you can ?" she asked. 

"At any. time you say. Now! tonight! I'm at your service." 

"Let me see," she deliberated. "Well, tomorrow will be time 
enough," she said, turning to the cabin door. "Thank you, and good 
night. I am very tired." 

Professor Campbell did not dream as he sat in his chair near the 
dying camp-fire after this easy victory, that the horses had been or- 
dered to wait where the trail crosses Silver Trout Creek to avoid 
any danger of his accompanying the party. 

The low adobe house was known to the Mexicans as the "Green 
Garden." To the citizens it was Natches' Dive, kept in bounds of 
decency only by the vigilance of Sheriff Montgomery. 

The place was crowded with armed Mexicans. Behind a low 
screen near the rear of the room sat Ramon Ruez, pale and wan 
from loss of sleep and the strain of escapes, to reach this, the strong- 
hold of his people. He sat leaning on his arm in an attitude of 
boyish dejection. Heavy-eyed he listened to the whispered plans of 
defense and escape, too tired to be alert. 

Raw wine was passing freely and the air was heavy with the smoke 
of cigarettes. 

"Senorita Maestra ! Senorita Maestro !" 

Like an electric shock it went through the assembly. 

Celia Thornton's voice could be heard as she playfully cajoled the 
guard at the door, and, without waiting, pressed past him, closely 
followed by Mrs. Green. The sefiorita was like a vision of light in 
her gown of filmy whiteness, a sky-blue shawl lightly covering her 
hair. An angel she looked to those distorted men, a creature from 
realms all fair and pure — a miracle, but they believed in miracles 
and now one had come true. 

"Friends," she said, liolding her guitar lightly poised against her 
side, "I have come with a message for you, but you must let me 
sing it." 

Her voice, intense with sympathy, carried easily into their hearts. 
Chairs were gallantly set for the visitors, amid puzzled exclamations 
of, "Si, si sefiorita. Sing for us! The senorita will sing!" 

She moved her chair farther back, to where she could see Ramon 
Ruez behind the screen. Then she began to sing of the home in 



A KNIGHT OF THE PLAINS 3»5 

old Mexico. They hummed the familiar air, their faces tender with 
memories. She sang of the babies in the hammock, swinging in the 
summer breezes. She sang of the dear old mother, waving a last 
farewell from the doorway. 

Jack Montgomery entered the breathless room almost unnoticed, 
while she was singing her own version of "Home, Sweet Home" in 
their tongue. They resented Jack's entrance, not because he was an 
officer come to arrest their fugitive, but because he disconcerted the 
singer. 

After the song of home, there burst upon that reeking, sin-haunted 
place the song of the "Mother of Sorrows." The eternal joy and 
the martyrdom of motherhood seemed wrung into strains of music. 
It fell upon the assembly like a holy, compelling spell. The dark men 
wept and crossed themselves with heads bowed low. 

As the music died upon the strings, the singer arose, inspired. 

"I came to sing to you, friends, because music is the language of 
heaven." Intense sympathy moved her voice as she spoke. "I came 
to say to our friend, Ramon Ruez, that I understand the reason of 
his anger three days ago. I know, friends, that the white man did 
the wrong. Ramon loved the injured girl and I believe that his soul 
is not stained with blood, for I believe that a great wrong was done." 

"Si, si, Sefiorita!" they cried, in breathless satisfaction at having 
their position appreciated. They drew closer to hear every word that 
she uttered. She could hear the Mexican women whispering at the 
back door. She could see Jack Montgomery leaning calmly against 
the wall. His arms were crossed ; he knew that she had never been 
safer in her life. He was leaving the action to her, and she was 
grateful. 

"Yes, friends," she resumed. "Three days ago, when Ramon tried 
to avenge a young girl's wrong, he was not to blame ; but tonight I 
want to say to Ramon that he must be careful lest he should become 
a guilty man. You are young, Ramon, but there lies upon your 
shoulders a strong man's burden of decision. Remember the Holy 
Mother's grief as she stood by the cross of sorrows. Remember the 
grief of all mothers when they see their loved ones white and cold. 
Wait one moment, friends." She crossed the room to where the 
sheriff stood. "Let them see you give the keys of the jail to me, 
Jack. You can trust me." 

He passed a bunch of keys to her without a word, but during 
that moment he held her gaze, and from the glowing depths of her 
eyes, there flashed into his life his dream of home realized. In her 
face, lighted up with the white inspiration of the moment, he read 
unconditional surrender. With the surge of it flooding his being, 
he felt like a king, but he bowed his head as in prayer. 



3*6 OUT W EST 

When Celia Thornton returned to Ramon, the screen had been re- 
moved and old Jose Chavez was offering a glass of water to Mrs. 
Green, who was giving way to memories of another day. Old Jose 
remembered, too. 

"Ramon," the young woman began, "I hold the keys; say that 
there shall be no more killing. If there be, the death of each must 
weigh heavy upon your soul. We may face life either as slaves or as 
free men. The slave is carried in irons; the free man knows no 
chains. Let me lead you to the house of rest and safety, Ramon. 
I promise you our friendship when you shall need friends, for we 
understand !" 

She laid her guitar upon the table, beside the young man's listless 
arm. "Take this little companion of mine, Ramon, for you know 
well how to make it speak. Take it with my friendship to comfort 
you ; and now, come with me, choose this the free man's way !" 

The young Mexican arose to anticipate old Jose's angry inter- 
ference. He raised his hand with decision. He was a boy no longer. 

"I will do as you say, Sehorita Cecilia," he cried with a ring of joy 
in his voice. "I am a man. There shall be no more killing because 
of me." He took up the guitar from the table and kissed the blue 
ribbon by which she had carried it. "I am your captive. I am 
your slave !" 

She laid her hand lightly upon his arm. A long procession fol- 
lowed them, with Mrs. Green and Sheriff Montgomery bringing up 
the rear. 

As they crossed the road which led to the mountains, a dust-cov- 
ered rider stood watching them from the shadow of the pepper-trees, 
unnoticed save by a straying dog. It was the losing knight in the 
tournament. 

Helicon Colony, Englewood, N. J. 



T 



APRIL BAPTISM 

By MEET A MARQUIS. 

'HE mustard's yellow tapers cast a glow 
Of soft, religious clearness as I wend 
The quiet cafion way ; pale alders bend 
To add their luminance, while poppies show 
Like gold communion cups as on I go 
Adown the aisle. Sage-odors pungent blend 
With breaking earth, and incense-like ascend. 
An altar lifts here where the live oaks grow. 
Young grasses hush my reverent-treading feet; 
The chanting wind calls flower and weed to prayer. 
To worship in God's April is so sweet, 
With every choiring bird I fain would sing ! 
Kneel, soul, beside this pool of maiden-hair — 
It is the hour to be immersed in Spring. 
Los Angeles. 




3*7 



SOME LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA 
CALENDAR 

By ETHEL GRIFFITH. 
IV. 

April 1st. 

LOW pervasive buzz of many big flies among the mus- 
tard blossoms today. Bees are thick in the pepper trees. 
A warm day ! Heat rises from the ground and flows on 
a dry breeze, a veritable bath of warmth. Locusts lie 
hot and silent on the parched earth, yet intermittently 
letting off their whirr in great gusts like the white-hot steam from 
a whole palpitating train of tiny steam-engines. On these windless 
mornings they are Nature's best safety-valves. One imagines the 
low yellow sky, like the earth's hot lid, would else pop off with ac- 
cumulated pressure. 

Strawberry cactus has now many berries. How strong and ugly 
the fish-hook spines have become ! 

The foliage of the valley iceplant makes a rich carpet of old-rose, 
but against the hills grows another and larger variety, with green 
leaves, flowering at this season profusely. Each little blossom tips 
to catch the sun's whole strength in its tiny cup, spreading the minute 
divisions of its corolla in imitation of the spreading of the sun's 
white rays. Its buds and leaves are gaudy with glassy, water-filled 
beads — very like the elaborate bead-work of the Indians, for which 
they may perhaps have been the model. 

April 2d. 

Found a great many coyote holes in the soft dirt of a western- 
sloping hill, today. I think they like a hill for the vantage point 
it gives. They come out of an evening and take observation of the 
valley, snuflf the wind for scent of game and watch the carrion- 
crow to see where there may be profitable gathering. 

Bobcats are troubling the outlying farmers. 

Quail are mating profusely this season. There is no bird more 
domestic, civilized and virtuous than the quail, but during last year's 
drought they paired very sparingly. Is there no suggestion to civ^ 
ilized man in this fact ? Someone should ask the president. 

April 5th. 

Godetia, or "Farewell-to-Spring," is now blooming along dry 
banks and hill-slopes. It opens a beautiful lilac cup to the light. 
The deep purple spot at its center is bright and finely shaded like an 
expressive, intelligent eye turned ever with constant devotion frankly 
up to the sun. I find them scattered over a gray clay bank which the 
more tender flowers habitually ignore, but they do not grow in 



3z8 O U T W EST 

throngs like the lilac butterfly-tulip (calochortus splendens), which 
it much resembles, but which is of a more slender, airy stem and 
whose blossom about here is larger. Coming unexpectedly upon a 
field of these tulips, one finds them beautiful and vivacious as the 
great spangled butterflies for which they are named ; waving among 
the grasses and straining at their long, thin stems as at the one 
slender anchor-line that held them from their longed-for flight. 

"Insect or blossom? Fragile fairy thing, 
Poised upon a slender tip and quivering 
To flight! A flower of the fields and air; 
A jeweled moth, a butterfly with rare 
And tender tints upon his downy wing, 
A moment resting in our happy sight; 
A flower held captive by a thread so slight 
Its petal-wings of broidered gossamer 
Are, Ught as the wind, with every wind astir, 
Wasting sweet odor, faint and exquisite. 
O dainty nursling of the field and sky, 
What fairer thing looks up to heaven's blue, 
And drinks the noontide sun, the dawning's dew? 
Thou winged bloom ! thou blossom butterfly ! !" 

— Ina Coolhrith. 

Yerba Mansa, a rank, wholesome, vigorous herb with fresh, green 
leaves and clean, white, star-like blooms, fills the Sweetwater river- 
bed with grateful verdure. A plant which one approves at sight, 
and whose medicinal virtues never betray an instinctive trust. It 
has a big, open, sincere blossom, with its great, white, conical spike 
prominent and characterful as a good nose in a cheerful face. One 
can believe it might easily impart some of its abundant and whole- 
some life to those who seek it. 

April loth. 

Walking down the railroad track this afternoon, I gathered some 
chanchalagua, or Indian fever medicine, for its pungent odor ; but it 
was too old and dry — all the rich oil of its flower and stem was 
carefully secreted on the inside. Its strength was greater than in 
the spring but not so easily to be secured, so I pulled the stem and 
crushed the flower in my hand: immediately it gave up its stored 
harvest of strength in a rank and overpowering odor, such as I had 
not dreamed it contained. I have sometimes known the toughest 
hearts to conceal a rare sweetness, whose fragrance was to be re- 
leased only by the crush of adversity. These found real blessing in 
their wounds, and Nature thus found adequate expression at last. 

April 1 2th. 

The morning air is washed clean with the heavy dews of these 
April nights, and the wind from the ocean, which rises quite regu- 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 32 

larly about mid-forenoon, sweeps in with a fine fresh tang of the 
salt and the sea. All the musty, timid thoughts of the night arc aireu 
or dispelled, and one's mind is disinfected for the day. Nothing but 
purity can withstand the wind and the sunshine. 

The shaved grain-fields gleam creamy white with the fresh stub- 
ble, and in the valley, where the barley was early harvested, a second 
crop of wild oats has sprung up and ripened. 

Many morning-glories blooming now. Tar-weed makes a rich 
covering over the mesas — a fresh strong old-gold in patches, but 
blended on sunny knolls with the soft rich brown of burnt weeds 
and grasses. Dodder is climbing over the sage-brush and "old 
man," its vivid orange, bright and vivacious against the sombre 
greyish-green of the shrubs — a swift, clinging parasite, flinging it- 
self upon these sturdy, tough-hearted shrubs and covering them for 
its short life with fierce intensity. I have yet to learn that years or 
knowledge are any guarantee of wisdom, and ''old men" and sages 
though they be, this vegetable Vivian has wrapped them as merci- 
lessly in her clinging coils as ever Merlin of old. Nor are they aware 
that they are bound. 

Everywhere the browning and bared fields are taking on the 
burnt-sienna and raw-umber of midsummer. The flowers are nearly 
gone. At noon the glaring light from the sheared fields rises in trem- 
ulous waves of heat and along the misty horizon the world's rim 
dances and quivers. Directly above, the sky is dark and intensely 
blue. It looks clean and buoyant as if one might drink in life at 
every breath of it, but its color fades and whitens with rising heat 
and dust to a faint, yellowish grey that sits flat and heavy on the 
hot, stupid mesas, or runs down the distant mountain canons m 
rose or lilac mist. 

April 20th. 

The fields are dotted with piles of drying barley, and in the val- 
leys the ranchers are mowing alfalfa. Great loads of barley and 
wild-oat hay are being drawn to the sheds, and the largest hay-stacks 
of many years adorn the meadows. A luxurious feeling of comfort 
and plenty exudes with the perfume of the new-mown hay. The 
swallows under the barn-eaves scold as they are disturbed, and the 
hens step speculatively about in the barnyard sunshine, picking at 
the falling grains, and singing their homely, raucous song. Occa- 
sionally, one who has discovered a good nest by the new-piled stack 
sets up a loud hysterical cackle, running excitedly about to spread 
her news with a hen's never-ending astonishment at a new-laid egg. 

The horses work with cheerfulness at haying-time, as if here with- 
out doubt was work of some importance; and toil patiently to and 
from the fields with the great racks of the hay-wagon piled to a 



330 OUT W UST 

tottering height. They seem never to complain of the dust or the 
heat, provided they can snatch a bite at some waving tuft of oats or 
take a hasty toll at some near-by pile during the stacking. 

The White Wyandotte is also making her hay these days, after her 
own fashion ; tramping indefatigably about all day long in the wake 
of her twelve overgrown chickens who run from house to barn and 
from barn to field on their great, stout, tireless legs — a lawless, non- 
chalant, bohemian brood, who seem now to tolerate rather than re- 
yere her, but whom she cannot as yet make up her heart to forego. 

Even the Lovely-Cat is moved from her customary languor by 
the busy spirit of the season, and strolls craftily about the meadow 
in search of homeless field-mice, or follows the men about the yard, 
begging their attention with long, complaining, half-petulant mews 
and seductive and graceful manoeuvers. Sometimes she appears 
from the hay-field, proudly dragging a heavy gopher, and, from the 
long enforced silence of her watch, and the parching heat of the day, 
can only open her mouth widely in an earnest but ineffectual at- 
tempt to tell her story, all the time waving her eloquent tail in proud 
and speaking gestures. 

Squirrels are sounding their shrill, tantalizing chit-chit from every 
dry hillock; and the mockers, who love to tease, sit near with an 
exact and impudent imitation. 

The liquid melody of nearly all the bird-songs has greatly evap- 
orated with the heat and drought of the year. Their notes, except 
at dawn, are now a little hard and dry. Have found a number of 
nestfuls of young linnets in the orange-grove, and frequently see 
the mothers fluttering about the ground, simulating a broken wing 
to decoy me away. Butcher-birds have many a full larder; the 
thorns of orange- and lemon-trees and the barbs of wire fences are 
hooks from which the pierced bodies of insect victims swing in the 
wind. Road-runners scuttle along the dusty roads ahead of the 
teams, ever curious and prying, their bright eyes wide and impudent, 
balancing their heavy tails with some difficulty and seeming always 
in danger of an upset in the wind. 

Sticky monkey-flowers, wild sage and buckwheat are about the 
only flowers left. Indian fever-pinks are stiffening and drying on 
their stems. Tar-weed looks dry and hot and rusty iron in the sun, 
but at a distance clothes the hills with a warm delicious brown, sooth- 
ing and harmonious. 

Locusts break out with a high, shrill, unifying whirr, that spreads 
rapidly over the hills in a palpitating wave of sound — the vibrations 
so fine and high they are like the audible voice of the rising heat that 
flows along the blurred horizon and shimmers in the warming, 
misty valleys. 

This great sheared land ! How tanned and bare and elemental it 



LEAVES FROM A CALIFORNIA CALENDAR 33' 

looks, stretching huge and naked under the whitened glare of the 
sun. All the green of the fields, all the hues of many flowers and 
the misty springtime blue of the hills are bleached and parched. 
The delicate Spring is dead and the beauty of ripened Summer is 
fully come. 

The sun is blazing white in a pale and cloudless sky. He pours 
down his light and heat on a quivering earth like an armed and 
living host, and the siege of the long summer's drought is upon the 
land. 

April 23d. 

I find lately that I am overlooking the usual, more common, nat- 
ural forms that have heretofore attracted me in my rambles, and 
may claim to have discovered with fresher interest a new specimen — 
i. e., a man in Nature. Most people are mere visitors or wanderers 
in her fields, having strayed, or been lost, without their consent, 
among her hills, and one is inclined to examine their brand that he 
may return them to proper enclosures. But I discover in Hall Dudley 
a wild and native strain that harmonizes well with out-of-doors, and 
have never found his society more impertinent than that of the clump 
of willows that grows in the damp arroyo or the Spanish bayonet 
that camps perpetually along the gaunt and sunburned ridges. 

I have sometimes thought him not unlike the Spanish bayonet — 
this strong, tough, masculine plant, a soldier of unending sieges, 
unapproachable except with skillful handling (although smooth as 
possible to one who knows its secret), indomitable, self-sufficient, 
and of endless tough vitality — defiant of circumstances and fighting 
with a serene heart its hard struggle for existence on some lonely and 
desolate crag. After the rains, these great, fierce plants send up 
from their centers a shaft or flower-stalk five or six feet high, bear- 
ing on its head a mass of waxy, creamy flowers, rich and fragrant 
with all the distilled sweetness of the long years of its stored life. 
They are the perfection of a slow maturity, beautiful and deliberate 
as the culminating flower of love in a strong heart. 

The neighbors love to go abroad in the blooming season with 
sharp knives to cut the smaller stems. Their parlors are heavy with 
the confined perfume. But these are meant for larger spaces — to 
decorate the loma and to sweeten the air of a wind-swept valley — 
and only sicken when held too close. I do not wish to hold my 
friends thus near, but find their fragrance most wholesome when 
wafted naturally from their native haunts on the breeze of an undis- 
turbed destiny. I would not take the bayonet from its setting against 
the bare and desolate hills. 

April 25th. 
Spent the morning on the salt-marsh. The air today is very dry. 



33=^ OUT WEST 

and a strong desert-wind blows the dust and sand in thick gusts. 
The yellowish grey sky is perfectly cloudless and the light is bUnding. 
The ground burns red on adobe hills, but glistens white and cold on 
the alkaline flats, whose salty crust crunches underfoot like crisp 
snow, and resembles at a distance a light frost, giving a cool and 
most inviting icing to the monotonous level. 

The spring vegetation, watered by rains, which flourished for a 
time on this barren land, has at length dropped its seeds into the 
deep cracks of the splitting earth and given up the struggle for the 
year. Only the everlasting Bermuda, or devil-grass as some call it, 
and the salt-brush, with its dark, fresh green, keep their perennial 
youth. 

Startled a lark from her hiding in a bunch of salt-brush near an 
old nest which I knew, and looked for her nest, hoping she might be 
the mate of my young dandy of early January. The nest was de- 
serted, but I uncovered instead a big tarantula who ran excitedly 
away as fast as his awkward, hairy legs would work for him. 

I like to come upon these poisonous, defiant insects — they are so 
at home in this tough country — so adequate and self-sufficient. 
Peculiarly native in a fierce, untamed land! 

As I came home through the scrub-brush of a desolate hill, a 
small rattlesnake crossed my path a few feet ahead. He stopped 
for a leisurely survey of me, eyeing me all the time with great inno- 
cence and intentness, his head elevated slightly and his small bright 
eyes lustrous in his flat, ugly head. He was a young one and had 
likely never used his fangs; perhaps was yet unaware that he pos- 
sessed them; yet had I approached him, his instinct, no doubt, would 
have been quite instant and reliable. 

I do not complain of this trick of the rattlesnake, for I am dimly 
conscious of certain hidden fangs of my own, unglimpsed as yet, but 
of whose venom I have reason to be horrified. It is amazing and 
terrible what poisonous fangs — what demons of anger and treachery 
and sin — may leap into life in the mildest person at an instant's 
provocation. It is as if the poison of the whole animal kingdom 
were latent in a higher, more subtle and more dangerous form in 
every man, and as if he possessed the necessity at times of outdoing 
the vilest of subordinate animals, keeping his supremacy no less of 
Evil than Good, and proving himself, as it were, a very King of 
Devils. 

National City, Cal. 




BASTBR BELLS 333 

EASTER BELLS 

By ELLSWORTH LEE 
WN, and the sunlight flung from east to west. 
Peace, and a brooding calm made manifest 
By the soft tones of chiming Mission bells. 
Joy and a vivid sense of glowing Spring 
Abroad on all the hill-sides. On the wing 
The meadow larks and finches flit and sing 
Among the poppies, and their chorus swells 
The song of Easter bells. 

Their carol seems a half-remembered note 

Flung back from days remote — 

The romance of an earlier dawn, 

The chant of times long gone, 
When holy saints and padres prayed 
And toiled among a rude and passionate race. 

Now while the Mission bells swing to and fro 

And steadily intone j 

Their message, the heroic dead 
Seem once again to pace 

With soundless, measured tread 
The flower-strewn fields and cloisters old; 
Till like a tale retold, 

Quaint legends of the saint and sage 
And all the brave deeds of an earlier age 

Seem nearer and far more familiar grown. 
And, over all, the California Spring 

Breathes its glad spirit. On the wing 
The meadow-larks and finches flit and sing 

Among the poppies, and their chorus swells 
The chime of Easter bells. 



DAWN-WIND 

By ALDIS DUNBAR. 

rE cool sweet air that brings me, as I wake, 
Fresh breath of pines, down from the forest green- 
The perfume of my clover-field will take 
To one beneath whose lattice roses lean. 
As from each drowsy bud it shakes the dew, 
It is my fair good-morning, love, to you ! 
Eric, Pa. 




334 

IN SEARCH or TRUTH 

By DAVID STARR JORDAN. 
THE January meeting of the Astral Club at Alcalde, 
Mr. Arthur Grimshaw, of Berkeley, the newly ap- 
pointed science teacher of the Alcalde Union High 
School, read a curious and interesting though revolu- 
tionary paper on the "source of knowledge." His title 
was "What Is Truth?" This paper was highly appreciated by the 
club as an example of the best results which can be attained on the 
material plane of thought. The author's failure to rise to the heights 
of astral conception was, however, painfully evident. It is plain that 
in the laboratories where his training was secured all esoteric sources 
of truth have been ignored. But as the Astral Club of Alcalde, 
though I say it who should not, is nothing if not open-minded, it 
shall be the duty of the secretary to transfer to this record the sub- 
stance of this young man's views on the tests by which truth may be 
known. 

Mr. Grimshaw began by a discussion of the significance of "philo- 
sophic doubt," whereby men question the only things they know to 
be true, in the hope of proving the reality of things they know are not 
true. For if you can show that truth and falsehood are identical in 
the one case, it lends probability to the theory that falsehood is truth 
in other cases. On this general argument are founded many forms 
of modern philosophy, and of ancient philosophy as well. Mr. 
Grimshaw said: 

"What I mean to show is, that all truth is truth so far as it goes. 
The things we know to be real are real, and we are not deceived in 
believing in them. The proof of the reality of an object, the truth 
of a proposition, lies in the fact that we can accept it and translate 
it into action, into life. If it were not true, we could not act 
upon it. Acts based upon it would sooner or later put an end to 
existence. 

"The real nature of an object before us may be of little impor- 
tance to us. It may be solid rock or empty vapor, if we choose to let 
it alone. But the moment we form relations with it, its reality be- 
comes a vital matter. If it is a rock or an apple, then rock or apple 
it is in all its relations. If we view the apple as something essentially 
different from what it is, there will be similar errors in our thought 
of other things. If we are deceived as to the rock, we shall have un- 
sound notions as to other things. 

"Poisons would seem as foods, foods as poisons ; pleasures as sins, 
and sins as pleasures. The whole sanity and accuracy of life would 
be destroyed. For the security of action is conditioned by the ex- 
actness of our perceptions of the relations of external things and by 
the correctness of our reasoning in regard to these perceptions." 

Reprinted by permistion, from the Popular Scikncb Monthly 



IN SEARCH OF TRUTH 335 

Mr. Grimshaw, falling back on the lore he had learned in school, 
said : 

"In psychology the term reality is sometimes applied to a sense 
perception which is based on an outside influence acting then and 
there. In this sense the reality is not the external influence itself, 
but our direct or normal perception of it. Thus, the impression made 
by the sound of a gun would be a reality when the pressure of air- 
waves reached the brain, though the explosion may have taken place 
some seconds before. This reality as it comes to the brain should 
bear a definite relation to its source. In other words it must give 
the mind such information that the actual occurrence may be cor- 
rectly interpreted. On its correct interpretation the fitness of our 
response in action must be conditioned. The term 'common sense' is 
applied to the normal working of these brain processes. An external 
stimulus produces a reality. The reality is transmitted to the brain, 
where it is considered in its proper relations. Afterwards, an im- 
pulse to action passes along the motor nerves to the muscles, which 
are the servants of the brain. 

"In simple matters, as those pertaining to the apple, the dictates 
of 'common sense' are obvious enough. The feelings are not moved 
by an apple, and our recognition of its nature is clouded by no illu- 
sions. But there are many relations in life in which 'common sense' 
does not find the problem so easy. If we examine the actions of our- 
selves and of our fellows, we shall find that the 'common sense' of 
different men does not act in parallel ways, and what seems to one 
wise or natural becomes grotesque or absurd to another." 

Mr. Grimshaw then gave a number of illustrations of thought or 
action in which the "common sense" may be deceived : 

"You are in a railway train which is waiting on a side-track. An- 
other train comes in sight ; its motion seems transferred to your own 
train, but in the opposite direction. This motion continues until the 
other train has passed. It ceases suddenly, when you can almost feel 
the jolt of its stopping. But from other observations you know that 
your train has not moved in all this time. 

"This is a simple illusion, easily corrected by the mind before it 
passes over into action. Let us look at some others. The story is 
told of a merchant, who, smacking his lips over a glass of brandy, said 
to his clerk : 'The world looks very different to the man who has 
taken a good drink of brandy in the morning.' 'Yes,' said the clerk, 
'and he looks different to the world, too.' Now, which is right ? Is 
the world different that it looks brighter? So it seems to the man's 
own 'common sense.' Or is the difference subjective only, in the 
man himself, who has lost his bearings to the outside world ? 

"The revered sage of Los Gatos, Brother Ambrose Bierce, tells 



336 OU T W EST 

the story of a man who visited a naturahst in San Francisco, and 
remained over night as a guest. The naturahst was fond of snakes 
and had several of them in the house. When the visitor retired at 
night he looked under the bed and found a great coiled serpent, who 
watched him with glittering eyes. These eyes made some strange 
impression on him, and in the morning the people of the house found 
their guest kneeling on the floor, dead, his open eyes still staring in 
horror at the thing under the bed. This thing was the stuffed skin 
of a kingsnake, with two shoe-buttons for eyes. The 'common sense' 
of the man told him that the snake was charming him, and in the 
belief that he was charmed to a horrible death he must have perished. 
If he had not believed that snakes have the power to 'charm' and to 
kill, surely he would not have died. 

"It is said that a ship once landed on a barren island in the Pacific 
Ocean. Its passengers brought with them the materials for a house, 
which they set up, to the surprise of the natives who had never seen 
a wooden house before. They put in it blankets and cooking uten- 
sils, and after a day or two they set up near the house on a solid 
foundation a long tube through which they gazed by turns at the 
sun. After watching the sun for a single day, they hastily returned 
to the ship, carrying the long tube and the blankets, but leaving the 
house and everything else of value on the island. The delighted 
natives took possession of the house and they hold it to this day. 
But they look in vain for the return of the foolish people who left 
it there. 

"Men who have traveled in Mexico tell me that all along the coasts 
of Sinaloa people are engaged in digging for buried treasures under 
the direction of men or women in San Francisco. These people have 
never been in Mexico, but they are said to have the power of seeing 
clearly objects not before them, in any part of the earth. There is 
a very old legend current which tells that a pirate ship, hard pressed 
by the Mexican soldiers, landed on the Cape of Camarron near 
Mazatlan, where the buccaneers hastily buried a vast treasure of sil- 
ver, after which they all fled. A man is engaged today in boring a 
tunnel into solid granite and lava to find the treasures thus laid away. 
A woman, in a shabby Sacramento Street boarding house, claims to 
see in her trances the inner secrets of the mountains and directs all 
these operations. Our 'common sense,' or our experience, may con- 
demn the whole operation as ridiculous; but the transit of Venus 
seemed equally absurd to the local critics who occupy its abandoned 
shelter. 

"One man takes a forked rod of witch-hazel, and, going over a 
tract of land, he feels the fork twist downward at a certain point. 
He digs there and finds a well of living water. If there is much 



IN SEARCH OF TRUTH 337 

water, the rod turns more vigorously or even turns the other way. 
Another uses the same rod and finds coal, iron, gas or building stone 
— whatever he may seek. To do this he has only to attach to the 
branch of the rod a small fragment of that which he would seek. 
Thus, a dime may be attached, if one is seeking for silver ; a five- 
dollar gold piece, if one looks for gold. In California, where there 
is no witch-hazel, the mountain-willow serves the purpose best, be- 
cause there is water in its make-up. But even the madrofio, or the 
azalea, can be used in an emergency. A man once tried to bore for 
gas on a certain tract of land in Southern Indiana. He engaged a 
soothsayer with a witch-hazel rod. But the wizard, finding the ter- 
ritory too large to be gone over in this way, makes a little rod, parlor- 
size, and, taking the map of Vanderburg county, goes over it with the 
instrument. The result is just as satisfactory. He chooses a point 
on the map, they bore the well in accordance with the rod's directions. 
Plenty of gas is found, which proves the accuracy of the method. 
As Lord Bacon once observed, 'Men mark when they hit, but never 
when they miss.' Still another man wishes to find the material of 
which a star is made. He takes a tube of metal, with lenses and 
prisms of glass, and turns it toward the star. Speedily, by means of 
lines and streaks on the prism, he has his answer — and the composi- 
tion of a vast sun, so far away that the light which left it in the days 
of Caesar has never yet reached us, he describes with confidence. 
Then he turns his tube on the Pole Star and tells us that it is made 
of two stars, one a great sun which we can see, and the other a 
smaller sun which we have never seen and which we can never see. 
Is all this real? If the spectroscope tells the truth where it speaks 
in such bold fashion may we not trust the witch-hazel, too, in its more 
modest claims? 

"An astronomer traces the course of a far-oflF planet and finds that 
its orbit bends a little from a perfect ellipse. From this fact he con- 
cludes that another planet must be coming near it to attract it. He 
goes to work to determine the size of this other planet and the place 
in which it ought to be. When his calculation is finished, the tele- 
scope is turned toward this place, and the unseen planet is there. If 
the mathematician through his instruments be thus sensitive to far- 
oflF matter in infinite space, may not the clairvoyant through her sen- 
sitile-projectile astral body be equally sensitive to a mass of silver? 

"Once, in a trance, a finely organized adept or 'medium' wandered 
in her astral body through the open belt where the souls of the planets 
wander at will. While there she heard the comet-shriek, the cry of a 
lost planet soul, the most terrible sound that rings through the heav- 
enly spaces of the zenith. Is not her testimony to be received with 
that of the other astronomers? 



338 OUT WEST 

"From shore to shore across the Atlantic Ocean runs a metallic 
cable. By means of electric batteries, magnets and sparks, a mes- 
sage is conveyed from one end of this to the other. Messages have 
been sent so many times that the most sceptical cannot doubt the 
fact. By such means a wanderer in any part of the world may be 
found and called home, or if need be sent still further on. Most of 
us have seen this done and all have heard of it. Because it has grown 
familiar it seems real to us, and its mystery is dissipated. But why 
use the metallic cable at all? What occult power lurks in metal? 
Why must we work always on the material plane ? Why not use the 
air ? And indeed the air has been used and with wonderful success. 
But let us not stop here. Why not use the invisible ether, along 
which so many forms of energy are propagated ? Why not use the 
boundless sympathy of life? In Europe there is a large species of 
snail which runs up and down the cabbages, feeding on their leaves, 
and is very fond of its mate. It, too, has been used in telegraphy. 
Leave your sweetheart in Italy when you come back home, but leave 
her with a large piece of cardboard and take another like it for your- 
self. On each of these write a number of sentences of sentiment and 
affection — quotations from the poets, the finest possible to your lit- 
erary taste, Browning, Tennyson, Wordsworth, or the latest topical 
song — any of these will do. Then take for yourself one of a devoted 
pair of snails, leaving the other with her. At an agreed moment 
(standard time, making allowances for differences of longitude), 
place your snail upon the card and she will do the same with hers. 
Your snail will creep to any sentiment you choose as you direct it. 
Hers is left free in its movements, but it will follow the same course 
that its mate has chosen. Thus the sweetest messages can be sent 
across the ocean. The last word of the snail in America, 'All's well,' 
or 'Non ti scordar di me' can be made to echo sweetly on a far-off 
shore. This is the Parasilinic Telegraph — no invention of mine, but 
the actual work of an ingenious 'psychic adept.' 

"But why use the snails? Surely their cold, sHmy bodies are not 
more forceful than the throbbing heart and eager brain of man. 
Surely they are not more sensitive than his astral form. Let the 
snails go. They belong to the crude beginning of astral science. 
You have only to sit in your room alone in darkness, and by intense 
thought and irresistible vohtion you may set the whole ether of the 
world in palpitation with your dreams and desires. 

"To your thought the 'sensitive' you love will respond. Her astral 
brain will register your ether throbs. 'It is my wish' — that is enough 
for her. But you can do more than that, if we may trust the records. 
Your own astral body may be sent across the ocean on the tremulous 
ether, and it will appear to her in her dreams or as part of her real- 



IN SEARCH OF TRUTH 339 

ities. While the absence of this body may be a slight inconvenience 
to you, for you must sleep or suffer while it is gone, it will be a 
source of joy to her. It may plead your cause for you in a way which 
protoplasmic bodies can never imitate. That this is not imagina- 
tion or illusion we have abundant testimony, if the word of man 
unverified by instruments of precision is convincing to you. Thought 
and ideas, we are told, may be 'impressed on consciousness in solid 
chunks without waiting for words or clicks or other means of ex- 
pression, or for a lightning train to convey them,' and there are thou- 
sands of records to show how this is done. 

"But you do not stop with the expression of your power over the 
ether and the astral messages it is the function of the ether to carry. 
You may exert control over matter itself. Mind is matter's king. 
Matter is the vassal of mind. Then, under the force of mind, matter 
will change or vanish. Recent experimenters claim that by gazing 
at a photographic plate in the dark, an impression can be made on it. 
This is the mind flashing out through the human eye. Then what- 
ever is in this 'mind's eye' should appear on the sensitive plate of the 
camera. But greater deeds than these were done long ago, as our 
honored president once pointed out, and to my mind they are told in 
records better authenticated. The sagas tell us that Odin wished to 
secure the golden mead of the giants, that men might drink it and be 
strong as they. After great labors he came to the mead. He found 
that the giant Suttung had concealed it in a great stone house, to 
which Odin could get no key. So Odin and his friend, the giant 
Bauge, sat down before the house and gazed at its walls all day. By 
this means they made a small hole in the rock, and, changing him- 
self into an angle-worm, Odin entered the hole and at last carried 
the golden mead away in triumph. The influence of this golden mead 
is, no doubt, still potent in Odin's descendants whose glances have 
marvelous power. 

"There was once a California nurseryman who had a good busi- 
ness and was making money, as the phrase is. So he put aside all 
the fruit trees which would sell and devoted himself to making others 
which would not. Each year he trimmed his plums and apricots and 
lilies and poppies, taking away the pollen which nature had provided 
and putting it on flowers to which it did not belong. Each year he 
planted thousands of seeds of many kinds, and, when the plants 
came up, he pulled up nearly all of them and burned them in a great 
bonfire. Meanwhile he made no money, and lost, little by little, all 
that he began with. Then men began to see that all fruits and nuts 
and flowers changed under his hands. The plums grew very large 
and very juicy, red, blue and white, and more on the tree than men 
had ever seen before. The lilies and the poppies and all the other 



340 OUT WEST 

flowers grew larger, the cactus lost its thorns and the onion its odor, 
the chestnut bore its fruit with its second crop of leaves and all things 
which he touched turned into something better or handsomer, and 
every year he pulled up nearly all that he had and burned it in great 
windrows. And foolish people said that he was a wizard and they 
came from great distances to see him at his work. And there were 
a few who thought that they understood. 

"There was once an old white-haired man who came to an assem- 
blage of scholars, bringing with him two bars of wood connected 
by bands of iron. Fifty-three years before he had left his home on 
the bay of Quinte, in Ontario, to show these bars to the world and to 
give to mankind what it never had before, control over 'The Uncon- 
ditioned Force of the Universe.' This force, through this little ma- 
chine, would 'revolutionize human industry, economize human labor 
and relieve human want.' 'Gentlemen,' said the old man, 'I gave 
up the free and easy life of the Canadian forests, I sought my home 
among the dwellers of cities, I have sacrificed fifty-three years of 
my life upon the altar of my desire to benefit mankind. In three 
weeks more my invention will be perfected and through these bars 
the unconditioned force of the universe will do its works for you and 
for me. The time has gone by,' he said, 'when the recognition of my 
principle would have pleased my ambition. I love my race, and I 
wish to do them good.' Two years more went by, the unconditioned 
force lacked but a few days — just one more week — of accomplish- 
ment, and in that week the old man died in the poorhouse of Monroe 
County, Indiana, and in the dust and cobwebs in an attic of a neigh- 
boring college the model of the machine to be controlled by the un- 
conditioned force of the universe still awaits the touch which for the 
first time shall make it run. There were some who called the old 
man a 'wizard,' and some a 'philosopher,' and because fame has for- 
gotten his name, I speak it here — Robert Havens. In both these 
cases, and in all cases, what is our test of truth ? 

"Not long ago, on the plains of Texas, by order of the government 
of the United States, tons of gunpowder were exploded. A great 
noise was made, the smoke arose to the skies, and then all was as 
before. The purpose of this was to produce rain under conditions in 
which common sense said rain was impossible. While these condi- 
tions remained there was no rain, but the wisdom of the experiment 
has the official stamp of the United States. 

"Not long ago, and I am sure that the good people of Alcalde will 
remember this, some enterprising men had bought the dry bed of a 
river in Southern California. It is filled with winter floods in the 
rainy season, while in summer it is white with granite sand and 
barren stones. At best its boulders can only produce a scant growth 



IN SEARCH OF TRUTH 34' 

of chaparral and cactus. Yet when it was announced that a city was 
to be built on this land, men grew wild at the thought. All night they 
stood in the streets of Los Angeles, each to take his turn in buying 
its town lots. The people who bought these lots were guided, in 
one way or another, by what they termed their 'common sense.' The 
sense of great wealth was in the air, and even t