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Full text of "The Oxyrhynchus papyri"

THE 

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

PART VI 

G REN FELL AND HUNT 



^te' 



w^ 




EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND 



GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH 

V- ^ ^ ^ 



THE 



OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



PART VI 



EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES 

liY 

BERNARD P. GRENFELL, D.Litt. 

HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN; HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG 
PROFESSOR OF PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF O.XFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN's COLLEGE 

FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY 
CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

AND 

ARTHUR S. HUNT, D.Litt. 

HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG 
LECTURER IN PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN's COLLEGE 

LATE FELLOW OF LINCOLN COLLEGE 



WITH SIX PLATES 



LONDON 

SOLD AT 

The Offices of the EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND, Z7 Great Russell St., W.C. 

AND Pierce Building, Copley Square, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. 

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., Dryden House, Gerrard St., W. 

BERNARD QUARITCH, ii Grafton St., New Bond St., W. 

ASHER & CO., 13 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C, and 56 Unter den Linden, Berlin 

and HENRY FROWDE, Amen Corner, E.C., and 29-35 West 32ND Street, New York, U.S.A. 



1908 



All rights reserved 







OXFORD 

HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY 



PREFACE 

Of the papyri included in this volume, the two long classical texts 
containing the Hypslpyle of Euripides (852) and the new commentary 
on Thucydides II (853) formed part of the large find of literary MSS, 
which was made on Jan. 13, 1906, in the circumstances described in the 
Times of May 24, 1906, and the Archaeological Report of the Egypt 
Exploration Fund, 1905-6, p. 10. The other literary papyri were 
chiefly discovered during the same season, but some were found in 
1897 oi* 1902. The non-literary documents, which largely belong to 
the third and fourth centuries, come, with a few exceptions, from the 
finds of 1897. 

In editing the new classical texts we have for the first time been 
without the support of the late Professor F. Blass, to whom our 
previous publications have owed so much ; but for 852 and 853 we have 
been fortunate in obtaining the generous aid of Professors U. von 
Wilamowitz-Mollendorff and J. B. Bury, who have very materially 
furthered the reconstruction of those texts, while Mr. Gilbert Murray 
has also contributed many most valuable suggestions and criticisms 
upon 852, To these three scholars in particular, and to some others 
whose occasional assistance is acknowledged in connexion with the 
individual papyri, we here offer our sincerest thanks. Lastly, we would 
express our obligations to the accomplished Proof-reader of the 
University Press, whose care, in this book as in its predecessors, has 
removed many small blemishes from our pages. 

The next volume of the Graeco-Roman Branch will be Part VII of 
the Oxyrhync/ms Papyri, to be issued, we hope, in the course of 1909. 
We expect to include in it a detailed description of the site and 
excavations with a plan, and a rdszimd of the topographical information 
which the papyri have so far yielded concerning Oxyrhynchus and the 
Oxyrhynchite nome. 

BERNARD P. GRENFELL. 

ARTHUR S. HUNT. 

Queen's College, Oxford, 
September, 1908. 



CONTENTS 



Preface ........... 

List of Plates .......... 

Table of Papyri .......... 

Note on the Method of Publication and List of Abbreviations 



PAGE 
V 

viii 

ix 

xiii 



TEXTS 

L Theological FraGiMEnts (845-851) . 

IL New Classical Texts (852-872) . 
in. Extant Classical Authors (873-884) . 
IV. Miscellaneous Literary Fragments (885-887) 

V. Documents of the Roman and Byzantine Periods 
{a) Official (888-893) .... 

(d) Declarations to Officials (894-897) . 
{c) Petitions (898-904) 

{d) Contracts (905-915) 

(e) Taxation (916-919) 
(/) Accounts (920-922) 

{g) Prayers (923-925) .... 

{k) Private Correspondence (926-943) . 
Collations of Homeric Fragments (944-956) 
Miscellaneous Documents (957-1006) . 

INDICES 

New Literary Texts : 

{a) 852 (Euripides, Hypsipyle) 
(d) 853 (Commentary on Thuc. II) 
(c) Other Literary Texts 
II. Emperors 

III. Consuls, Eras, and Indictions 

IV. Months and Days . 
V. Personal Names 

VI. Geographical . 
VII. Religion .... 



VI. 
VIL 



I. 



19 
179 

198 

202 
213 
221 

243 
269 

283 
288 
291 
315 
317 



329 
335 
340 
346 

347 
348 
348 
357 
359 



Vlll 



CONTENTS 



VIIT. Official and Military Titles 

IX. Weights, Measures, and Coins 

X. Taxes ... 

XI. General Index of Greek and Latin Words 

XII. Index of Passages Discussed . 



PAGE 

360 
362 

363 

363 
380 



LIST OF PLATES 

I. 848 verso, 849 recto, 850 recto, 854, 867 

II. 852 Fr. I, Cols, ii-iii .... 

III. 852 Fr. 60, Cols, i-ii .... 

IV. 853 Cols, xvi-xvii 

V. 871 and 884 recto .... 

VI. 847 recto and 894 .... 



y at the cud. 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



{An asterisk denotes texts ivhich are not printed in full.) 



845. Psalms Ixviii and Ixx . 

846. Amos ii 

847. St. John's Gospel ii (Plate VI) . 

848. Revelation xvi (Plate 1) 

849. Acts of Peter (Plate I) 

850. Acts of John (Plate 1) 
_851. Apocryphal Acts 

852. Euripides, Hypsipyle (Plates II-IIl) 

853. Commentary on Thucydides II (Plate 

854. Archilochus, 'EAeyem (Plate I) 

855. Menander(.?) 

856. Scholia on Aristophanes' Acharnians 

857. Epitome of Herodotus 

858. Oration against Demosthenes 
859-864. Poetical Fragments 
865-870. Prose Fragments (Plate I) 
871, 872. Latin Fragments (Plate V) 

873. Hesiod, Theogonia 

874. ApoUonius Rhodius, Argonautica III 

875. Sophocles, Antigone . . 

876. Euripides, Hecuba 

877. Euripides, Hecuba 

878. Thucydides II . . . 

879. Thucydides III . 

880. Thucydides V . . . 

881. Plato, Euthydemus and Lysis 

882. Demosthenes, In Aristogitonem I 

883. Demosthenes, In Aristocratejn 

884. Sallust, Catilina (Plate V) 

885. Treatise on Divination 

886. Magical Formula 

887. Directions for Wrestling (.?) 

888. Edict of a Praefect and Petition 



IV) 



A. D. 




PAGE 


Late 4th or 5lh cent. 


. 


I 


6th cent, 


•  


3 


4th cent. 


. 


4 


5th cent. 


. 


6 


Early 4th cent. 


. 


6 


4th cent. 


. 


12 


5th or 6th cent. 


, 


18 


Late 2nd or early 3rd 


cent. 


19 


Late 2nd cent. 


• • 


107 


Late 2nd cent. 


• 


149 


3rd cent. 


• 


150 


3rd cent. 


. 


155 


4th cent. 


• 


161 


Late 2nd or early 3rd 


cent. 


164 


ist-3rd cent. . 


. 


168 


ist-7th cent. . 


. 


173 


5th-6th cent. . 


. 


177 


3rd cent. 


. 


179 


Early 3rd cent. 


• 


180 


Early 2nd cent. 


. 


181 


5th cent. 


• 


. 182 


3rd cent. . 


• 


183 


Late Tst cent. 


• 


184 


3rd cent. 


« 


i86 


Late 2nd cent. 


« 


187 


Late 2nd or 3rd cent. 


« 


192 


2nd cent. 


• 


194 


3rd cent. 


. 


• 195 


5th cent. . 


• 


 195 


Late 2nd or early 3rd 


cent. 


198 


3rd cent. 


. 


200 


3rd cent. . 


.  


201 


Late 3rd or early 4th 


cent. 


. 202 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



889. Edict of Diocletian and Petition . 

~"~~^90. Letter to a Strategus .... 

891. Apportionment of Duties to an Exegetes 

892. Appointment of a Superintendent of Works 

893. Judicial Sentence .... 

894. Latin Declaration of Birth (Plate VI) 

895. Return of Village-Accounts 

896. Reports to a Logistes . 

897. Declaration to Riparii . 

898. Petition to an Acting-Strategus 

899. Petition of Apollonarion 

900. Petition to a Logistes . 

901. Petition to a Public Advocate 

902. Petition to a Public Advocate 

903. Accusation against a Husband 

904. Petition to a Praeses . 

905. Marriage Contract 

906. Deed of Divorce 

907. Will of Hermogenes . 

908. Contract between Eutheniarchs 

909. Sale of Acacia-Trees . 

910. Lease of Land , 

911. Lease of a House 

912. Lease of a Cellar 

913. Lease of Land . 

914. Acknowledgement of a Debt 

915. Receipt for Lead and Tin . 

916. Tax-Receipt 

917. Taxing- Memorandum 

918. Land-Survey 

919. Advance of Dues on a 

920. Account of Food 

921. Inventory of Property 

922. Account of Horses 

923. Petition to a Pagan Deity 

924. Gnostic Charm . 
925. Christian Prayer . 

926. Invitation to Dinner . 

927. Invitation to a Wedding 

928. Letter of Lucius 



Freight 



A. E 


. 


PAGE 


. 4th cent. 


. 


205 


. 3rd cent. 


. 


207 


. 294 


. 


208 


• 338 . 


. 


210 


. Late 6 th or 


7th cent. 


211 


. 194-6 . 


. 


. 213 


• 305 


. 


215 


. 316 . 


• • • 


 217 


• 346 


. 


219 


. 123 


. 


221 


. 200 


• 


222 


. 322 


. 


232 


• 336 


. 


234 


. About 465 


. 


• 236 


. 4th cent. 


. 


• 238 


. 5th cent. 


... 


241 


. 170 


. 


• 243 


. 2nd or early 3rd cent. . 


246 


. 276 




• 247 


. 199 




. 254 


. 225 




257 


. 197 




259 


. 233 or 265 




. 262 


• 235 




 263 


. 442 




265 


. 486 




. 267 


• 572 




268 


. 198 




269 


. Late 2nd or early 3rd cent. 


. 271 


2nd cent. 


. • 


272 


. 182? . 


•  . 


. 282 


. Late 2nd 01 


• early 3rd cent. 


 283 


. 3rd cent. 


• » • 


284 


. Late 6 th or 


early 7th cent. 


. 286 


. Late 2nd 01 


• early 3rd cent. 


288 


. 4th cent. 


• •  


. 289 


. 5th or 6th cent. 


. 291 


. 3rd cent. 


• • • 


291 


. 3rd cent. 


• • • 


. 292 


. 2nd or 3rd 


cent. 


• 293 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



XI 







A. D. 


PAGE 


929. 


Letter of Nicanor 


Late 2nd or 3rd cent. 


294 


930. 


Letter to Ptolemaeus from his Mother 


2nd or 3rd cent. 


295 


931. 


Letter of Theopompus to a Strategus 


2nd cent. . . . . 


296 


932. 


Letter of Thais 


Late 2nd cent. 


298 


933. 


Letter of Diogenes 


Late 2nd cent. 


299 


934. 


Letter of Aurelius Stephanus 


3rd cent 


300 


935. 


Letter of Serenus 


3rd cent 


301 


936. 


Letter of Pausanias 


3rd cent 


303 


937. 


Letter of Demarchus .... 


3rd cent 


305 


938. 


Letter of Demetrius ..... 


Late 3rd or 4th cent. 


306 


939. 


Letter to Flavianus . . 


4th cent. 


307 


940. 


Letter to a Clerk 


5th cent. 


309 


941. 


Letter to John 


6th cent. 


310 


942. 


Letter of Timotheus .... 


6th or 7th cent. 


3" 


943. 


Letter of Victor 


6th cent. 


313 


* 944-1 


356. Homeric Fragments .... 


2nd-5th cent. 


315 


957. 


Leather (TiXkvj3os (?) . 


122-3 . .  • 


• 317 


958. 


Vellum ariWv^os (?) 


80 .... 


. 318 


*959. 


Magical Symbols 


3rd cent. 


. 318 


960. 


Memorandum of a Payment of Corn 


3rd cent. 


318 


*961. 


Demotic Papyrus 


I St or 2nd cent. 


. 318 


962. 


*d7roypa^77 of Sheep and Memorandum of 








Contracts 


Late I St cent. 


. 318 


-963. 


Letter of Ophelia to her Mother 


2nd or 3rd cent. 


. 318 


964. 


Receipt for the Rent of a Camel-Shed 


263 ... . 


. 318 


966. 


Order to Collectors of Corn-Dues 


3rd cent. 


. 318 


966. 


Official Account of Payments and Writing- 








Exercise 


3rd cent. 


• 319 


967. 


Letter from Apion to his Sister . 


2nd cent. 


. 319 


*968. 


Will of Didyme 


A.D. 100-138 


• 319 


969. 


Order for Arrest 


Early 2nd cent. 


• 319 


970. 


dnoypa(f)T] , ...... 


Early 3rd cent. 


• 319 


971. 


Account of Expenditure on L-rigation 


Late I St or early 2nd cent. 


• 319 


972. 


Oath of an Official 


223 ... . 


. 320 


*973. 


Notice to Sitologi 


168-9 .... 


. 320 


974. 


Order for Payment of Wheat . 


3rd cent. 


. 320 


*975. 


Lease of Land 


82-3 or 98-9 


• 320 


*976. 


Declaration on Oath .... 


197 ... . 


. 320 


977. 


Payment of the ^opor of an d<rxoX»;/ia . 


253 ... . 


. 320 


978. 


List of Furniture 


3rd cent. 


. 321 



Xll 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



*979. 
980. 

981. 
*982. 
♦983. 
*984. 
*985. 
*986. 

987. 
988. 

989. 

990. 

991. 

992. 

993. 

994. 

995. 
*996. 

997. 
*998. 
*999. 
*1000 
*1004- 
*1006. 



Account of Payments of Corn . 

*List of Abstracts of Contracts (?) and of 

Payments for Houses . 
Taxing-Memorandum . 
Taxing-Memorandum 
Report to a Logistes 
Census-List 
Private Account 
List of House- and Land-Property and of 

Loans of Seed-Corn 
Vellum Title (.?) 
Loan of Corn and Memorandum concerning 

a Sale .... 
List of Persons and Workshops 
Will of a Woman 
Petition to a Police Official 
Order for Payment of Wine 
Order for Payment of Wine 
Order for Payment of Corn 
Receipt for Money . 
Deed of Surety 
Account .... 
Account of Allowances (?) 
Account .... 
-3. Receipts for Lead and Tin 
-5. Arabic Papyri 
Arabic Paper , 



A.D. 




PAGE 


2nd or 3rd cent. 


• 


 321 


3rd cent. 


• 


321 


Late 2nd or early 3rd 


cent. 


. 321 


3rd cent. 


• 


• 321 


316 .. . 


• 


321 


82-97 . 


• 


. 321 


50-100". 


• 


. 322 


131-2 . 


, 


• 323 


5th or 6th cent. 


• 


^ 324 


224 


• 


• 324 


Late 3rd or 4th cent. 


• 


• 325 


331 • 


• 


 325 


341 


• 


325 


413 .. . 


• 


• 325 


6th cent. 


• 


• 325 


499 . . 


. 


• 325 


5th cent. 


• 


. 326 


584 .. . 


• 


. 326 


4th cent. 


• 


326 


Late 6th cent. 


. 


. 326 


616-7 • 


. 


327 


About 572 . 


. 


327 


7th or 8th cent. 


. 


327 


Mediaeval Period . 


. 


327 



NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

The general method followed in this volume is the same as that in 
Parts I-V. As before, some of the more important new literary texts (852-3, 
855) are printed in a dual form, a literal transcript being accompanied by 
a reconstruction in modern style. In other cases, and in the fragments of 
extant authors, the originals are reproduced except for division of words, 
capital initials in proper names, expansion of abbreviations, and supplements of 
lacunae. Additions or corrections by the same hand as the body of the text 
are in small thin type, those by a different hand in thick type. Non-literary 
documents, including the magical text (886) in the ' Miscellaneous ' section, are 
given in modern form with accentuation and punctuation. Abbreviations and 
symbols are resolved ; additions and corrections are usually incorporated in the 
text and their occurrence is recorded in the critical apparatus, where also faults 
of orthography, &c., are corrected if they seemed likely to give rise to any 
difficulty. Iota adscript has been printed when so written, otherwise iota sub- 
script is employed. Square brackets [ ] indicate a lacuna, round brackets ( ) the 
resolution of a symbol or abbreviation, angular brackets ( ) a mistaken omission 
in the original, braces { } a superfluous letter or letters, double square brackets 
[[ ]] a deletion in the original. Dots placed within brackets represent the 
approximate number of letters lost or deleted ; dots outside brackets indicate 
mutilated or otherwise illegible letters. Letters with dots underneath them are 
to be considered doubtful. Heavy Arabic numerals refer to the texts of the 
Oxyrhynchus papyri in this volume and Parts I-V, ordinary numerals to lines, 
small Roman numerals to columns. 

The abbreviations used in referring to papyrological publications are 
practically those adopted in the Archiv fiir PapyrusforscJmng, viz. : — 

P. Amh. = The Amherst Papyri (Greek), Vols. I-II, by B. P. Grenfell and 

A. S. Hunt. 
Archiv — Archiv fur Papyrusforschung. 

B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den K. Museen zu Berlin, Griechische Urkunden. 
P. Brit. Mus. = Greek Papyri in the British Museum, Vols. I-II, by F. G. Kenyon ; 

Vol. Ill, by F. G. Kenyon and H. I. Bell. 



xiv LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

C. P. Herm. = Corpus Papyrorum Hermopolitanorum, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. 

C. P. R. = Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. 

P. Cairo = Catalogue of Greek Papyri in the Cairo Museum, by B. P. Grenfell 

and A. S. Hunt. 
P. Fay. = Fayum Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and 

D. G. Hogarth. 
P. Flor. = Papiri Fiorentini, Vol. I, by G. VitelH. 
P. Gen. = Les Papyrus de Geneve, Vol. I, by J. Nicole. 
P. Grenf. = Greek Papyri, Series I, by B. P. Grenfell, and Series II, by B. P. 

Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 
P. Hibeh = The Hibeh Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 
P. Leipzig — Griechische Urkunden der Papyrussammlung zu Leipzig, Vol. I, by 

L. Mitteis. 
P. Leyden = Papyri Graeci Musei Antiquarii Lugdunl-Batavi, by C. Leemans. 
P. Magd. = Papyrus de Magdola, Bull, de Corr. Hcll.^ xxvi. pp. 95-128, xxvii. 

pp. 174-205, by P. Jouguet and G. Lefebvre. 
P. Oxy. = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-V, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. 

Hunt. 
P. Par. = Les Papyrus grecs du Musee du Louvre, Notices ct Extraiis, t. xviii. 2, 

by W. Brunet de Presle and E. Egger. 
P. Reinach = Papyrus grecs et demotiques, by Th. Reinach, W. Spiegelberg, and 

S. de Ricci. 
Rev. Laws = Revenue Laws of Ptolemy Philadelphus, by B. P. Grenfell, with an 

Introduction by J. P. Mahafify. 
P. Strassb. = Griechische Papyrus der K. Universitatsbibliothek zu Strassburg im 

Elsass, Vol. I, Parts 1-2, by F. Preisigke. 
P. Tebt. = The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and 

J. G. Smyly ; and Part II, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and E. J. 

Goodspeed. 
Wilcken, Ost. = Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken. 



I. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 



845. Psalms Ixviii and Ixx. 

12-5 X i8-2 cm. Late fourth or fifth century. 

This fragment from a papyrus book contains parts of Ps. Ixviii and Ixx, 
written in a large and clear cursive hand probably of the period from 350 to 450. 
The book was of a large size, the page when complete measuring about 22 cm. 
across. No lection signs occur beyond the diaeresis ; the usual contractions 
of d(6i and Kvpio^ are used, but ovpavoi and fxrjrpos are written in full. For the 
two Psalms here represented the chief uncial MSS. are }^, B, and R (the Verona 
Psalter, attributed to the sixth century), but the papyrus does not agree con- 
sistently with any of these authorities. It seems to have been rather nearer to N 
than to B, and, as would be expected in an Egyptian text, supports none of the 
peculiar readings of R. 

Verso Ixviii. 30-7. 

• •••••••• 

TO /u[ov aivecrco to ouofta tov 6v fX€T coStj^ fxeyaXvi^co avTOu €u at 
i^€ae[i] Kai ape(r[et] too 0[(o] v[7r€p] fJ^oo-)([ou v€ov KepaTa eKC^epovTa kul 
orrXas i[S'\(T[co]a-ay tttco-^oi kul ev(PpavO\r]TOi>\(Tav [^K^vjT'qcraTe 
TOV 6v KUL eK^TjcreTaL rj '\|/"t'X^ vpcoy otl \^L(Trf\Kova\^v tcov 
5 Trivr}Ta)v ks kul tovs TrerreSrjp.ei'Ov^ [avTov ovk e^ovSe 

vcoareL aiveaaTaxrav avTOv ol ovpavoi /c«[i rj yt] OaXaacra Kai irav 
Ta ra epnovTa ev avToi^ otl ^[y acoa€L ttjv Hicoi/ Kai olko 
Sopr]6r][(rovTa]t [ai noXei? Tr]9 lovSaia^ Kai KaTOiK-qaovaiv eKei 
KUL KXrj[povojjLria'ovaiv auTrjy kul to aTrepfxa tcov SovXcou ovtov 
10 [K\a6e[^ov<nv avTrjv 

B 



?** 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 
Recto Ixx. 3-8. 

[tottov oyvpov rov acoaat fie on] aT€p[€]Q}na fiou K[a]i Kara 
[(pvyrj fiov €L (TV 69 fiov] f3y[(j-ai] /xe e/c x^^poS" anapTcoXou 
[eK veipos TTapavoix6\vvTO^ Kai aSiKovvTO^ on av ei vivo 
[{JLOvq no}v ice fxoy ice eXTrty fiov e/c vcottjtos {lov em ere 
15 [€Tr€(TT]r]pi)(6i]i' airo yaarpo^ e/c KoiXia^ iirjTpo<i fiov av pov 
[ci aKe-rraaTrf]^ iv aoi rj vTro/xouTjai^ fxov Sia iravros cocrei 
[repa^ €yevrj\6r]v roi? ttoXXo/? K[a]i croi Porj6o9 Kai Kparaios 
[7r\r]pcodi]Tco to arofia fxov a]i[v€a]€co9 on(09 ijpvi-jaco 



1. It is doubtful whether to at the beginning of this Hne is the final syllable of 
avTe\a(iiTo OX the article before ovona. The latter division would make the line rather short, 
but it could be sufficiently lengthened by the insertion of /xou after 6[eo\v with ^^c.a^ ^^^g 
vestige of the letter after to suits /i better than o, but is too slight to decide the point, and 
some traces of ink later on in this line are also indecisive. 

2. TO) &y{e)u>\: or perhaps 7-0) /cj^(upi)a)], which would be a new reading, though the cursive 
188 has Tov Kvpiov. (KcfxpovTci was perhaps omitted, as in ^^*, Its insertion produces a very 
long line, while on the other hand its omission leaves the supplement a little shorter than 
would be expected. 

3. [fK(t]Tr)rTaTe : ^t]Ti]aaTe R. Cf. nOtC On 1. 4. 

4. 6(fo\v : Kvplov R. 

eK^qa-eTai t) yj/vxi] vpav : (ijaerm j; ^v\r] rjficou (I'/xcoi' i^^.a^ J^ R^ ^rjatade B. The (K is 

a repetition from fKt^rjTrjaarf, or the scribe may have transferred the preposition from one verb 
to the other; cf. the omission of «« with C'Ftjaure in R. 

5. ({(I'pto)? : o Kvpios Bl^R. 

f^ovbe^vaafi: SO i^*R ; e^ovSti^wiTfr B^^c.a^ 

'J. tp-novTa ev aVTon ; SO B^^c.aJ^ . j^fpara Tt]s yrji t^ ' . 

12. The length of the lacuna indicates that the papyrus had pov after 6{(o)i with t^R ; 
B omits. 

13. vno[povr]: SO the cursives 27, 285; rj utto/x. Bt^R. Cf. the omission of r; before 
eXnis in 1. 14. It is unlikely that koi stood before fK as in R. 

14. K{vpi)e pov : cm. p.nv Bt^R ; cf. the addition of pov in I. 12. 
K(^vpi)€ f\nii : Kvpie ij (Xnis R ; Kvpios r] fXnis B^^. 

15. [(ne(TT]r)pix6T)p . . . aKenaaTt]]i. The papyruS agrees with Bi^ ; R has arf pt(f)rjv eK 
parpos (K K. Tj]s p. pov av (i poi vTrfpaaTncrTi^s pov. o of KniXias is corrected from v. 

16. vnopovr](ni (y scems to be corrected) = vnopi/rja-ii, which is the reading of t^ 
and the Sahidic version ; vpi>r](Tis BR. to of axrei is corrected. 

17. o-ot: 1. orv. t^c.aR ^(](\ ^oy j^ftej- lSo)]dos. 

Kin Kpcnaioi- : om. Km Bt^R ; Kcii Kparaioipd pov Arm. Ed., Psalt. Aethiop, 

18. R adds Kvpif after mveatas: ottcoj vpv-qau) {tt)v So^au aov) was orignally omitted in t^, 
but added by the second corrector. 



846. AMOS, II 



846. Amos ii. 

164 X 12-6 cm. 



Sixth century. 



The upper portion of a leaf from a papyrus codex, preserving part of the 
second chapter of the book of Amos in the Septuagint version. Six lines are 
lost at the bottom of the verso, and the size of the complete page can be 
estimated at about 26-5 x 15-5 cm. The large and heavy uncial script, round 
and upright, in brown ink, and resembling the hand of P. Amh. 190, is probably 
of the sixth century. At the ends of the longer lines the writing becomes very 
small. Two kinds of stops, the high and middle, occur, as well as some of the 
usual contractions. The text is fairly correct, and so far as it goes coincides for 
the most part with that of the Vaticanus, Alexandrinus, and Marchalianus, 
with which we give a collation. The only variant of interest is in verse 7, where 
a reading peculiar to a few cursives occurs. 



Verso ii. 6-8. 

Ta fiV^K(.v vnoSi]fiaT[a>i' 

[T]a TTarovvra ctti tov [x^t'i^ 

rrjS yr]9' Kai €Koi/8vXi[^oi' 

5 KUL oSou TaTvivodv e[^e/fXi 
\y'\av Kat vlo9 kul Wp \avTov 
[<cr]e7ro/)ei'oi'ro Trpo[^ r)]v avrrj 
7ra[L]8La-K^]u ottcos [^e(3r]X(o 
[cr]ov(Tiv TO oi'[o]fxa r[ov 6v av 
10 [rcojf Kai Toc LfiarLa [avTcoi> 
[8]eafi€vovT€s (txIolviols 
[7r]apaTreTa(rjj.aTa €Tt[oiovi' 
[e])(OfX€va Tov 6va[iaaTr] 
piov Kai OLVOv €K o[vKO(pai' 

15 TlOdU €7rn'o[u €V TOO OlKQi 
TOV 6\v aVTCOP 



Recto ii. 9-12. 
a[v]TOv i'TTOKaroiOiv' K\a.L e\yoi 
\av\qyayov vp\a.'\<i e/c yr]^ [^f] 
[yyJTrrof Kai irepiriyayov v 
20 [//a]? €v TT] eprjpco T€cro-[e 
[paK]oyTa err] tov KaTaK[X'r} 
[popo]fJ.rjcrai tyjv yqv T(c\y 
[App]opat(ov Kat €Xa^o[v eK 

[TCOf v]L<Cy VfiCOU €19 7rp[o 

25 [(f)r]Ta\9- Kai €k t(ov veav]} 
[(T/cct)]f ypccv et? aytyaapov 
l/XT] ovk] €aTi[v] TavTa vi\ol 
[It]X Ae]yei ks Kai e7roT[(^e 
[re To]vs -qyiaa-ix^voy^ [ol 

30 \yov /c]a[i] TOis Trpo(f)rjTaL9 
[eveTeXXeaOy [T^]] Xeyoi^rey 
\ov prj 7rpo(pr]Tevarj]Te' 



7. [la-^^TToptvovTo : or [(i.]a(e)7ropfvovTo. The supplement at the end of the line is rather 
long, and perhaps t>;i' was omitted. 

8. [^t(3r]\o}(T]ovaiv : SO the cursives 86, 153, 198 (Holmes); ^((3t]X(oaiv B, Swete, 

^f^T}\a,(Ta>(n{v) A^Q, &C. 

B 3 



4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

20. Tf(Ta\(paK\vTa : SO AQ ; /x' B. 

23. [A/i^jopatwj' : Afj.oppaio)v ]\ISS. There is room for at least three letters in the lacuna ; 
Apo\fipamp cannot be read. 

(Xal^ov : Q^ has avf\a,3ov. 

28. A stop is probably lost after K{vpio)s. 



847. St. John's GosrEL ii. 

i6-2 X 14-6 cm. Fourth century. Plate VI (recto). 

This leaf from a vellum MS. of St. John's Gospel is sufificiently early in date 
to be of decided value. The rather large calligraphic script is more closely 
related to the sloping oval type of the third and fourth centuries than to the 
squarer heavier style which subsequently became common for biblical texts and 
of which 848 and 851 are examples. Especially noticeable are the small and 
0) placed high in the line of writing ; the co is also remarkabl}' shallow — shallower 
for instance, than that in 665 (cf. P. Oxy. IV, Plate I). We have little hesitation 
in referring the MS. to the fourth century, and it may well be as old as any of 
the great biblical codices. Stops in the middle position are freely used ; a few 
other dots which occur seem to be accidental. The usual contractions of -naTpo^ 
and 'Irjaovs are used, the latter word appearing both as Iijs- (1. 9) and U (1. 30); 
lJ.-^Tr]p, on the other hand, is written out at length (1. 4). 

The leaf is practically entire, and preserves a dozen verses from chap, ii of 
the Gospel. Compared with the three principal MSS., the Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, 
and Alexandrinus (C and D are both defective here), the text is much nearest to 
that of the Vaticanus, with which it agrees four times against the other two, 
whereas there is no coincidence with N against AB, one with A against NH, and 
only two with h^A against B. Readings unsupported by any of the three are 
found in verse 12, ravra for tovto, and verse 15, where d)s is added before (ppay^kXiov, 
variants for which the new MS. is much the earliest authority. 

Recto ii. 11 -16. Verso ii. 16-22. 

avTOv Kai (iTncTTivaav eiy a.v 20 n^piarepa^ ttcoXovctiu eintu- 
rov 01 fiaOrjrai avrov- fiera apare ravra eurevdei^. pi] 

ravra Kan^T] ei? Kacpapva noLdre rov olkov rov Wps 

ovp- avro9 Kai t] pi]Tr)p avrov- pov olkov epnopiov- epvt] 

5 Kai 01 aSeX(poL- Kai 01 paOrj aOija-av 01 padi^rai avrov- 

rai avrov- Kai eKei epeivav 25 ri ycypappevos eariv- ^?/Xoy 



847. ST. JOHN'S GOSPEL, II 5 

Of TToAXay -qfiepas- Kai ^yyvs tcv oikov aov- KaTa^ay^rai fxc 

■qv TO iraaya ra)v lovSaLcov- kui arreKpLOrjcrau ovv ol lovSaioi 

[aj/e]^r] ety lepocroXufia Ir]S KaL einav avTco- tc ar]p[€LOU Set 

10 [Kai ev]pei' ev TO) lepoo tov^ nco Kiveis r][iiv- otl rav^ra noieis 
[Xov]uTas (3oa9 Kai Trpo^aTa- 30 aTreKpiOrj ly /cat enref av[Toi? 

[Ka]i TTepiarepa^- Kai tovs K€p Xvcrare rou vaov tovtov [kul 

p\aT\i<yras KaOrjpevovs [Kai [ev rjpicrti/ rjpepais eyepco [avrou 

TTOLr](Tas coy (ppayeXXioi/ [e/c o']xol [€nr]ai' ovv 01 lovSaioi- p Kai e^ € 

15 vioav naura? e^€^aXe[u e]K Ti[(n]u (oKoBopi^Orj uao9 ov 
Tov I'cpov ra re irpo^ara kul tovs 35 roy[-] Kat au ev Tpiaiv rjpepais 

(3oas Kai tcov koXXv^lo-tcou e^e eyepeis avTov- eK€iuo9 Se eXe 

)(eei' ra Keppara- Kai Tas rpa yev irepi tov vaov tov accpaTos 

7re^[a]y aveTpey^ev Kai tols Tas avToV' ore ovv rjyepdq €k v^k 

1-2. fis avTov originally stood after avrov in b5. 

3. ravra: SO M, the cui'sive 124, &c.; tovto ^5AB, W(estcott)-II(ort), T(extus) R(eceptus). 

Kdfpapvaovfi : SO i*5B, W-H : KaTrfpuiiovfi A, T-R. 

4. A curved mark above the p oi firjrtjp is presumably accidental. 

5. The MS. agrees with B in omitting mrov after adfXcpui (so W-H); ^^A add avrov 

(so T-R). 5^ omits Kai 01 pa6r]TM avrov, 
• 6. fpdvav: epeivfv A. 
y. KOI fyyiiy : fyyu? fie b5. 
9. o If;((jou)s : SO ^^B, W-H, T-R ; A has o l(>;(rou)? us UpoaoXvpa ^{r]aov)i, 

1 r . i^ originally read Kai ra npolSara Kai ^uas. 

14. (OS is found before (f)payeXXiov also in GLX, some cursives, &c. ; om. w i^AB, 
W-H, T-R. 5^ originally had crroirjaev ... Kat Travras in place of the participial construction. 
t6. re and rovs are omitted in ^5. 

18. ra K(pp.aTa : SO B, W-H ; to Kfppa i^A, T-R. 

19. av(Tpf\j/fu: SO B, W-H in text ; avedrpi'^ev A, T-R, W-H mg., KareaTpe^ev i^. 

2 1. fxr] : Kai pr) A. 

23. (pvr](T07]a-av : SO i^B, W-H ; fpv. fie A, T-R. 

25. ytypappfvos is an error for yeypappevou. In B eariv precedes ytyp. 

26. KaTa(})ayeTai : SO i^AB, W-H; KaT((paye T-R with some cursives and patristic 
citations. 

28. (inav : so B, W-H ; (inov ^A, T-R. The same variation occurs at 1. 33. 
30. i{r](Tov)s : so AB, W-H ; o I. ^5, T-R. 

32. [ef] : so i^A, W-H in brackets, T-R; om. B. To read [km] in place of [fv] 
would leave 1. 31 too short. 

33. p. Kai (^ : the use of figures instead of words is unusual in early uncial MSS., though 
sometimes found in B and elsewhere; cf. e.g. 2. recto 9 sqq., 846. 20, note. 

34. (OKodopr]6i] : so A, T-R; oiKo8opi]6r) {^B*, W-H. 

35. (V is omitted in t^. 
38. avTov : om. ^^. 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



848. Revelation xvi. 

3-1x9 cm. Fifth century. Plate I (verso). 

Fragment of a leaf from a vellum codex, containing a few verses from 
Rev. xvi. The book was of remarkably small size, for only 11 lines are lost 
between the last line of the recto and the first of the versO; whence it follows that 
there were only 17 lines in the complete page ; the inscribed surface would 
thus have been about jo cm. in height. The bold upright uncials are similar in 
style to those of the Codex Alexandrinus, though rather heavier ; they may be 
referred to the fifth century. Stops in both the high and middle position occur. 
The text agrees, so far as it goes, with that of the Codex Alexandrinus. 



Recto xvi. 17-8. 



Verso xvi. 19-20. 



\tov va6\u ano rov 
Opovou Xeyovcra' 
yeyoveu Kai eye 
vovTO acrTpanai 
5 Kai (pcouai KUL fSpb 
Tar K[ai ayia-ixo^ 6y[e 



TTLOV TOU 6v SoV 

vai avT7] TO TTort] 

10 plOU TOV Oll'OV 
TOU 6v/J.0V TT]? 

[o]pyr]^ aVT[o]u Kai 



I. \tov vao\u : so i^A, W(estcott)-H(ort) ; rov vaov TOV oi'pavov B &c., T(extus) R(eceptus). 
ovpavov, if uncontracted, would occupy the same space as rov vaov, and it is therefore possible 
that [ovpavojv should be read here. 

ano TOV Opovov is omitted in t^ and tov 6eov substituted. 

4-5. The IMS. agrees with A (so W-H). ^^ inadvertently has ^povTai Kai before aarpanai 
as well as kqi ^povTui after (pcovai. cji. km ^p. kui ua-Tp. T-R with a number of cursives. 

8. Sowai : TOV dovvai ^^. 

9-12. TO, TOV, and avTov are omitted in t^. 



849. Acts of Peter. 

98 X 9 cm. Early fourth century. Plate I (recto). 

A single leaf from a vellum codex of the Acfs of Peter in Greek, the two 
pages being numbered 167 and 168 respectively. These so-called * Gnostic 'Acts 
of Peter, distinct from the so-called ' Catholic ' Acts, are partially preserved in 
more than one shape. There is firstly the LaCin Codex Vcrcellensis of the 



849. ACTS OF PETER 7 

seventh century, which contains an account of the acts of Peter at Rome in con- 
nexion with Simon Magus and of his martyrdom. Secondly, there are two Greek 
MSS. (of the ninth to eleventh centuries) containing only the martyrdom ; 
dependent upon this recension are the Slavonic, Coptic, Armenian, and Ethiopic 
versions. Thirdly, another Latin version of the martyrdom, ascribed to Bishop 
Linus and extant in a large number of MSS., is independent of the version 
in the Codex Vercellensis, which is shorter and written in much worse Latin. 
These three texts were edited by Lipsius in Acta Apostolorum Apocrypha, L 
pp. 1-33 and 45-103. Recently a fragment of a different portion of the Acts 
dealing with an incident during Peter's sojourn at Jerusalem has been published 
by C. Schmidt from a fourth or fifth century Coptic MS. at Berlin [Die altcn 
Pctviisaktcn in Tcxtc und UntcrsncJnnigcu, Bd. xxiv. Heft i). The date and 
character of these Acts of Peter, and the history of the text in its different forms 
have been the subject of much discussion ; and the discovery of a fragment 
of what is no doubt the Greek original is a new factor of considerable importance. 
Our fragment belongs to the portion of the Acts concerned with Simon Magus 
found only in the Codex Vercellensis, and corresponds to p. 73, 11. 16-27 of 
Lipsius' edition. 

The leaf is practically perfect, but the ink is much obliterated in the last five 
lines of the verso. The handwriting is a medium-sized upright uncial of a common 
third to fourth century type. Had the material used been papyrus, we should 
have been more disposed to assign it to the late third than to the fourth century, 
but since vellum was not commonly used in Egypt until the fourth century, it is 
safer to attribute the fragment to the period from Diocletian to Constantine. 
The papyri with which it was found were rather mixed in point of date, ranging 
from the third century to the fifth. The usual contraction of Q^os and its cases is 
employed, but \xy\Ti.p is uncontracted. v at the end of a line is sometimes indicated 
by a stroke above the preceding letter. There are no stops, breathings, or accents, 
but a coronis is employed to fill up a space at the end of 1. 14. The scribe was 
not very careful ; ^(eo)u for ^(e)w occurs in 1. 8 and a-n-otrjo-o/xe^a for aTroiao/xe^a 
in 1. 9, while in 11. 1-2 it is clear that the text is seriously corrupt; cf. note 
ad loc. Apart, however, from this difficulty at the beginning, the agreement 
between the Greek of our fragment and the Latin of the Codex Vercellensis 
is on the whole very close. The Greek sometimes tends to be fuller than the 
Latin, there being two instances (cf. notes on 11. 6-7 and 19) where the Latin 
omits words or phrases found in the Greek: at other times the Latin is longer ; 
cf. notes on 11. 14, 22, and 26. o-e . . . ireLpdaai 6t\wv in 11. 20- r is wrongly 
rendered confidens in te, but as a rule the Latin is a singularly literal interpretation ; 
cf. e.g. libcntcr Jiabct for ?}8ea)s iyj.{. in 11. 16-7, and the close resemblance in the 



8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

order of the words throughout. That our fragment represents the Greek text 
from which the Codex Vercellensis was translated admits of little doubt. 

For the question of the relation of the two Latin versions and the Greek 
fmprvpiov to the Greek original of the Acts of Peter that conclusion is of cardinal 
importance. Lipsius had supposed that the Greek original was altogether lost, 
and that the longer Latin version found in the martyrijim ascribed to Bishop 
Linus, so far as it went, represented the original more faithfully than the shorter 
Latin version found in the Codex Vercellensis, while he regarded the Greek text 
of the jxapTvpiov as a retranslation from the shorter Latin version. Against this 
complicated hypothesis Zahn {Gesch. d. NTKanons, ii. pp. 832 sqq.) put forward 
the simpler explanation that the extant Greek ixaprvpiov was part of the original 
Acts of Peter, that the Codex Vercellensis was a translation of it, the longer Latin 
version being an independent translation made at a later date with numerous 
elaborations, and a much less faithful representation of the original. The 
correctness of Zahn's explanation, which has been generally accepted (cf Harnack, 
C/iron. d. altchr. Lit.,\\. i, p. 551), is thoroughly vindicated by the new discovery. 
Though the longer Latin version of that portion of the Acts to which our frag- 
ment belongs is not extant (whether the longer Latin version ever contained more 
than the martyi'ium is very doubtful), a comparison of the divergences in the two 
Latin versions of the martyrinm shows unquestionably that the shorter and not 
the longer one is the form supported by our fragment. The rejection of the 
claims of the longer Latin version to be regarded as more authentic than the 
shorter also removes the principal reason for supposing the Greek text of 
the fxapTvpiov to be a retranslation from the Latin, and this theory may now 
be finally abandoned. Since the Greek fxaprvpiov agrees on the whole very 
closely with the conclusion of the Codex Vercellensis, Zahn is clearly right 
in accepting the former as belonging to the Greek original. Its relation to this 
shorter Latin version is very similar to that of our fragment to the corresponding 
portion of the Codex Vercellensis. The Greek tends to be rather fuller than 
the Latin, which however sometimes instead of abbreviating paraphrases the 
Greek at greater length and generally follows it closely. So far as the style 
of our fragment can be judged, it is quite in keeping with that of the ixaprvpiov. 
The construction, for instance, opwvTiov . . . (Twe-nadovv in 11, 4-5 finds a parallel 
in the jxapTvpiov, p. 83. 24-5 koI KctTaTrerrovTos avTov avoiOev (KX{v6)ds (rvarfj. 

Did the MS. to which our fragment belongs begin at the point where the 
Codex Vercellensis commences, or did it also comprise an account of earlier doings 
of Peter, including perhaps the events at Jerusalem described in C. Schmidt's 
fragment, which apparently belongs to the period before Peter came to Rome ? 
The two pages of our fragment, nos. 167 and j6S of the MS., correspond to 13 



849. ACTS OF PETER . 9 

lines of Lipsius' edition of the Codex Vercellensis. The previous 166 pages 
therefore ought to correspond to approximately 996 lines of his edition. As 
a matter of fact the preceding portion of the Codex Vercellensis occupies 908 
lines, and when allowance is made for the circumstance that, judging by the 
fxapTvpiov, the tendency of the Latin to abbreviate the original is less marked than 
usual in our fragment, there is every probability that the beginning of this MS. 
coincided with the beginning of the Codex Vercellensis, and that the acts 
of Peter at Jerusalem formed no part of it. This conclusion is not necessarily 
fatal to C. Schmidt's view that his fragments form part of the same work as the 
Codex Vercellensis, for from an early period the various apocryphal Actstended 
to break up into distinct sections, if indeed these sections were originally com- 
bined. That the Ac^s of Paul comprised the Acts of Paul and Tliecla, the forged 
correspondence with the Corinthians, and the Martyrmm Paiili, which were 
previously known as distinct documents, has only recently been made clear 
through C. Schmidt's discovery of the Coptic fragments of the Acts as a whole. 
Similarly of the Acts of Jolin various sections have been preserved in different 
forms, but with considerable lacunae in or between them, in one of which is 
no doubt to be placed the new fragment in the present volume (850), itself con- 
taining the beginning of a distinct section with a sub-title of its own. But since 
the composition of the Acts of Peter is referred by the principal critics to A. D. 
160-170 (Zahn), 200-210 (C. Schmidt), 200-220 (Harnack), our fragment was 
written little, if at all, later than a century afterwards ; and the apparent absence 
in so early a MS. of any section corresponding with C. Schmidt's fragment 
certainly provides an argument in favour of G. Ficker, who {Die Petnisaktcn, 
pp. 6-7, Neutest. Apokryphcn, ed. E. Hennecke, pp. 383-4) is disposed to regard 
that fragment as either not belonging to the Acts of Peter as such, or as later 
than the Acts of the Codex Vercellensis, and thinks that these Acts were intended 
to follow immediately after the Acts of the Apostles. On the other hand the 
subscription in the Coptic MS. Opa^t? Ylirpov certainly provides strong prima 
facie evidence that it belonged to the same work as the Codex Vercellensis, 
and, as C. Schmidt reminds us, in the stichometry of Nicephorus the Acts of 
Peter is credited with 2750 orixot (i. e. it was about the same length as Leviticus 
or St. Luke's Gospel), a number which is too large to be accounted for by the 
Greek original of the Codex Vercellensis alone. 

On the disputed questions of the date of the composition of the Acts of 
Peter and their supposed Gnostic or ' vulgarchristliche ' origin (cf. Harnack, 
op. cit., ii. 2. pp. 170-2) the new fragment has no direct bearing, but its appearance 
is useful in tending to clear the ground by a dispersal of the suspicions of having 
been tampered with which have hitherto attached to the Codex Vercellensis and 



TO 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



the Greek \xapTvpiov (cf. Harnack's later view that the Acts of Peter are a com- 
pilation in Tcxte und Unters. Bd. xx. Heft 3, pp. ico sqq., and C. Schmidt's 
criticism of this in his Petntsakten). For, putting aside the question whether 
C. Schmidt's Coptic fragment was an integral part of the Acts or not, there is now 
no longer any reason to doubt the substantial fidelity of the shorter Latin version, 
or to suppose that it and the ixopTvpiov represent, as far as they go, anything else 
than the Acts of Peter in their original form. 



Verso. 

Si efiov jxy] fxe\Xr](ravTi9 
[ ]avTov Kare-^ovTCou ei a 
[ ]f)a aX7]6<JO^ an^Oai'tu Kai 
opcovTCtiv on aXrjOco'i ve 
5 Kpo9 eariy avveTTaOovv 
TT] ypaiSi XeyofTcy ci apa 
^ovXii P-f}Ti:p Kai 6app€is 
TCO TJdTpov 6u apavT€9 
aVTov rjp^Ls aTTOirjaop^Oa 
10 eicei iva avrov eyeif)a^ 
anoSco aoi rovrooi' S^ ou 
rcoy XaXovuTcou irpaKJ)^ 

KTOS aTi^Vl^COV TCO IIeTf)(0 

y lSov n^Tpe ^ 



Recto. 

piv 

15 TTttf? poU VdKpOS K€lTai 

ov Kai (SaaiXiVS ijS^cos 
e)(ei Kat ovk dtp^Krapr^v 
avTov KaiTOL ye €T€povs 
e^coj/ p€T epavTov v^avi(X 

20 Kovs aXXa ae paXXoi' Kai to 
Sia aov 6v neipaaai OeXcov 
ei apa aX'/^ei? eare tovto 
7](3ovXi]6rii/ anodau^w Kai 
o IliTpos ecfyrj ov neipa^^Tai 

25 6s ovSe SoKipa^^Tai Aypnr 
na aXXa (^iXovpn'os Kai 
TTapaKoXovp^vos aKov^i 
T(t)V a^ioov €7r^L Se vvvl 



' . . . (Ihe youihs having examined his nostiilb to see) whether he was indeed really 
dead, and seeing that he was in truth a corpse, consoled the old woman saying, " If indeed 
you wish, mollier, and trust in the God of Peter, we will lift him up and carry him thither, 
in order that Peter may raise him and restore him to you." While they were thus speaking, 
the praefect looking intently at Peter (said), " Ikhold, Peter, my servant lies dead, who was 
a favourite of the king himself, and I did not spare him although I have with nie other 
youths ; but because 1 desired to try you and the God wliom you preach, whether ye are 
indeed true, I wished him to die." And Peter said, " God is not to be tried or proved, 
Agrippa, but when He is loved and entreated He hearkens to those who are worthy. But 
since now . . ." ' 

Codex Vercellensis (Lipsius, Acta Apost. Apocr., p. 73). 

miieues aiitevi qui ucnerttnt nares pucri considerarant si iiere mortmis csset. uidcntcs 
auinn quoniatn vwrlinis est consolabantur matrcm ipsitis diccntcs : Si ucrc credis in dco Petri 
tolknles ettin perferimus ad Pclruin lit eiim stiscilans restitiiat tibi. Iiaec dicentibus iubenibus 



849. ACTS OF PETER ii 

praefcclus aiikm in foro inlucns Pel rum dixil : Quid die is, Pcire ? ecce puer moriuus iacct 
quern et iviperator libenier hahet et no7i illi peperci ; utique hahebam alios conplures iiiuenes ; 
sed confidens in te et in dominum tuum quern praedieas, si uere certi et ueri estis : ideo hunc 
uolui viori. Petrus autetn dixit : Non tcmptatur deus neque ex{is')tiviatur, sed dilcctissimus 
ex animo colendus exaudiet qui digni sunt. Sed quoniam nunc . . . 

1-2. Line i is not only far removed from the equivalent of the Latin at this point 
(something like tuv 6e vfnvidKoov irpoaekBovTav Koi tus pipas would be expected), but is obviously 
quite inappropriate. St €/:iov is unintelligible, while the case of /ueXXjyo-cuTf y is in contradiction 
to KaTfxovToov . . . opooPToov in 11. 2—4, and though in itself the nominative would yield a better 
construction than the genitive, a parallel for this kind of genitive absolute is cited from 
another part of the Aets of Peter in inlrod. Nor can avTov KarexovTcov in 1. 2 be right, 
for a participle meaning ' examined ' is necessary in view of the following clause « apa 
u^TjBas amdavev. By altering /caTf;^oi'Tcoi/ to KaT{f)ibovTwv 1. 2 may be retained, but Si (p.ov pij 
p.fX\t}aavTei is almost hopclcss to emend. p.rj peXXrjaavTcov might be read and connected 
with qui uenerunt (cf. continuo surrexerunt four lines previously, and, for p.r] instead of ov in 
this phrase. Acts of John, ed. Bonnet, p. 191. 23 /ur) /icAXi^o-ao-a), but 8t e/iiou would remain 
unaccounted for, and it would slill be necessary to suppose the omission of /cat ray ptva% 
before avTov. It seems more probable that St e/uou p) p.fXXijaavTes has come in by mistake 
from some other passage. St' e'/^tou presumably occurred where the Latin h3.sfaciens per 
?ne a few lines after the passage preserved in our fragment, and perhaps again two lines 
later where /^r ineam uocevi is found, /xj) peXXijaavTes, however, docs not suggest itself as an 
equivalent for any Latin expression on p. 73 of Lipsius' edition, except continuo in]. 11 
where Si' ep-ov would be out of place. 

2. [ ]avTov: there is a hole which occupies the place where the first letter of this line 
and of 1. 3 would have come, if these lines began evenly with II. i and 4-14, and it is 
therefore possible that a letter is lost before avTov and pa respectively. But this hypothesis 
is not satisfactory in 1. 2, where avrov is preferable to e.g. [T]nvTov or [<r]avTov, and leads to 
much difficulty in 1. 3 ; for though the p of pa is very faint the o is practically certain (x is 
the only alternative), and that apa is the word meant is shown clearly by 11. 6 and 22. 
Hence if [a]pa is read in 1. 3, the a at the end of 1. 2 becomes superfluous. We prefer to 
suppose that the hole was there when the leaf was written upon, and that the scribe therefore 
began 11. 2-3 further to the right than 1. i. tlpa dXijdcos is rendered by only one word in the 
Latin, uere; cf. 1. 22 where in rendering apa dhjOels the Latin is redundant. 

6-7. For TT] ypaibi the Latin has matrem ipsius, omitting to translate jSouXci iJ-ijrep kui. 

8. ^ is a mistake for 6co. 

9. anoirjaop.fda : 1. dnoKTopfda, 

ID. fK€i: ad Petrum Lat., which is clearer. 

12. Trpai(PeKT09 : for this form cf. ch. 12 of the fxaprvpiov (p. 100. 16, ed. Lipsius) rw 
npaiifx'KTM 'Ayplnna. The Latin has /laec dicentibus iubenibus praefectus autem in foro, putting 
autem too late. The addition of iji foro, however, makes the passage clearer, since the 
preceding lines refer to what took place at the house of the old woman. 

13. aTevi((xiv: cf. aTfviaa^ in chs. 55 and 56 of the jSIarlyrium Petri et Pauli (ed. 
Lipsius, pp. 164. 21, 166. 6), which is supposed to be based on the older Acts of Peter (cf. 
Harnack, Chron. d. altchr. Lit., ii. 2, p. 177). 

1 4. The Latin has dixit : Quid dicis, Petre .^ ecce puer ?nortuus, Sec, and we should expect 
at the beginning of this line ecf^r]- W </)i;y ;, for which there is not room. The doubtful s might 
be 6, i. e. the termination of eiWe, which is, however, insufficient by itself. The leaf is torn 
at this point, and the ink very much obhterated, so that decipherment is impossible. 

15. p.ov is omitted in the Latin. 



12 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

1 6. [±i(jik€vs = mpera/or, as frequently in the Martyrium Petri ct Paiili. 

1 8. Kotroi ye erepovy : the point of this is that the boy chosen to die was the favourite 
servant, and that Agrippa might have chosen one of his other attendants. 

19. In place of /xfr i\x.avTov the Latin has conphires. 

20-1. Tov 8ia (Tov 6(eo)v =z dominum iuum giiein praedicas. The addition of a participle 
such as KrjpvTTOfievov would be an improvement, but is not necessary, neipacrai deXutv is 
mistianslated by the Latin co/ijidcns m, which does not suit the following clause si tiere 
certi, Sec. 

22. ft apa a\r)6fts : the Latin is redundant, si uere certi et ueri. In 11. 2-3 on the other 
hand lipa iiXTjdus is rendered by one word uere. 

25. Ayptmra is Omitted in the Latin. 

26-7. (piXovfjLeuus KiH TrcipaKaXovp(Pos : this is clearer than the Latin di/eetissimus ex 
animo colendiis. 



850. Acts of John. 

i2-ixio-7cm. Fourth century. Plate I (recto). 

t 

The upper portion (apparently) of a leaf from a codex of the Acts cf John, 
contahiing a mutilated account of two incidents, neither of which occurs in 
the extant portions of that work. The handwriting is a good-sized, irregular 
and rather inelegant uncial of the fourth century. Stops (middle and low points) 
are freely employed, as well as occasional breathings. The ordinary theological 
contractions of ^eo's, 'bjo-oiSs, and /cijptos occur. The recto has in one or two lines at 
the top of the page the sub-title of the section of the Acts. This sub-title is unfor- 
tunately incomplete, and no light is thrown upon it by the actual contents of the 
fragment ; but the mention of Andronicus supplies a point of contact with the 
extant portions of the Acts of John, in which that individual is mentioned several 
times as a aTpaTr]y6s of Ephesus who, at first a sceptic, afterwards became one of 
the apostle's chief disciples in that city. The following incident is of a type 
familiar in apocryphal Acts. The apostle goes to visit the brethren apparently 
at a village near Ephesus, and on the way has to cross a bridge, where his passage 
is barred by a demon in the form of a soldier, who threatens violence. The 
military aspect assumed by the demon recalls a similar story in the Martyritivi 
Matthaci, which is not impossibly here copying the Acts of John\ cf. 1. 26, 
note. Rebuked by St. John, the demon vanishes, and on reaching his destina- 
tion the apostle exhorts the brethren to worship and joins with them in prayer 
(11. i^-'if)). The verso (11. 1-T9) is concerned with a quite different episode which 
is much more obscure. The scene is a church (cf. 1. 16), and apparently a person 
called Zeuxis (1. 13) had just tried to hang himself but had been miraculously 
saved by St. John (11. 5-6), who in 11. 4-13 offers up a thanksgiving of a character 
for which there are numerous parallels in the extant Acts of John. Afterwards 



850. ACTS OF JOHN 13 

some question seems to arise concerning the partaking of the Eucharist 
(11. 13-5), and the proconsul (sc. of Ephesus) intervenes, perhaps bringing a letter 
from the Emperor (11. 15-8), but the circumstances are obscure. Whether the 
page on the recto precedes that on the verso or vice versa there is no external 
evidence to show ; but since the description of the incident on the verso implies 
a considerable amount of space devoted to the earlier part of the Zeuxis story, 
we prefer to suppose that the verso precedes the recto, for the missing lower half 
of the recto does not seem to allow sufficient room for the beginning of the 
Zeuxis story, which is obviously quite unconnected with the incident concerning 
the demon in the form of a soldier. The verso therefore presumably belongs 
to the conclusion of one section of the Acts of John, and the recto to the begin- 
ning of the next. The tendency of the various apocryphal Acts to split up into 
independent parts has already been noted (cf. p. 9) in regard to the Acts 
of Peter, and in the Acts of John is especially marked ; the fullest edition 
(Bonnet, Acta Apost. Apocr., i. pp. 151 -21 6) is made up of five separate 
sections derived from different MSS., and not only separated from each other by 
gaps of uncertain length, but also exhibiting in some places evidence of internal 
omissions. There is no difficulty in finding a place for the new fragment. The 
references to Andronicus and the proconsul clearly indicate Ephesus as the back- 
ground. Andronicus is mentioned, obviously for the first time, in c, 31 of the 
extant Acts, where he appears as an unbeliever, but in c. 37 he has already 
become a disciple, and the account of his conversion probably occurred in one or 
more lost chapters which originally intervened between cc. 31 and 37, although 
these both belong to the continuous section of the Acts (cc. 18- 86) found in the 
Codex Patmensis. Andronicus also occurs in the following section found only 
in the Codex Vindobonensis (cc. 87-105), so that our fragment must be 
inserted at some point later than c. 31 and before c. 106, where begins the 
account of the ixirdaraais with which the work concluded. Two periods of 
residence at Ephesus are ascribed to the apostle in these chapters, the first 
covering cc. 31-55, at which point St. John leaves for Smyrna and there is 
a gap in which several chapters are lost. His return to Ephesus is narrated 
in c. 62, and throughout the rest of the Acts Ephesus remains the scene. 
Excluding therefore cc. 55-62 with those lost between cc. S5 and 58, all of 
which dealt with events away from Ephesus, the most suitable points for the 
insertion of our fragment are (i) c. 37 before the sentence beginning ot 8e otto 
MikriTov, where there is a change of subject, and a lacuna is in any case probable 
owing to the inconsistency of c. 37 with c. 31 concerning Andronicus ; (2) the 
gap between cc. 86 and 87 ; (3) the gap between cc. 105 and 106. But though 
in these three places the lacunae are evident, there are other points between 



14 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

cc. 31-55 and 62-86 (cc. 87-105 form one long speech) where the existence 
of lacunae is possible, so that there is much freedom of choice. If the title 
in 11. 20 and 21 refers, as is possible, to the separation of Andronicus from his wife 
Drusiane, alluded to in c. 6'^ (ex ttoAAoG koX tov ai'bpds Kex^copia^iii]^ amij's hia 
deocrejSeiav), our fragment must have preceded that chapter, and the general 
resemblance between the situation in 11. 22 sqq. and that in c. 48 (especially 
in the version found in the Codex Parisiacus ; cf. 11. 22-3, note) also suggests that 
our fragment belongs to the earlier rather than to the later portions of the Acfs 
of John. 

The composition of the original Acts of John is assigned by all critics 
to the second century, but how far back in that century the work is to be placed 
depends largel}^ upon the disputed question whether it was used by Clement of 
Alexandria, as has been supposed by Zahn and others, but not by Harnack 
[C/iroji. d. altchr. Lit., ii. i, p. 542, li. 2, p. 174). As is usual with apocryphal 
Acts preserved in comparatively late MSS., there is some uncertainty as to the 
extent to which the existing portions accurately represent the original or have 
been subjected to editing. So far as it goes, our fragment, which on account of 
its antiquity no doubt belongs to the original Acts of John, agrees closely both 
in its general form and contents with the previously extant portions, and there- 
fore tends to support the view that these have not undergone any serious amount 
of revision ; cf. the similar conclusion to which we attained in connexion with the 
Acts of Peter (pp. 9-10). The use of the first person plural in reference to Leucius, 
the supposed narrator of the Acts of JoJiii, which often occurs in the narrative 
portions of the Acts dealing with Ephesus, Is not found in 11. 22 sqq. where it 
might perhaps be expected ; but no importance is to be attached to this circum- 
stance, for e. g. in the story in cc. 48 sqq. the use of the first person is equally 
absent. Formerly the Acts of John were treated as pronouncedly Gnostic, but 
this inference has recently been disputed by C. Schmidt, who is followed by 
Harnack {op. cit., ii. 3, p. 173) in regarding them as ' vulgarchrlstlich, aber von 
ausscrordentlich starker modallstischcr und doketischer Fiirbung '. It is unfortu- 
nate that the passage in our fragment which would be most likely to show 
its author's theological point of view, the prayer in 11. 5-13, is far from com- 
plete. While most of the phrases are, so far as can be judged, of a conventional 
character, the expression o ra [ju,]7j8ert yrc.jp[i/xa . . .] yvinpiC^v In 11. 7-8 has 
a somewhat Gnostic ring. 

The beginnings and ends of lines are lost on both pages of the fragment, but 
it is clear from the fairly certain restorations of the lacunae between 11. 22-3, 
26-7, 29-30, and 31-2 that the lines on the recto contained about 41 letters, 
and 1. 27 which projects proves that at least 5 letters arc lost at the beginnings 



850. ACTS OF JOHN 



15 



of the other lines on the recto. We have calculated the size of the lacunae on 
the hypothesis that one letter is lost before (r;ui'os in 1. 27 and 4 letters at the 
end of 1. 31. The arrangement of the division of lines on the verso is more 
problematical ; we suppose the lines to be of the same length as those on the 
recto and have taken the restorations in 11. 12 and 13 as the basis for calculating 
the size of the lacunae elsewhere ; cf. note on I. 9. 



Verso. 



. . v]n€f) avTov 7t[. . . 
. . .] 8e Icoavvq^ yu[. 



Zev^]LSi avaaras apa's tto . [ 

5 ]o . [.jTTT . [. .]?. o avajKaaa^ fie fiera . [ 

. . . .] €PPOOvu[ra] l3[p]o^iaaL eavrou- ra a7reyi'CD[(Tfi€ya 

] eTTLaTp[e(f)\(i)v ety (re. 6 ra [fji\r]Sei'i yucop[t/2a .... 

]j'o? yi'copi^coj'. 6 KXaicov tou9 Te6\ifi[j-i€vov9 

. . . .](o- Tovs veveKpwjxevov^ avi(TT(ov fx . . [.]oy . [. . . 

10 ....]. aj'i? TCoi> a8vvaT0)V Irjv- 6 irapaKXrjTO^ [rcoy 

. . . .]icoi'. aivovnev ae kul TrpoaKvvovpcv Ka\j. iv^api 
aTOv\ixev evi iraarj or[o]i^ Scopea- kul ttj vvv oiKoi'o[ixia aov 
Kai\ 8LaKou[L]a. Kai jxovco T(o Zev^iSi Tr]s eu^ayo[£0-Tm9 

.] €7re[5&)/f]e[i'] 8e tol^ ^[ov]\o[xei>oi9 Xa^Hv .[...... 

.]evL(7avT(.[s d\vK €ro\nr](Tav. Se av6vnaTo\s 

.joot'tt K\a\Ta TO [iiaov ttj^ eKKXr][(Ti]a9 rco [Icoaui'i] 

.^(ou X[€ye]i SovXe tov aKaTcoi'ojxaaTov o [ 

..]..[....] emaToXa? (Ko/xiaei' irapa Kaia[apo? . . . 

] . Kai avi'[ 



Recto. 
20 a7ra]XXayr] '. ^ > > > > [ 

A]vSpoviK09 Kac rj y\yvri ? 

7]p.epcov S]€ oXiycou SieXOouacov e[^eX$oou Icoav 



i6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

vrj^ aii\a irX^iocriv aSeX(f)0i9 npo? [ ejSovXe 

TO 7rep]aiv€tv ye^vpav vcf) rjv 7r[o]ra/ioy €pp€ey [. . . . 

25 Kai 7ro]pevojj.ei^ov [t]ov Icoavvov irpos t[ov\^ a8€.\^[ov^ 

]^ rty \Tr]poaei(nv avrco a^rj/iaTL <TTpaTi(OT[ov rj/xcpi 

e](Tp.ei'0?. KUL €19 oylr[i\i^ aurov aras €(f>T]. Iccavvr] ei a[. . . . 

. . . €L9^ X^'P'^[^] f'^f^^^ Ta^iara- Kai Icoavvris oi[ 

60?; (r]/3ea-i aov ks tt^v aTT€iXr]v [Ka\i Ti]V opyrji^ K[ai ti]v 

30 nXr}fifi]eXiav Kai I'Sov €K€ii*09 acpai^r]^ eyeueTO a[7reX 

OopTo]? ovv rov I[(o]ai^uov Trp[o s ovs aTTr](:[i\ Kai ivpo\i'T09 
avTov\'i avvrjOpoiariJLeuoyi iLmv- a[va<JTa\vT€S a[5eX 
0O£ iiov] KXetfcofxeu yovara npos tov kv [K\aL tov p.ey[aXov e^ 
6pov a?ppaTOV ei^epyqfia KaTapyT]aay\Ta . . ,]T7;cra[ 

35 ... av T0L9 eKXeiueu yovuTa a/xa ay[Tois . . .]7re/'[ 

]tcou 69 e0[ 



' John . . . (spake) to Zeuxis, " Rise up and lift . . . ; thou who didst compel me to 
turn from his purpose one who was intending to hang himself, who turnest the hearts that 
are in despair to thyself, who makest known the things that are known to none . . ., who 
weepest for the afflicted . . ., who raisest the dead ... of the weak, O Jesus, the comforter 
of the . . . We praise thee and w'orship thee and give thanks to thee for all thy bounty and 
the present dispensation and service." And he (gave) the eucharist to Zeuxis alone, (and 
then) offered it to those who wished to receive it, but . . . did not dare to do so. The 
proconsul . . . (coming) into the middle of the church saith to John : " O servant of the 
unnameable one, . . . brought letters from Caesar . . ." 

' The separation (?) ; Andronicus and his wife. 

' After a few days had passed, John went forth with several brethren to . . ., and wished 
to cross a bridge under which a . . . river was flowing. And as John was on his way to 
the brethren, a certain . . ., clothed in the fashion of a soldier, approached him, and standing 
before his face said, " John, if thou (advancest) thou shalt straightway engage me in combat." 
And John . . . said, " The Lord shall quench thy threat and thy wrath and thy offence," and 
behold the other vanished. John then having come to those whom he was visiting and 
found them gathered together, spake, *' Let us rise up, my brethren, and bow our knees 
before the Lord who has made of none effect the unseen activity of even the great 
(enemy ?)"... he bowed his knees with them . . .' 

4. Probably (me is to be supplied before Z(v$]t8i (for whom cf. 1. 13) and cwaaras, apa^ 
... is the beginning of the speech, although there is no stop after Zev$]i8i ; cf. however 
1. 30, note. 

5. After [. .]f is a low stop, as after ae in 1. 7 and »7^(/)tf]a-/Ljffoj in 1. 27. U fie before 
fjLern . [ is not due to diltography, we may restore fieTaT\pe'rTfip (or iJieTatTjpfcpeip) Z6v|t5a] 
(vvoovvja]. The letter after pera is quite uncertain. For similar invocations in the Ac/s of 
John see pp. 187-93 of Bonnet's edition. 



850. ACTS OF JOHN 17 

6. o both before to here and before tovs in 1. 9 probably had a breathing which is lost 
in a lacuna. 

7. The line may be completed yv(Of.[ifxa 8ia if ]vos in 1. 8 is a genitive ; 1, or fi could 
be read there in place of the doubtful v. 

9. The supposed w at the beginning of the line is extremely doubtful, and it would be 
possible to read e. g. s. In that case, if the lines on the verso were 3 or 4 letters shorter 
than those on the recto (cf. introd. p. 15), we might read Tf6Kin[iJ.(\vov]s here, with So|^afo]^ei/ 
in place of evxapi.\(TTov]iJ.€i> in 11. 11-2, omitting both aov in 1. 12 and the supposed lacuna 
between a7reyva)[(rfjLem and eTnaTp[e(f)]o}v in 11. 6-7. The reduction of the corresponding lacunae 
elsewhere by 3 or 4 letters would, however, present some difficulty in 11. 13-4, where a verb 
is necessary ; and we prefer to adhere to the length of lines indicated by the recto. 

KM is possible after aviarav in place of /n . ., but less suitable. 

10. aviarav is not Satisfactory since the word occurred in the previous line. Ij;(o-o)v is 
no doubt vocative. 

1 1-3. Cf. e.g. Ac/s of John {AJ), p. 189. 23-4, and 193. 2 sqq., and for oiKovofila 
p. 188. 2. 

14. (KoiP(ovr]<T(, which would be expected (cf. AJ, p. 193. 14, &c.), is too long for the 
lacuna after evxapia-Tias. e\8iOKe] might be read ; but then if f 7rf[5a)/c]([i/] in the next line is right 
(cf. A/, p. 208. 11) these two sentences do not connect well together. 

The supposed stop after XajSecv may be the beginning of a letter, e. g. r. The letter at 
the end of the line is represented by the lower half of a vertical stroke ; [o]i [Se is possible. 

15. Perhaps ar^eviaavTels. The supposed apostrophe after uvk is very doubtful. For 
the dvdim-aros of Ephesus cf. AJ, p. 167. 28 and 851. 2, note. 

16. ]ov suggests a participle like fX^jwf, but the following letters constitute a difficulty, 
the arrangement of the fibres, which are twisted, being not C[uite certain. Of the supposed 
K the merest vesdge remains, but Se [Kaya is unsuitable. 

17. ]ou may be read in place of jwr. At the end of the line the supposed rough 
breathing is more to the left than usual, but it is not satisfactory to regard it as part 

of a mark of abbreviation, i. e. '6[v. d/caroi/ojunoros does not occur elsewhere in the 
apocryphal Acts. 

20-1. Prof. C. Schmidt well compares the similar sub-titles in the Coptic Ac/a Paidi. 
fiXXayi] = 'posting-stage', which is unsuitable here, occurs in AJ, p. 154. 7. Of the 
compounds dTraXXay/; seems most likely, and if the words in 1. 22 had been in the genitive 
it would be easy to connect this heading with the allusion to the separation of Andronicus 
and his wife Drusiane in AJ, p. 181. 25. The presence of the nominative there renders 
this explanation more difficult, unless indeed we restore on-cd? d7rr;]XX<iy/;. The double dots 
after IXXny;; are not certain. That «7r«lAX«yr} refers to the death of St. John is very 
improbable, for the section of the Acts of John dealing with that subject is extant, under 
the sub-title of /^fTdcrToa-ty or dva-navaii {AJ, p. 203). With regard to the reading 7; 7[v^'^, 
the y is almost certain, p being the only alernative and less suitable ; but 777 might of 
course be the beginning of e. g. another proper name. The prominence of Drusiane, 
however, as well as Andronicus in the Ads of John makes tf y\yvrj very probable, even if 
1. 20 has no connexion with 1. 21 and belongs, as is possible, to the preceding section, not 
to the sub-title at all. 

22—3. Cf. Af ^, 175. 24—5 (Codex Parisiacus) pfra ovu rjpepas nvas Kara 6(iav dTroKaXvyj/^tv 
e^rjKdfv 6 'l(x)dvprfi ef Tivi Kaprj els eni(TKf\f/ii' ra>v dbf\(j)oiv, npos |67ri(TKe\|/«i/ (with a shorter verb 

than f/3ouX€To) is possible in 1. 23, but a place-name or equivalent expression is more likely. 
The parallel passage in the Codex Patmensis is t[j de e'^^s '/MW "*'"/' 6(aaup.fvos 6 'icodwTjs 

fiiXia Tpta e^o) nvXav TTepnTaTrjcrai ovk rjpeXrjaev dX\' updpov dfaaras apa Toii u8e\(pols (1t\ rijv udov 
e^dS(Ce. 

c 



i8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

24. The lacuna at the end may be filled either by a short epithet o{n[oyayios, e. g. /xeyas 
or ^advs, or else by reading km with a compound of irolpevofievov. The doubtful v of tpp^ev 
might be /i. 

26. Cf. Mariyrmvi Matthaei (Bonnet, Ada Apost. Apocr., ii. i, p. 232. 15-6) 6 hi. daificov 

6 fv TO) (TTpaTicoTLKQi (T-)(rjpaTi dcj)df\s nporepov ra ^aaCkdiraXiv peTaaxfJlJ^ariadeh fv (TXTjiMari (TTpariaTov 

eoTt] K.T.X. Since the Marly ritwi Ma/ihaei wzs composed much later than the Acts of John, 
the coincidence may be due to imitation by the author of the former work, dalpai' would 
be expected at the beginning of this line, for it is clearly an evil spirit who appears ; but the 
traces of the last letter are inconsistent with v and suggest p, though 8ain](o(v) might 
be read. 

28. op[yia6is might be read at the end of the line. The supposed o might be o- but not 
f, so that f i| TTfj/ is inadmissible. 

30. There is no stop or blank space after eyevero, and a possibly represents a[vTa), with 
aiTo\i3nvTo]i for the next word. Cf. note on 1. 4. 

33-4. The second letter of k{vplo)v is rather more like v, but the accusative seems to 
be required by the sense, p or n can be read after p-e in place of y. The word no doubt 
refers to the powers of evil; with evepyrjpa in 1. 34 cf. A/, p. 187. 24 ivepyuav KaKoiTiKrju, 200. 

14 daipoves, evepyeiat, cnreiXal, For KaTapyrjTavyra cf. Af, p. I92. 24 KaTapyr]6r]Ti, and Ac/a 

Philippi, ed. Bonnet, 40. 7 KarapyrjOijafTM naa-a r] tov e^dpov hvvapis. The doubtful t before 
ijcra can be y, and 8ii}]yrj(rapevos is possible. The word is probably a participle in any case. 
35, aSeX]0oTj cannot be read, and the t is nearly certain. With regard to av[Tois, the 
repetition of this word is not very satisfactory, but aS^fX^ot? is inadmissible there also. The 
next word may be etVei' [Sf, but r can be read for tt. 

851. Apocryphal Acts. 

5-3x18 cm. Fifth or sixth century. 

The following small fragment of a papyrus codex, which clearly contained the 
Acts of some apostle or saint, we have not succeeded in identifying with any 
of the Acta Apostoloriim Apocrypha edited by Lipsius and Bonnet. It consists of 
the lower portion of a leaf, written with brown ink in a large round calligraphic 
uncial hand which is certainly not later than the sixth century and may belong 
to the fifth. 6t6s is contracted as usual, but not avOpca-nos, nor perhaps Kvpios. 
The recto begins just after the commencement of a new chapter which is indicated 
by a paragraphus and by a vertical wavy line in the margin, apparently the 
bottom of a flourish. If our restoration rjyej/xwy in 1. i (cf. 1. 5) fs correct, a prae- 
fect is apparently giving orders for some one to be exposed to wild beasts. The 
verso contains part of a protest made to the praefect, defending some one (no 
doubt the apostle concerned in these Acts) from the charge of being a magician. 
Whether the recto or the verso comes first is quite uncertain. Some points 
of connexion with the Acts 0/ Paul and Thecla, in which a similar scene occurs, 
suggest that the fragment may belong either to a different version of those Acts 
or to one of the lost sections of the Acts of Paul (cf p. 9), but it does not 
correspond to any of the new Coptic fragments of that work. 



851. APOCRYPHAL ACTS 19 

Recto. Verso. 



C eiTTCi/ coy ^ovXt] 7r[oi]et [Se rjye [ ].[....]... o^[, . 

jxcoy enreif irpos tovs ap^iKV 5 [Kv^pie [j/yje/xwi/ ovtos av 

vr]yov9 ayere /xoc coSe ^covOav 6p<i)7ro9 ovk eariu fj-ayos 

aXXa raya 69 avTov /xeyas iariu 

' . . . said " Do as you wish ", The praefect said to the chief huntsmen, " Bring to 
me here . . . 

'' O lord praefect, this man is not a magician, but perhaps his god is great . . ." ' 

2. apxiKvvrjyovs : this word does not seem to occur in Lipsius and Bonnet's Ac/a Apost. 
Apocr., but cf. Acts of Paul and Thecla, ed. Lipsius, p. 257. 4 avros yap f8i8ov tu Kvvrjyia. 
r)yep.<jiv (cf. 1. 5) is also the word used in those Acts for the Roman governor, while 7rpui<peKT0i is 
used in the Ac/s of Peter and avQvTrmos in the Acts offohn. 

3. The letter after C«, if not v, must be p. or possibly tt, and the next letter seems to be 
a round one, but much narrower than the scribe's ^ or o elsewhere. Possibly he began to 
write iiavra and corrected it to iix^aav, but though the supposed v may have been crossed 
through the next letter is not like o- or t corrected into o-. Or perhaps a proper name 
is intended. ^u>ypiav cannot be read. 

5—6. Cf. Acts of Paul ajid Thecla, p. 249. 1—2 6 8e ox^os irpoaaxQivTos ttoKiv tov HavKov 
TTtpiadOTepas t^oa, pdyos iariv, alpe avTov, 



II. NEW CLASSICAL TEXTS. 

852. Euripides, Hypsipyle. 

Height 37-1 cm. Late second or early third century. 

Plates II and III (Fr. i. ii-iii, 
Fr. 60. i-ii). 

The following fragments, which constitute the most important addition 
to the remains of Greek tragedy hitherto made by Egyptian papyri, belong, like 
841-4 in our previous volume and 853 in this, to the first large group of literary 
texts found in 1906. The style and contents of 852 were sufficiently definite to 
enable us at the time of the first announcement of the discovery to identify the 
play as the Hypsipyle of Euripides, and this identification has subsequently been 
confirmed by the recognition of at least two coincidences with citations from that 
drama by ancient authorities. 

C 2 



20 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

In common with the other manuscripts from this find, the papyrus was 
recovered in an extremely mutilated condition. The most considerable piece 
was the central portion of Fr. i containing parts of two consecutive columns ; 
but the majority of the fragments, originally numbering over 300, were com- 
paratively small in size. On the whole they have hardly fitted together so well 
as might have been expected. Particularly difficult to deal with in this respect 
are the pieces numbered 6-17 and 30-56, which formed a small group found 
subsequently at some little distance from the rest, and distinguished by being of 
a darker colour and badly worm-eaten. Another characteristic shared by 852 
with 841-2 and 853 is that the literary text is on the verso of a non-literary 
document, — in this instance a money account, of which a description is given 
under 985. Though of course very useful for purposes of confirmation, this 
document on the recto, which follows no regular formula, is in too large a hand 
to be of much assistance towards the combination of small fragments ; moreover 
the recto of a number of the fragments is uninscribed. The account is of 
a decidedly early date, and may be safely placed within the first century ; but 
it was apparently not till a good many years later that the verso came to be used 
for this copy of the Hypsipyle, which we should judge to be little anterior to 
A.D. 300. It is written in a sloping uncial hand similar in kind to that of 
842 (the new historian), and no doubt of about the same period. ^ is always 
of the cursive shape, with a tail, and other cursive forms occasionally make their 
appearance, particularly at the ends of lines, e. g. d? of oikovs in Fr. 58. 8, /xei' of 
Xe^oixev in Fr. 60. 59. The size of the letters and the spacing show considerable 
variations in different parts of the MS. ; there is a marked contrast for instance 
in this respect between Fr. i. ii and Fr. 60. ii (cf. Plates II and III). Hence 
inequalities occur in the number of lines contained in the columns, which are 
remarkably tall : there was a difference of seven lines between Cols, i and ii of 
Fr. 60, numbering 63 and ^^ lines respectively ; Col. ii of Fr. 64 has only 54 lines, 
while the first seven columns of the play averaged about 60 lines, as is shown by 
the occurrence in the seventh column of the figure 400, the verse opposite 
to which this numeral is placed being succeeded by at least 15 lines before the 
column ended. This marginal numeration of verses by hundreds is not infrequent 
in papyri ; cf. e. g. 841 (Pindar's Paeans), and note on Fr. 35. There are frequent 
variations of the point in the column at which the lines were commenced, 
the object usually being to mark the distinction between iambics and lyrics 
or strophic divisions within the latter. Accents, breathings, and marks of elision 
and quantity are fairly frequent throughout, but lection al signs, as might be 
expected, are rather commoner in the lyrical parts than elsewhere. The 
system of accentuation is similar in character to that of 223, 841 and other 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 21 

papyri of this period ; it should be noted that for convenience of printing 
we place the circumflex on the second vowel of a diphthong, though in the 
original it usually covers the two letters. A line curving upwards is occasionally 
placed below compound words, as in 841 and the Bacchylides papyrus. Punc- 
tuation, which is rare, is commonly effected by a high stop, usually placed well 
above the line ; a low stop occurs in Fr. 68. 7. To what extent these various signs 
are due to the original scribe is uncertain ; but he evidently wrote some of them 
and the majority may well come from his pen. The same writer was also doubt- 
less responsible for the names of the dramatis pcrsonac which occasionally appear 
in the margin (cf. 211, 855, &c.), for the stichometrical figures already mentioned, 
and for the paragraphi, which are employed both to denote changes of speaker 
and to mark strophic divisions. But it is equally clear that a number of the fre- 
quent alterations and additions made in the text are due to another hand, which 
we have as usual attempted to distinguish by the use of a thicker type ; it is 
however often very difficult to feel confidence in assigning the authorship of 
minor corrections, and doubtful cases have as a rule been credited to the original 
writer. Occasionally a variant or an explanatory note is inserted in the margin. 
But in spite of the numerous modifications the text is left in a by no means 
satisfactory condition, and in several passages emendation is necessary. The 
fault no doubt sometimes lay with the archetype, but it is impossible to acquit 
our copyist of much carelessness. His orthography is very fair : et and t are 
unusually correctly written, but iota adscript is frequently omitted, and some 
mistakes of accentuation occur. With regard to the use of the Doric a in the 
lyrical parts there is little consistency, and here we as a rule follow the spelling 
of the papyrus. 

The fragments are scattered widely over the play, and though much of the 
plot is now clear, some essential points unfortunately remain in doubt. Hypsi- 
pyle's story is told by several ancient authorities, but none of the versions is 
found to agree very closely with the treatment of Euripides. Hypsipyle, 
daughter of Thoas, the son of Dionysus and king of Lemnos, in a massacre 
of the men of the island by the women concealed and saved her father, whom 
she succeeded in the government of Lemnos. The deception was eventually dis- 
covered, and Hypsipyle, who had meanwhile become the mother of two sons by 
Jason on his way to Colchis in quest of the golden fleece, was sold as a slave to 
Lycurgus, king of Nemea, and put in charge of his infant son. It was with her 
subsequent adventures at Nemea that the plot of Euripides' drama was con- 
cerned. The following is the account of the scholiast to Clement of Alexandria, 
p. 105 sqq. : — ore 01 cTrra knX Qi]l3as crvv 'ASpao-ro) nal Uokw^iKei kcrTpanvovro, 
Tiapi^aXov eis tt]V Neixiav' tottos 8e ovtos tov "Apyovi. ^rjrowres 8e vhpi.vaa<j6ai avvi- 



22 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Tvyov 'T^iTtvXj] rfi QoavTos dvyaTpl Tpe(f)OV(nj Tiaihiov ^OcpiXrijv KaXovpievov Ev(f>i]yov 
(1. EvcfjriTov?) Kol EvpyhU-i^s. i] 8e aTioBeixivi] to "naihiov aTii]kdev avToU vbpevaaadai, 
fSovXoixivy]. bpaKoov 6e ev toctovtw TieptTTea-cbv rw 7rat8tw avelXev avro. r] 8e ^TraveXOovaa 
i6p)']V€i,'Aiji.(f)i,dpao? be 6 iidpTis ets ojy rwz; kiTTa aTTo tov avjxjSdL'Tos rots ' E\Xi]aL davarov 
TTpo€[j.avTev(7aTO Kol TOV Tialha ^Apyjep.opov (KaXecrcv. "AbpaaTos be 'napaixvOovp.e.vos ttjv 
'T\}/nTvki-jv kii av7<f tov Nf/xeaKoi; dyQva avve(TTi]<TaTo. If AvKovpyov be substituted 
for Eii(/j7/you and in the last sentence 'AiJi.(})Ldpaos for "AbpaaTos and EvpybU-qv for 
'T\lrfnv\-i]v, the outline so far as it goes will be accurate, but it omits entirely the 
two sons of Hypsipyle who, as we now know, played a part in the plot of 
Euripides. ApoUodorus iii. 6. 4 is slightly less detailed : he adds however that 
the serpent was slain and gives Lycurgus as the name of the king of Nemea. 
Four separate accounts are prefixed to the scholia on Pindar's Nevica. The 
first of these brings in Hypsipyle's sons, though with marked divergences from 
Euripides : Iv ^k^Cvu) 8e rw Katpw kutq, {Tjr/^crti; ol TratSes Qoas Kal Evrtcos trapifiaXov 
€v Ne/xea. EvpuStK?]? 8e r^? AvKovpyov yvvaiKos f3ov\o[xevi]S 8ta tov O^e'Arou OdvaTov 
dveXtlv Ti]v 'T\}/L7iv\i]v bid TovTo re (V tlvl roTiw Xa6paC(^ KaroKAetcraiTTj?, Aix(pidpaos 
p.avTevadfxevos biiKwat toIs Traial ti]v 'T^i-nvki]v. i] §e rouro evTV^i^a-aa-a TrapeKuXet 
tovs rjpcoas rots 7rato-ty {(TVv)ayoivi(raa6aL. There was evidently no question of the 
concealment of Hypsipyle by the queen in Euripides' play, nor any intercourse 
between the former and the seven chieftains after her recognition by her sons. 
The brief account of Hyginus c. 74 is very similar to those of ApoUodorus and 
the scholiast on Clement. In only one extant work is the story of Hypsipyle at 
Nemea treated at length, namely the TJiebais of Statius, which might have been 
expected to reflect the version of Euripides and was largely drawn upon by 
Hartung in connexion with the Hypsipyle in his Ew'ipides Restitutes, ii. pp. 430 
sqq. Statius, however, whom as Hartung thought esse Eiiripide iisiun anctore 
manifestuni est, turns out to have been by no means a safe guide. Apart from 
minor variations in detail, which need not be emphasized here, there are funda- 
mental discrepancies in structure. After the death of the child [TJicb. v. 505 sqq.) 
Statius represents the Argive army as proceeding with Hypsipyle to the palace 
of Lycurgus. The procession is met by the king, who proposes to take vengeance 
for Hypsipyle's negligence, but is restrained by the chieftains. In the confusion 
which results the sons of Hypsipyle, who had been hospitably received at the 
palace, go to the assistance of Lycurgus and are so led to discover their mother's 
identity. Then follows the institution of the Nemean games at the instigation 
of Amphiaraus. As will be seen, it was certainly not from Euripides that Statius 
derived the ground-plan of this part of his poem. In the fragments of the 
tragedy Lycurgus is conspicuous by his absence, his place being taken by the 
queen Eurydice who in Statius is a minor figure, while the only representative of 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 23 

the Argive army is Amphiaraus accompanied by a few attendants, and his appeal 
on Hypsipyle's behalf is exclusively to right, not might (Fr. 60. 40). 

Let us now turn to the actual remains of the play. First in order stand 
the three verses quoted in Aristoph. Frogs 131 1-3 from the prologue (Nauck 
Fr. 752) AtoVwo-o?, OS 6vpcroL(TL . . . TrrjSa k.t.K. Welcker, Gricch. Trag. ii. pp. 557-8, 
and Hartung, Etirip. Rest. ii. p. 431, are very positive that the prologue was spoken 
by Dionysus and have therefore to suppose that the lines cited by Aristophanes 
were preceded by one or two other verses. This however is on the one hand 
inconsistent with the use of the third person 7r?}oa, and on the other with the 
express testimony of the scholiast, which there is no reason to doubt, that the 
passage was 'T\/Ai7rvA?js 7\ apx>i' The opening is strictly parallel to others in 
the prologues of Euripides, e. g. those of the /ou or the IpJiig. in Taiiris, where 
the speaker begins by giving his or her genealogy. In the present case accord- 
ingly the speaker was tracing descent from Dionysus, and the only persons who 
can here come in question are Hypsipyle herself or one of her two sons Euneos 
and Thoas. In the first column of Fr. i of the papyrus, which, as the stichometry 
indicates, was the third column of the play, the sons in the guise of travellers 
seeking hospitality for the night appear in colloquy with a woman, whose con- 
gratulations to the mother of the strangers would almost suffice to identify her as 
Hypsipyle herself; hence the initial pj/crts would be quite appropriate in the 
mouth of any one of the three persons who are available. If the speaker of 
it is, as we suppose, Hypsipyle, the arrangement is similar to that of the 
Iphigenia in Taiiris. Hypsipyle recounts her history and circumstances^ and 
then enters the palace, perhaps for the purpose of fetching the child Archemorus ; 
Euneos and Thoas arrive, and after some conversation, in which their identity 
and mission (they were looking for their lost mother: causa viae genetrix as 
Statius, Theb. v. 715, says; cf. Schol. Neni. quoted on p. 22) are explained, 
knock at the door of the palace ; Hypsipyle opens it and the dialogue of Fr. i. 
Col. i follows. If on the other hand Euneos or Thoas made the opening speech, 
Hypsipyle would not have appeared until the travellers proceeded to knock 
at the door. This view is simpler, but possibly too simple ; it hardly accounts 
so well for the 1 20 lines of the first two columns, apart from the consideration 
that the heroine of the piece is perhaps more suitable as the upoXoyiCpvaa. 

The papyrus breaks off in the middle of the conversation of Hypsipyle with 
the strangers, who presumably gained admittance, in spite of the absence of the 
king Lycurgus (Fr. i. i. 11) ; in these two details Statius is in agreement with 
Euripides (cf. Theb. v. 640, 715). Hypsipyle then sings a monody to her nurs- 
ling, of which the conclusion is preserved in the first 14 lines of Fr. i. ii. This is 
the song, as the reference in 1. 8 to KpoVaAa indicates, to which allusion is made 



24 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

in Frogs 1305 sqq. tiov Vnt* 7/ rois oorpa/cots avVr; Kporovcra ; 8e{5/3o MoCcr' EvptTriSou : 
cf. Phot. H^x. p. 180. 12 KpoTaXC^eiV oi bia t5)V xeipSiv Kporetr, dXAa 8ta KportiAou. 
T?)? KporaAtcracr?;?, w? Etrpt7n'8jj(i^) (])r](Tlv 6 kco/xikos Trept r?)? 'T\}/tiTv\i]S Xiycov. Nauck, 
Fr. 769, takes the word KporaXto-dcn]^ as having occurred in the text of the play, 
but that is not at all likely ; the verse of the papyrus sufficiently accounts for 
Photius' note. The parodos of the chorus, consisting of Nemean women friendly 
to Hypsipyle (cf. Fr. i. ii. 15 0iA.a, Frs. 20-1. i 0[tAra]rat, 14 (f)i\as), follows, the 
choral ode consisting of a strophe and antistrophe (largely composed of glyconic 
verses), each of which is succeeded by a lyrical response from Hypsipyle. In 
the strophe (Fr. i. ii. 15-40) the chorus asks if the captive's thoughts are stijl 
busy with her island home while such stirring events as the march of the army 
of Adrastus against Thebes are in progress. Hypsipyle replies (Fr. i. iii. 1-17) 
that she cares for none of these things ; her heart is with the ships of the 
Agonauts. The chorus offers consolation by recalling the adventures of other 
heroines who had left their homes and suggests that Hypsipyle's prospects are 
brighter than were theirs (Fr. i. iii. 18-43). Hypsipyle refuses to take comfort, 
and can only look forward to the release of death (Fr. i. iv. 1-9). She then 
perceives some strangers approaching (Fr. i. iv. 10-14), and Amphiaraus enters 
with a small retinue (Fr. 1. iv. 15). He addresses Hypsipyle, and asks to be 
shown the way to running water, which was needed for the purpose of a sacrifice 
on behalf of the army on crossing the frontier (cf, note on Fr. i. iv. ^^). A long 
dialogue ensues in which Amphiaraus explains who he is, what was the object of 
the expedition, and how he himself came to be concerned in it, while Hypsipyle 
in her turn discloses her identity and antecedents (Fr. 1. iv. S^-v with Frs. ^-q)- 
Finally she consents to comply with Amphiaraus' request (Nauck, Fr. 753 beC^o) 
}ikv "" Apytiotaiv 'AxeAwou poov)^ and goes off with him, carrying the child with her. 
Thus ends the first t-nnGohior, and the chorus occupied the interval with an ode, 
to which Frs. 6-9 are likely to belong ; there is a reference in Fr. 6. j to xipvtfia, 
and the description in Frs. 8-9 of the quarrel between Polynices and Tydeus 
which led up to the expedition of Adrastus would be a very suitable subject 
at this point. Meanwhile Hypsipyle, perhaps with the motive attributed to her 
by Statius 71c tarda Pclasgis dux fore t (iv. 778), had left the child lying unguarded 
on the ground, to find on her return that he had fallen a victim to a snake ; cf. 
the fragmentary description of the accident by Amphiaraus in Fr. 60. G'j sqq. 

At this point the course of events becomes obscured, and clearness is reached 
only at Frs. 20-1, where Hypsipyle is found in conversation with the chorus, 
fearful of the vengeance of the child's parents and considering means of flight. 
In what way is the lacuna to be filled ? How was the misadventure made 
known to the chorus and in the palace ? The usual tragic means in such a case 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE ^5 

was the report of a messenger, and as a matter of fact in Fr. 18 there are the 
remains of a few lines which certainly refer to the serpent, and might well come 
from such a report. The objection to this view is the subsequent occurrence 
of a description of the scene by Amphiaraus when pleading with Eurydice. On 
this ground Prof. U. von Wilamowitz-Mollendorff, to whom with Prof. J. B. Bury 
and Mr. Gilbert Murray we owe a number of most valuable suggestions and 
criticisms, would reject the intervention of a messenger, and refer Fr. 18 to the 
first dialogue between Amphiaraus and Hypsipyle, supposing the serpent to be 
a well-known object to whose existence Hypsipyle might allude in speaking 
of the spring. This no doubt is a quite tenable explanation, and the serpent 
is actually so treated by Statins; cf. v. 505 nevioris saccr horror Achaei, 51 1-2 
IitacJiio sanctum dixcre Tonaiiti agricolae, and 579 sqq. On the other hand some 
description of the disaster seems essential at this point, if only for the enlighten- 
ment of the audience; moreover to credit Hypsipyle with so clear a previous 
knowledge of the risk would considerably increase her culpability in leaving her 
charge unprotected, while to the parallel from Statius a counterweight may 
be found in his reference to a messenger : ct iam sacrifici subitiis per tccta 
Lyairgi nuntiits iinplerat lacriniis (v. 638-9). Hence, whether a regular mes- 
senger was employed by Euripides or not, we should prefer to regard Fr. 18 as 
part oi 2i post factitm narrative. But there is an obvious alternative to a regular 
messenger : possibly the narrator was Hypsipyle herself. At the conclusion of 
the stasimon she may have returned alone from her ill-fated expedition^ and 
in answer to interrogations from the chorus briefly stated what had occurred ; to 
the lyrical portion of such a scene we should refer Frs. 10-13 ; cf. the scholiast 
on Clement quoted above, 17 8e knaviXQoxxja e^prji/et. The question would then 
arise, how was the news to reach queen Eurydice ? A hint towards the solution 
of this problem is perhaps to be found in the rather mysterious remark of 
Hypsipyle when being led off to death, /cera 8' (■nr]hia6i]v apa, ' to no purpose then 
was my compunction ' (Fr. 60. 21). These words appear to imply that shame 
had prevented her from a certain action ; and we can find no interpretation more 
suitable than that first suggested by Mr. Murray, that Hypsipyle's feelings 
of honour led her to abandon the project of flight discussed in Frs. 20-1. 
If that is right, then she might naturally be supposed to have gone a step 
further, and voluntarily to have surrendered herself. Of course this explanation 
of Fr. 60. 21 is quite compatible with the hypothesis of a messenger; but the 
latter expedient becomes rather superfluous, and the awkwardness of a second 
description of Archemorus' fate would be far slighter if the first had been a more 
or less incoherent account by the distracted Hypsipyle, and not a formal report 
of another independent eyewitness. 



26 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Our supposition of a voluntary surrender seems to harmonize with the 
mutilated fragment in which Eurydice first occurs among the dramatis per sonae. 
In Fr. 22 the speakers are an unnamed person who appears to be pleading the 
cause of Hypsipyle, the chorus, and Eurydice. The chorus praise the first 
speaker's nobility or generosity {y^vv\(n ejAc'^as), and Eurydice follows with 
an angry accusation of using specious words (1. 1 1 n' Tavr\o\ Koii\}/[a ...;). If the 
first speaker is Hypsipyle and she had courageously thrown herself upon the 
queen's mercy, yevvalos would be the natural epithet for the chorus to apply 
to her, while her scruples and excuses would no less naturally appear to the 
indignant mother as mere Ko//\/^orrjs. Frs. 23-31 may for the most part well 
belong to the same scene as Fr. 22 ; in the case of three of them stichometrical 
figures show that they come from the central portion of the play (11. 600-800), 
though somewhat widely dispersed. 

Postponing for the moment the question of what further scenes may have 
here inteivened, we pass on to Fr. 60, where sure ground is again reached. 
Hypsipyle is now being led off to her doom. She makes a final appeal to 
Eurydice, acknowledging indeed that she had unwillingly caused the child's death, 
but indignantly repudiating the charge of malicious negligence made against her 
by the queen (cf. 11. S5~^ (prjal 8' i]b' kKOvaicos Kravelv jue TraiSa KaTrt/iouAeuo-ai So'/^iots, 
and Nauck Fr. 758). It is of no avail, and her position seems hopeless when at 
the critical moment Amphiaraus suddenly interposes. He had foreseen, he says, 
Hypsipyle's fate, and comes with the object of preventing it, not by force, but 
by persuasion. The queen, who here meets Amphiaraus for the first time, con- 
sents to hear him. He proceeds to tell her (11. 55-Tii) how he had induced 
Hypsipyle to show the way to the spring, and describes the accident with the 
deductions which he drew from it concerning the fate of the expedition against 
Thebes. He offers philosophical consolation, and concludes with the practical 
proposal that the army should give her son burial and institute a festival (the 
Nemean games) to perpetuate both his name and hers. Of Eurydice's reply 
only the first few lines arc preserved, but their tone suggests that she had been 
convinced and was prepared to give way (11. 1 1 2-7). Another gap here occurs, 
but that it is of no very large extent seems to follow from the fact that in Fr. 64. 
Col. ii Amphiaraus is still found upon the stage. He has now done the further 
service of bringing about a recognition between Hypsipyle and her sons, and this 
accomplished he leaves them to mutual explanations in which the adventures 
of both parties are reviewed, Hypsipyle speaking mainly in lyrical measures and 
the sons more calmly in iambics. The i6ooth line is marked in the course 
of this column, and that the end of the play is imminent is also clear from 
the occurrence in the margin of the column following of the name of the god 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 27 

Dionysus as a speaker. Col. i of this fragment has ahnost entirely disappeared, 
but it must have been largely if not entirely occupied by the scene of anagnorisis, 
and therefore one or more columns are required between Fr. 60. ii and Fr. 64. i 
for Eurydice's decision and exit, and the development by Amphiaraus of the 
preliminaries, whatever they were, to the recognition. Stichometrical data point 
to a loss of three columns, to which probably should be assigned Frs. 61-3 
(cf. Fr. 61. 4-6, Fr. 62. 3, Fr. 6^. 6). A suitable place can also be found for the 
lyrical fragments 57-9 in the choral ode immediately preceding the long act 
which we have now reconstructed. In these fragments, of which the connexion 
is evident and the language recalls that of the parodos in the Bacchae, the chorus 
sings the praises of Dionysus. The topic at this juncture would be especially 
appropriate : the god is invoked to come to the assistance of his descendant 
in her extremity, and his actual appearance in the concluding scene is fittingly 
presaged. In one of these fragments {^T. 15; cf. note ad he.) the figure 1100 
probably occurs, which though consistent with the position assigned to them 
involves a final act of unusual length, if it be inferred from the presence of 
Amphiaraus (cf. p. 26) that Frs. 60 and 64 belong to a single act. The longest 
^4^ohos in the extant plays of Euripides, that of the Ion, is under 400 lines, 
whereas the efoSos here would reach nearly 600. Hence it is likely that a short 
choral ode, like e.g. that in Elcctra 1147-64, divided the exit of Eurydice 
and the recognition of Hypsipyle's sons, though not necessarily effecting a real 
break in the action. The large lyrical element in the two columns of Fr. 64 
is a further reason for reducing the part of the chorus in this section. 

Euripides' plot may thus be followed with sufficient clearness by means 
of the surviving fragments both in its earlier stages and its final denouement ; but 
there is an intermediate link which remains wrapped in obscurity. It would 
in any case have been not a little singular if Hypsipyle's sons who, as has 
been seen, appeared both at the outset and at the end of the play, were kept 
entirely out of the action during the rest of it. Secondly, an interval of some 
200 lines between about 11. 900 and 11 00 at present remains quite unaccounted 
for, and it is difficult to see how this can be filled without bringing in the sons in 
some way. Now on this point we have some external evidence to take into 
consideration, primarily that of the epigram in Anth. Pal. iii. 10:— 

'J>atye, Qoav, BaKX.oto (pVTOV ro8e* ixaripa yap aov 

pvat] Tov davoLTov; oIk^tlv 'Ti//'t7rvAaz', 
a TOV ott' Eu/3v8i/cas exAry ^(oXov, rjfxos a-novpas 

vbpos, 6 yas ycviras, wAeo-ey ^kpyiixopov. 
oretxf S^ Ka\ (xv Xmoiv 'A(rco7ri8os ayKca Kovpas (?) 

ycivapiivqv a^oiv Arjfxvov is i]ya6t^v. 



28 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

To which the following explanation is prefixed : — h h'k rw Kara hvoiv ttAcv/w eoriy 
kv apxj] Tov b^KCLTOV -nivaKOs Evyoos yiyKvy.\iivo<i koX Go'as, ovs eyeVwjcrei; Txj/LTTvkrj, 
avayvcopiC6[X€VOL rfj fX7jrpl kol T-qv XP'^^^V^ beiKvvvTes a/xTieAor, oirep i]v avTols tov yei'ous 
aviijioXov^ KoX pvofxevoi avTi]V t^s bta tov ' Ap\^p.6pov OdvaTov tiap' ^vpvbiKi]^ Tipooptas. 
According to this Euneos and Thoas rescued Hypsipyle ; but in Euripides her 
preserver, properly so called, was certainly Amphiaraus. There thus appear to be 
two distinct traditions ; and it is even possible, as Wilamowitz suggests, to follow 
these to their source. There was at Athens a class of musicians called Eivdbai 
who traced their descent from Euneos the son of Hypsipyle ; cf. e. g. Hesych. 
yivos cnrd F,vvi]ov (sic) K€K\riix€vov, tov 'Idcrovos vlov, oXov yivos 6px>](TTSiV koX Ki6api(TTG>v 
. . . ol bi, yivos tl 'Adi]vri(TL KidapLaro^v, Photius yevos 'AOrjvijcn fiovacKov, otto Evveca 
TOV 'Idaovos Kal 'T\j/LTtvKrj9. yevos ecrrl Trapa ' AdrjvaloLs ovrcos 6vop.aC6ij.ei'ov' ^(rav be 
KiOapdiboi, TTpos rds Upovpyias irapiyovTis ti)v ^peCav. Attic legend therefore brought 
Euneos to Athens, and would accordingly be likely to glorify him by giving him 
and his brother the credit of saving Hypsipyle. A clear reflection of this form 
of the legend is to be found in Euripides in Fr. 64. 98, where one of the sons 
(obviously Euneos) says that Orpheus had taught him the lyre. These con- 
siderations provide a clue, as Wilamowitz points out, to the tenour of the speech 
of Dionysus, whose appearance when the crisis was over would otherwise have 
remained rather unaccountable ; the god no doubt directed Euneos to go to 
Athens ^ It is quite in accordance with this inference to find from C.I. A. iii. 274 
that Dionysus Melpomenos was the object of the family cult of the Euneidae. 
The other and probably older legend, which represented Hypsipyle as owing her 
preservation to Amphiaraus, is likely to have been derived from Theban epic 
tradition. Euripides contrived to combine both versions of the story ; but what 
part he assigned to the sons between their arrival at the palace and their recog- 
nition is a problem which still awaits solution. Hartung, Eurip. Rest. \\. pp. 431 
and 437-8, proposing in Arist. Poet. c. 14 Kat kv t[] "EWij 6 vlds ti]v p.r]Tipa 
fKOibovai. iJLe\\(ov dreyvcopiaev to read 'Tv/ztTTvA?/ in place of "EAA?/ (Valckenaer had 
conjectured 'Ai;rto7r?/), thought that P^uneos and Thoas were constituted Hypsi- 
pyle's judges and condemned her to death, a view supported, as he believed, 
by an amphora published by Gerhard in 1837, which represents Hypsipyle and 
Amphiaraus standing before Eurydice, with Euneos and Thoas on the side 
next Hypsipyle and the two chieftains Parthenopaeus and Capaneus next to 
Amphiaraus ; above the two former appears Dionysus, above the other pair 
Zeus and Nemea. But this evidence is of very doubtful value. In the passage 

' He went on to I^mnos afterwards, at any rate according to Homer H 467 sqq., where he is 
represented as sending cargoes of Lemnian wine to the Greek army — a most appropriate gift from 
a descendant of Dionysus. Cf. Anth. Pal. iii. 10. 5-6 quoted above. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 29 

from the Poetics "EKXr\ (though otherwise unknown) is retained by the best 
modern editors ; and it is now clear that 'T^lttvKj] would not really be suitable, 
for it was not the sons' recognition but the intervention of Amphiaraus that saved 
Hypsipyle ; the recognition came afterwards. As for the amphora, the artist's 
object seems to have been to include the principal figures associated in the 
legend rather than to depict a single scene of it ; at any rate it is evident that 
Hypsipyle, her two sons, Eurydice, Amphiaraus, Parthenopaeus, and Capaneus 
cannot all have been brought on the stage together by Euripides. There is 
apparently no road this way ; and we have searched vainly for a clue in the 
papyrus. One or two mutilated passages indeed in the central group of fragments 
may be interpreted as remains of a scene in which the sons appear, the most 
significant being Frs. 34-5. There Hypsipyle is alluded to by the periphrasis 
ojuwts r) rpo0 o? ?] tIkvov, which in Wilamowitz^s opinion implies that the speaker 
was unacquainted with her name. The only characters to whom such ignorance 
would be natural are Euneos and Thoas ; and perhaps the latter name is to 
be recognized in Fr. '^■^. 7, while -rr^/Xas OvpStv in 1. 2 of the same fragment may 
be a reference to their encounter with Hypsipyle in the prologos. But these 
fragments are too ambiguous to carry much weight, and they hardly bring 
us any nearer to the answer to the question how the sons were brought into con- 
nexion with the main action. If, as we have supposed, Hypsipyle did not carry 
out her idea of flight, they cannot have assisted her in it — although perhaps 
it was of the travellers whom she had befriended that she was thinking in 
her question to the chorus (Frs. 2c-i. 15), ' What if I found some one to convey 
me out of the country ? ' Possibly there is a substratum of truth in Hartung's 
theory, and Eurydice in the absence of her husband turned to the two strangers 
for advice or support in her condemnation of the culprit. Or possibly — and this 
we think more likely — they may have gone to seek the assistance of Amphiaraus, 
although the natural inference from his words in Fr. 60. 37-8 is that his 
opportune arrival was spontaneous. This last suggestion would have the 
further advantage of bringing the young men into contact with Amphiaraus, and 
so give him an opportunity to discover their identity. Indeed it is difficult 
to perceive how otherwise he can have become aware of their presence at all — 
unless by a very remarkable display of his powers of divination. 

It will be convenient here to summarize briefly our conception of the 
dramatic structure. 

Prologos. Speech of Hypsipyle, describing her history and present circum- 
stances, after which she retires on some pretext into the palace. Arrival of 
Euneos and Thoas, who hold an explanatory conversation ; they then knock 
and Hypsipyle emerges with the child Archemorus. She inquires their business, 



30 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

and they enter. Hypsipyle left alone sings to the child. 11. i-about 200. 
Nauck Fr. 752, Fr. i. i-ii. 14, Fr. 2. 

Parodos of Chorus of Nemean women. Strophe and antistrophe, each 
followed by lyrical response from Hypsipyle. About 11. 200-310. Fr. i. ii. 15- 
iv. 9. 

jst Epeisodion. Arrival of Amphiaraus, who converses with Hypsipyle and 
persuades her to conduct him to a stream of water. They go out together. 
About 11. 310-430. Fr. I. iv. lo-v, Frs. ^-^, Nauck Fr. 753. 

1st Stasimon. The chorus refer to the quarrel of Polynices and Tydeus at 
Argos, and their marriage with the daughters of Adrastus. About 11. 430-500. 
Fr. 7-9. 

2nd Epeisodion. Hypsipyle returns in great grief after the death of 
Archemorus. She laments his fate, and questioned by the chorus gives some 
description of what had occurred. Becoming calmer she considers plans of 
flight, but finally resolves to give herself up to Eurydice (?). About 11. 500-650. 
Frs. 10-13, Nauck Fr. 754-5, Frs. 20-1. 

2nd Stasimon. About 11. 650-700. 

3rd Epeisodion. Hypsipyle and Eurydice ; Hypsipyle is condemned to 
death. About 11. 700-850. Frs. 22-32, Nauck Frs. 758, 760. 

3rd Stasimon. About 11. 850-900. 

4th Epeisodion. Euneos and Thoas take an uncertain part in the action. 
They were probably confronted with Eurydice, and perhaps subsequently induced 
either by an appeal from Hypsipyle or by natural generosity to go and seek 
assistance from Amphiaraus. About 11. 900-1080. Frs. '^'^-S- 

4th Stasimon. The chorus sing the praises of Dionysus and call on him for 
succour. About 11. 1080-1 150. Frs. 57-9. 

5th Epeisodion. Hypsipyle is led out to meet her doom. Arrival of 
Amphiaraus, who persuades Eurydice of Hypsipyle's real innocence. Exit 
Eurydice. About 11. 1 150-1350. Fr. 60. i-ii. 

5th Stasimon. About 11. 1350-75. 

Exodos. Amphiaraus brings about the recognition between Hypsipyle and 
Euneos and Thoas, and then leaves the mother and sons together. Dionysus, the 
ancestor of the family, appears ex machina, and sends Euneos to Athens. About 
11. 1375-1720. Frs. 61-64, Nauck Frs. 756, 761, 762, Fr. ap. Lydus. 

With regard to the number of the actors, though the characters in the play 
are only six, they would require four aycavtaTaC to represent them if the papyrus 
is followed in the ascription of Fr. 64. 68-70 to the two sons of Hypsipyle — 
whether they speak simultaneously or one after the other ; cf note ad loc. If the 
number is to be reduced to the ordinary three, one of the sons must be a mute. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE  31 

It is clear from internal evidence that Euneos is the speaker in Fr. 64. loi (cf. 
p. 28), while the papyrus assigns Fr. i. i. 7 sqq. to Thoas ; but the former may- 
have been the Kco(f)6v TTpoa-oiirov in one scene, the latter in the other. 

The Hypsipyle was one of the latest of Euripides' plays, being brought 
out not long before Aristophanes' Frogs, as stated by the scholiast on 1, ^'^ 
of that comedy tCw -npb 6\Cyov bibaxd^i'Tcov koI koAcoz', 'Tx/^ittuA?;?, 't>oLDLacr(i)v, 
'A^Tto7^?/s : the Frogs was produced in 405 B. c, Euripides having died the year 
before. This statement of date is borne out by indications traceable in the 
character of the lyrical odes (cf. notes on Fr. i. ii. 15 sqq.), as well as by the 
repeated parodies of the Hypsipyle in the Frogs (cf. e.g. notes on Fr. i. ii. 8-10, 
Fr. 7. 4), which are more natural if the play be supposed to be fresh in the 
memory of Aristophanes' audience. From the conjunction of the three names 
in the above-mentioned note of the scholiast it has been inferred by some critics, 
e. g. Hartung and Meineke, that the Hypsipyle^ PJioenissae, and Antiopc belonged 
to the same tetralogy ; but this is quite uncertain. The remark that they 
were * fine ' tragedies probably reflects the popular verdict, which in the case 
of the Hypsipyle has been endorsed, on the strength of the scanty evidence before 
them, by modern critics : ' drama eximiuml Valckenaer, Diatr. p. 211, ^ fahtila 
vcmtstissima rericm varietate distinctal Hartung, op. cit. ii. p. 411. We now 
know that there was not quite so much varietas as Hartung imagined, but 
the remains happily brought to light at Oxyrhynchus sufficiently justify his 
epithet * veimsta '. If none of the new fragments reveals Euripides in his 
sublimest poetic flights, they maintain a high level of excellence, and need 
not fear comparison with much of his extant work ; while the fact that the 
dramatization of this part of the Hypsipyle legend appears to be essentially 
a Euripidean creation renders the recovery of at any rate the bulk of his plot, 
with upwards of 300 verses either complete or capable of suitable restoration, 
a matter of especial satisfaction. 

In arranging the fragments of the papyrus we have placed them so far 
as possible in what we conceive to have been their original order. The small 
group, which, as already explained (p. 20), was found separately, and both from 
the stichometrical numeration and internal evidence appears to represent the 
central portion of the play, has been kept together (Frs. 6-17, 20-56) ; the other 
minor fragments, the contents of which give no sufificient clue to their position, 
are placed at the end. Finally on pp. 80-83 ^^ print the previously known 
citations from the play, and attempt to assign them their place among the 
fragments of the papyrus. 



32 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. I. 



Col. i. 



lO 



ypa[ 24 letters y.^*-^ 

^^fl ]<r'^ • [ ]6vpiia[.]a 

aa(ii)i\?]^Sypjiu)veKya\rji[, . . .jjoei/acr 

vn€i(TeKpov(Ta.Ta>P€di'ia[ ]o" 

5)[xaKapLa(T(f)u>vrjT€Ko\^. . . .jxtcrTTor -qv 

TLT5i\.\8€jXe\a6p(Ov8([. . ^^VOLTjpoarjXQtTOV 

Ooaa (rT€y[.](rKe)(prifj.ed'[.]v[. . . .]^6r]uaLyvi'ai 

€i8v[. .JTor . [•].i'i't'>CT6[ ]aifxiau 

6^o[. .]uS o[.]coi^S€'ir[.]no[. . .]Xv[.]T]poi$o[ 

ecro[.]ea6aTo7(rS€ToSeaou(i)(T€X^^f^[- •]^i 
. . .J7roro<TiJ.[. . .]iK[.]crapaei^a>i'Kv[. .]i 

17 letters ] . [. .]So)fi[.]Ta 



Fr. 2. 



10 



[• -1^ • [ 

XvKOVp[ 

yvvr]8[ 
Ooaa ovKd^^ei 
7rpoaB'a[ 
r]Ki(rr[ 

a€i8e[ 

(T 

. . [.]ajj'€5[ 



Fr. I. Col. ii. 

• • •  • 

[ ] . . ocroL 

[ ]oa-i'5e(r0ai 

T 

[ ] . . p^ova>&^voTrpov 



Plate ir. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 33 

Fr. J. Col. i. 

ypa[ 24 letters ]eo£y 

T/|e[£ jcTTT . [ a^^Qvpixalryx, 

a (7u>v \o\Bvpixa)V kKya\rj\vul <p]pii'a9. 

v/ieTs eKpovcruT , o) i>€avia[i, TTuAajy ; 
5 CO fxaKapia a<pa>v ?'/ TeKo\v(T , 'q^TLS ttot rjv. 

Ti Ta>[u]8€ niXdOpccv 8i\o(xe'\vQi vpoai^XOeToi' ; 
0oay. (TTey[r]]9 Ke^pi^/xeO' [e]j/[Toy d])(^6fjvai, yvvai^ 

cl Sv[va]Toi^ v[F^^ vvkt i\yav\Lcr\ai- p-tav. 

€;(o[//e]t' 8 o[(j\(tiv Set' t[i] 7ro[re] Xv[7r]r]poi 86[poi9 
10 €(T6[p]ea6a T0?(r8€ ; to 5e aov coy e^e: p[ev]ec. 

('T-v//-.) [a^eo-JTTOToy /^[er o]i/c[o]y dpaej/cov Kvlpc]? 

[ 1 7 letters ]•[••] ^ct5)"[a]ra 



Fr. 2. 



• • 



('T>/..) [..]ix.[ 

AvKOvp[yo9 

yvpr] 8[e Evpv8iKr] 

Qoas. ovK kv ^e\y5>(n 
5 TTpOS 8' a[ 

(T-^.) 7]KicrT[a 
|eVo[ 
dd 8k [ 
dXX' e/y i^[ 
10 . . [.](ioi/ e8[ 



• « 



Fr. I. Col ii. Plate 11. 

• ••«•••• 

(Ty^r.) [ ] . . oaoi (TTp. a 

[ ]oy i8€cr6ai 

[ ] . . p\ov coy kvoTTTpov 

D 



34 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[ }o<pariTiv avyav 

5 [ ]dv^7jfiaToaoi' 

[. .]fJ.l'T](TCOfXaiT€KVOV€V 

co7roi(Tr]6(pa7r€Lai(T 

V 

I'SovKTVTToaoSeKpordXwi'a 

t 
/ / ovrdS^aVm-rjyaaovTdSeK^pKiSocr 

lo KTTorovovTTapaiivOLok'qixvLa 

Kp K 

r)-^apivq6epaTTeviiaTa7rp6(T(popa 
[.]aLSnrpe7r€iveapcoi 
raS€fi€\a)Socrav8(o 
15 ]Ti(ru7rapa7rpo6vpoia(l)iXa 
TTOTepaSoofiaToaeiaoSova 
o-dipeiarjSpoaoi'ennr^Scoi 
^aXXeiabidTeSovXa 
TjTdi^apycoTdvSiacrov 
20 aTOfiaToaaeiKXri^ofieuav 
7revTT]K6uTepoi'a.]Sii(T 
Tjro^pv<T€op.aXXou 
upoi^SepoaoTTepiSpvoa- 
o^oLCTOfXfxaSpaKOi'Toar 
25 (ppovpelfj.i^ap.oavuaSeaoi 

\t)|jiv 

Taaay)(^idXoio^vr)(T^ou 

rdvaiyaLO(TeXi[.]<Ta)v 

Kvp.oTVTrocrdyj^l 

SevpoTavXeifxcovai'e/ieil ] 

30 aiTdyei)(aXKiio[.](T07rXo[ ] 

apy€'iouTT[.]Sioi'Tra[ 
€7riTOTa[.]KcOdpaa€pvpa[ 
Tda-a/xcpioviaaipyoi^l 
ct)[. .]Tr6Saa-a[. .]aa[. .]a[ 
35 o[.]eKaX€(T(fji€i'o[ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 35 

[. . X€VK]o(f)afj riv avyav 
5 6 [ ] av^rjfia to aov 

7 [. .] fiurja-cofiai, t^kvov, ^v- 

8 coTTCi? ^ depaTTCiai?. 

9 ISov KTVTTo^ oSe KpordXwv dv(«). 

11 ov rdSi TTTji'a^ ov rdSe KepKiSo? 
10 12 laTorovov Trapa/jivOia ArjfxvLa, 

13 Movaa, /jiiXet //e KpiKCLu, ti 5' e/? virvov 

14 ri xdpLv 7/ OepaTrevfiaTa TTp6(j(fiopa 

15 [7r]ai5t TTpeTvei viapw 
10 rdSe /ieX(o8o9 avSco. 

Xo(j}69)] 15 1 Ti' o-i) Trapa 7rpo6vpoi9, (^iXa ; aTp. ^' 

2 TTOTcpa SwjJiaTos elaoSovs 

3 aaip€i9 ^ Spocrov knl niSo) 
i l3dXXei9 Old re SovXa, 

5 ^ rau Apyoo Tav 81a. aov 
20 6 aTC/iUTO? del KXr}(on€vav 

7 TTeVT11K6vT{o)pOV dSciS, 

8 7; TO )(pvae6/xaXXou 

9 /epoi' 5epos 7rep2 ^pyo? 
10 o^oiy 6/xfxa BpuKovTos 

25 n <ppovpe?, fivafxoavva Si crot 

12 ray dy^idXoio Arnxvov 

13 Taj/ Alyaios iXi[(T-](r<i)i' 

14 KVjxo{K)TVTros d)(^e?, 

15 ^eyp' ot' ar X^Lfxodva Ne/ji€i[ou 
30 16 aTTayef ;(aX/f€{i}o[i]o-(fi/) o7rAo[ip 

17 Apyuov 7r[e]5ioi' 7ra[pefy 

18 cTTt TO Ta[y] KiOdpas epvfjia, 

19 Tay 'A/jL(f)iovia9 epyou [x^po9 

20 Q)[Kv]7r68a9 "A[Sp]aa[To]9 [Apr] Boov, 
35 21 6 [8'] ^KaXfae /jL€uo[s ... 



D 2 



36 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



a 



Ka[.]/j.oPo^dfiove[ 
a€ipo/ieuoi)(^6[ 
4° [ ]or[ 

• • • • 

Fr. I. Col. iii. Plate 11. 

• • • • • 

[ ]R^i[-] 

[ ]paKiav 

[ ](j[.]fi(vr](ropovaa(T 

iTTOiS/xayaX-qveiaa 

5 TTpviivqaLavay\raL 

TovarovTTOTajJiovTTap 

Yiv' V 

6€V0(TdL]^VV~^iTiK0!)(TiV 

TTi]XeafjiecrQ)Se7rapL<TT(oi 
aaiaaiXey^vC-qiov 
lo $pr](ra((3oaKL6api(Top(piQ)9 
/j.aKpo7ro\coj/7riTv\(ov 
€p(Tr]ia-iKeXeva-fJ.aTaixe\7rofieuav 
TOTCfxeuTa^VTrXovv 
TOTiS' eiXaTLuaa-ara7ravfxa7TXaTa[. .] 
1 5 T[.]SefioiTaS€$vfiO(r'LS€U'i€Tai 
SapacovSiTTOvovcr 
€T€pocrava^oaTa) 
X 7rapaao(po)i'€KXvoi^Xoyo[.](T 

TroTepovcoaeTTiKVfiaTcoi^ 
20 7roXivKai7raTpiovaSofioy[ 
(poii'iKaaTvpiarraicr 






ivpcoTraXinova ane(3a 

SiOTpo(f)OPKprjTai/l'epau 

Kovpr]TCovTpo(bovavSp(i)V 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 37 

22 TTotKiXa crdfiaTa [. . . 

23 To^a re )(^pva{€)a [. , . 

24 Ka[l] fiovo^dfiovi[^ . . . 

25 dupofXivoi xO[ou 
40 -6 [ ]ot[ 

• •••••.., 

Fr- I. Col. iii. Plate II. 

( ^^0 [ ]P^'[-] avTiarp. a 

[ Q]paKiav 

[ ](T[.]/iei/?;y opovaas 

in otS/xa yaXrjveias 
5 irpvixvrjCTL dvd-^ai, 

6 roj/ a 70 C noTafio{h) nap- 

T diuo9 Atyiv kjkKv(ti(T^{v\ TItj- 

8 Aea, yuecTft) (5e 7ra/)' /oto) 

9 Aatd^ eX€y(o)i' iTytoi' 

10 10 Qpfjaar' k^oa Ki$api9 'O/j0ecu?, 

11 fJ-aKponoXcoi/ nirvXcoi^ epirrjai Ke- 

12 Xevafiara fieXno/xtva {i^} , t6t€ p.\v ra^v- 

13 nXovv TOTe 8 e/AanVay dvdnavfia nXd- 
15 H ra[y.] T[a](5e /zoi ra^e ^f/zoy {v)Sui^ I'e- 

16 raf, Aavaoov 8\ noi'ovs 
16 krepos dva^odTco. 
Xo(po9). 1 Trapa aocfioiv ^kXvou Xoyo[i/]y dvTiarp. /S' 

2 TT(ji)6TipOV coy CTTi Kvfidrcoy 

20 3 TroA^i/ /cat narpiovs S6/xov[9 
i ^oiviKas Tvpia irah 

5 EvpcoTTa Xinova eiri^a 

6 AtoTpo^ou KprJTav kpdv 

7 Kovp-qTOiv Tpocphv dySpoiV) 



38 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



25 dT€KV0iiVap6T0La\J\v 

TpL(Ta-oi(reXtTr€VKpa[. . 
yjjii paaT oX^iovap^oiv 
apy€iav6\Tepai>KXv(ii 

[. .]Tpco^a^\n'^ai^L(o 



•] 



30 



35 



40 



.'\pa<ja}i(f.L(ra{iuy^aL 

.]aa(f)opovaTav 

. .]Tav6€0(T€L(r(f)pouTiSadr]aoL 

...']. [.]a-Sr](j)i\aTO/x€aov[.] 

]a7ro\iLy^€L 

jarepocrnaTepa 



.1 . KVTTO . o[.]p.iTaUL(Ta€Tai[ 

. .]y6i/ea[. . . .] 



.]ioa[ 



\Q>a 



.]<TCf>c\[ 
•••]■[ 

. .] . 9 • [ 



Fr. I. 



Col. iv. 



10 



"[vipovayayktroTi . [ 

KVpO^T^OVr(.TTOKpiv[ 



TaviroaiatKTa 



KaT(6pr]vr](rivaoiSaia[ 
$avaT0(T€Xa^€TaS(pana6e[ 

Ticrai'r]y6o(TT]peXoar]Ki6apaa .Kidapi[ 

€7nSaKpv<TeLpovaavoSvpop€pa . €niSaKpv(rip[. 

p^TaKaXXionaa 

iiTLTTOvovaaveXOoL 

co^iwepiaaTfjaS' dX(ro(r€)((i)u 

T Lv o(T i piToptaaT ova 8\yyv a opoi 



85J 



EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



39 



12 

30 13 

11 

15 
16 

17 

35 18 

19 
20 
21 
22 
40 23 
24 
•25 



8 a TiKvcov dp6T0La[i]r 

9 Tpiacrois eXirreu Kpd[Tos] 

10 x^pa^ T oX^iov dp)^dv. 

11 'Apyeiav 0' irepau kXvco 
oia]Tpa) ^aaiXiiau 'Iod 
7rdT]pas du(f)h dfxel-^ac 
Kip}pi(T^6pov drav. 

Tav\T dv 6ios €19 <ppovTiSa Bfi aoi 
...']. [.]9 5?;, (f)LXa, TO p.€(Tov 

] aTToXei-^ei 

TTJarepoy narepa 

]^^X^' cre^ei' 

] (oKVTropo[s] p.€Tavi(j(T€TaL 

] yiv^a[. . . .] 

]'oo-[ 

, JCOO" . [ 

]o-0iA[ 

. • .  ] . [ 

.....]. . [ 



Col. iv with Fr. 3. 



(T\f/.) v^p.ov ayaye Trore . [ 

Kv{y)ay6v Tc n(^p)6Kpii> 
Tocu TToais eKTa 
KaTi6pr,vti(T€v doiBah. 
6duaT09 eAa^e rdS' ifid 7ra^e[a. 

TCs av Tj yoos rj fieXos rj Kioapas 

inl SdKpvai fxova di/oSvpo/xiva 

fji€Ta KaXXionas 

inl ir6vov9 dv 'iXOoL ; 

CO Z^v Nefiia^ ttjoS' d'Acroy ey^cou 
Tiuos efiTTopias TovaS' tyyvs 6pa> 



to (Xo.) 



40 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

7T€\dTaa^€uovaS(Of^o^SnT€TTX(ou 

€aBfj(rTLaa(p€L<j7rpoaTova8eSoiJ.ov(T 

(TT€i-^ovTa(TipriiiovavdX(XO(T 

15 afi<pia (joai')(^povav6po>noLcnvaLT€pr][iLaL 
oTauT€)(peiauei(nr€(T(ovo8oLTropoa 

aypov(T€pr]/xovaKaLfj.^i^poiKr]TouaiS7] 



o 



auopvav^pix-qviVTOvaTTopiaveyoiv 

oTT7]Tpa.7rr]TaiKaiix€yapToS[.]a)(^ep€(T 
20 TovTeia(3el3r]Kei'da/x€i'0(rS'eiSou8o/ji[ 

TovaS ev8LO(T\ip.oovLViii(.d8ocry6ov[ 

Kaia€€LT€8ov\r]Toiad'e(f)€crTy]KaaSo/j,'\ 

iLTov^L8ovXov(TCo/xe)(^ovaeprjcrofj.at 

Tiuoa-Ta8av8pooufjLr]Xb^o(TKa8cofxaT[ 
25 (pX€LouuTLaa-yr]aa>^evr]uofj.L^eTai 

v\lniTv\- J [.]X^iaXuKOvpyov/x€Xa6paKXr]^eTaiTa[ 

[.](T€^a7ra(7r](Tevped€i<Taa-co7na 

KXr]SoV)^6(T€(TTLTOV7ri)(a)pLOv8LO<7 

^h [.]i^roj'Aa/3ef^'[.]/3[. . . .]ixavevKf^o^<jaoLav8(>ip 

30 [.ypvL^a6eoL]^.'\LVo[. . .](oa-Xpr](TaLfxe6a 

(TTpaTOiivyapv8aT(ov[.]aHaTaov8L€Lir€Tri 

(TTpaTov8(nXT]d€nrauTa(TvyTapa(r<TiTai. 

v\j/i [. . .]u€(Tfj.oXovTeaKac)([.]ovoa7roiaaa7ro 

[-] 

(KTCop/xvKrjucovl. .]fi€vapyeioiyeu[ 

35 \.]pLaSvTr^p^aLvovTe(yH(TaXXr]v^6ova 

[. . i\aTovTTp\^6vaaL^ovXoiie<TBa8av[.Y8oi)[.'\ 
[.]ixeia\. ...]..[... .]danpocrKa8/j.ov7rvXaa 
[ 19 letters ]vrvx(t>(ryvi'at -eiSfjl 

[ » ), ]<Tov6efii[. .]a6€ii/ 

40 [ 20 „ ]a8an[. . . .]Kr]VTraTpaa 

Fr. 3. [^. .]a)[ ]aaenpd[ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 41 

TTeXaray ^(.tvovs AoopiSi ninXoiu 
ea6fj{(r\Ti aacpeh irpos TovaSe So/xovs 
CTdiyovTa^ epfjfjLou dv dXaos ; 
15 'A/x(pidp{aos). CDS k'^Opov dpOpcoTroiaiu at r i{K8)r]ixiai 
orav T€ )(p€iav elcmea'cou oSoinopos 
dypoiis €pi]fiov9 Kal /xovoiki^tovs I'St] 
a(0tXoy) di'€pfXTJv€VTo{s) dnopiau 'i'^oav 
OTTT] rpdTTr)TaL' Kdfil yap to 8\y](T-)(jep\s 
20 TOVT €l(r(3i(3r]K€U' dcTfxei/os S' elSou S6p[ov9 

TovcrS' Iv Aios Xeificoui Ne/j.edSo9 \6ou[69. 
Kal a, eiTe SovXr] toIctS" k(f)i(TTr)Ka9 86p.\oLS 
UT ov^L SovXov (tco/jl 'iyov(7\ ep-q(Top.ai. 
Tiyo9 TaS' dv8pa>v p.r]Xofio<TKd 8(OfxaT[a 
25 ^XeiowTias 7779, CO i^^V} vop.L(eTai. 

'T\^f7ri'[A(jy).] [o]X/3ia AvKovpyov /xiXadpa KX^^erai Td[S€, 
[o\s e^ dnda-Tjs {al)p€6€h 'Aaconia^s) 
KXr]8ov-^6s kaTL TOviTL^coptov A 169. 
A/jL(p{iapaos)' [p]vTbu Xa^dv [xM?7^°'W ^^ ^^ Kpcoaaois v8Qip 
30 [y^^pin^a ^€or[(r]ii' 6[Siov] coy x{e)ai/xi6a. 

<TT{p\ara>u yap vSdrcou [t'ja/zar' ov SuTTiTrj, 
arparov 8e TrXrjOeL iravra avvrapdaaeTau 
'T-^nriyXr}). [ti\i/€9 fioXoPTe^ Kal ^[^joros' ttoius dno ; 
(Afi^.) e/c Tcoi' MvKTjucov [eo-]/iez^ Apydoi yei/[oy, 
35 \o\pLa 8' V7r€p(3aiuovT€S e/y dXXr]i/ y^Bbva 

\(jTp\arov iT^o\Bv(Tai f3ovX6fxia6a Aav[a'\L8co[v.] 
[77]//ety [ydp o)]pp[T]/x€a]6a npos Kd8/xov nvXas, 
[it TTCoy Oeol Tri/jiTroiev ejyri/^coy, yvvai. el 8r] [ 
('T^.) [tl (5e o-TpaTeveaO' , et ye] aov defii[s pi]a6eiv ; 
40 (A/ji(f).) \KardyHv 6iXouT€9 (pvy]d8a n[oXvui]Kr]u iraTpas. 

(T-^.) [cri) ^] a>[v Tis dXXcov 7rr]fjiov]as Or]pa[s Xa^dv ; 
(Afi^.) 7rai[y] Olk[X€ovs toi p-avTis] 'AjX(l)idp[€QiS eyco. 



42 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a);ieyaX[ I'^'^^/l 

7ra)(r<5' oiX[ ]o"a . [ 



Fr. 4. 



'\riTOv[ 
]/ ovoiia[ 

5 n 



Fr. ]. Col. V 

6(na(f)[ 

5 eYnixoKX . [ 
ei(rr]i/Ti(T(£>[ 

TaVTr]SL8(0(T[ 

TToXvScopocrovl 
10 €L7rov6€acr(pv[ 
TovTov8€7rat.[ 

[ r-'i 



Fr. 5. 



V 

oaKaial 

xpvv^pI 

5 [•]<5?^4 



Fr. I. Col. V. . 

_ e|a)yi;[ 

8 (OCTOV . [ 

30 ov8v[ 

ei8 . [ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 43 

(Tx//-.) CO /zeyaA[a jta Kat [^ — >^ — 

(Afi(p.) TTcos 8' oiX[ ]<ra . [ 



• (A/xcfy.) [. .>< 

(Tyjf.) ^ Tov [ 

(AfKp.) ovo^a \to (TOV vvv Kol yiuos \^^ov, yvvai. 

(Tyfr.) 77 Ar]fi[uia \6(iou 'T\j/nrvXr]u 'i6pi\jri fie. 

5 (A,x<f>.) : [ 



Fr. I. Col. V. 

(A/x(p.) yi^urj fi 'ineia-e ... 

(T\jf.) ocria (^[povova rj . . . 

(Afi(f>.) iSi^[a6' op/xov . . . 

(Tf.) 7r6d€u /i[ 375 

5 (^/J-<{>-) '^yVI^' o K\e[ipb9 'Ap/xouiau KdSfios nori, 

('T>|r.) e/y ^u Tis a>[v Kal deol a-vurjXOou eh ydjiov^. 

(Afi(f).) ravTi) SiSaaliv opjxou AcppoSiTrj KaXov. 

(Ty\r.) deol 6ia>v ya[p naLcrlv evjievth dii. 

(A 11(f).) TJoXvScopos ov[v kKXrj^iO' ov^ avTcov y 61/09. 380 

10 (T-yj/.) €L TTOV $eds 0i)[y deV iSi^ar, cIkotcos. 

CAfJL(f>.) TovTov Sh nails r}v Ad^SaKos ^ - ^ — 

cn-) [ ] . [ 



Fr. 5 Fr. i. Col. v 

(A) [.]ei . [ (Tylr.) elp^alerai 

(B) ou KOI a[ C^f^(f>') H^ yv[vai 

{A) ds XPV[ C^^O <^y ov . [ 400 

(B) XPV Y^P [ 30 (^/^0-) ov 8v[va 

5 (A) [.]Soia[ {'Tf.) dS . [ 

(Aix((>.) [.]i(TX  [ 



44 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a\\oL\ 

• • • • L 

35 8l8[ 



Fr. 6. 



o 



[ ]x^pv^^<^[ 

[ l^o-e^. •]« • [ 

[ ] • (<«?/[ 

[ ]«^?[-] • [ 

[ M-]f<^of^[ 

[ ]«'?«[ 

[ ]^?[ 



Fr. 7. ... 

[ ]^0[ 

[ ] . no\vK(^ 

[ jcticrraxf^ 

[ ]o(^^ioixeY[ 

5 [ ]5coTO/3e(r€i . [ 

[ l^x . [. . .]fM 



Frs. 8, 9. . 

7r\(.vp\ 
aXarei'[ 

7raTpa[ ] • [ 

5 (pvyaal ] 

pv[ yi/KOiiTapavXa[ 

(pi8[ ]^ei/3o . eyoi 

(tlS[ If?"'? 



Frs. 8, 9. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 45 

(Tf.) d\\oi[ 

(Afi(p.) Ti9 xp[ 405 

35 (Tf.) SiS[ 



Fr. 6 

{Xo.) [ ] x^p^^l^4 

[ ]ea€i'[. .]a . [ 

>[ 
[ ] . Kacri[ 

[ Wol] ' [ 

5 [ ]o-[.]io-o^[ 

[ ]ai8a[ 

[ . . . .](Ta[ 



■t^*«7«« • • • « • t 

["" M ^ 

[ ] . 7roXvKd[p7rcou 

[ ]ai aTa)(ya>[i^ 

[. . . . Sp]oai^o/jL€v[ 

5 [ ]S(OT0p€^ (I . [ 

[ ]eX . [. . .]e/3/o[ 



IIX€Vp[<OU 

d\aTev[ 

7rdTpa[ ] . [ 

5 0vyay [ ] 

i^v[ktos 5' InoLovu] kv Koiraicri nap avXd 
epi5[ay Odfi d]fi€i^6nepoi 
aL8[dpov T €Lp]€crca 



46 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a(f) . \ya[. . . .]\ou 
ro KXiaiaa- . [. .yuvKTcpoy 
y€Pi^aicov7r[.]T€pa>i' 
(p[.]yaS€<TSopidv/jioy[. .] 
0oi/3of5'ej'[.]7ra[.]/3[. .]iX(ya€i'V)(€v 



el" *" 



e[.]a8paaToa€x^^l\^ 
^€Kva6r)p(ny[.] . . [.]ai 

^5 [ ]of^o[. . .] 

[ ]afiTr€Ta(Ta<T 



Fr, lo 

7ro[ ]op[ 

]. TTovjiaXa 

rl iyyvaovyip.a\ 

9 

5 . . .]£/f£orota<re/[[.]] . [ 

.jeyco 
ri6po€i(T 
coAo/zaf[ 

'[ w 



Fr. II. . . . Fr. 12. . . . 

5c([ ovyapefifieyl 



X 



X9[ 

5 ^[ vyjnnvicofjLoi . [ 



Fr. lo. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 47 

cr(payd [re SfjjXoi^ 
10 KXiaias TT[€p]t pvKripov 

yivvai(t)v 7r[a]repa)i/ 

0[i;]ya5es' 8opl Ovfiou. 

4>oi^ov 8' h[o]7ra[i] ^[a(r]tX€vs Ivvyfv- 

e[j/] "ASpacTTO^ 'i-^^oov 
15 T^KPa drjpalv [Cj^^[i]c^^ 

[ S]6po[u . .] 

[ ] dfiTreTcca-a? 



(Xo.) 


7ro[L' . . . .]op' 




TTov fxdX* ; 


'Tfl]TT{6\rj). 


eyyi^y, oi;^i fia[Kpau 




Xeyiaaeif dXXa ao 


(Xo.) 


aX]t>c€y, oJay 6//0 . ' 


(Tf.) 


oij eyo)" 


(Xo.) 


ri 6po€L9 ; 


(Tf.) 


d>X6fxai' [ 


(Xo.) 


' \'^^\. 



Fr, II Fr. 12 . 

^r^-) « ^[€ (Xo. ?) <p[ 

k\ k\k ni[ye]eo^ a5[ 

(Xo. ?) 5a[ ou ya/O kjifxivl 

yo[ 'T-^L7rvX(r]). id) jiOL . [ 

5 M 5 (Xo. ?) [.] .[...]• a^q 
[ '\o(Ta[ 



48 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 13. . 



.[ 



• • 



• • 



Fr. 14. . . Fr. 15. . . . Fr. 16. . 

.[ ] ] ] 

[ '\aTa>VL\_ ] '\(f)aTOi>vo\. .]tcr 

X ^^^[ 5 ]0^[ ] 5 ] . . • . 

5 [ • • ... ](t' .. [^y8p . [.] 



Fr. 17. . 



] 
] 



• • « 



Fr. 18. . . . 

Kpr}vr]vBia^[ 
SpaKcov7rapoiK[ 
[.]opy(onaXevcr(T(o[ 

5 7roifiev€(j€7r€i . ty'cJ^y . [ 
]\q 7rai^[. .]SLaSpa(TaiKaipy[ 
(f)[. . . .yaLKiirauTayiyi/el 
[. . . .]<Tr]K€i-(pv\aKa8' ovw[ 

oa 



Fr. 19 



]5aya)[ 

oy 

]pa{ 



Frs. 20. 21. 



<a^|[. . .]Taiy[ 

ecrTr}\Kap[l\iT . [[. . vBe[ ]] 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 
Fr. 13. Fr. 14. Fr. 15. 



.[ 



.[ 



]a^[.]5[ 





arccvi 


Xo{p6^). rjSr] 


5 ]^n[ 


5 [ 


• • 


• 





]liLv[ 



49 



Fr. 16. 



] 

1 
'\(f)aT(i>v o[. .]fy 

]o-' . . [^^v8p . [.] 



Fr. 17. 



• • 



]o-(i/[ 

] 

] 



SpaKcou 7rdpoiK[os 

[y]opya)7ra A6i/(ro"a)[i/ 

7ri]Xr]Ka aeicoi/, ov 06/3[&) 
5 TToipiyes enei u'ly ei^[.] . [ 
]A.a 7raj'[. .]5ta Spdaai Kal pv[ 

(Xo. ?) 0[€C" yvyaiKi Trdvra yiyve\rai 

[. . . .]$■ 17/cef (pvXaKa 8' ov 7r[ 



OCT 



[. 



.jaet' . . <p€.[.]po[ 



Fr. 19. 



]iS^ dy(o[ 

ov 
]/)Q)[ 



Frs. 20, 21. 



(T-ijr.) ci) 0[/XTa]rai y[vva?K€9, w irrc ^vpov 

E 



50 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



ei'eX77-|[. . ■]yTi[. . •]'fX^f?"^[ 
5 (pivyeLvcTT . [.]a)i'Ta)/[. .]Sf)[ 

ray 
TiSri^nof^f^€vpr}Ka(T€ia-aXK[ 

rraiSoa 

S€So[.]Ka6[. .]aTa)oiaTr(iaofj.[ 

ovKovvanapoay coTa\aLi'aa-[ 

[-] 
€yi^ctiKaKay(OT0VT0Kai(f)vXa^[ 

[-] 
lo 7roi8r]TaTpe\lrr)tricra€8[.]^€raiTro[.]t(r 

7ro8€aKpiu[.^^aiTovTOKa[. .]^po6v[iLa 

ev 

^i;Aa(r[.]6Ta[.]y7?[[^5e]]0poi;[. ^j^LcrivKVKXoiL 
\^^^lKa[?^(.(c8r]TOVTJ\a\\[.'\^T■(p\olJiaL 
aK07rei(piXaa-[. .^pTa[. . .]avpl3ovXov(T€-^ei(r 
15 riS€iTiy(yp[.]ip[. . •]/cre^a|f[.]/L<eyj/a- 
[ 31 letters ]8ovXovcray€iu 

[ 25 „ ]r(po[ 



Fr. 22. 



[. . .]^ovTaXe[ 
KatfJ.T]8top[ 
■^poi'co8e^ov[ 
5 TOT0oi'yvvai[ 
KaiTra[.]8aT[ 
Kau8Lapi6n[ 

lo evaco(ppoaa'[ 



Y 



TITO 



yjiyopfl 



Fr. 23. 



Fr. 



T/0[.](re[ 

COTTa . [ 



1< 

Kanr[ 
CDa[.]r]Ti[ 
a>a[. . .]p[ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



51 



ctfaf^i'] 'i^eiv ol (p6(3oL S[ 'ia-yovcTL [le. 

(Xo.) eve\TT[L S' o]vTi [/O^/i]' ^'x^'^ ([tTreTr (ptXais ; 
5 (TKJr.) (f)€vyeif OT/[(S]a)i' tcoj/[5' l']Sp[i9 el yap rj novov. 

(Xo.) TL Si]Td y e^€vp>]Kas e/y d\K[i]u a dyov ; 

(Tyfr.) 8e8o[i]Ka $[ai']dT(p naiSb? oia n€Laofi[ai. 

(Xo.) ovKovv drreipo^ y , co rdXawa, a[vfi(popcoi\ 

(T-yjr.) eyi'OOKa Kdycb tovto Kal (pv\d^[ofiai. 
10 (Xo.) TToT BrjTa TpeyjfT] ; T19 ae 5[e]^6ra£ 7ro[A]t? ; 

('Ti^.) 7r65e? Kpip[o]v(n tovto Ka[l njpodv/xia. 

(Xo.) (f)vXda[a]eTa[i] yfj (ppov[pio]iati' kv kvkXco. 

{'Tyj/.) [»']ffa[9'] eco (5^ toDt[o] (y')- ctAX' [a]7re/)^o/iat. 

(Xo.) (TKOTTdL, ^iXa^ {y^^P Td\(T8€\ (TVH^ovXcu? f'x^'^* 
15 (Tyjr.) TL 8' ei' tlv ei//9[o]i^' [6aT\L<i k^d^e[L\ fxe yr]9 ; 

(Xo.) [ovK eaTiv oaTLS ^ovXiTai\ 8ovXovs dyeiv. 
[ 25 letters ]^f/'o[. . 



Fr. 22 , 

('Tx/^.) [....]. iroi'o[ 
[. . .]/8oy TaXe[ 
Kat /xr) 81 op\yr\S 
Xpov(o 8\ /3of[A 
5 TO Tcoj^ yut'a([^a)f 
/cat 7ra[t](5a t[ 
/car 8iapL6fJ.[r] 
^u 8' e^afia[pT 
Xoipoi). yevi'laV '€]X([^a9 
10 eu adxppoaiv [ 
Evpv8L]K(r]). Ti Tavr[a] /co//\//[a 



Fr. 23. 



(A) tI 0[?7]? 4 

(B) Uel Xo[ 
[A) S> Tva . [ 
(E) t5 /.[ 



Fr. 24. 



(B) Koi 7r[ 

(^) C^)? [5]^ Tt[ 

(B) m [. . -M 



E 3 



53 



J THE 


OXYRHYNCHUS 


PAPYRI 


Col. i. Col. 


• • 

11. 








Fr. 25. . 




Fr. 


26. 


• • • 










• • • 


• • 

Fr. 27 










[-] 
^ [.]p . [ ]i;[ 




Fr. 


28. 


• • • 


/faix[. •I'^'^L 








]<5^'l[ 


eG)5e[. .jfAa 








]e7ro) 


.] . TjTaTrji'i 








' KOV 


5 apiTTjv^evo 








M 


SoKQiSfTay 




' » 




* • « 












tjX . [. . . .]oi;/c 










; 1 . . ; 











Fr. 29. 



a . [ 

7ro[ 

7r[ 



Fr. 30. 



7r(oaS[ 
eav[ 

Ol([ 



Fr. 31. . 



1 
R[ 



Fr. 32. 



M 

]5'6(r[ ]roX[ 

]ayy . a . [. .] . lacr . [ 
]yoveKTe\eiy\vK[ 
5 ]pi€^ova€i'ayKaX[ 

a 

]Ke[. .]i0iX[[o]]o-Te>fi'[ 



Fr. 33- 



]€\aadvpcov . [ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 
Fr. 25. Col. i. Fr. 26. 



] 
]aty 



• • » 



700 



53 



Fr. 27 

('^f .) [-IP • [ ]"[ 

Kal xbp]^^^[ 
eo) 5e[. .]i'Xg[ 
[.] SfJTa Trjfil 

SoKw Se Tav[T 

r]v fif] av n€iad[iJ9 

[!]A . [, . . .]ovk[ 



Fr. 39. 



[• 



a.[ 
7ro[ 

4 



•]••[ 



Fr. 30. 



800 



80: 



Fr. 28. 



eau[ 



(B) 0^4 



Mi 
7rco[ 

KOp[ 



Fr. 31. 






Fr. 32. . 

(Tir.) 



]^' ^4 VoX[ 

]avv . a . [. .] . laa . [ 
jroj/ €KT€Xer yAi;/c[i;f 
5 7re]/0i€xoyo-' ei' ay/caX[ats 



F»- 33- 



TTJeAa? 6vp(ov . [ 
]aSo9 (ipy([ 
] . t[.]t diroi[ 



5 ](Ta<T[ 



54 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

]r]\r]ixaTo[ ]ai6oa[ 

](L\oy(ov[ ]ox'i[ 

]7rayKa\aiai[ I'^fll 
lo ]cra7ra)Xo//[ 
]Kx^pa)Up[ 



Frs. 34, 35. 



[ ]y[ 

[ ]Vl[ ]7roiua[ 

[ ]9i'<^V^R[- ']^(^[ ] • OV(T€[ 

[ ]a)ixaLScofxaTcou[ ]r/^°[ 

5 [ '\Te^a)8jji(o'i(Tr]Tpo(f)[. . . ."Yvov [ 

[ ]SiSa)aLvovS€ao)^diy[. . . .]fxcoi^[ 

[ ]?P • [• • • •]-^po[ 



Fr. 36. 






Fr. 37. . . 


. Fr. 


38. 


. 


Fr. 


39- 


• « • 


Fr. 


40. 


a • • 


M 






apT 






' TTkL 






afCT 


 at 






]<Tr]X6 . [ 






^i'icra 






' ovraTovS 


jaXX 






' lT(o8 






. ia[ 






"[oTa 


]yoiovK 






a<n\ 






• • • 






](Ta[ 


5  ys 


 




^Tova 






- 






• • • 



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852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



55 



lO 



K\ri\riixaTo\<i 
]ei Xoycav [ 
tJTT dyKaXais i[ 
]y a7rft)X6//[7;j/ 






Frs. 34, 35. 



14 
]r7;[. , . . Bt&\iToiva [— 

— — «^]ot KXfjBp]^]^ CO? [ ] . of(7e[— 

^ — "--jcwyuat Sco/jLarcoi/ [ ]TiSa[ 

— — ^]t' e|co S/xcots T] Tpo(l^[b? Te]KUOV 

— — ] SiS(0(Tiv ov8 eaoo (3aii'[ei S6]nci>v. 



.]op .[.. . .]Trpo[ 



Fr. 36. 



]■'[ 1 



Fr. 37. 



Fr. 38. 



Fr. 39. 



Fr. 40. 



Kt 


]apT 


TTei 


au a 


\ . di 


(TTjxe . 


e^iacol 


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' TOXX 


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. La 


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. 


' aa' 


]v8[ 




5 ]TOva [ 

• • • 




• « • • 



56 
Fr. 41. 



]Tuaiu[ 
]opi[ 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 
Fr. 42. . . . Fr. 43. . . . 



] • /?[ 
]apyo(T[ 

]•[ 



]o5'e[ 
]t(rTtcr[ 



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Fr. 45- 



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M 



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M 

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]aaX[ 
]v7ri[ 



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• • « 


Fr 50. . . . 


Fr. 51. 


• • • 


Fr. 53. . . 


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' 


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Fr. 55- 



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Fr. 57- 

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[.]e^ioi'Ucr6a-T[ 

[.]at'ro(r€to-eo-[ 

o)o-[.] . i8[ 
[.] . iS''ovt[ 

Tl(TnOT[ 



Fr. 58. 



]pvpvaaKanv[ 
jaTTOit/ao- 
]$r]Ka(pipoy(raTpnre[ 



852. 



Fr. 41. 

• • • • 

]oi^i[ 

]lT0[ 



Fr. 45. 



EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 
Fr. 42. Fr. 43. 



• • 



] "Apyo^ [ 



• • 



Fr. 46. 



• • 



\oS e[ 
]i<7ri(r[ 



Fr. 47. 



57 



Fr. 44. 

] TlKTQV(y\ 



Fr. 48. 



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• • 

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M 


a? A 


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M 


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Fr. 49. 



Fr. 50. 



Fr. 51. 



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]- apa 


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aXaK 


']ov 


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« * • 



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Fr. 53- • ' ' 
M 



Fr 54. . 



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Fr- 55- 



] 



Fr. 56. . 



H 



Fr. 57. (Xo.) [. .] '^oiKi Se[ Fr. 58 

[.]e Jioi/vaos T[e 1085 ] avpa OiXofXiu [ 



[.]aPT09 eicrea[ 

[.](f)€<TTT]K OvS[ 

5 [.] . iS', ovt[ 
Tis noT [ 



a]/xvpi'a? Kani>[ 
6a]\d/xoi9 Bp6/j.io[. .]e£[ 
J an oLvas 
5 ]r€ ^iXai 

]^7;<a (pepova-a Tpnre[ 



58 THE 

^dXX€LVTr[ 

ai/dTai6[ 
I o TiTOcrfjfxa[ 

^OTpvaa . [ 

avaSiS(c[ 

pu8€yd[ 

ard^eil 
15 veKTap[ 

\i^avov[ 

/ xapiva\ 
avTdya)[ 
20 ,]7r6rj'ia0eco[ 

TTOV 

.]ao(rao-/co[rt'ot']][ 
.]e/3t7r/ja)T6yofo[ 
. . . ']/)coo-bVej/i/[ 

]§'r)TOT^[ 

25 ]yivo[ 



OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



]acr7ra/Daxt/pocrfc5t[ 
jcrecroi/cofa- 

10 ]7ra/3i{rcr6/)o5oj/xf/"^'[ 



Fr. 59. 



]a(ra/zacr[ 
]o/cr?)//a . [ 

5 VoiKoto- [ 
]e|ayera[ 
]oj/yet'o[ 
]ef7reT'a[ 
j/xej^cra . [ 
10 ]VX«P'^[ 



Fr. 60. Col. i. 

3 (?) lines lost. 

' V ' l[ 

opyrjirpiuopOoxTTrpayfi' 
aiyaa-a/jLeif3r]S^ ovSei'a>[ 

(oaTovdav€iv/X€uovveK[ ]ct> 

Tot'5eKrareii'ro7eKi'OJ^ou/cop^[.V5o>ca) 
lo TovpLOVTL6r]vqfioviTT(iiai(nvayKa\aia 
■n\y)vovTtKovaaTaWa^oi)aniovT^Kvov 



Plate III. 



(7re/oyoi/(rat0epoi'to0tAr;/i'e/iot^t|Ir]]a 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 

da\afio[ 1090 jay napa ^eipo? tSt[^a 

(3d\\€i vtt[ ]y es oiKov? 

dvd T ai6[(p ]€poi'- coy 8' iir e7rd)p,[ioi/ 

10 Ti TO aijua [ 10 Kv]7rapiaa6po{(p)oi/ \€pl p[ 

^OTpv? a . [ '€](r(o6^u 

dvaSiS(o[(n i095 ]Ti[. ?..].[ 

/oVr $€ yd[XaKTi ...... 

ard^ei [ 

15 i/eKTap [ 

Xi^dvov [ Fr. 59 

Td-)( dv e[ 1 100 ] • • [ 

Xa/Jti^ a[ ]a? dfids [ 

dvTdy(D[v 7"]o KTrJua . [ 

20 arp. 5)] TTOTvia Bi5^ ]? ovyjL Biy\ 

(^\do<i d(TKOTTOV [ 5 ]V OLKOIS 

d]JpL TTpa>T6yoi'o[v 1105 ] ^^dy^Ta\L 

. . . ']/9coy oTi vv[^ ]ov y€vo[^ 

] 8r] roTi [ ] €"r6 t a[ 

25 ] yei'o[ l/^ei' o-a • [ 

] • • ^[ ^° ]*? X«P'^ [ 

]t5' a7ro^[ 



59 



Fr. 60, 



Col. i. 
3 lines lost. 



Plate III. 



5 ovTUi 8oK\ti^ (TV Srj ^api^eadai TV(f)Xf} 
opyfj npiv 6p6(o9 npayix[dTcoi/ paOeiu oSou. 
(Ttya?, djJL^i^rj S' ovSeu §>[i/ KarriyopO) ; 
d)9 rov Oavtlv p.\v ovv^k [atria y ey]c6, 
TOV Sk KTav^lv TO T^KVOV OVK 6p6[d)]? SoKm, 
10 Tovfiov TtBrjvqix , ov eV kjiaiaiv dyKdXai? 
nXi]v ov TiKovaa rdXXa (y') coy i/xov t(ki/oi^ 
(TTepyova- 'ic^^pip^ov, (a^^Xrjix kjxol \ikya. 



6o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

u)TTp(X)paKaiKaLV0ve^a\nrjav8<x)p 
apyoval'conaiSe&cocraTroXXvfiaiKaKaxT 
1 5 o)fxavTL7raTpoaoLK\€ova6aPovfXi.6a 
a/07/^o[. .]X6€firjfiLSr]avnaLTia(r 
aia-^paaBavovaavStaaeyapbLoWviiai 

T 

iXB^oi<T6ayap8r]TaixaKaiailxap^p^vpa 
aa(f)€crTaTauSe^aiT di^TjS'ificouKaKcov 

20 ayiTe-cpiXcouyapovSepaetaopconeXaa 
oaTicrixea(iO(7€iKei/aS\^,]Tn]S€a6rjvapa 
e7rio-;(e(ra)7re/i7roucrar[.]t'5ec7ricr0aya[.] 
8o/xcoi'avaa(raTa>yapevTp€7r€i(TLS(oi^ 
TovX€v$epouaoi7rpoaTL07]p.LTi](f)vaii 

25 (io7rpoaaeyoi'aT(iovLK€TiaajX(pLap€0)TnTi^(o 
[.]ai7rpoa[.]^V€L . [. A^r](jaTToXX(jdvoar^\vris 
[.]aipoi'yaprjKeLaTOLaefioi<nyei'KaKoi<r 
[.^VGaijxvBiayapcrrjvaTToXXvixai^apiv 
lJiiXX<ji)T^6vi](yK^Lv8^ap.Lav8^jx ^taopacr 

30 TTpoaaoiaiyovacnvriTo6\nTOixr]u^ivov<T 

I (Tl S 

oaa^L^Sin pa^eiao^L^ocrcoi/n p[.]Sovaefxe 

V 

ou€LSo(rapyeLoi^o^aii'eXXr]aii^Tea^oi'^ 

a 

aXX(t)8ia[. . .]u€fnTvp(ovX(va(oi'TV)(^a(T 
Savaoiaii'[. . .]€Tr]i'Se(rvn<popauTeKuov 

35 7rap(oi'ya[. . .]0a(f)7]cn8€r]S€€KOV(ricos 
KTav€iufi[. .]aLSaKa7n^ovXev(7aiSofioi(T 
€iSa)aa(p€LynaiTT]]/TV)(r]UTV7r€iSo/XT]u 
Tr]V(Tr]ua7reL(n]T€KTr€TTvevKOToaTeKPOv 
T]K[.]S'apr]^(ovavix(popai(nTaicncraia 

40 Top[.y^Laioi^ovKe^a)i^'To8iV(Te^e(r 

ai[. . .]ot/yapevix^i'e^e7naTaa6ai7ra6eii/ 

SpaaaiSe/J.-qSevevnadopranpocrcr^deu 

TTp(x)Tovixivovvaov8i:L^ova>^ivr]Kapa 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 6i 

CO npatpa Kol X^vkolvov e^ dX/xr]^ vScop 

'Apyov9, /o) 7rai8'\€9}' toy (XTroXXvfxai kukw. 
15 CO fiduTi waTpos OikX€ov9, OavovfXiOa. 

dpri^o[v, ejX^e, firi ^i iSrjs vn alrias 

aiavpds Bavovaav, Sid ere yap SioXXvfiai. 

'4X6', oTaOa yap 8i] Ta/xd, Kal a\ jxaprvpa 

(ra(f>€aTaT(o)t/ Se^air du r]8' €fXMU KaKooi'. 
20 dyere, (fiiXodv yap ov8iv daopco TTeXay 

oarty //e adyaer Kevd S' [€]7rT]S(adr]v dpa. 
(AfX(p.) eTrta-^ey, ^ Trefxivovaa r[7^]j'(5' knl o-0ayci[yj] 

86p.(ov dvaaaa' rco yap (v(Tr)peTreL a IScov 

TovXevdepou croi TTpoarWrjfXL rfj (fivaei. 
25 (Ty^r.) CO Trpoy ae yovdroav iKens, 'Afxcfudpeo), niTvoi 

[/c]ai vrpoy [y]ei'ei'o[u T]rjs (r) 'An6XXooj^o9 Tc^fT^y, 

[K]aipbu yap r]Kei9 roFy (fioicriv eV KaK0?9, 

[p]vaai fi€' 8id yap crr]v dnoXXv/xaL y^dpiv, 

//eXXco re 6vr)<TKHV, Sea-fiiaf (T)e p.' eiaopas 
30 TTyOoy crorcTf ydvaaiv, r) ToB' eino/xriy ^evoi^' 

oaia Se Trpd^ei9 ocrio? &v' 'ap\6\8ov'i 8i ywe 

oy€i8o^ ApyetoLCTLv " EXXrjcrir r' eaj]. 

dXX' (o 81 d[yvd)]i^ ifXTrvpcoy Xevaacoi^ Tv\a? 

Aavaoldiv [eiTTJe T^[v\8e avp^opdv reKvov, 
35 napoou yd[p oicr]Oa' cp-i^al 8' i]8 e/cofcr/coy 

KTaveTv /i[e TT\a'i8a Kani^ovXevaai Sofioi^. 
(Afi(p.) e/(5cby dcply/iai ti]v tv\7]u 6' vTrei86p.r]y 

rrjv arjy d Treicrij r I kit en v^v koto's t^kvov, 

^'/f[co] 5 dpr\^(i)v (TV/icpopaTai ralcri era??, 
40 TO /^[eJM (Siaiop ovK e'x'^''' ''"^ ^' ^^<^^^4^- 

ai\cr\p\pv yap ev jikv i^eniaTaaOaL naOeiv 

8pdaai 8e fxr]8ev €v TtadovTa irpoi aeOev. 

npcoTov p\v ovv (Tov Sei^ou^ d> i^i'f], Kdpa' 



62 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

(O p 

a^o^(povyaponnaTOvnoveWriv(i)v\oyo^ 

■ne 

45 7roXvcr8ir]K€iKai(f)VKovT(o(Tyvi'aL 

KoafieLPTefjiavTOPKaLTaSiacpepoi'O opav 

5 € o- 

enf-LTaKovaovTOVTa^^ovaiTOvSavi^o^ 

a 
(ifj.€Pyapa\Xo7rai>afiapTapeiv\peci)v 

•\^vvr]v8\aavBpoariyvvaLKO(TOVKa\ov 

50 (t)^€v^'TrpO'japyuTT\r}aio.\J\vai(i)V'^6ova 

TvavTcovB' aKoova oiSaaeo'.^raacocppoya 

ovyap7roT€i(TToS'ofj.fiae(3X[.]\lrac-iTapcov 

pvpS€LTi^ovXeLKaiKXve[.yaedev6€Xco 

Kuia eKSLSaa-KeivovKaya^ioa-yapei 

55 yvi^aiTOTr)<r8eTr]aTaXanra)povK[.]Kou 

aypLo)a<pepovaavairimov6[ ]<« 

oyTriv8iiiaX[?ipvr)TOTrja8[.'\Kr)(ro[.](av 

aLa)(yi>oiJLaiSe(poLPovov8L€finvp(op 

T€)(i'r)V€Tra(TKcopylrev8oa-€[.]iX€^ofJ.€v 

60 TavTr]V€ya>^€Traa-aKpr]vaLOv[. .'\vo(i 

8€i^aL8Layvcovp€VfiaT(oy[ ] 

o" apY*n>vi»)<r 

aTpaTiairpo6vfxa^(Ta>(TTii'[.] •'i^'J\8[ ] 

Fr. 60. Col. ii. Plate III. 

3 (?) lines lost. 

[ ]V7^^[ 

[. . . .]7ra((r/xe[ 

[. . .]aaa/xej'[ 

[. .]eL(T8e[ 

70 [. . .]aL6(X[ 

[. .]a/c(Mracr[ 

X T]K6pTl(T€a[ 

Kaiviv8pofi[ 

eiXi^ei^ap(l)[ 

75 T]/xeia8€l'8o[ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 63 

cruxppoi' yap o/ifxa Tovfiou ' EWrjifCoi^ X6y09 
45 TToAt'S' SirJKer kol necpv)^ ovt(09, yvi'ai, 

Koafiuv r IjiavTov kol to. 8ia^epov& opdv. 

eneiT uKovaov, tov ra^of? 8h tovS' dv^S' 

€19 /xei^ yap dWo ttoLv ap.apTdveLV ^pecoi', 

'^I'XV^ 5' cy drSpbs rj yvvaiKO'i ov KaXov. 
50 (Evp.) (5 ^ere Trpoy "Apyei 7rX?;cria[j'] vaicav yQova, 

TrduTcov { (5 I dKo(v)ovcr otSd a oiy^ra crdx^pova' 

ov yap TTOT 6iy t68 ofXfx (av) ej3A[e]\//-a9 rrap<x>v. 

vvu 8' €1 TL j3ovX{u^, KOL K\ve'[L\v aideu OeXco 

Kai (T €K8i8d(TK€LV ovK dud^L09 yap ei. 
55 (Ap<p.) yvvai, TO TrjaSe Tr]9 raXanrdpov /c[a]/coi^ 

dyptcos (f)epov(rdv a tjttlou 6[ea6ai 6eX](o, 

ov Triv8e /iaX[X]oi/ 17 to TrJ9 8[i]Kri9 6[p](oi'. 

aia)(yi^o/j.aL 8e ^o?(3ov ov 81 €pTrvp[(o]i' 

Teyvrjv kTra(TKa>\v\ , -^evSo^ e[i t]c Xe^ojxev. 
60 TavTr)v eycb '^eTreiaa Kpr]va1ov [yajfoy 

8€i^ai 81' dyvodv p^vp-dTCov [oTTCoy XdjSoi 

(TTpaTid^ TrpoOvfi , 'Apyeiou coy 8[i€Kn€pd)U 



Fr. 60. Col. ii. Plate III. 

3 lines lost. 

[ 'iva-ifl 

[....] 7ra?9 fx€[ 
[. . .]a(ra p.\v [ 
[^ftjety 8\ [ 
70 [. . .]ai 6€X[ovT€9 
[8p\dKaiv aa[ 
rjKovTicr d[ 
Kat viv 8p6p[a) 
€iXi^€v dfi(f:{t 
75 T]fi(?9 5' iS6[vr€9 



64 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

eyoaBer olivary 
apxriyapriiiLv{ 

P 

80 6pi'i6a8'apyeio[ 
KaipT](rTo\[ 

noX\oi8[ 

KaSfiov[ 

85 foaTOVKvprjal 
5 
dpaaToa'L^erap\ 

€7rTaaTpaTr]y[ 

Tafxevyepofxefl 

aSavirapaiva>T[ 

90 e(pupei'ov8(iao[ 

avT0iT€6vr}(rK€[ 

a 

eiyijvcfxpoPTecrl 

f3iovdepi^eiva)[ 
95 KaiTOPfX€i'ei[ 

crT€V€iyane[ 

aSetKocrapyol 

6ayj/aiSoar]fi[ 

aXXeiarovael 
100 TO . [. . .]ia^p6T€[ 

KXeiyocryapeal 

aycovdr avTCD[ 

aT€(pavovaSi8[ 

^rjXQ>Toa-€aT[ 
105 €VTa>8€ixe . [ 

fxvr]a6r]a-eTa[ 

€7ra)vofxaa6r][ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 65 

fyo) o iTo^eva [ 

'^PX^ yap J7yuri/ [ttt] fidrcoi^ noWcoi' Bavoov 

Ap^e/Mopos e[aTii> 

(TV r ovy\ crai'TT)[j/ 
80 opviOa S' 'Apy€io[i(n 

Kal fir] (77oX[ 

aXXof^[ 

TToWol 5[ 

KdSjxov [ 
85 voarov Kvpr]a[ 

"A8paaT09 i^eTdp[a Trdrpiou av neSov 

iTTTcc crT/9aT7/y[(5r €K(reaa)crfievo9 jiovo^. 

TO. jxkv yev6iiev[a Srj aacfico^ iniaracrat' 

a S av napaivco T[avTd fxoi Si^ai^ yvvai. 
90 t<^v \i\v oi'Sel^ o[crTi9 ov rrouei (SpoTcoif 

Odnrei { ^' } re re/c[j/a y^drepa Krarai vea 

avToi^s) T€ OurjaKelr Koi rdS' d^Oovrai ^ parol 

€19 yrjv (pepouT€9 [yrjv. drayKaico^ S' e)(€L 

^iov Oepi^Hv oi>[oTe KdpTTifiov aTd)(yu, 
95 Kal rou fiev el[vai tov Se prj- tl Tavra Set 

areveLU drrelp Set Kara (f)V(TLV SuKuepdv ; 

d S' et'/coy 'Apyo[ 

Odyjfai 809 '^p[ti^ 

dW' €19 TOV de\L TOL y^povov Toh TTrjjJLacnv 
roo Tol\9 crojr? Pp6re[L0v co(f)€\i](r€Tai yei/09. 

k\€ivo9 yap ecr[rai Td^o9 eV di'6pd)7roi9 oSe, 

dyooyd r avrw [yvp-VLKou a-va-T-qaofxev 

aTe(f)dvov9 8i8\ovTe9 T0T9 Kparovai ^vXXd8o9. 

^T^Acoroy ecrT[at <5' dv8pdariv viKrj irdi'v. 
105 eu r(p8e fikv [ 

fii>rjcr67]cr€Ta[i 8' 009 

eTriovofidadr] [ 



66 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



v€fj.€a(rKaTaXa[ 
avaLTiaydp'TOicrl 

no avi/yapKaXcocro[ 
OrjaeiaeKatTraiS'l 
a>naLTo/iei'croiT[ 
[. .]f](r(TOPr]iJ.rji/[ 
[.]po<rTao-(pv(r€i(r[ 

115 KaiTaa-SiaiTa(TTQ)[ 
7r[. .]6(oS€Toi(rfi€[ 
To[ ]aioia[ 



Fr. 61. 



]€i7rot[ 
]Xo[.]pia^7]X(CKa[ 
]d€KapSiaa€o[ 
](TS[.'])(^oiav€ai'i[ 
5 ]\6ofj.ov7rap6i/6^o . 
](ripr]T€6i'a(TiS[ 
]XXaSu(rTV)^ovu[ 
]SovX€iai'7nKp[ 
](rav7)i'VTOvaXo[ 

10 ]dvcro/xai(re8co[ 
]Ka-raaTr](r€ia(ra[ 
']a$'eX€v6€pap . [ 
]po(T€icrvfxoiTep[ 
]o(f)ooSoLr](T)(a[ 

15 ]yXii<a[. . .]iXd[ 



[ 



Fr. 62. 



10 



]vr]TOfxo . 
]rjnviaicro8€ 

]ovKa)Xvei 
]ov(r/xoX€iv 
j^iaaTiPoa- 
]avnaTa 
jvTrXaKa 
] . ov(ppa[ 



Fr. 6^. 



].[..]. [.]rca[ 
]ap8paKaT€(pijy€i'[ 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 

Ne/xias Kar aAa[or. Tr]uS( S' ovv \vaai (T€ yp^y 

dvairia ydp' Toi9 [ 
no avu yap kuXm (Tc\y, a> yvuai, nddos reXei 

dr](r€i ae Kal iraiS" [et'y to Xolttov eu/fXeeTy. 
^Evp.) (5 nal, TO jxiv aoi t[ 

[. .] rj<T(TOV rj fJiT]p[ 

[Tr]pb9 TO.? (f)vcr€i9 [XPV '<(^^ to, Trpdyfiara (tkott^^v 
115 Kal Ta<i StaiTas Tai\y KaKoov re Kayadcou, 

7T[€t]6a) Se T0T9 /xe[i' adxppocriv noWtjv e^f^'j 

To[i9 fit] SiK]aL0L9 [8' ovSe (TV/x^dWeiu xpecioy. 



67 



Fr. 61. 
C^f- ?) 



Fr. 62. 



]enToi[ 
]X' o[t']pi' d^ijXo) Ka K(o 
■^X]^e KapSia9 'i(T[(o 
](j-S' [e]xo'9 i€aui[ 
ri]\B* ojxov TTapovB' op[co9 
^co\(nv rj TiOvdcn B[r] 
]XXor 8vaTvyovv\T 
] SovXciav 7riKp[ai^ 
]? uvrjvvT0V9 X6[yovs 
]avoopai are S(o[ 
] KaTaaT-qaeia^ d\y 
T:po\<j& kXevQepav . [ 
j/jo? el (TV jlOl T€p[ 
o^ocpSt 8oir]S X^[/"^ 
15 '\vX'iKa[. . .]£Xa[ 

]•[ 



10 



10 



] . 0- . . . [ 
'\>r]Top.o . 
A'\qnviais oSe 
]^aip.(v dv 
] ov K(oXveL 
jouy fxoXuv 
je/ay tlpo? 
]avjxaTa 
]v rrXuKa 
] . ov (Ppa[(T 

yo[ 



Fr. 6c^. . 

(r^lr. ?) ].[..]. [.]Tca[ 

] dv8pa KaTecpvyeu [^ — ^ — 
]d€iu k(TTiv €19 Ta[.]8e . [«-* — 
]ov9 dveOeaav to.^ (JVV^\j — 
F 2 



68 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

5 '\ovK^')(ovcn(TvniJLa^oy(T\ 
]aafi(piap€coa'aa>aai[ 







' Oiacoanepeii' a cocr . 








a[.]/3aj'(W 

• • • • 


• 






Fr. 64. Col. i. 






26 lines lost. 






27 


TOV 




4 lines lost. 


34 


V 

5 lines lost. 


50 
51 


]Su)vicri 6pa 

Kiaur 
"Jyvaiov opoo- 

]TT]0-9paKT]0- 




4 lines lost. 


52 


aa 


39 


j^ere 




3 lines lost. 




4 lines lost. 


56 


'0-771/ 




aaTCov 




;_t/]]([KaT]l Ka-r 


45 


<r 




end of column 



Fr. 64. Col. ii. 

TiKvdravaiiiavoSov 
avaTT\^.'\\LV€Tpo')(^aaev 
60 €7ri(p6^ou€7rir€ 

8e^i\aiiy^€Vivap.epo(r 
aficpLa TTjvp.evTTapriY^^wvcoyvvaLcfx.pri'^apiv 



65 



eTreiSeiiOLTrpodunoafjaO'oTrji'TOTe 
aTreScoKaKaycoaonrpoOvpaecrTralSe'oco 

OV (/) TTJvSs 

cr£o^[[e]](5e5?;o-fTe/cra*o-co5e/f?7re/3a 






Kai^aipeT 7]pe[.]aS'wcnr(popprjfji€a6a8T] 
crTpaT€V/J.a[.]ovr€aT]^opei'6y]^acr€Tri 
oivy\rL^ evSaifiovoir](T'd^co(ryap(o^€ve 
i'oi 
70 ivSaifj.ovoLr]a-8r]Tara)i^8eaci)VKaKOOP 

TaXatuaprjTepOfQiUTiacoaaTrX-qaToar] 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



69 



5 ] ovK i)(ovaL av[i}xd')(ovs 
\s 'AficpidpiQiS' aa>aai [w — 
]di9 Qiarrfpu j/ecoy . [ 

X]a[fji](3drco[ 



Fr. 64. 



Col. i. 





26 lines lost. 














27 




TOV 
V 




1548 




50 


4 lines lost. 

'HJ5o)vicri 0pa- 
Kiais 




34 


5 
4 


lines lost, 
lines lost. 




1555 




51 
52 


nd]Y"yaiov opos 

] TTJS 0p<jK1]S 

]ay 
3 lines lost. 


1573 


39 


4 


](5€Te 
lines lost. 
' aaToov 




1560 




56 


y ?]i/ 

i/ KdT(««)). 


1577 


45 




]^ 




1566 










Fr. 64. 






Col. ii. 










(Yir.) 


T^KVa T 


ava 


fiiav 


680V 









60 CTTt (po^ou kirl { xe I 
X^-pi-v eXt'^ay, 

^povco 8' e^eXaixyjrev evd/jiepo?. 
'A/xcpidp^ao?). TTji/ fx\v nap r][ix\5)V, d> yvvai, <P^PU X^P'-''' 
cTTCf S' kfxol 7rp66vp.09 rjcrO' ot rjuToijJ.rju) 
65 dir^ScoKa Kaycb aol npoOvfi ey naiSe crd). 

aco^ov 5e Sf] av {re/fi/a} acpoo Se Ti^vSe firjTepa, 
Kol x^ipeB'' r]pe[i]s S' , axnrep 6jp/jLijfi(a6a Srj, 
o-TpdrevfJ.' d['y]oi/T€9 rj^ofi^v Orj^as kni. 
oi^Ty^nT{yXr]s) ivSaifxovoir)^, d^i09 ydp, co ^ei^e, 
vol. 70 — fv8aifxovoiri9 8fJTa' tS>v 8\ crSiv KaKwv, 

rdXaiva nrJTep, Otoov tl9 coy dnXtjCTTo? ^(v)- 



1580 



1585 



1590 



70 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

(OT€KUOV€ifxddoLaXr]jii'ov7rovTiaa 

[[v]l ^ ^ 
oTLTTaTepoaovKiTefioPTrbXlovKapa 

7g rjydpaeTa^avnaTepacrovKaTaKTaveiv 

(f)oPo(re\€LIXeTCOVTOT€KaKCOV'L(0 

TeKvaoLaTeyopydSecrevXeKTpoia- 
eKauouevviTaa- 
TT av8'e^iKX€\lfa(r7ra>(T7r68acoa-Teixr]6aueLi^ 

" li 

80 aKTo.a-^apv^S'^pofxova 

iKOfiaveTTLTOiSfjLadaXaa-aLoi'opi'eeoiu 
iprj/xovKoirai^ 
KaK€i6ivr}\6eaBevpoiTu>(T'TivL(TToX(ii> 
uavTaiKMTTaia 



KOV 



85 vavTrXLOv^Lo-XLfj.eua^eui^cov'^TTopou 

ay6vn€8ovXoa[.]vaT e7r€pa<Tav(OTe[.]uoy 
evOaSrj^Srj'^vaLCCPfieXeoye/jLTroXau 

Oip.OLKaKQ)V(T00U 

fir)<jTiv enevTV)(j.ai(nv 

s 
90 aXXa(TV7rco(T€Tpd(pr]<TOTeS' ei/Tiui 

yjEipiTeKvovoaT^KVOv 

eueir' eveTre/xaTpLaa 

apycofj.eKaiTovS'rjyayeiaKoX'^cjiii^TroXii' 

aTTOjiaaTiSiouy €fJ.a>uaT€ppa)u 

a 
95 €7reL8'La]^i^cove6av€HO(Tixr}T€p7raTr)p 

oi/jLOLKaKcouXiyeLaSaKpvdT ofifxaaiu 

/ TeKvove/xoLaSiSoDa 

op(p€vafi€KaLTOi'S''T]yay'eio-dpaKr](TT07rou 

Tiya7raT€pinoTe)(apLPadXLQ)]^Ti6€fiwoa^ 

100 TL6tlJL€VO(T€Ve7r€fXOlT€KUOV 

KiOa 

fiova-dufie^Ko^pKraal'dSoaSLSaaKirai 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



71 



75 {Ev^ 
(Tf. 



(Evu 
80 (Ty\r. 



[E^v. 
(Tf. 



90 



100 



'T\jn7r{vXT}). alal cpvyas {t\ e/xi6ei/ as 'i(f>vyov, 

CO T^KVov, el fxdOois, Arjixvov irovTias 

ttoXlov on Trarepo? ovk erefiov Kcipa. 
rj yap cr 'ira^av narepa aov KaraKTavav ; 

(p6^os 'e)((ii fie T(i)v TOTe KaKcJov lo) 

TeKvi^ov), old re FopydSes ev XiKTpoi? 

(.Kavov evveTa<i. 
av S e^e/fXe\|/-as' ttco? ttoS' cocrre fifj Bavuv ; 

aKTocs ^apv^pofiovs iKO/iai/ 

kwi T ocSfia 6a\da(Tiov, 6pv(Ji6)(x)u 

kpr^jxov Kohav. 
KUKeWeu T/X^ey SeOpo ttco? tiui (ttoXco ; 

vavTUL KOiTraLs 

NavirXiov eh Xijxeva ^eviKov nopov 

dyayov pe 8ovXoavv]a t eirejSaaau, cS Te[K'\vov, 

evOdSie Aa)vai(S)(jov fieXeov epiroXdv. 
ol'poi KaKoov au)V. 

pf] arev' en evTvyJataLv. 

dXXd ail ttco? erpdcpTjs oSe (j) ev tlvl 

Xeipi, reKvov w reKvov ; 

even evene parpl ad. 
'Apyd> pe Kol TouS' rjyay e\i}9 (Ico)X{Kb)'y noXiv. 

dnopaaTiSiov y epSiV aTepvodv. 
enel S" 'Idacov eOav epos, pr]Tep, nariqp — 

oi'pot KaK{a) Xeyeis, SdKpvd r oppaaiu, 

TeKvov, epoh SiSxs. 
Op(f)evs pe Kai tovB' r\yay eh ©paKtjs Tonov. 

riva narepi nore X^P'-^ dOXtoi 

TiOepevos ; evene poi, TeKvov. 



{Evu. 
(Tf. 



{Evu. 

(Tf, 

95 {Evu. 

(n. 

{E6u. 
(Tf. 



1595 



1600 



1605 



l6lD 



1615 



1620 



{Evu.) povadu pe Kiddp{a)s 'AaidSos SiSdaKerai, 



72 



I05 

io6 (a) 
106(b) 



1 10 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a 

TOVT[.]u8'e(Tdf)(ooaoTrXacKO(Tfj.r](r€i^H^a^)(^r](T 

SiaLydiovSeTLPaTTopof 

e/i[. .]€T aKTdu\r]/xuiav 
doacr[. pixi^i^iaoanarripSvoLVTtKvoi 

77ya[.]o-eo-[.](rr[.]f 

^[- -IXl-' • ']y^MX^^^^^ 

[ j'^^l- • • -^OUOiV 

[ ]ocrSoKLaPiOTd(T[. .] 

[ ]€/iaTpnTatSacrf] 

 [ ly"Oi 

K€t[ }vTO(yOLVa)TTOV^OTpVV 



Fr. 64. 

31 lines lost. 

«[ 

?[ 

145 - [ 

.4 

[ 

«[ 

[ 

150 o[ 



Col. ill. 



155 



4 
(T :_L 

K 



Fr. 65. 



Fr. 66. 



]8vTOI.[ 
«(7ro[ 

]roOre[ 
]^a7 ^/cco5'[ 



] . aaip.a\ 

^Tovaov . [ 

'\KviaTr][ 

/' 
'[aiayayapXiy 



Fr. 67. 






852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 

TOVT[o]y S ty "Ap€0D9 ottA' iKoajirja^v fxciyr]^. 
(T-\jr.) Si Aiyaiov Se rira iropov 
e/^[6A]er' olktolv Ar^jxvLav ; 
105 (Evv.) &6a9 [k]ohi^€i abs nccTJjp TUvoi Sv{o). 
('T\|/-.) rj ya[p] <Tia[(t)]aT[a]L ; 

(Evp.) •^^Mx["'^] y^ p-'qyavals. 

107 erf.) [ ]^6[. . . .]6i;<ov 

[ 7rp]oaSoKia fiords 

[ ]e fxarpl naiSa^ rj 

no . [ ] /lOi, 

(06.) /C€t'[t/Oy ]i/7-0y olvODTTOV ^OTpVV 



73 



1625 



1630 



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31 lines lost. 

4 

o-[ 1665 

145 • [ 

4 

[ 

4 

[ 1670 

150 o[ 



Col. iii. 



4 



ALovvaios). o\ 



155 ^1 



1675 



Fr. 6S. 



tnro\ 

]y /z6t'o[ 

] (TTpaTi[ 

]^a^' ^/co) S' ] 



Fr. 66. 



] . a? e/ia[? 

]toj/ croj' . [ 

Te]KV iaTi][p 

]t/ oT iT0[lfJi (?) 

]ai SeSpaKl 

] ala-^pa yap Ae[y 



Fr. 67. 



ev TTO . [ 

at 
oty 



(piXa 



74 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



]Ta$veiy[ 

lo ]t . .[ 



]a/fa[[X]]XaX€y[ 



Fr. 68. 



10 



]d(3r]L 

]" 

]uov 

]V 
]vco. 

]KaKOV 

]n 



Fr. 69. . . . 
]yave[ 

]udea)p[ 
] . ov 

] 






].^ 



Fr. 70. . 

JOTTTOXIV 

'] 

5 ]uya8<oi' 
](Paoar 
^oo^vycoi 

]• 

]yns 

10 ]/xei' 



Fr. 71. 



kX[ 
Ka[ 

o.[ 



Fr. 72. 



]^ 



]7ra(r;;X0e[ 
5 ]XXcoi>Se[ 

]uS'an[ 



Fr. 7 



]aTa7r€<[ 



.7/1'. 



]iS\lttp[ 

]<T(3pOVT' 



853. 
]ai aacpcos [ 

:'o[ 

e]crTiv ai[ 
jra Oviiu [ 

XO ]i . .[ 



EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 

]a xaXa Xey[ 



75 



Fr. 68 


Fr. 69. 




Fr. 


70. 


. 






jya*'^ 






aTTJOTTToXll/ 


]/ia 




€ 






i Tu;(ats 


X]a/3,; 




V Bi^COV 






] 


]^ 




. ov 






Triv 


5 \vov 


5 


aXjXayjyi/ 






5 0]L'ya(5a)i/ 


1^ 




] 






0aos 


J'O)* 




e 






0) ^uyoJ 


KUKOy 




'■] ^ [■]o^ 






]. 


a 




. V 






jy?? 


10 ]^ dippcou 










10 ]//€!/ 


]v 










e/^ay 


• • • • 










]/zoi/a 



Fr. 7], 



Fr. 72 



(B) ^X[ 

{A) Ml 

(B) >ca[ 

5 {A) TL(X[ 

(J) o[ 

(B) o.[ 



2 


Fr. 


73- 


I . . • • 


]\ 






] . IM 


] • x/'^/^^^^ 






]aTa7r€i 


]ef [xoi naiS 






TTTiLV e 








"f5' et irp 


5 ]XXco»' 8e 




5 


]S ^pOVT[ 


]X' a7r65o[ 






] . . [-l-^l 


]uS' an 






• •  • 


-./p 









76 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 74. 



Fr. 7 



]/(iei/re[ 
]a)yura[ 



/o- 



]i;eti'/i'€i[ 
\TovaaBv[ 
]7ror6/f[ 
]0afaT[ 

]• 



Fr. 76. 



]X[ 

](r(T . 

5 ]ei^eft)^/ 



Fr. yj. 



] 

] 

p 
] . rjnepacr 

] 



Fr. 78. 



H-]r • [ 
If' 

] 



• • 



Fr. 79. 



Fr. 80. 



Fr. 81. 



Fr. 83. 



(t)a[.]a6 


vvv8 


Ocaapl 


. a . . 


' pyaarjuT 


]ovTa . 


VT€Tpa^ 


KUK . 


]\iSa(T/jii[ 


]co^au 


]Sa6ecov . 


. aStTia 


]naia 


la)(rTeo-[ 


• [• •]7iy[ 


re 



5 ]•[ 



Fr. 83. 
]7rtl6a> . [ 

]KOfXiCi[ 

VV 

I- -IXPV • [ 



Fr. 84. . 



](TTO(rO . [ 

]aavOf}[ 



Fr. 85 



1 r 


. et(r€[.]/c 


ICTKafl . 


] ' [-M 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



77 



Fr. 74. 



]fi€i/ re [ 
] M yvya[L 



]"[ 



Fr. 75. 



]vv aoi Ball' 
]aov(Ta 8v[ 

]iTOT€k[ 

] 6avaT[ 

]• 
]•[ 



Fr. 76. 



Jcrcr . 

5 ]et ^ecoi' 



Fr. 77. 



Fr. 78. 



] . a 

] 

B]efii9 

] xpv T^^V"? 

5 ]aa6ai 

] 



] 

1«[ 



Fr. 79. . . . Fr. 80. 

]oo(r[.]a8[ 
]pycc arjv t[ 

]7rata[ 



Fr. 81 

] vvv 5[ ]^eay p[ 

]ofr' a . [ '\vTirpa(p[ 

]oi)0-Te(r[ ] . [. .'\aLv[ 



Fr. 82. 



b J 



' [ 






Fr. 83. ] tthB^ . [ 
] 01^ X/"? • [ 



Fr. 84. 



](7roo-o[ 



Fr. 85. 



] . efo-e[.]/c[ 

] • [-M 



78 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 86. 






jc/cr 



«v 



TTore 



Fr. 87. 



]YVX • [ 
]_;/[[o]]i/7n;^[ 



Fr. 88. 



I 

]nepi 



Fr. 89. 



Fr. 90. . 



Fr. 91. 



Fr. 92. . 





]0(T 


]•- 


1^4 


; . €(r6[ 




] 


] 


]n6[ 


]f^o/^[ 




]li(0(T 


'i;<r 


]TT6p€Va 


\6 




1 

J 


] . o<r 


] • [• .]« 


VaTaTraf 

J • • • L 


5 




] 
] 


• • • 


• • • 



Fr. 93. 



Fr. 97. . 



• • 

avTri 


> 


;4. . 


X i. V 


'0- • 


X 1 . 


yw. 


• • • 

AaT[ 


H 




v(rv\ 




^^f^'^^l 






' • h. 


' aVTT[ 




]aoo- 




]64 






]-i[ 


• • • 




• • 




• • fl 






• • • 


• • 


Fr. 


98. . 


Fr. 


99. . . . 


Fr. 


100. 


1 • 


]f A[ 




M^ 




]Hoi[ 






]?.»'.'[ 


4 




]6v5' 




] 






] 


T 

« L 




]I4 




• 1r«[ 






' aTe[ 


» • • 








• • 






].[ 



Fr. 101. 



Fr. IC2. . 



Fr. 103. . 



Fr. 104. . 



M 


](nv(^ 


]a)/ca[ 


]y«.''[ 


."^p^l 


' ato- • y . 


3x^9i 


]ya[ 


]«l 


; 


• 


* » 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



79 



Fr. 86. 






TTore 



Fr. 87. 



Fr. 88. 



• • 



'\vr]v iTvp[ 



]..i 



] TTipl 



Fr. 89. 



Joy 
1 

1 

5 ]vs 



Fr. 90. 



Fr. 91. 



Fr. 92. 



I-'' 


].7r[ 


] • eo"^^ 


] 


]ri6[ 


>^0/i[ 


]l/9 


TTopiva^ 


Ae; 


 . oy 


] . [• ¥^ 


" <ara7ra[ 



Fr. 93. 



Fr. 94. 



Fr. 95. 



Fr. 96. 



r\avT-q 






• • 




]e5€[ 


Xar 


n 






'vaTT[ 




](OV C 


' • h. 


' OLVTT 






'aocr[ 




' €LV\^ 


].-/>[ 


eAa 

• a • 






• • 




a  
• • • 


]5e[ 

• • 


Fr. 97. . . . 




Fr. 


98. . . . 


Fr. 


99. . . . 


Fr. 100. . . 


r H 






I'/^L 




' jXOV 


' avL[ 


4 






Y>v8' [ 




3 


] 


^[ 






YA 




>4 


ar€[ 


• • • 






• * * 




« • • 


• • 


Fr. loi. . . 


Fr. 


102 


• • • « 


Fr. I 


03. . . , 


Fr. 104. . . 


•o[ 






(rtJ'o[ 




]a)/f ^ 


' yav' 


\lTpO 






jaiCT . y . [ 




1x^4 


1/4 


]o\ 






] 




a • a 


a « 



8o 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 105. 






Fr. 106. 



'\Koicr 



Fr. 107. 



Fr. 108. 



]7ra)[ 



1^[ 
]ape 



Fr. 109. 



]iOo-ef[ 



Fr. no. 



]0VT^[ 



Fr. III. . 



1'4 



Fr. 112. 



]Td0 . [ 



Fr. 113. . 



]8gu[ 

] [ 

] [ 



Fr. 114. 



] [ 

] [ 



Fr. II 



a- 



]eoa[ 

] [ 
] [ 



Fr. 116. 



/ 

]^ovcr[ 



We append here the previously known fragments of the HypsipyJe ; the numbers are 
those of Nauck's Fragmenia Tragiconan^ 1889. 

752. Aristoph. Frogs 121 1-3 and Schol. ad loc: 

Aidvvdo^y 09 dvpaoicTL kol ve^puyv Sopah 
KaOaiTTos €v TTevKuiai Ilapvacrov Kara 
TrrjSa ^opevcov napOevois avv Ae\(f)i(Tiv 

The first three hnes of the play, spoken by Hypsipyle, or, less probably, one of her 
sons; cf. introd. p. 23. 

753. Didymus in INIacrob. Sa/. 5. 18. 12: 

Sei^co fxev 'Apyeioiaiv 'A)(^e\coov poov 

Hypsipyle accedes to Amphiaraus' request to show him a spring. The line is to be 
placed between Fr. i. v. 35 and Fr. 6. 

754. Plut. j\Ior. p. 93 D = p. 661 F: 

erepov €0' €T€pa> alpofxeros 
dypevfi duOecov rjSofiii^^ ^^X? 
TO vqniou dirXrjcrTov kyoiv 

I. oipo/ifj/os p. 93, lafxevos p. 661. 3. axp^Tov t\u>v p. 93, uTrX/joTof fiiv p, 66 1. 

This fragment, spoken by Hypsipyle and referring to Archemorus, probably belongs to 
the lyrical portion of the scene between her and the chorus immediately after the accident; 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 



8i 



Fr. 105. 



]roi'r[ 
] . o-67r[ 

• • • 



Fr. 106. . 
] 



]kois 



Fr. 107. . 



]7ro)[ 



Fr. 108. . 






* • 



Fr. 109. . 

]to<ret[ 



Fr. 1 13. 



] [ 
] [ 



Fr. no. . 



Fr. 114. 



]oi;t€[ 



• • 



Fr. III. 



] [ 
] [ 



Fr. 115. 



>[ 



Fr. 112. , 



^Toio . [ 



. 


Fr. 116. . . , 


Qoa 


• 


' 


]gov <r[ 


' 


• • • 



• • 



see introd. p. 25, and note on Fr. 10, in the neighbourhood of which it is to be placed. 

Cf. Statius, Theb. iv. 786 sqq. at puer in gremio vernae, &c. 

755. Aristoph. Frogs 1328 and Schol. ad loc. : 

BcoB^Kafiriyavov avrpov 



y \ \ 

ava TO 



This is usually supposed to refer to the lair of the bpaKuiv (cf. Phoen. 10 10 (jr\Kov is 
fieXan^aS^] dpaKovros), and if SO is to be connected with No. 754 and Frs. 10 sqq. dadeKafxr)- 
Xavov, however, is a very strange epithet of avrpov. There is another reading na-rpov, which 
has been taken to mean the sun or the moon ; but this is also unsatisfactory. 

756. Aristoph. Frogs 1322 and Schol. 1320: 

irepi^aX' m t^kvov <oXiva9 

Spoken by Hypsipyle and probably from the scene of recognition between her 
and her sons (Fr. 64. i), rather than addressed to the child Archemorus in the early part 
of the play. 

757. = Fr. 60. 89-96. 

758. Stob. F/or. 10. 26: 

KUKoh TO Kep8o9 TTJs 8iKT]s vuipTcpov 

Probably to be attributed to Eurydice, who is accusing Hypsipyle of corruption ; cf. 
Fr. 60. 35-6. The line will then come from the vicinity of Frs. 22-32. 

759. = Fr. 60. 1 14-18. 



82 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

760. Stob. Flor. 20. 31 and 20. 12 : 

e^o) yap opyrjs Tray dvrip (TO(pcoT€po9 

The speaker here is in all probability Hypsipyle, deprecating the anger of Eurydice ; 
cf. Fr. 22. 3 Koi fif) 81 6p[y^s . . . Hence this line is likely to come from the same scene as 
No. 758 and Frs. 22-32. 

761. Sioh. F/or. no. i6: 

deXTTTou ovSiu, irdvTa 8' iX-rri^eiv xpecou 

Presumably spoken either by Amphiaraus to Hypsipyle or by Hypsipyle herself 
after her unexpected deliverance, and to be placed somewhere between Fr. 60. 117 
and Fr. 64. ii. 

762. Eust. ii. p. 959. 43: 

€V(f)7]fia Kal ad kol KaTea-cppayKr/xeua 

Valckenaer wished to emend (vcfirjfia to (va-rjfia, and Hartung following Zirndorfer 
supposes that the reference is to the (rtj^ida by which the recognition of Euneos and Thoas 
was effected. Wilamowitz would retain fv4>r]na, supposing a reference to some secret which 
was to be preserved by silence ; but the context cannot be recovered. 

763. Aristoph. Frogs 64 and Schol. ad loc.\ 

r\ iripa <ppdaa> ; 

The •words give no indication of their context. Bothe supposed that the scholiast's 
remark fan 8e t6 ffyna-rixiov i^ 'Y'^ittvXtjs referred to the first half of the line, 3p' fKSiSuo-Kca 

TO <Ta(j)ti. 

764. Galenus, vol. 18, 1 p. 519: 

ISov, TTyOoy aldep' k^afiiWrjaai Kopas 

ypauTOVS (r er aUT)o7cn TTp6(T^X€(y^)ov tvttov? 

I. Kopai ]\ISS., Kopas Hermann, Kopais Musgrave. 2. oio-t irpoa^XfTrov MSS., tv ahToicri 

npoa-^Xendp Valckenaer, Diair. p. 214 (the passage being quoted in connexion with aiTiapxi 
or aiToi), T . . . 7vp6(jfi\e-^ov Nauck. 

The reference in these lines is obscure ; possibly they occurred in the conversation of 
Euneos and Thoas on their arrival outside the palace; cf. introd. p. 23, and Fr. i. 
i. 1-3, note. 

765. Aristoph. Frogs 1326 and Schol. ad he. : 

olvdvQa Tpi^ei rov Upov fSoTpvv 

Tpt(f)fi RV, (f)€p(i other MSS., olvavras T( Tpfcfifi Tzetzes. 

This is connected by Welcker {Gr. Trag. ii. p. 559) with the x9^^h tlpnfXos referred to 
in the Scholium on Anth. Pal. iii. 10 (introd. p. 28) as the symbol by which Euneos and 
Thoas established their identity. But the words might well come from a choral ode such as 
those to which Frs. 7 and 57-9 belong; cf. also Fr. 64. in. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 83 

766. Hesychius i, p. 320 : 

dvaBponai 

Hesych. gives as synonyms av^i](Tus, ^Xaor/jtretf. An ode such as that in Frs. 57-9 
would be a Hkely place for the word to occur. 

767. Harpocration, s. V. apKTfvo-at : 



>/ 



apKTOS 

Harp, says on 8« at apKTfvofxevai irapdevoi apKTOi KaXovvrai, EvpiniBrjs 'Yyj/nTiiXr), ' Apia-rotpaptjs 

Arjpviais Koi Avaia-rpaTT]. These so-called apKToi were devoted to the cult of Artemis 
Brauronia, who was associated with Lemnian legend through the story told by Hdt. vi. 138 
of the rape of Athenian women from Brauron. At what point an allusion to them came in 
the Hypsipyle is quite obscure. 

768. = Fr. I. iv. 15? 

769. Cf. Fr. I. ii. 7 and introd. p. 24. 

770. = Fr. I. ii. 13? 

862. (fab. inc.) Bekker, Anecd. p. 362 : 

8pdKOVT09 aljxaTcoTrbu o/zfia 

Cf. Fr. 60. 71-2, note. 

Lydus, de mensidus iv. 7, p. 72, ed. Wiinsch : 

o) OvrjTa irapacppovrjiiar dvOpcoTrai', p.a.T'qv 
OL (^aaiv dual rfji/ tv)(^t]i/ d\X' ov diov?' 
€1 yap TV)(V p.\v iaTiv, ovB\v Set diov, 
el 8 01 deol crOivovcnu, ovSev rj tv-^t). 

Our attention was drawn by Wilamowitz to this citation, which is given with the name 
of the poet and play. The two last lines appear in the form d ph deal a-Gevovaiv ovk ea-Tip 
Tvxn' fl fi' ou adevovcriv ovSev iariv 17 Tv^'? in Floril. Monac. 108 (cf. Schol. Lucian, p. 171), and 
so stand in Nauck, Fr. adesp. 169 ; W-M would read 6((i>v for 6iov in 1. 3. The Hues are 
likely to have occurred towards the end of the play, after Fr. 60. 

Fr. 1. i. 2-1 1. Hypsipyle. '. . . toys to soothe thy mind from lamentation. Was it you, 
young sirs, who knocked at the gates ? Oh happy woman your mother, whoe'er she was. 
What do ye come seeking from these halls .'' 

Thoas. We desire to be taken within the house, woman, if it be possible for us to rest 
here a single night. We have with us all we need : wherein should we be any trouble to 
these halls ? Thy duties will be undisturbed. 

Hyps. It chances that the house is left without a man to rule it . . .' 

1-3. Hypsipyle is apparently quieting the child, which had been crying, before addressing 
the strangers ; possibly their appearance was the cause of the child's alarm. In 1. 3 some 

G a 



84 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

alteration of o-wi' seems almost necessary, and a-a^, which W(ilamo\vitz)-]M(ollendorff) suggests, 
is a simple remedy ; to^v would be easier than o-wf. The remains of the two preceding verses 
give little clue to their sense ; at the end of 1. i the letter before oi<: had a curved base, and 

may be e, o-, n, or v. ypa\_ suggests Nauck Fr. 764. 2 ypaiTTOvs (r' eV aleT)oi(Ti. 7rp6(T^\e(yl/)ov 

TVTTovs, but the difference of termination seems to preclude any identification with that verse ; 
af]roij could not be read, and to suppose that tvttois was written for rvnovs is too bold. In 
1. 2 the doubtful n may be kt or to. 

4. The accents of (Kpovaar and veavia\i are wrongly placed. 

7. Gday: this was the name of the second son of Jason and Hypsipyle according also 
to Schol. Find. Nem. Arguni.-, Myth. Vat. i. 133, 2. 141, Anth. Pal. iii. 10, and Statins, 
T7ieb. vi. 342; Apollod. i. 9. 17 calls him Nebrophonus, Hyginus, c. 17, Deipylus. 

[6]i{T6f a}x6r]vai is duc to Murray. 

8. ec avXt'o-jat (Murray) suits the scanty traces sufficiently well, and is more euphonious 
after the preceding a\\6r]vai. than another passive infinitive such as hex^rivai. havKi^nv occurs 
in Soph. Phil. 33. 

9. The reading of the latter half of the line is doubtful, t after Set is only fairly 
satisfactory, and kox v might well be substituted ; [re] hardly fills the lacuna after tto, but the 
scribe's spacing is irregular, and e especially sometimes occupies a good deal of room. 

II. \ahk<f\rTOTo^ \^iv oj?<[o]f (Bury) suits the papyrus decidedly better than \a.np6cr\TaT0i 

ii\lv o]t\[oJf (W-M). 

Fr. 2. I. The gap between this and the preceding fragment is evidently very slight, 
and Fr. 2. i may well be the next line to Fr. i. i. 11. It is indeed just possible that the 
two lines should be combined into one, reading [uSj/o-Troror k.t.X,, but the vestiges in 
Fr. 2. I though scanty are not in favour of o-. The purport of the passage clearly 
is that Lycurgus the king was away (cf. introd. p. 23), and that in his absence the queen 
Eurydice was at the head of affairs. 

4 sqq. The remains of these verses suggest that the sense of Thoas's remark was 
* Then we cannot find quarters here but must seek them elsewhere .? ' to which Hypsipyle 
replied, ' By no means; strangers are always made w^elcome here.' LI. 4-5 may accordingly 

be restored e. g. ovk. iv ^ffi/cocri toTo-S' ap ava.Tvav<Taip.(G av, Trpos 8' ti^Xo 8t] Ti Sco/x' d(popp.acr6ai 

Xpeu>v ; cf for the latter line Here. F. 1286 h aWrjv 817 nu Spprjo-a noXiv; Ale. 1040 ei tov npos 
aWov 86}fia6' apfirjOt/s ^(vov, and, for the reply of Hypsipyle in 11. 6-9, Ale. 566-7 rap-a S' oIk 

(TriaTarm peXadp' dnotBuv ov8' driixd^fiv ^evovs, 

Fr. 1. ii. 1-14. Hypsipyle is singing to the child Archemorus; cf. introd. p. 23. The 
metrical identity between 11. 9-14 here and II. 11-7 in Col. iii, makes natural the supposition 
that the preceding verses of these two sets of lyrics were in strophic correspondence, though 
as they stand in the papyrus they do not at first sight appear to be so. But, as W-M points 
out to us, a sufficient correspondence can be obtained in II. 5-8 with very slight manipulation, 
the verses being glyconics, in which a free responsion is permissible. Between 11. 8 and 9 
the loss of a verse, answering to iii. 10 Opfja-a-'' i^6a Kadapn 'Op^ecoc, is marked by the marginal 
01/(0)); cf. note on II. 8-10. By writing noTap.oio for iroranov in iii. 6, and in the following 
verse omitting the v ecpeXKvariKov in (TfKfcoaev and transposing the first syllable of TlrjXea, the 
following correspondence is obtained : — 

ii. 5- [— — — ] ^'-' — (3rd glyc.) = iii. 6. \j «^v^ — kj — (2nd glyc.) 

[— — ] w«^ — (3rd glyc.) ^w ^<j — yu — (2nd glyc.) 

^^ (pherecr.) — ^ — \^^ (pherecr.) 

— (3rd glyc.) Kj\^\j i^^ww - ^ — (2nd glyc.) 



\^ — V_'W\^ — KJiU 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 85 

Owing to the imperfect text it is hazardous to attempt to extend this process to the 
preceding lines ; but it seems likely that in Col. iii. 3-5 the scribe's division is at fault, and 
that the glyconic-pherecralic measure should be restored by writing a^jyivrjs 6pov\cTas eV 
ol^im ya\avti\as irpv^jLvrja-C a.vdy\/ai. Similarly in Col. ii. 4 the second syllable of alyav very 
likely belongs to the following verse ; in 1. 3 there seems to be a more serious dislocation or 
corruption. 

3. Perhaps v\rTdpxov, but the vestiges are too slight to give any confirmation. 

4. 'Kexxy^arj : cf. /, A. 1054 \evKo(parj ^afia6ov ', but this Is Only one of several 
possibilities. 

8-14, Ifyps. ' Lo this rattle's sound! (. . .) No Lemnian strain as solace for the 
shuttle or for the comb pressed within the web, O Muse, is this which I have to utter, but 
whatever befits a young child, for his slumber or amusement or meet tending, of this I make 
my song' (i. e. I sing for the benefit of my nursling, not to beguile labour at the loom). 

8-10. For KpoToXcov cf. Aristophanes, Frogs 1305-6, and the other references given in 

introd. p. 24. IrogS 13 13— 6 al ff VTr<op6<pioi Kara ycovias fUieiaXiaa-iTf BaKrvXais (pdXayyts 

laroTova nrjviapaTa KfpKiboi doidov ptXiras was perhaps intended to be a parody on 11. 9-1 1, and 
ia-TOTovov here strongly supports laroTova in the Aristophanes passage where the Ravennas 
alone has la-Tonova, the reading preferred by recent editors. 

av[o)), written in a probably different hand at the end of 1. 8, and the critical signs in 
front of 11. 8~9 refer to an insertion in the lost upper margin supplying a textual omission 
which is also indicated by the metre ; cf. note on 11. 1-14. Cf. also Fr. 64. 57, where Kar(a)) 
occurs in a similar position, and 223. 125, 700. 27. 

II. W-M suggests KoXel for /xeXet, but, as Mr. E. C. Marchant observes, this is 
unnecessary if MoCo-a be taken as a vocative, \eyeiv has been altered (perhaps by the first 
hand) to KptKeiv ; cf. 1. 26, where Arjpiov has replaced vrjaov. Murray remarks that these 
variations recall the double readings which are found in the Laurentian MS. in several of 
Euripides' plays, the Io?i, I. A., I. T., and Rhesus, and which perhaps descended from the 
edition of Aristophanes of Byzantium; cf. Wilamowitz, Heracles, 1. pp. 147 sqq., 214 sq. 

13. viapa'. perhaps this is the passage referred to in Bekker, Antiatt. p. 109. 15 (= Nauck 

Fr. 77'-') veapoi' dvTi tqv veos' 'Eipmibiji 'Yyj/'nTvXr] , 

14. Ta8e: this construction ad sensiim of a plural substantive with a singular relative 
having a collective sense is common from Homer downwards. A good parallel to the 

present passage is Soph. Ant. 707 oort? yap airds ^ (ppope'tv povos 8oKf'i, rj yXcbaa-av, fjv ovK aXXos, 
rj ^vxi]i> e^fi-v, ovToi, bianTv^diPTes axpdr^aav Kfvoi, 

15-37, Chorus. 'Why art thou, dear one, at the vestibule.? Art thou sweeping the 
palace-entrance or sprinkling water-drops upon the ground in servile wise, or art thou 
hymning the fifty-oared Argo which is ever on thy lips or the sacred fleece of gold 
guarded upon oaken branches by a dragon's eye ? Are thy thoughts with sea-girt Lemnos, 
echoing to the rolling billows of the Aegean, now, when hither up Nemea's meads in brazen 
panoply fleet Adrastus having passed the plain of Argos is bringing swift war against the 
lyre-built wall, the work of Amphion's hand ? He has summoned the might (of Hellas) with 
divers scutcheons and gilded bows . . .' 

15 sqq. As with the lyrics of Hypsipyle (cf. note on ii. 1-14), so too in the two choral 
odes, strophic responsion was naturally observed, and ii. 15 sqq. = iii. 18 sqq., the metre 
being as before to a large extent glyconic, and the correspondence of a free character. 
A greater licence in the use of the polyschematic glyconic verse, as was remarked by 
G. Hermann, Elem. docir. meir., is a characteristic of Euripides' later period. Hypsipyle's 



86 THE ®XYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

third song, of which the conclusion remains at the top of Col. iv, served as an epode ; the 
general scheme thus is a /3 a /3 y. 

17. aaipfts : cf. e.g. //ec. 363—4 aalpeiv re fiw/tta KepKiaiv t €(p(crTi'ivai 'Kvjrpav uyovcrav 

tjpfpav n' duayKd<Tfi. The accent on r) is erroneous ; cf. i. 4, note. 

18. old TC so again Fr. 64. 77 ; cf. Homer, y 73, Hdt. ii. 175. 

19 sqq. Cf. Statius, T^ed. v. 615-6 guo/tens tibi Lemnon el Argo stieta loqui ei longa 
somnum suadere querela. 

21. nivTTjKovTopoi is the usual Attic spelling; -fpoi was an Ionic form, and appears in 

Hdt. Cf. Apollod. i. 9. x6 KaKtluos {?,C. Argus) ^AOqvasinoOfpfvrisnfVTrjKovTopovvavv KareaKevaae 
Tijv iTpoaayopevdfi<Tai> . . . *Apy&>. 

2 2. ;^pu(reo/naXXoi' : cf. -£V. 724-5 xpva-eopdK'Xov . . . noipvap and Apollod. i. 9. 1 6 
XpvaopaXXov 8epas. 

28. nvpoTxmoi though unattested is quite a possible word, but KvixoKTvnos (Simmias ap. 
Hephaest. p. 74 Gaisf. Kvpoiervnav rjpav dXimv pvxcop) is required by the metre. 

29. 8fvp' or* (Murray) seems preferable to 8fvpo (8'), bringing out more clearly the 
connexion of thought ; * Are you still harping,' the chorus asks, ' on the old themes when 
events of such importance are passing at our doors ? ' A comma-like mark just below the 
a of Xdnava seems to be meaningless. 

30. anayei is not a quite satisfactory reading. The n is represented only by the second 
of the two uprights, which is drawn so long as to be more like p or v with a space for an 
intervening letter after the a ; there would also be room for a narrow letter between y and ei. 
But we can find no suitable alternative to dndyfi, and a tt of just this shape occurs in the 
next column in 1. 20 irarpiovs; cf. also nais in 1. 21. The verse can be easily reduced to 
a third glyconic and brought into harmony with the remains of iii. 15 by reading xaXKfoiatv 
for xaX»cetots'. Murray suggests a[v]p ayet, with e. g. ktvttov after 'S€pei[ov in 1. 29 (cf. Or. 181 
KTVTTov Tjydyer) 2in6. Trd^Tcvvratv in 1. 3 1 instead oi na peis. But something of the base of a u 
would be expected to be visible between a and p, and a mixture of dochmiacs (-oi' Krvnov 
K.r.X.) with glyconics does not seem very probable in a choral ode. 

31. 7ra[pfty (W-M) suits the sense, and to a sufficient extent also the metre, though the 
corresponding line (iii. 34) is catalectic. Part of the tail of the p would indeed be expected 
to be visible, but the scribe does not always make that letter very long (cf. e. g. epvpa in the 
next line), and it is not quite clear how far the accent on e of epvpa extends, i. e. the upper 
extremity of it might belong to a p of the line above. 

32-3. The wall raised by the lyre of Amphion is of course Thebes. Cf Phoen. 823-4 

({)6ppiyyi Tf Tfixfa GijjSas rds ' Apcf)ioi>ias rt Xvpas vrro nvpyoi dvia-ra. 

34. d)[Kv]n68as { = u)Kvn68r}s : cf. Anth. Pal. v. 223, ix. 371) is due to W-M. It is 
noticeable that wKvnopos occurs in the corresponding verse of the antistrophe (1. 37). The 
supplement at the end of the line aims at reproducing the metre of iii. 37, but is of course 
highly conjectural ; for dndyei . . ."Aprj cf Phoen. 1 123-4 TrvXaiy "Apr; npoaijyf, I. A. 283-4 
X(VKT]pfTpov 5' "Apr] Td(f)iov vyev. A[fip]a(r[To]f is very doubtfully read, but his name can hardly 
be spared in this line, and the initial a is fairly certain. 

35. (KoXfaf ptvf^s, as Wilamowitz suggests, is more apposite than KaX(a-6p(i>o[s since the 
army was already on the march, and it would be more natural to describe the result than 
the process of Adrastus' preparations. The scanty vestiges between o- and p. are consistent 
with either o or e, though an e must have been written rather small. 

36. Apparently avepara was originally written, the v being afterwards crossed through, 
but not the 6 ; possibly, however, the second letter is a deleted t or y, and the cross-bar of 
the supposed e represents the stroke of deletion. Above the line is an a, and adpara 
{(TTjpaTu) would be a natural word in this context; cf P/. 455-6 ao-7n'6or tv kikXm Toid8e 

a-f)paTa, LA. 275 npvpvas a^pa Tavponovv. W-M, however, WOUld prefer o-dypara (cf. Atldr. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 87 

617 KciWidTa Tevxn S' ff KoKolai. (TayiiauLv), and it is indeed possible that an overwritten y 
followed the a, for the papyrus is rubbed here. 

37. The accentuation of To^d re is in accordance with the rules of ancient grammarians ; 
cf. Fr. 64. ii. I, 841. V. 44 fv6a fie and note ad loc. 

38. \xovo^a[kove\y '. the Only other instance of this word is Anth. Pal. xv. 27, where it is 
applied to [lir^iov in the sense of having only one foot. Cf. TerpaQdiiav, EL 476, &c. 

iii. 3-17. Hyps. '. . . speeding over the waves in the calm to make fast the cables, 
him whom the river-maiden Aegina bore, even Peleus ; and by the mast amidships Orpheus' 
Thracian lyre of Asia sounded a dirge of invocation, playing a measure for the rowers of 
the long-shafted oars, now a swift stroke, now easying the blade of pine. This, this my soul 
longs to celebrate : let others hymn the toils of the Danai.' 

3-5. In its present condition this is an obscure passage. On the question of the 
metre cf. note on ii. 1-14. 

6-7. "noTafxo'io and iTeKvcoue n»;|Xea are changes made on metrical grounds; cf. note on 
ii. 1-14. Peleus is introduced here as one of the Argonauts; cf. Apollod. i. 9. 16; but 
according to the usual mythology he was the son of Aeacus, and grandson, not son, of 
Aegina. The ' river ' of course is Asopus. 

8-10. Cf. Statins, Theb. v. 342 sqq. vox media de puppe venif . . . Oeagrius illic acclinis 
vialo mediis iniersonat Orpheus remigiis. 'fKeyov is a certain emendation of W-M. The 
termination has been altered in the papyrus, but what was first written is doubtful ; possibly 
it was actually iKeyov, with a very small o. The combination of 'Ao-tds and Qpfjaaa as 
epithets of Kidapis is harsh but excusable on account of the frequency of the conjunction 
'Asian lyre'; cf. Fr. 64. loi, Cyclops 443, &c. Orpheus is enumerated among the 
Argonauts by Pindar, Pyth. iv. 315, and according to later mythographers his musical art 
had much to do with the success of the expedition. Cf. Fr. 64. 98. 

1 1 sqq. We rearrange the division of the verses so as to correspond to that 
of ii. 9 sqq. 

II. paKpoTToXos is not found elsewhere, but may perhaps be defended here on the 
analogy of the Homeric fv dKpon6Xoi(Tiv opeucnv E 523, t 205. W-M's suggestion to read 
uaKpoTTobcov (though that word too lacks classical support) is, however, very attractive ; cf. e. g. 
Timolheus, Persae 10 1-2, where dpdovs TrdSas va6s is a synonym for oars. 

1 1— 2. Cf. /. T. 1 125 sqq. avpi^cov 6' 6 KrjpoBeras Koikapoi ovpeiov Havbs Kwnais (mdwii^ei. 

15. v8('ii/ W-M: the earliest examples of this verb are in Alexandrian poets, but the 
ineptness of I8f7v and the parallelism of dm^odroi make the correction practically certain 
here; cf. also ii. 19-21. 

18-32. C horns. ' From wise men have I heard the tale how of old the Tyrian maid 
Europa left the city and Phoenician home of her fathers, and journeyed on the waves to 
sacred Crete, nurse of Zeus and home of the Curetes ; yet to a threefold birth of children 
she left sovran ty and happy sway over the land. And another maiden, I hear, queenly lo 
of Argos, quitted her fatherland to take the horns of a cow and suffer a gadfly's torment, 
When the god calls this to thy mind . . .' 

18 sqq. On the sequence of thought cf. introd. p. 24. 

21—2. Cf. Creies, Nauck Fr. 472 <ioiviKoyivovs nai t^s Tvpins TfKvov Evpanas. Nauck 

following Bothe omits nal ttjs Tvpius, and nal followed by t(kvov can hardly be right, but a less 
drastic remedy would be to emend nal t^s to naibSs ; cf. Tvpla naU here. 

22. There does not seem much to choose between the alternative readings dne^a and 
fTTffia, but dno^aivfip does not happen to occur with a direct accusative elsewhere in Euripides, 



88 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

and the idea of departure is sufficiently expressed by Xmoixra. Whether the interlinear € was 
added by the first or second hand is doubtful; cf. introd. p. 21. 

23-4. Cf. Bacch. 120-2 w 6aKdfifVfJia Kovpr]T<ov ^aOiov re KpijToj Aioyei/eVopey fvavKoL. The 

collocation ^lorpof^ov . . . Tpo(j)6v is a little inelegant, but probably sound ; AioTp6(pos is a new 
compound. 

26. rpia-aois : i.e. Minos, Rhadamanthys, and Sarpedon; cf. Hesiod, Fr. 39 (Schol. //. 
M 292), Apollod. iii. i. i, &c. 

27. Both a circumflex and an acute accent have been placed above the <o of xcopay; the 
former of course is erroneous. 

29. [oio-jrpw: [Kev]Tpa would remove the hiatus, but is both a less natural term (cf. 
however, Aesch. Prom. 596 sqq. voa-op ... a fiapalv^i p.e xp^ovaa KevTpots (poiToXeots) and less 
suited to the size of lacuna. The following word as originally written was a vox nihili ; the 
first of the two deleted letters seems to be X rather than a. 

30. \naT^pa% : the supplement is rather longer than would be expected on the analogy 
of the verses above, but the scribe tends to make the point of commencement of the lines 
advance slightly towards the left as the column proceeds ; cf. 1. 3 1 where [Kep]a(T(p6pov is 
practically certain. [x«!>]paf is less appropriate, especially so soon after 1. 27. 

dp(j)is, a word common in Homer and also used by Pindar, is not found elsewhere 
in tragedy, but that is not a sufficient reason for questioning its genuineness here. 

31. [K€p]aa(})6pov (IMurray) seems guaranteed by the parallel of Phoen. 248 ray Kepaa- 
(})6pov . . . 'lovs, though aa is not certain, and two letters would be enough for the lacuna if 
the column was kept straight; cf. the preceding note. Aeschylus, Prom. 588, calls lo tch 

^ovKepoo Trapdivov, 

32 sqq. In this passage the chorus is with little doubt seeking to off"er consolation and 
encouragement to Hypsipyle, and Wilamowitz suggests that 11. 32-7 may have run somewhat 

as follows : — [i-aiilr' av 6(os els cftpuvriba 6fj aot | [o•l'^^et]s Stj, (f)iXa, to p^eaov | ikiiis h' ovk^ dno\ti-^(i. | 
[ert ae tov "nXiTepoi Trartpa I Ipvcrecrdai ttoJt ' e^^ei credev | [mpau /cat rdxa (t'J w/cvTropoj^yJ fieravlcrafTai. 
Cf. Soph. O. C. 385—6 faxes fXTTiB' cos ep-ov 6(ovs iopav Tiv e^etf, SxTTe (Tiodiivai nore. This 

restoration, which is made only exempli gratia, brilliantly satisfies the requirements of 
sense and metre, but in the last verse can only with difficulty be reconciled with the 
papyrus, where the lacuna at the beginning of 11. 35-7 is practically of the same size ; one 
letter more than in 1. 35 might be conceded in 1, 37 on account of the slope of the column, 
but hardly three more. In 1. 33 also [o-uz't]€[i]s though just possible is unsatisfactory, since 
«[i] would not normally fill up the space ; moreover a future would be more apposite than 
a present tense. The letters o-S are quite doubtful ; the 8 may well be ^ or o- and the o- possibly 
o or CO : yji/too-jj might be read were it not for the difficulty of the apparent vestige of an accent 
above the place where the y would come ; the accent might, however, belong to the pre- 
ceding letter. Perhaps d-noKib^ti is the apodosis of the sentence, and we should read \<av (?)] 
a[tJo-^i;, <^iKa, to pecrov, | [eXnls (t' ovk] dno'Kfiyj/ei act.X. This would well Satisfy all the Conditions 
except that [xaj^jis a short supplement for the beginning of 1. 33 ; a[i] would not be open to the 
objection brought above against f[tl The supposed acute accent cannot be a mark of 
elision or length. In 11. 36-7 it is evident that the scribe's division of the verses was not the 
same as in ii. 33-4. 

38. yfvfa fits in with the context as explained in the preceding note; the god will not 
forget his descendant. 

iv. 2-9. I/yps. ' . . . sang a lament for Procris the huntress whom her husband 

slew. Death is the meet end of these my woes. What wailing, what song, what music 

of the lyre with tearful lament, though Calliope inspired it, could come up to my 
suffering ? ' 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 89 

2. The insidious corruption in this line was detected by Murray. The legend of 
Procris, daughter of Erechtheus, who was accidentally killed when hunting by her husband 

CephaluS is thus told by Apollod, iii. 15. I SiaXXayetcra Ke^aXw/nera tovtov Trapayivtrai tnl dfjpau' 
^v yap drjpevTiKf], bioiKovcrav yap avrfju (v rfj \6\pT] dyvorjcras Ke(f)aXos aKOVTi^fi Koi TV)((i}v dnoKTfivfi 
TIpoKpiv. Koi. Kpidfls iv 'Apetco ndyco (pvyrjv didiop KUTaBiKa^eTai, 

3. This line at first omitted has been inserted by the original scribe ; cf. ii. 8, note. 

5. In view of the imperfect context we have left this verse as it stands in the papyrus, 
though the transposition suggested by W-M to. 8' (pa ndSfa dduaros fXaxe may be right. 
Or possibly 6dvaTo(^v) eXaxe (sc. Procris)* TCI S' ipa nddia rls k.t.X. should be read. 

6. For the form of this verse cf. /. T. 895-9 Ws av ovv rdb' av ^ 6e6s fj ^poros ^ ri twu 

dSoKrjTcov . . . (cjinivoi) KUKOiv eKkvaiv ;, and for the substance of this and the following lines 

Phoen. 1498— 1 501 Tiva 8e TrpocrcoSov fj rlva povcroitoKov urovaxav irn daKpvai baKpyaiv, a> topos 

a 86pos, dvoKaXecrcopai ; The marginal Ki6api\_ is perhaps more probably Kiddpia-pa, as W-M 
suggests, than Kidapi[s as a variant for Kiddpas, but either of these would involve some alteration 
of pova-' dpo8vpnp€va m the following line; cf. the next note. 

7. cTTiSaKpuo-t was originally written, and then altered to (in^aKpvaei, emdaKpva-i being 
added in the margin as a variant. The p[ following is presumably the initial letter of povaa 
in some form, and possibly povcrau was substituted for pova dv-, which could not be con- 
structed with the variant icWapis (?) for Kiddpas. inibaKpvaei, however, would neither scan nor 
construe with any of these readings. 

9. novovs without a possessive or similar adjective is obscure, but perhaps admissible in 
consequence of the proximity of epd TTdde\a in 1. 5. W-M thinks that poixr in 1. 7 conceals 
an original ipovs, but if so the corruption has gone very deep. 

The chorus now catches sight of the approaching strangers, whose advance is signalized 
by the usual anapaests, 11. 10-4. 

iv. 10-42. Chor. ' O Zeus, Lord of our Nemea's grove, what is the quest of these 
strangers, marked by the Dorian fashion of their dress, whom I see approaching hard by, on 
their way towards these halls through the lonely grove .'' 

Amphiaraiis. How distasteful to a man is travel, and the sight of fields deserted or with 
lonely habitations when a wayfarer is overtaken by some need, unbefriended, with none to 
interpret his want, in doubt which way to turn. E'en upon me has this strait come, but 
with joy I saw yon house in the mead of Zeus in Nemea's land. And thee, strange woman, 
whether thou art a slave who watchest over the house, or no servile person, thee will I ask, 
what man is called the lord of this mansion where the sheep are tended in the land of Phlius ? 

Hyps. Lycurgus call men the master of these rich halls, who was chosen from out all 
Asopia to be the warden of Zeus, the country's god. 

Amph. I desire to take some running water in our pitchers as a libation to the gods 
offered by us on our journey. For streams of stagnant water are impure, and they have all 
been defiled by the army's throng. 

Hyps. Who are ye, and from what land do ye come ? 

Amph. We are from Mycenae and of Argive race, and on crossing the border into 
another land we wish to offer sacrifice for the Danaid army ; for we have set forth against 
the gates of Cadmus — if haply the gods may speed us prospering on our way, woman. 

Hyps. Why are ye marching, if I may learn this of thee ? 

Amph. We would restore Poly nices, an exile from his fatherland. 

Hyps. And who art thou who seekest to take the troubles of others ? 

Ainph. I am the seer Amphiaraus, son of Oecles.' 

II. Tovah' : this abnormal accent was preferred by some grammarians; cf. Fr. 64. 
66 rrp>8i. 



90 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

12. For TTtXaraj cf. Soph. Phil. 1 1 64 evvola iraaa TreXarai/. The scribe apparently began 
to write a X in place of the first tt of TTeiiK<t)v. 

13. (adrjTi; c(t6. Pap., following the analogy of evw^i, &c. ; but the spiritus lenis (due 
probably to the following &) is usual in eV^^s, &c. 

15. The correction of tprjfiiai to eKSijuiai is due to W-]\I. eKSrjfxla is quoted from the 
Hypsipyle in Bekker, Antiatt. p. 93. 26 (Nauck Fr. 768), and tptjixlai followed by dypovs 
fpTjiJLovs in 1. 17 produces an awkward tautology. 

18. anoiv was originally written, and the i was subsequently converted into p and o 
written through the mark of elision, the correction being probably by a different hand ; an 
acute accent seems to have been erased over the first o. anopov . . . anopiav is intolerable, 
and some other adjective must be substituted. It also seems likely that the nominative case 
in this and the next word has been replaced by the accusative, though the latter need not 
be wrong, anoKn, as Murray remarks, would be closer to the text of the papyrus than 
a(})LKos; cf. Ifec. 811 cino'Xi.s fprjfios ddXiooTaTT] /3poTco^'. This passage supports Wakefield's 
correction di'ep(^p.)r]V(VTa in Ion 255. 

24. The compound nrjXo^oa-Kos is not otherwise attested. 

27, alpedeii js a simple correction o[ tvpedeis, which is not a natural word here. 

28. KXrjbovxoi 'priest', as in / T. 131 Saias K\r]8ovxov, 

29-30. [x];j[?yCo']«^' «" and o[8iou] were suggested by Murray, xf"'V«^« instead of 
XpriaaipfBa by W-M, The middle x^'fo-^a' is idiomatic (cf. e.g. Soph. 0. C. 477 x''"^ 
xeaaBai), whereas xp'jo-at/ite^a is indefensible with [xjepw/Sa ; perhaps the scribe was influenced 
by xpiito'^t^i' in the previous verse. Statius describes the country as suff"ering from a drought, 
and it was water for drink not a libation that Hypsipyle was begged to indicate ; cf. Theb. iv. 

754 sqq. 

31. cTTpaTMv was an easy error with a-rparov at the beginning of the next verse. 
35. [o]pta W-M. 

37. wppfjpf(T6a appears likely here, but the supposed pfu. are extremely doubtful ; the 
vestiges would suit v or ^ better than p. A combination with Fr, 92, though the papyrus 
is very similar in appearance, does not seem practicable. 

38. €i8r][ in the margin at the end of this line is no doubt a variant like those in Col. iv, 
and we therefore infer that the verse began with el and some other particle than 8^, e. g. 
770)5 or yap. This opening combined with e]vTvxa>i renders the general sense sufficiently clear, 
and the line may be completed in various ways, of which we print an illustration. To 
suppose that ei8T}[ is the commencement of a line originally omitted and subsequently 
supplied is inadmissible, for the margin between the columns is not nearly broad enough to 
contain a verse in a single line, while if the verse were divided into several lines, something 
of these should be visible below fi8q. 

39. The restoration of the first half of the verse is the suggestion of Bury; but it is 
quite likely that the letters should be divided ]? ov 6ftxt[s . . .; 

41. nripopyis dr]pa[s Xa/3eij/ W-M. S> [^fi'(e), "XXcov 7r»;/Lio»/]as 6r]pa[s tIs wV, WOuld also bc 

suitable. The position of Fr. 3, containing the beginnings of 11. 41-4, is practically assured 
by the appearance of the papyrus and the appropriateness of its contents. 

42. Both here and in Fr. 60. 15 the papyrus has the Homeric and Pindaric form 
'OlVX^y, but oIkKtis is preferred by editors of Aeschylus and Euripides. In Suppl. 925, the 
only other passage is Eurip. where the name occurs, LP read 'loicXeous. 

43. Hypsipyle evidently knew Amphiaraus by name ; cf. e. g. Ion 260-3 (Kp.) V^ptovaa 

fitu poi Tovvofi, (K 8' ^Epexdecos iTe(j)VKa, narpls yi] 6' 'ASrjvaiayu Tro'Xtf. (*Iw.) i> K\eivov olKova aarv 
yfvvaicjiv t ano Tpa(f)f7cra Traripav k.t.X. 

44. oih\^ : or oix\_'i 

Fr. 4. The precise position of this fragment is uncertain, but there are two reasons for 



853. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 91 

placing it above rather than below 11, i-ii of Col. v : (i) Amphiaraus after telling Hypsipyle 
his name would naturally proceed to ask hers before making any further disclosures, 
especially when he found that his name was familiar to her (cf. 1. 43, note), (2) a dark fibre in 
the papyrus in front of the lines is noticeable in Fr, 4 and also in the upper part of Col. v, 
but disappears lower in the column. Since the break along the top of Cols, iv and v is 
horizontal and the number of lines in a column here is about 60 (cf. introd. p. 20), there is 
a loss of at least 15 lines between iv. 44 and v. i. 

2. V-' or Tf or Tjl 

3-4. We print a restoration suggested by Bury ; the same sense can of course be 
represented in various other ways. 

Pr. 1. V. i-ii. Amph. ' My wife persuaded me . . . 

H)>ps. With righteous intent or (guilefully) ? 

Amph. She received a necklace . . . 

Hyps. Whence (was it obtained) ? 

Amph. Famed Cadmus once married Harmonia, — 

Hyps. He was one of those whose nuptials were attended by gods. 

Ainph. To her Aphrodite gave a lovely necklace. 

Hyps. The gods to children of gods are ever kind. 

A?nph. Now their son was called Polydorus. 

Hyps. If he was the son of a goddess, and received gods' gifts, 'twas a fit name. 

Amph. His son was Labdacus . . .' 

I-II. The subject of this passage, as was perceived by both W-M and Bury, is clearly 
the famous necklace of Harmonia with which Polynices bribed Eriphyle, the wife of 
Amphiaraus, to persuade her husband to join the expedition against Thebes ; Amphiaraus 
had sworn that Eriphyle should be the arbiter in any question that might arise between 
himself and Adrastus, and so could not reject Eriphyle's request, although he was aware of 
her duplicity ; cf. ApoUod. iii. 6. 2. 

I. Only the bottoms of the first two letters rem.ain, and their identity is extremely 
doubtful ; but the vestiges suit yv, and if oa-ia ^[povova-a is right in 1. 2, Eriphyle must have 

been the subject of 1. I. Cf. Apollod iii. 6. 2 'Epi(f)v\r] tov Sppov "Ka^ovaa eweia-e TOP ((ivSpa) 
arparevdv. 

3. The line may be completed e. g. €5e^[a^' opixov x^P'^'- TioXweiKovs napa. nodev in 1. 4 
probably indicates that the opfios in particular and not merely bapa in general had been 
mentioned, but it hardly follows that Polynices had also been specified. 

5. For the genealogy here following cf. Phoen. 5 sqq. Kd8poi ... 6s TrmSa y^fjLas KinrpiSos 

'App.oviav nore no\v8<opov f^e<pv(Te, tov Se Ad^8aKoi/ (pvvai, \eyovatp, eK 8e rovde Aaiov. 

6. Restored by W— M. Cf. Phoen. 822 'Appovim M ttot' ds vpevaiovs rjXvOov ovpavlbai. 

7. Accounts differ as to who gave the necklace and to whom it was given ; according 
to some Harmonia received it from Cadmus. But that the giver in this line should be 
divine is necessary from the emphasis on 6eoi in 1. 8 ; cf. Schol. Phoen. 71 tqv pkv oppov 

'AcppodiTr] . . . avTjj (sc. 'Appovla) exaplaaro, 

8-10. The restorations were suggested by W-M. 

Fr. 5. The appearance of the papyrus suggests that this fragment goes closer to 1. 12 
than to 1. 27, and the first line of it may even coincide with 1. 12. It is noticeable that 
on the lower edge of the recto there are two or three half obliterated letters in a small hand, 
whereas the recto of the rest of Cols, iv-v is blank. But these few letters run in the reverse 



92 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

direction to the other writing on the recto, and their presence is not a valid reason against 
placing the fragment in Col. v, which is its most suitable position. Which of the speakers 
is Amphiaraus and which Hypsipyle is not clearly defined. 
5. The letter after 8 is more probably o than e. 

Col. V. 27. A comparison with the preceding column indicates a gap of 14 lines 
after 1. 12. If 7i{ in 1. 28 is yi\yai. in the vocative the speaker there must be Amphiaraus, 
but that is far from certain. 

29. The 8 in the left margin marks the 400th line of the play; cf. Fr. 25, and introd. 
p. 20. 

Frs. 6-9. We regard these fragments as forming part of the stasimon which followed 
the scene between Hypsipyle and Amphiaraus. That Frs. 6-7 and 9 belong to a single 
column is practically assured by a vertical crease in the papyrus, made, as the writing in the case 
of the two latter shows, after the recto but before the verso was inscribed. This crease has 
also served as a rough guide to the number of letters lost at the beginnings of lines in Frs. 6 
and 7. The position of the three fragments relatively to each other is quite uncertain, and 
they may be arranged in any order ; but it is likely on account of the difference of subject 
that Fr. 9 was separated by a considerable gap from the other two. The reference to 
Xipvi^a\_ in Fr. 6. i affords a slight reason for placing that fragment first ; also Frs. 7 and 9 
are alike in colour, while that of Fr. 6 is rather different, Fr. 8, containing the beginnings 
of nine lines from [. .]\ei;[ to ct^ . [ is shown to belong to the same column by the appear- 
ance of the papyrus on both recto and verso (the line of junction between two selides 
accurately corresponds in Frs. 8 and 9), and its place has been determined on internal 
evidence, especially 11. 6-7 and 9. 

Fr. 6. I. x^'i'^^i^ is usually accented, like other words in yf/, on the penultimate, but 
the accent x^p"^^"^, &c., as in the papyrus, was usual napa toIs TToiijTdls according to 
Suidas s. v. 

3. The supposed interlinear i> is possibly only a circumflex accent, but the angle seems 
to be too acute. 

Fr. 7. 4. tp]oaiCofifv\ W-M. dpoa-iCopevai in Aristoph. Progs 13 12 may well be a 
reminiscence of this passage. 

Frs. 8-9. The chorus is here tracing the events which led to the expedition against 
Thebes. According to the well-known story Polynices of Thebes and Tydeus of Calydon, 
both fugitives from their homes, arrived simultaneously at Argos and began quarrelling 
in front of the palace of Adrastus about their quarters for the night {KXialas 7i[f/j]t wKzepov, 
1. 10). Adrastus roused by the noise separated the combatants ; and, believing that they 
represented the lion and the boar which an oracle had foretold as the husbands of his 
daughters (11. 13-5 ^oi^ov 8' 6j/[o]n-6i[y] . , . reKva drjpalv [Qev\^]ai), adopted them as sons-in-law 
and undertook to restore them each to his country. Cf. Siippl. 131 sqq., Phoeti. 409 sqq., 
Apollod. iii. 6. i. 

2. Pleuron was close to Calydon, the capital of Tydeus. 

6-15. ' By night in lairs by the court-yard, exchanging frequent defiances, by oarage 
of iron and by slaughter they made proof with the spear, fugitives as they were, of the spirit 
of their noble fathers. And king Adrastus lay in his couch, having received the behests of 
Phoebus that he should wed his daughters to wild beasts . . .' 

6-9. The restoration, which proceeds on the assumption that 6vp6v in 1. 1 2 is correct 
(cf. note ad loc), is mainly due to IMurray. For 1. 6 cf. Phoen. 415-6 (no.) vl^ ^f, 'ASpdarou 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 93 

S' rj\6ov els Trapaardbas. (lo.) Koiras fiarevoiv . . .', vv\_ is evidently vv^ In some form, and if 
(fivyas in 1. 5 is masculine and not feminine it is probable, as Bury remarks, that 1. 6 
is a fresh clause and vv\ktos 8e should be restored. At the end of the line either avXa or 
avXa[ry is possible. In 1. 7 W-M suggests f'pi8' [epidos d]iJ.fi^6p(voi, which may be right ; but 
the dative would perhaps be expected rather than the genitive in such a phrase, as e. g. 
in Aret. p. 71. 30 dfieiyl/acrdai to kqkop KUKa. In 1. 8 <Ti8[apov r dp\t(T[a (Bury and Murray) 
seems certain, though we can find nothing quite parallel. In 1. 9 the letter before ov 
may be x» <r<paya is a somewhat strong expression, since nobody was killed or, for anything 
the story tells us, even hurt ; but the imperfect eVoiovi/ serves to soften it. 

12. dvpLov: only very slight vestiges remain of the letters after /i, and the first of them 
may also be a or w ; 6vpa)h\^. .] could be read, but there is not room for 6vyLcob[eis\, even if 
that prosaic word could be admitted here, and 8op\ dvp.(^h\(i\ is an improbable combination. 
A compound adjective 8opi0vfi . . . agreeing with (pvydBes would be attractive, but none such 
is known, nor are there obvious analogies upon which to coin one that would suit the 
papyrus. 

13. €V[o]77a[s] was suggested by Murray. Cf. Phoen. 409-11 fxp'7<^' 'ASpaVrw Ao^iW 

)(pr](Tp6v riva . , . Kanpco Xeovrl & dpp6(Tat. naiboiv ydpovs, and Pi. I302 ^oi^ov t a(ro(f)oi yXwa-arjs 
evoTTai. 

15. [f]fi;[^]at is somewhat too cramped to be quite satisfactory, but is adopted in default 
of a better reading ; dppoam is excluded. 

16-17. npntrdaas probably refers to some word like 'house' or 'gates' and hence 
S]o/iio[j/ (so Bury; 8]o/io[u or d]6pa,[v are alternatives) is a natural restoration. Cf. Ale. 597 

dofiov dfnrfTdcras, Phoen. 297 dprnijatiov nvXas, 

Pr. 10. As explained in introd. p. 25 we regard this and the three following fragments 
(the relative order of which is quite uncertain) as belonging to a lyrical dialogue between the 
chorus and Hypsipyle after the latter's return from her disastrous expedition with Amphiaraus. 
Much depends upon the correctness of the decipherment in 1. 3 of Fr. 10, where there 
is a broken letter of the name of the speaker. If the name is, as we believe, 'Y\f/iy{vXt]), 
the view adopted of this fragment seems necessary. The doubtful tt may also be a letter 
with a round top like ^ or o (hardly p), but the abbreviation x]'^{p"^) is unsuitable because 
something of the x ought also to be visible. Murray proposed to make Fr. 10 refer to 
a search for Hypsipyle and Fr. 11. 1-2 represent her cries when captured, while Bury 
thought that Fr. 10 is a dialogue between the members of the chorus, who caught sight of 
the struggle with the serpent going on in the distance. But the name of Hypsipyle before 
1. 3 would of course be inconsistent with either of these interpretations. 

2. There is a speck of ink at the edge of the papyrus in front of this line, but 
the absence of a paragraphus below 1. i is against referring 1. 2 to a different speaker 
whose name might be given in the margin, as in 1. 3. 

3. iia[Kpuv Murray. There is no paragraphus below fyyvr. 

4. If Xfjuo-o-eti/ is right, this line projected by a letter further to the left than 11. 3 
and 7-8. 

5. For aXJtfCff cf. Here. jP. 513 Travva-Tarov vvv, rjXiKes, BebopKare, Phoen. 1747 '''pos ^XiKOs 

(f)dvr)di ads. Either two or three letters may be lost according as 1. 4 or 11. 7-8 are taken as 
the standard (cf. note on 1. 4) ; ywa^iKes would be too long. At the end of this line some 
correction has been made ; apparently a letter like 7 or t has been crossed through and o or 
p written above. Whether the next letter, which is rounded like e, $, or o-, was also altered 
cannot be determined ; tipr^Ke is unsatisfactory as the remains stand. 



94 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

6. If eyo) is right the y has been corrected, perhaps from r or because as first written 
the effect of t was produced; cf. Fr. i. iv. 2 and Fr. 64. 12, where there has been 
a confusion of y and r. 

Fr. 13. I. The vestige in the margin may be part of an obhque dash (cf. Fr. 57. 16, 
Fr. 60. 72, &c.) or represent a letter, e.g. x[o{p6s) as in 1. 4 below. 

Frs. 14-7. These fragments may be connected either with Frs. 6-9 or 10-3. 
Frs. 1 4 and 1 5 were found adhering together, face to face, and the worm-eaten edges follow 
the same pattern. 

Frs. 18-9. On the position and interpretation of these two pieces cf. introd. p. 25. 
They were found with the main group of fragments, but are distinguished from them by the 
dark colour and semi-decayed condition of the papyrus. 

rr. 18. I. The letters vh are very doubtful: Kpr^vi) a-/ctnf[ might be read; cf. /. T. 

1245—6 bpaKwv (TKiepq Kara^^akKos (?) eii^uXXw 8acf)vq. 

3. A mark like a grave accent has been placed above rr as well as the preceding 
CO ; probably the accent intended for the m was first written too far to the right, and then re- 
peated in its proper place. The acute accent on Xev(rcrco[ seems to have been corrected from 
a circumflex. 

4. Trf]\r)Ka <T(l(x>v presumably refers to the bpaKoov, though Ttrjkrj^ is not used elsewhere 
of a serpent's crest. Cf. Statins, Theb. v. 510 auratae crudelis gloria frontis prominei, 572 
per que tubas sianiis capitisque insigne corusci emicat. 

5. Perhaps eVe* o-iy' or t-ndai y', as W-INI suggests ; but the passage is very obscure. 
The vestige of the letter after fTret is too minute to be recognized. 

6. At the left edge of the papyrus opposite this line are two letters, in a smaller 
but perhaps not different hand, which may be read as ]Xa or ]aX. They probably belong to 
a marginal note on the preceding column (cf. Fr. 64. 50-1) rather than to an entry of the 
dramatis persona, since the paragraphus shows that a change of speaker does not occur till 
the line below. The commencement of the verse is difficult. The letter after the lacuna 
seems to be either 8 or a, and rather the former than the latter. i\av^ja\ biaSpaa-ai suggests 
itself, but the compound diabpav does not occur. On the other hand if the words are 
divided iTav[. .]Sta bpaam a satisfactory restoration is not evident ; neither -ndv^ff o]Sta (Murray) 
nor nai^T t\hia seems very likely. 7rai{T]ora is not suitable. 

7. The first letter of the line had a tall stroke and was with little doubt either (/> or ■\//'. 
We suppose the verse to have begun with a hypermetrical ^d on account of the difficulty 
of filling up a foot with the remaining two letters ; but there is a rather similar problem in 
the next fine. 

8. The vestige supposed to represent the top of the e in «t and the stop at the end of 
the word might together be taken as a diaeresis over the t, /c[-]'* ] but there would then 
be room only for a very narrow letter, another t or o, in the lacuna. At the beginning 
of the line the space is so short that the foot and a half to be supplied there (if '\n]K(i is right) 
must have consisted mainly of vowels. 

9. Some insertion has been made over the line, but its nature is very uncertain. The 
f after (^ is on a small fragment which broke away when the papyrus was being flattened, 
and should perhaps be put closer to the p. A/i^.[ia]p«[(i)s cannot be read. 

Fr. 19. This fragment is closely connected with Fr. 18 by the appearance of the 
papyrus. Possibly it joins on above 8taf[ in 1. i of Fr. 18. 

Frs. 20, 21. On the scene here see introd. p, 24. The position of Fr. 20, which con- 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 95 

tains the beginnings of 11. 1-4, is probable on internal evidence and confirmed by the 
correspondence of the fibres of the recto. 

1-16. Hyps. 'Dear friends, I stand on the razor's edge, (in danger of) shameful 

treatment ; I am full of fear. 

Chor. Hast thou no word of hope to tell thy friends ? 

Hyps. Flight ! if only I had knowledge of these roads 1 

Chor. What then hast thou found that spurs thee to boldness .-* 

Hyps. I am fearful of what I shall suffer because of the child's death. 

Chor. Poor soul, thou hast some acquaintance with such ills I 

Hyps. Yea, I know them, and I will be on my guard. 

Chor. Where then wilt thou turn ? What city will receive thee ? 

Hyps. My feet and zeal will decide that. 

Chor. The land is guarded round about by sentinel-posts. 

Hyps. You are right : let that be ; but I go. 

Chor. Consider, for thou hast friends in us to give thee counsel. 

Hyps. What if I found some one to conduct me forth from this land ? 

Chor. There is no one who is willing to conduct a slave.' 



'o 



I. w (^[tXrajrat, suggested by Bury, is suitable in itself but not a very satisfactory reading 
of the papyrus, as it makes the letters between ^ and t rather crowded, while on the other 
hand there is a slight space betw-een the « and the ^ ; a)[.]p could be read. S ^tXrarat 
yvvaiKes occurs in Oresi. 136; w ^[t'Xrajrai however may of course stand alone, and the 
y here is quite doubtful. At the end of the line eVt ^vpov is only one of many possibilities : 

cf. Here. F. 630 wS' e/^r/r' eVt ^vpov ; Homer K 173 ejri ^vpox) ta-TaTM aKfiTJs, &C. 

3. taxova-i seems preferable to exova-i on account of the preceding e$fiv; but e'x"'' is the 
usual word, e. g. Fr. 64. 76, Ores/. 1255 ^o/3os e^ft fi(. 

5. (rTf[y]cov TU)v[8', which could be read, is an obvious restoration, but the line is then 
difficult to complete ; there is not room for fK]8p[anovcra. Bury suggests e]Sp[az;' as raxos 
BoKfl, but (bpava, though a word used by Euripides as well as Aeschylus and Sophocles, 
occurs only in lyrics. Hence we adopt the restoration proposed by Murray, which is 
sufficiently consistent with the papyrus ; something of the lost i3 might have been expected 
to be visible, but would not necessarily be so. 

6. W-I\I would restore at the end of this line KaKuv, on the analogy oi Androm. 28 
oKktiv Tiv evpilv kutiikov prjaiv kukcjv, but oKkt) in the present passage seems to have a different 
sense. Hypsipyle has just stated in the previous line what her dA/ci) KaKwv, her defence or 
resource, was to be, namely flight ; and her reply in 1. 7 shows clearly that the present ques- 
tion must be, what induced her to contemplate such a bold step. Our proposed restoration 
attempts to give this meaning. Whether the alteration of the original reading 87 ttot, for 
which 8T]Tn y has apparently been substituted, is by the first hand, is doubtful. 

10. So JMed. 386 j'ls fxf Se^frat ttoXis ; 

n. For the conjunction of ttovs and npoBviiia cf. Ion iiog-io tU irpodvp-iaiTobSav e^fi o-t; 
and Phoai. 1430 irpodvpia nobos. 

12-3. (j)po[vpio]i(Tii> and [i/]i(ca[r] W-M ; for the latter cf. Suppl. 946-7 (erj.) tI drjTa 

XvTTT}!' rala-Be npoaBelvai ^eXeiy ; (aS.) vikos' p-^veiv xph TXrjfiovas. We had thought of [f]tVa[ t'j ew 

81) T(a)vT(a y"), on the analogy of E/. 379 Kparia-rov flKfj ravT iav, but this is not so close to 
the papyrus. In 1. 12 j^Se has been lightly crossed through with ink of the same colour as 
that of the overwritten (v. 

14-6. The restoration of these lines is largely due to Murray* In 1. 16 [ovSels SfXrjcrei 
SpaireTai] may be suggested as an alternative supplement. 



96 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. 22. The speaker of 11. r-8 is evidently pleading the cause of Hypsipyle, and 
we assign them to Hypsipyle herself for the reasons given in introd. p. 26. 

2. The doubtful iS may be 6. 

7. biapi6n\_ may be some part of the verb hapiBfiuv or hi api6y[uiv'\ ; for the former cf. 
/. T. 966 yj/fjcpovs 8ir]pidp.r](T€, and for the latter (W-M) Bacch. 209 hi dpidpcov S' ovdip 

av^eadai 6e\et. 

9. {]\f[^as Bury ; ]\o[ or ]\co[ can also be read, or possibly ]a(r[ though the first letter 
is more like X than a. There would not be room for e8p]a(r[as. 
II. This was the last line of a column. 

Frs. 23-36. The relative position of these pieces is mostly indeterminate, though there 
are grounds in certain cases for connecting two or more of them somewhat closely together; 
see the notes on the individual fragments. 



'O' 



Frs. 23-4. These two fragments are similar in appearance, and may well belong to 
the same dialogue ; if the speakers are, as we conjecture, Eurydice and Hypsipyle, (A), the 
questioner, would naturally be the former in both pieces. 

Fr. 23. 3. Perhaps S) Trav[KaK[(rTT) (cf. Hipp. 682), if the line is spoken by Eurydice 
to Hypsipyle ; cf. the previous note. 

Fr. 25. f in the margin of Col. ii marks, we suppose, the 600th, not the 700th line, the 
numeration being by the letters of the alphabet, not figures ; thus 1000 = k, not t, iioo = X, 
not la, and so on ; cf. Fr. 64. 79, 841. II. 25, VI. 7, and P. Brit. JMus. 732. Col. xvi {/ourtial 
0/ Phil. xxvi. No. 51, p. 43), where a C denotes the 600th line of Iliad xiii. The same 
alphabetical system, in which $- is omitted and f = 6, is commonly used for the numeration 
of the books ofawork, e. g. Homer and Herodotus. In P. Grenf. II. 11. ii. 4 (Pherecydes), 
where a $■ which is in all probability stichometrical is found, the scribe has confused the 
alphabetical and numerical systems or employed the latter. 

Frs. 27-9. Fr. 28 was found adhering, face downwards, to the upper right-hand side of 
Fr. 27, and the worm-eaten edges have the same pattern. This indication that the two 
fragments are to be connected gains some confirmation from the recto, where part of an 
oblique dash denoting a total occurs on Fr. 27, and on Fr. 28 there is in the right position 
the end of a stroke which may be the continuation of the same oblique dash. If so, the 
gap between them is unlikely to be large, and koi xep]vi^[a>v e\^(i^[a . . . p6ov or xjpyi0^as\ 
b'\ei^^ov(Ta would be a suitable combination ; but we have not succeeded in carrying out the 
restoration on this basis. That Fr. 29 belongs to the same column as Fr. 27 is made 
probable by the presence of a pair of dark fibres in the left margin of both fragments; 
these fibres are rather closer to the commencement of the lines in Fr. 27 than in Fr. 29, 
which suggests that the latter preceded, but this inference is not certain. The speaker 
apparently is Hypsipyle, who is addressing the queen Eurydice (cf. Fr. 27. 2 and 6-7), as in 
Fr. 22, and perhaps Frs. 27-9 come from the upper part of the column of which Fr. 22 is 
the bottom; but the writing on them is of a distinctly smaller size than that of Fr. 22, so 
that in any case it is likely that there was an appreciable interval. 

Fr. 27. I. Only the bottom of the stichometrical letter in the margin remains, and it 
may be read as e, but e does not suit the supposed situation here ; cf. the previous note 
and introd. p. 26. 

2. The accent of x[fp]«"'/3[ does not prove that the termination was the genitive plural ; 
cf. Fr. 6. I, note. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 97 

3. There is not room for fyw at the beginning of this line, but vtto would be just 
possible ; perhaps not more than a single letter is lost in the lacuna between e and v. 
A paragraphus below this or the next line would probably be invisible, the papyrus being 
much rubbed. 

4. A single broad letter would fill the space before S;;ra (?), but there would be room 
for e.g. ov or tl. Either y or tt could well be read in place oft before the final lacuna. 

Fr. 28. I. ]S6i^' : thei maybe i^, i.e. J5' ei'|[. For a possible combination with Fr. 27. 
2 of. note above on Frs. 27-9. 

3. Only part of the v remains, but there is enough of it, we think, to exclude /x. 

Fr. 29. See note on Frs. 27-9. 

Fr. 32. The speaker here, evidently, is again Hypsipyle, who is dwelling upon her love 
for her dead nursling, probably in repudiation of the accusations of Eurydice ; cf. 
Fr. 60. 10. It is clear from the recto that the fragment is not from the same column 
as Fr. 22 or Fr. 27. 

3. V after av is fairly certain, but beyond this the remains of letters are very slight till 
ui(T is reached ; the l may be part of a n, and vnaa- or ijxaa- could be read. 

4. W-M suggests vit\vov. 

7. K\rjkr]naTo[s '. Kr}kf]^aTa is uscd in Troad. 893 of the charms of Helen. 
9. e'jTr' dy/ciiXaiy : cf Fr. 6o. lo ; perhaps eJTr' ayKoKaiui. \\i^ov, but the last letter may also 
be e. g. K, X, or v. 

II. X is corrected, apparently from y. 

Fr. 33. The speaker and subject of this fragment are both problematical. Qod^ in 1. 7 
naturally suggests eoi^?, and perhaps this fragment belongs with Frs. 34-5 to a scene 
in which the sons of Hypsipyle again figured; cf. introd. p. 29. 

I. The supposed grave accent on w is very doubtful; a circumflex or breathing, or an 
interlinear letter, is equally possible. 

Frs. 34-5. The suggested combination of these two fragments is made probable by its 
suitability in 11. 5-6, and some confirmatory evidence is supplied by the recto. But the 
situation remains very doubtful, and we abstain from attempts at reconstruction. That 
Eurydice is one of the characters concerned is probable (cf. 1. 2 fiea-jn-otfa), and W-M thinks 
that she is confronted by Euneos and Thoas, but we are not convinced that the periphrasis 
used in speaking of Hypsipyle in 1. 5 really involves this; cf. introd. p. 29, and the notes 
below. The number of letters to be supplied at the beginnings of the lines is uncertain ; 
they are estimated on the hypothesis that six are lost in 11. 4-6, but though there can hardly 
have been less, there may have been more. The worm-eaten pattern of Fr. 35 is identical 
with that of Frs. 14-5. 

3. Bury suggests fxaXare \i}pi KKriBp wf \av f.lotk\&ov(T e[a-«, supposing the speaker to be 
Eurydice who had been away from the palace, and had now just returned. He thinks that 
the absence of the queen as well as the king when Amphiaraus arrived would be an 
advantage to the plot as helping to excuse Hypsipyle, who thus could not ask leave to grant his 
request. But the data seem scarcely sufficient to substantiate this view. The vestige before 
ov(T suits a 6 only moderately well, and the proposed restoration of the preceding lacuna is 
somewhat overlong. 

4. Perhaps ^povyihc^ ; the letter before t (which is almost certain) may be y. Bury 
suggests epjcojuat . . . [n-peCT/3u]ri6a, but 8co/x(ira)i/ npfo-^vTti is not a very suitable phrase in 
referring to Hypsipyle. 

5-6. ri Tpo(fi[6s W-M, Murray. We had proposed to read fj rpo0[QS' Tfjcvov . . . blbaxnv, 

H 



98 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

but W-M objects to this (i) that TeVrw would be expected, and (2) that Hypsipyle was 
a dry-nurse. No doubt the dative would be more natural, but the genitive hardly seems 
impossible ; and to the latter objection it may be answered that Hypsipyle would not be 
more than middle-aged (Statius, Theb. v. 466, makes her sons about twenty years old), and 
that her own language rather conveys the impression that she fulfilled all a mother's functions 
■nXi-jv ov reKovaa, especially if tqxp^ov be read in Fr. 60. 12, and secondly that she was certainly 
imagined as a nurse in the fuller sense by Statius; cf. Theb. v. 617 ubera parvo iam 
inaterna dabain. It may also be questioned whether Tpo(f)as 8id6um would necessarily imply 
suckling, ovb' eaco ^aiu[(i. suggests Something like [e'^wx^jr e^a at the beginning of 1. 5- 

Frs. 37-56 are too small to give clear indications concerning their metre. They were 
found at the same time as Frs. 6 sqq. (cf. introd. p. 20), and are therefore grouped here 
with them. 

Fr. 41. I. fidpyva-iv : cf. Fr. 60. 18. 

Fr. 46. I. The deleted a was originally unelided. 

Fr. 49. 2. There was a horizontal stroke like a mark of length or a rough breathing 
above the letter preceding the first a. 

Frs. 57-9 probably belong to the stasimon preceding the act partially preserved in 
Fr. 60 ; cf. introd. p. 27, and note on 1. 17. We have not succeeded in finding a combina- 
tion between them, but the texture of the papyrus and the character of the script, as well as 
similarities in subject and metre, serve to connect them. The praise of Dionysus is the 
main theme, and the metre had a large anapaestic element. 

Fr. 57. I. This line is apparently the first of a column. 

5. The supposed stop after 18 may well be one of two dots inclosing the interlinear 
variant, though such dots are not commonly used in this papyrus ; cf. however, 
Fr. I. iv. 6-7 and Fr. 73. 4. 

10. Cf Rhes, 12 tI to a-Tjixa 6p6(i. 

13—6. Cf. Bacch. 142 sqq. pet Se yoKaKTi ■nihov, pfi b o'lva, pel be /leXtcraai' veKTapi, 2vptas 
S' u>s Xi^dvov KatTvoi. 

17. The traces of the stichometrical figure are slight, but that it is such a figure is 
evident from the horizontal dashes above and below it, and this granted the only 
suitable reading is X, i.e. 11 go; the stroke seems to be too diagonal for the right-hand 
limb of a /i. 

20 sqq. The commencement of a new strophe or antistrophe is marked by the para- 
graphus and the projection of the lines to the left; cf. e. g. Fr. i. iii. 18. Who is addressed 
in TioTvia 6((ov is not clear. 

22. Cf. /. T. 209 irpaToyovov 6aKos. 

Fr. 58. I. avpai: or Xvpat. 

2. Cf. Fr. 57. 16 and Io7l 8g (TfxvpvTjs b' dvvbpov Kanvos fls op6(f)ovs ^ol^ov TTiraTai, Tl'O. I064 
ajjLvpvrjs aWepias T€ koitvov, 

3. Cf. Fr. 57- 7- 

10. Kv'napi(Ta6po((f))ov: this word was conjectured by Casaubon in INInesim. I/ipp. i. 
I, where the IMS. reading is KvnapiTTOTp6<pov. It is just possible that (|) and not 8 stood 
in the papyrus, but something of the vertical stroke of a ^ ought certainly to appear. 
KVTTapi(i(T6p(ibos, as W-M remarks, is a hardly possible compound. 

Fr. 59. The colour of the papyrus suggests that this fragment is to be placed below 
rather than above Fr. 58 ; it does not seem likely that Fr. 58. 12 and Fr, 59. i coincide. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 99 

Fr. 60. 5-62. Hyps. ' ... So seemest thou to indulge blind rage without staying 
to learn truly the events' course. Art thou silent, and answerest none of my complaints ? 
For of the child's death I am indeed the cause, but of killing him I am not justly accused, — 
my nursling, whom I fed in my arms, and who to my love was as my own child in all save 
that I bare him not, my great comfort ! O prow of Argo, and the sea's white foam ! O my 
children, I perish miserably ! O seer, son of Oecles, death is upon me 1 Help me, come, 
suffer me not to die on a shameful charge ; since for thy sake I am lost ! Come, for thou 
knowest my case, and wouldst be received by this woman as the surest witness of my 
mishap. — Let us go, since I see no friend at hand to save me. Vain then was my 
compunction ! 

Amph. Stay, thou who art sending this woman to be slain, O queen of the palace ; for 
from thy comeliness to my view I attribute to thee noble birth. 

Hyps. O, by thy knees, Amphiaraus, from the ground I supplicate thee, by thy beard, 
by Apollo's sacred art, save me, for thou art come at the very moment in my extremity, and 
'tis for thy sake that I perish. I am at the point of death, and in bonds thou seest me at 
thy knees who then went with the strangers. So thou, a holy man, wilt do a holy deed ; 
but if thou desertest me thou wilt be a reproach to the Argives, yea, to the Hellene race. O 
thou who by the altar's sacred flame dost foresee the forfunes of the Danai, tell this woman 
of the child's disaster, for thou wert by and knowest. She says that of set purpose I killed 
her son and plotted against her house. 

Amph. With knowledge am I come, having suspected the fate which the child's end 
would bring upon thee ; and I am here to aid thine evil case, armed not with might, but 
right. For it were shame to know well how to receive benefits from thee, and having received 
them, how to do nought in return. First then, stranger lady, show thy face ; for the dis- 
creetness of my eye is much noised abroad among the Hellenes, and it is my nature, lady, 
to restrain myself and to discern qualities. Next listen and relax this hastiness. In all else 
error needs must be, but error against the life of a man or woman is a foul thing. 

Euryd. Stranger, native of the neighbouring land by Argos, I have learned of all men 
of thy discretion, else hadst thou never stood by and looked upon this face. And now if 
thou desirest, I am willing to listen and to instruct thee ; for thou art not unworthy. 

Amph. Lady, I would soften thy bitterness at this poor creature's injury, not so 
much out of regard for her as for justice ; and I am shamed before Phoebus whose art 
I practise by sacrificial fire if I speak any falsehood. 'Twas I who persuaded this woman 
to show a spring of water running with a pure stream that therefrom I might take an offering 
for the army in crossing the bounds of Argos . . .' 

4 sqq. Hypsipyle on her way to death is making a last effort to move Eurydice ; 
of. introd. p. 26. 

5, 8o(c[eTs av \ or SoK[eT (joi, and the sentence is perhaps interrogative. For xapt'CfO"^"' 
cf. Nauck Fr. 31 from the Aeolus 6pyr) yap oa-ris (vdeo)^ x^P'C^"""'' 

11. (y) : 8' Pap., but Be as W-M remarks, is superfluous; t«XX' Sttcos, which he 
suggests, is a rather larger alteration. 

12. Murray's fcfxp^ov for ecpepov seems the best remedy for this defective line. The 
mistake would be a very easy one especially after in' inala-iv dymXaty (cf. Or. 464 ttoIS' 

dyKoXaiai irfpicpepociv), and e(f)ep^ov can be supported by Cyc/. 1^2 op i^i6p(^a ToicrK f'yto noT 

ayKoXais. W-]\I suggests ec})epou (en)u)(f)eXi]p.\ Cf. for the language here Fr. 32, and for 
d)(f)e\r]p,' Statins, Thed. v. 608 sqq. mihi desertae naionwi dulcis iinago, Archemore, rerum 
et patriae soJainen adeinptae serviiiique deais. 

13. \iVKaiviiv is transitive elsewhere in Euripides; cf. Nicander, yi/. 170 u'Ppolo vi-qv 

iCKvba \evKaivQV(Tav. 

H % 



loo THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

14. The dot which is placed directly over o- of iraibta- was perhaps intended to cancel 
that superfluous letter, but it may be a carelessly written stop. 

16. aprj^u\y, f\6e: SO Hcrc. F. 494. 

19. (Ta(ji€(iTaTlo)u : cf. Hipp. 972 fidpTvpos a-a^fcrrarou. (Ta(li€(TTaT av WOuld not yield the 

required sense. 

20. ayere is addressed by Hypsipyle to her guards. 

21. On the significance of the words Keva b' [i}iTrfbi(Tdriv Spa see introd. p. 25. It was 
suggested by Murray that ini^^in-dqv might possibly be here used in a passive sense, ' I was 
reverenced,' i. e. spared, in which case Hypsipyle would mean that she might as well have 
been slain at once ; but there seems to be no parallel for such a use. 

22. o of Tre/LiTTovcra has been corrected apparently from e, and probably irepneLa was first 
written. The left margin is broken away close to the beginnings of the lines throughout 
this column, and the entries of the speakers' names, if they occurred, are lost. 

23. fVTpenes was first written, the t being a later insertion though possibly by the original 
scribe, tm fVTrpejrfl is instrumental and there is no need for an alteration like eya yap 
fvnpeTTTj. The sentence was begun as if i\(.v6ipav ttjv (pvaiv elvai elKa(a), or something of the 
sort, was to follow. 

25. o-e . . . iKiTis TTiTvcc ■= (Ti Ik€T€vq}, thc abnormal construction being assisted by the 
familiarity of the formula npSi ae yovdrav, &c., which is sometimes used with an entire ellipse 
of a verb. Cf for this appeal e.g. Andr. 572 sqq. oXX' avruiCui a, w yepou, rav acov ndpos 

niTvovaa yovdraiv — X^^P'- ^ ^^'^ e^eari poi riji arji Aa/3e'cr^ai (j)i\TdTr]s yeveidSos — pvaai pt npos 6fu>v. 

29. Since the second sentence expands the first and does not stand in any sort of 
opposition to it, t€ is more appropriate than Se. Perhaps the particles should be trans- 
posed, peXXa Se . . . bicrpiav re. 

30. 6 of ro6 is corrected from r. The mistaken v in ^evovs has not been crossed out. 
31-2. Some or even all of the corrections may be in another hand; the »? above ot in 

1. 32 looks as if it had been enlarged after it was first inserted. 

35. [orCT](9a (Murray) is more likely than j^^o-]^a. 

43. Eurydice had veiled herself on the sudden intrusion of a strange man. Cf the 
words of the rpo^o? of Hermione in Aiidr. 876 dXX' eiV/^' fio-w pr]hi (pavrd^ov Sopoov ndpoide 
Toivbe, prj Tiv al(xxvvriv \d^rjs TTpda-Ofv piKadpoiv TavK opcopevT], TiKvov. It is also to be remembered 
thai Eurydice's husband was absent from the palace. A more subtle interpretation of her 
attitude has been proposed by IMurray, who thinks that shame at being surprised by a good 
man in an act of blind vindictiveness led to an outburst of tears. There is, however, no real 
hint of this in the Greek, and 11. 51-2 are hardly consistent with it. For the turn of the 

verse cf. Mevacl. 942 npioTttv ptu ovv pot 8evp' {7ri(TTp€\lrou Kupa. 

44-5. There seems to be no similar instance of this use of 8li]K€iv, which inverts 
the ordinary construction, e. g. Soph. O. C. 305-6 noXv ydp, w yepov, to uov ovopa 5a}«i wavras. 
But the locution may be defended on the analogy of buivai, Supx^crdai, Sec, and there is no 
need to suspect a corruption, k of ^m has been corrected; the scribe apparently began to write o-. 

46. Koapelu = ' regulate,' ' restrain,' as in Afldr. 956 XP^^" Koa-pfh ywalKas tuj yvvaiK(la<; 

vocTovs. By TO. 8ia(f)fpov6' opav Amphiaraus apparently means that he regarded essential 
qualities, not allowing himself to be distracted by vanities. 

47. Perhaps the interlinear 8 as well as the e and o- is by a later hand. 

49- Cf. Ale. 301 '^vxi]i yap oudiv eort TipicoTfpov. 

52. Sense and metre both demand the insertion of w after oppa. 

53. l3ov\u here Pap., but -n is the regular form elsewhere. 

60. The circumflex accent on eyw, influenced apparently by the prodelision, is curious; 
but the accentuation is not seldom at fault; cf Fr. i. i. 4, iv. 11. Kprjva'iov ydvoi occurs in 
Aesch. Pers. 483. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE loi 

6i. [oTTcos \d(ia INIuiray. 

62. What was originally written in place of 'Apyilov wy is obscure ; perhaps the a 
of npodvfjia was also deleted. The mark above w of w? was presumably intended as a rough 
breathing but it consists of a single horizontal stroke. dl^^ifKTTfpwv, followed by some such 
word as Sina-fia, \V-M. 

67. In the initial lacuna W-M suggests x^, which might be written koi o, Bury IW. 

68. fiev[ : or fxei . [, in which case [xe[v probably followed nals in the preceding line. ]a? 
o/^ei>|/[ could be read. 

71-2. Bury suggests ua\i]fj.os and in the next verse ti[ifiaTaTrov oniiaaiv ^AeVcoi/, comparing 
Nauck Fr. 870 SpuKovros alparconop op.pa, which is quoted from Euripides in Anecd. Bekk. 
p. 362, and has been referred to this play by Hartung, Eurip. Rest. ii. p. 436. The subject 
of r]K6v7i(T is evidently 8p«Kcoi' ; Bury compares aKovr'm^, the name of a kind of serpent. 
The breathings in 1. 72 are both not quite certain. 

77. We adopt the restoration proposed by Bury; the line of course easily admits 
of several variations, e. g. fivplav nopcov or kukmi/ or noXvnovov polpas, but the sense is evident. 

80. opvi6a =■ ' omen ', as e. g. in LA. 988 Spvis yivoir av . . . davova' ffjLt) TTuis. 

81. The letters after pr] are represented by exiguous vestiges and are all very doubtful. 
Above the second of them there is a faint vertical mark which may represent an inserted 
iota ; that it is the top of a (^ or x//- is not probable. 

82. dXX' ovx[ or aWov x[- 

84. Kddpov : sc, 7j-oX(ir) or some equivalent expression. 

85. Probably Kvpria[as agreeing with "ASparrToj. 

86. i^eTap[, as Murray suggests, seems to be a crasis of t^erat dpa. Our restorations 
in this and the next two lines only attempt to give the sense. 

89-96 = Nauck Fr. 757. 1-8. Lines 89-92 and 95 end-96 are quoted by Clement 
Alex. S/rom. iv. p. 587, 11. 89-96, by Plutarch, Mor. p. no F, and Stobaeus (who gives the 
name of the play), Flor. 108. 11, 11. 94-5 prj, by Marcus Antoninus 7. 40, and 1. 94 again 
at II. 6. Lines 90-4 are translated by Cicero, Tusc. 3. 25. 59. 

89. 8' av : yow Clem. ; 8' av is clearly right. 

90. ov 7T0VU ^poTcov : ovK del novel Stob. ov vocrel /3p, is conjectured by F. G, Schmidt, 
Kn'/. S/ud. ii. p. 487, on the ground that Cicero has que??i non attingit dolor. 

91. There is considerable variation in this line in the authorities; Stob. has 6dmeiv . . . 

Kot ejepa KTaadai. ndXiv, Plutarch ddnrei . , . X^''^/^' av Krarai via, Clement GdirTet kul hepa aireipu 

vea. We follow Nauck's text. 

92. avToi in the papyrus is a slip for amos as read by Plut. and Clem, avrovs Svrjo-Keiv 

Stob., who also has Kara 8' (= Kara 8' ?) for Koi Tu8\ 

93. [yrjv dvayKaias 8' : TrjvS" dvayKoias Plut. and Stob., Corrected by Grotius from Cicero's 
translation reddenda terrae est terra. 

94-5. /3iov M. Ant. II. 6, and t6 . . . t6 for t6v . . . t6v 7. 40. 

96. (TTeveiv . . . dteKirepav l areyeiv . . . del 8' eK-nepdv Clem. 

After this line Plut. and Clem, give another, which Nauck edits as beivhv yap ovbev rav 
dvayKa'iwv ^poTois {oiiBev yap 8eiv6v Plut., ov 8eiv6v ovdev Clem.), and it is quite possible that there 
has been an omission in the papyrus; cf. Fr. i. ii. 8 and Fr. 64. 57. On the other hand 
the verse is not added here by Stobaeus, who quotes it (in the form ovk alaxpov ovdev k.t.X.) 
as Evpinibov simply, without the name of the play, in another place, E/or. 29. 56. 
Stobaeus' testimony, therefore, tends to corroborate the papyrus, and as the line is easily 
spared we do not insert it. 

97. The letter before the lacuna seems to be o rather than e, i.e.''Apyo[vs or 'ApyoSev. 
Something like "Apyo^ys i$dyovai wpoa-cpopa | ddyj/ai dos VL'"' '^^^ Kevov ti npd^opev seems 
indicated. 



I02 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

99-101. Cf. Statius, Theb. v. 536-7 ut hide saccr per saecula Grais gentibus et tanto 
digniis morerere sepulcro, and 741 mansnris donandns honor ibiis infans. 

102-3, Cf. the words of the scholiast on Clement quoted in introd. p. 22 fV avT(^ thv 

"^Hi^aKov (iyam (TVV€(TTT]o-aTO, and Schol. Pindar, A^em. arg. 4 6 8e a-Titpavos in ;^Xw/3cbi/ TrXeKcrat 
afXiixov. 

106. The line may be completed e. g. 'Apx^fj-opov TedvrjKUTos, as Bury suggests. 

111. (Is TO XoiTTov Murray. 

112. Murray proposes T[tfxiov npoa-KeiaeTai. Tjfiiov is also suggested here by Bury. 

113. j) after Tjaaov is naturally interpreted as ?)'; cf. Fr, i. ii. 19 and 22, where 7 is 
written in the same way. But p.Tiv[ is obscure. 

1 14-7 = Nauck Fr. 759, quoted from the Hypsipyle in Orion, Flor. 7. 5, p. 51, 10; 
1. 114 also appears, without statement of the source, in Flor. Monac. 100. 

114. (pvaeis : so correctly Flor. IMonac. ; xRW^i-^ Orion. 

117. ov8e: ov8ev Orion, corn Schneidewin. Wecklein, Rhein. Mus. xxxiii. p. 121 
proposes to read \6yov in place of xp^av. 

Frs. 61-3. These fragments, as W-M suggests, may be assigned with probability to 
the columns intervening between Fr. 60. ii and Fr. 64. i ; the allusions to Hypsipyle's sons in 
Fr. 61. 4-6, to Lemnos in Fr. 62. 3, and to Amphiaraus in Fr. 63. 6 suit that position. 
But though all three give ends of lines they appear to come from different columns. Fr. 63 
is distinguished by a sells rather to the right of the centre ; and the other two are quite 
dissimilar, Fr. 61 being light-coloured and well preserved, whereas Fr. 62 is dark and 
rubbed. It is likely enough that some of the other pieces among Frs. 65-73 ^^so belong 
to this part of the play, but in the absence of definite indications we do not attempt to assign 
their position. 

Fr. 61. Hypsipyle is the speaker in part of this fragment at any rate, perhaps throughout. 
In 1. 6 she is probably expressing her ignorance whether her sons survive or not, and 11. 8 
and 12 contain allusions to her servitude. A reference to the strange young men precedes 
in 1. 4 ; W-M may well be right in thinking that Hypsipyle is addressing one of the latter, 
and asking him to obtain her liberty. If so the fragment would be preliminary to their 
recognition. 

2. dfijXo) /co[Kaj W-M ; o[v']pta ^jjXw k(i[/«i (INIurray) seems more difficult. dX]Xo[r]pta fijXo) 
Kt^Ko. is objectionable owing to the neglect of caesura : perhaps a ^tjXw. 

4. f]xois : or possibly [oj^ois : cf Fr. 33. 8, where ]oxr)[ might be oxn'^a- 

5. p. of opov is corrected from X, probably by a later hand. The words may also be 
divided o p ov irapuvO' op\u)s (?) as Murray suggests, which would imply a masculine speaker 
for this line. 

15. Apparently not t^viKa. 

Fr. 62. 2. The v above the line seems to have been inserted by the first hand, and was 
perhaps deleted by the second. 

5. The short v in KoAvei, if the reading is right, is remarkable. The v is similarly 
scanned e.g. in Aristophanes' Knights 723, 972, but is long elsewhere in tragedy wherever 
the quantity is determinable, Io7i 391, Phoen. 990. Murray notes the parallel oi pr]vX<x)v in 
Rhcs. 494. 

7. Tii'dy: orriVoy; the fragment may be stichomuthic. 

Fr. 63. The speaker is probably Hypsipyle, who after her rescue by Amphiaraus 
seems in 11. 5-8 to be asking for further assistance ; cf note on 11. 7-S. 

3. An acute accent on (<tti.v has been substituted for a barytone ; cf. 841. VI. 88. 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE . 103 

4. u of over was originally omitted. 

7-8. \V— M proposes av^Bn uxjTvepti Vices i\a\r] txXayKTrjs KvliepvrjTrjp ere] 'Ka^fj.'^dvco [o-o^ov 

as representing the sense of these two verses ; ^[aA?/ however could not be read, though 
<T[d\(o would suit. 

Fr. 64. i. dmyvrnpicns between Hypsipyle and her sons ; cf. introd. p. 26. It is tempting 
to place Fr. 70 at the top of this column. The recto is blank save for the tip of an oblique 
dash, and in the margin of Fr. 64. i recto there are two incomplete oblique dashes, to one 
of which the tip in Fr. 70 might well belong. On the other hand the strongly marked 
fibres of the papyrus do not correspond in the two pieces as they should do, and the 
combination cannot therefore be regarded as satisfactory. 

50-1. These explanatory glosses are in a small hand resembling that of the text, 
though perhaps distinct from it. The words 'Hdavlai and ndyyaiou of course occurred 
in the text. 

57. *c(it((i)) refers to an entry in the (lost) margin below, replacing a deletion (apparently) 
in the text ; cf. Fr. i. ii. 8. KdT(co) has been written twice, perhaps through mere inadvertence, 
or possibly the corrector thought that the word was placed too near the end of the verse, 
and so rubbed it out and rewrote it further off. 

58-106. Hyps. * . . . (the wheel of the god) ... me and my children has run back again 
along a single road, rolling us now towards terror, now delight ; and at last he has shone 
forth serene. 

Ajnph. This is the guerdon, lady, that thou receivest from me ; since thou wert 
zealous towards my entreaty, I in my turn have shown my zeal towards thy sons. God keep 
thee now, and keep ye this your mother, and fare ye well; while we will go on with our 
army to Thebes, even as we have set forth to do. 

The sons of Hyps. Blessings on thee, friend, for thou dost merit them; yea, blessings 
on thee. Hapless mother, how insatiate of thy woes was one among the gods ! 

Hyps. Ah, if thou shouldst learn of my banishment, my son, my banishment from 
sea-washed Lemnos, because I cut not off the grey head of my father ! 

Eim. Can they have ordered thee to slay thy father .'' 

Hyps. I am full of terror at those bygone woes. Oh, my son, like Gorgons they 
slaughtered their husbands in their beds. 

Eiin. And thou, how didst thou steal away from death ? 

Hyps. I reached the resounding shore and the sea-wave where the birds make their 
lonely nests. 

Eun. And how camest thou thence, what convoy brought thee hither ? 

Hyps. Sailors carried me by ship to Nauplia's haven, the place of travellers' passage, 
and brought me to servitude here, my son, a sorry merchandise of Danaid maidens. 

Eiin. Alas for thy woes ! 

Hyps. Lament not in our good fortune. But how wert thou and thy brother here 
brought up, and by whose hand. O my son ? Tell me, tell thy mother. 

Eu7i. The Argo brought me and him to the city of lolcus. 

Hvps. Yea, the nursling of my breast ! 

Eun. But when my father Jason died, mother, — 

Hyps. Alas ! thou speakest of my afflictions, my son, and bringest the tears to my eyes. 

Eun. — Then Orpheus brought him and me to the land of Thrace. 

Hyps. What kindness was he doing to thy hapless father } Tell me, my son. 

Eun. He taught me the music of the Asian lyre, and my brother he schooled in Ares' 
art of arms. 

Hyps. And by what way went ye over the Aegean to the shore of Lemnos ? 



I04 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Eun. Thy father Thoas conveyed thy two children. 

Hyps. Is he then safe ? 

Etm. Yea, by the contrivance of Bacchus.' 

58-62, (\ii evidently preceded, and the subject of the sentence is hal^iav or Brk^os- or 
some equivalent expression. XP^""? • • • ^^a\>.eflo<i is a regular dochmiac dimeter, and 11. 58-60 
as they stand in the pap3Tus may also be regarded as resolved dochmiacs, but it is perhaps 
better, as W-M suggests, to regard those verses as iambic on account of eXi'^aj. In either 
case Tf is best omitted. For the metaphor of iTpoxauiv cf. e.g. Soph. Fr, 787 7rdr/ioy iv 

TTVKVM 6eov Tpn^(^ KVKXelTai. 

64. t]vt6ix>]v is a somewhat strong expression, but we can find no more suitable correction 
for the meaningless v" totc of the papyrus, and it is well to suppose that Hypsipyle was not 
easily persuaded. 

65. A slightly curved stroke in which we can see no meaning stands above f of 7r«tSe ; 
it might be meant for an iota. 

66. The line as left by the first hand though grammatically correct will not scan, since it 
gives a short final vov/el before acp. To omit reKva and bring in rfjvbf (accented rrjuSf, cf. Fr. i. 
vi. 11), which was inserted at a diff"erent time and probably by a different hand, is an easy 
remedy, but the construction then becomes more difficult, since a transitive vaiCfTe or a-w^eade 
has to be supplied out of the passive acpCov. 

69-71. The marginal annotation assigns these lines to both sons, which implies a fourth 
aclor ; cf. introd. p. 30. Perhaps one of them spoke 1. 69, the other 11. 70-1 ; this adds point 
to the repeated (vSmfiovoirjs (cf. however, Soph. E/. 1 163—4 &s fi on-coXeo-as" drrobXecras 6^t', Ores/. 
219 \a(3ov, Ka^ov Stjt). W-M reminds us of the parallel in Jl/ed. 1271 sqq., where the INISS. 
prefix to 1. 1 2 71 nali, to 1272 fT(pos-rrais, and to 1277-8 nalSes or 01 8vo TralSey. The stop in 
1. 70 should have been placed after S7;ra instead of before it. 

72-3. r which follows 4>vyas in the papyrus might be regarded as an error for y (cf. 
Fr. 60. 12), but is better omitted altogether. The metre of these two verses is iambic 
monometer, dochmiac monometer, dochmiac dimeter. 

74. The deleted v, which was written by the first hand over v of f/xoi/, implies the 
division ovkct' enov, though if the words were so understood on ought also to have been 
altered to orf. The transposition of ttoXiov is suggested by W-]\I in order to produce 
a dochmiac dimeter. 

75 sqq. Since Euneos is the speaker in 1. loi (cf. introd. p. 28), it is best to regard 
him as sustaining the whole of this conversation. 

77. The correction of Te^m to rtKvov, proposed by W-M, is probable since one son is 
addressed throughout this passage; cf. 11. 73, 86, 91, &c. An anapaestic dimeter is here 
interposed between a dochmiac dim. and a dochmiac monom. For old re cf. Fr. i. ii. 18. 
Topyd^fs in the sense of ropyore? is quoted in Phot. Lex. nXoKiov ropyd8os- t6v bo6iVTa nXoKapov 

Trjs Topy6in]i ' Acrreporrr] Ttj KT/c^ewf ; cf. Lycophr. I 349 t) iraXlp^Ppav Topyds, which is explained bv 
some Scholl. as meaning Hera ?} tpnoiovaa (podov napu t^v yopydrijTa. The word Vopydbau 

is glossed by Hesychius, who cites it (i p. 851) from Sophocles' Daedalus, as aKidhu>v\ cf. 

ihld. rnpyiSfi' al '^Ktcivibss, ZoP. I^ex. p. 448 yopydbfs' al deanoivni, 

79. On the marginal n = I 1600 cf. Fr. 25, note. 

80-82. opvffiov {sic) Pap., but opvfov though a good word does not occur elsewhere in 
tragedy and W-M's correction opvlfiwv is also metrically j^referable. Transposing iKopnv to 
1. 81 we then get here an iambic dimeter, an anapaestic dimeter, and a dochmiac with 
irrational penultimate. The papyrus shows both the old Altic (properispome) and the later 
accentuation of (prjpos. For dpvlOwp . . . koItciv cf. a fragment from the Polyidus (Nauck 
636. 5) 6 Kvpar oIkcov opvis. ol8p.a BaXdacriop occurred in the Bellerophon (Nauck 301. 2) 



852. EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE 105 

84-6 = spond. dip., dactyl, tetrap., 2 dactylo-epitrit. dims., with catalexis in the second. 

87. We adopt W-lNPs conjecture ivdabe AavaiSav, which produces a dochmiac dimeter, 
for the unintelligible tv6a8r] (another §7? deleted) vaicov. Murray suggests evddS' fj vala, which 
is closer to the papyrus but makes the construction of neXeov finroXdv more difficult, besides 
being less satisfactory metrically. The o of nfXeov is more like w, and perhaps /ifXewi/ was 
written owing to confusion with raitoi-. 

89-92. Dactylo-epitrit. dim. (npocrohiaKov), dactyl, tetrap., 2 cretic dims, (apparently). 
oT€ 8 was written for oSc r : cf. Fr. 60. 29, note; the partial correction is by the first hand. 

93. We substitute is '1u>\k6v for ds KoX^cor', the incongruity of which had already struck 
us and was further emphasized by Dr. Mahafify. According to Ovid, Heroid. 6. 56, Jason 
stayed two years at Lemnos, but his children were not yet born when he sailed for 
Colchis : at any rate it is improbable that he could have wished to take two infants on that 
dangerous expedition ; moreover there would be a strange hiatus in Euneos' story if he said 
nothing of going to Thessaly. Euripides apparently imagined Jason as calling again at Lemnos 
on his return from Colchis (cf. Pindar, Pyih. 4. 251), and on finding Hypsipyle gone — she 
had in the meantime been banished — his natural course would be to carry his young children 
away with him to his own home ; according to Statius, Theb. v. 467, Hypsipyle on going into 
exile left them in the charge of a person named Lycaste, who is unknown from other sources. 

Cf. Apollon. Rhod. i. 904-6 (Jason to Hypsipyle) d 8' ou'juoi irfTrpcoTai es 'EXXdSa yalav iKta-dai 
Tr]'S.ov dpaTrXct)0VTi, crv 8' lifxreva jralda TeKrjai, 7re/i7re jiiv TjjSrjcravTa UfXaa-yiSos evbov 'IcoXkou. W— INI 

however, in spite of the foregoing considerations, would retain ds KoXxwi' on the ground 
that this is required by Hypsipyle's interjection in the next line, aTro/xaoriStov k.t.X. 

The intedinear e is written through a mark of elision. 

94 = Anapaestic monom. (equivalent to dochmiac) + catalectic dochmiac. 

95. The letters no- of f^ioa- are converted from an a. 

96-7. KUKa for KUKcov I\iurray, restoring the dochmiac trimeter. 

98. For Orpheus cf. note on Fr. i. iii. 8-10. 

99-100 = Resolved dochmiac + iambic trim. For ^"P"' • • • Ttdefievos cf. Pi. 61 

\dpiTa Tidffxivrj TTocrei. 

1 01. This verse which shows that Euneos is the speaker alludes to the Attic clan of 
EvvdBai: cf. introd. p. 28. The first hand perhaps wrote fxaKapiaas, but the vestige of the 
letter after /x is too slight to show whether it was corrected. 

102. "Apecos oTrXa . . . pdxrjs : 07r'\a-pdxT]s coalesces into a single term, being practically 
equivalent, as W-M remarks, to onXopaxiav. Cf. Phoen. 307-9 ^oa-Tpvxov re Kvav6xp(^Ta 

Xairas-n^^oKapop, Soph. Ajl/. 795 /SXe^apwj'-i/xfpos ev\eKTpov vviJ.<pas, &C. The letters (cr, 

though broken, are practically certain. 

103-4 = Dochmiac trim., the first member catalectic, the third with an irrational first 
syllable. 

105. The papyrus has 8volv reKva, which is obviously wrong. W-M believes that 
there is a serious corruption, first on account of the form TiKva, and secondly because the 
words would naturally mean ' his children ' not ' your children '. But although dual neuters 
in -w are certainly rare, they do occasionally occur, e. g. /. T. 487 hv i^ ivbs kgko), Phoen. 582 
8\jo KOKQ), Aristoph. Birds 1464 Trrepw, Lysis/. 291 tw |uXo), Xen. Cj'r. v. 4. 51 tw fie 8vo 
(ppovpioi ; and though the expression is not clear, no doubt could arise concerning the 
intended meaning. It would be easy to complete the line diiferently, e. g. t<o nalde aov, or 
tVfto-e t'w, but not easy to account for the corruption. W^e therefore leave the text as nearly 
as possible in the form in which it stands, while quite admitting its questionable authenticity. 
IMurray ingeniously proposes dv ol reKvco, which no doubt might readily produce bioiv reKva ; 
but the collocation does not seem quite satisfactory. 

106. Ba[K]x[ttu] suits the space better than Bo[(c]x[iair], and, as IMurray remarks, is more 



io6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

probable in itself in view of the extremely common use in Euripides of 'BAkxi-os = 'Ro.kxos. 
In Statins, Theb. v. 283-4, Dionysus in aiding Thoas to escape from Lemnos promises to 
watch over his fortunes: tulato pairem cominitie pro/undo. Succcdam cur is. 

107. Perhaps vrjoVwi', but fiiTapJj^ai (cf. Nauck Fr. inc. 864 nera^oXas yap TTopuv del 

(f)i\(o) is excluded by the accent on o. 

109. TTuldas rj\ for the circumflex on r) cf. Fr. i. ii. 17 ; TraiSa o-fj is less likely. 

III. Possibly ^poTolat bo\vToi, as INIurray suggests: but the sense of the passage 
remains too obscure for a restoration. 

152. On this appearance of Dionysus and the purport of his speech cf. introd. p. 28. 

Fr. 65. crrpare, in 1. 4 and 6vnv in 1. 9 are doubtless references to the Argive army (cf. 
Frs. I. iv. 36 and 60. 62), and the speaker is perhaps Amphiaraus, in which case the frag- 
ment should probably be placed with Frs. 61-3 in the gap between Frs. 60 and 64. 

Fr. 67. The rubbed papyrus is very similar in appearance to the bottom of Fr. i. iii ; 
it is quite likely to be lyrical, but does not seem to join on there directly. 

Frs. 68-9. Fr. 68 cannot be placed in Col. i of Fr. 64, nor is it at all likely that 
Fr. 69 belongs there. 

Fr. 70. Possibly this fragment belongs to the top of Fr. 64. i ; cf. note ad loc. It does 
not come from the same column as Fr. 77. 

2. ]i Tvxaii : or -nTvyaii. 

5. This may be a lyric verse. 

Fr. 71. Since the recto contains beginnings of lines, this fragment does not belong to 
Fr. I. V, where the recto is blank. 

Fr. 72. This piece approximates in condition to Frs. 18-9, but not closely enough 
to be definitely grouped with them. 

Fr. 73. 4. r)v (not ^V) is inserted above the line apparently as a variant on d : in the 
absence of the context it is of course impossible to give either the preference. 

Fr. 76. 3. The insertion above the line is puzzling : the two sigmas are clear, and at 
a short distance from them is a vestige of what seems to be another letter. 

Fr. 77. 4. The slight vestige of the first letter would suit x- 

Fr. 79. This fragment looks as if it belonged to Fr. i. ii, but we cannot find a place for 
it there. 

Fr. 86. 3. A vestige on the edge of the papyrus above the top of the 6 may represent 
a breathing or belong to another inserted letter. 

Fr. 90. 4. This is probably the last line of a column. 

Fr. 96. 4. The supposed e has been corrected apparently from u ; but perhaps the first 
letter is a and the v was merely crossed out, being followed by a t. 

Fr. 97. In the margin slightly above 1. i is what appears to be a small 6 with two 
horizontal strokes below it. The remains do not well suit either one of the dramatis 
personae or a stichometrical figure, though ^ = 1400 is just possible. 

Fr. 115. Judged by the manner of writing, <c)6c\^ is more probably part of the text than 
a marginal dramalis persona, though the blank space below would suit the latter hypothesis. 

Fr. 116. This is perhaps part of a marginal note; cf. Fr. 64. i. 50-1. The stroke 
like an accent is some little way above the ^. 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 107 



853. Commentary on Tiiucydides II. 

Height 20-5 cm. Late second century. 

Plate IV (Cols, xvi-xvii). 

These considerable portions of a commentary upon the second book of 
Thucydides belong to the large find of literary papyri which produced 841-4 and 
852, and consisted originally of about a hundred fragments of varying sizes, 
two-thirds of which have been pieced together. Excluding the small unplaced 
fragments, 19 columns (about 600 lines) are preserved, divided into eight separate 
sections which we have called A-H, and covering the first 45 chapters of the 
book, though with large gaps at certain points. Like 842, which was written 
on the verso of a long official document from the Arsinoite nome (918), this 
commentary is on the back of a series of non-literary documents from that 
district. A detailed description of these texts is given under 886 ; here it is 
necessary to state that the writing proceeds in the opposite direction to that 
of the scholia, and that at least three originally different papyri have been joined 
together to form a roll of sufficient length for the literary text. Cols, i-iv of the 
recto (= Cols, xix-xiv of the verso) belong to a survey-list of confiscated 
house property ; Cols, v-viii of the recto {= Cols, xiii-viii of the verso) are in 
the same hand and of a similar character, but are concerned with property in land, 
the writer, a comogrammateus of the village of Oxyrhyncha in the i6th year of 
Hadrian, making a fresh start. Col. viii of the recto was cut down the middle and 
joined to another second-century document, Col. ix (=Col. vii of the verso), 
containing a return by sitologi which has itself had the beginnings of lines cut 
off ; the line of junction corresponds to the margin between Cols, viii and vii of 
the verso. Cols, x-xv of the recto (= Cols, vi-i of the verso) belong to a third 
document, a second-century account concerning loans of seed-corn to cultivators 
of Crown lands. 

The script of the commentary is a small and neat informal uncial, with a 
tendency to lapse into cursive forms, especially in the letters e and k, and presents 
much similarity to the hand of the Oxyrhynchus scholia on Iliad xxi (221). The 
circumstance that one of the documents on the recto is dated in A. D. 131-a 
provides a terminus a qno for the date of the text on the verso, which on 
palaeographical grounds is not likely to be later than A. D. 200. Probably 842, 
852, and 853 were all written about the same time, somewhat later than 221. 
Iota adscript is rarely (e. g. x. 15, 31, xv. 34) omitted. There are no stops, 
and accents, breathings, and elision-marks are used sparingly ; but paragraphi 



io8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

occur frequently to separate the notes, and the lemmata project into the left 
margin by the width of one letter, as in the Berlin Didymus papyrus, and are 
separated from the notes referring to them by a short blank space. With each 
new quotation the scribe begins a fresh line. The common angular sign (some- 
times doubled) is employed to fill up short lines, i and v occasionally have the 
diaeresis. The concluding word of a note is four times (v. 15, vii. 28, xv. 4, xvi. 1 ]) 
abbreviated, even though in the first two cases there was plenty of room to write 
the word out in full ; but of the conventional abbreviations often found in com- 
mentaries of this period (cf e. g. 856) there is no trace. The columns contain 
from '^^ to 38 lines, the beginnings of which tend to slope away to the left as the 
column proceeds. There are a few corrections, all due to the original scribe^ who 
was not a very careful copyist, so that several minor alterations in the text, 
chiefly due to omissions, are necessary ; cf. i. 32, ii. 19, 28; vii. 24, ix. 13, x. 27, 
XV. 4, 3^- 

Of the eight sections into which the papyrus falls; A contains Cols, i-iii in 
a very fair condition, and the beginnings of lines of Col. iv. So far as the 
external evidence is concerned, there is no special indication that Col. i is the 
original beginning of the writing on the verso, but since the first note refers 
to the opening words of Book II, it is probable that in Col. i we have the actual 
commencement of the work, and that the roll did not contain our author's com- 
mentary on Book I if he wrote one. i. 7-iv. 9 is taken up by a long discussion 
of the criticisms directed against Thucydides' method of writing history by 
Dionysius of Halicarnassus in his extant work Trepl QovKvhihov, so that by the end 
of Col. iv our author has only reached c. 2. 4. B, comprising the two well- 
preserved columns v and vi, follows immediately after A and covers cc. 2. 4-8. 2, 
after which there is a gap. Since the writing on the recto of B has no connexion 
with that on the recto of C, it does not help to decide the width of the lacuna 
between these two sections, but the internal evidence of the scholia shows that 
at least one column and probably not more than two are missing between 
Cols, vi and vii. C, which contains the two damaged columns vii and viii, begins 
at c. II. 4 and reaches c. 13. 6. D, containing the upper half of Col. ix, 
follows C without an interval, and down to 1. 18 covers c. 13. 6-7. Fr. i, how- 
ever, apparently refers to c. 14. i and probably belongs to the lower part of 
Col. ix, which no doubt covered all c. 14 ; for E begins at c. 15. i, and though, as 
far as the verso is concerned, there might be a column or two missing between 
D and E, the writing on the recto makes it practically certain that Col. x follows 
immediately after Col. ix. While Col. i of E ( = Col. x), which covers cc. 15. i- 
17. 1 is in moderate preservation. Col. ii (=Col. xi) is represented only by 
three small detached fragments. The exact position of that containing parts of 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 109 

11. 1-3 is obvious from internal evidence, while that containing the beginnings 
of 11. 15-7 is fixed not only by its suitability to this context, but by the 
writing on the recto, and the accuracy of the position assigned to the third 
fragment, containing parts of 11. 14-21 (Fr. 2), is hardly open to question. The 
next section, F, consists of the ends of lines of Col. xii and three quarters 
of Col. xiii, covering cc. 17. 4-24. i. That anything is lost between Cols, xi and 
xii is most unlikely, but after Col. xiii there is a long gap, since G begins at 
c. 34. 5. In this section we have the ends of lines of Col. xiv, then three well- 
preserved columns (xv-xvii) and the beginnings of lines of another (xviii) cover- 
ing cc. 34. 5-41. 3. The beginning of the funeral oration of Pericles (cc. 35-45) 
is noted in xiv. 3. After Col. xviii there is another considerable lacuna in which 
probably 3 or 4 columns are lost, and H (Col. xix) has only the ends of 18 lines 
on a fragment dealing with c. 45. 2, near the conclusion of the funeral oration. 

The date at which these scholia were composed can be fixed within tolerably 
narrow limits. Dionysius of Halicarnassus came to Rome in 30 B.C. and issued 
his great work on Roman Archaeology in 7 B. C. {Ant. i. 7. 2}, while Q. Aelius 
Tubero, to whom the treatise on Thucydides was addressed, is probably identical 
with the consul of 11 B. c, so that our commentary which discusses that treatise 
cannot be earlier than 30 B. C. and is not likely to be earlier than 10 B.C. On 
the other hand, since the MS. itself is not later than A. D. 200, the composition 
of the commentary can hardly have taken place later than Hadrian's time, 
and it is more likely that it was written soon after the beginning of the 
Christian era. 

The extant scholia on Thucydides, derived from the Byzantine MSS. and of 
varying dates, are fairly full, but do not display much learning, and are rarely 
of great value either for the elucidation of the text or for quotations from other 
writers ; and in spite of the greater antiquity of our commentary it is but little 
superior to them in point of quality. Our author's interest in Thucydides was 
mainly grammatical, and most of the notes are devoted to the explanation of words, 
phrases, or constructions, with frequent paraphrases of clauses or even whole 
sentences which were difficult, especially in the funeral oration. Questions of 
spelling and accentuation are discussed in v. 12-5 and vi. 25-8. In exegesis 
our author displays more intelligence than the extant scholia (e.g. v. 1-3) ; and 
though many of his remarks are trivial enough, his opinions on several well- 
known and much disputed passages have some importance, as supporting now 
one, now another of the modern commentators, or suggesting something new ; 
e.g. X. 25-30, xiv. 6-11, XV. 16-24, xvii. 16-9, 23-9, and 31-3. But his 
authority cannot be ranked high, for in several places his interpretation is certainly 
wide of the mark ; cf. v. 22-9 (two explanations of the infinitive tov jj-i] iKcfivydv, 



no THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

both of which are unsatisfactory), ix. 4-6 (an impossible explanation of v-no 
as equivalent to aito), xix. 4 sqq. (a hopelessly wrong interpretation of ?%- av kix' 
k\ax}.(TTov k.tX). Of more interest than his exegetical remarks are his critical 
notes on the text. The variant &piir]To for wpyrjTo recorded in xiii. 13-5 was 
already known, but neither haTpaTevojxh'oov (vii. 29), which occurred in our 
author's text of Thucydides II. 12. 2, nor the alternative reading in the note 
aTpaT€vovTMv (vii. 30) have found their way into the existing MSS., which all have 
€^ea-TpaTev[j.ipMv, a reading ignored by our author. Of real value is the note on 
Ueipaa-LOL (xiii. 20-3), which explains the origin of a long felt corruption in the text 
of c. 22. 3. In the rare cases where the commentary deals with historical or 
geographical rather than with grammatical or textual questions, it is singularly 
disappointing. The brief indication of the position of Phrygia in xiii. 16 slightly 
modifies the current view of the site of that unimportant village, and the note on 
the temple of Dionysus at Limnac (x. 7-14) might have been of some value 
if more complete, but that on the Anthesteria (x. 16-8) merely confirms what 
was already known to us from other sources, and such annotations as vi. 3 6-24 
and xiii. 25-8 are elementary. Our author, indeed, exhibits a very limited 
acquaintance with Greek literature. There is not a single quotation from other 
Greek historians, and apart from the discussion of the criticisms of Dionysius, the 
only prose writer of any kind who is referred to is . . .]os (apparently an earlier 
commentator on Thucydides) mentioned in x. 11. A well-known quotation from 
Pindar, which in its later proverbial form is also quoted by the extant scholia 
on Thucydides, occurs in vi. 34-5, and there is a passing allusion to the Erech- 
theiis of Euripides in x. 3 ; but the only other writers with whom our author 
shows familiarity are Homer and Callimachus. The former is quoted by way of 
illustration not less than ten times (iv. 6, 17, vi. 9-10 (?), 14-5, vii. jo-i, 27-8, ix. 
^-6^ xiii. 17-9, 20-1, xvii. 18-9, xix. 6-7), the interpretation in the last instance 
being singularly perverse, though in accordance with that of the earlier Alex- 
andrian commentators, while the citation in ix. ^-6 is quite inapposite (cf. vi. 
9-10, note). The text is uniformly the vulgate except in xvii. 18-9, where our 
author probably relied on his memory and quoted inaccurately. Callimachus 
is cited twice, the first quotation (x. 7-10, from the Hccale) being partly extant, 
the second (x. 37-8) new. 

In viewof the general similarity in mode of treatment between this commentary 
and the extant scholia it is surprising that the points of actual agreement are so 
few. The most noteworthy is the Pindar quotation alluded to above (vi. 34-5), 
but even here the scholia quote the saying as a -napoip-ia and in a slightly different 
form. Elsewhere there are occasional verbal similarities, such as would be 
expected from any commentators covering the same ground (cf. e. g. notes 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II iii 

on V. '^^ viii. 7-9, ix. 10, x. 19-30, xii. 10, xiii. 17, xv. 16, xvi. 19-24), but amid 
innumerable divergencies no striking coincidences are found anywhere, and there 
is no reason to think that our author is one of the direct sources of the extant 
schoHa, while even an indirect influence upon them seems unlikely. 

The somewhat unfavourable impression which our author makes as a com- 
mentator on the text of Thucydides is improved when we turn to his discussion 
of the views of Dionysius about Thucydides' methods as a historian. As 
a literary critic he exhibits himself to greater advantage than as a grammarian, 
and his defence of Thucydides is both just and sensible. Dionysius, whose 
whole treatment of Thucydides though not wanting in learning and acumen 
is marked by a lack of appreciation of his real merits, in cc. 9-20 of his Dc 
Thucyd. ludic. censures the historian's mode of dealing with his subject-matter, 
the following chapters (cc. 21-55) being concerned with his style. Dionysius' 
criticisms on the former topic are represented as coming not from himself but 
from Tti/e's, i. e. his predecessors, and his objections fall under the three heads 
of btaipeais, rd^Ls, and (^epyaaia (c. 9). Our author replies to the criticisms under 
the first two heads, briefly summarizing cc. 9-12 in i. 7-33. To Dionysius' 
strictures with regard to 8tatpeo-ts on firstly Thucydides' choice of a division accord- 
ing to summers and winters in preference to the years of the archons or Olympiads 
or the geographical arrangement adopted by Herodotus, and secondly on the 
consequent want of connexion and abrupt transitions in his narrative, our author 
justly retorts that there was no reason why Thucydides should have chosen 
to reckon by archons or Olympiads (ii. 6 sqq.), and that the Herodotean method 
of narrating events according to localities was quite inapplicable to a history of 
the Peloponnesian war (ii. 15-27), concluding with an efl'ective argumentinn 
ad hoviinevi against Dionysius (ii. 33-iii. 1), whose own theory of what system of 
chronology ought to have been followed is shown to be open to the objection con- 
cerning abrupt transitions which he had brought against Thucydides. A system 
of dating by the years of the archons or Olympiads which began in the summer 
would in fact disturb the sequence of the narrative far more than Thucydides' 
division of the year into summer and winter, which in describing military opera- 
tions is the most natural one. In iii. 2-17, a passage which is much mutilated, our 
author deals with the supposed want of connexion in Thucydides' narrative, and 
shows that this charge is exaggerated. In iii. i8-iv. 9 he contradicts Dionysius' 
criticism directed against the rd£ts, that in his account of the origin of the war 
Thucydides ought to have begun by describing the true cause of it, the rise 
of Athens, instead of postponing this to his description of the commonly alleged 
causes, the Corcyrean and Potidaean incidents. The point at issue between our 
author and Dionysius is here more debateable. No doubt a modern historian 



112 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

of the Peloponnesian war would in agreement with Dionysius prefer to begin 
with a sketch of the rise of Athens rather than to introduce this subsequently as 
a digression. But looking at Book I from the point of view of Thucydides' aims 
as expressed in his preface, the arrangement adopted by him is quite defensible. 
As our author points out (iii. 22-30), Dionysius was wrong in thinking that 
Thucydides was under an obligation to give an elaborate account of events pre- 
ceding the Peloponnesian war. Probably his desire to avoid becoming involved 
in this so serious an undertaking was one of the chief reasons for the postpone- 
ment of the sketch of the rise of Athens. Further, our author's dictum in 
iii. 30-iv. I about the duty of a historian to relate the obvious before the remoter 
causes of events is at least as true as Dionysius' opposing aphorism in c. 11 that 
true causes ought to precede false ones, the fact being that no a priori rule can be 
laid down on the subject, which has to be settled with regard to expediency. 
Whatever his demerits as an annotator, our author must on the points in dispute 
be credited with a fairer appreciation of Thucydides than his adversary, one 
of the ablest critics of the day. 

Can our author be identified with any of the known commentators upon 
Thucydides? The answer, is, we think, in the negative. The extant scholia 
mention three of their sources, Antyllus, Asclepius (or Asclepiades), and 
Phoebammon. Of these Phoebammon, who lived in the fourth century, is out 
of the question. The dates of Antyllus and Asclepius, who is generally thought 
to have been a rhetorician rather than a grammarian, are quite uncertain, and 
might therefore fall within the period (about 10 B. C.-A. D. 140) in which the 
author of our commentary wrote ; but the slightness of the connexion between it 
and the extant scholia (cf. p. no) excludes the likelihood of an identification with 
writers utilized in them. Nor is much more to be said in favour of identifvine 
our author with any of the other rhetoricians or grammarians who composed 
commentaries upon Thucydides ; cf. E. Schwabe, Lcipz. Stud. iv. pp. 81 sqq., 
Doberentz, Dc Scholiis in T/nic, Halle, 1876. Numenius, who wrote -mpl tu>v r?/s 
Af^fcos (T\i]\xaT<x)V, viToOecrn'i twv Arjfjt.ocrd€vovs Kal ScvKybibov, \pei.G>v frvz-aytoy?;, &C., 
probably lived in the time of Hadrian, which barely falls within the right period, 
and to judge by the title his work seems to have consisted of short arguments, 
not a detailed commentary. Julius Vestinus, who also lived under Hadrian, and 
wrote an kK\oyi] ex rSiv QovKvhibov, was apparently a lexicographer, not a regular 
commentator upon Thucydides. The title of Claudius Didymus' work, composed 
probably in the first century, ircpl rlav r}p.apTy]ixiv(t)v -napa ti]v avaXoyiav QovKvhih], 
indicates that it was quite different from our commentary, as were the C^r7/(rei9 
Kara crToiy^uov ©ovKvhihov or rdv 'napa QovKvlihi] ^r\Tovp.iviiiv Kara Xi^iv written by 
Evagoras of Lindus, also probably in the first century. Didymus xo^KeWe^oos, 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 113 

though a contemporary of Dionysius, is also, we think, out of the question, 
for it is very doubtful whether he wrote on Thucydides (cf. Pauly-Wissowa, 
Real-encycl. v. p. 460), and his recently discovered commentary on Demosthenes is 
almost entirely historical, not grammatical, and abounds in quotations, being thus 
far removed in character from our papyrus. Caecilius Calactinus, who was also 
coeval with Dionysius, has no stronger claims than Didymus to be identified 
with our author. He discussed and quoted Thucydides (cf. pp. 57-8 and 
193-6 of Ofenloch's edition), and though Dionysius {^Ep. ad Cn. Pomp. 3. 20) calls 
Caecilius (t)i\TaTos, the two critics seem to have had controversies (cf Ofenloch, 
p. xiii). But Caecilius was primarily a rhetorician, and that he wrote a gram- 
matical commentary on Thucydides is improbable. Sabinus (time of Hadrian), 
Tiberius, and Heron son of Cotys (dates unknown) wrote vTToiJ.in][xaTa upon Thucy- 
dides about which nothing further has been recorded, and since our commentary 
is technically a v-noixviiixa, it is possible that one of these writers is identical with 
our author ; but it is more likely that he was some obscure Alexandrian gram- 
marian whose v/orks were not long preserved, and whose name even is lost. 
Of his influence on later grammarians (apart from the Thucydides scholia 
already discussed) we have not discovered any clear trace, though cf. x. 36-7, 
note. 

It remains to examine our author's text of Thucydides, in so far as this can 
be ascertained from the lemmata. The chief MSS. fall into two main families, 
CG and ABEFM, of which the former is now generally considered to be superior. 
As usual, the text of the papyrus is of an eclectic character and does not con- 
sistently agree with either family ; but it supports the ABEFM group seven 
times (cf. notes on i. 6-7, xiii. 13, xiv. 4, xv. 15, xvii. 20, 30, xviii. 24) against 
only four agreements with the other (cf. notes on vii. 37, xiv. 25, xvi. 29, 31). 
Several new readings occur, of which we append a list. 

(i) i, 7 (c. I. i) V. 1. 6epi] Kai \iiix(iivas above the line for Oipos koX yjeiixdva. 

(2) V. 5 (c- 3. 4) \pr](T6ai for XPW^^^^'-- 

(3) V. 21 (c. 4. 2) €K(pvyeLv for eK(f)€vyetv (ex^vyeiv only in a late Paris MS.). 

(4) V. 30 (c. 4. 3) (TTvpaKi for afvpaKi(o. 

(5) vii. 15 (c. II. 9) vfxLv for rjiuv. 

(6) vii. 29 (c. 12. 2) €ii(7TpaT€Voix€V(i)v, with v. 1. (rTpaTevovTO)v, for ^^ecrTparev- 
fxivMv. 

(7) ix. 3 (c. 13. 7) VTTO for airo. 

(8) X. 15 (c. 15- 4) apx^aLOTara for ap\ai6Tepa. 

(9) xiii. 20 (c. 22. 3) ^apcraAioi Ylupacrioi (Kpawco^tot) for ^^apadXioi Ylapaatoi 
KpavvuivioL YleipdcrioL. 

(10) XV. 34 (c. 37. 2) bpa Tt for tl bpa. 

I 



114 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

(ii) xvi. 25 (c. 39. i) Statrcojue^a for Statrw/xez'ot. 

(12) xvii. '^j (c. 40. 3) avroi for ol avrol. 
Of these (5), which confirms a conjecture of Hude, and (9), where the note 
shows that Uapacnoi is an interpolation, are undoubtedly better than the readings 
of the MSS. On the other hand (7) is certainly wrong and (i),(ii), and (12) may 
be merely due to mistakes on the part of the copyist of the papyrus (cf. his omission 
in ix. 3) and in any case are not likely to be right. In respect to the other new 
readings there is little to choose between them and the MSS., the sense being 
hardly if at all affected by any of them. As regards the passages in Thucydides 
which have been suspected of being corrupt, the explanation of Uapdaioi 
supports the conclusions of modern editors, and there is some reason to believe 
that the formidable anacoluthon in the MSS. reading at c. 7. 2 did not occur in 
our author's text (cf. vi. 16, note) ; but elsewhere the papyrus, like other Thucy- 
dides papyri (cf. 878-880), tends to confirm the ordinary text even where 
alterations have generally been accepted. Thus in c. 15. 4 (x. 15) the words 
rfj 1/3', usually regarded as a gloss, are found, and neither Cobet's insertion 
of ToD in c. 15. 4 (x. 7, note) nor Lipsius' transference of -navoLKriaiq in c. 16. i 
(x. 31) nor the proposals to omit words in c. 4. 2 (v. 21-2, note) and c. 16. i (x. 25, 
note) are confirmed. On the whole our author's text, though not on a level 
with the first-century fragments of Book IV (16 and 696), and perhaps affected 
to some extent by errors of the copyist, is a good one, and its early date gives it 
considerable value. 

r 

In the restoration of the very imperfect text of this papyrus, we have received 
much assistance from Professors U. von Wilamowitz-Mollendoi-ff and J. B, 
Bury ; some suggestions are also due to Dr. C. Hude and Mr. H. Stuart Jones. 
We give the text and reconstruction in parallel columns, the lemmata being 
distinguished in the latter by thick type. In the notes Schol. = the extant scholia 
on Thucydides. 

Col. i ( = A col. i). 

[ ] I. I. [dpx.€TaL 5€ 6 iroXeiJLOs evSevSe-] 

[ ] • M [ 1 • PL 

[. . . .ycTTWo^. ..... .^LToeyOa [••••] fo"'"''' o[/io/(x)y KaVi to ivBa. 

[. . . .]AX7yXot'[ ^vTrpoaaWr} [Trap' d]XXTi\ou[s* dvrl t6\v npo? dXXi]- 

5 [. . . .]avvT)[ ]l [Xovs] (rvuT][6€i Xe^ejt. 

[ ]TaiSi.]r)(Tcc{. .]KaaTa(yiyi^( ["YCYpairlTai 8' € I'fjs a)[s tjKaaTa kyiyvi- 

•'?• <^ 

[.]oKaTa6epo(JKai)(^e[. jiQiyaSiow [t]o Kara Bepos Kal \€^_i]ji.ci>va* Aiovv- 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



1^5 



<j{.oa\J\aKLKapva(j(Tiv(Te.vr(£)i.'mpi 
6ovKvSiSo[.]<TvvTayixaTi7r€piov 
10 Tro\\covji[.]fjL(l)eTaiTOP$ovKvSi 

ST]UTaSav[.]TaTa)LTpiaK€(pa\aia 
Si€^eicrLuo[. .]TeovKap)(^ovTacrKat 
o\vixTTLa8a\. . .](jotAof7ro£7rpore 

15 6€pT]Kai^€i[. . .]aaKaioTi8L€a7ra 
K€KaiSir][. . . .YrrjVLaTopLav > 
KaL(TvvKo[. . . .]Ta7rpayfxaTaov 
Ka7ra[.]Ti^a)[. .]a[.]7r€pi€Kaa-T<i)i' 

a 

§ir]y[.]ar€Laa[. .]aTraXX(oveTraXXa 

20 TpeTrofj.€vo(T7rp[.]vT€X€ia)craLKat > 
OTiTrji/aXr]6T]TOV7roXefiovaiT[.] 
av€7na}i/a}cr(T^oSpaavToa€^r] 
TaKcoaoTiSL€vXa^ecavTr]aLa-)(yo(T 
TCovaOrjvaicoveTToX^jirjaavav 

25 TOicroLXaKeSaifxouLoioviJ.aSia 

SLaTaKopKvpal'Ka-qnorciSaLaTi 
KaKaLTaanapaTOianoXXoLaX^yo > 
/xcuacraLTiaao/icocrovKaTroTov > 
raiuoov€KpiucpavToaSLr]y€LTai 

30 €K[.]Ld€vap^a/x€i'ocra(poia>i'Trpa 
yfiaTcovfJLeTaTaTTepariKarjv^r] 
OrjcravoiaOrivaLOiaXXaTTaXiveTn 
TaaK0ivaaaiTia(TTp€7reTaL' roiav > 
Ta/x(vo8iopv(rLoa€LKOToocr8au 

35 TLcnrpocravTovTrpoTriTcoaovTcocr > 



(Tio^ [6] 'AXiKapua(Ta-(v9 kv t(2 Trept 
@ovKv8i8d[v\ avvTciy/xaTi Tvepl ov 
7roXXa)u /i[e]//0erai tou OovkvSC- 
8t]v, to, 8' du[<a]TdTa) rpta K€<j)dXaia 
8l€^€1(tiv, 6[ti] re ovk ap')(ovTa^ Kal 
OXv/x7nd8a[9 o)]? 01 Xoinol npoTe^ 
BuKe Tcov )([p6uco\y dXX' i8ia>9 
dipt] Kal xei[p(ou]a9, Kal otl SiiaTra- 
Ke Kal 8i^[pr]K]€ Trjv iaroptav 
Kal <TvyK6[TrTeL\ to, irpdyfjiaTa ov- 
K d7ra[p]Ti^co[u r]a[y] nepl iKdarcov 

8ir]y[TJ]a€is d[XX]a drr dXXa>v kn dXXa 
TpiTTOfXiuos 7rp[l]v TeXeicocrai, Kal 
OTL Tr]v dXrjdi] rod noXi/jLov aLT[i-] 
av €(i)7r { £ 1 0)1/ 0)9 a(f)68pa avTOS k^-q- 
raKUiS, OTL 8l evXd^aav r^y L(r)(yos 
t5>u 'Ad'qvaiccv knoXi/j.rjo-ai' av- 
T0?9 OL AaK€8aLp6inoi, ov /.id Aia 
810. Ta KopKvpa'iKa rj IIoT^i8aiaTi- 
KOL Kal Ta^ napd toTs ttoXXoT^ Xeyo- 
fih'a? ahias, o/xco^ ovk ctTTo tov- 
todv S)V eKpLv^v avT09 Si-qyuTaL 
€/c[e]i^er dp^d/xevos dcf) olcov npa- 
y/xdTcou fiiTcc TO. UepcTLKa Tjv^rj' 
Orjaav 01 ABr]valoL, dXXa ttoXlv knl 
TCL^ KOLvd^ aiTias TpineTai. Toiav- 
Ta jjikv 6 Alovv<tlos' (lkotcos 8' dv 
TLS Trpos avTou npoTreTco? ovtco? 



Col. ii (=A col. ii). 

[ ]?"^[']^K']n [lx€fi(p6fi€Vou duT€yKaXe]ae[iyv [6]tl 

[ ] . Toa-o[ ]•?•[• [ ] • Too-o[ ].€.[. 

t[ ]Toou7rpayiJ.aTa)v t[ ] tmu npayfidTcoy 



I 2 



ii6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

<r[ ]y\oyLanoyo(rKai (r[ ]v Xoyia/xoy bs Kal 

5 a[. ]uo(T7rape8coK€v > a[ ]vos napidcoKeu 

e[ ^avrjyapKaraap > e[ ]ai/. 97 yap Kara dp- 

)([ '\KaLKaTo\vixiria -^^ovra^ SidOecns] koX kut OXvimid- 

8\_ ]er7rXaref/caiou 5[as oi'tto) eyeyo^ei] ej/ nXdrei Kal ov 

k[ ]vovSco(rr]poSo k[ y ovS' coy HpoSo- 

10 r[ ]L'roi/cruj/e>(GO(r T[oy ]vtov avv€\a>9 

t[ ]v(T7r0lKl t[ ]V9 TTOLKL- 

Xo^[ "[fiovypa Xov [ ]//oj/ ypd- 

(l)co[ ]oLovTr]i ^a>[v ] olov rfj 

roy[ ]o[. .]a(TTOvcr rov [ ]o[. .]a(TTOvs 

15 a[ ]TrXa[.]aLKaa7ro a[ Tcc] IlXa[T]aLKa aTTo 

[ ]iJ.€)(pLTa)vvaTaTa>v [tcov Trpcorcor] jJL^Xpi t5>v vardrcov 

[ ]Ta€iTa7raXLV7ra(ra(r [Sie^eX06v]Ta, itra ndXip ndaas 

Taa-[. .]^oXaa-Toou7reXoTrouur][. . Ta9 [€(r](3oXas Toou neXo7rovvr)[(7i- 

coy[.]7raXXT]Xovcrypa(peLv[. .]k[. . cov [e]7raXX?7Xous' ypdcpav, \Ta\ (Se) K[op- 

20 Kupal'Ka€^e^r]aSLa(pepovT[. . KvpalKa i<pe^fjs Sia(pepovT[a 

roia-)(^povoLcrnavTayapav(Tvv[. . Toh •^povois. rravTa yap dv (Tvv\(e- 

)(€(i'r]7raXipe7rLTOvcravTov(T)([. . X^^^ V "^dXiv enl tovs avTovs x[P°" 

uov(Tai^eTpe)(€va7rp€7rccKrKa[. . vovs dv^Tpe\€v dnpeTra)^ Ka\l 

aXoy(i)crovyapiJ.iau7ro6€(TLar)v[ dXoycos. ov yap fxia virSOeais rjv 

25 ov8€€V'kvL'XpovoaLr]TOTT(OLaXXa\^ ov8\ kv eVi "^povco rj tottco, dXXd 

iroXXaiKaiTToXXayovKaLKaTa woXXal Kal 7roXXa)(ov Kal Kara 

Kai p 

TToXXova^povova Kai/irju > ttoXXovs Kaipov9> Kal /xrji/ 

UKaLKaTaap-)(pvTaiypa(p^va > > e/ Kal Kara dp^ovTai^) 'iiypa(f)€u, a- 

vayKriTTaXivr]v8LaLpHVTa'rTpa vdyKr] trdXiv ^u 8iaipi?u rd irpd- 

30 y/xaTa€7raXXcouyapKaiaXXa)y y/xara* eir dXXcoi/ yap Kal dXXcov 

TavTaapyovToavavui^aivev TavTa dp-)(6vT(£>v avv^^aiv^v 

OTav8eTicrevKe(paXaiovy pacp-qL OTav 8e Tis %v K€(pdXaiou ypdcpj) 

fxovov(Tvi'€)(a>(r€ip€ieavTcoLovi' jiovov crvveySiS ecpet. iavTO) ovp 

€avTiaXeyeto8iovvaLO(rKaLyap > kiv)avTia Xeyei 6 Alovvo-los' Kal yap 

35 ^LKarap'xovTa(Te8eLypa(f)^Lva)(T €t Kar dpyovra^ 'i8^i ypd<^Hv cuy 

<^T](nvo[iQi(£i(T^yjir]v8iaip^ivTa (prjaiv^ ofioiois ^XP^lv 8i.aipi.lv rd 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



117 



10 



15 



Col. iii (: 

7r[.]ayixaTaaKo\ov6[ ]ov(rLv 

.^avyeToiavv^LprJi '\aKai 

.]?7/fft)Ai;oo(rfroi)(p[ ]7/o-[. 

. . .]Kv8L8rj[.]8Lr]ye[ ]_f[. . . 

...]..[.. .]rrjLC(TVY[ 

]7-aioy(5eir[ 

]poLKaTo[. .]...[ 

]LKaKa[.'\0LKl[ 

]7roXX[.]cr/ce0a[. . . . 

]€Ta^€ii/o5e(5[. . . . 

]e^co^€i/7ra/)a/Sa[. . . . 

]//era/8acretcr//eTa|[. . . . 

^aivovK^TnTiiidi^, . . . 

]u7rpoK€L/xevT]vl .[.... 

• •]y • [• • • •]Taaiy[.]jrTiaKaiXvS[. . . . 

7" • [•]?^?L ]? • • o:crJ7f[.]X .[.... 

aKp€L^(0(T[ ]a)([ ]a 

7rpoaS€To[ ]^TV[ ]<^^ 

fiT]a7roTr]aTa)[. . .]r]i'a[.'\a)pav^r] 
20 creooa7r€7roir]a6aiTov[.]ovKvSi8T]v 
-qvirepcfy-qaLvaXTjOea-repavaiTiy 

ai/€lVaLTOV7ro\€/Jt,OV7rpQ)TOVfX€U 
pr]T€0Va)<T0VK€fieXX€T0l'7r€\0 

■7roi'VT](riaKouTrpo6[.]p.et/oa(rvu 
25 ypacpeLUTToXe/xovTrXeLova-TroXe > 
lxovcra7roT(£)VTT€pcnK(i>vavr(cv 
cr^^SovatpcovTTpoiTOivqv^rjOr] 
cravaO-qvaLoiemLcrayuvevirpoa- 
6r]Kr](Tfi€p€Le^coyapTeX€0VTr]<T 
30 vTroOea-ecoa-cyLveTOCTrdrcvdv > 

IT 

fx.r]T€ovoTi^T^a<javuypa^€V(TO(pei 
X€iTaa(pavepa(7Kai6pvX[.]vfi€i/a(r 



A col. iii). 

7r[p]dyiJ.aTa dKoXovO[(os to?9 dp)(]ov(nu. 
[ejai' yl tol awdprj \Td iTpdy\iar\a koX 
[//]?) KOikudiicnv 01 y(p[6voi €0e|]?7y [6 
[0ov]Kv8iSr][s] 8ir]y€[LTai, olov .]i[. . • 

[...]..[...] Tfj ^' o-i;r[ex(Sy 

[ 'Yai. ov8' ei t[ 

[ ]/)0(/caro[. .]...[ 

[ ]i/fa Ka[T]oi/ci[ 

[ ] 7roXX[a]y ice0a[Xas' . 

[ e^jera^efi'. 6 8\ A[iovv- 

[aios ] i^QiO^v 7rapa^a[. . . . 

[ ] fieTa^daa^ /jLeTa^[v tcov 

[7rpa(raofJLev]cov ovk einTLjxa \^Hpo86- 

[t6) ]v TrpoKeifxiuT]!/ t ' . [. . . 

[. . .]u .[. . . .] ra Aly[v]7rTia kol Av8[iaKd, 
TT . [.] 8\ o[ ]a . . aar] [.]X .[.... 

UKpi^COS [ ]CCX[ ]^' 

rrpos 8e to [ttju dp)^r]]u t^[? laTopC\as 
fi-q dnb rfjs Tco[v ji6]T]va[L]a)U av^rj- 
(recoy TreiroifjaOai rov [@\ovKv8L8r]v 
rjvTrep (prjalv dXtjOearipai' aiTt- 
av chai rov iroXefiov, irpcoTOu jikv 
prjTiov 0)9 OVK e/feXXe Tot' ITeXo- 
TTOwqaiaKov 7rpo^[€]/uei'o? avy- 
ypd(f)€iu TToXe/jLov irXeLovs iroXi- 
fxovs dirb tS)V IlepcnKcov avrS>v 
a)(e8ov dcf a>v 7rpd)T(0P rjv^riOr]- 
aav 'AOrjvaioL ineia-dyeiu kv irpoa- 
6rJKr]s {xepei' e^co yap reX^ou rfjs 
vTToOiaeoas eyiveTO. eTretr' ei^dv- 

injTiou oTt Tray avyypacpevs 6(p€i- 
Xei ray ^avepas Kal $pvX[o]vfjL€i/as 



ii8 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



aiTLa(TTOiVTrpayiiaTCdv^vTrpai > 
TOL(TaKpiPoi>aa(pr]yH(76aUL8iTL > 
35 va>va(pave(TT€pcouv7roi^o€LTOv 



aiTias Tcov npayfiarcov er npco- 
Tois aKpi^cos d^-qyuaOai, el Si tl- 
va>v d(f)av€aT€pcov virovoel tov- 







Col. iv (= A col. iv). 






T0€7ri 


TO iml 






aOaioS' 


adat 6 A[iovv<nos 




toikut' 


Toi Kar 






KaLTre 


Kttl ire 


> 
a- 


5 


vafxe&l 


va p.ea\ov 






ofxrjpiK 


'Ofxr]piK[m 






■^(cva . 


Xcou a . [ 


> 

€- 




TTieLKr)' 


TTLeiKrj [ 






(TVKO(p[ 


<rvKO(p[avT 




lO 


aiTpiaK[ 


2. I. al TpiaK[0VT0'liT€LS 


(TTTOvSai' av- 




raiKara 


rat KaTa[ 


TpiaKOVTOV- 




TiiaKa 


Tei9 Ka 






Kovcaa 


KOV 0)9 






Stjo-k . \ 


8ris K .[ 




15 


canXara 


€S n\dTa[iav TTJs 


BoiWTiaS* 17 TTO- 




XLa€vi[ 


Xiy eVf[/ca)y XeyeTai. kol "Ofx.T]pos 




oiT€7r\a[ 


61 T€ nXd[Tai,av 


ixov. 




[ M* . 


Tw 8€ Tr]e[\iirr($ Kal Sckcltw €- 




T 


T[€t €Trl Xp\)(ri8os 


kv "Ap-yci t6t€ 


20 


n 


'ir[€VTTiKOVTa 5i)oXv 


Seovra €TT] 




l€p[ 


Up[co|i,€V'ns" 






Tl[ 


r4 






4 


4 






rrp 


7rp[ 




25 


rrj.[ 


TT] . [ 






TaOVK€ . [ 


Ta OVK € . 






(l)aa-LTLyo[ 


^aat r(j'o[y 






KaiKaTo\[ 


Kal Kar '0X[vfimd8as (?) 




opi(TatTov[ 


opiaai rox\ 





853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



119 



30 ovSoKifia[ 
T07rpocrTa[ 
Oe/xevoiSl 
avTiT0v6[ 

35 KatOpe^a^x^ 



ov SoKifj.a[ 
TO 7rpoara[ 
2. 4. 6e}jL€voi 5[€ €S TT|v cL-yopdv xd oirXa' 

dl^TL TOV 6[ei/T€S 

6efX€yos [ 

Kol 6p€-^dfj.[^j/os olvtI TOV 6pi^a9. 



10 



TcS€d€jX€yoiai'[. .]rofa7ro[.]e/ze 
yoiKaiaTpaT07T[. . .]vaaix€UOi€v 
TTjiayopa 

yua>fir]i/S€Tro[. .]uuTOKT]pvyixaaiu 
5 T€)(pr](T6aie7nTr]Se[.]oia- cyvcoaav > 
S€(pi\LKoiaKr)puynaaiP)(pT]a-dai 
Kat€i<T(pi\iapv7rayay€(rSaiXiyov(rL 
yapeTriTrjSeiovaTOV(r^i[.]ov(r 

€SoK€iovy€7rf)^€ipr]T€aeiuai tool 
o-vurj6€ia)(r]fiaTiK€^pr]TaLavTi 
ToveTTL^eiprjTeou 

KaLCLa-^eipaarjia-aj/KaTaTa^ocr St > 
av\Xa(3co(Tai/ayuco(TT€Ovrjiaapoi 
fjiei^yap'uousaKaiaioXeia-Siaipov 
aivovToiSeaSLaLper^ 

OLTrXeLovaeuaKOTCOiKacTTTjXcoi > 

Ta)pSL6Sa:[.]r]i^prja[.]drjvai (TKO 
TCOLai^oo/xaXcoo'^prjTaieinoTeaxT 
apaeviKOOLevLOTeSeaxTOvSeTepooi 
20 efi7r€Lpova8e-)(ovT€crrovcr8La)KOV 

TaaTovnr]€K(pvy€Lva)(rTe8i€^det 

pOVTOOLTToXXoL T]T0l0VTa>Crpr]T€0l' 

efj.TT€tpov[.]S€)(^ovT€aTova8ia>Kou 
Ta(TeicrTOfir]€K(pvyeiv8i€(pd€ipou 
25 Tooi7roXXoiQ)(TT€napeXKea6aiTO 
(oa-T^TjToapdpounXeouaa-^iTO > 



15 



Col. v(= Bcol. i). 

TO 8e OifieuoL dv[Tl] tov d7ro[$]efi€- 
voL Kal aTpaT07r[€8e]va'd/x€i'oi kv 
Trj dyopd. 
yv<ji\n\v 8' €'iro[io]vvTO KX]pvy[).a(Tiv 
T€ XP^o"6<^i' €TriTTi8€[i]ois* 'iyvcaaav 
Sk (piXiKO?? Krjpvyjxacnv )(pr]adai 
Kal €ty (piXiav virayaykaBar Xiyovcri 
yap kinTr)8itovs Toiis (pi\X\ov^. 
3. 3. eSoKci ovv €irix€ipTlT€a etvai' ro) 
avuT]6ei a^-fjjxaTL Ke^prjTai dvTi 

TOV kTn\eLpr}T(.0V. 

3. 4. Kal €ls x^^po^S ^orav Kara raxos* 8l- 
avXXa^cos dvayvoonTkov Jiaav. ol 
jikv yap '^Icoues Kal AloXeis 8iaipoO- 
aiv, ovTOL 8\ d8iaipiTa(^s). 
4. 2, ol irXcious €V aK6T(o Kal Tn]Xco 

T<ov 8l65(o[v] xi XP^I cr[o)]6fivaf o-ko- 
rot) dvcofidXcos XpfJTai, evioT€ coy 
dp(TiVLK(o, ivioTC 8e coy ovSeripo). 
l|jnr€ipous 5' €xovT€s tovs Sicokov- 
ras TOV |iT| €K<j)V'Y€iv oiaxe 8i€<|>6€(- 

pOVTO ol TToWoi* rJTOl OVTCOS pT]Tioy, 
€/X7reipov[s] 8' e^ouTiS tovs Slcokou- 
Tas €1? TO fir) kK(pvy€iv 8t€(p6cipoy- 
To ol TToXXoi, axTTe TTapiXKeaOaL to 
a>(TT€' fj TO dpOpov nXiovdaii to 



T20 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Tovefnr€ipovaSe)(_ovT€[.]TOva > > 

SLQ)KOPTa(ra>aTefJ.r]€K(pvy€iP' 

SLe(j)6eipoi>ToonroX\oL 

30 CTVpaKiaKOVTLOV TCOLO-avpCOTTJpL 

Ka\ovfJi€vcoL€aTiSiTO€(r)(^aToy 
TovSoparocr 
^vv^^rjaavTOLcnrXaTaievai awe 
deuToeiO-a-vfxISaareia-qXdovfjiiTa 
35 (popLKa)(ra7roTOVeiaTavTo^aLv[. .]i' 
TOvaei^napaTa^eLSiea-TcoTacr > 
aXXrjXcou 



Tov, kfiTTiipovs S' e^or're[s'] tovs 
SicoKOP'Tas axTTe firj eKcpvy^Tj/ 
SiecpOeipovTO 01 ttoXXol. 

4. 3. CTvpaKL dKOVTiou* T<S aavpoojfjpi 
KaXovfxiucp. 'i(TTL 8h to eV^arov 
TOV SopaTos. 

4. 7. luvepTiaav to is TlXarauvcri' crvvi- 
OevTO, eh avfi^daeis rjXOov, jxeTa- 
^opiKas dnb tov e/y TavTo (3aLv[ei]u 
T0V9 ev TTapaTcc^ei SiecTTcoTas 
dXXrjXcoi^. 



iravcTTpaTiai «[ 

\ Trav(rv8LriL7Taa\^ 

olaair poaBoKrjTOvl^ , 

Tcoiar6a7rpocr5o[ 

5 [•]7roT[. . . .'\avTe(T[ 

rrTevaavTeaKaiK^ 

TiveaXeyovai [ 

[.]€icravTe(T7r€piT0La[ 

TrepiTcope^ooofjioil 

10 8aixaa6eLaypa(peT[. . . . 

^ovXevcrcoaLTrepLavTl 

TcoiToiovTcoLXeyeiS . [. . . 

(TiTOVTeea-Tjyayou \ 

Kavofj.rjpocn/r]€(T[ 

15 7rap€(rTaaav[. . .]o^/a[. . 
e^iTaXia(TKa[. . .j/feAtao- €[. 
(J>r]cnuo6[.]vKvSi8T](TKa[. . 
XiooTai(rKa[.]TOL(Ta7ro(TCK[. 
XaK€8ai}xovLOLvava-7r[. . . 
ao ei(TTT]vavjxjj.a)(^Lavov8[. . . 

K€l6€l/7Tape8c0K€V7r€[. . . . 



Col. vi (= B col. ii). 

5. I. iravcTpaTia* a)[s 

Trav(Tv8irj 7rao-[ 

5. 4. ola dTrpoo-SoKTiTou [KaKov* 'lctov 

TO) ctTe d7rpoa8o[K-qTOV. 

5. 5. [■0]'TroT[oTrTJo']avT€S* [di/Ti tov VTTO- 

TTT^vaavTes Kol k\ 

Tiv\^ Xiyovai. 
[5]€i(ravT€S irepl tois [€|w dvTi tov 

, nepl tS>v e^o), 6/Jioi\a>s 

. . 8apaa$€L9. ypd^eT[aL 5e . . . . . 

6, 2. pouXe-Oo-wori Tr€pl aiiT[»v 

. . . tS ToiovTcp Xeyei 8 . [ 

6. 4. (TLTOV T€ CO'Ti'Ya'YOV [(TLTOV k(Tr\vey- 
. . Kav "0/j.rjpos TT^ey [5' eK Arjjivoio 

. . . TrapicTTaaav \oiv\ov a\yov(TaL. 

. . . . 7. 2. €|'lTa\ias Ka[l SiJKcXias* k[nha^av, 

i . (prjalu 6 ©[o]vKv8t8r]9, Ka[l T0t9 Itu- 

. . . XtcoTais Ka[l] T019 dnb ^iK[eXias ol 

. . AaK€8aifj.6pL0L vavs 7r[oi€TadaL 

. . €LS TTjv av/xpa^iav oi^5[ei9 5e i- 

KiWiu iTapi8oiK€v 7r([fi(pOTJi/ai 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



I2T 



vavariavfifia-)(^r](rai'Taa[. . . 

(r)(^aT[.](Ta7roavpaKov(TO-a)[. . 

icoviavTaafied[.^pixoKpaT[. . 
25 opcovTear€L(r(pLai ey/cXir€o[. . . 

oaofoiovTeSecaco^eivl, . . . . 

TToXXaKicrSeevavTiovTal. . . 

7T€piTa(rfi€Ta^a(r€i(rT(ouS[. . 
ap'^0[XivoLy[.^pnavTe(TO^VT[. . 
30 TL\a[i^avovTaL 8ri\ova)a[. . . 

7reTTXr]yfX€voiovS€KeKaK[. . . 

coa/jLeTayorjaaieTT i(f>€peiyov[. 

veoTr]crovKaKovaia>av7r[. . . . 

r}TrT€TOTOV7roX€fxovyXvK[. . 
35 XefiO(Ta7r€ipot(nu(0(T(pr)[. . . 



vav^ 77 aviniayjiaavTa^, [e/ jxrj en e- 
cr^ar[oi]s' dno XvpaKovcra5)[v e/y rriv 
'Icouiau TO.? fxeO^ [' E]pfiOKpdT[ov9. 

7. 3. opwVTCS €L <T^l(Tl' iyKXLTlo[u 

ocrou otov T€ Si? crco^eiy [tov tovov, 

7roXXdKi9 Se €j/avTiovTa[L 

vepl ray /xeTa^daeis rccv B[ 

8. I. dpx^d|X€Voi ^[djp irdvT€S 6|'0T[€pov dv- 
TtXajJipdvoVTai* SrjXov coy [ov Kara- 
7r€7rXr]yfj.€yoi ovSe K€KaK[a)fj.ii/oi 
coy iieTavorjaai. ini^epei yov[u 8tl 17 
veoTTjS ovK aKOVaricos V7r[b dncipcas 

XeyMoy dneipoiaiv 009 (f)r][(Ti IliuSapos. 



TToXXaSe)(pr)a-{xoXoyoLrji8o[ 8. 2. iroWd bk )(pT|(j|Jio\6'Yoi fj5o[v 

One or more columns lost. 



[. 



Col. vii 

](raLTiaa7roXXaKi(TKaL8L > 

[ Y^rjXBovKaiavve^a > 

[ '\vaVTLOL(T 

. , '\fJ.coieXa)(iaTa)(^pcofji€voi > 

5 [ ]ei<TTa€(r€pyo[. . .]diarTai'[ 

[ ]oy.'[' • ']vi^Tecr[ 



[• 



[• 



.]a-Tr](TLyapTaTT[. 



10 



[ ]v€icrToy ..[.]•[ 

[.]7r . [ ]ovS€T0U7roX€fj,oy 

[.]/z[ ]€v6aKeV0VK€TL[.]p[. .]l' 

[.]r[ ]aaLTOjxeTeX0Q3i/ovKe 

TLTTpOv[. . .'\(TLT0l0VT0LKaTaTT0Xe 

\?pv6yp.[. .]e^opiJ.cc(nv 
[.]aifieyiaTr]u8o^avoLaon€voi > 
15 [. .yaTenpoyouoLo-KaiupivavTOKr > 
[.]najx^oT€pa€KTiovaTro^aLvoi' > 



( = C col. i). 

(11. 4.) [. . iK ixiKpd]^ alrias noXXdKis Kal 81' 
[opyfj^ . . . .] €^TJX6ov Kal avuifia- 
[Xov roTs k'lvavTLOL^. 
II. 7. [Kal ol Xo-yio-jixw tXaxitrTa xp(«>|i€Voi 
[6u|iw irX]€i(7Ta €S €p'Yo[v KajQiaxav- 
[rai* ol aX]oyi[crro]i)i'rey [roXjirjpo- 
[raTOL, e^L'\(TTT]at yap to. 7r[d6r] .... 

[ ]v els Tov . .[.].[ 

[.JTT . [. . .J epy]ou 8e tov TroXefxav 
[' 0]fjL[r]pLKa)9,] evOa Kev ovKeri [^p[yo]u 
[d]v[r]p 6vo\aaLTO iiereXOoiv. ovKe- 
Ti 7rpou[oov\cn toiovtoi, Kara, ttoXc- 
\jli\ov 6vix\(a\ e^op/xataiu. 
II. 9. [K]al \L^yi(yTT\v 56|av olcr6|i€Voi 

[to]ls t€ irpo'Yovois Kal v|xlv avTots 
[eJTT d|jL(j)6T€pa Ik twv diropaivdv- 



122 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



20 



25 



[.]cof €i/jiT]7rpo(r€K€iTOTO(irafi(po > 
Tipar]v[. ...].[. .]-o/ieyt(rr?7J/5o 

^aveir[ ]^iaavvv8e8i 

[•]reoi'[ ]oXrjyl/Li'co<TTOi 

[ ]7r[ ]€^ovT€(rKai 

[. . . .]Kaioi7rpoyovoiT])(^pr](rTr]u 

[.]covo7roiouua7roTO)i'€py(ou > 

f. .'\XXov(ropra[.]€j/iKoarpa>i Koapoa 
[.]iaTa^i(Tco(TT[. . .]ap€7reiK0(Tpr) 
[.]evapr]y€/x[. .] 

[ ]aipoi/ico[.]€KarpaTevop.€V(ov 

30 [• • • .]era[.]<aia'[. .]ar€i'[.]rT[.]i'oi' 
[. . •]^8e)(op[. . .]pe(Tl3eia[.]TroX€ 
[. . .jt'TO)!/?]^. . .]SiaXv(raiTO(rTpa 
[ ]€7T[.'\iK[.]vai'a)(^(opT](xai 

[ ]r^^ 

35 [ ]uy€vr]Tai fxrjSeviarvu 

[. ]r]8ei(ropeLXiaueX6r]i 

[ ]ScaXve(x6ai SiaKpiue 

[. . . ."^Qipi^eadai 

Col. 



[•]7re/);cai[. .]o[. . 
[.]^'ej'ei<a€/c[. . 

K€VOTiy[.]fXl^[. 

KX€aKaiaij[. . 



5 Ta>iayecc[.](X[. . . .] . ay[. .]fr[. . , 
T][.'\7r€pia)(yo[.](rL [.]a6oiar)(yova[. . . 

[. . .])(^eipoa-e\€iv ev)(€p(rii'[ 

[.]€Ta)(^€ipi^€aOaiSLaTT][ 

[.]var](r(Triii€X€iacr 
10 [. .](i)/irjiKai^pT]p.aTcovn[. . . .]va-i[. . 



[TJtov €1 p-fj 7rpoaiK€iTo TO err dp(f)6- 
Tepa -qv \aKOv\a\aL\ to fxeyiaTrji' 86- 
^av e77-[i Tr)S iv8o'\^Las, vvv 8k 5e- 
[/cjreoj/ [olvtI tov t'7r]6X7yv|/-ir d>9 tol- 
[avTT]v v]7r[6Xr)-^iv] e^ovTe^ kol 
\ypus\ Kal 01 npoyovoL rj \pr]crTr]v 
\fi kv'\avTLav eK tcov OLTTO^aivov- 
\t'\(iov ottoTol (a)i/ dirb TOiv 'ipyoav 
[e]^' iKccTepop 6(p6r]T€. 

[irojXXovs ovTa[s] €Vi K6(r|xco* Koa-po^ 
\8\idTa^LSi (oy t[o avT'\ap ^Tret Koaprj- 
[6Yv ap i7ye//[o(i/eo"(ri).] 
12. 2. [AaK€6]ai|JLOVi(o[v] €K(rTpaT€\)0|X£Vcov 

\y pd(^iTa\C\ Kal a[Tp]aTev[6]pT[a)y. ov 
[yap] e8i)(^ov[To Tr]p€(T^(ia[v] noXe- 
[pov]i/T(ou 7r[pli'] 8iaXvaraL to aTpd- 
[Tevpa ^] in [o]ik[o]v dua^^copfjaai 
[dpax'r]]T(i. 

[\LT]^wl ^v]y>{ivT\rai' p7]8€vl avp- 
[pi(Ty]j p]r]^' ^i's" opiXiav ^XOrj. 
12. 3. [e'jjLeXXe] 8iaX"0€(r9af 8LaKpLve- 
[aOai, )(]a)pi^€(r6ai. 

viii ( = C col. ii). 

13. 3. [djucp Kal ['Trp]6[T€pov 

[.y 'iv€Ka eAf[ 

Kiv OTt p[o]piC[ Ilepi- 

KXia Kal ap[ 

rS dy€L f[^]eA[a . . .] . av[. .]it[. . . . 

TITTCp i(XXyo[v](Tl' [K]a$' l<TXV0V(r[l. 

[Std] x^i'Pos €X^iV' h xepalv [^x^iv, 
[p]€Ta)(€LpL^€a6ai 8id t^[s del 8€- 
[o]v(rr)9 eiripeXeias. 

[■yvjwfJLTi Kal xpr]\ia,r()iv ■ir[€pLo]uai[a 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



123 



[ ]?"9^[' • -\i<o,TopBov[. . 

[ ](rKaiSr]fji[. 



22 



[• 



]•[• 

[. . . .]5t07r[ ].[.]. at . [. 

av€$€(Tav[ ]ySr]fiov 

25 [. . . .]o-f[ ]fXO(TLOV > 

[. . . .]v 

a[ ]^[-]^^x4* • • -lya^/^aTccr 

a[. . . .]TaTaXav[ ]dfx.ov[. .]y 

[ ]6ovKaL[ ]/>ero[. . . . 

30 [ Ke[ 

[ ]f[ 

[ ] 

[• .] [ 

poveXOjil 

35 OTUUKadl 

KaL7r€pLaip[ 



[KpaT€i](r6[a]f npovoia K[al XP]^/^aT[coi/ 
[napaa-Kevfj] 7roX[\a>i/] KaTopOov[crdai. 
13. 4. [€V re dvaGrJiiaaLV 18iol]s Kal 6ti|x[o- 

[o-iois ] . [.]j/ct)r[. . . . 

7 lines lost. 

[ ] • [• 

[....] oio7t[ ].[.]. ai . [. 

dviOeaai/ [ to]v 8-qiiov 

[. . . .](rt[ 8rj\ii6<TLOv 

^ [. . . .]r. 
13. 5. d[Tr6<j)aiv]€ [8]€ €Xo[v t6 dj-yaXjiia T€cr- 

cr[apdKov]Ta Td\av[Ta crTa]0|ji6v [xp]y- 

[(Tiou dTTecfjjGou Kal [Tr€piai]p€T6[v et- 

[vai dirav] 6 TJilpiKXrjs 

[ 14 

[ ] 

[. .] ..... [ 

pov 'iXOrj [ 
oTav KaB[ 
13. 6. Kal ir€pLaip[€T6v 



10 



Col. ix ( 
[i]aLTa)V'TTapiiTaX^iv Ta)V(f)vXa 

[. .]oi/r(Di'TaT€ix^[' .](ovaieiraX^eL(r 
[. . .^ovToiyapicpvXacrcTOvvTroTeTaiv 
[. . .]or/3i;raT(Dj/ avTiTovanoTCov 
[.]p€a^vTaTCi>va>(r8aiS(i>i/v7ro > 
Xa/j.iroixe[.]a<ou 
TOVT€[.]ap<paXr]pLKoyTei)(ov<x(TTa8i 
oir]aai'[.]€UT[.]KaiTpi[.]KOVTa7rpo<T 

[']ov[ ]i'r[.]t;a(rT€[. . . .]i/n[.]ou 

[. .]^TOVKv[.]Xovr]i/[. . . .]x'nTO 
/^[']y(PaXrjp[. . .]o8€To[. .]7r[. . .]i[ 
€a>[.]a7rapi.6[.]HTat8i[. .]a-oy[. .]i/ 



= D with Fr. i). 

13. 6. [KJal Twv Trap' i'lraXltv toou ^vXa- 

[o-o-joj/roDf TO. rd^r] [e0'] S)v at kirdX^us. 
13. 7. [too-jo-Otoi -ydp €<|)v\ao'crov vird t€ t«v 
[irpcJo'puTdTwv dvTi tov aTro t<ou 
[7r]p€(r^vTdTcou, d>s 8at8<ov viro 
Xa/j,7rojj,€[p]da)u. 
Toii T€ [vjdp §aXT)piKOV T€IX0US (TTdSl- 

OL ^<rav [u]€Vt[€] Kal Tpi[d]K0VTa irpos 

[t]6v [k1JK\o]v t[o]v daT€[(OS" d]vTt [t]ov 
[^C0]S TOV Kv[k]X0V' 7JV [/3' Tei]xr] TO 

fj.[e]v ^aXTJp[ov t]o 8e To[v] n[€ipa]i- 
€<c[s'] dTrapi6[p.]elTai 8^ [To](rov[Toy 



124 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



To8ia<TTr]/i.a[.]'7roTov(paXr]pi.[. .]u 
a\piTOVKVK[. .'\vTQvacm(£)(x[.'\vK\ov 
15 5eXeyefTOj/7r[.]pt/3oXorrofa[. .]e(»[. 
[.'\anTa\LvoTToaovqve\j, .]6_i[. . . . 
[. . .])(^pltovkvk\ov 



22 



25 



Fr. I. 

aXA[ 
KaLyap\_ 

9.'[ 



TO Sid<TTr]/xa [d]7ro Tov ^aXrjp\i[KJo]v 
d)(^pi TOV kvk[Xo]v tov dcrT€(t>9, [k]vkXou 
Se XeyeL toi^ 7r[e]pi(3oXoi' tov a[<7r]€G)[y, 
[K]ai TToXiv oTTOcrov rjv e[/f JT]ei[paie- 
[coy «]XP^ "^^^ kvkXov. 
[|vv Mo]uvux[L]a'" A[i]/^^i^ ^[rn/CTyy 



About 3 lines lost. 



77r[ 
14. I. E'iipo[iav 
aXX[ 
KOL yap [ 

[.YlT0[ 
Ol[ 



[ 

[ ]//€Tei'yUo[ 

[ ]X^€iei;/3(77-i[ 

^ [ ] 

5 ^«[ ]^5j7|i;rT[ 

eo"av[ ]j/TeXoi'j/Tft)[ 

roej/X[. . . .]t(r 5foz/i;cro[ 

/j.ej/<pr](r[. .]€v8eSiovi^ 

[.]»7T0j/[. .]T€Xev6r}pei[ 

[. . .]opoa-Td[.]a(Tr]yoye[ 

[. . .]oaS€OVT[.](r(l)r](riv[ 

[. .]aT0€KX€X[.]fii/aa-6ai[ 

[. .]Ti8€Kai€v[.]r] lXukcovlI 

[. .]ovXip.vaT[.](TecrTLvapT[. . . .] 
15 [. . .]aap)(^aLOTaTaSiovv(naTrjLP7roi 
[....] e7nTp€i(rfie[.]ea[. .yeopTTjrjfx.c 



10 



Col. 
] 



X (= E col. 1). 

[ 
15. I. ['E\€\)(rivioL] (i€r' EvjjL6[\irou' . 

[. . . ev 'Epe\^6d Evpi7rC[8r]S . 



• • • 



[• 



.] 



15. 2. 1^ a.['n-a.VT<dv] ti5t| §uvt[€\ovvtcdv 

€S av[TTiv ^vyT^Xovi^Toolv 

15. 4. TO €V A[i|JLva]is Aiov'Ocro[u* EaXXifia^os 

flip ^r]a[iv] ev Se Aicouv[(t 

[.]rj TOP [7ro]r' 'EX^vOijp €i[. Aifivaico 
[8\ •)(\opoa-Td[8]as rjyov e[o/)ray, . . . 
[. . .]oy Se ovt[(o]9 (prjaiv [KaXeiadaL 
[Si]a TO iKX€X[i]fj.vd(r6ai [top tottop. 
[ea]Ti 8e Kal kp \f\fj AaKCOPL[a lepop 
[o7r]ov AifxpdT[i]9 kaTip '^pr[f/xiy.] 
[w TJd dpxaidTaxa Aiovxio-ia rfi i^ iroi- 
[eiTai*] knl Tpds p-^[v] k<j[TL]p iopTT) rjfjii- 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



125 



20 



[. . .]mt^iye7ria-[ ]TiSer]il3 

[. .]KaL€LTT€Vav[. . . .] 

[. . .]\[.]i(rTova^[. .]ex/30Di'T[.] (lara 

[ ]t[. .]a^ia 

[. . . .]e'Ya/xiKa)i'Kai€(raXXa[.]a}VL€ 
[. . .]i'oni^eTaiT(oivSaTLx[. .](rdai 

[. .]fJ.l^€Tai.UOlXLfjl.OU€(TTl . [ ] . [. 



[pay] la l^' ly , eTria[r]iJ.6s eajn Se fj l^' , 
[coy] Kol €C7r€u ai;[r6y.] 
15. 5. [rd Tr]\[€]icrTOU d|[ia] €XP«vt[o*] e/y to, 
[7rXeia-]T[ov] d^ca. 
[irpd t]€ ya\iiKS>v Kal Is aWa [t](ov U- 
[pcov] vo|xi1^€Tat T^ (jSttTi xlP^y^o-f 
[vo]fxi^eTai vofxifiov kcTTi . [ ] . [. 



[. . . .]^ovviirnTo\vKaTarr][ 16. i [r-n t]€ o\iv etrl iroXv Kaxd tt|[v X'^po-v 

. . [a]'UTOv6p,co olKfjcrcf fi€Ta ro\y [1€tu')(ov 

... ol 'AQ-qvaioi, 8ia ttjv Kara [r^i/ ^(a)- 

. . . pav avTOvojiov o\L]Kr}(nv d\yTl {tov) ttjs 

. . . Kara ttju yoi>pav \a\vTOv6jx[ov oIktj- 

. . . (recoy. eLp-qrai 8e virep^aT(io[9,Tb yap i- 

. . ^^y enl noXv jieT^i^ov ol 'A\6r]vaL0L. 

... ['n-a]v[oL]KT|(j-ia -Yevdixevoi* 6X[ 

.... lA' "] 'n'ccvoiKia if Tav7[fj 

T0[. ol]KOVUTe9. 

, . . 17. I Kal T[d] T)pwa irdvTa* to. tcov [rjpco-' 

. . . o)[i/ T€]jx€VTj a0 &U kvlcov K\aXovvTaL 

. . . ^\yX\aL. XeyovcTL Se rjpoioov jj.e[u tovs 

.... arjKov?, Oeoov Se vao()S' KaXX[Lfia)(_os 
del 5' t^oj/ evTOfxa ar]KOi. 



25 [,]vTOVO[JLCoioiKr}aeiixeTaTo[. . . 

]oia6T]i/aioiSLaTr]VKaTa[. . 

pavavTovofJLOvo[.]Kr]cnva[. . 

KaTaTr]v\a>pau[.]vTovofi[. . 

aea)creLpriraL8ev7repPaTco[. 
30 ^riaeTTLTToXviiereLyovoLal^. . 
[. .]p[. .]Kr]a-iayeuonei/OL oX[. 

//[. .]TrayoLKiaieyTavT[. . . 

T0[. . .]kOVI'T€(T 

KaLT[.]rjp(oa7rai^Ta TaTcov[. . . 
35 co[. . .]fjievr]a(p<JOvevLcouK[. . 
0[. .]aLXeyovaLSer]pco(i)vfJ.e[. 
ar]Kov(rdeQ)u8evaov(TKaXX[. 
aeiSeyovevTOixaariKOL 



KauLTiaXXo^el 
KaieiTiaXXoa[ 
[. . . .]/cai0yAa[ 



Col. xi (= E col. ii. with Fr. 2). 

Kal ei Ti dWo p€[pai(ds k\t|(7t6v ^v 

Kal e'l Ti dXXo d[cr(paXa)9 

[....] Kal (f)vXa\(Ta6iievov 
10 lines lost. 



[• 



15 



e^m[. . 
ovyap[. 

[ 



Fr. a. 
]?■?[• • 

.]KOvdp[. . . 

.]a)t/C7/[. . . . 
. . ,]uo/x[. . . 

, .]V0IMC0[. . . . 



[ ] 7rd[(Tr]S fxeu 

[ya]nj[y to neXa(ryi]Kou */4p[yoy dfieivoy. 
€|cp[KTJ0TT ]a>Krj[dT]. 

17. 2. ov 'ydp [8id tt^v iTapd]vo|Ji[ov €Voikt|- 
[<riv irapa]v6aQ)[ 



126 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



20 



.]o-6XpJ7[. 
. .]\rjK[. . 



. .] . o[. . 



Col. xii 

[ ]^opiKa>aa7TOTcov 

[ ]voLepGTaieTOi > 

[ ]7ir]u 

[ ]7roX(/xov/j.a > 

5 [ ]adpoLar€iKaL 

[ ] . eau€ifX€uoa 

[ H<r 

[ ]Ka6e8pai€i 

[ ]^/^[- -J^fi^f ai 

lo [ ]adt]crdaiapy(ioa 



(=Fcol. i). 

17. 4. [€|apT'OoVT€S' fl€Ta](f)0piKCOS CCTTO t5>v 

[TrXoioiv Xeycrai OTa]u oi fperai '4tol- 
[/xoi Oicri 7rpo9 tt^v Ka>]7rT]j/. 

18. 3. [€V Tr\ luva-ywYf) tov] iroXe'iJLOU |ia- 

[XaK6s* ] d$poia€i Kal 

[ ] . e dfei/xivos 



[• 



.]Tr]9. 



[' 



•] 



[. 



[• 



]Ta(popiKa)a- 

]e)(€Lva^ou 

[. . . . ])(^eipiat 

15 [ ]vaia)vi7r 

[ ]ovfi€vov(r 

[ ]iro7r[. .](r 

[ ]»?'«[• • •] 

Some 

[ ]aiTTTT€a)u[ 

20 [ ] . . XaxTTo .[.... 

[ ]fXrixv6o[ 

[ ]«f"^ff[ 

[ ] . . (lc8€€Vv[. . . . 

[ ]j}^<^t rjSeiaavH . [ 

25 [ l^a' 

[ ]i€iro r{XTri^ev8u[ 

[ ]?<^^^ ai'nT[.]uet€7r€^[ 



18. 5. [tov 'Apxi5a|xov kv T-g] Ka6eSpa €i- 

[X^v* ]a //[eAjAeij' kol 

[ K\a6fjo-6ai dpyo)? 

^ [ ] 

[dv€iX€V* fx.e]Ta<popiKci}9 

[ttTTo TOV TO, onXa dv^k'^eLv dcf) ov 
[Kal dfoxal at iKe])(€ipiai. 

19. 2. [Kal TpoiTTJv Tiva Twv 'A9T|]vaio)V lir- 

[tTCCOV TTCpl ToilS 'PciTOUS KaX]0U|Jl€V0US 

[eiroLTJaavTO* ]i T07r[o .]y 

[ ]V «[•••] 

lines lost (?). 

[ ]a iTTTricou [ 

[ ] . . X(CS TO . [ 

[ ]€Xr]Xveo[ 

[. . . ^ ] dvdXev [ 

[ ] . . dSe ii/v[. . . . 

20. I. [ov KaTap]T]vai* flSeia-av et . [ 

[ ]pai. 

20. 3. [iretpav €1to]i€lto' rjXTri^cv, SL€[voetTo. 
[el €Tr€|i]a(riv di^Ti t[o]v e/ e7re|[eXet'- 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



T27 



.]tOTO . . . [.]lK0LTl6[. . 



aoPTai,] TOP evearcoTa avrl to[v fx^XXov- 
TO^ . . .]rOTO . . . [.]lKOL ri6[ 

M.-].^-[ ]-o[ 



.]<rroJ7_o[. 



.]? TO i]p[. 
.] Kal fie[. 



Col. xiii (=F col. ii). 

Kaunaiv€(T[.]aOaiavTiTov€Tra[. . . (20. 4.) Kal e7raii'i(r[€]a6ai durl tov iTra[ii/i- 

(r€iv(rwr}6e(TTOi(TaTTLKoi(r a^iv avurjdes Toi^ 'Attikoi^. 

Opia)^€ T07nKco(ravTiTov€i(rT[. . . 21. i. Opicoj^c roniKCds dvrl tov e/y t[o Opid- 

aLoi>7rei8Lovavur]0[.](rr]KoXoy[. . . aioi^ Tr€{ ijSLOf, (TVUi]6[(o]9' rjKoXov[Oei 

5 'Yapa>aoXvfi7ri.a^€KaioiKaSi6pi[. . . yap d>9 'OXv/xnta^e Kal ofKaSe 0pL[a>^€. 

aXXavToia(oaeiKO(TTr]a[.]r](TT€fiv[. . . 21. 2. dW avTOis ws eiKos rfis [y]T\S T€|iv[o- 

fxei^rjcr VTrep^aTov€<TTiToyape[ |JL€VT|S* vneplSaTov iari, to yap ^[^fjs 

avToia-8€ii^oue(f)aiveTOTa8a[. . . avTois Seivbu i^aivero, to. 8' d[XXa 

8ia/x€crov Sia fiecrov. 

10 KaTa^vpo-Taae[,]<TT[.]y€ivofX€vo[. . . 21. 3. Kara |u<rTdo'€[i]s t[€] 'yi'YV(5|XCVo[i* 

avvT<JTaiJiivoL(TvvaTpi(f)op.€vo[. . avuicTTafxevoi, avaTpccpofxevoli 

KaTafxcpr) KaTa p-iprj. 

(oa-eKaaToacopyrjTO co(T€/ca<7To[.]a)[. . . WS €Kao"TOS cSp-ynTO' coy eKaaTol^] Q)[pi- 

yeTO€7r[.]0vp€i€i'€Vioi(r8€ypa(p[. . . y^TO, eTT[€]6vp€t. kv kvioL^ 8e ypa0[e- 

15 Tai(opfjiT}TO Tai &ppr]TO. 

evcppvyLOicr T07Toa8r]povadpoi'eco[. . 22. 2. €V ^pU'yiois* tottos 8rjjxov AOfiov€co[v. 

TiXeiifCTcovLmrecov TaypaTLv[. . TeXei evl tcov linrtcov TayfxaTi, v[vv 

p€vSop7rov€X€(xO€KaTaa'Tpa[.]oi'[. . fi\v 8bp-nov eAeu^e KaTa (TTpa^j^v 

(PTeXeeaai if TeXicaa-i. 

20 (jiapaaXionrcipda-iot a7r[.]Trr}p€iaaTa[. . 22. 3. ^apcdXioi neipdorioi* a7r[o] TIripeLas, Ta[s 

euTTT] p€irjLOp€'^apy[ iu IlrjpeiT} Opiyjr' dpy[vp6To^o?. dfxap- 

Tavovcn8€OLypa[ Tavovai 8\ 01 ypd[(povT€9 Uapdai- 

o[.'\i<rTLvyapTr]aapK[ o[t,] i<TTiv yap Trj^ 'ApK[a8ias. 

dpavT^cr a7rapavT(a-[. . . .]TavTio- 23. i. dpaVT€S' dTrdpavT^s, \diro&\TdvTG^. 

25 TrapiovTe[.]8ea)pa>TTo[. . . .]opLocr 23. 3. 'irapi6vT€[s] 6€ 'J2pa)Tr6[v fi€0]6pio9 

yr](r^oico[. . .]Kaia6r^u[. . . ■]g-Tiv > y^s Boia)[Tcov] Kal 'AOr]v[aiQ>v e]<rT/V, 



128 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[odei/ r]fji^icr]fiT]rT](Tap [7roXX]a/cts 
[. . .]ov [avT]ov. 

[ ]a[. . . .]8av[ ]oia6r][. 24. i. [dvaxa)p'n(7]d[vTcov] 8' av[TS>v] ol 'A6t|- 



Some columns lost. 



35. 



10 



Col. xiv ( 

]yTr)KOT(oi'apae 34 

]aiT0Vfxapa6(oi^a 

]cf)LO(r 

[ ]SpL7roXXa>i'apeTa(r 

5 [ ^^yreKai^eipoyei 

[ ]r]i/ai Kaifirjeuevi 

[ ] • 7oy[ ]aTro 

[ ]vTa(rapeTa(TKivSvv€[. 

[ ]TrovTiKaLKaKa)aToiov 

[ ]ani(TTev€(r6aLa)crai' > 

[ I'TTT? 

]fieTpia>a€nr€Li^ > 



[• 



35- 



[. 



.]KaLiKai^cocr 



[ ]oKr](n(TTr]aa\r] 

15 [ ]v(TKoXove(rriu 

[ jirpayfiaTifMO 

[ ]aauTroXr] > 

[ ]aiSva-KoXou 

[ ]7rL<TT€LTai 



20 



[• 



[• 



]ov7rpayfxa 

]8o^aKai 

[ ]T9^'[']' 

[ ] 

[ ]Xeova(e 

25 [ ]Tr)vav > 

[ ]00VVT€a 

[ ]/XiO-€t 



= G col. i). 

5. [ TeTeX€]vTT]K6TC0V. dp<Te- 

[vik5)^ 8\ Xeyov'\(n tov M.apa65>va. 
[ e7rira]0toy. 

1. [Kal |xt| 6V €vl dv]5pl TToXXwv dp€Tds 

[Klv8uV€V€0-9ai] €\» T€ Kttl X^^P^V cl- 

[ttovti TTKrTevGJTJvai' kol p-rj kv iul 

[dvSpl ....]. crov[ ] ccTTO- 

\6av6vT(£>\v ras dperas Kiv8vv€\y- 

[UV €U ilJTTOVTl Kal KaKOOS TOIOV- 

[TOTp67rov]s TTiCTTiveaOai coy dv 
[0VT09 ejiTTT;. 

2. [xaXeirov "ydp to] jxcTpicos elireiv 

[ ] Kal LKavcos. 

[kv « [ioXis Kal f) SJOKTICIS TTJS dXi]- 
[Beias pepaiovxaf S]vaKoX6i/ kcrriv 

[ ] irpdypiaTL jxo- 

[ ]ay vTToXrj- 

[%//• ]at 8vaKoXov 

[ d'\in(XTe'iTai 

[ r'\ov TTpdyp-a- 

[roy ] 86^a Kal 

[ • • • ']'rov . [.] . 



[. 



.] 



[8 T€ dTTCipds c(rTiv d Kal irjXcovdl^e- 
[cr6ai 6id (JjBovov ct tl tiircp] tt]v aii- 
[tov <))ijcriv dKovoi' ol dyp]oovi'Tes 

[ V0]p.L(r€l' 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



129 



30 



[ ]uTLva, 

[ '\vyapTO 

[ '\KaaTO(r 

[ • • -Jjyyf.'^ai 

[ ]v^ovXr] 

[ jeTTi > > 

[ JCTTOV 



[av av ] €iTiva 

[ ]f yap TO 

[ e]^ao-Toy 

[ ]^yeTTaL 

[Tr€ipdo-6aL v[lS>v ttjs ^KdcTTo]!) PouXtj- 

[0'€(OS T€ Kal Sdl-qS TUX^LV WS] €111 
[ttXcIO'TOV €Kd]aTOV 



4 lines lost. 



10 



Col. XV (: 

[. . .]aiouyapai^ 

[. .]KaiOl'TT[. .]ll'€ipr]K[.]v . [. . . .JTT . [. 
aVTlT0VTr[.]0(Tr]K0U 

Ka6^aT7}Kvia[.]r]XiKiai evTTjnrapa . rjiTav 

5 Kaiopofiafi€i'SiaTOiJir]€croXiyov(r 
aX\€[.]nX€iova(ToiKeivSr]fxoKpaTia 
K€kX[. .]ai ovTrapaTOTToXXova-oLKiiv 
yLvf:\. .]i8r]ixoKpaTiaa[.]XaToiovTOu 
Xey€iSiaTO/xr]upo(ro[.]Lyap)(tav > 
SLOiKCiadairanpaypaTaaXXado- 
[. ,]TOV7rXr]6ovaavfX(f>€pov 
/x.eT([.]TLS€KaTa/j,€UTovauopov(r 
npocTTaiSiaSidcpopaTraaiToicrouKa 
TaSerr]i'a^i(0(ni'co(T€KaaTO(rej/Tcoi 
15 €vSoKLp€LovKa7rofjL€povcrro7rXeo[. 
SLa(popavvvTaSiacf)epouTa/JL[. 
Teyov(nBenavT^(XKaTapevTOV(T 
vofxova-evToial'SioKravfi^oXail. .](r 
'Ccrr]yopLa(TKaTa8iTr]va^Lav(iiaev 
20 TLVL^K\.'\fTToaXainTpo(Tvop.i(eTai 
€VTo[.](TKoivoia-oyKaTaTopepocrTO 
€7nPaXXouLcroi'avTa)iTr](r7r[. .]iT€i 
a(T7rpo(TTOKOLyoi'T[.]paTaiaXXa > 



= G col. ii). 

36. I. [SiKJaiov "YcLp axi[TOLS Kal Trpcuov Se 

[Si]Kaioi/ 7r[dX]Lu €'ipr]K[ey .[... .]tt . [. 
dvrl rov tt\^p\o<tt)Kov. 

36. 3. KaSecTTTiKuia -f^XiKia* kv rfj 7rapa{Kp)fj 

ravT{ri). 

37. I. Kal ovojxa [xev 8id to |xti €S oXi-yous 

dXX' €[s] TrXciovas oIk€iv SinxoKpaxia 
K€KX['tiT]ai* ov napa to ttoXXovs oiKetu 
yiue[Ta]i Srj/xoKpaTia, a[A]Xa toiovtov 
Xiyei Sia to prj Trpoy 6[X]iyap)(^iau 
SiOLKeicrdai to. npdy/xaTa dXXa eh 
[to\ tov 7rXrj6ovs avp.<pepoy. 
|16T€[o']ti 8€ Kara jxtv tovs vojjlous 
irpos rd tSia 8id(J)opa iraari to taov, Ka- 

Td 8c TT^V d|lC0O-lV cbs tKaO-TOS €V T(0 

cti8oKt|X€L ovK diro |X£pOl)S TO TrX€o[v 

8id(popd vvv TO, Siacpepoi'Ta' /i[e- 
Te-^ovai Se irdvTes KaTO, fiev tovs 
pofiov? kv ToTs iStois crvp^oXai[oL]s 
la-qyoptas, KaTO. Se ttju d^iav coy ev 
TLvi eA:[a](rTOS Xafxirpos vo/xi^eTai 
kv To[r]s' Koivois, ov KaTO, TO jiepos TO 
km^dXXov tcrov avT(o t^9 7t[oX]it€i- 
as Trpbs to kolvov T[L]paTai dXXa 



K 



130 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



25 



SiaTT]uapiTri[ ] . ^[.^piTcoi^oi 

[.] . k[. . . .]e .[ yra^LV 

[ ]eKaorToa 

[ 

[ 



30 



35 



[• 



]uuoficoj/ 

liapeTT] > 

]<^ 

]tokoivov 

]v7rpo(r > 

. .]/fa0[. . .]pav€7nTr] 
. .]^iau[. . .]iopyr]<r > > 
. .]8our][.]Spari€)(^ov 
](r(l>T](ni^noX[.]TevofjLe6a 
.]voL(rKai7r[. .]<TaXXTj > 
.YtOrju^paviTnTt] > > 
, . .JxfTroTrreucrovreo- 



Blcl TTjv dpeTr][i/ ^ e/c r]oop [ci]p€Tcoy 01- 

[•]•'<[ ]f • [ ]pTaiLu 

[ ] €KaaT09 

[ Ta>]u vojicnv 

[ > ^P^T^ 

[ ; ]^. 

37. 2. [tXeuGepcos 5e rd re irpos] to koivov 

[TToXiTevoixev Kal €S tt|]v irpos 

[d\\T|\ous Twv] Ka6' [Ti|xe]pav eiriTTi- 

[5€U|xdT(ov '0Tro]4;iav [ov 8]l' op-yfis 

[tov TreXas €l Ka6' ti]8ovti[v] 8pa ti c'xov- 

[t£S* eXeu^epcojy (prjolv 7roX[£]rei;6/ze^a 

\iv re T0?9 kol]uo?^ Kal 7r[po]y dWiq- 

[\ov9 kv Tols K\a6^ rjiiepav iiriTT]- 

[Sevfiaaii^ ot-ji^ v7roTrT€v{ajoi^T€9 



10 



Col. xvi (= G col. iii). 

To[. . . .]a<TovSopy[ 

7rp[. . . .]ovt]vt[. 

ov8e[.]^T)fjLiov[ ]t]1. 

oylr[. .]a)^6r]Sova.[ ] 

ovXvnov/iei/ . [. .]y . . [ ]flr 

ToiaT]Se(X)<7Sia[. . .]cnvo[ ^P^H-^^ 

^rjHiaaTri(TKaTa[.'\Keiv[. . . .]oPKa 
Tr)yop[. .] . [.']i7rpo(TTifioy[. .]ey6ep(09 
^r)j/e[. . .]peTrofj.€vaXXa)aSe(K 
TOV . . [. . .'\ayBoixivoiKai^aaKaLvov 

T6(re7r[. . . J\aXX(ovr]8ovai(r8iaTeXov'^ 



au€Tra[. . .]cr8€Tai8ia7rpo(TOfj.iXovi/ 
T€(TTa8[. . .]oaia8ia8ioa/jLaXi(rTaov 
7rapavofi[. .]fi€v ivToio-iBtoKraiTXl. 
15 aT€poi^[. . .]r]Xoia-avi^oi'T€(7€VTotar 
KOivoia[. . .]apa)aKaii'opijicocnro 



37- 3- 



Plate IV. 

Tolv TreAjay ov8' 6py[i^6fX€uoi €t 

7r/j[oy rj8]ovt]i' t[l 8pa. 
oiibk [d]l^T||iiot)[s iJiev XvTTTjpds Se t]-^ 
6\|/[€i] dx6T|56va[s irpoo-TtGefjievoi-] 

ov XvTTOVpev . [. .Ju . . [ ]? 

roh rjBecos 8ia[iTa)]<nu, o[u5e cc'^]pi p\v 
^rifxta^ Tr}s Kara [k'\KiLv[(iov , ol^ov Ka- 
Tr]yop[ca9] K[a]i TrpoaTifiov, [eXyvdepco? 
(r]v e[7rir]pe7rojueF, aXXcos 8e e/c 
TOV ..[...] d-^dofxeuoi Kal jBaaKaivov- 

rey e7r[i Tah] dXXcov r]8oi^ah 8iaTe- 
Xoi)//(€i/). 
dv€ira[x6to]s Se rd i8ia irpoo-oiJLiXovv- 
Tes xd 8[T|}jL]6o-ta 8id 8€os |xdXio-Ta ov 
irapavo|i[o€]|i€V er T019 181019 d7rX[ov- 
(TTepov [aXXj^Xoiy avv6vTe9 kv T0T9 
Koivols [ei^XjayScSy Kal vofitpcas tto- 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



131 



20 



XLTevo[. .'\6a 
TCoi^T€a[.]€i€i'ap)(^r]iouTQ)vaKpoaa€i 

T(oiKaT[.]Kov€ivKa[.]irii6€(T0aiToia- 

ap)(ov[. .]v 
Kai$uacaicr[. . .]Tr](noicr oiovSioXovroverova 38. !• Kal Guaiats [5i€]TT|(riois* ofoi' 81 oXov tov 

ToXvTrr] pop[. .]nXr](ra-ei e^aipeiTau^ayei 



XiTev6[fj.e]6a. 
Ttov T€ a[L]€l €V cipx^TJ ovTwv aKpodcei* 
TO) KaT[a]Kov€Lv Ka[i] irdOiO-Oai to?s 
dp^ov[(ny. 



'irov9. 



rr]VTiyap[. .'^ivKOLvrjvTrape^o > 
p.ev a/f[. . . .]Xi^€iXaK€8aipoi/iovar 
25 ai/€iiJ.ev[. .]SLaira)p.e6a ovKavTi 
rovapy]^. .'\aXXaa8^(oa- 
/faiTOt€t[. . .]vfiLai/J.aXXoyr]Trovcov 

p.€X€Trjl[. . .]fJ.1]/.t€TaU0/J.a)VT07rX€ 

ovr]TpoTr[. .]ap8p€iaa€$eXop.€u > 
30 KivSvi'el. . . .]Tr€piyLyi'€TaLT]iJ.ii/ 
Toi(TT€p[. . . .\vcnvaXy eivoLor jJi-q > 
7rpoKaiiv[. . .]Kai€aavTa€Xdovaiu 
p.r]aToXp[. . .]ovaTa)uaL€i/j.o)(^dovu 
Tcoy(paiu[. . . .]i KaiToi€[.]€i/aue<T€L 
35 fiaXXoi>[. . . .]aLaT<our][.]^a>/j.eu 
fir]KaK[. . .]6ovvT€crTrjiacrKT]crei 
lxrj8viroi'op.covavayKa(oiie 
i'OLaXXaSLaTrji^e/jL(pvTo[.]ai^8pei 



TO XuTTTipov [cKJirXTJaaef k^aip^Tai, 
eidyet. 
39. I. Ti^v T€ "ydp [ttojXiv koivt^v irapexo- 
|X€V a/c[po/3o]A/'(^et AaKe8aL[j.oviov9. 

dv€L(JL€V[cOS] 6iaLTtO|X€9a* OVK dvTL 

TOV dpy\S)^] dXXd d8eS>s. 
39. 4. KaiTOL el [pa6]i)|JLia [idWov 11 irdvoiv 
pieXeTTi [Kal] ^y\ |X€Td v6p,(ov to irXe- 
ov 11 Tp6u[tov] dvSpcias cOeXop-ev 
KLV5UV€['U€IV] TTcpi'yi'YveTaL f)p,LV 
Tois T6 pL[€XXo]uaiv dX-yeivoLS p.T| 
'TrpoKdp.v[€Lv] Kal Is atiTd IXQovcnv 
p,T| dToX[ji[oT£p]oi)9 Tcov aUl ptoxQoTJV- 
TWV <J)aiv[€a0a]i' KaiTOi e[/] kv dvea-ei. 
/xaXXou [kuI p]acrTcovr) ^wfxev 
/JLT) KaK[oTra]6ovt/re9 rrj dcrKrjacL 
fjLTjS' VTTO vojxcdv di^ayKa^ofxe- 
vol dXXd Slo, ttju ejX(pvT6[y] du8pd- 



Col. xvii ( = G col. iv). Plate IV. 

aVVTT0\ '\tOV(TKLv8vVOV(T av V7ro[(p€pOVT€9] T0V9 KLv8vV0V9, 

[. . ■]ie(rr[ ^pT0[>v8eLvaiv > [mpY^crryLv r}p.ds tt/jJo tS>v 8eivS)v 

[ ^aiKaLecTTOvcTKLv [/XTj raXai7ra)pua6]aL Kal ey tov9 klv- 

[ ]avTa(TjX-qavav8\.\q \8vvov^ dTravTrja]p.vTas fir) duau8[p]o' 

T[.]povaTQ}vai€LKaKOTra6ovvT<ov T[i]pov9 Ta>u alel KaKonaOovvToov 

(paiuea6aL0i{xevyapXaK0DvecrauL (baiv^aOaL. ol p\v ydp AdKooue^ aUl 

Trov€LvvTroTa>vvopoi>vrjvayKa irovw vno t5)v fopcou rjvayKd- 

Cov700L8aQr]vaLonrapaTova-KLV C^vto, ol 8' 'A6i]vaLoi napd tovs klv- 

K 2 



132 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

SvVOVaiTOVOVVTO SvVOVS klTOVOVVTO. 

V 

lo TrXovTcoLTecpyo^i/^HaXXovKaipooLTjXo 40. i. irXovTW t€ tp'you |JLdX\ov Kaipw r\ X6- 

yovKO/jLTTcoiXfjco/MiOa onXovToarjixoiv "you KOiiirw XP'^R^Q^,* ttXovtos rjjj.a)i/ 

€7nTa>ve[. .]oou€PKaipccL(paiveTaL > im Tcov e^^pyjcor e/^ KaipZ (jiaLViTai, 

ovXoycov\. . .^^^oveLaiXeyofiivuXovTHv ov X6y(ov \^a,Xd\(ou€La Xeyo/xev ttXovt^Iv. 

KaLTOTrev[. . . .'\Lov)(oiioXoy^LVTLVLaL Kal to 'Tr£v[€(r0a]t ov\ oiioXo-ycLV tlvi al- 

15 o-;(yooj/aXXa[. . .]8La(pevy€iy€pycoiaicr^eLov <yxpbv ctXXd [|jit|] 8ia(|)€TJ'Y€iv ep-yco aiaxiov 

ov^co<TKaLT[. .]iTeyea6aiaLa-XpovavTcoi ovy(^ d)? /cat t[ov] niueaSai alay^pov avT(o 

Xeyofi€i^ovaX[. . . .^vKpiTLKOvavTL > Xeyofxii/ov, dX[Xa av]yKpLTiKov olvtI 

aTrXovT€$€LK[. . . .](TOfir)po(rai6i8e anXov Ti6€iK[€v, cbjy "O/xijpos alel Sh 

P€coT€poia(J)p[. . . .jvaiu vecorepoi d(pp[a8io]vcriv. 

20 ei're[.]o[. .]avTOL[ ]icopajj.aKaL7roXi 40. 2. €V T€ [t]o[ls] a'iiToi[s olK€]i(dV a[JLa Kal iroXi- 

rcK(ope7n/ji€Xia[. . . .]TepoL<j7rpoaepya tlkwv liriixtXcia [Kal €]T€pois irpos cp'Yci 

T€TpaflfX(yoia[ yLKafirjevSe T€Tpa|JL}JL€VOlS [tcI TroXl]TlKd |XT| €V5€- 

coaypcouai 6X[ ]TOV7rap)(^eioiov ws "Yvwyai" eX[Xi7rey] to virdp-^H, olov 

(.vroi(TavTOL(j[ ]ai.i^€(TTivTcoi/ kv TOi? avToTs [dj/8pd](nu karlv tS>v 

25 ref5icoj/KatT[ ^ivcavKaTa > re 18l(ov Kal t[S)U Ko\Lva)y Kara 

Tr]UTToXivT]e[. . . .]eXeiaKaieT€ ttju ttoXlv rj e[7ri;i]eXeia, Kal iri- 

poio-€aTnTpoa-e[. . . ,]piiT]KocnTaTr](r poi9 ea-rl Trpoy ([pya Qj]pfir]K6aL to, ttjs 

yecopyiaaKairanl. . . .]iKap,r]8ev > yecopyias Kal to. 7r[oXiT]t/ca /j,t]8€v 

7]TTOi^8Layiu[. . . .]€iv rJTTOv 5iayfi/[c6a-/c]efi'. 

30 KaiavToiT]TOiKpi[. . . .]vyeT]€v6v Kal avTol tjtoi Kpi[vo|X€]v "ye r\ IvGu- 

p.ov/j.(6aop$cio[ ]ay/xaTaKpii'o jiovixcSa 6p0ca[s xd iTp]d'Y[JLaTa' Kptvo- 

fxei' oioue7nKpi[. . . .ycocreTepcou /xey ohv e7nKpi[vo/xe]u djy irepcoi/ 

evpovTCou evp6vT(£)V. 

8ia(p€poi'Tco<Tyap[. . . .]8€e^ofX€u 40. 3. 8La4)€p6vT<os "ydp [Si] t6]8€ €)(0|X€v 

35 a>aT€ToXjxavT€a[. . . .'^fxa[. . . .]aKaL wcrT€ ToX)xdv T€ a['iiTol] jJid[Xio-T]a Kal 

7r€piQ>ue7rL)(ei.[ ]i^€ TTcpl wv €'TriX€i[pT)o-op,€V cKXc-yjil^e- 

cr6aioroia-aXX[ (xBar tois dXX[ois djiaOia \i.€V Spdaos, 

Col. xviii ( = G col. v). 

Xo[ Xo['Yl(r|JL6s §€ OKVOV ()>€p€l' 

o[ o[ 

r[ r[ 



853. 



ai'6p[ 

a/xaX[ 

/jiei/o[ 



lo 



ovTecr, 



L 



a7r€ipi[ 

KaiKad€K[ 
avrovav]^ 
1 5 (TTavd^ 

(TTaveVTf3[ 

K€cnrap€)([ 
a6rivaLo[ 

20 TCocr//aXi[ 
iavTova[ 
TvapaayoL^ 

T0VWK0\[ 

lxovr]yapr[ 

25 (T(i)V€aiTiLp[ 

KpeL(T(T(i)v[ 

vr)yapTre[ 
yoovevToi[ 
KaiiJ.opr]T[ 

30 TCOUOVKal 

S€€(rTepco[ 

TC0VV7rT][ 

apxrjaoi^ 

OVTeT60LVn[ 

35 a7roKoivo[ 
TO€-^€iovr[ 
KaTd/xe/j.ylr[ 



COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 133 

'' r 

oi're? [ 
a7reipi[ 

40. 5. dStws Ti[va d)<j)€Xov|i,€V 

41. I. Kal Ka9' €K[ao-Tov 8ok€iv dv |jloi tov 

a-uTov dv[8pa irap' fi|xcbv IttI irXei- 

(TT* dv €l6['tl Kal JJL€Td )(^apLT(OV |id\l- 

(tt' dv €'i)Tp[a'ir€X(os to <rw|jia avrap- 

K€S irapexL^o'SaL' 

'AQr]valo\^ kru 

TrXeTara ([I'Sr] yapuv- 

TC09 /xdXi[aTa 

iavTov a[v avrapKr] tco aaifjiaTi 

irapda-yoL. [eurpaTreAooy 8\ dvrl 

41. 3. iidvT] "ydp T[tov vvv dKofjs Kpeio-- 

cwv €S Treip[av tpxcTai* 

Kpdaa-odv [ fi(h 

vrj yhp 7re[ T(iiV \o- 

yoav kv roi\^ 'ipyois 

KoX /XOUT] r[oSl/ TToX^fMLOOU 

Tcov ovK d[yaudKTT](nv €)(€i a>s kv 

S€€(TTepci)[9 ovSe 

t5>v VTrr)\K6a>v cos Trjs 

dpyfi^ ov[K d^ia ovaa. 

OVT€ TW Vir[T|K6(0 KaTd|X€|i\|flV 

ttTTO KOlVO[v XrjTTTioU 

TO ^X€i. ovt[€ dyavdKTrjaiv ovt€ 
KaTd/xc/jLyj/liu e^ei. 
Some columns lost. 



134 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Col. xix ( = H). 



[ ]0f(rea)(r [. . 

[  .]a)(ia-Toi/a[.]eT[. . 

[ ]appeo-iAcXeo<r77[. . 

[ ^vcrvvSecrixov . [. . 

5 [ ]aVTlTOVKCUT€[. . 

[ ]fJi€ya)\aov(rooj^[ 

[ ]\€a6aia7roKoiu[ 

[ ]\rjTrTeoi'TO(pv[ 

[ ](pvaeQ)creXa^L(TTo[ 

10 [ ]fj.r]\l/oyov7rapa > 

[ ]'^^[' •]<J'^KCctr]<Tai/ 

[ ]Xeocrfjn€pt.ap€ > 

[ .]oyovei'Totcrav[.]pa[ 

[ ]Ka<TST]\oyor[.]no 

15 [ ]aTOVUor]paro[.]Trap[ 

[ ]So^aTaiayvt/[. . . . 

[ ](pai'T]j/aiTr][. , . . 

[ ]Kanrapa[ 



[ ] (f)vcr€009. 

45. 2. [i] 56|a Kttl r\s dv eir' €\]dxLO'Tov d[p]€T[f]S 
[irepi r\ y\f6yov Iv tols] appecL kXcos ""■ 
[ ]v avvSea-fjLou . [. . 

[ TO 7]\ aVTl TOV Kai T€[o€l- 

[kcv "Ofxr]po9 Pov\6\ji eyo) Xaov aoov 
[tfifXivaL rj d7ro]\ia6aL. (XTro koiu[ov 

[8k ] Xrjirrkov to (f)V- 

[crecos ] (f)va€Q)S eXa^to"ro[i/ 

[ ] fXTj yj/oyov wapa 

[ ] ^X[€o]? rj Kol ^? av 

\kir kXayjiarov /cjXeoy ?/ mpl dpe- 

[r^y i//-]oyoy ev rois du[S]pd- 

[ai yvuai^Ka^ Sr]Xoi^6T[i] tto- 

[ ]a TOV i/OJ7/zaro[y] TTap[a 

[ ] 86^a Tai9 ywlai^i 

[ ] (pavrjuaL tt][. . . . 

[ ] Kal 7rapa[ 





Unplaced 


Frag 


:ments. 






{a) 


To Cols. 


• • 

l-Vl. 




Fr. 3. 










Fr. 3. 


• • 

(Suva 










• • • 

' i8vva[ 
'. ^i^PX^. 


KaiTTO 










Kai TTO 


• • 










• • 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



135 



{b) To Cols, viii-xiii. 

Fr. 4. Fr. 5. Fr. 4. 

'\aTpi8a\_ ... (?) 7r]aTptSa [ 

]a(rapeT[ ]Tr]i Jay a/3€7[as' 

]o-rir'o[ ] . cr eJor^V o[ 

](rarT[ ] . ]o-arT[ 



Fr. 5. 

]ray 

]-^ 
]• 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 7. 



Fr. 8. 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 7. 



Fr. 8. 



J • 


a 


(i'e[ 


]KaTe[. 


[ > 


. ov[ 


ySia 


]aL 


• • 



iyo[. . 


a 


iv^ 


KaTe[. 




. ov[ 


V Sia 


at 


• 



Fr. 9. 



(^) To Cols, viii-xix. 
Fr. 10. Fr. 9. 



Fr. JO. 



• 


]•?[ 


Tvep . 


//a^; 


eo-^ . . ; 


' rjTCoarTi [ 


vrov 

J. . • L 


VTO-qS' 


] . at 


]j/T€o- \ 



].[ 


].< 


7re/) .  


]/^a^ 


]6o-d . . ; 


"?;T<»y ri[ 


rro// 


uro i75[ 


] . at[ 


' VT^^ ', 



Fr. II. 



Fr. 12. 



Fr. 13. 



• • 



Fr. II. 



Fr. 12. 



Fr. 13. 





• • 


* 




[•]•[ 


• 


]TOfJ.a.VT 


l^[ 


]0o[ 


]to [iavT 


lA 


]0o[ 


' po[.]€Tr 


V • ! 


]•[ 


po[J\ e7r[ 


V • [ 


]•[ 


]t 


'•¥. 


• • 


M 


Av. 


• 



136 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 14 (to col. XV ?). 



]lvk 


]eo) . [ 


' vrOL(Tl[ 


jo-aXr; 


]oft)^e[ 


]e . [ 


erovS 


• • . < 


5 '\TaL . \ 





{d) To Cols, xiv-xix. 
Fr. 15. Fr. 14. 



'\0(i>V €[ 

]e TovS[ 
]TaL . [ 



Fr. 15. 

• • • 

]ea) . [ 
]? a\rii[ 



• -• 





{e) Uncertain 


Fr. 16. 


Fr. 17. 


• • • 


• • • 

Ka\\[ 


]/j.aT' 


\ . VTocr 


]p4[ 


. vaa-TTj' 


Xia-Ta 


"Kvaa 


5 ] . cikul' 


5 ]avTL \ 


yvTT 


* 


]80T 


• • • 



Fr. 16. 

]'P[ 
]fiaT[ 

fid]\iaTa [ 
]€L Kai [ 
]vv7r[ 
]8ot[ 



Fr. 17. 

• • • 

] /caXA[ 
] . vTOcr[ 

]Xv<Ta[ 
] dvTL [ 



Fr. 18. 



• • 



Fr. 19. 



Fr. 20. 



' aXo 




a 




o-a[ 

• • 


]P'[ 


v. 21. 


Fr. 22. 


Fr. 23. 


• • • 


• • 
J • • L 


• • 


. ac^o 


yp[ 


• • 


• • • 


'.f^v. 





Fr. 18. 

• • • 

]aXo[ 

]..4 



Fr 21 



Fr. 19. 

• • 

aia[ 



tra 



[ 



Fr. 22. 



].[ 


]a(T 


] . a^o 


M 


• • • 


firj 



Fr. 20. 



• • 



a 


• • 


Fr. 23. 


• • 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 137 

Fr. 24. Fr. 25. Fr. 24. Fr 25. 

• • ••• «• •• 

lfP[ ] • f7r[ ]^/'[ ] • ^'^[ 



i. 1-3. A note on ev0ev8e. 6[noia>s Ka]l (so W(ilamowitz)-M(6llendorflf) and Bury) t6 evOa 
means that i'vOa is sometimes used in a temporal sense like ivdevde. Cf. Hesych. s. v. evda 
and Bekker, Anecd. i. p. 250. 32 ivBevhe' rJToi tottikov (o-tiv ... 77 ;^poi'tK6i/ . . . Our author, 
interpreting ivBivhe in a temporal sense, thus avoided the wrong explanation of it given by 

Schol., OTTO TTjcrhe ttjs alrias. 

6-7. [yeypaTTJrai S' : SO most MSS. (Se), Stuart Jones ; Koi yeypanTai C, liude. For the 
alternative reading 6epr] . . . ;^et/[icoras there is no MS. authority, and it may be merely due 

to dfpr] Koi x^niavas in 1. 15. 

i. 7 — -iv. I. ' Dionysius of Halicarnassus in his treatise on Thucydides blames Thucydides 
on a few grounds, and discusses three chief points, first that he has not fixed his dates by 
archons and Olympiads, like other historians, but according to a system of his own by 
summers and winters ; secondly that he has disturbed and divided the narrative and breaks 
up the events, not completing his accounts of the several incidents, but turning from one 
subject to another before he has finished with it ; and thirdly that although he declares, as 
the result of his own elaborate examination, the true cause of the war to be this, that it was 
precaution against the power of the Athenians which induced the Lacedaemonians to make 
war on them, not really the Corcyrean or Potidaean affairs or the causes generally 
alleged, nevertheless he does not begin at the point which he has chosen and start with the 
events which led to the growth of Athens after the Persian war, but reverts to the commonly 
accepted causes. Such is Dionysius' view ; but in opposition to this rash criticism one 
might reasonably retort that . . . For the system of dating by archons and Olympiads had 
not yet come into common use ... (it was impossible) to relate Plataean affairs from first to 
last, and then go back to describe all the invasions of the Peloponnesians one after the other, 
and Corcyrean affairs continuously, differing as they did in date ; for he would have thrown 
everything into confusion, or turned back again to periods which he had treated, in a fashion 
both unsuitable and unreasonable. For he was not dealing with a single subject or events at 
one time or one place, but with many subjects in many places and at many periods. Moreover, 
even if he had dated by archons, he would still have been obliged to divide the events, for these 
occurred some under one archon, some under another ; it is when a person is only writing 
about a single subject that his narrative is continuous throughout. Hence Dionysius 
contradicts himself; for even if Thucydides ought to have dated by the archons, as he asserts, 
he would have been equally obliged to divide events according to the archons. If, however, 
the events are connected and the chronology offers no obstacle, Thucydides' narrative is 
continuous, as for instance ... in the seventh book ... As for the charge that Thucydides 
has not made the beginning of his history start with the growth of the Athenians, which he 
asserts was the truer cause of the war, in the first place it must be remarked that it was not 
his intention, after setting out to write a history of the Peloponnesian war, to introduce by 
way of a supplement several other wars since the Persian war itself, which may almost be 
regarded as the origin of the growth of Athens ; for that would have lain altogether outside 



138 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

his subject. Secondly it must be remembered that it is the duty of every historian to 
describe accurately first of all the obvious and commonly alleged causes of events, and if he 
suspects the existence of any more obscure reasons (to add these afterwards . . .).' 

i. 8-9. iv rw TTfpi eot;Ku6/So[v] crvvTiiyiJiaTi: of the two extant MSS. of this treatise one 
has no title, the other has eVi nepi QovKvblhov nXarvTepov, this book following upon the I^p. ad 
Cn. Pomp. 

11-34. The passage of Dionysius here summarized is De Thucyd. lud. ed. 
Radermacher, pp. 335 sqq. (cc. 9-12). Of Dionysius' three objections, the first, relating 
to the division into summers and winters (11. 12-15), corresponds to 335. 20-336. 12, the 
second, concerning the want of connexion (11. 15-20), to 336. 12-338. 3, and the third, 
concerning the causes of the war (11. 21-33), to 338. 4-343. 4. On the first two points 
similar criticisms are also made, but more briefly, in the same author's Ep. ad Cn. Pomp. 

C. 3, and by Theon, Progymn. pp. 184—5 """^P fyKoKova-i nves ra GovkuSi'Si^. SifXcbv yap K.T.X., 
and Doxopater, ad Aphthon. ii. p. 220 tovtq yovv kox t6v QovkvBlStjv Tives alriatPTai Kot Tav 
TTpo rjfiuiv, OTL Kara 6epos Koi tov )(^€ip.5>va k.t.\. 

2 2. For the correction of en-twi/ to enviov, suggested by W-M, cf. Dionys. op. cit. c. 10 

(p. 338) Toy alrias jSov^erai npcoTOV elireiv d(^' hv rrjv dp^rjv eXajSf. 

ii. 7-8. The restorations didOecns (or dialpeais) and oi/'ttcd iyeyovei are due to Bury, who in 

11, 8-9 suggests oil k[oiv6s Xoyia-fios ^]v (cf. 1. 4). 

ID. \vTov is very likely a]vTov, referring to Herodotus. Bury suggests eV Tfji ^v^Xai as 
the preceding words. 

II. Perhaps Kara roVojus, as Bury suggests; cf. Dionys. op. cit. c. 9 Tajj/ Trph avTov 

yevopevoiv (Tvyypa(peuiv ^ Kara ronovs p-tpL^ovTcov rds dvaypa(})as k.t.X. 

15. The construction of 11. 15-7 is not certain. W-M, who proposed [Sif^eX^di/jra in 
I. 17, would supply something like ov yap ^1/ in 1. 15; Bury, reading [elpeiv Trdv]Ta in 1. 17, 

would restore 11. 13—5 olov rfi | tov [TroXe/xow dp)(ff\ f[a(r]as tovs Y^Orjvaiovs to. /xeV] nXa[r]tuKa k.t.X, 

The vestiges of writing before [. .jaorovy, however, do not suit e : if not o or a, they are 
probably parts of two letters, e. g. ai or X»;. 

19. A conjunction, i.e. 8e or re, seems to have been omitted through ypdi^eti/ being 
wrongly connected with what follows. 

31. Tavra: Or raiird, i.e. affairs belonging to the same series, which is preferred 
by Bury. 

iii. 3-5. i4)f^]fjs and (Tvv[(X('>i were suggested by W-M and Bury, rfj C presumably 
refers to the seventh, not the sixth, book of Thucydides. That in reckoning the eight books 
our author's notation followed the letters of the alphabet, as in the books of Homer, rather 
than the numerals is unlikely, though cf. iii. 10-5, note. The existing division of Thucydides' 
work into eight books was already known to Dionysius, who mentions the eighth in op. cit. 
c. 16, and though there were other ancient divisions of the work into nine or thirteen books, 
our author no doubt agreed with Dionysius in employing the system which Marcellinus ( Vit. 
Thuc. 58), quoting Asclepius, calls v nXfia-Tij Ka\ fj koivtj. 

5-6. Bury suggests rd 2tKfXi|Kd Str/yetjrat. 

8. The absence of a diaeresis above ]iKa makes it probable that the preceding letter 
was a consonant, e.g. 2i<eX tK«' rather than nXaraliKd. It does not seem possible to find 
a suitable second adjective ending in tKi[Ka, for Op]aiKi[Kd cannot be read, although the 
supposed o is very uncertain. Ka[T]oLKi[av or some part of KaroiKi^fiv is more probable, 
especially as KaT[oLK\ia . [ could be read in 1. 7. ]pot there seems to be an optative, possibly 
a-vi'ei]poi. In 11. 9-10 something hke ds] noXX[d]s K£0o[Xds p.(\n(piafj.(va f^](TdC(ip (Bury) is 
likely. 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 139 

10-5. The restorations in 11. 12-3 are due to Bury. It is tempting to read ia\ropiav in 
I, 14, but the stroke above t must then be ignored, for it is not a rough breathing. Since 
Herodotus' history contained only nine books, / in this context seems to mean the ninth 
book, the notation following the letters of the alphabet, while TTpoKdjxivrjv indicates that it 
had just been mentioned, possibly in 1. 1 2. But the narrative in the ninth book is particularly 
free from fiera^da-ecs, and we should expect the ninth book to be called 6' (cf iii. 3-5, note), 
so that the suggested explanation is not satisfactory. The passage in Dionysius which our 
author seems to have had in his mind is in op. cit. c. 9 (p. 336) oiVe yap toIsto'ttois eV oh al 

jrpd^eis eneTe\€crdT]crav aKciXovdcbv epepicre ras dirjyrjcrfis, cos 'HpoSoros re Kal'EXKdi'iKos k.t.X. ; cf. also 

the praise of Herodotus in c. 5. 

iv. 4-5. a]va ii((t[ou : there is probably a reference, as Dr. J. E. Sandys suggests, to 
what Quintilian (v. 12. 14) calls the Hovierka dispositio (cf. 1. 6 'Op^pD^ms), i.e. placing the 
weakest part of one's rhetorical forces in the middle (//. iv. 297-300); cf. Cic. Orator 50, 
Cornificius, Rhet.\\\. 10, 18, Quintil. vii. i. 10. 

10-4. Perhaps Ka^ovvrai in 1. 12 and eouKvS/]|S7;s in 1. 13. 

15-7. The restorations in 11. 16-7 are by W-M. The Homeric quotation is 
from B 504. 

18-31. This note is out of place and should have preceded that in 11. 15-7. In 1. 27 
Ti.vi\s is possible, but the doubtful letter is more like o. 

33-5. The first part of this note on depevoi, as was perceived by W-M and Bury, refers 
to the use of the middle for the active, dpeyl/dixevos being adduced as a parallel. 

V. I. dTro[d]ep(voi: dipevoi is wrongly explained by Schol. dvri tov nepidepfvoi iavTois. 

"Oprjpos' <jdK€ copoia-iv Wevro. dvor^Tov yap k.t.X. The correct interpretation given by our author 

is supported by Schol. Aeschin. i. 29 TaonXa pfj Tideaar to rideadai "Keyerai Kai enl rov dnoTiOe- 
adai TO. orrXa Kai eVc rov nepiridea-dai Ka\ ivbvecrQai, ws fyv(op(v iv rdis QovKvbibeiois iv tj) ^'. euravda 
8e im Toi) aTTOTidea-dai (corr. to nfpiTidea-dai by Reiske, but wrongly) Xeyf'. 
5- xp^""^"' • xpw^^^^'' MSS. 

7—8. Cf. Schol, iniTrjSeiois' TTpos (fiiXiav. 

12. els: is MSS., which, however, have the form rfea-av or ^'uaav here as elsewhere in 
place of the more correct jjiaav (i. e. rja-av) found in our author's text. Cf. the first century 
Thucydides papyrus from Oxyrhynchus (16), which in iii. 7 has anrjucrav with the variant 
anr]ta-av. The object of the note is to distinguish the Attic rjiaav with iota adscript from rjia-av 
as a trisyllable, the form found in Homer, &c. 

17-9. This is the only place where Thucydides uses the masculine form of o-kotos; the 
neuter occurs in Thuc. iii. 23 and viii. 42. The Clarendonianus and Aeneas Tact. 2 have 
o-Ko'rei in the present passage, but the papyrus supports the overwhelming majority of the MSS. 

21-2. fK(f)vy€(.v: so Parisinus 1735; eKcptvyeiv other MSS. The papyrus text agrees 
with most MSS. in reading oi noXXoi in place of ttoXXoi, the reading of A, which is preferred 
by many recent editors, but not by Stuart Jones. The construction of tov p.^ iK(f)fiiyeiv is 
difficult, and has been explained in several ways. Classen connects the words with ipndpovs, 
which is the most satisfactory view, while Poppo constructs them with haxovras as an infinitive 
of purpose * in order that they might not escape ', and Kriiger regarded the phrase as 
expressing the effect 'so that they could not escape', an explanation which produces 
a tautology with the following words wore BiecpdfipopTo ol Tro'KXoi Hude, following Herwerden, 
would omit tov pj] cKcfievyfiv altogether. Our author's criticism is not very illuminating. 
He remarks that either qjotc is redundant (11. 22-6) or else tov should be omitted and wore put 
in its place. Since he renders tov prj eKcfivye'iv by els t6 pfj iK<pvye'iv in the one case, and &aTe 
pT] iK^vytlv in the other, both his interpretations approximate to that of Kriiger rather than 
the rival explanations (unless els t6 means 'in respect of, in which case our author's first 



I40 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

explanation agrees with Classen's), but both seem to rest upon a misapprehension of the 
construction of the whole sentence. For the omission of wore or the transference of it to 
the place occupied by tov would have the effect of leaving 8u(f)6etpovTo without any con- 
struction, unless indeed in our author's text a fresh sentence began where the MSS. have 
aneipoi fiev ovres connected with what precedes. No variant, however, upon pev in that 
passage is known, and it is more likely that our author simply misunderstood the 
sentence. 

30. oTvpaKi : (TTvpaKia MSS. ; but there is possibly a reference to the reading of the 
papyrus in Cramer, Anecd. Par. iii. p. 84. 3 rov aavpcoriipa orvpaKa 0j;crt OovKvdiBrjs. With 

the note cf. Schol. a-rvpaKiou eariv 6 KoKovpevos cravpaTrjp twv boparav, HesychiuS (TTVpa^ . . . 

6 aavpcoTrp TOV doparos, and the similar explanations in other lexicographers. 

33, (TVve'dfUTO : cf. Schol. OTTO avvdrjKt]! 8t]Kov6tc, 

vi. 1-2. The lacuna at the end of 1. i may have contained another parallel for Tvavtrrpana, 

e. g. TtavoiKia (cf. X, 31) or navBrjpfi, OV, aS W-]\I suggests, a)[y Trap' 'Oprjpa | TravcrvBir]. If 7ra(T[ 

in I. 2 is right, 7rao-[7yt r^t a-Tpariai is a natural restoration, but this is rather long, and the 
reading 7rai'[ (e. g. TTav\pr]pd or waj^Ti tSu (TTpaTwi) is not excluded. The meaning, if any, of 
the stroke in the margin against 1. 2 is obscure. There is in the top margin another stroke /, 
which seems to be accidental. 

3. It is of course doubtful whether KaKov (or rov KaKou as conjectured by Bredow and 
Baumeister) occurred in the lemma, which may have ended with aTrpoo-So/ojrov. 

6-7. Perhaps koI ^[oiriyt ws [ nves "Keyovai, as Bury suggests, meaning that this use of 
viroTOTreai was not confined to Attic. To the doubtful k the only alternative is i. 

9-10. A note on the dative in place of the genitive after nepl. dapaadeis must belong to 
a quotation, which would be expected to be from Homer; and though neither of the two 
instances of dapaadtis in the I/i'ad (n 816 6eov nXTj-yj] koL 8ovp\ 8ap., and X 55 ^v prj koI a-ii 6(1vt}s 
'Axi><rjt 8ap.) is really at all apposite, W-M nevertheless may be right in restoring opo^ov 
'A^tX^t, and supposing that the latter passage was referred to. Schol. A had noted that the 
dative there was used for in 'AxiXXewy. A more relevant illustration would be one in which 
vTTo with the dative was used in place of irro with the genitive, but it is difficult to see 
whence this is to be obtained without altering Bapaadeis. ypd(}){T[ai (cf. vii. 30) points to 
a variant upon nepl toIs e^at (nepl Tav e^o) ?), though none is known. 

1 1-2. Bury suggests rpoVwi | twi toiovtoh Xeyci St[Kd^a)o-t : but the letter following S is much 
more likely to be a, e, or o than t. 

14-5. The Homeric quotation is from H 467. 

16. There is not room for wy after inira^av unless the line was exceptionally long, but 
o might be inserted. It is unfortunate that the text of this passage, in which a well-known 
difficulty occurs, is not quoted in extenso. The chief MSS. have Ka\ AaKebaipovlois npos 

Toii avTov vTTap^ovcrais e^ 'ir, koi 2t/c. to'ls TaKfivcov eXopevois vavs fntraxdrja-av Troieicr^at, which 

will not construe. Hude follows Herbst in emending ineTaxdrjo-av to ineTaxdr] a-', i. e. diaKoulas ; 
Poppo and Stuart Jones read iirtraxGn (with apparently one late MS.); Classen preferred the 
alteration of vaxa to i^es, while Cobet boldly met the difficulty by reading h.aK(8aip6vLoi . . . 
(irtTiTaxfo-av {ineTa^av Bohme). It is impossible to argue with certainty from our author's 
paraphrase in 11. 16-20 back to his text of Thucydides at this point; but seeing that he 
ignores any grammatical difficulty, it is improbable that such an anacoluthon as AaKeSat/zowoty 
. . . (neTax6r]aav vavs existed in his text. With regard to the various emendations the para- 
phrase does not favour v^f r in place of vavs or eirfTuxdn o"'> and with eirfraxdr] simply a note 
on the dative of the agent AuKebaipoviois would be expected. On the other hand Cobet's 
A.aKf8aip6vi.oi (TTfTfTaxfo'av (or inira^av) would suit the paraphrase very w'ell, especially as the 
construction of the sentence would then be quite easy, and no grammatical note would be 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 141 

necessary. But the great difficulty would still remain of accounting for the origin of 
the corruption. 

21. TTe\)j.<p6rfvai W-M. The expedition of Hermocrates to Ionia is described in 
Thuc. viii. 26. 

25-8. The rules for the accentuation of o-c^m and similar pronouns are given by 

Herodian, ed. Lentz, i. p. 555 ^QQ* ^'^^ i"^" "^^ anoXe'Xvfifvas Xeyovrat koI ovxi npbs erepov irpocrunTov 
avTi^iadTiWovTai, iyeipovai rr]v npo uvtwv o^elav' ore 8e Kara rfjv npoi tl erepov SiaaroXrjv fK(pepovTai, 

opdoTovovvTai k.tX. ; cf. the rules quoted in the notes ad loc. from the Homeric scholia. The 
general sense of the passage seems to be ' o-^tVi here is enclitic, for although one ought to keep 
its accent {rhv rovov W-]M) as far as possible, the rule concerning pera^da-eis (i. e. the reference of 
a pronoun to another person than the subject of the sentence) often prevents this '. But the 
lacunae make the whole passage obscure. JNIodern editors accentuate o-c^/o-t here. 

34—5. Cf. Schol. VTTo cmeipias' Trapocfxia, yXvKvs aTrdpco noXepos, Stob. Flor. 50. 3 Ilivdapos 
VTTop)(i]pdT(i>V yXvKV 8e noXepos dndpoLcnv, Schol. II. A 2 2^ as Koi HivSapos' yXvKvs andpu) noXepos. 

Schroeder (Fr. no, ed. 1908) writes yXvKv S' dirfipm noXfpos, but this now seems hardly 
satisfactory in view of the uncertainty of the metre and the agreement of our author with 
Stobaeus. The precise restoration of the lacuna at the end of 1. 34 is uncertain. 'yXvK[u 8e no- | 
is hardly long enough, but yXvK[vs yap 6 no- | is possible, if our author was not aiming at an 
exact quotation. 

vii. I. The extent of the gap between Cols, vi and vii cannot be determined by the 
writing on the recto ; cf. introd. p. 108. LI. 1-3 are the end of a note on koi i^ oXiyov ra noXXa 

Koi fit opyris ai e'lrixeipTjcreis yiyvovrai in C. II. 4. 

6-9. The restorations are due to W-M. 

10. For '0^p[r)pcKa)s] cf. iv. 6. The quotation is from A 539. 

12-3. irpov[oov]a-i is far from certain; the supposed o- is more like 7 or r, but with o]rt 
it is difficult to find anything suitable for the previous word. W-M proposes ovKen 
irpo[poiai\ ol roiovToi Kara n6Xe[p]^ov, 6vp[a>i S'] i^oppuxriv. The article is certainly wanted before 
TOLovToi and there is just room for [wtat] and [wiS] in the two lacunae, but ]ot, though not 
impossible, is less suitable than ](tl. dXXd might be read in place of Kara, but it is not 
satisfactory to make i^oppaxriv transitive. 

15. vplv: the papyrus confirms the conjecture of Hude ; ij/Mtf MSS., Stuart Jones, 

18. Tjv \aKov\a[ai\ : or possibly r]K[ovop]f[v clu], as W-M suggests; but though < can be 
read in place of v, and the vestige which we regard as the tip of an a- might belong to f or i/ 
or several other letters [aKov](T[at! suits the space better, and the author of the commentary 
does not elsewhere employ the first person plural. With this lengthy note on eV dpcporepa 

cf. the brief remark of Schol. 86^a in dpcporepa koI evKXelas koI SvaKXeiai, 
20—1. [dvTi Tov and i]7r[oX7;\//«' W-M. 

27-8. The Homeric quotation (identified by W-M) is from r i. 

29. fKo-TpaTfvopfvcov: neither this reading nor arparevovTav, a variant mentioned in 1. 30, 
was known previously, the MSS. all having i^ea-rpaTevpevav. The perfect middle of this verb 
is not found elsewhere in Thucydides, and the present is quite defensible. 

34. [dpaxn\rii was Suggested by Bury. 

37. 8iaXv€a-dai : 8iaXv€\e(T6ai (sic) C, 8iaXva-€adai Other MSS., but cf. Schol. SiaXveadaf 

d<^i(TTaa-6ai rav dyajyav. Thucydides employs the future infinitive after peXXeiv somewhat 
more often than the present, and where the MSS. are divided on the point, e. g. here and 
in i, 107. 3 and viii. 6. 5, editors prefer the future. 

viii. 4. Hude proposes to restore the line ap[a avrai revs evoxovs. 

5. The word following ciyei is probably some part of e'^eXaww ; cf. Thuc. i. 127. i t6 
ayos . . . iXavvuv, to which 11. 4-5 refer. 



T42 



THE OXYRHYXCHUS PAPYRI 



7-9. Cf. Schol. tia X^^P°^' ^' errifieXfias iva /jJ) aTToaravL dei in L 8 waS suggested 

by Bun*. 

Ill Probably the scribe wrote [Kpari'a-dat, for the lacuna is hardly sufficient for 
six letters. 

12. TTpaa-oliiDi] and [rropuTfjiSu] are both too short for the lacuna, which requires 9 or 
I o letters. Perhaps Koropdovv should be restored in place of KaTop6<n\<T6(u, which makes this 
line rather long. 

33-4. Perhaps KaOapov Tk&rj with Ka^a^ov in L 35, as Hude suggests. 

36. (cat TTepiaiperov has already been quoted in the lemma in 1. 29. 

ix. 3—6. The MSS. have roaovroi yap eCJ^vXaa-trop to Trp&rov 6~6re 01 noXefuoi ecr^aXoiev a— 6 
re Tonv TTpecr^VTaTCiiy Koi ray vecoTfpav /cat fifroiKcav offOi ottXItoi ^arav. The Omission of ro irp&rov 

. . . da^ouv in the lemma is probably a mere accident, and does not imply that the words 
were wanting in our author's text, though this seems to have gone astray at this point. The 
reading ittcJ, which stood there in place of qtto, is indefensible if l-rro re rav jrpecr^. »cr.X. is 
to be connected with roaoiToi ic^iXaaaov, as our author clearly intended ; for 1170 cannot be 
used as equivalent to d-6 in this sense, and the Homeric parallel which he cites, tatbtitv vrzo 
XafLTTofievdav (2 492), is irrelevant, since tiro there has its not uncommon sense 'to the 
accompaniment of. 

10. [ew]f : cf. Schol. etflj tov icvkXov. The reading dTT^, though possible, is less suitable. 
The insertion of ^ was suggested bv Burv. 

14-6. [kIi/cXof Se . . . a oT]e£d[r is a parenthesis, and [ejat jraXiv 6-6<Tov icT.\. depends on 
aTrapiBpiirai, referring to Thucydides' words a few lines later than the lemma, to. be fiaxpa 

Tilxji TTpbs TOV Heipaia reacrapoKOvra oraStwv. Il\ei[paie ck waS suggested by \\ -M and Bury ; 

i^K TOV [n. or e'fc tVu n. cannot be read. The second s of ao-rews in 1- 14 has been 
rewritten. 

18. Mo^vwx t a : so MSS. : yiowtxiq Hude, Stuart Jones. 

22-8. The position assigned by us to Fr. i is not certain. On the one hand the 
colour and general appearance of the fragment suggest that it belongs to this column, and 
when placed where it is Xi^o? at the beginning of a line ginng a new entry of ihe land- 
svu-vey on the recto of Fr. i will come just underneath Xi^os at the beginning of another en"jy 
which is on the recto of the upper part of Col. ix, while the lines on the recto of the frag- 
ment containing the ends of \"iii. 2 2-9 (the position of which is fixed) may be the continuation 
of the lines on the recto of Fr. i, though there is no certain connexion. The chief objection 
to the position assigned to Fr. i is that on the recto of the upper part of Col. ix there seems 
to be a junction between two selides, which would be expected to appear also on Fr. i, but 
does not. We have, however, been unable to find any suitable place for the lemma in 1. 23 
commencing ev^o[ except EvSo'iav in 14. i, and if that restoration is accepted, the position 
given to Fr. i must be approximately correct. A difficulty arises in 1. 26 where ^- x^(rv<{ 
is a ver}- unsatisfactory combination of letters, and probably there is some corruption. The 
$ projects somewhat to the left, but not enough to justity the inference that it belongs 
to a lemma. 

X. 2-4. Bury suggests Trapdlyei (V 'Epf^^Bel EvptJrt 8179 top | Ev^xoXjror]. 

6. The word following ^yreXoivrJiv may, as Bury remarks, have been xp^H^^'' or 
(laxfiopds. 

7. TO fv A[itivais Atoifvao^v- SO MSS. ; to (toC) eV A. A. Hude, following Cobet. The 
scribe has left a blank space after Xifipais as if the lemma ended there, but probably this is 
a mistake; cf. x. 25. The remains of 1. 10, as was perceived by W-M and Bury, belong to 
a quotation from the Hecale of Callimachus (Fr. 66 a ed. Schneider) ; see Schol. Ar. Frogs 

216 \ipvai j^ojpioi' T^r 'Arrtjc^y, iv o) SioyCaov Upov. KaXAi'/ia;^os eV 'EkoAj' \ipvaiia hi ;^opo<TTddar 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 



143 



riyov eoprds, and Stcph. Byz. Aifivai evda 6 Atofvaos iriiiaTO. KaW'niaxps' Aifivaico Se k.t.X. (/<al 

ol Xifxvaioi codd.). W-M, restoring KaXXi/uaxos in 1. 7, regards the quotation as beginning 
with fv 8e in 1. 8 and containing two complete hexameters, but this view is open to some 
objections. The restoration KaWifiaxos at the end of 1. 7 implies that 1 1 letters are lost 
after 8iovv(to[, whereas elsewhere in this column the corresponding space contains only 5-8 
letters. This difficulty can be got over by supposing that KaXXi'/ixn^oy was abbreviated, but 
in 1. 9 a similar and more serious obstacle arises ; for Aifivaiai (which is certain) is sufficient 
by itself to fill the lacuna at the end of the line, and since 'EXevdfip will be the conclusion of 
the first hexameter, the first foot of the second hexameter seems to be reduced to «. W-M 
proposes et[a-aTo, which makes excellent sense, but involves a supplement of 12 letters 
in the lacuna. The e of «[ has been corrected from a straight stroke (probably t) but the 
reading is practically certain, rj being the only alternative for ei and less satisfactory. Bury 
on the other hand would restore a shorter name than KaWifiaxos in 1. 7 (AtSv/xoy ?), and regard 
the Callimachus quotation as beginning with [Aifivaiai in 1. g, reading the preceding word as 
'E\ev6r]pe'i, i. 6. ^E\ev6epet. But that Callimachus' name was mentioned in 1. 7 (cf. x. 37), and 
that 11. 8-9 belong to the quotation, seem to us more probable. On Eleuther, the eponymous, 
hero of Eleutherae, who is said to have made the first image of Dionysus subsequently 
brought by Pegasus to the temple eV Ai'/xmts at Athens, cf. Pauly-Wissowa, Real-encycl. s. vv. 
Dionysos, Eleuther, Eleuthereus. 

1 1-2. Apparently the point of the contrast between this statement and the Callimachus 
quotation is that according to the latter the temple at Limnae was called after Dionysus 
as god of marshes in general, while according to the other explanation Limnae was merely 
a local name. With oi!r|0)]j in 1. 11 ]of is the termination of a proper name, e. g. hi}^v\ips', 
but it is possible to read ]&)? hk o5t[o]j, jwy being the termination of an adverb or a substantive 
in the genitive with e, g. hia. ovt\o\s would however then have to mean Thucydides, which is 
not satisfactory. 

15. apxai-oTara: dpxaiorepa MSS. The reading of the lemma may be a mere error, but 
is in itself defensible ; for accepting Boeckh's view that there were four distinct Dionysiac 
festivals at Athens, the Greater and Lesser Dionysia, the Anthesteria, and Lenaea, the 
Anthesteria might be called the 'most ancient' instead of the ' more ancient', i. e. than the 
Greater Dionysia. Thucydides' statement that the Anthesteria was a general Ionic festival 
is intended to prove its high antiquity, and cf. Schol. dpxmoTepa eine Stdrt eWt Ka\ i/ewrepa «XXa. 
rrj 1/3' : so MSS ; most modern editors follow Torstrik in regarding the words as 
a gloss. With a mention of the day iitjvos, not eV firfvl, would be expected. The papyrus 
shows, however, that the interpolation, if it be such, is very early. Our author's note con- 
cerning the date of the festival is in accord with the extant evidence on the subject ; 
cf. Pauly-Wissowa, Real-e7icycL i. p. 2372. 

19-20. 7r]X[f]t(Trov : so most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones ; nXelara AB (corr. A 2nd hand), 
which Torstrik wished to read, omitting a^ia. With «$ ra k.t.X. cf. Schol. Xctrrei f] els, 

IV f] ets ra nXeiarov a^ia, 

25. There can hardly be any doubt that the lemma ends at oj/oyo-tt, although the scribe 
fails to Iea.ve a blank space ; cf. x. 7, note. The following words in Thuc. are iierelxo" ol 
'Adrjvaloi, and the construction of the dative oiK^a-ei with nernxov being extremely difficult, 
some recent editors, including Hude, would omit the latter word. That our author's text had 
fierelxov is clear from 1. 30, and the difficulty of connecting it with oiK^aei is discussed by 
him in 11. 25-9, but the nature of his explanation is somewhat obscure. Apparently 

he regarded rfj air. oiK^a-« in place of t^s air. oiKTja-eas as equivalent to Sm Tr]v air. oUrjcnv, 

thus approximating to the view of Herbst, who explained the dative as instrumental and 
supplied avTr]s (i. e. tt^s avTovofiov olK^jcrecos) ; this, however, produces a very redundant con- 
struction, li ynTo. To[v p-fTelxov is rightly restored in 1. 25, the beginning of the note seems 



144 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

to mean ' rfi air. olKrjo-ei goes with ^ere'ixov oi 'Adrjvaioi. ', and 8ia ttjv Kara k.t.\. is a distinct re- 
mark ; if oi 'kBr^vaioi with either nerfixov or a different verb in I. 25 be connected with hia Tfjv 
Kara k.tX, fifTci To[i must be abandoned : e or w might be read in place of the doubtful o. 
Schol. merely remark that auroi/o'/nw oiKijo-et is for avrovofiov olKija-fois. 

29-30. (tprjTai 6e vn(p^aTS)[f: K.r.X. refers to the position of eVi TToXv which is to be con- 
nected with fieTflx^v. TO i^ijs (restored by W-M) means ' the grammatical sequence is ' ; 
cf. xiii. 7, note. 

31. [7ray^oi]KT](Tia yevofievoi: SO MSS. (v. 1. 7rai/oiK€cria) ; Hude and Stuart Jones follow 

Lipsius in placing TravoiKrjcriq after oi pabias, 

33. The o following r is almost certain, v being the only alternative, [ol] does not fill 
up the lacuna, so that to is not the termination of e. g. dieyivovTo. 8ia 7rai/|ro[sj is possible. 

Schol. remark TravoiKTjO-la koI ov Travomia Xeyerai, 

35-6. K[aXovvTai I (j)[vX]ai was Suggested by Bury and Hude, 

36-7. This distinction between aTjKog and vaos is also stated by Ammonius: vaos Koi o-t)k6s 
Biafpepei. 6 p.ev yap vaos eaTi deoov, 6 Se otjkos rjpmav. The distinction is not always observed ; cf. 
Liddell and Scott, s.v. o-7/Kdy. The quotation from Callimachus (from the Hecalel; cf. x. 7, 
note) is new. 

xi. 14-5. The accent of ap[yo? points, as W-IM perceived, to the restoration of these 
lines as a quotation of the well-known oracle, which occurs e.g. in Schol. Theocr. xiv. 48. 
The beginning of the line is commonly cited as ymj^s piv Trda-rjs, but here yairjs and ndar]s have 
changed places. A difficulty arises in connexion with the reading \ya]ir][s, that, since it 
belongs to the note, not the lemma, there ought to be only one letter lost, but the scribe 
sometimes begins his lines unevenly (e.g. in ix. 26) and occasionally treats words belonging 
to the note as if they were part of the lemma (e. g. in xvii. 31). Possibly, however, he wrote 

16. Perhaps oXas] aKi^dtj. 

17. ov is given the barytone accent in order to distinguish it from ov. The note probably 

began with something like ov bia t6 Trapa]v6p.u)[s oUflv \ ToaavTais avp(popa'i\s e;i^pij[cravTO, aS 

Stuart Jones suggests. 

xii. 2-3. The restorations are due to W-M. 

5. elvai may have been added in the lemma after paXaKoi. The occurrence of ddpola-fi 
in the paraphrase indicates that our author explained ^wayoiyj} as referring to the assemblage 
of the allies at Sparta not to the conduct of the war, thus agreeing with Herbst against the 
ordinary view ; cf. Classen, ad loc. 

6. ] . e : the vestige of the first letter would suit S or X best. 

7. Stuart Jones suggests ["O/iijpos poKQaKos olxp-<^r]s (p 588). 

10. dpycos ; cf. Schol. ev tij KadiSpa' rfi dpylq ttjs noXiopKias trjXovoTi. 

12. The word before pe]Ta(f)opiKais was probably an equivalent of dve'ixev, perhaps eptvfv 
(Bury) or cKwXwej/ (W-M, who compares Bekker, Anecd. i. p. 400. 7 Xe'yeTai di/ex"" ««' 
TO KoXvfiv. QovKvblbTjs ev (ktw k.t.X.). In place of to. onXa (W-M) Bury suggests xf'P«s'. 
Line 14 clearly contains a comparison between dvoxr] and fKfxeipia, but the reconstruction is 
uncertain. There is certainly a letter after eKe])(eipia, and the vestige suits t better than s. 
If eKf]xfipiai is nominative plural this may be accounted for by the plural use of dvoxai ; if it 
is dative singular something like \dvnxf] ta-rj rr} (Kf^x^tpla. is required, [dvoxai eVi ttjs eKej^etpia? 
(W-M) would have been more satisfactory. 

17. It is tempting to restore ol 'Pelrojt Ton-[o]y | t^s 'Attik^s, but o does not fill the lacuna 
before s. Possibly Pf]troi t[. .'\s should be read, but the letter following to is more like n than 
it and there is not room for T[6no]s. 

19. Lines 19-32 are on a detached fragment. The writing on the recto confirms the 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES 11 145 

internal evidence of 11. 24-7 that these lines belong to the lower portion of Col. xii, but the 
extent of the gap, if any, between II. 1 8 and 1 9 is uncertain. 

23. The accent of fiSe suggests, as W-M remarks, a form like 'EXcutrjImSf, but though 
the letter before aSe might be v, the letter before that is more like f, o, or v than t. 

24. The letter before vau may be t instead of >;, but [ra^a^ivav /xf]ti/at does not suit 
the size of the initial lacuna, and [rtipuhfiv r/x^^j'jmi is also too long, so that [ov KaT-a/3]/}i/at 
is practically certain. To the form fj^do-au there is no objection, but the word does 
not seem very suitable in this context. The doubtful 8 might be read as a, X, or /x. 

27-9. The restoration of the beginning of the note is due to W-M, who further 
suggests ] t6t{€) (?) oi 'At[t iKol TL6[m(Tiv but Ar[r]tKot does not suit the vestiges. For tVe^- 

fXfutrorrat cf. Schol. fl (ne^laa-iv' et eVf^fXeiVoi'Tot oi ^ Adrjvaioi irpos TroXf/ioy, 

xiii. I. This line, restored by Hude, and the next clearly belong to a note on 
the use of the middle in place of the active in x'^pijo-eo-^at (c. 20. 4), eTraivea-eaBai being adduced 
as an illustration ; cf. iv. 32-5. The first two letters of eTratvfo-ffjo-^ai have a stroke 
through them, but this is to be regarded as accidental, not as implying deletion. 

7. A note on the construction of avrois, which depends on Seivou i<^aivtTo after a long 
interval. The reading e'[|?)s is not very satisfactory, for the traces of ink suit o, or, or t better 
than f, but rb i^rjs is the technical phrase required here ; cf. the close parallel in x. 29-30. 

13. (opyrjTo : I\ISS. are divided between this reading and copiirjTo (CEG), which accord- 
ing to our author (1. 14) was found 'in some copies', and must have been a very early 
variant. Editors also differ ; Hude and Stuart Jones prefer wp/ijjro. 

16. Apart from the present passage in Thuc. Phrygia in Attica is only mentioned 

twice, (l) Schol. Arist. Birds 493 ^puy/ui' epiwv' ^ an6 <^pvyias fj ano Brjfiov, fK€i yap dnaXa koI 
KoKa fpia, (2) Steph. Byz. S, v. 'Ppvyia, . . , i'cTTi Koi ra ^pvyui oi/Serepw? tottos p-era^v Boioirias Koi 

'Attik^s. Bursian [Geogr. i. p. 334) conjecturally placed it in the neighbourhood of Acharnae 
at the north-east foot of Mount Aegaleus. Since the site of Athmonon is fixed {/did. p. 343) 
at the modern village of INIarusi, which is 7 kilometres west of Acharnae, the statement of 
our author that Phrygia belonged to the Athmonian deme does not accord with the position 
assigned to the village by Bursian, although Athmonon being an important deme may have 
stretched some way to the west. Our author is likely to be right on the point, in spite of 
Steph. Byz.'s assertion that Phrygia was ' between Boeotia and Attica ', which suggests quite 
a different position. 

17. rdypaTi : SO Schol. Taynari hi The Homeric quotation is from 2 298. 

20. ^apaakioi Tleipaaioi ; ^apadXioi Hapuaioi ]MSS. (cf. 878. 6 ; Hepdaioi B), vvhich 

continue Kpawuvioi neipdaioi. Tlapdcrioi, a term nowhere else applied to a Thessalian tribe, 
has generally been rejected by critics as an interpolation due to a misspelling of lleipdatoi and 
a confusion with the nappdaiot in Arcadia, who are out of place here, while the form rietpdcrtot 
is generally altered to llvpdaioi in accordance with Sirabo ix. p. 435, and Steph. Byz. s.v. 
Ilvpaaos. The reading of the lemma proves that Ylapda-iot did not stand after ^apa-dXioi 
in our author's text of Thuc, while his note shows that he knew of TlapdaioL (or nappdaioi) 
as a variant on Ueipdartoi, but rightly rejected it. That iiapdaiot was originally a marginal 
variant which found its way into the text, causing the transposition of Unpda-ioi, is now clear, 
and the hypothesis of an interpolation is confirmed. As regards the form llctpacriot the 
lemma supports the traditional spelling of the MSS. against ilvpdaioi, and in view of the fact 
that Steph. Byz. mentions a certain lleipaa-ia noXis Mayvrja-ias, the alteration to Uvpaaioi seems 
to us unnecessary. Our author's explanation of Heipda-ioi as connected with the Urjpda men- 
tioned in B 766 is however very doubtful, for the reading Uijpeirj is there somewhat uncertain 
(there are variants ^rjpit} and Uifpij] besides Uuplrj), and Steph. Byz. distinguishes nrjpeia 
©fcrcraXiay ;^&)pioi/ from llfipaaia, 

L 



146 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

22-3. The restoration of these two Hnes was proposed by W-M, Stuart Jones, and 

Hude ; cf. Schol. HapacnoC Ilappacnoi 'ApKadfs, Ilapda-ioi QerraXoL. 

29. The restoration of this hne is far from certain, especially as jav does not fill the 
lacuna after av, unless those letters were unusually spread out. Perhaps the lemma ended 
with av[TS}v', which would then be followed by a blank space, and oi 'Adri\vaioi belongs to 
the note. 

xiv. 1—2. Part of a note on alel iv avTa dd-rTTovcn Tovs €K tcov iroXepav 77X171/ ye tovs eu 

Mapadavt. The restoration in 1. 2 is due to W-M, who is no doubt right in regarding 
fTnTd]cj)ios in 1. 3 as a title. 

4. That before ivi the papyrus had eV, which is omitted by CG, is certain not only from 
the size of the lacuna but from eV ivi in the paraphrase, 1. 6. 

6-1 1. The proposed restoration of the paraphrase is very doubtful in several respects. 
For Kiv8vve[v\eiv KipbvviJ)f\(Tdai may be substituted, or possibly kIv8vvos \ yap, as W-]\I suggests, 
with eivai tS>v] in 1. 7 ; ToiovTOTponov'^s is not very satisfactory, but there is not room for 
Toiov'jovs aiTou]?. In 1. 7 either TroXXwy or an equivalent is required. tJ'jo-outwi/ dv^piiv] 
is possible, with another word in place of dv8pi. The doubtful a may be n, but neither 
eV;iT6i'[n nor ] t7oX[Kcov can be read. Our author seems to have interpreted irtaTevBTjvai, like 
Poppo and Classen, as epexegetic of Kivbwevea-dai. and not as the subject of it {t6 being 
omitted), which latter view is supported by Schol. (di-rl tov kgl prj iv kiv8vuco yiveadat to 
Tna-Tev6r)vat.) and now advocated by Steup ; cf. Classen's Thucydides, ed. iv. p. 221. 

13. Perhaps [a-upperpois], as W-M suggests (cf. Schol. perplai- a-vppeTpus, d^(wj), or 

[iTTiTi^^eias] (Bury). 

15-20. Bury restores these lines filuo-KoXdj/ so-tlv | ti)v dXrjdeiav eV tw] Trpdypan p6\vov 
^e^aioiiv Kara r]ds v7roXij|\//«s tcov uKpoaruyv, (cl it bvcTKokov | dXtjdevfiu BoKelv d^iTKTTf'iTai | yap to 
vnep^ciKKov t\ov Trpdypavros. 

2 2. The letter (beginning with a vertical stroke) following tov has a horizontal line 
above it, indicating either a numeral or word cited like Kai in xix. 5. 

25. av\Toi): soCG; iavTov ABEFM. It is of course possible, but less likely, that our 
author meant avrov. 

27—31. Bury suggests vo^nlaeiYw uv tvia TrXfowl^fo-^at] ei Tiva | luip avrnvs qkovokV 
/lOfolf yap TO . . . Koi o e^Kacrroi | avros iKavoi eiVai dpdcrai] TjyeiTai. 

32-3. Bury is probably right in assigning these lines to a fresh lemma, not to the pre- 
ceding note, although 11. 30-1 paraphrase words not included in 11. 24-6. 

XV. 2. 77 dX]tr, which can hardly be evaded, may be explained, as W-IM suggests, 
as a reference back to dUaiov yap rjpds k.t.X. in c. 11. 2. Our author's note on that passage, 
if he had one, is lost in the gap between Cols, vi and vii. The word after e"p7i<[f]i' is probably 
an adverb. 

4. Ka6((TTT}Kvia[i] : the papyrus follows the ordinary spelling of the MSS. ; xadfa-TTjKva 
Hude. After Tjj it is difficult to see what other word than napaKprj can have been meant, but 
that was certainly not written ; the letter following napa is conceivably k, but is much more 
like y or r, and p is out of the question. 

6. oiKfiv : so most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones ; iJKeiv C (second hand) and superscr. G. 

7-1 1. In regarding olKelv as equivalent to 8ioiK(7adai our author is quite correct, but in 
paraphrasing cV as 'for the advantage of he conflicts with modern editors, who practically 

all adopt the view that eV nXelovas oiKelv :=■ Stotmo-^at toore nXfiovas fLvai tovs dioiKovvras. This 

is supported both by the variant ijKup for oIkuv and by several parallels for this use of «r 
(especially Thuc. viii. 53), and suits the context much better. The interpretation which our 
author rejects in 11. 7-8 seems to be right in its interpretation of (s, but is wrong with regard 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 147 

to the meaning of oIkCiv, which cannot mean in this context ' inhabit ', as seems to be implied 
by the contrast between olKiiv in 1. 7 and dcotKda-dai in 1. lo. 

14. Twt has the barytone accent to distinguish it from rai.. 

15. TO n\eo[v : so ABEFM [nXe'iou), Hude, Stuart Jones ; to. n^(<o CG. 

1 6. 8id(f)opd vvv TO. 8ia(f)epovTa : cf. Schol. ra 8ia(j)fpovTa Tois IdimTais, 

21-2. This explanation of the obscure phrase ovk dno fiepovs is novel. Schol. remark 

TovTo Xeyei 8ia Toiis 'HpoKXeidas, ^acriXfZf toov AaKMvav, olrives drro fxepovs 'jpx.fJV Sta p6vr]v ttjv 

fvyei'€tav k&v fif) f^x^'' dper^v, and in accordance with this supposed reference to the Spartan 
kings the phrase has generally been interpreted ' not because he is sprung from a particular 
class ', while Classen thinks that the meaning is ' not because he is supported by a political 
party ', and Herwerden wished to read yevovs for pepovs. Our author on the other hand 
interprets it ' not according to the equal share to which he is entitled as a member of 
a democratic state', i.e. honours are distributed not in equal shares but in accordance 
with merit. In 1. 25 Bury suggests oi\[8]€ (which is possible) followed by a participle 
or infinitive meaning ' will be assigned ' {K[aTav]€p[ri$i'j(j((Tdai T17I1/ rd^iu is too long, but 

K[aTavep\T]Orjaopevr]jv (rrju) rd^iv COuld be read), and in 1. 26 [aiircoi iv rrii TToXtTf/ai] fKaaros. 

33. vTTo\^iav : or possibly dpvTro\^iav ; cf. note on 1. 38. 

34. 8pa Ti : Ti 8pa MSS. 8pa Ti may be a mere slip of a copyist, rt 8pa apparently 
occurs in the paraphrase (xvi. 2). 

38. oil j^ v7TOTTT€v[(T}ovTis i If our author's text had the ordinary reading Inoyj/iap in 1. 33, 
his paraphrase is not very accurate at this point. Thucydides' phrase h Tfjv ... vnoxj/iav does 
not harmonize well with the following words ov St' opy^s k.t.'X., and Madvig conjectured 
eiro-^tv, Reifferscheid dvvnoyf^iav, to which ov]^ vTroTTTfvovTes would be appropriate enough. To 
read dwnoYf/iav in I. 33 is possible, for though it would produce 13 mostly broad letters 
in the lacuna as against only 11 in 1. 32, there are 14 letters in the corresponding lacuna in 
1. 34, and in the lower part of this column the beginnings of lines seems to have sloped 
away to the left. But it is more probable that our author read vno'^iav and in ov]x vno- 
TTTcvovTes was merely giving the general sense, obtaining his negative from ov St' opyrjs ; 

cf. Schol. eXfvdipas Se' axiavu 'f\(yev ovk tcrpiv oKXt^Xois vnonToi. 

xvi. 5. The vestige of a letter following ^vnovptv would suit e. g. t, but hardly o, so that 
\vTrovpfvo[i is improbable, v may be read in place of the doubtful t^. ([TnaK]vdp[(ondCovTf]s 
(Bury) is unsuitable, but ]$• may well be the end of a participle. 

9-10. (K Tov . . [. . .j probably refers to rrj '6-^ci. eV tov hr^ov] (Bury) does not suit ; 
the first letter seems to be a, k, or X, the second to be a round letter, e. g. o ; or possibly p[ 
might be read. 

18. a\Vfl: so Hude with E; dd other MSS. ; cf. 1. 33. 

19—20. TOIf cipXOv\<Tiv : cf. Schol. TMV dpXOVTWU. 

21. olov St' oKov TOV erovs: cf. Schol. St' oXou tov erovs dvovaiu ol 'A6t]vaioi Kad eKadTrjv ttXtjc 
pias Tjpfpas. 

24, aK[/)o^o]XtXet AaKeSaipoviovs : similar remarks (e.g. ahiTT^Tai npos A(iK(8aipoviovs) are 
frequent in Schol. on cc. 37-9; cf. also xvii. 6-9. 

25. 8iaiT0L>peda : Siatrco/xfvoi MSS., the verb being x^poC/xey. Whether 8unT6ipeda is 
an inadvertence, or implies a different arrangement of this sentence in our author's text (e. g. 
8iaiTap(6a . . . ;^c<)po{)j/res) is uncertain. 

29. (deXopev: SO CG, Hude, Stuart Jones; edi\oipev other MSS. and Dion. Hal. 
31. Tols re: so BCG, Hude, Stuart Jones ; re tuIs other MSS. 

33. droX/x[oTep]ous : SO most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones; oToXpoTepois suprascr. Gj, ex 
corr. f, and Dion. Hal. 

atet: so E, Hude, Stuart Jones; del other MSS. ; cf. I. i8. 

L 2, 



148 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

xvii. 1-2. ai'U7ro[ and 'j€o-t[ are on a separate fragment, and the margin is broken 
away immediately to the left of amno ; but the position assigned to the fragment admits of 
practically no doubt, especially as it belongs to the top of a column. 

3. TaXaiTrajpeio-^jai : SO Bury and Hude ; KaTaiTovfl<T6\ai W— M. 

10. KMpa: so the best MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones ; iv KmpCoY^g. It is disputed whether 
KaLp(f is a predicate of itKovt(o, ws being omitted (so Poppo and Steup), or is a kind of 
adverbial dative (so Classen, 3rd ed.) : our author's paraphrase in spite of the use of eV 
Kaipa is compatible with either view. 

16-8. This explanation of alfrxi^ov as a comparative used in place of the simple adjective 
agrees with that of the ancient grammarian quoted by Poppo (who practically accepts this 
view) a'icrx'.ov dvri tov alaxpov, eovKv^idijs, while Other explanations, e. g. Classen's, attach 
greater significance to the comparative. 

18-9. The quotation is from ?; 294. A slight error has crept in, for the MSS. have 
aUl yap re, not aif\ 8e, which will not scan. 

20. eV : so ABEF ; i'vi CGfg, Hude, Siuart Jones, With eV it is necessary to supply 
the verb, as is remarked in I. 23 ; and eVt is no doubt preferable. 

21. e]Tepois: so MSS., Poppo and S:uart Jones; erepa Classen; hipois erepa Hude 
following Richards. The traditional reading is defended by Poppo on the view that erepot 
refers to the poorer classes of Athenians who were too busy to take part in the administration 
of public affairs, but able to form a judgement on them, and that the persons meant by 
Tois avTois are the richer classes, an interpreiation which is rather arbitrary. With erepa or 
iTtpoii fTfpa both halves of the sentence reTer to the Athenians in general, the second half 
emphasizing the same idea as that expressed by the first. Our author does not explain 
precisely who are meant by erepoi, but since he took epya in the sense of ra t^s yecopylas epya 
he seems to agree with Poppo's view that eirepot refers to the poorer classes. 

30. avToL: so ABEF, Poppo, Classen ; ol avrol CG, Hude, Stuart Jones. Cf. 
1. 35, note. 

31. The scribe has by mistake included Kpivopev in the lemma. The note explains 
Kpivopiv as meaning ' decide upon proposals invented by others ', implying a contrast with 
' originate new ones ourselves ' {ivdvpovp-tda). Our author's interpretation thus supports 
Poppo's translation aut iiidicamus eerie (ab aliis proposiid) ant excogitamiis {nova) recte, 
against Classen's ' entweder bringen wir die Sachen zur Entscheidung, oder suchen iiber sie 
richtige Einsicht zu gewinnen'. 

34. [^;) TolSe : Sjj (Set AB) (cairoSe MSS., Stuart Jones ; fiij (cal toS? Hude. The papyrus 
may have had [/cat ro^i. 

35. a^vroj'J: ot axjTOL MSS. ; cf avrol in 1. 30, whcrc the MSS. are divided, avroi may be 
right there, but here o\ avrol is distinctly better. 

xviii. 12. The note was doubtless on tlSeoos, upon which Schol. remark a.vr\ tov fieydXas. 
peydXcos may have occurred here, or, as W-INI suggests, d(p06vcos. 

14. TrXetjfrr' : SO most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones; TrXeiarov AB. 

18-23. X"P'«*']'"'"f ill J- 19 aiid the restoration of 1. 22 were suggested by Bury and 
Stuart Jones, the restoration of 1. 21 by Bury, who proposes 'A6i)valc[i di>Tjp in 1. 18 and 
pd\i[(jra Tuv iiWuv uvdpoiTrcop in 1. 20. inixapifcos (W-]\I) is an alternative in 1. 19. Schol. 

explain (vrpaTreXas by fvKiVTjTcus, cVSe^icus-. 

24. KpeliT^acov: SO most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones; Kpelaaov C. 

27. Perhaps nelpiylverai, as W-M proposes. Xu]yu>v . . . epyois was suggested by both him 
and Bury. 

29-33- These lines paraphrase the sentence of Thucydides following the lemma. The 
restorations are mainly due to Bury, who further proposes vi.Kr]dfv]T<ov in 1. 29, fx^^'^'^ eKflvav 



853. COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES II 149 

in 1. 31, and iioyi.^r]v f'x^i in 1. 32. The paraphrase does not help in regard to the difficult 
reading tw TroXfp'w i-neKdovTi, which many critics have wished to alter. 

35-7. A note (restored in part by Bury) to the effect that e'xet governs KaTdfieii^w as 

well as ayavaKT-qaiv , 

xix. 1-3. There is a blank space after (pva-eas before the lacuna, and if (^vo-eaj was the 
end of the line, 1. i probably belongs to a note on ttjs tc yap Inapxava-r]! (^uo-ewy and 11. 2-3 
are a lemma. It is possible, however, that a couple of letters are lost in the lacuna after 
<Pvae<jis, in which case that word belongs to the lemma and 11. 2-3 to the note. That all 
three lines belong to a note is less likely, for 1. i would then be too short ; and the same 
objection applies to regarding all three as a lemma, while in addition it would then be 
necessary to suppose the omission of a whole line {firj xf^poa-i yeveadai vpXv neyaXr}). 

4-7. The Homeric quotation (from A 117) is cited in order to illustrate the use of 7 
for Koi, and if our author considered that Thucydides also employed fj for Kai his comment 
must apply to rj v|^dyov, though in reality there is no justification for interpreting rj there as 
Kai It is possible, however, as W-M points out, that the quotation is intended to illustrate 
the converse of Thucydides' use ; in that case our author's remark applies to koI ^r, which 
in his opinion was for rj ijs; i. e. he thought that the construction was ttjs vTrapxova-rjs (jiva-fuis 
lifyaXr] 86^n ia-Tiv fir) xftpo""' yeveaOu rj eKeivr] fj (f)v(n{ f;$ ap k.t.\., which makes no sense. Which- 
ever view we credit him with, our author seems to have completely misunderstood the 
meaning of the sentence, and the Homeric parallel makes matters worse ; for rj is not there 
used for kqI, though on this point he is only following the singularly perverse interpretation 
of that passage by the Alexandrian critics; cf. Schol. A oSeXoyos toiovtos' 6eka>, (prjo-iv, eyo) 

TOP ox^ov jxaWov crco^ea-dai koi avros arrdkecrdai. 6 yap fj avpdeafios avrl tov Kai nape iXrjnTai T^noLrjrfj. 

Our author's lack of judgement in explaining Thucydides' meaning is made still clearer by 
11. 7-8 dno Koi,v[ov . . . XrjTTTeov to ^v[(Tf(os, meaning that (f)v(Teais is to be supplied with ^s, for 
the real antecedent of rjs is fKfivrj rfj ywaiKi understood, and the words which are truly dn6 
Koivov are fieyaXr) fj 86^a. It is impossible to acquit him of having committed a series of 
errors in his attempt to elucidate this badly constructed, but not particularly difficult 
sentence. 



854. ArCHILOCHUS, 'EAeyeia. 

3*7 X 3" 3 cm. Late second century. Plate I. 

The extreme smallness of this fragment is very unfortunate, since the 
coincidence of the last four lines with a quotation in Athenaeus proves the 
author to have been Archilochus ; cf. Athen. 483 d ixvr]\xov€vii avrov (sc. tov 
kmOmvos) Koi 'A/))(tAoxos (v 'EAeyeiots a>s 'nonipiov ovrcos* dAA' aye k.t.X. (=Fr. 4 
Bergk *). An addition to the 2a lines which, including these four cited by 
Athenaeus, are all that survive of the 'EAeyeia, would have been very welcome ; 
but in its present mutilated state the fragment is practically worthless. It seems 
to have come from an extensive roll (cf. note on 1. 2), the recto of which was 
occupied by a cursive document dating probably from about the middle of the 
second century ; the seventh year of an emperor (Antoninus ?) is mentioned. The 
literary text on the verso, written in rather small round uncials, need not be 



150 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

referred to a much later period, and may well fall within the same century. Two 
accents occur, besides some marginal marks of uncertain significance. 



]$ <ppa[ 

T 

^€ll>Ol . [ 

SeiTTvou Soy[ 
5 — ovT ejxoL (OS ai[ 

aXX aye aw K(o[Oooi'L Oor]s Sia (TiXiiara prjos 
(poLTa Kai KOLX(t)[u nco/jiaT a^eX/ce Ka8a>u 
dyp€L 8 oivov [epvOpov ano rpvyos ovSe yap rjfieis 
vr](pi[t.]i' ey [(pvXaKr) rrjSe SvvqaojxeOa 



2. The marginal 6 is most naturally explained as marking the Sooth line of the 
manuscript ; of. e. g. 852. The papyrus is broken immediately above the 6, but a slight 
vestige is left which we suppose to represent a stroke over the letter. Of the marks below 
6 the second horizontal line and the verUcal one beneath should perhaps be combined as 
a critical sign referring to 1. 3, to which they are really opposite; cf. the dash 
opposite 1. 5. 

6. aXX aye : aWa re A, corrected by Musurus. 

7. KnCKw[v: Ko'Ckav A and editors, but KotXav, an Aeolic form found in Anacreon 9. 2, 
may well be right here. 

9. vrj(l)f[i.]v ev : V. ytiv A, eV INIus. But the reading in the papyrus is not satisfactory ; 
one letter between and v would be better than two, and the traces after the second f, if 
not absolutely inconsistent with v, suggest a round letter like <t. Moreover the accent is 
wrong. But we can find no suitable alternative ; the fourth letter can hardly be o, and 
therefore vij<povis does not suit ; vqrpffjLfmi (conj. Bergk) is inadmissible. 



855. MeNANDER ? 

13X16-3 cm. Third century. 

This fragment of an unidentified New Attic comedy, though inconsiderable 
in size, is of more than usual interest, bringing before us with much vividness 
a scene to which we think there is no exact parallel in the extant remains 
of either Greek or Roman comedy. A slave Daus has been detected and caught 
by an indulgent (1. 13) master, Laches, in some act of villainy connected with an 
inheritance (1. 18), and Laches proposes to have him burnt alive. Daus is 
perhaps bound to a stake ; his fellow-slaves, to whom the victim appeals 



855. MENANDER? 151 

vainly for mercy, bring out faggots and pile them round him ; and Laches 
himself carries the lighted torch. Wilamowitz, to whom we are much indebted 
in the reconstruction of this text, supposes that the slave had taken refuge at 
an altar, where however the right of asylum would not protect him from being 
burnt. At any rate the language plainly implies that it was not his master's object 
merely to dislodge him from a place of sanctuary. Of course the grim scene was 
not acted out, and no doubt Daus eventually escaped ; but that it should be carried 
so far is a significant indication of the Athenian attitude towards slavery at this 
period, and the passage may be placed in contrast to some others where a more 
humane tendency is displayed, e.g. Philemon's eXevOipovs e-Tro'jjo-e iravTas rfj (})vatc 
bovXovs 8e f^ereTTOJ/o-ei; 57 -nXeove^ia (Kock, Fr. 95). It is said that the position 
of slaves was peculiarly favourable at Athens, and though a master had the 
power of punishment he might not legally put them to death ; cf. Antiphon, 
de caede Herodis, p. 728 ovh\ ol roi/s Seo-TroVa? airoKT^CvavTcs . . . ovb' ovrot 
6vrj(TKOvcnv vtt' avrdv to)V Tipocr^KovTOiv . . . Kara rojuous vixitipovs TraTpwvs : but 
perhaps the law was stricter in theory on this point than in practice. For 
the burning of slaves Wilamowitz cites the fragment from Euripides' Syleiis 
(Nauck Fr. 687) in which Heracles in a servile position says -niix-np^i, KaraiOe 
a-dpKas K.T.A. Murray suggests that Laches only wished to frighten Daus, and 
was playing a big practical joke. That is a quite tenable hypothesis, but perhaps 
not much is gained by it so far as the rights of Athenian slaves are concerned. 
Daus certainly thought that he was to be burned, and seems rather to take it for 
granted ; he makes no protest against the illegality or the unheard of barbarity 
of the act. There is a general similarity between the scene in the papyrus and 
that in Aristophanes' TJiesmoph. 726 sqq., with the essential difference that 
Mnesilochus, for whose burning preparations are there made, is a free man. 

The identity of the play to which the fragment belongs and of its author 
is quite uncertain. Wilamowitz would refer it to some other poet than 
Menander on the ground of the occurrence of the article at the end of a verse at 
1. 23, to which there is no parallel in the Cairo papyrus. But this is not a very 
conclusive argument, and it seems to us to be more than outweighed by a 
remarkable linguistic coincidence between 11. 13-4 and a citation from the 
Perinthia ; cf. note ad loc. 

There are remains of two columns^ the second of which is in fair 
preservation. The text is written in medium-sized sloping uncials of the 
common third-century type. Double dots and paragraphi are employed to 
denote the alternations of the dialogue, and, as in 211, 852, and the Cairo Menan- 
der, the names of the speakers are sometimes inserted, in a more cursive but 
perhaps not different hand. Stops, mostly a high point (one in the middle 



152 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



position occurs at the end of ii. 5), are freely used, though not always with 
discrimination, and marks of elision are also frequent ; two accents occur (one 
misplaced) and a mark of long quantity {Kav — kox iv). All these lection signs 
seem to be due to the original scribe. 

Col. ii. 



Col. i. 



Ix 



OL 



1/30 



10 



[ ]-(Xv8aKo\ov6€L[ 

[ ]aae^€iaiv^epcouT07rvp[ 

Kanrvp'TrpoSrjXofCOTLPeieKaiyeTa 

€7reLTaKaTaKav(reLijL a(peLT]T ayyera 

.]8ov\ouorTa'KaLSia(T<x>aap[. .junai'V- 
.]aufMa(p€Lr]TaXXa7r€pLO\lr€(T6e/M(- 
.] . TT poaaXK-qXovaeyoiiiV'rr poaepyjETaL 
. .]pLaa-o(TOuye^opTioy^epcou 
.^(oXa'Kai^aiS avToar]ii^ivr)viyodv 

Xax 

. . . .]oXov$ei : TrepiB^T €[.]KVKXcoLTa)(y 

. . . .^iBiL^aiSaiT'qvTTavovpyLav 
7€\VT]PTiP€vp(oi'Sia(f)uy(oi'Tev6euS€fie 
T€)(vr]veya) ; vaiSaeToixeraTrpayfiova 
KaiKovcpoue^dTrarai^yapea-TiSea-rroTrjv 
15 (pXvapoa : 7]r]u : eiSeTi(rTr]yT(ov(pp€U(ou 
o-raKTTjv : €Kvta6rj(T : ov')(j.Trpo(Taov8e<nroTa 
op.iVTvovripo(T'oBpa(Tvaiv6aB' apTioiCT 
KaTaTooi/(TKeXo)VTT)VKXr]poi^o/xiav(pi[.]TaTo[ 
[ ]o8a)ye^au)(^apLi' 

20 [ ](TV(pr]fia>v : Ka€T[.] 

[ 1 . axra^LKiTo 

[ ](f)€po{X€vo(ryapKdvKVKX(o[ 

[ jjOTcorrecrriTo 

Unplaced fragment . 



855. MENANDER ? 153 



Col. ii. 

• ••••••• • • • 

[ ] • (TV S' aKoXovQu [fioL, rira. 

(AcO(;) [KXr]fjLaTiS]a9 'i^^Laiv cpepcow to nvp[Savoi^ 
Kai TTvp TrpoSrjXov co Ti^ie Kal rira, 
'ineiTa KaraKavaH fx d(f)ur]T du, TeTa, 
5 \(Tvv\Bov\ov ovTa, Kal Sia(T(o<Tau[T ; o]v ndvv 
[vvv] dv \i d(p€LrjT- dWa Trepioyjreadi jie ; 
[tl S\r] TTpoy dW'qXov^ 'i^ofi^v ; 7rpo(rep)(€TaL 
[6 nvp]pia9 ocrov ye (popriou (pepaov 
[aTTojXooAa* kol SaS' avTo^ rjfifievrjv '(eya)v 
10 [Ad-)(r]^ dKYXovOd. Aa)((H(;). TTepiOer k\y\ kvkXco Ta\v 
[to, ^uA'' iTrySei^ai, Ade, ttju iravovpyiav 
T^\yrjv Tiv €vpoDU Sia^vyoiv r kvOivSe fie. 
(Aa.) T^yv-qv kyu> ; (Aa)(.) va(, Ade, to jikv dirpdyfJLova 
Kal Kov^ov k^airaTav ydp icxTi S((T7r6Tr]v 
15 (f)Xvapo9. (Aa.) rjrji^. (Aa)(.) el Si tis ty^v ratv (Ppeucou 
(TTaKTrjv — kKviaO-qs ', i/^Oi) ov)(l npos aov, SianoTa. 
(Aa.) 6 fjL€U TTOvrjpos, dpa(rv9, kvOdS dpTicos 

Kara tcov cKiXcov ttjv KX-qpovojiiav (f)L\X'\TdTo[v 

ir\o8a)v. (Aa.) e^eiv X^P"^ 

]y ^0' r]ii5>v. Aax(Hq). KdeT[e\ 

] TT]u[p]pia(;. . a>y dcpUdTo 

] (pepo/xeuos ydp Kdv kvkXo) 

]pTCOU T icTTl TO 



20 



' Tibius (?) . . ., and do you, Getes, follow me. 

Dans. He is coming out with faggots ; there is the fuel and the fire. O Tibius and 
Getes, would you then leave me to be burnt, Getes, me your fellow slave, and your preserver ? 
Surely you will not desert me now ! Will you disregard me ? What have we against each 
other ? Here comes Pyrrhias, with what a load on his back I I am undone ! Laches himself 
is following with a lighted torch. 



154 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Laches. Put the logs quickly all round him. Give an exhibition, Daus, of your cunning 
by finding some device and escaping me here. 

Da. I find a device ? 

La. Yes, Daus ; for to deceive an easygoing and careless master is mere foolery. 

Da. Oh! 

La. But if one feels his brains turning to ashes — were you hurt ? 

Da. Not by you, master. 

La. This rascal, this rogue, has lately in a cowardly manner (made away) here with 
the inheritance of my dearest . . .' 

Col. i. ^j3wo-( ) is in the same hand as the interlinear dramatis persofiae in the next 
column. In the Cairo IMenander papyrus the names of speakers are frequently added in the 
right-hand margin of the column to which they refer, and that might be the case here, 
though ]/3a)o-( ) suggests no likely name. Perhaps (Ta(T{ ), e. g. 2w(r((as), a name frequent 
in comedy, may be read, though there would then remain an unexplained mark below the 
first 0-; cf. note on 1. 21. But of course the word may not be a name at all. 

Col. ii. 2. The supplements were suggested by Wilamowitz. For \KkrmaTib'\ai cf. 
Aristoph. Thesmoph. 728 and, for nvpbavop, 661. 19. 

3. Tt/3ios and TtTTjs were common names of slaves. In the line cited from Menander's 
Thettale as (v6vfila ^ie rbv SoiiXov Tpfcfxi (Kock, Fr. 231) Bentley proposed to read fiOvnta toi 
Ti'^ie K.T.\., but as the second syllable of the name is now shown to be long, the toi is 
superfluous. 

4. KaraKavaei is quite clearly written, and there is no necessity to emend to KaraKavaai, 
though that might have been expected. 

6. [vvv], which makes an apposite contrast to the aorist bmauxrapj', is due to Wilamowitz. 
The only objection to it is the stop after navv, but as the scribe's pointing is not always 
accurate (cf. e. g. 1. 3) this is not a fatal obstacle. If the presence of the stop is to be pressed, 
we might read o\v naw, [ovk], 

7. The letter before npos, of which only a very slight vestige remains, may be w, but 
there does not seem to be room for [ourjo). 

8. [6 nvp]pias Wilamowitz. Cf. Aristoph. Progs 730 Ilvppiai.s and Schol. 6Vo/xa yap 

BovXov 6 Uvppias. 

9. The t of daib'' was inserted after the second S had been written. 

II. Restored by Wilamowitz. In 1. 10 after raxv an indistinct spot on the edge of the 
papyrus may represent a stop, but it is further away from the final letter than is the case e. g. 
in 11. 5 and 6 and, since an object for irepiBeT is desirable, it is better disregarded. Even if 
the stop were certain, this would not necessarily preclude the suggested supplement ; cf. 
note on 1. 6. 

13-4. Cf. for the language Menander, Perinlhia (Kock, Fr. 393) "Oo-ny TrapaKa^uv 

Ofcnrorrjv unpaypova Koi Kov(pov (^airaTO. Oepdnav, ovk 018' o rt ovtos peyaKuov fort bianenpaypepos, 

(ira^tkTfpioiTas tov (TTporepov) djSeXrfpoi'. Such a Striking similarity seems to us to point to 
Menander as the author of our fragment ; cf. introd. 

15. f)f)v appears to be an exclamation not otherwise attested. Wilamowitz compares 
Euripides, Here. Pur. 906 ^^ {n ^)- 

1 6. The sentence d 8f . . . araKTfjv is not completed, a wince on the part of the slave 
at the idea of his brains' ashes leading Laches to break off with the question tKviadqs. 
A single stop instead of double dots should have been placed between oraKTtjv and (KuiaBijs : 
the latter word is also wrongly accented. This passage seems to be much the earliest 
instance of the use of (TTaKrfj in the sense of W^pa, for which cf. e. g. Demetrius Constantinop. 

HieracOS. 2. 18 p-^tu. QTaKTr\% dn6 KXrjpaTidav. 



855. MENANDER? 155 

1 8. KaTo. Tcov iTKe\u)v : cf. AHstoph. Peace 241 6 Kara Toil' (TK(\olv and Schol. Rav. 
(Tvixl^oXiKov fVi tS>v 8ia dfiXiav anonarovvTciiv (Wilamowitz). Whether this explanation would 
suit the present passage remains uncertain owing to the mutilation of the context, e/c7r]o6a)i/ (?) 
in 1. 19 would be consistent with it. 

19. There may have been two dots, not one, after ]oha)v, the papyrus being damaged in 
the place where the lower dot would be placed. Since KaeT[f] in 1. 20 is attributed to 
Laches, a change of speaker must have intervened in 11. 19-20. fWjoSwi/ is probably to be 
restored rather than ir\ohu)v. 

21. Perhaps ] ttwc a^UeTo, but the vestige before ws might also represent double dots, 
and <i)s should then be read. With regard to the name of the speaker inserted above the 
line, we read n]i.[p]ptaf on the strength of 1. 8, but the traces preceding the termination las 
are extremely slight, and though not inconsistent with ]u[.lp they do not suggest those 
letters. 2[wViar, a name possibly to be recognized in the first column (cf. note ad loc), would 
in some ways be more suitable. 

23. The article t6 at the end of a verse is noticeable; cf. introd. This line was 
apparently the last of the column. 

24. We have failed to fix the place of this small fragment. The letters suggest 
Tt/3[tof. 

856. Scholia on Aristophanes' Achamians. 

Fr. ((z) 1 1-9 X 5-9, Fr. ((5) 10-2 x 5-1 cm. Third century. 

These scholia are contained in two fragments, preserving parts of two successive 
columns. The long interval between the subjects of the last line of Col. i and 
the first remaining line of Col. ii shows that the columns were tall, the probable 
height of the papyrus being over 30 cm. They were also proportionately broad, 
and the compact writing combined with extensive abbreviation enables the scribe 
to economize greatly in space. On the same scale another column would have 
brought him to the end of the play, and the commentary was thus completed in 
three columns. It may well have belonged to a series of similar commentaries, 
and is evidently not to be classed as a collection of school-notes. It Is written 
in rather small sloping uncials, apparently of the third century ; the several 
notes are divided ofif from each other by double dots, accompanied by paragraphi ; 
a single high dot usually follows the lemmata, but Is also occasionally used as 
an ordinary stop ; accents and breathings are sparingly added. The system 
of abbreviation resembles that of the Berlin commentary of Didymus on Demo- 
sthenes and of the 'A^jji^aiwy IloXtreta ; besides words shortened by the ordinary 
method of omitting the termination and writing a letter above the line, the 
following more conventional abbreviations occur : y'= yap, b'= 8e, k'= kui, ii = ixtv, 
'n=T:apd, 7r = 7rotTjT^s, i^rrTrpo?, T=T(av, (/)j = 0rjcrt or (f)aai, <> :=el(TL. 

As win be seen from the excerpts quoted below, the scholia stand In no 
close relation to the extant scholia, of which the principal source for the 



156 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Acharnians is the Codex Ravennas. The papyrus notes are usually not only 
far shorter but also less frequent ; vv. 392-444, for instance, are covered in 
five lines whereas in Dindorf s edition they occupy four pages. On the other 
hand words or phrases are sometimes here selected for comment which in the 
extant scholia are passed over (cf. 11. 9, 29, -3^^, 37, 38, 44, 68), and the notes are 
occasionally quite full, e. g. those on vv. 614-7 5 similarly a more precise explana- 
tion than that of the scholia is noticeable in 1. ^^. Verbal agreements occur here 
and there, but they are nowhere striking and scarcely amount to more than 
is natural in a treatment of the same subject. If, indeed, there be any historical 
connexion between the annotations of the papyrus and those represented in the 
mediaeval MSS., it is of a very slight and distant character. 

In the commentary below Schol. means the extant scholia, which we cite 
from the edition of Dindorf, with some modification from Rutherford's transcript 
of the Ravennas. 



Fr. {a) 



Col. i. 



] TlVOiV 

](nov 

]oL 5(e) (l>a(<n) 

]a^a\\co(v) : 
7r(oy]a>va ^^©(rr ) 

0e]a>pos : 
Oto^vis* TpaycoiSia?] "^v^pos Tro{irjTr]^) 

KlaraircX 
15 Taaovxaf j^aroy [] 

0]7;(o-i) TToXiu : 
]rji a 



10 



108 ? 
118 

120 
127 

140 

160 



856. SCHOLIA ON ARISTOPHANES' ' ACHARNIANS ' 157 



20 



TO)T 



]oi {eiai) : 
]au fiVT 



174 
180 



Fr. (b) 



25 



30 



35 



40 



45 



50 



\l/il4)Tl6aK€iv 368, 376 
T-qv ircpx) 378 



l€p«Vl)|XOU* 7ro(ir]Tr]9) 386 

391 
392 



]ivov : ouK €yao-iTi6[a)(o-o|iaL)] oiov [ 

iTTii ylfr](f)]ois SiKa^ouT(9 XpcovTai . [ 
(Ti K(0|Jio)li5iav' eis tovs Ba(3v\a>i/io[vs 

]tovs t((ov) A6r]vaia>v K{ai) m8i[ 

v\tto KXiCovos Slktji/ e0i;[ye 

TiS rjv Koj/xr^TTjy : Tou Sio'\)<j)OV oioi^ [ 

. . iraploifiiav a-Krjyjrii^ ayoou ovjo? . [ 

.... 8]uo"iroT|JioS' eiaayeTaL y{ap) TTaf)[a tool EvptTriSrji (uy e/CTreTrrco/ftuy 419 
€K Tr]9 ^a](riXeias K{ai) Trroo^oy 7r€pii/[oaTcoi' 

]TaL nap avran vwo <5(e) y^iipcov [ 

. . Ta pa]KT] K{ai) Ta ax^afiara : o'Ki|Jia[Xio'w 

TJoiy prjjxaai : TTi\€(})o)t 6 a'Y[a) <|)pova)' 

|i€V ou8]€V 7rp(oy) ro X/°^°^ Xeyet ; a)(nr€[p -q pLT|TTip' 
(j)X)X\€La] 5os ra cranpa (fivXXa a €k t[ 
5iKa* Ajaxat'ioj/ ri : €|jnrop€UTc[a* 

, ] VTTip AaK€5(ai|xovio)v) av5p<»v \€'y(civ) . [ 

... 8p]o^eoi>v : irapaKCKojjL|i€va [ 

O'IK(UOV) l5o\€V Ov{t ) aiKVCOl TlOooucOL €01K[ ) [ Tr€(J)\)0't'Y'Y»p.€VOl 

€KK€Kav]ix€yoi : iropvd 5uo* coy nopvl o-KoXia 

IxeXr] TTa\poivLa : S€pL(j)iwv ratv A6[r]i'ai iraXXaSicDV 

. . . . to] Triepi) Ta9 rpirjpeis ovTct naXXaS[o9 ayaXfxaTa 
€V 8iktuo]ls Xe(ye«) ej/ yvpyadois : Tpt)([i5<ov 

]ai : Tov 8l€] T-qXecljOV [ 

]....«.[.. .]vKaj/ €7r[ 

20 letters ]. avToyv [ 
„ „ a\yQ}t^i^o{ji€ycDu) TOo[i> 

21 „ ] ouroy 5efx[^ 
4)\)X€Ta*] aTTO Tjyy aivrrjs) (f>y[XT]s 568 



Xp€OS 

la^va |xot 
(TKav 

^pa|j.p.T 



444 
446, 455 

457j 469 

478 

480 
482, 483 

517 
520, 526 

527? 532 
542, 547 

550. 551 
555 



158 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. {a) Col. ii. 

[ ]xn?i[ 

[....] t{(cv) a[. .].T(i>[ . • 

[.]/caA( ) OL erepoi Toy[s 

Seiv coy (J)a[a-i) K{aC) oi r]6[ irxepov aiTU 5S4 

55 Lva KaOeis €ls ttju ^apvya e[^€/xe(T7] KO|jnroXaK(u0o\))- ovtm Xe(yei) 589 

Toi/ Aafiayov ot{i) KOfiiraa-Trjs [rju o'uou5ap)((i5T)s)" crTpa 595, 596 

Ta>vi5iis 7r{apa) to <TTpaTev€a$a[L |JiLO'9apx.i5'tis Se on ftiaOou 597 

Xap.(3ava>y e0 019 ctv 7r[ KOKKU-yeS* e 598 

prjfiiau OL opu(€L9) : Ticra|j,cv[o<})aiv(nnrous)* navoup'Ynr(7rapxL8as)' na 603 
60 t'ovpyiai : r€p'tiTo9€o5((opous) Fepl-q^ 605 

a\\ 6 Koiaupas* MeyaKXrj^' t[ 614 

5(e) Af(ai) oaoi npoSoTai (eicri) 01 fi^ei^) a[ 

eKeiae €iTa iTvv6aveT{aC) X[ 

Tr)v Ta^LV avTcou rj (p[ 
65 TOL (P'qia-i) Kotavpas K{ai) Aafia)([o9 616—7 

eXeyop €^1(tt(0' to 5(e) a7ro[uLnTpop 

TTpo(f)(i>vovaiv i^KXTco 'iv[a 

Aa|jLax.os' ^lO JiKaionioXi?) ovS[ 619 ? 

Xa,uvoiroX(iTas) oiov \avuovs : o[t€ Ktti paaiXtus* v 635, 647 



Kai 



70 TTcp (avTOv Xeycov OT(e) /3a<rtXe[i;y 

TTpcoTOu p{^v) TTOTipov Tttis uav[aL KpuTovaiv 

H^yaXocppoavvriv eavTOV [ 

Sia 5(e) TavTtt <pr]{ai) AaKeSaifioiyLov^) [ 652 

'iro(i'qTTiv) (pa{ai) y{ap) 01 jxiev) avTOv eKei . [ 654 

75 otov e^ (ou TO SiKaa-TLKOv [ 656-8 

K{aL) irpo9 X^P^^ XeyovT . [ 

glB ovtco KaTeirpaTTOv [ 

<j>X€'YDpa' euOep/xo?: <})[€\|;aXos* o-Trir $r] p : iTravQpaKihi^' i^6ve9 665,668,670 

r) Kpia : 01 8(c) ©acnav to[ 671 

6. The remains of this line suggest Schol. 108 axwr) utrpov iari UepaiKov . . . «AXot Se 
(fiaaiv on Kiarrj iiTTiv. 

7. Cf. Schol. oiiTOS 6 KXfiardevrfs ae\ tu yeveiov i^vparo in\ to df\ (f}aiv(a6ai pe'us' diu (vvovx<o 
avTov (lm((i. 



856. SCHOLIA ON ARISTOPHANES' ' ACHARNIANS' 159 

9. There is nothing in the extant scholia corresponding to 7rcoy]coi/a (xo(vt ) ; the w is 
very uncertain, but iruyava is strongly suggested by f^K'"' )• The overwritten letter is 
plainly o not w. 

1 0. Cf. Schol. on ov8erroT( y iV^ft 6vpa : irapoifiUi eVt rmv iroWoiis ^evovs aTroBtxofJ^fvav. 

11. Cf. Schol. 6 Krjpv^ KoXel ("iWov TTpi(j^(VTr)v i\66vra napa ^itoKkovs tov QpaKwv jSaaiXews, 
npos ov rjaav airocTTeiXavTa avrov ^AdrjvaioC ovtos fie fKaXftro Gecopoj. The double dotS after 

Gejojpos indicate that the name is the end of the note, not of the lemma. 

12. The note in Schol. is similarly worded ; oilros 6 Qeoyvis rpayabias Ti-otrjr^s yf/vxp6s. 
14. jcaraTrfXraCTOfrat is glossed in Schol. KaTaKovrlcrovai, KaTmroXfpfjaovai . . . KciToSpa- 

fiovprai. 

16. The note perhaps relates to aaxrinoXis in 1. 163 ; but crcoa VoXn/ cannot be read. 

17-20. The remains of these lines give no clear clue to their subjects. In the extant 
scholia there are notes on 162 6 6paviTT]s Xew?, 163 about Dicaeopolis and the o-Ko'poSa, 
166 ov pf] npoaei k.t.X., 171 8io(TT}pia, 1 72 evrjv, but Coincidences do not occur here with their 
language. dLoaijpia cannot be read in 1. 17; the first letter is certainly;?, jevotj in 1. 19 
might be eWs referring to i'vrjv, but is more likely to be the termination of a participle, 
or eV ois. 

21. Cf. Schol. pvTTOiTov : avrl tov aKopoda, e'^ av 6 ij,vttu>t6s yiveTai, KaTaaK^vu^eTai dno 
Tvpov /cat (TKopodov Koi <oov. 

22. aK\r]poi is probably a gloss on npivivot in 180 or ureptipoves in 181. Cf. Schol. 

npii'ivoi ', artpeol koi (TKKrjpoi . . . drfpcipoves '. \iav (TKKrjpoi . . . 

23. The letter before v can hardly be »?, so eVtlj/^wu (cf. 11. 355, 359, 365-6) is un- 
suitable. oiiK fvaaniSaaopai is gloSSed in Schol. durl tov oii KaOon'Kiaopm, ovk danl8i irtpi- 
^aXovpai (Tfpvvvopevos, rj (TKivaadtjaopai, indbri ^pa^vs fipt. 

24. Schol. are quite different, ^i]4"? ^^kuv: olov KaTabiKa^fiv. navTaxov ws (piXodlKovs . . . 
Tovs ' Adrjvaiovs Kwpoibfl, 

25— 7« Cf. Schol. TOVS BalivXuiviovs Xeyft. tovtovs yap irpo t<>>v ' Axapvecou 'ApiCTTOcpdvrjs eSiSo^fi^, 
fi> on noWovs KQKas eirrfv. fKapddrjaeu yap ras T€ KXrjpcoTcis Ka\ xfi'POTovrjTas dpxas kuI K\fu>un 
TrapovTav tcov ^eVcoi' . . . Ka\ dia tovto opynrdus 6 KXecoi* iypdi^aTO avTOV dbiKias . . . 7rf6t[ in 1. 26 

seems strange. 

27—8. Cf. Schol. ovTQS 6 'l. pi\a>p (CTTi TToiTjrfji KOI TpaycoboTTOLos dvuipaXos Ka\ dvoiKOp6p,rjTOs, 
8id TO nyav epnaOtls ypd(p£iv vttq6((J(is . . . fKcopoiddro St cos nnvv ko^Q>v. The WOrd Kopi'jTTjs is USed 
in connexion with him by Aristophanes in Clouds 348. dvo\.Kovo'^i\Tr\i (rpayadias) would be 
a much less likely restoration. 

28. TOV 2i<Jv(f)ov : ras 2. MSS., on which Schol. have dpipdv tipu koI Travovpyov TTapabf8a)Kaaiv 
ol TTOirjTal tov 'Siavcfiov . , . 

29. There is no comment in Schol. on this verse beyond the Victorian gloss (tkj]\I/ip : 
rjyovv np6<j)aaip. 

30—3. Cf. Schol. . . . dcj)r]pe6r] ttjp ^aaikfiap (ilrfvs bia to yrjpas vno Tap 'Aypiov iraiSap Ka\ 

TTtpii'ifi Tantipos ... 1. 32 seems to be a continuation of the same note, and 1. 33 
TO pa]Kr) . . . axia-paTa may also belong to it ; the latter words may, however, be a gloss 
on 423 \aKi8as or 431 andpyapa, or go back to Tpvxr) in 418. Cf. Schol. in the note on 
Olpfvs quoted above rpvxr] to. pdKtj TpuyiKws : similarly XoKt'Stf in 423 are explained as bteppoyora 

IfiaTia, or according to 01. Vict. Xoki's* paxds . . . axia-pa. 

33-4. Cf. Schol. (TKipaXlaoi : f^ovOepldd), xKfvdaa (c.r.X. TOis prjpaai in 1. 34 belongs tO 

the same note. 

34. Schol. have only a note to the effect that the verse is a parody of a line in Eurip. 

Telephus KaXas i'xoipi, Trj\f(f>a 8' ciyw (ppopw. 

35. TTp{os) . . . Xfyet : there is nothing corresponding to this in Schol. On 457 Schol. 
has aKoiTTTd airop ws XaxnponaXip e^oira pi^Ttpa ttjp KXfirci). 



i6o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

36. Cf. Schol. olov nffiapa^fjLfva /cat evTcX^ tcov Xaxavav (j)vWa . . , to. dnoXenlaiiaTa t5)V 
\axava)v. There was apparently no stop after bos. 

37. Cf. Schol. . . . eo-Ti yap (17 (TKavhi^) \axavov aypiov fVTeXfS. No nOte OCCUrS OH e/x7ro- 

ptvTfa, a reading in which the papyrus supports R and other MSS. evnopevria A, 
fKTTopfvrea Bentley. 

38. There is no corresponding comment in Schol. 

39. For Spjo/iftoj/ cf. Schol. ypup-P-h 5' uvrrji : apxr}, d(f)€Tt]pia, r) Xeyo^eVfj /3aX/3/y eK fieTa^opus 
ovv Twu 8pope<ov. On TrapnKfKOHfjLtva the note is firjdev cWeXej exovra- dno [leracpopas tSdv ddoKifKov 
vop-iapdrwu . . . 

40. This line is obscure; o-uvcoi indicates that the reference is to verse 520, and we 
therefore restore (tik{vop) i8o]i(v, though it is noticeable that there is no stop after i8o]i(v ; cf., 
however, 1. 36. nduivcoi seems to be corrupt ; Ti6av hi is as unsatisfactory here as iiOavun. 
Ttduivov occurs in Acharn. 688. 

41. Cf. Schol. (pva-L-y^ Xeyerai to fKTOs \iTTi(Tp.a rav aKopobav . . . ■jTfn'Krfap.ivoi [necfiva-TjiJLevoi R) 
OTTO p.era(f)opds . . . d(TKQ)v rj cf)vacov. fj {KKeKovfiivoi, oldovvres. 

The note here on nopm 8vo apparently had no relation to Schol. iropva is the accepted 
reading; nopvas R and Athenaeus, 

42. na]poivia: Schol. have no explanation of the term aKoXiov in the present passage, 

but cf. IVaspS 1238 fvioi 8( (jiao-iv w? eV Tov evavTiov npoarjyopevdTja-av dKoXia to. napoivia fJifXt], 
and 1239 Xe^etff aKoKiov: . . . iv rots Upa^'iK\r]s (f>(p{Tai napoivion. For 2(pi<f)icov cf. Schol. 17 2cpi(/>of 
vijcros evrfXeardTT) irpos ttjv BpuKrjv, 

43. Cf. Schol. eV rn'ti npiopais twv TpiT^puv rjv dydX/xard Ttva ^xiKiva ttjs 'Adrjpds KadiSpvpitva. 

44. Schol. have no remark on 8iktvois. rpixides are explained as elSos IxOvav. 

45. ]at is probably part of a note on viyXdpav in 554, e. g. /xeXos «... xp^«""]at or . . . ot 

KfXf vo-rlat ; cf Schol. 6 viyXapos Kpovpid eari Koi /^e'Xos p.ov(n.Kov napaKeXfvaTiKOU. On top 8e 
Tr]\((})oi> the only remark is Koi Tavra eK TrjXtcfiov EiptTri'Sov. 

48. This line appears to be part of a description of the quarrel between the two halves 

of the chorus; cf. Schol. 557 ivravOa biaipurai 6 xopos els 8vo p.epr], Kai to fiiu opyl^erai tcf)' ok 
\tyei 6 A(K., TO 8e /cat dnobexeTai, and 563 to rjfiixopiov to o'vi'aywi't^'dpei/oi/ avTc^ X/yfi on fxi) 
duax(>>pT)(Tr]s , . • 

49-52. Perhaps 1. 51 or 1. 52 should be combined with 1. 50, but we have failed to 
make out any connexion. If 1. 50 is rightly explained as a gloss on 568 ^uXcVa it is not 
possible to put 1. 51 higher up than 1. 49. There is no note on (pvXfra in Schol. 

53. The first letter may be X or x instead of k ; the letter above the line seems 
to be X or x- 

54—5. Cf. Schol. TO TTTtpov aiTet tva (^tp-far]. tlaBaai yap 01 bvatfieis TTTtpa xpTJ(T6ai. 

25—6. Cf. Schol. KOfjLTToKaKvdov : paTaioKop-nov, Kop.no)8ovs iv TW KavxdaOai, Trapcrroirjafv Kai 
TrapeTrXaaev ovopa[Ta] opvidos 8ia to Kop.naaTrjv diai tov Adpaxov. On ov (TTrov8apxi8i]S the gloSS 
is oil (Tnov8d^u>v TTfpl dpx^ii. 

57-8. Schol. are similar, the glosses being, on o-rparwj/tSfjr, dvri toO aTpaTfvopfvos, 
aTpaTiuTTjs, and on fiia-dapx., picrdov Xapl:idv(oV rj oti roiis tS>v (TTpaTiwTciiv p.iaBovs ija-Biev. 

58—9. The note on KOKKvyes in Schol. is different : dwi tov uTaKToi xai dTrai8fvToi. koI yap 
6 KOKKv^ TO fwoi/ (ipovaov Ti <pdiyy(Tai. A similar idea, however, to that apparently expressed in 

(prfpiav is to be found in Hesychius KoKKvyes' eVl vnovorjOevTav TrXeidi/coi' dvai, Kai dXiyoiv 

OVT(tiV. 

59-60. Schol. have 6 Ticrap.fv6s cos ^evos Ka\ p.aiTTiyias KupabuTai, 6 8€ 'i>aivimros ws a-v(l>8t]s 
Ka\ rjTaipTjKois. . . . nai/ovpytTTTrapxi'Sas : tovtovs K(i)p(o8('i ws navovpyovs . . . (Is p.aXaKiav fiie^dXXero 
Tep-qs Koi ©fdScopo?, Kai ort fK 8ovXu)V. 

61-4. In Schol. 6 Koto-upasis similarly interpreted as Megacles, but here the resemblance 
ceases. What follows apparently corresponds to the explanation of the allusion to 6 KotoT.'pas 



856. SCHOLIA ON ARISTOPHANES' ' ACHARNIANS ' i6i 

Ka\ Aaiiaxos quoted ill the next note, but it is quite differently worded. In 1. 62 the supposed 
8 of 5(f) may be meant for an a, but the abbreviation a here would be more difficult 
to explain. 

^5~7* Cf. Schol. (lu>d(aau ('l TTOTf (KX^oiTO ciTTOviTTTpov djTO Tuiv dvplBoiv tva firj Tti ^po-xfj roiv 
Trapiovrav e^tcrTO) Xeyetv . , . tovto Xeyft Btnirvpcov M. koI A. cos nporepov fj.ev neprjras ovras flra 
e^ai(f)V7]s nXovTrjcravTas otto Trjs noXfcos. to7s davd^ovcrt, napjjvovv oi (plXoi i^'nJTaadai ruv dnvet^dv toIs 

ToiovToii ocpeiXovaii' epuvovs Kal xp^^y or according to another explanation, ol (f>lXoi x^^s ko). npuirjv 

(Tvvf^ovXevov KaTaxpecns oiiaiv viro re (pduccp k(h 6(pXr]nurct)v e^icTTaadai rrjs ovcria^, ws /ixij bvvapivois 

anobuvvni. In 1. 66 r of to is Corrected. 

68. The paragraphus above this line indicates a new lemma, and the stop after \ap.axos 
suggests (though it does not prove) that that name formed part of it ; hence we refer the 
note to 619. There is nothing corresponding in Schol. 

69. Cf. Schol. ;^auj'07r. : Kfxf^vvcopevov^ n€p\ tijv noXiTeiav ij ttjv TruXiv. 

69—72. Schol. 648—9 have norepoi t(us iav(Ti: TToioL aiiTav tuiv 'Adrjvnicov (koi tu>v AaKtbai- 
p-ovlav T) e'v rrj vavp,axia Kparoixriv . . . TTorepovs e'lnoi rroXXd '. civrl tov irepl tovtov tov Trnujrnv rjpwTa 
rivas Sia,3(jXXei Km Kai/nwSeZ. ((PatTKf yap oti ovs av ovtos 6 TToirjTrjs ffKci)\^»;, tuvtovs aci)(f)poui.^€a6at Koi 

yiveaBai ^eXriovs. In 1. 7 2 the first v of eavrov is written as a curved stroke above a, as if 
the word was to be abbreviated, and there has been some correction of the t ; possibly 
e(iD(roi>) TOV [ should be read. 

73. dm S(e) K.T.X. seems to have been tacked on to the previous note without a new 
lemma. Schol. have 8ia Tovff : bia to 'ix^'-^ Ipa^ tov ' Apia-Tocjxivtjv noirjTrjv npnTTov. The papyrus 
agrees with R in reading Tav6 : Tovff A". 

74. Cf. Schol. evTfidev Tivfs vop-i^ovcnv iv Alyivr/ Tas Kutp-udlai ttoluv tov ' A, . . . tois itXrjddais 
fis rjv Twv iv Tij vTjcrai KXrjpovx'Jo'dvTmv . . . ('iXXcos' ov8f\s laroprjKev a>s fv Aiyivt] KeKTrjrai ti 'A. . . . 

K[<Dna>idias might be read after eK«t. 

75-7, These lines seem to give a paraphrase of 656-8; cf. Schol. 657 ovd' vrroTelvcov : 

ovbe Ticri fiiadov 8i8ovs Iv' avTov eTTcuveauxriV) 658 KUTap8<ov . . . KaTajBpexfov {ifxas to7s (naivoi? 
(Bf (pvTa. 

78. Cf. Schol. 665 (pXeyvpd : Xafirrpd, (piXeyovaa, Xdfinovaa, 6epprj 8ia tovs avdpaKas. 668 
(pe^'aXos : (nnv6rjp. 

78—9. Cf. Schol. on fnavdpaKiBes, X(TtTo\ Ix^ves ottto/. irdvTa to. enl dvdpdKwv 6rTTa>p.eva 

ejravdpaKiSas fKaXovv. These two lines project below the last line of the preceding column. 

79. Perhaps after Oamav a high point was written which has coalesced with the cross-bar 
of the following r. 

857. Epitome of Herodotus. 

10-7 X 7' I cm. Fourth century. 

The lower portion of a leaf from a vellum codex, containing in all 28 lines, 
most of which are incomplete, from a historical work. The script is a medium- 
sized upright uncial of the biblical type, and probably of the fourth century, 
without lection-marks. The MS. is far from accurate, serious mistakes (probably 
due to omissions) occurring in 11. 3 and 17. The verso is concerned with the 
dispatch of Cadmus the Coan by Gelon to watch the struggle between Xerxes 
and the Greeks, and is nothing but an abstract of Herodotus vii. 163. The 
subject of the recto, the refusal of the Argives to join in the defence of Greece, 

M 



l62 



THE OXYRHYXCHCS PAPYRI 



corresponds to that of cc. 148-52 of the same book, though the verbal 
resemblance to Herodotus is here less marked. In the absence of external 
evidence to show which side of the leaf came first, we suppose that the order of 
the narrative in our fragment agreed with Herodotus, and therefore the recto 
precedes the verso. A mention in 1. a of the battle of Thermopylae, which 
is not described by Herodotus until cc. 2ci sqq., causes some difficult}' (cf. 
II. 1-4, note), but it is clear that this is a forward reference and not part of our 
author's description of the engagement. The chapters interx'ening between 152 
and 163 are occupied by, first, a digression on Gelon. and secondly his colloquy 
with the ambassadors who came to ask for help, and the lacuna between the end 
of the recto and the beginning of the verso no doubt contained a brief account of 
the unsuccessful embassy ; cf. note on 11. 15 sqq. Probably our fragment belongs 
to an epitome of Herodotus as such, rather than to a historical work closely based 
upon him. This being granted, the first name that suggests itself for the author- 
ship is Theopompus, who began his historical researches by writing an epitome 
of Herodotus of which only a few isolated words sur\'ive. The fragment is 
too short to enable us to obtain much idea of the writer's style, but the occurrence 
of at least t«^o examples of hiatus (11. ao and 21-2), which is very rare in the 
extant quotations from Theopompus. does not favour the view that he w^as the 
author, though his earliest literary efforts may have shown less care in this 
respect. 

The fragment is in two pieces which do not actually join, but the position of 
the smaller one, which contains the last line of each page and parts of the two 
preceding ones, is made practically certain by the combination xp^i[h-o~^ ^^ ^- -7> 
that word being required by the context ; cf. note on 11. 15 sqq. 



Recto. 



Verso. 



[. .]S[ . 7rpo]cre^a[\ . . 
[Se]pfiOTrvXai9 r]ycJj'i. 
YJoKTO ot ava rpiuKo 
[o-iloi/y ttXtjv Apy€Lco~ 
5 [o^vroi yap e0 €avrco~ 
lievovre^ oirre av 
Bpas ovre vavs eSco 
Kav \Kai oySeyi avve 
pLa'^ovv 5ila T-qv So 
10 Ko[vaai' avTcou] npo^ 



15 [. . . aTTrjX'Oov o 5,6 Pe 
[Xoor €v\a^ovfi( i'09 

TTepi TOV flT] VlKTfOdV 
Tcav TCOV EW'qi'Q.-^V 

KavTOS arvyrjo-q vtto 
20 TOV (Bap^apov eTrefxyln 
KaSfioi' TOV SkvOov [ 
ai'Spa Kco[ov €Tr\i Trf[v 

TT]KOy[TOpC0l' Tp LCCV [ 

fiS" A\(e\(I>ov^ . . .] no\[. 



857. EPITOME OF HERODOTUS 163 

n[€p(Ta9 avyycvei ? 25 to[ ] • ®[- 

«k..]- [ i ] • /3l«/>]/3«p[- 

ov[.]o'rrp[ [ ]. a xPn[lA<^ra [ . 

rjnepa^ VTrepeiS[. . [. .] kui yr\v Kai vScop 

' . . . attacked Thermopylae, the (Lacedaemonians) fought to the number of three 
hun(h-ed, except the Argives. These remaining at home provided neither men nor ships, 
and allied themselves with neither side on account of their pretended relationship to the 
Persians (?)... (The ambassadors) . . . departed. Gelon, taking precautions that if the 
Greeks were defeated he should himself suffer no harm at the hands of the barbarians, sent 
Cadmus, son of Scythes, a man of Cos, in command of three fifty-oared vessels to Delphi 
(v.'ith instructions to offer to the barbarians, if victorious), money, earth, and water ..." 

1-4. n-po]o-f|3a'X may be imperfect or aorist. The subject is in any case the Persians 
or Xerxes, but the construction of 11. 1-4 is obscure. After 01 in 1. 3 a word has dropped 
out : (AaKfSai/xoftoi) would suit ava rpinKoaiovs and might easily have been omitted through 
homoioteleuton, but then nXrjv Apyeiav must be connected, not with the words immediately 
preceding, but with something lost before 1. i. (F.XXrjrey) or (iHKonow-qcnoi) would suit ttXtji^ 
Apyftwi/ very well, but involve a difficulty with regard to the figure, since 300 applies to the 
Lacedaemonian contingent. The reference to the battle of Thermopylae is in any case 
somewhat remarkable, since Herodotus first mentions that place in c. 175 and describes 
the battle in cc. 201 sqq., whereas our fragment corresponds to cc. 148-63 ; of. introd. 

5. The neutrality of Argos is discussed in detail by Herodotus, who opposes the Argive 
version of their action (cc. 148-9) to that current elsewhere (cc. 150-1) and then gives 
his own intentionally confused view (c. 152). If our restoration of 11. 9-12 is on the right 
lines, the epitomizer explained the action of the Argives in the light of c. 150 (the letter of 
Xerxes claiming relationship between the Persians and Argives), thus interpreting correctly 
the real opinion of Herodotus, who no doubt believed in the medism of the Argives, though 
unwilling to accuse them openly. 

14. rjfiepas vn€p(ih[{-e or -or?) : the subject here seems to have changed, and we have 
been unable to recover the connexion with Herodotus. 

15 sqq. Cf. Hdt. vii. 163 ol piv 8f] tu>v 'EXXijiJCBf /JyyeXot ToiaxiTn t(o reXcori )(pr)paTi.(Tdpevoi 
dnen\fov' VeXcov Se Trpoj rniiTa 8f!.(Tas fiev nepi roicn "KWr^ai /hi) ov diivavTai tov ftdp^apov inrtp- 
^aXfcrdai, deipov Be Koi ovk dvaa.xfTov noirjadpfpos f\6(i)v es nfXonovvrjtrov ap)({cr0ai vtto XaKthcupovloiv 
ioiv 2iKf\iT]s Tvpavvos, TavTrji/ pev Tr]v 686u ijptXrjaf, 6 8e aWrjs (i\fTo. (Tcelre yap rd^iaTa fnvdtTo 
TOV Uipa-rjv hia^f^rjKdra top 'EWrianouTou, nepnei irevTrjKOVTepoKTi rpial Kddpov tov 'SKiidea nv8pa Kaov 
ff AfXipovs, (\0VTa ■)(pripaTa TroXXa Ka\ (ptKtovs Xoyuvs, Kapa8oKr]croirra Trjv pd)(rjv tt) TTftreerai, Ka\ rjv 
piv 6 ^dp^apos viKa, rd re xprjpaTa avrio 8i8dvai Kal yijv re Kai v8a)p tcov opx^' ^ TfXcov, i]v 8i ol 
E,XXrjV(s, dnicro) dndyeiv. 

1 7-9. The construction in Trepi tov pi . . . arvx^crr] has become confused. Either nepi 
tov must be omitted or arvxTjar) altered to aTvxw^i- or, what is perhaps more likely, a word 
like peXXovTos is to be supplied after jiepi tov. 

22. eir\ : the vestige of the letter after the lacuna is extremely slight, but there is not 
room for /X6r]a. For fVi with the dative in connexion with irepireiv cf. Thuc. vi. 29 irepneiv 

avTov €7t\ Toaovro) (TrparevpaTi. 

24. 7roX[ may be some part of noXvs (cf. Hdt. /. c. exovTa xpw'^'^'^ TvoXXd), but it is not 
certain that any letter is lost at the end of 1. 24 ; 7roX|Xo[v is unsatisfactory. 
28. Perhaps [xf] Kai. xP^\.A^'^°' [ "^^y ^"^ '• 27 ; cf. Hdt. /. c. 

M 2 



164 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

858. Oration against Demosthenes. 

Fr. {b) 18x7-7 cm. Late second or early third century. 

Two fragments of an oration attacking Demosthenes, written on the verso of 
a second-century cursive document of which only a few letters from the ends 
and beginnings of lines are preserved. The exact position of Fr. {a), containing 
parts of six lines from the top of a column, in relation to Fr. {b) is not certain, 
but that the two fragments belong to the same column is most likely. If so 
Fr. {a) must on account of the recto be placed above the right side of Fr. {b) and 
comes from near the ends of the lines, but there is nothing to indicate how near 

I. I of Fr. {b) is to the top of the column. The script of the oration is a sloping 
uncial bearing a strong resemblance to the hand of 853, with which it may 
be regarded as contemporary. The ends of lines are lost throughout, and the 
margin is also broken at the beginnings, being only visible at 1. 29, where rat 
seems to be the beginning of a line, though even that is not quite certain ; in 

II. 26-36 however, where the restorations hardly admit of doubt, it is clear that 
the inteival between the end of one line and the beginning of the next does not 
exceed four or five letters. No lection-marks occur except a doubtful accent 
in 1. 4, but there are several corrections (some due to the original scribe, others 
in a second hand), the text being very faulty. 

Where the fragment first becomes intelligible at 1. 13, an unfavourable 
comparison is being instituted between Demosthenes and another orator, whose 
identity is uncertain, the point of the contrast being that Demosthenes had never 
himself taken part in active service. In 1. 25 the subject changes, and the 
speaker criticizes Demosthenes for his behaviour when the news of the capture 
of Elatea reached Athens ; this passage is clearly borrow^ed from the famous 
description of that crisis in De Cor. 169 sqq., several of the phrases which 
Demosthenes there used being here actually placed in his mouth (11. 25-9). 
The oration to which the fragment belonged therefore presupposes the existence 
of the De Corona which was composed after B. C. 330 ; but on the other hand the 
general situation implied by our author seems to be the period between the 
capture of Elatea in 339 and the battle of Chaeronea in September 338, for 
since Demosthenes took part in that engagement the reproaches addressed to 
him in 11. 24-5 and 29-30 would be inapphcable at a later date. This incon- 
sistency at once gives rise to the suspicion that our fragment belongs to a 
rhetorical exercise, not to a genuine oration whether of Demades or another 
philo-Macedonian orator, and several other considerations combine to leave 
no room for doubt as to the real character of the composition. The florid, jerky 



858. ORATION AGAINST DEMOSTHENES 



165 



style^ the use of bi]iJ.)]y6pos-, a term foreign to Attic oratory, the exaggerated 
description of Demosthenes in 1. 19 as holding a shield in one hand and a 
psephisma in the other, and still more the serious blunder with regard to Attic 
law which has crept into a passage (11. 34-5) borrowed from the De Corona, 
are all quite incompatible with a contemporary of Demosthenes, and indicate 
that the oration is, like 216, a work of the Alexandrian school of rhetoric, and 
probably not earlier than the Christian era. 

We are indebted to Prof. U. von Wilamowitz-Mollendorff for several 
suggestions in the restoration and interpretation of this fragment. 



Fr. (d) Fr. (a) 

[  . [ ]ai' (fxiiu . [ 

[ !''"•[ ]0(T0V CV/J^ 

[ ]^1't[ ]vS T€\[ 

[ ]AeVe[ ] -^"v-^ov [ 

5 i ].e.l- •)-[ 1°" '^^f 

I ].[..]-[ ''-"'^-f 

1 1 ••[■■•]•[■•]■• .K _ ^*'' 

[....] J/<'"[i']X'[<^'^] ayeii^ CTT . . /c[ 

[....].. 7ToX[. .] . o'JTrja-ajl] . [ 

H 
10 [. . . .]ei<TToy[. .M.]/c . . . [ 

[• • • -k^' T9d-] • • [ 

[....] KaKco aXX .[...] ft? MapaOcava e[ 

[. . TTa^p(.\^iv o.^t-q[v a]AAa jxriv OTTore 7ra[paKaXoL 
[tov]tov9 ei? ©r](3[as] eXOeiu ov tovs p-iv a[k\ovs 

15 [e^€7r]e/z7rej/ aur[os 8]e olkol KaOrjaro ^i(3 . [. . . 
[. . .] ava6€L9 tovt[. .] . . ttoXltcov ra 07rX[a . . . 
[. . .]r . . ei . . . TTpooToy . . [.]e . . [e]iy Tiqv pa\y^i]v 
[6crr]a) Srjprjyopo^ kul arpaTTjyos [0] avros [kul 
[Ar]p]oad€yr]^ aaniSa Kai. ■\^i)(l)L(Tpa e)(cov a\yoptv 

20 [iTco] 0eyu[(]o-TOKX€oi;y 8rjpi]yopovvros ^f^[l^1 
[(rop]aL e^ayerco TIcpiKXi]? eiS" Xapov 7rX[efcro 
[paL] aKoXovOijao) ToXpiSr] Sia neXoTTOv\yr]aov €t 
[8L](^eiaiu OVTO? ArjpoaOei/ei Se ttcos irleiaopaL 
0) ye ov Ocopa^ ov Sopv ov ^i^oy ovSe to Tr[apa tov 



i66 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



25 narpos EXareLa yap KaTet\r]fjL7rTa[L cpt] 

[en] KUL TmravpTai Seiiri'^.'^ovi'Tes oi irpvT[aveLS 
[a]v^(TTri(Tav Se e/c tt]? ayopas 01 Tas aK[r]vas 
[e];(oi'r€S rov Se aaXinKT-qv {jL€Ta7re[fX7T€ 
rai Tis TavTa yap -qv aKoveLv Ar)[X0(T6^v[r)s 

30 8 ovnconoTi aaXniyyos aKovaas auTo[9 v 
p.as e^ecpojSeL ravra Xeyoov Kai 6'ie^i(»[r 
Se Srjfios avco KaOrjTO tj ^ovXt] Se [ovnco 
7r[p]o(v}^ePovXevKei nepi Tooy napoi'TOi[i' Kai 
[777]? jj.ei' ISovXrjs fxrj 7rpo,8e/3oL'X[eu]Kuia[y 

35 Xeyeiv ArjuoaOevr] Kr]pvTTOVT[o]? t[ov kt] 

Tos ovSevos 

[p]i;/c[o]y Kai anauToop eXeyeu vofiovs . ap\_ 

[.] fovs dirrovs oik oieaOe Kai evvo[vv 

[riji^a Kai nap-qKoXovOrjKOTa To[i9 irpayp-aai 



[• 
40 [. 

[. 
[• 
[• 
[• 



]f yap 01 TrXovaicoTaToi t^oi^ 7roX[iTcou . , . 
] .[..]. iay 01 T[a]s p.€yaXa[s eniSoaeLS 

]<iot[.] Kai navjes el3ovXe[a$e 

l|at TTjy TToXiv aX[ 
.] Bopv^[6\vvTos o[ 

]v (oare a[ 

. . . .]eo[.]5e . [ 

• •••'.. -M 



13-38. ' Yet when he exhorted them to come to Thebes, he did not dispatch the rest 
and himself remain at home, but ... he was the first to go out to fight. Let the same man 
be both orator and general, and let Demosthenes harangue with a shield in his hands as 
well as a decree. If Themistocles is the orator I will embark ; let Pericles lead an 
expedition to Samos and I will sail ; I will follow Tolmides across the Peloponnese, 
if he marches through it ; but how can 1 listen to Demosthenes, who has no breastplate, 
no spear, no sword, not even one inherited from his father.? '■ Elatea has been captured," 
he said, " the prytaneis have broken off their meal ; the owner of tents have left the market- 
place ; some one is fetching the trumpeter." That was what we heard him say. Although 
Demosthenes had never yet heard the sound of a trumpet he was nevertheless terrifying you 
by these words and this description. The demos was seated on the hill, the boule had not 
yet deliberated about the crisis, and although the boule had not yet decided that Demosthenes 



858. ORATION AGAINST DEMOSTHENES 167 

should speak, when the herald made the proclamation and no one came forward he 
nevertheless (in violation of?) the laws said: " Do 3-ou not think that a loyal and a careful 
follower of events (is needed) ? " ' 

13-4. The identity of this commander who marched to Thebes is obscure; there 
is no need for him to have been a contemporary of Demosthenes, for 11. 20-3 are quite 
general. Timotheus, as Wilamowitz remarks, would be a most suitable person to mention 
in this context, but he did not command at Thebes in b. c. 378, though as he was strategus 
at the time he may have been credited with having done so by the author of this oration. 
6 of 6r]^[ai\ has been corrected from /3. 

14. .Toujrous: or perhaps [avjrouy, in which case [in^finnv must be read in 1. 15. The 
initial lacuna throughout 11. 14-22 would be expected to extend to three letters. 

18-21. The restorations are chiefly due to Wilamowitz, who also suggested 7f[eicro/-ai 
in 1. 23 and 0rjcrt in 1. 25. 

22-3. For the reference to Tolmides cf. Aeschin. ii. 75 ToXp'Soi; . . . 6$ ;(iXtoi)? eTriXeKrour 

fjj^coi' 'A6qvaio)v 8ia fieaqs neXonovvfjo-ov noXffiias ova-ijs d8ecos Sie^jjd, which may, as WilamowitZ 

points out, well be the source of the present passage. The statement is of course a rhetorical 
exaggeration. 

24-5. TO 7T[apa Tov] narpos : Demosthenes' father was a sword-manufacturer ; cf. 
Dem. xxvii. 9. 

2 5~9* Cf. De Cor. 169 fo-nepa fiev yap rjv, rjKe S' dyyeXXav Tts av roiis irpyTaveii ojs 
EXareta KaretXr/Trrni. koX fxeTii Tovff ol fieu ev6vs f^apa(TTdvT€s pera^v btinvoiiVTes rovs r eK twv 
(TKrjvwv T(ov Kara ttjv aynpav f^upyov Koi ra yipp evfTripnpacrav, oi di tovs (TTparr^yovs pfTenepTrovro 
Koi TOV craXniKTijv eVuXovi*. 

31—6. Cf. Z)c Cor, ibid, ry 5' vaTtpala apa Ttj f)pepa ol pev TrpvTavds ti)v ^ovXfjv fKuXow tis 
TO l3ovXevTT]piov, vpHs 6' els ttju iKKXrja-iav iiropeixa-de^ Ka\ irplv eKi'ivrjv p^pij/LtaTiVat Kai 7rpo[3ovXfV(Tai 
nas 6 drjpos fiva KadrJTo. Kai pfTa TaiiO' as rfXQfv f] ^ovXrj Ka\ dnrjyyeiXav oi TrpvTavfis Ta npoarfyyeXpev' 
eavTols Kai tov rJKovTa naprjyayov KaKelvos einev, rjpoiTa pev 6 Krjpv^ tis dyopevdv ^ovXeTat ; nap^ei 
S" ov8eis. 

33. nepi is corrected from napa. 

34. The dots above pev indicate that the word was to be omitted ; cf. 1. 37. The 
implication that the speakers at the (KKXrjaia were fixed by the jSovXrj betrays ignorance of 
Attic law on the subject ; cf. introd. 

36. vopovs 7rap[al3aiva)v, as Wilamowitz Suggests, is the natural restoration, but there 
is hardly room for so broad a letter as n, and it is not even certain that any letter stood 
between vopovs and ap[. 

37—42. Cf. Z)e Cor. 171 Kairoi el pev tovs (Tuyd^vai t^v ttoXiv jHovXopevovs napeXOe'iv ehei, 
TiavTes av vpels Kai ol aXXoi Adrjvaloi dvaaTaVTes eni to ^rjp e'/SaSt^ere* ndvTes yap old' on crat^fjvai 
avTr]v e^ovXecroe' el oe tovs nXovaiajTaTovs, ol TpiaKoaioi' el 8e tovs dpfpoTepa Tama, Kai evvovs ttj 
TToXei Kai nXovcriovs, ol pera TavTa tos peydXas e'mdoaeis enidovres' Kai yap evvoia Kai nXovT(o tovt' 
enoirjcrav. aXX as eoiKev eKelvos 6 Kaipos Kai 17 fjpepa eKeivrj ov povov evvovv Kai nXovaiov av8p' eKoXei, 
aXXa Kai TraprjKoXovdrjKoTa to7s npdypaa-iv e| dp)(rjs, Kai a-vXXeXoyiapevov opdas ... At the end 

of 1. 37 some such infinitive as dppoaat is required, but evvo[vv{?) has apparently been 
corrected, and what exactly was written is very uncertain. 



i68 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

859-864. Poetical Fragments. 

The following six small pieces in verse, which do not seem to be extant, may- 
be conveniently grouped together. 

859 contains the latter parts of a few hexameter lines from the end of 
a column, written in bold and well-formed uncials of the sloping type common 
in the third century. Some variae Icctioncs and corrections have been inserted 
apparently by a second hand, to whom the occasional accents and breathings 
may also be due ; a high point, placed slightly above the line, occurs once. 
There are mentions of Stymphelus and Talaus king of Argos (1. 2) ; and the 
very rare word aAa/3w5/)?, otherwise known only from Hesychius, is found in 1. 5. 
On the verso are some blots and flourishes. 

860, consisting of three fragments from a column of lyrics, is more valuable. 
The good-sized, upright hand is evidently early in date and probably falls within 
the first century, or at any rate is not later than the beginning of the second. 
An insertion in 1. 3 and a variant, enclosed as commonly within two dots, at 1. 5 
are due to the original scribe, who seems also to be responsible for the occasional 
accents and punctuation (a point in the middle position in 1. 7). The subject and 
authorship of the poem are alike obscure ; the vocabulary is suggestive of 
Bacchylides : Fr. {ci) 3 rajAaKapSto?, cf. Bacch. 5. 157, 15. 26 TaXairevdris ; 5 fpf/^- 
vats, cf. Bacch. 16. 116, where ipeixvov should be retained ; 10 /xeyaAoKXe'a, a com- 
pound otherwise only found in Bacch. 7-49; Fr. {d) 7 fxeve-nyoXeixoov {?), cf. 
Bacch. 5. 126, 170, 16. 73. With regard to the position of the two main fragments, 
(/;) is probably to be placed below (a) so that the right edges of the papyrus make 
a more or less straight line, the extent of the gap between [a) 18 and (d) i being 
uncertain. This arrangement is indicated by some strongly marked fibres on 
the verso, which is inscribed with part of an account of some kind, written towards 
the end of the second century. 

861 is a narrow strip containing very scanty remains of two columns of 
iambics, the language pointing to tragedy rather than comedy. The squarely 
formed upright uncials belong to what is commonly called the biblical type, and 
may be assigned to the third century. A broad margin was left at the top 
of the columns. 

862 and 863 are fragments of comedies. 862 belongs to a dialogue 
mentioning a person called Phidias, a name no doubt frequent in the later Attic 
comedy (cf Antiphanes ap. Athen. ii. 3cS /;, Menander Aeia-tSai/xwi; Fr. ]). The 
hand, which is probably of the third century, is a better and perhaps rather 
earlier example of the style exemplified by 861. Change of speaker is denoted 
by the usual double dots. Two marks of elision are perhaps later additions. 



859-864. POETICAL FRAGMENTS 169 

863, written in well-formed sloping uncials of the third century, is in rather better 
preservation. The verses perhaps belong to a single speaker, who seems to be 
bewailing his misfortunes ; but they are too broken for reconstruction. Two 
instances of the rough breathing and a high point at the end of 1. 8 may well be 
by the original scribe. 

864, containing the ends of lines from an entire column, comes apparently 
from an anthology. At the top are five hexameter lines, in which the hloi 
'Axatot figure, written in a semicursive hand ; the letters of the last three lines, 
which seem to have been put in at a different time, are markedly larger and 
coarser than those of the two preceding Below, in a more regular and probably 
distinct hand, is a series of iambic verses in tragic style, written continuously like 
prose. The column is divided off into three paragraphs, of which the third 
is separated by a broad blank space from the second, while a rather narrower 
interval is left between the second and the hexameters. It is likely that the 
names of the authors stood in these spaces. The occurrence in 1. 23 of the 
unattested word ixvKi]h6v, followed two lines later by 6pi)V(ah6v, is noticeable. The 
papyrus probably dates from the third century. In the transcription given below 
we have tentatively marked off by horizontal lines the successive verses ; in the 
last paragraph the point of division is sometimes indicated by short intervals left 
between the words. 



859. 5-5 X 7-5 cm- 

• « • • « • • 

•].[.]. a. [..]aX.[.].[ 

]r]Te KaL ey TaXaoio 6[ 
l!T]vfi(pr]\oi' anoTrpoX . [ 

]aa(TK€- TrapoiOi Si 01 . .[ 
5 jcroov aXa^doSeos ei/5o[ 

V- 

]r] ^[[p]]rJ]P OaXafiov Se fj.o[Xov<Ta 

]riTi KaraSpadoL cos to Tra[pos nep 
]aiai TT^Xea-K^TO ipyov ov\ 

2. The form TaXawo is also found in a citation from Antimachus in Pausan. 8. 25. 9 ; 

of. Etym. INI. p. 746- 10 TaXawo fi(Ta tov i Tivis' rjv yap (paai TaXaolo' oh KaTendyfi 8e, dno yap 
Twv fls to? (v6(ici)U 'Attikmv KfKKirai, Ka) nXeovaapm tov o, <os Mivcoo, 

3. 2Ti>p(f)T]'Kos was the name of several mythological personages, as well as of the city, 



170 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



river, and mountain in Arcadia. The following word is perhaps dn-oTr/joXtTreii' in some form ; 
but the vestige of the letter after X is too slight to give any indication, 

5. aXa/3&)Seoj: cf. Hcsjchius dXa/3(»5es' avdpaKuihis, KiKanvi(Tixivov ; the word is a derivative 

of dXa/3>y = nv6paK€S. 

8. ■nikiCTKto occurs in Iliad X 433. 



860. 

Fr. {a) 

jTOiCTi ^pOTWV 

] €p)(^0/Ji€VOl<TlU V7T0Cr[ 

TaXaKapSio^ €7rAe 
TO ]vTa ^aX/cov 



5 ]cou iTTLOUT epvjJLvails 

yXXais 
]t aXKccu- 
eJKacrroy aprjp 
Tr^aTpiSos ai acpiaiv o[ 
10 ^u p^yaXoKX^a 8o\ 

] 

jra naaav e . [. ']AAo/3[ 
15 Jap Toi^ eXO.K^l i 

avSpi yap ovS[ 

^] 
]€VTe Ka 



Fr. (a) 9-2 x 5-1 cm. 
Fr. {b) . 



10 



] 8^8op[K 
]r}poXo[ 

1 
]p oppajl 

] 
]np[.] .[...] 

(?) p€Vi7r]ToXep<ou 

jet* TTVKivas (JTiya\s 

] Kai epi^arov X[ 

ottXois 



Fr. (0 . 
] 



]VT0[ 



Fr. [a) 3. The meaning of the insertion (probably by the first hand) is not evident. 
There are some traces of ink after tp, but whether another letter or letters followed is very 
doubtful. 

6. No doubt (ijfXXfuy or ^ujfXXau, to which (i}ffipai[i in 1. 5 probably refers. 

Fr. [d) 4. The first letter is more like p than (f). 



859-864. POETICAL FRAGMENTS 



171 





861. 


I2-6X 3-5 cm. 




Col. i. 






Col. 


'co[. 






K 

0) 
IT 


cou Trepa? 






20 ^[ 


(0 y efiov 
]Xiou 








8]V(TTV)((0 

]KaXeL 
10 ]y €pco 

](T'lTOTr]P 








vov av 

• • 






a 


ocppoou 

• • • • 






Xe 

« 


4. nepas or Trepfi?. 

1 1 . Se^anorrju or ? nor rjv. 




• 





862. 13-2 X IO-2 cm. 



] . a[. .](iv 
ov]Toai 
7r]aiSL0v 

] . ouy oi^op 

JTTOPTa TOVTOVL [ 



15 



eX^rfXvB' v\(T\Ti[pos 
] . oiov e7ri[ 
](r[. . rjouy 6i[ovs 
]y : 7rA[7;f ] ar 0) : 
]€/)0f etrrt /loi 
1 . ov\. ^ . 8 . vvv 
T]r]v Kopr]v Xa/3e[ 



172 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



jo/co? ecTTLv y Oji<X)\y 

10 ejyeyK e//€[.] . . [ 

7. The correction may be due to the first hand. 



] 9^f «^['K-] 



863. 6-8 X IO-8 cm. 



lo 



]Sri ixoy [. 



.]?;Au(j[ 



] . Toty ero . [. .]/po£y 6(.ois 
] . /ccoy ovK av i^ioov ov8 ana^ 
5 ]j/ fioL r?79 TToXecoy ttXhcttov ttoXv 
'\aiioi Sia(f)6eipovat vvv 

]8poL re Kai TlapiSes o/iov 
] ro)!/ (.vOaSv 
] nap^X^iTTov npo t[o]u 
] . eiy avaKpiaiv [ 



3. The doubtful o may be e and the next letter had a long tail like p ox v. \. roi a-e 
j'e/j[T6]pois' might read. But the supposed p may also be v or t. 

7. riapiSfs occurs in the sense of /noixot in Anth. Pal. xi. 278 and Chariton 5. 2. 
Perhaps AXe^oi/ji'ipoi preceded. 

12. €C7-a)[ : or ^ej{ or ^f/:i[. 



864. 15-8x6.8 cm. 



^fiova^ iv ^p['e\aL fivBovs 
]e (jiaiverai eiuat apicrrov 

] . ovai Se Seioi A^aioi 
]8 aXXoi TravT€9 api{(T)TOL 
](f)pa(Tei Tiva iraures 

] 
7r](i^6r]p€t aroXt] \ crTevovcra 



20 



]? aLcopcou viKVv I nav 
E]XXr](nTovTiav j KaO e/c . [ 
7re](pvpfi€i^oi 1 TOT (K 6aXa[(T 
]f^icc9 1 aXeveTai ivBa 
"[v j afiovaof aKTt]^ 
]i/ /LteXoy I eTretra Trai/ 
] kXvBwv I oTToia Ko^Xoy[9 



859-864. POETICAL FRAGMENTS 173 

\iTOVTL(ji)V ]s I KOiXai Se nerpcov 

** ]a5ey I jxvktjSou €KpoTo[vv 

liWCov oXeuais | KonTOvaa , * , ^ . 

I \€V(jdv avoL^as koattov [ 

10 li/y -vopov^ I OTTOf aeouy eoai ' ' ,. . '* 

^ ^ ] . ft)!/ I Opr]va)0ov [. . . 



] 
] 



^5 ]f X"^'^^°^ ! 0ai/ra^e[. 

ojuy ^pOVTTjS KTV7ro[v9 



I. a o[ ]novas has been corrected from e. 

7. nfvdrjpr] crToXr]u occurs in Jo. Chrysost. t. 2, p. 624 c (ed. Par.). 

10. The end of the verse may equally well be after onov. e8ni suggests only edaia-ep : 
fSft cannot be read. 

17. If the text is right aXevfrai and (v0a form a crasis. The epic word uXeiKcrdm is not 
found in the tragedians, though dXeveiv occurs in lyric passages. 

24. ^ in dj)i]voi8ov is corrected apparently from x- 



865-870. Prose Fragments. 

Plate I (867). 

The following six small prose fragments remain unidentified, and except in the 
case of 866 there is good reason for believing them to belong to works which are 
not extant. The first three seem to be historical, the fourth is perhaps from 
a commentary, the fifth is philosophical, and the sixth geographical. 

865 consists of the beginnings of the last eight lines of a column, written in 
a medium-sized uncial hand of the third century. The fragment belongs to 
a description of a war in which Greeks were apparently fighting foreigners, and 
the leader of one of the armies was the illegitimate son of a person whose 
name probably ended in -eu? (1. 5), this general being subsequently recalled, 
perhaps in consequence of an oracle (11. 6-7). 'Tdpovs, presumably the town 
in Calabria, is mentioned in 1. 3. A (^ypovpiov of that name occurred in Book xxxix 
of Theopompus' PJiilippica (Fr. 210), which was concerned with Sicilian history, 
though whether the i\^povpiov was identical with 'T^poCs- in Calabria is not certain. 
Possibly our fragment too belongs to a lost work dealing with Sicilian history. 
Apart from the Theopompus passage, there seems to be no mention of 'To/aoS? 
in Greek historians before the Roman period. 

866 contains a few letters from the first seven lines of a column. The script 
is a neat uncial of a distinctly early type, and may be ascribed with confidence to 
the first century. A mention of the Carthaginians in 1. 5 suggests that this 
fragment also is historical, but the context is quite uncertain. 

867 (Plate I) has six nearly complete lines from the top of a column, in 



174 ^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a rather large and handsome square uncial, resembling the hand of 661 (Part IV, 
Plate V). That papyrus (late second century) provides an exceptionally early 
example of the type of hand to which the great Biblical codices belong. The 
present specimen is probably somewhat later than 661, and is likely to have been 
written in the third century. Two kinds of stops (high and middle points) occur. 
An iota adscript has been inserted in one place by the original scribe. The 
fragment refers to the capture of Ephesus, and may belong to a historical work. 
For Tipoa-fSLdCea-OaL with the dative, which occurs in 1. 4, the only example quoted 
in the lexica is Diod. xx. 39. 

868 consists of parts of twelve lines, apparently from the top of a column, 
written on the verso, the recto being blank except in one corner where there are 
one or two broken letters. The script is a medium-sized rather irregular uncial, 
probably of the first century. The nature of the fragment is very obscure ; the 
second person singular occurs in 11. 5 and 9, but it is difficult to believe that the 
lines belong to a connected oration or dialogue, and we are disposed to regard 
the fragment as a piece of a commentary, the blank spaces after aptarot? and 
uKoveis in 11. 6 and 9 in that case marking the division between the text and the 
scholia ; cf. 853. The rare word airoKaiixa (1. 4) is not found in writers of the 
classical period. 

869 contains the ends of twenty-two lines from the upper part of a column, 
written in a sloping uncial hand of probably the latter half of the third century. 
The subject is clearly of a philosophical character, and perhaps hd.$ reference to 
religion. 

870 is part of a leaf from a papyrus codex containing a geographical work. 
The recto gives a list of tribes in Thrace, Macedonia, and Asia Minor, apparently 
in two columns, the successive names being numbered. Of the verso only a few 
letters from the ends of lines are preserved ; the last seven lines also seem to be 
a list of names, but the upper portion of the page is different. Which side of the 
leaf came first is uncertain. The script is a good-sized oval uncial of the sixth or 
seventh century. 

865. 8x6-3 cm. 866. 6 x 24 cm. 

a7roXei7r[ ] TToXty fioy[ 

fiV(o 8ia'T[. . . .]y[ ]ai Trv6ofXi[i^ 

VTTO T8pov[v\To^ AceA[ Tov arpa ]o(3a\ovai [ 

rev/xuTO? rjyeiTO . [ e ]e KaOoXov [ 

5 coy 1/060^ vLos vaT[Epov Se fie 5 K]ap)(^r}Soyio[ 



865-870. PROSE FRAGMENTS 



175 



Tr]9 Kara /j.aPT€ia[u 
/xevcov Ttop E\Xt)[uq}i^ 



]p€l/ €19 TTt .[ 



865. 3. The supposed X after Kf might be x- 

5. (OS is probably the termination of the genitive of a proper name ending in -(vs. The 
phrase nfTiinefiTTTos yiyvfoOai occurs twice in Plutarch, 

7. Kara yiavTfia\y : OV KaTaixnvTeia\s , but this WOrd is nOt known. 

866. 2. ■nv6oixe\_ may be the end of a line. 



867. 5-7 X 7-5 cm. Plate I. 

vScup af[. . .] . . [7; 
. veyKiv €iri 6a[ 
Xaaaav- KaK\(e]i6\ev 
E^eaco'^ 7r/3ocre/3t[a 
5 adi]' ra S aXXa ya[p 
[v]jr(pfir]Krj TTpoa[. 



10 



868. 81 X4-I cm. 
]€y^e[.]of Tou aKparov [ 
] Kai on 6pavaTr]9 <r[ 
]? Sov[Xyov r]jX€T€p(o[v 
]Xoi9 airoKavfiaTa [ 

]y SiKr]u T€ia€i9 €fj.ov [ 
]oy T019 apiaT0i9 a[ 
8ia.]Kov€iT<oaai' 7r€vi[ 
]jj,€VT]9 yvvaiKis a[ 

]/L£Q)j' ovK aK0vei9 a{ 
]a6ri[.]a> T[p]axr]Xov [ 



10 



vov 



869. 13-8 X 61 cm. 

] VTrap^€a)9 Siano . [. 

] fjLi] ^XeTreiv vaov9 r[. 

]y KaL ^cofiov9 a(pay[. 

]a9 'qXOov €Trc TO 8icrT[. 

\pov eariy t] ovk e . [. . 

ttjXX ov-^L TavTa jxev [ 

]ar]9 T019 Xoi7roi9 aTro[ 

pov 
]i/^ Se TTOTe T019 Ka[ 

]V0V(TIV $€019 aiTO 

] voyn^oii€voi9 OV 
]li€V09 avT0i9 napacr 
]tl T019 KUT aXT]6rj 
] aXX ov^i Toia . . [. . 
15 ]y avayKaaTLKo[. 
\v ei9 TO 7rpoKei/j.[€ 
] fi.€yL[a]Ta Se iraaiv [ 
yv ajia TTjv napa[ 
JKaTa (pXvap[ 

]t €19 au6poii[Tr . . . 

] . auT€9 OTL [. . . . 
\X0v9 vo[ 



20 



867. I. ]••['/: the first letter 
second suggest y, ij, », tt, or r. It is 



is probably a, S, k, X, or x^ while the vestiges of the 
not certain that a letter is lost at the end of the line. 



176 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



868. I. jeM^"]"' •^ possible, though the v would be rather cramped. But there may 
have been a blank space before oi ; cf. 11. 6 and 9. 

2. oTi dpavarrjs : the division o TiSpava-rrjs is less probable. 

869. 3. Some form of d(f)ayi'iC(iv is presumably to be restored, if the y is right; but the 
vestiges after acjia may represent the angular mark for filling up a line. 

5. Perhaps t] ovk ea-[rt. 
14. Possibly TO yXa)cr[(r. 
I 8. Or ^eva fxarr]v. 





87C 


>• 14-5 X 5-5 cm 


• 






Verso. 




Recto. 






Col. i. 




Col. ii. 




• • • • 


• • 


• • 


• • • • 

T€KTqq\ayes 




re . . 


] 


hV 


Ta\aT[ai 




e]di'r) Tr]9 


] 


f^S 


na(pX[ayop€9 




ia9- 


25 ] 


f'^ 


^/3i'yf[y 


5 


(TLV' Apa 
€\v yap rco 


] 
] 


45 /^^ 


.... [ 

. \.]aiaX' 




Apa^ia 


] 


fC 


0€TTaX[oi 




; 


. y 


firj 


MaKaiS[ope9 




. ai 

• • 


30 ] 


,.0 


QpaKi'i [ 


10 


 


]• 


50 i^ 


Mvaoi 




01 yeyovaaiv 


• • 


pa 


BiaaoL [ 




Evpco7r[r] 


• • 


r/3 


Aap8ap\oi 




1 


• 


py 


XapiJ.a[Tai 




Trpocrrjyopia^ 


35 


pS 


rp[ ' ' 


15 


A]pKaS€S- 


]• 


55 ^e 


n[ 




co^'ey. Tou 


• 








JJOVTIKOL. 


 


I'T 


n 




ai'€^. 


]. 


yC 


4\ 




TIa~\ii(f)v\oi. 


• • 


• • 


• • • • 


20 


} . . ai 

• • • • 










48. 1. MaKf^oveg. 


54. Pel 


haps P/j uiKoi. 



871, 872. LATIN FRAGMENTS 177 

871, 872. Latin Fragments. 

Plate V (871). 

We have not been able to identify the two following fragments in Latin, 
and print them here in the hope that some of our readers may be more successful. 

871, a papyrus, has a considerable palaeographical interest, since part of 
a document in Greek cursive on the verso, which is most probably of the fifth 
century, provides a fairly secure terminus ante quern. On the other hand it 
is unlikely that the writing on the recto was separated from that on the verso by 
a very wide interval of time, and consequently that the literary text is to be put 
earlier than the fourth century, while it may be as late as the commencement of 
the fifth. It is written in rather heavy rustic capitals, of a less formal and epi- 
graphic type than e. g. those of the Palatine Virgil, though not dissimilar in 
formation. The tail of the is a conspicuous feature ; / is made rather tall in 
qui in 1. 5 and iis in 1. 6. Words are divided off by dots after the manner 
of inscriptions, as in the Herculaneum fragments on Actium and in 30, a manu- 
script which in Part I we perhaps dated rather too early. Somebody is addressed 
in the second person in 1. 3, and the treatise seems to have been of a philosophical 
character, and not extant, if the references for the rather rare word astutia, which 
occurs in 1. 2, are complete in the new Latin Thesaurus. 

872 is a small piece from a vellum leaf of a book, containing on one side the 
beginnings and on the other the ends of a few lines, written in good-sized and 
rather ornate uncials which may be referred to the sixth century. S at the 
beginning of a line is made rather tall ; the same letter is combined with a C/" at 
the end of 1. 6 in order to save space. Whether the fragment is to be classed as 
prose or verse is doubtful. The scanty remains, so far as they go, would suit 
hexameters, and the lines differ considerably in length, but that is not seldom the 
case in Latin prose MSS. It does not seem to be Virgil ; but no good word 
occurs to provide a clue. 

871. I2'3xi2-9cm. Plate V. 

inertia • m\agis • .] . it > qtiani virtu f^e • 
et • astuti[ae - mag]is - convenit • qudjn • 
sapientia[e • ine\inineris • auteni de • [ 
iis • me • loq\iii no]n • qui • nunieros • q\. 

5 tium • suo . [ ]cunt • sed • qui • in\ • 

iis ' partib[us - in •] quibus • mdlus • ne^ • 
minimu[s • quidein • 
tius  quam[ • 

N 



178 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

id • quod • e . \ 
10 [ti]egantf^ 
[pe]rforq[ 



I. The vestiges before it suggest c, t, ox s ; x would probably also be suitable, but no 
example of that letter occurs in the papyrus. 

4. The letter at the end of the line if not a can only be m or possibly n, and judging 
by the preceding and following lines, not more than one or two letters should follow. 
a\r^tium is the obvious word, and this would involve suos, not suorum (the slight vestiges 
after suo would be consistent with either r or s) in 1. 5 ; but numeros artiiim suos, whatever 
the mutilated verb in ]<:««/ may be (discunt, dicunt ?), seems an awkward collocation. The 
use of the plural numeros is noticeable ; it should mean not ' numbers ' but ' parts ', 
'members', or ' office', a sense in which the word is often accompanied by suus. 

6-7. nullus tie mini?nu\s quidem : cf. e. g. Cicero, Tusc. 5. 6. 16 nulla ne mi?iima quideni 
aura ; but n€\c without quidem would also be possible. At the end of 1. 7 libeti^ius 
suggests itself. 

II. \pe^rforc^\ the final letter may be vi or w, but per/ormare ox per/ormidolosus are 
improbable, and the absence of a stop between r zxxdi/ vc\z\.ts per /orm\_ inadmissible. 



872. 5-9x7 cm. 

Recto. Verso. 

• « • • • • 

] . d^.\ 

] . tiis sic d[ 

] . e ter s . \_ 

\tros 10 tunc w[ 

] . er iusc[ 

]ndus . [ 



5. Or possibly ] . eri, but the appearance of i is probably due to the penetration of ink 
from the other side, the vellum being thin. 
1 1. The letter after s may also be e or 0. 



873. HESIOD, THEOGONIA 179 



III. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 

873. HeSIOD, Theogonia. 

5'9 X 6-7 cm. Third century. 

The beginnings and ends of a few lines from the Theogonia of Hesiod, 
preserved on a fragment of a leaf from a papyrus book. The character of the 
handwriting, a rather small and informal round uncial, points to a date not very- 
late in the third century, in which the codex form is somewhat uncommon except 
for theological works. A mark of elision is used in 1. 999, and in one or two other 
places a similar sign may have been obliterated, the surface of the papyrus being 
damaged. The columns of writing were remarkably tall, there being an interval 
of 6'^ lines between the corresponding points of the recto and verso. The text 
agrees, so far as it goes, with that of Rzach. 

Verso. 

• • • •• • •  • 

930 e/f [5] AiJ,(f)[iTpiTr]s KUL cpiKTvirov Evvocnyaiov 

Tp[:]ra)i/ ([vpv^Lrj? yevero yweyay oy re daXaaar]^ 

TTvdfxeu [€X<^^ irapa jMrjTpL (ptXi] kul Trarpt avaKTi 

vaui x/oy[o-e]a 8[o) Seivos 6eo9 avrap Aprji 

piivoTopcd Kv6e[peia ^o^ov koli Aeifxav eriKTe 
935 Seipovs OL T av[Spaiu tTUKiva? KXouiovcri (paXayya^ 

ev TToXf/ico KpvoeylTi aw Aprji irroXLTTopQco 

ApfiOVllJP T€ [r]]u Ka[S/X09 VTT€p6v/X09 6eT aKOLTLV 

Zt\vi S ap A[T]XavTL^ [Mairj t€K€ KvSifxou Epfirju 
K[r}p]vK a6[a]yaT[oou lepov Aexoy eicravafiaa-a 

• • • • • •• « • 

Recto. 

[rjye nap Airjr^co TeAe<ray arovocvTas ae]dXov^ 

995 [tovt TToXAouy eTrereAAe yueyay ^acnXev]9 vnep-qvoop 

[v^pia-TTjs UeXirjs Kai araadaXo? o^pL\noipyo<s 

N 2 



i8o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

\tovs reXeo-as" ey IcoXkou acpiKCTO 7ro\X]a fioyrja-a? 
[ooK€ir]s eTTL vr]09 ayuov €XLKco7nS]a Kovpr]v 
\AiaovL8r}^ Kai /jliu 6a\€]g[T]]v iroi-qcraT aKoiTiv 
looo [kul p rj y€. SfiTjOeta vtt Ir]a]o[vi] TToi/xeuL Xacov 
[M-qSiLOv reKe naiSa rov o\vp€(nv ^Tpecfye Xcipcoy 
[^cXXvpiSrjs /xeyaXov Se Aio^ v]oo9 e^^T€X€iTo 
[avrap Nrjprjo^ Kovpai aXioio y€p]oi/To? 
[r] TOL fj.€u ^coKov Wafiadr] T€Ki] Sicc deacou 



997. fs IcoXkov : we print the reading of the MSS. 'laaXKov Rzach, 
1004. 8ia: or 8€[i]a. 



874. Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica III. 

6x4-8 cm. Early third century. 

Oxyrhynchus papyri of Apollonius Rhodius have been remarkably pro- 
ductive of valuable readings (of. 690-1), and it is to be regretted that the re- 
mains of the present MS. are not more extensive, since judging by the small 
fragment which survives it would have been of much importance for critical 
purposes. Only the ends of nine lines from the bottom of a column are pre- 
served ; but in this narrow compass occurs an apparent confirmation of a generally 
accepted emendation of Brunck (1. 263), besides marginal references to unknown 
variants in two other lines. The text is written in a small sloping hand on the 
verso of a second-century list of persons, and probably dates from the end 
of that century or the earlier part of the third. There is one instance of an acute 
accent which may be by the original scribe, but no clear case of punctuation (cf. 
1. 368, note). Our references to the MSS. L(aurentianus) and G(uelferbytanus) 
are derived from Merkel's edition. 



[XefyaXcT^y ^pi^oLO €(f)]r]fxocrvvr]i[ai]i' €X€<T[6e 
[naTpo? fiiv 6uT]crKQ)]u arvyepa? CTrereXXer ap[ca9 
265 [rjfjLeTeprj KpaSir] tl] Si K€u ttoXlv Op)(OfjL(uoL[o 
[o(TTi9 08 Opyofxevos /c]reai/&)t' A6ap.avT0S eK7]Ti 
[lJ.T]T€p €r]u a-)(jiiOvcrau d\noTTpoXnTovTes LKOiaOe 
[coy c(paT AirjTT]? Se 7ra]uvaTaT09 copro Ovpa^e. 



874. APOLLONIUS RHODIUS, ARGONAUTICA III i8i 

\eK S avTT] EtSvia Safiap k]i€v Airjrao 
270 [Xa\Ki07rT]s aiovaa to\ 8 avTiKa nau oixaSoio iTr]v yu[ 

[epKo^ €TT€7rXr]d€i TOL fi€v] fxeyuv ajj.(l)€TrevouTO . [ 

[ 19 letters ] kku Airjrao €u T^taiu) ov(t<jo?) (p€peT[at 

09 (fy^perai [ 

263. e(l)^T]fio(Tvvr]i[(n]v f\fa\Bf'. SO Brunck ,' . . . (f)T]fio(Tvin]iaive((j6ail^; e(j)r]fioavvr)(Tiv efcrde . . 

G. The reading in the papyrus is unfortunately not certain, but at any rate does not agree 
with that of LG, while on the other hand the broken letters are quite consistent with 
Brunck's conjecture. 

264. tnereXKtT : fTTfTflXar MSS. 

265. K(v noXiv : so L ; Kt tttoXiv G. 

268. At some little distance from the end of the line there is an ink-spot which perhaps 
represents a stop (in the middle position). 

269. This line is rewritten at the bottom of the column with a note concerning an 
alternative version found in some INISS. Whether the ordinary reading of the verse 
stood in the text is of course uncertain. No variant is cited by editors beyond the trivial 
I8v7a (L) for ElSv'ia. The abbreviation of ov(Tcoi) is written in the usual way with a semi- 
circle above o, and cannot be naturally interpreted as the negative ov ; moreover the omission 
of 1. 269 would necessitate the alteration of the feminine participle and the following to 
b' in 1. 270. There was indeed a considerable variation in that verse (cf. the next note); 
but there is no need to suppose that it affected the general construction of the passage. 
The letters preceding (^eperai in the second line of the adscript are very doubtful ; before 
the papyrus breaks off after (Peperai, there is a short blank space, but not enough to show 
that the note ended here. 

270. irT]v fx[ in the margin at the end of the line seems to be a variant on (XaXKi6)TT7]s 
alova-a, but no Other reading is attested here. The letter after ntjv is almost certainly n, not 
a ; it is unlikely that another letter has disappeared in the space between v and fx. 

271. aficpfirfvovTo : SO LG ; dn(f)nr. Brunck with four late Paris MSS. On the extreme 
edge of the papyrus opposite this line are signs of ink which would suit e. g. r or : but 
they may be accidental. 



875. Sophocles, Antigone. 

5-5 X 5-7 cm. Early second century. 

A fragment from the top of a column, inscribed with the ends of five lines 
from the Antigone. The hand is a good-sized uncial, round and upright, but not 
calligraphic ; it probably dates from the first half of the second century. A 
different writer seems to have made at least one alteration (1. 243), but the mark 
of elision in 1. 244 is apparently original. The antiquity of L's <jr\\iaiv(Xiv in I. 242, 
where the variant ijr[[i.avS>v is commonly preferred, is the one small item of any 
value to be gleaned from the text. 



i82 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[to TrpayiJLa Sj]Xols S <»]? ti a-qiiaivoov v(\ov 



KV 



[ra Seiua yap tol TrpodTilOrj^K^ c^y(K^ov '!to\v[v 
\ovKovv ep€is TTOT ei]T aiTaWayO^LS a7re[f 
245 [Kai St] Xeyco aoi tov veK\pov T[i]? apTia>\^ 
\6ay\ras Pe^r]Ke KauL XP*^^]' ^L-^iav 



242. a-rj^aivcov: SO LA; arjfjLavQ^v Ven. 472 and several other late MSS., and this was 
apparently also the reading of Didymus; cf. Schol. Ajax 1225. 

243. The correction of the graphical error oxKov seems to be due to a diorthotes ; 
whether he or the original scribe was responsible for the alteration of the preceding k to o- is 
more doubtful. The method of the change is different, the k being crossed through, while 
the x^ are cancelled by dots placed above them. Presumably TTpoureBr^K was first written. 

244. TT of anaWaxdeis has been converted from a 7. 

876. Euripides, Hecuba. 

2'9x8-4. Fifth century. 

A small fragment of a leaf from a papyrus book containing the Hecuba 
of Euripides. The somewhat negligent uncial writing, which is upright and of 
good size, seems to belong to the earlier Byzantine period, and may date from 
the fifth century ; the ink is of the common brown colour. Marks of elision 
were used, but no accent occurs. The paragraphus after 1. 738 and elision mark 
in 1. 740 are in blacker ink and seem to be due to a corrector, who is perhaps 
responsible also for ^puiv in 1. 703. A variant found in Parisinus 2713 (thirteenth 
century) alone of the better MSS. appears in 1. 740. 

Verso. 

700 \(.v yjrafiaOco Xevpa ] 

[ttovtov vlv i^-qviyK^ mXayios KXv8a>~ 

[coixoL aiai ] 

[ifiadov ivvTTVLov 6]fxfJiaTa)u epcou [ 



Recto. 

• ••••••• 

E[Ka^r] Ti] 8[paaco noTepa Trpoa-neao) yovv 



876. EURIPIDES, HECUBA 183 

Aya/ie/j-i^ovo? tovS ij [(f>€.p(o aiyrj KUKa 
TL fioi TrpocrcoTrco vco[tou ey/cAij/acra aoi/ 
740 [Svpr]] TO KpaOev S' ov Aey[€iy T19 (ad oSe 



703. The space suits {wnviov (MSS.) better than ewnvov (Murray with Hermann). The 
division of the verse at ami is also found in A. 

739. A dot above the line between a and v is apparently meaningless. 

740. KpaOfV. so the first hand in Cod. Par. 2713, the reading having been subsequendy 
altered to npax^ev, as in other MSS., by correctors. Kpadev of course gives no sense, and 
presumably Kpavdtv was intended; cf. e. g. Ion 77 ^° KpavOtv wj av iK)xa.6a. 



877. Euripides, Hecuba. 

Fr. {a) ii'8 x 4-3 cm. Third century. 

These two fragments from the upper part of a column also come from 
a copy of the Hecuba. The text, which is on the verso of the papyrus, the recto 
being blank, is in a slightly sloping uncial hand of the oval type, and was 
probably written in the third century. No lectional sign occurs other than the 
paragraphus. A variant at I. 1272 is of some small interest. 

oiiio\i. yvvaiKo^ co? eot^ rjcro'coixeyo? 

SovXt][9 V(p€^Q) TOI9 KaKLOaLV SlKTJU 

ovKOv[v SLKaicos iiTTip €ipya(X(o KaKa 
1255 OLiio\i TeKvcov ToovS ofXjxaToov T e/xa>v TaXa9 

aAye([y ti 8 t] fie nacdos ovk aXyeiu Sok€l9 

Xocip([i9 v^pi^ova ei? efx co rrayovpye av 

ov yap /j.[e -^aLpHv y^prj ae TifJ.<opoufi€vr]v 

aXX ov T[a)( rjvLK av ere irovria votis 
1260 fjicou p[avcrToXT]crri yrjs opov9 EXX-qviSo^ 

Kp[v]-^r] [fiei' ovv ireaovaav e/c KapyrjaLcav 

TTpos t\ov ^taioov Tvyyavovcrav aXfiarcop 

avTT] tripos i(TT0v vaos afx^ijar] noSi 

V7r0TT[Tep0L9 VOiTOialV 7] TTOLCO TpOTTOi 

1265 Kva)v [yevr]ar} nvpa e^ovcra Sepyfiara 

TTcoy [8 oLcrda fiop(prj9 rrjs eiirjs /xeraaracriv 
&pT]^[t p.avTLS enre Aiouvaos Ta8e 



184 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

(TOi S o[vK e-^prjaev ovS^v <ou (X€is kukoov 
ov ya[p TTOT av av fi eiXe? coSi cvv So\(o 

• &• • • • • • • 

1 27 1 [6avov](Ta TVfi^[a> S ovo]iJ.a aco [ KeK\r]cr€Tai 
[fxop^r]]9 iTTCoSoy fx[r)] tl tijs ^/^[j?? f/Ofi? 
[kwos] ToXaivq^ arjfia pavT[iXoLi r€Kfi.ap 
[ovSev {j.]e\€i fiOL aou ye fioi Sov[tos Slktju 

1275 [Kac arjv] y avayKt] naiSa Kaaa[v8pav 6avuv 
[aTTJeTTTua- avTooi [croi] SiSoo/x e[x«i' 
[/crjei^ei I'w rj tovS aXo)(^o[9 oiKovpo9 niKpa 
[/LiT^TTO)] ixaviirj Tv[u\8apL[^ ToaovSe nais 
[KavTov] ye t[o]vtou [Tre]X€[Kvu e^apaa avoa 

1280 \ovTO'i (Tv\ fjLaLp[r] KaL KUKcov €pas TV)(eiu 



1256. Tl be ne MSS., corr. Bothe. 

1272. The vestiges after fncaSov are inconsistent with rj and suit fi, and there is space 
for another letter between this and rt. ij.[ti] ti gives a sense, but would be a doubtful 
improvement on the MSS. reading ^ W. Nauck proposed enaywfiov n. 

1276. aiiTw Tavra (to\ bibafx i'^fiv MSS. ravra seems to have been omitted after avrai. 
The line may have been completed by e. g. raSf, but a graphical error is more likely. 

1279. ye: so L; but the vestige of the first letter is too slight to be decisive against 
the variants 8e and o-e. 



878. THUCYDIDES II. 

27-4 X 16-9 cm. Late first century. 

These remains of three consecutive columns, containing portions of chapters 
22-4 of the second book of Thucydides, were found not at Oxyrhynchus itself 
but in a small very shallow mound lying about a mile beyond the site to the 
north, where some experimental work (without other result) was done one day in 
January, 1906. The text is written in a round ornamental hand which we should 
refer to the latter part of the first century. Upright strokes are commonly 
finished off with apices, A is of the capital shape, M shallow-topped, I of the 
archaic form. No breathings, accents, or stops occur; a short blank space marks 
a pause in 1. 23, paragraphi are sometimes employed, and the ordinary angular 
sign (cf. e. g. 853), which is here usually accompanied by a dot above and below 
it, like a bi-nKij TrepKaTLyix^rr), is used to fill up short lines. But though early in 



878. THUCYDIDES II 



185 



date the MS. is inferior in quality, having several erroneous readings ; it is 
however of some interest on account of its support, in two doubtful passages, of 
the traditional text. Our collations in 878-880 are with the text of Hude. 



Col. i. 
\i(TT-qcrav rj Se ^0T]]6eia avrrj 22. 3 
[rcDf Qecra-aXoov] Kara to ira 

\\alOV ^VIXIia\LK\0V €y€V€TO 

[tol? Adrji/aioi? K]ai acpiKov 
5 [to Trap avTov? Aap]ia(Taioi ^ap 
[aaXioi TlapaaLOi] Kpavvco > 
\yioi Ileipaa-ioi rvp]TC0VL0L > 



[^epaioi -qyovvTO 5]e avToav 
[e/c fjiiv Aapi(rar]S IloXvfJir]] 
10 [Sr]9 Kai ApiaT]oyoy9 ano > 
[ttjs crTa<Teco9 e/carepoy ej/c 
[$€ ^apaaXov Mevcov rf\(jav 
[5e /cai] Ta)\y aXXccv KaTa tt\o 
[Xe:?] ap)(^ovT€9 [ 



Col. ii. 
15 aveywip-qaav Sia BoiccTOij/ 
ovx ^i7re/3 eaejSaXoi' TrapLov 
T€9 Se Opcoirov Trjv yr^v ttju 

•I- 
IIeipaKr)v KaXovficurju r]v 

vefiovTai SlpcoTTOi AB-qvai 

o 

20 (ov vTrr]\[L^K^(o\\OL e8r]i(o(Tav acpL 
KOfJiCvot. Se ey HeXoirovvq 
(Tov SieXvOrjaai^ kutu no > 
X€i9 €KacrToi ava-^coprjaav 
Toov S avTdnv 01 AdrjuacoL 0u 

25 XaKas KaTea-TTjaauTo KaTa 
yr]v Kai KaTa OaXaTTav axr 
TTcp St] efxeXXou Sta iravTos 
[rof] TToXefiov (f)vXa^€iu Kai 
[)(^iXia] TaXMVTa ano tcov er 

30 [7771] aKpoTToXii )(pr] /xaTCov [e] 
[So^e]u a.y[T0i]9 e^aipeTa ttoi 
[^]aa/^evol9 )(]a)pi^€adaL Kai 
[fxr] avaXovv] aXXa ano Tcoy 
[aXXcai/ noX€]fjL€iv -qv Se T19 



Col. iii. 
23- 3 nei^TT][K0VTa vavai npoa 25. i 

^€^or]$r]K[oT€S Kai aXXoi 
Tirey Tcou €[k€1 ^vnp-a^cav 
aXXa re eKaK[ovv nepinXe 
45 ovTC? Kai ey [MeOcourji/ tt]9 
AaKcouiKT)? [anofiavTfS 
Tcot T€i)(^ei np\oae^aXov ov 
Ti aadevei K[ai avOpconcou 
ovK ivovTCcv [cTf^e 8^ ne 25. 2 

24. I 50 pi T0V9 ^C0p0v[9 T0VT0V9 B pa 

ai8as T€XXi8[os aurjp Snap 
TiaTr]9 ^povp[au e)(cov Kai ai 
cr6o/xevo? €(3[or]deL T019 (v 
Tcoi y(^cop[i]coi fie[Ta onXiToav 

55 €KaTov 8[ia8papQ>u Sc to 
Toav Adrjv[ai(ou a-TpaToni8ov 
i(TK^8ao[fi€vov KaTa tt]v xco 
pav Kai [npo9 to ret^oy TeTpaji 
[fi^yov €a[ninT€i ey Trjv Me 

60 [dcojj/rjv K[aL oXiyov9 Tiva? 
ev TT]i eK[8po/xr]i anoXeaas 



i86 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

35 \<EnrrjL rj €7n\lf]r](f>i€n]L kw^lv TOiv /J.eO a[vrou Trjj/ re iroXii/ 

[tu y^priixaTa r]avTa ey aXXo ri 7repLe7roL[r](re Kai avo tovtov 

[r]u fxt] OL 7roX€]fiioL vqiri-ji tov ToXfxr][fiaTo^ npcoTO? tcoi/ 

[arparcoi e7ri7rAeft)]cri [T]r]t tto 65 Kara tov [tvoX^jiov €7rr]ii/e6rj 

[Xei Kai Se-rji ap.vuaa]6aL 6a ev S7rapT7][i 01 8e AOrjuaioi 25. 3 

40 [vuTov (r)fxiav e7^€^]e^^ro [ap]avTe'i TT[apenX^ov Kai 

[crxorrjey Tr][i HXeias 

5. Aapjicro-cioi : SO AB ; Aapiara'ioi H(ude) with FM. 

6. The papyrus evidently agreed with the MSS. in inserting a name {Uapda-Ku ACEFM, 
Ufpnaioi B) between ^aptToXioi and Kpawoovioi. H. brackets IT. following Heringa, Uayaa-aloi 
Stahl. Tiie correct reading is probably <^apmiXioi Ufipdaioi, omitting TLeipaa-iot after Kpaw^vwi, 
as indicated by the new Thucydides commentary; cf. 853. xiii. 20, note. 

7. Ufipaa-Loi]: so MSS.; cf the previous note, nvpuaioi H., cf Strabo ix. p. 435 and 
Steph. Byz. 

10-3. The remains of letters are scanty and the decipherment is doubtful, rw (?) in 
1. 13 and apxovres in I. 14 are on a detached fragment. 

17. 1. Qpanov : the initial letter is correctly written in 1. 19. 

18. UeipaiKTjv: so MSS.; TpalK^v Steph. Byz., H. The interlinear i may have been 
inserted by the first hand. It is not clear whether the two dots merely enclose the added 
letter as is often the case, or represent a diaeresis ; the former alternative is more likely- 

1 9. 1. Slpanioi. 

20. The correction is perhaps by a diorthotes. 

32. x]''P'f*o"^at : x^P'f ^«a"^«t MSS., rightly no doubt. 

44. The paragraphus is misplaced ; perhaps the scribe took aWa for the conjunction. 

61. iK\ppopr]i: eabpopjj MSS., more appropriately. 

62. a[vTov: so E, H. ; iavrov ABFM. 

64. [. . . nparos: SO MSS. ; npwTov Herwerden, H. 

879. Thucydides III. 

121 X 8-1 cm. Third century. 

Part of one column, with the beginnings of a few lines of the column adjoin- 
ing, written in third-century sloping uncials of a common type. The portion 
preserved, from the fifty-eighth and fifty-ninth chapters of Thucydides, Book III, 
shows a correct text, supporting a traditional but suspected reading (1. 23). Two 
kinds of stop, the high and low (1. 13), are used, besides paragraphi ; these, like 
the interlinear insertions in 11. 8 and 11, may be by the original scribe. 

Col. i. 

• » • « • 

[pas ii'/ifjiax]o[t- Se op.ai 58. 4 

X^o/s' 7ror[e] yivop.euoLS 



879. 



THUCYDIDES III 



187 



cov vfids TO evavTiov 
av Spa(raLT€ fir] opdcos 
5 yvovTes' (TKeylraaOe 5e' 
Ilava-auias ji^v yap iOa 

TTTiV aVT0V9 VOIXl^COV 

Kai nap avSpacn toiovtoi9' 

10 VfJ.€L9 Se ei KT€UelT€ T] 

\ 
lj[a]9 Kai [xl^pai' TV^ ^^ 
rauoa QriJ^aiSa noLrjcre 
re. Ti aXXo rj iv iroXefxiai 
re Kai napa tol9 avOcv 

15 TaL9 7raT€pa? T0V9 VfJ.€ 

T€pov9 xa[L ^yjyyereiy a 
Ti/xovs yepoov cov vvv 
[ijo-^ofori KaTaXuyjreTe' rrpos 
5e Kai yr}v ev rji rjXev 
20 [6]€pa>6r]crap 01 EXXrjves 
SovX(i)(T€T€ I'epa re Oecov 
[019] €v^afJ.evoi MriSoiv 

[€Kp]aTT](TaU' €pr]fiOVT€ 

[Kai 0]v(nas [ra]? [Tr]aTpiov9 
25 [tcov €(r(rafji€va)]v Kai kti 
[aavTCov a^aipr]a-€(r]0€ 



58.5 



Col. n. 



aK\oiiiv €KeiuT]9 r]L ra 59. 2 

XalfinpoTara fxer avrcov 
30 Trp[a^avT€9 vvv a> rrji 

Se T[a SeivoTara kivSv 

ve[voiJ.ev TraOiiv onep 59. 3 

Se a[vayKaiov re /cat 

)(^aX[€7rcoTaTOV T019 coSe 
35 €)(^o[vai Xoyov reXevrav Si 

OTi K[ai Tov ^lov KivBvvos 

€yyi'[y ywer avTOV 



5. 8( : so ABEFGM ; re C, H(ude). 

23. fprjfjLovre : SO MSS. ; fpr]fioivT€S Stahl, iprjiiaafTe Hei'Werden. H. prints eprjiiovre 

with an obelus. 

880. THUCYDIDES V. 

Fr. (5) i8'i X 13-2 cm. Late second century. 

The following nine fragments from the fifth book of Thucydides fall into two 
groups, which were discovered on different occasions and come from quite different 
parts of the MS. Frs. {a)-{d), containing portions of chapters 32-4 and 40, were 



i88 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

found together, and the remainder, covering chapters 96-105 and part of iii, 
made their appearance some little distance away ten days afterwards. The 
rather broad columns are written in a clear and upright semicursive hand, dating 
apparently from the later decades of the second century. High stops and para- 
graph! are used, double dots as usual denoting a change of speaker in the report 
of the debate at Melos. There are two instances of the rough breathing ; 
a final v is occasionally represented by a horizontal dash over the preceding 
vowel ; iota adscript and ^ in ^w are commonly but not consistently written. 
The text is not of a high class and shows several errors which are absent from 
the better mediaeval MSS. ; it supports tradition in two passages where 
emendations are accepted by Hude, but confirms Kriiger's conjecture tov kuC 
for Kal TOV in c. 97, which Hude does not adopt. 

Fr. (a). ..... 

Toyjy ay[T0V9 32. i 

] fXiv A6[r]uaioi 
a7r(K]T€ivav [ 
yvv]aiKa9 [ 
5 IlXaT]ai(vaiv [ 

KCi\rr\yayd\y 

• • • • • 

Fr- (<^) 

[a5i;]i/a[rof 5 oj/jey ^i\(^(X(£)(Tai to re] eu [Kv 33. 2 

[\/AeXo£y] t[€1)(^os kul rjay €v [Tlappaa-ioL?] 7ro\[€is 
10 am^Xldoju' AaKeSa[i/j.]o[viot S]€ tov9 re n[ap 33. 3 

[p]aaiovs avToyo/xov? 7r[oiT]a-au]Te? Kai to [t€1 

[X09 Ka]6eXovT€9 av€-)(a)pr}(rav err olkov Ka[i 34. i 

[tov a\v[T'\ov Oepovs rjSrj tjkoptcov avTOi? t[<ov 

[aJTTO ©paiKTjs fiCTa BpaaiSov ^^eXOovTOiv 
15 [(TT]paTi(t)T(>>v ov? KX€apL8a[s] /lera Ta[9 (tttov 

[5ay €/c]o//io-e 01 AaK[€.8ai\iJL[o]vioi €yjrr][(pi(rau 

[to tovs p](u fiCTa Bpa[(nSov] EiXcotu? p[a)(eara 

[/1€U0V]9 €X(v6(pOV9 ([L]uaL KUl OlKilV ©[TTOf 

[av ^ovX]a)UTai Kai va-T(p[o]v ov ttoXXco a[vT0V9 
20 [p€Ta t](oi/ veoSafMcoScou ey Aenpeov [kutc 



880. THUCYDIDES V 189 

[cTT-qaav^ K^ifid/ov (ttl rrjt AaKcouiK[T]t. kul 

\Tr]L HX]eiai orrey rjSrj Stacpopoi. H[X\(i[ois tovs 34. 2 

[8 €K r]?;? vrjcTOV Xr](f)d€j/ra['S (rcpcov Kai ra 
[owXa] TTapaSouTas S€[ia]avTes [firj ri Sia tijv 
25 [^v/x^]opau vofi[La]au[T]€[9] €Xa[a-a-codT]a-€a-6ai 

[kuc oi']re[y iTr]iTi[noi] v[€(OT]€pc<T[(0(nv tjStj Kat ap 
[;(ay rivas e^ov]Tas a[TL]fiov9 e[7roi?/o-aj/ an 
[fiiau Se TOiavSi] oaare {JLrjTe a[p)(^€ii' fir]TG irpi 
[ajiivov^ Ti T] 7r(oXov]pTa9 K[vpi.ov9 nvai 

' V') ' • ' • ' • • • • • 

30 €TOy TC0[l TToXejKOL €T€XevTa u/xa Se Tool -qpi ev 40. I 

6v9 t[ov €TnyLyuofi€vov Ocpovs 01 Apynoc coy ot 
re 7r[pe(T^iLS tccu Boicotcov ov9 €(f>aaau Treixy\mv 
cu^ ■r][Kov TO T€ JJavoLKTOv r]L(jBovTO Kadaipov 
fi€v[ov Kai ^v/x(xa)(^cau iBiav y(y€pr)jX€VT]v 

35 TOty [B0L<0T019 

Fr. (d) . . 

^[ 40 i[ 
T[ (r[ 

e[ ya[ 

Tq[ it[ 

• « 

Frs. (e), if), {g). 

[rouy Te firj 7rpoa-r]Ko]yT[a9 Kai oaoi airoiKoi ov 96 

45 [rey 01 ttoXXol Kai a]Troa[TavTes Tirey K^yjeipoiv 

[rat ey to avTO Ti]6[€]a(n[ : SiKaKOfiaTi yap ovS^Te 97 

[povs €XX€nr€i]y r)yovu[Tai KaTa 8vvap.Lv 8g tovs 
[pev '7repiyiyv€](r$aL' rjpas 8[€ (pojScoi ovk eTrte 
[vai (ioa-T€ €^(0 To]v K[ai] 7rX€Ov[<ov ap^ai Kai to a 

50 [or^aXey rjpiv 8La to Ka\Ta(TTpa[(f>r]vai a]y n[apa 
[<T)(oiT€ aXXcos T€ Kai vr]]<n(OTai [vavKp]aTop[Q)v 
[Kai aar6€V€(TT€poi eTepcov orrey €i prj 7r]eptye 



igo THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[voiaOi : iv S eK€tp(oi ov vofii^iTe acr](f)<t^X]€i 98 

[av Sei yap av Kai €PTav6a ccanep v/xei9 t<ov] 61 
55 [kuicov Xoycov 7]fias eK^i^aaavp"^^ [t(cl vjxc 
[TfpcoL ^v/x(popo>L vwuKoveiu] 7rei^er[e Kai rj 
[/iay TO Tjpiv y^pr)(rip.ov 8L8aaKo\vTas [n. Tvy)(avii 
[kui vfiiv TO avTO ^vp^aipov] 7Tiipaa[0aL neiOel 
[oaoi yap vvv p.r]S€T€poi9 ^vfip,]a)(^ov[(ri ncos ov 



Fr. </i). 

60 [0 u/xety a]a[6ev€i? re /cat em poTrrj^ pias ovTes firj 103. 2 

[fiovX€a]d€ 7rad[€i]v. fx[r]8 o]fj.o[ia>6r]vaL T0L9] tt[oX 

[Xozy o]iy Trapov apdpa)mico[s en <TQi]^€a6ai 67ret 

[Sav] 7ri€^ovii€vovs avTo[vs (TriXi]rrco(Tiv ai (jya 

[i/€]p[a]t iXiriSes cm Ta? a(f)a[v€is Ka]6ia-TauTai 
65 iiavTLKr]v T€ Kai )(^pr]crfiovs Kai oaa TOiavTa fi€ 

[t] eXmScop Xvp-aiveTai ; \aXenov p.iv Kai -q 104 

//€t9 ev i(TTe ifOfju^ofKu irpos Bvvajxiv re 

Tr}v vfi^Tipav Kai ttjp Tvyr]v et jxr] airo tov i'a-ov 

[(CTTai] aya>vi^(aOai o/xooy Se TricrTevofjiev ttji 
70 [/x€v T]v)(r]i €K TOV 6hov fiTj (.XaacTOdaiaOaL oti 

[ocTLOi] ^oaioi^ ov 7r/)oy SiKaiovs la-Ta/nOa' ttj^ Se 

[Svva]fx.[€a>s] ro) eXXenrovri Tr)v AaKiSai/xo 

[v]ia)v r)/iiv ^vvfiaxiav Trpoaea-ecrOai avay 

KTjv f^ovcrav Kai et /it; tov aXXov tt]^ ye avyye 
75 V€ia9 eviKa aKT^vvrji ^orjOeiv Kai ov -navTa 

rraai ovTca^ aXoya>9 0pa[avv]ojxe6a [:] Trjs p.^v 105. i 

TOivvv 7rpo9 TO B^LOv ^[v^fx^v^ia^ ovS rjfl^LS ol 

opLcOa XeXeiylreaOai ovSev yap e^oo ttj^ avOpoo 

TTHas Ta>v /i€v e? to Oeiov vofiia-ecos toou Se 
80 ey acpas avTOVs ^ovXrja-^coi SiKaiovfxcvr]^ rrpaa 

aofjLcv 7]yovjjii6a yap to re deiov So^tji to av 105. 2 

OpcoTTiiov re aa^cos Sia rravTOS ano 0i;(r[ecBy] 

avayKaias ov av KpaTtji ap)(^eiv Kai Tjficis ovt€ 

6(VT(9 TOV VOpoV 0VT€ K0lV(Ol TTpCOTOl \prj 



880. THUCYDWES V 191 

85 aajXivoL ovTCC 5e napaXa^ovTes Kat €ao/xei>d 
€9 aei KaTa\eL\lfouT€[9] Xpco/^iOa avTcoi eiSo 

[re]? Kai vfxa^ Kat aXXovs €i/ ttjl avrrji §vi/afj.eL • 

[r]^/^iu y^voixivov^ SpcoPTa9 av avTO Kai npos 105. 3 

[jJ-^v] TO BeiOV 0VT(09 €K TOV €tKOTO^ OV (pO^OV 

90 [fie]6a eXaa(T[(o]a€(r6ai. r[t;y 8e es A]aKe8aifj.[oui 
[ofy So^r]9 T]U 8ia to aia)(pou Sr] ^or]]6r]a[€iv 



Fr. [i). . . ... .... 

7T-a/je[xe]re ei [p.ri fX€TaaTr](TajX€voi. €tl r]fxas iii. 2 

aXXo TL [T\Cdv8i [acocppouea-Tepou yvcoacade 

ov yap 8r] em ye Tr][u eu roi? ataxpois Kai irpov nr. 3 

95 TTToty Kii'Svi'0i[9 nXeicTTa 8La(p0eipovaav 
[av6pai]n[6\j^ \aia-)(yvr]v rpi-^eade ttoXXois 
[yap 7rpoop]co[n€vOL9 



1-2. The papyrus seems to have differed here from the ordinary text which would give 
40 letters between the s of rov^ in 1. i and v of n^v in 1. 2, whereas the usual length of 
a line is about 34-5 letters. Perhaps tovtov was omitted; that there was an agreement 
with Dion, Hal. De Thuc. lud. 845. 12, who has jrepi hi tovs avToin xpo''o^i tovtovs ^ikvcovIovs 
^A0i]vaioi, is less likely. 

14. [a]no: so MSS.; ^ni H(ude). 

21—2. Trji AaKQiviKlrji Kai Ti]i HXjfiat : Trjs AaKcovLKrjs Ka\ Tijs 'HXf/as MSS. 

33. t;[»coi': tjkovto or £Ko^ro MSS. The T] in the papyius is clear, and the line is quite 
long enough without the superfluous to. 

Fr. {d). This small piece, containing the first letters of lines, we have failed to identify. 
Since it was found with Frs. {a)-{c) it would be expected to come from the neighbourhood of 
cc. 30-40. 

49. To\v K[ai : so Kriiger; koi tov MSS., H. 

50-1. It is likely that the papyrus had vavKparopav rather than vavroKparopav (B corr. 
M), but owing to the very doubtful identity of the two broken letters at the end of 1. 50 the 
size of the lacuna between r^jo-iwrat and ]aTop[(jiv is uncertain, 

55. (K^i^a<Tav\Tts : SO H. with CG; but (K^iaa-av^Tfs (ABEFM) may equally well have 
stood in the papyrus. 

63. TTie^ovpLevovs : this late form also occurs in C. 

tm\i\7TU)(nv (AB) suits the space better than eTrtXetJTrcoo-ir (CEFGM). 

71. ov irpos : 1. irpoi ov with MSS. 

72. The second e of eXXenrovTi has been corrected probably from an (. 

75. atcr;^i;i;;;i : Kai alcrx. MSS. The loss of /cai would be easy between Ka and ai. 

80. 8iKaiovfi(vr]i : biKaiovfXfv f] MSS. 



192 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



82. ajTO t vt:6 MSS. 

84. Koivoii : 1. Keififpcoi with MSS. 

87. v^as ', ifJLas av INISS. 

88. avTo : SO MSS. ; ravro H., cf. Valla and Schol. 



881. Plato, Euthydemiis and Lysis. 



IO-2 X 6-2 cm. Late second or third century. 



A small fragment containing on the recto part of a column, and a few 
letters from the ends of some lines of the column preceding, from Plato's 
Euthydenms. The text, which is written in a small neat uncial hand, round and 
upright, of about the end of the second century, shows one or two unimportant 
variants as compared with the three principal MSS., with none of which it 
agrees at all consistently. Stops (in the middle position), paragraphi, and 
double dots marking a change of speaker occur. 

On the verso of this is a portion of a column from the Lysis, written 
in a small irregular uncial hand with some admixture of cursive, dating probably 
from the first half of the third century. Double dots accompanied by paragraphi 
mark, as usual, alternations in the dialogue ; there is also a doubtful instance of a 
high stop, and one accent. The surface of the papyrus has suffered considerably 
and decipherment is sometimes difficult. Considering the small size of the frag- 
ment variations from the ordinary text are surprisingly frequent ; they do not 
seem to be very valuable, though in most cases they are not obviously wrong. 



Recto. 



Col. i. 

\liov TovSe : ap ovv €(pr] T]av 
[tu rjyrji, aa Hvai odv a'\v 
\a.p^r]i^ Kai e^rji aoi av]TOi^ 
[)(pT](TOai OTi av Pov\ri\i- 
5 [oLov ^ovs Kai Trpo/Sajra 
[ap av rjyoLO ravra aa] (i 
[vai a croi €^€IT] Kai a7r]o 
[SoaOai Kai Bovvai K]ai 
\6vcrai OTOoi ^ovXoio ^e]ft)j/. 
lo [a 8 av fir) ovToas ^X^^J ^^ 



Col. ii. 



301 e 



302 a 



Xr]IJ./J.[€VOS OVK €(TTIV 

r]V 8 e'Y[a> o) AiovaxroSo) 
p6 : Ta[\aL7raipo^ apa 
(TV ye t[l9 avOpcoTTOS ei 
15 Kai ov8e [A6r]vaL0^ cot. 

fXr]T€ Oi[ot TTaTpCCLOl €1(TIV 

fir]d l'c[pa fjLTjTe aXXo jirj 
8€v KaX[ov KUL ayaOov \ ea 
riv 8 eyco o) AiovvcroSa) 
20 pe- evcprjfjLd re Kai fjL[r] ya 
AeTTO)? /i€ TrpoSi8a(T[K€ 



302 b 



302 c 



881. PLATO, EUTHYDEMUS AND LYSIS 193 

€(TTL yap efxotye Kai ^[(0 
fMOL Kat I'epa TraT[pcoia 
Kai raXXa oaanep [tols 
25'aXXoty A6rjuaio[Ls tcou 

TOLOVTdOV : ^[iTa TOLS uX 

Xois €(f)r] Adr]i^[aioi9 
o[vK e<7TL Zevs Trarpcoi 



5. 7rpo/3a]Ta : cf. T, Ven. 189 and Par. 1808, where npo^arov has an a written above the 
final syllable ; irpo^arov BW, Burnet. 

14. av ye t]is : tis av ye Burn, with T, re crv ye B. 

22-3. ^cofxoi Kai: SO TW, Burn.; om. B. 

23. lepa 7raT\^pci)ia : Upa olKela Koi narpaa BTW. 



[€7rLTp€7rov]aiu aXXa ap[ 
[;(et <To]y T19 : rriSaycoyos 
[e077 :] fxcov SovXos oav 
[T^yLterjepoy ye e0j/ : 77 5ei 
5 \yov 7]^ 8 eyco iXcvde 
[pov ouJTa ye vno SovXov 
[ap)(ecr]^ai* Ti 5e Kai TroLcof 
[av ov]tos (tov Tra[i\Say<o 
yos a[p])(ef : aycav [p^rjTTOv 



Verso. 
208 c 



10 e07; e[i]y 8L8a(TKa\Xo'\v \ 

[xoiv fjLi] Kai ovToi a[ov] a[p] 
X9[fO"]i[i/ o]i 8iSa(rKaXo[i] : 
7r]auT[(o]9 Stjttov ; rrafi 208 d 
7ro]AA[oi']s' apa aoi ye 8e(nTo 
15 [to.^ Kac ap)(]oi/Ta? coy eot 
Kev] €Kco[v] TraT7]p €<pt 
(TTTjcn : aXX apa e7r]et^aj/ 

1 . . . 



1. ap at the end of the line is uncertain, but to read aW apx is not more satisfactory, for 
though the first of the doubtful letters is in some ways more like p than a the second is 
more like p than x- ^loreover the division opx|et is very objectionable in a literary text, 
while to read apx\eL would make this line longer than any of those that follow, and besides 
necessitate a supplement of three letters at the beginning of 1. 2, where there is no 
known variant. 

2. cro\y Tis: ris crov MSS., which also read o8e or 6 8e (6 alone Paris. 181 1) before 
TratSaywyof. The scribe omitted the a and perhaps also the i in the latter word ; he does not 
seem to have written iredayayos. 

4. dWa tL prjv precedes fjpeTepos ye in the MSS. (omit dWa . . . ecf)T] Ven. 189). 

6. ye: om. MSS. 

7. he KM : de MSS. except Vat. 226 which has Kai in place of Se. 

O 



194 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

8. CrOV O TT,: 6 TT. (TOV MSS. 

14. ye : the reading is quite uncertain, but something certainly stood in the papyrus 
between o-oi and 8(arno[Tas. For the insertion of ye cf. 1. 6. 

1 5. (OS foi[Kfv : om. MSS. as '4oiKiv occurred a few lines above in 208 b. It is superfluous 
here after apa. 



882. Demosthenes, lit Aristogitonem I. 

9-8 X 7 cm. Second century. 

A fragment from the bottom of a column of a roll containing the first 
speech of Demosthenes against Aristogiton. It is written in an upright and 
rather small round hand, not very regular, and probably dating from the second 
century. No stops or other lectional signs are found, but slight blank spaces, 
perhaps corresponding to marginal paragraph!, are left where a pause occurred in 
11. 7 and 10. An interlinear addition in 1. 8 may be by the original scribe. The 
fragment is too small to possess any critical value ; the writer was apparently 
careless. 



\K\ai /ceypa[yft)y] A:[ai 16^ lov 7r[avT avco ^47 

[r]€ Kai KUTCo 7roL(o[v €v] ruLS eKKXrjai 
[ai.]s CO? Seov crT[p€p\ov]v Xa^cov o 
[ri]5?;7rore napooj/ OTi\ rjcfmeTO a(f)0> 
5 [f]oy eyevcTO Tr][v kuto] Atj/jlokXc 
[ov]9 €L(Tayy(Xia[v ai']a[cr€iaa]? noi e 
[r/o]e^|r€^' aXXa fivpia a>v €ixo[i] fiep 

S[ev 

[(p]yoy airavTCOv fiurjadrjvai crv o[iSa 
[oJTi Kai ra [av]Tiypa^a avTCov e^fis 
10 [e/j]yoXaj3a)j/ avrcoi [t]ls ovv tov toi ^ 48 

I. 1. KfKpayas, 

8. SY add (<tti{v) after imdvTav : om. Blass with the other MSS. 

(TV 8 [tv] o[iSa : om. ev AF, Blass. It is of course impossible to be sure that ev was 
inserted here as well as 8, but the similarity of a-v and ev will readily account for the original 
omission of 8 ev, whereas 8 by itself would less easily drop out. 

9. e|ets : 1. e^etf with MSS. 



883. DEMOSTHENES, IN ARISTOCRATEM 



^95 



883. Demosthenes, In Aristocratem. 

i8x4-icm. Third centuiy. 

A short fragment containing parts of §§ 149-50 of the speech against Aris- 
tocrates. The roll was written in narrow columns, a large space (7-5 cm.) being 
left above them. The good-sized, well-formed hand is of the oval type, but the 
letters are upright or have only a very slight slope ; w is noticeably small. It 
seems to be a rather early example of this style of literary writing, and perhaps 
goes back to the beginning of the third century. A stop placed midway in the 
line and accompanied by a paragraphus marks the end of a section. There are 
two agreements with minor MSS. against S ; but judging from the blunders 
in 11. 11-4 the text was not of a high class. 



npa^s r\piaK\ov 
Topovs ov a/c[p£ 
^(By rj8eL 7ra[u 
Tcou av6pci>n\a>v 

5 SiaK€l/X€l'[0V 

(yOpoTara v 
fiLV' Kai ixe[Ta 
TavTa e7rei5[7/ 
Tov Trpoy Ap[(pL 
10 TtoXiv 7roA[e 



I M9 



? 150 



piov TraXiu [no 
X€fl(lU 7r[po€i 
Aero X€p[povrj 
crou Kai ov\8(iV 

15 uye iroieiv [ 
vfias €K€i Ka 
Kov fi\i(T\6o[L ira 
Xlv avTOv OX\yv 
61019 T0l[9 t'ji"[f 

20 repoi^ e)([6pois 



3. na[v]Ta}v : SO A ; tmv Svtcov Other MSS., Blass. 

5—6. StaKet/Li€i'[oi'] ex^poTUTa vfiiv : e^^, vfiiv 8taK. MSS. 

8. Tavra : SO V ; ravTa y Blass with Other MSS. 

1 1 sqq. The ordinary reading here is nporepov noktfxi'i.v elXero Tip.66fos tov np6s Xtppovrja-ov. 
The text of the papyrus has gone badly astray ; TrpoeiXero for elXero is comparatively harmless, 
but TToXiv is an awkward repetition of naXiv in 1. 17, and the omission before Xfp[povri](rov 
reduces the passage to nonsense. 



884. SalluST, Catilijia. 

15-8 X 15-4 cm. Fifth century. Plate V (recto). 

Latin classics have been conspicuous for their rarity among papyri from 
Egypt, and hence the following fragment of Sallust's Catilina, ch. vi, is of more 
than ordinary interest. It consists of a nearly complete leaf from a papyrus 

o 2 



196 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

codex, which may be assigned to the fifth century. The upright and well- 
formed hand is of the ' mixed ' type, the forms of the letters, in which cursive 
characteristics predominate, being in general similar to those e. g. of the legal 
fragments in P. Amh. II. 28, which are no doubt of about the same date. The ink 
is of the reddish-brown colour common at this period. Dots in three positions as 
well as the colon (cf. P. Amh. II. 37) are used for purposes of punctuation, pauses 
being also sometimes marked by blank spaces (11. i, 3, 25) or paragraph! (1. 6). 
qtie is written g- ; the only other abbreviation which occurs is reip- for reipublicae. 
The scribe was extremely careless and made a number of errors, which have 
been amended to some extent by himself but more often by some one else. 
Since the colour of the ink in these corrections does not differ from that of the 
text, it is not easy to distinguish the hands ; but the alteration of e. ^. proptilarent 
to propulerant in 1. 18 seems clearly to be by the original writer, while the inser- 
tion of annis four lines lower down is not less clearly due to another person. 
There also occur a few cursive adscripts (11. 5, 6, and 10) which may be independent 
both of the original scribe and the corrector of annis, Bic. ; if, however, they are 
to be assigned to one or other of them, the former seems more likely to be 
responsible than the latter. It may be noted that the cross-stroke of t in 
tempore, 1. 5, is brought down to form the base of the following e as in the 
Italian papyri of the fifth and sixth centuries. In several places small interlinear 
marks are found of which the significance is not clear ; cf. note on 11. 7, 26-7, 30. 
The text as corrected is good, agreeing in the main with the best MSS., of which 
there are a large number dating from the tenth century onwards. The most 
interesting reading is the occurrence in 11. ^-6 of the sentence ita brevi . . .facta est, 
for which there is otherwise small support. Our collation is based on the edition 
of R. Dietsch (Leipzig, 1859), from whose text the papyrus rarely diverges. 

Verso. 
liberum adq- sohtttinv [[/?///•]] hi posfqnam vi. 2 

in una moenia convenere. dispart genere 

a 

dissimili lingj^^c^. alius alio more viveji 
tes. incredibile memoratu^s'^ est- qtiam faci 
a tempore tu 

5 le collier in J\ ita brevi vmltido diver sa 
t g per con m 

«[[^]]^- ^'rt[[j']]« Concordia civitas facta est : 

c 

sed postqnam res eornm civibns moribus 

agris- aucta' satis prospera satisq- pollens 
videbatnr : sictiti pleraq- mortalium h'aben 



884. SALLUST, CATILINA 197 

entia ia 

10 iur- invidia ex opoleiit^imi^ orta esf 

i 

[i]gitnr regcs. populiq' f^e^nitiini. bell\o tern 

taba[nt] 

\p\t\a^'e [pa]tic\i] ex amicis aiixilio esse [nam ceie 
[ri metu pe]r[c]7ilsi a per{c[tilis aberrant 

4 lines lost. 
Recto. 

e a t 

propiif^a\r^'^it : sociis a^cf^q- amicis aiixilia por[ta 

a 

bant m^us'^isg- [[^^V]] dandis quam accipien 
20 dis benejiciis amicitias parabant' imperiuiu 6 

legetimtim notnen imperii reginm habe 

annis 

bant' delecti qnibus c[o]rpns in fir mum- inge 
itium sapientia validiim erat- reip- consul ta 

e 
bant' ii vel aetate vel cur a similitudine 

25 patres appellaba7itur' post ubi reginm 7 

imperium quod initio conservatidae t\i 

t e 

\b\ertatis ^[[^j]^* augenda reip' fuerat- in super 

\bi\am dominationemq- se convertit- immu 
[tato m]ore amiua imperia- binosq- impera 
},o [tores sibi fecere eo] modo min\iime 



\. fuit, which is crossed through, is not found in the MSS. 

3. alius: so the majority of MSS. ; c?/;/ Dietsch with P^BT (2nd hand) p^ &c. 

5-6. ita . . .facta est: this sentence is found in Leid. G and with erat for est in a 
MS. used by Popma, Vind. i and 2, and cod. Herbipolitanus ; om. Dietsch. tempore, 
which is inserted above the line, is found only here ; the addition is no improvement, per 
concordiam as a variant for concordia is also novel ; the reading is uncertain, the supposed c of 
con looking more like 71, and very little remaining of the final m. Both per concordiam and 
tempore might be regarded as explanatory glosses rather than textual variants. 

7. Above e oi eorutn is a mark resembling a small c, which we do not understand, 

10. We suppose that the mistaken opulentum has been twice corrected, ia over the 
termination is clear, but the decipherment of the cursive letters which precede at a higher 
level is very doubtful. The first of them is probably e, and etiiia seems just possible, though 
there is really more ink than is satisfactorily accounted for by nt. ex ... ox epo . . . might 
be read. 

11. temptare or tentare MSS. Just in front of the upright stroke of 3 in bello there is 
an angular mark to which we can attach no meaning. The low stop beneath it is doubtful. 



198 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

13. pe]t\c]ussi {^ gg® a) might also be read, but is less likely i\i2iX\ pe]r[c]ulsi. 

21. 1. legitimwn. 

22. annis t\o'rpus: so 2)? ; corpus anm's is the usual order. 
24. ti: ei MSS., except g^ which has hi. 

26-7. Several small interlinear signs of doubtful significance occur here ; cf. Plate V. 
Above quod there is something rather like an e, and above the middle i of initio are some 
strokes resembling the letters //; a more complicated sign appears over augendae, and an 
angular mark over e ol fiierat. 

30. There is an angular mark above the n of viinume; cf. notes on 11. 11 and 26-7. 



IV. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 

885. Treatise on Divination. 

23-3 X 8-3 cm. Late second or early third century. 

This text, containing one well-preserved column between two others which 
have almost entirely disappeared, is written in careful and well-formed upright 
uncials of about the end of the second century. High stops are used, besides 
paragraph!, while a coronis below a short line at 1, ^J marks the end of a section ; 
an accent occurs in 1. 38. The subject of what remains is the interpretation 
of strokes of lightning when falling upon statues. A parallel to this is to be 
found in the work of Johannes Lydus, de Ostentis, §§ 47-52, where a section occurs 
(probably derived from Cornelius Labeo, a writer of the second or third century) 
giving the prognostications to be deduced when various objects, and among them 
statues, are struck by lightning, according to the position of the sun. Possibly 
astronomical conditions were also taken into account in the present treatise, 
though they do not figure in what remains. Whether it concerned thunderbolts 
only (-Trept Kepavvwv) or was of a wider character and included other bioa-rjij.c'iai, is 
also doubtful. It is interesting as an early specimen of the treatises on signs 
and wonders which in the Byzantine period became so popular. A noticeable 
circumstance is that there are no traces of Egyptian influence, the gods men- 
tioned in 11. 44-6 being exclusively Greek. According to Lydus indeed (§§ 43, 
52), things vv'ere not struck by lightning in Egypt, or if ever they were, when the 
sun was in Pisces, it was a good omen. Thunderstorms do occur at the present 
day, though rarely. 



885. TREATISE ON DIVINATION 



199 



Col. i. 



Col. ii. 



Col. iii. 



10 



15 



20 



25 



30 



ap 



' OL 


Xq avToo earai 


[ 


^v 


Tr]S ^vBaijxovL 


[ 


, 


as eau Se o\o(T)(^e 


r' 


. 


35 pcoy Kara-ma-qL 


65 v' 


ecr 


rj ciKcou nXt] 


[ 




yeia-a vrro tou k€ 


a 





pavvov andoXei 


a 


I 


av avTov roi^ ye 


y. 


CO 


40 f€f arjp.au/eL 


70 rj 


>p X(or ^prj ovv tou 


7 


e 


nevrjTa €iKOPa 


y ' . 


. 


a(piepovi/- KaL 


a 


; 


6vav Au Kepav 


ep 


. 


45 i'[L]<or Kai HpaKXd 


75 fi 


oty 


Kai Tv)(r]i HcoTeL 


aOi 


y 


pa Kara 8vva 


Ke 


yap 


piv Kai irpoa-TTOL 


^9[ 


at 


iiadaL p€u TO npo 


Ta 


r]a 


50 repov aqpeiow 


80 n 


a 

J • 


TTjy Se necrovcTTjs 


X • [ 


] 


CIK0V09 €kOv€ 


0-77 


; 


aOai Kai anoTpo 


€7r 


J* 


7ria^€(r6ai to arj 


 ^ 


ao" 


55 p€Lou BvovTa 


85 t[ 


• 


TOLS avTois 6e 


a 


] 


ois >p 


Xa[ 


 


?" 


T 


] 


€av €iKoye9 avSpa>v 


f^. 


]? 


60 KaXcoy K[a]yaB(ov 


90 TT 




VTTO K€paVVOV 

. 7rA»;ya)(r[i] .[.... 


P?[ 



51. First a of neaovarjs corr. from I. 



200 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

' (If the statue of a poor man be struck by a thunderbolt and do not fall), it will be the 
beginning of happiness for him ; but if the statue when struck by the thunderbolt falls down 
entirely, it indicates the destruction of his whole family. The poor man should therefore 
purify the statue, and sacrifice to Zeus Wielder of Thunder, and Heracles, and Fortune the 
Preserver in accordance with his means, and appropriate the former portent ; but the portent 
of the fallen statue he should expiate and avert by sacrifice to the same gods. If the statues 
of noble men be struck by a thunderbolt . . .* 

31 sqq. The sense of the protasis of this sentence is apparent from what follows; 

it may be restored eav eiKav avhpos nfprjros fTTjO I ^Kepavvov TrXTj-ye^^a-a ftr] KaraiTear) upJIx*? f.i'.^. 

In Lydus, De Osletiti's, the passage concerning statues is as follows (§ 47) : d 8e Kar dyaX/xdroji/ 

Karepfx^jj {nepavvos) TroiKiXas Koi (TraXXrjXovs ras (TVfKpopas rdls irpdypiaa-iv ajreiXfl' et yap xapuKtiipiS 
idfSiv Tivcov Koi KOCTfita TroXfcoi/ rd dyaXnara VTranrevdr] rois TTokaiols, dpa rois npdyfjLaaiv fj nepl avra 

v^pis. The statues there meant are public ornaments, or represent abstract qualities, and 
the portent has a more general significance than is the case here, where private individuals 
are concerned, 

41. The marginal sign, which stands midway between the two columns, is repeated 
again before 1. 87. Its meaning is obscure; it cannot be associated with the paragraphus 
below 1. 41, since at I. 87 there is no paragraphus, nor on the other hand is it very likely in 
the latter place to have some connexion with the conclusion of the section in 1. 57, for 1. 10 
is a full line, and there is therefore no reason to suppose that a section ended at that point. 
The symbol might be taken to represent ap or Sp, but the first letter would be incompletely 
formed. 



886. Magical Formula. 

2i'3 X i2'5 cm. Third century. 

A formula for obtaining an omen, of a type common in magical papyri, and 
purporting, as often happens with Hermetic writings, to be copied from a sacred 
book ; cf. note on 11. 2-4 and Reitzenstein, Poimandres, pp. 138 sqq. 

The letters of the alphabet, which are frequently employed in astrology and 
magic (cf. Boll, Sphaera, pp. 469 sqq., Reitzenstein, op. cit., pp. 260 and 288, 
Dieterich, ABC-Denkmdler, P. Brit. Mus. 121. 705 sqq., &c.), play a somewhat 
mysterious part in the formula, their number being reckoned as 29 instead of 24. 
An uneven figure was in any case required owing to the nature of the process 
described in 11. 19-21, but how the figure 29 was obtained is quite obscure. To 
give confidence in the efificacy of the spell, the claim is made (11. 7-10) that it was 
used by Hermes and Isis in the search for the dismembered body of Osiris. The 
scribe was a very illiterate person, and makes several mistakes. A couple of 
dashes are placed in the margin below 1. i and against 11. 24-5. 

MeydXr) 'lais rj Kvpia. pi S)i/ diXis KXrjSouia- 

6r]vai. Xaftcbu (f>yvL- 



886. MAGICAL FORMULA 



20 [ 



dvTLypa(pov Upas (3[- 
/3Aoy rrjs evp^Ttar^s kv 
TOis Tov 'Ep/xou rafiioLS. 
5 6 5e rpoTTOS karlv tcl 7rep[i] 
TO. ypdfjLfjiara k6 
8l q)v 6 'Epfxfj? Ke r) 'Icrts 
^rjTOvaa eavTrjs Tov d- 
SeX(pov K€ dvSpa "O- 
10 aipeiy. eniKaXov )"e[i' (?) 
TOV </ Ke Tovs ^v /3y- 
OZ 6€ov9 iravTas ne- 



15 K09 dpaepos (pvXXa k6 

kTTiyp{ay\rov) kv iKdaro) tu)v 
(pvXXcou rd t5)v Oecov 
ouo/xara k€ eirev^d- 
fxevos epe /cara 8vo 

20 8vo, TO Se v7roXL7r6[n](- 
vov 'i(r')(aTov dvayvoo- 

TL Ke €Vpi](Jl9 (TOV TTJl/ kXt]- 

Sova (1/ 0I9 fxiTcaTeiv 
Kal XprjuadLaOrjcrrj ttj- 
25 Xauywy. 



I. 'iais Pap. ; so in 1. 7. 3. 1. (vp(6fiat]s. 7. 1. kqI: so in 11. 9, 11, 18, 22. 
9. '6\(Tipfiv' Pap. 14. 1. (poiviKos. The k has been inserted later. 17. 0f(o~ Pap. 

19. 1. alpe. 19—20. 8vo' 8vo' Pap. 20. vnoXLiro^^fi^evov Pap. 21. 1. dvayvcodt. 

24. 1. XPW'"'*''^'?'''?/' 

' Great is the Lady Isis. Copy of a sacred book found in the archives of Hermes. 
The method is concerned with the 29 letters used by Hermes and Isis when searching for 
her brother and husband Osiris, Invoke the sun and all the gods in the deep concerning 
those things about which you wish to receive an omen. Take 29 leaves of a male palm, 
and inscribe on each of the leaves the names of the gods ; then after a prayer lift them up 
two by two, and read that which is left at the last, and you will find wherein your omen 
consists, and you will obtain an illuminating answer.' 

2-4. Prof. F. Cumont well compares the beginning of a magical formula found 

in Catal. codd. Astr. Graec. vii. p. 62 Bi',3Xos fvpe^elcra iv 'HXiovTroXet TTjs Alyinrrov iv tm iepa 
fv abiiTois iyyfypap.piivr) iv Upois ypdp,pacn. k,t,\. 

6. k6\ in 1. 15 Ke might be read in place of k6, the right-hand part of the second 
numeral being lost, but there is, we think, no doubt about the reading k6 here ; cf. introd. 

10. (TTiKoKov fjif\v : the vestiges following /x suit e better than a. /^/[i/ is not very 
satisfactory, and iniKaXovpai constantly occurs in magical formulae of this character (e. g. 
the extract from P. Leyden W. quoted in note on 1. 1 4) ; but to read fTriKoKovpLe ( = eVtKa- 
Xovpai) here makes the change to the second person singular in 1. 13 very difficult. 

I I . The sign following t6v is the ordinary symbol in magical papyri for ijXios-. 

14 sqq. Cf. e. g. P. Leyden W. xxiv. 31 sqq. Xa^iop (f)v'K\ou 8a(pvr]s (Triypayfrov t6v xaXanTrjpa 
(\. x'^P^'^') ^ (!• ^0 ^^'^'■^ '^"' deltas to (1. rS>) (^Xiw) Xeye, eVtKaXov/nai ere k.t.X. 

19. Kara 8io 8vo : for this mixture of distributives cf. e. g. Luke x. i. 



887. Directions for Wrestling (?). 

IO-6 X 5-8 cm. Third century. 

On the recto of this small fragment are parts of eight lines from the bottom 
of a column, containing repeated references to different parts of the body and 



202 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



apparently belonging to a treatise of the same class as 466, which is concerned 
with grips in wrestling. The careful and rather large uncial writing is probably 
of the third century. On the verso is another text in a similar and possibly 
identical hand ; but the letters are more hastily formed, and the lines are set 
much wider apart and also come further down towards the lower edge of the 
papyrus. The subject here is evidently different, but the remains are too scanty 
to give a definite clue to its nature. 



Recto. 



Verso. 



] e^y ra apiarepa tov [ 

] em TOV Se^iov oo^ixou 

] em TO \a\Kpov tov [ 

] em t\o'\v apLaTepo\v mpov 
]\r)p\l/eTaL 

] eTTL TO aKpov To\y 

] em TO aTr)6o9 7r[ 



]r]ar) yap tou fx . [ 
Xa]^ov(rau p.eyaXa[ 
] Kai e^ct) (f)evyr] [ 
]eTat 7] yvvr] 6Ae[ 
5 a^vOpanroL em Toy[ 
]a (pappa\K\a KaT^ 
\iKav Ka6ev8o[ 



V. DOCUMENTS OF THE ROMAN AND 
BYZANTINE PERIODS 

{a) OFFICIAL 

888. Edict of a Praefect and Petition. 

Fr. {b) 9-2 X 14-9 cm. Late third or early fourth 

century. 

A petition to the exegetes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, with which is here 
coupled the Small Oasis, from two persons, one of whom was a woman (cf. note 
on 1. 9), concerning the guardianship of the children of their dead sister. Only 
the first two or three lines of this document remain and its purport is unknown ; 
the interest of the papyrus lies in the fact that prefixed to the mutilated petition 
is a copy of an edict, dated in the year 387, of the praefect Flavius Valerius 



888. EDICT OF A PRAEFECT AND PETITION 203 

Pompeianus, relating to the appointment of guardians for orphan minors. This 
ordinance directs that magistrates empowered to make such appointments 
{ol Tov x^i-poTovav Kvpioi) should do so in all cases where orphans were without 
guardians, since absence of the latter led to much delay in business in which 
orphans were involved. The question here arises, what magistrates were com- 
petent to appoint guardians ? According to the lex hilia et Titia, passed in 
B.C. 31, this right was in the provinces vested in the praefects, and that that 
enactment continued in force in the third century is shown by 720, where 
it is expressly named (a. D. 247). In practice, however, the praefect of Egypt 
is seldom found exercising his power, which was delegated to subordinate officials, 
and in particular to the (^rj-y-qraC, who, as in 888, are the persons most commonly 
invoked in connexion with the guardianship of minors ; cf. e. g. B. G. U. 1070, 
in which a woman supplies to the exegetes the name of a man suitable for the 
guardianship of her children. From P. Amh. 85 and 86, which are applications 
addressed to the exegetes for leases of land belonging to orphans, it would appear 
that this magistrate was actually responsible to some extent for the proper 
management of property of that class. Professor Mitteis, to whom we are indebted 
for several points in the interpretation of this papyrus, thinks that the praefect 
was principally appealed to when the parties concerned came from different nomes, 
or when one or other of them happened to be residing outside his own nome, 
and the local magistrates were consequently unable to act. The latter explana- 
tion would well suit P. Tebt. 326, where the applicants who have recourse to the 
praefect are natives of Antinoopolis domiciled in the Fayum. The exegetae, 
however, were not the only officials competent in these matters. In 487 the 
ypa/xjuarei;? TTo'Aecos is stated to have assigned a guardian to certain minors, and the 
epistrategus is requested to direct the strategus to give orders that the ypa/x]u.ar€vs 
should substitute another person. According to P. Tebt. 326, where the case is 
referred to the praefect, the magistrate v/ho would actually make the appoint- 
ment in accordance with the praefect's instructions would be not the exegetes 
but the strategus ; cf. P. Cattaoui verso ii. 17-9, where the iuridicus proposes to 
instruct the strategus to make an appointment of guardians. In both these 
instances no doubt the strategus may be supposed to be acting merely as the 
temporary delegate of the superior authority ; but a more general competence to 
deal with such matters is proved, for Oxyrhynchus at any rate, by 56, where an 
application by a woman for a Kvptos is addressed to the exegetes because the 
deputy-strategus was absent, and 898. 26-9, where a strategus orders the 
guardian of a minor to be changed. A new date is supplied by this papyrus for 
the praefecture of Pompeianus, who is shown to have been in office in Oct. 287, 
while from P. Amh. 137 he is known to have been still praefect in July 289. 



204 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[^]\a[ovLOS OvaXipLos UojiTTrfLavos 6 SLaari[ii6]TaT0S 'iirap-^os AiyvnTov 

oly [kav fir] neTTOirj/iipoi cocr]i^ KriBefiovi^ of)\(j)av\oh ol tov yeipoTov^lu 

KvpioL Ka0[eo-7corey 
ej/[ 15 letters iroL^daOooaav tov? KaO' [rj\]LKLau KrjSefxovas' 

ovTCo yap avp.(3r](T€Tai ttjs 7r[/00(r- 
r]K[ov<TT]9 eTrifxeXeias T\vyydviiv, cos vvv ye [TrjoXXa Ta>v 6p(pai^LKa>u npay- 

fidrcov tS>v eTTi to\ls 
5 Kr}\8(p6aLv ovTCOv dva'\^o\rjs Tvy\a.viLv Slcc to jxt) wapciuai T019 6p(f)apoLS 

eTTiTponovs rjTOL 
KOvlpaTopas. eTovs] S koI y (^tov?) tcou Kvptcov rjix5)V ^lOKXrjTiayov Kal 

Ma^Lfxiavov X^^olcttociv 
^a\5>(f>L . . npoeTedr] kv ' O ^v\pvyyci)v tS) uvtZ fir]v[l] ^aaxpi k^. 
. . [ 16 letters e]fa/3^a) k^tjyrjTfj ^O^vpvy[\LT0V K\al MiKpd? 

'Oda€Q)9 PovX{€VTfj) Trjs XafiTr{pds) Kal Xap.v{poTdTr)s;) 'O^vpvy- 

[^ODl/ TToXeCD? ] 

10 [irapd Ka]l 'AnoXXo^via? dfi(f)OT[i]pcov 'flpiy^vovs f^vi'^pos) 

©arja-ios dnb TfJ9 Xafnr{pds!) Kal Xap.TT[poTdTr)s) 
^O^vpvy\{a)v) Tr6X{€Q}9). TVyovTes ttj? K]r]8efji0vias tcov d(j)r]XiKoov dSeXcpiScou 

■qpLcov, T^Kvcov Tr]9 H€TT]XXa)(y- 
\ias 50 letters 'S2piy]eyovs d7r[o] ttj? 

[avT^S TToXecoy ... 



I. TroyLirrj^Javoi Pap. 5. Tvyxavfiv Pap. 6. ae^aara Pap. 8. o^vpvy Pap. 

• Proclamation of his excellency Flavins Valerius Pompeianus, praefect of Egypt. 
Orphans for whom no guardians have been assigned shall have guardians in accordance 
with their age created for them by those competent to make the appointment . . . ; for it 
will thus result that they receive proper attention, whereas at present much business 
concerning orphans and depending upon their guardians is delayed because the orphans 
are unattended by /u/ores or curaiores. The 4th which = the 3rd year of our lords the 
Augusti Diocletianus and Maximianus, Phaophi . . . Published in Oxyrhynchus on the 
27th of the same month Phaophi. 

To . . . , exegetes in office of the Oxyrhynchite nome and the Small Oasis, senator of 
the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, from . . . and Apollonia, both 
children of Origenes and Thaesis, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus. 
We were given the guardianship of our nephews (or nieces), the children of our dead 
sister . . . daughter of Origenes, of the said city . . .' 



888. EDICT OF A PRAEFECT AND PETITION 205 

3. The lacuna may be filled e.g. iv [iKaara vofia fvdeojs, or iv[T6s . . . ^/xepwy. 7r[poo-]j7- 
k[oi)(tt]s IMitteis. 

Tois Kaff [ffK'\iKiav KrjBe/jLovas, ' guardians Corresponding to the age of the orphans/ i. e. 
tutor es for those below the age of puberty (14 years), curatores for those under 25 years. 
Kr]8ffiaiv is here used as a wider term including both tutores and curatores ; cf. 11. 5-6 where 
iiTtTpoTTovs fJToi Kov\pdTopas is synonymous with toi-s Ka6' riKiK. Kr}8fp6vas, ' tutores or curatores as 
the case may be.' The distinction between tutor and curator is not infrequently lost sight 
of in provincial documents of this period, but no such confusion would be expected, as 
Mitteis has pointed out to us, in an official proclamation, and rJToi. therefore does not mean 
that eniTpoTTovs and Kovparopas are convertible terms. 

5. There is a hole in the papyrus between tj and s of nraj^oX^f, in which there is room 
for a letter ; the writing surface seems to have been faulty at this point. The supplement 
of the preceding lacuna is a trifle shorter than it might be. 

6. There would be room for about five letters between Kov[pdTcpas and erovs, but a short 
blank space may well have been left before the date. 

8. The Small Oasis (Bahriyeh) which was grouped with the 'EirTavofila (cf. P. Amh. 
137. I fniaTp{aTrjya>) 'Ettt. kui 'Oaafcos MiKpai) would naturally, for administrative purposes, 
be combined with the Oxyrhynchite nome, to the west of which it lies ; cf. 485, where the 
implication is that persons Hving in the Oasis were under the jurisdiction of the Oxyrhynchite 
strategus. 

9. The petitioners were either brother and sister, or else two sisters ; in the former 
case, which is the more probable, they perhaps also stood in the relation of husband and 
wife. In any case the passage provides another instance of female guardianship, which has 
already been attested for peregrini by 495, and for Roman citizens by P. Tebt. 378; cf. 
Wenger, Zeitschr.f. Savigny-Stiftimg, 28, p. 305 ^ Various instances in the papyri prove 
the possibility of a mother acting as guardian to her children (cf. e.g. 898. 5-6), and the 
guardianship of mothers and grandmothers was eventually admitted by the later Roman law ; 
but that of women not so related to the ward was at no period legalized. 



889. Edict of Diocletian and Petition. 

23-5 X 9'3 cm. Fourth century. 

This narrow strip from a papyrus written in a large cursive hand in very- 
broad lines contains in 11. 1 1 sqq. part of a petition addressed to the boule of, no 
doubt, Oxyrhynchus, by a man who probably wished to be let off some municipal 
burden on the score of old age and ill-health. In support of his case he appeals 
to an imperial decree, of which a copy is prefixed in 11. i-ii. The papyrus 
is thus similar in character to P. Flor. 57, a petition to the praefect claiming 
immunity from XeiTovpyCat, which begins by quoting several rescripts of Septimius 
Severus and Caracalla guaranteeing this immunity to persons over the age of 70. 
The authors of the present decree are clearly Diocletian and Maximian, and the 
date of it is apparently the third consulship of the Caesars Constantine and 

^ In 495 it is the sister of the testator, not, as stated by Wenger, his daughter, who is appointed 
guardian. 



2o6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Galerius, A.D. 300. It was of the nature of an indulgence {(l)i\]av6p(aTTLa, 1. 5) 
apparently to persons over the age of 60 (ef (/Koz^raereT?, 1. 9), but the special nature 
of the benefits conferred remains obscure, the only clue being afforded by 1. 8, 
where there seems to be a reference to irpaKTop^s (?) and to the practice of 
quartering persons upon others {kir'KJTaQjxoi). The remains of the date of the 
petition itself (11. ii-a) are too slight to fix the year, but it no doubt falls within 
the 50 years following A.D. 300. 

Ti^pjiaviKo^ MiyicTTOs Tovu6lk[o9 Meyiaro^ 
Evae^rjS E]vTV)^Tj9 NiKr]Tr]9 ^€(3aaTos K[at 

]y SapfjiaTiKol MiyLcrTOt, r€pfxav[iKos MeyLOTOS 
Ma^ifiiapo]^ ol k-mcpaviaTaTOL Kaccrape[s 
5 (piX]av6pco7ria KCKeXevKajxeu [ 

]ov ^pouov Trjs TToXvaiTia? a . [ 
] KaTokan^avovTUiv Bia r[ 
7rp]d.KTop€9 Kol eTTlCTTadflOl Ko[ 
]oi^ i^r]K0VTaeTT9 oi)S el iXa[ 
10 Trpoeridrj kv 'AXe^avS\pLa, rfj a eiBS>v AeKen^picd\y 

Kaiaap^aiv to y vnaTois- vnaTias 'Ok[ 
ra>v Xa/x]7rpoTdrQiv Ila^^cbv k6 . [ 

TTojAecoy Sia tov kvdpy(ov iTpvTdv\e(os 
rrjs] avTTJs TToXeoos [ 

15 rrapa Trjs] avrfjs TroXecoy. tov TTpoT€Tay[fxipov 

i^r]K0](TTbv kvLaVTOV VTr€pfi€^r]K0T[ 

i^86\iir]KO(JTov Kol TpiTov kviav\Tov 

7r]epJ kfik yfjpa9 Kal ttjv tov (7cw[/zaT0S' daOkvuav 
yr]po^]oaKiap firJTe KTrja-Lv [ 
20 ]t/ knip(oa6r]vai Kafiol joy . [ 

]aL knl Tcou o/xoicov /xov cpOaaavT . [ 



6. 1. TToXvfTi'ar. II, virarois vnarias Pap. 1 6. v7rfp^f^T}K0T[ Pap. l8. v of t?;^ 

corr. from o-. 

1-4. Since there are two August! bearing the titles Germanicus and Sarmaticus, and 
two Caesars, while the consuls hold office for the third time and must be Caesars or Augusti 
{AvTOKpdTop\<Tiv is the only alternative for Km'«j-ap](ni/ in 1. 11), the reign of Diocletian and 
Maximian, and the third consulship of Constanlius and Galerius are clearly indicated. 
A slight difficulty arises in connexion with the title TowOikos (= Golhicus; cf. for the form 
P. Leipzig 119. verso ii. 8, where perhaps TowOikov should be read for Tovvtikov), which was 



889. EDICT OF DIOCLETIAN AND PETITION 207 

adopted by Claudius, Aurelian, and Probus, but seems to be new as an epithet of Diocletian. 
With regard to the length of the lines, only in 11. i and 13 can the beginnings be restored 
with any degree of probability. In 1. i [AvroAfpaTwp Taioi Kvprjkios Ovakipws AioKXr^navos 
FejpiiaviKos implies an initial loss of 46 letters, and in 1. 13 [rfj Kpario-rTi ^ovXfj ttjs XafiTrpas koI 
'kafj.npoTdTrji 'o^vpvyxiruv TrdjXfcof a loss of 52, and since no shorter restorations of these two 
lines are likely, the initial lacunae may be estimated at not less than 45 letters throughout. 
How much is lost at the ends of lines is more uncertain. If the names of the Caesars were 
given in full, as is likely, in 11. 3-4, we must restore kgI ^Xavios OvaXfpws Kava-rdvTios koI rdios 
Oiiahepios Mo^i/itaj'6]s, i.e. 56 letters, of which 5-10 probably occurred in 1. 3; hence even if 
Tfppav[iK6s Meyiaros is the last of Maximian's titles, there seems to be a loss of from 15 to 20 
letters, and the total number of letters missing between the points at which one line breaks 
off and the next commences can hardly be less than 60 on an average, and may amount 
to 70 or more. In 1. 3 ^apuariKoi Meyiaroi secms to be an error for the singular, applying to 
Maximian alone, for if the plural is correct here, Tepnai{tKo\ Meyiaroi must then be read, and 
Diocletian has already been styled FepfiaviKos in I. i. 
8. Ko[: or Ku[l. 

II. Probably ^KcovaTavTicp Koi Ma^ifMiavcS toI? eTrKpavea-raTOis Kalaap^aiv ', cf. the note on 

11. 1-4. The date by the regnal years {erovs i^ koI t$- Ka\ ff) probably occurred at the end of 
1. 10. The date beginning vnarias refers to the following petition; Ov[ may be read for Ok[. 
Owing to the length of the lacuna before Xap^poraTcov the names must have been given in 
full, and it is quite uncertain who these consuls were. 

13. Probably [rfj KpaTiari] /3ovX,7 TTJf \ofnrpds Koi XaixirpordTrjs 'O^vpvyx^irwu TrolXf wf J cf. 

note on 11. 1-4. 

15. 'npoT€Tay[p€vov: SC. fTn(TTd\p.aTos or SiaTayfiaros or the like. 

16. f^T]Ko^(TT6v : cf. 1. 9 f^rjKovraiTis. €/38o/xjjko]ctto'i/ (cf. 1. 17) is also possible. 

890. Letter to a Strategus. 

20-2 X 14-7 cm. Third century. 

An incomplete letter from the prytanis of the local ^ovX'q at Oxyrhynchus 
to the strategus, giving a list of persons who ovi^ed money to the municipal 
treasury. Apparently these sums v^^ere to be collected by the agents of the 
imperial government and to be balanced against moneys owing to the imperial 
from the municipal exchequer. 

A0VKL09 S(7rTijxio9 AvprjXto9 
Xapanioiv 6 Koi 'AiroXivdipLos Koi coy 
)(^pr]fxaTi^(o 'ivapy(ps irpvTavL^ r^y 
Oivpvyx^eiTcov TToAecoy AvprjXio) 
5 AecopiSrj aTparrjycp ran (f)iX- 
TccTCoi yaipiLV. 

Toi>9 d7raiT€Ta[6a]t fiiXXovras a0' S)v 
[6](p[€iX]ovai Tfj 7r[6Xet] ^a>povuTa>p 



2o8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[e/y 8t.'\aypa(pr]v tcov €K Xoyov Trjs 
lo [TToAejcoy SiaypacpojJievcov Kal vvv 
[ypdcpo/xii'] aoi npbs to fir} efLiroSi- 
[^€cr6aL Tr)]^ itcnrpa^LV rod UpcoraTOV 
[ran^Lov. ] €iVi 8\ Avp-qXioL 

[ Kal ''A]tto\\(X)vlos Kal AofiiTTia- 

15 [^oy, ol TpHS S]apa7ria>vos rod Kal 

[ ayop'\avoiiri(TavTO^, [ppa'^ixas ?) v, 

[ 'Jlpja/cXa? ovofiaTOS 

[ 20 letters ]aT ..[... 



12. IfpatTarov Pap. 1 4. ^o/iirViaj[i'os Pap. 

' Lucius Septimius Aurelius Sarapion also called Apolinarius, and however I am styled, 
prytanis in office of Oxyrhynchus, to his dearest Aurelius Leonides, strategus, greeting. 
A written list of those from whom are to be exacted the sums which they owe to the city, 
and which are to be used in payment of moneys payable from the account of the city, is 
hereby given you in order that there may be no hindrance in collecting the revenues of the 
most sacred Treasury, They are Aurelius . . ., Aurelius Apollonius, and Aurelius Domitianus, 
all three sons of Sarapion also called . . ., ex-agoranomus, 400 drachmae . . .' 

7. With a^' hv the sentence begins as if the object of anairfKrOai, i. e. particular sums 
of money or to. im^dWovTa, was going to be stated ; but this is not expressed, so that dcp' S)v 
is practically equivalent to 5. 

14. Perhaps [. . . . 6 koI 'A]7roXXa)j/to9, in which case Svo must be substituted for 
rpeif in 1. 15. 

16. {bpaxiias}) v: av, i.e. Av\pTi\ios, might be read; but it is likely that the actual 
amounts of the debts were mentioned, not merely the names of the debtors. 



891. Apportionment of Duties to an Exegetes. 

ii'8x6-7 cm. A.D. 294. 

A letter from the boule of Oxyrhynchus to an exegetes, acquainting him 
with the fact that he had been chosen to act in his oflficial capacity during part of 
the month of Epeiph as superintendent or president in the discharge of certain 
duties, the nature of vi^hich is uncertain (of. 1. ii, note), the expenses being borne 
in common by the whole body of exegetae. 

The papyrus is written in a small very flowing cursive, and the surface 
is much damaged in several places. 



891. APPORTIONMENT OF DUTIES TO AN EXEGETES 209 

['iJ0' i>\ndT(cv OvaX^pmv Kcou- 

[ a]Tai'T[io]y Kal Ma^i/j.ia[vov 

roov €Tri(f)av€<TTdTcou Katadpcov. 

'0^vpvy^LrS>v ttjs Xafinpas Kal 
5 { Kai \ Xafj.Tr{poTdTrj9) TroAecoy 17 KpairLarrj) ^ou- 

Xrj Si AvprjXiov Kopv-qXiavov 

Siaa- . . ( ) kvdp^ov TrpvTduecos 

nToX€fi€Lva) TO) Kal Xappdrr) 

HvyV^V ^^ ^iXijdTcc) ■^aipeiv. 
10 €^rjyr]TOv ^-qrovpevov eh roa 

a . \. .]a9 'Ewacf) ecoy i^, 

eSo^eu axTTe ae ficv irpo- 

CTTTJi'aL, TO, Se dvaXcofiara 

dnb Tov Koipov tmu ctTro 
15 TOV rdjuaro^ SoOrjuai' Kal 

iva Tovro elSeyai e^oiy 

kiTKTTeXXeraL croi, (piXraTC. 
2nd hand eppcoaOai o-e evx{6peOa), 
(ptXrare. 

' In the consulship of Valerius Constantius and Valerius Maximianus, the most 
renowned Caesars. The most high senate of the illustrious and most illustrious city of 
Oxyrhynchus through Aurelius Cornelianus . . ., prytanis in office, to their dearest 
Ptoleminus also called Sarmates, exegetes, greeting. An exegetes being required for the . . . 
of Epeiph up to the 17th, it was decided that you should preside, while the expenses should 
be paid by the whole body of those belonging to the order. This letter is accordingly sent to 
you, dear friend, for your information. We pray for your health, dear friend.' 

1-2. The writing is much obliterated in these lines, but on palaeographical grounds 
the papyrus can hardly be later than Diocletian's reign, and that the Caesars are Constantius 
and Galerius is, we think, certain. Probably the initial e was written large, causing 1. 2 to 
begin much further to the right than 11. i and 3. 

5. The reading Ka\ XafinlpoTaTrjs) is very doubtful, and it is not satisfactory to suppose the 
repetiiion of Kal • but Xa^n-pa Koi XafjinpoTaTtj are the regular epithets of Oxyrhynchus, and 
though Xa/x . p might be read for km Xo/i', the letter before the supposed p would suit v or p. but 
not 77. (TepvoTaTr]s and dpx^aias, honorific epithets of Hermopolis (e.g. in P. Brit. Mus. 955), 
are out of the question here. 

7. diaa- . . ( ) : 8ia(TTjp{ ) or 8ta(rT( ) might perhaps be read; the letter following the 
doubtful a- has a vertical stroke coming below the line and suggests r or p, while above this 
is a long horizontal line possibly representing an overwritten X or p.. But hiaarjp^oTaTov) and 
8iaaT{oXfcos) are unsuitable to the context, and no title of any kind would be expected at this 

P 



2IO THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

point, so that it is perhaps safer to regard the word as part of the name of the prytanis, 
though in that case the abbreviation of it is remarkable. 

II. a . [. .]as 'Eneicfi '• the supposed s is very doubtful, and there may be nothing at all 
between a (for which 6 may be read) and 'Enelcp, but o7r[6 r^?] a is unsuitable, for the lacuna 
ought not to contain more than 3 letters at most, and even with d7r[6] a there is no stroke 
above a to indicate a numeral, as there is over f of iC Moreover, to supply fjnepas with to? 
and suppose that only the period and not the purpose for which the exegetes was required 
was expressed, is unsatisfactory. We prefer therefore to read a . [. .]ay in agreement with 
raf, though Tov 'ETTficf) would be expected. 

14. dno TOV TaynaTos : this sccms to mean the i^rjyrjriKov Tn'y/xa, for there were no doubt 
several exegetae, just as there were several gymnasiarchs ; cf. Preisigke, Stadtisches 
Beamtenwesen, p. 60, and 908. introd. That ^ovXevriKov is the word to be supplied with 
ray/xa (cf. C. I. G. 44 1 1 b. 5) is less likely. 



892. Appointment of a Superintendent of Works. 

24-2 X 13-8 cm. A. D. 338. 

A letter from the logistes of the nome to a member of the boule at 
Oxyrhynchus, informing him that he had been appointed by that body to super- 
intend the supply of wood required in building a public bath and a gate. 
Though written in a formal cursive hand the letter is only a rough draft, which 
has been subjected to correction, especially towards the end. The words added 
between the lines are more cursively written than the body of the document, but 
the hand seems to be the same; fxijb^v added in the margin of 1. ii is almost 
certainly due to the original scribe. 

On the verso is a list of names preceded by a heading in two lines, the 
writing being much effaced. Apparently the individuals in question were sent 
to the Arsinoite nome to meet some charge. 

^XaovL09 EvaefSios Xoyicrrrjs '0[^vpvy)(^iTC>u 
AvprjXiip TlacTLcovL flpicopo? ^[ovXevTTj 
TJjy avrfj? TroXeco? dSeXcpS) e . [. . . . ^aipeiv. 
laOi €K rS)V kiTLaTaXivTOdv utto rj}[9 r^9 iroXecos 
5 KpaTLdTTjS (SovXij^ Sia rod kvdpyov 'iT[pvTdvea)^ 

AvprjXiov NencoTiai^ov fjprjaOai ere [e/? 

TUiv eu^prj^oi/Tcoi' ^vXcov (h . . . 0(r[ 

^aXavtov kol [rjryi/ KaraaK^va^o pLivqv jBoppivriu 

TTvXrjv, Kai 'Iva tov ipyov [d]uTiXd^r] kol Sia raytcav 



892. APPOINTMENT OF A SUPERINTENDENT OF WORKS 211 
10 ravTa iKKoyjra? TTap(.vey6r]vaL TTOi-qa-rj^ e/y to 

wept TO KovTpov [ 

HTjSiv 'iviSpov y€P€a6ai rb Srjiiocnou Kal ttoKlt^ikov 
epyou eniaTeXXt], d8eX(f)i. 

VTranias ^X[aov]ico[v O]vp(rov Kal IloXefiiov 
Tcov XajXTrp^oT^dTcov Tu^i irj. 



vno 



Pap. 9. iva Pap. 



' Flavius Eusebius, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, to Aurelius Pasion, son of 
Horion, senator of the said city, his . . . brother, greeting. Know that by the instructions 
of the most high senate of the city conveyed through the prytanis in office, Aurelius 
Nepotianus, you have been chosen to (provide) the timber required for the . . . bath, and 
also for the construction of the north gate of the city ; and you are hereby instructed, 
brother, to take charge of the work, and with all speed to get the timber cut and delivered, 
so that there may be no fraud in connexion with the public bath and the municipal work. 
In the consulship of Flavius Ursus and Flavius Polemius the most illustrious, Tubi 18.' 

I. Flavius Eusebius occurs also in 85 and 86. 

6. Cf. C. P. Herm. 83. 'J—S alptdevTOS . . . (h awcdv^fjv 7rotr;a-e]o-5at Ka\ [ali/o*fo/itSryi/ ^vKav. 

[«V (rvv<i)vf}v is possible here, but does not combine very well with fKKoxj/as. [ds dvaKopuSt'iv 
or [fls (TTifj.tXfiai' (cf. e. g. C. P. Herm. 67. 8) w^ould be appropriate enough, but are somewhat 
long. For a similar notification of appointment cf. B. G. U. 362. v. 

7. 8t]n6atov would be expected to occur somewhere at the end of this line ; cf. 1. 11 t6 
trj^Loa-iov XovTfjuv; but (Is 8r]n6a[iov cannot be read, and though the letter following eh may be 
T, and the doubtful a may be S, fl't re t6 t[r]pL6a-tou is also inadmissible. Perhaps the word 
following fls gave the special name of the bath in question, but if so it differed from the 

tiiov ^aXaveiov (43. verSO ill. 24), Kai((Ta)pos f^aXave'iou (43. verSO iv. 24), and depfiav 'A8piavS)i> 
Brjixoa-iop ^aXavelov (896. 7 ; cf. 53. 6). 

1 1-2. The words from evedpov to i'pyov have lines drawn through or above them, 
indicating deletion, but ivtbpov ytvea-dai at any rate cannot be spared. Apparently the 
corrector, whether identical or not with the original scribe (cf. introd.), at first cancelled these 
words, intending to rewrite the sentence entirely, but changed his mind and merely added 
what was required to restore the sense of the passage. 

893. Judicial Sentence. 

12*5 X 34 cm. Late sixth or seventh century. 

The extraordinary grammar of this document makes it difficult to construe, 
though its general purport is fairly clear. It is a decision or enactment (tvttos ; cf. 
note on 1. i) pronounced by three p.dCoves (cf 600. 19, note) of a village concern- 
ing some dispute, of which no details are given, between Marcus, another ixiiCoav^ 
and Marinus. The latter, who was apparently the plaintiff, is declared to have 
the right of imposing upon Marcus, acting through his daughter Sophia, a formal 
affidavit {dtio^ opKos), in which perjury would have serious consequences ; and 

P 2 



212 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Marcus would then be free from further proceedings. If Marinus declined to 
conduct an investigation by means of the proposed affidavit he was to be debarred 
from taking other steps in the matter. 

The writing is across the fibres of the papyrus. 

+ 
4- Ta> TV7ra> tcou d^L(o[.]TrL(rTa)v duSpcov Ua/xovOiov fxei^ovos) [v]l{ov) . a-(o[, o]v 

Kal Uav^Lpev d-rro fiei^(6i^(ov) 

[v]l[ov) ['I]coa^'^'Ol/ Kal 'AttoWco UTrb p.ei({ova>v) vl{pv) ^oL^dii[Jicovos diro Kcofxr]^ 

'AttoWccvos vnep MdpKov 

dnb fxei^^ofcou) Kal Maptvov arLTnroTrpayixarevTfj, (aore Mapivov e^ovaiav 

avrov 

^rjrfjaaL rod 6€{i)ov opKov Slo, Xo(pta Ovyarpl tov avrov MdpKOv dno 

5 Kal fx€rd rrjv (-qrovix^vov rod $e{i)ov opKOV Sia rfj avrrj ^o^lcc a[v]Tov 8k 

Mapivov 
ovSev[a'\ \6yov virep oiaaS^Trore oXou to avvoXov Trpdyparos. iypdcf^rj) 

fiT](^i'b9) 
JJavvL [k\6 opa '^KTrj tov rjp.epa^, SfjXa 8e ndXiv rj e/ 5e //?) OeX-qaai tov 

avTov 
Maplv[ov'\ (rjTTJa-ai tov 6€{i)ov opKov Slcc Trj avrfj Xo<pLa avTov 8e Mapivov 

ovSeva Xoyou 
[uTrep OLa&\8rjnoTi oXov to avvoXov 7rpdyfx{aTos) Kal dir^XXdyO-qv avTov a)9 



kv TVTTCO. 



2. [tlcoawov Pap. 3. 1. ariTTTroTrpaynaTevrov , . . Mapivco e^. avra fiviu. OTf of coo-Te over 

an erasure. 4. 1. ^Jjr^crat bia tov . . . 2o<^i'a? dvyarpoi. 5. 1. to ^ijt, . . . Trjs avTijs 2o(f)ias avT<a 

Maplvoi fCTfirdai. 6. 1. olov8r]TTOTe. 7. 1. aipa . . . ttjs fjfj.. . . . ^eX/Jcrei 6 avTos. 8. 1. 

Map'ivos . . . 8ia TOV . . . Ttjs avTijs ^ocpias avra Mapivco ((rsaOai. 9. it of BrjnoTe apparently 

COrr. 1. olovprjnoTe . . . aTTTjWdxO)]. 

' By the sentence of the honourable men Pamuthius, official, son of . . ., and 
Paniren, of official rank, son of John, and Apollos, of official rank, son of Phoebammon, 
of the village of Apollo, in respect of Marcus, of official rank, and Marinus, tow-merchant : 
Marinus has power to make inquiry by means of the divine oath through Sophia, daughter 
of the said INIarcus, of offiicial rank, and after the inquiry by means of the divine oath 
through the said Sophia Marinus shall have no ground of complaint on any matter of any 
kind whatsoever. Written on the 29th of the month Pauni, the sixth hour of the day. It 
is manifest on the other hand that, if the said INIarinus refuses to make inquiry by means of 
the divine oath through the said Sophia, Marinus shall have no ground of complaint on any 
matter of any kind whatsoever, and Marcus is free of him as though he were declared so 
by sentence.' 



893. JUDICIAL SENTENCE 213 

I. For Tvnos in the sense of ordinance or decree, found in late Greek, cf. P. Brit. Mus. 

77" 45~7 A"?S^ TTpou-eXevcTiv Kara (tov . . . TroirjaaaBai . . . nrjdi alrrjaai 6a.ov Ka\ npayfiariKop rirnov 
npos Trjv8{ TTjv bia6r]KT]v, Justin. Nov. II3 tit. Oeiovs tvttovs fj 6eias KfXevafis. 

d^ia)[.]ni(rTwv : a^ioniarav muSt be intended (cf. e.g. P. Brit. ]\IuS. 77. 68 a^ionia-rav 

fiaprvpcoi') ; but the space between co and n is so wide that it is difficult to suppose that nothing 
intervened. d^i(o[v]niaToov may have been written, but not d^ia[v Kal]. 

7-9. This clause is added as a postscript to provide for the contingency of Marinus 
refusing to acquiesce in the form of investigation prescribed. Something seems to have 
been written between naXiv and el, and the traces may be read as rj; but the expression is 
very clumsy. 

(d) DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS 

894. Latin Declaration of Birth. 

9-4 X 10-8 cm. A. D. 194-6. Plate V]. 

Declarations of the birth of children are of frequent occurrence among 
Egyptian papyri, but these have alu^ays related to peregrini and until recently 
there has been no example of such a declaration made by a Roman citizen. Two 
years ago, however, the omission was supplied by some wax tablets in the Cairo 
Museum published by S. de Ricci, among which is a certificated copy, taken 
from an official register, of a declaration of birth made by a Roman in the year 
148 {Nouv. Revtte Hist., 1906, p. 483 ; cf. ArcJiiv, IV. p. 252). The formula of these 
tablets, which are in Latin, falls into four sections: (i) Names of seven witnesses. 
(2) Date {a) by Roman consuls and month, {b) by Emperor and Egyptian months, 
Alexandr{iae) ad Aegyptiini, descriptiim et recognittmi fac\tum'\ ex tabula albi 
professio7i\iim libero\niin nator\tiin'\ &c. (3) Date as before, M[arc6) Petronio 
Honor ato praef{ecto) Aeg[ypti) professionis liber ornm acceptae citra causarum 
cognitionem tabula v et post alia pag[ina) Hi, xviii k{ale7idas) Octobr[es). (4) Ti- 
b{erius) hiliiis Dioscorides . . . fil(iam) n{atain) hdiam Ammonum ex Iidia 
Ammonario xiii k{alendas) Septembres. . . . Here three chief points are clear: 
the declaration was made in the Latin language, it was made at Alexandria, and 
to the praefect of Egypt. A fragment of a tablet in the Bodleian Library has 
been recognized by Wilcken {Archiv, IV. p. 267) as part of a similar Latin 
declaration. 

Another instance has now come to light in the following papyrus, which is 
later in date by some two generations. In the meantime according to the state- 
ment of Julius Capitolinus, Vita Marci, 9. 7-9, the formalities of registration had 
been regulated by Marcus Aurelius, who ordered that declarations of birth should 
be made within 30 days of the event at Rome to ihe praefecti aerarii Sattirni, in 
the provinces to certain tabularii publici. We should therefore be prepared 



214 ^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

to find in a registration of a date subsequent to this regulation some features 
distinguishing it from one of the reign of Antoninus. As a matter of fact, however, 
these distinguishing features do not occur. Our papyrus shows the same three 
essential points as the Cairo tablets : the declaration was made at Alexandria, 
and to the praefect, and the certificate is drawn up in Latin, though followed by 
the signature of the declaring party in Greek. The tabtilarii piiblici, whatever 
that vague term may signify, do not appear. Prof. Mitteis, to whom we are 
indebted for information on this question of registration, thinks that perhaps only 
the praefectorial bureau is thereby meant. In any case it seems that the regula- 
tions attributed to Marcus Aurelius had practically no effect upon the form 
of a Roman declaration of birth in Egypt. 

The scarcity of dated specimens of Latin cursive makes this papyrus palaeo- 
graphically valuable. It is written in a clear and good-sized hand with occasional 
division of words. Abbreviations and an ordinal figure in 1. 6 (cf 737) are 
followed by a single dot. a is sometimes supplied with an abortive cross-bar. 
On the verso are traces of ink which seem to be more than blottings, but the 
writing is too much effaced for decipherment ; it is probably Latin, perhaps 
figures. 

,«••••■ • 

[ 21 letters ^qnno \^. ."] Imp{eratoj'is) Cae\sa\ris L[iecii) 

\Septimii Severi Pii Perti\nacis Aug{usti) A\rabi\ci Adiabenici 

\mense die . . . A']lexandr{iae) ad A[egypt\um, 

\apud Marcum Ulpiuni Pri\nianiim praef{ectinn) Aegypti 
5 [ 17 letters pro\fessus est filiuni sibi natiim 

[ 20 „ ^mm, ex Ulpia Sabina xvi 

[ ^9 V ] • hab{it ) \0\xyryncho. 

r 20 „ 8rjA.a) v\o^ jjlol yeyevrjcrOat 

7. [o]xyrync/id Pap. 

' In the . . . year of the Emperor Caesar Lucius Septimius Severus Pius Pertinax 
Augustus Arabicus Adiabenicus, in the month . . ., at Alexandria on the coast of Egypt, before 
Marcus Ulpius Primianus, praefect of Egypt. . . . has declared a son, named . . . nus, born 
to him and Ulpia Sabina on the i6th . . ., being an inhabitant (?) of Oxyrhynchus. (Signed) 
I, . . ., declare that a son has been born to me . . .' 

I. Probably one line is lost which with the first half of 1. i gave the date by the Roman 
consuls and month, as in the Cairo tablets. The year may be the second, third, fourth, or 
fifth ; cf. 1. 4, note. 

3. mense . . . die . . .: so the Cairo tablets, which also support the supplement ad 
A\egypt\um. 

4. M. Ulpius Primianus is the only praefect with a name ending in -ianus who is 



894. LATIN DECLARATION OF BIRTH 215 

known in the sole reign of Severus, and though the list is not certainly complete the three 
praefects who held office during this short period cover it quite sufficiendy. There is 
therefore good ground for identifying the praefect of the papyrus with Primianus, whose 
name occurs in two inscriptions, C. I. G. 4863. iv of a. d. 194-5 and C. I. L. III. 51 of 
Feb. 24, 196, and in E.G. U. 973. 6 (undated). Mantennius Sabinus was still praefect on 
April 21, 194 {Archiv, II. p. 447, no. 77), and Aemilius Saturninus had entered office before 
July II, 197 (B. G. U. 15. ii. i). The limits of Primianus' praefecture are thus from the 
second to the fifth years of Severus. 

4—5. Cf. Vi'ia Gordiani \.^ apudpraefedumaerarii more Romano professiis filium. The 
lacuna at the beginning of 1. 5 was filled by the name of the father. 

6. ^mim is the termination of the son's name, and xvi refers to the day of the month 
on which the birth occurred, and which was given according to the Roman calendar ; cf. 
the Cairo tablets, section (4). According to the law attributed to Marcus Aurelius (cf. 
introd.) the registration had to be made intra tricensimum diem ; it is noticeable that the 
Cairo tablets are already in accordance with this regulation. 

7. If /lab- stands for habitans referring to the name of the father, it is somewhat out 
of its place. Perhaps a plural participle was intended, connecting loosely with both parents. 
{O^xyryncho should then in either case strictly be \0\xyrynchi, unless \0\xyryncho(ru7n^ (sc. 
urbe) be read. 

895. Return of Village-Accounts. 

19 X 15-4 cm. A.D. 305. 

A statement rendered to the logistes of the nome by two comarchs of 
the village of Tampeti, of the village-accounts for two months. Most of its 
details are lost through the mutilation of the papyrus. The report was required 
in consequence of an order of the praefect (cf. e. g. P. Tebt. 336) Clodius Culcianus, 
for whose period of ofifice a new date is supplied ; cf. note on 1. 8. The document 
has been joined to another return of a similar character, of which only the 
beginnings of the first eleven lines are preserved ; "^alaXov occurs apparently as 
a village name. On the verso at right angles to the writing on the recto are the 
ends of nine lines, apparently of an account of judicial proceedings. The last 
three lines are: ] . . . er/o hiaho\o<i ^X-ni^^vY ra Tmrpayix^va \ 'Ajju/xcoytai/ou ^v jjivCav] 
] KVpiov jxov bLaa(riix)6TaTov. 

'Etti vTrccTCdv tS>u Kvpioou r]ii5i\y Koiv\a[TavT\lov 
Kol Ma^ifxiavov t5>v errKfyavccrTaTCdv Kaia-dpoou to €. 
Avp-qXicp X^vOl tS> kol ^flpicovL X[o]yL(rTfj '0^upvy^LT[ov 
irapa AvprjXicou XaKda>uo9 TleripLo^ Kal WSlto^ 
5 UaTa^fJTOs dfxcpoTepoov KUip-ap-^wv Kcofirjs TafiTreri. 
70V €v€a-Ta>T09 Ka KOL ly {eTov<i) eTTi^rjTovuTL croi Kara 
KeXivaiu Tov Siaa-qfjLoraTOV rj/xoou rjyepoi^os 
KXcoSlov KovXKiavov tov9 K(opr]T[LKo]v9 Xoyovs TrJ9 



2i6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

TjiiiTepas KOijxrjS ii-qv5)v Svo tov re ^ap/xovOi 
lo Kal TOV na)(cbv dvayK[ai]a>[u ■qy^qadfxevoL kni- 

SiSo/j.ei' tv €LSii/aL [e'xj/]?. [e](rTi Si' 

TifXTJi yapTOV Kal ypdnlTpcou ....]. eXt'ay kpyarSiv 

Tpt5)v dnoaTaXipT[(op ] inl Ba^v\S)va (Spa)(^fj.al) pK, 

rtfjLTJs \dpTov Kal ypdn[Tp(jdv . . eA/jay dXXov kpydrov ii/09 
15 [d7ro(rT]a\ivTO)v CTTi [ttjv ]iTa)V ttoXlv (Spa)(^fial) p[ 

[yi(j'ovTaL)] ojxov (SpaxfJ-c^l) o"[ ] P • ' [ 

[ ]uVfi€U Sk To[ 

[....] /jLeTa(popa tt[ 

[ ] MiKpai/ ''0[a(n]u . [ 

20 [ ] €Xr. .] . [ 

[. . . . 7rap]€a^ri[Ka{X€]u [ 

Remains of 4 more lines, below which the papyrus breaks off. 

10. 1. dj'ayK[ai]o[v. 1 5. 1. dnoa-TaXevros. 

' In the consulship of our lords Constantius and Maximianus, most renowned Caesars, 
for the fifth time. To Aurelius Seuthes also called Horion, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite 
nome, from Aurelius Sakaon son of Petiris, and Aurelius Psois son of Patabes, both comarchs 
of the village of Tampeti. In reply to your request in the present 21st which = the 13th 
year, in accordance with the order of his excellency the praefect Clodius Culcianus, for the 
village-accounts of our village in the two months Pharmouthi and Pachon, we, regarding 
this as a necessary duty, present them for your information, as follows : — For the price of 
papyrus and writing-materials . . . of three workmen sent to Babylon 120 drachmae ; for the 
price of papyrus and writing-materials ... of one workman sent to . . . i[. .] drachmae; total 
together 2[. .jdrachmae . . .' 

2. The numeral e is not very satisfactory, but is confirmed by the date in 1. 6, 

6. The years are those of Diocletian and the Caesars Constantius and Maximianus, the 
year of the emperor Maximianus being omitted ; cf. e. g. the date in 71. 4. 

8. Clodius Culcianus is mentioned as praefect in Feb., a. d. 303, in 71. The present 
passage proves him to have been still in office at the end of May, a. d. 305. 

10. Perhaps ai/ayAfetuj/ was written ; the space between k and &> is narrow for two letters. 

12. ypd7i[Tpo>v Wilcken, who compares B. G. U. 1062. 20 n/iijr xdprov koI ypdnTpcov. 

] . (Xias, however, remains a difficulty, for there is hardly room for Kal fTnfi]f\ias here, and 
certainly not in 1. 14. 

15. 'o^vpvyx]iTS>vv/ou\dh!Lre\y go into the space, and Ba^v\S)va in 1. 13 suggests a more 
remote locality, e. g. 'Apo-ti/ojtrou/. 

16. p seems to be the numeral; it is followed at a slight interval by a tall upright 
stroke which may be t = 10. 

17. Probably not ofx^vfifv, since the statement of accounts is continued in 1. 18 sqq.; 
fnibfiK]vvfMev, e.g., is more likely. 

19. MiKpdv''o[a(Ti]v: cf. 888. 8, note. 



896. REPORTS TO A LOGISTES 217 

896. Reports to a Logistes. 

25-1 X34 cm, A.D. 316. 

These two reports addressed to the logistes Valerius Ammonianus belong to 
the same series as 53, which was sent to the same official and is dated in the same 
year. The first of them, which is numbered at the top 127, is also closely con- 
nected with 53 in subject. It is an estimate of the probable expense of painting 
certain specified parts of some public baths which were in course of repair ; and 
these repairs were also the occasion of the report contained in 53, Some new 
technical terms occur in the description of the work stated to be necessary. 
This is followed by a medical report, similar to 51-2, 476, B, G. U. 647, &c. (cf. 
983), upon an official in the service of the governor of the province Aegyptus 
Herctdia (cf. note on 1. 29), The doctors certify that the person in question, who 
was perhaps suspected of malingering, was suffering from a mild attack of fever. 

Col. i. 

OvaXepm 'Afxfxcoi/iavM t(o koI FepovTiO) X[oyiaTr} 0^(vpvyyjTov) 
napa AvprjXiov 'ApTe/xiScopov 'Apaivoov diro Trjs 
Xa)U7r(pay) Kal XapLiripoTaT-qs) '0^vpvy^LTa>v TroXiCcs ^<oypd<pov rrjv 
5 eTriCTTTjurjp. etn^rjTOVcrr} rrj afj eyu/zeXe/a rrji/ 
(rvvoyjnv toou Scofiifooi^ roircov ^coypacpia? 
Tov €VTV\cos eTTiarKiva^ofiivov Tpaiavoiv 
'A8piaya>v depficov SrjfioaLOV Trjs 
avTTJs TToXecoy ^aXauiou, Kara ravra SrjXm XPfj- 
10 ^eiu e/y Xoyou ^coypaipLa? tcov re Sfo/jtipcoy 

TOTTCOV t5>V SvO '^V')(^pO(p6p(£)V KOI ipjSaTLKOV 

[6]6Xov ivo9 Kal dp8pop.rjKLaia>v oXov ^varov 
\iL\<j6B(iov Kal e^oScou Kal napaOoXicov Teacrdpccv 
\t'\ov e^coripov ^varov Kal tS>v aXXa>v tottcov 
15 [e/y /i]ei/ Tiprjv y^poap-dTOiv dpyvpiov Srjuapicoy 

[fivptdS ...].[ ] . €oy ^(cypa(f)ia9 oXoou epycoy 

[dpyvpLov 8rjvapmv /j,v]pidSai/ pLiav omp 

\TTpoa(p(i)v5i. ] 

[uTrarciay KaiKiviov ^a^ivo]v Kal Ov€ttiov ^Pov(bivov 



2i8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

20 [t5>v XaiXTr^poTccTCOu) ] (2nd hand) Aupy](\ioi) 'Apre fit- 
Scop 09 
[iTTiSiScoKa. Avp-q^Xioi) jcoi/ 'iypa{y^<x) V7r(ep) avToO ix(j)) iS(^6ro9)- 

Col. ii. 

[ PKV 1 

P[ya]A[e]/3[/c() 'Aixficoviavcp rco /cat FepouTico XoyiaTrj '0^(upvy^LTOv) 

napa AvprjXicoi' "Hpccvos [•] . [ Koi AiSvpov 

25 AioaKopov dfi(f)(^oTepcov) dno Ti]S Xa[/i7rQoa?) Kal] Xa/jLn[poTdTr]s) 

' 0^v[pvy^iTa>i/ 
TToXecoy Sij/xocrioou iarpwv. e7r[€cr]raX7/^ei^ vno (tov 
arjfKpov r]Ti9 eoTif ^apfiovOi fj- [e/c] ^i^XiSicov 
imSoOiuTcov croi vtto AnoXXcoviov 6(p[<piKiaXiov) riyovfjiivov 
Alyynrov 'HpKOvXeia^ AvprjXwv Avtcopiov oxttc yevicOai 
30 [(Tr]l Tfi[v] oiKiay kv rrj avrrj noXu Kal tovtov icfuSii/ 
Kal [ri]u Slv KaTaXd^[oop.i]v nepl avTov SidOecriv ky- 
y[pa0co]y Trpocrcfxovfja-ai. oOev y€v6p,€uoi iv6a dpa>- 
fj.e[v avTb]y ro[Or]oi/ KX€[Li'r]]pr)i' oVra irvpaLTioi^ 
a .[.]<.. . [.] avv€)([6/x€i'ov orrep] Trpoacfxevovpiv. 
35 vnareias Kai[KL]ucov l![a]^Lv[ov Kal] OverTiov 'Pov^ivov 
Ta>v Xann{poTdTCou) ^ap/J.[o]v6i [<,-.] 
2nd hand Avp-qXio^ "Hpcov kveiSkScoKa 

np[oa](pa)UMu cop TrpoKeirai. 
3rd hand AvprjXio? AiSvp.09 kniSiScoKa Trpocrcpcovatv 
40 wy 7Tp[6]KeLTai. 

4. o^vpvy'xiTav Pap, 7-8. Tpaiavcav abpiaixov OVer an erasure, probably of a^piavav 

6(pfia)V. 26. "iarpoiv Pap. 28. vno Pap. 31. fy Pap. 33. 1. irvpfTioii. 

' To Valerius Ammonianus also called Gerontius, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, 
from Aurelius Artemidorus son of Arsinoiis, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of 
Oxyrhynchus, a painter by profession. In reply to the request of your grace for an 
inspection of the places requiring painting in the public bath of the said city now auspi- 
ciously under repair at the warm baths of Trajanus Hadrianus, I hereby declare that for 
the painting of the parts requiring it — of the two cold water conductors, and one vapour- 
bath, and the entrances and exits of the entire colonnade, and four passages round the 
vapour-bath in the outer colonnade, and the other places — there is required for cost of paint 
. . . thousand denarii of silver, and of the . . . painting of the whole work ten thousand 
denarii of silver ; which I therefore report. The consulship of Caecinius Sabinus and 



896. REPORTS TO A LOGISTES 219 

Vettius Rufinus the most illustrious, . . . (Signed) I, Aurelius Artemidorus, have presented 
the report. I, Aurelius ... on wrote for him, being illiterate.' 

' To Valerius Ammonianus also called Gerontius, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, 
from the Aurelii Heron son of . . . and Didymus son of Dioscorus, both of the illustrious and 
most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, public physicians. We were sent by you to-day, 
Pharmouthi 6, in consequence of a petition delivered to you by Apollonius, officer of 
Aurelius Antonius governor of Aegyptus Herculia, to go to the house in the said city and 
inspect this person, and to make a written report upon the condition in which we found him. 
Having therefore proceeded thither we saw the man himself lying on a bed seized with 
a slight . . . fever ; which we accordingly report.' Date and signature of the two physicians. 

7-8. Tpmavwv'hbpiavav depuSiv : the ' Baths of Hadrian' are also mentioned in 54. 14 
in A. D. 201, when too they were undergoing repair. Cf. 53. 5-6 roij €vtvxS)s <7r[i](7-Kei;a^[o]- 
/xeVov 6epfjio)v brjuucriov l^aXaviov, which is evidently identical with the 0a\av'iov here ; the note 
ad loc. is to be modified accordingly. 

11-13. ipL^aTiKoii \d]okov: ffx^aais and in later Greek //i/3aT^ are used in the sense of 
a bath. For 66\os of. P. Magd. 33. 3 dixxd. Melanges Nicole, p. 282 ivrSn ywaiKelcoi doXm. 

dpBpoprjKuncov is an unknown word of uncertain signification ; napadoXiov is also new, but 
creates no difficulty. 

16. It is not possible to read ija-ep Cwypa^ias, since not only is there no sign of any tail 
for the p, but a mark like an overwritten v would remain unexplained ; the supposed v, 
however, is more directly above the o than elsewhere in the papyrus. Ke^ajXeou for K«^a]\aiou 
might be read but is not satisfactory ; perhaps Ka\ riYiov. 

29. Aegyptus Jovt'a, Aegyptus Herculia, and Thebais were the three provinces of Egypt 
according to the reorganization of Diocletian. It was supposed by Mommsen i^Abh. 
d. Berl. Akad., 1862, p. 500), whose view has been generally followed, that Aegyptus J ovia 
consisted of the western, Aegyptus Herculia of the eastern, portions of lower Egypt, the 
latter coinciding with the province afterwards called Augustamnica ; but the intrinsically 
more probable hypothesis of C. JuUian {Rev. Hist. xix. p. 357) that Aegyptus Jovia was the 
Delta and Aegyptus Herculia corresponded to the Heptanomis with the Arsinoite nome, is 
supported, as the editors notice, by a papyrus published by CoUinet and Jouguet in Archiv, 
III. pp. 339 sqq., and receives fresh confirmation from 896. Mommsen's theory, however, 
might be reconciled w^ith these two documents by transposing Aegyptus Herculia to the 
west bank. 

31. KaTa\a^a>p('\v '. Or perhaps /caTaXd^[a)/i]a«, the singular being used by mistake for the 
plural ; the middle is supported by 51. 10. 

33. KKdVTjprjv ovra occurs in the corresponding passage of 983. 

34. The mutilated word is probably an adjective qualifying nvpfTiois. 



897. Declaration to Riparii. 

16-5 X 12-6 cm. A. D. 346. 

A declaration on oath addressed to two riparii of the Oxyrhynchite nome 
by four inhabitants of a village, denying all knowledge of the whereabouts 
of a certain individual whom they had been ordered to produce. On the riparii^ 
who were police-officers, see 904. 3, note. The papyrus is nearly complete ; the 
missing termination probably contained only the signatures. 



220 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

^Tirareia^ tS>v SecrnoTcov rjucov KoovcrravTLOV 

TO ^ Koi Ka)va-TavT09 to y AvyovaTcov. 

^XaovLOLS EvXoyio) kol Aiouvaapico pnrapioLS 'O^vpvy)((^LT0v) 

irapa AvprjXLCoi' 'Ap-OLTOS " flpov Kol TlaTdrrLos 
5 Uarjcriov kol SappaTov Trpecr^vTepov Kal JJaTTvoVTiov 

JJarjcriov t5>v iravTatv a-no Kcopr]^ Icreiov 

ZaniTov. kniOiTO rjp.'iv rj vpcov efxpiXia 

a><TT€ Xoiovv 'HpaKXijov inro^X-qOiv- 

Ta dvai OLTTo Trjs rjpiTepa? Ka>pr}9 dva- 
lo ^r)TTJ(raL Kal irapaa-Trjaai. KaToc TavTa 

6p.oXoyovpiv opvvvT^s Tov crejSdcrpiov 

6eiov opKOv Ta>v SecTTTOTcop ripcov Avyov(TT(£>v 

[/zjl^re TOV Xoiovv 'iri (.Ivai knl r^y 

\fiii5)v K]d>pT]^ H-V"^^ elSevai rjpds 
15 [oTTOv TTojre kaTiv, Kal prjSev Steyjrev- 

[crjOai [^ '&]o^oL d[rjpiv tS>\ 0^\t\(o opKO) 

]'. [ ' 



I. vnaTfias Pap. 6. 'iattov Pap. 8. vnojBXrjdfVTa Pap. 12. avyovarci Pap. 

14. T of /iJjTf corn from S. 

' In the consulship of our masters Constantius for the fourth time and Constans for the 
third time, the Augusti. To Flavins Eulogius and Flavius Dionysarius, riparii of the 
Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Amois son of Horus, and Aurelius Patapis son of 
Paesius, and Aurelius Sarmates the elder, and Aurelius Papnutius son of Paesius, all from 
the village of Ision Zapitou. Your grace required us to search out and produce Choous son 
of Heracleus, supposed to belong to our village. We therefore declare on the august 
divine oath by our masters the Augusti that Choous is no longer at our village, and that 
we do not know where he is, and that we have made no false statement, under pain of 
becoming liable to the consequences of the divine oath . . .' 

7. ZaniTov: or Zaniaov or Zayvlov. The name of this village is new; cf. 'latlov Ilayya 
(899. 7), 'la-ftov Tpicpoivos (719. 14). 



898. PETITION TO AN ACTING-STRATEGUS 



221 



[c) PETITIONS 
898. Petition to an Acting-Strategus. 

23-3 x8 cm. 



A. D. 123. 



A petition to Hermodorus (cf. 714), basilicogrammateus and acting-strategus, 
from Didymus, a minor, complaining of fraud on the part of his mother Matrina 
in her capacity as his guardian. It is alleged that Matrina, after various acts of 
bad faith, had obtained possession of a deed belonging to Didymus and demanded 
in exchange for it a document absolving her from all claims in connexion with 
the guardianship. 



'Ep/xoSdopcoL l3a(TiX{tK(p) ypa{fjLfxaTu) 

8La8€\o[x^v(i>L Ko] [T\r]v a-T[pa(Tr]yiav) 
irapa, jdiSvfiov Alovvctiov rov Ka[l 
^arpecos oltt ' O^vpvyyoav 7r6Aeo)[y. 
5 77 fi^Tr]p fjLov MaTpdua 'HpaKXijov 
Tov Koi MaTp€[ov o]v(rd [lOV i7T[iTpo- 
TToy Kal TToXXd /i[e djSiKovcra in 
Kol nXauTjcraa-d fie enoCrjcrei/ e/y 
"Oaaiv Kara^fjuai Kal ypd-^acrQai 

10 AiofTKopcd duSpl dneXevdipas 
avTTJ^ ovTi IBlooi avTrjs aSoT . [. 
dpyvpLov raXdvTOv eVoy rjixia {o]v 
Kal vTTodicrdaL oaa e_>((W e^' rfj 'Odcr€[i 
KTTJfxaTa [Xa](36vTa tov Aio(TK6po[v 

15 ypap-jxaTa d7rep[ian]daT0v. dva^d\y- 
Ta Si /xe e/y tou '0^vpvy)(^eiTr]v 
/xera Kal tov AiocrKopov kvqSpev- 
(rev aXP' ^^ aiTijar) /xe ttji/ dnepi- 
cmacTTOV Kal TavTt)^ ivKpaTTjs 

20 yevofiivT] Kal avueiSvia iavTrji 
TToXXd Tcov kfi5>v dvqpiraKVLrji 



ov TrpoTepof o/xoXoyeTy OiXei 
aiTOVcrd p[e] dvTl Tavrrj^ dno'^rjv 
TTJ^ eTTLTpoTrrj^, oloixeur] kK tov- 
25 TOV SvvacrOaL eKcpvyeii/ d Sienpa- 

^ev KaiTOL ^lXovlkov tov (TTpairriyov) 
Kad V7rofx.uT]fjiaTia/j.ov9 Kpei- 
vavTO^ eTepov jxov kirlTpoTTov 
KaTaaTadijvai, ov Tria-T€V0i/T09 

30 OVT€ aVTjj OvSk TTJL rjXiKia fXOV. 
\<Oph Se TOVT(£>V ov8k 6-^co- 
vLov [XOL k)(oprjyri(Tev eTi irpo fxr}- 

VWV Tpioiv, €K TTaVT09 OXci^OV- 

ad fie e/y to fxr] SvuacrdaL KaT av- 
35 T^y irpoeXOeiu. S>u iravTcav yd- 
piv dvayKams i7riSi8ov9 to 
dva(f)6pLov d^ico e-yecu kv KaTa- 
ya>pi(7/x^ Kal SiaXa^elv coy kdv 
(TOl [S]6^r]. (eTOvs) C AvTOKpdTopos 
40 Kaiaapos Tpaiavov 'ASpiauov Xe^acrTov 
IlavvL k6. 



II. i'Stwt Pap. 



20. avvet8via Pap. 



21. avrjpvQKvirji Pap. 



222 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

' To Hermodorus, basilicogrammateus and deputy-strategus, from Didyinus son of 
Dionysius also called Phatres, of the city of Oxyrhynchus. My mother Matrina, daughter 
of Heracleus also called IMatreus, who is my guardian and by whom I am much injured, 
has ended by beguiling me and causing me to go to the Oasis, and to draw up with 
Dioscorus, the husband of her freedwoman and her confidant, a ... of one and a half talents 
of silver, and to mortgage all my property in the Oasis in return for a deed of release 
received from Dioscorus. On my return to the Oxyrhynchite nome with Dioscorus she 
watched for an opportunity of asking me for the deed, and after obtaining possession of it, 
being conscious of the theft of much of my property, she refuses to acknowledge having it, 
and demands in return a receipt for her guardianship, thinking by this means to escape 
the consequences of her misdeeds. This she has done notwithstanding the fact that 
Philonicus the strategus has decided, in accordance with a report of proceedings, that 
another person should be appointed as rny guardian, distrusting both her and my own 
youth. Besides this she has failed to supply my allowance for the last three months, using 
every means of oppressing me so as to render me incapable of proceeding against her. For 
all these reasons I am obliged to present this petition, and beg that it may be registered, and 
that you will take whatever steps you think best. The seventh year of the Emperor Caesar 
Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Pauni 29.' 

I. 'Epnobapm ; cf. 714. 2, referring to the year before the date of the present papyrus. 
In the previous line there [o-Tpa(T??ya)) should be read in place of [rwi, for 898. 26 shows 
that Philonicus was the name of the strategus. 

6. «7r[irpo]7ror : cf 888. 9, note. 

9. "OacTLv: i.e. the Small Oasis (Bahriyeh) ; cf. 888. 8, note. 

I I . a8oT , [. : a substantive is wanted to be the object of ypdyl/aadai and to govern the 
genitive raXavrov in 1. 12. The letters a8o are quite clear, and the next letter is 
either t or tt. Possibly aSorov is to be read; cf. 1. 18 tt]v dirfpianaaTov, and P. Brit. Mus. II. 
361 verso 5 n€p\ dboTov TrpooiK[6s : but this needs other support. For tS/w cf. 974. 

15. ypayLfiara dnfpiandcrTov. i.e. a deed of indemnification, distinguished by the formula 
dTTfptWaffToi' 7rop€^f(T^ai or an equivalent phrase ; cC e^g. 270, 286. 9 sqq., and P. Tebt. 392. 
In 1. 18 the deed is called ^ dneplanacrTos simply. 

22-3. The construction is tnixed : ol npoTepop . . . de'Xti would naturally be followed by 
Trp\p av Xdf^T}, instead of which a participial phrase is used as if npdrfpov were absent. 

26. <Pi\oi>Ikov : cf. note on 1. i and 957. (TTpairr^yrja-avTos) is possible, if Philonicus had 
resigned or died and was not merely absent temporarily. For the competence of the 
strategi in the appointment of guardians cf. 888. introd. 

31. d-<\ra>vi.ov : the allowance of Didymus was probably fixed by his father's will ; cf. e. g. 

494. 16^8' avTTi yvVT] fiov xopr^yrjaii rw via p.ov K.r.X. 

899. Petition of Apollonarion. 

35-3 X 25-3 cm- A.D. 200. 

The recto of this papyrus consists of a copy of a petition from a woman 
called Apollonarion, claiming on the score of her sex to be released from the 
responsibility of cultivating various plots of Crown land in the Oxyrhynchite 
nome. That women were legally exempt from the obligation to undertake this 
duty was known from B. G. U. 648. 12-4 et? rjv [yfoopyCai') yvvri ovcra ovk 6<pcL\o) 



899. PETITION OF APOLLONARION 223 

KaO^kKeadai Kara to. vtto tG>v ij-yeixovcav koI (iTtTpoTTcov irepi tovtov SiarerayjueVa (the 
correctness of Wilcken's interpretation of that passage in Os^. i. p. 702 is now 
confirmed against the view of Mitteis, Aits d. Griech. Papyrustirk. p. 48) ; cf. also 
P. Tebt. 327, a petition from a woman asking to be released from the liabilities 
of an fTTLT7]p7]cns y€vi]fxaToypa(f)oviJ.4v(t}v vTtapxovTMv inherited from her father. 

The petition of Apollonarion is dated at the end Thoth i of the 9th year of 
an emperor, who from the reference in 1. 10 to the praefect Aemilius Saturninus 
must be Septimius Severus : it was a very elaborate and composite document, giving 
apparently the history of her case from the beginning, and quoting both her own 
previous petitions and various official correspondence in connexion with them. 
Since the papyrus contains only the concluding portion of the document, one or 
more preceding columns being lost, and what remains is in far from perfect con- 
dition, it is difficult to trace fully the whole complicated narrative, but the general 
outline of Apollonarion's proceedings is fairly clear. Her first step was to send 
the petition which occupies 11. 2-32. In this she explained the nature of her 
liabilities in connexion with the cultivation of Crown land (11. 3-8) and the 
difficulties into which she had fallen (11. 8-14), and requested that she, as a woman, 
might be released from the obligations and her place taken by men (11. 14-20). 
In support of her claim she appended an account of a similar application made 
in court in A.D. 154 by a woman, which after the recital of earlier precedents 
created by two praefects and an epistrategus was decided in the applicant's 
favour (11. 20-32). The name and rank of the official to whom this initial petition 
was addressed are lost, but 11. 9-10 show that he was not the praefect, and 
11. 16-7 that he was above the strategus. The hypothesis that he was the 
epistrategus can be supported by the possible restoration crv 6 Kvpios ^-niaTlpar^yos 
in 1. 18 ; but since this petition seems to be identical with the j3ij3\CbLov which in 
11. ^^ and 38 is coupled with an (iriaToXri of the dioecetes, probably the latter 
official was addressed, his name being Flavius Studiosus^ as appears from a con- 
temporary document on the verso (cf. p- 225). In answer to Apollonarion the 
dioecetes wrote a letter, apparently to the acting strategus of the nome, at the 
same time enclosing a copy of her petitioi). The text of this letter, as is shown 
by 1. ^^ ecos TOVTOV ttjs eTrtoroA?/? koI tov /3i/3Aet8iou to a.vTLypa{(f)oi>), occurred imme- 
diately before 11. 2-32 : €ari[j.m[(T]d[fxr]v at the end of 1. 32 may indicate the official 
signature of the dioecetes appended to the enclosure. The date in 1. ^;^, Pha- 
menoth 6 of the 7th year, applies to this signature, not to ApoUofiarion's petition, 
which was probably written a short time previously. Concerning the contents of 
the dioecetes' letter, it is clear both from Apollonarion's reference to it in a later 
petition (11. 44-5 KaOuts -npoTepov cTreWeiAas) and from the terms in which it is 
spoken of by the acting strategus (11. 37-8) that the dioecetes admitted the justice 



224 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

of Apollonarion's claims. The next step, as appears from 11. 37-8, was for 
Apollonarion to write a petition to the acting strategus, Ammonianus, enclosing 
the letter of the dioecetes and her original petition, and no doubt asking him to 
give the necessary instructions to the local officials of the different villages 
to remove her name from the list of cultivators. This petition to the acting 
strategus must have been presented between Phamenoth 6 and Pachon 27 of the 
7th year, for on the latter day Ammonianus wrote to the comogrammateis of 
the villages concerned the letter contained in 11. 36-9, enclosing a copy of Apollo- 
narion's petition to himself, the letter of the dioecetes and the original petition, 
and ordering an inquiry into the facts to be held and a report to be made. So 
far the negotiations seem to have proceeded smoothly, but at this point a hitch 
occurred ; for in Tubi of the 8th year (i. e. eight months later than Ammonianus' 
letter to the comogrammateis) Apollonarion addressed a second petition to the 
dioecetes, of which the conclusion is extant in 11. 40-45, while the lost beginning 
of it presumably preceded the letter of the dioecetes which occurred immediately 
before 11. 2 sqq. In this second petition Apollonarion began by quoting the 
dioecetes' letter in answer to her first petition, and the first petition itself (11. 2-23), 
then recounted the action of Ammonianus (11 33-9), and ended by asking the 
dioecetes to give stricter instructions to the new strategus (whose name is shown 
by one of the documents on the verso to be Diophan[es]), so that pressure might 
be applied to the local village authorities to carry out the previous orders 
of the dioecetes and to release her. The second petition of Apollonarion to the 
dioecetes is, we think, the /3t/3Aet8toy which in 1. 46 is coupled with an avaypa^rj and 
eTTto-ToA?/ as having been quoted in the papyrus. Hence the texts of both these 
documents seem to have immediately preceded the beginning of the second 
petition. The eTrto-roA?) is no doubt a second letter of the dioecetes (to the 
strategus or Apollonarion) in answer to the second petition : and with it we 
should connect [eo-jjj/ixeicoo-aju?/!' in 1. 46, interpreting that on the analogy of 
k(Tr]fxi(ii[(T](k[yLr\v in 1. 32 as the official signature of the dioecetes appended to 
the copy of the petition enclosed in his reply ; but the identity of Aufidius 
Ammonius, who also appends his signature in 1. 46, remains quite obscure. The 
nature of the avaypacf)/] is explained by Col. ii of the verso, which seems to contain 
an actual copy of it. It was a report, probably supplied by the various como- 
grammateis, giving the situations and descriptions of Apollonarion's holdings and 
the names of the previous cultivators. Probably it was sent to the dioecetes by 
Apollonarion along with her second petition to him, and was also included 
by him in his reply. That this reply was, like the earlier one, favourable to 
Apollonarion is clear from the context, especially the words oU a ko\[o]v 6 oi}[s k.t.X. 
in 11. 46-7 : the date at which it was dispatched is not stated, but though the 



899. PETITION OF APOLLONARION 



225 



lost 



second petition was written in Tubi the reply had not taken effect by the end of 
the year, for on Thoth i of the 9th year Apollonarion sent off yet another 
petition, addressed, as we think, to the strategus. In this she began by citing the 
whole dossier, which by this time comprised the second letter of the dioecetes, the 
avaypatpi], and her own second petition with all its enclosures, and concluded 
(11. 46-50) with the usual request that the local officials should be instructed 
to release her from liabilities. Of this petition to the strategus we take the 
papyrus to be a copy, and, if so, the beginning of this third petition of which 
the end remains in 11. 46-50 was the actual beginning of the papyrus. A brief 
summary of the arrangement of this very complicated document, as reconstructed 
by us, may be of assistance. 

1 Petition of Apollonarion to the strategus (beginning) 

2 second letter of the dioecetes 

3 avaypa<pri 

4 second petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes (beginning) 

5 first letter of the dioecetes 

6 first petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes 11. 2-32 
4 second petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes (continued) 11. 33-5 

7 letter of Ammonianus 11. 36-9 
4 second petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes (end) 11. 40-5 

I petition of Apoll. to the strategus (end) 11. 46-50 

The chronological order of the documents is 6, 5, 7, 4, 3, 2, i. 
On the verso, the surface of which is much damaged, are two incomplete 
columns belonging to three distinct documents, written in hands which strongly 
resemble each other, but are perhaps not identical, and are certainly different 
from the hand of the recto. The upper half of Col. i contains parts of 22 lines (the 
last 8 being almost entirely obliterated) of a document quoting a T^Tro/xyTj/iAano-juo?. 
Among the words decipherable are 1. i ]as d-Tro^acrecos [ , 3 ■napoiK{ ) koX ■y€<apy{ ), 
5 'AvToovCvu), 6 €v] ^A\i^[avhp€iq) tj] Trpos Atyv[7rr]a), 7 ^rpo t' elboiv] 'ATTpiAAtwi; ^apfxovOi 
ty, 8 ]s eiTti^ev)' KaTa(l)vyi]v iirl ce tov Kvpi-, 9 ov ] \iycov e8ai'e[t](ra/x7jy, lo Ke]0ci- 

XaLov Kol Tovs TOKovs. So far as can be judged, this document, unlike the two 
following, has no bearing on Apollonarion's case. The rest of Col. i is occupied 
by a copy of a petition similar to that of Apollonarion, made apparently a year 
later by another woman called Heraclia. It begins Ato^dy.et (or -rw), the rest 
of that line and the two next being almost entirely effaced, but in 1. 4 sqq. is 
a passage which is legible : v-nd aov e7ncrraA|^(aro? ?) ov I^^o-tlv] avTiypa{(f)ovy 
ALO(f)[dvris) crrpa(Tr;y6s) '0^{vpvyx_(.TOv) \ (5) K(aiioypap.iiaTiV(Tt tQ>v VT:oyeypaiip[iv(a\v 
Kcoix{(ov). /3tj3A(t8tcoi') bod4vT((av) /xot | (6) vtto 'HpaKXeta? Qeaivos co di'etATj]U7Tra[t] 
avTCypa((pov) e7rtoToA(?js) ypa^et(r(r/s) virb \ (7) ^Xaviov SrovStwcrou tov Kpa(ri(rTov) 

Q 



226 THE OXRYHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

8toiK(r/roC) TTepi [y]e(«py(tas) hrjfxocrias yj}? 0)9 ov \ (8) TTpoaijKovcnis avrf] avTiypa[(\)Qv) 

e7Ticr7e'AAe(rat) v/itf ottcoj f^eTdcravr(es) | (9) Kara to aKpeifiiarepov rw . . . [ ] 

aK.[6\o]ud6v iCTTiv T . . . \ (10) (T€cnriix{(L(i)[xai), (hovs) rj Meaoiprj) €TTa(yop.4v(i)v) €. With 
this letter of Diophanes cf. the almost identical letter of Ammonianus in 11. 36-9 
of the recto. Then follows a copy of the petition to Diophanes from Heraclia 
enclosing a letter of the dioecetes Flavius Studiosus, but these two documents, 
which continue up to the end of 1. 17, are in a hopeless condition. In 1. 18 sqq. 
is what appears to be a short imperial decree bearing upon the immunity of 
women from yecopyCa and beginning AvTOKpariap Kala-ap Aovk[los) 2e7jTi/;x(tos) ^eovijpos 
Ei;(re/3(7j?) : the words ywoi^lv htnaCas -napaiT-qa-eoDS occur in 1. 21, and a date, 
77 (hovi) ^apiJ.ovd(i) 11]. 1. 22 also seems to belong to the decree, but the subject 
of the two following lines, which are the last of the column and begin much 
further to the right, is different. Col. ii has only the beginnings of lines, and 
probably not more than about a third of each is preserved. The subject of the 
first five lines is uncertain, but the rest of the column (11. 6-45) is occupied 
by a document bearing upon Apollonarion's case, being we think a copy of the 
avaypa(p^ referred to in 1. 46 of the recto (cf. p. 224). It begins (I, 6) br]\ov[j.{€v) 
avaypd(t)€(r[6ai, Apollonarion is alluded to more than once, and there are numerous 
references to lands at various places, including the ro/zat Atovvaidbos mentioned in 
1. 6 of the recto, while lists of persons occur, in one case being followed by the 
words 7rdiT(es) ovt^^s) 7rpoyea)pyo(t ?). 

[ 30 letters ] • • () «X() /^ • «r() <5.4 

2nd hand [^Xaovia> ^TovSLoxra) tco KpaTiara) SioiKrjTrj napa 'Air\o\\wvapiov Trjs 

[Kal 'ApLarduSpa? 'ApLardvBpov /j.r]~ 

[rpos Ai]SvfjLr]9 Tfj[^ dnb Trjs '0^vpvyyjeiT(ov\ TToAeooy. tj;? 

ivtiiv([(7TdTr]S 19 letters 

[ ]purer kni[ 25 letters ]i k-)(Bka6ai kirl to kolt kp.\ 

o"[ 25 letters 

5 [. . .] . kA[. .\'iLov<TL .[..].. [.]/o[ ]o-[ Tov\ 'O^vpvy- 

yeirov coy avva . [ 25 letters 

[. . 7r]€/)[t] fi\v "^^^^V (dpovpa?) k, 7r[(p]i Si XvaLv €k [rjcoi/ vofiZv 

Aiopvcnd8o[9 {dpovpa?) . Kal nepl {apovpas) . Kal 

n]€pl TO 'latov Tlayyd (dpovpas) pi Kal rrepl ^€/3[i']0ij/ {dpovpa^) X-qL 

Kal mpl XiviKtXiv Kal Ke[ 25 letters 

. . .\<Tos. €$■ o(7ov fikv ovv Svyafiis fioi vnfjp^eu TavTa? kyeoopyovv 

Kal dv[ 25 letters 



899. PETITION OF APOLLONARION 227 

[to, r]eXou/xei/a, kiTil 81 avve^ri fjLOi e/c re e7riKX[a](7fj.a>i' KeXevcrOivTCov 

[ vnb Tov XajxnpoTci- 

10 \rov\ rjyefxovo^ AifiiXiou XaTovpvivov Kol e^ dXXcov tiucov d(f)opnaiv 

Koi tr[ 25 letters 

[tti/ajy/fa/coy a)(€86i' ri SuviavTiaai fie kv tovtoi? ov fiovov avveyo- 

Ha'[r]v 19 letters aXXa 

[/cai] 8ia Tovfo rrjv re ivSojxeviiav fiov Kol rov oIkuov Koafiov koi 

Trjv a . [ 25 letters 

[koi d]XXa T(iiv i[i5>p irXila'Ta efi^opa ttoXXov d^ia oXiyov iravTiXo)^ 

kv t£ [ 25 letters 

[ety ev8€Ld\v fie ov Trjv Tv\ovaav ncpiaTfjuai. ov Sr/ xdpiv vnep tov 

fifj /x€Ta[vdaT]T]i' [fxe yeviaOai 

15 [....] e^ . . o\a)\v fxovcov rpa^ilaa kol dva . . eiaa Seofiai eTnSi8ova[a 

TO vnofivrjua 21 letters 

[. . . to] avfi^e^rjKOTa /xoi /cat dnaXXd^ai jie TrJ9 yeccpyias tcov npo- 

Kei/xiucov [d]p[ovpcov Kal ypdyjrai to) tov O- 
[ivpvy^]€iTov a-TparrjyS) ottoos 6 iKd(XTr]S Kcofirj^ irpay/iaTiKos rrpo- 

voLav 7roiTj(Tr][TaL 17 letters 

[. . y€Cop]yiaj^ yipicrdar dvSpdai yap €oiK€u jd ttjs yeccpyia^, coy Kal 

(TV 6 Kvpios kir(crT\a<TaL, 16 letters 

[ ]/jiaTQiv 8id TTju 'ijxcpvTov aov evepyeaiav viriTa^d aoi coy 

iTcpat acpo [••]•[ fV S) 

20 [8id] aov KaTa iravTa ivepyeTrjiMeurj. 8LevTvyjeL, (eroi/y) lt] Oeov 

AlXlov 'Avfoivivov Q[cii6 14 letters 

....]. €Ti8os TItoXXicovos, XaTovpvlvo^ prjTcop H7r(e)' UtoXXlcov 6 

TraTTjp Trjy [(r]vuTjyop[oviJ.ev]r]^ ^T ' [ 

[. . . .] . 8L€Tdcrcr€T0 yfjv ^aaiXiKrjv re Kal 8r][iioa\i.av nept re Kcofxrjv 

Bovaup[i]v Kal ©LVTrjpiv Kal Ta . . [ 

[....]. )(09 KWfia^ TOV ' HpaKXeoTToXfiTov. end ovv eKeivov fxeTaX- 

Xd^avTOS eTTi KXrjpovo/iO) TavTjj 01 [toou K(o- 
[fJicoy] TOVTODv K<a/jioypafxiiaT€i9 Trapd Ta drrrjyopevjxeva inL^dXXovcri 

avTrj T^v TOV Trar/joy ye<»/Dyi[ai/ . . 
25 [• •>] KeKpiTai 81 VTTO Ta>v KaTa Kaipov ■qyefiovcov Kal kmaTpaTrfyoiv 

yvva\lKd\s TavTjj Trj xpeicc /j.f) KadiX[K€a- 

Q 2 



228 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[0]a[i] Kol a[vTri d^]Lol dvayeivaxTKOva-a ra KeKpijikva d-m^XlXalyOai 

Tfj9 yecopyia? dvSpdcn [jlovoi^ TTp\o\(jr]K[ov- 
[0-77]?. [nd\fi[pi\^vt(ov HiT{iv)' dvayvoio-driTco ra e[7r]i r5>v TOL[ov\TaiV 

K[e]Kpifiii'a. dvayvccaOivTOS ...[... 
^L\aT[dy'\{xaTO^ Tt^epiov 'AX^^avBpov dTTayop\€vov\ro^ yvvaiKa y^ccpyia . 

.[.].. aTi\(T\6aL kirl tov /3 i^iTOvs) TdX^a [. . . 
. . L Koi OvaXepiov EvSaifiovos tov rjyeixovcva-avTOS to avTO k€KPLk6to[9 

eJTTi TOV € {^TOVS) 'AvTOOVllvhv [. . . 

30 Kctl MiyiKLov KopeXXiavov kincTTpaTrjyov knl tov i {€Tov9) Avtcovlvov 
Kaiaapo^ tov k[v]p[lo]u, TIap/xeviccv Hniev)' dKoX\ov- 

\6a>'\s 7"[o^?] dvayvaxxde'icn BvvaTaL rj Tadvvv 7^9 yeco[p]yia9 

dTrrjXXd^Oat r [. ']to[.] [. . . 

^'W^/?''M^ [y]ecBpyoi)s e/y Trju y^oapyiav \i^TaBiaTd^ai. ATToXX\(£iv\apiov 

rj KOL 'ApiardvSpa kTriSiScoKa. ea-rj iJ.Lai[a]d[p.r]i'. 
[. .] (erouy) ^ ^afievcoO q. 'icos tovtov r^y eTnaToXfj^ koL tov ^l^X[^'\l8lov 

TO dvTLy pa((pov). Trpo9 r]v dKoXov6[co9 
[7r]o[i]a)V 6 TOV vo/jlov ^aaiXiKos ypafifxaTevs 'Afificoviaubs ^ta^e^o/iej^oy 

Tfjv (TTpaTriyiav eneaTeiXep toIs 
35 TTpayixaTLKols tcou Kcop.coi' nepl a(y) iaTtf to, iSd(f>r] 009 viroTeTaKTaf 
'A/x[fx](oviavb9 ^aa-iXiKos ypafxp.aTev9 ^ia^e^o/zevoy Trj[i'] (TTpaTriyiav 

K<o/ioypa/x/j.aT€T Xucrecoy Kal dXXcoy kco- 
liS>v. ^L^XeiSioov SoOivToav fioi vno 'AnoXXcovapiov T^[y] Kal 'Apia- 

TdvSpas (p duuXrjfjLTTTai kinaToXr] tov Kpa[TiaTov 
8i[o]iKr]Tov eVi 5e Kal ^i/SXeiSiou nepl yecopyia^ ^u €8i]X[(o](Tei^ //r) 

Trpoa-qKeiy avTTJ, ro €T€pou knicTTeXXeTai {/[fxiv 
OTTCoy Kard to. KeKpi/iii^a ttji/ i^iTaaiv Troirjad/xcvoi SrjXdxrrjTi /xoi. 

k(x-qp.L(cadp{r)v). {(tovs) ( TIa)(oi)v K^. 
40 Skov ovv TTjv fieTaSiaTayrjv eTepois yeviaOai KaToc to, ypacpiuTa viro 

(TOV K(xl T^u dnaiTrjaiu tcov (f)6pooy 7ra[- 
[p]a Tol)V yeyeoopyrjKoTcov, oOeu Skojiai kdv (tov ttj TV)([r]] So^rj [>c]eAei5o"at 

kTriaTpe(f)eaT€poi' ypa(f}rji/aL too vvv 
crr[p]ar7;y£ tov vo/jlov oVcoy kiravayKdarj tovs fikv 7rp[a]yfxaTiKOV9 Kaja 

TO, kn e7r£(rr(a)A[e]»/ra avTlpls 

T\rj\v fj.eTaSiaTayrji' iroLTjcraaBai, tovs Sh irpaKTopas ttji/ diraiTrf^cnv 

7r]oLT]aaa$aL Trap[d] rcov dvTi7roiov/i[kuQ)t/ 



899. PETITION OF APOLLONARION 229 

T[fi\s yij? y€(opy(ou, koL fir] kvo^X^laOai jxe yvuaiKa ova[ay dvavSpou 

Kal d^orj6r]TOv, Ka6o>s [TT\p6Tipov iir\i- 
45 a[r]eiAa? -n^pl tovtov, tv S> evepyerrjfiivr]. 8LevTV)(^iL. 'A[Tr]oXXco 
vd[p]iov 17 Kal ApiarduSpa ^TTLSiScoKa. (eTOV?) rj Tv^l i[, 
[ea]r]/xia>crdp[rju). Av^iSios A/x/j.(ovio? ear]p(^etcoadix7]i'). ecoy tovtov t[o] 

^i(3X€[S[i]ov Kal rj dvayp\a\(pri Kal rj k-maToXri- ols dKoX[o]vdco[9 
[d]^ia) eTTiaTeiXai a€ toIs T(ov tottccv -rrpayfiaTiKois 07rc«[9] KaO' (a) rj^icocra 

TTjv fi[€Ta]8LaTayriv noiiqacovTai tt/jo? 
TO Kal Tovs TTpdKTopas TTjv drratTijaiP TMf 6(p€iXo/x€ua)u nonijaaadaL 

Trap' S>v Trpoo-fjK^i. (eTOvs) 6 0co$ a. 
^A7roXX]coydpiop r) Kal ApicrTavSpa 'ApicrTavSpov eniSiSooKa. KoppijXios 

UeKvcLos kmykypajxiiai a[i)]r^y Kvp\ios. 
50 [ ]$• VTTr]pkTr]S kTrri\y\eyKa. (erofy) B ©ood a. 

4. 1. eKdea^ai. ni of evrt above the line. 7- '^^'■ov Pap. 8. vnrjpxiv Pap. 14. vntp 

Pap. 19. vTjeTa^a Pap. 25. vtto Pap. ; so in 1. 37. 35. i/TroTeraKrat Pap. 38. v[iiiv 

Pap. 47. (Te added above the line. 

' To his highness the dioecetes Flavins Studiosus from Apollonarion also called 
Aristandra, daughter of Aristander, her mother being Didyma daughter of . . ., of 
Oxyrhynchus. ... (I am lessee of) 20 arourae near the metropolis, . arourae at Chusis in the 
pastures of Dionysias, ... no arourae at Ision Panga, 38-! arourae at Seruphis, and . . . 
arourae at Senekeleu and ... As long as I had the power I cultivated these and (paid) 
the taxes, but since it has been my fate as the result both of the extra levies ordained . . . 
by his excellency the praefect Aemilius Saturninus and of other causes ... to have perforce 
spent nearly all the year on them, not only being hard pressed . . . but also in consequence 
(having sacrificed) both my household stock, my private ornaments, and . . . and a large 
quantity of other property worth a considerable amount for quite a small sum . . ., I am 
hence reduced to extreme poverty. For which reason, in order that I may not become 
a wanderer . . ., as I have only ... to live on, I present this petition, and entreat you (to 
pity) my fate, and release me from the cultivation of the aforesaid lands, and to write to 
the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome instructions that the official in each village shall 
provide for the cultivation being performed by others ; for men are the persons suitable for 
undertaking the cultivation, as you yourself, my lord, . . . owing to your innate kindness, 
I have appended ... in order that I may be completely benefited through you. Farewell. 
The 1 8th year of the deified Aelius Antoninus, Thoth . ., in the case of . . . etis daughter 
of Ptollion : Saturninus, advocate, said, " PtoUion the father of my client was appointed 
(to cultivate) Crown and public land at the villages of Busiris, Thinteris, and ... in the 
Heracleopolite nome. He died leaving her as his heir, and since the comogrammateis of 
these villages are imposing upon her the obligation to cultivate her father's land in defiance 
of the regulations forbidding this, and it has been decided by praefects and epistrategi from 
time to time that women are not to be forced to undertake this duty, she too requests, citing 
these judgements, that she may be released from the cultivation, which pertains only to men." 
Parmenion said, " Let the judgements upon such cases be read." There were read a decree 



230 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

of Tiberius Alexander in the 2nd year of Galba, forbidding women to be made cultivators, 
and a decision of Valerius Eudaemon to the same effect in the 5th year of Antoninus, and 
another of INIinicius Corellianus, epistrategus in the loth year of Antoninus Caesar the lord; 
whereupon Parmenion said, " In accordance with the judgements which have been read, 
Tathun . . . has the right to be released from the cultivation . . . , and other cultivators ought 
to be appointed for the land in her stead." I, Apollonarion also called Aristandra, have 
presented this petition. Signed, the 7th year, Phamenoth 6. So far the copy of the letter 
and the petition ; acting in accordance with which the basilicogrammateus of the nome and 
deputy-strategus Ammonianus wrote instructions to the officials of the villages where the 
lands are situated as follows : Ammonianus, basilicogrammateus and deputy-strategus, to 
the comogrammateus of Chusis and those of the other villages. I send you a copy of the 
petition presented to me by Apollonarion also called Aristandra, to which is joined a letter 
of his highness the dioecetes, and also a petition concerning the cultivation for which she 
declared herself not to be liable, in order that you may, in accordance with the judgements 
on the subject, hold an inquiry and report to me. Signed, the 7th year, Pachon 27. 
The change in appointment of other cultivators ought accordingly to take place in 
conformity with your letter, and the rents should be exacted from the former cultivators ; 
I therefore entreat you, if it please your Fortune, to command that stricter instructions be 
written to the present strategus of the nome to compel the officials to make the change 
in accordance with the orders which they have received, and the collectors to exact the dues 
from the cultivators who claim the land, and not to harass me, a woman without a husband 
or helper, following your previous instructions in this matter, that I may obtain relief. 
Farewell. Presented by me, Apollonarion also called Aristandia. The 8th year, Tubi i[.]. 
Signed. Signed by me Aufidius Ammonius. Thus far the petition, the list, and the letter ; 
in accordance with which I entreat you to instruct the local officials to make the change in 
the appointment as claimed by me, and the collectors to exact the dues from the proper 
persons. The 9th year, Thoth i. Presented by me Apollonarion also called Aristandra, 
daughter of Aristander, I, Cornelius son of Pekusis, have been appointed her guardian. 
I, . . . s, assistant, have brought the petition. The 9th year, Thoth i. 

1. The nature of this much abbreviated marginal note, which is written in a larger 
hand than the body of the text, is quite uncertain. 

2. For the restoration 4>Xaovi(» SrouSiio-o) K.r.X. cf. introd. p. 225. 

9. For iiTiKkaa-iLoi, which were special levies at intervals, see P. Tebt. 373. 12, 
note. After KeXevcrdivrav a date probably followed. 

10. Aemilius Saturninus is known from B^G. U. 15. ii. i, a letter from him to the 
strategi of the Heptanomis written on Epeiph 1 7 of the 5th year. His official rank was not 
there given, but P. INI. Meyer's view that he was praefect is now confirmed by the present 
passage and 916. 10, where he is mentioned as praefect in Pauni of the 6th year ; cf. 
Cantarelli, La serie dei prefetli di Egitto, pp. 63^4. The precise date of this petition of 
Apollonarion to the dioecetes is uncertain (cf. introd.) ; it cannot be later than Phamenoth 6 
of the 7th year (cf 1. 32, note), and probably is not many months earlier. After Saturninus 
the next praefect who is known is Q. Maecius Laetus, who held office in the loth year. 

17. Trpay/iariKOf : cf 11. 35—6, where by irpayfiaTiKoi are meant the KufioypanfiarfU, and 
11. 42-3, where they are contrasted with the npuKTopfs. The word seems to be a general 
term for a minor official; cf. P. Amh. 107. 15 tu>v tov vopov irpayfiaTiKoyv, P. Brit. Mus. 164. 

7 rSiv ^a<TiK{i<u>v) ypa(^ppaT((i>i>) Koi 7rpaypaTiKS)i>, P. Flor. 57* 54> ^C- After noifjarj^rai. something 

like coiTTf v0' fTepoiv Tr)v yecop^yiav yeveadat is required by the sense. Possibly the previous 
cultivators (oJ ytytcopyrjKOTa) Were to be reinstated ; cf. 11. 40-4 and the dmypacpf] on the verso 
(p. 226) which contains a list of these persons. 



899. PETITION OF APOLLONARION 231 

18. imarl may be <7riVT[ao-a< or some part of eTna-roXr] or (TnaTfWdv, but hardly f'mcripd- 
rrjyoi; cf. introd. The construction of 11. 18-19 is not clear, inrera^a, if right, refers to the 
Inofiv-qfiaTKyfio^ appended by Apollonarion in 11. 20-32, and Se has perhaps dropped out. 
vntra^as ottws cannot be read, and the word following ertpai does not seem to be any part 

of dipirjfit. 

21. ] . ertSos Uro^Xlavos : the name of the applicant is given in I. 31 as 17 Tadwv , 

where the termination is not -(tis. Probably she had two names. 

er .[: perhaps eVt, yfjv being an accusative of the same kind as e.g. Aeschin. 3. 24 
f'xfipoTov^dr] Ar]fjLoa6(vr]s ttjv apxrjv ; or an infinitive such as yfcopyuv may have occurred. 

25. fTTia-TpaTriyav corresponds to fTTtTpoTTcov in the parallel passage fromB. G. U. 648. 
12-4 quoted on pp. 222-3; cf Wilcken, Os/. i. p. 427. 

27. Parmenion, the presiding judge, cannot have been praefect, for on Thoth i of the 
i8th year of Antoninus (cf. 1. 20) that office was held by Sempronius Liberalis (B. G. U. 372). 
Perhaps he was epistrategus of the Heptanomis, but that view is open to the objection that 
in Choiak of the 20th year the epistrategus was Statilius Maximus, as is shown by 487. i, 
while B. G. U. 340, an undated petition to him, refers to events in the 12th year, so that 
Statilius Maximus may have been already in office in the 1 8th year. Other possibilities are 
that Parmenion was tiKaioBorijs, 8ioiKr)Tr]s, or i'l^ios Xoyoy. 

28-30. For Tiberius Alexander and Valerius Eudaemon cf. Cantarelli, op. cit. pp. 33 
and 49. Minicius Corellianus, epistrategus of the Heptanomis, occurs also in P. Gen. 31 
which refers to the 9th year of Antoninus. Before OvdKepiov EvBaip.ovos, vnop.vrjpaTivp.ov, not 
SiardypaTos, is to be understood, as is shown by the word KeKp«o'ro[9. In 1. 28 after ytapyta 
no compound of nyfadm seems satisfactory. 

32. ((rr]pia[(TyL[pr]v is the signature of some official and the following date refers to it, 
not to eVifieSwKa which marks the end of ApoUonarion's petition. The signature may have 
been added in the office of the dioecetes upon the receipt of the petition, but since the 
petition is itself an enclosure in the letter of the dioecetes, we are disposed to regard 
far]pi(o[or]a[priv as the signature of the dioecetes at the conclusion of the copy of the petition 
which he was forwarding ; cf. 1. 46 and introd, 

33. ews TovTov : cf. 1. 46, B. G. U. 613. 25 and 36, and introd. 

37. <u dvfiXrjpnrac : a singular antecedent for w can be found in t6 (tepov on which 
^i^AiS/coj/ depends, but the plural ^ilSXibloov being probably used, as often, for the singular, the 
writer may well have meant it to be the antecedent of «. Cf. the letter of Diophanes 
quoted on p. 225, where the phrase recurs, but with the abbreviation of /3t0X(t5 ) Bod(in{ ). 
For M-a\ap^dvfiv in the sense of 'including in' cf. e.g. 085 hv fTrdvco dv{i\{r)ppfvai) eV tm 

Tov T] (fTovs) Xdy(a)) (6pa;^/iat) '/3, and B. G. U. 1 68. 24 ra v(p' (Kartpov pfpovs [Xf^devlra toIt 
vnopvTjpaai dvt\r]p(p6T]. 

38. TO (Tfpou : TO Idov or TO dvriypa^ov would be expected at this point (cf. the letter of 
Diophanes quoted on pp. 225-6), and perhaps to hepov means no more than the 'duplicate', 
i. e. ' copy.' If it means the second of two ^i^XiSia, and the plural ^i^Xetbiav in I. 37 is really 
correct, these were probably duplicates, not two petitions to Ammonianus written at 
different times, so that the sense would be much the same. None of the three documents 
stated to be enclosed in Ammonianus' letter actually follows in 1. 40 sqq. ; the Bi.^\l8i.ov nfpl 
ytupyias is the original petition to the dioecetes already quoted in 11. 2-32, and the letter of 
the dioecetes immediately preceded it, but the petition of Apollonarion to Ammonianus 
himself does not seem to have been cited in the papyrus ; cf. introd. 

39. {(Tovs) C Uaxo>v K^: the traces of the figure of the year are very slight, and would 
suit e. g. T] as well ; but the date of Ammonianus' letter is clearly later than Phamenoih 6 of the 
7th year (1. 33), the date of the communication from the dioecetes which caused it to be 
written, and unless the date in 1. 39 is earlier than that in 1. 45 (Tubi of the 8th year) we are 



232 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

unable to explain the relation of 11. 40-50 to what precedes, for 11. 40-5 cannot be regarded 
as an enclosure in the letter of Ammonianus, 

41. Tcoi/ yeyeapyrfKOTUiv '. apparently the previous cultivators were to be made responsible 
for the land leased by Apollonarion ; cf. 7rpoyecapyo(t ?) in the amypacprj cited on p. 226. In 
11. 43-4 a different phrase is used rav aim7roiovfji[eva)v] r'^]? y^y yeapyuv, and in 1. 48 they are 
vaguely called o>v npoa^Kd. imcrrpecpecTTfpov was suggested by Wilcken. 

900. Petition to a Logistes. 

24'3Xi6cni. A.D. 322. 

A petition to Dioscurides, the same logistes who issued the proclamation 
about the gymnastic display in 42, from a functionary who had been nominated 
as an annual superintendent of the express-post, and who here complains of the 
failure of certain donkey-drivers to support him in carrying out his duties. It is 
badly put together, in spite of the comparatively high position of the writer. 

The year of the sixth consulate of Licinius Augustus and the second 
of Licinius Caesar, in which the papyrus is dated (cf. 42. 8-9), is still disputed. 
The two most recent discussions are those of Jouguet in Comptes rendns de 
I Acad, des Inscr. et Belles-Lettres, 1906, pp. 231-6 (cf. Archiv, III. pp. 339-43), 
and Seeck in Rhcin. Mus. 1907, pp. 517 sqq., who uphold A.D. 322, and Viereck 
in Archiv, IV. pp. 156-62, who decides for A.D. 323. Of these alternatives w^e 
prefer the former. 

'T7rare/'[a]y tu)v 8eaiT\oTa>v tj/xcov Alklviov ^e^aarov to q' Koi 

AiKiviov 
Tov enKpai^caTccTov Kaiaapos to /3' [ 
OvaXepm AioaKovpiSt] r<S Kal 'lovXiavo) Xo[yL(TTfj '0^vpvy)((jTov) 
7rap[a] AvprjXiov AioaKopov XiX^avov ap^avTos /3oi^[X(ei/roi})] Trjs 

X\ap.TT[pds) Kal Xa/x7r{poTdTT]s) 
5 0^vpvy')(jeLT(jiiV noXeco^. npanroaiTOV pov oi/tos TraTpipccvaXicnv 
SiKccTov Trdyov TovSe tov vopov vno^XijOevTO^ eri e/y KovBovKTopiav 
TOV 6^€0? Spopov TOV evTV)(^a>s daiovTO^ €tovs, Kal k^prjv tolvvv tov9 

e^ edovs 
TavTrjv TTjv y^copav dTTonXrjpovvTas vnkp tS>v iviavam? e/y tovto 

v7r[o]^aX- 
Xopivcoy V7raK0V€iv Kal -qpeiv Tois kvyjipiaBeTai irXtaTa Srjpoaia eTriTa- 
10 y//ara Kal ttju y^cdpav rjv e| Wovs dnonXrjpovaL diroirXrjpolv, Trape^o/^e- 
vcov avTo?9 Ta>p inl tovtols dvaXcopdTCcv. dXX' €7ri8r) pavddvco tovtov9 



900. PETITION TO A LOGISTES 233 

^ovXofxivovs eveSpevetu ttjv TTjXiKavTrju dTrapirrjTou y(^puav rial fikv 
aiTi[6\v(TL^ kuLOVs Se Sia^dXXovras, tmu r]fx€pa)v r^y dvTiXrip.y\rea)s aliA^va- 
vdiyTCou Tov XiTOvpyrjiiaTOS, €k tovtov rjiriyOriv to, ^ijSXia eniSovvai 

d^L- 
15 cou T0V9 avrovs ovrjXaTas kiravayKaaQ-qvai ^avarov /cat ' flpov koI 

Xaipiav 
TrdvT e^etJ^ VTr\p oov k^ereXovv Kar eT09 Trjs KovBovKTopias \piioi)V ndv- 
[tu t€ 7rapa](T)(^iadaL ayTops{s} TOis €vi{av(Tc)ois vnaKovovr^s, kol 

i7[/i]as' Sia Tcov 
[avTOiV T\r]v kv^iipLaOda-au •)(jidav diroTrXr] potu kol jxt] e/y dvdyKrjv /le 

yej/e- 
[aOai kvrv\)(jHv Toh fid^ocnv irepl tovtov. (2nd hand) kueSpua^ yeyeprj- 

pkvris. 
20 \ynaT€La\9 ttjs TrpoKifxkyrj^ Meaoprj <r. 
3rd hand [Avp{i]XL09)] AioaKopos kniSeSooKa. 

3. 'iovXiavco Pap. 12. 1. airapaiTr^Tov . . . rovs fiiv aiTi\o^vTn^. 13' ^ Oi fVLOis COrr. 

from J. 1. a\y\vax6eiao:v. 1 4. At of XtroupyT^/xaToy COrr. 1 6. to oi KovbovKTopias COYT. 

17. \, viraKOVovTus, 1 8. av o[ (Vxeipi(j6fi(Tav COXX. 

' In the consulship of our masters Licinius Augustus for the sixth time and Licinius 
the most renowned Caesar for the second time, . . . To Valerius Dioscurides also called 
Julianus, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Dioscorus son of Silvanus, 
ex-magistrate and senator of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus. 
Being already the administrator of the imperial patrimonial estates in the tenth pagus of this 
nome, I have besides been nominated as contractor for the express-post for the year 
auspiciously approaching. It was accordingly incumbent on those who customarily 
discharge such services on behalf of the annual nominees to this office, to render obedience 
to me who have been entrusted with so many public burdens, and to discharge their 
customary services, for which their expenses are provided. But whereas I learn that these 
persons are desirous of acting fraudulently in respect of these important and unavoidable 
functions, some by absenting themselves, and others by deception, and since the period 
before entering upon this duty has become short, I therefore hasten to present this petition, 
requesting that the said donkey-drivers, Faustus, Horus, and Chaereas, be compelled to 
retain and to provide everything for the functions pertaining to the contract which they were 
wont yearly to fulfil, in obedience to the annual contractors, so that I may with their 
assistance perform the function entrusted to me, and not be reduced to appeal to the officials 
upon this matter. (Endorsed) Concerning a case of fraud : in the consulship aforesaid, 
Mesore 6. (Signed) Presented by me, Aurelius Dioscorus.' 

5. The TvaTpiy-avoKia are the properties belonging to the imperial patrimonium, which in 
Egypt in the Roman period were usually called ovaiaKa. The occurrence of the term 
patrimonalia in the fourth century is noticeable. 



234 ^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

6. vnofi\r)Bivroi : cf. B. G. U. 906. lO vTro^\t]6ei^Ta ^ovktvTr]v, P. Leipzig 40. ili. 17 Twi/ 
vnofiXrjdfVTOiv vtto tcov ^^o]v\evTci)V els top KfcfiaXaiaTTjv. 

KovdovKTopiav tov o^fos 6/30/.toi) : cf. 138. 9 naKTcipios tov o^eojj Bpi'ifiov, 140. 7 0Ta,3XtT;js toC 

o^. Bp., P. Flor. 39. 6 ypafinarrjcfiopov tov of Sp. In P. Oxy. I. p. 219, &c., we took of 8/j. to 
refer to the race-course, but, as Wilcken has remarked to us, the airsus velox or express 
postal service is doubtless meant ; cf. Cod. Theod. 8. 5. 62 and Preisigke, Klio, VII. p. 269. 
KovdovKTopla = conductoria is novel, and conducioria is apparently not found in the sense 
implied here. 

1 2-3. For djrapaiTrjTov xp^'-av cf. 904. 9. Tterl p^ev an^o^iKTi. has no Construction, and should 
have been in the accusative. The reading is indeed uncertain, and the supposed n not very 
satisfactory ; but a participle seems required to balance hia^aWovras, and a7rt[o]i}(rt, but for 
the case, gives a good sense. It is noticeable that iviois was originally written for iviovs. 

tS>v fjpepoiv . . . a-l^v^vaxdePTo^v : we suppose o[yyax6f it <ov tO be an error for (r[vyaxdei-(Ta}V, 

and the meaning to be that the interval of time remaining before Dioscorus had to take up 
his duties had become short. This remedy is somewhat violent, but cf. B, G. U. 893. 12-14 

ovrot ot KeKXrjpcopevoi , . . dini\r]ii\lAo\vTai rijr op^'f- • • o\iyai(?\ mufpai iv pecrai ecaiu, where the 

sense appears to be very similar, and, for this use of dvTiXap^dffadai, e.g. B. G. U. 18. 14 

dvTiKup^. TTJs fyxipicdflcrTjs a'Jnrois Xp4'" ^' 

15. On the duties of ovrjXdrai see Rostowzew, Il/w, vi. p. 253. 

16-17. 'T"'^' fx^if is strange, but we can find no other suitable reading, and navT is 

supported by the following Trdi^ra. nav t exeiv . . . ndv [re 7rapn]o-;(/o-(9ai would hardly fill the 

space at the beginning of 1. 17. avroCs is practically certain in spite of the letters marked 
doubtful, for though the vt could equally well be read as n, and vs might possibly be ki, 
these alternatives give no word. The final s has been written twice over, once as a flourish 
below the line, and again in the ordinary position, evion seems to be a slip for eviavaiois, 
a word which has already occurred in the adverbial form in 1. 8 ; the mistake may have 
been assisted by ipiovs in 1. 13. to2s mois is hardly a possible expression. 

19. Tois peiCnaiv ; pfi^mv and pfifdrepo? are apparently general terms for a person in autho- 
rity, used in much the same way as 6<p(piKuiXios. The titles commonly occur without further 
definition as e.g. in 894. r, but are also found both in combination with a local name 
indicating the sphere of influence, e.g. 158. 2 tm pd^ovi rrjs avTr][s] Tapireri, or with the name 
of the person to whom the pd(a)v was subordinate, e. g. 131. 14 pd^ova KXavBiavoi), B. G. U. 

367. 5 ^'^^ 368. 10 Koptri Koi pei^oTepa ^rpaTTjyiov tov navev(f)fjpov iraTpiKiov ; cf. the similar USC 

of 6(f)^LKidXLns in 896. 28. The earliest instance of a ptiCov that we have noticed is P. Brit. 
Mus. II. 214. 22, of the reign of Aurelian. 



901. Petition to a Public Advocate. 

15X 12 cm. A.D. 336. 

This document like 902 is addressed to an official occupying the position 
of ejcdiKo? or defensor (cf. 902. i, note), though in this case as a deputy. It 
is a complaint of a woman against a neighbour arising out of a chase after her 
pigs which had got loose ; but the details of the story are lost owing to the 
mutilation of the papyrus. On the verso are a few letters which apparently have 
no relation to the petition on the recto. 



901. PETITION TO A PUBLIC ADVOCATE 235 

^T7raT(ias 0[vi^iov] NeTrcoriauov kol TeTTiov ^aKovvSov 

tS)V XanTTpordraiv TI\(i\ya)V ^5". 

<?Aaoiii'[&)] 'lovXiai^cp Blolkovvti kKBiKiav 'O^ypvyytrov 

napa AvprjXias AWovTo? Qoaviov dno Kcopr]? Taafj.7ripo[v] 
5 e ndyov. ianepipe^ (wpey rfj x^^^ Vf^^P?- Vf^^TepoL X^poi 

Svo TTjv 6ppr]u TTOLovp^voi iwl TjfxiTepov e8a(po9 

yevd)pei'OL eV vSpaycoyio) /^J/X^^^^ "^^^ r]/j.€Tepa)i/ 

irkSoav Koi Tla^dvov Tivos diro rfjs avrfj^ kS/xtjs, [Kal] 

6 TTpoipT]p[iyos II]a^dvo9 TrapaTvx<>>v eycoi' /Xird 
10 x^P^^ ^oiXioy . , . . lu T0V9 X'^poL'S' l3ovX6ix€i^[o]s 

Kal TOVTO /J. . . . [ ]cos iJir]8a[im d8iKr}da[s 

vTTo t5>v xVR['^^ dX]Xa exo/zei/oy rfj^ npbs tovs 

X^pov? €...[.. otl] e/xql ktriXriXvOav ^ovXopevo^ 

oiKUTu . [ 15 letters ] . coy / /x^ e/c tipos 

15 [d7ro]pva9 j^v [ Jtt . [d]XX' ovv t5)v ^comi/ 

[....]. oy avKa .[...]..[. .]r}p.r]v vtt avTov 

[ 33 letters ]«:6>//-ay coy U Tmv 

18 ., ] ozy Tivds irapdy^r^ 

[ 26 letters ] 6pa(rvTT]Ti [. . . 
20 [ „ „ ]ova-a . [ 



I, vjrareias . . . tct'tiov Pap. 3. (l>\aov^w'\ 'iovXiavco Pap. 5. 1. iantpivals utpais . . . 

Xoipoi : 1, xoip. also in 10, 12, 13. 7. 1. yevoixtvoi. rjpnTepu) Pap. 8. 1. Trai'Scoi/. 9. 

npo'lprjfjS^fvos Pap. 10. 1. ^vXlov. 14. t ^7; e/cVtros Pap. 15. 1. [o7ro]i/oi'ay . . . ^ooiv. 
16. VTT Pap. 18. 1. Trapayerai. 

' In the consulship of Vibius (?) Nepotianus and Tettius Facundus the most illustrious, 
Pachon 6. To Flavius Julianus, deputy-advocate of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelia 
Allous daughter of Thonius of the village of Taampemou in the fifth pagus. In the 
evening time of yesterday our two pigs made a rush into our piece of land, and got into the 
channel of the water-machine of our children and a certain Pabanus, of the said village. 
The aforesaid Pabanus happening to be by, and having in his hands a stick, wished to 
(catch) the pigs and (remove them ?) from the place. He had not been in the least injured 
by the pigs, but full of . . . against ihem, because they had overrun me, wishing to . . . 
(I know not how?) unless from some madness . . .' 

I. Cf. for these consuls, whose gentile names are not known from literary sources, 
P. Flor. 96. 6 and 13, where Vitelli reads Ovi . [.]ov and Tfririov. With regard to the latter, 
though the traces of the second rin our papyrus are excessively slight, the letter is guaranteed 
by the comma after the first r (see critical note). Tliis mark, which is quite clear, would 



236 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

not have been inserted if the next letter had been a vowel, and we have no doubt that the 
supposed I in P. Flor. 96 is a similar sign, which is sometimes so exaggerated that it could 
easily be mistaken for a letter. Moreover, Tettius has the advantage of being a well-known 
Roman name. Om . [.]ov may represent either Virius, as Vitelli suggests, or Vibius. 

3. SioiKovvTi eVSt/ctW : the occurrence of this phrase shows that Wilcken's objections in 
Arc/iw, II. p. 127 to our supplement Bioik{ovvti) [rfiv a-Tpiarrjylav) in P. Amh. 72. i are 
groundless. Its precise significance is not yet proved, but we adhere meanwhile to our 
original explanation that it means a deputy, and not the magistrate proper ; cf, the analogous 
use of SteVcoi/ in e. g. 727. 5, P. Brit. INIus. 908. 13 and 19. 

4. The village of Taa/xn-e'/iou is mentioned in 501. 10, &c. 

8. 77f8a)i/, if not equivalent to naidav as suggested above, might be for TreS/wv; but nedia 
in papyri commonly mean the lands of a village, not of a private owner. 

10 IV is no doubt an infinitive depending on ^ovX6fMev[o]s, but not Xa^nv or Xa^lv. 

14. Perhaps ovk oiSa oJTrcas. At the beginning of the line there is a vestige of ink in 
front of ot, but if another letter was written this line was begun further to the left than those 
above it. 



902. Petition to a Public Advocate. 

3i'5X39cm. About a. d. 465. 

A petition to a defensor (eKbiKos: cf. note on 1. i) of Cynopolis from a 
cultivator, complaining of oppression and wrongful imprisonment by a member of 
the senate. According to his own statement the petitioner would seem to hav^e 
been treated with extreme harshness ; but it is likely from his repeated offer 
(11. 9-10, 16-7) to pay any debt which could be established against him, that right 
was not entirely on one side. A difificulty arises regarding the date of the 
papyrus; cf. note on 1. 19. 

^[Xa]oviQ)' laaK rm XoyionToiTci) cryoXaaTLKco eKSiKco TJ/y dVco KvvottoXltccv 
[TTtt/oa] AvprjXiov MaKapiov vlov Icocrrjip dirb r^y avTrj? TroXeooy. 
7rp[b r]ovTov vSpoirdpoyos KaOicrTrjKa Kai yecopyoy <pavepa>v TTpayfxdTcov 

overlap 
Tov [ttj]^ jxaKaptas pLvqii-qs 0ot^[d]fjL/iQ)i'O9 tov 7ro\LT€va-ap.evov, p.iTa 

Se TTju TOVTov TeXevrrj]/ 
5 6 t[ovt]ov a6eX0oy ©eoScopo^ iTTiarjXOeu e/y ttji' (ppovriSa roov tovtov 

TTpayjidTCcv 
K\a\ Tvp]apviKw TpoTTOi diTicriTacrf^v oktco KaXd €K Ta>v kpa)v ^oiKwi' 

Kol \k(TTi\Xaro KOL 7rap€(rK€va(rev fxe dSiKms di'aXrjfjicpOrjvai T<p Sea-fico- 

T-qptco npo 
TpLoov TovTcov fxrjvcou, Kal CK TOVTOV avfi^T) TO vTToXonrov t5)v kfiaiv ^(ocov 



902. PETITION TO A PUBLIC ADVOCATE 237 

Tfj XijxM T^OvdvaL, TavTa efjiov eVot/xcoy €)^opto9 et Kal (paueir]i/ x,P^c)(t- 

TOVVTa 

10 avT(o eyypdcpQiS irXrjpMaai. iirl roivvv oi '^kSlkol eirevorjdrjcrau kv raty 

TToXf^CTilV 

7rpo[y] 7(5 ^orjQ^Lav opi^ai roh dSiKovuhoi?, e/y reXiiau yap di/arpoTrrju 

Kal ci'y aiydTTju 
TreLvcci/ Trepiiarrju 'iviK^v tov 7rpo€ipr]fi€vov TroXirevofxepov, TovaSe roj)y 

Xi^iXXov9 
eTTLSLScofXL rfj afj XoyioTLTL d^icou KeXevcrat tovtov fJ.cTaa-TaXfjvai, 

irpMTo{u) Srj TTCof [ikv 
TTapa(TKi\yd(jaL\ Tr]v avrov dperrjv dnoSovvai fxoi dnep dTricTTracrei/ 

TVpavVlK^ rpOTTCO PoLKa JJ.OV 

15 ^S)a ivOaXrj KaOoos Kal dnecr7raa-€U, ncpl Se tZv dXXcov rd SoKOvvra rfj 

arj XoyioTTjTC irpa- 
yOrjvaL dvi6ifj)vaL re /i€ tu>v Secrficou, kjxov coy irpoeTnou iTot/xco^ evouTos 

TrXrjpcocrai 
oaa €Tro(f)iXco avTM eyypdcfxos' /J.iaov(reiu yap 01 vo/xoi roi'y rd dSiKa 

SianpaTTO- 
fjLeu[o]v9, XoyLcoTare eKSiKe Kvpie. (2nd hand) AvprjXLo^ MaKapio^ 

Ico(Tri(p eTriSiScoKa. 
3rd hand fxerd [t\^v vnaT^iav ^Xa[ov(6\y Bi(3iai^ov tov XafiTrpordrov to /? Kal tov 

SrjXoodrjao/xiuov 'AOiip k8. 

I. to-a»fj Pap. 2. tcaCTJ70 Pap. 3. vS/307rapo;(os Pap. 6. e of f*c COrr. ^oiKav 

Pap. 9. 1. xp^^^'''^^' ^i« °' ^1^ TO's and ahiKovix(voii written above 7, which is crossed 

through. 1 1-2. \. i(TXaTr]v TTflvav. 1 3. 1. XoytoVi^Tt. 15. SeCOnd tt of aTreffTrao-ei' COrr. 

16. Some letters inserted above teaficov have been erased. 17. First a- of ma-ovaeiv corn 

from C BianpaT^To Pap. 19. oufvov ad blotted. 

* To Flavins Isaac, most learned advocate and defensor of the upper quarter of Cynopolis, 
from Aurelius Macarius, son of Joseph, of the said city. In the past I was appointed 
irrigator and cultivator of real property on the estate of Phoebammon, of blessed memory, 
member of the council. After his death his brother Theodorus entered upon the manage- 
ment of his property, and tyrannously seized eight fine beasts out of my kine ; he also 
sent and had me unjustly carried off to prison three months ago, in consequence of which 
the remainder of my kine have died of hunger. This he has done in spite of my readiness 
to pay, if written proof of any debt to him can be produced. Therefore, since advocates 
have been devised in the cities for the purpose of lending assistance to the oppressed — and 
I have been reduced to complete ruin and the extremity of hunger through the aforesaid 
member of the council — I present this petition to your wisdom, begging you to order him to 



238 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

be summoned, first of all bringing about the restoration to me by his excellency of my kine 
which he tyrannously seized, in the same good condition in which they then were ; and for 
the rest directing that what seems good to your wisdom should be done, and that I be 
released from my bonds, since I am ready, as aforesaid, to discharge any debt secured in 
writing. For the perpetrators of injustice are hateful to the laws, most learned lord 
advocate. (Signed) I, Aurelius Macarius, son of Joseph, presented this petition. The year 
after the consulship of the most illustrious Flavius Vivianus for the second time, and of the 
consul whose name is to be declared, Athur 24.' 

I. axoXacTTiKc^ (kBIkm : cf. 801. 3, 129. 3 Toil Xa/u7rpo(Tdrov) skBikov ravTrjs t^s 'O^vpvyxiTav 
7!-dXe{coy), P. Brit. Mus. I. 87. 85 fK8iK0i 'Epfj.a>vd{f(Oi), B. G. U. IO94. I (rxo^°'^'''^i^o^ *<«'' fKdtKos 
Trjs 'EpfJiov 7roX(ea))j (1. 7roX€(coy) ?), P. Strassb. 40. 6 (rxoXaa-TiKm Kal (Twrj-yolpoi (J") T^sl S^/Sa/Soy. 

These ckSikoi are the defensores civitaiis who from the year a. d. 365 appear as regularly 
constituted authorities in the provincial towns (Cod. Just, i, 55; Cod. Theod. i. 29). They 
were elected by the body of the citizens, the decurions being ineligible, and held office 
originally for five years, but after the time of Justinian only for two. Scholastici are 
expressly named in Cod. Theod. i. 29. 2 among the classes suitable for the appointment. 
The defensores had a limited jurisdiction in civil cases and in minor criminal matters; their 
chief function was, as described in 11. lo-i of the papyrus, to protect citizens from oppression 
and injustice — plebem iantiim vel deairtones ab onmiimproboru7n irisolentia et tevieritate tueatihir, 
Cod. Theod. i. 29. 7; cf Cod. Just. i. 55. 4 ut imprimis parentis vkem plebi exhibeas, 
descriptionibus rusticos urbanosque non paiiaris adjiigi, officialium insolentiae, iudicum procacitati 
. . . occurras, &c. In P. Leipzig 34. 10 of c. a.d. 375 the form drjcfji^faap is used. 

The axoXaa-TiKoi were advocates employed in defending cases and similar legal work, 
such as drawing up petitions; cf. Cod. Theod. 8. 10. 2, where they are coupled with 
oficiales, and their avarice is censured: 7iec latei . . . scholasticos ultra jnodiim accepiis 
honorariis in defensione causarum om?iium et afinofias et sumptus accipere cofisuesse. 

3. vbpoTvapoxoi: cf. 137. 22 v8ponapox{ias) and P. Brit. Mus. III. 1044. 25. (pavepav 
npaypArav is similar to aKi-VTjTcov rrpaypdroiv in 126. I 7, &C. 

7. [ecTTtjXaTo is not quite satisfactory, the X being doubtful, and the middle voice 
unusual. 

13. Trpa)To(v) brj tt(os : or 7rp(OTo(Tv)no)s, as Wilcken suggests. 

19. This date is singular, for the order of the words must imply that Vivianus had 
been consul for the second time, whereas his only recorded consulship is that in a.d. 463 
(when his partner was Fl. Caecina Basilius, or, according to Marcellinus, Felix), and the 
lists show no blanks in the years preceding and following that year, to w'hich period without 
doubt the papyrus belongs. For the phrase tov dri^codrja-opfvov cf. C. I. G. 3467. 3, 42. 9, 

and 60. 12 vols uTroBfixdrjaopfvoi^ vnaTois to y, P. Brit. INIuS. III. 99 1. I vnaretas . . .IXeiou tov 

XapnpoTaTov koI tov airoBixOrja-opfvov : numerous Other examples are given in Du Cange, s. v. 
Cnaroi brjk(o6r)<T6ix(voi, Its Occurrence in a date ytsTa ttjv lirariap is unusual. 

903. Accusation against a Husband. 

27-2 X 2i'6 cm. Fourth century. 

This singular document is an elaborate indictment of a husband by his wife, 
who gives a circumstantial account of the former's violent or insulting behaviour, 
extending over a considerable period of time. The two, whose names are not 
mentioned, seem to have been a young couple, united originally by an 6.ypa(f>os 



903. ACCUSATION AGAINST A HUSBAND 239 

yafios, and subsequently by a regular contract (11. 17-8) ; but in neither condition 
could they succeed in living on terms of harmony. The present document, which 
is unaddressed, was presumably a kind of affidavit used in proceedings taken 
against the husband ; it is written in vulgar Greek, and in an irregular uncial 
hand, the letters of the first two lines being much enlarged. The occurrence 
of the word ttoXltiktj in 1. 37 is of special interest in connexion with the much- 
discussed Epistle of Psevosiris ; cf. note ad loc. On the verso are a few lines of 
shorthand in two columns. 

li^pi iravTOiV oiv dncv Kar efiov v^pecou. 
kvf.KXiiaiv T0V9 i[a.]vTOV SovXov? Kal rouy 

efxov afia tcov Tpo(pi/x[co]v fiov Kal top npopofjTrjv Kal tou 
viov avTOv cVi oAay e'[77T]a rjfiipas (I? to, Kardyaia avTov, 

5 Tovs pikv SovXov9 avT[ov K]al ttjv i/jtrju SovXrjv Zcotjv v^piaas 

dnoKTivas avTovs r5>v 7r[X]?;ycSi', Kal rrvp Trpoa'qviyKiv Tai9 Tpo- 
(pifiai^ jjLOv yvpvdxras ai/[ra]s TrarreXcos' a ov ttoiovctl ol vofioi, Kal 
Xeyoov T019 avTo79 rpocpipoL^ on Sore Travra to, avTrjs, Kal nnav 
OTi ovSev i\iL Trap' rjpZv, Toh 8\ $ovXoi9 Xiycou fxaaTLy{y}o(y)/jL€yoi{'5) OTi 

10 Ti ripKiv iK T7J9 oiKias fJiov, ^aaavL^opivoi ovv Hirav on ovSky 
TCOV crwv rjpK^v dXXd (Tccd icrnU irdvTa to, ad. 
dTTT]VTr]a^v Se avT(o ZoiiijiX^ps on Kal tov Tp6(f)L/j.ov avrov ivi- 

kXi<t€v, Kal eiireu avr^ 07[i] Sia rbu Tp6(f)Ln6v <rov rjXdas ^ Sia rfju 
Toiav rfXOai XaXfjcrai kirdvca avTfjs ; 

15 Kal wfxo<T€v €7rl napovaia toov (niaKOTrcov Kal tcov dSiXcpwv avTov 

Koi TOis SovXois 

OTI direvTivOev ov firi Kpv->^(o avTr}(v) irdaas fioi) Tas kX€19 Kal ini^co 

avrov imOTtviv Kafiol ovk (marevtv, 

ovT€ v^pi^oo avT^v dnevTivOiV. Kal yap-iKov yiyov€v, Kal fi€Ta 
Tas (TvvOrjKai TavTas Kal tov9 8pKOV9 €Kpv^€v ttoXlv kfik Tas k\(19 
c/y e/xe. Kal dniXGovcra [et]y to KvpiaKov kv Sa/i^aOco, Kal kiroC-qcrev 

20 Tcby e|a) 6vpa9 avTOV iVKXiadfjvaL kndvco jxov Xiycov oti Sia ti dnfjX- 
6a9 e/y to KvpiaKov ; Kal noXXa da^Xy-qpaTa Xiyoov c/y Trpoaccnov 
fiov Kal Slo, Tfj9 pivbs avTo[v,] Kal mpl aiTov {dpTd^asi) p tov STjfioaiov tov 
ovopaTos pov prjSev SeScoKoos prjSe dpTd^{rjv) piav. €viKXei(T€v Si 
Tovs Topovs KpaTTjaas ai'T[o]vs oti S6t€ ttjv Ttprjv 760V (dpTajScov) p, prjSlv 

25 5c5a)[Ka)y] coy Trpoilirov. Kol httcv tois SovXols avTov oti S6t€ avppd- 
\ov9 iva Kal avTTjv kvKXdaaxri. Kal iKpaTiqOrj Xcoovs 6 ^OT]6b9 avTov 



240 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

€L9 TO Brjixocnov Kal irapecr^f^v avTco EuddXa/109 kveyypov Kol ovk rjpKecrdr]. 
rjpKa Kayoi dWo fiLKpov Kal Trapecrypv tS> avrS> Xooovrt. dnauTijaa^ Se 
avTco €19 'AvTivoov 'i-^ovaa to TT/aoy ^aXavlov fj.ov fied S)v 'i)^co Kocrfxapi- 

30 SlCOV, Kal HTT^V fXOL OTL cf TL ^X^l^ fi€T k<T0V aipCO aVTO. Sl b SiSoOKe^ TO) 

^or]6(p jiQv XcoovTL kv^y^vpov Sia toc Srjfiocna avTov. p-apTvprjaaL 8\ 
nepl TovTcov ndvTCov rj firjTr^p avTOv. Kal nepl 'AuiWa? r^y SovXrjs 
avTOV €fi€iv€u OXt^cov Tr]V ■^^V'^rjv fiov Kal kv ttj Avtlvoov kol kvTavOa 
OTL eKJSaXe ttju SovXrjv TavT-qv kireiSr] avTr] oiSev ocra KeKTTjTai, lacos 
35 diXcov fiOL KaTanXi^aL Kal TavTrj Trj irpocpdcret dpai ef tl e^co- Kaycb ovk 
7]vi(T)(oiir]v eK^aXelv avTr]v. Kal 'i/jieii^ev Xiyoov otl /x^to. iirjvav 
XajJL^dv(a noXLTiKrjV epavTco. TavTa Se oiScu 6 ^(eoy). 

I. vl3pfa>p Pap. 3. 1. rats rpocpifxais. 4. iJiov Pap. 6. t: poarjv fyKev Pap. 7. 10 of 
TTQiovai added above the line. 8. 1. rat? avTals Tpo(^inaii. 9. txaaTiyyofKvoi Pap. 17. 

iJ^piCoi Pap. 22. o- of trirou COrr. from r. 26. iVa Pap. 28. 1. dnrjVTTjaa. 31. 1. 

fxapTvprjaei. 33. Second o of airii/oou COrr. 34. 'ia-oas Pap. 35. 1. /xf for /[lot. KM 

added above the line, ai of apai corr. (?) 37. ik o^ ttoXitiktjv added above the line. 

' Concerning all the insults uttered by him against me. He shut up his own slaves and 
mine ^vith my foster-daughters and his agent and son for seven whole days in his cellars, 
having insulted his slaves and my slave Zoe and half killed them with blows, and he applied 
fire to my foster-daughters, having stripped them quite naked, which is contrary to the laws. 
He also said to the same foster-daughters, " Give up all that is hers," and they said, " She 
has nothing with us " ; and to the slaves when they were being beaten he said, " What did 
she take from my house ? " and they under torture said, " She has taken nothing of yours, 
but all your property is safe." Zoilus went to see him because he had shut up his foster-son, 
and he said to him, " Have you come on account of your foster-son or of such a woman, to 
talk about her .? " He swore in the presence of the bishops and of his own brothers, " Hence- 
forward I will not hide all my keys from her (he trusted his slaves but would not trust me) ; 
I will stop and not insult her." Whereupon a marriage deed was made, and after this agreement 
and his oaths, he again hid the keys from me ; and when I had gone out to the church at 
Sambatho he had the outside doors shut on me, saying, " Why did you go to the church? " 
and using many terms of abuse to my face, and through his nose. There were 100 artabae 
of corn due to the State on my account of which he paid nothing, not a single artaba. He 
obtained possession of the books, and shut them up saying, " Pay the price of the hundred 
artabae " having himself paid nothing, as I stated before ; and he said to his slaves, " Pro- 
vide helpers, to shut her up also." Choous his assistant was carried off to prison, and 
Euthalamus gave security for him which was insufficient, so I took a little more and gave it 
for the said Choous. W^hen I met him at Antinoopolis having my bathing-bag (?) with my 
ornaments, he said to me, " I shall take anything you have with you on account of the 
security which you gave to my assistant Choous for his dues to the State." To all this his 
mother will bear witness. He also persisted in vexing my soul about his slave Anilla, both 
at Antinoopolis and here, saying, " Send away this slave, for she knows how much she has 
possessed herself of," probably wanting to get me involved, and on this pretext to take 
away whatever I have myself. But I refused to send her away, and he kept saying, 
" A month hence I will take a mistress." God knows this is true.' 



903. ACCUSATION AGAINST A HUSBAND 241 

3. Tpo<^ifjS^a)^v : cf. p. Leipzig 47. 10. The rpo^iixai here were apparently some girls 
who were being brought up by the complainant, the masculine in 1. 8 being an error. 
A diflerent male Tp6(f)ifios is mentioned in 1. 12. 

6. For the hyperbole in dnoKTivas cf. e.g. P. Brit. Mus. I. 113. 12 (</). n 6 xp^'^'^'^l^ 
('(jiopfvaev fxe. The instrumental use of the genitive rcbv nXyiySiv is noticeable. 

9. nap' Tjpav (literally ' on our side ') is practically equivalent to nap' fjplv. 

14. Toiav is a slighting reference to the writer of this indictment. For endvco cf. 131. 

14—5 pdprvpas r&[i']r fvpedevras endv(o rov naTpos p.ov, B. G. U. 29. 1—2 eaxov . . . eVdva) twv 

ifiwu KXrjpcoi/ (both of Byzantine period) ; the word is used in another uncommon 
sense in 1. 20. 

15. With this oath made in the presence of the bishops cf. P. Leipzig 43, where 
a bishop acts as a judge. 

16-7. The insertion above the line is a parenthetical explanation of ov p.r] KpCyj/co . . . 

2 2. Speaking through the nose aggravated the insult ; cf. fiVKTr]pi((iv, naso stispendere, &c. 
In Persius i. 33 balba de nare locutus has a different meaning. 

29. TTpo? IBaXavlov is perhaps better written as two words than one. In either case the 
article meant seems to be some kind of handbag which was carried by a lady in going to 
the bath, and would hold trinkets and similar objects. A connexion with ^aXavivt], sc. oroXii 
(cf. 265. 3), is less likely. 

34. avTi) oi^ep : cf. p. Tebt, 424. 5 f' ^e paravofis, crv oi8as, 

35. KaranXi^ai is the Opposite oi eKn^eKtiv aS used in P. Tebt. 315. 21 Kaya ae €/C7rXe^<i). 

37. For noKiTiKr] in the sense of nopvi] cf. P. Grenf. II. 73. 9. The present passage, 
which supplies a contemporary parallel, supports our view of that papyrus as against the 
interpretation of Deissmann ( The Epistle of Psenosiris) who wished to make tjjv noKiriKTjv 
there a proper name. 



904. Petition to a Praeses. 

31-3 X 88-5 cm. Fifth century. 

A petition addressed to an unnamed praeses (of the Thebaid) by a certain 
Flavius, who had consented to act as substitute for Philoxenus in the post of 
riparius, a police ofificial (cf. 1. 3, note). Philoxenus had undertaken to provide 
Flavius with the requisite stafif of helpers and indemnity in case of accident, but 
had failed to fulfil his bond ; and Flavius, who had been subjected to much 
indignity and even violence in the performance of his duties, now prays that he may 
be released from them and the original holder made responsible. The petition is 
cast in a stilted and rhetorical style ; the handwriting is an exceptionally large, 
formal cursive. 

1 Hapa ^X{aoviov). 

2 T] Tr}9 v/x.€T€pas SiKaLOKpL(r[i]as KaOapoTT]^ 7rdvTco9 Kdfik eXe^a-ei tou yeyrjpa- 

KOTu Kol dcrvvdrjKel SiaTreTrovOoTa koI )(Xevr]v napd ^iXo^ivov tov kuOo- 
aicofxevov iiayicrTpiavov. 

R 



242 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

3 ovros yap \6yov kvcofiOTco^ fxoi BeSoDKoos Koi kiTay[yeL\]a[xevos coy TToivTm 

6(TaiTep k7ri^T]T€LTai e/y Ti]i/ tov pLnaptov Xeirovpyeiau e/croy nda-rjs 
vTrofjLurjaecos nXripcocrei, 

4 irapiy^oiv jxol Kal irpos ^OT^Oetav oUeras re Kal aviiiidyov^ kol [a]XXouy rouy 

6(j)ei\ovTa9 TTjv 7rapa(f)vXaKr}v Trjs TroAecoy iroulaOai, ov iiovov 8\ tovto, 
dW' el Kal (Tvn^fj aTOTrrjfid tl yevecrOai 

5 avTov TO d(rjixLov nXrjpoTu rot[y] rrju (3Xdl3r}v vTro/xevovaLi^, dXXd Kal to. dXXa 

irdvTa TO, avvrtvovTa e/y Tr]v XeiTovpyeiai/ ravrrju diroKaOicrTdu' tovtcov 
8\ oXcov eKTos yeyevqTaL 

6 Kal napopwy /Lie Toi/ dOXiov. Ka& eKdcTTrjv rj/xepau iJiere(£)pL([o\}xevov ayoivioLS 

Kal TrXrjyaLS KaraKonTOfievov Kara to acofxa, fir] KeKT-qfxevov jxr) dSeX^ou 
fjLT] avvyeprj firj 

7 vlbi^ Svudfieuou dfia /xol (rvviraOlv, coy Xolttov e/y avTo to r^y crcoTripia? Trvevfia 

SvaTV^Lu /xe. odei/ ray iKcaia^ Trpoacpipco Tfj v/xeTepa k^ovaia axiTe e/xe 
/xej/ eXevOepcoOfjpaL 

8 ray TOiavTas Xeirou/)yei[a]9, \tov\ 8\ \TTpai\ToTVTTOV KaTavayKa^eaBai fj Sl iavTOV 

^ Sia olov8i]7roT€ Trpoacoirov ttju TOiavTrju XiLTOvpyiav k^avvcraL, kfiov diro- 
Ta^afikvov Kal fxr) 
y Swafikvov [/j.r]8a/xcos virofikviv t]^v TOLavTrjv dirapeTr^TOv Kal (popTiKcoTdTrjv 
XeiTOvpytav, iva Kayoo tovtov Tvyoov evyapi(jTr](T(£) Tats dKXeiviis aKoals 
Trjs vjJ,€Tkpas 
10 k^ovatas, jJ.eyaXo\TTpeirk(TTaTe rjp.coi' r]y]e/jiQ)v Kvpie. -\- 

2. iJfieTfpas Pap. ; SO in II. 7 and 9. 1. KaQaxna^iivov. 3. f7ray'['yeiX]a^ei'oy Pap. 

VTrofivrjaecos Pap. 4. aXX< Pap. 5. v7rofxevov(riv . . . anoKa&iarav Pap. 'J. vlov . . . 

iKfaias . • . vfierepa Pap. 8. 1. ttjs ToiavTtjs. 9. 1. ajrapaiTTjTov. 'iva Pap. 1. aKKiveai. 

' From Flavius. The purity of your righteous judgement will surely pity me, an old man 
who has suffered a breach of covenant and mockery at the hands of Philoxenus, the devoted 
magistrianus. He gave me his word on oath, and promised that he would surely fulfil 
without any reminding every requirement for the office of riparius, providing for my support 
both servants and assistants and others whose duty it would be to undertake the guarding 
of the city; and not only so, but he promised that, if anything extraordinary happened, he 
would himself make up the loss to those who suffered injury, and also that he would set 
right everything connected with this office. But all this he has evaded, paying no attention 
to my unfortunate self, who am daily suspended by ropes and have my body belaboured 
with blows, and possess no brother, no relative, no son to sympathize with me, so that at 
last the very breath of my life is in danger. Accordingly I make my entreaties to your 
highness that I should be released from so grievous an office, and that the original holder 
should be compelled to finish it either himself or through some other person, as I renounce 



904. PETITION TO A PRAESES • 243 

it, being unable to endure any longer an office so severe and onerous, in order that having 
gained my request I may bless the impartial ears of your highness, our most noble lord 
praeses.' 

2. a(Tvv6r]K(i is presumably an adverb from da-CvOrjKos, a form occurring in Onesand. 
Slrateg. i. 37. davvdtjKa would have been more normal with Kai x^^^v" following. 

fxayiaTpiavoii : the viagistria7ii were the agentes in rebus in the service of the magisier 
officioriim, and were employed as messengers or representatives in the provinces ; cf. Cod. 
Theod. 6. 27, Cod. Just. 12. 20 De agentilms in rebus. KaduxriwyLivos which = devolissimus, 
i. e. a true servant of the State, was the regular epithet of magistriani; cf. e. g. Cod. Just. 12. 
21. 7 schola devotissimoriim agentum in rebus, C. I. G. 3467. 7-8 Kadio(Ti<>}(ifva ii[ay\icrTpLav(o koI 

3. pinapiov : that the riparius, who first appears in the fourth century, was primarily 
a police official appears clearly from 1. 4, where the Trapac^uXaKj) r^s noXtcos is mentioned as 
the sphere of duties of his assistants, and the other evidence is in accordance with this. In 
P. Amh. 146 a riparius issues to eirenarchs an order for arrest similar to those sent in earlier 
times by the strategus (e.g. P. Tebt. 290), decurion (64), or beneficiarius (65). Petitions 
to riparii concerning cases of assault are extant in P. Cairo 10269 ^"^ P. Leipzig 37, and in 
897 they are found engaged in the search for offenders. Other references to them are 
P. Leipzig 49, where a riparius appears as surety for the appearance of a person, P. Leipzig 
62. i. 34, where two riparii are found acting with a (nrobfKTtjs xpvo-oO npavcov in the delivery 
of gold to a xp^^^^l^i C. P. R. 30. 52, where a pmapios tov ivdrov o'Ikov occurs in a papyrus 
of the sixth century, when the ' houses ' of the great nobles play an important part in the 
administration of the country (cf. 133. 8), and P. Brit. Mus. 653. 17. They were sometimes 
officials oi p.r]TpoTTokfi^ (e. g- P. Leipzig 49), sometimes of the nome (P. Leipzig 37 and 897), 
and are often found acting in pairs, e.g. 897, and P. Cairo 10269. The office, as 904 
shows, was a burdensome XeiTovpyia. 

5. dnoKadiardv: this form occurs as early as Aristotle, Metaph. n. 8. 12; cf. Diod. i. 
78, Act. ApOSt. 17. 15 KaQidjavm, &c. 

8. [jr/jtoJrdrvTroi' : cf. 136. II 6p.oXoy5} eyo) 6 TrpayTOTVTTOs, P. Strassb. 40. 25-8 fXfr eyyvT)T\oii^ 
. . , dvadexof^^vi^ov^ . . . to Trpoaanov tov TrpcoTorinrov. 



(d) CONTRACTS 

905. Marriage Contract. 

20-4x18 cm. A. D. 170. 

A short but interesting contract of marriage between two inhabitants of the 
Oxyrhynchite village Psobthis. The formula, as usual in Oxyrhynchus marriage- 
contracts, is of the protocol type, not that of a 6\ioXoyia as in the Fay Am ; cf. 496. 
The dowry brought by the bride is briefly described, the obligation of the husband 
to maintain his wife adequately is emphasized in the stereotyped phraseology, and 
provision Is made for the restoration of the dowry in case of a separation. An 
uncommon clause is added at the end, where the bridegroom's father appears as 
a consenting party to the deed and guarantor of the repayment of the dowry ; 
and the opening formula is also remarkable ; cf. 1. i, note. 

R 2 



244 T^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[ 'AvT(iiivi]vov Kol ^av(TT€iva9 SefiacTTcov. 

[e^eSoTo MrjuoScopo]^ "fipov fXT]T{pb9) TaKaXXiTrnov dno Kco/xr]^ Wcofidtco^ 
[ttjv avTov 6vyaT\kpav ©arprju fxrjTpos OaTpfjro? 'AnoWcovia) 
[HpaKXeovs pr]Tpo]9 TavaopdnLO^ cctto t^? avrrj^ Ka>nr]s vrpo? ydpov kol- 
5 [vwviav. T] 5' eK8oT]o9 cpepH t«3 dvSpl [e/y (f)€]purjv Xoyov [x]pvaov fikv koivov 

(TTaOpO) 

'[0^vpvy)(jeLTrj\ jivayaiov %v [[reraproj/]] kv dS^cn arvvTipi-jOev, 
[/ftti eVi (iV 7rap]a(pipvoi9 IfiaTioop <TOvPpoKO/xa<p6pTLa Svo, 

[ej/ /xep ]i'ou TO 8e erepou XevKou. [[oi/ourj] avplSiovTccxray 

[ovi/ dXXrjXois 01 y]apovvT€9 (f)vXd(r(rovTe9 ret rov yd/xov SUaia, 

lo [kol 6 yapSiv e7ri])(^opr]yeLTCo rfj yapovpkvrj jd Seovra Kara Svva- 
pLLV [tov (3lov. €]dy S[e d]TraXXayr] yiur]r[a]i TiKvcav ovrcov rj Kai 
[fir] yevofieuoof aTTO^orjo) 6 yapStv rd iTapd(f)epva rrdvTa 
fiky ciix[d\ T[fi dn]aXXayfj ttju 5[e] (pepurji/ kv rjpepais i^rj- 
KOVTa a[0' ^1? e[ar 17 d\iTaXXayr] y^vqrai, rrj^ npd^ccos |Taf]i] ovarjs 

15 Tco e/f5i56f[r]t MTjuoSdopov napd tov yapovvTO^ Koi eK 
Tcov vTTapy\^6]yT(t)V avTco ndpTCoi/, napcou Se 6 TraTrjp tov 
yafiovvTos 'Hp[a]KXfJ9 Mciopov fjir)T{po9) 'A7r[oX]Xa)uia9 dno Tfj9 avTrjS Koopr^s 

cvSoKeT tS) frfel] ydp(o kol kvyvaTai e/y eKTianv 
TTjv TTpoKupivqv (f)ipvr}v. Kvpia rj avvypa^r] Siaar] ypa- 
(P(?(ra 7rpo9 to iKarepov pkpos ^X^'^ povayov, koI iTrepcoTt]- 

20 [$ip]T€9 iavToTs [[aAXj^Xoi?]] copoXoyrjo-ai'. {eTovs) l ^apevooO it], 

4. K of (cco/xT^f corr. from tt, and y and /x of yafiov written above n and y which are 
crossed through. 5. [fn cpejpvrjv Xoyov added above the line ; 1. (t)e]pvTjs \6yov. 6. 1. 

fxvnalov. 7. 'ifiaTKov Pap. 1. (rov^piKo^a(f)6pTia. I4. o of ovarjs COrr. from t. 15' !• 

Mr/i-oSco/jw. 17. r}p[a.]KXr]s . . . K(j)p-qs added above the Hne. 

* . . . Antoninus and Faustina, Augusti. Menodorus son of Horus and Tacallippus of 
the village of Psobthis has given for partnership of marriage Thatres, his daughter by Thatres, 
to Apollonius son of Heracles and Tausorapis. The bride brings to her husband in respect of 
dowry one mina's weight on the Oxyrhynchite standard of common gold, in kind, according 
to valuation, and in parapherna in clothing two outer veils, one . , ., the other white. Let 
the husband and wife therefore live together observing the duties of marriage, and the 
husband shall supply the wife with necessaries in proportion to his means. If a separation 
takes place after the birth of children or before it, the husband shall restore all the super- 
dowry at the time of separation, and the dowry in sixty days from the day on which the 
separation takes place ; and Menodorus, the giver of the bride, shall have the right of 
execution upon the husband and upon all his property. The father of the husband, 
Heracles son of Morus and Apollonia, of the said village, being present assents to the 



905. MARRIAGE CONTRACT 245 

marriage, and is surety for the payment of the aforesaid dowry. This contract is vaUd, being 
written in duplicate in order that each party may have a copy ; and in answer to the formal 
question they have declared to each other their consent. The loth year, Phamenoth 18.' 

I. It is very unlikely that this line is a date. There seems to be barely room for 
{(Tovs) I (cf. 1. 20) AvpriXlov 'AvTcovCi^ov, even if erovs were written as a symbol ; it is also 
noticeable that the month is not added (there being a blank space after 'S.f^aarwv), and the 
date at the end makes another at the beginning quite superfluous. Moreover, the mention 
of the empress in a date would be very unusual, though possibly it might have been thought 
appropriate in a marriage-contract ; cf. the coins in which Faustina is associated with 
Fectinditas, Fortima muh'ebris, Laetitia, &c. These considerations suggest the probability 
that 1. I contains some unfamiliar formula, e. g. ttj rvxn ' A.vT(>ivi\vov k.t.X., with which might 
be compared the dya0f] rvxn common in wills. In any case, however, the mention of 
^avaTf'iva ^(jBaarr] here appears to fix the year given in 1. 20 as the loth of Marcus Aurelius, 
for though the phrase eTr(pci)Tr][6ev]Tfs cofiokoyqaav in 11. 19-20 suggests a later period (cf. note 
aJ loc), the fact that none of the parties to the contract is an Aurelius gives strong support 
to a date earlier than Caracalla. For Faustina cf. 502. 3-4, where a priest of ^avarha 
^f^aaTTj occurs in the reign of Marcus. 

5. 6 8e Mt]v68mp]oi is too long, and the natural subject of ^epi is the bride. We there- 
fore suggest eKSorjoy, though that word does not apparently occur in the papyri ; cf. however, 

iKdi86vai and eKdorrjs. 

6. ['O^ypvyxfiTTji] '. cf. 496. 3 xP^'^^o]'^ araOiia 'O^upvyp^eiVfj; pvaiaia irivre. The insertion 

of 7 in fivayaiof exemplifies a common phenomenon; cf. P. Tebt. 26. 12, Mayser, 
Grammatik, pp. 167-8. 

7. a-ov^p{i)Kofjia4)6pTiov seems to be a new compound; cf. 921. 4 and B.G. U. 327. 7 

<TOv(^^) piKonaXKioi', 

8. ]vov is the termination of some word like aavBvKtvou or KpoKmnvov. 

10. f77tj;(opj/yetTa) : cf. e.g. 906. 6. 

12-3. Cf 603, where it is similarly provided that the Trnpa^fpi'a were to be returned on 
demand, and the </)epM; within sixty days. The latter term is also that fixed in 497. 6 and 
P. Gen. 2 1 {Archiv, III. p. 387); in Roman marriage-contracts thirty days is a commoner 
limit. At the beginning of 1. 13 the space is rather broad for a'/^« , and perhaps a/Li[a avY\j] 
{t}]) should be read. 

16-8. On the analogy of this passage we would suggest that the signature which in 
497. 22-4 follows those of the bridegroom and the bride's father is that of the bridegroom's 
father, who was perhaps made security, as here, for the repayment. Similarly in 906. 10 
Isidorus, who is only a few years younger than the father of the wife, may well be the father 
of the husband. In P. Leipzig 27, which like 906 is an agreement for divorce, the husband 
is associated with a person who actually pays over the dowry on his behalf to the wife's 
father ; but this fourth person is there unlikely to be the husband's father, since not only is 
no such relationship stated, but the husband was a freedman, who would not be expected to 
have an assignable father. INIitteis suggests that he was the banker, but that does not seem 
at all probable ; we should prefer to suppose that he was more intimately concerned in the 
transaction, and had appeared in the original marriage-contract as the husband's 
guarantor. 

19. This is a remarkably early example of the use in Egypt of the stipulatory formula, 
which only becomes common in the third century. In fact we are unable to refer to another 
instance from the second century apart from those in which Roman citizens are concerned, 
for in C. [P. R. 22. [35, 'which is cited by Mitteis, Reichsrecht, p. 486^, e7repaj]nj^el[a-a is an 
erroneous reading (Hunt, Goti. Gel Anz,, 1897, p. 462). 



246 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

906. Deed of Divorce. 

i2'6 X 33' I cm. Second or early third century. 

The conclusion of a contract for divorce ; cf. 266, P. Leipzig 27, C. P. R. I, 
23, &c. The document is apparently called an a-noxi], referring to the repayment 
of the dowry ; cf. note on 1. 10. At the end are the names and descriptions of 
the principal parties to the contract, Horion who is no doubt the wife's father, 
Plutarche the wife, and a third person who is not the husband but may have been 
a surety for him ; cf. 905. 16-8, note. 



[ 45 letters ]«•[••]•[ 

[ 24 „ ] . a\[ ](T0 . [. .] /c[ai] TO, Sia 

r^y avTTJs awypacfirjs i[(T]Tafi[€va 
7rapd(p[€]p[va ovra e/c] 8pa)(^ixa)V reaa-apccKovra, 01 Se rpei? Kal firj kvKaXitv 

dWrjXoiS fJ-flBi kvKaXecmv 
p.r]B\ eneXevaeadaL fnqre nepl /jir]Sevo9 ra>v eh ttjv a-vv^toia-Lv tov Aioyivovs 

Kal TTJ? nXovTcipxv^ 
5 TeivopTooi^ ixrjSe nepl dXXov ixrjSevos dnXcos IJ.^XP'- "^^^ hearoixTri^ rjfiepas. 6 Sc 

A[i.]oyii'r]9 

Kal knLyopr}yri[(j\eL dnb tov vvv to, [8]eovTa tols avToTs vloTs avTcov Trap' avTM 

SLaiTcoixii'[o]is dxP'- 
TjXiKia?. aTTO 8e tov vvv i^uvai rw Aioyevei Kal Trj TlXovTdpxv ^Karepo? 

avTcov dp/x6^ea[$aL] coy idv alpf]- 
Tai ydjioi dv€v6vy(o ovtl, rj ttjv kaoii^vriv 'i(po8ov aKvpov dual, Trjv Sk SrjXov- 

/xevrjv a[v]vypa(pj]u 
K[al] TTjv [y]€vofievr]u avTfjS Sid tov KaTaXoydov SrjfjLoa-icocnv [Kal] fi^TaSoaiv 

avvya>pov(Tei aKvpov aval. 
10 KvpCa T] dnoxy- 'fipio)v oy (er<5i') v^ dar)fx{os). TlXovrdpx^ ^^ {kToiv) kS 
do-rjfi{os). 0[. . ( )] 'Ia-i(5(co/3oy) coy (ercoi/) fxr] ovX{rj) ocppi^i) 8e^{Lw). 

7. 1. fKUTepa. 10. 1. wy for 6s. 

' . . . and the parapherna fixed in the said contract, worth 40 drachmae. The three 
further agree that they neither make nor will make any claim or proceed against each other 
on any point connected with the union of Diogenes and Plutarche, or on any other subject 
whatever up to the present day. Diogenes shall henceforth provide the necessary means 
for the said sons, who shall live with him until they come of age ; and henceforth it shall 



906. DEED OE DIVORCE 247 

be lawful for Diogenes and Plutarche, either of them, to marry as they choose without 
incurring liability, any act of aggression against them being invalid. The above-mentioned 
contract, and the registration of it through the record-office, and communication of it are 
acknowledged to be invalid. This receipt is valid. Horion, aged about 57, with no 
distinguishing mark. Plutarche, aged about 24, with no distinguishing mark. O . . 
Isidorus, aged about 48, with a scar on his right eyebrow.' 

1 — 2. Cf. P. Leipz. 2 7- 20—3 "Hpcof be direxw Trapa tov 2a)aa ras 8ia rqi (Tvvypa(f)rjs (pfpvrjs 

apyvpiov 8paxpas Tpi[aKo\(rias K[a\ to. na']pd({)€pva iravTa, In marriage-contracls the repayment of 
the Trapd({)epva iS generally provided for without any stipulation concerning their value, such 
as commonly occurs in connexion with the (pepvi). In the marriage-contract of Diogenes 
and Plutarche, however, though ^^(ryap.[ipa and 6Wa eV] are very uncertain, the value of the 
napdcpeppa seem to have been stated. 

7. eKaTep[o]is Cannot be read, nor Sn for &)$■. 

9. 8ia TOV KaraXoyelov drjpoaiccaiv apparently refers to the registration of deeds through the 
archidicastes in the Library of Hadrian and Nanaeum at Alexandria; cf 719, P. Leipzig 10, 
and, for the latest discussion, P. Strassb. 29 introd. These deeds were, however, in all 
previously known instances x^^poypa^ct, i- e. private notes of hand without the intervention 
of the agoranomus or other notarial official, whereas the document in the present case was 
a avyypac^rj, i. e. the original marriage-contract of Diogenes and Plutarche. The extant 
marriage-contracts of the Roman period are all notarial (Tvyypa4>ai (cf. P. M. Meyer, JC/i'o, VI. 
pp. 442 sqq.), and that a avyypafpi] should have undergone drjpoa-taa-is ^.t Alexandria is a new 
and surprising phenomenon. The only explanation which we can suggest is that the 
avyypa<f)rj in question resembled that mentioned in 259. 1 1 in being tbioypacpos, i. e. that 
it was really a )(^eip6ypa(pov (cf. P. M. Meyer, op. cit., p. 447), which required to be sent to 
Alexandria to receive official STjpoalaxns. What is precisely meant by perddoa-tv here is also 
not quite clear, owing to our ignorance of the terms of the avyypacpr] and the circumstances of 
its Sjy^oo-icoCTty, but pfrddoaiv is likely to be connected with peraboBrjTU) which occurs in the 
instructions of the archidicastes quoted in the documents bearing upon the b-qpocrimat^, e. g. 
719. 4, B.G. U. 578. 7. pfTadodrjTco in the latter example is explained by Mitteis {Hermes, 
xxxii. p. 647) as ' the communication of the copy of the petition concerning brjpoa-iuxiis to the 
defendant through the strategus ', but this explanation does not very well suit the other cases 
where the br^poaiaxris is not preparatory to an action at law as in B. G. U. 578, but is only 
a precautionary step (cf. 719. introd.). Perhaps pirdboais means the official communication 
of the fact of Srjpoa-iacns to all concerned. 

10. diroxr): the reading of the last three letters is uncertain, but an abbreviation of 
aTraXKayr'] ov dno^vyT] is not admissible. The repayment of the dowry was the chief point in 
a contract concerning divorce ; the formula of 266 and P. Brit. Mus. II. 178 is simply that 
of an dnoxr] : cf. Lesquier, Rev. de Phil. 1906, p. 25. 



907. Will of Hermogenes. 

26-5 X 22-4 cm. A. D. 276. 

The following will is preserved on the verso of 412, a fragment from the 
Keo-roi of Julius Africanus. The testator, Aurelius Hermogenes, a president of 
the boule at Oxyrhynchus, divides a considerable real estate between his five 
children — three sons and two daughters — and his wife. Property of various 



248 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

kinds is first apportioned to the sons, a special bequest being made to the eldest 
of them (11. 7-1 1 ). Other property was similarly to be shared by the daughters, 
the elder of whom was married ; the dowry bestowed on this elder daughter 
is confirmed, and provision made for the future marriage-portion of her sister 
(11. 1 1-6, 24-5). To the wife is given the absolute ownership of some land hypo- 
thecated as security for her dowry. A guardian is appointed for the three 
younger children who were still under age, to act in the case of the sons until 
the}' attained their majority, in that of the daughter until her marriage ; the wife 
of Hermogenes is associated in the guardianship, and a nephew is requested 
to give his assistance when required. 

The chief point of interest in this will, which is not the original document but 
a copy taken after the original was opened (cf. 1. 38 and note), lies in its adherence 
to Latin formulae. According to the express statement of 1. 2 the deed was 
drawn up in Greek ; yet it reproduces in a striking manner the phraseology 
of the will of Gaius Longinus Castor at Berlin (B. G. U. 326 ; cf. Mommsen, 
Sitznngsbcr. d. Pr. Akad. 1894, p, 47, Scialoja, Btdl. dciP Inst, di dir. roin. vii, 
p. 2, &c.), which was translated from the Latin. In the recent monograph of 
Arangio-Ruiz, Lasnccessione testamentaria secondo i papiri grcco-egizii^ where the 
evidence is conveniently collected and fully discussed, it is remarked (pp. 277-9) 
how little difference the promulgation of the constitutio Antonina made to the 
testamentary formulae current in Egypt. Latin phrases and forms appear 
sporadically, but the few previously published Greek wills of the third and follow- 
ing centuries have been cast in the typically Greek shape. In the light of the 
present text this conclusion needs some modification. The preference here 
shown for Latin forms may be traceable in a greater or less degree to the high 
municipal position of the testator ; but the influence of Roman law upon the 
formulae of Egyptian wills was evidently stronger than has hitherto been 
suspected. 

The papyrus is dated on Pauni 7 (June i) of the first year of the emperor 
Tacitus, and is said to have been opened in the following month Epeiph (June 25- 
July 24) of the 'same first year'. Aurelian seems to have been killed before 
March 25, 275, but since Tacitus was not chosen emperor till about September 
and his accession could not have been foreseen, it is evident that the date of the 
papyrus refers to the year 276. Tacitus only reigned six months, his death 
probably occurring early in April ; that the news of it had not yet reached 
Oxyrhynchus by Epeiph is however not very remarkable, for there were con- 
siderable variations in the length of the periods which elapsed before changes 
in the imperial succession became generally known in Egypt : Commodus 
appears in the date of B. G. U. 515 more than five months after his death. Cf. 



907. WILL OF HERMOGENES 249 

912. 40, note, and P. Strassburg 8, 17, where Pauni 14 of the first year of Tacitus 
occurs, and Preisigke's discussion in pp. 30 sqq. 

The ends of the Hnes are missing throughout and the exact extent of the 
loss is not quite certain. Assuming that 1. 6 corresponded verbally to B. G. U. 
326. i. 15, the number of letters to be supplied in 11. 1-16 is about '^^, in the 
remainder 2 or 3 less ; and our restorations are made on this hypothesis. In one 
or two places a slightly longer supplement seems necessary, but not more than 
can be accounted for by a reasonable variation in the length of the lines and the 
size of the writing. 



[Avprj\\io'i 'Ep{ioyivT]S 6 Kol E[v]8aiiJ.coi^ ^ivVV^V^ ^ovXeurrjs [kuI Tr]f)[vTai'i9 

Tfj9 Xaixn]pd9 koI \afj.7rpoTd[TT]S '0^vpvy)(^Lra)u TToXecoy ToSe to ^ovXrj/xa 
' EXXrjviKoh ypap-fxaai kuto, to. avvK^^wprni^va VTrrjyopevarev 
AvprjXioi 'Epp^lvo^ Kol 'flpeicoi^ kol 'IIpaKX€iSi]9 Koi IlToXe/xah kol AiSv/jL[r], 

01 Tre]vT€ TiKva /xov yXvKvrara [e]/f [r^y crvvova-qs p.01 18 letters yvvai- 
K09 AvprjXia^ 'latSoopas rfjs Kal TIpdaKas fxaTpoovas aroXaTas, alpeaei rfj 

v7roT€Tay/xii>T] e(p' 019 €Ka(rT09 rrpocrSl KX-qpovo/xoc [xov 'iaToxrav, ol 

8e XoiTTol 
5 ndi'Tes dnoKXrjpovoixoL fjiov earcaaav , irpoadp^^crOcoadv re r^ KX-qpovojita /xov 

enl T0?9 iKdcTTO) KaTaXLp.\TTavop.evoLS onorav pacrdai 

iavT0V9 epov KXrjpov6pov9 uvai, ovroi re vttwQvvol 'iaroicrav SiSouai Troirjaai 

TrapacryjeaOai ravra Trdvra \oaa kv ravrrj rfj SiaBrjKrj pov yeypapp^va 

^(TTl, 

TovTo re Trj n[iaT]cL avTcov 7TapaKaTaT^0iiC)pai. AvprjXiois 'Eppeiua> Kal 

'iflpeicovi Kal 'HpaKXeiSr] ro?s Tpiai pov [vloT^ w? TrpoKciTai KaraXeiTrco 

Koivoos e^ i- 
aov vnhp Tfj9 KX-qpovopias rfjs kpfjs e^o) ir^pl ro'Iarpov tQ)V Kara to dvoo 

'ladou dpneXiKoi^ -yoipLOv Kal a€n[iKds dpovpas ndaa^ Kal 16 letters 
pv^ Kal \pr](XTrjpLa Kal avvKvpovvTa irdvTa Kal ay e^co trepl H^rpo) a-eiTiKa? 

dpovpas trdcras Kal kv Trj pr]TpoTr[6XH ttjv 28 letters 

10 pov oiKiav Kal ttjv kv avTrj kvSopeveiav irdaav, tS> Se Eppetvco povcp KaT 

k^aipcTov ay 'ix'^ ncpl H€v[ Koivd? Trpb? 

aeiTiKa9 dpovpas Trdaas Kal SovXov pov ovopaTi ^iXoSioa-Kopov. Avp7]Xiai9 

TlToX^paiSi Kal AiSvprj Tacs 'Trp[oyeypappkvais OvyaTpdcri pov 

SiSco- 



250 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

fxi KajaXeiTrco Kal avrdls koivZ^ e^ '[<tov virkp Trjs KXrjpovofJLia^ Tf]9 ^fi-rjs ^)((o 

Koivov TTpbs Toi^ avT[or 24 letters djineXiKov 

yoipiov Kal aeiTiKa^ dpovpas ndcras Kol Tvpo-^peia^ Kal ^prjarTrjpia Kal avv- 

KvpovvTa Tvdvra, rfj Se AiSvprj [fxaurj Kar e^aiperou 20 letters 

dWa Kal Trj IlToXepaiSL ^e^aico Sia tovtov pov tov ^ovXrjparos rjv (j)6dcras 

emSeScoKa avrrj npoLKa t[ 21 letters Kal KaTaXaTToa ttji/ 

15 SovXrjv ovopari Evvoiav, ra Se Xonrd pov SovXa acopara reaaapa Aioctkov- 

piSj]u Kal Xa^dvov Kal 'Epp[. . . Kal T0i9 TrpoKeipeuoi? appeal roh 

rpial Kal Trj pia tcop dijXeicoy, Xeyco Srj Trj AiSvprj. AvprjXia 'laiScopa ttj Kal 

UpeicTKa TTj avvovar] poL \yvvaiKl 29 letters 

Trpenoi'Tcos irepl ttjp avp^icocriu dvaaTpa(f)eta-r] KaraX[ei]7r(o KvpuvTiKUiS as e\(o 

KOLvas irpos TOV [avTov 22 letters mpl . . .- 

fSiu aeiTLKas dpovpas irdaas npovnaXXayeiaas avTrj vtt kpov npos ttjv tt/joct- 

ev€)(^6€i(rdu poL in avTrj r[. . . (pepvqv. krriTpoTTOv Sk -rroico tcop npoKeipi- 
voov d(j)r)XiKcov pov t^kvoov T[pi5i\v 'flpeioovos Kal 'HpaKXeiSov Kal AiSvprjs k'cos 

dp 01 pep dpp[epes Trjs rjXiKias yepoopTai rj Se OrjXeia 
20 dpSpl yaprjOrj Avp-qXiop ArjprjTpiop \tov] AioPvaoBecopos, kiraKoXovBovcrrjS Trdcri 

Tois Trj eTTiTpoTreia Sia(pep[ovaL Trjs npoyeypappeprjs pov yvpaiKos 
'laiScopas Trjs Kal TIpeiaKas, Kal Bid tovto [ov (3o]vXopai. dp^opTa rj dpTap^opTa 

rj €T€p6p Tipa 7rap€PTi6ipaL iavT[op 29 letters e- 

TTiTeXXco yap Kal Trjs tov dpeylnov po[v Ai]8vpov eivai evae^das (Sorjdija-eLP T(S 

ArjprjTpicp ep els edp avTov [SerjTai 26 letters 

AvprjXLco Atopyadppcopi ^iXo) pc[v] KaTaXeiTTCo SoOrjvaL re ^ovXopai KaT €Tos 

e^' OP ^-qcreTai -^popop d[(f) cop e^(o 26 letters 

irepl Moaa aaTiKoop dpov[p]a)P oi'pov pkv dpa Tpvyr\ Kepdpia TpiaKOPTa Kal 

TTvpov peTpcp ScKdTcp tS> Ilav[pL prjpi dpTd(3as 14 letters tjj Al- 

25 8vpr} . (cpa .[.].. . yepopep . vtto tcop dSeXc^cop avTrjs dpyvpiov ToXaPTa 

Teaaapa, ttjp (ppoPTiSa t[ $2 letters 

KXr]pop[o]pia. TO ^ovXr]pa enoLrjaa ep Trj Xapirpa Kal XapirpoTdTrj 'O^vpvy- 

•)(eLT5>p noXei a (trei) tov Kvpiov rjpcop [MdpKov KXavSiov TaKiTov 

TIavpL ^. 
{eTovs) a AvTOKpdTopos Kaiarapos MdpKov KXavSiov TaKiTOV Evae^ovs 

EvTV)(^ovs ^e^aaTov Uavpi ^. Avpr][Xios 'Eppoyeprjs 6 Kal EvSaipcop 

TO ^ovXrjpa ireiroLr]- 
Ka iirl [7rd<T]i to2[s] npoKeipepois. iXvOrj tov avTOv a (Itovs) 'ETrei<p. 



90r. WILL OF HERMOGENES 251 

3. TTToXf/xo*? Pap.: so in 1]. 11, 14. 4. latSapas Pap. : so in 1. 16. 6. virfvOwoi 

Pap. 7. \avpr]\ioii Vap. 12, k O^ koivov COTT. hom tt, i8. TrpovTraXXayeto-of Pap. 

27. Trail j/t Pap. 

' Aurelius Hermogenes also called Eudaemon, exegetes, councillor and prytanis of the 
illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, dictated the following will in the Greek 
language, in accordance with the permission, Aurelius Herminus, Aurelius Horion, 
Aurelius Heraclides, Aurelia Ptolemais and Aurelia Didyme, my five dearest children by 
my . . . wife Aurelia Isidora also called Prisca, a matron wearing the stola, shall be my 
heirs according to the disposition below written, and on the conditions on which each . . ., 
all other persons being disinherited ; they shall proceed to my inheritance in accordance 
with the bequests made to each of them whenever they . . . themselves to be my 
heirs; they shall be responsible for giving, doing, and providing all this which is written in 
this my testament, and I confide this to their honour. To Aurelius Herminus, Aurelius 
Horion, and Aurelius Heraclides my three sons as aforesaid I bequeath jointly in equal 
shares on behalf of my inheritance the vineyard belonging to me near the village of (.-*) 
Istrus by the upper temple of Isis, and all the corn-land and . . . and utensils and all 
appurtenances, and all the corn-land belonging to me at Sepho, and in the metropolis my 
. . . house and all the furniture in it ; and to Herminus alone as his special property all the 
corn-land belonging to me at Sen . . . jointly with . . ., and my slave called Philodioscorus. 
To Aurelia Ptolemais and Aurelia Didyme my aforesaid daughters ... I give and bequeath 
likewise jointly, and in equal shares on behalf of my inheritance, the vineyard belonging to 
me at . . . jointly with the said . . . with all the corn-land and the plant, utensils, and all 
appurtenances. To Didyme alone as her special property 1 bequeath . . . and I also confirm 
to Ptolemais by this my will the dowry . . . which I previously gave her, and I leave to her my 
slave named Eunoea ; my remaining four slaves, Dioscurides and Sabinus and Herm . . . 
and . . ., I bequeath to the three sons and one of the daughters, to wit Didyme. To Aurelia 
Isidora also called Prisca, my wedded wife . . . who has conducted herself becomingly in 
our married life, I leave as her own property all the corn-land belonging to me at . . . bis 
jointly with the said . . ., which was previously mortgaged by me to her in security 
for the dowry brought to me with her ... I appoint as guardian of my three children 
aforesaid who are under age, Horion, Heraclides, and Didyme, until the boys attain 
majority and the girl is married, Aurelius Demetrius son of Dionysotheon, with the con- 
currence, in all that pertains to the guardianship, of my aforesaid wife Isidora also called 
Prisca ; and accordingly I do not wish any magistrate or deputy or any other person to 
intrude himself . . ., for I further enjoin it upon the piety of my nephew Didymus to assist 
Demetrius in any way that may be required of him. To my friend Aurelius Dionysammon 
I bequeath and I wish that there be given him during his lifetime from . . . and the corn- 
land belonging to me at Moa thirty jars of wine at the vintage and . . . artabae of wheat 
by the tenth measure in the month of Pauni. (I direct that there be provided as dowry) for 
Didyme ... by her brothers four talents of silver . . . This will was made by me in the 
illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus in the first year of our lord Marcus 
Claudius Tacitus, Pauni 7. The first year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Claudius Tacitus 
Pius Felix Augustus, Pauni 7. I, Aurelius Hermogenes also called Eudaemon, have made 
this will with all the above provisions. Opened in the same first year, Epeiph.' 

1. ^ov\r]fia: cf. 11. 14 and 26 below, and P. Leipzig 29. 7 'yXKtjvikov ^ov\Tip.aTos. 

2. Cf. 990 and P. Rainer 1702. 13 {Wi'en. Shid. ix. p. 241) ypafxyia(Tiv\ 'EWrjviKo'is «ko- 
\6v6a)s rj) deia [Siard^fi. According to the older Roman law the use of the Latin language 
was essential in all legal transactions. The emperor who established the right to use Greek 



252 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

is thought to have been Alexander Severus, to whose reign the Rainer papyrus belongs ; 
whether the permission applied to other countries besides Egypt is disputed ; of. Arangio- 
Ruiz, op. a't., p. 266 sqq. 

3. (Tvvovarjs fj-oi is restored from 1. 16, and was probably followed by some epithet. 
d8f\(j>ijs Kai would not fill the space. 

4. fiarpoovas (TToKnTa^ : cf. B. G. U. 86o. I, P. Flor. i6. I. The s/ola was the mark of 
rank and dignity, alpeafi = volunlati, a common term in connexion with wills. Trpoo-S [is 
a verb apparently meaning ' shares ' or ' is endowed '. 

For the supplement KKr]pov6poi fiov eorwa-ai/ cf. B. G. U. 326. i. 6, where, as Schubart 
informs us, the fifth letter is almost certainly i, and therefore something like \Ka\ avrai eaToaav 
KXrjpoyofioi is probably to be restored. The construction of the rest of that line remains 
imcertain ; p^povs], however, is not necessary (cf. e. g. 11. 7 and 1 2 of our papyrus) and 
possibly popai by pov K\r]pni[6po'i may be read (cf. P. Leipzig 29. 5 KXrjpovopop ae p[6y^t]]v 
Kara navTas rovs i[o^ovs KadiaTTjpi), though the repetition of KXrjpovopoi is awkward. Or 
perhaps Vo/xot is part of some phrase with oi^ vopoi, for which cf the passage of the Leipzig 
papyrus just quoted, and P. Brit. Mus. L 77. 13-4 (Will of Abraham^) w? vn6 tS>v , . . 

vopwv tiriyopevpfva. 

4-5. 01 8e XoiTTol] . . . {(TTcoaav : cf B. G. U. 326. i. 7, and the will published by de Ricci 
in Wessely's S/ud. z. Paldographie I, p. 6, 1. 24 ; the phrase corresponds to the Latin formula 
ceteri onmes exhei'edes sunto (Gaius 2. 128). The papyrus proves that ^ov, not /xot which 
Arangio-Ruiz wishes to read before taruxiav {pp. ciL, pp 223, 276), is correct. 

5. B. G. U. 326. i. 7-8 is on this analogy to be read 7rpoo-e[pj;^eo-[^o)(7dj' re t^ K'\ripovopla'\ pov, 
which is now confirmed by Schubart. in\ . . . KaTaXip[7Tavopevois is there replaced by Uda-Tr) 
vntp Tov Ih'iov ptpovs, after which 1. SnoTav (Schubart) for dno r[&)]i'. We accordingly read 
ondrav in the corresponding position, the infinitive . . . paadai, which is also adopted from 
the Berlin papyrus, perhaps depending on an intervening verb, e. g. cpaivrjTai. The p of paadai, 
Schubart tells us, can be any letter having a long tail, i. e. t, (p, or \/r, and it is preceded at an 
interval of three letters by a similar long stroke. dnoypdxl/aaOai. therefore does not seem 
suitable. Dareste proposed perd t6 opdadai, and Gradenwitz suggests a connexion with 
cernere, but this is hardly convincing. 

6-7. Cf. B. G. U. 326. i. 14-5, where Taira (so Schubart) not aird is no doubt to be 
read after napaa-xeaBai, as here. Schubart would write in the Berlin text ndvra \Td] eV . . . 

yeypappfva. f'ir], rfj re Tviarti l^rajurijy (not [ajir^f) TrapaxaTaTidopai, but this absolute USe of e»; 

does not greatly commend itself, and the mood might be due to a sin/ in the original Latin. 
It therefore seems more satisfactory to have either oaa . . . ytypappeva ia-ri or to . . . yeypap- 
fiiva in the lacuna here. The corresponding Latin formulae are daz/i/ias esto dare 
facere praesiare . . . fideique ems commitlo; cf the will of Dasumius C. L L. 1352. 116 and 
125, the will of Hadoindus in Brissonius, de FormuUs vii, iia tit tibiciimqiie aliquid per hoc 
lestamenhim vuiim dedero legavero dareque iussero id lit dehir fiat praestetur fidei tiiae heres ??iea 
conwiitto, &c. 

7. Or perhaps [r/Kroty nppeo-t hihwpi KaraXelnu) : cf 11. 1 1-2. pov is by no means certain. 

8. 7T(p\ TO . . . 'la-e'iov '. it is not quite clear how these words should be constructed or 
even how some of them should be divided. Perhaps To"\(yTpov, sc. inoUiov, tu>v Kara t6 ava 
'lo-., sc. olKOTTf'Bcov, is the best interpretation ; but the first t6 may refer to 'lo-aov and "larpov . . . 
nro) be descriptive of that name ; cf. combinations like 'laduv iiayyd (899. 7), 'la-uov 
Tpvcpavoi (719. 14). 

9. vvs, which is clearly written, is puzzling. Some expression corresponding to 

* We are surprised to see that Arangio-Ruiz, op. a/., p. 295, repeats the error of writing (<pa) in 1. 51 
of that papyrus. Evidently (<p' w should be read there as well as in 11. 28 and 60. 



907. WILL OF HERMOGENES 253 

npoxpdas in 1. 1 3 is expected. The lacuna at the end of the line was presumably occupied 
with a description of the oiKia. 

10. The names of several Oxyrhynchite villages beginning with ^(v are known, 

'S,eveKe\(v, 2et/e7rro, ^evoKaXtvo), 2evoK0)fxis, 2evTa>. The following Koivas npos is indicated by 1. 12 

where t6v avT[6v, if correct, implies a previous mention of a person with whom Hermogenes 
held property in common, and the end of 1. 10 seems the most suitable place for the name to 
be given; cf. also 1. 17. 

1 1-2. 6iSco]/:tt KaTaXeina = do UgO, aS C. g. in C. I. L. I352. 12^ ; cf. B, G. U. 326. i, 18 
\ri K^ai 8i8o}fjii KaTaXiTTci), and ii. 17. The name to which top avT[6v refers probably occurred at 
the end of 1. 10; cf. the previous note. 

14. Perhaps e[r apyvpiov ToXavTOis . . .: cf. 1. 25. 

16. The line may be completed e.g. evvoova-jj poi (so 494. 9) koI Kara navra. 

17. Perhaps Trepl KopSopiv (45. 9) or ew(r]/3ti' (614, &c.). 

18. It was the usual practice in marriage contracts to give the wife a general claim 
against the husband's property for the repayment of her dowry, but in the present case the 
security seems to have been limited to a portion of the husband's estate which was formally 

mortgaged for this purpose. For eV avrfj cf. e. g. 266. 9 Trpoa-rjvtyKaro avTa f'(p' eavT^ iv 

(pfpvj]. r[nv ydpov might be Supplied before <pfpvf)v, but three or four letters would 
be enough. 

19. For Tj'kiKias yfvfirdai cf. e.g. 496. 12, 651; the age of 14 years is probably here 
meant, at which time a boy passed from the care of a hilor (J-rriTpoTros) to that of a curator 
{({)povTiaTTis). According to the provisions of some Oxyrhynchus wills (cf. 491. 9, 495. 10) 
fTrirponoL are appointed to act for minors up to the age of 20 or 25 years, but these cases 
are anterior to the constitidio Atitofthta, and considering the strong tendency of Hermogenes 
to use Roman formulae, it is safer to take eTriTponos here in its technical Roman sense. A /u/or 
but not a curator could be appointed by a Roman will. For the phrase emrpoTrov noitiv cf, 
B. G. U. 326. ii, 17 erroirjaa enlTponov rfj I8ia ttIvti. The analogy of the present passage, 
in which the tutor is assigned to the daughter as well as the sons, makes it clear that in that 
much discussed clause also (cf. Arangio-Ruiz, op. ci't. pp. 232 sqq.) iniTpoTTos means tutor. 

20. inaKoKov6ov<rr]s : cf. 909, 4 d(pr]\iK<ov p-rjTtjp koi inaKoKovdrjTpia, and note, 

21. (ipxovTa rj dvrdpxovTa : cf, C, g. C, I. G. 2222. 17 d[p])(dvT(ov fj avTap^ovrav. duri- 

corresponds to the Latin pro-. But the intervention of a magistrate would according to 
Roman law be necessary when the sons required a curator; cf. 888. introd, 

23. ^tX« fiov is very doubtful ; the name of Dionysammon's (?) father may be 
given instead. 

25. Possibly eV &pa ydpov yevopivj], with hoBrjvai jSovXopai before Trj Aibvprj, but the 

reading would not be very satisfactory, and yevoiKv., if rightly deciphered, may also be 
constructed with vn6. 

26. We suppose that there is a small dash after K\r]poi{o]nla, followed by a short blank 
space ; but the papyrus is damaged in this part, and a letter or two may have intervened 
before the supposed to. There is not room for Evae^ovs k.t.X. at the end of this line. 
Perhaps TokItov alone stood here, with the Roman month or a reference to the consuls ; cf. 
B, G.U. 326. ii. 1 1-2. 

28. eXidr] K.T.X. : this entry, which is in the same hand and was evidently written at 
the same time as the rest of the text, indicates that the whole document is a copy made 

after the Xva-is had taken place. Cf. B.G. U. 326, ii. 21 kuI dveyvuxrdria-av tj) avTJj fjfiepq iv ^ 

Ka\ f) diadrjKT] fXvOrj, and for Xvfiv in this connexion also 715. 19, B. G.U. 592. ii. 7, &c. 



254 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

908. Contract between Eutheniarchs. 

30>6 x8-5 cm. a. d. 199. 

An agreement between Sarapion, who was either himself a eutheniarch 
at Oxyrhynchus or, more probably, the grandson of a person holding that office 
(cf. note on 1. 5), and five other eutheniarchs concerning the grinding of wheat for 
bread to be supplied to the city. The precise terms of the agreement are much 
obscured by the mutilation of the papyrus ; the five eutheniarchs were however 
each to bear the expense of one factory, and Sarapion and his grandfather were 
apparently together made responsible for a sixth, the average daily output of 
each mill being fixed at 20 artabae. But the details are comparatively unimpor- 
tant, and the value of the document lies mainly in the fresh information supplied 
regarding the office of gymnasiarch and eutheniarch. The eutheniarchs, who 
first appear towards the end of the second century, superintended the food 
supply of the capital towns ; but they are not very often mentioned and their 
official rank is not yet clear (cf. P. Tebt. 397. 14-5, note). They are sometimes 
found holding another office simultaneously, e. g. that of exegetes ; in the present 
case five eutheniarchs were gymnasiarchs. We here learn further that at 
Oxyrhynchus they formed a board of at least six ; and 11. i8-ai indicate that 
these six held office for a period of a single month. Hence it would appear 
that the number for the year was twelve, and that they exercised their functions 
in alternate months in two sections of six. With regard to the number of the 
gymnasiarchs, of whom five are mentioned in 11. 6-15, this is the largest figure 
yet attested for Oxyrhynchus ; but C. P. Herm. 57 (to which Wilcken called our 
attention) indicates the coexistence of at least ten gymnasiarchs at Hermopolis, 
and there may well have been ten or twelve or even more at Oxyrhynchus. At 
Athens at this period there were monthly as well as yearly gymnasiarchs, 
and the monthly office was sometimes held by more than one person (Boeckh, 
Staatshaushalliing, I. 548). 

HapanLcou 6 kol 'flpHw[v . . . 
(ovos Slo, tov Kara 7raT[^pa ndir- 
TTov 'AiTLOdvos yvfxva[a]iap)(^r]- 
aavTo^ rrj^ '0^vpvy)(€LTcou 
5 noXect)^ vvvel ev6r]i/idp)(r]S 
TTJs avTTJs TToXeco? TifSepLO) 
KXavSicp AiSvfia) kol oxt y^prip.a' 



908. CONTRACT BETWEEN EUTHENIARCHS 255 

Ti^^L Tcou dnb Tov Alovvcthov 
Kal TTJ^ iV/jay auvoSov lepovei- 
10 Kcov areAcoi/ Kal ©i(ovL tco 

L 

[Kal 'Ap]Tifxd)(^a) Kal Aiovva-LCi) Tot Kal 

[. . . . K]al 'A\iXXeL tco Kal 'IcrLScopco 

[€^r]]yr]Tev(TauTi Kal 'flpdoovt 

[tco K]al Bepei/iiKiapm ^^rjyi-j- 
15 [T^v^cravTL Toh e yvjxvacndp- 

[X<^^y] /f«i ivdrjVLap-y^aLS ttjs avTtj? 

[ 0^v]pvy)(^€iT6ou TToXecoy )([aip]eii'. 

[av]j/e6i/j.r]u npos v/xds vvv 

[(]v6r]Uiap)(^ovi'Ti d7T[b X] tov 6v- 
20 [royl fxrjubs Havui eooy k6 tov 

miv^ l^'H^b^ 'Endcp tov euecTToo- 

[tos] ^ {eTOVs) wcTTe vcp' iKaaTov vfxcoi' 

dpTOKOirelov tv dirapTicrOrivaL 

[. .] . 7;cri€ . . Tpecp6vTCov vjjlcJov to, 
25 [K'lT'qvri X^P^co re Kal KpiOfj km tco 

[d^X-qOiiv T[d KT]r]UT] rjfieprjcTLcos Kad' e- 

KacTTOV kp[y'\acTTrjpLov p-^XP'- "^^rI^v 

dpTa^cop e[i]/co(ri .[.].. (xcrap [. vo- 

[pr]y]ovvTOS to, kv iKacTTco kpyacrTr]pL[co 
30 K[T^rjvr) KaTa to a[.] .[..].. XcoKape 

[.] .[...]. vpcov . . o-ayfj.aayov[. .] . [.] . n[a- 

[p]iX€ii' iu ^pya?Tri[p]i[v] top . . [ 

[.]i'e/o^( ) kfxov 7J'ocp[i]xoy[T]g^ jpocpd? . . . 

[d]Xr]6ouTa9 Trpo? to ... . [kpy]acrTrjpiou Td[s 
35 taa9- rjpeprjcricos y[ dpTa^as 

eLKOcri, ovK k^ovTO^ [ov8evT\ rjpcoy [7r]a[pa- 

[^a]ii/€Lv TO, Trpoyeypapp\kva. K]ypi[a'\ T(iv[T'\(t 

TO, ypdjxpaTa i^acrcra. ypa<pip[Ta] trpb? [Tb kJKcx- 

T€pou Tjpcou e'xeii' [lovaxov- {^tovs) C 
40 AvTOKpaTopcov KaLcrdpcov Aovkiov 

SeTTTipiov ^eovrjpov Evae^ovs TlepTivayKos 

Apa/3iKov 'A8ia^[r]]i'iKov IlapdiKOv MeyiaTOv 



256 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Kal MdpKOu AvprjXLov 'Avtccvlvov X^^aaroav 
IlavvL KT], (2nd hand) Hapanicou (6) kul ^ fLpiL[av 
45 8l efxov 'Anicouos 7r[d\inrov 
evSoKa> TToiaLv Toh npoKei- 
fj.ei/oL9. 

5. 1. fvOrjviapxov {jY 9. 'Upas . . . iepoveiKav Pap. 12. icridcopa Pap. 18. v/xas 

Pap. 19. 1. [fYidrjviapxovvTas. 20. Traijvi Pap. 22. ij(p . , . vp.u>v Pap. 35. 'itras Pap. (?) 

' Sarapion also called Horion, son of . . . on, through his paternal grandfather Apion, 
ex-gymnasiarch of Oxyrhynchus, at present eutheniarch of the said city, to Tiberius Claudius 
Didymus and however he is styled, a victor in the games and exempt from taxation, member 
of the Dionyseum and the sacred club, and to Theon also called Antimachus and Dionysius 
also called . . . and Achilles also called Isidorus, ex-exegetes, and Horion also called 
Berenicianus, ex-exegetes, all five gymnasiarchs and eutheniarchs of the said city of 
Oxyrhynchus, greeting. I have made a compact with you being now eutheniarchs from 
the (30th.?) of the present month Pauni till the 29th of the following month Epeiph in the 
current 7th year, that one bakery be fitted out by each of you . . . the animals being fed by 
you with grass and barley, on the understanding that they grind daily in each factory as 
much as 20 artabae of wheat . . . supplying the animals in each factory ... to provide one 
factory, the fodder being provided by me, and we shall grind at (this) factory an equal 
amount daily, namely 20 artabae; and it shall be unlawful for any of us to transgress the 
aforesaid conditions. This contract, done in six copies in order that each of us may have 
one, is valid.' Date and signature of Sarapion. 

I. Probably 'Qpeijwi/oy or 'ATrtJcofoy. 

5. It is not clear whether (vdrjvidpxns refers to Sarapion or to Apion ; in the former case 
the order is irregular, in the latter evdrjviapxov should have been written. On the whole we 
prefer the second alternative, though why Sarapion appears in the business at all then 
becomes obscure, and his action must be supposed to depend upon a private arrangement 
between himself and his grandfather. 

8-10. This Aiovvaelov is more probably an Oxyrhynchite than an Alexandrian temple; 
cf. B. G. U. 1073, a notification from the boule of Oxyrhynchus to the record-oflfice of the 
election of a person to the avWoyos of a If pa a-vvotos, which entitled him to ar/Aeia, and 1074, 
the statement of this individual's claim, which in 1. i cites a rescript of Claudius Gothicus 
(cf. Wilcken, Archiv, IV. p. 564 and Viereck, Klio, VIII. p. 413) addressed ToTy dn-o rr\s 

oLKOvfifVTjs irepi top Aiovvaov UpoviKais crrecjiapelTais, A Tonoi KoKovpfvos Aiovvaov Ttx^i-TSiv at 

Oxyrhynchus is mentioned in 171 (Part II, p. 208), and the impost in 917. 3 apparently 
called a7r{ov8)]) Ator(uo-ov) may in some way have benefited the Aiowa-elov. 

19. d-rro iX] : cf. 1. 44, which shows that this contract was written on Pauni 28. 30 days 
w'ould be a natural period. 

24. [ex] Tijs 'icrr)s is not Satisfactory, for though the doubtful e may be o-, the vestiges of 
the next letter do not seem to suit r] ; a stroke below the line suggests rather ^ or p. With 
'ia-rji moreover a diaeresis would be expected over the t. [f]pe]pT]a-io>s cannot be read. 

28. Not tpov ^apaniavns, 

30. There may be a letter at the end of the line after e, e. g. v, but a first person 
plural does not accord at all well with Kara to. The traces do not suit ^edr^XaKafxeu, and 
dvTj'KwKapfP is unsatisfactory, n might be read in place of to. 



908. CONTRACT BETWEEN EUTHENIARCHS 257 

3 1 . Perhaps naa-av. The doubtful /x may be X or 8 ; cifBpas would be possible. . . . 
fjfias Tov[s would assist [a\\T]6ovTas in 1. 34, but the r especially is difficult. 

32. Perhaps t6u 'ATr[icova. 

33. ep is followed by the curved mark commonly used in abbreviations to represent n. 
nafj[f']x.ot{T]os is very doubtful. 

38. f^aa-aoi is unknown to the lexica but is parallel to Terpaa-aos, P. Amh. 107. 16, 
B. G. U. 817. 17. The word is also to be recognized in P. Strassb. 29. 46 where, as the 

facsimile shows, iiaaaq ypacjilaa should be read for i^as avi>ypa(p'i(ra. 



909. Sale of Acacia-Trees. 

27-5 X 10-8 cm. A.D. 225. 

A contract for the sale of fourteen acacia-trees on the edge of a vineyard 
for 1200 drachmae, the purchase-money being devoted to the payment of 
arrears of taxes upon the vineyard. 

Avpi]\tos TItoWloiv TItoWlcouo? an 'O^vpvy^coi/ 

TToAecoy kntrpoTTO^ dip-qXiKcou t^kvoov 

'AttoXXcoi'iov tov koi AiSv/xov 'Oi^rjadro^ 

Koi 77 Ta>v d(pr]XtK(op fJ-rJTtjp koI knaKoXov- 
5 OrjTpia AvprjXia EvSaifiovh 'Avtlvoov 

TOV Kal 'Epfiov Aurii/oh \a)ph Kvpiov XPV~ 

/xari^ovaa Kara 'P(o/j.atcou eOr] rkKvcov 

SiKaLco Avpr]XL0L9 X^privfp vlSt AvprjXiou 

Afj.fj.coviou €^rjyr}T^vaat/T09 Trjs 'O^vpvy- 
10 )(^€LTciou TToAecoy Kal X^prjvco X^privov 

Kal Qeoovdri )(pr]fjLaTi^oi^Ti pr]Tpo9 

Taap/iLvcTLO? Kal XcoTrjpL^co AiSv/iov a7r[6 

rfjs avTi]9 TToXecoy \oi.ipeLv. ofioXoyov/xey 

ireTTpaKevaL vfi^iv Tols TecrcrapcrL k^ caov 
15 rd^ ovcras errl )(ci)/iaro? djx7r€X[i]Kov 

KTrjp.aTOi l/€0(f)VTOV Tciov d^rjXlKCOl' 

TTipl Ka>/xr)v Heuerrra aKavdas dpiBfico 
T€X€ia9 S^Kariacrapas Teifxfjs rfj? av/x- 
TrecfxournjLii/Tjs npo^ dXX-qXovs dpyu- 
20 pcov 8pay^p.a)v ^eiA[i]<wi' diaKoaictiv, at rrpcc- 
€yoi)pr](Tav el? a-vvcovrji/ Trvpov xcoprj- 

S 



258 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

ala^vTOS vrrep /xerprj/xccTooy r^y 7rpo/c[ei- 
/jiiur)? dfLireXov y^povcov deov Ko/j.6So[v 
knl tS> vjjids ttju rS>v TrpoK€ipL^vci>v oLKav- 

25 6Siv dua^oXrjv e^ [e]7ripi^aiv Kal dpaiv 
TOLS vficov SanduaL? iroLriaaaOaL onorav 
alpfjaOai, kirdvayKov 8\ f^^XP'- "^^^ Meaopi] 
Tov ei^ecTTCoTO^ S (eVoi^y), Kal /j.erd ttjv tS)v aKavOcoy 
duafSoXrjv Kal dpaiv tov [/cjocr/zot' roov t6- 

30 TTWv TO i<TOV TTOLTjaaaOai rj/id^ re KaToc to rj- 
fJ-i[(T]v Kal vjids Tovs TreTTpaKOTai KaTo. to eVe/)o[j/ 
fjiiiav KaOcbs enl tovtols ecrTaOy], Kal eirrjpco- 
TTjOevT^S aipoXoyrja-ajxev. Kvpia 77 npdcn? 
Siaai] ypacpeicra. (eTov^) S AvTOKpaTopos Kai(Tap[o9 

35 MdpKOV AvprjXtov Xiovrjpov 'AXei[dv8pov Eucr(^o]v^ 
EvTV^ov? ^€(3aaTov Tv^i le. 
2nd hand Avp-qXio? riToXXi[a>i> UtoXXlcovos peT kna- 
KoXovBr)T pias T^[S' prjTpos 



*J. TeKvccT" Pap. 8. via Pap. 9, (v of (^rjyrjTfvcravTos COrr. fl"Om rj. 1 4. "icrov 

Pap. 2 1-2. o of x«p'?o["]«'Tos' corn from a and s added above the line. 27. 1. alp^aOe. 

28. Tcov added above the line. 30. iaov Pap. 32. 1. enepccTrjdivTes. 

' Aurelius Ptollion son of Ptollion, of Oxyrhynchus, /u/or of the children of Apollonius 
also called Didymus, son of Onesas, who are minors, and the mother of the minors, who 
gives her concurrence, Aurelia Eudaemonis daughter of Antinous also called Hermes, of 
Antinoopolis, acting without a guardian in accordance with Roman custom by the right of her 
children, to the Aurelii Serenus son of Aurelius Ammonius, formerly exegetes of Oxyrhynchus, 
and Serenus son of Serenus, and Theonas styled as having Taarmiusis as his mother, and 
Soterichus son of Didymus, of the said city, greeting. We acknowledge that we have 
sold to you four in equal shares the fourteen acacia-trees in good condition growing upon 
the embankment of the newly-planted vineyard belonging to the minors, at the price agreed 
upon between us of 1200 drachmae of silver, which sum was devoted to the purchase of 
wheat paid for the dues upon the aforesaid vineyard in the reign of the deified Commodus, 
on condition that you shall perform the complete uprooting and removal of the aforesaid 
acacia-trees at your own expense whenever you choose, but of necessity not later than 
Mesorc of the present 4th year, and after the pulling up and removal of the acacia-trces the 
place shall be set in order in equal shares, half by us and the other half by you the buyers, 
as hereby agreed, and in answer to the formal question we have given our consent. This 
sale, of which there are two copies, is valid. The 4th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus 
Aurelius Severus Alexander Pius Felix Augustus, Tubi 15.' Signature of Aurelius 
Ptollion. 



909. SALE OF ACACIA-TREES 259 

4. Cf. P. Leipzig 9. 6, where three d(f)T]\iKes send an cmoypa^ri through their mother as 
eTraKoXovdr'jTpia, and 907. 20, where the concurrence {inaKoXovdelv) of the mother in the acts 
of the guardian of minors is provided for by wilh 

15. For ciKavdai in vineyards cf. P. Brit. Mus. 214. 13-5 (II. p. 162). The wood was 
used for boat-building (Hdt. ii. 96), and for various kinds of machinery (P. Brit. Mus. 1177. 
177-220 = III. pp. 186-7), ^"d gum arabic was obtained from it (Hdt. ii. 96). 

20. The clause at rrpoa-fx^^pw"^ (f.T.X. takes the place of the usual acknowledgement of 
the purchase-price by the seller. Apparently the money in question had been paid direct to 
the sellers of the corn. 

25. dva^oXfjv: this word is generally used for 'banking up', and the trees were eVi 
xiifiaros (1. 1 5) ; but the context shows that it must here be employed in the unusual sense 
of digging up or uprooting, e'^ [ejn-t/n'^wi' is very uncertain ; co[. can be read for e^, but <»[? 
yields no sense, a[s ej/rl prjTcov being inadmissible. We suppose the sense of fnlppiCos, which 
apparently does not occur, to be similar to that of fntppiCiov which is read by editors in 
Diosc. I. 10 piCa 8e . . . n'kdyia 5e ra inippi^ia extt, i.e. the smaller roots subsidiary to the 
main ones ; for the form cf. vnoppiCos. 



910. Lease of Land. 

31-5 X 9 cm. A. D. 197. 

A lease of 5 arourae of land at Pakerke for four years, following the usual 
formula. In the first and third years of the lease the land was to be sown with 
wheat at a rent of 6 artabae per aroura, in the second and fourth years with 
green-stuffs at a rent of 3a drachmae per aroura ; cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 377. Seven 
artabae of seed-corn were lent by the landlord for the first year's crop. Caracalla 
is called in the date formula emperor-designate on Nov. 4, 197, as in inscriptions 
and coins of that year ; his tribiinicia potestas began in the following January, and 
already by May, 198, he was placed on an equality with his father (C. I. L. viii. 
2465) ; cf. 976, which was written 2a days later than 910, Caracalla being still 
emperor-designate, and 916, where he appears as full emperor in Pauni (May 26- 
June 24 A.D. 198). 

'^^ \iicf\Q(i)<Tiv ^lepa\<.\p^v 'l€paKi(OP09 oltt 'O- 
\^vpvy^(£)V tt6X(C09 dyopavofxijaa^ ttjs atWrj^ 
[TToXeoo]? TeooTL SapandfXfjLcoi'O^ /XTjrpos 
[ jctTO? KaTay^Lvoiiivoa kv Kcoprj Tla- 

5 [KipKTj] CCTrrfXlCOTOV TOTTap^iaS (:h '^TT] 

[Te(r(ra]pa cctto tov IviarSoTOS T (^irovs) ray 
[vTTap-^6\v<Tas avrS) nepl ttju IlaKepKT] dpov- 
[pa9 Trefjre, ware r<o jxkv ivecrTcoTi t (eVet) 
[kqI r) (€T6i)] aireipai irvpZ €K(popiov /car eroy 

S 3 



26o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

lo [KaT a\povpav dva irvpov dprdfias ($, tco Sk 

[poLS (f)6]pov dxravTCO^ Kar eVo? kut dpov- 
[pav dva] Spaxjias TpiaKovra Svo. o/xo- 
[Xoyei Se] 6 nefiLadcojievo? avToOt 
15 [eo-x^fet^ai] Kal Trapane/xerpfjcrOai napa 
[tov ycoluxov kv it p[6\)(^pda eh a-nepixa 
[vnep Tt]]? yr)S fiovov tov iueaTcoTO? erovs 
[rrvpov dpyd^as imd, &y ray iVay eird- 
\yayK6\v dTroScocrei avrZ d/xa tols r^y 
20 [y^y €K](j)opLOi9 T(p Uavvi fj.r]vl tov avTOv 
[ei/eoTJcoroy hov[s] fxiTpa> J napeiX-qcfieu 
[dKiy8]wa irdvTa [7r]ai/roy Kiv8vvov, 
\t5)v\ Trj9 y^y Srj[fjL\oaLa)i' ovtcov irpos 
\tov yeo^pyov^ ov \K]al KvpieveLv tcou 
25 [KapTr]cov ecoy to. KaT eVoy 6(peLX6fj.e- 

[va Ko]pi(Tr]Tai. eav Si Tis dnb tov laiov- 
[roy ejrouy, pr^ e[L]r], d^poxo? yivrjTaL 
[7ra/)a]5ex^J70"era[i] tS> p€piaOa)fiei/a>, 
[09 ftYPaLovp.kvrj[<i\ Trjs /iicr^cwcreooy 
30 [d7ro]86T(o TO, €K[^]6pLa Kal tovs <p6povs 
[/cajr eroy pLr^vl [Il]avvi., tov Se irvpov 
[e]0' d'Xo) TTyy IlaKepKT] veov KaOapbv 
dSoXov aKpeiOov K(KoaKcvev/x€vov 
peTpco TiTpayoLveiKco TrapaXrjp- 

35 TTTIK^ TOV yeOVyOV, T^9 fl€Tpj](r€C09 

y[e]tvofJiivrj9 VTr[o tcov] Trap' avTOV, Kal 77 Trpd- 
^[i]y €[cr]rcB e/c re avTov Kal €K tcov vnap- 
^ovTcov avTco TTavToav, e7r[t] tS tov 
avTov pe/iLO-Ocopivov 7rapaSa>vai Tr)v 
40 y[vv] T(o kayaToc) kviavTco TeOpvoKo- 

irripkvqv Kal Ka[6]apav dirb Opvov Kal Set- 
(rT]9 Trdar]S. Kvpia 17 piadooai^. (eroyy) 9 
AvTOKpaTopo^ Kataapo? AovKiov XenTLpiov 
Xeov-fipov EvaejSov? IlepTivaKOS Xe^aaTOv 



910. LEASE OF LAND 261 

45 'Apa^iKov 'ASia^r]PiKOV Kal MdpKOV Avpr]Xiov 

AvTcoveivov Kaicrapos ccTroSeSeLyfievov 

AvTOKparopos AOvp 77. (:ind hand) Tecoy ^apa- 

Trdfificoi'os p.€fjLia6cofiai, kirl 

TO, Tiaaapa errj ttji/ yrjv €K(f)opC- 
50 ov Kal (fiopov /f[a]r' dpovpav Kar eros 

rfjs /x€u kv 7r[i/]yoS SiCTias dva nv- 

pov dprd^a^ €^, [T]fjs Se kv y^Xco- 

poFy dva Spay^jxd^ rpidKovTa 

Svo, Kal ia-yov Ta9 t5>v aTrep/xdrcov 
55 TTvpov dprd^as [i7r]Td Kal dTToSdxrco 

irdvTa a)[? 7r]/o[o;feira]i. IlToXcfiaios Alo- 

vvatov 'iypa-^a \pTT\p\ avTov jjlt] e/(5[6- 

roy ypdfxfxara. 

I. 'i(paK[i]a>v 'Up. Pap. 14. o before fiffiiad. over an erasure. 18. la-as Pap. 

26. 'ia-iou^TOS Pap. 37- vnapxovTav Pap. 

' Hieracion son of Hieracion, of Oxyrhynchus, ex-agoranomus of the said city, has 
leased to Teos son of Sarapammon, his mother being ... as, inhabiting the village of 
Pakerke in the eastern toparchy, for four years dating from the present 6th year, the 5 
arourae which he owns at Pakerke, on condition that in the present 6th year and in the 
8th year Teos shall sow them with wheat at the annual rent of 6 artabae of wheat per 
aroura, and in the following 7th and 9th years he shall cultivate them with green-stuffs 
at the annual rent likewise of 32 drachmae per aroura. The lessee acknowledges that he 
has on the spot received and had measured to him from the landlord as a loan for seed on 
account of the land, for the present year only, 7 artabae of wheat, of which he shall be 
compelled to repay an equal amount to the lessor together with the rent in kind in the 
month Pauni of the said present year, by the same measure as that by which he received it, 
guaranteed completely against all risks, the taxes upon the land being payable by the 
landlord, who shall further retain the ownership of the produce until he recovers his annual 
dues. If after the coming year (which heaven forbid !) any part be unirrigated, an allowance 
shall be made to the lessee, who when the lease is guaranteed shall pay the rent in kind 
and money annually in the month of Pauni, the wheat at the threshing-floor of Pakerke, 
new, pure, unadulterated, unmixed with barley, and sifted, according to the 4-choenix 
receiving measure of the landlord, the measuring being done by his agents ; and he shall 
have the right of execution upon both the lessee and all his property, and the said lessee 
shall deliver the land in the last year with all the rushes cut, and free from rushes and dirt 
of all kinds. This lease is valid.' Date and signature of the lessee. 

30. ra iiS^(^YP'-^ '^"'* '■"^^ (f)6povi: for the distinction cf. P. Tebt. 377. 23-7, note. 



262 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

911. Lease of a House. 

ii-iX7-2cm. A. D. 233 or 265. 

This contract for the lease of part of a house at Oxyrhynchus follows so far 
as it goes the ordinary formula (cf. e. g. 502) ; the chief point of interest in it is 
the mention of a special appointment of a viroypacfievs or subscriber to act on 
behalf of the lessee, whose sight was affected ; cf. note on 11. 6 sqq. The papyrus 
was written in the third century in the 13th year of an emperor who must 
be Severus Alexander or Gallienus. 

'EfXLa6a)(rev AvprjXLOS ArjfxrjTpios 
6 Kol [Z](BiXo? dp-^i(paTev(ra9 ^ivVV' 
T^y ^[o]u\€VTrjS TTJs '0^vpvyy^Hr(i>v no- 
Aecoy AvprjXio) ©eoyivi Qeoyii^ovs 
5 Tov ©eoyepou9 cctto tt^S" avTfjS 7r6Xea)[s 
dadevi Tccs oyjn^ per vwoypacpicos 
TOV (TVvyu)pr]6ivT0S avTCo eK t[coi> 
VTTopvrjpdT(i>v rrjs crTpaTrjyLas 
AvpTj[Xio]u AiouvlaYov tov Kal App(i>vLo[v 

10 CTTi y^p[6\vOV 'iTT] SvO eTL aTTO a 0cbd 

TOV kvearodTos ly (eroi;y) dnb rcor vnap- 
yJ)VT(i>v avT(o kv Trj avTjj '0^vpvy)^(o[u 
TToAev [iJTT* dp(p68ov Apopov ©orjpiSo? 
ripiav pepo9 oiKias; kol alOpiov ixf ^u 
15 KaTayiou Kal avXrjs Kal tcou TavTi]9 
Xpi^o-TTjpiQiv \ji\dvT(i>v Koivrjs 7r[/3oy 
[ ] . . [.]oy KaTo, To[ 

• ••••••• 

2. [fjodlXof Pap. 6. /xer' Pap. 1. fie6\ 8. vTrofivrifiaTcov Vap, II. vnapxourav 

Pap. 14. v4) Pap. 

' Aurelius Demetrius also called Zoilus, ex-chief priest, exegetes and councillor of 
Oxyrhynchus, has leased to Aurelius Theogenes son of Theogenes, of the said city, who 
has weak sight, and is acting with the subscriber who has been appointed for him in 
accordance with the memoranda of the office of the strategus, namely Aurelius Dionysius 
also called Ammonius, for a period of two years from Thoth i of the present 13th year, of 
his property at the said city of Oxyrhynchus in the quarter of the Square of Thoeris, a half 
share of a house and yard, beneath which is a cellar, and court, and all the appurtenances, 
being held by me in common with . . .' 



911. 



LEASE OF A HOUSE 



263 



6-8. An appointment of a vnoypacfifvs by the strategus seems to be quite novel, and 
shows the Inoypa^ivs in a somewhat new light. This term is frequently used in contracts 
to designate the person who signs on behalf of an illiterate party to an agreement, but 
per se has no other concern with the business in hand ; there is no reason to suppose that 
ordinary ' subscribers ' of this kind required any official recognition. A man with defective 
sight would naturally need in his business transactions the services of such a vnoypacpivs, 
but the latter would not be expected to have the prominence here accorded him, or to be 
specially appointed by the strategus. On the other hand if the physical disabilities of 
Theogenes had been such as to debar him from acting on his own account, his representative 
should have been termed Krjdffiav or (ppovTiari'is, not vTroypa(f)evs. The position of this officially 
constituted v7Toypa(f)fvs appears to lie somewhere between that of the curator mente capti and 
the normal ' subscriber '. 



912. Lease of a Cellar. 
26-8 X 7'9 cm. 



A.D. 235. 



A lease of an underground chamber in a house together with the space 
above the exhedra, at an annual rental of 60 drachmae ; cf. 502, the phraseology 
of which is closely similar, and B. G. U. 253. The date in 1. 40 appears to show 
that the death of Alexander Severus and the accession of Maximinus occurred 
some days earlier in the year %'^^ than has been generally supposed ; cf. the note 
ad loc. 



' E {xia6cocr€u AvprjXia Brjcrovs 
Ilaparrioofo^ fj.r]Tpos Xapaind- 
S09 cctt' '0^vpvyya)V noXecos 
fjLera. o-vi^earcoTO? AvprjXiov 
5 &ia)i'09 rod Kal AcrKXr]7rid8ov 
Avp-qXico TlarvTL Tlavovpio^ 
diro M(p{j.ep$(ov in kviavTov 
eva dnb a @ood tov dcnovTos /3 (erous') 
a0' rj'i Kal avTt] e^e^ e/x /xtcrOcoa-it 

10 napd AvprjXiJov) IcnSdipov XaLprjjiovo^ 
ctt' d/j.(p6Sov Norou KprjireTSos 
olKias TO kvov Kardyeiov Kal toi^ 
errdi'd) rrjs e^i8pa9 tottov kvoi- 
Kiov rod 'irovs dpyvpiov Spa'^p.o)!^ 

15 i^rjKovTa. ^e^aiovpei^r]^ Sk r^y 
pLa6d)aecos ^pdaOai 6 jJiejxL- 



vov napaSoro) tov9 jiLaOov- 
fieuovs avTTJ coy npoKetTai 

25 TOTTOV^ KaBapovs dno Korrpioou 
Kal Trda-rjs dKaOapaia^ coy kdv 
TrapaXd^D Kal ray eip^crrcoaa? 
roFy roTTOiy Ovpas Kal KX^iSas, 
17 d7roT€iadT<o ov kdv fir] 7ra- 

30 paSw rrjv d^iav T€i/j.r]v b S [ea]f 
TTpocrocpLXear) dnb roO kvoi- 
Kiov fj.^6' rjjiioXLas, y^ivojie- 
vrjs T^y npd^€Q)9 napd re av- 
Tov Kal iK Twv vnapyovT(£)V 

35 avrco ndvTcov. Kvpia rj /xiaOco- 
ais, Kal €nepcDTr]$€h Q)fio- 
Xoyrjaev. (erouy) a AvTOKpdropos 
Kaicrapos Taiov 'lovXiov Ovrjpov 



264 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

aBcofiivo? Toh fiia-OovjjLii/ois Ma^i^dvov Eva-e^ovs EvTvyovs 

avT^ TOTTois k-rrl tov xpovov 40 [X^^a{(rTov) ^a/j.€]yco$ a. (2nd hand) 

aKcoXvTco?, Kal aTroSoTco ro kvoi- AvprjXta 

20 Kiop kv Socreai Sval tov erovs [Brjaovs fi\^iiia6ooKa coy irp[6- 

81 e^ay.rjvov to rjfiLav dv- [KUTai ] 

virepOeToo?. /xera Se tou \p6- ....... 

7. f wauTo Pap. 14. Spa^/iw Pap. 21. avvTrepdercoi Tap. 24. ]. avra. 30. 

[fa] Pap. 32. fieB' Pap. 34. VTrapxovTa Pap. 

' Aurelia Besous, daughter of Sarapion and Sarapias, of Oxyrhynchus, acting with 
Aurelius Theon also called Asclepiades, has leased to Aurelius Patus son of Panouris, from 
Mermertha, for one year from Thoth i of the coming 2nd year out of the house which she 
herself holds on lease from Aurelius Isidorus son of Chaeremon in the South Quay quarter, 
the cellar within it and the space above the hall at the rent of 60 drachmae of silver for the 
year. When the lease is guaranteed the lessee shall use the parts leased to him throughout 
the period without hindrance, and shall pay the rent in two instalments in the year, half the 
sum at intervals of 6 months, without any delay. And at the end of the period he shall 
deliver the parts leased to him as aforesaid free from filth and dirt of every kind, in the 
condition in which he receives them, with the exisdng doors and keys, or shall forfeit a sum 
equivalent to what he fails to deliver, and for arrears of rent one and a half times the 
original amount, the lessor having the right of execution upon both his person and all his 
property. This lease is valid, and in answer to the formal question he gave his consent. 
The ist year of the Emperor Caesar Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus Pius Felix Augustus, 
Phamenoth i.' Signature of Aurelia Besous. 

4. jifTa cvvf(TTu,Tos : the precise legal significance of this phrase, which is found in 
several papyri of the period subsequent to the constitidio Antonina, is somewhat obscure. 
That it is not equivalent to /^era Kvpiou is quite clear from e. g. C. P. R. I. 9. 2 {^wpi? Kvpiov 
XprjpaT 1(0 v(TT] . . . (Tvvea-TcoTos (Toi Avpr/Xi'ou 'Evdaip.ovos : cf. P. Leipzig 4. 8 and P. Strassb. 29. 
29), where there is a direct opposidon between Kvpios and a-vuea-TMs. Wenger, in his most 
recent discussion of the subject. Go//. gel. Anz. 1907, p. 293, proposes to find an explanation 
in the distinction between Reichsrecht and Volksrecht ; where the former no longer re- 
quired a Kvpios the latter retained him in the form of a (rvvta-Tua : cf. P. Leipzig 28. 4 nera 
avvfo-TcoTos ov €Ko\va^a enavrfi napfjvcyKa. (Tvpivapu>v is Sometimes used as a synonym for 
avvi(TTi)s; cf. P. Leipzig 3. i. 2 and 29. 3, 20. 

40. ^apf\voi>6 a : this is a remarkable date, since Alexander Severus is supposed to have 
been killed about Feb. 10, and that the accession of Maximinus should have been known 
at Oxyrhynchus so soon after as Feb. 25 is incredible. U <i^ap.e'\i>(o6 a here is correct, the 
death of Alexander must be put back somewhat earlier; a date from about Jan. 10-20 is 
the latest that would be expected. On the other hand some days of January in this year 
must be allowed to Alexander in order to account for coins on which is marked the 14th 
year of his /ribunicia po/es/as, which would date from Jan. i. The problem is further 
complicated by a papyrus from the Heracleopolite nome translated by Wessely in Fiihrer 
Pap. Erz. Rainer No. 249, which is dated in Pharmouthi of the 14th year of Alexander ; 
that is to say, the writer of that document continued to reckon the year by Alexander at 
least 30 days after another writer, at a place further south, had adopted the new reckoning 



912. LEASE OF A CELLAR 265 

by Maximinus. The discrepancy, however, is less striking than that between B. G. U. 784 
which is dated by Pertinax on April 2, 193, and B. G. U. 515 which is still dated by 
Commodus on June 2 of the same year, both documents coming from the Fayfim. It 
seems that the scribes were not very prompt in adapting themselves to the altered conditions, 
and that force of habit sometimes led careless persons to go on using a superseded 
formula; cf. 907. introd. 

With regard to the reading, the numeral a might perhaps be «, but that makes hardly 
any difference. It is a litde surprising that there is nothing to be seen of the abbreviation 
of it^aia-Tov), for the papyrus is broken only slightly above the line of the letters. [Sf/SaoroC] 
Q(j>6 might well be read, but Thoth i of a first year is an impossible date, since according to 
the Egyptian reckoning Thoth i always began a new regnal year. There is no doubt 
either about the number of the year in 1. 37, which is also guaranteed by 1. 8, or that '\. a>6 a 
was written at the same time as the rest of the date. Qa,d a might possibly be explained as 
an inadvertence of the scribe caused by a reminiscence of 1. 8 ; but this cannot be regarded 
as a satisfactory hypothesis. 

4 1 . TrpoKfirai may of course have been abbreviated. 



913. Lease of Land. 

31-7 X 23-5 cm. A.D. 442. 

A lease of 9 acres of land for apparently three years (cf. note on 1. 8), at the 
rent of half the produce, the landlord being responsible for taxes and the tenants 
providing seed. 

['TTrareray ^]Xaovia}v EvSo^iov K[al] Aioa-Kopov tcou \ainrp[oTdTaiv) 

^aaxpi L-q. 

[ &\vyaTpl Tov T[fj]s dpiaTr]S fxur](^pr])s AavirjXiov 

[7rpo7ro\iT€vo]fJiiuov Tfj9 XafiTTpd^ kol XapTrpoTUT'q^ '0^vpvy^iTcoi> noXeco^ 
5 [Tra]pd Avpr}[Xico]u 'Ap/xLvcriov vlov TIaSiSv/xov Kal Tdop Ovyarpos KdcrTopos 
[. .]6€afi[. . . d]7rb Kd)p.r]s Tlrooyia)^ tov avrov vojxov. eKovaico^ 
[^ovX6/xe6]a fxiaOcoaaaOai e^ dXXr]Xeyyvr]9 diro tov kvecrTcoTO^ 
^iTov^ eo)?] anopds Trjs TpiaKaiS^KdTrjs lvSlktiovos diro t5>v 
\pnap'^6vT(i>^^v croi kv neStco Trjs rj[iiT^pas KcJoprji eSdc^ovs 

10 [cTLTiKov dp]oupa9 kvvea rj ocra? kdv waiv, eTTi tS) rj/xds TavTas 
[<r7rer/j«i ol?] alpoayi^Qa y^vr]p.a<nv k<f> rj/xicrta^ ndvTOiv tcov 
\TrepLyiyvoiJi\iv(ov KapTroo[v'\ k(f) (oTe ■f]fids Trapaayelv aol Tfj yeovyot 
\to rjjiLav fX€p]o9 dvTi (popov tcou TrepiyLyi^ofiivcoy Kapncof 
fi[€Td KaXf]]f 7rLa[T]eQ)9, 'qp.ds Se tov9 fJ.€jJ.i(T6a)fievov9 dvff a>v 

15 TroLovp.\^6a\ KafxaTCou Tfj9 yeccpyias Kal dvTi tS)v KaTa(3aXXofX€va)U 
nap' rj/j.Q)[i' cr]Tr€p/j.dT(ou Trj yfj e>(€ir to dXXo rj[xicrv /xipos 



266 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

dvVTrip\6^T\(»is, Twv T/7? yr]<i 8r}p.oamv ovToiv ivpos ere 
rr]v yeoO>([oj^"] kirdvayKes Se rj/xccs i^ dXXrjXeyyvr]? irapaay^du 
TO 7]fXLa[v fi]epos tS)V Kapirwv kv tS> SiovTL Kaipco avvTrepOeTcos 
20 Kal TTjv di'[a^o]Xr]v toov \v]d[p)oyp5)V norqaaaOai. KVpta rj piaBooais 
diaarj yp[a^ei](Ta Ka[l] eiTep(a)Tr)$ii'T€?) cbp[oX]oyi]aap€u. (2nd hand) Avprj- 

XeioiC) 'AppLvaiou vlov 
IIa$LSvp{i]ov K[a]l [Tdop] dvydrrjp KdaTopos 01 irpoyeypap/xeuoL pepLo-Odopeda 

Tr]v 

yrjv Kal d7ro§d)a[op](v e^ dXXi]Xeyyvr]^ to rjpiav pepo[^] tS)v TrepiyLyvo- 

pevov KapTTOv 
Kal avp^covl VpIi^i^ Trdv^ra to, kyyeypappiva d)y npoKiTai. ^X^aovio?) 

XapaivLOiv '^fipicovos d^icoda? 
25 'iypay^a vjrep avTa)[v Tra\p6vTa>v ypdppaTa prj elSoTcoi^. 

(ist hand) p di enui //^ • • 

On the verso vestiges of an endorsement. 

3. havir)\iov over an erasure. 5. a oi apfiivaiov corr. from 0, mov Pap. 7. aWrj- 

Xeyyvrjs Pap. 8. 'Cu^iktiouos Pap. 17. avvnep^deT^uis Pap. I9. avvTrfpdeTOis Pap. 

21. 1. 'Apixivaioi vloi. 23. 1. Trepiyiyvopcvu>v Kopncov. 

' In the consulship of Flavins Eudoxius and Flavins Dioscorus the most illustrious, 
Phaophi 18. To . . . daughter of of Daniel, of excellent memory, president of the council 
in the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, from Aurelius Harmiusius son of 
Padidymus and Aurelia Taor daughter of Castor, . . . from the village of Ptochis in the said 
nome. We desire of our own free will to lease upon our mutual security from the present 
year until the sowing of the 13th indiction, out of the land belonging to you in the fields of 
our village, 9 arourae of corn-land or thereabouts, on condition that we sow them with any 
crops we please on the basis of half shares in the resulting produce, the terms being that we 
shall pay to you the landlord in place of rent the half of the produce in good faith, and 
that we the lessees in return for the labour bestowed on the cultivation and the seed sown 
by us in the land shall keep the other half, with no delay, the taxes upon the land being 
due from you the landlord ; and it shall be obligatory upon us on our mutual security to 
pay the half of the produce at the proper season with no delay, and to perform the banking 
up of the land. This lease, of which there are two copies, is valid, and in answer to the 
formal question we have given our assent.' Signatures of the lessees written for them by 
Flavius Sarapion. 

4. [nponoXiTfvoyevov : cf. 67. 2, C. P. R. I. 19. I, P. Leipzig 37. 3. The title probably 
means president of the deciiriones (TroXiTev6p.{voi) ; cf. Milteis, C. P. R. I. pp. 61-2. 

6. ]6f<Tfi[ is awkward and raises doubts whether the fragment containing these letters 
and ]pa avpTj[ in I. 5 is after all rightly placed here ; the hand, however, though not certainly 
identical, is very similar, the fibres of the papyrus correspond rather well, and the verso, 
which contains vestiges of an endorsement in the right position, is also suitable. A title 



913. LEASE OF LAND 267 

referring to Kno-roprj? would be apposite, but ]^eo-M[ suggests nothing likely. The name 
"Ey^fCT/xof occurs in 70. 6, and possibly this may be read here as the patronymic of Castor, 
roi) being omitted, though in the case of the other persons concerned grandfathers' names 
are not added, and there would barely be room for [Ei/]. 

8. For ewsl CTTTOpas cf. B. G. U. 586. 10 npos fxourjv rr]v Tov eveararos erovs anopav. aTrol 

a-nopas is suggested by e.g. P. Tebt. 378. 9 ; but a difficulty would then arise concerning the 
number of the indiction, which should in that case be the nth, not the 13th, and ewj has 
the further advantage of defining the term of the lease. 

II. There is not room in the lacuna for oh idv. The rent of one half the produce was 
fairly common in the Oxyrhynchite nome ; cf 103, 277, 729. 

14. For fx[€Ta Ka\ri]i (or dya6ri]i) 7rt'or[r]ecoy cf. e.g. P. Leipzig 28. 21. 

20. The corrupt word movpcov is more probably for dpovpwv, as Wilcken suggests, 

than e.g. for veovpyOiv or vfmpav (cf TheophraSt. C. PI. 3. 13. 3 Bia t6 veovpy6v re ftvai 
TTjV yrjv Koi dKapnaiToi', and Photius vetopov Vfov). 



014. Acknowledgement of a Debt. 

i7'ixii'6cm. A.D. 486. 

A promissory note for the payment of two solidi of gold, due in consequence 
of a purchase of dye. The goods had already been delivered to the purchaser, 
who in the present document undertakes to pay the money for them two months 
later. 

[ -}- To]?? fi^Ta TTjV VTTareiau ^Xaoviov Q^oSo^pi^ov tov 
Xafj.7rp{oTdTov) Mi^^elp e 6 ivSiKijiovos). 

\Avprj\'\Lo^ 'A7r(f)ovTos vib9 'ApeovTo? p.'qrpos Kvpia^ 

[6p/j,](iofj.evo9 0.770 rfjs '0^vpvy)(iTa>v rroAecoy \ 

5 [Avpr]]\ico ^ep-fjvco vlco AaurjeiXLOi txTTO r^y 

[avTTJs 7r]6X60)? ^aipciu. op-oXoyS) 6(p(Xeiv aoi Kal 

[■)(^p€]<oaTeTu dirb ripfjs Sia^opcou ^appdrcav 

[£j/ e]a)yr]paL napa aov Kal e/Saora^a Kara, to, pera^v 

[avp(p]a)ua )(pvcrov vopicrpaTia Svo, y({viTaL) ^p(y(rov) vo(jxi(TpdTLa) ^. 
10 [to, Se To]v ^(^pvaov voptcrpdrLa Svo aKivSwa 

\TTdvT\a diTo TTavTos KivBvvov kndvayKdS 

[a7ro5]ft)(rco croi kv t5 ^appovdi pr]v\ tov 

[ereo-T]a)Toy erofS' /o|/3 pXa Trj^ rrapova-qs kvdTr]s 

\ivBi\KTtovos dwirepOeTco^, Trjs elcnrpd^eco? 
15 [aoi yi]yvopij/r]9 'n[a]pd re kpov Kal e/c T^y vnap- 

\yovT\oi>v poL TTdvT(»)v vnoKcipiucov TJj 



268 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[€/cri]crei TovBe tov -^pkovs kveyypov Xoyca 
[koI iTTo\6riKr)S SiKaio). Kvpiov to ypafJ.fidTiou 
[SL(r<xo]u y/?a0f[i^] K[al] e[7repa>Tr)6d9 afxoXoyqcra. 

On the verso 
20 ypianiidTLov) 'Att^ovtos vlov 'Ap^coTOv dnb rfjs Xajxirpas '0^v[pvy)(^LTa>v 

TToXecos. 

I. vnaTciau (fAaov'iov Pap. 2. 'ivhtK^riovoi) Pap. 3. 1. 'ATrc^oOr. v'ios Pap. 5- ^• 

Aavn]\inv. 1 4. avvnepderuis Pap. 1 5. v7rap[xovr^oiv Pap. 20. utot^ Pap. 

' The year after the consulship of Flavius Theodoric the most illustrious, Mecheir 5, the 
9th indiction. Aurelius Apphous son of Hareous and Cyria, coming from the city of 
Oxyrhynchus, to Aurelius Serenus son of Daniel, of the said city, greeting. I acknowledge 
that I owe as a debt to you, of the price of various dyes which I have bought from you 
and removed in accordance with the agreement between us, two solidi of gold, total 2 soHdi 
of gold ; and the two solidi of gold I will of necessity repay to you free of all risk in the 
month Pharmouthi of the current 162nd = the 131st year and the present 9th indiction 
with no delay, and you shall have the right of execution upon me and all my property, 
which is mortgaged for the repayment of this debt, as security and lawful pledge. This 
bond, which is written in duplicate, is valid, and in answer to the formal question I have 
given my consent. (Endorsed) Deed of Apphous son of Hareotes, of the illustrious city of 
Oxyrhynchus.' 

I. There is an inconsistency in the statements of date, for the year after the consulship 
of Theodoric was a. d. 485, whereas the dates by the indiction in 1. 2 and by the Oxyrhyn- 
chite eras in 1. 13 combine to fix the year as 486. The letters ]i? are broken, but 
satisfactory enough, and ]/3 cannot be read ; there would indeed be room for one or two 
more letters in the lacuna, but with a chrism and an enlarged initial letter the space would 
be sufficiently accounted for. The scribe therefore seems to have made a mistake ; cf. 133 
and 140, in which the eighth year after the consulship of Basilius appears where the ninth 
would be expected. 

3. 'Apfoiros : in the endorsement on the back the father's name is given as 'Aptarov. 

9. For [(rvfMcf)]cova cf e.g. P. Strassb. 40. 13. 

10. The supplement is a trifle long for the lacuna. 
13. On the Oxyrhynchite eras cf. 125. introd. 
17-8. Cf. 136. 41 and P. Arnh. 151. 19. 



915. Receipt for Lead and Tin. 

6 X30-4 cm. A.D. 572. 

A receipt for lead and tin supplied by a lead-worker for repairing the pipes 
of a bath. The papyrus was found rolled up with four similar receipts issued to 
the same lead-worker, which are described in 1000-1003. The writing is in 
each case across the fibres. 915 alone is dated by the two Oxyrhynchite eras. 



915. RECEIPT FOR LEAD AND TIN 269 

-)- 'ES66(r]aap) 5(ia) 'AiroXXcb iioXi^ovpyiov) Tecopytoi jraiSl ciy KoXXrjcTty 

Tcov (rciciXrjVCov 
Tov XovTp{ov) Tov Trpoa(TTt[ov) ^am(pL K IvB{lktlovos:) t fxoXrjSov XiTp(ai) 

8coS(Ka Kal KaaiSrjpiov XiTp[ai) Tpls, 
ytlyovTai) p.oXrjS{ov) Xifjpai) i/3 Kal KaaL8{r]piov) XLirpai) y ii{pvaL). 
(and hand) yL{yovTai) /j.oX{v^8ov) Xi(Tpai) ScoS^Ka Kal Ka(Tc8r]p[iov) 
Xi(Tpai) Tpi9 fi{6vai). 
(ist hand) {^irovs;) <rp.d Kal airj ^aaxpi k iv8{LKTiovos) e/CT[7??. ] 

I. 1. /LtoXv|3Soupy(ov). 2. 1. fioXv^dov . . . Kavcirtpiov : SO in 1. 3. 

' Provided by ApoIIos, lead-worker, for Georgius, servant, for soldering the pipes of the 
bath in the suburb on Phaophi 20 of the 6th indiction, twelve pounds of lead and three 
pounds of tin, total 12 lbs. lead and 3 lbs. tin only. Total 12 lbs. lead and 3 lbs. tin only. 
The 249th which = the 218th year, Phaophi 20, 6th indiction.' 



{e) TAXATION 

916. Tax-Receipt. 

i6-3X 19-4 cm. A. D. 198. 

A receipt for a series of payments on account of a tax of which the name 
is abbreviated as t?J or rj+ and the precise nature is still a matter of uncertainty. 
This impost is known from two other published texts, B. G. U. 573. 5 and 10, 
and P. Tebt. 500, in both instances occurring along with the vavj3i.ov and other 
imposts on land. Wilcken {Ost. I. p. 174^) interprets it as meaning oyhoi). The 
present text shows that it was calculated upon the aroura, and the mention 
of the praefect's instructions concerning it suggests that it was a special levy 
rather than a regular tax. The sums paid are rather high, amounting to 640 
drachmae within two months (11. 12-9), but it is not clear whether the individual 
to whom the receipt is issued was the tax-collector or the tax-payer. Caracalla 
appears as full emperor in Pauni of the 6th year (May 26-June 34 of A.D. 198) ; 
cf. 910. introd. 

Etov9 5" AovKcov Xi7rTifii[ov 
Siovrjpov Ev(T€^ovs Il€pTtvaK[os 
^e^acTToD 'Ap(^a)^iKov 'ASLal3r]viK[ov 



270 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

TlapdiKOv MiytcTTOv kol AvTOKp\oiTo\po^ 
5 Kaiaapos MdpKov AvprjXiov 'AuTcc[vr\vov 
^e/SacTTov Uavvi. Sie'ypd(pr] JJacrLcovi 
[K\al fj.cT6^{oL9) 8rjix{o(TLOLi) Tpa7r{e^iTai9) 'O^(vpvy)(^iT0v) [X]6y[ov) r)( 

dOda-ris Kar dpovpa\y a^jeve^^^yai 

uKoXovdcos Tois ypa[(pd](n vtto AlfXLXi[o]v 
10 Xarovpvivov tov Xa[ii\TTpoTdTov ?7ye/i[($ro?] 

Ti^^pios KXovSios T^iiiivos 6 /c[a£] 

Taua)v Spa-^(/xa?) 8iaKocrL[a]9, ytiyovTai) (Spa^fxal) cr. naaut[v] 

f3aaiXiK(^bs) Tpair^e^LTr]?) a€ar]fi(€i(o/xaL). 

KOL rfj i^ TOV avrov p.r}vos 6n(o[cos) 6 avTo? Spa(^fxa)7 
15 rpLaKoaias recrcrepa/foi'[T]a, yi{yovTaL) (8pa)(fiaL) Tfi. JJaaioiv 

^aaiXiKios) Tpair{e^LTr]S) a€(TT]fi(ei(o/^ai). 
2nd hand Kal rfj La tov 'E7ret0 6noi[(£,s) X6y(ov) 77 + 

SpaxfJ-d? (.KUTov, / iPpay^paX) p. Z(»iX[os) V'[7r]/7[/)]e(r7?9) 

o-eo-?7/x(e/cDyuat). 
20 KOL Trj kS tov ^aaxpL 6fx{oico^) [X6y[ov) 7/+ 8pa- 

X/^oc9 [S]i[aKO(r]i[a]s, [ y/ (Spaxf^al) cr. 



3. ^ 0^ apj3iKov written through an a. 6. 1. ditypayj/e. 11. o? of icXovStoy corr. 

1. KXai'Sioy. 17. u of tov and first e of en e 1(f) corr. 20. S of kS corr. 

' The sixth year of Lucius Septimius Severus Pius Pertinax Augustus Arabicus 
Adiabenicus Parthicus Maximus and of the emperor Caesar IVIarcus Aurelius Antoninus 
Augustus, Pauni. Paid to Pasion and his associates, pubHc bankers of the Oxyrhynchite 
nome, on account of the tax of | (?) ordered to be paid upon the aroura in accordance with 
the edict of his excellency the praefect Aemilius Saturninus, by Tiberius Claudius Geminus 
also called Gaiion(?) two hundred drachmae, total 2co dr. Signed by me, Pasion, public 
banker.' Records of other instalments follow. 

9. On the praefecture of Aemilius Saturninus cf. 899. 10, note. 

1 1-2. The name Taluv occurs in P. Brit. Mus. II. 258. 130-1, &c., and the repetition 
of the t here was perhaps a clerical error. The initial letter is uncertain, and might be meant 
for o- or possibly e, and f could also be read in place of a. In any case a second name 
seems here more likely than e. g. ol[Tr{fp) (for Inep) (y}yai\i}a>v, for though the interchange 
of 01 and V is common enough, to postulate it in a doubtful passage is not very satisfactory. 
There would too only just be room for the abbreviation of n and ey in the lacuna. 



917. TAXING-MEMORANDUM 271 

917. Taxing-Memorandum. 

5 X 9-8 cm. Late second or early third century. 

A memorandum extracted from the day-book of a collector of money-taxes, 
summarizing payments under various heads. Of the imposts mentioned two, 
the vavj3iov (1. 2) and e-napovpiov (1. 3), are familiar. The tax of | (1. 2) is not often 
met with in Roman times, but a (.KTr] re^iaxoov occurs in P. Brit. Mus. III. 1171. 72 
and a cktij levied upon TrapaSeicroi apparently in P. Tebt. 343. 69, where we sup- 
posed that it was connected with the Ptolemaic tax of | of the produce for 
ciTToixoipa upon vineyards and gardens, in spite of the fact that the airoixoipa is 
known to have been sometimes calculated in Roman times upon the acreage 
of land. That the e/cr?] here too means the airopiotpa is very likely, especially as the 
latter is found in 653, where several of the taxes mentioned in 917 occur ; the 
name eKrr/, however, may be a mere survival and not necessarily imply that 
the tax was actually | of the produce. The tax va{ ) 0o( ) (1. 2) is known 
from 653, where we resolved the abbreviations doubtfully as va(v\ov) (Po^prCoiv). 
va{vXov) is on the whole more probable than va{v^Lov) ; but (t)o{pTC(t)v) is unsatis- 
factory, and (f)o(piTpov) is more likely than (f)6(pov) though vo{vXov) (})o{p4Tpov) 
is a somewhat tautologous expression ; (poLvtKcov or (j)ot,viK(ovos, however, would 
more naturally be abbreviated (poi{ ). The remaining impost, abbreviated 
(T7r( ) 8toi'( ) (1. 3), we connect with (7TTovh(ri) in 653, and regard it as levied 
nominally for a libation to Dionysus ; cf. a-novb/] as a tax in P. Tebt. 347. 2. 
There may well be a connexion between this tax and the Atovvadov at Oxy- 
rhynchus, which perhaps benefited by the proceeds ; cf. 908. 8-10, note. 

Two other similar memoranda by the same tax-collector are described 
in 981-2. One of these has only the beginnings of lines; the other, which is 
complete, mentions besides €T:apo(vpiov) a tax called -n-qyJ^KTixov) TT€pia{T€p(avo}v), for 
which 47 dr. i ob. 2 chal. are paid, -ni^x^aixov by itself appears as an impost 
in P. Brit. Mus. II. 11 71. 73, where 7^ dr. are paid for it, and 400 drachmae are 
entered for e7n/3oA(7]s) td/x'o-Mou in P. Brit. Mus. III. 1 157. 1 1 1, 600 dr. in 1. 113, and 
400 dr. for TTrjxi'-o-p.ov) otK07i(e8&)z;) in 1. 152. The editors suggest that the charges for 
TTrjxio-fxos were for measuring areas, but remark that the amounts paid are high ; 
possibly the impost was levied upon the areas measured, not on behalf of the 
measuring. That the impost yeco/xerpia? means land-tax, not a tax for measuring, 
was maintained by Wilcken (Ost. I. pp. 173-6), but the evidence subsequently 
discovered does not support that view ; cf. P. Tebt. I. p. 39. There is, how- 
ever, somewhat less difficulty in referring the term 777jxto"Mos than yecojuerpta to 
an area measured, and we are disposed to regard the Trrj^tc/^^? TrfpLarepcovMv 



272 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

as a tax upon pigeon-houses levied according to their size. In Ptolemaic times 
there was a tax upon them called Tpirr] TTepiaTepcov(ov (i. e. | of the profits ; cf. 
P. Tebt. 84, 9, note), but this is not known to have survived into Roman times, 
and the 7777)(to-jix6s ircpia-T. may have taken its place. The 4th year, in which 917 
and 981 are written (982 is dated in the 3rd year), more probably refers to the 
reign of Septimius Severus than to that of Marcus Aurelius, Elagabalus, or Severus 
Alexander. 

'E^ k(p-q{jxepL8o^) 'Airioivos TrpdiKTopos;) dpy[vpiK<iou) TaXaco. 

vaixj^LOv) Kol <^' KOI vaiyXov) (f)o{pirpov ?) rov kveaT{5iTOs) 8 (eVouy) (Spa^fial) 

K^ {r]fj.i(o^e\iov), 

kirapo^ypiov) {8 pa-)(^ixa\) p6 ^{aXKoT) y, (T7r{oi/8r]s:) ALOv{vaov}) ■[8pa\pal) rj 

(rerpco^oXov) ■^(aXKOvs) a, 

y {8pa)(jiaA) pX6 (nevTco^oXov). 86<tls {8pay^p.al) pXd 6(3{oXol) <7, 

5 y [Spa^fxal) Ikutov rpiaKovTa ivv^a 6^oX{pl) ^. 

(irovs) 8 UavvL e. 

2. 3 of K^S corr. from 8. 

' From the day-book of Apion, collector of money-taxes at Talao. For naubion and 
the tax of ^ and freight by water for the present 4th year 22 dr. i ob., for land-tax 109 dr. 
3 chalci, for a libation to Dionysus (?) 8 dr. 4 ob. i chal. Total 139 dr. 50b. Paid 
139 dr. 6 ob. Total one hundred and thirty-nine dr. 6 obols. The 4th year, Pauni 5.' 

3. a-n{ovhr]i) : the first letter might possibly be e, but a- is a more suitable reading and 
is confirmed by 653 ; cf. introd. 

4. The sum actually paid is i obol in excess of what was due ; similarly in 981 the 
S(5a-tf exceeds the previous total by nearly 2 obols. 



918. Land-Survey. 

Height 21-2 cm. Second century. 

The verso of this long papyrus contains the text of the new Greek historian 
(842), and a short description of the document on the recto was given in Part V, 
pp. iio-i. This is a very elaborate survey-register of Crown land at a village in 
the south-west of the Arsinoite nome near Ibion Argaei, which is mentioned 
e.g. in v. 17. The plots leased to separate cultivators are arranged in o-^payiSej 
of varying sizes which have a double system of numbering. One set of numbers 
refers to the order in which they occur in the present list, beginning with the ist 
(T<f)payis and ending, so for as the papyrus goes, with the 12th ; the other set of 
numbers refers to some more extensive register, of which the <r(ppayLbis here 



918. LAND-SURVEY 273 

described formed a part. In only two cases are the figures of the second set 
preserved, the ist and 2nd o-(^payt8es of the present list corresponding to the 
17th and 18th of the other; and it is not unlikely that there was a difference of 
16 between the two sets of numbers throughout. From these numbered o-^payTSe? 
must be distinguished the use of the term a-cppayis in 918 to denote the individual 
plots ; cf. ii. 16, note. 

The normal scheme of the survey is as follows. First comes a description of 
a particular ac^payU as a whole, — its geographical relation to the preceding a(f)payLSf 
its number on both systems, its size, the rents yielded by it, and its adjacent areas. 
Where as the result of flooding or other cause in former years (ranging from the 
3rd to the 1 3th of an unnamed emperor) the rents were no longer paid or had 
been reduced, or the land had changed its category (e. g. x^pca'^/^u/jo? which had 
become pasture land), information is added on these points, there being several 
references to earlier surveys. The general account of each a^payis closes with 
the words S>v to KaTaK{ ) (cf. ii. 13, note), referring to the following description 
of the individual plots into which it was subdivided. These more detailed entries 
give the geographical position ot each plot (in the first entry the arourae are 
defined as ap^op-^vai, in the later ones as €xop.evai), the name of the lessee or 
cultivator, the size and rent of the plot, the adjacent areas, and the addition made 
to the rent as the result of a reassessment. Where the land was not paying 
the normal rent or had undergone changes, the details already summarized 
in the general account of the acppayCs are repeated in reference to the particular 
cultivators, e. g. in Col. xi. 

The papyrus is divided into four sections separated by gaps, and as the 
writing on the recto and verso runs in opposite directions, D, the last section of 
the historical work containing Cols, xi-xxi, is the first of the land-survey, com- 
prising Cols, i-viii. Col. i, which is much mutilated, is in a different hand from 
the rest, and is apparently the concluding part of a summary of the succeeding 
columns. It is concerned chiefly with land KaO' vSaros (cf. Cols, ix-xv), and 
ends ytVo(i'rat) ko^' vbaros [apovpai) \//Kr]Z/'7" A'/S'^S'. &v rj TTocreia. In Col. ii 
begins the detailed list of acppaylbes. Lines i-a indicate the point from which 
the survey starts, and 11. $-y apparently define the position of certain arourae, 
22|- in number, which stand in some obscure relationship to the ist (T(l)payk. The 
general description of that acppayts occupies 11. 8-13, and the details concerning 
the two sets of cultivators of the g^e arourae comprised in it fill ii. i-iii. 2. 
In iii. 3 begins the general description of the 2nd o-0payt?, which contained 
io| arourae, the details following in iii. ii-v. 14. The 3rd a<ppayi^ (v. 15-21) 
contained only 3 arourae situated in a hollow which seems to have been formerly 
dry but was now flooded, and as no rent or cultivators were assigned to it only 

T 



274 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

the general description was required. The account of the 4th (r(f)payLs (vi. 1-8) 
is incomplete, but the number of the arourae in it (8, including -^^ aroura for 
a canal) is preserved. It was divided among three sets of cultivators who owned 
respectively -^ly^g, 2, and i^f arourae. vi. 19-vii. 1 contains the description of 
what is clearly the 5th o-(/;payts, though the number is for some reason omitted. 
It comprised 53^2 arourae, but only 4-3*2 ^^^ accounted for in vii. 2-1 1 , so that 
either 5^2 is an error for 43*2 or an entry has been left out. vii. 12-18 gives the 
description of the 6th o-<^payts, which contained 30^% arourae, and the details 
concerning the several plots followed in Col. viii, of which only a few letters from 
the beginnings of lines are preserved, section D breaking off at this point. So far 
the land in question, with the exception of that in the 2nd o-^payts, had been 
in good condition. The rents up to this point range with one exception from 
6^ artabae per aroura down to 4||-, this being the commonest rate ; cf. P. Brit. 
Mus. II. 267, where the rents of Crown land near Lake Moeris range from 7 to 2^ 
artabae per aroura, 4|J art. being the most frequent. The exception occurs 
in the description of the 6th a^payi^, where the 30Y^g arourae pay at the rate of 
{-nvpov apTa^as;) h k ^'p'^\ \. e. ^-^q -^q yIo > o^ 4ws art, a fraction which could not be 
expressed without departing from the ordinary series of fractions of the artaba 
h ^ T2' &c. In every instance an addition to the rents had been recently made 
of amounts ranging from y^ to i artaba, and in one case (iii. 1-2) the rent had 
been twice raised. The case is different when we turn to the later columns 
of the sui-vey on the recto of sections C, B, and A. These are chiefly concerned 
with land which had been flooded, and was therefore unproductive except where 
it had been reclaimed for pastures. A, containing the ends of lines of Col. xiii, 
Col. xiv, which is incomplete, and Col. xv, of which the ends of lines are lost, 
deals with the nth and 12th a(j)payibes ; but to which acppayCi C (parts of 12 lines 
from Col. ix) and B (containing a portion of Col. x, Col. xi, which is fairly well 
preserved, and a few letters from the beginnings of lines of Col. xii) refer is not 
indicated, and the relative order of these three sections would be quite doubtful 
apart from the text on the verso. If we are right in regarding A as the first 
section of the historical work (cf. Part V, pp. 114-5), it is the last of the survey, 
and C and B must belong to the a-(^payt8es intervening between the 6th and 
nth ; but it remains uncertain whether C comes between D and B or between 
B and A ; cf. Part V, pp. 1 13-4. Col. ix, so far as can be judged from its scanty 
remains, deals with land similar to that described in Col. xi, various dra/xerpjya-eis 
(cf. xi. 5) being mentioned. Nothing can be made of Col. x, but Col. xi. 1-9 gives 
the conclusion of a general description of a new (Kppayig, which had been flooded, 
the entries concerning the individual holdings following in 11. 10 sqq. Owing to 
the loss of the beginning and the uncertainty of the construction of the various 



918. LAND-SURVEY 275 

relative clauses which are piled one upon another the details are not clear, but 
various categories of land KaO' vhaTos are distinguishable : (1) in 1. 2 that on which 
rent continued for a time at any rate to be exacted, S>v to. [ejK^o'pta 8ie(rrdA.(r]). 
(2) in 11. 3 and 13 land of which the rent had been reduced and which subsequently 
had been converted into pasture land, (3) in 1. 21 land h e-Troxf/j a category frequently 
rnentioned also in Cols, xiii-xiv, and apparently implying land upon which the 
collection of the rents (in xi. 214 artabae to the aroura) had been suspended 
indefinitely ; cf. P. Tebt. ■^2>^. 13-5 and 337. 2, notes. Col. xii, as we have said, 
is represented only by a few letters, and Col. xiii, with which section A begins, 
has only ends of lines. Both this column and Col. xiv give part of a detailed 
list of entries referring to what must be the nth <Tcf)payLs, since the account of 
the 1 2th (T<^payis begins at the top of Col. xv. Of the five entries in Col. xiii two 
are concerned with land h ^ttox}], two with land in another category, the arourae 
being called ivacfyeidxevai,), a term which occurs in P. Tebt. II. 325. 5 ; cf. note 
ad loc. The land had presumably been placed in this class because it had been 
flooded, but to judge by P. Tebt. 325 era0et(//eVrj) yr\ was capable of being 
cultivated, though at only a nominal rent. Col. xiv contains five more entries 
concerning lands placed kv (ttoxji in the 8th year. Rents at the rate of 4^ and 
i| artabae to the aroura are mentioned (the latter being exceptionally low, 
cf. p. 274), but if our interpretation of iiroxi] is correct these represent only the 
rents paid before the land went out of cultivation. Col. xv begins with a 
description of the 12th a^payis, which occupies 11. 1-12. Lines 3-1 1 summarize 
in a manner similar to xi. 1-5 the changes which had taken place in the character 
of the land since the 4th year as the result of various e7ri(TK€\/ret9, but owing to the 
loss of the ends no connected sense is obtainable. The o-<^payts seems to have 
consisted largely of x^pa-aX^p-vpos) which had been converted into vop.ai at different 
periods, and, since 3C§| arourae are mentioned in 1. 6, to have been more extensive 
than usual. Lines 13-21 give the first three entries concerning individual hold- 
ings. In one of these the land had become KaO' vbaros in the 12th year, but the 
remark is added a7TOKaT€aTa9(r]) t[u)] eye(Tr[a)rt] (eret) [, showing that it had been re- 
claimed in the year in which the survey was written. Since no years later than the 
1 2th are mentioned elsewhere in the papyrus, the evea-rds eros is likely to have 
been very soon after the 12th, and may even be the 13th. The handwriting 
proves that the survey belongs to the second century, and most probably to the 
reign of Antoninus or Marcus Aurelius. We print Cols. ii. i-iii. 16, v. 15-21, 
xi and xiii, which afford good specimens of the whole. The parts omitted 
mainly consist of repetitions of the same formulae or are too much damaged to 
be intelligible. 

Two other land-surveys of the Roman period exhibit a classification of land 

T 2 



276 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

by numbered o-^paytSe?, P. Fay. 339 and P. Bruxell. i (Mayence and de Ricci, 
Miisee Beige, 1904, pp. loi sqq.). P. Fay. 339 is a mere fragment, but the 
accounts of the nth and 12th acppaylbes are for the most part preserved ; the text 
of the entry concerning the I2tli cr^payi^ is quoted in our publication, that of 
the nth follows the same formula. The geographical situation of each a-cppayis, 
its size, rent, cultivator, and surroundings are given ; but the areas are much smaller 
than in 918, being only i and i^ arourae in the two cases, and the term o-^/jayt? 
seems to be used to denote a plot of ground belonging to a single lessee rather 
than a group of such plots ; cf. ii. 16, note. On the other hand in the Brussels 
papyrus, which though reputed to come from Dimeh is on account of the proper 
names more likely to have been discovered at Hermopolis and to refer to land in 
the Hermopolite, not the Arsinoite, nome, the o-(/)payr8es are much larger than 
those in 918, one of them containing over 635 arourae. tStcoriK?) as well as 
IBaa-iXiKT] yrj is included in them, and the land-tax upon the former is added 
to receipts from rents of the latter, whereas in 918 private land, though frequently 
mentioned among the yeiroves, is not included in the survey. The Brussels sui-vey, 
of which the extant portions cover the 6th to the loth o-^payiSe?, is moreover on 
a much less elaborate scale than 918, and does not enter into any details concerning 
individual cultivators of Crown land. 



Col. ii. 

2nd hand [dp)(^ofj.ei'](ov cctto v6t[ov ]ouy (poi(i>LKa)V09) kv rjTreipco 

[ ]\ovn[ipa)) 

[ ] SlpLyevovs a7r[ ] e^ dir-qXiiodTOv) 8mpv^o[^) T^k- 

[vduLS Ka\\ovn[ivr}s) jXiff {fiv) yvrj^ [ ] k^lt] ^LaTiv\o{v(TaC)\ 

> \ 

5 vot{ov). y\i{rov(.s)\ vot{ov) tS>v ttjs [ 'A]fxvPTapovTo[9 r]^? 

'Ajj.vu[to]v, ^oppd Siciopv^ [ ,] d7rr]X{idoTov) Taaara^ovTos 

[r]^? 'Ovt'c«0[/3]e<JO9 ai(TO(p6po9)^ [X£^o(y) Sicopv]^ //e^' (t)u) 6S6{9). 

[a] a(ppa{yLs) rj €(tt{i) i^ cr(ppa(yh) e[ ] . ev€LX{ ) Kal 

Kafi7r(y\r] ?) (Tiropco 
[apovpai) 6l<^' S)V d{ya) (Trvpov dprd^as) ^S' [dpovpai) /3 [kol d[va) 
{■JTvpoO dpTU^a^)] S/lS' li{r]) (dpovpai) ^^'t', / al 7r(poK(ifi€vai). 
10 yi{T0ve9) v6t{ov) Siccpv^, fxeO' (rju) yvri[s a]rf<5p(oy), (Soppd ^acriX[iKr}) yrj 

T]Tripo{?) 
Slcc yeo)py{5)v) !4y^opi/z0ect)[y] Ovvd>(f)pi<x>s Ka\l UaTvvLOS 



918. LAND-SURVEY 277 

"Hpo)vo{s;) Kal fi^ro-^^iov), aTrrjXi^icoTov) i8(d(pr)) ©ea^'qcnco^ rrjs 

IIe[(rovp€a)9, 
\il3b(s) TiKvdvLS Xeyofx[ii'r]) Siciopv^ fxeO' {rjv) oSos. a>u [to kutuk^ )• 
dpyoiiievai) dno v6t(ov) [...]. eyy 'A/x-qov9 toO ^OKOi'don^ios) Kal [. . . . 
15 'A/xjjovs Tov JJaTvveoas e^ d\\r]\(eyyvr]s) d{yd) (jrvpov dprd^as) 88' fxrf 

[apovpai) eo r} t'S' • 
yi{Tov€s) v6t{ov) Sicopv^, (3oppd 17 e)(o{fxeur]) (X(f)pa{yis), dTrrjX^KoTov) 

KaTOLK{iKa) k8{d<pr]), Xiifio?) 
Sicopv^. Kal TrpocrcopiaOij]) d'AXo KaTcc [apovpav) (nvpov dprd^rj?) /S'. 
jSoppd k-^opi^vai) ky^iatvova-aC) d7rr]X{i(0T0v) 'Ay)(^opip(pea)9 'Oi'i^dxppecos 

TOV 

Adov Kal 'I(XLcovo(s) Ilave^pefipeco? Kal Harvvis "Hpcou[o(s!) 
20 TOv"Hpcovo(9) e^ dXXr]X(€yyvr]?) [apovpai) yL8' hv d(ya) (nvpov dprd^as) 

<r(5' [apovpai) j8, Kal d[va) (nvpov dpTa^as) 8l^ \ir] 
(apovpa) aL8' , y^ at n[poKei/J.ei'aL), Iv ah KotXa)p[a) Ka& v8[aT0s). 

yL[Toves) v6t[ov) tj kyrdvo) 
a^pa[yh) Kal kiri ri jj,[€pos) l8i[coTiKd) iS[d^r]) Oea^T^accos Ueaov- 

pe(09, (3oppd 
PaaiX[iKf]) yrj rjireipos 8id ye(opy[a>i>) 'Ay)(^op[i]p[(p€a)s) 'Oi'vd>[(f)peQ)9) 

Kal naTVUL[o['5) 
"Hp(ovo{s) Kal /x€t6)(<[ov), d7r{r]Xi(oT0v) ©ea[3i]a€co^ Ilea-ovpecos 

KXrjp[os), [ 

5. IT of afiVvrapovTo[s COrr. 6. Final o of Taaara^ovTos COrr. from T). 

Col. ill. 
Xi(3os Sia>[pv]^. [Kal 7rpoa<opLo-6(Tj) dX]Xo Kara [apovpai) [nvpov 

dprd[3r]s) L. 
//S (erei) [apovpai) /S tov . [. . . n po(T(i)pi'\o\P(r]) ] dXXo KaToc 

(^apovpai/) [nvpov dpTd(3r]s) 8^. 
dnr]X[id)TOv), L dpd peao[v ovTOiv i8L\a>TiK[S)u) k8a(f)S)V napaT[uv6vTaiv) 

^oppd inl v6t[ov) [ ]^, /3 a-(f)pa[yh) i] iaT[i) it] 

a(ppa[yh) 
5 <Tn[6pcf) [apovpai) ir] d(ya) [nvpov dpTd^a?) €8' [ [dpovpa) a d[ua) 
[nvpov dpTd(3as) 8l8' j/r)''^ [apovpai) Orf ^ y/ al n[poK€LjX€vai). 



278 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

yiiroves) v6t{ov) 8L(c[pv^) T(K[vd.vLS \e]yoii{evri) fxcO' {fjv) 686(9), ^oppd 

l3a<TiX{LKr]) 

yi] i77rei/3o(y) Slcc [yecopy{a)u)] 'Ouyaxppeoos rov ' flpov KaL 
'AttoXXcoulov t[ov nave](ppeiji/x€a)9, XijSo? Taafxeiovs 

] . fjioj{ ) ldiaj(TtKa) l5(a</)7/) 

rfjs 'Apfiiic£[s Kal] kiri tl fxepos rj irpoK^an^vrj) ^aaiX{iKr]) yrj, 
10 dirrjX^LCoTov) Sicopv^. cou to KaTaK{ )• 

dp)(6fJ.{€vaL) Xi^bs jB€J/ic[. . OS 'Ayx]opifi(})€cos t[ov 

'Ayxopificpecos Kal [ITaTWfo(?) ] "Hpa>vo{s) rov N[6(rrj/?;0ea)y 

e| dXXr]X{^yyvris:) d{va) {nvpov dpTajSas) 8/.S'fjLr]' [{dpovpai) . . 

yiirovei) ] v6t{ov) T^Kvd\yLS 
Xeyo{x{iur)) 8ioopv^, ^oppd [(3aaLX{iKrj) yrj r]]Tr€ipo{s) Sia yea)[py(a)i'), 

15 d7Tr}X{iooTOv) 17 kxo{tiivri) a^pa{yLs), X//3[o(y) Kal Trpocrco- 

pi[a6{T)) dXXo 

Kara [dpovpav) [irvpov dpTa^iis) 1.8 . 

7 more lines. 

Col. V. 
14 lines. 
15 v6t{ov) Kal d7rT)X(La>Tov), 5 ai^a fi{i(rou) ov(tt]9 8La>pvxo{s) Kal iKavov 

8La(TTrinaT{os), 
y (r(f>pa{yh) )(^epa-o{v) ku KoiXiodjiaTL) Ka6' v8{aT0S!) [dpovpai) /3. 

yL(T0V€9) v6t{ov) 8ia>pv^ 
^ayrjovs XGyo{jxhri) fxed' (^v) (rvya>p(ia) 'J)3£(Sro(y) 'ApyaCov, ^oppd 
AnoXXcovias ttjs Hapaniccvos KXfjpo[s) KaToiK{iKbs) dva fi{k(Tov) 
ova-qs 8ia>{pvyos) Kal 'HpaKXd8ov tov 'ATroXX(tii/io{v) /cA^/)o(y), 
20 d7ri]X{LcoTov) 68b{s) 8r)fioaL{a) kv rj dcpecTL? XlOivtj, Xi^o? 
V ^X'^K^^^) ^c^Ktjovs Xeyofx{ii'T]) 8L(opv^. 

17. 1. o-wop(ia). 21. € of €xo/i(«i'»7) corr. 

Col. xi. 

[ 8id] TO Ka6' vSaTOS y[€yo(vivat.) {dpovpai)] 88' r{ l ^' X' ^' !! 

a[ . . .je^' al eT[. ( ) 
[8ia TO Ka$' v8]aTo(f) y€yo{viuai), dav to. [k]K(f)6[pLa) 8i€crTdX{T]), 

p[€/jiLa]0{cofj.6vai) y (eret) vrro 



918. LAND-SURVEY 



279 



7rpea((3vTepQ)u) t^? /fct(/uj/s)] {dpovpai) ir}L.B\ cou to. kK(f)6{pLa) t(o 8 

(eVci) r]Xacra[u)6{r])] Sia to Ka6' v8(aT09) 
[yeyc(uevai), dXcorem?] (apovpa) a d(va) (jrvpoD dprd^as) SS' , coy 

ilaLv at eK rfj^ [ye]t'o//(ei/?7?) T<a la (eVet) 
5 [tov aiyiaXov] di/ap[eTp^]ar€cos €up€6{eia-a:) dvrl Kad' vS{aTOs) vop-oiv 

[dpovpai) t[a]5' 

[ ] yi[T0Vis) t5>v oX^cou) v6t(ov) $ia>pv^ jxi& {t)v) tj i^rjs 

a(ppa{yh), 
[^oppd iSioolriKa.)] k8{a^r]), aTrrjX^icorov) Sia>pv^ peO' (rji/) ^aaiX^iKrj) 

yfj rjn{€cpos:) Si(^a) ye&lpy(a)^') Kal tov Trpoy p6t{ov) 
[pipov9 • . . .]y( ) rj (T^pa{yL'i), Xl^o{s) Si(o{pv^) Kal e7r[/] Ti p{kpo9) 

ISicoT^CKo) k8{a(l>ri). 
Qiu [to] /ca[ra]/f( )• 
10 dpyop{evai) v6t{ov) ^[opjroro/icoj^ kp(^6[pwv) [dpovpai) i8l.r]'^' 8' . ytijoves) 

v6t{ov) 8iS>pv^, 
[^o]ppd TrpoTiepov) pepiaOicopivr]) rj kyo[iJL^vr]) i . . [. .]^( ), aTrrj- 

X{ia>Tou) Kal Xi^[o]i 8i(opv^. 
^\op]pd k)(^6p{ei/ai) p[epi]a6(a)piuai) y {'^Tei) vtto ^A[.'\aTreovs'' Hp(iivo{f) Kal 

TMv Xoin(ooy) 7rp€al3(yTepa)v) 
[rJTjy K[<oiJ.r]s] (dpovpai) X[. .]8' at ova{ai) Ka6' v8{aT0s;), oiv to, 

€>c[0c(p/a)] tS) 8 {'^T€i) r)Xaaaa)6(rj), 
a>v ^l\(Tiv at e>c] tj;? yevo{p.^vr]s) r5 la 0T€i) tov alyiaXov dva- 

fjl,€Tp7](T€Q)9 

15 [€vpe$(eia-ai.) dvTl K^aO' vS(aT09) kv vop{cusi) (dpovpai) ^£.8' Ka[. ...]., 

/ ai 7r{poK€ip€yai). 
[yi{T0ves) v6t(ov) 77 kirdlyoi [(r]0pa(yf'?), ^oppd kXt][p{os)] K{aT)oi[KiK09) 

[Kal k]7ri Ti p€po{s) dXcouei[a]s' 

[ J d7r]r)X{ia)T0v) 8i(opv^ Kal K[aToi]K{iKa) k8{a(pri) [Kal\ 

€L(ray((oy6s), At/So(y) 8i(opv^. 

[/Soyopja Kal d7rr]X(ia>T0v) kyop(kvri) 8ia y€a)[py(a)v) d]Xcov€ia9 

(apovpa) a d(vd) (nvpov dpTa^as) 8[8' 
[yt'(roi/ey)] v6t(ov) tj kirdva) o-0[p]a(y/'y), [(3oppd Kal d7rr]X(id)Tov) 

8]icopv^^ Xi^o(s) r} kn(dvco) a(f)[pa(yh). 
20 [l^opp'ld kypii(evaC) ky^(aivov(rai) Ai/3o(y) X[a]Lprjfiop[o9 'Ay)^o]pip(f)ea>s 

TOV Ol'VC0((pp€Q)9) Kal 'Ay)(o(pip(p€(o9) 



28o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

"flpov diva) (jrvpov dprd^as) S ey kco6 . [ ] . [.]... 

y€<o[p(y )] al ova{ai) kv kiroyji 
diro [ . {€TOvs)] Sia to KaO' vS^aros) [ye]yo(v€vai) 

I. f of fT[ corr. from a. The fractions after SS' have a horizontal stroke above them ; 
similarly in 1. lo and xiii. i and i6. 

Col, xiii. 
[ 27 letters (dpovpai) . ]8'7]'fS' S^u d{y^ {nvpov dpTd(3as) SS' 
[ ^^ 5J e]j/ kiTO-^fi Teray/jL(ivai) 

[t5 . (eVei) Sia to Ka6' v8(aT09) yeyoiyevai). yi(TOves) v6t{ov) kol 

fio]ppd KOL Xi/Sbs Sia>{pv^), 
[dnT]X[ia>Tov) 35 letters ] 

5 [ 23 letters Kal fxeySxicoy) {apovpai) yL8' , at ova{ai) 

[ 29 )5 ] yL[TOve^) v6t{ov) koI ^oppd 

[ 29 „ ] Tov TTpb? v6t(ov) fiipov? 

[ 29 „ ] 

[28 „ t](3 S {^T€l) kva(f)ei{iievai) Sta to 

10 [ 26 „ yi(TOV€S:)] voTipv) ^a<nX{iKr}) yrj aiyi{a\lTLs), 

[^oppd 34 letters ] 

[ 28 letters rjo) 8 (ereO ha^ii{fxhai) Sea to 

[27 „ y]i{TOU€^) vot{ov) ne\o)po9 

[26 ,, 8L]a)pv^, d7rrjX{^La>T0v) iTepa 

15 [8ia>pv^, X0os) 20 letters] 

23 letters ]•[••• -1^ (apoupai.) a8'y]Lq^'8\ hv 

[ 23 „ ] /^ al TT^poKdiJLivai). koi kv kiro)({rf) 

kTayirjaav) 
[tS) . {€T€l) 8ia TO Kad' v8{aT0?) y(:yo[vivai). yi{Toves) v6]t{ov) Kal 

^oppd Kal A/(/3oy) fi(fiia6(<opiii/ ) 

[ ] 

ii. 2. Probably not Ka\\ovfi{€i>ai), for there is hardly room for a proper name, even if an 
yJTTfipoi was likely to bear one. 

4. /i€^' {J)v) : the abbreviation jjhB^ ) occurs frequently in this survey, always following 
the description of one of the yflrovts, but is nowhere written out. It is clearly different from 
ava fx((Tov which occurs in a corresponding position, e. g. in v. 18, and is, we think, contrasted 
■with it, meaning ' beyond ' as opposed to ' between ' ; cf, v. 17, where fji.e6{ ) (Tvva)p{ia) *l/3icoi'o(f) 
'Apyaiov must mean that the boundary between the lands of Ibion and the village with which 



918. LAND-SURVEY 281 

018 is concerned lay beyond the canal which was the south yeumv of the 3rd acjipayit. 
fi€6[(')piov) would hardly give the required sense, and would have been probably abbreviated 
fie6op{ ), and ped' (^v) (or ov or 6) is practically certain. In B.G. U. 571. 9-10, where 

Wilcken reads dn-o ;^/po-o(i;) vnoXi^oyov) (^(ipovpa) a fjs yiijovfs) /3o(ppa) v8p[aya>y6s) pedopus, Xt^of 
Xfpo'os, voTov v8p(^aya>y6s) pf6(^opos) 6S( ), aTrijX^twrov) k.t.X., we propose p-eB" (of) opos, . . . pfO' 

K^Lr{ : the interpretation of these figures, which seem to give the total of the arourae 
described in 11. 3-7, is uncertain, for they have a line above them such as is found elsewhere 
in the papyrus above a series of fractions, e.g. xi. 10, but not above numerals referring to 
arourae. The relationship of 11. 3-7 to 11. 1-2 and 8 sqq. is very obscure, but regarded as 
fractions the figures are still more difficult. 

8. [a] o-0pn(yiff) : the restoration of the missing figure is certain, not only from the 
position of the entry at the beginning of the list (cf. iii. 4) but from Col. vi, where a 

(T^pa{y\s) rj €<tt(i.) i^ a[({)pa(yis) OCCUrs in Connexion with the south yeirccv of the 4th a(ppayis. 

ev€i\{ ) is perhaps for eV fl\{vptvr]) : IXvco meaning to cover with slime is quoted by 
Hesychius. (veL\{i]ppivr]) and fpeiX^rjpevTj) are unsatisfactory, (xnopco is to be connected with 
{apovpai), not with the preceding words ; cf. iii. 5. 

12. piToxipv) is more probable than //eTo;^ («i') here and in 1. 24, since 'lai'wi'nai'e^pe/x/Liew? 
(1. 19) seems to be meant. 

13. TiKvavis Xeyopi^ivrj) timpv^ : neither this canal nor that called ^ayrjovs (v. 17), or 
^aKT]ovs (v. 21), was known previously. For wv [t6 KaTaK[ ) cf. iii, 10, xi. 9. The abbrevia- 
tion KUTUK^ ) perhaps stands for Kara KetpaKrjv, which is used e.g. in Arist. Pol. 2. 10. 7 in the 
sense of /car' avdpa. Cf. P. Tebt. 343. 5 and 88, where di<e^dXo(v) in a survey-list apparently 
means ' nondescript ', ' unclassified.' 

16. ^oppa T] ixo{p.^vr}) a(ppa{yis) means not the 2nd or any other crcftpayii adjoining the 
I St, but the plot described in 11. 18 sqq.; cf. 1. 21, where v6t{ov) fj inavia (T(ppa{yls) refers 
back to the plot described in 11. 14-7, both plots being comprised in the ist o-^/jayiV. 

Similarly in iii. 15 dnrjX^tairov) rj (x.o{ij-(vt)) a(f)pa[yis) corresponds to Xi/3oy T] indv[a> a(f)pa{yls) in 

the yeiTopes of the next plot described ; cf. also xi. 16 and 19, where fj iirdva a-cppuyls refers 
in each case to the preceding holding. This, the ordinary use of o-(^payt's, which occurs 
throughout 918 in describing the yelroves of the individual holdings to express the separate 
parcels, must be distinguished from its use to denote the larger areas which had numbers, 
and contained several (T(ppay'i8es in the narrower sense. Where, as e. g. in xi. 6, 17 e^^s 
or f) indva (T(ppa{yis) occurs in the description of a numbered a-cppayis as a whole, it refers 
to another numbered acf^payli, not to an individual holding. 
18. For iy^{aivov(rai) cf. P. Tebt. 84. 9 1 and note. 

iii. 3. For the occurrence of an angular sign before dva piaov cf. P. Tebt. 86. 32. In 
V. 1 it takes the shape of a wavy line. 

5. (Tiv{6pco) : cf. ii. 8, where anopa is written out. 

The missing figure of the arourae assessed at 5I artabae is supplied by the arithmetic 
(io|- = I + 9^), and confirmed by the details concerning the 2nd acppayls given in iii. 17-v. 
14, since two mentions of ^ aroura at that rate occur. The rate at which the 9I arourae 
were assessed (4ff artabae) is restored from 1. 13, &c. 

n-2. The restorations of the proper names are derived from an entry in Col. iv, 
where i aroura belonging to these three persons is described. Bevu'i[pios is not improbable, 
but there is no likelihood of a connexion between this name, which ought to be Graeco- 
Egyptian, and Benjamin. 

V. 17. Though the « of avvd}p(ia) is for the most part lost in a lacuna, this spelling is 
confirmed by <Tvv6)p{ia) 'i/3. 'Apy. which occurs in Col. vii. 



282 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

21. exofj.{evrj) is Superfluous and should be omitted, or perhaps altered to irpoKfifievr], 
since the canals called ^ayrjovs (1. 1 7) and ^oKfjovs are obviously identical. 

xi. 1. In the fractions of the aroura after Jg we should expect -Jj J^; XjS can be 
read, but the two following letters are irreconcilable with $8. The following n may be for 
d^va), but the sign for rrvpov dprd^as would not fill the lacuna. At the end of the line fT[. is 
perhaps fT[dy(r](Tav), sc. ev enoxij ', cf. xiii. 17. 

2-5. The punctuation of these lines is not clear, and to what figure wr in each case 
refers is uncertain. The land ' leased in the 3rd year' (1. 2) corresponds to that described 
in 11. 12-3, the i aroura in 1. 4 to that in 1. 18, and the 6f arourae in 1. 5 to the 6| arourae 
in 1. 15. The i8| arourae in 1. 3 would be expected to correspond to the figure in 1. 13, 
but the vestiges following {apovpai) there suit X, not i. 

9. r] before atppa^yls) is probably 17, not the number of the a(ppayls, since there is no 
stroke above it such as occurs with the numbers of the o-^payTSe? elsewhere. 

II. tj f'xo{p(vr]) clearly refers to the land described in 11. 12-7; the following word is 
not (T(f)pa{yU), and to read 1(3 [(T(j)pa{yis)] is unsatisfactory, for the individual holdings com- 
prised in the numbered (T<ppayl8es do not themselves have numbers; cf. ii. 16, note. 
Moreover after t ..[..] is a horizontal line indicating p, or merely a mark of abbreviation, 
but not occurring in the abbreviation of (K^payU elsewhere in the papyrus. 

21. It is not clear whether ey means 5^ (arourae) or is an abbreviated word. ^ is not 
a common fraction of the aroura, but occurs in Rev. Laws Ix. 23. It is not possible to read 
Z for e and connect the fractions with the preceding S. 



919. Advance of Dues on a Freight. 

14-5 X 10=3 cm. A. D. 182? 

Memorandum of an advance of 160 drachmae to a ship's captain for customs- 
dues to be paid at Memphis on a cargo of olives and honey. The 22nd year in 
which the document is dated probably refers to the reign of Commodus. 

K^ (eTOVs) Ilavi'i k^ 

€K X6y{ov) K\ri[pov ?) 'IovX{iov) H apan(jLCOvos). 
KaXXia Kv^ipvrjr{rj) ei'y riXtf 
MefX(l)ea)9 tcou lp[^]Xri6evT[a>v) 
5 avTcoL kXaias II poaco7r(tTa>p) cj 
K0]j.La6{evTa)v) an ^ApaivoiiT{ov) Kal 
p-ovr} KXavSia 'laiScopa 
peXiTos K(pa{picou) ^ Kal cre- 
^eiTicov K S)u Xoyoiy) 
10 Sooa^i [Spa)(paT) p|. 

86{t(o) Xoyipv) SapaTT[ia>vi) {ppa\pa)v) p^. 

4. 6 of fij{dY-l^f'^{'^^) corr. from r. 



919. ADVANCE OF DUES ON A FREIGHT 283 

' The 22nd year, Pauni 27, on account of the holding (?) of Julius Sarapion. Paid to 
Calleas, pilot, for the taxes of Memphis upon his freight of 90 Prosopite measures of olives 
carried from the Arsinoite nome, and 7 jars and 20 boxes of honey for Claudia Isidora 
solely, 160 drachmae, of which he shall render an account. 

Let him render an account to Sarapion of 160 drachmae.' 

2. KX»y(pov) is not quite satisfactory, but KKr)(^povQfjLov) or -av is unlikely owing to I. 11, 
where a Sarapion is apparently mentioned whom it is natural to identify with the Julius 
Sarapion here. 

3-4. The Ti\r} Me'iKJifas are analogous to the duty called Xifievos Meficpfcos in Fayfim 
customs-receipts, e.g. P. Fay. 69, 72, &c. ; cf. P. Brit. Mus. III. 1107 and Preisigke's recent 
discussion of this tax in P. Strassb. i. p. 50. In P. Hibeh no. 24, of the third century b. c, 
only a small sum for ypannaTiKov was paid at Memphis upon a freight of corn. 

5. We suppose npocra)n{iTt}s) to be a measure deriving its name from the Prosopite 
nome, like the 'o^upuxtVj^s (P. Brit. Mus. III. 11 70. verso 79, &c.) from Oxyrhynchus. rrpo- 
o-a)n(iTtSos) might also be read in agreement with eXaiat (cf. e.g. 116. 11 ;ue'rpoi' 'O/^jSemKoC 
cf)oiviKo(s)), in which case the measure is not specified ; but apart from that small difficulty it 
is unlikely that olives from the Prosopite nome in the Delta would be taken to Memphis 
via the Fayfim. The figure at the end of the line is doubtful; it is more like (\ than i, but 
does not greatly resemble either. A figure of some kind however seems essential. 

8. a-f^eiTiav. cf. P. Par. 10. 22 ac^'iTiov yvvaiKflov. The word is supposed to be 
a diminutive of o-f/3tV, which according to Hesychius = nv^ls. 

II. 2apa7i(iWt) : the letters are damaged but fairly secure. 



(/) ACCOUNTS 

920. Account of Food. 

13-9 X 13-8 cm. Late second or early third 

century. 

A short list of various articles, largely comestibles, with the prices paid for 
them. This is written on the verso of another money account of which parts of 
two columns remain, the beginnings and ends of lines respectively being lost. 
The items in the second column are dated in Phamenoth and Pharmouthi of the 
2ist year of an emperor whom from the handwriting we should suppose to be 
Antoninus or Commodus ; the document on the verso, which is in a different 
hand, is unlikely to be very much later. 

Al(v(Pccv [dpTdPrj) a {Spay^iMal) k (Svo^oXot), 

(Tivdirecos fi{eTpa ?) ^ (Spa)(/xaT) n^, 

nXaTaKioiv {Spa^jial) kS [o^oXos), 

XiTTTOiv (Spa)(fJiai) rj, 

5 craXcoTia (8pa-^fJ.al) j8 {Svo^oXoi), 



284 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

eAeai (Spa^fial) 16 {SvojSoXoi), 

TrXaraKLoav {8pa\fiai) fxt), 

arpovT^ov) fX€ydX{ov) (Spa^^^/xaT) rj, 

a(f)ai[p]im' (Spaxfial) kS, 

10 TrXaraKicov (Spax/J-al) v^, 

a^aipfcoy (SpaxfJ-cci) vfi, 

h X6y{ov) dpa^a>[vos) (TTpovT{ov) {8pa\ixai) i^ [ 

poaiy {SpaxiJ-al) 6 [ 

I. Si^v^ai/ Pap. 3. First a of TrXnroKtcoj/ COrr. 6. 1, f'Xatat. 8. \. (TTpov6[ov); 

so in 1. 12, 

1. Bi^vcjiaiv : cf. Anth. Pal. ix. 503 OIk d\6ya>s iv Si^Ccfiois Bvvafiip Tiva Oeiav uvai i'cf)r]v, 
X^fS yovv 8i^v(f)ov iv xpovlai fjnidXa KafivovTi Terapralu TTfpirjyl^a, Koi yivovev rap^ewr, ola KpoTcov, vyirjs, 

8iCv(f)ois and 8iCv(Pov have been commonly rejected {diCvdois Erasm., C^Cv4'°^s (cf. Geop. x. 44 
CiCv(pa ek olvofifXi (^vXarrerat) Bapt. Pius, &c., ^covcpiois Toup, ' genuina VOX nondum reperta ' 
Stadtmiiller), but are now confirmed by the papyrus. AlCvcpov is apparently another form 
of CiCv(Pov, the fruit of the zizyphus or jujube-tree ; cf. e. g. Pliny, II. N. 15. 14. § 47. 

2. n{(Tpa): or perhaps /n(drta) : the abbreviation consists of a yn with a small f written 
above and somewhat to the right of it. 

3. nXaraKiov is a (new) diminutive of 7rXaTa|, which, according to Athen. 309 a, was an 
Alexandrian name of the fish KopaKlvos. 

4. For \fiTTa>v cf. P. Strassb. 40. 48 rh i^ tdovs dibopem XeTrra . . . ; what exactly is meant 
is not clear. 

5. aaXuiTia : the word is unknown. 

8. (TTpovBus ixiyns OX peydXr) means an ostrich, but ostriches can hardly have been 
purchased for 8 drachmae. Perhaps this was a part payment; cf. 1. 12, where 12 drachmae 
are paid as earnest money for (rTpovT{ov). In P. Leipzig 97. xxviii. 18 and 20, xxix. 19 and 
2 1 occur entries of an artaba fls ra a-rpovBcov. 

9. cr^atpi'a are probably sweetmeats, so called from their shape; cf. Vi'/a MS. 

S. SinieOfilS Sail aikiyvia Ka\ (K^aipia Ka\ 6\j/dpia. 



921. Inventory of Property. 

34'3 X 14-4 cm. Third century. 

A list of various articles, chiefly of dress ; cf. 109, 741, P. Tebt. 406, P. Gen. 
80, &c. The list is on the verso of a lengthy third-century account, of which the 
beginnings of lines are lost throughout, mostly concerning measurements of build- 
ings, &c., and mentioning different kinds of TrT/x^'? — airXol, Kap.apoiTiKoi (or -ootol), 
and (ixfBaboL : e. g. cTrt to] a{vTd) a-nXoi ■7r7jx(c'?) X''^^ ^'^' '-' ^\ <Sv KajxapoiTiKol \ avb, ol] 
Aot7r(oi) ■n-qx{€Ls) VKeZ<^' L ^' . 7r)/xeis KaixapcoTiKoi are not otherwise attested ; the form 
ffx^aboC for ffxlBabLKoC occurs in Heron, D^ 3Iensuns, p. 314. Mention is made of 



921. INVENTORY OF PROPERTY 285 

Tirjyuaros yovft^vapiaiv €pLKtv(i)i', avji^lreXCcav, and KaivQv irXaKLoov. At the bottom 

is an entry concerning KiepdixLa, followed by the signature Aiip7jAio[s] I,apa9 
€ar]fx((L(acrdix'qv), part of a date, and . . .] eTrtSeSwKa. 



i a aTTOKLjxeva irapa Apcnuoijv 




^TTlKapCTLOV Kaivov 


a, 


nepi^oXciSLa epea 


y. 


15 


aivSovLa (TKLcord 


)8, 


crrpdofiaTa a- . iKiaya 


7> 




KoXo^LU TpLJSaKO. 


8, 


aovpiKonaWLov 


a, 




dva^oXdSia 


y> 


5 Ifxciriov XevKou 


a, 




fiaXavdpLOv 


a, 


KoXo^ia afidXXea 


8, 




(TLvBovLOu irayv 


a, 


lxa(f)6pTiov XevKov 


«, 


20 


KcpwiKdpia Tpi(3aK(d) 


/S, 


KepniKapia kpea KaXXe(ov) 


/3 




aivdovLv KyyoTToX^iTOv) Tpi^^aKov) 


a, 


Kal Xij/a, 






'AcppoSiTT], 




10 irfpi^cofia 


a, 




iea-Tac /3, 




cra^avo^aKLoipLou puLiKpov) 


a, 




Kal kv red 7rvp{i]yi(TKa) 




(ravavo(paKidpL[ov) Qarjai[os) 


a, 


25 


fiva-pa, 




dXXo Tpi^aKov 


a, 




TTiTrepas. 





8. Kn\\i{ov) inserted later: the final letter has a stroke above it. 12. 1. <xal3avo- 

(PaKidpi(^ov). 16. 8 written through y. 24. ^cw of Truptyto-Koj above the line. 

' Articles deposited with Arsinoe : — 3 woollen wraps, 3 . . . coverings, i outer cloak, 
I white mantle, 4 woollen (?) shirts, i white veil, 2 woollen pillows belonging to Calleas, 
and some linen ones, i girdle, i small face-cloth, i face-cloth belonging to Thaesis, i ditto, 
worn, I new cross-band, 2 cambrics with shaded stripes, 4 worn shirts, 3 shawls, i bathing- 
bag (?), I thick cambric, 2 worn pillows, i Cynopolite cambric, worn, an Aphrodite, 2 cups ; 
and in the casket some spoons, some pepper.' 

3. 0- . iKiava is perhaps a geographical adjective ; the first letter may be a. 

4. crovpiKonaXKiov : usually spelled o-ov/3piK07rdAXtoi' ; cf B. G. U. 327. 7, C. P. R. I. p. 124. 
6. (TudkXfa is possibly to be connected with fiaWos: cf the collateral forms papiXr] 

(Tfiapikri, fjLopayva crp.apayi'a, &c. ; but there seems to be no other trace of the spelling with an 
initial a- in the case of naXXos. 

8. Kfp-niKapia = cervicalta ; the word is found in the form Kep^iKapia in a similar list 
published by Wessely in C. P. R. I. p. 125, and in B. G. U. 814. 11. We interpret KaX\e(ov) 
as a proper name on the analogy of Qar](n{os) in I. 12. 

II. a-a^avo^aKidpiov is a new compound. aa^avLov occurs in P. Gen. 80. 4. 

14. i-niKapcrioV. cf. C. P. R. I. 21. 1 9 (Tovhdpiov ^i-mK^^dpa-iov and 27. 9 TraWlokov yKo^ov 
in iKapfTiov, 

15. o-Kiwra : cf. Arrian, Peripl. Mar. Ruhr. p. 13 (Sivai cTKicoTal, explained to be 
variegated girdles. a-iKimrep in P. Tebt. 413. 11 is perhaps for o-kiodtov. 

17. dva^okdbia occur also in 109. 9. How they differed from irepi^oXaSia is 
not clear. 

18. ^akavdpiov is apparently novel; the word may mean a towel or perhaps a bag 
carried by a person going to the bath like irphs ^oKavtou in 903. 29. 



286 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

24. TTipyicTKa seem's to be the word intended, though there is something between the p 
and y. The surface of the papyrus was fauhy here, and this may have disconcerted 
the writer. 

26. ninepas is apparently a form of TreVfpty: cf. Alex. Trail, i. p. 67 imrfpoyapov for 

TTtTiepoyapov. 



922. Account of Horses. 

3i«i X 21-7 cm. Late sixth or early seventh 

century. 

This document contains particulars concerning a number of horses and other 
^wa, how they had been disposed of, changes effected by sale and purchase, and 
losses through decease. The use to which these animals were put is not stated, but 
some of them may well have been employed in the o^vs 8po/xos (cf. 900. 6, note), 
or perhaps the hif]\x6aios nipKos (145. 2). The popularity of horse-racing at this 
period seems to have led to the introduction of foreign breeds and variation of 
qualities; one of the horses here enumerated came from Constantinople (1. 1^), 
and several unknown technical terms or epithets occur. 

The sheet of papyrus is so made up that the recto of a strip added along 
one side coincides with the verso of the remainder, and on this surface, which is 
thus mostly verso, the account is written. On the back at a distance from each 
other are two semi-effaced and illegible lines in which we can discover no 
connexion with the main document. 

+ Ta Svo iTnrdpia "Ao-kXov k866rj e/y Tov tmrLK^ov). 
TO tmrdpip "fl(p€(o9 €866[r]) eh to dvco o-tcc^Xov. 
TO iTTTrdpLv TOV dp^o{yT09) kSoOiji) eh to avTo aTa^Xov. 
TO linTdp[iov) Unapias e866{rf) eh to avrb aTd(3Xov. 
5 TO iTTTrdpiiov) tov ApoivoiTcv eS66(r]) eh to avTo a^Td^Xov. 
TO jxiKpov XevKov iTTTrdpLv eS66(r)) eh tov ImriKiov). 
HaTpiKiov Kal Tou fxiKpbu yepdj-qu SeSdoKafiev 

vnep TOV TTvppov imrov tov dvoa ard^Xov. 
TO XevKov (popdSiv Kal neXajov BeSdtKapev 
lo vnep TOV diroOavovTO^ fxiKpov 'imrov. 
TOV KiVTLVov TTeTTpdKajiev Kal Tjyopdaafxev 
TOV /XLKpov p.eXavov tov ev tQ> aTd^Xca. 
TOV iTTTTOv TOV Xeyojievov nXe^ TTeiTpdKajiev 

vnep Tpicov vopiap.dT(iou Kal TavTa e^ei 6 Kvpio9 ^iXo^evoi?). 



922. ACCOUNT OF HORSES 287 

15 TO iTTTTapiv KoovcTTavTiyov TToXeo)? TrenpaKafiiv 

virep [vo^fiia-fxarcou)] y kol Tama e^ei 6 Kvpi09 ^tXo^evo^. 
TO, /3 ^co[a T]fjs 'HpaKXiovs Kal to C^ou Ovpeeirj^T 

7reTTpd[K]afiiy vtt(}p) i^o^/XLo-fxaTCCi') e/3' Kal TavTa I866{rj) tS> avTco. 
TO C^ou To[v] dp-^civTOs) Kal to tov vSpo(p6pov Kal dfxovpyo9 
20 aTTaiOavav. 

TO ^opaSiv TO diToOavoov vnoKaTOi M-qva. /x€i^oTep(ov). 
■fjyopaaBr) diro "fl<p(C09 (wa Tpta vo(fxi(rparaiu) ijy' , 
Kal dno IlaXXoocreoos dXXo ^(oov vc^ixicrpaTcov) y. 
2nd hand rjTriOauev 17 ovodriX^eLa) tcov Kapav^oiToov. 

25 TTjv dXXr]v ouoOrjXiav Tcav avT(£>v Kapav^ooTOdv Kal ttju t5)V diro 

AovKiov 
Kal TTju jXLKpav knooXvcra Kal '^XajSa Ticrcrapa vo^fXiafiaTa) vnep avToov. 

I. 8i/o Pap. "tTrVapia Pap. ; so in 11. 2-6, 15. t7rV£*c(oi') Pap. ; so in 1.6. 5. npo-i- 

voiTov Pap. 7. jr oi narpiKiou corr. (?). 8. vTTfp Pap.; so in 11. 10, 14, 16, and 26. 

iVVou Pap.; so in 11. 10, 13. 17. Above the last 5 letters of orpeet?j/3r there is a horizontal 

stroke. 19. vdpo(popov Pap. 20. 1. anidavov, 2 1. 1. dnodapov. VTroKaTco Pap. 

24. 1. anfdavev. 25. Tr]v in both cases corr. from -q, and final v oi aWr^v and ovoOtjXmv 

inserted. 26. 1. enoiXrja-a. 

' The two horses from Asclou were delivered to the groom. The horse from Ophis 
was delivered to the upper stable. The horse of the magistrate was delivered to the same 
stable. The horse from Spania was delivered to the same stable. The horse from the 
Arsinoite noma was delivered to the same stable. The small white horse was delivered to 
the groom. I gave. Patricius(?) and the small ... for the bay horse of the upper stable. 
I gave the white mare and the . . . for the small horse which died. I sold the . . . and 
bought the small black one which is in the stable. I sold the horse called Pleb for 3 solidi, 
which the revered Philoxenus has. I sold the horse from Constantinople for 3 solidi, 
which the revered Philoxenus has. I sold the two asses (?) from Heracleopolis and the ass 
from Oureeiebt for 5§ solidi, which were paid to the same. The ass of the magistrate 
and that of the water-carrier and its mate are dead. The mare which died belonged to 
Menas the official. Three asses were bought from Ophis for 8^ solidi, and another from 
Pallosis for 3 solidi. The she-ass of the Karaneots is dead. The other she-ass of the said 
Karaneots and that belonging to the people from Lucii and the small one I sold, and 
received 4 solidi for them.' 

I. "AotkXov on the analogy of "Qcfieas, 2navias (which occurred in 190), &c., should be 
a place-name. 

7. narpiKiov here appears to be a proper name rather than a title. The paragraphus 
after 1. 6 indicates that 'mniK{ov) ends the sentence (cf. 1. i), so that Patricius does not refer 
to the groom. Perhaps the name of a horse is meant; cf. 1. 13 and note, yepdrrjv may 
possibly mean 'aged'; cf. the late form yeparia. The r might be read as y. 

9. neXuTov : or neXayop, which is no easier. For 0opaSt(o)i' cf. Hesych. cpopddes ai 

BTjXfiai tTTTTOt. 



288 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

II. KevTivos is an unknown word. 

13. innav Tov 'Keyojxevov Yl\i^ : cf. 140. 2 2 (mov tov \eyofi(vov Uepia-a-ov. Is nXe'/3 con- 
nected \\[\.\\ plebcius (cf. UarpiKiov in 1. 7 and note) ? 

17. C^a in this context more probably signifies asses or mules than oxen (cf. P. Amh. 

146. 3 /3oV<a C<^a^. In P. Amh. 150. 23—4 X°pij"^) iip{'^^) ''■f^f'pT(i(T)/ieVa fwa rrevTrjKOvra asseS 

are likely to be meant; cf. 140. 22 tov enov (aov in a contract concerning a aTd,3Xov. 
According to Sophocles' Lex. C^p was not used of horses. 

19. 6 fjLovpy OS does not seem to occur elsewhere, but oixofpyrjizndSixoepyia are attested in 
late writers. Sfiovpyoi was perhaps intended. 

24-5. KapwfcorC^v is not likely to mean natives of Karanis in the Fayiim, though cf. 1. 5 
'Apaivoirov. There may well have been a village called Kapdvein nearer to OxyrhynchuS. 



t^) PRAYERS 
923. Petition to a Pagan Deity. 

20-I X 8-4 cm. Late second or early third 

century, 

A petition addressed to the deity of some Oxyrhynchite temple, perhaps 
Sarapis, apparently with a view to prevent the departure of a certain person 
to Alexandria for purposes of sacrifice, and to cause him to sacrifice at the 
Oxyrhynchite Sarapeum instead ; but owing to the incompleteness of the first six 
lines, where the construction is uncertain, the precise object of the prayer is 
obscure ; cf. 1. 6, note. Similar petitions or questions addressed to Graeco- 
Egyptian deities are extant in P. Fay. 137-8, B. G. U. 229-30, Wessely, Script. 
Gr. Spec. no. 26, and P. Brit. Mus. 1267 <^ {Archiv, IV. p. 559); cf also 925. 
The papyrus is broken at the top, but it is not certain that any lines are missing. 



[ ] • fw liiyaK[ 

[ ] . . ere 'AiTLOiv'l. . . 

T . . [.]i . , vq 'E^CCKai' . [. . 
[....]. Tiaai avrols axTTe 

5 [ ]l€lS aVToTs TOV 

/x[. . . .]u oy €ia(Tap (h 
Ovatav (TOV rov Kvpiov fxr] 
KaT^veyKCiL e/y 'AX^^av- 
Spciay, enel Kar dyvoiau 
10 Tcop cppoPTiScov av- 



923. PETITION TO A PAGAN DEITY 289 

t5)V rjpyaaaro, dWa 'irepov 
dvT avTOv, Kal eKeii^ou 
Ovaai kv rw eV 'O^vpvy^iiTrj 
SccpcnreiM. tovto rj/xeiu 
1 5 S6s. 

1. Perhaps /xfyaX[«, for which cf. e.g. P. Fay. 137 hegmning ^oKavviSKovv'i deai ixf(yd)\((oi) 
fjifydXcdi. Line i here may be the beginning of the petition, but [tm Kv]pico (cf. P. Fay. 138. i 
Kvpioi AiocTKovpoi) is unsuitable ; the traces of the letter before the supposed t rather suggest 
y or T. 

2. The letter before a-e may be t, v, or v. 

3. Unless 'E^aKcov is nominative, the following letter must be t, which is possible. 

4. Possibly [xpr]fJ-]aTi(Tai. 

5. jietf seems to be the termination of a future verb, though this does not yield 
a satisfactory construction, v or n can be read in place of i. 

6. Possibly n[6(rxo]f, in w-hich case eKeivov in 1. 12 is the object, not the subject, of Qva-ai. 
But it seems hardly likely that the petition should be merely concerned with the place where 
a calf was to be sacrificed, and the question whether a person was to make a journey was 
frequently asked of an oracle; cf. P. Fay. 137-8 and P. Tebt. 284. 2 sqq., and for 
a Christian parallel 925. We prefer therefore to suppose that tov /i[. . . .V is a personal 
name or description. 

8. KareviyKoi : leSS probably KareviyKT], 

924. Gnostic Charm. 

9 X 7-6 cm. Fourth century. 

A charm for warding off fever, similar to B. G. U. 956 (edited with a com- 
mentary by Wilcken in Archiv, I. pp. 420-7) and P. Tebt. 275, but Christian 
instead of pagan ; cf. B. G. U. 954-5. The Deity is not addressed under any 
particular name at the beginning, but the essentially Gnostic character of the 
charm is shown at the end by the mystical symbols and the occurrence of the 
title Abrasax, a common Gnostic name of the Supreme Being. 

'J? ii.r]v (f)v\a^ri<i Kal crvvrr]- 
prjcTTj^ 'ApLa9 dnb tov e7nr]ix€pi- 
pov (PpLK09 Kal dno tov KaQrjfxe- 
pivGV (ppiKO^ Kal dnb tov vvKTepi- 
5 pov (ppLKo? Kal dnb tov X^tttov 

\to(v) XeTTrou} nvpe[Tov 

<pr]9. TavTa ev[p.€pa)]9 [7r]/3a[^- 

  

ety oXcoy Kara to 6i\r]fid 

U 



290 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

(Tov TrpcoTou Kal Kara rrji/ iricr- 
10 Tiu avTfj9 OTi SovXr] ecrrtV 

TOV 6(eo)v TOV (oiVTOS, KOI 'lua 

TO ovofia aov rj Sia navTo^ 
1 77 [ Se8o^a(TjJ.ip[ov. ] 



15 a 'I(r]ao)v TTaT-qp vl 

V — 

I 7rj(€i5//)a a 



69 f^TJrrjp X{pi(TTo)v 

V 

CO ayios CO 



On the verso 



'A^pa ad^ 



'Apt{a)t. 



2. 1. 'Apiav . . . tP;? e(f)rjfifpivTis. v of fniTjfKpivov COrr. from tr. 3~4' !• '■'1^ Ka6rjfifpm]i 

, . . T^r vvKTfpivrjs. 16. 1. ayiov, 

' Verily guard and protect Aria from ague by day and quotidian ague and ague by 
night and slight fever and . . . All this thou wilt graciously do in accordance with thy 
will first and with her faith, since she is a servant of the Hving God, and in order that thy 
name may be glorified for ever.' 

1. TJ ixrjv: cf. B. G. U. 229. 3 and 230. 3 ^ ^eu a-odrjo-ai {sz'c). 

2. e-mrjpfpivos is contrasted with WKTtpivos (1. 4), nadr^fifpivos with e. g. rpiTalos ; cf. 

p. Tebt. 275. 21, &c. 

6. Above the t of Xetttou is what looks like a tt, but in any case seems to be superfluous. 
The line cannot have proceeded koi anb eVal^^f, for though 6770^17 is coupled with if pa 
v6(Tos in contracts relating to the purchase of slaves, who are guaranteed to be dvanopicfioi 
n'k^v Upai voa-ov koi fna(f)^s (e.g. in 95. 19), the term does not signify a disease, as will 
shortly be demonstrated by Prof. Kubler. 

7-8. [7r]pai^]fty is very doubtful, for the writer elsewhere divides words between two 
lines correctly, and the supposed p might be t, t, or cf), while of the supposed a only the 
slightest vestige remains. 

10— II. Cf. B. G. U. 954- 8 tpiov tov dov\ov a-ov, 8ov\os tov dtov tov (5)vtos occurs in 
Daniel (Theodot.) 6. 20. 

15-7. IV and XV are written larger than the rest. The use of the vowels is very 
common in magical formulae, but it is curious that here they are six, not seven in number, 
€ being omitted, unless indeed it was written to the left of a or »?, where the edge of the 
papyrus is damagedi 



925. CHRISTIAN PRAYER 291 

925. Christian Prayer. 

5-6 X 9-6 cm. Fifth or sixth century. 

This prayer is a Christian counterpart of the pagan petitions to the oracle of 
which 923 is a specimen. The writer asks whether it was the divine will that he 
should make a certain journey and whether success would attend him. Pre- 
sumably this prayer was to be deposited in some church, just as the similar pagan 
documents were left in the temples ; cf. P. Fay. 137. introd. It is written in 
a clear cursive of the fifth or sixth century. 

+'0 ^(eo)y 6 TravTOKpaTcap 6 dyLO? 
6 dXrjdivbs (f)iXdvdp(OTTO? KoL 

SrjfiLovpyb^ 6 'n{ar)r]p tov K(ypto)v (^<aT) aa)(Tfj)p(o)? 
r}fi5iv 'I{r](To)v X[piaTo)v ^avepcccrov fioL ttji/ 
5 irapd (Tol dXrjBLav el fiovXt) fj.e direXOuv 
e/y Xioiir rj evpicrK(o ere avu e/xol 
irparrovTa {koI) evfxa'fju. yevoiTO, o^O. 

' O God almighty, holy, true, and merciful, Creator, Father of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ, reveal to me thy truth, whether it be thy will that I go to Chiout, and 
whether I shall find thee aiding me and gracious. So be it; Amen.' 

1-4. Cf. B. G.U. 954. 1-3. 

7. qd is the common symbol for dixrjv, 99 being the sum of the numerical equivalents of 
the letters. 



{/i) PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE 

926. Invitation to Dinner. 

2'9 X 4*9 cm. Third century. 

This and the following papyrus (927) are further examples of the formal 
invitations to feasts of which we have previously published examples from 
Oxyrhynchus (110-1, 524, 747) and the Fayiam (P. Fay. 1:^2), but which 
curiously enough have not yet appeared in other collections. The occasion 
of the party in the present case was the kTriKpiais of the person in whose 
name the invitation was issued, i. e. his admission to the privileged class who 
were wholly or in part exempt from the poll-tax ; cf. P. Oxy. II. pp. 217 sqq. 
The normal age of candidates for i-nUpicns was about 13 years, since on reaching 

U 2 



292 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

14 they became liable to the tax ; the formality thus heralded the attainment of 
puberty and the entry upon the duties of a citizen. This invitation is peculiar in 
having upon the back what seems to be an address, which former instances have 
lacked ; the address, however, is in a different hand and doubtfully deciphered, 
and possibly it is not really connected with the note on the recto. 

KaXii a€ 'HpaOicov 
Senrvfjcrai e/s ttji/ eni- 
Kpiaiv avTOV kv Trj ol- 
Kia avT\o\v avpiov r]Tis 
5 eo-riV e ctTTo &p{as;) \0.] 

On the verso 

and hand XaiXaficoyi 
'HXaaiov. 



• • I 



6. 1. Xaipafificovt (?). 

' Heratheon invites you to dine with him, on the occasion of his examination, at his 
house to-morrow, the 5th, at the 9th hour.' 

5. The abbreviation of o>pas consists of an o through which a p is drawn. 

927. Invitation to a Wedding. 

3-2 X 6'2 cm. Third century. 

A formal invitation to a wedding, by which no doubt a feast in celebration 
of the wedding is to be understood ; cf 926. introd., and 111, 747, and P. Fay. 132, 
which are also invitations to wedding feasts. The writing is on the verso of 
a strip cut from two documents which have been gummed together ; one of these 
apparently mentioned the emperor Alexander Severus, so that the invitation may 
be referred to the middle or latter part of the third century. 



KaXT <Tat Epa>s 
f/y ydfxov? tJtis 
ia-uf avpiov k6 
aiTo CO pas V. 

I. 1. <T(. 2-3. I. avpiou tJtis ((TTiv : cf. e.g. 920. 4-5. 

' Eros invites you to a wedding to-morrow the 29th at the 9th hour.' 



928. LETTER OF LUCIUS 



293 



928. Letter of Lucius. 

10-2 X 7-3 cm. Second or third century. 

In this kindly letter written by Lucius to Apolinarius, who is addressed as 
' brother ', the latter is warned of a plot against a girl who had lost her pro- 
tector, and is asked to befriend her. The writing is across the fibres of the 
papyrus. 

A^v'\kios 'AiroXLvapmL tcoi 

€7ri Z<onvpov TeXivrrjaavTos rfj 
TatSi Tov 'Afx.(f)LdaXeo9 ilcriu 01 
5 kmSp^vovTiS, co/xeiXTjaa? 

8i flOL TTOTi TTfpl TOVTOV, (pU- 

vepov aoL noico 'iva kav 80KI- 

jidcrrjs TTOirj(rr]s rrplv irpo- 

Xrjix(p6fji'af ovSe yap 6 tov 
10 He^aareipov p.r]Tepa e'x^^* 

iav Tap^L^ia a^avrZ ttol- 

^[s] Kdjiol KipdjXLov iri/Ji- 

^//^[o]^'. TO, iraiSia irap kjiov koI 

'I(riSa}picovo9 7rpoaay6p€[v]e. 
15 eppcoadai <t€ ev)(op.ai. 

On the verso 

'AiroXivapiooi. 

4. 1. eaiSt. 5. 1. €(f){8pfvovT(s. 7. (Va Pap. 9. r of Tou written over Something 
else. 14. ^(TibeopuDvos Pap. 

' Lucius to Apolinarius his brother, greeting. Since now that Zopyrus is dead there 
are persons making designs upon Thai's daughter of Amphithales, and you once had a 
conversation with me on this subject, I therefore inform you, in order that if you think 
fit you may act before she is entrapped ; for the son (?) of Sebastinus has no mother either. 
If you are making pickled fish for yourself send me a jar too. Greet the children from me 
and Isidorion. I pray for your health. (Addressed) To Apolinarius.' 

3. The use of the article with the proper names in 11. 3-4 is unusual, but neither 
Tt){T]6l8i nor rfj waibi can be read for rj? TaiSi. 

9. It is difficult to avoid reading 6 before tov, though the sentence then seems irrelevant. 
Without 6, the subject of «x€t is ThaYs. 



294 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

929. Letter of Nicanor. 

34*5 X 9*8 cm. Late second or third century. 

The subject of this letter is the loss of some articles of clothing, which the 
writer wished his correspondent to assist him in recovering. It is on the verso of 
the papyrus, the recto containing the latter parts of lines of a column of early 
second-century accounts, of which the upper portion has been erased to receive 
the address of the letter. Three sections remain, each following the same 
formula, e. g. (the last) (i) v-n'kp 7 (2) ] aAc^a ^ /3^T-(a) A<7 (3) ]ajue( ) p-n 'Abpi{av?} 
Kol b' A/3 (4) ] t i'^,/ T^h (5) ] 'A^A^- AttoKKwvls r^b (6) ] A7//x(/jiaro?) T^b, I avriX[(ap.aTOs) 
T^b, 7rA(?/pes). The preceding sections are similarly headed ] vtt^p b and ]y virep e 
respectively, with aAc^a and f37]T{a) followed by different figures in the next line ; in 
No. 2, 1. 3, there is a y before ajue( ) and 'A8( ) for 'A8pi( ) ; 'AttoXXmvis appears 
in the same position in both cases. 

The verso had already been once used, and has been cleaned to make way 
for Nicanor's epistle. The original document began with a date of the 21st year 
of Commodus (a. d. 180), but beyond this only a few isolated letters are legible. 

NeiKcivcop Nivvd- yfj X^vKrj^ Kal aw rov- 
p(o tS>l d8€X(p(p y^aipuv. 15 t(^ dWa SvfxaTa irdv- 

elScos (Tov TO \(j\nov8eov ra, co? ilvai knl to avTO 

TO rrpos irdvTa^ Kal dpiOpco e^, dTTOKaTacTTT)- 

5 vvv €v TOVTo fie virrj- crai p.01 ety 'O^vpvy^eiTriv 

p€Ti](T€i9. KaXa>^ noLT]- €^ S)u 'icr^ov to, rrpoKu- 
cr€iy dnaLT^aa^ Ti^^' ^° fieva ndvTa. Sib ypd^co 

Lv TOV vavTLKov Svfta (Toi, a5eX0e, 'iv ei dXXoTpid 

KapoLVOV ^LTCopo? kaTiv iSr}^, efjus Si [xol kv 

10 kv d> Xtvov Kal Xkv- Tdyei Trepl tovtov, 

TLov Tpi^aKov, Kal €pia, kppaxrOat ae et'^o^(at). 

TavTa Se TrdvTa crvv- 
€vrji eh TW \iTa)ua tov Kapoivov 
Kal €o-(Ppayicrdi] 

On the recto 

25 Nivvdpco oLKovofiip 'Ama>vo9 ^TRo^{TT)yov) 
and hand i^apd) NeiKdvopos. 

2. xotpfi Pap. 3. 1. [«r]7roi»8aroi'. g. 1. fioi. 12. I. (Tvv€vrjv. tit . . . Ka\poivov 

above 11. 13-4. 



929. LETTER OF NIC A NOR 



295 



' Nicanor to Ninnarus his brother, greeting. Knowing your goodness to all, I ask you 
now to do me this one service. Please demand from Tithois the sailor a garment consisting 
of a brown tunic, inside which was a linen cloth, a worn towel, and some wool. All these 
were inside the brown tunic, and it was sealed with white clay, and with it send back to me 
all the other garments, making the total number six, to the Oxyrhynchite nome whence 
I obtained all the aforesaid articles. I write therefore to you, brother, to see if they are in 
some one else's possession. Please tell me at once about this. I pray for your health. 
(Addressed) To Ninnarus steward of Apion, strategus (?), from Nicanor.' 

5. h TovTo : or perhaps fV Tov7-(a)), but there is no other case of the confusion of o and 
ft) in this letter. 

8, bvfia for evSvfia is apparently novel. 

9. Kapolvnv seems to be for Kapvtvov, 'nut-brown'; cf. Theophr. de Sensu >j8 KapCivov 

)(po)fia eK j^'Xapov Koi Kvapoddovs. 

12. (Tvvfvrji: this form is the converse of the common use of ^ufov§, e.g. P. Tebt. 

317. 19-20 e(p' av ei^a\u , . . ^v. 

17. aTTOKaTaa-T^a-as, continuing the construction of dTraiTrja-as in 1. 7, would have been 
more regular. 

1 9. e^ u)v makes a bad concord with 'o^vpvyxfirtjv. 
25. crrpa(r7jyoi') is very doubtful. 



930. Letter to Ptolemaeus from his Mother. 

15x9-2 cm. Second or third century. 

An interesting letter from a mother to her son, whose teacher (Kadrjyrirris) had 
just left him, and who was now in the charge of his -naibayooyos. The writer 
with evident anxiety urges him to find another teacher. 



[ ]^ hV O/Cn /JLOl 

['y]pd<p€iy Kal nepl S>u e- 

$€V kXonTrjOrjv kiriyvov' 
5 aa napa rfj? dvyarpos 
ToD KadrjyrjTov r]fia>v 
Aioykvovs KaraTreTrXev- 
Kivai avTov Tjfiepifivovu 
yap TTcpl avTov elSvia 0- 
\o TL Kara 5w[a]//zi/ /xiXXei 
(TOL 7rpoai)(€iv. kfieXijcrc 
Si fioi nifiy^ai Kal nvOi- 



15 (T/cei?. Kal eX^yiv to ^fJTa, 
e/xapTvpei Sh rroXXa rre- 
pl Tov TraiSaycoyov aov. 

CO(TT€ OVV, T€KVOV, fieXlJ- 

adra (xoi re Kal Toa rraiSa- 
20 ycoyw (TOV KaBriKOVTi Ka- 
OrjyrjTTj cr€ irapa^aXXav. 
dcnra^ovTai (re noXXa at 
d8fX(f)aL crov Kal to. d^aa- 
KavTa naiSia ©ecot'/Soy 
25 Kal 01 rjneTepoi vauTes 
KaT Svofxa. dcnracrai tov 



296 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

uOai nepl rfj? vyias aov Kal reifiicoTaTOi' TraiSayco- 

kiTLyvSivaL TL dvayeivco- yov aov "Epcora. 

In the left-hand margin 

] • ?■«'? • • ^rI- .]•••[•••] '4^^R f[-] 

On the verso 

30 ] /TroXeyuai'a) vlcoc. 

4. 1, fXvTTTjdrjv, 

' ... do not hesitate to write to me about anything which you require. It grieved me 
to learn from the daughter of our teacher Diogenes that he had sailed, for I had no anxiety 
about him, knowing that he intended to look after you to the best of his ability. I took 
care to send and ask about your health and learn what you are reading ; he said that it was 
the sixth book and testified at length concerning your attendant. So my son, I urge both 
you and your attendant to take care that you go to a suitable teacher. IMany salutations 
are sent to you by your sisters and Theonis' children, whom the evil eye shall not harm, 
and by all our friends by name. Salute your esteemed attendant Eros . . . (Addressed) . . . 
to her son Ptolemaeus.' 

3. ivrevdiv, whether meaning 'forthwith' (e.g. P. Tebt. 378. 11 evrevdev 8e (o-xov) or 
' therefore ', is more probably to be connected with fXvnrjSrjv than with the preceding 
sentence. 

15. The subject of eXeyev is the Ka6T)yriTT]s ; his daughter could hardly have given this 
information. t6 C^ra no doubt refers to Homer, and is therefore likely to denote the sixth 
rather than the seventh book, the Homeric books being commonly numbered by letters not 
figures; cf. notes on 852. Fr. 25, and 853. iii. 3-5. 

23. d^da-Kavra: cf. e.g. P. Fay. 126. 10 TO a^acTKavTov avTrjs ttmBiov. 

28. There is a blank space after "Epcora, which indicates that this is the name of the 
TTaibayayos, not the imperative of eparav to be constructed with what follows in the margin. 

29. If the letters tpp are right they no doubt belong to eppaa-o or eppaadai, but the 
succeeding vestiges present difficulties. The letter next after the lacuna may be 6 or a, but 
neither ipf^Si<T]dai. nor fpp[a)<T]d{ai) fvx{ofiai) suits, the plural (ppaxTdii) is unlikely, and there is 
not room for (pp[cba6]ai. 

931. Letter of Theopompus to a Strategus. 
Chicago. 22-9XiO'2cm. Second century. 

A respectful letter to a strategus of the upper Sebennyte noma (cf. 1. 15, 
note) from a friend, accompanying the present of an ounce of purple. The fact 
that in 1. 8 the praefect is called KpanuTos not Xa^TrporaTos indicates that the letter 
was written before the close of the second century, and the early occurrence 
of the formula kppdcrOai ae . . , (vxofj.aL, which is here combined with (ppcoa-o, is 
noticeable ; cf. 237. vi. 35, note. The papyrus was briefly described in Part 1. 163. 



931. LETTER OF THEOPOMPUS TO A STRATEGUS 297 
©eoTTO/j-TTOs HapanicovL root 

coy r)6eXr](Ta9, Kvpie, ttjI' 
ovyKiav Trj9 7rop(f)vpa[s] kTrep.- 
5 ■^a Sia Tov KOfiiaavTOS [r]o dno 

(TOV €Tri<7T6\iOV (j)V\aKOS 80- 

O-qcrojxivov €19 Tr]v ^euiav 
TTJi fieiKpa- ae yap tool KpariaTOOL rjyejiovi 
aKoXovOeiv c<TTO)(a(xd/xr]y. 
10 eppaxrOai ae, Kvpie fxov, avv Trji 

KpaTLaTTji dSeX(pfjL Kal ttji KvpiWrj 
ivyvjjLai. 

epp<D(cro). 
^aaxpi le. 

On the verso 

15 ^apawLCOPi aTpaTr]ya)i X^^ivvvTov dvco tottoov 
n{apd) ©eoTTOfXTTOv 
cpiXov. 

8. Tt]i fieiKpa above the line. 6. 1. do0t](TofifW]v. 

' Theopompus to his most esteemed Sarapion, greeting. As you wished, sir, I have 
sent by the guard who brought the letter from you the ounce of purple to be presented at 
the entertainment to the little one ; for I guessed that you were in attendance upon his 
excellency the praefect. I pray for the health of you, sir, with your excellent sister and 
Cyrilla. Good-bye. Phaophi 15. (Addressed) To Sarapion, strategus of the upper 
toparchy of the Sebennyte nome, from his friend Theopompus.' 

8. The fiiKpa who receives presents at the itvia (cf. Arcki'v, IV. p. 539) is more likely 
to be a youthful daughter of the praefect than of Sarapion, especially as ydp in 1. 8 suggests 
that 11. 8—9 are closely connected with the preceding sentence. 

15. aTpaTTjyoii 2€^fvvvTov ava Toitav : usually a strategus had a whole nome under his 
jurisdiction, but the Arsinoite nome had two strategi for the three pfpiSes. That the 
Sebennyte nome was in the Roman period divided for administrative purposes into two 
distinct halves, the upper and the lower, with Sebennytus and Pachnamounis as their 
respective fxrjrponoXus, was already known from Ptol. Geogr. iv. 5. 21 and 23. 



298 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

932. Letter of Thais. 

9'6 X 12 cm. Late second century. 

A letter from a woman to a relative or friend, giving him various instructions 
about the payment of dues and other matters relating to agriculture. The sen- 
tences are loosely constructed and the meaning in consequence not always 
transparent. 



©at? Tiyp'm rcoi IStco •^^atpuv. 

'iypay^ra 'ATToXivapLco iva yeyrjTai kv rfj 

Il€.Tvq 'iva //[ejrpTycr?;/. kpi aoi Se AnoXii'dpi^ 

TTco? TO, Oi/xara Kol to. Srjiiocna- to ovo- 
^ jxa av avTos aoi eiTrr). av ipxV oi(pi^ dp- 

rd^as t^ Is tov9 (Tukkovs acppaytaas \a')(a- 

vocnrep/xov 'iva 7rp6)(^ipoL dicn, Kal eav 

Svvr) dva^fjvai 'iva kniyvois rov ovov. 

d(T7ra^€Tai ere XapairoScopa /c(a/) Sa/Sivos. ra 
10 yoipiSia )(a)ph fJ-ov /xt) ttooXi. 
'ippoxro. 

I. dais . . . iStw Pap. 2. 'iva Pap. ; so in 11. 3, 7, and 8. 7. ea Pap. 8. ovo 

Pap. 9. K Pap. 

' ThaYs fo her own Tigrius, greeting. I wrote to Apolinarius to come to Petne for 
the measuring. Apolinarius will tell you how the deposits and public dues stand : the name 
will be that which he will tell you himself. If you come, take out six artabae of vegetable- 
seed, sealing it in the sacks in order that they may be ready, and if you can go up to find 
out the ass, do so. Sarapodora and Sabinus salute you. Do not sell the young pigs 
without me. Good-bye. 

3. It appears from 88. 4 and elsewhere that UfTurj is indeclinable. 

4-5. The construction and punctuation of these two lines are not clear. Apparently 
a verb is to be understood with ttSis, and 6 av /c.t.X. is the predicate of t6 Svoiia. After the a 
of 8r]fi6<Tia above a hole in the papyrus there is a mark which might be taken for the top of 
a 0-, but to suppose that a- was written e.g. for («')? does not seem likely, and the mark in 
question is more probably accidental, or denotes a pause. The ' name ' was presumably 
that of the person to whom the measuring specially related. 



933. LETTER OF DIOGENES 299 

933. Letter of Diogenes. 

Width 9-2 cm. Late second century. 

A letter to ApoHnarius, a 7r/3eo-/3evr7js, from a friend, chiefly concerning 
a little girl who probably was Apolinarius' daughter and had been commended 
to the care of his correspondent. 

Xaipoi9, Kvpii fiov <Tr) Kal iravTa avrrj 

'AiToXivapie, irapa vnfjpKTai axrTe kna- 

Aioyivov^ (ptXov. v^XOovra ae fiaprvprj- 

TV)(^oi)v [r]ov Trpbs 0"[e] yet- Or]. Kal nepl toD olkov 
5 voixevo\v\ rjBLaTa ere dcr- 20 dfxepifivo? yeivov co? 

Tra^oix\ai\ €v)(6neuo9 <rov Trapovro^. 8i€7r€/x- 

irdcTL To\J^ OeoY^ 7re[p£ ^].^[s' yjrafxrji^ Ttj jiiKpa ro 

[a\(:jo\Tr]pLas <tov\ k[. . . . €7ricrr6[X]ioi/, iiroirjaa 

about 3 lines lost ^e Kal rov vvKToarpa- 

[ . .]p[. . . TT]V /X€- 25 T-qyov (l)[ii\\aKa Koifida-- 

y[d]XT]i/ iopTrjv fj^a. 6aL irpo? ttj oIklo,. dcnra- 

nepl rfjs fiiKpas eyevd- (T[ai\ nXov[T]oyiprji^ tou (fiiXov. 
15 pL-qv dxptS du KaTanXeu- epp[a)](T6{ai) ae eyxo{pai), Kvpi€. 

In the left-hand margin 

edu croi drapes fi \Trev6ov\ irapd 'Avtlvoov et riyopaa^v rS rraiSm crov 
30 TO ^aiXoviov, el S[e pLrj dyo\pa(TOV. 

On the verso 

'ATToXivaptcdL /3 . . ai'r( ) irpeajSiVTrj 
rr(apd) Aioyivov? 



66 



oviaKov. 



18. 1. fxapTvprja-dv. 23. e7rt(rro[X]toi'" Pap. 

' Greeting, my good Apolinarius, from your friend Diogenes. Having met with a man 
who is going to you I greet you most kindly, praying to all the gods for your preservation. 
... I came to the great festival. With regard to the little girl, I was there until she sailed, 
and everything was provided for her so that when you come back you will bear me witness. 
Have no more anxiety about your household than you would if you were present. I sent 
the letter to the little girl and made the night-strategus sleep on guard at the house. Salute 
my friend Plutogenes. I pray for your health, sir. If it is no trouble to you inquire of 



300 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Antinous ^vhether he bought the cloak for your child, and if not, buy it. (Addressed) 
To Apolinarius, . . . legate, from Diogenes, linen-merchant.' 

I. For the optative in place of the more usual infinitive cf. e.g. 520. i, 
P. Tebt. 417. I. 

8. The size of the gap below this line is estimated by the apparent length of the lacunae 
in 11. 29-30, which are written along the left-hand margin. 

13. The late aorist r^^a occurs e.g. in Pausan. 2. n. 5 jj^as. 

14-5. Apparently -nap airfj is to be understood with eyevafirjv, and Sxpts av KaraTrXeva-ri is 

for nxpis KaTf'nXevae ; but possibly an adjective meaning ' careful ', ' solHcitous,' has been 
accidentally omitted after piicpas. 

24. vvKToaTparrjyoi occur at Hermopolis, e.g. P. Leipzig 39. 3, 40. iii. 16 (late fourth 
century) and were probably established in other large provincial towns of Egypt, as they were 
in those of Asia Minor (Hirschfeld, Sitzungsher. Berl. Akad. 1891, p. 868) ; cf. the wKTfpivbs 
arpaTTjyos of Alexandria. Their existence at Oxyrhynchus, however, cannot be inferred 
from the present passage, since it is uncertain where the letter was written. The office 
is described as a viunus personale in Dig. 50. 4. 18. 12. It is somewhat surprising to find 
the vvKToaTparr^yoi himself mounting guard over a particular house, especially as it seems 
from 1. 33 that the writer Diogenes was a person in a private station ; his correspondent, 
however, was a man of some importance. 

30. ^aCkoviov: the transposition of X and v is common in this word; cf. P. Fay. 347, 
2 Ep. Tim. 4. 13 (p(\6vT]v. 

31. The letters /3 . . are close to the name ^Anokivapiai, while avT{ ), which is written 
smaller, is separated by a wide space both from |3 . . and npfa^evr^. ^ov[\[(vt^)] 'AvT[ivo€a)v 
noXtai) is a possible reading, but too doubtful to insert in the text. For iTpta^fvTfj cf. 33. 
iii. II npe\cr]l3(x)TTjv *A\(^avbpi(ov, B. G. U. 932. 2 7Tpfa^iVT[ov rai'] ftap^dpcov : an error for 
irpfCT^vTrj is unlikely. 

33. 66oviaKov: cf. C. I. G. 3582. 2 Al]Xiov 'Aya^oVoSos odoviaKov. Boeckh regards 
66opiaKov as a proper name, but the word is, we think, more probably a title both there and 
in our papyrus. 

934. Letter of Aurelius Stephanus. 

14 X 14' 3 cm. Third century. 

A letter concerning purchases of yokes and manure, and other domestic 
matters. 

AvprjXio^ XT^(f)avos AvprjXico XaipT^/xovL 

t£ d8€X(f)a> yaipuv. 
e^iovTos pov (h 'AXe^duSpLau /xereySa- 
Xoprjv TO) ayoiVLonXoKU) TleTO^aaTiL na- 
5 povTO^ '^HpaKXrjOV ety Tiprjv (iVKrrjpiaty 
Spa-^pa^ i^rjKovra, koI c/y TLpr}V k[o\ttpov 
kv Xvaei TTapovTO^ Konpicos {8pa)(pas) p, Kal Trj Ka- 
Xfj a>(TT€ KoTTpi.1 ^y il)(pv p(Ta \i1pas ray 



934 LETTER OF AU RE LI US STEPHANUS 301 

{8pa\ixas) p.rj. fir] ovv diieX-qa-r^s rov (3aXe?y rrjv 
10 Konpov. av]/e(f)a)vr]a-a yap {aprapas) K€ [8pa^p.S)v) p irapov- 

Tos Ko7rpeco9' Scoaei^ ovi/ tccs Xonra9 (Spa)(p.as) t/3. /Jtr] 

dfieXija-T]^ napa^aXeiv e/cet Kal rfj yvvai- 

Ki '4a>^ av napayiuoo/xai Kal X^P^^ "^^^ 

TTOTiafxcop. tvpov rov AldioTrdv Kal Ka- 
15 XcSy avTco kcrriv. dcnraaai tov9 i)p.S>v irav- 

Ta9. eppaxrOai ae iv^o/xiai). 

On the verso 

AvpriX{L(o) X.aiprj[iovL n(apd) AuprjX^LOv) Xre^avov. 

5. Second >; of rjpaKXrjov corr. from ov. 

* Aurelius Stephanus to Aurelius Chaeremon, his brother, greeting. As I was setting 
forth for Alexandria I paid to the rope- weaver Petobastis in the presence of Heracleus as 
the price of yokes 60 drachmae, and as the price of manure at Chusis in the presence of 
Kopreus 40 drachmae, and to Kale for Kopreus the 48 drachmae which I had with me. 
Do not fail therefore to throw the manure on the land. I agreed to pay 100 drachmae for 
25 artabae, in the presence of Kopreus ; you will therefore give him the remaining 
12 drachmae. Do not fail to go there, both to help my wife until I return, and for the 
sake of the irrigation. I found Aethiopas and it is well with him. Salute all our friends. 
I pray for your health. (Addressed) To Aurelius Chaeremon from Aurelius Stephanus.' 

5. ^evKTrjpiav : ^fVKTrjpia apparently in connexion with a water-wheel (the yokes of the 
oxen which drew it?) occur in P. Flor. 16. 26. 

•7. ev Xva-ei: for the village of this name cf. 899. 6. eV x""""? 'in a heap,' referring to 
the Koirpos is less likely, even if the Konpos in the present case consisted of sifted nitrous 
earth {sebakh\ which Wilcken [Archiv, II. pp. 308-12) supposes to have been used in 
Roman times, as now, for purposes of fertilization. For the name KaKf] cf. B. G. U. 839. i. 

10. An infinitive is omitted after a-wecpauTja-a, e. g. Xa^e'iv or cLveia-dai. 

12. For Trapa^aWdu in the sense of going to a place cf. 930. 20-1 Ka6r]K0VTl KadrjyrjTrj a-e 
napa^dWfiv, 937. lO Trapa^aXrjs npos t>] nXarelq, and B. G. U. 824. 1 4 napd^aXe (ku. 



935. Letter of Serenus. 

3i'5X8-8cm. Third century. 

A letter from a man to his brother, chiefly concerned v^ith the health of 
various members of the family. On the recto, perhaps in the same hand, are 
remains of two columns of a list of persons, many of them women, the names 
being either in the nominative or dative case, followed in some instances at any rate 
by amounts in artabae. One entry is Qarjarei ywa(tKi) 'ATprj{Tos) vi{ov) f3aXav[, 



302 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



another "lipw Avktou [, while towards the end of Col. ii is the heading Aaxi ar]o7T(&)\at) 
c,fxoi((i)s) with a note below the next entry bid(f>o{pov) j3 (eVouj) {apTd(3ris) 8' .[. The 
names np[ei]o-KtAXa and Kc/K^r(os, gen.) also occur. The document appears to be 
a taxing-list of some kind. 



TU) dSeXcf)^ y^aipeiv. 

Oecov avvXan^avou- 

T(ov 7] dSeXcpr] enl t[o 
5 KOii-^6r(pov eTpavT], 

Kal 6 dSeX(l)b^ Se 'Aprro- 

KpaTLCou crco^eraL 

Kal [vyi]atvei, crvv\aix^\a- 

vo\yai\ yap TjjjieTu del o[i 
10 7T[dT]pioL Oeol rjpoov 

6[i86]vT€9 rjnuu vyia\y Kal 

(r(i>\T]r]pLav, ijieWov S\k 

Kal a[vTo]? dva^rji/ai t[^ . 

€7re[l ol Trapa\ ^apanLOi\yos 
15 UTTOv [/ca/c]ft)y e^'^tv a\y\T\ov, 

Sib y[pd(p](o crot oircos Sl o[v 

17, a of Sia above the line. 19. 

6(avovv corr. from a. 



II0[l] 7T[€]pl TOVTOV. TJ jXiT a(f)\0 pO, 

tS)v dvKaXoiv eVre ev6[e- 
20 0)9 vTvo Tov narpos' e(f)Bau€ 

yap npo^aard^as ras kv rah {dpov- 

pais ?) i . 
da-Traa-ai noWd tov yXvKvra- 
Tov dSeX(pbu ApTroKparLCoya 
Kal Oeai'ovv Kal &eoova 
25 Kal Aioyevrjv Kal ^HXioScopov. 
noXXd vfids rrdvTas daird- 
(erai '/[eyoja/cf'ati^a Kal rj 
6vydt[T]p] Tcreufjcriy. 



30 



(arai. 



e[p]pa)(Td[at) ere eiM^oyL<(at) 
navoLKei. 

21. npo above the line. 24. ^ of 



' Serenus to Diogenes his brother, greeting. With the assistance of heaven our sister 
has taken a turn for the better, and our brother Harpocration is safe and well ; for our 
ancestral gods continually assist us, granting us health and safety. I intended to come up 
myself on the [. th, since Sarapion's friends said that he was ill. I write to you therefore 
to ask you to write to me at once (?) about him by any messenger you may have. The 
transport of the bundles will be performed immediately by my father : he has already taken 
away those in the i[ . ] arourae. Many salutations to my sweetest brother Harpocration, 
Theanous, Theon, Diogenes, and Heliodorus. Many salutations to you all from Hieraciaena 
and her daughter Tsenesis; I pray for the health of you and all the household.' 

5. KOfiyl/oTtpov : cf. P. Tebt. 414. 10 eav KOfi-^as arx^i ^^' Joh^ 4-52 Koixyp-orepov ((T^tv. 
19. avKoKoiv: cf e.g. p. Amh. 150. 25 x^P"^^^ . . . iv ayyuKms {sic), P. Flor. 17. I3, 

and an Oxyrhynchus ostracon published in Arch. Report, 1904-5, p. 16 rTjXtcos fj.ai/bdKai f, 

dyKuXai TV. 

21. At the end of the line figures apparently follow the symbol for dpovpat. 



936. LETTER OF PAUSANIAS 



936. Letter of Pausanias. 



303 



16-7 X 14-9 cm. Third century. 

This letter is noticeable for several unusual words which it contains. It 
is written in a fairly regular sloping uncial hand in two columns, that to the left, 
of which only the ends of lines remain, following that to the right. The writer 
apparently anticipated that he would not finish his letter in a single column, but 
curiously began on the right-hand side of the sheet, leaving a broad margin 
in front of his first column. The writing of the left column, which was no doubt 
considerably narrower than the other, is of a reduced size. A graphical peculiarity 
is a horizontal dash placed below as well as above the figures in 11. 6, 11, &c. 

Col. i. 

Tlavaavias 'lovXico 'AXe^di/Spcot 

Tcoi iraTpl \aLpiiv. 
TTpo p.lu Trdvrcov ev^ofiai ere vyiaiveLv 
Kal TO TTpocTKvyqfid cov TTOico irapa T019 
5 linycopLois Oeoh. KopLiaai napa ^vpov 

kXoVLOV (pCOV TT Kal ^aVKoXlOV OTTOU 

TpiypiveiKOv (TLvaTreco^ Kal -q/it^ovu 

eXaiov ^acpavLvov Kal (SavKaXiov onou 

ripi^ovv fxiXiTO? Kal to ^KpiSiv. 
10 Kopiaai irapa 'AyaOr^fxepov fieXiK-qpiSa 

Kal KvOpav TrXaKovvTonv i Kal jieXiTLva 

(TT€(f>dvLa y TavTa 8v9 ttj dSeX^rj jxov 

Kal dcmd^ov avT-qv Xeiav. KOfiLcrai napa 

Tov KofjLi^ovTos <TOL TO kniaToXiov kXovlqv 
15 ^xov fi Kal a-(pvpiSiov KavoiTTLKov oirov (evyr) 

dpTCOP 8 Kal <r C^vyr] cTKCopaeXaua?. 

6 rjTTTjTrjS Xiyu otl ov 818(0 ovt€ tou )(aXKbv 

ovT€ TO (fiaivoXiv aTcp 'lovaTOV, Xeyei yap 

OTL ovnct) XeXvTpcoTai to (paivoXiv ov8\ 
20 ^iXo^evov oX' e^ oXcou ovx dvpov. dirfjXdou 

Trpoy TTjv /xr)Tipa (Afx)ixci>viov Kal Xiyei otl 

ovK e^o) dpTL a-eiTov ov8e to, ^i^Xi8ia dirrjp- 



304 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[T\L<TTai ecB? dpTL. eVe(y)/coj/ fJLOL 8vq aKvrdpia 
av[a\^o\ov kol Ta\{X\dpLov iTrniKivaKOL 
25 TrevraiTLa^ Kal viroSrijxa. dpn fxoL 
7re/i'v|/-or (xapKOcpavriv 'iy(ovTa fxa- 



Col. ii. 



30 



35 



40 



(xai 



KOVS 



]tcoS rjfxds 

J €//€ Kai TTjU 

]epa fxov ypa- 
]fi^ii' Kal 
]to Su TTOrj- 
]? TO yap €1 

] . on TreLpa- 

]fiov kXBuv 
^av 'iyjei kv ey- 
] trapd aol Xrj- 

] p.i(TT0V 7761'- 

-h'\poL-^jJiov Kal ^€1- 
] . epeov fxvpou 
](o aTarijpa tov 



45 [ 



[fXOV 



50 



'\ov yap avTOv r] 
e\]aPov Kal d^r]- 
] . di/d\(jofj.a Kal 
]ti (vnevKOL 

] 8' vcrrepa na- 
] efj.(p 6u6/J.aTL 
daird(i\Tat ae rj fJ-yjTrjp 
'\vrijxd fiov 

] 

ep]pcoa6ai ae ev- 
\onaL 7roA]A[or]? 
[\p6voLS. ] 



i'ovXiw Pap. 2. TwV Pap. 3. vyiaivil Pap. 6. kKov'Iov Pap. ; so in 1. 14. 

8. OTT of oTTov COrr. from fcai (?). 11. rrXaKovi'Tcui' t Pap. a of /neXirti/a COrr. from o. 12. 

1. So'r. 19. o o{ (^aivoKiv corr. from t. 20. x of ou^ corr. 

Pausanias to his father Julius Alexander, greeting. Before all else I pray for your 
health, and I perform the act of worship on your behalf to the gods of the country. Receive 
from Syrus a basket of 80 eggs and a jug with 3 choinices of mustard and half a chous of 
raphanus oil and a jug with half a chous of honey and the dagger. From Agathemerus 
receive a honeycomb and a pot of 10 cakes and 3 honey-sweet garlands ; give these to my 
sister and salute her warmly. Receive from the bearer of the letter a basket containing 
40 eggs (?) and a Canopic basket with 4 pairs of loaves and 6 pairs of . . , The cobbler says 
that he will not give up either the money or the cloak without Justus, for he says " The 
cloak has not yet been redeemed, and I have entirely failed to find Philoxenus ". I went to 
the mother of Ammonius, and she says "I have no food now, and the petitions have not 
yet been got ready ". Bring me two hides, a wrap, and a small crate . . . five years old, and 
some (?) shoes. Send me now an open-work covering (?) having a . . .' 

6. kKovIov seems to be a form of kKov^Lov or kXw^Iop, a bird-cage; cf. the Hebrew 
keMv. kXov^iv occurs in P. Tebt. 413. 14, where it was mistakenly regarded as a form of 
KoX6/3(oi'. For oTTou after ^ at the end of the line cf. 11. 8 and 15. Both here and in 1. 15 
the second letter is apparently n not /x, and ofioC, if that were the word meant, should of 



936. LETTER OF PA US A NI AS 



305 



course be followed by a dative ; in 1. 8 the reading is doubtful on account of a correction 
and the imperfect state of the papyrus. 

II, fitKiTivov has been altered to fxeXlnva, the o having been converted to an a, but the 
stroke representing the final u being left untouched. This is more likely than that fieX(\y- 
Ti(o)y a should be read, for numerals in this letter have a stroke below as well as above, and 
the original o is more unaccountable if a figure was intended. 

16. (TK(op(re\(ivas is presumably a compound of crK<bp and a-^Xivov, but no such word is 
known ; the doubtful « may be rj, but this is not less difficult. 

20. oA' e£ o\<dv = iravTairainv, ' entirely ' ; cf 893. 6 okov TO (TvvoKov. 

24. av\apQ\ov : cf. P. Tebt. 413. I o Te(o-a-a)pa dj'(a),3oXa, which we were therefore wrong 
in altering to uc(a),3oXd(y) on the analogy of 741. 13-4. The end of this line is puzzling ; 
perhaps inniKiv is a separate word = iTrmKov, The final letter is possibly e. g. v, but only 
a single stroke is visible ; s is unlikely. 

25. For TTevTaerlas cf. P. Fay. 347 Terparias, which occurs in a list of miscellaneous 
articles ; but the meaning is obscure in either case. 

26. The adjective a-apKocpaufis is used of animals in Sext. Pyrrh. Hypol. i. 14. 50 to. u 
6(rTpaK68(pp.a Koi ra <rapKo(f)avrj, but (rapKocpavfjv here seems to be a garment of some sort. 

39. Not cr]T€p€ov. 

42. (\]a3ov : or jX/Soj/. 
48. Perhaps 7Tpo(TKvyr]p.a, 



937. Letter of Demarchus. 

21 X 9-1 cm. Third century. 

The following letter to a woman named Taor from her brother Demarchus 
is chiefly concerned with a stone bowl, about the safety of which the writer was 
anxious. The usual request for various articles and announcement of other 
articles on their way to the addressee form the conclusion. 



Arjiiapyo^ Taop rrj 

dSeXcpf] TrXuara ^aipetv, 
yeiraxTKeii/ ere OeXco on 'iypa- 
A^/'tt? fioi TTcpl ov inoLTjaip /xoi 
5 AyaT€?uo9. (ocp ovv ^rjdco 
•^povqv Kol €X6(o e/y ttjv 

TTUTpiSa fXOV €K8LKTi](TC0 kjXaV' 

Tov. KOLV vvv ovv TTapaj- 
yiXXco aoi, S> Kvpia jxov dSeX- 
10 07], I'va TTapa^aXr}^ irpo^ ttj 
irXaTda tov OeaTpov koI 
fidOrjs vepl T^y (f)idXr)s 
tfjs XiOiurjs eu ^r)(5 nXoico 



KOL 7rapayyeiXr]9 naai T019 
15 eKei, ^LXoKvpa> Kat Z(ocrifiq>, 
7rapaTr]p€iaOai avTrjv firj 
So^rj avrS) [[Xa)S]] tco 'Aya~ 
reivco Xa^fj\(T\aL ttjv ^idXT]v, 
Ka[l] di/Tiypayjroy [xoi Sia tov 
20 'AvTivoea>[?] irepl cv aoi 
e7re/z\|/'a, Koi [y]paylroy eK€t 
TO KUT dSo9 on Ti Kai tl uXt]- 
0ay. Kat ef tluos XP^^^'- ^ ^*'~ 
Tivo€vs 7rapaar)(ij(reis avT(p 
25 KOL eXevcTCf //€t' avrov npos tou 
Ta[(r]oLTdu. [n]€ix\l/ov tov /xa- 



3o6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

In the left margin, at right angles 

^opTTjv aov Koi TO Kipafxiof Tov yapovs Kal SikotvXov kXaiov y^prjcrTov. 

eppcoaOai ae ev^o/iai. 

On the verso 

Sf^e y oraKKOvSia 7T{apa) tov 'Avtivo- 
30 €0)9 tov (tol to. ypdjj.jj.aTa SiSSi^to?. 

dnoS^os) Tdop TT} d8(X(pTJ Tr{apa) Ar][p]dp)(^ov. 

2. x«'P" Pap- 4- o of ou corn from r. 5. 1. 'Ayaddvos, and similarly in 1. 17. 

8. TTopny'yfXXco Pap. ; similarly in 1. 14. 10. iVa Pap. 17. w of avro corr. from oto-. 

19. K of /fo[t] corn from f. 25. i^ of avrov corr. from v. 29. 1. beim. 

* Demarchus to his sister Taor, very many greetings. I would have you know that 
you wrote to me about what Agathinus did to me. Well, if I live and come to my native 
land I will have my revenge. And for the present I bid you, my dear sister, go to the street 
of the theatre and find out about the stone bowl in the boat and warn them all there, 
Philocyrus and Zosimus, to keep a watch on it, lest Agathinus should determine to take the 
bowl. Write me a reply through the man from Antinoopolis about whom I sent to you, and 
write the list there, that you have received so and so. If the man from Antinoopolis wants 
anything provide him with it, and come with him to meet Tasoitas. Send your cloak and 
the jar of pickled fish and two cotylae of good oil. I pray for your health. You will 
receive three bags from the man from Antinoopolis who is the bearer of this letter. 
(Addressed) Deliver to my sister Taor from Demarchus.' 

13. The papyrus has fp w ttXoko, of which the easiest correction seems to be to write 
Tw for CO. fv w ttXoiov might perhaps mean ' engraved with a relief of a boat ', but this 
is less likely. 

18. For }\.a^rj[a]ai cf Bekker, Anecd. Ox. I. p. 268 eorl XajSw nfpianafifvov 6ffia ... Kal 
6 fi(X\(i)u TOV Xo/Sci) Xa^fjcro)' Kal Trap 'EvttoXlSi XfXdj37;/fa ws fiado) ^adrjaa, ov 6 napaKiifitvos fitfindrjKa. 

But there is not much room for the [a], and the ^ is of the cursive form like a k, which is 
not used in napa^dXjjs in 1. 10; the other letters, however, are clear. The writer began the 
same word after avra in the line above. 

22. Tt Kai Ti is analogous to t6 koi to : this is simpler than to take rt koi tI as an indirect 
interrogative, on being redundant. 

26. TH[CT]otTai/ : cf P. Fay. lor. recto ii. 9 Taa-vrrjs. 

27. yapovs : the usual form is 6 yapos or t6 ydpov, but t6 yapos occurs in Geopon. 20. 46 
ed. Basil., and EL Mag. Tapi^os . . . napa to ydprj (xdv. 

938, Letter of Demetrius. 

Chicago. 8-9 X 17-8 cm. Late third or fourth century. 

A letter from a son to his father, reproaching him for his failure to send 
fodder for the oxen. The papyrus was briefly described in Part L 161. The 

writing is across the fibres. 



938. LETTER OF DEMETRIUS 307 

Ar]iJ.rJTpios 'HpuKXeiSr] irarpl )^aip€iv. 

ovK oLKoXovOov TTpdyiia enoirjcras kveSpevaas ras Tpo(pa? roov ktijucoi/ 
7779 S^uaco, '(.KiraXaL k-maTok^ls SooSeKa arapyaPas \6pfov eK€i dTrocTiikai 
Kal pf] Trepyjfa^, toy e/c tovtov KivSwevuv to, KT-qvt] Sia(p6apfji/ai. tcov 
5 ovp KTr]vS)V KaKco? kyovroiv Kal ttjs yrj^ Sia tovto prj noTt^opei^i]^ rjTreL- 
xOrfv Kal vvv <tol ypd'^ai orrcos avTr]^ oopas yofKc^aas^^dijvaL knLTri8da>^ ray 

crapydva^ 
TTOiriara^ dnocrTciXij^. Trj yap dayoXia pov \yap\ e^o^ay kir^yyeXoip. 

kppaxrOai ere iroXXoh \p6voLS 
iV)(opai. 

7. fTTiyy€\av Pap. 

' Demetrius to Heraclides his father, greeting. It was an unfitting act of yours to 
intercept the fodder for the oxen at Senao, and not to dispatch it, although you had long ago 
been instructed to send twelve baskets of hay thither, with the result that the oxen are in 
danger of destruction. Since the oxen are thus in a sorry state, and the land in conse- 
quence is not being irrigated, I hasten to write to you now once more and beg you 
instantly to get the baskets properly laden and send them off; for you seem to be mocking 
my industry. I pray for your long health.' 

3. Sfi/ao), which is presumably a village of the Oxyrhynchite noma, is not mentioned 
elsewhere. 

939. Letter to Flavianus. 

25-3 X 17-6 cm. Fourth century. 

An affectionately worded Christian letter, apparently from a dependent to 
his master, concerning the illness of his mistress. The style, which shows the 
influence of the New Testament, is more polished than that of the average letter 
of the period, and the document ranks high as a specimen of epistolary com- 
position. A strip containing the beginnings of lines is missing in the upper 
portion, but the sense is always clear though the restoration is sometimes 
quite conjectural. 

[To) KvpLcp] pov ^Xa^iavcoi 

[At]P'}^t]plos •)(aipiiv. 

[toy kv aXjAofy TrXeurroiy vvv en pdXXov 17 Tr/joy <7€ 
[tov Sea7r6]TOV Beov yvatais dv^c^avq diracrLv rjpTv 
5 [coaTi Tr}v] Kvpiav dva(r(f)rjXac kK rrjs KaTaXa^ovarjs 
[avrfjv v6a-]ov, Kal drj Sia TravTos rjpds )^dpiTas opo- 

X 2 



3o8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[Xoyowra]y SiaTeX^^lv on tj/jlTu i'Aco)? eyivero 
[/cat TaTs evjx^a?^ rj/xcoy kirkvevaiv Siaacaaa? rjinv 
\Trjv rjpLcov] Kvptav kv yap avTrj irdvTes ras iXniSas 

10 [e^ofiev.] <7vvyvoi>iir]v Si, Kvpik jxov, (T')(oir]^ fLoi 
[Kal cvvovs] dnoSi^ei /x€ el kuI is TrjXiKavrrjv are 
\ayoiiVLa\v aKoav ivi^aXov ypdyjras irepl avTTJs ocra 
[eKOfiiaoo.] TO, p.\v yap irpatTa iv OXi-^ei airrfjs 
\TToXXfj ov\(jrjS ovK cou iv ep.avT(£> dnicrTeLXa 

15 [(TTTOvSd^cov] et TTcoy eK navTos Tponov SvuijOei-qs 
[irpos 17/^ay] dcpiKecrOai, tovto tov KaOrjKOVTOS 
d'n\a'\L\TOvvT\os' to[y 8e ivrl t]o paou eSo^eu rerpdcpOai 
€T€pd ae ypdpfjiara iiriKaraXa^eti' icnrovSaaa Sia 
Ev(f)po(Tvvov iva ae evOvfxoTcpov KaraaTrjaoo. 

20 vr} yap rrjv ar]v (TCOTrjpiav, Kvpii pov, rjs pdXta-Ta 
poL piXeL, el prj eirivoa-cos ia)(T}KeL to aMpdriov 
Tore 6 vlb? 'AOavdaios avTov dv dnicrTetXa npo? ak 
apa IlXovTdp\(o rjpiKa e(3ap€iT0 rrj voacct. vvv Se 
TTcos irXiova ypdyjrco irepl avTrjs aTTopco, eSo^ev 

25 pev yap wy Trpoelnov dveKTorepov ia-^r]Kevai dvaKaOeaOeL- 
cra, voarjXorepov Se opcos to accpaTiov e^ei» irapa- 
pv6ovp[e]6a Se avTrjv eKdaTrj? Spas €>c5e^6/:e- 
voi TTju [cr]f]i' d(pi^iv. ippSxrOai ere, Kvpie pov, 

Sid TTaVTOS tS) tcov oXoiv 

30 SeaTTOTfi ev^opai. 

^appovdi <^. 

On the verso 

^Xa^iavm 
ArjpriTpiOS. 

>]. tXftof Pap. 14. OVK Pap. 19. 'iva Pap. 22. vVor Pap. 25- ovaKaBeaddo-a 

inserted later. 

' To my lord Flavianus from Demetrius, greeting. As on many other occasions so 
now even more plainly than ever has the regard of the Lord God for you been revealed to 
us all by the recovery of my mistress from the sickness which overtook her, and may it be 
granted us to continue for ever to acknowledge our thanks to Him because He was 
gracious to us and inclined His ear to our prayers by preserving for us our mistress; for in 



939. LETTER TO FLAVIANUS 309 

her the hopes of all of us rest. Please pardon me, my lord, and receive me kindly, though 
I unwillingly caused you so much anxiety by writing to you the messages which you 
received. I wrote the first letter when she was in much pain, and I was beside myself in 
anxiety that you should come to us by every possible means in your power, for this was 
what duty demanded ; but as she seems to have taken a turn for the better I am anxious 
that you should receive another letter by Euphrosynus, in order that I may make you more 
cheerful. By your own safety, my lord, which is my first interest, if my son Athanasius 
had not then been ailing, I should have sent him to you with Plutarchus when she was 
overcome by the sickness. But now I know not what more I am to write concerning her, 
for her condition seems, as I have said, to be more tolerable, as she has sat up, but she 
nevertheless remains rather ill. We comfort her by hourly expecting your arrival, I pray 
my lord, to the Master of all for your continued health. Pharmouthi 6. (Addressed) To 
Flavianus from Demetrius.' 

II. (vvovi'. or perhaps Tkeas, which has already occurred in 1. 7. tkeas Bf^acrdai is 
a Sophoclean phrase, Aj. 1009, Tr. 763. 

28 sqq. eppuxrdai. k.t.X. is in darker ink, and at first sight appears to have been added 
by a different hand ; but (Kdexofie- presents a similar appearance, whereas the rest of the 
sentence vot . . . a(pi^iv, which must have been written at the same time, is just like the 
preceding lines. It is therefore improbable that any distinction of hand should be made. 

840. Letter to a Clerk. 

10'7 X 30 cm. Fifth century. 

A letter containing instructions to a vordpios concerning the vintage. The 
writing, as is usual with Byzantine letters, e. g. 941-3, is across the fibres of the 
papyrus. 

Xvvopa> rids kv ravTOTTjTi jxiTvai ray pvaeis a'xP^ ^^^ nXiVTaia^ fiepiSos 

Lva firj 
S6^a)fi€v Bi.a)K€iv Tovs aXXouy tov9 firj-Jrco TpvyrjaavTa^, roivvv^ coy dva>T€p(o 

iiprjTai, 
Kara^iaxrou eTre^eiv tov \oyi<T/iov ecos ov fiddij^ rrju Ta>v dWcau fxepiScov 

Swa/xiv, 
5 Kal kv ToaovT(o ypd^ds p-oi koI ovt(09 ckottco to TrpuKTeou. tou Sk 

^oi^dfifiwva 
TOU (ppovTiaTTiv fi€Ta(TT€iXd/j.€vos e^c eyyvs (tov fxiau fiiav. 
On the verso 

kniBo{s) TO) Bavixaa\ioi){TdT<o)\ 'Icoarjcf) voTapim 

. . . Xapfi6(rQ)V09' 

2. 'iva Pap. 



3IO THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

* It is my desire that the flow of the wine should remain as it is for some time until the 
last holding is ready, that we may not seem to press hardly upon the others who have not 
yet gathered the grapes. Therefore, as stated above, please to delay the account-taking 
until you learn the capacity of the other holdings, and in the meantime write to me, and 
thus I shall see what is to be done. Send for Phoebammon the steward, and keep him at 
hand together with you. (Addressed) Deliver to the most admirable Joseph, clerk, from (?) 
Charmoson (?).' 

1. A careful discussion of various explanations of the mystic formula xMy is given by 
Smirnoff in Berl. Phil. Wochensch., Aug. i8, 1906, pp. 1082 sqq. He suggests that 
the letters correspond to the Hebrew inx = «« or Iv, comparing the representation of the 
Hebrew tetragrammaton by the Greek n-jn-t. It may perhaps be regarded as some slight 
support for this view that the order of the letters occasionally follows that of the Hebrew, 
riWX (cf Arch. Report for 1906-7, p. 10 ad Jin.) ; but the question remains unsettled. 

2. (Tvvopav in the sense of to ' resolve ' or ' determine ' is common in Byzantine Greek, 

e.g. Concil. Chalced. 639 e crvvopwfiev np6 navrav fiiu TO. irpmrfia . . . ^v\aTTeadai. 

6. p.iav fi'iav was used for Kara fiiav by Sophoclcs according to Antiatt. 108. 9, and 

Apophthegm. Patrum 80 a (Migne, vol. xlv) xph ^vv fiiav ixlav a-vyKara^aiveiv toI? d8f\(f}ois is 

quoted by Jannaris, Nist. Gr. Gram. § 666 as an instance of the same use, while Sophocles, 
Lexicon, p. 427, translates this ' once in a while, occasionally '. In the papyrus, however, the 
context clearly indicates that fxiav p.lav means 'together', una, and the sense may well be 
the same in Apophthegm. 80 a, emphasizing the aw of o-uyKara^aiWtj/. 

8. Possibly n(apa) Xapnoaravos or AiipKaaaivos, but Tr{apd) does not really account sufficiently 
for all the traces, and the word ending in -avos may be the name of the place of which 

Joseph was vorapios. 



941. Letter to John. 

13-3 X 31-4 cm. Sixth century. 

In this letter the writer entreats his friend to help him in obtaining from the 
monastery of St. Justus a piece of ground to be used for brickmaking. 

+ EttuSt] nXivOiVTr]^ \iy€i tov tottov tov vlov NiuvovSo^ oaTpaKcoSrjs 
Kal firj TreTTOirjfJiivou els nXivOevaai, coy 8\ Xeyet 6Vt kav o'[/c]pA^s' irpos tov 

VLOV 

TOV olKOvofiov TOV dyiov 'lovaTov irape-^ii. aoi tottov oXiyov rj dvTh tov 

fiapTvpiov 
5 ^ e^ dp[i](rT€podV avTOV ijyovv €/c Se^icov, KaTa^taxxov yapiaacrOai fioc 

(rK[v]Xfiov 
nphs ai/Tov aXX &pTi, Kal ilmiv avT(h. ukos Trapiyei aoi t^v ^dpiv, e< 

TOV yap 



941. LETTER TO JOHN 311 

eyyuy kaTLv. aXA' ovrcos Xeyeij aurS ore iav OiXds 7rape)(^o/j.ii' <tol to 

kvOiKLOV, 

[lovov Tjap^j^e fiOL, Tou 5e 6ebu aov. cvdv9 Sia 4^oL^d/xfj,covo^ Srj\co(r6v fioL 
T^v nap avToD diroKpKriv. ehrk 8e aurcS on oA[/y?;]i' ijl6u[ou 6€Xofi]€v koI 

OV TToWrjV. 

10 iiriSlps) 'I<cdv[vrf 7r{apa) ]evov. -j- 

2. vibv Pap. 1. ^ivvovTos oarpaKcDbr]. 3. (t of TrXij/^fvo-ai corrected, vtor Pap. 4. mvoTTOv 

Pap. 6, aXXf Pap. ; so in 1. 7. 7. f/yur Pap. 10. ca)aj/[i'»j Pap. 

' Since the brickmaker says that the place of the son of Ninnous (?) is full of sherds and 
not adapted for brickmaking, and as he says that if you will trouble to go to the son of the 
steward of the monastery of St. Justus he will provide you with a small space, either 
opposite the martyr's shrine, or on the left of it, or on the right, vouchsafe me the favour 
of going to him and speaking to him now. It is likely that he will grant you this favour, 
for it is close by. Say to him this : " If you wish, we will pay you rent, only grant me the 
favour and God be with you (?) " Inform me immediately by Phoebammon of his answer. 
Tell him that we only want a little and not much. (Addressed) Deliver to John 
from . . .' 

I. The meaning of this n with a dash through it, which is not uncommon at the top 
of letters of this period, is obscure. It is written like the abbreviation of napd, but napd 
without a following name is meaningless. Possibly, however, the custom of commencing 
napa tov 8f'iva, e. g. 904, led scribes to write 7r(opd) even when there was no real intention of 
adding the name. 

3. cTKvXfjvai Trpos = ' to take the trouble of going to,' as is shown by instances where ewr 
replaces npSs, e.g. Cyrill. Scythop. J7/a S. Sabae (TKvXrjvai eas tov o'Uov. Cf. 123. 10 (third 
or fourth century) noirjaou avTov a-KvXfjvai Trpos Ttfiodfov, which we translated wrongly, and 
B. G. U. 830. 25 where the active form a-icvXai nva npos is found in a letter of the first century. 

4. The form amy, evidently employed in a local sense, is remarkable. It occurs at 
a later period with an accusative, e.g. Th. Prodromus 3. 285-6 (twelfth century) avT\s vtpov 
<})app.aKiv, and is used in modern Greek. 

7. The subject of fo-nv is perhaps 6 ronog, the meaning being that the proposed change 
of locality would be slight ; this seems more likely than that 17 x"P^^ is the subject, and that 
tyyvs is metaphorical, ' the favour is nothing out of the way.' 

8. TOV 8e 6f6v (TOV : this very elliptical phrase appears to mean, ' I pray that God may 

bless you (if you do as I ask) ' ; cf. 155. 4—5 ttoWo^s xpovoit Ka\ Ka\o7s ttjv vfitTepap /oc«yaXo- 

7rp(€7r<ta»'), ' I wish long life and happiness to your magnificence.' 



942. Letter of Timotheus. 

Chicago. 7 X 30 cm. Sixth or seventh century. 

A letter from a man who had just arrived at NilopoHs, where he had received 
a letter from the addressee ; in consequence of this he had resumed his journey 
without delay though very unwillingly. Both the writer and the person addressed 



31? THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

bear abbreviated titles (apparently ordinarius and exceptor respectively) which are 
somejvhat obscure but seem to be military ; cf. 11. 6-^], notes. The papyrus was 
briefly described in Part I. 162. 

•\-KaTa TT)v Tpia-KaiSeKaTT]}/ KareXd^afieu Tr]v NeiXoviroXLTMV rrepl &pav 

eKT-qv, Kol /x€Ta to 
diroXvprai rjfid^ ra ^Za ypafifiara rjfjLiu d-rreSoOr] jfj^ o-fj? dSe\(pLKrjs 

Xafiirp{6Tr]T09) nepl oySorju copav 
Koi 6 $€os olSiv direp jir] ■q/iiOa diroXva-avre^ rd ^5a, et 5* avrd eixapeu 

krravaXvaaL. irpo rpioiv ovu 
Q)pd)y, 6t€ Kal Svvdfieda e^eXOeiu rqs TroXecoy, e^epx6/J.€$a ocpiiXovTcs (rvv 6i(o 

Trapayeviadai. 
5 irdvv Si rifxas drjSia-eu 17 d8€X(pLKij crov Xajnr p[6rris) p.rj8(v rjfiiv arjiidvacra t5)V 

TTapaKoXovOrjadvTcov. 

On the verso 

+ ewiSipi) TO) S€cnr6{Trj) t(o TTd{v)r{(ov) XaniTp[ordT(o) €v8oK{ifX(OTdTa)) Tird{vTm^ 

(f)LX{TdTa)) dSiXcpicp) n^TpccvLO) €^K[e7rTopi) 
ir{apd) Ti/xodiov 6pS[ivapiov) ©coSoSov. 

4, (opcov Pap. 7* ^« ©eoSoT-ou. 

' We reached Nilopolis on the 13th about the 6th hour, and after we had released the 
animals a letter was delivered to us from your brotherly excellency about the 8th hour ; and 
God knows whether we had not released the animals, and whether we had any more to 
unloose. Accordingly before three hours were passed, as soon as we could leave the city 
we leave it, being obliged by the help of God to arrive. We were much displeased with 
your brotherly excellency for not explaining to us any of the consequences. (Addressed) 
Deliver to the lord my most excellent, most illustrious, and most beloved brother Petronius, 
exceptor, from Timotheus, ordinarius of Theodotus.' 

1. wpai/ iKTr)v : about noon. 

2. fia: probably donkeys rather than horses; cf 922. 17, note. 

3. 8* avTCi'. or perhaps havra for ravra', cf Qfohohov in 1. 7. A better sense would be 
obtained if ii(Tavt{lK)a could be read, in which case ^xa^^v ftravaXva-ai would mean ' could 
have returned '. 

6. f^K{f7rTopi) : cf. the f^Kfn{Topfs) mentioned in 43. recto ii. 26, an account of military 
supplies. The excepiores were a kind of clerks, and those in 43 were clearly connected 
with the army ; probably Petronius too held a military position ; cf the next note. 
i$K{ov^iTopi), as Wilcken remarks, is also possible; cf P. Brit. Mus. I. 113 (7). 14 

o-Kovi3irop(oj). 

7. up?(ivapLov) : we have not found another instance of this title in a papyrus, and the 
meaning is uncertain, but as ordinarius was used for a centurion and equated to ra^iapxoi, 
the term may well apply to some minor military officer. 



943, BETTER OF VICTOR 313 

943. Letter of Victor. 

17.4 X 34 cm. Sixth century. 

A request to a chartidarius (cf. 328. i, &c.) that he would send three persons 
in order that a decision might be arrived at on the question which of them was 
responsible for the dues upon a bath. 

+ 

-\- KaTa^iaxrr) rj arj yvrjaia dSeXcpoTris Mrjvdv tov \a\nTpoTarov KaX ^(pfjuov 
Tov XafinporaTov TpaTre^iTr]i> kol Mrjudy rov irpoKovpaTopa TrapaaK^vdaai 
dmXdeii/ (Is Siairav eucKeu tov Xovrpov, Kal prj drrocrrrj air avrSiv 6 

fxei^oTipos 
dwpt (TVVop.o\oyil tco kv86^(o olkco 6 otp^tXcov k^ avrcov tov <p6pov tov 

\o(v)TpoV 

5 Sovuai. Heprjvos yap 6 XafLirpoTaTos TpaTre^iTrjs Sia Triap-aTos yvvaiKos 

KoXXovOov TOV (vXajSiaTaTov e/c tov Xo(v)Tpov, Kal 6t€ enoirjaev to nia-pa 

auTOV ov OeXei dnoaTrjvai. 
Kal ^rj Kvpi09 ovK d(f)i(TTapaL Toov Tpioov, aAX' avTol TrXrjpovaiv tov <p6pov 
TOV XoyTpo[v] eG)[s . .]eiy dvTLy(ov)(o[v.] -\- 

On the verso 

-f- 8€a7r6(Trj) T<S a7rd(vTCov) XapirpoijdToi) TLfia^ia)(TdTa>) crvv 0(€a)) dSeXcf)^ 
4- Pecopyto) ^apT{pvXapia)) + B iKTCop avv 0{((f>) a . . . X( ). 

3. <r of an-otTTj; corr. from o. 4. First o of a-wofjioXoyfi over an erasure, 6. tov 

evXa^oTTaTov abovc the line in a different hand. 7. aXXavroi Pap. 

* May your true brotherliness vouchsafe to cause the most illustrious Menas and 
Serenus the most illustrious banker, and Menas the agent to come to arbitration with respect 
to the bath, and let not the official leave them until the one of them who owes the rent of 
the bath agrees with the noble house to pay it. For Serenus the most illustrious banker 
through the persuasion pf his wife chased the most discreet CoUuthus out of the bath, and 
having done what he was persuaded to do will not depart. As the Lord lives I do not 
leave the three, but they pay the rent of the bath until the deputy . . . (Addressed) To the 
most illustrious and honourable lord, by the grace of God my brother George, secretary, 
from Victor, by the grace of God . . .' 

2. npoKovpdropa : cf. P. Brit. Mus. IIL 1032. 10, a letter of about the same period as this, 
and Gloss. Basil. TrponovpaTup iariv 6 (PpoirnarTtjs ^ evroXevs, 6 npayp,a tTepop tear ivToXfjv airov 



314 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

4. axpi a-vvoficXoyu : SO probably rather than axpis av o/uoXoyet, though a and v when 
written small, as here, are at this period often indistinguishable. For oUm cf. 126. 4, note. 

6. anoa-Trjvai. : SO. tov \ovTpov (?). But the connexion is not very clear. 

7. Cu Kvpios is frequent in the LXX ; cf. e.g. Judges 8. 19 fi? Kvpios . . . ovk av 

aweKTeiva iipa.!. 

8. The term dvTiyfovxos, which is apparently not found in literary sources, occurs also 

in 153. 3 ra fV6(6|a)) a., 156. 5 X"P''''^(^*^/"°s) *'^'' ^-f B. G. U. 303. 28 p€yo\onp(^eTre<TTaTov'^ 

rpi^ovvov a., and 693. 2, all of the Byzantine period. In 156 we translated the word as 
' land-agent ', i. e. the deputy of the owner, which on analogy should be the meaning. The 
ytovxoviTfs of Byzantine papyri are commonly people of importance, e. g. Flavins Apion at 
Oxyrhynchus (133. 4-5, &c.), whose representative would be an influential person. In the 
indices of the B. G. U. avnyeoxixos is classed among the officials. 

The preceding word seems to be an infinitive, but there is not space for iKBtiv, 
and IJKfiv and l^elv are not suitable. A break occurs in the papyrus after the supposed v, and 
this may have been followed by another narrow letter. 



VI. COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS 

(The collations are with text of Ludwich.) 
(a) Iliad. 

944. 6-1 x^-'>, cm. A few letters from the ends of ii. 436-444, with elision- 
marks. Third century, written in sloping oval uncials. 

945. 13-5 X 6'^ cm. Fragment of the top of a leaf from a book, containing on 
the recto the ends of ii. 732-741 and on the verso the beginnings of 753-772, 
with occasional breathings, accents, and elision-marks. 724 Final e of 
\iv\t](t(.(jQ^ corr. to 0.1 by a second hand. 734 T'nipia\y. Fifth century, 
written in heavy sloping uncials. 

946. ^-ly-S'?) cm. A few letters from the middles of ii. 861-867. 864 
? Me^joTjs re koi AfTt[0os. Late second or third century, written in broad, 
slightly sloping uncials. 

947. ']'S X 2-9 cm. A few letters from the beginnings of iv. 443-452, from the 
bottom of a column, with elision-marks. Third century, written in a small 
and neat but not very regular uncial hand. 

948. Fr. {a) 8-9 x 4-3 cm. Two fragments containing the ends of x. lyi^-i^'^ 
and 250-255, with stops (middle and low points) and occasional breathings, 
accents, and marks of quantity. Third century, written in a good-sized 
semi-uncial hand. 

949. 13x4-6 cm. A few letters rom near the ends of x. 437-452, from the 
bottom of a column, with occasional accents (449 7)e). 446 ^or\v ayoLpo^ 
[Aio/LtrjSrjs {rhv 8' ap virobpa ib(i)V 7rpocre(f)r] Kparepbi AiojutJSt;? MSS.). 45 1 
7!ToX€fjLt.$b>[v. Late second or third century, written in square upright uncials 
similar to those of 869 (Plate I). 

950. Fr. (d) 23-8 x 5*7 cm. Two fragments, the first containing a few letters 
from near the beginnings of xi. 322-329, the second the ends of 359-402 
(a whole column), with stops, and occasional breathings, accents, and elision- 
marks. ^66 (o-TLv. 368 €i€]vapi^€v. 371 Tuju/3(oi addcd by a second hand 
above TTvpycoi, which is crossed through. 375 areiXKe. 381 ajio Ovfj-ov oXicraai. 
Third century, written in sloping oval uncials. 



3i6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

951. Fr. (^) 8 X 6 cm. Part of a leaf from a book, containing on the verso 
portions of xx. 425-437 and on the recto portions of 470-482, with elision- 
marks. 473 The letter before ovs is not p or t but seems to be a, i. e. Trapja 
or KaT]a. Fourth century, written in heavy sloping uncials. 

952. 117 x5'a cm. Parts of xxiv. 74-90 from the top of a column, with high 
stops and occasional accents. 78 re omitted. Third century, written in 
sloping oval uncials. 

{b) Odyssey. 

953. Fr. {d) iixii-p cm. Four fragments from three distinct columns of 
a MS. of iv. Fr. [a), from the bottom ot a column, contains a few letters 
from 97-100, Fr. {b), from the top of a column, parts of 197-204, Fr. {c) 
a few letters from 222-224, and Fr. {d), from the bottom of a column, parts 
of 248-261, with high stops, and occasional breathings, accents, and elision- 
marks. 249 Kar6/3r? TpSxav. 251 aveipcaroiv. 2q2 eycov ekoevv (the reading 
of Aristarchus ?). 254 /xe for fxev. Second century, written in a round 
upright uncial hand of good size and handsome appearance. 

954. 2-6 X 9*3 cm. Fragment of a leaf from a vellum book, containing on the 
verso the beginnings of xiv. 299-303 and on the recto the ends of 328-332, 
with frequent accents. Fourth or fifth century, the verso being written 
in lighter and more sloping uncials than the recto. 

955. 7 X 2*8 cm. Fragment of a leaf from a book, containing on the verso 
a few letters from xvii. 601-606 and on the recto parts of xviii. 27-40, with 
high stops and frequent accents. 34 ^vve]riK. Third century, written in 
upright uncials, those on the recto being much smaller than those on the 
verso. 

956. 9-6 X 14-2 cm. Ends of xxiii. 309-326 and beginnings of 342-356, from 
the tops of two columns. 317 fxeyaka (or (Sapia. 318 A]aLaTVyovLr]v acpuovTo. 
320 omitted. 345 p' omitted. Second or third century, written in heavy 
square, nearly upright uncials of medium size. 



VII. MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS 

These may be classified as follows (we call attention to the fact that the 
texts of 957-8, 962-7, 969-72, 974, 977-8, 980-1, 987-95, and 997 are given 
nearly or quite in full). 

Writing Exercise 966 verso. 

Magical papyrus 959. 

Orders to officials 965, 969. 

aTToypacfyaC 962 recto, 970. 

Reports to officials 983, 989. 

Declarations on oath 972, 976. 

Petition 991. 

Lease 975. 

Wills 968, 990. 

Loan 988 recto. 

Deed of surety 996. 

Miscellaneous contracts 977, 980 recto. 

Receipts 964, 995,1000-3. 

Taxation 960, 966 recto, 979, 981-2, 997. 

Census- List 984. 

Land-Survey 984, 986, 988 verso. 

Accounts 962 verso, 971, 978, 980 verso, 985-6, 998-9. 

Orders for payment 973-4, 992-4. 

Private Correspondence 963, 967. 

Titles or o-iAXv/3oi 957-8, 987. 

Demotic papyrus 961. 

Arabic papyri and paper 1004-6. 

957. 3-3 X 1 3*4 cm. A strip of leather, once glued to a papyrus, perhaps 
a at'AAv^os, and containing a much abbreviated official note, of which the 
text is (l) ^lX(ovlkov} o-rpa(r7jyoi;) (cf. 898. 26) 5- toju(o9) e^rjT(ao-/xeva)y ?) ei8(c5r) 
J OL aiTO bta\oy{7]9 ?) C (^tovs) (2) ^Abptavov os ear{t) t&v Ttpbs TTapayy€X(Cav) (3) 
a-TTo ly, below which in the right-hand corner is a:r?j( ) enclosed apparently 
between rounded brackets. The symbol after ei8((Si;) is obscure ; it resembles 
the sign for bpaxixt] or a cursive at, the following letters ot being raised slightly 
above the line : perhaps (kci) ot. A. D. 122-3. Complete. 4 lines. 



3i8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

958. 2 X 8-4 cm. A strip of vellum, perhaps used like 957 as a o-tAAv/3os. It is 
inscribed with two lines (i) ] 7rpa/(( ) tov ixr]vds 2e/3ao-rou (2) ] y (erous) Tltov 
(a. d. 80). The strip is complete above and below the writing, and perhaps 
nothing is lost at the beginnings of lines. 7rpaK( ), if correct, probably 
refers to itpaKToap or a derivative, but T/paK( ) can equally well be read. 

959. 7'2 X 13 cm. 8 incomplete lines containing magical symbols, interspersed 
with occasional Greek letters. About the third century. 

960. 57 X 9-5 cm. Memorandum of a payment of corn by two persons, the 
text being AvpriKia &eavovs Aibvixov koL 6 vlbs AvprjAios ^apa-nCuiV 6 kol Qeoov 
2epj;0ea)? ttoAccos (apTa^as) fx/.^'. ^€pv<p((09 tto'Ai? seems to be identical with 
the known Oxyrhynchite village SepCt^t? (cf. e. g. 991). Third century. 
Complete. 5 h'nes. 

961. IO-2XI2-4 cm. Demotic papyrus containing the first 15 lines of a 
document. First or second century. 

962. ii'5x6-i cm. On the recto the first 18 lines of an airoypacpri of sheep, 
addressed to the strategus (cf. 245-6) probably in the reign of Claudius or 
Nero, the writing being much obliterated. On the verso a memorandum 
concerning various contracts, of which the text is IToAecos' ayopaapov oUiai a 

(eTovs) Nepcoi/o(s) ^appovd{i), kol hiaipicnv r a (erovs) Uavvt, 18 (Irous) 

KXavbiov p.ri(vd<i) repfxavLneCov ayopa(T[x{dv) oIklus. Probably written in or soon 
after the reign of Nero. Complete. 8 lines. 

963. 16 X 9-7 cm. The upper part of a letter from a woman to her mother, 
thanking her for sending a Kadebpapiov ('stool'). The text of 11. i-ii is 
'i2c/)eAia QeapovTi rfj pLT^Tpl yaipuv. aa-na^op-ai at, M^Tep, 8ta Toii; ypappdroiv 
TOVTcov (TTidvpovaa ijbr] Oida-aaOai. X^P'-^ ^^ ^^'' ot8a, pfJTfp, e77t t?) crnovbT} rod 
KaOebpapLov, enopia-ap-qv yap avTo. ovk aAAor/)to[v yap] tov ■tjdovs irouls, <piX[Ta.Tr} 
prjT^p, (T]'iTovbd(ovaa . . . Second or third century. 14 lines. 

964. 137 X 16-3 cm. Receipt for the rent of a camel-shed, of which the text 
is Avpi]kios ©ecriv 6 koI Fivbaipcov eiiiKaXovpevos 'Apio-TLcav Kal rj dbeX(f)ri ^apairovi 
1] KOt AyaOoKkia dpc^oTipoi ''Apia-TLOivos Kal ws (XprjpaTi^iv AvprjXiio 'lo-tSwpw 
XaCpeiv. opoXoyovpev aTrecrx^/Kerat Trapa aov rd kvoUia ov ^\iis r]p5iv iv juto-^waet 
Kap.r]\(avos €7r' dp(p6bov ['IttJtt^cov Ylapep^oXiji rdv dnb 4>a/x€ra)0 eco? Mcaopij tov 
8teA?;Av^or[o]s i (irovs) (v bpaxpials biaKoaiais (iKoaa, ptivovTos rjpelv tov Xoyov 
TrdvTUiv OTTO TOV iv€(TT(idT09 ptjvo'i Qci)d ivoiKtioy dKoXovda}[s] 757 pia-OuxTH. KVpia 7] 
uTioxi] Kol eiT€pMTr]ddvT€s u)poXoyri(Tap€v. ((tov^) la AvTOKpdTopo^ KatVapo? FTov- 
ttXCov AiKivyiov TaXXu]vov TepfxavLKov Meytorou Ei'<re/3oi;s Fivtvxov^ ^(fSacrrov &(ii>d 
T- Signature of Aurelius Theon. A. D. 263. Complete. 1 2 lines. 

965. iO'2xi2-i cm. An order to the collectors of corn-dues at the village 
of <PtXoviKov (cf. P. Hibeh p. 8) to deal gently with a certain individual. 



MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS 319 

The text is WpaKTopcr[i\ (tltikwv ^lXovcCkov. fxr] TTap€[vo])(^kri<rr]T€ AovKica 

KepeA[. ]avLav(t) Kal a-nokvaov t'!]v [ avT\ov ecos ov Karao-Tretpcoo-ty 

[ ]. Cf. P. Brit. Mus, 11. 379, P. Reinach 57, and Fayiiin Tozvns, Ostr. 

45. Third century. Written across the fibres. Incomplete. 4 or 5 lines. 

966. 127x10-5 cm. On the recto 7 lines of an official account, apparently- 
giving a list of payments from different villages. The text is koX e^ eViKpto-ews 
Tivpov (apTalSai.) yjiQh'Kh'ix'ri^ Xayavov (dpra^at) 'p^^^'^'^'* nov)(ecos* (paKov 
(apTajSai.) jS, Xaxai'ov [apTajiai) ^yL, Koi k^ iiTiKpCa€0}s [. Third century. On 
the verso are two lines in rude uncials, no doubt a writing-exercise, of which 
the text is ev itaaiv ((tt abtKrov rj (corr.) yvoip-r] Kakov (a corrupt iambic line) e. . 

967. i5'iX9-2cm. The upper part of a letter from a man to his sister. 
Lines I-II 'ATrtcoy 'E^OKajroCrt T?;t aheX<prii \aipi.LV. <f)aal top KparicrTov rjyepova 
fk^vcreadaL (vOdbe mpX Tr\v TpiaKoha, o iV ciStJs ypd(f)ot} croi. koAws be irofqaeti 
iTiKTTeikaaa et? aypbv dp^aaOai T(av fts tovs dpLirekSivas TtoTKrp.Stv rf] 'nip.TTTrj tov 
If^s prjvos . . . Address on the verso. Second century, 18 lines. 

968. 39-9 X 13-4 cm. Ends of lines of the will of a woman called Didyme, 
leaving her property to her sons by her former husband Kkdpos and her 
present husband Sarapion, and making provision for her Tpo(f)bs 'Apdais. At 
the end are the signatures of the testatrix and witnesses, one of whom 
is called 'EKarcav. Cf. 489-95. Written across the fibres, probably in the 
reign of Trajan or Hadrian. 45 lines, including 3 lines of an endorsement 
upon the verso. 

969. 8-8 X 1 2-4 cm. An order to an apxe^oSo? to summon an accused person, simi- 
lar e. g. to 64-5. The text is 'Ap)(e</)o'8coi. p.€TdTT€pi\lfov 'ATtokkdviov TaCov, (vtv- 
xdvTos 'AttoAAwviou Trepi Karacnropas. Early second century. Complete. 3 lines. 

970. 8'i X 8*7 cm. Beginning of an dTToypacpi] addressed to the comogrammateus 
of ^epv(f)is by an inhabitant of Antinoopolis. The text is Kiopoypalppare'i) 
2epv<^eco9 irapa AvprjkCov Yldpibos tov koi Zev^iavov Nepoutaz^etou rod koL riV€ap)(^eLov 
dT:ob€beLyp.{4vov) dp)(iepea)? t?js Aap.Trpas'Ai'nroecoi'TroAecds bia Avp-qkLOv Ylrokep-aiov 
'l€paKiaLi>i]S aTTo IleAa. diioypdi^op.ai) Kara rd Kek€V(r6(4vTa) into Avprjkiov 'Ay- 
TOiVLVov TOV Kpa(TLaTov) TTpos TOL^ e7ri(TK(€(^^eicrais ?) [. Avp. ^AvTcavlvos is perhaps 
identical with Avp. 'AvtCvoos, vice-praefect in a.d. 215-6 (cf. Cantarelli, 
La serie dei prefetti, p. 66\ unless Trpos rarse77to-K(e\/^c(ri), a new title, be read. 
e77tKp(i(reCT-i) is unsuitable. Early third century. 12 lines. This oTroypac/)?? has 
been glued to another, of which the beginnings of 8 lines are preserved, and 
which on the verso has Xatp^(p,oj^t) aTpa{Tr]yQ)) and at right angles ] 2epv^e(a)s). 

971. 14-7 X 7 cm. Account of expenditure on irrigation, of which the text is 
Aoyo(j) duTk^ilcreois) Aiovvaiov. Me)((etp) k8 iroLovat vbpaycb{ybv) kv T(ali) Kk{i]pif) 
epyiaTais) /3 d/3(oAot) t, k€ /3 6^(oko\) i, k<^ /3 d/3(oAoi) t, k^ a 6^{okol) e, kt} 



320 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

avT'k{ov(n) epy{aTais) b o/3(oXot) A<^, k6 avT\{ov(n) kol 'nap<!iy{ovai.) vbpay{(aydv) 
b 6j3{o\ol) A<5-, A b d/i(oAoi) Kq; koI dr7jX(co/xaTos) ivoLKiov KTjX(a)retoi;) (cf. P. Tebt. 
II. 342. iii. 19) d/3(oAot) ir], / 6^(oAoi) p^a. koI T€t/i(7/9) eAai(ou ?) (8v6/3oAot), / 
6/3(oAot) p^y, 0*1 (8/3axMat) kz.. Late first or early second century. Complete. 
10 lines. 

972. 14-9x10 cm. Conclusion of an oath taken by an official upon entering 
office, similar to 82, a fragment of an oath by a strategus. The text is 
e]ii," [to kv p.rj\b€v\ fji^fxcpOijvai. [tj] iiVo]xo[s e]t/ji' tw opKco. koI T:[a]pi(rxov 8e (jxavTOV 
(vyvrjTTjv FciLOV 'lovXiov ^Avrunnov irapovTa kol (vboKovvra. Irons /3 AvTOKparopOi 
Kai(ra[p]os MdpKov AvprjAiov ^eovrjpov ^AXe^dvbpov Evcre^ovs Evtvxovs ^e^aorou 
MecTopr} HayoixivoiV a. Tdios UovXcpepvLos Ti-liepdvos b)p.o(ra tov o[p\kov koX 
hnXea-co Tr]v XP^^^i^ ^^ ^JpoKetrat. (2nd hand) Tdtos 'Iou[A]io[s] 'AvT(avLo[s] 
ivyvopiai (1. cyyrwjuat) avTov €KTe\ov{v)Ta ti]v bi]\ovix&r]V \pt-av m TipoKiTau 
A. D. 223. 16 lines. 

973. 8.5 X 10 cm. A notice to sltologi, similar to 516, 619-32, and P. Leipzig 
iia-117, authorizing them to pay 24^ artabae of wheat, beginning A7j/x?jrpta 
'Ai'8po/xdx(ou) 81(d) 'A7roA(Aa)i;('ov) ^07j(9(o{5) o-troA(dyois) *o/3o'ov To'7r(coi;) xaipf'^- 
Siao-TeiAare k.t.A. The ^o^oov (or ^okoov) tottoi are clearly identical with the 
^0^ . ixov ToiroL in P. Leipzig 116. 2. After the date, the 9th year of Aurelius 
and Verus (a. D. 168-9), is the signature of a certain Evrvx^s, perhaps 
a crtToAoyo?. Nearly complete. 12 lines. 

974. 4-5 X 9-1 cm. An order for the payment of 2 artabae of wheat. The 
text is U{apa) 2apd Aiovvadp y€(Dpy<^ x^-'-P^'-^' ^^^ ZaxTLixi^ ibico VTiep 6\l/uivi(av 
TTvpov dpTdj3a^ bvo, yi{vovTat) -nvpov (dprd/3ai) (3. (hovs) 8 Miaopi] e aiariix[{(o^aL). 
Third century. Complete. 4 lines. 

975. 19-8 X 7-5 cm. Signature to a lease of 2^ arourae, in which the lessee 
agrees to pay rent at the rate of 5^ artabae per aroura and acknowledges 
a loan of 28 drachmae to be repaid dixa t[] (eVf/ Tpv[y]-)j, apart from other 
debts to the lessor. Written in the 2nd year of an emperor who is probably 
Domitian or Trajan. 20 lines. 

976. 1 1-7 X 11-8 cm. Conclusion of a declaration on oath, containing the date 
(iTovs) q AvTOKpdTo{pos) Kaio-apos Aovkl[ov ScTrnj/xtou ^eovripov Ev(T€j3ovs Ilepn- 
vaKo{s) 2e/3aoToS 'Apa/3[tKo{)] 'Abta^r^VLKOv Koi MdpKov Avpr]{\LOv) 'Avto)v[vov 
K[ai](r(ipo? d77o8e8ty/xerou Ai/roKpdropo(s) 'A6vp A (i.e. Nov. 26, A. D. 197; cf. 
910. introd.), and the signatures of 'Arrets lapandros, who makes the 
declaration, and of a collector of corn-dues as yrwoTTjp (IlauAea'os TTpd{KTu)p) 
<n{TiK&v) . . . . A( ) 81(d) AiovvaCov i3ori{6ov) yrcopifa)) ; cf. 496. 1 6, note. 
14 lines. 

977. 18-7 X7-2 cm. Conclusion of a document relating to a payment of 800 



MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS 321 

drachmae for the (^iopos of an aayo^w^ (the collection of a tax ?), containing 
only the date and signatures. Lines 4-19 (Irov?) j8 AvTOKparopcav Kato-dpcoy 
Fatou OvL^iov TpejScoviavov FdAAou koI Tatov OvclSiov ' A^iviov VaXkov OviXhov- 
fxiavov Ovokov(Ti.avov Evore/3&)i' YAvrv^GiV ^€l3aaT<iiv Me)(eip i. Aii/37](Atos) ^apairlcav 
6 K(at) 'ATretj ^ovA(€vt?j9) 8t' e(/xoii) Avpri(X[ov) AtoaKopov /cat ws y^iprniariCoi) 
aTtoaycTTq^Oils) hieijoptcra 4>opov tov TTpoK(eLix4vov) d(r^oArj(/>taros) ras 7ipoK{€tpiivas) 
8pax(/^as) o/craKOcrta?, / (Spa^jwai) co, w? 7rpdK(ei7ai). (2nd hand) Av/j?;Aios 
Atoj;v(Tto9 6 Ka6 'A^poStcrtos yv(iJLva(rLap\os) (3ov\(eVTi]'i) cre(n|(/xetaj/xat) TaihpaxiJ''a.s 
oKTaKoaias, / (hpaxiJ-al) co, followed by a similar signature by an exegetes. 
A. D. 253. 21 lines. 

978. 4-6 X 7'5 cm. Beginning of a list of articles of furniture. The text is 
KepXapca (1. KcAAcipta ?), Si^po? (jzV) /3, \t(3ai'o6i]Ki], ocroiiTpov (1. tcroTiTpov), ryA[r;], 
K . [. Third century. 6 lines. 

979. 7'4x4'2 cm. Fragment of an account of payments in artabae from the 
villages of ^eviirra, ^KOi, 2ei'eKeA(€v), and Movlix{ov). Second or third century. 
6 lines, the ends of which are lost. 

980. 14-9 X 7*8 cm. On the i*ecto parts of 14 lines from a list of abstracts of 
contracts (?), the last 8 lines referring to a purchase of land. Early third 
century. On the verso is a short list of payments for the purchase of 
houses, of which the text is KopyTjAtos TrotKtArri? nixrjs oiKia? ey Tricrret 19 
■^v TtjLtT;? (Spa^piat) 'B, "Apeioj o7rcopo7rft)Ar;[s] rtp,^? oiKta? (8pa;(juai) <f), Arj/xea? 
KArj( ) oiK(tas) (Spax^at) 'A. o) (1. 6 ?) //et(&>(i^ ?) ccrrj/jie(.(a)o-aro ?). Third century. 
Complete. 7 lines. 

981. 9 X 9'5 cm. Extract from the e(/)}jp,epts of Apion similar to 917 and 982. 
The text is 'E^ e0r}(piept8os) 'ATrtcoi^os 7rpd(/<ropos) upy(upiKWi') 2ei'Ta)(Aei'(o) 
iiTapo(vpiov) TOV ^v€(t{tS)tos) b (eVous) (8paxp.at) o'i' {bvojSoXoi), Ttri)(^(L(rixov) irepi- 
(rT{ep(av(x)v) rod a{vTov) b (erovs) (Spax/^at) p,^ (6/3oA6s) x(«'^'^ot) /3, y(tVo:;rat) K.r.A. 
Cf 917. introd. Late second or early third century. Complete. 6 lines. 

982. 6'5 X 6-^ cm. Fragment of a similar memorandum of Apion, written 
in the 3rd year, the ends of lines being lost. Cf. 917. introd. 4 lines. 

983. 24-5 X 18-7 cm. Report, similar to 896. ii, addressed to Valerius Ammo- 
nianus, logistes, by two bi]iJ.6aL0L larpoi, of whom the second is named 'Attlmv 
'HpoboTov, concerning the injuries received by a certain Moi^et?. The papyrus 
is numbered 106 in the series of which 53 is no. 105 and 896 nos. 127-8 ; cf. 
53 and 896. introd. Dated in the consulship of Sabinus and Rufinus (a. d. 
316). Incomplete. 16 lines. 

984. Height 18 cm. The verso of this mutilated papyrus contains the Paeans 
of Pindar (841). On the recto of sections A-C is a census-list of persons 
with their ages, parentage, abode, &c., e. g. Uav€ave{vs) d7i-eA(ev^epos) 'AttoA- 

Y 



323 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Awfta? e^ a7Toypa{(f)ris) a{vTOv) oIkcov iv tepcot "Apecos O^ov fxeyia-Tov yepb(tos) 
aarjiixos) (erwr) fJ.€, Tarovpis y{vi>i)) avrov (st^v) A, Qar]au' 6vy{aTipa) ((t&v) cf, 
^evTTaveave{a) aWrjv (erov?) a '2(V7TapaW(Ls) aXXrj ni](Tpb9) TaTvayovTo{s), 8i 7^? 
Koi €hrj\{ooOri) TleTapTTOxpa{TLoyva) vlov avTo{v) aTToyeypaiixixevov) rwt y (eret) Tltov 
6iov (eTovs) a TereAei;r7;KeVat. 'HpaKXijs YlToX{€p.aLOv) rov 'HpaKXi]o{v) /x7jrpo(s) 
2ey0a>tro(s) ir{p€(rj3vT€pas ?) Avko(v) d^rjA(t^) 0770 y{vixvaaiov) e£ aTToypa{(f)ri'i) 
Fjvb{aLixovos) AvKOV rou "ilpov (f)povTL(rTOV oIkQv iv ix4psL {rjinaeL) olKtas ^evorva>- 
{(jipecos) 'UpaKXi^ov juieA(tx/3co9) {hS)v) l[.]. Other entries of interest are (i) 'OvpSt- 
(<^/)ts) 'OpcrevTov Tov Avk6<Ppo{vos) pi.r}TpG{s) ^Avp€(no(s) 4>arpe[cos e]^ a.TToypa{(pT]s) 
a{vTov) airo y{vixva(riov) oIk&v kv ixavh{pa) 'Hpa/cAi/ov 'lepoKO? (Irwr) ju, (2) Sicrvc^ts 
2iVli;^(tos) Toi; 'O^te'co? ixr]{Tpds) TepevTos e£ a'7Toypa{(prjs) a{vTov) 7rao-(To0opos) 
'A7r[o]AAu)i'os 0eoi5 jLieyi(r(Tou) oikwi' ey TTa(rTO(})op[(o tov avTo(v) Upo{v) (erojv) ^, 
(3) 'lepa^ 'HpaK-Aeo8(c«)pot') to({;) 'HpaKAeo8(wpoi)) /vtrj(rpos) 'A7roAAa)i'ta[sl Ttpo^evov 
l3ov\[e\)TU)v (a phrase which recurs in another fragment . . . e^ aT:oypa{4n]i) 
a{vTov) TTp6^€vo{s ?) /3ovA(euTcSz^) oikwi' et' . . .). The following rare names occur : 
4'a)t?, Xe/xei'eCs, 2€vx^(p.ev€vs, Te/3ex«( ) (f^cm-)) Tei'^wus (fern.), Taaz^oC^t? (fem.), 
Qaptoiv AlaxvpcLTos, Sei'v^ts (fem.), "i/avrLS, Teatv//t? (fem.), ©aAAoixra, noui'frts, 
'naavov(l)Ls, rTaTTz/Si?, 'ArT/pt?, ^ap-noKparis (fem.), ^(ppayts (fem.), TocHvais (fem.), 
^Lpatdris, ^evTovs, 'Apgvau)Ls, UavcfyiaL'i, TavcpioLS (fem.), 'A/3a^tKt(s ?), Sei'Trro'AAts 
(fem.), 2ivTp[L]s (fem.), Ta\(/oo(3ai.s (fem.), TaTrrt'x'C^) (^^n^-)) Ta<pif3LS (fem.), 
^iXo(rTi(j)(avos), 'AcnrLbas, YlapcxaTrjs, ITeror^wt?. The locality is apparently 
Oxyrhynchus, the ap(f)obov Kp[?j]'n-(t8o9) being mentioned; cf. 714. 11 NoVov 
Kprjirlbos. Written after the reign of Titus, probably in that of Domitian. 
On the recto of section D in a different hand (cf. Part V. p. 13) are parts of 
a few lines from a land-survey, mentioning various /cA^poi. a { = T:p6Tepov) 
KaTot(K09) precedes some of the personal names. 
985. Height 37-1 cm. The verso of this papyrus contains the fragments of 
Euripides' Hypsipylc (852). On the recto is a private account of receipts 
and expenditure written in the second half of the first century in a large 
cursive hand. Only one column has complete lines, e. g. 11. 6 sqq. : [t]a. 
X-!]\}.p.a{jo<i) 'Ep/jtaro? otro7rpa(rov) ^tto rtp,j)s oXvov y€i'')](iJ.aTos) 17 {^TOV'i) et? a(v/>i- 
irXripcoa-iv) (Spax/^wj-) ^T^i] ixera Ta{s) e7rd(i;(o) (bpaxp.a.'i) 'B'P^Tj Kara pMpos (bpaxpial) 
p. Lj3. di^rjAa)/xa(Tos) <Pav(rT(o avrXovvTi ixr]xo.{vi]v) fir]vds 2g/3o((rTOu) 8 e 9 rip.f.(pG)v) 
y ios To{v) y.i]{vo<i) {bpaxP-S)v) k al (Tvvay6{p.€vai) [bpaxJJ-ox) /3. kpyaTr]i Tr)povvTi tov 
olvov TOV €v rjXia{(TTi]pi(o) Movxi-vcap (an Oxyrhynchite village ; cf. 491. 3) 
(bpaxp-ol) b. . . . ty. ^apa-KLMVL BeAAit'co] (so in another fragment) d/>i7reAo(i'py<3) 
81(d) YleT€a(ovxov) {bpaxP-0.1) k, L m]p.a{iv€i) 6^apa{-nicov) avi]\u>(6rivaL) epyd(Tai?) 
bval (TKd7Tro2;r(t) x^Cy koi e7rtrt^o(wrt) (sic) toIs ovols ets to airi^XtooTLKuv x^f^^ "^^^ 
Xwpiov e<os k8 i]iJ.€p(av La epyluTan) /c/3 di^d (rerpw/SoAor) d/Jo(Aot) ttj] at (1. 0*) 



MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS 323 

(bpaxjJ-al) 1/3 (TeTpcojioXov), 3tv ho{6u(Tai) a({/rw) e-Trt Ao'y(or) {hpa^jxat) rj. i<j- 
'HpaxAan p.fi\a{vapi(j^) l(Td{yovrL?) pi}(vus) 2e/3o(oTo{5) C ^'^^ '^ (8pa\/xai) 77. In 
another fragment a series of figures is summed up / ets ro a{vTd) (bpaxfj-ol) 
Tx/3 {rpKiijioXov), S)V orarcot aviiX{r]p.pAvai) (cf 899. 37, note) ei' rw roS 7; {trovs) 
Ao'y((«)) (bpaxP-ou) 'B, KaiTaXdirovTai) (bpaxfxal) 'A^iS {rpidi^okov). 
986. Height 20-5 cm. The verso of this papyrus contains the commentary on 
Thucydides (853). On the recto are three distinct documents which have 
been joined together to form a roll of sufficient length ; cf. p. 107. The 
first of these, which is on the recto of Cols, xix-xiv of the commentary, is 
part of a list of house-property apparently in the hands of ov<TiaKo\ ixta-Ocorai, 
probably at the Arsinoite village of Oxyrhyncha, in the i6th year of Hadrian 
(see below). Col. i (on the recto of section H) is a mere fragment and 
Col. ii has only ends of lines ; but Col. iii is well preserved, and contains the 

following three entries (11. 4-25) tov avrov Z /xepos \}/€lXov T077(ot') a.v[ ] 

[j.r]v[ 1 . pti)C i/xio-et (sic) xj/iXov tottov lbtOL>( ) [. . .]aiJ.o . . [. oIklo] koI avXr] 

brjK{o}d€l(ra) eTTLKeKpaTrjadai, irpb ttJs avaXr}p.^eu)S vtto HeTeo-oyxov ^AjxpLodva tov Flacr- 
TiaovTos OTTO T^s K(ap.{r]'i) i^ ov Ttcpiyeyoviiyai) airb ivotKicov (bpaxp-as) t(3. yiTOves 
TTJs &Xr]s {sic) oIkCu^ kol avXijs votov t^kvcov "Hpcavos tov Zy]vooi'o[s otJKta, ^oppa 
pvjxri /3ao-iA(iK7/), Xt/3oj 'ApiJLi,vcr€(o(s) ITarpcows bia k \r] povojiCDv olnia, a77rjA(ta5rov) 
laobos Kal €^obo9. tov avTov y /zFepojs oIkms Kal aWpiov kuLKpaT^Q'kv vtto tov 
avTov ([^ o]v (bi]X{(i>dTi) 66 (Itcc) 7rept[yelyo^;e(^'at) (bpaxp-a.'i) b. yiTOV^s tG>v oKoov k.t.X. 
' h.pp.(3iviov ^ A[ixp?oiii'Lov tov kol 'FobCoovos yevap€v[ov] ovcnaKov [p.La-6]oiTov /cat ii'o(f)€L- 
kiaavTos ev t .[...] A \xepos b' fj.[4povs\ oinias koI avXrJ9. yLToves ttjs oX{r]s) oLKias 
Koi a.[v\r]s] votov koI avi]\{LU)Tov) pvixrj /3ao-tA(tK?/), AtjSos Ylovijpiojs [olKta,] ^oppa 
tTipoiv oi[K]t(a), ov TO Tr€ pLyevdp{€i'ov) avv toIs (titlIkoIs] v-ndpxovaeL tov 'Aju/xwriou 
(TTdvuide uipia-Tat. In the margin against the beginning of each of these 
entries is K6\(\-qiJ.a) (\C- Col. iv is less complete ; 11. 4-7 tov a[vTo'^fi ^//■tA[os] 
To-nos diib [[xypovs dvoiK.obop.r]p.ivos d-nb avv[. . .] TikivQov (or ^ irXivdov) ov \xiTpa 
votov eVi fioppd 7r?;x(eis) M, At/3os ctt' diirj\{i(aTTi]v) t[ov] irpbs votov jx^povs 7r7yx(e'?) 
10/., €K be TOV Tipbs fioppa T.-q^i^i-s) t/3Z, [e]^ ov piribev iiepiyiv€(Td{ai). The next 
entry mentions rf; ywa}x{ivri) rw ly (erei) eVeAei^crf.' ['rlwy ovcnaKm', and that 
following begins 4>ovtou n^Tea-opcpLcopLeas tov (PavCov. In Col. v, which is in 
the same hand as Cols, i-iv and is on the recto of Col. xiii of the com- 
mentary, begins a return of TrpoaobiKa ibd(pi] (i. e. confiscated land) at 

Oxyrhyncha supplied by the comogrammateus. Lines 1-5 [irapa y 

"Hpoivos K(D}xoyp{api.p.aTi(iis) '0^vpvyx{(av) [ t]cov vnb [t]ov Trjs iJ.€pibo(s) 

/3a(nA(tKo{)) ypa(p.iJ.aT€U)s) nToAe/^ato(i;) ets [e77tcrKex//-ti'; ixeTabod€VT((i)i>) irpoaobiK&v 
€ba(t}U>v TOV t<5- (Irot)?) [AvTOKpdropos Kaiaapos Tpaiavov 'Abpiavov 2e/3acrroi; (A. D. 
131-2). eu-ai li' followed by a survey-list of holdings with rents, yeCTovcs, 

V 2 



324 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

&c., which is continued in the fragmentary Cols, vi-viii. Col, viii has been 
cut down the middle and joined to another document in a different hand 
(Col. ix), the line of junction corresponding to the margin between Cols, viii 
and vii of the verso. This is a return by aiToXoyoi y To-n{ap)(J,as) to an official 
of the noXijxodvo^ H-^P^^, probably the basilicogrammateus, and mentions 
;8ao-]iA(iK?)i') yfjv (TTVpov) (poyrf 7Tpncro[8(oi.') [apovpat) ?] A8 (TTvpov) [. . . Alo^vvo-o- 
bbypLavfjs ovaCa^ {nvpov) eyi/, but is too much damaged to be intelligible. 
Cols, x-xv, corresponding to Cols, vi-i of the commentary, belong to 
an account of seed-corn issued at the rate of i artaba per aroura to 
various cultivators of Crown land, the rent of the holdings being described in 
detail. Col. xi is well preserved, but the others are more or less broken. 
The formula is the same throughout; e.g. xi. 7-15 Mvadas 'HpaKXTi']o{v) rod 
AeCov Tov 'Oi'i'io((ppLos) Kol Aeioj Aioi> rod 'Ovv(jo((f)pLOs) (apovpaL) yh'r{ic^'^'h' , 
&v a{va.) (TTvpov) hLi'^'p! (apovpat) fSb'rfiW koL a(va) (Trvpov) bZ.Kfx (apovpa) 
a, {iTvpov) yy'ri'. 'Ayxo/oi/x^( 1)0(9) 'Oi'i'w0pto(s) rou Aetou (apovpai) iLh' , SiV a{va) 
{TTvpov) SZi'^'/x' (apovpai) j3Z., koI a{va) (irvpov) hLh'.' .' (apovpas) h'i{ , kcu. 
a{va) (TTDpov) 6Z {apovpas;) Li'c^'X' ji\ koX a{va) {irvpov) 8tV' ^'ct' t'e'o'e' (apovpat) 
/3, KaL a(va) (TTvpov) by Ka\ l'^'o'^' (apovpaL) {{apovpaL)} y7'tV'^'/3'> ^al a{va) 
{nvpov) bZ.Kb'p! {apovpaL) ^Ltf, (irvpov) iLb' . 31-6 Yl^v^ovrfpLs 'HpaK\j;o(i;) tov 
Y[€V€ovripLo{s!) Kal r[(ve[o^\vi]{pL'i) n peer ^{vr epos) A^lovtov ^Ovv(a(})pLo{s) koi 'HpaKXrjs 
HpaKX7]o{v) TOV n€Peovrj{pLos) ot y (apovpaL) <r'/tV^'^'7 ^^ a{va) (iTvpov) ee kcu 
tVo'e' (apovpaL) yi]' l (^' ^' b' , Ka\ ?i(va) {isvpov) bZ.b'[JL (apovpas) Z/V/S', /cat 
a(va) (iTVpov) bLb'o'^' (apovpaL) [3, Kal 6.(va) (TTvpov) 88' (apovpas) b' 1] l t^' X' ^' , 
(■nvpov) <7<7'K'8^ The fractions 3^, -^^ gV^ A> ^"^ /j of an artaba are 
unusual ; cf. 918. introd. and P. Tebt. 341. 

987. 7"7 X 9"4 cm. A piece of vellum with the name "A-na Blktcop in uncials 
enclosed in an ornamental border, and below in different ink ]. xp- Fifth 
or sixth century. 

988. 15 X 18.4 cm. On the recto is the conclusion of two copies of a x€Lp6ypa(j>ov 
concerning a loan of corn, the first copy having lost the beginnings of lines. 
Col. ii. I-IO aTTob(a(Tu> bi aoL to. TtpoKeipLeva Kec/^aAata avv rots (rvvax6i]a-op.ivoLS 
bLa(j)6poLS Tco IlavvL fx-qvl tov ivecTTCOTOs rera/JTou erovs e^' ciAco 'Ictlov Tiayya via 
KaOapa aboXa djSoiXa K^Koa-KLvevfiiva, tov p-cv TTvpov Kal ciKpeLOov w? ei? to bi]pLua-Lov 
fieTpovpiCvov, Ti]v oe Kpi6i]v KaXcas T7€TraTrip.4vriv x'l'P'? Sicttj? ical adipos, "navTa pL^Tpoi 
7(3 TTpoKCLixhy K.T.X. Datcd in the 4th year of Severus Alexander, Athur 30 
(a. D. 224). On the verso is a memorandum concerning the sale of unpro- 
ductive land, of which the text is 'EyA7/jui(0t^e:/ ?) e/< ypacjiiis viroXoyov u; (hovs) 
KopLobov Icretov Tlayya ' Apx^zoXLbos KXi]pov fied( ) Kal tS>v avv\(i)povp€V(tiv els 
TTpaaLv ovK eXaacrov bLirXijs TLp.i]s fJ-ed( ) ap.p.ov KaTe^(va-p.evov) (apovpG>v) b, yetr(orfs") 



MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS 325 

v6t{ov) /3q((n\LKr} ?) bia 'ApL<TTdvb{pov) Zt]V(ovo9 koL aWcov KaKO(f)Vi]i, fioppa '2apa- 
inddo? 'Hpdbov vvvl 'Hpaibov Aiovva-iov, dTTi]\L(OT[ov] rj iJ.€y[a\r] bi&pv^, At/3(6s) 57 
erepa bi.Mpv$, \ip(jd}X}j.ov (dpovpojv) C yetT(oi;es) 7TdvTo6{(v) ''2a?pa7:tdb{os) *Rp(abov 
vvi'l 'Hpoib[ov] Aiovvaiov. Third century, soon after A, D. 224. 

989. 24 X IO-8 cm. A list of persons and epyaa-Tijpia at different villages, sent 
apparently to some official with a view to the exaction of a contribution from 
them. The text is . . , Tlaaioiv yaXnevi. iv e/roiKiw IlroAejua epyaaTi]pLoi\ 
Kai kv K(i)[xi] Tr/t €pya(XTri[ptov] ^Ap.p.oiviov crvv rots ui[ors] koi Emyye'Aov )(akK[i(as.] 
Kai iv €iTot.KL(i) Taa/x[7;ejU0i»j kpyacTTripiov. koX iv kw/x?/ "Hcfii kpyaa-Tqpiov. koX kv 
rw HpaKAeto) e77ot/cia) lpya(TTr]piov, Karap-ivL b\ (v eTToiKtw Siz-'ttckAtj Kakovp[i\v(o. 
Kai ev K\u>p:rj 2epv(/)et "^ivafxovvis vtos /^loaKopov. koX ev K(.!yp.r\ Y\aviV€L Ylay(avis. 
Kai iv 0a>(r/3i SaAo'^ts. Kai iv Xvai dvoi 'l/3oet?. kuI 'Icriou Tpt'(/)a>ros Ilivfia. 
Kai iv KMjj.r] 'Abev 'AjxpMVLos. d^Lovp.(v tovtovs crvvrekdv (tvv i][X€lv. Late third 
or fourth century. Incomplete, the beginning being lost. 26 lines. 

990. 9-5 X 35-3 cm. Beginning of a will of a woman. The text is 'TTraretas 
'lovviov Baaaov ko.i 4>Aaou/,'ou 'Aj3\a(3iov tQv Xap-TtpordTuiv iirdpyjjiv jMecrop?] kij iv 
Ti] Xap-Txpa Koi Aa/^TTpordrr/ ^O^vpvyyjeiT[G>v\ 77oAet. AvprjXia 'Ata? Qvydri^p ^ Aya[6]ov 

Aaijj.ovos KcKtAtou dp^[avTO'i) yevop-Jvov rijs Aa//7r(pas) Kai Kap.ri{pordrr]s) 

'O^vpvyx^etrQv -o'Aecos ro'oe to jBovki] [xa . . . . ' i-noiricra voovcra kol cfypovovcra imvo- 
aois expvcra ypa(^(kv ?....] 'E[A^A7/i'tKot9 ypdpp.aaiv Kara to. avvK€\u)priix€va vtt[. . ., 
followed by parts of two more lines. For the formula cf. 907. A. D. 331. 8 Hues. 

991. 8-3x11 cm. Beginning of a petition (?) addressed to a police official 
called eTroTTTJ]? etpr/i^?;?. The text is 'TTrareta? 'AvTcaviov MapKeAAtVou Kai 
Il^Tpoiiviov YlpolSivov T(av Aa/ji(7rporaroji') (cf. P. Cairo 10690) ^app.ovdi i. (t>Xo.vm 
AiocTKopco iiTOTtTr} ipi]vi]s ^O^vpvyyjirov -napd Avpr\\ias T ao.p.p.oiviov 'S.apaTiicovos dird 
K(api]s ^€pv(j)€0)9 y [sic, not 'n[dyov)) Tov avTov vopov ... A. D. 341. 9 lines. 

992. 8-6xi6-i cm. Order for the payment of a jar of wine. The text is 
^lovKiavbs Au>po9€(i), -napacryjov ^lapiq yvvi] (sic) rTeKoAaptco (1. -ov) oivotv] 6i(7rAow) 
a iv Ao)(iats avTrjs,: (re(rrip.{€LMpai) otvov bi-\ovv a. (erovs) 7:6 p.r] (1. vy]) ^appovdi 
Kj3. A. D. 413. Written across the fibres. Complete. 6 lines. 

993. 6-9 X 7-3 cm. Order issued by a church for the payment of two jars 
of wine to a plasterer on the occasion of a feast. The text is 4- 'H dyia 
eK(K)A(7/(n'a) AvovOico bi^aKovca?) oiK[ov6p.(£t?) rod dyiov TajSpiriX. TTapa(Tx{ov) rw 
KoviaTT] v-n{ep) ttjs kopT{i]s) tov TS/3i /3 ivb{iKTiovo^) o'iv{ov) 8t('7rAa) /3 bvo /i(o'x-'a), 
followed by flourishes. Sixth century. Complete. 5 lines. 

994. 30-5x8 cm. Order for the payment of 12 artabae of corn to a monk. 
The text is +'i>oi^d\pix](tiv K6p.{es) kuI SajuourjA iT€pi^k{€TTTos). irapacrxov 
'loyo-TO) povd({ovTi) \6y(ov) 6\//£02-'tou KaTa avvi]6{€iav) Kai errt tt)? ivaTrjs ivbiKTiovos 
aCT{ov) KoyKcAAo) dprd^as bb)beKa, yi[voiTai) (rtr(ov) Kay(KeAA<i)) (dpTa/Sat) i(3 



326 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

ix6{vai). (erows) po9 /a/xe 0w^ . . tV8tK(noyo?) 6.+ A. D. 499. A difficulty arises, 
as often, in the figure of the indiction, which should be the 8th not the 9th. 
Written across the fibres. Complete. 4 lines. 

995. 31x11 cm. An illiterate receipt for a solidus and three koixtu. The 
text is )(My+ Kv/3t(<p) l^ov a8eAf/)(w) Bapixa <f>ot/3ajuju,a)Z' X€p{i.(rTrii). ex« t^/? "''7? 
aperrjs vtrep tov Kvpiov /u. ov\ 'Icaavvov xptaov vop-ipiaTLav eW, yC{veTai) v[o{p.L(rp.aTiov)] 
a jxovov. jVIea-O(0?/ La 6 ivb{LKT[ovos) ap^j], le 6/xot(a)?) koI Kopra ( = C0J/i/a?) rpia 
p.6va, xpyaioy vop.{i(rp.dTiov ?). Written across the fibres, in the fifth century. 
Complete. 4 lines. 

996. 17-1 X29-4 cm. Deed whereby two yewpyot become surety to the heirs of 
Flavius Apion that two other yecopyot, Praous and Georgius, would remain on 
the estate belonging to the heirs, the formula being practically identical with 
that of 135, beginning BacriAeia? tov OeLordrov koL evo-e/Seorarov Tjp.6iv 8e(r7r[o tov 
fxeyCcTiTov (]vepyeTov 'i>Xao[vLov] Tt/3eptoti MavpL[KL]ov tov al(s)VLo[v] AiyovaTov Kau 
AvTOKp^TOpa eTovs y, vrraTeias tov avTov evrre/3(eoTarou) i]p(av 8e(77r(oroi;) erov? a 

'A6vp Kb ivb{lKTLOVOs) TpiTr]S (a. D. 5^4)' ''''^^^ VTT€p(pVe(TTdTOlS 8ta8o)(ots . . . 

'Avrjo-ios TrpeafjvTepos i^toj 'Ai'oi'77 jur/rpoy Ta/3?ys kol Avp?/Atos 'Az'ovtt (ppovTtcrTrjs 
utos 'Avii(TL0v eTcpov pLTjTpos TotTTai'T/s 6pp.(apevoi dirb iTTOinLov peydXov Movx^ecas Kat 
Fecopyto? vloi Icoavi'ov 0.1:6 (ttolklov Evru)(ta8os . . . 6}w\oyovp.iv eKovcrUi. yrwpi] 
K.r.A. Nearly complete, only the last few lines, which corresponded to 135. 
38-31, being missing. Title on the verso. 31 lines. 

997. 15-1 X 9-2 cm. An account relating to various Oxyrhynchite villages, 
perhaps a list of fines for arrears of taxes. The text is [? 'TirTep i ( = ge/car?/? ?) 
TiapoXKcav (cf. P. Amh. 1 26. 20 v7r(ep) v'!Tepxpovi{as)). 'Ne[i\.]ov e770t/<(iou) Ke, 
Tavdectis Ke, YleTvrj k, Ta/coAKiAecos i, Te^eel t, 2e0w A, Tap.TniTei Ae, 'le'pity t<f, and on 
the verso in a different hand Net'Aou e7ro6K(toi;) [.,] Tavdecos h. Fourth century. 
Practically complete. 1 1 lines. 

998. 32x45 cm. Account of allowances (?) to inhabitants of various Oxyrhyn- 
chite villages, beginning Lri']wo-(ts) Trjs 7!-apaxcop?/o-(ea)?) tov b€cn:6{Tov) r]p.Cov tov 
Kvpov ovTMs' Toij 01770 FlaAwo-ea)? 'AAe^(ar8p€iay) vo{ixiap.dTLa) oy Kep{dTLa) b, 
[rjot? diro EvayyeAetou koI TtXXutvos (tl{tov) a(pra/3at) a koX 'AAe^(ar6peias) 
vo(p.L(rpdTLa) t^. The other payments are made to [t]oIs dzv NeKwr^ecos ^(Trep) 
dTTOTdKT{(i)v) \())p{i(ji>v), [rjois diib Ta/X7re'rt, ^ec{)(i>, ITaKepKr/, Meo-Karow'ecos, SkcAovs, 
TepvOeios kol &eayevovs Kal Nlki'Jtov, MeAtra, Nj/ctou Aaxavias, Qai'jcrio^i, Uayyov- 
Aeeiou, Nr;(Tou AiVKabiov, Aodkiotj, TapovaejBT, TapovOivov, TaKova, 'OcrTpaKLvov, 
'll3Cu)vos, ^T((})avL(Dvos. The total is given in a second column, yi(i^orrat) 
(tC{tov) (dpTd^ai) ^arTT^ koI ''AXe^(avbpdas) voipLta-pLdria) tk K€p(dTia) b. Late 
sixth century. Practically complete. 24 lines. The papyrus was briefly 
described as 191. 



MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS 327 

999. 34 X 37-3 cm. Account of receipts and expenditure on one of the estates 
of FJavius Apion the younger (cf. 138. 5)- Lines 1-5 <i>Aaoui<{) 'A-Trtwi^t tw 
7Tai'ev(}){/]iJ.(o) Koi viT€p(f)v{i(TTdTii)) a-no VTtdT(o[v dpbivapi](i){v) y€ov)(^ovvTL (koI) (VTav6(a) 
rfi \aii-npa 'O^vpy^iTwv TTo'Aet. A.o'yo(?) Xjjpi\xd{T(ov) /cat dz-'aAco/.ia(rwi') yev\o^p.i{v(iiv) 
hi. ipLov ^recpdvov 7Tpo(voriTov} riayyoi'Aeetou avv to(Is) aAA(ots) \xip{€.(Ti) (/<ai) 
^\a\p\yapiTov koX 'A/^i/StoOroj Kai ^\aiOvp.a Ka\ dW(oi)v) e^coriK(wi') roVcoy (koi) ctiI 
rj/s e Ivb(iKTLOVos) (hovi) a(\y (koi) (r£8 (A. D. 616-7). Xr}p.p.{aTa) oi/'(rco?)' 
TT(apd) K\i]p(ov6[j.(iiv) ' AiTcpovTOs 'E7rt/xa)(ou otto KT?//x(a)T(o?) OayyoijAeeioD airov 
K{ayKiXXoi) (apra/3at) z^e (koi) podxtcrixaTio) rrcj . . ., followed by similar entries, 
one of which is ir(apa) rou Kotyou twz; yeu)pyu)p {/(irep) t8t(as) y%. The names 
^evap-ovv and Ta7r77rap(tos?) occur. Title on the verso. One nearly complete 
column, probably followed by another which is lost. 32 lines in all. The 
papyrus was briefly described as 196. 

1000. 6-;^ X 26'H cm. Receipt similar to 915 for 4 AiVpat of tin^ provided by 
Apollos, ixoXvj3ovpy6s, ets bL6p6(acr(iv) rod XefivTos (1. Ae/ir;ros) rod yeov^i-Kiov) 
IxaKeXXap(iov). Written across the fibres, about A. D. 572. Cf 915. introd. 
Nearly complete. 2 lines. 

1001. 8-3 X 31-2 cm. A similar receipt for 6 Xirpai. of tin and 4 of lead 
provided by Apollos rewpytw ya(npi(ri{ ) (? =■ Kaar piaiM, castrcnsi) ds iJ-oroa-t^v) 
(cf. P. Brit. Mus. III. iiyj. 295 iJ.0Tu>paTos) roiv p.ay€LptK(u>v) [o']^'f[i'i<3[i'j tov 
bea-rrloTov) i]p.(av tov Kvpov. Written across the fibres, about A. D. 572. 
Nearly complete. 3 lines. 

1002. 5-8 X 31-5 cm. A similar receipt for 8 AtVpat of lead and some tin 
provided by Apollos ds 8top^(a>a-ty) tov aoAi]v{os) X€yop.[ivov) 2a/3?jr( ) tov 
XovTp{ov) Tiji ix€ydX{y]s) otK(tas) etj iint3ovX[. Written across the fibres, 
about A. D. 572. Incomplete. 3 lines. 

1003. 6-5 X 30-3 cm. A similar receipt for 8 Atrpat of lead and 4 of tin 
provided by Apollos ets 8top^wfT(tz') tcov xaXKLcov tov Kr7//x(aro?) MeaKa- 
vovvicos. Written across the fibres, about A. D. 572. Nearly complete, 
2 lines. 

1004. 34-2 X 17-2 cm. Arabic papyrus containing on the recto 24 lines, 
of which the ends are missing, and on the verso a complete letter (?) of 
9 lines in a large hand. Seventh or eighth century. 

1005. i8-9X22'i cm. Arabic papyrus containing on the recto 8 complete 
lines with part of one line at right angles, and on the verso the last 10 lines 
of another document with part of one line at right angles. Seventh or 
eighth century. 

1006. i5"'5x7-7 cm. A complete Arabic document of 13 lines, written on 
paper in the mediaeval period. 



INDICES 



I. NEW LITERARY TEXTS. 



(a) 852 (Euripides, Hypsipyle). 
{N timbers in thick type refer to fragments^ 



ayaQos 60. 115. 
ayiiv 1. i. 7, iv, I ; 20-1. 16; 
60. 20; 64. 68, 86, 93, 
^ 98. 

ayKa\r\ 32. 5, 9; 60. lO. 
ayvo^ 60. 33, 61. 
ay picas 60. 56- 
dypds 1. iv, 17. 
ay\iaKos 1. ii. 26. 
dyco[ 19. 2. 
ayiiv 60. 102. 
q^iiv 1. ii. 21. 
aSfO"7roroy 1. 1. II. 

"hhpacnoi 1. ii. 34 ; 8-9. 14 ; 

60. 80. 
ad 1. ii. 20 ; 2. 8 ; 60. 99. 
dfipfip 1. ii. 39. 

aCn^os 61. 2 (?). 
dijp 57. 22. 
a0\ws 64. 99. 
advpfia 1. i. 2. 
aiai 64. 72. 

Atyaios 1. ii. 27 ; 64. 103. 

A'lyiva 1. iii. 7. 

aWrjp 57. 9. 

aipeiv 1. iv. 27 {evpedds Pap.). 

alaxpos 60. 16, 41 ; 66. 6. 
alaxvvtadai 60. 58- 
ntWa 60, 16. 
aKOVTi^dv 60. 72. 

uKovfiv 60. 47, 5i' 

nKT)7 64. 80, 104. 
a\r)T€v[ 8-9. 3. 
oKkti 20-1. 6. 

axxd 2. 9; 10.4; 20-1. 13; 

60- 33> 99; 64. 90. 



dXXayij 69. 5- 

(iXXos 1. iv. 35, V. 33 ; 60. 
II, 48. 

a\[XT, 60. 13. 

a\(Tos 1. iv. 10, 14; 60. 

108. 

apaprdvftv 60. 48. 

dfieilBeiv 1, iii, 30 ; 8-9. 7 ; 

60. 7. 
lifios 59. 2. 
d/i(^t 60. 74. 
*A/i^(apaos 1. iv. 1 5, 29 ; 64. 

63. 'Ap(f)uip€(os 1. iv. 42 ; 

60. 25 ; 63. 6. 
' Ap.(f)t6i'ios 1. ii. 33. 
cipcpLs 1. iii, 30, 
civ 1. iv, 6, 9, 29 ; 57. 17 ; 

60. 19, 52 ; 61. II ; 62. 

4. = eav 1. iii. 32 ', KHV 

22. 7. = ava. 1. ii, 29, 

iv, 14. 
avi 57, 9; 64, 58. av 1. ii. 
29, iv. 14. 

ava^oav 1, iii. 1 7. 
avayKa'ios 60. 93. 
dr-aStSdj/ai 57. 12. 
avaiTios 60. 109. 
avd^Los 20-1. 3; 60. 54. 
avdiTa\i.v 64. 59- 
dfdTrau/ixa 1. iii. 14. 
dvaneravvvvaL 8—9. I 7> 
dvanrecv 1, iii. 5. 
avacTcra 60. 23, 
dvariOevat. 63, 4, 
di>fpp.rjvtvTos 1, iv, 18. 
di')7i'uros' 61. 9. 



di'i7p 1. iii. 24, iv. 24 ; 60. 49 ; 

63. 2. 
avOpconos 1. iv, 15; 84. 3. 
dvievai 60. 47. 
apoBvpeadai 1. iv. 7- 
dirdyeii' 57, 1 9. 
auTeadai 64. 64 (.?). 

(ivci) 1, ii, 8, 
"^tof 64. 69. 

uoidi] 1, IV, 4, 
dndyeiv 1, ii, 30. 
anas 1, iv, 27. 
uTTdpos 20-1. 8. 
diTfpxfo-dai 20—1, 13. 
anXrja'TOS 64, 7 I • 
dno 1. iv. 33; 58. 4. 
dno^alveiv (v. I. enij-i.) 1. iii. 2 2. 

dno8i86mi 64. 65 ; 72. 6 (?), 
d7roi[ 33. 4. 
aTToXeiTTdv 1. iii. 34. 
dnoWCvai 32. lo; 60. 14, 28. 
'AttoWuv 60. 26. 
diTop,aaTi8iov 64. 94. 
dTrdTTroAis' 70. I. 
dnopia 1, iv. 18, 
anopos (1. aCpiKos ?) 1, iv. 1 8, 
opa 60. 21, 86. 

'Apyelor 1. ii. 3 1, iii. 28, iv. 

34; 60. 32, 62, 80. 
"Apyor 42. 2 ; 60. 50, 97. 
'Apyco 1. ii. 19; 60. 14 ; 64. 

93- 
dpfTTj 27. 5. 

dprjyuv 60. 16, 39. 
"Apr^s 64. 102. 
dpiOpos 22. 7 (.?). 



330 



INDICES 



apoTOS 1. iii. 2 5- 
aj)(Tt]V 1. i. II. 
Ap^e/JLOfjos 60. 78. 

apx^ 1. iii. 27 ; 60. 77. 
'Acrids 1. iii. 9 ; 64. ici. 

licTKOTkOi 57. 2 I . 
aapevos 1. IV. 2 0. 
AtrcoTr I'a 1. iv. 27. 
(ITT) 1. iii. 31. 
av 60. 89. 
avyr) 1. ii. 4. 
albav 1. ii. 14. 
aiX^ 8-9. 6. 
av^t]fxa 1. ii. 5. 
oi/'pa 58. I (.''). 
aiiTOf 60. 92, 102. 
dcPiKvelirdai 60. 37. 
n(f)l\os [nTTOpns Pap.) 1. iv. 18. 
[djC^to-Tacai 57. 4. 
acPpoiv 68. 10. 
ti^dfaOfu 60. 92. 

^aivetv 34-5. 6. 
Ba(c;^tos 64. 1 06. 
/SaXXetj/ 1. ii. 18 ; 57. 8. 

^apv^papos 64. 80. 

^acrtXfui 1. iii. 29. 

/3ao-tXfi'j 8-9. 13. 

^laios 60. 40. 

i3(or 60. 94. 

^lorf) 64. loS. 

fiXitvfiv 60. 52. 

^\(o(TK(iv 1. iv. 33,; 62. 6 ; 

64. 104. 
jiodv 1. iii. 10. 
/3oi;[X 22. 4. 

^ovXf(T6ni 1. iv. 36 ; 60. 53. 
Corpus 57. I I ; 64. III. 
Bpopios 58. 3. 
Ppopt[ 73. 5. 
^poTdos 60. 100. 
^poTos 60. 90, 92. 

■ytiXa 57. 13. 
yaXrjvfia 1. iii. 4. 
yapdv 1. V. 5. 
ydvos 60. 60. 

yap 1. iv. 19, 31, V. 8; 12. 3 ; 
20-1. 14; 60. 17, 18, 20, 

23, 27, 28, 35, 41,44,48, 



52, 54, 77, loi- 109, no; 
64. 69, 75, 106 ; 66. 6. 
ye 20-1. 6, 8, 13; 60. 11 
(Se Pap.) ; 64. 106. 

yfved 1. iii. 38. 

y(V(ioi> 60. 26. 

yej'j'otoj 8-9. 1 X ; 22. 9. 

yivos 1. iv. 34; 57. 2 5(.?) ; 

59. 7. 

yn 1. iv. 25; 20-1. 12, 15; 

60. 93. 

ylyvfvGai. 18. 7 ; 60. 88. 

yiyvacTKeiv 20—1. 9. 

yXvKvs 32. 4. 

■yoVi; 60. 25, 30. 

yoof 1. iv. 6. 

T'opyn? 64. 77. 

yopycoTTos 18. 3. 

ypa[ 1. i. I. 

ywiy 1. i. 7, iv. 38, v. i. 28; 

2. 3; 20-1. i; 22. 5; 

60. 45, 49, 55, 89; 64. 

63 ; 74. 3. 

8dKpv 1. iv. 7 ; 64. 96. 
Aavai8ai 1. iv. 36 ; 64. 87 (.?). 
Aaraot 1. iii. 16; 60. 34. 
8f8<)iK€vm 20—1. 7- 
deiKvvi'cii 28. I ; 60. 43; 60. 

61. 

8(iv 1. i. 9 ; 60. 95, 96. 

8fl(r6ai 1. i. 6. 

Se'pof 1. ii. 23. 

8ecrpios 60. 29. 

8e(T7Toiva 34—5. 2. 

8fCpo 1. ii. 29 ; 64. 83. 

8ex^€a6M 1. V. 3; 20-1. 10; 

58. 7; 60. 19, 89. 
5i7 1. iii. 33, iv. 38; 20-1. 

13; 24. 3; 57. 24; 60. 

18 ; 61. 6; 64. 66, 67. 
8Pi\ns 8-9. 9. 
8iiTa 20-1. 6, 10; 27. 4; 

64. 70. 
8ul 1. ii. 19; 22. 3, 7(?); 

60. 17, 28, 33, 58, 61; 

64. 103. 
Slmra 60. 115. 
8iapi(lp('tu 22. 7 (.?). 
8ia(pep(iv 60. 46. 



6tS«o-/cfii/ 64. 10 1. 
StSoi/ai 1. v. 7, 35 ; 34-5. 6 ; 
60. 98 ; 61. 14; 64. 97. 

8l(KTTfpilV 60. 96. 

8irjK€iv 60. 45. 
8uniTri<i 1. iv. 31. 
h'lKaios 60. 117. 
StK/; 60. .(57. 
StoXXi'rai 60. 1 7. 

Aio'fva-oj 57. 2 ; 64. 132. 

Aiorpo^oj 1. iii. 23. 

8icT 78. 5. 

SpcoiV 34—5. 5. 

fiom.- 5. 5(.?); 27. 6; 60. 

5> 9- 
Sd/itos 1. i. 9, iii. 20, iv. 13, 

20, 22 ; 8-9. 16 ; 34-5. 

6; 60. 23, 36. 

86pv 8-9. II. 

SouXeia 61. 8. 

SoL'Xos 1. ii. 18, iv. 22, 23; 

20-1. 16. 
8ovKo<Tvvi-j 64. 86. 
8pdKCDv 1. ii. 24 ; 18. 2 ; 60. 

71- 
8pdu 18. 6 ; 60. 42 ; 66. 5. 

8p6pos 60. 73* 
8po<jL^iLv 7. 4. 
8p6aos 1. ii. 17. 
8pvs 1. ii. 23. 
8v[va 1. v. 30, 
Svvaros 1. i. 8. 
8vo 64. 105. 

8v(TTVX(lV 61. 7- 
Sva-xfptjs 1. iv. 19. 
8o)pa 1. i. 12, ii. 16, iv. 24; 
' 34-5. 4. 

I Acopt's 1. iv. 12. 
jSooTwp 7. 5. 

eor 20-1. 13 ; 27. 3. 

tyyvs 1. iv. II ; 10. 3. 

eyco 1. ii. II, iii. 15, iv. 19 ; 
10. 6 ; 12. 4 ; 20 1. 9, 
15; 60. 8, 12, 16, 21, 
28, 29, 31, 36, 60, 76, 
89; 61. 13; 64. 64, 65, 
72 {(p(6(v), 76,86,93.98, 
100, loi, no; 72. 3; 
75. 2. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS 



331 



£6 11. I, 2. 

d 1. I, 8; 20-1. 15; 60. 
53, 59; 64. 73>\^73. 4- 
fl hi] 1. iv. 38. 61 nov 1. 
V. 10. 

dbivai 60. i8, 35. 37, 51. 

6i»ct)s 60. 97. 

ftXarti'Of 1. iii. 14. 

e?i/ai 1. i. 5, 10, iv. 28, 34, 

V. 6; 60. 31, 32, 51, 54, 
95, loi, 104; 61. i3(?); 

63. 3; 64. 64, 71; 65.8. 
flntlv 20-1. 4 ; 59. 8 ; 60. 

„ 34- 

ftpyeii/ 33. 3. 
flpetTia 8—9. 8. 
efs 1. i. 8, V. 6 ; 64. 58. 
els 1. ii. II, iii. 32, iv. 35; 
2. 9 ; 5.3; 20-1. 6 ; 60. 
48, 52, 93. 99 ; 63. 3; 

^ 64. 85, 98. 
ela^aiveiu 1. iv. 20. 
eiffoSos 1. ii. 16. 
tlaopav 60. 20, 29, 
(laniTTTecv 1, iv. 1 6. 
firf 1. iv. 2 2, 23. 
fK. 1. iv. 34; 32. II. 
eKya\r]vi^eiv 1. i. 3. 
eKdrjfxUi {Jpr]fi'ia Pap.) 1. iv. I 5. 
fKBiddcTKeiu 60. 54- 
eW 23. 2. 
(KeWeu 64. 83. 

fKKKfTTTflV 64. 79- 

(KXaixneiv 64. 62. 

€K0V(TL(OS 60. 35- 

(KuflOuv 64. 60. 

eKTTVfiv 60. 38. 

eVreAeti' 32. 4. 

eXtyoy 1. iii. 9. 

eXev^f po? 60. 24; 61. 12. 

fXiaa-fii' 1. ii. 27; 60. 74; 

64. 61. 
"EX\r]v 60. 32, 44, 
ffiavTOV 60. 46. 

eV/if^ 12. 3- 

(fios 1. iv, 5; 60. 10, II, 18, 
I9> 27, 44; 64. 94, 95, 
97; 66. I ; 70. 11. 

fUnoXr) 64. 87. 

epnopia 1. iv. 1 1 . 



(fiTTvpa 60. 33, 58. 

eV 1. iv. 2 1, 29 ; 2. 4 ; 20-1. 

12 ; 22. 10; 32. 5; 60. 

27, 105; 64. 77, 90. 

fvavXi^dv 1. 1. 8. 
evenew 64. 92, lOO. 
ivBcibe 64. 87. 
eVoTTfj 8—9. 13. 

fVOTTTpOV 1. ii. 3. 

fVTOS 1. i. 7- 

e^ 1. iv. 27; 60. 13. 
e^dyeip 20-1. 1 5 ; 59. 6. 
e^apapraveiv 22. 8. 
e^erricrTaa-dai 60. 41. 

f^(Vpi(TK€lV 20—1. 6. 

e^iaovv 39. 2. 

ejco 1. v. 28; 34-5. 5. 

(oiKevac 57. I. 

enmBfiadai 60. 21. 

iTrauKilv 60. 59- 

e;r«18. 5(.= ); 64.64,95. 

eneiTa 60. 47. 

enea-dai 60. 30. 

eiTe)(€lv 60. 2 2. 

fW 1. ii. 17, 32, iii. 4, 19, 

iv. 7, 9; 32. 9; 58. 9; 

60. 10, 22 ; 64. 60, 68, 

81, 89. 
im^aiviiv 1. iii. 22 (z^. /. dnoiS.) ; 

64. 86. 
ent^ovXeveiv 60. 36. 
enixojpioi 1. iv. 28. 
(Tiovopn^dv 60. 107. 
errra 60. 87. 
e7ra)/i[ 58. 9. 
epyov 1. ii. 33. 
epeti/ 1. V. 27. 
fpfaOai 1. iv. 23. 
eperrjs 1. iii. 12. 
fpt]pia 1. iv. I 5 (I. fK8r]p.ui ?y 
(pijpos 1. iv. 14, 17 ; 64. 82. 
ept? 8-9. 7. 
epv^a 1. ii. 32. 
epxea-dai 1. iv. 9 ; 38. 2 (.?) ; 

60. 16, 18; 61. 3, 5; 64. 

83 ; 72. 3. 
ti 58. 8 ; 60. 49 ; 64. 65, 

93 («s Pap.), 102. 

f'a-drjs 1. iv. 13. 

IVco 34-5. 6 ; 61. 3. 



i(TU)6(v 58. II. 

eVfpos 1. iii. 17, 28 ; 60. 91. 
(To'ipos 66. 4 (?). 
eV 60. 41, 42. 
fidaiprivflv 64. 69, 70- 
fi/'eXTTty 20-1. 4. 
(vfjpfpoi 64. 62. 
fvveTtjs 64. 78. 
evnpfTn'js 60. 23. 
fvpi(TK(if 1, iv. 27 (1. ntpe^ei'i) ; 
20-1. 15. 

EvpvdtKr] 22. 1 1. 

Evpmnr] 1. iii. 2 2. 

f{i(r(^f]^ 60. 40. 

{VTV)(ia 64. 89. 

€uri);^co9 1. iv. 38. 

futoTToy 1. ii. 6. 

i(picrravai 1. iv. 2 2 ; 57. 4 (?). 

ex^'" !• i- 9, iii- 36 (?), iv. 10, 
18, 23 ; 8-9. 14 ; 20-1. 
3, 4, 14; 60.40,93, 116; 



61. 4; 63. 
76. 4. 

fxdpos 1. iv. 15. 



O ; 



64. 76; 



Cfvyvvvai 8—9. 15' 
Ztvs 1. iv. 10, 2 1, 28. 
CrjXcoTOS 60. 104. 

in" 61. 6. 

Cvyou 70. 7. 



rjKfU 



27, 



V 1. ii. 7, 12, 17, 19, 22, iv. 

6; 60. 49, 57, 113; 61. 

6; 64. 109. 
7 4. 2. V yap 64. 75, 106. 
vS^ 13. 4. 

'HScow'y 64. 50 Schol. 

IV 1. i. 2 ; 18. 8 ; 60. 
39; 64. 68 ; 65. 6. 
rjKiara 2. 6. 

^X.^ 10. 5. 

Tjpeis 1. i. 8, iv. 37; 60. 69, 

75, 77, 98; 64. 63, 67. 
vV 22. 8 ; 27. 7. 
TJnios 60. ^6. 
rja-<Tov 60. 113. 
^X"" 1« ii- 28. 

edXafios 57. 7 ; 58. 3. 
6a\daaios 64. 81. 



332 



INDICES 



edvaros 1. iv. 5 ; 20-1. 7 ; 

75. 5- 

BanTfiv 60. 91, 98. 
fifci 1. V. 10. 

6i\eiv 58. I ; 60. 53, 56, 70. 
^//iis- 1. iv. 39 ; 77. 3. 
6(6s 1. iii. 32, iv, 30, v. 8; 
57. 20; 64. 71 ; 69. 3; 

76. 5; 81. 3. 

BepaTifia 1. ii. "J. 
6{pdn(viJ.a 1. il, 12. 
Btpi^iiv 60. 94. 
e7/3ni 64. 68. 
% 8-9. 15- 
^i^pSj/ 1. iv. 41. 

BiyyaviLV 59. 4. 

BvijaKHv 30. 3 (?) ; 60. 8, 15, 
17, 29, 92 ; 61. 6 ; 64. 
79 ; 75. I (.?). 

eon? 1. i. 7 ; 2. 4 ; 33. 7 ; 

64. 105, 115. 
epaKT] 64. 51 schol., 98. 
GpaKios 1. iii. 2 ; 64. 50 

schol. 

Opaaaa 1. iii. lO. 

6pouv 10. 7- 

^ufn/ 65. 9. 

0vp(')s 1. iii. 15 ; 8-9. 12. 

^(^/ja 33. 2. 

'lutTUiV 64. 95. 

iar/;p 66. 3. 

I8('iu 1. ii. 2, iii. 15 (1. v8('iv), 
iv. 17, 20, V. 31 ; 60. 16, 

23, 75- 
18 w 1. ii. 8. 

'ibpis 20-1. 5. 

leVat 1. iii. 15. 

lepos 1. ii. 23, iii. 23. 

Irjios 1. iii. 9. 

iKtTis 60. 25. 

twelo-^at 60. 86 ; 64. 80. 

i(TT(ivai 20-1. 2. 

i(TT(')s 1. iii. 8. 

tfj-rororos 1. ii. lO. 

'ico 1. iii. 29. 

tci 12. 4; 60. 14; 64. 76. 

'IwXkos 64. 93 (KoX;)^oi Pap.). 

Kadpoi 1. iv. 37 ; 60. 84. 



KaBLCTTUVal 61. 1 1. 

Kaivdv 64. 78. 
Kaipos 60. 27. 
KaKOi 60. 19, 27, 55, 115; 

61. 2; 64. 70, 76, 88, 
96; 68. 8. KOKwj 60. 14. 

KiiKdv 1. ii. 35. 

KaXXton-?; 1. iv. 8. 

KnXoj 60. 49, no; 66. 7. 

Kav 22. 7. 

Kanvos 58. 2. 

mpa 60. 43 ; 64. 74. 

Kopbia 61. 3. 

Kapmpoi 60. 94. 

Kara 60. 96, 108. 

KaTa6pr]velv 1. IV. 4. 

KaraKTelveii/ 64. 75- 

KarcKpfvyfiv 63. 2. 

wirco 64. 57* 

(ceii/oy 64. III. 

KeXivapa 1. iii. I 2. 

Kfi/oy 60. 21. 

Kepacrc{)6pos 1. ill. 3 1. 

K(pKis 1. ii. 9. 

KrjXrjpa 32. 7- 

KiOdpa 1. ii. 32, iv. 6 (r. /. 

Ki6npis or KiOapiapa) ] 64. 

lOI. 

Kidapii 1. iii. 10, iv. 6 (.''). 
Ki&dpi(Tp.a 1. iv. 6 (.?). 
/(XftTOf 1. V. 5; 60. loi. 

KXrjSovx^OS 1. IV. 28. 

k\jj^(iv 1. ii. 20, iv, 26. 

Kkj)6pov 34-5. 3. 

KkKTia 8—9. 10. 

kKwiv 1. iii. 18, 28 ; 60. 53. 

koIti^ 8-9. 6 ; 64. 82. 

KoX^oi 64. 93 (1. 'IcoX/cos ?). 

Kopi^uv 64. 105 ; 83. 2. 

Kopi^os 22. 1 1. 

Koa-pfiv 60. 46; 64. 102. 

Koup^re? 1. iii. 24, 

Kpdros 1. iii. 26. 

KpeKfLV 1. ii. II (t^. /. Xe'yfti'). 

Kptjvaioi 60. 60. 

Kpr/i/j; 18. I. 

KpijTj? 1. iii. 23. 

Kp'lVilV 20—1. I I. 

KpoToKov 1. ii. 8. 
Kpoiidp 1. i. 4. 



Kpaxraos 1. iv. 29. 

KTi'iveiv 1. iv. 3 ; 36. 3 ; 60. 

9, 36. 
KTiipa, 59. 3. 
KTvnos 1. ii. 8. 
Ki;<Xof 20—1. 12. 
Kvpa 1. iii. 19. 
Kvpo(^K^Tinros 1. ii. 28. 
Kui'nyos 1. iv. 2. 
KVTrapicra6po(f)os 58. lO. 
Kvperi- 1. i. II ; 60. 85. 
KcoXveiv 62. 5- 

KCOTTJ; 64. 84. 

\ay)(<ivfiv 1. iv. 5. 

'Knpfidveiv 1. iv. 29; 36. 4; 

63. 8 ; 68. 3. 

Xe'yeti/ 1. ii. I I {v. I. KpfKeif) ; 

22. 9; 60. 59; 64. 96; 

66. 6, 7. 
\(ipu>v 1. ii. 29, iv. 21. 
XeiVetj' 1. iii. 22, 26. 
XeKTpov 64. 77« 

XevKULi'dv 60. 13. 
X€u/c]o0n7;f 1. ii. 4. 

Xfvaafiv 10. 4 ; 18. 3 ; 60. 

33- 
Arjpvios 1. ii. 10 ; 4. 4 ; 62, 

3; 64. 104. 
Xi'jpuoi 1. ii. 26 (^i. /. vrjaos) ; 

64. 73. 
Xlfiavus 57. 16, 
Xi/xr;z/ 64, 85. 

Xo'yoy 1, iii. 18; 32. 8; 60. 
44 ; 61. 9. 

AvKovpyos 1. iv. 26; 2. 2. 
Xvnrjpos 1. i. 9. 



pciKupios 1. 1. 5- 
paKpdv 10. 4, 
paKponnXos 1, iii, 1 1 . 
;n(tXa 10. 2. 
pdWov 60, 57. 
pavOavfiv 1, iv, 39 ; 64,x73. 
pji/Ttf 60. 15. \ 

pdprvs 41. I ; 60. 18. 
pdxi] 64. 102. 

ptyai 1, iv, 43 ; 60. 12. 
peyeffos 12. 2. 
pfXudpov 1. i. 6, iv. 26. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS 



333 



fl(\(lV 1. 11. I I. 

fieXfos 64. 87. 
fieWfiv 60. 29. 
/Lte'Aos 1. iv. 6. 
fieXtreaOai 1. iii. 12. 
/xeXmSos 1. ii. 14. 

fiiv 1. i. II, iii. 13 ; 60. 8, 40, 
41, 48, 68, 88, 90, 95, 
105, 112, 116 ; 64. 63. 

fih ovv 60. 43. 
fiiixiv 1. i. 10. 
fxevoi 1. ii. 35. 
Inferos 1. iii. 8, 33. 
nerd 1. iv. 8. 
IxfTavia-diO-Qai 1. iii. 3*7. 

H'} 22. 3; 27. 7; 60. 16, 
81, 95, 117; 64. 79, 89. 

firjbeis 60. 42. 

fj.i]\olSo(TK6s 1. iv. 24. 

filjrrjp 64. 66, 71, 92, 95, 
109. 

fxr]xavi] 64. 106. 

(iifjivrjcrKfadai 1. ii. 6 ; 60. I06. 

HvrjfioaiivT] 1. ii, 25. 

fiovoj3i]fj.(jL>v 1. li. 38. 

fxovo'iKT]TOi 1. IV. 17. 

/io'i/os 65. 3 (?). 

/LioOo-a 1. ii. II, iv. 7; 64. 

lOI. 
MvKrjvai 1. iv. 34, 

vaUiv 60. 50. 

j/u^iia 1. iv. 31, 

NavTrXtos 64. 85. 

vavf 63. 7* 

vavTTjs 64. 84. 

veavlas 1. i. 4 J 61. 4- 

peapos 1. ii. 13. 

veKTop 57. I5' 

Nfyiieu 1. iv. 10; 60. 108. 

Nf/ifdf 1. iv. 21. 

Ne'/iftof 1. ii. 29. 

li/f/xoj' 1. iv. I. 

veos 60. 91. 

vrjaos 1. ii. 26 (v. /. Arju^os). 

ViKav 20-1. 13. 

VLV 60. 73. 

yocrror 60. 85. 

vvKTtpoi 8-9. 10. 

vvv 60. 53 ; 80. i. 



vv^l. i. 8; 8-9. 6; 57. 23. 
vvx^viiu 8-9. 13. 

^euiKoi 64. 85. 

|ewy 1. iv. 12 (^eii'.), 25; 

2. 7 ; 27. 5 ; 60. 30, 43, 
50 ; 64. 69. 

^{voiv 2. 4. 

o (rel.) 1. ii. 27, iii. 6, iv. 3, 
10, II. 

oSe 1. i. 6, 10, ii. 8, 9, 14, iii. 
15. iv. 5, 13, 21, 22, 24, 
26; 20-1. 5, 14; 60. 19, 

22, 34, 35>47> 52, 55, 57> 

92, 105; 62. 3; 64. 66, 

90, 93, 98. 
oStos 1. iv. 30. 
6bonT6pos 1. iv. 16. 
ohos 64. 58. 
o^vpp.6s 1. 1. 3. 
oCos 1. ii. 24. 
oi5/ia 1. iii. 4 ; 64. 81. 
OlKkrji 1. iv. 42 ; 60. 15. 
oiKOi 1. i. II ; 58. 8 ; 59. 5. 
o'ip.01 64. 88, 96. 
o'lVT] 58. 4. 
olvmnos 64. III. 
olos 10. 5 ; 20-1. 7 ; 37. 4 ; 

66.4. omrel.ii.i8;64.77. 
oiaTpos 1. iii. 29. 
o\/3toy 1. iii. 27, iv. 26. 

oWvuai 10. 8. 

of^na 1. ii. 24; 60. 44, 52; 

64. 96. 
opov 61. 5. 
SfX<os 61. 5- 
oVeiSo? 60. 32. 
ovopa 4. 3. 
onrj 1. iv. 19. 
onkov 1. ii. 30 ; 64. 102. 
opav 1. iv. II ; 60. 46, 57. 
opyr] 22. 3 {pC 6pyi]s) ; 60. 6. 
up6as 60. 6, 9. 
opiou 1. iv. 35. 
oppav 1. iv. 37 ; 64. 67. 
opvis 60. 80; 64. 81. 
opos 64. 51 schol. 
opoOeti' 1. iii. 3. 
'Opcpevs 1. iii. 10; 64. 98. 



ov, - 



OS 1. i. 3, ii. 23, iii. 25, iv. 27, 
V. 6; 5. 2; 18. 4; 60. 7, 
10, 30, 38, 58, 89, 97 ; 
64. 72 ; 73. 4; 83. 3. 

oaios 1. V. 2 ; 60. 3 1 . 

ocros 1. i. 9. 

oa-nep 60. 96. 

o(TTts 1. i. 5, ii. 11; 20-1. 1 5 ; 
60. 21, 90. 

orav 1. iv. 16. 

ore 1. ii. 29 ; 57. 25 ; 64. 64. 
oTi 64. 74. 

ovK 1. ii. 9, iv. 31, V. 30 ; 

2. 4 ; 12. 3 ; 18. 8 ; 60. 

9, II, 40, 49, 52, 54, 57, 

90; 62. 5; 63. 5; 64. 

74. ovxil. iv. 23; 10. 3; 

59. 4- 

oiSe 34-5. 6; 57. 4(?); 60. 
117. 

oiiSetV 60. 7, 20, 90. 
OVKOVV 20—1. 8. 

ovv 1. V. 9; 60. 43. 

ovveKa 60. 8. 

ovpios 61. 2 (.''). 

ovTis 20—1. 4. 

ovTos 1. iii. 32, iv. 20, v. 7, 

11; 20-1. 9, II, 13; 

27. 6; 60. 60, 89, 95; 

64. 102; 93. I. 

OVTQ}, OVTCOS 60. 5, 45* 

Uayyaios 64. 51 schol. 
rrdSos 1. iv. 5. 

TTois 1. ii. 13, iii. 21, iv. 42 
v. 11; 20-1. 7; 22. 6 

60. 14, 36, 67, III, 112 
64. 65, 109; 72. 3. 

napd 1. ii. 1 5, iii. 8, 18; 8-9. 
6 ; 58. 7 ; 64. 63. 

napaivelv 60. 89. 
TvapnpvOiov 1. ii. lO. 
nape'ivai 60. 35, 52 ; 61. 5. 
napdivos 1. 111. 6. 
naptevai 1. ii. 3 I. 
irdpoixos 18. 2. 

TTds 1. iv. 32; 18. 6(?), 7; 

60. 48, 51- 
Trdarxeiv 20-1. 7 ; 60. 38, 4 1, 

42. 



334 



INDICES 



TTari'ip 1. iii. 35 ; 8-9. 1 1 ; 
60. 15 ; 64. 74, 75, 95, 
99; 64. 105. 

Trdrpa 1. iii. 30, iv. 40; 8-9. 

Trdrpioi 1. iii. 20. 
neSiou 1. ii. 31. 
7re8ov 1. ii. I 7. 
TTfWeiv 27. "J. 
TTdda 60. 116; 83. I. 
■neXas 32. 2 ; 60. 2 0. 
TreXdrjyj 1. iv. 12. 
Tre fineiv 60. 2 2. 

TTfVTTjKOVTOpOi 1. il. 21. 

TTtnXov 1. iii. 12. 
Trepof 77. 4. 

Trepi 1. ii. 23 ; 8-9. lo; 88. 

3; 
TreptexcH' 32. 5- 

rijjXew 1. iii, 7, 

■Krjkr]^ 18. 4. 
TTi]povrj 1. iv. 41. 

TTiji''? 1. ii. 9. 
jTiKpos 60. 8. 
TTiTveiv 60. 25. 
TTiVvXos- 1. iii. 1 1. 
ttXu^ 62. 9. 
TrXdrrj 1. iii, 14. 
nXeupwi' 8-9. 2. 
ttX^^os 1. iv. 32. 
ttXiji^ 60. 1 1. 
TrXrjalos 60. 50. 
TTodfV 1. V. 4. 

TToI 20-1. 10. 
TTOtKlXoy 1. ii. 36. 
TTOlpljV 18. 5. 

TTOioy 1. iv. 33. 
TToXtdy 64. 74- 
TToXtf 1, iii. 20; 20-1. 10; 

64. 93. 
Ylokvhapoi 1. V. 9, 
noKvKapTTos 7. 2. 
noXui/eiK^y 1. iv. 40. 
TToXvs 60. 45, 83, I 16, 
TTovet:' 60. 90. 

TToi/of 1. iii. 16, iv. 9. 

TTOJ/TtOf 64. 73- 
TTOpfVflV 91. 3. 

TTopos 64. 85, 103, 
7r«5(rir 1, iv. 3. 



7roTap,6s 1. iii. 6. 
TTore 1. i. 5, 9, iv. I ; 57. 6 ; 
60. 52; 64. 99; 86. 3. 

TTuTfpa 1. 11. 16. 
TTOTVia 57. 20. 

TTOO 10. I, 2. 
TTOU 1. V. 10. 

TTovs 20-1. II ; 64, 79. 

TTpaypa 60. 6, II 4. 
npaaaeiv 60. 3 I. 

TtpiTTdV 1. 11. 13, 

TTpoSiSoiat 60. 31. 
npodveiv 1. iv. 36. 
np66vpn 60. 62. 
TrpoBvp'ia 20—1. 1 1 . 
npodvpos 64. 64, 65. 
npodvpuv 1. ii. 15. 
IIpoKpis 1. iv. 2. 
j Trpdsl.iv. 13,37; 2.5; 60. 
25, 26, 30, 42, 50, 114. 
npoadoKia 64. loS. 
irpoaf'pxeo'dai 1. i. 6. 
TTpoa-df 61. I 2. 
TTpo(TTt6ii>ai 60. 24. 
7rp6(T(f)opui 1. li. 12. 
npoTfpov 1. iii. 19. 
TrpvpvTjaia 1. iii. 5. 
TrpcSpa 60. 13. 
npcoToyovos 57. 2 2. 
np(i>Tov 60. 43. 
jrvX?; 1. i. 4, iv. 37. 
7rvp[ 87. 2. 

TTwr 1. iv, 44 ; 30. 2 ; 64. 79, 
83, 90. 

pdv 57. 13. 
pevpa 60. 61. 
pveaOai 60. 28. 

pvTos 1. iv. 29. 

aaipfiv 1. ii. 17. 

aavTOv 60. 79- 

(Ta(l)Tis 1. iv. 13, (Tacjws 65. 

7. <Ta(f)((TTaTOs 60. 19. 
o■e^«t^ 18. 4. 
o-iy/ia 1. ii. 36 ; 57. 10. 
o-ry«18. 5(.?). 
(Tiyav 60. 7- 
(Tidrjpoi 8—9. 8. 
a-Konuv 20-1. 14; 60. 1 1 4. 



(Tfxvpva 58. 2. 

o-o's 1. i. 3, 10. ii. 5, 19; 60. 

28, 3o> 38, 39. 43. 10°. 
no; 64. 6s, 7°, 75, 88, 
92, 105; 66. 2 ; 79. 2. 

cro(p6s 1. iii. 18 ; 61. 14. 

(TTaCeiv 57. 14. 

arraTos 1. iv. 3 I . 

araxvi 7. 3 ; 60. 94. 

aTfyrj 1. i. 7. 

(jT(ix(i-v 1. iv. 14. 

(TTevtiv 60. 96 ; 64. 89. 

(TTepytiv 60. I 2. 

ITT€pVOV 64. 94. 

(TTe(f)avoi 60. 103. 
(Tn/3os 20-1. 5. 
o-ToX[ 60. 81. 
(TToXos 64. 83. 

(TTopa 1. ii, 20. 

0-rpdrfV/xa 64. 68 ; 65. 4 (.?). 

(TTparrjyos 60. 87. 

aTpartd 60. 62. 

OTpardf 1. iv. 32, 36. 

o-iJ 1. ii. 15, 25, iii. 32,iv. 22, 
39; 20-1. 10; 27. 7 
60. 17, 1 8, 23-5, 51, 54 
56, 79, III, 112 ; 61. 10 
13; 64. 65, 66, 79, 90 
75. I. atdfv 1. iii. 36 
60. 42, 53. (T(f)w 64. 66. 
(T(f>av 1. i. 5- 

avp^dXkdv 60. 117. 
(Tvp^ovXos 20-1. 14. 
(Tvpfiaxos 63. 5' 

(rvn(f>opd 20-1. 8; 60. 34, 
39- 

(TVV 60. I 10. 

(TvvTapdaa-etv 1. iv. 32. 
a(f)ay^ 8-9. 9 ; 60. 22. 
o-w^fti' 60. 21 ; 63. 6; 64. 
66, 106 ; 74. 4. 

(xaifxa 1. iv. 23. 

aa}(f)pcov 22. 10; 60. 44, 51, 
116. 

ToXalTTQipOS 60. 55* 
rdXay 20-1. 8 ; 64. 7 I . 

Td<T(T(iv 64. 75- 

rax nv 57. 1 7« 
rdxos 60. 47. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS 



335 



rax^virXcvs 1. iii. I 3. 
TiKvov 1. ii. 6, iii. 25 ; 8-9. 
15; 32. 6; 34-5. 5; 60. 

9' ii> 34, 38,91 ; 64.58, 

{66}, 73, 77, 86, 91, 97, 
100, 105; 66. 3. 

TiKVOVV 1. 111. 7- 

Tfjivfiu 64. 74- 
">'? 60. 26, 59. 
TiOevai 1. iii. 32 ; 60. 56, 
III ; 64. 100. 

ridr]Pt]fxa 60. lO. 

TiKTeiv 1. i. 5 ; 44. i ; 60. 11. 
t'is 1. i. 6, 9, 15, iv. 6, II, 

24, 33' V. 34; 10. 7 ; 

20-1. 6, 10, 15; 22. II ; 

23. I ; 24. 3; 57. 6, 10; 

60. 95; 64. 83, 90, 99, 

103. 
Tis 1. ii. 4, V. 6 ; 20-1. 1 5 ; 

60. 53, 59 ; 62. 7 ; 64. 

71; 82. 3. 
To^evdv 60. 76. 
To^ov 1. ii. 37. 

TOTTOS 64. 98. 

TOTf 1. iii. 13, 14; 57. 24; 

60. 30 ; 64. 76. 
rpinuv 1. iv. 19; 20-1. 10. 
rpf(Peiv 64. 90; 81. 2. 
rpt7r6[ 58. 6. 
rpia-aos 1. iii. 26. 
Tpo(f)6i 1. iii. 24 ; 34-5. 5. 
TpoxdCetv 64. 59. 
Tvpto9 1. iii. 21. 
rixn 60. 33, 37; 70. 2. 

vSeti' 1. iii. 15 {I8e~iv Pap.). 
uSwp 1. iv. 29, 31 ; 60. 13. 
vpels 1. i. 4. 
iios 64. 69. 

vTVfpjiaLVfiv 1. iv. 35. 



vinbiadai 60. 37- 

wTTvos 1. ii. 11; 32. 4 (?). 

vTTo 57. 8(?); 60. 16. 

'Y^JAinvXr] 1. iv. 26, 33; 10. 

3; 12. 4; 64.69, 72. 

^di'c.t 23. I ; 60. 36. 

(f)dos 57. 2 1 ; 70. 6. 

](})nTOs; 16. 4. 

(peplBav 60. 12 (4>€p€iv Pap.). 

(pepeiv 58. 6 ; 60. 12 (1. ^e'/,- 

^f'^), 56, 93 ; 64. 63. 
(fifv 18. 7. 

(pfvyeiv 20-1. 5; 64. 72. 

r/u'Xof 1. ii. 15, iii. 33, 41 (?); 

20-1. 14 ; 32. 6; 58. 5; 

60. 20; 67. 5. (plXraTos 

20-1. I. 
<J?\io{ii'Tios 1. iv. 25. 
(p6l3os 18. 4; 20-1. 3; 64. 

60, 76. 
*(u/3c.? 8-9. 13; 60. 58. 
^oiviKt] 1. iii. 21. 
(ppdCeiv 62. 10. 
0P''p 1- i- 3- 

(jipovflv 1. v. 2. 

(ppovTis 1. iii. 32. 
(jipovpflv 1. ii. 25. 

(ppovpiov 20-1. 12. 
^vydy 1. iv. 40; 8-9. 5, 12 ; 
70. 5. 

(Pvyfj 64. 72. 

(pveiul. V, 10; 60. 45, 90. 

0uXa^ 18. 18. 
<fiv\d(T(Teiv 20—1. 9, 12. 

(pv(Tis 60. 24, 96, 114. 

Xaipeiv 64 67. 
;(aXiceoy 1. ii. 30. 

Xnpis 1. ii. 12; 57. 18 ; 59. 



10; 60. 28; 61. 14 ; 64. 

61, 63, 99. 
X(~iv 1. iv. 30 (xpna-dui Pap.). 
X"'p 32. II ; 58. 7, 10 ; 64. 

91. 
Xep"i\l/-l.[v. 30; 6. I ; 27. 2. 
X0<^>'1. ii. 39, iv. 21, 33, 35; 

60. 50; 103. 2(.?). 
xopds 1. iii. 18 ; 13. 4 ; 22.9. 
xptif, Ksxp'li^c-i- !• i- 7 ' XM'^0"'- 

72. 2. 
XpfM 1. iv. 16. 
Xpeoiv 60. 48, 117. 
xp^ 5. 4; 60. 114; 77. 4; 

83. 3 (0- 
X/>'?f 5- 3- 
xpnOi-v 1. iv. 29. 
Xpdi'os 22. 4 ; 64. 62. 

;^pvcr€o/xaAAo$- 1. ii. 2 2. 
XpiicTfos 1. ii. 37. 
X<^P<^ !• iii. 27. 

x/revSo? 60. 59. 
^vxn 60. 49. 

«1. i. 4, 5, iv. 10, 25, 43; 
20-1. I, 8 ; 23. 3 ; 60. 
13, 15, 22, 25, 33, 43, 50, 
112; 64. 63, 69, 73, 86, 
91; 74.3. 

dxvTTobtJS 1. ii. 34. 

cjKinropos 1. iii. 37. 

w? (relative) 1. i. 10, ii. 3, iv. 
15; 58. 9; 60.8, 11,14, 
62 ; 64. 71. (final) 1. iii. 
19, iv. 30; 34-5.3. (un- 
certain) 1. V. 29 ; 24. 3, 4. 

(oanep 64. 67. 

wanepei 63. 7- 

wore 60. 94 ; 64. 79. 

d}(f)f\t]pa 60. 12. 



(l?) 853 (Commentary on Thucydides II). 
{Numbers in thick type refer to columns.) 



dyavdKTTjcris 18. 30. 
dyvoflv 14. 26. 
dyopd 5. 3. 
("lyos 8. 5- 



dSeoJy 16. 26. 

u8iaipfTa>s 5. 15- 

del 10. 38. met 17- 5, 6. 

'Adrjmios 1. 24, 32 ; 3. 19, 



28; 10. 26. 30; 13. 26 ; 
17. 8; 18. 18. 

'.\0p.ove(ov 8iiiJ.ns 13. 1 6. 
adpoicrii 12. 5. 



336 



INDICES 



AlyilTTTlOS 3. I5« 
AloXevs 5. 14. 
at<Txpos 17.* 1 6. 
ahia 1. 2 1, 285 33; 3. 2 1, 
33; 7. I. 

UKukovdfll' 13. 4. 

aKoXovdciii 3. I. 
ciKoveiu 7. 18. 
d/couo-tcor 6. 33, 

ilKpi^OdS 3. 17, 34. 
UKpO^oXlt^flV 16. 24. 

fiXafoi'fi'a 17. 13. 

aXrjdfjs 1. 21 ; 3. 21. 

' AXiKapvaaaevs, Aiovixrioi 6 'AX, 

1. 8. 
«XXa 1. 14, 19, 32 ; 2. 25 ; 

15. 8, 10, 23)16.26,38; 
17. 17. 

aXXijXcof 1. 4)5. 37 ; 15. 

36; 16. 15. 
«XXos 1. 19; 2. 30; 11. 2; 

13. 8; 16. II. »XXa)y 

16. 9. 
dXoyi(TTf2v 7. 6. 
dXoycos 2. 24. 
ri/xapraveii/ 13. 21. 

a/^aX'?"' 7. 34- 
up(f>i(Tfit]T(iv 13. 27. 
dfi(f)6Ttpoi 7. 17- 

uj/ 1. 34; 2. 21 ; 7. 24 ; 14. 
10; 18. 21. 

df a 4. 4 . 

di/a'ytyi'cofrKfti' 5. 1 3. 
dvayK(i((iv 16. 37 ," 17. 7- 
ardyKj; 2. 28. 
duaipe'iv 12. 2 2. 
di/arSpoTepos 17. 4. 
dvaTidfvai 8. 24. 
dvarpe;(f II' 2. 23. 
ui'a;^coperi' 7. 33. 
dvdpela 16. 38. 
avecris 16. 34. 
uvfxfiv 12. 13. 
di/^p 17. 24 ; 19. 13. 
uvdpunroi 18. 6 (?). 
(iftCKat 12. 6. 
di'Tf'yKnXfTi' 2. I (?). 

dvTi 17. 1 7 ; Fr. 1 7. 5. tli^ri 

ToO 1 4; 4. 33; 5. I, 10; 
9. 4, 9; 10. 27; 12. 27, 



[8. inr\ovaT(pou 



I 28 ; 13. I, 3 ; 15. 3 ; 16. 
25; 18. 22; 19. 5. 

di/(0fidXu>5 5. 18. 
avcoTaTO} 1. II. 
d^la 15. 19. 
ti^io? 10. 20. 
aTraipeiv 13. 24. 
(JTran-ai' 17. 4. 
dTrapidfieip 9. 12. 
dnaprl^eiu 1, 1 8. 
dneipLa 18. 1 1. 
(ineipos 6. 35. 
aTrtOTelj' 14. 1 9. 
dn-XoCy 17. I< 

16. 14. 
dno 1. 19, 28, 30; 2. 15; 

3. 19, 26, 27; 5. 35; 6. 

18, 23; 7. 24; 9. 4, 13; 

10. 35; 12. I, 13; 13. 

20; 18. 35; 19. 7. 
ano^aivfiv 7. 23. 
dnodvTjaKtiv 14. 7' 

UTTOTldfUai 5. I. 

d-rrpfTTcos 2. 23. 

aTTpocrboKrjTos 6. 4. 

aTTTdv 6. 34. 

"Apyof 11. 15. 

dpymf 12. 10; 16. 26. 

dper^ 14. 8; 15. 24, 28 ; 19. 
12 ; Fr. 4. 2. 

apBpov 5. 26. 

'ApKaSia 13. 23. 

dptrei'tKd? 5. 1 9. d/)(Tfi'tKcos 

14. I. 
"ApTf/utf 10. 14. 
apXfvdat 1. 30. 
dpxv 3. 18; 18. 33. 
n/JX'^'^ 1- 12; 2. 6, 28, 31, 

35 ; 3. I ; 16. 20. 

aaKrjais 16. 36. 
a(T7-u 9. 14. 15. 
datpaXcos 11. 2. 
are 6. 4. 
'Attikt) 9. 18. 
'ATTiifdy 13. 2. 
ai^dvfiv 1. 31 ; 3. 27. 
av^rjcris 3. I 9. 
aiiTovopos 10. 27, 28. 
avTof 1. 22, 24, 29, 35; 3. 
26; 10. 18 ; 13. 8, 28; 



15. 22 ; 17. 16, 

2. 22 ; 5. 35; 10. 32; 

17. 24. 

dcpavecTTfpos 3. 35- 
d(pi]yf1(T6ai 3. 34. 
d(f>i(rTdvai 13. 24. 
ax6ecr6ai 16. lO. 
lixpi 9. 14, 17; 16. 6. 

^aiveiv 5. 35. 
^a<TKa'iv(iv 16. 10. 
Boicoro'f 13. 26. 

yala 11. 15. 

ydp 2. 6, 2 1, 24, 30, 34 ; 3. 

29; 5. 8, 14; 7. 7 ; 9. 

25; 13. 5,7, 23; 14. 29; 

17. 6; 18. 27. 
ye 3. 2. 
yeapy'ia 17. 28. 
y^ 13. 26. 

ylyveadai 3. 30 ; 15. 8, 
ytyj'wtrKftJ' 5. 5- 
yXvKvs 6. 34. 
yoOi^ 6. 32. 
ypa(i6a.' 2. 12, 19, 28, 32, 

35; 6. 10; 7. 30; 13. 

14, 22. 
yvpfj 19. 14, 16, 

8apu((iv 6. 10. 

8€l.34; 2.32; 3.16, 18,34; 
5. I, 6, 15, 31; 6. 27; 
7. 19; 9. II, 15; 10. 8, 
II, i3> 17, 29, 36, 37, 
38; 13. 8, 14, 22; 15. 17, 
1 9 ; 16. 9 ; 17. 8. 

te'iv 2. 35; 6. 26; 8. 8. 

Bfivos 13. 8 ; 17. 2. 

8(KTfOV 7. 19. 

8fxf<T6ai 7. 31. 

fiijXoi'drt 19. 14. 
S^Xoy 6. 30. 
SrjpoKpnTia 15. 8. 
b^pos 8. 24 ; 13. 16. 
drjpoaios 8. 2 5- 

8id 1. 23, 26; 7. I ; 8. 8; 
10. 12, 26; 13. 9; 15. 
9, 24; 16. 21, 31. 

SinyiyvaxrKfiv 17. 29. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS 



337 



SiatpcTi/ 1. i6; 2, 29, 36 ; 5. 

Siairai' 16. 6. 
diaKpivfiv 7. 37- 
8taXi)f(i' 7. 32. 
8iavo(2cr6ai 12. 26. 
StnffTray 1. 15. 
8id(TTi]fjia 9. 13. 
Stora^is 7. 27. 
fitarcXeiv 16. 1 1. 
8ia(p€p€iv 2. 20 ; 15. 16. 

8in(f)detf)eiv 5. 24, 29. 

Buicpopos 15. 16. 

^Lf^fp^ecdni 2, I7« 

Sit^iefai 1. I 2, 

Sirjyua-daL 1. 29 ; 3. 4. 

diijyrjais 1. 1 9. 

6tKrr«i'at 5. 36, 

SUaios 15. 2. 

StotKfii^ 15. 10. 

Atoi/ucrtos ^6 'A^(Kap^'oo■c^fus'j 1. 

I, 34; 2.34; 3. 10; 4. 3. 
AtdriJO-o? 10. 8. 
SktvXXci^us 5. 12. 

SiaKflv 5. 23, 28. 
boKipa^av 4. 30. 

So^a 7. 18; 14. 21 ; 19. 16. 

bopv 5. 32. 
dvvaadai Fr. 3. 2. 
diKTKoKos 14. 15) 18. 

ea.^ 3. 2. 

favTov 2. 33 ; 18. 2 1. 

iyKXtreov 6. 25. 

fJ 2. 28, 35; 3. 6, 31 ; 7. 
17; 11. 2 ; 12. 27; 14. 
^ 28 ; 16. 34. 

flbevai 12. 24. 

(I80S 18. 19. 

(Ik6to)s 1. 34. 

fJvai 1. 3 ; 2. 24, 29 ; 3. 22 ; 

5. 31 ; 7. 18 ; 9. 10, 16; 

10. 13, 14, 16, 17, 23; 

13. 7, 23, 26; 14. 15; 

17. 24, 27 ; 18. 10; 19. 

II, 12; Fr. 4. 4. 

elne'iv 1. 22; 10. 18; 14. 9, 
II. 

f'lpHV 2. 33. 

eh 5. 7, 24, 34, 35; 6. 20; 



7. 8, 36; 10. 19; 13. 3; 

15. 10. 
(Is 2. 24, 25, 32 ; 14. 6. 
eiacpfpdi' 6. 13. 
fiTa 2. 1 7. 
fV 7. 23 ; 9. 16 ; 16. 9. 

cKaaros 1. 18; 13. 1 3 ; 14. 
30. 34; 15- 20, 26. 

eKiiTfpos 7. 25. 

iK(l6ev 1. 30 ; 6. 2 0. 
eKeli'os 16. 7- 
eKfXftpin 12. 14. 
eK\ippa^(iv 10. I 2. 
€K(p(vyeii' 5. 24, 28. 
€Aa_;^(o-Tos 19. 9. 
(Xevdepus 15. 35 ; 16. 8. 

'EXfu^j;p 10. 9. 

(WiTTijs 17. 23. 

eXTTifftr 12. 26. 

'ipLUdpos 5. 23, 27. 

ep<pVTos 16. 38. 

eVl. 8; 2.8,25; 3. 28,33; 

5. 2, 36; 8. 7 ; 10. 13; 

13. 14; 14. 6; 15. 4, 18, 

19, 21; 16. 14, 15, 34; 

17. 12, 24; 18. 28; 19. 

13- 

ivavrios 2. 34; 7. 3, 23. 
ivavTLovaOai 6. 27. 
evbeearepas 18. 30. 
ej/fKO 8. 2. 
eV^a 1. 3. 
ivdvpei(j6ai 3. 30. 
eviKois 4. 16. 
moi 10. 35; 13. 14. 
evioTe 5. 18, 19. 
ivicrravai 12. 28. 
evTOfia 10. 38. 
f^dydv 16. 2 2. 
i^aipeiv 16. 2 2. 
(^eXavveiv 8. 5- 

4e>Xfo-^«' 7. 2 ; Fr. 3. 3. 

e|€T((^ety 1. 22 ; 3. lO. 

i^^s, t6 L 10. 29 ; 13. 7. 

e^KTTCivai 7. 7- 
i^oppav 7. 13. 

e'lo) 3. 29 ; 6. 9. 

6|a)^6i/ 3. 1 1 . 
ioprr] 10 . 16. 
firawe'iv 13. I. 

Z 



67raXX>;Xoy 2. I 9. 

enoK^is 9. 2. 

inacrdynv 3. 28. 

iiTiira 3. 30. 

€Tr(^€p)(ea6ai 12. 27. 

eVi 1. 19, 32 ; 2. 2 2, 30; 7. 
17. 19, 25, 33; 10. 16, 
30; 16. II ; 17. 12. 

eTTi^uWeiv 1.5, 2 2. 
enifiKrjs 4. 7- 
eTTiBvpLelv 13. 14. 
eniKplveiv 17. 32. 
fVt/ieXeta 8. 9; 17. 26. 
enia-rjpos 10. I 7- 

iTVLTd(T(TeLV 6. I 6. 

eTTiTd(f)ios 14. 3. 
eniTrjSeins 5. 8. 
fTnrrjSfvpa 15. 37- 
entTLiiap 3. 13- 

fTTLTpeTTflV 16. 9. 

e'nKpepeiv 6. 32. 

€iTix^eiprjT€OV 5. II. 

f'pyoy 7. 9, 24; 17. 12, 27. 

epf?!' 10. 29 ; 15. 2. 

eperrj^ 12. 2. 

'Epf;^^euf 10. 3. 

' EpfioKpdTr]s 6. 24. 

e>X«o-^«' 5. 34; 7. 36; 8. 

34; 12. 21. 
eViSoX^ 2. 18. 
((TxaTos 5. 31 ; 6. 2 2. 
erfpoy 17. 26, 32. 
eroipos 12. 2. 
eVof 16. 21. 
(S 10. 8. 

evto^ia 7. 19. 
evKoXms 18. 23. 
evXd^fia 1. 23. 
eiiXa^MS 16. 1 6. 

EvpLTTlSl]! 10. 3. 

(vpiaKdv 17. 33. 

€0f^^s 2. 20 ; 3. 3. 

exeic 5. 23, 27 ; 7. 21 ; 10. 

38 ; 18. 36. 
im 9. 10. 

Zew, /xa Ala 1. 25. 
^T/pt'a 16. 7. 
C^" 16. 9, 35. 



338 



INDICES 



rj 1. 26 ; 2. 22, 25 ; 5. 26 ; 
6. 22 ; 7. 22, 23. 

^Seas 16. 6. 

17801//; 16. 2, II. 
Vf^s 17. II. 

i]^lLipa 10. 16; 15. 37. 

'WpoboTos 2. 9 ; 3. 13. 
TJpm 10. 34, 36. 

rJTOl 5. 2 2. 
^rroj/ 17. 29. 

6f<'s 10. 37. 
6(pos 1. 13. 
eoL'/cufiS/;s- 1. 9, 10 ; 3. 4, 20; 

6- 17- 

Qpidcnof TTehiov 13. 3- 
QpimCi 13. 5. 
Bpvkeiv 3. 2 2. 
Bvjios 7. 13. 

t' 3. 14. 

t^ios: 15. 18; 16. 14; 17. 25. 

tSi'ojy 1. I 4. 
i«i/ai 5. 13. 
j/carcoff 14. 13. 
iTrrreus 12. 1 9. 
larjyoplu 15. I 9. 
t(ror 15. 2 2. 
Icrx^fiv 8. 6. 
laxiis 1. 23. 
i(TTopin 1. 16 ; 3. 18. 
'IraXtcoT/^y 6. I 7> 
loves 5 14. 
'loJi/i'(! 6. 24. 

Kadrja-dai 12. I O. 

faj yap 2. 34; 9. 25. 

KOi flTjV 2. 27. 

Kaipdy 2. 27 ; 17. 12. 

Ka'iTOL 16. 34. 

KUKonadnv 16. 36 ; 17. 5. 

KUKOVU 6. 31. 

KaKuis 14. 9. 

KoXeti/ 5. 31 ; 10. 35. 

KaXXlpaxos 10. 7 (?), 37. 
Kara 2. 0, 7, 26, 28, 35 ; 4. 

28; 7. 12 ; 8. 6 ; 10. 26, 
28; 13. 12; 15. 17, 19, 
21, 37; 16. 7; 17. 25. 



KaTciKovfiv \Q. ig, 
KaTdp(p\l/-is 18. 37- 
K.aTaiTXi]a(T(iv Q. 30. 
KaTT^yopia 16. 7- 
KaTOiK[ 3. 8. 
Karopdoiv 8. 12. 
KecpdXaiov 1. 1 1 ; 2. 32. 
Ke(pa\j] 3. 9. 
Krjpvypa 5. 6. 
/cXeos 19. II, 12. 

KtJ/SvrfVfl!/ 14. 8. 

Kiv^vvos 17. I, 3, 8. 

Koivos 1. 33; 15. 21, 23, 36; 

16. 16; 17. 25; 18. 35; 

19. 7. 
KopKvpaiKu 1. 26 ; 2. 19. 
Kocrnos 7. 26. 
Kpfiaauiv 18. 26. 
Kpivetv 1. 29 ; 17. 31. 
kvk\os 9. 10, 1 4, 1 7. 
KwAveii/ 3. 3. 
Kwnr] 12. 3. 

AaxeSut/xo'i/toy 1. 25 J 6. I9 ; 

16. 24. 

Ahkchv 17. 6. 
AaKcowa 10. 1 3. 
Xa/iTrpo'f 1.5. 20. 

Xeyetr 1. 27 ; 2. 34 ; 5. 7 ; 

6. 7, 12; 10. 36; 14. 2; 

15. 9; 17. 13, 17. 
Xe|ts 1. 5. 
XrjnTiov 19. 8. 
Xt/xjji/ 9. 18. 

AipvaTis/'ApTffjLis A. 10. 1 4. 
Tioyiapos 2. 4- 
Xoyoy 17. 13 ; 18. 27. 
XoiTToy 1. 13. 
AvSuiKa 3. I 5- 

XviTflv 16. 5- 

/iia A/a 1. 25. 

/xoXiCTxa 18. 20 ; Fr. 16. 4 (?). 
puWov 16. 35. 
Mapa^ci)!/ 14. 2. 
/ieyicTTos 7. 18. 
pfdopios 13. 25. 

/it'XXfiv 3. 23 ; 12, 9. 

pep.(f)€a0ai 1. lO. 

/jfV 1. 34; 3. 22; 5. 14; 9. 



11; 10, 8, 36; 11. 14; 

15. 17; 16. 6; 17.6. 
pf'poi 3. 29 ; 13. 12 ; 15. 21. 
ptaos 4. 5 ; 13. 9. 
[ifTdl. 31; 6. 24; 10. 25. 
perdfiams 3. 12 ; 6. 28. 
peravoflv 6. 32. 
pfTa^v 3. 12. 

piTa(j)opiKcos 5. 34 ; 12. I, 12. 
peTa)(tLpi^ecr6(U 8. 8. 
piTex^iv 10. 30; 15. 16. 
piXP'- 2. 16. 
^/} 3. 3, 19; 5. 24, 28; 7. 

17; 14. 6; 15.9; 18. 36; 

17. 4; 19. 10. 
)^^S€7. 36; 16. 37- 
py^yisi. 35; 17. 28. 

/xiji/, Ka\ p. 2. 27. 

pdi/oy 2. 33; 18. 26, 29. 

vaos 10. 37- 
J'a^s 6. 19, 22. 
veoTTjs 6. 33. 
vorjpa 19. 15- 

vopi^fiv 8. 3; 10. 23; 14. 
27 ; 15. 20. 

i/d//tjLtoy 10. 23. vopipcos 16. 16. 
j/d/xos 15. 18, 27; 16. 37; 

17.7- 

vvv 7. 19. 
vvv 15. 16. 

o'lKaBe 13. 5' 

olKfh 10. 33 ; 15. 7. 
o'lKrjais 10. 27, 28. 
owos 7. 33. 

ofo? 1. 30. oiov 2. 13; 16. 
7, 21; 17. 23, 32. oidj 

T€ 6. 26. 

uXiyapxta 15. 9- 
oXos 16. 21. 
'OXvpnia^e 13. 5- 

'oXvpmds 1. 13 ; 2. 7 ; 4. 

2 8(?). 

'OpT]piKa>s 4. 6 ; 7. 10. 
''o^;7pos-4. 16; 6. 14; 17. 18. 

d/xiXt'a 7. 36. 

opotas 1. 3 ; 2. 36 ; 6. 9. 
o/.icor 1. 28. 
oTToiof 7. 24. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS 



339 



6tt6<tos 9 . 1 6 . 

OTTOV 10. 14. 

6p(iv 7. 25. 

opyi^tudai 16. I. 
opfyecrdiu 13. I 3. 
opi^fiv 4. 29. 

op/idi' 13. 15 ; 17. 27. 

ocroj 6. 26. 

ocnrep 3. 2 I . 

oVai'2. 32; 8. 35; 12. 2. 

ort 1. 12, 15, 21, 23; 2. i; 

3. 31 ; 8. 3. 

oeSe 2. 9, 25; 3. 6; 6 31; 

16. I, 6. 
ov8fis 6. 20. 
ovttTfpos 5. 19. 

OVKfTl 1.11, 

ovv 2. 33. 

OVTf 18. 36. 

oJroy 1. 28 ; 2. 31 ; 3. 35 ; 

4. 10 ; 5. 15 ; 15. 4. ovro:^ 
1. 35; 5. 22; 10. II. 

6(p(t\(iv 3. 31. 

nddos 7. 7- 

ndXiv 1. 32 ; 2. 17, 2 2, 29; 
9. 16 ; 15. 2. 

■navoiKiq 10. 32. 
iravcTvhij] 6. 2. 

TTopa 1. 27 ; 15. 7 ; 17. 8. 

TTapajSaivdv 3. 1 1 (.''). 
Trapa8i86vai 2. 5 j 6. 2 1. 
napoKpr] 15. 4. 
TTapdvopos 11. 18. 
HapcKTioL 13. 2 2. 
71 apdra^is 5. 36. 
nupeXKeiv 5. 2 5- 
irapex^^v 18. 2 2. 

TTOff 2. 17, 21 ; 3. 31 ; 11. 
14; 15. 17. 

Trarpis Fr. 4. I, 
neSlov 13. 4. 
■KfiOiiv 16. 19. 
lifipauvs 9. II, 16. 
TreXa? 16. I. 
neXaayiKoy 11. 15- 
JlfKonovvrjaiaKos 3. 23. 
n«Xo7roi'i'ij(riof 2. 18. 
TTipireiv 6.21. 
TTfViaBai 17. 1 6 



77€pi'1.8,9, 18; 6.9,28; 19.12. 

7rfpij3oX(s 9. 15. 

TT(pieivai 17. 2. 

Ilfpt/cX/]? 8. 3, 30. 

Ilf/jo-ud 1. 31 ; 3. 26. 

Urjpeia 13. 20. 

IliVSa/jos- 6. 35. 

7Ti(TT€veif 14. 10. 

nXarai'wj 2. I 5. 

TiXaTVS 2. 8. 

TrXfJCTTcs' 10. 20; 18. 19. 

TrXfttoi/ 3. 25. 

TrXeoi'd^fti/ 5. 26. 

ttXtiGos 15. J I . 

ttXovtuv 17. 13. 

TrXovTfiy 17. 1 1. 

noifiv 3. 20 ; 6. 19. 

noiKiXos 2. II. 

7roXf/ie7i/ 1. 24 ; 7. 31. 

TToXepos 1. 21; 3. 22, 25; 6. 

34; 7. 9, 12. 
TToXty 4. 15 ; 17. 26. 

TToXirftn 15. 2 2. 

TToXiTfi^fa^ot 15. 35; 16. 16. 

TToXlTlKOS 17. 28. 

TToXXaKis 6. 27 ; 7. I ; 13. 27. 

TToXXa^ov 2. 26. 

TToXr? 1. 10; 2. 26, 27 ; 3. 

9; 8. 12; 10. 30; 15. 7. 

oi TioXXot 1. 27 ; 5. 25, 29. 
TTOvelv 17. 7, 9. 
TTore 10. 9. 
iroretSataTtKa 1. 26. 
TrpSypa 1. 17, 30; 2. 3, 29 ; 

3. I, 2, 33; 14. 16, 20; 

15. 10. 

1Tpd(T(T€lV 3. 13. 

TTpetJ^eia 7. 31. 
TTpealBvTUTos 9. 5* 
TrpiV 1. 20; 7. 32. 
npo 17. 2. 
TTpoyoj'os 7. 2 2. 
7rpoKf7a0ai 3. 14. 
npovoe'iv 7. 12. 
npovoia 8. II. 
TvpoTTiTcos 1. 35. 
^r/'os-l. 4> 35; 3. 18; 15. 9, 
23, 36; 16. 2; 17. 2. 

TrpoarjKew 15. 3. 
TTpoaSrjKt] 3. 28. 

Z 3 



npodndaOai 7. 17. 
Trp6aTt[iou 16. 8. 
7TpoTi6ei'cn 1. 13 ; 3. 24. 
jrpciJT-oy 3. 2 7) 33. TrpcuTov 3. 22. 

pqcrravT] 16. 35. 
pt]T€ou 3. 23 ; 5. 2 2. 

aravpcdTtjp 5. 30. 
o-fjKo'y 10. 37, 38. 
2i«fXt'a 6. 18. 
(TKoroy 5. I 7- 
arpartidv 7. 30. 
oTpuTfvpa 7. 32. 
(TTpaTOTiibiveiv 5. 2. 
(Tvyypd(p€iv 3. 24. 
avyypa(f)(vs 3. 3 I. 
av^Konreti' 1. 17. 
(TuyfcpiTiKos 17. I 7. 
trv-y;^??!^ 2. 2 I . 
(rvKocpavrl 4. 9. 
avp^aipeiv 2. 31. 
avp^dXXeiv 7- 2. 
avp^aais 5. 34. 
(jvp^oXaiov 15. 18. 
avpfjLa)(('ii> Q. 22. 
avpixa^ia 6. 20. 
nvpplaydv 7. 35- 
(Tvp.cfiefifii' 15. II. 
(Tvvteapos 19. 4. 
CTDi'eii'ai 16. I 5. 
avviipeiv 3. 2. 
crwex^f 2. 10, 33; 3. 5. 

avvrjdris 1. 5 ; 5. 10; 13. 2. 

fff^r^^cos 13. 4. 
CTu^'(0■Td^'al 13. II. 
avmaypa 1. 9. 
trvi'TfXeii' 10. 6. 
(TVVTiBevcu 5. 33. 
2vpd(coi'(r(rat 6. 23. 

(TVCTTpeffxLV 13. I I. 

(T(()68pa 1. 2 2. 
cr;(66oi' 3. 27. 
<TXW^ 5. lO. 
CTwfeij/ 6. 26. 

rdy/Lta 13. 17. 
ToXatTTtDpf ti/ 17. 3 (?). 
re 6. 26 ; 17. 25. 
Tflxos 9. 2, 10. 



340 

rf\€iovv 1. 20. 

T(\(OV 3. 29. 

TfXfvrav 14. T. 
Te'fifvos 10. 35- 

Ti^«W 4. 33, 34 ; 5. I ; 17. 
18 ; 19. 5- 

Tifiav 15. 23. 

r«f 1. 35; 2. 32; 3. 34; 4. 

27; 6. 7; 11. 2; 14. 28; 

15. 20 ; 16. 2. 

TOt 3. 2. Cf. KaiTOi. 

Toiovror 1. 33 ; 6. 12; 7.12, 

20; 15. 8. 

TOiovTorponos 14. 9 (?)• 

TOTTJKtO? 13. 3. 

tSttos 2. 25 ; 12. 17 ; 13. 16. 

TOaoVTOS 9. 12. 

rpeir 1. 1 1 ; 10. 1 6. 

TpfTTdV 1. 20, 33. 

Tpec^fti; 4. 35. 
TptaicovTOVTrjs ^. II. 

indytiv 5. 7. 



INDICES 

vnapx^i'V 17. 23. 

VTTf pharos 13. 7' vTTep^aTois 

10. 29. 
vnfjKoos 18. 32. 

vTT^e. 33; 16. 37; 17. 7- 

vTTodfais 2. 24; 3. 30. 
vnoXiT^is 7. 20, 21 ; 14. 17. 

VTTOVOfiv 3. 35- 

vTTOTrreifiv 6. 5; 15. 38. 
VTVo(^ip(iv 17. I. 
voraros 2. 1 6. 

(f)aivea-6ai 13. 8 ; 17. 6. I 2 ; 
19. 17. 

^oXT/pOl- 9. II, 13. 

(^dj/ut 2. 36 ; 3. 21 ; 4. 27 ; 
6. 17, 35; 10.8, 11; 15. 

(pavepos 3. 32, 

(piXia 5. 7- 

(piXiKos 5. 6. 

(piXos 5. 8. 

(pvXctaaeiv 9. I ; 11. 3. 



(^vXij 10. 36. 
(})vats 19. I, 8, 9. 

X^pi-^vrcxis 18. I9(?). 
Xeipoiv 1. 15. 
Xeip 8. 7. 
XPV 2. 36. 

xP'yM" 8. II. 

Xprjo-dai. 5. 6, 10, 18 ; 11. 19. 
Xprja-Tos 7. 2 2. 

Xpovos 1. 14; 2. 2 1, 22, 25 ; 
3. 3- 

Xcopa 10. 26, 28. 

X'^p'C"" 7. 38. 

>//-o7os 19. 10, 13. 

is 1. 13, 22; 2. 9, 35; 3. 
23; 4. 13; 5. 18, 19; 6. 
30, 32, 35; 7. 20, 27; 9. 
5; 13. 5, 13; 14. 10; 15. 
19; 17. 16, 18, 32. 

a)(TTi 5. 25, 26, 28. 



(c) OTHER LITERARY TEXTS. 
{Numbers in thick type refer to papyri^ 



ayaQo^ 885. 59. 

aynv 851. 3 ; 856. 29 ; 858 h. 

8. aye 854. 6. 
ayopa 858^. 27. 
ayopiviiv 858 3. 19 (.'). 
aypeif 854. 8. 
' Ay piTTTTas 849. 25. 
dyaviCta-dai 856. 48 ; 857. 3. 
<1f6«Krof 966 (?). 
as*X0(59 850. 23, 25, 32 ; 

886. 8. 

dbivaroi 850. lO. 

ueXXa 860 a. 6 {?). 
'Adrivaioi 856. 26, 42. 
mmi/ 850. 1 1. 
alvcos 860 a. 13. 
mpjn/ 849. 8 ; 850. 4 ; 886. 
19. 



(i) Greek. 

alcopflp 864. 14. 
UKaTOi'opaaros 850. 17- 
uKoXovdfiu 855. 1,10; 858 />. 

22. 
(iKovfiu 849. 27; 858 (^. 29, 

30; 868. 9. 
aKparos 868. I. 

("iKpoi 887. recto 4, 7. 

ilicTt] 864. 18. 

d\a^a)8r;f 859. 5. 

dXeitaeai 864. I 7. 

dXT]6!]s 849. 22 ; 869. 13. 

(]Xr;<9(Ls- 849. 3, 4. 
dXKr) 860 (?. 7. 
dXXu 849. 20, 26; 851. 7; 

854. 6; 855. 6 ; 858//. 

13 ; 869. 6, 14. 
oXXt^Xo)!/ 855. 7- 



o'XXo? 858 (^. 14; 864. 4; 

867. 5- 
dpa 850. 23, 35; 869. 18. 
illiovaos 864. 18. 
dpcpKWvviu 850. 26. 
f/i. 855. 4, 6; 856. 58; 

863. 4. 
dvd 857. 3. 
dra-yiyrcoo-Kfii' 886. 21. 
dvayKa^tiv 850. 5- 
duaynaaTiKos 869. 15- 
dvuKpiais 863. 10. 
di>aTi6€Vai 858 d. 16. 
'AfSpdi/tKOf 850. 21. 
dv^p 857. 6, 22; 860 rt. 8, 

16; 885.58; 886. 9. 
ni'dpoTTos 851. 8; 869. 20; 

887. verso 5. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS. 



341 



avQviraTOS 850. I5. 

aviaravai 850. 4, 9 {(ivkttuiv^ ] 

SbSb. 27. 
avoiyvvvai 864. 23. 
avTiypacpov 886. 2. 

avco 858 d. 32 ; 862. 14. 
tiiios 849. 28; 858*5'. 13 ; 
862. 18. 

aoparos 850. 34. 

dnaWayrj 850. 2 0. 

unavTav 858 (5. 36. 

arra^ 863. 4. 

anaXr] 850. 29. 

dnepx^aeaL 850. 1 3 (?) ) 857. 

diTUvai 850. 31. 

oVo 854. 8; 856. 50; 869. 

7 (?)> 9 (?)• 

nTTo/SaXXet;/ 866. 3 (.?). 
aTToyiyi'cocncfJi' 850. 6. 
aTToSiSdi'at 849. II. 
dno6ui'](TK(iv 849. 3, 23. 
(iTTOKau/ia 868. 4. 
dTToXeiTTfif 865. I. 
ajToXXiii'ai 855. 9. 

aTTOVLTTTpOV 856. 66. 

diroTTpoke'iTieiv 859. 3 (.'')■ 
dTTOTpoTTia(ea6ai 885. 53. 
dnocfitpeiv 849. 9. 
dnpdyficov 855. I 3. 
oTTTfiv 855. 9. 
aTTwXeta 885. 38. 
apa 849. 2, 6; 22. 
^Apa/3ta 870 5 (?), 7. 
'Apydoi 857. 4. 

dpia-repos 887. recto 2, 5. 
apia-Tos 864. 2, 4; 868. 6. 
'ApKudes 870. 15. 
apo-r;!' 886. 15. 

dpTiojs 855. I 7- 

dpxiKvvrjyos 851. 2. 

dpx'7 885. 31. 

do-TTts 858 ^. 19. 

drei'tfeti' 849. 13; 850. 15. 

dri'^^eTi' 857. 19. 

avTos 849. 2, 9, 10, 18 ; 

850. I, 26, 27, 32, 35; 

851. 7 ; 855. 9 ; 856. 

32, 47, 50, 64, 74 ; 857. 
19 ; 858 d. 15, 30; 869. 



12; 885.32,39. 6 avTos 
858^. 18; 885. 56. 

d4>ayvi((iv 869. 3 (?). 

d(})aifis 850. 30. 

dcpe^Kdv 854. 7- 

d(l)ifvai 855. 4, 6. 

d(piepovv 885. 43. 

dcfyiKveladai 855. 2 1. 

'Ap^aioi 864. 3. 

Ba/3i;X&)i/(ot 856. 25. 

^axXetj/ 856. 8 (?). 

lidplSapos 857. 20, 26. 

(iaaiXiia 856. 3 1. 

^a(Ti\f{is 849. 16; 856. 70. 

BeWot 870. 32. 

/5i/3Xoj 886. 2. 

/3to{;i/ 863. 4. 

^Xerruv 869. 2. 

/SXcocncfti/ 859. 6. 

^odXtadai 849. 7, 23 ; 850. 

14; 851. I ; 858(5. 41. 
/SovX); 858 (5. 32, 34. 
l3povTr] 864. 26. 
IBpoTos 860 a. I. 
dpoxlCav 850. 6. 
Mor886. II. 
/3co/xds 869. 3. 

TakaTai 870. 23. 

ydp 854. 8 ; 855. 14, 22 ; 

856. 30, 74; 857. 5; 

QBQb. 25, 29, 39 ; 860. 

16; 867. 5; 870. 6; 

887. verso i. 
ye 849. 18; 855. 8; 858(5. 

24 ; 861. 5 ; 862. 8. 

TeXav 857. I 5. 
yeVoy 885. 39. 
Vipri^ 856. 60. 
T€Tj]s 855. 3, 4. 
yffpvpa 850. 24. 

yi? 857. 28. 

ylyveadai 850. 30; 865. 6; 

870. II. 
yvafiri 966. 
yvonpl^eiv 850, 8. 
yva)pip.oi 850. 7- 
ydi/u 850. 33, 35. 
ypniV 849. 6. 



ypufjLfia 886. 6. 

ywv 850. 21 ; 868. 8; 887. 

verso 4. 
yvpyaBos 856. 44. 

Sat'eti' 864. io(?). 
Auos 855. II, 13. 
AdpSavot. 870. 33. 
Sar 855. 9. 
dfiKuvvai 856. 49. 
8(ii> 856. 54. 
deiTTVHv 858 (5. 26. 
de'iTTVov 854. 4. 
AeX0oi 857. 24. 

Se^tdf 887. recto i, 3. 

dspKf(T0ai 860 (5. I. 
dfanoTTjs 855. 14, 1 6. 
6eVo-^«t 856. 20. 
8.7 855. 7. 

brjp.r]yopuv 858 ^. 20. 
8nfji.riy6pos 858 iJ. 18. 
8rjfjLos 858(5. 32. 
Arjpioadivrjs 858 <5. 1 9, 23, 29, 

35- 
8ii 849. I, 21 ; 854. 6; 

856. 73; 857.9; 858(5. 

22 ; 886. 7. 
tiaKove'iv 868. 7* 
8iaKovia 850. 1 3. 
8iacrw^€tj/ 855. 5- 
dta^euyfit' 856. 12. 

8ia(jjddp6iv 863. 6. 
8tSoVat 857. 7. 
bif^ihai 858 (5. 23, 31. 
8ifpx((T6ai 850. 2 2. 
St/cd^eii' 856. 24. 
AtKawTToXts 856. 68. 
StKaoTtKof 856. 75* 
dUrj 856. 27 ; 868. 5. 
8I0S 864. 3. 
SoKeiv 857. 9. 
8oKip.d((i,v 849. 25. 
Sdpv 858 (5. 24. 
SoOXoj 850. 17 ; 868. 3. 
Spojxfvs 856. 39. 
SvvafiLs 885. 47* 
dvvaadai. 854. 9. 
8vo, Kara 8vo 8vo 886. 1 9. 
8vaTvxf^'' 861. 8. 
Scoped 850. 12. 



342 



INDICES 



850. 5; 



iav 885. 34, 58- 

favTov 850. 6 ; 853. 70, 72 ; 

857. 5 (e0' envr^!/) ; 886. 

8. 

iydpdv 849. 10. 
«yw 849. I, 15; 

851. 3 ; 854. 4 ; 855. 4, 

6, 12, 13; 861. 5; 862. 

15; 863. 2, 5; 868. 5. 
Wvos 870. 3. 
(I 849. 2, 6, 22 ; 850. 27 ; 

855. 15. 
tiKiav 885. 36, 42, 52, 58. 
e^at 849. 5, 22 ; 851. 6. 7 

855. 5, 14, 23 ; 856. 20 
43, 62; 858(5. 18, 29 
862. 8, 15; 864. 2 ; 869 
5; 885. 32; 886. 5 
966. 

etVfii' 850. 32 ; 851. i, 2. 

eiy 966 (.?). 

6(V850. 7, 27; 856.25, 55; 
857. 24; 858 <5. 12, 14, 
17, 21 ; 866. 6; 869. 
16, 2o(.?); 887. recto 2. 

eio-ayetr 856. 30. 

iha 856. 63, 68, 77. 

(K 856. 36; 858^. 27; 

864. 16. 
€KaoTO!r 860 a. 8; 869. io(.='); 

886. 16. 
eW 849. 10; 858. 74. 
fKfietv 867. 3. 
fKftros 850. 30. 
(Kflae 856. 63. 
(KeCeuem 885. 52. 
fV^cdeti' 856. 41. 
(KKXr](Tin 850. 16. 

fKTTifXTTflV 858 (5. 15. 

(Knodcov 855. 1 9 (.''). 
fK(})o^fh 858 <5. 31. 
'EXoTeia 858 <5. 25. 
"EXXr/./ 857. 18 ; 865. 7. 

'EXXi;o-7roVr(os- 864. 8 (.''}, 1 5. 

€fiavTov 849. 19. 

(filiaivfiv 858(5. 20. 

fV 854. 9; 855. 10, 22 ; 

856. 44; 864. I ; 870. 
^ 6; 886. 3, II, 16, 23. 
ivipyqiM 850. 34. 



h6a 864. 17. 
(vddbe 855. 17; 863. 8. 
ivdivhe 855. 12. 
euffepfjios 853. 78. 
ivvo('iv 850. 6. 
6| 856. 75. 
f'^dyeti' 858 b. 21. 
(^anarav 855. 1 4. 

i^^tiuv 856. -,5(?). 

e^epXf(T6ca 850. 2 2. 
e'^u'fai 855. 2. 
(^lardvni 856. 66, 67. 
e^o) 887. verso 3. 

eoiKevai 856. 40. 

eVf/ 849. 28. 

eneiTa 855. 4 ; 864. 1 9. 

enevxeo-ddi 886. I 8. 

eVi850. 12 ; 856. 58; 857. 
5, 22; 867. 2; 869. 4; 
887. recto i etsacp., verso 

('niypdfpeiv 886. I 6. 

eTTiSeiKiwvai 855. II. 

eTTidiBouai 850. 14. 

enievai 860 ^. 5. 

(TTiKoXuaBai 886. 10. 

CTTtcrroXij 850. 18. 

fni(JTpefj>eiv 850. 7- 

e/jyoi'859. 8. 

e'pai/ 861. 10. 

ipepvos 860 f?. 5 (t'. l.epvpvos). 

eprjp'ia 856. 58. 

'Ep/xr> 886. 4, 7. 

ipvOpos 854. 8. 

('pvpvos 860 «". 5 (z'. /. iptpioi). 

epxeadai 850. 28; 858(5. 

14; 860 a. 2 ; 862. 11 ; 

869. 4. 
is 859. I. 
eaxaros 886. 2 1. 
ere/jos 849. 18; 856. 53. 
evdaipovia 885. 33. 
(iiXa^uadai 857. 16. 
evpovs 858 6. 37. 
fvpiaKfiv 850. 31 ; 855. 12 ; 

886. 3, 22. 

Evpunr] 870. 12. 
iVxapidTt'iv 850. 1 1 . 
(vxapifTTLa 850. 13. 
"E^eo-oj 867. 4. 



^X"" 849. 17, 19; 855. 7, 
9, 19 ; 856. 9, 18 ; 858(5. 
19, 28 ; 860 a. 15, 

Zdiis 850. 4, 13. 
Zfi'y 885. 44. 
C'/rai/ 886. 8. 
lC<op0av{?) 851. 3. 

V 869. 5. 

ijydadai 865. 4. 
,T)yepu)v 851. I, 5. 
ijSecof 849. 16. 
T]rjv 855. 15. 
17X10S 886. II. 
Tipds 849. 9 ; 854. 8 ; 855. 

20. 
T]pepa 857. 14. 
7]p(Tfpos 868. 3. 
'HpaKXj)f 835. 45. 
i](Tvx}a 858 (5. 8. 

dakapos 859. 6. 

BdXaa-a-a 864. 16 ; 867. 2. 

Bappnv 849. 7. 

<9eXai/ 849. 2 1 ; 886. 13. 

QfpicTTOKXijs 858 (5. 20. 

e€6s 849. 8, 21, 25 ; 850. 

36; 851. 7; 862. 13; 

863. 3; 864. 10; 869. 

9; 885. 56; 888. 12, 17. 

QfppoTTvXal 857. 2. 
efrraXoi 870. 28. 
Qeapos 856. II. 
Gr;/3at 858(5. 14. 

6Wfiv 850. 8. 
^oo'y 854. 6. 
dopv^uv 858 1^. 43. 
ep?iKes 870. 30. 
OpatTvs 855. 17. 
OpavoTos 868. 2. 

^prjl'iwSdy 864. 24. 

dudv 885. 44, 55. 
dwpa^ 858 (5. 24. 

tSou 849. 14 ; 850. 30. 
Upos 886. 2. 

'Ir;o-oi)y 850. ID. 

tea 849. 10; 856. 55, 67. 
'lais 886. I, 7. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS 



343 



'i(TTavai 850. 27. 
'icoai/i'T^s 850. 3. 16, 22, 25, 
27, 28, 31. 

KfiS^uo? 857. 2 1. 
/cdSof 854. 7. 
Kfjftv 855. 20. 
KaBevheiv 887. verso 7. 

KiiOrjadca Q58 b. 15, 32. 
KaOuvai 856. 55- 
Ka^dXou 866. 4. 
Kmo-ap 850. 18. 
KniVot 849. 18. 
KOKOi 858 b. 12. 
^KoKelv 861. 9. 
(caXds 885. 59; 966. 

Kapxq^ovins 866. 5- 

Kara 850. 1 6 ; 855. 18 ; 
864. 15 ; 865. 7 ; 869. 
13, I9(?); 885.47; 886 
19. 

Karadapdavfiv 859. 7- 

KaraKavais 855. 4. 

KaraXa/u/3di'eti^ 858(5. 2 5- 

KiiTaninTdv 885. 35- 

KaranpaTTdv 856. 77- 

Karnpyfiu 850. 34. 

KaTf)((iv 849. 2. 

Ke'iadai. 849. 1 5. 

Kepavvios 885. 44. 

Ktpavvos 885. 37, 60. 

Knpv^ 858 b. 35. 

Kr]pv(r(T€iu 858 b. 35- 

kKuUiv 850. 8. 

K\eta^ei^f;f 856. 7. 

K\eW 856. 27. 

xXT^Soi'/feti' 886. 13. 

KXT]8oiv 886. 22. 

K^rjparis 855. 2. 

KKrjpovopia 855. 18. 

KXiveLv 850. 33, 35. 

kXvSoou 864. 20. 

Kvi^eiv 855. 16. 

KolXos 864. 21. (cdi'Xos 854. 

Koio-vpa 856. 65. 
KoXnos 864. 23. 
Kop,<)Ty)^ 856. 28, 
KOfiL^eiv 850. 18. 
KoixnadTt'js 856. 56. 



KOTTTfti' 864. 9. 
Kopr) 862. 17. 
Kov(f)os 855. 14. 
Kd;(Xos 884. 20. 
(cpeas 856. 79. 

KpOTUV 864. 2 2. 

KTvncs 864. 26. 
kukXo? 855. 10, 2 2. 
Kvpios 850. 29, 33; 851. 5. 
(ci'pi'a 886. I. 

Kciidcov 854. 6. 
KcopcpSia 856. 3. 
K(Sos 857. 22. 

AaKeSat/xdrtot 856. 73- 
XaXfti/ 849. 12. 
Adpaxos 858. 56, 65. 

\cipl3dveti' 850. 14 ; 858. 58 ; 
862. 17 ; 886. 1,4 ; 887. 
recto 6, verso 2. 

Xa;^di'toi' 856. 37. 

Aiixrjs 855. 10. 

Xeyfiz/ 849. 6 ; 850. 1 7 ; 

856. 35, 44, 66, 70, 76; 

858^. 31, 35, 36. 
XoiTToy 869. 7. 

/idyo? 851. 6. 

/xafo's 864. 9. 

MaKedoves 870. 29. 

pMvrda 865. 7- 

Ma/ia^cor 858 i5. 12. 

p.axf(T6ai 863. II. 

/idx»7 858 <5. 17. 

Meya^X^f 856. 61. 

/.teyaXoKX^y 860 (7. lO. 

fi,eya\o(f)poavvT] 856. ^2. 

lueyar 850. 33; 851. 7; 

858 <5. 40; 886. i; 887. 

verso 2. pLijiaros 869. 17. 
fxiWdv 849. I. 
^e'Xof 864. 19. 
^e'l' 855. 13, 17 ;. 856. 62, 

71, 74; 858 b. 14; 869. 

6 ; 885. 49. 
Iiei'dv 857. 6. 
pfvenroXepos 860 (5. 7 (O* 
fiiuoi 850. 16. 
/xtrd 849. 19 ; 850. 5. 

[KTaTTtpTTdV 858 ^. 28. 



peTUTrfpTrrns 865. 5. 

pe-uvai 886. 23. 

p.} 849. I ; 857. 17; 858*5. 

34; 869. 2. 
prih(k 850. 7. 
/u^f 858 i5. 13. 
/x>?r;7P 849. 7 ; 859. 6. 

ptyvvvai 860 (5. 9. 
/ao-(9J? 856. 57. 
/[idi'oj 850. 13. 
pidos 864. I . 

pVKrjbhV 864. 2 2. 
Mi;o-ot 870. 31. 

pVTTOiTOS 856. 2 1. 

vai 855. 13. 

i^ni"y854. 6; 856. 71; 857. 7. 

I'eavlaKns 849. 1 9. 

rffcpdy 849. 4, 15. 

ViKpOVV 850. 9. 

j/eKDy 864. 14. 

PT](f)fLv 854. 9. 
I'lKav 857. 7- 
rdi^oj 865. 5. 
vop[((iv 869. ir. 
vd/ttos 858 b. 36. 
i-vi^ 850. 12; 862. 16; 863. 
6. vvvi 849. 28. 

|eVos 856. 10. ^(hos 854. 3. 
^t(/)oy 858 b. 24. 

oSe 854. 9. 
('UaBai 858 ^. 37. 
oiKoi 858 /'. 15. 
oiKOvoula 850. 12. 

olvos 854. 8. 

olos 862. 12. olov 856. 23, 

^ 28, 69, 75. 

dXt'yoy 850. 2 2. 

oXos 885. 40. 

6Xo(r;(fpa)$' 885. 34. 

opov 863. 7. 

opm 862. 8. 

dfopa 886. 1 8. 

ovoi 862. 5. 

07rXoj/858^. 16; 860(5. 10. 

oTToIoy 864. 2 0. 

onov 864. TO. 

oTTore 858 b. 1 3. 



344 



INDICES 



optiv 849. 4. 

opyr] 850. 29. 

opfxav 860 b. 4. 

opvi'i 856. 59' 

Of 849. 16 ; 850. 24, 31 ; 

856. 36, 58, 75; 858^. 

24 ; 860 a. 9 ; 886. 7, 

i3> 23. 
"Oa-ipis 886. 9. 
offos- 855. 8 ; 856. 62. 
ore 856. 70. 
oTi 849. 4; 856. 56; 868. 

2 ; 869. 21. 
ov (reflexive) 859. 4. 
OL-, ovK 849. 17, 24; 850, 

15; 851. 6; 855. 5 ; 

858 b. 14, 24, 36 ; 862. 

18; 863. 4; 868. 9; 

869. 5, II. ovxi 855. 16; 

869. 6, 14. 
OL-Se 849. 25 ; 854. 8 ; 858 Z'. 

24 ; 863. 4. 
ov8eU 857. 8; 858 Zi. 36. 
ovv 885. 41. 
ovTTanoTi 858 3. 30, 
oiVe 854. 5 ; 857. 6, 7. 
ovroy 849. II, 22; 851. 5; 

856. 29, 49, 73; 857.5; 

858 a. 4, b. 14, 16, 23, 

29, 31; 869. 6. ovroo-i 
^862. 3, 6. 
oL/ro), oi/rcos 849. II ; 856. 

4o(.?), 77- 
]o0pcoi/ 861. 16. 
o;/)-^^ 850. 27. 

iraihlov 862. 4, 9. 
jraiy 849. 15. 
naXXas 856. 43. 
IlapcjivXoL 870. 19. 
navovpyia 855. II ; 856 59. 
Trai/u 855. 5. 

Trapu 850. 18; 856. 30, 32, 
57 ; 858 b. 24. 

TrnpaKaXfri- 849. 27; 858(5'. 1 3. 
napaKXtjTos 850. lO. 
napaKoXovdelv 858 (Ji. 38. 
irapdkfiirdv 863. 9. 
Tvapuvai 858 <^. 33. 
napixdv 858 3. 13. 



naptf 863. 7. 

Ttapoide 859. 4. 

napoipla 856. 29. 

napoivLos 856. 42. 

TTapos 859. 7- 

Tvas 850. 12 ; 858 b. 41 ; 

860 a. 14; 864. 4, 5, 14, 

19; 869. 17 ; 888. 12 ; 

966. 
naTTjp 858 b. 25. 
Tvarpis 860 <2. 9. 
iraveiv 858 ^. 26. 
na0X«y()i/6j 870. 24. 
JJ-e8([ 856. 26. 
TTflddv 858 (^. 23. 
neipaCfiv 849. 24. 
neipav 849. 2 1. 
neXfaOai 859. 8 (-eVxero) ; 

860 a. 3. 
IlfXoTrofi'/^o-or 858 b. 22. 
nepneiv 857. 20. 
I 77«i'>;s 885. 42. 
TTepdt]pr]s 864. 7. 
7rew[ 868. 7. 

TTiVTrjKOVTopoS 857. 2 2. 

nepaiveiv 850. 24. 

nepas 861. 4, 

TTf/a/ 856. 4, 43; 857. 17 ; 

858 b. 33; 886. 5, 12. 
TlepuXtis 858 (^. 21. 
irepivodTi'iv 856. 31. 
Tvepiopav 855. 6. 
TTtpiTidevm 855. 10. 
Uepcrai 857. II. 
Trerpa 864. 21. 
neVpoy 849. 8, 13, 14, 24. 

TTlTTTdV 885. 51. 

TrXeri/ 858 b. 21. 
TiXeicoi' 850. 23. nXelarop 
863. 5. 

TrXrjpiJieXfia 850. 30. 

nX^u 857. 4 ; 862. I4(?). 
nXrj(T(T(iv 885. 36, 61. 
TrXouo'tcoraros' 858 i5. 39. 
TTOtftl' 851. I. 
TTOltJTTjS 856. 12. 

noXis 856. 16; 858 (^. 42 ; 
863. 5; 866. I. 

TToXiVr;? 858 b. 16, 39. 
TToXi's' 863. 5. 



■novrjpoi 855. 17. 

UovTiKoi 870. 17. 

]7^o^'7toy 864. 8. 

Tropevecrdai. 850. 25. 

7ro'/3i/)j 856. 41. 

TTorapik 850. 24. 

TiOTepov 869. 8. 

TToG 862. 7. 

Trpal(f)€KTOs 849. 12. 

rrpd, TTpo Tov 863. 9. 

TTpo^oxAeveiv 858b. 33, 34. 

7rpc)8r;Xoy 855. 3. 

TTpoSorrjs 856. 62. 

npoKfla-dm 869. 16. 

Trpo'j 850. 23, 25, 31, 33 ; 

851. 2; 855. 7, 16; 856. 

34, 76; 857. 10. 
Trpoa-^dXXeiv 857. I. 
Trpoa-^id^eadai 867. 4. 
irpo(T(p)(€cr6ai 855. 7- 
TVpoa-rjyopla 870. 1 4. 
npocruvai 850. 26. 

n-pOtTKtil'ftJ' 850. II. 
Tvpoa-noieiaSaL 885. 48. 
TTpoTfpos 885. 49. npoTepov 

856. 71. 
7rpo(f>cov(7v 856. 67. 
TTpuravii 858 3. 26. 
TTpcoms 858 (5. 17. TTpolTOV 

856. 71. 
7rrco;^;oj 856. 3 1. 

TTUKlw'y 860 (^. 8. 

TTvvddveadai 856. 63 ; 866. 2. 
TTiip 855. 3. 

TTVphnvov 855. 2. 
Tlvppias 855. 8, 21. 
TTwycof 856. 9. 
7rd)y^a 854. 7. 

TTois 858 (5. 23. 

puKos 856. 33. 
peii/ 850. 24. 
pnpa 856. 34. 

o-aXTTty^ 858 b. 30. 
(raXTTiKTijii' 858 b. 28. 
2«/ios 858 <^. 21. 
cranpus 856. 36. 
Eappdrai 870. 34. 
cr^fvvvvai 850. 29. 



/. NEW LITERARY TEXTS 



345 



(TeXixa 854. 6. 

(T'qixaiveiv 885. 4O. 

a-Tjuflov 885. 50, 54. 

a'lKvos 856. 40. 

(TKeXoi, Kara tcov ctk. 855. 18. 

(TKr]v{] 858 d. 27. 

aKi^^is 856. 29. 

(tkXtjpos 856. 22. 

2kv% 857. 21. 

araKTr) 855. I 6. 

(TTevayiJLOS 850. 2. 

tTTiVdV 864. 7- 

(TTrjdoi 887. recto 8. 
(TTixoi 860 (5. 8. 

o-roA?; 864. 7. 

cTTparevdv 856. 57- 

crTpdT€V[xa 865. 3. 

(TTparrjyos 858 d. 1 8. 

<TTpaTia)Tr]s 850. 26. 

2Tvp(f)r]'Kos 859. 3. 

(TV 849. II, 20, 21 ; 850. 7, 

II, 12, 29; 855. I, 16; 

866. 22. 
(Tvppax^i'iv 857. 8. 
(Tv^inade'iv 849. 5- 
avv 854. 6. 
avvaQpol^dv 850. 32. 
cr{)vhov\oi 855. 5. 
o-^ely 860 a. 9. 
(TXW^ 850. 26. 
a-xL(Tpa 856. 33. 
Scoretpa 885. 46. 

TaXaKCJ/jSto? 860 (7. 3. 

TaXaoy 859. 2. 

rafxiiov 886. 4. 

Tti^ts 856. 64. 

raxa 851. 7- 

Taxv 855. 10. Ta;^i(TTa 850. 

28. 
Tf Kroo-a-ye? 870. 2 2. 
Tf^i/j; 855. 12, 13. 
Trjkavyws 886. 24. 



astutia 871. 2. 
autem 871. 3. 

convenire 871. 2. 

de 871. 3. 



) 



Ti/3tos 855. 3. 
irt^cocwt 856. 40. 
Tivuv 868. 5. 

r(r 850. 26; 855. 12, i^, 
856.2,37; 858(5.29,38; 

864. 5. 
Toi 856. 65. 
roLos 869. 14. 
ToXfxiw 850. i5« 
ToXpidi]s 858 Z'. 22. 
t6t{ 864. 16. 
'■p''X'A°^ 868. 10. 
Tpf'is 857. 23. 
TpLaKoaioi 857. 3. 
TpiT]p7]s 856. 43. 
rpoTTos 886. 5. 
rpu^ 854. 8. 

Tuxv 885. 46. 

'Y8pods 865. 3. 

uScop 857. 28 ; 867. i. 

v'i6s 865. 5. 

vfMfis 858 (^. 30. 

vnap^ii 869. I. 

V7rf> 850. I ; 856. 69. 

iinepLbdv 857. 1 4. 

VT:fpiJLT]KI]S 867. 6. 

uTTo 850. 24 ; 855. 20 ; 856. 

27,32; 857.19; 865.3; 

885. 37, 60. 
vnoXeiTTdv 886. 20. 
vcTTfpos 862. II. varepov 

865. 5. 

(j)aivfcr0aL 884. 2. 
(jbcifni 849. 24; 850. 27; 
856.6, 16, 54,65, 73, 74. 
(pavrdCdu 864. 25. 
(pdpp,aKov 887. verso 6. 
</)<i/n7^ 856. 55. 
fj)(i8f(r6ui 849. I 7. 
^etS/aj 862. 7. 

(2) Latin (871-2). 

e 871. 9. 
ego 871. 4. 

in 871. 5. 
inertia 871. i. 



(pepeiv 855. 2, 18, 22. eVey- 

Ki'ip 862. 10; 867. I. 
^fuyei;^ 856. 27; 887. verso 3. 
(piXuv 849. 26. 

(piXTurns 855. 18. 
^Xvnp[ 869. 19. 
<j>\vnpos 855. 15. 
^ori/',^ 886. 14. 

(})OLTaV 854. 7- 

(fiopriov 855, 8. 

^pa[ 854. 2. 

(jbpiji' 855. 15 ; 864. i. 

^pvyfs 870. 25. 

cj^vXaKi] 854. 9. 

^uXjj 856. 50. 

4,vXXov 856. 36 ; 886. 15, 17. 

(f>vpei.v 864. 16. 

<pcip[ 858 a. I. 

XaX/cfny 864. 25. 

XoXko^ 860 (7. 4. 

X'!/Kf 855. 19 ; 856. 76. 

X'lVfos 856. 69. 

Xfip 850. 28 ; 856. 32 (.=■). 

Xopos 864. 10. 

XPf'o? 856. 35. 

Xpv 885. 41. 

XPwa 857. 27. 

Xprip-aTi^iiv 886. 24. 
Xp^a-dai 856. 24. 

^f]^ia-pa 858 b. 19. 
xj/rjcjios 856. 24. 
•(//■vxP*^^ 856. 12. 

w 855. 3. 
wSe 851. 3. 
fiXeVf; 864. 9. 
w/ios 887. recto 3. 
wy (relative) 851. i ; 854. 5 ; 
856. 41, 54; 859. 7. 

= ore 855. 21 (.?). 

uxTTf 858 d. 44. 



is 871. 4, 6, 9. 

loqui 871. 4. 

magis 871. i, 2. 
meminisse 871. 3. 



346 



INDICES 



minimus 871. 7. 

ne . . . quidem 871. 6-7. 
negare 871. 10. 
non 871. 4. 
nullus 871. 6. 
numeius 871. 4. 



pars 871. 6. 
perforaie 871. n (.''). 

quam 871. i, 2, 8 (?). 
qui 871. 4, 5, 6, 9. 

sapicntia 871. 3. 
sed 871. 5. 



sic 872. 8. 
suus 871. 5. 

ter 872. 9. 
tunc 872. 16. 

villus 871. I. 



II. EMPERORS. 
Claudius. 

KKavhw 962. 

Nkro. 

N//3wj^ 962. 

Galba. 

raX/:iH 899. 28. 

Titus. 

6eos Tlroi 984. Tiros 958. 
Hadrian. 

AvTOKp. Kala. Tpaiavos 'Abpiavus ^e^aaros 898. 40 ; 986. 
'Afipuu'oy 957. 

Antoninus Pius. 

'AiTwi'Ti'os Kala. 6 Kvpws 899. 30. 
6{us Ai'Xtos- AvtcovIpos 899. 20. 
Avravlvos 899. 29. 

Marcus Aurelius and Verus. 

'AvTwv'ivos Koi Ovijpos oi Kvpioi ^t^aoroi 973. 

Marcus Aurelius. 

'Apt(ov1vos Kal ^av(TT'iva Se^norot 905. I. 

COMMODUS. 

Stoi Konohoi 909. 23. 
Kofxobos 988. 

Septimius Severus. 

Imp. Caes. Lucius Septimius Severus Pius Pertinax Aug. Arabicus Adiabenicus 
894. I. 

AvTOKp, Kaia: Aovkios ^errTLpios 2(ovrjpos Evaf^iji 899. introd. 

Septimius Severus and Caracalla. 

AiiTOKp. Kala. Advkios "S-cirTipios 'S.tovripns Evae^. YltpTiva^ 2(/5, 'Apa/3, 'A8ia^t]v. koi MdpKos 
AvpT]\tus 'AvtwvIvos Kala. dnodf^fiypfuos AvroKp. 910. 43 ; 976. 



in. CONSULS, ERAS, AND INDICTIONS 347 

AvTOKp. Kaia: Aovkios 2enTifiios 2{ov^pns Evo-e/3. Tlfpriva^ 2e/3, 'Apa/3. 'ASta/S;/!'. IlnpdiKoi; 
MeytoTos Kai AvTOKp. Kmcr. MdpKos AvprjXioi 'Avtcov^vos 2e/3. 916. I. 

AvTOKp. Kaiaapes Aovkws ^enrifiios 2fovripos: Ev(re/3. YlepTiva^ 'Apa^. 'AbLrjjBtjv. Tlapd. Mtyiar. 
Koi MdpKos AvpijXLOi'AvTotv'iVos SejSuoroi 908. 40. 

Severus Alexander. 

AvTOKp. Kato". MupKos AvprjXios 2(ovrjpos ^AXe^tiv^pos Evae^. Eiirvx^. Se/S. 909. 34; 972; 
988. 

Maximinus. 

AiTOKp. Kaitr. Tdtos 'lovXios Ovrjpos Ma^i/xeiws Evae^. Eutd;^. 2e/3. 912. 37. 

Gallus and Volusianus. 

AvTOKp. Kai'a-apts Tuios OvilSios Tpe^cortnros r«'XXof Km Ydioi Out/3toy 'Ac^iVtoy FeXXor OikX- 
8ovpviav6s OvoXov(Tiav6s EiVe^. EvtvX' '^f^aarol 977. 

Gallienus. ^ 

AiJTOKp. Kaicr. Hovn^.ios AiKii'inos VaXXirjvos T(ppaviKoi Me'ytor. Evae^, Evtvx. 2(j3. 964. 

Tacitus. 

AvToKp. Knlcr. MdpKns KXavdios Tiikitos Eto-e/S. EiVu;(. 2e/3. 907. 27. 
6 Kvpios MdpKos KXavdios Tokitos 907. 26. 

Diocletian and Maximian (of. Index III). 

ol Kvpioi AioKXrjTiavus Koi Ma^ifiLavos 2f^(icrToi 888. 6. 

[AvTOKp. Tdios Avpi^Xtos OvaXepios AioKXr/Tiavos] YfppapiKos Meyiar. TovvdiKos [Meyarr. k .t. \. 
Ev(T(l3.] Evtvx- NiK)/ri)y 2ej3. Kal [AvroKp. TSIdpKns Ai'pr;Xto? OvaXepios Ma^tpiavos EvcrejS. Evtvx- 
2f/3.] 2npiiaTiKos Meyiar. Vepp.. [MeyicrT. Kal 'i'Xaovios OvaXepios KcovariivTios koI Tdios OvaXepios 
Ma^ip.iai'6s] 01 iirif^uvifTTaToi Kaiaapes 889. I. 

Ka Koi ly fTos (of Diocletian and the Caesars Constantius and Maximian) 895. 6. 
Maurice. 

6 Geioraros koi evcrfjSfaTaTos rjpcov BeaTTorrjs piyi(TTos fvepyirrjs ^Xaovms Ti/3epioy MavpiKios 6 
alaivios AvyovaTos Kal AvTOKparap 996. 
Avyov(TToi 897. 12. 



III. CONSULS, ERAS, AND INDICTIONS. 
Consuls. 

e(^' viTdrwv Kwi'crrnw/ou KnX Ma^ipiavov ra>v errKp, Kaiddpcov (294) 891. I. 
Kcova-TavTLco Koi Ma^iptava rols fTTt^ai'tcrraroij Kai(rap(riv to y vmiTon (300) 889. II. 
e'^ vTrdrcov Kcovarai'Tiov Kal Ma^ifiiavov tojv €7ri(p. Kaicrdpcov to e' (305) 895. I. 
vnaTeias KaiKivlov 2a/3iVov Kai OveTTWv 'Povcpivov twv XapTrpoTaTcov (3 1 6) 896. 1 9, 35 ; 
983. 

VTTaTeias AiKLv'iov 'S.f^adTov to c;' km Aikw'iov tov fTTKp. Kaia. to ^' (322) 900. I. 
iiniTeias 'lovviov Bacrcrov Kai ^Xaoviov 'A/3Xa/3t'ov ToovXafinpoT. endpxo>P (33 I ) 990. 
tTrarfi'ay Ovi\^^lov NeTTwrtni'oG Kai Terrtou ^aKOwSov Tav XapnpoT. (33^) ^Ol- !• 



348 



INDICES 



VTraTi'ias ^}<.aovi(ov Ovpaov kol YloXefxiov tojv Xo^Trpor. (338) 892. 1 3. 
VTTaTfins 'Avtcovlov Mnp^eXXiVov Km HfTpcovlov Ilpo^ivov twv Xa/xTrpor. (34 l) 991. 
VTTaTfias KavcrTai'Tiov to S' koi KmraravTOi to y AvyovaToav (346) 897- !■ 
VTrareias ^Xaovlav Evbo^lov Kai AioaKopov tcov Xn/x7rpor. (442) 913. I. 

p-eTO. Ti)v vnaTeiav $Xaoviou Bi^iavoii tov XaprrpoT. to /3' koi tov hrjKaBridopiivov (abOUt 465) 
902. 19. 

roiy piTa ttjv vTraTeiav $Xaoiiiov Qeo8a>pi)(ov tov \apnpoT. (486) 914. I. 
vTTaTila^ ^Xanvlov Ti^epiov Mai'ptKi'ou tTovs a (584) 996. 

Eras of Oxyrhynchus. 

eVos 7r6 VT) [pr] Pap. ; 413) 992. 
„ p|,3 pXa (486) 914. 13. 
po^ pp€ (499) 994. 
a-pfi ai'] (572) 915. 4. 
o-cjy a|/3 (616-7) 999- 

Indictions. 

2nd (6th cent.) 993. 
3rd (584) 996. 
5th (616-7) 999. 
6th (572) 915. 2, 14. 
9th (486) 914. 2, 14 
13th (444-5) 913. 8. 



J) 



(499 ; 1. 8th) 994; Mesore 11, upxn (5th cent.) 995. 



IV. MONTHS AND DAYS- 
(a) Months. 

TfppaviKdos (Pachon) 962. 
2f/3ao-rdf (Thoth) 958 ; 985. 



fl8o\ 'ATrpiXXuu 899. introd. 

etSct A(K€p^p(ai 889. 10. 



{/?) Days. 



eVayopei/wc n 972. 
TpiaKas 967. 



V. PERSONAL NAMES. 



'A[.]d7r>ys village- elder, son of Heron 918. xi. 

12. 
'Alicil3'LKi{s) 984. 
'A^paad^ 924. 18. 
'AyaBfjpfpos 936. lO. 
'Ayneivoi 937. 5, I 7. 



'AyaOoKkfia, ^apanovs also Called Ag., daughter 
of Aristion 964. 

'Ayn^or Aaipav ap^as son of CaeciliuS 990. 

'AyxopipcpLs father of Anchorimphis 918. iii.i 2. 
'Ayxoptpcfiis son of Anchorimphis and father 
of Benia[.]is 918. iii. ii. 



V. PERSONAL NAMES 



349 



'Ay;^opi/i^is son of Horus 918. xi. 20. 
'Ayxopifi(t)is son of Onnophris (i) 918. ii. 11, 

18, 23, xi. 20; (2) 986. 
'A8pi{av ) 929. introd. 
'A.6avd<nos son of Demetrius 939. 22. 
*Aiay, AvpT]\in 'A. daughter of Agathodaemon 

990. 
AlBionas 934. 1 4. 

AlpiXios ^aTovpy'ivos praefect 899. 10; 916. 9. 
Ataxvpas father of Tharion 984. 
'AXe^ai/fipoy, 'lovXios 'A. father of Pausanias 

936. I. 
'AXe^ai/fipoj, Tt/3fptof 'A. praefect 899. 28. 
'aXXols, j\vpr]\ui 'A. daughter of Thonius 

901. 4. 
^Aprjovs son of Patunis 918. ii. 15. 
'ApTjoiis son of Sokonopis 918. ii. 14. 
'Apucovai son of Pastoous and father of 

Petesuchus 986. 
'Appcoviavos 895. introd. 
'Appaviavos, OiiaXepios'A.also Called Gerontius, 

logistes 896. i, 23, 34, 36; 983. 
\\ppavios 936. 2 1 ; 989. 
'App(j)pios son of Ammonius 986. 
'Appo3vios son of Rhodion and father of 

Ammonius 986. 
'Appupios, AvprjXios 'A. ex-exegetes 908. 8. 
*Appu>vios, AvpTjXioi Aiovvcnos also called Am. 

911. 9. 
'Appo)vios, Avcj)ibios 'a, 899. 46. 

'Apois, AvprjXios 'A. son of Horus 897. 4. 
'Apvvrapovs daughter of Amyntas 918. 5. 

'A/iuwar 918. 6. 

'A/i^t^oXijy 928. 4. 

^Avdpopaxos 973. 

'Avi}(Tios son of Anoup 996. 

'AvTjatos father of Aurelius Anoup 996. 

"AviWa 903. 32. 

'Avovdios deacon (.?) 993. 

'Avovn father of Anesius 996. 

AvovTT, AvprjXios 'a. son of Anesius 996. 

'Avpeais daughter of Phrateus 984. 

'Avreli son of Sarapas 976. 

'Avripaxos, Qecov also called Ant., gymnasiarch 

908. 10. 
'AvTivoos 933. 29. 

'Aptivoos also called Hermes 909. 5. 
^Avravlvos 899. introd. 

*AvTa)v1vos, AvprjXios 'A, 6 KpariCTTOs (vice- 

praefect ?) 970. 



'AvToyvios, AvprjXios 'A. govemor of Aegyptus 
Herculia 896. 29. 

'AvToJvios, rdios 'lovXios 'A. 972. 
"Arra BiKTcap 987. 
'Anfls, AvprjXios ^apantav also called Ap., 

senator 977. 
'Anicov 923. 2 ; 967. 
'Anioiv collector of money-taxes 917. i ; 

981; 982. 
'Att/wi/ eutheniarch 908. 3, 45. 
'Aniav public physician, son of Herodotus 

983. 
'AttiW strategus(?) 929. 25. 

Anicof, f^Xaovios 'A. 999. 
"ATToXivcipios 928. I, 16; 932. 2, 3. 

AnoXivdpios, Aovkios ^enTipios AvprjXios 'EapaTTicov 

also called Ap., prytanis 890. i. 

AiToXivapios npfcrfiiVTTjs 933. I, 31. 
' AiToXXav 9(6s piyiuTos 984. 
' AnoXXcovdpiov also called Aristandra daughter 
of Aristander 899. 2 et saep. 

'AnoXXoovia 905. 17; 984. 

'AnoXXavia daughter of Origenes 888. ro. 
'AnoXXoovia daughter of Sarapion 918. v. 18. 
'AttoXXwwos 929. introd.; 969. 
'ATToXXconoy assistant of sitologi 973. 
' AnoXXuvios also called Didymus son of 

Onesas 909. 3. 
' ATroXXo>i>ios son of Gaius 969. 
'AnoXXavios Son of Heracles 905. 3. 
' ATToXXavios father of Heraclides 918. ii. 19. 

' AnoXXai/iQs 6^(f)iKid\ios 896. 28. 

'A7roXXa)i/ioy son of Panephremmis 918. iii. 8. 

' AnoXXavios , AvprjXios 'A. SOU of Sarapion 

890. 14. 
'Atj-oXXcos leadworker 915. i ; 1000-3. 
'AnoXXws p-f 1^(01/, son of Phoebammon 893. 2. 
'ATr(povi son of Epimachus 999. 
'An(povs, AvprjXios 'A. son of Hareous 914. 3, 

20. 

'Apaais 968. 
'Apeta 924. 2, I9. 

"Apeios vegetable-seller 980. 
'Apfovs father of Aurelius Apphous 914. 3, 
20, 

"Aprjs 6eos piyiaros 984. 

'ApiardvBpa, ApoUonarion also called Ar., 
daughter of Aristander 899. 2 e/ saep. 

'Apiarav^pos father of ApoUonarion also 
called Aristandra 899. 2. 



350 



INDICES 



' Api(TTavhpos son of Zenon 988. 

'Apiarlcov father of Aurelius Theon also called 

Eudaemon 964. 
^ApicrTiwv, AvprjXios Qeav also called Eudacmou 

surnamed Ar., son of Aristion 964. 
'AppUvs father of Taames 918. iii. 9. 
'ApfjiivcTioi, Avp7]\ios 'A. son of Padidymus 

913. 5, 21. 
'Appiva-is son of Patron 986. 
'Apovaujis 984. 
' ApTVOKpaTiav 935. 6. 
'Apaivoi] 921. I. 

'Apa-ivoos father of Aurelius Artemidorus 

896. 2. 
^ApTepiSojpos, AvpijXios *A. painter, son of 

Arsinous 896. 2, 20. 

^A(TK\r]nid8r]s, AiprjXios Qiav also Called Ascl. 

912. 4. 

'Ao-TTiSrif 984. 

'ATJJpij 984. 

'Atp^s 935. introd. 

AvKTOi father of Horus 935. introd. 

Avpr)\ia "A'ias daughter of Agathodaemon 990. 

AvprjXia 'AXXovs daughter of Thonius 901. 4. 

Avpr]\ia Brja-ovs daughter of Sarapion 912. i, 

40. 
AvprjXia AtSu^"? daughter of Aurelius Hermo- 

genes also called Eudaemon 907. 3 e/ saep. 
Avpt]Xla Evbatpovis daughter of Antinous also 

called Hermes 909. 5. 
Avpt]Xia eeavovs daughter of Didymus 960. 
AvprjXla 'la-iboopa also Called Prisca 907. 4, 

16, 21. 
AvprjXla UroXfpats daughter of Aurelius 

Hermogenes also called Eudaemon 907. 

3. II. 14- 

Aiipr^Xta Taappu}Pios daughter of Sarapion 

991. 

AvprjXla Taup daughter of Castor 913. 5, 22. 
AvpljXios 'Appavioi ex-exegetes 909. 8. 
AvpijXioi 'Apois son of Horus 897. 4. 
Avpf)Xios 'Ai/ow son of Anesius 993. 
AviiTjXios 'AvTcov'tvos 6 Kpariaros (vice-praefect ? ) 

970. 
AvprjXios 'AvTOJvios governor of Acgyptus 

Herculia 896. 29. 
AvprjXios ' AttoXXo)vios SOU of Sarapiou 890. 14. 
AvprjXt.os 'AvKpovs SOU of Harcous 914. 3. 
AvpT]Xiot 'Appiva-ios son of Padidymus 913. 

5> 21. 



AvpTjXios 'Aprepibaipoi painter, son of Arsinous 

896. 2, 20. 
Avpf]Xios Arjpfirpios son of Dionysotheon 907. 

20. 
Avpr]Xios Arjp^rpios also called Zoilus, exegetes 

911. I. 
AvprjXios Aibvuos public physiciau, son of 

Dioscorus 896. 24, 37. 

Avpi'jXios Aiovvadppoiv 907. 23. 

A>jpr]Xios Aiovvaios also called Ammonius 

911. 9. 
AvprjXios Aiovvaios also Called Aphrodisius, 

gymnasiarch 977. 

AvprjXios i\i6(TK0pc,s 977. 

AvpnXioi AwaKdpos senator, son of Silvanus 
900. 4, 31. 

AvprjXios AopiTTiams SOU of Sarapion 890. 14. 

AvpiiXim 'Eppe'ivos SOU of Aurelius Hermo- 
genes also called Eudaemon 907. 3, 7, 10. 

AvprjXios 'Eppnyevrjs also callcd Eudacmou, 
exegetes 907. i, 27. 

AvpijXius 'HpaKXeibrjs SOU of Aurelius Hemio- 
genes also called Eudaemon 907. 3, 7, 
19. 

AvpijXios "Hpcov puhYic physician 896. 24, 37. 

AvprjXioi Qeoyiprjs SOU of ThcOgeueS 911. 4. 

AvprjXios eecor also Called Asclepiades 912. 4. 
Avp^Xios Qewv also called Eudaemon sur- 
named Aristion, son of Aristion 964. 

AvprjXios Gfcoia? 909. I. 
AvpijXios 'irriboipos 964. 

AvprjXios 'lo-ifiwpo? son of Chaeremon 912. 10. 
AvpijXios KopvrjXiuvos prytanis 891. 6. 
Avpi^Xios Aeai'iBrjs strategus 890. 4. 

Avpi'jXios, AovKios 'SeTVTipios Avp. SapoTrtcoi' also 

called Apolinarius, prytanis 890. i. 

AvprjXios MaKupios SOU of Joseph 902. 2, 1 8. 

AvprjXios NfTTcoTtai/os- prytanis 892. 6. 

AvprjXios Uapis also called Zeuxianus, chief- 
priest elect 970. 

AvprjXios llacriuiv scuator, son of Horion 
892. 2. 

Avp^Xios UanvovTios SOU of Paesius 897. 5. 

AvprjXios niiTanis SOU of Pacsis 897. 4. 

AvprjXios narvTis SOU of Pauouris 912. 6. 

AvpfjXios UroXepaios 970. 

AvprjXios UtoXXicou SOU of Ptollion 909. I, 

37- 
AvprjXios 2aKd(ov comarch, son of Petiris 

895. 4. 



V. PERSONAL NAMES 



351 



Avpi]\ios 2apa7ri(j3v also called Apeis, senator 

877. 
Avpi'iXios 2apaniu>v also Called Theon 960. 
Avpj'jXtos 2apas 921. introd. 
AvprjXios 2app.dTr]i elder 897. 5. 
AvprjXioi 2fpijvos son of AurcHus Ammonius 

909. 8. 
AvprjXios 2f prjvos SOU of Daniel 914. 5. 
Avpi]Xios ^tprjvos son of Serenus 909. 10, 
AvpT]Xios 2fv6qs also called Horion, logistes 

895. 3. 
AvprjXios 2Ti(})avoi 934. I, 1 7. 

AiprjXios 2(i)Trjpixos son ofDidymus 909. 12. 

Avpi']Xios Xaipi]pcov 934. 1,17. 

AvpriXios "^ois comarch, son of Patabes 895. 4. 
AvprjXioi 'npiav son of Aurelius Hermogenes 
also called Eudaemon 807. 3, 7, 19. 

Av<pl8ios Appaivios 899. 46. 

'Acppobiaioi, AvprjXios Aiovvaios also Called 

Aphr., gymnasiarch 977. 
'A(ppo5iTr] goddess 921. 22. 
'Axi-XXevs also called Isidorus, gymnasiarch 

908. 12. 

Bapixas 995. 

BtXXfcos father of Sarapion 985. 
B«j^(a[.](s son of Anchorimphis 918. iii. 11. 
BepefiKiauos, 'Qplcou also called Ber., gymnasi- 
arch 908. 13. 
Brjaoiis, AvprjXin B. 912. I, 40. 
BUrap 943. 9. "ATra BiKTcop 987. 

ro/3/j(j}X, 6 dyios r. 993. 

Tdios father of Apollonius 969. 

Tdios 'lovXios 'AvTOivios 972. 

Tdios TJovXtpepvios Ti^cplvos 972. 

Taiav (?), Ti/3eptos KXauStoj Tipipos alsO Called 

Gai. 916. II. 
Tf'piyos, Ti(3epios KXavbios T. also called Gaion 
916. II. 

rtpomios, OvaXfpios ' Afi/xcoviavos also Called 

Gerontius, logistes 896. i, 23. 

TeMpyios 915. I. 

Tfcopyios castrensis (.'') 1001. 
Teco/jytos chartularius 943. 9. 
Ttapyios son of John 996. 

Aalpav, 'Ayados A. clp^as, SOn of Caecilius 

990. 
Aavn'jXios father of Aurelius Serenus 914. 5. 



Aavi^Xios president of the council 913. 2. 
Aijpapxos 937. I, 31. 

Arjptas 980. 

ArjprjTpia daughter of Andromachus 973. 
ArjfjLriTpios father of Athanasius 939. 2, 33. 
ArjiirjTpios son of Heraclidcs 938. i. 
ArjprjTpios, AvprjXios A. son of DionysotheoH 

907. 20, 22. 
ArjpfjTpios, AvprjXios A, also Called Zoilus, 

exegetes 911. i. 
AiUpr] 899. 3 ; 968. 
Aihvprj, AvprjXia A. daughter of Aurelius 

Hermogenes also called Eudaemon 907. 

3 et saep. 
Aihvpos 907. 22; 960. 
Ai'Sv/xos father of Aurelius Soterichus 909. 12. 
Aibvpos son of Dionysius also called Phatreus 

898. 3. 
Aihvpos, *A7roXX&)t/tof also called Did., son of 

Demeas 908. 3. 
Aibvpos, AvprjXios A. public physician, son of 

Dioscorus 896. 24, 37. 
Aidvpos, Tijieptos KXavdios A. gymnasiarch 
^908. 6. 
^ioy€i>rjs 906. 4, 5, 7 ; 935. i, 25. 

Aioye'vTjs Kadrjyrjrrjs 930. 7- 

Aioyevrjs linen-merchant 933. i, 32. 

Aiovvadpfiau, Avpi'jXios A. 807. 23. 

Aiovvadpios, ^Xuovios A. riparius 887. 3. 

Aiovvaios 871 ; 874. 

Aiovvaios assistant of collector of corn-dues 

876. 
Aiovvmos gymnasiarch 808. 11. 
Aiovvaios father of Herodes 988. 
AiovvcTios also called Phatreus, father of 

Didymus 898. 3. 
Aiovva-ios father of Ptolemaeus 910. 56. 
Aiovvaios, AvprjXios A. also Called Ammonius 

911. 9. 
Aiovvaios, AvprjXios A. also Called Aphrodisius, 

gymnasiarch 977. 
Aiovvaodeav father of Aurelius Demetrius 

907. 20. 
Aiovvaos god 917. 3. 

A'los son of Dius 986. 

Alos father of Onnophris 918. ii. 19 ; 986. 

A'los son of Onnophris and father of Dius 

986. 
Aios son of Onnophris and father of Hera- 

cleus 986. 



352 



INDICES 



ATos son of Onnophris and father of Pene- 

oueris 986. 
Aioo-Kopof 898. lo, 14, 17. 
Aio'o-Kopos father of Aurelius Didymus 896. 

25- 

Aioo-Kopof father of Psenamounis 989. 

Atoa-Kopos, AvpT]\ios A. 977. 

AioTKopoi, Mpr]\ioi A. senator, son of Silvanus 

900. 4- 

Aioa-Kopos, $X(ivtof A. (nonrr^s elpfjtnjs 991. 
AtoCTKOvpt'Sf;? 907. 15 

^tocTKovpitrjs, OiaXe/nos A. also Called Julianus, 

logistes 900. 3. 
Ato(pdvr]s] strategus 899. introd. 
AoptTTiavos, Avp^Xiof A. son of Sarapion 890. 

14. 

Acopd^fos 992. 

'EKcnav 968. 

'E^aKovoii 967. 

'E^ciKOiv 923. 3. 

'Enipaxos father of Apphous 999. 

'Epp[ 907. 15. 

'Eppai wineseller 985. 

'EppTjs, 'Avt'ivoos also called Herm. 909. 5. 

'Epixoy€vr]s, Mp-qXioi 'E. also called Eudaemon, 

exegetes 907. i, 27. 
'Epp68(^pos basilicogrammateus and acting 

strategus 898. i. 
"Epccs 927. I. 
"Epco? TraiSayojyds 930. 2b. 
Evayye\os smith 989. 

Eibaipovis, AvprjXia Ev8. daughter of Antinous 

also called Hermes 909. 3. 
EL/Saipcor son of Lycus 984. 

Evbaipatv, Aip^Xior 'Eppoyivr)s alsO called Eud.,, 

exegetes 907. i, 27. 
Elhalpav, kvpi]\Lo^ Qeav also called Eud. sur- 

named 'Apiariav, son of Aristion 964. 
Evbaip.(ov, OvaUpios Ev8. praefcct 899. 29. 

EiddXapos 903. 27. 

Ev\6yios, ^Xaomos EuX. riparius 897. 3. 

Evvoia 907. 15. 

Evae^ios, ^XaomosEva: logistes 892. I. 

EvTvxn^ sitologus (?) 973. 
Ev(})p6(Tvvos 939. 19. 

Zfv^iavos, AvprjKtos udpis also Called Zeux., 
chief-priest elect 970. 



Zfjvcov father of Aristander 988. 

Zfjvav father of Heron 986. 

ZC017 903. 5. 

Zox'Xos 903. 12. 

ZcotXoj banker's assistant 916. 18. 

ZaiXos, Avp^Xios Arjprjrptos alsO called Zo., 

exegetes 911. i. 

ZaiTvpos 928. 3. 

Zcocri/xoff 937. 1 5 ; 974. 



HX(io-«oj (.?) 926. 7. 
HXtdScopof 935. 25. 
HpaOecov 926. I. 

HpoKXas 890. 17 ; 985. 

HpdKXe-.a daughter of Theon 899. introd. 
HpaKXeldris son of ApoUonius 918. v. 19. 
HpaKXelbrji father of Demetrius 938. i. 
UpnKXdbijs, Ai-p/jXio? 'Hp. son of Aurelius 
Hermogenes also called Eudaemon 907. 

3, 17, 19. 

'HpaKXfdSwpos father of Heracleodorus 984. 

'HpaKXfo'Scopof son of Heracleodorus and 
father of Hierax 984. 

'HpdK\r]os 934. 5 ; 984. 

'HpdK\r]os father of Choous 897. 8. 

'HpdKXrjos son of Dius and father of INIuslhas 
986. 

'HpdicKr]os son of Hierax 984. 

'UpdKXjps also called Matreas 898. 5. 

'HpdKXrjoi son of Peneoueris 986. 

'HpdKXr]os son of Peneoueris and father of 
Heracles 986. 

'HpdKXrjos father of Ptolemaeus 984. 

'HpaKX^s son of Heracleus 986. 

'Hpn/cXi)? son of Morus and father of ApoUo- 
nius 905. 4, 17. 

'UpaKX?is son of Ptolemaeus 984. 

'HpdSoros- father of Apion public physician 
983. 

'Hpw8r;y 988. 

'HpciS/jj son of Dionysius 988. 

"Hpcoi' comogrammateus 986. 

"Hpcov father of Heron 918. ii. 19. 

"Hpcov son of Heron and father of Patunis 

918. ii. 12, 18, 24. 
"Upcov son of Nestnephis and father of Patunis 

918. iii. 12. 
"Hpmv village-elder, father of A[.]apes 918. 

xi. 12. 
Hpwv son of Xenon 986. 



PERSONAL NAMES 



353 



'Hpwi', AvpijXios "Hp. public physician 
24, 37- 



896. 



Is., gym- 
ii. 19. 



BaPia-is 888. 10; 921. 12; 935. introd. 
Oajjdis daughter of Panesneus 984. 
eats 932. I. 
ecus daughter of Amphithales 928. 4. 

eciWova-a 984. 

Qapicov son of Aischuias 984. 
QaTpTjs daughter of Menodorus 905. 3. 
Bea^riais daughter of Pesouris 918. ii. 12, 
22, 24. 

Qecwovs 935. 24. 

Qeauoxis, AvprjXia 9. daughter of Didymus 960. 

Geapois 963. 

eeoyevT]! father of Theogenes 911. 4. 
GfoyeVjyy son of Theogenes 911. 4. 
Qfoy(vr]s father of AureHus Theogenes 911. 4. 
BeoyevT]!, AvpfjXioi 6. SOU of Theogenes 911. 4. 

QeotoToi 942. 7. 
eeoSwpos 902. 5. 
GfOTro/iTTOj 931. I, 16. 

GfW 899. introd.; 935. 24. 

eeccu also called Antimachus, gymnasiarch KfpeX[, AoCklos Kep{\[ ]amav6s 965. 



IcrtSwpa, AvptjXia 'I. 964. 

lo-iSupa, Avpr]\ta 'I. also Called Prisca 907. 
4, 16, 21. 

IfftScopa, KXauS/a 'l. 919. 7- 

l(Ti8Q}pi(iiu 928. 14. 

IcriSwpor 906. 10. 

laldcopoi, Aiipi]\ios 'I. SOU of Chaeremon 912. 

10. 
lo-iSwpo?, 'A^j^iXXfw also called 

nasiarch 908. 12. 
Io-('<ai/ son of Panephremmis 918. 
laavvr]s 941. 10 ; 995. 
Icudvurjs father of Georgius 996. 
Io)ow;jy father of Paniren 893. 2. 
lco(r)7<^ father of Aurelius Macarius 902. 2, 18. 
l(0(rT](f> notary 940. 7. 

KamXios father of Agathodaemon 990. 
KaK^s 935. introd. 
KdXfj 934. 7. 

KaXXeay 921. 8. 
KaXkeas pilot 919. 3. 
KacTTcop 913. 5, 2 2. 



908. 10. 

eiMv,Avpfj\ios e. also called Asclepiades 912. 4. 
Qiav, AvpfjXios Q, also called Eudaemon sur- 
nanied Aristion, son of Aristion 964. 

Q€a>vas,Avpr]Xios Q. 909. II. 

Gfcum 930. 24. 

Wofis 989. 
IfpaKiawa 935. 27. 

UpaKiaiv ex-agoranomus, son of Hieracion 

910. I. 
UpaKicov father of Hieracion 910. i. 
lepa^ son of Heracleodorus 984. 
Upa^ father of Heracleus 984. 
l/jo-ovj 924. 15; 925. 4. 
lovXiavos 992. 
lovXiavos, OvaXepivs /^io(rK0vpi8r]s alsO Called 

Jul., logistes 900. 3. 
lovXiavos, *Xaoutos 'l. acting defensor 901. 3. 
lovKios We^avBpoi father of Pausanias 936. i . 

lovXios 2npairio)v 919. 2, 1 1 (.''). 
louXioy, rdioy 'I. 'Aprmi'LOS 972. 
lovaros 936. 18. 
lovaTos monk 994. 
lovaros, 6 ayios 'I. 941. 3. 

lauK, ^Xaovios 'l. defensor 902. i. 



KXapcs 968. 

KXavdia 'ifftScopa 919. 7. 

KXav8ios, TilSeptos KX. Ffpivos alsO Called 

Gaion(?) 916. 11. 
KXavbios, Ti^tpios KX. Ai8v>iof gymnasiarch 

908. 6. 
KXcoStoj KovXKiavos praefect 895. 8. 
KoXXovdcs 934. 6. 
Kon-pevy 934. 7, 8, II. 

KopeXXaWf, MmKios K. epistrategus 899. 30. 
KopvT}Xiav6s, Avpr]Xios K. prytanis 891. 6. 
KopvriXios son of Pekusis 899. 49. 

Koppi]Xios TroiKiXTfjs 980. 

KovXkiovos, KXa>8ios K. praefect 895. 8. 

Kvpla 914. 3. 
Ki^piAXa 93i. II. 

AfQ)vi8r]s, AvprjXtos A. strategus 890. 4. 
AovKios 928. I. 

Aoujftoy KfpeX[ ^aviavos 965. 

AouKtof 2enTipios AlpfjXios Xapanioiv also called 

Apolinarius, prytanis 890. i. 
AvKos 984. 
AvKos son of Horus and father of Eudaemon 

984. 
AvKocppoov father of Orseutes 984, 



A a 



354 



INDICES 



Ma/capiof, AvprjXios M. SOn of JoSCph 902. 2, 

1 8. 

Mapia 992. 

Map'ivos tow-merchant 893. 4, 5, 8. 
Marcus Ulpius Primianus praefect 894. 4. 

MapKos fifiCcov 893. 2, 4. 

Marptas, 'HpaxXijoy also called Mat. 898. 6. 
Marpeifa daughter of Heracleus also called 

Matreas 898. 5. 
Mrjvis 943. I. 

Mrjvas pei^oTepos 922. 21. 
Mrjvas TTpOKOVpaTap 943. 2. 

Mr]v68(opos son of Horus 905. 2, 15. 
Mu'i/ctos KopeXXtai/ds epistrategus 899. 30. 

Movels 983. 

Mvadas son of Heraclcus 986. 
Mibpos father of Heracles 905. 17. 

^enariavos, AvpfjXtos N. prytanis 892. 6. 
NecrTr^<^<j father of Heron 918. iii. 12. 
NtKai-wp 929. I, 26. 
Nt'wapoy olKovopos 929. I, 25. 
Ntwovr 941. I {.''). 

'Ovr](Tas father of Apollonius also called 

Didymus 909. 3. 
'Ovvacppis 918. ii. 7. 
'Owco0ptf father of Dius 986. 
'Ovvcocjipis son of Dius and father of Ancho- 

rimphis 918. ii. 11, 18, 23, xi. 20; 986. 
'OvvSxppis son of Horus 918. iii. 7. 
'Ovva^pis son of Orseutes 984. 
'opaevTTjs son of Lycophron and father of 

Onnophris 984. 
OvaXtpios ' Apfioiviavos also called Gerontius, 

logistes 896. i, 23; 983. 
OvaXepios Ain<TKovpi8r]s also Called Julianus, 

logistes 900. 3. 
OvaXtpios Evdaificov pracfect 899. 29. 

OviAfpios, <P\aovios Ov. TIofMnrjiavot praefect 

888. I. 
'O^ieuy father of Sisuphis 984. 

naavov(f)is 984. 
no^ivos 901. 8, 9. 
Uayavis 989. 

llahiBvuoi father of Aurelius Harmiusis 913. 

5, 22. 
nafjiTios father of Aurelius Papnoutius 897. 6. 
Ua^aios father of Aurelius Patapis 897. 5. 



Hapovdios p.fi^a>v 893. I. 

nav{(TV€vi freedman, father of Petarpo- 

cration 984. 
navf(f)pfppis father of Apollonius 918. iii. 8. 
Tiai'fippeppis father of Ision 918. ii. 19. 
nav'ipff pLfi^av son of John 893. i. 
Ilavovpis father of Aurelius Patutis 912. 6. 
HanivovTios, AvpfjXios II. SOU of Paesius 897. 6. 

JJapexanjs 984. 

riaptj, AvprjXios II. also called Zeuxianus, chief- 
priest elect 970. 

Uapfieviav 899. 27, 30. 

Ilao-twi/ public banker 916. 6, 12, 15. 

llao-iW smith 989. 

iiaa-icov, Avpt]\ioi U. senator, son of Horion 

892. 2. 
Uaaroiovs father of Ammonas 986. 
UaTa^Tjs son of Aurelius Psois 895. 5. 

narams, AvprjXios II. SOU of PaesiuS 897. 4. 
nar^^tj 984. 
UarpLKios {?) 922. 7. 

narpcov father of Harmiusis 986. 

Uarvvis father of Arneous 918. ii. 15. 

Iiarwty son of Heron 918. ii. 11, 19, 23, iii. 12. 

UaTiiTts, AvprjXios II. SOU of Pauouris 912. 6. 

liavXlvos collector of corn-dues 976. 

iiavaavias SOU of Julius Alexander 936. i. 

Tlav(f>u)is 984. 

UfKoXcipios (?) 992. 

DeAwpoj 918. xiii. 13. 

Il€KV(Tis father of Kopvr'jXios 899. 49. 

niv^a 989. 

Tlevfovpis son of Dius 986. 

JJeveovpis father of Heracleus 986. 

Ufveovpis son of Heracleus 986. 

ne(roCpts father of Theabesis 918.ii.i2, 22, 24. 

U(TnpTTuKpaTio)P son of Panesneus 984. 

UfTeaopcpiapis SOU of Phanias 986. 

UeTeaov^^os 985. 

UeT((Tovxos son of Ammonas 986. 
ntrlpis son of Aurelius Sakaon 895. 4. 
UfTo^iia-Tis ropemaker 934. 4. 

II(Tov(f)a>is 984. 

Uerpdyvios exceptor 942. 6. 

nXfi3 horse 922. 13. 

nXovTapxr] 906. 4, 7, 10. 

nXovroytV/;y 933. 27. 

nopnrjiavos, 'tXaovios OvaXepios U.praefect 888.1. 

novfjpis 986. 

novXcptpfios, Taios II, Ti^tp'ivos 972. 



V. PERSONAL NAMES 



355 



Uovva-is 984. 
Upaovi 996. 

upflaKa, AvprjXia *lo-(8d)pa also Called Prisca 

907. 4, i6, 21. 
UpeiaKiWa 935. iiitrod. 
Primianus, Marcus Ulpius P. praefect 894. 4. 
ni-oXf /xalof 930. 30. 
llToXf polos basilicogrammateus 986. 
IlToXfpaios son of Dionysius 910. 56. 
nroXe/iatof son of Hcraclcus and father of 

Heracles 984. 
iiToXepalos, AvpijXtof 11. son of Hicraciacna 

970. 
TiToXepats, AiiprjXiii H. daughter of Hermogenes 

also called Eudaemon 907. 3, n, 14. 
jiToXepfivos also called Sarmates, exegetes 

891. 8. 

nroXXiW 899. 21. 

nToXXiW father of Aurelius Ptollion909. 1,37. 
nroXKiuv, AvpT]Kios n. son of PtoUion 909. 

I, 37- 

'Pobiav father of Ammonius 986. 

Sabina, Ulpia S. 894. 6. 

2a^lvos 907. 15 ; 932. 9. 

2aXo/3ij 989. 

2apovf)X ■nepiffKemos 994. 

2apandpp<i>v father of Teos 910. 3, 48. 

^apanas father of Anteis 976. 

^apuTTias 912. 2. 

2iipamas daughter of Herodes 988. 
'S.apanlwv 890. I ; 912. 2; 918. V. iS; 935. 
14, 23 ; 968; 991. 

"S.apaKiwv son of Belleos 985. 

l,apaTTia>i> ex-agoranomus, father of Apollonius 

and Domittianus 890. 15. 
lapaTricov also called Horion, son of ... on 

908. I, 44. 
2apamcov, strategus of Sebennytus 931. i, 15. 

2apania)v, AvprjKios 2. also Called Apeis, 

senator 977. 
2apania)v, Avpr]\ios 2. also Called Theon 960. 

2apani(ov, Aovkios 2(TTTipios AvptjXios 2. also 

called Apolinarius, prytanis 890. i. 

^apanlav, ^Xaovios 2. SOn of Horion 913. 24. 
2apano8o)pa 932. 9. 

2apanovs also called Agathoclia, daughter of 

Aristion 964. 
2apas 974. 

A 



2apas, AvpTj'Kios 2. 921. introd. 

2appdTr]s, AvprjXios 2. elder 897. 5. 

2appdTT]s, iiroXe/Lierj/os also called Sarm.,exegetes 

891. 8. 
2apTroKpaTis 984. 
2aTovpviuoi pTjTOip 899. 21. 

^aTovpvivos, AlpiXios 2. praefcct 899. 10 ; 

916. 9. 
2i^a<TTeivos 928. 10. 
2fvapovv 999. 

^fvouvaxppis daughter of Heracleus 984. 

2fvnave(TV€vs daughter of Panesneus 984, 

2ev7rapal6is daughter of Panesneus 984. 

2ei/7rTdXXif 984. 

2€VTpis 984. 

2fvv(l)ii 984. 

2ev(f)a>is daughter of Lycus 984. 

2€vxfpfvevs 984. 

2(nTipios, AovKios 2. AupjjXtoy 2apani(t)v also 

called Apolinarius, prytanis 890. i. 

^fprjvos 935. I. 

2fprjvos banker 943. i, 5. 

2ep^vos father of Serenus 909. 10. 

2eprjvos son of Scrcuus 909. 10. 

2fprji/os, Avpri\Los 2. son of Aurclius Ammo- 
nius 909. 8. 

^ep^vos, AvprjXios 2. SOU of Daniel 914. 5. 

2fv6r]s, AvprjXios 2, also Called Horion, logistes 
895. 3. 

2iXj3av6s father of Aurelius Dioscorus 900. 4. 

2iav(t)is son of Ophieus and father of Sisuphis 
984. 

2i(Tv(})is pastophorus, son of Sisuphis 984. 

2oKoi'w7riy father of Ameous 918. ii. 14. 

2o^ia daughter of Marcus 893. 4, 5, 8, 

2Tf(pavos TTpOVOrjTTJS 999. 
2Te(f)ai>os, AvpTjXios 2. 934. I, 1 7. 

2Tou5tG)(TOf, *Xautos 2. dioecetes 899. introd., 2. 

2vpos 936. 5. 

2(}}payis 984. 

2oiT fjpixos, AvpriXios 2. son of Didymus 909. 1 2, 

Taap^s daughter of Harmieus 918. iii. 8. 
Taapavios, AvptjXia T. daughter of Sarapion 

991. 
Taavovcpis 984. 
Taappiva-is 909. 12. 
Tdl3r) 996. 

TaBvvp . . . 899. 31. 
TaKaXXirmos 905. 2. 

a 2 



356 



INDICES 



Tavovpis 984. 
Tadp 937. I, 31. 

Taop, Xlprjkia T, daughter of Castor 913. 5, 22. 

TanavT) 996. 

TaTTT)Tap{ioi'i) 999. 

Tanrixis 984. 

Tao-aTo/Sotf daughter of Onnophris 918. ii. 6. 

Tao-otrar 937. 26. 

TaTi'ayoCr 084. 

TauaopaTTtf 905. 4. 

Tavcfims 984. 

Ta^ZiStf 984. 

Tayf^co^dis 984. 

Tea:\/^tf 984. 

Tfpfw 984. 

TfpfXa( ) 984. 

Tev<|)coi)f 984. 

Tewf son of Sarapammon 910. 3, 48. 
Ti^f plvos rdios HovXcpfpvios T. 972. 
Ti^tpiof 'AXf'^ai/Spof praefect 899. 28. 
Tt^f'pios K\av8ios TeptfoE also called Gaion (?) 

916. II. 
Ti^epiosKXavdioi At'Su/ios gymnasiarch 908. 6. 
Tlypios 932. I. 
Ti^dtr 929. 7. 
Tip6d(os ordinarius 942. 7. 
Towvo-af 984. 
Taevfjais 935. 28. 

Ulpia Sabina 894. 6. 

Ulpius, Marcus U. Primianus praefect 894. 4. 

^avias father of Petesorphiomis 986. 
^avlas son of Pctesorphiomls 986. 

'tarpfvi 984. 

^arpds, Aiovda-ios also Called Phat., father of 
Didymus 898. 4. 

^aiaros 900. I 5 ; 985. 

^i\oti6(rKopos 907. I I . 

<ti\6Kvpos 937. 15. 

*iXdi/KOf strategus 898. 26 ; 957. 

^iXo^evns 922. 14, 16; 936. 20. 

*tXd^*i/of magisirianus 904. 2. 

4><Xocrrt'0ai/of 984. 
^Xa^iavos 939. I, 32. 
^Xaovios 904. I. 

^Xaoviot Aiovvadpiot riparius 897. 3. 
^Xaovios EvXoyioi riparius 897. 3. 
♦Xaoinof Evo-t/3tor logistes 892. I. 



^Xaovtos 'lovXiavos acting defensor 901. 3. 
^Xaovios'lvuK defensor 902. i. 

'tXaovios OiaXepiOi Hopnrjiavos praefeCt 888. I. 
<^Xaovios 2apaTrio)v SOn of Horion 913. 24. 

^XaVlOS AlOCTKQpQS fTrOTTTTjS flpfjUTJS 991. 

<^Xavws STovSt'wo-os dioecetes 899. introd., 2. 

^oi^dpp.(ov 941. 8. 

<I>o(/3d/xpwv father of Apollos 893. 2. 

*ot/3dppojj/ comes 994. 

^oijSdppav ex-councillor 902. 4. 

^oi^dfxptov (ppovTi(TTT]i 940. 5. 

^oi^dp-p-av )((ipi,aTT]i 995. 

Xaipdp.fjLU)v 926. 6 (?). 
Xaiptai 900. 15. 

XaiprjpLcjiv son of Anchorimphis 918. xi. 20. 
Xatprjfjicov father of Aurelius Isidorus 912. 10. 
Xaiprjpav strategus 970. 

Xaipr]p.cov, AvprjXios X. 934. I, I'J. 

Xfp.(vfvs 984. 

XpicrrSi 924. 15; 925. 4. 

XcooCj 903. 26, 28, 31. 

Xaovs son of Heracleus 897. 8, 13. 

"iravTis 984. 

^(vapLovvii son of Dioscorus 989. 

"irevTovs 984. 

"^ipaidrji 984. 

*a)<j 984. 

'ClffifXia 963. 

'ilpiyfurjs 888. 10, 12 ; 918. ii. 3. 

'Qpiav 906. 10. 

'Qployv father of Aurelius Pasion 892. 2. 

'Qpi'wi' also called Berenicianus, gymnasiarch 

908. 13. 
'Cipiaiv father of Flavius Sarapion 913. 24. 
'Qpicov, AvprjXtos 2fv6i]s also Called Hor., logistes 

895. 3- 
'Slpicov, AvpfjXios 'Si. son of Aurelius Hermo- 

genesalso called Eudaemon 907. 3,17, 19. 
'Qpiav, 2,ipanio)i> also Called Hor., son of . . . on 

908. I, 44. 
'Qpof 900. 15. 

*Qpos father of Anchorimphis 918. xi. 21. 
*Qpos father of Aurelius Amois 897. 4. 
*Qpos son of Auctus 935. introd. 
'Qpof father of Lycus 984. 
*npos father of IMenodorus 905. 2. 
*ilpoi father of Onnophris 918. iii. 7. 



VL GEOGRAPHICAL 



357 



VI. GEOGRAPHICAL. 
(a) Countries, Nomes, Cities, Toparchies. 



(?). 



Aegyptus 894. 3, 4. 
AiyvTTTos 688. I ; 899. introd. 

AtyvTrror 'HpKovXia 896. 29. 

'A\(^dv8peiu889. 10; 899. introd. ; 923.8; 

934. 3; 998. 
Alexandria 894. 4. 
'AvTivofvs 937. 20, 23, 29. 

AvTifois 909. 6. 

AvTivof(i)V noXii 970. 
'Avrti/dov (ttoAis) 903. 29, 33 ; 933. 
'ApaivoLTTjs (^vofi6i) 919. 6; 922. 5. 

Bo/3uXcov 895. 13. 

'E\\t]vik6s 907. 2 ; 990. 

'HpaKKeonoXiTTjs (^vofioi) 899. 23. 
'HpaKXfovs (TToXiy) 922. I 7. 
'HpKovXla, Alyvnros 'UpK, 896. 29. 

KavconiKos 936. 15- 
KwoTToXirr]! (vopos) 921. 21. 
Kvi^oTToXtrwr (TrdXtj), t] avco 902. I. 
KuivaTavTivov ttoXis 922. 15- 

M€n(})ii 919. 4. 
/xepis 986. 

NeiXouTroXtTwy (ttoXis) 942. I . 

vofjios 899. 42 ; 900. 6 ; 913. 6 ; 991. 

o (?) 991. 



"Oao-is 898. 9, 13. MiKpa"0. 888. 8 ; 895. 

19. 
'o$vpvyxlTT}s {vopos) 888. 8 ; 892. i ; 895. 

3; 896.1,23; 898.16; 899. introd., 5, 

16; 900. 3; 901. 3; 905. 6; 916. 7; 

923. 13; 929. 18; 991. 
'O^vpvyxiTwv n6\is 889. 13 ; 890. 4 ; 891. 4 ; 

896. 3, 25; 899. 3; 900. 5; 907. i, 

26; 908. 4, 17; 909. 9; 911. 3; 913. 

4; 914. 4, 20; 990; 999. 
'o^vpvyXfov TToXty 888. 7, 8, II ; 898-4; 

909. I ; 910. I ; 911. 12 ; 912. 3. 
Oxyrhynchus (? Oxyrhynchorum urbs) 894. 

7. 

nayos, beKaroi n. 900. 6. e tt. 901. 5. 
TloXepcovos /ifpU 986. 

TToXis, = Cynopolis 902. 2. = Nilopolis 942. 
4. = Oxyrhynchus 889. 14, 15 ; 892. 3, 
9 ; 896. 9, 30 ; 899. 6 ; 904. 4 ; 908. 6 ; 
909. 13; 910, 3; 911. 5; 914. 6; 962. 

jiTcoj/ TToXtf 895. 15. TToXets 902. ro. 

npo(Tu)niTr)s 919. 5. 

'Papaioi 919. 7. 

2f^evvvT0v ava toitoi 931. 1 5. 

Tonapxia, dnrjXMTov (Oxyrh.) 910. 5- V ^o""- 
(noXfp.(i)vos fiepiSoi, Arsin.) 986. 2e/3ff wrou 

aVCi) TOTTOt 931. 15' 



(^) Villages, k-noiKia^ ro-noi. 
I. Oxyrhynchite. 



'Ahtv 989. 
'A^^iovTof roVoi 999. 
'AttoXXwi'os Kw/Ltj; 893. 2. 
'Ao-kXou 922. I. 



EvayyeXfiov 998. 
EuTu;(tuSof (noiK. 996. 



ZaniTov, 'icTfioj' Z. 897. 6. 

'HpuKXeiou ino'iK. 989. 

earjaios 998. 
Oeayei/ovf 998. 
eSxr^is 989. 

'1/3(0)1/ 998. 



358 



INDICES 



*UfjLr] 997. 

'la-flov ZawiTov 897. 6. 
'lo-eloj/ Uayya 899. 7 ; 988. 
'lo-eloi/ Tpv(pu>vos 989. 
"lorpov 907. 8. 

Kopai/fwrr;? 922. 24, 25. 

Aa^awas N^crof 998. 
AtvKabiov N^fTos 998. 
AouKtou 922. 25 ; 998. 

MatOV/iS TOTTOf 999. 

Mapyapirov tSttoi 999. 
MeXiVa 998. 
M(pixfp0a 912. 7. 
Meo-Kaj/oiins 998. 
Movipov 979. 
Mouxtvwp 985. 
Mo{);^is inoLK, 996. 
Maa 907. 24. 

NfiXou (itoIk, 997. 
f^tKavOis 998; 1003. 
N^<7os Aaxavlas 998. 
N^CTof AfVKabiov 998. 
NiKijTOU 998. 

'OorpaKiVou 998. 
OvpfLf)l3T 922. 17. 

00770, 'lo-fTor n. 899. 7 j 988. 

nayyouXffi'ov 998 ; 999. 

UaKepKT) 910. 4, 7, 32 ; 998. 

liaXXwo-i? or riaXwo-iy 922. 23 ; 998. 

Uaviw 989. 

ne'Xa 970. 

UiTVT) 932. 3 ; 997. 

Uovxis 966. 

IlToXf/ia eVotK. 989. 



nrmxis 913. 6. 
SaSoXou 895. introd. 

2ap^a6a> 903. 1 9. 
2ei( 907. 10. 
Serao) 938. 3. 

^€vfK€\ev 899. 7 ; 979. 
ifvfTTTa 909. 17 ; 979. 

SciTcoXei/a) 981. 

2fp{;^ts 899. 7; 970; 989; 991. 2fpv- 

(j)€a>s noXis 960. 
26(/)a) 907. 9; 997; 998. 

Sti/TefcX?; enoiK. 989. 
2k(\ovs 998. 
Sko) 979. 
2navia 922. 4. 
2T€<pavca)vos 998. 

Taapnepov 901. 4 ; 989 (?). 
ToKoX/etXts (?) 997. 
TaKova 998. 
TaXaw 917. I. 

TapneTi 895. 5 ; 997 ; 998. 

Tavdts 997. 
Tapovdivov 998. 
Tapov(re/3r 998. 
Te^en' 997. 
Tfpvdis 998. 
T^if 989. 
TiWcovos 998. 
Tpixpauos, 'la-eiou T. 989. 

ipO^OOV (or ^OKOOu) rOTTOi 973. 

Xioi^T (? not Oxyrhynchite) 925. 6. 
Xvo-ts 899. 6, 36 ; 934. 7. X. aW 989. 

1'w^(9iy 905. 2. 

'fl^if 922. 2, 22 ; 989. 



'l/^twi/ 'Apyaiov 918. V. 17. 



a. Arsinoite. 

1 'O^vpilyxa 986. 



Bouo-fTptf 899. 22. 
QivTTipii 899. 22. 



3. Hevacleopolite. 

'^iXoviKov 965. 



VII. RELIGION 



359 



{c) a(j.(f)oba of Oxyrhynchus. 



Apofiov QoTjpidos 911. 13. 
Inntoyp Ilapefi^oXfjs 964. 



Kpr]ir28os 984. 

NOTOU KprjTTidos 912. II. 



(d) Tribe and Deme (Antinoite). 

Nfpovidvftos 6 Koi Ttvfdpxfios 970. 

(e) Miscellaneous (Buildings, KXijpoi, ovaCai, &c.). 



'Adpiava, Tpaiava 'A8p. Beppa 896. 7. 
Ap;^€7rdXt8os KXrjpos 988. 
^aXave'iov drjpoaiov 896. 8. Cf. 892. 8. 
AiovvcTiddos vopa'i 899. inti'od., 6. 

AlOVVCTfloV 908. 8. 

Aiowarotapiavq ovtria (Arsinoite) 986. 

biapv^ TfKvdvis (Arsinoite) 918. ii. 3, 13, iii. 

6, 13. 8. ^ayrjovs OV ^aKrjovs (Arsinoitc) 
918. V. 17, 21. p(yd\r)8. 988. 

Otppa Tpaiavd 'A8piavd 896. 'J. 

'l(T(lov, TO ava 'l(T. 907. 8. 

Kkripos ' Apx(n6\i8os 988. 

KvpiaKov 903. 19, 21. 



"KovTpoi/, 8r]p6(nov X. 892. II. X. tov npoaaTfiov 

915. 2. 
paprvpiov 941 4. 

vopai Aiopvaid8os 899. ititrod. 6. 

ovcria Aiovvcro8ci)piavrj (Arsinoite) 986. 

7rpod<TT(iov 915. 2. 

ttuXj; jBoppivT] 892. 8. 

2a^r]T(^ ), o-coX))!' Xfyo/aei'os 2. 1002. 

2apanf'iou 923. 1 4. 

TfKvdvis Siwpv| (Arsinoite) 918. ii. 3, 13, iii. 

6, 13; 

Tpaiavd 'A8piavd Otppd 896. 7- 

^ayr]ovs OX ^aKiJous 8iS)pv^ (Arsinoitc) 918. V. 

17, 21. 



'AttoXXo)!', ^eoj /x/ytoTos 984. 
'Ap7J, ^eof pfyidTos 984. 
'A^po8lTr) 921. 2 2. 



VII. RELIGION. 

(i) Pagan. 

(iz) Gods. 



Aiofvo-os 917. 3 (?). 

6ioi 933. 7 ; 935. 3, 10 ; 936. 5. 



{b) Temples. 



Aiowfff'iov 908. 8. 

Upov 'AnoWavos 984. Jfp.'Apecos 984. 



dpx"P'"'<^<''"f 911. 2. 
dp\itpevi 970. 



7raaTo(})6pLov 984. 
SapaTTeiox' 923. 9. 



(^) Priests. 

nnaTo(l>6pos 984. 



360 



INDICES 



ioprrj, fj.(yd\T] iop. 933. 1 3. 

6v(ria 923. 7. 

ifim avvo8os 908. 9. 



(d) Miscellaneous. 



IfpovUrjs 908. 9. 

(TTTOvdr) AlOVVCTOV (?) 917. 3. 



(2) Christian. 
(a) Divine Titles. 

'A/3pacra^ 924. I 7. | 'l/jcrovy Xpiords 924. 15; 925. 4. 

hiGTx6Tr\% 6i6s 939. 4. 6 ra'r oXcoi' 5f(rrr. 939. ' Kvpios 925. 4 ; 943. 7. 
29. i p^rrjp 924. 15. 

(9eds- 903. 37 ; 941. 8 ; 942. 3, 4 ; 943. 9. naT^jp 924. 15. 

6(6% fifo-TTOTrjs 939. 4. 6t6s C^f 924. 11. ! nveiipa ayiav 924. 16. 
^eoj TravToKparap 925. I. I vidf 924. I 5. 



((^) Ecclesiastical Titles. 



Mkovo% 993 (.''). 
fni(TKoTros 903. 15. 



I\i^ptvX, 6 ay(oy T. 993. 
€KKk)](Tia, 17 oyi'a e/<(cX. 993. 
lovaros, 6 ayios 'l. 941. 4. 



/^lofd^o)!/ 994. 

oiKovop-oi Tov ayiov ^h)\j<TTuv 941. 4. 



(t) Miscellaneous. 



papTvpioP 941. 4. 
cj(9 (= 6p^v) 925. 7. 
XMy 940. I ; 995. 



VIII. OFFICIAL AND MILITARY TITLES. 



dyopavopljcrns 890. 16; 910. 2. 

diTdp;;(coi' 907. 2 1. 

«p|ay 900. 4 ; 990. 

dpxi(po8os 969. 

dpxtfpciT€V(Tai 911. 2. 

dpxitpfvs 970. 

npxwi' 907. 2 1 ; 922. 3, 19. 

^aaiXiKos ypap.p.aTevs [a^ 'O^vpvyxirov. 'Eppo- 
8a>pos, Sta8e;(d/xfi'0f Km rrjv crTpaTtjyiav (a. D. 
123) 898. I. 'Appaviavos, 8ia8fx- <o-i Trjv 
(TTpaT. (a. D. 1 99) 899. 34, 36. (d) 'Apa-ivoi- 
Tov TloXfpoopos p.(pi8os. .n.ToXfpa'ios (a. D. 

131-2) 986. 
l3or]e6s 976. Cf. Index XI. 
fiov\evTi)s 888. 8 ; 892. 2 ; 900. 4 ; 907. i ; 

911. 3; 977; 984. 
^ovKtj, f] KparlaTT] Q. 891. 5 ; 892. 5. 



ypapparevs. See ^uaiXiKos ypap.. 
yvpvaaiapxrjs 908. 1 5 ', 977. 
yvpva(TLapxt']o-as 908. 3. 

8lOlKT]TT]S, ^XaVlOS StOuSiCOCTOS 6 KpaTKTTOi 8wiK. 

(a. d. 200) 899. intiod., i, 37. 

fK8iKiav O^vpvyxiTov 8ioiKa>v 901. 3. 
e/cSticof 902. 10, 18. €k8. TTJs avco KvroTroXiraif 
902. I. 

(^r]yr]T(V(Tai 908. I3, I4 ; 909. 9. 

fhyiT^s 891. 9, 10 ; 907. i ; 911. 2 ; 977. 

f^Tjy. 'O^vpvyx^Tov Koi MiKpds 'Odo-fwy 888. 8, 
i^Kinrc^p 942. 6 (.?). 
(Trapxos, lovvios Bdacros Kcii ^Xaovios A/3Xa'/3toy 

oi XannpoTaToi enapxot (a. D. 33 1 ) 990. 

Cf. fjyepo}}'. 



VIII. OFFICIALS AND MILITARY TITLES 



361 



e7rt(7Tpdr»j70f 899. 25. MtfiKios KoptWiavos 

(TTKTTp. (a.d. 146-7) 899. 30. 
(TTOTTTTjs flprjvrjs 991. 
€v6r]vidp)(T]S 908. 5) 16. 
(v6j]VLapxwv 908. 19. 

Tjyffiovevaas. See fiytfjiav. 

fjyffiav 899. 25; 904. 10. Tt^e'ptos 'AXe- 
^av^poi (a.d. 69) 899. 28. OvaXepins 
Kvdnificov rjytpLOVivCFat (a. D. I 4 1— 2) 899. 29. 

M. Ulpius Primianus (.^), praefectus Ae- 

gypti 894. 4. 6 XapnpoTaTos f]y. AlfiiXios 

:£aTovpi''vos (a.d. 198) 816. 10, (a.d. 200) 

899. 10. AvprjXiiJS 'AvTiovlvos 6 KpuTia-roi 

(? identical with Aip. 'AvtIpoos, vice-praefect 

in A.D. 215—6) 970. ^\aovioi OvaXtpioi 
HopTTrjiavos 6 diacrrjpoTaTos enapxos (a. D. 287) 
888. I. KXwStos KovXKiavos 6 8taar]p. fjy. 
(a. D. 305) 895. 7. 6 KoaTKTTOs fjyfpav 

(unnamed) 931. 8 ; 967. 

y'jyovpevus AlyvTVTOv 'WpKovKtias (a. D. 3^6) 
896. 28. 

loTpos, 8t]p6(tlos tur. 896. 26 j 983. 

Kaarpicnoi (?) 1001. 
Kop-ts 994. 
K(opdpx']S 895. 5- 

KcopoypappoTevs 899. introd., 24,' 36; 970; 
986. 

XoyicTTTjs. AiipTjXios ^ev6r]i 6 Koi 'Slpiav (a. D. 
305) 895. 3. OvaXepios ' Appavtavos 6 Kai 
Tipovrios (a.d. 316) 896. 2, 23; 983. 
OvaXepios Aioo-Kovpi'Srjs 6 koi 'louXiaw? (a. D. 
322) 900. 3. *Xaovtos Evo-f iStoj (a. D. 338) 

892. I. 

payiarpiavos, Ku^cocrtco/ueVor pay. 904. 2. 

pfiCoTfpoi 922. 2 1 ; 943. 3. 

pfiC^^v 893. I ; 900.19; 980. diro ptiCovcov 

893. 2, 3, 4. 

vorapioi 940. 7- 
vvKToarpdrqyos 933. 24. 

oUovopos arpaTijyov (J) 929. 25. Cf. Index 
VII. (2) (^). 



opBivdpios 942. 7- aJTo UTrdrcoi' opSii'apicoi' 999. 
6(f)(f>iKtd\ios 896. 28. 

TToXlTfvdpePOS 902. 12. TToXtTfl/O-d/iei'OS 902. 4. 

TTpay/xaTtKOf 899. I 7, 35, 42, 47- 

praefectus. See rjyepmv. 

npanroaiTos TrarpipaivaXiaiv ^eKdriw ndynv 900. 5- 
■jrpdKTcop 889. 8; 899. 43, 48; 958 (?). 

TTp. dpyvpiKcov 917. I ; 981—2. np. ctitlkCov 

965; 976. 
TTpea-^fvTi'js 933. 31. 
irpta-^vTfpoi KcopTjs 918. xi. 3, 12. 
irpoKovpdrap 943. 2. 

TTpO^eVOS ^OvXfVTcbl' 984. 

npoT7oXiTev6p€P()s 913. 4. 

npvravis 907. I. evapx'*^ npvT. 889. 1 3 ; 
890. 3 ; 891. 7 ; 892. 5. 

pmdpio^ 897. 3; 904. 3, 

(TiToXoyoi 973 ; 986. 

(TTpar-qyia 911. 8. ^aaiXiKos ypapparevs 8ia8exd- 
pevos Ka\ Tr}v (TTp. See ^aaiXiKoi ypap. 

(TTparriyos (rt) 'O^vpvyxiTov. ^lXovikos (a. D. 
123) 898. 26 ; 957. ^io(f)dp[T}s] (a.d. 200) 
899. introd. 'Ani(op(?) (late second or 
third cent.) 929. 25. Xaiprjpoip (early third 
cent.) 970. AfcowSf;s (third cent.) 890. 5. 
Unnamed 899. 17, 42. ^aaiXiKos ypap- 

parevs SiaSe^j^o/xej/oy koi tijp crrp. See (Saa. 
yp. (^) If^evpvTov avco TonciP. '2apa7ritx>v 

(second cent.) 931. 15. 

(TxoXaaTiKos 902. I. 

TpaTre^irrjs 943. 2, 5- i^aaiXiKos Tp. 916. 1 3, 
16. brjpoaioi Tp. 916. 7. 

VTroToj, dno vnaTdP opbwapiup 999. Cf. Index 

III. 
vnrjpfTtjs 899. 50; 916. 18. 

^vXa| 931. 6 ; 933. 25. 

XapTovXdpios 943. 9. 
Xeipt<TTf]<! 995. 



362 



INDICES 



IX. WEIGHTS, MEASURES, AND COINS. 
{a) Weights and Measures. 

Xirpa 915. 2, 3; 1000-1002. 



ayKoKT) 935. 19. 

apovpa 899. 6, 7, 16; 907. 8, 9, n, 13, 18, 

24; 910. 7, 10, 12, 50; 913. 10, 20 (?); 

916. 8 ; 918. introd. ei saep. ; 935. 21 (?) ; 

986; 988. 
apra^jj 903. 22, 23, 24; 907. 24 J 908. 28, 

35; 910. 10, 18, 52, 55; 918. introd. et 

saep.; 920. i; 932. 5; 934. 10; 960; 

966; 974; 979; 986; 994; 998-9. 

Unusual fractions: ^986. ^^QQQ. ^ 986. 

2V 918. introd. ; 986. 4V 986. ^o 918. 



introd. 



tV 986. 



160 



918. introd. 



BiKOTvXov 937. 27. 
bmXovv 992-3. 

Cfiiyos 936. 15, 16. 

f}Hixovv 936. 7, 9. 

KayKtWos, KayKeWo) SC. ptrpa 994; 999. 

Kepa/itoi;907 24; 919. 8; 961. introd. ; 928. 
12 ; 937. 27. 

KOfMTOV (?) 995. 



fifTpov 910. 21. p. hUarov 907. 24. p. 
Terpaxoiuncov napaXrjrrTiKov tov yfovxov 910. 
34. Kay/ceXXo), SC. /ifrpw 994; 999. ptrpov 

= ji artaba (?) 920. 2. 

/ii/aatoi/. XP^''""'^ KOti/oC araBpco ^O^ypvyxirrj pv. 
905. 5. 

ovyicia 931. 4- 

^eVr/js 921. 23. 

TT^X^s 921. introd. ; 986. n.anXovs, ('p&abos, 

KapapcoTiKos (or -tot) 921. introd. 
UpovairiTrjs (?) 919. 5- 

aapyavT) 938. 3> 6* 

crraQpoi 'O^vpvyx^TrjS 905. 5- 

(TTaTTjp 936. 40. 

TiTpaxoiviKOv perpov. See ptrpov. 
TpixolviKOV 936. 7" 



(^) Coins. 



apyi^pio^ 896. 15, 17; 898. 12; 907.25; 
909. 19; 912. 14. 

Srjvapluv pvpiiis 896. 15} 17- 

bpaxpn 890. i6(?); 895. 13, I5. ^6; 906. 

3; 909. 20; 910. 13, 53; 912. 14; 

916. 12 e/ saep. ; 917. 2, 3, 4, 5 ; 919. 10, 

1 1 ; 920. I e^ saep. ; 934. 6, 7, 9, 10, 1 1 ; 

964; 977; 980-1; 985-6. 
Svo^oXoi 920. I, 5, 6 ; 971; 981. 

fjpia^iXiov 917. 2. 

KfpaTiov 998. 

pvaaiov, xpv<Tov pv. 905. 5. 



vopiapa 922. 14, 16, 18, 22, 23, 26. 
vopiapiriov 914. 9, 10 ; 995 ; 999. 'A\f^av- 
Bpdas vop. 998. 

o/3oX6f 917. 4, 5 ; 920. 3 ; 971 ; 981 ; 985. 

nepTu^oXov 917. 4. 

ToKavTov 898. 12; 907. 25. 
T£Tpa)/3oXoj/ 917. 3 ; 985. 
rpiu^oKov 985. 

XoKkSs 936. 17. 
XaXKois 917. 3 ; 981. 
Xpvaiov 995 (?). 

Xpvo-dy 914. 9, 10; 995. XP- '^""'"^ tXTadpa, 
'O^vpvyxiTrj pvaaiop 905. 5- 



XL GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 363 



apyvpiKCi 981—2. 



X. TAXES. 

^ivia 931. 7. 



btKarrj napoiXKav (?) 997. 

8rjfi6(Tia, TCI 8. 903. 31 (?) ; 910. 23 ; 913. 17 ; 
932. 4. 

iKTr] 917. 2. 

f'napovpiov 917. 3 ; 981. 

(TTiKkaa-iios 899. 9. 

ri),T,+ {= oySo'r;?) 916. 7, I 7, 20. 

M{p(j)eu)s Ti\rj 919. 3. 
fX(Tpr]p.a 909. 2 2. 

vav^iov 917. 2. 

faOXof (fioptrpov (?) 917. 2. 



oy8d»7. See »;\ 
ovaiaKu 986. 

1Tri\l(TpOS TTf pi(TT(paV<t)U 981. 

o-tTtKa 965 ; 976 ; 986. 

<Tirov8f) Aiovvcrov (?) 917. 3- 

TiXj] Mfp(pecos 919. 3. 
reXov^cj/a 899. 9. 

<^dpof 899. 40. Cf. Index XI. 



XI. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS. 



d0apr]s 933. 29. 
d^dcTKavTos 930. 23. 
d^0T]dr]T0s 899. 44. 
cijSpoxos 910. 27. 
a/3a)Xof 988. 

dyios 924. 16; 925. i; 941. 4; 993. 

dyKoKr] 935. 19. 
ayvoia 923. 9. 

dyopd^fiv 922. II, 22 ; 933. 29, 30. 

dyopavonrjaas 890. 1 6 ; 910. 2. 
dyopaapos 962. 
dypdy 967. 
dyavia 939. I 2. 

d8eX(^.j 930. 23 ; 931. 1 1 ; 935. 4 ; 936. 12 ; 

937. 2, 9, 31 ; 964; 967. 
dSeX^iSoCf 888. II. 
dbe\4)i.K6s 942. 2, 5. 
dbf\(i)6s 892. 3, 12 ; 902. 5 ; 903. 15 ; 904. 

6 ; 907. 25 ; 928. 2 ; 929. 2, 21 ; 934. 

2 ; 935. 2, 6, 23 ; 942. 6 ; 943. 9 ; 995. 
dSfX^oTjjr 943. I. 
dhiKtXv 898. 7 ; 901. 11 ; 902. 11. 
abiKos 902. 17. dhUois 902. 7. 



SSoXof 910. 33; 988. 
aet' 935. 9. 
d(rjpios 904. 5« 
drjSiCdv 942. 5. 
a% 988. 
SdXios 904. 6. 

atyiaXtrtj 918. xiii. 10. 
alyidkos 918. xi. 5, I 4. 
aWptov 911. 14 ; 986. 
alpuv 892. 6; 906. 7; 909. 27; 913. 11. 

aipeiv 903. 10, II, 28, 30, 35. 

aipecTis 907. 4. 

ahf'iv 898. 18, 23. 

aicoftor 996. 

dKadapaia 912. 26. 

a/caj/^a 909. 1 7, 24, 28. 

aKivdwos 910. 2 2 ; 914. lO. 

dKXivTjs 904. 9. 

dKOT] 904. 9. 

aKoXou^eti/ 931. 9. 

dfcoXov^of 899. introd. ; 938. 2. d/coXou^wf 

899. 30, 33,46; 916. 9; 964. 
dKpt/3coTfpos 899. introd. 



3^4 



INDICES 



aKpiBos 910. 33 ; 888. 
oKvpos 906. 8, 9. 

OKCoXuTCOJ 912. 19. 
OKCOJ/ 939. 12. 

aKfi6eta 925. 5. 

uX^dfiv 908. 26, 34. 

oKr^eivos 925. 2. 

dX^TjXf-yyvr] 913. 7, i8, 23; 918. ii. 15, 20, 

iii. 13. 
d\\l]Xav 906. 3; 909. 19. 
liWos 895. 14; 899. 10, 13, 36; 902. 15; 

903. 28; 904. 4, 5; 906. 5; 913. 16; 

918. ii. 17, iii. r, 2, 15; 921. 13; 922. 

23, 25; 929. 15; 939. 3; 940. 3, 4; 

984; 988; 999. 
dAXdrptoj 929. 21 ; 963. 
aX(j)a 929. intiod. 
uXunxia 918. xi. 4, 16, 18. 
oXojs 910. 32 ; 988. 
apa 903. 3; 904. 7; 905. 13; 907. 24; 

910. 19 ; 939. 23; 975. 

aixeXe'iv 934. 9, 12. 
dfjifpinvflv 930. 8. 
dufpipvos 933. 20. 
cip^v (q(9) 925. 7. . . 
apfJLOS 988. 

dpneXiKos 907. 8; 909. 15. 
apntXoi 909. 23. 
(IpTreXovpyos 985. 
dpTTfXcov 967. 

ap(f)o8ou Oil. 13; 912. II ; 964; 984. 
dpipoTfpoi 895. 5 ; 896. 25 ; 964. 
dmISaivfLv 898. 15; 932. 8; 935. 13. 
dva^oXddiov 921. 1 7. 

dva^oXfj 888. 5 ; 909. 25, 29 ; 913. 20. 

di/al3o\ov 936. 24. 

dmyiyi'coo-Kfti' 899. 26, 27, 3 1 ; 930. 1 4. 

dpayKoios 895. lO. dvayKai(Oi 898. 36 ; 899. 

II. 
dvayKt] 900. 18. 

dpnypd(t)uv 899. intfod. 

dvaypa(f)r] 899. 46. 
dva(r]T(li> 897. 9. 
(i^QKa^^CT^at 939. 25. 

dvaXap^dvfiv 899. introd., 37 ; 902. 7 ; 
985. 

dfaArjil/^tf 986. 
dvaXi.(TK(iv 985. 

dvd\o)pu 891. 13; 900. 11; 929. introd.; 
936. 43; 971; 985; 999. 



dpap.(Tprj(Tis 918. introd., xi. 5, 14. 

avavbpos 899. 44* 
dvapnd^dv 898. 21. 
dvaarpfCpfiv 907. I7> 
dva(T(f)dXX(iv 939. 5* 
', dvarpoTrf] 902. II. 
dvacpaiveiv 939. 4. 
dva(p(p€iv 916. 8. 
dvnrpopiov 898. 37. 
dvfKTOTfpop 939. 25. 
dufvdvvos 906. 8. 
dfexfo-Oai 903. 36. 
«f«\/r(dj 907. 2 2. 

dvijp 893. i; 898. lo; 899. i8, 26; 905. 
5 : 907. 20. 

dvievai 902. I 6. 

annus 894. i. 

duoiKobopuv 986. 

dvTdp)(^cov 907. 21. 

dfTiyeov^os 943. 8. 

dvT iypd(l)€ IV QQT. 19. 

dvTiypa(f>ov 899. inlrod., ^^. 

dpTiXap^avfiv 892. 9. 

dvTiXrj'^is 900. 13. 

dpTi7roi(l.(rdai 899. 43. . 

dvTLs 941. 4. 

dvrXup 971; 985. 

(ivrXTjCTis 971. 

t'lvvSpos 918. ii. 10. 

dpvnfpda-ois 912. 21; 913. 17, 19; 914. 14. 

civio 902. I ; 907. 8 ; 922. 2, 8; 831. 15; 

989. dvcoTepto 940. 3. 
d^ionicTTos 893. I. 
n^iof 899. 13; 912. 30. 
d^iodp 898. 37; 899, 26, 47; 900. 14; 

902. 13 ; 913. 24; 989. 

dTTayopfvfiv 899. 24, 28. 
diraiTf'ip 890. 7; 929. 7 ; 939. 17. 
dnairrjcris 899. 40, 43, 48. 
d7raXXayi7 905. II, 13, I4. 
drraXXdaatip 893. 9 ; 899. 16, 26, 31. 
dnaPTap 903. 12, 28. 
dnapairrjTos 900. 12 ; 904. 9. 
dTraprt^fti' 908. 23 ; 936.22. 
dnm 939. 4 ; 943. 9. 
dntXfCdfpos 898. 10; 884. 
dn(PTevd(P 803. 16, 17. 
dnfpia-TTacTTos 888. 1 5, 1 8. 
dnipxfadai 803. 19, 20 ; 825. 5; 836. 20; 
843. 3. 



XI. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 365 



uTTfx^t'V 964. 

ajriyXtwTjjr 910. 5 ; 9\S.\\. ^ ei saep.\ 986; 988. 

anrj\iu)TiK6s 985. 

atrUvm 900. 1 3. 

aiikovs 921. introd. aTrXws 906. 5. 

aTToyiiacpdu 970 J 984. 

Hnoypacpi} 984. 

anobfiKviivai., anobthtiyixivos AvTOKpiWoip 910. 

46 ; 976. an-oSfS. dp;(tfpevs 970. 
aiToBex(a6ai 939. II. 
aVo8t8oVai 902. 14; 905. 12; 910. 19, 30, 

55; 912. 19; 913. 23; 914. 12; 937. 

31; 942. 2; 988. 
dnodfTja-Kdv 922. 10, 20, 21, 24. 
nnoKadi,(TTdvai. 904. 5 ("TTOKa^icrTai/) ; 918. 

introd.; 929. 17. 

dnoKeiaOai 921. I. 
dnoKkrjpovojxos 907. 5- 
diroKpKTis 941. 9. 

aTTOKTCtVftl' 903. ^. 

dnokCuv 942. 2, 3 ; 966. 

dnovoia 901. I 5- 

aTTOTrKripovv 900. 8, lO, 1 8. 

d-rropflv 939. 24. 

dnoanav 902. 6, 1 4, I 5. 

an-oore'XXftt' 895. 13, 15 ; 938. 3, 7; 939. 

14, 22. 
djroCTvj'KrTdi'ai 977. 
aTrdraKrof 998. 
dnoTaacTdv 904. 8. 
dnoTivdv 912. 29. 
dir6(f)aaii 899. introd. 
dnoxn 898 23 ; 906. 10; 964. 
dpyvpiKa, See Index X. 
dpyCpiov 896. 15, 17; 898. 12; 907. 25; 

909. 19; 912. 14. 

dpbpopTjKinioi 896. 12. 

dp(T^ 902. 14; 995. 
dpi0p6s 909. 17 ; 929. 17. 

dpKTTfpOS 941. 5- 

apia-Tos 913. 3. 

dp/cfrr 903. 27. 

app6Cfiv 906. 7. 

npovpa. See Index IX (o). 

dppa^av 920. 12. 

appfji' 907. 15, 19. 

apais 909. 25, 29. 

dpra^T). See Index IX (a). 
<V 836. 22, 23, 25; 941. 6. 
dproKOTTftop 908. 23. 



rtpros^ 936. 16. 

apxfiv. ("tpxayv 907. 21; 922. 3, 19. ap^as 

900. 4; 990. apxfadai 918. ii. i, 14, 

iii. IX, xi. 10 ; 967. 

dp;(«(/)oSos' 969. 
dpXT] 995. 

dpxifpaT€V(ras 911. 2. 
dpxKpfi'S 970. 
dafXyrjpa 903. 2 1. 
a(77;;:/oj 906. lO ; 984. 

d(T6(pf]s 911. 6. 

d(j7rdt«o-^<u 930. 22, 26; 932. 9; 933. 5, 

26; 934. 15; 935. 22, 26; 936. 13, 47; 

963. 

davvOrjKfi 904. 2. 
d(r;^dXjj/;ia 977. 
daxoXia 938. 7. 
dreXijy 908. 10. 
&Tep 936. 8. 
droTTtjpa 904. 4. 
avXrj 911. 15; 986. 
avpiov 926. 4 ; 927. 3. 
avTodi 910. 14. 
a(f)fais 918. V. 20. 

d^^Xt^ 888. 11; 907. 19; 909. 2, 4, 16; 

984. 
dcf^Uvai 932. 5. 
d<piKvuadai 939. 1 6. 
^ii^is 939. 28. 
dcpicTTdvai 943. 3, 6, 7. 
dcpoppLTj 899. 10. 
o'xpt 898. 18; 906. 6; 940. 2; 943. 4. 

a'xpts 933. 15. 

^aXavdpiov 921. 1 8. 

^dkavf'iov 892. 9 ; 896. 9. ro 7r/3o?i3aX. 903. 
29. 

^aXai'[ 935. introd. 

/3dXX«i/ 934. 9. 

^d/xpa 914. 7. 

^apeTi/ 939. 23. 

^aa-avi^iiv 903. lO. 

^aaiKiKos. ^aa. yrj 899. 22; 918. ii. lO, 23, 

iii. 6, 9, 14, xi. 7, xiii. 10; 986; 988(?). 

^a<r. pvprj 986. /3ao-. ypappartis and /3ao-. 

TpaTTfCirr]!. See Index VIII. 

^ao-rdffti/ 914. 8. 

^avKaXtov 936. 6,^8. 

Pe^aioiu 907. 14'; 910. 29; 912. 15. 

^^ra 929. introd. 



366 



INDICES 



^i^\ibiov 896. 27 ; 899. introd., 33, 37, 38, 

46; 936. 22. 
/StjSXt'oi/ 900. 14. 
^iKos 936. 28. 
i8(0f 905. II. 
^Xd/3/; 904. 5. 
^oi^eaa 902. II ; 904. 4. 
^orjBf'iv 907. 22. 

0o)?«9d? 903. 26, 31 ; 973; 976. 
^oiKos 902. 6, 14. 

poppas 918. ii. 6 ei saep.; 988; 988. 
^opptv6s 892. 8. 
^odXeadai 900. 12; 901. TO, 13; 907. 21, 

23 ; 913. 7 ; 925. 5. 
/3ovXfDT)7f. See Index VIII. 
j3oi;X.; 891. 5; 892. 5. 
^o{\r],ici 907. I, 14, 26, 27'; 990. 
/Sovj 901. 15. 

yafiuv 905. 9, 10, 12, 15, 17 ; 907. 20. 

yafxtKov 903. 17. 

yd/nos 905. 4, 9, 17 ; 906. 8; 927. 2. 

ydpos {to y.) 937. 27. 
yaoTplvt^os) ( = Katrrpivios .'') 1001. 

yetVoji^ 918. ii. 5 et saep. ; 986 ; 988. 

yivr]p.a 913. II ; 985. 

yiovytiv 999. 

y«ou;(t(cdy 1000. 

•yeoCxof 910. 16, 24, 35; 913. 12, 18. 

■yfpdr/jy 922. 7- 

yf pBios 984. 

ytapyf'iv 899. 8, 41. 

yfupyia 899. introd., 16, 18, 24; 26, 28, 31, 

32, 38 ; 913. 15. 
yecapyoi 899. introd., 32, 44 ; 902. 3 ; 918. ii. 

II, 23,iii. 7, 14, xi. 7, 18, 21 ; 974; 999. 
yv 899. 44 ; 910. 17, 20, 23, 40, 49 ; 913. 

16, 17,23; 938. 5; 999. ISaaiXiK,) yij 

899. 22 ; 918. ii. 10, 23, iii. 6, 9, 14, xi. 

7, xiii. 10; 986; 988 (.?). Sr^/ioo-i'a yij 

899. introd., 22. yly XevK^ 929. 14. npo- 

(t68ov sc. yrj 986. 
yripas 889. 18. 
yr]pd(TKfiv 904. 2. 
yr]po^oa-Kia 889. 1 9. 
yiyve(T0ai 892. II ; 894. 8; 895. 16; 896. 

29,32; 898. 20; 899. 18, 40; 900. 

18, 19; 901. 7; 903. 17; 904. 4, 5; 

905. 11,14; 906. 9; 907. 25(.?); 910. 

27, 36; 912. 32 ; 914. 9, 15; 915. 3; 



916. 12, 15 ; 918. introd., xi. i, 2, 4, 13, 
22, xiii. 3, 18; 925. 7 ; 932. 2; 933. 4, 
14, 20; 939. 7; 974; 981; 986; 990; 
994-5; 998-9. 

yiyvdiaKfiv 937. 3. 
yXvKvs 907. 3 ; 935. 22. 
yvTjo-ioi 943. I. 
yvMpt] 996. 
yvcopi^fiv 976. 
yvcbais 939. 4 ; 998. 
yv(o(TTr]p 976. 
yopovv 938. 6. 

yov^fvapiov 921. introd. 

ypa/x/:xa 898. 15; 907.2; 908. 38; 910. 

58; 913.25; 937.30; 939.18; 942. 

2; 963; 990. 

ypappuTfiis. See Index VIII. 
ypappariov 914. 1 8, 20. 
ypuTTTpov 895. 12, 14. 

ypii^nv 893. 6; 896. 21; 898. 9 ; 899. 

introd., 40, 41 ; 905. i8; 908. 38 ; 909. 

34; 910.57; 913.21, 25; 914. 19; 

916. 9; 929.20; 930.2; 932.2; 935. 

16, 17; 936. 29; 937. 3, 21; 938. 6; 

939. 12, 24 ; 940. 5 ; 967 ; 990. 
ypa^T? 988. 
yvr]i 918. ii. 4, 10. 
yvpvaaiap)(i]a-as. See Index VIII. 
yvpvacnapxrjs. See Index VIII. 

yvpvamov, ano yvp,v, 984. 
yvpvovv 903. 7- 

yvvi] 899. introd., 25, 28, 44 ; 907. 3, 16, 
20; 934. 12; 935. introd., 943. 5; 
984; 992. 

8av(i((ii' 899. introd. 

Sanairj 909. 26. 

8('iv 899. 40; 905. 10; 906. 6; 913. 19; 
936. 31. 

Stinpe'iu 926. 2. 

8u(T(i 910. 41 ; 988. 

dfiveai 896. 6, 10; 899. 15, 41; 907. 22. 

8eKdrr} 997(?). 

8f$i6s 906. 10; 941. 5. 
bfapos 902. 16. 

8«TIX0iTTJplOV 902. 7. 

S€(77rdr7jy 942. 6; 943. 9; 998; 1001. 

fifffTT. 0f6s 939. 4. O TWI* S\(OU SfUTT. 939. 

30. CI'. Index II. 
bixiaBm 937. 29. 



XL 



GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 367 



S'i 899. 14; 902. I3(?); 907. 16. 
S^Xos 893. 7. 

brikovv 896. 9 ; 899. introd., 38, 39 ; 902. 
19; 906. 8; 941.8; 972; 984; 986. 

trjfiiovpyos 925. 3. 

SrifiocTlos. TO Srju. 903. 2 2, 2^ ', 988. TCI 

drift. 903. 31 ; 910. 23; 913. 17 ; 932. 

4, drin. ^aXavflou 896. 8. dr]^. yrj 899. 
introd., 22. 87/i. eVtVay/xa 900. 9. fir/M. 
tarpdy 896. 26; 983. hr^. \ovTp6v 892. 
II. 8r;/Xi ohos 918. V. 20. S?^^. TpaneCiTijS 

916. 7. 
drjfxoaioicns 906. 9. 
gTjwipioy 896. 15, 17. 

8id. 8ia S>pas 935. 17. di(a) 913. 26. 
dia^dWfip 900. 13. 
8iaypd(f)(iv 890. 10; 916. 6. 

htaypacjirj 890. 9. 

8ia8e'xea6ai 898. 2 ; 899. 34, 36. 

8taSo;^oy 895. iiitrod. ; 996. 

8iad€(Tis 896. 31. 

S(a^»?K»7 907. 6. 

Biaipeais 962. 

St'aira 943. 3. 

Siairdv 906. 6. 

biaKOvoi 993 (?). 

diaKafi^dudP 898. 38. 

StaXoyj; 957 (.?). 

Sta7ra(r;(eii' 904. 2. 

StuTTe/iiTreu' 933. 21. 

8ianopi^(Lv 977. 

Bianpdacreiv 898. 25; 902. 17. 

BiaarjpoTaTos 888. I ; 895. introd., 7. 
fitao-re'XXeji/ 918. intiod., xi. 2 ; 973. 

8idaTr]pa 918. V. 1 5. 

8ia(T6((w 939. 8. 

didraypa 899. 28. 

Staracrcreii/ 899. 2 2. 

StarejVfti' 918. ii. 4. 

8iaT(Xup 937- 7. 

8ia(f)€pfiv 907. 20. 

8ia(j)6€'ip(iv 938. 4. 

8id(f)opos 914. 7. 8id(j)opa 988. 

fita\i/ev6e(7^ai 897. 1 5. 

dtSoWt 891. 15; 899. introd., 37; 903. 8, 

23, 24, 25, 30; 904. 3; 907. 6, 11,23 ; 

915. i; 919. 10, 11; 922. i ef saep. ; 

923. 15; 931. 6; 934. 11; 935. 11; 

936. 1 2, 1 7 ; 937. 30 ; 943. 5 ; 974 ; 985. 
8i(viavTi^(iv 899. II. 



8i€pxf(T6ai 964. 
8i(Tia 910. 51. 
Sitvrvxflv 899. 20, 45. 
8iCv(t)ov 920. I. 
8iKai0Kpiaia 904. 2. 

8t*catos 899. introd.; 905. 9 ; 909.8; 914. 

18. 
8ik6tv\ov 937. 27. 
816 929. 20; 935. 16. 
dioiKflv 901. 3. 
8i,oiKT]T^s. See Index VIII. 
8i6pd(0(ris 1000 ; 1002-3. 
8inXovs 988. SinXovv. See Index IX {a). 
8i<t(t6s 905. 18 ; 909. 34; 913. 21 ; 914. 

19. 
8i4>pos 978. 

8iu)Kfiv 940. 3 ; 943. 5. 
Siwpvl 918. ii. 3 e/ saep. ; 988. 
SokcIp 891. 12; 898. 39; 899.41; 902. 

15; 937. 17; 938. 7; 939. 17, 24; 

940. 3. 
8oKipdCeiv 928. 7. 
8o$d(fiv 924. 13. 
86a-Ls 912. 20 ; 917. 4. 
8oiXos 903. 2, 5, 9, 16, 25, 32, 34; 907. 

11, 15 ; 924. 10. 
8paxiJLt]. See Index IX {d). 
-8paxpos 936. 38. 

8p6ixos 900. 7 ; 911. 13. 

8vfia 929. 8, 15. 

Bvvapis 899. 8; 905. 10; 930. 10; 940.4- 

8vvaa0ai 898. 25, 34; 899. 31; 904. 7, 

9; 932. 8 ; 939. 15; 942. 4. 
8v(rTvxf'iv 904. 7. 

fW 923. 6. 

e^doprjKOOTos koi rpiTOs 889. I7' 

eyypdcpfip 913. 24. 

(yypd<pa)S 896. 31; 902. lO,. 1 7. 

cyyvao-^ai 905. 1 7 ; 972. 

eyyvrjTTjs 972. 

eyyvi 940. 6 ; 941. 7. 

eyKaXeii/ 906. 3. 

iyKXtieiv 903. 2, 12, 20, 23, 26. 

iyKpaTrjs 898. 1 9. 

eyXetp'T"" 900. 9, 18. 

fyXP?/C«»' 892. 7. 

6-yci). emu 913. 26. 

eSa^oj 899. 35; 901. 6; 913. 9; 918. ii. 

12, 16, 22, iii. 3, 9, xi. 7, 8; 986. 



368 



INDICES 



f0os 900. 7, lo; 909. 7. 

fiWi/m 891. 16; 892. 4; 895. n; 896, 
21 ; 897. 14; 903. 34, 37) 910. 57 : 
913.25; 929.3,22; 930.9; 942.3; 
963; 967. 

fl8oi 889. 10; 899. introd. 

(iSos 905. 6; 937. 22 ; 957. 

fi/co's 941. 6. 

ftTTfp 942. 3. 

flp^vT) 991. 

€ii. fj.[ai> fxiav 940. 6. 
fladytip 985 (?). 
fto-ayajydy 918. xi. 1 7. 

fiaUpai 900. 7; 910. 26; 912. 8. 
e'laodos 896. 1 3 ; 986. 
ei'ir/irpa^ts 890. 12; 914. 1 4. 

fKacrros 899. 1 7 ; 904. 6 ; 907. 4, 5 ; 908. 

22, 26, 29; 939. 27. 
(KUTtpos 905. 19 ; 906. 7 ; 908. 38. 
(K^alvuv 918. ii. 18, xi. 20. 
€K^dX\eiv 903. 34, 36. 
(K8fXfo-6ai 939. 27. 
eKfiiSd^/at 905. 2, I 5. 
(k8ikuv 937. 7. 
(KdiKia 901. 3. 

eKdiKos. See Index VIII. 

exSoros 905 5 (?). 

(Ku 934. 12 ; 937. 15, 21 ; 938. 3. 

f\(ivoi 899. 23 • 923. 12. 

(KK\T]aia 993. 

(KKonrtiv 892. 10. 

f KXapfidveiv 988. 

fnoxxTios 996. fKovaicos 913. 6. 

eWaXai 938. 3. 

fKTfXetj/ 900. 16 ; 972. 

fACT^. See Index X. 

(KTiOivai 899. 4. 

f/fTtcrtr 905. 17 ; 914, 17. 

f'KTor 904. 3, 5, * 

(Kcpfvyfiu 898, 25. 

fK(f)6piot> 910, 9, 20, 30, 49; 918. inlrod., xi, 

2, 3. 13- 
e'Xai'd 919, 5 ; 920. 6. 
i'\mi>v 936. 8; 937. 27; 971. 

(Xaaaovf 918. xi. 3, I 3. 

fXacraoiv 988. 

iXfelv 904. 2. 

(\(v6tpovv 904. 7. 

ATTif 939. 9. 

(fxavToii 937. 7 ; 972. eV €/iavra5 939. 1 4. 



ep^aSlKOS 896. II. 

epl^ados 921. introd. 
f'pjidXXeiv 919. 4; 939. 12. 
efipeXeia 896. 5 ; 897. 7. 
epnodiCfiv 890. II. 
f fji(popus 899. 13; 918. xi. 10. 

ep(f>VTOs 899. 19. 

fi'cipx^Oi. iv. f^r]yf]Ti)s 888. 8. eV. Ti-piVafis 

889. 13 ; 890. 3; 891. 7 ; 892. 5. 

€va(f)i(vai, fvacpeipevT} (?) SC. yrj 918. xili. 9. 12, 

(v8(ia 899. 14. 

fv8opfvUi 899. 12; 907. 10. 

eVSolos 943. 4, 

fvtbpda 900. 19, 

ivibpiviiv 898. 17 ; 900. 12 ; 938. 2. 

ivebpov 892. II. 
ivelvai 912. 12. 

ei^fKfc 902, 12 ; 943, 3. 

fvex^pov 903. 27, 31 ; 914. 17. 

evda 896. 32, 

eV(9dSf 967. 

eviavaios 900. I 7 (?)• €viav(rlo)S 900. 8. 

eVtavToy 889. 1 6, 17 ; 910. 40 ; 912. 7, 

ewoi 900. 13, I7(?). 

fvia-rdmi 895. 6; 906. 5; 908. 21; 909. 

28 ; 910. 6, 8, 1 7, 2 1 ; 911. 1 1 ; 913. 7 ; 

914. 13; 917. 2; 918. introd.; 964; 

981; 988. 
fvoLKiov 912. 13, 19, 31 ; 941. 7 ; 964; 971 ; 

986. 
evo(peiX(ii' 986. 
fvo)(Xe'ip 899. 44. 

fvoxos 897. 10 ; 972. 
e'vTcwda 903. 33 ; 999. 
(PTddfv 930. 3. 
evTvyxdvcLV 900. ig; 969, 
tvcopoTUS 904. 3, 
i^alpiTos 907, 10, 13. 
f^upTjvos 912. 2 1. 
f^iivvdv 904. 8. 
(^aaa-os 908. 38. 
fl(8pa 912. I 3. 
elfliai 906. 7 ; 908. 36. 

($(pxecr6cu 942. 4. 

e^erdCf'" 899. iiitiod. ; 957. 
(^{Taais 899. 39. 

(^r]yr}T(va-as. See Index VII!. 
f^rjyqriji. See Indcx VIII. 

f^rjKOVTafTj'js 889. 9. 
e'lijKoords 889. l6(?). 



XL GENERAL LNDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 369 



e^^y 908. 21 ; 910. 11 ; 918. xi. 6; 967. 

f^ievai 934. 3. 

f^KfTTTCOp 942. 6 (?). 

e^oSoy 896. 13; 986. 
flova-ia 893. 3; 904. 7, 10. 
e|cB 903. 20. 
('^arepos 896. 14. 
f^ooTiKos 999. 
eoiKei/ai 899. 1 8. 
eoprjj 933. 13; 993. 
(TrayyeXXeiv 904. 3. 

firdyeiv, itrayopevai rifiepat. See Index IV. 
enaKoXovddv 907. 20. 
fvaKoXovSrjTpia 909. 4, 37. 
eVaJ/a-yKd^dv 899. 42 ; 900. 15. 
f'navdyKTjs 913. 18; 914. II. 
endmyKos 909. 27 ; 910. 1 8. 
enavaXvfLu 942. 3. 
iiravtpxfcrOai 933. I 7. 

eVdrcd 903. 14, 20; 912. 13; 918. ii. 21, 
xi. 16, 19; 985. 

endvcode 986. 
enapovpiov 917. 3 ; 981. 

eTt-apxos. See Index VJII. 

ineyyeXdv 938. 7. 

fTra' 899. 9, 23 ; 902. lo ; 923. 9 ; 928. 3 ; 

935. 14. 
fneiyfiv 900. 1 4 ; 938. 5. 
eVeiSij 900. 11 ; 903. 34; 941. 2. 
(n(i(T€p)(f(Tdai 902. 5- 
eTreXfvaii 986. 

eirepxfddaL 901. 1 3 ; 906. 4. 
fnepardu 905. 19 ; 909. 32 ; 912. 36 ; 913. 

2 1 ; 914. 9 ; 964. 
iirexeiv 903. 16; 940. 4. 
fTn^dXX(ii> 899. 24. 
e7rti3oi;X[ 1002. 

eniyiyvuxTKeiv 930. 4, I4; 932. 8. 
fTTiypd(f)eiv 899. 49. 
eVtStSdi/nt 895. 10; 896. 21, 28, 36, 38; 

898. 36 ; 899. 15, 32, 45, 49 ; 900. 14, 

21 ; 902. 13, 18; 907. 14; 921. introd. ; 

940. 7; 941. 10 ; 942. 6. 
imOiTf'iv 895. 6; 896. 5; 904. 3. 
enidvpdi' 963. 
eTTiKoXeiv 964. 
iniKdpaiov 921. 1 4. 
iTTiKaTaXajj.^dvfiv 939. 1 8. 
eTTiKXacrfios 899. 9. 
irnKpicTis 926. 2 ; 966. 



iiriKpaTe'Lv 986. 
eTTLveveiv 939. 9. 
inivoe'iv 902. 10. 
iiTiv6(Ta)'i 939. 21 ; 990. 
emppiCos{?) 909. 25. 
empoovvvvai 889. 2 O. 
(TTiaKevdCeiv 896. 7. 

ini(TKey\n<i 918. introd. ; 970 ; 986. 
iirlcrKonos 903. 15- 
ema-radpos 889. 8. 
emcTTaXpa 899. introd. (?). 
iniaTatrdai 899. I 8. 

inia-TeXXdvQQl.i']; 892.4,12; 896.26; 899. 
introd., 34, 38, 42, 44, 47 ; 938-3; 967. 

e-maTTjpri 896. 5. 

iina-ToXf] 899. introd., 33, 37, 46. 
iiTKTToXLov 931. 6; 933. 23; 936. 14. 

e7n(TTpdTT]yos. See Index VIII. 

eTri(Trpe<peaT€pov 899. 4 I. 

fTTLTuypa 900. 9. 

eniTeXXeiv 907 . 2 1. 

eViTT^Setcoj 938. 6. 

fTriTidevai 897. 7 ; 985 (iniTtQovvTi). 

iTTiTpoTTi'ia 907. 20. 

eTTiTponr] 898. 24. 

fTr/rpo7ros'888.5; 898.6,28; 907. 18; 909.2. 

eTTLCjiavea-TaTos. See Indices II and III. 

fTTKpepeiv 899. 50. 
fTnxoprjye'iu 905. lo; 906. 6. 
enixbipios 936. 5- 
(TToiKiov 989 ; 996-7. 
eTroTTTrjs 991. 
eTTOfpeiXdv 902. 17. 

eVoxi; 918. introd., xi. 21, xiii. 2, 17. 

€pydCi<T6ai 923. II. 

ipyaarripiov 908. 27, 29, 32, 34; 989. 

f pydrrjs 895. 12,14; 971; 985. 

epyov 892. 9, 12 ; 896. 16. 

epelv 929. 22 ; 932. 3 ; 940. 3. Cf. Xeynv. 

ep(ovs 921. 2, 8. 

fpiKivos 921. introd. 

e'piou 929. II. 

fpXf(TBaL 903. 13, 14; 932. 5; 936. 34; 

937. 6, 25 ; 967. 
ecronrpou 978. 
((Tneptvos 901. 5- 
eo-^nros 902. 1 1 ; 910. 40. 

enpos 898. 28; 899. 19, 32, 38, 40; 905. 
8; 907. 21; 909. 31; 918. xiii. 14; 
923. 11; 939. 18; 936; 988; 996. 



Bb 



370 



INDICES 



€Ti 898. 7, 32 ; 899. 38 ; 900. 6 ; 911. 10 ; 
939.3- 

eT0ifj.(0i 902. 9, 16. 

(vboKf'iv 905. 17 ; 908. 46; 972. 

ev^oKtixos 942. 6. 

(vepyeala 899. 1 9. 

fVfpyfTf'iv 899. 20, 45. 

evepyfTTjs 996. Cf. Index II. 

e^^aX^s 902. 1 5. 

(vdfcos 935. 19. ft^^LS 941. 8. 

(v6rjvinp)(^eiv 908. 1 9. 

fv6T]vidpxr]^. See Index VIII. 

(vdvpoTepos 939. 19. 
fvKa^eaTaTos 943. 6. 

(Vfifmjs 899. 3 ; 925. 7. ilfx^vSis 924. 7. 
fvpiGKdv 918. xi. 5, 15; 925. 6; 934. 14; 
936. 20. 

fiat^eia 907. 2 2. 

fvae^ea-TciTos 996. Cf. Index II. 

evTvxws 896. 7 ; 900. 7. 

(IxapidTilv 904. 9. 

fvx((reai 891. 18; 928. 15; 929. 24; 931. 

12 ; 933. 6, 28 ; 934. i6 ; 935. 29 ; 936. 

3, 50; 937. 28; 938. 9; 939. 30. 
f^-X-? 939. 8, 
f(f)e8pivfiv 928. 5. 
f(f)r)fj,€piv6s (f'nuip.) 924. 2. 

((prjpepls 917. I ; 981-2. 

fcPiardvcu 912. 27. 

eioSoy 906. 8. 

((popav 896. 30. 

exeif 891. 16 ; 895. 11 ; 898. 13, 37 ; 900. 

16; 901.9,12; 902.9,16; 903.9,29, 

30, 35; 905. 19; 907. 8, 9, 10, 12, 17, 

23; 908. 39; 910. 15, 54; 912. 9; 

913. 16; 918. ii. 16, 18, iii. 15, v. 21, 

xi. II, 12, 18, 20; 922. 14, 16; 928. 

10; 929.19; 930.3; 934.8; 935. 

15, 17; 936. 15, 22, 26, 35; 938. 5; 

939. 10, 21, 25, 26; 940. 6; 942. 3; 

964; 990; 995. 
€<as 891. II ; 899. 33, 46; 907. 19; 910. 

25; 934. 13; 936. 13; 940. 4; 943. 

8; 964; 965; 985. 

filius 894. 5. 
^eCyos 936. 15, 16. 

^(VKTrjpiov 934. 5. 



C^v 907.23; 924. 11; 937. 5; 943. 7" 

{(fl KVpiOs). 

Cfira, TO C (i.e. I/i'ad vi) 930. 15. 
Crjrf'^v 891. 10; 893. 4, 5, 8. 
Cioypacfiia 896. 6, 10, 16. 
fcoypa^os 898. 4. 

C<oov 902. 6, 8, 15; 922. 17, 19, 22, 23; 
942. 2, 3. 

7 893. 7 ; 903. 13 ; 904. 8 ; 906. 8 ; 907. 
21; 912. 29; 913. 10; 925. 6; 941. 4, 
5; 972. 

rj prjv 924. I. 

i7y6io-^at 895. 10. Tjyovp.evo':. See Index VIII. 

fjyepovivaas 899. 29. 

fjytpav. See Index VIII. 

TJyovu 941. 5. 

^'8r, 963. 

fjdia-Ta 933. 5. 
^6os 963. 
fJKeiv 933. 13. 

TJXiaCTTtjplOV 985. 

fjXiKla 888. 3; 898. 30; 906. 7; 907. 19. 
fjpepa 893. 7; 900. 13; 901. 5; 903. 4; 
904. 6 ; 905. 13 ; 906. 5. 

Tjp.epr]aici)S 908. 26, 35. 
^fXLokia 912. 32. 

IJHiavs 909. 30, 32; 911. 14; 912. 21; 

913. 13, 16, 19, 23; 986. f(fi fjp.i(Teias 

913. II. 
fjpixovu 936. 7, 9. 
f]fjLio>^f'Xiov. See Index IX {i). 
fjviKa 939. 23. 
tjnftpos 918. ii. I, 10, 23, iii. 7, 14, xi. 7. 

TjnrjTi^s 936. 17. 
V'rot 888. 5. 

9avpd<Tios 940. 7' 
deaa-dcu 963. 
Oearpov 937. II. 

^eZoy (sc. o/)Kof) 893. 4, 5, 8 J 897. 12, 16, 

OdOTaTos 996. 
Bikdv 893. 7 ; 898. 22 ; 903. 35; 931. 3; 

937. 3 ; 941. 7, 9 ; 943. 6. 
6f\i]pLa 924. 8. 
^t'/ia 932. 4. 
5eo9. See Index VII. 
e^ppd 896. 8. 
^^Xvf 907. 16, 19. 
exi^eiv 898. 33 ; 903. 33. 



XL GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 371 

GXly^ns 939. 13. 

BprjCTKiiv 902. 9. 

66\o9 896. 12. 

6pa(TVTT]s 901. 19. 

BpvoKOTvdv 910. 40. 

^piJoi' 910. 41. 

evydrrjii 893. 4 ; 905. 3 ; 913. 3, 5, 22 ; 

930. 5; 984; 990. 
6Ceiv 923. 23. 
Svpa 903. 20 ; 912. 28. 
6v(ria 923. 7. 



habitare 894. 7. 

»ar/3os 896. 26; 983, 

iStos898. 11; 932. i; 974; 999. 

IdiwTiKos 918. ii. 22, iii. 3, 9, xi. 7, 8. 

«3ta)( ) 986. 

ifpoviKTjs 908. 9. 

/fpoy. lepa avvoSos 908. 9. tfpwraroj/ Tapalov 

890. 12. tfpw 984. 
t/cayo? 918. V. 15. 
(Kfo-ta 904. 7. 
tXfwy 939. 7. 
tXtJet./ 918. ii. 8 (?). 
ipariov 905. 7 ; 921. 5. 
im 891. 16; 892.9; 895. 11; 899.45; 

903. 26; 904.9; 924. 11; 928. 7; 

929. 21; 932. 2, 3, 7, 8; 937. lo; 

939. 19 ; 940. 2 ; 967. 
(VStfcr/co./ 913. 8 ; 993-6. Cf. Index III. 
'nrndpiov 922. I ^/ J'a^'/. 
imrtKivaKoi (?) 936. 24. 

tTTTTtKOS' 922. I, 6. 

tTrTro? 922. 8, lO, 13. 

1(70$: 907. 7, 12; 908. 35; 909. 14, 30; 

910. 18. 'la-cos 903. 34. 
laTdvai 906. 2 (?) ; 909. 32. 

KayKfWos 994 ; 999. 

KaOapos 910. 32, 41 ; 912. 25; 988. 

KadapoTtjs 904. 2. 

KaOebpdpiov 963. 

KadekKeiv 899. 25. 

KudrjyrjTrjs 930. 6. 

KaBrjKiiv 930. 12 ; 939. i6. 

Kadrjpfpivos 924. 3. 

Ka^to-Toi-ai 888. 2; 898. 29; 902. 3; 939. 

19- ^ 
Ka6o(Tiovv 904. 2. 

Bb 



Kadas 899. 44; 902. 15; 909. 32. 

Kairoi 898. 26. 

Kaivos 921. introd., 14. 

Kntpdr 899. 25; 913. 19. 

KaKo<f)vr]s 988. 

KQKihs 935. 15; 938. 5. 

KoXt'iv 918. ii. 4 ; 926. i ; 927. i ; 989. 

KoXos 902. 6; 913. 14; 988. ^aXi? 929. 

6; 934. 14; 967. 
Kafj.apoi)TiK6s 921. introd. 
Kofiaparos 921. introd. 

KdfjLaTos 913. 15. 
Kafir]\<i)v 964. 
KainrvXos 918. ii. 8 (?). 
Kai/cBTTtKoi' (T^vpihiov 936. 1 5. 

/capTTos ('wrist') 910. 25. 

KapiTos ('fruit') 913. 12, 13, 19, 23. 

Kapvivos (Kdpoivoi) 929. 9) 1 3. 

KaaaiTfpiov 915. 2,3; 1000-3. 

Ka(TTpl(nos 1001 (?). 

KUTa^aivdv 898. 9. 

Kara/SaXXftJ' 913. 1 5. 

Karuyaiov 903. 4. Kordynov 911. 1 5 ; 912. 12. 

KaTay'iyvecrBai 910. 4. 

KarafcoTrreti' 904. 6. 

KaTaK( ) 918. ii. 13, iii. 10, xi. 9. 

KuTaXaplBdveiu 889. 7; 896. 31; 939. 5; 

942. I. 
KaTaXeirrdv 907. 7, 12, 14, 17, 23; 985. 
KaTa\ip,TTdv(LV 907. 5- 
KaraKoyelov 906. 9. 
Karapeudv 989. 
KaravayKa^fiv 904. 8. 

Kara^ioiv 940. 4; 941.5; 943. i. 

Kara^vfiv 988. 
KaraTrXerv 930. 7 ; 933. 1 5- 
KaranXeKfiu 903. 35. 
KaraaKevd^ftv 892. 8. 
KaTaanflpeiv 965. 
Karairnopd 969. 
KaTa(f>epeiv 923. 8. 

KaTa(j)vyf] 899. introd. 

/cara;(copto-/ioy 898. 37. 

KaroiKtKos 918. ii. 16, V. 18, xi. 16, 17. 

KdroiKos 984. 

KtXfveiv 889. 5; 899. 9, 41; 902. 13; 

916. 7 ; 970. 
KeXfvais 895. 'J. 
KfVTivos 922. II. 
Kfpdfxiov. See Index IX (a). 

a 



372 



INDICES 



KepXapiov (= KeWapiov ?) 978. 
KfpTViKupiov 921. 8, 20. 

Ke^i\aiov 899. introd. ; 988. 

KrjSfpovia 888. II. 
K7;Se/xcbi/ 888. 2, 3, 5. 
KTJXcoveiov 971. 
KivBvvevfiv 938. 4- 
KiVSuwr 910. 22; 914. 11. 
jcXeis 903. 16, 18; 912. 28. 
KKrjpovofila 907. 5; ^j ^2, 26. 

K\7]pov6pos 899. 23 ; 907. 4, 6 ; 986 ; 999. 
K^rjpos 918. ii. 24, V. 18, 19, xi. 16; 919. 

2(?); 971; 984; 988. 
kX7/( ) 980. 
K\ivTjpi]i 896. 33. 
kXow'oi'(=: kXov^Iov}) 936. 6, 14. 
KoiXcopa 918. ii. 21, V. 16. 
Koipaadai 933. 25. 
Koti/o'f 891. 14; 905. 5, 12; 907. 17; 911. 

16. TO Koiv. Twv y(a>pya>v 999. koivws 

907. 12. 

Koivcovla 905. 4. 
KoXXrjpa 986. 
KOfies 994. 

KoplCeLv 910. 26; 919. 6; 931. 5; 936. 5, 
10, 13, 14; 963. 

K6Wr](TlS 915. I. 

KoX6(3iov 921. 6, 16. 
KOflTOV 995 (?). 
KOpyj/OTfpOS 935. 5- 
KovSovKTopia 900. 6, 16. 
Koviarfji 993. 

KOTTplOV 912. 25. 

Konpos 934. 6, 10. 
KOdKiviveiv 910. 33 ; 988. 

Koapaplhiov 903. 29. 
Kdo-/xor 899. 12; 909. 29. 
Kovpdrap 888. 6. 
KpuTflv 903. 24, 26. 

KparirTTOi. Kp. aSeX^ij 931. II. f/). |3ouX^ 

891. 5; 892. 5. Kp. 8ioiKqTr)s 899. introd., 
I, 37, 6 Kp. rjyfpoiu 931. 8 ; 967. 6 Kp, 
970. 

Kpidr] 908. 25 ; 988. 

Kpiveiv 898. 27; 899. 25, 26, 27, 29, 39. 

Kpinreiv 903. 1 6, 1 8. 

KTaaeai 903. 34 ; 904. 6. 

Kr^/^a 898. 14; 909. 16; 999 ; 1003. 

KT^vos 908. 25, 26, 30; 938. 2, 4, 5. 

KTrjcris 889. 19. 



Kv^epvTjTrjs 919. 3. 

Ku(9pa 936. II. 

KvpiaKos. TO KvpiaKOv 903. 19, 2 1. 
Kvpieveiv 910. 24. 

KVpifVTlKWS 907. 17- 

Kvpios ('guardian') 888. 2; 899. 49 

909. 6. 
Kipws ('valid') 905. 18; 906. 10; 908. 

37; 909. 33; 910. 42; 912. 35; 913. 

20; 914. 18; 964. 
Kvpios (title) 895. introd. ; 899. introd., 18; 

902. 18; 904. 10; 922. 14, 16; 923. 

7; 925. 3; 931. 3, 10; 933. i, 28; 

937. 9; 939. I, 5, 9, 20, 28; 943. 7; 

995. Cf. Index II. 
Kvpos 998 ; 1001. 
KU)papxt]s 895. 5- 
Kw^r; 895. 5, 9 ; 897.6,9,14; 899. introd., 

n, 35- 36; 901. 8; 905. 4, n l 913. 

9 ; 918. xi. 3,13; 986 ; 989 ; 991. Cf. 

Index VI (3). 

KCOprjTLKOS 895. 8. 

KupoypappaTevs. See Index VIII. 

XaXeh 903. 14. 

\ap!3dveiv 898. 14; 903. 37; 922. 26; 

936. 42 ; 937. 18 (Xa/Svo-ai), 22. 
Xaprrpos 942. 6; 943. I, 2, 5, 9. Cf. 

Index III and Index VI s. v. 'o^vpvyxircov 

TToXli. 

Xafj.Trp6Tr]s 942. 2, 5. 
Xa^avou 966. 
XaxavonaXr]^ 935. introd. 
Xa-)(av6crTr(ppov 932. 6. 
Xi^r^s 1000. 

Xeyeti/ 888. i; 895. introd.; 899. introd., 
21, 27, 30; 903. I, 8, 9, 10, 13, 20, 21, 
25. 30, 36; 907. 16; 918. ii. 13, iii. 6, 
14, V. 17, 21; 922. 13; 930. 15; 932. 
5; 935. 15; 936. 17, 18, 21; 941. 2, 
3, 6, 7, 9; 1002. 

XeiTovpyrjpa 900. 14. 

XeiTovpyia 904. 3, 5, 8, 9. 

XevTiov 929. 10. 

XfTrrdy 924. 5. XeTrrd 920. 4. 

XfVKos 905. 8; 921. 5, 7; 922. 6, 9; 929. 

14. 
X?ippa 929. introd. ; 985 ; 999. 
Xlav 936. 13. 

Xi^avo6r]Kr) 978. 



XI. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 373 



Xi^eWos 902. 12. 

\[6ivos 918. V. 20; 937. 13. 

'Kitios (jy) 902. 9. 

Ati/oCf 921. 9. 

\ivov 929. 10. 

XiVpa 915. 2, 3 ; 1000-3. 

Xt'\/' 918. ii. 7 et saep.; 986; 988. 

Xdyioj 902. I, 18, 

XoyioTT^y 902. 13, 15. 

Xoyttr/Lioy 940. 4. 

XoyiCTTjjf. See Index VIII. 

Xoyo? 890. 9; 893. 6, 8; 895.8; 896. 

10; 904. 3; 905. 5; 914. 17; 916. 7, 

17, 20; 919. 2, 9, 11; 920. 12; 964; 

971; 985; 994; 999. 
XotTTor 904. 7 ; 907. 15 ; 918. xi. 12 ; 921. 

introd. ; 934. 11. 
Xovrpov 892. II ; 915. 2; 943. 3, 4, 6, 8; 

1002. 
\ox'iia 992. 
Xii«j/ 907. 28. 
XvTiiiv 930. 4. 
Xvrpouy 936. 19. 

fiayetpiKos 1001. 

fiayicTTpiavos 904. 2. 

fxaKapios 902. 4. 

fxaKtWapios 1000. 

fiaXiara 939. 20. 

/xaXXoj/ 939. 3. 

fidvdpa 984. 

fxavddudv 900. II ; 937. 12; 940. 4. 

fiaprvpHi- 903. 31 ; 930. 16; 933. 18. 

fxaprvpiov 941. 4. 

fiaaTiyovv 903. 9. 

fiarpoiva aroXara 907. 4* 

fiafPoprrjs 937. 26. 

fia(j)6pTiov 921. 7- 

p.eyakoTrp€TTe(TTaTOS 904. lO. 

/xeyaj 920. 8; 923. i; 833. 12; 984; 

988; 996; 1002. fiuCcov SiXid ixfiC6Tfpos. 

See Index VIII. 
fied' [rjv) 918. ii. 4 ef saep. 
pe6{ ) 988. 
pLfiCorepos, fieiCoiv. See Index VIII. 

fieXas 922. 12. 

/xf'Xeii/ 930. II, 18; 939. 21. 

/xeXt 919. 8 ; 936. 9. 

fj.e\iKr]pis 936. 10. 

fifXiTivos 936. 1 1. 



fj.(Xixpcos 984. 

/LieXXfii/ 890. 7; 930. 10; 935. 12. 

peiJ.(p(a-6ai 972. 

/ifV ovf 899. 8. 

fjLfvetv 903. 33, 36 ; 940. 2 ; 964, 

fxfpls 940. 2, 4; 986. 

fifpos 905. 19; 911. 14; 913. 13, 16, 19, 

23; 918. ii. 22, iii. 9, xi. 8, 16, xiii. 7; 

984-6 ; 999. 

fxeaos. dva piiaov 918. iii. 3, V. 1 5, 1 8. 

fxearos 936. 37. 

ptTajBaXXfiif 934. 3. 

fierabiaTayrj 899. 40, 43, 47. 

fxeTa^iaTaa-aeiv 899. 32. 

fierdSco-ts 906. 9. 

HeTaXXdcra-eiv 888. II ; 899. 23. 

fi(Tavd(TTT]s 899. 14- 

fifTd^i 914. 8. 

fMeTan(p.7veii> 969. 

IJLfTadTfXXetv 902. 13 ; 940. 6. 

fi(Ta(j)opd 895. 18; 935. 18. 

fxeTfapi^dv 904. 6. 

jueroxos 916. 7 ; 918. ii. 12, 24, xiii. 5. 

fjieTpelv 932. 3 ; 988. 

Iierprjfia 909. 2 2. 
pi€Tpr](ns 910. 35- 
fierpov 907. 24; 910.21,34; 986; 988. 

Cf. Index IX (a). 
P-e'xpi- 906. 5; 908. 27; 909. 27. 
firjdafxws 901. II. 
fi^v 893. 6; 895. 9; 898. 32; 902. 8; 

903. 6 ; 908. 20, 21 ; 910. 20, 31 ; 914. 

12; 916. 14; 958; 962; 964; 967; 

985 ; 988. Cf. Index IV. 
HTjTrjp 888. 10 ; 898. 5 ; 899.2; 903. 32 ; 

905. 2, 3, 4, 17 ; 909. 4, 11, 38 ; 910. 

3; 912. 2; 914. 3; 924. 15; 928. 10; 

936. 21, 47; 963; 984; 996. 

IxrjTpoTToXis 907. 9. 

lirjXavdpios 985. , 

IJir)xav{] 901. 7 ; 985. 

fjiiKpos 903. 28 ; 921. 11 ; 922. 6, 7, 10, 12, 

26; 931. 8; 933. 14, 22. 
fxiadv 902. 17. 
IxidBovv 910. I, 14, 28, 39, 48; 911. i; 

912. I, 16, 17, 23, 41; 913. 7, 14, 22; 

918. xi. 2, II, 12, xiii. 18; 977. 
liiaeaxTis 910. 29, 42; 912. 9, 16, 35; 913. 

20 ; 964. 
fXKrOcoTrjs 986. 



374 



INDICES 



fjLvaaiov 905. 6. 

fiveia 895. introd. 
fivfiixt] 902. 4 ; 913. 3. 
IJi6\v^8os 915. 2, 3; 1001-3. 
/ioXv^Sovpyos 915. I ; 1000-3. 

fJLOvd^dv 994. 



ixovaxoc 905. 19; 908. 39. 
fiouos 899. m, 26; 907. ic 



3. 19; yuo. 39. 

.«, ^. 15, 26; 907. 10; 910. 17 ; 915. 

3 ; 919. 7 ; 993-5. fiovov 899. 1 1 ; 904. 



4; 941.8,9 
fioTuxns 1001. 
ixvpids 896. 16, 17. 
fivpor 936. 39. 
fivarpov 921. 25. 

nasci 894. 5. 

vav^iov 917. 2. 

vaCXoz^ 917. 2. 

yavTtKoy 929. 8. 

veot 910. 32 ; 988. 

veocfiVTos 909. 16. 

yij 939. 20. 

j/oeti/ 990. 

vo/xj? 899. introd., 6; 918. introd., xi. 5, 

15- 
vopxafia. See Index IX (b). 

vofua-fiaTiov. See Index IX (<5). 

^(^/[los: 902. 17 ; 903. 7. 

roy:i6f 899. 30, 42; 900. 6; 913. 6; 991. 

Cf. Index VI {a). 
voariKoTfpoi 939. 26. 
voaoi 939. 6, 23. 
vordpios 940. 7- 

wTof 918. ii. I et saep.', 986; 988. 
vvKTfpivos 924. 4. 
lOJKTocrrpaTJjyos' 933. 24. 

viu 899. 41; 906. 6, 7; 908. 18; 929. 

5; 937. 8; 938. 6; 939. 3, 23. 
vvvi 908. 5; 988. 

$(via 931. 7. 
$((TTT]<: 921. 23. 
ii(})idioi> 936. 9. 
|i'Xa/iai^ 910. 1 1. 
ivXoi/ 892. 7. 
^uoTof 896. 12, 14. 

oy6o7;(?) 916. 7, 17, 20. 

3i3oXo'f . See Index IX {5). 
odos 918. ii. 7, 13, iii. 6, v. 20. 



odev 896. 32 ; 899. 41 ; 904. 7. 
oBoviaKos 933. 23. 
oiefrdiu 898. 24. 
OIKHV 984. 

oiKflos 899. 12. 

ol<eTr]s 904. 4. 

oiKt'a 896. 30; 903. 10; 907. 10; 911. 

14; 912. 12; 926. 3; 933. 26; 962; 

980; 984; 986; 1002. 
olKov6p.ns 929. 25; 941. 4; 993. 
oUoi 933. 19; 943. 4. 
oli'OTrpaTrjs 985. 

oiW 907. 24 ; 985 ; 992-3. 

oioddfjTTOTe 893. 6, 9 ; 904. 8. 

oKVHv 930. I. 

6Xiyos 899. 13; 941. 4, 9. 

0X09 893. 6, 9; 896. 12, 16; 903. 4, 5; 

918. xi. 6 ; 936. 19 (oX' (^oKcou), 29 ; 986. 

oXcof 924. 8. 
o/xtXeii/ 928. 5» 
o/no(os 889. 21. 6/xoi'cdj 916. 14, 17, 20; 935. 

introd.; 995. 
ofividv 897. 11; 903. 15; 972. 
ofioXoye'iv 897. II ; 898. 22 ; 905. 20; 909. 

13,33; 910- 13; 912.36; 913. 21; 914. 

6, 19; 939. 6; 964; 998. 
Sixov 895. 16. 
6p.ovpy6s 922. 20. 
ofxcos 939. 26. 
oi/;;Xar»;s 900. 15' 
ovodrjKfia 922. 24, 25. 

ovona 890. 17 ; 903. 23 ; 907. 11, 15; 924. 

12 ; 930. 26 ; 932. 4 ; 936. 46. 
owr 932. 8 ; 985. 
o^v<: 900. 7. 
onoToi/ 909. 26. 

oTTov 936. 6, 8 (.?), 15. 

on-copoTTcoXj;? 980. 

oTTco? 899. introd., 17,39, 42, 47; 935. 16; 

938. 6. 
opav 896. 32. 
op8tm/3ioj 942. 7 ; 999. 

upiynv 902. 1 1. 
opiXen/ 986. 

opKos 893. 4, 5, 8; 897. 12, 16; 903. 18; 

972. 
opuaadai 914. 4 ; 996. 
opp.'] 901. 6. 
opcpaviKOs 888. 4. 
6p(pav6s 888. 2, 5. 



XL GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 375 



otros 898. 13; 899.8; 902. i 7 ; 903. 34; 

913. 10; 939. 12. 
oaoanep 904. 3. 
ocrrpaxcbSj/f 941. 2. 

ore 942. 4 ; 943. 6, 

on 903. 8 etsacp.; 924. 10 ; 930. 9 ; 936. 
17, 19, 21; 937. 22; 939. 7; 941. 3, 

7,9- 
oh fx^ 903. 16. 
ovyKia 931. 4. 
oiAij 906. 10. 
0^1/899. 8, 40; 901. 15; 903. 10; 930. 

18; 934.9; 937.5,8; 938.5; 942.3. 
ovaln 902. 3 ; 986. 
ovcriaKos fJUcrdajTTjs 986. 

ovTco 888. 3. ovT(os 940. 5 ; 941. 7 ; 998-9. 
o0eiX«f 890. 8; 899. 48; 904. 4; 910. 

25; 914. 6; 942. 4; 943. 4. 
o^pw 906. 10. 
6(p<piKidXios 896. 28. 
oyj/is 911. 6. 

ofaviov 898. 31 ; 974; 994. 
o , y o 991. 

tt/ 941. I. 

irayos 900. 6 ; 901. 5. 

TratSaywyos 930. I 7, 1 9, 27. 

TToiSiW 928. 13 ; 930. 24 ; 933. 29, 

Trmy 901. 8; 915. i. 

7ra\ji'893. 7 ; 903. 18. 

navevCprjiJLOS 999. 

rravoiKfi 935. 30. 

navreXw 899. 13; 903. 7. 

iravTodev 988. 

TravTOKpaTwp 925. I. 

irnvTois 904. 2, 3. 

irdw 942. 5. 

TraTTTTos 908. 2, 45. 

■jvapa^a'iveiv 908. 36. 

napa^dWeiv 930. 21 ; 934. 12 ; 937. 10. 

napayytXia 957. 
TrapayyAXfii' 937. 8, 14. 
napdyeiv 901. 1 8 ; 971. 
TTapayiyveadai 934. I3; 642. 4. 
TrapaSexfcdai 910. 28. 
7rapa8iSoVat 910. 39; 912. 23, 29. 
irapaddXiov 896. 1 3. 
napaiTTja-is 899. introd. 
napaKaTaTidi'vai 907. 7- 
TTapoKoXoii^fti' 942. 5- 



napaKap^dveiv 912. 27. 

TrapaXTjTrrtKo'y 910. 34. 

irapapiTpuv 910. 15. 

Trapap.v6(i(Tdai 939. 26. 

napaa-Kfvd^eiv 902. 7? 14 ; 943. 2. 

irapaTeivfiv 918. iii. 3. 

TrapaTrjpeiv 937. 1 6. 

7rapaTvy;(ai'e(i' 901. 9. 

7rapa(})€pfiv 892. lO. 

napdipfpva 905. 7, 12 ; 906. 3. 

7rapa<pvXaKr] 904. 4. 

■7rapax<i>pr}(Tis 998. 

napduai. 888.5; 905. 16; 913. 25; 914. 

13; 933. 21 ; 934. 4, 7, 10; 972. 
TrapfvoxT^elv 965. 
TrapevTiQcvai 907. 21. 

7rap€';^6(i/ 895. 2 1 ; 900. 10, 17 ; 903. 27, 28; 
904. 4 ; 907. 6 ; 908. 31, 33 ; 913. 12, 
18; 937.24; 941.4,6,7,8; 972; 992-4. 

TrapKTTdvai 897. lO. 

napoiK^ ) 899. introd. 

TTapoXKTj 997. 

irapopav 904. 6. 
TTnpovdla 903. 15. 

TToy 897. 6 ; 898. 33, 35 ; 899. introd,, 20 ; 

900. 16 ; 903. i, 8, 11, 16, 32 ; 904. 3, 

5; 905. 12, 16; 907. 5,6, 9, 10, II, 13, 

18,20, 28 ; 908. 46; 910. 22, 38, 42, 56 ; 

911. 16; 912. 26,35; 913.11, 24; 914. 

II, 16; 924. 12; 929. 4, 12, 15, 20; 

930. 25 ; 933. 7, 16 ; 934. 15 ; 935. 26 ; 

936. 3 ; 937. 14 ; 939. 6, 9, 15, 29 ; 942. 

6; 964; 988. 
iraaTocpdpos 984. 
iraTeiv 988. 
nar^p 899. 21, 24; 905. 16 ; 908. 2 ; 924. 

15; 925. 3; 935. 20; 936. 2; 937. 10. 
Trarpj/icoraXia 900. 5- 
ndrpios 935. lO. 
irarpls 937. 7. 
iraxvs 921. 19. 
nebiov 913. 9. 
TTe'iva 902. 12. 
ireia-p.a 943. 5, 6. 
TTiXarov (?) 922. 9. 
Trep-rreiv 928. 12 ; 930. 12 ; 931. 4, 26 ; 937. 

21, 26; 938. 4. 
TTtvTafTia 936. 25. 
nevralSoXov. See Index IX [i). 

nenepis. See ninepas. 



376 



INDICES 



TTfpi^XfTTTCS 994. 
TTfpi/SoXdStOI^ 921. 2. 

nepiyiyveadai 913. 12, 1 3, 23 ; 986. 

Trepi^cofia 921. lO. 

rrepuo-rami 899. 14 ,' 902.12. 

nfpiaTepi)v 981. 

Trrjypa 921. introd. 

Trr]^i(rp6s 981. 

7r^;^vr. See Index IX (a). 

TTinepas 921. 26. 

TnirpaaKdv 909. 14, 31; 922. II, 13, 15, 

18. 
TTttTTf^eti^ 898. 29; 903. 17. 
TTt'o-T-tj 907. 7 ; 913. 14; 924. 9; 980. 

TTtOTdy 893. I. 

TtXaKiov 921. introd. 

ttXcikovs 936. II. 

■nXavav 898. 8. 

TrXordicioi' 920. 3, 7; lO. 

TrXareta 937. II. 

nXelcov, TrXfto-TO?. See noXvs. 

7r\r]y{] 903. 6 ; 904. 6. 

■nkriprjs 929. introd. 

irXrjpodu 902. 10, 16; 904. 3, 5; 943. 7. 

TrXti^^evfii' 941. 3. 

n'\tv6evT7]s 941. 2. 

lAivBos 986. 

ttXoioj/ 937. 13. 

■nvtZ'pa 904. 7 ; 924. 16. 

■noifiv 888. 3; 892. 10; 898. 8; 899. 17, 

34, 39, 43, 47, 48; 901. 6; 903. 7, 19; 

904. 4 ; 907. 6, 18, 26, 27 ; 909. 26, 30 ; 

913. 15, 20 ; 928. 7, 8, 11 ; 929. 6 ; 933. 

23 ; 936. 4, 31 ; 9S7. 4 ; 938. 2, 7 ; 941. 

3; 943. 6; 963; 967; 971; 990. 

iTOiKikri]s 980. 

TToXtf 890. 8, 10; 892.3,9; 895.15; 896. 
9, 30; 899. 6; 902. 2, 10; 904. 4; 
908. 6 ; 909. 13 ; 910. 3 ; 911. 5 ; 914. 
6 ; 942. 4 ; 960 ; 962. Cf. Index VI {a). 

TToXiTfveadai 902. 4, 12. 

TTO^ITIKT] 903. 37. 
TToXlTtKOS 892. II. 

■noXverla 889. 6. 

no\is 888. 4; 898. 7, 21 ; 899. 13; 903. 

21 ; 930. 16, 22; 935. 22, 26; 936. 51 ; 

938. 8 ; 941. 9. nXdoyv 939. 24. nXel- 

a-Tos 899. 13; 900. 9; 939. 3. nXfla-ra 

937. 2. 
7rop<pvpa 931. 4. 



TTocreia 918. intiod. 

TTore 928. 6. 

noTi^fiv 938. 5- 

TTOTia-pos 934. 14 ; 967. 

npaypa 888. 4 ; 893. 6, 9 ; 902. 3, 5 ; 938. 2 

TTpaypaTLKos 899. 17, 35, 42, 47. 
npaiTTocriTos 900. 5- 
wpaKTfOs 940. 5- 

TrpaKTcop. See Index VIII. 

irpa^ts 905. 14 ; 910. 36 ; 912. 33. 

TrpSo-ty 909. 33; 988. 

Trpaao-eiv 895. introd. ; 902. 15 ; 924. 7 (.?) 

925. 7. 
TrpeTTovTcos 907. 17- 
Trpea^fVTTjs 933. 31. 

TrpeajSiTipos 897. 5; 984(.?); 986; 998 

TTpfcr^. Ka>pr]s 918. xi. 3, 12. 

TT/jtV 928. 8, 

TTpoavTdov 915. 2. 

irpo^aa-Ta^eiv 935. 2 1. 

Trpoyfo/pyos (.?) 899. introd. 

npoypd(f)eiv 907. II ; 908. 37 ; 913. 22. 

irpoepxeaBai 898. 35. 

profiteii 894. 5. 

TrpoiarTavai 891. 12. 

npoi^ 907. 14. 

npoKuadai 896. 37, 39 ; 899. 16 ; 900. 20 ; 

905. 18; 907. 18,28; 908. 46; 909. 

22, 24 ; 910. 56 ; 912. 24, 41 ; 913. 24 ; 

918. ii. 9, 2i,iii. 5, 9, xi. 15, xiii. 17; 929. 

19 ; 972; 977; 988. 

Trpo<ovpuTa>p 943. 2. 

TrpoKap^avdv 928. 8. 

irpokiyeiv 901. 9; 902. 12, 16; 903. 25 ; 

939. 25. 
TTpovorjTrj^ 903. 3 ; 999. 

TTpovoia 899. 17- 

trpo^evos (SavX^vroov 984. 

Trpo7roXiTeve(T0ai 913. 4. 

TrpoaayopeveLP 928. I 4. 

npoa€p)(e(T0ai 907. 5. 

wpoatx^^v 930. Ii. 

TTpoa^Kciv 888. 3 ; 899. introd., 26, 38, 48. 

TrpoaKiivTjpu 936. 4, 48 (?). 

TTpocroBiKos 986. 

TrpdcToSo?, npoaoSov SC. yrj 986. 

npoa-opiCdv 918. ii. 17, iii. i, 2, 15. 

Trpo(TO(PfiXeiv 912. 31. 

Trpoacfifpdv 903. 6; 904. 7 ; 907. 18. 

7Tpo(r<p(ovuv 896. 18, 32, 34, 37, 38. 



XL GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 377 



Trpo(T)((op€lv 909. 20. 

Tvpoa-airov 903. 2 1 ; 904. 8. 

TTpordaaeiv 889. l5- 

TrpoTepov 898. 22; 899. 44; 918. xi. 11. 

d = TTporepov 984. 
irpoTidivai 888. 7; 889. 10. 
TrpovTraWda-aeiv 907. 1 8. 
Trp6<pa(ns 903. 35. 
Tvpoxeipos 932. 7. 
npoxpfia 907. 13; 910. 1 6. 

npvTavis. See Index VIII. 

TTpSiTOV 902. 13; 924. 9. TTpwrn 939. 13. 

TIpOJTOTVTTOS 904. 8. 7Tp<OTOTVT7a>S 902. I3 (.''). 

niXi] 892. 9. 

TTvveavidOai 930. 12; 933. 29. 

TTup 903. 6. 

TTvpyianos 921. 24. 
TTvpfTos 924. 6. 

TTvpeTiov 896. 33. 

TTvpo? 907. 24; 908. 27; 909. 21 ; 910. 9, 
10, 18, 31, 51, 55; 918. ii. 9 e/ saep.; 
966; 974; 986; 988. 

TTvppos 922. 8. 

TTcoXe'iv 922. 6 ; 932. 10. 

TTwy 902. i3(?); 939. 15. 

TrS>s 932. 4; 939. 24. 

paoy 939. 17. 
pacpdvivos 936. 8. 
pTjTwp 899. 21. 
piTrdpto? 897. 3 ; 904. 3, 
pis 903. 22. 
p6a 920. 13. 
pCpr, 986. 
pvo-i? 940. 2. 

fxuvvvvai. eppacro 931. 1 3 ; 932. II. ippaxTQai 
o-e evxopm 891. 18; 928. 15; 929. 24; 
931. 10; 933. 28; 934. 16; 935. 29; 
936. 50; 937. 28; 938. 8; 939. 28. 

cra^avo(paKiapiov 921. II, 12, 
auKKos 932. 6. 
aaKKovdiou 937. 29. 
(ra\oi)Tin 920. 5- 
a-apydvr] 938. 3, 6. 
(TapKo(f)avr]s 936. 26. 
(Teavroi) 928. II. 
a-flBda-pios 897. II. 
(Tf^lTlOV 919. 8. 

a-rjpalpeiv 942. 5 ; 985. 



(TTjpnovv. crfo-Tjfielcopat 899. introd. ; 916, 13, 
16,19; 974; 977; 992. ((TrjfKtaadprju 
899. 32, 39, 46 ; 921. introd. eaTjpeiaaaTo 
980. 

(TTjpepov 896. 2 I. 

CTtVoTTt 920. 2; 936. 7. 

(Tiv86viov 921. 15, 19, 21. 

(titikSs 907. 8 etsaep.\ 913. 10; 965. 

o-iT-oXoyof 973; 986. 

(riToj 903. 22; 936. 22; 994; 998-9. 

criTocpopos 918. ii. 7- 

(TKaTrreti/ 985, 

(TKeCo? 1001, 

(TKICOTOS 921, 15. 

(TKoneiu 940. 5. 
(TKvXXetf 941. 3. 
(TKuXpos 941. 5. 
aKvrdpLov 936. 23. 
aKojpaeXivr] (?) 936. 1 6. 
apdXXeos (?) 921. 6, 
(Tov^piKopacfjopTiov 905. 7. 
aov^piKOTrdXXiov 921. 4. 
(TTTfipetv 910. 9 ; 913. II. 
aneppa 910. 1 6, 54; 913. 1 6. 
(TTTOvbrj 917. 3. 
O-TTOpu 913. 8. 

CTTTcJpoj 918. ii. 8, iii. 5, 

o-TTovSaCftf 939. 18; 963. 

(jrrovbaios 929. 3. 

a-irovbi] 963. 

(TTdjBXov 922. 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12. 

aradpos 905. 5. 

(TTarijp 936. 40. 

(TTeXXeiv 902, 7. 

aT((pdvioi> 936. I 2. 

OTtTrTroTTpaypareuTfis 893. 3, 

aToXdra 907, 4. 

o-roxaffo-^at 931. 9. 

(TTpaTTjyia. See Index VIII. 
arpaTrjyos. See Index VIII. 

crrpovOos 920. 8, 12. 

(TTpa>pa 921. 3. 

(Tu, eVoO 903. 30. 

avyyevrjs 904. 6. 

(Tvyyvaprj 939. 10. 

(Tvyypafp^ 905. 1 8 ; 906. 2, 8. 

avyKvpe'iv 907. 9, 1 3. 

o-vyx'upe''^ 906. 9; 907. 2; 911. 7; 988; 
990. 

avXXap^dvfiv 935. 3, 8. 



378 



INDICES 



(Tvii^alvHv 888. 3; 899. 9, 16; 902. 8; 

904. 4. 
(Tv^^iovv 905. 8. 
trvn,3lco(ni 906. 4; 907. 17. 
avufxaxos 903. 25 ; 904. 4. 
crvfi77a(T)((iv 904. 7- 
crvfinXrjpoxTii 985. 
(rvyL(paivfiv 909. 18; 913. 24; 934. 10. 

<TVfl<p(i>VOS 914. 4. 

(jviiy\riXin 921. introd. 

<n;i;ayetv 900. 13; 985 J 988. 
(Twei^fvaL 898. 20. 
(Tvmvat 907. 16. 
(TVJ'ei'fTi'at 929. 12. 

(TvwV'i' 896. 34 ; 899. 11. 

(Twrjyopnv 899. 2 1. 
(rvvT)6fia 994. 
(TVV&qKT} 903. 13. 
(TVVKTTuvaL, avvi(nis>% 912. 4- 
avvobos 908. 9. 
(Tvi/oXos 893. 6, 9. 
(rvfo/xoXoyetv 943. 4* 
(Tvvopav 940. 2. 
(Tvvopiov 918. V. 17. 
<Tvvo\l^i.i 896. 6. 
avvrdviw 904. 5« 
auvrekflv 989. 
crvvTTjpflv 924. I. 
(rvvTiOivai 908. 18. 
crvirnpxiv 905. 6. 
crvvoivr] 909. 21. 
(TC^aipiov 920. 9, II. 
a-(j)paylCfiv 929. 13; 932. 6. 
<T(f>payis 918. introd. f/ i'^i?/'. 

(Tipvpidlov 936. 15* 

(Txf^ov 899. II. 

<T)(01v'l0V 904. 6. 

(Tj^oivMwrXoico? 934. 4- 

crj^oXatrriKos- 902. I. 

o-wffti/ 935. 7. 

croiKrjv 915. I. crwX. Xfyo/iei/Of l,a^iyr{^ ) 

1002. 
(T^/ia 889. 18; 904. 6; 907. 15. 

(TutpLaTLOV 939. 21, 26. 

o-wr 903. 1 1. 
<Ta>Tr)p 925. 3. 

<Tu>Trfp'ia 904. 7 ; 933. 8 ; 935. 12 ; 939. 20. 
<T . iKinvoi 921. 3. 

Tciy^ 891. 15- 



rakavTov. See Index IX (3). 

raXaptoi/ 936. 24. 

rapelov 890. I 3. 

rapixiov 928. 

rdo-o-ei:/ 918. xiii. 2. 1 7. 

rauroTj;? 940. 2. 

ra;^tj. eV Ta;^?? 929. 23. Bia Tap^/coi/ 892. 9. 

reive IV 906. 5. 

rewoi/ 888. II ; 905. 1 1 ; 907.3,19; 909. 

2, 7; 930. iS ; 986. 
reXflv 899. 9. 
TfXeioj 902. II ; 909. 18. 
TeXevraios 940. 2. 
TfXevTa-^ 928. 3 ; 984. 
TfXfvrr? 902. 4. 
TeXof 919. 3. 
TerpaxoiviKi:! 910. 34. 

Terpud^Xov. See Inde.x IX (i). 

Tews 940. 2. 

n^XticoOToy 900. 12: 939. 11. 

Tr)pe'iv 985. 

Tipa^LcoTaTOi 943. 9. 

Tt/i7 895. 12, 14; 896. 15; 903. 24; 909. 

18; 912. 30; 914. 7; 934.5,6; 971; 

980; 985 : 988. 
TipioiTaros 930. 27; 931. 2. 
rts, Ti Kai Ti 937. 2 2. 

Toiwv 900. 7; 902. 10; 940. 3. 

Toloy 903. 14. 

TotoCros 899. 27 ; 904. 8, 9. 

TOKOS 899. introd. 

Topos 903. 24 ; 957. 

TOTTapxia 910. 5 ; 986. 

TOTTos 896. 6, II, 14; 899. 47; 909. 29; 

912. 13, 18, 25, 28; 931. 15; 941. 2, 

4; 973; 986; 999. 

Toaoins 940. 5. 
t6t€ 939. 22. 

TpaTTfCirriS 916. 7, I3, 16; 943. 2, 5. 

Tp^ireiv 935. 5; 939. 17. 
Tpf(peiv 899. 15; 908. 24. 

TpiaKns 987. 

Tpi^aKOi 921. 13, 16, 20, 21; 929. II. 

rpixoiviKov 936. 7. 

rpoTTos 902. 6, 14; 939. 15. 

Tpo(p^ 908. 33 ; 938. 2. 

rpocpipoi 903. 3, 6, 8, 12, 13. 

Tpo^oj 968. 

Tpvyav 940. 3. 

Tpvytf 907. 24 ; 975. 



XI. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS 379 



Tvyxaveiv 888. 4, 5j 899. 14; 904. 9; 

933. 4. 
tvXtj 978. 
Tviros 893. I, 9. 
TvpawiKos 902. 6, 14. 
Tvxn 899. 41. 

l^piCdv 903. 5, 17. 
v^pii 903. I. 
vyft'a 930. 13 ; 935. 11. 
vyiaivfiv 935. 8; 936. 3. 

v8paya)yinv 901- 7* 

v8paya>y6s 971. 

vdpoT:dpo)(os 902. 3. 

v8po(f)6poi 922. 19. 

vSwp, »ca5' vSaros 918. introd. e/ saep. 

vlw 893. 12; 894. 8; 902. 2; 903. 4; 

904. 7 ; 909. 8 ; 913. 5, 21 ; 914. 3, 5, 

20; 924. 15; 930. 30; 935. introd.; 

939. 22; 941. 2, 3; 960; 984; 989; 

996. 
vrrayopfvfiv 907. 2, 
xmaKoieiv 900. 9, 17. 

v-apx(^v 899. 8 ; 905. 16 ; 910. 7, 37 ; 911. 
1 1 ; 912. 34 ; 913. 9 ; 914. 1 5 ; 933. 1 7 

(xjTTTfpKTai) ; 986. 
vTrareia. See Index III. 

vnaros. otto vnaTcov ophivap'iav 999. Cf. 

Index III. 
inrevdwos 907. 6. 
VTTfp^aivdv 889. 16. 
vT7€p(f)viaTiiTos 996 ; 999. 
xnrqpfTf'iy 929. 5- 
lTrr]pfTT]s 899. 50; 916. 18. 
vTTo^oKXav 897. 8 ; 900. 6, 8. 
inroypdcpeiv 899. introd. 
vrroypa'pevs 911. 6. 
inroSrjfia 936. 25. 
VTTod^KTJ 914, 18. 

vTroKOToj 922. 21. 
xmoKeiaBai 914. 1 6. 
iTToXoyoy 988. 
vn-oXotTTos 902. 8. 

VTTOfieVftP 904. 5- 

imojivrj^n 911. 8. 

VTVop.vr]p.aTia-p6^ 898. 27. 

vrronvqais 904. 3. 

{•noTda-adv 899. 1 9, 35 ; 907. 4. 

vnoTidivai, 898. 13. 

varepos 936. 45. 



(paiveiv 902. 9. 

(paivoXiov 936. 18, 19. ^atXdwoJ/ 933. 30. 

^czKo'j 966. 

(pdvai 967. 

(Pavepos 902. 3 ; 928. 6. 

(pavfpovv 925. 4. 

(jb/pety 905. 5 ; 936. 23. 

<)!)fpi'j? 905. 5, 13, 18; 907. 18. 

(pOdvuv 889. 21 ; 907. 14 ; 935. 20. 

(jbtdXr; 937. 12, 18. 

(piKavOpcoTTia 889. 5' 

(f)i\du0p<j>—os 925. 2. 

qbi'Xoj 890. 5; 891. 9, 17, 19; 907. 23; 

931. 17 ; 933. 3, 27; 942. 6; 963. 
(poiviKu>v 918. ii. I. 
(f)opd8iov 922. 9, 21. 
tpoperpou 917. 2. 

^opoy 899. 40; 910. 12, 30, 50; 913. 13 ; 
943. 4, 7 ; 977. 

(popTiKoiTaros 904. 9. 

<^p/^ 924. 3, 4, 5. ' 

(ppovf'ii' 990. 

^povrls 902. 5; 907. 25; 923. 10. 

(i)povTicr-n,s 940. 6 ; 984 ; 996. 

(pvXai 931. 6 ; 933. 25. 

(pyXdaa-fiv 905. 9; 924. I. 

Xalpnu 890. 6 ; 891. 9 ; 892. 3 ; 908. 17 ; 
909.13; 928.2; 929.2; 931.2; 932. 
I ; 934. 2 ; 935. 2 ; 936. 2 ; 937. 2 ; 
938. i; 939.2; 963-4; 967; 973-4. 

Xaipois 933. I. 

Xa>^K€is 989. 

XoXkIov 1003. 

XoXkos 936. 17. 

;)(aX<or?. See Index IX (5). 

XapiC^a-Bai 941. 5. 

xaptf 939. 6 ; 941. 6 ; 963. xa'p'" 898. 35 ; 

899. 14 ; 934. 13. 
X^p'^V^ 895. 12, 14. 
XopTovXdpios 943. 9. 
Xftp 901. 10. ^era p^eipaj 934. 8. 
Xfipia-TTjs 995. 
p^fiporomf 888. 2. 
Xfpa-dXfxvpos 918. introd. 
X^po-apLuoi 988. 
Xep(Tos 918. V. 16. 
X<5e\ 901. 5. 
XtTcov 929. 9, 13. 
xXevr; 904. 2. 



38o 



INDICES 



xXwpo? 910. II, 52. 
X/xy 940. I ; 995. 
xoipidiov 932. 10. 
xolpos 901. 5, 10, 12, 13. 
Xopriyf'iv 898. 32 ; 908. 28. 

XOpTOVOfJLTj 918. XI. 10. 

XopTos 908. 25 ; 938. 3. 

xovs ('mound') 985. 

Xpei'n 899. 25; 900. 12, 16, 18; 930. 3; 

972. 
XpeW 914. 17. 
Xpeaarflv 902. 9 ; 914. 7. 
Xp/y't"-^ 896. 9 ; 937. 23. 
XpwariC^^v 890. 3; 908. 7; 909. 6, 11; 

964; 977. 

Xprivai 900. 7- 

Xprja-dm 912. 16. 

Xpr](TTT]piov 907. 9, 13 ; 911- 16. 

Xprja-Tos 937. 27. 

Xpoi-os 889. 6 ; 907. 23 ; 909. 23 ; 911. 10 ; 
912. 18, 22 ; 936. 52 ; 937. 6 ; 938. 8. 



Xpvaos 905. 5; 914. 9, 10; 995. 

XP^fia 896. 15. 

X^pa 909. 15; 985. 

Xoypa 900. 8, 10. 

xapflv 890. 8 ; 909. 21. 

xopiov 907. 8, 13; 985; 998. 

X<^pis 898. 31 ; 909. 6; 932. 10; 988. 

yj/iXoi 986. 
fi^X"? 903. 33. 
^vxpo(p6pos 8QQ. II. 

como-i^at 914. 8. 

cfop 936. 6. 

^pa893. 7; 901.5; 926.5; 927.4; 935. 

17 (Sia wpai) ; 938. 6 ; 939. 27 ; 942. i, 

2, 4. 
cbtravrco? 910. I 2. 
wo-re 891. 12; 893. 3; 896. 29; 897.8; 

904. 7 ; 908. 22 ; 910. 8 ; 923. 4; 930. 

18; 933. 17; 934. 8; 939. 5. 



XII. INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED. 



{a) Authors. 









PAGE 








PAGE 


Anth. Pal. iii. 10 


• 




27 


Euripides Frag. 472 (Nauck) . 


. 87 


ix. 503 . 


. 




284 




752 


• 23 


Apophthegm. Patrum 80 a 


• 




310 




754 




. 80 


Aristophanes, Frogs 131 2 


• 




 92 




755-8 




81 


1313-6 


• 




85 




757 




. lOI 


Aristotle, Poetics 14 . 


, 




. 28-9 




759 




. 102 


Callimachus Frag. 66 a 


, 




142 




760-7 




. 82-3 


Clemens Alex., Schol. on p. 


105 




21 




764 




. . 84 


Cod. lust. I. 55 


. 




238 




870 




. lOI 


Cod. Theod. i. 29 . 


, 




238 


Homer X 55 


. . . 




. 140 


Comicorum Fragmenta 231 


(Kock) 


154 


lul. Capitolinus, Vita Marci 9. 


7-9 213-4 


Cramer, Anecd. Fan's, iii. p. 


84. 


3 


. 140 


Lydus, Fe Mensibiis iv. 7. p. 72 


. 83 


Diony?ius Hal., Fe T/iucj 


'd. ludic 




IMnesimachus, 


Hipp. I. I . 


. 98 


9-20 .... 


, 




III-2 


Pindar Frag. 


no . 


. 141 


Dioscorides i. 10 


. 




259 


Steph. Byz. s. 


V. <i>pvyia 


. 145 


Euripides, I071 255 . 


. 




90 











XII. INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED 



381 



{b) Papyri, Inscriptions, &c. 







PAGE 




PAGE 


P. Amh. 72. I . 




236 


P. Grenf. II. 73. 9 . 


. 241 


107. 15 




230 


P. Leipzig 27 . 


245 


150. 23-4 . 




288 


37 • 


243 


B. G. U. I. 15. ii. I . 




230 


49 . 


243 


303. 28 . 




314 


116. 2 . . . . 


320 


326. i. 6-8, li 


t-5 • 


252 


119. verso ii. 8 . 


206 


ii. 17 




253 


P. Oxy. I. 42. 8-9 . 


232 


II. 571. 9-10 




281 


53 


217 


572. 5, 10 




269 


53. 5-6 . 


219 


578. 7 • 


• • < 


247 


123. 10 . . . 


3" 


648. 12-4 


222- 


3, 231 


138.9 . . . 


234 


III. 893. 12-4 




234 


140. 7 . . . 


234 


IV. 1094. I . 




238 


153-3 


314 


P. Brit. Mus. I. 77. 51 




252 


156.5 


314 


164. 7 




230 


II. 259. II . 


247 


III. 1 157. Ill, I 


13. 152 


. 271 


III. 495 . • . • 


205 


1171- 73 




271 


497. 22-4 . 


245 


P. Bruxell. i . 




276 


653 • 


. 271 


P. Cairo in Archiv, III. p. 


339 • 


. 219 


IV. 714. I . . . 


222 


Cairo tablets in Nouv. Rev. 


Hist. 1906 


) 


P. Rainer in Wessely, Fiihrer, No. 249 


264 


p. 483. 




213-5 


P. Strassb. 29. 46 . 


257 


C. I. G. 3582. 2 




300 


40. 6 . 


238 


C. P. R. I. 22. 35 . 




245 


40. 48 . . . 


. 2S4 


30. 52 . 




243 


P. Tebt. II. 343. 5, 88 . 


281 


P. Fay. 339 . 




276 


343. 69 . 


271 


347 • 




• 305 


413. 10. 


305 


P Flor. I. 16. 26 . 




301 


413. II . 


285 


39- 1 




• 234 


413. 14 . 


• 304 


96. 6, 13 




235-6 


500 .. . 


269 


P. Grenf. II. 11. ii. 4 




96 







Plate I 



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Fr. I, Cols, ii-iii 






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No. 852. Fr. 60, Cols, i-ii 



Plate IV 



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No. 847 Aw/o 



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